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Sample records for acoustic clinical measurements

  1. The use of electro-acoustic impedance measurements in detecting early clinical otosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Van Wagoner, R S; Campbell, J D

    1976-02-01

    The first evidence that sodium fluoride (NaFl) can stop the otosclerotic process was recently presented. This development has placed new emphasis on the early detection of clinical otosclerosis. Electro-acoustic impedance measurements often detect minute changes in absolute impedance and compliance of the ossicular chain. The most valuable diagnostic information, however, is a negative on-off (biphasic) type of acoustic reflex. These results are often evident prior to the detection of positive clinical signs of otosclerosis. The negative on-off acoustic reflex is reviewed in this paper along with case discussions involving medical/surgical management of early otosclerosis.

  2. Clinical value of acoustic voice measures: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Werth, Katrin; Voigt, Daniel; Döllinger, Michael; Eysholdt, Ulrich; Lohscheller, Jörg

    2010-08-01

    Within this study a retrospective analysis of clinical voice perturbation measures, Dysphonia Severity Index and subjective perceived hoarseness was performed to determine their value under clinical aspects. The study included the data of 580 healthy and 1,700 pathologic voices, which were investigated under the following aspects. The relevant parameters were identified and their interrelation determined. Group differences between healthy and pathologic voices were figured out and investigated if voice quality measures allowed an automatic diagnosis of voice disorders. The analysis revealed significant changes between the clinical groups, which indicate the diagnostic relevance of voice quality measures. However, an individual diagnosis of the underlying voice disorder failed due to a vast spread of the parameter values within the respective groups. Classification accuracies of 75-90% were achieved. The high misclassification rate of up to 25% implied that in voice disorder diagnosis, the individual interpretation of the parameter values has to be done carefully.

  3. Classification of heart valve single leg separations from acoustic clinical measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, G.A.; Bowman, B.C.; Boruta, N.; Thomas, G.H.; Jones, H.E.; Buhl, M.R.

    1994-05-01

    Our system classifies the condition (intact or single leg separated) of in vivo Bjork-Shiley Convexo-Concave (BSCC) heart valves by processing acoustic measurements of clinical heart valve opening sounds. We use spectral features as inputs to a two-stage classifier, which first classifies individual heart beats, then classifies valves. Performance is measured by probability of detection and probability of false alarm, and by confidence intervals on the probability of correct classification. The novelty of the work lies in the application of advanced techniques to real heart valve data, and extensions of published algorithms that enhance their applicability. We show that even when given a very small number of training samples, the classifier can achieve a probability of correct classification of 100%.

  4. Acoustic field characterization of the Duolith: Measurements and modeling of a clinical shock wave therapy device

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Camilo; Chen, Hong; Matula, Thomas J.; Karzova, Maria; Khokhlova, Vera A.

    2013-01-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) uses acoustic pulses to treat certain musculoskeletal disorders. In this paper the acoustic field of a clinical portable ESWT device (Duolith SD1) was characterized. Field mapping was performed in water for two different standoffs of the electromagnetic head (15 or 30 mm) using a fiber optic probe hydrophone. Peak positive pressures at the focus ranged from 2 to 45 MPa, while peak negative pressures ranged from −2 to −11 MPa. Pulse rise times ranged from 8 to 500 ns; shock formation did not occur for any machine settings. The maximum standard deviation in peak pressure at the focus was 1.2%, indicating that the Duolith SD1 generates stable pulses. The results compare qualitatively, but not quantitatively with manufacturer specifications. Simulations were carried out for the short standoff by matching a Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya-Kuznetzov equation to the measured field at a plane near the source, and then propagating the wave outward. The results of modeling agree well with experimental data. The model was used to analyze the spatial structure of the peak pressures. Predictions from the model suggest that a true shock wave could be obtained in water if the initial pressure output of the device were doubled. PMID:23927207

  5. Acoustic field characterization of the Duolith: measurements and modeling of a clinical shock wave therapy device.

    PubMed

    Perez, Camilo; Chen, Hong; Matula, Thomas J; Karzova, Maria; Khokhlova, Vera A

    2013-08-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) uses acoustic pulses to treat certain musculoskeletal disorders. In this paper the acoustic field of a clinical portable ESWT device (Duolith SD1) was characterized. Field mapping was performed in water for two different standoffs of the electromagnetic head (15 or 30 mm) using a fiber optic probe hydrophone. Peak positive pressures at the focus ranged from 2 to 45 MPa, while peak negative pressures ranged from -2 to -11 MPa. Pulse rise times ranged from 8 to 500 ns; shock formation did not occur for any machine settings. The maximum standard deviation in peak pressure at the focus was 1.2%, indicating that the Duolith SD1 generates stable pulses. The results compare qualitatively, but not quantitatively with manufacturer specifications. Simulations were carried out for the short standoff by matching a Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya-Kuznetzov equation to the measured field at a plane near the source, and then propagating the wave outward. The results of modeling agree well with experimental data. The model was used to analyze the spatial structure of the peak pressures. Predictions from the model suggest that a true shock wave could be obtained in water if the initial pressure output of the device were doubled.

  6. Acoustic reflex measurement.

    PubMed

    Schairer, Kim S; Feeney, M Patrick; Sanford, Chris A

    2013-07-01

    Middle ear muscle reflex (MEMR) measurements have been a part of the standard clinical immittance test battery for decades as a cross-check with the behavioral audiogram and as a way to separate cochlear from retrocochlear pathologies. MEMR responses are measured in the ear canal by using a probe stimulus (e.g., single frequency or broadband noise) to monitor admittance changes elicited by a reflex-activating stimulus. In the clinical MEMR procedures, one test yields changes in a single measurement (i.e., admittance) at a single pure tone (e.g., 226 or 1000 Hz). In contrast, for the wideband acoustic immittance (WAI) procedure,one test yields information about multiple measurements (e.g., admittance, power reflectance, absorbance) across a wide frequency range (e.g., 250 to 8000 Hz analysis bandwidth of the probe). One benefit of the WAI method is that the MEMR can be identified in a single test regardless of the frequency at which the maximum shift in the immittance measurement occurs; this is beneficial because maximal shifts in immittance vary as a function of age and other factors. Another benefit is that the wideband response analysis yields lower MEMR thresholds than with the clinical procedures. Lower MEMR thresholds would allow for MEMR decay tests in ears in which the activator levels could not be safely presented. Finally, the WAI procedures can be automated with objective identification of the MEMR, which would allow for use in newborn and other screening programs in which the tests are completed by nonaudiological personnel.

  7. Measuring acoustic habitats.

    PubMed

    Merchant, Nathan D; Fristrup, Kurt M; Johnson, Mark P; Tyack, Peter L; Witt, Matthew J; Blondel, Philippe; Parks, Susan E

    2015-03-01

    1. Many organisms depend on sound for communication, predator/prey detection and navigation. The acoustic environment can therefore play an important role in ecosystem dynamics and evolution. A growing number of studies are documenting acoustic habitats and their influences on animal development, behaviour, physiology and spatial ecology, which has led to increasing demand for passive acoustic monitoring (PAM) expertise in the life sciences. However, as yet, there has been no synthesis of data processing methods for acoustic habitat monitoring, which presents an unnecessary obstacle to would-be PAM analysts. 2. Here, we review the signal processing techniques needed to produce calibrated measurements of terrestrial and aquatic acoustic habitats. We include a supplemental tutorial and template computer codes in matlab and r, which give detailed guidance on how to produce calibrated spectrograms and statistical analyses of sound levels. Key metrics and terminology for the characterisation of biotic, abiotic and anthropogenic sound are covered, and their application to relevant monitoring scenarios is illustrated through example data sets. To inform study design and hardware selection, we also include an up-to-date overview of terrestrial and aquatic PAM instruments. 3. Monitoring of acoustic habitats at large spatiotemporal scales is becoming possible through recent advances in PAM technology. This will enhance our understanding of the role of sound in the spatial ecology of acoustically sensitive species and inform spatial planning to mitigate the rising influence of anthropogenic noise in these ecosystems. As we demonstrate in this work, progress in these areas will depend upon the application of consistent and appropriate PAM methodologies.

  8. Measuring acoustic habitats

    PubMed Central

    Merchant, Nathan D; Fristrup, Kurt M; Johnson, Mark P; Tyack, Peter L; Witt, Matthew J; Blondel, Philippe; Parks, Susan E

    2015-01-01

    1. Many organisms depend on sound for communication, predator/prey detection and navigation. The acoustic environment can therefore play an important role in ecosystem dynamics and evolution. A growing number of studies are documenting acoustic habitats and their influences on animal development, behaviour, physiology and spatial ecology, which has led to increasing demand for passive acoustic monitoring (PAM) expertise in the life sciences. However, as yet, there has been no synthesis of data processing methods for acoustic habitat monitoring, which presents an unnecessary obstacle to would-be PAM analysts. 2. Here, we review the signal processing techniques needed to produce calibrated measurements of terrestrial and aquatic acoustic habitats. We include a supplemental tutorial and template computer codes in matlab and r, which give detailed guidance on how to produce calibrated spectrograms and statistical analyses of sound levels. Key metrics and terminology for the characterisation of biotic, abiotic and anthropogenic sound are covered, and their application to relevant monitoring scenarios is illustrated through example data sets. To inform study design and hardware selection, we also include an up-to-date overview of terrestrial and aquatic PAM instruments. 3. Monitoring of acoustic habitats at large spatiotemporal scales is becoming possible through recent advances in PAM technology. This will enhance our understanding of the role of sound in the spatial ecology of acoustically sensitive species and inform spatial planning to mitigate the rising influence of anthropogenic noise in these ecosystems. As we demonstrate in this work, progress in these areas will depend upon the application of consistent and appropriate PAM methodologies. PMID:25954500

  9. Acoustics, computers and measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truchard, James J.

    2003-10-01

    The human ear has created a high standard for the requirements of acoustical measurements. The transient nature of most acoustical signals has limited the success of traditional volt meters. Professor Hixson's pioneering work in electroacoustical measurements at ARL and The University of Texas helped set the stage for modern computer-based measurements. The tremendous performance of modern PCs and extensive libraries of signal processing functions in virtual instrumentation application software has revolutionized the way acoustical measurements are made. Today's analog to digital converters have up to 24 bits of resolution with a dynamic range of over 120 dB and a single PC processor can process 112 channels of FFTs at 4 kHz in real time. Wavelet technology further extends the capabilities for analyzing transients. The tools available for measurements in speech, electroacoustics, noise, and vibration represent some of the most advanced measurement tools available. During the last 50 years, Professor Hixson has helped drive this revolution from simple oscilloscope measurements to the modern high performance computer-based measurements.

  10. Wireless Acoustic Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Paul D.; Dorland, Wade D.

    2005-01-01

    A prototype wireless acoustic measurement system (WAMS) is one of two main subsystems of the Acoustic Prediction/Measurement Tool, which comprises software, acoustic instrumentation, and electronic hardware combined to afford integrated capabilities for predicting and measuring noise emitted by rocket and jet engines. The other main subsystem is described in "Predicting Rocket or Jet Noise in Real Time" (SSC-00215-1), which appears elsewhere in this issue of NASA Tech Briefs. The WAMS includes analog acoustic measurement instrumentation and analog and digital electronic circuitry combined with computer wireless local-area networking to enable (1) measurement of sound-pressure levels at multiple locations in the sound field of an engine under test and (2) recording and processing of the measurement data. At each field location, the measurements are taken by a portable unit, denoted a field station. There are ten field stations, each of which can take two channels of measurements. Each field station is equipped with two instrumentation microphones, a micro-ATX computer, a wireless network adapter, an environmental enclosure, a directional radio antenna, and a battery power supply. The environmental enclosure shields the computer from weather and from extreme acoustically induced vibrations. The power supply is based on a marine-service lead-acid storage battery that has enough capacity to support operation for as long as 10 hours. A desktop computer serves as a control server for the WAMS. The server is connected to a wireless router for communication with the field stations via a wireless local-area network that complies with wireless-network standard 802.11b of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. The router and the wireless network adapters are controlled by use of Linux-compatible driver software. The server runs custom Linux software for synchronizing the recording of measurement data in the field stations. The software includes a module that

  11. Wireless Acoustic Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Paul D.; Dorland, Wade D.; Jolly, Ronald L.

    2007-01-01

    A prototype wireless acoustic measurement system (WAMS) is one of two main subsystems of the Acoustic Prediction/ Measurement Tool, which comprises software, acoustic instrumentation, and electronic hardware combined to afford integrated capabilities for predicting and measuring noise emitted by rocket and jet engines. The other main subsystem is described in the article on page 8. The WAMS includes analog acoustic measurement instrumentation and analog and digital electronic circuitry combined with computer wireless local-area networking to enable (1) measurement of sound-pressure levels at multiple locations in the sound field of an engine under test and (2) recording and processing of the measurement data. At each field location, the measurements are taken by a portable unit, denoted a field station. There are ten field stations, each of which can take two channels of measurements. Each field station is equipped with two instrumentation microphones, a micro- ATX computer, a wireless network adapter, an environmental enclosure, a directional radio antenna, and a battery power supply. The environmental enclosure shields the computer from weather and from extreme acoustically induced vibrations. The power supply is based on a marine-service lead-acid storage battery that has enough capacity to support operation for as long as 10 hours. A desktop computer serves as a control server for the WAMS. The server is connected to a wireless router for communication with the field stations via a wireless local-area network that complies with wireless-network standard 802.11b of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. The router and the wireless network adapters are controlled by use of Linux-compatible driver software. The server runs custom Linux software for synchronizing the recording of measurement data in the field stations. The software includes a module that provides an intuitive graphical user interface through which an operator at the control server

  12. Clinical and acoustical variability in hypokinetic dysarthria

    SciTech Connect

    Metter, E.J.; Hanson, W.R.

    1986-10-01

    Ten male patients with parkinsonism secondary to Parkinson's disease or progressive supranuclear palsy had clinical neurological, speech, and acoustical speech evaluations. In addition, seven of the patients were evaluated by x-ray computed tomography (CT) and (F-18)-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET). Extensive variability of speech features, both clinical and acoustical, were found and seemed to be independent of the severity of any parkinsonian sign, CT, or FDG PET. In addition, little relationship existed between the variability across each measured speech feature. What appeared to be important for the appearance of abnormal acoustic measures was the degree of overall severity of the dysarthria. These observations suggest that a better understanding of hypokinetic dysarthria may result from more extensive examination of the variability between patients. Emphasizing a specific feature such as rapid speaking rate in characterizing hypokinetic dysarthria focuses on a single and inconstant finding in a complex speech pattern.

  13. Acoustical Measurement Of Mine-Shaft Length

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, Joseph S.

    1988-01-01

    Acoustical system proposed to measure depth of a "blind" shaft. Acoustic wave guided by shaft and provides estimate of shaft length, from which volume estimated. Acoustic-generator system determines resonant-frequency difference to measure shaft length.

  14. Reflectance measurement validation using acoustic horns.

    PubMed

    Rasetshwane, Daniel M; Neely, Stephen T

    2015-10-01

    Variability in wideband acoustic reflectance (and absorbance) measurements adversely affects the clinical utility of reflectance for diagnosis of middle-ear disorders. A reflectance standard would encourage consistency across different measurement systems and help identify calibration related issues. Theoretical equations exist for the reflectance of finite-length exponential, conical, and parabolic acoustic horns. Reflectance measurements were repeatedly made in each of these three horn shapes and the results were compared to the corresponding theoretical reflectance. A method is described of adjusting acoustic impedance measurements to compensate for spreading of the wave front that propagates from the small diameter sound port of the probe to the larger diameter of the acoustic cavity. Agreement between measured and theoretical reflectance was less than 1 dB at most frequencies in the range from 0.2 to 10 kHz. Pearson correlation coefficients were greater than 0.95 between measured and theoretical time-domain reflectance within the flare region of the horns. The agreement suggests that the distributed reflectance of acoustic horns may be useful for validating reflectance measurements made in human ear canals; however, refinements to reflectance measurement methods may still be needed.

  15. Reflectance measurement validation using acoustic horns

    PubMed Central

    Rasetshwane, Daniel M.; Neely, Stephen T.

    2015-01-01

    Variability in wideband acoustic reflectance (and absorbance) measurements adversely affects the clinical utility of reflectance for diagnosis of middle-ear disorders. A reflectance standard would encourage consistency across different measurement systems and help identify calibration related issues. Theoretical equations exist for the reflectance of finite-length exponential, conical, and parabolic acoustic horns. Reflectance measurements were repeatedly made in each of these three horn shapes and the results were compared to the corresponding theoretical reflectance. A method is described of adjusting acoustic impedance measurements to compensate for spreading of the wave front that propagates from the small diameter sound port of the probe to the larger diameter of the acoustic cavity. Agreement between measured and theoretical reflectance was less than 1 dB at most frequencies in the range from 0.2 to 10 kHz. Pearson correlation coefficients were greater than 0.95 between measured and theoretical time-domain reflectance within the flare region of the horns. The agreement suggests that the distributed reflectance of acoustic horns may be useful for validating reflectance measurements made in human ear canals; however, refinements to reflectance measurement methods may still be needed. PMID:26520306

  16. Fundamentals of Acoustics. Psychoacoustics and Hearing. Acoustical Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Begault, Durand R.; Ahumada, Al (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    These are 3 chapters that will appear in a book titled "Building Acoustical Design", edited by Charles Salter. They are designed to introduce the reader to fundamental concepts of acoustics, particularly as they relate to the built environment. "Fundamentals of Acoustics" reviews basic concepts of sound waveform frequency, pressure, and phase. "Psychoacoustics and Hearing" discusses the human interpretation sound pressure as loudness, particularly as a function of frequency. "Acoustic Measurements" gives a simple overview of the time and frequency weightings for sound pressure measurements that are used in acoustical work.

  17. Fundamentals of Acoustics. Psychoacoustics and Hearing. Acoustical Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Begault, Durand R.; Ahumada, Al (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    These are 3 chapters that will appear in a book titled "Building Acoustical Design", edited by Charles Salter. They are designed to introduce the reader to fundamental concepts of acoustics, particularly as they relate to the built environment. "Fundamentals of Acoustics" reviews basic concepts of sound waveform frequency, pressure, and phase. "Psychoacoustics and Hearing" discusses the human interpretation sound pressure as loudness, particularly as a function of frequency. "Acoustic Measurements" gives a simple overview of the time and frequency weightings for sound pressure measurements that are used in acoustical work.

  18. Wideband acoustic immittance: tympanometric measures.

    PubMed

    Sanford, Chris A; Hunter, Lisa L; Feeney, M Patrick; Nakajima, Hideko Heidi

    2013-07-01

    Wideband tympanometry (WT) measurements provide a view of the acoustic response properties of the middle ear over a broad range of frequencies and ear-canal pressures. These measurements show sensitivity to trends in ear-canal/middle ear maturation and changes in middle ear status as a result of different types of dysfunction. While results from early WT work showed improvements over ambient wideband tests in terms of test performance for identifying middle ear dysfunction and conductive hearing loss (CHL), more recent studies have shown high, but similar test performance for both ambient and tympanometric wideband tests. Case study and group results presented in this article, demonstrating the sensitivity of WT to middle ear dysfunction, CHL, and maturational changes in the middle ear, are promising and suggest the need for additional investigations in individual subjects and large subject populations. Future research should focus on identifying key predictors of developmental trends, middle ear dysfunction, and CHL in an effort to develop middle ear tests with high sensitivity and specificity. Technological advances, more accessibility to equipment, and evolving data analysis techniques should encourage progress in the areas of WT research and clinical application.

  19. Acoustical Measurement Of Furnace Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parthasarathy, Shakkottai; Venkateshan, Shakkottai P.

    1989-01-01

    Simple probes withstand severe conditions, yet give spatially-resolved temperature readings. Prototype acoustical system developed to measure temperatures from ambient to 1,800 degree F in such structures as large industrial lime kilns and recovery-boiler furnaces. Pulses of sound reflected from obstructions in sensing tube. Speed of sound and temperature in each segment deduced from travel times of pulses.

  20. Acoustical Measurement Of Furnace Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parthasarathy, Shakkottai; Venkateshan, Shakkottai P.

    1989-01-01

    Simple probes withstand severe conditions, yet give spatially-resolved temperature readings. Prototype acoustical system developed to measure temperatures from ambient to 1,800 degree F in such structures as large industrial lime kilns and recovery-boiler furnaces. Pulses of sound reflected from obstructions in sensing tube. Speed of sound and temperature in each segment deduced from travel times of pulses.

  1. Scale Model Thruster Acoustic Measurement Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, R. Jeremy; Vargas, Magda B.

    2013-01-01

    Subscale rocket acoustic data is used to predict acoustic environments for full scale rockets. Over the last several years acoustic data has been collected during horizontal tests of solid rocket motors. Space Launch System (SLS) Scale Model Acoustic Test (SMAT) was designed to evaluate the acoustics of the SLS vehicle including the liquid engines and solid rocket boosters. SMAT is comprised of liquid thrusters scalable to the Space Shuttle Main engines (SSME) and Rocket Assisted Take Off (RATO) motors scalable to the 5-segment Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSTMV). Horizontal testing of the liquid thrusters provided an opportunity to collect acoustic data from liquid thrusters to characterize the acoustic environments. Acoustic data was collected during the horizontal firings of a single thruster and a 4-thruster (Quad) configuration. Presentation scope. Discuss the results of the single and 4-thruster acoustic measurements. Compare the measured acoustic levels of the liquid thrusters to the Solid Rocket Test Motor V - Nozzle 2 (SRTMV-N2).

  2. Wind turbines acoustic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trematerra, Amelia; Iannace, Gino

    2017-07-01

    The importance of wind turbines has increased over the last few years throughout the European Community. The European energy policy guidelines state that for the year 2020 20% of all energy must be produced by alternative energy sources. Wind turbines are an important type of energy production without petrol. A wind speed in a range from 2.5 m/s to 25.0 m/s is needed. One of the obstacles to the widespread diffusion of wind turbine is noise generation. This work presents some noise measurements of wind turbines in the South of Italy, and discusses the noise problems for the people living near wind farms.

  3. Acoustic measurements of articulator motions.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, M R; Strube, H W

    1979-01-01

    Methods for estimating articulatory data from acoustic measurements are reviewed. First, relations between the vocal-tract area function and formant or impedance data are pointed out. Then the possibility of determining a (discretized) area function from the speech signal itself is considered. Finally, we look at the estimation of certain articulatory parameters rather than the area function. By using a regression method, such parameters can even be estimated independently of any vocal-tract model. Results for real-speech data are given.

  4. Clinical and diagnostic evaluation of acoustic neuromas.

    PubMed

    Stucken, Emily Z; Brown, Kevin; Selesnick, Samuel H

    2012-04-01

    In the past century, significant advances have been made in understanding the clinical features of acoustic neuromas. Furthermore, rapid technological advances have led to the development of sensitive, rapid, and relatively noninvasive diagnostic modalities, which has allowed for earlier discovery of acoustic neuromas and has reduced the average tumor size at time of diagnosis. The ultimate result has been improved clinical outcomes after surgery and radiotherapy.

  5. Acoustic Measurements of Small Solid Rocket Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargas, Magda B.; Kenny, R. Jeremy

    2010-01-01

    Rocket acoustic noise can induce loads and vibration on the vehicle as well as the surrounding structures. Models have been developed to predict these acoustic loads based on scaling existing solid rocket motor data. The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center acoustics team has measured several small solid rocket motors (thrust below 150,000 lbf) to anchor prediction models. This data will provide NASA the capability to predict the acoustic environments and consequent vibro-acoustic response of larger rockets (thrust above 1,000,000 lbf) such as those planned for the NASA Constellation program. This paper presents the methods used to measure acoustic data during the static firing of small solid rocket motors and the trends found in the data.

  6. Acoustic Measurements of Small Solid Rocket Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargas, Magda B.; Kenny, R. Jeremy

    2010-01-01

    Rocket acoustic noise can induce loads and vibration on the vehicle as well as the surrounding structures. Models have been developed to predict these acoustic loads based on scaling existing solid rocket motor data. The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center acoustics team has measured several small solid rocket motors (thrust below 150,000 lbf) to anchor prediction models. This data will provide NASA the capability to predict the acoustic environments and consequent vibro-acoustic response of larger rockets (thrust above 1,000,000 lbf) such as those planned for the NASA Constellation program. This paper presents the methods used to measure acoustic data during the static firing of small solid rocket motors and the trends found in the data.

  7. Acoustic measurements in sheared granular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzinski, Theodore; Daniels, Karen

    2014-03-01

    Acoustic measurements in static, jammed granular materials have revealed an excess of low-frequency vibrational modes which decreases as the confining pressure is increased. This behavior may be analogous to the excess in low-frequency modes associated with the loss of rigidity in molecular and colloidal glasses. To test this analogy, we measure the acoustic emissions from jammed, quasi-2D granular packings under shear. In contrast to static experiments, shear enables direct comparison of acoustic properties as a packing approaches failure. We use a split-bottom geometry with flexible boundaries held under controlled tension, allowing experiments to be conducted at a set confining pressure.

  8. Measuring the acoustic response of Helmholtz resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteiro, Martín; Marti, Arturo C.; Vogt, Patrik; Kasper, Lutz; Quarthal, Dominik

    2015-04-01

    Many experiments have been proposed to investigate acoustic phenomena in college and early undergraduate levels, in particular the speed of sound,1-9 by means of different methods, such as time of flight, transit time, or resonance in tubes. In this paper we propose to measure the acoustic response curves of a glass beaker filled with different gases, used as an acoustic resonator. We show that these curves expose many interesting peaks and features, one of which matches the resonance peak predicted for a Helmholtz resonator fairly well, and gives a decent estimate for the speed of sound in some cases. The measures are obtained thanks to the capabilities of smartphones.

  9. Rotating Microphone Rake Measures Spinning Acoustic Modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Konno, Kevin E.; Hausmann, Clifford R.

    1996-01-01

    Rotating rake of pressure transducers developed for use in experimental studies of sources and propagation of noise generated by subsonic fan engines. Pressure transducers used as microphones to measure acoustic modes generated by, and spin with, fans. Versatility of control software used in rake-drive system enables measurements of acoustic modes on wide range of test-engine configurations. Rake-drive hardware easily adapted to different engines because not mechanically coupled to engine under test.

  10. Acoustic Impedance Measurement for Underground Surfaces.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cockcroft, Paul William

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. This thesis investigates the measurement of acoustic impedance for surfaces likely to be found in underground coal mines. By introducing the concepts of industrial noise, the effects of noise on the ear and relevant legislation the need for the protection of workers can be appreciated. Representative acoustic impedance values are vital as input for existing computer models that predict sound levels in various underground environments. These enable the mining engineer to predict the noise level at any point within a mine in the vicinity of noisy machinery. The concepts of acoustic intensity and acoustic impedance are investigated and different acoustic impedance measurement techniques are detailed. The possible use of either an impedance tube or an intensity meter for these kinds of measurements are suggested. The problems with acoustic intensity and acoustic impedance measurements are discussed with reference to the restraints that an underground environment imposes on any measurement technique. The impedance tube method for work in an acoustics laboratory is shown and the theory explained, accompanied by a few representative results. The use of a Metravib intensity meter in a soundproof chamber to gain impedance values is explained in detail. The accompanying software for the analysis of the two measured pressure signals is shown as well as the actual results for a variety of test surfaces. The use of a Nagra IV-SJ tape recorder is investigated to determine the effect of recording on the measurement and subsequent analysis of the input signals, particularly with reference to the phase difference introduced between the two simultaneous pressure signals. The subsequent use of a Norwegian Electronic intensity meter, including a proposal for underground work, is shown along with results for tests completed with this piece of equipment. Finally, recommendations are made on how to link up

  11. Acoustic Measurements for Small Solid Rocket Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargas, Magda B.; Kenny, R. Jeremy

    2010-01-01

    Models have been developed to predict large solid rocket motor acoustic loads based on the scaling of small solid rocket motors. MSFC has measured several small solid rocket motors in horizontal and launch configurations to anchor these models. Solid Rocket Test Motor (SRTM) has ballistics similar to the Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) therefore a good choice for acoustic scaling. Acoustic measurements were collected during the test firing of the Insulation Configuration Extended Length (ICXL) 7,6, and 8 (in firing order) in order to compare to RSRM horizontal firing data. The scope of this presentation includes: Acoustic test procedures and instrumentation implemented during the three SRTM firings and Data analysis method and general trends observed in the data.

  12. Acoustic streaming measurements in annular thermoacoustic engines.

    PubMed

    Joba, Stéphane; Gusev, Vitalyi; Lotton, Pierrick; Bruneau, Michel

    2003-04-01

    Experiments with an annular thermoacoustic engine employing quasiadiabatic interaction between traveling acoustic waves and an inhomogeneously heated porous material indicate the presence of a closed-loop mass flux. A qualitative modeling of the enthalpy flux in the thermoacoustic core provides an opportunity to estimate the thermal convection associated with this mass flux, by using temperature measurement at different positions in the system. The estimated acoustically induced mass flux is in accordance with recent theoretical results.

  13. Acoustic Doppler discharge-measurement system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simpson, Michael R.; Oltmann, Richard N.; ,

    1990-01-01

    A discharge-measurement system that uses a vessel-mounted acoustic Doppler current profiler has been developed and tested by the U.S. Geological Survey. Discharge measurements using the system require a fraction of the time needed for conventional current-meter discharge measurements and do not require shore-based navigational aids or tag lines for positioning the vessel.

  14. Drag Measurements of Porous Plate Acoustic Liners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolter, John D.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents the results of direct drag measurements on a variety of porous plate acoustic liners. The existing literature describes numerous studies of drag on porous walls with injection or suction, but relatively few of drag on porous plates with neither injection nor suction. Furthermore, the porosity of the porous plate in existing studies is much lower than typically used in acoustic liners. In the present work, the acoustic liners consisted of a perforated face sheet covering a bulk acoustic absorber material. Factors that were varied in the experiment were hole diameter, hole pattern, face sheet thickness, bulk material type, and size of the gap (if any) between the face sheet and the absorber material.

  15. Voice Acoustical Measurement of the Severity of Major Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cannizzaro, Michael; Harel, Brian; Reilly, Nicole; Chappell, Phillip; Snyder, Peter J.

    2004-01-01

    A number of empirical studies have documented the relationship between quantifiable and objective acoustical measures of voice and speech, and clinical subjective ratings of severity of Major Depression. To further explore this relationship, speech samples were extracted from videotape recordings of structured interviews made during the…

  16. Voice Acoustical Measurement of the Severity of Major Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cannizzaro, Michael; Harel, Brian; Reilly, Nicole; Chappell, Phillip; Snyder, Peter J.

    2004-01-01

    A number of empirical studies have documented the relationship between quantifiable and objective acoustical measures of voice and speech, and clinical subjective ratings of severity of Major Depression. To further explore this relationship, speech samples were extracted from videotape recordings of structured interviews made during the…

  17. Acoustical measurements in ancient Roman theatres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farnetani, Andrea; Fausti, Patrizio; Pompoli, Roberto; Prodi, Nicola

    2004-05-01

    The Greek and Roman theatres are among the most precious and spectacular items of cultural heritage in the Mediterranean countries. The theatres are famous not only for their impressive architecture, but also for the acoustic qualities. For this reason it is important to consider these theatres as an acoustical heritage and to study their sound field. Within the activities of the ERATO (identification Evaluation and Revival of the Acoustical heritage of ancient Theatres and Odea) project, acoustical measurements were taken in well-preserved ancient Roman theatres at Aspendos (Turkey) and Jerash (Jordan). Roman theatres have an impressive stage building that forms a back wall in the orchestra area, and it was found that, from the analysis of the acoustical parameters, the reverberation time (e.g., 1.7 s at middle frequencies in the theatre of Aspendos) is quite long compared not only with other open-space theatres but also with closed spaces. Contrary to modern halls the clarity is high and this fact, together with a low sound level in most of the seats, gives the sound field a unique character.

  18. Acoustic Measurement of Potato Cannon Velocity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Courtney, Michael; Courtney, Amy

    2007-01-01

    Potato cannon velocity can be measured with a digitized microphone signal. A microphone is attached to the potato cannon muzzle, and a potato is fired at an aluminum target about 10 m away. Flight time can be determined from the acoustic waveform by subtracting the time in the barrel and time for sound to return from the target. The potato…

  19. Acoustic Measurement of Potato Cannon Velocity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Courtney, Michael; Courtney, Amy

    2007-01-01

    Potato cannon velocity can be measured with a digitized microphone signal. A microphone is attached to the potato cannon muzzle, and a potato is fired at an aluminum target about 10 m away. Flight time can be determined from the acoustic waveform by subtracting the time in the barrel and time for sound to return from the target. The potato…

  20. Acoustic impedance measurements of pulse tube refrigerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwase, Takashi; Biwa, Tetsushi; Yazaki, Taichi

    2010-02-01

    Complex acoustic impedance is determined in a prototype refrigerator that can mimic orifice-type, inertance-type, and double inlet-type pulse tube refrigerators from simultaneous measurements of pressure and velocity oscillations at the cold end. The impedance measurements revealed the means by which the oscillatory flow condition in the basic pulse tube refrigerator is improved by additional components such as a valve and a tank. The working mechanism of pulse tube refrigerators is explained based on an electrical circuit analogy.

  1. An Expendable Source for Measuring Shallow Water Acoustic Propagation and Geo-Acoustic Bottom Properties

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. An Expendable Source for Measuring Shallow Water Acoustic ...Propagation and Geo- Acoustic Bottom Properties Harry A DeFerrari RSMAS – University of Miami 4600 Rickenbacker Causeway Miami FL. 33149...broadband source is being developed that transmits high gain m-sequence to clandestinly measure pulse response of shallow water acoustic propagation

  2. Mobile Communication Devices, Ambient Noise, and Acoustic Voice Measures.

    PubMed

    Maryn, Youri; Ysenbaert, Femke; Zarowski, Andrzej; Vanspauwen, Robby

    2017-03-01

    The ability to move with mobile communication devices (MCDs; ie, smartphones and tablet computers) may induce differences in microphone-to-mouth positioning and use in noise-packed environments, and thus influence reliability of acoustic voice measurements. This study investigated differences in various acoustic voice measures between six recording equipments in backgrounds with low and increasing noise levels. One chain of continuous speech and sustained vowel from 50 subjects with voice disorders (all separated by silence intervals) was radiated and re-recorded in an anechoic chamber with five MCDs and one high-quality recording system. These recordings were acquired in one condition without ambient noise and in four conditions with increased ambient noise. A total of 10 acoustic voice markers were obtained in the program Praat. Differences between MCDs and noise condition were assessed with Friedman repeated-measures test and posthoc Wilcoxon signed-rank tests, both for related samples, after Bonferroni correction. (1) Except median fundamental frequency and seven nonsignificant differences, MCD samples have significantly higher acoustic markers than clinical reference samples in minimal environmental noise. (2) Except median fundamental frequency, jitter local, and jitter rap, all acoustic measures on samples recorded with the reference system experienced significant influence from room noise levels. Fundamental frequency is resistant to recording system, environmental noise, and their combination. All other measures, however, were impacted by both recording system and noise condition, and especially by their combination, often already in the reference/baseline condition without added ambient noise. Caution is therefore warranted regarding implementation of MCDs as clinical recording tools, particularly when applied for treatment outcomes assessments. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. [The influences of vowel ae and a: on acoustic measures].

    PubMed

    Wei, C; Chen, F; Wang, W

    1999-03-01

    To study the influences of vowel ae and a: on acoustics measures. Fifty-three cases of laryngeal diseases were measured acoustically. The acoustic sampling were vowels ae and a:. The results showed that Fo, Jitter and Shimmer were similar between two groups, and NNE of vowel a: was much lower than that of ae, indicating larger glottal closure in vowel a:. Vowels have something to do with glottal closure, therefore influencs acoustical measures.

  4. Measuring Acoustic Noise around Kahoolawe Island.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-10-01

    NAVAL OCEAN SYSTEMS CENTER SAN DIEGO, CALIFORNIA 92152 C y 2 .V ANAVAL OCEAN SYSTEMS CENTER, SAN DIEGO, CA 92152 AN ACTIV IT Y OF THE NAVAL... Ocean Systems Center (NOSC), Code 512, on NSAP Project TH-1 -80, "Measurement of Acoustic Noise Around Kahoolawe". CDR J. W. Carlmark, USN, COMTHIRDFLT N...Bioacoustics & Bionics Division Biosciences Department ,or -.. .- ?---1 1 : ’" " "’ .... .-j UNCLASSIFIED SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE (When Data

  5. Measuring acoustic emissions in an avalanche slope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiweger, Ingrid; Schweizer, Jürg

    2014-05-01

    Measurements of acoustic emissions are a common technique for monitoring damage and predicting imminent failure of a material. Within natural hazards it has already been used to successfully predict the break-off of a hanging glacier. To explore the applicability of the acoustic emission (AE) technique for avalanche prediction, we installed two acoustic sensors (with 30 kHz and 60 kHz resonance frequency) in an avalanche prone slope at the Mittelgrat in the Parsenn ski area above Davos, Switzerland. The slope is north-east facing, frequently wind loaded, and approximately 35° steep. The AE signals - in particular the event energy and waiting time distributions - were compared with slope stability. The latter was determined by observing avalanche activity. The results of two winter's measurements yielded that the exponent β of the inverse cumulative distribution of event energy showed a significant drop (from a value of 3.5 to roughly 2.5) at very unstable conditions, i.e. on the three days during our measurement periods when spontaneous avalanches released on our study slope.

  6. Acoustic Doppler velocimeter-induced acoustic streaming and its implications for measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poindexter, C. M.; Rusello, P. J.; Variano, E. A.

    2011-05-01

    The acoustic Doppler velocimeter (ADV) is widely used for the characterization of fluid flow. Secondary flows ("acoustic streaming") generated by the ADV's acoustic pulses may affect the accuracy of measurements in experiments with small velocities. We assessed the impact of acoustic streaming on flow measurement using particle image velocimetry. The probes of two different ADVs were successively mounted in a tank of quiescent water. The probes' ultrasound emitters were aligned with a laser light sheet. Observed flow was primarily in the axial direction, accelerating from the ultrasound emitter and peaking within centimeters of the velocimeter sampling volume before dropping off. We measured the dependence of acoustic streaming velocity on ADV configuration, finding that different settings induce streaming ranging from negligible to more than 2.0 cm s-1. From these results, we describe cases where acoustic streaming affects velocity measurements and also cases where ADVs accurately measure their own acoustic streaming.

  7. Acoustic performance and clinical use of a fibreoptic hydrophone.

    PubMed

    Coleman, A J; Draguioti, E; Tiptaf, R; Shotri, N; Saunders, J E

    1998-01-01

    Initial clinical experience with the use of an optical fibre hydrophone for in vivo ultrasound dosimetry is reported. The hydrophone, originally described by Beard and Mills (1997), operates as an extrinsic, low-finesse Fabry-Perot optical sensor where acoustically-induced thickness changes in a polymer film modulate the phase difference between light beams reflected from the two surfaces of the film. The pressure waveforms from the sensor are compared with those from a calibrated piezoelectric polymer membrane hydrophone. The sensor is found to have a frequency resonance at around 12 MHz, corresponding to the thickness mode of the 50-micron polymer film. The directional responses at 0.16 MHz, 1.0 MHz and 5.0 MHz are found to be similar to those predicted for a plane piston receiver with the same diameter as that of the polymer film (400 microns). The performance of the sensor as a broad-band hydrophone is degraded by the relatively low acoustical impedance of the adhesive used in the fibre-film bond. The hydrophone was used in the clinic for measurement of acoustic pressures within the ureter of 4 patients undergoing clinical extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy on a Dornier HM3 lithotripter. Pressures in the range 0.5 to 5.0 MPa were recorded in the ureter at positions over 10 cm from the renal pelvis. Problems related to the clinical use of the sensor, including instability in the sensitivity of the sensor following handling and its mechanical strength in high-amplitude acoustic fields, are discussed.

  8. Clinical behavior of acoustic tumors. A flow cytometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Kesterson, L; Shelton, C; Dressler, L; Berliner, K I

    1993-03-01

    Recently, nonsurgical treatment of acoustic tumors has been advocated as an alternative to surgical resection. Because of the relatively short follow-up in reported series of radiation-treated acoustic tumors, the lack of growth of some tumors may merely reflect the variable biologic growth potential of these tumors and not the result of treatment. DNA flow cytometry has been used to predict biologic activity in other solid tumors. It is applied in this study to assess the variability of growth potential in a typical acoustic tumor population and to determine whether relationships exist between flow cytometric data and clinical characteristics of acoustic tumors. DNA flow cytometry techniques were used to evaluate formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue previously obtained from patients who were surgically treated for acoustic neuromas. Relationships between flow cytometry data and historical data were also statistically evaluated. Tissue samples were from patients of a large private otologic practice. Subjects were a convenience sample of 49 patients (26 female and 23 male) with a mean age of 59 years who had undergone surgical removal of an acoustic neuroma. None of the patients had other stigmata of neurofibromatosis or tumor recurrence. All tissue specimens were pathologically confirmed acoustic neurons, with a range in tumor size from 1 to 6 cm. The measures included DNA ploidy and S-phase fraction. Historical data included age, sex, size of tumor, presenting symptom, and symptom duration. All 49 tumors showed a diploid distribution, with S-phase values ranging from 1.07% to 20.74% (mean +/- SD, 6.30 +/- 4.24). The ploidy and S-phase data compare favorably with previously published data in which fresh tissue was used. There were no statistically significant relationships between S-phase value and historical data. The wide range of S-phase values is consistent with a large variation in tumor growth potential and suggests caution in interpreting the results of

  9. Measurements of acoustic sources in motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrello, L.; Norum, T. D.

    1978-01-01

    Results of the far-field pressures measured from three different types of moving sources are presented. These acoustic sources consist of a point monopole, a small model jet, and an aircraft. Results for the pressure time history produced by the point source show good agreement with those predicted analytically. Both actual and simulated forward motion of the model jet show reductions in noise levels with forward speed at all angles between the source and observer. Measurement with the aircraft over both an anechoic floor and over the ground yields a method for evaluating the transfer function for ground reflections at various angles between the moving aircraft and measurement position.

  10. Acoustic levitation methods for density measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, E. H.; Hsu, C. J.

    1986-01-01

    The capability of ultrasonic levitators operating in air to perform density measurements has been demonstrated. The remote determination of the density of ordinary liquids as well as low density solid metals can be carried out using levitated samples with size on the order of a few millimeters and at a frequency of 20 kHz. Two basic methods may be used. The first one is derived from a previously known technique developed for acoustic levitation in liquid media, and is based on the static equilibrium position of levitated samples in the earth's gravitational field. The second approach relies on the dynamic interaction between a levitated sample and the acoustic field. The first technique appears more accurate (1 percent uncertainty), but the latter method is directly applicable to a near gravity-free environment such as that found in space.

  11. Measurements of thermo-acoustic coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pun, Winston

    The problem of combustion instabilities has existed since the early 1940s, when they were observed during the development of solid and liquid rocket engines. While various engineering solutions have served well in these fields, the problem is revisited in modern gas-turbine engines. The purpose of this work is to provide experimental measurements of laboratory devices that exhibit thermo-acoustic coupling, similar to the interaction observed during combustion instabilities, which will aid in the design and development of stable systems. Possibly the simplest device which exhibits these characteristics is a Rijke tube. An electrical, horizontally mounted, 1 m long version of the original Rijke tube is presented, with measurements taken during unstable and stable operation. An accurate stability boundary with uncertainty is determined for a heater position of x/L = ¼, as a function of mass flow rate and heater power. Hysteresis, not previously reported, is observed at flow rates above 3 g/s. A one-dimensional model of the stability boundary with linear acoustics is shown to have qualitative agreement with experimental data. A novel technique has also been devised which can provide insight into the local dynamic response of a flame to an acoustic field. In the experiments, a test chamber is acoustically excited by a pair of low-frequency drivers. The response of the flame is visualized by two techniques; chemiluminescence and planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) of the hydroxyl (OH) radical, both of which are well-known indicators for heat release in flames. The resulting images are phase-resolved and averaged to yield a qualitative picture of the fluctuation of the heat release. The images are correlated with a pressure transducer near the flame, which allows stability to be evaluated using Rayleigh's criterion and a combustion response function. This is the first known measurement of the combustion dynamics of a flame over a range of frequencies. Results

  12. Acoustic measuring techniques for suspended sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruber, P.; Felix, D.; Storti, G.; Lattuada, M.; Fleckenstein, P.; Deschwanden, F.

    2016-11-01

    Acoustic signals can be used in various ways for suspended sediment monitoring. One possibility which lends itself particularly well in the context of hydropower plants (HPPs), is to use installations for acoustic discharge measurement (ADM). Such installations already exist at waterways of many HPPs. Similar to certain turbidimeters, the attenuation of the forward scattered signal travelling through the water-sediment mixture is correlated with suspended sediment concentration (SSC). This correlation can be based on reference SSCs, e.g. from gravimetric analyses of bottle samples. Without the need of additional sensors and practically maintenance-free, this method is used successfully in the HPP Fieschertal to warn the HPP operator of high SSC to prevent excessive turbine abrasion. Acoustic methods and systems that allow for estimating both SSC and particle size distribution (PSD) are under development. The simultaneous determination of SSC and PSD is not possible using a single frequency. Therefore, multi-frequency approaches are investigated for generally scattered signals. When backscattered signals are used, a stronger frequency dependency can be exploited. However, the reliable simultaneous determination of particle size (and distribution) and concentration is still a major challenge due to a low signal-to-noise ratio and an ill- posed problem of estimating concentration and size from recorded signals. The optimal setup configuration (angles, frequencies) for such a system is not unique and further investigations are recommended.

  13. Acoustics measurements in normal jet impingement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleis, S. J.

    1977-01-01

    The dependence of far field acoustic measurements for a uniform jet on nozzle to plate spacing for small dimensionless spacings (h/d - 0.75 to 3.0) was investigated. Spectra from a real time analyzer were read and processed by an HP 2116 minicomputer in on-line mode. Similar data was generated for a fully developed pipe flow exit condition jet to compare with other investigations. The data base for normal jet impingement was extended to smaller values of nozzle to plate spacing. The effects of slight noise heating (30 deg rise) of the jet on the far field noise produced by the impinging jet are demonstrated.

  14. Flight Acoustics Measurement Techniques and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Preisser, J. S.; Marcolini, M. A.

    1998-01-01

    Careful consideration must be given to data acquisition and analysis techniques in the design of experiments for the measurement of noise generated by flight vehicles. Although noise measurement locations and data reduction procedures are specified for aircraft certification by FAA and ICAO directives, for example, there are virtually no established procedures for aircraft noise measurement for other purposes. To optimize the quality and quantity of information obtained in a flight acoustics experiment, microphone layout, data acquisition, and analysis must be tailored to the specific test objective. This paper will review flight acoustics technology at NASA Langley Research Center developed over the past decade. In particular, the paper will focus on flight experiments performed for three diverse objectives: (1) research applications, such as noise prediction code validation, (2) noise impact modeling, and (3) noise abatement flight procedures. To best achieve these diverse objectives, different deployments of microphone systems on the ground are required, and different data analysis techniques are needed. In all cases, accurate positioning of the aircraft synchronized in time with the data recording is necessary. However, there are some restrictions on flight operations unique to each case for the methods to properly work.

  15. Outdoor synthetic aperture acoustic ground target measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, Steven; Ngaya, Therese-Ann; Vignola, Joe; Judge, John; Marble, Jay; Gugino, Peter; Soumekh, Mehrdad; Rosen, Erik

    2010-04-01

    A novel outdoor synthetic aperture acoustic (SAA) system consists of a microphone and loudspeaker traveling along a 6.3-meter rail system. This is an extension from a prior indoor laboratory measurement system in which selected targets were insonified while suspended in air. Here, the loudspeaker and microphone are aimed perpendicular to their direction of travel along the rail. The area next to the rail is insonified and the microphone records the reflected acoustic signal, while the travel of the transceiver along the rail creates a synthetic aperture allowing imaging of the scene. Ground surfaces consisted of weathered asphalt and short grass. Several surface-laid objects were arranged on the ground for SAA imaging. These included rocks, concrete masonry blocks, grout covered foam blocks; foliage obscured objects and several spherical canonical targets such as a bowling ball, and plastic and metal spheres. The measured data are processed and ground targets are further analyzed for characteristics and features amenable for discrimination. This paper includes a description of the measurement system, target descriptions, synthetic aperture processing approach and preliminary findings with respect to ground surface and target characteristics.

  16. Precision of Four Acoustic Bone Measurement Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Christopher; Feiveson, Alan H.; Shackelford, Linda; Rianon, Nahida; LeBlanc, Adrian

    2000-01-01

    Though many studies have quantified the precision of various acoustic bone measurement devices, it is difficult to directly compare the results among the studies, because they used disparate subject pools, did not specify the estimation methodology, or did not use consistent definitions for various precision characteristics. In this study, we used a repeated measures design protocol to directly determine the precision characteristics of four acoustic bone measurement devices: the Mechanical Response Tissue Analyzer (MRTA), the UBA-575+, the SoundScan 2000 (S2000), and the Sahara Ultrasound Done Analyzer. Ten men and ten women were scanned on all four devices by two different operators at five discrete time points: Week 1, Week 2, Week 3, Month 3 and Month 6. The percent coefficient of variation (%CV) and standardized coefficient of variation were computed for the following precision characteristics: interoperator effect, operator-subject interaction, short-term error variance, and long-term drift, The MRTA had high interoperator errors for its ulnar and tibial stiffness measures and a large long-term drift in its tibial stiffness measurement. The UBA-575+ exhibited large short-term error variances and long-term drift for all three of its measurements. The S2000's tibial speed of sound measurement showed a high short-term error variance and a significant operator-subject interaction but very good values ( < 1%) for the other precision characteristics. The Sahara seemed to have the best overall performance, but was hampered by a large %CV for short-term error variance in its broadband ultrasound attenuation measure.

  17. Precision of Four Acoustic Bone Measurement Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Christopher; Rianon, Nahid; Feiveson, Alan; Shackelford, Linda; LeBlanc, Adrian

    2000-01-01

    Though many studies have quantified the precision of various acoustic bone measurement devices, it is difficult to directly compare the results among the studies, because they used disparate subject pools, did not specify the estimation methodology, or did not use consistent definitions for various precision characteristics. In this study, we used a repeated measures design protocol to directly determine the precision characteristics of four acoustic bone measurement devices: the Mechanical Response Tissue Analyzer (MRTA), the UBA-575+, the SoundScan 2000 (S2000), and the Sahara Ultrasound Bone Analyzer. Ten men and ten women were scanned on all four devices by two different operators at five discrete time points: Week 1, Week 2, Week 3, Month 3 and Month 6. The percent coefficient of variation (%CV) and standardized coefficient of variation were computed for the following precision characteristics: interoperator effect, operator-subject interaction, short-term error variance, and long-term drift. The MRTA had high interoperator errors for its ulnar and tibial stiffness measures and a large long-term drift in its tibial stiffness measurement. The UBA-575+ exhibited large short-term error variances and long-term drift for all three of its measurements. The S2000's tibial speed of sound measurement showed a high short-term error variance and a significant operator-subject interaction but very good values (less than 1%) for the other precision characteristics. The Sahara seemed to have the best overall performance, but was hampered by a large %CV for short-term error variance in its broadband ultrasound attenuation measure.

  18. Precision of Four Acoustic Bone Measurement Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Christopher; Rianon, Nahid; Feiveson, Alan; Shackelford, Linda; LeBlanc, Adrian

    2000-01-01

    Though many studies have quantified the precision of various acoustic bone measurement devices, it is difficult to directly compare the results among the studies, because they used disparate subject pools, did not specify the estimation methodology, or did not use consistent definitions for various precision characteristics. In this study, we used a repeated measures design protocol to directly determine the precision characteristics of four acoustic bone measurement devices: the Mechanical Response Tissue Analyzer (MRTA), the UBA-575+, the SoundScan 2000 (S2000), and the Sahara Ultrasound Bone Analyzer. Ten men and ten women were scanned on all four devices by two different operators at five discrete time points: Week 1, Week 2, Week 3, Month 3 and Month 6. The percent coefficient of variation (%CV) and standardized coefficient of variation were computed for the following precision characteristics: interoperator effect, operator-subject interaction, short-term error variance, and long-term drift. The MRTA had high interoperator errors for its ulnar and tibial stiffness measures and a large long-term drift in its tibial stiffness measurement. The UBA-575+ exhibited large short-term error variances and long-term drift for all three of its measurements. The S2000's tibial speed of sound measurement showed a high short-term error variance and a significant operator-subject interaction but very good values (less than 1%) for the other precision characteristics. The Sahara seemed to have the best overall performance, but was hampered by a large %CV for short-term error variance in its broadband ultrasound attenuation measure.

  19. A comparison between acoustic mode measurements and acoustic finite element analysis performed for SAAB SF 340

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goeransson, P.; Green, I.

    1986-03-01

    In order to verify an acoustic finite element package, measured and calculated eigenmodes and eigenfrequencies for Saab SF 340 cabin acoustics were compared. The measurements were performed in an acoustic mockup. For the analysis, a two dimensional model of the cross section of the fuselage was used. The comparison shows quite good agreement, the discrepancies being due to the representation of the flexible wall of the fuselage as rigid in the analysis.

  20. Evaluation of Voice Acoustics as Predictors of Clinical Depression Scores.

    PubMed

    Hashim, Nik Wahidah; Wilkes, Mitch; Salomon, Ronald; Meggs, Jared; France, Daniel J

    2017-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine if acoustic measures of voice, characterizing specific spectral and timing properties, predict clinical ratings of depression severity measured in a sample of patients using the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD) and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II). This is a prospective study. Voice samples and clinical depression scores were collected prospectively from consenting adult patients who were referred to psychiatry from the adult emergency department or primary care clinics. The patients were audio-recorded as they read a standardized passage in a nearly closed-room environment. Mean Absolute Error (MAE) between actual and predicted depression scores was used as the primary outcome measure. The average MAE between predicted and actual HAMD scores was approximately two scores for both men and women, and the MAE for the BDI-II scores was approximately one score for men and eight scores for women. Timing features were predictive of HAMD scores in female patients while a combination of timing features and spectral features was predictive of scores in male patients. Timing features were predictive of BDI-II scores in male patients. Voice acoustic features extracted from read speech demonstrated variable effectiveness in predicting clinical depression scores in men and women. Voice features were highly predictive of HAMD scores in men and women, and BDI-II scores in men, respectively. The methodology is feasible for diagnostic applications in diverse clinical settings as it can be implemented during a standard clinical interview in a normal closed room and without strict control on the recording environment. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Acoustic systems for the measurement of streamflow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laenen, Antonius; Smith, Winchell

    1982-01-01

    Very little information is available concerning acoustic velocity meter (AVM) operation, performance, and limitations. This report provides a better understanding about the application of AVM instrumentation to streamflow measurment. Operational U.S. Geological Survey systems have proven that AVM equipment is accurate and dependable. AVM equipment has no practical upper limit of measureable velocity if sonic transducers are securely placed and adequately protected, and will measure velocitites as low as 0.1 meter per second which is normally less than the threshold level for mechanical or head-loss meters. In some situations the performance of AVM equipment may be degraded by multipath interference, signal bending, signal attenuation, and variable streamline orientation. Smaller, less-expensive, more conveniently operable microprocessor equipment is now available which should increase use of AVM systems in streamflow applications. (USGS)

  2. Resin characterization by electro-acoustic measurements.

    PubMed

    Müller, Egbert; Mann, Christian

    2007-03-09

    The electro-acoustic effects, namely the ion vibration potential (IVP) and the colloidal vibration current (CVI), colloidal vibration potential (CVP) first described by P. Debye [P. Debye, J. Chem. Phys. 1 (1933) 13], are a result of charge separation of bound or free ions at different degrees by ultrasonic waves. Today commercial instruments are available to investigate liquid homogeneous and heterogeneous systems. In the present paper the application of this technique for the characterization of salts, protein solutions and resins for biochromatography is shown and valuable information about resins can be derived in a short time. Various resins were investigated with the following results: (1) the CVI magnitude is dependent of several parameters (such as particle size distribution, volume fraction, density difference); (2) the CVI is influenced by the surface modification of the resins. Polymeric modifications decrease the value of CVI. The CVI is generally lower for high capacity resins; (3) the measurement of the electro-acoustic effects can be used to detect small changes in resins. The CVI is dependent of the amount of adsorbed protein in "native" and denatured state.

  3. Acoustic Measurements of Rectangular Nozzles With Bevel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, James E.

    2012-01-01

    A series of convergent rectangular nozzles of aspect ratios 2:1, 4:1, and 8:1 were constructed with uniform exit velocity profiles. Additional nozzles were constructed that extended the wide lip on one side of these nozzles to form beveled nozzles. Far-field acoustic measurements were made and analyzed, and the results presented. The impact of aspect ratio on jet noise was similar to that of enhanced mixing devices: reduction in aft, peak frequency noise with an increase in broadside, high frequency noise. Azimuthally, it was found that rectangular jets produced more noise directed away from their wide sides than from their narrow sides. The azimuthal dependence decreased at aft angles where noise decreased. The effect of temperature, keeping acoustic Mach number constant, was minimal. Since most installations would have the observer on the wide size of the nozzle, the increased high frequency noise has a deleterious impact on the observer. Extending one wide side of the rectangular nozzle, evocative of an aft deck in an installed propulsion system, increased the noise of the jet with increasing length. The impact of both aspect ratio and bevel length were relatively well behaved, allowing a simple bilinear model to be constructed relative to a simple round jet.

  4. Acoustic Measurements of Rectangular Nozzles with Bevel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, James E.

    2012-01-01

    A series of convergent rectangular nozzles of aspect ratios 2:1, 4:1, and 8:1 were constructed with uniform exit velocity profiles. Additional nozzles were constructed that extended the wide lip on one side of these nozzles to form beveled nozzles. Far-field acoustic measurements were made and analyzed, and the results presented. The impact of aspect ratio on jet noise was similar to that of enhanced mixing devices: reduction in aft, peak frequency noise with an increase in broadside, high frequency noise. Azimuthally, it was found that rectangular jets produced more noise directed away from their wide sides than from their narrow sides. The azimuthal dependence decreased at aft angles where noise decreased. The effect of temperature, keeping acoustic Mach number constant, was minimal. Since most installations would have the observer on the wide size of the nozzle, the increased high frequency noise has a deleterious impact on the observer. Extending one wide side of the rectangular nozzle, evocative of an aft deck in an installed propulsion system, increased the noise of the jet with increasing length. The impact of both aspect ratio and bevel length were relatively well behaved, allowing a simple bilinear model to be constructed relative to a simple round jet.

  5. Experimental observation of acoustic emissions generated by a pulsed proton beam from a hospital-based clinical cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Kevin C.; Solberg, Timothy D.; Avery, Stephen; Vander Stappen, François; Janssens, Guillaume; Prieels, Damien; Bawiec, Christopher R.; Lewin, Peter A.; Sehgal, Chandra M.

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: To measure the acoustic signal generated by a pulsed proton spill from a hospital-based clinical cyclotron. Methods: An electronic function generator modulated the IBA C230 isochronous cyclotron to create a pulsed proton beam. The acoustic emissions generated by the proton beam were measured in water using a hydrophone. The acoustic measurements were repeated with increasing proton current and increasing distance between detector and beam. Results: The cyclotron generated proton spills with rise times of 18 μs and a maximum measured instantaneous proton current of 790 nA. Acoustic emissions generated by the proton energy deposition were measured to be on the order of mPa. The origin of the acoustic wave was identified as the proton beam based on the correlation between acoustic emission arrival time and distance between the hydrophone and proton beam. The acoustic frequency spectrum peaked at 10 kHz, and the acoustic pressure amplitude increased monotonically with increasing proton current. Conclusions: The authors report the first observation of acoustic emissions generated by a proton beam from a hospital-based clinical cyclotron. When modulated by an electronic function generator, the cyclotron is capable of creating proton spills with fast rise times (18 μs) and high instantaneous currents (790 nA). Measurements of the proton-generated acoustic emissions in a clinical setting may provide a method for in vivo proton range verification and patient monitoring.

  6. Experimental observation of acoustic emissions generated by a pulsed proton beam from a hospital-based clinical cyclotron.

    PubMed

    Jones, Kevin C; Vander Stappen, François; Bawiec, Christopher R; Janssens, Guillaume; Lewin, Peter A; Prieels, Damien; Solberg, Timothy D; Sehgal, Chandra M; Avery, Stephen

    2015-12-01

    To measure the acoustic signal generated by a pulsed proton spill from a hospital-based clinical cyclotron. An electronic function generator modulated the IBA C230 isochronous cyclotron to create a pulsed proton beam. The acoustic emissions generated by the proton beam were measured in water using a hydrophone. The acoustic measurements were repeated with increasing proton current and increasing distance between detector and beam. The cyclotron generated proton spills with rise times of 18 μs and a maximum measured instantaneous proton current of 790 nA. Acoustic emissions generated by the proton energy deposition were measured to be on the order of mPa. The origin of the acoustic wave was identified as the proton beam based on the correlation between acoustic emission arrival time and distance between the hydrophone and proton beam. The acoustic frequency spectrum peaked at 10 kHz, and the acoustic pressure amplitude increased monotonically with increasing proton current. The authors report the first observation of acoustic emissions generated by a proton beam from a hospital-based clinical cyclotron. When modulated by an electronic function generator, the cyclotron is capable of creating proton spills with fast rise times (18 μs) and high instantaneous currents (790 nA). Measurements of the proton-generated acoustic emissions in a clinical setting may provide a method for in vivo proton range verification and patient monitoring.

  7. Measurement of acoustical characteristics of mosques in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Abdou, Adel A

    2003-03-01

    The study of mosque acoustics, with regard to acoustical characteristics, sound quality for speech intelligibility, and other applicable acoustic criteria, has been largely neglected. In this study a background as to why mosques are designed as they are and how mosque design is influenced by worship considerations is given. In the study the acoustical characteristics of typically constructed contemporary mosques in Saudi Arabia have been investigated, employing a well-known impulse response. Extensive field measurements were taken in 21 representative mosques of different sizes and architectural features in order to characterize their acoustical quality and to identify the impact of air conditioning, ceiling fans, and sound reinforcement systems on their acoustics. Objective room-acoustic indicators such as reverberation time (RT) and clarity (C50) were measured. Background noise (BN) was assessed with and without the operation of air conditioning and fans. The speech transmission index (STI) was also evaluated with and without the operation of existing sound reinforcement systems. The existence of acoustical deficiencies was confirmed and quantified. The study, in addition to describing mosque acoustics, compares design goals to results obtained in practice and suggests acoustical target values for mosque design. The results show that acoustical quality in the investigated mosques deviates from optimum conditions when unoccupied, but is much better in the occupied condition.

  8. Measurement of acoustical characteristics of mosques in Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdou, Adel A.

