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Sample records for acoustic combustion instability

  1. Review of Combustion-acoustic Instabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oyediran, Ayo; Darling, Douglas; Radhakrishnan, Krishnan

    1995-01-01

    Combustion-acoustic instabilities occur when the acoustic energy increase due to the unsteady heat release of the flame is greater than the losses of acoustic energy from the system. The problem of combustion-acoustic instability is a concern in many devices for various reasons, as each device may have a unique mechanism causing unsteady heat release rates and many have unique boundary conditions. To accurately predict and quantify combustion-acoustic stabilities, the unsteady heat release rate and boundary conditions need to be accurately determined. The present review brings together work performed on a variety of practical combustion devices. Many theoretical and experimental investigations of the unsteady heat release rate have been performed, some based on perturbations in the fuel delivery system particularly for rocket instabilities, while others are based on hydrodynamic processes as in ramjet dump combustors. The boundary conditions for rocket engines have been analyzed and measured extensively. However, less work has been done to measure acoustic boundary conditions in many other combustion systems.

  2. Combustion instability coupling with feed system acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Priem, Richard J.; Breisacher, Kevin J.

    1988-01-01

    High frequency combustion instability has recently been observed by Rocketdyne in a 40K thrust methane/LOX combustion chamber. The oscillations had frequencies as high as 14,000 Hz with pressure amplitudes in the LOX dome of 500 psi at a chamber pressures of 2,000 psi. At this frequency the wave length associated with a period of oscillation is 2.3 inches in LOX and 1.4 inches in methane. These distances are comparable to the lengths of the injector elements which requires that acoustic waves be considered in the feed systems rather than using lumped parameters as is normally considered for feed system coupled oscillations. To expand the capability of existing models, the Feiler and Heidmann feed system coupled instability model was modified to include acoustic oscillations in the feed system. Similarly the vaporization controlled instability model of Heidmann and Wieber was modified to include flow oscillations that would be produced by feed system coupling. The major elements that control oscillations in a rocket combustion chamber are shown and discussed.

  3. Propellant injection strategy for suppressing acoustic combustion instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diao, Qina

    Shear-coaxial injector elements are often used in liquid-propellant-rocket thrust chambers, where combustion instabilities remain a significant problem. A conventional solution to the combustion instability problem relies on passive control techniques that use empirically-developed hardware such as acoustic baffles and tuned cavities. In addition to adding weight and decreasing engine performance, these devices are designed using trial-and-error methods, which do not provide the capability to predict the overall system stability characteristics in advance. In this thesis, two novel control strategies that are based on propellant fluid dynamics were investigated for mitigating acoustic instability involving shear-coaxial injector elements. The new control strategies would use a set of controlled injectors allowing local adjustment of propellant flow patterns for each operating condition, particularly when instability could become a problem. One strategy relies on reducing the oxidizer-fuel density gradient by blending heavier methane with the main fuel, hydrogen. Another strategy utilizes modifying the equivalence ratio to affect the acoustic impedance through mixing and reaction rate changes. The potential effectiveness of these strategies was assessed by conducting unit-physics experiments. Two different model combustors, one simulating a single-element injector test and the other a double-element injector test, were designed and tested for flame-acoustic interaction. For these experiments, the Reynolds number of the central oxygen jet was kept between 4700 and 5500 making the injector flames sufficiently turbulent. A compression driver, mounted on one side of the combustor wall, provided controlled acoustic excitation to the injector flames, simulating the initial phase of flame-acoustic interaction. Acoustic excitation was applied either as band-limited white noise forcing between 100 Hz and 5000 Hz or as single-frequency, fixed-amplitude forcing at 1150 Hz

  4. Analysis of combustion instability in liquid propellant engines with or without acoustic cavities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oberg, C. L.; Kesselring, R. C.; Warner, C., III; Schuman, M. D.

    1974-01-01

    Analytical studies have been made of the relative combustion stability of various propellant combinations when used with hardware configurations representative of current design practices and with or without acoustic cavities. Two combustion instability models, a Priem-type model and a modification of the Northern Research and Engineering (NREC) instability model, were used to predict the variation in engine stability with changes in operating conditions, hardware characteristics or propellant combination, exclusive of acoustic cavity effects. The NREC model was developed for turbojet engines but is applicable to liquid propellant engines. A steady-state combustion model was used to predict the needed input for the instability models. In addition, preliminary development was completed on a new model to predict the influence of an acoustic cavity with specific allowance for the effects the nozzle, steady flow and combustion.

  5. A Simplified Model for the Investigation of Acoustically Driven Combustion Instabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paxson, Daniel E.; Quinn, D. Dane

    1998-01-01

    A simplified one-dimensional model of reactive flow is presented which captures features of aeropropulsion systems, including acoustically driven combustion instabilities. Although the resulting partial differential equations are one dimensional, they qualitatively describe observed phenomena, including, resonant frequencies and the admission of both steady and unsteady behavior. A number of simulations are shown which exhibit both steady and unsteady behavior, including flame migration and thermo acoustic instabilities. Finally, we present examples of unsteady flow resulting from fuel modulation.

  6. A facility for testing the acoustic combustion instability characteristics of solid rocket propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathes, H. B.

    1980-01-01

    A facility is described that has been specifically designed for small-scale laboratory testing of solid rocket propellants. A description of the facility is provided which includes the general plan of the facility and features related to personnel safety. One of the major activities in the facility is testing solid rocket propellants for combustion response to acoustic perturbations. A detailed discussion of acoustic instability testing is given including specially designed combustion apparatus, data acquisition, and signal conditioning. Techniques of data reduction are reviewed and some of the instrumentation problems that arise in this type of testing are mentioned along with practical solutions.

  7. Sensitivity of Combustion-Acoustic Instabilities to Boundary Conditions for Premixed Gas Turbine Combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darling, Douglas; Radhakrishnan, Krishnan; Oyediran, Ayo

    1995-01-01

    Premixed combustors, which are being considered for low NOx engines, are susceptible to instabilities due to feedback between pressure perturbations and combustion. This feedback can cause damaging mechanical vibrations of the system as well as degrade the emissions characteristics and combustion efficiency. In a lean combustor instabilities can also lead to blowout. A model was developed to perform linear combustion-acoustic stability analysis using detailed chemical kinetic mechanisms. The Lewis Kinetics and Sensitivity Analysis Code, LSENS, was used to calculate the sensitivities of the heat release rate to perturbations in density and temperature. In the present work, an assumption was made that the mean flow velocity was small relative to the speed of sound. Results of this model showed the regions of growth of perturbations to be most sensitive to the reflectivity of the boundary when reflectivities were close to unity.

  8. Combustion Instability Analysis and the Effects of Drop Size on Acoustic Driving Rocket Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper, Brent (Technical Monitor); Ellison, L. Renea; Moser, Marlow D.

    2004-01-01

    High frequency combustion instability, the most destructive kind, is generally solved on a per engine basis. The instability often is the result of compounding acoustic oscillations, usually from the propellant combustion itself. To counteract the instability the chamber geometry can be changed and/or the method of propellant injection can be altered. This experiment will alter the chamber dimensions slightly; using a cylindrical shape of constant diameter and the length will be varied from six to twelve inches in three-inch increments. The main flowfield will be the products of a high OF hydrogen/oxygen flow. The liquid fuel will be injected into this flowfield using a modulated injector. It will allow for varied droplet size, feed rate, spray pattern, and location for the mixture within the chamber. The response will be deduced from the chamber pressure oscillations.

  9. Gas turbine combustion instability

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, G.A.; Lee, G.T.

    1996-09-01

    Combustion oscillations are a common problem in development of LPM (lean premix) combustors. Unlike earlier, diffusion style combustors, LPM combustors are especially susceptible to oscillations because acoustic losses are smaller and operation near lean blowoff produces a greater combustion response to disturbances in reactant supply, mixing, etc. In ongoing tests at METC, five instability mechanisms have been identified in subscale and commercial scale nozzle tests. Changes to fuel nozzle geometry showed that it is possible to stabilize combustion by altering the timing of the feedback between acoustic waves and the variation in heat release.

  10. Simulation of Non-Acoustic Combustion Instability in a Hybrid Rocket Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rocker, Marvin

    1999-01-01

    A transient model of a hybrid motor was formulated to study the cause and elimination of non-acoustic combustion instability. The transient model was used to simulate four key tests out of a series of seventeen hybrid motor tests conducted by Thiokol, Rocketdyne and Martin Marietta at NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (NASAIMSFC). These tests were performed under the Hybrid Propulsion Technology for Launch Vehicle Boosters (HPTLVB) program. The first test resulted in stable combustion. The second test resulted in large-amplitude, 6.5 Hz chamber pressure oscillations that gradually damped away by the end of the test. The third test resulted in large-amplitude, 7.5 Hz chamber pressure oscillations that were sustained throughout the test. The seventh test resulted in the elimination of combustion instability with the installation of an orifice immediately upstream of the injector. The formulation and implementation of the model are the scope of this presentation. The current model is an independent continuation of modeling presented previously by joint Thiokol-Rocketdyne collaborators Boardman, Hawkins, Wassom, and Claflin. The previous model simulated an unstable IR&D hybrid motor test performed by Thiokol. There was very good agreement between the model and the test data. Like the previous model, the current model was developed using Matrix-x simulation software. However, the tests performed at NASA/MSFC under the HPTLVB program were actually simulated. In the current model, the hybrid motor consisting of the liquid oxygen (LOX) injector, the multi-port solid fuel grain and the nozzle was simulated. Also, simulated in the model was the LOX feed system consisting of the tank, venturi, valve and feed lines. All components of the hybrid motor and LOX feed system are treated by a lumped-parameter approach. Agreement between the results of the transient model and the actual test data was very good. This agreement between simulated and actual test data indicated that the

  11. High-frequency combustion instability control through acoustic modulation at the inlet boundary for liquid rocket engine applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennewitz, John William

    This research investigation encompasses experimental tests demonstrating the control of a high-frequency combustion instability by acoustically modulating the propellant flow. A model rocket combustor burned gaseous oxygen and methane using a single-element, pentad-style injector. Flow conditions were established that spontaneously excited a 2430 Hz first longitudinal combustion oscillation at an amplitude up to p'/pc ≈ 6%. An acoustic speaker was placed at the base of the oxidizer supply to modulate the flow and alter the oscillatory behavior of the combustor. Two speaker modulation approaches were investigated: (1) Bands of white noise and (2) Pure sinusoidal tones. The first approach adjusted 500 Hz bands of white noise ranging from 0-500 Hz to 2000-2500 Hz, while the second implemented single-frequency signals with arbitrary phase swept from 500-2500 Hz. The results showed that above a modulation signal amplitude threshold, both approaches suppressed 95+% of the spontaneous combustion oscillation. By increasing the applied signal amplitude, a wider frequency range of instability suppression became present for these two acoustic modulation approaches. Complimentary to these experiments, a linear modal analysis was undertaken to investigate the effects of acoustic modulation at the inlet boundary on the longitudinal instability modes of a dump combustor. The modal analysis employed acoustically consistent matching conditions with a specific impedance boundary condition at the inlet to represent the acoustic modulation. From the modal analysis, a naturally unstable first longitudinal mode was predicted in the absence of acoustic modulation, consistent with the spontaneously excited 2430 Hz instability observed experimentally. Subsequently, a detailed investigation involving variation of the modulation signal from 0-2500 Hz and mean combustor temperature from 1248-1685 K demonstrated the unstable to stable transition of a 2300-2500 Hz first longitudinal mode. The

  12. Characterization of degeneration process in thermo-acoustic combustion instability using dynamical systems theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Kenta; Gotoda, Hiroshi; Okuno, Yuta; Tachibana, Shigeru; Tokyo University of Science Collaboration; Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    We have experimentally investigated the degeneration process of combustion instability in a lean premixed gas-turbine model combustor on the basis of dynamical systems theory. Our previous study reported that with increasing the equivalence ratio, the dynamical behavior of combustion state close to lean blowout transits from stochastic fluctuations to periodic thermoacoustic combustion oscillations via low-dimensional chaotic oscillations. The further increase in the equivalence ratio gives rise to the quasi-periodic oscillations and the subsequent chaotic oscillations with small amplitudes. The route to chaotic oscillations is quantitatively shown by the use of nonlinear time series analysis involving the color recurrence plots, permutation entropy and local predictor.

  13. Flame-acoustic coupling of combustion instability in a non-premixed backward-facing step combustor: the role of acoustic-Reynolds stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannan, Ashwin; Chellappan, Balaji; Chakravarthy, Satyanarayanan

    2016-07-01

    Combustion instability in a laboratory scale backward-facing step combustor is numerically investigated by carrying out an acoustically coupled incompressible large eddy simulation of turbulent reacting flow for various Reynolds numbers with fuel injection at the step. The problem is mathematically formulated as a decomposition of the full compressible Navier-Stokes equations using multi-scale analysis by recognising the small length scale and large time scale of the flow field relative to a longitudinal mode acoustic field for low mean Mach numbers. The equations are decomposed into those for an incompressible flow with temperature-dependent density to zeroth order and linearised Euler equations for acoustics as a first order compressibility correction. Explicit coupling terms between the two equation sets are identified to be the flow dilatation as a source of acoustic energy and the acoustic Reynolds stress (ARS) as a source of flow momentum. The numerical simulations are able to capture the experimentally observed flow-acoustic lock-on that signifies the onset of combustion instability, marked by a shift in the dominant frequency from an acoustic to a hydrodynamic mode and accompanied by a nonlinear variation of pressure amplitude. Attention is devoted to flow conditions at two Reynolds numbers before and after lock-on to show that, after lock-on, the ARS causes large-scale vortical rollup resulting in the evolution of a compact flame. As compared to acoustically uncoupled simulations at these Reynolds numbers that show an elongated flame with no significant roll up and disturbance in the upstream flow field, the ARS is seen to alter the shear layer dynamics by affecting the flow field upstream of the step as well, when acoustically coupled.

  14. Combustion instability analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, T. J.

    1990-01-01

    A theory and computer program for combustion instability analysis are presented. The basic theoretical foundation resides in the concept of entropy-controlled energy growth or decay. Third order perturbation expansion is performed on the entropy-controlled acoustic energy equation to obtain the first order integrodifferential equation for the energy growth factor in terms of the linear, second, and third order energy growth parameters. These parameters are calculated from Navier-Stokes solutions with time averages performed on as many Navier-Stokes time steps as required to cover at least one peak wave period. Applications are made for a 1-D Navier-Stokes solution for the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) thrust chamber with cross section area variations taken into account. It is shown that instability occurs when the mean pressure is set at 2000 psi with 30 percent disturbances. Instability also arises when the mean pressure is set at 2935 psi with 20 percent disturbances. The system with mean pressures and disturbances more adverse that these cases were shown to be unstable.

  15. Combustion Instabilities Modeled

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paxson, Daniel E.

    1999-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center's Advanced Controls and Dynamics Technology Branch is investigating active control strategies to mitigate or eliminate the combustion instabilities prevalent in lean-burning, low-emission combustors. These instabilities result from coupling between the heat-release mechanisms of the burning process and the acoustic flow field of the combustor. Control design and implementation require a simulation capability that is both fast and accurate. It must capture the essential physics of the system, yet be as simple as possible. A quasi-one-dimensional, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) based simulation has been developed which may meet these requirements. The Euler equations of mass, momentum, and energy have been used, along with a single reactive species transport equation to simulate coupled thermoacoustic oscillations. A very simple numerical integration scheme was chosen to reduce computing time. Robust boundary condition procedures were incorporated to simulate various flow conditions (e.g., valves, open ends, and choked inflow) as well as to accommodate flow reversals that may arise during large flow-field oscillations. The accompanying figure shows a sample simulation result. A combustor with an open inlet, a choked outlet, and a large constriction approximately two thirds of the way down the length is shown. The middle plot shows normalized, time-averaged distributions of the relevant flow quantities, and the bottom plot illustrates the acoustic mode shape of the resulting thermoacoustic oscillation. For this simulation, the limit cycle peak-to-peak pressure fluctuations were 13 percent of the mean. The simulation used 100 numerical cells. The total normalized simulation time was 50 units (approximately 15 oscillations), which took 26 sec on a Sun Ultra2.

  16. Experimental Replication of an Aeroengine Combustion Instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, J. M.; Hibshman, J. R.; Proscia, W.; Rosfjord, T. J.; Wake, B. E.; McVey, J. B.; Lovett, J.; Ondas, M.; DeLaat, J.; Breisacher, K.

    2000-01-01

    Combustion instabilities in gas turbine engines are most frequently encountered during the late phases of engine development, at which point they are difficult and expensive to fix. The ability to replicate an engine-traceable combustion instability in a laboratory-scale experiment offers the opportunity to economically diagnose the problem (to determine the root cause), and to investigate solutions to the problem, such as active control. The development and validation of active combustion instability control requires that the causal dynamic processes be reproduced in experimental test facilities which can be used as a test bed for control system evaluation. This paper discusses the process through which a laboratory-scale experiment was designed to replicate an instability observed in a developmental engine. The scaling process used physically-based analyses to preserve the relevant geometric, acoustic and thermo-fluid features. The process increases the probability that results achieved in the single-nozzle experiment will be scalable to the engine.

  17. Liquid propellant rocket combustion instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrje, D. T.

    1972-01-01

    The solution of problems of combustion instability for more effective communication between the various workers in this field is considered. The extent of combustion instability problems in liquid propellant rocket engines and recommendations for their solution are discussed. The most significant developments, both theoretical and experimental, are presented, with emphasis on fundamental principles and relationships between alternative approaches.

  18. Active control of combustion instability

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, W.; Poinsot, T.; Candel, S.

    1987-12-01

    The principle of 'antisound' is used to construct a method for the suppression of combustion instabilities. This active instability control (AIC) method uses external acoustic excitation by a loudspeaker to suppress the oscillations of a flame. The excitation signal is provided by a microphone located upstream of the flame. This signal is filtered, processed, amplified, and sent to the loudspeaker. The AIC method is validated on a laboratory combustor. It allows the suppression of all unstable modes of the burner for any operating ratio. The influence of the microphone and loudspeaker locations on the performance of the AIC system is described. For a given configuration, domains of stability, i.e., domains where the AIC system parameters provide suppression of the oscillation, are investigated. Measurements of the electric input of the loudspeaker show that the energy consumption of the AIC system is almost negligible and suggest that this method could be used for industrial combustor stabilization. Finally, a simple model describing the effects of the AIC system is developed and its results compared to the experiment.

  19. ASRM combustion instability studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strand, L. D.

    1992-01-01

    The objectives of this task were to measure and compare the combustion response characteristics of the selected propellant formulation for the Space Shuttle Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM) with those of the current Redesigned Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) formulation. Tests were also carried out to characterize the combustion response of the selected propellant formulation for the ASRM igniter motor.

  20. Large-scale coherent structures as drivers of combustion instability

    SciTech Connect

    Schadow, K.C.; Gutmark, E.; Parr, T.P.; Parr, D.M.; Wilson, K.J.

    1987-06-01

    The role of flow coherent structures as drivers of combustion instabilities in a dump combustor was studied. Results of nonreacting tests in air and water flows as well as combustion experiments in a diffusion flame and dump combustor are discussed to provide insight into the generation process of large-scale structures in the combustor flow and their interaction with the combustion process. It is shown that the flow structures, or vortices, are formed by interaction between the flow instabilities and the chamber acoustic resonance. When these vortices dominate the reacting flow, the combustion is confined to their cores, leading to periodic heat release, which may result in the driving of high amplitude pressure oscillations. These oscillations are typical to the occurrence of combustion instabilities for certain operating conditions. The basic understanding of the interaction between flow dynamics and the combustion process opens up the possibility for rational control of combustion-induced pressure oscillations. 42 references.

  1. Nonlinear Combustion Instability Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flandro, Gary

    2010-01-01

    The liquid rocket engine stability prediction software (LCI) predicts combustion stability of systems using LOX-LH2 propellants. Both longitudinal and transverse mode stability characteristics are calculated. This software has the unique feature of being able to predict system limit amplitude.

  2. Combustion instability modeling and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Santoro, R.J.; Yang, V.; Santavicca, D.A.; Sheppard, E.J.

    1995-12-31

    It is well known that the two key elements for achieving low emissions and high performance in a gas turbine combustor are to simultaneously establish (1) a lean combustion zone for maintaining low NO{sub x} emissions and (2) rapid mixing for good ignition and flame stability. However, these requirements, when coupled with the short combustor lengths used to limit the residence time for NO formation typical of advanced gas turbine combustors, can lead to problems regarding unburned hydrocarbons (UHC) and carbon monoxide (CO) emissions, as well as the occurrence of combustion instabilities. The concurrent development of suitable analytical and numerical models that are validated with experimental studies is important for achieving this objective. A major benefit of the present research will be to provide for the first time an experimentally verified model of emissions and performance of gas turbine combustors. The present study represents a coordinated effort between industry, government and academia to investigate gas turbine combustion dynamics. Specific study areas include development of advanced diagnostics, definition of controlling phenomena, advancement of analytical and numerical modeling capabilities, and assessment of the current status of our ability to apply these tools to practical gas turbine combustors. The present work involves four tasks which address, respectively, (1) the development of a fiber-optic probe for fuel-air ratio measurements, (2) the study of combustion instability using laser-based diagnostics in a high pressure, high temperature flow reactor, (3) the development of analytical and numerical modeling capabilities for describing combustion instability which will be validated against experimental data, and (4) the preparation of a literature survey and establishment of a data base on practical experience with combustion instability.

  3. Acoustic Emissions Reveal Combustion Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramohalli, D. N. R.; Seshan, P. K.

    1983-01-01

    Turbulent-flame acoustic emissions change with air/fuel ratio variations. Acoustic emissions sensed and processed to detect inefficient operation; control system responds by adjusting fuel/air mixture for greater efficiency. Useful for diagnosis of combustion processes and fuel/air control.

  4. Combustion instability modeling and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Santoro, R.J.; Yang, V.; Santavicca, D.A.

    1995-10-01

    It is well known that the two key elements for achieving low emissions and high performance in a gas turbine combustor are to simultaneously establish (1) a lean combustion zone for maintaining low NO{sub x} emissions and (2) rapid mixing for good ignition and flame stability. However, these requirements, when coupled with the short combustor lengths used to limit the residence time for NO formation typical of advanced gas turbine combustors, can lead to problems regarding unburned hydrocarbons (UHC) and carbon monoxide (CO) emissions, as well as the occurrence of combustion instabilities. Clearly, the key to successful gas turbine development is based on understanding the effects of geometry and operating conditions on combustion instability, emissions (including UHC, CO and NO{sub x}) and performance. The concurrent development of suitable analytical and numerical models that are validated with experimental studies is important for achieving this objective. A major benefit of the present research will be to provide for the first time an experimentally verified model of emissions and performance of gas turbine combustors.

  5. Computational investigation on combustion instabilities in a rocket combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Lei; Shen, Chibing

    2016-10-01

    High frequency combustion instability is viewed as the most challenging task in the development of Liquid Rocket Engines. In this article, results of attempts to capture the self-excited high frequency combustion instability in a rocket combustor are shown. The presence of combustion instability was demonstrated using point measurements, along with Fast Fourier Transform analysis and instantaneous flowfield contours. A baseline case demonstrates a similar wall heat flux profile as the associated experimental case. The acoustic oscillation modes and corresponding frequencies predicted by current simulations are almost the same as the results obtained from classic acoustic analysis. Pressure wave moving back and forth across the combustor was also observed. Then this baseline case was compared against different fuel-oxidizer velocity ratios. It predicts a general trend: the smaller velocity ratio produces larger oscillation amplitudes than the larger one. A possible explanation for the trend was given using the computational results.

  6. Longitudinal Mode Aeroengine Combustion Instability: Model and Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, J. M.; Hibshman, J. R.; Proscia, W.; Rosfjord, T. J.; Wake, B. E.; McVey, J. B.; Lovett, J.; Ondas, M.; DeLaat, J.; Breisacher, K.

    2001-01-01

    Combustion instabilities in gas turbine engines are most frequently encountered during the late phases of engine development, at which point they are difficult and expensive to fix. The ability to replicate an engine-traceable combustion instability in a laboratory-scale experiment offers the opportunity to economically diagnose the problem more completely (to determine the root cause), and to investigate solutions to the problem, such as active control. The development and validation of active combustion instability control requires that the casual dynamic processes be reproduced in experimental test facilities which can be used as a test bed for control system evaluation. This paper discusses the process through which a laboratory-scale experiment and be designed to replicate an instability observed in a developmental engine. The scaling process used physically-based analyses to preserve the relevant geometric, acoustic, and thermo-fluid features, ensuring that results achieved in the single-nozzle experiment will be scalable to the engine.

  7. Combustion-acoustic stability analysis for premixed gas turbine combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darling, Douglas; Radhakrishnan, Krishnan; Oyediran, Ayo; Cowan, Lizabeth

    1995-01-01

    Lean, prevaporized, premixed combustors are susceptible to combustion-acoustic instabilities. A model was developed to predict eigenvalues of axial modes for combustion-acoustic interactions in a premixed combustor. This work extends previous work by including variable area and detailed chemical kinetics mechanisms, using the code LSENS. Thus the acoustic equations could be integrated through the flame zone. Linear perturbations were made of the continuity, momentum, energy, chemical species, and state equations. The qualitative accuracy of our approach was checked by examining its predictions for various unsteady heat release rate models. Perturbations in fuel flow rate are currently being added to the model.

  8. Longitudinal-Mode Combustion Instabilities: Modeling and Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, J. M.; Hibshman, J. R.; Proscia, W.; Rosfjord, T. J.; Wake, B. E.; McVey, J. B.; Lovett, J.; Ondas, M.; DeLaat, J.; Breisacher, K.

    2000-01-01

    Combustion instabilities can lead to increased development time and cost for aeroengine gas turbines. This problem has been evident in the development of very-low emissions stationary gas turbines, and will likely be encountered in the newer, more aggressive aeroengine designs. In order to minimize development time and cost, it is imperative that potential combustion dynamics issues be resolved using analyses and smaller-scale experimentation. This paper discusses a methodology through which a problem in a full-scale engine was replicated in a single-nozzle laboratory combustor. Specifically, this approach is valid for longitudinal and "bulk" mode combustion instabilities. An explanation and partial validation of the acoustic analyses that were used to achieve this replication are also included. This approach yields a testbed for the diagnosis of combustion dynamics problems and for their solution through passive and active control techniques.

  9. Active control: an investigation method for combustion instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poinsot, T.; Yip, B.; Veynante, D.; Trouvé, A.; Samaniego, J. M.; Candel, S.

    1992-07-01

    Closed-loop active control methods and their application to combustion instabilities are discussed. In these methods the instability development is impeded with a feedback control loop: the signal provided by a sensor monitoring the flame or pressure oscillations is processed and sent back to actuators mounted on the combustor or on the feeding system. Different active control systems tested on a non-premixed multiple-flame turbulent combustor are described. These systems can suppress all unstable plane modes of oscillation (i.e. low frequency modes). The active instability control (AIC) also constitutes an original and powerful technique for studies of mechanisms leading to instability or resulting from the instability. Two basic applications of this kind are described. In the first case the flame is initially controlled with AIC, the feedback loop is then switched off and the growth of the instability is analysed through high speed Schlieren cinematography and simultaneous sound pressure and reaction rate measurements. Three phases are identified during th growth of the oscillations: (1) a linear phase where acoustic waves induce a flapping motion of the flame sheets without interaction between sheets, (2) a modulation phase, where flame sheets interact randomly and (3) a nonlinear phase where the flame sheets are broken and a limit cycle is reached. In the second case we investigate different types of flame extinctions associated with combustion instability. It is shown that pressure oscillations may lead to partial or total extinctions. Extinctions occur in various forms but usually follow a rapid growth of pressure oscillations. The flame is extinguished during the modulation phase observed in the initiation experiments. In these studies devoted to transient instability phenomena, the control system constitutes a unique investigation tool because it is difficult to obtain the same information by other means. Implications for modelling and prediction of

  10. LES and acoustic analysis of thermo-acoustic instabilities in a partially premixed model combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández, Ignacio; Staffelbach, Gabriel; Poinsot, Thierry; Román Casado, Juan C.; Kok, Jim B. W.

    2013-01-01

    Numerical simulations were performed using Large Eddy Simulation (LES) and acoustic analysis tools to study thermo-acoustic instabilities in a methane/air academic burner installed at the University of Twente (The Netherlands). It operates under fuel-lean partially premixed conditions at atmospheric pressure, and was built to study thermo-acoustic instabilities in conditions representative of gas turbine Lean Premixed systems: gaseous fuel is injected upstream of the combustor and has a limited time to mix with air. Even though the objective is to burn in a premixed mode, the actual regime corresponds to a partially premixed flame where strong equivalence ratio variations are created especially during combustion instabilities. Capturing these modes with LES is a challenge: here, simulations for both stable and unstable regimes are performed. In the unstable case, the limit cycle oscillations (LCO) are characterized and compared to experimental results. Reasonable agreement is found between simulations and experiments.

  11. Acoustic resonance in the combustion conduits of a steam locomotive

    SciTech Connect

    Ziada, S.; Oengoeren, A.; Vogel, H.H.

    1996-12-01

    The sound emission of a modern, oil fired steam rack locomotive increased sharply when the locomotive speed exceeded the design value of 12 km/hr. The results of pressure and noise measurements, together with an acoustical model of the combustion conduits indicated that the acoustic resonance modes of the combustion conduits are excited by the pressure pulsations generated by the exhaust from the steam cylinders at multiples of the piston frequency. Additionally, when the acoustic resonance is initiated, the resulting pulsations trigger the flame instability of the oil burners which, in turn, enhances the resonance. By means of the acoustical model, a Helmholtz resonator has been designed and optimized to reduce the acoustic response such that it does not excite the flame instability. A second set of measurements, after installing the resonator, has shown a reduction in the noise level by an amount exceeding 21 dBA. The paper focuses upon the identification of the excitation source and the implementation of the countermeasure which are of interest to other applications involving combustion oscillations.

  12. Modeling of thermo-acoustic instabilities in counterflow flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zambon, Andrea C.

    Under certain operating conditions, many combustion systems in aerospace propulsion and land-based power generation exhibit large-amplitude pressure oscillations coupled with unsteadiness in the combustion processes. This unsteady multi-scale phenomenon is generally referred to as thermo-acoustic instability. Recently, model-based active control approaches are being pursued to suppress the potentially destructive instability and for this purpose a fundamental understanding of the coupling mechanisms between the dynamics of the flame and acoustics is critical. In the present investigation, a numerical model is developed to study the interaction of longitudinal acoustic waves with planar flames in the simplified counterflow configuration. The mathematical formulation of quasi one-dimensional, fully unsteady, laminar counterflow flames is derived and the governing equations are integrated numerically based on a MacCormack predictor-corrector scheme, with the inclusion of detailed transport and finite-rate chemistry. In order to accurately represent perfect and partial reflection of acoustic waves at the boundaries, Navier-Stokes characteristic boundary conditions are implemented. The focus of the investigation is on the linear regime of thermo-acoustic instabilities associated with planar flames. Specifically, coupling mechanisms intrinsic to the dynamics of the flame are addressed, such as flow compressibility effects, which may be responsible for the initial triggering of thermo-acoustic instabilities, and finite-rate chemistry effects. For well-resolved simulations, the occurrence of the self-sustained amplification of pressure fluctuations is analyzed in both non-premixed and premixed methane-air flames for a range of flow strain rates and flame locations, and employing different chemical kinetic models. A detailed analysis of the characteristic time-scales associated with convection, diffusion, chemistry and acoustics is performed together with an analysis of the

  13. Fundamental Insights into Combustion Instability Predictions in Aerospace Propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Cheng

    Integrated multi-fidelity modeling has been performed for combustion instability in aerospace propulsion, which includes two levels of analysis: first, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) using hybrid RANS/LES simulations for underlying physics investigations (high-fidelity modeling); second, modal decomposition techniques for diagnostics (analysis & validation); third, development of flame response model using model reduction techniques for practical design applications (low-order model). For the high-fidelity modeling, the relevant CFD code development work is moving towards combustion instability prediction for liquid propulsion system. A laboratory-scale single-element lean direct injection (LDI) gas turbine combustor is used for configuration that produces self-excited combustion instability. The model gas turbine combustor is featured with an air inlet section, air plenum, swirler-venturi-injector assembly, combustion chamber, and exit nozzle. The combustor uses liquid fuel (Jet-A/FT-SPK) and heated air up to 800K. Combustion dynamics investigations are performed with the same geometry and operating conditions concurrently between the experiment and computation at both high (φ=0.6) and low (φ=0.36) equivalence ratios. The simulation is able to reach reasonable agreement with experiment measurements in terms of the pressure signal. Computational analyses are also performed using an acoustically-open geometry to investigate the characteristic hydrodynamics in the combustor with both constant and perturbed inlet mass flow rates. Two hydrodynamic modes are identified by using Dynamic Mode Decomposition (DMD) analysis: Vortex Breakdown Bubble (VBB) and swirling modes. Following that, the closed geometry simulation results are analyzed in three steps. In step one, a detailed cycle analysis shows two physically important couplings in the combustor: first, the acoustic compression enhances the spray drop breakup and vaporization, and generates more gaseous fuel for

  14. Investigation of combustion instability in ramjet combustors

    SciTech Connect

    Reuter, D.M.

    1988-01-01

    This research is concerned with investigation of the mechanisms responsible for the driving of longitudinal instabilities in dump-type ramjet combustors. In particular, the coupling between the core flame which is stabilized at the entrance of the combustor and the longitudinal acoustic field was studied. The time-dependent structure of premixed V-shaped flames was experimentally examined using pressure measurements, space- and time-resolved C-H radical radiation measurements, high-speed shadow cine photography, and laser-Doppler velocimetry. The investigation revealed that the acoustic energy to sustain the instability is mainly supplied by the oscillatory heat release from the flame. Based on this finding, a model was developed that is capable of predicting the acoustic pressure spectrum from measured heat-release rates. Furthermore, it was shown that the periodic heat-release rates largely result from periodic changes in the flame surface area caused by acoustically triggered symmetric vortex shedding in the wake of the flame holders. Lastly, experiments were conducted that used this mechanism to show the suppression of instabilities at the fundamental acoustic mode by staggering multiple flames so that the unsteady heat release fields destructively interfere with one another.

  15. Control of Combustion-Instabilities Through Various Passive Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frendi, Kader

    2005-01-01

    It is well known that under some operating conditions, rocket engines (using solid or liquid fuels) exhibit unstable modes of operation that can lead to engine malfunction and shutdown. The sources of these instabilities are diverse and are dependent on fuel, chamber geometry and various upstream sources such as pumps, valves and injection mechanism. It is believed that combustion-acoustic instabilities occur when the acoustic energy increase due to the unsteady heat release of the flame is greater than the losses of acoustic energy from the system [1, 2]. Giammar and Putnam [3] performed a comprehensive study of noise generated by gasfired industrial burners and made several key observations; flow noise was sometimes more intense than combustion roar, which tended to have a characteristic frequency spectrum. Turbulence was amplified by the flame. The noise power varied directly with combustion intensity and also with the product of pressure drop and heat release rate. Karchmer [4] correlated the noise emitted from a turbofan jet engine with that in the combustion chamber. This is important, since it quantified how much of the noise from an engine originates in the combustor. A physical interpretation of the interchange of energy between sound waves and unsteady heat release rates was given by Rayleigh [5] for inviscid, linear perturbations. Bloxidge et al [6] extended Rayleigh s criterion to describe the interaction of unsteady combustion with one-dimensional acoustic waves in a duct. Solutions to the mass, momentum and energy conservation equations in the pre- and post-flame zones were matched by making several assumptions about the combustion process. They concluded that changes in boundary conditions affect the energy balance of acoustic waves in the combustor. Abouseif et al [7] also solved the one-dimensional flow equations, but they used a onestep reaction to evaluate the unsteady heat release rate by relating it to temperature and velocity perturbations

  16. Hydrodynamic wave contributions to combustion instability in rockets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu-Irshaid, Esam M. T.

    Experimental measurements suggest that a new source of instability in rocket motors is due to hydrodynamic disturbances. These disturbances, if ignored, could impact our assessment of rocket motor performance. In this work, the corresponding problem of hydrodynamic instability is considered. A mathematical model for these disturbances is carried out by perturbing the continuity and momentum equations. A one dimensional model which represents the wave disturbances in time and space is implemented to quantify the amplification rate, in time or space, and the wave amplitude. The only available measurements of these disturbances arise in cold flow experiments that simulate the gas dynamics in a solid rocket motor and where no real combustion takes place. The reason for cold flow experiments is the difficulty in measuring the hydrodynamic disturbances in real rockets. To gain better understanding of the interaction between hydrodynamic and combustion driven disturbances, a new approach is implemented that accounts for hydrodynamic effects on the combustion instability net system amplitude. In this model the impact of spatial hydrodynamic vortices in solid rocket motors is projected on the net system amplitude calculations. Results show that some factors play a significant role in controlling the hydrodynamic disturbances. These factors include the injection Mach number, chamber aspect ratio, admittance function and the tangential wave number. Here, the influence of each of these factors is examined. Finally, the hydrodynamic energy density is calculated and found to be small in comparison to the vortical-acoustic one.

  17. Global tools for thermo-acoustic instabilities in gas turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicoud, Franck; Benoit, Laurent

    2003-11-01

    The trend to operate gas turbine in leaner regime in order to decrease the pollutant emission increases the opportunities for thermo-acoustic instabilities. Suppress these oscillations at the design level requires a better understanding of the physical phenomena involved. A key point is the knowledge of the acoustic eigenmodes under industrial conditions (complex geometry, variable speed of sound, unsteady combustion). A classical approach consists in representing the flow domain as a network of 1D acoustic tubes connected to each other thanks to jump relationships. We present a different strategy where the 3D acoustic equations are solved for the pressure in the frequency domain with pulsation dependent impedance as acoustic boundary conditions. The effect of the flame on the acoustics is accounting for by modelling the unsteady heat release via the classical n-τ model. The interaction index n and the time delay τ depend on space and can be assessed experimentally or by means of Large-Eddy Simulations. The reactive acoustic equations in the frequency domain lead to a non-linear eigenvalue problem that is being solved thanks to asymptotic expansion in n. Results are presented in order to demonstrate the capability of the method to account for unsteady flames and complex geometries.

  18. LOX/Hydrocarbon Combustion Instability Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, R. J.; Dodson, H. C.; Claflin, S. E.

    1989-01-01

    The LOX/Hydrocarbon Combustion Instability Investigation Program was structured to determine if the use of light hydrocarbon combustion fuels with liquid oxygen (LOX) produces combustion performance and stability behavior similar to the LOX/hydrogen propellant combination. In particular methane was investigated to determine if that fuel can be rated for combustion instability using the same techniques as previously used for LOX/hydrogen. These techniques included fuel temperature ramping and stability bomb tests. The hot fire program probed the combustion behavior of methane from ambient to subambient temperatures. Very interesting results were obtained from this program that have potential importance to future LOX/methane development programs. A very thorough and carefully reasoned documentation of the experimental data obtained is contained. The hot fire test logic and the associated tests are discussed. Subscale performance and stability rating testing was accomplished using 40,000 lb. thrust class hardware. Stability rating tests used both bombs and fuel temperature ramping techniques. The test program was successful in generating data for the evaluation of the methane stability characteristics relative to hydrogen and to anchor stability models. Data correlations, performance analysis, stability analyses, and key stability margin enhancement parameters are discussed.

  19. Axisymmetric single shear element combustion instability experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breisacher, Kevin J.

    1993-01-01

    The combustion stability characteristics of a combustor consisting of a single shear element and a cylindrical chamber utilizing LOX and gaseous hydrogen as propellants are presented. The combustor geometry and the resulting longitudinal mode instability are axisymmetric. Hydrogen injection temperature and pyrotechnic pulsing were used to determine stability boundaries. Mixture ratio, fuel annulus gap, and LOX post configuration were varied. Performance and stability data are presented for chamber pressures of 300 and 1000 psia.

  20. Axisymmetric single shear element combustion instability experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breisacher, Kevin J.

    1993-01-01

    The combustion stability characteristics of a combustor consisting of a single shear element and a cylindrical chamber utilizing LOX and gaseous hydrogen as propellants are presented. The combustor geometry and the resulting longitudinal mode instability are axisymmetric. Hydrogen injection temperature and pyrotechnic pulsing were used to determine stability boundaries. Mixture ratio, fuel annulus gap, and LOX post configuration were varied. Performance and stability data were obtained for chamber pressures of 300 and 1000 psia.

  1. Solid Rocket Motor Combustion Instability Modeling in COMSOL Multiphysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischbach, Sean R.

    2015-01-01

    Combustion instability modeling of Solid Rocket Motors (SRM) remains a topic of active research. Many rockets display violent fluctuations in pressure, velocity, and temperature originating from the complex interactions between the combustion process, acoustics, and steady-state gas dynamics. Recent advances in defining the energy transport of disturbances within steady flow-fields have been applied by combustion stability modelers to improve the analysis framework [1, 2, 3]. Employing this more accurate global energy balance requires a higher fidelity model of the SRM flow-field and acoustic mode shapes. The current industry standard analysis tool utilizes a one dimensional analysis of the time dependent fluid dynamics along with a quasi-three dimensional propellant grain regression model to determine the SRM ballistics. The code then couples with another application that calculates the eigenvalues of the one dimensional homogenous wave equation. The mean flow parameters and acoustic normal modes are coupled to evaluate the stability theory developed and popularized by Culick [4, 5]. The assumption of a linear, non-dissipative wave in a quiescent fluid remains valid while acoustic amplitudes are small and local gas velocities stay below Mach 0.2. The current study employs the COMSOL multiphysics finite element framework to model the steady flow-field parameters and acoustic normal modes of a generic SRM. The study requires one way coupling of the CFD High Mach Number Flow (HMNF) and mathematics module. The HMNF module evaluates the gas flow inside of a SRM using St. Robert's law to model the solid propellant burn rate, no slip boundary conditions, and the hybrid outflow condition. Results from the HMNF model are verified by comparing the pertinent ballistics parameters with the industry standard code outputs (i.e. pressure drop, thrust, ect.). These results are then used by the coefficient form of the mathematics module to determine the complex eigenvalues of the

  2. Perturbation solutions of combustion instability problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Googerdy, A.; Peddieson, J., Jr.; Ventrice, M.

    1979-01-01

    A method involving approximate modal analysis using the Galerkin method followed by an approximate solution of the resulting modal-amplitude equations by the two-variable perturbation method (method of multiple scales) is applied to two problems of pressure-sensitive nonlinear combustion instability in liquid-fuel rocket motors. One problem exhibits self-coupled instability while the other exhibits mode-coupled instability. In both cases it is possible to carry out the entire linear stability analysis and significant portions of the nonlinear stability analysis in closed form. In the problem of self-coupled instability the nonlinear stability boundary and approximate forms of the limit-cycle amplitudes and growth and decay rates are determined in closed form while the exact limit-cycle amplitudes and growth and decay rates are found numerically. In the problem of mode-coupled instability the limit-cycle amplitudes are found in closed form while the growth and decay rates are found numerically. The behavior of the solutions found by the perturbation method are in agreement with solutions obtained using complex numerical methods.

  3. Investigation of combustion chamber acoustics and its interaction with LOX/H2 spray flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oschwald, M.; Knapp, B.

    2009-09-01

    Acoustics of combustion chambers is investigated experimentally in cold flow and hot fire tests. The performance of absorber elements is analyzed in respect to their effect on combustion chamber eigenfrequencies as well as to their damping characteristics. It is shown that predictions of numerical modal analysis of chamber acoustics are in very good agreement with measurements. In hot fire tests, a burning LOX/H2 spray is acoustically excited with a siren wheel and combustion response is recorded with dynamic pressure sensors and by high-speed visualization of the spray and the flame. Although no combustion instability could be observed, analyzing the temporal and spatial distribution of flame response allowed addressing the question, whether the coupling of acoustics to combustion is via pressure or velocity sensitive processes.

  4. Multi-injector modeling of transverse combustion instability experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shipley, Kevin J.

    waves in the chamber. The computational results are analyzed and compared with experiment results in the time, frequency and modal domains. Results from the three injector model show how applying different velocity forcing amplitudes change the amplitude and spatial location of heat release from the center injector. The instability amplitudes in the simulation are able to be tuned to experiments and produce similar modal combustion responses of the center injector. The reaction model applied was found to play an important role in the spatial and temporal heat release response. Only when the model was calibrated to ignition delay measurements did the heat release response reflect measurements in the experiment. While insightful the simulations are not truly predictive because the driving frequency and forcing function amplitude are input into the simulation. However, the use of this approach as a tool to investigate combustion response is demonstrated. Results from the seven injector simulations provide an insightful look at the mechanisms driving the instability in the combustor. The instability was studied over a range of pressure fluctuations, up to 70% of mean chamber pressure produced in the self-exited simulation. At low amplitudes the transverse instability was found to be supported by both flame impingement with the side wall as well as vortex shedding at the primary acoustic frequency. As instability level grew the primary supporting mechanism shifted to just vortex impingement on the side walls and the greatest growth was seen as additional vortices began impinging between injector elements at the primary acoustic frequency. This research reveals the advantages and limitations of applying these two modeling techniques to simulate multiple injector experiments. The advantage of the three injector model is a simplified geometry which results in faster model development and the ability to more rapidly study the injector response under varying velocity amplitudes

  5. Analyses of Injection-Coupled Combustion Instability from J-2X Gas Generator Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hulka, James R.; Kenny, R. Jeremy; Protz, Chris; Casiano, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    During development of the gas generator for the liquid oxygen/liquid hydrogen propellant J-2X rocket engine, combustion instabilities were observed near the frequency of the first longitudinal acoustic mode of the hot gas combustion chamber duct. These instabilities were similar to intermediate-frequency or buzz-type instabilities as described in historical programs, except for several aspects: 1) the frequencies were low, in the realm of chug; 2) at times the instability oscillation amplitudes were quite large, with peak-to-peak amplitudes exceeding 50% of the mean chamber pressure along with the appearance of harmonics; 3) the chamber excitation was related to but not exactly at the first longitudinal combustion chamber acoustic mode; and 4) the injector provided mass flow rate oscillations induced by capacitance and inertance effects in the injector rather than by organ pipe resonances of the coaxial oxidizer posts. This type of combustion instability is referred to as "injection coupling" because one critical driving source of the instability is mass flow rate oscillations from the injector. However, the type of injection coupling observed here is different than observed in previous instances of buzz instability with coaxial injectors, because of the lower frequencies and lack of influence from the oxidizer post organ pipe resonances. Test data and preliminary analyses of the initial combustion instabilities were presented in several papers at the 5th Liquid Propulsion Subcommittee meeting. Since that time, additional hot-fire tests with several new hardware configurations have been conducted, and additional analyses have been completed. The analytical models described in previous papers have been updated to include the influences of new geometrical configurations, including a different oxidizer injector manifold configuration and a branch pipe in the hot gas duct that supplies gaseous helium during the start transient to pre-spin the turbine. In addition, the

  6. Engine Hydraulic Stability. [injector model for analyzing combustion instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kesselring, R. C.; Sprouse, K. M.

    1977-01-01

    An analytical injector model was developed specifically to analyze combustion instability coupling between the injector hydraulics and the combustion process. This digital computer dynamic injector model will, for any imposed chamber of inlet pressure profile with a frequency ranging from 100 to 3000 Hz (minimum) accurately predict/calculate the instantaneous injector flowrates. The injector system is described in terms of which flow segments enter and leave each pressure node. For each flow segment, a resistance, line lengths, and areas are required as inputs (the line lengths and areas are used in determining inertance). For each pressure node, volume and acoustic velocity are required as inputs (volume and acoustic velocity determine capacitance). The geometric criteria for determining inertances of flow segments and capacitance of pressure nodes was set. Also, a technique was developed for analytically determining time averaged steady-state pressure drops and flowrates for every flow segment in an injector when such data is not known. These pressure drops and flowrates are then used in determining the linearized flow resistance for each line segment of flow.

  7. Fundamental Insights into Combustion Instability Predictions in Aerospace Propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Cheng

    Integrated multi-fidelity modeling has been performed for combustion instability in aerospace propulsion, which includes two levels of analysis: first, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) using hybrid RANS/LES simulations for underlying physics investigations (high-fidelity modeling); second, modal decomposition techniques for diagnostics (analysis & validation); third, development of flame response model using model reduction techniques for practical design applications (low-order model). For the high-fidelity modeling, the relevant CFD code development work is moving towards combustion instability prediction for liquid propulsion system. A laboratory-scale single-element lean direct injection (LDI) gas turbine combustor is used for configuration that produces self-excited combustion instability. The model gas turbine combustor is featured with an air inlet section, air plenum, swirler-venturi-injector assembly, combustion chamber, and exit nozzle. The combustor uses liquid fuel (Jet-A/FT-SPK) and heated air up to 800K. Combustion dynamics investigations are performed with the same geometry and operating conditions concurrently between the experiment and computation at both high (φ=0.6) and low (φ=0.36) equivalence ratios. The simulation is able to reach reasonable agreement with experiment measurements in terms of the pressure signal. Computational analyses are also performed using an acoustically-open geometry to investigate the characteristic hydrodynamics in the combustor with both constant and perturbed inlet mass flow rates. Two hydrodynamic modes are identified by using Dynamic Mode Decomposition (DMD) analysis: Vortex Breakdown Bubble (VBB) and swirling modes. Following that, the closed geometry simulation results are analyzed in three steps. In step one, a detailed cycle analysis shows two physically important couplings in the combustor: first, the acoustic compression enhances the spray drop breakup and vaporization, and generates more gaseous fuel for

  8. Solid Rocket Motor Combustion Instability Modeling in COMSOL Multiphysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischbach, S. R.

    2015-01-01

    Combustion instability modeling of Solid Rocket Motors (SRM) remains a topic of active research. Many rockets display violent fluctuations in pressure, velocity, and temperature originating from the complex interactions between the combustion process, acoustics, and steady-state gas dynamics. Recent advances in defining the energy transport of disturbances within steady flow-fields have been applied by combustion stability modelers to improve the analysis framework. Employing this more accurate global energy balance requires a higher fidelity model of the SRM flow-field and acoustic mode shapes. The current industry standard analysis tool utilizes a one dimensional analysis of the time dependent fluid dynamics along with a quasi-three dimensional propellant grain regression model to determine the SRM ballistics. The code then couples with another application that calculates the eigenvalues of the one dimensional homogenous wave equation. The mean flow parameters and acoustic normal modes are coupled to evaluate the stability theory developed and popularized by Culick. The assumption of a linear, non-dissipative wave in a quiescent fluid remains valid while acoustic amplitudes are small and local gas velocities stay below Mach 0.2. The current study employs the COMSOL Multiphysics finite element framework to model the steady flow-field parameters and acoustic normal modes of a generic SRM. This work builds upon previous efforts to verify the use of the acoustic velocity potential equation (AVPE) laid out by Campos. The acoustic velocity potential (psi) describing the acoustic wave motion in the presence of an inhomogeneous steady high-speed flow is defined by, del squared psi - (lambda/c) squared psi - M x [M x del((del)(psi))] - 2((lambda)(M)/c + M x del(M) x (del)(psi) - 2(lambda)(psi)[M x del(1/c)] = 0. with M as the Mach vector, c as the speed of sound, and ? as the complex eigenvalue. The study requires one way coupling of the CFD High Mach Number Flow (HMNF

  9. The prediction of nonlinear three dimensional combustion instability in liquid rockets with conventional nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, E. A.; Zinn, B. T.

    1973-01-01

    An analytical technique is developed to solve nonlinear three-dimensional, transverse and axial combustion instability problems associated with liquid-propellant rocket motors. The Method of Weighted Residuals is used to determine the nonlinear stability characteristics of a cylindrical combustor with uniform injection of propellants at one end and a conventional DeLaval nozzle at the other end. Crocco's pressure sensitive time-lag model is used to describe the unsteady combustion process. The developed model predicts the transient behavior and nonlinear wave shapes as well as limit-cycle amplitudes and frequencies typical of unstable motor operation. The limit-cycle amplitude increases with increasing sensitivity of the combustion process to pressure oscillations. For transverse instabilities, calculated pressure waveforms exhibit sharp peaks and shallow minima, and the frequency of oscillation is within a few percent of the pure acoustic mode frequency. For axial instabilities, the theory predicts a steep-fronted wave moving back and forth along the combustor.

  10. Method and apparatus for detecting combustion instability in continuous combustion systems

    DOEpatents

    Benson, Kelly J.; Thornton, Jimmy D.; Richards, George A.; Straub, Douglas L.

    2006-08-29

    An apparatus and method to sense the onset of combustion stability is presented. An electrode is positioned in a turbine combustion chamber such that the electrode is exposed to gases in the combustion chamber. A control module applies a voltage potential to the electrode and detects a combustion ionization signal and determines if there is an oscillation in the combustion ionization signal indicative of the occurrence of combustion stability or the onset of combustion instability. A second electrode held in a coplanar but spaced apart manner by an insulating member from the electrode provides a combustion ionization signal to the control module when the first electrode fails. The control module broadcasts a notice if the parameters indicate the combustion process is at the onset of combustion instability or broadcasts an alarm signal if the parameters indicate the combustion process is unstable.

  11. Coherent structures in swirling flows and their role in acoustic combustion control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paschereit, Christian Oliver; Gutmark, Ephraim; Weisenstein, Wolfgang

    1999-09-01

    Interaction between flow instabilities and acoustic resonant modes and their effect on heat release were investigated and controlled in an experimental low-emission swirl stabilized combustor. Acoustic boundary conditions of the combustor were modified to excite combustion instability at various axisymmetric and helical unstable modes in a fully premixed combustion. The combustion unstable modes were related to flow instabilities in the recirculating wakelike region on the combustor axis and the separating shear layer at the sudden expansion (dump plane). Flow field measurements were performed in a water tunnel using a simulated combustor configuration. The water tunnel tests demonstrated the existence of several modes of flow instabilities in a highly swirling flow, modes which were shown to affect the combustion process. Mean and turbulent characteristics of the internal and external swirling shear layers were measured and unstable flow modes were identified. Instability modes during combustion were visualized by phase locked images of OH chemiluminescence. The axisymmetric mode showed large variation of the heat release during one cycle, while the helical modes showed variations in the radial location of maximal heat release. Closed loop active control system was employed to suppress the thermoacoustic pressure oscillations and to reduce NOx emissions. Microphone and OH emission detection sensors monitored the combustion process and provided input to the control system. An acoustic source modulated the airflow and thus affected the mixing process and the combustion. Effective suppression of the pressure oscillations and the concomitant reduction of NOx emissions were associated with a reduced coherence of the flow structures which excited the thermoacoustic instability.

  12. A hybrid 2-zone/WAVE engine combustion model for simulating combustion instabilities during dilute operation

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, Kevin Dean; Wagner, Robert M; Chakravarthy, Veerathu K; Daw, C Stuart; Green Jr, Johney Boyd

    2006-01-01

    Internal combustion engines are operated under conditions of high exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) to reduce NO x emissions and promote enhanced combustion modes such as HCCI. However, high EGR under certain conditions also promotes nonlinear feedback between cycles, leading to the development of combustion instabilities and cyclic variability. We employ a two-zone phenomenological combustion model to simulate the onset of combustion instabilities under highly dilute conditions and to illustrate the impact of these instabilities on emissions and fuel efficiency. The two-zone in-cylinder combustion model is coupled to a WAVE engine-simulation code through a Simulink interface, allowing rapid simulation of several hundred successive engine cycles with many external engine parametric effects included. We demonstrate how this hybrid model can be used to study strategies for adaptive feedback control to reduce cyclic combustion instabilities and, thus, preserve fuel efficiency and reduce emissions.

  13. Pulse combusted acoustic agglomeration apparatus and process

    DOEpatents

    Mansour, Momtaz N.; Chandran, Ravi

    1994-01-01

    An improved apparatus and process for removal of particulates entrained in a gas stream are provided. The removal process employs a pulse combustor to provide an acoustic pressure wave to acoustically enhance agglomeration of particulates which may be collected and removed using a conventional separation apparatus. The apparatus may be employed as a direct fired system for improved operation of gas-operated equipment such as a gas turbine, or may, alternatively, be employed as an add-on subsystem for combustion exhaust clean-up. Additionally, added particulates may include a sorbent for effecting sorption of other contaminants such as sulfur. Various other particulates for contaminant removal may also be introduced into the system as exemplified by alkali-gettering agents.

  14. Pulse combusted acoustic agglomeration apparatus and process

    DOEpatents

    Mansour, Momtaz N.

    1993-01-01

    An improved apparatus and process for removal of particulates entrained in a gas stream are provided. The removal process employs a pulse combustor to provide an acoustic pressure wave to acoustically enhance bimodal agglomeration of particulates which may be collected and removed using a conventional separation apparatus. A particulate having a size different from the size of the particulate in the gas stream to be cleaned is introduced into the system to effectuate the bimodal process. The apparatus may be employed as a direct fired system for improved operation of gas-operated equipment such as a gas turbine, or may, alternatively, be employed as an add-on subsystem for combustion exhaust clean-up. Additionally, the added particulate may be a sorbent for effecting sorption of other contaminants such as sulfur. Various other particulates for contaminant removal may also be introduced into the system as exemplified by alkali-gettering agents.

  15. A Two-dimensional Cartesian and Axisymmetric Study of Combustion-acoustic Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, Caroline; Frendi, Abdelkader

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes a study of a lean premixed (LP) methane-air combustion wave in a two-dimensional Cartesian and axisymmetric coordinate system. Lean premixed combustors provide low emission and high efficiency; however, they are susceptible to combustion instabilities. The present study focuses on the behavior of the flame as it interacts with an external acoustic disturbance. It was found that the flame oscillations increase as the disturbance amplitude is increased. Furthermore, when the frequency of the disturbance is at resonance with a chamber frequency, the instabilities increase. For the axisymmetric geometry, the flame is found to be more unstable compared to the Cartesian case. In some cases, these instabilities were severe and led to flame extinction. In the axisymmetric case, several passive control devices were tested to assess their effectiveness. It is found that an acoustic cavity is better able at controlling the pressure fluctuations in the chamber.

  16. Nonlinear simulations of combustion instabilities with a quasi-1D Navier-Stokes code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haugen, Nils Erland L.; Langørgen, Øyvind; Sannan, Sigurd

    2011-11-01

    As lean premixed combustion systems are more susceptible to combustion instabilities than non-premixed systems, there is an increasing demand for improved numerical design tools that can predict the occurrence of combustion instabilities with high accuracy. The inherent nonlinearities in combustion instabilities can be of crucial importance, and we here propose an approach in which the one-dimensional (1D) Navier-Stokes and scalar transport equations are solved for geometries of variable cross-section. The focus is on attached flames, and for this purpose a new phenomenological model for the unsteady heat release from a flame front is introduced. In the attached flame method (AFM) the heat release occurs over the full length of the flame. The nonlinear code with the use of the AFM approach is validated against analytical results and against an experimental study of thermoacoustic instabilities in oxy-fuel flames by Ditaranto and Hals [Combustion and Flame 146 (2006) 493-512]. The numerical simulations are in accordance with the experimental measurements and the analytical results and both the frequencies and the amplitudes of the resonant acoustic pressure modes are reproduced with good accuracy.

  17. Causes of Combustion Instabilities with Passive and Active Methods of Control for practical application to Gas Turbine Engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornwell, Michael D.

    Combustion at high pressure in applications such as rocket engines and gas turbine engines commonly experience destructive combustion instabilities. These instabilities results from interactions between combustion heat release, fluid mechanics and acoustics. This research explores the significant affect of unstable fluid mechanics processes in augmenting unstable periodic combustion heat release. The frequency of the unstable heat release may shift to match one of the combustors natural acoustic frequencies which then can result in significant energy exchange from chemical to acoustic energy resulting in thermoacoustic instability. The mechanisms of the fluid mechanics in coupling combustion to acoustics are very broad with many varying mechanisms explained in detail in the first chapter. Significant effort is made in understanding these mechanisms in this research in order to find commonalities, useful for mitigating multiple instability mechanisms. The complexity of combustion instabilities makes mitigation of combustion instabilities very difficult as few mitigation methods have historically proven to be very effective for broad ranges of combustion instabilities. This research identifies turbulence intensity near the forward stagnation point and movement of the forward stagnation point as a common link in what would otherwise appear to be very different instabilities. The most common method of stabilization of both premixed and diffusion flame combustion is through the introduction of swirl. Reverse flow along the centerline is introduced to transport heat and chemically active combustion products back upstream to sustain combustion. This research develops methods to suppress the movement of the forward stagnation point without suppressing the development of the vortex breakdown process which is critical to the transport of heat and reactive species necessary for flame stabilization. These methods are useful in suppressing the local turbulence at the forward

  18. Computational fluid dynamic analysis of liquid rocket combustion instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkateswaran, Sankaran; Grenda, Jeffrey; Merkle, Charles L.

    1991-01-01

    The paper presents a computational analysis of liquid rocket combustion instability. Consideration is given to both a fully nonlinear unsteady calculation as well as a new CFD-based linearized stability analysis. An analytical solution for the linear stability problem in a constant area combustion chamber with uniform mean flow is developed to verify the numerical analyses.

  19. Effects of Non-Homogeneities on the Eigenmodes of Acoustic Pressure in Combustion Chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J. S.; Williams, F. A.

    1998-02-01

    Modifications to acoustic eigenmodes in combustion chambers such as those of liquid propellant rocket engines, produced by spatial variations of density and sound speed that arise mainly through progress of combustion processes, are analyzed by using a variational method. The variational principle shows that the eigenvalue is the ratio of a weighted acoustic kinetic energy to a weighted acoustic potential energy, and the eigenfunction is the minimizing function of this ratio. A sample calculation is made for the case in which variations of the properties occur dominantly in the longitudinal direction, with lower temperatures and higher densities prevailing near the injector. The results of the calculation exhibit two major characteristics: the longitudinal density variation aids transfer of acoustic kinetic energy from a lower mode to the adjacent higher mode, so that the pure transverse modes have substantially larger reductions (sometimes exceeding 50%) of their eigenvalues than the combined modes; and variations of the acoustic pressure gradients are found to be larger in high-density regions, so that the acoustic pressure amplitude for purely tangential modes is found to be much higher near the injector than near the nozzle. The higher head acoustic pressure may contribute to the greater sensitivity of acoustic instability to characteristics of the flames near the injectors, as commonly found in engine tests. The improved acoustic eigensolutions can also be helpful in sizing damping devices, such as baffles or acoustic liners.

  20. The acoustic instabilities in magnetized collisional dusty plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, B. P.; Vladimirov, S. V.; Dwivedi, C. B.

    2014-09-15

    The present work investigates the wave propagation in collisional dusty plasmas in the presence of electric and magnetic field. It is shown that the dust ion-acoustic waves may become unstable to the reactive instability whereas dust-acoustic waves may suffer from both reactive and dissipative instabilities. If the wave phase speed is smaller than the plasma drift speed, the instability is of reactive type whereas in the opposite case, the instability becomes dissipative in nature. Plasma in the vicinity of dust may also become unstable to reactive instability with the instability sensitive to the dust material: dielectric dust may considerably quench this instability. This has implications for the dust charging and the use of dust as a probe in the plasma sheath.

  1. Hydrodynamic instabilities in swirl-stabilized combustion: experimental assessment and theoretical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberleithner, Kilian; Stöhr, Michael; Terhaar, Steffen; Paschereit, Oliver

    2014-11-01

    In gas turbine industry, it is common practice to implement swirling jets and associated vortex breakdown to stabilize the flame and to enhance turbulent mixing. The flow field of such swirl-stabilized combustors features a wide range of flow instabilities that promote the formation of large-scale flow structure. This talk presents recent experimental studies at the Technical University Berlin and the German Aerospace Center (DLR) targeting the impact of these instabilities on the combustion performance. Particular focus is placed on two types of instability: (i) a self-excited helical instability, typically known as the precessing vortex core, which crucially affects mixing and flame anchoring; (ii) the axisymmetric Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, which crucially affects the flame dynamics at thermo-acoustic oscillations. All experimental observations are correlated with analytic flow models utilizing linear hydrodynamic stability theory. This mathematical framework reveals the driving mechanisms that lead to the formation, saturation, and suppression of large-scale flow structures and how these mechanisms interact with the combustion process. The authors kindly acknowledge the financial support of the German Research Foundation (DFG) and the Research Association for Combustion Engines (FVV).

  2. Acoustic stabilization of electric arc instabilities in nontransferred plasma torches

    SciTech Connect

    Rat, V.; Coudert, J. F.

    2010-03-08

    Electric arc instabilities in dc plasma torches lead to nonhomogeneous treatments of nanosized solid particles or liquids injected within thermal plasma jets. This paper shows that an additional acoustic resonator mounted on the cathode cavity allows reaching a significant damping of these instabilities, particularly the Helmholtz mode of arc oscillations. The acoustic resonator is coupled with the Helmholtz resonator of the plasma torch limiting the amplitude of arc voltage variations. It is also highlighted that this damping is dependent on friction effects in the acoustic resonator.

  3. Control of Thermo-Acoustics Instabilities: The Multi-Scale Extended Kalman Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le, Dzu K.; DeLaat, John C.; Chang, Clarence T.

    2003-01-01

    "Multi-Scale Extended Kalman" (MSEK) is a novel model-based control approach recently found to be effective for suppressing combustion instabilities in gas turbines. A control law formulated in this approach for fuel modulation demonstrated steady suppression of a high-frequency combustion instability (less than 500Hz) in a liquid-fuel combustion test rig under engine-realistic conditions. To make-up for severe transport-delays on control effect, the MSEK controller combines a wavelet -like Multi-Scale analysis and an Extended Kalman Observer to predict the thermo-acoustic states of combustion pressure perturbations. The commanded fuel modulation is composed of a damper action based on the predicted states, and a tones suppression action based on the Multi-Scale estimation of thermal excitations and other transient disturbances. The controller performs automatic adjustments of the gain and phase of these actions to minimize the Time-Scale Averaged Variances of the pressures inside the combustion zone and upstream of the injector. The successful demonstration of Active Combustion Control with this MSEK controller completed an important NASA milestone for the current research in advanced combustion technologies.

  4. Fingering instability in combustion: an extended view.

    PubMed

    Zik, O; Moses, E

    1999-07-01

    We detail the experimental situation concerning the fingering instability that occurs when a solid fuel is forced to burn against a horizontal oxidizing wind. The instability appears when the Rayleigh number for convection is below criticality. The focus is on the developed fingering state. We present direct measurements of the depletion of oxygen by the front as well as new results that connect heat losses to the characteristic scale of the instability. In addition, we detail the experimental system, elaborate (qualitatively and quantitatively) on the results that were previously presented, and discuss new observations. We also show that the same phenomenological model applies to electrochemical deposition.

  5. External high-frequency control of combustion instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larionov, V. M.; Mitrofanov, G. A.; Kozar, A. N.

    2016-01-01

    The article presents the results of experimental studies of combustion instability in the pulse combustor. Propane-air mixture is burned in the chamber with the flame holder. It was experimentally found that feeding high-frequency sound vibrations into the combustion chamber causes the suppression of pulsating combustion. The oscillation frequency ranges in 870 to 1400 Hz. This corresponds to 9-12 resonance frequencies of oscillations in the combustor. The physical mechanism of the observed phenomenon consists in changing the conditions of formation and destruction of fuel jets in the vortex zone behind the flame holder.

  6. Assessing Spontaneous Combustion Instability with Nonlinear Time Series Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberhart, C. J.; Casiano, M. J.

    2015-01-01

    Considerable interest lies in the ability to characterize the onset of spontaneous instabilities within liquid propellant rocket engine (LPRE) combustion devices. Linear techniques, such as fast Fourier transforms, various correlation parameters, and critical damping parameters, have been used at great length for over fifty years. Recently, nonlinear time series methods have been applied to deduce information pertaining to instability incipiency hidden in seemingly stochastic combustion noise. A technique commonly used in biological sciences known as the Multifractal Detrended Fluctuation Analysis has been extended to the combustion dynamics field, and is introduced here as a data analysis approach complementary to linear ones. Advancing, a modified technique is leveraged to extract artifacts of impending combustion instability that present themselves a priori growth to limit cycle amplitudes. Analysis is demonstrated on data from J-2X gas generator testing during which a distinct spontaneous instability was observed. Comparisons are made to previous work wherein the data were characterized using linear approaches. Verification of the technique is performed by examining idealized signals and comparing two separate, independently developed tools.

  7. Acoustic mode in numerical calculations of subsonic combustion

    SciTech Connect

    O'Rourke, P.J.

    1984-01-01

    A review is given of the methods for treating the acoustic mode in numerical calculations of subsonic combustion. In numerical calculations of subsonic combustion, treatment of the acoustic mode has been a problem for many researchers. It is widely believed that Mach number and acoustic wave effects are negligible in many subsonic combustion problems. Yet, the equations that are often solved contain the acoustic mode, and many numerical techniques for solving these equations are inefficient when the Mach number is much smaller than one. This paper reviews two general approaches to ameliorating this problem. In the first approach, equations are solved that ignore acoustic waves and Mach number effects. Section II of this paper gives two such formulations which are called the Elliptic Primitive and the Stream and Potential Function formulations. We tell how these formulations are obtained and give some advantages and disadvantages of solving them numerically. In the second approach to the problem of calculating subsonic combustion, the fully compressible equations are solved by numerical methods that are efficient, but treat the acoustic mode inaccurately, in low Mach number calculations. Section III of this paper introduces two of these numerical methods in the context of an analysis of their stability properties when applied to the acoustic wave equations. These are called the ICE and acoustic subcycling methods. It is shown that even though these methods are more efficient than traditional methods for solving subsonic combustion problems, they still can be inefficient when the Mach number is very small. Finally, a method called Pressure Gradient Scaling is described that, when used in conjunction with either the ICE or acoustic subcycling methods, allows for very efficient numerical solution of subsonic combustion problems. 11 refs.

  8. Solar wind driven dust acoustic instability with Lorentzian kappa distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Arshad, Kashif; Ehsan, Zahida; Khan, S. A.; Mahmood, S.

    2014-02-15

    In a three species electron-ion-dust plasma following a generalized non-Maxwellian distribution function (Lorentzian or kappa), it is shown that a kinetic instability of dust-acoustic mode exists. The instability threshold is affected when such (quasineutral) plasma permeates through another static plasma. Such case is of interest when the solar wind is streaming through the cometary plasma in the presence of interstellar dust. In the limits of phase velocity of the waves larger and smaller than the thermal velocity of dust particles, the dispersion properties and growth rate of dust-acoustic mode are investigated analytically with validation via numerical analysis.

  9. Analyses of Longitudinal Mode Combustion Instability in J-2X Gas Generator Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hulka, J. R.; Protz, C. S.; Casiano, M. J.; Kenny, R. J.

    2011-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne are developing a liquid oxygen/liquid hydrogen rocket engine for future upper stage and trans-lunar applications. This engine, designated the J-2X, is a higher pressure, higher thrust variant of the Apollo-era J-2 engine. The contract for development was let to Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne in 2006. Over the past several years, development of the gas generator for the J-2X engine has progressed through a variety of workhorse injector, chamber, and feed system configurations on the component test stand at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Several of the initial configurations resulted in combustion instability of the workhorse gas generator assembly at a frequency near the first longitudinal mode of the combustion chamber. In this paper, several aspects of these combustion instabilities are discussed, including injector, combustion chamber, feed system, and nozzle influences. To ensure elimination of the instabilities at the engine level, and to understand the stability margin, the gas generator system has been modeled at the NASA MSFC with two techniques, the Rocket Combustor Interaction Design and Analysis (ROCCID) code and a lumped-parameter MATLAB(TradeMark) model created as an alternative calculation to the ROCCID methodology. To correctly predict the instability characteristics of all the chamber and injector geometries and test conditions as a whole, several inputs to the submodels in ROCCID and the MATLAB(TradeMark) model were modified. Extensive sensitivity calculations were conducted to determine how to model and anchor a lumped-parameter injector response, and finite-element and acoustic analyses were conducted on several complicated combustion chamber geometries to determine how to model and anchor the chamber response. These modifications and their ramification for future stability analyses of this type are discussed.

  10. Route to chaos for combustion instability in ducted laminar premixed flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabiraj, Lipika; Saurabh, Aditya; Wahi, Pankaj; Sujith, R. I.

    2012-06-01

    Complex thermoacoustic oscillations are observed experimentally in a simple laboratory combustor that burns lean premixed fuel-air mixture, as a result of nonlinear interaction between the acoustic field and the combustion processes. The application of nonlinear time series analysis, particularly techniques based on phase space reconstruction from acquired pressure data, reveals rich dynamical behavior and the existence of several complex states. A route to chaos for thermoacoustic instability is established experimentally for the first time. We show that, as the location of the heat source is gradually varied, self-excited periodic thermoacoustic oscillations undergo transition to chaos via the Ruelle-Takens scenario.

  11. Amplification of Reynolds number dependent processes by wave distortion. [acoustic instability of liquid propellant rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ventrice, M. B.; Fang, J. C.; Purdy, K. R.

    1975-01-01

    A system using a hot-wire transducer as an analog of a liquid droplet of propellant was employed to investigate the ingredients of the acoustic instability of liquid-propellant rocket engines. It was assumed that the combustion process was vaporization-limited and that the combustion chamber was acoustically similar to a closed-closed right-circular cylinder. Before studying the hot-wire closed-loop system (the analog system), a microphone closed-loop system, which used the response of a microphone as the source of a linear feedback exciting signal, was investigated to establish the characteristics of self-sustenance of acoustic fields. Self-sustained acoustic fields were found to occur only at resonant frequencies of the chamber. In the hot-wire closed-loop system, the response of hot-wire anemometer was used as the source of the feedback exciting signal. The self-sustained acoustic fields which developed in the system were always found to be harmonically distorted and to have as their fundamental frquency a resonant frequency for which there also existed a second resonant frequency which was approximately twice the fundamental frequency.

  12. Control of Combustion-Instabilities Through Various Passive Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frendi, Abdelkader; Nesman, Tom; Canabal, Francisco

    2005-01-01

    Results of a computational study on the effectiveness of various passive devices for the control of combustion instabilities are presented. An axi-symmetric combustion chamber is considered. The passive control devices investigated are, baffles, Helmholtz resonators and quarter-waves. The results show that a Helmholtz resonator with a smooth orifice achieves the best control results, while a baffle is the least effective for the frequency tested. At high sound pressure levels, the Helmholtz resonator is less effective. It is also found that for a quarter wave, the smoothness of the orifice has the opposite effect than the Helmholtz resonator, i.e. results in less control.

  13. Combustion instability and active control: Alternative fuels, augmentors, and modeling heat release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sammy Ace

    Experimental and analytical studies were conducted to explore thermo-acoustic coupling during the onset of combustion instability in various air-breathing combustor configurations. These include a laboratory-scale 200-kW dump combustor and a 100-kW augmentor featuring a v-gutter flame holder. They were used to simulate main combustion chambers and afterburners in aero engines, respectively. The three primary themes of this work includes: 1) modeling heat release fluctuations for stability analysis, 2) conducting active combustion control with alternative fuels, and 3) demonstrating practical active control for augmentor instability suppression. The phenomenon of combustion instabilities remains an unsolved problem in propulsion engines, mainly because of the difficulty in predicting the fluctuating component of heat release without extensive testing. A hybrid model was developed to describe both the temporal and spatial variations in dynamic heat release, using a separation of variables approach that requires only a limited amount of experimental data. The use of sinusoidal basis functions further reduced the amount of data required. When the mean heat release behavior is known, the only experimental data needed for detailed stability analysis is one instantaneous picture of heat release at the peak pressure phase. This model was successfully tested in the dump combustor experiments, reproducing the correct sign of the overall Rayleigh index as well as the remarkably accurate spatial distribution pattern of fluctuating heat release. Active combustion control was explored for fuel-flexible combustor operation using twelve different jet fuels including bio-synthetic and Fischer-Tropsch types. Analysis done using an actuated spray combustion model revealed that the combustion response times of these fuels were similar. Combined with experimental spray characterizations, this suggested that controller performance should remain effective with various alternative fuels

  14. Mechanism of instabilities in turbulent combustion leading to flashback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, J. O.; Vaneveld, L.; Ghoniem, A. F.; Daily, J. W.; Oppenheim, A. K.; Korschelt, D.; Hubbard, G. L.

    1981-01-01

    High-speed schlieren cinematography, combined with synchronized pressure transducer records, was used to investigate the mechanism of combustion instabilities leading to flashback. The combustion chamber had an oblong rectangular cross-section to model the essential features of planar flow, and was provided with a rearward facing step acting as a flameholder. As the rich limit was approached, three instability modes were observed: (1) humming - a significant increase in the amplitude of the vortex pattern; (2) buzzing - a large-scale oscillation of the flame; and (3) chucking - a cyclic reformation of the flame, which results in flashback. The mechanism of these phenomena is ascribed to the action of vortices in the recirculation zone and their interactions with the trailing vortex pattern of the turbulent mixing layer behind the step.

  15. A review of acoustic dampers applied to combustion chambers in aerospace industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Dan; Li, X. Y.

    2015-04-01

    In engine combustion systems such as rockets, aero-engines and gas turbines, pressure fluctuations are always present, even during normal operation. One of design prerequisites for the engine combustors is stable operation, since large-amplitude self-sustained pressure fluctuations (also known as combustion instability) have the potential to cause serious structural damage and catastrophic engine failure. To dampen pressure fluctuations and to reduce noise, acoustic dampers are widely applied as a passive control means to stabilize combustion/engine systems. However, they cannot respond to the dynamic changes of operating conditions and tend to be effective over certain narrow range of frequencies. To maintain their optimum damping performance over a broad frequency range, extensive researches have been conducted during the past four decades. The present work is to summarize the status, challenges and progress of implementing such acoustic dampers on engine systems. The damping effect and mechanism of various acoustic dampers, such as Helmholtz resonators, perforated liners, baffles, half- and quarter-wave tube are introduced first. A summary of numerical, experimental and theoretical studies are then presented to review the progress made so far. Finally, as an alternative means, ';tunable acoustic dampers' are discussed. Potential, challenges and issues associated with the dampers practical implementation are highlighted.

  16. Baseline Computational Fluid Dynamics Methodology for Longitudinal-Mode Liquid-Propellant Rocket Combustion Instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, R. J.

    2005-01-01

    A computational method for the analysis of longitudinal-mode liquid rocket combustion instability has been developed based on the unsteady, quasi-one-dimensional Euler equations where the combustion process source terms were introduced through the incorporation of a two-zone, linearized representation: (1) A two-parameter collapsed combustion zone at the injector face, and (2) a two-parameter distributed combustion zone based on a Lagrangian treatment of the propellant spray. The unsteady Euler equations in inhomogeneous form retain full hyperbolicity and are integrated implicitly in time using second-order, high-resolution, characteristic-based, flux-differencing spatial discretization with Roe-averaging of the Jacobian matrix. This method was initially validated against an analytical solution for nonreacting, isentropic duct acoustics with specified admittances at the inflow and outflow boundaries. For small amplitude perturbations, numerical predictions for the amplification coefficient and oscillation period were found to compare favorably with predictions from linearized small-disturbance theory as long as the grid exceeded a critical density (100 nodes/wavelength). The numerical methodology was then exercised on a generic combustor configuration using both collapsed and distributed combustion zone models with a short nozzle admittance approximation for the outflow boundary. In these cases, the response parameters were varied to determine stability limits defining resonant coupling onset.

  17. Combustion instability investigations on the BR710 jet engine

    SciTech Connect

    Konrad, W.; Brehm, N.; Kameier, F.; Freeman, C.; Day, I.J.

    1998-01-01

    During the development of the BR710 jet engine, audible combustor instabilities (termed rumble) occurred. Amplitudes measured with test cell microphones were up to 130 dB at around 100 Hz. Disturbances of this amplitude are clearly undesirable, even if only present during start-up, and a research program was initiated to eliminate the problem. Presented here is the methodical and structured approach used to identify, understand, and remove the instability. Some reference is made to theory, which was used for guidance, but the focus of the work is on the research done to find the cause of the problem and to correct it. The investigation followed two separate, but parallel, paths--one looking in detail at individual components of the engine to identify possible involvement in the instability and the other looking at the pressure signals from various parts of a complete engine to help pinpoint the source of the disturbance. The main cause of the BR710 combustor rumble was found to be a self-excited aerodynamic instability arising from the design of the fuel injector head. In the end, minor modifications lead to spray pattern changes, which greatly reduced the combustor noise. As a result of this work, new recommendation are made for reducing the risk of combustion instabilities in jet engines.

  18. Some experimental results on the L-star instability of metallized composite propellants. [combustion instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, R. N.

    1975-01-01

    Experimental results are reported on the L-star instability characteristics of three AP/composite propellants. The metal content of the propellants is 2, 16, and 16%. Chuffing, bulk mode oscillations, and time-independent combustion are observed with all three of these propellants. The stability boundary, defined as the boundary between time-independent and unstable combustion, is found to be well defined for two of the propellants in agreement with recognized trends available in the literature on other propellants. The frequency of bulk mode oscillations is presented as a function of the chamber characteristic length. One of the propellants tested has shown bulk mode instability at as high a pressure as 217 psia.

  19. Controllable Solid Propulsion Combustion and Acoustic Knowledge Base Improvements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCauley, Rachel; Fischbach, Sean; Fredrick, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Controllable solid propulsion systems have distinctive combustion and acoustic environments that require enhanced testing and analysis techniques to progress this new technology from development to production. In a hot gas valve actuating system, the movement of the pintle through the hot gas exhibits complex acoustic disturbances and flow characteristics that can amplify induced pressure loads that can damage or detonate the rocket motor. The geometry of a controllable solid propulsion gas chamber can set up unique unsteady flow which can feed acoustic oscillations patterns that require characterization. Research in this area aids in the understanding of how best to design, test, and analyze future controllable solid rocket motors using the lessons learned from past government programs as well as university research and testing. This survey paper will give the reader a better understanding of the potentially amplifying affects propagated by a controllable solid rocket motor system and the knowledge of the tools current available to address these acoustic disturbances in a preliminary design. Finally the paper will supply lessons learned from past experiences which will allow the reader to come away with understanding of what steps need to be taken when developing a controllable solid rocket propulsion system. The focus of this survey will be on testing and analysis work published by solid rocket programs and from combustion and acoustic books, conference papers, journal articles, and additionally from subject matter experts dealing currently with controllable solid rocket acoustic analysis.

  20. Filamentation instability of nonextensive current-driven plasma in the ion acoustic frequency range

    SciTech Connect

    Khorashadizadeh, S. M. Rastbood, E.; Niknam, A. R.

    2014-12-15

    The filamentation and ion acoustic instabilities of nonextensive current-driven plasma in the ion acoustic frequency range have been studied using the Lorentz transformation formulas. Based on the kinetic theory, the possibility of filamentation instability and its growth rate as well as the ion acoustic instability have been investigated. The results of the research show that the possibility and growth rate of these instabilities are significantly dependent on the electron nonextensive parameter and drift velocity. Besides, the increase of electrons nonextensive parameter and drift velocity lead to the increase of the growth rates of both instabilities. In addition, the wavelength region in which the filamentation instability occurs is more stretched in the presence of higher values of drift velocity and nonextensive parameter. Finally, the results of filamentation and ion acoustic instabilities have been compared and the conditions for filamentation instability to be dominant mode of instability have been presented.

  1. Low-frequency combustion instability mechanisms in a side-dump combustor

    SciTech Connect

    Samaniego, J.M.; Yip, B.; Poinsot, T.; Candel, S. . E.M2.C Lab.)

    1993-09-01

    This article describes a study of a two-dimensional two-inlet side-dump combustor fed with a mixture of air and propane. The present results concern symmetric operating conditions with respect to the two inlets. Stable and unstable regimes which depend on the inlet velocity and the equivalence ratio have been identified. Schlieren visualization, radical imaging with an intensified CCD camera, and simultaneous pressure, inlet velocity and C[sub 2] emission light measurements, have been used to characterize the combustor behavior. Imaging of the flowfield has provided an insight on the flame structure and its interaction with the entering jets. Two low-frequency unstable modes (a fuel-rich regime and a fuel-lean regime with an instability frequency around 500 Hz) were studied using a conditional imaging technique. It was found that unsteady heat release occurs in two different ways: pulsating combustion in the dome region and convection of reaction zones downstream of the jet-impingement region. Flame oscillations were induced by a periodic impingement of the jets on the centerplane of the chamber. Pressure fluctuations in the test section were roughly in phase with the global C[sub 2] emission, indicating that the instabilities were sustained by energy addition to the acoustic field. A two-dimensional distribution of the Rayleigh index computed for each unstable mode indicated that the fuel-lean mode was driven by the unsteady heat release in the dome region whereas the fuel-rich mode was driven by the flame oscillations downstream of the jet-impingement region. The transition from the fuel-lean to the fuel-rich instability featured a shift of driving mechanism. This study shows that even in the idealized geometry the coupling mechanisms leading to low-frequency combustion instabilities are not unique and illustrates the difficulty of devising predictive models.

  2. On Nonlinear Combustion Instability in Liquid Propellant Rocket Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, J. D. (Technical Monitor); Flandro, Gary A.; Majdalani, Joseph; Sims, Joseph D.

    2004-01-01

    All liquid propellant rocket instability calculations in current use have limited value in the predictive sense and serve mainly as a correlating framework for the available data sets. The well-known n-t model first introduced by Crocco and Cheng in 1956 is still used as the primary analytical tool of this type. A multitude of attempts to establish practical analytical methods have achieved only limited success. These methods usually produce only stability boundary maps that are of little use in making critical design decisions in new motor development programs. Recent progress in understanding the mechanisms of combustion instability in solid propellant rockets"' provides a firm foundation for a new approach to prediction, diagnosis, and correction of the closely related problems in liquid motor instability. For predictive tools to be useful in the motor design process, they must have the capability to accurately determine: 1) time evolution of the pressure oscillations and limit amplitude, 2) critical triggering pulse amplitude, and 3) unsteady heat transfer rates at injector surfaces and chamber walls. The method described in this paper relates these critical motor characteristics directly to system design parameters. Inclusion of mechanisms such as wave steepening, vorticity production and transport, and unsteady detonation wave phenomena greatly enhance the representation of key features of motor chamber oscillatory behavior. The basic theoretical model is described and preliminary computations are compared to experimental data. A plan to develop the new predictive method into a comprehensive analysis tool is also described.

  3. Filamentation instability of current-driven dust ion-acoustic waves in a collisional dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Niknam, A. R.; Haghtalab, T.; Khorashadizadeh, S. M.

    2011-11-15

    A theoretical investigation has been made of the dust ion-acoustic filamentation instability in an unmagnetized current-driven dusty plasma by using the Lorentz transformation formulas. The effect of collision between the charged particles with neutrals and their thermal motion on this instability is considered. Developing the filamentation instability of the current-driven dust ion-acoustic wave allows us to determine the period and the establishment time of the filamentation structure and threshold for instability development.

  4. Acoustic measurement of boiling instabilities in a solar receiver

    SciTech Connect

    Beattie, A. G.

    1980-11-01

    An acoustic technique was developed and used to search for boiling instabilities in the prototype receiver for the Barstow 10 MW Solar Thermal Pilot Plant. Instabilities, consisting of movements of the transition zone between regions of nucleate and film boiling, were observed. The periods of these fluctuations ranged between three and fifteen seconds with no indications of preferred frequencies. The peak to peak amplitudes of the fluctuations averaged 0.4 meters under steady state conditions at absorbed power levels between 2.0 and 3.2 MW. Transient fluctuations with amplitudes up to 2.0 meters were also seen. These transients usually lasted between 30 and 300 seconds. It was not possible to pinpoint the causes of these transients.

  5. Experimental investigation of high-frequency combustion instabilities in liquid rocket engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richecoeur, F.; Ducruix, S.; Scouflaire, P.; Candel, S.

    2008-01-01

    High-frequency instabilities in liquid propellant rocket engines are experimentally investigated in a model scale research facility. Liquid oxygen and gaseous methane are injected in the combustion chamber at 0.9 MPa through three coaxial injectors vertically aligned. High-amplitude transverse pressure fluctuations are generated in the chamber at frequencies above 1 kHz by a rotating toothed wheel actuator which periodically blocks an auxiliary lateral nozzle. The chamber eigenmodes are identified in a first stage by examining the response of the system to a linear frequency sweep. In a second stage the chamber is excited at the frequency corresponding to the first transverse (1T) mode. The effect of the pressure mode on combustion is observed with intensified and high-speed cameras. Photo-multipliers and pressure sensors are also used to characterize the system behavior and examine phase relations between the corresponding signals. Flame structure modifications observed for specific injection conditions correspond to a strong coupling between acoustics and combustion which notably modifies the flow dynamics, augments the flame expansion rate and enhances heat transfer to the wall.

  6. Dynamic properties of combustion instability in a lean premixed gas-turbine combustor.

    PubMed

    Gotoda, Hiroshi; Nikimoto, Hiroyuki; Miyano, Takaya; Tachibana, Shigeru

    2011-03-01

    We experimentally investigate the dynamic behavior of the combustion instability in a lean premixed gas-turbine combustor from the viewpoint of nonlinear dynamics. A nonlinear time series analysis in combination with a surrogate data method clearly reveals that as the equivalence ratio increases, the dynamic behavior of the combustion instability undergoes a significant transition from stochastic fluctuation to periodic oscillation through low-dimensional chaotic oscillation. We also show that a nonlinear forecasting method is useful for predicting the short-term dynamic behavior of the combustion instability in a lean premixed gas-turbine combustor, which has not been addressed in the fields of combustion science and physics.

  7. Characterization of complexities in combustion instability in a lean premixed gas-turbine model combustor.

    PubMed

    Gotoda, Hiroshi; Amano, Masahito; Miyano, Takaya; Ikawa, Takuya; Maki, Koshiro; Tachibana, Shigeru

    2012-12-01

    We characterize complexities in combustion instability in a lean premixed gas-turbine model combustor by nonlinear time series analysis to evaluate permutation entropy, fractal dimensions, and short-term predictability. The dynamic behavior in combustion instability near lean blowout exhibits a self-affine structure and is ascribed to fractional Brownian motion. It undergoes chaos by the onset of combustion oscillations with slow amplitude modulation. Our results indicate that nonlinear time series analysis is capable of characterizing complexities in combustion instability close to lean blowout.

  8. Characterization of complexities in combustion instability in a lean premixed gas-turbine model combustor.

    PubMed

    Gotoda, Hiroshi; Amano, Masahito; Miyano, Takaya; Ikawa, Takuya; Maki, Koshiro; Tachibana, Shigeru

    2012-12-01

    We characterize complexities in combustion instability in a lean premixed gas-turbine model combustor by nonlinear time series analysis to evaluate permutation entropy, fractal dimensions, and short-term predictability. The dynamic behavior in combustion instability near lean blowout exhibits a self-affine structure and is ascribed to fractional Brownian motion. It undergoes chaos by the onset of combustion oscillations with slow amplitude modulation. Our results indicate that nonlinear time series analysis is capable of characterizing complexities in combustion instability close to lean blowout. PMID:23278063

  9. Dust acoustic instability in a strongly coupled dusty plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, M.; Kalman, G. J.; Hartmann, P.; Goree, J.

    2013-10-01

    Dusty plasmas are plasmas containing charged micron to sub-micron size dust grains (solid particulates). Because the grains can be multiply charged and are much more massive than the ions, the presence of dust can lead to novel waves such as the dust acoustic wave, which is a compressional wave that can be excited by a flow of ions that is driven by an electric field. Moreover, the large dust charge can result in strong Coulomb coupling between the dust grains, where the electrostatic energy between neighboring grains is larger than their thermal (kinetic) energy. When the coupling between dust grains is strong, but not large enough for crystallization, the dust is in the strongly coupled liquid phase. This poster theoretically investigates the dust acoustic instability, which is driven by sub-thermal ion flow, in a three-dimensional dusty plasma in the strongly coupled liquid phase. It is found that strong coupling enhances the instability. The application is to microgravity experiments with dusty plasma planned for the PK-4 and PlasmaLab instruments, which are in development for the International Space Station. Microgravity conditions enable the preparation of dust clouds under these sub-thermal ion flow conditions by avoiding the need for strong electric fields to levitate the dust grains.

  10. Effect of strong coupling on dust acoustic waves and instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, M.; Kalman, G.

    1998-10-21

    The presence of charged dust in a plasma can lead to very low frequency dust acoustic waves and instabilities. In certain laboratory plasmas the dust is strongly coupled, as characterized by the condition {gamma}{sub d}=Q{sub d}{sup 2} exp(-d/{lambda}{sub D})/dT{sub d}{>=}1, where Q{sub d} is the dust charge, d is the intergrain spacing, T{sub d} is the dust thermal energy, and {lambda}{sub D} is the plasma screening length. When the dust is strongly coupled, the spatial correlation of the grains can affect the dispersion relation of these waves. We review our recent work [1] on the dispersion properties of dust acoustic waves in the strongly coupled (liquid) phase in a dusty plasma, including also the effects of dust-neutral collisions. We then discuss a preliminary analysis of the effect of strong dust coupling on an ion dust two-stream instability in a collisional dusty plasma. Applications to laboratory dusty plasmas are discussed.

  11. Effect of strong coupling on dust acoustic waves and instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, M. Kalman, G.

    1998-10-01

    The presence of charged dust in a plasma can lead to very low frequency dust acoustic waves and instabilities. In certain laboratory plasmas the dust is strongly coupled, as characterized by the condition {Gamma}{sub d}=Q{sub d}{sup 2} exp({minus}d/{lambda}{sub D})/dT{sub d}{ge}1, where Q{sub d} is the dust charge, {ital d} is the intergrain spacing, T{sub d} is the dust thermal energy, and {lambda}{sub D} is the plasma screening length. When the dust is strongly coupled, the spatial correlation of the grains can affect the dispersion relation of these waves. We review our recent work [1] on the dispersion properties of dust acoustic waves in the strongly coupled (liquid) phase in a dusty plasma, including also the effects of dust-neutral collisions. We then discuss a preliminary analysis of the effect of strong dust coupling on an ion dust two-stream instability in a collisional dusty plasma. Applications to laboratory dusty plasmas are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  12. Elimination of High-Frequency Combustion Instability in the Fastrac Engine Thrust Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rocker, Marvin; Nesman, Tomas E.

    1999-01-01

    A series of tests were conducted to stabilize the combustion of the Fastrac engine thrust chamber. The first few stability tests resulted in unstable combustion due ineffective acoustic cavity designs. The thrust chamber exhibited unstable combustion in the first-tangential mode and its harmonics. Combustion was stabilized by increasing the volume of the acoustic cavities and by plugging the dump-cooling orifices so that the cavities were uncooled. Although the first few stability tests resulted in unstable combustion, prior and subsequent long-duration performance tests of the Fastrac thrust chamber were spontaneously stable. Stability considerations during the injector faceplate design were based on the Hewitt correlation.

  13. Characterization of degeneration process in combustion instability based on dynamical systems theory.

    PubMed

    Gotoda, Hiroshi; Okuno, Yuta; Hayashi, Kenta; Tachibana, Shigeru

    2015-11-01

    We present a detailed study on the characterization of the degeneration process in combustion instability based on dynamical systems theory. We deal with combustion instability in a lean premixed-type gas-turbine model combustor, one of the fundamentally and practically important combustion systems. The dynamic behavior of combustion instability in close proximity to lean blowout is dominated by a stochastic process and transits to periodic oscillations created by thermoacoustic combustion oscillations via chaos with increasing equivalence ratio [Chaos 21, 013124 (2011); Chaos 22, 043128 (2012)]. Thermoacoustic combustion oscillations degenerate with a further increase in the equivalence ratio, and the dynamic behavior leads to chaotic fluctuations via quasiperiodic oscillations. The concept of dynamical systems theory presented here allows us to clarify the nonlinear characteristics hidden in complex combustion dynamics.

  14. Characterization of degeneration process in combustion instability based on dynamical systems theory.

    PubMed

    Gotoda, Hiroshi; Okuno, Yuta; Hayashi, Kenta; Tachibana, Shigeru

    2015-11-01

    We present a detailed study on the characterization of the degeneration process in combustion instability based on dynamical systems theory. We deal with combustion instability in a lean premixed-type gas-turbine model combustor, one of the fundamentally and practically important combustion systems. The dynamic behavior of combustion instability in close proximity to lean blowout is dominated by a stochastic process and transits to periodic oscillations created by thermoacoustic combustion oscillations via chaos with increasing equivalence ratio [Chaos 21, 013124 (2011); Chaos 22, 043128 (2012)]. Thermoacoustic combustion oscillations degenerate with a further increase in the equivalence ratio, and the dynamic behavior leads to chaotic fluctuations via quasiperiodic oscillations. The concept of dynamical systems theory presented here allows us to clarify the nonlinear characteristics hidden in complex combustion dynamics. PMID:26651761

  15. Triggered instabilities in rocket motors and active combustion control for an incinerator afterburner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wicker, Josef M.

    1999-11-01

    Two branches of research are conducted in this thesis. The first deals with nonlinear combustion response as a mechanism for triggering combustion instabilities in solid rocket motors. A nonlinear wave equation is developed to study a wide class of combustion response functions to second-order in fluctuation amplitude. Conditions for triggering are derived from analysis of limit cycles, and regions of triggering are found in parametric space. Introduction of linear cross-coupling and quadratic self-coupling among the acoustic modes appears to be how the nonlinear combustion response produces triggering to a stable limit cycle. Regions of initial conditions corresponding to stable pulses were found, suggesting that stability depends on initial phase angle and harmonic content, as well as the composite amplitude, of the pulse. Also, dependence of nonlinear stability upon system parameters is considered. The second part of this thesis presents research for a controller to improve the emissions of an incinerator afterburner. The developed controller was experimentally tested at the Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC), on a 50kW-scale model of an afterburner for Naval shipboard incinerator applications. Acoustic forcing of the combustor's reacting shear layer is used to control the formation of coherent vortical structures, within which favorable fuel-air mixing and efficient combustion can occur. Laser-based measurements of CO emissions are used as the performance indicator for the combustor. The controller algorithm is based on the downhill simplex method and adjusts the shear layer forcing parameters in order to minimize the CO emissions. The downhill simplex method was analyzed with respect to its behavior in the face of time-variation of the plant and noise in the sensor signal, and was modified to account for these difficulties. The control system has experimentally demonstrated the ability (1) to find optimal control action for single- and multi-variable control, (2

  16. Acoustic excitation of droplet combustion in microgravity and normal gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Dattarajan, S.; Lutomirski, A.; Lobbia, R.; Smith, O.I.; Karagozian, A.R.

    2006-01-01

    This experimental study focused on methanol droplet combustion characteristics during exposure to external acoustical perturbations in both normal gravity and microgravity. Emphasis was placed on examination of excitation conditions in which the droplet was situated (1) at or near a velocity antinode (pressure node), where the droplet experienced the greatest effects of velocity perturbations, or (2) at a velocity node (pressure antinode), where the droplet was exposed to minimal velocity fluctuations. Acoustic excitation had a significantly greater influence on droplet-burning rates and flame structures in microgravity than in normal gravity. In normal gravity, acoustic excitation of droplets situated near a pressure node produced only very moderate increases in burning rate (about 11-15% higher than for nonacoustically excited, burning droplets) and produced no significant change in burning rate near a pressure antinode. In microgravity, for the same range in sound pressure level, droplet burning rates increased by over 75 and 200% for droplets situated at or near pressure antinode and pressure node locations, respectively. Observed flame deformation for droplets situated near pressure nodes or antinodes were generally consistent with the notion of acoustic radiation forces arising in connection with acoustic streaming, yet both velocity and pressure perturbations were seen to affect flame behavior, even when the droplet was situated precisely at or extremely close to node or antinode locations. Displacements of the droplet with respect to node or antinode locations were observed to have a measureable effect on droplet burning rates, yet acoustic accelerations associated with such displacements, as an analogy to gravitational acceleration, did not completely explain the significant increases in burning rate resulting from the excitation.

  17. Prediction of the Acoustic Field Associated with Instability Wave Source Model for a Compressible Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golubev, Vladimir; Mankbadi, Reda R.; Dahl, Milo D.; Kiraly, L. James (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This paper provides preliminary results of the study of the acoustic radiation from the source model representing spatially-growing instability waves in a round jet at high speeds. The source model is briefly discussed first followed by the analysis of the produced acoustic directivity pattern. Two integral surface techniques are discussed and compared for prediction of the jet acoustic radiation field.

  18. Mixing fuel particles for space combustion research using acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Robert J.; Johnson, Jerome A.; Klimek, Robert B.

    1988-01-01

    Part of the microgravity science to be conducted aboard the Shuttle (STS) involves combustion using solids, particles, and liquid droplets. The central experimental facts needed for characterization of premixed quiescent particle cloud flames cannot be adequately established by normal gravity studies alone. The experimental results to date of acoustically mixing a prototypical particulate, lycopodium, in a 5 cm diameter by 75 cm long flame tube aboard a Learjet aircraft flying a 20 sec low gravity trajectory are described. Photographic and light detector instrumentation combine to measure and characterize particle cloud uniformity.

  19. The Effect of Resistance on Rocket Injector Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, C. J.

    2015-01-01

    Combustion instability, where unsteady heat release couples with acoustic modes, has long been an area of concern in liquid rocket engines. Accurate modeling of the acoustic normal modes of the combustion chamber is important to understanding and preventing combustion instability. The injector resistance can have a significant influence on the chamber normal mode shape, and hence on the system stability.

  20. Acoustic instability driven by cosmic-ray streaming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begelman, Mitchell C.; Zweibel, Ellen G.

    1994-08-01

    We study the linear stability of compressional waves in a medium through which cosmic rays stream at the Alfven speed due to strong coupling with Alfven waves. Acoustic waves can be driven unstable by the cosmic-ray drift, provided that the streaming speed is sufficiently large compared to the thermal sound speed. Two effects can cause instability: (1) the heating of the thermal gas due to the damping of Alfven waves driven unstable by cosmic-ray streaming; and (2) phase shifts in the cosmic-ray pressure perturbation caused by the combination of cosmic-ray streaming and diffusion. The instability does not depend on the magnitude of the background cosmic-ray pressure gradient, and occurs whether or not cosmic-ray diffusion is important relative to streaming. When the cosmic-ray pressure is small compared to the gas pressure, or cosmic-ray diffusion is strong, the instability manifests itself as a weak overstability of slow magnetosonic waves. Larger cosmic-ray pressure gives rise to new hybrid modes, which can be strongly unstable in the limits of both weak and strong cosmic-ray diffusion and in the presence of thermal conduction. Parts of our analysis parallel earlier work by McKenzie & Webb (which were brought to our attention after this paper was accepted for publication), but our treatment of diffusive effects, thermal conduction, and nonlinearities represent significant extensions. Although the linear growth rate of instability is independent of the background cosmic-ray pressure gradient, the onset of nonlinear eff ects does depend on absolute value of DEL (vector differential operator) Pc. At the onset of nonlinearity the fractional amplitude of cosmic-ray pressure perturbations is delta PC/PC approximately (kL) -1 much less than 1, where k is the wavenumber and L is the pressure scale height of the unperturbed cosmic rays. We speculate that the instability may lead to a mode of cosmic-ray transport in which plateaus of uniform cosmic-ray pressure are

  1. Navier-Stokes Entropy Controlled Combustion Instability Analysis for Liquid Propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, T. J.; Yoon, W. S.

    1990-01-01

    Navier-Stokes solutions are used to calculate oscillatory components of pressure, velocity, and density, which in turn provide necessary data to compute energy growth factors to determine combustion instability. It is shown that wave instabilities are associated with changes in entropy and the space and time averages of oscillatory components of pressure, velocity and density, together with the mean flow field in the energy equation. Compressible laminar and turbulent flows and reacting flows with hydrogen/oxygen combustion are considered. The SSME combustion/thrust chamber is used for illustration of the theory. The analysis shows that the increase of mean pressure and disturbances consistently results in the increase of instability. It is shown that adequate combustion instability analysis requires at least third order nonlinearity in energy growth or decay.

  2. Modeling of spray combustion in an acoustic field

    SciTech Connect

    Dubey, R.K.; McQuay, M.Q.; Carvalho, J.A. Jr.

    1998-07-01

    Combustion characteristics of an ethanol flame in a Rijke-tube, pulse combustor was theoretically studied to analyze the effects of injection velocity, burner location, droplet size distribution, surrounding gas velocity, and droplet phase difference on Sauter-mean diameter. The effects of these parameters were studied at first (80 Hz), second (160 Hz), and third (240 Hz) acoustic modes with steady (no oscillations) case as reference. The sound pressure level was kept constant at 150 decibels for all theoretical simulations. The simulation frequencies and sound pressure level was selected to match the actual conditions inside the rector. For all simulations, actual droplet size and velocity distributions, as experimentally measured using a phase-Doppler particle analyzer, at the injector exit were used. Significant effects on spray size distributions were found when the burning droplets were placed at the locations corresponding to the maximum acoustic velocity amplitude. Also, for both simulations and experimental results, the Sauter-mean diameters were higher for oscillating conditions compared to steady value because small droplets burn faster under an acoustic field and therefore, Sauter-mean diameter, which is biased towards larger droplets, increases.

  3. Detection and control of combustion instability based on the concept of dynamical system theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotoda, Hiroshi; Shinoda, Yuta; Kobayashi, Masaki; Okuno, Yuta; Tachibana, Shigeru

    2014-02-01

    We propose an online method of detecting combustion instability based on the concept of dynamical system theory, including the characterization of the dynamic behavior of combustion instability. As an important case study relevant to combustion instability encountered in fundamental and practical combustion systems, we deal with the combustion dynamics close to lean blowout (LBO) in a premixed gas-turbine model combustor. The relatively regular pressure fluctuations generated by thermoacoustic oscillations transit to low-dimensional intermittent chaos owing to the intermittent appearance of burst with decreasing equivalence ratio. The translation error, which is characterized by quantifying the degree of parallelism of trajectories in the phase space, can be used as a control variable to prevent LBO.

  4. Detection and control of combustion instability based on the concept of dynamical system theory.

    PubMed

    Gotoda, Hiroshi; Shinoda, Yuta; Kobayashi, Masaki; Okuno, Yuta; Tachibana, Shigeru

    2014-02-01

    We propose an online method of detecting combustion instability based on the concept of dynamical system theory, including the characterization of the dynamic behavior of combustion instability. As an important case study relevant to combustion instability encountered in fundamental and practical combustion systems, we deal with the combustion dynamics close to lean blowout (LBO) in a premixed gas-turbine model combustor. The relatively regular pressure fluctuations generated by thermoacoustic oscillations transit to low-dimensional intermittent chaos owing to the intermittent appearance of burst with decreasing equivalence ratio. The translation error, which is characterized by quantifying the degree of parallelism of trajectories in the phase space, can be used as a control variable to prevent LBO. PMID:25353548

  5. Dynamic instabilities in spark-ignited combustion engines with high exhaust gas recirculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daw, C. Stuart; Finney, Charles E. A.

    2011-04-01

    We propose a cycle-resolved dynamic model for combustion instabilities in spark-ignition engines operating with high levels of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). We account for the complex combustion response to cycle-to-cycle feedback by utilizing a global probability distribution that describes the pre-spark state of in-cylinder fuel mixing. The proposed model does a good job of simulating combustion instabilities observed in both lean-fueling engine experiments and in experiments where nitrogen dilution is used to simulate some of the combustion inhibition of EGR. When used to simulate high internal EGR operation, the model exhibits a range of global bifurcations and chaos that appear to be very robust. We use the model to show that it should be possible to reduce high EGR combustion instabilities by switching from internal to external EGR.

  6. Ion-acoustic and Buneman instabilities in collisional plasmas with q-nonextensive distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashemzadeh, M.

    2016-10-01

    The ion-acoustic and Buneman instabilities are studied in a current carrying plasma by taking into account the collisional effects and q-nonextensive distribution function. Using the kinetic theory and Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook collision model, a generalized dielectric permittivity function in the presence of moving electrons and electron and ion-neutral collision frequency is derived. The longitudinal dispersion relation in the Buneman and ion-acoustic instability limit is obtained. The results of the Buneman instability shows that the collision frequency, the q-parameter and electron drift velocity affect the growth rate of the instability. Finally, the profile of the ion-acoustic growth rate indicates that by increasing the ion to electron temperature ratio the instability growth rate decreases.

  7. Nonlinear behavior of acoustic waves in combustion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culick, F. E. C.

    1975-01-01

    The nonlinear growth and limiting amplitude of acoustic waves in a combustion chamber are considered. A formal framework is provided within which practical problems can be treated with a minimum of effort and expense. The general conservation equations were expanded in two small parameters, one characterizing the mean flow field and one measuring the amplitude of oscillations, and then combined to yield a nonlinear inhomogeneous wave equation. The unsteady pressure and velocity fields were expressed as syntheses of the normal modes of the chamber, but with unknown time-varying amplitudes. This procedure yielded a representation of a general unsteady field as a system of coupled nonlinear oscillators. The system of nonlinear equations was treated by the method of averaging to produce a set of coupled nonlinear first order differential equations for the amplitudes and phases of the modes. The analysis is applicable to any combustion chamber. The most interesting applications are probably to solid rockets, liquid rockets, or thrust augmentors on jet engines.

  8. Fluids and Combustion Facility Acoustic Emissions Controlled by Aggressive Low-Noise Design Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Beth A.; Young, Judith A.

    2004-01-01

    The Fluids and Combustion Facility (FCF) is a dual-rack microgravity research facility that is being developed by Northrop Grumman Information Technology (NGIT) for the International Space Station (ISS) at the NASA Glenn Research Center. As an on-orbit test bed, FCF will host a succession of experiments in fluid and combustion physics. The Fluids Integrated Rack (FIR) and the Combustion Integrated Rack (CIR) must meet ISS acoustic emission requirements (ref. 1), which support speech communication and hearing-loss-prevention goals for ISS crew. To meet these requirements, the NGIT acoustics team implemented an aggressive low-noise design effort that incorporated frequent acoustic emission testing for all internal noise sources, larger-scale systems, and fully integrated racks (ref. 2). Glenn's Acoustical Testing Laboratory (ref. 3) provided acoustical testing services (see the following photograph) as well as specialized acoustical engineering support as part of the low-noise design process (ref. 4).

  9. Experimental Characterization of Combustion Instabilities and Flow-Flame Dynamics in a Partially-Premixed Gas Turbine Model Combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, Patton Manuel

    Partially-premixed, swirl combustion is applied in gas turbine combustors to achieve flame stabilization and reduced emission production. However, this method is also inherently sensitive to combustion instabilities which can cause large pressure, velocity, and heat release fluctuations. This thesis investigates thermoacoustic coupling created by flow-flame dynamics in a gas turbine model combustor (GTMC) for a variety of fuels and operating flow rates. Several naturally occurring instability modes were identified to control the acoustic response of the system, including Helmholtz resonances from the plenum and convective-acoustic effects which cause equivalence ratio oscillations. Laser Doppler velocimetry was used to measure radial flow in the GTMC, which can set up flow-fields which create loudly resonating flat-shaped flames, in comparison to quiet V-shaped flames. Flame location and shape altered convective time delays which determine the relative phases of pressure and heat release oscillations. Simultaneous pressure and chemiluminescence imaging showed that the heat release, pressure fluctuations, and flame motion are all coupled at the same instability frequency. Videos of the flame motion also revealed that the precessing vortex core (PVC), created by the swirling flow, influences the rocking behavior of the flame. Acetone was added to the fuel to act as a tracer in fluorescence measurements which indicated the localization of unburned fuel. It was discovered that fuel was distributed in lobes which corresponded to locations surrounding the shear layer outside of the central recirculation zone, and that the relative distribution of the lobes adjusted to forcing by the flow. Finally, high-speed formaldehyde planar laser-induced fluorescence was applied to study the motion of preheat zone surfaces in response to the oscillations of the instability. The flame surface density and wrinkling fluctuated at the acoustic frequency and displayed dampened motions

  10. Instability of interfaces of gas bubbles in liquids under acoustic excitation with dual frequency.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuning; Du, Xiaoze; Xian, Haizhen; Wu, Yulin

    2015-03-01

    Instability of interfaces of gas bubbles in liquids under acoustic excitation with dual frequency is theoretically investigated. The critical bubble radii dividing stable and unstable regions of bubbles under dual-frequency acoustic excitation are strongly affected by the amplitudes of dual-frequency acoustic excitation rather than the frequencies of dual-frequency excitation. The limitation of the proposed model is also discussed with demonstrating examples.

  11. An experimental study of the effect of a pilot flame on technically pre-mixed, self-excited combustion instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Meara, Bridget C.

    Combustion instabilities are a problem facing the gas turbine industry in the operation of lean, pre-mixed combustors. Secondary flames known as "pilot flames" are a common passive control strategy for eliminating combustion instabilities in industrial gas turbines, but the underlying mechanisms responsible for the pilot flame's stabilizing effect are not well understood. This dissertation presents an experimental study of a pilot flame in a single-nozzle, swirl-stabilized, variable length atmospheric combustion test facility and the effect of the pilot on combustion instabilities. A variable length combustor tuned the acoustics of the system to excite instabilities over a range of operating conditions without a pilot flame. The inlet velocity was varied from 25 -- 50 m/s and the equivalence ratio was varied from 0.525 -- 0.65. This range of operating conditions was determined by the operating range of the combustion test facility. Stability at each operating condition and combustor length was characterized by measurements of pressure oscillations in the combustor. The effect of the pilot flame on the magnitude and frequency of combustor stability was then investigated. The mechanisms responsible for the pilot flame effect were studied using chemiluminescence flame images of both stable and unstable flames. Stable flame structure was investigated using stable flame images of CH* chemiluminescence emission. The effect of the pilot on stable flame metrics such as flame length, flame angle, and flame width was investigated. In addition, a new flame metric, flame base distance, was defined to characterize the effect of the pilot flame on stable flame anchoring of the flame base to the centerbody. The effect of the pilot flame on flame base anchoring was investigated because the improved stability with a pilot flame is usually attributed to improved flame anchoring through the recirculation of hot products from the pilot to the main flame base. Chemiluminescence images

  12. Modeling self-excited combustion instabilities using a combination of two- and three-dimensional simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvazinski, Matthew Evan

    Self-excited combustion instabilities have been studied using a combination of two- and three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. This work was undertaken to assess the ability of CFD simulations to generate the high-amplitude resonant combustion dynamics without external forcing or a combustion response function. Specifically, detached eddy simulations (DES), which allow for significantly coarser grid resolutions in wall bounded flows than traditional large eddy simulations (LES), were investigated for their capability of simulating the instability. A single-element laboratory rocket combustor which produces self-excited longitudinal instabilities is used for the configuration. The model rocket combustor uses an injector configuration based on practical oxidizer-rich staged-combustion devices; a sudden expansion combustion section; and uses decomposed hydrogen peroxide as the oxidizer and gaseous methane as the fuel. A better understanding of the physics has been achieved using a series of diagnostics. Standard CFD outputs like instantaneous and time averaged flowfield outputs are combined with other tools, like the Rayleigh index to provide additional insight. The Rayleigh index is used to identify local regions in the combustor which are responsible for driving and damping the instability. By comparing the Rayleigh index to flowfield parameters it is possible to connect damping and driving to specific flowfield conditions. A cost effective procedure to compute multidimensional local Rayleigh index was developed. This work shows that combustion instabilities can be qualitatively simulated using two-dimensional axisymmetric simulations for fuel rich operating conditions. A full three-dimensional simulation produces a higher level of instability which agrees quite well with the experimental results. In addition to matching the level of instability the three-dimensional simulation also predicts the harmonic nature of the instability that is

  13. Active suppression of vortex-driven combustion instability using controlled liquid-fuel injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Bin

    Combustion instabilities remain one of the most challenging problems encountered in developing propulsion and power systems. Large amplitude pressure oscillations, driven by unsteady heat release, can produce numerous detrimental effects. Most previous active control studies utilized gaseous fuels to suppress combustion instabilities. However, using liquid fuel to suppress combustion instabilities is more realistic for propulsion applications. Active instability suppression in vortex-driven combustors using a direct liquid fuel injection strategy was theoretically established and experimentally demonstrated in this dissertation work. Droplet size measurements revealed that with pulsed fuel injection management, fuel droplet size could be modulated periodically. Consequently, desired heat release fluctuation could be created. If this oscillatory heat release is coupled with the natural pressure oscillation in an out of phase manner, combustion instabilities can be suppressed. To identify proper locations of supplying additional liquid fuel for the purpose of achieving control, the natural heat release pattern in a vortex-driven combustor was characterized in this study. It was found that at high Damkohler number oscillatory heat release pattern closely followed the evolving vortex front. However, when Damkohler number became close to unity, heat release fluctuation wave no longer coincided with the coherent structures. A heat release deficit area was found near the dump plane when combustor was operated in lean premixed conditions. Active combustion instability suppression experiments were performed in a dump combustor using a controlled liquid fuel injection strategy. High-speed Schlieren results illustrated that vortex shedding plays an important role in maintaining self-sustained combustion instabilities. Complete combustion instability control requires total suppression of these large-scale coherent structures. The sound pressure level at the excited dominant

  14. The effect of boundaries on the ion acoustic beam-plasma instability in experiment and simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Rapson, Christopher; Grulke, Olaf; Matyash, Konstantin; Klinger, Thomas

    2014-05-15

    The ion acoustic beam-plasma instability is known to excite strong solitary waves near the Earth's bow shock. Using a double plasma experiment, tightly coupled with a 1-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation, the results presented here show that this instability is critically sensitive to the experimental conditions. Boundary effects, which do not have any counterpart in space or in most simulations, unavoidably excite parasitic instabilities. Potential fluctuations from these instabilities lead to an increase of the beam temperature which reduces the growth rate such that non-linear effects leading to solitary waves are less likely to be observed. Furthermore, the increased temperature modifies the range of beam velocities for which an ion acoustic beam plasma instability is observed.

  15. Combustion Instability in an Acid-Heptane Rocket with a Pressurized-Gas Propellant Pumping System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischler, Adelbert O.; Bellman, Donald R.

    1951-01-01

    Results of experimental measurements of low-frequency combustion instability of a 300-pound thrust acid-heptane rocket engine were compared to the trends predicted by an analysis of combustion instability in a rocket engine with a pressurized-gas propellant pumping system. The simplified analysis, which assumes a monopropellant model, was based on the concept of a combustion the delay occurring from the moment of propellant injection to the moment of propellant combustion. This combustion time delay was experimentally measured; the experimental values were of approximately half the magnitude predicted by the analysis. The pressure-fluctuation frequency for a rocket engine with a characteristic length of 100 inches and operated at a combustion-chamber pressure of 280 pounds per square inch absolute was 38 cycles per second; the analysis indicated. a frequency of 37 cycles per second. Increasing combustion-chamber characteristic length decreased the pressure-fluctuation frequency, in conformity to the analysis. Increasing the chamber operating pressure or increasing the injector pressure drop increased the frequency. These latter two effects are contrary to the analysis; the discrepancies are attributed to the conflict between the assumptions made to simplify the analysis and the experimental conditions. Oxidant-fuel ratio had no apparent effect on the experimentally measured pressure-fluctuation frequency for acid-heptane ratios from 3.0 to 7.0. The frequencies decreased with increased amplitude of the combustion-chamber pressure variations. The analysis indicated that if the combustion time delay were sufficiently short, low-frequency combustion instability would be eliminated.

  16. Analysis of combustion instability in liquid fuel rocket motors. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, K. W.

    1979-01-01

    The development of an analytical technique used in the solution of nonlinear velocity-sensitive combustion instability problems is presented. The Galerkin method was used and proved successful. The pressure wave forms exhibit a strong second harmonic distortion and a variety of behaviors are possible depending on the nature of the combustion process and the parametric values involved. A one dimensional model provides insight into the problem by allowing a comparison of Galerkin solutions with more exact finite difference computations.

  17. A Review of LOX/Kerosene Combustion Instability in American and Russian Combustion Devices in Application to Next-Generation Launch Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rocker, Marvin; Nesman, Tomas E.; Hulka, James R.; Dougherty, N. Sam

    2003-01-01

    The Next-Generation Launch Technology (NGLT) project was introduced with its objectives. To meet the objectives, NASA has directed aerospace industry to perform advances and risk reduction of relevant technologies, including propulsion. Originally, the propulsion industry focused on producing both LOWLH2 and LOWkerosene flight engine technology demonstrators. These flight engine technology demonstrators were briefly reviewed. NASA recently redirected this focus to Lowkerosene only. Discussion of LOWkerosene combustion devices was and is prefaced by grave concerns about combustion instability. These concerns have prompted a review of LOWkerosene combustion instability in American and Russian combustion devices. In the review of the Russian propulsion industry's experience in eliminating LOWkerosene combustion instabilities, the history of principal Russian rocket scientists and their role in the development of LOXkerosene combustion devices is presented. The innovative methods implemented by the Russians of eliminations combustion instabilities in LOXkerosene combustion devices were reviewed. The successful elimination of these combustion instabilities has resulted in two generations of Russian-produced, high-performance LOWkerosene combustion devices.

  18. Dynamic instabilities in spark-ignited combustion engines with high exhaust gas recirculation

    SciTech Connect

    Daw, C Stuart; FINNEY, Charles E A

    2011-01-01

    We propose a cycle-resolved dynamic model for combustion instabilities in spark-ignition engines operating with high levels of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). High EGR is important for increasing fuel efficiency and implementing advanced low-emission combustion modes such as homogenous charge compression ignition (HCCI). We account for the complex combustion response to cycle-to-cycle feedback by utilizing a global probability distribution that describes the pre-spark state of in-cylinder fuel mixing. The proposed model does a good job of simulating combustion instabilities observed in both lean-fueling engine experiments and in experiments where nitrogen dilution is used to simulate some of the combustion inhibition of EGR. When used to simulate high internal EGR operation, the model exhibits a range of global bifurcations and chaos that appear to be very robust. We use the model to show that it should be possible to reduce high EGR combustion instabilities by switching from internal to external EGR. We also explain why it might be helpful to deliberately stratify the fuel in the pre-spark gas mixture. It might be possible to extend the simple approach used in this model to other chemical reaction systems with spatial inhomogeneity.

  19. Characterizing dilute combustion instabilities in a multi-cylinder spark-ignited engine using symbolic analysis.

    PubMed

    Daw, C S; Finney, C E A; Kaul, B C; Edwards, K D; Wagner, R M

    2015-02-13

    Spark-ignited internal combustion engines have evolved considerably in recent years in response to increasingly stringent regulations for emissions and fuel economy. One new advanced engine strategy ustilizes high levels of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) to reduce combustion temperatures, thereby increasing thermodynamic efficiency and reducing nitrogen oxide emissions. While this strategy can be highly effective, it also poses major control and design challenges due to the large combustion oscillations that develop at sufficiently high EGR levels. Previous research has documented that combustion instabilities can propagate between successive engine cycles in individual cylinders via self-generated feedback of reactive species and thermal energy in the retained residual exhaust gases. In this work, we use symbolic analysis to characterize multi-cylinder combustion oscillations in an experimental engine operating with external EGR. At low levels of EGR, intra-cylinder oscillations are clearly visible and appear to be associated with brief, intermittent coupling among cylinders. As EGR is increased further, a point is reached where all four cylinders lock almost completely in phase and alternate simultaneously between two distinct bi-stable combustion states. From a practical perspective, it is important to understand the causes of this phenomenon and develop diagnostics that might be applied to ameliorate its effects. We demonstrate here that two approaches for symbolizing the engine combustion measurements can provide useful probes for characterizing these instabilities. PMID:25548262

  20. Characterizing dilute combustion instabilities in a multi-cylinder spark-ignited engine using symbolic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Daw, C. Stuart; Finney, Charles E. A.; Kaul, Brian C.; Edwards, Kevin Dean; Wagner, Robert M.