    2003-03-01

    The study of mosque acoustics, with regard to acoustical characteristics, sound quality for speech intelligibility, and other applicable acoustic criteria, has been largely neglected. In this study a background as to why mosques are designed as they are and how mosque design is influenced by worship considerations is given. In the study the acoustical characteristics of typically constructed contemporary mosques in Saudi Arabia have been investigated, employing a well-known impulse response. Extensive field measurements were taken in 21 representative mosques of different sizes and architectural features in order to characterize their acoustical quality and to identify the impact of air conditioning, ceiling fans, and sound reinforcement systems on their acoustics. Objective room-acoustic indicators such as reverberation time (RT) and clarity (C50) were measured. Background noise (BN) was assessed with and without the operation of air conditioning and fans. The speech transmission index (STI) was also evaluated with and without the operation of existing sound reinforcement systems. The existence of acoustical deficiencies was confirmed and quantified. The study, in addition to describing mosque acoustics, compares design goals to results obtained in practice and suggests acoustical target values for mosque design. The results show that acoustical quality in the investigated mosques deviates from optimum conditions when unoccupied, but is much better in the occupied condition.

  9. Application of BP neural network in acoustic wave measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Meifeng

    2017-07-01

    Acoustic wave measurement technology is the supporting technology in acoustic wave field. It is important to study acoustic wave with high precision and reliability testing equipment and scientific testing methods. The mathematical model of this acoustic wave measurement system was analyzed on the building of the system. The BP neural network algorithm was used in order to attain the higher accuracy for the acoustic wave measurement system. Frequency domain calibration was carried out by which the amplitude/frequency character curve of this system could be obtained. Then the model of the system was established by BP neural network algorithm. Finally, the validity of the established model was tested. The conclusion was that the math model reflected the original acoustic wave measurement system’s character through the regression result in the frequency domain.

  10. Measuring aeolian sand transport using acoustic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poortinga, Ate; van Rheenen, Hans; Ellis, Jean T.; Sherman, Douglas J.

    2015-03-01

    Acoustic sensors are frequently used to measure aeolian saltation. Different approaches are used to process the signals from these instruments. The goal of this paper is to describe and discuss a method to measure aeolian saltation with acoustic sensors. In a laboratory experiment, we measured the output from an advanced signal processing scheme on the circuit board of the saltiphone. We use a software implementation of this processing scheme to re-analyse data from four miniphones obtained during a field experiment. It is shown that a set of filters remove background noise outside the frequency spectrum of aeolian saltation (at 8 kHz), whereas signals within this frequency spectrum are amplified. The resulting analogue signal is a proxy of the energy. Using an AC pulse convertor, this signal can be converted into a digital and analogue count signal or an analogue energy signal, using a rectifier and integrator. Spatio-temporal correlation between field deployed miniphones increases by using longer integration times for signal processing. To quantify aeolian grain impact, it is suggested to use the analogue energy output, as this mode is able to detect changes in frequency and amplitude. The analogue and digital count signals are able to detect an increase in frequency, but are not able to detect an increase in signal amplitude. We propose a two-stage calibration scheme consisting of (1) a factory calibration, to set the frequency spectrum of the sensor and (2) a standardized drop-test conducted before and after the experiment to evaluate the response of the sensor.

  11. Measuring Acoustic Nonlinearity by Collinear Mixing Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, M.; Tang, G.; Jacobs, L. J.; Qu, J.

    2011-06-01

    It is well known that the acoustic nonlinearity parameter β is correlated to fatigue damage in metallic materials. Various methods have been developed to measure β. One of the most often used methods is the harmonic generation technique, in which β is obtained by measuring the magnitude of the second order harmonic waves. An inherent weakness of this method is the difficulty in distinguishing material nonlinearity from the nonlinearity of the measurement system. In this paper, we demonstrate the possibility of using collinear mixing waves to measure β. The wave mixing method is based on the interaction between two incident waves in a nonlinear medium. Under certain conditions, such interactions generate a third wave of different frequency. This generated third wave is also called resonant wave, because its amplitude is unbounded if the medium has no attenuation. Such resonant waves are less sensitive to the nonlinearity of the measurement system, and have the potential to identify the source location of the nonlinearity. In this work, we used a longitudinal wave and a shear wave as the incident waves. The resonant shear wave is measured experimentally on samples made of aluminum and steel, respectively. Numerical simulations of the tests were also performed using a finite difference method.

  12. Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Tests Instrumentation for Acoustic and Pressure Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargas, Magda B.; Counter, Douglas D.

    2011-01-01

    The Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) was a development test performed at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) East Test Area (ETA) Test Stand 116. The test article included a 5% scale Ares I vehicle model and tower mounted on the Mobile Launcher. Acoustic and pressure data were measured by approximately 200 instruments located throughout the test article. There were four primary ASMAT instrument suites: ignition overpressure (IOP), lift-off acoustics (LOA), ground acoustics (GA), and spatial correlation (SC). Each instrumentation suite incorporated different sensor models which were selected based upon measurement requirements. These requirements included the type of measurement, exposure to the environment, instrumentation check-outs and data acquisition. The sensors were attached to the test article using different mounts and brackets dependent upon the location of the sensor. This presentation addresses the observed effect of the sensors and mounts on the acoustic and pressure measurements.

  13. Extreme Low Frequency Acoustic Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shams, Qamar A. (Inventor); Zuckerwar, Allan J. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    The present invention is an extremely low frequency (ELF) microphone and acoustic measurement system capable of infrasound detection in a portable and easily deployable form factor. In one embodiment of the invention, an extremely low frequency electret microphone comprises a membrane, a backplate, and a backchamber. The backchamber is sealed to allow substantially no air exchange between the backchamber and outside the microphone. Compliance of the membrane may be less than ambient air compliance. The backplate may define a plurality of holes and a slot may be defined between an outer diameter of the backplate and an inner wall of the microphone. The locations and sizes of the holes, the size of the slot, and the volume of the backchamber may be selected such that membrane motion is substantially critically damped.

  14. Extreme low frequency acoustic measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shams, Qamar A. (Inventor); Zuckerwar, Allan J. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention is an extremely low frequency (ELF) microphone and acoustic measurement system capable of infrasound detection in a portable and easily deployable form factor. In one embodiment of the invention, an extremely low frequency electret microphone comprises a membrane, a backplate, and a backchamber. The backchamber is sealed to allow substantially no air exchange between the backchamber and outside the microphone. Compliance of the membrane may be less than ambient air compliance. The backplate may define a plurality of holes and a slot may be defined between an outer diameter of the backplate and an inner wall of the microphone. The locations and sizes of the holes, the size of the slot, and the volume of the backchamber may be selected such that membrane motion is substantially critically damped.

  15. Pediatric applications of wideband acoustic immittance measures.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Lisa L; Prieve, Beth A; Kei, Joseph; Sanford, Chris A

    2013-07-01

    Wideband acoustic immittance (WAI) measures have potential capability to improve newborn hearing screening outcomes and middle ear diagnosis for infants and children. To fully capitalize on these immittance measures for pediatric hearing care, developmental and pathologic effects need to be fully understood. Published literature on wideband immittance (reflectance, absorbance, tympanometry, and acoustic reflexes) is reviewed in this article to determine pathologic effects in newborns, infants, and children relative to standard audiologic tests such as otoacoustic emissions (OAEs), standard tympanometry, air and bone conduction auditory brainstem response, and otoscopy. Infants and children with surgically confirmed otitis media with effusion have lower absorbance in the mid-frequency range (1 to 3 kHz) for the affected ear(s). Newborns that do not pass OAE screening at birth also have lower absorbance for frequencies from 1 to 3 kHz, suggesting that nonpass results are frequently associated with middle ear issues at birth. In Newborn Hearing Screening Programs, WAI may help to interpret hearing screening results. Conclusions are limited by the fact that the true status of the middle ear and cochlea are not known for newborns and infants in studies that use OAE or tympanometry as the reference standard. Likelihood ratios for reflectance against surgery gold standards range from diagnostically suggestive to informative. Although some of the results are promising, limited evidence and methodological considerations restrict the conclusions that can be drawn regarding the diagnostic accuracy of WAI technologies in infants and children. Additional investigations using stronger gold standard comparisons are needed to determine which tools can most accurately predict middle ear status in the pediatric population.

  16. Outdoor Synthetic Aperture Acoustic Ground Target Measurements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-19

    1341 (2003). [11] C. A. Dimarzio, T. Shi, F. J. Blonigen et al., “ Laser -Induced Acoustic Landmine Detection,” The Journal Of The Acoustical Society...High Frequency A/S Coupling For Ap Buried Landmine Detection Using Laser Doppler Vibrometers,” Proc. SPIE 5415(1), 35-41 (2004). [16] Bishop, S... Dolphin Echolocation Clicks For Target Discrimination,” The Journal Of The Acoustical Society Of America 124(1), 657-666 (2008). [20] Y. Nakamura

  17. Beyond auscultation: acoustic cardiography in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Wen, Yong-Na; Lee, Alex Pui-Wai; Fang, Fang; Jin, Chun-Na; Yu, Cheuk-Man

    2014-04-01

    Cardiac auscultation by stethoscope is widely used but limited by low sensitivity and accuracy. Phonocardiogram was developed in an attempt to provide quantitative and qualitative information of heart sounds and murmurs by transforming acoustic signal into visual wavelet. Although phonocardiogram provides objective heart sound information and holds diagnostic potentials of different heart problems, its examination procedure is time-consuming and it requires specially trained technicians to operate the device. Acoustic cardiography (AUDICOR, Inovise Medical, Inc., Portland, OR, USA) is a major recent advance in the evolution of cardiac auscultation technology. The technique is more efficient and less operator-dependent. It synchronizes cardiac auscultation with ECG recording and provides a comprehensive assessment of both mechanical and electronic function of the heart. The application of acoustic cardiography is far beyond auscultation only. It generates various parameters which have been proven to correlate with gold standards in heart failure diagnosis and ischemic heart disease detection. Its application can be extended to other diseases, including LV hypertrophy, constrictive pericarditis, sleep apnea and ventricular fibrillation. The newly developed ambulatory acoustic cardiography is potentially used in heart failure follow-up in both home and hospital setting. This review comprehensively summarizes acoustic cardiographic research, including the most recent development.

  18. Hybrid system for magnetic and acoustic measurement.

    PubMed

    Bruno, A C; Baffa, O; Carneiro, A O

    2009-01-01

    In order to improve the spatial resolution of Biosusceptometry of Alternate Current (BAC), we are suggesting the coupling of a Doppler ultrasonic transducer with the BAC system. The Doppler transducer obtains information from the vibration of ferromagnetic particles immersed in a visco-elastic medium when it is excited by an alternating magnetic field. In this case, the same magnetic particles used as contrast for susceptometric measurement also will work as contrast for the Doppler measurement. In this work, we present the characterization of the hybrid system for susceptometric and acoustic measurements simultaneously. It was observed that the susceptometric and Doppler ultrasound signal have the same profile and maximum amplitude for frequency of magnetizing field about 200 Hz. When using ferrite particles as magnetic contrast mixed with yogurt as based material, the susceptometric and Doppler measurement have sensitivity for concentration of particles as low as 1%. The sensitivity of the Doppler is dependent of the gradient of magnetic field over the sample. In this work, the magnetic field 5 cm far from the face of the transducer was 70 microT/volts.

  19. Cosmological implications of baryon acoustic oscillation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubourg, Éric; Bailey, Stephen; Bautista, Julian E.; Beutler, Florian; Bhardwaj, Vaishali; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Blanton, Michael; Blomqvist, Michael; Bolton, Adam S.; Bovy, Jo; Brewington, Howard; Brinkmann, J.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Burden, Angela; Busca, Nicolás G.; Carithers, William; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Comparat, Johan; Croft, Rupert A. C.; Cuesta, Antonio J.; Dawson, Kyle S.; Delubac, Timothée; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Ge, Jian; Le Goff, J.-M.; Gontcho, Satya Gontcho A.; Gott, J. Richard; Gunn, James E.; Guo, Hong; Guy, Julien; Hamilton, Jean-Christophe; Ho, Shirley; Honscheid, Klaus; Howlett, Cullan; Kirkby, David; Kitaura, Francisco S.; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Lee, Khee-Gan; Long, Dan; Lupton, Robert H.; Magaña, Mariana Vargas; Malanushenko, Viktor; Malanushenko, Elena; Manera, Marc; Maraston, Claudia; Margala, Daniel; McBride, Cameron K.; Miralda-Escudé, Jordi; Myers, Adam D.; Nichol, Robert C.; Noterdaeme, Pasquier; Nuza, Sebastián E.; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Oravetz, Daniel; Pâris, Isabelle; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Pan, Kaike; Pellejero-Ibanez, Marcos; Percival, Will J.; Petitjean, Patrick; Pieri, Matthew M.; Prada, Francisco; Reid, Beth; Rich, James; Roe, Natalie A.; Ross, Ashley J.; Ross, Nicholas P.; Rossi, Graziano; Rubiño-Martín, Jose Alberto; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Samushia, Lado; Génova-Santos, Ricardo Tanausú; Scóccola, Claudia G.; Schlegel, David J.; Schneider, Donald P.; Seo, Hee-Jong; Sheldon, Erin; Simmons, Audrey; Skibba, Ramin A.; Slosar, Anže; Strauss, Michael A.; Thomas, Daniel; Tinker, Jeremy L.; Tojeiro, Rita; Vazquez, Jose Alberto; Viel, Matteo; Wake, David A.; Weaver, Benjamin A.; Weinberg, David H.; Wood-Vasey, W. M.; Yèche, Christophe; Zehavi, Idit; Zhao, Gong-Bo; BOSS Collaboration

    2015-12-01

    We derive constraints on cosmological parameters and tests of dark energy models from the combination of baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) measurements with cosmic microwave background (CMB) data and a recent reanalysis of Type Ia supernova (SN) data. In particular, we take advantage of high-precision BAO measurements from galaxy clustering and the Lyman-α forest (LyaF) in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). Treating the BAO scale as an uncalibrated standard ruler, BAO data alone yield a high confidence detection of dark energy; in combination with the CMB angular acoustic scale they further imply a nearly flat universe. Adding the CMB-calibrated physical scale of the sound horizon, the combination of BAO and SN data into an "inverse distance ladder" yields a measurement of H0=67.3 ±1.1 km s-1 Mpc-1 , with 1.7% precision. This measurement assumes standard prerecombination physics but is insensitive to assumptions about dark energy or space curvature, so agreement with CMB-based estimates that assume a flat Λ CDM cosmology is an important corroboration of this minimal cosmological model. For constant dark energy (Λ ), our BAO +SN +CMB combination yields matter density Ωm=0.301 ±0.008 and curvature Ωk=-0.003 ±0.003 . When we allow more general forms of evolving dark energy, the BAO +SN +CMB parameter constraints are always consistent with flat Λ CDM values at ≈1 σ . While the overall χ2 of model fits is satisfactory, the LyaF BAO measurements are in moderate (2 - 2.5 σ ) tension with model predictions. Models with early dark energy that tracks the dominant energy component at high redshift remain consistent with our expansion history constraints, and they yield a higher H0 and lower matter clustering amplitude, improving agreement with some low redshift observations. Expansion history alone yields an upper limit on the summed mass of neutrino species, ∑mν<0.56 eV (95% confidence), improving to ∑mν<0.25 eV if we include the

  20. Method and means for measuring acoustic emissions

    DOEpatents

    Renken, Jr., Claus J.

    1976-01-06

    The detection of acoustic emissions emanating from an object is achieved with a capacitive transducer coupled to the object. The capacitive transducer is charged and then allowed to discharge with the rate of discharge being monitored. Oscillations in the rate of discharge about the normally exponential discharge curve for the capacitive transducer indicate the presence of acoustic emissions.

  1. Acoustic systems for the measurement of streamflow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laenen, Antonius; Smith, Winchell

    1983-01-01

    The acoustic velocity meter (AVM), also referred to as an ultrasonic flowmeter, has been an operational tool for the measurement of streamflow since 1965. Very little information is available concerning AVM operation, performance, and limitations. The purpose of this report is to consolidate information in such a manner as to provide a better understanding about the application of this instrumentation to streamflow measurement. AVM instrumentation is highly accurate and nonmechanical. Most commercial AVM systems that measure streamflow use the time-of-travel method to determine a velocity between two points. The systems operate on the principle that point-to-point upstream travel-time of sound is longer than the downstream travel-time, and this difference can be monitored and measured accurately by electronics. AVM equipment has no practical upper limit of measurable velocity if sonic transducers are securely placed and adequately protected. AVM systems used in streamflow measurement generally operate with a resolution of ?0.01 meter per second but this is dependent on system frequency, path length, and signal attenuation. In some applications the performance of AVM equipment may be degraded by multipath interference, signal bending, signal attenuation, and variable streamline orientation. Presently used minicomputer systems, although expensive to purchase and maintain, perform well. Increased use of AVM systems probably will be realized as smaller, less expensive, and more conveniently operable microprocessor-based systems become readily available. Available AVM equipment should be capable of flow measurement in a wide variety of situations heretofore untried. New signal-detection techniques and communication linkages can provide additional flexibility to the systems so that operation is possible in more river and estuary situations.

  2. Bone assessment via thermal photo-acoustic measurements.

    PubMed

    Feng, Ting; Kozloff, Kenneth M; Tian, Chao; Perosky, Joseph E; Hsiao, Yi-Sing; Du, Sidan; Yuan, Jie; Deng, Cheri X; Wang, Xueding

    2015-04-15

    The feasibility of an innovative biomedical diagnostic technique, thermal photo-acoustic (TPA) measurement, for non-ionizing and non-invasive assessment of bone health is investigated. Unlike conventional photo-acoustic PA methods that are mostly focused on the measurement of absolute signal intensity, TPA targets the change in PA signal intensity as a function of the sample temperature, i.e., the temperature-dependent Grueneisen parameter that is closely relevant to the chemical and molecular properties in the sample. Based on the differentiation measurement, the results from TPA technique are less susceptible to the variations associated with sample and system, and could be quantified with improved accurately. Due to the fact that the PA signal intensity from organic components such as blood changes faster than that from non-organic mineral under the same modulation of temperature, TPA measurement is able to objectively evaluate bone mineral density (BMD) and its loss as a result of osteoporosis. In an experiment on well-established rat models of bone loss and preservation, PA measurements of rat tibia bones were conducted over a temperature range from 37°C to 44°C. The slope of PA signal intensity verses temperature was quantified for each specimen. The comparison among three groups of specimens with different BMD shows that bones with lower BMD have higher slopes, demonstrating the potential of the proposed TPA technique in future clinical management of osteoporosis.

  3. Field Measurement of the Acoustic Nonlinearity Parameter in Turbine Blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinton, Yolanda L.; Na, Jeong K.; Yost, William T.; Kessel, Gregory L.

    2000-01-01

    Nonlinear acoustics techniques were used to measure fatigue in turbine blades in a power generation plant. The measurements were made in the field using a reference based measurement technique, and a reference sample previously measured in the laboratory. The acoustic nonlinearity parameter showed significant increase with fatigue in the blades, as indicated by service age and areas of increased stress. The technique shows promise for effectively measuring fatigue in field applications and predicting subsequent failures.

  4. Acoustic Measurement Of Periodic Motion Of Levitated Object

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, John L.; Barmatz, Martin B.

    1992-01-01

    Some internal vibrations, oscillations in position, and rotations of acoustically levitated object measured by use of microphone already installed in typical levitation chamber for tuning chamber to resonance and monitoring operation. Levitating acoustic signal modulated by object motion of lower frequency. Amplitude modulation detected and analyzed spectrally to determine amplitudes and frequencies of motions.

  5. Applications of acoustics in the measurement of coal slab thickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadden, W. J., Jr.; Mills, J. M.; Pierce, A. D.

    1980-01-01

    The determination of the possibility of employing acoustic waves at ultrasonic frequencies for measurements of thicknesses of slabs of coal backed by shale is investigated. Fundamental information concerning the acoustical properties of coal, and the relationship between these properties and the structural and compositional parameters used to characterize coal samples was also sought. The testing device, which utilizes two matched transducers, is described.

  6. Validation of Bragg grating measurements of acoustic plate waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Claire; Rajic, Nik; Rosalie, Cedric

    2008-04-01

    This paper reports on aspects of the design and validation of a Bragg grating sensor for acoustic plate wave detection. Advanced numerical modelling and an alternative experimental approach using Laser Vibrometry is used to validate the response of the Bragg measurements across a range of acoustic frequencies in a metal plate.

  7. Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test Instrumentation for Acoustic and Pressure Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargas, Magda B.; Counter, Douglas

    2011-01-01

    Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) is a 5% scale model test of the Ares I vehicle, launch pad and support structures conducted at MSFC to verify acoustic and ignition environments and evaluate water suppression systems Test design considerations 5% measurements must be scaled to full scale requiring high frequency measurements Users had different frequencies of interest Acoustics: 200 - 2,000 Hz full scale equals 4,000 - 40,000 Hz model scale Ignition Transient: 0 - 100 Hz full scale equals 0 - 2,000 Hz model scale Environment exposure Weather exposure: heat, humidity, thunderstorms, rain, cold and snow Test environments: Plume impingement heat and pressure, and water deluge impingement Several types of sensors were used to measure the environments Different instrument mounts were used according to the location and exposure to the environment This presentation addresses the observed effects of the selected sensors and mount design on the acoustic and pressure measurements

  8. Multi-dimensional analysis of subjective acoustical ratings and acoustical measures in existing concert halls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okano, Toshiyuki

    2004-05-01

    Correlations between subjective acoustical ratings and hall-averaged values of acoustical measures are studied among existing worldwide major concert halls. It was shown that the classified acoustical ratings by Beranek [Concert and Opera Halls, How They Sound (ASA, 1996)] are discriminated correctly by combining binaural quality index (BQI) with some other acoustical measures. BQI is determined by the arithmetic average of inter-aural cross correlation coefficient in three octave bands of 500, 1000, and 2000 Hz, subtracted from unity, calculated from the early 80-ms part of binaural impulse response. Considering that the upper limit value of BQI not to cause disturbing image shift is approximately 0.85 at individual seat [Okano, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 2219-2230 (2000)], the values of 0.6 or higher in hall averaged value of BQI, 0.85 or smaller in individual seat value of BQI, and approximately 5 dB or higher in strength factor at middle frequencies are proposed as design objectives to attain a high acoustical quality. It should be provided that other acoustical measures are also optimized. These target values will be very effective in studying room shape of halls, using scale models or computer models.

  9. Cosmological implications of baryon acoustic oscillation measurements

    DOE PAGES

    Aubourg, Eric

    2015-12-01

    Here, we derive constraints on cosmological parameters and tests of dark energy models from the combination of baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) measurements with cosmic microwave background (CMB) data and a recent reanalysis of Type Ia supernova (SN) data. Particularly, we take advantage of high-precision BAO measurements from galaxy clustering and the Lyman-α forest (LyaF) in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). Treating the BAO scale as an uncalibrated standard ruler, BAO data alone yield a high confidence detection of dark energy; in combination with the CMB angular acoustic scale they further imply a nearly flat universe. Adding the CMB-calibratedmore » physical scale of the sound horizon, the combination of BAO and SN data into an “inverse distance ladder” yields a measurement of H0=67.3±1.1 km s-1 Mpc-1, with 1.7% precision. This measurement assumes standard prerecombination physics but is insensitive to assumptions about dark energy or space curvature, so agreement with CMB-based estimates that assume a flat ΛCDM cosmology is an important corroboration of this minimal cosmological model. For constant dark energy (Λ), our BAO+SN+CMB combination yields matter density Ωm=0.301±0.008 and curvature Ωk=-0.003±0.003. When we allow more general forms of evolving dark energy, the BAO+SN+CMB parameter constraints are always consistent with flat ΛCDM values at ≈1σ. And while the overall χ2 of model fits is satisfactory, the LyaF BAO measurements are in moderate (2–2.5σ) tension with model predictions. Models with early dark energy that tracks the dominant energy component at high redshift remain consistent with our expansion history constraints, and they yield a higher H0 and lower matter clustering amplitude, improving agreement with some low redshift observations. Expansion history alone yields an upper limit on the summed mass of neutrino species, Σmν<0.56 eV (95% confidence), improving to Σmν<0.25 eV if we include

  10. Cosmological implications of baryon acoustic oscillation measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Aubourg, Eric

    2015-12-01

    Here, we derive constraints on cosmological parameters and tests of dark energy models from the combination of baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) measurements with cosmic microwave background (CMB) data and a recent reanalysis of Type Ia supernova (SN) data. Particularly, we take advantage of high-precision BAO measurements from galaxy clustering and the Lyman-α forest (LyaF) in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). Treating the BAO scale as an uncalibrated standard ruler, BAO data alone yield a high confidence detection of dark energy; in combination with the CMB angular acoustic scale they further imply a nearly flat universe. Adding the CMB-calibrated physical scale of the sound horizon, the combination of BAO and SN data into an “inverse distance ladder” yields a measurement of H0=67.3±1.1 km s-1 Mpc-1, with 1.7% precision. This measurement assumes standard prerecombination physics but is insensitive to assumptions about dark energy or space curvature, so agreement with CMB-based estimates that assume a flat ΛCDM cosmology is an important corroboration of this minimal cosmological model. For constant dark energy (Λ), our BAO+SN+CMB combination yields matter density Ωm=0.301±0.008 and curvature Ωk=-0.003±0.003. When we allow more general forms of evolving dark energy, the BAO+SN+CMB parameter constraints are always consistent with flat ΛCDM values at ≈1σ. And while the overall χ2 of model fits is satisfactory, the LyaF BAO measurements are in moderate (2–2.5σ) tension with model predictions. Models with early dark energy that tracks the dominant energy component at high redshift remain consistent with our expansion history constraints, and they yield a higher H0 and lower matter clustering amplitude, improving agreement with some low redshift observations. Expansion history alone yields an upper limit on the summed mass of neutrino species,

  11. Cosmological implications of baryon acoustic oscillation measurements

    DOE PAGES

    Aubourg, Eric

    2015-12-01

    Here, we derive constraints on cosmological parameters and tests of dark energy models from the combination of baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) measurements with cosmic microwave background (CMB) data and a recent reanalysis of Type Ia supernova (SN) data. Particularly, we take advantage of high-precision BAO measurements from galaxy clustering and the Lyman-α forest (LyaF) in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). Treating the BAO scale as an uncalibrated standard ruler, BAO data alone yield a high confidence detection of dark energy; in combination with the CMB angular acoustic scale they further imply a nearly flat universe. Adding the CMB-calibratedmore » physical scale of the sound horizon, the combination of BAO and SN data into an “inverse distance ladder” yields a measurement of H0=67.3±1.1 km s-1 Mpc-1, with 1.7% precision. This measurement assumes standard prerecombination physics but is insensitive to assumptions about dark energy or space curvature, so agreement with CMB-based estimates that assume a flat ΛCDM cosmology is an important corroboration of this minimal cosmological model. For constant dark energy (Λ), our BAO+SN+CMB combination yields matter density Ωm=0.301±0.008 and curvature Ωk=-0.003±0.003. When we allow more general forms of evolving dark energy, the BAO+SN+CMB parameter constraints are always consistent with flat ΛCDM values at ≈1σ. And while the overall χ2 of model fits is satisfactory, the LyaF BAO measurements are in moderate (2–2.5σ) tension with model predictions. Models with early dark energy that tracks the dominant energy component at high redshift remain consistent with our expansion history constraints, and they yield a higher H0 and lower matter clustering amplitude, improving agreement with some low redshift observations. Expansion history alone yields an upper limit on the summed mass of neutrino species, Σmν<0.56 eV (95% confidence), improving to Σmν<0.25 eV if we include

  12. Cosmological implications of baryon acoustic oscillation measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Aubourg, Eric

    2015-12-01

    Here, we derive constraints on cosmological parameters and tests of dark energy models from the combination of baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) measurements with cosmic microwave background (CMB) data and a recent reanalysis of Type Ia supernova (SN) data. Particularly, we take advantage of high-precision BAO measurements from galaxy clustering and the Lyman-α forest (LyaF) in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). Treating the BAO scale as an uncalibrated standard ruler, BAO data alone yield a high confidence detection of dark energy; in combination with the CMB angular acoustic scale they further imply a nearly flat universe. Adding the CMB-calibrated physical scale of the sound horizon, the combination of BAO and SN data into an “inverse distance ladder” yields a measurement of H0=67.3±1.1 km s-1 Mpc-1, with 1.7% precision. This measurement assumes standard prerecombination physics but is insensitive to assumptions about dark energy or space curvature, so agreement with CMB-based estimates that assume a flat ΛCDM cosmology is an important corroboration of this minimal cosmological model. For constant dark energy (Λ), our BAO+SN+CMB combination yields matter density Ωm=0.301±0.008 and curvature Ωk=-0.003±0.003. When we allow more general forms of evolving dark energy, the BAO+SN+CMB parameter constraints are always consistent with flat ΛCDM values at ≈1σ. And while the overall χ2 of model fits is satisfactory, the LyaF BAO measurements are in moderate (2–2.5σ) tension with model predictions. Models with early dark energy that tracks the dominant energy component at high redshift remain consistent with our expansion history constraints, and they yield a higher H0 and lower matter clustering amplitude, improving agreement with some low redshift observations. Expansion history alone yields an upper limit on the summed mass of neutrino species,

  13. Acoustic velocity measurements in materials using a regenerative method

    DOEpatents

    Laine, Edwin F.

    1986-01-01

    Acoustic energy is propagated through earth material between an electro-acoustic generator and a receiver which converts the received acoustic energy into electrical signals. A closed loop is formed by a variable gain amplifier system connected between the receiver and the generator. The gain of the amplifier system is increased until sustained oscillations are produced in the closed loop. The frequency of the oscillations is measured as an indication of the acoustic propagation velocity through the earth material. The amplifier gain is measured as an indication of the acoustic attenuation through the earth materials. The method is also applicable to the non-destructive testing of structural materials, such as steel, aluminum and concrete.

  14. Acoustic-velocity measurements in materials using a regenerative method

    DOEpatents

    Laine, E.F.

    1982-09-30

    Acoustic energy is propatated through earth material between an electro-acoustic generator and a receiver which converts the received acoustic energy into electrical signals. A closed loop is formed by a variable gain amplifier system connected between the receiver and the generator. The gain of the amplifier system is increased until sustained oscillations are produced in the closed loop. The frequency of the oscillations is measured as an indication of the acoustic propagation velocity through the earth material. The amplifier gain is measured as an indication of the acoustic attenuation through the earth materials. The method is also applicable to the non-destructive testing of structural materials, such as steel, aluminum and concrete.

  15. Scale Model Thruster Acoustic Measurement Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargas, Magda; Kenny, R. Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    The Space Launch System (SLS) Scale Model Acoustic Test (SMAT) is a 5% scale representation of the SLS vehicle, mobile launcher, tower, and launch pad trench. The SLS launch propulsion system will be comprised of the Rocket Assisted Take-Off (RATO) motors representing the solid boosters and 4 Gas Hydrogen (GH2) thrusters representing the core engines. The GH2 thrusters were tested in a horizontal configuration in order to characterize their performance. In Phase 1, a single thruster was fired to determine the engine performance parameters necessary for scaling a single engine. A cluster configuration, consisting of the 4 thrusters, was tested in Phase 2 to integrate the system and determine their combined performance. Acoustic and overpressure data was collected during both test phases in order to characterize the system's acoustic performance. The results from the single thruster and 4- thuster system are discussed and compared.

  16. Motion measurement of acoustically levitated object

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, John L. (Inventor); Barmatz, Martin B. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A system is described for determining motion of an object that is acoustically positioned in a standing wave field in a chamber. Sonic energy in the chamber is sensed, and variation in the amplitude of the sonic energy is detected, which is caused by linear motion, rotational motion, or drop shape oscillation of the object. Apparatus for detecting object motion can include a microphone coupled to the chamber and a low pass filter connected to the output of the microphone, which passes only frequencies below the frequency of sound produced by a transducer that maintains the acoustic standing wave field. Knowledge about object motion can be useful by itself, can be useful to determine surface tension, viscosity, and other information about the object, and can be useful to determine the pressure and other characteristics of the acoustic field.

  17. Articulatory-acoustic vowel space: Associations between acoustic and perceptual measures of clear speech.

    PubMed

    Whitfield, Jason A; Goberman, Alexander M

    2017-04-01

    The current investigation examined the relationship between perceptual ratings of speech clarity and acoustic measures of speech production. Included among the acoustic measures was the Articulatory-Acoustic Vowel Space (AAVS), which provides a measure of working formant space derived from continuously sampled formant trajectories in connected speech. Acoustic measures of articulation and listener ratings of speech clarity were obtained from habitual and clear speech samples produced by 10 neurologically healthy adults. Perceptual ratings of speech clarity were obtained from visual-analogue scale ratings and acoustic measures included the AAVS measure, articulation rate and percentage pause. Clear speech was characterised by a higher perceptual clarity rating, slower articulation rate, greater percentage pause and larger AAVS compared to habitual speech. Additionally, correlation analysis revealed a significant relationship between the perceptual clear speech effect and the relative clarity-related change in the AAVS and articulation rate measures. The current findings suggest that, along with speech rate measures, the recently introduced AAVS is sensitive to changes in speech clarity.

  18. Comparison of acoustic and mechanical excitation for modal response measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musson, B. G.; Stevens, J. R.

    An acoustic field is examined as an alternate to mechanical excitation of a test specimen to measure modal response. A square, flat plate with clamped edges is used because classical analytical solutions to its modal analysis are readily available. A small hammer with a built-in force transducer is used to mechanically excite the plate, and the plate is excited with electro-pneumatic acoustic drivers coupled to a progressive-wave test fixture. Band limited random amplitude acoustic waves over a frequency range of 50 to 1000 Hz are applied at grazing incidence to the plate. The acoustic field is characterized and a microphone at a single fixed position is used to provide the reference forcing function. Results are compared with the analytical solutions and with the mechanically excited results. Conclusions are presented concerning the equivalence of acoustic and mechanical excitation for obtaining modal response.

  19. Acoustic wayfinding: A method to measure the acoustic contrast of different paving materials for blind people.

    PubMed

    Secchi, Simone; Lauria, Antonio; Cellai, Gianfranco

    2017-01-01

    Acoustic wayfinding involves using a variety of auditory cues to create a mental map of the surrounding environment. For blind people, these auditory cues become the primary substitute for visual information in order to understand the features of the spatial context and orient themselves. This can include creating sound waves, such as tapping a cane. This paper reports the results of a research about the "acoustic contrast" parameter between paving materials functioning as a cue and the surrounding or adjacent surface functioning as a background. A number of different materials was selected in order to create a test path and a procedure was defined for the verification of the ability of blind people to distinguish different acoustic contrasts. A method is proposed for measuring acoustic contrast generated by the impact of a cane tip on the ground to provide blind people with environmental information on spatial orientation and wayfinding in urban places.

  20. Measurement of the Q value of an acoustic resonator.

    PubMed

    Biwa, Tetsushi; Ueda, Yuki; Nomura, Hiroshi; Mizutani, Uichiro; Yazaki, Taichi

    2005-08-01

    A cylindrical acoustic resonator was externally driven at the first resonance frequency by a compression driver. The acoustic energy stored in the resonator and the power dissipated per unit time were evaluated through the simultaneous measurements of acoustic pressure and velocity, in order to determine the Q value of the resonator. The resulting Q value, being employed as a measure of the damping in a resonator, was obtained as 36. However, the Q value determined from a frequency response curve known as a conventional technique turned out to be 25, which is 30% less than that obtained in the present method. By further applying these two methods in the case of a resonator having an acoustic load inside, we present an accurate measurement of the Q value of the resonator by making full use of its definition.

  1. Characterization of a Multi-element Clinical HIFU System Using Acoustic Holography and Nonlinear Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Kreider, Wayne; Yuldashev, Petr V.; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.; Farr, Navid; Partanen, Ari; Bailey, Michael R.; Khokhlova, Vera A.

    2014-01-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is a treatment modality that relies on the delivery of acoustic energy to remote tissue sites to induce thermal and/or mechanical tissue ablation. To ensure the safety and efficacy of this medical technology, standard approaches are needed for accurately characterizing the acoustic pressures generated by clinical ultrasound sources under operating conditions. Characterization of HIFU fields is complicated by nonlinear wave propagation and the complexity of phased-array transducers. Previous work has described aspects of an approach that combines measurements and modeling, and here we demonstrate this approach for a clinical phased array transducer. First, low-amplitude hydrophone measurements were performed in water over a scan plane between the array and the focus. Second, these measurements were used to holographically reconstruct the surface vibrations of the transducer and to set a boundary condition for a 3-D acoustic propagation model. Finally, nonlinear simulations of the acoustic field were carried out over a range of source power levels. Simulation results were compared to pressure waveforms measured directly by hydrophone at both low and high power levels, demonstrating that details of the acoustic field including shock formation are quantitatively predicted. PMID:25004539

  2. Characterization of a multi-element clinical HIFU system using acoustic holography and nonlinear modeling.

    PubMed

    Kreider, Wayne; Yuldashev, Petr V; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A; Farr, Navid; Partanen, Ari; Bailey, Michael R; Khokhlova, Vera A

    2013-08-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is a treatment modality that relies on the delivery of acoustic energy to remote tissue sites to induce thermal and/or mechanical tissue ablation. To ensure the safety and efficacy of this medical technology, standard approaches are needed for accurately characterizing the acoustic pressures generated by clinical ultrasound sources under operating conditions. Characterization of HIFU fields is complicated by nonlinear wave propagation and the complexity of phased-array transducers. Previous work has described aspects of an approach that combines measurements and modeling, and here we demonstrate this approach for a clinical phased-array transducer. First, low amplitude hydrophone measurements were performed in water over a scan plane between the array and the focus. Second, these measurements were used to holographically reconstruct the surface vibrations of the transducer and to set a boundary condition for a 3-D acoustic propagation model. Finally, nonlinear simulations of the acoustic field were carried out over a range of source power levels. Simulation results were compared with pressure waveforms measured directly by hydrophone at both low and high power levels, demonstrating that details of the acoustic field, including shock formation, are quantitatively predicted.

  3. Material Property Measurement in Hostile Environments using Laser Acoustics

    SciTech Connect

    Ken L. Telschow

    2004-08-01

    Acoustic methods are well known and have been used to measure various intrinsic material properties, such as, elastic coefficients, density, crystal axis orientation, microstructural texture, and residual stress. Extrinsic properties, such as, dimensions, motion variables or temperature are also readily determined from acoustic methods. Laser acoustics, employing optical generation and detection of elastic waves, has a unique advantage over other acoustic methods—it is noncontacting, uses the sample surface itself for transduction, requires no couplant or invasive sample surface preparation and can be utilized in any hostile environment allowing optical access to the sample surface. In addition, optical generation and detection probe beams can be focused to the micron scale and/or shaped to alter the transduction process with a degree of control not possible using contact transduction methods. Laser methods are amenable to both continuous wave and pulse-echo measurements and have been used from Hz to 100’s of GHz (time scales from sec to psec) and with amplitudes sufficient to fracture materials. This paper shall review recent applications of laser acoustic methods to determining material properties in hostile environments that preclude the use of contacting transduction techniques. Example environments include high temperature (>1000C) sintering and molten metal processing, thin film deposition by plasma techniques, materials moving at high velocity during the fabrication process and nuclear high radiation regions. Recent technological advances in solid-state lasers and telecommunications have greatly aided the development and implementation of laser acoustic methods, particularly at ultra high frequencies. Consequently, laser acoustic material property measurements exhibit high precision and reproducibility today. In addition, optical techniques provide methods of imaging acoustic motion that is both quantitative and rapid. Possible future directions for

  4. Detection of acoustic emission from cavitation in tissue during clinical extracorporeal lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Coleman, A J; Choi, M J; Saunders, J E

    1996-01-01

    A 1-MHz focused hydrophone has been used to search for acoustic emission expected to arise from cavitation occurring in tissue during clinical extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy (ESWL). The hydrophone is acoustically coupled to the patient's skin and the focus directed at depth in tissue under ultrasound guidance. The measured amplitude-time variation of the acoustic emission from tissue near the shock-wave focus of the Storz Modulith SL20 lithotripter has been examined in four patients. There is evidence of increased amplitude acoustic emission at 1 MHz from regions within tissue that also appear hyperechoic in simultaneously acquired ultrasound images. The acoustic emission from these regions decays from an initial peak to the noise level in about 500 microseconds following each shock-wave pulse. Within this period, a second peak, often of higher amplitude than the first, is typically observed about 100 microseconds after the shockwave. The time between the initial and second peaks is found to increase with increasing shock-wave amplitude. The results are similar to those previously observed from cavitation induced by shock-wave exposure in water and indicate that the 1-MHz acoustic emission arises from inertial cavitation in tissue during clinical ESWL.

  5. Acoustic temperature measurement in a rocket noise field.

    PubMed

    Giraud, Jarom H; Gee, Kent L; Ellsworth, John E

    2010-05-01

    A 1 μm diameter platinum wire resistance thermometer has been used to measure temperature fluctuations generated during a static GEM-60 rocket motor test. Exact and small-signal relationships between acoustic pressure and acoustic temperature are derived in order to compare the temperature probe output with that of a 3.18 mm diameter condenser microphone. After preliminary plane wave tests yielded good agreement between the transducers within the temperature probe's ∼2 kHz bandwidth, comparison between the temperature probe and microphone data during the motor firing show that the ±∼3 K acoustic temperature fluctuations are a significant contributor to the total temperature variations.

  6. Acoustical enhancement systems: Design criteria and evaluation of room acoustical parameters based on in situ measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Munster, Bjorn; Prinssen, Wim

    2003-10-01

    Acoustic enhancement systems have evolved significantly during the years. Where the early systems only aimed to increase the reverberation time in a hall, nowadays the increase of the reverberation time is only one of the features of such a system. Contrary and additionally to passive acoustics, an acoustic enhancement system enables a designer or acoustical consultant to change the acoustical characteristics of a hall in a more flexible way. Due to the sophisticated convolution processes and layout of such a system besides the reverberation time also, e.g., speech intelligibility and spaciousness can be improved or special effects can be added to shows. In this paper the applications of an enhancement system in general will be outlined in more detail. Furthermore, design criteria will be given which can be formulated for the installation of such a system. These criteria can be used to evaluate proposed designs, but also to estimate the required provisions to be included in the planning of a system installation. Besides, the paper describes the results of in situ measurements of one such system (SIAP) whereby the increase of the reverberation time is evaluated with respect to certain important room acoustical parameters, i.e., reverberant level, lateral efficiency and clarity.

  7. Energy flow measurements in acoustic waves in a duct.

    PubMed

    Biwa, Tetsushi

    2006-12-22

    Where, how much and how efficiently the energy conversion takes place in a regenerator of a thermoacoustic engine are expressed using the axial distribution of acoustic work flow and heat flow. As a first step in determining the energy flows inside the regenerator, measuring methods of the work flow are briefly described and the experimental results in an acoustic resonator are shown. Applicability of these methods to the regenerator is discussed.

  8. Acoustic levitator for containerless measurements on low temperature liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Benmore, Chris J; Weber, Richard; Neuefeind, Joerg C; Rey, Charles A A

    2009-01-01

    A single-axis acoustic levitator was constructed and used to levitate liquid and solid drops at temperatures from -40 to +40 C. The levitator consisted of: (i) two acoustic transducers mounted on a rigid vertical support that was bolted to an optical breadboard, (ii) a acoustic power supply that controlled acoustic intensity, relative phase of the drive to the transducers, and could modulate the acoustic forces at frequencies up to 1kHz, (iii) a video camera, and (iv) a system for providing a stream of controlled temperature gas flow over the sample. The acoustic transducers were operated at their resonant frequency of ~ 22 kHz and could produce sound pressure levels up to 160 dB. The force applied by the acoustic field could be modulated using a frequency generator to excite oscillations in the sample. Sample temperature was controlled using a modified Cryostream Plus and measured using thermocouples and an infrared thermal imager. The levitator was installed at x-ray beamline 11 ID-C at the Advanced Photon Source and used to investigate the structure of supercooled liquids.

  9. Effect of contralateral stimulation on acoustic reflectance measurements.

    PubMed

    Pichelli, Tathiany Silva; Soares, Jordana Costa; Cibin, Bruna Carla; Carvallo, Renata Mota Mamede

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic reflectance is an important tool in the assessment of middle ear afflictions, and the method is considered advantageous in relation to tympanometry. There has been a growing interest in the study of contralateral acoustic stimulation and its effect on the activation of the efferent auditory pathway. Studies have shown that the introduction of simultaneous stimulation in the contralateral ear generates alterations in auditory response patterns. To investigate the influence of contralateral stimulation on acoustic reflectance measurements. Case study of 30 subjects with normal hearing, of both genders, aged 18-30 years. The test and retest acoustic reflectance was conducted in the frequency range 200-6000Hz. The procedure was repeated with the simultaneous presence of contralateral white noise at 30dBNS. The analysis of the conditions of test, retest, and test with contralateral noise showed statistical difference at the frequency of 2kHz (p=0.011 and p=0.002 in test and retest, respectively) in the right ear. The activation of the auditory efferent pathways through contralateral acoustic stimulation produces alterations in response patterns of acoustic reflectance, increasing sound reflection and modifying middle ear acoustical energy transfer. Copyright © 2015 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  10. Primary Progressive Apraxia of Speech: Clinical Features and Acoustic and Neurologic Correlates

    PubMed Central

    Strand, Edythe A.; Clark, Heather; Machulda, Mary; Whitwell, Jennifer L.; Josephs, Keith A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study summarizes 2 illustrative cases of a neurodegenerative speech disorder, primary progressive apraxia of speech (AOS), as a vehicle for providing an overview of the disorder and an approach to describing and quantifying its perceptual features and some of its temporal acoustic attributes. Method Two individuals with primary progressive AOS underwent speech-language and neurologic evaluations on 2 occasions, ranging from 2.0 to 7.5 years postonset. Performance on several tests, tasks, and rating scales, as well as several acoustic measures, were compared over time within and between cases. Acoustic measures were compared with performance of control speakers. Results Both patients initially presented with AOS as the only or predominant sign of disease and without aphasia or dysarthria. The presenting features and temporal progression were captured in an AOS Rating Scale, an Articulation Error Score, and temporal acoustic measures of utterance duration, syllable rates per second, rates of speechlike alternating motion and sequential motion, and a pairwise variability index measure. Conclusions AOS can be the predominant manifestation of neurodegenerative disease. Clinical ratings of its attributes and acoustic measures of some of its temporal characteristics can support its diagnosis and help quantify its salient characteristics and progression over time. PMID:25654422

  11. Classroom acoustics in Omaha, Nebraska: Measurements and outreach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowden, Erica E.; Wang, Lily M.; Bradley, David T.

    2002-11-01

    This project collected data detailing the current status of classroom acoustics while simultaneously increasing awareness of educational acoustics and exposure to acoustical engineering research in local schools. In 8 Omaha-area schools, 2 acoustical aspects which directly influence speech intelligibility were measured and studied: (1) background noise levels resulting from a building's mechanical systems; and (2) reverberation times within the classroom. Prior to each measurement session, a presentation on good classroom acoustic principles was presented to the teacher and students in that classroom. Subsequently, the teacher and students assisted the principal investigator and research assistants in the measurement of the acoustic data from their classroom. In total, 13 classrooms were studied, with the assistance of 425 middle and high school students in 14 different classes. The background noise results have been associated with commonly used noise criterion curves. Results are compared to recommended background noise levels and reverberation times suggested by ANSI standard S12.60-2002. The resulting database provides knowledge on the current status of classrooms in Omaha, and may be indicative of classroom situations across the midwestern United States.

  12. Effect of Contralateral Noise on Acoustic Reflex Latency Measures.

    PubMed

    Prabhu, Prashanth; Divyashree, Koratagere Narayanaswamy; Neeraja, Raju; Akhilandeshwari, Sivaswami

    2015-12-01

    The present study was conducted to determine the effect of contralateral broadband noise on acoustic reflex latency (ARL). Acoustic reflex latency changes for 10 and 90% on- and off-time acoustic reflexes with contralateral broadband noise were measured in 30 adults with normal hearing. The results of the study demonstrate that there was a latency prolongation for reflex on-time (10 and 90%) and latency reduction for reflex off-time (10 and 90%). This effect was seen for 500, 1000, and 2000 Hz reflex-eliciting signals. The results also showed that there was no effect of gender on latency changes in acoustic reflexes. Latency changes may explain efferent auditory system mechanisms used for the protection of the cochlea and improvement in speech perception. Thus, contralateral changes of ARL can serve as an additional tool to assess the efferent system functioning.

  13. Relation between near field and far field acoustic measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bies, D. A.; Scharton, T. D.

    1974-01-01

    Several approaches to the problem of determining the far field directivity of an acoustic source located in a reverberant environment, such as a wind tunnel, are investigated analytically and experimentally. The decrease of sound pressure level with distance is illustrated; and the spatial extent of the hydrodynamic and geometric near fields, the far field, and the reverberant field are described. A previously-prosposed analytical technique for predicting the far field directivity of the acoustic source on the basis of near field data is investigated. Experiments are conducted with small acoustic sources and an analysis is performed to determine the variation with distance from the source of the directionality of the sound field. A novel experiment is conducted in which the sound pressure measured at various distances from an acoustic driver located in the NASA Ames 40 x 80 ft wind tunnel is crosscorrelated with the driver excitation voltage.

  14. Theoretical study of different attenuation measurement by acoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamdi, F.; Bouhedja, S.; Amrani, H.

    2013-10-01

    Many works are devoted to study the attenuation of surface waves in media, particularly, leaky surface acoustic waves (LSAW). In this work, a big part of the study is based on the intensity of the output signal, i.e., acoustic signature, V(z). The latter is obtained by the use of quantitative mode of acoustic microscopy in order to measure the velocity and the attenuation of those excited waves at the limit between the specimen and the coupling liquid. Our aim is to compare the attenuation values of the LSAW propagation in porous silicon obtained with three different methods. The first is obtained by resolving Viktorov equation. The second method is the spectral analysis acoustical signature V(z) curves. The third method uses the dark field. The obtained results are in a good agreement with those experiments.

  15. Field-Deployable Acoustic Digital Systems for Noise Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shams, Qamar A.; Wright, Kenneth D.; Lunsford, Charles B.; Smith, Charlie D.

    2000-01-01

    Langley Research Center (LaRC) has for years been a leader in field acoustic array measurement technique. Two field-deployable digital measurement systems have been developed to support acoustic research programs at LaRC. For several years, LaRC has used the Digital Acoustic Measurement System (DAMS) for measuring the acoustic noise levels from rotorcraft and tiltrotor aircraft. Recently, a second system called Remote Acquisition and Storage System (RASS) was developed and deployed for the first time in the field along with DAMS system for the Community Noise Flight Test using the NASA LaRC-757 aircraft during April, 2000. The test was performed at Airborne Airport in Wilmington, OH to validate predicted noise reduction benefits from alternative operational procedures. The test matrix was composed of various combinations of altitude, cutback power, and aircraft weight. The DAMS digitizes the acoustic inputs at the microphone site and can be located up to 2000 feet from the van which houses the acquisition, storage and analysis equipment. Digitized data from up to 10 microphones is recorded on a Jaz disk and is analyzed post-test by microcomputer system. The RASS digitizes and stores acoustic inputs at the microphone site that can be located up to three miles from the base station and can compose a 3 mile by 3 mile array of microphones. 16-bit digitized data from the microphones is stored on removable Jaz disk and is transferred through a high speed array to a very large high speed permanent storage device. Up to 30 microphones can be utilized in the array. System control and monitoring is accomplished via Radio Frequency (RF) link. This paper will present a detailed description of both systems, along with acoustic data analysis from both systems.

  16. On acoustic intensity measurements in the presence of mean flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munro, D. H.; Ingard, K. U.

    1979-01-01

    A theoretical analysis demonstrates that the technique of measuring acoustic intensity by means of cross correlation between nearby microphones cannot, in general, be extended to situations in which there is mean flow. However, it may be possible to use this technique to measure intensities in ducts with mean flow at frequencies below their cutoff frequencies.

  17. Normative Study of Wideband Acoustic Immittance Measures in Newborn Infants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aithal, Sreedevi; Kei, Joseph; Aithal, Venkatesh; Manuel, Alehandrea; Myers, Joshua; Driscoll, Carlie; Khan, Asaduzzaman

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to describe normative aspects of wideband acoustic immittance (WAI) measures obtained from healthy White neonates. Method: In this cross-sectional study, wideband absorbance (WBA), admittance magnitude, and admittance phase were measured under ambient pressure condition in 326 ears from 203 neonates (M age…

  18. Approach to Eliminate Couplant-Effect in Acoustic Nonlinearity Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, L.; Kulkarni, S. S.; Achenbach, J. D.; Krishnaswamy, S.

    2006-03-06

    An approach to eliminate couplant-effect in acoustic nonlinearity measurements for fatigued components is proposed in this paper. Measurements are performed on a fatigued steel 4340 specimen using both the conventional and proposed techniques. It is observed that the coefficients of variation of the nonlinearity parameter obtained using the proposed technique is approximately half of that obtained using the conventional technique.

  19. Measurement of the acoustic reflex without a pressure seal.

    PubMed

    Surr, R K; Schuchman, G I

    1976-03-01

    Obtaining a hermetic seal in the external auditory canal is often a major obstacle in impedance audiometry. In the present study, the acoustic reflex threshold was determined for three groups of subjects, first with and then without a pressure-tight seal. It was found that for subjects with normal hearing or sensorineural hearing loss and normal tympanograms, 96% of the measurements obtained without a pressure seal were within 5 dB of those obtained with a seal. Among the subjects who exhibited negative middle ear pressure, the acoustic reflex could be measured consistently at the point of maximum compliance, while no response was observed without a pressure seal.

  20. ARL Acoustic Measurement in Buildings 518 and 520 at APG

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-04-01

    ARL Acoustic Measurements in Buildings 518 and 520 at APG by Angélique A. Scharine , Phuong Tran, and Mary Binseel ARL-MR-0580 April...Proving Ground, MD 21005-5425 ARL-MR-0580 April 2004 ARL Acoustic Measurements in Buildings 518 and 520 at APG Angélique A. Scharine ...5e. TASK NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Angélique A. Scharine , Phuong Tran, and Mary Binseel (all of ARL) 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING

  1. An optoacoustic point source for acoustic scale model measurements.

    PubMed

    Bolaños, Javier Gómez; Pulkki, Ville; Karppinen, Pasi; Hæggström, Edward

    2013-04-01

    A massless acoustic source is proposed for scale model work. This source is generated by focusing a pulsed laser beam to rapidly heat the air at the focal point. This produces an expanding small plasma ball which generates a sonic impulse that may be used as an acoustic point source. Repeatability, frequency response, and directivity of the source were measured to show that it can serve as a massless point source. The impulse response of a rectangular space was determined using this type of source. A good match was found between the predicted and the measured impulse responses of the space.

  2. Acoustical measurement of the Salt Lake Mormon Tabernacle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rollins, Sarah; Leishman, Timothy W.

    2004-05-01

    An acoustical survey of the Salt Lake Mormon Tabernacle has been performed to assess the behavior of the hall in its current state. The tabernacle is a well-known historical building with a large elongated dome ceiling. This paper discusses the measurements used to characterize the hall. Several parameters derived from omnidirectional, directional, and binaural impulse response measurements are presented. Color maps of the parameters over audience seating areas reveal their spatial variations. These maps and the statistical properties of the parameters aid in clarifying the acoustical characteristics and anomalies of the hall.

  3. Acoustic measurement study 40 by 80 foot subsonic wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    An acoustical study conducted during the period from September 1, 1973 to April 30, 1974 measured sound pressure levels and vibration amplitudes inside and outside of the subsonic tunnel and on the tunnel structure. A discussion of the technical aspects of the study, the field measurement and data reduction procedures, and results are presentd, and conclusions resulting from the study which bear upon near field and far field tunnel noise, upon the tunnel as an acoustical enclosure, and upon the sources of noise within the tunnel drive system are given.

  4. End tidal carbon dioxide measurement using an electro acoustic sensor.

    PubMed

    Folke, M; Hok, B; Ekstrom, M; Backlund, Y

    2004-01-01

    End tidal carbon dioxide measurement with an electro-acoustic sensor is demonstrated. The sensor consists of an acoustic resonator coupled to a low cost electro-acoustic element. By simultaneous measurements with a reference sensor, the new device was tested on subjects performing exercise, hypo- and hyperventilation whereby the CO2concentration ranged from 2.1 to 7.0 kPa. The output from the experimental device correlated well with the reference CO2readings with a correlation coefficient of 0.976. Response time for expiration less than 0.8 seconds was noted. The new device could be useful in situations where selectivity to other gases is not important.

  5. Acoustic Liner Drag: Measurements on Novel Facesheet Perforate Geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howerton, Brian M.; Jones, Michael G.

    2016-01-01

    Interest in characterization of the aerodynamic drag of acoustic liners has increased in the past several years. This paper details experiments in the NASA Langley Grazing Flow Impedance Tube to quantify the relative drag of several perforate-over-honeycomb liner configurations at flow speeds of centerline flow Mach number equals 0.3 and 0.5. Various perforate geometries and orientations are investigated to determine their resistance factors using a static pressure drop approach. Comparison of these resistance factors gives a relative measurement of liner drag. For these same flow conditions, acoustic measurements are performed with tonal excitation from 400 to 3000 hertz at source sound pressure levels of 140 and 150 decibels. Educed impedance and attenuation spectra are used to determine the impact of variations in perforate geometry on acoustic performance.

  6. Bimodal schwa: Evidence from acoustic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamane-Tanaka, Noriko; Gick, Bryan; Bird, Sonya

    2004-05-01

    The question of whether schwa is targeted or targetless has been the subject of much debate (Browman et al., 1992; Browman and Goldstein, 1995; Gick, 1999, 2002). Gick (2002) found that there is a pharyngeal constriction during schwa relative to rest position, and concluded that schwa is not targetless. This experiment further showed a ``bimodal'' pattern in schwa in a nonrhotic speaker, indicating that the subject has distinct schwas in lexical words and function words. The present study examines the existence of the ``bimodal'' pattern in schwas in nonrhotic dialects through an acoustic experiment. It is predicted that there is a significant difference in formant values between lexical schwas and function schwas. Results to date indicate a significant difference in them between schwas in lexical versus function words, both between historical schwas and those derived from final /r/ reduction. Data from several additional nonrhotic subjects will be presented. Implications for intrusive r as well as for the phonological treatment of function words will be discussed. [Work funded by NSERC and SSHRC.

  7. A pilot study of scanning acoustic microscopy as a tool for measuring arterial stiffness in aortic biopsies.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, Riaz; Cruickshank, J Kennedy; Zhao, Xuegen; Derby, Brian; Weber, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    This study explores the use of scanning acoustic microscopy (SAM) as a potential tool for characterisation of arterial stiffness using aortic biopsies. SAM data is presented for human tissue collected during aortic bypass graft surgery for multi-vessel coronary artery disease. Acoustic wave speed as determined by SAM was compared to clinical data for the patients namely, pulse wave velocity (PWV), blood pressure, cholesterol and glucose levels. There was no obvious trend relating acoustic wave speed to PWV values, and an inverse relationship was found between systolic and diastolic blood pressure and acoustic wave speed. However, in patients with a higher cholesterol or glucose level, the acoustic wave speed increased. A more detailed investigation is needed to relate SAM data to clinical measurements.

  8. On-chip measurements of cell compressibility via acoustic radiation.

    PubMed

    Hartono, Deny; Liu, Yang; Tan, Pei Lin; Then, Xin Yi Sherlene; Yung, Lin-Yue Lanry; Lim, Kian-Meng

    2011-12-07

    Measurements of mechanical properties of biological cells are of great importance because changes in these properties can be strongly associated with the progression of cell differentiation and cell diseases. Although state of the art methods, such as atomic force microscopy, optical tweezers and micropipette aspiration, have been widely used to measure the mechanical properties of biological cells, all these methods involve direct contact with the cell and the measurements could be affected by the contact or any local deformation. In addition, all these methods typically deduced the Young's modulus of the cells based on their measurements. Herein, we report a new method for fast and direct measurement of the compressibility or bulk modulus of various cell lines on a microchip. In this method, the whole cell is exposed to acoustic radiation force without any direct contact. The method exploits the formation of an acoustic standing wave within a straight microchannel. When the polystyrene beads and cells are introduced into the channel, the acoustic radiation force moves them to the acoustic pressure node and the movement speed is dependent on the compressibility. By fitting the experimental and theoretical trajectories of the beads and the cells, the compressibility of the cells can be obtained. We find that the compressibility of various cancer cells (MCF-7: 4.22 ± 0.19 × 10(-10) Pa(-1), HEPG2: 4.28 ± 0.12 × 10(-10) Pa(-1), HT-29: 4.04 ± 0.16 × 10(-10) Pa(-1)) is higher than that of normal breast cells (3.77 ± 0.09 × 10(-10) Pa(-1)) and fibroblast cells (3.78 ± 0.17 × 10(-10) Pa(-1)). This work demonstrates a novel acoustic-based method for on-chip measurements of cell compressibility, complementing existing methods for measuring the mechanical properties of biological cells.

  9. Measurement of acoustic output power in a traveling wave engine.

    PubMed

    Miwa, M; Sumi, T; Biwa, T; Ueda, Y; Yazaki, T

    2006-12-22

    We built and tested a double-loop thermoacoustic cooler consisting of an engine-loop, a branch resonator, and a cooler-loop. The cooling power of 6.4 W was obtained at the cooling temperature of 0 degrees C, when the input heat power of 416 W was supplied to the engine-loop. We measured the acoustic power and found that the output power emitted from the engine-loop was 12 W, and that the input acoustic power entering the cooler-loop was 6 W.

  10. Acoustic absorbance measurements in neonates exposed to smoking during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Pucci, Beatriz Paloma Corrêa; Roque, Nayara Michelle Costa de Freitas; Gamero, Marcella Scigliano; Durante, Alessandra Spada

    2017-04-01

    To analyze acoustic absorbance using wideband tympanometry in neonates exposed to passive smoking during pregnancy. A study comprising 54 neonates in the control group (CG - unexposed) and 19 in the study group (SG - exposed) was carried out. Subjects were submitted to the wideband tympanometry test and subsequent analysis of absorbance of 17 frequencies. Low frequencies had a lower level of absorbance compared to high frequencies for both ambient and peak pressures, with no difference between the groups. No effect of passive smoking on acoustic absorbance measurements in neonates was observed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Advances in non-invasive measures of vocal acoustics.

    PubMed

    LaBlance, G R; Steckol, K F; Cooper, M H

    1991-10-01

    Objective assessment of vocal pitch, loudness, and quality is a crucial adjunct to endoscopy in the diagnosis and treatment of vocal pathology. Historically, this assessment was made through subjective, perceptual measures that were questionable in terms of validity and reliability. Recent advances in electronic technology now permit objective analysis of the acoustic characteristics of voice. Kay Elemetric's Visi-Pitch, DSP 5500 Digital Spectrograph, and Nasometer are representative of these new instruments and are used as illustrations in the discussion of the assessment of speech acoustics.