    2014-12-29

    Spark-ignited internal combustion engines have evolved considerably in recent years in response to increasingly stringent regulations for emissions and fuel-economy. One new advanced engine strategy utilizes high levels of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) to reduce combustion temperatures, thereby increasing thermodynamic efficiency and reducing nitrogen oxide emissions. While this strategy can be highly effective, it also poses major control and design challenges due to the large combustion oscillations that develop at sufficiently high EGR levels. Previous research has documented that combustion instabilities can propagate between successive engine cycles in individual cylinders via self-generated feedback of reactive species and thermal energy in the retained residual exhaust gases. In this work, we use symbolic analysis to characterize multi-cylinder combustion oscillations in an experimental engine operating with external EGR. At low levels of EGR, intra-cylinder oscillations are clearly visible and appear to be associated with brief, intermittent coupling among cylinders. As EGR is increased further, a point is reached where all four cylinders lock almost completely in phase and alternate simultaneously between two distinct bi-stable combustion states. From a practical perspective, it is important to understand the causes of this phenomenon and develop diagnostics that might be applied to ameliorate its effects. We demonstrate here that two approaches for symbolizing the engine combustion measurements can provide useful probes for characterizing these instabilities.

  1. Characterizing dilute combustion instabilities in a multi-cylinder spark-ignited engine using symbolic analysis.

    PubMed

    Daw, C S; Finney, C E A; Kaul, B C; Edwards, K D; Wagner, R M

    2015-02-13

    Spark-ignited internal combustion engines have evolved considerably in recent years in response to increasingly stringent regulations for emissions and fuel economy. One new advanced engine strategy ustilizes high levels of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) to reduce combustion temperatures, thereby increasing thermodynamic efficiency and reducing nitrogen oxide emissions. While this strategy can be highly effective, it also poses major control and design challenges due to the large combustion oscillations that develop at sufficiently high EGR levels. Previous research has documented that combustion instabilities can propagate between successive engine cycles in individual cylinders via self-generated feedback of reactive species and thermal energy in the retained residual exhaust gases. In this work, we use symbolic analysis to characterize multi-cylinder combustion oscillations in an experimental engine operating with external EGR. At low levels of EGR, intra-cylinder oscillations are clearly visible and appear to be associated with brief, intermittent coupling among cylinders. As EGR is increased further, a point is reached where all four cylinders lock almost completely in phase and alternate simultaneously between two distinct bi-stable combustion states. From a practical perspective, it is important to understand the causes of this phenomenon and develop diagnostics that might be applied to ameliorate its effects. We demonstrate here that two approaches for symbolizing the engine combustion measurements can provide useful probes for characterizing these instabilities.

  2. Characterizing dilute combustion instabilities in a multi-cylinder spark-ignited engine using symbolic analysis

    DOE PAGES

    Daw, C. Stuart; Finney, Charles E. A.; Kaul, Brian C.; Edwards, Kevin Dean; Wagner, Robert M.

    2014-12-29

    Spark-ignited internal combustion engines have evolved considerably in recent years in response to increasingly stringent regulations for emissions and fuel-economy. One new advanced engine strategy utilizes high levels of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) to reduce combustion temperatures, thereby increasing thermodynamic efficiency and reducing nitrogen oxide emissions. While this strategy can be highly effective, it also poses major control and design challenges due to the large combustion oscillations that develop at sufficiently high EGR levels. Previous research has documented that combustion instabilities can propagate between successive engine cycles in individual cylinders via self-generated feedback of reactive species and thermal energy inmore » the retained residual exhaust gases. In this work, we use symbolic analysis to characterize multi-cylinder combustion oscillations in an experimental engine operating with external EGR. At low levels of EGR, intra-cylinder oscillations are clearly visible and appear to be associated with brief, intermittent coupling among cylinders. As EGR is increased further, a point is reached where all four cylinders lock almost completely in phase and alternate simultaneously between two distinct bi-stable combustion states. From a practical perspective, it is important to understand the causes of this phenomenon and develop diagnostics that might be applied to ameliorate its effects. We demonstrate here that two approaches for symbolizing the engine combustion measurements can provide useful probes for characterizing these instabilities.« less

  3. Identification and quantification analysis of nonlinear dynamics properties of combustion instability in a diesel engine

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Li-Ping Ding, Shun-Liang; Song, En-Zhe; Ma, Xiu-Zhen; Litak, Grzegorz

    2015-01-15

    The cycling combustion instabilities in a diesel engine have been analyzed based on chaos theory. The objective was to investigate the dynamical characteristics of combustion in diesel engine. In this study, experiments were performed under the entire operating range of a diesel engine (the engine speed was changed from 600 to 1400 rpm and the engine load rate was from 0% to 100%), and acquired real-time series of in-cylinder combustion pressure using a piezoelectric transducer installed on the cylinder head. Several methods were applied to identify and quantitatively analyze the combustion process complexity in the diesel engine including delay-coordinate embedding, recurrence plot (RP), Recurrence Quantification Analysis, correlation dimension (CD), and the largest Lyapunov exponent (LLE) estimation. The results show that the combustion process exhibits some determinism. If LLE is positive, then the combustion system has a fractal dimension and CD is no more than 1.6 and within the diesel engine operating range. We have concluded that the combustion system of diesel engine is a low-dimensional chaotic system and the maximum values of CD and LLE occur at the lowest engine speed and load. This means that combustion system is more complex and sensitive to initial conditions and that poor combustion quality leads to the decrease of fuel economy and the increase of exhaust emissions.

  4. Identification and quantification analysis of nonlinear dynamics properties of combustion instability in a diesel engine.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li-Ping; Ding, Shun-Liang; Litak, Grzegorz; Song, En-Zhe; Ma, Xiu-Zhen

    2015-01-01

    The cycling combustion instabilities in a diesel engine have been analyzed based on chaos theory. The objective was to investigate the dynamical characteristics of combustion in diesel engine. In this study, experiments were performed under the entire operating range of a diesel engine (the engine speed was changed from 600 to 1400 rpm and the engine load rate was from 0% to 100%), and acquired real-time series of in-cylinder combustion pressure using a piezoelectric transducer installed on the cylinder head. Several methods were applied to identify and quantitatively analyze the combustion process complexity in the diesel engine including delay-coordinate embedding, recurrence plot (RP), Recurrence Quantification Analysis, correlation dimension (CD), and the largest Lyapunov exponent (LLE) estimation. The results show that the combustion process exhibits some determinism. If LLE is positive, then the combustion system has a fractal dimension and CD is no more than 1.6 and within the diesel engine operating range. We have concluded that the combustion system of diesel engine is a low-dimensional chaotic system and the maximum values of CD and LLE occur at the lowest engine speed and load. This means that combustion system is more complex and sensitive to initial conditions and that poor combustion quality leads to the decrease of fuel economy and the increase of exhaust emissions.

  5. Validation of an Adaptive Combustion Instability Control Method for Gas-Turbine Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopasakis, George; DeLaat, John C.; Chang, Clarence T.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes ongoing testing of an adaptive control method to suppress high frequency thermo-acoustic instabilities like those found in lean-burning, low emission combustors that are being developed for future aircraft gas turbine engines. The method called Adaptive Sliding Phasor Averaged Control, was previously tested in an experimental rig designed to simulate a combustor with an instability of about 530 Hz. Results published earlier, and briefly presented here, demonstrated that this method was effective in suppressing the instability. Because this test rig did not exhibit a well pronounced instability, a question remained regarding the effectiveness of the control methodology when applied to a more coherent instability. To answer this question, a modified combustor rig was assembled at the NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. The modified rig exhibited a more coherent, higher amplitude instability, but at a lower frequency of about 315 Hz. Test results show that this control method successfully reduced the instability pressure of the lower frequency test rig. In addition, due to a certain phenomena discovered and reported earlier, the so called Intra-Harmonic Coupling, a dramatic suppression of the instability was achieved by focusing control on the second harmonic of the instability. These results and their implications are discussed, as well as a hypothesis describing the mechanism of intra-harmonic coupling.

  6. Experimental study of propagation of instability waves in a submerged jet under transverse acoustic excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironov, A. K.; Krasheninnikov, S. Yu.; Maslov, V. P.; Zakharov, D. E.

    2016-07-01

    An experimental study was conducted on the specific features of instability wave propagation in the mixing layer of a turbulent jet when the jet is excited by an external acoustic wave. We used the technique of conditional phase averaging of data obtained by particle image velocimetry using the reference signal of a microphone placed near the jet. The influence of the excitation frequency on the characteristics of large-scale structures in the mixing layer was investigated. It is shown that the propagation patterns of the instability waves agree well with previously obtained data on the localization of acoustic sources in turbulent jets.

  7. Transverse Instability of Dust-Acoustic Solitary Waves in Magnetized Dusty Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Congbo; Wang, Linxue; Yang, Xue; Shi, Yuren

    2015-04-01

    We theoretically investigated the transverse instability of three-dimensional (3D) dust-acoustic solitary waves in a magnetized dusty plasma. First, a 3D nonlinear Zakharov-Kuznetsov (ZK) equation, which can be used to describe the time-evolution of dust-acoustic solitary waves in magnetized dusty plasmas, is derived by using the reductive perturbation method. Second, we established a numerical scheme to study the transverse instability of the solitary waves described by the ZK equation. It was found that both stable and unstable solitary waves exist. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11047010)

  8. Nonlinear combustion instability model in two- to three-dimensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Priem, Richard J.; Breisacher, Kevin J.

    1989-01-01

    A model is developed on using quasi-steady state equations for the injection, atomization, and vaporization processes that consider the instantaneous local pressures, temperatures, density, and gas velocity vector associated with a 3-D wave. The coupled sets of equations are solved to determine frequency and growth rate of the oscillations as a function of wave amplitude. Calculated results are used to explain the observed instabilities in a 40 Klb LOX/Methane combustor.

  9. Instability of sonoluminescing bubbles under a nonspherical symmetrical acoustic-pressure perturbation.

    PubMed

    An, Yu; Lu, Tao; Yang, Bing

    2005-02-01

    The perturbation of nonspherical symmetrical acoustic pressure is added to the equation governing the spherical stability of sonoluminescing bubbles. The numerical calculations of the shape instability of sonoluminescing bubbles with the modified equation are conducted and the results are illustrated accordingly in the p(a) - R0 phase diagrams. The calculated results indicate that the stability region vanishes as the amplitude of the driving acoustic pressure p(a) arrives at the upper threshold ( approximately 1.6 atm) due to the perturbation of a small nonspherical symmetrical acoustic pressure (about a few Pa), which is in consistence with the experimental observations.

  10. Active Control of High Frequency Combustion Instability in Aircraft Gas-Turbine Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corrigan, Bob (Technical Monitor); DeLaat, John C.; Chang, Clarence T.

    2003-01-01

    Active control of high-frequency (greater than 500 Hz) combustion instability has been demonstrated in the NASA single-nozzle combustor rig at United Technologies Research Center. The combustor rig emulates an actual engine instability and has many of the complexities of a real engine combustor (i.e. actual fuel nozzle and swirler, dilution cooling, etc.) In order to demonstrate control, a high-frequency fuel valve capable of modulating the fuel flow at up to 1kHz was developed. Characterization of the fuel delivery system was accomplished in a custom dynamic flow rig developed for that purpose. Two instability control methods, one model-based and one based on adaptive phase-shifting, were developed and evaluated against reduced order models and a Sectored-1-dimensional model of the combustor rig. Open-loop fuel modulation testing in the rig demonstrated sufficient fuel modulation authority to proceed with closed-loop testing. During closed-loop testing, both control methods were able to identify the instability from the background noise and were shown to reduce the pressure oscillations at the instability frequency by 30%. This is the first known successful demonstration of high-frequency combustion instability suppression in a realistic aero-engine environment. Future plans are to carry these technologies forward to demonstration on an advanced low-emission combustor.

  11. On the generation of double layers from ion- and electron-acoustic instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Xiangrong; Cowee, Misa M.; Gary, S. Peter; Winske, Dan

    2016-03-01

    A plasma double layer (DL) is a nonlinear electrostatic structure that carries a uni-polar electric field parallel to the background magnetic field due to local charge separation. Past studies showed that DLs observed in space plasmas are mostly associated with the ion acoustic instability. Recent Van Allen Probes observations of parallel electric field structures traveling much faster than the ion acoustic speed have motivated a computational study to test the hypothesis that a new type of DLs—electron acoustic DLs—generated from the electron acoustic instability are responsible for these electric fields. Nonlinear particle-in-cell simulations yield negative results, i.e., the hypothetical electron acoustic DLs cannot be formed in a way similar to ion acoustic DLs. Linear theory analysis and the simulations show that the frequencies of electron acoustic waves are too high for ions to respond and maintain charge separation required by DLs. However, our results do show that local density perturbations in a two-electron-component plasma can result in unipolar-like electric field structures that propagate at the electron thermal speed, suggesting another potential explanation for the observations.

  12. Ion-acoustic enhancements generated by beam-plasma instability in an auroral cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziebell, L. F.; Yoon, P. H.; Pavan, J.; Gaelzer, R.

    2011-03-01

    This article demonstrates the generation of enhanced ion-acoustic waves by beam-plasma instability in a density cavity. The self-consistent equations of weak turbulence theory that include quasi-linear, decay, and scattering processes as well as convective and dispersive effects are numerically solved for a one-dimensional density cavity. It is shown that significant enhancements of ion-acoustic waves occur in the presence of counterstreaming electron beams and that the enhanced ion-acoustic waves are initially localized near the center of the density cavity at large wavelengths. Later in the evolution, the enhancement in the spectrum of ion-acoustic waves spreads out toward the edges of the cavity, with a shift to smaller wavelengths, while the enhancement near the center of the cavity tends to decrease in magnitude. The significance of the present findings is discussed.

  13. Modeling of Nonacoustic Combustion Instability in Simulations of Hybrid Motor Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rocker, M.

    2000-01-01

    A transient model of a hybrid motor was formulated to study the cause and elimination of nonacoustic combustion instability. The transient model was used to simulate four key tests out of a series of seventeen hybrid motor tests conducted by Thiokol, Rocketdyne, and Martin Marietta at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). These tests were performed under the Hybrid Propulsion Technology for Launch Vehicle Boosters (HPTLVB) program. The first test resulted in stable combustion. The second test resulted in large-amplitude, 6.5-Hz chamber pressure oscillations that gradually damped away by the end of the test. The third test resulted in large-amplitude, 7.5-Hz chamber pressure oscillations that were sustained throughout the test. The seventh test resulted in elimination of combustion instability with the installation of an orifice immediately upstream of the injector. Formulation and implementation of the model are the scope of this presentation. The current model is an independent continuation of modeling presented previously by joint Thiokol-Rocketdyne collaborators Boardman, Hawkins, Wassom. and Claflin. The previous model simulated an unstable independent research and development (IR&D) hybrid motor test performed by Thiokol. There was very good agreement between the model and test data. Like the previous model, the current model was developed using Matrix-x simulation software. However, tests performed at MSFC under the HPTLVB program were actually simulated. ln the current model, the hybrid motor, consisting of the liquid oxygen (lox) injector, the multiport solid fuel grain, and nozzle, was simulated. The lox feedsystem, consisting of the tank, venturi. valve, and feed lines, was also simulated in the model. All components of the hybrid motor and lox feedsystem are treated by a lumped-parameter approach. Agreement between the results of the transient model and actual test data was very good. This agreement between simulated and actual test data indicated

  14. Modeling self-excited combustion instabilities using a combination of two- and three-dimensional simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvazinski, Matthew Evan

    Self-excited combustion instabilities have been studied using a combination of two- and three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. This work was undertaken to assess the ability of CFD simulations to generate the high-amplitude resonant combustion dynamics without external forcing or a combustion response function. Specifically, detached eddy simulations (DES), which allow for significantly coarser grid resolutions in wall bounded flows than traditional large eddy simulations (LES), were investigated for their capability of simulating the instability. A single-element laboratory rocket combustor which produces self-excited longitudinal instabilities is used for the configuration. The model rocket combustor uses an injector configuration based on practical oxidizer-rich staged-combustion devices; a sudden expansion combustion section; and uses decomposed hydrogen peroxide as the oxidizer and gaseous methane as the fuel. A better understanding of the physics has been achieved using a series of diagnostics. Standard CFD outputs like instantaneous and time averaged flowfield outputs are combined with other tools, like the Rayleigh index to provide additional insight. The Rayleigh index is used to identify local regions in the combustor which are responsible for driving and damping the instability. By comparing the Rayleigh index to flowfield parameters it is possible to connect damping and driving to specific flowfield conditions. A cost effective procedure to compute multidimensional local Rayleigh index was developed. This work shows that combustion instabilities can be qualitatively simulated using two-dimensional axisymmetric simulations for fuel rich operating conditions. A full three-dimensional simulation produces a higher level of instability which agrees quite well with the experimental results. In addition to matching the level of instability the three-dimensional simulation also predicts the harmonic nature of the instability that is

  15. Hydrodynamic instability and shear layer effects in turbulent premixed combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlimpert, S.; Feldhusen, A.; Grimmen, J. H.; Roidl, B.; Meinke, M.; Schröder, W.

    2016-01-01

    A turbulent premixed plane jet flame is analyzed by large-eddy simulations. The analysis shows that the flame front wrinkling is strongly influenced by the shear layer effect when the gas expansion effects are small leading to larger flame front amplitudes at the flame base than at high gas expansion ratios. However, the hydrodynamic instability effect induces a continuously increasing flame front amplitude which yields an enhanced flame pocket generation at the flame tip. Both phenomena influence the magnitude of the turbulent burning area and burning area rate response through the flame front deflections which are determined by the contribution coefficient. This coefficient represents the mutual interaction between the flame and the flow. At low gas expansion ratios, the total heat release rate spectra of the turbulent flame are wider in terms of dominant modes at Strouhal numbers which are linked to the mean flame height oscillations. Thus, at low gas expansion ratios, the vortex-flame interaction is less damped by the flame in the sense that vortices can perturb the flame front stronger. The total heat release rate trend of St-2.2 previously found for a round jet flame is also determined for the current slot jet at realistic gas expansion ratios indicating a general tendency to transfer energy from large to small flame structures. At high gas expansion ratios, an increasing Markstein length leads to an energy transfer between neighboring dominant modes in the low frequency range 1 < St < 10 and the burning area rate response becomes more important for the total heat release rate spectra of the turbulent slot flames which agrees with recent findings for a laminar premixed plane flame.

  16. An acoustic streaming instability in thermoacoustic devices utilizing jet pumps.

    PubMed

    Backhaus, S; Swift, G W

    2003-03-01

    Thermoacoustic-Stirling hybrid engines and feedback pulse tube refrigerators can utilize jet pumps to suppress streaming that would otherwise cause large heat leaks and reduced efficiency. It is desirable to use jet pumps to suppress streaming because they do not introduce moving parts such as bellows or membranes. In most cases, this form of streaming suppression works reliably. However, in some cases, the streaming suppression has been found to be unstable. Using a simple model of the acoustics in the regenerators and jet pumps of these devices, a stability criterion is derived that predicts when jet pumps can reliably suppress streaming. PMID:12656366

  17. Feedback control of combustion instabilities from within limit cycle oscillations using H∞ loop-shaping and the ν-gap metric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jingxuan; Morgans, Aimee S.

    2016-07-01

    Combustion instabilities arise owing to a two-way coupling between acoustic waves and unsteady heat release. Oscillation amplitudes successively grow, until nonlinear effects cause saturation into limit cycle oscillations. Feedback control, in which an actuator modifies some combustor input in response to a sensor measurement, can suppress combustion instabilities. Linear feedback controllers are typically designed, using linear combustor models. However, when activated from within limit cycle, the linear model is invalid, and such controllers are not guaranteed to stabilize. This work develops a feedback control strategy guaranteed to stabilize from within limit cycle oscillations. A low-order model of a simple combustor, exhibiting the essential features of more complex systems, is presented. Linear plane acoustic wave modelling is combined with a weakly nonlinear describing function for the flame. The latter is determined numerically using a level set approach. Its implication is that the open-loop transfer function (OLTF) needed for controller design varies with oscillation level. The difference between the mean and the rest of the OLTFs is characterized using the ν-gap metric, providing the minimum required `robustness margin' for an H∞ loop-shaping controller. Such controllers are designed and achieve stability both for linear fluctuations and from within limit cycle oscillations.

  18. Feedback control of combustion instabilities from within limit cycle oscillations using H∞ loop-shaping and the ν-gap metric

    PubMed Central

    Morgans, Aimee S.

    2016-01-01

    Combustion instabilities arise owing to a two-way coupling between acoustic waves and unsteady heat release. Oscillation amplitudes successively grow, until nonlinear effects cause saturation into limit cycle oscillations. Feedback control, in which an actuator modifies some combustor input in response to a sensor measurement, can suppress combustion instabilities. Linear feedback controllers are typically designed, using linear combustor models. However, when activated from within limit cycle, the linear model is invalid, and such controllers are not guaranteed to stabilize. This work develops a feedback control strategy guaranteed to stabilize from within limit cycle oscillations. A low-order model of a simple combustor, exhibiting the essential features of more complex systems, is presented. Linear plane acoustic wave modelling is combined with a weakly nonlinear describing function for the flame. The latter is determined numerically using a level set approach. Its implication is that the open-loop transfer function (OLTF) needed for controller design varies with oscillation level. The difference between the mean and the rest of the OLTFs is characterized using the ν-gap metric, providing the minimum required ‘robustness margin’ for an H∞ loop-shaping controller. Such controllers are designed and achieve stability both for linear fluctuations and from within limit cycle oscillations. PMID:27493558

  19. Acoustic measurements for the combustion diagnosis of diesel engines fuelled with biodiesels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhen, Dong; Wang, Tie; Gu, Fengshou; Tesfa, Belachew; Ball, Andrew

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, an experimental investigation was carried out on the combustion process of a compression ignition (CI) engine running with biodiesel blends under steady state operating conditions. The effects of biodiesel on the combustion process and engine dynamics were analysed for non-intrusive combustion diagnosis based on a four-cylinder, four-stroke, direct injection and turbocharged diesel engine. The signals of vibration, acoustic and in-cylinder pressure were measured simultaneously to find their inter-connection for diagnostic feature extraction. It was found that the sound energy level increases with the increase of engine load and speed, and the sound characteristics are closely correlated with the variation of in-cylinder pressure and combustion process. The continuous wavelet transform (CWT) was employed to analyse the non-stationary nature of engine noise in a higher frequency range. Before the wavelet analysis, time synchronous average (TSA) was used to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the acoustic signal by suppressing the components which are asynchronous. Based on the root mean square (RMS) values of CWT coefficients, the effects of biodiesel fractions and operating conditions (speed and load) on combustion process and engine dynamics were investigated. The result leads to the potential of airborne acoustic measurements and analysis for engine condition monitoring and fuel quality evaluation.

  20. Hydrodynamic Instability in an Extended Landau/Levich Model of Liquid-Propellant Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margolis, Stephen B.; Sackesteder, Kurt (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The classical Landau/Levich models of liquid propellant combustion, which serve as seminal examples of hydrodynamic instability in reactive systems, have been combined and extended to account for a dynamic dependence, absent in the original formulations, of the local burning rate on the local pressure and/or temperature fields. The resulting model admits an extremely rich variety of both hydrodynamic and reactive/diffusive instabilities that can be analyzed in various limiting parameter regimes. In the present work, a formal asymptotic analysis, based on the realistic smallness of the gas-to-liquid density ratio, is developed to investigate the combined effects of gravity, surface tension and viscosity on the hydrodynamic instability of the propagating liquid/gas interface. In particular, a composite asymptotic expression, spanning three distinguished wavenumber regimes, is derived for both cellular and pulsating hydrodynamic neutral stability boundaries A(sub p)(k), where A(sub p) is the pressure sensitivity of the burning rate and k is the disturbance wavenumber. For the case of cellular (Landau) instability, the results demonstrate explicitly the stabilizing effect of gravity on long-wave disturbances, the stabilizing effect of viscosity and surface tension on short-wave perturbations, and the instability associated with intermediate wavenumbers for critical negative values of A(sub p). In the limiting case of weak gravity, it is shown that cellular hydrodynamic instability in this context is a long-wave instability phenomenon, whereas at normal gravity, this instability is first manifested through O(l) wavenumber disturbances. It is also demonstrated that, in the large wavenumber regime, surface tension and both liquid and gas viscosity all produce comparable stabilizing effects in the large-wavenumber regime, thereby providing significant modifications to previous analyses of Landau instability in which one or more of these effects were neglected. In contrast

  1. JV Task 110 - Evaluation of an Acoustic Single-Fluid Nozzle for Oil Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin Galbreath; Jay Gunderson; James Tibbetts; Lingbu Kong

    2007-08-01

    Two residual (No. 6 fuel) oils from Texas and North Dakota with very different chemical compositions and physical properties were burned at similar injection rates ({approx}28 lb/hr) in a pilot-scale (550,000 Btu/hr) combustion test facility unit using conventional dual-fluid and Kimberly-Clark (K-C) acoustic nozzles to compare flame characteristics, gaseous and fly ash emissions, and fly ash morphological and chemical characteristics. The K-C acoustic nozzle supplied a more consistent oil feed rate to the furnace relative to the conventional dual-fluid nozzle. This consistency in oil flow reduced the variability in NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, and O{sub 2} flue gas concentrations. K-C nozzle injection, however, produced a more carbon-rich residual oil fly ash (ROFA) relative to the conventional nozzle. The K-C acoustic nozzle promoted oil atomization and extended the flame higher in the furnace so that the residence time of the residual oil was greatly reduced. The lack of oil residence time in the furnace contributed to the incomplete combustion performance of the K-C acoustic nozzle. On average, the K-C acoustic nozzle reduced NO{sub x} emissions from burning the Texas and North Dakota oils by 66% and 33%, respectively. Late in the test program, it was discovered that a significant increase in power to the K-C acoustic nozzle improved combustion efficiency, flame stability, and reduced the amount of unburned carbon in ROFA. The unburned carbon particles were smaller, generally about 50 {micro}m in diameter, as a result of the increase in power to the K-C nozzle. Additional optimization of the K-C nozzle at higher power in a larger furnace has the potential to further improve combustion efficiency.

  2. Viscous and Thermal Effects on Hydrodynamic Instability in Liquid-Propellant Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margolis, Stephen B.; Sacksteder, Kurt (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A pulsating form of hydrodynamic instability has recently been shown to arise during the deflagration of liquid propellants in those parameter regimes where the pressure-dependent burning rate is characterized by a negative pressure sensitivity. This type of instability can coexist with the classical cellular, or Landau, form of hydrodynamic instability, with the occurrence of either dependent on whether the pressure sensitivity is sufficiently large or small in magnitude. For the inviscid problem, it has been shown that when the burning rate is realistically allowed to depend on temperature as well as pressure, that sufficiently large values of the temperature sensitivity relative to the pressure sensitivity causes the pulsating form of hydrodynamic instability to become dominant. In that regime, steady, planar burning becomes intrinsically unstable to pulsating disturbances whose wavenumbers are sufficiently small. In the present work, this analysis is extended to the fully viscous case, where it is shown that although viscosity is stabilizing for intermediate and larger wavenumber perturbations, the intrinsic pulsating instability for small wavenumbers remains. Under these conditions, liquid-propellant combustion is predicted to be characterized by large unsteady cells along the liquid/gas interface.

  3. Viscous Analysis of Pulsating Hydrodynamic Instability and Thermal Coupling Liquid-Propellant Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margolis, Stephen B.; Sacksteder, Kurt (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A pulsating form of hydrodynamic instability has recently been shown to arise during liquid-propellant deflagration in those parameter regimes where the pressure-dependent burning rate is characterized by a negative pressure sensitivity. This type of instability can coexist with the classical cellular, or Landau form of hydrodynamic instability, with the occurrence of either dependent on whether the pressure sensitivity is sufficiently large or small in magnitude. For the inviscid problem, it has been shown that, when the burning rate is realistically allowed to depend on temperature as well as pressure, sufficiently large values of the temperature sensitivity relative to the pressure sensitivity causes like pulsating form of hydrodynamic instability to become dominant. In that regime, steady, planar burning becomes intrinsically unstable to pulsating disturbances whose wave numbers are sufficiently small. This analysis is extended to the fully viscous case, where it is shown that although viscosity is stabilizing for intermediate and larger wave number perturbations, the intrinsic pulsating instability for small wave numbers remains. Under these conditions, liquid-propellant combustion is predicted to be characterized by large unsteady cells along the liquid/gas interface.

  4. Analysis of hydrodynamic (landau) instability in liquid-propellant combustion at normal and reduced gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Margolis, S.B.

    1997-10-01

    The burning of liquid propellants is a fundamental combustion problem that is applicable to various types of propulsion and energetic systems. The deflagration process is often rather complex, with vaporization and pyrolysis occurring at the liquid/gas interface and distributed combustion occurring either in the gas phase or in a spray. Nonetheless, there are realistic limiting cases in which combustion may be approximated by an overall reaction at the liquid/gas interface. In one such limit, distributed combustion occurs in an intrusive regime, the reaction zone lying closer to the liquid/gas interface than the length scale of any disturbance of interest. Such limiting models have recently been formulated thereby significantly generalizing earlier classical models that were originally introduced to study the hydrodynamic stability of a reactive liquid/gas interface. In all of these investigations, gravity appears explicitly and plays a significant role, along with surface tension, viscosity, and, in the more recent models, certain reaction-rate parameters associated with the pressure and temperature sensitivities of the reaction itself. In particular, these parameters determine the stability of the deflagration with respect to not only classical hydrodynamic disturbances, but also with respect to reactive/diffusive influences as well. These instabilities thus lead to a number of interesting phenomena, such as the sloshing type of waves that have been observed in mixtures of HAN and triethanolammonium nitrate (TEAN) with water. Although the Froude number was treated as an O(l) quantity in these studies, the limit of small inverse Froude number corresponding to the microgravity regime is increasingly of interest. In the present work, the author formally exploits this limiting parameter regime to compare some of the features of hydrodynamic instability of liquid-propellant combustion at reduced gravity with the same phenomenon at normal gravity.

  5. Hydrodynamic Instability and Thermal Coupling in a Dynamic Model of Liquid-Propellant Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margolis, S. B.

    1999-01-01

    For liquid-propellant combustion, the Landau/Levich hydrodynamic models have been combined and extended to account for a dynamic dependence of the burning rate on the local pressure and temperature fields. Analysis of these extended models is greatly facilitated by exploiting the realistic smallness of the gas-to-liquid density ratio rho. Neglecting thermal coupling effects, an asymptotic expression was then derived for the cellular stability boundary A(sub p)(k) where A(sub p) is the pressure sensitivity of the burning rate and k is the disturbance wavenumber. The results explicitly indicate the stabilizing effects of gravity on long-wave disturbances, and those of viscosity and surface tension on short-wave perturbations, and the instability associated with intermediate wavenumbers for critical negative values of A(sub p). In the limit of weak gravity, hydrodynamic instability in liquid-propellant combustion becomes a long-wave, instability phenomenon, whereas at normal gravity, this instability is first manifested through O(1) wavenumbers. In addition, surface tension and viscosity (both liquid and gas) each produce comparable effects in the large-wavenumber regime, thereby providing important modifications to the previous analyses in which one or more of these effects was neglected. For A(sub p)= O, the Landau/Levich results are recovered in appropriate limiting cases, although this typically corresponds to a hydrodynamically unstable parameter regime for p << 1. In addition to the classical cellular form of hydrodynamic stability, there exists a pulsating form corresponding to the loss of stability of steady, planar burning to time-dependent perturbations. This occurs for negative values of the parameter A(sub p), and is thus absent from the original Landau/Levich models. In the extended model, however, there exists a stable band of negative pressure sensitivities bounded above by the Landau type of instability, and below by this pulsating form of hydrodynamic

  6. Modulational instability of electrostatic acoustic waves in an electron-hole semiconductor quantum plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yunliang Lü, Xiaoxia

    2014-02-15

    The modulational instability of quantum electrostatic acoustic waves in electron-hole quantum semiconductor plasmas is investigated using the quantum hydrodynamic model, from which a modified nonlinear Schrödinger equation with damping effects is derived using the reductive perturbation method. Here, we consider the combined effects of quantum recoil, quantum degenerate pressures, as well as the exchange-correlation effect standing for the electrons (holes) spin. The modulational instability for different semiconductors (GaAs, GaSb, and InP) is discussed. The collision between electron (hole) and phonon is also investigated. The permitted maximum time for modulational instability and the damping features of quantum envelope solitary wave are all determined by the collision. The approximate solitary solution with damping effects is presented in weak collision limit. The damping properties were discussed by numerical method.

  7. Ion heating in a dusty plasma due to the dust/ion acoustic instability

    SciTech Connect

    Winske, D.; Gary, S.P.; Jones, M.E.

    1995-08-01

    The drift of plasma ions relative to charged grains in a dusty plasma can give rise to a dust/ion acoustic instability. The authors investigate the linear properties of the instability by numerically solving an appropriate linear dispersion equation and examine the nonlinear behavior through one-dimensional electrostatic particle simulations, in which the plasma and dust ions are treated as discrete particles and the electrons are modeled as a Boltzmann fluid. The instability is slightly weaker when the dust particles have a range of sizes, and corresponding range of charges and masses. It is argued that due to dust particles that comprise planetary rings, this process can contribute to ion heating and diffusion observed in the linear magnetosphere of Saturn. 14 refs., 4 figs.

  8. Elimination of High-Frequency Combustion Instability in the Fastrac Engine Thrust Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rocker, Marvin; Nesman, Thomas E.

    1998-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center(MSFC) has been tasked with developing a 60,000 pound thrust, pump-fed, LOX/RP-1 engine under the Advanced Space Transportation Program(ASTP). This government-led design has been designated the Fastrac engine. The X-34 vehicle will use the Fastrac engine as the main propulsion system. The X-34 will be a suborbital vehicle developed by the Orbital Sciences Corporation. The X-34 vehicle will be launched from an L-1011 airliner. After launch, the X-34 vehicle will be able to climb to altitudes up to 250,000 feet and reach speeds up to Mach 8, over a mission range of 500 miles. The overall length, wingspan, and gross takeoff weight of the X-34 vehicle are 58.3 feet, 27.7 feet and 45,000 pounds, respectively. This report summarizes the plan of achieving a Fastrac thrust chamber assembly(TCA) stable bomb test that meets the JANNAF standards, the Fastrac TCA design, and the combustion instabilities exhibited by the Fastrac TCA during testing at MSFC's test stand 116 as determined from high-frequency fluctuating pressure measurements. This report also summarizes the characterization of the combustion instabilities from the pressure measurements and the steps taken to eliminate the instabilities.

  9. Large-Eddy Simulation of combustion instabilities in a variable-length combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garby, Romain; Selle, Laurent; Poinsot, Thierry

    2013-01-01

    This article presents a simulation of a model rocket combustor with continuously variable acoustic properties thanks to a variable-length injector tube. Fully compressible Large-Eddy Simulations are conducted using the AVBP code. An original flame stabilization mechanism is uncovered where the recirculation of hot gases in the corner recirculation zone creates a triple flame structure. An unstable operating point is then chosen to investigate the mechanism of the instability. The simulations are compared to experimental results in terms of frequency and mode structure. Two-dimensional axi-symmetric computations are compared to full 3D simulations in order to assess the validity of the axi-symmetry assumption for the prediction of mean and unsteady features of this flow. Despite the inaccuracies inherent to the 2D description of a turbulent flow, for this configuration and the particular operating point investigated, the axi-symmetric simulation qualitatively reproduces some features of the instability.

  10. Numerical prediction of low frequency combustion instability in a model ramjet combustor

    SciTech Connect

    Shang, H.M.; Chen, Y.S.; Shih, M.S.; Farmer, R.C.

    1996-12-31

    A numerical analysis has been conducted for low-frequency combustion instability in a model ramjet combustor. The facility is two-dimensional, and is comprised of a long inlet duct, a dump combustor chamber, and an exhaust nozzle. The experiments observed that the combustor pressure oscillation under the particular operating condition did not have much cycle-to-cycle variation. The main resonant frequency occurs at about 65 Hz for this case. In the numerical analysis, a time accurate Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code with a pressure-correction algorithm is used, and the combustion process was modeled with a single step chemistry model and a modified eddy breakup model. A high-order upwind scheme with flux limiter is used for convection terms. The convergence of the linear algebraic equations is accelerated through a preconditioned conjugate gradient matrix solver. The numerical predictions show that the flame oscillates in the combustion chamber at the calculation condition and are justified by the experimental schlieren photographs. The numerical analyses correctly predict the chamber pressure oscillation frequency is over-predicted compared with the experimental data. The discrepancy can be explained by the simplified turbulence and combustion model used in this study, and the uncertainty of the inlet boundary conditions.

  11. Model-based control of thermoacoustic instabilities in partially premixed lean combustion - a design case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xiao-Chuan; Glover, Keith

    2013-11-01

    Self-excited oscillation is becoming a major issue in low-emission, lean partially premixed combustion systems, and active control has been shown to be a feasible method to suppress such instabilities. A number of robust control methods are employed to obtain a feedback controller and it is observed that the robustness to system uncertainty is significantly better for a low complexity controller in spite of the norms being similar. Moreover, we demonstrate that closed-loop stability for such a complex system can be proved via use of the integral quadratic constraint method. Open- and closed-loop nonlinear simulations are provided.

  12. Invited Review. Combustion instability in spray-guided stratified-charge engines. A review

    DOE PAGES

    Fansler, Todd D.; Reuss, D. L.; Sick, V.; Dahms, R. N.

    2015-02-02

    Our article reviews systematic research on combustion instabilities (principally rare, random misfires and partial burns) in spray-guided stratified-charge (SGSC) engines operated at part load with highly stratified fuel -air -residual mixtures. Results from high-speed optical imaging diagnostics and numerical simulation provide a conceptual framework and quantify the sensitivity of ignition and flame propagation to strong, cyclically varying temporal and spatial gradients in the flow field and in the fuel -air -residual distribution. For SGSC engines using multi-hole injectors, spark stretching and locally rich ignition are beneficial. Moreover, combustion instability is dominated by convective flow fluctuations that impede motion of themore » spark or flame kernel toward the bulk of the fuel, coupled with low flame speeds due to locally lean mixtures surrounding the kernel. In SGSC engines using outwardly opening piezo-electric injectors, ignition and early flame growth are strongly influenced by the spray's characteristic recirculation vortex. For both injection systems, the spray and the intake/compression-generated flow field influence each other. Factors underlying the benefits of multi-pulse injection are identified. Finally, some unresolved questions include (1) the extent to which piezo-SGSC misfires are caused by failure to form a flame kernel rather than by flame-kernel extinction (as in multi-hole SGSC engines); (2) the relative contributions of partially premixed flame propagation and mixing-controlled combustion under the exceptionally late-injection conditions that permit SGSC operation on E85-like fuels with very low NOx and soot emissions; and (3) the effects of flow-field variability on later combustion, where fuel-air-residual mixing within the piston bowl becomes important.« less

  13. Invited Review. Combustion instability in spray-guided stratified-charge engines. A review

    SciTech Connect

    Fansler, Todd D.; Reuss, D. L.; Sick, V.; Dahms, R. N.

    2015-02-02

    Our article reviews systematic research on combustion instabilities (principally rare, random misfires and partial burns) in spray-guided stratified-charge (SGSC) engines operated at part load with highly stratified fuel -air -residual mixtures. Results from high-speed optical imaging diagnostics and numerical simulation provide a conceptual framework and quantify the sensitivity of ignition and flame propagation to strong, cyclically varying temporal and spatial gradients in the flow field and in the fuel -air -residual distribution. For SGSC engines using multi-hole injectors, spark stretching and locally rich ignition are beneficial. Moreover, combustion instability is dominated by convective flow fluctuations that impede motion of the spark or flame kernel toward the bulk of the fuel, coupled with low flame speeds due to locally lean mixtures surrounding the kernel. In SGSC engines using outwardly opening piezo-electric injectors, ignition and early flame growth are strongly influenced by the spray's characteristic recirculation vortex. For both injection systems, the spray and the intake/compression-generated flow field influence each other. Factors underlying the benefits of multi-pulse injection are identified. Finally, some unresolved questions include (1) the extent to which piezo-SGSC misfires are caused by failure to form a flame kernel rather than by flame-kernel extinction (as in multi-hole SGSC engines); (2) the relative contributions of partially premixed flame propagation and mixing-controlled combustion under the exceptionally late-injection conditions that permit SGSC operation on E85-like fuels with very low NOx and soot emissions; and (3) the effects of flow-field variability on later combustion, where fuel-air-residual mixing within the piston bowl becomes important.

  14. Analysis of Hydrodynamic (Landau) Instability in Liquid-Propellant Combustion at Normal and Reduced Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margolis, Stephen B.

    1997-01-01

    which steady, planar burning is unstable to nonsteady, and/or nonplanar (cellular) modes of burning. These instabilities thus lead to a number of interesting phenomena, such as the sloshing type of waves that have been observed in mixtures of HAN and TriEthanolAmmonium Nitrate (TEAN) with water. Although the Froude number was treated as an O(1) quantity in these studies, the limit of small inverse Froude number corresponding to the microgravity regime is increasingly of interest and can be treated explicitly, leading to various limiting forms of the models, the neutral stability boundaries, and, ultimately, the evolution equations that govern the nonlinear dynamics of the propagating reaction front. In the present work, we formally exploit this limiting parameter regime to compare some of the features of hydrodynamic instability of liquid-propellant combustion at reduced gravity with the same phenomenon at normal gravity.

  15. An acoustic energy framework for predicting combustion-driven acoustic instabilities in premixed gas-turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, Zuhair M. A.

    The purpose of this study was to discover and assess student financial services delivered to students enrolled at East Tennessee State University. The research was undertaken for institutional self-improvement. The research explored changes that have occurred in student financial services in the dynamic higher education market. The research revealed universities pursued best practices for the delivery of student financial services through expanded employee knowledge, restructured organizations, and integrated information technologies. The research was conducted during October and November, 2006. The data were gathered from an online student survey of student financial services. The areas researched included: the Bursar office, the Financial Aid office, and online services. The results of the data analysis revealed problems with the students' perceived quality of existing financial services and the additional services students desire. The research focused on student perceptions of the quality of financial services by age and gender classifications and response categories. Although no statistically significant difference was found between the age-gender classifications on the perception of the quality of the financial services studied, the research adds to our understanding of student financial services at East Tennessee State University. Recommendation for continued research included annual surveys of segmented student populations that include ethnicity, age, gender, and educational level. The research would be used for continuous improvement efforts and student relationship management. Also additional research was recommended for employee learning in relation to the institution's mission, goals, and values.

  16. Experimental characterization of onset of acoustic instability in a nonpremixed half-dump combustor.

    PubMed

    Chakravarthy, Satyanarayanan R; Shreenivasan, Obla J; Boehm, Benjamin; Dreizler, Andreas; Janicka, Johannes

    2007-07-01

    This paper reports work on a nonpremixed half-dump combustor, in which methane is injected at the backward-facing step, and mixes and burns with the air flowing past the step in the unsteady recirculation zone. The flow and geometric parameters are widely varied, to gradually change from conditions of low-amplitude noise to excitation of high-amplitude discrete tones. The purpose of the work is to focus on the transition from the former condition to the latter, and to mark the onset of instability. Dimensionless groups such as the Helmholtz and Strouhal numbers are formed based on the observed dominant frequencies, whose variation with the air flow Reynolds number is used to identify the oscillations as those due to the natural acoustic modes or the vortex shedding process. High-speed chemiluminescence imaging reveals shedding of vortical structures in the flame zone. With variation in the conditions, flow-acoustic lock-on and transition from one vortex shedding mode to another is marked by nonlinearity in the corresponding amplitude variations. Such conditions are identified as the onset of instability in terms of the ratio of the flow time scale to the acoustic time scale and mapped against the operating fuel-air equivalence ratio of the combustor. PMID:17614471

  17. The Effect of Inlet Swirler Design on Passive Control of Combustion Noise and Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borsuk, Alex; Agrawal, Ajay; Williams, Justin

    2011-11-01

    The use of porous inert media (PIM) in the reaction zone of a swirl-stabilized lean-premixed combustor provides a passive method of controlling combustion noise and instability. Swirl-stabilized combustors use an inlet swirler that imparts a swirling motion to the reactant flow and stabilizes the flame. In this study, the effect of swirler design and swirl number on combustion without and with PIM has been investigated experimentally, using a methane-fueled quartz combustor at atmospheric pressure. Swirler vane angle was varied to obtain swirl numbers of 0.45, 0.78, and 1.10. Swiler location was varied to obtain recess depth in the premixer tube of 0, 2.5, and 5 cm. Experiments were conducted at a constant air flow rate of 300 SLPM and equivalence ratios of 0.7, 0.75, and 0.8. PIM geometries with increasing and decreasing flow cross-sectional area were tested. The performance of each test case is compared by measuring sound pressure levels (SPL) with a microphone probe and observing the flame behavior. Results indicate that PIM can be effective in reducing noise and instability over a wide range of operating conditions. Total SPL reductions of up to 7.6 dBA were observed with PIM. Funded by NSF REU Site #10626110.

  18. Partial Extinction and the Rayleigh Index in Acoustically Driven Fuel Droplet Combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentini, Dario; Tran, Phuoc Hai; Lopez, Brett; Ekmekji, Ari; Smith, Owen; Karagozian, Ann

    2014-11-01

    This experimental study examines burning liquid fuel droplets exposed to standing acoustic waves created within an atmospheric pressure waveguide. Building on prior studies which study relatively low-level excitation conditions in which the droplet is situated in the vicinity of a pressure node (PN), the present experiments focus on higher amplitude excitation which can lead to periodic flame extinction. Phase-locked OH* chemiluminescence imaging reveals temporal oscillations in flame standoff distance from the droplet as well as chemiluminescent intensity in response to the applied acoustic perturbations. Temporal variation in the chemiluminescent intensity as well as pressure in the vicinity of the burning droplet enable quantification of combustion-acoustic coupling via the Rayleigh index. While the sign of the Rayleigh index is consistent with oscillatory combustion during low-level acoustic excitation, when periodic partial extinction occurs at higher amplitude excitation, the Rayleigh index is insufficient to fully represent such coupling. Alternative metrics and methods are explored to enable a more robust study under such conditions. Supported by the University of Pisa and the UC CARE and MSD Scholars programs.

  19. Stick-slip instabilities in sheared granular flow: The role of friction and acoustic vibrations.

    PubMed

    Lieou, Charles K C; Elbanna, Ahmed E; Langer, J S; Carlson, J M

    2015-08-01

    We propose a theory of shear flow in dense granular materials. A key ingredient of the theory is an effective temperature that determines how the material responds to external driving forces such as shear stresses and vibrations. We show that, within our model, friction between grains produces stick-slip behavior at intermediate shear rates, even if the material is rate strengthening at larger rates. In addition, externally generated acoustic vibrations alter the stick-slip amplitude, or suppress stick-slip altogether, depending on the pressure and shear rate. We construct a phase diagram that indicates the parameter regimes for which stick-slip occurs in the presence and absence of acoustic vibrations of a fixed amplitude and frequency. These results connect the microscopic physics to macroscopic dynamics and thus produce useful information about a variety of granular phenomena, including rupture and slip along earthquake faults, the remote triggering of instabilities, and the control of friction in material processing.

  20. Progress in analytical methods to predict and control azimuthal combustion instability modes in annular chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauerheim, M.; Nicoud, F.; Poinsot, T.

    2016-02-01

    Longitudinal low-frequency thermoacoustic unstable modes in combustion chambers have been intensively studied experimentally, numerically, and theoretically, leading to significant progress in both understanding and controlling these acoustic modes. However, modern annular gas turbines may also exhibit azimuthal modes, which are much less studied and feature specific mode structures and dynamic behaviors, leading to more complex situations. Moreover, dealing with 10-20 burners mounted in the same chamber limits the use of high fidelity simulations or annular experiments to investigate these modes because of their complexity and costs. Consequently, for such circumferential acoustic modes, theoretical tools have been developed to uncover underlying phenomena controlling their stability, nature, and dynamics. This review presents recent progress in this field. First, Galerkin and network models are described with their pros and cons in both the temporal and frequency framework. Then, key features of such acoustic modes are unveiled, focusing on their specificities such as symmetry breaking, non-linear modal coupling, forcing by turbulence. Finally, recent works on uncertainty quantifications, guided by theoretical studies and applied to annular combustors, are presented. The objective is to provide a global view of theoretical research on azimuthal modes to highlight their complexities and potential.

  1. Modulational instability of ion-acoustic wave envelopes in magnetized quantum electron-positron-ion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Bains, A. S.; Gill, T. S.; Misra, A. P.; Saini, N. S.

    2010-01-15

    The amplitude modulation of quantum ion-acoustic waves (QIAWs) along an external magnetic field is studied in a quantum electron-positron-ion (e-p-i) magnetoplasma. Reductive perturbation technique is used to derive the three-dimensional nonlinear Schroedinger equation which governs the slow modulation of QIAW packets. Accounting for the effects of the electron to ion number density ratio (mu), the normalized ion-cyclotron frequency (omega{sub c}) as well as the ratio (H) of the 'plasmonic energy density' to the Fermi energy, new regimes for the modulational instability of QIAWs are obtained and analyzed. In contrast to one-dimensional unmagnetized e-p-i plasmas, the instability growth rate is shown to suppress with increasing mu or decreasing the values of H. The predicted results could be important for understanding the salient features of modulated QIAW packets in dense astrophysical plasmas as well as to the next generation intense laser solid density plasma experiments.

  2. Dust-acoustic waves modulational instability and rogue waves in a polarized dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Bouzit, Omar; Tribeche, Mouloud

    2015-10-15

    The polarization force-induced changes in the dust-acoustic waves (DAWs) modulational instability (MI) are examined. Using the reductive perturbation method, the nonlinear Schrödinger equation that governs the MI of the DAWs is obtained. It is found that the effect of the polarization term R is to narrow the wave number domain for the onset of instability. The amplitude of the wave envelope decreases as R increases, meaning that the polarization force effects render weaker the associated DA rogue waves. The latter may therefore completely damp in the vicinity of R ∼ 1, i.e., as the polarization force becomes close to the electrostatic one (the net force acting on the dust particles becomes vanishingly small). The DA rogue wave profile is very sensitive to any change in the restoring force acting on the dust particles. It turns out that the polarization effects may completely smear out the DA rogue waves.

  3. Energetic Geodesic Acoustic Modes Associated with Two-Stream-like Instabilities in Tokamak Plasmas.

    PubMed

    Qu, Z S; Hole, M J; Fitzgerald, M

    2016-03-01

    An unstable branch of the energetic geodesic acoustic mode (EGAM) is found using fluid theory with fast ions characterized by their narrow width in energy distribution and collective transit along field lines. This mode, with a frequency much lower than the thermal GAM frequency ω_{GAM}, is now confirmed as a new type of unstable EGAM: a reactive instability similar to the two-stream instability. The mode can have a very small fast ion density threshold when the fast ion transit frequency is smaller than ω_{GAM}, consistent with the onset of the mode right after the turn-on of the beam in DIII-D experiments. The transition of this reactive EGAM to the velocity gradient driven EGAM is also discussed.

  4. On Pulsating and Cellular Forms of Hydrodynamic Instability in Liquid-Propellant Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margolis, Stephen B.; Sacksteder, Kurt (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    An extended Landau-Levich model of liquid-propellant combustion, one that allows for a local dependence of the burning rate on the (gas) pressure at the liquid-gas interface, exhibits not only the classical hydrodynamic cellular instability attributed to Landau but also a pulsating hydrodynamic instability associated with sufficiently negative pressure sensitivities. Exploiting the realistic limit of small values of the gas-to-liquid density ratio p, analytical formulas for both neutral stability boundaries may be obtained by expanding all quantities in appropriate powers of p in each of three distinguished wave-number regimes. In particular, composite analytical expressions are derived for the neutral stability boundaries A(sub p)(k), where A, is the pressure sensitivity of the burning rate and k is the wave number of the disturbance. For the cellular boundary, the results demonstrate explicitly the stabilizing effect of gravity on long-wave disturbances, the stabilizing effect of viscosity (both liquid and gas) and surface tension on short-wave perturbations, and the instability associated with intermediate wave numbers for negative values of A(sub p), which is characteristic of many hydroxylammonium nitrate-based liquid propellants over certain pressure ranges. In contrast, the pulsating hydrodynamic stability boundary is insensitive to gravitational and surface-tension effects but is more sensitive to the effects of liquid viscosity because, for typical nonzero values of the latter, the pulsating boundary decreases to larger negative values of A(sub p) as k increases through O(l) values. Thus, liquid-propellant combustion is predicted to be stable (that is, steady and planar) only for a range of negative pressure sensitivities that lie below the cellular boundary that exists for sufficiently small negative values of A(sub p) and above the pulsating boundary that exists for larger negative values of this parameter.

  5. Instability of nonplanar modulated dust acoustic wave packets in a strongly coupled nonthermal dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    El-Labany, S. K. Zedan, N. A.; El-Taibany, W. F. E-mail: eltaibany@du.edu.eg

    2015-07-15

    Cylindrical and spherical amplitude modulations of dust acoustic (DA) solitary wave envelopes in a strongly coupled dusty plasma containing nonthermal distributed ions are studied. Employing a reductive perturbation technique, a modified nonlinear Schrödinger equation including the geometrical effect is derived. The influences of nonthermal ions, polarization force, and the geometries on the modulational instability conditions are analyzed and the possible rogue wave structures are discussed in detail. It is found that the spherical DA waves are more structurally stable to perturbations than the cylindrical ones. Possible applications of these theoretical findings are briefly discussed.

  6. Electrostatic ion-acoustic-like instabilities in the solar wind with a backstreaming alpha particle beam

    SciTech Connect

    Gomberoff, L.; Gomberoff, K.; Deutsch, A.

    2010-06-15

    Nonlinear electrostatic instabilities have been shown to occur frequently and under very different conditions in plasma with two ion beams such as the fast solar wind. These instabilities can be triggered when the phase velocity of electrostatic ion-acoustic waves propagating forward and backward relative to the interplanetary magnetic field overlaps due to the presence of a finite amplitude of circularly polarized wave. The instabilities can be triggered by waves supported by the same ion component, or by waves supported by different ion components. By assuming a beam of alpha particles moving backward relative to the external magnetic field, as observed in some events in the fast solar wind, it is shown that a very small negative drift velocity of the alpha particle beam relative to the core plasma--a few percent of the local Alfven velocity--can trigger a very rich variety of nonlinear electrostatic acousticlike instabilities. Their growth rates can be rather large and they persist for larger negative alpha particles drift velocities and temperatures.

  7. Ion-acoustic solitary waves and their multi-dimensional instability in a magnetized degenerate plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Haider, M. M.; Mamun, A. A.

    2012-10-15

    A rigorous theoretical investigation has been made on Zakharov-Kuznetsov (ZK) equation of ion-acoustic (IA) solitary waves (SWs) and their multi-dimensional instability in a magnetized degenerate plasma which consists of inertialess electrons, inertial ions, negatively, and positively charged stationary heavy ions. The ZK equation is derived by the reductive perturbation method, and multi-dimensional instability of these solitary structures is also studied by the small-k (long wave-length plane wave) perturbation expansion technique. The effects of the external magnetic field are found to significantly modify the basic properties of small but finite-amplitude IA SWs. The external magnetic field and the propagation directions of both the nonlinear waves and their perturbation modes are found to play a very important role in changing the instability criterion and the growth rate of the unstable IA SWs. The basic features (viz., amplitude, width, instability, etc.) and the underlying physics of the IA SWs, which are relevant to space and laboratory plasma situations, are briefly discussed.

  8. Multi-dimensional analysis of combustion instabilities in liquid rocket motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grenda, Jeffrey M.; Venkateswaran, Sankaran; Merkle, Charles L.

    1992-01-01

    A three-dimensional analysis of combustion instabilities in liquid rocket engines is presented based on a mixed finite difference/spectral solution methodology for the gas phase and a discrete droplet tracking formulation for the liquid phase. Vaporization is treated by a simplified model based on an infinite thermal conductivitiy assumption for spherical liquid droplets of fuel in a convective environment undergoing transient heating. A simple two parameter phenomenological combustion response model is employed for validation of the results in the small amplitude regime. The computational procedure is demonstrated to capture the phenomena of wave propagation within the combustion chamber accurately. Results demonstrate excellent amplitude and phase agreement with analytical solutions for properly selected grid resolutions under both stable and unstable operating conditions. Computations utilizing the simplified droplet model demonstrate stable response to arbitrary pulsing. This is possibly due to the assumption of uniform droplet temperature which removes the thermal inertia time-lag response of the vaporization process. The mixed-character scheme is sufficiently efficient to allow solutions on workstations at a modest increase in computational time over that required for two-dimensional solutions.

  9. Non-ideal Effects in Streaming Bi-Dust Acoustic Instability

    SciTech Connect

    Puerta, J.; Castro, E.; Martin, P.; Arias, H.

    2006-12-04

    Streaming dust acoustic instabilities in the presence of a dust beam in a weakly non-ideal dusty plasma have been studied considering a new form for the state equation with two kind of grains. Fluctuating charging effects are not considered in this work. Homogeneous dust-acoustic waves (DAWS) are studied for a perturbed plasma in a very low frequency regime, where dusty plasmas support new kind of waves and instabilities due to the dust collective dynamics. In this analysis a fluid model is used and electrons and ions are determined by their Boltzmann factors in order to find an adequate dispersion relation, which has several parameters depending of the state equation constants. In this paper we use the state equation structured by Ree and Hoover using Pade approximant for a hard-sphere gas in the form P = nT 1 + nb{sub 0} (1 + a{sub 1}b{sub 0}n + a{sub 2}b{sub 0}{sup 2}n{sup 2}/1 - b{sub 1}b{sub 0}n + b{sub 2}b{sub 0}{sup 2}n{sup 2}) is applied, where b0 is calculated by the second virial term for the hard-core model. This type of equation is more accurate than other expressions and easier to manipulate. Comparisons between the ideal and non ideal cases is performed. Constants a1, a2, b1, b2, are calculated with the Pade method. The onset of the instability and also the growth rates are studied in function of relevant parameters of the system as the radius of the grains and their densities. In our analysis the instability region for non ideal plasma is compared with that of the ideal ones.

  10. Dynamics of self-excited thermoacoustic instability in a combustion system: Pseudo-periodic and high-dimensional nature.

    PubMed

    Okuno, Yuta; Small, Michael; Gotoda, Hiroshi

    2015-04-01

    We have examined the dynamics of self-excited thermoacoustic instability in a fundamentally and practically important gas-turbine model combustion system on the basis of complex network approaches. We have incorporated sophisticated complex networks consisting of cycle networks and phase space networks, neither of which has been considered in the areas of combustion physics and science. Pseudo-periodicity and high-dimensionality exist in the dynamics of thermoacoustic instability, including the possible presence of a clear power-law distribution and small-world-like nature.

  11. Dynamics of self-excited thermoacoustic instability in a combustion system: Pseudo-periodic and high-dimensional nature.

    PubMed

    Okuno, Yuta; Small, Michael; Gotoda, Hiroshi

    2015-04-01

    We have examined the dynamics of self-excited thermoacoustic instability in a fundamentally and practically important gas-turbine model combustion system on the basis of complex network approaches. We have incorporated sophisticated complex networks consisting of cycle networks and phase space networks, neither of which has been considered in the areas of combustion physics and science. Pseudo-periodicity and high-dimensionality exist in the dynamics of thermoacoustic instability, including the possible presence of a clear power-law distribution and small-world-like nature. PMID:25933655

  12. On pulsating and cellular forms of hydrodynamic instability in liquid-propellant combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Margolis, S.B.

    1997-11-01

    An extended Landau/Levich model of liquid-propellant combustion, one that allows for a local dependence of the burning rate on the (gas) pressure at the liquid/gas interface, exhibits not only the classical hydrodynamic cellular instability attributed to Landau, but also a pulsating hydrodynamic instability associated with sufficiently negative pressure sensitivities. Exploiting the realistic limit of small values of the gas-to-liquid density ratio {rho}, analytical formulas for both neutral stability boundaries may be obtained by expanding all quantities in appropriate powers of {rho} in each of three distinguished wavenumber regimes. In particular, composite analytical expressions are derived for the neutral stability boundaries A{sub p}(k), where A{sub p} is the pressure sensitivity of the burning rate and k is the wavenumber of the disturbance. For the cellular boundary, the results demonstrate explicitly the stabilizing effect of gravity on long-wave disturbances, the stabilizing effect of viscosity and surface tension on short-wave perturbations, and the instability associated with intermediate wavenumbers for negative values of A{sub p}, which is characteristic of many hydroxylammonium nitrate-based liquid propellants over certain pressure ranges. In contrast, the pulsating hydrodynamic stability boundary is insensitive to gravitational and surface-tension effects, but is more sensitive to the effects of liquid viscosity since, for typical nonzero values of the latter, the pulsating boundary decreases to larger negative values of A{sub p} as k increases through O(1) values.

  13. Linear and nonlinear acoustics with nonuiform entropy in combustion chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Humphrey, J.W.

    1987-01-01

    A one-dimensional analytical model is presented for calculating the longitudinal acoustic modes of idealized dump-type ramjet engines. A plane flame was studied and incorporated into the combustor model where the flame is allowed to move or oscillate in the combustor. This provides three mechanisms of interaction at the flame sheet: agement to supply the necessary transparency and the ability to transmit data in a lazy fashion. Study of the test-bed system reveals that copy-on-reference address space transmission improves migration effectiveness (performance). Relocations occur up to a thousand times faster, with transfer times independent of process size. Since processes access a small portion of their memory in their lifetimes, the number of bytes transferred between machines drops by up to 96%. Message-handling cost are lowered by up to 94%, and are more evenly distributed across the remote execution. Implementation, instrumentation, and study of the test bed provides more useful information than is possible through a simulation.

  14. Active control of combustion instabilities in low NO{sub x} gas turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Zinn, B.T.; Neumeier, Y.

    1995-10-01

    This 3-year research program was initiated in September, 1995, to investigate active control of detrimental combustion instabilities in low NO{sub x} gas turbines (LNGT), which burn natural gas in a lean premixed mode to reduce NO{sub x} emissions. The program will investigate the mechanisms that drive these instabilities. Furthermore, it will study active control systems (ACS) that can effectively prevent the onset of such instabilities and/or reduce their amplitudes to acceptable levels. An understanding of the driving mechanisms will not only guide the development of effective ACS for LNGT but may also lead to combustor design changes (i.e., passive control) that will fully or partially resolve the problem. Initial attempts to stabilize combustors (i.e., chemical rockets) by ACS were reported more than 40 years ago, but were unsuccessful due to lack of adequate sensors, electronics, and actuators for performing the needed control actions. Progress made in recent years in sensor and actuator technology, electronics, and control theory has rekindled interest in developing ACS for unstable combustors. While initial efforts in this area, which focused on active control of instabilities in air breathing combustors, have demonstrated the considerable potential of active control, they have also indicated that more effective observers, controllers, and actuators are needed for practical applications. Considerable progress has been made in the observer and actuator areas by the principal investigators of this program during the past 2 years under an AFOSR program. The developed observer is based upon wavelets theory, and can identify the amplitudes, frequencies, and phases of the five most dominant combustor modes in (virtually) real time. The developed actuator is a fuel injector that uses a novel magneto-strictive material to modulate the fuel flow rate into the combustor.