  12. High-frequency attenuation measurements using an acoustic microscope.

    PubMed

    Gracewski, S M; Waag, R C; Schenk, E A

    1988-06-01

    An acoustic microscope was used to measure excess attenuation of aqueous solutions of sugars and proteins at 1.0 GHz. Interference pattern spacing and peak amplitude reduction of V(z) curves, obtained with these solutions as the acoustic microscope coupling liquid, were related to the solution wavespeed and attenuation, respectively. Consistent with published results for lower frequencies, solutions with molecular weight greater than 10,000 had a higher specific absorption than those with a molecular weight less than 1000 and within these two molecular weight ranges specific absorption was independent of concentration.

  13. Acoustic ship signature measurements by cross-correlation method.

    PubMed

    Fillinger, Laurent; Sutin, Alexander; Sedunov, Alexander

    2011-02-01

    Cross-correlation methods were applied for the estimation of the power spectral density and modulation spectrum of underwater noise generated by moving vessels. The cross-correlation of the signal from two hydrophones allows the separation of vessel acoustic signatures in a busy estuary. Experimental data recorded in the Hudson River are used for demonstration that cross-correlation method measured the same ship noise and ship noise modulation spectra as conventional methods. The cross-correlation method was then applied for the separation of the acoustic signatures of two ships present simultaneously. Presented methods can be useful for ship traffic monitoring and small ship classification, even in noisy harbor environments.

  14. Measurement of the total acoustic output power of HITU transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenderka, Klaus-V.; Beissner, Klaus

    2010-03-01

    The majority of High Intensity Therapeutic Ultrasound (HITU) applications use strongly focused ultrasound fields generating very high local intensities in the focal region. The metrology of these high-power ultrasound fields is a challenge for the established measurement procedures and devices. This paper describes the results of measurements by means of the radiation force for a total acoustic output power up to 400 W at 1.5 MHz and up to 200 W at 2.45 MHz. For this purpose, a radiation force balance set-up was adapted for the determination of large acoustic output powers. For two types of HITU transducers, the relationship between the total acoustic output power and the applied net electrical power was determined at close transducer-target distance. Further, dependence of the measured electro-acoustic radiation conductance on the transducer-target distance was investigated at reduced power levels, considering the appearance of focal anomalies. Concluding, a list of the main uncertainty contributions, and an estimate of the uncertainty for the used radiation force balance set-up is given for measurements at high power levels.

  15. A Comparative Study of Two Acoustic Measures of Hypernasality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogel, Adam P.; Ibrahim, Hasherah M.; Reilly, Sheena; Kilpatrick, Nicky

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This study aimed to compare 2 quantitative acoustic measures of nasality in children with cleft lip and palate (CLP) and healthy controls using formalized perceptual assessment as a guide. Method: Fifty participants (23 children with CLP and 27 age- and gender-matched healthy controls) aged between 4 and 12 years produced a variety of…

  16. Field-Deployable Acoustic Digital Systems for Noise Measurement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-01-01

    October 1997. 3. David L. Gray, Kenneth D. Wright and Wayne D. Rowland “A Field Deployable Digital Acoustic Measurement System”, Proceedings of the NASA ... Technology 2000 conference, Washington D.C. 4. Kenneth D. Wright, Scott Martinson, and Toby Comeaux “A Remote Acquisition and Storage System” A Remote

  17. Measuring acoustic properties of materials and jet nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, P. D.; Plumblee, H. E.; Salikuddin, M.

    1980-01-01

    Method measures acoustic properties of sound-absorbent materials and jet-nozzle system. Advantages of impulse method over other methods are that test time and complication are reduced. Results obtained from impulse method have been compared with those from existing methods, both experimental and theoretical, and show excellent agreement.

  18. A Comparative Study of Two Acoustic Measures of Hypernasality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogel, Adam P.; Ibrahim, Hasherah M.; Reilly, Sheena; Kilpatrick, Nicky

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This study aimed to compare 2 quantitative acoustic measures of nasality in children with cleft lip and palate (CLP) and healthy controls using formalized perceptual assessment as a guide. Method: Fifty participants (23 children with CLP and 27 age- and gender-matched healthy controls) aged between 4 and 12 years produced a variety of…

  19. Particle densitometer based on the acoustical resonance measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Vetter, A.A.

    1990-10-01

    Work continued on development of a particle densitometer based on the Acoustical Resonance Measurement to monitor pneumatically conveyed particle mass loading. During this quarter, the closed-loop test system was used for testing and an open-loop test system was constructed. 3 figs.

  20. Laboratory comparisons of acoustic and optical sensors for microbubble measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Ming Yang; Todoroff, Douglas; Cartmill, John

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a recent comparison between three microbubble size spectrum measurement systems. These systems are the light-scattering bubble counter, the photographic bubble-imaging system, and the acoustic resonator array. Good agreement was formed among these three systems over the bubble size range appropriate for each system.

  1. A field-deployable digital acoustic measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, David L.; Wright, Kenneth D., II; Rowland, Wayne D.

    1991-01-01

    A field deployable digital acoustic measurement system was developed to support acoustic research programs at the Langley Research Center. The system digitizes the acoustic inputs at the microphone, which can be located up to 1000 feet from the van which houses the acquisition, storage, and analysis equipment. Digitized data from up to 12 microphones is recorded on high density 8mm tape and is analyzed post-test by a microcomputer system. Synchronous and nonsynchronous sampling is available with maximum sample rates of 12,500 and 40,000 samples per second respectively. The high density tape storage system is capable of storing 5 gigabytes of data at transfer rates up to 1 megabyte per second. System overall dynamic range exceeds 83 dB.

  2. Measurement of acoustic attenuation in South Pole ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    IceCube Collaboration; Abbasi, R.; Abdou, Y.; Abu-Zayyad, T.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Andeen, K.; Auffenberg, J.; Bai, X.; Baker, M.; Barwick, S. W.; Bay, R.; Bazo Alba, J. L.; Beattie, K.; Beatty, J. J.; Bechet, S.; Becker, J. K.; Becker, K.-H.; Benabderrahmane, M. L.; Berdermann, J.; Berghaus, P.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Bertrand, D.; Besson, D. Z.; Bissok, M.; Blaufuss, E.; Boersma, D. J.; Bohm, C.; Böser, S.; Botner, O.; Bradley, L.; Braun, J.; Buitink, S.; Carson, M.; Chirkin, D.; Christy, B.; Clem, J.; Clevermann, F.; Cohen, S.; Colnard, C.; Cowen, D. F.; D'Agostino, M. V.; Danninger, M.; de Clercq, C.; Demirörs, L.; Depaepe, O.; Descamps, F.; Desiati, P.; de Vries-Uiterweerd, G.; Deyoung, T.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; Dreyer, J.; Dumm, J. P.; Duvoort, M. R.; Ehrlich, R.; Eisch, J.; Ellsworth, R. W.; Engdegård, O.; Euler, S.; Evenson, P. A.; Fadiran, O.; Fazely, A. R.; Feusels, T.; Filimonov, K.; Finley, C.; Foerster, M. M.; Fox, B. D.; Franckowiak, A.; Franke, R.; Gaisser, T. K.; Gallagher, J.; Ganugapati, R.; Geisler, M.; Gerhardt, L.; Gladstone, L.; Glüsenkamp, T.; Goldschmidt, A.; Goodman, J. A.; Grant, D.; Griesel, T.; Groß, A.; Grullon, S.; Gunasingha, R. M.; Gurtner, M.; Gustafsson, L.; Ha, C.; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Han, K.; Hanson, K.; Helbing, K.; Herquet, P.; Hickford, S.; Hill, G. C.; Hoffman, K. D.; Homeier, A.; Hoshina, K.; Hubert, D.; Huelsnitz, W.; Hülß, J.-P.; Hulth, P. O.; Hultqvist, K.; Hussain, S.; Imlay, R. L.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobsen, J.; Japaridze, G. S.; Johansson, H.; Joseph, J. M.; Kampert, K.-H.; Kappes, A.; Karg, T.; Karle, A.; Kelley, J. L.; Kemming, N.; Kenny, P.; Kiryluk, J.; Kislat, F.; Klein, S. R.; Knops, S.; Köhne, J.-H.; Kohnen, G.; Kolanoski, H.; Köpke, L.; Koskinen, D. J.; Kowalski, M.; Kowarik, T.; Krasberg, M.; Krings, T.; Kroll, G.; Kuehn, K.; Kuwabara, T.; Labare, M.; Lafebre, S.; Laihem, K.; Landsman, H.; Lauer, R.; Lehmann, R.; Lennarz, D.; Lünemann, J.; Madsen, J.; Majumdar, P.; Maruyama, R.; Mase, K.; Matis, H. S.; Matusik, M.; Meagher, K.; Merck, M.; Mészáros, P.; Meures, T.; Middell, E.; Milke, N.; Montaruli, T.; Morse, R.; Movit, S. M.; Nahnhauer, R.; Nam, J. W.; Naumann, U.; Nießen, P.; Nygren, D. R.; Odrowski, S.; Olivas, A.; Olivo, M.; Ono, M.; Panknin, S.; Paul, L.; Pérez de Los Heros, C.; Petrovic, J.; Piegsa, A.; Pieloth, D.; Porrata, R.; Posselt, J.; Price, P. B.; Prikockis, M.; Przybylski, G. T.; Rawlins, K.; Redl, P.; Resconi, E.; Rhode, W.; Ribordy, M.; Rizzo, A.; Rodrigues, J. P.; Roth, P.; Rothmaier, F.; Rott, C.; Roucelle, C.; Ruhe, T.; Rutledge, D.; Ruzybayev, B.; Ryckbosch, D.; Sander, H.-G.; Sarkar, S.; Schatto, K.; Schlenstedt, S.; Schmidt, T.; Schneider, D.; Schukraft, A.; Schultes, A.; Schulz, O.; Schunck, M.; Seckel, D.; Semburg, B.; Seo, S. H.; Sestayo, Y.; Seunarine, S.; Silvestri, A.; Slipak, A.; Spiczak, G. M.; Spiering, C.; Stamatikos, M.; Stanev, T.; Stephens, G.; Stezelberger, T.; Stokstad, R. G.; Stoyanov, S.; Strahler, E. A.; Straszheim, T.; Sullivan, G. W.; Swillens, Q.; Taboada, I.; Tamburro, A.; Tarasova, O.; Tepe, A.; Ter-Antonyan, S.; Tilav, S.; Toale, P. A.; Tosi, D.; Turčan, D.; van Eijndhoven, N.; Vandenbroucke, J.; van Overloop, A.; van Santen, J.; Voigt, B.; Walck, C.; Waldenmaier, T.; Wallraff, M.; Walter, M.; Wendt, C.; Westerhoff, S.; Whitehorn, N.; Wiebe, K.; Wiebusch, C. H.; Wikström, G.; Williams, D. R.; Wischnewski, R.; Wissing, H.; Woschnagg, K.; Xu, C.; Xu, X. W.; Yanez, J. P.; Yodh, G.; Yoshida, S.; Zarzhitsky, P.; IceCube Collaboration

    2011-01-01

    Using the South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS) and a retrievable transmitter deployed in holes drilled for the IceCube experiment, we have measured the attenuation of acoustic signals by South Pole ice at depths between 190 m and 500 m. Three data sets, using different acoustic sources, have been analyzed and give consistent results. The method with the smallest systematic uncertainties yields an amplitude attenuation coefficient α = 3.20 ± 0.57 km-1 between 10 and 30 kHz, considerably larger than previous theoretical estimates. Expressed as an attenuation length, the analyses give a consistent result for λ ≡ 1/α of ˜300 m with 20% uncertainty. No significant depth or frequency dependence has been found.

  3. Measurement of acoustic shielding by a turbulent jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, J. C.; Fratello, D. J.

    1985-01-01

    The acoustic shielding properties of a turbulent jet have been investigated experimentally. The experimental arrangement consisted of an acoustic point source and a turbulent shielding jet. The source and jet parameters investigated include the source frequency, source spectrum, jet velocity, jet heating by simulation and the lateral and longitudinal source positions with respect to the shielding jet. It is found that the maximum sound attenuation provided by the shielding jet depends on the balance between refraction and diffraction. Over the frequency range investigated, the redistribution of sound by the shielding air jet is power conserving. Comparison between measurement and prediction based on an idealized cylindrical uniform jet model indicates that the spreading and decay of the flow field in real jets are important. Comparisons between the present data trends and those reported for jet-by-jet shielding suggest that the major effects observed in the latter are acoustical rather than aerodynamical.

  4. Acoustic measurements of air entrainment by breaking waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrill, Eric James

    1998-11-01

    Wave breaking at the surface of the ocean plays an important role in air-sea interaction processes. Bubbles entrained by breaking waves not only enhance the transfer of atmospheric gases to the ocean, but also modify the phase speed and attenuation of acoustic waves propagating through the bubbly medium. The development of acoustic instruments to measure bubbles and the results obtained from a number of field and laboratory experiments are presented. The first part of this dissertation addresses sound speed measurements made in the North Atlantic as part of the Acoustic Surface Reverberation Experiment (ASREX). An autonomous buoy system that directly measures the sound speed in the surface wave layer was developed. Data obtained with the instrument spanned several storm cycles with wind speeds and significant wave heights reaching 20 m/s and 8 m, respectively. The use of Wood's relation (1946) allows the calculation of the void fraction of air based on the low-frequency sound speed measurements. The highly variable near-surface sound speed/void fraction field is analyzed with respect to wind and surface wave- breaking parameters. The second part of this dissertation presents the development of a broadband acoustic technique which simultaneously measures the phase speed and attenuation at acoustic frequencies ranging from 4-100 kHz. The acoustic data is inverted for the size distribution of bubbles using algorithms that are based upon the physics of sound propagation through a bubbly mixture. This acoustic technique was evaluated in the large wave channel at the Hydraulics Laboratory, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, using mechanically generated breaking waves in seawater. Field measurements of bubble concentrations that result from wave breaking were made in both shallow water off Scripps Pier, California and in deep water near Point Conception, California using the broadband technique. Significant variability is observed in the bubble field, characterized by

  5. Acoustic power measurement of high-intensity focused ultrasound transducer using a pressure sensor.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yufeng

    2015-03-01

    The acoustic power of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is an important parameter that should be measured prior to each treatment to guarantee effective and safe outcomes. A new calibration technique was developed that involves estimating the pressure distribution, calculating the acoustic power using an underwater pressure blast sensor, and compensating the contribution of harmonics to the acoustic power. The output of a clinical extracorporeal HIFU system (center frequency of ~1 MHz, p+ = 2.5-57.2 MPa, p(-) = -1.8 to -13.9 MPa, I(SPPA) = 513-22,940 W/cm(2), -6 dB size of 1.6 × 10 mm: lateral × axial) was measured using this approach and then compared with that obtained using a radiation force balance. Similarities were found between each method at acoustic power ranging from 18.2 W to 912 W with an electrical-to-acoustic conversion efficiency of ~42%. The proposed method has advantages of low weight, smaller size, high sensitivity, quick response, high signal-to-noise ratio (especially at low power output), robust performance, and easy operation of HIFU exposimetry measurement.

  6. Broadband acoustic scattering measurements of underwater unexploded ordnance (UXO).

    PubMed

    Bucaro, J A; Houston, B H; Saniga, M; Dragonette, L R; Yoder, T; Dey, S; Kraus, L; Carin, L

    2008-02-01

    In order to evaluate the potential for detection and identification of underwater unexploded ordnance (UXO) by exploiting their structural acoustic response, we carried out broadband monostatic scattering measurements over a full 360 degrees on UXO's (two mortar rounds, an artillery shell, and a rocket warhead) and false targets (a cinder block and a large rock). The measurement band, 1-140 kHz, includes a low frequency structural acoustics region in which the wavelengths are comparable to or larger than the target characteristic dimensions. In general, there are aspects that provide relatively high target strength levels ( approximately -10 to -15 dB), and from our experience the targets should be detectable in this structural acoustics band in most acoustic environments. The rigid body scattering was also calculated for one UXO in order to highlight the measured scattering features involving elastic responses. The broadband scattering data should be able to support feature-based separation of UXO versus false targets and identification of various classes of UXO as well.

  7. Real-time temperature field measurement based on acoustic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Yong; Jia, Jiabin; Polydorides, Nick

    2017-07-01

    Acoustic tomography can be used to measure the temperature field from the time-of-flight (TOF). In order to capture real-time temperature field changes and accurately yield quantitative temperature images, two improvements to the conventional acoustic tomography system are studied: simultaneous acoustic transmission and TOF collection along multiple ray paths, and an offline iteration reconstruction algorithm. During system operation, all the acoustic transceivers send modulated and filtered wideband Kasami sequences simultaneously to facilitate fast and accurate TOF measurements using cross-correlation detection. For image reconstruction, the iteration process is separated and executed offline beforehand to shorten computation time for online temperature field reconstruction. The feasibility and effectiveness of the developed methods are validated in the simulation study. The simulation results demonstrate that the proposed method can reduce the processing time per frame from 160 ms to 20 ms, while the reconstruction error remains less than 5%. Hence, the proposed method has great potential in the measurement of rapid temperature change with good temporal and spatial resolution.

  8. Measuring against clinical standards.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Charles D

    2003-07-15

    Systematic improvement of health services requires the objective measurement of people, practices and organisations against valid and explicit standards in order to identify and implement appropriate change. Effective quality systems must embrace a wide range of definitions of quality, and a similar variety of approaches to defining, measuring and improving. Clinical performance may be examined from three professional viewpoints--clinical competence: assessment of individual practitioners against explicit criteria to recognise achievement and to promote continuing development. Traditional mechanisms of training, registration and accreditation enable clinicians to reach career grades but responsibility for subsequent support is often unclear between employers, professions and registering bodies. Clinical practice: assessment of actual clinical process and outcomes against research-based "best practice" to identify and reduce variation. Peer review, clinical audit and confidential enquiries are examples of this approach, which may involve single or multiple professional groups and their interface with management. Service accreditation: systems to assess health care organisations against published standards in order to encourage best management practice. These are usually run on a regional or national basis and, though sensitive to expectations of patients, managers, clinicians, paying agencies and government, they are usually managed by an impartial but authoritative organisation.

  9. Measurement of non-linear distortions in the vibration of acoustic transducers and acoustically driven membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aerts, J. R. M.; Dirckx, J. J. J.; Pintelon, R.

    2009-03-01

    Different methods exist to quantify non-linearity, and recently a new method was proposed that uses multisines to determine output response level, noise level, and level of non-linear distortions simultaneously from one single short experiment. We used heterodyne vibrometry to measure the vibration of a membrane while it is stimulated acoustically, and to determine the non-linear distortions in its response with this new method of analysis. We demonstrate the method on an electrically driven earphone. Analysis of the sound output and optically measured vibration deliver comparable results, and clearly detect non-linear distortions. Next, we apply the method on an acoustically driven elastic membrane. At vibration amplitudes of the same magnitude as on the earphone, non-linear distortions are much smaller, as to be expected on an elastic membrane, but they can still be detected with the vibrometer. This technique can be used to investigate the non-linearity of acoustically driven systems such as the middle ear.

  10. Experimental measurement of acoustic properties in snow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyagi, Kapil Dev; Kumar, Arun; Bahl, Rajendar; Singh, Karmjeet

    2017-05-01

    This paper presents the results of field experiments done for the measurement of attenuation constant and speed of sound in the snow medium. The field experiments were conducted at two locations corresponding to relatively dry and wet snow. The main objective of our method is to overcome the potential limitations of the other methods. There are two major concerns: one is sound signal leakage and the other is the measurement need to be done within a same layer of snowpack. The ref lections from the boundaries will affect the measurements. In our experiments the transducers are kept far from the snowpack boundaries, so that there will be no likelihood of strong ref lected signals from the boundaries. These issues have not been addressed by the other researchers. This work adds to the measurement results of the attenuation constant and speed of sound in snow that are available in the research literature. It is found that sound signal attenuation greatly depends on the frequency of sound signal and wetness of snow.

  11. Field Assessment of Acoustic-Doppler Based Discharge Measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mueller, D.S.; ,

    2002-01-01

    The use of equipment based on the Doppler principle for measuring water velocity and computing discharge is common within the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The instruments and software have changed appreciably during the last 5 years; therefore, the USGS has begun a field validation of the instruments currently (2002) available for making discharge measurements from a moving boat in streams of various sizes. Instruments manufactured by SonTek/YSI2 and RD Instruments, Inc. were used to collect discharge data at five different sites. One or more traditional discharge measurements were made by the use of a Price AA current meter and standard USGS procedures with the acoustic instruments at each site during data collection. The discharges measured with the acoustic instruments were compared with the discharges measured with Price AA meters and the current USGS stage-discharge rating for each site. The mean discharges measured by each acoustic instrument were within 5 percent of the Price AA-based measurement and (or) discharge from the stage-discharge rating. Additional analysis of the data collected indicates that the coefficient of variation of the discharge measurements consistently was less for the RD Instruments, Inc. Rio Grandes than it was for the SonTek/YSI RiverSurveyors. The bottom-tracking referenced measurement had a lower coefficient of variation than the differentially corrected global positioning system referenced measurements. It was observed that the higher frequency RiverSurveyors measured a moving bed more often than the lower frequency Rio Grandes. The detection of a moving bed caused RiverSurveyors to be consistently biased low when referenced to bottom tracking. Differentially corrected global positioning system data may be used to remove the bias observed in the bottom-tracking referenced measurements.

  12. Acoustic property measurements in a photoacoustic imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willemink, René G. H.; Manohar, Srirang; Slump, Cornelis H.; van der Heijden, Ferdi; van Leeuwen, Ton

    2007-07-01

    Photoacoustics is a hybrid imaging technique that combines the contrast available to optical imaging with the resolution that is possessed by ultrasound imaging. The technique is based on generating ultrasound from absorbing structures in tissue using pulsed light. In photoacoustic (PA) computerized tomography (CT) imaging, reconstruction of the optical absorption in a subject, is performed for example by filtered backprojection. The backprojection is performed along circular paths in image space instead of along straight lines as in X-ray CT imaging. To achieve this, the speed-of-sound through the subject is usually assumed constant. An unsuitable speed-of-sound can degrade resolution and contrast. We discuss here a method of actually measuring the speed-of- sound distribution using ultrasound transmission through the subject under photoacoustic investigation. This is achieved in a simple approach that does not require any additional ultrasound transmitter. The method uses a passive element (carbon fiber) that is placed in the imager in the path of the illumination which generates ultrasound by the photoacoustic effect and behaves as an ultrasound source. Measuring the time-of-flight of this ultrasound transient by the same detector used for conventional photoacoustics, allows a speed-of-sound image to be reconstructed. This concept is validated on phantoms.

  13. Nonlinear acoustic measurements ahead of a notch during fatigue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, R. W.; Mooers, R. D.; Hutson, A. L.; Sathish, S.; Blodgett, M. P.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents measurements of relative nonlinear acoustic parameter (βrel), ahead of a notch in Al 7075-T651 dog bone samples, subjected to fatigue. It is compared with crack growth measurements on the same samples. Measurements performed on two samples subjected to identical fatigue conditions that failed at vastly different number of fatigue cycles are described. The βrel measurement for both samples as a function of fatigue cycles was fit a Boltzmann curve. The role of changing βrel ahead of a notch is explored as a possible approach for remain life evaluation.

  14. Acoustic waves undetectable by transient reflectivity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Chuan; Ristow, Oliver; Grossmann, Martin; Brick, Delia; Guo, Yuning; Schubert, Martin; Hettich, Mike; Gusev, Vitalyi; Dekorsy, Thomas

    2017-05-01

    A free-standing GaAs membrane is investigated by pump-probe reflectivity measurements with femtosecond laser pulses of 400-nm wavelength. It is found that the detected wide spectrum of laser-generated coherent strain waves in the membrane does not contain a specific hypersonic frequency. Theoretical analysis reveals that this effect is related to zero sensitivity of the acousto-optic detection at a particular frequency defined by the wavelength of the probe laser pulse on the mechanical free surface of the GaAs membrane. We predict that a similar behavior is expected in Si and Au membranes and films, indicating that the presence of zeros in the spectral transformation function of acousto-optic conversion is a rather general phenomenon in picosecond ultrasonics that has so far been neglected.

  15. Determining Transmission Loss from Measured External and Internal Acoustic Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scogin, Tyler; Smith, A. M.

    2012-01-01

    An estimate of the internal acoustic environment in each internal cavity of a launch vehicle is needed to ensure survivability of Space Launch System (SLS) avionics. Currently, this is achieved by using the noise reduction database of heritage flight vehicles such as the Space Shuttle and Saturn V for liftoff and ascent flight conditions. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is conducting a series of transmission loss tests to verify and augment this method. For this test setup, an aluminum orthogrid curved panel representing 1/8th of the circumference of a section of the SLS main structure was mounted in between a reverberation chamber and an anechoic chamber. Transmission loss was measured across the panel using microphones. Data measured during this test will be used to estimate the internal acoustic environments for several of the SLS launch vehicle internal spaces.

  16. Acoustics and Surface Pressure Measurements from Tandem Cylinder Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutcheson, Florence V.; Brooks, Thomas F.; Lockard, David P.; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Stead, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    Acoustic and unsteady surface pressure measurements from two cylinders in tandem configurations were acquired to study the effect of spacing, surface trip and freestream velocity on the radiated noise. The Reynolds number ranged from 1.15x10(exp 5) to 2.17x10(exp 5), and the cylinder spacing varied between 1.435 and 3.7 cylinder diameters. The acoustic and surface pressure spectral characteristics associated with the different flow regimes produced by the cylinders' wake interference were identified. The dependence of the Strouhal number, peak Sound Pressure Level and spanwise coherence on cylinder spacing and flow velocity was examined. Directivity measurements were performed to determine how well the dipole assumption for the radiation of vortex shedding noise holds for the largest and smallest cylinder spacing tested.

  17. Atypical prosody in Asperger syndrome: perceptual and acoustic measurements.

    PubMed

    Filipe, Marisa G; Frota, Sónia; Castro, São Luís; Vicente, Selene G

    2014-08-01

    It is known that individuals with Asperger syndrome (AS) may show no problems with regard to what is said (e.g., lexical content) but tend to have difficulties in how utterances are produced, i.e., they may show prosodic impairments. In the present study, we focus on the use of prosodic features to express grammatical meaning. Specifically, we explored the sentence type difference between statements and questions that is conveyed by intonation, using perceptual and acoustic measurements. Children aged 8 and 9 years with AS (n = 12) were matched according to age and nonverbal intelligence with typically developing peers (n = 17). Although children with AS could produce categorically accurate prosodic patterns, their prosodic contours were perceived as odd by adult listeners, and acoustic measurements showed alterations in duration and pitch. Additionally, children with AS had greater variability in fundamental frequency contours compared to typically developing peers.

  18. Acoustic temperature profile measurement technique for large combustion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkateshan, S. P.; Shakkottai, P.; Kwack, E. Y.; Back, L. H.

    1989-01-01

    Measurement of times of flight of sound waves can be used to determine temperatures in a gas. This paper describes a system, based on this principle, that is capable of giving the temperature profile in a nonisothermal gas volume, for example, prevalent in a large furnace. The apparatus is simple, rugged, accurate, and capable of being automated for process control applications. It is basically an acoustic waveguide where the outside temperature profile is transferred to a chosen gas contained inside the guide.

  19. Validation of streamflow measurements made with acoustic doppler current profilers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oberg, K.; Mueller, D.S.

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey and other international agencies have collaborated to conduct laboratory and field validations of acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) measurements of streamflow. Laboratory validations made in a large towing basin show that the mean differences between tow cart velocity and ADCP bottom-track and water-track velocities were -0.51 and -1.10%, respectively. Field validations of commercially available ADCPs were conducted by comparing streamflow measurements made with ADCPs to reference streamflow measurements obtained from concurrent mechanical current-meter measurements, stable rating curves, salt-dilution measurements, or acoustic velocity meters. Data from 1,032 transects, comprising 100 discharge measurements, were analyzed from 22 sites in the United States, Canada, Sweden, and The Netherlands. Results of these analyses show that broadband ADCP streamflow measurements are unbiased when compared to the reference discharges regardless of the water mode used for making the measurement. Measurement duration is more important than the number of transects for reducing the uncertainty of the ADCP streamflow measurement. ?? 2007 ASCE.

  20. Flow velocity measurement with the nonlinear acoustic wave scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Didenkulov, Igor; Pronchatov-Rubtsov, Nikolay

    2015-10-28

    A problem of noninvasive measurement of liquid flow velocity arises in many practical applications. To this end the most often approach is the use of the linear Doppler technique. The Doppler frequency shift of signal scattered from the inhomogeneities distributed in a liquid relatively to the emitted frequency is proportional to the sound frequency and velocities of inhomogeneities. In the case of very slow flow one needs to use very high frequency sound. This approach fails in media with strong sound attenuation because acoustic wave attenuation increases with frequency and there is limit in increasing sound intensity, i.e. the cavitation threshold. Another approach which is considered in this paper is based on the method using the difference frequency Doppler Effect for flows with bubbles. This method is based on simultaneous action of two high-frequency primary acoustic waves with closed frequencies on bubbles and registration of the scattered by bubbles acoustic field at the difference frequency. The use of this method is interesting since the scattered difference frequency wave has much lower attenuation in a liquid. The theoretical consideration of the method is given in the paper. The experimental examples confirming the theoretical equations, as well as the ability of the method to be applied in medical diagnostics and in technical applications on measurement of flow velocities in liquids with strong sound attenuation is described. It is shown that the Doppler spectrum form depends on bubble concentration velocity distribution in the primary acoustic beams crossing zone that allows one to measure the flow velocity distribution.

  1. Application of the acoustic voice quality index for objective measurement of dysphonia severity.

    PubMed

    Núñez-Batalla, Faustino; Díaz-Fresno, Estefanía; Álvarez-Fernández, Andrea; Muñoz Cordero, Gabriela; Llorente Pendás, José Luis

    Over the past several decades, many acoustic parameters have been studied as sensitive to and to measure dysphonia. However, current acoustic measures might not be sensitive measures of perceived voice quality. A meta-analysis which evaluated the relationship between perceived overall voice quality and several acoustic-phonetic correlates, identified measures that do not rely on the extraction of the fundamental period, such the measures derived from the cepstrum, and that can be used in sustained vowel as well as continuous speech samples. A specific and recently developed method to quantify the severity of overall dysphonia is the acoustic voice quality index (AVQI) that is a multivariate construct that combines multiple acoustic markers to yield a single number that correlates reasonably with overall vocal quality. This research is based on one pool of voice recordings collected in two sets of subjects: 60 vocally normal and 58 voice disordered participants. A sustained vowel and a sample of connected speech were recorded and analyzed to obtain the six parameters included in the AVQI using the program Praat. Statistical analysis was completed using SPSS for Windows, version 12.0. Correlation between perception of overall voice quality and AVQI: A significant difference exists (t(95) = 9.5; p<.000) between normal and dysphonic voices. The findings of this study demonstrate the clinical feasibility of the AVQI as a measure of dysphonia severity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Cirugía de Cabeza y Cuello. All rights reserved.

  2. The relationship between VHI scores and specific acoustic measures of mildly disordered voice production.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Karen M; Collins, Savita P; Sapienza, Christine M

    2006-06-01

    This study was designed to examine the relationship between the Voice Handicap Index (VHI) and acoustic measures of voice samples common in clinical practice. Fifty participants, 38 women and 12 men, ranging in age from 19 to 80 years, with a mean age of 49 years, served as participants. Of these 50 participants, 17 participants could be included in the acoustic analysis of voice based on measures of error calculated with the TF32 software. All participants completed the VHI and provided voice samples including three trials of the sustained vowel /A/ at a comfortable loudness level as well as a connected speech sample consisting of the Zoo Passage. Acoustic measures were made with TF32 and Cool Edit software and included fundamental frequency, jitter %, shimmer %, signal-to-noise ratio, mean root-mean-square intensity, fundamental frequency standard deviation, aphonic periods, and breath groups. Results indicate that these measures were not predictive of overall VHI score, and no cohesive or predictable pattern was identified when comparing individual measures with overall VHI or with each subscale item. Likely contributions to this lack of correlation and subsequent clinical implications are discussed, as well as the direction for further research.

  3. Arterial stiffness measurements with acoustic radiation force impulse imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trahey, Gregg E.; Dahl, Jeremy J.; McAleavey, Stephen A.; Gallippi, Caterina M.; Nightingale, Kathryn R.

    2003-05-01

    We have developed a new method of imaging the mechanical properties of tissues based on very brief (<1msec) and localized applications of acoustic radiation force and the ultrasonic measurement of local tissues' responses to that force. Initial results with this technique demonstrate its ability to image mechanical properties of the medial and adventitial layers within ex vivo and in vivo arteries, and to distinguish hard and soft atherosclerotic plaques from normal vessel wall. We have labeled this method Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) imaging. We describe studies to utilize this technique in the characterization of diffuse and focal atherosclerosis. We describe phantom trials and finite element simulations which explore the fundamental resolution and contrast achievable with this method. We describe in vivo and ex vivo trials in the popliteal, femoral and brachial arteries to assess the relationship between the mechanical properties of healthy and diseased arteries provided by this method and those obtained by alternative methods.

  4. Determining low-frequency source location from acoustic phase measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poole, Travis L.; Frisk, George V.

    2002-11-01

    For low-frequency cw sound sources in shallow water, the time rate-of-change of the measured acoustic phase is well approximated by the time rate-of-change of the source-receiver separation distance. An algorithm for determining a locus of possible source locations based on this idea has been developed. The locus has the general form of a hyperbola, which can be used to provide a bearing estimation at long ranges, and an estimate of source location at short ranges. The algorithm uses only acoustic phase data and receiver geometry as input, and can be used even when the source frequency is slightly unstable and/or imprecisely known. The algorithm has been applied to data from low-frequency experiments (20-300 Hz), both for stable and unstable source frequencies, and shown to perform well. [Work supported by ONR and WHOI Academic Programs Office.

  5. Investigation of bacterial biofilm in the human middle ear using optical coherence tomography and acoustic measurements

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Cac T.; Robinson, Sarah R.; Jung, Woonggyu; Novak, Michael A.; Boppart, Stephen A.; Allen, Jont B.

    2013-01-01

    Children with chronic otitis media (OM) often have conductive hearing loss which results in communication difficulties and requires surgical treatment. Recent studies have provided clinical evidence that there is a one-to-one correspondence between chronic OM and the presence of a bacterial biofilm behind the tympanic membrane (TM). Here we investigate the acoustic effects of bacterial biofilms, confirmed using optical coherence tomography (OCT), in adult ears. Non-invasive OCT images are collected to visualize the cross-sectional structure of the middle ear, verifying the presence of a biofilm behind the TM. Wideband measurements of acoustic reflectance and impedance (0.2 to 6 [kHz]) are used to study the acoustic properties of ears with confirmed bacterial biofilms. Compared to known acoustic properties of normal middle ears, each of the ears with a bacterial biofilm has an elevated power reflectance in the 1 to 3 [kHz] range, corresponding to an abnormally small resistance (real part of the impedance). These results provide assistance for the clinical diagnosis of a bacterial biofilm, which could lead to improved treatment of chronic middle ear infection and further understanding of the impact of chronic OM on conductive hearing loss. PMID:23588039

  6. Acoustic Intensity Measurements in the Presence of Low Mach Number Flow

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-09-01

    broadband acoustic holography ,3 intensity measurements in the presence of flow,"𔄁𔄀. 7 in-situ evaluation of the acoustic impedance and sound absorption...Cross Spectra" Ph.D. Thesis, Catholic University, (1987). 3. Loyau, T., Pascal, J., Gaillard, P., "Broadband Acoustic Holography Reconstruction From...AD-A269 995 The Pennsylvania State University APPLIED RESEARCH LABORATORY P.O. Box 30 State College, PA 16804 ACOUSTIC INTENSITY MEASUREMENTS IN THE

  7. Clinical significance of SNAP somnography test acoustic recording.

    PubMed

    Galer, Chad; Yonkers, Anthony; Duff, Wallace; Heywood, Barbara

    2007-02-01

    To examine the clinical significance of acoustic data recorded by the SNAP home polysomnography system (SNAP Laboratories, Glenview, IL). Retrospective analysis of SNAP data from 59 patients undergoing evaluation for sleep apnea at the University of Nebraska Medical Center and an associated private practice in Omaha, NE. Snoring did not correlate with anthropometric variables such as body mass index and neck circumference. Statistical analysis showed no correlation between respiratory disturbance index and the maximum or average loudness of snoring. Average loudness was predictive of the presence of sleep apnea. Spectral analysis of snoring sonography found that the proportion of snoring events associated with a palatal source correlated strongly with the loudness of snoring. These data suggest that analysis of snoring has limited utility in the evaluation of the patient with sleep apnea but may be able to select patients who would benefit from palatal procedures to reduce snoring.

  8. Calibration of ipsilateral stimulus transducer for acoustic reflex measurements.

    PubMed

    Olsen, S; Osterhammel, P A; Rasmussen, A N; Nielsen, L H

    1995-01-01

    Pure-tone Reference Equivalent Threshold Sound Pressure Level (RETSPL) of the ipsilateral stimulus receiver for acoustic reflex measurements on Madsen Electronics type Zodiac 901 impedance audiometer is provided. The results, obtained from 20 normal-hearing subjects, are achieved by comparing hearing threshold levels measured using a TDH 39 telephone (calibrated to ISO 389) with thresholds recorded using the ipsilateral stimulus insert phone. The calibration is referenced to an IEC-711 ear simulator and comprises the following frequencies: 125, 250, 500, 750, 1000, 1500, 2000, 3000, 4000, 6000, 8000 Hz.

  9. Acoustic force measurement in a dual-temperature resonant chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robey, Judith L.; Trinh, Eugene H.; Wang, Taylor G.

    1987-01-01

    The acoustic radiation force was measured for a dual-temperature resonant chamber. This rectangular chamber has its long dimension approximately 8.5 times the square cross-sectional dimension, and the opposite ends are at widely different temperatures. Force profiles were obtained for two hot end temperatures of 520 C and 760 C, while the cool end remained at approximately room temperature. Force magnitudes as high as 17 dyn for a sample 1.2 cm in diameter at 760 C and at 162-dB input level were measured.

  10. Measuring acoustic nonlinearity parameter using collinear wave mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Minghe; Tang, Guangxin; Jacobs, Laurence J.; Qu, Jianmin

    2012-07-01

    This study introduces a new acoustic nonlinearity parameter βT. It is shown that βT is associated with the interaction between a longitudinal wave and a shear wave in isotropic elastic solids with quadratic nonlinearity. Experimental measurements are conducted to demonstrate that the collinear wave mixing technique is capable of measuring βT nondestructively. Further, it is shown that βT is well-correlated with the plastic deformation in Al-6061 alloys. These results indicate that collinear wave mixing is a promising method for nondestructive assessment of plastic deformation, and possibly, fatigue damage in metallic materials.

  11. Predicting the intelligibility of deaf children's speech from acoustic measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchanski, Rosalie M.; Geers, Ann E.; Brenner, Christine M.; Tobey, Emily A.

    2004-05-01

    A weighted combination of speech-acoustic measures may provide an objective assessment of speech intelligibility in deaf children that could be used to evaluate the benefits of sensory aids and rehabilitation programs. This investigation compared the accuracy of two different approaches, multiple linear regression and a simple neural net. These two methods were applied to identical sets of acoustic measures, including both segmental (e.g., voice-onset times of plosives, spectral moments of fricatives, second formant frequencies of vowels) and suprasegmental measures (e.g., sentence duration, number and frequency of intersentence pauses). These independent variables were obtained from digitized recordings of deaf children's imitations of 11 simple sentences. The dependent measure was the percentage of spoken words from the 36 McGarr Sentences understood by groups of naive listeners. The two predictive methods were trained on speech measures obtained from 123 out of 164 8- and 9-year-old deaf children who used cochlear implants. Then, predictions were obtained using speech measures from the remaining 41 children. Preliminary results indicate that multiple linear regression is a better predictor of intelligibility than the neural net, accounting for 79% as opposed to 65% of the variance in the data. [Work supported by NIH.

  12. Comparison of multi-microphone transfer matrix measurements with acoustic network models of swirl burners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, A.; Hirsch, C.; Sattelmayer, T.

    2006-11-01

    Utilizing the close analogy between electronic circuits and ducted acoustic systems, mathematical methods originally developed for the characterization of electronic networks are applied to the experimental acoustic plane wave characterization of swirl burners with complex geometries. The experiments presented in the paper show that the acoustic behavior of swirl generators can be quantitatively evaluated treating them as acoustic two-ports. Such acoustic two-ports are presented in forms of transfer-, scattering- and mobility matrices of the element. In the acoustic burner study dynamic pressure measurements were made at several locations of a tubular combustor test rig for two acoustically independent states, which were generated by forcing with sirens at the opposite ends of the setup. The technique for the experimental evaluation of acoustic transfer matrices of complex geometries on the basis of these dynamic pressure measurements is illustrated. As an alternative to the experiment, the evaluation of the acoustic behavior of acoustic systems is assessed using acoustic networks consisting of simple acoustic elements like ducts, bends, junctions and sudden area changes with transfer matrices, which are derived from first principles. In the paper, a network model representing the transfer characteristics of swirl burners is presented and compared with the previously measured transfer matrices. Although the burner geometry is rather complex, its acoustic behavior can be successfully mapped to a network consisting of a serial connection of nine elements with only minor adjustment of one parameter.

  13. Combined Use of Standard and Throat Microphones for Measurement of Acoustic Voice Parameters and Voice Categorization.

    PubMed

    Uloza, Virgilijus; Padervinskis, Evaldas; Uloziene, Ingrida; Saferis, Viktoras; Verikas, Antanas

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the reliability of the measurements of acoustic voice parameters obtained simultaneously using oral and contact (throat) microphones and to investigate utility of combined use of these microphones for voice categorization. Voice samples of sustained vowel /a/ obtained from 157 subjects (105 healthy and 52 pathological voices) were recorded in a soundproof booth simultaneously through two microphones: oral AKG Perception 220 microphone (AKG Acoustics, Vienna, Austria) and contact (throat) Triumph PC microphone (Clearer Communications, Inc, Burnaby, Canada) placed on the lamina of thyroid cartilage. Acoustic voice signal data were measured for fundamental frequency, percent of jitter and shimmer, normalized noise energy, signal-to-noise ratio, and harmonic-to-noise ratio using Dr. Speech software (Tiger Electronics, Seattle, WA). The correlations of acoustic voice parameters in vocal performance were statistically significant and strong (r = 0.71-1.0) for the entire functional measurements obtained for the two microphones. When classifying into healthy-pathological voice classes, the oral-shimmer revealed the correct classification rate (CCR) of 75.2% and the throat-jitter revealed CCR of 70.7%. However, combination of both throat and oral microphones allowed identifying a set of three voice parameters: throat-signal-to-noise ratio, oral-shimmer, and oral-normalized noise energy, which provided the CCR of 80.3%. The measurements of acoustic voice parameters using a combination of oral and throat microphones showed to be reliable in clinical settings and demonstrated high CCRs when distinguishing the healthy and pathological voice patient groups. Our study validates the suitability of the throat microphone signal for the task of automatic voice analysis for the purpose of voice screening. Copyright © 2015 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Velocity measurements in whole blood using acoustic resolution photoacoustic Doppler

    PubMed Central

    Brunker, Joanna; Beard, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Acoustic resolution photoacoustic Doppler velocimetry promises to overcome the spatial resolution and depth penetration limitations of current blood flow measuring methods. Despite successful implementation using blood-mimicking fluids, measurements in blood have proved challenging, thus preventing in vivo application. A common explanation for this difficulty is that whole blood is insufficiently heterogeneous relative to detector frequencies of tens of MHz compatible with deep tissue photoacoustic measurements. Through rigorous experimental measurements we provide new insight that refutes this assertion. We show for the first time that, by careful choice of the detector frequency and field-of-view, and by employing novel signal processing methods, it is possible to make velocity measurements in whole blood using transducers with frequencies in the tens of MHz range. These findings have important implications for the prospects of making deep tissue measurements of blood flow relevant to the study of microcirculatory abnormalities associated with cancer, diabetes, atherosclerosis and other conditions. PMID:27446707

  15. Velocity measurements in whole blood using acoustic resolution photoacoustic Doppler.

    PubMed

    Brunker, Joanna; Beard, Paul

    2016-07-01

    Acoustic resolution photoacoustic Doppler velocimetry promises to overcome the spatial resolution and depth penetration limitations of current blood flow measuring methods. Despite successful implementation using blood-mimicking fluids, measurements in blood have proved challenging, thus preventing in vivo application. A common explanation for this difficulty is that whole blood is insufficiently heterogeneous relative to detector frequencies of tens of MHz compatible with deep tissue photoacoustic measurements. Through rigorous experimental measurements we provide new insight that refutes this assertion. We show for the first time that, by careful choice of the detector frequency and field-of-view, and by employing novel signal processing methods, it is possible to make velocity measurements in whole blood using transducers with frequencies in the tens of MHz range. These findings have important implications for the prospects of making deep tissue measurements of blood flow relevant to the study of microcirculatory abnormalities associated with cancer, diabetes, atherosclerosis and other conditions.

  16. Evaluation of disfluent speech by means of automatic acoustic measurements.

    PubMed

    Lustyk, Tomas; Bergl, Petr; Cmejla, Roman

    2014-03-01

    An experiment was carried out to determine whether the level of the speech fluency disorder can be estimated by means of automatic acoustic measurements. These measures analyze, for example, the amount of silence in a recording or the number of abrupt spectral changes in a speech signal. All the measures were designed to take into account symptoms of stuttering. In the experiment, 118 audio recordings of read speech by Czech native speakers were employed. The results indicate that the human-made rating of the speech fluency disorder in read speech can be predicted on the basis of automatic measurements. The number of abrupt spectral changes in the speech segments turns out to be the most appropriate measure to describe the overall speech performance. The results also imply that there are measures with good results describing partial symptoms (especially fixed postures without audible airflow).

  17. An Acoustic Measure for Word Prominence in Spontaneous Speech

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dagen; Narayanan, Shrikanth

    2010-01-01

    An algorithm for automatic speech prominence detection is reported in this paper. We describe a comparative analysis on various acoustic features for word prominence detection and report results using a spoken dialog corpus with manually assigned prominence labels. The focus is on features such as spectral intensity and speech rate that are directly extracted from speech based on a correlation-based approach without requiring explicit linguistic or phonetic knowledge. Additionally, various pitch-based measures are studied with respect to their discriminating ability for prominence detection. A parametric scheme for modeling pitch plateau is proposed and this feature alone is found to outperform the traditional local pitch statistics. Two sets of experiments are used to explore the usefulness of the acoustic score generated using these features. The first set focuses on a more traditional way of word prominence detection based on a manually-tagged corpus. A 76.8% classification accuracy was achieved on a corpus of role-playing spoken dialogs. Due to difficulties in manually tagging speech prominence into discrete levels (categories), the second set of experiments focuses on evaluating the score indirectly. Specifically, through experiments on the Switchboard corpus, it is shown that the proposed acoustic score can discriminate between content word and function words in a statistically significant way. The relation between speech prominence and content/function words is also explored. Since prominent words tend to be predominantly content words, and since content words can be automatically marked from text-derived part of speech (POS) information, it is shown that the proposed acoustic score can be indirectly cross-validated through POS information. PMID:20454538

  18. Diffraction correction for precision surface acoustic wave velocity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz M., Alberto; Nagy, Peter B.

    2002-09-01

    Surface wave dispersion measurements can be used to nondestructively characterize shot-peened, laser shock-peened, burnished, and otherwise surface-treated specimens. In recent years, there have been numerous efforts to separate the contribution of surface roughness from those of near-surface material variations, such as residual stress, texture, and increased dislocation density. As the accuracy of the dispersion measurements was gradually increased using state-of-the-art laser-ultrasonic scanning and sophisticated digital signal processing methods, it was recognized that a perceivable dispersive effect, similar to the one found on rough shot-peened specimens, is exhibited by untreated smooth surfaces as well. This dispersion effect is on the order of 0.1%, that is significantly higher than the experimental error associated with the measurements and comparable to the expected velocity change produced by near-surface compressive residual stresses in metals below their yield point. This paper demonstrates that the cause of this apparent dispersion is the diffraction of the surface acoustic wave (SAW) as it travels over the surface of the specimen. The results suggest that a diffraction correction may be introduced to increase the accuracy of surface wave dispersion measurements. A simple diffraction correction model was developed for surface waves and this correction was subsequently validated by laser-interferometric velocity measurements on aluminum specimens. copyright 2002 Acoustical Society of America.

  19. Compensating for ear-canal acoustics when measuring otoacoustic emissions.

    PubMed

    Charaziak, Karolina K; Shera, Christopher A

    2017-01-01

    Otoacoustic emissions (OAEs) provide an acoustic fingerprint of the inner ear, and changes in this fingerprint may indicate changes in cochlear function arising from efferent modulation, aging, noise trauma, and/or exposure to harmful agents. However, the reproducibility and diagnostic power of OAE measurements is compromised by the variable acoustics of the ear canal, in particular, by multiple reflections and the emergence of standing waves at relevant frequencies. Even when stimulus levels are controlled using methods that circumvent standing-wave problems (e.g., forward-pressure-level calibration), distortion-product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) levels vary with probe location by 10-15 dB near half-wave resonant frequencies. The method presented here estimates the initial outgoing OAE pressure wave at the eardrum from measurements of the conventional OAE, allowing one to separate the emitted OAE from the many reflections trapped in the ear canal. The emitted pressure level (EPL) represents the OAE level that would be recorded were the ear canal replaced by an infinite tube with no reflections. When DPOAEs are expressed using EPL, their variation with probe location decreases to the test-retest repeatability of measurements obtained at similar probe positions. EPL provides a powerful way to reduce the variability of OAE measurements and improve their ability to detect cochlear changes.

  20. Photo-acoustic tomography in a rotating measurement setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bal, Guillaume; Moradifam, Amir

    2016-10-01

    Photo-acoustic tomography (PAT) aims to leverage the photo-acoustic coupling between optical absorption of light sources and ultrasound (US) emission to obtain high contrast reconstructions of optical parameters with the high resolution of sonic waves. Quantitative PAT often involves a two-step procedure: first the map of sonic emission is reconstructed from US boundary measurements; and second optical properties of biological tissues are evaluated. We consider here a practical measurement setting in which such a separation does not apply. We assume that the optical source and an array of ultrasonic transducers are mounted on a rotating frame (in two or three dimensions) so that the light source rotates at the same time as the US measurements are acquired. As a consequence, we no longer have the option to reconstruct a map of sonic emission corresponding to a given optical illumination. We propose here a framework where the two steps are combined into one and an absorption map is directly reconstructed from the available US measurements.

  1. Acoustic measurement of the Deepwater Horizon Macondo well flow rate

    PubMed Central

    Camilli, Richard; Di Iorio, Daniela; Bowen, Andrew; Reddy, Christopher M.; Techet, Alexandra H.; Yoerger, Dana R.; Whitcomb, Louis L.; Seewald, Jeffrey S.; Sylva, Sean P.; Fenwick, Judith

    2012-01-01

    On May 31, 2010, a direct acoustic measurement method was used to quantify fluid leakage rate from the Deepwater Horizon Macondo well prior to removal of its broken riser. This method utilized an acoustic imaging sonar and acoustic Doppler sonar operating onboard a remotely operated vehicle for noncontact measurement of flow cross-section and velocity from the well’s two leak sites. Over 2,500 sonar cross-sections and over 85,000 Doppler velocity measurements were recorded during the acquisition process. These data were then applied to turbulent jet and plume flow models to account for entrained water and calculate a combined hydrocarbon flow rate from the two leak sites at seafloor conditions. Based on the chemical composition of end-member samples collected from within the well, this bulk volumetric rate was then normalized to account for contributions from gases and condensates at initial leak source conditions. Results from this investigation indicate that on May 31, 2010, the well’s oil flow rate was approximately 0.10 ± 0.017 m3 s-1 at seafloor conditions, or approximately 85 ± 15 kg s-1 (7.4 ± 1.3 Gg d-1), equivalent to approximately 57,000 ± 9,800 barrels of oil per day at surface conditions. End-member chemical composition indicates that this oil release rate was accompanied by approximately an additional 24 ± 4.2 kg s-1 (2.1 ± 0.37 Gg d-1) of natural gas (methane through pentanes), yielding a total hydrocarbon release rate of 110 ± 19 kg s-1 (9.5 ± 1.6 Gg d-1). PMID:21903931

  2. Acoustic measurement of the Deepwater Horizon Macondo well flow rate.

    PubMed

    Camilli, Richard; Di Iorio, Daniela; Bowen, Andrew; Reddy, Christopher M; Techet, Alexandra H; Yoerger, Dana R; Whitcomb, Louis L; Seewald, Jeffrey S; Sylva, Sean P; Fenwick, Judith

    2012-12-11

    On May 31, 2010, a direct acoustic measurement method was used to quantify fluid leakage rate from the Deepwater Horizon Macondo well prior to removal of its broken riser. This method utilized an acoustic imaging sonar and acoustic Doppler sonar operating onboard a remotely operated vehicle for noncontact measurement of flow cross-section and velocity from the well's two leak sites. Over 2,500 sonar cross-sections and over 85,000 Doppler velocity measurements were recorded during the acquisition process. These data were then applied to turbulent jet and plume flow models to account for entrained water and calculate a combined hydrocarbon flow rate from the two leak sites at seafloor conditions. Based on the chemical composition of end-member samples collected from within the well, this bulk volumetric rate was then normalized to account for contributions from gases and condensates at initial leak source conditions. Results from this investigation indicate that on May 31, 2010, the well's oil flow rate was approximately 0.10 ± 0.017 m(3) s(-1) at seafloor conditions, or approximately 85 ± 15 kg s(-1) (7.4 ± 1.3 Gg d(-1)), equivalent to approximately 57,000 ± 9,800 barrels of oil per day at surface conditions. End-member chemical composition indicates that this oil release rate was accompanied by approximately an additional 24 ± 4.2 kg s(-1) (2.1 ± 0.37 Gg d(-1)) of natural gas (methane through pentanes), yielding a total hydrocarbon release rate of 110 ± 19 kg s(-1) (9.5 ± 1.6 Gg d(-1)).

  3. A multidimensional investigation of children's /r/ productions: perceptual, ultrasound, and acoustic measures.

    PubMed

    Klein, Harriet B; McAllister Byun, Tara; Davidson, Lisa; Grigos, Maria I

    2013-08-01

    This study explored relationships among perceptual, ultrasound, and acoustic measurements of children's correct and misarticulated /r/ sounds. Longitudinal data documenting changes across these parameters were collected from 2 children who acquired /r/ over a period of intervention and were compared with data from children with typical speech. Participants were 3 children with typical speech, recorded once, and 2 children with /r/ misarticulation, recorded over 7-8 months. The following data from /r/ produced in nonwords were collected: perceptually rated accuracy, ultrasound measures of tongue shape, and F3 - F2 distance. Regression models revealed significant associations among perceptual, ultrasound, and acoustic measures of /r/ accuracy. The inclusion of quantitative tongue-shape measurements improved the match between the ultrasound and perceptual/acoustic data. Perceptually incorrect /r/ productions were found to feature posteriorly located peaked tongue shapes. Of the children who were seen longitudinally, 1 developed a bunched /r/ and 1 demonstrated retroflexion. The children with typical speech also differed in their tongue shapes. Results support the validity of using qualitative and quantitative ultrasound measures to characterize the accuracy of children's /r/ sounds. Clinically, findings suggest that it is important to encourage pharyngeal constriction while allowing children to find the /r/ tongue shape that best fits their individual vocal tract.

  4. A Multidimensional Investigation of Children’s /r/ Productions: Perceptual, Ultrasound, and Acoustic Measures

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Harriet B.; Byun, Tara McAllister; Davidson, Lisa; Grigos, Maria I.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This study explored relationships among perceptual, ultrasound, and acoustic measurements of children’s correct and misarticulated /r/ sounds. Longitudinal data documenting changes across these parameters were collected from 2 children who acquired /r/ over a period of intervention and were compared with data from children with typical speech. Method Participants were 3 children with typical speech, recorded once, and 2 children with /r/ misarticulation, recorded over 7–8 months. The following data from /r/ produced in nonwords were collected: perceptually rated accuracy, ultrasound measures of tongue shape, and F3 – F2 distance. Results Regression models revealed significant associations among perceptual, ultrasound, and acoustic measures of /r/ accuracy. The inclusion of quantitative tongue-shape measurements improved the match between the ultrasound and perceptual/acoustic data. Perceptually incorrect /r/ productions were found to feature posteriorly located peaked tongue shapes. Of the children who were seen longitudinally, 1 developed a bunched /r/ and 1 demonstrated retroflexion. The children with typical speech also differed in their tongue shapes. Conclusion Results support the validity of using qualitative and quantitative ultrasound measures to characterize the accuracy of children’s /r/ sounds. Clinically, findings suggest that it is important to encourage pharyngeal constriction while allowing children to find the /r/ tongue shape that best fits their individual vocal tract. PMID:23813195

  5. Measurement of stiffness of standing trees and felled logs using acoustics: A review.

    PubMed

    Legg, Mathew; Bradley, Stuart

    2016-02-01

    This paper provides a review on the use of acoustics to measure stiffness of standing trees, stems, and logs. An outline is given of the properties of wood and how these are related to stiffness and acoustic velocity throughout the tree. Factors are described that influence the speed of sound in wood, including the different types of acoustic waves which propagate in tree stems and lumber. Acoustic tools and techniques that have been used to measure the stiffness of wood are reviewed. The reasons for a systematic difference between direct and acoustic measurements of stiffness for standing trees, and methods for correction, are discussed. Other techniques, which have been used in addition to acoustics to try to improve stiffness measurements, are also briefly described. Also reviewed are studies which have used acoustic tools to investigate factors that influence the stiffness of trees. These factors include different silvicultural practices, geographic and environmental conditions, and genetics.

  6. Passive Wake Acoustics Measurements at Denver International Airport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Frank Y.; Wassaf, Hadi; Dougherty, Robert P.; Clark, Kevin; Gulsrud, Andrew; Fenichel, Neil; Bryant, Wayne H.

    2004-01-01

    From August to September 2003, NASA conducted an extensive measurement campaign to characterize the acoustic signal of wake vortices. A large, both spatially as well as in number of elements, phased microphone array was deployed at Denver International Airport for this effort. This paper will briefly describe the program background, the microphone array, as well as the supporting ground-truth and meteorological sensor suite. Sample results to date are then presented and discussed. It is seen that, in the frequency range processed so far, wake noise is generated predominantly from a very confined area around the cores.

  7. Measurement of food texture by an acoustic vibration method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakurai, Naoki; Taniwaki, Mitsuru; Iwatani, Shin-ichiro; Akimoto, Hidemi

    2011-09-01

    Food texture was measured by a new acoustic vibration method. A piezoelectric sensor sandwiched between a probe and piston was inserted into a food sample by delivery of silicon oil to a cylinder by a pump. Vibration emitted from the food sample on insertion of the probe was monitored by voltage outputs of the sensor. The voltage signals were passed through 19 half octave bands to calculate texture index for each band. The texture index was defined as vibration energy of the probe caused by the food rupture and/or breakage per unit time.

  8. Determination of rotor harmonic blade loads from acoustic measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasper, P. K.

    1975-01-01

    The magnitude of discrete frequency sound radiated by a rotating blade is strongly influenced by the presence of a nonuniform distribution of aerodynamic forces over the rotor disk. An analytical development and experimental results are provided for a technique by which harmonic blade loads are derived from acoustic measurements. The technique relates, on a one-to-one basis, the discrete frequency sound harmonic amplitudes measured at a point on the axis of rotation to the blade-load harmonic amplitudes. This technique was applied to acoustic data from two helicopter types and from a series of test results using the NASA-Langley Research Center rotor test facility. The inferred blade-load harmonics for the cases considered tended to follow an inverse power law relationship with harmonic blade-load number. Empirical curve fits to the data showed the harmonic fall-off rate to be in the range of 6 to 9 db per octave of harmonic order. These empirical relationships were subsequently used as input data in a compatible far field rotational noise prediction model. A comparison between predicted and measured off-axis sound harmonic levels is provided for the experimental cases considered.

  9. Analysis of acoustic reduction using spectral similarity measures.

    PubMed

    Hämäläinen, Annika; Gubian, Michele; ten Bosch, Louis; Boves, Lou

    2009-12-01

    Articulatory and acoustic reduction can manifest itself in the temporal and spectral domains. This study introduces a measure of spectral reduction, which is based on the speech decoding techniques commonly used in automatic speech recognizers. Using data for four frequent Dutch affixes from a large corpus of spontaneous face-to-face conversations, it builds on an earlier study examining the effects of lexical frequency on durational reduction in spoken Dutch [Pluymaekers, M. et al. (2005). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 118, 2561-2569], and compares the proposed measure of spectral reduction with duration as a measure of reduction. The results suggest that the spectral reduction scores capture other aspects of reduction than duration. While duration can--albeit to a moderate degree--be predicted by a number of linguistically motivated variables (such as word frequency, segmental context, and speech rate), the spectral reduction scores cannot. This suggests that the spectral reduction scores capture information that is not directly accounted for by the linguistically motivated variables. The results also show that the spectral reduction scores are able to predict a substantial amount of the variation in duration that the linguistically motivated variables do not account for.

  10. Measurement of surface acoustic wave resonances in ferroelectric domains by microwave microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Scott R.; Yang, Yongliang; Cui, Yong-Tao; Ma, Eric Yue; Kämpfe, Thomas; Eng, Lukas M.; Zhou, Jian; Chen, Yan-Feng; Lu, Minghui; Shen, Zhi-Xun

    2017-08-01

    Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) resonances were imaged within a closed domain in the ferroelectric LiTaO3 via scanning Microwave Impedance Microscopy (MIM). The MIM probe is used for both SAW generation and measurement, allowing the contact-less measurement within a mesoscopic structure. Measurements taken over a range of microwave frequencies are consistent with a constant acoustic velocity, demonstrating the acoustic nature of the measurement.

  11. Acoustic field characterization of a clinical magnetic resonance-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound system inside the magnet bore.