  15. Method and device for diagnosing and controlling combustion instabilities in internal combustion engines operating in or transitioning to homogeneous charge combustion ignition mode

    DOEpatents

    Wagner, Robert M [Knoxville, TN; Daw, Charles S [Knoxville, TN; Green, Johney B [Knoxville, TN; Edwards, Kevin D [Knoxville, TN

    2008-10-07

    This invention is a method of achieving stable, optimal mixtures of HCCI and SI in practical gasoline internal combustion engines comprising the steps of: characterizing the combustion process based on combustion process measurements, determining the ratio of conventional and HCCI combustion, determining the trajectory (sequence) of states for consecutive combustion processes, and determining subsequent combustion process modifications using said information to steer the engine combustion toward desired behavior.

  16. Modulation instability of ion acoustic waves, solitons, and their interactions in nonthermal electron-positron-ion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Jiefang; Wang Yueyue; Wu Lei

    2009-06-15

    The propagation of ion acoustic waves in plasmas composed of ions, positrons, and nonthermally distributed electrons is investigated. By means of the reduction perturbation technique, a nonlinear Schroedinger equation is derived and the modulation instability of ion acoustic wave is analyzed, where the nonthermal parameter is found to be of significant importance. Furthermore, analytical expressions for the bright and dark solitons are obtained, and the interaction of multiple solitons is discussed.

  17. Theoretical evaluation of rigid baffles in the suppression of combustion instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baer, M. R.; Mitchell, C. E.

    1976-01-01

    An analytical technique for the prediction of the effects of rigid baffles on the stability of liquid propellant combustors is presented. This analysis employs both two and three dimensional combustor models characterized by concentrated combustion sources at the chamber injector and a constant Mach number nozzle. An eigenfunction-matching method is used to solve the linearized partial differential equations describing the unsteady flow field for both models. Boundary layer corrections to this unsteady flow are in a mechanical energy dissipation model to evaluate viscous and turbulence effects within the flow. An integral instability relationship is then employed to predict the decay rate of the oscillations. Results of this analysis agree qualitatively with experimental observations and show that sufficient dissipation exists to indicate that the proper mechanism of baffle damping is a fluid dynamic loss. The response of the dissipation model to varying baffle blade length, mean flow Mach number, oscillation amplitude, baffle configuration, and oscillation mode is examined.

  18. Nonlinear Evolution of the Radiation-driven Magneto-acoustic Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, Rodrigo; Socrates, Aristotle

    2013-04-01

    We examine the nonlinear development of unstable magnetosonic waves driven by a background radiative flux—the radiation-driven magneto-acoustic instability (RMI, a.k.a. the "photon bubble" instability). The RMI may serve as a persistent source of density, radiative flux, and magnetic field fluctuations in stably stratified, optically thick media. The conditions for instability are present in a variety of astrophysical environments and do not require the radiation pressure to dominate or the magnetic field to be strong. Here, we numerically study the saturation properties of the RMI, covering three orders of magnitude in the relative strength of radiation, magnetic field, and gas energies. Two-dimensional, time-dependent radiation-magnetohydrodynamic simulations of local, stably stratified domains are conducted with Zeus-MP in the optically thick, highly conducting limit. Our results confirm the theoretical expectations of Blaes & Socrates in that the RMI operates even in gas-pressure-dominated environments that are weakly magnetized. The saturation amplitude is a monotonically increasing function of the ratio of radiation to gas pressure. Keeping this ratio constant, we find that the saturation amplitude peaks when the magnetic pressure is comparable to the radiation pressure. We discuss the implications of our results for the dynamics of magnetized stellar envelopes, where the RMI should act as a source of sub-photospheric perturbations.

  19. The Langmuir's Paradox: Can the Ion Acoustic Instability at the Sheath Edge Thermalize the Ions Too?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yip, Chi-Shung; Hershkowitz, Noah; Severn, Greg

    2013-09-01

    Recently a theoretical prediction was that in single-species plasmas, ion-ion collisional friction is enhanced by the ion acoustic instability. The theory predicted that the instability will not only enhance the thermalization of the electrons, but will also, near the sheath-edge, thermalize the non-Maxwellian tail of the ion velocity distribution function (IVDF), caused by charge exchange in the presheath. The theory also predicted that this instability disappears through collisional damping as neutral pressure of the plasma increases. This experiment aims to verify this theory by measuring the IVDFs near the sheath edge in a multi-dipole chamber discharge in Argon and Xenon gas for a variety of neutral pressures and electron temperatures. The threshold parameters of the phenomenon are explored. The IVDFs are determined by Laser-Induced Florescence, the electron temperature is measured by a Langmuir probe and the plasma potential towards the boundary is measured by an emissive probe. DOE Grant nos. DE-SC0001939, DE FG02- 03ER54728, and NSF No. CBET0903832.

  20. NONLINEAR EVOLUTION OF THE RADIATION-DRIVEN MAGNETO-ACOUSTIC INSTABILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, Rodrigo; Socrates, Aristotle

    2013-04-20

    We examine the nonlinear development of unstable magnetosonic waves driven by a background radiative flux-the radiation-driven magneto-acoustic instability (RMI, a.k.a. the ''photon bubble'' instability). The RMI may serve as a persistent source of density, radiative flux, and magnetic field fluctuations in stably stratified, optically thick media. The conditions for instability are present in a variety of astrophysical environments and do not require the radiation pressure to dominate or the magnetic field to be strong. Here, we numerically study the saturation properties of the RMI, covering three orders of magnitude in the relative strength of radiation, magnetic field, and gas energies. Two-dimensional, time-dependent radiation-magnetohydrodynamic simulations of local, stably stratified domains are conducted with Zeus-MP in the optically thick, highly conducting limit. Our results confirm the theoretical expectations of Blaes and Socrates in that the RMI operates even in gas-pressure-dominated environments that are weakly magnetized. The saturation amplitude is a monotonically increasing function of the ratio of radiation to gas pressure. Keeping this ratio constant, we find that the saturation amplitude peaks when the magnetic pressure is comparable to the radiation pressure. We discuss the implications of our results for the dynamics of magnetized stellar envelopes, where the RMI should act as a source of sub-photospheric perturbations.

  1. Development of a computerized analysis for solid propellant combustion instability with turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, T. J.; Park, O. Y.

    1988-01-01

    A multi-dimensional numerical model has been developed for the unsteady state oscillatory combustion of solid propellants subject to acoustic pressure disturbances. Including the gas phase unsteady effects, the assumption of uniform pressure across the flame zone, which has been conventionally used, is relaxed so that a higher frequency response in the long flame of a double-base propellant can be calculated. The formulation is based on a premixed, laminar flame with a one-step overall chemical reaction and the Arrhenius law of decomposition with no condensed phase reaction. In a given geometry, the Galerkin finite element solution shows the strong resonance and damping effect at the lower frequencies, similar to the result of Denison and Baum. Extended studies deal with the higher frequency region where the pressure varies in the flame thickness. The nonlinear system behavior is investigated by carrying out the second order expansion in wave amplitude when the acoustic pressure oscillations are finite in amplitude. Offset in the burning rate shows a negative sign in the whole frequency region considered, and it verifies the experimental results of Price. Finally, the velocity coupling in the two-dimensional model is discussed.

  2. The Effect of Resistance on Rocket Injector Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, C. J.

    2015-01-01

    Combustion instability, where unsteady heat release couples with acoustic modes, has long been an area of concern in liquid rocket engines. Accurate modeling of the acoustic normal modes of the combustion chamber is important to understanding and preventing combustion instability. This study evaluates the effect of injector resistance on the mode shapes and complex eigen-frequencies of an injector/combustion chamber system by defining a high Mach-flow form of the convective wave equation (see Eq. 1) in COMSOL Multiphysics' Coefficient Form PDE Mathematics Module.

  3. Modulational instability of ion-acoustic waves in plasma with a q-nonextensive nonthermal electron velocity distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Bouzit, Omar Tribeche, Mouloud E-mail: mtribeche@usthb.dz; Bains, A. S.

    2015-08-15

    Modulation instability of ion-acoustic waves (IAWs) is investigated in a collisionless unmagnetized one dimensional plasma, containing positive ions and electrons following the mixed nonextensive nonthermal distribution [Tribeche et al., Phys. Rev. E 85, 037401 (2012)]. Using the reductive perturbation technique, a nonlinear Schrödinger equation which governs the modulation instability of the IAWs is obtained. Valid range of plasma parameters has been fixed and their effects on the modulational instability discussed in detail. We find that the plasma supports both bright and dark solutions. The valid domain for the wave number k where instabilities set in varies with both nonextensive parameter q as well as non thermal parameter α. Moreover, the analysis is extended for the rational solutions of IAWs in the instability regime. Present study is useful for the understanding of IAWs in the region where such mixed distribution may exist.

  4. Multi-dimensional instability of obliquely propagating ion acoustic solitary waves in electron-positron-ion superthermal magnetoplasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    EL-Shamy, E. F.

    2014-08-01

    The solitary structures of multi-dimensional ion-acoustic solitary waves (IASWs) have been considered in magnetoplasmas consisting of electron-positron-ion with high-energy (superthermal) electrons and positrons are investigated. Using a reductive perturbation method, a nonlinear Zakharov-Kuznetsov equation is derived. The multi-dimensional instability of obliquely propagating (with respect to the external magnetic field) IASWs has been studied by the small-k (long wavelength plane wave) expansion perturbation method. The instability condition and the growth rate of the instability have been derived. It is shown that the instability criterion and their growth rate depend on the parameter measuring the superthermality, the ion gyrofrequency, the unperturbed positrons-to-ions density ratio, the direction cosine, and the ion-to-electron temperature ratio. Clearly, the study of our model under consideration is helpful for explaining the propagation and the instability of IASWs in space observations of magnetoplasmas with superthermal electrons and positrons.

  5. Multi-dimensional instability of obliquely propagating ion acoustic solitary waves in electron-positron-ion superthermal magnetoplasmas

    SciTech Connect

    EL-Shamy, E. F.

    2014-08-15

    The solitary structures of multi–dimensional ion-acoustic solitary waves (IASWs) have been considered in magnetoplasmas consisting of electron-positron-ion with high-energy (superthermal) electrons and positrons are investigated. Using a reductive perturbation method, a nonlinear Zakharov-Kuznetsov equation is derived. The multi-dimensional instability of obliquely propagating (with respect to the external magnetic field) IASWs has been studied by the small-k (long wavelength plane wave) expansion perturbation method. The instability condition and the growth rate of the instability have been derived. It is shown that the instability criterion and their growth rate depend on the parameter measuring the superthermality, the ion gyrofrequency, the unperturbed positrons-to-ions density ratio, the direction cosine, and the ion-to-electron temperature ratio. Clearly, the study of our model under consideration is helpful for explaining the propagation and the instability of IASWs in space observations of magnetoplasmas with superthermal electrons and positrons.

  6. Numerical study of acoustic instability in a partly lined flow duct using the full linearized Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Bo; Sun, Dakun; Jing, Xiaodong; Sun, Xiaofeng

    2016-07-01

    Lined ducts are extensively applied to suppress noise emission from aero-engines and other turbomachines. The complex noise/flow interaction in a lined duct possibly leads to acoustic instability in certain conditions. To investigate the instability, the full linearized Navier-Stokes equations with eddy viscosity considered are solved in frequency domain using a Galerkin finite element method to compute the sound transmission in shear flow in the lined duct as well as the flow perturbation over the impedance wall. A good agreement between the numerical predictions and the published experimental results is obtained for the sound transmission, showing that a transmission peak occurs around the resonant frequency of the acoustic liner in the presence of shear flow. The eddy viscosity is an important influential factor that plays the roles of both providing destabilizing and making coupling between the acoustic and flow motions over the acoustic liner. Moreover, it is shown from the numerical investigation that the occurrence of the sound amplification and the magnitude of transmission coefficient are closely related to the realistic velocity profile, and we find it essential that the actual variation of the velocity profile in the axial direction over the liner surface be included in the computation. The simulation results of the periodic flow patterns possess the proper features of the convective instability over the liner, as observed in Marx et al.'s experiment. A quantitative comparison between numerical and experimental results of amplitude and phase of the instability is performed. The corresponding eigenvalues achieve great agreement.

  7. Nonlinear ion-acoustic structures in a nonextensive electron–positron–ion–dust plasma: Modulational instability and rogue waves

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Shimin; Mei, Liquan; Sun, Anbang

    2013-05-15

    The nonlinear propagation of planar and nonplanar (cylindrical and spherical) ion-acoustic waves in an unmagnetized electron–positron–ion–dust plasma with two-electron temperature distributions is investigated in the context of the nonextensive statistics. Using the reductive perturbation method, a modified nonlinear Schrödinger equation is derived for the potential wave amplitude. The effects of plasma parameters on the modulational instability of ion-acoustic waves are discussed in detail for planar as well as for cylindrical and spherical geometries. In addition, for the planar case, we analyze how the plasma parameters influence the nonlinear structures of the first- and second-order ion-acoustic rogue waves within the modulational instability region. The present results may be helpful in providing a good fit between the theoretical analysis and real applications in future spatial observations and laboratory plasma experiments. -- Highlights: ► Modulational instability of ion-acoustic waves in a new plasma model is discussed. ► Tsallis’s statistics is considered in the model. ► The second-order ion-acoustic rogue wave is studied for the first time.

  8. Kinetic instability of the dust acoustic mode in inhomogeneous, partially magnetized plasma with both positively and negatively charged grains

    SciTech Connect

    Vranjes, J.; Poedts, S.

    2010-08-15

    A purely kinetic instability of the dust acoustic mode in inhomogeneous plasmas is discussed. In the presence of a magnetic field, electrons and ions may be magnetized while at the same time dust grains may remain unmagnetized. Although the dynamics of the light species is strongly affected by the magnetic field, the dust acoustic mode may still propagate in practically any direction. The inhomogeneity implies a source of free energy for an instability that develops through the diamagnetic drift effects of the magnetized species. It is shown that this may be a powerful mechanism for the excitation of dust acoustic waves. The analysis presented in the work is also directly applicable to plasmas containing both positive and negative ions and electrons, provided that at least one of the two ion species is unmagnetized.

  9. Acoustic signature from flames as a combustion diagnostic tool. Final technical report, 1 May 79-31 Oct 83

    SciTech Connect

    Strahle, W.C.

    1983-11-01

    A program was conducted to investigate the feasibility of using the combustion noise acoustic output as a non-intrusive diagnostic of some details of the combustion process. Investigated were an open premixed turbulent jet flame and a gas turbine combustor converted to run on propane. The analysis links the acoustic pressure fluctuations to the distribution of heat release rate fluctuations. Measurement of the sound field, yields in principle, the heat release rate fluctuation field. It was found, however, that the analytical methods for this inverse problem are too sensitive to small experimental uncertainties. Consequently, it appears that the method is not, in general feasible.

  10. Modulational instability of ion-acoustic wave envelopes in magnetized quantum electron-positron-ion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bains, A. S.; Misra, A. P.; Saini, N. S.; Gill, T. S.

    2010-01-01

    The amplitude modulation of quantum ion-acoustic waves (QIAWs) along an external magnetic field is studied in a quantum electron-positron-ion (e-p-i) magnetoplasma. Reductive perturbation technique is used to derive the three-dimensional nonlinear Schrödinger equation which governs the slow modulation of QIAW packets. Accounting for the effects of the electron to ion number density ratio (μ), the normalized ion-cyclotron frequency (ωc) as well as the ratio (H) of the "plasmonic energy density" to the Fermi energy, new regimes for the modulational instability of QIAWs are obtained and analyzed. In contrast to one-dimensional unmagnetized e-p-i plasmas, the instability growth rate is shown to suppress with increasing μ or decreasing the values of H. The predicted results could be important for understanding the salient features of modulated QIAW packets in dense astrophysical plasmas as well as to the next generation intense laser solid density plasma experiments.

  11. Hydrodynamic Instability in an Extended Landau/Levich Model of Liquid-Propellant Combustion at Normal and Reduced Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margolis, S. B.

    1997-01-01

    The classical Landau/Levich models of liquid-propellant combustion, despite their relative simplicity, serve as seminal examples that correctly describe the onset of hydrodynamic instability in reactive systems. Recently, these two separate models have been combined and extended to account for a dynamic dependence, absent in the original formulations, of the local burning rate on the local pressure and temperature fields. The resulting model admits an extremely rich variety of both hydrodynamic and reactive/diffusive instabilities that can be analyzed either numerically or analytically in various limiting parameter regimes. In the present work, a formal asymptotic analysis, based on the realistic smallness of the gas-to-liquid density ratio, is developed to investigate the combined effects of gravity and other parameters on the hydrodynamic instability of the propagating liquid/gas interface. In particular, an analytical expression is derived for the neutral stability boundary A(p)(k), where A(p) is the pressure sensitivity of the burning rate and k is the wavenumber of the disturbance. The results demonstrate explicitly the stabilizing effect of gravity on long-wave disturbances, the stabilizing effect of viscosity (both liquid and gas) and surface tension on short-wave perturbations, and the instability associated with intermediate wavenumbers for negative values of A(p). In the limiting case of weak gravity, it is shown that hydrodynamic instability in liquid-propellant combustion is a long-wave instability phenomenon, whereas at normal gravity, this instability is first manifested through O(1) wavenumber disturbances. it is also demonstrated that, in general, surface tension and the viscosity of both the liquid and gas phases each produce comparable stabilizing effects in the long-wavenumber regime, thereby providing important modifications to previous analyses in which one or more of these effects were neglected.

  12. Hydrodynamic Instability in an Extended Landau/Levich Model of Liquid-Propellant Combustion at Normal and Reduced Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margolis, Stephen B.

    1998-01-01

    The classical Landau/Levich models of liquid-propellant combustion, despite their relative simplicity, serve as seminal examples that correctly describe the onset of hydrodynamic instability in reactive systems. Recently, these two separate models have been combined and extended to account for a dynamic dependence, absent in the original formulations, of the local burning rate on the local pressure and temperature fields. The resulting model admits an extremely rich variety of both hydrodynamic and reactive/diffusive instabilities that can be analyzed either numerically or analytically in various limiting parameter regimes. In the present work, a formal asymptotic analysis, based on the realistic smallness of the gas-to-liquid density ratio, is developed to investigate the combined effects of gravity and other parameters on the hydrodynamic instability of the propagating liquid/gas interface. In particular, an analytical expression is derived for the neutral stability boundary A(sub p)(k), where A(sub p) is the pressure sensitivity of the burning rate and k is the wavenumber of the disturbance. The results demonstrate explicitly the stabilizing effect of gravity on long-wave disturbances, the stabilizing effect of viscosity (both liquid and gas) and surface tension on short-wave perturbations, and the instability associated with intermediate wavenumbers for critical negative values of A(sub p). In the limiting case of weak gravity, it is shown that hydrodynamic instability in liquid-propellant combustion is a long-wave instability phenomenon, whereas at normal gravity, this instability is first manifested through O(1) wavenumber disturbances. It is also demonstrated that, in general, surface tension and the viscosity of both the liquid and gas phases each produce comparable stabilizing effects in the large-wavenumber regime, thereby providing important modifications to previous analyses in which one or more of these effects were neglected.

  13. Modeling of microgravity combustion experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckmaster, John

    1995-01-01

    This program started in February 1991, and is designed to improve our understanding of basic combustion phenomena by the modeling of various configurations undergoing experimental study by others. Results through 1992 were reported in the second workshop. Work since that time has examined the following topics: Flame-balls; Intrinsic and acoustic instabilities in multiphase mixtures; Radiation effects in premixed combustion; Smouldering, both forward and reverse, as well as two dimensional smoulder.

  14. Modelling of Landau-Darrieus and thermo-diffusive instability effects for CFD simulations of laminar and turbulent premixed combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keppeler, Roman; Pfitzner, Michael

    2015-01-01

    An algebraic model is derived that accounts for the effects of non-resolved Landau-Darrieus and thermo-diffusive instabilities on the propagation speed of fully premixed laminar and turbulent flame fronts in the Large Eddy Simulation (LES) context provided that the laminar flame speed appears as a model parameter in the LES combustion model. The model is derived assuming fractal characteristics of flames which exhibit cellular structures due to instabilities. The smallest and largest unstable wavelengths are computed employing a dispersion relation for nominally planar flames. Values for the fractal dimension characterising the flame structures are taken from the literature. A phenomenological model accounts for the stabilising effect of strain. Based on experimental data, a correlation for a critical strain rate, which indicates the onset of instabilities, is formulated. To validate the new model which accounts for instabilities on the effective speed of laminar flame propagation, laminar expanding spherical methane-air flames at p = 5 bar and p = 10 bar are simulated in the LES context. Values for the fractal dimension, as proposed in the literature, are varied. The predicted flame propagation speed is in very good agreement with experimental data when applying a fractal dimension of about D = 2.06. The critical strain turns out to be a suitable parameter to indicate the onset of instabilities and to quantify the influence of instabilities. Simulations applying a second model proposed by Bradley and valid for spherically expanding flames show similar results. LES of turbulent Bunsen flames at 1, 5 and 10 bar, which are characterised by u‧/s0L < 1, are performed to evaluate the derived instability model for turbulent flames. The simulated flames (from the Kobayashi database) have already been experimentally investigated in the context of Landau-Darrieus and thermo-diffusive instabilities. In agreement with conclusions from these investigations, for the

  15. Multi-dimensional instability of dust-acoustic solitary waves in a magnetized plasma with opposite polarity dust

    SciTech Connect

    Akhter, T.; Hossain, M. M.; Mamun, A. A.

    2012-09-15

    Dust-acoustic (DA) solitary structures and their multi-dimensional instability in a magnetized dusty plasma (containing inertial negatively and positively charged dust particles, and Boltzmann electrons and ions) have been theoretically investigated by the reductive perturbation method, and the small-k perturbation expansion technique. It has been found that the basic features (polarity, speed, height, thickness, etc.) of such DA solitary structures, and their multi-dimensional instability criterion or growth rate are significantly modified by the presence of opposite polarity dust particles and external magnetic field. The implications of our results in space and laboratory dusty plasma systems have been briefly discussed.

  16. Collective Thomson scattering measurements of the Ion Acoustic Decay Instability. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuno, K.; DeGroot, J.S.; Drake, R.P.; Seka, W.

    1993-12-31

    We have developed an uv collective Thomson scattering system for plasma produced by a short wavelength laser. The Ion Acoustic Decay Instabilities are studied in a large ({approximately}mm) scale, hot ({approximately}keV) plasma, which is relevant to a direct-driven laser fusion plasma. The IADI primary decay process is measured by the CTS. We used a random phase plate to minimize the non uniform irradiation of the interaction laser. Nevertheless, the threshold of the most unstable mode driven by the IADI is quite low. The measured threshold value agrees favorably with the theoretical value of the large scale plasma. We have also shown that the CTS from the IADI can be a good tool for measuring a local electron temperature. The measured results agree reasonably with the SAGE computer calculations. We used the real part of the wave (frequency) to estimate T{sub e}. The real part is, in general, reliable compared to the imaginary part such as the damping, and the growth rates. We have shown that the IADI can be easily excited in a large scale, hot plasma. The IADI has potentially important applications to direct drive laser fusion, and also critical surface diagnostic.

  17. The Acoustic Field Generated by Interaction of a Shear-Layer Instability Wave with the Downstream Lip of a Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerschen, E. J.

    1997-11-01

    High amplitude acoustic resonances may develop in cavities that are exposed to high-speed flows. These resonances arise from a feedback loop which involves a downstream-propagating instability wave in the shear layer across the open face of the cavity, and an upstream-propagating acoustic field inside the cavity. These two wave fields are coupled by the interactions at the edges of the cavity. A theory is presented for the acoustic field generated by the interaction of a shear-layer instability wave with a thin overhanging downstream lip of a cavity. The theory addresses the case of a supersonic free stream and utilizes the vortex-sheet approximation for the shear layer. The linearized unsteady flow is described by a mixed boundary value problem which is solved utilizing the Wiener-Hopf technique. The upstream-propagating acoustic field within the cavity is expressed as a eigenfunction series in terms of the leaky-cavity modes. Results for the pressure distribution along the bottom surface of the cavity are presented for a representative case. For shallow cavities, the feedback to the upstream lip is dominated by the first few leaky-cavity modes.

  18. Control and simulation of thermoacoustic instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poinsot, Thierry

    2014-11-01

    Combustion instabilities (CI), due to thermoacoustic coupling between acoustic waves and chemical reaction, constitute a major danger for all combustion systems. They can drive the system to unstable states where the whole combustor can oscillate, vibrate, quench or in extreme cases explode or burn. Such phenomena are commonly observed in the final phases of development programs, leading to major difficulties and significant additional costs. One of the most famous examples of combustion instabilities is the F1 engine of the Apollo program which required more than 1000 engine tests to obtain a stable regime satisfying all other constraints (performance, ignition, etc). CIs constitute one of the most challenging problems in fluid mechanics: they combine turbulence, acoustics, chemistry, unsteady two-phase flow in complex geometries. Since combustion instabilities have been identified (more than hundred years ago), the combustion community has followed two paths: (1) improve our understanding of the phenomena controlling stability to build engines which would be ``stable by design'' and (2) give up on a detailed understanding of mechanisms and add control systems either in open or closed loop devices to inhibit unstable modes. Of course, understanding phenomena driving combustion instabilities to suppress them would be the most satisfying approach but there is no fully reliable theory or numerical method today which can predict whether a combustor will be stable or not before it is fired. This talk will present an overview of combustion instabilities phenomenology before focusing on: (1) active control methods for combustion instabilities and (2) recent methods to predict unstable modes in combustors. These methods are based on recent Large Eddy Simulation codes for compressible reacting flows on HPC systems but we will also describe recent fully analytical methods which provide new insights into unstable modes in annular combustion chambers. Support: European

  19. Modulational instability of dust acoustic waves in dusty plasmas: Modulation obliqueness, background ion nonthermality, and dust charging effects

    SciTech Connect

    El-Taibany, W.F.; Kourakis, I.

    2006-06-15

    The oblique modulational instability of dust acoustic (DA) waves in an unmagnetized warm dusty plasma with nonthermal ions, taking into account dust grain charge variation (charging), is investigated. A nonlinear Schroedinger-type equation governing the slow modulation of the wave amplitude is derived. The effects of dust temperature, dust charge variation, ion deviation from Maxwellian equilibrium (nonthermality) and constituent species' concentration on the modulational instability of DA waves are examined. It is found that these parameters modify significantly the oblique modulational instability domain in the k-{theta} plane. Explicit expressions for the instability rate and threshold have been obtained in terms of the dispersion laws of the system. The possibility and conditions for the existence of different types of localized excitations are also discussed. The findings of this investigation may be useful in understanding the stable electrostatic wave packet acceleration mechanisms close to the Moon, and also enhances our knowledge on the occurrence of instability associated to pickup ions around unmagnetized bodies, such as comets, Mars, and Venus.

  20. A computational study of the effects of chemical kinetics on high frequency combustion instability in a single-element rocket combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whiteman, Alexander Thomas

    The objective of this research is to determine and analyze the effect a significant change in the speed of reaction (chemical kinetics) has on combustion instability in a single-element rocket combustor. This is carried out using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and is a continuation of previous work on CFD modeling of combustion instability. Specifically, the goal is to determine whether the combustion will have the same, greater, or less instability with a significant decrease in the speed of reaction in the combustor. Other flow characteristics such as temperature, vorticity, and Rayleigh index are also analyzed and compared with those obtained with the original reaction speed. The combustor modeled is a single-element, longitudinal rocket combustor with a choked exhaust nozzle. The fuel is JP-8 and decomposed hydrogen peroxide is used as the oxidizer. The propellants are introduced to the combustion chamber coaxially and are non-premixed. Due to time and computational restraints, a number of simplifications are made to the computational model. These include using 2D axisymmetric modeling, using a single-step global combustion model, and neglecting two-phase effects. The results obtained show that the instability is slightly decreased by using the slower chemical kinetics. The results also show that a number of different and often competing phenomena contribute to the instability of the flow. Overall, the large change in chemical kinetics did not have a great effect on the stability of the combustion, although some flow characteristics were greatly changed. This research indicates that there are many contributing factors to combustion instability and the CFD can help in determining which factors are of greatest import for a given combustor.

  1. Stability analysis of a liquid fuel annular combustion chamber. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, G. H.

    1979-01-01

    The problems of combustion instability in an annular combustion chamber are investigated. A modified Galerkin method was used to produce a set of modal amplitude equations from the general nonlinear partial differential acoustic wave equation. From these modal amplitude equations, the two variable perturbation method was used to develop a set of approximate equations of a given order of magnitude. These equations were modeled to show the effects of velocity sensitive combustion instabilities by evaluating the effects of certain parameters in the given set of equations. By evaluating these effects, parameters which cause instabilities to occur in the combustion chamber can be ascertained. It is assumed that in the annular combustion chamber, the liquid propellants are injected uniformly across the injector face, the combustion processes are distributed throughout the combustion chamber, and that no time delay occurs in the combustion processes.

  2. Multi-dimensional instability of dust-ion-acoustic solitary structure with opposite polarity ions and non-thermal electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haider, M. M.; Rahman, O.

    2016-07-01

    An attempt has been made to study the multi-dimensional instability of dust-ion-acoustic (DIA) solitary waves (SWs) in magnetized multi-ion plasmas containing opposite polarity ions, opposite polarity dusts and non-thermal electrons. First of all, we have derived Zakharov-Kuznetsov (ZK) equation to study the DIA SWs in this case using reductive perturbation method as well as its solution. Small-k perturbation technique was employed to find out the instability criterion and growth rate of such a wave which can give a guideline in understanding the space and laboratory plasmas, situated in the D-region of the Earth's ionosphere, mesosphere, and solar photosphere, as well as the microelectronics plasma processing reactors.

  3. Modulational instability of ion-acoustic waves in a plasma with two-temperature kappa-distributed electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alinejad, H.; Mahdavi, M.; Shahmansouri, M.

    2014-08-01

    Existence and characteristics of ion-acoustic (IA) wave modulation are studied in a plasma with two-temperature electron satisfying kappa distribution. Based on the multiple time scales perturbation, a nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLS) is derived. Similar to the case of double Maxwellian electrons, both polarities of envelope soliton can exist over restricted ranges of the fractional hot electron density ratio and two-temperature superthermal electrons. The transition from stable dark solitons to unstable bright ones shifts to the smaller wavelength regions in the presence of cool and hot superthermal electrons. It is shown that the small values of the hot electron populations leads to shrinking the modulation instability region. It is also found the instability growth rate reduces due to the presence of hot electrons. The result of present investigation contributes to the physics of wave modulation in Saturn's magnetosphere where two-temperature electrons with kappa distribution exist.

  4. Dual-mode resonant instabilities of the surface dust-acoustic wave in a Lorentzian plasma slab

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Myoung-Jae; Jung, Young-Dae

    2015-08-15

    The dual-mode resonant instabilities of the dust-acoustic surface wave propagating at the plasma-vacuum interfaces of the generalized Lorentzian dusty plasma slab are kinetically investigated. The dispersion relation is derived for the two propagation modes: symmetric and anti-symmetric waves. We have found that the temporal growth rate of the resonant instability increases with an increase of the slab thickness for both modes. Especially, the nonthermality of plasmas enhances the growth rate of the anti-symmetric resonant wave, and the nonthermal effect is enhanced as the slab thickness is increased. It is also found that the growth rate increases with increasing angular frequency of the rotating dust grain due to the enhanced resonant energy exchange.

  5. Modulational instability of ion-acoustic waves in a plasma with a q-nonextensive electron velocity distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Bains, A. S.; Gill, T. S.; Tribeche, Mouloud

    2011-02-15

    The modulational instability (MI) of ion-acoustic waves (IAWs) in a two-component plasma is investigated in the context of the nonextensive statistics proposed by Tsallis [J. Stat. Phys. 52, 479 (1988)]. Using the reductive perturbation method, the nonlinear Schroedinger equation (NLSE) which governs the MI of the IAWs is obtained. The presence of the nonextensive electron distribution is shown to influence the MI of the waves. Three different ranges of the nonextensive q-parameter are considered and in each case the MI sets in under different conditions. Furthermore, the effects of the q-parameter on the growth rate of MI are discussed in detail.

  6. Amplitude modulation of quantum-ion-acoustic wavepackets in electron-positron-ion plasmas: Modulational instability, envelope modes, extreme wavesa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Ata-ur-; Kerr, Michael Mc; El-Taibany, Wael F.; Kourakis, Ioannis; Qamar, A.

    2015-02-01

    A semirelativistic fluid model is employed to describe the nonlinear amplitude modulation of low-frequency (ionic scale) electrostatic waves in an unmagnetized electron-positron-ion plasma. Electrons and positrons are assumed to be degenerated and inertialess, whereas ions are warm and classical. A multiscale perturbation method is used to derive a nonlinear Schrödinger equation for the envelope amplitude, based on which the occurrence of modulational instability is investigated in detail. Various types of localized ion acoustic excitations are shown to exist, in the form of either bright type envelope solitons (envelope pulses) or dark-type envelope solitons (voids, holes). The plasma configurational parameters (namely, the relativistic degeneracy parameter, the positron concentration, and the ionic temperature) are shown to affect the conditions for modulational instability significantly, in fact modifying the associated threshold as well as the instability growth rate. In particular, the relativistic degeneracy parameter leads to an enhancement of the modulational instability mechanism. Furthermore, the effect of different relevant plasma parameters on the characteristics (amplitude, width) of these envelope solitary structures is also presented in detail. Finally, the occurrence of extreme amplitude excitation (rogue waves) is also discussed briefly. Our results aim at elucidating the formation and dynamics of nonlinear electrostatic excitations in superdense astrophysical regimes.

  7. Amplitude modulation of quantum-ion-acoustic wavepackets in electron-positron-ion plasmas: Modulational instability, envelope modes, extreme waves

    SciTech Connect

    Rahman, Ata-ur-; Kerr, Michael Mc Kourakis, Ioannis; El-Taibany, Wael F.; Qamar, A.

    2015-02-15

    A semirelativistic fluid model is employed to describe the nonlinear amplitude modulation of low-frequency (ionic scale) electrostatic waves in an unmagnetized electron-positron-ion plasma. Electrons and positrons are assumed to be degenerated and inertialess, whereas ions are warm and classical. A multiscale perturbation method is used to derive a nonlinear Schrödinger equation for the envelope amplitude, based on which the occurrence of modulational instability is investigated in detail. Various types of localized ion acoustic excitations are shown to exist, in the form of either bright type envelope solitons (envelope pulses) or dark-type envelope solitons (voids, holes). The plasma configurational parameters (namely, the relativistic degeneracy parameter, the positron concentration, and the ionic temperature) are shown to affect the conditions for modulational instability significantly, in fact modifying the associated threshold as well as the instability growth rate. In particular, the relativistic degeneracy parameter leads to an enhancement of the modulational instability mechanism. Furthermore, the effect of different relevant plasma parameters on the characteristics (amplitude, width) of these envelope solitary structures is also presented in detail. Finally, the occurrence of extreme amplitude excitation (rogue waves) is also discussed briefly. Our results aim at elucidating the formation and dynamics of nonlinear electrostatic excitations in superdense astrophysical regimes.

  8. Corotational instability, magnetic resonances and global inertial-acoustic oscillations in magnetized black hole accretion discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Wen; Lai, Dong

    2011-01-01

    Low-order, non-axisymmetric p-modes (also referred as inertial-acoustic modes) in hydrodynamic accretion discs around black holes are plausible candidates for high-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) observed in a number of accreting black hole systems. These modes are trapped in the innermost region of the accretion disc, and are subject to global instabilities due to wave absorption at the corotation resonance (where the wave pattern frequency ω/m equals the disc rotation rate Ω), when the fluid vortensity, ζ=κ2/(2ΩΣ) (where κ and Σ are the radial epicyclic frequency and disc surface density, respectively), has a positive gradient. We investigate the effects of disc magnetic fields on the wave absorption at corotation and the related wave super-reflection of the corotation barrier, and on the overstability of disc p-modes. In general, in the presence of magnetic fields, the p-modes have the character of inertial-fast magnetosonic waves in their propagation zone. For discs with a pure toroidal field, the corotation resonance is split into two magnetic resonances, where the wave frequency in the corotating frame of the fluid, ?, matches the slow magnetosonic wave frequency. Significant wave energy/angular momentum absorption occurs at both magnetic resonances, but with opposite signs, such that one of them enhances the super-reflection while the other diminishes it. The combined effect of the two magnetic resonances is to reduce the super-reflection and the growth rate of the overstable p-modes. Our calculations show that even a subthermal toroidal field (with the magnetic pressure less than the gas pressure) may suppress the overstability of hydrodynamic (B= 0) p-modes. For accretion discs with mixed (toroidal and vertical) magnetic fields, two additional Alfvén resonances appear, where ? matches the local Alfvén wave frequency. The effect of these additional resonances is to further reduce or diminish the growth rate of p-modes. Our results

  9. Modulational instability of ion acoustic waves in e-p-i plasmas with electrons and positrons following a q-nonextensive distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Eslami, Parvin; Mottaghizadeh, Marzieh; Pakzad, Hamid Reza

    2011-10-15

    The propagation of ion acoustic waves (IAWs) in plasmas composed of ions and nonextensive electrons and positrons is investigated. By means of the reduction perturbation technique, a nonlinear Schroedinger equation is derived and the modulation instability (MI) of ion acoustic waves is analyzed in detail. The effects of different ranges of the nonextensive parameter q on the MI are studied. The growth rate of the MI is also given for different values of the q parameter. It is also found that the ratio of the electron temperature to positron temperature and the ratio of the positron density to electron density modify the nature of IAWs instability and the solitary structures.

  10. Modification of the formation of high-Mach number electrostatic shock-like structures by the ion acoustic instability

    SciTech Connect

    Dieckmann, M. E.; Sarri, G.; Doria, D.; Borghesi, M.; Pohl, M.

    2013-10-15

    The formation of unmagnetized electrostatic shock-like structures with a high Mach number is examined with one- and two-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. The structures are generated through the collision of two identical plasma clouds, which consist of equally hot electrons and ions with a mass ratio of 250. The Mach number of the collision speed with respect to the initial ion acoustic speed of the plasma is set to 4.6. This high Mach number delays the formation of such structures by tens of inverse ion plasma frequencies. A pair of stable shock-like structures is observed after this time in the 1D simulation, which gradually evolves into electrostatic shocks. The ion acoustic instability, which can develop in the 2D simulation but not in the 1D one, competes with the nonlinear process that gives rise to these structures. The oblique ion acoustic waves fragment their electric field. The transition layer, across which the bulk of the ions change their speed, widens and their speed change is reduced. Double layer-shock hybrid structures develop.

  11. Modification of the formation of high-Mach number electrostatic shock-like structures by the ion acoustic instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dieckmann, M. E.; Sarri, G.; Doria, D.; Pohl, M.; Borghesi, M.

    2013-10-01

    The formation of unmagnetized electrostatic shock-like structures with a high Mach number is examined with one- and two-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. The structures are generated through the collision of two identical plasma clouds, which consist of equally hot electrons and ions with a mass ratio of 250. The Mach number of the collision speed with respect to the initial ion acoustic speed of the plasma is set to 4.6. This high Mach number delays the formation of such structures by tens of inverse ion plasma frequencies. A pair of stable shock-like structures is observed after this time in the 1D simulation, which gradually evolves into electrostatic shocks. The ion acoustic instability, which can develop in the 2D simulation but not in the 1D one, competes with the nonlinear process that gives rise to these structures. The oblique ion acoustic waves fragment their electric field. The transition layer, across which the bulk of the ions change their speed, widens and their speed change is reduced. Double layer-shock hybrid structures develop.

  12. Stability analysis of a liquid fuel annular combustion chamber. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, G. H.

    1978-01-01

    High frequency combustion instability problems in a liquid fuel annular combustion chamber are examined. A modified Galerkin method was used to produce a set of modal amplitude equations from the general nonlinear partial differential acoustic wave equation in order to analyze the problem of instability. From these modal amplitude equations, the two variable perturbation method was used to develop a set of approximate equations of a given order of magnitude. These equations were modeled to show the effects of velocity sensitive combustion instabilities by evaluating the effects of certain parameters in the given set of equations.

  13. Transverse instability of ion acoustic solitons in a magnetized plasma including -nonextensive electrons and positrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhtar, N.; El-Taibany, W. F.; Mahmood, S.; Behery, E. E.; Khan, S. A.; Ali, S.; Hussain, S.

    2015-10-01

    > . The magnetic field has no effect on the amplitude of the IASW, whereas the obliqueness angle of the wave propagation, the ion-to-electron temperature ratio and positron-to-ion density concentration ratio affect both the amplitude and the width of the solitary wave structures. The transverse instability analysis illustrates that the one soliton solution has a constant growth rate, and it suffers from instability in the transverse direction. The relevance of the present study to astrophysical space plasmas is also discussed.

  14. Influence of resonators on the acoustic and propulsion performance characteristics of a ramjet ejector chamber under conditions with vibration hydrogen combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potapkin, A. V.; Moskvichev, D. Yu.

    2008-09-01

    The influence of acoustic resonators on the acoustic and propulsion performance characteristics of a ramjet ejector chamber under conditions with vibration hydrogen combustion was experimentally examined. In the study, resonators having identical throats and different cavity diameters were used. For fixed-volume resonators the best propulsion performance characteristics were achieved in the case in which the cavity diameter differed little from the resonator throat diameter.

  15. Development of a new plasma diagnostic of the critical surface and studies of the ion acoustic decay instability using collective Thomson scattering. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuno, K.; DeGroot, J.S.; Seka, W.; Drake, R.P.

    1992-08-01

    We have developed 5-channel collective Thomson scattering system to measure the ion acoustic wave excited by the ion acoustic wave decay instabilities. The multichannel collective Thomson scattering technique was established with 4{omega} probe laser beam using GDL laser system at LLE, Univ. of Rochester. We have obtained the ionic charge state Z by measuring the second harmonic emission from the ion acoustic decay instability. The LASNEX computer simulation calculations have been carried out. The experimental results agree very well with the LASNEX computer simulation results with the flux number f=0.l. In high power laser regime, the spectrum become broad, and the {Delta}{gamma} decreases indicating that the turbulent like spectrum is observed. In order to understand the experimental results, we have developed a theory to study absorption of laser and heat transport. This new theory includes the temporal evolution of the heat conduction region. The results agree with flux-limited hydrodynamic simulations.

  16. Development of a new plasma diagnostic of the critical surface and studies of the ion acoustic decay instability using collective Thomson scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuno, K.; DeGroot, J.S. ); Seka, W. . Lab. of Laser Energetics); Drake, R.P. )

    1992-01-01

    We have developed 5-channel collective Thomson scattering system to measure the ion acoustic wave excited by the ion acoustic wave decay instabilities. The multichannel collective Thomson scattering technique was established with 4{omega} probe laser beam using GDL laser system at LLE, Univ. of Rochester. We have obtained the ionic charge state Z by measuring the second harmonic emission from the ion acoustic decay instability. The LASNEX computer simulation calculations have been carried out. The experimental results agree very well with the LASNEX computer simulation results with the flux number f=0.l. In high power laser regime, the spectrum become broad, and the {Delta}{gamma} decreases indicating that the turbulent like spectrum is observed. In order to understand the experimental results, we have developed a theory to study absorption of laser and heat transport. This new theory includes the temporal evolution of the heat conduction region. The results agree with flux-limited hydrodynamic simulations.

  17. A Sectored-One-Dimensional Model for Simulating Combustion Instabilities in Premix Combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paxson, Daniel E.

    1999-01-01

    A one-dimensional, CFD based combustor simulation has been developed that exhibits self-excited, thermoacoustic oscillations in premixed combustor geometries that typically have large, abrupt changes in cross sectional area. The combustor geometry is approximated by dividing it into a finite number of one-dimensional sectors. Within each sector, the equations of motion are integrated numerically, along with a species transport and a reaction equation. Across the sectors, mass and energy are conserved, and momentum loss is prescribed using appropriately compatible boundary conditions that account for the area change. The resulting simulation and associated boundary conditions essentially represent a one-dimensional, multi-block technique. Details of the simulation code are presented herein. Results are then shown comparing experimentally observed and simulated operation of a particular combustor rig that exhibited different instabilities at different operating points. It will be shown that the simulation closely matched the rig data in oscillation amplitudes, frequencies, and operating points at which the instabilities occurred. Finally, advantages and limitations of the simulation technique are discussed.

  18. Modulation instability and dissipative ion-acoustic structures in collisional nonthermal electron-positron-ion plasma: solitary and shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Shimin; Mei, Liquan; He, Ya-Ling; Ma, Chenchen; Sun, Youfa

    2016-10-01

    The nonlinear behavior of an ion-acoustic wave packet is investigated in a three-component plasma consisting of warm ions, nonthermal electrons and positrons. The nonthermal components are assumed to be inertialess and hot where they are modeled by the kappa distribution. The relevant processes, including the kinematic viscosity amongst the plasma constituents and the collision between ions and neutrals, are taken into consideration. It is shown that the dynamics of the modulated ion-acoustic wave is governed by the generalized complex Ginzburg-Landau equation with a linear dissipative term. The dispersion relation and modulation instability criterion for the generalized complex Ginzburg-Landau equation are investigated numerically. In the general dissipation regime, the effect of the plasma parameters on the dissipative solitary (dissipative soliton) and shock waves is also discussed in detail. The project is supported by NSF of China (11501441, 11371289, 11371288), National Natural Science Foundation of China (U1261112), China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (2014M560756), and Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (xjj2015067).

  19. A theoretical evaluation of rigid baffles in suppression of combustion instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baer, M. R.; Mitchell, C. E.

    1976-01-01

    An analytical technique for the prediction of the effects of rigid baffles on the stability of liquid propellant combustors is presented. A three dimensional combustor model characterized by a concentrated combustion source at the chamber injector and a constant Mach number nozzle is used. The linearized partial differential equations describing the unsteady flow field are solved by an eigenfunction matching method. Boundary layer corrections to this unsteady flow are used to evaluate viscous and turbulence effects within the flow. An integral stability relationship is then employed to predict the decay rate of the oscillations. Results show that sufficient dissipation exists to indicate that the proper mechanism of baffle damping is a fluid dynamic loss. The response of the dissipation model to varying baffle blade length, mean flow Mach number and oscillation amplitude is examined.

  20. Pulsating Hydrodynamic Instability and Thermal Coupling in an Extended Landau/Levich Model of Liquid-Propellant Combustion -- I. Inviscid Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen B. Margolis; Forman A. Williams

    1999-03-01

    Hydrodynamic (Landau) instability in combustion is typically associated with the onset of wrinkling of a flame surface, corresponding to the formation of steady cellular structures as the stability threshold is crossed. In the context of liquid-propellant combustion, such instability has recently been shown to occur for critical values of the pressure sensitivity of the burning rate and the disturbance wavenumber, significantly generalizing previous classical results for this problem that assumed a constant normal burning rate. Additionally, however, a pulsating form of hydrodynamic instability has been shown to occur as well, corresponding to the onset of temporal oscillations in the location of the liquid/gas interface. In the present work, we consider the realistic influence of a nonzero temperature sensitivity in the local burning rate on both types of stability thresholds. It is found that for sufficiently small values of this parameter, there exists a stable range of pressure sensitivities for steady, planar burning such that the classical cellular form of hydrodynamic instability and the more recent pulsating form of hydrodynamic instability can each occur as the corresponding stability threshold is crossed. For larger thermal sensitivities, however, the pulsating stability boundary evolves into a C-shaped curve in the (disturbance-wavenumber, pressure-sensitivity) plane, indicating loss of stability to pulsating perturbations for all sufficiently large disturbance wavelengths. It is thus concluded, based on characteristic parameter values, that an equally likely form of hydrodynamic instability in liquid-propellant combustion is of a nonsteady, long-wave nature, distinct from the steady, cellular form originally predicted by Landau.

  1. Pulsating Hydrodynamic Instability and Thermal Coupling in an Extended Landau/Levich Model of Liquid-Propellant Combustion. 1; Inviscid Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margolis, Stephen B.; Sacksteder, Kurt (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Hydrodynamic (Landau) instability in combustion is typically associated with the onset of wrinkling of a flame surface, corresponding to the formation of steady cellular structures as the stability threshold is crossed. In the context of liquid-propellant combustion, such instability has recently been shown to occur for critical values of the pressure sensitivity of the burning rate and the disturbance wavenumber, significantly generalizing previous classical results for this problem that assumed a constant normal burning rate. Additionally, however, a pulsating form of hydrodynamic instability has been shown to occur as well, corresponding to the onset of temporal oscillations in the location of the liquid/gas interface. In the present work, we consider the realistic influence of a non-zero temperature sensitivity in the local burning rate on both types of stability thresholds. It is found that for sufficiently small values of this parameter, there exists a stable range of pressure sensitivities for steady, planar burning such that the classical cellular form of hydrodynamic instability and the more recent pulsating form of hydrodynamic instability can each occur as the corresponding stability threshold is crossed. For larger thermal sensitivities, however, the pulsating stability boundary evolves into a C-shaped curve in the (disturbance-wavenumber, pressure-sensitivity) plane, indicating loss of stability to pulsating perturbations for all sufficiently large disturbance wavelengths. It is thus concluded, based on characteristic parameter values, that an equally likely form of hydrodynamic instability in liquid-propellant combustion is of a non-steady, long-wave nature, distinct from the steady, cellular form originally predicted by Landau.

  2. Predictive Acoustic Modelling Applied to the Control of Intake/exhaust Noise of Internal Combustion Engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, P. O. A. L.; Harrison, M. F.

    1997-05-01

    The application of validated acoustic models to intake/exhaust system acoustic design is described with reference to a sequence of specific practical examples. These include large turbocharged diesel generating sets, truck engines and high performance petrol engines. The discussion includes a comparison of frequency domain, time domain and hybrid modelling approaches to design methodology. The calculation of sound emission from open terminations is summarized in an appendix.

  3. Emissions, combustion dynamics, and control of a multiple swirl combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guoqiang

    To achieve single digit NOx emission from gas turbine combustors and prevent the combustion dynamics encountered in Lean Premixed Combustion, it is essential to understand the correlations among emission characteristics, combustion dynamics, and dynamics and characteristics of swirling flow field. The focus of this dissertation is to investigate the emission characteristics and combustion dynamics of multiple swirl dump combustors either in premixing or non-premixed combustion (e.g. Lean Direct Injection), and correlate these combustion characteristics (emissions, combustion instability and lean flammability) to the fluids dynamics (flow structures and its evolution). This study covers measurement of velocity flow field, temperature field, and combustion under effects of various parameters, including inlet flow Reynolds number, inlet air temperature, swirl configurations, downstream exhaust nozzle contraction ratios, length of mixing tube. These parameters are tested in both liquid and gaseous fuel combustions. Knowledge obtained through this comprehensive study is applied to passive and active controls for improving gas turbine combustion performance in the aid of novel sensor and actuator technologies. Emissions and combustion characteristics are shown closely related to the shape and size of central recirculation zone (CRZ), the mean and turbulence velocity and strain rate, and dynamics of large vortical structures. The passive controls, mostly geometry factors, affect the combustion characteristics and emissions through their influences on flow fields, and consequently temperature and radical fields. Air assist, which is used to adjust the momentum of fuel spray, is effective in reducing NOx and depress combustion oscillation without hurting LBO. Fuel distribution/split is also one important factor for achieving low NOx emission and control of combustion dynamics. The dynamics of combustion, including flame oscillations close to LBO and acoustic combustion

  4. Acoustic cavity technology for high performance injectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The feasibility of damping more than one mode of rocket engine combustion instability by means of differently tuned acoustic cavities sharing a common entrance was shown. Analytical procedures and acoustic modeling techniques for predicting the stability behavior of acoustic cavity designs in hot firings were developed. Full scale testing of various common entrance, dual cavity configurations, and subscale testing for the purpose of obtaining motion pictures of the cavity entrance region, to aid in determining the mechanism of cavity damping were the two major aspects of the program.

  5. Effect of dust charge fluctuation on multidimensional instability of dust-acoustic solitary waves in a magnetized dusty plasma with nonthermal ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahmohammadi, Nafise; Dorranian, Davoud

    2015-10-01

    Simultaneous effects of dust charge fluctuation and nonthermal ions on the threshold point and growth rate of three-dimensional instability of dust-acoustic solitary waves (DASW) in magnetized dusty plasma have been investigated. In this model, dusty plasma consists of Maxwellian electrons, nonthermal ions, and micron size negatively charged dust particles. Modified Zakharov-Kuznetsov equation for DASW was derived employing a reductive perturbation method and its solitary answer under the influence of dust charge fluctuation and nonthermal ions has been studied. The dispersion relation of DASW has been derived using a small-k perturbation method. Results show that the direction and the magnitude of external magnetic field at which the instability takes place are strongly affected by the rate of dust charge fluctuation and nonthermality of ions. With increasing the number of nonthermal ions, the growth rate of instability decreases, while increasing the dust charge fluctuation increases the growth rate of instability.

  6. Effect of dust charge fluctuation on multidimensional instability of dust-acoustic solitary waves in a magnetized dusty plasma with nonthermal ions

    SciTech Connect

    Shahmohammadi, Nafise; Dorranian, Davoud

    2015-10-15

    Simultaneous effects of dust charge fluctuation and nonthermal ions on the threshold point and growth rate of three-dimensional instability of dust-acoustic solitary waves (DASW) in magnetized dusty plasma have been investigated. In this model, dusty plasma consists of Maxwellian electrons, nonthermal ions, and micron size negatively charged dust particles. Modified Zakharov-Kuznetsov equation for DASW was derived employing a reductive perturbation method and its solitary answer under the influence of dust charge fluctuation and nonthermal ions has been studied. The dispersion relation of DASW has been derived using a small-k perturbation method. Results show that the direction and the magnitude of external magnetic field at which the instability takes place are strongly affected by the rate of dust charge fluctuation and nonthermality of ions. With increasing the number of nonthermal ions, the growth rate of instability decreases, while increasing the dust charge fluctuation increases the growth rate of instability.

  7. Open-loop control of combustion instabilities in a model gas turbine combustor*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, Christopher; Menon, Suresh

    2003-05-01

    The effect of premixer-induced inlet swirl on the stability of a model swirl-stabilized, lean-premixed gas turbine combustor has been numerically investigated using the large-eddy simulation methodology. The unsteady vortex-flame and acoustic-flame interactions are captured in this study using a thin-flame model that includes an ability to account for the variation in inlet equivalence ratio. Comparisons are made, based on fluid particle trajectories, between the structure of the recirculation regions. It is shown that only for high swirl does a region of flow recirculation, often called vortex breakdown(VB), occur in the centreline region of the dump combustor. This VB region helps to stabilize the flame and results in significant attenuation of the fluctuating pressure amplitudes, p'. The reduced p' amplitudes are accompanied by reduced longitudinal flame-front oscillations and reduced coherence in the shed vortices. A methodology for open-loop control based on the modulation of incoming fuel-air equivalence ratio is investigated. It is demonstrated that combustor pressure fluctuations respond much more rapidly to these changes compared to earlier studies of inlet swirl number modulation. The impact of these changes on flame stability and overall dynamics is analysed and discussed. Finally, the impact of imperfect mixedness in the incoming fuel-air mixture is also analysed and it is shown that the pressure oscillation amplitude is actually reduced under these conditions.

  8. Modes of chocked flame instability defined by the peculiarities of combustion kinetics at rising pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiverin, A. D.; Yakovenko, I. S.

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the paper was to analyze the structure and the stability of the chocked flames to understand the origins of different possible combustion modes, including quasi-stable supersonic flames and deflagration-to-detonation transition. By means of numerical analysis, it is shown that the chocked flame structure and its stability are defined by two basic mechanisms: compression of the fresh mixture ahead of the flame front and compression of the reacting mixture inside it. The first mechanism provides burning velocity increase; the second one can either accelerate or decelerate reaction depending on the pressure-dependent reaction behavior in the observed pressure range and depending on the rate of compression. In case of reaction intensification with rising pressure, a detonation forms on the leading edge of the flame front. Otherwise, the flame propagates in a quasi-stable supersonic regime consisting of consequential stages of deceleration and re-acceleration of the flame. On the deceleration stage, the compressed fresh mixture priorly chocked by the supersonic flow near the flame tip flows downstream generating the compression wave ahead. The new contact surface between this packet of compressed mixture and the fresh mixture ahead of the flame front can become the kernel of the exothermal reaction, evolving in a new deflagration wave or even detonation.

  9. Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bulzan, Dan

    2007-01-01

    An overview of the emissions related research being conducted as part of the Fundamental Aeronautics Subsonics Fixed Wing Project is presented. The overview includes project metrics, milestones, and descriptions of major research areas. The overview also includes information on some of the emissions research being conducted under NASA Research Announcements. Objective: Development of comprehensive detailed and reduced kinetic mechanisms of jet fuels for chemically-reacting flow modeling. Scientific Challenges: 1) Developing experimental facilities capable of handling higher hydrocarbons and providing benchmark combustion data. 2) Determining and understanding ignition and combustion characteristics, such as laminar flame speeds, extinction stretch rates, and autoignition delays, of jet fuels and hydrocarbons relevant to jet surrogates. 3) Developing comprehensive kinetic models for jet fuels.

  10. Adaptive Instability Suppression Controls in a Liquid-fueled Combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopasakis, George; DeLaat, John C.

    2002-01-01

    An adaptive control algorithm has been developed for the suppression of combustion thermo-acoustic instabilities. This technique involves modulating the fuel flow in the combustor with a control phase that continuously slides within the stable phase region, in a back and forth motion. The control method is referred to as Adaptive Sliding Phasor Averaged Control (ASPAC). The control method is evaluated against a simplified simulation of the combustion instability. Plans are to validate the control approach against a more physics-based model and an actual experimental combustor rig.

  11. Nonlinear behavior of acoustic waves in combustion chambers. I, II. [stability in solid propellant rocket engine and T burner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culick, F. E. C.

    1976-01-01

    The general problem of the nonlinear growth and limiting amplitude of acoustic waves in a combustion chamber is treated in three parts: (1) the general conservation equations are expanded in two small parameters, and then combined to yield a nonlinear inhomogeneous wave equation, (2) the unsteady pressure and velocity fields are expressed as a synthesis of the normal modes of the chamber, but with unknown time-varying amplitudes, and (3) the system of nonlinear equations is treated by the method of averaging to produce a set of coupled nonlinear first order differential equations for the amplitudes and phases of the modes. This approximate analysis is applied to the investigation of the unstable motions in a solid propellant rocket engine and in a T burner.

  12. Effect of standing transverse acoustic oscillations on fuel-oxidant mixing in cylindrical combustion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mickelsen, William R

    1957-01-01

    Vapor fuel-oxidant mixing is analyzed for standing transverse acoustic fields simulating those existing in screeching or screaming combustors. The additional mixing due to the acoustic field is shown to be a function of sound pressure and frequency, stream velocity, and turbulence. The effects of these parameters are shown graphically for a realistic range of combustor conditions. The fuel-oxidant ratio at various combustor stations is shown to have a cyclic fluctuation which is in phase with the pressure fluctuations. Possible mechanisms contributing to screech and scream are discussed.

  13. Current-driven ion-acoustic and potential-relaxation instabilities excited in plasma plume during electron beam welding

    SciTech Connect

    Trushnikov, D. N.; Mladenov, G. M. Koleva, E. G.; Belenkiy, V. Ya. Varushkin, S. V.

    2014-04-15

    Many papers have sought correlations between the parameters of secondary particles generated above the beam/work piece interaction zone, dynamics of processes in the keyhole, and technological processes. Low- and high-frequency oscillations of the current, collected by plasma have been observed above the welding zone during electron beam welding. Low-frequency oscillations of secondary signals are related to capillary instabilities of the keyhole, however; the physical mechanisms responsible for the high-frequency oscillations (>10 kHz) of the collected current are not fully understood. This paper shows that peak frequencies in the spectra of the collected high-frequency signal are dependent on the reciprocal distance between the welding zone and collector electrode. From the relationship between current harmonics frequency and distance of the collector/welding zone, it can be estimated that the draft velocity of electrons or phase velocity of excited waves is about 1600 m/s. The dispersion relation with the properties of ion-acoustic waves is related to electron temperature 10 000 K, ion temperature 2 400 K and plasma density 10{sup 16} m{sup −3}, which is analogues to the parameters of potential-relaxation instabilities, observed in similar conditions. The estimated critical density of the transported current for creating the anomalous resistance state of plasma is of the order of 3 A·m{sup −2}, i.e. 8 mA for a 3–10 cm{sup 2} collector electrode. Thus, it is assumed that the observed high-frequency oscillations of the current collected by the positive collector electrode are caused by relaxation processes in the plasma plume above the welding zone, and not a direct demonstration of oscillations in the keyhole.

  14. Modulational instability and envelope excitation of ion-acoustic waves in quantum electron-positron-ion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, A. P.; Bhowmik, C.; Shukla, P. K.

    2009-07-01

    The theoretical study of modulational instability (MI) and localized envelope excitations of finite amplitude ion-acoustic waves (IAWs) is revisited in an unmagnetized quantum electron-positron-ion plasma. For this purpose, a one-dimensional nonlinear Schrödinger equation, which governs the slow modulation of IAW packets, is derived by using the standard reductive perturbations technique. Two parameters, defining the ratio of the electron to ion number density (μ) and the quantum coupling parameter (H) describing the ratio of the "plasmonic energy density" to the Fermi energy density, are shown to play crucial roles in determining the modulational stability/MI domains, as well as for the existence of both bright and dark envelope solitons. It is found that the stability region increases (decreases) with increasing μ(H ), whereas the MI region for the IAW mode shifts to larger (smaller) wave number k as the value of μ(H ) increases. Moreover, the parameter H is shown to suppress the MI growth rate of the IAWs. The present results may be relevant to dense astrophysical plasmas (e.g., white dwarfs, where the electron-positron annihilation can be important, and where the particle density is of the order of 1034-1035 m-3) as well as to the next generation intense laser solid density plasma experiments.

  15. Development of computerized analysis for solid propellant combustion (ISAP-2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, T. J.; Hallit, Raymond

    1987-01-01

    This report is an improvement of ISAP-1, SRB Vorticity-Acoustic Coupled Instability Analysis, September 1986. Included in this report are the automatic generation of all input data for grid configuration, boundary conditions for coupled acoustic and vortical field calculations, transformation of all dimensions to a parametric form, resulting in flexibility for the user to define the size of the problem (geometric configurations) with reduction in storage (15 to 65%) and computer run-time (50 to 75%). Additional research is required for the following areas: (1) turbulence effects; (2) nonlinear wave oscillations; and (3) chemistry upon combustion instability.

  16. Pulsating hydrodynamic instability and thermal coupling in an extended Landau/Levich model of liquid-propellant combustion. 2. Viscous analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen B. Margolis

    2000-01-01

    A pulsating form of hydrodynamic instability has recently been shown to arise during liquid-propellant deflagration in those parameter regimes where the pressure-dependent burning rate is characterized by a negative pressure sensitivity. This type of instability can coexist with the classical cellular, or Landau, form of hydrodynamic instability, with the occurrence of either dependent on whether the pressure sensitivity is sufficiently large or small in magnitude. For the inviscid problem, it has been shown that when the burning rate is realistically allowed to depend on temperature as well as pressure, that sufficiently large values of the temperature sensitivity relative to the pressure sensitivity causes the pulsating form of hydrodynamic instability to become dominant. In that regime, steady, planar burning becomes intrinsically unstable to pulsating disturbances whose wavenumbers are sufficiently small. In the present work, this analysis is extended to the fully viscous case, where it is shown that although viscosity is stabilizing for intermediate and larger wavenumber perturbations, the intrinsic pulsating instability for small wavenumbers remains. Under these conditions, liquid-propellant combustion is predicted to be characterized by large unsteady cells along the liquid/gas interface.

  17. Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Jerry R.; Grosveld, Ferdinand

    2007-01-01

    The acoustics environment in space operations is important to maintain at manageable levels so that the crewperson can remain safe, functional, effective, and reasonably comfortable. High acoustic levels can produce temporary or permanent hearing loss, or cause other physiological symptoms such as auditory pain, headaches, discomfort, strain in the vocal cords, or fatigue. Noise is defined as undesirable sound. Excessive noise may result in psychological effects such as irritability, inability to concentrate, decrease in productivity, annoyance, errors in judgment, and distraction. A noisy environment can also result in the inability to sleep, or sleep well. Elevated noise levels can affect the ability to communicate, understand what is being said, hear what is going on in the environment, degrade crew performance and operations, and create habitability concerns. Superfluous noise emissions can also create the inability to hear alarms or other important auditory cues such as an equipment malfunctioning. Recent space flight experience, evaluations of the requirements in crew habitable areas, and lessons learned (Goodman 2003; Allen and Goodman 2003; Pilkinton 2003; Grosveld et al. 2003) show the importance of maintaining an acceptable acoustics environment. This is best accomplished by having a high-quality set of limits/requirements early in the program, the "designing in" of acoustics in the development of hardware and systems, and by monitoring, testing and verifying the levels to ensure that they are acceptable.

  18. Concerning the problem of dynamic damping of the vibration combustion self-oscillations in a liquid-propellant rocket engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basok, B. I.; Gotsulenko, V. V.; Gotsulenko, V. N.

    2012-11-01

    The reason for the decrease in the amplitude of longitudinal vibration combustion self-oscillations in the combustion chamber of a liquid-propellant rocket engine by means of antipulse partitions has been justified. A mathematical model of the development of combustion instability in such a chamber on attachment of a Helmholtz resonator to it has been obtained. The character of the damping of vibration combustion self-oscillations excited by the action of the Crocco mechanisms and negative thermal resistance, when varying the acoustic parameters of the resonator and of the pressure head characteristics of combustion chamber is established.

  19. Mean Flow Augmented Acoustics in Rocket Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischbach, Sean

    2014-01-01

    Combustion instability in solid rocket motors and liquid engines has long been a subject of concern. Many rockets display violent fluctuations in pressure, velocity, and temperature originating from the complex interactions between the combustion process and gas dynamics. Recent advances in energy based modeling of combustion instabilities require accurate determination of acoustic frequencies and mode shapes. Of particular interest is the acoustic mean flow interactions within the converging section of a rocket nozzle, where gradients of pressure, density, and velocity become large. The expulsion of unsteady energy through the nozzle of a rocket is identified as the predominate source of acoustic damping for most rocket systems. Recently, an approach to address nozzle damping with mean flow effects was implemented by French [1]. This new approach extends the work originated by Sigman and Zinn [2] by solving the acoustic velocity potential equation (AVPE) formulated by perturbing the Euler equations [3]. The present study aims to implement the French model within the COMSOL Multiphysiscs framework and analyzes one of the author's presented test cases.

  20. Measurements of acoustic responses of gaseous propellant injectors. [for rocket combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janardan, B. A.; Daniel, B. R.; Zinn, B. T.

    1976-01-01

    Results are presented for an investigation intended to provide experimental data that can quantitatively describe the way in which various coaxial injector designs affect the stability of gaseous propellant rocket motors. The response factors of configurations that simulate the flow conditions in a gaseous-fuel injector element and a gaseous-oxidizer injector element are measured by using a modified impedance-tube technique and under cold-flow conditions simulating those observed in rocket motors with axial instability. The measured injector response factor data are presented and discussed. It is shown that there is reasonable agreement between the measured injector response factors and those predicted by the Feiler and Heidmann model (1967), and that the orifice length can be varied to shift the resonant frequency of the injector without any change in the magnitude of the response factor at resonance. A change in the injector open-area ratio is found to have a significant effect on the characteristics of the injector response factor.

  1. Numerical study of the two-species Vlasov-Ampère system: Energy-conserving schemes and the current-driven ion-acoustic instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yingda; Christlieb, Andrew J.; Zhong, Xinghui

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we propose energy-conserving Eulerian solvers for the two-species Vlasov-Ampère (VA) system and apply the methods to simulate current-driven ion-acoustic instability. The two-species VA systems are of practical importance in applications, and they conserve many physical quantities including the particle number of each species and the total energy that is comprised of kinetic energy for both species and the electric energy. The main goal of this paper is to generalize our previous work for the single-species VA system [9] and Vlasov-Maxwell (VM) system [8] to the two-species case. The methodologies proposed involve careful design of temporal discretization and the use of the discontinuous Galerkin (DG) spatial discretizations. We show that the energy-conserving time discretizations for single-species equations [9,8] can also work for the two-species case if extended properly. Compared to other high order schemes, we emphasize that our schemes can preserve the total particle number and total energy on the fully discrete level regardless of mesh size, making them very attractive for long time simulations. We benchmark our algorithms on a test example to check the one-species limit, and the current-driven ion-acoustic instability. To simulate the current-driven ion-acoustic instability, a slight modification for the implicit method is necessary to fully decouple the split equations. This is achieved by a Gauss-Seidel type iteration technique. Numerical results verified the conservation and performance of our methods. Finally, we remark that the schemes in this paper can be readily extended to applications when the models take more general form, such as the multi-species VM equations.

  2. Effects of strong electrostatic interaction on multi-dimensional instability of dust-acoustic solitary waves in a magnetized strongly coupled dusty plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahmansouri, M.; Mamun, A. A.

    2015-07-01

    The effects of strong electrostatic interaction among highly charged dust on multi-dimensional instability of dust-acoustic (DA) solitary waves in a magnetized strongly coupled dusty plasma by small- k perturbation expansion method have been investigated. We found that a Zakharov-Kuznetsov equation governs the evolution of obliquely propagating small amplitude DA solitary waves in such a strongly coupled dusty plasma. The parametric regimes for which the obliquely propagating DA solitary waves become unstable are identified. The basic properties, viz., amplitude, width, instability criterion, and growth rate, of these obliquely propagating DA solitary structures are found to be significantly modified by the effects of different physical strongly coupled dusty plasma parameters. The implications of our results in some space/astrophysical plasmas and some future laboratory experiments are briefly discussed.

  3. Evaluation and Improvement of Liquid Propellant Rocket Chugging Analysis Techniques. Part 2: a Study of Low Frequency Combustion Instability in Rocket Engine Preburners Using a Heterogeneous Stirred Tank Reactor Model. Final Report M.S. Thesis - Aug. 1987

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartrand, Timothy A.

    1988-01-01

    During the shutdown of the space shuttle main engine, oxygen flow is shut off from the fuel preburner and helium is used to push the residual oxygen into the combustion chamber. During this process a low frequency combustion instability, or chug, occurs. This chug has resulted in damage to the engine's augmented spark igniter due to backflow of the contents of the preburner combustion chamber into the oxidizer feed system. To determine possible causes and fixes for the chug, the fuel preburner was modeled as a heterogeneous stirred tank combustion chamber, a variable mass flow rate oxidizer feed system, a constant mass flow rate fuel feed system and an exit turbine. Within the combustion chamber gases were assumed perfectly mixed. To account for liquid in the combustion chamber, a uniform droplet distribution was assumed to exist in the chamber, with mean droplet diameter determined from an empirical relation. A computer program was written to integrate the resulting differential equations. Because chamber contents were assumed perfectly mixed, the fuel preburner model erroneously predicted that combustion would not take place during shutdown. The combustion rate model was modified to assume that all liquid oxygen that vaporized instantaneously combusted with fuel. Using this combustion model, the effect of engine parameters on chamber pressure oscillations during the SSME shutdown was calculated.

  4. Characterization of lean premixed gas turbine burners as acoustic multi-ports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paschereit, C. O.; Polifke, W.

    1997-11-01

    Thermoacoustic combustion instabilities, involving a feedback cycle between fluctuations of velocity, pressure and heat release rate, are a cause for concern in many combustion applications. To model thermoacoustic oscillations, a combustion system can be described as a network of acoustic elements, representing for example fuel and air supply, burner and flame, combustor, cooling channels, suitable terminations, etc. For most of these elements, simple analytical models provide an adequate description of their (thermo-) acoustic properties. However, the complex response of burner and flame to acoustic perturbations has - at least in a first step - to be determined by experiment. In our approach, we describe the burner as an active acoustical two port, where the state variables pressure and velocity at the inlet and the outlet are coupled via a four element transfer matrix. To determine all four coefficients, two independent test states have to be created. This is achieved by using acoustic sources upstream and downstream of the burner, respectively. In application to a full size gas turbine burner, the method's accuracy was tested in a first step without combustion and the results were compared to an analytical model for the burner's acoustic properties. Then the method was used to determine the burner transfer matrix with combustion and to investigate the influence of various parameters such as acoustic amplitude and equivalence ratio.

  5. Modeling of fluidized-bed combustion of coal: Phase II, final reports. Volume V. Appendix: stability and instability in fluidized-bed combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Louis, J.F.; Tung, S.E.

    1980-10-01

    This document is the fifth of the seven volumes series of our Phase II Final Report. The material developed in this volume has not been incorporated into the system model. It will be used as a precursor of a transient model to be developed in the next phase of our model work. There have been various fluidized combustor models of differing complexity and scope published in the literature. Most of these models have identified and predicted - often in satisfactory agreement with results from pilot units - the key steady state combustor characteristics such as the mass of carbon in the bed (carbon loading), the combustion efficiency, the sulfur retention by the solid sorbent and the pollutant (mainly NO/sub x/) emissions. These models, however, cannot be in most instances successfully used to study the extinction and ignition characteristics of the combustor because they are isothermal in structure in the sense that the bed temperature is not an output variable but rather an input one and must be a priori specified. In order to remedy these inadequacies of the previous models, we here present a comprehensive account of the formulation and some typical results of a new nonisothermal model which has been developed in order to study, among other things, the ignition and extinction characteristics of the AFBC units. This model is able to predict the temperature patterns in the bed, the carbon loading, the combustion efficiency and the O/sub 2/ and CO concentration profiles in the combustor for the different design or operational characteristics.

  6. On the Interaction of a Premixed Flame with an Acoustic Disturbance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, Caroline; Frendi, Abdelkader

    2005-01-01

    The main objective of this research is to analyze the effect of acoustic disturbances on a premixed flame and determine their role in the onset of combustion instabilities. Computations for the one-dimensional, unsteady combustion of a lean premixed methane-air mixture are performed. An acoustic excitation is introduced in the chamber and interacts with the flame front. Our results indicate that as the amplitude of the acoustic excitation is increased, the flame front position fluctuates rapidly. This phenomenon is even more intense when the frequency of the acoustic disturbance matches the fundamental frequency of the chamber. Our results suggest that the interactions between the flame and the acoustic excitation may result in flame extinguishment. In addition various passive control devices are tested and we found that the Helmholtz resonator with rounded inlet corners is the most efficient.

  7. Numerical study of friction-induced instability and acoustic radiation - Effect of ramp loading on the squeal propensity for a simplified brake model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soobbarayen, K.; Sinou, J.-J.; Besset, S.

    2014-10-01

    This paper presents a numerical study of the influence of loading conditions on the vibrational and acoustic responses of a disc brake system subjected to squeal. A simplified model composed of a circular disc and a pad is proposed. Nonlinear effects of contact and friction over the frictional interface are modelled with a cubic law and a classical Coulomb's law with a constant friction coefficient. The stability analysis of this system shows the presence of two instabilities with one and two unstable modes that lead to friction-induced nonlinear vibrations and squeal noise. Nonlinear time analysis by temporal integration is conducted for two cases of loadings and initial conditions: a static load near the associated sliding equilibrium and a slow and a fast ramp loading. The analysis of the time responses shows that a sufficiently fast ramp loading can destabilize a stable configuration and generate nonlinear vibrations. Moreover, the fast ramp loading applied for the two unstable cases generates higher amplitudes of velocity than for the static load cases. The frequency analysis shows that the fast ramp loading generates a more complex spectrum than for the static load with the appearance of new resonance peaks. The acoustic responses for these cases are estimated by applying the multi-frequency acoustic calculation method based on the Fourier series decomposition of the velocity and the Boundary Element Method. Squeal noise emissions for the fast ramp loading present lower or higher levels than for the static load due to the different amplitudes of velocities. Moreover, the directivity is more complex for the fast ramp loading due to the appearance of new harmonic components in the velocity spectrum. Finally, the sound pressure convergence study shows that only the first harmonic components are sufficient to well describe the acoustic response.

  8. A simulation study of the convective instability and subsequent generation of Acoustic-gravity waves in the troposphere to MLT region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, B. R.; Kherani, E. A.; Sobral, J. H. A.

    2014-12-01

    The convective instability (CI) is excited in the troposphere in the presence of negative temperature gradient. The rising bubbles generated by the instability act like pressure disturbances at the top of the troposphere and subsequently excite the acoustic-gravity waves (AGWs) in the atmosphere. These AGWs propagate radially outward towards overlying MLT region while their amplitude increases exponentially with increasing altitude. In the MLT region, these waves encounter thermal and density ducts, leading to the dissipation of these waves and subsequent generation of secondary AGWs. In this work, we present the simulation study of coupled convective instability - AGWs dynamics in the atmosphere covering troposphere to MLT region. We derive the governing hydrodynamics equations for the CI and AGWs that include the non-adiabatic dynamics of CI in the troposphere and compressible and ducting dynamics of AGWs above troposphere. These equations are solved using Finite-Time-Centered-Space difference method complemented by the Crank-Nicolson implicit scheme for the integration and Gradient-Conjugate method to solve the matrix equation. The simulation domain consists of altitude-longitude-latitude covering the tropical Brazilian region. The novel features of the present study are as follows: (1) Owing to the non-adiabatic dynamics, the CI in the troposphere grows for the adiabatically stable temperature profile (2) The growth remains linear and excite the bubbles reaching up to the base of the tropopause (~10 km altitude), (3) Thereafter, AGWs are excited attaining large amplitude in the MLT region, (4) In the MLT region, these large amplitude waves become ducted and as a result, the AGWs with short period equals to the Brunt-Vaisala period of MLT region, are amplified, (5) These ducting dynamics excite the atmospheric disturbances consist of ripples and bands, respectively associated with the short and long period AGWs.

  9. Status on the Verification of Combustion Stability for the J-2X Engine Thrust Chamber Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casiano, Matthew; Hinerman, Tim; Kenny, R. Jeremy; Hulka, Jim; Barnett, Greg; Dodd, Fred; Martin, Tom

    2013-01-01

    Development is underway of the J -2X engine, a liquid oxygen/liquid hydrogen rocket engine for use on the Space Launch System. The Engine E10001 began hot fire testing in June 2011 and testing will continue with subsequent engines. The J -2X engine main combustion chamber contains both acoustic cavities and baffles. These stability aids are intended to dampen the acoustics in the main combustion chamber. Verification of the engine thrust chamber stability is determined primarily by examining experimental data using a dynamic stability rating technique; however, additional requirements were included to guard against any spontaneous instability or rough combustion. Startup and shutdown chug oscillations are also characterized for this engine. This paper details the stability requirements and verification including low and high frequency dynamics, a discussion on sensor selection and sensor port dynamics, and the process developed to assess combustion stability. A status on the stability results is also provided and discussed.

  10. Effects of ambient conditions and fuel composition on combustion stability

    SciTech Connect

    Janus, M.C.; Richards, G.A.; Yip, M.J.; Robey, E.H.

    1997-04-01

    Recent regulations on NO, emissions are promoting the use of lean premix (LPM) combustion for industrial gas turbines. LPM combustors avoid locally stoichiometric combustion by premixing fuel and the air upstream of the reaction region, thereby eliminating the high temperatures that produce thermal NO.. Unfortunately, this style of combustor is prone to combustion oscillation. Significant pressure fluctuations can occur when variations in heat release periodically couple pressure to acoustic modes in the combustion chamber. These oscillations must be controlled because resulting vibration can shorten the life of engine hardware. Laboratory and engine field testing have shown that instability regimes can vary with environmental conditions. These observations prompted this study of the effects of ambient conditions and fuel composition on combustion stability. Tests are conducted on a sub-scale combustor burning natural gas, propane, and some hydrogen/hydrocarbon mixtures. A premix, swirl-stabilized fuel nozzle typical of industrial gas turbines is used. Experimental and numerical results describe how stability regions may shift as inlet air temperature, humidity, and fuel composition are altered. Results appear to indicate that shifting instability instability regimes are primarily caused by changes in reaction rate.

  11. Effects of rotating nanoparticles on the instability of dust-acoustic waves in a plasma containing superthermal electrons and ions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Myoung-Jae

    2011-01-01

    Charged particles with sizes ranging from tens of nanometer to tens of micrometer are created in various situations such as DC discharges, rf discharges, laser-driven plasmas, processing plasmas used in device fabrications, as well as in space such as interstellar clouds, solar system, etc. In general, a large number of background electrons could stick onto the nanoparticle surface during the charging processes and as a result a significant depletion of the electron number density can be encountered. If charged non-spherical nanoparticles are created, they can rotate due to the interaction with surrounding plasmas or oscillating electric field. Therefore, a significant modification of the conventional plasma wave dispersion relations might be necessary for the complex plasma that consists of electrons, ions and nanoparticles. In this work, the growing of dust-acoustic wave is investigated in the presence of the nanoparticles in a superthermal plasma. Full spectrums of the growth rate of the dust-acoustic wave is obtained and analyzed to investigate the effect of nanoparticle rotation. The superthermal plasma effect on the growth rate is also analyzed. The growth rate was found to be enhanced by the rotation of nanoparticles, but suppressed by the superthermal plasmas.

  12. Analytical and experimental investigations of gas turbine model combustor acoustics operated at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richecoeur, Franck; Schuller, Thierry; Lamraoui, Ammar; Ducruix, Sébastien

    2013-01-01

    When coupled to acoustics, unsteady heat release oscillations may cause recurrent problems in many combustion chambers, potentially leading to dramatic damages to the structure. Accumulation of acoustic energy around the eigenmodes of the combustor results from the resonant coupling between pressure disturbances in the flame region with synchronized heat release rate perturbations. Predicting these frequencies and the corresponding sound pressure field is a key issue to design passive or active control systems to prevent the growth of these instabilities. In this study, an acoustically controlled combustion test bench CESAM is used to stabilize a partially premixed swirling propane-air flame. In the premixing tube, reactants are injected tangentially to generate the swirling flow, the flame being stabilized in the combustion chamber by a sudden expansion of the cross section. The premixer backplane is equipped with an Impedance Control System (ICS) allowing to adjust the acoustic reflection coefficient at this location. Acoustics of the coupled-cavity system formed by the premixer and the combustion chamber is investigated analytically by taking into account the measured acoustic impedances at the premixer backplane and in the feeding lines. The chamber length is also modified to examine the effects of the geometry on these predictions. It is shown that the premixer and combustion chamber can be considered as acoustically decoupled for small values of the acoustic coupling index, defined in the article. This offers flexible solutions to control the pressure distribution within the combustor, except when these frequencies match. When the frequencies are close to each other, only the analysis of the damping of the different cavities enables to indicate whether the system is coupled or not. Modifying either the acoustic coupling index or the damping values featuring the same frequency appears then as alternative solutions to decouple cavities.

  13. Nonlinear Longitudinal Mode Instability in Liquid Propellant Rocket Engine Preburners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, J. D. (Technical Monitor); Flandro, Gary A.; Majdalani, Joseph; Sims, Joseph D.

    2004-01-01

    Nonlinear pressure oscillations have been observed in liquid propellant rocket instability preburner devices. Unlike the familiar transverse mode instabilities that characterize primary combustion chambers, these oscillations appear as longitudinal gas motions with frequencies that are typical of the chamber axial acoustic modes. In several respects, the phenomenon is similar to longitudinal mode combustion instability appearing in low-smoke solid propellant motors. An important feature is evidence of steep-fronted wave motions with very high amplitude. Clearly, gas motions of this type threaten the mechanical integrity of associated engine components and create unacceptably high vibration levels. This paper focuses on development of the analytical tools needed to predict, diagnose, and correct instabilities of this type. For this purpose, mechanisms that lead to steep-fronted, high-amplitude pressure waves are described in detail. It is shown that such gas motions are the outcome of the natural steepening process in which initially low amplitude standing acoustic waves grow into shock-like disturbances. The energy source that promotes this behavior is a combination of unsteady combustion energy release and interactions with the quasi-steady mean chamber flow. Since shock waves characterize the gas motions, detonation-like mechanisms may well control the unsteady combustion processes. When the energy gains exceed the losses (represented mainly by nozzle and viscous damping), the waves can rapidly grow to a finite amplitude limit cycle. Analytical tools are described that allow the prediction of the limit cycle amplitude and show the dependence of this wave amplitude on the system geometry and other design parameters. This information can be used to guide corrective procedures that mitigate or eliminate the oscillations.

  14. Ion streaming instability of dust-acoustic surface waves in a semi-infinite Lorentzian complex plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Myoung-Jae; Jung, Young-Dae

    2016-10-01

    The growth rate of the dust-acoustic surface wave in the semi-infinite complex plasma with an ion streaming passing through the plasma at rest is analytically derived. We have adopted the Lorentzian distribution for electrons to investigate the nonthermal property of a plasma on the growth rate. We find that the growth rate of the surface wave increases as the wave number increases, and it is always larger than that of the bulk wave, especially in the realm of large wave numbers. The nonthermal effect of Lorentzian electrons in the high-energy tail is found to enhance the growth rate. It is also found that the density and speed of streaming ion would increase the growth rate. The growth rate of the surface wave is compared to that of the bulk wave for various physical parameters.

  15. Evolution of linear acoustic domains in a plane layer of a liquid crystal beyond the instability threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapustina, O. A.

    2015-05-01

    This work experimentally validates for the first time the adequacy of a model describing the abovethreshold dynamics of a system of acoustic linear domains appearing in a plane layer of a nematic liquid crystal under the action of an oscillating hydrodynamic flow induced by shear vibrations at frequencies of the audio range. Values of the domain period are determined at the threshold of the effect and above the threshold up to oscillation amplitudes corresponding to orientational turbulization of the medium in layers with a thickness of 10-80 μm at frequencies of 0.1-20 Hz. The domain period has been determined as a function of the amplitude and oscillation frequency at different values of the layer thickness.

  16. Experimental investigation of cryogenic flame dynamics under transverse acoustic modulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Méry, Yoann; Hakim, Layal; Scouflaire, Philippe; Vingert, Lucien; Ducruix, Sébastien; Candel, Sébastien

    2013-01-01

    The present investigation is focused on high-frequency combustion instabilities coupled by transverse acoustic modes. This phenomenon has been observed during the development of many liquid rocket engines and other high performance devices. Such instabilities induce an unsteady heat release which leads in many cases to a rapid intensification of heat fluxes to the thrust chamber walls, causing fatal damage and a spectacular destruction of the propulsion system. One central objective of this effort is to observe and understand the physical processes leading the coupling between acoustics and combustion, and resulting in the growth of such instabilities. Experiments carried out on the Mascotte testbed at ONERA serve to identify the main processes involved and bring forth mechanisms taking place when an engine becomes unstable. Hot fire experiments are carried out in a model scale combustor reproducing many of the conditions prevailing in unstable rocket engines. Subcritical and transcritical cryogenic jets are injected in a multiple injector combustion chamber (MIC). This system is fed with LOx and methane through five injection units. The flames formed in this configuration are modulated by an acoustic wave with an amplitude of several bars. This is obtained with a new Very Large Amplitude Modulator (VHAM) capable of generating acoustic mode amplitudes representative of those found in actual engine undergoing HF instabilities. It is shown first that the strength of the acoustic field and the frequency range of oscillation (1 kHz-3.5 kHz) are consistent with rocket instability observations. Conditions where a feedback of the flame on the acoustic field occurs are obtained. High speed diagnostics indicates that the velocity field dramatically enhances the atomization process. The liquid core length is strongly reduced. At moderate amplitudes, the liquid jets are flattened in the spanwise direction and heat release takes place in two sheets neighboring the dense core

  17. Prediction of Combustion Stability and Flashback in Turbines with High-Hydrogen Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Lieuwen, Tim; Santavicca, Dom; Yang, Vigor

    2012-03-31

    During the duration of this sponsorship, we broadened our understanding of combustion instabilities through both analytical and experimental work. Predictive models were developed for flame response to transverse acoustic instabilities and for quantifying how a turbulent flame responds to velocity and fuel/air ratio forcing. Analysis was performed on the key instability mechanisms controlling heat release response for flames over a wide range of instability frequencies. Importantly, work was done closely with industrial partners to transition existing models into internal instability prediction codes. Experimentally, the forced response of hydrogen-enriched natural gas/air premixed and partially premixed flames were measured. The response of a lean premixed flame was investigated, subjected to velocity, equivalence ratio, and both forcing mechanisms simultaneously. In addition, important physical mechanisms controlling the response of partially premixed flames to inlet velocity and equivalence ratio oscillations were analyzed. This final technical report summarizes our findings and major publications stemming from this program.

  18. Combustion Stability Assessments of the Black Brant Solid Rocket Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischbach, Sean

    2014-01-01

    The Black Brant variation of the Standard Brant developed in the 1960's has been a workhorse motor of the NASA Sounding Rocket Project Office (SRPO) since the 1970's. In March 2012, the Black Brant Mk1 used on mission 36.277 experienced combustion instability during a flight at White Sands Missile Range, the third event in the last four years, the first occurring in November, 2009, the second in April 2010. After the 2010 event the program has been increasing the motor's throat diameter post-delivery with the goal of lowering the chamber pressure and increasing the margin against combustion instability. During the most recent combustion instability event, the vibrations exceeded the qualification levels for the Flight Termination System. The present study utilizes data generated from T-burner testing of multiple Black Brant propellants at the Naval Air Warfare Center at China Lake, to improve the combustion stability predictions for the Black Brant Mk1 and to generate new predictions for the Mk2. Three unique one dimensional (1-D) stability models were generated, representing distinct Black Brant flights, two of which experienced instabilities. The individual models allowed for comparison of stability characteristics between various nozzle configurations. A long standing "rule of thumb" states that increased stability margin is gained by increasing the throat diameter. In contradiction to this experience based rule, the analysis shows that little or no margin is gained from a larger throat diameter. The present analysis demonstrates competing effects resulting from an increased throat diameter accompanying a large response function. As is expected, more acoustic energy was expelled through the nozzle, but conversely more acoustic energy was generated due to larger gas velocities near the propellant surfaces.

  19. Active Suppression of Instabilities in Engine Combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopasakis, George

    2004-01-01

    A method of feedback control has been proposed as a means of suppressing thermo-acoustic instabilities in a liquid- fueled combustor of a type used in an aircraft engine. The basic principle of the method is one of (1) sensing combustor pressure oscillations associated with instabilities and (2) modulating the rate of flow of fuel to the combustor with a control phase that is chosen adaptively so that the pressure oscillations caused by the modulation oppose the sensed pressure oscillations. The need for this method arises because of the planned introduction of advanced, lean-burning aircraft gas turbine engines, which promise to operate with higher efficiencies and to emit smaller quantities of nitrogen oxides, relative to those of present aircraft engines. Unfortunately, the advanced engines are more susceptible to thermoacoustic instabilities. These instabilities are hard to control because they include large dead-time phase shifts, wide-band noise characterized by amplitudes that are large relative to those of the instabilities, exponential growth of the instabilities, random net phase walks, and amplitude fluctuations. In this method (see figure), the output of a combustion-pressure sensor would be wide-band-pass filtered and then further processed to generate a control signal that would be applied to a fast-actuation valve to modulate the flow of fuel. Initially, the controller would rapidly take large phase steps in order to home in, within a fraction of a second, to a favorable phase region within which the instability would be reduced. Then the controller would restrict itself to operate within this phase region and would further restrict itself to operate within a region of stability, as long as the power in the instability signal was decreasing. In the phase-shifting scheme of this method, the phase of the control vector would be made to continuously bounce back and forth from one boundary of an effective stability region to the other. Computationally

  20. Transient combustion in hybrid rockets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karabeyoglu, Mustafa Arif

    1998-09-01

    Hybrid rockets regained interest recently as an alternative chemical propulsion system due to their advantages over the solid and liquid systems that are currently in use. Development efforts on hybrids revealed two important problem areas: (1) low frequency instabilities and (2) slow transient response. Both of these are closely related to the transient behavior which is a poorly understood aspect of hybrid operation. This thesis is mainly involved with a theoretical study of transient combustion in hybrid rockets. We follow the methodology of identifying and modeling the subsystems of the motor such as the thermal lags in the solid, boundary layer combustion and chamber gasdynamics from a dynamic point of view. We begin with the thermal lag in the solid which yield the regression rate for any given wall heat flux variation. Interesting phenomena such as overshooting during throttling and the amplification and phase lead regions in the frequency domain are discovered. Later we develop a quasi-steady transient hybrid combustion model supported with time delays for the boundary layer processes. This is integrated with the thermal lag system to obtain the thermal combustion (TC) coupled response. The TC coupled system with positive delays generated low frequency instabilities. The scaling of the instabilities are in good agreement with actual motor test data. Finally, we formulate a gasdynamic model for the hybrid chamber which successfully resolves the filling/emptying and longitudinal acoustic behavior of the motor. The TC coupled system is later integrated to the gasdynamic model to obtain the overall response (TCG coupled system) of gaseous oxidizer motors with stiff feed systems. Low frequency instabilities were also encountered for the TCG coupled system. Apart from the transient investigations, the regression rate behavior of liquefying hybrid propellants such as solid cryogenic materials are also studied. The theory is based on the possibility of enhancement

  1. Use of co-combustion bottom ash to design an acoustic absorbing material for highway noise barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Arenas, Celia; Leiva, Carlos; Vilches, Luis F.

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • The particle size of bottom ash influenced the acoustic behavior of the barrier. • The best sound absorption coefficients were measured for larger particle sizes. • The maximum noise absorption is displaced to lower frequencies for higher thickness. • A noise barrier was designed with better properties than commercial products. • Recycling products from bottom ash no present leaching and radioactivity problems. - Abstract: The present study aims to determine and evaluate the applicability of a new product consisting of coal bottom ash mixed with Portland cement in the application of highway noise barriers. In order to effectively recycle the bottom ash, the influence of the grain particle size of bottom ash, the thickness of the panel and the combination of different layers with various particle sizes have been studied, as well as some environmental properties including leachability (EN-12457-4, NEN-7345) and radioactivity tests. Based on the obtained results, the acoustic properties of the final composite material were similar or even better than those found in porous concrete used for the same application. According to this study, the material produced presented no environmental risk.

  2. Combustion physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, A. R.

    1985-11-01

    Over 90% of our energy comes from combustion. By the year 2000 the figure will still be 80%, even allowing for nuclear and alternative energy sources. There are many familiar examples of combustion use, both domestic and industrial. These range from the Bunsen burner to large flares, from small combustion chambers, such as those in car engines, to industrial furnaces for steel manufacture or the generation of megawatts of electricity. There are also fires and explosions. The bountiful energy release from combustion, however, brings its problems, prominent among which are diminishing fuel resources and pollution. Combustion science is directed towards finding ways of improving efficiency and reducing pollution. One may ask, since combustion is a chemical reaction, why physics is involved: the answer is in three parts. First, chemicals cannot react unless they come together. In most flames the fuel and air are initially separate. The chemical reaction in the gas phase is very fast compared with the rate of mixing. Thus, once the fuel and air are mixed the reaction can be considered to occur instantaneously and fluid mechanics limits the rate of burning. Secondly, thermodynamics and heat transfer determine the thermal properties of the combustion products. Heat transfer also plays a role by preheating the reactants and is essential to extracting useful work. Fluid mechanics is relevant if work is to be performed directly, as in a turbine. Finally, physical methods, including electric probes, acoustics, optics, spectroscopy and pyrometry, are used to examine flames. The article is concerned mainly with how physics is used to improve the efficiency of combustion.

  3. Use of co-combustion bottom ash to design an acoustic absorbing material for highway noise barriers.

    PubMed

    Arenas, Celia; Leiva, Carlos; Vilches, Luis F; Cifuentes, Héctor

    2013-11-01

    The present study aims to determine and evaluate the applicability of a new product consisting of coal bottom ash mixed with Portland cement in the application of highway noise barriers. In order to effectively recycle the bottom ash, the influence of the grain particle size of bottom ash, the thickness of the panel and the combination of different layers with various particle sizes have been studied, as well as some environmental properties including leachability (EN-12457-4, NEN-7345) and radioactivity tests. Based on the obtained results, the acoustic properties of the final composite material were similar or even better than those found in porous concrete used for the same application. According to this study, the material produced presented no environmental risk. PMID:23916843

  4. Measurements of thermo-acoustic coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pun, Winston

    The problem of combustion instabilities has existed since the early 1940s, when they were observed during the development of solid and liquid rocket engines. While various engineering solutions have served well in these fields, the problem is revisited in modern gas-turbine engines. The purpose of this work is to provide experimental measurements of laboratory devices that exhibit thermo-acoustic coupling, similar to the interaction observed during combustion instabilities, which will aid in the design and development of stable systems. Possibly the simplest device which exhibits these characteristics is a Rijke tube. An electrical, horizontally mounted, 1 m long version of the original Rijke tube is presented, with measurements taken during unstable and stable operation. An accurate stability boundary with uncertainty is determined for a heater position of x/L = ¼, as a function of mass flow rate and heater power. Hysteresis, not previously reported, is observed at flow rates above 3 g/s. A one-dimensional model of the stability boundary with linear acoustics is shown to have qualitative agreement with experimental data. A novel technique has also been devised which can provide insight into the local dynamic response of a flame to an acoustic field. In the experiments, a test chamber is acoustically excited by a pair of low-frequency drivers. The response of the flame is visualized by two techniques; chemiluminescence and planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) of the hydroxyl (OH) radical, both of which are well-known indicators for heat release in flames. The resulting images are phase-resolved and averaged to yield a qualitative picture of the fluctuation of the heat release. The images are correlated with a pressure transducer near the flame, which allows stability to be evaluated using Rayleigh's criterion and a combustion response function. This is the first known measurement of the combustion dynamics of a flame over a range of frequencies. Results

  5. Modeling and analysis of thermoacoustic instabilities in an annular combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murthy, Sandeep; Sayadi, Taraneh; Le Chenadec, Vincent; Schmid, Peter

    2015-11-01

    A simplified model is introduced to study thermo-acoustic instabilities in axisymmetric combustion chambers. Such instabilities can be triggered when correlations between heat-release and pressure oscillations exist, leading to undesirable effects. Gas turbine designs typically consist of a periodic assembly of N identical units; as evidenced by documented studies, the coupling across sectors may give rise to unstable modes, which are the highlight of this study. In the proposed model, the governing equations are linearized in the acoustic limit, with each burner modeled as a one-dimensional system, featuring acoustic damping and a compact heat source. The coupling between the burners is accounted for by solving the two-dimensional wave equation over an annular region, perpendicular to the burners, representing the chamber's geometry. The discretization of these equations results in a set of coupled delay-differential equations, that depends on a finite set of parameters. The system's periodicity is leveraged using a recently developed root-of-unity formalism (Schmid et al., 2015). This results in a linear system, which is then subjected to modal and non-modal analysis to explore the influence of the coupled behavior of the burners on the system's stability and receptivity.

  6. Bubble Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corrigan, Jackie

    2004-01-01

    A method of energy production that is capable of low pollutant emissions is fundamental to one of the four pillars of NASA s Aeronautics Blueprint: Revolutionary Vehicles. Bubble combustion, a new engine technology currently being developed at Glenn Research Center promises to provide low emissions combustion in support of NASA s vision under the Emissions Element because it generates power, while minimizing the production of carbon dioxide (CO2) and nitrous oxides (NOx), both known to be Greenhouse gases. and allows the use of alternative fuels such as corn oil, low-grade fuels, and even used motor oil. Bubble combustion is analogous to the inverse of spray combustion: the difference between bubble and spray combustion is that spray combustion is spraying a liquid in to a gas to form droplets, whereas bubble combustion involves injecting a gas into a liquid to form gaseous bubbles. In bubble combustion, the process for the ignition of the bubbles takes place on a time scale of less than a nanosecond and begins with acoustic waves perturbing each bubble. This perturbation causes the local pressure to drop below the vapor pressure of the liquid thus producing cavitation in which the bubble diameter grows, and upon reversal of the oscillating pressure field, the bubble then collapses rapidly with the aid of the high surface tension forces acting on the wall of the bubble. The rapid and violent collapse causes the temperatures inside the bubbles to soar as a result of adiabatic heating. As the temperatures rise, the gaseous contents of the bubble ignite with the bubble itself serving as its own combustion chamber. After ignition, this is the time in the bubble s life cycle where power is generated, and CO2, and NOx among other species, are produced. However, the pollutants CO2 and NOx are absorbed into the surrounding liquid. The importance of bubble combustion is that it generates power using a simple and compact device. We conducted a parametric study using CAVCHEM

  7. Combustion Dynamics and Control for Ultra Low Emissions in Aircraft Gas-Turbine Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLaat, John C.

    2011-01-01

    Future aircraft engines must provide ultra-low emissions and high efficiency at low cost while maintaining the reliability and operability of present day engines. The demands for increased performance and decreased emissions have resulted in advanced combustor designs that are critically dependent on efficient fuel/air mixing and lean operation. However, all combustors, but most notably lean-burning low-emissions combustors, are susceptible to combustion instabilities. These instabilities are typically caused by the interaction of the fluctuating heat release of the combustion process with naturally occurring acoustic resonances. These interactions can produce large pressure oscillations within the combustor and can reduce component life and potentially lead to premature mechanical failures. Active Combustion Control which consists of feedback-based control of the fuel-air mixing process can provide an approach to achieving acceptable combustor dynamic behavior while minimizing emissions, and thus can provide flexibility during the combustor design process. The NASA Glenn Active Combustion Control Technology activity aims to demonstrate active control in a realistic environment relevant to aircraft engines by providing experiments tied to aircraft gas turbine combustors. The intent is to allow the technology maturity of active combustion control to advance to eventual demonstration in an engine environment. Work at NASA Glenn has shown that active combustion control, utilizing advanced algorithms working through high frequency fuel actuation, can effectively suppress instabilities in a combustor which emulates the instabilities found in an aircraft gas turbine engine. Current efforts are aimed at extending these active control technologies to advanced ultra-low-emissions combustors such as those employing multi-point lean direct injection.

  8. Response function theories that account for size distribution effects - A review. [mathematical models concerning composite propellant heterogeneity effects on combustion instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, N. S.

    1980-01-01

    The paper presents theoretical models developed to account for the heterogeneity of composite propellants in expressing the pressure-coupled combustion response function. It is noted that the model of Lengelle and Williams (1968) furnishes a viable basis to explain the effects of heterogeneity.

  9. Evaluation and Improvement of Liquid Propellant Rocket Chugging Analysis Techniques. Part 1: A One-Dimensional Analysis of Low Frequency Combustion Instability in the Fuel Preburner of the Space Shuttle Main Engine. Final Report M.S. Thesis - Aug. 1986

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, Kair Chuan

    1986-01-01

    Low frequency combustion instability, known as chugging, is consistently experienced during shutdown in the fuel and oxidizer preburners of the Space Shuttle Main Engines. Such problems always occur during the helium purge of the residual oxidizer from the preburner manifolds during the shutdown sequence. Possible causes and triggering mechanisms are analyzed and details in modeling the fuel preburner chug are presented. A linearized chugging model, based on the foundation of previous models, capable of predicting the chug occurrence is discussed and the predicted results are presented and compared to experimental work performed by NASA. Sensitivity parameters such as chamber pressure, fuel and oxidizer temperatures, and the effective bulk modulus of the liquid oxidizer are considered in analyzing the fuel preburner chug. The computer program CHUGTEST is utilized to generate the stability boundary for each sensitivity study and the region for stable operation is identified.

  10. Combustion oscillation control by cyclic fuel injection

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, G.A.; Yip, M.J.; Robey, E.; Cowell, L.; Rawlins, D.

    1995-04-01

    A number of recent articles have demonstrated the use of active control to mitigate the effects of combustion instability in afterburner and dump combustor applications. In these applications, cyclic injection of small quantities of control fuel has been proposed to counteract the periodic heat release that contributes to undesired pressure oscillations. This same technique may also be useful to mitigate oscillations in gas turbine combustors, especially in test rig combustors characterized by acoustic modes that do not exist in the final engine configuration. To address this issue, the present paper reports on active control of a subscale, atmospheric pressure nozzle/combustor arrangement. The fuel is natural gas. Cyclic injection of 14% control fuel in a premix fuel nozzle is shown to reduce oscillating pressure amplitude by a factor of 0.30 (i.e., {approximately}10 dB) at 300 Hz. Measurement of the oscillating heat release is also reported.

  11. Tripropellant combustion process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kmiec, T. D.; Carroll, R. G.

    1988-01-01

    The addition of small amounts of hydrogen to the combustion of LOX/hydrocarbon propellants in large rocket booster engines has the potential to enhance the system stability. Programs being conducted to evaluate the effects of hydrogen on the combustion of LOX/hydrocarbon propellants at supercritical pressures are described. Combustion instability has been a problem during the development of large hydrocarbon fueled rocket engines. At the higher combustion chamber pressures expected for the next generation of booster engines, the effect of unstable combustion could be even more destructive. The tripropellant engine cycle takes advantage of the superior cooling characteristics of hydrogen to cool the combustion chamber and a small amount of the hydrogen coolant can be used in the combustion process to enhance the system stability. Three aspects of work that will be accomplished to evaluate tripropellant combustion are described. The first is laboratory demonstration of the benefits through the evaluation of drop size, ignition delay and burning rate. The second is analytical modeling of the combustion process using the empirical relationship determined in the laboratory. The third is a subscale demonstration in which the system stability will be evaluated. The approach for each aspect is described and the analytical models that will be used are presented.

  12. High Frequency Adaptive Instability Suppression Controls in a Liquid-Fueled Combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopasakis, George

    2003-01-01

    This effort extends into high frequency (>500 Hz), an earlier developed adaptive control algorithm for the suppression of thermo-acoustic instabilities in a liquidfueled combustor. The earlier work covered the development of a controls algorithm for the suppression of a low frequency (280 Hz) combustion instability based on simulations, with no hardware testing involved. The work described here includes changes to the simulation and controller design necessary to control the high frequency instability, augmentations to the control algorithm to improve its performance, and finally hardware testing and results with an experimental combustor rig developed for the high frequency case. The Adaptive Sliding Phasor Averaged Control (ASPAC) algorithm modulates the fuel flow in the combustor with a control phase that continuously slides back and forth within the phase region that reduces the amplitude of the instability. The results demonstrate the power of the method - that it can identify and suppress the instability even when the instability amplitude is buried in the noise of the combustor pressure. The successful testing of the ASPAC approach helped complete an important NASA milestone to demonstrate advanced technologies for low-emission combustors.

  13. Acoustic Characterization of Compact Jet Engine Simulator Units

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doty, Michael J.; Haskin, Henry H.

    2013-01-01

    Two dual-stream, heated jet, Compact Jet Engine Simulator (CJES) units are designed for wind tunnel acoustic experiments involving a Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) vehicle. The newly fabricated CJES units are characterized with a series of acoustic and flowfield investigations to ensure successful operation with minimal rig noise. To limit simulator size, consistent with a 5.8% HWB model, the CJES units adapt Ultra Compact Combustor (UCC) technology developed at the Air Force Research Laboratory. Stable and controllable operation of the combustor is demonstrated using passive swirl air injection and backpressuring of the combustion chamber. Combustion instability tones are eliminated using nonuniform flow conditioners in conjunction with upstream screens. Through proper flow conditioning, rig noise is reduced by more than 20 dB over a broad spectral range, but it is not completely eliminated at high frequencies. The low-noise chevron nozzle concept designed for the HWB test shows expected acoustic benefits when installed on the CJES unit, and consistency between CJES units is shown to be within 0.5 dB OASPL.

  14. Acoustic excitation of liquid fuel droplets and coaxial jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Juan Ignacio

    This experimental study focuses on two important problems relevant to acoustic coupling with condensed phase transport processes, with special relevance to liquid rocket engine and airbreathing engine combustion instabilities. The first part of this dissertation describes droplet combustion characteristics of various fuels during exposure to external acoustical perturbations. Methanol, ethanol, a liquid synthetic fuel derived from coal gasification via the Fischer-Tropsch process, and a blend of aviation fuel and the synthetic fuel are used. During acoustic excitation, the droplet is situated at or near a pressure node condition, where the droplet experiences the largest velocity perturbations, and at or near a pressure antinode condition, where the droplet is exposed to minimal velocity fluctuations. For unforced conditions, the values of the droplet burning rate constant K of the different fuels are consistent with data in the literature. The location of the droplet with respect to a pressure node or antinode also has a measurable effect on droplet burning rates, which are different for different fuels and in some cases are as high as 28% above the unforced burning rate value. Estimates of flame extinction due to acoustic forcing for different fuels are also obtained. The second part of this work consists of an experimental study on coaxial jet behavior under non-reactive, cryogenic conditions, with direct applications to flow mixing and unstable behavior characterization in liquid rocket engines. These experiments, conducted with nitrogen, span a range of outer to inner jet momentum flux ratios from 0.013 to 23, and explore subcritical, nearcritical and supercritical pressure conditions, with and without acoustic excitation, for two injector geometries. Acoustic forcing at 3 kHz is utilized to maximize the pressure fluctuations within the chamber acting on the jet, reaching maximum values of 4% of the mean chamber pressure. The effect of the magnitude and phase

  15. Traveling-Wave Thermoacoustic Engines With Internal Combustion

    DOEpatents

    Weiland, Nathan Thomas; Zinn, Ben T.; Swift, Gregory William

    2004-05-11

    Thermoacoustic devices are disclosed wherein, for some embodiments, a combustion zone provides heat to a regenerator using a mean flow of compressible fluid. In other embodiments, burning of a combustible mixture within the combustion zone is pulsed in phase with the acoustic pressure oscillations to increase acoustic power output. In an example embodiment, the combustion zone and the regenerator are thermally insulated from other components within the thermoacoustic device.

  16. Combustion Stability Characteristics of the Project Morpheus Liquid Oxygen / Liquid Methane Main Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melcher, John C.; Morehead, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    The project Morpheus liquid oxygen (LOX) / liquid methane (LCH4) main engine is a Johnson Space Center (JSC) designed 5,000 lbf-thrust, 4:1 throttling, pressure-fed cryogenic engine using an impinging element injector design. The engine met or exceeded all performance requirements without experiencing any in- ight failures, but the engine exhibited acoustic-coupled combustion instabilities during sea-level ground-based testing. First tangential (1T), rst radial (1R), 1T1R, and higher order modes were triggered by conditions during the Morpheus vehicle derived low chamber pressure startup sequence. The instability was never observed to initiate during mainstage, even at low power levels. Ground-interaction acoustics aggravated the instability in vehicle tests. Analysis of more than 200 hot re tests on the Morpheus vehicle and Stennis Space Center (SSC) test stand showed a relationship between ignition stability and injector/chamber pressure. The instability had the distinct characteristic of initiating at high relative injection pressure drop at low chamber pressure during the start sequence. Data analysis suggests that the two-phase density during engine start results in a high injection velocity, possibly triggering the instabilities predicted by the Hewitt stability curves. Engine ignition instability was successfully mitigated via a higher-chamber pressure start sequence (e.g., 50% power level vs 30%) and operational propellant start temperature limits that maintained \\cold LOX" and \\warm methane" at the engine inlet. The main engine successfully demonstrated 4:1 throttling without chugging during mainstage, but chug instabilities were observed during some engine shutdown sequences at low injector pressure drop, especially during vehicle landing.

  17. On the behavior of a shear-coaxial jet, spanning sub- to supercritical pressures, with and without an externally imposed transverse acoustic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Dustin Wayne

    In the past, liquid rocket engines (LRE) have experienced high-frequency combustion instability, which impose an acoustic field in the combustion chamber. The acoustic field interacts with the fluid jets issuing from the injectors, thus altering the behavior of the jet compared to that of stable operation of the LRE. It is possible that this interaction could be a substantial feed back mechanism driving the combustion instability. In order to understand the problem of combustion instability, it is necessary to understand the interaction of the jet with the acoustic waves. From past combustion instability studies of the liquid oxygen and hydrogen propellant combination in a shear-coaxial injector configuration, a design guideline of outer-to-inner jet velocity ratio greater than about ten was proposed in order to avoid high-frequency acoustic combustion instability problems. However, no satisfactory physical explanation was provided. To promote this understanding, a cold-flow experimental investigation of a shear-coaxial jet interacting with a high-amplitude non-linear acoustic field was undertaken under chamber pressures extending into the supercritical regime. Liquid nitrogen (LN2) flowed from the inner tube of a coaxial injector while gaseous nitrogen (GN2) issued from its annular region. The injector fluids were directed into a chamber pressurized with gaseous nitrogen. The acoustic excitation was provided by an external driver capable of delivering acoustic field amplitudes up to 165 dB. The resonant modes of the chamber governed the two frequencies studied here, with the first two modes being about 3 and 5.2 kHz. High-speed images of the jet were taken with a Phantom CMOS camera. The so-called "dark core" of the jet is among the most salient features in the acquired images, and therefore, was defined and measured. The core length was found to decrease with increasing velocity and momentum flux ratio. Because of the ability of the camera to capture thousands of

  18. Superresonant instability of a compressible hydrodynamic vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Leandro A.; Cardoso, Vitor; Crispino, Luís C. B.

    2016-06-01

    We show that a purely circulating and compressible system, in an adiabatic regime of acoustic propagation, presents superresonant instabilities. To show the existence these instabilities, we compute the quasinormal mode frequencies of this system numerically using two different frequency domain methods.

  19. Electrostatic ion (hydrogen) cyclotron and ion acoustic wave instabilities in regions of upward field-aligned current and upward ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergmann, R.

    1984-02-01

    An investigation is made into the stability of electrostatic hydrogen ion cyclotron and ion acoustic waves in a model plasma where an ion beam, population 2, and oppositely directed drifting electrons pass through a stationary ion background, population 1. The excited wave properties are then compared with the characteristics of the unstable modes observed on the S3-3 satellite. Three temperature regimes are studied: (1) Te greater than Ti2 much greater than Ti1, (2) Ti2 greater than Te not less than Ti1, and (3) Te approximately equal to Ti1 greater than Ti2. It is found that the ion beam acts as a free energy source only in regime 1. This regime is also highly unstable to the electrons as a free energy source. Unstable modes in regimes 2 and 3 seem to best satisfy the electrostatic hydrogen cyclotron wave (EHC) properties at 1 earth radius. For these cases the electrons are the free energy source, the beam supplies damping.

  20. Electrostatic ion (hydrogen) cyclotron and ion acoustic wave instabilities in regions of upward field-aligned current and upward ion beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergmann, R.

    1984-01-01

    An investigation is made into the stability of electrostatic hydrogen ion cyclotron and ion acoustic waves in a model plasma where an ion beam, population 2, and oppositely directed drifting electrons pass through a stationary ion background, population 1. The excited wave properties are then compared with the characteristics of the unstable modes observed on the S3-3 satellite. Three temperature regimes are studied: (1) Te greater than Ti2 much greater than Ti1, (2) Ti2 greater than Te not less than Ti1, and (3) Te approximately equal to Ti1 greater than Ti2. It is found that the ion beam acts as a free energy source only in regime 1. This regime is also highly unstable to the electrons as a free energy source. Unstable modes in regimes 2 and 3 seem to best satisfy the electrostatic hydrogen cyclotron wave (EHC) properties at 1 earth radius. For these cases the electrons are the free energy source, the beam supplies damping.

  1. Hip instability.

    PubMed

    Smith, Matthew V; Sekiya, Jon K

    2010-06-01

    Hip instability is becoming a more commonly recognized source of pain and disability in patients. Traumatic causes of hip instability are often clear. Appropriate treatment includes immediate reduction, early surgery for acetabular rim fractures greater than 25% or incarcerated fragments in the joint, and close follow-up to monitor for avascular necrosis. Late surgical intervention may be necessary for residual symptomatic hip instability. Atraumatic causes of hip instability include repetitive external rotation with axial loading, generalized ligamentous laxity, and collagen disorders like Ehlers-Danlos. Symptoms caused by atraumatic hip instability often have an insidious onset. Patients may have a wide array of hip symptoms while demonstrating only subtle findings suggestive of capsular laxity. Traction views of the affected hip can be helpful in diagnosing hip instability. Open and arthroscopic techniques can be used to treat capsular laxity. We describe an arthroscopic anterior hip capsular plication using a suture technique. PMID:20473129

  2. Collective instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    K.Y. Ng

    2003-08-25

    The lecture covers mainly Sections 2.VIII and 3.VII of the book ''Accelerator Physics'' by S.Y. Lee, plus mode-coupling instabilities and chromaticity-driven head-tail instability. Besides giving more detailed derivation of many equations, simple interpretations of many collective instabilities are included with the intention that the phenomena can be understood more easily without going into too much mathematics. The notations of Lee's book as well as the e{sup jwt} convention are followed.

  3. Demonstration of Active Combustion Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovett, Jeffrey A.; Teerlinck, Karen A.; Cohen, Jeffrey M.

    2008-01-01

    The primary objective of this effort was to demonstrate active control of combustion instabilities in a direct-injection gas turbine combustor that accurately simulates engine operating conditions and reproduces an engine-type instability. This report documents the second phase of a two-phase effort. The first phase involved the analysis of an instability observed in a developmental aeroengine and the design of a single-nozzle test rig to replicate that phenomenon. This was successfully completed in 2001 and is documented in the Phase I report. This second phase was directed toward demonstration of active control strategies to mitigate this instability and thereby demonstrate the viability of active control for aircraft engine combustors. This involved development of high-speed actuator technology, testing and analysis of how the actuation system was integrated with the combustion system, control algorithm development, and demonstration testing in the single-nozzle test rig. A 30 percent reduction in the amplitude of the high-frequency (570 Hz) instability was achieved using actuation systems and control algorithms developed within this effort. Even larger reductions were shown with a low-frequency (270 Hz) instability. This represents a unique achievement in the development and practical demonstration of active combustion control systems for gas turbine applications.

  4. Microscale instabilities in stream interaction regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eviatar, A.; Goldstein, M. L.

    1979-01-01

    The microstructure of solar wind stream interaction regions is considered theoretically with emphasis on the role of several electrostatic kinetic instabilities which may be important within the stream interface and the compression region. Inside of 1 AU, the interface is likely to be stable against the electrostatic streaming instabilities considered. Between 1 and 2 AU, the interface will excite the magnetized ion-ion instability. The compression region is also found to be unstable beyond 1 AU where the modified two-stream instability, beam-cyclotron instability, and ion-acoustic instability are important in determining the structure of the compressive pulses as they evolve into forward and reverse shocks. It is concluded that the modified two-stream instability and beam-cyclotron instability predominately play a role in heating the electrons to the threshold for the ion-acoustic instability. Various electrostatic plasma waves, ranging in frequency from the lower-hybrid to harmonics of the electron cyclotron frequency, would be produced by these instabilities. Their signature should also be seen by high time resolution measurements of the temperature of the various plasma species.

  5. Booming Dune Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreotti, B.; Bonneau, L.

    2009-12-01

    Sand avalanches flowing down the leeward face of some desert dunes spontaneously produce a loud sound with a characteristic vibrato around a well-defined frequency, a phenomenon called the “song of dunes.” Here, we show through theory that a homogenous granular surface flow is linearly unstable towards growing elastic waves when a localized shear band forms at the interface between the avalanche and the static part of the dune. We unravel the nature of the acoustic amplifying mechanism at the origin of this booming instability. The dispersion relation and the shape of the most unstable modes are computed and compared to field measurements.

  6. Booming dune instability.

    PubMed

    Andreotti, B; Bonneau, L

    2009-12-01

    Sand avalanches flowing down the leeward face of some desert dunes spontaneously produce a loud sound with a characteristic vibrato around a well-defined frequency, a phenomenon called the "song of dunes." Here, we show through theory that a homogenous granular surface flow is linearly unstable towards growing elastic waves when a localized shear band forms at the interface between the avalanche and the static part of the dune. We unravel the nature of the acoustic amplifying mechanism at the origin of this booming instability. The dispersion relation and the shape of the most unstable modes are computed and compared to field measurements. PMID:20366176

  7. Mean Flow Augmented Acoustics in Rocket Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischbach, Sean R.

    2015-01-01

    Combustion instability in solid rocket motors and liquid engines is a complication that continues to plague designers and engineers. Many rocket systems experience violent fluctuations in pressure, velocity, and temperature originating from the complex interactions between the combustion process and gas dynamics. During sever cases of combustion instability fluctuation amplitudes can reach values equal to or greater than the average chamber pressure. Large amplitude oscillations lead to damaged injectors, loss of rocket performance, damaged payloads, and in some cases breach of case/loss of mission. Historic difficulties in modeling and predicting combustion instability has reduced most rocket systems experiencing instability into a costly fix through testing paradigm or to scrap the system entirely.

  8. Simulation of Unsteady Combustion in a Ramjet Engine Using a Highly Parallel Computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menon, Suresh; Weeratunga, Sisira; Cooper, D. M. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Combustion instability in ramjets is a complex phenomenon that involve nonlinear interaction between acoustic waves, vortex motion and unsteady heat release in the combustor. To numerically simulate this 3-D, transient phenomenon, enormous computer resources (time, memory and disk storage) are required. Although current generation vector supercomputers are capable of providing adequate resources for simulations of this nature, their high cost and limited availability, makes such machines less than satisfactory for routine use. The primary focus of this study is to assess the feasibility of using highly parallel computer systems as a cost-effective alternative for conducting such unsteady flow simulations. Towards this end, a large-eddy simulation model for combustion instability was implemented on the Intel iPSC/860 and a careful study was conducted to determine the benefits and the problems associated with the use of such machines for transient simulations. Details of this study along with the results obtained from the unsteady combustion simulations carried out on the iPSC/860 are discussed in this paper.

  9. Investigation of Combustion Control in a Dump Combustor Using the Feedback Free Fluidic Oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meier, Eric J.; Casiano, Matthew J.; Anderson, William E.; Heister, Stephen D.

    2015-01-01

    A feedback free fluidic oscillator was designed and integrated into a single element rocket combustor with the goal of suppressing longitudinal combustion instabilities. The fluidic oscillator uses internal fluid dynamics to create an unsteady outlet jet at a specific frequency. An array of nine fluidic oscillators was tested to mimic modulated secondary oxidizer injection into the combustor dump plane. The combustor has a coaxial injector that uses gaseous methane and decomposed hydrogen peroxide with an overall O/F ratio of 11.7. A sonic choke plate on an actuator arm allows for continuous adjustment of the oxidizer post acoustics enabling the study of a variety of instability magnitudes. The fluidic oscillator unsteady outlet jet performance is compared against equivalent steady jet injection and a baseline design with no secondary oxidizer injection. At the most unstable operating conditions, the unsteady outlet jet saw a 67% reduction in the instability pressure oscillation magnitude when compared to the steady jet and baseline data. Additionally, computational fluid dynamics analysis of the combustor gives insight into the flow field interaction of the fluidic oscillators. The results indicate that open loop high frequency propellant modulation for combustion control can be achieved through fluidic devices that require no moving parts or electrical power to operate.

  10. Stable And Oscillating Acoustic Levitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, Martin B.; Garrett, Steven L.

    1988-01-01

    Sample stability or instability determined by levitating frequency. Degree of oscillation of acoustically levitated object along axis of levitation chamber controlled by varying frequency of acoustic driver for axis above or below frequency of corresponding chamber resonance. Stabilization/oscillation technique applied in normal Earth gravity, or in absence of gravity to bring object quickly to rest at nominal levitation position or make object oscillate in desired range about that position.

  11. Combustion noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strahle, W. C.

    1977-01-01

    A review of the subject of combustion generated noise is presented. Combustion noise is an important noise source in industrial furnaces and process heaters, turbopropulsion and gas turbine systems, flaring operations, Diesel engines, and rocket engines. The state-of-the-art in combustion noise importance, understanding, prediction and scaling is presented for these systems. The fundamentals and available theories of combustion noise are given. Controversies in the field are discussed and recommendations for future research are made.