    PubMed

    Kothapalli, Satya V V N; Altman, Michael B; Partanen, Ari; Wan, Leighton; Gach, H Michael; Straube, William; Hallahan, Dennis E; Chen, Hong

    2017-09-01

    With the expanding clinical application of magnetic resonance-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU), acoustic field characterization of MR-HIFU systems is needed for facilitating regulatory approval and ensuring consistent and safe power output of HIFU transducers. However, the established acoustic field measurement techniques typically use equipment that cannot be used in a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) suite, thus posing a challenge to the development and execution of HIFU acoustic field characterization techniques. In this study, we developed and characterized a technique for HIFU acoustic field calibration within the MRI magnet bore, and validated the technique with standard hydrophone measurements outside of the MRI suite. A clinical Philips MR-HIFU system (Sonalleve V2, Philips, Vantaa, Finland) was used to assess the proposed technique. A fiber-optic hydrophone with a long fiber was inserted through a 24-gauge angiocatheter and fixed inside a water tank that was placed on the HIFU patient table above the acoustic window. The long fiber allowed the hydrophone control unit to be placed outside of the magnet room. The location of the fiber tip was traced on MR images, and the HIFU focal point was positioned at the fiber tip using the MR-HIFU therapy planning software. To perform acoustic field mapping inside the magnet, the HIFU focus was positioned relative to the fiber tip using an MRI-compatible 5-axis robotic transducer positioning system embedded in the HIFU patient table. To perform validation measurements of the acoustic fields, the HIFU table was moved out of the MRI suite, and a standard laboratory hydrophone measurement setup was used to perform acoustic field measurements outside the magnetic field. The pressure field scans along and across the acoustic beam path obtained inside the MRI bore were in good agreement with those obtained outside of the MRI suite. At the HIFU focus with varying nominal acoustic powers of 10-500 W, the

  12. Cepstral analysis of hypokinetic and ataxic voices: correlations with perceptual and other acoustic measures.

    PubMed

    Jannetts, Stephen; Lowit, Anja

    2014-11-01

    To investigate the validity of cepstral analyses against other conventional acoustic measures of voice quality in determining the perceptual impression in different motor speech disorders-hypokinetic and ataxic dysarthria, and speech tasks-prolonged vowels and connected speech. Prolonged vowel productions and connected speech samples (reading passages and monologues) from 43 participants with Parkinson disease and 10 speakers with ataxia were analyzed perceptually by a trained listener using GRBAS. In addition, acoustic measures of cepstral peak prominence (CPP), smoothed CPP (CPPs), harmonics-to-noise ratio (HNR), shimmer %, shimmer dB, amplitude perturbation quotient (APQ), relative average perturbation (RAP), jitter, and pitch perturbation quotient (PPQ) were performed. Statistical analysis involved correlations between perceptual and acoustic measures, as well as determination of differences across speaker groups and elicitation tasks. CPP and CPPs results showed greater levels of correlation with overall dysphonia, breathiness, and asthenia ratings than the other acoustic measures, except in the case of roughness. Sustained vowel production produced a higher number of significant correlations across all parameters other than connected speech, but task choice did not affect CPP and CPPs results. There were no significant differences in any parameters across the two speaker groups. The results of this study are consistent with the results of other studies investigating the same measures in speakers with nonmotor-related voice pathologies. In addition, there was an indication that they performed better in relation to asthenia, which might be particularly relevant for the current speaker group. The results support the clinical and research use of CPP and CPPs as a quantitative measure of voice quality in populations with motor speech disorder. Copyright © 2014 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Wideband acoustic immittance measures: developmental characteristics (0 to 12 months).

    PubMed

    Kei, Joseph; Sanford, Chris A; Prieve, Beth A; Hunter, Lisa L

    2013-07-01

    Rapid developmental changes of the peripheral auditory system in normal infants occur in the first year of life. Specifically, the postnatal development of the external and middle ear affects all measures of external and middle ear function including wideband acoustic immittance(WAI). This article provides an overview of WAI studies in newborns and infants from a developmental perspective. Normative WAI data in newborns are fairly consistent across studies. However, there are discrepancies in some WAI measures between studies, possibly due to differences in sampling, methodology, and instrumentation. Accuracy of WAI measurements is compromised when a good probe seal cannot be maintained during testing or an inaccurate estimate of the cross-sectional area of the ear canal of newborns occurs. Comparison of WAI data between age groups from 0 to 12 months reveals maturation effects. Additional age-specific longitudinal and cross-sectional normative WAI data for infants from birth to 12 months are required to validate and consolidate existing data.

  14. Measurements of Low-Frequency Acoustic Attenuation in Soils.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Engineering Research Laboratory to design an acoustic subsurface imaging system, a set of experiments was conducted in which the attenuation and the velocity...support of the U.S. Army Construction Engineering Research Laboratory’s efforts to design an acoustic subsurface imaging system which would ideally be...of acoustic waves such as those generated by a subsurface imaging system. An experiment reported in the literature characterized the acoustic

  15. Turbulent Diffusivity under High Winds from Acoustic Measurements of Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, D. W.; Wijesekera, H. W.; Jarosz, E.; Teague, W. J.; Pegau, W. S.

    2015-12-01

    Breaking surface waves generate layers of bubble clouds as air parcels entrain into the upper-ocean by the action of turbulent motions. The turbulent diffusivity in the bubble cloud layer was investigated by combining measurements of surface winds, waves, bubble acoustic backscatter, currents, and hydrography. These measurements were made at water depths of 60-90 m on the shelf of the Gulf of Alaska near Kayak Island during late December 2012, a period where the ocean was experiencing winds and significant wave heights up to 22 m s-1 and 9 m, respectively. Vertical profiles of acoustic backscatter decayed exponentially from the wave surface with e-folding lengths of about 0.6 to 6 m, while the bubble penetration depths were about 3 to 30 m. Both e-folding lengths and bubble depths were highly correlated with surface wind and wave conditions. The turbulent diffusion coefficients, inferred from e-folding length and bubble depth, varied from about 0.01 m2 s-1 to 0.4 m2 s-1. Our analysis suggests that the turbulent diffusivity in the bubble layer can be parameterized as a function of the cube of the wind friction velocity with a proportionality coefficient that depends weakly on wave age. Furthermore, in the bubble layer, on average, the shear production of the turbulent kinetic energy estimated by the diffusion coefficients was a similar order magnitude as the dissipation rate predicted by the wall boundary-layer theory.

  16. Classification of heart valve condition using acoustic measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, G.

    1994-11-15

    Prosthetic heart valves and the many great strides in valve design have been responsible for extending the life spans of many people with serious heart conditions. Even though the prosthetic valves are extremely reliable, they are eventually susceptible to long-term fatigue and structural failure effects expected from mechanical devices operating over long periods of time. The purpose of our work is to classify the condition of in vivo Bjork-Shiley Convexo-Concave (BSCC) heart valves by processing acoustic measurements of heart valve sounds. The structural failures of interest for Bscc valves is called single leg separation (SLS). SLS can occur if the outlet strut cracks and separates from the main structure of the valve. We measure acoustic opening and closing sounds (waveforms) using high sensitivity contact microphones on the patient`s thorax. For our analysis, we focus our processing and classification efforts on the opening sounds because they yield direct information about outlet strut condition with minimal distortion caused by energy radiated from the valve disc.

  17. Modeling and Measuring Acoustic Backscatter from Fish Aggregations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-09-30

    of the abundance, spatial distribution, schooling behaviour and acoustic backscatter of the Namibian pilchard. Cruise Report 99-4, Dr. Fridtjof ... Nansen . 103 pp. Rudstam, L, Horne, J., Fleischer, G. Report from the Great Lakes Acoustic Workshop III: Translation of acoustic data to fish abundance

  18. Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Jerry R.; Grosveld, Ferdinand

    2007-01-01

    The acoustics environment in space operations is important to maintain at manageable levels so that the crewperson can remain safe, functional, effective, and reasonably comfortable. High acoustic levels can produce temporary or permanent hearing loss, or cause other physiological symptoms such as auditory pain, headaches, discomfort, strain in the vocal cords, or fatigue. Noise is defined as undesirable sound. Excessive noise may result in psychological effects such as irritability, inability to concentrate, decrease in productivity, annoyance, errors in judgment, and distraction. A noisy environment can also result in the inability to sleep, or sleep well. Elevated noise levels can affect the ability to communicate, understand what is being said, hear what is going on in the environment, degrade crew performance and operations, and create habitability concerns. Superfluous noise emissions can also create the inability to hear alarms or other important auditory cues such as an equipment malfunctioning. Recent space flight experience, evaluations of the requirements in crew habitable areas, and lessons learned (Goodman 2003; Allen and Goodman 2003; Pilkinton 2003; Grosveld et al. 2003) show the importance of maintaining an acceptable acoustics environment. This is best accomplished by having a high-quality set of limits/requirements early in the program, the "designing in" of acoustics in the development of hardware and systems, and by monitoring, testing and verifying the levels to ensure that they are acceptable.

  19. Relationship between acoustic measures and speech naturalness ratings in Parkinson's disease: A within-speaker approach.

    PubMed

    Klopfenstein, Marie

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the acoustic basis of across-utterance, within-speaker variation in speech naturalness for four speakers with dysarthria secondary to Parkinson's disease (PD). Speakers read sentences and produced spontaneous speech. Acoustic measures of fundamental frequency, phrase-final syllable lengthening, intensity and speech rate were obtained. A group of listeners judged speech naturalness using a nine-point Likert scale. Relationships between judgements of speech naturalness and acoustic measures were determined for individual speakers with PD. Relationships among acoustic measures also were quantified. Despite variability between speakers, measures of mean F0, intensity range, articulation rate, average syllable duration, duration of final syllables, vocalic nucleus length of final unstressed syllables and pitch accent of final syllables emerged as possible acoustic variables contributing to within-speaker variations in speech naturalness. Results suggest that acoustic measures correlate with speech naturalness, but in dysarthric speech they depend on the speaker due to the within-speaker variation in speech impairment.

  20. Measuring Behavioral Individuality in the Acoustic Startle Behavior in Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Pantoja, Carlos; Hoagland, Adam; Carroll, Elizabeth; Schoppik, David; Isacoff, Ehud Y

    2017-04-05

    The objective of this protocol is to provide a detailed description for the construction and use of a behavioral apparatus, the zBox, for high-throughput behavioral measurements in larval zebrafish (Danio rerio). The zBox is used to measure behavior in multiple individuals simultaneously. Individual fish are housed in wells of multi-well plates and receive acoustic/vibration stimuli with simultaneous recording of behavior. Automated analysis of behavioral movies is performed with MATLAB scripts. This protocol was adapted from two of our previously published papers (Levitz et al., 2013; Pantoja et al., 2016). The zBox provides an easy to setup flexible platform for behavioral experiments in zebrafish larvae.

  1. Acoustic measurement of the surface tension of levitated drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, E. H.; Marston, P. L.; Robey, J. L.

    1988-01-01

    The measurement of the frequency of the fundamental mode of shape oscillation of acoustically levitated drops has been carried out to determine the surface tension of the drop material. Sound fields of about 20 kHz in frequency allow the suspension of drops a few millimeters in size, as well as the necessary drive for oscillations. The surface tension of water, hexadecane, silicone oil, and aqueous solutions of glycerin levitated in air has been measured, and the results have been compared with those obtained with standard ring tensiometry. The two sets of data are in good agreement, the largest discrepancy being about 10 percent. Uncertainties in the effects of the nonspherical static shape of drops levitated in the earth's gravitational field and the rotation state of the sample are the major contributors to the experimental error. A decrease of the resonance frequency of the fundamental mode indicates a soft nonlinearity as the oscillation amplitude increases.

  2. Acoustic measurement of the surface tension of levitated drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, E. H.; Marston, P. L.; Robey, J. L.

    1988-01-01

    The measurement of the frequency of the fundamental mode of shape oscillation of acoustically levitated drops has been carried out to determine the surface tension of the drop material. Sound fields of about 20 kHz in frequency allow the suspension of drops a few millimeters in size, as well as the necessary drive for oscillations. The surface tension of water, hexadecane, silicone oil, and aqueous solutions of glycerin levitated in air has been measured, and the results have been compared with those obtained with standard ring tensiometry. The two sets of data are in good agreement, the largest discrepancy being about 10 percent. Uncertainties in the effects of the nonspherical static shape of drops levitated in the earth's gravitational field and the rotation state of the sample are the major contributors to the experimental error. A decrease of the resonance frequency of the fundamental mode indicates a soft nonlinearity as the oscillation amplitude increases.

  3. Measured acoustic properties of variable and low density bulk absorbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahl, M. D.; Rice, E. J.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental data were taken to determine the acoustic absorbing properties of uniform low density and layered variable density samples using a bulk absober with a perforated plate facing to hold the material in place. In the layered variable density case, the bulk absorber was packed such that the lowest density layer began at the surface of the sample and progressed to higher density layers deeper inside. The samples were placed in a rectangular duct and measurements were taken using the two microphone method. The data were used to calculate specific acoustic impedances and normal incidence absorption coefficients. Results showed that for uniform density samples the absorption coefficient at low frequencies decreased with increasing density and resonances occurred in the absorption coefficient curve at lower densities. These results were confirmed by a model for uniform density bulk absorbers. Results from layered variable density samples showed that low frequency absorption was the highest when the lowest density possible was packed in the first layer near the exposed surface. The layers of increasing density within the sample had the effect of damping the resonances.

  4. Measurement and Characterization of Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor Plume Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, Robert Jeremy

    2009-01-01

    NASA's current models to predict lift-off acoustics for launch vehicles are currently being updated using several numerical and empirical inputs. One empirical input comes from free-field acoustic data measured at three Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) static firings. The measurements were collected by a joint collaboration between NASA - Marshall Space Flight Center, Wyle Labs, and ATK Launch Systems. For the first time NASA measured large-thrust solid rocket motor plume acoustics for evaluation of both noise sources and acoustic radiation properties. Over sixty acoustic free-field measurements were taken over the three static firings to support evaluation of acoustic radiation near the rocket plume, far-field acoustic radiation patterns, plume acoustic power efficiencies, and apparent noise source locations within the plume. At approximately 67 m off nozzle centerline and 70 m downstream of the nozzle exit plan, the measured overall sound pressure level of the RSRM was 155 dB. Peak overall levels in the far field were over 140 dB at 300 m and 50-deg off of the RSRM thrust centerline. The successful collaboration has yielded valuable data that are being implemented into NASA's lift-off acoustic models, which will then be used to update predictions for Ares I and Ares V liftoff acoustic environments.

  5. Acoustic Environment of Admiralty Inlet: Broadband Noise Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Jinshan; Deng, Zhiqun; Martinez, Jayson J.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Myers, Joshua R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Jones, Mark E.

    2011-09-30

    Admiralty Inlet has been selected as a potential tidal energy site. It is located near shipping lanes, is a highly variable acoustic environment, and is frequented by the highly endangered southern resident killer whale (SRKW). Resolving environmental impacts is the first step to receiving approval to deploy tidal turbines at Admiralty Inlet. Of particular concern is the potential for blade strike or other negative interactions between the SRKW and the tidal turbine. A variety of technologies including passive and active monitoring systems are being considered as potential tools to determine the presence of SRKW in the vicinity of the turbines. Broadband noise level measurements are critical for the determination of design and operation specifications of all marine and hydrokinetic energy capture technologies. Acoustic environment data at the proposed site was acquired at different depths using a cabled vertical line array (VLA) with four calibrated hydrophones. The sound pressure level (SPL) power spectrum density was estimated based on the fast Fourier transform. This study describes the first broadband SPL measurements for this site at different depths with frequency ranging from 10 kHz to 480 kHz in combination with other information. To understand the SPL caused by this bedload transport, three different pressure sensors with temperature and conductivity were also assembled on the VLA to measure the conditions at the hydrophone deployment depth. The broadband SPL levels at frequency ranges of 3 kHz to 7 kHz as a function of depth were estimated. Only the hydrophone at an average depth of 40 m showed the strong dependence of SPL with distance from the bottom, which was possibly caused by the cobbles shifting on the seabed. Automatic Identification System data were also studied to understand the SPL measurements.

  6. Prediction and Measurement of the Vibration and Acoustic Radiation of Panels Subjected to Acoustic Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Travis L.; Rizzi, Stephen A.

    1995-01-01

    Interior noise and sonic fatigue are important issues in the development and design of advanced subsonic and supersonic aircraft. Conventional aircraft typically employ passive treatments, such as constrained layer damping and acoustic absorption materials, to reduce the structural response and resulting acoustic levels in the aircraft interior. These techniques require significant addition of mass and only attenuate relatively high frequency noise transmitted through the fuselage. Although structural acoustic coupling is in general very important in the study of aircraft fuselage interior noise, analysis of noise transmission through a panel supported in an infinite rigid baffle (separating two semi-infinite acoustic domains) can be useful in evaluating the effects of active/adaptive materials, complex loading, etc. Recent work has been aimed at developing adaptive and/or active methods of controlling the structural acoustic response of panels to reduce the transmitted noise1. A finite element formulation was recently developed to study the dynamic response of shape memory alloy (SMA) hybrid composite panels (conventional composite panel with embedded SMA fibers) subject to combined acoustic and thermal loads2. Further analysis has been performed to predict the far-field acoustic radiation using the finite element dynamic panel response prediction3. The purpose of the present work is to validate the panel vibration and acoustic radiation prediction methods with baseline experimental results obtained from an isotropic panel, without the effect of SMA.

  7. Prediction and Measurement of the Vibration and Acoustic Radiation of Panels Subjected to Acoustic Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Travis L.; Rizzi, Stephen A.

    1995-01-01

    Interior noise and sonic fatigue are important issues in the development and design of advanced subsonic and supersonic aircraft. Conventional aircraft typically employ passive treatments, such as constrained layer damping and acoustic absorption materials, to reduce the structural response and resulting acoustic levels in the aircraft interior. These techniques require significant addition of mass and only attenuate relatively high frequency noise transmitted through the fuselage. Although structural acoustic coupling is in general very important in the study of aircraft fuselage interior noise, analysis of noise transmission through a panel supported in an infinite rigid baffle (separating two semi-infinite acoustic domains) can be useful in evaluating the effects of active/adaptive materials, complex loading, etc. Recent work has been aimed at developing adaptive and/or active methods of controlling the structural acoustic response of panels to reduce the transmitted noise1. A finite element formulation was recently developed to study the dynamic response of shape memory alloy (SMA) hybrid composite panels (conventional composite panel with embedded SMA fibers) subject to combined acoustic and thermal loads2. Further analysis has been performed to predict the far-field acoustic radiation using the finite element dynamic panel response prediction3. The purpose of the present work is to validate the panel vibration and acoustic radiation prediction methods with baseline experimental results obtained from an isotropic panel, without the effect of SMA.

  8. An Ultrasonic Caliper Device for Measuring Acoustic Nonlinearity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, Christopher; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.; Maxwell, Adam D.; Khokhlova, Vera A.; Wang, Yak-Nam; MacConaghy, Brian; Kreider, Wayne

    In medical and industrial ultrasound, it is often necessary to measure the acoustic properties of a material. A specific medical application requires measurements of sound speed, attenuation, and nonlinearity to characterize livers being evaluated for transplantation. For this application, a transmission-mode caliper device is proposed in which both transmit and receive transducers are directly coupled to a test sample, the propagation distance is measured with an indicator gage, and receive waveforms are recorded for analysis. In this configuration, accurate measurements of nonlinearity present particular challenges: diffraction effects can be considerable while nonlinear distortions over short distances typically remain small. To enable simple estimates of the nonlinearity coeffcient from a quasi-linear approximation to the lossless Burgers' equation, the calipers utilize a large transmitter and plane waves are measured at distances of 15-50 mm. Waves at 667 kHz and pressures between 0.1 and 1 MPa were generated and measured in water at different distances; the nonlinearity coeffcient of water was estimated from these measurements with a variability of approximately 10%. Ongoing efforts seek to test caliper performance in other media and improve accuracy via additional transducer calibrations.

  9. Fiber-optic sensor systems for acoustic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Miao

    In this dissertation, fiber-optic sensor systems for high-bandwidth acoustic measurements are studied and developed. As a part of this work, investigations into mechanical elements, optical elements, and sensor signal modulation and demodulation schemes are conducted. Two fiber-optic sensor systems are developed and demonstrated, one being an intrinsic sensing scheme constructed from a Bragg grating based Fabry-Perot (BGFP) sensor system and the other being an extrinsic sensing scheme constructed from a fiber tip based Fabry-Perot (FTFP) sensor system. The primary mechanical element in both sensor systems is a diaphragm. A comprehensive model based on a plate with in-plane tension is found to cover the extreme cases of plate models and membrane models and the in-between models. This analysis and related results, which are especially important for designing sensors on a small scale, is believed to be one of the fundamental contributions of this work. Differing from the existing fiber-optic acoustic measurement techniques based on conventional interferometry, here, the optical system design is based on low coherence fiber-optic interferometry (LCFOI); this scheme has a high dynamic range and it is not very sensitive to wavelength fluctuations in the light source. The use of LCFOI technique to realize a fiber-optic microphone is another contribution of this work. In addition, a novel phase modulation and demodulation scheme, which is based on a digital phase stepping modulation and demodulation algorithm, is developed to carry out high-speed real-time phase demodulation. Without requiring the use of any hardware demodulators, active control elements, and multiple readout interferometers, for the first time, this scheme makes it possible to demodulate a phase signal from a sensor system with a "small" cavity length. Overall, the FTFP sensor system is shown to exhibit good performance and have a capability for measuring acoustic pressure in the frequency range of 20 Hz

  10. Clinical Concerns About Clinical Performance Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Werner, Rachel M.; Asch, David A.

    2007-01-01

    Performance measurement has become one of the foundations of current efforts to improve health care quality and has successfully increased compliance with practice guidelines in many settings. Despite the successes of performance measurement, many physicians remain apprehensive about its use because performance measurement “gets in the way of” delivering good care. There are several reasons clinicians might feel this way. First, performance measurement is increasingly being extended to areas that have only a small clinical benefit and thus risk diverting attention from other more important but unmeasured aspects of care. Second, most performance measurement systems provide no priority for following guidelines likely to yield a large clinical benefit compared with guidelines likely to yield at best a small clinical benefit. Third, performance measures focus physicians’ attention narrowly on compliance with those measures rather than more broadly on the needs of the individual patient. Because performance measures are evaluated at the level of the indicator, they may crowd out quality at the level of the patient that is equally important but that cannot be easily measured. Performance measures play an important role in improving health care quality and will undoubtedly continue to do so; however, they are only one part of the solution to improving health care quality. Good performance is not necessarily good care, and pressure to improve performance can come at the sacrifice of good care. In its current state, performance measurement is better suited to improving measured care than improving the care of individual patients. PMID:17389541

  11. Portable Multi Hydrophone Array for Field and Laboratory Measurements of Odontocete Acoustic Signals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    Measurements of Odontocete Acoustic Signals Paul E. Nachtigall University of Hawaii 2530 Dole Street Sakamaki D-200 Honolulu, HI 96822 phone...profiles of acoustic signals of several species of odontocetes can be collected and analyzed in order to provide better verification of signals...collected via passive acoustic monitoring. Additionally, because the array is versatile and portable, other sound sources can be measured and described in

  12. Application of acoustic doppler velocimeters for streamflow measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rehmel, M.

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) principally has used Price AA and Price pygmy mechanical current meters for measurement of discharge. New technologies have resulted in the introduction of alternatives to the Price meters. One alternative, the FlowTracker acoustic Doppler velocimeter, was designed by SonTek/YSI to make streamflow measurements in wadeable conditions. The device measures a point velocity and can be used with standard midsection method algorithms to compute streamflow. The USGS collected 55 quality-assurance measurements with the FlowTracker at 43 different USGS streamflow-gaging stations across the United States, with mean depths from 0.05to0.67m, mean velocities from 13 to 60 cm/s, and discharges from 0.02 to 12.4m3/s. These measurements were compared with Price mechanical current meter measurements. Analysis of the comparisons shows that the FlowTracker discharges were not statistically different from the Price meter discharges at a 95% confidence level. ?? 2007 ASCE.

  13. Measurement of ultrasonic power and electro-acoustic efficiency of high power transducers.

    PubMed

    Lin, S; Zhang, F

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, an improved method for the measurement of acoustic power and electro-acoustic efficiency of high power ultrasonic transducers is presented. The measuring principle is described, the experimental results are given. In comparison with traditional methods, the method presented in this paper has the advantages of simplicity, economy and practicality. The most important is that it can measure the output acoustic power and the electro-acoustic efficiency of the transducer under the condition of high power and practical applications, such as ultrasonic cleaning and soldering.

  14. Pulse Transit Time Measurement Using Seismocardiogram, Photoplethysmogram, and Acoustic Recordings: Evaluation and Comparison.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chenxi; Tavassolian, Negar

    2017-04-24

    This work proposes a novel method of pulse transit time measurement. The proximal arterial location data is collected from seismocardiogram (SCG) recordings by placing a MEMS accelerometer on the chest wall. The distal arterial location data is recorded using an acoustic sensor placed inside the ear. The performance of distal location recordings is evaluated by comparing SCG-acoustic and SCG-Photoplethysmogram (PPG) measurements. PPG and acoustic performances under motion noise are also compared. Experimental results suggest comparable performances for the acoustic-based and PPG-based devices. The feasibility of each PTT measurement method is validated for blood pressure (BP) evaluations and its limitations are analyzed.

  15. Phase averaged acoustic measurements for a Mach number 0.6 jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, G. L.; Emami, S.

    1984-01-01

    Acoustic phase (ensemble) averaged measurements were performed in a cold, axisymmetric, Mach number 0.6 jet of air. These measurements show that the noise directly radiated by the coherent structure in the jet flow field was responsible for the directivity of the acoustic field. Comparison of phase averaged acoustic spectra with phase averaged radial velocity fluctuations within the jet illustrate the direct link between the two and show that different regions of the jet are responsible for producing the noise measured at various locations in the acoustic field.

  16. Pulsed electro-acoustic (PEA) measurements of embedded charge distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennison, J. R.; Pearson, Lee H.

    2013-09-01

    Knowledge of the spatial distribution and evolution of embedded charge in thin dielectric materials has important applications in semiconductor, high-power electronic device, high-voltage DC power cable insulation, high-energy and plasma physics apparatus, and spacecraft industries. Knowing how, where, and how much charge accumulates and how it redistributes and dissipates can predict destructive charging effects. Pulsed Electro-acoustic (PEA) measurements— and two closely related methods, Pressure Wave Propagation (PWP) and Laser Intensity Modulation (LIMM)— nondestructively probe such internal charge distributions. We review the instrumentation, methods, theory and signal processing of simple PEA experiments, as well as the related PPW and LIMM methods. We emphasize system improvements required to achieve high spatial resolution for in vacuo measurements of thin dielectrics charged using electron beam injection.

  17. Surface Acoustic Wave Vibration Sensors for Measuring Aircraft Flutter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, William C.; Moore, Jason P.; Juarez, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    Under NASA's Advanced Air Vehicles Program the Advanced Air Transport Technology (AATT) Project is investigating flutter effects on aeroelastic wings. To support that work a new method for measuring vibrations due to flutter has been developed. The method employs low power Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) sensors. To demonstrate the ability of the SAW sensor to detect flutter vibrations the sensors were attached to a Carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite panel which was vibrated at six frequencies from 1Hz to 50Hz. The SAW data was compared to accelerometer data and was found to resemble sine waves and match each other closely. The SAW module design and results from the tests are presented here.

  18. Measurements of atmospheric turbulence effects on tail rotor acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagen, Martin J.; Yamauchi, Gloria K.; Signor, David B.; Mosher, Marianne

    1994-01-01

    Results from an outdoor hover test of a full-scale Lynx tail rotor are presented. The investigation was designed to further the understanding of the acoustics of an isolated tail rotor hovering out-of-ground effect in atmospheric turbulence, without the effects of the main rotor wake or other helicopter components. Measurements include simultaneous rotor performance, noise, inflow, and far-field atmospheric turbulence. Results with grid-generated inflow turbulence are also presented. The effects of atmospheric turbulence ingestion on rotor noise are quantified. In contradiction to current theories, increasing rotor inflow and rotor thrust were found to increase turbulence ingestion noise. This is the final report of Task 13A--Helicopter Tail Rotor Noise, of the NASA/United Kingdom Defense Research Agency cooperative Aeronautics Research Program.

  19. Effects of ingested atmospheric turbulence on measured tail rotor acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Signor, David B.; Yamauchi, Gloria K.; Mosher, Marianne; Hagen, Martin J.; George, Albert R.

    1992-01-01

    Results from an outdoor hover test of a full-scale Lynx tail rotor are presented. The investigation was designed to further the understanding of the acoustics of an isolated tail rotor hovering out-of-ground effect in atmospheric turbulence, without the effects of the main rotor wake or other helicopter components. Measurements include simultaneous rotor performance, noise, inflow, and far-field atmospheric turbulence. Results with grid-generated inflow turbulence are also presented. The effects of turbulence ingestion on rotor noise are quantified. Turbulence ingestion noise is found to be the dominant noise mechanism at locations near the rotor axis. At these locations, the sound radiated by the hovering rotor increases with both increasing atmospheric wind speed and ingested rms turbulent velocity.

  20. Determination of particle size distributions from acoustic wave propagation measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Spelt, P.D.; Norato, M.A.; Sangani, A.S.; Tavlarides, L.L.

    1999-05-01

    The wave equations for the interior and exterior of the particles are ensemble averaged and combined with an analysis by Allegra and Hawley [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. {bold 51}, 1545 (1972)] for the interaction of a single particle with the incident wave to determine the phase speed and attenuation of sound waves propagating through dilute slurries. The theory is shown to compare very well with the measured attenuation. The inverse problem, i.e., the problem of determining the particle size distribution given the attenuation as a function of frequency, is examined using regularization techniques that have been successful for bubbly liquids. It is shown that, unlike the bubbly liquids, the success of solving the inverse problem is limited since it depends strongly on the nature of particles and the frequency range used in inverse calculations. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  1. Acoustic measurements of a full-scale coaxial helicopter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mosher, M.; Peterson, R. L.

    1983-01-01

    Acoustic data were obtained during a full-scale test of the XH-59A Advancing Blade Concept (ABC) Technology Demonstrator in the NASA Ames 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel. The XH-59A is a research helicopter with two coaxial rotors and hingeless blades. Performance, vibration, noise at various forward speeds, rotor lift coefficients, and rotor shaft angles of attack were investigated. In general, the noise level is shown to increase with rotor lift coefficient except under certain operating conditions where it is increased by significant impulsive blade/vortex interactions. The impulsivity appears to depend upon how the lift is distributed between the two rotors. The noise levels measured are shown to be slightly higher than on a modern conventional rotor tested in the same facility.

  2. Picosecond Acoustic Measurement of Anisotropic Properties of Thin Films

    SciTech Connect

    Perton, M.; Rossignol, C.; Chigarev, N.; Audoin, B.

    2007-03-21

    Properties of thin metallic films have been studied extensively by means of laser-picosecond ultrasonics. Generation of longitudinal and shear waves via thermoelastic mechanism and large source has been only demonstrated for waves vectors along the normal to the interface. However, such measurements cannot provide complete information about elastic properties of films. As it has been already shown for nanosecond ultrasonics, the knowledge of group or phase velocities in several directions for sources with small lateral size allows determining the stiffness tensor coefficients of a sample. The experimental set-up was prepared to obtain the thinnest size for the source to achieve acoustic diffraction. The identification of the stiffness tensor components, based on the inversion of the bulk waves phase velocities, is applied to signals simulated and experimentally recorded for a material with hexagonal properties. First estimation of stiffness tensor coefficients for thin metallic film 2.1 {mu}m has been performed.

  3. International Congress on Acoustic Intensity Measurement: Measurement Techniques and Applications, 2nd, Senlis, France, September 23-26, 1985, Proceedings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Recent developments in acoustic-intensity measurement are discussed in reviews and reports of theoretical and experimental investigations. Instrumentation, vector acoustics, sound radiation, intensity in the presence of flow, intensity in structures, sound power, source localization, impedance, absorption, and transmission are the fields covered by the contributions. Specific topics addressed include microphone configurations for intensity probes, the rotational structure of intensity fields, acoustic intensity and numerical simulation, sound-power measurement in the presence of background noise, and techniques for measuring the absorption coefficient of acoustic materials. Graphs, drawings, diagrams, tables of numerical data, and photographs of test setups are provided.

  4. Measurement of the Acoustic Nonlinearity Parameter for Biological Media.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobb, Wesley Nelson

    In vitro measurements of the acoustic nonlinearity parameter are presented for several biological media. With these measurements it is possible to predict the distortion of a finite amplitude wave in biological tissues of current diagnostic and research interest. The measurement method is based on the finite amplitude distortion of a sine wave that is emmitted by a piston source. The growth of the second harmonic component of this wave is measured by a piston receiver which is coaxial with and has the same size as the source. The experimental measurements and theory are compared in order to determine the nonlinearity parameter. The density, sound speed, and attenuation for the medium are determined in order to make this comparison. The theory developed for this study accounts for the influence of both diffraction and attenuation on the experimental measurements. The effects of dispersion, tissue inhomogeneity and gas bubbles within the excised tissues are studied. To test the measurement method, experimental results are compared with established values for the nonlinearity parameter of distilled water, ethylene glycol and glycerol. The agreement between these values suggests that the measurement uncertainty is (+OR-) 5% for liquids and (+OR-) 10% for solid tissues. Measurements are presented for dog blood and bovine serum albumen as a function of concentration. The nonlinearity parameters for liver, kidney and spleen are reported for both human and canine tissues. The values for the fresh tissues displayed little variation (6.8 to 7.8). Measurements for fixed, normal and cirrhotic tissues indicated that the nonlinearity parameter does not depend strongly on pathology. However, the values for fixed tissues were somewhat higher than those of the fresh tissues.

  5. Measurement of Bubble Size Distribution Based on Acoustic Propagation in Bubbly Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiongjun; Hsiao, Chao-Tsung; Choi, Jin-Keun; Chahine, Georges

    2013-03-01

    Acoustic properties are strongly affected by bubble size distribution in a bubbly medium. Measurement of the acoustic transmission becomes increasingly difficulty as the void fraction of the bubbly medium increases due to strong attenuation, while acoustic reflection can be measured more easily with increasing void fraction. The ABS ACOUSTIC BUBBLE SPECTROMETER®\\copyright, an instrument for bubble size measurement that is under development tries to take full advantage of the properties of acoustic propagation in bubbly media to extract bubble size distribution. Properties of both acoustic transmission and reflection in the bubbly medium from a range of short single-frequency bursts of acoustic waves at different frequencies are measured in an effort to deduce the bubble size distribution. With the combination of both acoustic transmission and reflection, assisted with validations from photography, the ABS ACOUSTIC BUBBLE SPECTROMETER®\\copyright has the potential to measure bubble size distributions in a wider void fraction range. This work was sponsored by Department of Energy SBIR program

  6. Reliability of Phase Velocity Measurements of Flexural Acoustic Waves in the Human Tibia In-Vivo.

    PubMed

    Vogl, Florian; Schnüriger, Karin; Gerber, Hans; Taylor, William R

    2016-01-01

    Axial-transmission acoustics have shown to be a promising technique to measure individual bone properties and detect bone pathologies. With the ultimate goal being the in-vivo application of such systems, quantification of the key aspects governing the reliability is crucial to bring this method towards clinical use. This work presents a systematic reliability study quantifying the sources of variability and their magnitudes of in-vivo measurements using axial-transmission acoustics. 42 healthy subjects were measured by an experienced operator twice per week, over a four-month period, resulting in over 150000 wave measurements. In a complementary study to assess the influence of different operators performing the measurements, 10 novice operators were trained, and each measured 5 subjects on a single occasion, using the same measurement protocol as in the first part of the study. The estimated standard error for the measurement protocol used to collect the study data was ∼ 17 m/s (∼ 4% of the grand mean) and the index of dependability, as a measure of reliability, was Φ = 0.81. It was shown that the method is suitable for multi-operator use and that the reliability can be improved efficiently by additional measurements with device repositioning, while additional measurements without repositioning cannot improve the reliability substantially. Phase velocity values were found to be significantly higher in males than in females (p < 10-5) and an intra-class correlation coefficient of r = 0.70 was found between the legs of each subject. The high reliability of this non-invasive approach and its intrinsic sensitivity to mechanical properties opens perspectives for the rapid and inexpensive clinical assessment of bone pathologies, as well as for monitoring programmes without any radiation exposure for the patient.

  7. Reliability of Phase Velocity Measurements of Flexural Acoustic Waves in the Human Tibia In-Vivo

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Axial-transmission acoustics have shown to be a promising technique to measure individual bone properties and detect bone pathologies. With the ultimate goal being the in-vivo application of such systems, quantification of the key aspects governing the reliability is crucial to bring this method towards clinical use. Materials and Methods This work presents a systematic reliability study quantifying the sources of variability and their magnitudes of in-vivo measurements using axial-transmission acoustics. 42 healthy subjects were measured by an experienced operator twice per week, over a four-month period, resulting in over 150000 wave measurements. In a complementary study to assess the influence of different operators performing the measurements, 10 novice operators were trained, and each measured 5 subjects on a single occasion, using the same measurement protocol as in the first part of the study. Results The estimated standard error for the measurement protocol used to collect the study data was ∼ 17 m/s (∼ 4% of the grand mean) and the index of dependability, as a measure of reliability, was Φ = 0.81. It was shown that the method is suitable for multi-operator use and that the reliability can be improved efficiently by additional measurements with device repositioning, while additional measurements without repositioning cannot improve the reliability substantially. Phase velocity values were found to be significantly higher in males than in females (p < 10−5) and an intra-class correlation coefficient of r = 0.70 was found between the legs of each subject. Conclusions The high reliability of this non-invasive approach and its intrinsic sensitivity to mechanical properties opens perspectives for the rapid and inexpensive clinical assessment of bone pathologies, as well as for monitoring programmes without any radiation exposure for the patient. PMID:27015093

  8. Acoustic measurements of F-16 aircraft operating in hush house, NSN 4920-02-070-2721

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, V. R.; Plzak, G. A.; Chinn, J. M.

    1981-09-01

    The purpose of this test program was to measure the acoustic environment in the hush house facility located at Kelly Air Force Base, Texas, during operation of the F-16 aircraft to ensure that aircraft structural acoustic design limits were not exceeded. The acoustic measurements showed that no sonic fatigue problems are anticipated with the F-16 aircraft aft fuselage structure during operation in the hush house. The measured acoustic levels were less than those measured in an F-16 aircraft water cooled hush house at Hill AFB, but were increased over that measured during ground run up. It was recommended that the acoustic loads measured in this program should be specified in the structural design criteria for aircraft which will be subjected to hush house operation or defining requirements for associated equipment.

  9. Relationships between vocal function measures derived from an acoustic microphone and a subglottal neck-surface accelerometer

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Daryush D.; Van Stan, Jarrad H.; Hillman, Robert E.

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring subglottal neck-surface acceleration has received renewed attention due to the ability of low-profile accelerometers to confidentially and noninvasively track properties related to normal and disordered voice characteristics and behavior. This study investigated the ability of subglottal neck-surface acceleration to yield vocal function measures traditionally derived from the acoustic voice signal and help guide the development of clinically functional accelerometer-based measures from a physiological perspective. Results are reported for 82 adult speakers with voice disorders and 52 adult speakers with normal voices who produced the sustained vowels /a/, /i/, and /u/ at a comfortable pitch and loudness during the simultaneous recording of radiated acoustic pressure and subglottal neck-surface acceleration. As expected, timing-related measures of jitter exhibited the strongest correlation between acoustic and neck-surface acceleration waveforms (r ≤ 0.99), whereas amplitude-based measures of shimmer correlated less strongly (r ≤ 0.74). Additionally, weaker correlations were exhibited by spectral measures of harmonics-to-noise ratio (r ≤ 0.69) and tilt (r ≤ 0.57), whereas the cepstral peak prominence correlated more strongly (r ≤ 0.90). These empirical relationships provide evidence to support the use of accelerometers as effective complements to acoustic recordings in the assessment and monitoring of vocal function in the laboratory, clinic, and during an individual’s daily activities. PMID:27066520

  10. Quantitative acoustic measurements for characterization of speech and voice disorders in early untreated Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Rusz, J; Cmejla, R; Ruzickova, H; Ruzicka, E

    2011-01-01

    An assessment of vocal impairment is presented for separating healthy people from persons with early untreated Parkinson's disease (PD). This study's main purpose was to (a) determine whether voice and speech disorder are present from early stages of PD before starting dopaminergic pharmacotherapy, (b) ascertain the specific characteristics of the PD-related vocal impairment, (c) identify PD-related acoustic signatures for the major part of traditional clinically used measurement methods with respect to their automatic assessment, and (d) design new automatic measurement methods of articulation. The varied speech data were collected from 46 Czech native speakers, 23 with PD. Subsequently, 19 representative measurements were pre-selected, and Wald sequential analysis was then applied to assess the efficiency of each measure and the extent of vocal impairment of each subject. It was found that measurement of the fundamental frequency variations applied to two selected tasks was the best method for separating healthy from PD subjects. On the basis of objective acoustic measures, statistical decision-making theory, and validation from practicing speech therapists, it has been demonstrated that 78% of early untreated PD subjects indicate some form of vocal impairment. The speech defects thus uncovered differ individually in various characteristics including phonation, articulation, and prosody.

  11. Outcomes Measurement in Voice Disorders: Application of an Acoustic Index of Dysphonia Severity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Awan, Shaheen N.; Roy, Nelson

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this experiment was to assess the ability of an acoustic model composed of both time-based and spectral-based measures to track change following voice disorder treatment and to serve as a possible treatment outcomes measure. Method: A weighted, four-factor acoustic algorithm consisting of shimmer, pitch sigma, the ratio of…

  12. Model helicopter rotor high-speed impulsive noise: Measured acoustics and blade pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boxwell, D. A.; Schmitz, F. H.; Splettstoesser, W. R.; Schultz, K. J.

    1983-01-01

    A 1/17-scale research model of the AH-1 series helicopter main rotor was tested. Model-rotor acoustic and simultaneous blade pressure data were recorded at high speeds where full-scale helicopter high-speed impulsive noise levels are known to be dominant. Model-rotor measurements of the peak acoustic pressure levels, waveform shapes, and directively patterns are directly compared with full-scale investigations, using an equivalent in-flight technique. Model acoustic data are shown to scale remarkably well in shape and in amplitude with full-scale results. Model rotor-blade pressures are presented for rotor operating conditions both with and without shock-like discontinuities in the radiated acoustic waveform. Acoustically, both model and full-scale measurements support current evidence that above certain high subsonic advancing-tip Mach numbers, local shock waves that exist on the rotor blades ""delocalize'' and radiate to the acoustic far-field.

  13. On the influence of laryngeal pathologies on acoustic and electroglottographic jitter measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, MauríLio N.; McInnes, Fergus R.; Jack, Mervyn A.

    2002-02-01

    This study compared acoustic and electroglottographic (EGG) jitter from [a] vowels of 103 dysphonic speakers. The EGG recordings were chosen according to their intensity, signal-to-noise ratio, and percentage of unvoiced intervals, while acoustic signals were selected based on voicing detection and the reliability of jitter extraction. The agreement between jitter measures was expressed numerically as a normalized difference. In 63.1% (65/103) of the cases the differences fell within +/-22.5%. Positive differences above +22.5% were associated with increased acoustic jitter and occurred in 12.6% (13/103) of the speakers. These were, typically, cases of small nodular lesions without problems in the posterior larynx. On the other hand, substantial rises in EGG jitter leading to differences below -22.5% took place in 24.3% (25/103) of the speakers and were related to hyperfunctional voices, creaky-like voices, small laryngeal asymmetries affecting the arytenoids, or small-to-moderate glottal chinks. A clinically relevant outcome of the study was the possibility of detecting gentle laryngeal asymmetries among cases of large unilateral increase in EGG jitter. These asymmetries can be linked with vocal problems that are often overlooked in endoscopic examinations.

  14. Trends in acoustic neuroma management: a 20-year review of the oxford skull base clinic.

    PubMed

    Mackeith, Samuel A C; Kerr, Richard S; Milford, Chris A

    2013-08-01

    Objective To describe the change in the management of acoustic neuromas at one United Kingdom center over a 20-year period and to compare this with what is known regarding trends in practice on a national and international scale. Design, Setting, and Participants Data was collected prospectively on all patients attending the Oxford Skull Base Clinic between 1990 and 2009. Main Outcome Measures The proportion of patients managed initially by observation versus radiotherapy versus surgery was recorded for each year. Results Significantly more patients received radiation treatment (instead of surgery) between 2000 and 2009 when compared with 1990 to 1999. Compared with national audit data, the Oxford Skull Base Clinic treats a higher proportion of patients with radiotherapy and significantly lower proportion with surgery, though the trend nationally is toward more observation and radiotherapy and less surgery. Conclusion Surgery will remain crucial in the management of some patients with acoustic neuromas (usually those with the larger tumors where radiosurgery is recognized to be less appropriate), but using current trends to predict future practice would suggest that alternative nonmicrosurgical treatment may play an increasingly important role in the future.

  15. Acoustic measurements on trees and logs: a review and analysis

    Treesearch

    Xiping Wang

    2013-01-01

    Acoustic technologies have been well established as material evaluation tools in the past several decades, and their use has become widely accepted in the forest products industry for online quality control and products grading. Recent research developments on acoustic sensing technology offer further opportunities to evaluate standing trees and logs for general wood...

  16. Passive Acoustic Tomography Tested for Measuring Gas Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fralick, Gustave C.; Kleppe, John

    2004-01-01

    The requirements of higher performance, better fuel economy, and lower emissions place an increasing premium on knowing the internal operating parameters of jet engines. One of the most important is the gas temperature in the post combustor section of the engine. Typically the gas temperature is measured with a thermocouple probe or by some optical technique such as Rayleigh scattering. Probes, while providing valuable information, have several limitations. The probe signal must be corrected for radiation and conduction losses, probes provide only a point measurement, and probes must be constructed of materials whose melting points are lower than the temperature of the environment into which they are inserted. Some of the disadvantages of probes are overcome by various optical techniques. Nothing needs to be inserted into the flow, and the temperature can be directly related to the signal by known physical laws. However, optical techniques require optical access (i.e., a window) and a light source (such as a laser), and they are very sensitive to the presence of particles in the flow. To overcome these problems, researchers from the NASA Glenn Research Center and The University of Nevada are developing a technique that uses sound instead of light to measure gas temperature. Like optical techniques, it is nonintrusive--no probe need be exposed to the combustion environment--and the temperature is directly related to a measured quantity--the speed of sound, which is proportional to the square root of the absolute temperature. The temperature profile inside the engine is constructed from the differences in arrival time between correlated signals from an array of microphones placed around the circumference of the engine. In much the same way as a complete picture of the inside of your body can be constructed from an array of x-ray photographs taken at different angles, the temperature profile in the engine is constructed from the angular array of microphones. It is

  17. Membrane hydrophone phase characteristics through nonlinear acoustics measurements.

    PubMed

    Bloomfield, Philip E; Gandhi, Gaurav; Lewin, Peter A

    2011-11-01

    This work considers the need for both the amplitude and phase to fully characterize polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membrane hydrophones and presents a comprehensive discussion of the nonlinear acoustic measurements utilized to extract the phase information and the experimental results taken with two widely used PVDF membrane hydrophones up to 100 MHz. A semi-empirical computer model utilized the hyperbolic propagation operator to predict the nonlinear pressure field and provide the complex frequency response of the corresponding source transducer. The PVDF hydrophone phase characteristics, which were obtained directly from the difference between the computer-modeled nonlinear field simulation and the corresponding measured harmonic frequency phase values, agree to within 10% with the phase predictions obtained from receive-transfer-function simulations based on software modeling of the membrane's physical properties. Cable loading effects and membrane hydrophone resonances were distinguished and identified through a series of impedance measurements and receive transfer function simulations on the hydrophones including their hard-wired coaxial cables. The results obtained indicate that the PVDF membrane hydrophone's phase versus frequency plot exhibits oscillations about a monotonically decreasing line. The maxima and minima inflection point slopes occur at the membrane thickness resonances and antiresonances, respectively. A cable resonance was seen at 100 MHz for the hydrophone with a 1-m cable attached, but not seen for the hydrophone with a shorter 0.65-m cable.

  18. Unrestrained acoustic plethysmograph for measuring tidal volume in mice.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Jeffrey S; Frazer, David G

    2006-09-01

    The traditional method for measurement of tidal volume in unrestrained mice relies on pressure changes induced by a freely respiring animal in a whole body plethysmograph. These changes have been assumed to be the result of thermo-hygrometric differences between respired air and gas within the chamber. It is known, however, that gas compression in the lung can also contribute significantly to changes in plethysmograph pressure. This study describes an acoustic plethysmograph for mice that is capable of measuring the tidal volume time series without the errors associated with the traditional method. The plethysmograph was designed as a resonating cavity at a fixed frequency. It had a sharp resonant peak and was tuned so that changes in body volume produced nearly linear changes in sound amplitude. The plethysmograph was tested with a water filled balloon connected to a syringe pump. The volume of the balloon was varied as a triangle wave with an amplitude of 250 microL. The RMS error between measured and delivered volume was 4.43 microL. A volume step test, performed to assess the response time of the system, showed that the plethysmograph responded in less than one millisecond.

  19. Acoustic Measurements of an Uninstalled Spacecraft Cabin Ventilation Fan Prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, L. Danielle; Brown, Clifford A.; Shook, Tony D.; Winkel, James; Kolacz, John S.; Podboy, Devin M.; Loew, Raymond A.; Mirecki, Julius H.

    2012-01-01

    Sound pressure measurements were recorded for a prototype of a spacecraft cabin ventilation fan in a test in the NASA Glenn Acoustical Testing Laboratory. The axial fan is approximately 0.089 m (3.50 in.) in diameter and 0.223 m (9.00 in.) long and has nine rotor blades and eleven stator vanes. At design point of 12,000 rpm, the fan was predicted to produce a flow rate of 0.709 cu m/s (150 cfm) and a total pressure rise of 925 Pa (3.72 in. of water) at 12,000 rpm. While the fan was designed to be part of a ducted atmospheric revitalization system, no attempt was made to throttle the flow or simulate the installed configuration during this test. The fan was operated at six speeds from 6,000 to 13,500 rpm. A 13-microphone traversing array was used to collect sound pressure measurements along two horizontal planes parallel to the flow direction, two vertical planes upstream of the fan inlet and two vertical planes downstream of the fan exhaust. Measurements indicate that sound at blade passing frequency harmonics contribute significantly to the overall audible noise produced by the fan at free delivery conditions.

  20. Experimental and Theoretical Measurements of Concentration Distributions in Acoustic Focusing Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, K A; Fisher, K; Jung, B; Ness, K; Mariella Jr., R P

    2008-06-16

    We describe a modeling approach to capture the particle motion within an acoustic focusing microfluidic device. Our approach combines finite element models for the acoustic forces with analytical models for the fluid motion and uses these force fields to calculate the particle motion in a Brownian dynamics simulation. We compare results for the model with experimental measurements of the focusing efficiency within a microfabricated device. The results show good qualitative agreement over a range of acoustic driving voltages and particle sizes.

  1. The application of acoustic emission technique to fatigue crack measurement. [in aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; Davis, W. T.; Crews, J. H., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    The applicability of acoustic emission technique to measure fatigue cracks in aluminum alloy specimens was investigated. There are several variables, such as the metallurgical and the physical treatment of the specimen, that can affect the level of acoustic activity of a fatigue specimen. It is therefore recommended that the acoustic emission technique be supplemented by other nondestructive evaluation methods to obtain quantitative data on crack growth.

  2. Evaluation of acoustic emission technique for crack growth measurement in aeronautical structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; Davis, W. T.

    1974-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted concerning the possibility to use the acoustic emission technique for the measurement of fatigue crack growth in aluminum alloy specimens. Two types of aluminum alloys were tested in the investigation. It was found that the acoustic emission technique provides a reliable indication of changes in the crack dimensions over relatively short periods of time. The level of acoustic activity serves as an indicator of the size of the cracks.

  3. Measurement of transmission loss characteristics using acoustic intensity techniques at the KU-FRL Acoustic Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roskam, J.

    1983-01-01

    The transmission loss characteristics of panels using the acoustic intensity technique is presented. The theoretical formulation, installation of hardware, modifications to the test facility, and development of computer programs and test procedures are described. A listing of all the programs is also provided. The initial test results indicate that the acoustic intensity technique is easily adapted to measure transmission loss characteristics of panels. Use of this method will give average transmission loss values. The fixtures developed to position the microphones along the grid points are very useful in plotting the intensity maps of vibrating panels.

  4. Acoustic generation of underwater cavities-Comparing modeled and measured acoustic signals generated by seismic air gun arrays.

    PubMed

    Khodabandeloo, Babak; Landrø, Martin; Hanssen, Alfred

    2017-04-01

    Underwater vapor cavities can be generated by acoustic stimulation. When the acoustic signals from several air guns are reflected from the sea surface, the pressure drop at some locations is sufficient for cavity growth and subsequent collapse. In this paper the generation of multiple water vapor cavities and their collapses are numerically modeled and the results are validated by comparing with field data from a seismic air gun array test. In a first modeling attempt where cavity interaction is neglected, a correspondence between measured and modeled data is found. Then, this correspondence is improved by assuming that the acoustic signal generated by the other cavities changes the hydrostatic pressure surrounding each cavity. This modeling can be used to estimate the amount and strength of high frequency signals generated by typical marine air gun arrays, given that a calibration step is performed prior to the modeling.

  5. Resonant Acoustic Measurement of Vapor Phase Transport Phenomenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuhmann, R. J.; Garrett, S. L.; Matson, J. V.

    2002-12-01

    A major impediment to accurate non steady-state diffusion measurements is the ability to accurately measure and track a rapidly changing gas concentration without disturbing the system. Non-destructive methods that do not interfere with system dynamics have been developed in the past. These methods, however, have tended to be cumbersome or inaccurate at low concentrations. A new experimental approach has been developed to measure gaseous diffusion in free air and through porous materials. The method combines the traditional non steady-state laboratory methodology with resonant acoustic gas analysis. A phase-locked-loop (PLL) resonance frequency tracker is combined with a thermally insulated copper resonator. A piston sealed with a metal bellows excites the fundamental standing wave resonance of the resonator. The PLL maintains a constant phase difference (typically 90§) between the accelerometer mounted on the piston and a microphone near the piston to track the resonance frequency in real time. A capillary or glass bead filled core is fitted into an o-ring sealed opening at the end of the resonator opposite the bellows. The rate at which the tracer gas is replaced by air within the resonator is controlled by the diffusion coefficient of the gas in free air through the capillary (DA) or by the effective diffusion coefficient of the gas through the core (De). The mean molecular weight of the gas mixture in the resonator is directly determined six times each minute from the ratio of the absolute temperature to the square of the fundamental acoustic resonance frequency. Average system stability (temperature divided by frequency squared) is better than 350 ppm. DA values for a 0.3-inch diameter capillary were in excellent agreement with published values. De values for porous media samples (0.5 mm glass beads) of four different lengths (1 through 4 inches) using three different tracer gases (He, CH4, Kr) will be reported. Comments will be offered regarding tracer gas

  6. Automated acoustic intensity measurements and the effect of gear tooth profile on noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atherton, William J.; Pintz, Adam; Lewicki, David G.

    1987-01-01

    Acoustic intensity measurements were made at NASA Lewis Research Center on a spur gear test apparatus. The measurements were obtained with the Robotic Acoustic Intensity Measurement System developed by Cleveland State University. This system provided dense spatial positioning, and was calibrated against a high quality acoustic intensity system. The measured gear noise compared gearsets having two different tooth profiles. The tests evaluated the sound field of the different gears for two speeds and three loads. The experimental results showed that gear tooth profile had a major effect on measured noise. Load and speed were found to have an effect on noise also.

  7. Thick Films acoustic sensors devoted to MTR environment measurements. Thick Films acoustic sensors devoted to Material Testing Reactor environment measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Very, F.; Rosenkrantz, E.; Combette, P.; Ferrandis, J.Y.; Fourmentel, D.; Destouches, C.; Villard, J.F.

    2015-07-01

    The development of advanced instrumentation for in-pile experiments in Material Testing Reactor constitutes a main goal for the improvement of the nuclear fuel behavior knowledge. An acoustic method for fission gas release detection was tested with success during a first experiment called REMORA 3 in 2010 and 2011, and the results were used to differentiate helium and fission gas release kinetics under transient operating conditions. This experiment was lead at OSIRIS reactor (CEA Saclay, France). The maximal temperature on the sensor during the irradiation was about 150 deg. C. In this paper we present a thick film transducer produce by screen printing process. The screen printing of piezoelectric offers a wide range of possible applications for the development of acoustic sensors and piezoelectric structure for measurements in high temperature environment. We firstly produced a Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT) based paste composed of Pz27 powder from Ferroperm, CF7575 glass, and organic solvent ESL 400. Likewise a Bismuth Titanate based paste synthesized in our laboratory was produced. With these inks we produced thick film up to 130 μm by screen printing process. Material properties characterizations of these thick-film resonators are essential for device design and applications. The piezoelectric coefficients d33 and pyro-electric P(T) coefficient are investigated. The highest P(T) and d33 are respectively 80 μC.m{sup -2}.K{sup -1} and 130 μC.N{sup -1} for the PZT transducer -which validates the fabrication process-. In view of the development of this transducer oriented for high temperature and irradiation environment, we investigated the electrical properties of the transducers for different ranges of frequencies and temperature - from 20 Hz up to 40 MHz between 30 and 400 deg. C. We highlight the evolution of the impedance response and piezoelectric parameters of screen printed piezoelectric structures on alumina. Shortly an irradiation will be realized in

  8. Relationship between acoustic measures and judgments of intelligibility in Parkinson's disease: a within-speaker approach.

    PubMed

    Feenaughty, Lynda; Tjaden, Kris; Sussman, Joan

    2014-11-01

    This study investigated the acoustic basis of within-speaker, across-utterance variation in sentence intelligibility for 12 speakers with dysarthria secondary to Parkinson's disease (PD). Acoustic measures were also obtained for 12 healthy controls for comparison to speakers with PD. Speakers read sentences using their typical speech style. Acoustic measures of speech rate, articulatory rate, fundamental frequency, sound pressure level and F2 interquartile range (F2 IQR) were obtained. A group of listeners judged sentence intelligibility using a computerized visual-analog scale. Relationships between judgments of intelligibility and acoustic measures were determined for individual speakers with PD. Relationships among acoustic measures were also quantified. Although considerable variability was noted, articulatory rate, fundamental frequency and F2 IQR were most frequently associated with within-speaker variation in sentence intelligibility. Results suggest that diversity among speakers with PD should be considered when interpreting results from group analyses.

  9. Acoustic measurements of a liquefied cohesive sediment bed under waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosquera, R.; Groposo, V.; Pedocchi, F.

    2014-04-01

    In this article the response of a cohesive sediment deposit under the action of water waves is studied with the help of laboratory experiments and an analytical model. Under the same regular wave condition three different bed responses were observed depending on the degree of consolidation of the deposit: no bed motion, bed motion of the upper layer after the action of the first waves, and massive bed motion after several waves. The kinematic of the upper 3 cm of the deposit were measured with an ultrasound acoustic profiler, while the pore-water pressure inside the bed was simultaneously measured using several pore pressure sensors. A poro-elastic model was developed to interpret the experimental observations. The model showed that the amplitude of the shear stress increased down into the bed. Then it is possible that the lower layers of the deposit experience plastic deformations, while the upper layers present just elastic deformations. Since plastic deformations in the lower layers are necessary for pore pressure build-up, the analytical model was used to interpret the experimental results and to state that liquefaction of a self consolidated cohesive sediment bed would only occur if the bed yield stress falls within the range defined by the amplitude of the shear stress inside the bed.

  10. Optimization of Acoustic Pressure Measurements for Impedance Eduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, M. G.; Watson, W. R.; Nark, D. M.

    2007-01-01

    As noise constraints become increasingly stringent, there is continued emphasis on the development of improved acoustic liner concepts to reduce the amount of fan noise radiated to communities surrounding airports. As a result, multiple analytical prediction tools and experimental rigs have been developed by industry and academia to support liner evaluation. NASA Langley has also placed considerable effort in this area over the last three decades. More recently, a finite element code (Q3D) based on a quasi-3D implementation of the convected Helmholtz equation has been combined with measured data acquired in the Langley Grazing Incidence Tube (GIT) to reduce liner impedance in the presence of grazing flow. A new Curved Duct Test Rig (CDTR) has also been developed to allow evaluation of liners in the presence of grazing flow and controlled, higher-order modes, with straight and curved waveguides. Upgraded versions of each of these two test rigs are expected to begin operation by early 2008. The Grazing Flow Impedance Tube (GFIT) will replace the GIT, and additional capabilities will be incorporated into the CDTR. The current investigation uses the Q3D finite element code to evaluate some of the key capabilities of these two test rigs. First, the Q3D code is used to evaluate the microphone distribution designed for the GFIT. Liners ranging in length from 51 to 610 mm are investigated to determine whether acceptable impedance eduction can be achieved with microphones placed on the wall opposite the liner. This analysis indicates the best results are achieved for liner lengths of at least 203 mm. Next, the effects of moving this GFIT microphone array to the wall adjacent to the liner are evaluated, and acceptable results are achieved if the microphones are placed off the centerline. Finally, the code is used to investigate potential microphone placements in the CDTR rigid wall adjacent to the wall containing an acoustic liner, to determine if sufficient fidelity can be

  11. Experimental study of coaxial nozzle exhaust noise. [acoustic measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodykoontz, J. H.; Stone, J. R.

    1979-01-01

    Experimental results are presented for static acoustic model tests of various geometrical configurations of coaxial nozzles operating over a range of flow conditions. The geometrical configurations consisted of nozzles with coplanar and non-coplanar exit planes and various exhaust area ratios. Primary and secondary nozzle flows were varied independently over a range of nozzle pressure ratios from 1.4 to 3.0 and gas temperatures from 280 to 1100 K. Acoustic data are presented for the conventional mode of coaxial nozzle operation as well as for the inverted velocity profile mode. Comparisons are presented to show the effect of configuration and flow changes on the acoustic characteristics of the nozzles.

  12. The Belt voice: Acoustical measurements and esthetic correlates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bounous, Barry Urban

    This dissertation explores the esthetic attributes of the Belt voice through spectral acoustical analysis. The process of understanding the nature and safe practice of Belt is just beginning, whereas the understanding of classical singing is well established. The unique nature of the Belt sound provides difficulties for voice teachers attempting to evaluate the quality and appropriateness of a particular sound or performance. This study attempts to provide answers to the question "does Belt conform to a set of measurable esthetic standards?" In answering this question, this paper expands on a previous study of the esthetic attributes of the classical baritone voice (see "Vocal Beauty", NATS Journal 51,1) which also drew some tentative conclusions about the Belt voice but which had an inadequate sample pool of subjects from which to draw. Further, this study demonstrates that it is possible to scientifically investigate the realm of musical esthetics in the singing voice. It is possible to go beyond the "a trained voice compared to an untrained voice" paradigm when evaluating quantitative vocal parameters and actually investigate what truly beautiful voices do. There are functions of sound energy (measured in dB) transference which may affect the nervous system in predictable ways and which can be measured and associated with esthetics. This study does not show consistency in measurements for absolute beauty (taste) even among belt teachers and researchers but does show some markers with varying degrees of importance which may point to a difference between our cognitive learned response to singing and our emotional, more visceral response to sounds. The markers which are significant in determining vocal beauty are: (1) Vibrancy-Characteristics of vibrato including speed, width, and consistency (low variability). (2) Spectral makeup-Ratio of partial strength above the fundamental to the fundamental. (3) Activity of the voice-The quantity of energy being produced. (4

  13. Advances in Fast Response Acoustically Derived Air Temperature Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogoev, Ivan; Jacobsen, Larry; Horst, Thomas; Conrad, Benjamin

    2016-04-01

    Fast-response accurate air-temperature measurements are required when estimating turbulent fluxes of heat, water and carbon dioxide by open-path eddy-covariance technique. In comparison with contact thermometers like thermocouples, ultra-sonic thermometers do not suffer from solar radiation loading, water vapor condensation and evaporative cooling effects. Consequently they have the potential to provide more accurate true air temperature measurements. The absolute accuracy of the ultrasonic thermometer is limited by the following parameters: the distance between the transducer pairs, transducer delays associated with the electrical-acoustic signal conversion that vary with temperature, components of the wind vector that are normal to the ultrasonic paths, and humidity. The distance between the transducer pairs is commonly obtained by coordinate measuring machine. Improved accuracy demonstrated in this study results from increased stiffness in the anemometer head to better maintain the ultrasonic path-length distances. To further improve accuracy and account for changes in transducer delays and distance as a function of temperature, these parameters are characterized in a zero-wind chamber over the entire operating temperature range. When the sonic anemometer is combined with a co-located fast-response water vapor analyzer, like in the IRGASON instrument, speed of sound can be compensated for humidity effects on a point-by-point basis resulting in a true fast-response air temperature measurement. Laboratory test results show that when the above steps are implemented in the calibration of the ultrasonic thermometer air-temperature accuracy better than ±0.5 degrees Celsius can be achieved over the entire operating range. The approach is also validated in a field inter-comparison with an aspirated thermistor probe mounted in a radiation shield.