  12. Generalized laser filamentation instability coupled to cooling instability

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, E.P.; Wong, J.; Garrison, J.

    1984-04-24

    We consider the propagation of laser light in an initially slightly nonuniform plasma. The classical dispersion relation for the laser filamentation growth rate (see e.g., B. Langdon, in the 1980 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Laser Program Annual Report, pp. 3-56, UCRL-50021-80, 1981) can be generalized to include other acoustical effects. For example, we find that the inclusion of potential imbalances in the heating and cooling rates of the ambient medium due to density and temperature perturbations can cause the laser filamentation mode to bifurcate into a cooling instability mode at long acoustic wavelengths. We also attempt to study semi-analytically the nonlinear evolution of this and related instabilities. These results have wide applications to a variety of chemical gas lasers and phenomena related to laser-target interactions (e.g., jet-like behavior).

  13. LASER STABILIZATION FOR NEAR ZERO NO{sub x} GAS TURBINE COMBUSTION SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Vivek Khanna

    2002-09-30

    Historically, the development of new industrial gas turbines has been primarily driven by the intent to achieve higher efficiency, lower operating costs and lower emissions. Higher efficiency and lower cost is obtained through higher turbine operating temperatures, while reduction in emissions is obtained by extending the lean operating limit of the combustor. However reduction in the lean stability limit of operation is limited greatly by the chemistry of the combustion process and by the occurrence of thermo-acoustic instabilities. Solar Turbines, CFD Research Corporation, and Los Alamos National Laboratory have teamed to advance the technology associated with laser-assisted ignition and flame stabilization, to a level where it could be incorporated onto a gas turbine combustor. The system being developed is expected to enhance the lean stability limit of the swirl stabilized combustion process and assist in reducing combustion oscillations. Such a system has the potential to allow operation at the ultra-lean conditions needed to achieve NO{sub x} emissions below 5 ppm without the need of exhaust treatment or catalytic technologies. The research effort was focused on analytically modeling laser-assisted flame stabilization using advanced CFD techniques, and experimentally demonstrating the technology, using a solid-state laser and low-cost durable optics. A pulsed laser beam was used to generate a plasma pool at strategic locations within the combustor flow field such that the energy from the plasma became an ignition source and helped maintain a flame at ultra lean operating conditions. The periodic plasma generation and decay was used to nullify the fluctuations in the heat release from the flame itself, thus decoupling the heat release from the combustor acoustics and effectively reducing the combustion oscillations. The program was built on an existing technology base and includes: extending LANL's existing laser stabilization experience to a sub

  14. Grid Effects on LES Thermo-Acoustic Limit-Cycle of a Full Annular Aeronautical Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Pierre; Gicquel, Laurent Y. M.; Staffelbach, Gabriel; Poinsot, Thierry

    Recent developments in large scale computer architectures allow Large Eddy Simulation (LES) to be considered for the prediction of turbulent reacting flows in geometries encountered in industry. To do so, various difficulties must be overcome and the first one is to ensure that proper meshes can be used for LES. Indeed, the quality of meshes is known to be a critical factor in LES of reacting flows. This issue becomes even more crucial when LES is used to compute large configurations such as full annular combustion chambers. Various analysis of mesh effects on LES results have been published before but all are limited to single-sector computational domains. However, real annular gas-turbine engines contain ten to twenty of such sectors and LES must also be used in such full chambers for the study of ignition or azimuthal thermo-acoustic interactions. Instabilities (mostly azimuthal modes involving the full annular geometry) remain a critical issue to aeronautical or power-generation industries and LES seems to be a promising path to properly apprehend such complex unsteady couplings. Based on these observations, mesh effects on LES in a full annular gas-turbine combustion chamber (including its casing) is studied here in the context of its azimuthal thermo-acoustic response. To do so, a fully compressible, multi-species reacting LES is used on two meshes yielding two fully unsteady turbulent reacting predictions of the same configuration. The two tetrahedra meshes contain respectively 38 and 93 millions cells. Limit-cycles as obtained by the two LES are gauged against each other for various flow quantities such as mean velocity profiles, flame position and temperature fields. The thermo-acoustic limit-cycles are observed to be relatively indepedent of the grid resolution which comforts the use of LES tools to provide insights and understanding of the mechanisms triggering the coupling between the system acoustic eigenmodes and combustion.

  15. Quantifying Instability Sources in Liquid Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farmer, Richard C.; Cheng, Gary C.

    2000-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics methodology to predict the effects of combusting flows on acoustic pressure oscillations in liquid rocket engines (LREs) is under development. 'Me intent of the investigation is to develop the causal physics of combustion driven acoustic resonances in LREs. The crux of the analysis is the accurate simulation of pressure/density/sound speed in a combustor which when used by the FDNS-RFV CFD code will produce realistic flow phenomena. An analysis of a gas generator considered for the Fastrac engine will be used as a test validation case.

  16. JANNAF 37th Combustion Subcommittee Meeting. Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fry, Ronald S. (Editor); Gannaway, Mary T. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    This volume, the first of two volumes is a compilation of 59 unclassified/unlimited-distribution technical papers presented at the Joint Army-Navy-NASA-Air Force (JANNAF) 37th Combustion Subcommittee (CS) meeting held jointly with the 25th Airbreathing Propulsion Subcommittee (APS), 19th Propulsion Systems Hazards Subcommittee (PSHS), and 1st Modeling and Simulation Subcommittee (MSS) meetings. The meeting was held 13-17 November 2000 at the Naval Postgraduate School and Hyatt Regency Hotel, Monterey, California. Topics covered at the CS meeting include: a keynote address on the Future Combat Systems, and review of a new JANNAF Modeling and Simulation Subcommittee, and technical papers on gun propellant burning rate, gun tube erosion, advanced gun propulsion concepts, ETC guns, novel gun propellants; liquid, hybrid and novel propellant combustion; solid propellant combustion kinetics, GAP, ADN and RDX combustion, sandwich combustion, metal combustion, combustion instability, and motor combustion instability.

  17. Combustion response to compositional fluctuations. [of composite solid propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, N. S.; Strand, L. D.

    1983-01-01

    A mechanism involving compositional fluctuations at certain frequencies is examined by which the heterogeneity of a composite solid propellant may contribute directly to the combustion response function of combustion instability theory. A combustion model appropriate to ammonium perchlorate (AP) is used to derive the combustion response to compositional fluctuations, and the properties of the combustion response are discussed in terms of the theoretical results obtained. The concentration exponent, i.e., the dependence of the burn rate on AP concentration, is found to be a signficant combustion parameter and to have a tremendous range of variability. It is suggested that the combustion response to compositional fluctuations may be a dominating factor in driving combustion instability.

  18. An experimental and theoretical investigation of a fuel system tuner for the suppression of combustion driven oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarborough, David E.

    Manufacturers of commercial, power-generating, gas turbine engines continue to develop combustors that produce lower emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO x) in order to meet the environmental standards of governments around the world. Lean, premixed combustion technology is one technique used to reduce NOx emissions in many current power and energy generating systems. However, lean, premixed combustors are susceptible to thermo-acoustic oscillations, which are pressure and heat-release fluctuations that occur because of a coupling between the combustion process and the natural acoustic modes of the system. These pressure oscillations lead to premature failure of system components, resulting in very costly maintenance and downtime. Therefore, a great deal of work has gone into developing methods to prevent or eliminate these combustion instabilities. This dissertation presents the results of a theoretical and experimental investigation of a novel Fuel System Tuner (FST) used to damp detrimental combustion oscillations in a gas turbine combustor by changing the fuel supply system impedance, which controls the amplitude and phase of the fuel flowrate. When the FST is properly tuned, the heat release oscillations resulting from the fuel-air ratio oscillations damp, rather than drive, the combustor acoustic pressure oscillations. A feasibility study was conducted to prove the validity of the basic idea and to develop some basic guidelines for designing the FST. Acoustic models for the subcomponents of the FST were developed, and these models were experimentally verified using a two-microphone impedance tube. Models useful for designing, analyzing, and predicting the performance of the FST were developed and used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the FST. Experimental tests showed that the FST reduced the acoustic pressure amplitude of an unstable, model, gas-turbine combustor over a wide range of operating conditions and combustor configurations. Finally, combustor

  19. Flameless Combustion for Gas Turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutmark, Ephraim; Li, Guoqiang; Overman, Nick; Cornwell, Michael; Stankovic, Dragan; Fuchs, Laszlo; Milosavljevic, Vladimir

    2006-11-01

    An experimental study of a novel flameless combustor for gas turbine engines is presented. Flameless combustion is characterized by distributed flame and even temperature distribution for high preheat air temperature and large amount of recirculating low oxygen exhaust gases. Extremely low emissions of NOx, CO, and UHC are reported. Measurements of the flame chemiluminescence, CO and NOx emissions, acoustic pressure, temperature and velocity fields as a function of the preheat temperature, inlet air mass flow rate, exhaust nozzle contraction ratio, and combustor chamber diameter are described. The data indicate that larger pressure drop promotes flameless combustion and low NOx emissions at the same flame temperature. High preheated temperature and flow rates also help in forming stable combustion and therefore are favorable for flameless combustion.

  20. Performance through Deformation and Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertoldi, Katia

    2015-03-01

    Materials capable of undergoing large deformations like elastomers and gels are ubiquitous in daily life and nature. An exciting field of engineering is emerging that uses these compliant materials to design active devices, such as actuators, adaptive optical systems and self-regulating fluidics. Compliant structures may significantly change their architecture in response to diverse stimuli. When excessive deformation is applied, they may eventually become unstable. Traditionally, mechanical instabilities have been viewed as an inconvenience, with research focusing on how to avoid them. Here, I will demonstrate that these instabilities can be exploited to design materials with novel, switchable functionalities. The abrupt changes introduced into the architecture of soft materials by instabilities will be used to change their shape in a sudden, but controlled manner. Possible and exciting applications include materials with unusual properties such negative Poisson's ratio, phononic crystals with tunable low-frequency acoustic band gaps and reversible encapsulation systems.

  1. Computational Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Westbrook, C K; Mizobuchi, Y; Poinsot, T J; Smith, P J; Warnatz, J

    2004-08-26

    Progress in the field of computational combustion over the past 50 years is reviewed. Particular attention is given to those classes of models that are common to most system modeling efforts, including fluid dynamics, chemical kinetics, liquid sprays, and turbulent flame models. The developments in combustion modeling are placed into the time-dependent context of the accompanying exponential growth in computer capabilities and Moore's Law. Superimposed on this steady growth, the occasional sudden advances in modeling capabilities are identified and their impacts are discussed. Integration of submodels into system models for spark ignition, diesel and homogeneous charge, compression ignition engines, surface and catalytic combustion, pulse combustion, and detonations are described. Finally, the current state of combustion modeling is illustrated by descriptions of a very large jet lifted 3D turbulent hydrogen flame with direct numerical simulation and 3D large eddy simulations of practical gas burner combustion devices.

  2. Simulating Combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merker, G.; Schwarz, C.; Stiesch, G.; Otto, F.

    The content spans from simple thermodynamics of the combustion engine to complex models for the description of the air/fuel mixture, ignition, combustion and pollutant formation considering the engine periphery of petrol and diesel engines. Thus the emphasis of the book is on the simulation models and how they are applicable for the development of modern combustion engines. Computers can be used as the engineers testbench following the rules and recommendations described here.

  3. Uncertainty Quantification of Non-linear Oscillation Triggering in a Multi-injector Liquid-propellant Rocket Combustion Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Pavel; Sideris, Athanasios; Sirignano, William

    2014-11-01

    We examine the non-linear dynamics of the transverse modes of combustion-driven acoustic instability in a liquid-propellant rocket engine. Triggering can occur, whereby small perturbations from mean conditions decay, while larger disturbances grow to a limit-cycle of amplitude that may compare to the mean pressure. For a deterministic perturbation, the system is also deterministic, computed by coupled finite-volume solvers at low computational cost for a single realization. The randomness of the triggering disturbance is captured by treating the injector flow rates, local pressure disturbances, and sudden acceleration of the entire combustion chamber as random variables. The combustor chamber with its many sub-fields resulting from many injector ports may be viewed as a multi-scale complex system wherein the developing acoustic oscillation is the emergent structure. Numerical simulation of the resulting stochastic PDE system is performed using the polynomial chaos expansion method. The overall probability of unstable growth is assessed in different regions of the parameter space. We address, in particular, the seven-injector, rectangular Purdue University experimental combustion chamber. In addition to the novel geometry, new features include disturbances caused by engine acceleration and unsteady thruster nozzle flow.

  4. Acoustical standards in engineering acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkhard, Mahlon D.

    2001-05-01

    The Engineering Acoustics Technical Committee is concerned with the evolution and improvement of acoustical techniques and apparatus, and with the promotion of new applications of acoustics. As cited in the Membership Directory and Handbook (2002), the interest areas include transducers and arrays; underwater acoustic systems; acoustical instrumentation and monitoring; applied sonics, promotion of useful effects, information gathering and transmission; audio engineering; acoustic holography and acoustic imaging; acoustic signal processing (equipment and techniques); and ultrasound and infrasound. Evident connections between engineering and standards are needs for calibration, consistent terminology, uniform presentation of data, reference levels, or design targets for product development. Thus for the acoustical engineer standards are both a tool for practices, for communication, and for comparison of his efforts with those of others. Development of many standards depends on knowledge of the way products are put together for the market place and acoustical engineers provide important input to the development of standards. Acoustical engineers and members of the Engineering Acoustics arm of the Society both benefit from and contribute to the Acoustical Standards of the Acoustical Society.

  5. Fuel gas combustion research at METC

    SciTech Connect

    Norton, T.S.

    1995-06-01

    The in-house combustion research program at METC is an integral part of many METC activities, providing support to METC product teams, project managers, and external industrial and university partners. While the majority of in-house combustion research in recent years has been focussed on the lean premixed combustion of natural gas fuel for Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) applications, increasing emphasis is being placed on issues of syngas combustion, as the time approaches when the ATS and coal-fired power systems programs will reach convergence. When the METC syngas generator is built in 1996, METC will have the unique combination of mid-scale pressurized experimental facilities, a continuous syngas supply with variable ammonia loading, and a team of people with expertise in low-emissions combustion, chemical kinetics, combustion modeling, combustion diagnostics, and the control of combustion instabilities. These will enable us to investigate such issues as the effects of pressure, temperature, and fuel gas composition on the rate of conversion of fuel nitrogen to NOx, and on combustion instabilities in a variety of combustor designs.

  6. Microgravity combustion of dust suspensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, John H. S.; Peraldi, Olivier; Knystautas, Rom

    1993-01-01

    Unlike the combustion of homogeneous gas mixtures, there are practically no reliable fundamental data (i.e., laminar burning velocity, flammability limits, quenching distance, minimum ignition energy) for the combustion of heterogeneous dust suspensions. Even the equilibrium thermodynamic data such as the constant pressure volume combustion pressure and the constant pressure adiabatic flame temperature are not accurately known for dust mixtures. This is mainly due to the problem of gravity sedimentation. In normal gravity, turbulence, convective flow, electric and acoustic fields are required to maintain a dust in suspension. These external influences have a dominating effect on the combustion processes. Microgravity offers a unique environment where a quiescent dust cloud can in principle be maintained for a sufficiently long duration for almost all combustion experiments (dust suspensions are inherently unstable due to Brownian motion and particle aggregation). Thus, the microgravity duration provided by drop towers, parabolic flights, and the space shuttle, can all be exploited for different kinds of dust combustion experiments. The present paper describes some recent studies on microgravity combustion of dust suspension carried out on the KC-135 and the Caravelle aircraft. The results reported are obtained from three parabolic flight campaigns.

  7. Some aspects of the comparison between optics and nonlinear acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perrin, B.

    1980-01-01

    Some results concerning nonlinear acoustics deduced from a comparison of nonlinear processes in optics and acoustics are discussed. An aspect of nonlinearity in acoustics connected with the dimensionality of the medium of propagation is emphasized and illustrated by the proof of static instability of an ideal linear solid. In addition a phenomenon, which can be called acoustical rectification by analogy with nonlinear optics, is propounded to measure the third order elastic constants. Its experimental consequences are predicted in a particular case.

  8. Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    An acoustic neuroma is a benign tumor that develops on the nerve that connects the ear to the brain. The tumor ... press against the brain, becoming life-threatening. Acoustic neuroma can be difficult to diagnose, because the symptoms ...

  9. Adjoint sensitivity analysis of thermoacoustic instability in a nonlinear Helmholtz solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juniper, Matthew; Magri, Luca

    2014-11-01

    Thermoacoustic instability is a persistent problem in aircraft and rocket engines. It occurs when heat release in the combustion chamber synchronizes with acoustic oscillations. It is always noisy and can sometimes result in catastrophic failure of the engine. Typically, the heat release from the flame is assumed to equal the acoustic velocity at a reference point multiplied by a spatially-varying function (the flame envelope) subject to a spatially-varying time delay. This models hydrodynamic perturbations convecting down the flame causing subsequent heat release perturbations. This creates an eigenvalue problem that is linear in the acoustic pressure but nonlinear in the complex frequency, omega. This can be solved as a sequence of linear eigenvalue problems in which the operators are updated with a new value of omega after each iteration. Adjoint methods find the sensitivity of each eigenmode to all the parameters simultaneously and are well suited to thermoacoustic problems because there are a few interesting eigenmodes but many influential parameters. The challenge here is to express the sensitivity of the eigenvalue at the final iteration to an arbitrary change in the parameters of the first iteration. This is a promising new technique for the control of thermoacoustics. European Research Council Grant Number 2590620.

  10. Radiative heat transport instability in a laser produced inhomogeneous plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Bychenkov, V. Yu.; Rozmus, W.

    2015-08-15

    A laser produced high-Z plasma in which an energy balance is achieved due to radiation emission and radiative heat transfer supports ion acoustic instability. A linear dispersion relation is derived, and instability is compared to the radiation cooling instability [R. G. Evans, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 27, 751 (1985)]. Under conditions of indirect drive fusion experiments, the driving term for the instability is the radiative heat flux and, in particular, the density dependence of the radiative heat conductivity. A specific example of thermal Bremsstrahlung radiation source has been considered. This instability may lead to plasma jet formation and anisotropic x-ray generation, thus affecting inertial confinement fusion related experiments.

  11. The booming dune instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreotti, B.; Bonneau, L.

    2009-12-01

    Sand avalanches flowing down the leeward face of some desert dunes spontaneously produce a loud sound with a characteristic vibrato around a well defined frequency, a phenomenon called the "song of dunes". Here, we show theoretically that an homogenous granular surface flow is linearly unstable towards growing elastic waves when a localized shear band form at the interface between the avalanche and the static part of the dune. We unravel the nature of the acoustic amplifying mechanism at the origin of this booming instability. The dispersion relation and the shape of the most unstable modes are computed and compared to field records performed in the Atlantic Sahara. We finally show that several characteristics predicted by the model and observed in the field allow to dismiss former hypothesis based on resonances or the synchronisation of sand grain collisions.

  12. Radiative heat transport instability in ICF plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozmus, W.; Bychenkov, V. Yu.

    2015-11-01

    A laser produced high-Z plasma in which an energy balance is achieved due to radiation losses and radiative heat transfer supports ion acoustic wave instability. A linear dispersion relation is derived and instability is compared to the radiation cooling instability. This instability develops in the wide range of angles and wavenumbers with the typical growth rate on the order of cs/LT (cs is the sound speed, LT is the temperature scale length). In addition to radiation dominated systems, a similar thermal transport driven ion acoustic instability was found before in plasmas where the thermal transport coefficient depends on electron density. However, under conditions of indirect drive ICF experiments the driving term for the instability is the radiative heat flux and in particular, the density dependence of the radiative heat conductivity. A specific example of thermal Bremsstrahlung radiation source has been considered corresponding to a thermal conductivity coefficient that is inversely proportional to the square of local particle density. In the nonlinear regime this instability may lead to plasma jet formation and anisotropic x-ray generation.

  13. Acoustic Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention relates to a sealing device having an acoustic resonator. The acoustic resonator is adapted to create acoustic waveforms to generate a sealing pressure barrier blocking fluid flow from a high pressure area to a lower pressure area. The sealing device permits noncontacting sealing operation. The sealing device may include a resonant-macrosonic-synthesis (RMS) resonator.

  14. Acoustic seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention relates to a sealing device having an acoustic resonator. The acoustic resonator is adapted to create acoustic waveforms to generate a sealing pressure barrier blocking fluid flow from a high pressure area to a lower pressure area. The sealing device permits noncontacting sealing operation. The sealing device may include a resonant-macrosonic-synthesis (RMS) resonator.

  15. Modeling and simulation of combustion dynamics in lean-premixed swirl-stabilized gas-turbine engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ying

    state to an unstable state indicates that the inlet flow temperature and equivalence ratio are the two most important variables determining the stability characteristics of the combustor. Under unstable operating conditions, several physical processes responsible for driving combustion instabilities in the chamber have been identified and quantified. These processes include vortex shedding and acoustic interaction, coupling between the flame evolution and local flow oscillations, vortex and flame interaction and coupling between heat release and acoustic motions. The effects of inlet swirl number on the flow development and flame dynamics in the chamber are also carefully studied. In the last part of this thesis, an analytical model is developed using triple decomposition techniques to model the combustion response of turbulent premixed flames to acoustic oscillations.

  16. Use of filtered combustion light and backlit high-speed images in combustion stability studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomeroy, B.; Wierman, M.; Anderson, W. E.

    2013-03-01

    The measurement of the heat release is a key part of characterizing the combustion instability, but it is extremely difficult to directly measure in a rocket combustion chamber due to high temperatures and pressures, as well as the complexity of the turbulent reacting flowfield, which can often have more than one phase. Measuring the light emission from excited species during a combustion is a nonintrusive method to approximate a global heat release in combustion chambers. CH∗ and OH∗ are the most often measured species. This paper outlines methods of using a filtered combustion light to obtain a better understanding of the physical mechanisms active in the combustion instability, and to provide partial validation data for predictive models of the combustion instability. Methods that are discussed include Rayleigh index, phase-angle plots, a proper orthogonal decomposition (POD), and a simultaneous imaging of combustion light and backlit flow structures. The methods are applied to an experiment that studies the effects of imposed transverse oscillations on a gas-centered, swirl-coaxial injector element.

  17. Lagrangian Model of Bluffbody-Stabilized Premixed Combustion for Flow Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soteriou, Marios; Prashant, Mehta

    2002-11-01

    Thermoacoustic instabilities develop in various power generation devices such as gas turbines and rockets when acoustic modes couple with unsteady heat release in a positive feedback loop. Active control of these instabilities requires an in depth understanding of the reacting flow physics. Moreover, proposed control algorithms need to be tested in a dynamic and realistic modeling environment prior to implementation in an engineering device. These issues necessitate the development of physics-based models that inexpensively capture the flow dynamics. In this work, we present such a model for the case of flameholder stabilized premixed combustion. Computational savings are achieved by restricting the model to two spatial dimensions and by seeking solutions of the governing equations in the Lagrangian frame of reference. Specifically, a compressible form of the Vortex Element Method is coupled to a G-equation based flame-sheet representation of the reacting field. Model results are compared to experimental evidence. It is shown that the model reproduces the shift from asymmetric to symmetric vortex shedding witnessed when combustion exothermicity is present. Mean velocity profiles and shedding frequency spectra provide further evidence of the ability of the model to capture the physics of the flameholder wake.

  18. Two-Fluid Interface Instability Being Studied

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niederhaus, Charles E.

    2003-01-01

    The interface between two fluids of different density can experience instability when gravity acts normal to the surface. The relatively well known Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability results when the gravity is constant with a heavy fluid over a light fluid. An impulsive acceleration applied to the fluids results in the Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instability. The RM instability occurs regardless of the relative orientation of the heavy and light fluids. In many systems, the passing of a shock wave through the interface provides the impulsive acceleration. Both the RT and RM instabilities result in mixing at the interface. These instabilities arise in a diverse array of circumstances, including supernovas, oceans, supersonic combustion, and inertial confinement fusion (ICF). The area with the greatest current interest in RT and RM instabilities is ICF, which is an attempt to produce fusion energy for nuclear reactors from BB-sized pellets of deuterium and tritium. In the ICF experiments conducted so far, RM and RT instabilities have prevented the generation of net-positive energy. The $4 billion National Ignition Facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is being constructed to study these instabilities and to attempt to achieve net-positive yield in an ICF experiment.

  19. [Carpal instability].

    PubMed

    Redeker, J; Vogt, P M

    2011-01-01

    Carpal instability can be understood as a disturbed anatomical alignment between bones articulating in the carpus. This disturbed balance occurs either only dynamically (with movement) under the effect of physiological force or even statically at rest. The most common cause of carpal instability is wrist trauma with rupture of the stabilizing ligaments and adaptive misalignment following fractures of the radius or carpus. Carpal collapse plays a special role in this mechanism due to non-healed fracture of the scaphoid bone. In addition degenerative inflammatory alterations, such as chondrocalcinosis or gout, more rarely aseptic bone necrosis of the lunate or scaphoid bones or misalignment due to deposition (Madelung deformity) can lead to wrist instability. Under increased pressure the misaligned joint surfaces lead to bone arrosion with secondary arthritis of the wrist. In order to arrest or slow down this irreversible process, diagnosis must occur as early as possible. Many surgical methods have been thought out to regain stability ranging from direct reconstruction of the damaged ligaments, through ligament replacement to partial stiffening of the wrist joint.

  20. Advances in Turbulent Combustion Dynamics Simulations in Bluff-Body Stabilized Flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tovar, Jonathan Michael

    This work examines the three main aspects of bluff-body stabilized flames: stationary combustion, lean blow-out, and thermo-acoustic instabilities. For the cases of stationary combustion and lean blow-out, an improved version of the Linear Eddy Model approach is used, while in the case of thermo-acoustic instabilities, the effect of boundary conditions on the predictions are studied. The improved version couples the Linear Eddy Model with the full-set of resolved scale Large Eddy Simulation equations for continuity, momentum, energy, and species transport. In traditional implementations the species equations are generally solved using a Lagrangian method which has some significant limitations. The novelty in this work is that the Eulerian species concentration equations are solved at the resolved scale and the Linear Eddy Model is strictly used to close the species production term. In this work, the improved Linear Eddy Model approach is applied to predict the flame properties inside the Volvo rig and it is shown to over-predict the flame temperature and normalized velocity when compared to experimental data using a premixed single step global propane reaction with an equivalence ratio of 0.65. The model is also applied to predict lean blow-out and is shown to predict a stable flame at an equivalence ratio of 0.5 when experiments achieve flame extinction at an equivalence ratio of 0.55. The improved Linear Eddy Model is, however, shown to be closer to experimental data than a comparable reactive flow simulation that uses laminar closure of the species source terms. The thermo-acoustic analysis is performed on a combustor rig designed at the Air Force Research Laboratory. The analysis is performed using a premixed single step global methane reaction for laminar reactive flow and shows that imposing a non-physical boundary condition at the rig exhaust will result in the suppression of acoustic content inside the domain and can alter the temperature contours in non

  1. Investigation of combustion control in a dump combustor using the feedback free fluidic oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, Eric J.

    The feedback free fluidic oscillator uses the unsteady nature of two colliding jets to create a single oscillating outlet jet with a wide sweep angle. These devices have the potential to provide additional combustion control, boundary layer control, thrust vectoring, and industrial flow deflection. Two-dimensional computational fluid dynamics, CFD, was used to analyze the jet oscillation frequency over a range of operating conditions and to determine the effect that geometric changes in the oscillator design have on the frequency. Results presented illustrate the changes in jet oscillation frequency with gas type, gas temperature, operating pressure, pressure ratio across the oscillator, aspect ratio of the oscillator, and the frequency trends with various changes to the oscillator geometry. A fluidic oscillator was designed and integrated into single element rocket combustor with the goal of suppressing longitudinal combustion instabilities. An array of nine fluidic oscillators was tested to mimic modulated secondary oxidizer injection into the dump plane using 15% of the oxidizer flow. The combustor has a coaxial injector that uses gaseous methane and decomposed hydrogen peroxide at an O/F of 11.66. A sonic choke plate on an actuator arm allows for continuous adjustment of the oxidizer post acoustics for studying a variety of instability magnitudes. The fluidic oscillator unsteady outlet jet performance is compared with equivalent steady jet injection and a baseline design with no secondary oxidizer injection. At the most unstable operating conditions, the unsteady outlet jet saw a 60% reduction in the instability pressure oscillation magnitude when compared to the steady jet and baseline data. The results indicate open loop propellant modulation for combustion control can be achieved through fluidic devices that require no moving parts or electrical power to operate. Three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics, 3-D CFD, was conducted to determine the

  2. Simulation and modeling of an acoustically forced model rocket injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gers, David Michael

    A numerical and experimental study was performed to assess the capability of the Loci-CHEM CFD solver in simulating dynamic interaction between hydrogen-oxygen turbulent diffusion flames and periodic pressure waves. Previous experimental studies involving a single-element shear-coaxial model injector revealed an unusual flame-acoustic interaction mechanism affecting combustion instability characteristics. To directly compare the simulation and experiments, various models in the present solver were examined and additional experiments conducted. A customized mesh and corresponding boundary conditions were designed and developed, closely approximating the experimental setup. Full 3-D simulations were conducted using a hybrid RANS/LES framework with appropriate chemistry and turbulence models. The results were compared for both reacting and non-reacting flows that were excited at various forcing frequencies representing both resonant and non-resonant behaviors. Although a good qualitative agreement was obtained for the most part, there was a significant discrepancy in simulating the flame-acoustic interaction behavior observed under non-resonant forcing conditions.

  3. Large eddy simulation of a lean premixed swirl flame in complex geometry - comparison of two turbulent combustion models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, P.; Fröhlich, J.; Maas, U.

    Lean premixed combustion is employed to reduce emission, but can exhibit undesired effects such as lean blow-off and thermo-acoustic resonance. To cope with these, burners with strong swirl are utilized for flame stabilization. In the resulting complex flow system, flow instabilities are observed in both experiments and simulations. To date, large eddy simulation (LES) is becoming a widely used approach for understanding the properties of turbulent flow phenomena. However, LES of lean premixed combustion still constitutes an open challenge. Many turbulent combustion modeling methods have been developed for LES of such flows [1, 2]. Two types of them are the thickened flame (TF) model [3] and the flame surface density (FSD) model [4]. However, none of these models is ideal and suitable for all kinds of flame configurations. A detailed comparison was made between the TF and FSD by Lin et al. [5] for freely propagating premixed flames in homogeneous isotropic decaying turbulent fields, and qualitative agreement between them was found. In the present work, the performances of the two cited turbulent combustion models, TF and FSD, in simulating the lean premixed swirl flames in an industrial gas trubine model combustor is compared against the well-documented experiment data obtained by Meier et al. [6].

  4. LES SOFTWARE FOR THE DESIGN OF LOW EMISSION COMBUSTION SYSTEMS FOR VISION 21 PLANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Clifford E. Smith; Steven M. Cannon; Virgil Adumitroaie; David L. Black; Karl V. Meredith

    2005-01-01

    In this project, an advanced computational software tool was developed for the design of low emission combustion systems required for Vision 21 clean energy plants. Vision 21 combustion systems, such as combustors for gas turbines, combustors for indirect fired cycles, furnaces and sequestrian-ready combustion systems, will require innovative low emission designs and low development costs if Vision 21 goals are to be realized. The simulation tool will greatly reduce the number of experimental tests; this is especially desirable for gas turbine combustor design since the cost of the high pressure testing is extremely costly. In addition, the software will stimulate new ideas, will provide the capability of assessing and adapting low-emission combustors to alternate fuels, and will greatly reduce the development time cycle of combustion systems. The revolutionary combustion simulation software is able to accurately simulate the highly transient nature of gaseous-fueled (e.g. natural gas, low BTU syngas, hydrogen, biogas etc.) turbulent combustion and assess innovative concepts needed for Vision 21 plants. In addition, the software is capable of analyzing liquid-fueled combustion systems since that capability was developed under a concurrent Air Force Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) program. The complex physics of the reacting flow field are captured using 3D Large Eddy Simulation (LES) methods, in which large scale transient motion is resolved by time-accurate numerics, while the small scale motion is modeled using advanced subgrid turbulence and chemistry closures. In this way, LES combustion simulations can model many physical aspects that, until now, were impossible to predict with 3D steady-state Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) analysis, i.e. very low NOx emissions, combustion instability (coupling of unsteady heat and acoustics), lean blowout, flashback, autoignition, etc. LES methods are becoming more and more practical by linking together tens

  5. Effect of Fuel Composition on the Response of an Acoustically Forced Flat Flame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorski, Jan

    Interest in alternative fuels for power generation is growing, yet these fuels bring new challenges to gas turbine design and operation. Among these challenges are combustor operability issues, highlighted by problems with combustion instabilities. For this thesis, a fundamental study of the effects of fuel composition on combustion dynamics was undertaken. An acoustically forced flat flame burner was constructed, allowing measurement of the flame transfer function (FTF) relating acoustic perturbations to heat release rate fluctuations in the flame. Tests were done using methane, along with simulated syngas and biogas fuel mixtures over a variety of operating conditions. Large variations in methane concentration had a significant impact on the FTF, while variations in the hydrogen to carbon monoxide ratio did not impact the FTF in fuel mixtures of equal parts methane and syngas. The Strouhal number was found to be an important parameter in predicting phase response independent of the fuel type. Flame liftoff distance and fuel composition were the key parameters determining the peak FTF magnitude. A hypothesis on the role of the non-adiabatic nature of the flat flame and thermal-diffusive effects on the trends in peak FTF magnitude is presented and discussed.

  6. Novel Active Combustion Control Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caspermeyer, Matt

    2014-01-01

    This project presents an innovative solution for active combustion control. Relative to the state of the art, this concept provides frequency modulation (greater than 1,000 Hz) in combination with high-amplitude modulation (in excess of 30 percent flow) and can be adapted to a large range of fuel injector sizes. Existing valves often have low flow modulation strength. To achieve higher flow modulation requires excessively large valves or too much electrical power to be practical. This active combustion control valve (ACCV) has high-frequency and -amplitude modulation, consumes low electrical power, is closely coupled with the fuel injector for modulation strength, and is practical in size and weight. By mitigating combustion instabilities at higher frequencies than have been previously achieved (approximately 1,000 Hz), this new technology enables gas turbines to run at operating points that produce lower emissions and higher performance.

  7. Topological Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhaoju; Gao, Fei; Shi, Xihang; Lin, Xiao; Gao, Zhen; Chong, Yidong; Zhang, Baile

    2015-03-01

    The manipulation of acoustic wave propagation in fluids has numerous applications, including some in everyday life. Acoustic technologies frequently develop in tandem with optics, using shared concepts such as waveguiding and metamedia. It is thus noteworthy that an entirely novel class of electromagnetic waves, known as "topological edge states," has recently been demonstrated. These are inspired by the electronic edge states occurring in topological insulators, and possess a striking and technologically promising property: the ability to travel in a single direction along a surface without backscattering, regardless of the existence of defects or disorder. Here, we develop an analogous theory of topological fluid acoustics, and propose a scheme for realizing topological edge states in an acoustic structure containing circulating fluids. The phenomenon of disorder-free one-way sound propagation, which does not occur in ordinary acoustic devices, may have novel applications for acoustic isolators, modulators, and transducers.

  8. Topological acoustics.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhaoju; Gao, Fei; Shi, Xihang; Lin, Xiao; Gao, Zhen; Chong, Yidong; Zhang, Baile

    2015-03-20

    The manipulation of acoustic wave propagation in fluids has numerous applications, including some in everyday life. Acoustic technologies frequently develop in tandem with optics, using shared concepts such as waveguiding and metamedia. It is thus noteworthy that an entirely novel class of electromagnetic waves, known as "topological edge states," has recently been demonstrated. These are inspired by the electronic edge states occurring in topological insulators, and possess a striking and technologically promising property: the ability to travel in a single direction along a surface without backscattering, regardless of the existence of defects or disorder. Here, we develop an analogous theory of topological fluid acoustics, and propose a scheme for realizing topological edge states in an acoustic structure containing circulating fluids. The phenomenon of disorder-free one-way sound propagation, which does not occur in ordinary acoustic devices, may have novel applications for acoustic isolators, modulators, and transducers.

  9. Free-radicals aided combustion with scramjet applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Yongsheng; Kumar, Ramohalli

    1992-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental investigations aimed at altering 'nature-prescribed' combustion rates in hydrogen/hydrocarbon reactions with (enriched) air are presented. The intent is to anchor flame zones in supersonic streams, and to ensure proper and controllable complete combustion in scramjets. The diagnostics are nonintrusive through IR thermograms and acoustic emissions in the control and free-radicals altered flame zones.

  10. Active Combustion Control for Aircraft Gas Turbine Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLaat, John C.; Breisacher, Kevin J.; Saus, Joseph R.; Paxson, Daniel E.

    2000-01-01

    Lean-burning combustors are susceptible to combustion instabilities. Additionally, due to non-uniformities in the fuel-air mixing and in the combustion process, there typically exist hot areas in the combustor exit plane. These hot areas limit the operating temperature at the turbine inlet and thus constrain performance and efficiency. Finally, it is necessary to optimize the fuel-air ratio and flame temperature throughout the combustor to minimize the production of pollutants. In recent years, there has been considerable activity addressing Active Combustion Control. NASA Glenn Research Center's Active Combustion Control Technology effort aims to demonstrate active control in a realistic environment relevant to aircraft engines. Analysis and experiments are tied to aircraft gas turbine combustors. Considerable progress has been shown in demonstrating technologies for Combustion Instability Control, Pattern Factor Control, and Emissions Minimizing Control. Future plans are to advance the maturity of active combustion control technology to eventual demonstration in an engine environment.

  11. JANNAF 35th Combustion Subcommittee Meeting. Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fry, Ronald S. (Editor); Gannaway, Mary T. (Editor); Rognan, Melanie (Editor)

    1998-01-01

    Volume 1, the first of two volumes is a compilation of 63 unclassified/unlimited distribution technical papers presented at the 35th meeting of the Joint Army-Navy-NASA-Air Force (JANNAF) Combustion Subcommittee (CS) held jointly with the 17th Propulsion Systems Hazards Subcommittee (PSHS) and Airbreathing Propulsion Subcommittee (APS). The meeting was held on 7-11 December 1998 at Raytheon Systems Company and the Marriott Hotel, Tucson, AZ. Topics covered include solid gun propellant processing, ignition and combustion, charge concepts, barrel erosion and flash, gun interior ballistics, kinetics and molecular modeling, ETC gun modeling, simulation and diagnostics, and liquid gun propellant combustion; solid rocket motor propellant combustion, combustion instability fundamentals, motor instability, and measurement techniques; and liquid and hybrid rocket combustion.

  12. JANNAF 36th Combustion Subcommittee Meeting. Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fry, Ronald S. (Editor); Gannaway, Mary T. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    Volume 1, the first of three volumes is a compilation of 47 unclassified/unlimited-distribution technical papers presented at the Joint Army-Navy-NASA-Air Force (JANNAF) 36th Combustion Subcommittee held jointly with the 24th Airbreathing Propulsion Subcommittee and 18th Propulsion Systems Hazards Subcommittee. The meeting was held on 18-21 October 1999 at NASA Kennedy Space Center and The DoubleTree Oceanfront Hotel, Cocoa Beach, Florida. Solid phase propellant combustion topics covered in this volume include cookoff phenomena in the pre- and post-ignition phases, solid rocket motor and gun propellant combustion, aluminized composite propellant combustion, combustion modeling and combustion instability and instability measurement techniques.

  13. The Fluids and Combustion Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kundu, Sampa

    2004-01-01

    Microgravity is an environment with very weak gravitational effects. The Fluids and Combustion Facility (FCF) on the International Space Station (ISS) will support the study of fluid physics and combustion science in a long-duration microgravity environment. The Fluid Combustion Facility's design will permit both independent and remote control operations from the Telescience Support Center. The crew of the International Space Station will continue to insert and remove the experiment module, store and reload removable data storage and media data tapes, and reconfigure diagnostics on either side of the optics benches. Upon completion of the Fluids Combustion Facility, about ten experiments will be conducted within a ten-year period. Several different areas of fluid physics will be studied in the Fluids Combustion Facility. These areas include complex fluids, interfacial phenomena, dynamics and instabilities, and multiphase flows and phase change. Recently, emphasis has been placed in areas that relate directly to NASA missions including life support, power, propulsion, and thermal control systems. By 2006 or 2007, a Fluids Integrated Rack (FIR) and a Combustion Integrated Rack (CIR) will be installed inside the International Space Station. The Fluids Integrated Rack will contain all the hardware and software necessary to perform experiments in fluid physics. A wide range of experiments that meet the requirements of the international space station, including research from other specialties, will be considered. Experiments will be contained in subsystems such as the international standard payload rack, the active rack isolation system, the optics bench, environmental subsystem, electrical power control unit, the gas interface subsystem, and the command and data management subsystem. In conclusion, the Fluids and Combustion Facility will allow researchers to study fluid physics and combustion science in a long-duration microgravity environment. Additional information is

  14. Acoustical Detection Of Leakage In A Combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puster, Richard L.; Petty, Jeffrey L.

    1993-01-01

    Abnormal combustion excites characteristic standing wave. Acoustical leak-detection system gives early warning of failure, enabling operating personnel to stop combustion process and repair spray bar before leak grows large enough to cause damage. Applicable to engines, gas turbines, furnaces, and other machines in which acoustic emissions at known frequencies signify onset of damage. Bearings in rotating machines monitored for emergence of characteristic frequencies shown in previous tests associated with incipient failure. Also possible to monitor for signs of trouble at multiple frequencies by feeding output of transducer simultaneously to multiple band-pass filters and associated circuitry, including separate trigger circuit set to appropriate level for each frequency.

  15. Active shear flow control for improved combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutmark, E.; Parr, T. P.; Hanson-Parr, D. M.; Schadow, K. C.

    1990-01-01

    The acoustical and fluid dynamic facets of an excited premixed flame were studied experimentally to evaluate possibilities for development of a stabilizing closed-loop control system. The flame was analyzed as a nonlinear system which includes different subcomponents: acoustics, fluid dynamics, and chemical reaction. Identification of the acoustical and fluid dynamics subsystems is done by analyzing the transfer function, which was obtained by driving the system with both white-noise and a frequency-sweeping sine-wave. The features obtained by this analysis are compared to results of flow visualization and hot-wire flow-field and spectral measurements. The acoustical subsystem is determined by the resonant acoustic modes of the settling chamber. These modes are subsequently filtered and amplified by the flow shear layer, whose instability characteristics are dominated by the preferred mode frequency.

  16. Influence of ion streaming instabilities on transport near plasma boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baalrud, Scott D.

    2016-04-01

    Plasma boundary layers are susceptible to electrostatic instabilities driven by ion flows in presheaths and, when present, these instabilities can influence transport. In plasmas with a single species of positive ion, ion-acoustic instabilities are expected under conditions of low pressure and large electron-to-ion temperature ratio ({{T}e}/{{T}i}\\gg 1 ). In plasmas with two species of positive ions, ion-ion two-stream instabilities can also be excited. The stability phase-space is characterized using the Penrose criterion and approximate linear dispersion relations. Predictions for how these instabilities affect ion and electron transport in presheaths, including rapid thermalization due to instability-enhanced collisions and an instability-enhanced ion-ion friction force, are briefly reviewed. Recent experimental tests of these predictions are discussed along with research needs required for further validation. The calculated stability boundaries provide a guide to determine the experimental conditions at which these effects can be expected.

  17. Reynolds number effects in combustion noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seshan, P. K.

    1981-01-01

    Acoustic emission spectra have been obtained for non-premixed turbulent combustion from two small diameter laboratory gas burners, two commercial gas burners and a large gas burner in the firebox of a Babcock-Wilcox Boiler (50,000 lb steam/hr). The changes in burner size and firing rate represent changes in Reynolds number and changes in air/fuel ratio represent departure from stoichiometric proportions. The combustion efficiency was measured independently through gas analysis. The acoustic spectra obtained from the various burners exhibit a persistent shape over the Reynolds number range of 8200-82,000. The spectra were analyzed for identification of a predictable frequency domain that is most responsive to, and readily correlated with, combustion efficiency. A simple parameter (consisting of the ratio of the average acoustic power output in the most responsive frequency bandwidth to the acoustic power level of the loudest frequency) is proposed whose value increases significantly and unmistakably as combustion efficiency approaches 100%. The dependence of the most responsive frequency domain on the various Reynolds numbers associated with turbulent jets is discussed.

  18. Coupling between hydrodynamics, acoustics, and heat release in a self-excited unstable combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvazinski, Matthew E.; Huang, Cheng; Sankaran, Venkateswaran; Feldman, Thomas W.; Anderson, William E.; Merkle, Charles L.; Talley, Douglas G.

    2015-04-01

    The unsteady gas dynamic field in a closed combustor is determined by the nonlinear interactions between chamber acoustics, hydrodynamics, and turbulent combustion that can energize these modes. These interactions are studied in detail using hybrid RANS/large eddy simulations (RANS = Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes) of a non-premixed, high-pressure laboratory combustor that produces self-excited longitudinal instabilities. The main variable in the study is the relative acoustic length between the combustion chamber and the tube that injects oxidizer into the combustor. Assuming a half-wave (closed-closed) combustion chamber, the tube lengths approximately correspond to quarter-, 3/8-, and half-wave resonators that serve to vary the phasing between the acoustic modes in the tube and the combustion chamber. The simulation correctly predicts the relatively stable behavior measured with the shortest tube and the very unstable behavior measured with the intermediate tube. Unstable behavior is also predicted for the longest tube, a case for which bifurcated stability behavior was measured in the experiment. In the first (stable) configuration, fuel flows into the combustor uninterrupted, and heat release is spatially continuous with a flame that remains attached to the back step. In the second (unstable) configuration, a cyclic process is apparent comprising a disruption in the fuel flow, subsequent detachment of the flame from the back step, and accumulation of fuel in the recirculation zone that ignites upon arrival of a compression wave reflected from the downstream boundary of the combustion chamber. The third case (mixed stable/unstable) shares features with both of the other cases. The major difference between the two cases predicted to be unstable is that, in the intermediate length tube, a pressure wave reflection inside the tube pushes unburnt fuel behind the back step radially outward, leading to a post-coupled reignition mechanism, while in the case of the

  19. A comparative study of sound generation by laminar, combusting and non-combusting jet flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talei, Mohsen; Brear, Michael J.; Hawkes, Evatt R.

    2014-08-01

    Sound production by two-dimensional, laminar jet flows with and without combustion is studied numerically and theoretically. The compressible Navier-Stokes, energy and progress variable equations are solved by resolving both the near field and the acoustics. The combusting jet flows are compared to non-combusting jets of the same jet Mach number, with the non-combusting, non-isothermal jets having the same steady temperature difference as the combusting jets. This infers that the magnitude of entropic and density disturbances is similar in some of the combusting and non-combusting cases. The flows are perturbed by a sinusoidal inlet velocity fluctuation at different Strouhal numbers. The computational domain is resolved to the far field in all cases, allowing direct examination of the sound radiated and its sources. Lighthill's acoustic analogy is then solved numerically using Green's functions. The radiated sound calculated using Lighthill's equation is in good agreement with that from the simulations for all cases, validating the numerical solution of Lighthill's equation. The contribution of the source terms in Dowling's reformulation of Lighthill's equation is then investigated. It is shown that the source term relating to changes in the momentum of density inhomogeneities is the dominant source term for all non-reacting, non-isothermal cases. Further, this source term has similar magnitude in the combusting cases and is one of the several source terms that have similar magnitude to the source term involving fluctuations in the heat release rate.

  20. Musical Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gough, Colin

    This chapter provides an introduction to the physical and psycho-acoustic principles underlying the production and perception of the sounds of musical instruments. The first section introduces generic aspects of musical acoustics and the perception of musical sounds, followed by separate sections on string, wind and percussion instruments.

  1. Biofuels combustion.

    PubMed

    Westbrook, Charles K

    2013-01-01

    This review describes major features of current research in renewable fuels derived from plants and from fatty acids. Recent and ongoing fundamental studies of biofuel molecular structure, oxidation reactions, and biofuel chemical properties are reviewed, in addition to combustion applications of biofuels in the major types of engines in which biofuels are used. Biofuels and their combustion are compared with combustion features of conventional petroleum-based fuels. Two main classes of biofuels are described, those consisting of small, primarily alcohol, fuels (particularly ethanol, n-butanol, and iso-pentanol) that are used primarily to replace or supplement gasoline and those derived from fatty acids and used primarily to replace or supplement conventional diesel fuels. Research efforts on so-called second- and third-generation biofuels are discussed briefly.

  2. Biofuels combustion*

    DOE PAGES

    Westbrook, Charles K.

    2013-01-04

    This review describes major features of current research in renewable fuels derived from plants and from fatty acids. Recent and ongoing fundamental studies of biofuel molecular structure, oxidation reactions, and biofuel chemical properties are reviewed, in addition to combustion applications of biofuels in the major types of engines in which biofuels are used. Biofuels and their combustion are compared with combustion features of conventional petroleum-based fuels. Two main classes of biofuels are described, those consisting of small, primarily alcohol, fuels (particularly ethanol, n-butanol, and iso-pentanol) that are used primarily to replace or supplement gasoline and those derived from fatty acidsmore » and used primarily to replace or supplement conventional diesel fuels. As a result, research efforts on so-called second- and third-generation biofuels are discussed briefly.« less

  3. Biofuels combustion*

    SciTech Connect

    Westbrook, Charles K.

    2013-01-04

    This review describes major features of current research in renewable fuels derived from plants and from fatty acids. Recent and ongoing fundamental studies of biofuel molecular structure, oxidation reactions, and biofuel chemical properties are reviewed, in addition to combustion applications of biofuels in the major types of engines in which biofuels are used. Biofuels and their combustion are compared with combustion features of conventional petroleum-based fuels. Two main classes of biofuels are described, those consisting of small, primarily alcohol, fuels (particularly ethanol, n-butanol, and iso-pentanol) that are used primarily to replace or supplement gasoline and those derived from fatty acids and used primarily to replace or supplement conventional diesel fuels. As a result, research efforts on so-called second- and third-generation biofuels are discussed briefly.

  4. Biofuels Combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westbrook, Charles K.

    2013-04-01

    This review describes major features of current research in renewable fuels derived from plants and from fatty acids. Recent and ongoing fundamental studies of biofuel molecular structure, oxidation reactions, and biofuel chemical properties are reviewed, in addition to combustion applications of biofuels in the major types of engines in which biofuels are used. Biofuels and their combustion are compared with combustion features of conventional petroleum-based fuels. Two main classes of biofuels are described, those consisting of small, primarily alcohol, fuels (particularly ethanol, n-butanol, and iso-pentanol) that are used primarily to replace or supplement gasoline and those derived from fatty acids and used primarily to replace or supplement conventional diesel fuels. Research efforts on so-called second- and third-generation biofuels are discussed briefly.

  5. Acoustic metafluids.

    PubMed

    Norris, Andrew N

    2009-02-01

    Acoustic metafluids are defined as the class of fluids that allow one domain of fluid to acoustically mimic another, as exemplified by acoustic cloaks. It is shown that the most general class of acoustic metafluids are materials with anisotropic inertia and the elastic properties of what are known as pentamode materials. The derivation uses the notion of finite deformation to define the transformation of one region to another. The main result is found by considering energy density in the original and transformed regions. Properties of acoustic metafluids are discussed, and general conditions are found which ensure that the mapped fluid has isotropic inertia, which potentially opens up the possibility of achieving broadband cloaking. PMID:19206861

  6. Aeroelasticity Analysis of AN Industrial Gas Turbine Combustor Using a Simplified Combustion Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bréard, C.; Sayma, A. I.; Vahdati, M.; Imregun, M.

    2002-12-01

    Lean premixed industrial gas turbine combustors are susceptible to flame instabilities, resulting in large unsteady pressure waves that may cause the discharge nozzle to experience excessive vibration levels. A detailed aeroelasticity analysis, aimed at investigating possible structural failure mechanisms, was undertaken using a time-accurate unsteady flow representation, a simplified combustion disturbance and a structural model of the discharge nozzle. The computational domain included the lower part of the combustor geometry as well as the nozzle guide vanes (NGVs) at the HP turbine inlet. A pressure perturbation, representing the unsteadiness due to the combustion process, was applied below the tertiary fuel inlet and its frequency was set to each structural natural frequency in turn. The propagation of the pressure perturbation through the combustor nozzle, its reflection from the NGVs and further reflections were monitored using two different models. The first one, the so-called ``open'' system, ignored the reflections from the upper part of the combustion chamber while the second one, the ``closed'' system, assumed full reflection with an appropriate time shift. The calculations have shown that the imposed excitation could generate unsteady pressure shapes that were correlated with the ``flap'' modes of the discharge nozzle. In addition, an acoustic resonance condition was observed when the forcing pressure wave had a frequency close to 550 Hz, the experimentally observed failure frequency of the nozzle. The co-existence of these two factors, i.e., excitation/structural-mode match and the possibility of acoustic resonance, was thought to have the potential of producing very high vibration response.

  7. Lean Premixed Combustion/Active Control

    SciTech Connect

    D. J. Seery

    2000-02-01

    An experimental comparison between two contrasting fuel-air swirlers for industrial gas turbine applications was undertaken at the United Technologies Research Center. The first, termed an Aerodynamic nozzle, relied on the prevailing aerodynamic forces to stabilize the downstream combustion zone. The second configuration relied on a conventional bluff plate for combustion stability and was hence named a Bluff-Body nozzle. Performance mapping over the power curve revealed the acoustic superiority of the Bluff-Body nozzle. Two dimensional Rayleigh indices calculated from CCD images identified larger acoustic driving zones associated with the Aerodynamic nozzle relative to its bluff counterpart. The Bluff-Body's success is due to increased flame stabilization (superior anchoring ability) which reduced flame motion and thermal/acoustic coupling.

  8. Effect of acoustic flows on the structure of a constricted glow discharge in argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saifutdinov, A. I.; Fadeev, S. A.; Saifutdinova, A. A.; Kashapov, N. F.

    2015-11-01

    Numerical experiments on the effect of acoustic flows on the structure of a constricted glow discharge in argon have been performed in the hybrid approximation. The possibility of controlling the combustion regime of the glow discharge with an extended positive column at a high pressure by means of the formation of acoustic flows at the excitation of a standing acoustic wave has been demonstrated. In this case, the discharge transfers from the constricted combustion regime to the diffuse one and becomes stable.

  9. MTCI acoustic agglomeration particulate control

    SciTech Connect

    Chandran, R.R.; Mansour, M.N.; Scaroni, A.W.; Koopmann, G.H.; Loth, J.L.

    1994-10-01

    The overall objective of this project is to demonstrate pulse combination induced acoustic enhancement of coal ash agglomeration and sulfur capture at conditions typical of direct coal-fired turbines and PFBC hot gas cleanup. MTCI has developed an advanced compact pulse combustor island for direct coal-firing in combustion gas turbines. This combustor island comprises a coal-fired pulse combustor, a combined ash agglomeration and sulfur capture chamber (CAASCC), and a hot cyclone. In the MTCI proprietary approach, the pulse combustion-induced high intensity sound waves improve sulfur capture efficiency and ash agglomeration. The resulting agglomerates allow the use of commercial cyclones and achieve very high particulate collection efficiency. In the MTCI proprietary approach, sorbent particles are injected into a gas stream subjected to an intense acoustic field. The acoustic field serves to improve sulfur capture efficiency by enhancing both gas film and intra-particle mass transfer rates. In addition, the sorbent particles act as dynamic filter foci, providing a high density of stagnant agglomerating centers for trapping the finer entrained (in the oscillating flow field) fly ash fractions. A team has been formed with MTCI as the prime contractor and Penn State University and West Virginia University as subcontractors to MTCI. MTCI is focusing on hardware development and system demonstration, PSU is investigating and modeling acoustic agglomeration and sulfur capture, and WVU is studying aerovalve fluid dynamics. Results are presented from all three studies.

  10. Ion acoustic waves and related plasma observations in the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, D. A.; Marsch, E.; Pilipp, W.; Schwenn, R.; Rosenbauer, H.

    1979-01-01

    The paper presents a study of the relationship between the interplanetary ion acoustic waves detected by Helios and the macroscopic and microscopic characteristics of the solar wind plasma. Two major mechanisms, an electron heat flux instability and a double-ion beam instability, are considered for generating the ion-acoustic-like waves observed in the solar wind. The results provide support to both mechanisms for generating the solar wind ion acoustic waves, although each mechanism has problems under certain conditions.

  11. Droplet Vaporization In A Levitating Acoustic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruff, G. A.; Liu, S.; Ciobanescu, I.

    2003-01-01

    Combustion experiments using arrays of droplets seek to provide a link between single droplet combustion phenomena and the behavior of complex spray combustion systems. Both single droplet and droplet array studies have been conducted in microgravity to better isolate the droplet interaction phenomena and eliminate or reduce the effects of buoyancy-induced convection. In most experiments involving droplet arrays, the droplets are supported on fibers to keep them stationary and close together before the combustion event. The presence of the fiber, however, disturbs the combustion process by introducing a source of heat transfer and asymmetry into the configuration. As the number of drops in a droplet array increases, supporting the drops on fibers becomes less practical because of the cumulative effect of the fibers on the combustion process. To eliminate the effect of the fiber, several researchers have conducted microgravity experiments using unsupported droplets. Jackson and Avedisian investigated single, unsupported drops while Nomura et al. studied droplet clouds formed by a condensation technique. The overall objective of this research is to extend the study of unsupported drops by investigating the combustion of well-characterized drop clusters in a microgravity environment. Direct experimental observations and measurements of the combustion of droplet clusters would provide unique experimental data for the verification and improvement of spray combustion models. In this work, the formation of drop clusters is precisely controlled using an acoustic levitation system so that dilute, as well as dense clusters can be created and stabilized before combustion in microgravity is begun. While the low-gravity test facility is being completed, tests have been conducted in 1-g to characterize the effect of the acoustic field on the vaporization of single and multiple droplets. This is important because in the combustion experiment, the droplets will be formed and

  12. Turbulent combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Talbot, L.; Cheng, R.K.

    1993-12-01

    Turbulent combustion is the dominant process in heat and power generating systems. Its most significant aspect is to enhance the burning rate and volumetric power density. Turbulent mixing, however, also influences the chemical rates and has a direct effect on the formation of pollutants, flame ignition and extinction. Therefore, research and development of modern combustion systems for power generation, waste incineration and material synthesis must rely on a fundamental understanding of the physical effect of turbulence on combustion to develop theoretical models that can be used as design tools. The overall objective of this program is to investigate, primarily experimentally, the interaction and coupling between turbulence and combustion. These processes are complex and are characterized by scalar and velocity fluctuations with time and length scales spanning several orders of magnitude. They are also influenced by the so-called {open_quotes}field{close_quotes} effects associated with the characteristics of the flow and burner geometries. The authors` approach is to gain a fundamental understanding by investigating idealized laboratory flames. Laboratory flames are amenable to detailed interrogation by laser diagnostics and their flow geometries are chosen to simplify numerical modeling and simulations and to facilitate comparison between experiments and theory.

  13. Rayleigh criterion and acoustic energy balance in unconfined self-sustained oscillating flames

    SciTech Connect

    Durox, D.; Schuller, T.; Noiray, N.; Birbaud, A.L.; Candel, S.

    2009-01-15

    Instabilities of confined combustion systems are often discussed in terms of the Rayleigh criterion, which provides a necessary condition for unstable operation and is commonly used to distinguish driving and damping regions. The analysis is also carried out in some cases by making use of an acoustic energy balance in which the Rayleigh term acts as a source. The case of unconfined flames is less well documented but of importance in practical systems used in heating and drying. This study is motivated by problems of self-sustained oscillations of radiant burners for domestic or industrial processes and of various other types of open flames. Application of the Rayleigh criterion and of the balance of acoustic energy to oscillations arising in such unconfined systems is examined. The objective is to see if the Rayleigh condition is fulfilled and to show how the different perturbed variables are linked to each other to develop an unstable oscillation. These issues are investigated by experiments in two geometries. The first case relates to a single ''V''- or ''M''-shaped flame formed by a burner behaving like a Helmholtz resonator. The second geometry features a collection of conical flames (CCF) established by a multipoint injector. This system is fed by a manifold that features a set of plane modes and resonates like an organ pipe at frequencies corresponding to odd multiples of the quarter wave. The Rayleigh criterion and a related result written in the form of an acoustic energy balance are used to define conditions of instability. A link is established between the pressure signal radiated by the burner and the total heat release rate perturbation yielding the phase lag between these two variables and providing conditions for unstable operation. Systematic experiments carried out in the two burner geometries and model predictions are in good agreement indicating that the Rayleigh source term is positive and that the criterion is well fulfilled by the wavefield

  14. Rayleigh criterion and acoustic energy balance in unconfined self-sustained oscillating flames

    SciTech Connect

    Durox, D.; Schuller, T.; Noiray, N.; Birbaud, A.L.; Candel, S.

    2008-11-15

    Instabilities of confined combustion systems are often discussed in terms of the Rayleigh criterion, which provides a necessary condition for unstable operation and is commonly used to distinguish driving and damping regions. The analysis is also carried out in some cases by making use of an acoustic energy balance in which the Rayleigh term acts as a source. The case of unconfined flames is less well documented but of importance in practical systems used in heating and drying. This study is motivated by problems of self-sustained oscillations of radiant burners for domestic or industrial processes and of various other types of open flames. Application of the Rayleigh criterion and of the balance of acoustic energy to oscillations arising in such unconfined systems is examined. The objective is to see if the Rayleigh condition is fulfilled and to show how the different perturbed variables are linked to each other to develop an unstable oscillation. These issues are investigated by experiments in two geometries. The first case relates to a single ''V''- or ''M''-shaped flame formed by a burner behaving like a Helmholtz resonator. The second geometry features a collection of conical flames (CCF) established by a multipoint injector. This system is fed by a manifold that features a set of plane modes and resonates like an organ pipe at frequencies corresponding to odd multiples of the quarter wave. The Rayleigh criterion and a related result written in the form of an acoustic energy balance are used to define conditions of instability. A link is established between the pressure signal radiated by the burner and the total heat release rate perturbation yielding the phase lag between these two variables and providing conditions for unstable operation. Systematic experiments carried out in the two burner geometries and model predictions are in good agreement indicating that the Rayleigh source term is positive and that the criterion is well fulfilled by the wavefield

  15. Observation of self-excited acoustic vortices in defect-mediated dust acoustic wave turbulence.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ya-Yi; I, Lin

    2014-07-01

    Using the self-excited dust acoustic wave as a platform, we demonstrate experimental observation of self-excited fluctuating acoustic vortex pairs with ± 1 topological charges through spontaneous waveform undulation in defect-mediated turbulence for three-dimensional traveling nonlinear longitudinal waves. The acoustic vortex pair has helical waveforms with opposite chirality around the low-density hole filament pair in xyt space (the xy plane is the plane normal to the wave propagation direction). It is generated through ruptures of sequential crest surfaces and reconnections with their trailing ruptured crest surfaces. The initial rupture is originated from the amplitude reduction induced by the formation of the kinked wave crest strip with strong stretching through the undulation instability. Increasing rupture causes the separation of the acoustic vortex pair after generation. A similar reverse process is followed for the acoustic vortex annihilating with the opposite-charged acoustic vortex from the same or another pair generation.