  14. Cosmic sound: Measuring the Universe with baryonic acoustic oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hütsi, Gert

    2006-05-01

    matter power spectrum one is able to put constraints on several cosmological parameters. In this thesis we have investigated the prospects for the future wide-field SZ cluster surveys to detect the acoustic scale in the matter power spectrum, specifically concentrating on the possibilities for constraining the properties of the DE. The core part of the thesis is concerned with a power spectrum analysis of the SDSS Luminous Red Galaxy (LRG) sample. We have been able to detect acoustic features in the redshift-space power spectrum of LRGs down to scales of ~ 0.2 hMpc^{-1}, which approximately corresponds to the seventh peak in the CMB angular spectrum. Using this power spectrum measurement along with the measured size of the sound horizon, we have carried out the maximum likelihood cosmological parameter estimation using Markov chain Monte Carlo techniques. The precise measurement of the low redshift sound horizon in combination with the CMB data has enabled us to measure, under some simplifying assumptions, the Hubble constant with a high precision: H_0 = 70.8 {+1.9} {-1.8} km/s/Mpc. Also we have shown that a decelerating expansion of the Universe is ruled out at more than 5-sigma confidence level.

  15. A Technique to Measure the Volume of Elastomers as a Function of Temperature and Pressure with an Acoustic Pycnometer.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-12-28

    acoustic pycnometer used evolved from the work of Corsaro , Jarzynski, and Davis [5). These investigators describe the use of an acoustic densitometer to...sample can be measured accurately by means of an acoustic pycnometer. The background for the acoustic pycnometer used evolved from the work of Corsaro ...design will be discussed later. *The acoustic densitometer of Corsaro , Jarzynski, and Davis was obtained from the Naval Research Laboratory in Washington

  16. Acoustic measurements of F-15 aircraft operating in hush house, NSN 4920-02-070-2721

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, V. R.; Plzak, G. A.; Chinn, J. M.

    1981-09-01

    The purpose of this test program was to measure the acoustic environment in the hush house facility located at Kelly Air Force Base, Texas, during operation of the F-15 aircraft to ensure that aircraft structural acoustic design limits were not exceeded. The acoustic measurements showed that no potential sonic fatigue problems are anticipated with the F-15 aircraft structure during operation in the hush house. However, since these acoustic levels were increased over those measuring during run up on a concrete pad, it is recommended that F-15 equipment qualification levels be checked. The data indicated that the noise field within the hush house is diffuse and that the acoustical energy in the hangar area is radiated from the region between the engine exhaust and the hush house muffler front edge toward the forward part of the hangar.

  17. A fast full frequency range measurement of nonlinear distortions in the vibration of acoustic transducers and acoustically driven membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aerts, J. R. M.; Dirckx, J. J. J.

    2007-11-01

    Recently, a new method was proposed to measure nonlinear distortions in weak nonlinear systems using specially designed broadband excitation signals (odd random phase multisines). During one single experiment, the output response level, the noise level and the level of the nonlinear distortions are simultaneously measured. We implement this method in an opto-acoustic set-up which allows us to measure vibrations with high accuracy. To demonstrate the method, we present results obtained on the membrane of an earphone speaker and a latex membrane. On the earphone good agreement is found between measurements of the produced sound field and the actual membrane vibration using heterodyne interferometry. The results show that heterodyne vibrometry can be used to detect nonlinear distortions which are up to 80 dB below the output level in an acoustically driven system.

  18. Dummy head microphone and its application to the measurements of electro-acoustic equipments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1984-12-01

    An acoustic measurement system using a dummy head microphone was developed. The system consists of a dummy head microphone and an equipment for digital signal processing, and the system can be used to measure characteristics of hearing aids and headphones. The ear simulator, newly developed for practical use, is terminated in a simple resistance element of 320 cgs acoustic ohms. The dummy head microphone with the ear simulator shows the good agreement with the acoustical characteristics of the averaged human external ear. Several measured results of hearing aids and headphones using the measurement system are shown.

  19. Long range acoustic measurements of an undersea volcano.

    PubMed

    Heaney, Kevin D; Campbell, Richard L; Snellen, Mirjam

    2013-10-01

    A seamount 8 km southeast of Sarigan Island erupted on 29 May 2010 and was visually observed. The recordings on two sets of hydrophones, operated by International Monitoring System (IMS) of the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) are analyzed. Each array is a triplet of axial single hydrophones deployed as a 2 km triangle. Measurements of acoustic intensity for the path to the southern triplet are on the order of 6 dB lower than those received on the northern triplet. Temporal cross-correlation beamforming estimation is performed and the estimated arrival angles for the two arrays, 265° and 267° were consistent with the predicted geodesic arrival of 264.6° and 267.8°, respectively. Cross-correlation between single phones on the northern and southern arrays reveals a peak at 266°, with a cross-correlation of 0.1. Nx2D parabolic equation modeling predicts complete blockage due to seamount interaction along the geodesic path. Overprediction of the seamount blockage indicates that the 2D approximation is incorrect, and three-dimensional propagation must be used to explain the observations. This is demonstrated by the computation of the Adiabatic Mode Parabolic Equation Transmission Loss, which predicts a 5-10 dB lower reception at the southern site.

  20. Measurement resolution of noise directivity patterns from acoustic flight tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conner, David A.

    1989-01-01

    The measurement resolution of noise directivity patterns from acoustic flight tests was investigated. Directivity angle resolution is affected by the data reduction parameters, the aircraft velocity and flyover altitude, and by deviations of the aircraft from the desired flight path. Equations are developed which determine bounds for the lateral and longitudinal directivity angle resolution as a function of the nominal directivity angle. The equations are applied to a flight test data base and the effects of several flight conditions and data reduction parameters on the directivity angle resolution are presented. The maximum directivity angle resolution typically occurs when the aircraft is at or near the overhead position. In general, directivity angle resolution improves with decreasing velocity, increasing altitude, increasing sampling rate, decreasing block size, and decreasing block averages. Deviations from the desired ideal flight path will increase the resolution. For the flight experiment considered in this study, an average of two flyovers were required at each test condition to obtain an acceptable flight path. The ability of the pilot to maintain the flight track improved with decreasing altitude, decreasing velocity, and practice. Due to the prevailing wind conditions, yaw angles of as much as 20 deg were required to maintain the desired flight path.

  1. Effects of Various Architectural Parameters on Six Room Acoustical Measures in Auditoria.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Wei-Hwa

    The effects of architectural parameters on six room acoustical measures were investigated by means of correlation analyses, factor analyses and multiple regression analyses based on data taken in twenty halls. Architectural parameters were used to estimate acoustical measures taken at individual locations within each room as well as the averages and standard deviations of all measured values in the rooms. The six acoustical measures were Early Decay Time (EDT10), Clarity Index (C80), Overall Level (G), Bass Ratio based on Early Decay Time (BR(EDT)), Treble Ratio based on Early Decay Time (TR(EDT)), and Early Inter-aural Cross Correlation (IACC80). A comprehensive method of quantifying various architectural characteristics of rooms was developed to define a large number of architectural parameters that were hypothesized to effect the acoustical measurements made in the rooms. This study quantitatively confirmed many of the principles used in the design of concert halls and auditoria. Three groups of room architectural parameters such as the parameters associated with the depth of diffusing surfaces were significantly correlated with the hall standard deviations of most of the acoustical measures. Significant differences of statistical relations among architectural parameters and receiver specific acoustical measures were found between a group of music halls and a group of lecture halls. For example, architectural parameters such as the relative distance from the receiver to the overhead ceiling increased the percentage of the variance of acoustical measures that was explained by Barron's revised theory from approximately 70% to 80% only when data were taken in the group of music halls. This study revealed the major architectural parameters which have strong relations with individual acoustical measures forming the basis for a more quantitative method for advancing the theoretical design of concert halls and other auditoria. The results of this study provide

  2. On measuring the absolute scale of baryon acoustic oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutherland, Will

    2012-10-01

    The baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) feature in the distribution of galaxies provides a fundamental standard ruler which is widely used to constrain cosmological parameters. In most analyses, the comoving length of the ruler is inferred from a combination of cosmic microwave background (CMB) observations and theory. However, this inferred length may be biased by various non-standard effects in early universe physics; this can lead to biased inferences of cosmological parameters such as H0, Ωm and w, so it would be valuable to measure the absolute BAO length by combining a galaxy redshift survey and a suitable direct low-z distance measurement. One obstacle is that low-redshift BAO surveys mainly constrain the ratio rS/DV(z), where DV is a dilation scale which is not directly observable by standard candles. Here, we find a new approximation DV(z)≃34DL(43z)(1+43z)-1(1-0.02455 z3+0.0105 z4) which connects DV to the standard luminosity distance DL at a somewhat higher redshift; this is shown to be very accurate (relative error <0.2 per cent) for all Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe compatible Friedmann models at z < 0.4, with very weak dependence on cosmological parameters H0, Ωm, Ωk, w. This provides a route to measure the absolute BAO length using only observations at z ≲ 0.3, including Type Ia supernovae, and potentially future H0-free physical distance indicators such as gravitational lenses or gravitational wave standard sirens. This would provide a zero-parameter check of the standard cosmology at 103 ≲ z ≲ 105, and can constrain the number of relativistic species Neff with fewer degeneracies than the CMB.

  3. Quantification of Acoustic Cavitation Produced by a Clinical Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy System Using a Passive Cylindrical Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, M. J.; Cho, S. C.; Kang, G. S.; Paeng, D. G.; Lee, K. I.; Hodnett, M.; Zeqiri, B.; Coleman, A. J.

    Acoustic cavitation is regarded to play an important role in extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT). However it is not yet well characterized the cavitation in ESWT due to difficulty in its measurement. This study tests NPL cavitation sensor to discuss its potential to quantify cavitation activities produced by a clinical shock wave field. In the present experiment, the sensor was located at the focus of an electromagentic shock wave generator (HnT Medical System, Korea). Measurements were repeated 15 times as varying setting numbers. It was observed that the acoustic signals recorded by the sensor contain characteristic features of broadband spikes representing cavitation. Spectral band magnitude (SBM), used as a cavitation measure, rose with the setting number. There was a threshold above which SBM soared up and had its uncertainty greately increased. The results prove the potential of the sensor in characterizing the cavitation produced by shock wave fields.

  4. Influence of Architectural Features and Styles on Various Acoustical Measures in Churches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, Antonio Pedro Oliveira De.

    This work reports on acoustical field measurements made in a major survey of 41 Catholic churches in Portugal that were built in the last 14 centuries. A series of monaural and binaural acoustical measurements was taken at multiple source/receiver positions in each church using the impulse response with noise burst method. The acoustical measures were Reverberation Time (RT), Early Decay Time (EDT), Clarity (C80), Definition (D), Center Time (TS), Loudness (L), Bass Ratios based on the Reverberation Time and Loudness rm (BR_-RT and rm BR_-L), Rapid Speech Transmission Index (RASTI), and the binaural Coherence (COH). The scope of this research is to investigate how the acoustical performance of Catholic churches relates to their architectural features and to determine simple formulas to predict acoustical measures by the use of elementary architectural parameters. Prediction equations were defined among the acoustical measures to estimate values at individual locations within each room as well as the mean values in each church. Best fits with rm R^2~0.9 were not uncommon among many of the measures. Within and interchurch differences in the data for the acoustical measures were also analyzed. The variations of RT and EDT were identified as much smaller than the variations of the other measures. The churches tested were grouped in eight architectural styles, and the effect of their evolution through time on these acoustical measures was investigated. Statistically significant differences were found regarding some architectural styles that can be traced to historical changes in Church history, especially to the Reformation period. Prediction equations were defined to estimate mean acoustical measures by the use of fifteen simple architectural parameters. The use of the Sabine and Eyring reverberation time equations was tested. The effect of coupled spaces was analyzed, and a new algorithm for the application of the Sabine equation was developed, achieving an average of

  5. High resolution mechano-optical method for acoustic field measurements in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welter, J. T.; Sathish, S.; Cherry, M. R.; Brodrick, P. G.

    2013-01-01

    Acoustic fields are typically visualized by measuring spatial variation of pressure in a medium, using optical (ie: Schlieren, laser interferometry) and electro-mechanical (ie: transducers, micro-electro-mechanical sensors) methods. These methods have limited ability to visualize acoustic fields in air, especially at high spatial resolution (< 0.5 mm). This paper presents a method to detect and quantify the acoustic fields in air by measuring the displacements of a micro-reflector attached to fiber with a laser interferometer. The potential of the method is demonstrated by measuring acoustic pressure of an air coupled transducer, and the variation of acoustic pressure in the focal region of an air coupled acoustic lens. In the current experimental arrangement an approximate spatial resolution of 250 microns and an approximate acoustic pressure of 7 mPa have been demonstrated. A physics based mathematical model is presented that has been used to analyze the spatial resolution and acoustic pressure. Limitations of the method and possible improvements to achieve higher spatial and temporal resolution are discussed.

  6. Postoperative improvement in acoustic rhinometry measurements after septoplasty correlates with long-term satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Toyserkani, N M; Frisch, T; Von Buchwald, C

    2013-06-01

    Not much is known about long-term satisfaction of septoplasty. Our goal was to compare pre- and postoperative acoustic rhinometry measurements with satisfaction 11 years after surgery. Acoustic rhinometry measurements were performed preoperatively and 3 months postoperatively. Satisfaction was evaluated with semi-structured interviews by telephone 11 years after surgery. Symptoms were evaluated using the NOSE score. In total, 222 patients were interviewed and eligible to enter the study. Of these, 213 had preoperative acoustic rhinometry and 159 had postoperative acoustic rhinometry. In total, 157 patients had a complete data set. Mean follow-up time was 11.3 years. Patients satisfied with surgery had a bigger improvement in total minimum cross-sectional area before decongestion and total nasal cavity volume after decongestion. NOSE scores were not correlated with acoustic rhinometry measurements. Acoustic rhinometry could be a valuable tool for evaluating the results of septoplasty. Satisfaction at 11 years follow-up was associated with 3 months postoperative acoustic rhinometry improvements. Acoustic rhinometry did not show preoperative patient selection potential.

  7. Relative measurement of acoustic nonlinear parameters and comparison of sensitivity to thermal aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Hogeon; Ren, Gang; Kim, Jongbeom; Jhang, Kyung-Young

    2015-03-01

    The acoustic nonlinearity measurement of ultrasonic waves are being extensively researched as a promising nondestructive evaluation element. In the condition of constant propagation distance and wave number, many researchers have measured the second-order relative acoustic nonlinear parameter, β', that can be simply defined as the ratio of the amplitude of the second harmonic frequency component to the amplitude squared of the fundamental frequency component and compared them in order to identify the acoustic nonlinearity variation according to material degradation. In this study, we extended this concept to the third-order relative acoustic nonlinear parameter, γ', by defining it as the ratio of the amplitude of the third harmonic frequency component to the amplitude cubed of the fundamental frequency component. To investigate its effectiveness as a nondestructive evaluation element for the material property degradation, both the second-order acoustic relative nonlinear parameter and the third-order relative acoustic nonlinear parameter were measured for the aluminum specimens processed by heat treatment for the different times and then contrasted each other. From the experimental results, the third-order acoustic relative nonlinear parameter was more sensitive than the second-order relative acoustic nonlinear parameter that has been widely used although the amplitude of the third harmonic frequency component was lower than the amplitude of the second harmonic frequency component.

  8. Acoustic power measurement of high intensity focused ultrasound in medicine based on radiation force.

    PubMed

    Shou, Wende; Huang, Xiaowei; Duan, Shimei; Xia, Rongmin; Shi, Zhonglong; Geng, Xiaoming; Li, Faqi

    2006-12-22

    How to measure the acoustic power of HIFU is one of the most important tasks in its medical application. In the paper a whole series of formula for calculating the radiation force related to the acoustic power radiated by a single element focusing transducer and by the focusing transducer array were given. Various system of radiation force balance (RFB) to measure the acoustic power of HIFU in medicine were designed and applied in China. In high power experiments, the dependence of radiation force acting the absorbing target on the target position at the beam axis of focusing transducer was fined. There is a peak value of "radiation force" acting the absorbing target in the focal region when the acoustic power through the focal plane exceeds some threshold. In order to avoid this big measurement error caused by the 'peak effect' in focal region, the distance between the absorbing target of RFB and the focusing transducer or transducer array was defined to be equal to or less than 0.7 times of the focal length in the National Standard of China for the measurements of acoustic power and field characteristics of HIFU. More than six different therapeutic equipments of HIFU have been examined by RFB for measuring the acoustic power since 1998. These results show that RFB with the absorbing target is valid in the acoustic power range up to 500W with good linearity for the drive voltage squared of focusing transducer or array. The uncertainty of measurement is within +/-15%.

  9. Analysis of Measured and Predicted Acoustics from an XV-15 Flight Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, D. Douglas, Jr.; Burley, Casey L.

    2001-01-01

    Flight acoustic and vehicle state data from an XV-15 acoustic flight test are examined. Flight predictions using TRAC are performed for a level flight (repeated) and four descent conditions (including a BVI). The assumptions and procedures used for TRAC flight predictions as well as the variability in flight measurements, which are used for input and comparison to predictions, are investigated in detail. Differences were found in the measured vehicle airspeed, altitude, glideslope, and vehicle orientation (yaw, pitch and roll angle) between each of the repeat runs. These differences violate some of the prediction assumptions and significantly impacted the resulting acoustic predictions. Multiple acoustic pulses, with a variable time between the pulses, were found in the measured acoustic time histories for the repeat runs. These differences could be attributed in part to the variability in vehicle orientation. Acoustic predictions that used the measured vehicle orientation for the repeat runs captured this multiple pulse variability. Thickness noise was found to be dominant on approach for all the cases, except the BVI condition. After the aircraft passed overhead, broadband noise and low frequency loading noise were dominant. The predicted LowSPL time histories compared well with measurement on approach to the array for the non-BVI conditions and poorly for the BVI condition. Accurate prediction of the lift share between the rotor and fuselage must be known in order to improve predictions. At a minimum, measurements of the rotor thrust and tip-path-plane angle are critical to further develop accurate flight acoustic prediction capabilities.

  10. Theoretical Insights into Sub-Terahertz Acoustic Vibrations of Proteins Measured in Single-Molecule Experiments.

    PubMed

    Nicolaï, Adrien; Delarue, Patrice; Senet, Patrick

    2016-12-15

    Proteins are an important class of nanobioparticles with acoustical modes in the sub-THz frequency range. There is considerable interest to measure and establish the role of these acoustical vibrations for biological function. So far, the technique providing the most detailed information about the acoustical modes of proteins is the very recent Extraordinary Acoustic Raman (EAR) spectroscopy. In this technique, proteins are trapped in nanoholes and excited by two optical lasers of slightly different wavelengths producing an electric field at low frequency (<100 GHz). We demonstrate that the acoustical modes of proteins studied by EAR spectroscopy are both infrared- and Raman-active modes, and we provided interpretation of the spectroscopic fingerprints measured at the single-molecule level. A combination of the present calculations with techniques based on the excitation of a single nanobioparticle by an electric field, such as EAR spectroscopy, should provide a wealth of information on the role of molecular dynamics for biological function.

  11. Calibration of an acoustic system for measuring 2-D temperature distribution around hydrothermal vents.

    PubMed

    Fan, Wei; Chen, Chen-Tung Arthur; Chen, Ying

    2013-04-01

    One of the fundamental purposes of quantitative acoustic surveys of seafloor hydrothermal vents is to measure their 2-D temperature distributions. Knowing the system latencies and the acoustic center-to-center distances between the underwater transducers in an acoustic tomography system is fundamental to the overall accuracy of the temperature reconstruction. However, commercial transducer sources typically do not supply the needed data. Here we present a novel calibration algorithm to automatically determine the system latencies and the acoustic center-to-center distances. The possible system latency error and the resulting temperature error are derived and analyzed. We have also developed the experimental setup for calibration. To validate the effectiveness of the proposed calibration method, an experimental study was performed on acoustic imaging of underwater temperature fields in Lake Qiezishan, located at Longling County, Yunnan Province, China. Using the calibrated data, the reconstructed temperature distributions closely resemble the actual distributions measured with thermocouples, thus confirming the effectiveness of our algorithm.

  12. Analysis of Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) Data for Acoustic Velocity Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackshire, James L.

    1997-01-01

    Acoustic velocity measurements were taken using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) in a Normal Incidence Tube configuration at various frequency, phase, and amplitude levels. This report presents the results of the PIV analysis and data reduction portions of the test and details the processing that was done. Estimates of lower measurement sensitivity levels were determined based on PIV image quality, correlation, and noise level parameters used in the test. Comparison of measurements with linear acoustic theory are presented. The onset of nonlinear, harmonic frequency acoustic levels were also studied for various decibel and frequency levels ranging from 90 to 132 dB and 500 to 3000 Hz, respectively.

  13. Passive acoustic measurements of wind velocity and sound speed in air.

    PubMed

    Godin, Oleg A; Irisov, Vladimir G; Charnotskii, Mikhail I

    2014-02-01

    Random acoustic fields generated by uncorrelated sources in moving media contain information about the propagation environment, including sound speed and flow velocity. This information can be recovered by noise interferometry. Here interferometric techniques are applied to road traffic noise. Acoustic travel times and their nonreciprocity are retrieved from two-point cross-correlation functions of noise. The feasibility of passive acoustic measurements of wind velocity using diffuse noise is experimentally demonstrated for the first time. The accuracy of the interferometric measurements of sound speed and wind velocity is confirmed by comparison with in situ measurements of wind, air temperature, and humidity.

  14. Directional acoustic measurements by laser Doppler velocimeters. [for jet aircraft noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazumder, M. K.; Overbey, R. L.; Testerman, M. K.

    1976-01-01

    Laser Doppler velocimeters (LDVs) were used as velocity microphones to measure sound pressure level in the range of 90-130 db, spectral components, and two-point cross correlation functions for acoustic noise source identification. Close agreement between LDV and microphone data is observed. It was concluded that directional sensitivity and the ability to measure remotely make LDVs useful tools for acoustic measurement where placement of any physical probe is difficult or undesirable, as in the diagnosis of jet aircraft noise.

  15. Measuring Turbulence from Moored Acoustic Doppler Velocimeters. A Manual to Quantifying Inflow at Tidal Energy Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Kilcher, Levi; Thomson, Jim; Talbert, Joe; DeKlerk, Alex

    2016-03-01

    This work details a methodology for measuring hub height inflow turbulence using moored acoustic Doppler velocimiters (ADVs). This approach is motivated by the shortcomings of alternatives. For example, remote velocity measurements (i.e., from acoustic Doppler profilers) lack sufficient precision for device simulation, and rigid tower-mounted measurements are very expensive and technically challenging in the tidal environment. Moorings offer a low-cost, site-adaptable and robust deployment platform, and ADVs provide the necessary precision to accurately quantify turbulence.

  16. Local oscillator phase noise limitation on the resolution of acoustic delay line wireless passive sensor measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrétien, N.; Friedt, J.-M.; Martin, G.

    2014-06-01

    The role of the phase noise of a local oscillator driving a pulsed-mode RADAR used for probing surface acoustic wave sensors is investigated. The echo delay, representative of the acoustic velocity, and hence the physical quantity probed by the sensor, is finely measured as a phase. Considering that the intrinsic oscillator phase fluctuation defines the phase noise measurement resolution, we experimentally and theoretically assess the relation between phase noise, measurement range, and measurand resolution.

  17. Measurements of the force fields within an acoustic standing wave using holographic optical tweezers

    SciTech Connect

    Bassindale, P. G.; Drinkwater, B. W.; Phillips, D. B.; Barnes, A. C.

    2014-04-21

    Direct measurement of the forces experienced by micro-spheres in an acoustic standing wave device have been obtained using calibrated optical traps generated with holographic optical tweezers. A micro-sphere, which is optically trapped in three dimensions, can be moved through the acoustic device to measure forces acting upon it. When the micro-sphere is subjected to acoustic forces, it's equilibrium position is displaced to a position where the acoustic forces and optical forces are balanced. Once the optical trapping stiffness has been calibrated, observation of this displacement enables a direct measurement of the forces acting upon the micro-sphere. The measured forces are separated into a spatially oscillating component, attributed to the acoustic radiation force, and a constant force, attributed to fluid streaming. As the drive conditions of the acoustic device were varied, oscillating forces (>2.5 pN{sub pp}) and streaming forces (<0.2 pN) were measured. A 5 μm silica micro-sphere was used to characterise a 6.8 MHz standing wave, λ = 220 μm, to a spatial resolution limited by the uncertainty in the positioning of the micro-sphere (here to within 2 nm) and with a force resolution on the order of 10 fN. The results have application in the design and testing of acoustic manipulation devices.

  18. Imaging and detection of mines from acoustic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witten, Alan J.; DiMarzio, Charles A.; Li, Wen; McKnight, Stephen W.

    1999-08-01

    A laboratory-scale acoustic experiment is described where a buried target, a hockey puck cut in half, is shallowly buried in a sand box. To avoid the need for source and receiver coupling to the host sand, an acoustic wave is generated in the subsurface by a pulsed laser suspended above the air-sand interface. Similarly, an airborne microphone is suspended above this interface and moved in unison with the laser. After some pre-processing of the data, reflections for the target, although weak, could clearly be identified. While the existence and location of the target can be determined by inspection of the data, its unique shape can not. Since target discrimination is important in mine detection, a 3D imaging algorithm was applied to the acquired acoustic data. This algorithm yielded a reconstructed image where the shape of the target was resolved.

  19. Measuring baryon acoustic oscillations from the clustering of voids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Yu; Zhao, Cheng; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Tao, Charling

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the necessary methodology to optimally measure the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) signal from voids, based on galaxy redshift catalogues. To this end, we study the dependence of the BAO signal on the population of voids classified by their sizes. We find for the first time the characteristic features of the correlation function of voids including the first robust detection of BAOs in mock galaxy catalogues. These show an anti-correlation around the scale corresponding to the smallest size of voids in the sample (the void exclusion effect), and dips at both sides of the BAO peak, which can be used to determine the significance of the BAO signal without any priori model. Furthermore, our analysis demonstrates that there is a scale-dependent bias for different populations of voids depending on the radius, with the peculiar property that the void population with the largest BAO significance corresponds to tracers with approximately zero bias on the largest scales. We further investigate the methodology on an additional set of 1000 realistic mock galaxy catalogues reproducing the SDSS-III/BOSS CMASS DR11 data, to control the impact of sky mask and radial selection function. Our solution is based on generating voids from randoms including the same survey geometry and completeness, and a post-processing cleaning procedure in the holes and at the boundaries of the survey. The methodology and optimal selection of void populations validated in this work have been used to perform the first BAO detection from voids in observations, presented in a companion paper.

  20. Acoustic and manual measurements of methane ebullition in peatlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varner, R. K.; Palace, M. W.; Lennartz, J. M.; Wik, M.; Crill, P. M.; Ewing, S. A.; Harden, J. W.; Turetsky, M. R.

    2013-12-01

    Controls on the magnitude and frequency of methane (CH4) release through ebullition (bubbling) in water saturated ecosystems such as bogs, fens and lakes are important to both the atmospheric and ecosystems science community. In order to understand the response of these ecosystems to future climate forcing, we need to systematically monitor ebullition from these ecosystems over many seasons and across a multitude of landscape morphologies. We have developed and field tested an inexpensive array of sampling/monitoring instruments to identify the frequency and magnitude of bubbling events which allows us to correlate bubble data with potential drivers such as changes in hydrostatic pressure, wind and temperature. The instrument consists of a nested, inverted funnel design with a hydrophone for detecting bubbles that rise through the peat. The design offers a way to sample the gas collected in the funnels to determine the concentration of CH4. Laboratory calibration of the instrument resulted in an equation that relates frequency of bubbles hitting the hydrophone with bubble volume. Audio data was recorded continuously using a digital audio recorder attached to two ebullition sensors and could be deployed remotely for up to 20 days. Time, fundamental frequency, and estimated bubble size were determined using MATLAB code. Manual bubble flux measurements were also made for comparison to the acoustically sensed ebullition. Instruments were deployed in summers 2011-2013 at a temperate fen (Sallie's Fen, NH, USA) and a subarctic mire (Stordalen, Abisko, Sweden). We also recorded ebullition at two locations in subarctic Alaska (APEX Research Site, Fairbanks, AK and Innoko National Wildlife Refuge) during summer 2011. Ebullition was observed at all sites with highest daily rates in fen versus bog sites. Observed distributions of bubble events correlate with published models of ebullition based on peat density.

  1. Dynamic Reconstruction Algorithm of Three-Dimensional Temperature Field Measurement by Acoustic Tomography.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanqiu; Liu, Shi; Inaki, Schlaberg H

    2017-09-12

    Accuracy and speed of algorithms play an important role in the reconstruction of temperature field measurements by acoustic tomography. Existing algorithms are based on static models which only consider the measurement information. A dynamic model of three-dimensional temperature reconstruction by acoustic tomography is established in this paper. A dynamic algorithm is proposed considering both acoustic measurement information and the dynamic evolution information of the temperature field. An objective function is built which fuses measurement information and the space constraint of the temperature field with its dynamic evolution information. Robust estimation is used to extend the objective function. The method combines a tunneling algorithm and a local minimization technique to solve the objective function. Numerical simulations show that the image quality and noise immunity of the dynamic reconstruction algorithm are better when compared with static algorithms such as least square method, algebraic reconstruction technique and standard Tikhonov regularization algorithms. An effective method is provided for temperature field reconstruction by acoustic tomography.

  2. Clinical outcome measures of psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Bonifati, C; Berardesca, E

    2007-01-01

    Several tools have been introduced in clinical trials to quantify the severity and the response to a given therapeutic regimen of both psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. Each method present specific advantages and limitations. Here we will discuss some of the most popular clinical outcome measures of both psoriasis (Psoriasis Severity Index, Physician Global Assessment, National Psoriasis Fundation-Psoriasis Score, Dermatology Life Quality Index) and psoriatic arthritis (American College Rheumatology response criteria, Psoriatic Arthritis Response Criteria).

  3. Measuring the acoustic absorption coefficient in biological tissue specimens using ultrasonic phase conjugation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smagin, N. V.; Krutyansky, L. M.; Zelenova, Z. V.; Brysev, A. P.

    2014-03-01

    Acoustic absorption has been measured in a series of biological tissue specimens—porcine muscle, renal and fat tissues—by the standard insert-substitution method, as well as by ultrasonic phase conjugation. Comparison of the experimental results and revealed differences confirm the promise of using phase conjugate waves to measure acoustic losses in biological objects. It is demonstrated that in inhomogeneous tissues, the phase conjugation method makes it possible to obtain a more reliable estimate of dissipative losses.

  4. The Feasibility of Performing Particle Tracking Based Flow Measurements with Acoustic Cameras

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-08-01

    ER D C/ CH L SR -1 7- 1 Dredging Operations and Environmental Research Program The Feasibility of Performing Particle- Tracking-Based...Flow Measurements with Acoustic Cameras Co as ta l a nd H yd ra ul ic s La bo ra to ry David L . Young and Brian C. McFall August 2017...Tracking-Based Flow Measurements with Acoustic Cameras David L . Young and Brian C. McFall Coastal and Hydraulics Laboratory U.S. Army Engineer

  5. Acoustical properties of a model rotor in nonaxial flight. [wind tunnel model noise measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinterkeuser, E. G.

    1973-01-01

    Wind tunnel measurements on model rotor blade loads and acoustical noise were correlated to a theoretical formulation of the rotational noise of a rotor in non-axial flight. Good correlation between theory and data was achieved using actual measured rotor blade pressure harmonic decay levels and lift, drag and radial force magnitudes. Both pressure and acoustic data exhibited considerable scatter in hover and low speed forward flight which resulted in a fairly wide latitude in the noise level prediction at higher harmonics.

  6. Acoustic Measurement and Model Predictions for the Aural Nondetectability of Two Night-Vision Goggles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-11-01

    Acoustic Measurement and Model Predictions for the Aural Nondetectability of Two Night - Vision Goggles by Jeremy Gaston, Tim Mermagen, and...SUBTITLE Acoustic Measurement and Model Predictions for the Aural Nondetectability of Two Night - Vision Goggles 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER...13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT This study evaluates two different night - vision goggles (NVGs) to determine if the devices meet level II

  7. Underwater hybrid near-field acoustical holography based on the measurement of vector hydrophone array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Bo; Yang, Desen; Sun, Yu

    2010-06-01

    Hybrid near-field acoustical holography (NAH) is developed for reconstructing acoustic radiation from a cylindrical source in a complex underwater environment. In hybrid NAH, we combine statistically optimized near-field acoustical holography (SONAH) and broadband acoustical holography from intensity measurements (BAHIM) to reconstruct the underwater cylindrical source field. First, the BAHIM is utilized to regenerate as much acoustic pressures on the hologram surface as necessary, and then the acoustic pressures are taken as input to the formulation implemented numerically by SONAH. The main advantages of this technology are that the complex pressure on the hologram surface can be reconstructed without reference signal, and the measurement array can be smaller than the source, thus the practicability and efficiency of this technology are greatly enhanced. Numerical examples of a cylindrical source are demonstrated. Test results show that hybrid NAH can yield a more accurate reconstruction than conventional NAH. Then, an experiment has been carried out with a vector hydrophone array. The experimental results show the advantage of hybrid NAH in the reconstruction of an acoustic field and the feasibility of using a vector hydrophone array in an underwater NAH measurement, as well as the identification and localization of noise sources.

  8. Identification of vibration excitations from acoustic measurements using near field acoustic holography and the force analysis technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pézerat, C.; Leclère, Q.; Totaro, N.; Pachebat, M.

    2009-10-01

    This study presents a method of using acoustic holography and the force analysis technique to identify vibration sources from radiated noise measurements. The structure studied is a plate excited by a shaker on which three measurements were performed: the first is a reference measurement of plate velocity obtained by scanning laser vibrometry, the second is based on sound pressure measurements in the near field of the structure, and the third is the measurement of normal acoustic velocities by using a p-U probe recently developed by Microflown Technologies. This was followed by the application of classical NAH, known as pressure-to-velocity holography and velocity-to-velocity holography to predict the plate velocity field from acoustic measurements at distances of 1 and 5 cm. Afterwards, the force analysis technique, also known as the RIFF technique, is applied with these five data sets. The principle is to inject the displacement field of the structure into its equation of motion and extract the resulting force distribution. This technique requires regularization done by a low-pass filter in the wavenumber domain. Apart from pressure-to-velocity holography at 5 cm, the reconstructed force distribution allows localizing the excitation point in the measurement area. FAT regularization is also shown to improve results as its cutoff wavenumber is optimized with the natural wavenumber of the plate. Lastly, quantitative force values are extracted from force distributions at all frequencies of the band 0-4 kHz studied and compared with the force spectrum measured directly by a piezoelectric sensor.

  9. Fish Acoustics: Physics-Based Modeling and Measurement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    physical scattering mechanisms. To demonstrate this point, the target strength of a canonical gas-filled sphere is computed using a standard...high-frequency sound scattering by swimbladdered fish,” Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, Vol. 78, pp. 688-700 (1985). 9. Gauss , R. C

  10. Instrumental Dimensioning of Normal and Pathological Phonation Using Acoustic Measurements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Putzer, Manfred; Barry, William J.

    2008-01-01

    The present study deals with the dimensions of normal and pathological phonation. Separation of normal voices from pathological voices is tested under different aspects. Using a new parametrization of voice-quality properties in the acoustic signal, the vowel productions of 534 speakers (267 M, 267 F) without any reported voice pathology and the…

  11. Instrumental Dimensioning of Normal and Pathological Phonation Using Acoustic Measurements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Putzer, Manfred; Barry, William J.

    2008-01-01

    The present study deals with the dimensions of normal and pathological phonation. Separation of normal voices from pathological voices is tested under different aspects. Using a new parametrization of voice-quality properties in the acoustic signal, the vowel productions of 534 speakers (267 M, 267 F) without any reported voice pathology and the…

  12. Measurement and Modeling of Deep Water Ocean Acoustics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    coverage. It was found that diffractive effects, which reduce the size of acoustic shadows behind 4 seamounts , ridges and islands, increased the...This is the position of a CTBTO station that deployed in the early 2000s. Note the diffractive filling of the shadow behind islands in the

  13. Acoustic measurements of soil-pipeflow and internal erosion

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Internal erosion of soil pipes can lead to embankment failures, landslides, and gully erosion. Therefore, non-intrusive methods are needed to detect and monitor soil pipeflow and the resulting internal erosion. This paper presents a laboratory study using both active and passive acoustic techniques ...

  14. Acoustic measurements of soil pipeflow and internal erosion

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Internal erosion of soil pipes can lead to embankment failures, landslides, and gully erosion therefore non-intrusive methods are needed to detect and monitor soil pipeflow and the resulting internal erosion. This paper presents a laboratory study using both active and passive acoustic techniques to...

  15. Acoustic detection of resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization for spatially resolved temperature measurement.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yue; Gragston, Mark; Zhang, Zhili

    2017-09-01

    In this Letter, acoustic detection of resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (A-REMPI) is characterized and used to measure spatially resolved O2 rotational temperature in air. The acoustic signal is generated using O2 REMPI in air and is detected by a single microphone operating within the audible range. Compared to electron number measurements by coherent microwave scattering, nonlinear light absorption and subsequent local pressure perturbation are captured by the microphone. A typical acoustic cycle of compression and rarefication of the acoustic wave is observed in the A-REMPI. Since the pressure perturbation can be regarded as close to thermodynamic equilibrium, the rotational temperature measured by A-REMPI is lower and closer to the realistic condition.

  16. The Ability to Structure Acoustic Material as a Measure of Musical Aptitude. 4. Experiences with Modifications of the Acoustic Structuring Test. Research Bulletin. No. 51.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karma, Kai

    Four new versions of an acoustic structuring test were developed, administered, and analyzed in order to produce better tests and to contribute to better understanding of the abilities measured by these tests. The tests consist of tape recordings of patterns of musical notes played on an electric organ or an acoustic guitar. Item analyses and…

  17. Field evaluation of boat-mounted acoustic Doppler instruments used to measure streamflow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mueller, D.S.; ,

    2003-01-01

    The use of instruments based on the Doppler principle for measuring water velocity and computing discharge is common within the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The instruments and software have changed appreciably during the last 5 years; therefore, the USGS has begun field validation of the instruments used to make discharge measurements from a moving boat. Instruments manufactured by SonTek/YSI and RD Instruments, Inc. were used to collect discharge data at five different sites. One or more traditional discharge measurements were made using a Price AA current meter and standard USGS procedures concurrent with the acoustic instruments at each site. Discharges measured with the acoustic instruments were compared with discharges measured with Price AA current meters and the USGS stage-discharge rating for each site. The mean discharges measured by each acoustic instrument were within 5 percent of the Price AA-based measurement and (or) discharge from the stage-discharge rating.

  18. Method of measuring reactive acoustic power density in a fluid

    DOEpatents

    Wheatley, John C.; Swift, Gregory W.; Migliori, Albert

    1985-01-01

    A method for determining reactive acoustic power density level and its direction in a fluid using a single sensor is disclosed. In the preferred embodiment, an apparatus for conducting the method, which is termed a thermoacoustic couple, consists of a stack of thin, spaced apart polymeric plates, selected ones of which include multiple bimetallic thermocouple junctions positioned along opposite end edges thereof. The thermocouple junctions are connected in series in the nature of a thermopile, and are arranged so as to be responsive to small temperature differences between the opposite edges of the plates. The magnitude of the temperature difference, as represented by the magnitude of the electrical potential difference generated by the thermopile, is found to be directly related to the level of acoustic power density in the gas.

  19. Method of measuring reactive acoustic power density in a fluid

    DOEpatents

    Wheatley, J.C.; Swift, G.W.; Migliori, A.

    1985-09-03

    A method for determining reactive acoustic power density level and its direction in a fluid using a single sensor is disclosed. In the preferred embodiment, an apparatus for conducting the method, which is termed a thermoacoustic couple, consists of a stack of thin, spaced apart polymeric plates, selected ones of which include multiple bimetallic thermocouple junctions positioned along opposite end edges thereof. The thermocouple junctions are connected in series in the nature of a thermopile, and are arranged so as to be responsive to small temperature differences between the opposite edges of the plates. The magnitude of the temperature difference, as represented by the magnitude of the electrical potential difference generated by the thermopile, is found to be directly related to the level of acoustic power density in the gas. 5 figs.

  20. Experimental Acoustic Velocity Measurements in a Tidally Affected Stream

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Storm, J.B.; ,

    2002-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) constructed a continuous steamgaging station on the tidally affected Escatawpa River at Interstate 10 near Orange Grove, Mississippi, in August 2001. The gage collects water quantity parameters of stage and stream velocity, and water quality parameters of water temperature, specific conductance, and salinity. Data are transmitted to the local USGS office via the GOES satellite and are presented on a near real-time web page. Due to tidal effects, the stream has multiple flow regimes which include downstream, bi-directional, and reverse flows. Advances in acoustic technology have made it possible to gage streams of this nature where conventional methods have been unsuccessful. An experimental mount was designed in an attempt to recognize, describe, and quantify these flow regimes by using acoustic Doppler equipment.

  1. [A clinical analysis for sudden sensorineural hearing loss with acoustic neurinoma].

    PubMed

    Gong, Qi-lin; Zhou, Ai-dong; Lin, Chang

    2013-04-01

    Retrospectively analyzed the clinical data of sudden sensorineural hearing loss with acoustic neuroma. The clinical data of 467 cases with sudden sensorineural hearing loss were collected between Jan, 2008 and Aug, 2012. Discussed the clinical data which were diagnosed as acoustic neuroma. In 467 cases of sudden sensorineural hearing loss, nine cases were diagnosed as acoustic neuromas (9 ears, 1.93%), two males and seven females, with a age range of 28 to 57 years. Among them, seven cases accompanied with tinnitus, seven cases with vertigo. The hearing results in nine cases, two cases were found to be mild, two were moderate, four were severe, and one was profound hearling loss respectively. Hearing was classified into five types according to audiogram shape (1 of up-sloping, 1 of down-sloping, 2 of mid-frequency, 1 of profound loss, 4 of flat audiogram). Eight cases had abnormal ABR, nine cases with ear ipsilateral stapedius reflex were completely not elicited, seven cases with health ear contralateral stapedius reflex were completely not elicited. Tumors were graded by Koos Grades according to size (7 of grade I, 1 of grade II, 1 of grade IV). Seven small acoustic neuroma was taken waiting strategies. Meanwhile, we use glucocorticoid and improve the microcirculation of the inner ear medication short-termly for these patients. Four patients' hearing were improved. The initial symptoms of some acoustic neuroma are sudden hearing loss, especially the small tumors in internal auditory canal. In order to prevent misdiagnosis, MRI and ABR should be performed as a routine test for sudden sensorineural hearing loss. It is necessary to give appropriate treatment to protecting hearing for the small acoustic neuroma patients whose first symptoms are diagnosed as sudden sensorineural hearing loss.

  2. Granular temperature measured experimentally in a shear flow by acoustic energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Stephanie; Brodsky, Emily E.

    2017-09-01

    Granular temperature may control high-speed granular flows, yet it is difficult to measure in laboratory experiments. Here we utilize acoustic energy to measure granular temperature in dense shear flows. We show that acoustic energy captures the anticipated behavior of granular temperature as a function of grain size in quartz sand shear flows. We also find that granular temperature (through its proxy acoustic energy) is nearly linearly proportional to inertial number, and dilation is proportional to acoustic energy raised to the power 0.6 ±0.2 . This demonstrates the existence of a relationship between granular temperature and dilation. It is also consistent with previous results on dilation due to externally imposed vibration, thus showing that internally and externally induced vibrations have identical results on granular shear flows.

  3. Measuring the Kuroshio Current with ocean acoustic tomography.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Naokazu; Huang, Chen-Fen; Kaneko, Arata; Liu, Cho-Teng; Howe, Bruce M; Wang, Yu-Huai; Yang, Yih; Lin, Ju; Zhu, Xiao-Hua; Gohda, Noriaki

    2013-10-01

    Ocean current profiling using ocean acoustic tomography (OAT) was conducted in the Kuroshio Current southeast of Taiwan from August 20 to September 15, 2009. Sound pulses were transmitted reciprocally between two acoustic stations placed near the underwater sound channel axis and separated by 48 km. Based on the result of ray simulation, the received signals are divided into multiple ray groups because it is difficult to resolve the ray arrivals for individual rays. The average differential travel times from these ray groups are used to reconstruct the vertical profiles of currents. The currents are estimated with respect to the deepest water layer via two methods: An explicit solution and an inversion with regularization. The strong currents were confined to the upper 200 m and rapidly weakened toward 500 m in depth. Both methods give similar results and are consistent with shipboard acoustic Doppler current profiler results in the upper 150 m. The observed temporal variation demonstrates a similar trend to the prediction from the Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model.

  4. Measurement of a damaged layer thickness with reflection acoustic microscope.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, I; Kanda, H; Katakura, K; Semba, T

    1989-01-01

    An acoustic microscope was used for determining the frequency dependence of surface acoustic wave (SAW) velocity on a specimen whose silicon single-crystal surface was machined under various conditions. Consequently, thickness of the damaged layers could be estimated from the curvature points of frequency dispersion curves of the SAW velocity. It was revealed that thicknesses of the damaged layers can be estimated through rough approximation by about one-half the wavelength determined by the frequency at curvature points. From specimens possessing two damaged layers, frequency dispersion curves with two curvature lines can be obtained. From the curvature point at high frequencies the thickness of the top damaged layer can be determined. On the other hand, from the curvature point at low frequencies, the thickness of the inner damaged layer can also be determined. By choosing an acoustic lens as the condition for exciting SAWs, images can be observed while varying the frequency. From observation results obtained with this method, the distribution in the depth direction can be clarified.

  5. Exploring the feasibility of smart phone microphone for measurement of acoustic voice parameters and voice pathology screening.

    PubMed

    Uloza, Virgilijus; Padervinskis, Evaldas; Vegiene, Aurelija; Pribuisiene, Ruta; Saferis, Viktoras; Vaiciukynas, Evaldas; Gelzinis, Adas; Verikas, Antanas

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the reliability of acoustic voice parameters obtained using smart phone (SP) microphones and investigate the utility of use of SP voice recordings for voice screening. Voice samples of sustained vowel/a/obtained from 118 subjects (34 normal and 84 pathological voices) were recorded simultaneously through two microphones: oral AKG Perception 220 microphone and SP Samsung Galaxy Note3 microphone. Acoustic voice signal data were measured for fundamental frequency, jitter and shimmer, normalized noise energy (NNE), signal to noise ratio and harmonic to noise ratio using Dr. Speech software. Discriminant analysis-based Correct Classification Rate (CCR) and Random Forest Classifier (RFC) based Equal Error Rate (EER) were used to evaluate the feasibility of acoustic voice parameters classifying normal and pathological voice classes. Lithuanian version of Glottal Function Index (LT_GFI) questionnaire was utilized for self-assessment of the severity of voice disorder. The correlations of acoustic voice parameters obtained with two types of microphones were statistically significant and strong (r = 0.73-1.0) for the entire measurements. When classifying into normal/pathological voice classes, the Oral-NNE revealed the CCR of 73.7% and the pair of SP-NNE and SP-shimmer parameters revealed CCR of 79.5%. However, fusion of the results obtained from SP voice recordings and GFI data provided the CCR of 84.60% and RFC revealed the EER of 7.9%, respectively. In conclusion, measurements of acoustic voice parameters using SP microphone were shown to be reliable in clinical settings demonstrating high CCR and low EER when distinguishing normal and pathological voice classes, and validated the suitability of the SP microphone signal for the task of automatic voice analysis and screening.

  6. Comparison between psycho-acoustics and physio-acoustic measurement to determine optimum reverberation time of pentatonic angklung music concert hall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudarsono, Anugrah S.; Merthayasa, I. G. N.; Suprijanto

    2015-09-01

    This research tried to compare psycho-acoustics and Physio-acoustic measurement to find the optimum reverberation time of soundfield from angklung music. Psycho-acoustic measurement was conducted using a paired comparison method and Physio-acoustic measurement was conducted with EEG Measurement on T3, T4, FP1, and FP2 measurement points. EEG measurement was conducted with 5 persons. Pentatonic angklung music was used as a stimulus with reverberation time variation. The variation was between 0.8 s - 1.6 s with 0.2 s step. EEG signal was analysed using a Power Spectral Density method on Alpha Wave, High Alpha Wave, and Theta Wave. Psycho-acoustic measurement on 50 persons showed that reverberation time preference of pentatonic angklung music was 1.2 second. The result was similar to Theta Wave measurement on FP2 measurement point. High Alpha wave on T4 measurement gave different results, but had similar patterns with psycho-acoustic measurement

  7. Acoustic Measurements of a Large Civil Transport Main Landing Gear Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ravetta, Patricio A.; Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Burdisso, Ricardo A.; Wisda, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Microphone phased array acoustic measurements of a 26 percent-scale, Boeing 777-200 main landing gear model with and without noise reduction fairings installed were obtained in the anechoic configuration of the Virginia Tech Stability Tunnel. Data were acquired at Mach numbers of 0.12, 0.15, and 0.17 with the latter speed used as the nominal test condition. The fully and partially dressed gear with the truck angle set at 13 degrees toe-up landing configuration were the two most extensively tested configurations, serving as the baselines for comparison purposes. Acoustic measurements were also acquired for the same two baseline configurations with the truck angle set at 0 degrees. In addition, a previously tested noise reducing, toboggan-shaped fairing was re-evaluated extensively to address some of the lingering questions regarding the extent of acoustic benefit achievable with this device. The integrated spectra generated from the acoustic source maps reconfirm, in general terms, the previously reported noise reduction performance of the toboggan fairing as installed on an isolated gear. With the recent improvements to the Virginia Tech tunnel acoustic quality and microphone array capabilities, the present measurements provide an additional, higher quality database to the acoustic information available for this gear model.

  8. Reference Phantom Method for Acoustic Backscatter Coefficient and Attenuation Coefficient Measurements.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Linxin

    1990-08-01

    In previous work in our laboratory accurate backscatter coefficient measurements were obtained with a data reduction method that explicitly accounts for experimental factors involved in recording echo data. An alternative, relative processing method for determining the backscatter coefficient and the attenuation coefficient is presented here. This method involves comparison of echo data from a sample with data recorded from a reference phantom whose backscatter and attenuation coefficients are known. The ratio of the signals cancels depth-dependent instrumentation factors. This saves the efforts of beam profile computation and various calibrations. The attenuation coefficient and backscatter coefficient of the sample are found from these ratios and the known acoustic properties of the reference phantom. This method is tested using tissue-mimicking phantoms with known scattering and attenuation properties. Various experiments have been done using clinical scanners with different transducers to compute attenuation coefficients and backscatter coefficients, and to make quantitative images. This method has been found to be accurate for media containing Rayleigh scatterers, as well as samples containing intermediate-size scatterers. Accuracy was maintained over different frequency bands and for a wide range of transducer-to-ROI distances. Measurements were done in vivo for human livers, kidneys and dog myocardium. The results have shown that the reference phantom method simplifies the measurement procedure as well as keeps the accuracy, and therefore is practical clinically. Statistical uncertainties propagated in the data reduction have been analyzed in detail. Formulae are deduced to predict statistical errors in the attenuation and backscatter coefficients measured with the reference phantom method. Spatial correlations of the echo signals are also considered. A 2-dimensional lateral correlation matrix is introduced to compute the number of effective independent

  9. Challenges and regulatory considerations in the acoustic measurement of high-frequency (>20 MHz) ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Nagle, Samuel M; Sundar, Guru; Schafer, Mark E; Harris, Gerald R; Vaezy, Shahram; Gessert, James M; Howard, Samuel M; Moore, Mary K; Eaton, Richard M

    2013-11-01

    This article examines the challenges associated with making acoustic output measurements at high ultrasound frequencies (>20 MHz) in the context of regulatory considerations contained in the US Food and Drug Administration industry guidance document for diagnostic ultrasound devices. Error sources in the acoustic measurement, including hydrophone calibration and spatial averaging, nonlinear distortion, and mechanical alignment, are evaluated, and the limitations of currently available acoustic measurement instruments are discussed. An uncertainty analysis of acoustic intensity and power measurements is presented, and an example uncertainty calculation is done on a hypothetical 30-MHz high-frequency ultrasound system. This analysis concludes that the estimated measurement uncertainty of the acoustic intensity is +73%/-86%, and the uncertainty in the mechanical index is +37%/-43%. These values exceed the respective levels in the Food and Drug Administration guidance document of 30% and 15%, respectively, which are more representative of the measurement uncertainty associated with characterizing lower-frequency ultrasound systems. Recommendations made for minimizing the measurement uncertainty include implementing a mechanical positioning system that has sufficient repeatability and precision, reconstructing the time-pressure waveform via deconvolution using the hydrophone frequency response, and correcting for hydrophone spatial averaging.

  10. [Analysis of the clinical salience for sudden hearing loss in acoustic neuroma].

    PubMed

    Lü, M; Liu, H; Wang, J

    2001-02-01

    To avoid misdiagnosis and misapplied therapy of acoustic neuroma. 92 cases of acoustic neuroma treated between 1983 and 1997 were retrospectively reviewed. Among them, 20 patients (21 ears, 21.7%) presented with sudden hearing loss as the starting symptoms. The diagnosis was based on audiological and radiologic examinations. The clinical and audiological analysis demonstrated that 57.1% of the ears showed hearing loss over 71 dBHL, and all ears had deteriorated ABRs. Acoustic reflex was nonreactive in all 10 ears tested. Positive findings in CT scan were 88.89%. CT pneumoencephalography or MRI provided useful information of diagnosis in those with negative findings of place CT scan. ABR should be used as a routine test for patients with sudden deafness. When ABR was abnormal, CT scan around the internal auditory meatus was needed.

  11. Measuring derived acoustic power of an ultrasound surgical device in the linear and nonlinear operating modes.

    PubMed

    Petosić, Antonio; Ivancević, Bojan; Svilar, Dragoljub

    2009-06-01

    The method for measuring derived acoustic power of an ultrasound point source in the form of a sonotrode tip has been considered in the free acoustic field, according to the IEC 61847 standard. The main objective of this work is measuring averaged pressure magnitude spatial distribution of an sonotrode tip in the free acoustic field conditions at different electrical excitation levels and calculation of the derived acoustic power at excitation frequency (f0 approximately 25 kHz). Finding the derived acoustic power of an ultrasonic surgical device in the strong cavitation regime of working, even in the considered laboratory conditions (anechoic pool), will enable better understanding of the biological effects on the tissue produced during operation with the considered device. The pressure magnitude spatial distribution is measured using B&K 8103 hydrophone connected with a B&K 2626 conditioning amplifier, digital storage oscilloscope LeCroy Waverunner 474, where pressure waveforms in the field points are recorded. Using MATLAB with DSP processing toolbox, averaged power spectrum density of recorded pressure signals in different field positions is calculated. The measured pressure magnitude spatial distributions are fitted with the appropriate theoretical models. In the linear operating mode, using the acoustic reciprocity principle, the sonotrode tip is theoretically described as radially oscillating sphere (ROS) and transversely oscillating sphere (TOS) in the vicinity of pressure release boundary. The measured pressure magnitude spatial distribution is fitted with theoretical curves, describing the pressure field of the considered theoretical models. The velocity and displacement magnitudes with derived acoustic power of equivalent theoretical sources are found, and the electroacoustic efficiency factor is calculated. When the transmitter is excited at higher electrical power levels, the displacement magnitude of sonotrode tip is increased, and nonlinear behaviour

  12. A Methodology to Integrate Magnetic Resonance and Acoustic Measurements for Reservoir Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Parra, J.O.

    2001-01-26

    The objective of this project was to develop an advanced imaging method, including pore scale imaging, to integrate magnetic resonance (MR) techniques and acoustic measurements to improve predictability of the pay zone in two hydrocarbon reservoirs. This was accomplished by extracting the fluid property parameters using MR laboratory measurements and the elastic parameters of the rock matrix from acoustic measurements to create poroelastic models of different parts of the reservoir. Laboratory measurements were compared with petrographic analysis results to determine the relative roles of petrographic elements such as porosity type, mineralogy, texture, and distribution of clay and cement in creating permeability heterogeneity.

  13. A Methodology to Integrate Magnetic Resonance and Acoustic Measurements for Reservoir Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Parra, Jorge O.; Hackert, Chris L.; Collier, Hughbert A.; Bennett, Michael

    2002-01-29

    The objective of this project was to develop an advanced imaging method, including pore scale imaging, to integrate NMR techniques and acoustic measurements to improve predictability of the pay zone in hydrocarbon reservoirs. This is accomplished by extracting the fluid property parameters using NMR laboratory measurements and the elastic parameters of the rock matrix from acoustic measurements to create poroelastic models of different parts of the reservoir. Laboratory measurement techniques and core imaging are being linked with a balanced petrographical analysis of the core and theoretical model.

  14. A Methodology to Integrate Magnetic Resonance and Acoustic Measurements for Reservoir Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Parra, Ph.D., Jorge O.

    2002-06-10

    The objective of the project was to develop an advanced imaging method, including pore scale imaging, to integrate nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques and acoustic measurements to improve predictability of the pay zone in hydrocarbon reservoirs. This will be accomplished by extracting the fluid property parameters using NMR laboratory measurements and the elastic parameters of the rock matrix from acoustic measurements to create poroelastic models of different parts of the reservoir. Laboratory measurement techniques and core imaging were linked with a balanced petrographical analysis of cores and theoretical modeling.

  15. Measured wavenumber: frequency spectrum associated with acoustic and aerodynamic wall pressure fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Arguillat, Blandine; Ricot, Denis; Bailly, Christophe; Robert, Gilles

    2010-10-01

    Direct measurements of the wavenumber-frequency spectrum of wall pressure fluctuations beneath a turbulent plane channel flow have been performed in an anechoic wind tunnel. A rotative array has been designed that allows the measurement of a complete map, 63×63 measuring points, of cross-power spectral densities over a large area. An original post-processing has been developed to separate the acoustic and the aerodynamic exciting loadings by transforming space-frequency data into wavenumber-frequency spectra. The acoustic part has also been estimated from a simple Corcos-like model including the contribution of a diffuse sound field. The measured acoustic contribution to the surface pressure fluctuations is 5% of the measured aerodynamic surface pressure fluctuations for a velocity and boundary layer thickness relevant for automotive interior noise applications. This shows that for aerodynamically induced car interior noise, both contributions to the surface pressure fluctuations on car windows have to be taken into account.

  16. Optimizing Vowel Formant Measurements in Four Acoustic Analysis Systems for Diverse Speaker Groups

    PubMed Central

    Derdemezis, Ekaterini; Kent, Ray D.; Fourakis, Marios; Reinicke, Emily L.; Bolt, Daniel M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study systematically assessed the effects of select linear predictive coding (LPC) analysis parameter manipulations on vowel formant measurements for diverse speaker groups using 4 trademarked Speech Acoustic Analysis Software Packages (SAASPs): CSL, Praat, TF32, and WaveSurfer. Method Productions of 4 words containing the corner vowels were recorded from 4 speaker groups with typical development (male and female adults and male and female children) and 4 speaker groups with Down syndrome (male and female adults and male and female children). Formant frequencies were determined from manual measurements using a consensus analysis procedure to establish formant reference values, and from the 4 SAASPs (using both the default analysis parameters and with adjustments or manipulations to select parameters). Smaller differences between values obtained from the SAASPs and the consensus analysis implied more optimal analysis parameter settings. Results Manipulations of default analysis parameters in CSL, Praat, and TF32 yielded more accurate formant measurements, though the benefit was not uniform across speaker groups and formants. In WaveSurfer, manipulations did not improve formant measurements. Conclusions The effects of analysis parameter manipulations on accuracy of formant-frequency measurements varied by SAASP, speaker group, and formant. The information from this study helps to guide clinical and research applications of SAASPs. PMID:26501214

  17. Acoustic characterization of high intensity focused ultrasound fields: A combined measurement and modeling approach

    PubMed Central

    Canney, Michael S.; Bailey, Michael R.; Crum, Lawrence A.; Khokhlova, Vera A.; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.

    2008-01-01

    Acoustic characterization of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) fields is important both for the accurate prediction of ultrasound induced bioeffects in tissues and for the development of regulatory standards for clinical HIFU devices. In this paper, a method to determine HIFU field parameters at and around the focus is proposed. Nonlinear pressure waveforms were measured and modeled in water and in a tissue-mimicking gel phantom for a 2 MHz transducer with an aperture and focal length of 4.4 cm. Measurements were performed with a fiber optic probe hydrophone at intensity levels up to 24 000 W∕cm2. The inputs to a Khokhlov–Zabolotskaya–Kuznetsov-type numerical model were determined based on experimental low amplitude beam plots. Strongly asymmetric waveforms with peak positive pressures up to 80 MPa and peak negative pressures up to 15 MPa were obtained both numerically and experimentally. Numerical simulations and experimental measurements agreed well; however, when steep shocks were present in the waveform at focal intensity levels higher than 6000 W∕cm2, lower values of the peak positive pressure were observed in the measured waveforms. This underrepresentation was attributed mainly to the limited hydrophone bandwidth of 100 MHz. It is shown that a combination of measurements and modeling is necessary to enable accurate characterization of HIFU fields. PMID:19062878

  18. Acoustic characterization of high intensity focused ultrasound fields: a combined measurement and modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Canney, Michael S; Bailey, Michael R; Crum, Lawrence A; Khokhlova, Vera A; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A

    2008-10-01

    Acoustic characterization of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) fields is important both for the accurate prediction of ultrasound induced bioeffects in tissues and for the development of regulatory standards for clinical HIFU devices. In this paper, a method to determine HIFU field parameters at and around the focus is proposed. Nonlinear pressure waveforms were measured and modeled in water and in a tissue-mimicking gel phantom for a 2 MHz transducer with an aperture and focal length of 4.4 cm. Measurements were performed with a fiber optic probe hydrophone at intensity levels up to 24,000 W/cm(2). The inputs to a Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya-Kuznetsov-type numerical model were determined based on experimental low amplitude beam plots. Strongly asymmetric waveforms with peak positive pressures up to 80 MPa and peak negative pressures up to 15 MPa were obtained both numerically and experimentally. Numerical simulations and experimental measurements agreed well; however, when steep shocks were present in the waveform at focal intensity levels higher than 6000 W/cm(2), lower values of the peak positive pressure were observed in the measured waveforms. This underrepresentation was attributed mainly to the limited hydrophone bandwidth of 100 MHz. It is shown that a combination of measurements and modeling is necessary to enable accurate characterization of HIFU fields.