  16. EFFECT OF COMBUSTOR INLET GEOMETRY ON ACOUSTIC SIGNATURE AND FLOW FIELD BEHAVIOUR OF THE LOW SWIRL INJECTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Therkelsen, Peter L.; Littlejohn, David; Cheng, Robert K.; Portillo, J. Enrique; Martin, Scott M.

    2009-11-30

    Low Swirl Injector (LSI) technology is a lean premixed combustion method that is being developed for fuel-flexible gas turbines. The objective of this study is to characterize the fuel effects and influences of combustor geometry on the LSI's overall acoustic signatures and flowfields. The experiments consist of 24 flames at atmospheric condition with bulk flows ranging between 10 and 18 m/s. The flames burn CH{sub 4} (at {phi} = 0.6 & 0.7) and a blend of 90% H{sub 2} - 10% CH{sub 4} by volume (at {phi} = 0.35 & 0.4). Two combustor configurations are used, consisting of a cylindrical chamber with and without a divergent quarl at the dump plane. The data consist of pressure spectral distributions at five positions within the system and 2D flowfield information measured by Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV). The results show that acoustic oscillations increase with U{sub 0} and {phi}. However, the levels in the 90% H{sub 2} flames are significantly higher than in the CH{sub 4} flames. For both fuels, the use of the quarl reduces the fluctuating pressures in the combustion chamber by up to a factor of 7. The PIV results suggest this to be a consequence of the quarl restricting the formation of large vortices in the outer shear layer. A Generalized Instability Model (GIM) was applied to analyze the acoustic response of baseline flames for each of the two fuels. The measured frequencies and the stability trends for these two cases are predicted and the triggered acoustic mode shapes identified.

  17. Acoustic trauma

    MedlinePlus

    Acoustic trauma is a common cause of sensory hearing loss . Damage to the hearing mechanisms within the inner ... Symptoms include: Partial hearing loss that most often involves ... The hearing loss may slowly get worse. Noises, ringing in ...

  18. Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    ... slow growing tumor which arise primarily from the vestibular portion of the VIII cranial nerve and lie ... you have a "brain tumor" called acoustic neuroma (vestibular schwannoma). You think you are the only one ...

  19. Underwater Acoustics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Creasey, D. J.

    1981-01-01

    Summarizes the history of underwater acoustics and describes related research studies and teaching activities at the University of Birmingham (England). Also includes research studies on transducer design and mathematical techniques. (SK)

  20. Room Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuttruff, Heinrich; Mommertz, Eckard

    The traditional task of room acoustics is to create or formulate conditions which ensure the best possible propagation of sound in a room from a sound source to a listener. Thus, objects of room acoustics are in particular assembly halls of all kinds, such as auditoria and lecture halls, conference rooms, theaters, concert halls or churches. Already at this point, it has to be pointed out that these conditions essentially depend on the question if speech or music should be transmitted; in the first case, the criterion for transmission quality is good speech intelligibility, in the other case, however, the success of room-acoustical efforts depends on other factors that cannot be quantified that easily, not least it also depends on the hearing habits of the listeners. In any case, absolutely "good acoustics" of a room do not exist.

  1. Jet mixer noise suppressor using acoustic feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, Edward J. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    The present invention generally relates to providing an improved jet mixer noise suppressor for high speed jets that rapidly mixes high speed air flow with a lower speed air flow, and more particularly, relates to an improved jet mixer noise suppressor that uses feedback of acoustic waves produced by the interaction of shear flow instability waves with an obstacle downstream of the jet nozzle.

  2. Jet mixer noise suppressor using acoustic feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, Edward J. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    The present invention generally relates to providing an improved jet mixer noise suppressor for high speed jets that rapidly mixes high speed air flow with a lower speed air flow, and more particularly, relates to an improved jet mixer noise suppressor that uses feedback of acoustic waves produced by the interaction of sheer flow instability waves with an obstacle downstream of the jet nozzle.

  3. Regenerative combustion device

    DOEpatents

    West, Phillip B.

    2004-03-16

    A regenerative combustion device having a combustion zone, and chemicals contained within the combustion zone, such as water, having a first equilibrium state, and a second combustible state. Means for transforming the chemicals from the first equilibrium state to the second combustible state, such as electrodes, are disposed within the chemicals. An igniter, such as a spark plug or similar device, is disposed within the combustion zone for igniting combustion of the chemicals in the second combustible state. The combustion products are contained within the combustion zone, and the chemicals are selected such that the combustion products naturally chemically revert into the chemicals in the first equilibrium state following combustion. The combustion device may thus be repeatedly reused, requiring only a brief wait after each ignition to allow the regeneration of combustible gasses within the head space.

  4. Combustion of Unconfined Droplet Clusters in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruff, G. A.; Liu, S.

    2001-01-01

    Combustion experiments using arrays of droplets seek to provide a link between single droplet combustion phenomena and the behavior of complex spray combustion systems. Both single droplet and droplet array studies have been conducted in microgravity to better isolate the droplet interaction phenomena and eliminate or reduce the confounding effects of buoyancy-induced convection. In most experiments involving droplet arrays, the droplets are supported on fibers to keep them stationary and close together before the combustion event. The presence of the fiber, however, disturbs the combustion process by introducing a source of heat transfer and asymmetry into the configuration. As the number of drops in a droplet array increases, supporting the drops on fibers becomes less practical because of the cumulative effect of the fibers on the combustion process. To eliminate the effect of the fiber, several researchers have conducted microgravity experiments using unsupported droplets. Jackson and Avedisian investigated single, unsupported drops while Nomura et al. studied droplet clouds formed by a condensation technique. The overall objective of this research is to extend the study of unsupported drops by investigating the combustion of well-characterized drop clusters in a microgravity environment. Direct experimental observations and measurements of the combustion of droplet clusters would fill a large gap in our current understanding of droplet and spray combustion and provide unique experimental data for the verification and improvement of spray combustion models. In this work, the formation of drop clusters is precisely controlled using an acoustic levitation system so that dilute, as well as dense clusters can be created and stabilized before combustion in microgravity is begun. This paper describes the design and performance of the 1-g experimental apparatus, some preliminary 1-g results, and plans for testing in microgravity.

  5. Advanced Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, Gordon R.

    2013-03-11

    The activity reported in this presentation is to provide the mechanical and physical property information needed to allow rational design, development and/or choice of alloys, manufacturing approaches, and environmental exposure and component life models to enable oxy-fuel combustion boilers to operate at Ultra-Supercritical (up to 650{degrees}C & between 22-30 MPa) and/or Advanced Ultra-Supercritical conditions (760{degrees}C & 35 MPa).

  6. High-bandwidth Modulation of H2/Syngas Fuel to Control Combustion Dynamics in Micro-Mixing Lean Premix Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Jeff Melzak; Tim Lieuwen; Adel Mansour

    2012-01-31

    The goal of this program was to develop and demonstrate fuel injection technologies that will facilitate the development of cost-effective turbine engines for Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plants, while improving efficiency and reducing emissions. The program involved developing a next-generation multi-point injector with enhanced stability performance for lean premix turbine systems that burn hydrogen (H2) or synthesis gas (syngas) fuels. A previously developed injector that demonstrated superior emissions performance was improved to enhance static flame stability through zone staging and pilot sheltering. In addition, piezo valve technology was implemented to investigate the potential for enhanced dynamic stability through high-bandwidth modulation of the fuel supply. Prototype injector and valve hardware were tested in an atmospheric combustion facility. The program was successful in meeting its objectives. Specifically, the following was accomplished: Demonstrated improvement of lean operability of the Parker multi-point injector through staging of fuel flow and primary zone sheltering; Developed a piezo valve capable of proportional and high-bandwidth modulation of gaseous fuel flow at frequencies as high as 500 Hz; The valve was shown to be capable of effecting changes to flame dynamics, heat release, and acoustic signature of an atmospheric combustor. The latter achievement indicates the viability of the Parker piezo valve technology for use in future adaptively controlled systems for the mitigation of combustion instabilities, particularly for attenuating combustion dynamics under ultra-lean conditions.

  7. Optimization of hydrocarbon fuels combustion variable composition in thermal power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saifullin, E. R.; Larionov, V. M.; Busarov, A. V.; Busarov, V. V.

    2016-01-01

    It is known that associated petroleum gas and refinery waste can be used as fuel in thermal power plants. However, random changes in the composition of such fuels cause instability of the combustion process. This article explores the burning of hydrocarbon fuel in the case of long continuous change of its specific heat of combustion. The results of analysis were used to develop a technique of optimizing the combustion process, ensuring complete combustion of the fuel and its minimum flow.

  8. Acoustic biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Fogel, Ronen; Seshia, Ashwin A.

    2016-01-01

    Resonant and acoustic wave devices have been researched for several decades for application in the gravimetric sensing of a variety of biological and chemical analytes. These devices operate by coupling the measurand (e.g. analyte adsorption) as a modulation in the physical properties of the acoustic wave (e.g. resonant frequency, acoustic velocity, dissipation) that can then be correlated with the amount of adsorbed analyte. These devices can also be miniaturized with advantages in terms of cost, size and scalability, as well as potential additional features including integration with microfluidics and electronics, scaled sensitivities associated with smaller dimensions and higher operational frequencies, the ability to multiplex detection across arrays of hundreds of devices embedded in a single chip, increased throughput and the ability to interrogate a wider range of modes including within the same device. Additionally, device fabrication is often compatible with semiconductor volume batch manufacturing techniques enabling cost scalability and a high degree of precision and reproducibility in the manufacturing process. Integration with microfluidics handling also enables suitable sample pre-processing/separation/purification/amplification steps that could improve selectivity and the overall signal-to-noise ratio. Three device types are reviewed here: (i) bulk acoustic wave sensors, (ii) surface acoustic wave sensors, and (iii) micro/nano-electromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS) sensors. PMID:27365040

  9. Acoustic biosensors.

    PubMed

    Fogel, Ronen; Limson, Janice; Seshia, Ashwin A

    2016-06-30

    Resonant and acoustic wave devices have been researched for several decades for application in the gravimetric sensing of a variety of biological and chemical analytes. These devices operate by coupling the measurand (e.g. analyte adsorption) as a modulation in the physical properties of the acoustic wave (e.g. resonant frequency, acoustic velocity, dissipation) that can then be correlated with the amount of adsorbed analyte. These devices can also be miniaturized with advantages in terms of cost, size and scalability, as well as potential additional features including integration with microfluidics and electronics, scaled sensitivities associated with smaller dimensions and higher operational frequencies, the ability to multiplex detection across arrays of hundreds of devices embedded in a single chip, increased throughput and the ability to interrogate a wider range of modes including within the same device. Additionally, device fabrication is often compatible with semiconductor volume batch manufacturing techniques enabling cost scalability and a high degree of precision and reproducibility in the manufacturing process. Integration with microfluidics handling also enables suitable sample pre-processing/separation/purification/amplification steps that could improve selectivity and the overall signal-to-noise ratio. Three device types are reviewed here: (i) bulk acoustic wave sensors, (ii) surface acoustic wave sensors, and (iii) micro/nano-electromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS) sensors. PMID:27365040

  10. Behaviour of a Premixed Flame Subjected to Acoustic Oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Shafiq R.; Khan, Waqar A.; Prosser, Robert

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, a one dimensional premixed laminar methane flame is subjected to acoustic oscillations and studied. The purpose of this analysis is to investigate the effects of acoustic perturbations on the reaction rates of different species, with a view to their respective contribution to thermoacoustic instabilities. Acoustically transparent non reflecting boundary conditions are employed. The flame response has been studied with acoustic waves of different frequencies and amplitudes. The integral values of the reaction rates, the burning velocities and the heat release of the acoustically perturbed flame are compared with the unperturbed case. We found that the flame's sensitivity to acoustic perturbations is greatest when the wavelength is comparable to the flame thickness. Even in this case, the perturbations are stable with time. We conclude that acoustic fields acting on the chemistry do not contribute significantly to the emergence of large amplitude pressure oscillations. PMID:24376501

  11. Acoustic filtration and sedimentation of soot particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, K. M.; Ezekoye, O. A.

    Removal of soot particles from a static chamber by an intense acoustic field is investigated. Combustion of a solid fuel fills a rectangular chamber with small soot particles, which sediment very slowly. The chamber is then irradiated by an intense acoustic source to produce a three dimensional standing wave field in the chamber. The acoustic excitation causes the soot particles to agglomerate, forming larger particles which sediment faster from the system. The soot also forms 1-2 cm disks, with axes parallel to the axis of the acoustic source, which are levitated by the sound field at half-wavelength spacing within the chamber. Laser extinction measurements are made to determine soot volume fractions as a function of exposure time within the chamber. The volume fraction is reduced over time by sedimentation and by particle migration to the disks. The soot disks are considered to be a novel mechanism for particle removal from the air stream, and this mechanism has been dubbed acoustic filtration. An experimental method is developed for comparing the rate of soot removal by sedimentation alone with the rate of soot removal by sedimentation and acoustic filtration. Results show that acoustic filtration increases the rate of soot removal by a factor of two over acoustically-induced sedimentation alone.

  12. Turbine instabilities: Case histories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laws, C. W.

    1985-01-01

    Several possible causes of turbine rotor instability are discussed and the related design features of a wide range of turbomachinery types and sizes are considered. The instrumentation options available for detecting rotor instability and assessing its severity are also discussed.

  13. Combustion of solid waste in a pulse incinerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kan, Tie

    This study investigated the effects of pulsations on the combustion of simulated solid waste at high Reynolds numbers in an incinerator fed with cold or preheated combustion air. Corrugated cardboard and charcoal were chosen as waste surrogates. Combustion times and emissions of CO2, CO and NOx were measured while the samples were burned under different experimental conditions. Pulsations significantly reduced flaming combustion times in tests with and without preheated. Most of this enhancement resulted from increased heat transfer rate due to a closer attachment of the gas flame to the solid sample. Pulsations also reduced smoldering combustion time. This was caused by faster transport of oxygen to and combustion products from the sample surface. Furthermore, the smoldering combustion rate increased with increasing Sound Pressure Levels. While this effect was the strongest in laminar flows, pulsations doubled combustion rates even in a highly turbulent flow where Re = 47,000. Higher combustion rates at elevated Reynolds numbers in steady tests were caused by larger turbulent velocity fluctuations. Combustion rates were further enhanced by the addition of acoustic velocity fluctuations, which dominated the process if they were much larger than the turbulent velocity fluctuations. Below this limit, acoustic modes with velocities normal to the main flow enhanced the combustion process more significantly than those parallel to the flow. Most of this enhancement by pulsations resulted from increased species transport due to faster removal of ash layers on the burning surface by acoustic shear. Acoustic streaming was not responsible for the observed, enhanced combustion rates. Instantaneous pollutant emissions were much higher with pulsations than without. However, pulsations did not affect total amount of carbon converted into gaseous products from the sample but favored more complete combustion, i.e., less total CO emission. This was caused by a larger fraction of

  14. Acoustics of Fluid-Structure Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howe, M. S.

    1998-08-01

    Acoustics of Fluid-Structure Interactions addresses an increasingly important branch of fluid mechanics--the absorption of noise and vibration by fluid flow. This subject, which offers numerous challenges to conventional areas of acoustics, is of growing concern in places where the environment is adversely affected by sound. Howe presents useful background material on fluid mechanics and the elementary concepts of classical acoustics and structural vibrations. Using examples, many of which include complete worked solutions, he vividly illustrates the theoretical concepts involved. He provides the basis for all calculations necessary for the determination of sound generation by aircraft, ships, general ventilation and combustion systems, as well as musical instruments. Both a graduate textbook and a reference for researchers, Acoustics of Fluid-Structure Interactions is an important synthesis of information in this field. It will also aid engineers in the theory and practice of noise control.

  15. Dielectric permittivity tensor and low frequency instabilities of a magnetoactive current-driven plasma with nonextensive distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Niknam, A. R.; Rastbood, E.; Khorashadizadeh, S. M.

    2015-12-15

    The dielectric permittivity tensor of a magnetoactive current-driven plasma is obtained by employing the kinetic theory based on the Vlasov equation and Lorentz transformation formulas with an emphasize on the q-nonextensive statistics. By deriving the q-generalized dispersion relation of the low frequency modes in this plasma system, the possibility and properties of filamentation and ion acoustic instabilities are then studied. It is shown that the occurrence and the growth rate of these instabilities depend strongly on the nonextensive parameters, external magnetic field strength, and drift velocity. It is observed that the growth rate of ion acoustic instability is affected by the magnetic field strength much more than that of the filamentation instability in the low frequency range. The external magnetic field facilitates the development of the ion-acoustic instability. It is also shown that the filamentation is the dominant instability only for the high value of drift velocity.

  16. Dielectric permittivity tensor and low frequency instabilities of a magnetoactive current-driven plasma with nonextensive distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niknam, A. R.; Rastbood, E.; Khorashadizadeh, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    The dielectric permittivity tensor of a magnetoactive current-driven plasma is obtained by employing the kinetic theory based on the Vlasov equation and Lorentz transformation formulas with an emphasize on the q-nonextensive statistics. By deriving the q-generalized dispersion relation of the low frequency modes in this plasma system, the possibility and properties of filamentation and ion acoustic instabilities are then studied. It is shown that the occurrence and the growth rate of these instabilities depend strongly on the nonextensive parameters, external magnetic field strength, and drift velocity. It is observed that the growth rate of ion acoustic instability is affected by the magnetic field strength much more than that of the filamentation instability in the low frequency range. The external magnetic field facilitates the development of the ion-acoustic instability. It is also shown that the filamentation is the dominant instability only for the high value of drift velocity.

  17. Numerical Simulations of Instabilities in Single-Hole Office Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahuja, Vineet; Hosangadi, Ashvin; Hitt, Matthew A.; Lineberry, David M.

    2013-01-01

    An orifice element is commonly used in liquid rocket engine test facilities either as a flow metering device, a damper for acoustic resonance or to provide a large reduction in pressure over a very small distance in the piping system. While the orifice as a device is largely effective in stepping down pressure, it is also susceptible to a wake-vortex type instability that generates pressure fluctuations that propagate downstream and interact with other elements of the test facility resulting in structural vibrations. Furthermore in piping systems an unstable feedback loop can exist between the vortex shedding and acoustic perturbations from upstream components resulting in an amplification of the modes convecting downstream. Such was the case in several tests conducted at NASA as well as in the Ariane 5 strap-on P230 engine in a static firing test where pressure oscillations of 0.5% resulted in 5% thrust oscillations. Exacerbating the situation in cryogenic test facilities, is the possibility of the formation of vapor clouds when the pressure in the wake falls below the vapor pressure leading to a cavitation instability that has a lower frequency than the primary wake-vortex instability. The cavitation instability has the potential for high amplitude fluctuations that can cause catastrophic damage in the facility. In this paper high-fidelity multi-phase numerical simulations of an orifice element are used to characterize the different instabilities, understand the dominant instability mechanisms and identify the tonal content of the instabilities.

  18. Combustion chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, N.J.

    1993-12-01

    This research is concerned with the development and use of sensitivity analysis tools to probe the response of dependent variables to model input variables. Sensitivity analysis is important at all levels of combustion modeling. This group`s research continues to be focused on elucidating the interrelationship between features in the underlying potential energy surface (obtained from ab initio quantum chemistry calculations) and their responses in the quantum dynamics, e.g., reactive transition probabilities, cross sections, and thermal rate coefficients. The goals of this research are: (i) to provide feedback information to quantum chemists in their potential surface refinement efforts, and (ii) to gain a better understanding of how various regions in the potential influence the dynamics. These investigations are carried out with the methodology of quantum functional sensitivity analysis (QFSA).

  19. Acoustic transducer for acoustic microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Khuri-Yakub, B.T.; Chou, C.H.

    1990-03-20

    A shear acoustic transducer-lens system is described in which a shear polarized piezoelectric material excites shear polarized waves at one end of a buffer rod having a lens at the other end which excites longitudinal waves in a coupling medium by mode conversion at selected locations on the lens. 9 figs.

  20. Acoustic transducer for acoustic microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T.; Chou, Ching H.

    1990-01-01

    A shear acoustic transducer-lens system in which a shear polarized piezoelectric material excites shear polarized waves at one end of a buffer rod having a lens at the other end which excites longitudinal waves in a coupling medium by mode conversion at selected locations on the lens.

  1. Technology Awareness Workshop on Active Combustion Control (ACC) in Propulsion Systems: JANNAF Combustion Subcommittee Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fry, Ronald S. (Editor); Gannaway, Mary T. (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    A JANNAF Combustion Subcommittee Technology Awareness Seminar on Active Combustion Control (ACC) in Propulsion Systems' was held 12 November 1997 at the NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC), Cleveland, Ohio. The objectives of the seminar were: 1) Define the need and potential of ACC to meet future requirements for gas turbines and ramjets; 2) Explain general principles of ACC and discuss recent successes to suppress combustion instabilities, increase combustion efficiency, reduce emission, and extend flammability limits; 3) Identify R&D barriers/needs for practical implementation of ACC; 4) Explore potential for improving coordination of future R&D activities funded by various government agencies. Over 40 individuals representing senior management from over 20 industry and government organizations participated. This document summarizes the presentations and findings of this seminar.

  2. Instability of rectangular jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tam, Christopher K. W.; Thies, Andrew T.

    1992-01-01

    The instability of rectangular jets is investigated using a vortex sheet model. It is shown that such jets support four linearly independent families of instability waves. Within each family there are infinitely many modes. A way to classify these modes according to the characteristics of their mode shapes or eigenfunctions is proposed. A parametric study of the instability wave characteristics has been carried out. A sample of the numerical results is reported here. It is found that the first and third modes of each instability wave family are corner modes. The pressure fluctuations associated with these instability waves are localized near the corners of the jet. The second mode, however, is a center mode with maximum fluctuations concentrated in the central portion of the jet flow. The center mode has the largest spatial growth rate. It is anticipated that as the instability waves propagate downstream the center mode would emerge as the dominant instability of the jet.

  3. Medical Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beach, Kirk W.; Dunmire, Barbrina

    Medical acoustics can be subdivided into diagnostics and therapy. Diagnostics are further separated into auditory and ultrasonic methods, and both employ low amplitudes. Therapy (excluding medical advice) uses ultrasound for heating, cooking, permeablizing, activating and fracturing tissues and structures within the body, usually at much higher amplitudes than in diagnostics. Because ultrasound is a wave, linear wave physics are generally applicable, but recently nonlinear effects have become more important, even in low-intensity diagnostic applications.

  4. Ion heating via turbulent ion acoustic waves.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, R. J.; Coroniti, F. V.

    1972-01-01

    The ion acoustic turbulence in the turbulent-heating experiment reported is excited by the ion-ion beam instability. Graphs are presented, showing the spatial evolution of the parallel ion beam energy and the spatial evolution of the ion acoustic turbulent wave spectrum. The observed characteristics of test waves in a turbulent beam-plasma imply that wave saturation is a dynamic balance between the emission of waves by the beam and the destruction or damping of wave coherence by the turbulent diffusion of particle orbits.

  5. Instabilities of diffusion flames near extinction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papas, Paul; Rais, Redha M.; Monkewitz, Peter A.; Tomboulides, Ananias G.

    2003-12-01

    The linear spatio-temporal stability of a diffusion flame, represented by a simplified one-dimensional model, located in a mixing layer is investigated. The analysis focuses on recently discovered `heat release' or combustion modes reported for flames near the extinction limit, i.e. for low Damköhler number. Numerical simulations of the two-dimensional linearized impulse response are performed to uncover the convective versus absolute nature of these combustion modes. To complement these two-dimensional simulations, the convective absolute transitions of these modes are confirmed with spatio-temporal linear stability calculations. The effects of initial reactant temperature, flow shear Reynolds number, as well as low fuel Lewis number, are explored. In addition to the Kelvin Helmholtz mode, the generalized model predicts a variety of instabilities near the extinction state, such as travelling and stationary cellular modes, zero wavenumber instabilities or `pulsations', and coupled hydrodynamic-combustion modes. The results elucidate the fundamental destabilizing mechanisms for these near-extinction flames and their relationship to previous work.

  6. Coal combustion science

    SciTech Connect

    Hardesty, D.R.; Baxter, L.L.; Fletcher, T.H.; Mitchell, R.E.

    1990-11-01

    The objective of this activity is to support the Office of Fossil Energy in executing research on coal combustion science. This activity consists of basic research on coal combustion that supports both the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) Direct Utilization Advanced Research and Technology Development Program, and the International Energy Agency (IEA) Coal Combustion Science Project. Specific tasks include: coal devolatilization, coal char combustion, and fate of mineral matter during coal combustion. 91 refs., 40 figs., 9 tabs.

  7. Combustion Fundamentals Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Increased emphasis is placed on fundamental and generic research at Lewis Research Center with less systems development efforts. This is especially true in combustion research, where the study of combustion fundamentals has grown significantly in order to better address the perceived long term technical needs of the aerospace industry. The main thrusts for this combustion fundamentals program area are as follows: analytical models of combustion processes, model verification experiments, fundamental combustion experiments, and advanced numeric techniques.

  8. Combustion performance and heat transfer characterization of LOX/hydrocarbon type propellants, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoenman, L.

    1983-01-01

    A data base which relates candidate design variables, such as injector type, acoustic cavity configuration, chamber length, fuel film-cooling, etc., to operational characteristics such as combustion efficiency, combustion stability, carbon deposition, and chamber gas-side heat flux was generated.

  9. SONOTECH, INC. FREQUENCY-TUNABLE PULSE COMBUSTION SYSTEM (CELLO PULSE BURNER) - INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sonotech, Inc. (Sonotech) of Atlanta, Georgia, has developed a pulse combustion burner technology that claims to offer benefits when applied in a variety of combustion processes. The technology incorporates a combustor that can be tuned to induce large-amplitude acoustic or soni...

  10. Effects of rotating flows on combustion and jet noise.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, I. R.

    1972-01-01

    Experimental investigations of combustion in rotating (swirling) flow have shown that the mixing and combustion processes were accelerated, flame length and noise levels significantly decreased, and flame stability increased relative to that obtained without rotation. Unsteady burning accompanied by a pulsating flame, violent fluctuating jet, and intense noise present in straight flow burning were not present in rotating flow burning. Correlations between theory and experiment show good agreement. Such effects due to rotating flows could lead to suppressing jet noise, improving combustion, reducing pollution, and decreasing aircraft engine size. Quantitative analysis of the aero-acoustic relationship and noise source characteristics are needed.-

  11. Acoustic Tooth Cleaner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, J. S.

    1984-01-01

    Acoustically-energized water jet aids in plaque breakdown. Acoustic Wand includes acoustic transducer 1/4 wave plate, and tapered cone. Together elements energize solution of water containing mild abrasive injected into mouth to help prevent calculous buildup.

  12. Flow instabilities in turbomachines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greitzer, E. M.

    Instabilities occurring in systems involving the movement of a fluid through pipes, ducts, etc., by means of turbomachinery are discussed. While static instabilities may be inferred from system transient performance that is viewed as a sequence of quasi-steady states, such parameters as system interfaces and capacitances must be included in the prediction of dynamic instability, since they play an essential role in determining the transient response of the system to disturbances. A pumping system can be statically stable and still exhibit dynamic instability. Attention is given to rotating stall compressor instability, inlet distortion effects on axial compressor instability, the stability effects of downstream components, and the stability of centrifugal compressors and pumps.

  13. Joint Instability and Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Blalock, Darryl; Miller, Andrew; Tilley, Michael; Wang, Jinxi

    2015-01-01

    Joint instability creates a clinical and economic burden in the health care system. Injuries and disorders that directly damage the joint structure or lead to joint instability are highly associated with osteoarthritis (OA). Thus, understanding the physiology of joint stability and the mechanisms of joint instability-induced OA is of clinical significance. The first section of this review discusses the structure and function of major joint tissues, including periarticular muscles, which play a significant role in joint stability. Because the knee, ankle, and shoulder joints demonstrate a high incidence of ligament injury and joint instability, the second section summarizes the mechanisms of ligament injury-associated joint instability of these joints. The final section highlights the recent advances in the understanding of the mechanical and biological mechanisms of joint instability-induced OA. These advances may lead to new opportunities for clinical intervention in the prevention and early treatment of OA. PMID:25741184

  14. Numerical Simulations of Acoustically Driven, Burning Droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, H.-C.; Karagozian, A. R.; Smith, O. I.; Urban, Dave (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    This computational study focuses on understanding and quantifying the effects of external acoustical perturbations on droplet combustion. A one-dimensional, axisymmetric representation of the essential diffusion and reaction processes occurring in the vicinity of the droplet stagnation point is used here in order to isolate the effects of the imposed acoustic disturbance. The simulation is performed using a third order accurate, essentially non-oscillatory (ENO) numerical scheme with a full methanol-air reaction mechanism. Consistent with recent microgravity and normal gravity combustion experiments, focus is placed on conditions where the droplet is situated at a velocity antinode in order for the droplet to experience the greatest effects of fluid mechanical straining of flame structures. The effects of imposed sound pressure level and frequency are explored here, and conditions leading to maximum burning rates are identified.

  15. Modeling of nonlinear longitudinal instability in solid rocket motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baum, Joseph D.; Levine, Jay N.

    A comprehensive model of nonlinear longitudinal combustion instability in solid rocket motors has been developed. The two primary elements of this stability analysis are a finite difference solution of the two phase flow in the combustion chamber and a coupled solution of the nonlinear transient propellant burning rate. A new combination finite difference scheme gives the analysis the ability to treat the type of multiple travelling shock wave instabilities that are frequently observed in reduced smoke tactical solid rocket motors. Models for predicting the behavior of both gas ejection and solid ejecta pulses were developed and incorporated into the analysis. Extensive comparisons between model predictions and experimental data from pulsed solid rocket motor firings have been carried out. The nonlinear instability analysis was found to be capable of predicting the complete range of nonlinear behavior observed in actual motor firing data. Good agreement between measured and predicted initial pulse amplitude, pulse evolution, limit cycle amplitude and mean pressure shift was obtained. This investigation has also provided new insight into the nature of nonlinear pulse triggered instability and the factors which influence its occurrence and severity. This new instability analysis should significantly enhance our capability to design tactical solid rocket motors that are free from troublesome and expensive nonlinear combusion instability problems.

  16. Flame spectra of solid propellants during unstable combustion.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eisel, J. L.; Ryan, N. W.; Baer, A. D.

    1972-01-01

    The spectral and temporal details of the flames of a series of ammonium perchlorate-polyurethane propellants during both unstable and stable combustion were observed experimentally. A 400-scan per second optical spectrometer operating in the middle infrared region was used. During unstable combustion at low ratios of chamber free volume to nozzle throat area, three different frequencies were observed simultaneously. These were attributable to at least two mechanisms. During stable combustion periodic fluctuations in flame temperature and composition were also observed. Some aspects of theory of bulk mode instability were confirmed, but the assumptions of constant flame temperature and constant composition were found to be inaccurate.

  17. Characteristics of fluid flow in the combustion synthesis of TiC from the elements

    SciTech Connect

    Valone, S.M.; Behrens, R.G.

    1986-01-01

    Finite reservoir effects on capillary spreading at small reservoir dimensions are explored numerically and related to wave propagation in combustion synthesis of TiC from elemental Ti and C. In addition a convective instability which may be activated by gravitational, surface tension or contact forces may cause void regions to coalesce thereby altering the void distribution in combustion synthesis products.

  18. Combustion 2000

    SciTech Connect

    2000-06-30

    This report presents work carried out under contract DE-AC22-95PC95144 ''Combustion 2000 - Phase II.'' The goals of the program are to develop a coal-fired high performance power generation system (HIPPS) that is capable of: {lg_bullet} thermal efficiency (HHV) {ge} 47% {lg_bullet} NOx, SOx, and particulates {le} 10% NSPS (New Source Performance Standard) {lg_bullet} coal providing {ge} 65% of heat input {lg_bullet} all solid wastes benign {lg_bullet} cost of electricity {le} 90% of present plants Phase I, which began in 1992, focused on the analysis of various configurations of indirectly fired cycles and on technical assessments of alternative plant subsystems and components, including performance requirements, developmental status, design options, complexity and reliability, and capital and operating costs. Phase I also included preliminary R&D and the preparation of designs for HIPPS commercial plants approximately 300 MWe in size. Phase II, had as its initial objective the development of a complete design base for the construction and operation of a HIPPS prototype plant to be constructed in Phase III. As part of a descoping initiative, the Phase III program has been eliminated and work related to the commercial plant design has been ended. The rescoped program retained a program of engineering research and development focusing on high temperature heat exchangers, e.g. HITAF development (Task 2); a rescoped Task 6 that is pertinent to Vision 21 objectives and focuses on advanced cycle analysis and optimization, integration of gas turbines into complex cycles, and repowering designs; and preparation of the Phase II Technical Report (Task 8). This rescoped program deleted all subsystem testing (Tasks 3, 4, and 5) and the development of a site specific engineering design and test plan for the HIPPS prototype plant (Task 7). Work reported herein is from: {lg_bullet} Task 2.2.4 Pilot Scale Testing {lg_bullet} Task 2.2.5.2 Laboratory and Bench Scale Activities

  19. Instability in Rotating Machinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The proceedings contain 45 papers on a wide range of subjects including flow generated instabilities in fluid flow machines, cracked shaft detection, case histories of instability phenomena in compressors, turbines, and pumps, vibration control in turbomachinery (including antiswirl techniques), and the simulation and estimation of destabilizing forces in rotating machines. The symposium was held to serve as an update on the understanding and control of rotating machinery instability problems.

  20. The problem of carrying out a diagnosis of an internal combustion engine by vibroacoustical parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lukanin, V. N.; Sidorov, V. I.

    1973-01-01

    The physics of noise formation in an internal combustion engine is discussed. A dependence of the acoustical radiation on the engine operating process, its construction, and operational parameters, as well as on the degree of wear on its parts, has been established. An example of tests conducted on an internal combustion engine is provided. A system for cybernetic diagnostics for internal combustion engines by vibroacoustical parameters is diagrammed.

  1. Combustion 2000

    SciTech Connect

    A. Levasseur; S. Goodstine; J. Ruby; M. Nawaz; C. Senior; F. Robson; S. Lehman; W. Blecher; W. Fugard; A. Rao; A. Sarofim; P. Smith; D. Pershing; E. Eddings; M. Cremer; J. Hurley; G. Weber; M. Jones; M. Collings; D. Hajicek; A. Henderson; P. Klevan; D. Seery; B. Knight; R. Lessard; J. Sangiovanni; A. Dennis; C. Bird; W. Sutton; N. Bornstein; F. Cogswell; C. Randino; S. Gale; Mike Heap

    2001-06-30

    . To achieve these objectives requires a change from complete reliance of coal-fired systems on steam turbines (Rankine cycles) and moving forward to a combined cycle utilizing gas turbines (Brayton cycles) which offer the possibility of significantly greater efficiency. This is because gas turbine cycles operate at temperatures well beyond current steam cycles, allowing the working fluid (air) temperature to more closely approach that of the major energy source, the combustion of coal. In fact, a good figure of merit for a HIPPS design is just how much of the enthalpy from coal combustion is used by the gas turbine. The efficiency of a power cycle varies directly with the temperature of the working fluid and for contemporary gas turbines the optimal turbine inlet temperature is in the range of 2300-2500 F (1260-1371 C). These temperatures are beyond the working range of currently available alloys and are also in the range of the ash fusion temperature of most coals. These two sets of physical properties combine to produce the major engineering challenges for a HIPPS design. The UTRC team developed a design hierarchy to impose more rigor in our approach. Once the size of the plant had been determined by the choice of gas turbine and the matching steam turbine, the design process of the High Temperature Advanced Furnace (HITAF) moved ineluctably to a down-fired, slagging configuration. This design was based on two air heaters: one a high temperature slagging Radiative Air Heater (RAH) and a lower temperature, dry ash Convective Air Heater (CAH). The specific details of the air heaters are arrived at by an iterative sequence in the following order:-Starting from the overall Cycle requirements which set the limits for the combustion and heat transfer analysis-The available enthalpy determined the range of materials, ceramics or alloys, which could tolerate the temperatures-Structural Analysis of the designs proved to be the major limitation-Finally the commercialization

  2. Commercial combustion research aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schowengerdt, F. D.

    1999-01-01

    The Center for Commercial Applications of Combustion in Space (CCACS) is planning a number of combustion experiments to be done on the International Space Station (ISS). These experiments will be conducted in two ISS facilities, the SpaceDRUMS™ Acoustic Levitation Furnace (ALF) and the Combustion Integrated Rack (CIR) portion of the Fluids and Combustion Facility (FCF). The experiments are part of ongoing commercial projects involving flame synthesis of ceramic powders, catalytic combustion, water mist fire suppression, glass-ceramics for fiber and other applications and porous ceramics for bone replacements, filters and catalyst supports. Ground- and parabolic aircraft-based experiments are currently underway to verify the scientific bases and to test prototype flight hardware. The projects have strong external support.

  3. Nonlocal magnetorotational instability

    SciTech Connect

    Mikhailovskii, A. B.; Erokhin, N. N.; Lominadze, J. G.; Galvao, R. M. O.; Churikov, A. P.; Kharshiladze, O. A.; Amador, C. H. S.

    2008-05-15

    An analytical theory of the nonlocal magnetorotational instability (MRI) is developed for the simplest astrophysical plasma model. It is assumed that the rotation frequency profile has a steplike character, so that there are two regions in which it has constant different values, separated by a narrow transition layer. The surface wave approach is employed to investigate the MRI in this configuration. It is shown that the main regularities of the nonlocal MRI are similar to those of the local instability and that driving the nonaxisymmetric MRI is less effective than the axisymmetric one, also for the case of the nonlocal instability. The existence of nonlocal instabilities in nonmagnetized plasma is predicted.

  4. Active Combustion Control for Aircraft Gas-Turbine Engines-Experimental Results for an Advanced, Low-Emissions Combustor Prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLaat, John C.; Kopasakis, George; Saus, Joseph R.; Chang, Clarence T.; Wey, Changlie

    2012-01-01

    Lean combustion concepts for aircraft engine combustors are prone to combustion instabilities. Mitigation of instabilities is an enabling technology for these low-emissions combustors. NASA Glenn Research Center s prior activity has demonstrated active control to suppress a high-frequency combustion instability in a combustor rig designed to emulate an actual aircraft engine instability experience with a conventional, rich-front-end combustor. The current effort is developing further understanding of the problem specifically as applied to future lean-burning, very low-emissions combustors. A prototype advanced, low-emissions aircraft engine combustor with a combustion instability has been identified and previous work has characterized the dynamic behavior of that combustor prototype. The combustor exhibits thermoacoustic instabilities that are related to increasing fuel flow and that potentially prevent full-power operation. A simplified, non-linear oscillator model and a more physics-based sectored 1-D dynamic model have been developed to capture the combustor prototype s instability behavior. Utilizing these models, the NASA Adaptive Sliding Phasor Average Control (ASPAC) instability control method has been updated for the low-emissions combustor prototype. Active combustion instability suppression using the ASPAC control method has been demonstrated experimentally with this combustor prototype in a NASA combustion test cell operating at engine pressures, temperatures, and flows. A high-frequency fuel valve was utilized to perturb the combustor fuel flow. Successful instability suppression was shown using a dynamic pressure sensor in the combustor for controller feedback. Instability control was also shown with a pressure feedback sensor in the lower temperature region upstream of the combustor. It was also demonstrated that the controller can prevent the instability from occurring while combustor operation was transitioning from a stable, low-power condition to

  5. Vortex ring instability and its sound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verzicco, R.; Shariff, K.

    1994-01-01

    This work carries earlier finite-difference calculations of the Widnall instability of vortex rings into the late non-linear stage. Plots of energy in azimuthal Fourier modes indicate that low-order modes dominate at large times; their structure and dynamics remain unexplored, however. An attempt was made to calculate the acoustic signal using the theory of Mohring (1978), valid for unbounded flow. This theory shows that only low-order azimuthal modes contribute to the sound. As a check on the effects of axial periodicity and a slip wall at large radius imposed by the numerical scheme, the acoustic integrals were also computed in a truncated region. Half of the terms contributing to the sound have large differences between the two regions, and the results are therefore unreliable. The error is less severe for a contribution involving only the m = 2 mode, and its low frequency is consistent with a free elliptic bending wave on a thin ring.

  6. Acoustic transducer

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, D.S.

    1997-12-30

    An acoustic transducer is described comprising a one-piece hollow mandrel into the outer surface of which is formed a recess with sides perpendicular to the central axis of the mandrel and separated by a first distance and with a bottom parallel to the central axis and within which recess are a plurality of washer-shaped discs of a piezoelectric material and at least one disc of a temperature-compensating material with the discs being captured between the sides of the recess in a pre-stressed interference fit, typically at 2,000 psi of compressive stress. The transducer also includes a power supply and means to connect to a measurement device. The transducer is intended to be used for telemetry between a measurement device located downhole in an oil or gas well and the surface. The transducer is of an construction that is stronger with fewer joints that could leak fluids into the recess holding the piezoelectric elements than is found in previous acoustic transducers. 4 figs.

  7. Acoustic transducer

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, Douglas S.

    1997-01-01

    An acoustic transducer comprising a one-piece hollow mandrel into the outer surface of which is formed a recess with sides perpendicular to the central axis of the mandrel and separated by a first distance and with a bottom parallel to the central axis and within which recess are a plurality of washer-shaped discs of a piezoelectric material and at least one disc of a temperature-compensating material with the discs being captured between the sides of the recess in a pre-stressed interference fit, typically at 2000 psi of compressive stress. The transducer also includes a power supply and means to connect to a measurement device. The transducer is intended to be used for telemetry between a measurement device located downhole in an oil or gas well and the surface. The transducer is of an construction that is stronger with fewer joints that could leak fluids into the recess holding the piezoelectric elements than is found in previous acoustic transducers.

  8. Hydrodynamic Instabilities in Blast-Driven Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry de Frahan, Marc; Johnsen, Eric

    2014-11-01

    Mixing from hydrodynamics instabilities such as Richtmyer-Meshkov, Rayleigh-Taylor, and Kelvin-Helmholtz, occurs in a wide range of engineering applications such as inertial confinement fusion, supernova collapse, and scramjet combustion. The success of these applications depends on an accurate understanding of these phenomena. Following previous work investigating hydrodynamic mixing from the interaction of a perturbed interface with a planar blast wave, we model the perturbation growth by analyzing the different acceleration phases of a blast wave: an instantaneous acceleration (a pressure increase) followed by a gradual, time-dependent deceleration (a pressure decrease). Depending on the characteristics of these phases, the instability will be dominated by Richtmyer-Meshkov or Rayleigh-Taylor growth. We use a high-order accurate Discontinuous Galerkin method that prevents pressure errors at interfaces with variable specific heats ratios to simulate these systems and understand the different growth regimes.

  9. Resonant instability of supersonic shear layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tam, C. K. W.; Lele, S. K.

    1990-01-01

    A computer simulation of possible resonant instability of a supersonic shear layer is carried out. The resonance of two acoustic duct modes of the flow induced by periodic Mach waves generated by a wavy wall is sought. Results of the simulations are reported. Simulations are unable to document a resonant instability and the mixing characteristics remain unchanged. Possible weakness of the present simulations are discussed. A second set of simulations involving a mixing layer separating a supersonic and a subsonic stream were performed. A wavy wall placed adjacent to the supersonic stream to produce a set of periodic Mach waves terminating at the shear layer is modelled. The entire flow field is similar to that of an imperfectly expanded supersonic jet discharging into a subsonic coflowing stream for which enhanced mixing due to the onset of screech (feedback instability) is known to occur. The purpose of these simulations is to see if enhanced mixing and feedback instability would, indeed, take place. Some evidence of feedback oscillations is found in the simulated flow.

  10. Surge instability on a cavitating propeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duttweiler, Mark Edward

    2001-11-01

    The present study details results from experiments investigating a surge instability on a cavitating propeller. Initially, the stable behavior of the propeller is explored, and the nature and extent of the cavitation is documented at various experimental conditions, including propeller yaw. The cavitation surge instability is first explored through visual observation of the cavitation on the propeller blades and in the tip vortices. Particular note is made of similarities between the behavior of the re-entrant jets and that noted by other investigators. It is also observed that the nature of the instability is closely related to the partial cavity instability observed on single, two-dimensional hydrofoils. The flow conditions that lead to instability are determined and it is shown that onset corresponds to a specific configuration of attached cavity lengths on an individual propeller blade. Pressure measurements are obtained from transducers within the experimental facility, and the acoustic signature of the instability is identified. The magnitude of the fluctuating pressures is very large, presumably capable of producing severe hull vibration. A simple model is developed based on cavity volume estimates obtained from high speed video footage, and the predictions of the model are compared with the experimentally obtained pressures. To assess the significance of the surrounding facility in initiating and sustaining the instability, a model is developed for the experimental facility dynamics. The predictions of this model are then compared with an experimentally determined facility response to a volumetric excitation imposed by an oscillating piston. To quantify the response of the cavitation to fluctuations in test section conditions, quasistatic estimates are obtained for the cavitation compliance and mass flow gain factor of the propeller. These parameters have previously been employed in developing system transfer functions for cavitating pumps. Finally, a model

  11. Multidimensional instability and dynamics of spin avalanches in crystals of nanomagnets.

    PubMed

    Jukimenko, O; Dion, C M; Marklund, M; Bychkov, V

    2014-11-21

    We obtain a fundamental instability of the magnetization-switching fronts in superparamagnetic and ferromagnetic materials such as crystals of nanomagnets, ferromagnetic nanowires, and systems of quantum dots with large spin. We develop the instability theory for both linear and nonlinear stages. By using numerical simulations we investigate the instability properties focusing on spin avalanches in crystals of nanomagnets. The instability distorts spontaneously the fronts and leads to a complex multidimensional front dynamics. We show that the instability has a universal physical nature, with a deep relationship to a wide variety of physical systems, such as the Darrieus-Landau instability of deflagration fronts in combustion, inertial confinement fusion, and thermonuclear supernovae, and the instability of doping fronts in organic semiconductors. PMID:25479521

  12. Multidimensional Instability and Dynamics of Spin Avalanches in Crystals of Nanomagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jukimenko, O.; Dion, C. M.; Marklund, M.; Bychkov, V.

    2014-11-01

    We obtain a fundamental instability of the magnetization-switching fronts in superparamagnetic and ferromagnetic materials such as crystals of nanomagnets, ferromagnetic nanowires, and systems of quantum dots with large spin. We develop the instability theory for both linear and nonlinear stages. By using numerical simulations we investigate the instability properties focusing on spin avalanches in crystals of nanomagnets. The instability distorts spontaneously the fronts and leads to a complex multidimensional front dynamics. We show that the instability has a universal physical nature, with a deep relationship to a wide variety of physical systems, such as the Darrieus-Landau instability of deflagration fronts in combustion, inertial confinement fusion, and thermonuclear supernovae, and the instability of doping fronts in organic semiconductors.

  13. Multidimensional instability and dynamics of spin avalanches in crystals of nanomagnets.

    PubMed

    Jukimenko, O; Dion, C M; Marklund, M; Bychkov, V

    2014-11-21

    We obtain a fundamental instability of the magnetization-switching fronts in superparamagnetic and ferromagnetic materials such as crystals of nanomagnets, ferromagnetic nanowires, and systems of quantum dots with large spin. We develop the instability theory for both linear and nonlinear stages. By using numerical simulations we investigate the instability properties focusing on spin avalanches in crystals of nanomagnets. The instability distorts spontaneously the fronts and leads to a complex multidimensional front dynamics. We show that the instability has a universal physical nature, with a deep relationship to a wide variety of physical systems, such as the Darrieus-Landau instability of deflagration fronts in combustion, inertial confinement fusion, and thermonuclear supernovae, and the instability of doping fronts in organic semiconductors.

  14. Characterization and Simulation of the Thermoacoustic Instability Behavior of an Advanced, Low Emissions Combustor Prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLaat, John C.; Paxson, Daniel E.

    2008-01-01

    Extensive research is being done toward the development of ultra-low-emissions combustors for aircraft gas turbine engines. However, these combustors have an increased susceptibility to thermoacoustic instabilities. This type of instability was recently observed in an advanced, low emissions combustor prototype installed in a NASA Glenn Research Center test stand. The instability produces pressure oscillations that grow with increasing fuel/air ratio, preventing full power operation. The instability behavior makes the combustor a potentially useful test bed for research into active control methods for combustion instability suppression. The instability behavior was characterized by operating the combustor at various pressures, temperatures, and fuel and air flows representative of operation within an aircraft gas turbine engine. Trends in instability behavior versus operating condition have been identified and documented, and possible explanations for the trends provided. A simulation developed at NASA Glenn captures the observed instability behavior. The physics-based simulation includes the relevant physical features of the combustor and test rig, employs a Sectored 1-D approach, includes simplified reaction equations, and provides time-accurate results. A computationally efficient method is used for area transitions, which decreases run times and allows the simulation to be used for parametric studies, including control method investigations. Simulation results show that the simulation exhibits a self-starting, self-sustained combustion instability and also replicates the experimentally observed instability trends versus operating condition. Future plans are to use the simulation to investigate active control strategies to suppress combustion instabilities and then to experimentally demonstrate active instability suppression with the low emissions combustor prototype, enabling full power, stable operation.

  15. Quantum-electrodynamical parametric instability in the incoherent photon gas.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yunliang; Shukla, P K; Eliasson, B

    2013-02-01

    We present a theory for the quantum-electrodynamical (QED) parametric scattering instability of an intense photon pulse in an incoherent radiation background. The pump electromagnetic (EM) wave can decay into a scattered daughter EM wave and an acousticlike wave due to the QED vacuum polarization nonlinearity. By a linear instability analysis we obtain a nonlinear dispersion relation for the growth rate of the scattering instability. The nonlinear QED scattering instability can give rise to the exchange of orbital angular momentum between intense Laguerre-Gaussian mode photon pulses and the two daughter waves, which may be a useful method to detect the highly energetic photon gases existing in the vicinity of rotating dense bodies in the Universe, such as pulsars and magnetars. The observation of the scattered waves may reveal information about the twisted acoustic waves in the incoherent photon gas.

  16. Systems Characterization of Combustor Instabilities With Controls Design Emphasis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopasakis, George

    2004-01-01

    This effort performed test data analysis in order to characterize the general behavior of combustor instabilities with emphasis on controls design. The analysis is performed on data obtained from two configurations of a laboratory combustor rig and from a developmental aero-engine combustor. The study has characterized several dynamic behaviors associated with combustor instabilities. These are: frequency and phase randomness, amplitude modulations, net random phase walks, random noise, exponential growth and intra-harmonic couplings. Finally, the very cause of combustor instabilities was explored and it could be attributed to a more general source-load type impedance interaction that includes the thermo-acoustic coupling. Performing these characterizations on different combustors allows for more accurate identification of the cause of these phenomena and their effect on instability.

  17. Filtration Combustion in Smoldering and SHS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matkowsky, Bernard

    1999-01-01

    considered a number of problems involving filtration combustion. Here we describe two such studies: (A) fingering instabilities in filtration combustion, (B) rapid filtration combustion waves driven by convection.

  18. Fundamentals of Gas Turbine combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerstein, M.

    1979-01-01

    Combustion problems and research recommendations are discussed in the areas of atomization and vaporization, combustion chemistry, combustion dynamics, and combustion modelling. The recommendations considered of highest priority in these areas are presented.

  19. Ignition/combustion processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pryor, D. E.

    1985-01-01

    The overall objectives for this initial technology are to generate an advanced, comprehensive combustion analytical code, and to verify the combustion flow dynamic predictions from this model with hot test experimental data.

  20. Programmed combustion steam generator

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, W.R.

    1984-08-14

    The present invention provides a steam generator which comprises rocket-type multielement injector head and a small diameter, highly elongated, cylindrical combustion chamber whose walls are formed from a plurality of longitudinally adjoined water tubes. The multielement injector head injects an array of associating streams of fuel and oxidizer into the combustion chamber under sufficient pressure to maintain a combustion pressure in the range of 25-150 psia whereupon the narrowness of the combustion chamber serves to constrict the resultant combustion gases to thereby promote radiant and convective heat transfer from the flame of combustion through the walls of the combustion chamber into the water passing through the water tubes. By such arrangement the production of nitrogen oxides in the combustion chamber is avoided.

  1. A general approach for the prediction of localized instability generation in boundary layer flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhari, Meelan; Ng, Lian; Streett, Craig L.

    1991-01-01

    The present approach to the prediction of instability generation that is due to the interaction of freestream disturbances with regions of subscale variations in surface boundary conditions can account for the finite Reynolds number effects, while furnishing a framework for the study of receptivity in compressible flow and in 3D boundary layers. The approach is illustrated for the case of Tollmien-Schlichting wave generation in a Blasius boundary layer, due to the interaction of a freestream acoustic wave with a localized wall inhomogeneity. Results are presented for the generation of viscous and inviscid instabilities in adverse pressure-gradient boundary layers, supersonic boundary layer instabilities, and cross-flow vortex instabilities.

  2. The acoustic characteristics of turbomachinery cavities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucas, M. J.; Noreen, R.; Southerland, L. D.; Cole, J., III; Junger, M.

    1995-01-01

    Internal fluid flows are subject not only to self-sustained oscillations of the purely hydrodynamic type but also to the coupling of the instability with the acoustic mode of the surrounding cavity. This situation is common to turbomachinery, since flow instabilities are confined within a flow path where the acoustic wavelength is typically smaller than the dimensions of the cavity and flow speeds are low enough to allow resonances. When acoustic coupling occurs, the fluctuations can become so severe in amplitude that it may induce structural failure of engine components. The potential for catastrophic failure makes identifying flow-induced noise and vibration sources a priority. In view of the complexity of these types of flows, this report was written with the purpose of presenting many of the methods used to compute frequencies for self-sustained oscillations. The report also presents the engineering formulae needed to calculate the acoustic resonant modes for ducts and cavities. Although the report is not a replacement for more complex numerical or experimental modeling techniques, it is intended to be used on general types of flow configurations that are known to produce self-sustained oscillations. This report provides a complete collection of these models under one cover.

  3. Acoustic emission descriptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witos, Franciszek; Malecki, Ignacy

    The authors present selected problems associated with acoustic emission interpreted as a physical phenomenon and as a measurement technique. The authors examine point sources of acoustic emission in isotropic, homogeneous linearly elastic media of different shapes. In the case of an unbounded medium the authors give the analytical form of the stress field and the wave shift field of the acoustic emission. In the case of a medium which is unbounded plate the authors give a form for the equations which is suitable for numerical calculation of the changes over time of selected acoustic emission values. For acoustic emission as a measurement technique, the authors represent the output signal as the resultant of a mechanical input value which describes the source, the transient function of the medium, and the transient function of specific components of the measurement loop. As an effect of this notation, the authors introduce the distinction between an acoustic measurement signal and an acoustic measurement impulse. The authors define the basic parameters of an arbitrary impulse. The authors extensively discuss the signal functions of acoustic emission impulses and acoustic emission signals defined in this article as acoustic emission descriptors (or signal functions of acoustic emission impulses) and advanced acoustic emission descriptors (which are either descriptors associated with acoustic emission applications or the signal functions of acoustic emission signals). The article also contains the results of experimental research on three different problems in which acoustic emission descriptors associated with acoustic emission pulses, acoustic emission applications, and acoustic emission signals are used. These problems are respectively: a problem of the amplitude-load characteristics of acoustic emission pulses in carbon samples subjected to compound uniaxial compression, the use of acoustic emission to predict the durability characteristics of conveyor belts, and

  4. Acoustic transducer

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, Douglas S.

    2000-01-01

    An active acoustic transducer tool for use down-hole applications. The tool includes a single cylindrical mandrel including a shoulder defining the boundary of a narrowed portion over which is placed a sandwich-style piezoelectric tranducer assembly. The piezoelectric transducer assembly is prestressed by being placed in a thermal interference fit between the shoulder of the mandrel and the base of an anvil which is likewise positioned over the narrower portion of the mandrel. In the preferred embodiment, assembly of the tool is accomplished using a hydraulic jack to stretch the mandrel prior to emplacement of the cylindrical sandwich-style piezoelectric transducer assembly and anvil. After those elements are positioned and secured, the stretched mandrel is allowed to return substantially to its original (pre-stretch) dimensions with the result that the piezoelectric transducer elements are compressed between the anvil and the shoulder of the mandrel.

  5. Acoustic cryocooler

    DOEpatents

    Swift, Gregory W.; Martin, Richard A.; Radenbaugh, Ray

    1990-01-01

    An acoustic cryocooler with no moving parts is formed from a thermoacoustic driver (TAD) driving a pulse tube refrigerator (PTR) through a standing wave tube. Thermoacoustic elements in the TAD are spaced apart a distance effective to accommodate the increased thermal penetration length arising from the relatively low TAD operating frequency in the range of 15-60 Hz. At these low operating frequencies, a long tube is required to support the standing wave. The tube may be coiled to reduce the overall length of the cryocooler. One or two PTR's are located on the standing wave tube adjacent antinodes in the standing wave to be driven by the standing wave pressure oscillations. It is predicted that a heat input of 1000 W at 1000 K will maintian a cooling load of 5 W at 80 K.

  6. Internal combustion engine with multiple combustion chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Gruenwald, D.J.

    1992-05-26

    This patent describes a two-cycle compression ignition engine. It comprises one cylinder, a reciprocable piston moveable in the cylinder, a piston connecting rod, a crankshaft for operation of the piston connecting rod, a cylinder head enclosing the cylinder, the upper surface of the piston and the enclosing surface of the cylinder head defining a cylinder clearance volume, a first combustion chamber and a second combustion chamber located in the cylinder head. This patent describes improvement in means for isolating the combustion process for one full 360{degrees} rotation of the crankshaft; wherein the combustion chambers alternatively provide for expansion of combustion products in the respective chambers into the cylinder volume near top dead center upon each revolution of the crankshaft.

  7. Maximal combustion temperature estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golodova, E.; Shchepakina, E.

    2006-12-01

    This work is concerned with the phenomenon of delayed loss of stability and the estimation of the maximal temperature of safe combustion. Using the qualitative theory of singular perturbations and canard techniques we determine the maximal temperature on the trajectories located in the transition region between the slow combustion regime and the explosive one. This approach is used to estimate the maximal temperature of safe combustion in multi-phase combustion models.

  8. Acoustic telemetry.

    SciTech Connect

    Drumheller, Douglas Schaeffer; Kuszmaul, Scott S.

    2003-08-01

    Broadcasting messages through the earth is a daunting task. Indeed, broadcasting a normal telephone conversion through the earth by wireless means is impossible with todays technology. Most of us don't care, but some do. Industries that drill into the earth need wireless communication to broadcast navigation parameters. This allows them to steer their drill bits. They also need information about the natural formation that they are drilling. Measurements of parameters such as pressure, temperature, and gamma radiation levels can tell them if they have found a valuable resource such as a geothermal reservoir or a stratum bearing natural gas. Wireless communication methods are available to the drilling industry. Information is broadcast via either pressure waves in the drilling fluid or electromagnetic waves in the earth and well tubing. Data transmission can only travel one way at rates around a few baud. Given that normal Internet telephone modems operate near 20,000 baud, these data rates are truly very slow. Moreover, communication is often interrupted or permanently blocked by drilling conditions or natural formation properties. Here we describe a tool that communicates with stress waves traveling through the steel drill pipe and production tubing in the well. It's based on an old idea called Acoustic Telemetry. But what we present here is more than an idea. This tool exists, it's drilled several wells, and it works. Currently, it's the first and only acoustic telemetry tool that can withstand the drilling environment. It broadcasts one way over a limited range at much faster rates than existing methods, but we also know how build a system that can communicate both up and down wells of indefinite length.

  9. Commercial investments in Combustion research aboard ISS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schowengerdt, F. D.

    2000-01-01

    The Center for Commercial Applications of Combustion in Space (CCACS) at the Colorado School of Mines is working with a number of companies planning commercial combustion research to be done aboard the International Space Station (ISS). This research will be conducted in two major ISS facilities, SpaceDRUMS™ and the Fluids and Combustion Facility. SpaceDRUMS™, under development by Guigne Technologies, Ltd., of St. John's Newfoundland, is a containerless processing facility employing active acoustic sample positioning. It is capable of processing the large samples needed in commercial research and development with virtually complete vibration isolation from the space station. The Fluids and Combustion Facility (FCF), being developed by NASA-Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, is a general-purpose combustion furnace designed to accommodate a wide range of scientific experiments. SpaceDRUMS™ will be the first commercial hardware to be launched to ISS. Launch is currently scheduled for UF-1 in 2001. The CCACS research to be done in SpaceDRUMS™ includes combustion synthesis of glass-ceramics and porous materials. The FCF is currently scheduled to be launched to ISS aboard UF-3 in 2002. The CCACS research to be done in the FCF includes water mist fire suppression, catalytic combustion and flame synthesis of ceramic powders. The companies currently planning to be involved in the research include Guigne International, Ltd., Technology International, Inc., Coors Ceramics Company, TDA Research, Advanced Refractory Technologies, Inc., ADA Technologies, Inc., ITN Energy Systems, Inc., Innovative Scientific Solutions, Inc., Princeton Instruments, Inc., Environmental Engineering Concepts, Inc., and Solar Turbines, Inc. Together, these companies are currently investing almost $2 million in cash and in-kind annually toward the seven commercial projects within CCACS. Total private investment in CCACS research to date is over $7 million. .

  10. Thermally induced secondary atomization of droplet in an acoustic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Saptarshi; Saha, Abhishek; Kumar, Ranganathan

    2012-01-01

    We study the thermal effects that lead to instability and break up in acoustically levitated vaporizing fuel droplets. For selective liquids, atomization occurs at the droplet equator under external heating. Short wavelength [Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH)] instability for diesel and bio-diesel droplets triggers this secondary atomization. Vapor pressure, latent heat, and specific heat govern the vaporization rate and temperature history, which affect the surface tension gradient and gas phase density, ultimately dictating the onset of KH instability. We develop a criterion based on Weber number to define a condition for the inception of secondary atomization.

  11. Apparatus and method for combusting low quality fuel

    DOEpatents

    Brushwood, John Samuel; Pillsbury, Paul; Foote, John; Heilos, Andreas

    2003-11-04

    A gas turbine (12) capable of combusting a low quality gaseous fuel having a ratio of flammability limits less than 2, or a heat value below 100 BTU/SCF. A high quality fuel is burned simultaneously with the low quality fuel to eliminate instability in the combustion flame. A sensor (46) is used to monitor at least one parameter of the flame indicative of instability. A controller (50) having the sensor signal (48) as input is programmed to control the relative flow rates of the low quality and high quality fuels. When instability is detected, the flow rate of high quality fuel is automatically increased in relation to the flow rate of low quality fuel to restore stability.

  12. An impulsive source with variable output and stable bandwidth for underwater acoustic experiments.

    PubMed

    McNeese, Andrew R; Wilson, Preston S; Sagers, Jason D; Knobles, David P

    2014-07-01

    The Combustive Sound Source (CSS) is being developed as an environmentally friendly source to be used in ocean acoustics research and surveys. It has the ability to maintain the same wide bandwidth signal over a 20 dB drop in source level. The CSS consists of a submersible combustion chamber filled with a fuel/oxidizer mixture. The mixture is ignited and the ensuing combustion and bubble activity radiates an impulsive, thus broadband, acoustic pulse. The ability to control pulse amplitude while maintaining bandwidth is demonstrated. PMID:24993239

  13. An impulsive source with variable output and stable bandwidth for underwater acoustic experiments.

    PubMed

    McNeese, Andrew R; Wilson, Preston S; Sagers, Jason D; Knobles, David P

    2014-07-01

    The Combustive Sound Source (CSS) is being developed as an environmentally friendly source to be used in ocean acoustics research and surveys. It has the ability to maintain the same wide bandwidth signal over a 20 dB drop in source level. The CSS consists of a submersible combustion chamber filled with a fuel/oxidizer mixture. The mixture is ignited and the ensuing combustion and bubble activity radiates an impulsive, thus broadband, acoustic pulse. The ability to control pulse amplitude while maintaining bandwidth is demonstrated.

  14. Buckling instability in arteries.

    PubMed

    Vandiver, Rebecca M

    2015-04-21

    Arteries can become tortuous in response to abnormal growth stimuli, genetic defects and aging. It is suggested that a buckling instability is a mechanism that might lead to artery tortuosity. Here, the buckling instability in arteries is studied by examining asymmetric modes of bifurcation of two-layer cylindrical structures that are residually stressed. These structures are loaded by an axial force, internal pressure and have nonlinear, anisotropic, hyperelastic responses to stresses. Strain-softening and reduced opening angle are shown to lower the critical internal pressure leading to buckling. In addition, the ratio of the media thickness to the adventitia thickness is shown to have a dramatic impact on arterial instability.

  15. Weakly dissipative dust-ion acoustic wave modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alinejad, H.; Mahdavi, M.; Shahmansouri, M.

    2016-02-01

    The modulational instability of dust-ion acoustic (DIA) waves in an unmagnetized dusty plasma is investigated in the presence of weak dissipations arising due to the low rates (compared to the ion oscillation frequency) of ionization recombination and ion loss. Based on the multiple space and time scales perturbation, a new modified nonlinear Schrödinger equation governing the evolution of modulated DIA waves is derived with a linear damping term. It is shown that the combined action of all dissipative mechanisms due to collisions between particles reveals the permitted maximum time for the occurrence of the modulational instability. The influence on the modulational instability regions of relevant physical parameters such as ion temperature, dust concentration, ionization, recombination and ion loss is numerically examined. It is also found that the recombination frequency controls the instability growth rate, whereas recombination and ion loss make the instability regions wider.

  16. The Role of Instability Waves in Predicting Jet Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, Marvin E.; Handler, Louis M.

    2003-01-01

    Debate over whether linear instability waves play a role in the prediction of jet noise has been going on for many years. Parallel mean flow models, such as the one proposed by Lilley, usually neglect these waves because they cause the solution to become infinite. The present paper solves the true non-parallel acoustic equations for a two-dimensional shear layer by using a vector Greens function and assuming small mean flow spread rate. The results show that linear instability waves must be accounted for in order to construct a proper causal solution to the problem.

  17. Jeans instability of a dusty plasma with dust charge variations

    SciTech Connect

    Hakimi Pajouh, H. Afshari, N.

    2015-09-15

    The effect of the dust charge variations on the stability of a self-gravitating dusty plasma has been theoretically investigated. The dispersion relation for the dust-acoustic waves in a self-gravitating dusty plasma is obtained. It is shown that the dust charge variations have significant effects. It increases the growth rate of instability and the instability cutoff wavenumbers. It is found that by increasing the value of the ions temperature and the absolute value of the equilibrium dust charge, the cutoff wavenumber decreases and the stability region is extended.

  18. Combustion Sensors: Gas Turbine Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Human, Mel

    2002-01-01

    This report documents efforts to survey the current research directions in sensor technology for gas turbine systems. The work is driven by the current and future requirements on system performance and optimization. Accurate real time measurements of velocities, pressure, temperatures, and species concentrations will be required for objectives such as combustion instability attenuation, pollutant reduction, engine health management, exhaust profile control via active control, etc. Changing combustor conditions - engine aging, flow path slagging, or rapid maneuvering - will require adaptive responses; the effectiveness of such will be only as good as the dynamic information available for processing. All of these issues point toward the importance of continued sensor development. For adequate control of the combustion process, sensor data must include information about the above mentioned quantities along with equivalence ratios and radical concentrations, and also include both temporal and spatial velocity resolution. Ultimately these devices must transfer from the laboratory to field installations, and thus must become low weight and cost, reliable and maintainable. A primary conclusion from this study is that the optics-based sensor science will be the primary diagnostic in future gas turbine technologies.

  19. Fuel combustion exhibiting low NO{sub x} and CO levels

    DOEpatents

    Keller, J.O.; Bramlette, T.T.; Barr, P.K.

    1996-07-30

    Method and apparatus are disclosed for safely combusting a fuel in such a manner that very low levels of NO{sub x} and CO are produced. The apparatus comprises an inlet line containing a fuel and an inlet line containing an oxidant. Coupled to the fuel line and to the oxidant line is a mixing means for thoroughly mixing the fuel and the oxidant without combusting them. Coupled to the mixing means is a means for injecting the mixed fuel and oxidant, in the form of a large-scale fluid dynamic structure, into a combustion region. Coupled to the combustion region is a means for producing a periodic flow field within the combustion region to mix the fuel and the oxidant with ambient gases in order to lower the temperature of combustion. The means for producing a periodic flow field can be a pulse combustor, a rotating band, or a rotating cylinder within an acoustic chamber positioned upstream or downstream of the region of combustion. The mixing means can be a one-way flapper valve; a rotating cylinder; a rotating band having slots that expose open ends of said fuel inlet line and said oxidant inlet line simultaneously; or a set of coaxial fuel annuli and oxidizer annuli. The means for producing a periodic flow field may or may not be in communication with an acoustic resonance. When employed, the acoustic resonance may be upstream or downstream of the region of combustion. 14 figs.

  20. Separating Direct and Indirect Turbofan Engine Combustion Noise While Estimating Post-Combustion (Post-Flame) Residence Time Using the Correlation Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, Jeffrey Hilton

    2011-01-01

    A previous investigation on the presence of direct and indirect combustion noise for a full-scale turbofan engine using a far-field microphone at 130 is extended by also examining signals obtained at two additional downstream directions using far-field microphones at 110 deg and 160 deg. A generalized cross-correlation function technique is used to study the change in propagation time to the far field of the combined direct and indirect combustion noise signal as a sequence of low-pass filters are applied. The filtering procedure used produces no phase distortion. As the low-pass filter frequency is decreased, the travel time increases because the relative amount of direct combustion noise is reduced. The indirect combustion noise signal travels more slowly because in the combustor entropy fluctuations move with the flow velocity, which is slow compared to the local speed of sound. The indirect combustion noise signal travels at acoustic velocities after reaching the turbine and being converted into an acoustic signal. The direct combustion noise is always propagating at acoustic velocities. The results show that the estimated indirect combustion noise time delay values (post-combustion residence times) measured at each angle are fairly consistent with one another for a relevant range of operating conditions and demonstrate source separation of a mixture of direct and indirect combustion noise. The results may lead to a better idea about the acoustics in the combustor and may help develop and validate improved reduced-order physics-based methods for predicting turbofan engine core noise.

  1. Experimental study of the thermal-acoustic efficiency in a long turbulent diffusion-flame burner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahan, J. R.

    1983-01-01

    A two-year study of noise production in a long tubular burner is described. The research was motivated by an interest in understanding and eventually reducing core noise in gas turbine engines. The general approach is to employ an acoustic source/propagation model to interpret the sound pressure spectrum in the acoustic far field of the burner in terms of the source spectrum that must have produced it. In the model the sources are assumed to be due uniquely to the unsteady component of combustion heat release; thus only direct combustion-noise is considered. The source spectrum is then the variation with frequency of the thermal-acoustic efficiency, defined as the fraction of combustion heat release which is converted into acoustic energy at a given frequency. The thrust of the research was to study the variation of the source spectrum with the design and operating parameters of the burner.

  2. Opportunities in pulse combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Brenchley, D.L.; Bomelburg, H.J.

    1985-10-01

    In most pulse combustors, the combustion occurs near the closed end of a tube where inlet valves operate in phase with the pressure amplitude variations. Thus, within the combustion zone, both the temperature and the pressure oscillate around a mean value. However, the development of practical applications of pulse combustion has been hampered because effective design requires the right combination of the combustor's dimensions, valve characteristics, fuel/oxidizer combination, and flow pattern. Pulse combustion has several additional advantages for energy conversion efficiency, including high combustion and thermal efficiency, high combustion intensity, and high convective heat transfer rates. Also, pulse combustion can be self-aspirating, generating a pressure boost without using a blower. This allows the use of a compact heat exchanger that may include a condensing section and may obviate the need for a chimney. In the last decade, these features have revived interest in pulse combustion research and development, which has resulted in the development of a pulse combustion air heater by Lennox, and a pulse combustion hydronic unit by Hydrotherm, Inc. To appraise this potential for energy savings, a systematic study was conducted of the many past and present attempts to use pulse combustion for practical purposes. The authors recommended areas where pulse combustion technology could possibly be applied in the future and identified areas in which additional R and D would be necessary. Many of the results of the study project derived from a special workshop on pulse combustion. This document highlights the main points of the study report, with particular emphasis on pulse combustion application in chemical engineering.

  3. Acoustic hemostasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crum, Lawrence; Beach, Kirk; Carter, Stephen; Chandler, Wayne; Curra, Francesco; Kaczkowski, Peter; Keilman, George; Khokhlova, Vera; Martin, Roy; Mourad, Pierre; Vaezy, Shahram

    2000-07-01

    In cases of severe injury, physicians speak of a "golden hour"—a brief grace period in which quickly applied, proper therapy can save the life of the patient. Much of this mortality results from exsanguination, i.e., bleeding to death—often from internal hemorrhage. The inability of a paramedic to treat breaches in the vascular system deep within the body or to stem the loss of blood from internal organs is a major reason for the high level of mortality associated with blunt trauma. We have undertaken an extensive research program to treat the problem of internal bleeding. Our approach is as follows: (a) We use scanning ultrasound to identify internal bleeding and hemorrhage, (b) we use ultrasound imaging to locate specific breaches in the vascular system, both from damaged vessels and gross damage to the capillary bed, and (c) we use High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) to treat the damaged region and to induce hemostasis. We present a general review of this research with some emphasis on the role of nonlinear acoustics.

  4. Imaging in carpal instability.

    PubMed

    Ramamurthy, N K; Chojnowski, A J; Toms, A P

    2016-01-01

    Carpal instability is a complex and heterogeneous clinical condition. Management requires accurate identification of structural injury with an understanding of the resultant movement (kinematic) and load transfer (kinetic) failure. Static imaging techniques, such as plain film radiography, stress views, ultrasound, magnetic resonance, MR arthrography and computerized tomography arthrography, may accurately depict major wrist ligamentous injury. Dynamic ultrasound and videofluoroscopy may demonstrate dynamic instability and kinematic dysfunction. There is a growing evidence base for the diagnostic accuracy of these techniques in detecting intrinsic ligament tears, but there are limitations. Evidence of their efficacy and relevance in detection of non-dissociative carpal instability and extrinsic ligament tears is weak. Further research into the accuracy of existing imaging modalities is still required. Novel techniques, including four-dimensional computerized tomography and magnetic resonance, can evaluate both cross-sectional and functional carpal anatomy. This is a narrative review of level-III studies evaluating the role of imaging in carpal instability. PMID:26586689

  5. Bacterial Genome Instability

    PubMed Central

    Darmon, Elise

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Bacterial genomes are remarkably stable from one generation to the next but are plastic on an evolutionary time scale, substantially shaped by horizontal gene transfer, genome rearrangement, and the activities of mobile DNA elements. This implies the existence of a delicate balance between the maintenance of genome stability and the tolerance of genome instability. In this review, we describe the specialized genetic elements and the endogenous processes that contribute to genome instability. We then discuss the consequences of genome instability at the physiological level, where cells have harnessed instability to mediate phase and antigenic variation, and at the evolutionary level, where horizontal gene transfer has played an important role. Indeed, this ability to share DNA sequences has played a major part in the evolution of life on Earth. The evolutionary plasticity of bacterial genomes, coupled with the vast numbers of bacteria on the planet, substantially limits our ability to control disease. PMID:24600039

  6. Advanced acoustic cavity technology. [for hydrogen oxygen rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hines, W. S.; Oberg, C. L.; Kusak, L.

    1974-01-01

    A series of rocket motor firings was performed in a modified linear aerospike thrust chamber with the H2/O2 propellant combination to allow determination of the physical properties of the combustion gases in acoustic cavities located in the chamber side walls. A preliminary analytical study was first conducted to define theoretically both the appropriate cavity dimensions and the combustion gas flow field adjacent to the cavity openings. During the subsequent motor firings, cavity gas temperature profiles were measured and gas samples were withdrawn from the bottom of the cavities for compositional analysis by measurement of pressure/temperature variation and gas chromatography. Data were obtained with both radially and axially oriented cavities and with and without hydrogen bleed flow through the cavities. A simplified procedure was developed for predicting gas cavity and acoustic velocity for use in acoustic cavity design analyses.

  7. Review of passive shear-flow control research for improved subsonic and supersonic combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Schadow, K.C.; Gutmark, E.

    1989-01-01

    Shear-flow investigations have been conducted in the high-Re, turbulent initial-condition combustion regime representative of flow configurations encountered in ramjets and in supersonic plumes. Large-scale vortical structures were identified and characterized in both nonreacting and combustion-reaction experimental conditions; attention was given to these structures' role in mixing, and their breakup into fine-scale turbulence. Shear-flow/combustion control was obtained by actively enlisting duct acoustics and passively employing noncircular flow cross-sections. The investigations were extended to supersonic shear flows, yielding improved mixing for supersonic combustion. 44 refs.

  8. Combustion modeling in internal combustion engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeleznik, F. J.

    1976-01-01

    The fundamental assumptions of the Blizard and Keck combustion model for internal combustion engines are examined and a generalization of that model is derived. The most significant feature of the model is that it permits the occurrence of unburned hydrocarbons in the thermodynamic-kinetic modeling of exhaust gases. The general formulas are evaluated in two specific cases that are likely to be significant in the applications of the model.

  9. Robust active combustion control for the optimization of environmental performance and energy efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demayo, Trevor Nat

    Criteria pollutant regulations, climate change concerns, and energy conservation efforts are placing strict constraints in the design and operation of advanced, stationary combustion systems. To ensure minimal pollutant emissions and maximal efficiency at every instant of operation while preventing reaction blowout, combustion systems need to react and adapt in real-time to external changes. This study describes the development, demonstration, and evaluation of a multivariable feedback control system, designed to maximize the performance of natural gas-fired combustion systems. A feedback sensor array was developed to monitor reaction stability and measure combustion performance as a function of NOx, CO, and O, emissions. Acoustic and UV chemiluminescent emissions were investigated for use as stability indicators. Modulated signals of CH* and CO2* chemiluminescence were found to correlate well with the onset of lean blowout. A variety of emissions sensors were tested and evaluated, including conventional CEMS', micro-fuel cells, a zirconia NOx transducer, and a rapid response predictive NOx sensor based on UV flame chemiluminescence. A dual time-scale controller was designed to actively optimize operating conditions by maximizing a multivariable performance function J using a linear direction set search algorithm. The controller evaluated J under slow, quasi steady-state conditions, while dynamically monitoring the reaction zone at high speed for pre-blowout instabilities or boundary condition violations. To establish the input control parameters, two burner systems were selected: a 30 kW air-swirl, generic research burner, and a 120 kW scaled, fuel-staged, industrial boiler burner. The parameters, chosen to most affect burner performance, consisted of air swirl intensity and excess air for the generic burner, and fuel-staging and excess air for the boiler burner. A set of optimization parameters was also established to ensure efficient and deterministic

  10. Combustion oscillation monitoring using flame ionization in a turbulent premixed combustor

    SciTech Connect

    Chorpening, B.T.; Thornton, J.D.; Huckaby, E.D.; Benson, K.J.

    2007-04-01

    To achieve very low NOx emission levels, lean-premixed gas turbine combustors have been commercially implemented that operate near the fuel-lean flame extinction limit. Near the lean limit, however, flashback, lean blow off, and combustion dynamics have appeared as problems during operation. To help address these operational problems, a combustion control and diagnostics sensor (CCADS) for gas turbine combustors is being developed. CCADS uses the electrical properties of the flame to detect key events and monitor critical operating parameters within the combustor. Previous development efforts have shown the capability of CCADS to monitor flashback and equivalence ratio. Recent work has focused on detecting and measuring combustion instabilities. A highly instrumented atmospheric combustor has been used to measure the pressure oscillations in the combustor, the OH emission, and the flame ion field at the premix injector outlet and along the walls of the combustor. This instrumentation allows examination of the downstream extent of the combustion field using both the OH emission and the corresponding electron and ion distribution near the walls of the combustor. In most cases, the strongest pressure oscillation dominates the frequency behavior of the OH emission and the flame ion signals. Using this highly instrumented combustor, tests were run over a matrix of equivalence ratios from 0.6 to 0.8, with an inlet reference velocity of 25 m/s 82 ft/ s . The acoustics of the fuel system for the combustor were tuned using an active-passive technique with an adjustable quarter-wave resonator. Although several statistics were investigated for correlation with the dynamic pressure in the combustor, the best correlation was found with the standard deviation of the guard current. The data show a monotonic relationship between the standard deviation of the guard current (the current through the flame at the premix injector outlet) and the standard deviation of the chamber

  11. Acoustic source for generating an acoustic beam

    DOEpatents

    Vu, Cung Khac; Sinha, Dipen N.; Pantea, Cristian

    2016-05-31

    An acoustic source for generating an acoustic beam includes a housing; a plurality of spaced apart piezo-electric layers disposed within the housing; and a non-linear medium filling between the plurality of layers. Each of the plurality of piezoelectric layers is configured to generate an acoustic wave. The non-linear medium and the plurality of piezo-electric material layers have a matching impedance so as to enhance a transmission of the acoustic wave generated by each of plurality of layers through the remaining plurality of layers.

  12. Boiler using combustible fluid

    DOEpatents

    Baumgartner, H.; Meier, J.G.

    1974-07-03

    A fluid fuel boiler is described comprising a combustion chamber, a cover on the combustion chamber having an opening for introducing a combustion-supporting gaseous fluid through said openings, means to impart rotation to the gaseous fluid about an axis of the combustion chamber, a burner for introducing a fluid fuel into the chamber mixed with the gaseous fluid for combustion thereof, the cover having a generally frustro-conical configuration diverging from the opening toward the interior of the chamber at an angle of between 15/sup 0/ and 55/sup 0/; means defining said combustion chamber having means defining a plurality of axial hot gas flow paths from a downstream portion of the combustion chamber to flow hot gases into an upstream portion of the combustion chamber, and means for diverting some of the hot gas flow along paths in a direction circumferentially of the combustion chamber, with the latter paths being immersed in the water flow path thereby to improve heat transfer and terminating in a gas outlet, the combustion chamber comprising at least one modular element, joined axially to the frustro-conical cover and coaxial therewith. The modular element comprises an inner ring and means of defining the circumferential, radial, and spiral flow paths of the hot gases.

  13. Catalytic combustion over hexaaluminates

    SciTech Connect

    Ramesh, K.S.; Kingsley, J.J.; Hubler, T.L.; McCready, D.E.; Cox, J.L.

    1997-12-31

    Combustion is the oldest and most extensively used process for the production of light, heat, and energy utilization. Mankind has sought to control combustion since prehistoric times to more effectively utilize the combustible material, control the products of combustion, and harness the energy released during combustion. Catalysts provide the means to control the reactions of combustion beyond what can be achieved in the homogeneous gas phase (1). Catalysts also enable operation outside the range of flammability limits and control atmospheric pollutants of combustion, mainly NO{sub x}, carbon monoxide, and particles of incomplete combustion (soot). The major technical difficulty that has hindered widespread application of catalytic combustion devices is their poor performance, particularly durability of their ceramic substrates and catalytically active phases in the high temperature environment. Catalytic combustion of hydrocarbons over metals and metal oxide catalysts has been explored extensively. Recent reviews of materials for high temperature catalytic combustion have been provided by Marcus et al. (2) and Trim (3). Hexaaluminates which show good thermal stability above 1200{degrees}C are one class of metal oxides receiving consideration for application in high temperature combustion devices. Matsuda et al. (4) have developed thermally stable La-hexaaluminates with the same layer structure as Ba-hexaaluminate and have investigated their catalytic application. Machida et al. (5-7) have investigated the catalytic properties of a number of hexaaluminates of BaMAl{sub 11}O{sub 19-{alpha}}(M=Cr, Mn,Fe,Co,Ni). Here we report the synthesis, properties and catalytic combustion of some new hexaaluminates.

  14. Canonical Acoustics and Its Application to Surface Acoustic Wave on Acoustic Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jian Qi

    2016-08-01

    In a conventional formalism of acoustics, acoustic pressure p and velocity field u are used for characterizing acoustic waves propagating inside elastic/acoustic materials. We shall treat some fundamental problems relevant to acoustic wave propagation alternatively by using canonical acoustics (a more concise and compact formalism of acoustic dynamics), in which an acoustic scalar potential and an acoustic vector potential (Φ ,V), instead of the conventional acoustic field quantities such as acoustic pressure and velocity field (p,u) for characterizing acoustic waves, have been defined as the fundamental variables. The canonical formalism of the acoustic energy-momentum tensor is derived in terms of the acoustic potentials. Both the acoustic Hamiltonian density and the acoustic Lagrangian density have been defined, and based on this formulation, the acoustic wave quantization in a fluid is also developed. Such a formalism of acoustic potentials is employed to the problem of negative-mass-density assisted surface acoustic wave that is a highly localized surface bound state (an eigenstate of the acoustic wave equations). Since such a surface acoustic wave can be strongly confined to an interface between an acoustic metamaterial (e.g., fluid-solid composite structures with a negative dynamical mass density) and an ordinary material (with a positive mass density), it will give rise to an effect of acoustic field enhancement on the acoustic interface, and would have potential applications in acoustic device design for acoustic wave control.

  15. What Is an Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Acoustic Neuroma An acoustic neuroma, also called a vestibular schwannoma, is a rare benign tumor of the ... Acoustic Neuroma? An acoustic neuroma, known as a vestibular schwannoma, is a benign (non-cancerous) growth that ...

  16. Microgravity acoustic mixing for particle cloud combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pla, Frederic; Rubinstein, Robert I.

    1990-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical investigations of acoustic mixing procedures designed to uniformly distribute fuel particles in a combustion tube for application in the proposed Particle Cloud Combustion Experiment (PCCE) are described. Two acoustic mixing methods are investigated: mixing in a cylindrical tube using high frequency spinning modes generated by suitably phased, or quadrature speakers, and acoustic premixing in a sphere. Quadrature mixing leads to rapid circumferential circulation of the powder around the tube. Good mixing is observed in the circulating regions. However, because axial inhomogeneities are necessarily present in the acoustic field, this circulation does not extend throughout the tube. Simultaneous operation of the quadrature-speaker set and the axial-speaker was observed to produce considerably enhanced mixing compared to operation of the quadrature-speaker set alone. Mixing experiments using both types of speakers were free of the longitudinal powder drift observed using axial-speakers alone. Vigorous powder mixing was obtained in the sphere for many normal modes: however, in no case was the powder observed to fill the sphere entirely. Theoretical analysis indicated that mixing under steady conditions cannot fill more than a hemisphere except under very unusual conditions. Premixing in a hemisphere may be satisfactory; otherwise, complete mixing in microgravity might be possible by operating the speaker in short bursts. A general conclusion is that acoustic transients are more likely to produce good mixing than steady state conditions. The reason is that in steady conditions, flow structures like nodal planes are possible and often even unavoidable. These tend to separate the mixing region into cells across which powder cannot be transferred. In contrast, transients not only are free of such structures, they also have the characteristics, desirable for mixing, of randomness and disorder. This conclusion is corroborated by mixing

  17. Observation and analysis of in vivo vocal fold tissue instabilities produced by nonlinear source-filter coupling: A case studya

    PubMed Central

    Zañartu, Matías; Mehta, Daryush D.; Ho, Julio C.; Wodicka, George R.; Hillman, Robert E.

    2011-01-01

    Different source-related factors can lead to vocal fold instabilities and bifurcations referred to as voice breaks. Nonlinear coupling in phonation suggests that changes in acoustic loading can also be responsible for this unstable behavior. However, no in vivo visualization of tissue motion during these acoustically induced instabilities has been reported. Simultaneous recordings of laryngeal high-speed videoendoscopy, acoustics, aerodynamics, electroglottography, and neck skin acceleration are obtained from a participant consistently exhibiting voice breaks during pitch glide maneuvers. Results suggest that acoustically induced and source-induced instabilities can be distinguished at the tissue level. Differences in vibratory patterns are described through kymography and phonovibrography; measures of glottal area, open∕speed quotient, and amplitude∕phase asymmetry; and empirical orthogonal function decomposition. Acoustically induced tissue instabilities appear abruptly and exhibit irregular vocal fold motion after the bifurcation point, whereas source-induced ones show a smoother transition. These observations are also reflected in the acoustic and acceleration signals. Added aperiodicity is observed after the acoustically induced break, and harmonic changes appear prior to the bifurcation for the source-induced break. Both types of breaks appear to be subcritical bifurcations due to the presence of hysteresis and amplitude changes after the frequency jumps. These results are consistent with previous studies and the nonlinear source-filter coupling theory. PMID:21303014

  18. Suppression of parametric instabilities in future gravitational wave detectors using damping rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gras, S.; Blair, D. G.; Zhao, C.

    2009-07-01

    The next generation of laser interferometer gravitational wave detectors requires optical cavities with stored power approaching 1 MW. However, such proposed cavities are subject to parametric instability where carrier power resonantly downconverts to drive a large number of test mass acoustic resonances. Damping rings on the test mass circumference have been proposed as a means of suppressing such instabilities, and in previous work, the affect of such a ring on test mass acoustic modes and thermal noise was analysed. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the general issue of parametric instability suppression with damping rings. We determine the optimal position and geometry of damping rings, so as to obtain sufficient instability suppression with the least thermal noise penalty. It is shown that unilateral stability can be attained with a ring damper alone at the expense of a 20% increase in thermal noise, while if just one optical mode is suppressed, there is only a 5% noise penalty.

  19. Heat release effects on the instability of parallel shear layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hegde, U.

    1994-01-01

    The influence of time-dependent heat addition on the linear instablity of shear layers is of considerable interest in understanding the dynamic behavior of reacting flows and combustion-turbulence interactions. The approach is based upon the Bernoulli enthalpy aeroacoustics theory, which utilizes the specific enthalpy and specific entropy as the primary thermodynamic variables. In addition, velocity oscillations are split into Helmoholtz decomposition theorem.

  20. A model for premixed combustion oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Janus, M.C.; Richards, G.A.

    1996-03-01

    Combustion oscillations are receiving renewed research interest due to increasing application of lean premix (LPM) combustion to gas turbines. A simple, nonlinear model for premixed combustion is described; it was developed to explain experimental results and to provide guidance for developing active control schemes based on nonlinear concepts. The model can be used to quickly examine instability trends associated with changes in equivalence ratio, mass flow rate, geometry, ambient conditions, etc. The model represents the relevant processes occurring in a fuel nozzle and combustor analogous to current LPM turbine combustors. Conservation equations for the nozzle and combustor are developed from simple control volume analysis, providing ordinary differential equations that can be solved on a PC. Combustion is modeled as a stirred reactor, with bimolecular reaction between fuel and air. Although focus is on the model, it and experimental results are compared to understand effects of inlet air temperature and open loop control schemes. The model shows that both are related to changes in transport time.

  1. Combustion of Micropowdered Biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geil, Ethan; Thorne, Robert

    2009-03-01

    Combustion of finely powdered biomass has the potential to replace heating oil, which accounts for a significant fraction of US oil consumption, in heating, cooling and local power generation applications. When ground to 30-150 micron powders and dispersed in air, wood and other biomass can undergo deflagrating combustion, as occurs with gaseous and dispersed liquid fuels. Combustion is very nearly complete, and in contrast to sugar/starch or cellulose-derived ethanol, nearly all of the available plant mass is converted to usable energy so the economics are much more promising. We are exploring the fundamental combustion science of biomass powders in this size range. In particular, we are examining how powder size, powder composition (including the fraction of volatile organics) and other parameters affect the combustion regime and the combustion products.

  2. Lump wood combustion process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubesa, Petr; Horák, Jiří; Branc, Michal; Krpec, Kamil; Hopan, František; Koloničný, Jan; Ochodek, Tadeáš; Drastichová, Vendula; Martiník, Lubomír; Malcho, Milan

    2014-08-01

    The article deals with the combustion process for lump wood in low-power fireplaces (units to dozens of kW). Such a combustion process is cyclical in its nature, and what combustion facility users are most interested in is the frequency, at which fuel needs to be stoked to the fireplace. The paper defines the basic terms such as burnout curve and burning rate curve, which are closely related to the stocking frequency. The fuel burning rate is directly dependent on the immediate thermal power of the fireplace. This is also related to the temperature achieved in the fireplace, magnitude of flue gas losses and the ability to generate conditions favouring the full burnout of the fuel's combustible component, which, at once ensures the minimum production of combustible pollutants. Another part of the paper describes experiments conducted in traditional fireplaces with a grate, at which well-dried lump wood was combusted.

  3. Symptoms of Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions to Ask Yourself ... Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions to Ask Yourself ...

  4. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    MedlinePlus

    ... Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions to Ask Yourself ... Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions to Ask Yourself ...

  5. High and low frequency instabilities driven by counter-streaming electron beams in space plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Mbuli, L. N.; Maharaj, S. K.; Bharuthram, R.

    2014-05-15

    A four-component plasma composed of a drifting (parallel to ambient magnetic field) population of warm electrons, drifting (anti-parallel to ambient magnetic field) cool electrons, stationary hot electrons, and thermal ions is studied in an attempt to further our understanding of the excitation mechanisms of broadband electrostatic noise (BEN) in the Earth's magnetospheric regions such as the magnetosheath, plasmasphere, and plasma sheet boundary layer (PSBL). Using kinetic theory, beam-driven electrostatic instabilities such as the ion-acoustic, electron-acoustic instabilities are found to be supported in our multi-component model. The dependence of the instability growth rates and real frequencies on various plasma parameters such as beam speed, number density, temperature, and temperature anisotropy of the counter-streaming (relative to ambient magnetic field) cool electron beam are investigated. It is found that the number density of the anti-field aligned cool electron beam and drift speed play a central role in determining which instability is excited. Using plasma parameters which are closely correlated with the measurements made by the Cluster satellites in the PSBL region, we find that the electron-acoustic and ion-acoustic instabilities could account for the generation of BEN in this region.

  6. Coal combustion products

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kalyoncu, R.S.; Olson, D.W.

    2001-01-01

    Coal-burning powerplants, which supply more than half of U.S. electricity, also generate coal combustion products, which can be both a resource and a disposal problem. The U.S. Geological Survey collaborates with the American Coal Ash Association in preparing its annual report on coal combustion products. This Fact Sheet answers questions about present and potential uses of coal combustion products.

  7. Numerical simulations in combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, T. J.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reviews numerical simulations in reacting flows in general and combustion phenomena in particular. It is shown that use of implicit schemes and/or adaptive mesh strategies can improve convergence, stability, and accuracy of the solution. Difficulties increase as turbulence and multidimensions are considered, particularly when finite-rate chemistry governs the given combustion problem. Particular attention is given to the areas of solid-propellant combustion dynamics, turbulent diffusion flames, and spray droplet vaporization.

  8. Combustion Stability Analyses for J-2X Gas Generator Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hulka, J. R.; Protz, C. S.; Casiano, M. J.; Kenny, R. J.

    2010-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is developing a liquid oxygen/liquid hydrogen rocket engine for upper stage and trans-lunar applications of the Ares vehicles for the Constellation program. This engine, designated the J-2X, is a higher pressure, higher thrust variant of the Apollo-era J-2 engine. Development was contracted to Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne in 2006. Over the past several years, development of the gas generator for the J-2X engine has progressed through a variety of workhorse injector, chamber, and feed system configurations. Several of these configurations have resulted in injection-coupled combustion instability of the gas generator assembly at the first longitudinal mode of the combustion chamber. In this paper, the longitudinal mode combustion instabilities observed on the workhorse test stand are discussed in detail. Aspects of this combustion instability have been modeled at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center with several codes, including the Rocket Combustor Interaction Design and Analysis (ROCCID) code and a new lumped-parameter MatLab model. To accurately predict the instability characteristics of all the chamber and injector geometries and test conditions, several features of the submodels in the ROCCID suite of calculations required modification. Finite-element analyses were conducted of several complicated combustion chamber geometries to determine how to model and anchor the chamber response in ROCCID. A large suite of sensitivity calculations were conducted to determine how to model and anchor the injector response in ROCCID. These modifications and their ramification for future stability analyses of this type are discussed in detail. The lumped-parameter MatLab model of the gas generator assembly was created as an alternative calculation to the ROCCID methodology. This paper also describes this model and the stability calculations.

  9. Acoustic emission frequency discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sugg, Frank E. (Inventor); Graham, Lloyd J. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    In acoustic emission nondestructive testing, broadband frequency noise is distinguished from narrow banded acoustic emission signals, since the latter are valid events indicative of structural flaws in the material being examined. This is accomplished by separating out those signals which contain frequency components both within and beyond (either above or below) the range of valid acoustic emission events. Application to acoustic emission monitoring during nondestructive bond verification and proof loading of undensified tiles on the Space Shuttle Orbiter is considered.

  10. Combustion pressure sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Bettman, M.

    1986-04-29

    A combustion pressure sensor is described for mounting on an internal combustion engine so as to have access to the interior of a combustion cylinder. The sensor consists of: a first diaphragm means adjacent a combustion region for deflecting as a function of the magnitude of adjacent pressure in the combustion region, and for acting as a gas tight seal between the combustion region and an interior volume of the combustion pressure sensor means; a second diaphragm means, spaced from the first diaphragm means, for deflecting as a function of the deflection of the first diaphragm and generating a signal indicative of the deflection of the second diaphragm means; a force transmitting means located between the first diaphragm means and the second diaphragm means for transmitting movement from the first diaphragm means to the second diaphragm means, and for reducing the speed and amplitude of heat tramsmission from the first diaphragm means to the second diaphragm means; and the second diaphragm including a steel member having a portion coated with an electrically insulating glass enamel, upon which is formed a thick film piezoresistor for use as a thick film resistive strain gauge and overlapping thick film conductor terminations for use as electrically conductive contacts, the thick film piezoresistor having a baseline resistance which can be temperature compensated by resistance measurement between successive combustion firings in the interior of the combustion cylinder.

  11. Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Ziemkiewicz; Tamara Vandivort; Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Y. Paul Chugh; James Hower

    2008-08-31

    Ashlines: To promote and support the commercially viable and environmentally sound recycling of coal combustion byproducts for productive uses through scientific research, development, and field testing.

  12. Diesel engine combustion processes

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    Diesel Engine Combustion Processes guides the engineer and research technician toward engine designs which will give the ``best payoff`` in terms of emissions and fuel economy. Contents include: Three-dimensional modeling of soot and NO in a direct-injection diesel engine; Prechamber for lean burn for low NOx; Modeling and identification of a diesel combustion process with the downhill gradient search method; The droplet group micro-explosions in W/O diesel fuel emulsion sprays; Combustion process of diesel spray in high temperature air; Combustion process of diesel engines at regions with different altitude; and more.

  13. Self-gravitational instability in magnetized finitely conducting viscoelastic fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prajapati, R. P.; Chhajlani, R. K.

    2013-04-01

    The linear self-gravitational instability of finitely conducting, magnetized viscoelastic fluid is investigated using the modified generalized hydrodynamic (GH) model. A general dispersion relation is obtained with the help of linearized perturbation equations using the normal mode analysis and it is discussed for longitudinal and transverse modes of propagation. In longitudinal propagation, we find that Alfven mode is uncoupled with the gravitating mode. The Jeans criterion of instability is determined which depends upon shear viscosity and bulk viscosity while it is independent of magnetic field. The viscoelastic effects modify the fundamental Jeans criterion of gravitational instability. In transverse mode of propagation, the Alfven mode couples with the acoustic mode, compressional viscoelastic mode and gravitating mode. The growth rate of Jeans instability is compared in weakly coupled plasma (WCP) and strongly coupled plasma (SCP) which is larger for SCP in both the modes of propagations. The presence of finite electrical resistivity removes the effect of magnetic field in the condition of Jeans instability and expression of critical Jeans wavenumber. It is found that Mach number and shear viscosity has stabilizing while finite electrical resistivity has destabilizing influence on the growth rate of Jeans instability.

  14. Supersonic combustion engine and method of combustion initiation and distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Stickler, D.B.; Ballantyne, A.; Kyuman Jeong.

    1993-06-29

    A supersonic combustion ramjet engine having a combustor with a combustion zone intended to channel gas flow at relatively high speed therethrough, the engine comprising: means for substantially continuously supplying fuel into the combustion zone; and means for substantially instantaneously igniting a volume of fuel in the combustion zone for providing a spatially controlled combustion distribution, the igniting means having means for providing a diffuse discharge of energy into the volume, the volume extending across a substantially complete cross-sectional area of the combustion zone, the means for discharging energy being capable of generating free radicals within the volume of reactive fuel in the combustion zone such that fuel in the volume can initiate a controlled relatively rapid combustion of fuel in the combustion zone whereby combustion distribution in relatively high speed gas flows through the combustion zone can be initiated and controlled without dependence upon a flame holder or relatively high local static temperature in the combustion zone.

  15. Tutorial on architectural acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Neil; Talaske, Rick; Bistafa, Sylvio

    2002-11-01

    This tutorial is intended to provide an overview of current knowledge and practice in architectural acoustics. Topics covered will include basic concepts and history, acoustics of small rooms (small rooms for speech such as classrooms and meeting rooms, music studios, small critical listening spaces such as home theatres) and the acoustics of large rooms (larger assembly halls, auditoria, and performance halls).

  16. Micromachined silicon acoustic delay line with 3D-printed micro linkers and tapered input for improved structural stability and acoustic directivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Y.; Kumar, A.; Xu, S.; Zou, J.

    2016-10-01

    Recent studies have shown that micromachined silicon acoustic delay lines can provide a promising solution to achieve real-time photoacoustic tomography without the need for complex transducer arrays and data acquisition electronics. To achieve deeper imaging depth and wider field of view, a longer delay time and therefore delay length are required. However, as the length of the delay line increases, it becomes more vulnerable to structural instability due to reduced mechanical stiffness. In this paper, we report the design, fabrication, and testing of a new silicon acoustic delay line enhanced with 3D printed polymer micro linker structures. First, mechanical deformation of the silicon acoustic delay line (with and without linker structures) under gravity was simulated by using finite element method. Second, the acoustic crosstalk and acoustic attenuation caused by the polymer micro linker structures were evaluated with both numerical simulation and ultrasound transmission testing. The result shows that the use of the polymer micro linker structures significantly improves the structural stability of the silicon acoustic delay lines without creating additional acoustic attenuation and crosstalk. In addition, the improvement of the acoustic acceptance angle of the silicon acoustic delay lines was also investigated to better suppress the reception of unwanted ultrasound signals outside of the imaging plane. These two improvements are expected to provide an effective solution to eliminate current limitations on the achievable acoustic delay time and out-of-plane imaging resolution of micromachined silicon acoustic delay line arrays.

  17. Gauging magnetorotational instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herron, Isom; Goodman, Jeremy

    2010-08-01

    Previously (Z. Angew. Math. Phys. 57:615-622, 2006), we examined the axisymmetric stability of viscous resistive magnetized Couette flow with emphasis on flows that would be hydrodynamically stable according to Rayleigh’s criterion: opposing gradients of angular velocity and specific angular momentum. A uniform axial magnetic field permeates the fluid. In this regime, magnetorotational instability (MRI) may occur. It was proved that MRI is suppressed, in fact no instability at all occurs, with insulating boundary conditions, when a term multipling the magnetic Prandtl number is neglected. Likewise, in the current work, including this term, when the magnetic resistivity is sufficiently large, MRI is suppressed. This shows conclusively that small magnetic dissipation is a feature of this instability for all magnetic Prandtl numbers. A criterion is provided for the onset of MRI.

  18. The Walking Droplet Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostwick, Joshua; Steen, Paul

    2013-11-01

    A droplet of liquid that partially wets a solid substrate assumes a spherical-cap equilibrium shape. We show that the spherical-cap with a mobile contact-line is unstable to a non-axisymmetric disturbance and we characterize the instability mechanism, as it depends upon the wetting properties of the substrate. We then solve the hydrodynamic problem for inviscid motions showing that the flow associated with the instability correlates with horizontal motion of the droplet's center-of-mass. We calculate the resulting ``walking speed.'' A novel feature is that the energy conversion mechanism is not unique, so long as the contact-line is mobilized. Hence, the walking droplet instability is potentially significant to a number of industrial applications, such as self-cleansing surfaces or energy harvesting devices.

  19. Exact solutions for modeling sound propagation through a combustion zone.

    PubMed

    Sujith, R I

    2001-10-01

    Exact analytical solutions for one-dimensional sound propagation through a combustion zone, taking the effects of mean temperature gradient and oscillatory heat release into account, are presented in this paper. The wave equation is derived starting from the momentum and energy equations. Using appropriate transformations, solutions are derived for the case of an exponential mean temperature gradient in terms of Bessel functions. For the case of a linear mean temperature profile, solutions are derived in terms of confluent hypergeometric functions. Example calculations show that the accuracy in modeling combustion-acoustics interactions can be significantly increased by the use of these solutions.

  20. Results of a model for premixed combustion oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Janus, M.C.; Richards, G.A.

    1996-09-01

    Combustion oscillations are receiving renewed research interest due to increasing use of lean premix (LPM) combustion to gas turbines. A simple, nonlinear model for premixed combustion is described in this paper. The model was developed to help explain specific experimental observations and to provide guidance for development of active control schemes based on nonlinear concepts. The model can be used to quickly examine instability trends associated with changes in equivalence ratio, mass flow rate, geometry, ambient conditions, etc. The model represents the relevant processes occurring in a fuel nozzle and combustor which are analogous to current LPM turbine combustors. Conservation equations for the fuel nozzle and combustor are developed from simple control volume analysis, providing a set of ordinary differential equations that can be solved on a personal computer. Combustion is modeled as a stirred reactor, with a bimolecular reaction rate between fuel and air. A variety of numerical results and comparisons to experimental data are presented to demonstrate the utility of the model. Model results are used to understand the fundamental mechanisms which drive combustion oscillations, effects of inlet air temperature and nozzle geometry on instability, and effectiveness of open loop control schemes.

  1. Dislocation motion and instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yichao; Chapman, Stephen Jonathan; Acharya, Amit

    2013-08-01

    The Peach-Koehler expression for the stress generated by a single (non-planar) curvilinear dislocation is evaluated to calculate the dislocation self stress. This is combined with a law of motion to give the self-induced motion of a general dislocation curve. A stability analysis of a rectilinear, uniformly translating dislocation is then performed. The dislocation is found to be susceptible to a helical instability, with the maximum growth rate occurring when the dislocation is almost, but not exactly, pure screw. The non-linear evolution of the instability is determined numerically, and implications for slip band formation and non-Schmid behavior in yielding are discussed.

  2. The influence of wall resonances on the levitation of objects in a single-axis acoustic processing chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, B. B.

    1980-01-01

    Instabilities were observed in high temperature, single axis acoustic processing chambers. At certain temperatures, strong wall resonances were generated within the processing chamber itself and these transverse resonances were thought sufficient to disrupt the levitation well. These wall resonances are apparently not strong enough to cause instabilities in the levitation well.

  3. Fifteenth combustion research conference

    SciTech Connect

    1993-06-01

    The BES research efforts cover chemical reaction theory, experimental dynamics and spectroscopy, thermodynamics of combustion intermediates, chemical kinetics, reaction mechanisms, combustion diagnostics, and fluid dynamics and chemically reacting flows. 98 papers and abstracts are included. Separate abstracts were prepared for the papers.

  4. Coal Combustion Science

    SciTech Connect

    Hardesty, D.R.; Fletcher, T.H.; Hurt, R.H.; Baxter, L.L. )

    1991-08-01

    The objective of this activity is to support the Office of Fossil Energy in executing research on coal combustion science. This activity consists of basic research on coal combustion that supports both the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center Direct Utilization Advanced Research and Technology Development Program, and the International Energy Agency Coal Combustion Science Project. Specific tasks for this activity include: (1) coal devolatilization - the objective of this risk is to characterize the physical and chemical processes that constitute the early devolatilization phase of coal combustion as a function of coal type, heating rate, particle size and temperature, and gas phase temperature and oxidizer concentration; (2) coal char combustion -the objective of this task is to characterize the physical and chemical processes involved during coal char combustion as a function of coal type, particle size and temperature, and gas phase temperature and oxygen concentration; (3) fate of mineral matter during coal combustion - the objective of this task is to establish a quantitative understanding of the mechanisms and rates of transformation, fragmentation, and deposition of mineral matter in coal combustion environments as a function of coal type, particle size and temperature, the initial forms and distribution of mineral species in the unreacted coal, and the local gas temperature and composition.

  5. Some limitations on processing materials in acoustic levitation devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oran, W. A.; Witherow, W. K.; Ross, B. B.; Rush, J. E.

    1979-01-01

    The spot heating of samples, suspended in an acoustic field, was investigated to determine if the technique could be used to process materials. A single axis resonance device operating in air at 25 C with an rms pressure maximum of 160 to 170 db was used in the experiments. The heat flow from a hot object suspended in a levitation node is dominated by the effects of the field, with the heat loss approximately 20 times larger than that due to natural convection. The acoustic forces which suspend the body at a node also serve to eject the heated air. The coupling between the locally heated region around the body and the acoustic field results in instabilities in both the pressure wave and force field. The investigations indicated the extreme difficulties in developing a materials processing device based on acoustic/spot heating for use in a terrestrial environment.

  6. ACOUSTICAL STANDARDS NEWS.

    PubMed

    Stremmel, Neil; Struck, Christopher J

    2016-07-01

    American National Standards (ANSI Standards) developed by Accredited Standards Committees S1, S2, S3, S3/SC 1, and S12 in the areas of acoustics, mechanical vibration and shock, bioacoustics, animal bioacoustics, and noise, respectively, are published by the Acoustical Society of America (ASA). In addition to these standards, ASA publishes a catalog of Acoustical American National Standards. To receive a copy of the latest Standards catalog, please contact Neil Stremmel.Comments are welcomed on all material in Acoustical Standards News.This Acoustical Standards News section in JASA, as well as the National Catalog of Acoustical Standards and other information on the Standards Program of the Acoustical Society of America, are available via the ASA home page: http://acousticalsociety.org. PMID:27475185

  7. Japan's microgravity combustion science program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sato, Junichi

    1993-01-01

    Most of energy used by us is generated by combustion of fuels. On the other hand, combustion is responsible for contamination of our living earth. Combustion, also, gives us damage to our life as fire or explosive accidents. Therefore, clean and safe combustion is now eagerly required. Knowledge of the combustion process in combustors is needed to achieve proper designs that have stable operation, high efficiency, and low emission levels. However, current understanding on combustion is far from complete. Especially, there is few useful information on practical liquid and solid particle cloud combustion. Studies on combustion process under microgravity condition will provide many informations for basic questions related to combustors.

  8. Global Linear Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theofilis, Vassilios

    2011-01-01

    This article reviews linear instability analysis of flows over or through complex two-dimensional (2D) and 3D geometries. In the three decades since it first appeared in the literature, global instability analysis, based on the solution of the multidimensional eigenvalue and/or initial value problem, is continuously broadening both in scope and in depth. To date it has dealt successfully with a wide range of applications arising in aerospace engineering, physiological flows, food processing, and nuclear-reactor safety. In recent years, nonmodal analysis has complemented the more traditional modal approach and increased knowledge of flow instability physics. Recent highlights delivered by the application of either modal or nonmodal global analysis are briefly discussed. A conscious effort is made to demystify both the tools currently utilized and the jargon employed to describe them, demonstrating the simplicity of the analysis. Hopefully this will provide new impulses for the creation of next-generation algorithms capable of coping with the main open research areas in which step-change progress can be expected by the application of the theory: instability analysis of fully inhomogeneous, 3D flows and control thereof.

  9. Capillary instability of jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauhan, Anuj

    This thesis studies the capillary instability of a compound jet. A compound jet comprises an inner core of a primary fluid surrounded by an annulus of an immiscible secondary fluid. The compound jet is unstable due to capillarity. A compound jet finds applications in a variety of fields, such as, ink jet printing, particle sorting, extrusion, molding, particle production etc. In some of these applications such as molding, the disturbances that could cause the jet breakup start as periodic spatial disturbances of Fourier wave number k and grow in time. This is the temporal instability. In some other applications, such as, ink-jet printing, the disturbances initiate at the edge of the nozzle from which the jet issues out. These disturbances grow in space. This is the spatial instability. At small velocities, even if the initial disturbances are periodic in time, they grow exponentially in time. This is the absolute instability. We perform the temporal, spatial and the absolute stability analysis of an inviscid compound jet in a unified framework using the theory of transforms. Further, we solve the temporal instability problem for a viscous jet to understand the effect of viscosity on breakup dynamics. In the temporal analysis, we show that each interface of the compound jet contributes one mode to the instability. The modes contributed by the inner and outer interfaces grow for waves longer than the inner and the outer circumference of the undisturbed jet, respectively. The inner interface mode has a higher growth rate and hence dominates the breakup. The two interfaces grow exactly in phase in this mode and hence it is refereed to as the stretching mode. The other mode is the squeezing mode because the two interfaces grow exactly out of phase. The same two modes are also present in the spatial analysis. At high Weber numbers the predictions of the spatial theory reduce to those of the temporal theory because the waves simply convect with the jet velocity and there

  10. Laboratory test methods for combustion stability properties of solid propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strand, L. D.; Brown, R. S.

    1992-01-01

    An overview is presented of experimental methods for determining the combustion-stability properties of solid propellants. The methods are generally based on either the temporal response to an initial disturbance or on external methods for generating the required oscillations. The size distribution of condensed-phase combustion products are characterized by means of the experimental approaches. The 'T-burner' approach is shown to assist in the derivation of pressure-coupled driving contributions and particle damping in solid-propellant rocket motors. Other techniques examined include the rotating-valve apparatus, the impedance tube, the modulated throat-acoustic damping burner, and the magnetic flowmeter. The paper shows that experimental methods do not exist for measuring the interactions between acoustic velocity oscillations and burning propellant.

  11. Control Strategies for HCCI Mixed-Mode Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Robert M; Edwards, Kevin Dean

    2010-03-01

    Delphi Automotive Systems and ORNL established this CRADA to expand the operational range of Homogenous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) mixed-mode combustion for gasoline en-gines. ORNL has extensive experience in the analysis, interpretation, and control of dynamic engine phenomena, and Delphi has extensive knowledge and experience in powertrain compo-nents and subsystems. The partnership of these knowledge bases was important to address criti-cal barriers associated with the realistic implementation of HCCI and enabling clean, efficient operation for the next generation of transportation engines. The foundation of this CRADA was established through the analysis of spark-assisted HCCI data from a single-cylinder research engine. This data was used to (1) establish a conceptual kinetic model to better understand and predict the development of combustion instabilities, (2) develop a low-order model framework suitable for real-time controls, and (3) provide guidance in the initial definition of engine valve strategies for achieving HCCI operation. The next phase focused on the development of a new combustion metric for real-time characterization of the combustion process. Rapid feedback on the state of the combustion process is critical to high-speed decision making for predictive control. Simultaneous to the modeling/analysis studies, Delphi was focused on the development of engine hardware and the engine management system. This included custom Delphi hardware and control systems allowing for flexible control of the valvetrain sys-tem to enable HCCI operation. The final phase of this CRADA included the demonstration of conventional and spark assisted HCCI on the multi-cylinder engine as well as the characterization of combustion instabilities, which govern the operational boundaries of this mode of combustion. ORNL and Delphi maintained strong collaboration throughout this project. Meetings were held on a bi-weekly basis with additional reports, presentation, and

  12. Effect of HMX on the combustion response function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strand, L. D.; Cohen, N. S.

    1980-01-01

    Over a pressure range of 3.5-7 MPa and a frequency range of 500-2000 Hz and compared to propellants having equivalent energy and burn rate, HMX produces less pressure-coupled acoustic driving than AP and is equivalent to NC/TMETN. Formation of carbonaceous combustion products indicates that binder decomposition does not follow equilibrium thermochemistry, and that this is aggravated by fuel richness or the absence of AP.

  13. AST Launch Vehicle Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houston, Janice; Counter, D.; Giacomoni, D.

    2015-01-01

    The liftoff phase induces acoustic loading over a broad frequency range for a launch vehicle. These external acoustic environments are then used in the prediction of internal vibration responses of the vehicle and components which result in the qualification levels. Thus, predicting these liftoff acoustic (LOA) environments is critical to the design requirements of any launch vehicle. If there is a significant amount of uncertainty in the predictions or if acoustic mitigation options must be implemented, a subscale acoustic test is a feasible pre-launch test option to verify the LOA environments. The NASA Space Launch System (SLS) program initiated the Scale Model Acoustic Test (SMAT) to verify the predicted SLS LOA environments and to determine the acoustic reduction with an above deck water sound suppression system. The SMAT was conducted at Marshall Space Flight Center and the test article included a 5% scale SLS vehicle model, tower and Mobile Launcher. Acoustic and pressure data were measured by approximately 250 instruments. The SMAT liftoff acoustic results are presented, findings are discussed and a comparison is shown to the Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) results.

  14. Mean Flow Augmented Acoustics in Rocket Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischbach, Sean R.

    2014-01-01

    Oscillatory motion in solid rocket motors and liquid engines has long been a subject of concern. Many rockets display violent fluctuations in pressure, velocity, and temperature originating from the complex interactions between the combustion process and gas dynamics. The customary approach to modeling acoustic waves inside a rocket chamber is to apply the classical inhomogeneous wave equation to the combustion gas. The assumption of a linear, non-dissipative wave in a quiescent fluid remains valid while the acoustic amplitudes are small and local gas velocities stay below Mach 0.2. The converging section of a rocket nozzle, where gradients in pressure, density, and velocity become large, is a notable region where this approach is not applicable. The expulsion of unsteady energy through the nozzle of a rocket is identified as the predominate source of acoustic damping for most rocket systems. An accurate model of the acoustic behavior within this region where acoustic modes are influenced by the presence of a steady mean flow is required for reliable stability predictions. Recently, an approach to address nozzle damping with mean flow effects was implemented by French [1]. This new approach extends the work originated by Sigman and Zinn [2] by solving the acoustic velocity potential equation (AVPE) formulated by perturbing the Euler equations [3]. The acoustic velocity potential (psi) describing the acoustic wave motion in the presence of an inhomogeneous steady high-speed flow is defined by, (del squared)(psi) - (lambda/c)(exp 2)(psi) - M(dot)[M(dot)(del)(del(psi))] - 2(lambda(M/c) + (M(dot)del(M))(dot)del(psi)-2(lambda)(psi)[M(dot)del(1/c)]=0 (1) with M as the Mach vector, c as the speed of sound, and lambda as the complex eigenvalue. French apply the finite volume method to solve the steady flow field within the combustion chamber and nozzle with inviscid walls. The complex eigenvalues and eigenvector are determined with the use of the ARPACK eigensolver. The

  15. Acoustic Translation of an Acoustically Levitated Sample

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, M. B.; Allen, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    Acoustic-levitation apparatus uses only one acoustic mode to move sample from one region of chamber to another. Sample heated and cooled quickly by translation between hot and cold regions of levitation chamber. Levitated sample is raised into furnace region by raising plunger. Frequency of sound produced by transducers adjusted by feedback system to maintain (102) resonant mode, which levitates sample midway between transducers and plunger regardless of plunger position.

  16. Experimental observations of the development and growth of flame instabilities formed during vented deflagrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauwens, C. Regis; Bergthorson, Jeffrey M.; Dorofeev, Sergey B.

    2015-11-01

    The formation of instabilities on the surface of large expanding flames can significantly increase the rate of flame propagation and heat release. As the rate of heat release is the key parameter that determines the pressures that develop, the formation of these instabilities have a strong role in determining the consequences of accidental explosions. For this work, large-scale experiments of uniform propane-air mixtures in a 64 m3 vented enclosure were performed. The formation of hydrodynamic flame instabilities, including the Darrieus-Landau and Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities, as well as strong flame-acoustic interactions, was observed. These instabilities were found to be the primary driver of the pressures that developed and were ultimately responsible for the overall maximum overpressure.

  17. Combustion in supersonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Northam, G. B.

    1985-01-01

    A workshop on combustion in supersonic flow was held in conjunction with the 21st JANNAF Combustion Meeting at Laurel, Maryland on October 3 to 4 1984. The objective of the workshop was to establish the level of current understanding of supersonic combustion. The workshop was attended by approximately fifty representatives from government laboratories, engine companies, and universities. Twenty different speakers made presentations in their area of expertise during the first day of the workshop. On the second day, the presentations were discussed, deficiencies in the current understanding defined, and a list of recommended programs generated to address these deficiencies. The agenda for the workshop is given.

  18. Liquid Helium Acoustic Microscope.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steer, Andrew Paul

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. In an acoustic microscope, images are generated by monitoring the intensity of the ultrasonic reflection, or echo, from the surface of a sample. In order to achieve this a pulse of acoustic energy is produced by the excitation of a thin film transducer. The pulse thus generated propagates through a crystal and is incident upon the acoustic lens surface, which is the boundary between the crystal and an acoustic coupling liquid. The acoustic lens is a converging element, and brings the ultrasonic beam to a focus within the liquid. A sample, placed at the focus, can act as a reflector, and the returned pulse then contains information regarding the acoustic reflectivity of this specimen. Acoustic pulses are repeatedly launched and detected while the acoustic lens is scanned over the surface of the sample. In this manner an acoustic image is constructed. Acoustic losses in room temperature liquid coupling media represent a considerable source of difficulty in the recovery of acoustic echo signals. At the frequencies of operation required in a microscope which is capable of high resolution, the ultrasonic attenuation is not only large but increases with the square of frequency. In superfluid liquid helium at temperatures below 0.1 K, however, the ultrasonic attenuation becomes negligible. Furthermore, the low sound velocity in liquid helium results in an increase in resolution, since the acoustic wavelength is proportional to velocity. A liquid helium acoustic microscope has been designed and constructed. Details of the various possible detection methods are given, and comparisons are made between them. Measurements of the performance of the system that was adopted are reported. The development of a cooled preamplifier is also described. The variation of reflected signal with object distance has been measured and compared with theoretical predictions. This variation is important in the analysis of acoustic

  19. Fuel Line Based Acoustic Flame-Out Detection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puster, Richard L. (Inventor); Franke, John M. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    An acoustic flame-out detection system that renders a large high pressure combustor safe in the event of a flame-out and possible explosive reignition. A dynamic pressure transducer is placed in the fuel and detects the stabilizing fuel pressure oscillations, caused by the combustion process. An electric circuit converts the signal from the combustion vortices, and transmitted to the fuel flow to a series of pulses. A missing pulse detector counts the pulses and continuously resets itself. If three consecutive pulses are missing, the circuit closes the fuel valve. With fuel denied the combustor is shut down or restarted under controlled conditions.

  20. Nonlinear Acoustics in Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauterborn, Werner; Kurz, Thomas; Akhatov, Iskander

    At high sound intensities or long propagation distances at in fluids sufficiently low damping acoustic phenomena become nonlinear. This chapter focuses on nonlinear acoustic wave properties in gases and liquids. The origin of nonlinearity, equations of state, simple nonlinear waves, nonlinear acoustic wave equations, shock-wave formation, and interaction of waves are presented and discussed. Tables are given for the nonlinearity parameter B/A for water and a range of organic liquids, liquid metals and gases. Acoustic cavitation with its nonlinear bubble oscillations, pattern formation and sonoluminescence (light from sound) are modern examples of nonlinear acoustics. The language of nonlinear dynamics needed for understanding chaotic dynamics and acoustic chaotic systems is introduced.