  19. An objective method and measuring equipment for noise control and acoustic diagnostics of motorcars. [acoustic diagnostics on automobile engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kacprowski, J.; Motylewski, J.; Miazga, J.

    1974-01-01

    An objective method and apparatus for noise control and acoustic diagnostics of motorcar engines are reported. The method and apparatus let us know whether the noisiness of the vehicle under test exceeds the admissible threshold levels given by appropriate standards and if so what is the main source of the excessive noise. The method consists in measuring both the overall noise level and the sound pressure levels in definite frequency bands while the engine speed is controlled as well and may be fixed at prescribed values. Whenever the individually adjusted threshold level has been exceeded in any frequency band, a self-sustaining control signal is sent.

  20. Measurement of the acoustic radiation force on a sphere embedded in a soft solid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lidon, Pierre; Villa, Louis; Taberlet, Nicolas; Manneville, Sébastien

    2017-01-01

    The acoustic radiation force exerted on a small sphere located at the focus of an ultrasonic beam is measured in a soft gel. It is proved to evolve quadratically with the local amplitude of the acoustic field. Strong oscillations of the local pressure are observed and attributed to an acoustic Fabry-Pérot effect between the ultrasonic emitter and the sphere. Taking this effect into account with a simple model, a quantitative link between the radiation force and the acoustic pressure is proposed and compared to theoretical predictions in the absence of dissipation. The discrepancy between experiment and theory suggests that dissipative effects should be taken into account for fully modeling the observations.

  1. Reproducibility experiments on measuring acoustical properties of rigid-frame porous media (round-robin tests).

    PubMed

    Horoshenkov, Kirill V; Khan, Amir; Bécot, François-Xavier; Jaouen, Luc; Sgard, Franck; Renault, Amélie; Amirouche, Nesrine; Pompoli, Francesco; Prodi, Nicola; Bonfiglio, Paolo; Pispola, Giulio; Asdrubali, Francesco; Hübelt, Jörn; Atalla, Noureddine; Amédin, Celse K; Lauriks, Walter; Boeckx, Laurens

    2007-07-01

    This paper reports the results of reproducibility experiments on the interlaboratory characterization of the acoustical properties of three types of consolidated porous media: granulated porous rubber, reticulated foam, and fiberglass. The measurements are conducted in several independent laboratories in Europe and North America. The studied acoustical characteristics are the surface complex acoustic impedance at normal incidence and plane wave absorption coefficient which are determined using the standard impedance tube method. The paper provides detailed procedures related to sample preparation and installation and it discusses the dispersion in the acoustical material property observed between individual material samples and laboratories. The importance of the boundary conditions, homogeneity of the porous material structure, and stability of the adopted signal processing method are highlighted.

  2. ATK Launch Vehicle (ALV-X1) Liftoff Acoustic Environments: Prediction vs. Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houston, Janice; Counter, Douglas; Kenny, Jeremy; Murphy, John

    2009-01-01

    The ATK Launch Vehicle (ALV-X1) provided an opportunity to measure liftoff acoustic noise data. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) engineers were interested in the ALV-X1 launch because the First Stage motor and launch pad conditions, including a relativity short deflector ducting, provide a potential analogue to future Ares I launches. This paper presents the measured liftoff acoustics on the vehicle and tower. Those measured results are compared to predictions based upon the method described in NASA SP-8072 "Acoustic Loads Generated by the Propulsion System" and the Vehicle Acoustic Environment Prediction Program (VAEPP) which was developed by MSFC acoustics engineers. One-third octave band sound pressure levels will be presented. This data is useful for the ALV-X1 in validating the pre-launch environments and loads predictions. Additionally, the ALV-X1 liftoff data can be scaled to define liftoff environments for the NASA Constellation program Ares vehicles. Vehicle liftoff noise is caused by the supersonic jet flow interaction with surrounding atmosphere or more simply, jet noise. As the vehicle's First Stage motor is ignited, an acoustic noise field is generated by the exhaust. This noise field persists due to the supersonic jet noise and reflections from the launch pad and tower, then changes as the vehicle begins to liftoff from the launch pad. Depending on launch pad and adjacent tower configurations, the liftoff noise is generally very high near the nozzle exit and decreases rapidly away from the nozzle. The liftoff acoustic time range of interest is typically 0 to 20 seconds after ignition. The exhaust plume thermo-fluid mechanics generates sound at approx.10 Hz to 20 kHz. Liftoff acoustic noise is usually the most severe dynamic environment for a launch vehicle or payload in the mid to high frequency range (approx.50 to 2000 Hz). This noise environment can induce high-level vibrations along the external surfaces of the vehicle and surrounding

  3. Measurement of acoustic characteristics of Japanese Buddhist temples in relation to sound source location and direction.

    PubMed

    Soeta, Yoshiharu; Shimokura, Ryota; Kim, Yong Hee; Ohsawa, Tomohiro; Ito, Ken

    2013-05-01

    Although temples are important buildings in the Buddhist community, the acoustic quality has not been examined in detail. Buddhist monks change the location and direction according to the ceremony, and associated acoustical changes have not yet been examined scientifically. To discuss the desired acoustics of temples, it is necessary to know the acoustic characteristics appropriate for each phase of a ceremony. In this study, acoustic measurements were taken at various source locations and directions in Japanese temples. A directional loudspeaker was used as the source to provide vocal acoustic fields, and impulse responses were measured and analyzed. The speech transmission index was higher and the interaural cross-correlation coefficient was lower for the sound source directed toward the side wall than that directed toward the altar. This suggests that the change in direction improves speech intelligibility, and the asymmetric property of direct sound and complex reflections from the altar and side wall increases the apparent source width. The large and coupled-like structure of the altar of a Buddhist temple may have reinforced the reverberation components and the table in the altar, which is called the "syumidan," may have decreased binaural coherence.

  4. Long-term continuous acoustical suspended-sediment measurements in rivers - Theory, application, bias, and error

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Topping, David J.; Wright, Scott A.

    2016-05-04

    It is commonly recognized that suspended-sediment concentrations in rivers can change rapidly in time and independently of water discharge during important sediment‑transporting events (for example, during floods); thus, suspended-sediment measurements at closely spaced time intervals are necessary to characterize suspended‑sediment loads. Because the manual collection of sufficient numbers of suspended-sediment samples required to characterize this variability is often time and cost prohibitive, several “surrogate” techniques have been developed for in situ measurements of properties related to suspended-sediment characteristics (for example, turbidity, laser-diffraction, acoustics). Herein, we present a new physically based method for the simultaneous measurement of suspended-silt-and-clay concentration, suspended-sand concentration, and suspended‑sand median grain size in rivers, using multi‑frequency arrays of single-frequency side‑looking acoustic-Doppler profilers. The method is strongly grounded in the extensive scientific literature on the incoherent scattering of sound by random suspensions of small particles. In particular, the method takes advantage of theory that relates acoustic frequency, acoustic attenuation, acoustic backscatter, suspended-sediment concentration, and suspended-sediment grain-size distribution. We develop the theory and methods, and demonstrate the application of the method at six study sites on the Colorado River and Rio Grande, where large numbers of suspended-sediment samples have been collected concurrently with acoustic attenuation and backscatter measurements over many years. The method produces acoustical measurements of suspended-silt-and-clay and suspended-sand concentration (in units of mg/L), and acoustical measurements of suspended-sand median grain size (in units of mm) that are generally in good to excellent agreement with concurrent physical measurements of these quantities in the river cross sections at

  5. Acoustic methods for measuring the porosities of porous materials incorporating dead-end pores.

    PubMed

    Dupont, Thomas; Leclaire, Philippe; Panneton, Raymond

    2013-04-01

    The acoustic properties of porous materials containing dead-end (DE) pores have been proposed by Dupont et al. [J. Appl. Phys. 110, 094903 (2011)]. In the theoretical description, two physical parameters were defined (the dead-end porosity and the average length of the dead-end pores). With the knowledge of the open porosity (measured with non-acoustic methods), and the measurement of kinematic porosity (also called the Biot porosity in this article), it is possible to deduce the dead-end porosity. Two acoustic methods for measuring the Biot porosity for a wide range of porosities are proposed. These methods are based on acoustic transmission and on the low and high frequency behaviors of acoustic indicators. The low frequency method is valid for high porosities. It involves measurements in a transmission tube and the knowledge of the theoretical asymptotic behavior of the phase velocity at high frequencies. The high frequency method is based on ultrasonic measurements and on the high frequency asymptotic behavior of the transmission coefficient. It is well adapted for material with relatively low values of porosity. Good precision was found for both methods and materials containing dead end porosity were tested.

  6. Integrating voice evaluation: correlation between acoustic and audio-perceptual measures.

    PubMed

    Vaz Freitas, Susana; Melo Pestana, Pedro; Almeida, Vítor; Ferreira, Aníbal

    2015-05-01

    This article aims to establish correlations between acoustic and audio-perceptual measures using the GRBAS scale with respect to four different voice analysis software programs. Exploratory, transversal. A total of 90 voice records were collected and analyzed with the Dr. Speech (Tiger Electronics, Seattle, WA), Multidimensional Voice Program (Kay Elemetrics, NJ, USA), PRAAT (University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands), and Voice Studio (Seegnal, Oporto, Portugal) software programs. The acoustic measures were correlated to the audio-perceptual parameters of the GRBAS and rated by 10 experts. The predictive value of the acoustic measurements related to the audio-perceptual parameters exhibited magnitudes ranging from weak (R(2)a=0.17) to moderate (R(2)a=0.71). The parameter exhibiting the highest correlation magnitude is B (Breathiness), whereas the weaker correlation magnitudes were found to be for A (Asthenia) and S (Strain). The acoustic measures with stronger predictive values were local Shimmer, harmonics-to-noise ratio, APQ5 shimmer, and PPQ5 jitter, with different magnitudes for each one of the studied software programs. Some acoustic measures are pointed as significant predictors of GRBAS parameters, but they differ among software programs. B (Breathiness) was the parameter exhibiting the highest correlation magnitude. Copyright © 2015 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Nondisturbing transverse acoustic sensor based on weak measurement in Mach-Zehnder interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dongmei; Guan, Tian; Jiang, Jingying; He, Yonghong

    2017-03-01

    We proposed an optical sensing scheme, based on the mechanism of weak measurement, to detect the sonic pressure transversally without any disturbance. According to the theory of weak measurement in frequency domain, a tiny phase difference between the two eigenstates of the system could be detected, depending on the shift of central wavelength of output spectra. The optical path difference between two paths of a Mach-Zehnder interferometer is induced by the varied acoustic waves propagating in liquid. The propagating direction of the testing light beam is orthogonal to that of the acoustic wave. Thus, the phase shift corresponding to the changing acoustic pressure could be monitored transversally. The experiment with the hydrophone is implemented as a reference to demonstrate the feasibility and authenticity of this weak measurement scheme. With this method, an optical phase resolution of 1.12×10-5 rad was acquired in such a weak measurement system.

  8. Measurement of drug lipophilicity and pKa using acoustics.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Cooper, Matthew A

    2012-03-20

    Lipophilicity of chemicals and drug candidates is normally described in terms of octanol/water partitioning and log P. We investigated an alternate approach to lipophilicity determination using a mimic of an alkyl alcohol with compound partitioning quantified using acoustic sensing. A self-assembled monolayer composed of HSC(10)(CH(2)CH(2)O)(6)C(18) was formed on planar gold electrodes of a piezoelectric acoustic sensor. The system was challenged with compounds covering a 4-log range of log D values. As compounds partitioned in the interfacial layer, changes in sensor resonant frequency were found to correlate with compound partition coefficients (log P) and with distribution coefficients (log D). Linear concordance (R(2) = 0.933) was established between log(-dF/M(w)t) and log P and with log D in both water and biological buffers at variant pH (pH 5.2 to 7.8). In turn, drug pK(a) could be determined by profiling log D changes during pH titration. The lipophilicity/pH profile of a weakly basic drug (quinine; pK(a) = 7.95) was sigmoidal with respect to -dF/M(w) values, with a profile inverse to that of a weakly acidic drug (naproxen; pK(a) = 4.15).

  9. Measurement of a broadband negative index with space-coiling acoustic metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yangbo; Popa, Bogdan-Ioan; Zigoneanu, Lucian; Cummer, Steven A

    2013-04-26

    We report the experimental demonstration of a broadband negative refractive index obtained in a labyrinthine acoustic metamaterial structure. Two different approaches were employed to prove the metamaterial negative index nature: one-dimensional extractions of effective parameters from reflection and transmission measurements and two-dimensional prism-based measurements that convincingly show the transmission angle corresponding to negative refraction. The transmission angles observed in the latter case also agree very well with the refractive index obtained in the one-dimensional measurements and numerical simulations. We expect this labyrinthine metamaterial to become the unit cell of choice for practical acoustic metamaterial devices that require broadband and significantly negative indices of refraction.

  10. Near field acoustic holography measurements of carbon nanotube thin film speakers.

    PubMed

    Asgarisabet, Mahsa; Barnard, Andrew R; Bouman, Troy M

    2016-12-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) thin film speakers produce sound with the thermoacoustic effect. Better understanding of the physical acoustic properties of these speakers will drive future design improvements. Measuring acoustic properties at the surface of the CNT thin film is difficult because the films, themselves, do not vibrate, are fragile and have a high surface temperature. In order to measure the surface particle velocity and sound pressure level (SPL), near field acoustic holography (NAH) has been used by employing probe microphones. NAH images the acoustic quantities of the source system using the set of acoustic pressure measurements on a hologram parallel to the source surface. It is shown that the particle velocity at the surface of an open-air, double-sided speaker is nominally zero, as expected. However, the SPL distribution is not uniform on the source surface, contrary to common lumped parameter model assumptions. Also, particle velocity and sound intensity distributions on the hologram have been obtained in this study. Finally, measured directivity patterns of the planar CNT speaker are reported.

  11. High-Speed Videoendoscopic Analysis of Relationships Between Cepstral-Based Acoustic Measures and Voice Production Mechanisms in Patients Undergoing Phonomicrosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Daryush D.; Zeitels, Steven M.; Burns, James A.; Friedman, Aaron D.; Deliyski, Dimitar D.; Hillman, Robert E.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives There is increased interest in using cepstral-based acoustic measures for objective clinical voice assessment because of their apparent advantages over more time-honored methods, but there is a paucity of information about how these newer measures relate to underlying phonatory mechanisms. Methods We investigated the relationships between the acoustic cepstral peak magnitude (CPM) and high-speed videoendoscopy (HSV)–based measures of vocal fold phonatory function in 20 subjects who underwent phonomicrosurgery for vocal fold lesions. Acoustic and imaging data were acquired during sustained vowel phonation before and after surgery. Results The changes in the measures between presurgical and postsurgical assessments showed that the CPM correlated significantly with an HSV-based measure combining fundamental frequency deviation and average speed quotient (r = 0.70; p < 0.001) in a multiple linear regression, and that the variation in the CPM could also be attributed to tradingrelationships between the HSV-based measures of vibratory phase asymmetry and glottal closure. Conclusions These initial results demonstrate that the clinical utility of cepstral-based measures can be enhanced by a better understanding of how these acoustic measures relate to underlying phonatory mechanisms. The CPM seems to integrate information about aperiodicity in vocal fold vibration, the relative speed of glottal closure, and estimates of glottal noise generation. PMID:22724281

  12. Measurement of evanescent wave properties of a bulk acoustic wave resonator.

    PubMed

    Kokkonen, Kimmo; Meltaus, Johanna; Pensala, Tuomas; Kaivola, Matti

    2012-03-01

    Acoustic wave fields in a thin-film bulk acoustic wave resonator are studied using a heterodyne laser interferometer. The measurement area is extended outside the active electrode region of the resonator, so that wave fields in both the active and surrounding regions can be characterized. At frequencies at which the region surrounding the resonator does not support laterally propagating acoustic waves, the analysis of the measurement data shows exponentially decaying amplitude fields outside the active resonator area, as suggested by theory. The magnitude of the imaginary wave vectors is determined by fitting an exponential function to the measured amplitude data, and thereby the experimentally determined dispersion diagram is extended into the region of imaginary wave numbers.

  13. A differential optical interferometer for measuring short pulses of surface acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Anurupa; Teyssieux, Damien; Laude, Vincent

    2017-09-01

    The measurement of the displacements caused by the propagation of a short pulse of surface acoustic waves on a solid substrate is investigated. A stabilized time-domain differential interferometer is proposed, with the surface acoustic wave (SAW) sample placed outside the interferometer. Experiments are conducted with surface acoustic waves excited by a chirped interdigital transducer on a piezoelectric lithium niobate substrate having an operational bandwidth covering the 200-400MHz frequency range and producing 10-ns pulses with 36nm maximum out-of-plane displacement. The interferometric response is compared with a direct electrical measurement obtained with a receiving wide bandwidth interdigital transducer and good correspondence is observed. The effects of varying the path difference of the interferometer and the measurement position on the surface are discussed. Pulse compression along the chirped interdigital transducer is observed experimentally. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Measurement of Aqueous Foam Rheology by Acoustic Levitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDaniel, J. Gregory; Holt, R. Glynn; Rogers, Rich (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    An experimental technique is demonstrated for acoustically levitating aqueous foam drops and exciting their spheroidal modes. This allows fundamental studies of foam-drop dynamics that provide an alternative means of estimating the viscoelastic properties of the foam. One unique advantage of the technique is the lack of interactions between the foam and container surfaces, which must be accounted for in other techniques. Results are presented in which a foam drop with gas volume fraction phi = 0.77 is levitated at 30 kHz and excited into its first quadrupole resonance at 63 +/- 3 Hz. By modeling the drop as an elastic sphere, the shear modulus of the foam was estimated at 75 +/- 3 Pa.

  15. Measurement of Aqueous Foam Rheology by Acoustic Levitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDaniel, J. Gregory; Holt, R. Glynn; Rogers, Rich (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    An experimental technique is demonstrated for acoustically levitating aqueous foam drops and exciting their spheroidal modes. This allows fundamental studies of foam-drop dynamics that provide an alternative means of estimating the viscoelastic properties of the foam. One unique advantage of the technique is the lack of interactions between the foam and container surfaces, which must be accounted for in other techniques. Results are presented in which a foam drop with gas volume fraction phi = 0.77 is levitated at 30 kHz and excited into its first quadrupole resonance at 63 +/- 3 Hz. By modeling the drop as an elastic sphere, the shear modulus of the foam was estimated at 75 +/- 3 Pa.

  16. Measuring the speed of light with baryon acoustic oscillations.

    PubMed

    Salzano, Vincenzo; Dąbrowski, Mariusz P; Lazkoz, Ruth

    2015-03-13

    In this Letter, we describe a new method to use baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) to derive a constraint on the possible variation of the speed of light. The method relies on the fact that there is a simple relation between the angular diameter distance (D(A)) maximum and the Hubble function (H) evaluated at the same maximum-condition redshift, which includes speed of light c. We note the close analogy of the BAO probe with a laboratory experiment: here we have D(A) which plays the role of a standard (cosmological) ruler, and H^{-1}, with the dimension of time, as a (cosmological) clock. We evaluate if current or future missions such as Euclid can be sensitive enough to detect any variation of c.

  17. Final Report. Geothermal Dual Acoustic Tool for Measurement of Rock Stress

    SciTech Connect

    Normann, Randy A

    2014-12-01

    This paper outlines the technology need for a rock formation stress measurement in future EGS wells. This paper reports on the results of work undertaken under a Phase I, DOE/SBIR on the feasibility to build an acoustic well logging tool for measuring rock formation stress.

  18. Acoustic measurement of suspensions of clay and silt particles using single frequency attenuation and backscatter

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The use of ultrasonic acoustic technology to measure the concentration of fine suspended sediments has the potential to greatly increase the temporal and spatial resolution of sediment measurements while reducing the need for personnel to be present at gauging stations during storm events. The conv...

  19. Wideband Acoustic Immittance: Normative Study and Test-Retest Reliability of Tympanometric Measurements in Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sun, Xiao-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to present normative data of tympanometric measurements of wideband acoustic immittance and to characterize wideband tympanograms. Method: Data were collected in 84 young adults with strictly defined normal hearing and middle ear status. Energy absorbance (EA) was measured using clicks for 1/12-octave…

  20. Final Report: Geothermal dual acoustic tool for measurement of rock stress

    SciTech Connect

    Normann, Randy A.

    2014-12-01

    This paper outlines the technology need for a rock formation stress measurement in future EGS wells. This paper reports on the results of work undertaken under a Phase I, DOE/SBIR on the feasibility to build an acoustic well logging tool for measuring rock formation stress.

  1. An acoustic method for measuring characteristics of rotating stall in a compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaofeng; Hu, Xongan; Feng, Yucheng; Zhou, Sheng

    1991-04-01

    According to analysis of the characteristics of frequency and propagation of the sound generated by the rotating stall, an acoustic measuring method is developed in which the characteristic parameters such as the number and propagation speed of stall cells are measured. Primary experimental results obtained on a transonic axial-flow compressor facility demonstrate the feasibility of this method.

  2. Time-of-Flight Adjustment Procedure for Acoustic Measurements in Structural Timber

    Treesearch

    Danbiel F. Llana; Guillermo Iñiguez-Gonzalez; Francisco Arriaga; Xiping Wang

    2016-01-01

    The effect of timber length on time-of-flight acoustic longitudinal measurements was investigated on the structural timber of four Spanish species: radiata pine (Pinus radiata D. Don), Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.), laricio pine (Pinus nigra Arn.), and maritime pine (Pinus pinaster Ait.). Time-of-flight longitudinal measurements were conducted on 120 specimens of...

  3. Wideband Acoustic Immittance: Normative Study and Test-Retest Reliability of Tympanometric Measurements in Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sun, Xiao-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to present normative data of tympanometric measurements of wideband acoustic immittance and to characterize wideband tympanograms. Method: Data were collected in 84 young adults with strictly defined normal hearing and middle ear status. Energy absorbance (EA) was measured using clicks for 1/12-octave…

  4. Improvements to the methods used to measure bubble attenuation using an underwater acoustical resonator.

    PubMed

    Czerski, Helen; Vagle, Svein; Farmer, David M; Hall-Patch, Nick

    2011-11-01

    Active acoustic techniques are commonly used to measure oceanic bubble size distributions, by inverting the bulk acoustical properties of the water (usually the attenuation) to infer the bubble population. Acoustical resonators have previously been used to determine attenuation over a wide range of frequencies (10-200 kHz) in a single measurement, corresponding to the simultaneous measurement of a wide range of bubble sizes (20-300 μm radii). However, there is now also considerable interest in acquiring measurements of bubbles with radii smaller than 16 μm, since these are thought to be important for ocean optics and as tracers for near-surface flow. To extend the bubble population measurement to smaller radii, it is necessary to extend the attenuation measurements to higher frequencies. Although the principles of resonator operation do not change as the frequency increases, the assumptions previously made during the spectral analysis may no longer be valid. In order to improve the methods used to calculate attenuation from acoustical resonator outputs, a more complete analysis of the resonator operation is presented here than has been published previously. This approach allows for robust attenuation measurements over a much wider frequency range and enables accurate measurements from lower-quality spectral peaks.

  5. Non-Destructive Measurement of Vascular Tissue Development in Stems of Miniature Tomato Using Acoustic Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kageyama, Kensuke; Watanabe, Eiko; Kato, Hiroshi

    The guided wave effect resembling that of annual rings found in woods and the cortical region of bones is believed to be observable in vascular tissues of herbaceous plants. The properties of acoustic waves traveling through the vascular tissue in the stem of a miniature tomato were measured using a piezoelectric pulser and receiver. The thickness of the vascular tissues and the stem's water content were measured. The detected acoustic waves showed a guided wave effect. The apparent sound velocity, va, was related to the vascular tissue thickness, tv. These results reveal that the detected acoustic waves traveled along the vascular tissues in stems. The maximum peak intensity of the detected acoustic waves, Imax was also related to t. Furthermore, wilting of the examined plants decreased the Imax, although va was not changed. The decrease in Imax might result from cavitations and embolisms with a subsequent increase in air pores in xylem tissues. These results demonstrate that the measurement of acoustic waves traveling through vascular tissue is a useful tool for the non-destructive evaluation of vascular tissue development and embolism density in xylem tissues.

  6. Measurements and empirical model of the acoustic properties of reticulated vitreous carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muehleisen, Ralph T.; Beamer, C. Walter; Tinianov, Brandon D.

    2005-02-01

    Reticulated vitreous carbon (RVC) is a highly porous, rigid, open cell carbon foam structure with a high melting point, good chemical inertness, and low bulk thermal conductivity. For the proper design of acoustic devices such as acoustic absorbers and thermoacoustic stacks and regenerators utilizing RVC, the acoustic properties of RVC must be known. From knowledge of the complex characteristic impedance and wave number most other acoustic properties can be computed. In this investigation, the four-microphone transfer matrix measurement method is used to measure the complex characteristic impedance and wave number for 60 to 300 pore-per-inch RVC foams with flow resistivities from 1759 to 10 782 Pa s m-2 in the frequency range of 330 Hz-2 kHz. The data are found to be poorly predicted by the fibrous material empirical model developed by Delany and Bazley, the open cell plastic foam empirical model developed by Qunli, or the Johnson-Allard microstructural model. A new empirical power law model is developed and is shown to provide good predictions of the acoustic properties over the frequency range of measurement. Uncertainty estimates for the constants of the model are also computed. .

  7. Comparison of cosmology and seabed acoustics measurements using statistical inference from maximum entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knobles, David; Stotts, Steven; Sagers, Jason

    2012-03-01

    Why can one obtain from similar measurements a greater amount of information about cosmological parameters than seabed parameters in ocean waveguides? The cosmological measurements are in the form of a power spectrum constructed from spatial correlations of temperature fluctuations within the microwave background radiation. The seabed acoustic measurements are in the form of spatial correlations along the length of a spatial aperture. This study explores the above question from the perspective of posterior probability distributions obtained from maximizing a relative entropy functional. An answer is in part that the seabed in shallow ocean environments generally has large temporal and spatial inhomogeneities, whereas the early universe was a nearly homogeneous cosmological soup with small but important fluctuations. Acoustic propagation models used in shallow water acoustics generally do not capture spatial and temporal variability sufficiently well, which leads to model error dominating the statistical inference problem. This is not the case in cosmology. Further, the physics of the acoustic modes in cosmology is that of a standing wave with simple initial conditions, whereas for underwater acoustics it is a traveling wave in a strongly inhomogeneous bounded medium.

  8. a Rayleigh Wave Technique to Measure the Acoustic Nonlinearity Parameter of Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shui, G.; Jacobs, L. J.; Qu, J.; Wang, Y. S.; Kim, J.-Y.

    2008-02-01

    Nonlinear ultrasonic techniques have shown great potential for evaluating accumulated damage early in the fatigue life, and ultimately for predicting remaining lifetime of a structural component. The acoustic nonlinearity parameter, a direct measure of the accumulated fatigue damage, is determined from the second harmonic amplitude in finite amplitude sinusoidal ultrasonic waves transmitted through the material. An absolute determination of the acoustic nonlinear parameter is notoriously difficult for several reasons. In this paper, a new experimental technique based on Rayleigh surface waves is presented for determining the absolute acoustic nonlinearity parameter of a relatively thin material specimen. Rayleigh waves are efficiently generated in a specimen by exciting at its edge, and the surface normal velocity of the propagating Rayleigh waves is measured with a laser interferometer system. The high efficiency of the excitation method allows us to drive the transmitting piezoelectric transducer as low as 60 Vpp, and thus to avoid the inherent harmonic distortion from the transducer. The absolute acoustic nonlinearity parameter is then determined from the measured magnitudes of the fundamental and second harmonic surface normal velocities. This technique is applied to determining the acoustic nonlinearity parameters of aluminum alloys 2024 and 6061; the results are compared with those available in the literature. The present technique is especially well-suited for relatively thin components, and much simpler and efficient than the traditional longitudinal wave technique.

  9. Measuring Ultrasonic Acoustic Velocity in a Thin Sheet of Graphite Epoxy Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    A method for measuring the acoustic velocity in a thin sheet of a graphite epoxy composite (GEC) material was investigated. This method uses two identical acoustic-emission (AE) sensors, one to transmit and one to receive. The delay time as a function of distance between sensors determines a bulk velocity. A lightweight fixture (balsa wood in the current implementation) provides a consistent method of positioning the sensors, thus providing multiple measurements of the time delay between sensors at different known distances. A linear fit to separation, x, versus delay time, t, will yield an estimate of the velocity from the slope of the line.

  10. Use of Acoustic Doppler Instruments for Measuring Discharge in Streams with Appreciable Sediment Transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mueller, D.S.; ,

    2002-01-01

    The use of Acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCP) for measuring discharge in streams with sediment transport was discussed. The studies show that the acoustic frequency of an ADCP in combination with the sediment transport characteristics in a river causes the ADCP bottom-tracking algorithms to detect a moving bottom. A moving bottom causes bottom-tracking-referenced water velocities and discharges to be biased low. The results also show that the use of differential global positioning system (DGPS) data allows accurate measurement of water velocities and discharges in such cases.

  11. Correlation Between Acoustic Measurements and Self-Reported Voice Disorders Among Female Teachers.

    PubMed

    Lin, Feng-Chuan; Chen, Sheng Hwa; Chen, Su-Chiu; Wang, Chi-Te; Kuo, Yu-Ching

    2016-07-01

    Many studies focused on teachers' voice problems and most of them were conducted using questionnaires, whereas little research has investigated the relationship between self-reported voice disorders and objective quantification of voice. This study intends to explore the relationship of acoustic measurements according to self-reported symptoms and its predictive value of future dysphonia. This is a case-control study. Voice samples of 80 female teachers were analyzed, including 40 self-reported voice disorders (VD) and 40 self-reported normal voice (NVD) subjects. The acoustic measurements included jitter, shimmer, and noise-to-harmonics ratio (NHR). Levene's t test and logistic regression were used to analyze the differences between VD and NVD and the relationship between self-reported voice conditions and the acoustic measurements. To examine whether acoustic measurements can be used to predict further voice disorders, we applied a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve to determine the cutoff values and the associated sensitivity and specificity. The results showed that jitter, shimmer, and the NHR of VD were significantly higher than those of NVD. Among the parameters, the NHR and shimmer demonstrated the highest correlation with self-reported voice disorders. By using the NHR ≥0.138 and shimmer ≥0.470 dB as the cutoff values, the ROC curve displayed 72.5% of sensitivity and 75% of specificity, and the overall positive predictive value for subsequent dysphonia achieved 60%. This study demonstrated a significant correlation between acoustic measurements and self-reported dysphonic symptoms. NHR and ShdB are two acoustic parameters that are more able to reflect vocal abnormalities and, probably, to predict subsequent subjective voice disorder. Future research recruiting more subjects in other occupations and genders shall validate the preliminary results revealed in this study. Copyright © 2016 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  12. Objective dysphonia measures in the program Praat: smoothed cepstral peak prominence and acoustic voice quality index.

    PubMed

    Maryn, Youri; Weenink, David

    2015-01-01

    A version of the "smoothed cepstral peak prominence" (i.e., CPPS) has recently been implemented in the program Praat. The present study therefore estimated the correspondence between the original CPPS from the program SpeechTool and Praat's version of the CPPS. Because the CPPS is the main factor in the multivariate Acoustic Voice Quality Index (AVQI), this study also investigated the proportional relationship between the AVQI with the original and the second version of the CPPS. Comparative cohort study. Clinical recordings of sustained vowel phonation and continuous speech from 289 subjects with various voice disorders were analyzed with the two versions of the CPPS and the AVQI. Pearson correlation coefficients and coefficients of determination were calculated between both CPPS-methods and between both AVQI-methods. Quasi-perfect correlations and coefficients of determination approaching hundred percent were found. The findings of this study demonstrate that the outcomes of the two CPPS-methods and the two AVQI-methods are highly comparable, increasing the clinical feasibility of both methods as measures of dysphonia severity. Copyright © 2015 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Improving Acoustics in American Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Peggy B.

    2000-01-01

    This introductory article to a clinical forum describes the following seven articles that discuss the problem of noisy classrooms and resulting reduction in learning, basic principles of noise and reverberation measurements in classrooms, solutions to the problem of poor classroom acoustics, and the development of a classroom acoustics standard.…

  14. Acoustic puncture assist device™ versus conventional loss of resistance technique for thoracic paravertebral space identification: Clinical and ultrasound evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Monaz Abdulrahman; Abdellatif, Ashraf Abualhasan

    2017-01-01

    Background: Acoustic puncture assist device (APAD™) is a pressure measurement combined with a related acoustic signal that has been successfully used to facilitate epidural punctures. The principal of loss of resistance (LOR) is similar when performing paravertebral block (PVB). We investigated the usefulness of APAD™ by comparing it with the conventional LOR techniques for identifying paravertebral space (PVS). Subjects and Methods: A total of 100 women who were scheduled for elective breast surgery under general anesthesia with PVB were randomized into two equal groups. The first group (APAD group) was scheduled for PVB using APAD™. The second group (C group) was scheduled for PVB using conventional LOR technique. We recorded the success rate assessed by clinical and ultrasound findings, the time required to identify the PVS, the depth of the PVS and the number of attempts. The attending anesthesiologist was also questioned about the usefulness of the acoustic signal for detection of the PVS. Results: The incidence of successful PVB was (49) in APAD group compared to (42) in C group P < 0.05. The time required to do PVB was significantly shorter in APAD group than in C group (3.5 ± 1.35 vs. 4.1 ± 1.42) minutes. Two patients in APAD group needed two or more attempts compared to four patients in C group. The attending anesthesiologist found the acoustic signal valuable in all patients in APAD group. Conclusion: Using APAD™ compared to the conventional LOR technique showed a lower failure rate and a shorter time to identify the PVS. PMID:28217050

  15. MO-F-CAMPUS-J-01: Acoustic Range Verification of Proton Beams: Simulation of Heterogeneity and Clinical Proton Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, K; Sehgal, C; Avery, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Through simulation, to assess acoustic-based range verification of proton beams (protoacoustics) under clinical conditions. Methods: Pressure waves generated by the energy deposition of a 150 MeV, 8 mm FWHM pulsed pencil proton beam were numerically simulated through two Methods: 1) For a homogeneous water medium, an analytical wave-equation solution was used to calculate the time-dependent pressure measured at detector points surrounding the proton Bragg peak. 2) For heterogeneity studies, a CT tissue image was used to calculate the proton dose deposition and define the acoustic properties of the voxels through which numerical pressure wave propagation was simulated with the k-Wave matlab toolbox. The simulations were used to assess the dependence of the acoustic amplitude and range-verification accuracy on proton pulse rise time and tissue heterogeneity. Results: As the proton pulse rise time is increased from 1 to 40 µs, the amplitude of the expected acoustic emission decreases (a 60% drop distal to the Bragg peak), the central frequency of the expected signal decreases (from 45 to 6 kHz), and the accuracy of the range-verification decreases (from <1 mm to 16 mm at 5 cm distal to the Bragg peak). For a 300 nA pulse, the expected pressure range is on the order of 0.1 Pa, which is observable with commercial detectors. For the heterogeneous medium, our test case shows that pressure waves emitted by an anterior pencil beam directed into the abdomen and detected posteriorly can determine the Bragg peak range to an accuracy of <2mm for a 1 µs proton pulse. Conclusion: For proton pulses with fast rise-times, protoacoustics is a promising potential method for monitoring penetration depth through heterogeneous tissue. The loss of range-verification accuracy with increasing rise-times, however, suggests the need for comparisons to modeling to improve accuracy for slower cyclotron proton sources.

  16. Electron density measurement in gas discharge plasmas by optical and acoustic methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biagioni, A.; Anania, M. P.; Bellaveglia, M.; Chiadroni, E.; Cianchi, A.; Di Giovenale, D.; Di Pirro, G.; Ferrario, M.; Filippi, F.; Mostacci, A.; Pompili, R.; Shpakov, V.; Vaccarezza, C.; Villa, F.; Zigler, A.

    2016-08-01

    Plasma density represents a very important parameter for both laser wakefield and plasma wakefield acceleration, which use a gas-filled capillary plasma source. Several techniques can be used to measure the plasma density within a capillary discharge, which are mainly based on optical diagnostic methods, as for example the well-known spectroscopic method using the Stark broadening effect. In this work, we introduce a preliminary study on an alternative way to detect the plasma density, based on the shock waves produced by gas discharge in a capillary. Firstly, the measurements of the acoustic spectral content relative to the laser-induced plasmas by a solid target allowed us to understand the main properties of the acoustic waves produced during this kind of plasma generation; afterwards, we have extended such acoustic technique to the capillary plasma source in order to calibrate it by comparison with the stark broadening method.

  17. Acoustic speed and attenuation coefficient in sheep aorta measured at 5-9 MHz.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Katharine H; Poepping, Tamie L; McNeilly, Alan; Megson, Ian L; Hoskins, Peter R

    2006-06-01

    B-mode ultrasound (US) images from blood vessels in vivo differ significantly from vascular flow phantom images. Phantoms with acoustic properties more closely matched to those of in vivo arteries may give better images. A method was developed for measuring the speed and attenuation coefficient of US over the range 5 to 9 MHz in samples of sheep aorta using a pulse-echo technique. The times-of-flight method was used with envelope functions to identify the reference points. The method was tested with samples of tissue-mimicking material of known acoustic properties. The tissue samples were stored in Krebs physiologic buffer solution and measured over a range of temperatures. At 37 degrees C, the acoustic speed and attenuation coefficient as a function of frequency in MHz were 1600 +/- 50 ms(-1) and 1.5 +/- 4f(0.94 +/- 1.3) dB cm(-1), respectively.

  18. Field acoustic measurements of high-speed train sound along BTIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, HuaHua; Li, JiaChun

    2013-02-01

    In this paper, single-point field measurements of noise radiated from high-speed trains were performed at two sites along Beijing-Tianjin intercity railway (BTIR), aiming at acquiring the realistic acoustic data for validation and verification of physical model and computational prediction. The measurements showed that A-weighted sound pressure levels (SPLs) were between 80 and 87 dBA as trains passed. The maximum noise occurred at the moment when the pantograph arrived, suggesting that pantograph noise was one of the most significant sources. Sound radiated from high-speed trains of BTIR was a typical broadband spectrum with most acoustic power restricted in the range of medium-high frequency from about 400 Hz to 5 kHz. Aerodynamic noise was shown to be the dominant one over other acoustic sources for high-speed trains.

  19. Guidelines for Acoustical Measurements Inside Historical Opera Houses: Procedures and Validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    POMPOLI, ROBERTO; PRODI, NICOLA

    2000-04-01

    The acoustics of Italian historical theatres is to be regarded as a cultural heritage, which is to be preserved and studied. These actions are imperative for handing down the heritage to future generations and to avoid its loss. In this paper, the technical means for scientific quantification of the acoustical heritage are presented in the form of operative guidelines for acoustical measurements inside historical theatres. The document includes the advice of international experts and is being employed during an extended measurement campaign inside renaissance and baroque historical theatres. A relevant part of the paper deals with the experimental validation of the recommendations given in the guidelines, achieved by a dedicated test session inside the Municipal Theatre of Ferrara.

  20. Monitoring Concrete Deterioration Due to Reinforcement Corrosion by Integrating Acoustic Emission and FBG Strain Measurements.

    PubMed

    Li, Weijie; Xu, Changhang; Ho, Siu Chun Michael; Wang, Bo; Song, Gangbing

    2017-03-22

    Corrosion of concrete reinforcement members has been recognized as a predominant structural deterioration mechanism for steel reinforced concrete structures. Many corrosion detection techniques have been developed for reinforced concrete structures, but a dependable one is more than desired. Acoustic emission technique and fiber optic sensing have emerged as new tools in the field of structural health monitoring. In this paper, we present the results of an experimental investigation on corrosion monitoring of a steel reinforced mortar block through combined acoustic emission and fiber Bragg grating strain measurement. Constant current was applied to the mortar block in order to induce accelerated corrosion. The monitoring process has two aspects: corrosion initiation and crack propagation. Propagation of cracks can be captured through corresponding acoustic emission whereas the mortar expansion due to the generation of corrosion products will be monitored by fiber Bragg grating strain sensors. The results demonstrate that the acoustic emission sources comes from three different types, namely, evolution of hydrogen bubbles, generation of corrosion products and crack propagation. Their corresponding properties are also discussed. The results also show a good correlation between acoustic emission activity and expansive strain measured on the specimen surface.

  1. Monitoring Concrete Deterioration Due to Reinforcement Corrosion by Integrating Acoustic Emission and FBG Strain Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Li, Weijie; Xu, Changhang; Ho, Siu Chun Michael; Wang, Bo; Song, Gangbing

    2017-01-01

    Corrosion of concrete reinforcement members has been recognized as a predominant structural deterioration mechanism for steel reinforced concrete structures. Many corrosion detection techniques have been developed for reinforced concrete structures, but a dependable one is more than desired. Acoustic emission technique and fiber optic sensing have emerged as new tools in the field of structural health monitoring. In this paper, we present the results of an experimental investigation on corrosion monitoring of a steel reinforced mortar block through combined acoustic emission and fiber Bragg grating strain measurement. Constant current was applied to the mortar block in order to induce accelerated corrosion. The monitoring process has two aspects: corrosion initiation and crack propagation. Propagation of cracks can be captured through corresponding acoustic emission whereas the mortar expansion due to the generation of corrosion products will be monitored by fiber Bragg grating strain sensors. The results demonstrate that the acoustic emission sources comes from three different types, namely, evolution of hydrogen bubbles, generation of corrosion products and crack propagation. Their corresponding properties are also discussed. The results also show a good correlation between acoustic emission activity and expansive strain measured on the specimen surface. PMID:28327510

  2. Radio acoustic measurement of temperature profile in the troposphere and stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matuura, N.; Masuda, Y.; Inuki, H.; Kato, S.; Fukao, S.; Sato, T.; Tsuda, T.

    1986-10-01

    The radio acoustic sounding system (RASS) uses radar to measure the temperature profile in the atmosphere. In the standard technique of atmospheric radar, the radar backscatter results from electrical permittivity variations due to natural phenomena such as turbulence and precipitation. In the RASS technique, the radar backscatter results from periodical permittivity variations due to density/temperature variations imposed on the atmosphere by an acoustic wave artificially generated in such a way that the acoustic wavelength is half the radar (electromagnetic) wavelength. This `Bragg condition' is necessary for efficient backscattering. The backscatter echo of the RASS is affected by the Doppler frequency shift arising both from the speed at which the longitudinal acoustic perturbations propagate (the sound speed), and from the radial bulk velocity in the common volume of the atmosphere-the latter can be measured by the standard technique of turbulence scatter. The observed sound speed is reduced to give the local atmospheric temperature. Here we report an experiment using the RASS, carried out on 1-3 August 1985, which consisted of a high-power, very-high-frequency (VHF) Doppler radar at Shigaraki, Shiga, Japan and a movable high-power acoustic transmitter, and which gave the first experimental proof of the possibility of temperature profiling in the troposphere and stratosphere up to an altitude of ~20 km.

  3. Measurements and computational fluid dynamics predictions of the acoustic impedance of orifices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, J.; Rupp, J.; Garmory, A.; Carrotte, J. F.

    2015-09-01

    The response of orifices to incident acoustic waves, which is important for many engineering applications, is investigated with an approach combining both experimental measurements and numerical simulations. This paper presents experimental data on acoustic impedance of orifices, which is subsequently used for validation of a numerical technique developed for the purpose of predicting the acoustic response of a range of geometries with moderate computational cost. Measurements are conducted for orifices with length to diameter ratios, L/D, of 0.5, 5 and 10. The experimental data is obtained for a range of frequencies using a configuration in which a mean (or bias) flow passes from a duct through the test orifices before issuing into a plenum. Acoustic waves are provided by a sound generator on the upstream side of the orifices. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculations of the same configuration have also been performed. These have been undertaken using an unsteady Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) approach with a pressure based compressible formulation with appropriate characteristic based boundary conditions to simulate the correct acoustic behaviour at the boundaries. The CFD predictions are in very good agreement with the experimental data, predicting the correct trend with both frequency and orifice L/D in a way not seen with analytical models. The CFD was also able to successfully predict a negative resistance, and hence a reflection coefficient greater than unity for the L / D = 0.5 case.

  4. A Decade of Ocean Acoustic Measurements from R/P FLIP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Spain, G. L.

    2002-12-01

    Studies of the properties of low frequency acoustic fields in the ocean continue to benefit from the use of manned, stable offshore platforms such as R/P FLIP. A major benefit is providing the at-sea stability required for deployment of extremely large aperture line arrays, line arrays composed of both acoustic motion and acoustic pressure sensors, and arrays that provide measurements in all 3 spatial dimensions. In addition, FLIP provides a high-profile (25 m) observation post with 360 deg coverage for simultaneous visual observations of marine mammals. A few examples of the scientific results that have been achieved over this past decade with ocean acoustic data collected on FLIP are presented. These results include the normal mode decomposition of earthquake T phases to study their generation and water/land coupling characteristics using a 3000 m vertical aperture hydrophone array, simultaneous vertical and horizontal directional information on the underwater sound field from line arrays of hydrophones and geophones, the strange nightime chorusing behavior of fish measured by 3D array aperture, the mirage effect caused by bathymetry changes in inversions for source location in shallow water, and the diving behavior of blue whales determined from 1D recordings of their vocalizations. Presently, FLIP serves as the central data recording platform in ocean acoustic studies using AUV's.

  5. Long Term Statistical Measurements of Environmental Acoustics Parameters in the Arctic. AEAS Report Number 2. Low Frequency Transmission Loss Measurements in the Central Arctic Ocean.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    RD-RI56 576 LONG TERM STATISTICAL MEASUREMENTS OF ENVIRONMENTAL 1/2 ACOUSTICS PRAMETERS I..(U) POLRR RESEARCH LAB INC CARPINTERIA CA B M BUCK 15 JAN...BUREAU Of STANDARDS-1963-A I l I E ".-.’ .’ In :j: Lona Term Statistical Measurements of Environmental Acoustics Parameters in the Arctic - AEAS...No - Lo Frequency Transmission ’>:--’.-’- , .- ’ ,. ’.*- Lona Term Statistical Measurements ofcean Environmental Acoustics Parameters ,..-’, in the

  6. High-pressure cylindrical acoustic resonance diffusion measurements of methane in liquid hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Colgate, S.O.; House, V.E.; Thieu, V.

    1995-05-01

    A novel cylindrical acoustic resonance method for the measurement of gas diffusion into liquids at high pressures is described. The measurements were performed in a vertically oriented cylindrical acoustic resonator containing both the liquid solvent and gaseous diffusant while under high-precision isothermal and isobaric control. Individual resonance modes of the liquid column, the gas column, and the two-phase coupled fluid are resolved in the last Fourier transform acoustic-resonance spectrum (FFT-ARS). High-resolution acoustic spectra measured at frequent time intervals reveal the changes which accompany the diffusion of gas into the liquid phase. One change, namely, the growth in length of the liquid column, results in a systematic shift to higher frequencies of axial modes in the gas column. The temporal behavior of this moving boundary, together with quantitative measurement of the flow to the gas column required to sustain the constant pressure, permits determination of the gas-into-liquid diffusion coefficient. Diffusion coefficients were determined from the change in frequency as a function of time of axial resonance modes in the gas-phase virtual cylinder as the surface of the underlying liquid phase advanced due to gas absorption. Measurements of the systems methane/n-octane, methane/n-nonane, and methane/n-decane were performed as a function of temperature at a pressure of 250 psia. Comparisons is made to results obtained elsewhere and by other methods but at the same temperatures and pressure.

  7. Impulse source versus dodecahedral loudspeaker for measuring parameters derived from the impulse response in room acoustics.

    PubMed

    San Martín, Ricardo; Arana, Miguel; Machín, Jorge; Arregui, Abel

    2013-07-01

    This study investigates the performance of dodecahedral and impulse sources when measuring acoustic parameters in enclosures according to ISO 3382-1 [Acoustics-Measurement of room acoustic parameters. Part 1: Performance spaces (International Organization for Standardization, Geneva, Switzerland, 2009)]. In general, methods using speakers as a sound source are limited by their frequency response and directivity. On the other hand, getting impulse responses from impulse sources typically involves a lack of repeatability, and it is usually necessary to average several measurements for each position. Through experiments in different auditoriums that recreate typical situations in which the measurement standard is applied, it is found that using impulse sources leads to greater variation in the results, especially at low frequencies. However, this prevents subsequent dispersions due to variables that this technique does not require, such as the orientation of the emitting source. These dispersions may be relevant at high frequencies exceeding the established tolerance criteria for certain parameters. Finally, a new descriptor for dodecahedral sources reflecting the influence their lack of omnidirectionality produces on measuring acoustic parameters is proposed.

  8. Impact of Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Imaging in Clinical Practice of Patients after Orthotopic Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Wildner, Dane; Strobel, Deike; Konturek, Peter C.; Görtz, Rüdiger S.; Croner, Roland S.; Neurath, Markus F.; Zopf, Steffen

    2014-01-01

    Background Acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) elastography is a reliable diagnostic device for quantitative non-invasive assessment of liver fibrosis in patients with chronic liver disease. The aim of our prospective study was to evaluate the impact of ARFI in patients after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). Therefore, we compared ARFI shear wave velocities with clinical features, non-invasive markers, and the histology of patients following OLT. Material/Methods Post-transplant patients underwent a clinical examination and blood samples were taken. B-mode and Doppler ultrasound (US) of the portal vein and the hepatic artery were performed. Subsequently, a minimum of 10 valid ARFI values were measured in the left and right liver lobe. Liver biopsy was performed if indicated. Results Between May 2012 and May 2014, 58 Patients after OLT were included in the prospective study. Laboratory markers and aspartate aminotransferase-to-platelet ratio index (APRI) correlated with ARFI values (r=0.44, p<0.001). The histological (n=22) fibrosis score (Ludwig) was significantly correlated with the ARFI of the biopsy site (r=0.55, p=0.008). The mean shear-wave velocities were significantly increased in advanced fibrosis (F≤2 1.57±0.57 m/s; F≥3 2.85±0.66 m/s; p<0.001), obstructive cholestasis and active viral hepatitis. The area under the receiver operating characteristic (AUROC) curves for the accuracy of ARFI were 74% (F≥1), 73% (F≥2), 93% (F≥3), and 80% (=F4). Conclusions ARFI elastography correlates well with laboratory values and with noninvasive and invasive markers of fibrosis in patients after OLT. In this regard, elevated ARFI-velocities should be interpreted with caution in the context of obstructive cholestasis and active viral disease. PMID:25342166

  9. Measurement and Characterization of Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor Plume Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, Jeremy; Hobbs, Chris; Plotkin, Ken; Pilkey, Debbie

    2009-01-01

    Lift-off acoustic environments generated by the future Ares I launch vehicle are assessed by the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) acoustics team using several prediction tools. This acoustic environment is directly caused by the Ares I First Stage booster, powered by the five-segment Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRMV). The RSRMV is a larger-thrust derivative design from the currently used Space Shuttle solid rocket motor, the Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM). Lift-off acoustics is an integral part of the composite launch vibration environment affecting the Ares launch vehicle and must be assessed to help generate hardware qualification levels and ensure structural integrity of the vehicle during launch and lift-off. Available prediction tools that use free field noise source spectrums as a starting point for generation of lift-off acoustic environments are described in the monograph NASA SP-8072: "Acoustic Loads Generated by the Propulsion System." This monograph uses a reference database for free field noise source spectrums which consist of subscale rocket motor firings, oriented in horizontal static configurations. The phrase "subscale" is appropriate, since the thrust levels of rockets in the reference database are orders of magnitude lower than the current design thrust for the Ares launch family. Thus, extrapolation is needed to extend the various reference curves to match Ares-scale acoustic levels. This extrapolation process yields a subsequent amount of uncertainty added upon the acoustic environment predictions. As the Ares launch vehicle design schedule progresses, it is important to take every opportunity to lower prediction uncertainty and subsequently increase prediction accuracy. Never before in NASA s history has plume acoustics been measured for large scale solid rocket motors. Approximately twice a year, the RSRM prime vendor, ATK Launch Systems, static fires an assembled RSRM motor in a horizontal configuration at their test facility

  10. Acoustic measurements of F100-PW-100 engine operating in hush house NSN 4920-02-070-2721

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, V. R.; Plzak, G. A.; Chinn, J. M.

    1981-09-01

    The purpose of this test program was to measure the acoustic environment in the hush house facility located at Kelly AFB Texas during operation of the F100-PW-100 engine to ensure that engine structural acoustic design limits were not exceeded. The acoustic measurements showed that no sonic fatigue problems are anticipated with the F100-PW-100 engine structure during operation in the hush house. The measured acoustic levels were less than those measured in an existing F100-PW-100 engine wet-cooled noise suppressor, but were increased over that measured during operation on an open test stand. It was recommended that the acoustic load increases measured in this program should be specified in the structural design criteria for engines which will be subjected to hush house operation or defining requirements for associated equipment.

  11. Acoustic measurements of F-4E aircraft operating in hush house, NSN 4920-02-070-2721

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, V. R.; Plzak, G. A.; Chinn, J. M.

    1981-09-01

    The primary purpose of this test program was to measure the acoustic environment in the hush house facility located at Kelly Air Force Base, Texas, during operation of the F-4E aircraft to ensure that aircraft structural acoustic design limits were not exceeded. The acoustic measurements showed that sonic fatigue problems are anticipated with the F-4E aircraft aft fuselage structure during operation in the hush house. The measured acoustic levels were less than those measured in an F-4E aircraft water cooled hush house at Hill AFB in the lower frequencies, but were increased over that measured during ground run up on some areas of the aircraft. It was recommended that the acoustic loads measured in this program should be specified in the structural design criteria for aircraft which will be subjected to hush house operation or defining requirements for associated equipment. Recommendations were also made to increase the fatigue life of the aft fuselage.

  12. Acoustic absorption measurement of human hair and skin within the audible frequency range.

    PubMed

    Katz, B F

    2000-11-01

    Utilizing the two-microphone impedance tube method, the acoustic absorption of human skin and hair is measured in the frequency range 1-6 kHz. Various locations on a number of human subjects are measured to determine if the presence of bone or an air pocket affects the acoustic absorption of human skin. The absorption coefficient of human hair is also measured. Additional techniques are utilized to minimize errors due to sample mounting methods. Techniques are employed to minimize potential errors in sensor and sample locations. The results of these measurements are compared to relevant historical papers on similar investigations. Results for skin measurements compare well with previous work. Measured hair absorption data do not agree with previous work in the area but do coincide with expected trends, which previous works do not.

  13. Use of acoustic intensity measurements in the characterization of jet noise sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musafir, R. E.; Slama, J. G.; Zindeluk, M.

    The usefulness of two-microphone acoustic-intensity (AI) measurements for characterizing the acoustic field of a jet flow is investigated by means of numerical simulations. The theoretical principles and data basis for the simulations are explained, and the intensity patterns generated by the simulation are presented graphically. It is found that the vector information in AI data from the near field are useful in understanding complex sources, but that far-field intensity charts cannot locate separate sources and may be misleading if not analyzed in terms of a sound physical model.

  14. Design and Instrumentation of a Measurement and Calibration System for an Acoustic Telemetry System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-31

    a Measurement and Calibration System for an Acoustic Telemetry System Zhiqun Deng 1,*, Mark Weiland 1, Thomas Carlson 1 and M. Brad Eppard 2 1...of Engineers, Portland District. References 1. McMichael, G.A.; Eppard, M.B.; Carlson, T.J.; Carter, J.A.; Ebberts, B.D.; Brown, R.S.; Weiland , M.A...Ploskey, G.R.; Harnish, R.A.; Deng, Z.D. The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System: a new tool. Fisheries 2010, 35, 9-22. 2. Weiland , M.A

  15. A Void Fraction Characterisation by Low Frequency Acoustic Velocity Measurements in Microbubble Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavaro, Matthieu

    Low frequency acoustic velocity measurements have been applied for the characterization of microbubble clouds generated in water. This method, based on the Wood's model (1941) links the acoustic velocity throughout a two-phase medium to its void fraction value. Low frequency means below resonance frequencies of the bubbles inside the cloud. An original bench was developed to allow the qualification of this method. The experiments conducted allowed us to characterize void fraction values between 10-3 and 10-7. The radii of the studied microbubbles are between a few micrometers and a hundred micrometers.

  16. Acoustic sounder system design for measurement of optical turbulence and wind profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Judith E.; Eaton, Frank D.; Stokes, Sheldon S.

    2000-07-01

    An Acoustic Sounder System has been installed on the side of the cliff at North Oscura Peak, WSMR to provide important refractive index structure parameter, Cn2 data for laser propagation tests. The acoustic sounder system records echo information that is used to provide 3D wind and optical turbulence profiles. The received signal is the product of the interaction of the transmitted acoustic pulse with the small scale atmospheric temperature variations. This information is displayed as a time-height display of the signal intensity. The frequency of the received signals are processed and converted into time histories of the horizontal wind field. The data from the Acoustic Sounder is calibrated with the hot-wire anemometer temperature structure parameter (Ct2) data, and meteorological data measured locally to produce the Cn2 profile. The design and location of the Acoustic Sounder System will be discussed along with the methodology of extracting the turbulence. Many days of data have been collected and representative data will be shown.

  17. Effect of Foreshortening on Center-to-Limb Variations of Measured Acoustic Travel Times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Junwei; Stejko, Andrey; Chen, Ruizhu

    2016-03-01

    We use data observed near the solar disk center by the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (SDO/HMI) to mimic observations at high-latitude areas after applying geometric transform and projection. These data are then used to study how foreshortening affects the time-distance measurements of acoustic travel times. We find that foreshortening reduces the measured mean travel-times through altering the acoustic-power weighting in different harmonic degrees, but the level of reduction and the latitude dependence are not as strong as those measured from the observation data at the same latitude. Foreshortening is not found to be accountable for the systematic center-to-limb effect in the measured acoustic travel-time differences, which is an essential factor for a reliable inference of the Sun's meridional-circulation profile. The differences in the acoustic power spectrum between the mimicked data and the observation data in high-latitude areas suggest that the optical spectrum-line formation height or convection cells in these areas may be the primary cause of the center-to-limb effect in helioseismic analyses.

  18. A Multidimensional Investigation of Children's /r/ Productions: Perceptual, Ultrasound, and Acoustic Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Harriet B.; McAllister Byun, Tara; Davidson, Lisa; Grigos, Maria I.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This study explored relationships among perceptual, ultrasound, and acoustic measurements of children's correct and misarticulated /r/ sounds. Longitudinal data documenting changes across these parameters were collected from 2 children who acquired /r/ over a period of intervention and were compared with data from children with typical…

  19. A Multidimensional Investigation of Children's /r/ Productions: Perceptual, Ultrasound, and Acoustic Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Harriet B.; McAllister Byun, Tara; Davidson, Lisa; Grigos, Maria I.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This study explored relationships among perceptual, ultrasound, and acoustic measurements of children's correct and misarticulated /r/ sounds. Longitudinal data documenting changes across these parameters were collected from 2 children who acquired /r/ over a period of intervention and were compared with data from children with typical…

  20. Relationships between acoustic variables and different measures of stiffness in standing Pinus taeda trees

    Treesearch

    Christian R. Mora; Laurence R. Schimleck; Fikret Isik; Jerry M. Mahon Jr.; Alexander Clark III; Richard F. Daniels

    2009-01-01

    Acoustic tools are increasingly used to estimate standing-tree (dynamic) stiffness; however, such techniques overestimate static stiffness, the standard measurement for determining modulus of elasticity (MOE) of wood. This study aimed to identify correction methods for standing-tree estimates making dynamic and static stiffness comparable. Sixty Pinus taeda L...

  1. Molecular recognition in gas sensing: Results from acoustic wave and in-situ FTIR measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Hierlemann, A.; Ricco, A.J.; Bodenhoefer, K.; Goepel, W.

    1998-06-01

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) measurements were combined with direct, in-situ molecular spectroscopy to understand the interactions of surface-confined sensing films with gas-phase analytes. This was accomplished by collecting Fourier-transform infrared external-reflectance spectra (FTIR-ERS) on operating SAW devices during dosing of their specifically coated surfaces with key analytes.

  2. Modal measurements and propeller field excitation on acoustic full scale mockup of SAAB 340 aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustavsson, Lars

    1992-06-01

    The acoustic mockup of the cabin SAAB 340 aircraft was measured in an anechoic chamber concerning modal parameters and operating deflection shapes. The mockup was excited with vibration shakers at the fuselage for modal estimation and with a ring of loudspeakers around the fuselage to generate propeller fields for operating deflection shapes. Two cases of structure configuration were used at the measurements; one consisting of only the fuselage, without trimpanels and floorpanels and one case with trimpanels and floorpanels. Modal measurements were done with excitation on a frame of the fuselage at the propeller plane. The modes were estimated for the individual components; fuselage, trimpanels, floorpanels, and soundfield in the cabin. The modes of the fuselage were compared with the acoustic models in the cabin concerning possible coupling effects. With the loudspeakering, the sound field from the left and the right propeller were generated at a blade passage frequency of 81.9 Hz and its first harmonic. Operating deflection shapes of fuselage, panels, and cabin acoustic were estimated. The results from the measurements could be used to verify a finite element model and as a tool for developing acoustic noise control systems.

  3. Dynamic Reconstruction Algorithm of Three-Dimensional Temperature Field Measurement by Acoustic Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanqiu; Liu, Shi; Inaki, Schlaberg H.

    2017-01-01

    Accuracy and speed of algorithms play an important role in the reconstruction of temperature field measurements by acoustic tomography. Existing algorithms are based on static models which only consider the measurement information. A dynamic model of three-dimensional temperature reconstruction by acoustic tomography is established in this paper. A dynamic algorithm is proposed considering both acoustic measurement information and the dynamic evolution information of the temperature field. An objective function is built which fuses measurement information and the space constraint of the temperature field with its dynamic evolution information. Robust estimation is used to extend the objective function. The method combines a tunneling algorithm and a local minimization technique to solve the objective function. Numerical simulations show that the image quality and noise immunity of the dynamic reconstruction algorithm are better when compared with static algorithms such as least square method, algebraic reconstruction technique and standard Tikhonov regularization algorithms. An effective method is provided for temperature field reconstruction by acoustic tomography. PMID:28895930

  4. An all fiber-optic sensor for surface acoustic wave measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowers, J. E.; Jungerman, R. L.; Khuri-Yakub, B. T.; Kino, G. S.

    1983-01-01

    A surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor constructed from single-mode fiber-optic components is described. An analysis of reciprocal and nonreciprocal modes of operation of the sensor is presented. Results from measurements on a variety of SAW devices illustrate the use of the sensor. The amplitude sensitivity is 0.0003 A for an integration time of 0.1 s.

  5. Feasibility of using nonlinear guided waves to measure acoustic nonlinearity of aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matlack, Kathryn H.; Kim, Jin-Yeon; Jacobs, Laurence J.; Qu, Jianmin

    2011-04-01

    This research investigates the feasibility of measuring acoustic nonlinearity in aluminum with different ultrasonic guided wave modes. Acoustic nonlinearity is manifested by generation of a second harmonic component in an originally monochromatic ultrasonic wave signal, and previous research has shown this correlates to an intrinsic material property. This parameter has been shown to increase with accumulated material damage - specifically in low- and high-cycle fatigue - prior to crack initiation, whereas other ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques measuring linear parameters are unable to detect damage prior to crack initiation. In structural components such as jet engines and aircraft structures subjected to fatigue damage, crack initiation does not occur until ~80% of a component's life. Thus, there is a need for structural health monitoring (SHM) techniques that can characterize material damage state prior to crack initiation, and therefore nonlinear ultrasonic techniques have the potential to be powerful NDE and SHM tools. Experimental results using Rayleigh and Lamb guided wave modes to measure acoustic nonlinearity in undamaged aluminum 6061 samples are presented, and a comparison of the efficiency of these modes to measure acoustic nonlinearity is given.

  6. Deriving content-specific measures of room acoustic perception using a binaural, nonlinear auditory model.

    PubMed

    van Dorp Schuitman, Jasper; de Vries, Diemer; Lindau, Alexander

    2013-03-01

    Acousticians generally assess the acoustic qualities of a concert hall or any other room using impulse response-based measures such as the reverberation time, clarity index, and others. These parameters are used to predict perceptual attributes related to the acoustic qualities of the room. Various studies show that these physical measures are not able to predict the related perceptual attributes sufficiently well under all circumstances. In particular, it has been shown that physical measures are dependent on the state of occupation, are prone to exaggerated spatial fluctuation, and suffer from lacking discrimination regarding the kind of acoustic stimulus being presented. Accordingly, this paper proposes a method for the derivation of signal-based measures aiming at predicting aspects of room acoustic perception from content specific signal representations produced by a binaural, nonlinear model of the human auditory system. Listening tests were performed to test the proposed auditory parameters for both speech and music. The results look promising; the parameters correlate with their corresponding perceptual attributes in most cases.

  7. An all fiber-optic sensor for surface acoustic wave measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowers, J. E.; Jungerman, R. L.; Khuri-Yakub, B. T.; Kino, G. S.

    1983-01-01

    A surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor constructed from single-mode fiber-optic components is described. An analysis of reciprocal and nonreciprocal modes of operation of the sensor is presented. Results from measurements on a variety of SAW devices illustrate the use of the sensor. The amplitude sensitivity is 0.0003 A for an integration time of 0.1 s.

  8. Relation of perceived breathiness to laryngeal kinematics and acoustic measures based on computational modeling

    PubMed Central

    Samlan, Robin A.; Story, Brad H.; Bunton, Kate

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine 1) how specific vocal fold structural and vibratory features relate to breathy voice quality and 2) the relation of perceived breathiness to four acoustic correlates of breathiness. Method A computational, kinematic model of the vocal fold medial surfaces was used to specify features of vocal fold structure and vibration in a manner consistent with breathy voice. Four model parameters were altered: vocal process separation, surface bulging, vibratory nodal point, and epilaryngeal constriction. Twelve naïve listeners rated breathiness of 364 samples relative to a reference. The degree of breathiness was then compared to 1) the underlying kinematic profile and 2) four acoustic measures: cepstral peak prominence (CPP), harmonics-to-noise ratio, and two measures of spectral slope. Results Vocal process separation alone accounted for 61.4% of the variance in perceptual rating. Adding nodal point ratio and bulging to the equation increased the explained variance to 88.7%. The acoustic measure CPP accounted for 86.7% of the variance in perceived breathiness, and explained variance increased to 92.6% with the addition of one spectral slope measure. Conclusions Breathiness ratings were best explained kinematically by the degree of vocal process separation and acoustically by CPP. PMID:23785184

  9. Evaluation of Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler measurements of river discharge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morlock, S.E.

    1996-01-01

    The standard deviations of the ADCP measurements ranged from approximately 1 to 6 percent and were generally higher than the measurement errors predicted by error-propagation analysis of ADCP instrument performance. These error-prediction methods assume that the largest component of ADCP discharge measurement error is instrument related. The larger standard deviations indicate that substantial portions of measurement error may be attributable to sources unrelated to ADCP electronics or signal processing and are functions of the field environment.

  10. Acoustic signal propagation and measurement in natural stream channels for application to surrogate bed load measurements: Halfmoon Creek, Colorado

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Monitoring sediment-generated noise using submerged hydrophones is a surrogate method for measuring bed load transport in streams with the potential for improving estimates of bed load transport through widespread, inexpensive monitoring. Understanding acoustic signal propagation in natural stream e...

  11. Comparison of different measurement technologies for the in-flight assessment of radiated acoustic intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klos, Jacob; Palumbo, Daniel L.; Buehrle, Ralph D.; Williams, Earl G.; Valdivia, Nicolas; Herdic, Peter C.; Sklanka, Bernard

    2005-09-01

    Near-field acoustical holography (NAH) microphone array measurement technologies are currently being investigated for use in aircraft for determining the sound intensity that is radiated through a trimmed aircraft fuselage. Two types of microphone array geometries are studied in this effort, spherical and conformal to the sidewall. Due to the complexity of the interior sound field and in-flight excitation, questions have arisen concerning the capability of array techniques to measure these desired acoustic quantities. The main questions relate to the agreement between array measurements and traditional two-microphone intensity probe measurements and the sensitivity of array measurements to backside sources present in the aircraft cabin. Thus, an investigation was performed in which the NAH array results were compared to intensity probe results measured in the NASA Langley Structural Acoustic Loads and Transmission facility, the Boeing Interior Noise Test Facility, and in flight on the NASA Aries 757 aircraft. An overview of this test sequence and a comparison of NAH, IBEM, and two-microphone intensity probe measurements are made. These comparisons show the relative behavior of the different measurement techniques in both idealized laboratory and realistic in-flight environments. Conclusions are drawn concerning the use of array measurements to assess the sound intensity transmitted through an aircraft sidewall in-flight.

  12. Liver Stiffness Measurements Using Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse in Recipients of Living-Donor and Deceased-Donor Orthotopic Liver Transplant.

    PubMed

    Haberal, Kemal Murat; Turnaoğlu, Hale; Özdemir, Adnan; Uslu, Nihal; Haberal Reyhan, Asuman Nihan; Moray, Gökhan; Haberal, Mehmet

    2017-08-24

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic efficiency of the acoustic radiation force impulse (Siemens Medical Solutions, Erlangen, Germany) elastography in assessment of fibrosis in orthotopic liver transplant patients. We enrolled 28 orthotopic liver transplant patients (deceased and living donors), whose biopsy decision had been prospectively given clinically. Ten acoustic radiation force impulse elastographic measurements were applied before the biopsy or within 3 days after the biopsy by 2 radiologists. After the core tissue needle biopsy, specimens of all patients were analyzed according to the modified Ishak scoring system. Measurements of acoustic radiation force impulse elastography and pathology specimen results were compared. From 28 biopsies, fibrosis scores of 4 biopsies were evaluated as F0 (14.3%), 16 as F1 (57.1%), 4 as F2 (14.3%), and 4 as F3 (14.3%). Mean results of acoustic radiation force impulse measurements were calculated as 1.4 ± 0.07 in F0, 1.74 ± 0.57 in F1, 2.19 ± 0.7 in F2, and 2.18 ± 0.35 in F3. There were no significant correlations of mean acoustic radiation force impulse values between the F0 versus F1 (P = .956) and F0 versus F2 stages (P = .234). A statistically significant correlation of mean acoustic radiation force impulse values was found between the F0 and F3 fibrosis stages (P = .046). Acoustic radiation force impulse imaging is a promising screening test for detecting significant liver fibrosis (≥ F3 in modified Ishak) in living-donor or deceased-donor orthotopic liver transplant recipients.

  13. Extending acoustic data measured with small-scale supersonic model jets to practical aircraft exhaust jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Ching-Wen

    2010-06-01

    Modern military aircraft jet engines are designed with variable geometry nozzles to provide optimum thrust in different operating conditions within the flight envelope. However, the acoustic measurements for such nozzles are scarce, due to the cost involved in making full-scale measurements and the lack of details about the exact geometry of these nozzles. Thus the present effort at The Pennsylvania State University and the NASA Glenn Research Center, in partnership with GE Aviation, is aiming to study and characterize the acoustic field produced by supersonic jets issuing from converging-diverging military style nozzles. An equally important objective is to develop a scaling methodology for using data obtained from small- and moderate-scale experiments which exhibits the independence of the jet sizes to the measured noise levels. The experimental results presented in this thesis have shown reasonable agreement between small-scale and moderate-scale jet acoustic data, as well as between heated jets and heat-simulated ones. As the scaling methodology is validated, it will be extended to using acoustic data measured with small-scale supersonic model jets to the prediction of the most important components of full-scale engine noise. When comparing the measured acoustic spectra with a microphone array set at different radial locations, the characteristics of the jet noise source distribution may induce subtle inaccuracies, depending on the conditions of jet operation. A close look is taken at the details of the noise generation region in order to better understand the mismatch between spectra measured at various acoustic field radial locations. A processing methodology was developed to correct the effect of the noise source distribution and efficiently compare near-field and far-field spectra with unprecedented accuracy. This technique then demonstrates that the measured noise levels in the physically restricted space of an anechoic chamber can be appropriately

  14. Temporal acoustic measures distinguish primary progressive apraxia of speech from primary progressive aphasia.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Joseph R; Hanley, Holly; Utianski, Rene; Clark, Heather; Strand, Edythe; Josephs, Keith A; Whitwell, Jennifer L

    2017-02-07

    The purpose of this study was to determine if acoustic measures of duration and syllable rate during word and sentence repetition, and a measure of within-word lexical stress, distinguish speakers with primary progressive apraxia of speech (PPAOS) from nonapraxic speakers with the agrammatic or logopenic variants of primary progressive aphasia (PPA), and control speakers. Results revealed that the PPAOS group had longer durations and reduced rate of syllable production for most words and sentences, and the measure of lexical stress. Sensitivity and specificity indices for the PPAOS versus the other groups were highest for longer multisyllabic words and sentences. For the PPAOS group, correlations between acoustic measures and perceptual ratings of AOS were moderately high to high. Several temporal measures used in this study may aid differential diagnosis and help quantify features of PPAOS that are distinct from those associated with PPA in which AOS is not present.

  15. Measurement and modeling of the acoustic field near an underwater vehicle and implications for acoustic source localization.

    PubMed

    Lepper, Paul A; D'Spain, Gerald L

    2007-08-01

    The performance of traditional techniques of passive localization in ocean acoustics such as time-of-arrival (phase differences) and amplitude ratios measured by multiple receivers may be degraded when the receivers are placed on an underwater vehicle due to effects of scattering. However, knowledge of the interference pattern caused by scattering provides a potential enhancement to traditional source localization techniques. Results based on a study using data from a multi-element receiving array mounted on the inner shroud of an autonomous underwater vehicle show that scattering causes the localization ambiguities (side lobes) to decrease in overall level and to move closer to the true source location, thereby improving localization performance, for signals in the frequency band 2-8 kHz. These measurements are compared with numerical modeling results from a two-dimensional time domain finite difference scheme for scattering from two fluid-loaded cylindrical shells. Measured and numerically modeled results are presented for multiple source aspect angles and frequencies. Matched field processing techniques quantify the source localization capabilities for both measurements and numerical modeling output.

  16. Acoustic Measurements of Particle Flux in Strongly Bi-Modal Sediment Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, G.; Hay, A. E.; Rotermund, L.

    2016-12-01

    Acoustic profilers measure the velocity of and energy backscattered from scatterers in the water column. When the scatterers are primarily discrete sediment particles, the backscattered intensity can be shown to be proportional to particle concentration. Assuming a narrow distribution of particle size, and homogeneous particle composition, the velocity-concentration product is then equal to the sediment flux. An outstanding problem, however, is how to measure the flux of a specific size/type of sediment (e.g., sand) when sediment of a very different size/type is also present (e.g., mud). This can be done in principle by exploiting the frequency dependence of acoustic scattering. Towards that goal, lab experiments were performed using a multi-frequency acoustic Doppler profiler to measure various two-component mixtures of particles settling vertically through water. An acoustic model is inverted to extract the flux of each particle type in the mixture. Results will be presented for three mixture types: plastic/glass beads, mud/sand, and mud/flocs.

  17. Measurement and mathematical simulation of acoustic characteristics of an artificially lengthened vocal tract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radolf, Vojtěch; Horáček, Jaromír; Dlask, Pavel; Otčenášek, Zdeněk; Geneid, Ahmed; Laukkanen, Anne-Maria

    2016-03-01

    Phonation into tubes is used for voice training and therapy. In the present study, the formant frequencies were estimated from measurements of the acoustic pressure and the acoustic input impedance for a plexiglass model of the vocal tract (VT) prolonged by a glass tube. Similar transfer function measurements were performed with a human VT in vivo. The experimental results matched the mathematical modelling and confirmed the legitimacy of assuming rigid walls in mathematical simulations of the acoustic characteristics of an artificial VT model prolonged by a tube. However, this study also proved a considerable influence from soft tissues in the yielding walls of human VT cavities on the first formant frequency, F1. The measured F1 for the VT model corresponded to the computed value of 78 Hz. The experiments in a human instead resulted in a much higher value of F1: about 200 Hz. The results confirm that a VT model with yielding walls must be considered for mathematical modelling of the occluded or semi-occluded human vocal tract, e.g. prolonged by tubes or straws. This is explained by an acoustic-structural interaction of the vocal tract cavities with a mechanical low-frequency resonance of the soft tissue in the larynx.

  18. Acoustic-Seismic Coupling in Porous Ground - Measurements and Analysis for On-Site-Inspection Support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebsch, Mattes; Gorschlüter, Felix; Altmann, Jürgen

    2014-05-01

    During on-site inspections (OSI) of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty Organisation (CTBTO) a local seismic network can be installed to measure seismic aftershock signals of an assumed underground nuclear explosion. These signals are caused by relaxation processes in and near the cavity created by the explosion and when detected can lead to a localisation of the cavity. This localisation is necessary to take gas samples from the ground which are analysed for radioactive noble gas isotopes to confirm or dismiss the suspicion of a nuclear test. The aftershock signals are of very low magnitude so they can be masked by different sources, in particular periodic disturbances caused by vehicles and aircraft in the inspection area. Vehicles and aircraft (mainly helicopters) will be used for the inspection activities themselves, e.g. for overhead imagery or magnetic-anomaly sensing. While vehicles in contact with the ground can excite soil vibrations directly, aircraft and vehicles alike emit acoustic waves which excite soil vibrations when hitting the ground. These disturbing signals are of periodic nature while the seismic aftershock signals are pulse-shaped, so their separation is possible. The understanding of the coupling of acoustic waves to the ground is yet incomplete, a better understanding is necessary to improve the performance of an OSI, e.g. to address potential consequences for the sensor placement, the helicopter trajectories etc. In a project funded by the Young Scientist Research Award of the CTBTO to one of us (ML), we investigated the acoustic-seismic coupling of airborne signals of jet aircraft and artificially induced ones by a speaker. During a measurement campaign several acoustic and seismic sensors were placed below the take-off trajectory of an airport at 4 km distance. Therefore taking off and landing jet aircraft passed nearly straightly above the setup. Microphones were placed close to the ground to record the sound pressure of incident

  19. Influence of Smartphones and Software on Acoustic Voice Measures

    PubMed Central

    GRILLO, ELIZABETH U.; BROSIOUS, JENNA N.; SORRELL, STACI L.; ANAND, SUPRAJA

    2016-01-01

    This study assessed the within-subject variability of voice measures captured using different recording devices (i.e., smartphones and head mounted microphone) and software programs (i.e., Analysis of Dysphonia in Speech and Voice (ADSV), Multi-dimensional Voice Program (MDVP), and Praat). Correlations between the software programs that calculated the voice measures were also analyzed. Results demonstrated no significant within-subject variability across devices and software and that some of the measures were highly correlated across software programs. The study suggests that certain smartphones may be appropriate to record daily voice measures representing the effects of vocal loading within individuals. In addition, even though different algorithms are used to compute voice measures across software programs, some of the programs and measures share a similar relationship. PMID:28775797

  20. Treatment of Tinnitus With a Customized, Dynamic Acoustic Neural Stimulus: Underlying Principles and Clinical Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Hanley, Peter J.; Davis, Paul B.

    2008-01-01

    Tinnitus has been challenging to treat with consistently positive results. The Neuromonics Tinnitus Treatment is a newly available approach to the treatment of clinically significant, problematic tinnitus (and reduced sound tolerance) that was developed with the intention of simultaneously addressing the auditory, attentional, and emotional processes underlying the condition. It uses a prescribed acoustic stimulus, customized for each patient's individual audiometric profile, which provides a broad frequency stimulus to address the effects of auditory deprivation, promotes relief and relaxation with the intention of reducing engagement of the limbic system/amygdala and autonomic nervous system, and applies the principles of systematic desensitization to address the attentional processes. This article describes the underlying principles behind this approach. It also summarizes evidence for clinical efficacy from controlled clinical studies and from a private practice clinical setting, where it has been shown to provide consistently positive outcomes for patients meeting suitability criteria. PMID:18614554

  1. Tethered acoustic doppler current profiler platforms for measuring streamflow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rehmel, Michael S.; Stewart, James A.; Morlock, Scott E.

    2003-01-01

    A tethered-platform design with a trimaran hull and 900-megahertz radio modems is now commercially available. Continued field use has resulted in U.S. Geological Survey procedures for making tethered-platform discharge measurements, including methods for tethered-boat deployment, moving-bed tests, and measurement of edge distances.

  2. Numerical and experimental investigation of a low-frequency measurement technique: differential acoustic resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Hanjun; Zhao, Jianguo; Tang, Genyang; Ma, Xiaoyi; Wang, Shangxu

    2016-06-01

    Differential acoustic resonance spectroscopy (DARS) has been developed to determine the elastic properties of saturated rocks within the kHz frequency range. This laboratory technique is based on considerations from perturbation theory, wherein the resonance frequencies of the resonant cavity with and without a perturbation sample are used to estimate the acoustic properties of the test sample. In order to better understand the operating mechanism of DARS and therefore optimize the procedure, it is important to develop an accurate and efficient numerical model. Accordingly, this study presents a new multiphysics model by coupling together considerations from acoustics, solid mechanics, and electrostatics. The numerical results reveal that the newly developed model can successfully simulate the acoustic pressure field at different resonance modes, and that it can accurately reflect the measurement process. Based on the understanding of the DARS system afforded by the numerical simulation, we refine the system configuration by utilizing cavities of different lengths and appropriate radii to broaden the frequency bandwidth and ensure testing accuracy. Four synthetic samples are measured to test the performance of the optimized DARS system, in conjunction with ultrasonic and static measurements. For nonporous samples, the estimated bulk moduli are shown to be independent of the different measurement methods (i.e. DARS or ultrasonic techniques). In contrast, for sealed porous samples, the differences in bulk moduli between the low- and high-frequency techniques can be clearly observed; this discrepancy is attributed to frequency dispersion. In summary, the optimized DARS system with an extended frequency range of 500-2000 Hz demonstrates considerable utility in investigating the frequency dependence of the acoustic properties of reservoir rocks.

  3. Relationship between acoustic measures and judgments of intelligibility in Parkinson’s disease: A within-speaker approach

    PubMed Central

    FEENAUGHTY, LYNDA; TJADEN, KRIS; SUSSMAN, JOAN

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the acoustic basis of within-speaker, across-utterance variation in sentence intelligibility for 12 speakers with dysarthria secondary to Parkinson’s disease (PD). Acoustic measures were also obtained for 12 healthy controls for comparison to speakers with PD. Speakers read sentences using their typical speech style. Acoustic measures of speech rate, articulatory rate, fundamental frequency, sound pressure level and F2 interquartile range (F2 IQR) were obtained. A group of listeners judged sentence intelligibility using a computerized visual-analog scale. Relationships between judgments of intelligibility and acoustic measures were determined for individual speakers with PD. Relationships among acoustic measures were also quantified. Although considerable variability was noted, articulatory rate, fundamental frequency and F2 IQR were most frequently associated with within-speaker variation in sentence intelligibility. Results suggest that diversity among speakers with PD should be considered when interpreting results from group analyses. PMID:24874184

  4. Numerical investigation and electro-acoustic modeling of measurement methods for the in-duct acoustical source parameters.

    PubMed

    Jang, Seung-Ho; Ih, Jeong-Guon

    2003-02-01

    It is known that the direct method yields different results from the indirect (or load) method in measuring the in-duct acoustic source parameters of fluid machines. The load method usually comes up with a negative source resistance, although a fairly accurate prediction of radiated noise can be obtained from any method. This study is focused on the effect of the time-varying nature of fluid machines on the output results of two typical measurement methods. For this purpose, a simplified fluid machine consisting of a reservoir, a valve, and an exhaust pipe is considered as representing a typical periodic, time-varying system and the measurement situations are simulated by using the method of characteristics. The equivalent circuits for such simulations are also analyzed by considering the system as having a linear time-varying source. It is found that the results from the load method are quite sensitive to the change of cylinder pressure or valve profile, in contrast to those from the direct method. In the load method, the source admittance turns out to be predominantly dependent on the valve admittance at the calculation frequency as well as the valve and load admittances at other frequencies. In the direct method, however, the source resistance is always positive and the source admittance depends mainly upon the zeroth order of valve admittance.

  5. Pressure transducer for measuring acoustic radiation force based on a magnetic sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamimura, H. A. S.; Pavan, T. Z.; Almeida, T. W. J.; Pádua, M. L. A.; Baggio, A. L.; Fatemi, M.; Carneiro, A. A. O.

    2011-01-01

    This work presents a pressure transducer based on a magnetic sensor to measure acoustic radiation force (ARF) and small displacements. The methodology presented in this paper allowed this transducer to be calibrated for use as an acoustic pressure and intensity meter. It can control the acoustic intensity emitted by ultrasound used, for example, in ARF impulse imaging, vibro-acoustography and high-intensity focused ultrasound techniques. The device comprises a magnet, a membrane, a magnetoresistive sensor and a coil to cancel the external magnetic field. When ARF is applied to the membrane, the magnetic field on the sensor changes due to the magnetic target displacement. The variation of the output signal from the magnetic transducer is proportional to the acoustic pressure applied to the membrane. A focused ultrasound transducer with a central frequency of 3 MHz was used to apply a continuous ARF. The sensitivities of the magnetic transducer as an acoustic pressure and intensity meter, evaluated in water, were respectively 0.597 µV MPa-1 and 0.073 µV (W cm-2)-1/2, while those of the needle hydrophone (Onda model HNP-0400) used in the magnetic transducer calibration were respectively, 0.5024 mV MPa-1 and 6.153 mV (W cm-2)-1/2. The transducer resolution to displacement is 5 nm and 6 dB of signal attenuation occurs for 7° of misalignment. The transducer responded well to acoustic pressure in water above 200 kPa.

  6. A Comparison of Measured and Predicted XV-15 Tiltrotor Surface Acoustic Pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyle, Karen H.; Burley, Casey L.; Prichard, Devon S.

    1997-01-01

    Predicted XV-15 exterior surface acoustic pressures are compared with previously published experimental data. Surface acoustic pressure transducers were concentrated near the tip-path-plane of the rotor in airplane mode. The comparison emphasized cruise conditions which are of interest for tiltrotor interior noise - level flight for speeds ranging from 72 m/s to 113 m/s. The predictions were produced by components of the NASA Langley Tiltrotor Aeroacoustic Code (TRAC) system of computer codes. Comparisons between measurements and predictions were made in both the time and frequency domains, as well as overall sound pressure levels. In general, the predictions replicated the measured data well. Discrepancies between measurements and predictions were noted. Some of the discrepancies were due to poor correlation of the measured data with the rotor tach signal. In other cases limitations of the predictive methodology have been indicated.

  7. Surface acoustical intensity measurements on a diesel engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgary, M. C.; Crocker, M. J.

    1980-01-01

    The use of surface intensity measurements as an alternative to the conventional selective wrapping technique of noise source identification and ranking on diesel engines was investigated. A six cylinder, in line turbocharged, 350 horsepower diesel engine was used. Sound power was measured under anechoic conditions for eight separate parts of the engine at steady state operating conditions using the conventional technique. Sound power measurements were repeated on five separate parts of the engine using the surface intensity at the same steady state operating conditions. The results were compared by plotting sound power level against frequency and noise source rankings for the two methods.

  8. X-Ray And Acoustic Measurements Yield Stiffnesses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madaras, Eric Irvine; Kline, Ronald A.

    1993-01-01

    Analytical technique combines ultrasonic scanning measurements of local velocity of sound in specimen of material with x-ray computed tomographic measurements of local mass density to compute local stiffness of material. Stiffnesses at various locations in specimen then used in finite-element mathematical model of elastic behavior of specimen to compute local stresses, local strains, and overall deformations. Technique enhances value of quantitative nondestructive x-ray and ultrasonic measurements. Especially useful in characterization of carbon/carbon composites and other advanced materials not homogeneous and for which customary simplifying assumption of constant density and/or constant stiffness not valid.

  9. A novel instrument to measure acoustic resonances of the vocal tract during phonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epps, J.; Smith, J. R.; Wolfe, J.

    1997-10-01

    Acoustic resonances of the vocal tract give rise to formants (broad bands of acoustic power) in the speech signal when the vocal tract is excited by a periodic signal from the vocal folds. This paper reports a novel instrument which uses a real-time, non-invasive technique to measure these resonances accurately during phonation. A broadband acoustic current source is located just outside the mouth of the subject and the resulting acoustic pressure is measured near the lips. The contribution of the speech signal to the pressure spectrum is then digitally suppressed and the resonances are calculated from the input impedance of the vocal tract as a function of the frequency. The external excitation signal has a much smaller harmonic spacing than does the periodic signal from the vocal folds and consequently the resonances are determined much more accurately due to the closer sampling. This is particularly important for higher pitched voices and we demonstrate that this technique can be markedly superior to the curve-fitting technique of linear prediction. The superior frequency resolution of this instrument which results from external vocal tract excitation can provide the precise, stable, effective, articulatory feedback considered essential for some language-learning and speech-therapy applications.

  10. Integration of acoustic radiation force and optical imaging for blood plasma clot stiffness measurement.

    PubMed

    Wang, Caroline W; Perez, Matthew J; Helmke, Brian P; Viola, Francesco; Lawrence, Michael B

    2015-01-01

    Despite the life-preserving function blood clotting serves in the body, inadequate or excessive blood clot stiffness has been associated with life-threatening diseases such as stroke, hemorrhage, and heart attack. The relationship between blood clot stiffness and vascular diseases underscores the importance of quantifying the magnitude and kinetics of blood's transformation from a fluid to a viscoelastic solid. To measure blood plasma clot stiffness, we have developed a method that uses ultrasound acoustic radiation force (ARF) to induce micron-scaled displacements (1-500 μm) on microbeads suspended in blood plasma. The displacements were detected by optical microscopy and took place within a micro-liter sized clot region formed within a larger volume (2 mL sample) to minimize container surface effects. Modulation of the ultrasound generated acoustic radiation force allowed stiffness measurements to be made in blood plasma from before its gel point to the stage where it was a fully developed viscoelastic solid. A 0.5 wt % agarose hydrogel was 9.8-fold stiffer than the plasma (platelet-rich) clot at 1 h post-kaolin stimulus. The acoustic radiation force microbead method was sensitive to the presence of platelets and strength of coagulation stimulus. Platelet depletion reduced clot stiffness 6.9 fold relative to platelet rich plasma. The sensitivity of acoustic radiation force based stiffness assessment may allow for studying platelet regulation of both incipient and mature clot mechanical properties.

  11. The acoustic environment of intensive care wards based on long period nocturnal measurements.

    PubMed

    Xie, Hui; Kang, Jian

    2012-01-01

    The patients in the Intensive Care Units are often exposed to excessive levels of noise and activities. They can suffer from sleep disturbance, especially at night, but they are often too ill to cope with the poor environment. This article investigates the acoustic environment of typical intensive care wards in the UK, based on long period nocturnal measurements, and examines the differences between singlebed and multibed wards, using statistical analysis. It has been shown that the acoustic environment differs significantly every night. There are also significant differences between the noise levels in the singlebed and multibed wards, where acoustic ceilings are present. Despite the similar background noises in both ward types, more intrusive noises tend to originate from the multibed wards, while more extreme sounds are likely to occur in the single wards. The sound levels in the measured wards for each night are in excess of the World Health Organization's (WHO) guide levels by at least 20 dBA, dominantly at the middle frequencies. Although the sound level at night varies less than that in the daytime, the nocturnal acoustic environment is not dependant on any specific time, thus neither the noisiest nor quietest period can be determined. It is expected that the statistical analysis of the collected data will provide essential information for the development of relevant guidelines and noise reduction strategies.

  12. Integration of Acoustic Radiation Force and Optical Imaging for Blood Plasma Clot Stiffness Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Caroline W.; Perez, Matthew J.; Helmke, Brian P.; Viola, Francesco; Lawrence, Michael B.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the life-preserving function blood clotting serves in the body, inadequate or excessive blood clot stiffness has been associated with life-threatening diseases such as stroke, hemorrhage, and heart attack. The relationship between blood clot stiffness and vascular diseases underscores the importance of quantifying the magnitude and kinetics of blood’s transformation from a fluid to a viscoelastic solid. To measure blood plasma clot stiffness, we have developed a method that uses ultrasound acoustic radiation force (ARF) to induce micron-scaled displacements (1-500 μm) on microbeads suspended in blood plasma. The displacements were detected by optical microscopy and took place within a micro-liter sized clot region formed within a larger volume (2 mL sample) to minimize container surface effects. Modulation of the ultrasound generated acoustic radiation force allowed stiffness measurements to be made in blood plasma from before its gel point to the stage where it was a fully developed viscoelastic solid. A 0.5 wt % agarose hydrogel was 9.8-fold stiffer than the plasma (platelet-rich) clot at 1 h post-kaolin stimulus. The acoustic radiation force microbead method was sensitive to the presence of platelets and strength of coagulation stimulus. Platelet depletion reduced clot stiffness 6.9 fold relative to platelet rich plasma. The sensitivity of acoustic radiation force based stiffness assessment may allow for studying platelet regulation of both incipient and mature clot mechanical properties. PMID:26042775

  13. Laser and acoustic Doppler techniques for the measurement of fluid velocities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliff, W. C.

    1975-01-01

    An overview of current laser and acoustic Doppler techniques is presented. Results obtained by Doppler anemometry and conventional sensors are compared. Comparisons include simultaneous velocity measurements by hot wire and a three-dimensional laser anemometer made in a gaseous pipe flow as well as direct comparisons of atmospheric velocities measured with propeller and cup anemometry. Scanning techniques are also discussed. Conclusions and recommendations for future work are presented.

  14. Optimization of Measurement Points Choice in Preparation of Green Areas Acoustic Map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sztubecka, Małgorzata; Bujarkiewicz, Adam; Sztubecki, Jacek

    2016-12-01

    The aim of the article is to analyze the selection of measuring points of sustainable sound level in the spa park. A set of points should allow to make on their basis an acoustic climate map for the park at certain times of day by usage available tools. Practical part contains a comparative analysis of developed noise maps, taking into account different variants of the distribution and number of measuring points on the selected area of the park.

  15. Acoustic Measurement of Surface Wave Damping by a Meniscus.

    PubMed

    Michel, Guillaume; Pétrélis, François; Fauve, Stéphan

    2016-04-29

    We investigate the reflection of gravity-capillary surface waves by a plane vertical barrier. The size of the meniscus is found to strongly affect reflection: the energy of the reflected wave with a pinned contact line is around twice the one corresponding to a fully developed meniscus. To perform these measurements, a new experimental setup similar to an acousto-optic modulator is developed and offers a simple way to measure the amplitude, frequency and direction of propagation of surface waves.

  16. Acoustic Measurements of Residual Stresses and Grain Sizes in Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Martin John

    The theory of acoustoelasticity relates the velocity of an acoustic wave in a solid to the elastic stress state in that solid. This thesis presents new theories, measurement techniques, and methodologies related to the use of longitudinal wave acoustoelasticity in aluminum alloys. A one-dimensional model has been developed to provide a simple understanding of the acoustoelastic effect. A new acoustic device for accurately measuring relative thickness variations has been designed and built. This device is used--in conjunction with a pulse-echo phase measurement device and a computer controlled scanning system--to measure acoustic velocity variations in plastically deformed and non-flat-and-parallel samples. Acoustic velocity variations from point to point in an unstressed sample can sometimes be on the same order as velocity changes due to applied or residual stresses, and this can make stress measurements difficult. A statistical theory has been developed to relate these unstressed velocity variations to the average grain size in the sample and to the active area of the acoustic transducer used. Large transducers and small grain sizes will minimize these variations. This relationship has been verified by tests on a number of aluminum alloys and a new method for non-destructive grain size determination has been suggested. A systematic methodology has been developed and tested for studying the influence of uniaxial plastic deformation on the acoustoelastic response. Samples have been plastically deformed in four-point bending to produce elastic-plastic and residual stress states. Acoustic measurements of these stresses have then been compared directly to theoretical predictions based on the materials' stress-strain curves and simple beam theory. In the aluminum alloys tested (2024-T351 and 7075-T651), the acoustoelastic constants are shown to be virtually unchanged by uniaxial plastic strains of less than 2.5%. Thus, the acoustoelastic technique can be reliably

  17. Measurement of ultrasonic nonlinear parameter by using electromagnetic acoustic transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Zhichao; Liu, Suzhen; Zhang, Chuang

    2017-02-01

    The nonlinear ultrasonic technology is generally known as an effective method for the microcrack detection. However, most of the previous experimental studies were limited by a contact nonlinearity method. Since measurement by the contact method is affected by the coupling conditions, additional nonlinear coefficient are lead into the measurement. This research presents a novel technique for nonlinear ultrasonic wave measurements that uses a non-contact electromagnetic ultrasonic transducer (EMAT). And for a better understanding and a more in-depth analysis of the macroscopic nonlinear behavior of microcrack, the developed FEM modeling approach was built to simulate microcrack induced nonlinearities manifested in electromagnetic ultrasonic waves and validated experimentally. This study has yielded a quantitative characterization strategy for microcrack using EMAT, facilitating deployment of structural health monitoring by noncontact electromagnetic nondestructive testing.

  18. Acoustic measurements through analysis of binaural recordings of speech and music

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griesinger, David

    2004-10-01

    This paper will present and demonstrate some recent work on the measurement of acoustic properties from binaural recordings of live performances. It is found that models of the process of stream formation can be used to measure intelligibility, and, when combined with band-limited running cross-correlation, can be used to measure spaciousness and envelopment. Analysis of the running cross correlation during sound onsets can be used to measure the accuracy of azimuth perception. It is additionally found that the ease of detecting fundamental pitch from the upper partials of speech and music can be used as a measure of sound quality, particularly for solo instruments and singers.

  19. Specific acoustic impedance measurements of an air-filled thermoacoustic prime mover

    SciTech Connect

    Arnott, W.P.; Bass, H.E.; Raspet, R. )

    1992-12-01

    Thermoacoustic heat engines can be used to produce sound from heat and to transport heat using sound. The air-filled prime mover studied is a quarter wavelength resonator that produces sound at nominally 115 Hz for a temperature difference of [Delta]T = 176 K. Specific acoustic impedance at the mouth of the prime mover was measured as a function of the temperature difference between the hot and cold heat exchangers. The real part of the impedance changes sign for sufficiently large temperature differences, indicating the possibility of sound production. The theoretically predicted radiation impedance of an open pipe was compared to the measured impedance curves. The operating point was confirmed from the intersection of these experimental and theoretical impedance curves. These measurements allow for analysis of the prime mover as a sound source as discussed in a recent theoretical paper [T. B. Gabrielson, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 90, 2628-2636 (1991)]. 11 refs., 2 figs.

  20. The effect of artificial rain on backscattered acoustic signal: first measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titchenko, Yuriy; Karaev, Vladimir; Meshkov, Evgeny; Goldblat, Vladimir

    The problem of rain influencing on a characteristics of backscattered ultrasonic and microwave signal by water surface is considered. The rain influence on backscattering process of electromagnetic waves was investigated in laboratory and field experiments, for example [1-3]. Raindrops have a significant impact on backscattering of microwave and influence on wave spectrum measurement accuracy by string wave gauge. This occurs due to presence of raindrops in atmosphere and modification of the water surface. For measurements of water surface characteristics during precipitation we propose to use an acoustic system. This allows us obtaining of the water surface parameters independently on precipitation in atmosphere. The measurements of significant wave height of water surface using underwater acoustical systems are well known [4, 5]. Moreover, the variance of orbital velocity can be measure using these systems. However, these methods cannot be used for measurements of slope variance and the other second statistical moments of water surface that required for analyzing the radar backscatter signal. An original design Doppler underwater acoustic wave gauge allows directly measuring the surface roughness characteristics that affect on electromagnetic waves backscattering of the same wavelength [6]. Acoustic wave gauge is Doppler ultrasonic sonar which is fixed near the bottom on the floating disk. Measurements are carried out at vertically orientation of sonar antennas towards water surface. The first experiments were conducted with the first model of an acoustic wave gauge. The acoustic wave gauge (8 mm wavelength) is equipped with a transceiving antenna with a wide symmetrical antenna pattern. The gauge allows us to measure Doppler spectrum and cross section of backscattered signal. Variance of orbital velocity vertical component can be retrieved from Doppler spectrum with high accuracy. The result of laboratory and field experiments during artificial rain is presented

  1. Measurements of Acoustic Properties of Porous and Granular Materials and Application to Vibration Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Junhong; Palumbo, Daniel L.

    2004-01-01

    For application of porous and granular materials to vibro-acoustic controls, a finite dynamic strength of the solid component (frame) is an important design factor. The primary goal of this study was to investigate structural vibration damping through this frame wave propagation for various poroelastic materials. A measurement method to investigate the vibration characteristics of the frame was proposed. The measured properties were found to follow closely the characteristics of the viscoelastic materials - the dynamic modulus increased with frequency and the degree of the frequency dependence was determined by its loss factor. The dynamic stiffness of hollow cylindrical beams containing porous and granular materials as damping treatment was measured also. The data were used to extract the damping materials characteristics using the Rayleigh-Ritz method. The results suggested that the acoustic structure interaction between the frame and the structure enhances the dissipation of the vibration energy significantly.

  2. Developing a confocal acoustic holography microscope for non-invasive 3D temperature and composition measurements.

    PubMed

    Herring, Rodney A; Jacquemin, Peter; Sawicka, Barbara D; Atalick, Stefan

    2009-06-01

    A confocal acoustic holography microscope (CAHM) has been designed, simulated and partially verified experimentally to take holograms for non-invasive, three-dimensional measurements of a specimen's refractive indices from one view point. The designed and simulated prototype CAHM used a frequency of 2.25 MHz and measured sound speed changes of 16 m/s, temperature changes of 5 degrees C and had a spatial resolution of 660 microm. With future improvements utilizing the latest technologies such as two-dimensional array detectors, Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS), and acoustic lenses, resolutions of 1m/s, 0.5 degrees C, and 150 microm are expected. The CAHM is expected to have many useful applications, including non-invasive mass and heat transfer measurements in fluids and materials and as a medical diagnostic tool to non-intrusively visualize compositions and temperatures within the human body.

  3. Fracture hydromechanical response measured by fiber optic distributed acoustic sensing at milliHertz frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, M. W.; Ciervo, C.; Cole, M.; Coleman, T.; Mondanos, M.

    2017-07-01

    A new method of measuring dynamic strain in boreholes was used to record fracture displacement in response to head oscillation. Fiber optic distributed acoustic sensing (DAS) was used to measure strain at mHz frequencies, rather than the Hz to kHz frequencies typical for seismic and acoustic monitoring. Fiber optic cable was mechanically coupled to the wall of a borehole drilled into fractured crystalline bedrock. Oscillating hydraulic signals were applied at a companion borehole 30 m away. The DAS instrument measured fracture displacement at frequencies of less than 1 mHz and amplitudes of less than 1 nm, in response to fluid pressure changes of less 20 Pa (2 mm H2O). Displacement was linearly related to the log of effective stress, a relationship typically explained by the effect of self-affine fracture roughness on fracture closure. These results imply that fracture roughness affects closure even when displacement is a million times smaller than the fracture aperture.

  4. Accurate measurements of the acoustical physical constants of synthetic alpha-quartz for SAW devices.

    PubMed

    Kushibiki, Juin-ichi; Takanaga, Izumi; Nishiyama, Shouichi

    2002-01-01

    Accurate measurements of the acoustical physical constants (elastic constants, piezoelectric constants, dielectric constants, and density) of commercially available and widely used surface acoustic wave (SAW)-grade synthetic a-quartz are reported. The propagation directions and modes of bulk waves optimal for accurately determining the constants were selected through numerical calculations, and three principal X-, Y-, and Z-cut specimens and several rotated Y-cut specimens were prepared from a single crystal ingot to determine the constants and to confirm their accuracy. All of the constants were determined through highly accurate measurements of the longitudinal velocities, shear velocities, dielectric constants, and density. The velocity values measured for the specimens that were not used to determine the constants agreed well with those calculated from the determined constants, within a difference of +/- 0.20 m/s (+/- 0.004%).

  5. In situ measurements of sediment acoustic properties in Currituck Sound and comparison to models.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kevin M; Ballard, Megan S; McNeese, Andrew R; Muir, Thomas G; Wilson, Preston S; Costley, R Daniel; Hathaway, Kent K

    2016-11-01

    In situ measurements of compressional and shear wave speed and attenuation were collected 30 cm below the water-sediment interface in Currituck Sound, North Carolina at two field locations having distinctly different sediment types: medium-to-fine-grained sand and fine-grained sand with approximately 10% mud content. Shear wave measurements were performed with bimorph transducers to generate and receive horizontally polarized shear waves in the 300 Hz to 1 kHz band, and compressional wave measurements were performed using hydrophones operated in the 5 kHz to 100 kHz band. Sediment samples were collected at both measurement sites and later analyzed in the laboratory to characterize the sediment grain size distribution for each field location. Compressional and shear wave speed and attenuation were estimated from the acoustic measurements, and preliminary comparisons to the extended Biot model by Chotiros and Isakson [J. Acoust. Soc. 135, 3264-3279 (2014)] and the viscous grain-shearing theory by Buckingham [J. Acoust. Soc. 136, 2478-2488 (2014)] were performed.

  6. Discrepancies Between LWD and Wireline Acoustic Logging Measurements in an Unconsolidated Formation: a Modeling Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, S.; Briggs, V.; Burns, D.; Rao, V.

    2005-05-01

    Acoustic Logging-While-Drilling (LWD) significantly reduces drilling rig time in deepwater development than its wireline counterpart. It can also provide high-resolution formation velocity logs as wireline logging does in most situations. LWD measurements are critical in subsurface imaging, seismic-well tie, and wellbore stability. However, in an unconsolidated formation, data show both compressional and shear wave velocities by a LWD tool are slower than those obtained by a wireline tool. The discrepancies may result from differences in geometries, source-receiver offsets, operating frequencies, and off-centering of the tools and borehole conditions in which both measurements are made. To pinpoint the main cause of the difference and build confidence on application of LWD tools, we extend the propagator matrix method for simulation of acoustic multipole wireline measurements to acoustic LWD modeling in radially layered formations. Both LWD measurements and dispersion properties can be computed analytically. Time and frequency domain semblance techniques are also used to quantify depths of investigation of LWD and wireline tools in boreholes with radially increasing velocity profiles. Extensive modeling results show that the LWD tool investigates about half of the depth of the wireline tool does in this unconsolidated formation. To ensure accurate measurements of formation velocities, particularly shear wave velocities, in unconsolidated formations, a wireline or LWD tool operating at low frequency may be necessary.

  7. Acoustic input impedance of the avian inner ear measured in ostrich (Struthio camelus).

    PubMed

    Muyshondt, Pieter G G; Aerts, Peter; Dirckx, Joris J J

    2016-09-01

    In both mammals and birds, the mechanical behavior of the middle ear structures is affected by the mechanical impedance of the inner ear. In this study, the aim was to quantify the acoustic impedance of the avian inner ear in the ostrich, which allows us to determine the effect on columellar vibrations and middle ear power flow in future studies. To determine the inner ear impedance, vibrations of the columella were measured for both the quasi-static and acoustic stimulus frequencies. In the frequency range of 0.3-4 kHz, we used electromagnetic stimulation of the ossicle and a laser Doppler vibrometer to measure the vibration response. At low frequencies, harmonic displacements were imposed on the columella using piezo stimulation and the resulting force response was measured with a force sensor. From these measurement data, the acoustic impedance of the inner ear could be determined. A simple RLC model in series of the impedance measurements resulted in a stiffness reactance of KIE = 0.20·10(12) Pa/m³, an inertial impedance of MIE = 0.652·10(6) Pa s(2)/m³, and a resistance of RIE = 1.57·10(9) Pa s/m. We found that values of the inner ear impedance in the ostrich are one to two orders in magnitude smaller than what is found in mammal ears.

  8. Acoustic containerless experiment system: A non-contact surface tension measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elleman, D. D.; Wang, T. G.; Barmatz, M.

    1988-01-01

    The Acoustic Containerless Experiment System (ACES) was flown on STS 41-B in February 1984 and was scheduled to be reflown in 1986. The primary experiment that was to be conducted with the ACES module was the containerless melting and processing of a fluoride glass sample. A second experiment that was to be conducted was the verification of a non-contact surface tension measurement technique using the molten glass sample. The ACES module consisted of a three-axis acoustic positioning module that was inside an electric furnace capable of heating the system above the melting temperature of the sample. The acoustic module is able to hold the sample with acoustic forces in the center of the chamber and, in addition, has the capability of applying a modulating force on the sample along one axis of the chamber so that the molten sample or liquid drop could be driven into one of its normal oscillation modes. The acoustic module could also be adjusted so that it could place a torque on the molten drop and cause the drop to rotate. In the ACES, a modulating frequency was applied to the drop and swept through a range of frequencies that would include the n = 2 mode. A maximum amplitude of the drop oscillation would indicate when resonance was reached and from that data the surface tension could be calculated. For large viscosity samples, a second technique for measuring surface tension was developed. The results of the ACES experiment and some of the problems encountered during the actual flight of the experiment will be discussed.

  9. Acoustic device and method for measuring gas densities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shakkottai, Parthasarathy (Inventor); Kwack, Eug Y. (Inventor); Back, Lloyd (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    Density measurements can be made in a gas contained in a flow through enclosure by measuring the sound pressure level at a receiver or microphone located near a dipole sound source which is driven at constant velocity amplitude at low frequencies. Analytical results, which are provided in terms of geometrical parameters, wave numbers, and sound source type for systems of this invention, agree well with published data. The relatively simple designs feature a transmitter transducer at the closed end of a small tube and a receiver transducer on the circumference of the small tube located a small distance away from the transmitter. The transmitter should be a dipole operated at low frequency with the kL value preferable less that about 0.3.

  10. Acoustic method for permeability measurement of tissue-engineering scaffold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiavi, A.; Guglielmone, C.; Pennella, F.; Morbiducci, U.

    2012-10-01

    An accurate intrinsic permeability measurement system has been designed and realized in order to quantify the inter-pore connectivity structure of tissue-engineering scaffolds by using a single (pressure) transducer. The proposed method uses a slow alternating airflow as a fluid medium and allows at the same time a simple and accurate measurement procedure. The intrinsic permeability is determined in the linear Darcy's region, and deviation from linearity due to inertial losses is also quantified. The structural parameters of a scaffold, such as effective porosity, tortuosity and effective length of cylindrical pores, are estimated using the classical Ergun's equation recently modified by Wu et al. From this relation, it is possible to achieve a well-defined range of data and associated uncertainties for characterizing the structure/architecture of tissue-engineering scaffolds. This quantitative analysis is of paramount importance in tissue engineering, where scaffold topological features are strongly related to their biological performance.

  11. Measurements of Infrared and Acoustic Source Distributions in Jet Plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agboola, Femi A.; Bridges, James; Saiyed, Naseem

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to use the linear phased array (LPA) microphones and infrared (IR) imaging to study the effects of advanced nozzle-mixing techniques on jet noise reduction. Several full-scale engine nozzles were tested at varying power cycles with the linear phased array setup parallel to the jet axis. The array consisted of 16 sparsely distributed microphones. The phased array microphone measurements were taken at a distance of 51.0 ft (15.5 m) from the jet axis, and the results were used to obtain relative overall sound pressure levels from one nozzle design to the other. The IR imaging system was used to acquire real-time dynamic thermal patterns of the exhaust jet from the nozzles tested. The IR camera measured the IR radiation from the nozzle exit to a distance of six fan diameters (X/D(sub FAN) = 6), along the jet plume axis. The images confirmed the expected jet plume mixing intensity, and the phased array results showed the differences in sound pressure level with respect to nozzle configurations. The results show the effects of changes in configurations to the exit nozzles on both the flows mixing patterns and radiant energy dissipation patterns. By comparing the results from these two measurements, a relationship between noise reduction and core/bypass flow mixing is demonstrated.

  12. Measurement of Acoustic Attenuation and Absorption Coefficients using Thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Hugh; Rivens, Ian; Shaw, Adam; ter Haar, Gail

    2007-05-01

    Accurate knowledge of both the attenuation and the absorption coefficient of tissue are required when planning an optimal high intensity focused ultrasound treatment. A novel technique for simple measurement of this parameters has been developed in which a thin-film thermocouple (TFT) is placed between two layers of tissue of different thicknesses. The sample can be rotated about an axis through the junction of the TFT so that it can be insonated from either side leaving the tissue adjacent to the junction unchanged, but changing the overlying thickness. The attenuation and absorption coefficients can be calculated from the heating curves measured in the two orientations. Experiments have been carried out in both tissue mimicking material (TMM) and in ex vivo liver tissue. Weakly focused transducers, resonant at 1.05 MHz, 2.4 MHz and 3.55 MHz were used at free-field spatial peak intensities of 9-14 W/cm2. The temperature rise was measured as a function of time using a TFT. These thermocouples are not subject to the viscous heating artefact that is common to other thermocouple devices and so are advantageous for this purpose. Alignment was achieved with a 3D automated gantry system, which was controlled with specialised software. Timing and data acquisition were also controlled with this software. All experiments were carried out in degassed water. Results for TMM and degassed excised bovine liver are presented.

  13. Age effects in the human middle ear: Wideband acoustical measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feeney, M. Patrick; Sanford, Chris A.

    2004-12-01

    Studies that have examined age effects in the human middle ear using either admittance measures at 220 or 660 Hz or multifrequency tympanometry from 200 to 2000 Hz have had conflicting results. Several studies have suggested an increase in admittance with age, while several others have suggested a decrease in admittance with age. A third group of studies found no significant age effect. This study examined 226 Hz tympanometry and wideband energy reflectance and impedance at ambient pressure in a group of 40 young adults and a group of 30 adults with age >=60 years. The groups did not differ in admittance measures of the middle ear at 226 Hz. However, significant age effects were found in wideband energy reflectance and impedance. In particular, in older adults there was a comparative decrease in reflectance from 800 to 2000 Hz but an increase near 4000 Hz. The results suggest a decrease in middle-ear stiffness with age. The findings of this study hold relevance for understanding the aging process in the auditory system, for the establishment of normative data for wideband energy reflectance, for the possibility of a conductive component to presbycusis, and for the interpretation of otoacoustic emission measurements. .

  14. A measure of acoustic noise generated from transcranial magnetic stimulation coils.

    PubMed

    Dhamne, Sameer C; Kothare, Raveena S; Yu, Camilla; Hsieh, Tsung-Hsun; Anastasio, Elana M; Oberman, Lindsay; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Rotenberg, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    The intensity of sound emanating from the discharge of magnetic coils used in repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) can potentially cause acoustic trauma. Per Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) standards for safety of noise exposure, hearing protection is recommended beyond restricted levels of noise and time limits. We measured the sound pressure levels (SPLs) from four rTMS coils with the goal of assessing if the acoustic artifact levels are of sufficient amplitude to warrant protection from acoustic trauma per OSHA standards. We studied the SPLs at two frequencies (5 and 10 Hz), three machine outputs (MO) (60, 80 and 100%), and two distances from the coil (5 and 10 cm). We found that the SPLs were louder at closer proximity from the coil and directly dependent on the MO. We also found that in all studied conditions, SPLs were lower than the OSHA permissible thresholds for short (<15 min) acoustic exposure, but at extremes of use, may generate sufficient noise to warrant ear protection with prolonged (>8 h) exposure. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A novel multipitch measurement algorithm for acoustic signals of moving targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jingchang; Guo, Feng; Zu, Xingshui; Li, Haiyan; Liu, Huawei; Li, Baoqing

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, a novel multipitch measurement (MPM) method is proposed for acoustic signals. Starting from the analysis of moving targets' acoustic signatures, a pitch-based harmonics representation model of acoustic signal is put forward. According to the proposed harmonics model, a modified greatest common divisor (MGCD) method is developed to obtain an initial multipitch set (IMS). Subsequently, the harmonic number vector (HNV) associated with the IMS is determined by maximizing the objective function formulated as a multi-impulse-train weighted symmetric average magnitude sum function (SAMSF) of the observed signal. The frequencies of SAMSF are determined by the target acoustic signal, the periods of the multi-impulse-train are governed by the estimated IMS harmonics and the maximization of the objective function is figured out through a time-domain matching of periodicities of the multi-impulse-train with that of the SAMSF. Finally, by using the obtained IMS and its HNV, a precise fundamental frequency set is achieved. Evaluation of the algorithm performances in comparison with state-of-the-art methods indicates that MPM is practical for the multipitch extraction of moving targets.

  16. Synthetic aperture acoustic measurements of stationary suspended cinderblock and surrogate substitutes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, Steven; Woods, Teresa; Vignola, Joe; Judge, John; Soumekh, Mehrdad

    2009-05-01

    A synthetic aperture acoustic approach is used as a standoff method to assess material properties of a typical cinder block, referred to as a concrete masonry unit (CMU), and a variety of CMU surrogates. The objective is to identify anomalies in CMU wall surfaces. The acoustic specular return and phase change across the blocks are the fundamental measurements of interest. The CMU surrogates are created from commercially available closed cell expanding foam. Results from three test articles are presented that show potentially exploitable differences in terms of acoustic magnitude and acoustic phase response between the surrogates and typical CMUs. The test articles are; a typical CMU, a foam block, and a foam block with an embedded steel object. All test articles are similar in size and shape, and both foam blocks are covered in grout so that surface appearance closely matches that of a CMU. The results show that each of the test articles has characteristics that may be used for discrimination and anomaly detection.

  17. Estimation of acoustical streaming: theoretical model, Doppler measurements and optical visualisation.

    PubMed

    Nowicki, A; Kowalewski, T; Secomski, W; Wójcik, J

    1998-02-01

    An approximate solution for the streaming velocity generated by flat and weakly focused transducers was derived by directly solving the Dirichlet boundary conditions for the Poisson equation, the solution of the Navier-Stokes equation for the axial components of the streaming velocity. The theoretical model was verified experimentally using a 32 MHz pulsed Doppler unit. The experimental acoustical fields were produced by three different 4 mm diameter flat and focused transducers driven by the transmitter generating the average acoustic power within the range from 1 microW to 6 mW. The streaming velocity was measured along the ultrasonic beam from 0 to 2 cm. Streaming was induced in a solution of water and corn starch. The experimental results showed that for a given acoustic power the streaming velocity was independent of the starch density in water, changed from 0.3 to 40 grams of starch in 1 l of distilled water. For applied acoustic powers, the streaming velocity changed linearly from 0.2 to 40 mm/s. Both, the theoretical solutions for plane and focused waves and the experimental results were in good agreement. The streaming velocity field was also visualised using the particle image velocimetry (PIV) and two different evaluation methods. The first based on the FFT-based cross-correlation analysis between small sections for each pair of images and the second employing the algorithm of searching for local displacements between several images.

  18. High Frequency Acoustic Sensor Dedicated to the High Resolution Measurement of Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meignen, Pierre-Antoine; Le Clézio, Emmanuel; Despaux, Gilles

    Through acoustic signature, scanning acoustic microscopy can be used to quantify local mechanical properties of a medium thanks to the generation of surface waves, mostly Rayleigh waves. Despite being quite effective, this method requires to evaluate the mechanical properties of a single point the acquisition of many ultrasonic signals. This process is then time-consuming and is hardly adaptable to quantitative imaging. The solution considered in this paper to speed-up the method is to design a multi-element sensor allowing the extraction of information on Rayleigh waves with a reduced number of acquisitions. The work is conducted along two axes. As a first step, a model allowing the simulation of the acoustic wave behavior at a fluid/solid interface is developed. This model leads to a better understanding of the characterization of the mechanical properties and to the definition of an adapted sensor's design. As a second step, an experimental method for acoustic field reconstruction is used to characterize the multi-elements sensor and measurements of mechanical properties were done.

  19. Covariation among vowel height effects on acoustic measures.

    PubMed

    Berry, Jeff; Moyle, Maura

    2011-11-01

    Covariation among vowel height effects on vowel intrinsic fundamental frequency (IF(0)), voice onset time (VOT), and voiceless interval duration (VID) is analyzed to assess the plausibility of a common physiological mechanism underlying variation in these measures. Phrases spoken by 20 young adults, containing words composed of initial voiceless stops or /s/ and high or low vowels, were produced in habitual and voluntarily increased F(0) conditions. High vowels were associated with increased IF(0) and longer VIDs. VOT and VID exhibited significant covariation with IF(0) only for males at habitual F(0). The lack of covariation for females and at increased F(0) is discussed.

  20. Acoustic Resuspension Measurement System (ARMS): Announcement of Availability.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-04-01

    their controlling circuitry to be con,- Z bined in compact, battery -powered packages. These instrument packages can W 0 be contained in rellatively... Station DTIO QUALITY [INSP8•ECTE"•D 4 3909 Halls Ferry Road. Vicksburg, MS 39180-6199 tzqq o- ,1TEDOf’ rYCjA" PiosJ Mr. E. Clark McNair, Jr., (601... Prickett and Michelle M. Thevenot. Introduction In order to measure in situ properties of the boundary layer above dredged material mounds in open

  1. Shallow-water acoustic tomography from angle measurements instead of travel-time measurements.

    PubMed

    Aulanier, Florian; Nicolas, Barbara; Mars, Jérôme I; Roux, Philippe; Brossier, Romain

    2013-10-01

    For shallow-water waveguides and mid-frequency broadband acoustic signals, ocean acoustic tomography (OAT) is based on the multi-path aspect of wave propagation. Using arrays in emission and reception and advanced array processing, every acoustic arrival can be isolated and matched to an eigenray that is defined not only by its travel time but also by its launch and reception angles. Classically, OAT uses travel-time variations to retrieve sound-speed perturbations; this assumes very accurate source-to-receiver clock synchronization. This letter uses numerical simulations to demonstrate that launch-and-reception-angle tomography gives similar results to travel-time tomography without the same requirement for high-precision synchronization.

  2. Initiation of GPS-Acoustics Measurements on the Continental Slope of the Cascadia Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadwell, C. D.

    2016-12-01

    Land-based GPS measurements suggest the megathrust is locked offshore along the Cascadia Subduction Zone. However, land-based data alone lack geometric resolution to constrain the how the slip is distributed. GPS-Acoustic measurements can provide these constraints, but using traditional GPS-Acoustic approaches employing a ship is costly. Wave Gliders, a wave- and solar-powered, remotely-piloted sea surface platform, provide a low cost method for collecting GPS-A data. We have adapted GPS-Acoustic technology to the Wave Glider. In July 2016, the GPS-A Wave Glider was launched on month-long mission to two sites on the continental slope of the Cascadia Subduction Zone. One site is approximately 45 NM offshore central Oregon and the other approximately 50 NM offshore central Washington State. We will report on initial results of the GPS-A data collection and operational experiences of the mission. Wave Glider based GPS-A measurement have the potential to significantly increase the number and frequency of measurements of strain accumulation in Cascadia Subduction Zone and elsewhere.

  3. The determination of the acoustic parameters of volcanic rocks from compressional velocity measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carroll, R.D.

    1969-01-01

    A statistical analysis was made of the relationship of various acoustic parameters of volcanic rocks to compressional wave velocities for data obtained in a volcanic region in Nevada. Some additional samples, chiefly granitic rocks, were also included in the study to extend the range of parameters and the variety of siliceous rock types sampled. Laboratory acoustic measurements obtained on 62 dry core samples were grouped with similar measurements obtained from geophysical logging devices at several depth intervals in a hole from which 15 of the core samples had been obtained. The effects of lithostatic and hydrostatic load on changing the rock acoustic parameters measured in the hole were noticeable when compared with the laboratory measurements on the same core. The results of the analyses determined by grouping all of the data, however, indicate that dynamic Young's, shear and bulk modulus, shear velocity, shear and compressional characteristic impedance, as well as amplitude and energy reflection coefficients may be reliably estimated on the basis of the compressional wave velocities of the rocks investigated. Less precise estimates can be made of density based on the rock compressional velocity. The possible extension of these relationships to include many siliceous rocks is suggested. ?? 1969.

  4. The feasibility of measuring ocean pH by long-range acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worcester, Peter F.

    1989-04-01

    Low frequency (<1000 Hz) sound absorption in the ocean depends exponentially on ocean pH. While the absolute amplitudes measured in long-range (order of 1000 km) acoustic transmission experiments depend in a complex manner on ocean structure and are difficult to interpret without ambiguity, measurements of differential absorption as a function of frequency contain significant information. For surface-reflected rays (RSR) there is the additional factor of frequency-dependent reflectivity. In principle, a comparison of transmitted and received acoustic spectra can be inverted to obtain ocean pH and surface roughness. Calculations performed with preliminary data from a 750-km path in the North Pacific give qualitative agreement with theory (higher frequencies are attenuated more than lower frequencies) but are inadequate for quantitative comparisons (the experiment was not optimized for differential attenuation measurements). Our conclusion is that it is possible, but not easy, to obtain quantitative information on ocean pH and surface roughness from measurements of differential attenuation with frequency along resolved ray paths. To obtain an accuracy of 0.05 in pH with a 750-km transmission at 550+/-100 Hz would require about 100 independent samples for the North Pacific (pH~7.7) and 60 independent samples for the Atlantic (pH~8.0) in order to achieve adequate averaging of amplitude fluctuations induced by internal waves and ambient acoustic noise.

  5. Selecting an acoustic correlate for automated measurement of American English rhotic production in children.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Heather; Harel, Daphna; Hitchcock, Elaine; McAllister Byun, Tara

    2017-08-10

    A current need in the field of speech-language pathology is the development of reliable and efficient techniques to evaluate accuracy of speech targets over the course of treatment. As acoustic measurement techniques improve, it should become possible to use automated scoring in lieu of ratings from a trained clinician in some contexts. This study asks which acoustic measures correspond most closely with expert ratings of children's productions of American English /ɹ/ in an effort to develop an automated scoring algorithm for use in treatment targeting rhotics. A series of ordinal mixed-effects regression models were fit over a large sample of children's productions of words containing /ɹ/ that had previously been rated by three trained clinicians. Akaike/Bayesian Information Criteria were used to select the best-fitting model. Controlling for age, sex, and allophonic contextual differences, the measure that accounted for the most variance in speech rating was F3-F2 distance normalised relative to a sample of age- and sex-matched speakers. We recommend this acoustic measure for use in future automated scoring of children's production of American English rhotics. We also suggest that computer-based treatment with automated scoring should facilitate increases in treatment dosage by improving options for home practice.

  6. Overview of hydro-acoustic current-measurement applications by the U.S. geological survey in Indiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morlock, Scott E.; Stewart, James A.

    1999-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) maintains a network of 170 streamflow-gaging stations in Indiana to collect data from which continuous records of river discharges are produced. Traditionally, the discharge record from a station is produced by recording river stage and making periodic discharge measurements through a range of stage, then developing a relation between stage and discharge. Techniques that promise to increase data collection accuracy and efficiency include the use of hydro-acoustic instrumentation to measure river velocities. The velocity measurements are used to compute river discharge. In-situ applications of hydro-acoustic instruments by the USGS in Indiana include acoustic velocity meters (AVM's) at six streamflow-gaging stations and newly developed Doppler velocity meters (DVM's) at two stations. AVM's use reciprocal travel times of acoustic signals to measure average water velocities along acoustic paths, whereas DVM's use the Doppler shift of backscattered acoustic signals to compute water velocities. In addition to the in-situ applications, three acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCP's) are used to make river-discharge measurements from moving boats at streamflow-gaging stations in Indiana. The USGS has designed and is testing an innovative unmanned platform from which to make ADCP discharge measurements.

  7. In-situ optical and acoustical measurements of the buoyant cyanobacterium p. Rubescens: spatial and temporal distribution patterns.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Hilmar; Peeters, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Optical (fluorescence) and acoustic in-situ techniques were tested in their ability to measure the spatial and temporal distribution of plankton in freshwater ecosystems with special emphasis on the harmful and buoyant cyanobacterium P. rubescens. Fluorescence was measured with the multi-spectral FluoroProbe (Moldaenke FluoroProbe, MFP) and a Seapoint Chlorophyll Fluorometer (SCF). In-situ measurements of the acoustic backscatter strength (ABS) were conducted with three different acoustic devices covering multiple acoustic frequencies (614 kHz ADCP, 2 MHz ADP, and 6 MHz ADV). The MFP provides a fast and reliable technique to measure fluorescence at different wavelengths in situ, which allows discriminating between P. rubescens and other phytoplankton species. All three acoustic devices are sensitive to P. rubescens even if other scatterers, e.g., zooplankton or suspended sediment, are present in the water column, because P. rubescens containing gas vesicles has a strong density difference and hence acoustic contrast to the ambient water and other scatterers. After calibration, the combination of optical and acoustical measurements not only allows qualitative and quantitative observation of P. rubescens, but also distinction between P. rubescens, other phytoplankton, and zooplankton. As the measuring devices can sample in situ at high rates they enable assessment of plankton distributions at high temporal (minutes) and spatial (decimeters) resolution or covering large temporal (seasonal) and spatial (basin scale) scales.

  8. Sub-Microsecond Temperature Measurement in Liquid Water Using Laser Induced Thermal Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alderfer, David W.; Herring, G. C.; Danehy, Paul M.; Mizukaki, Toshiharu; Takayama, Kazuyoshi

    2005-01-01

    Using laser-induced thermal acoustics, we demonstrate non-intrusive and remote sound speed and temperature measurements over the range 10 - 45 C in liquid water. Averaged accuracy of sound speed and temperature measurements (10 s) are 0.64 m/s and 0.45 C respectively. Single-shot precisions based on one standard deviation of 100 or greater samples range from 1 m/s to 16.5 m/s and 0.3 C to 9.5 C for sound speed and temperature measurements respectively. The time resolution of each single-shot measurement was 300 nsec.

  9. Non-Destructive Evaluation Method and Apparatus for Measuring Acoustic Material Nonlinearity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yost, William T. (Inventor); Cantrell, John H. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    An acoustic non-linearity parameter (beta) measurement method and system for Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) of materials and structural members obviates the need for electronic calibration of the measuring equipment. Unlike known substitutional measuring techniques requiring elaborate calibration procedures, the electrical outputs of the capacitive detector of a sample with known beta and the test sample of unknown beta are compared to determine the unknown beta. In order to provide the necessary stability of the present-inventive reference-based approach, the bandpass filters of the measurement system are maintained in a temperature-controlled environment, and the line voltage supplied to said amplifiers is well-regulated.

  10. Brillouin-scattering measurements of the acoustic absorption coefficient in liquid CS2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coakley, R. W.; Detenbeck, R. W.

    1975-01-01

    High-resolution Brillouin spectra were recorded for light scattered at small angles from liquid CS2. The use of a single-mode He-Ne laser, locked in frequency to a Fabry-Perot interferometer, permitted measurements of line widths of the order of 10 MHz for frequencies in the range 300-1000 MHz. These measurements extend previous Brillouin line-width measurements at higher frequencies into the region where relaxation effects are dominant and connect the optical measurements with lower-frequency acoustical data.

  11. Acoustic Experiment to Measure the Bulk Viscosity of Near-Critical Xenon in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillis, K. A.; Shinder, I.; Moldover, M. R.; Zimmerli, G. A.

    2002-01-01

    We plan a rigorous test of the theory of dynamic scaling by accurately measuring the bulk viscosity of xenon in microgravity 50 times closer to the critical temperature T(sub c) than previous experiments. The bulk viscosity zeta (or "second viscosity" or "dilational viscosity") will be determined by measuring the attenuation length of sound alpha lambda and also measuring the frequency-dependence of the speed of sound. For these measurements, we developed a unique Helmholtz resonator and specialized electro-acoustic transducers. We describe the resonator, the transducers, their performance on Earth, and their expected performance in microgravity.

  12. Measurements of acoustic particle velocity in a coaxial duct and its application to a traveling-wave thermoacoustic heat engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morii, Jun; Biwa, Tetsushi; Yazaki, Taichi

    2014-09-01

    We present theoretical solutions, based on linear acoustic theory, for axial acoustic particle velocity in an annular region of a coaxial duct. The solutions are expressed in terms of two non-dimensional parameters h/δν and R; h and δν, respectively, represent the half of the spacing between two concentric ducts and the characteristic length given by kinematic viscosity of the gas and angular frequency of acoustic oscillations, and R is the radius ratio of the ducts. The validity of the solutions was verified by direct measurements using a laser Doppler velocimeter. The present results are applied to measurements of the acoustic power distribution in a traveling wave thermoacoustic engine with a coaxial duct, which provides experimental evidence for acoustic power feedback in the coaxial duct.

  13. Measurements of acoustic particle velocity in a coaxial duct and its application to a traveling-wave thermoacoustic heat engine.

    PubMed

    Morii, Jun; Biwa, Tetsushi; Yazaki, Taichi

    2014-09-01

    We present theoretical solutions, based on linear acoustic theory, for axial acoustic particle velocity in an annular region of a coaxial duct. The solutions are expressed in terms of two non-dimensional parameters h/δ(ν) and R; h and δ(ν), respectively, represent the half of the spacing between two concentric ducts and the characteristic length given by kinematic viscosity of the gas and angular frequency of acoustic oscillations, and R is the radius ratio of the ducts. The validity of the solutions was verified by direct measurements using a laser Doppler velocimeter. The present results are applied to measurements of the acoustic power distribution in a traveling wave thermoacoustic engine with a coaxial duct, which provides experimental evidence for acoustic power feedback in the coaxial duct.

  14. Microscopic imaging of residual stress using a scanning phase-measuring acoustic microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meeks, Steven W.; Peter, D.; Horne, D.; Young, K.; Novotny, V.

    1989-10-01

    A high-resolution scanning phase-measuring acoustic microscope (SPAM) has been developed and used to image the near-surface residual stress field around features etched in sputtered alumina via the acoustoelastic effect. This microscope operates at 670 MHz and has a resolution of 5-10 microns, depending upon the amount of defocus. Relative velocity changes of sample surface waves as small as 50 ppm are resolved. Images of the stress field at the tip of a 400-micron-wide slot etched in alumina are presented and compared with a finite element simulation. The SPAM uses an unconventional acoustic lens with an anisotropic illumination pattern which can measure anisotropic effects and map residual stress fields with several-micron resolution and a stress sensitivity of 1/3 MPa in an alumina film.

  15. Design and Implementation of an Acoustic X-ray Detector to Measure the LCLS Beam Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Loos, Jennifer L.; /San Jose State U. /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    On April 11, 2009, first light was seen from LCLS. The present apparatus being used to measure the x-ray beam energy is the Total Energy Sensor which uses a suite of thermal sensors. Another device is needed to cross-check the energy measurements. This new diagnostic tool utilizes radiation acoustic phenomena to determine the x-ray beam energy. A target is hit by the x-rays from the beam, and a voltage is generated in two piezoelectric sensors attached to the target in response to the consequent deformation. Once the voltage is known, the power can be obtained. Thermal sensors will also be attached to the target for calibration purposes. Material selection and design were based on: durability, ultra-high vacuum compatibility, safety and thermal properties. The target material was also chosen for its acoustic properties which were determined from tests using a frequency generator and laser. Initial tests suggest the device will function as anticipated.

  16. Clinical Studies of Real-Time Monitoring of Lithotripter Performance Using Passive Acoustic Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leighton, T. G.; Fedele, F.; Coleman, A. J.; McCarthy, C.; Ryves, S.; Hurrell, A. M.; De Stefano, A.; White, P. R.

    2008-09-01

    This paper describes the development and clinical testing of a passive device which monitors the passive acoustic emissions generated within the patient's body during Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy (ESWL). Designed and clinically tested so that it can be operated by a nurse, the device analyses the echoes generated in the body in response to each ESWL shock, and so gives real time shock-by-shock feedback on whether the stone was at the focus of the lithotripter, and if so whether the previous shock contributed to stone fragmentation when that shock reached the focus. A shock is defined as being `effective' if these two conditions are satisfied. Not only can the device provide real-time feedback to the operator, but the trends in shock `effectiveness' can inform treatment. In particular, at any time during the treatment (once a statistically significant number of shocks have been delivered), the percentage of shocks which were `effective' provides a treatment score TS(t) which reflects the effectiveness of the treatment up to that point. The TS(t) figure is automatically delivered by the device without user intervention. Two clinical studies of the device were conducted, the ethics guidelines permitting only use of the value of TS(t) obtained at the end of treatment (this value is termed the treatment score TS0). The acoustically-derived treatment score was compared with the treatment score CTS2 given by the consultant urologist at the three-week patient's follow-up appointment. In the first clinical study (phase 1), records could be compared for 30 out of the 118 patients originally recruited, and the results of phase 1 were used to refine the parameter values (the `rules') with which the acoustic device provides its treatment score. These rules were tested in phase 2, for which records were compared for 49 of the 85 patients recruited. Considering just the phase 2 results (since the phase 1 data were used to draw up the `rules' under which phase 2 operated

  17. Measurement of Turbulence with Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers - Sources of Error and Laboratory Results

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nystrom, E.A.; Oberg, K.A.; Rehmann, C.R.; ,

    2002-01-01

    Acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) provide a promising method for measuring surface-water turbulence because they can provide data from a large spatial range in a relatively short time with relative ease. Some potential sources of errors in turbulence measurements made with ADCPs include inaccuracy of Doppler-shift measurements, poor temporal and spatial measurement resolution, and inaccuracy of multi-dimensional velocities resolved from one-dimensional velocities measured at separate locations. Results from laboratory measurements of mean velocity and turbulence statistics made with two pulse-coherent ADCPs in 0.87 meters of water are used to illustrate several of inherent sources of error in ADCP turbulence measurements. Results show that processing algorithms and beam configurations have important effects on turbulence measurements. ADCPs can provide reasonable estimates of many turbulence parameters; however, the accuracy of turbulence measurements made with commercially available ADCPs is often poor in comparison to standard measurement techniques.

  18. Breath air measurement using wide-band frequency tuning IR laser photo-acoustic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kistenev, Yury V.; Borisov, Alexey V.; Kuzmin, Dmitry A.; Bulanova, Anna A.; Boyko, Andrey A.; Kostyukova, Nadezhda Y.; Karapuzikov, Alexey A.

    2016-03-01

    The results of measuring of biomarkers in breath air of patients with broncho-pulmonary diseases using wide-band frequency tuning IR laser photo-acoustic spectroscopy and the methods of data mining are presented. We will discuss experimental equipment and various methods of intellectual analysis of the experimental spectra in context of above task. The work was carried out with partial financial support of the FCPIR contract No 14.578.21.0082 (ID RFMEFI57814X0082).

  19. Development of explicit diffraction corrections for absolute measurements of acoustic nonlinearity parameters in the quasilinear regime.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Hyunjo; Zhang, Shuzeng; Cho, Sungjong; Li, Xiongbing

    2016-08-01

    In absolute measurements of acoustic nonlinearity parameters, amplitudes of harmonics must be corrected for diffraction effects. In this study, we develop explicit multi-Gaussian beam (MGB) model-based diffraction corrections for the first three harmonics in weakly nonlinear, axisymmetric sound beams. The effects of making diffraction corrections on nonlinearity parameter estimation are investigated by defining "total diffraction correction (TDC)". The results demonstrate that TDC cannot be neglected even for harmonic generation experiments in the nearfield region.

  20. Correlation of combustor acoustic power levels inferred from internal fluctuating pressure measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonglahn, U. H.

    1978-01-01

    Combustion chamber acoustic power levels inferred from internal fluctuating pressure measurements are correlated with operating conditions and chamber geometries over a wide range. The variables include considerations of chamber design (can, annular, and reverse-flow annular) and size, number of fuel nozzles, burner staging and fuel split, airflow and heat release rates, and chamber inlet pressure and temperature levels. The correlated data include those obtained with combustion component development rigs as well as engines.

  1. Acoustical measurements of expression devices in pipe organs.

    PubMed

    Braasch, Jonas

    2008-03-01

    In this investigation, three different swell systems known in pipe organs, the swell box, the crescendo wheel, and the historic wind swell were measured and compared to each other. The dynamic range of the crescendo wheel was found to be most effective, and for frequencies near 2 kHz the increase in sound pressure level could be up to 50 dB between the softest and the loudest adjustment. The maximum dynamic range for the wind swell and the swell box were found to be 10-20 dB in the same frequency range. With its step-wise crescendo procedure, the crescendo wheel simulates the type of orchestra crescendo which is reached by successively adding further musical instruments. In contrast, the swell box and the wind swell produce a crescendo effect similar to the crescendo in which individual musical instruments perform a dynamic movement. This type of crescendo requires a continuous level increase but allows a smaller dynamic range. The disappearance of the wind swell is not surprising because it offers no advantage over the swell box, while being restricted to stops with free reeds.

  2. [Clinical and radiological evolution of a group of untreated acoustic neuromas].

    PubMed

    Escorihuela-García, Vicente; Llópez-Carratalá, Ignacio; Orts-Alborch, Miguel; Marco-Algarra, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    The acoustic neuroma is a benign tumour that originates in the vestibular branch of the eighth cranial nerve. The main treatment is surgery, but many authors suggest that with elderly patients or in small neuromas we can opt for watchful waiting. This was a retrospective study from 2007 to 2013 that included 27 patients diagnosed of acoustic neuroma that had not been treated due to the size of the tumour, age and comorbidities, or by patient choice. We evaluated overall condition, hearing thresholds, degree of canal paresis and central disorders. After 6 years of follow up, clinical manifestations of 18 patients remained unchanged, 5 patients underwent hearing loss and developed tinnitus, 2 cases had more intense tinnitus and 2 cases had dizziness. The radiological controls by magnetic resonance imaging showed that the initial maximum diameters (5-16mm) increased by 1.7mm on average, with annual growth rates below 0.5mm. In selected cases, such as for small neuromas and in elderly patients, the conservative option of close monitoring with magnetic resonance imaging is an important alternative given that, in our cases, clinical features and radiological image did not suffer major changes. If there were any such changes, therapeutic options could be proposed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. y Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Patología Cérvico-Facial. All rights reserved.

  3. Discharge measurements using a broad-band acoustic Doppler current profiler

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simpson, Michael R.

    2002-01-01

    The measurement of unsteady or tidally affected flow has been a problem faced by hydrologists for many years. Dynamic discharge conditions impose an unreasonably short time constraint on conventional current-meter discharge-measurement methods, which typically last a minimum of 1 hour. Tidally affected discharge can change more than 100 percent during a 10-minute period. Over the years, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has developed moving-boat discharge-measurement techniques that are much faster but less accurate than conventional methods. For a bibliography of conventional moving-boat publications, see Simpson and Oltmann (1993, page 17). The advent of the acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) made possible the development of a discharge-measurement system capable of more accurately measuring unsteady or tidally affected flow. In most cases, an ADCP discharge-measurement system is dramatically faster than conventional discharge-measurement systems, and has comparable or better accuracy. In many cases, an ADCP discharge-measurement system is the only choice for use at a particular measurement site. ADCP systems are not yet ?turnkey;? they are still under development, and for proper operation, require a significant amount of operator training. Not only must the operator have a rudimentary knowledge of acoustic physics, but also a working knowledge of ADCP operation, the manufacturer's discharge-measurement software, and boating techniques and safety.

  4. [Clinical research=design*measurements*statistical analyses].

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Toshiaki

    2012-06-01

    A clinical study must address true endpoints that matter for the patients and the doctors. A good clinical study starts with a good clinical question. Formulating a clinical question in the form of PECO can sharpen one's original question. In order to perform a good clinical study one must have a knowledge of study design, measurements and statistical analyses: The first is taught by epidemiology, the second by psychometrics and the third by biostatistics.

  5. Granular Shear Zone Formation: Acoustic Emission Measurements and Fiber-bundle Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michlmayr, Gernot; Or, Dani

    2013-04-01

    We couple the acoustic emissions method with conceptual models of granular material behavior for investigation of granular shear zone formation and to assess eminence of landslide hazard. When granular materials are mechanically loaded or sheared, they tend to produce discrete events of force network restructuring, and frictional interaction at grain contacts. Such abrupt perturbations within the granular lattice release part of the elastic energy stored in the strained material. Elastic waves generated by such events can be measured as acoustic emissions (AE) and may be used as surrogates for intermittent structural transitions associated with shear zone formation. To experimentally investigate the connection between granular shearing and acoustic signals we performed an array of strain-controlled shear-frame tests using glass beads. AE were measured with two different systems operating at two frequency ranges. High temporal resolution measurements of the shear stresses revealed the presence of small fluctuations typically associated with low-frequency (< 20 kHz) acoustic bursts. Shear stress jumps and linked acoustic signals give account of discrete events of grain network rearrangements and obey characteristic exponential frequency-size distributions. We found that statistical features of force jumps and AE events depend on mechanical boundary conditions and evolve during the straining process. Activity characteristics of high-frequency (> 30 kHz) AE events is linked to friction between grains. To interpret failure associated AE signals, we adapted a conceptual fiber-bundle model (FBM) that describes some of the salient statistical features of failure and associated energy production. Using FBMs for the abrupt mechanical response of the granular medium and an associated grain and force chain AE generation model provides us with a full description of the mechanical-acoustical granular shearing process. Highly resolved AE may serve as a diagnostic tool not only

  6. Acoustical measurements of DOE/NASA MOD-0 wind turbine at Plum Brook Station, Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Etter, C.L.; Kelley, N.D.; McKenna, H.E.; Linn, C.; Garrelts, R.

    1983-06-01

    This report documents the evaluation of low-frequency acoustic emissions associated with the operation of the DOE/NASA MOD-0 wind turbine generator located at Plum Brook Station, Ohio. These measurements were taken as part of a joint SERI/NASA Brook Station, Ohio. These measurements were taken as part of a joint SERI/NASA effort to study acoustic noise generation by utility-sized wind turbines. The machine-operating conditions closely simulated the operation of the larger DOE/NASA MOD-1 wind turbine installed near Boone, NC, in both its design downwind configuration and theoretical upwind mode. Measurement results indicated that acoustic impulses characteristic of the MOD-1 turbine were detectable only with a downwind configuration and a 35-rpm rotor speed, a situation which parallels a 23-rpm rotor speed operation on the MOD-1. Under the available meteorological conditions, no impulses were detected during downwind 23 rpm or by wind-induced noise, indicating a severe limitation of the microphone configuration used in these tests.

  7. Optimizing stepwise rotation of dodecahedron sound source to improve the accuracy of room acoustic measures.

    PubMed

    Martellotta, Francesco

    2013-09-01

    Dodecahedron sound sources are widely used for acoustical measurement purposes as they produce a good approximation of omnidirectional radiation. Evidence shows that such an assumption is acceptable only in the low-frequency range (namely below 1 kHz), while at higher frequencies sound radiation is far from being uniform. In order to improve the accuracy of acoustical measurements obtained from dodecahedron sources, international standard ISO 3382 suggests an averaging of results after a source rotation. This paper investigates the effects of such rotations, both in terms of variations in acoustical parameters and spatial distribution of sound reflections. Taking advantage of a spherical microphone array, the different reflection patterns were mapped as a function of source rotation, showing that some reflections may be considerably attenuated for different aiming directions. This paper investigates the concept of averaging results while changing rotation angles and the minimum number of rotations required to improve the accuracy of the average value. Results show that averages of three measurements carried out at 30° angular steps are closer to actual values and show much less fluctuation. In addition, an averaging of the directional intensity components of the selected responses stabilizes the spatial distribution of the reflections.

  8. The Application of Acoustic Measurements and Audio Recordings for Diagnosis of In-Flight Hardware Anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welsh, David; Denham, Samuel; Allen, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    In many cases, an initial symptom of hardware malfunction is unusual or unexpected acoustic noise. Many industries such as automotive, heating and air conditioning, and petro-chemical processing use noise and vibration data along with rotating machinery analysis techniques to identify noise sources and correct hardware defects. The NASA/Johnson Space Center Acoustics Office monitors the acoustic environment of the International Space Station (ISS) through periodic sound level measurement surveys. Trending of the sound level measurement survey results can identify in-flight hardware anomalies. The crew of the ISS also serves as a "detection tool" in identifying unusual hardware noises; in these cases the spectral analysis of audio recordings made on orbit can be used to identify hardware defects that are related to rotating components such as fans, pumps, and compressors. In this paper, three examples of the use of sound level measurements and audio recordings for the diagnosis of in-flight hardware anomalies are discussed: identification of blocked inter-module ventilation (IMV) ducts, diagnosis of abnormal ISS Crew Quarters rack exhaust fan noise, and the identification and replacement of a defective flywheel assembly in the Treadmill with Vibration Isolation (TVIS) hardware. In each of these examples, crew time was saved by identifying the off nominal component or condition that existed and in directing in-flight maintenance activities to address and correct each of these problems.

  9. In situ Probe Microphone Measurement for Testing the Direct Acoustical Cochlear Stimulator.

    PubMed

    Stieger, Christof; Alnufaily, Yasser H; Candreia, Claudia; Caversaccio, Marco D; Arnold, Andreas M

    2017-01-01

    Hypothesis: Acoustical measurements can be used for functional control of a direct acoustic cochlear stimulator (DACS). Background: The DACS is a recently released active hearing implant that works on the principle of a conventional piston prosthesis driven by the rod of an electromagnetic actuator. An inherent part of the DACS actuator is a thin titanium diaphragm that allows for movement of the stimulation rod while hermetically sealing the housing. In addition to mechanical stimulation, the actuator emits sound into the mastoid cavity because of the motion of the diaphragm. Methods: We investigated the use of the sound emission of a DACS for intra-operative testing. We measured sound emission in the external auditory canal (PEAC) and velocity of the actuators stimulation rod (Vact) in five implanted ears of whole-head specimens. We tested the influence various positions of the loudspeaker and a probe microphone on PEAC and simulated implant malfunction in one example. Results: Sound emission of the DACS with a signal-to-noise ratio >10 dB was observed between 0.5 and 5 kHz. Simulated implant misplacement or malfunction could be detected by the absence or shift in the characteristic resonance frequency of the actuator. PEAC changed by <6 dB for variations of the microphone and loudspeaker position. Conclusion: Our data support the feasibility of acoustical measurements for in situ testing of the DACS implant in the mastoid cavity as well as for post-operative monitoring of actuator function.

  10. In situ Probe Microphone Measurement for Testing the Direct Acoustical Cochlear Stimulator

    PubMed Central

    Stieger, Christof; Alnufaily, Yasser H.; Candreia, Claudia; Caversaccio, Marco D.; Arnold, Andreas M.

    2017-01-01

    Hypothesis: Acoustical measurements can be used for functional control of a direct acoustic cochlear stimulator (DACS). Background: The DACS is a recently released active hearing implant that works on the principle of a conventional piston prosthesis driven by the rod of an electromagnetic actuator. An inherent part of the DACS actuator is a thin titanium diaphragm that allows for movement of the stimulation rod while hermetically sealing the housing. In addition to mechanical stimulation, the actuator emits sound into the mastoid cavity because of the motion of the diaphragm. Methods: We investigated the use of the sound emission of a DACS for intra-operative testing. We measured sound emission in the external auditory canal (PEAC) and velocity of the actuators stimulation rod (Vact) in five implanted ears of whole-head specimens. We tested the influence various positions of the loudspeaker and a probe microphone on PEAC and simulated implant malfunction in one example. Results: Sound emission of the DACS with a signal-to-noise ratio >10 dB was observed between 0.5 and 5 kHz. Simulated implant misplacement or malfunction could be detected by the absence or shift in the characteristic resonance frequency of the actuator. PEAC changed by <6 dB for variations of the microphone and loudspeaker position. Conclusion: Our data support the feasibility of acoustical measurements for in situ testing of the DACS implant in the mastoid cavity as well as for post-operative monitoring of actuator function. PMID:28860963

  11. Design and Instrumentation of a Measurement and Calibration System for an Acoustic Telemetry System

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Zhiqun; Weiland, Mark A.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Eppard, M. B.

    2010-03-31

    The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) is an active sensing technology developed by Portland District, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers for detecting and tracking small fish. It is used at hydroelectric projects and in the laboratory for evaluating behavior and survival of juvenile salmonids migrating through the Federal Columbia River Power System to the Pacific Ocean. It provides critical data for salmon protection and development of more “fish-friendly” hydroelectric facilities. The objective of this study was to design and build a measurement and calibration system for evaluating the JSATS component, because the JSATS requires comprehensive acceptance and performance testing in a controlled environment before it is deployed in the field. The system consists of a reference transducer, a water test tank lined with anechoic material, a motion control unit, a reference receiver, a signal conditioner and amplifier unit, a data acquisition board, MATLAB control and analysis interface, and a computer. The fully integrated system has been evaluated successfully at various simulated distances and using different encoded signals at frequencies within the bandwidth of the JSATS transmitter. It provides accurate acoustic mapping capability in a controlled environment and automates the process that allows real-time measurements and evaluation of the piezoelectric transducers, sensors, or the acoustic fields. The measurement and calibration system has been in use since 2009 for acceptance and performance testing of, and further improvements to, the JSATS.

  12. Air-coupled acoustic radiation force source for non-contact measurement of soft media elasticity (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambroziński, Lukasz; Pelivanov, Ivan; Song, Shaozhen; Yoon, Soon Joon; Li, David S.; Gao, Liang; Shen, Tueng T.; Wang, Ruikang K.; O'Donnell, Matthew

    2017-04-01

    Acoustic radiation force (ARF) is commonly used in ultrasound (US)-based elastography to generate shear waves deep within soft tissue. These waves can be detected with different methods, e.g. contact conventional ultrasound imaging probes or contact free magnetic resonance or optical coherence tomography (OCT). For many clinical applications, however, for instance the eye, a totally non-contact system for generation/detection of mechanical waves is needed. Here, we present a method for efficient non-contact excitation of broadband transverse mechanical waves in soft media. The approach is based on pushing the medium under study with a 1 MHz chirped US wave focused to its surface from air. The US beam reflected from the air/medium interface provides the ARF force to the medium surface launching a transient mechanical wave in the transverse (lateral) direction. The design and performance of the air-coupled transducer is discussed. The focal zone, peak pressure and acoustic intensity are measured for transducers with different numerical apertures. Time and frequency characteristics of the propagating mechanical waves, generated in soft tissue, are tracked with a phase-sensitive ultra-fast frame rate OCT imaging system. Application of the proposed method for non-contact, non-invasive, sub-mm resolution elasticity measurement in soft tissue is proposed.

  13. Measuring discharge with acoustic Doppler current profilers from a moving boat

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mueller, David S.; Wagner, Chad R.; Rehmel, Michael S.; Oberg, Kevin A.; Rainville, Francois

    2013-01-01

    The use of acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) from a moving boat is now a commonly used method for measuring streamflow. The technology and methods for making ADCP-based discharge measurements are different from the technology and methods used to make traditional discharge measurements with mechanical meters. Although the ADCP is a valuable tool for measuring streamflow, it is only accurate when used with appropriate techniques. This report presents guidance on the use of ADCPs for measuring streamflow; this guidance is based on the experience of U.S. Geological Survey employees and published reports, papers, and memorandums of the U.S. Geological Survey. The guidance is presented in a logical progression, from predeployment planning, to field data collection, and finally to post processing of the collected data. Acoustic Doppler technology and the instruments currently (2013) available also are discussed to highlight the advantages and limitations of the technology. More in-depth, technical explanations of how an ADCP measures streamflow and what to do when measuring in moving-bed conditions are presented in the appendixes. ADCP users need to know the proper procedures for measuring discharge from a moving boat and why those procedures are required, so that when the user encounters unusual field conditions, the procedures can be adapted without sacrificing the accuracy of the streamflow-measurement data.

  14. Complete velocity distribution in river cross-sections measured by acoustic instruments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cheng, R.T.; Gartner, J.W.; ,

    2003-01-01

    To fully understand the hydraulic properties of natural rivers, velocity distribution in the river cross-section should be studied in detail. The measurement task is not straightforward because there is not an instrument that can measure the velocity distribution covering the entire cross-section. Particularly, the velocities in regions near the free surface and in the bottom boundary layer are difficult to measure, and yet the velocity properties in these regions play the most significant role in characterizing the hydraulic properties. To further characterize river hydraulics, two acoustic instruments, namely, an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP), and a "BoogieDopp" (BD) were used on fixed platforms to measure the detailed velocity profiles across the river. Typically, 20 to 25 stations were used to represent a river cross-section. At each station, water velocity profiles were measured independently and/or concurrently by an ADCP and a BD. The measured velocity properties were compared and used in computation of river discharge. In a tow-tank evaluation of a BD, it has been confirmed that BD is capable of measuring water velocity at about 11 cm below the free-surface. Therefore, the surface velocity distribution across the river was extracted from the BD velocity measurements and used to compute the river discharge. These detailed velocity profiles and the composite velocity distribution were used to assess the validity of the classic theories of velocity distributions, conventional river discharge measurement methods, and for estimates of channel bottom roughness.

  15. Can changes in parentally measured acoustic reflectometry levels predict the middle ear status?

    PubMed

    Erkkola-Anttinen, Nora; Laine, Miia K; Tähtinen, Paula A; Ruohola, Aino

    2017-04-01

    Spectral gradient acoustic reflectometry (SG-AR) may be used to detect middle ear effusion. Our aim was to investigate whether increasing SG-AR levels between two SG-AR examinations indicate deterioration from a healthy middle ear to acute otitis media (AOM). We enrolled 185 children (age 6-35 months) whose parents were willing to use the SG-AR at home daily. Measurement pairs of parental home SG-AR examination results were generated and analyzed. There was one SG-AR examination result obtained within ±1 day of the reference visit and another result within ±1 day of the subsequent visit. We defined the SG-AR level as increasing when the difference between two measurements was ≥2 levels from a lower to a higher level, suggesting development of AOM. When the SG-AR level difference was ≤1, we defined this no change of the SG-AR level. The middle ear diagnosis was determined by pneumatic otoscopy at the study clinic. 361 paired SG-AR home measurements were obtained. The reference measurement was related to a healthy middle ear as determined by pneumatic otoscopy. Increasing SG-AR levels (59/361), were 63% (95% CI 50%-74%) sensitive and 94% (91%-97%) specific for deterioration of a healthy middle ear to AOM. The positive predictive value was 71% (58%-82%) and the negative predictive value was 92% (88%-95%). When there was no SG-AR level difference between the SG-AR examinations, the corresponding figures were 88% (95% CI 84%-92%), 69% (56%-79%), 93% (89%-95%) and 57% (45%-68%), respectively. This study shows that increasing SG-AR levels might not be sufficiently sensitive to detect deterioration of the middle ear status from healthy middle ear to AOM in symptomatic children. Importantly, however, the development of AOM seems to be unlikely in an initially healthy middle ear when there is no difference between the SG-AR levels in two separate measurements. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Measurement in Renal Transplantation: A Prospective, Longitudinal Study With Protocol Biopsies.

    PubMed

    Lee, Juhan; Oh, Young Taik; Joo, Dong Jin; Ma, Bo Gyoung; Lee, A-lan; Lee, Jae Geun; Song, Seung Hwan; Kim, Seung Up; Jung, Dae Chul; Chung, Yong Eun; Kim, Yu Seun

    2015-09-01

    Interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy (IF/TA) is a common cause of kidney allograft loss. Several noninvasive techniques developed to assess tissue fibrosis are widely used to examine the liver. However, relatively few studies have investigated the use of elastographic methods to assess transplanted kidneys. The aim of this study was to explore the clinical implications of the acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) technique in renal transplant patients. A total of 91 patients who underwent living donor renal transplantation between September 2010 and January 2013 were included in this prospective study. Shear wave velocity (SWV) was measured by ARFI at baseline and predetermined time points (1 week and 6 and 12 months after transplantation). Protocol biopsies were performed at 12 months. Instead of reflecting IF/TA, SWVs were found to be related to time elapsed after transplantation. Mean SWV increased continuously during the first postoperative year (P < 0.001). In addition, mixed model analysis showed no correlation existed between SWV and serum creatinine (r = -0.2426, P = 0.0771). There was also no evidence of a relationship between IF/TA and serum creatinine (odds ratio [OR] = 1.220, P = 0.7648). Furthermore, SWV temporal patterns were dependent on the kidney weight to body weight ratio (KW/BW). In patients with a KW/BW < 3.5 g/kg, mean SWV continuously increased for 12 months, whereas it decreased after 6 months in those with a KW/BW ≥ 3.5 g/kg.No significant correlation was observed between SWV and IF/TA or renal dysfunction. However, SWV was found to be related to the time after transplantation. Renal hemodynamics influenced by KW/BW might impact SWV values.

  17. Liquid mercury sound velocity measurements under high pressure and high temperature by picosecond acoustics in a diamond anvils cell.

    PubMed

    Decremps, F; Belliard, L; Couzinet, B; Vincent, S; Munsch, P; Le Marchand, G; Perrin, B

    2009-07-01

    Recent improvements to measure ultrasonic sound velocities of liquids under extreme conditions are described. Principle and feasibility of picosecond acoustics in liquids embedded in a diamond anvils cell are given. To illustrate the capability of these advances in the sound velocity measurement technique, original high pressure and high temperature results on the sound velocity of liquid mercury up to 5 GPa and 575 K are given. This high pressure technique will certainly be useful in several fundamental and applied problems in physics and many other fields such as geophysics, nonlinear acoustics, underwater sound, petrology or physical acoustics.

  18. Acoustic measurement method of the volume flux of a seafloor hydrothermal plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, G.; Jackson, D. R.; Bemis, K. G.; Rona, P. A.

    2011-12-01

    Measuring fluxes (volume, chemical, heat, etc.) of the deep sea hydrothermal vents has been a crucial but challenging task faced by the scientific community since the discovery of the vent systems. However, the great depths and complexities of the hydrothermal vents make traditional sampling methods laborious and almost daunting missions. Furthermore, the samples, in most cases both sparse in space and sporadic in time, are hardly enough to provide a result with moderate uncertainty. In September 2010, our Cabled Observatory Vent Imaging Sonar System (COVIS, http://vizlab.rutgers.edu/AcoustImag/covis.html) was connected to the Neptune Canada underwater ocean observatory network (http://www.neptunecanada.ca) at the Main Endeavour vent field on the Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. During the experiment, the COVIS system produced 3D images of the buoyant plume discharged from the vent complex Grotto by measuring the back-scattering intensity of the acoustic signal. Building on the methodology developed in our previous work, the vertical flow velocity of the plume is estimated from the Doppler shift of the acoustic signal using geometric correction to compensate for the ambient horizontal currents. A Gaussian distribution curve is fitted to the horizontal back-scattering intensity profile to determine the back-scattering intensity at the boundary of the plume. Such a boundary value is used as the threshold in a window function for separating the plume from background signal. Finally, the volume flux is obtained by integrating the resulting 2D vertical velocity profile over the horizontal cross-section of the plume. In this presentation, we discuss preliminary results from the COVIS experiment. In addition, several alternative approaches are applied to determination of the accuracy of the estimated plume vertical velocity in the absence of direct measurements. First, the results from our previous experiment (conducted in 2000 at the same vent complex using a

  19. A Synthetic Test of Precision in GPS/Acoustic Measurements of Seafloor Positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kido, M.; Sweeney, A. D.; Osada, Y.; Fujimoto, H.; Miura, S.

    2004-12-01

    In this decade, much efforts have been made in detecting seafloor movement using GPS/Acoustic ranging method. GPS/Acoustic measurement consists of two parts, one is the positioning of a transducer at sea surface using K-GPS and the other is measuring travel-time or slant-range between the transducer and transponders put on ocean bottom using acoustic ranging. Currently precision of the seafloor positioning reaches less than 10cm. Several possible factors arise, which still decrease the precision, such as GPS positioning itself in 1 Hz, interpolating of exact position of the transducer at an arbitrary timing of acoustic measurement, uncertainty of the sound velocity variation both in time and space as well as depth variation due mainly to ocean tide. A linear or spline interpolation can be applied to undulation of the transducer position when GPS antennas and the transducer are equipped on a ship. On the contrary when using a buoy system, one need additional physical sensors to detect flutter of the buoy in higher frequency. For the sound velocity, one can estimate it based on CTD or XCTD/XBT data. However, such data cannot cover entire period and space of observation. In general, sound velocity thought to varies smaller in lateral than in time. Accounting for this nature, Scripps group developed a strategy that set transponders like triangle and make acoustic measurement with the transducer kept laterally equidistant to the transponders. In this method most of laterally stratified component of sound velocity variation in time will be cancelled to determine the center of the triangle. Prior to this measurement, position of individual transponder must be estimated. Error in this estimation will biases the ``absolute'' final position of the center, which is not important to detect the crustal ``relative'' movement, as long as one take the same estimations in the next survey. However this error increase the misfit of travel-time, which results in the final position to

  20. Method and apparatus for measuring surface changes, in porous materials, using multiple differently-configured acoustic sensors

    DOEpatents

    Hietala, Susan Leslie; Hietala, Vincent Mark; Tigges, Chris Phillip

    2001-01-01

    A method and apparatus for measuring surface changes, such as mass uptake at various pressures, in a thin-film material, in particular porous membranes, using multiple differently-configured acoustic sensors.

  1. Acoustic measurements for the combustion diagnosis of diesel engines fuelled with biodiesels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhen, Dong; Wang, Tie; Gu, Fengshou; Tesfa, Belachew; Ball, Andrew

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, an experimental investigation was carried out on the combustion process of a compression ignition (CI) engine running with biodiesel blends under steady state operating conditions. The effects of biodiesel on the combustion process and engine dynamics were analysed for non-intrusive combustion diagnosis based on a four-cylinder, four-stroke, direct injection and turbocharged diesel engine. The signals of vibration, acoustic and in-cylinder pressure were measured simultaneously to find their inter-connection for diagnostic feature extraction. It was found that the sound energy level increases with the increase of engine load and speed, and the sound characteristics are closely correlated with the variation of in-cylinder pressure and combustion process. The continuous wavelet transform (CWT) was employed to analyse the non-stationary nature of engine noise in a higher frequency range. Before the wavelet analysis, time synchronous average (TSA) was used to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the acoustic signal by suppressing the components which are asynchronous. Based on the root mean square (RMS) values of CWT coefficients, the effects of biodiesel fractions and operating conditions (speed and load) on combustion process and engine dynamics were investigated. The result leads to the potential of airborne acoustic measurements and analysis for engine condition monitoring and fuel quality evaluation.

  2. Rotating rake design for unique measurement of fan-generated spinning acoustic modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Konno, Kevin E.; Hausmann, Clifford R.

    1993-01-01

    In light of the current emphasis on noise reduction in subsonic aircraft design, NASA has been actively studying the source of and propagation of noise generated by subsonic fan engines. NASA/LeRC has developed and tested a unique method of accurately measuring these spinning acoustic modes generated by an experimental fan. This mode measuring method is based on the use of a rotating microphone rake. Testing was conducted in the 9 x 15 Low-speed Wind Tunnel. The rotating rake was tested with the Advanced Ducted Propeller (ADP) model. This memorandum discusses the design and performance of the motor/drive system for the fan-synchronized rotating acoustic rake. This novel motor/drive design approach is now being adapted for additional acoustic mode studies in new test rigs as baseline data for the future design of active noise control for subsonic fan engines. Included in this memorandum are the research requirements, motor/drive specifications, test performance results, and a description of the controls and software involved.

  3. Design and Instrumentation of a Measurement and Calibration System for an Acoustic Telemetry System

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Zhiqun; Weiland, Mark; Carlson, Thomas; Eppard, M. Brad

    2010-01-01

    The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) is an active sensing technology developed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District, for detecting and tracking small fish. It is used primarily for evaluating behavior and survival of juvenile salmonids migrating through the Federal Columbia River Power System to the Pacific Ocean. It provides critical data for salmon protection and development of more “fish-friendly” hydroelectric facilities. The objective of this study was to design and build a Measurement and Calibration System (MCS) for evaluating the JSATS components, because the JSATS requires comprehensive acceptance and performance testing in a controlled environment before it is deployed in the field. The MCS consists of a reference transducer, a water test tank lined with anechoic material, a motion control unit, a reference receiver, a signal conditioner and amplifier unit, a data acquisition board, MATLAB control and analysis interface, and a computer. The fully integrated MCS has been evaluated successfully at various simulated distances and using different encoded signals at frequencies within the bandwidth of the JSATS transmitter. The MCS provides accurate acoustic mapping capability in a controlled environment and automates the process that allows real-time measurements and evaluation of the piezoelectric transducers, sensors, or the acoustic fields. The MCS has been in use since 2009 for acceptance and performance testing of, and further improvements to, the JSATS. PMID:22319288

  4. Acoustic Measurement of Suspended Sediment Flux Over Ripples and Dunes in Unidirectional Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, G.; Hay, A. E.; Zedel, L. J.

    2016-02-01

    In May 2015, an experiment was conducted in the main channel flume at the St. Anthony Falls Laboratory, to measure suspended- and bed-load sediment transport using a multi-frequency acoustic Doppler instrument (MFDop). The flume was operated with 1 meter water depth over a 50 cm thick bed of naturally-sourced medium sand. The flume uses water diverted from the Mississippi River. Therefore, the experiment closely simulated realistic field conditions, including high flow rates, turbid water, and sediment grain size variability. A series of experiments was conducted at different flow rates, ranging from the threshold of sediment transport ( 1000 L/s) up to a regime with 2 meter wavelength sand ripples ( 2000 L/s). At each flow rate, the MFDop was used to measure profiles of multi-frequency acoustic backscatter and 3-component velocity, from bed level to 10's of cm above-bed, in 4 mm range bins and at 30 Hz sampling rate. A rotary sonar was used to monitor the migration of bedforms under the MFDop during the data collection, until a full ripple phase had been observed. These data are used to quantify the statistics of time-resolved near-bed sediment suspension and flux at different ripple phases, via inversion of a model for multi-frequency acoustic backscatter amplitude as a function of grain size and concentration.

  5. A novel sensor for measuring the acoustic pressure in buried plastic water pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muggleton, J. M.; Brennan, M. J.; Pinnington, R. J.; Gao, Y.

    2006-08-01

    Acoustic techniques are widely used to locate leaks in buried water pipes. However, difficulties are often encountered when attempting to detect a leak in a plastic pipe, as the leak noise signals attenuate very rapidly away from the leak. Identifying suitable sensors which can be easily deployed and are sufficiently sensitive has been problematic. Polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) wire ring sensors have been proposed and demonstrated successfully in laboratory conditions previously. Here it is proposed that the ring sensor is used in a modified configuration: a flexible hose instrumented with the ring sensor is connected to the pipe, via a fire hydrant or other standard access point. Some theoretical modelling has been carried out, which predicts that the acoustic pressure in the main pipe transmits well into the sidebranch, whilst the pressure in the main pipe is largely unaffected. This suggests that PVDF wire located on the sidebranch will effectively monitor the pressure in the main pipe. Moreover, if the sidebranch is sufficiently flexible, substantial sensitivity gains can be made using this configuration compared with locating the wire on the main pipe. Measurements made in the laboratory on a medium density polyethylene (MDPE) finite pipe with a polythene sidebranch connected to it confirm that the acoustic pressure in the main pipe can indeed be measured on the sidebranch. The expected sensitivity gains were not fully realized, and a number of different reasons for this are proposed.

  6. Evaluation of stage acoustics in Seoul Arts Center Concert Hall by measuring stage support.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jin Yong; Barron, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Stage acoustics is an important characteristic for concert halls, both for the acoustic quality on stage and for the audience. However, relatively little research has been conducted into the question. This study was based on the investigation of an actual concert hall stage, that of the Seoul Arts Center Concert Hall in Korea. The stage acoustics was evaluated in the actual hall, and with two models: a 1:25 scale model and a computer model. The study was based on the stage support parameter ST1 proposed by Gade as a measure of support for individual performers [Acustica 65, 193-203 (1989)]. The variation of support was measured on the empty stage of the actual hall and in the two models. The effect of musicians on stage, the effect of moving the orchestra, the effect of ceiling height and of stage-wall profile were also investigated. Conclusions are drawn both relating to the Seoul Concert Hall stage and stages in general.

  7. Design and instrumentation of a measurement and calibration system for an acoustic telemetry system.

    PubMed

    Deng, Zhiqun; Weiland, Mark; Carlson, Thomas; Eppard, M Brad

    2010-01-01

    The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) is an active sensing technology developed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District, for detecting and tracking small fish. It is used primarily for evaluating behavior and survival of juvenile salmonids migrating through the Federal Columbia River Power System to the Pacific Ocean. It provides critical data for salmon protection and development of more "fish-friendly" hydroelectric facilities. The objective of this study was to design and build a Measurement and Calibration System (MCS) for evaluating the JSATS components, because the JSATS requires comprehensive acceptance and performance testing in a controlled environment before it is deployed in the field. The MCS consists of a reference transducer, a water test tank lined with anechoic material, a motion control unit, a reference receiver, a signal conditioner and amplifier unit, a data acquisition board, MATLAB control and analysis interface, and a computer. The fully integrated MCS has been evaluated successfully at various simulated distances and using different encoded signals at frequencies within the bandwidth of the JSATS transmitter. The MCS provides accurate acoustic mapping capability in a controlled environment and automates the process that allows real-time measurements and evaluation of the piezoelectric transducers, sensors, or the acoustic fields. The MCS has been in use since 2009 for acceptance and performance testing of, and further improvements to, the JSATS.

  8. Acoustic harmonic generation measurement applications: Detection of tight cracks in powder metallurgy compacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnard, D. J.; Foley, J. C.

    2000-05-01

    Standard linear ultrasonic testing techniques have long been employed for locating and characterizing relatively open cracks in a wide variety of materials, from metallic alloys and ceramics to composites. In all these materials, the detection of open cracks easily accomplished because the void between the two crack surfaces provides sufficient acoustic impedance mismatch to reflect the incident energy. Closed or partially closed cracks, however, may often go undetected because contacting interfaces allow transmission of ultrasound. In the green (unsintered) state, powder metallurgy compacts typically contain high residual stresses that have the ability to close cracks formed during the compaction process, a result of oxide films, improper powder lubricant, mold design, etc. After sintering, the reduction of residual stresses may no longer be sufficient to close the crack. Although the crack may be more easily detected, it is obvious most desirable to discover defects prior to sintering. It has been shown that the displacements of an interface may be highly nonlinear if a stress wave of sufficient intensity propagates across it, a result of the stress wave either opening or closing the interface. Current efforts involve the application of nonlinear acoustic techniques, in particular acoustic harmonic generation measurements, for the detection and characterization of tightly closed cracks in powder metallurgy parts. A description of the equipment and the measurement technique will be discussed and initial experimental results on sintered and green compacts will be presented.—This work was performed at the Ames Laboratory, Iowa State University under USDOE Contract No. W-7405-ENG-82.

  9. Acoustic measurements on aerofoils moving in a circle at high speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, S. E.; Crosby, W.; Lee, D. L.

    1982-04-01

    Features of the test apparatus, research objectives and sample test results at the Stanford University rotor aerodynamics and noise facility are described. A steel frame equipped to receive lead shot for damping vibrations supports the drive shaft for rotor blade elements. Sleeve bearings are employed to assure quietness, and a variable speed ac motor produces the rotations. The test stand can be configured for horizontal or vertical orientation of the drive shaft. The entire assembly is housed in an acoustically sealed room. Rotation conditions for hover and large angles of attack can be studied, together with rotational and blade element noises. Research is possible on broad band, discrete frequency, and high speed noise, with measurements taken 3 m from the center of the rotor. Acoustic signatures from Mach 0.3-0.93 trials with a NACA 0012 airfoil are provided.

  10. Measurements of Finite Dust Temperature Effects in the Dispersion Relation of the Dust Acoustic Wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snipes, Erica; Williams, Jeremiah

    2009-04-01

    A dusty plasma is a four-component system composed of ions, electrons, neutral particles and charged microparticles. The presence of these charged microparticles gives rise to new plasma wave modes, including the dust acoustic wave. Recent measurements [1, 2] of the dispersion relationship for the dust acoustic wave in a glow discharge have shown that finite temperature effects are observed at higher values of neutral pressure. Other work [3] has shown that these effects are not observed at lower values of neutral pressure. We present the results of ongoing work examining finite temperature effects in the dispersion relation as a function of neutral pressure. [4pt] [1] E. Thomas, Jr., R. Fisher, and R. L. Merlino, Phys. Plasmas 14, 123701 (2007). [0pt] [2] J. D. Williams, E. Thomas Jr., and L. Marcus, Phys. Plasmas 15, 043704 (2008). [0pt] [3] T. Trottenberg, D. Block, and A. Piel, Phys. Plasmas 13, 042105 (2006).

  11. A Tool Measuring Remaining Thickness of Notched Acoustic Cavities in Primary Reaction Control Thruster NDI Standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Yushi; Sun, Changhong; Zhu, Harry; Wincheski, Buzz

    2006-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking in the relief radius area of a space shuttle primary reaction control thruster is an issue of concern. The current approach for monitoring of potential crack growth is nondestructive inspection (NDI) of remaining thickness (RT) to the acoustic cavities using an eddy current or remote field eddy current probe. EDM manufacturers have difficulty in providing accurate RT calibration standards. Significant error in the RT values of NDI calibration standards could lead to a mistaken judgment of cracking condition of a thruster under inspection. A tool based on eddy current principle has been developed to measure the RT at each acoustic cavity of a calibration standard in order to validate that the standard meets the sample design criteria.

  12. An impulse test technique with application to acoustic measurements. [for engine noise absorbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salikuddin, M.; Dean, P. D.; Plumblee, H. E., Jr.; Ahuja, K. K.

    1979-01-01

    A method has been presented for measuring the acoustic properties of an absorbent material and a duct/nozzle system (with or without airflow) using a high voltage spark discharge as an impulse source of sound. The cross-spectra of the incident, reflected and transmitted acoustic pressure transients are analyzed by way of a FFT digital processor in the form of complex transfer functions. These transfer functions have a direct relationship to the termination impedance and radiation directivity. The impulse method has been justified by comparisons, with data obtained from existing methods (both experimental and theoretical), that show excellent agreement. Reflection coefficients and radiation impedances of various duct-nozzle systems and their associated far-field directivities are also presented as some of the applications of the impulse technique.

  13. Measuring Clinical Significance in Rehabilitation Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Erica K.; Dow, Christian; Lynch, Ruth T.; Hermann, Bruce P.

    2006-01-01

    Measurement of clinically significant change is critical for rehabilitation research because it can enhance the credibility of rehabilitation efforts and guide evidence-based practices. The practical appeal of clinically significant change is that it can bridge research and clinical practice by focusing on individual rather than group differences.…

  14. Impact of acoustic velocity structure to measurement of ocean bottom crustal deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikuta, R.; Tadokoro, K.; Okuda, T.; Sugimoto, S.; Watanabe, T.; Eto, S.; Ando, M.

    2010-12-01

    We are developing a geodetic method of monitoring crustal deformation under the ocean using kinematic GPS and acoustic ranging. The goal of our research is to achieve sub-centimeter accuracy in measuring oceanic crustal deformation by a very short-time measurement like 10 hours. In this study, we focused on lateral variation of acoustic velocity structure in seawater and introduced an inclined acoustic velocity structure model to improve accuracy of the measurement. We have a few measurement sites along Nankai trough, Japan. In each sites, we deployed a trio of transponders on ocean floor (seafloor benchmark units) within distance comparable with the depth. An ultrasonic signal is generated from a surface vessel drifting over the benchmark unit, which is received and replied by the benchmark unit. In this system, both acoustic velocity structure and the benchmark unit positions were determined simultaneously for the each measurement using a tomographic technique. This tomographic technique was adopted on an assumption that the acoustic velocity structure is horizontally layered and changes only in time, not in space. Ikuta et al., (AGU fall meeting 2009) reported an approach to improve accuracy of benchmark positioning using a new additional assumption. The additional assumption was that the configuration of the transponders trio constituting one benchmark unit does not change. They determined the time evolution of weight center for the fixed transponder triangle between different measurements using all repetitively obtained data sets at once. This is contrasting to the previous method in which each data set for different measurement was solved independently. This assumption worked well in reducing number of unknown parameters. As a result, repeatability of benchmark positioning improved from 5 cm to 3 cm. We conducted numerical experiments synthesizing acoustic travel-time data to evaluate the robustness of this new approach. When acoustic travel-time data is

  15. A more precise, repeatable and diagnostic alternative to surface electromyography - an appraisal of the clinical utility of acoustic myography.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Adrian P

    2017-03-02

    Acoustic myography (AMG) enables a detailed and accurate measurement of those muscles involved in a particular movement and is independent of electrical signals between the nerve and muscle, measuring solely muscle contractions, unlike surface electromyography (sEMG). With modern amplifiers and digital sound recording systems, measurements during physical activity both inside and outside a laboratory setting are now possible and accurate. Muscle sound gives a representation of the work of each muscle group during a complex movement, and under certain forms of movement even reveals both concentric and eccentric activity, something that sEMG is incapable of. Recent findings suggest that AMG has a number of advantages over sEMG, being simple to use, accurate and repeatable as well as being intuitive to interpret. The AMG signal comprises three physiological parameters, namely efficiency/coordination (E-score), spatial summation (S-score) and temporal summation (T-score). It is concluded that modern AMG units have the potential to accurately assess patients with neuromuscular and musculoskeletal complaints in hospital clinics, home monitoring situations as well as sports settings. © 2017 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. A noncontacting method for measuring sheet grammage and thickness using acoustic pulse techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuohelainen, Reijo Antero

    A new way to use an acoustic pulse transmission method to measure the basis weight and the thickness of paper and other thin materials was developed. The apparatus consisted of a sound source, a microphone, a digital oscilloscope, and a microcomputer. A short acoustic tone burst is transmitted through the sample and the transmission loss is defined as the ratio of the receiver voltage amplitude measured with the sample present to the voltage amplitude measured without the sample. This attenuation is a function of the basis weight of the sample and of the frequency used in the measurement. Different types of paper and plastic foils were measured with good accuracy. The measurement frequencies vary from 5 kHz to 40 kHz depending on the sample parameters. With the optimum frequency for the specific sample the accuracy is about +/-1% and the resolution is 0.5% of the grammage of the sample. This system can be used to measure both transparent and opaque foils, which makes it useful for many industrial and laboratory applications.

  17. Acoustic Measures of Voice and Physiologic Measures of Autonomic Arousal during Speech as a Function of Cognitive Load.

    PubMed

    MacPherson, Megan K; Abur, Defne; Stepp, Cara E

    2017-07-01

    This study aimed to determine the relationship among cognitive load condition and measures of autonomic arousal and voice production in healthy adults. A prospective study design was conducted. Sixteen healthy young adults (eight men, eight women) produced a sentence containing an embedded Stroop task in each of two cognitive load conditions: congruent and incongruent. In both conditions, participants said the font color of the color words instead of the word text. In the incongruent condition, font color differed from the word text, creating an increase in cognitive load relative to the congruent condition in which font color and word text matched. Three physiologic measures of autonomic arousal (pulse volume amplitude, pulse period, and skin conductance response amplitude) and four acoustic measures of voice (sound pressure level, fundamental frequency, cepstral peak prominence, and low-to-high spectral energy ratio) were analyzed for eight sentence productions in each cognitive load condition per participant. A logistic regression model was constructed to predict the cognitive load condition (congruent or incongruent) using subject as a categorical predictor and the three autonomic measures and four acoustic measures as continuous predictors. It revealed that skin conductance response amplitude, cepstral peak prominence, and low-to-high spectral energy ratio were significantly associated with cognitive load condition. During speech produced under increased cognitive load, healthy young adults show changes in physiologic markers of heightened autonomic arousal and acoustic measures of voice quality. Future work is necessary to examine these measures in older adults and individuals with voice disorders. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. In-situ geophysical measurements in marine sediments: Applications in seafloor acoustics and paleoceanography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorgas, Thomas Joerg

    Acoustic in-situ sound speeds and attenuation were measured on the Eel River shelf, CA, with the Acoustic Lance between 5 and 15 kHz to 2.0 meters below seafloor (mbsf). A comparison with laboratory ultrasonic geoacoustic data obtained at 400 kHz on cored sediments showed faster in-situ and ultrasonic sound speeds in coarse-grained deposits in water depths to 60 m than in fine-grained deposits below that contour line. Ultrasonic attenuation was often greater than in-situ values and remained almost constant below 0.4 mbsf in these heterogeneous deposits. In-situ attenuation decreased with depth. These observations partly agree with results from other field studies, and with theoretical models that incorporate intergranular friction and dispersion from viscosity as main controls on acoustic wave propagation in marine sediments. Deviations among in-situ and laboratory acoustic data from the Eel Margin with theoretical studies were linked to scattering effects. Acoustic Lance was also deployed in homogeneous, fine-grained sediments on the inner shelf of SE Korea, where free gas was identified in late-September, but not in mid-September 1999. Free gas was evidenced by an abrupt decrease of in-situ sound speed and by characteristic changes in acoustic waveforms. These results suggest the presence of a gassy sediment layer as shallow as 2 mbsf along the 70 m bathymetry line, and was attributed to a variable abundance of free gas on short-term and/or small-regional scales on the SE Korea shelf. Bulk density variations in marine sediments obtained along the Walvis Ridge/Basin, SW Africa, at Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Sites 1081 to 1084 were spectral-analyzed to compute high-resolution sedimentation rates (SRs) in both the time- and age domains by correctly identifying Milankovitch cycles (MCs). SRs for the ODP sites yielded age-depth models that often correlate positively with biostratigraphic data and with organic mass accumulation rates (MAR Corg), a proxy for

  19. Development of an Acoustic Sensor for On-Line Gas Temperature Measurement in Gasifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Peter Ariessohn; Hans Hornung

    2006-01-15

    This project was awarded under U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Program Solicitation DE-PS26-02NT41422 and specifically addresses Technical Topical Area 2-Gasification Technologies. The project team includes Enertechnix, Inc. as the main contractor and ConocoPhillips Company as a technical partner, who also provides access to the SG Solutions Gasification Facility (formerly Wabash River Energy Limited), host for the field-testing portion of the research. Since 1989 the U.S. Department of Energy has supported development of advanced coal gasification technology. The Wabash River and TECO IGCC demonstration projects supported by the DOE have demonstrated the ability of these plants to achieve high levels of energy efficiency and extremely low emissions of hazardous pollutants. However, a continuing challenge for this technology is the tradeoff between high carbon conversion which requires operation with high internal gas temperatures, and limited refractory life which is exacerbated by those high operating temperatures. Attempts to control internal gas temperature so as to operate these gasifiers at the optimum temperature have been hampered by the lack of a reliable technology for measuring internal gas temperatures. Thermocouples have serious survival problems and provide useful temperature information for only a few days or weeks after startup before burning out. For this reason, the Department of Energy has funded several research projects to develop more robust and reliable temperature measurement approaches for use in coal gasifiers. Enertechnix has developed a line of acoustic gas temperature sensors for use in coal-fired electric utility boilers, kraft recovery boilers, cement kilns and petrochemical process heaters. Acoustic pyrometry provides several significant advantages for gas temperature measurement in hostile process environments. First, it is non-intrusive so survival of the measurement components is not a

  20. Does enriched acoustic environment in humans abolish chronic tinnitus clinically and electrophysiologically? A double blind placebo controlled study.

    PubMed

    Vanneste, Sven; van Dongen, Marijn; De Vree, Bjorn; Hiseni, Senad; van der Velden, Eddy; Strydis, Christos; Joos, Kathleen; Norena, Arnaud; Serdijn, Wouter; De Ridder, Dirk

    2013-02-01

    Animal research has shown that loss of normal acoustic stimulation can increase spontaneous firing in the central auditory system and induce cortical map plasticity. Enriched acoustic environment after noise trauma prevents map plasticity and abolishes neural signs of tinnitus. In humans, the tinnitus spectrum overlaps with the area of hearing loss. Based on these findings it can be hypothesized that stimulating the auditory system by presenting music compensating specifically for the hearing loss might also suppress chronic tinnitus. To verify this hypothesis, a study was conducted in three groups of tinnitus patients. One group listened just to unmodified music (i.e. active control group), one group listened to music spectrally tailored to compensate for their hearing loss, and a third group received music tailored to overcompensate for their hearing loss, associated with one (in presbycusis) or two notches (in audiometric dip) at the edge of hearing loss. Our data indicate that applying overcompensation to the hearing loss worsens the patients' tinnitus loudness, the tinnitus annoyance and their depressive feelings. No significant effects were obtained for the control group or for the compensation group. These clinical findings were associated with an increase in current density within the left dorsal anterior cingulate cortex in the alpha2 frequency band and within the left pregenual anterior cingulate cortex in beta1 and beta2 frequency band. In addition, a region of interest analysis also demonstrated an associated increase in gamma band activity in the auditory cortex after overcompensation in comparison to baseline measurements. This was, however, not the case for the control or the compensation groups. In conclusion, music therapy compensating for hearing loss is not beneficial in suppressing tinnitus, and overcompensating hearing loss actually worsens tinnitus, both clinically and electrophysiologically. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights