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Sample records for acoustic control asac

  1. O the Use of Modern Control Theory for Active Structural Acoustic Control.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saunders, William Richard

    A modern control theory formulation of Active Structural Acoustic Control (ASAC) of simple structures radiating acoustic energy into light or heavy fluid mediums is discussed in this dissertation. ASAC of a baffled, simply-supported plate subject to mechanical disturbances is investigated. For the case of light fluid loading, a finite element modelling approach is used to extend previous ASAC design methods. Vibration and acoustic controllers are designed for the plate. Comparison of the controller performance shows distinct advantages of the ASAC method for minimizing radiated acoustic power. A novel approach to the modelling of the heavy fluid-loaded plate is developed here. Augmenting structural and acoustic dynamics using state vector formalism allows the design of both vibration and ASAC controllers for the fluid-loaded plate. This modern control approach to active structural acoustic control is unique in its ability to suppress both persistent and transient disturbances on a plate in a heavy fluid. Numerical simulations of the open-loop and closed-loop plate response are provided to support the theoretical developments.

  2. Active structural acoustic control using the remote sensor method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheer, Jordan; Daley, Steve

    2016-09-01

    Active structural acoustic control (ASAC) is an effective method of reducing the sound radiation from vibrating structures. In order to implement ASAC systems using only structural actuators and sensors, it is necessary to employ a model of the sound radiation from the structure. Such models have been presented in the literature for simple structures, such as baffled rectangular plates, and methods of determining the radiation modes of more complex practical structures using experimental data have also been explored. A similar problem arises in the context of active noise control, where cancellation of a disturbance is required at positions in space where it is not possible to locate a physical error microphone. In this case the signals at the cancellation points can be estimated from the outputs of remotely located measurement sensors using the “remote microphone method”. This remote microphone method is extended here to the ASAC problem, in which the pressures at a number of microphone locations must be estimated from measurements on the structure of the radiating system. The control and estimation strategies are described and the performance is assessed for a typical structural radiation problem.

  3. ASAC Executive Assistant Architecture Description Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Eileen; Villani, James A.

    1997-01-01

    In this technical document, we describe the system architecture developed for the Aviation System Analysis Capability (ASAC) Executive Assistant (EA). We describe the genesis and role of the ASAC system, discuss the objectives of the ASAC system and provide an overview of components and models within the ASAC system, discuss our choice for an architecture methodology, the Domain Specific Software Architecture (DSSA), and the DSSA approach to developing a system architecture, and describe the development process and the results of the ASAC EA system architecture. The document has six appendices.

  4. Acoustic boundary control for quieter aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsch, Scott Michael

    1999-08-01

    There is a strong interest in reducing the volume of low- frequency noise in aircraft cabins. Active noise control (ANC), in which loudspeakers placed in the cabin are used to generate a sound field which will cancel these disturbances, is now a commercially available solution. A second control approach is active structural acoustic control (ASAC), which uses structural control forces to reduce sound transmitted into the cabin through the fuselage. Some of the goals of current research are to reduce the cost, weight, and bulk of these control systems, along with improving global control performance. This thesis introduces an acoustic boundary control (ABC) concept for active noise control in aircraft. This control strategy uses distributed actuator arrays along enclosure boundaries to reduce noise transmitted into the enclosure through the boundaries and to reduce global noise levels due to other disturbances. The motivation is to provide global pressure attenuation with small, lightweight control actuators. Analytical studies are conducted of acoustic boundary in two-dimensional and three-dimensional rectangular enclosures and in a finite cylindrical enclosure. The simulations provide insight into the control mechanisms of ABC and demonstrate potential advantages of ABC over traditional ANC and ASAC implementations. A key component of acoustic boundary control is the ``smart'' trim panel, a structurally modified aircraft trim panel for use as an acoustic control source. A prototype smart trim panel is built and tested. The smart trim panel is used as the control source in a real-time active noise control system in a laboratory- scale fuselage model. It is shown that the smart trim panel works as well as traditional loudspeakers for this application. A control signal scheduling approach is proposed which allows for a reduction in the computational burden of the real-time controller used in active noise control applications. This approach uses off-line system

  5. 78 FR 20685 - Aviation Security Advisory Committee (ASAC) Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-05

    ... SECURITY Transportation Security Administration Aviation Security Advisory Committee (ASAC) Meeting AGENCY... Committee Meeting. SUMMARY: The Aviation Security Advisory Committee (ASAC) will meet in Arlington, VA. This.... L. 92-463). The Aviation Security Advisory Committee (ASAC) provides advice and...

  6. 77 FR 26641 - Aviation Security Advisory Committee (ASAC) Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-04

    ... 4, 2012 Part III Department of Homeland Security Transportation Security Administration Aviation... Aviation Security Advisory Committee (ASAC) Meeting AGENCY: Transportation Security Administration, DHS... Security Administration (TSA) will hold a meeting of the Aviation Security Advisory Committee (ASAC) on...

  7. 78 FR 41413 - Aviation Security Advisory Committee (ASAC) Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-10

    ... SECURITY Transportation Security Administration Aviation Security Advisory Committee (ASAC) Meeting AGENCY... Meeting. SUMMARY: The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) will hold a meeting of the Aviation... and provides advice and recommendations for improving aviation security measures to the...

  8. 76 FR 72967 - Aviation Security Advisory Committee (ASAC) Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-28

    ... SECURITY Transportation Security Administration Aviation Security Advisory Committee (ASAC) Meeting AGENCY... Meeting. SUMMARY: The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) will hold a meeting of the Aviation... matters affecting civil aviation security. This meeting is open to the public, but participation...

  9. The ASAC Air Carrier Investment Model (Third Generation)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingrove, Earl R., III; Gaier, Eric M.; Santmire, Tara E.

    1998-01-01

    To meet its objective of assisting the U.S. aviation industry with the technological challenges of the future, NASA must identify research areas that have the greatest potential for improving the operation of the air transportation system. To accomplish this, NASA is building an Aviation System Analysis Capability (ASAC). The ASAC differs from previous NASA modeling efforts in that the economic behavior of buyers and sellers in the air transportation and aviation industries is central to its conception. To link the economics of flight with the technology of flight, ASAC requires a parametrically based model with extensions that link airline operations and investments in aircraft with aircraft characteristics. This model also must provide a mechanism for incorporating air travel demand and profitability factors into the airlines' investment decisions. Finally, the model must be flexible and capable of being incorporated into a wide-ranging suite of economic and technical models flat are envisioned for ASAC.

  10. Aeroelastic structural acoustic control.

    PubMed

    Clark, R L; Frampton, K D

    1999-02-01

    Static, constant-gain, output-feedback control compensators were designed to increase the transmission loss across a panel subjected to mean flow on one surface and a stationary, acoustic half-space on the opposite surface. The multi-input, multi-output control system was based upon the use of an array of colocated transducer pairs. The performance of the static-gain, output-feedback controller was compared to that of the full state-feedback controller using the same control actuator arrays, and was found to yield comparable levels of performance for practical limitations on control effort. Additionally, the resulting static compensators proved to be dissipative in nature, and thus the design varied little as a function of the aeroelastic coupling induced by the fluid-structure interaction under subsonic flow conditions. Several parametric studies were performed, comparing the effects of control-effort penalty as well as the number of transducer pairs used in the control system.

  11. The ASAC Flight Segment and Network Cost Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaplan, Bruce J.; Lee, David A.; Retina, Nusrat; Wingrove, Earl R., III; Malone, Brett; Hall, Stephen G.; Houser, Scott A.

    1997-01-01

    To assist NASA in identifying research art, with the greatest potential for improving the air transportation system, two models were developed as part of its Aviation System Analysis Capability (ASAC). The ASAC Flight Segment Cost Model (FSCM) is used to predict aircraft trajectories, resource consumption, and variable operating costs for one or more flight segments. The Network Cost Model can either summarize the costs for a network of flight segments processed by the FSCM or can be used to independently estimate the variable operating costs of flying a fleet of equipment given the number of departures and average flight stage lengths.

  12. 77 FR 53902 - Aviation Security Advisory Committee (ASAC) Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-04

    ... SECURITY Transportation Security Administration Aviation Security Advisory Committee (ASAC) Meeting AGENCY... Meeting. SUMMARY: The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) will hold a meeting of the Aviation... of the International Aviation Sub-committee, placed in the public docket. You may submit comments...

  13. 78 FR 3908 - Aviation Security Advisory Committee (ASAC) Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-17

    ... SECURITY Transportation Security Administration Aviation Security Advisory Committee (ASAC) Meeting AGENCY... Meeting. SUMMARY: The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) will hold a meeting of the Aviation... Administrator of TSA on matters affecting civil aviation security. This meeting is open to the public,...

  14. The ASAC Air Carrier Investment Model (Second Generation)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingrove, Earl R., III; Johnson, Jesse P.; Sickles, Robin C.; Good, David H.

    1997-01-01

    To meet its objective of assisting the U.S. aviation industry with the technological challenges of the future, NASA must identify research areas that have the greatest potential for improving the operation of the air transportation system. To accomplish this, NASA is building an Aviation System Analysis Capability (ASAC). The ASAC differs from previous NASA modeling efforts in that the economic behavior of buyers and sellers in the air transportation and aviation industries is central to its conception. To link the economics of flight with the technology of flight, ASAC requires a parametrically based mode with extensions that link airline operations and investments in aircraft with aircraft characteristics. This model also must provide a mechanism for incorporating air travel demand and profitability factors into the airlines' investment decisions. Finally, the model must be flexible and capable of being incorporated into a wide-ranging suite of economic and technical models that are envisioned for ASAC. We describe a second-generation Air Carrier Investment Model that meets these requirements. The enhanced model incorporates econometric results from the supply and demand curves faced by U.S.-scheduled passenger air carriers. It uses detailed information about their fleets in 1995 to make predictions about future aircraft purchases. It enables analysts with the ability to project revenue passenger-miles flown, airline industry employment, airline operating profit margins, numbers and types of aircraft in the fleet, and changes in aircraft manufacturing employment under various user-defined scenarios.

  15. Controlling sound with acoustic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummer, Steven A.; Christensen, Johan; Alù, Andrea

    2016-03-01

    Acoustic metamaterials can manipulate and control sound waves in ways that are not possible in conventional materials. Metamaterials with zero, or even negative, refractive index for sound offer new possibilities for acoustic imaging and for the control of sound at subwavelength scales. The combination of transformation acoustics theory and highly anisotropic acoustic metamaterials enables precise control over the deformation of sound fields, which can be used, for example, to hide or cloak objects from incident acoustic energy. Active acoustic metamaterials use external control to create effective material properties that are not possible with passive structures and have led to the development of dynamically reconfigurable, loss-compensating and parity-time-symmetric materials for sound manipulation. Challenges remain, including the development of efficient techniques for fabricating large-scale metamaterial structures and converting laboratory experiments into useful devices. In this Review, we outline the designs and properties of materials with unusual acoustic parameters (for example, negative refractive index), discuss examples of extreme manipulation of sound and, finally, provide an overview of future directions in the field.

  16. Generation and control of acoustic cavitation structure.

    PubMed

    Bai, Lixin; Xu, Weilin; Deng, Jingjun; Li, Chao; Xu, Delong; Gao, Yandong

    2014-09-01

    The generation and control of acoustic cavitation structure are a prerequisite for application of cavitation in the field of ultrasonic sonochemistry and ultrasonic cleaning. The generation and control of several typical acoustic cavitation structures (conical bubble structure, smoker, acoustic Lichtenberg figure, tailing bubble structure, jet-induced bubble structures) in a 20-50 kHz ultrasonic field are investigated. Cavitation bubbles tend to move along the direction of pressure drop in the region in front of radiating surface, which are the premise and the foundation of some strong acoustic cavitation structure formation. The nuclei source of above-mentioned acoustic cavitation structures is analyzed. The relationship and mutual transformation of these acoustic cavitation structures are discussed.

  17. Acoustics: Motion controlled by sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neild, Adrian

    2016-09-01

    A simple technique has been developed that produces holograms made of sound waves. These acoustic landscapes are used to manipulate microscale objects, and offer great potential in medical imaging and selective heating. See Letter p.518

  18. MTCI acoustic agglomeration particulate control

    SciTech Connect

    Chandran, R.R.; Mansour, M.N.; Scaroni, A.W.; Koopmann, G.H.; Loth, J.L.

    1994-10-01

    The overall objective of this project is to demonstrate pulse combination induced acoustic enhancement of coal ash agglomeration and sulfur capture at conditions typical of direct coal-fired turbines and PFBC hot gas cleanup. MTCI has developed an advanced compact pulse combustor island for direct coal-firing in combustion gas turbines. This combustor island comprises a coal-fired pulse combustor, a combined ash agglomeration and sulfur capture chamber (CAASCC), and a hot cyclone. In the MTCI proprietary approach, the pulse combustion-induced high intensity sound waves improve sulfur capture efficiency and ash agglomeration. The resulting agglomerates allow the use of commercial cyclones and achieve very high particulate collection efficiency. In the MTCI proprietary approach, sorbent particles are injected into a gas stream subjected to an intense acoustic field. The acoustic field serves to improve sulfur capture efficiency by enhancing both gas film and intra-particle mass transfer rates. In addition, the sorbent particles act as dynamic filter foci, providing a high density of stagnant agglomerating centers for trapping the finer entrained (in the oscillating flow field) fly ash fractions. A team has been formed with MTCI as the prime contractor and Penn State University and West Virginia University as subcontractors to MTCI. MTCI is focusing on hardware development and system demonstration, PSU is investigating and modeling acoustic agglomeration and sulfur capture, and WVU is studying aerovalve fluid dynamics. Results are presented from all three studies.

  19. Controlling the acoustic streaming by pulsed ultrasounds.

    PubMed

    Hoyos, Mauricio; Castro, Angélica

    2013-01-01

    We propose a technique based on pulsed ultrasounds for controlling, reducing to a minimum observable value the acoustic streaming in closed ultrasonic standing wave fluidic resonators. By modifying the number of pulses and the repetition time it is possible to reduce the velocity of the acoustic streaming with respect to the velocity generated by the continuous ultrasound mode of operation. The acoustic streaming is observed at the nodal plane where a suspension of 800nm latex particles was focused by primary radiation force. A mixture of 800nm and 15μm latex particles has been also used for showing that the acoustic streaming is hardly reduced while primary and secondary forces continue to operate. The parameter we call "pulse mode factor" i.e. the time of applied ultrasound divided by the duty cycle, is found to be the adequate parameter that controls the acoustic streaming. We demonstrate that pulsed ultrasound is more efficient for controlling the acoustic streaming than the variation of the amplitude of the standing waves.

  20. System for controlled acoustic rotation of objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, M. B. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A system is described for use with acoustically levitated objects, which enables close control of rotation of the object. One system includes transducers that propagate acoustic waves along the three dimensions (X, Y, Z) of a chamber of rectangular cross section. Each transducers generates one wave which is resonant to a corresponding chamber dimension to acoustically levitate an object, and additional higher frequency resonant wavelengths for controlling rotation of the object. The three chamber dimensions and the corresponding three levitation modes (resonant wavelengths) are all different, to avoid degeneracy, or interference, of waves with one another, that could have an effect on object rotation. Only the higher frequencies, with pairs of them having the same wavelength, are utilized to control rotation, so that rotation is controlled independently of levitation and about any arbitrarily chosen axis.

  1. Acoustic oscillatory pressure control for ramjet

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, R.S.; Dunlap, R.

    1988-08-02

    A method for controlling the acoustic oscillatory pressures generated by gas flow at the combustor inlet to a ramjet engine, the inlet including a sudden geometry expansion is described characterized by; restricting the inlet at the sudden expansion geometry such that the gas flow separates upstream and has a vena contracta downstream of the restricted inlet.

  2. Zebra mussel control using acoustic energy

    SciTech Connect

    Tiller, G.W.; Gaucher, T.A.; Menezes, J.K.; Dolat, S.W. )

    1992-01-01

    A practical and economical device or method that reduces zebra mussel colonization without detrimental side effects is highly desirable. An ideal method is one that could be installed near, on, or in existing raw water intakes and conduits. It must have a known effect that is limited to a defined area, should have maximum effects on a targeted species, and preferably have a low life cycle cost than the current alternative methods of control and maintenance. Underwater sound could be such a desirable solution, if found to be an effective control measure for zebra mussels. Although sound most often applies specifically to acoustic energy that is audible to humans, 20 Hertz (Hz) to 20 kiloHertz (kHz), in this report we will use the terms sound and acoustic to include acoustic energy between 100 Hz and 100 MegaHertz (MHz). This research on zebra mussel biofouling is designed to effect the early developmental stages in the life cycle of Dreissena polymorpha (Pallas). Vulnerable stages in the development of D. polymorpha that might yield to site-specific acoustic deterrence measures include the free-swimming larval veliger stage, the postveliger pre-attachment demersal stage, and the immediate post-attachment stage. The proposed applications include surface treatment to prevent, reduce or eliminate colonization on underwater structures, and the stream treatment to reduce or eliminate (destroy) mussel larvae entrained in a moving volume of water.

  3. Aviation System Analysis Capability (ASAC) Quick Response System (QRS) Test Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Eileen; Villani, James A.; Ritter, Paul

    1997-01-01

    This document is the Aviation System Analysis Capability (ASAC) Quick Response System (QRS) Test Report. The purpose of this document is to present the results of the QRS unit and system tests in support of the ASAC QRS development effort. This document contains an overview of the project background and scope, defines the QRS system and presents the additions made to the QRS this year, explains the assumptions, constraints, and approach used to conduct QRS Unit and System Testing, and presents the schedule used to perform QRS Testing. The document also presents an overview of the Logistics Management Institute (LMI) Test Facility and testing environment and summarizes the QRS Unit and System Test effort and results.

  4. Experimental Robust Control of Structural Acoustic Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, David E.; Gibbs, Gary P.; Clark, Robert L.; Vipperman, Jeffrey S.

    1998-01-01

    This work addresses the design and application of robust controllers for structural acoustic control. Both simulation and experimental results are presented. H(infinity) and mu-synthesis design methods were used to design feedback controllers which minimize power radiated from a panel while avoiding instability due to unmodeled dynamics. Specifically, high order structural modes which couple strongly to the actuator-sensor path were poorly modeled. This model error was analytically bounded with an uncertainty model, which allowed controllers to be designed without artificial limits on control effort. It is found that robust control methods provide the control designer with physically meaningful parameters with which to tune control designs and can be very useful in determining limits of performance. Experimental results also showed, however, poor robustness properties for control designs with ad-hoc uncertainty models. The importance of quantifying and bounding model errors is discussed.

  5. Recent advances in active control of aircraft cabin noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathur, Gopal; Fuller, Christopher

    2002-11-01

    Active noise control techniques can provide significant reductions in aircraft interior noise levels without the structural modifications or weight penalties usually associated with passive techniques, particularly for low frequency noise. Our main objective in this presentation is to give a review of active control methods and their applications to aircraft cabin noise reduction with an emphasis on recent advances and challenges facing the noise control engineer in the practical application of these techniques. The active noise control method using secondary acoustic sources, e.g., loudspeakers, as control sources for tonal noise reduction is first discussed with results from an active noise control flight test demonstration. An innovative approach of applying control forces directly to the fuselage structure using piezoelectric actuators, known as active structural acoustic control (ASAC), to control cabin noise is then presented. Experimental results from laboratory ASAC tests conducted on a full-scale fuselage and from flight tests on a helicopter will be discussed. Finally, a hybrid active/passive noise control approach for achieving significant broadband noise reduction will be discussed. Experimental results of control of broadband noise transmission through an aircraft structure will be presented.

  6. Acoustic formation control for nonholonomic mobile robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegedus, Michael James

    Two leader-follower formation controllers are proposed for a group of nonholonomic mobile robots. Each controller is installed on the following robot and requires local sensory stimuli to move the follower into its formation's desired position. As a result, communication between robots is not necessary to maintain a desired formation. The first proposed controller utilizes range and bearing data from an acoustic sensor to move the follower into position. It assumes an acoustic source is attached to the leader and a stationary landmark. The second proposed controller is a landmark-less formation controller that assume two sources are attached to the leader, and the follower is equipped with an acoustic array and inertial sensor. Results show each controller exponentially reduces the tracking error to a steady-state level and can maintain stability, even in regions where the formation kinematics becomes singular. For two-dimensional passive arrays, a general method is described that ranks and selects multiple microphone configurations within the array that are likely to produce accurate position estimates. This method segments a two-dimensional array into various combinations and configurations of microphone pairs and flattens these configurations into one-dimension for comparison. Each configuration is ranked based on the microphones' spatial information (known a-priori) and incoming bearing estimates. These rankings select different microphone pair configurations, whose position estimates are combined in an adaptive weighted-average algorithm. Simulations and experimental results show that this method selects microphone configurations that provide the least position error. Through a fusion algorithm, which combines individual microphone pair data, an array's position accuracy can improve.

  7. Piezoceramic Actuator Placement for Acoustic Control of Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bevan, Jeffrey S.

    2000-01-01

    Optimum placement of multiple traditional piezoceramic actuators is determined for active structural acoustic control of flat panels. The structural acoustic response is determined using acoustic radiation filters and structural surface vibration characteristics. Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR) control is utilized to determine the optimum state feedback gain for active structural acoustic control. The optimum actuator location is determined by minimizing the structural acoustic radiated noise using a modified genetic algorithm. Experimental tests are conducted and compared to analytical results. Anisotropic piezoceramic actuators exhibit enhanced performance when compared to traditional isotropic piezoceramic actuators. As a result of the inherent isotropy, these advanced actuators develop strain along the principal material axis. The orientation of anisotropic actuators is investigated on the effect of structural vibration and acoustic control of curved and flat panels. A fully coupled shallow shell finite element formulation is developed to include anisotropic piezoceramic actuators for shell structures.

  8. Piezoceramic Actuator Placement for Acoustic Control of Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bevan, Jeffrey S.; Turner, Travis L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Optimum placement of multiple traditional piezoceramic actuators is determined for active structural acoustic control of flat panels. The structural acoustic response is determined using acoustic radiation filters and structural surface vibration characteristics. Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR) control is utilized to determine the optimum state feedback gain for active structural acoustic control. The optimum actuator location is determined by minimizing the structural acoustic radiated noise using a modified genetic algorithm. Experimental tests are conducted and compared to analytical results. Anisotropic piezoceramic actuators exhibits enhanced performance when compared to traditional isotropic piezoceramic actuators. As a result of the inherent isotropy, these advanced actuators develop strain along the principal material axis. The orientation of anisotropic actuators is investigated on the effect of structural vibration and acoustic control of curved and flat panels. A fully coupled shallow shell finite element formulation is developed to include anisotropic piezoceramic actuators for shell structures.

  9. Analog circuit for controlling acoustic transducer arrays

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, Douglas S.

    1991-01-01

    A simplified ananlog circuit is presented for controlling electromechanical transducer pairs in an acoustic telemetry system. The analog circuit of this invention comprises a single electrical resistor which replaces all of the digital components in a known digital circuit. In accordance with this invention, a first transducer in a transducer pair of array is driven in series with the resistor. The voltage drop across this resistor is then amplified and used to drive the second transducer. The voltage drop across the resistor is proportional and in phase with the current to the transducer. This current is approximately 90 degrees out of phase with the driving voltage to the transducer. This phase shift replaces the digital delay required by the digital control circuit of the prior art.

  10. Experimental investigation of different active noise control concepts applied to a passenger car equipped with an active windshield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misol, M.; Algermissen, S.; Monner, H. P.

    2012-05-01

    The main purpose of this work is the implementation and experimental investigation of different active structural acoustic control (ASAC) concepts for the reduction of interior noise in an automobile passenger compartment. For the control experiments, a medium-class test car was used, which had been equipped with an active windshield. The active windshield consists of the serial-production laminated glass pane augmented with piezoceramic patch-transducers applied to the blackened rim of the windshield. A multi-reference test provided measurement data for the identification of a local discrete-time state-space model (SSM). The subsequent acquisition of frequency response functions (FRF) by way of using the same actuators but measuring on a much finer grid provided the database for the formulation of a least-squares problem to derive a global system model. Based on the local and global discrete-time SSMs, different controllers were designed and experimentally realized. The comparison of the vibration levels in open- and closed-loop showed a global reduction of 5-7 dB in the acoustically relevant frequency band containing the second and third structural resonance of the windshield system. The occurrence of complex operational deflection shapes (ODS) was identified as the main limitation concerning the disturbance rejection of the active system. The acoustic performance of the ASAC system is reflected in a reduction up to 15 dB in sound pressure level (SPL).

  11. Active control of harmonic sound transmission into an acoustic enclosure using both structural and acoustic actuators

    PubMed

    Kim; Brennan

    2000-05-01

    This paper describes an analytical and experimental investigation into the active control of harmonic sound transmission in a structural-acoustic coupled system. A rectangular enclosure is considered that has five acoustically rigid walls and a flexible plate on the remaining side through which a harmonic sound wave is transmitted into the enclosure. The control system is designed to globally reduce the sound field inside the enclosure, and the roles of structural and acoustic actuators are of particular interest. Three control configurations, classified by the type of actuators, are compared and discussed. They are: (i) use of a single point-force actuator, (ii) use of a single acoustic piston source, and (iii) simultaneous use of both a point-force actuator and an acoustic piston source. It is shown both analytically and experimentally that the point-force actuator is effective in controlling plate-dominated modes while the acoustic source is effective in controlling cavity-dominated modes. Since the transmitted sound field is governed by both plate- and cavity-dominated modes, the hybrid use of both types of actuators is shown to be a desirable configuration for the active control of sound transmission into a structural-acoustic coupled system.

  12. Passive separation control by acoustic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, S. L.; Spedding, G. R.

    2013-10-01

    At transitional Reynolds numbers, the laminar boundary layer separation and possible reattachment on a smooth airfoil, or wing section, are notoriously sensitive to small variations in geometry or in the fluid environment. We report here on the results of a pilot study that adds to this list of sensitivities. The presence of small holes in the suction surface of an Eppler 387 wing has a transformative effect upon the aerodynamics, by changing the mean chordwise separation line location. These changes are not simply a consequence of the presence of the small cavities, which by themselves have no effect. Acoustic resonance in the backing cavities generates tones that interact with intrinsic flow instabilities. Possible consequences for passive flow control strategies are discussed together with potential problems in measurements through pressure taps in such flow regimes.

  13. A state feedback electro-acoustic transducer for active control of acoustic impedance.

    PubMed

    Samejima, Toshiya

    2003-03-01

    In this paper, a new control system in which the acoustic impedance of an electro-acoustic transducer diaphragm can be actively varied by modifying design parameters is presented and its effectiveness is theoretically investigated. The proposed control system is based on a state-space description of the control system derived from an electrical equivalent circuit of an electro-acoustic transducer to which a differentiating circuit is connected, and is designed using modem control theory. The optimal quadratic regulator is used in the control system design, with its quadratic performance index formulated for producing desired acoustic impedance. Computer simulations indicate that the acoustic impedance of the diaphragm can be significantly varied over a wide frequency range that includes the range below the resonance frequency of the electro-acoustic transducer. A computer model of the proposed control system is used to illustrate its application to semi-active noise control in a duct. It is demonstrated that the proposed control system provides substantial reductions in the noise radiating from the outlet of the duct, both in the stiffness control range and in the mass control range.

  14. 24. LAUNCH CONTROL CAPSULE. ENTRANCE TO ACOUSTICAL ENCLOSURE. SHOCK ISOLATOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. LAUNCH CONTROL CAPSULE. ENTRANCE TO ACOUSTICAL ENCLOSURE. SHOCK ISOLATOR AT FAR LEFT. VIEW TO NORTH. - Minuteman III ICBM Launch Control Facility November-1, 1.5 miles North of New Raymer & State Highway 14, New Raymer, Weld County, CO

  15. Digital control of high-intensity acoustic testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slusser, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    To eliminate previous system instabilities and control high-intensity acoustic tests, a digital control vibration test system is modified by a software change. Three systems for the control of acoustic testing are compared: a hybrid digital/analog system, a digital vibration system, and the same digital vibration system modified by a software change to allow acoustic testing. It is shown that the hybrid system and the modified vibration system exhibit almost equal performance, although the hybrid system performs testing twice as fast. The development of a specialized acoustic test control system is justified since it costs far less than the general-purpose vibration control system. However, the latter is much easier to set up for a test, which is important in preventing overtesting of valuable spacecraft components.

  16. Feedforward control of sound transmission using an active acoustic metamaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheer, Jordan; Daley, Stephen; McCormick, Cameron

    2017-02-01

    Metamaterials have received significant interest in recent years due to their potential ability to exhibit behaviour not found in naturally occurring materials. This includes the generation of band gaps, which are frequency regions with high levels of wave attenuation. In the context of acoustics, these band gaps can be tuned to occur at low frequencies where the acoustic wavelength is large compared to the material, and where the performance of traditional passive noise control treatments is limited. Therefore, such acoustic metamaterials have been shown to offer a significant performance advantage compared to traditional passive control treatments, however, due to their resonant behaviour, the band gaps tend to occur over a relatively narrow frequency range. A similar long wavelength performance advantage can be achieved using active noise control, but the systems in this case do not rely on resonant behaviour. This paper demonstrates how the performance of an acoustic metamaterial, consisting of an array of Helmholtz resonators, can be significantly enhanced by the integration of an active control mechanism that is facilitated by embedding loudspeakers into the resonators. Crucially, it is then also shown how the active acoustic metamaterial significantly outperforms an equivalent traditional active noise control system. In both cases a broadband feedforward control strategy is employed to minimise the transmitted pressure in a one-dimensional acoustic control problem and a new method of weighting the control effort over a targeted frequency range is described.

  17. 30. LAUNCH CONTROL CAPSULE. ACOUSTICAL ENCLOSURE. OPERATORS' CHAIR AND COMMUNICATIONS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. LAUNCH CONTROL CAPSULE. ACOUSTICAL ENCLOSURE. OPERATORS' CHAIR AND COMMUNICATIONS CONSOLE IN FOREGROUND. ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT RACK AT LEFT; LAUNCH CONTROL CONSOLE WITH CAPTAIN JAMES L. KING, JR. IN CENTER. LIEUTENANT KEVIN R. MCCLUNEY IN BACKGROUND. VIEW TO SOUTHEAST. - Minuteman III ICBM Launch Control Facility November-1, 1.5 miles North of New Raymer & State Highway 14, New Raymer, Weld County, CO

  18. 27. LAUNCH CONTROL CAPSULE. ACOUSTICAL ENCLOSURE. COMMUNICATIONS CONSOLE AT LEFT; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. LAUNCH CONTROL CAPSULE. ACOUSTICAL ENCLOSURE. COMMUNICATIONS CONSOLE AT LEFT; LAUNCH CONTROL CONSOLE AT RIGHT. PADLOCKED PANEL AT TOP CENTER CONTAINS MISSILE LAUNCH KEYS. SHOCK ISOLATOR AT FAR LEFT. VIEW TO EAST. - Minuteman III ICBM Launch Control Facility November-1, 1.5 miles North of New Raymer & State Highway 14, New Raymer, Weld County, CO

  19. 26. LAUNCH CONTROL CAPSULE. ACOUSTICAL ENCLOSURE WITH MISSILE COMBAT CREW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. LAUNCH CONTROL CAPSULE. ACOUSTICAL ENCLOSURE WITH MISSILE COMBAT CREW MEMBER LIEUTENANT KEVIN R. MCCLUNEY AT COMMUNICATIONS CONSOLE. LAUNCH CONTROL CONSOLE IN FOREGROUND. VIEW TO NORTH. - Minuteman III ICBM Launch Control Facility November-1, 1.5 miles North of New Raymer & State Highway 14, New Raymer, Weld County, CO

  20. Materials for Adaptive Structural Acoustic Controls

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-31

    Zirconate Titanate Stannate Films. J. Appl. Phys. 75, 1399 (1994). 52. Sheen, J., R. Guo, A. S. Bhalla, and L. E. Cross. Measurements of Dielectric...use of acoustic emission and concurrent current pulse measurement to separate domain switching and micro-cracking which can occur in the poling...motion is described in Appendix 13. New measurements of nonlinearity in PZT and PLZT compositions are used to support the theoretical conclusions. Full

  1. Possibilities of acoustic thermometry for controlling targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anosov, A. A.; Nemchenko, O. Yu.; Less, Yu. A.; Kazanskii, A. S.; Mansfel'd, A. D.

    2015-07-01

    Model acoustic thermometry experiments were conducted during heating of an aqueous liposome suspension. Heating was done to achieve the liposome phase transition temperature. At the moment of the phase transition, the thermal acoustic signal achieved a maximum and decreased, despite continued heating. During subsequent cooling of the suspension, when lipids again passed through the phase transition point, the thermal acoustic signal again increased, despite a reduction in temperature. This effect is related to an increase in ultrasound absorption by the liposome suspension at the moment of the lipid phase transition. The result shows that acoustic thermography can be used to control targeted delivery of drugs mixed in thermally sensitive liposomes, the integrity of which is violated during heating to the phase transition temperature.

  2. 28. LAUNCH CONTROL CAPSULE. ACOUSTICAL ENCLOSURE WITH MISSILE COMBAT CREW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. LAUNCH CONTROL CAPSULE. ACOUSTICAL ENCLOSURE WITH MISSILE COMBAT CREW MEMBERS (FRONT TO BACK) LIEUTENANT KEVIN R. MCCLUNEY AND CAPTAIN JAMES L. KING, JR. SHOCK ISOLATOR AND ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT RACK AT FAR LEFT. VIEW TO SOUTH. - Minuteman III ICBM Launch Control Facility November-1, 1.5 miles North of New Raymer & State Highway 14, New Raymer, Weld County, CO

  3. 25. LAUNCH CONTROL CAPSULE. ACOUSTICAL ENCLOSURE WITH MISSILE COMBAT CREW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. LAUNCH CONTROL CAPSULE. ACOUSTICAL ENCLOSURE WITH MISSILE COMBAT CREW MEMBERS (FRONT TO BACK) CAPTAIN JAMES L. KING, JR. AT LAUNCH CONTROL CONSOLE AND LIEUTENANT KEVIN R. MCCLUNEY AT COMMUNICATIONS CONSOLE. RADIO TRANSMITTER AND RECEIVER RACKS AT FAR RIGHT; ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT RACKS AT FAR LEFT. VIEW TO NORTH. - Minuteman III ICBM Launch Control Facility November-1, 1.5 miles North of New Raymer & State Highway 14, New Raymer, Weld County, CO

  4. Control of Acoustic Cavitation with Application to Lithotripsy.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    cavitation contributes to kidney stone comminution and tissue damage. An electrical spark at the near focus of an underwater ellipsoidal reflector was the...Control of acoustic cavitation (sound-induced bubble activity) is the subject of this dissertation. Application is to clinical lithotripsy where

  5. Acoustic emission feedback control for control of boiling in a microwave oven

    SciTech Connect

    White, T.L.

    1991-02-26

    This patent describes an acoustic emission based feedback system for controlling the boiling level of a liquid medium in a microwave oven. The acoustic emissions from the medium correlated with surface boiling is used to generate a feedback control signal proportional to the level of boiling of the medium. This signal is applied to a power controller to automatically and continuously vary the power applied to the oven to control the boiling at a selected level.

  6. Acoustic emission feedback control for control of boiling in a microwave oven

    SciTech Connect

    White, T.L.

    1990-05-02

    An acoustic emission based feedback system for controlling the boiling level of a liquid medium in a microwave oven is provided. The acoustic emissions from the medium correlated with surface boiling is used to generate a feedback control signal proportional to the level of boiling of the medium. This signal is applied to a power controller to automatically and continuously vary the power applied to the oven to control the boiling at a selected level. 2 figs.

  7. Acoustic emission feedback control for control of boiling in a microwave oven

    DOEpatents

    White, Terry L.

    1991-01-01

    An acoustic emission based feedback system for controlling the boiling level of a liquid medium in a microwave oven is provided. The acoustic emissions from the medium correlated with surface boiling is used to generate a feedback control signal proportional to the level of boiling of the medium. This signal is applied to a power controller to automatically and continuoulsly vary the power applied to the oven to control the boiling at a selected level.

  8. 29. LAUNCH CONTROL CAPSULE. ACOUSTICAL ENCLOSURE WITH MISSILE COMBAT CREW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. LAUNCH CONTROL CAPSULE. ACOUSTICAL ENCLOSURE WITH MISSILE COMBAT CREW MEMBERS (FRONT TO BACK) LIEUTENANT KEVIN R. MCCLUNEY AND CAPTAIN JAMES L. KING, JR. AT CONSOLES. REFRIGERATOR AT RIGHT FLANKED BY RADIO EQUIPMENT (RIGHT) AND FILE CABINETS (LEFT). VIEW TO SOUTHWEST. - Minuteman III ICBM Launch Control Facility November-1, 1.5 miles North of New Raymer & State Highway 14, New Raymer, Weld County, CO

  9. Digital control of high-intensity acoustic testing. [for spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slusser, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    Three systems for the control of acoustic testing are compared: a hybrid digital/analog system, a digital vibration system, and the same digital vibration system modified by a software change. The hybrid system was constructed to control the 1/3-octaves from 50 to 1000 Hz. The vibration system was equipped with programs for sine and random vibration tests, shock analysis and synthesis, and signal analysis. For the modified vibration system, the random-vibration control program of the unmodified unit was changed so that acoustic tests could be performed. The performance of the three systems is compared by conducting probability-density and time-history analyses of the proposed test spectrum for the Mariner Jupiter/Saturn 1977 program. The results of the analyses show that the hybrid and modified vibration systems perform almost equally, but the modified vibration system is easier to use and produces better test documentation.

  10. Acoustic contrast control in an arc-shaped area using a linear loudspeaker array.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Sipei; Qiu, Xiaojun; Burnett, Ian

    2015-02-01

    This paper proposes a method of creating acoustic contrast control in an arc-shaped area using a linear loudspeaker array. The boundary of the arc-shaped area is treated as the envelope of the tangent lines that can be formed by manipulating the phase profile of the loudspeakers in the array. When compared with the existing acoustic contrast control method, the proposed method is able to generate sound field inside an arc-shaped area and achieve a trade-off between acoustic uniformity and acoustic contrast. The acoustic contrast created by the proposed method increases while the acoustic uniformity decreases with frequency.

  11. Optimization and Control of Acoustic Liner Impedance with Bias Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Houston; Follet, Jesse

    2000-01-01

    Because communities are impacted by steady increases in aircraft traffic, aircraft noise continues to be a growing problem for the growth of commercial aviation. Research has focused on improving the design of specific high noise source areas of aircraft and on noise control measures to alleviate noise radiated from aircraft to the surrounding environment. Engine duct liners have long been a principal means of attenuating engine noise. The ability to control in-situ the acoustic impedance of a liner would provide a valuable tool to improve the performance of liners. The acoustic impedance of a liner is directly related to the sound absorption qualities of that liner. Increased attenuation rates, the ability to change liner acoustic impedance to match various operating conditions, or the ability to tune a liner to more precisely match design impedance represent some ways that in-situ impedance control could be useful. With this in mind, the research to be investigated will focus on improvements in the ability to control liner impedance using a mean flow through the liner which is referred to as bias flow.

  12. Potential acoustic benefits of circulation control rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. M.; Cheeseman, I. C.

    1978-01-01

    The fundamental aeroacoustic mechanisms responsible for noise generation on a rotating blade are theoretically examined. Their contribution to the overall rotor sound pressure level is predicted. Results from a theory for airfoil trailing edge noise are presented. Modifications and extensions to other source theories are described where it is necessary to account for unique aspects of circulation control (CC) aerodynamics. The circulation control rotor (CCR), as embodied on an X-wing vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) aircraft, is used as an example for computational purposes, although many of the theoretical results presented are generally applicable to other CC applications (such as low speed rotors, propellers, compressors, and fixed wing aircraft). Using the analytical models, it is shown that the utilization CC aerodynamics theoretically makes possible unprecedented advances in rotor noise reduction. For the X-wing VTOL these reductions appear to be feasible without incurring significant attendant performance and weight penalties.

  13. Cavitation controlled acoustic probe for fabric spot cleaning and moisture monitoring

    DOEpatents

    Sheen, Shuh-Haw; Chien, Hual-Te; Raptis, Apostolos C.

    1997-01-01

    A method and apparatus are provided for monitoring a fabric. An acoustic probe generates acoustic waves relative to the fabric. An acoustic sensor, such as an accelerometer is coupled to the acoustic probe for generating a signal representative of cavitation activity in the fabric. The generated cavitation activity representative signal is processed to indicate moisture content of the fabric. A feature of the invention is a feedback control signal is generated responsive to the generated cavitation activity representative signal. The feedback control signal can be used to control the energy level of the generated acoustic waves and to control the application of a cleaning solution to the fabric.

  14. Vibro-acoustic control with a distributed sensor network.

    PubMed

    Frampton, Kenneth D

    2006-04-01

    The purpose of this work is to demonstrate the ability of a distributed control system, based on a smart sensor network, to reduce acoustic radiation from a vibrating structure. The platform from which control is effected consists of a network of smart sensors, each referred to as a node. Each node possesses its own computational capability, sensor, actuator and the ability to communicate with other nodes via a wired or wireless network. The primary focus of this work is to employ existing group management middleware concepts to enable vibro-acoustic control with such a distributed network. Group management middleware is distributed software that provides for the establishment and maintenance of groups of distributed nodes and that provides for the network communication among such groups. The control objective is met by designing distributed feedback compensators that take advantage of node groups in order to effect their control. The node groups are formed based on physical proximity. The global control objective is to minimize the radiated sound power from a rectangular plate. Results of this investigation demonstrate that such a distributed control system can achieve attenuations comparable to those achieved by a centralized controller.

  15. Control strategies and mechanisms for active control of sound transmission into a vibro-acoustic enclosure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Guoyong; Feng, Na; Yang, Tiejun

    2011-06-01

    An analytical study was presented on active control of sound transmission into a vibro-acoustic enclosure comprising two flexible plates. Two types of actuators were used, i.e. acoustic actuator and distributed lead zirconate titanate piezoelectric (PZT) actuator instead of point force actuator. Using the modal acoustic transfer impedance-mobility matrices, the excitation and interaction in the coupled sound transmission system can be described with clear physical significance. With the control system designed to globally reduce the sound field, different control system configurations were considered, including the structural actuator on the incident plate, actuator on the receiving plate, acoustic actuator on the cavity, and their combinations. The effectiveness and performance of the control strategy corresponding to each system configuration were compared and discussed. The role and control mechanism of each type of actuator were of particular interest. It was shown that the incident plate actuator is effective in controlling the cavity-dominated modes and the structural modes dominated by the incident plate and receiving plate. Two main control mechanisms are involved in this control configuration, i.e., modal suppressing and modal rearrangement. For control system configuration with only acoustic actuator in the enclosure, the mechanism involved in this arrangement is purely modal suppression. Desirable placements of structural actuators in terms of total potential energy reduction were also discussed.

  16. Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Jerry R.; Grosveld, Ferdinand

    2007-01-01

    The acoustics environment in space operations is important to maintain at manageable levels so that the crewperson can remain safe, functional, effective, and reasonably comfortable. High acoustic levels can produce temporary or permanent hearing loss, or cause other physiological symptoms such as auditory pain, headaches, discomfort, strain in the vocal cords, or fatigue. Noise is defined as undesirable sound. Excessive noise may result in psychological effects such as irritability, inability to concentrate, decrease in productivity, annoyance, errors in judgment, and distraction. A noisy environment can also result in the inability to sleep, or sleep well. Elevated noise levels can affect the ability to communicate, understand what is being said, hear what is going on in the environment, degrade crew performance and operations, and create habitability concerns. Superfluous noise emissions can also create the inability to hear alarms or other important auditory cues such as an equipment malfunctioning. Recent space flight experience, evaluations of the requirements in crew habitable areas, and lessons learned (Goodman 2003; Allen and Goodman 2003; Pilkinton 2003; Grosveld et al. 2003) show the importance of maintaining an acceptable acoustics environment. This is best accomplished by having a high-quality set of limits/requirements early in the program, the "designing in" of acoustics in the development of hardware and systems, and by monitoring, testing and verifying the levels to ensure that they are acceptable.

  17. A supervisory control policy over an acoustic communication network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhadi, Alireza; Dumon, Jonathan; Canudas-de-Wit, Carlos

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents a supervisory multi-agent control policy over an acoustic communication network subject to imperfections (packet dropout and transmission delay) for localisation of an underwater flow source (e.g., source of chemical pollution, fresh water, etc.) with an unknown location at the bottom of the ocean. A two-loop control policy combined with a coding strategy for reliable communication is presented to perform the above task. A simulator is developed and used to evaluate the trade-offs between quality of communication, transmission delay and control for a fleet of autonomous underwater vehicles supervised over a noisy acoustic communication network by an autonomous surface vessel. It is illustrated that without compensation of the effects of severe random packet dropout, localisation of an unknown underwater flow source is not possible for the condition simulated just by implementing a two-loop control policy. But a two-loop control policy combined with a strategy for reliable communication locates the unknown location of flow source.

  18. Dynamic Response of X-37 Hot Structure Control Surfaces Exposed to Controlled Reverberant Acoustic Excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosveld, Ferdinand W.; Rizzi, Stephen A.; Rice, Chad E.

    2004-01-01

    This document represents a compilation of three informal reports from reverberant acoustic tests performed on X-37 hot structure control surfaces in the NASA Langley Research Center Structural Acoustics Loads and Transmission (SALT) facility. The first test was performed on a carbon-silicone carbide flaperon subcomponent on February 24, 2004. The second test was performed on a carbon-carbon ruddervator subcomponent on May 27, 2004. The third test was performed on a carbon-carbon flaperon subcomponent on June 30, 2004.

  19. Multivariable feedback active structural acoustic control using adaptive piezoelectric sensoriactuators.

    PubMed

    Vipperman, J S; Clark, R L

    1999-01-01

    An experimental implementation of a multivariable feedback active structural acoustic control system is demonstrated on a piezostructure plate with pinned boundary conditions. Four adaptive piezoelectric sensoriactuators provide an array of truly colocated actuator/sensor pairs to be used as control transducers. Radiation filters are developed based on the self- and mutual-radiation efficiencies of the structure and are included into the performance cost of an H2 control law which minimizes total radiated sound power. In the cost function, control effort is balanced with reductions in radiated sound power. A similarity transform which produces generalized velocity states that are required as inputs to the radiation filters is presented. Up to 15 dB of attenuation in radiated sound power was observed at the resonant frequencies of the piezostructure.

  20. Numerical Comparison of Active Acoustic and Structural Noise Control in a Stiffened Double Wall Cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosveld, Ferdinand W.

    1996-01-01

    The active acoustic and structural noise control characteristics of a double wall cylinder with and without ring stiffeners were numerically evaluated. An exterior monopole was assumed to acoustically excite the outside of the double wall cylinder at an acoustic cavity resonance frequency. Structural modal vibration properties of the inner and outer shells were analyzed by post-processing the results from a finite element analysis. A boundary element approach was used to calculate the acoustic cavity response and the coupled structural-acoustic interaction. In the frequency region of interest, below 500 Hz, all structural resonant modes were found to be acoustically slow and the nonresonant modal response to be dominant. Active sound transmission control was achieved by control forces applied to the inner or outer shell, or acoustic control monopoles placed just outside the inner or outer shell. A least mean square technique was used to minimize the interior sound pressures at the nodes of a data recovery mesh. Results showed that single acoustic control monopoles placed just outside the inner or outer shells resulted in better sound transmission control than six distributed point forces applied to either one of the shells. Adding stiffeners to the double wall structure constrained the modal vibrations of the shells, making the double wall stiffer with associated higher modal frequencies. Active noise control obtained for the stiffened double wall configurations was less than for the unstiffened cylinder. In all cases, the acoustic control monopoles controlled the sound transmission into the interior better than the structural control forces.

  1. Structural Acoustic Prediction and Interior Noise Control Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathur, G. P.; Chin, C. L.; Simpson, M. A.; Lee, J. T.; Palumbo, Daniel L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This report documents the results of Task 14, "Structural Acoustic Prediction and Interior Noise Control Technology". The task was to evaluate the performance of tuned foam elements (termed Smart Foam) both analytically and experimentally. Results taken from a three-dimensional finite element model of an active, tuned foam element are presented. Measurements of sound absorption and sound transmission loss were taken using the model. These results agree well with published data. Experimental performance data were taken in Boeing's Interior Noise Test Facility where 12 smart foam elements were applied to a 757 sidewall. Several configurations were tested. Noise reductions of 5-10 dB were achieved over the 200-800 Hz bandwidth of the controller. Accelerometers mounted on the panel provided a good reference for the controller. Configurations with far-field error microphones outperformed near-field cases.

  2. Electro-magnetically controlled acoustic metamaterials with adaptive properties.

    PubMed

    Malinovsky, Vladimir S; Donskoy, Dimitri M

    2012-10-01

    A design of actively controlled metamaterial is proposed and discussed. The metamaterial consists of layers of electrically charged nano or micro particles exposed to external magnetic field. The particles are also attached to compliant layers in a way that the designed structure exhibits two resonances: mechanical spring-mass resonance and electro-magnetic cyclotron resonance. It is shown that if the cyclotron frequency is greater than the mechanical resonance frequency, the designed structure could be highly attenuative (40-60 dB) for vibration and sound waves in very broad frequency range even for wavelength much greater than the thickness of the metamaterial. The approach opens up wide range of opportunities for design of adaptively controlled acoustic metamaterials by controlling magnetic field and/or electrical charges.

  3. Acoustic Aspects of Active-Twist Rotor Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booth, Earl R., Jr.; Wilbur, Matthew L.

    2002-01-01

    The use of an Active Twist Rotor system to provide both vibration reduction and performance enhancement has been explored in recent analytical and experimental studies. Effects of active-twist control on rotor noise, however, had not been determined. During a recent wind tunnel test of an active-twist rotor system, a set of acoustic measurements were obtained to assess the effects of active-twist control on noise produced by the rotor, especially blade-vortex interaction (BVI) noise. It was found that for rotor operating conditions where BVI noise is dominant, active-twist control provided a reduction in BVI noise level. This BVI noise reduction was almost, but not quite, as large as that obtained in a similar test using HHC. However, vibration levels were usually adversely affected at operating conditions favoring minimum BVI noise. Conversely, operating conditions favoring minimum vibration levels affected BVI noise levels, but not always adversely.

  4. Active control of acoustic pressure fields using smart material technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Smith, R. C.

    1993-01-01

    An overview describing the use of piezoceramic patches in reducing noise in a structural acoustics setting is presented. The passive and active contributions due to patches which are bonded to an Euler-Bernoulli beam or thin shell are briefly discussed and the results are incorporated into a 2-D structural acoustics model. In this model, an exterior noise source causes structural vibrations which in turn lead to interior noise as a result of nonlinear fluid/structure coupling mechanism. Interior sound pressure levels are reduced via patches bonded to the flexible boundary (a beam in this case) which generate pure bending moments when an out-of-phase voltage is applied. Well-posedness results for the infinite dimensional system are discussed and a Galerkin scheme for approximating the system dynamics is outlined. Control is implemented by using linear quadratic regulator (LQR) optimal control theory to calculate gains for the linearized system and then feeding these gains back into the nonlinear system of interest. The effectiveness of this strategy for this problem is illustrated in an example.

  5. Controls of pass-bands in asymmetric acoustic transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hong-Xiang; Zhang, Shu-Yi; Yuan, Shou-Qi

    2016-12-01

    The controls of the pass-bands in an asymmetric acoustic transmission system are investigated numerically and experimentally, and the system consists of a periodical rectangular grating and two uniform brass plates in water. We reveal that the pass-band of the asymmetric acoustic transmission is closely related to the grating period, but is affected slightly by the brass plate thickness. Moreover, the transmittance can be improved by adjusting the grating period and other structural parameters simultaneously. The control method of the system has the advantages of wider frequency range and simple operation, which has great potential applications in ultrasonic devices. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2012CB921504), the Major Program of the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51239005), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11174142 and 11404147), the Natural Science Foundation of Jiangsu Province, China (Grant No. BK20140519), the China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (Grant No. 2015M571672), the Training Project of Young Backbone Teachers of Jiangsu University, China, and the Research Fund for Advanced Talents of Jiangsu University, China (Grant No. 13JDG106).

  6. Controlled permeation of cell membrane by single bubble acoustic cavitation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Y; Yang, K; Cui, J; Ye, J Y; Deng, C X

    2012-01-10

    Sonoporation is the membrane disruption generated by ultrasound and has been exploited as a non-viral strategy for drug and gene delivery. Acoustic cavitation of microbubbles has been recognized to play an important role in sonoporation. However, due to the lack of adequate techniques for precise control of cavitation activities and real-time assessment of the resulting sub-micron process of sonoporation, limited knowledge has been available regarding the detail processes and correlation of cavitation with membrane disruption at the single cell level. In the current study, we developed a combined approach including optical, acoustical, and electrophysiological techniques to enable synchronized manipulation, imaging, and measurement of cavitation of single bubbles and the resulting cell membrane disruption in real-time. Using a self-focused femtosecond laser and high frequency ultrasound (7.44MHz) pulses, a single microbubble was generated and positioned at a desired distance from the membrane of a Xenopus oocyte. Cavitation of the bubble was achieved by applying a low frequency (1.5MHz) ultrasound pulse (duration 13.3 or 40μs) to induce bubble collapse. Disruption of the cell membrane was assessed by the increase in the transmembrane current (TMC) of the cell under voltage clamp. Simultaneous high-speed bright field imaging of cavitation and measurements of the TMC were obtained to correlate the ultrasound-generated bubble activities with the cell membrane poration. The change in membrane permeability was directly associated with the formation of a sub-micrometer pore from a local membrane rupture generated by bubble collapse or bubble compression depending on ultrasound amplitude and duration. The impact of the bubble collapse on membrane permeation decreased rapidly with increasing distance (D) between the bubble (diameter d) and the cell membrane. The effective range of cavitation impact on membrane poration was determined to be D/d=0.75. The maximum mean

  7. Control of acoustic cavitation with application to lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Michael Rollins

    Control of acoustic cavitation, which is sound-induced growth and collapse of bubbles, is the subject of this dissertation. Application is to extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL), used to treat kidney stones. Cavitation is thought to help comminute stones yet may damage tissue. Can cavitation be controlled? The acoustic source in a widely used clinical lithotripter is an electrical spark at the near focus of an underwater ellipsoidal reflector. To control cavitation, we used rigid reflectors, pressure release reflectors, and pairs of reflectors aligned to have a common focus and a controlled delay between sparks. Cavitation was measured with aluminum foil, which was placed along the axis at the far focus of the reflector(s). Collapsing bubbles pitted the foil. Pit depth measured with a profilometer provided a relative measure of cavitation intensity. Cavitation was also measured with a focused hydrophone, which detected the pressure pulse radiated in bubble collapse. Acoustic pressure signals produced by the reflectors were measured with a PVdF membrane hydrophone, digitally recorded, and input into a numerical version of the Gilmore equation (F. R. Gilmore, 'The growth or collapse of a spherical bubble in a viscous compressible liquid,' Rep#26-4, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena (1952), pp.1-40.). Maximum pressure produced in a spherical bubble was calculated and employed as a relative measure of collapse intensity. Experimental and numerical results demonstrate cavitation can be controlled by an appropriately delayed auxiliary pressure pulse. When two rigid-reflector pulses are used, a long interpulse delay (150-200 μs) of the second pulse 'kicks' the collapsing bubble and intensifies cavitation. Foil pit depth and computed pressure three times single pulse values were obtained. Conversely, a short delay (<90 μs) 'stifles' bubble growth and weakens cavitation. A single pressure release reflector time- reverses the rigid-reflector waveform

  8. Feasibility of using piezoelectric actuators to control launch vehicle acoustics and structural vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niezrecki, Christopher; Cudney, Harley H.

    2000-06-01

    Future launch vehicle payload fairings will be manufactured form advanced lightweight composite materials. The loss of distributed mass causes a significant increase in the internal acoustic environment, causing a severe threat to the payload. Using piezoelectric actuators to control the fairing vibration and the internal acoustic environment has been proposed. To help determine the acoustic control authority of piezoelectric actuators mounted on a rocket fairing, the internal acoustic response created by the actuators needs to be determined. In this work, the internal acoustic response of a closed simply-supported (SS) cylinder actuated by piezoelectric (PZT) actuators is determined using a n impedance model for the actuator and boundary element analysis. The experimentally validated model is used to extrapolate results for a SS cylinder that emulates a Minotaur payload fairing. The internal cylinder acoustic levels are investigated for PZT actuation between 35 and 400 Hz. Significant reductions in the structural response due to increased damping do not equate to similar reductions in the acoustic SPLs for the cylinder. The sound levels at the acoustic resonant frequencies are essentially unaffected by the significant increase in structural damping while the acoustic level sat the structural resonant frequencies are mildly reduced. The interior acoustic response of the cylinder is dominated by the acoustic modes and therefore significant reductions in the overall interior acoustic levels will not be achieved if only the structural resonances are controlled. As the actuation frequency is reduced, the number of actuators required to generate acoustic levels commensurate to that found in the fairing increases to impractical values. Below approximately 100 Hz, the current demands reach levels that are extremely difficult to achieve with a practical system. The results of this work imply that PZT actuators do not have the authority to control the payload fairing

  9. On the acoustics of a circulation control airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reger, R.; Nickels, A.; Ukeiley, L.; Cattafesta, L. N.

    2017-02-01

    A two-dimensional elliptical circulation control airfoil model is studied in the Florida State Aeroacoustic Tunnel. Far-field acoustics are obtained via a 55 microphone phased array. Single microphone spectra are also obtained, and it is shown that background noise is significant. In order to circumvent this problem, beamforming is employed. The primary sources of background noise are from the tunnel collector and jet/sidewall interaction. The deconvolution approach to mapping acoustic sources (DAMAS) is employed to remove the effects of the array point spread function. Spectra are acquired by integrating the DAMAS result over the source region. The resulting DAMAS spectral levels are significantly below single microphone levels. Although the DAMAS levels are reduced from those of a single microphone or delay and sum beamforming (DAS), they are still above those of a NACA 0012, estimated using NAFNoise, at the same geometric and free-stream conditions. A scaling analysis is performed on the processed array data. With a constant free-stream velocity and a varying jet velocity the data scale as jet Mach number to the 6th power. If the momentum coefficient is held constant and the free-stream velocity is varied the data scale as free-stream Mach number to the 7th power.

  10. Active vibration and noise control of vibro-acoustic system by using PID controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yunlong; Wang, Xiaojun; Huang, Ren; Qiu, Zhiping

    2015-07-01

    Active control simulation of the acoustic and vibration response of a vibro-acoustic cavity of an airplane based on a PID controller is presented. A full numerical vibro-acoustic model is developed by using an Eulerian model, which is a coupled model based on the finite element formulation. The reduced order model, which is used to design the closed-loop control system, is obtained by the combination of modal expansion and variable substitution. Some physical experiments are made to validate and update the full-order and the reduced-order numerical models. Optimization of the actuator placement is employed in order to get an effective closed-loop control system. For the controller design, an iterative method is used to determine the optimal parameters of the PID controller. The process is illustrated by the design of an active noise and vibration control system for a cavity structure. The numerical and experimental results show that a PID-based active control system can effectively suppress the noise inside the cavity using a sound pressure signal as the controller input. It is also possible to control the noise by suppressing the vibration of the structure using the structural displacement signal as the controller input. For an airplane cavity structure, considering the issue of space-saving, the latter is more suitable.

  11. Controlling cell-cell interactions using surface acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Guo, Feng; Li, Peng; French, Jarrod B; Mao, Zhangming; Zhao, Hong; Li, Sixing; Nama, Nitesh; Fick, James R; Benkovic, Stephen J; Huang, Tony Jun

    2015-01-06

    The interactions between pairs of cells and within multicellular assemblies are critical to many biological processes such as intercellular communication, tissue and organ formation, immunological reactions, and cancer metastasis. The ability to precisely control the position of cells relative to one another and within larger cellular assemblies will enable the investigation and characterization of phenomena not currently accessible by conventional in vitro methods. We present a versatile surface acoustic wave technique that is capable of controlling the intercellular distance and spatial arrangement of cells with micrometer level resolution. This technique is, to our knowledge, among the first of its kind to marry high precision and high throughput into a single extremely versatile and wholly biocompatible technology. We demonstrated the capabilities of the system to precisely control intercellular distance, assemble cells with defined geometries, maintain cellular assemblies in suspension, and translate these suspended assemblies to adherent states, all in a contactless, biocompatible manner. As an example of the power of this system, this technology was used to quantitatively investigate the gap junctional intercellular communication in several homotypic and heterotypic populations by visualizing the transfer of fluorescent dye between cells.

  12. Acoustic bubble: Controlled and selective micropropulsion and chemical waveform generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Daniel

    The physics governing swimming at the microscale---where viscous forces dominate over inertial---is distinctly different than that at the macroscale. Devices capable of finely controlled swimming at the microscale could enable bold ideas such as targeted drug delivery, non-invasive microsurgery, and precise materials assembly. Progress has already been made towards such artificial microswimmers using several means of actuation: chemical reactions and applied magnetic, electric or acoustic fields. However, the prevailing goal of selective actuation of a single microswimmer from within a group, the first step towards collaborative, guided action by a group of swimmers, has so far not been achieved. Here I present a new class of microswimmer that accomplishes for the first time selective actuation (Chapter 1). The swimmer design eschews the commonly-held design paradigm that microswimmers must use non-reciprocal motion to achieve propulsion; instead, the swimmer is propelled by oscillatory motion of an air bubble trapped within the swimmer's polymer body. This oscillatory motion is driven by a low-power biocompatible acoustic field to the ambient liquid, with meaningful swimmer propulsion occurring only at resonance frequencies of the bubble. This acoustically-powered microswimmer performs controllable rapid translational and rotational motion even in highly viscous liquid. By using a group of swimmers each with a different bubble size (and thus different resonance frequencies) selective actuation of a single swimmer from among the group can be readily achieved. Cellular response to chemical microenvironments depends on the spatiotemporal characteristics of the stimulus, which is central to many biological processes including gene expression, cell migration, differentiation, apoptosis, and intercellular signaling. To date, studies have been limited to digital (or step) chemical stimulation with little control over the temporal counterparts. Microfluidic approaches

  13. Publications in acoustic and noise control from NASA Langley Research Center during 1940-1979. [bibliographies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fryer, B. A. (Compiler)

    1980-01-01

    Reference lists of approximately 900 published Langley Research Center reports in various areas of acoustics and noise control for the period 1940-1979 are presented. Specific topic areas covered include: duct acoustics; propagation and operations; rotating blade noise; jet noise; sonic boom; flow surface interaction noise; structural response/interior noise; human response; and noise prediction.

  14. Passive hypervelocity boundary layer control using an acoustically absortive surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasheed, Adam

    A series of exploratory boundary layer transition experiments was performed on a sharp 5.06 degree half-angle round cone at zero angle-of-attack in the T5 Hypervelocity Shock Tunnel in order to test a novel hypersonic boundary layer control scheme. Recently performed linear stability analyses suggested that transition could be delayed in hypersonic boundary layers by using an ultrasonically absorptive surface that would damp the second mode (Mack mode). The cone used in the experiments was constructed with a smooth surface on half the cone (to serve as a control) and an acoustically absorptive porous surface on the other half. It was instrumented with flush-mounted thermocouples to detect the transition location. Test gases investigated included nitrogen and carbon dioxide at M = 5 with specific reservoir enthalpy ranging from 1.3 MJ/kg to 13.0 MJ/kg and reservoir pressure ranging from 9.0 MPa to 50.0 MPa. Detailed comparisons were performed to insure that previous results obtained in similar boundary layer transition experiments (on a regular smooth surface) were reproduced and the results were extended to examine the effects of the porous surface. These experiments indicated that the porous surface was highly effective in delaying transition provided that the hole size was significantly smaller than the viscous length scale.

  15. Deepwater pipeline intervention work with an acoustically controlled power module

    SciTech Connect

    Conter, A.; Launaro, F.; Bigoni, G.

    1997-02-01

    The stabilization of submarine pipeline free spans along uneven sea bottoms is performed conventionally using technologies such as gravel dumping, post trenching, and mattress installation. A new technology has been developed to support free spans along the 26-inch Transmed Gas Pipelines crossing the Sicily Channel in water depths ranging from 50 m to 510 m. This technology is based on the pipeline mechanical support Atlantis and its installation module Pegaso and was developed keeping requirements such as short installation time, system redundancy, operational flexibility, and simple interface with the support vessel in mind. The installation time reduction is achieved by automatic operational procedures that are controlled acoustically from the surface. Power is stored inside two dedicated battery packs placed on board pegaso; no umbilical cable is necessary, so that a vessel equipped with a normal crane is enough to launch and operate the system. Marine operations carried out in 1993 showed that a support can be installed in about 1 hour. In good weather conditions, three Atlantis were installed in 24 hours, including deck operations for recharging the battery packs. A total of 16 supports was installed along the 4th and 5th Transmed Gas Pipelines. The system has proved to be a cost-effective and flexible alternative to conventional technologies for free-span support, especially in deep waters. A cost/benefit analysis also shows the break-even point of the new technology vs. gravel dumping.

  16. Distributed acoustic receptivity in laminar flow control configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhari, Meelan

    1992-01-01

    A model problem related to distributed receptivity to free-stream acoustic waves in laminar flow control (LFC) configurations is studied, within the Orr-Sommerfield framework, by a suitable extension of the Goldstein-Ruban theory for receptivity due to localized disturbances on the airfoil surface. The results, thus, complement the earlier work on the receptivity produced by local variations in the surface suction and/or surface admittance. In particular, we show that the cumulative effect of the distributed receptivity can be substantially larger than that of a single, isolated suction strip or slot. Furthermore, even if the receptivity is spread out over very large distances, the most effective contributions come from a relatively short region in vicinity of the lower branch of the neutral stability curve. The length scale of this region is intermediate to that of the mean of these two length scales. Finally, it is found that the receptivity is effectively dominated by a narrow band of Fourier components from the wall-suction and admittance distributions, roughly corresponding to a detuning of less than ten percent with respect to the neutral instability wavenumber at the frequency under consideration. The results suggest that the drop-off in receptivity magnitudes away from the resonant wavenumber is nearly independent of the frequency parameter.

  17. Digital control of high-intensity acoustic testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slusser, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    A high intensity acoustic test system is reported that consists of a reverberation room measuring 18 feet wide by 21 feet long by 26 feet high, with an internal volume of 10,900 cubic feet. The room is rectangular in shape. Acoustic energy is supplied through two 50-Hz cutoff exponential horns about 12 feet long. Each of the two horns has two transducers rated at 4000 acoustic watts each. A gaseous nitrogen supply is used to supply the energy. The equalized electrical signal is corrected by a circuit designed to compensate for the transducer nonlinearity, then fed into one channel of a phase linear power amplifier, then into the transducer. The amplifiers have been modified to increase their reliability. The acoustic energy in the room is monitored by six B and K 1/2-inch condenser microphones. The electrical signal from each microphone is fed into a six channel real time averager to give a spatial average of the signals.

  18. An objective method and measuring equipment for noise control and acoustic diagnostics of motorcars. [acoustic diagnostics on automobile engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kacprowski, J.; Motylewski, J.; Miazga, J.

    1974-01-01

    An objective method and apparatus for noise control and acoustic diagnostics of motorcar engines are reported. The method and apparatus let us know whether the noisiness of the vehicle under test exceeds the admissible threshold levels given by appropriate standards and if so what is the main source of the excessive noise. The method consists in measuring both the overall noise level and the sound pressure levels in definite frequency bands while the engine speed is controlled as well and may be fixed at prescribed values. Whenever the individually adjusted threshold level has been exceeded in any frequency band, a self-sustaining control signal is sent.

  19. Duct wall impedance control as an advanced concept for acoustic impression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, P. D.; Tester, B. J.

    1975-01-01

    Models and tests on an acoustic duct liner system which has the property of controlled-variable acoustic impedance are described. This is achieved by a novel concept which uses the effect of steady air flow through a multi-layer, locally reacting, resonant-cavity absorber. The scope of this work was limited to a 'proof of concept.' The test of the concept was implemented by means of a small-scale, square-section flow duct facility designed specifically for acoustic measurements, with one side of the duct acoustically lined. The test liners were designed with the aid of previously established duct acoustic theory and a semi-empirical impedance model of the liner system. Over the limited range tested, the liner behaved primarily as predicted, exhibiting significant changes in resistance and reactance, thus providing the necessary concept validation.

  20. Computer-controlled noise adaption for acoustical test facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wedig, W. V.; Ams, A.

    1990-09-01

    For acoustical noise tests of elastic structures, statistically representative signals generated from white noise by means of spectrum shapers and band pass filters are needed. Subsequently, these signals are amplified and transformed into physical test noise by acoustical sirens. A mathematical model of the entire system based on measurements of frequency transfer functions in order to predict an optimal amplitude modulation of the spectrum shaper is presented. The prediction is performed by means of a nonlinear optimization procedure which iterates the tuning parameters of the shaper with respect to the stored frequency data of the entire system.

  1. New algorithm for controlling electric arc furnaces using their vibrational and acoustic characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherednichenko, V. S.; Bikeev, R. A.; Serikov, V. A.; Rechkalov, A. V.; Cherednichenko, A. V.

    2016-12-01

    The processes occurring in arc discharges are analyzed as the sources of acoustic radiation in an electric arc furnace (EAF). Acoustic vibrations are shown to transform into mechanical vibrations in the furnace laboratory. The shielding of the acoustic energy fluxes onto water-cooled wall panels by a charge is experimentally studied. It is shown that the rate of charge melting and the depth of submergence of arc discharges in the slag and metal melt can be monitored by measuring the vibrational characteristics of furnaces and using them in a universal industrial process-control system, which was developed for EAFs.

  2. Acoustic control of mosquito larvae in artificial drinking water containers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Acoustic larvicide devices are part of an emerging technology that provides a non-chemical and non-biological means to reduce larval populations of key medically important mosquito species such as Aedes aegypti in containers or catchments of water. These devices could benefit integrated vector manag...

  3. Noise control for a ChamberCore cylindrical structure using long T-shaped acoustic resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Deyu; Vipperman, Jeffrey S.

    2003-10-01

    The Air Force Research Laboratory, Space Vehicles Directorate has developed a new advanced composite launch vehicle fairing (referred to as ``ChamberCore''). The ChamberCore is sandwich-type structure fabricated from multi-layered composite face sheets separated by channels that form passive acoustic chambers. These acoustic chambers have a potential to create an acoustic resonator network that can be used to attenuate noise inside the closed ChamberCore cylindrical structure. In this study, first, the feasibility of using cylindrical Helmholtz resonators to control noise in a mock-scale ChamberCore composite cylinder is investigated. The targeted frequencies for noise control are the first four acoustic cavity resonances of the ChamberCore cylinder. The optimal position of the Helmholtz resonators for controlling each targeted cavity mode is discussed, and the effects of resonator spacing on noise attenuation are also experimentally evaluated. Next, six long T-shaped acoustic resonators are designed and constructed within the acoustic chambers of the structure and investigated. Several tests are conducted to evaluate the noise control ability of the resonators in the ChamberCore cylinder. Reductions ranging from 3.2 to 6.0 dB were observed in the overall mean-square noise reduction spectrum at the targeted inner cavity resonance frequencies. [Work supported by AFRL/DV.

  4. A closed-loop automatic control system for high-intensity acoustic test systems.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slusser, R. A.

    1973-01-01

    Sound at sound pressure levels in the range from 130 to 160 dB is used in the investigation. Random noise is passed through a series of parallel filters, generally 1/3-octave wide. A basic automatic system is investigated because of preadjustment inaccuracies and high costs found in a study of a typical manually controlled acoustic testing system. The unit described has been successfully used in automatic acoustic tests in connection with the spacecraft tests for the Mariner 1971 program.

  5. Publications in acoustics and noise control from the NASA Langley Research Center during 1940-1976

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fryer, B. A. (Compiler)

    1977-01-01

    Reference lists are presented of published research papers in various areas of acoustics and noise control for the period 1940-1976. The references are listed chronologically and are grouped under the following general headings: (1) Duct acoustics; (2) propagation and operations; (3) rotating blade noise; (4) jet noise; (5) sonic boom; (6) flow-surface interaction noise; (7) human response; (8) structural response; (9) prediction; and (10) miscellaneous.

  6. Closed-Loop Acoustic Control of Reverberant Room for Satellite Environmental Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janssens, Karl; Bianciardi, Fabio; Sabbatini, Danilo; Debille, Jan; Carrella, Alex

    2012-07-01

    The full satellite acoustic test is an important milestone in a satellite launch survivability verification campaign. This test is required to verify the satellite’s mechanical design against the high-level acoustic loads induced by the launch vehicle during the atmospheric flight. During the test, the satellite is subjected to a broadband diffuse acoustic field, reproducing the pressure levels observed during launch. The excitation is in most cases provided by a combination of horns for the low frequencies and noise generators for the higher frequencies. Acoustic control tests are commonly performed in reverberant rooms, controlling the sound pressure levels in third octave bands over the specified target spectrum. This paper discusses an automatic feedback control system for acoustic control of large reverberation rooms for satellite environmental testing. The acoustic control system consists of parallel third octave PI (Proportional Integral) feedback controllers that take the reverberation characteristics of the room into consideration. The drive output of the control system is shaped at every control step based on the comparison of the average third octave noise spectrum, measured from a number of microphones in the test room, with the target spectrum. Cross-over filters split the output drive into band- limited signals to feed each of the horns. The control system is realized in several steps. In the first phase, a dynamic process model is developed, including the non-linear characteristics of the horns and the reverberant properties of the room. The model is identified from dynamic experiments using system identification techniques. In the next phase, an adequate control strategy is designed which is capable of reaching the target spectrum in the required time period without overshoots. This control strategy is obtained from model-in-the-loop (MIL) simulations, evaluating the performance of various potential strategies. Finally, the proposed strategy is

  7. Active modal control simulation of vibro-acoustic response of a fluid-loaded plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Sheng

    2011-11-01

    Active modal control simulation of vibro-acoustic response of a fluid-loaded plate is presented. The active modal control of the vibro-acoustic response is implemented using piezoelectric actuators/sensors. The active modal damping is added to the coupled system via negative velocity feedback. The feedback gain between the piezoelectric actuators/sensors for the modal control is obtained using the in-vacuo modal matrix and the incompressible fluid-loaded modal matrix. The modal control performance of structural vibration and acoustic radiation of a baffled plate is numerically studied. It is shown that the proposed method increases the modal damping ratio and achieves reduction in the mean square velocity and the sound power for given modes of the fluid-loaded plate.

  8. Acoustic and vibration response of a structure with added noise control treatment under various excitations.

    PubMed

    Rhazi, Dilal; Atalla, Noureddine

    2014-02-01

    The evaluation of the acoustic performance of noise control treatments is of great importance in many engineering applications, e.g., aircraft, automotive, and building acoustics applications. Numerical methods such as finite- and boundary elements allow for the study of complex structures with added noise control treatment. However, these methods are computationally expensive when used for complex structures. At an early stage of the acoustic trim design process, many industries look for simple and easy to use tools that provide sufficient physical insight that can help to formulate design criteria. The paper presents a simple and tractable approach for the acoustic design of noise control treatments. It presents and compares two transfer matrix-based methods to investigate the vibroacoustic behavior of noise control treatments. The first is based on a modal approach, while the second is based on wave-number space decomposition. In addition to the classical rain-on-the-roof and diffuse acoustic field excitations, the paper also addresses turbulent boundary layer and point source (monopole) excitations. Various examples are presented and compared to a finite element calculation to validate the methodology and to confirm its relevance along with its limitations.

  9. On the control of propagating acoustic waves in sonic crystals: analytical, numerical and optimization techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, D. Vincent Romero

    The control of the acoustical properties of the sonic crystals (SC) needs the study of both the distribution of the scatterers in the structure and the intrinsic acoustical properties of the scatterers. In this work an exhaustive analysis of the distribution of the scatterers as well as the improvement of the acoustical properties of the SC made of scatterers with absorbent and/or resonant properties is presented. Both procedures, working together or independently, provide real possibilities to control the propagation of acoustic waves through SC. From the theoretical point of view, the wave propagation through periodic and quasiperiodic structures has been analysed by means of the multiple scattering theory, the plane wave expansion and the finite elements method. A novel extension of the plane wave expansion allowing the complex relation dispersion for SC is presented in this work. This technique complements the provided information using the classical methods and it allows us to analyse the evanescent behaviour of the modes inside of the band gaps as well as the evanescent behaviour of localized modes around the point defects in SC. The necessity of accurate measurements of the acoustical properties of the SC has motivated the development of a novel three-dimensional acquisition system that synchronises the motion of the receiver and acquisition of the temporal signals. A good agreement between the theoretical and experimental data is shown in this work. The joint work between the optimized structures of scatterers and the intrinsic properties of the scatterers themselves is applied to generate devices that present wide ranges of attenuated frequencies. These systems are presented as an alternative to the classic acoustic barrier where the propagation of waves through SC can be controlled. The results help to correctly understand the behaviour of SC for the localization of sound and for the design of both wave guides and acoustic filters.

  10. Structural sensing of interior sound for active control of noise in structural-acoustic cavities.

    PubMed

    Bagha, Ashok K; Modak, S V

    2015-07-01

    This paper proposes a method for structural sensing of acoustic potential energy for active control of noise in a structural-acoustic cavity. The sensing strategy aims at global control and works with a fewer number of sensors. It is based on the established concept of radiation modes and hence does not add too many states to the order of the system. Acoustic potential energy is sensed using a combination of a Kalman filter and a frequency weighting filter with the structural response measurements as the inputs. The use of Kalman filter also makes the system robust against measurement noise. The formulation of the strategy is presented using finite element models of the system including that of sensors and actuators so that it can be easily applied to practical systems. The sensing strategy is numerically evaluated in the framework of Linear Quadratic Gaussian based feedback control of interior noise in a rectangular box cavity with a flexible plate with single and multiple pairs of piezoelectric sensor-actuator patches when broadband disturbances act on the plate. The performance is compared with an "acoustic filter" that models the complete transfer function from the structure to the acoustic domain. The sensing performance is also compared with a direct estimation strategy.

  11. The evaluation and control of acoustical standing waves1

    PubMed Central

    Krasnegor, Norman A.; Hodos, William

    1974-01-01

    Calibration of a standard pigeon box subsequently modified for use as an acoustical chamber in a frequency discrimination experiment revealed that the enclosure was not acoustically “flat”. Standing waves were detected at each of the six frequencies measured. To ascertain whether the maximum standing waves recorded (3.0 dB) could serve as an added or alternative cue for pigeons tested in the chamber on a frequency discrimination problem, pure-tone intensity difference thresholds were determined for two pigeons at 1.0, 2.0, and 3.0 KHz. The results of the experiment indicated that the smallest intensity difference detectable was 10.0 dB, a value that was 7.0 dB above the maximum standing wave measured in the box. These data suggest that the modified pigeon chamber is suitable to test pure-tone frequency discriminations in pigeons in the range of 1.0 to 3.0 KHz. PMID:16811783

  12. Acoustic Resonators for Far-Field Control of Sound on a Subwavelength Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemoult, Fabrice; Fink, Mathias; Lerosey, Geoffroy

    2011-08-01

    We prove experimentally that broadband sounds can be controlled and focused at will on a subwavelength scale by using acoustic resonators. We demonstrate our approach in the audible range with soda cans, that is, Helmholtz resonators, and commercial computer speakers. We show that diffraction-limited sound fields convert efficiently into subdiffraction modes in the collection of cans that can be controlled coherently in order to obtain focal spots as thin as 1/25 of a wavelength in air. We establish that subwavelength acoustic pressure spots are responsible for a strong enhancement of the acoustic displacement at focus, which permits us to conclude with a visual experiment exemplifying the interest of our concept for subwavelength sensors and actuators.

  13. Modeling of Structural-Acoustic Interaction Using Coupled FE/BE Method and Control of Interior Acoustic Pressure Using Piezoelectric Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mei, Chuh; Shi, Yacheng

    1997-01-01

    A coupled finite element (FE) and boundary element (BE) approach is presented to model full coupled structural/acoustic/piezoelectric systems. The dual reciprocity boundary element method is used so that the natural frequencies and mode shapes of the coupled system can be obtained, and to extend this approach to time dependent problems. The boundary element method is applied to interior acoustic domains, and the results are very accurate when compared with limited exact solutions. Structural-acoustic problems are then analyzed with the coupled finite element/boundary element method, where the finite element method models the structural domain and the boundary element method models the acoustic domain. Results for a system consisting of an isotropic panel and a cubic cavity are in good agreement with exact solutions and experiment data. The response of a composite panel backed cavity is then obtained. The results show that the mass and stiffness of piezoelectric layers have to be considered. The coupled finite element and boundary element equations are transformed into modal coordinates, which is more convenient for transient excitation. Several transient problems are solved based on this formulation. Two control designs, a linear quadratic regulator (LQR) and a feedforward controller, are applied to reduce the acoustic pressure inside the cavity based on the equations in modal coordinates. The results indicate that both controllers can reduce the interior acoustic pressure and the plate deflection.

  14. Laser method of acoustical emission control from vibrating surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motyka, Zbigniew

    2013-01-01

    For limitation of the noise in environment, the necessity occurs of determining and location of sources of sounds emitted from surfaces of many machines and devices, assuring in effect the possibility of suitable constructional changes implementation, targeted at decreasing of their nuisance. In the paper, the results of tests and calculations are presented for plane surface sources emitting acoustic waves. The tests were realized with the use of scanning laser vibrometer which enabled remote registration and the spectral analysis of the surfaces vibrations. The known hybrid digital method developed for determination of sound wave emission from such surfaces divided into small finite elements was slightly modified by distinguishing the phase correlations between such vibrating elements. The final method being developed may find use in wide range of applications for different forms of vibrations of plane surfaces.

  15. Passive control of flow-excited acoustic resonance in rectangular cavities using upstream mounted blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaaban, Mahmoud; Mohany, Atef

    2015-04-01

    A passive method for controlling the flow-excited acoustic resonance resulting from subsonic flows over rectangular cavities in channels is investigated. A cavity with length to depth ratio of is tested in air flow of Mach number up to 0.45. When the acoustic resonance is excited, the sound pressure level in the cavity reaches 162 dB. Square blocks are attached to the surface of the channel and centred upstream of the cavity leading edge to suppress the flow-excited acoustic resonance in the cavity. Six blocks of different widths are tested at three different upstream distances. The results show that significant attenuation of up to 30 dB of the excited sound pressure level is achieved using a block with a width to height ratio of 3, while blocks that fill the whole width of the channel amplify the pressure of the excited acoustic resonance. Moreover, it is found that placing the block upstream of the cavity causes the onset of the acoustic resonance to occur at higher flow velocities. In order to investigate the nature of the interactions that lead to suppression of the acoustic resonance and to identify the changes in flow patterns due to the placement of the block, 2D measurements of turbulence intensity in the shear layer and the block wake region are performed. The location of the flow reattachment point downstream of the block relative to the shear layer separation point has a major influence on the suppression level of the excited acoustic resonance. Furthermore, higher attenuation of noise is related to lower span-wise correlation of the shear-layer perturbation.

  16. Experimental characterization of active acoustic metamaterial cell with controllable dynamic density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akl, Wael; Baz, Amr

    2012-10-01

    Controlling wave propagation pattern within acoustic fluid domains has been the motivation for the acoustic metamaterials developments to target applications ranging from acoustic cloaking to passive noise control techniques. Currently, various numerical and analytical approaches exist to predict the fluid domain material properties necessary for specific propagation pattern. Physical attempts to realize such material properties have revealed engineered material constructions that are focused on predefined wave propagation patterns. In the current paper, coupled fluid-structure one-dimensional metamaterial cell, in which piezoelectric active ingredient has been introduced, is manufactured to achieve controllable dynamic density. The density-controllable cell has been manufactured by coupling a water-filled cavity with piezoelectric elements in a cell of 4.5 cm length and 4.1 cm diameter subject to impulse excitation. A finite element model of the cell has been developed and its predictions are validated against the experimental results. The validated model is utilized to predict the changes in the pressure gradient inside the developed cell which is a direct measure of the changes introduced to the dynamic density of the acoustic metamaterial domain. With such predictions, it is demonstrated that densities as high as 3.2 gm/cm3 and as low as 0.72 gm/cm3 can be achieved experimentally for excitation frequencies ranging between 100 Hz and 500 Hz.

  17. MTR, TRA603. CONTROL ROOM DETAILS. ACOUSTIC PLASTER CEILING, USHAPED CONSOLE, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MTR, TRA-603. CONTROL ROOM DETAILS. ACOUSTIC PLASTER CEILING, U-SHAPED CONSOLE, INSTRUMENT PANELS, GLASS DOOR, ASPHALT TILE FLOOR AND COLORS. BLAW-KNOX 3150-803-11, 10/1950. INL INDEX NO. 531-0603-00-098-100570, REV. 3. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  18. Acoustics in Research Facilities--Control of Wanted and Unwanted Sound. Laboratory Design Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Robert B.

    Common and special acoustics problems are discussed in relation to the design and construction of research facilities. Following a brief examination of design criteria for the control of wanted and unwanted sound, the technology for achieving desired results is discussed. Emphasis is given to various design procedures and materials for the control…

  19. Publications in acoustics and noise control from the NASA Langley Research Center during 1940 - 1974

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, G. C. (Compiler); Laneave, J. N. (Compiler)

    1975-01-01

    This document contains reference lists of published Langley Research Center papers in various areas of acoustics and noise control for the period 1940-1974. The research work was performed either in-house by the center staff or by other personnel supported entirely or in part by grants or contracts. The references are listed chronologically and are grouped under the following general headings: (1) Duct acoustics, (2) Propagation and operations, (3) Rotating blade noise, (4) Jet noise, (5) Sonic boom, (6) Flow-surface interaction noise, (7) Human response, and (8) Structural response.

  20. Acoustic sensor for real-time control for the inductive heating process

    DOEpatents

    Kelley, John Bruce; Lu, Wei-Yang; Zutavern, Fred J.

    2003-09-30

    Disclosed is a system and method for providing closed-loop control of the heating of a workpiece by an induction heating machine, including generating an acoustic wave in the workpiece with a pulsed laser; optically measuring displacements of the surface of the workpiece in response to the acoustic wave; calculating a sub-surface material property by analyzing the measured surface displacements; creating an error signal by comparing an attribute of the calculated sub-surface material properties with a desired attribute; and reducing the error signal below an acceptable limit by adjusting, in real-time, as often as necessary, the operation of the inductive heating machine.

  1. Acoustical vortices on a Chip for 3D single particle manipulation and vorticity control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riaud, Antoine; Thomas, Jean-Louis; Bou Matar, Olivier; Baudoin, Michael

    Surface acoustic waves offer most of the basic functions required for on-chip actuation of fluids at small scales: efficient flow mixing, integrated pumping, particles separation, droplet displacement, atomization, division and fusion. Nevertheless some more advanced functions such as 3D particles manipulation and vorticity control require the introduction of some specific kind of waves called acoustic vortices. These helical waves propagate spinning around a phase singularity called the dark core. On the one hand, the beam angular momentum can be transferred to the fluid and create point-wise vorticity for confined mixing, and on the other the dark core can trap individual particles in an acoustic well for single object manipulation. In this presentation, I will show how acoustical vortices on-a-chip can be synthesized with a programmable electronics and an array of transducers. I will then highlight how some of their specificities can be used for acoustical tweezing and twisting. This work is supported by ANR Project No. ANR-12-BS09-0021-01 and ANR-12- BS09-0021-02, and Rgion Nord Pas de Calais.

  2. Acoustic noise associated with the MOD-1 wind turbine: its source, impact, and control

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, N.D.; McKenna, H.E.; Hemphill, R.R.; Etter, C.L.; Garrelts, R.L.; Linn, N.C.

    1985-02-01

    This report summarizes extensive research by staff of the Solar Energy Research Institute and its subcontractors conducted to establish the origin and possible amelioration of acoustic disturbances associated with the operation of the DOE/NASA MOD-1 wind turbine installed in 1979 near Boone, North Carolina. Results have shown that the source of this acoustic annoyance was the transient, unsteady aerodynamic lift imparted to the turbine blades as they passed through the lee wakes of the large, cylindrical tower supports. Nearby residents were annoyed by the low-frequency, acoustic impulses propagated into the structures in which the complainants lived. The situation was aggravated further by a complex sound propagation process controlled by terrain and atmospheric focusing. Several techniques for reducing the abrupt, unsteady blade load transients were researched and are discussed in the report.

  3. Analytical models for use in fan inflow control structure design. Inflow distortion and acoustic transmission models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gedge, M. R.

    1979-01-01

    Analytical models were developed to study the effect of flow contraction and screening on inflow distortions to identify qualitative design criteria. Results of the study are that: (1) static testing distortions are due to atmospheric turbulence, nacelle boundary layer, exhaust flow reingestion, flow over stand, ground plane, and engine casing; (2) flow contraction suppresses, initially, turbulent axial velocity distortions and magnifies turbulent transverse velocity distortions; (3) perforated plate and gauze screens suppress axial components of velocity distortions to a degree determined by the screen pressure loss coefficient; (4) honeycomb screen suppress transverse components of velocity distortions to a degree determined by the length to diameter ratio of the honeycomb; (5) acoustic transmission loss of perforated plate is controlled by the reactance of its acoustic impedance; (6) acoustic transmission loss of honeycomb screens is negligible; and (7) a model for the direction change due to a corner between honeycomb panels compares favorably with measured data.

  4. Multifunctional and Context-Dependent Control of Vocal Acoustics by Individual Muscles.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Kyle H; Elemans, Coen P H; Sober, Samuel J

    2015-10-21

    The relationship between muscle activity and behavioral output determines how the brain controls and modifies complex skills. In vocal control, ensembles of muscles are used to precisely tune single acoustic parameters such as fundamental frequency and sound amplitude. If individual vocal muscles were dedicated to the control of single parameters, then the brain could control each parameter independently by modulating the appropriate muscle or muscles. Alternatively, if each muscle influenced multiple parameters, a more complex control strategy would be required to selectively modulate a single parameter. Additionally, it is unknown whether the function of single muscles is fixed or varies across different vocal gestures. A fixed relationship would allow the brain to use the same changes in muscle activation to, for example, increase the fundamental frequency of different vocal gestures, whereas a context-dependent scheme would require the brain to calculate different motor modifications in each case. We tested the hypothesis that single muscles control multiple acoustic parameters and that the function of single muscles varies across gestures using three complementary approaches. First, we recorded electromyographic data from vocal muscles in singing Bengalese finches. Second, we electrically perturbed the activity of single muscles during song. Third, we developed an ex vivo technique to analyze the biomechanical and acoustic consequences of single-muscle perturbations. We found that single muscles drive changes in multiple parameters and that the function of single muscles differs across vocal gestures, suggesting that the brain uses a complex, gesture-dependent control scheme to regulate vocal output.

  5. Multifunctional and Context-Dependent Control of Vocal Acoustics by Individual Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Kyle H.; Elemans, Coen P.H.

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between muscle activity and behavioral output determines how the brain controls and modifies complex skills. In vocal control, ensembles of muscles are used to precisely tune single acoustic parameters such as fundamental frequency and sound amplitude. If individual vocal muscles were dedicated to the control of single parameters, then the brain could control each parameter independently by modulating the appropriate muscle or muscles. Alternatively, if each muscle influenced multiple parameters, a more complex control strategy would be required to selectively modulate a single parameter. Additionally, it is unknown whether the function of single muscles is fixed or varies across different vocal gestures. A fixed relationship would allow the brain to use the same changes in muscle activation to, for example, increase the fundamental frequency of different vocal gestures, whereas a context-dependent scheme would require the brain to calculate different motor modifications in each case. We tested the hypothesis that single muscles control multiple acoustic parameters and that the function of single muscles varies across gestures using three complementary approaches. First, we recorded electromyographic data from vocal muscles in singing Bengalese finches. Second, we electrically perturbed the activity of single muscles during song. Third, we developed an ex vivo technique to analyze the biomechanical and acoustic consequences of single-muscle perturbations. We found that single muscles drive changes in multiple parameters and that the function of single muscles differs across vocal gestures, suggesting that the brain uses a complex, gesture-dependent control scheme to regulate vocal output. PMID:26490859

  6. Acoustic-Modal Testing of the Ares I Launch Abort System Attitude Control Motor Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, R. Benjamin; Fischbach, Sean R.

    2010-01-01

    The Attitude Control Motor (ACM) is being developed for use in the Launch Abort System (LAS) of NASA's Ares I launch vehicle. The ACM consists of a small solid rocket motor and eight actuated pintle valves that directionally allocate.thrust_- 1t.has-been- predicted-that significant unsteady. pressure.fluctuations.will.exist. inside the-valves during operation. The dominant frequencies of these oscillations correspond to the lowest several acoustic natural frequencies of the individual valves. An acoustic finite element model of the fluid volume inside the valve has been critical to the prediction of these frequencies and their associated mode shapes. This work describes an effort to experimentally validate the acoustic finite model of the valve with an acoustic modal test. The modal test involved instrumenting a flight-like valve with six microphones and then exciting the enclosed air with a loudspeaker. The loudspeaker was configured to deliver broadband noise at relatively high sound pressure levels. The aquired microphone signals were post-processed and compared to results generated from the acoustic finite element model. Initial comparisons between the test data and the model results revealed that additional model refinement was necessary. Specifically, the model was updated to implement a complex impedance boundary condition at the entrance to the valve supply tube. This boundary condition models the frequency-dependent impedance that an acoustic wave will encounter as it reaches the end of the supply tube. Upon invoking this boundary condition, significantly improved agreement between the test data and the model was realized.

  7. The acoustics and unsteady wall pressure of a circulation control airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silver, Jonathan C.

    A Circulation Control (CC) airfoil uses a wall jet exiting onto a rounded trailing edge to generate lift via the Coanda effect. The aerodynamics of the CC airfoil have been studied extensively. The acoustics of the airfoil are, however, much less understood. The primary goal of the present work was to study the radiated sound and unsteady surface pressures of a CC airfoil. The focus of this work can be divided up into three main categories: characterizing the unsteady surface pressures, characterizing the radiated sound, and understanding the acoustics from surface pressures. The present work is the first to present the unsteady surface pressures from the trailing edge cylinder of a circulation control airfoil. The auto-spectral density of the unsteady surface pressures at various locations around the trailing edge are presented over a wide range of the jets momentum coefficient. Coherence of pressure and length scales were computed and presented. Single microphone measurements were made at a range of angles for a fixed observer distance in the far field. Spectra are presented for select angles to show the directivity of the airfoil's radiated sound. Predictions of the acoustics were made from unsteady surface pressures via Howe's curvature noise model and a modified Curle's analogy. A summary of the current understanding of the acoustics from a CC airfoil is given along with suggestions for future work.

  8. Comparison of STRUCTURAL-ACOUSTIC Control Designs on AN Active Composite Panel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    BINGHAM, B.; ATALLA, M. J.; HAGOOD, N. W.

    2001-07-01

    This work presents a comparison of three technologies for structural-acoustic control that, while prevalent in the literature, had not been compared on a single structure. The comparison is generalizable because the techniques are implemented on a panel structure representative of a more complex structure (e.g., an aircraft fuselage, a submarine vehicle hull, a satellite payload shroud, etc.). The test-bed used for this comparison is a carbon-fiber composite panel manufactured with embedded active fiber composite actuators. Since such integrated structures constitute a continued avenue of research, the manufacturing and performance of this structure is illustrated. The design of the test-bed is guided by an effort to achieve a dynamic response similar to a single panel in a typical aircraft or rotorcraft fuselage.Existing active control architectures for broadband acoustic radiation reduction are compared both analytically and experimentally on a representative structure to quantify the capabilities and limitations of the existing control methodologies. Specifically, three broad categories of control are compared: classical feedback (rate feedback), optimal feedback (linear quadratic Gaussian), and adaptive feedforward control (x -filtered least mean square). The control architectures implemented during this study are all single-input/single-output in order to allow a fair comparison of the issues involved in the design, as well as the use and performance of each approach. Both the vibration and the acoustic performance are recorded for each experiment under equivalent conditions to allow a generalizable comparison. Experimental results lead to conclusions pertaining to the application of active structural-based control to improve the acoustic performance of more complex structures.

  9. Birth Control Pills and Nonprofessional Voice: Acoustic Analyses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amir, Ofer; Biron-Shental, Tal; Shabtai, Esther

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Two studies are presented here. Study 1 was aimed at evaluating whether the voice characteristics of women who use birth control pills that contain different progestins differ from the voice characteristics of a control group. Study 2 presents a meta-analysis that combined the results of Study 1 with those from 3 recent studies that…

  10. Contributions of rapid neuromuscular transmission to the fine control of acoustic parameters of birdsong.

    PubMed

    Mencio, Caitlin; Kuberan, Balagurunathan; Goller, Franz

    2017-02-01

    Neural control of complex vocal behaviors, such as birdsong and speech, requires integration of biomechanical nonlinearities through muscular output. Although control of airflow and tension of vibrating tissues are known functions of vocal muscles, it remains unclear how specific muscle characteristics contribute to specific acoustic parameters. To address this gap, we removed heparan sulfate chains using heparitinases to perturb neuromuscular transmission subtly in the syrinx of adult male zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata). Infusion of heparitinases into ventral syringeal muscles altered their excitation threshold and reduced neuromuscular transmission changing their ability to modulate airflow. The changes in muscle activation dynamics caused a reduction in frequency modulation rates and elimination of many high-frequency syllables but did not alter the fundamental frequency of syllables. Sound amplitude was reduced and sound onset pressure was increased, suggesting a role of muscles in the induction of self-sustained oscillations under low-airflow conditions, thus enhancing vocal efficiency. These changes were reversed to preinfusion levels by 7 days after infusion. These results illustrate complex interactions between the control of airflow and tension and further define the importance of syringeal muscle in the control of a variety of acoustic song characteristics. In summary, the findings reported here show that altering neuromuscular transmission can lead to reversible changes to the acoustic structure of song. Understanding the full extent of muscle involvement in song production is critical in decoding the motor program for the production of complex vocal behavior, including our search for parallels between birdsong and human speech motor control.

  11. Acoustic Power Suppression of a Panel Structure Using H∞OUTPUT Feedback Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SIVRIOGLU, S.; TANAKA, N.; YUKSEK, I.

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents a robust control system design for suppressing the radiated acoustic power emitted from a vibrating planar structure, and spillover effect caused by neglected high-frequency modes. A state-space model of a simply supported panel structure is derived and an output equation is formed based on the one-dimensional PVDF film sensors. An output feedback H∞control is designed by introducing a multiplicative perturbation which represents unmodelled high-frequency dynamics in the control system. The simulation and experimental results demonstrated significant decrease in sound radiation for the considered structural power modes in control.

  12. Active control of acoustic radiation from laminated cylindrical shells integrated with a piezoelectric layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Xiongtao; Shi, Lei; Zhang, Xusheng; Jiang, Guohe

    2013-06-01

    Active control of sound radiation from piezoelectric laminated cylindrical shells is theoretically investigated in the wavenumber domain. The governing equations of the smart cylindrical shells are derived by using first-order shear deformation theory. The smart layer is divided into lots of actuator patches, each of which is coated with two very thin electrodes at its inner and outer surfaces. Proportional derivative negative feedback control is applied to the actuator patches and the stiffness of the controlled layer is derived in the wavenumber domain. The equivalent driving forces and moments generated by the piezoelectric layer can produce distinct sound radiation. Large actuator patches cause strong wavenumber conversion and fluctuation of the far-field sound pressure, and do not make any contribution to sound reduction. Nevertheless, suitable small actuator patches induce weak wavenumber conversion and play an important role in the suppression of vibration and acoustic power. The derivative gain of the active control can effectively suppress sound radiation from smart cylindrical shells. The effects of small proportional gain on the sound field can be neglected, but large proportional gain has a great impact on the acoustic radiation of cylindrical shells. The influence of different piezoelectric materials on the acoustic power is described in the numerical results.

  13. Structural acoustic control of plates with variable boundary conditions: design methodology.

    PubMed

    Sprofera, Joseph D; Cabell, Randolph H; Gibbs, Gary P; Clark, Robert L

    2007-07-01

    A method for optimizing a structural acoustic control system subject to variations in plate boundary conditions is provided. The assumed modes method is used to build a plate model with varying levels of rotational boundary stiffness to simulate the dynamics of a plate with uncertain edge conditions. A transducer placement scoring process, involving Hankel singular values, is combined with a genetic optimization routine to find spatial locations robust to boundary condition variation. Predicted frequency response characteristics are examined, and theoretically optimized results are discussed in relation to the range of boundary conditions investigated. Modeled results indicate that it is possible to minimize the impact of uncertain boundary conditions in active structural acoustic control by optimizing the placement of transducers with respect to those uncertainties.

  14. Manipulating particle trajectories with phase-control in surface acoustic wave microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Orloff, Nathan D; Dennis, Jaclyn R; Cecchini, Marco; Schonbrun, Ethan; Rocas, Eduard; Wang, Yu; Novotny, David; Simmonds, Raymond W; Moreland, John; Takeuchi, Ichiro; Booth, James C

    2011-12-01

    We present a 91 MHz surface acoustic wave resonator with integrated microfluidics that includes a flow focus, an expansion region, and a binning region in order to manipulate particle trajectories. We demonstrate the ability to change the position of the acoustic nodes by varying the electronic phase of one of the transducers relative to the other in a pseudo-static manner. The measurements were performed at room temperature with 3 μm diameter latex beads dispersed in a water-based solution. We demonstrate the dependence of nodal position on pseudo-static phase and show simultaneous control of 9 bead streams with spatial control of -0.058 μm/deg ± 0.001 μm/deg. As a consequence of changing the position of bead streams perpendicular to their flow direction, we also show that the integrated acoustic-microfluidic device can be used to change the trajectory of a bead stream towards a selected bin with an angular control of 0.008 deg/deg ± 0.000(2) deg/deg.

  15. Canonical Acoustics and Its Application to Surface Acoustic Wave on Acoustic Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jian Qi

    2016-08-01

    In a conventional formalism of acoustics, acoustic pressure p and velocity field u are used for characterizing acoustic waves propagating inside elastic/acoustic materials. We shall treat some fundamental problems relevant to acoustic wave propagation alternatively by using canonical acoustics (a more concise and compact formalism of acoustic dynamics), in which an acoustic scalar potential and an acoustic vector potential (Φ ,V), instead of the conventional acoustic field quantities such as acoustic pressure and velocity field (p,u) for characterizing acoustic waves, have been defined as the fundamental variables. The canonical formalism of the acoustic energy-momentum tensor is derived in terms of the acoustic potentials. Both the acoustic Hamiltonian density and the acoustic Lagrangian density have been defined, and based on this formulation, the acoustic wave quantization in a fluid is also developed. Such a formalism of acoustic potentials is employed to the problem of negative-mass-density assisted surface acoustic wave that is a highly localized surface bound state (an eigenstate of the acoustic wave equations). Since such a surface acoustic wave can be strongly confined to an interface between an acoustic metamaterial (e.g., fluid-solid composite structures with a negative dynamical mass density) and an ordinary material (with a positive mass density), it will give rise to an effect of acoustic field enhancement on the acoustic interface, and would have potential applications in acoustic device design for acoustic wave control.

  16. A closed-loop automatic control system for high-intensity acoustic test systems.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slusser, R. A.

    1973-01-01

    Description of an automatic control system for high-intensity acoustic tests in reverberation chambers. Working in 14 one-third-octave bands from 50 to 1000 Hz, the desired sound pressure levels are set into the memory in the control system before the test. The control system then increases the sound pressure level in the reverberation chamber gradually in each of the one-third-octave bands until the level set in the memory is reached. This level is then maintained for the duration of the test. Additional features of the system are overtest protection, the capability of 'holding' the spectrum at any time, and the presence of a total test timer.

  17. The optimization of force inputs for active structural acoustic control using a neural network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabell, R. H.; Lester, H. C.; Silcox, R. J.

    1992-01-01

    This paper investigates the use of a neural network to determine which force actuators, of a multi-actuator array, are best activated in order to achieve structural-acoustic control. The concept is demonstrated using a cylinder/cavity model on which the control forces, produced by piezoelectric actuators, are applied with the objective of reducing the interior noise. A two-layer neural network is employed and the back propagation solution is compared with the results calculated by a conventional, least-squares optimization analysis. The ability of the neural network to accurately and efficiently control actuator activation for interior noise reduction is demonstrated.

  18. Acoustic beam control in biomimetic projector via velocity gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xiaowei; Zhang, Yu; Cao, Wenwu; Dong, Erqian; Song, Zhongchang; Li, Songhai; Tang, Liguo; Zhang, Sai

    2016-07-01

    A biomimetic projector (BioP) based on computerized tomography of pygmy sperm whale's biosonar system has been designed using gradient-index (GRIN) material. The directivity of this BioP device was investigated as function of frequency and the velocity gradient of the GRIN material. A strong beam control over a broad bandwidth at the subwavelength scale has been achieved. Compared with a bare subwavelength source, the main lobe pressure of the BioP is about five times as high and the angular resolution is one order of magnitude better. Our results indicate that this BioP has excellent application potential in miniaturized underwater sonars.

  19. Noise control using a plate radiator and an acoustic resonator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pla, Frederic G. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    An active noise control subassembly for reducing noise caused by a source (such as an aircraft engine) independent of the subassembly. A noise radiating panel is bendably vibratable to generate a panel noise canceling at least a portion of the source noise. A piezoceramic actuator plate is connected to the panel. A front plate is spaced apart from the panel and the first plate, is positioned generally between the source noise and the panel, and has a sound exit port. A first pair of spaced-apart side walls each generally abut the panel and the front plate so as to generally enclose a front cavity to define a resonator.

  20. Effect of continuous rearing on courtship acoustics of five braconid parasitoids, candidates for augmentative biological control of Anastrepha species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The courtship acoustics of five species of parasitoid wasps (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), potential candidates for augmentative biological control of Anastrepha species (Diptera: Tephritidae), were compared between recently colonized individuals and those continuously reared 70-148 generations. During...

  1. The Impact of Model Uncertainty on Spatial Compensation in Structural Acoustic Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Robert L.

    2005-01-01

    Turbulent boundary layer (TBL) noise is considered a primary contribution to the interior noise present in commercial airliners. There are numerous investigations of interior noise control devoted to aircraft panels; however, practical realization is a potential challenge since physical boundary conditions are uncertain at best. In most prior studies, pinned or clamped boundary conditions were assumed; however, realistic panels likely display a range of boundary conditions between these two limits. Uncertainty in boundary conditions is a challenge for control system designers, both in terms of the compensator implemented and the location of transducers required to achieve the desired control. The impact of model uncertainties, specifically uncertain boundaries, on the selection of transducer locations for structural acoustic control is considered herein. The final goal of this work is the design of an aircraft panel structure that can reduce TBL noise transmission through the use of a completely adaptive, single-input, single-output control system. The feasibility of this goal is demonstrated through the creation of a detailed analytical solution, followed by the implementation of a test model in a transmission loss apparatus. Successfully realizing a control system robust to variations in boundary conditions can lead to the design and implementation of practical adaptive structures that could be used to control the transmission of sound to the interior of aircraft. Results from this research effort indicate it is possible to optimize the design of actuator and sensor location and aperture, minimizing the impact of boundary conditions on the desired structural acoustic control.

  2. Real-time RNN-based acoustic thermometry with feedback control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Stephen J.; Nam, Joana H.; Fan, Liexiang; Brunke, Shelby S.; Sekins, K. Michael

    2017-03-01

    A major obstacle to the widespread adoption of HIFU therapy is the development of a suitable method of monitoring the a blation therapy in real-time. While MR-thermometry has emerged as a promising method for HIFU therapy monitoring, acoustic guidance has continuously been sought for reasons of cost and practicality. We have previously demonstrated the potential of acoustic thermometry, by using a recurrent neural network (RNN) to estimate changes in tissue temperature during HIFU ablation therapies. A limitation of this method is that an excessive therapeutic dose can cause multiple, non-linear changes within the ultrasound data, resulting in unreliable temperature estimates from the RNN. Accordingly, we propose a revised method of dosing wherein closed loop feedback is used to provide a controlled and specific dose; not only to ensure an efficacious lesion, but also to preserve the integrity of the ultrasound image, thereby producing accurate temperature estimates from the RNN. This investigation of controlling the thermal dose using feedback was performed on ex vivo bovine liver. The acoustic parameters used as inputs to the RNN were: changes in integrated backscatter intensity, thermal strain, and decorrelation. The therapeutic dose was delivered using a 1.1 MHz, 2D-array HIFU transducer transmitting at regular intervals during a 40-second dose. Interleaved between these regular HIFU dose intervals, volumetric ultrasound images were acquired on a Siemens ACUSON SC2000, with a 4Zlc probe. Feedback was introduced to the system by varying the HIFU duty cycle, in order to minimize the difference between a desired temperature curve (assigned a priori) and the estimated focal temperature values. Two methods were used for obtaining the focal temperature: the first was direct measurement using a 75-micron copper-constantan thermocouple embedded within the liver sample, and the second was temperature estimation as calculated from the RNN-based output temperatures

  3. A Tool Measuring Remaining Thickness of Notched Acoustic Cavities in Primary Reaction Control Thruster NDI Standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Yushi; Sun, Changhong; Zhu, Harry; Wincheski, Buzz

    2006-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking in the relief radius area of a space shuttle primary reaction control thruster is an issue of concern. The current approach for monitoring of potential crack growth is nondestructive inspection (NDI) of remaining thickness (RT) to the acoustic cavities using an eddy current or remote field eddy current probe. EDM manufacturers have difficulty in providing accurate RT calibration standards. Significant error in the RT values of NDI calibration standards could lead to a mistaken judgment of cracking condition of a thruster under inspection. A tool based on eddy current principle has been developed to measure the RT at each acoustic cavity of a calibration standard in order to validate that the standard meets the sample design criteria.

  4. Measurements of Acoustic Properties of Porous and Granular Materials and Application to Vibration Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Junhong; Palumbo, Daniel L.

    2004-01-01

    For application of porous and granular materials to vibro-acoustic controls, a finite dynamic strength of the solid component (frame) is an important design factor. The primary goal of this study was to investigate structural vibration damping through this frame wave propagation for various poroelastic materials. A measurement method to investigate the vibration characteristics of the frame was proposed. The measured properties were found to follow closely the characteristics of the viscoelastic materials - the dynamic modulus increased with frequency and the degree of the frequency dependence was determined by its loss factor. The dynamic stiffness of hollow cylindrical beams containing porous and granular materials as damping treatment was measured also. The data were used to extract the damping materials characteristics using the Rayleigh-Ritz method. The results suggested that the acoustic structure interaction between the frame and the structure enhances the dissipation of the vibration energy significantly.

  5. Analysis of the STS-126 Flow Control Valve Structural-Acoustic Coupling Failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Trevor M.; Larko, Jeffrey M.; McNelis, Mark E.

    2010-01-01

    During the Space Transportation System mission STS-126, one of the main engine's flow control valves incurred an unexpected failure. A section of the valve broke off during liftoff. It is theorized that an acoustic mode of the flowing fuel, coupled with a structural mode of the valve, causing a high cycle fatigue failure. This report documents the analysis efforts conducted in an attempt to verify this theory. Hand calculations, computational fluid dynamics, and finite element methods are all implemented and analyses are performed using steady-state methods in addition to transient analysis methods. The conclusion of the analyses is that there is a critical acoustic mode that aligns with a structural mode of the valve

  6. Duct wall impedance control as an advanced concept for acoustic suppression enhancement. [engine noise reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, P. D.

    1978-01-01

    A systems concept procedure is described for the optimization of acoustic duct liner design for both uniform and multisegment types. The concept was implemented by the use of a double reverberant chamber flow duct facility coupled with sophisticated computer control and acoustic analysis systems. The optimization procedure for liner insertion loss was based on the concept of variable liner impedance produced by bias air flow through a multilayer, resonant cavity liner. A multiple microphone technique for in situ wall impedance measurements was used and successfully adapted to produce automated measurements for all liner configurations tested. The complete validation of the systems concept was prevented by the inability to optimize the insertion loss using bias flow induced wall impedance changes. This inability appeared to be a direct function of the presence of a higher order energy carrying modes which were not influenced significantly by the wall impedance changes.

  7. Digital servo control of random sound test excitation. [in reverberant acoustic chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakich, R. B. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A digital servocontrol system for random noise excitation of a test object in a reverberant acoustic chamber employs a plurality of sensors spaced in the sound field to produce signals in separate channels which are decorrelated and averaged. The average signal is divided into a plurality of adjacent frequency bands cyclically sampled by a time division multiplex system, converted into digital form, and compared to a predetermined spectrum value stored in digital form. The results of the comparisons are used to control a time-shared up-down counter to develop gain control signals for the respective frequency bands in the spectrum of random sound energy picked up by the microphones.

  8. Location optimization of a long T-shaped acoustic resonator array in noise control of enclosures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Ganghua; Cheng, Li

    2009-11-01

    Acoustic resonators are widely used in various noise control applications. In the pursuit of better performance and broad band control, multiple resonators or a resonator array are usually needed. The interaction among resonators significantly impacts on the control performance and leads to the requirement for a systematic design tool to determine their locations. In this work, simulated annealing (SA) algorithm is employed to optimize the locations of a set of long T-shaped acoustic resonators (TARs) for noise control inside an enclosure. Multiple optimal configurations are shown to exist. The control performance in terms of sound pressure level reduction, however, seems to be independent of the initial resonator-locations. Optimal solutions obtained from the SA approach are shown to outperform other existing methods for a TAR array design. Numerical simulations are systematically verified by experiments. Optimal locations are then synthesized, leading to a set of criteria, applicable to the present configuration, to guide engineering applications. It is concluded that the proposed optimization approach provides a systematic and effective tool to optimize the locations of TARs in noise control inside enclosures.

  9. Acoustic resonators for noise control in enclosures: Modelling, design and optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Ganghua

    This work systematically investigates the acoustic interaction between an enclosure and resonators, and establishes systematic design tools based upon the interaction theory to optimize the physical characteristics and the locations of resonators. A general theoretical model is first established to predict the acoustic performance of multiple resonators placed in an acoustic enclosure of arbitrary shape. Analytical solutions for the sound pressure inside the enclosure are obtained when a single resonator is installed, which provide insight into the physics of the acoustic interaction between the enclosure and resonators. The theoretical model is experimentally validated, showing the effectiveness and reliability of the theoretical model. Using the validated acoustic interaction model and the analytical solutions, the internal resistance of a resonator is optimized to improve its performance in a frequency band enclosing acoustic resonances. An energy reduction index is defined to conduct the optimization. The dual process of the energy dissipation and radiation of the resonator is quantified. Optimal resistance and its physical effect on the enclosure-resonator interaction are numerically evaluated and categorized in terms of frequency bandwidths. Predictions on the resonator performance are confirmed by experiments. Comparisons with existing models based on different optimization criteria are also performed. It is shown that the proposed model serves as an effective design tool to determine the optimal internal-resistance of the resonator in a chosen frequency band. Due to the multi-modal coupling, the resonator performance is also affected by its location besides its physical characteristics. When multiple resonators are used, the mutual interaction among resonators leads to the requirement of a systematic optimization tool to determine their locations. In the present work, different optimization methodologies are explored. These include a sequential design

  10. Phonatory Symptoms and Acoustic Findings in Patients with Asthma: A Cross-Sectional Controlled Study.

    PubMed

    Hamdan, Abdul Latif; Ziade, Georges; Kasti, Maher; Akl, Leslie; Bawab, Ibrahim; Kanj, Nadim

    2017-03-01

    To investigate the prevalence of phonatory symptoms, perceptual, acoustic and aerodynamic findings in patients with asthma compared to a control group. This study is a cross-sectional study. A total of 50 subjects, 31 asthmatic and 19 control subjects matched according to age and gender were enrolled in this study. All subjects were asked about the presence or absence of dysphonia, vocal fatigue, phonatory effort, cough, dyspnea, and respiratory failure. Perceptual evaluation, acoustic analysis and aerodynamic measurements were also performed. Patient's self assessment using the Voice Handicap Index 10 was reported. The mean age of patients was 43.5 years with a female to male ratio of 2:1. There was a statistically significant difference in the prevalence of dysphonia between the two groups (32.3 vs. 5.3%, p value 0.025) with a non-significant higher prevalence of vocal fatigue and phonatory effort. The overall grade of dysphonia was significantly higher in asthmatics compared to controls (p value 0.002). Patients with asthma had also significantly higher degree of asthenia and straining (p value of 0.04 and 0.008, respectively) with borderline significant difference with respect to roughness. There was no significant difference in the means of any of the acoustic parameters between patients and controls except for Shimmer, which was higher in the asthmatic group (p value of 0.037). There was also no significant difference in the Maximum phonation time between the two groups. Dysphonia is significantly more prevalent in patients with asthma compared to controls.

  11. Functional Connectivity Associated with Acoustic Stability During Vowel Production: Implications for Vocal-Motor Control

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Vowels provide the acoustic foundation of communication through speech and song, but little is known about how the brain orchestrates their production. Positron emission tomography was used to study regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) during sustained production of the vowel /a/. Acoustic and blood flow data from 13, normal, right-handed, native speakers of American English were analyzed to identify CBF patterns that predicted the stability of the first and second formants of this vowel. Formants are bands of resonance frequencies that provide vowel identity and contribute to voice quality. The results indicated that formant stability was directly associated with blood flow increases and decreases in both left- and right-sided brain regions. Secondary brain regions (those associated with the regions predicting formant stability) were more likely to have an indirect negative relationship with first formant variability, but an indirect positive relationship with second formant variability. These results are not definitive maps of vowel production, but they do suggest that the level of motor control necessary to produce stable vowels is reflected in the complexity of an underlying neural system. These results also extend a systems approach to functional image analysis, previously applied to normal and ataxic speech rate that is solely based on identifying patterns of brain activity associated with specific performance measures. Understanding the complex relationships between multiple brain regions and the acoustic characteristics of vocal stability may provide insight into the pathophysiology of the dysarthrias, vocal disorders, and other speech changes in neurological and psychiatric disorders. PMID:25295385

  12. Vibroacoustic modeling of an acoustic resonator tuned by dielectric elastomer membrane with voltage control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xiang; Lu, Zhenbo; Cheng, Li; Cui, Fangsen

    2017-01-01

    This paper investigates the acoustic properties of a duct resonator tuned by an electro-active membrane. The resonator takes the form of a side-branch cavity which is attached to a rigid duct and covered by a pre-stretched Dielectric Elastomer (DE) in the neck area. A three-dimensional, analytical model based on the sub-structuring approach is developed to characterize the complex structure-acoustic coupling between the DE membrane and its surrounding acoustic media. We show that such resonator provides sound attenuation in the medium frequency range mainly by means of sound reflection, as a result of the membrane vibration. The prediction accuracy of the proposed model is validated against experimental test. The pre-stretched DE membrane with fixed edges responds to applied voltage change with a varying inner stress and, by the same token, its natural frequency and vibrational response can be tuned to suit particular frequencies of interest. The peaks in the transmission loss (TL) curves can be shifted towards lower frequencies when the voltage applied to the DE membrane is increased. Through simulations on the effect of increasing the voltage level, the TL shifting mechanism and its possible tuning range are analyzed. This paves the way for applying such resonator device for adaptive-passive noise control.

  13. The Impact of Model Uncertainty on Spatial Compensation in Active Structural Acoustic Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabell, Randolph H.; Gibbs, Gary P.; Sprofera, Joseph D.; Clark, Robert L.

    2004-01-01

    Turbulent boundary layer (TBL) noise is considered a primary factor in the interior noise experienced by passengers aboard commercial airliners. There have been numerous investigations of interior noise control devoted to aircraft panels; however, practical realization is a challenge since the physical boundary conditions are uncertain at best. In most prior studies, pinned or clamped boundary conditions have been assumed; however, realistic panels likely display a range of varying boundary conditions between these two limits. Uncertainty in boundary conditions is a challenge for control system designers, both in terms of the compensator implemented and the location of actuators and sensors required to achieve the desired control. The impact of model uncertainties, uncertain boundary conditions in particular, on the selection of actuator and sensor locations for structural acoustic control are considered herein. Results from this research effort indicate that it is possible to optimize the design of actuator and sensor location and aperture, which minimizes the impact of boundary conditions on the desired structural acoustic control.

  14. Comparison of Acoustic and Stroboscopic Findings and Voice Handicap Index between Allergic Rhinitis Patients and Controls

    PubMed Central

    Koç, Eltaf Ayça Özbal; Koç, Bülent; Erbek, Selim

    2014-01-01

    Background: In our experience Allergic Rhinitis (AR) patients suffer from voice problems more than health subjects. Aims: To investigate the acoustic analysis of voice, stroscopic findings of larynx and Voice Handicap Index scores in allergic rhinitis patients compared with healthy controls. Study Design: Case-control study. Methods: Thirty adult patients diagnosed with perennial allergic rhinitis were compared with 30 age- and sex-matched healthy controls without allergy. All assessments were performed in the speech physiology laboratory and the testing sequence was as follows: 1. Voice Handicap Index (VHI) questionnaire, 2. Laryngovideostroboscopy, 3. Acoustic analyses. Results: No difference was observed between the allergic rhinitis and control groups regarding mean Maximum Phonation Time (MPT) values, Fo values, and stroboscopic assessment (p>0.05). On the other hand, mean VHI score (p=0.001) and s/z ratio (p=0.011) were significantly higher in the allergic rhinitis group than in controls. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that the presence of allergies could have effects on laryngeal dysfunction and voice-related quality of life. PMID:25667789

  15. Controlled ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier disruption using passive acoustic emissions monitoring.

    PubMed

    Arvanitis, Costas D; Livingstone, Margaret S; Vykhodtseva, Natalia; McDannold, Nathan

    2012-01-01

    The ability of ultrasonically-induced oscillations of circulating microbubbles to permeabilize vascular barriers such as the blood-brain barrier (BBB) holds great promise for noninvasive targeted drug delivery. A major issue has been a lack of control over the procedure to ensure both safe and effective treatment. Here, we evaluated the use of passively-recorded acoustic emissions as a means to achieve this control. An acoustic emissions monitoring system was constructed and integrated into a clinical transcranial MRI-guided focused ultrasound system. Recordings were analyzed using a spectroscopic method that isolates the acoustic emissions caused by the microbubbles during sonication. This analysis characterized and quantified harmonic oscillations that occur when the BBB is disrupted, and broadband emissions that occur when tissue damage occurs. After validating the system's performance in pilot studies that explored a wide range of exposure levels, the measurements were used to control the ultrasound exposure level during transcranial sonications at 104 volumes over 22 weekly sessions in four macaques. We found that increasing the exposure level until a large harmonic emissions signal was observed was an effective means to ensure BBB disruption without broadband emissions. We had a success rate of 96% in inducing BBB disruption as measured by in contrast-enhanced MRI, and we detected broadband emissions in less than 0.2% of the applied bursts. The magnitude of the harmonic emissions signals was significantly (P<0.001) larger for sonications where BBB disruption was detected, and it correlated with BBB permeabilization as indicated by the magnitude of the MRI signal enhancement after MRI contrast administration (R(2) = 0.78). Overall, the results indicate that harmonic emissions can be a used to control focused ultrasound-induced BBB disruption. These results are promising for clinical translation of this technology.

  16. Controlled Ultrasound-Induced Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption Using Passive Acoustic Emissions Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Arvanitis, Costas D.; Livingstone, Margaret S.; Vykhodtseva, Natalia; McDannold, Nathan

    2012-01-01

    The ability of ultrasonically-induced oscillations of circulating microbubbles to permeabilize vascular barriers such as the blood-brain barrier (BBB) holds great promise for noninvasive targeted drug delivery. A major issue has been a lack of control over the procedure to ensure both safe and effective treatment. Here, we evaluated the use of passively-recorded acoustic emissions as a means to achieve this control. An acoustic emissions monitoring system was constructed and integrated into a clinical transcranial MRI-guided focused ultrasound system. Recordings were analyzed using a spectroscopic method that isolates the acoustic emissions caused by the microbubbles during sonication. This analysis characterized and quantified harmonic oscillations that occur when the BBB is disrupted, and broadband emissions that occur when tissue damage occurs. After validating the system's performance in pilot studies that explored a wide range of exposure levels, the measurements were used to control the ultrasound exposure level during transcranial sonications at 104 volumes over 22 weekly sessions in four macaques. We found that increasing the exposure level until a large harmonic emissions signal was observed was an effective means to ensure BBB disruption without broadband emissions. We had a success rate of 96% in inducing BBB disruption as measured by in contrast-enhanced MRI, and we detected broadband emissions in less than 0.2% of the applied bursts. The magnitude of the harmonic emissions signals was significantly (P<0.001) larger for sonications where BBB disruption was detected, and it correlated with BBB permeabilization as indicated by the magnitude of the MRI signal enhancement after MRI contrast administration (R2 = 0.78). Overall, the results indicate that harmonic emissions can be a used to control focused ultrasound-induced BBB disruption. These results are promising for clinical translation of this technology. PMID:23029240

  17. Control of Spoken Vowel Acoustics and the Influence of Phonetic Context in Human Speech Sensorimotor Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Bouchard, Kristofer E.

    2014-01-01

    Speech production requires the precise control of vocal tract movements to generate individual speech sounds (phonemes) which, in turn, are rapidly organized into complex sequences. Multiple productions of the same phoneme can exhibit substantial variability, some of which is inherent to control of the vocal tract and its biomechanics, and some of which reflects the contextual effects of surrounding phonemes (“coarticulation”). The role of the CNS in these aspects of speech motor control is not well understood. To address these issues, we recorded multielectrode cortical activity directly from human ventral sensory-motor cortex (vSMC) during the production of consonant-vowel syllables. We analyzed the relationship between the acoustic parameters of vowels (pitch and formants) and cortical activity on a single-trial level. We found that vSMC activity robustly predicted acoustic parameters across vowel categories (up to 80% of variance), as well as different renditions of the same vowel (up to 25% of variance). Furthermore, we observed significant contextual effects on vSMC representations of produced phonemes that suggest active control of coarticulation: vSMC representations for vowels were biased toward the representations of the preceding consonant, and conversely, representations for consonants were biased toward upcoming vowels. These results reveal that vSMC activity for phonemes are not invariant and provide insight into the cortical mechanisms of coarticulation. PMID:25232105

  18. Non-chemical biofouling control in heat exchangers and seawater piping systems using acoustic pulses generated by an electrical discharge.

    PubMed

    Brizzolara, Robert A; Nordham, David J; Walch, Marianne; Lennen, Rebecca M; Simmons, Ron; Burnett, Evan; Mazzola, Michael S

    2003-02-01

    Acoustic pulses generated by an electrical discharge (pulsed acoustics) were investigated as a means for biofouling control in two test formats, viz. a 5/8" outside diameter titanium tube and a mockup heat exchanger. The pulsed acoustic device, when operated at 17 kV, demonstrated 95% inhibition of microfouling over a 20 ft length of titanium tube over a 4-week period, comparable to chlorination in combination with a high-velocity flush. The pulsed acoustic device inhibited microfouling over a downstream distance of 15 ft, therefore, a single pulsed acoustic device is theoretically capable of protecting at least 30 ft of tube from microfouling (15 ft on either side of the device). A correlation between acoustic intensity in the frequency range 0.01-1 MHz and the level of biofouling inhibition was observed. The threshold acoustic intensity for microfouling inhibition was determined for this frequency range. It was also observed that the orientation of the device is critical to obtaining microfouling inhibition.

  19. Acoustic emission technique for monitoring the pyrolysis of composites for process control.

    PubMed

    Tittmann, B R; Yen, C E

    2008-11-01

    Carbonization is the first step in the heat and pressure treatment (pyrolysis) of composites in preparing carbon-carbon parts. These find many uses, including aircraft brakes, rocket nozzles and medical implants. This paper describes the acoustic emissions (AE) from various stages of the manufacturing process of carbon-carbon composites. This process involves carbonization at a high temperature and this results in both thermal expansion and volume change (due to pyrolysis in which a sacrificial polymer matrix is converted to carbon). Importantly the resultant matrix is porous and has a network of small intra-lamina cracks. The formation of these microcracks produces AE and this paper describes how this observation can be used to monitor (and eventually control) the manufacturing process. The aim is to speed up manufacture, which is currently time-consuming. The first section of the paper describes the design of unimodal waveguides to enable the AE to propagate to a cool environment where a transducer can be located. The second part of the paper describes various experimental observations of AE under a range of process conditions. In particular, this paper presents a technique based on detecting acoustic emissions and (1) uses wire waveguides to monitor parts within the autoclave to 800 degrees C, (2) monitors microcracking during pyrolysis, (3) uses a four-level threshold to distinguish between low- and high-amplitude cracking events, (4) recognizes the occurrence of harmful delaminations, and (5) guides the control of the heating rate for optimum efficiency of the pyrolysis process. In addition, supporting data are presented of in situ measurements of porosity, weight loss, cross-ply shrinkage, and mass spectroscopy of gases emitted. The process evolution is illustrated by the use of interrupted manufacturing cycle micrographs obtained by optical, scanning acoustic (SAM) and scanning electron (SEM) microscopy. The technique promotes in-process monitoring and

  20. Coherent structures in swirling flows and their role in acoustic combustion control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paschereit, Christian Oliver; Gutmark, Ephraim; Weisenstein, Wolfgang

    1999-09-01

    Interaction between flow instabilities and acoustic resonant modes and their effect on heat release were investigated and controlled in an experimental low-emission swirl stabilized combustor. Acoustic boundary conditions of the combustor were modified to excite combustion instability at various axisymmetric and helical unstable modes in a fully premixed combustion. The combustion unstable modes were related to flow instabilities in the recirculating wakelike region on the combustor axis and the separating shear layer at the sudden expansion (dump plane). Flow field measurements were performed in a water tunnel using a simulated combustor configuration. The water tunnel tests demonstrated the existence of several modes of flow instabilities in a highly swirling flow, modes which were shown to affect the combustion process. Mean and turbulent characteristics of the internal and external swirling shear layers were measured and unstable flow modes were identified. Instability modes during combustion were visualized by phase locked images of OH chemiluminescence. The axisymmetric mode showed large variation of the heat release during one cycle, while the helical modes showed variations in the radial location of maximal heat release. Closed loop active control system was employed to suppress the thermoacoustic pressure oscillations and to reduce NOx emissions. Microphone and OH emission detection sensors monitored the combustion process and provided input to the control system. An acoustic source modulated the airflow and thus affected the mixing process and the combustion. Effective suppression of the pressure oscillations and the concomitant reduction of NOx emissions were associated with a reduced coherence of the flow structures which excited the thermoacoustic instability.

  1. An application review of dielectric electroactive polymer actuators in acoustics and vibration control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhenghong; Shuai, Changgeng; Gao, Yan; Rustighi, Emiliano; Xuan, Yuan

    2016-09-01

    Recent years have seen an increasing interest in the dielectric electroactive polymers (DEAPs) and their potential in actuator applications due to the large strain capabilities. This paper starts with an overview of some configurations of the DEAP actuators and follows with an in-depth literature and technical review of recent advances in the field with special considerations given to aspects pertaining to acoustics and vibration control. Significant research has shown that these smart actuators are promising replacement for many conventional actuators. The paper has been written with reference to a large number of published papers listed in the reference section.

  2. Controlled exciton transfer between quantum dots with acoustic phonons taken into account

    SciTech Connect

    Golovinski, P. A.

    2015-09-15

    A system of excitons in two quantum dots coupled by the dipole–dipole interaction is investigated. The excitation transfer process controlled by the optical Stark effect at nonresonant frequencies is considered and the effect of the interaction between excitons and acoustic phonons in a medium on this process is taken into account. The system evolution is described using quantum Heisenberg equations. A truncated set of equations is obtained and the transfer dynamics is numerically simulated. High-efficiency picosecond switching of the excitation transfer by a laser pulse with a rectangular envelope is demonstrated. The dependence of picosecond switching on the quantum-dot parameters and optical-pulse length is presented.

  3. Acoustic neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    Vestibular schwannoma; Tumor - acoustic; Cerebellopontine angle tumor; Angle tumor; Hearing loss - acoustic; Tinnitus - acoustic ... Acoustic neuromas have been linked with the genetic disorder neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2). Acoustic neuromas are uncommon.

  4. Control of Thermo-Acoustics Instabilities: The Multi-Scale Extended Kalman Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le, Dzu K.; DeLaat, John C.; Chang, Clarence T.

    2003-01-01

    "Multi-Scale Extended Kalman" (MSEK) is a novel model-based control approach recently found to be effective for suppressing combustion instabilities in gas turbines. A control law formulated in this approach for fuel modulation demonstrated steady suppression of a high-frequency combustion instability (less than 500Hz) in a liquid-fuel combustion test rig under engine-realistic conditions. To make-up for severe transport-delays on control effect, the MSEK controller combines a wavelet -like Multi-Scale analysis and an Extended Kalman Observer to predict the thermo-acoustic states of combustion pressure perturbations. The commanded fuel modulation is composed of a damper action based on the predicted states, and a tones suppression action based on the Multi-Scale estimation of thermal excitations and other transient disturbances. The controller performs automatic adjustments of the gain and phase of these actions to minimize the Time-Scale Averaged Variances of the pressures inside the combustion zone and upstream of the injector. The successful demonstration of Active Combustion Control with this MSEK controller completed an important NASA milestone for the current research in advanced combustion technologies.

  5. Baseline acoustic levels of the NASA Active Noise Control Fan rig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutliff, Daniel L.; Heidelberg, Laurence J.; Elliott, David M.; Nallasamy, M.

    1996-01-01

    Extensive measurements of the spinning acoustic mode structure in the NASA 48 inch Active Noise Control Fan (ANCF) test rig have been taken. A continuously rotating microphone rake system with a least-squares data reduction technique was employed to measure these modes in the inlet and exhaust. Farfield directivity patterns in an anechoic environment were also measured at matched corrected rotor speeds. Several vane counts and spacings were tested over a range of rotor speeds. The Eversman finite element radiation code was run with the measured in-duct modes as input and the computed farfield results were compared to the experimentally measured directivity pattern. The experimental data show that inlet spinning mode measurements can be made very accurately. Exhaust mode measurements may have wake interference, but the least-squares reduction does a good job of rejecting the non-acoustic pressure. The Eversman radiation code accurately extrapolates the farfield levels and directivity pattern when all in-duct modes are included.

  6. Optimal virtual sensing for active noise control in a rigid-walled acoustic duct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, Dick; Zander, Anthony C.; Cazzolato, Ben S.; Hansen, Colin H.

    2005-11-01

    The performance of local active noise control systems is generally limited by the small sizes of the zones of quiet created at the error sensors. This is often exacerbated by the fact that the error sensors cannot always be located close to an observer's ears. Virtual sensing is a method that can move the zone of quiet away from the physical location of the transducers to a desired location, such as an observer's ear. In this article, analytical expressions are derived for optimal virtual sensing in a rigid-walled acoustic duct with arbitrary termination conditions. The expressions are derived for tonal excitations, and are obtained by employing a traveling wave model of a rigid-walled acoustic duct. It is shown that the optimal solution for the virtual sensing microphone weights is independent of the source location and microphone locations. It is also shown that, theoretically, it is possible to obtain infinite reductions at the virtual location. The analytical expressions are compared with forward difference prediction techniques. The results demonstrate that the maximum attenuation, that theoretically can be obtained at the virtual location using forward difference prediction techniques, is expected to decrease for higher excitation frequencies and larger virtual distances.

  7. Active Structural Acoustic Control of Interior Noise on a Raytheon 1900D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palumbo, Dan; Cabell, Ran; Sullivan, Brenda; Cline, John

    2000-01-01

    An active structural acoustic control system has been demonstrated on a Raytheon Aircraft Company 1900D turboprop airliner. Both single frequency and multi-frequency control of the blade passage frequency and its harmonics was accomplished. The control algorithm was a variant of the popular filtered-x LMS implemented in the principal component domain. The control system consisted of 21 inertial actuators and 32 microphones. The actuators were mounted to the aircraft's ring frames. The microphones were distributed uniformly throughout the interior at head height, both seated and standing. Actuator locations were selected using a combinatorial search optimization algorithm. The control system achieved a 14 dB noise reduction of the blade passage frequency during single frequency tests. Multi-frequency control of the first 1st, 2nd and 3rd harmonics resulted in 10.2 dB, 3.3 dB and 1.6 dB noise reductions respectively. These results fall short of the predictions which were produced by the optimization algorithm (13.5 dB, 8.6 dB and 6.3 dB). The optimization was based on actuator transfer functions taken on the ground and it is postulated that cabin pressurization at flight altitude was a factor in this discrepancy.

  8. Approaches to Adaptive Active Acoustic Noise Control at a Point Using Feedforward Techniques.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zulch, Peter A.

    Active acoustic noise control systems have been of interest since their birth in the 1930's. The principle is to superimpose on an unwanted noise wave shape its inverse with the intention of destructive interference. This work presents two approaches to this idea. The first approach uses a direct design method to develop a controller using an auto-regressive moving-average (ARMA) model that will be used to condition the primary noise to produce the required anti-noise for cancellation. The development of this approach has shown that the stability of the controller relies heavily on a non-minimum phase model of the secondary noise path. For this reason, a second approach, using a controller consisting of two parts was developed. The first part of the controller is designed to cancel broadband noise and the second part is an adaptive controller designed to cancel periodic noise. A simple technique for identifying the parameters of the broadband controller is developed. An ARMA model is used, and it is shown that its stability is improved by prefiltering the test signal with a minimum-phase inverse of the secondary noise channel. The periodic controller uses an estimate of the fundamental frequency to cancel the first few harmonics of periodic noise. A computationally efficient adaptive technique based on least squares is developed for updating the harmonic controller gains at each time step. Experimental results are included for the broadband controller, the harmonic controller, and the combination of the two algorithms. The advantages of using both techniques in conjunction are shown using test cases involving both broadband noise and periodic noise.

  9. High-frequency combustion instability control through acoustic modulation at the inlet boundary for liquid rocket engine applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennewitz, John William

    This research investigation encompasses experimental tests demonstrating the control of a high-frequency combustion instability by acoustically modulating the propellant flow. A model rocket combustor burned gaseous oxygen and methane using a single-element, pentad-style injector. Flow conditions were established that spontaneously excited a 2430 Hz first longitudinal combustion oscillation at an amplitude up to p'/pc ≈ 6%. An acoustic speaker was placed at the base of the oxidizer supply to modulate the flow and alter the oscillatory behavior of the combustor. Two speaker modulation approaches were investigated: (1) Bands of white noise and (2) Pure sinusoidal tones. The first approach adjusted 500 Hz bands of white noise ranging from 0-500 Hz to 2000-2500 Hz, while the second implemented single-frequency signals with arbitrary phase swept from 500-2500 Hz. The results showed that above a modulation signal amplitude threshold, both approaches suppressed 95+% of the spontaneous combustion oscillation. By increasing the applied signal amplitude, a wider frequency range of instability suppression became present for these two acoustic modulation approaches. Complimentary to these experiments, a linear modal analysis was undertaken to investigate the effects of acoustic modulation at the inlet boundary on the longitudinal instability modes of a dump combustor. The modal analysis employed acoustically consistent matching conditions with a specific impedance boundary condition at the inlet to represent the acoustic modulation. From the modal analysis, a naturally unstable first longitudinal mode was predicted in the absence of acoustic modulation, consistent with the spontaneously excited 2430 Hz instability observed experimentally. Subsequently, a detailed investigation involving variation of the modulation signal from 0-2500 Hz and mean combustor temperature from 1248-1685 K demonstrated the unstable to stable transition of a 2300-2500 Hz first longitudinal mode. The

  10. An acoustically controlled tetherless underwater vehicle for installation and maintenance of neutrino detectors in the deep ocean

    SciTech Connect

    Ballou, Philip J.

    1997-02-01

    The task of installing and servicing high energy neutrino detectors in the deep ocean from a surface support vessel is problematic using conventional tethered systems. An array of multiple detector strings rising 500 m from the ocean floor, and forming a grid with 50 m spacing between the strings, presents a substantial entanglement hazard for equipment cables deployed from the surface. Such tasks may be accomplished with fewer risks using a tetherless underwater remotely operated vehicle that has a local acoustic telemetry link to send control commands and sensor data between the vehicle and a stationary hydrophone suspended above or just outside the perimeter of the work site. The Phase I effort involves the development of an underwater acoustic telemetry link for vehicle control and sensor feedback, the evaluation of video compression methods for real-time acoustic transmission of video through the water, and the defining of local control routines on board the vehicle to allow it to perform certain basic maneuvering tasks autonomously, or to initiate a self-rescue if the acoustic control link should be lost. In Phase II, a prototype tetherless vehicle system will be designed and constructed to demonstrate the ability to install cable interconnections within a detector array at 4 km depth. The same control technology could be used with a larger more powerful vehicle to maneuver the detector strings into desired positions as they are being lowered to the ocean floor.

  11. Active structural acoustic control of a smart cylindrical shell using a virtual microphone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loghmani, Ali; Danesh, Mohammad; Kwak, Moon K.; Keshmiri, Mehdi

    2016-04-01

    This paper investigates the active structural acoustic control of sound radiated from a smart cylindrical shell. The cylinder is equipped with piezoelectric sensors and actuators to estimate and control the sound pressure that radiates from the smart shell. This estimated pressure is referred to as a virtual microphone, and it can be used in control systems instead of actual microphones to attenuate noise due to structural vibrations. To this end, the dynamic model for the smart cylinder is derived using the extended Hamilton’s principle, the Sanders shell theory and the assumed mode method. The simplified Kirchhoff-Helmholtz integral estimates the far-field sound pressure radiating from the baffled cylindrical shell. A modified higher harmonic controller that can cope with a harmonic disturbance is designed and experimentally evaluated. The experimental tests were carried out on a baffled cylindrical aluminum shell in an anechoic chamber. The frequency response for the theoretical virtual microphone and the experimental actual microphone are in good agreement with each other, and the results show the effectiveness of the designed virtual microphone and controller in attenuating the radiated sound.

  12. Analogy electromagnetism-acoustics: Validation and application to local impedance active control for sound absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolas, L.; Furstoss, M.; Galland, M. A.

    1998-10-01

    An analogy between electromagnetism and acoustics is presented in 2D. The propagation of sound in presence of absorbing material is modeled using an open boundary microwave package. Validation is performed through analytical and experimental results. Application to local impedance active control for free field sound absorption is finally described. Une analogie entre acoustique et électromagnétisme est présentée en 2D, afin de modéliser la propagation d'ondes acoustiques, en présence de matériau absorbant et à l'aide d'un logiciel de micro-ondes en domaine ouvert. Cette analogie est validée par des résultats analytiques et expérimentaux. Une application au contrôle actif de l'impédance acoustique de surface de matériaux poreux est finalement décrite.

  13. Non-stationary drying of ceramic-like materials controlled through acoustic emission method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, Stefan Jan; Szadzińska, Justyna

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents results of convective drying of ceramic-like materials in non-stationary conditions. The effect of periodically changing drying parameters at different frequencies and amplitudes on material quality has been investigated. During drying tests the destruction of the material was controlled trough the acoustic emission method and monitored with a digital camera. The experiments were carried out on cylindrically shaped samples made of KOC kaolin clay. The non-stationary drying consisted in periodical changes of the drying medium temperature and humidity. It has been found that a properly arranged methodology of non-stationary drying positively affects the product quality, mainly when drying is carried on with periodical changes of air humidity and to lesser extent with periodical changes of air temperature.

  14. Confining capillary waves to control aerosol droplet size from surface acoustic wave nebulisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazarzadeh, Elijah; Reboud, Julien; Wilson, Rab; Cooper, Jonathan M.

    Aerosols play a significant role in targeted delivery of medication through inhalation of drugs in a droplet form to the lungs. Delivery and targeting efficiencies are mainly linked to the droplet size, leading to a high demand for devices that can produce aerosols with controlled sizes in the range of 1 to 5 μm. Here we focus on enabling the control of the droplet size of a liquid sample nebulised using surface acoustic wave (SAW) generated by interdigitated transducers on a piezoelectric substrate (lithium niobate). The formation of droplets was monitored through a high-speed camera (600,000 fps) and the sizes measured using laser diffraction (Spraytec, Malvern Ltd). Results show a wide droplet size distribution (between 0.8 and 400 μm), while visual observation (at fast frame rates) revealed that the large droplets (>100 μm) are ejected due to large capillary waves (80 to 300 μm) formed at the free surface of liquid due to leakage of acoustic radiation of the SAWs, as discussed in previous literature (Qi et al. Phys Fluids, 2008). To negate this effect, we show that a modulated structure, specifically with feature sizes, typically 200 μm, prevents formation of large capillary waves by reducing the degrees of freedom of the system, enabling us to obtain a mean droplet size within the optimum range for drug delivery (<10 μm). This work was supported by an EPSRC grant (EP/K027611/1) and an ERC Advanced Investigator Award (340117-Biophononics).

  15. Fluids and Combustion Facility Acoustic Emissions Controlled by Aggressive Low-Noise Design Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Beth A.; Young, Judith A.

    2004-01-01

    The Fluids and Combustion Facility (FCF) is a dual-rack microgravity research facility that is being developed by Northrop Grumman Information Technology (NGIT) for the International Space Station (ISS) at the NASA Glenn Research Center. As an on-orbit test bed, FCF will host a succession of experiments in fluid and combustion physics. The Fluids Integrated Rack (FIR) and the Combustion Integrated Rack (CIR) must meet ISS acoustic emission requirements (ref. 1), which support speech communication and hearing-loss-prevention goals for ISS crew. To meet these requirements, the NGIT acoustics team implemented an aggressive low-noise design effort that incorporated frequent acoustic emission testing for all internal noise sources, larger-scale systems, and fully integrated racks (ref. 2). Glenn's Acoustical Testing Laboratory (ref. 3) provided acoustical testing services (see the following photograph) as well as specialized acoustical engineering support as part of the low-noise design process (ref. 4).

  16. NASA/Army Rotorcraft Technology. Volume 2: Materials and Structures, Propulsion and Drive Systems, Flight Dynamics and Control, and Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The Conference Proceedings is a compilation of over 30 technical papers presented which report on the advances in rotorcraft technical knowledge resulting from NASA, Army, and industry research programs over the last 5 to 10 years. Topics addressed in this volume include: materials and structures; propulsion and drive systems; flight dynamics and control; and acoustics.

  17. Behavioral and electrophysiological auditory processing measures in traumatic brain injury after acoustically controlled auditory training: a long-term study

    PubMed Central

    Figueiredo, Carolina Calsolari; de Andrade, Adriana Neves; Marangoni-Castan, Andréa Tortosa; Gil, Daniela; Suriano, Italo Capraro

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To investigate the long-term efficacy of acoustically controlled auditory training in adults after tarumatic brain injury. Methods A total of six audioogically normal individuals aged between 20 and 37 years were studied. They suffered severe traumatic brain injury with diffuse axional lesion and underwent an acoustically controlled auditory training program approximately one year before. The results obtained in the behavioral and electrophysiological evaluation of auditory processing immediately after acoustically controlled auditory training were compared to reassessment findings, one year later. Results Quantitative analysis of auditory brainsteim response showed increased absolute latency of all waves and interpeak intervals, bilaterraly, when comparing both evaluations. Moreover, increased amplitude of all waves, and the wave V amplitude was statistically significant for the right ear, and wave III for the left ear. As to P3, decreased latency and increased amplitude were found for both ears in reassessment. The previous and current behavioral assessment showed similar results, except for the staggered spondaic words in the left ear and the amount of errors on the dichotic consonant-vowel test. Conclusion The acoustically controlled auditory training was effective in the long run, since better latency and amplitude results were observed in the electrophysiological evaluation, in addition to stability of behavioral measures after one-year training. PMID:26676270

  18. Coding Acoustic Metasurfaces.

    PubMed

    Xie, Boyang; Tang, Kun; Cheng, Hua; Liu, Zhengyou; Chen, Shuqi; Tian, Jianguo

    2017-02-01

    Coding acoustic metasurfaces can combine simple logical bits to acquire sophisticated functions in wave control. The acoustic logical bits can achieve a phase difference of exactly π and a perfect match of the amplitudes for the transmitted waves. By programming the coding sequences, acoustic metasurfaces with various functions, including creating peculiar antenna patterns and waves focusing, have been demonstrated.

  19. Acoustic and optoelectronic nature and interfacial durability of modified CNT and GnP-PVDF composites with nanostructural control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Joung-Man; Kwon, Dong-Jun; Wang, Zuo-Jia; DeVries, Lawrence

    2014-03-01

    Nano- and hetero-structures of modified carbon nanotube (CNT) and Graphene nano Platelet (GnP) can control significantly piezoresistive and optoelectronic properties in Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) as acoustic actuators. Interfacial durability and electrical properties of modified CNT and GnP embedded in poly (vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) nanocomposites were investigated for use in acoustic actuator applications. Modified GnP coated PVDF nanocomposite exhibited better electrical conductivity than neat and modified CNT due to the unique electrical nature of GnP. Modified GnP coating also exhibited good acoustical properties. Contact angle, surface energy, work of adhesion, and spreading coefficient measurements were contributed to explore the interfacial adhesion durability between neat CNT or plasma treated CNT and plasma treated PVDF. Acoustic actuation performance of modified GnP coated PVDF nanocomposites were investigated for different radii of curvature and different coating conditions, using a sound level meter. Modified GnP can be a more appropriate acoustic actuator than CNT cases because of improved electrical properties. Optimum radius of curvature and coating thickness was also obtained for the most appropriate sound pressure level (SPL) performance. This study can provide manufacturing parameters of transparent sound actuators with good quality practically.

  20. Data Quality Control for Vessel Mounted Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler. Application for the Western Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia-Gorriz, E.; Front, J.; Candela, J.

    1997-01-01

    A systematic Data Quality Checking Protocol for vessel Mounted Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler observations is proposed. Previous-to-acquisition conditions are considered along with simultaneous ones.

  1. Remote full control, by an Internet link, of an underwater acoustics laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranz-Guerra, Carlos; Cobo-Parra, Pedro; Siguero-Guerra, Manuel; Fernandez-Fernandez, Alejandro

    2002-11-01

    The Underwater Tank Laboratory located at the Instituto de Acustica, CSIC, Madrid, has been fully reshaped. Now, the two bridges (emission and reception) have full automatic motion control by the operator. These capabilities were complemented by a new management of signal generation, signal acquisition, processing and storing of data. This new framework makes many of the tasks to be performed in this kind of facility easier by putting at the hands of the operator specific friendly software programs that attend to the main aspects of the ongoing experiment. In one step forward, the remote control of all the functionalities was considered feasible. The potentialities of the Internet were thought to provide a new dimension to the laboratory by lowering the difficulties of taking over the full control of the installation, by any user around the world. Here is one real example of how this achievement can be carried out. The Underwater Acoustics Laboratory at the Instituto de Acustica, CSIC, is now ready to be run by any one interested. The main lines, over which this problem has been considered, are described in this paper. [Work supported by PN on Science and Technology and CSIC, Spain.

  2. A PDE-based methodology for modeling, parameter estimation and feedback control in structural and structural acoustic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Brown, D. E.; Metcalf, Vern L.; Silcox, R. J.; Smith, Ralph C.; Wang, Yun

    1994-01-01

    A problem of continued interest concerns the control of vibrations in a flexible structure and the related problem of reducing structure-borne noise in structural acoustic systems. In both cases, piezoceramic patches bonded to the structures have been successfully used as control actuators. Through the application of a controlling voltage, the patches can be used to reduce structural vibrations which in turn lead to methods for reducing structure-borne noise. A PDE-based methodology for modeling, estimating physical parameters, and implementing a feedback control scheme for problems of this type is discussed. While the illustrating example is a circular plate, the methodology is sufficiently general so as to be applicable in a variety of structural and structural acoustic systems.

  3. An evaluation of fish behavior upstream of the water temperature control tower at Cougar Dam, Oregon, using acoustic cameras, 2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Adams, Noah S.; Smith, Collin; Plumb, John M.; Hansen, Gabriel S.; Beeman, John W.

    2015-07-06

    This report describes the initial year of a 2-year study to determine the feasibility of using acoustic cameras to monitor fish movements to help inform decisions about fish passage at Cougar Dam near Springfield, Oregon. Specifically, we used acoustic cameras to measure fish presence, travel speed, and direction adjacent to the water temperature control tower in the forebay of Cougar Dam during the spring (May, June, and July) and fall (September, October, and November) of 2013. Cougar Dam is a high-head flood-control dam, and the water temperature control tower enables depth-specific water withdrawals to facilitate adjustment of water temperatures released downstream of the dam. The acoustic cameras were positioned at the upstream entrance of the tower to monitor free-ranging subyearling and yearling-size juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha). Because of the large size discrepancy, we could distinguish juvenile Chinook salmon from their predators, which enabled us to measure predators and prey in areas adjacent to the entrance of the tower. We used linear models to quantify and assess operational and environmental factors—such as time of day, discharge, and water temperature—that may influence juvenile Chinook salmon movements within the beam of the acoustic cameras. Although extensive milling behavior of fish near the structure may have masked directed movement of fish and added unpredictability to fish movement models, the acoustic-camera technology enabled us to ascertain the general behavior of discrete size classes of fish. Fish travel speed, direction of travel, and counts of fish moving toward the water temperature control tower primarily were influenced by the amount of water being discharged through the dam.

  4. Effectiveness of T-shaped acoustic resonators in low-frequency sound transmission control of a finite double-panel partition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Deyu; Zhang, Xiao-Hong; Cheng, Li; Yu, Ganghua

    2010-10-01

    Double-panel partitions are widely used for sound insulation purposes. Their insulation efficiency is, however, deteriorated at low frequencies due to the structural and acoustic resonances. To tackle this problem, this paper proposes the use of long T-shaped acoustic resonators in a double-panel partition embedded along the edges. In order to facilitate the design and assess the performance of the structure, a general vibro-acoustic model, characterizing the interaction between the panels, air cavity, and integrated acoustic resonators, is developed. The effectiveness of the technique as well as the optimal locations of the acoustic resonators is examined at various frequencies where the system exhibits different coupling characteristics. The measured optimal locations are also compared with the predicted ones to verify the developed theory. Finally, the performance of the acoustic resonators in broadband sound transmission control is demonstrated.

  5. Active Structural Acoustic Control in an Original A400M Aircraft Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koehne, C.; Sachau, D.; Renger, K.

    2016-09-01

    Low frequency noise has always been a challenge in propeller driven aircraft. At low frequencies passive noise treatments are not as efficient as active noise reduction systems. The Helmut-Schmidt-University has built up a full-scale test rig with an original A400M aircraft structure. This provides a good opportunity to develop and test active noise reduction systems in a realistic environment. The currently installed system consists of mechanical actuators and acoustical sensors. The actuators are called TVAs (Tuneable Vibration Absorber) and contain two spring-mass systems whose natural frequencies are adjusted to the BPFs (Blade Passage Frequency) of the propellers. The TVAs are mounted to the frames and the force direction is normal to the skin. The sensors are condenser microphones which are attached to the primary structure of the airframe. The TVAs are equipped with signal processing devices. These components carry out Fourier transforms and signal amplification for the sensor data and actuator signals. The communication between the TVAs and the central control unit is implemented by the CAN Bus protocol and mainly consists of complex coefficients for the sensor and actuator data. This paper describes the basic structure of the system, the hardware set-up and function tests of the controller.

  6. Active control of membrane-type acoustic metamaterial by electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Songwen; Ma, Guancong; Li, Yong; Yang, Zhiyu; Sheng, Ping

    2015-03-01

    By employing a metal-coated central platelet and a rigid mesh electrode which is transparent to acoustic wave, we show that the membrane-type acoustic metamaterials (MAMs) can be easily tuned by applying an external voltage. With static voltage, the MAM's eigenfrequencies and therefore the phase of the transmitted wave are tunable up to 70 Hz. The MAM's vibration can be significantly suppressed or enhanced by using phase-matched AC voltage. Functionalities such as phase modulation and acoustic switch with on/off ratio up to 21.3 dB are demonstrated.

  7. Acute and Chronic Effect of Acoustic and Visual Cues on Gait Training in Parkinson's Disease: A Randomized, Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In this randomized controlled study we analyse and compare the acute and chronic effects of visual and acoustic cues on gait performance in Parkinson's Disease (PD). We enrolled 46 patients with idiopathic PD who were assigned to 3 different modalities of gait training: (1) use of acoustic cues, (2) use of visual cues, or (3) overground training without cues. All patients were tested with kinematic analysis of gait at baseline (T0), at the end of the 4-week rehabilitation programme (T1), and 3 months later (T2). Regarding the acute effect, acoustic cues increased stride length and stride duration, while visual cues reduced the number of strides and normalized the stride/stance distribution but also reduced gait speed. As regards the chronic effect of cues, we recorded an improvement in some gait parameters in all 3 groups of patients: all 3 types of training improved gait speed; visual cues also normalized the stance/swing ratio, acoustic cues reduced the number of strides and increased stride length, and overground training improved stride length. The changes were not retained at T2 in any of the experimental groups. Our findings support and characterize the usefulness of cueing strategies in the rehabilitation of gait in PD. PMID:26693384

  8. Deep water pipeline intervention work with an acoustically controlled power module

    SciTech Connect

    Conter, A.; Launaro, F.; Bigoni, G.

    1995-12-31

    The stabilisation of submarine pipeline free spans along uneven sea bottoms is conventionally performed using technologies such as gravel dumping, post trenching, matresses installation etc.. A new technology has been developed to support free spans along the 26 inches Transmed Gas Pipelines crossing the Sicily Channel in water depths ranging from 50m to 510m. This technology is based on the pipeline mechanical supports {open_quotes}Atlantis{close_quotes} and their installation module {open_quotes}Pegaso{close_quotes} and was developed having in mind requirements such as short installation time, system redundancy, operational flexibility and simple interface with the support vessel. The installation time reduction is achieved by automatic operational procedures which are acoustically controlled from surface. Power is stored inside two dedicated battery packs placed onboard Pegaso; no umbilical cable is necessary so that a vessel equipped with a normal crane is enough to launch and operate the system. Marine operations carried out in 1993 showed that a support can be installed in about one hour; in good weather conditions three Atlantis were installed in 24 hours including deck operations for recharging the battery packs; as a total sixteen supports were installed along the 4th and 5th Transmed Gas Pipelines. The system has proved to be a cost effective and flexible alternative to conventional technologies for free span support, especially in deep waters. A cost/benefit analysis also shows the breakeven point of the new technology versus gravel dumping.

  9. Acoustic evaluation and adjustment of an open-plan office through architectural design and noise control.

    PubMed

    Passero, Carolina Reich Marcon; Zannin, Paulo Henrique Trombetta

    2012-11-01

    Arranging office space into a single open room offers advantages in terms of easy exchange of information and interaction among coworkers, but reduces privacy and acoustic comfort. Thus, the purpose of this work was to evaluate the acoustic quality of a real open-plan office and to propose changes in the room to improve the acoustic conditioning of this office. The computational model of the office under study was calibrated based on RT and STI measurements. Predictions were made of the RT and STI, which generated the radius of distraction r(D), and the rate of spatial decay of sound pressure levels per distance doubling DL(2) in the real conditions of the office and after modifications of the room. The insertion of dividers between work stations and an increase in the ceiling's sound absorption improved the acoustic conditions in the office under study.

  10. Predictive Acoustic Modelling Applied to the Control of Intake/exhaust Noise of Internal Combustion Engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, P. O. A. L.; Harrison, M. F.

    1997-05-01

    The application of validated acoustic models to intake/exhaust system acoustic design is described with reference to a sequence of specific practical examples. These include large turbocharged diesel generating sets, truck engines and high performance petrol engines. The discussion includes a comparison of frequency domain, time domain and hybrid modelling approaches to design methodology. The calculation of sound emission from open terminations is summarized in an appendix.

  11. Acoustic Beam Forming Array Using Feedback-Controlled Microphones for Tuning and Self-Matching of Frequency Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radcliffe, Eliott (Inventor); Naguib, Ahmed (Inventor); Humphreys, Jr., William M. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A feedback-controlled microphone includes a microphone body and a membrane operatively connected to the body. The membrane is configured to be initially deflected by acoustic pressure such that the initial deflection is characterized by a frequency response. The microphone also includes a sensor configured to detect the frequency response of the initial deflection and generate an output voltage indicative thereof. The microphone additionally includes a compensator in electric communication with the sensor and configured to establish a regulated voltage in response to the output voltage. Furthermore, the microphone includes an actuator in electric communication with the compensator, wherein the actuator is configured to secondarily deflect the membrane in opposition to the initial deflection such that the frequency response is adjusted. An acoustic beam forming microphone array including a plurality of the above feedback-controlled microphones is also disclosed.

  12. Active control of acoustic field-of-view in a biosonar system.

    PubMed

    Yovel, Yossi; Falk, Ben; Moss, Cynthia F; Ulanovsky, Nachum

    2011-09-01

    Active-sensing systems abound in nature, but little is known about systematic strategies that are used by these systems to scan the environment. Here, we addressed this question by studying echolocating bats, animals that have the ability to point their biosonar beam to a confined region of space. We trained Egyptian fruit bats to land on a target, under conditions of varying levels of environmental complexity, and measured their echolocation and flight behavior. The bats modulated the intensity of their biosonar emissions, and the spatial region they sampled, in a task-dependant manner. We report here that Egyptian fruit bats selectively change the emission intensity and the angle between the beam axes of sequentially emitted clicks, according to the distance to the target, and depending on the level of environmental complexity. In so doing, they effectively adjusted the spatial sector sampled by a pair of clicks-the "field-of-view." We suggest that the exact point within the beam that is directed towards an object (e.g., the beam's peak, maximal slope, etc.) is influenced by three competing task demands: detection, localization, and angular scanning-where the third factor is modulated by field-of-view. Our results suggest that lingual echolocation (based on tongue clicks) is in fact much more sophisticated than previously believed. They also reveal a new parameter under active control in animal sonar-the angle between consecutive beams. Our findings suggest that acoustic scanning of space by mammals is highly flexible and modulated much more selectively than previously recognized.

  13. Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    ... search IRSA's site Unique Hits since January 2003 Acoustic Neuroma Click Here for Acoustic Neuroma Practice Guideline ... to microsurgery. One doctor's story of having an acoustic neuroma In August 1991, Dr. Thomas F. Morgan ...

  14. Dynamic control of the optical emission from GaN/InGaN nanowire quantum dots by surface acoustic waves

    SciTech Connect

    Lazić, S. Chernysheva, E.; Meulen, H. P. van der; Calleja Pardo, J. M.; Gačević, Ž.; Calleja, E.

    2015-09-15

    The optical emission of InGaN quantum dots embedded in GaN nanowires is dynamically controlled by a surface acoustic wave (SAW). The emission energy of both the exciton and biexciton lines is modulated over a 1.5 meV range at ∼330 MHz. A small but systematic difference in the exciton and biexciton spectral modulation reveals a linear change of the biexciton binding energy with the SAW amplitude. The present results are relevant for the dynamic control of individual single photon emitters based on nitride semiconductors.

  15. Acoustic tests on a new motor generator system for the Minuteman launch control centers at Alpha 01 and Sierra 00, Malmstrom AFB, Montana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairman, Terry M.

    1991-05-01

    Field tests of the acoustic performance of a new motor generator system (MGS) were performed at Minuteman Launch Control Centers (LCC) Alpha 01 and Sierra 00, Malmstrom AFB, MT. This same MGS unit was accepted for use after the Hill Engineering Test Facilities (HETF) acoustic performance studies conducted in 1988. Rivet Mile from the Ogden ALC began installation of the new MGS at Malmstrom in the spring of 1990. Performance tests were requested by 00-ALC/MMGRMM, and SAC, to compare with the HETF data and document the LCC acoustic environment with the new MGS operating in a field setting. This report presents our findings.

  16. AMELIA CESTOL Test: Acoustic Characteristics of Circulation Control Wing with Leading- and Trailing-Edge Slot Blowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horne, William C.; Burnside, Nathan J.

    2013-01-01

    The AMELIA Cruise-Efficient Short Take-off and Landing (CESTOL) configuration concept was developed to meet future requirements of reduced field length, noise, and fuel burn by researchers at Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo and Georgia Tech Research Institute under sponsorship by the NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program (FAP), Subsonic Fixed Wing Project. The novel configuration includes leading- and trailing-edge circulation control wing (CCW), over-wing podded turbine propulsion simulation (TPS). Extensive aerodynamic measurements of forces, surfaces pressures, and wing surface skin friction measurements were recently measured over a wide range of test conditions in the Arnold Engineering Development Center(AEDC) National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex (NFAC) 40- by 80-Ft Wind Tunnel. Acoustic measurements of the model were also acquired for each configuration with 7 fixed microphones on a line under the left wing, and with a 48-element, 40-inch diameter phased microphone array under the right wing. This presentation will discuss acoustic characteristics of the CCW system for a variety of tunnel speeds (0 to 120 kts), model configurations (leading edge(LE) and/or trailing-edge(TE) slot blowing, and orientations (incidence and yaw) based on acoustic measurements acquired concurrently with the aerodynamic measurements. The flow coefficient, Cmu= mVSLOT/qSW varied from 0 to 0.88 at 40 kts, and from 0 to 0.15 at 120 kts. Here m is the slot mass flow rate, VSLOT is the slot exit velocity, q is dynamic pressure, and SW is wing surface area. Directivities at selected 1/3 octave bands will be compared with comparable measurements of a 2-D wing at GTRI, as will as microphone array near-field measurements of the right wing at maximum flow rate. The presentation will include discussion of acoustic sensor calibrations as well as characterization of the wind tunnel background noise environment.

  17. Biological Significance of Acoustic Impacts on Marine Mammals: Examples Using an Acoustic Recording tag to Define Acoustic Exposure of Sperm Whales, Physeter catodon, Exposed to Airgun Sounds in Controlled Exposure Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyack, P. L.; Johnson, M. P.; Madsen, P. T.; Miller, P. J.; Lynch, J.

    2006-05-01

    There has been considerable debate about how to regulate behavioral disruption in marine mammals. The U.S. Marine Mammal Protection Act prohibits "taking" marine mammals, including harassment, which is defined as injury or disruption of behavioral patterns. A 2005 report by the National Academy of Sciences focuses on the need to analyze acoustic impacts on marine mammal behavior in terms of biological significance. The report develops a model for predicting population consequences of acoustic impacts. One of the key data gaps involves methods to estimate the impact of disruption on an animal's ability to complete life functions critical for growth, survival, and reproduction. One of the few areas where theory and data are available involves foraging energetics. Patrick Miller in the next talk and I will discuss an example study designed to evaluate the impact of exposure to seismic survey on the foraging energetics of sperm whales. As petroleum exploration moves offshore to deep water, there is increasing overlap between seismic exploration and deep diving toothed whales such as the sperm whale which is listed by the US as an endangered species. With support from the US Minerals Management Service and the Industry Research Funding Coalition, we tagged sperm whales with tags that can record sound, orientation, acceleration, temperature and depth. Eight whales tagged in the Gulf of Mexico during 2002-2003 were subjects in 5 controlled experiments involving exposure to sounds of an airgun array. One critical component of evaluating effects involves quantifying exposure at the animal. While the on-axis signature of airgun arrays has been well quantified, there are few broadband calibrated measurements in the water column displaced horizontally away from the downward-directed beam. The acoustic recording tags provide direct data on sounds as received at the animals. Due to multipath propagation, multiple sound pulses were recorded on the tagged whales for each firing of

  18. Evaluation of the sensitivity of electro-acoustic measurements for process monitoring and control of an atmospheric pressure plasma jet system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Law, V. J.; O'Neill, F. T.; Dowling, D. P.

    2011-06-01

    The development of non-invasive process diagnostic techniques for the control of atmospheric plasmas is a critical issue for the wider adoption of this technology. This paper evaluates the use of a frequency-domain deconvolution of an electro-acoustic emission as a means to monitor and control the plasma formed using an atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) system. The air plasma system investigated was formed using a PlasmaTreat™ OpenAir applicator. Change was observed in the electro-acoustic signal with changes in substrate type (ceramic, steel, polymer). APPJ nozzle to substrate distance and substrate feature size were monitored. The decoding of the electro-acoustic emission yields three subdatasets that are described by three separate emission mechanisms. The three emissions are associated with the power supply fundamental drive frequency and its harmonics, the APPJ nozzle longitudinal mode acoustic emission and its odd overtones, and the acoustic surface reflection that is produced by the impedance mismatch between the discharge and the surface. Incorporating this knowledge into a LabVIEW program facilitated the continuous deconvolution of the electro-acoustic data. This enabled the use of specific frequency band test limits to control the APPJ treatment process which is sensitive to both plasma processing conditions and substrate type and features.

  19. A process to control light in a micro resonator through a coupling modulation by surface acoustic waves

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Guofang; Li, Yuan; Hu, Chunguang; Lei, Lihua; Guo, Yanchuan

    2016-01-01

    A novel process to control light through the coupling modulation by surface acoustic wave (SAW) is presented in an optical micro resonator. An optical waveguide modulator of a racetrack resonator on silicon-on-insulator (SOI) technology is took as an example to explore the mechanism. A finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) is developed to simulate the acousto-optical (AO) modulator using the mechanism. An analytical method is presented to verify our proposal. The results show that the process can work well as an optical modulator by SAW. PMID:27485470

  20. A process to control light in a micro resonator through a coupling modulation by surface acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Guofang; Li, Yuan; Hu, Chunguang; Lei, Lihua; Guo, Yanchuan

    2016-08-01

    A novel process to control light through the coupling modulation by surface acoustic wave (SAW) is presented in an optical micro resonator. An optical waveguide modulator of a racetrack resonator on silicon-on-insulator (SOI) technology is took as an example to explore the mechanism. A finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) is developed to simulate the acousto-optical (AO) modulator using the mechanism. An analytical method is presented to verify our proposal. The results show that the process can work well as an optical modulator by SAW.

  1. Direct Field Acoustic Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larkin, Paul; Goldstein, Bob

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an update to the methods and procedures used in Direct Field Acoustic Testing (DFAT). The paper will discuss some of the recent techniques and developments that are currently being used and the future publication of a reference standard. Acoustic testing using commercial sound system components is becoming a popular and cost effective way of generating a required acoustic test environment both in and out of a reverberant chamber. This paper will present the DFAT test method, the usual setup and procedure and the development and use of a closed-loop, narrow-band control system. Narrow-band control of the acoustic PSD allows all standard techniques and procedures currently used in random control to be applied to acoustics and some examples are given. The paper will conclude with a summary of the development of a standard practice guideline that is hoped to be available in the first quarter of next year.

  2. Acoustic Event Signatures for Damage Control: Water Events and Shipboard Ambient Noise

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    documents some of the acoustic work done for the Advanced Volume Sensor (AVS) Project, Dr. Susan Rose-Pehrsson, NRL Code 6112. The AVS project is an...element of the ONR FNC Advanced Damage Countermeasures (ADC) Program, managed at NRL by Dr. Fred Williams, Code 6180. The ADC program seeks to develop...also installed and recorded to provide a visual record of the events and to test the response of fire alarm systems to the events. The results of the

  3. Polydimethylsiloxane-LiNbO3 surface acoustic wave micropump devices for fluid control into microchannels.

    PubMed

    Girardo, Salvatore; Cecchini, Marco; Beltram, Fabio; Cingolani, Roberto; Pisignano, Dario

    2008-09-01

    This paper presents prototypical microfluidic devices made by hybrid microchannels based on piezoelectric LiNbO(3) and polydimethylsiloxane. This system enables withdrawing micropumping by acoustic radiation in microchannels. The withdrawing configuration, integrated on chip, is here quantitatively investigated for the first time, and found to be related to the formation and coalescence dynamics of droplets within the microchannel, primed by surface acoustic waves. The growth dynamics of droplets is governed by the water diffusion on LiNbO(3), determining the advancement of the fluid front. Observed velocities are up to 2.6 mm s(-1) for 30 dBm signals applied to the interdigital transducer, corresponding to tens of nl s(-1), and the micropumping dynamics is described by a model taking into account an acoustic power exponentially decaying upon travelling along the microchannel. This straighforward and flexible micropumping approach is particularly promising for the withdrawing of liquids in lab-on-chip devices performing cycling transport of fluids and biochemical reactions.

  4. Control of Thermal Deflection, Panel Flutter and Acoustic Fatigue at Elevated Temperatures Using Shape Memory Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mei, Chuh; Huang, Jen-Kuang

    1996-01-01

    The High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) will have to be designed to withstand high aerodynamic load at supersonic speeds (panel flutter) and high acoustic load (acoustic or sonic fatigue) due to fluctuating boundary layer or jet engine acoustic pressure. The thermal deflection of the skin panels will also alter the vehicle's configuration, thus it may affect the aerodynamic characteristics of the vehicle and lead to poor performance. Shape memory alloys (SMA) have an unique ability to recover large strains completely when the alloy is heated above the characteristic transformation (austenite finish T(sub f)) temperature. The recovery stress and elastic modulus are both temperature dependent, and the recovery stress also depends on the initial strain. An innovative concept is to utilize the recovery stress by embedding the initially strained SMA wire in a graphite/epoxy composite laminated panel. The SMA wires are thus restrained and large inplane forces are induced in the panel at elevated temeperatures. By embedding SMA in composite panel, the panel becomes much stiffer at elevated temperatures. That is because the large tensile inplane forces induced in the panel from the SMA recovery stress. A stiffer panel would certainly yield smaller dynamic responses.

  5. Coordinated Control of Acoustical Field of View and Flight in Three-Dimensional Space for Consecutive Capture by Echolocating Bats during Natural Foraging.

    PubMed

    Sumiya, Miwa; Fujioka, Emyo; Motoi, Kazuya; Kondo, Masaru; Hiryu, Shizuko

    2017-01-01

    Echolocating bats prey upon small moving insects in the dark using sophisticated sonar techniques. The direction and directivity pattern of the ultrasound broadcast of these bats are important factors that affect their acoustical field of view, allowing us to investigate how the bats control their acoustic attention (pulse direction) for advanced flight maneuvers. The purpose of this study was to understand the behavioral strategies of acoustical sensing of wild Japanese house bats Pipistrellus abramus in three-dimensional (3D) space during consecutive capture flights. The results showed that when the bats successively captured multiple airborne insects in short time intervals (less than 1.5 s), they maintained not only the immediate prey but also the subsequent one simultaneously within the beam widths of the emitted pulses in both horizontal and vertical planes before capturing the immediate one. This suggests that echolocating bats maintain multiple prey within their acoustical field of view by a single sensing using a wide directional beam while approaching the immediate prey, instead of frequently shifting acoustic attention between multiple prey. We also numerically simulated the bats' flight trajectories when approaching two prey successively to investigate the relationship between the acoustical field of view and the prey direction for effective consecutive captures. This simulation demonstrated that acoustically viewing both the immediate and the subsequent prey simultaneously increases the success rate of capturing both prey, which is considered to be one of the basic axes of efficient route planning for consecutive capture flight. The bat's wide sonar beam can incidentally cover multiple prey while the bat forages in an area where the prey density is high. Our findings suggest that the bats then keep future targets within their acoustical field of view for effective foraging. In addition, in both the experimental results and the numerical simulations

  6. Coordinated Control of Acoustical Field of View and Flight in Three-Dimensional Space for Consecutive Capture by Echolocating Bats during Natural Foraging

    PubMed Central

    Sumiya, Miwa; Fujioka, Emyo; Motoi, Kazuya; Kondo, Masaru; Hiryu, Shizuko

    2017-01-01

    Echolocating bats prey upon small moving insects in the dark using sophisticated sonar techniques. The direction and directivity pattern of the ultrasound broadcast of these bats are important factors that affect their acoustical field of view, allowing us to investigate how the bats control their acoustic attention (pulse direction) for advanced flight maneuvers. The purpose of this study was to understand the behavioral strategies of acoustical sensing of wild Japanese house bats Pipistrellus abramus in three-dimensional (3D) space during consecutive capture flights. The results showed that when the bats successively captured multiple airborne insects in short time intervals (less than 1.5 s), they maintained not only the immediate prey but also the subsequent one simultaneously within the beam widths of the emitted pulses in both horizontal and vertical planes before capturing the immediate one. This suggests that echolocating bats maintain multiple prey within their acoustical field of view by a single sensing using a wide directional beam while approaching the immediate prey, instead of frequently shifting acoustic attention between multiple prey. We also numerically simulated the bats’ flight trajectories when approaching two prey successively to investigate the relationship between the acoustical field of view and the prey direction for effective consecutive captures. This simulation demonstrated that acoustically viewing both the immediate and the subsequent prey simultaneously increases the success rate of capturing both prey, which is considered to be one of the basic axes of efficient route planning for consecutive capture flight. The bat’s wide sonar beam can incidentally cover multiple prey while the bat forages in an area where the prey density is high. Our findings suggest that the bats then keep future targets within their acoustical field of view for effective foraging. In addition, in both the experimental results and the numerical simulations

  7. Exploiting flow to control the in vitro spatiotemporal distribution of microbubble-seeded acoustic cavitation activity in ultrasound therapy.

    PubMed

    Pouliopoulos, Antonios N; Bonaccorsi, Simone; Choi, James J

    2014-11-21

    Focused ultrasound and microbubbles have been extensively used to generate therapeutic bioeffects. Despite encouraging in vivo results, there remains poor control of the magnitude and spatial distribution of these bioeffects due to the limited ability of conventional pulse shapes and sequences to control cavitation dynamics. Thus current techniques are restricted by an efficacy-safety trade-off. The primary aim of the present study was to incorporate the presence of flow in the design of new short pulse sequences, which can more uniformly distribute the cavitation activity. Microbubbles flowing (fluid velocity: 10 mm s(-1)) through a 300 μm tube were sonicated with a focused 0.5 MHz transducer while acoustic emissions were captured with an inserted focused 7.5 MHz passive cavitation detector. The two foci were co-axially aligned and their focal points were overlapped. Whereas conventional sequences are composed of a long burst (>10,000 cycles) emitted at a low burst repetition frequency (<10 Hz), we decomposed this burst into short pulses by adding intervals to facilitate inter-pulse microbubble movement. To evaluate how this sequence influenced cavitation distribution, we emitted short pulses (peak-rarefactional pressure (PRP): 40-366 kPa, pulse length (PL): 5-25 cycles) at high pulse repetition frequencies (PRF: 0.625-10 kHz) for a burst length of 100 ms. Increased cavitation persistence, implied by the duration of the microbubble acoustic emissions, was a measure of improved distribution due to the presence of flow. Sonication at lower acoustic pressures, longer pulse intervals and lower PLs improved the spatial distribution of cavitation. Furthermore, spectral analysis of the microbubble emissions revealed that the improvement at low pressures is due to persisting stable cavitation. In conclusion, new short-pulse sequences were shown to improve spatiotemporal control of acoustic cavitation dynamics during physiologically relevant flow. This

  8. Mobile phone use and risk of acoustic neuroma: results of the Interphone case–control study in five North European countries

    PubMed Central

    Schoemaker, M J; Swerdlow, A J; Ahlbom, A; Auvinen, A; Blaasaas, K G; Cardis, E; Christensen, H Collatz; Feychting, M; Hepworth, S J; Johansen, C; Klæboe, L; Lönn, S; McKinney, P A; Muir, K; Raitanen, J; Salminen, T; Thomsen, J; Tynes, T

    2005-01-01

    There is public concern that use of mobile phones could increase the risk of brain tumours. If such an effect exists, acoustic neuroma would be of particular concern because of the proximity of the acoustic nerve to the handset. We conducted, to a shared protocol, six population-based case–control studies in four Nordic countries and the UK to assess the risk of acoustic neuroma in relation to mobile phone use. Data were collected by personal interview from 678 cases of acoustic neuroma and 3553 controls. The risk of acoustic neuroma in relation to regular mobile phone use in the pooled data set was not raised (odds ratio (OR)=0.9, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.7–1.1). There was no association of risk with duration of use, lifetime cumulative hours of use or number of calls, for phone use overall or for analogue or digital phones separately. Risk of a tumour on the same side of the head as reported phone use was raised for use for 10 years or longer (OR=1.8, 95% CI: 1.1–3.1). The study suggests that there is no substantial risk of acoustic neuroma in the first decade after starting mobile phone use. However, an increase in risk after longer term use or after a longer lag period could not be ruled out. PMID:16136046

  9. Acoustic droplet–hydrogel composites for spatial and temporal control of growth factor delivery and scaffold stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Fabiilli, Mario L.; Wilson, Christopher G.; Padilla, Frédéric; Martín-Saavedra, Francisco M.; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Franceschi, Renny T.

    2013-01-01

    Wound healing is regulated by temporally and spatially restricted patterns of growth factor signaling, but there are few delivery vehicles capable of the “on-demand” release necessary for recapitulating these patterns. Recently we described a perfluorocarbon double emulsion that selectively releases a protein payload upon exposure to ultrasound through a process known as acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV). In this study, we describe a delivery system composed of fibrin hydrogels doped with growth factor-loaded double emulsion for applications in tissue regeneration. Release of immunoreactive basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) from the composites increased up to 5-fold following ADV and delayed release was achieved by delaying exposure to ultrasound. Releasates of ultrasound-treated materials significantly increased the proliferation of endothelial cells compared to sham controls, indicating that the released bFGF was bioactive. ADV also triggered changes in the ultrastructure and mechanical properties of the fibrin as bubble formation and consolidation of the fibrin in ultrasound-treated composites were accompanied by up to a 22-fold increase in shear stiffness. ADV did not reduce the viability of cells suspended in composite scaffolds. These results demonstrate that an acoustic droplet–hydrogel composite could have broad utility in promoting wound healing through on-demand control of growth factor release and/or scaffold architecture. PMID:23535233

  10. Control of boundary layer transition location and plate vibration in the presence of an external acoustic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrello, L.; Grosveld, F. W.

    1991-01-01

    The experiment is aimed at controlling the boundary layer transition location and the plate vibration when excited by a flow and an upstream sound source. Sound has been found to affect the flow at the leading edge and the response of a flexible plate in a boundary layer. Because the sound induces early transition, the panel vibration is acoustically coupled to the turbulent boundary layer by the upstream radiation. Localized surface heating at the leading edge delays the transition location downstream of the flexible plate. The response of the plate excited by a turbulent boundary layer (without sound) shows that the plate is forced to vibrate at different frequencies and with different amplitudes as the flow velocity changes indicating that the plate is driven by the convective waves of the boundary layer. The acoustic disturbances induced by the upstream sound dominate the response of the plate when the boundary layer is either turbulent or laminar. Active vibration control was used to reduce the sound induced displacement amplitude of the plate.

  11. Hypersonic acoustic excitations in binary colloidal crystals: big versus small hard sphere control.

    PubMed

    Tommaseo, G; Petekidis, G; Steffen, W; Fytas, G; Schofield, A B; Stefanou, N

    2007-01-07

    The phononic band structure of two binary colloidal crystals, at hypersonic frequencies, is studied by means of Brillouin light scattering and analyzed in conjunction with corresponding dispersion diagrams of the single colloidal crystals of the constituent particles. Besides the acoustic band of the average medium, the authors' results show the existence of narrow bands originating from resonant multipole modes of the individual particles as well as Bragg-type modes due to the (short-range) periodicity. Strong interaction, leading to the occurrence of hybridization gaps, is observed between the acoustic band and the band of quadrupole modes of the particles that occupy the largest fractional volume of the mixed crystal; the effective radius is either that of the large (in the symmetric NaCl-type crystalline phase) or the small (in the asymmetric NaZn(13)-type crystalline phase) particles. The possibility to reveal a universal behavior of the phononic band structure for different single and binary colloidal crystalline suspensions, by representing in the dispersion diagrams reduced quantities using an appropriate length scale, is discussed.

  12. Controlling acoustic streaming in an ultrasonic heptagonal tweezers with application to cell manipulation.

    PubMed

    Bernassau, A L; Glynne-Jones, P; Gesellchen, F; Riehle, M; Hill, M; Cumming, D R S

    2014-01-01

    Acoustic radiation force has been demonstrated as a method for manipulating micron-scale particles, but is frequently affected by unwanted streaming. In this paper the streaming in a multi-transducer quasi-standing wave acoustic particle manipulation device is assessed, and found to be dominated by a form of Eckart streaming. The experimentally observed streaming takes the form of two main vortices that have their highest velocity in the region where the standing wave is established. A finite element model is developed that agrees well with experimental results, and shows that the Reynolds stresses that give rise to the fluid motion are strongest in the high velocity region. A technical solution to reduce the streaming is explored that entails the introduction of a biocompatible agar gel layer at the bottom of the chamber so as to reduce the fluid depth and volume. By this means, we reduce the region of fluid that experiences the Reynolds stresses; the viscous drag per unit volume of fluid is also increased. Particle Image Velocimetry data is used to observe the streaming as a function of agar-modified cavity depth. It was found that, in an optimised structure, Eckart streaming could be reduced to negligible levels so that we could make a sonotweezers device with a large working area of up to 13 mm × 13 mm.

  13. A Device for Fetal Monitoring by Means of Control Over Cardiovascular Parameters Based on Acoustic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khokhlova, L. A.; Seleznev, A. I.; Zhdanov, D. S.; Zemlyakov, I. Yu; Kiseleva, E. Yu

    2016-01-01

    The problem of monitoring fetal health is topical at the moment taking into account a reduction in the level of fertile-age women's health and changes in the concept of perinatal medicine with reconsideration of live birth criteria. Fetal heart rate monitoring is a valuable means of assessing fetal health during pregnancy. The routine clinical measurements are usually carried out by the means of ultrasound cardiotocography. Although the cardiotocography monitoring provides valuable information on the fetal health status, the high quality ultrasound devices are expensive, they are not available for home care use. The recommended number of measurement is also limited. The passive and fully non-invasive acoustic recording provides an alternative low-cost measurement method. The article describes a device for fetal and maternal health monitoring by analyzing the frequency and periodicity of heart beats by means of acoustic signal received on the maternal abdomen. Based on the usage of this device a phonocardiographic fetal telemedicine system, which will allow to reduce the antenatal fetal mortality rate significantly due to continuous monitoring over the state of fetus regardless of mother's location, can be built.

  14. Active control of passive acoustic fields: passive synthetic aperture/Doppler beamforming with data from an autonomous vehicle.

    PubMed

    D'Spain, Gerald L; Terrill, Eric; Chadwell, C David; Smith, Jerome A; Lynch, Stephen D

    2006-12-01

    The maneuverability of autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) equipped with hull-mounted arrays provides the opportunity to actively modify received acoustic fields to optimize extraction of information. This paper uses ocean acoustic data collected by an AUV-mounted two-dimensional hydrophone array, with overall dimension one-tenth wavelength at 200-500 Hz, to demonstrate aspects of this control through vehicle motion. Source localization is performed using Doppler shifts measured at a set of receiver velocities by both single elements and a physical array. Results show that a source in the presence of a 10-dB higher-level interferer having exactly the same frequency content (as measured by a stationary receiver) is properly localized and that white-noise-constrained adaptive beamforming applied to the physical aperture data in combination with Doppler beamforming provides greater spatial resolution than physical-aperture-alone beamforming and significantly lower sidelobes than single element Doppler beamforming. A new broadband beamformer that adjusts for variations in vehicle velocity on a sample by sample basis is demonstrated with data collected during a high-acceleration maneuver. The importance of including the cost of energy expenditure in determining optimal vehicle motion is demonstrated through simulation, further illustrating how the vehicle characteristics are an integral part of the signal/array processing structure.

  15. Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    An acoustic neuroma is a benign tumor that develops on the nerve that connects the ear to the brain. ... can press against the brain, becoming life-threatening. Acoustic neuroma can be difficult to diagnose, because the ...

  16. Acoustic Seaglider

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-07

    a national naval responsibility. Acoustic sensors on mobile, autonomous platforms will enable basic research topics on temporal and spatial...problem and acoustic navigation and communications within the context of distributed autonomous persistent undersea surveillance sensor networks...Acoustic sensors on mobile, autonomous platforms will enable basic research topics on temporal and spatial coherence and the description of ambient

  17. Acoustic seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention relates to a sealing device having an acoustic resonator. The acoustic resonator is adapted to create acoustic waveforms to generate a sealing pressure barrier blocking fluid flow from a high pressure area to a lower pressure area. The sealing device permits noncontacting sealing operation. The sealing device may include a resonant-macrosonic-synthesis (RMS) resonator.

  18. Acoustic Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention relates to a sealing device having an acoustic resonator. The acoustic resonator is adapted to create acoustic waveforms to generate a sealing pressure barrier blocking fluid flow from a high pressure area to a lower pressure area. The sealing device permits noncontacting sealing operation. The sealing device may include a resonant-macrosonic-synthesis (RMS) resonator.

  19. Target spectrum matrix definition for multiple-input- multiple-output control strategies applied on direct-field- acoustic-excitation tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez Blanco, M.; Janssens, K.; Bianciardi, F.

    2016-09-01

    During the last two decades there have been several improvements on environmental acoustic qualification testing for launch and space vehicles. Direct field excitation (DFAX) tests using Multiple-Input-Multiple-Output (MIMO) control strategies seems to become the most cost-efficient way for component and subsystem acoustic testing. However there are still some concerns about the uniformity and diffusivity of the acoustic field produced by direct field testing. Lately, much of the documented progresses aimed to solve the non-uniformity of the field by altering the sound pressure level requirement, limiting responses and adding or modifying control microphones positions. However, the first two solutions imply modifying the qualification criteria, which could lead to under-testing, potentially risking the mission. Furthermore, adding or moving control microphones prematurely changes the system configuration, even if it is an optimal geometric layout in terms of wave interference patterns control. This research investigates the target definition as an initial condition for the acoustic MIMO control. Through experiments it is shown that for a given system configuration the performance of a DFAX test strongly depends on the target definition procedure. As output of this research a set of descriptors are presented describing a phenomenon defined as “Energy- sink”.

  20. The new science of fiber safety: Assuring the safety of fiber-based materials for acoustic and noise control applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadley, John

    2005-09-01

    In 2001, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) assembled a group of 18 international experts on the health effects of fibers. Their task was to review the available science on the health aspects of glass, rock, and slag wool fibers. The group of experts determined that glass, rock, and slag wool insulation fibers should be removed from the IARC list of possible carcinogens. That decision was based fundamentally on the development of new science that has led to an understanding of those properties of fibers which affect their potential biological activity. This presentation will provide both an overview of this new science and provide guidelines to assure the safety of fiber-based materials used in acoustic and noise-control applications.

  1. Effects of Computer-Based Intervention through Acoustically Modified Speech (Fast ForWord) in Severe Mixed Receptive-Expressive Language Impairment: Outcomes from a Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Wendy; Hodson, Ann; O'Hare, Anne; Boyle, James; Durrani, Tariq; McCartney, Elspeth; Mattey, Mike; Naftalin, Lionel; Watson, Jocelynne

    2005-01-01

    Seventy-seven children between the ages of 6 and 10 years, with severe mixed receptive-expressive specific language impairment (SLI), participated in a randomized controlled trial (RCT) of Fast ForWord (FFW; Scientific Learning Corporation, 1997, 2001). FFW is a computer-based intervention for treating SLI using acoustically enhanced speech…

  2. Optoelectronic and acoustic properties and their interfacial durability of GnP/PVDF/GnP composite actuators with nano-structural control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Joung-Man; Kwon, Dong-Jun; Wang, Zuo-Jia; Gu, Ga-Young; DeVries, Lawrence

    2013-03-01

    Nano- and hetero-structures of carbon nanotube (CNT), indium tin oxide (ITO), and Graphene nano Platelet (GnP) can control significantly piezoelectric and optoelectronic properties in Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) as acoustic actuators. Interfacial durability and electrical properties of CNT, ITO or GnP coated poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) nanocomposites were investigated for use in acoustic actuator applications. The GnP coated PVDF nanocomposite exhibited better electrical conductivity than either CNT or ITO, due to the unique electrical properties of GnP. GnP nanocomposite coatings also exhibited good acoustical properties. Contact angle, surface energy, work of adhesion, and spreading coefficient measurements were used to explore the interfacial adhesion durability between neat CNT (or plasma treated CNT) and plasma treated PVDF. The acoustic actuation performance of GnP coated PVDF nanocomposites were investigated for different radii of curvature and different coating conditions, using a sound level meter. GnP is considered to be a more appropriate acoustic actuator than either CNT or ITO because of its characteristic electrical properties. A radius of curvature of about 15 degrees was established as being most appropriate. Sound characteristics differed with varying coating thicknesses. The results of this study suggest that it should be possible to manufacture transparent actuators with good sound quality.

  3. Environmental controls of frost cracking revealed through in situ acoustic emission measurements in steep bedrock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girard, Lucas; Gruber, Stephan; Weber, Samuel; Beutel, Jan

    2013-05-01

    Frost cracking, the breakdown of rock by freezing, is one of the most important mechanical weathering processes acting on Earth's surface. Insights on the mechanisms driving frost cracking stem mainly from laboratory and theoretical studies. Transferring insights from such studies to natural conditions, involving jointed bedrock and heterogeneous thermal and hydrological properties, is a major challenge. We address this problem with simultaneous in situ measurements of acoustic emissions, used as proxy of rock damage, and rock temperature/moisture content. The 1 year data set acquired in an Alpine rock wall shows that (1) liquid water content has an important impact on freezing-induced rock damage, (2) sustained freezing can yield much stronger damage than repeated freeze-thaw cycling, and (3) that frost cracking occurs over the full range of temperatures measured extending from 0 down to -15°C. These new measurements yield a slightly different picture than previous field studies where ice segregation appears to play an important role.

  4. A film bulk acoustic resonator-based high-performance pressure sensor integrated with temperature control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Mengying; Zhao, Zhan; Du, Lidong; Fang, Zhen

    2017-04-01

    This paper presented a high-performance pressure sensor based on a film bulk acoustic resonator (FBAR). The support film of the FBAR chip was made of silicon nitride and the part under the resonator area was etched to enhance the sensitivity and improve the linearity of the pressure sensor. A micro resistor temperature sensor and a micro resistor heater were integrated in the chip to monitor and control the operating temperature. The sensor chip was fabricated, and packaged in an oscillator circuit for differential pressure detection. When the detected pressure ranged from  ‑100 hPa to 600 hPa, the sensitivity of the improved FBAR pressure sensor was  ‑0.967 kHz hPa‑1, namely  ‑0.69 ppm hPa‑1, which was 19% higher than that of existing sensors with a complete support film. The nonlinearity of the improved sensor was less than  ±0.35%, while that of the existing sensor was  ±5%. To eliminate measurement errors from humidity, the temperature control system integrated in the sensor chip controlled the temperature of the resonator up to 75 °C, with accuracy of  ±0.015 °C and power of 20 mW.

  5. Acoustic cooling engine

    DOEpatents

    Hofler, Thomas J.; Wheatley, John C.; Swift, Gregory W.; Migliori, Albert

    1988-01-01

    An acoustic cooling engine with improved thermal performance and reduced internal losses comprises a compressible fluid contained in a resonant pressure vessel. The fluid has a substantial thermal expansion coefficient and is capable of supporting an acoustic standing wave. A thermodynamic element has first and second ends and is located in the resonant pressure vessel in thermal communication with the fluid. The thermal response of the thermodynamic element to the acoustic standing wave pumps heat from the second end to the first end. The thermodynamic element permits substantial flow of the fluid through the thermodynamic element. An acoustic driver cyclically drives the fluid with an acoustic standing wave. The driver is at a location of maximum acoustic impedance in the resonant pressure vessel and proximate the first end of the thermodynamic element. A hot heat exchanger is adjacent to and in thermal communication with the first end of the thermodynamic element. The hot heat exchanger conducts heat from the first end to portions of the resonant pressure vessel proximate the hot heat exchanger. The hot heat exchanger permits substantial flow of the fluid through the hot heat exchanger. The resonant pressure vessel can include a housing less than one quarter wavelength in length coupled to a reservoir. The housing can include a reduced diameter portion communicating with the reservoir. The frequency of the acoustic driver can be continuously controlled so as to maintain resonance.

  6. Passive Acoustic Detection of Wind Turbine In-Flow Conditions for Active Control and Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, Nathan E.

    2012-03-12

    Wind is a significant source of energy; however, the human capability to produce electrical energy still has many hurdles to overcome. One of these is the unpredictability of the winds in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). The ABL is highly turbulent in both stable and unstable conditions (based on the vertical temperature profile) and the resulting fluctuations can have a dramatic impact on wind turbine operation. Any method by which these fluctuations could be observed, estimated, or predicted could provide a benefit to the wind energy industry as a whole. Based on the fundamental coupling of velocity fluctuations to pressure fluctuations in the nearly incompressible flow in the ABL, This work hypothesizes that a ground-based array of infrasonic pressure transducers could be employed to estimate the vertical wind profile over a height relevant for wind turbines. To analyze this hypothesis, experiments and field deployments were conducted. Wind tunnel experiments were performed for a thick turbulent boundary layer over a neutral or heated surface. Surface pressure and velocity probe measurements were acquired simultaneously. Two field deployments yielded surface pressure data from a 49 element array. The second deployment at the Reese Technology Center in Lubbock, TX, also included data from a smaller aperture, 96-element array and a 200-meter tall meteorological tower. Analysis of the data successfully demonstrated the ability to estimate the vertical velocity profile using coherence data from the pressure array. Also, dynamical systems analysis methods were successful in identifying and tracking a gust type event. In addition to the passive acoustic profiling method, this program also investigated a rapid response Doppler SODAR system, the optimization of wind turbine blades for enhanced power with reduced aeroacoustic noise production, and the implementation of a wireless health monitoring system for the wind turbine blades. Each of these other objectives

  7. Acoustics lecturing in Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beristain, Sergio

    2002-11-01

    Some thirty years ago acoustics lecturing started in Mexico at the National Polytechnic Institute in Mexico City, as part of the Bachelor of Science degree in Communications and Electronics Engineering curricula, including the widest program on this field in the whole country. This program has been producing acoustics specialists ever since. Nowadays many universities and superior education institutions around the country are teaching students at the B.Sc. level and postgraduate level many topics related to acoustics, such as Architectural Acoustics, Seismology, Mechanical Vibrations, Noise Control, Audio, Audiology, Music, etc. Also many institutions have started research programs in related fields, with participation of medical doctors, psychologists, musicians, engineers, etc. Details will be given on particular topics and development.

  8. Acoustic Imaging of Combustion Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramohalli, K. N.; Seshan, P. K.

    1984-01-01

    Elliposidal acoustic mirror used to measure sound emitted at discrete points in burning turbulent jets. Mirror deemphasizes sources close to target source and excludes sources far from target. At acoustic frequency of 20 kHz, mirror resolves sound from region 1.25 cm wide. Currently used by NASA for research on jet flames. Produces clearly identifiable and measurable variation of acoustic spectral intensities along length of flame. Utilized in variety of monitoring or control systems involving flames or other reacting flows.

  9. Musical Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gough, Colin

    This chapter provides an introduction to the physical and psycho-acoustic principles underlying the production and perception of the sounds of musical instruments. The first section introduces generic aspects of musical acoustics and the perception of musical sounds, followed by separate sections on string, wind and percussion instruments.

  10. Education in acoustics in Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyara, Federico

    2002-11-01

    Over the last decades, education in acoustics (EA) in Argentina has experienced ups and downs due to economic and political issues interfering with long term projects. Unlike other countries, like Chile, where EA has reached maturity in spite of the acoustical industry having shown little development, Argentina has several well-established manufacturers of acoustic materials and equipment but no specific career with a major in acoustics. At the university level, acoustics is taught as a complementary--often elective--course for careers such as architecture, communication engineering, or music. In spite of this there are several research centers with programs covering environmental and community noise, effects of noise on man, acoustic signal processing, musical acoustics and acoustic emission, and several national and international meetings are held each year in which results are communicated and discussed. Several books on a variety of topics such as sound system, architectural acoustics, and noise control have been published as well. Another chapter in EA is technical and vocational education, ranging between secondary and postsecondary levels, with technical training on sound system operation or design. Over the last years there have been several attempts to implement master degrees in acoustics or audio engineering, with little or no success.

  11. Control of deviations and prediction of surface roughness from micro machining of THz waveguides using acoustic emission signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, James M.; Diaz, Fernanda; Geerling, Edgar; Clasing, Matias; Ponce, Vicente; Taylor, Chris; Turner, Sam; Michael, Ernest A.; Patricio Mena, F.; Bronfman, Leonardo

    2017-02-01

    By using acoustic emission (AE) it is possible to control deviations and surface quality during micro milling operations. The method of micro milling is used to manufacture a submillimetre waveguide where micro machining is employed to achieve the required superior finish and geometrical tolerances. Submillimetre waveguide technology is used in deep space signal retrieval where highest detection efficiencies are needed and therefore every possible signal loss in the receiver has to be avoided and stringent tolerances achieved. With a sub-standard surface finish the signals travelling along the waveguides dissipate away faster than with perfect surfaces where the residual roughness becomes comparable with the electromagnetic skin depth. Therefore, the higher the radio frequency the more critical this becomes. The method of time-frequency analysis (STFT) is used to transfer raw AE into more meaningful salient signal features (SF). This information was then correlated against the measured geometrical deviations and, the onset of catastrophic tool wear. Such deviations can be offset from different AE signals (different deviations from subsequent tests) and feedback for a final spring cut ensuring the geometrical accuracies are met. Geometrical differences can impact on the required transfer of AE signals (change in cut off frequencies and diminished SNR at the interface) and therefore errors have to be minimised to within 1 μm. Rules based on both Classification and Regression Trees (CART) and Neural Networks (NN) were used to implement a simulation displaying how such a control regime could be used as a real time controller, be it corrective measures (via spring cuts) over several initial machining passes or, with a micron cut introducing a level plain measure for allowing setup corrective measures (similar to a spirit level).

  12. Control of low-frequency noise for piping systems via the design of coupled band gap of acoustic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yanfei; Shen, Huijie; Zhang, Linke; Su, Yongsheng; Yu, Dianlong

    2016-07-01

    Acoustic wave propagation and sound transmission in a metamaterial-based piping system with Helmholtz resonator (HR) attached periodically are studied. A transfer matrix method is developed to conduct the investigation. Calculational results show that the introduction of periodic HRs in the piping system could generate a band gap (BG) near the resonant frequency of the HR, such that the bandwidth and the attenuation effect of HR improved notably. Bragg type gaps are also exist in the system due to the systematic periodicity. By plotting the BG as functions of HR parameters, the effect of resonator parameters on the BG behavior, including bandwidth, location and attenuation performance, etc., is examined. It is found that Bragg-type gap would interplay with the resonant-type gap under some special situations, thereby giving rise to a super-wide coupled gap. Further, explicit formulation for BG exact coupling is extracted and some key parameters on modulating the width and the attenuation coefficient of coupled gaps are investigated. The coupled gap can be located to any frequency range as one concerned, thus rendering the low-frequency noise control feasible in a broad band range.

  13. Acoustic emission sensor system using a chirped fiber-Bragg-grating Fabry-Perot interferometer and smart feedback control.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qi; Zhu, Yupeng; Luo, Xiangyu; Liu, Guigen; Han, Ming

    2017-02-01

    We demonstrate a fiber-optic acoustic emission (AE) sensor system that is capable of performing AE detection, even when the sensor is experiencing large quasi-static strains. The sensor is a Fabry-Perot interferometer formed by cascaded chirped fiber-Bragg gratings (CFBGs). The reflection spectrum of the sensor features a number of narrow spectral notches equally spaced within the reflection bandwidth of the CFBG. A semiconductor laser whose wavelength can be fast tuned through current injection is used to lock the laser line to the center of a slope of a spectral notch. When the notch is knocked out of the tuning range of the laser, a neighboring notch moves into the range. Through a smart feedback control scheme, the laser is unlocked from the current spectral lock and relocked to the desired point of the new notch. The fast speed of the unlocking/relocking process (<1  ms) ensures that the AE signal is monitored without significant disruption.

  14. Reflective echo tomographic imaging using acoustic beams

    SciTech Connect

    Kisner, Roger; Santos-Villalobos, Hector J

    2014-11-25

    An inspection system includes a plurality of acoustic beamformers, where each of the plurality of acoustic beamformers including a plurality of acoustic transmitter elements. The system also includes at least one controller configured for causing each of the plurality of acoustic beamformers to generate an acoustic beam directed to a point in a volume of interest during a first time. Based on a reflected wave intensity detected at a plurality of acoustic receiver elements, an image of the volume of interest can be generated.

  15. Active Control of Fan Noise: Feasibility Study. Volume 5; Numerical Computation of Acoustic Mode Reflection Coefficients for an Unflanged Cylindrical Duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraft, R. E.

    1996-01-01

    A computational method to predict modal reflection coefficients in cylindrical ducts has been developed based on the work of Homicz, Lordi, and Rehm, which uses the Wiener-Hopf method to account for the boundary conditions at the termination of a thin cylindrical pipe. The purpose of this study is to develop a computational routine to predict the reflection coefficients of higher order acoustic modes impinging on the unflanged termination of a cylindrical duct. This effort was conducted wider Task Order 5 of the NASA Lewis LET Program, Active Noise Control of aircraft Engines: Feasibility Study, and will be used as part of the development of an integrated source noise, acoustic propagation, ANC actuator coupling, and control system algorithm simulation. The reflection coefficient prediction will be incorporated into an existing cylindrical duct modal analysis to account for the reflection of modes from the duct termination. This will provide a more accurate, rapid computation design tool for evaluating the effect of reflected waves on active noise control systems mounted in the duct, as well as providing a tool for the design of acoustic treatment in inlet ducts. As an active noise control system design tool, the method can be used preliminary to more accurate but more numerically intensive acoustic propagation models such as finite element methods. The resulting computer program has been shown to give reasonable results, some examples of which are presented. Reliable data to use for comparison is scarce, so complete checkout is difficult, and further checkout is needed over a wider range of system parameters. In future efforts the method will be adapted as a subroutine to the GEAE segmented cylindrical duct modal analysis program.

  16. A smart sensor system for trace organic vapor detection using a temperature-controlled array of surface acoustic wave vapor sensors, automated preconcentrator tubes, and pattern recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Grate, J.W.; Rose-Pehrsson, S.L.; Klusty, M.; Wohltjen, H.

    1993-05-01

    A smart sensor system for the detection, of toxic organophosphorus and toxic organosulfur vapors at trace concentrations has been designed, fabricated, and tested against a wide variety of vapor challenges. The key features of the system are: An array of four surface acoustic wave (SAW) vapor sensors, temperature control of the vapor sensors, the use of pattern recognition to analyze the sensor data, and an automated sampling system including thermally-desorbed preconcentrator tubes (PCTs).

  17. Hydrodynamic Controls on Acoustical and Optical Water Properties in Tropical Reefs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-30

    1999: Climate change, coral bleaching and the future of the world’s coral reefs. Mar. Freshw. Res., 50, 839-866. McKee and Cunningham, 2005. Evidence...hydrodynamic controls across different reef environments? Tropical coral health can be significantly affected by sedimentation that can limit light...availability, impact recruitment and bury coral colonies. The ongoing work will improve understanding of the dynamical processes that affect variability

  18. An Experimental Investigation of the Acoustic and Fluid Dynamic Characteristics of a Circulation-Controlled Airfoil

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-13

    sound production from a hydrofoil and identified three mechanisms: (1) low frequency curvature noise associated with interaction of a turbulent...2002). 2 Technical Approach A two-dimensional, dual-slotted, elliptic circulation control airfoil based on the hydrofoil studied by Rogers...airfoil, shown in Figure 1A, is designed based on the geometry of the hydrofoil previously studied by Rogers & Donnelly (2004). The airfoil’s profile

  19. Acoustic Evaluation and Recommended Controls for Runway Supervisory Units, Laughlin AFB, Texas.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-02-01

    corporate division, school, laboratory. etc., of the author. List city, state, and ZIP Code. lok. 0l Program ilement, Project, Task Area, and Work Unit...Specialty Composites Corporation Delaware Industrial Park Newark DE 19713 (302)738-6800 d. Noise Control Division of Canada Metal Company, Ltd. 721...bc! found at the time the systems were prepared for use in the field. Summarg This memo describes a ground commnications headset modification that will

  20. Hydrodynamic Controls on Acoustical and Optical Water Properties in Tropical Reefs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    the dominant hydrodynamic controls across different reef environments? Tropical coral health can be significantly affected by sedimentation that can...collaborative field work by the PIs, carried out in collaboration with UCSD SIO (PI: Terrill) and the Coral Reef Research Foundation in Koror (PI...bed stress in coral reef environments, using observations from Oahu, Palau and Guam. The project is providing partial support for a postdoctoral

  1. Analysis of a micro-scale pump which uses controlled acoustic streaming for fluid locomotion

    SciTech Connect

    Dohner, J.L.

    1998-01-01

    In this report the analysis of a micro-scale pump is described. This micro-pump uses active control to produce a distributed body force in a fluid micro-channel. The desired effect of this body force is to drive fluid through the channel. Limitations, assumptions, and design parameters are discussed. The mathematical analysis of pump dynamics is explained in detail. A perturbation analysis is used on the equations of mass, momentum and state to produce equations of motion for first and second order effects. The first order effects are described by linear wave motion in the fluid and are found by using integral equation methods. The second order effects are driven by body forces resulting from first order effects. Thus, by controlling the production of wave motion in the channel, second order excitation can also be controlled. This report is all theory and therefore needs experimental validation. Although many of the assumptions used in this report have been used elsewhere in the literature and have been found to be sufficient, there are many aspects of the problem which have been left unresolved. In particular, flow separation in the fluid channel is a critical problem. If the fluid does not separate, pumping will occur through the channel, however, if internal or external forces are not sufficient to stop separation, this type of pump will not function.

  2. Active Control of Fan Noise-Feasibility Study. Volume 2: Canceling Noise Source-Design of an Acoustic Plate Radiator Using Piezoceramic Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pla, F. G.; Rajiyah, H.

    1995-01-01

    The feasibility of using acoustic plate radiators powered by piezoceramic thin sheets as canceling sources for active control of aircraft engine fan noise is demonstrated. Analytical and numerical models of actuated beams and plates are developed and validated. An optimization study is performed to identify the optimum combination of design parameters that maximizes the plate volume velocity for a given resonance frequency. Fifteen plates with various plate and actuator sizes, thicknesses, and bonding layers were fabricated and tested using results from the optimization study. A maximum equivalent piston displacement of 0.39 mm was achieved with the optimized plate samples tested with only one actuator powered, corresponding to a plate deflection at the center of over 1 millimeter. This is very close to the deflection required for a full size engine application and represents a 160-fold improvement over previous work. Experimental results further show that performance is limited by the critical stress of the piezoceramic actuator and bonding layer rather than by the maximum moment available from the actuator. Design enhancements are described in detail that will lead to a flight-worthy acoustic plate radiator by minimizing actuator tensile stresses and reducing nonlinear effects. Finally, several adaptive tuning methods designed to increase the bandwidth of acoustic plate radiators are analyzed including passive, active, and semi-active approaches. The back chamber pressurization and volume variation methods are investigated experimentally and shown to be simple and effective ways to obtain substantial control over the resonance frequency of a plate radiator. This study shows that piezoceramic-based plate radiators can be a viable acoustic source for active control of aircraft engine fan noise.

  3. High temperature acoustic levitator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, M. B. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A system is described for acoustically levitating an object within a portion of a chamber that is heated to a high temperature, while a driver at the opposite end of the chamber is maintained at a relatively low temperature. The cold end of the chamber is constructed so it can be telescoped to vary the length (L sub 1) of the cold end portion and therefore of the entire chamber, so that the chamber remains resonant to a normal mode frequency, and so that the pressure at the hot end of the chamber is maximized. The precise length of the chamber at any given time, is maintained at an optimum resonant length by a feedback loop. The feedback loop includes an acoustic pressure sensor at the hot end of the chamber, which delivers its output to a control circuit which controls a motor that varies the length (L) of the chamber to a level where the sensed acoustic pressure is a maximum.

  4. Thin broadband noise absorption through acoustic reactance control by electro-mechanical coupling without sensor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yumin; Chan, Yum-Ji; Huang, Lixi

    2014-05-01

    Broadband noise with profound low-frequency profile is prevalent and difficult to be controlled mechanically. This study demonstrates effective broadband sound absorption by reducing the mechanical reactance of a loudspeaker using a shunt circuit through electro-mechanical coupling, which induces reactance with different signs from that of loudspeaker. An RLC shunt circuit is connected to the moving coil to provide an electrically induced mechanical impedance which counters the cavity stiffness at low frequencies and reduces the system inertia above the resonance frequency. A sound absorption coefficient well above 0.5 is demonstrated across frequencies between 150 and 1200 Hz. The performance of the proposed device is superior to existing passive absorbers of the same depth (60 mm), which has lower frequency limits of around 300 Hz. A passive noise absorber is further proposed by paralleling a micro-perforated panel with shunted loudspeaker which shows potentials in absorbing band-limit impulse noise.

  5. Room Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuttruff, Heinrich; Mommertz, Eckard

    The traditional task of room acoustics is to create or formulate conditions which ensure the best possible propagation of sound in a room from a sound source to a listener. Thus, objects of room acoustics are in particular assembly halls of all kinds, such as auditoria and lecture halls, conference rooms, theaters, concert halls or churches. Already at this point, it has to be pointed out that these conditions essentially depend on the question if speech or music should be transmitted; in the first case, the criterion for transmission quality is good speech intelligibility, in the other case, however, the success of room-acoustical efforts depends on other factors that cannot be quantified that easily, not least it also depends on the hearing habits of the listeners. In any case, absolutely "good acoustics" of a room do not exist.

  6. Correcting acoustic Doppler current profiler discharge measurement bias from moving-bed conditions without global positioning during the 2004 Glen Canyon Dam controlled flood on the Colorado River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gartner, J.W.; Ganju, N.K.

    2007-01-01

    Discharge measurements were made by acoustic Doppler current profiler at two locations on the Colorado River during the 2004 controlled flood from Glen Canyon Dam, Arizona. Measurement hardware and software have constantly improved from the 1980s such that discharge measurements by acoustic profiling instruments are now routinely made over a wide range of hydrologic conditions. However, measurements made with instruments deployed from moving boats require reliable boat velocity data for accurate measurements of discharge. This is normally accomplished by using special acoustic bottom track pings that sense instrument motion over bottom. While this method is suitable for most conditions, high current flows that produce downstream bed sediment movement create a condition known as moving bed that will bias velocities and discharge to lower than actual values. When this situation exists, one solution is to determine boat velocity with satellite positioning information. Another solution is to use a lower frequency instrument. Discharge measurements made during the 2004 Glen Canyon controlled flood were subject to moving-bed conditions and frequent loss of bottom track. Due to site conditions and equipment availability, the measurements were conducted without benefit of external positioning information or lower frequency instruments. This paper documents and evaluates several techniques used to correct the resulting underestimated discharge measurements. One technique produces discharge values in good agreement with estimates from numerical model and measured hydrographs during the flood. ?? 2007, by the American Society of Limnology and Oceanography, Inc.

  7. Controlled exploration of the effects of conductive hearing loss on wideband acoustic immittance in human cadaveric preparations.

    PubMed

    Merchant, Gabrielle R; Merchant, Saumil N; Rosowski, John J; Nakajima, Hideko Heidi

    2016-11-01

    Current clinical practice cannot distinguish, with any degree of certainty, the multiple pathologies that produce conductive hearing loss in patients with an intact tympanic membrane and a well-aerated middle ear without exploratory surgery. The lack of an effective non-surgical diagnostic procedure leads to unnecessary surgery and limits the accuracy of information available during pre-surgical consultations with the patient. A non-invasive measurement to determine the pathology responsible for a conductive hearing loss prior to surgery would be of great value. This work investigates the utility of wideband acoustic immittance (WAI), a non-invasive measure of middle-ear mobility, in the differential diagnosis of pathologies responsible for conductive hearing loss. We focus on determining whether power reflectance (PR), a derivative of WAI, is a possible solution to this problem. PR is a measure of the fraction of sound power reflected from the middle ear when a sound stimulus is presented to the ear canal. PR and other metrics of middle-ear performance (such as ossicular motion via laser Doppler vibrometry) were measured in well-controlled human temporal bone preparations with simulated pathologies. We report measurements before and after simulation of stapes fixation (n = 8), malleus fixation (n = 10), ossicular disarticulation (n = 10), and superior canal dehiscence (n = 8). Our results are consistent with the small set of previously published reflectance measurements made in temporal bones and patients. In this present study, these temporal bone experiments with different middle- and inner-ear pathologies were compared to the initial normal state by analyzing both WAI and ossicular motion, demonstrating that WAI can be a valuable tool in the diagnosis of conductive hearing loss.

  8. Acoustic emission intrusion detector

    DOEpatents

    Carver, Donald W.; Whittaker, Jerry W.

    1980-01-01

    An intrusion detector is provided for detecting a forcible entry into a secured structure while minimizing false alarms. The detector uses a piezoelectric crystal transducer to sense acoustic emissions. The transducer output is amplified by a selectable gain amplifier to control the sensitivity. The rectified output of the amplifier is applied to a Schmitt trigger circuit having a preselected threshold level to provide amplitude discrimination. Timing circuitry is provided which is activated by successive pulses from the Schmitt trigger which lie within a selected time frame for frequency discrimination. Detected signals having proper amplitude and frequency trigger an alarm within the first complete cycle time of a detected acoustical disturbance signal.

  9. Acoustic tests on a new motor generator system for the minuteman launch control centers in Hill engineering test facilities 1 and 2, Hill AFB, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairman, Terry M.

    1989-04-01

    Post critical design review acoustic tests were performed in Hill Engineering Test Facilities 1 and 2 (HETF) on a proposed new motor generator system for the Minuteman Launch Control Centers (LCC). A performance noise criteria equivalent to a preferred noise criterion (PNC-50) curve was established as the standard by which to judge the effectiveness of the new motor generator. Measurements were obtained at both the commander's console and the deputy commander's console. Results indicated the noise from the motor generator as configured in HETF 1 (the small LCC) exceeded the PNC-50 criteria primarily in the 63 hertz (Hz) octave band by 10 decibels (dB) when operated in both the ac and dc modes. The motor generator as configured in HETF 2 (the large LCC) exceeded the PNC-50 criteria by 3 dB in the 125 Hz octave band only at the deputy commander's console when operated in the ac mode. Acoustic intensity measurements were obtained to isolate specific noise sources and determine the transmission loss of the floor panels. Vibration measurements were also made on and near the motor generator to determine paths of structure-borne vibration energy. Specific recommendations for improving the acoustic environment in the LCC's are presented.

  10. Bill Lang's contributions to acoustics at International Business Machines Corporation (IBM), signal processing, international standards, and professionalism in noise control engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maling, George C.

    2005-09-01

    Bill Lang joined IBM in the late 1950s with a mandate from Thomas Watson Jr. himself to establish an acoustics program at IBM. Bill created the facilities in Poughkeepsie, developed the local program, and was the leader in having other IBM locations with development and manufacturing responsibilities construct facilities and hire staff under the Interdivisional Liaison Program. He also directed IBMs acoustics technology program. In the mid-1960s, he led an IEEE standards group in Audio and Electroacoustics, and, with the help of James Cooley, Peter Welch, and others, introduced the fast Fourier transform to the acoustics community. He was the convenor of ISO TC 43 SC1 WG6 that began writing the 3740 series of standards in the 1970s. It was his suggestion to promote professionalism in noise control engineering, and, through meetings with Leo Beranek and others, led the founding of INCE/USA in 1971. He was also a leader of the team that founded International INCE in 1974, and he served as president from 1988 until 1999.

  11. Acoustic biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Fogel, Ronen; Seshia, Ashwin A.

    2016-01-01

    Resonant and acoustic wave devices have been researched for several decades for application in the gravimetric sensing of a variety of biological and chemical analytes. These devices operate by coupling the measurand (e.g. analyte adsorption) as a modulation in the physical properties of the acoustic wave (e.g. resonant frequency, acoustic velocity, dissipation) that can then be correlated with the amount of adsorbed analyte. These devices can also be miniaturized with advantages in terms of cost, size and scalability, as well as potential additional features including integration with microfluidics and electronics, scaled sensitivities associated with smaller dimensions and higher operational frequencies, the ability to multiplex detection across arrays of hundreds of devices embedded in a single chip, increased throughput and the ability to interrogate a wider range of modes including within the same device. Additionally, device fabrication is often compatible with semiconductor volume batch manufacturing techniques enabling cost scalability and a high degree of precision and reproducibility in the manufacturing process. Integration with microfluidics handling also enables suitable sample pre-processing/separation/purification/amplification steps that could improve selectivity and the overall signal-to-noise ratio. Three device types are reviewed here: (i) bulk acoustic wave sensors, (ii) surface acoustic wave sensors, and (iii) micro/nano-electromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS) sensors. PMID:27365040

  12. Acoustic biosensors.

    PubMed

    Fogel, Ronen; Limson, Janice; Seshia, Ashwin A

    2016-06-30

    Resonant and acoustic wave devices have been researched for several decades for application in the gravimetric sensing of a variety of biological and chemical analytes. These devices operate by coupling the measurand (e.g. analyte adsorption) as a modulation in the physical properties of the acoustic wave (e.g. resonant frequency, acoustic velocity, dissipation) that can then be correlated with the amount of adsorbed analyte. These devices can also be miniaturized with advantages in terms of cost, size and scalability, as well as potential additional features including integration with microfluidics and electronics, scaled sensitivities associated with smaller dimensions and higher operational frequencies, the ability to multiplex detection across arrays of hundreds of devices embedded in a single chip, increased throughput and the ability to interrogate a wider range of modes including within the same device. Additionally, device fabrication is often compatible with semiconductor volume batch manufacturing techniques enabling cost scalability and a high degree of precision and reproducibility in the manufacturing process. Integration with microfluidics handling also enables suitable sample pre-processing/separation/purification/amplification steps that could improve selectivity and the overall signal-to-noise ratio. Three device types are reviewed here: (i) bulk acoustic wave sensors, (ii) surface acoustic wave sensors, and (iii) micro/nano-electromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS) sensors.

  13. Reverberant Acoustic Testing and Direct Field Acoustic Testing Acoustic Standing Waves and their Impact on Structural Responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R.; Doty, Benjamin; Chang, Zensheu

    2012-01-01

    The aerospace industry has been using two methods of acoustic testing to qualify flight hardware: (1) Reverberant Acoustic Test (RAT), (2) Direct Field Acoustic Test (DFAT). The acoustic field obtained by RAT is generally understood and assumed to be diffuse, expect below Schroeder cut-of frequencies. DFAT method of testing has some distinct advantages over RAT, however the acoustic field characteristics can be strongly affected by test setup such as the speaker layouts, number and location of control microphones and control schemes. In this paper the following are discussed based on DEMO tests performed at APL and JPL: (1) Acoustic wave interference patterns and acoustic standing waves, (2) The structural responses in RAT and DFAT.

  14. Nonlinear Acoustics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-02-14

    Wester- velt. [60] Streaming. In 1831, Michael Faraday [61] noted that currents of air were set up in the neighborhood of vibrating plates-the first... ducei in the case of a paramettc amy (from Berktay an Leahy 141). C’ "". k•, SEC 10.1 NONLINEAR ACOUSTICS 345 The principal results of their analysis

  15. Pooled analysis of case-control studies on acoustic neuroma diagnosed 1997-2003 and 2007-2009 and use of mobile and cordless phones.

    PubMed

    Hardell, Lennart; Carlberg, Michael; Söderqvist, Fredrik; Mild, Kjell Hansson

    2013-10-01

    We previously conducted a case-control study of acoustic neuroma. Subjects of both genders aged 20-80 years, diagnosed during 1997-2003 in parts of Sweden, were included, and the results were published. We have since made a further study for the time period 2007-2009 including both men and women aged 18-75 years selected from throughout the country. These new results for acoustic neuroma have not been published to date. Similar methods were used for both study periods. In each, one population-based control, matched on gender and age (within five years), was identified from the Swedish Population Registry. Exposures were assessed by a self-administered questionnaire supplemented by a phone interview. Since the number of acoustic neuroma cases in the new study was low we now present pooled results from both study periods based on 316 participating cases and 3,530 controls. Unconditional logistic regression analysis was performed, adjusting for age, gender, year of diagnosis and socio-economic index (SEI). Use of mobile phones of the analogue type gave odds ratio (OR) = 2.9, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 2.0-4.3, increasing with >20 years latency (time since first exposure) to OR = 7.7, 95% CI = 2.8-21. Digital 2G mobile phone use gave OR = 1.5, 95% CI = 1.1-2.1, increasing with latency >15 years to an OR = 1.8, 95% CI = 0.8-4.2. The results for cordless phone use were OR = 1.5, 95% CI = 1.1-2.1, and, for latency of >20 years, OR = 6.5, 95% CI = 1.7-26. Digital type wireless phones (2G and 3G mobile phones and cordless phones) gave OR = 1.5, 95% CI = 1.1-2.0 increasing to OR = 8.1, 95% CI = 2.0-32 with latency >20 years. For total wireless phone use, the highest risk was calculated for the longest latency time >20 years: OR = 4.4, 95% CI = 2.2-9.0. Several of the calculations in the long latency category were based on low numbers of exposed cases. Ipsilateral use resulted in a higher risk than contralateral for both mobile and cordless phones. OR increased per 100 h

  16. Acoustic transducer for acoustic microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T.; Chou, Ching H.

    1990-01-01

    A shear acoustic transducer-lens system in which a shear polarized piezoelectric material excites shear polarized waves at one end of a buffer rod having a lens at the other end which excites longitudinal waves in a coupling medium by mode conversion at selected locations on the lens.

  17. Acoustic transducer for acoustic microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Khuri-Yakub, B.T.; Chou, C.H.

    1990-03-20

    A shear acoustic transducer-lens system is described in which a shear polarized piezoelectric material excites shear polarized waves at one end of a buffer rod having a lens at the other end which excites longitudinal waves in a coupling medium by mode conversion at selected locations on the lens. 9 figs.

  18. Holograms for acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melde, Kai; Mark, Andrew G.; Qiu, Tian; Fischer, Peer

    2016-09-01

    Holographic techniques are fundamental to applications such as volumetric displays, high-density data storage and optical tweezers that require spatial control of intricate optical or acoustic fields within a three-dimensional volume. The basis of holography is spatial storage of the phase and/or amplitude profile of the desired wavefront in a manner that allows that wavefront to be reconstructed by interference when the hologram is illuminated with a suitable coherent source. Modern computer-generated holography skips the process of recording a hologram from a physical scene, and instead calculates the required phase profile before rendering it for reconstruction. In ultrasound applications, the phase profile is typically generated by discrete and independently driven ultrasound sources; however, these can only be used in small numbers, which limits the complexity or degrees of freedom that can be attained in the wavefront. Here we introduce monolithic acoustic holograms, which can reconstruct diffraction-limited acoustic pressure fields and thus arbitrary ultrasound beams. We use rapid fabrication to craft the holograms and achieve reconstruction degrees of freedom two orders of magnitude higher than commercial phased array sources. The technique is inexpensive, appropriate for both transmission and reflection elements, and scales well to higher information content, larger aperture size and higher power. The complex three-dimensional pressure and phase distributions produced by these acoustic holograms allow us to demonstrate new approaches to controlled ultrasonic manipulation of solids in water, and of liquids and solids in air. We expect that acoustic holograms will enable new capabilities in beam-steering and the contactless transfer of power, improve medical imaging, and drive new applications of ultrasound.

  19. Acoustic Transduction Materials and Devices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-01-01

    are to Cymbal and Tonpilz transducer arrays for 3 - 50 kHz sonars, thin/thick film transducers for 10 - 100 MHz medical acoustic devices...Cymbal arrayed projectors, PMN Tonpilz tunable transducers , thin/thick film micro- Tonpilz transducers and controlling electronics. The Center for...emphasis is shifting to the acoustic vector sensor. Film transducers The goal is to use the tonpilz design to facilitate development of high

  20. Acoustic chaos

    SciTech Connect

    Lauterborn, W.; Parlitz, U.; Holzfuss, J.; Billo, A.; Akhatov, I.

    1996-06-01

    Acoustic cavitation, a complex, spatio-temporal dynamical system, is investigated with respect to its chaotic properties. The sound output, the {open_quote}{open_quote}noise{close_quote}{close_quote}, is subjected to time series analysis. The spatial dynamics of the bubble filaments is captured by high speed holographic cinematography and subsequent digital picture processing from the holograms. Theoretical models are put forward for describing the pattern formation. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  1. Medical Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beach, Kirk W.; Dunmire, Barbrina

    Medical acoustics can be subdivided into diagnostics and therapy. Diagnostics are further separated into auditory and ultrasonic methods, and both employ low amplitudes. Therapy (excluding medical advice) uses ultrasound for heating, cooking, permeablizing, activating and fracturing tissues and structures within the body, usually at much higher amplitudes than in diagnostics. Because ultrasound is a wave, linear wave physics are generally applicable, but recently nonlinear effects have become more important, even in low-intensity diagnostic applications.

  2. Acoustic-phonon-assisted quantum control of qubit states near the Si/SiO2 interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gou, Bing-Ping; Zhao, Peiji; Kong, Xiao-Jun

    2013-10-01

    The waiting time between load/initialization and readout of electron spin qubit is related to electron tunneling between the donor and Si/SiO2 interface. Impacts of energy valley interference in silicon, lattice temperature, and screening of metallic gate on the waiting time associated with acoustic-phonon-assisted electron tunneling have been investigated. The results show that interface valley-orbit coupling causes its oscillation with donor depth and the influence of gate screening is significant when the SiO2 thickness is smaller than 10 nm. Moreover, the influences of these factors are strongest at critical electric field.

  3. Acoustic dose and acoustic dose-rate.

    PubMed

    Duck, Francis

    2009-10-01

    Acoustic dose is defined as the energy deposited by absorption of an acoustic wave per unit mass of the medium supporting the wave. Expressions for acoustic dose and acoustic dose-rate are given for plane-wave conditions, including temporal and frequency dependencies of energy deposition. The relationship between the acoustic dose-rate and the resulting temperature increase is explored, as is the relationship between acoustic dose-rate and radiation force. Energy transfer from the wave to the medium by means of acoustic cavitation is considered, and an approach is proposed in principle that could allow cavitation to be included within the proposed definitions of acoustic dose and acoustic dose-rate.

  4. Acoustic transistor: Amplification and switch of sound by sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Bin; Kan, Wei-wei; Zou, Xin-ye; Yin, Lei-lei; Cheng, Jian-chun

    2014-08-01

    We designed an acoustic transistor to manipulate sound in a manner similar to the manipulation of electric current by its electrical counterpart. The acoustic transistor is a three-terminal device with the essential ability to use a small monochromatic acoustic signal to control a much larger output signal within a broad frequency range. The output and controlling signals have the same frequency, suggesting the possibility of cascading the structure to amplify an acoustic signal. Capable of amplifying and switching sound by sound, acoustic transistors have various potential applications and may open the way to the design of conceptual devices such as acoustic logic gates.

  5. Controlled and in situ target strengths of the jumbo squid Dosidicus gigas and identification of potential acoustic scattering sources.

    PubMed

    Benoit-Bird, Kelly J; Gilly, William F; Au, Whitlow W L; Mate, Bruce

    2008-03-01

    This study presents the first target strength measurements of Dosidicus gigas, a large squid that is a key predator, a significant prey, and the target of an important fishery. Target strength of live, tethered squid was related to mantle length with values standardized to the length squared of -62.0, -67.4, -67.9, and -67.6 dB at 38, 70, 120, and 200 kHz, respectively. There were relatively small differences in target strength between dorsal and anterior aspects and none between live and freshly dead squid. Potential scattering mechanisms in squid have been long debated. Here, the reproductive organs had little effect on squid target strength. These data support the hypothesis that the pen may be an important source of squid acoustic scattering. The beak, eyes, and arms, probably via the sucker rings, also play a role in acoustic scattering though their effects were small and frequency specific. An unexpected source of scattering was the cranium of the squid which provided a target strength nearly as high as that of the entire squid though the mechanism remains unclear. Our in situ measurements of the target strength of free-swimming squid support the use of the values presented here in D. gigas assessment studies.

  6. Acoustic Tooth Cleaner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, J. S.

    1984-01-01

    Acoustically-energized water jet aids in plaque breakdown. Acoustic Wand includes acoustic transducer 1/4 wave plate, and tapered cone. Together elements energize solution of water containing mild abrasive injected into mouth to help prevent calculous buildup.

  7. Wireless Acoustic Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Paul D.; Dorland, Wade D.

    2005-01-01

    A prototype wireless acoustic measurement system (WAMS) is one of two main subsystems of the Acoustic Prediction/Measurement Tool, which comprises software, acoustic instrumentation, and electronic hardware combined to afford integrated capabilities for predicting and measuring noise emitted by rocket and jet engines. The other main subsystem is described in "Predicting Rocket or Jet Noise in Real Time" (SSC-00215-1), which appears elsewhere in this issue of NASA Tech Briefs. The WAMS includes analog acoustic measurement instrumentation and analog and digital electronic circuitry combined with computer wireless local-area networking to enable (1) measurement of sound-pressure levels at multiple locations in the sound field of an engine under test and (2) recording and processing of the measurement data. At each field location, the measurements are taken by a portable unit, denoted a field station. There are ten field stations, each of which can take two channels of measurements. Each field station is equipped with two instrumentation microphones, a micro-ATX computer, a wireless network adapter, an environmental enclosure, a directional radio antenna, and a battery power supply. The environmental enclosure shields the computer from weather and from extreme acoustically induced vibrations. The power supply is based on a marine-service lead-acid storage battery that has enough capacity to support operation for as long as 10 hours. A desktop computer serves as a control server for the WAMS. The server is connected to a wireless router for communication with the field stations via a wireless local-area network that complies with wireless-network standard 802.11b of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. The router and the wireless network adapters are controlled by use of Linux-compatible driver software. The server runs custom Linux software for synchronizing the recording of measurement data in the field stations. The software includes a module that

  8. Wireless Acoustic Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Paul D.; Dorland, Wade D.; Jolly, Ronald L.

    2007-01-01

    A prototype wireless acoustic measurement system (WAMS) is one of two main subsystems of the Acoustic Prediction/ Measurement Tool, which comprises software, acoustic instrumentation, and electronic hardware combined to afford integrated capabilities for predicting and measuring noise emitted by rocket and jet engines. The other main subsystem is described in the article on page 8. The WAMS includes analog acoustic measurement instrumentation and analog and digital electronic circuitry combined with computer wireless local-area networking to enable (1) measurement of sound-pressure levels at multiple locations in the sound field of an engine under test and (2) recording and processing of the measurement data. At each field location, the measurements are taken by a portable unit, denoted a field station. There are ten field stations, each of which can take two channels of measurements. Each field station is equipped with two instrumentation microphones, a micro- ATX computer, a wireless network adapter, an environmental enclosure, a directional radio antenna, and a battery power supply. The environmental enclosure shields the computer from weather and from extreme acoustically induced vibrations. The power supply is based on a marine-service lead-acid storage battery that has enough capacity to support operation for as long as 10 hours. A desktop computer serves as a control server for the WAMS. The server is connected to a wireless router for communication with the field stations via a wireless local-area network that complies with wireless-network standard 802.11b of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. The router and the wireless network adapters are controlled by use of Linux-compatible driver software. The server runs custom Linux software for synchronizing the recording of measurement data in the field stations. The software includes a module that provides an intuitive graphical user interface through which an operator at the control server

  9. Structural Acoustics and Vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaigne, Antoine

    This structural chapter is devoted to vibrations of structures and to their coupling with the acoustic field. Depending on the context, the radiated sound can be judged as desirable, as is mostly the case for musical instruments, or undesirable, like noise generated by machinery. In architectural acoustics, one main goal is to limit the transmission of sound through walls. In the automobile industry, the engineers have to control the noise generated inside and outside the passenger compartment. This can be achieved by means of passive or active damping. In general, there is a strong need for quieter products and better sound quality generated by the structures in our daily environment.

  10. A Martian acoustic anemometer.

    PubMed

    Banfield, Don; Schindel, David W; Tarr, Steve; Dissly, Richard W

    2016-08-01

    An acoustic anemometer for use on Mars has been developed. To understand the processes that control the interaction between surface and atmosphere on Mars, not only the mean winds, but also the turbulent boundary layer, the fluxes of momentum, heat and molecular constituents between surface and atmosphere must be measured. Terrestrially this is done with acoustic anemometers, but the low density atmosphere on Mars makes it challenging to adapt such an instrument for use on Mars. This has been achieved using capacitive transducers and pulse compression, and was successfully demonstrated on a stratospheric balloon (simulating the Martian environment) and in a dedicated Mars Wind Tunnel facility. This instrument achieves a measurement accuracy of ∼5 cm/s with an update rate of >20 Hz under Martian conditions.

  11. Acoustic methodology review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, R. G.

    1982-01-01

    It is important for industry and NASA to assess the status of acoustic design technology for predicting and controlling helicopter external noise in order for a meaningful research program to be formulated which will address this problem. The prediction methodologies available to the designer and the acoustic engineer are three-fold. First is what has been described as a first principle analysis. This analysis approach attempts to remove any empiricism from the analysis process and deals with a theoretical mechanism approach to predicting the noise. The second approach attempts to combine first principle methodology (when available) with empirical data to formulate source predictors which can be combined to predict vehicle levels. The third is an empirical analysis, which attempts to generalize measured trends into a vehicle noise prediction method. This paper will briefly address each.

  12. Acoustic iridescence.

    PubMed

    Cox, Trevor J

    2011-03-01

    An investigation has been undertaken into acoustic iridescence, exploring how a device can be constructed which alter sound waves, in a similar way to structures in nature that act on light to produce optical iridescence. The main construction had many thin perforated sheets spaced half a wavelength apart for a specified design frequency. The sheets create the necessary impedance discontinuities to create backscattered waves, which then interfere to create strongly reflected sound at certain frequencies. Predictions and measurements show a set of harmonics, evenly spaced in frequency, for which sound is reflected strongly. And the frequency of these harmonics increases as the angle of observation gets larger, mimicking the iridescence seen in natural optical systems. Similar to optical systems, the reflections become weaker for oblique angles of reflection. A second construction was briefly examined which exploited a metamaterial made from elements and inclusions which were much smaller than the wavelength. Boundary element method predictions confirmed the potential for creating acoustic iridescence from layers of such a material.

  13. Acoustic transducer

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, D.S.

    1997-12-30

    An acoustic transducer is described comprising a one-piece hollow mandrel into the outer surface of which is formed a recess with sides perpendicular to the central axis of the mandrel and separated by a first distance and with a bottom parallel to the central axis and within which recess are a plurality of washer-shaped discs of a piezoelectric material and at least one disc of a temperature-compensating material with the discs being captured between the sides of the recess in a pre-stressed interference fit, typically at 2,000 psi of compressive stress. The transducer also includes a power supply and means to connect to a measurement device. The transducer is intended to be used for telemetry between a measurement device located downhole in an oil or gas well and the surface. The transducer is of an construction that is stronger with fewer joints that could leak fluids into the recess holding the piezoelectric elements than is found in previous acoustic transducers. 4 figs.

  14. Acoustic transducer

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, Douglas S.

    1997-01-01

    An acoustic transducer comprising a one-piece hollow mandrel into the outer surface of which is formed a recess with sides perpendicular to the central axis of the mandrel and separated by a first distance and with a bottom parallel to the central axis and within which recess are a plurality of washer-shaped discs of a piezoelectric material and at least one disc of a temperature-compensating material with the discs being captured between the sides of the recess in a pre-stressed interference fit, typically at 2000 psi of compressive stress. The transducer also includes a power supply and means to connect to a measurement device. The transducer is intended to be used for telemetry between a measurement device located downhole in an oil or gas well and the surface. The transducer is of an construction that is stronger with fewer joints that could leak fluids into the recess holding the piezoelectric elements than is found in previous acoustic transducers.

  15. Opto-acoustic cell permeation

    SciTech Connect

    Visuri, S R; Heredia, N

    2000-03-09

    Optically generated acoustic waves have been used to temporarily permeate biological cells. This technique may be useful for enhancing transfection of DNA into cells or enhancing the absorption of locally delivered drugs. A diode-pumped frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser operating at kHz repetition rates was used to produce a series of acoustic pulses. An acoustic wave was formed via thermoelastic expansion by depositing laser radiation into an absorbing dye. Generated pressures were measured with a PVDF hydrophone. The acoustic waves were transmitted to cultured and plated cells. The cell media contained a selection of normally- impermeable fluorescent-labeled dextran dyes. Following treatment with the opto-acoustic technique, cellular incorporation of dyes, up to 40,000 Molecular Weight, was noted. Control cells that did not receive opto-acoustic treatment had unremarkable dye incorporation. Uptake of dye was quantified via fluorescent microscopic analysis. Trypan Blue membrane exclusion assays and fluorescent labeling assays confirmed the vitality of cells following treatment. This method of enhanced drug delivery has the potential to dramatically reduce required drug dosages and associated side effects and enable revolutionary therapies.

  16. Acoustic wave science realized by metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dongwoo; Nguyen, Duc Minh; Rho, Junsuk

    2017-01-01

    Artificially structured materials with unit cells at sub-wavelength scale, known as metamaterials, have been widely used to precisely control and manipulate waves thanks to their unconventional properties which cannot be found in nature. In fact, the field of acoustic metamaterials has been much developed over the past 15 years and still keeps developing. Here, we present a topical review of metamaterials in acoustic wave science. Particular attention is given to fundamental principles of acoustic metamaterials for realizing the extraordinary acoustic properties such as negative, near-zero and approaching-infinity parameters. Realization of acoustic cloaking phenomenon which is invisible from incident sound waves is also introduced by various approaches. Finally, acoustic lenses are discussed not only for sub-diffraction imaging but also for applications based on gradient index (GRIN) lens.

  17. Acoustic Analysis of Vowels Following Glossectomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitehill, Tara L.; Ciocca, Valter; Chan, Judy C-T.; Samman, Nabil

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the acoustic characteristics of vowels produced by speakers with partial glossectomy. Acoustic variables investigated included first formant (F1) frequency, second formant (F2) frequency, F1 range, F2 range and vowel space area. Data from the speakers with partial glossectomy were compared with age- and gender-matched controls.…

  18. ACOUSTIC FORMING FOR ENHANCED DEWATERING AND FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Cyrus K Aidun

    2007-11-30

    The next generation of forming elements based on acoustic excitation to increase drainage and enhances formation both with on-line control and profiling capabilities has been investigated in this project. The system can be designed and optimized based on the fundamental experimental and computational analysis and investigation of acoustic waves in a fiber suspension flow and interaction with the forming wire.

  19. Acoustic cryocooler

    DOEpatents

    Swift, Gregory W.; Martin, Richard A.; Radenbaugh, Ray

    1990-01-01

    An acoustic cryocooler with no moving parts is formed from a thermoacoustic driver (TAD) driving a pulse tube refrigerator (PTR) through a standing wave tube. Thermoacoustic elements in the TAD are spaced apart a distance effective to accommodate the increased thermal penetration length arising from the relatively low TAD operating frequency in the range of 15-60 Hz. At these low operating frequencies, a long tube is required to support the standing wave. The tube may be coiled to reduce the overall length of the cryocooler. One or two PTR's are located on the standing wave tube adjacent antinodes in the standing wave to be driven by the standing wave pressure oscillations. It is predicted that a heat input of 1000 W at 1000 K will maintian a cooling load of 5 W at 80 K.

  20. Acoustic transducer

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, Douglas S.

    2000-01-01

    An active acoustic transducer tool for use down-hole applications. The tool includes a single cylindrical mandrel including a shoulder defining the boundary of a narrowed portion over which is placed a sandwich-style piezoelectric tranducer assembly. The piezoelectric transducer assembly is prestressed by being placed in a thermal interference fit between the shoulder of the mandrel and the base of an anvil which is likewise positioned over the narrower portion of the mandrel. In the preferred embodiment, assembly of the tool is accomplished using a hydraulic jack to stretch the mandrel prior to emplacement of the cylindrical sandwich-style piezoelectric transducer assembly and anvil. After those elements are positioned and secured, the stretched mandrel is allowed to return substantially to its original (pre-stretch) dimensions with the result that the piezoelectric transducer elements are compressed between the anvil and the shoulder of the mandrel.

  1. Acoustic telemetry.

    SciTech Connect

    Drumheller, Douglas Schaeffer; Kuszmaul, Scott S.

    2003-08-01

    Broadcasting messages through the earth is a daunting task. Indeed, broadcasting a normal telephone conversion through the earth by wireless means is impossible with todays technology. Most of us don't care, but some do. Industries that drill into the earth need wireless communication to broadcast navigation parameters. This allows them to steer their drill bits. They also need information about the natural formation that they are drilling. Measurements of parameters such as pressure, temperature, and gamma radiation levels can tell them if they have found a valuable resource such as a geothermal reservoir or a stratum bearing natural gas. Wireless communication methods are available to the drilling industry. Information is broadcast via either pressure waves in the drilling fluid or electromagnetic waves in the earth and well tubing. Data transmission can only travel one way at rates around a few baud. Given that normal Internet telephone modems operate near 20,000 baud, these data rates are truly very slow. Moreover, communication is often interrupted or permanently blocked by drilling conditions or natural formation properties. Here we describe a tool that communicates with stress waves traveling through the steel drill pipe and production tubing in the well. It's based on an old idea called Acoustic Telemetry. But what we present here is more than an idea. This tool exists, it's drilled several wells, and it works. Currently, it's the first and only acoustic telemetry tool that can withstand the drilling environment. It broadcasts one way over a limited range at much faster rates than existing methods, but we also know how build a system that can communicate both up and down wells of indefinite length.

  2. Acoustic resonance for nonmetallic mine detection

    SciTech Connect

    Kercel, S.W.

    1998-04-01

    The feasibility of acoustic resonance for detection of plastic mines was investigated by researchers at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s Instrumentation and Controls Division under an internally funded program. The data reported in this paper suggest that acoustic resonance is not a practical method for mine detection. Representative small plastic anti-personnel mines were tested, and were found to not exhibit detectable acoustic resonances. Also, non-metal objects known to have strong acoustic resonances were tested with a variety of excitation techniques, and no practical non-contact method of exciting a consistently detectable resonance in a buried object was discovered. Some of the experimental data developed in this work may be useful to other researchers seeking a method to detect buried plastic mines. A number of excitation methods and their pitfalls are discussed. Excitation methods that were investigated include swept acoustic, chopped acoustic, wavelet acoustic, and mechanical shaking. Under very contrived conditions, a weak response that could be attributed to acoustic resonance was observed, but it does not appear to be practical as a mine detection feature. Transfer properties of soil were investigated. Impulse responses of several representative plastic mines were investigated. Acoustic leakage coupling, and its implications as a disruptive mechanism were investigated.

  3. Viscous flow drag reduction by acoustic excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagel, Robert T.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental program in which the effectiveness of a single large eddy break up (LEBU) blade is enhanced by proper acoustic excitation is described. Acoustic waves are generated in response to the incident large scale eddies and directed at the blade trailing edge through the test surface floor below the manipulator blade. The acoustic input is phase locked to the incident flow. Control of the acoustic input apparently allows enhancement of the large eddy cancellation process leading to a decrease of skin friction coefficient. Control of this process with acoustic excitation indicates that vortex unwinding is the mechanism for large eddy destruction in the boundary layer. A deeper understanding of this phenomena could lead to better drag reduction technology and further understanding of the physics of the turbulent boundary layer.

  4. Acoustic studies of solids

    SciTech Connect

    Granato, A.V.

    1987-01-01

    Acoustic technique have proven to be very useful in getting basic information on the configuration and dynamics of defects. Although the technique is indirect, the sensitivity is such that it often competes very favorably with more direct techniques such as neutron, x-ray, or phonon scattering. The symmetry information that comes directly from polarization control often also proves decisive in determining configurations. Many of the concepts that have been developed in explaining the various effects that have been seen in dislocation and point defect studies have proven also to be very useful when taken over almost directly into other areas of physics. 11 refs., 7 figs.

  5. Validation of self-reported start year of mobile phone use in a Swedish case-control study on radiofrequency fields and acoustic neuroma risk.

    PubMed

    Pettersson, David; Bottai, Matteo; Mathiesen, Tiit; Prochazka, Michaela; Feychting, Maria

    2015-01-01

    The possible effect of radiofrequency exposure from mobile phones on tumor risk has been studied since the late 1990s. Yet, empirical information about recall of the start of mobile phone use among adult cases and controls has never been reported. Limited knowledge about recall errors hampers interpretations of the epidemiological evidence. We used network operator data to validate the self-reported start year of mobile phone use in a case-control study of mobile phone use and acoustic neuroma risk. The answers of 96 (29%) cases and 111 (22%) controls could be included in the validation. The larger proportion of cases reflects a more complete and detailed reporting of subscription history. Misclassification was substantial, with large random errors, small systematic errors, and no significant differences between cases and controls. The average difference between self-reported and operator start year was -0.62 (95% confidence interval: -1.42, 0.17) years for cases and -0.71 (-1.50, 0.07) years for controls, standard deviations were 3.92 and 4.17 years, respectively. Agreement between self-reported and operator-recorded data categorized into short, intermediate and long-term use was moderate (kappa statistic: 0.42). Should an association exist, dilution of risk estimates and distortion of exposure-response patterns for time since first mobile phone use could result from the large random errors in self-reported start year. Retrospective collection of operator data likely leads to a selection of "good reporters", with a higher proportion of cases. Thus, differential recall cannot be entirely excluded.

  6. Effects of computer-based intervention through acoustically modified speech (Fast ForWord) in severe mixed receptive-expressive language impairment: outcomes from a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Wendy; Hodson, Ann; O'Hare, Anne; Boyle, James; Durrani, Tariq; McCartney, Elspeth; Mattey, Mike; Naftalin, Lionel; Watson, Jocelynne

    2005-06-01

    Seventy-seven children between the ages of 6 and 10 years, with severe mixed receptive-expressive specific language impairment (SLI), participated in a randomized controlled trial (RCT) of Fast ForWord (FFW; Scientific Learning Corporation, 1997, 2001). FFW is a computer-based intervention for treating SLI using acoustically enhanced speech stimuli. These stimuli are modified to exaggerate their time and intensity properties as part of an adaptive training process. All children who participated in the RCT maintained their regular speech and language therapy and school regime throughout the trial. Standardized measures of receptive and expressive language were used to assess performance at baseline and to measure outcome from treatment at 9 weeks and 6 months. Children were allocated to 1 of 3 groups. Group A (n = 23) received the FFW intervention as a home-based therapy for 6 weeks. Group B (n = 27) received commercially available computer-based activities designed to promote language as a control for computer games exposure. Group C (n = 27) received no additional study intervention. Each group made significant gains in language scores, but there was no additional effect for either computer intervention. Thus, the findings from this RCT do not support the efficacy of FFW as an intervention for children with severe mixed receptive-expressive SLI.

  7. Autonomous Adaptive Acoustic Relay Positioning

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    species as well as uncover underwater archaeological sites [21]. Remotely-operated vehicles (ROVs) are designed for remote human control and use with a...distribution unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT We consider the problem of maximizing underwater acoustic data transmission by...practical method of underwater wireless communication and improving channel throughput and reliability is key to improving the capabilities of underwater

  8. High-directivity acoustic antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Sum, H. M. A.

    1974-01-01

    Acoustic antenna with unique electronic steering control is used to identify and define aerodynamic noise sources in free field, particularly in wind tunnel which is quite reverberant. Provision is made for high directivity as well as improved discrimination against unwanted background noise such as reverberation or echoes.

  9. Controlling Chaos Caused by the Current-Driven Ion Acoustic Instability in a Laboratory Plasma Using Delayed Feedback

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-07-20

    for the Circuit experimental systems working in real time. k[x(t) - x(t - r)] We have attempted chaos control using the TDAS method based on the...Pyragas technique in order to attain stable chaos control . System 2. Experimental set up I 1 The experiments are performed using a Double G2 G1 x(t) Plasma

  10. Acoustic source for generating an acoustic beam

    DOEpatents

    Vu, Cung Khac; Sinha, Dipen N.; Pantea, Cristian

    2016-05-31

    An acoustic source for generating an acoustic beam includes a housing; a plurality of spaced apart piezo-electric layers disposed within the housing; and a non-linear medium filling between the plurality of layers. Each of the plurality of piezoelectric layers is configured to generate an acoustic wave. The non-linear medium and the plurality of piezo-electric material layers have a matching impedance so as to enhance a transmission of the acoustic wave generated by each of plurality of layers through the remaining plurality of layers.

  11. What Is an Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    ... ANAUSA.org Connect with us! What is an Acoustic Neuroma? Each heading slides to reveal information. Important ... Acoustic Neuroma Important Points To Know About an Acoustic Neuroma An acoustic neuroma, also called a vestibular ...

  12. My 65 years in acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beranek, Leo L.

    2004-05-01

    My entry into acoustics began as research assistant to Professor F. V. Hunt at Harvard University. I received my doctorate in 1940 and directed the Electro-Acoustic Laboratory at Harvard from October 1940 until September 1945. In 1947, I became a tenured associate professor at MIT, and, with Richard H. Bolt, formed the consulting firm Bolt and Beranek, that later included Robert B. Newman, becoming BBN. My most significant contributions before 1970 were design of wedge-lined anechoic chambers, systemization of noise reduction in ventilation systems, design of the world's largest muffler for the testing of supersonic jet engines at NASA's Lewis Laboratory in Cleveland, speech interference level, NC noise criterion curves, heading New York Port Authority's noise study that resulted in mufflers on jet aircraft, and steep aircraft climb procedures, and publishing books titled, Acoustical Measurements, Acoustics, Noise Reduction, Noise and Vibration Control, and Music, Acoustics and Architecture. As President of BBN, I supervised the formation of the group that built and operated the ARPANET (1969), which, when split in two (using TCP/IP protocol) became the INTERNET (1984). Since then, I have written two books on Concert Halls and Opera Houses and have consulted on four concert halls and an opera house.

  13. My 65 years in acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beranek, Leo L.

    2001-05-01

    My entry into acoustics began as research assistant to Professor F. V. Hunt at Harvard University. I received my doctorate in 1940 and directed the Electro-Acoustic Laboratory at Harvard from October 1940 until September 1945. In 1947, I became a tenured associate professor at MIT, and, with Richard H. Bolt, formed the consulting firm Bolt and Beranek, that later included Robert B. Newman, becoming BBN. My most significant contributions before 1970 were design of wedge-lined anechoic chambers, systemization of noise reduction in ventilation systems, design of the world's largest muffler for the testing of supersonic jet engines at NASA's Lewis Laboratory in Cleveland, speech interference level, NC noise criterion curves, heading New York Port Authority's noise study that resulted in mufflers on jet aircraft, and steep aircraft climb procedures, and publishing books titled, Acoustical Measurements, Acoustics, Noise Reduction, Noise and Vibration Control, and Music, Acoustics and Architecture. As President of BBN, I supervised the formation of the group that built and operated the ARPANET (1969), which, when split in two (using TCP/IP protocol) became the INTERNET (1984). Since then, I have written two books on Concert Halls and Opera Houses and have consulted on four concert halls and an opera house.

  14. International Space Station Acoustics - A Status Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Christopher S.; Denham, Samuel A.

    2011-01-01

    It is important to control acoustic noise aboard the International Space Station (ISS) to provide a satisfactory environment for voice communications, crew productivity, and restful sleep, and to minimize the risk for temporary and permanent hearing loss. Acoustic monitoring is an important part of the noise control process on ISS, providing critical data for trend analysis, noise exposure analysis, validation of acoustic analysis and predictions, and to provide strong evidence for ensuring crew health and safety, thus allowing Flight Certification. To this purpose, sound level meter (SLM) measurements and acoustic noise dosimetry are routinely performed. And since the primary noise sources on ISS include the environmental control and life support system (fans and airflow) and active thermal control system (pumps and water flow), acoustic monitoring will indicate changes in hardware noise emissions that may indicate system degradation or performance issues. This paper provides the current acoustic levels in the ISS modules and sleep stations, and is an update to the status presented in 20031. Many new modules, and sleep stations have been added to the ISS since that time. In addition, noise mitigation efforts have reduced noise levels in some areas. As a result, the acoustic levels on the ISS have improved.

  15. International Space Station Acoustics - A Status Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Christopher S.

    2015-01-01

    It is important to control acoustic noise aboard the International Space Station (ISS) to provide a satisfactory environment for voice communications, crew productivity, alarm audibility, and restful sleep, and to minimize the risk for temporary and permanent hearing loss. Acoustic monitoring is an important part of the noise control process on ISS, providing critical data for trend analysis, noise exposure analysis, validation of acoustic analyses and predictions, and to provide strong evidence for ensuring crew health and safety, thus allowing Flight Certification. To this purpose, sound level meter (SLM) measurements and acoustic noise dosimetry are routinely performed. And since the primary noise sources on ISS include the environmental control and life support system (fans and airflow) and active thermal control system (pumps and water flow), acoustic monitoring will reveal changes in hardware noise emissions that may indicate system degradation or performance issues. This paper provides the current acoustic levels in the ISS modules and sleep stations and is an update to the status presented in 2011. Since this last status report, many payloads (science experiment hardware) have been added and a significant number of quiet ventilation fans have replaced noisier fans in the Russian Segment. Also, noise mitigation efforts are planned to reduce the noise levels of the T2 treadmill and levels in Node 3, in general. As a result, the acoustic levels on the ISS continue to improve.

  16. Tunable acoustic waveguide based on vibro-acoustic metamaterials with shunted piezoelectric unit cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Byung-Jin; Jung, Jin-Young; Lee, Dooho; Park, Kwang-Chun; Oh, Il-Kwon

    2015-10-01

    We propose a new class of acoustic waveguides with tunable bandgaps (TBs) by using vibro-acoustic metamaterials with shunted periodic piezoelectric unit cells. The unit metamaterial cells that consist of a single crystal piezoelectric transducer and an electrical shunt circuit are designed to induce a strong vibro-acousto-electrical coupling, resulting in a tunable acoustic bandgap as well as local structural resonance and Bragg scattering bandgaps. The present results show that the TB frequency can be actively controlled and the transmission loss of the acoustic wave can be greatly improved by simply changing the inductance values in the shunt circuit.

  17. Density-near-zero using the acoustically induced transparency of a Fano acoustic resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elayouch, A.; Addouche, M.; Farhat, M.; Amin, M.; Bağcı, H.; Khelif, A.

    2016-11-01

    We report experimental results of near-zero mass density involving an acoustic metamaterial supporting Fano resonance. For this, we designed and fabricated an acoustic resonator with two closely coupled modes and measured its transmission properties. Our study reveals that the phenomenon of acoustically induced transparency is accompanied by an effect of near-zero density. Indeed, the dynamic effective parameters obtained from experimental data show the presence of a frequency band where the effective mass density is close to zero, with high transmission levels reaching 0.7. Furthermore, we demonstrate that such effective parameters lead to wave guiding in a 90-degrees-bent channel. This kind of acoustic metamaterial can, therefore, give rise to acoustic functions like controlling the wavefront, which may lead to very promising applications in acoustic cloacking or imaging.

  18. Impact of Acoustic Standing Waves on Structural Responses: Reverberant Acoustic Testing (RAT) vs. Direct Field Acoustic Testing (DFAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R.; Doty, Benjamin; Chang, Zensheu

    2012-01-01

    Loudspeakers have been used for acoustic qualification of spacecraft, reflectors, solar panels, and other acoustically responsive structures for more than a decade. Limited measurements from some of the recent speaker tests used to qualify flight hardware have indicated significant spatial variation of the acoustic field within the test volume. Also structural responses have been reported to differ when similar tests were performed using reverberant chambers. To address the impact of non-uniform acoustic field on structural responses, a series of acoustic tests were performed using a flat panel and a 3-ft cylinder exposed to the field controlled by speakers and repeated in a reverberant chamber. The speaker testing was performed using multi-input-single-output (MISO) and multi-input-multi-output (MIMO) control schemes with and without the test articles. In this paper the spatial variation of the acoustic field due to acoustic standing waves and their impacts on the structural responses in RAT and DFAT (both using MISO and MIMO controls for DFAT) are discussed in some detail.

  19. Symptoms of Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions to Ask Yourself ... Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions to Ask Yourself ...

  20. NPL closes acoustics department

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Extance, Andy

    2016-11-01

    The UK's National Physical Laboratory (NPL) has withdrawn funding for its acoustics, polymer and thermoelectrics groups, triggering concern among airborne acoustics specialists that the move could undermine the country's noise-management policies.

  1. Identifying the Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions to Ask Yourself ... Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions to Ask Yourself ...

  2. Sonification of acoustic emission data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raith, Manuel; Große, Christian

    2014-05-01

    While loading different specimens, acoustic emissions appear due to micro crack formation or friction of already existing crack edges. These acoustic emissions can be recorded using suitable ultrasonic transducers and transient recorders. The analysis of acoustic emissions can be used to investigate the mechanical behavior of different specimens under load. Our working group has undertaken several experiments, monitored with acoustic emission techniques. Different materials such as natural stone, concrete, wood, steel, carbon composites and bone were investigated. Also the experimental setup has been varied. Fire-spalling experiments on ultrahigh performance concrete and pullout experiments on bonded anchors have been carried out. Furthermore uniaxial compression tests on natural stone and animal bone had been conducted. The analysis tools include not only the counting of events but the analysis of full waveforms. Powerful localization algorithms and automatic onset picking techniques (based on Akaikes Information Criterion) were established to handle the huge amount of data. Up to several thousand events were recorded during experiments of a few minutes. More sophisticated techniques like moment tensor inversion have been established on this relatively small scale as well. Problems are related to the amount of data but also to signal-to-noise quality, boundary conditions (reflections) sensor characteristics and unknown and changing Greens functions of the media. Some of the acoustic emissions recorded during these experiments had been transferred into audio range. The transformation into the audio range was done using Matlab. It is the aim of the sonification to establish a tool that is on one hand able to help controlling the experiment in-situ and probably adjust the load parameters according to the number and intensity of the acoustic emissions. On the other hand sonification can help to improve the understanding of acoustic emission techniques for training

  3. Generation of acoustic helical wavefronts using metasurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esfahlani, Hussein; Lissek, Herve; Mosig, Juan R.

    2017-01-01

    It has been shown that acoustic waves with helical wavefronts can carry angular momentum, which can be transmitted towards a propagating medium. Such a wave field can be achieved by using a planar array of electroacoustic transducers, forming a given spatial distribution of phased sound sources which produce the desired helical wavefronts. Here, we introduce a technique to generate acoustic vortices, based on the passive acoustic metasurface concept. The proposed metasurface is composed of space-coiled cylindrical unit cells transmitting sound pressure with a controllable phase shift, which are arranged in a discretized circular configuration, and thus passively transforming an incident plane wavefront into the desired helical wavefront. This method presents the advantage of overcoming the restrictions on using many acoustic sources, and it is implemented with a transmitting metasurface which can be easily three-dimensionally printed. The proposed straightforward design principle can be adopted for easy production of acoustic angular momentum with minimum complexity and using a single source.

  4. Acoustic emission frequency discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sugg, Frank E. (Inventor); Graham, Lloyd J. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    In acoustic emission nondestructive testing, broadband frequency noise is distinguished from narrow banded acoustic emission signals, since the latter are valid events indicative of structural flaws in the material being examined. This is accomplished by separating out those signals which contain frequency components both within and beyond (either above or below) the range of valid acoustic emission events. Application to acoustic emission monitoring during nondestructive bond verification and proof loading of undensified tiles on the Space Shuttle Orbiter is considered.

  5. Deep Water Ocean Acoustics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-17

    under-ice scattering , bathymetric diffraction and the application of the ocean acoustic Parabolic Equation to infrasound. 2. Tasks a. Task 1...QSR-14C0172-Ocean Acoustics -063015 Figure 10. Estimated reflection coefficient as a function of frequency by taking the difference of downgoing and...OASIS, INC. 1 Report No. QSR-14C0172-Ocean Acoustics -063015 Quarterly Progress Report Technical and Financial Deep Water Ocean Acoustics

  6. Deep Water Ocean Acoustics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-19

    OASIS, INC. 1 Report No. QSR-14C0172-Ocean Acoustics-093015 Quarterly Progress Report Technical and Financial Deep Water Ocean Acoustics...number. 1. REPORT DATE OCT 2015 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 01-07-2015 to 30-09-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Deep Water Ocean Acoustics...understanding of the impact of the ocean and seafloor environmental variability on deep- water (long-range) ocean acoustic propagation and to develop

  7. Shallow Water Acoustics Studies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Shallow Water Acoustics Studies James F. Lynch MS #12...N00014-14-1-0040 http://acoustics.whoi.edu/sw06/ LONG TERM GOALS The long term goals of our shallow water acoustics work are to: 1) understand the...nature of low frequency (10-1500 Hz) acoustic propagation, scattering and noise in shallow water when strong oceanic variability is present in the

  8. Simulation-based conceptual design of an acoustic metamaterial with full band gap using an air-based 1-3 piezoelectric composite for ultrasonic noise control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaei, Shahrokh; Eskandari-Ghadi, Morteza; Rahimian, Mohammad

    2017-02-01

    This paper aims at proposing a novel type of acoustic metamaterials with complete band gap composed of piezoelectric rods with square array as inclusions embedded in an air background (matrix). A modified plane wave expansion method accompanied with the principles of the Bloch-Floquet method with electromechanical coupling effect and also impedance spectra are used to get a band frequency and to investigate the passband for the selected cut of piezoelectric rods. We investigate both the electromechanical coupling coefficient and mechanical quality factor and their dependency to passband and bandwidth, which depends on both the density and the wave impedance of the matrix and the inclusions (rods). The ratio of the volume of inclusion to the matrix is used to define the fill factor or the so-called inclusion ratio, to introduce the bandwidth as a function of that. Furthermore, the fabrication method is presented in this paper. The results make a suitable foundation for design purposes and may develop an inherently passive ultrasonic noise control. In addition, the results provide the required guidance for a simulation-based design of elastic wave filters or wave guide that might be useful in high-precision mechanical systems operated in certain frequency ranges and switches made of piezoelectric materials; they also propose a novel type of elastic metamaterials, which is independent of the wave direction and has an equal sensitivity in all directions in which it reacts omnidirectionally and mitigates the occupational noise exposure.

  9. Tutorial on architectural acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Neil; Talaske, Rick; Bistafa, Sylvio

    2002-11-01

    This tutorial is intended to provide an overview of current knowledge and practice in architectural acoustics. Topics covered will include basic concepts and history, acoustics of small rooms (small rooms for speech such as classrooms and meeting rooms, music studios, small critical listening spaces such as home theatres) and the acoustics of large rooms (larger assembly halls, auditoria, and performance halls).

  10. Design and implementation of an omni-directional underwater acoustic micro-modem based on a low-power micro-controller unit.

    PubMed

    Won, Tae-Hee; Park, Sung-Joon

    2012-01-01

    For decades, underwater acoustic communication has been restricted to the point-to-point long distance applications such as deep sea probes and offshore oil fields. For this reason, previous acoustic modems were typically characterized by high data rates and long working ranges at the expense of large size and high power consumption. Recently, as the need for underwater wireless sensor networks (UWSNs) has increased, the research and development of compact and low-power consuming communication devices has become the focus. From the consideration that the requisites of acoustic modems for UWSNs are low power consumption, omni-directional beam pattern, low cost and so on, in this paper, we design and implement an omni-directional underwater acoustic micro-modem satisfying these requirements. In order to execute fast digital domain signal processing and support flexible interfaces with other peripherals, an ARM Cortex-M3 is embedded in the micro-modem. Also, for the realization of small and omni-directional properties, a spherical transducer having a resonant frequency of 70 kHz and a diameter of 34 mm is utilized for the implementation. Physical layer frame format and symbol structure for efficient packet-based underwater communication systems are also investigated. The developed acoustic micro-modem is verified analytically and experimentally in indoor and outdoor environments in terms of functionality and performance. Since the modem satisfies the requirements for use in UWSNs, it could be deployed in a wide range of applications requiring underwater acoustic communication.

  11. Design and Implementation of an Omni-Directional Underwater Acoustic Micro-Modem Based on a Low-Power Micro-Controller Unit

    PubMed Central

    Won, Tae-Hee; Park, Sung-Joon

    2012-01-01

    For decades, underwater acoustic communication has been restricted to the point-to-point long distance applications such as deep sea probes and offshore oil fields. For this reason, previous acoustic modems were typically characterized by high data rates and long working ranges at the expense of large size and high power consumption. Recently, as the need for underwater wireless sensor networks (UWSNs) has increased, the research and development of compact and low-power consuming communication devices has become the focus. From the consideration that the requisites of acoustic modems for UWSNs are low power consumption, omni-directional beam pattern, low cost and so on, in this paper, we design and implement an omni-directional underwater acoustic micro-modem satisfying these requirements. In order to execute fast digital domain signal processing and support flexible interfaces with other peripherals, an ARM Cortex-M3 is embedded in the micro-modem. Also, for the realization of small and omni-directional properties, a spherical transducer having a resonant frequency of 70 kHz and a diameter of 34 mm is utilized for the implementation. Physical layer frame format and symbol structure for efficient packet-based underwater communication systems are also investigated. The developed acoustic micro-modem is verified analytically and experimentally in indoor and outdoor environments in terms of functionality and performance. Since the modem satisfies the requirements for use in UWSNs, it could be deployed in a wide range of applications requiring underwater acoustic communication. PMID:22438765

  12. Indoor acoustic gain design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Concha-Abarca, Justo Andres

    2002-11-01

    The design of sound reinforcement systems includes many variables and usually some of these variables are discussed. There are criteria to optimize the performance of the sound reinforcement systems under indoor conditions. The equivalent acoustic distance, the necessary acoustic gain, and the potential acoustic gain are parameters which must be adjusted with respect to the loudspeaker array, electric power and directionality of loudspeakers, the room acoustics conditions, the distance and distribution of the audience, and the type of the original sources. The design and installation of front of the house and monitoring systems have individual criteria. This article is about this criteria and it proposes general considerations for the indoor acoustic gain design.

  13. Opto-acoustic thrombolysis

    DOEpatents

    Celliers, Peter; Da Silva, Luiz; Glinsky, Michael; London, Richard; Maitland, Duncan; Matthews, Dennis; Fitch, Pat

    2000-01-01

    This invention is a catheter-based device for generating an ultrasound excitation in biological tissue. Pulsed laser light is guided through an optical fiber to provide the energy for producing the acoustic vibrations. The optical energy is deposited in a water-based absorbing fluid, e.g. saline, thrombolytic agent, blood or thrombus, and generates an acoustic impulse in the fluid through thermoelastic and/or thermodynamic mechanisms. By pulsing the laser at a repetition rate (which may vary from 10 Hz to 100 kHz) an ultrasonic radiation field can be established locally in the medium. This method of producing ultrasonic vibrations can be used in vivo for the treatment of stroke-related conditions in humans, particularly for dissolving thrombus or treating vasospasm. The catheter can also incorporate thrombolytic drug treatments as an adjunct therapy and it can be operated in conjunction with ultrasonic detection equipment for imaging and feedback control and with optical sensors for characterization of thrombus type and consistency.

  14. Experimental study on active structural acoustic control of rotating machinery using rotating piezo-based inertial actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, G.; Alujević, N.; Depraetere, B.; Pinte, G.; Swevers, J.; Sas, P.

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, two Piezo-Based Rotating Inertial Actuators (PBRIAs) are considered for the suppression of the structure-borne noise radiated from rotating machinery. As add-on devices, they can be directly mounted on a rotational shaft, in order to intervene as early as possible in the transfer path between disturbance and the noise radiating surfaces. A MIMO (Multi-Input-Multi-Output) form of the FxLMS control algorithm is employed to generate the appropriate actuation signals, relying on a linear interpolation scheme to approximate time varying secondary plants. The proposed active vibration control approach is tested on an experimental test bed comprising a rotating shaft mounted in a frame to which a noise-radiating plate is attached. The disturbance force is introduced by an electro-dynamic shaker. The experimental results show that when the shaft spins below 180 rpm, more than a 7 dB reduction can be achieved in terms of plate vibrations, along with a reduction in the same order of magnitude in terms of noise radiation.

  15. Multimode acoustic transparency and slow sound effects in hybrid subwavelength resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Yu-Qiang; Qi, Dong-Xiang; Tuo, Ming-Jun; Liu, Lian-Zi; Zhang, Rui-Li; Peng, Ru-Wen; Wang, Mu

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate that a series of hybrid Helmholtz resonators, which introduce “acoustic transparent atoms”, “acoustic nontransparent atoms”, and “acoustic quasitransparent atoms” simultaneously, can generate multimode acoustic transparency and the slow sound effect. Dual-mode acoustic transparency can be achieved by employing a waveguide incorporating three different Helmholtz resonators. Additional modes are introduced by adding further acoustic quasitransparent atoms. This can be explained by the destructive interference among different resonators. Furthermore, slow sound propagation is demonstrated in our multimode acoustic transparency systems by employing time-domain simulations. Our results may have potential applications for sound control in one-dimensional waveguides.

  16. Cyclones and attractive streaming generated by acoustical vortices.

    PubMed

    Riaud, Antoine; Baudoin, Michael; Thomas, Jean-Louis; Bou Matar, Olivier

    2014-07-01

    Acoustical and optical vortices have attracted great interest due to their ability to capture and manipulate particles with the use of radiation pressure. Here we show that acoustical vortices can also induce axial vortical flow reminiscent of cyclones, whose topology can be controlled by adjusting the properties of the acoustical beam. In confined geometry, the phase singularity enables generating "attractive streaming" with the flow directed toward the transducer. This opens perspectives for contactless vortical flow control.

  17. Writing magnetic patterns with surface acoustic waves

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Weiyang; Buford, Benjamin; Jander, Albrecht; Dhagat, Pallavi

    2014-05-07

    A novel patterning technique that creates magnetization patterns in a continuous magnetostrictive film with surface acoustic waves is demonstrated. Patterns of 10 μm wide stripes of alternating magnetization and a 3 μm dot of reversed magnetization are written using standing and focusing acoustic waves, respectively. The magnetization pattern is size-tunable, erasable, and rewritable by changing the magnetic field and acoustic power. This versatility, along with its solid-state implementation (no moving parts) and electronic control, renders it as a promising technique for application in magnetic recording, magnonic signal processing, magnetic particle manipulation, and spatial magneto-optical modulation.

  18. AMELIA CESTOL Test: Acoustic Characteristics of Circulation Control Wing with Leading-and Trailing-Edge Slot Blowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horne, Clifton; Burnside, Nathan J.

    2013-01-01

    Aeroacoustic measurements of the 11 % scale full-span AMELIA CESTOL model with leading- and trailing-edge slot blowing circulation control (CCW) wing were obtained during a recent test in the Arnold Engineering Development Center 40- by 80-Ft. Wind Tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center, Sound levels and spectra were acquired with seven in-flow microphones and a 48-element phased microphone array for a variety of vehicle configurations, CCW slot flow rates, and forward speeds, Corrections to the measurements and processing are in progress, however the data from selected configurations presented in this report confirm good measurement quality and dynamic range over the test conditions, Array beamform maps at 40 kts tunnel speed show that the trailing edge flap source is dominant for most frequencies at flap angles of 0deg and 60deg, The overall sound level for the 60deg flap was similar to the 0deg flap for most slot blowing rates forward of 90deg incidence, but was louder by up to 6 dB for downstream angles, At 100 kts, the in-flow microphone levels were louder than the sensor self-noise for the higher blowing rates, while passive and active background noise suppression methods for the microphone array revealed source levels as much as 20 dB lower than observed with the in-flow microphones,

  19. Reconfigurable origami-inspired acoustic waveguides.

    PubMed

    Babaee, Sahab; Overvelde, Johannes T B; Chen, Elizabeth R; Tournat, Vincent; Bertoldi, Katia

    2016-11-01

    We combine numerical simulations and experiments to design a new class of reconfigurable waveguides based on three-dimensional origami-inspired metamaterials. Our strategy builds on the fact that the rigid plates and hinges forming these structures define networks of tubes that can be easily reconfigured. As such, they provide an ideal platform to actively control and redirect the propagation of sound. We design reconfigurable systems that, depending on the externally applied deformation, can act as networks of waveguides oriented along one, two, or three preferential directions. Moreover, we demonstrate that the capability of the structure to guide and radiate acoustic energy along predefined directions can be easily switched on and off, as the networks of tubes are reversibly formed and disrupted. The proposed designs expand the ability of existing acoustic metamaterials and exploit complex waveguiding to enhance control over propagation and radiation of acoustic energy, opening avenues for the design of a new class of tunable acoustic functional systems.

  20. Reconfigurable origami-inspired acoustic waveguides

    PubMed Central

    Babaee, Sahab; Overvelde, Johannes T. B.; Chen, Elizabeth R.; Tournat, Vincent; Bertoldi, Katia

    2016-01-01

    We combine numerical simulations and experiments to design a new class of reconfigurable waveguides based on three-dimensional origami-inspired metamaterials. Our strategy builds on the fact that the rigid plates and hinges forming these structures define networks of tubes that can be easily reconfigured. As such, they provide an ideal platform to actively control and redirect the propagation of sound. We design reconfigurable systems that, depending on the externally applied deformation, can act as networks of waveguides oriented along one, two, or three preferential directions. Moreover, we demonstrate that the capability of the structure to guide and radiate acoustic energy along predefined directions can be easily switched on and off, as the networks of tubes are reversibly formed and disrupted. The proposed designs expand the ability of existing acoustic metamaterials and exploit complex waveguiding to enhance control over propagation and radiation of acoustic energy, opening avenues for the design of a new class of tunable acoustic functional systems. PMID:28138527

  1. Holographic acoustic elements for manipulation of levitated objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzo, Asier; Seah, Sue Ann; Drinkwater, Bruce W.; Sahoo, Deepak Ranjan; Long, Benjamin; Subramanian, Sriram

    2015-10-01

    Sound can levitate objects of different sizes and materials through air, water and tissue. This allows us to manipulate cells, liquids, compounds or living things without touching or contaminating them. However, acoustic levitation has required the targets to be enclosed with acoustic elements or had limited manoeuvrability. Here we optimize the phases used to drive an ultrasonic phased array and show that acoustic levitation can be employed to translate, rotate and manipulate particles using even a single-sided emitter. Furthermore, we introduce the holographic acoustic elements framework that permits the rapid generation of traps and provides a bridge between optical and acoustical trapping. Acoustic structures shaped as tweezers, twisters or bottles emerge as the optimum mechanisms for tractor beams or containerless transportation. Single-beam levitation could manipulate particles inside our body for applications in targeted drug delivery or acoustically controlled micro-machines that do not interfere with magnetic resonance imaging.

  2. Holographic acoustic elements for manipulation of levitated objects

    PubMed Central

    Marzo, Asier; Seah, Sue Ann; Drinkwater, Bruce W.; Sahoo, Deepak Ranjan; Long, Benjamin; Subramanian, Sriram

    2015-01-01

    Sound can levitate objects of different sizes and materials through air, water and tissue. This allows us to manipulate cells, liquids, compounds or living things without touching or contaminating them. However, acoustic levitation has required the targets to be enclosed with acoustic elements or had limited manoeuvrability. Here we optimize the phases used to drive an ultrasonic phased array and show that acoustic levitation can be employed to translate, rotate and manipulate particles using even a single-sided emitter. Furthermore, we introduce the holographic acoustic elements framework that permits the rapid generation of traps and provides a bridge between optical and acoustical trapping. Acoustic structures shaped as tweezers, twisters or bottles emerge as the optimum mechanisms for tractor beams or containerless transportation. Single-beam levitation could manipulate particles inside our body for applications in targeted drug delivery or acoustically controlled micro-machines that do not interfere with magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:26505138

  3. Holographic acoustic elements for manipulation of levitated objects.

    PubMed

    Marzo, Asier; Seah, Sue Ann; Drinkwater, Bruce W; Sahoo, Deepak Ranjan; Long, Benjamin; Subramanian, Sriram

    2015-10-27

    Sound can levitate objects of different sizes and materials through air, water and tissue. This allows us to manipulate cells, liquids, compounds or living things without touching or contaminating them. However, acoustic levitation has required the targets to be enclosed with acoustic elements or had limited manoeuvrability. Here we optimize the phases used to drive an ultrasonic phased array and show that acoustic levitation can be employed to translate, rotate and manipulate particles using even a single-sided emitter. Furthermore, we introduce the holographic acoustic elements framework that permits the rapid generation of traps and provides a bridge between optical and acoustical trapping. Acoustic structures shaped as tweezers, twisters or bottles emerge as the optimum mechanisms for tractor beams or containerless transportation. Single-beam levitation could manipulate particles inside our body for applications in targeted drug delivery or acoustically controlled micro-machines that do not interfere with magnetic resonance imaging.

  4. AST Launch Vehicle Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houston, Janice; Counter, D.; Giacomoni, D.

    2015-01-01

    The liftoff phase induces acoustic loading over a broad frequency range for a launch vehicle. These external acoustic environments are then used in the prediction of internal vibration responses of the vehicle and components which result in the qualification levels. Thus, predicting these liftoff acoustic (LOA) environments is critical to the design requirements of any launch vehicle. If there is a significant amount of uncertainty in the predictions or if acoustic mitigation options must be implemented, a subscale acoustic test is a feasible pre-launch test option to verify the LOA environments. The NASA Space Launch System (SLS) program initiated the Scale Model Acoustic Test (SMAT) to verify the predicted SLS LOA environments and to determine the acoustic reduction with an above deck water sound suppression system. The SMAT was conducted at Marshall Space Flight Center and the test article included a 5% scale SLS vehicle model, tower and Mobile Launcher. Acoustic and pressure data were measured by approximately 250 instruments. The SMAT liftoff acoustic results are presented, findings are discussed and a comparison is shown to the Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) results.

  5. Helicopter Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Exterior and interior noise problems are addressed both from the physics and engineering as well as the human factors point of view. The role of technology in closing the gap between what the customers and regulating agencies would like to have and what is available is explored. Noise regulation concepts, design, operations and testing for noise control, helicopter noise prediction, and research tools and measurements are among the topics covered.

  6. Acoustic Translation of an Acoustically Levitated Sample

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, M. B.; Allen, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    Acoustic-levitation apparatus uses only one acoustic mode to move sample from one region of chamber to another. Sample heated and cooled quickly by translation between hot and cold regions of levitation chamber. Levitated sample is raised into furnace region by raising plunger. Frequency of sound produced by transducers adjusted by feedback system to maintain (102) resonant mode, which levitates sample midway between transducers and plunger regardless of plunger position.

  7. Design of a programmable active acoustics metamaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smoker, Jason J.

    Metamaterials are artificial materials engineered to provide properties which may not be readily available in nature. The development of such class of materials constitutes a new area of research that has grown significantly over the past decade. Acoustic metamaterials, specifically, are even more novel than their electromagnetic counterparts arising only in the latter half of the decade. Acoustic metamaterials provide a new tool in controlling the propagation of pressure waves. However, physical design and frequency tuning, is still a large obstacle when creating a new acoustic metamaterial. This dissertation describes active and programmable design for acoustic metamaterials which allows the same basic physical design principles to be used for a variety of application. With cloaking technology being of a great interest to the US Navy, the proposed design approach would enable the development of a metamaterial with spatially changing effective parameters while retaining a uniform physical design features. The effective parameters would be controlled by tuning smart actuators embedded inside the metamaterial structure. Since this design is based on dynamic effective parameters that can be electrically controlled, material property ranges of several orders of magnitude could potentially be achieved without changing any physical parameters. With such unique capabilities, physically realizable acoustic cloaks can be achieved and objects treated with these active metamaterials can become acoustically invisible.

  8. Nearfield Acoustical Holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayek, Sabih I.

    Nearfield acoustical holography (NAH) is a method by which a set of acoustic pressure measurements at points located on a specific surface (called a hologram) can be used to image sources on vibrating surfaces on the acoustic field in three-dimensional space. NAH data are processed to take advantage of the evanescent wavefield to image sources that are separated less that one-eighth of a wavelength.

  9. Deep Water Acoustics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-28

    Estimates of basin-wide sound speed ( temperature ) fields obtained by the combination of acoustic, altimetry, and other data types with ocean...of acoustic coherence at long ranges in the ocean. Estimates of basin-wide sound speed ( temperature ) fields obtained by the combination of acoustic...index.html Award Number N00014-13-1-0053 LONG-TERM GOALS The ultimate limitations to the performance of long-range sonar are due to ocean sound speed

  10. Acoustic Communications (ACOMMS) ATD

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-14

    Acoustic Communications (ACOMMS) ATD Tam Nguyen 2531 Jefferson Davis Hwy Arlington, VA 22242 phone: (703) 604-6013 ext 520 fax: (703) 604-6056...email: NguyenTL@navsea.navy.mil Award # N0001499PD30007 LONG-TERM GOALS The goal of the recently completed Acoustic Communications Advanced...Technology Demonstration program (ACOMMS ATD) was to demonstrate long range and moderate data rate underwater acoustic communications between a submarine

  11. Deep Water Ocean Acoustics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-30

    OASIS, INC. 1 Report No. QSR-14C0172-Ocean Acoustics-043016 Quarterly Progress Report Technical and Financial Deep Water Ocean Acoustics...understanding of the impact of the ocean and seafloor environmental variability on deep- water (long-range) ocean acoustic propagation and to...improve our understanding. During the past few years, the physics effects studied have been three-dimensional propagation on global scales, deep water

  12. Multi-Point Hermes Acoustic Modem for High-Speed, High-Frequency Acoustic Communications with Low-Frequency Acoustic Control Loop for Real-Time Transmission of AUV-Carried High-Resolution Images and Navigation Data in Support of Ship Hulls Inspection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-31

    Message synchronization using the downlink synchronization pulse . ....................... 27 Figure 12: Constellation diagrams for the transmitted and...acoustic downlink, assuming a single reference sequence following the synchronization pulse ...68 Table 12: Signal-to-Noise Ratio per Mission and per Receiver

  13. Acoustic dispersive prism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esfahlani, Hussein; Karkar, Sami; Lissek, Herve; Mosig, Juan R.

    2016-01-01

    The optical dispersive prism is a well-studied element, which allows separating white light into its constituent spectral colors, and stands in nature as water droplets. In analogy to this definition, the acoustic dispersive prism should be an acoustic device with capability of splitting a broadband acoustic wave into its constituent Fourier components. However, due to the acoustical nature of materials as well as the design and fabrication difficulties, there is neither any natural acoustic counterpart of the optical prism, nor any artificial design reported so far exhibiting an equivalent acoustic behaviour. Here, based on exotic properties of the acoustic transmission-line metamaterials and exploiting unique physical behaviour of acoustic leaky-wave radiation, we report the first acoustic dispersive prism, effective within the audible frequency range 800 Hz–1300 Hz. The dispersive nature, and consequently the frequency-dependent refractive index of the metamaterial are exploited to split the sound waves towards different and frequency-dependent directions. Meanwhile, the leaky-wave nature of the structure facilitates the sound wave radiation into the ambient medium.

  14. Acoustic dispersive prism.

    PubMed

    Esfahlani, Hussein; Karkar, Sami; Lissek, Herve; Mosig, Juan R

    2016-01-07

    The optical dispersive prism is a well-studied element, which allows separating white light into its constituent spectral colors, and stands in nature as water droplets. In analogy to this definition, the acoustic dispersive prism should be an acoustic device with capability of splitting a broadband acoustic wave into its constituent Fourier components. However, due to the acoustical nature of materials as well as the design and fabrication difficulties, there is neither any natural acoustic counterpart of the optical prism, nor any artificial design reported so far exhibiting an equivalent acoustic behaviour. Here, based on exotic properties of the acoustic transmission-line metamaterials and exploiting unique physical behaviour of acoustic leaky-wave radiation, we report the first acoustic dispersive prism, effective within the audible frequency range 800 Hz-1300 Hz. The dispersive nature, and consequently the frequency-dependent refractive index of the metamaterial are exploited to split the sound waves towards different and frequency-dependent directions. Meanwhile, the leaky-wave nature of the structure facilitates the sound wave radiation into the ambient medium.

  15. Low frequency acoustic microscope

    DOEpatents

    Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T.

    1986-11-04

    A scanning acoustic microscope is disclosed for the detection and location of near surface flaws, inclusions or voids in a solid sample material. A focused beam of acoustic energy is directed at the sample with its focal plane at the subsurface flaw, inclusion or void location. The sample is scanned with the beam. Detected acoustic energy specularly reflected and mode converted at the surface of the sample and acoustic energy reflected by subsurface flaws, inclusions or voids at the focal plane are used for generating an interference signal which is processed and forms a signal indicative of the subsurface flaws, inclusions or voids.

  16. Acoustic dispersive prism

    PubMed Central

    Esfahlani, Hussein; Karkar, Sami; Lissek, Herve; Mosig, Juan R.

    2016-01-01

    The optical dispersive prism is a well-studied element, which allows separating white light into its constituent spectral colors, and stands in nature as water droplets. In analogy to this definition, the acoustic dispersive prism should be an acoustic device with capability of splitting a broadband acoustic wave into its constituent Fourier components. However, due to the acoustical nature of materials as well as the design and fabrication difficulties, there is neither any natural acoustic counterpart of the optical prism, nor any artificial design reported so far exhibiting an equivalent acoustic behaviour. Here, based on exotic properties of the acoustic transmission-line metamaterials and exploiting unique physical behaviour of acoustic leaky-wave radiation, we report the first acoustic dispersive prism, effective within the audible frequency range 800 Hz–1300 Hz. The dispersive nature, and consequently the frequency-dependent refractive index of the metamaterial are exploited to split the sound waves towards different and frequency-dependent directions. Meanwhile, the leaky-wave nature of the structure facilitates the sound wave radiation into the ambient medium. PMID:26739504

  17. Prediction and Measurement of the Vibration and Acoustic Radiation of Panels Subjected to Acoustic Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Travis L.; Rizzi, Stephen A.

    1995-01-01

    Interior noise and sonic fatigue are important issues in the development and design of advanced subsonic and supersonic aircraft. Conventional aircraft typically employ passive treatments, such as constrained layer damping and acoustic absorption materials, to reduce the structural response and resulting acoustic levels in the aircraft interior. These techniques require significant addition of mass and only attenuate relatively high frequency noise transmitted through the fuselage. Although structural acoustic coupling is in general very important in the study of aircraft fuselage interior noise, analysis of noise transmission through a panel supported in an infinite rigid baffle (separating two semi-infinite acoustic domains) can be useful in evaluating the effects of active/adaptive materials, complex loading, etc. Recent work has been aimed at developing adaptive and/or active methods of controlling the structural acoustic response of panels to reduce the transmitted noise1. A finite element formulation was recently developed to study the dynamic response of shape memory alloy (SMA) hybrid composite panels (conventional composite panel with embedded SMA fibers) subject to combined acoustic and thermal loads2. Further analysis has been performed to predict the far-field acoustic radiation using the finite element dynamic panel response prediction3. The purpose of the present work is to validate the panel vibration and acoustic radiation prediction methods with baseline experimental results obtained from an isotropic panel, without the effect of SMA.

  18. Air-coupled acoustic thermography for in-situ evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalameda, Joseph N. (Inventor); Winfree, William P. (Inventor); Yost, William T. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Acoustic thermography uses a housing configured for thermal, acoustic and infrared radiation shielding. For in-situ applications, the housing has an open side adapted to be sealingly coupled to a surface region of a structure such that an enclosed chamber filled with air is defined. One or more acoustic sources are positioned to direct acoustic waves through the air in the enclosed chamber and towards the surface region. To activate and control each acoustic source, a pulsed signal is applied thereto. An infrared imager focused on the surface region detects a thermal image of the surface region. A data capture device records the thermal image in synchronicity with each pulse of the pulsed signal such that a time series of thermal images is generated. For enhanced sensitivity and/or repeatability, sound and/or vibrations at the surface region can be used in feedback control of the pulsed signal applied to the acoustic sources.

  19. Nondestructive Acoustic Imaging Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, Volker

    Acoustic imaging techniques are used in the field of nondestructive testing of technical components to measure defects such as lack of side wall fusion or cracks in welded joints. Data acquisition is performed by a remote-controlled manipulator and a PC for the mass storage of the high-frequency time-of-flight data at each probe position. The quality of the acoustic images and the interpretation relies on the proper understanding of the transmitted wave fronts and the arrangement of the probes in pulse-echo mode or in pitch-and-catch arrangement. The use of the Synthetic Aperture Focusing Technique allows the depth-dependent resolution to be replaced by a depth-independent resolution and the signal-to-noise ratio to be improved. Examples with surface-connected cracks are shown to demonstrate the improved features. The localization accuracy could be improved by entering 2-dimensional or 3-dimensional reconstructed data into the environment of a 3-dimensional CAD drawing. The propagation of ultrasonic waves through austenitic welds is disturbed by the anisotropic and inhomogeneous structure of the material. The effect is more or less severe depending upon the longitudinal or shear wave modes. To optimize the performance of an inspection software tool, a 3-dimensional CAD-Ray program has been implemented, where the shape of the inhomogeneous part of a weld can be simulated together with the grain structure based on the elastic constants. Ray-tracing results are depicted for embedded and for surface-connected defects.

  20. Advanced Concepts for Underwater Acoustic Channel Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etter, P. C.; Haas, C. H.; Ramani, D. V.

    2014-12-01

    This paper examines nearshore underwater-acoustic channel modeling concepts and compares channel-state information requirements against existing modeling capabilities. This process defines a subset of candidate acoustic models suitable for simulating signal propagation in underwater communications. Underwater-acoustic communications find many practical applications in coastal oceanography, and networking is the enabling technology for these applications. Such networks can be formed by establishing two-way acoustic links between autonomous underwater vehicles and moored oceanographic sensors. These networks can be connected to a surface unit for further data transfer to ships, satellites, or shore stations via a radio-frequency link. This configuration establishes an interactive environment in which researchers can extract real-time data from multiple, but distant, underwater instruments. After evaluating the obtained data, control messages can be sent back to individual instruments to adapt the networks to changing situations. Underwater networks can also be used to increase the operating ranges of autonomous underwater vehicles by hopping the control and data messages through networks that cover large areas. A model of the ocean medium between acoustic sources and receivers is called a channel model. In an oceanic channel, characteristics of the acoustic signals change as they travel from transmitters to receivers. These characteristics depend upon the acoustic frequency, the distances between sources and receivers, the paths followed by the signals, and the prevailing ocean environment in the vicinity of the paths. Properties of the received signals can be derived from those of the transmitted signals using these channel models. This study concludes that ray-theory models are best suited to the simulation of acoustic signal propagation in oceanic channels and identifies 33 such models that are eligible candidates.

  1. Communication in Pipes Using Acoustic Modems that Provide Minimal Obstruction to Fluid Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph (Inventor); Archer, Eric D. (Inventor); Bao, Xiaoqi (Inventor); Sherrit, Stewart (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A plurality of phased array acoustic communication devices are used to communicate data along a tubulation, such as a well. The phased array acoustic communication devices employ phased arrays of acoustic transducers, such as piezoelectric transducers, to direct acoustic energy in desired directions along the tubulation. The system is controlled by a computer-based controller. Information, including data and commands, is communicated using digital signaling.

  2. The Acoustical Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Melissa

    Asserting that without an adequate acoustical environment, learning activities can be hindered, this paper reviews the literature on classroom acoustics, particularly noise, reverberation, signal-to-noise ratio, task performance, and recommendations for improvement. Through this review, the paper seeks to determine whether portable classrooms…

  3. Cystic acoustic schwannomas.

    PubMed

    Lunardi, P; Missori, P; Mastronardi, L; Fortuna, A

    1991-01-01

    Three cases with large space-occupying cysts in the cerebellopontine angle are reported. CT and MRI findings were not typical for acoustic schwannomas but at operation, besides the large cysts, small acoustic schwannomas could be detected and removed. The clinical and neuroradiological features of this unusual variety and the CT and MRI differential diagnosis of cerebellopontine angle lesions are discussed.

  4. Acoustic Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowling, David R.; Sabra, Karim G.

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic waves carry information about their source and collect information about their environment as they propagate. This article reviews how these information-carrying and -collecting features of acoustic waves that travel through fluids can be exploited for remote sensing. In nearly all cases, modern acoustic remote sensing involves array-recorded sounds and array signal processing to recover multidimensional results. The application realm for acoustic remote sensing spans an impressive range of signal frequencies (10-2 to 107 Hz) and distances (10-2 to 107 m) and involves biomedical ultrasound imaging, nondestructive evaluation, oil and gas exploration, military systems, and Nuclear Test Ban Treaty monitoring. In the past two decades, approaches have been developed to robustly localize remote sources; remove noise and multipath distortion from recorded signals; and determine the acoustic characteristics of the environment through which the sound waves have traveled, even when the recorded sounds originate from uncooperative sources or are merely ambient noise.

  5. Acoustic suspension system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, M. C.; Wang, T. G. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    An acoustic levitation system is described, with single acoustic source and a small reflector to stably levitate a small object while the object is processed as by coating or heating it. The system includes a concave acoustic source which has locations on opposite sides of its axis that vibrate towards and away from a focal point to generate a converging acoustic field. A small reflector is located near the focal point, and preferably slightly beyond it, to create an intense acoustic field that stably supports a small object near the reflector. The reflector is located about one-half wavelength from the focal point and is concavely curved to a radius of curvature (L) of about one-half the wavelength, to stably support an object one-quarter wavelength (N) from the reflector.

  6. Virtual acoustics displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenzel, Elizabeth M.; Fisher, Scott S.; Stone, Philip K.; Foster, Scott H.

    1991-01-01

    The real time acoustic display capabilities are described which were developed for the Virtual Environment Workstation (VIEW) Project at NASA-Ames. The acoustic display is capable of generating localized acoustic cues in real time over headphones. An auditory symbology, a related collection of representational auditory 'objects' or 'icons', can be designed using ACE (Auditory Cue Editor), which links both discrete and continuously varying acoustic parameters with information or events in the display. During a given display scenario, the symbology can be dynamically coordinated in real time with 3-D visual objects, speech, and gestural displays. The types of displays feasible with the system range from simple warnings and alarms to the acoustic representation of multidimensional data or events.

  7. Cochlear bionic acoustic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Fuyin; Wu, Jiu Hui; Huang, Meng; Fu, Gang; Bai, Changan

    2014-11-01

    A design of bionic acoustic metamaterial and acoustic functional devices was proposed by employing the mammalian cochlear as a prototype. First, combined with the experimental data in previous literatures, it is pointed out that the cochlear hair cells and stereocilia cluster are a kind of natural biological acoustic metamaterials with the negative stiffness characteristics. Then, to design the acoustic functional devices conveniently in engineering application, a simplified parametric helical structure was proposed to replace actual irregular cochlea for bionic design, and based on the computational results of such a bionic parametric helical structure, it is suggested that the overall cochlear is a local resonant system with the negative dynamic effective mass characteristics. There are many potential applications in the bandboard energy recovery device, cochlear implant, and acoustic black hole.

  8. Acoustic integrated extinction

    PubMed Central

    Norris, Andrew N.

    2015-01-01

    The integrated extinction (IE) is defined as the integral of the scattering cross section as a function of wavelength. Sohl et al. (2007 J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 122, 3206–3210. (doi:10.1121/1.2801546)) derived an IE expression for acoustic scattering that is causal, i.e. the scattered wavefront in the forward direction arrives later than the incident plane wave in the background medium. The IE formula was based on electromagnetic results, for which scattering is causal by default. Here, we derive a formula for the acoustic IE that is valid for causal and non-causal scattering. The general result is expressed as an integral of the time-dependent forward scattering function. The IE reduces to a finite integral for scatterers with zero long-wavelength monopole and dipole amplitudes. Implications for acoustic cloaking are discussed and a new metric is proposed for broadband acoustic transparency. PMID:27547100

  9. Virtual acoustics displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenzel, Elizabeth M.; Fisher, Scott S.; Stone, Philip K.; Foster, Scott H.

    1991-03-01

    The real time acoustic display capabilities are described which were developed for the Virtual Environment Workstation (VIEW) Project at NASA-Ames. The acoustic display is capable of generating localized acoustic cues in real time over headphones. An auditory symbology, a related collection of representational auditory 'objects' or 'icons', can be designed using ACE (Auditory Cue Editor), which links both discrete and continuously varying acoustic parameters with information or events in the display. During a given display scenario, the symbology can be dynamically coordinated in real time with 3-D visual objects, speech, and gestural displays. The types of displays feasible with the system range from simple warnings and alarms to the acoustic representation of multidimensional data or events.

  10. Classroom Acoustics: The Problem, Impact, and Solution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berg, Frederick S.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    This article describes aspects of classroom acoustics that interfere with the ability of listeners to understand speech. It considers impacts on students and teachers and offers four possible solutions: noise control, signal control without amplification, individual amplification systems, and sound field amplification systems. (Author/DB)

  11. Independent trapping and manipulation of microparticles using dexterous acoustic tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courtney, Charles R. P.; Demore, Christine E. M.; Wu, Hongxiao; Grinenko, Alon; Wilcox, Paul D.; Cochran, Sandy; Drinkwater, Bruce W.

    2014-04-01

    An electronically controlled acoustic tweezer was used to demonstrate two acoustic manipulation phenomena: superposition of Bessel functions to allow independent manipulation of multiple particles and the use of higher-order Bessel functions to trap particles in larger regions than is possible with first-order traps. The acoustic tweezers consist of a circular 64-element ultrasonic array operating at 2.35 MHz which generates ultrasonic pressure fields in a millimeter-scale fluid-filled chamber. The manipulation capabilities were demonstrated experimentally with 45 and 90-μm-diameter polystyrene spheres. These capabilities bring the dexterity of acoustic tweezers substantially closer to that of optical tweezers.

  12. Independent trapping and manipulation of microparticles using dexterous acoustic tweezers

    SciTech Connect

    Courtney, Charles R. P.; Demore, Christine E. M.; Wu, Hongxiao; Cochran, Sandy; Grinenko, Alon; Wilcox, Paul D.; Drinkwater, Bruce W.

    2014-04-14

    An electronically controlled acoustic tweezer was used to demonstrate two acoustic manipulation phenomena: superposition of Bessel functions to allow independent manipulation of multiple particles and the use of higher-order Bessel functions to trap particles in larger regions than is possible with first-order traps. The acoustic tweezers consist of a circular 64-element ultrasonic array operating at 2.35 MHz which generates ultrasonic pressure fields in a millimeter-scale fluid-filled chamber. The manipulation capabilities were demonstrated experimentally with 45 and 90-μm-diameter polystyrene spheres. These capabilities bring the dexterity of acoustic tweezers substantially closer to that of optical tweezers.

  13. Acoustic communications and autonomous underwater vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitag, Lee; Grund, Matthew; Preisig, James; Stojanovic, Milica

    2004-05-01

    Acoustic communications systems used on autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) provide supervisory control, access to real-time data, and also allow multiple vehicles to cooperate in undertaking adaptive sampling missions. However, the use of acoustic systems on AUVs presents special challenges because of limited space for optimal placement of transducers, and potential conflicts with other acoustic systems such as side-scan sonars and transponders. In addition, radiated and structure-borne acoustic interference from thrusters and actuators reduces the sensitivity of on-board receivers. Recent work in acoustic communications and AUVs has included combining some navigation functions into communications equipment, development of operating modes that remove conflicts between different subsystems, design of vehicle components to avoid or remove interference, and other approaches to improving performance. While these efforts have been successful for specific installations, many challenges remain. This talk addresses problems and solutions for supervised and completely autonomous multi-vehicle communications to support complex AUV missions. Also presented are recent results which demonstrate that acoustic communications can be used successfully on a variety of AUV platforms for many different applications. [Work supported by ONR.

  14. Exploratory Study of the Acoustic Performance of Piezoelectric Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    SantaMaria, O. S.; Thurlow, E. M.; Jones, M. G.

    1989-01-01

    The proposed ducted fan engine has prompted the need for increasingly lightweight and efficient noise control devices. Exploratory tests at the NASA Langley Research Center were conducted to evaluate three piezoelectric specimens as possible control transducers: a Polyvinylidene Flouride (PVDF) piezofilm sample and two composite samples of Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT) rods embedded in fiberglass. The tests measured the acoustic output efficiency and evaluated the noise control characteristics when interacting with a primary sound source. The results showed that a PZT sample could diminish the reflected acoustic waves. However, the PZT acoustic output must increase by several orders of magnitude to qualify as a control transducer for the ducted fan engine.

  15. System for Manipulating Drops and Bubbles Using Acoustic Radiation Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oeftering, Richard C. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    The manipulation and control of drops of liquid and gas bubbles is achieved using high intensity acoustics in the form of and/or acoustic radiation pressure and acoustic streaming. generated by a controlled wave emission from a transducer. Acoustic radiation pressure is used to deploy or dispense drops into a liquid or a gas or bubbles into a liquid at zero or near zero velocity from the discharge end of a needle such as a syringe needle. Acoustic streaming is useful in manipulating the drop or bubble during or after deployment. Deployment and discharge is achieved by focusing the acoustic radiation pressure on the discharge end of the needle, and passing the acoustic waves through the fluid in the needle. through the needle will itself, or coaxially through the fluid medium surrounding the needle. Alternatively, the acoustic waves can be counter-deployed by focusing on the discharge end of the needle from a transducer axially aligned with the needle, but at a position opposite the needle, to prevent premature deployment of the drop or bubble. The acoustic radiation pressure can also be used for detecting the presence or absence of a drop or a bubble at the tip of a needle or for sensing various physical characteristics of the drop or bubble such as size or density.

  16. Acoustic communication in insect disease vectors

    PubMed Central

    Vigoder, Felipe de Mello; Ritchie, Michael Gordon; Gibson, Gabriella; Peixoto, Alexandre Afranio

    2013-01-01

    Acoustic signalling has been extensively studied in insect species, which has led to a better understanding of sexual communication, sexual selection and modes of speciation. The significance of acoustic signals for a blood-sucking insect was first reported in the XIX century by Christopher Johnston, studying the hearing organs of mosquitoes, but has received relatively little attention in other disease vectors until recently. Acoustic signals are often associated with mating behaviour and sexual selection and changes in signalling can lead to rapid evolutionary divergence and may ultimately contribute to the process of speciation. Songs can also have implications for the success of novel methods of disease control such as determining the mating competitiveness of modified insects used for mass-release control programs. Species-specific sound “signatures” may help identify incipient species within species complexes that may be of epidemiological significance, e.g. of higher vectorial capacity, thereby enabling the application of more focussed control measures to optimise the reduction of pathogen transmission. Although the study of acoustic communication in insect vectors has been relatively limited, this review of research demonstrates their value as models for understanding both the functional and evolutionary significance of acoustic communication in insects. PMID:24473800

  17. Acoustic communication in insect disease vectors.

    PubMed

    Vigoder, Felipe de Mello; Ritchie, Michael Gordon; Gibson, Gabriella; Peixoto, Alexandre Afranio

    2013-01-01

    Acoustic signalling has been extensively studied in insect species, which has led to a better understanding of sexual communication, sexual selection and modes of speciation. The significance of acoustic signals for a blood-sucking insect was first reported in the XIX century by Christopher Johnston, studying the hearing organs of mosquitoes, but has received relatively little attention in other disease vectors until recently. Acoustic signals are often associated with mating behaviour and sexual selection and changes in signalling can lead to rapid evolutionary divergence and may ultimately contribute to the process of speciation. Songs can also have implications for the success of novel methods of disease control such as determining the mating competitiveness of modified insects used for mass-release control programs. Species-specific sound "signatures" may help identify incipient species within species complexes that may be of epidemiological significance, e.g. of higher vectorial capacity, thereby enabling the application of more focussed control measures to optimise the reduction of pathogen transmission. Although the study of acoustic communication in insect vectors has been relatively limited, this review of research demonstrates their value as models for understanding both the functional and evolutionary significance of acoustic communication in insects.

  18. Diffractive acoustic elements for laser ultrasonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, M.; Sharples, S. D.; Somekh, M. G.

    2000-05-01

    In a laser based surface acoustic wave (SAW) system the initial wavefront of the SAW is determined by the distribution of generating light on the sample surface. In our usual system the generating light is focussed into an arc or concentric arcs which spatially focus and temporally filter the SAWs. We have developed acoustic diffractive elements (DAEs) which, like diffractive optical elements, can shape the SAW distribution by diffraction. These DAEs are, like their optical analogues, highly dispersive and special consideration has to be made at the design stage in order to accommodate and utilize this dispersion. We demonstrate DAEs that produce well controlled multiple focii, frequency suppression and frequency selection. We also show that these complex acoustic elements can be accurately modelled using a simple angular spectrum technique. The DAEs are produced by computer generated holograms which control the generating distribution of light. These DAEs have applications in multi-frequency acoustic, harmonic acoustic imaging, SAW wavefront control and imaging on curved surfaces.

  19. Acoustic Imaging Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Behavior in the Immediate Forebay of the Water Temperature Control Tower at Cougar Dam, 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Fenton; Johnson, Gary E.; Royer, Ida M.; Phillips, Nathan RJ; Hughes, James S.; Fischer, Eric S.; Ploskey, Gene R.

    2011-10-01

    This report presents the results of an evaluation of juvenile Chinook salmonid (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) behavior in the immediate forebay of the Water Temperature Control (WTC) tower at Cougar Dam in 2010. The study was conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The overall goal of the study was to characterize juvenile salmonid behavior and movement patterns in the immediate forebay of the WTC tower for fisheries resource managers to use to make decisions on bioengineering designs for long-term structures and/or operations to facilitate safe downstream passage for juvenile salmonids. We collected acoustic imaging (Dual-Frequency Identification Sonar; DIDSON) data from February 1, 2010 through January 31, 2011 to evaluate juvenile salmonid behavior year-round in the immediate forebay surface layer of the WTC tower (within 20 m, depth 0-5 m). From October 28, 2010 through January 31, 2011 a BlueView acoustic camera was also deployed in an attempt to determine its usefulness for future studies as well as augment the DIDSON data. For the DIDSON data, we processed a total of 35 separate 24-h periods systematically covering every other week in the 12-month study. Two different 24-hour periods were processed for the BlueView data for the feasibility study. Juvenile salmonids were present in the immediate forebay of the WTC tower throughout 2010. The juvenile salmonid abundance index was low in the spring (<200 fish per sample-day), began increasing in late April and peaked in mid-May. Fish abundance index began decreasing in early June and remained low in the summer months. Fish abundance increased again in the fall, starting in October, and peaked on November 8-9. A second peak occurred on December 22. Afterwards, abundance was low for the rest of the study (through January 2011). Average fish length for juvenile salmonids during early spring 2010 was 214 {+-} 86 mm (standard deviation). From May through early November

  20. Acoustic mapping velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muste, M.; Baranya, S.; Tsubaki, R.; Kim, D.; Ho, H.; Tsai, H.; Law, D.

    2016-05-01

    Knowledge of sediment dynamics in rivers is of great importance for various practical purposes. Despite its high relevance in riverine environment processes, the monitoring of sediment rates remains a major and challenging task for both suspended and bed load estimation. While the measurement of suspended load is currently an active area of testing with nonintrusive technologies (optical and acoustic), bed load measurement does not mark a similar progress. This paper describes an innovative combination of measurement techniques and analysis protocols that establishes the proof-of-concept for a promising technique, labeled herein Acoustic Mapping Velocimetry (AMV). The technique estimates bed load rates in rivers developing bed forms using a nonintrusive measurements approach. The raw information for AMV is collected with acoustic multibeam technology that in turn provides maps of the bathymetry over longitudinal swaths. As long as the acoustic maps can be acquired relatively quickly and the repetition rate for the mapping is commensurate with the movement of the bed forms, successive acoustic maps capture the progression of the bed form movement. Two-dimensional velocity maps associated with the bed form migration are obtained by implementing algorithms typically used in particle image velocimetry to acoustic maps converted in gray-level images. Furthermore, use of the obtained acoustic and velocity maps in conjunction with analytical formulations (e.g., Exner equation) enables estimation of multidirectional bed load rates over the whole imaged area. This paper presents a validation study of the AMV technique using a set of laboratory experiments.

  1. Acoustic sniper localization system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prado, Gervasio; Dhaliwal, Hardave; Martel, Philip O.

    1997-02-01

    Technologies for sniper localization have received increased attention in recent months as American forces have been deployed to various trouble spots around the world. Among the technologies considered for this task acoustics is a natural choice for various reasons. The acoustic signatures of gunshots are loud and distinctive, making them easy to detect even in high noise background environments. Acoustics provides a passive sensing technology with excellent range and non line of sight capabilities. Last but not least, an acoustic sniper location system can be built at a low cost with off the shelf components. Despite its many advantages, the performance of acoustic sensors can degrade under adverse propagation conditions. Localization accuracy, although good, is usually not accurate enough to pinpoint a sniper's location in some scenarios (for example which widow in a building or behind which tree in a grove). For these more demanding missions, the acoustic sensor can be used in conjunction with an infra red imaging system that detects the muzzle blast of the gun. The acoustic system can be used to cue the pointing system of the IR camera in the direction of the shot's source.

  2. Origami acoustics: using principles of folding structural acoustics for simple and large focusing of sound energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harne, Ryan L.; Lynd, Danielle T.

    2016-08-01

    Fixed in spatial distribution, arrays of planar, electromechanical acoustic transducers cannot adapt their wave energy focusing abilities unless each transducer is externally controlled, creating challenges for the implementation and portability of such beamforming systems. Recently, planar, origami-based structural tessellations are found to facilitate great versatility in system function and properties through kinematic folding. In this research we bridge the physics of acoustics and origami-based design to discover that the simple topological reconfigurations of a Miura-ori-based acoustic array yield many orders of magnitude worth of reversible change in wave energy focusing: a potential for acoustic field morphing easily obtained through deployable, tessellated architectures. Our experimental and theoretical studies directly translate the roles of folding the tessellated array to the adaptations in spectral and spatial wave propagation sensitivities for far field energy transmission. It is shown that kinematic folding rules and flat-foldable tessellated arrays collectively provide novel solutions to the long-standing challenges of conventional, electronically-steered acoustic beamformers. While our examples consider sound radiation from the foldable array in air, linear acoustic reciprocity dictates that the findings may inspire new innovations for acoustic receivers, e.g. adaptive sound absorbers and microphone arrays, as well as concepts that include water-borne waves.

  3. Acoustic purification of extracellular microvesicles.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyungheon; Shao, Huilin; Weissleder, Ralph; Lee, Hakho

    2015-03-24

    Microvesicles (MVs) are an increasingly important source for biomarker discovery and clinical diagnostics. The small size of MVs and their presence in complex biological environment, however, pose technical challenges in sample preparation, particularly when sample volumes are small. We herein present an acoustic nanofilter system that size-specifically separates MVs in a continuous and contact-free manner. The separation uses ultrasound standing waves to exert differential acoustic force on MVs according to their size and density. By optimizing the design of the ultrasound transducers and underlying electronics, we were able to achieve a high separation yield and resolution. The "filter size-cutoff" can be controlled electronically in situ, which enables versatile MV-size selection. We applied the acoustic nanofilter to isolate nanoscale (<200 nm) vesicles from cell culture media as well as MVs in stored red blood cell products. With the capacity for rapid and contact-free MV isolation, the developed system could become a versatile preparatory tool for MV analyses.

  4. The acoustic design of outside broadcast vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, E. W.

    1984-05-01

    A review is given of the acoustic design of outside broadcast vehicles in terms of the constraints implicit in the use of road vehicles. A new design of vehicle wall construction is described, the provision of sound absorbing material suitable for use in small enclosures is discussed, and particular factors involved in utilizing large (articulated) vehicles are mentioned. As an illustration, an account is given of the acoustic design of the BBC's Digital Control Vehicle: priority was given, in this vehicle, to the provision of the best possible environment for sound monitoring and control.

  5. Feigned Depression and Feigned Sleepiness: A Voice Acoustical Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reilly, Nicole; Cannizzaro, Michael S.; Harel, Brian T.; Snyder, Peter J.

    2004-01-01

    We sought to profile the voice acoustical correlates of simulated, or feigned depression by neurologically and psychiatrically healthy control subjects. We also sought to identify the voice acoustical correlates of feigned sleepiness for these same subjects. Twenty-two participants were asked to speak freely about a cartoon, to count from 1 to 10,…

  6. The room acoustic rendering equation.

    PubMed

    Siltanen, Samuel; Lokki, Tapio; Kiminki, Sami; Savioja, Lauri

    2007-09-01

    An integral equation generalizing a variety of known geometrical room acoustics modeling algorithms is presented. The formulation of the room acoustic rendering equation is adopted from computer graphics. Based on the room acoustic rendering equation, an acoustic radiance transfer method, which can handle both diffuse and nondiffuse reflections, is derived. In a case study, the method is used to predict several acoustic parameters of a room model. The results are compared to measured data of the actual room and to the results given by other acoustics prediction software. It is concluded that the method can predict most acoustic parameters reliably and provides results as accurate as current commercial room acoustic prediction software. Although the presented acoustic radiance transfer method relies on geometrical acoustics, it can be extended to model diffraction and transmission through materials in future.

  7. PRSEUS Acoustic Panel Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicolette, Velicki; Yovanof, Nicolette P.; Baraja, Jaime; Mathur, Gopal; Thrash, Patrick; Pickell, Robert

    2011-01-01

    This report describes the development of a novel structural concept, Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS), that addresses the demanding fuselage loading requirements for the Hybrid Wing or Blended Wing Body (BWB) airplane configuration with regards to acoustic response. A PRSEUS panel was designed and fabricated and provided to NASA-LaRC for acoustic response testing in the Structural Acoustics Loads and Transmission (SALT) facility). Preliminary assessments of the sound transmission characteristics of a PRSEUS panel subjected to a representative Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) operating environment were completed for the NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Program.

  8. Acoustic well cleaner

    DOEpatents

    Maki, Jr., Voldi E.; Sharma, Mukul M.

    1997-01-21

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for cleaning the wellbore and the near wellbore region. A sonde is provided which is adapted to be lowered into a borehole and which includes a plurality of acoustic transducers arranged around the sonde. Electrical power provided by a cable is converted to acoustic energy. The high intensity acoustic energy directed to the borehole wall and into the near wellbore region, redissolves or resuspends the material which is reducing the permeability of the formation and/or restricting flow in the wellbore.

  9. Acoustical heat pumping engine

    DOEpatents

    Wheatley, John C.; Swift, Gregory W.; Migliori, Albert

    1983-08-16

    The disclosure is directed to an acoustical heat pumping engine without moving seals. A tubular housing holds a compressible fluid capable of supporting an acoustical standing wave. An acoustical driver is disposed at one end of the housing and the other end is capped. A second thermodynamic medium is disposed in the housing near to but spaced from the capped end. Heat is pumped along the second thermodynamic medium toward the capped end as a consequence both of the pressure oscillation due to the driver and imperfect thermal contact between the fluid and the second thermodynamic medium.

  10. Acoustical heat pumping engine

    DOEpatents

    Wheatley, J.C.; Swift, G.W.; Migliori, A.

    1983-08-16

    The disclosure is directed to an acoustical heat pumping engine without moving seals. A tubular housing holds a compressible fluid capable of supporting an acoustical standing wave. An acoustical driver is disposed at one end of the housing and the other end is capped. A second thermodynamic medium is disposed in the housing near to but spaced from the capped end. Heat is pumped along the second thermodynamic medium toward the capped end as a consequence both of the pressure oscillation due to the driver and imperfect thermal contact between the fluid and the second thermodynamic medium. 2 figs.

  11. RETRACTED: Size-controlled spherical polymer nanoparticles: synthesis with tandem acoustic emulsification followed by soap-free emulsion polymerization and one-step fabrication of colloidal crystal films of various colors.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Yuki; Nakabayashi, Koji; Kojima, Maya; Atobe, Mahito

    2014-11-01

    We have developed a novel synthesis method for size-controlled polymer nanoparticles using soap-free emulsion polymerization. This new synthetic method involves sequential ultrasonic irradiation (20kHz→500kHz→1.6MHz→2.4MHz) for acoustic emulsification of a water-insoluble monomer such as methylmethacrylate (MMA) in an aqueous medium, followed by emulsion polymerization in the obtained solution without using any surfactants. The sequential ultrasonication (tandem acoustic emulsification) could provide a clear and stable emulsified solution containing monomer droplets with relatively narrow size distribution in the nanometer range. The subsequent polymerization in this solution yielded size-controlled polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) nanoparticles and monodisperse PMMA nanoparticles of different sizes. Furthermore, colloidal crystal films could be easily prepared from the as-polymerized nanoparticle solution using the fluidic-cell method. Moreover, we succeeded to modify the structural color of colloidal crystal films by the addition of a small amount of organic solvent to the as-polymerized nanoparticle solution for the fluidic-cell method.

  12. Student design projects in applied acoustics.

    PubMed

    Bös, Joachim; Moritz, Karsten; Skowronek, Adam; Thyes, Christian; Tschesche, Johannes; Hanselka, Holger

    2012-03-01

    This paper describes a series of student projects which are intended to complement theoretical education in acoustics and engineering noise control with practical experience. The projects are also intended to enhance the students' ability to work in a team, to manage a project, and to present their results. The projects are carried out in close cooperation with industrial partners so that the students can get a taste of the professional life of noise control engineers. The organization of such a project, its execution, and some of the results from the most recent student project are presented as a demonstrative example. This latest project involved the creation of noise maps of a production hall, the acoustic analysis of a packaging machine, and the acoustic analysis of a spiral vibratory conveyor. Upon completion of the analysis, students then designed, applied, and verified some simple preliminary noise reduction measures to demonstrate the potential of these techniques.

  13. An acoustic glucose sensor.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ruifen; Stevenson, Adrian C; Lowe, Christopher R

    2012-05-15

    In vivo glucose monitoring is required for tighter glycaemic control. This report describes a new approach to construct a miniature implantable device based on a magnetic acoustic resonance sensor (MARS). A ≈ 600-800 nm thick glucose-responsive poly(acrylamide-co-3-acrylamidophenylboronic acid) (poly(acrylamide-co-3-APB)) film was polymerised on the quartz disc (12 mm in diameter and 0.25 mm thick) of the MARS. The swelling/shrinking of the polymer film induced by the glucose binding to the phenylboronate caused changes in the resonance amplitude of the quartz disc in the MARS. A linear relationship between the response of the MARS and the glucose concentration in the range ≈ 0-15 mM was observed, with the optimum response of the MARS sensor being obtained when the polymer films contained ≈ 20 mol% 3-APB. The MARS glucose sensor also functioned under flow conditions (9 μl/min) with a response almost identical to the sensor under static or non-flow conditions. The results suggest that the MARS could offer a promising strategy for developing a small subcutaneously implanted continuous glucose monitor.

  14. Acoustics of the Intonarumori

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serafin, Stefania

    2005-04-01

    The Intonarumori were a family of musical instruments invented by the Italian futurist composer and painter Luigi Russolo. Each Intonarumori was made of a wooden parallelepiped sound box, inside which a wheel of different sizes and materials was setting into vibration a catgut or metal string. The pitch of the string was varied by using a lever, while the speed of the wheel was controlled by the performer using a crank. At one end of the string there was a drumhead that transmitted vibrations to the speaker. Unfortunately, all the original Intonarumori were destroyed after a fire during World War II. Since then, researchers have tried to understand the sound production mechanism of such instruments, especially by consulting the patents compiled by Russolo or by reading his book ``The art of noise.'' In this paper we describe the acoustics of the Intonarumori. Based on such description, we propose physical models that simulate such instruments. The intonarumori's string is modeled using a one dimensional waveguide, which is excited either by an impact or a friction model. The body of the instrument is modeled using a 3-D rectangular mesh, while the horn is considered as an omnidirectional radiator.

  15. Acoustic imaging system

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Richard W.

    1979-01-01

    An acoustic imaging system for displaying an object viewed by a moving array of transducers as the array is pivoted about a fixed point within a given plane. A plurality of transducers are fixedly positioned and equally spaced within a laterally extending array and operatively directed to transmit and receive acoustic signals along substantially parallel transmission paths. The transducers are sequentially activated along the array to transmit and receive acoustic signals according to a preestablished sequence. Means are provided for generating output voltages for each reception of an acoustic signal, corresponding to the coordinate position of the object viewed as the array is pivoted. Receptions from each of the transducers are presented on the same display at coordinates corresponding to the actual position of the object viewed to form a plane view of the object scanned.

  16. Compact acoustic refrigerator

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, G.A.

    1991-12-31

    This invention is comprised of a compact acoustic refrigeration system that actively cools components, e.g., electrical circuits, in a borehole environment. An acoustic engine includes first thermodynamic elements for generating a standing acoustic wave in a selected medium. An acoustic refrigerator includes second thermodynamic elements located in the standing wave for generating a relatively cold temperature at a first end of the second thermodynamic elements and a relatively hot temperature at a second end of the second thermodynamic elements. A resonator volume cooperates with the first and second thermodynamic elements to support the standing wave. To accommodate the high heat fluxes required for heat transfer to/from the first and second thermodynamic elements, first heat pipes transfer heat from the heat load to the second thermodynamic elements and second heat pipes transfer heat from first and second thermodynamic elements to the borehole environment.

  17. Acoustic borehole logging

    SciTech Connect

    Medlin, W.L.; Manzi, S.J.

    1990-10-09

    This patent describes an acoustic borehole logging method. It comprises traversing a borehole with a borehole logging tool containing a transmitter of acoustic energy having a free-field frequency spectrum with at least one characteristic resonant frequency of vibration and spaced-apart receiver, repeatedly exciting the transmitter with a swept frequency tone burst of a duration sufficiently greater than the travel time of acoustic energy between the transmitter and the receiver to allow borehole cavity resonances to be established within the borehole cavity formed between the borehole logging tool and the borehole wall, detecting acoustic energy amplitude modulated by the borehole cavity resonances with the spaced-apart receiver, and recording an amplitude verses frequency output of the receiver in correlation with depth as a log of the borehole frequency spectrum representative of the subsurface formation comprising the borehole wall.

  18. Acoustic imaging system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kendall, J. M., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Tool detects noise sources by scanning sound "scene" and displaying relative location of noise-producing elements in area. System consists of ellipsoidal acoustic mirror and microphone and a display device.

  19. Compact acoustic refrigerator

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, G.A.

    1992-11-24

    A compact acoustic refrigeration system actively cools components, e.g., electrical circuits, in a borehole environment. An acoustic engine includes first thermodynamic elements for generating a standing acoustic wave in a selected medium. An acoustic refrigerator includes second thermodynamic elements located in the standing wave for generating a relatively cold temperature at a first end of the second thermodynamic elements and a relatively hot temperature at a second end of the second thermodynamic elements. A resonator volume cooperates with the first and second thermodynamic elements to support the standing wave. To accommodate the high heat fluxes required for heat transfer to/from the first and second thermodynamic elements, first heat pipes transfer heat from the heat load to the second thermodynamic elements and second heat pipes transfer heat from first and second thermodynamic elements to the borehole environment. 18 figs.

  20. Compact acoustic refrigerator

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, Gloria A.

    1992-01-01

    A compact acoustic refrigeration system actively cools components, e.g., electrical circuits (22), in a borehole environment. An acoustic engine (12, 14) includes first thermodynamic elements (12) for generating a standing acoustic wave in a selected medium. An acoustic refrigerator (16, 26, 28) includes second thermodynamic elements (16) located in the standing wave for generating a relatively cold temperature at a first end of the second thermodynamic elements (16) and a relatively hot temperature at a second end of the second thermodynamic elements (16). A resonator volume (18) cooperates with the first and second thermodynamic elements (12, 16) to support the standing wave. To accommodate the high heat fluxes required for heat transfer to/from the first and second thermodynamic elements (12, 16), first heat pipes (24, 26) transfer heat from the heat load (22) to the second thermodynamic elements (16) and second heat pipes (28, 32) transfer heat from first and second thermodynamic elements (12, 16) to the borehole environment.

  1. Acoustic bubble traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geisler, Reinhard; Kurz, Thomas; Lauterborn, Werner

    2000-07-01

    A small, oscillating bubble in a liquid can be trapped in the antinode of an acoustic standing wave field. Bubble stability is required for the study of single bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL). The properties of the acoustic resonator are essential for the stable trapping of sonoluminescing bubbles. Resonators can be chosen according to the intended application: size and geometry can be varied in a wide range. In this work, the acoustic responses of different resonators were measured by means of holographic interferometry, hydrophones and a laser vibrometer. Also, high-speed photography was used to observe the bubble dynamics. Several single, stable sonoluminescent bubbles were trapped simultaneously within an acoustic resonator in the pressure antinodes of a higher harmonic mode (few bubble sonoluminescence, FBSL).

  2. Department of Cybernetic Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The development of the theory, instrumentation and applications of methods and systems for the measurement, analysis, processing and synthesis of acoustic signals within the audio frequency range, particularly of the speech signal and the vibro-acoustic signal emitted by technical and industrial equipments treated as noise and vibration sources was discussed. The research work, both theoretical and experimental, aims at applications in various branches of science, and medicine, such as: acoustical diagnostics and phoniatric rehabilitation of pathological and postoperative states of the speech organ; bilateral ""man-machine'' speech communication based on the analysis, recognition and synthesis of the speech signal; vibro-acoustical diagnostics and continuous monitoring of the state of machines, technical equipments and technological processes.

  3. Basic Linear Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, Alan D.

    This chapter deals with the physical and mathematical aspects of sound when the disturbances are, in some sense, small. Acoustics is usually concerned with small-amplitude phenomena, and consequently a linear description is usually acoustics applicable. Disturbances are governed by the properties of the medium in which they occur, and the governing equations are the equations of continuum mechanics, which apply equally to gases, liquids, and solids. These include the mass, momentum, and energy equations, as well as thermodynamic principles. The viscosity and thermal conduction enter into the versions of these equations that apply to fluids. Fluids of typical great interest are air and sea water, and consequently this chapter includes a summary of their relevant acoustic properties. The foundation is also laid for the consideration of acoustic waves in elastic solids, suspensions, bubbly liquids, and porous media.

  4. Acoustic Neuroma Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... this sponsor... Platinum Sponsor More from this sponsor... Gold Sponsor University of Colorado Acoustic Neuroma Program Rocky Mountain Gamma Knife Center More from this sponsor... Gold Sponsor NYU Langone Medical Center Departments of Neurosurgery ...

  5. Wavefront modulation and subwavelength diffractive acoustics with an acoustic metasurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yangbo; Wang, Wenqi; Chen, Huanyang; Konneker, Adam; Popa, Bogdan-Ioan; Cummer, Steven A.

    2014-11-01

    Metasurfaces are a family of novel wavefront-shaping devices with planar profile and subwavelength thickness. Acoustic metasurfaces with ultralow profile yet extraordinary wave manipulating properties would be highly desirable for improving the performance of many acoustic wave-based applications. However, designing acoustic metasurfaces with similar functionality to their electromagnetic counterparts remains challenging with traditional metamaterial design approaches. Here we present a design and realization of an acoustic metasurface based on tapered labyrinthine metamaterials. The demonstrated metasurface can not only steer an acoustic beam as expected from the generalized Snell’s law, but also exhibits various unique properties such as conversion from propagating wave to surface mode, extraordinary beam-steering and apparent negative refraction through higher-order diffraction. Such designer acoustic metasurfaces provide a new design methodology for acoustic signal modulation devices and may be useful for applications such as acoustic imaging, beam steering, ultrasound lens design and acoustic surface wave-based applications.

  6. Wavefront modulation and subwavelength diffractive acoustics with an acoustic metasurface.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yangbo; Wang, Wenqi; Chen, Huanyang; Konneker, Adam; Popa, Bogdan-Ioan; Cummer, Steven A

    2014-11-24

    Metasurfaces are a family of novel wavefront-shaping devices with planar profile and subwavelength thickness. Acoustic metasurfaces with ultralow profile yet extraordinary wave manipulating properties would be highly desirable for improving the performance of many acoustic wave-based applications. However, designing acoustic metasurfaces with similar functionality to their electromagnetic counterparts remains challenging with traditional metamaterial design approaches. Here we present a design and realization of an acoustic metasurface based on tapered labyrinthine metamaterials. The demonstrated metasurface can not only steer an acoustic beam as expected from the generalized Snell's law, but also exhibits various unique properties such as conversion from propagating wave to surface mode, extraordinary beam-steering and apparent negative refraction through higher-order diffraction. Such designer acoustic metasurfaces provide a new design methodology for acoustic signal modulation devices and may be useful for applications such as acoustic imaging, beam steering, ultrasound lens design and acoustic surface wave-based applications.

  7. Ocean Acoustic Observatory Federation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-09-30

    J., C. G. Fox, and F. K. Duennebier, Hydroacoustic detection of submarine landslides on Kilauea volcano , Geophys. Res. Lett., vol. 28, 1811-1814...acoustic tomography experiments in the vicinity of coastal North America, • Monitor, in real time, marine mammals, earthquakes and volcanoes in the...distances, coastal tomography and thermometry, and earthquakes and volcanoes in the northern Pacific. APPROACH The members of the Ocean Acoustic

  8. Numerical Techniques in Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J. (Compiler)

    1985-01-01

    This is the compilation of abstracts of the Numerical Techniques in Acoustics Forum held at the ASME's Winter Annual Meeting. This forum was for informal presentation and information exchange of ongoing acoustic work in finite elements, finite difference, boundary elements and other numerical approaches. As part of this forum, it was intended to allow the participants time to raise questions on unresolved problems and to generate discussions on possible approaches and methods of solution.

  9. The neonatal acoustic reflex.

    PubMed

    Weatherby, L A; Bennett, M J

    1980-01-01

    Probe tones from 220 Hz to 2 000 Hz were used to measure the static and dynamic acoustic impedance of 44 neonates. Acoustic reflex thresholds to broad band noise were obtained from every neonate tested when employing the higher frequency probe tones. The reflex threshold levels measured are similar to those of adults. The static impedance values are discussed to give a possible explanation of why reflex thresholds cannot be detected using conventional 220 Hz impedance bridges.

  10. Directional Acoustic Density Sensor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-13

    fluctuations of fluid density at a point . (2) DESCRIPTION OF THE PRIOR ART [0004] Conventional vector sensors measure particle velocity, v (vx,Vytvz...dipole-type or first order sensor that is realized by measuring particle velocity at a point , (which is the vector sensor sensing approach for...underwater sensors), or by measuring the gradient of the acoustic pressure at two closely spaced (less than the wavelength of an acoustic wave) points as it

  11. Low Frequency Acoustics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-13

    with NOAA , ONR is providing technical services that will help establish a baseline for assessment of long- term VLF acoustic trends in selected...ABSTRACT unclassified c. THIS PAGE unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 sponsored by NOAA , was added to the...with NOAA (NMFS) and other parties has dealt with ocean acoustics related to issues stimulated by the Marine Mammal Protection Act. A focal point has

  12. Ocean acoustic reverberation tomography.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Robert A

    2015-12-01

    Seismic wide-angle imaging using ship-towed acoustic sources and networks of ocean bottom seismographs is a common technique for exploring earth structure beneath the oceans. In these studies, the recorded data are dominated by acoustic waves propagating as reverberations in the water column. For surveys with a small receiver spacing (e.g., <10 km), the acoustic wave field densely samples properties of the water column over the width of the receiver array. A method, referred to as ocean acoustic reverberation tomography, is developed that uses the travel times of direct and reflected waves to image ocean acoustic structure. Reverberation tomography offers an alternative approach for determining the structure of the oceans and advancing the understanding of ocean heat content and mixing processes. The technique has the potential for revealing small-scale ocean thermal structure over the entire vertical height of the water column and along long survey profiles or across three-dimensional volumes of the ocean. For realistic experimental geometries and data noise levels, the method can produce images of ocean sound speed on a smaller scale than traditional acoustic tomography.

  13. Shape-adaptable hyperlens for acoustic magnifying imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongkuan; Zhou, Xiaoming; Hu, Gengkai

    2016-11-01

    Previous prototypes of acoustic hyperlens consist of rigid channels, which are unable to adapt in shape to the object under detection. We propose to overcome this limitation by employing soft plastic tubes that could guide acoustics with robustness against bending deformation. Based on the idea of soft-tube acoustics, acoustic magnifying hyperlens with planar input and output surfaces has been fabricated and validated experimentally. The shape-adaption capability of the soft-tube hyperlens is demonstrated by a controlled experiment, in which the magnifying super-resolution images remain stable when the lens input surface is curved. Our study suggests a feasible route toward constructing the flexible channel-structured acoustic metamaterials with the shape-adaption capability, opening then an additional degree of freedom for full control of sound.

  14. Tunable acoustic double negativity metamaterial.

    PubMed

    Liang, Z; Willatzen, M; Li, J; Christensen, J

    2012-01-01

    Man-made composite materials called "metamaterials" allow for the creation of unusual wave propagation behavior. Acoustic and elastic metamaterials in particular, can pave the way for the full control of sound in realizing cloaks of invisibility, perfect lenses and much more. In this work we design acousto-elastic surface modes that are similar to surface plasmons in metals and on highly conducting surfaces perforated by holes. We combine a structure hosting these modes together with a gap material supporting negative modulus and collectively producing negative dispersion. By analytical techniques and full-wave simulations we attribute the observed behavior to the mass density and bulk modulus being simultaneously negative.

  15. Hyperreactivity to weak acoustic stimuli and prolonged acoustic startle latency in children with autism spectrum disorders

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background People with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are known to have enhanced auditory perception, however, acoustic startle response to weak stimuli has not been well documented in this population. The objectives of this study are to evaluate the basic profile of acoustic startle response, including peak startle latency and startle magnitude to weaker stimuli, in children with ASD and typical development (TD), and to evaluate their relationship to ASD characteristics. Methods We investigated acoustic startle response with weak and strong acoustic stimuli in 12 children with ASD and 28 children with TD, analyzing the relationship between startle measures and quantitative autistic traits assessed with the Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS). The electromyographic activity of the left orbicularis oculi muscle to acoustic stimuli of 65 to 115 dB sound pressure level (SPL), in increments of 5 dB, was measured to evaluate acoustic startle response. The average eyeblink magnitude for each acoustic stimuli intensity and the average peak startle latency of acoustic startle response were evaluated. Results The magnitude of the acoustic startle response to weak stimuli (85 dB or smaller) was greater in children with ASD. The peak startle latency was also prolonged in individuals with ASD. The average magnitude of the acoustic startle response for stimulus intensities greater than 85 dB was not significantly larger in the ASD group compared with the controls. Both greater startle magnitude in response to weak stimuli (particularly at 85 dB) and prolonged peak startle latency were significantly associated with total scores, as well as several subscales of the SRS in the whole sample. We also found a significant relationship between scores on the social cognition subscale of the SRS and the average magnitude of the acoustic startle response for stimulus intensities of 80 and 85 dB in the TD group. Conclusions Children with ASD exhibited larger startle magnitude to weak

  16. Sound transmission reduction with intelligent panel systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, Chris R.; Clark, Robert L.

    1992-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical investigations are performed of the use of intelligent panel systems to control the sound transmission and radiation. An intelligent structure is defined as a structural system with integrated actuators and sensors under the guidance of an adaptive, learning type controller. The system configuration is based on the Active Structural Acoustic Control (ASAC) concept where control inputs are applied directly to the structure to minimize an error quantity related to the radiated sound field. In this case multiple piezoelectric elements are employed as sensors. The importance of optimal shape and location is demonstrated to be of the same order of influence as increasing the number of channels of control.

  17. Blowing Polymer Bubbles in an Acoustic Levitator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, M. C.

    1985-01-01

    In new manufacturing process, small gas-filled polymer shells made by injecting gas directly into acoustically levitated prepolymer drops. New process allows sufficient time for precise control of shell geometry. Applications foreseen in fabrication of deuterium/tritium-filled fusion targets and in pharmaceutical coatings. New process also useful in glass blowing and blow molding.

  18. Acoustic-Induced Drag on a Bubble.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-03-01

    possibly controlling bubble migration and heat transfer. 14. SUBJECT TERMS: Drag, bubble dynamics, analog to stochastic electrodynamics 15. NUMBER OF...remains constant. The notion that acoustic noise can test, by analogy, predictions due to stochastic electrodynamics and to ZPF effects has been

  19. Measuring acoustic habitats.

    PubMed

    Merchant, Nathan D; Fristrup, Kurt M; Johnson, Mark P; Tyack, Peter L; Witt, Matthew J; Blondel, Philippe; Parks, Susan E

    2015-03-01

    1. Many organisms depend on sound for communication, predator/prey detection and navigation. The acoustic environment can therefore play an important role in ecosystem dynamics and evolution. A growing number of studies are documenting acoustic habitats and their influences on animal development, behaviour, physiology and spatial ecology, which has led to increasing demand for passive acoustic monitoring (PAM) expertise in the life sciences. However, as yet, there has been no synthesis of data processing methods for acoustic habitat monitoring, which presents an unnecessary obstacle to would-be PAM analysts. 2. Here, we review the signal processing techniques needed to produce calibrated measurements of terrestrial and aquatic acoustic habitats. We include a supplemental tutorial and template computer codes in matlab and r, which give detailed guidance on how to produce calibrated spectrograms and statistical analyses of sound levels. Key metrics and terminology for the characterisation of biotic, abiotic and anthropogenic sound are covered, and their application to relevant monitoring scenarios is illustrated through example data sets. To inform study design and hardware selection, we also include an up-to-date overview of terrestrial and aquatic PAM instruments. 3. Monitoring of acoustic habitats at large spatiotemporal scales is becoming possible through recent advances in PAM technology. This will enhance our understanding of the role of sound in the spatial ecology of acoustically sensitive species and inform spatial planning to mitigate the rising influence of anthropogenic noise in these ecosystems. As we demonstrate in this work, progress in these areas will depend upon the application of consistent and appropriate PAM methodologies.

  20. Measuring acoustic habitats

    PubMed Central

    Merchant, Nathan D; Fristrup, Kurt M; Johnson, Mark P; Tyack, Peter L; Witt, Matthew J; Blondel, Philippe; Parks, Susan E

    2015-01-01

    1. Many organisms depend on sound for communication, predator/prey detection and navigation. The acoustic environment can therefore play an important role in ecosystem dynamics and evolution. A growing number of studies are documenting acoustic habitats and their influences on animal development, behaviour, physiology and spatial ecology, which has led to increasing demand for passive acoustic monitoring (PAM) expertise in the life sciences. However, as yet, there has been no synthesis of data processing methods for acoustic habitat monitoring, which presents an unnecessary obstacle to would-be PAM analysts. 2. Here, we review the signal processing techniques needed to produce calibrated measurements of terrestrial and aquatic acoustic habitats. We include a supplemental tutorial and template computer codes in matlab and r, which give detailed guidance on how to produce calibrated spectrograms and statistical analyses of sound levels. Key metrics and terminology for the characterisation of biotic, abiotic and anthropogenic sound are covered, and their application to relevant monitoring scenarios is illustrated through example data sets. To inform study design and hardware selection, we also include an up-to-date overview of terrestrial and aquatic PAM instruments. 3. Monitoring of acoustic habitats at large spatiotemporal scales is becoming possible through recent advances in PAM technology. This will enhance our understanding of the role of sound in the spatial ecology of acoustically sensitive species and inform spatial planning to mitigate the rising influence of anthropogenic noise in these ecosystems. As we demonstrate in this work, progress in these areas will depend upon the application of consistent and appropriate PAM methodologies. PMID:25954500

  1. Linear phase distribution of acoustical vortices

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Lu; Zheng, Haixiang; Ma, Qingyu; Tu, Juan; Zhang, Dong

    2014-07-14

    Linear phase distribution of phase-coded acoustical vortices was theoretically investigated based on the radiation theory of point source, and then confirmed by experimental measurements. With the proposed criterion of positive phase slope, the possibility of constructing linear circular phase distributions is demonstrated to be determined by source parameters. Improved phase linearity can be achieved at larger source number, lower frequency, smaller vortex radius, and/or longer axial distance. Good agreements are observed between numerical simulations and measurement results for circular phase distributions. The favorable results confirm the feasibility of precise phase control for acoustical vortices and suggest potential applications in particle manipulation.

  2. An acoustic filter based on layered structure.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jianguo; Steer, Michael B; Jiang, Xiaoning

    2015-03-16

    Acoustic filters (AFs) are key components to control wave propagation in multi-frequency systems. We present a design which selectively achieves acoustic filtering with a stop band and passive amplification at the high- and low-frequencies, respectively. Measurement results from the prototypes closely match the design predictions. The AF suppresses the high frequency aliasing echo by 14.5 dB and amplifies the low frequency transmission by 8.0 dB, increasing an axial resolution from 416 to 86 μm in imaging. The AF design approach is proved to be effective in multi-frequency systems.

  3. Omnidirectional broadband acoustic deflector based on metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Liang, Bin; Zou, Xin-ye; Yang, Jing; Yang, Jun; Cheng, Jian-chun

    2017-02-01

    We report a theoretical, numerical, and experimental work on the design of an omnidirectional acoustic deflector capable of redirecting an incident wave to propagate along a predesigned direction over a broad frequency range, regardless of the incidence angle. An implementation by metamaterials is demonstrated both in simulation and experiment, with both showing the effectiveness of our scheme as long as the effective medium approximation stands. With the capability of omnidirectional broadband deflection and the flexibility of a controllable tuning angle, our design opens a route to the development of wave-steering devices and has great application potentials in various situations such as on-chip acoustic manipulations.

  4. Acoustically induced current flow in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miseikis, V.; Cunningham, J. E.; Saeed, K.; O'Rorke, R.; Davies, A. G.

    2012-03-01

    We demonstrate the directed control of charge carriers in graphene using the electric field that accompanies the propagation of surface acoustic waves (SAWs) on a piezoelectric surface. Graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition was transferred to the surface of lithium niobate, allowing its direct integration with interdigital transducers used for SAW generation and detection. Radio frequency (RF) signal applied to the transducers at their resonant frequency was found to generate a direct current flow by the transport of p-type charge carriers. The acoustically induced current scales linearly with the applied RF power and can be observed even in presence of a counter-flow current induced by an applied bias.

  5. Directivity of acoustic radiation from sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lansing, D. L.

    1979-01-01

    The radiation properties of acoustic monopoles and dipoles are described. The directivity of radiation from these sources in a free field and in the presence of an absorptive surface is described. The kinematic effects on source radiation due to translation and rotation are discussed. Experimental measurements of sound from an acoustic monopole in motion and the characteristics of helicopter rotor and propeller noise are reviewed. An introduction is provided to several essential concepts required by noise control engineers making measurements of noise from moving sources in the proximity of the ground.

  6. Directivity of acoustic radiation from sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lansing, D. L.

    1979-01-01

    The radiation properties of acoustic monopoles and dipoles are described, as well as the directivity of radiation from these sources in a free field and in the presence of an absorptive surface. The kinematic effects on source radiation due to translation and rotation are discussed. Experimental measurements of sound from an acoustic monopole in motion and the characteristics of helicopter rotor and propeller noise are reviewed. Several essential concepts required by noise control engineers making measurements of noise from moving sources in the proximity of the ground are introduced.

  7. Virtual reflections in electronic acoustic architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Munster, Bjorn

    2005-09-01

    In the era of the ancient Greeks and Byzantines, the first attempts for increasing reverberation time are noted. In the 1950s, the Ambiophonic system accomplished this by means of an electronic device, for the first time. The early systems only increased the reverberation time by delaying the picked-up reverberation. With the introduction of multichannel feedback-based systems, the reverberation level also could be increased. Later, it was understood that it was important to also fill in the missing reflections, address reflection density, frequency dependence, etc. This resulted in the development of the SIAP concept. Current DSP technology led to the development of a processor whereby density, length, level, and the frequency content can be controlled for different areas in the same room or different rooms, leading to the concept of the acoustic server. electronic acoustic architecture has become the current state-of-the-art approach for solving acoustic deficiencies in, among others, rehearsal rooms, theaters, churches, and multipurpose venues. Incorporation of complementary passive acoustic solutions provides an optimum solution for all room problems. This paper discusses the utilization of virtual reflections in the new approach of electronic acoustic architecture for different environments. Measurements performed in the Sejong Performing Arts Centre, Seoul, South Korea, show the power of this approach.

  8. Motor cortex inhibition induced by acoustic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Kühn, Andrea A; Sharott, Andrew; Trottenberg, Thomas; Kupsch, Andreas; Brown, Peter

    2004-09-01

    The influence of the brainstem motor system on cerebral motor areas may play an important role in motor control in health and disease. A new approach to investigate this interaction in man is combining acoustic stimulation activating the startle system with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) over the motor cortex. However, it is unclear whether the inhibition of TMS responses following acoustic stimulation occurs at the level of the motor cortex through reticulo-cortical projections or subcortically, perhaps through reticulo-spinal projections. We compared the influence of acoustic stimulation on motor effects elicited by TMS over motor cortical areas to those evoked with subcortical electrical stimulation (SES) through depth electrodes in five patients treated with deep brain stimulation for Parkinson's disease. SES bypasses the motor cortex, demonstrating any interaction with acoustic stimuli at the subcortical level. EMG was recorded from the contralateral biceps brachii muscle. Acoustic stimulation was delivered binaurally through headphones and used as a conditioning stimulus at an interstimulus interval of 50 ms. When TMS was used as the test stimulus, the area and amplitude of the conditioned motor response was significantly inhibited (area: 57.5+/-12.9%, amplitude: 47.9+/-7.4%, as percentage of unconditioned response) whereas facilitation occurred with SES (area: 110.1+/-4.3%, amplitude: 116.9+/-6.9%). We conclude that a startle-evoked activation of reticulo-cortical projections transiently inhibits the motor cortex.

  9. Tuned Chamber Core Panel Acoustic Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiller, Noah H.; Allen, Albert R.

    2016-01-01

    This report documents acoustic testing of tuned chamber core panels, which can be used to supplement the low-frequency performance of conventional acoustic treatment. The tuned chamber core concept incorporates low-frequency noise control directly within the primary structure and is applicable to sandwich constructions with a directional core, including corrugated-, truss-, and fluted-core designs. These types of sandwich structures have long, hollow channels (or chambers) in the core. By adding small holes through one of the facesheets, the hollow chambers can be utilized as an array of low-frequency acoustic resonators. These resonators can then be used to attenuate low-frequency noise (below 400 Hz) inside a vehicle compartment without increasing the weight or size of the structure. The results of this test program demonstrate that the tuned chamber core concept is effective when used in isolation or combined with acoustic foam treatments. Specifically, an array of acoustic resonators integrated within the core of the panels was shown to improve both the low-frequency absorption and transmission loss of the structure in targeted one-third octave bands.

  10. Mapping acoustics to kinematics in speech

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bali, Rohan

    An accurate mapping from speech acoustics to speech articulator movements has many practical applications, as well as theoretical implications of speech planning and perception science. This work can be divided into two parts. In the first part, we show that a simple codebook can be used to map acoustics to speech articulator movements in natural, conversational speech. In the second part, we incorporate cost optimization principles that have been shown to be relevant in motor control tasks into the codebook approach. These cost optimizations are defined as minimization of integral of magnitude velocity, acceleration and jerk of the speech articulators, and are implemented using a dynamic programming technique. Results show that incorporating cost minimization of speech articulator movements can significantly improve mapping acoustics to speech articulator movements. This suggests underlying physiological or neural planning principles used by speech articulators during speech production.

  11. The energetic basis of acoustic communication.

    PubMed

    Gillooly, James F; Ophir, Alexander G

    2010-05-07

    Animals produce a tremendous diversity of sounds for communication to perform life's basic functions, from courtship and parental care to defence and foraging. Explaining this diversity in sound production is important for understanding the ecology, evolution and behaviour of species. Here, we present a theory of acoustic communication that shows that much of the heterogeneity in animal vocal signals can be explained based on the energetic constraints of sound production. The models presented here yield quantitative predictions on key features of acoustic signals, including the frequency, power and duration of signals. Predictions are supported with data from nearly 500 diverse species (e.g. insects, fishes, reptiles, amphibians, birds and mammals). These results indicate that, for all species, acoustic communication is primarily controlled by individual metabolism such that call features vary predictably with body size and temperature. These results also provide insights regarding the common energetic and neuromuscular constraints on sound production, and the ecological and evolutionary consequences of producing these sounds.

  12. Acoustic emission monitoring system

    DOEpatents

    Romrell, Delwin M.

    1977-07-05

    Methods and apparatus for identifying the source location of acoustic emissions generated within an acoustically conductive medium. A plurality of acoustic receivers are communicably coupled to the surface of the medium at a corresponding number of spaced locations. The differences in the reception time of the respective sensors in response to a given acoustic event are measured among various sensor combinations prescribed by the monitoring mode employed. Acoustic reception response encountered subsequent to the reception by a predetermined number of the prescribed sensor combinations are inhibited from being communicated to the processing circuitry, while the time measurements obtained from the prescribed sensor combinations are translated into a position measurement representative of the location on the surface most proximate the source of the emission. The apparatus is programmable to function in six separate and five distinct operating modes employing either two, three or four sensory locations. In its preferred arrangement the apparatus of this invention will re-initiate a monitoring interval if the predetermined number of sensors do not respond to a particular emission within a given time period.

  13. Acoustic Imaging Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Behavior in the Immediate Forebay of the Water Temperature Control Tower at Cougar Dam, 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Fenton; Johnson, Gary E.; Royer, Ida M.; Phillips, Nathan RJ; Hughes, James S.; Fischer, Eric S.; Ham, Kenneth D.; Ploskey, Gene R.

    2012-04-01

    This report presents the results of an evaluation of juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) behavior at Cougar Dam on the south fork of the McKenzie River in Oregon in 2010. The study was conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE). The overall goal of the study was to characterize juvenile salmonid behavior and movement patterns in the immediate forebay of the Water Temperature Control (WTC) tower of the dam for USACE and fisheries resource managers use in making decisions about bioengineering designs for long-term structures and/or operations to facilitate safe downstream passage for juvenile salmonids. We collected acoustic imaging (Dual-Frequency Identification Sonar; DIDSON) data from March 1, 2010, through January 31, 2011. Juvenile salmonids (hereafter, called 'fish') were present in the immediate forebay of the WTC tower throughout the study. Fish abundance index was low in early spring (<200 fish per sample-day), increased in late April, and peaked on May 19 (6,039 fish). A second peak was observed on June 6 (2904 fish). Fish abundance index decreased in early June and remained low in the summer months (<100 fish per sample-day). During the fall and winter, fish numbers varied with a peak on November 10 (1881 fish) and a minimum on December 7 (12 fish). A second, smaller, peak occurred on December 22 (607 fish). A univariate statistical analysis indicated fish abundance index (log10-transformed) was significantly (P<0.05) positively correlated with forebay elevation, velocity over the WTC tower intake gate weirs, and river flows into the reservoir. A subsequent multiple regression analysis resulted in a model (R2=0.70) predicting fish abundance (log-transformed index values) using two independent variables of mean forebay elevation and the log10 of the forebay elevation range. From the approximate fish length measurements made using the DIDSON imaging software, the average fish length

  14. Propellant injection strategy for suppressing acoustic combustion instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diao, Qina

    Shear-coaxial injector elements are often used in liquid-propellant-rocket thrust chambers, where combustion instabilities remain a significant problem. A conventional solution to the combustion instability problem relies on passive control techniques that use empirically-developed hardware such as acoustic baffles and tuned cavities. In addition to adding weight and decreasing engine performance, these devices are designed using trial-and-error methods, which do not provide the capability to predict the overall system stability characteristics in advance. In this thesis, two novel control strategies that are based on propellant fluid dynamics were investigated for mitigating acoustic instability involving shear-coaxial injector elements. The new control strategies would use a set of controlled injectors allowing local adjustment of propellant flow patterns for each operating condition, particularly when instability could become a problem. One strategy relies on reducing the oxidizer-fuel density gradient by blending heavier methane with the main fuel, hydrogen. Another strategy utilizes modifying the equivalence ratio to affect the acoustic impedance through mixing and reaction rate changes. The potential effectiveness of these strategies was assessed by conducting unit-physics experiments. Two different model combustors, one simulating a single-element injector test and the other a double-element injector test, were designed and tested for flame-acoustic interaction. For these experiments, the Reynolds number of the central oxygen jet was kept between 4700 and 5500 making the injector flames sufficiently turbulent. A compression driver, mounted on one side of the combustor wall, provided controlled acoustic excitation to the injector flames, simulating the initial phase of flame-acoustic interaction. Acoustic excitation was applied either as band-limited white noise forcing between 100 Hz and 5000 Hz or as single-frequency, fixed-amplitude forcing at 1150 Hz

  15. Acoustic trapping in bubble-bounded micro-cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Mahoney, P.; McDougall, C.; Glynne-Jones, P.; MacDonald, M. P.

    2016-12-01

    We present a method for controllably producing longitudinal acoustic trapping sites inside microfluidic channels. Air bubbles are injected into a micro-capillary to create bubble-bounded `micro-cavities'. A cavity mode is formed that shows controlled longitudinal acoustic trapping between the two air/water interfaces along with the levitation to the centre of the channel that one would expect from a lower order lateral mode. 7 μm and 10 μm microspheres are trapped at the discrete acoustic trapping sites in these micro-cavities.We show this for several lengths of micro-cavity.

  16. LINAC radiosurgery and radiotherapy treatment of acoustic neuromas. 2007.

    PubMed

    Likhterov, Ilya; Allbright, Robert M; Selesnick, Samuel H

    2008-04-01

    This article provides an introduction to radiation therapy as it applies to intracranial tumors. It also provides a review of the natural growth progression of acoustic neuromas and accuracy of tumor size determination. Literature on the use of linear accelerator stereotactic radiosurgery and fractionated radiotherapy in acoustic neuroma management is reviewed and summarized. Specifically, the rates of reported tumor control, hearing preservation, facial and trigeminal nerve complications, and hydrocephalus are analyzed. Although the complication rates associated with linear accelerator therapy are relatively low, hearing preservation is poor and acoustic neuroma control is variable.

  17. LINAC radiosurgery and radiotherapy treatment of acoustic neuromas.

    PubMed

    Likhterov, Ilya; Allbright, Robert M; Selesnick, Samuel H

    2007-06-01

    This article provides an introduction to radiation therapy as it applies to intracranial tumors. It also provides a review of the natural growth progression of acoustic neuromas and accuracy of tumor size determination. Literature on the use of linear accelerator stereotactic radiosurgery and fractionated radiotherapy in acoustic neuroma management is reviewed and summarized. Specifically, the rates of reported tumor control, hearing preservation, facial and trigeminal nerve complications, and hydrocephalus are analyzed. Although the complication rates associated with linear accelerator therapy are relatively low, hearing preservation is poor and acoustic neuroma control is variable.

  18. 21 CFR 874.1060 - Acoustic chamber for audiometric testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 874.1060 Acoustic chamber for... provides isolation from outside sounds. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device...

  19. 21 CFR 874.1060 - Acoustic chamber for audiometric testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 874.1060 Acoustic chamber for... provides isolation from outside sounds. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device...

  20. ACOUSTICS IN ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, AN ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY ON ARCHITECTURAL ACOUSTICS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DOELLE, LESLIE L.

    THE PURPOSE OF THIS ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY ON ARCHITECTURAL ACOUSTICS WAS--(1) TO COMPILE A CLASSIFIED BIBLIOGRAPHY, INCLUDING MOST OF THOSE PUBLICATIONS ON ARCHITECTURAL ACOUSTICS, PUBLISHED IN ENGLISH, FRENCH, AND GERMAN WHICH CAN SUPPLY A USEFUL AND UP-TO-DATE SOURCE OF INFORMATION FOR THOSE ENCOUNTERING ANY ARCHITECTURAL-ACOUSTIC DESIGN…

  1. Magneto-Acoustic Hybrid Nanomotor.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinxing; Li, Tianlong; Xu, Tailin; Kiristi, Melek; Liu, Wenjuan; Wu, Zhiguang; Wang, Joseph

    2015-07-08

    Efficient and controlled nanoscale propulsion in harsh environments requires careful design and manufacturing of nanomachines, which can harvest and translate the propelling forces with high spatial and time resolution. Here we report a new class of artificial nanomachine, named magneto-acoustic hybrid nanomotor, which displays efficient propulsion in the presence of either magnetic or acoustic fields without adding any chemical fuel. These fuel-free hybrid nanomotors, which comprise a magnetic helical structure and a concave nanorod end, are synthesized using a template-assisted electrochemical deposition process followed by segment-selective chemical etching. Dynamic switching of the propulsion mode with reversal of the movement direction and digital speed regulation are demonstrated on a single nanovehicle. These hybrid nanomotors exhibit a diverse biomimetic collective behavior, including stable aggregation, swarm motion, and swarm vortex, triggered in response to different field inputs. Such adaptive hybrid operation and controlled collective behavior hold considerable promise for designing smart nanovehicles that autonomously reconfigure their operation mode according to their mission or in response to changes in their surrounding environment or in their own performance, thus holding considerable promise for diverse practical biomedical applications of fuel-free nanomachines.

  2. A New Wave of Acoustics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beyer, Robert

    1981-01-01

    Surveys 50 years of acoustical studies by discussing selected topics including the ear, nonlinear representations, underwater sound, acoustical diagnostics, absorption, electrolytes, phonons, magnetic interaction, and superfluidity and the five sounds. (JN)

  3. Laser-nucleated acoustic cavitation in focused ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Gerold, Bjoern; Kotopoulis, Spiros; McDougall, Craig; McGloin, David; Postema, Michiel; Prentice, Paul

    2011-04-01

    Acoustic cavitation can occur in therapeutic applications of high-amplitude focused ultrasound. Studying acoustic cavitation has been challenging, because the onset of nucleation is unpredictable. We hypothesized that acoustic cavitation can be forced to occur at a specific location using a laser to nucleate a microcavity in a pre-established ultrasound field. In this paper we describe a scientific instrument that is dedicated to this outcome, combining a focused ultrasound transducer with a pulsed laser. We present high-speed photographic observations of laser-induced cavitation and laser-nucleated acoustic cavitation, at frame rates of 0.5×10(6) frames per second, from laser pulses of energy above and below the optical breakdown threshold, respectively. Acoustic recordings demonstrated inertial cavitation can be controllably introduced to the ultrasound focus. This technique will contribute to the understanding of cavitation evolution in focused ultrasound including for potential therapeutic applications.

  4. Laser-nucleated acoustic cavitation in focused ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerold, Bjoern; Kotopoulis, Spiros; McDougall, Craig; McGloin, David; Postema, Michiel; Prentice, Paul

    2011-04-01

    Acoustic cavitation can occur in therapeutic applications of high-amplitude focused ultrasound. Studying acoustic cavitation has been challenging, because the onset of nucleation is unpredictable. We hypothesized that acoustic cavitation can be forced to occur at a specific location using a laser to nucleate a microcavity in a pre-established ultrasound field. In this paper we describe a scientific instrument that is dedicated to this outcome, combining a focused ultrasound transducer with a pulsed laser. We present high-speed photographic observations of laser-induced cavitation and laser-nucleated acoustic cavitation, at frame rates of 0.5×106 frames per second, from laser pulses of energy above and below the optical breakdown threshold, respectively. Acoustic recordings demonstrated inertial cavitation can be controllably introduced to the ultrasound focus. This technique will contribute to the understanding of cavitation evolution in focused ultrasound including for potential therapeutic applications.

  5. Acoustic metamaterials: From local resonances to broad horizons.

    PubMed

    Ma, Guancong; Sheng, Ping

    2016-02-01

    Within a time span of 15 years, acoustic metamaterials have emerged from academic curiosity to become an active field driven by scientific discoveries and diverse application potentials. This review traces the development of acoustic metamaterials from the initial findings of mass density and bulk modulus frequency dispersions in locally resonant structures to the diverse functionalities afforded by the perspective of negative constitutive parameter values, and their implications for acoustic wave behaviors. We survey the more recent developments, which include compact phase manipulation structures, superabsorption, and actively controllable metamaterials as well as the new directions on acoustic wave transport in moving fluid, elastic, and mechanical metamaterials, graphene-inspired metamaterials, and structures whose characteristics are best delineated by non-Hermitian Hamiltonians. Many of the novel acoustic metamaterial structures have transcended the original definition of metamaterials as arising from the collective manifestations of constituent resonating units, but they continue to extend wave manipulation functionalities beyond those found in nature.

  6. CO2 leak detection through acoustic sensing and infrared imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Xiwang; Yan, Yong; Ma, Lin; Ma, Yifan; Han, Xiaojuan

    2014-04-01

    When CO2 leakage occurs from a high pressure enclosure, the CO2 jet formed can produce fierce turbulent flow generating acoustic emission with possible phase change, depending on the pressure of the enclosure, and a significant temperature drop in the region close to the releasing point. Acoustic Emission (AE) and infrared imaging technologiesare promising methods for on-line monitoring of such accidental leakage. In this paper, leakage experiments were carried out with a CO2 container under well controlled conditions in a laboratory. Acoustic signals and temperature distribution at the leakage area were acquired using an acoustic sensor and an infraredthermalimaging camera. The acoustic signal was analyzed in both time and frequency domains. The characteristics of the signal frequencies areidentified, and their suitability for leakage detectionis investigated. The location of the leakage can be identified by seeking the lowest temperature area or point in the infrared image.

  7. Directional Electrostatic Accretion Process Employing Acoustic Droplet Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oeftering, Richard (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    The present invention is directed to an apparatus for manufacturing a free standing solid metal part. In the present invention, metal droplets are ejected in a nozzleless fashion from a free surface pool of molten metal by applying focused acoustic radiation pressure. The acoustic radiation pressure is produced by high intensity acoustic tone bursts emitted from an acoustic source positioned at the bottom of the pool which directs the acoustic energy at the pool surface. The metal droplets are electrostatically charged so their trajectory can be controlled by electric fields that guide the droplets to predetermined points on a target. The droplets impinge upon the target and solidify with the target material. The accretion of the electrostatically directed solidified droplets forms the free standing metal part.

  8. Acoustic metamaterials: From local resonances to broad horizons

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Guancong; Sheng, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Within a time span of 15 years, acoustic metamaterials have emerged from academic curiosity to become an active field driven by scientific discoveries and diverse application potentials. This review traces the development of acoustic metamaterials from the initial findings of mass density and bulk modulus frequency dispersions in locally resonant structures to the diverse functionalities afforded by the perspective of negative constitutive parameter values, and their implications for acoustic wave behaviors. We survey the more recent developments, which include compact phase manipulation structures, superabsorption, and actively controllable metamaterials as well as the new directions on acoustic wave transport in moving fluid, elastic, and mechanical metamaterials, graphene-inspired metamaterials, and structures whose characteristics are best delineated by non-Hermitian Hamiltonians. Many of the novel acoustic metamaterial structures have transcended the original definition of metamaterials as arising from the collective manifestations of constituent resonating units, but they continue to extend wave manipulation functionalities beyond those found in nature. PMID:26933692

  9. Acoustic Tweezing and Patterning of Concentration Fields in Microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlsen, Jonas T.; Bruus, Henrik

    2017-03-01

    We demonstrate theoretically that acoustic forces acting on inhomogeneous fluids can be used to pattern and manipulate solute concentration fields into spatiotemporally controllable configurations stabilized against gravity. A theoretical framework describing the dynamics of concentration fields that weakly perturb the fluid density and speed of sound is presented and applied to study manipulation of concentration fields in rectangular-channel acoustic eigenmodes and in Bessel-function acoustic vortices. In the first example, methods to obtain horizontal and vertical multilayer stratification of the concentration field at the end of a flow-through channel are presented. In the second example, we demonstrate acoustic tweezing and spatiotemporal manipulation of a local high-concentration region in a lower-concentration medium, thereby extending the realm of acoustic tweezing to include concentration fields.

  10. Sound reduction by metamaterial-based acoustic enclosure

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Shanshan; Li, Pei; Zhou, Xiaoming; Hu, Gengkai

    2014-12-15

    In many practical systems, acoustic radiation control on noise sources contained within a finite volume by an acoustic enclosure is of great importance, but difficult to be accomplished at low frequencies due to the enhanced acoustic-structure interaction. In this work, we propose to use acoustic metamaterials as the enclosure to efficiently reduce sound radiation at their negative-mass frequencies. Based on a circularly-shaped metamaterial model, sound radiation properties by either central or eccentric sources are analyzed by numerical simulations for structured metamaterials. The parametric analyses demonstrate that the barrier thickness, the cavity size, the source type, and the eccentricity of the source have a profound effect on the sound reduction. It is found that increasing the thickness of the metamaterial barrier is an efficient approach to achieve large sound reduction over the negative-mass frequencies. These results are helpful in designing highly efficient acoustic enclosures for blockage of sound in low frequencies.

  11. Estimating surface acoustic impedance with the inverse method.

    PubMed

    Piechowicz, Janusz

    2011-01-01

    Sound field parameters are predicted with numerical methods in sound control systems, in acoustic designs of building and in sound field simulations. Those methods define the acoustic properties of surfaces, such as sound absorption coefficients or acoustic impedance, to determine boundary conditions. Several in situ measurement techniques were developed; one of them uses 2 microphones to measure direct and reflected sound over a planar test surface. Another approach is used in the inverse boundary elements method, in which estimating acoustic impedance of a surface is expressed as an inverse boundary problem. The boundary values can be found from multipoint sound pressure measurements in the interior of a room. This method can be applied to arbitrarily-shaped surfaces. This investigation is part of a research programme on using inverse methods in industrial room acoustics.

  12. Passive broadband acoustic thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anosov, A. A.; Belyaev, R. V.; Klin'shov, V. V.; Mansfel'd, A. D.; Subochev, P. V.

    2016-04-01

    The 1D internal (core) temperature profiles for the model object (plasticine) and the human hand are reconstructed using the passive acoustothermometric broadband probing data. Thermal acoustic radiation is detected by a broadband (0.8-3.5 MHz) acoustic radiometer. The temperature distribution is reconstructed using a priori information corresponding to the experimental conditions. The temperature distribution for the heated model object is assumed to be monotonic. For the hand, we assume that the temperature distribution satisfies the heat-conduction equation taking into account the blood flow. The average error of reconstruction determined for plasticine from the results of independent temperature measurements is 0.6 K for a measuring time of 25 s. The reconstructed value of the core temperature of the hand (36°C) generally corresponds to physiological data. The obtained results make it possible to use passive broadband acoustic probing for measuring the core temperatures in medical procedures associated with heating of human organism tissues.

  13. Architectural-acoustics consulting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoover, Anthony K.

    2004-05-01

    Consulting involves both the science of acoustics and the art of communication, requiring an array of inherent and created skills. Perhaps because consulting on architectural acoustics is a relatively new field, there is a remarkable variety of career paths, all influenced by education, interest, and experience. Many consultants juggle dozens of chargeable projects at a time, not to mention proposals, seminars, teaching, articles, business concerns, and professional-society activities. This paper will discuss various aspects of career paths, projects, and clients as they relate to architectural-acoustics consulting. The intended emphasis will be considerations for those who may be interested in such a career, noting that consultants generally seem to thrive on the numerous challenges.

  14. Basic Linear Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, Alan

    This chapter deals with the physical and mathematical aspects of sound when the disturbances are, in some sense, small. Acoustics is usually concerned with small-amplitude phenomena, and consequently a linear description is usually applicable. Disturbances are governed by the properties of the medium in which they occur, and the governing equations are the equations of continuum mechanics, which apply equally to gases, liquids, and solids. These include the mass, momentum, and energy equations, as well as thermodynamic principles. The viscosity and thermal conduction enter into the versions of these equations that apply to fluids. Fluids of typical great interest are air and sea water, and consequently this chapter includes a summary of their relevant acoustic properties. The foundation is also laid for the consideration of acoustic waves in elastic solids, suspensions, bubbly liquids, and porous media.

  15. Acoustic Liners for Turbine Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Michael G (Inventor); Grady, Joseph E (Inventor); Kiser, James D. (Inventor); Miller, Christopher (Inventor); Heidmann, James D. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    An improved acoustic liner for turbine engines is disclosed. The acoustic liner may include a straight cell section including a plurality of cells with straight chambers. The acoustic liner may also include a bent cell section including one or more cells that are bent to extend chamber length without increasing the overall height of the acoustic liner by the entire chamber length. In some cases, holes are placed between cell chambers in addition to bending the cells, or instead of bending the cells.

  16. Spacecraft Internal Acoustic Environment Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Christopher; Chu, S. Reynold

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the project is to develop an acoustic modeling capability, based on commercial off-the-shelf software, to be used as a tool for oversight of the future manned Constellation vehicles to ensure compliance with acoustic requirements and thus provide a safe and habitable acoustic environment for the crews, and to validate developed models via building physical mockups and conducting acoustic measurements.

  17. Acoustically Induced Vibration of Structures: Reverberant Vs. Direct Acoustic Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R.; O'Connell, Michael R.; Tsoi, Wan B.

    2009-01-01

    Large reverberant chambers have been used for several decades in the aerospace industry to test larger structures such as solar arrays and reflectors to qualify and to detect faults in the design and fabrication of spacecraft and satellites. In the past decade some companies have begun using direct near field acoustic testing, employing speakers, for qualifying larger structures. A limited test data set obtained from recent acoustic tests of the same hardware exposed to both direct and reverberant acoustic field testing has indicated some differences in the resulting structural responses. In reverberant acoustic testing, higher vibration responses were observed at lower frequencies when compared with the direct acoustic testing. In the case of direct near field acoustic testing higher vibration responses appeared to occur at higher frequencies as well. In reverberant chamber testing and direct acoustic testing, standing acoustic modes of the reverberant chamber or the speakers and spacecraft parallel surfaces can strongly couple with the fundamental structural modes of the test hardware. In this paper data from recent acoustic testing of flight hardware, that yielded evidence of acoustic standing wave coupling with structural responses, are discussed in some detail. Convincing evidence of the acoustic standing wave/structural coupling phenomenon will be discussed, citing observations from acoustic testing of a simple aluminum plate. The implications of such acoustic coupling to testing of sensitive flight hardware will be discussed. The results discussed in this paper reveal issues with over or under testing of flight hardware that could pose unanticipated structural and flight qualification issues. Therefore, it is of paramount importance to understand the structural modal coupling with standing acoustic waves that has been observed in both methods of acoustic testing. This study will assist the community to choose an appropriate testing method and test setup in

  18. Acoustic bubble removal method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, E. H.; Elleman, D. D.; Wang, T. G. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A method is described for removing bubbles from a liquid bath such as a bath of molten glass to be used for optical elements. Larger bubbles are first removed by applying acoustic energy resonant to a bath dimension to drive the larger bubbles toward a pressure well where the bubbles can coalesce and then be more easily removed. Thereafter, submillimeter bubbles are removed by applying acoustic energy of frequencies resonant to the small bubbles to oscillate them and thereby stir liquid immediately about the bubbles to facilitate their breakup and absorption into the liquid.

  19. Broadband Acoustic Hyperbolic Metamaterial.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chen; Xie, Yangbo; Sui, Ni; Wang, Wenqi; Cummer, Steven A; Jing, Yun

    2015-12-18

    In this Letter, we report on the design and experimental characterization of a broadband acoustic hyperbolic metamaterial. The proposed metamaterial consists of multiple arrays of clamped thin plates facing the y direction and is shown to yield opposite signs of effective density in the x and y directions below a certain cutoff frequency, therefore, yielding a hyperbolic dispersion. Partial focusing and subwavelength imaging are experimentally demonstrated at frequencies between 1.0 and 2.5 kHz. The proposed metamaterial could open up new possibilities for acoustic wave manipulation and may find usage in medical imaging and nondestructive testing.

  20. Electromechanical acoustic liner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheplak, Mark (Inventor); Cattafesta, III, Louis N. (Inventor); Nishida, Toshikazu (Inventor); Horowitz, Stephen Brian (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A multi-resonator-based system responsive to acoustic waves includes at least two resonators, each including a bottom plate, side walls secured to the bottom plate, and a top plate disposed on top of the side walls. The top plate includes an orifice so that a portion of an incident acoustical wave compresses gas in the resonators. The bottom plate or the side walls include at least one compliant portion. A reciprocal electromechanical transducer coupled to the compliant portion of each of the resonators forms a first and second transducer/compliant composite. An electrical network is disposed between the reciprocal electromechanical transducer of the first and second resonator.

  1. Broadband Acoustic Clutter

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-30

    fluidized mud, which has sound speeds at (or sometimes below) the sound speed of the water column, here 1512 m/s. Interestingly, there is a sound speed...data. 3 specular 25m Figure 1. The map shows the AUV track (red line) overlaid on multibeam bathymetry. Mean water depth is about 165m...Preston, and D.A. Abraham, Long-range acoustic scattering from a shallow- water mud volcano cluster J. Acoust. Soc. Am., 122, 1946-1958, 2007. [3

  2. Acoustic tooth cleaner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, J. S. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    An acoustic oral hygiene unit is described that uses acoustic energy to oscillate mild abrasive particles in a water suspension which is then directed in a low pressure stream onto the teeth. The oscillating abrasives scrub the teeth clean removing food particles, plaque, calculous, and other foreign material from tooth surfaces, interproximal areas, and tooth-gingiva interface more effectively than any previous technique. The relatively low power output and the basic design makes the invention safe and convenient for everyday use in the home without special training. This invention replaces all former means of home dental prophylaxis, and requires no augmentation to fulfill all requirements for daily oral hygienic care.

  3. Post Treatment of Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    Home What is an AN What is an Acoustic Neuroma? Identifying an AN Symptoms Acoustic Neuroma Keywords Educational Video Pre-Treatment Treatment Options Summary Treatment Options Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions ...

  4. Differential phase acoustic microscope for micro-NDE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waters, David D.; Pusateri, T. L.; Huang, S. R.

    1992-01-01

    A differential phase scanning acoustic microscope (DP-SAM) was developed, fabricated, and tested in this project. This includes the acoustic lens and transducers, driving and receiving electronics, scanning stage, scanning software, and display software. This DP-SAM can produce mechanically raster-scanned acoustic microscopic images of differential phase, differential amplitude, or amplitude of the time gated returned echoes of the samples. The differential phase and differential amplitude images provide better image contrast over the conventional amplitude images. A specially designed miniature dual beam lens was used to form two foci to obtain the differential phase and amplitude information of the echoes. High image resolution (1 micron) was achieved by applying high frequency (around 1 GHz) acoustic signals to the samples and placing two foci close to each other (1 micron). Tone burst was used in this system to obtain a good estimation of the phase differences between echoes from the two adjacent foci. The system can also be used to extract the V(z) acoustic signature. Since two acoustic beams and four receiving modes are available, there are 12 possible combinations to produce an image or a V(z) scan. This provides a unique feature of this system that none of the existing acoustic microscopic systems can provide for the micro-nondestructive evaluation applications. The entire system, including the lens, electronics, and scanning control software, has made a competitive industrial product for nondestructive material inspection and evaluation and has attracted interest from existing acoustic microscope manufacturers.

  5. Quality Prediction of Twin Wire Arc Sprayed Coatings Using Acoustic Emission Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tillmann, W.; Abdulgader, M.; Wang, G.; Zielke, R.

    2013-03-01

    In this work, acoustic emission analysis is utilized in the twin wire arc spraying (TWAS) process to study the influence of the adjustable process parameters on the simultaneously obtained acoustic signals at the nozzle and at the substrate. The amplitude of recorded signals at the substrate was in general much higher than those recorded at the nozzle. At the substrate side, the amplitude of emitted acoustic signals is dependent on feedstock materials and is higher when using solid wires. The acoustic signals were recorded at the spraying gun for different gas pressures without arc ignition (as dry runs) in order to reveal the effect of the arc on the emitted acoustic signals. A correlation between controllable parameters, the acoustic signals, and the obtained in-flight particle characteristics was observed. This work contributes to the online control of TWAS processes and is one of many proposed publications in the research field of the conducted acoustic emission analysis.

  6. Fundamentals of Acoustics. Psychoacoustics and Hearing. Acoustical Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Begault, Durand R.; Ahumada, Al (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    These are 3 chapters that will appear in a book titled "Building Acoustical Design", edited by Charles Salter. They are designed to introduce the reader to fundamental concepts of acoustics, particularly as they relate to the built environment. "Fundamentals of Acoustics" reviews basic concepts of sound waveform frequency, pressure, and phase. "Psychoacoustics and Hearing" discusses the human interpretation sound pressure as loudness, particularly as a function of frequency. "Acoustic Measurements" gives a simple overview of the time and frequency weightings for sound pressure measurements that are used in acoustical work.

  7. Is dust acoustic wave a new plasma acoustic mode?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwivedi, C. B.

    1997-09-01

    In this Brief Communication, the claim of the novelty of the dust acoustic wave in a dusty plasma within the constant dust charge model is questioned. Conceptual lacunas behind the claim have been highlighted and appropriate physical arguments have been forwarded against the claim. It is demonstrated that the so-called dust acoustic wave could better be termed as a general acoustic fluctuation response with a dominant characteristic feature of the acoustic-like mode (ALM) fluctuation response reported by Dwivedi et al. [J. Plasma Phys. 41, 219 (1989)]. It is suggested that both correct and more usable nomenclature of the ALM should be the so-called acoustic mode.

  8. Acoustic subwavelength imaging of subsurface objects with acoustic resonant metalens

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Ying; Liu, XiaoJun; Zhou, Chen; Wei, Qi; Wu, DaJian

    2013-11-25

    Early research into acoustic metamaterials has shown the possibility of achieving subwavelength near-field acoustic imaging. However, a major restriction of acoustic metamaterials is that the imaging objects must be placed in close vicinity of the devices. Here, we present an approach for acoustic imaging of subsurface objects far below the diffraction limit. An acoustic metalens made of holey-structured metamaterials is used to magnify evanescent waves, which can rebuild an image at the central plane. Without changing the physical structure of the metalens, our proposed approach can image objects located at certain distances from the input surface, which provides subsurface signatures of the objects with subwavelength spatial resolution.

  9. Mars Acoustic Anemometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banfield, D. J.

    2012-12-01

    We have developed a very high performance anemometer (wind gauge) for use at Mars. This instrument has great scientific as well as strategic reasons to be included on all future missions to the surface of Mars. We will discuss why we set out to develop this instrument, as well as why the previous wind sensors for Mars are insufficient to meet the scientific and strategic needs at Mars. We will also discuss how the instrument works, and how it differs from terrestrial counterparts. Additionally, we will discuss the current status of the instrument. Measuring winds at Mars is important to better understand the atmospheric circulation at Mars, as well as exchange between the surface and atmosphere. The main conduit of transport of water, and hence its current stability at any particular location on Mars is controlled by these atmospheric motions and the exchange between surface and atmosphere. Mars' large-scale winds are moderately well understood from orbital observations, but the interaction with the surface can only be addressed adequately in situ. Previous anemometers have been 2-D (with the exception of REMS on MSL) and slow response (typically <1Hz), and relatively low sensitivity/accuracy (>1 m/s). Our instrument is capable of fully 3-D measurements, with fast response (>20 Hz) and great sensitivity/accuracy (~3 cm/s). This significant step forward in performance is important for the surface-atmosphere exchanges of heat, momentum and volatiles. In particular, our instrument could directly measure the heat and momentum fluxes between surface and atmosphere using eddy-flux techniques proven terrestrially. When combined with a fast response volatile analysis instrument (e.g., a TLS) we can also measure eddy fluxes of volatile transport. Such a study would be nearly impossible to carry out with preceding anemometers sent to Mars with insufficient response time and sensitivity to adequately sample the turbulent eddies. Additionally, our instrument, using acoustics

  10. Acoustic vibration can enhance bacterial biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Mark F; Edwards, Thomas; Hobbs, Glyn; Shepherd, Joanna; Bezombes, Frederic

    2016-12-01

    This paper explores the use of low-frequency-low-amplitude acoustic vibration on biofilm formation. Biofilm development is thought to be governed by a diverse range of environmental signals and much effort has gone into researching the effects of environmental factors including; nutrient availability, pH and temperature on the growth of biofilms. Many biofilm-forming organisms have evolved to thrive in mechanically challenging environments, for example soil yet, the effects of the physical environment on biofilm formation has been largely ignored. Exposure of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to vibration at 100, 800 and 1600 Hz for 48 h, resulted in a significant increase in biofilm formation compared with the control, with the greatest growth seen at 800 Hz vibration. The results also show that this increase in biofilm formation is accompanied with an increase in P. aeruginosa cell number. Acoustic vibration was also found to regulate the spatial distribution of biofilm formation in a frequency-dependent manner. Exposure of Staphylococcus aureus to acoustic vibration also resulted in enhanced biofilm formation with the greatest level of biofilm being formed following 48 h exposure at 1600 Hz. These results show that acoustic vibration can be used to control biofilm formation and therefore presents a novel and potentially cost effective means to manipulate the development and yield of biofilms in a range of important industrial and medical processes.

  11. Acoustics- Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    2012-09-13

    This package contains modules that model acoustic sensors and acoustic sources (hearable) in Umbra. It is typically used to represent hearing in characters within Umbra. Typically, the acoustic sensors detect acoustic sources at a given point; however, it also contains the capability to detect bullet cracks by detecting the sound along the bullet path that is closest to the sensor. A memory module, acoustic memory, represents remembered sounds within a given character. Over time, the sounds are removed, as a character forgets what it has heard.

  12. Acoustic visualizations using surface mapping.

    PubMed

    Siltanen, Samuel; Robinson, Philip W; Saarelma, Jukka; Pätynen, Jukka; Tervo, Sakari; Savioja, Lauri; Lokki, Tapio

    2014-06-01

    Sound visualizations have been an integral part of room acoustics studies for more than a century. As acoustic measurement techniques and knowledge of hearing evolve, acousticians need more intuitive ways to represent increasingly complex data. Microphone array processing now allows accurate measurement of spatio-temporal acoustic properties. However, the multidimensional data can be a challenge to display coherently. This letter details a method of mapping visual representations of acoustic reflections from a receiver position to the surfaces from which the reflections originated. The resulting animations are presented as a spatial acoustic analysis tool.

  13. Intelligent Engine Systems: Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wojno, John; Martens, Steve; Simpson, Benjamin

    2008-01-01

    An extensive study of new fan exhaust nozzle technologies was performed. Three new uniform chevron nozzles were designed, based on extensive CFD analysis. Two new azimuthally varying variants were defined. All five were tested, along with two existing nozzles, on a representative model-scale, medium BPR exhaust nozzle. Substantial acoustic benefits were obtained from the uniform chevron nozzle designs, the best benefit being provided by an existing design. However, one of the azimuthally varying nozzle designs exhibited even better performance than any of the uniform chevron nozzles. In addition to the fan chevron nozzles, a new technology was demonstrated, using devices that enhance mixing when applied to an exhaust nozzle. The acoustic benefits from these devices applied to medium BPR nozzles were similar, and in some cases superior to, those obtained from conventional uniform chevron nozzles. However, none of the low noise technologies provided equivalent acoustic benefits on a model-scale high BPR exhaust nozzle, similar to current large commercial applications. New technologies must be identified to improve the acoustics of state-of-the-art high BPR jet engines.

  14. Concert hall acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, Manfred

    2004-05-01

    I will review some work at Bell Laboratories on artificial reverberation and concert hall acoustics including Philharmonic Hall (Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts, New York). I will also touch on sound diffusion by number-theoretic surfaces and the measurement of reverberation time using the music as played in the hall as a ``test'' signal.

  15. Acoustics in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singer, Miriam J.

    This paper explores the issues associated with poor acoustics within schools. Additionally, it suggests remedies for existing buildings and those under renovation, as well as concerns for new construction. The paper discusses the effects of unwanted noise on students in terms of physiological, motivational, and cognitive influences. Issues are…

  16. Micro acoustic spectrum analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Schubert, W. Kent; Butler, Michael A.; Adkins, Douglas R.; Anderson, Larry F.

    2004-11-23

    A micro acoustic spectrum analyzer for determining the frequency components of a fluctuating sound signal comprises a microphone to pick up the fluctuating sound signal and produce an alternating current electrical signal; at least one microfabricated resonator, each resonator having a different resonant frequency, that vibrate in response to the alternating current electrical signal; and at least one detector to detect the vibration of the microfabricated resonators. The micro acoustic spectrum analyzer can further comprise a mixer to mix a reference signal with the alternating current electrical signal from the microphone to shift the frequency spectrum to a frequency range that is a better matched to the resonant frequencies of the microfabricated resonators. The micro acoustic spectrum analyzer can be designed specifically for portability, size, cost, accuracy, speed, power requirements, and use in a harsh environment. The micro acoustic spectrum analyzer is particularly suited for applications where size, accessibility, and power requirements are limited, such as the monitoring of industrial equipment and processes, detection of security intrusions, or evaluation of military threats.

  17. Detecting Contaminant Particles Acoustically

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyett, L. M.

    1986-01-01

    Apparatus "listens" for particles in interior of complex turbomachinery. Contact microphones are attached at several points on pump housing. Acoustic transducer also attached to housing to excite entire pump with sound. Frequency of sound is slowly raised until pump resonates. Microphones detect noise of loose particles scraping against pump parts. Such as machining chips in turbopumps or other machinery without disassembly.

  18. Indigenous Acoustic Detection.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-01-26

    considerable distances, and they act as good sensors of human presence. Though singing insects are ubiquitous in warm areas, even in the desert ( Nevo and...methodology. DTIC. CD-58-PL. Lloyd, J. E. 1981. Personnel communication. Nevo , E. and S. A. Blondheim. 1972. Acoustic isolation in the speciation of

  19. Acoustic field modulation in regenerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, J. Y.; Wang, W.; Luo, E. C.; Chen, Y. Y.

    2016-12-01

    The regenerator is a key component that transfers energy between heat and work. The conversion efficiency is significantly influenced by the acoustic field in the regenerator. Much effort has been spent to quantitatively determine this influence, but few comprehensive experimental verifications have been performed because of difficulties in modulating and measuring the acoustic field. In this paper, a method requiring two compressors is introduced and theoretically investigated that achieves acoustic field modulation in the regenerator. One compressor outputs the acoustic power for the regenerator; the other acts as a phase shifter. A RC load dissipates the acoustic power out of both the regenerator and the latter compressor. The acoustic field can be modulated by adjusting the current in the two compressors and opening the RC load. The acoustic field is measured with pressure sensors instead of flow-field imaging equipment, thereby greatly simplifying the experiment.

  20. Acoustic Suppression Systems and Related Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R. (Inventor); Kern, Dennis L. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An acoustic suppression system for absorbing and/or scattering acoustic energy comprising a plurality of acoustic targets in a containment is described, the acoustic targets configured to have resonance frequencies allowing the targets to be excited by incoming acoustic waves, the resonance frequencies being adjustable to suppress acoustic energy in a set frequency range. Methods for fabricating and implementing the acoustic suppression system are also provided.

  1. Prediction of Acoustic Noise in Switched Reluctance Motor Drives

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, CJ; Fahimi, B

    2014-03-01

    Prediction of acoustic noise distribution generated by electric machines has become an integral part of design and control in noise sensitive applications. This paper presents a fast and precise acoustic noise imaging technique for switched reluctance machines (SRMs). This method is based on distribution of radial vibration in the stator frame of the SRM. Radial vibration of the stator frame, at a network of probing points, is computed using input phase current and phase voltage waveforms. Sequentially, the acceleration of the probing network will be expanded to predict full acceleration on the stator frame surface, using which acoustic noise emission caused by the stator can be calculated using the boundary element method.

  2. Particle manipulation by a non-resonant acoustic levitator

    SciTech Connect

    Andrade, Marco A. B.; Pérez, Nicolás; Adamowski, Julio C.

    2015-01-05

    We present the analysis of a non-resonant acoustic levitator, formed by an ultrasonic transducer and a concave reflector. In contrast to traditional levitators, the geometry presented herein does not require the separation distance between the transducer and the reflector to be a multiple of half wavelength. The levitator behavior is numerically predicted by applying a numerical model to calculate the acoustic pressure distribution and the Gor'kov theory to obtain the potential of the acoustic radiation force that acts on a levitated particle. We also demonstrate that levitating particles can be manipulated by controlling the reflector position while maintaining the transducer in a fixed position.

  3. Acoustic solitons: A robust tool to investigate the generation and detection of ultrafast acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Péronne, Emmanuel; Chuecos, Nicolas; Thevenard, Laura; Perrin, Bernard

    2017-02-01

    Solitons are self-preserving traveling waves of great interest in nonlinear physics but hard to observe experimentally. In this report an experimental setup is designed to observe and characterize acoustic solitons in a GaAs(001) substrate. It is based on careful temperature control of the sample and an interferometric detection scheme. Ultrashort acoustic solitons, such as the one predicted by the Korteweg-de Vries equation, are observed and fully characterized. Their particlelike nature is clearly evidenced and their unique properties are thoroughly checked. The spatial averaging of the soliton wave front is shown to account for the differences between the theoretical and experimental soliton profile. It appears that ultrafast acoustic experiments provide a precise measurement of the soliton velocity. It allows for absolute calibration of the setup as well as the response function analysis of the detection layer. Moreover, the temporal distribution of the solitons is also analyzed with the help of the inverse scattering method. It shows how the initial acoustic pulse profile which gives birth to solitons after nonlinear propagation can be retrieved. Such investigations provide a new tool to probe transient properties of highly excited matter through the study of the emitted acoustic pulse after laser excitation.

  4. Acoustic Energy Estimates in Inhomogeneous Moving Media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farassat, F.; Farris, Mark

    1999-01-01

    In ducted fan engine noise research, there is a need for defining a simple and easy to use acoustic energy conservation law to help in quantification of noise control techniques. There is a well known conservation law relating acoustic energy and acoustic energy flux in the case of an isentropic irrotational flow. Several different approaches have been taken to generalize this conservation law. For example, Morfey finds an identity by separating out the irrotational part of the perturbed flow. Myers is able to find a series of indentities by observing an algebraic relationship between the basic conservation of energy equation for a background flow and the underlying equations of motion. In an approximate sense, this algebraic relationship is preserved under perturbation. A third approach which seems to have not been pursued in the literature is a result known as Noether's theorem. There is a Lagrangian formulation for the Euler equation of fluid mechanics. Noether's theorem says that any group action that leaves the Lagrangian action invariant leads to a conserved quantity. This presentation will include a survey of current results regarding acoustic energy and preliminary results on the symmetries of the Lagrangian.

  5. Computational acoustic modeling of cetacean vocalizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurevich, Michael Dixon

    A framework for computational acoustic modeling of hypothetical vocal production mechanisms in cetaceans is presented. As a specific example, a model of a proposed source in the larynx of odontocetes is developed. Whales and dolphins generate a broad range of vocal sounds, but the exact mechanisms they use are not conclusively understood. In the fifty years since it has become widely accepted that whales can and do make sound, how they do so has remained particularly confounding. Cetaceans' highly divergent respiratory anatomy, along with the difficulty of internal observation during vocalization have contributed to this uncertainty. A variety of acoustical, morphological, ethological and physiological evidence has led to conflicting and often disputed theories of the locations and mechanisms of cetaceans' sound sources. Computational acoustic modeling has been used to create real-time parametric models of musical instruments and the human voice. These techniques can be applied to cetacean vocalizations to help better understand the nature and function of these sounds. Extensive studies of odontocete laryngeal morphology have revealed vocal folds that are consistently similar to a known but poorly understood acoustic source, the ribbon reed. A parametric computational model of the ribbon reed is developed, based on simplified geometrical, mechanical and fluid models drawn from the human voice literature. The physical parameters of the ribbon reed model are then adapted to those of the odontocete larynx. With reasonable estimates of real physical parameters, both the ribbon reed and odontocete larynx models produce sounds that are perceptually similar to their real-world counterparts, and both respond realistically under varying control conditions. Comparisons of acoustic features of the real-world and synthetic systems show a number of consistencies. While this does not on its own prove that either model is conclusively an accurate description of the source, it

  6. Acoustic energy harvesting based on a planar acoustic metamaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Shuibao; Oudich, Mourad; Li, Yong; Assouar, Badreddine

    2016-06-01

    We theoretically report on an innovative and practical acoustic energy harvester based on a defected acoustic metamaterial (AMM) with piezoelectric material. The idea is to create suitable resonant defects in an AMM to confine the strain energy originating from an acoustic incidence. This scavenged energy is converted into electrical energy by attaching a structured piezoelectric material into the defect area of the AMM. We show an acoustic energy harvester based on a meta-structure capable of producing electrical power from an acoustic pressure. Numerical simulations are provided to analyze and elucidate the principles and the performances of the proposed system. A maximum output voltage of 1.3 V and a power density of 0.54 μW/cm3 are obtained at a frequency of 2257.5 Hz. The proposed concept should have broad applications on energy harvesting as well as on low-frequency sound isolation, since this system acts as both acoustic insulator and energy harvester.

  7. Manipulate acoustic waves by impedance matched acoustic metasurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ying; Mei, Jun; Aljahdali, Rasha

    We design a type of acoustic metasurface, which is composed of carefully designed slits in a rigid thin plate. The effective refractive indices of different slits are different but the impedances are kept the same as that of the host medium. Numerical simulations show that such a metasurface can redirect or reflect a normally incident wave at different frequencies, even though it is impedance matched to the host medium. We show that the underlying mechanisms can be understood by using the generalized Snell's law, and a unified analytic model based on mode-coupling theory. We demonstrate some simple realization of such acoustic metasurface with real materials. The principle is also extended to the design of planar acoustic lens which can focus acoustic waves. Manipulate acoustic waves by impedance matched acoustic metasurfaces.

  8. Surface acoustic wave stabilized oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, T. E.

    1978-01-01

    A number of 401.2 MHz surface acoustic wave (SAW) controlled oscillators were built and tested. The performance of these oscillators was evaluated for possible use as stable oscillators in communication systems. A short term frequency stability of better than 1 x 10 to the minus 9th power for one second was measured for the SAW oscillators. Long term frequency drift was measured and was found to be dependent on SAW design and packaging. Drift rates ranging from 15 ppm in twenty weeks to 2.5 ppm in twenty weeks were observed. Some further improvement was required. The temperature dependence of the saw oscillators was evaluated and it was concluded that some form of temperature compensation will be necessary to meet the requirements of some communication systems.

  9. Swimming Using Surface Acoustic Waves

    PubMed Central

    Bourquin, Yannyk; Cooper, Jonathan M.

    2013-01-01

    Microactuation of free standing objects in fluids is currently dominated by the rotary propeller, giving rise to a range of potential applications in the military, aeronautic and biomedical fields. Previously, surface acoustic waves (SAWs) have been shown to be of increasing interest in the field of microfluidics, where the refraction of a SAW into a drop of fluid creates a convective flow, a phenomenon generally known as SAW streaming. We now show how SAWs, generated at microelectronic devices, can be used as an efficient method of propulsion actuated by localised fluid streaming. The direction of the force arising from such streaming is optimal when the devices are maintained at the Rayleigh angle. The technique provides propulsion without any moving parts, and, due to the inherent design of the SAW transducer, enables simple control of the direction of travel. PMID:23431358

  10. Swimming using surface acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Bourquin, Yannyk; Cooper, Jonathan M

    2013-01-01

    Microactuation of free standing objects in fluids is currently dominated by the rotary propeller, giving rise to a range of potential applications in the military, aeronautic and biomedical fields. Previously, surface acoustic waves (SAWs) have been shown to be of increasing interest in the field of microfluidics, where the refraction of a SAW into a drop of fluid creates a convective flow, a phenomenon generally known as SAW streaming. We now show how SAWs, generated at microelectronic devices, can be used as an efficient method of propulsion actuated by localised fluid streaming. The direction of the force arising from such streaming is optimal when the devices are maintained at the Rayleigh angle. The technique provides propulsion without any moving parts, and, due to the inherent design of the SAW transducer, enables simple control of the direction of travel.

  11. Acoustic Environment Simulation Study; Acoustic Intrusion Sensor Performance.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-01

    RD-R149 245 ACOUSTIC ENVIRONMENT SIMULATION STUDY; ACOUSTIC is INTRUSION SENSOR PERFORMANCE(U) TIME SERIES ASSOCIATES PALO ALTO CA L ENOCHSON ET AL...ACOUSTIC ENVIRONMENT SIMULATION STUDY PREPARED BY: LOREN ENOCHSON TIME SERIES ASSOCIATES 920 WEST 33RD AVENUE SPOKANE, WA 99203 PREPARED FOR: NAVAL... TIME COVERED 5A0pA OF 1 jeamonth, Day) S, 54 ( 4UNT ,inal; .. na, F ROM TO o . !L,,Nv; REJa- ,GE U -. ,16. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTATION COSATI CODES 18

  12. Radiosurgery of acoustic neurinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Flickinger, J.C.; Lunsford, L.D.; Coffey, R.J.; Linskey, M.E.; Bissonette, D.J.; Maitz, A.H.; Kondziolka, D. )

    1991-01-15

    Eighty-five patients with acoustic neurinomas underwent stereotactic radiosurgery with the gamma unit at the University of Pittsburgh (Pittsburgh, PA) during its first 30 months of operation. Neuroimaging studies performed in 40 patients with more than 1 year follow-up showed that tumors were smaller in 22 (55%), unchanged in 17 (43%), and larger in one (2%). The 2-year actuarial rates for preservation of useful hearing and any hearing were 46% and 62%, respectively. Previously undetected neuropathies of the trigeminal (n = 12) and facial nerves (n = 14) occurred 1 week to 1 year after radiosurgery (median, 7 and 6 months, respectively), and improved at median intervals of 13 and 8 months, respectively, after onset. Hearing loss was significantly associated with increasing average tumor diameter (P = 0.04). No deterioration of any cranial nerve function has yet developed in seven patients with average tumor diameters less than 10 mm. Radiosurgery is an important treatment alternative for selected acoustic neurinoma patients.

  13. Acoustics Discipline Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Envia, Edmane; Thomas, Russell

    2007-01-01

    As part of the Fundamental Aeronautics Program Annual Review, a summary of the progress made in 2007 in acoustics research under the Subsonic Fixed Wing project is given. The presentation describes highlights from in-house and external activities including partnerships and NRA-funded research with industry and academia. Brief progress reports from all acoustics Phase 1 NRAs are also included as are outlines of the planned activities for 2008 and all Phase 2 NRAs. N+1 and N+2 technology paths outlined for Subsonic Fixed Wing noise targets. NRA Round 1 progressing with focus on prediction method advancement. NRA Round 2 initiating work focused on N+2 technology, prediction methods, and validation. Excellent partnerships in progress supporting N+1 technology targets and providing key data sets.

  14. Acoustic absorption by sunspots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, D. C.; Labonte, B. J.; Duvall, T. L., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The paper presents the initial results of a series of observations designed to probe the nature of sunspots by detecting their influence on high-degree p-mode oscillations in the surrounding photosphere. The analysis decomposes the observed oscillations into radially propagating waves described by Hankel functions in a cylindrical coordinate system centered on the sunspot. From measurements of the differences in power between waves traveling outward and inward, it is demonstrated that sunspots appear to absorb as much as 50 percent of the incoming acoustic waves. It is found that for all three sunspots observed, the amount of absorption increases linearly with horizontal wavenumber. The effect is present in p-mode oscillations with wavelengths both significantly larger and smaller than the diameter of the sunspot umbrae. Actual absorption of acoustic energy of the magnitude observed may produce measurable decreases in the power and lifetimes of high-degree p-mode oscillations during periods of high solar activity.

  15. Electromagnetic acoustic imaging.

    PubMed

    Emerson, Jane F; Chang, David B; McNaughton, Stuart; Jeong, Jong Seob; Shung, K K; Cerwin, Stephen A

    2013-02-01

    Electromagnetic acoustic imaging (EMAI) is a new imaging technique that uses long-wavelength RF electromagnetic (EM) waves to induce ultrasound emission. Signal intensity and image contrast have been found to depend on spatially varying electrical conductivity of the medium in addition to conventional acoustic properties. The resultant conductivity- weighted ultrasound data may enhance the diagnostic performance of medical ultrasound in cancer and cardiovascular applications because of the known changes in conductivity of malignancy and blood-filled spaces. EMAI has a potential advantage over other related imaging techniques because it combines the high resolution associated with ultrasound detection with the generation of the ultrasound signals directly related to physiologically important electrical properties of the tissues. Here, we report the theoretical development of EMAI, implementation of a dual-mode EMAI/ultrasound apparatus, and successful demonstrations of EMAI in various phantoms designed to establish feasibility of the approach for eventual medical applications.

  16. Suppression through acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Kevin D.; Short, Kenneth R.; VanMeenen, Kirsten M.; Servatius, Richard J.

    2006-05-01

    This paper reviews research conducted by our laboratory exploring the possible use of acoustical stimuli as a tool for influencing behavior. Over the course of several programs, different types of acoustic stimuli have been evaluated for their effectiveness in disrupting targeting, balance, and high-order cognitive processes in both humans and animals. Escape responses are of particular use in this regard. An escape response serves not only as an objective measure of aversion, but as a potential substitute for ongoing behavior. We have also assessed whether the level of performance changes if the individual does not perform an escape response. In general these studies have both suggested certain types of sounds are more aversive or distracting than others. Although the laboratory development of additional stimuli needs to continue, we are taking the next step by testing some of the more effective stimuli in more applied experimental scenarios including those involving group dynamics.

  17. FY 89 Acoustics Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-09-11

    small. (=0.3%) a result which exhibits qualitative agreemnent with the results of Korobko and Chernobaiŕ . We saw no detectable change in...Senlis, France, (1990). 5. A Practical Sensor for Acoustic Detection of Larvae and Insects in Harvested Commodities, R. Hickling, S.T. Chang , J.C. Webb...to detect or gene;rate ;Couste ,,vc’-. "hcsc mater;als are unitiue in that thcv can he formed into largecxihlc sheet. lhmrelut, it is possible to

  18. Structures and Acoustics Division

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acquaviva, Cynthia S.

    1999-01-01

    The Structures and Acoustics Division of NASA Glenn Research Center is an international leader in rotating structures, mechanical components, fatigue and fracture, and structural aeroacoustics. Included are disciplines related to life prediction and reliability, nondestructive evaluation, and mechanical drive systems. Reported are a synopsis of the work and accomplishments reported by the Division during the 1996 calendar year. A bibliography containing 42 citations is provided.

  19. Ocean acoustic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornuelle, Bruce D.; Worcester, Peter F.; Dzieciuch, Matthew A.

    2008-10-01

    Ocean acoustic tomography (OAT) was proposed in 1979 by Walter Munk and Carl Wunsch as an analogue to x-ray computed axial tomography for the oceans. The oceans are opaque to most electromagnetic radiation, but there is a strong acoustic waveguide, and sound can propagate for 10 Mm and more with distinct multiply-refracted ray paths. Transmitting broadband pulses in the ocean leads to a set of impulsive arrivals at the receiver which characterize the impulse response of the sound channel. The peaks observed at the receiver are assumed to represent the arrival of energy traveling along geometric ray paths. These paths can be distinguished by arrival time, and by arrival angle when a vertical array of receivers is available. Changes in ray arrival time can be used to infer changes in ocean structure. Ray travel time measurements have been a mainstay of long-range acoustic measurements, but the strong sensitivity of ray paths to range-dependent sound speed perturbations makes the ray sampling functions uncertain in real cases. In the ray approximation travel times are sensitive to medium changes only along the corresponding eigenrays. Ray theory is an infinite-frequency approximation, and its eikonal equation has nonlinearities not found in the acoustic wave equation. We build on recent seismology results (kernels for body wave arrivals in the earth) to characterize the kernel for converting sound speed change in the ocean to travel time changes using more complete propagation physics. Wave-theoretic finite frequency kernels may show less sensitivity to small-scale sound speed structure.

  20. Broadband Acoustic Clutter

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-30

    shallow water 1 Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for the collection of information is estimated to...claims to the contrary in the ocean acoustics community, sub-bottom clutter can and does occur in shallow water environments. A step-by-step detailed...that of the overlying water column and hence there is no critical angle. Thus, the reflection, scattering, propagation and reverberation are

  1. Advanced Broadband Acoustic Clutter

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-31

    7, 18]). Key result: despite some claims to the contrary in the ocean acoustics community, sub-bottom clutter can and does occur in shallow water ...propagation, and clutter in both theory and measurements. This is important because in some shallow water areas (especially those with significant riverine...Abraham, data from Clutter󈧋 Experiment) to examine dependence of clutter statistics on multipath (Ref [8]). Key result: in the shallow water

  2. Acoustics Local Area Network

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-31

    contract was to provide a shared computing i : resource - the acou tics local area network (ALAN) - to support ocean acoustic and related oceanographic...SECURITY CLASSIFICATION 20. UMITATION OF ABSTRACT OF REPORT: THIS PAGE OF ABSTRACT Unclassified I I ONRCtI COMPUTER V 10 11/94 STANDARD FORM 233 (REV 241) oo 0 90 " VLNV1LV HNO Og6OuLtOI, CT:tT 96/OT/0

  3. Acoustic Communications for UUVs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-07

    Acoustic Communications for UUVs Josko Catipovic Lee Freitag Naval Undersea Warfare Center Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution Newport, RI 02841... Woods Hole, MA 02543 (401) 832-3259 (508) 289-3285 catipovicj@npt.nuwc.navy.mil lfreitag@whoi.edu Dan Nagle Sam Smith Naval Undersea Warfare Center...positioned within a streamlined flow shield which reduces drag and protects them from damage. While the HF transducers are placed on the structure and the

  4. Acoustic Characterization of Soil

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    modified SAR imaging algorithm. Page 26 Final Report In the acoustic subsurface imaging scenario, the "object" to be imaged (i.e., cultural artifacts... subsurface imaging scenario. To combat this potential difficulty we can utilize a new SAR imaging algorithm (Lee et al., 1996) derived from a geophysics...essentially a transmit plane wave. This is a cost-effective means to evaluate the feasibility of subsurface imaging . A more complete (and costly

  5. Acoustic velocity meter systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laenen, Antonius

    1985-01-01

    Acoustic velocity meter (AVM) systems operate on the principles that the point-to-point upstream traveltime of an acoustic pulse is longer than the downstream traveltime and that this difference in traveltime can be accurately measured by electronic devices. An AVM system is capable of recording water velocity (and discharge) under a wide range of conditions, but some constraints apply: 1. Accuracy is reduced and performance is degraded if the acoustic path is not a continuous straight line. The path can be bent by reflection if it is too close to a stream boundary or by refraction if it passes through density gradients resulting from variations in either water temperature or salinity. For paths of less than 100 m, a temperature gradient of 0.1' per meter causes signal bending less than 0.6 meter at midchannel, and satisfactory velocity results can be obtained. Reflection from stream boundaries can cause signal cancellation if boundaries are too close to signal path. 2. Signal strength is attenuated by particles or bubbles that absorb, spread, or scatter sound. The concentration of particles or bubbles that can be tolerated is a function of the path length and frequency of the acoustic signal. 3. Changes in streamline orientation can affect system accuracy if the variability is random. 4. Errors relating to signal resolution are much larger for a single threshold detection scheme than for multiple threshold schemes. This report provides methods for computing the effect of various conditions on the accuracy of a record obtained from an AVM. The equipment must be adapted to the site. Field reconnaissance and preinstallation analysis to detect possible problems are critical for proper installation and operation of an AVM system.

  6. Structures and Acoustics Division

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acquaviva, Cynthia S.

    2001-01-01

    The Structures and Acoustics Division of the NASA Glenn Research Center is an international leader in rotating structures, mechanical components, fatigue and fracture, and structural aeroacoustics. Included in this report are disciplines related to life prediction and reliability, nondestructive evaluation, and mechanical drive systems. Reported is a synopsis of the work and accomplishments completed by the Division during the 1997, 1998, and 1999 calendar years. A bibliography containing 93 citations is provided.

  7. A new, simple electrostatic-acoustic hybrid levitator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lierke, E. G.; Loeb, H.; Gross, D.

    1990-01-01

    Battelle has developed a hybrid levitator by combining the known single-axis acoustic standing wave levitator with a coaxial DC electric field. The resulting Coulomb forces on the charged liquid or solid sample support its weight and, together with the acoustic force, center the sample. Liquid samples with volumes approximately less than 100 micro-liters are deployed from a syringe reservoir into the acoustic pressure node. The sample is charged using a miniature high voltage power supply (approximately less than 20 kV) connected to the syringe needle. As the electric field, generated by a second miniature power supply, is increased, the acoustic intensity is reduced. The combination of both fields allows stable levitation of samples larger than either single technique could position on the ground. Decreasing the acoustic intensity reduces acoustic convection and sample deformation. Neither the electrostatic nor the acoustic field requires sample position sensing or active control. The levitator, now used for static and dynamic fluid physics investigations on the ground, can be easily modified for space operations.

  8. Acoustic assessment of erygmophonic speech of Moroccan laryngectomized patients

    PubMed Central

    Ouattassi, Naouar; Benmansour, Najib; Ridal, Mohammed; Zaki, Zouheir; Bendahhou, Karima; Nejjari, Chakib; Cherkaoui, Abdeljabbar; El Alami, Mohammed Nouredine El Amine

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Acoustic evaluation of alaryngeal voices is among the most prominent issues in speech analysis field. In fact, many methods have been developed to date to substitute the classic perceptual evaluation. The Aim of this study is to present our experience in erygmophonic speech objective assessment and to discuss the most widely used methods of acoustic speech appraisal. through a prospective case-control study we have measured acoustic parameters of speech quality during one year of erygmophonic rehabilitation therapy of Moroccan laryngectomized patients. Methods We have assessed acoustic parameters of erygmophonic speech samples of eleven laryngectomized patients through the speech rehabilitation therapy. Acoustic parameters were obtained by perturbation analysis method and linear predictive coding algorithms also through the broadband spectrogram. Results Using perturbation analysis methods, we have found erygmophonic voice to be significantly poorer than normal speech and it exhibits higher formant frequency values. However, erygmophonic voice shows also higher and extremely variable Error values that were greater than the acceptable level. And thus, live a doubt on the reliability of those analytic methods results. Conclusion Acoustic parameters for objective evaluation of alaryngeal voices should allow a reliable representation of the perceptual evaluation of the quality of speech. This requirement has not been fulfilled by the common methods used so far. Therefore, acoustical assessment of erygmophonic speech needs more investigations. PMID:26587121

  9. Acoustic Force Density Acting on Inhomogeneous Fluids in Acoustic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlsen, Jonas T.; Augustsson, Per; Bruus, Henrik

    2016-09-01

    We present a theory for the acoustic force density acting on inhomogeneous fluids in acoustic fields on time scales that are slow compared to the acoustic oscillation period. The acoustic force density depends on gradients in the density and compressibility of the fluid. For microfluidic systems, the theory predicts a relocation of the inhomogeneities into stable field-dependent configurations, which are qualitatively different from the horizontally layered configurations due to gravity. Experimental validation is obtained by confocal imaging of aqueous solutions in a glass-silicon microchip.

  10. Acoustically enhanced heat transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ang, Kar M.; Yeo, Leslie Y.; Friend, James R.; Hung, Yew Mun; Tan, Ming K.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the enhancement of heat transfer in the nucleate boiling regime by inducing high frequency acoustic waves (f ˜ 106 Hz) on the heated surface. In the experiments, liquid droplets (deionized water) are dispensed directly onto a heated, vibrating substrate. At lower vibration amplitudes (ξs ˜ 10-9 m), the improved heat transfer is mainly due to the detachment of vapor bubbles from the heated surface and the induced thermal mixing. Upon increasing the vibration amplitude (ξs ˜ 10-8 m), the heat transfer becomes more substantial due to the rapid bursting of vapor bubbles happening at the liquid-air interface as a consequence of capillary waves travelling in the thin liquid film between the vapor bubble and the air. Further increases then lead to rapid atomization that continues to enhance the heat transfer. An acoustic wave displacement amplitude on the order of 10-8 m with 106 Hz order frequencies is observed to produce an improvement of up to 50% reduction in the surface temperature over the case without acoustic excitation.

  11. Virtual acoustic prototyping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Marty

    2003-10-01

    In this paper the re-creation of 3-D sound fields so the full psycho-acoustic impact of sound sources can be assessed before the manufacture of a product or environment is examined. Using head related transfer functions (HRTFs) coupled with a head tracked set of headphones the sound field at the left and right ears of a listener can be re-created for a set of sound sources. However, the HRTFs require that sources have a defined location and this is not the typical output from numerical codes which describe the sound field as a set of distributed modes. In this paper a method of creating a set of equivalent sources is described such that the standard set of HRTFs can be applied in real time. A structural-acoustic model of a cylinder driving an enclosed acoustic field will be used as an example. It will be shown that equivalent sources can be used to recreate all of the reverberation of the enclosed space. An efficient singular value decomposition technique allows the large number of sources required to be simulated in real time. An introduction to the requirements necessary for 3-D virtual prototyping using high frequency Statistical Energy Analysis models will be presented. [Work supported by AuSim and NASA.

  12. Acoustically enhanced heat transport

    SciTech Connect

    Ang, Kar M.; Hung, Yew Mun; Tan, Ming K.; Yeo, Leslie Y.

    2016-01-15

    We investigate the enhancement of heat transfer in the nucleate boiling regime by inducing high frequency acoustic waves (f ∼ 10{sup 6} Hz) on the heated surface. In the experiments, liquid droplets (deionized water) are dispensed directly onto a heated, vibrating substrate. At lower vibration amplitudes (ξ{sub s} ∼ 10{sup −9} m), the improved heat transfer is mainly due to the detachment of vapor bubbles from the heated surface and the induced thermal mixing. Upon increasing the vibration amplitude (ξ{sub s} ∼ 10{sup −8} m), the heat transfer becomes more substantial due to the rapid bursting of vapor bubbles happening at the liquid-air interface as a consequence of capillary waves travelling in the thin liquid film between the vapor bubble and the air. Further increases then lead to rapid atomization that continues to enhance the heat transfer. An acoustic wave displacement amplitude on the order of 10{sup −8} m with 10{sup 6} Hz order frequencies is observed to produce an improvement of up to 50% reduction in the surface temperature over the case without acoustic excitation.

  13. Acoustically enhanced heat transport.

    PubMed

    Ang, Kar M; Yeo, Leslie Y; Friend, James R; Hung, Yew Mun; Tan, Ming K

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the enhancement of heat transfer in the nucleate boiling regime by inducing high frequency acoustic waves (f ∼ 10(6) Hz) on the heated surface. In the experiments, liquid droplets (deionized water) are dispensed directly onto a heated, vibrating substrate. At lower vibration amplitudes (ξs ∼ 10(-9) m), the improved heat transfer is mainly due to the detachment of vapor bubbles from the heated surface and the induced thermal mixing. Upon increasing the vibration amplitude (ξs ∼ 10(-8) m), the heat transfer becomes more substantial due to the rapid bursting of vapor bubbles happening at the liquid-air interface as a consequence of capillary waves travelling in the thin liquid film between the vapor bubble and the air. Further increases then lead to rapid atomization that continues to enhance the heat transfer. An acoustic wave displacement amplitude on the order of 10(-8) m with 10(6) Hz order frequencies is observed to produce an improvement of up to 50% reduction in the surface temperature over the case without acoustic excitation.

  14. Acoustic paramagnetic logging tool

    DOEpatents

    Vail, III, William B.

    1988-01-01

    New methods and apparatus are disclosed which allow measurement of the presence of oil and water in geological formations using a new physical effect called the Acoustic Paramagnetic Logging Effect (APLE). The presence of petroleum in formation causes a slight increase in the earth's magnetic field in the vicinity of the reservoir. This is the phenomena of paramagnetism. Application of an acoustic source to a geological formation at the Larmor frequency of the nucleons present causes the paramagnetism of the formation to disappear. This results in a decrease in the earth3 s magnetic field in the vicinity of the oil bearing formation. Repetitively frequency sweeping the acoustic source through the Larmor frequency of the nucleons present (approx. 2 kHz) causes an amplitude modulation of the earth's magnetic field which is a consequence of the APLE. The amplitude modulation of the earth's magnetic field is measured with an induction coil gradiometer and provides a direct measure of the amount of oil and water in the excitation zone of the formation . The phase of the signal is used to infer the longitudinal relaxation times of the fluids present, which results in the ability in general to separate oil and water and to measure the viscosity of the oil present. Such measurements may be preformed in open boreholes and in cased well bores.

  15. Issues Related to Large Flight Hardware Acoustic Qualification Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R.; Perry, Douglas C.; Kern, Dennis L.

    2011-01-01

    The characteristics of acoustical testing volumes generated by reverberant chambers or a circle of loudspeakers with and without large flight hardware within the testing volume are significantly different. The parameters attributing to these differences are normally not accounted for through analysis or acoustic tests prior to the qualification testing without the test hardware present. In most cases the control microphones are kept at least 2-ft away from hardware surfaces, chamber walls, and speaker surfaces to minimize the impact of the hardware in controlling the sound field. However, the acoustic absorption and radiation of sound by hardware surfaces may significantly alter the sound pressure field controlled within the chamber/speaker volume to a given specification. These parameters often result in an acoustic field that may provide under/over testing scenarios for flight hardware. In this paper the acoustic absorption by hardware surfaces will be discussed in some detail. A simple model is provided to account for some of the observations made from Mars Science Laboratory spacecraft that recently underwent acoustic qualification tests in a reverberant chamber.

  16. Acoustic metamaterials with circular sector cavities and programmable densities.

    PubMed

    Akl, W; Elsabbagh, A; Baz, A

    2012-10-01

    Considerable interest has been devoted to the development of various classes of acoustic metamaterials that can control the propagation of acoustical wave energy throughout fluid domains. However, all the currently exerted efforts are focused on studying passive metamaterials with fixed material properties. In this paper, the emphasis is placed on the development of a class of composite one-dimensional acoustic metamaterials with effective densities that are programmed to adapt to any prescribed pattern along the metamaterial. The proposed acoustic metamaterial is composed of a periodic arrangement of cell structures, in which each cell consists of a circular sector cavity bounded by actively controlled flexible panels to provide the capability for manipulating the overall effective dynamic density. The theoretical analysis of this class of multilayered composite active acoustic metamaterials (CAAMM) is presented and the theoretical predictions are determined for a cascading array of fluid cavities coupled to flexible piezoelectric active boundaries forming the metamaterial domain with programmable dynamic density. The stiffness of the piezoelectric boundaries is electrically manipulated to control the overall density of the individual cells utilizing the strong coupling with the fluid domain and using direct acoustic pressure feedback. The interaction between the neighboring cells of the composite metamaterial is modeled using a lumped-parameter approach. Numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the performance characteristics of the proposed CAAMM and its potential for generating prescribed spatial and spectral patterns of density variation.

  17. Magnetomechanical Acoustic Emission - A Review

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-09-01

    Nickel Alloys Ferromagnetic Materials LA Acoustic Emission Barkhausen noise O-A Residual Stress ’~20 ABSTWA 7- ontinue reverse ad. Ii nedceeory and...also called magneto-acoustic emission [13], or acoustic Barkhausen effect [1]. When a ferromagnetic sample is placed in an alternating magnetic field...transducer, which should be insensitive to a magnetic field, was attached to a sample. A flux sensing coil and a Barkhausen noise (BN) probe are also

  18. Wavelet Preprocessing of Acoustic Signals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-01

    wavelet transform to preprocess acoustic broadband signals in a system that discriminates between different classes of acoustic bursts. This is motivated by the similarity between the proportional bandwidth filters provided by the wavelet transform and those found in biological hearing systems. The experiment involves comparing statistical pattern classifier effects of wavelet and FFT preprocessed acoustic signals. The data used was from the DARPA Phase I database, which consists of artificially generated signals with real ocean background. The

  19. Acoustic actuation of bioinspired microswimmers.

    PubMed

    Kaynak, Murat; Ozcelik, Adem; Nourhani, Amir; Lammert, Paul E; Crespi, Vincent H; Huang, Tony Jun

    2017-01-31

    Acoustic actuation of bioinspired microswimmers is experimentally demonstrated. Microswimmers are fabricated in situ in a microchannel. Upon acoustic excitation, the flagellum of the microswimmer oscillates, which in turn generates linear or rotary movement depending on the swimmer design. The speed of these bioinspired microswimmers is tuned by adjusting the voltage amplitude applied to the acoustic transducer. Simple microfabrication and remote actuation are promising for biomedical applications.

  20. A Brief History of Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossing, Thomas

    Although there are certainly some good historical treatments of acoustics in the literature, it still seems appropriate to begin a handbook of acoustics with a brief history of the subject. We begin by mentioning some important experiments that took place before the 19th century. Acoustics in the 19th century is characterized by describing the work of seven outstanding acousticians: Tyndall, von Helmholtz, Rayleigh, Stokes, Bell, Edison, and Koenig. Of course this sampling omits the mention of many other outstanding investigators.

  1. APL - North Pacific Acoustic Laboratory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-04

    Acoustic Lab” Encl: (1) Final Technical Report for Subject Grant (2) SF298 for Enclosure Enclosure (1) is the Final Technical Report for the subject...Laboratory (hard copy with SF 298) Defense Technical Information Center (electronic files with SF298) APL - North Pacific Acoustic ...speed perturbations and the characteristics of the ambient acoustic noise field. Scattering and diffraction resulting from internal waves and other

  2. Spacecraft Internal Acoustic Environment Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, S. Reynold; Allen, Chris

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the project is to develop an acoustic modeling capability, based on commercial off-the-shelf software, to be used as a tool for oversight of the future manned Constellation vehicles. The use of such a model will help ensure compliance with acoustic requirements. Also, this project includes modeling validation and development feedback via building physical mockups and conducting acoustic measurements to compare with the predictions.

  3. Broadband and stable acoustic vortex emitter with multi-arm coiling slits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xue; Zhao, Jiajun; Liu, Shi-lei; Liang, Bin; Zou, Xin-ye; Yang, Jing; Qiu, Cheng-Wei; Cheng, Jian-chun

    2016-05-01

    We present the analytical design and experimental realization of a scheme based on multi-arm coiling slits to generate the stable acoustic vortices in a broadband. The proposed structure is able to spiral the acoustic wave spatially and generate the twisted acoustic vortices with invariant topological charge for a long propagation distance. Compared with conventional methods which require the electronic control of a bulky loudspeaker, this scheme provides an effective and compact solution to generate acoustic vortices with controllable topological charge in the broadband, which offers more initiatives in the demanding applications.

  4. The application of smart structures toward feedback suppression in amplified acoustic guitars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, Steve; Lane, Steven A.; Clark, Robert L.

    2003-06-01

    Smart structures technology can be applied to amplified acoustic guitars to prevent instability resulting from acoustic feedback. This work presents a coupled model of the guitar dynamics and the acoustic feedback mechanism, and explains how a simple control loop using a piezoelectric ceramic actuator can be used to reduce the effects of acoustic feedback. In addition to model simulations, experimental results using a real system and a simple controller are presented. The results show that a significantly higher (7 dB) guitar output can be achieved before instability, without detrimentally affecting the amplified and unamplified guitar response.

  5. Realization of acoustic wave directivity at low frequencies with a subwavelength Mie resonant structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Gengxi; Ding, Erliang; Wang, Yangyang; Peng, Xiuyuan; Cui, Jun; Liu, Xiaozhou; Liu, Xiaojun

    2017-03-01

    We realized high-efficiency acoustic directivity at low frequencies based on monopolar Mie resonance. This is caused by micro structures that have a high refractive index relative to the background medium. The structures can strongly control the radiation pattern though the acoustic wavelength is much larger than its dimensions. We herein discuss how to enhance the directivity through modifying the structure's parameters. Furthermore, our structure is proposed for use in obtaining an acoustic collimated beam without sidelobes. The structure characteristics and applications are demonstrated both theoretically and experimentally. Potential applications of our structures include acoustic device miniaturization, noise control, and medical ultrasonics.

  6. Acoustical experiment of yogurt fermentation process.

    PubMed

    Ogasawara, H; Mizutani, K; Ohbuchi, T; Nakamura, T

    2006-12-22

    One of the important factors through food manufacturing is hygienic management. Thus, food manufactures prove their hygienic activities by taking certifications like a Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP). This concept also applies to food monitoring. Acoustical measurements have advantage for other measurement in food monitoring because they make it possible to measure with noncontact and nondestructive. We tried to monitor lactic fermentation of yogurt by a probing sensor using a pair of acoustic transducers. Temperature of the solution changes by the reaction heat of fermentation. Consequently the sound velocity propagated through the solution also changes depending on the temperature. At the same time, the solution change its phase from liquid to gel. The transducers usage in the solution indicates the change of the temperature as the change of the phase difference between two transducers. The acoustic method has advantages of nondestructive measurement that reduces contamination of food product by measuring instrument. The sensor was inserted into milk with lactic acid bacterial stain of 19 degrees C and monitored phase retardation of propagated acoustic wave and its temperature with thermocouples in the mild. The monitoring result of fermentation from milk to Caspian Sea yogurt by the acoustic transducers with the frequency of 3.7 MHz started to show gradient change in temperature caused by reaction heat of fermentation but stop the gradient change at the end although the temperature still change. The gradient change stopped its change because of phase change from liquid to gel. The present method will be able to measure indirectly by setting transducers outside of the measuring object. This noncontact sensing method will have great advantage of reduces risk of food contamination from measuring instrument because the measurement probes are set out of fermentation reactor or food containers. Our proposed method will contribute to the

  7. Acoustic confinement in superlattice cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Sanchez, Daniel; Déleglise, Samuel; Thomas, Jean-Louis; Atkinson, Paola; Lagoin, Camille; Perrin, Bernard

    2016-09-01

    The large coupling rate between the acoustic and optical fields confined in GaAs/AlAs superlattice cavities makes them appealing systems for cavity optomechanics. We have developed a mathematical model based on the scattering matrix that allows the acoustic guided modes to be predicted in nano and micropillar superlattice cavities. We demonstrate here that the reflection at the surface boundary considerably modifies the acoustic quality factor and leads to significant confinement at the micropillar center. Our mathematical model also predicts unprecedented acoustic Fano resonances on nanopillars featuring small mode volumes and very high mechanical quality factors, making them attractive systems for optomechanical applications.

  8. Double-negative acoustic metamaterial.

    PubMed

    Li, Jensen; Chan, C T

    2004-11-01

    We show here the existence of acoustic metamaterial, in which both the effective density and bulk modulus are simultaneously negative, in the true and strict sense of an effective medium. Our double-negative acoustic system is an acoustic analogue of Veselago's medium in electromagnetism, and shares many unique consequences, such as negative refractive index. The double negativity in acoustics is derived from low-frequency resonances, as in the case of electromagnetism, but the negative density and modulus are derived from a single resonance structure as distinct from electromagnetism in which the negative permeability and negative permittivity originates from different resonance mechanisms.

  9. Guided acoustic wave inspection system

    SciTech Connect

    Chinn, Diane J.

    2004-10-05

    A system for inspecting a conduit for undesirable characteristics. A transducer system induces guided acoustic waves onto said conduit. The transducer system detects the undesirable characteristics of the conduit by receiving guided acoustic waves that contain information about the undesirable characteristics. The conduit has at least two sides and the transducer system utilizes flexural modes of propagation to provide inspection using access from only the one side of the conduit. Cracking is detected with pulse-echo testing using one transducer to both send and receive the guided acoustic waves. Thinning is detected in through-transmission testing where one transducer sends and another transducer receives the guided acoustic waves.

  10. Truck acoustic data analyzer system

    SciTech Connect

    Haynes, Howard D.; Akerman, Alfred; Ayers, Curtis W.

    2006-07-04

    A passive vehicle acoustic data analyzer system having at least one microphone disposed in the acoustic field of a moving vehicle and a computer in electronic communication the microphone(s). The computer detects and measures the frequency shift in the acoustic signature emitted by the vehicle as it approaches and passes the microphone(s). The acoustic signature of a truck driving by a microphone can provide enough information to estimate the truck speed in miles-per-hour (mph), engine speed in rotations-per-minute (RPM), turbocharger speed in RPM, and vehicle weight.

  11. Transition section for acoustic waveguides

    DOEpatents

    Karplus, H.H.B.

    1975-10-28

    A means of facilitating the transmission of acoustic waves with minimal reflection between two regions having different specific acoustic impedances is described comprising a region exhibiting a constant product of cross-sectional area and specific acoustic impedance at each cross-sectional plane along the axis of the transition region. A variety of structures that exhibit this feature is disclosed, the preferred embodiment comprising a nested structure of doubly reentrant cones. This structure is useful for monitoring the operation of nuclear reactors in which random acoustic signals are generated in the course of operation.

  12. Surface Acoustic Waves to Drive Plant Transpiration

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Eliot F.; Berggren, Magnus; Simon, Daniel T.

    2017-01-01

    Emerging fields of research in electronic plants (e-plants) and agro-nanotechnology seek to create more advanced control of plants and their products. Electronic/nanotechnology plant systems strive to seamlessly monitor, harvest, or deliver chemical signals to sense or regulate plant physiology in a controlled manner. Since the plant vascular system (xylem/phloem) is the primary pathway used to transport water, nutrients, and chemical signals—as well as the primary vehicle for current e-plant and phtyo-nanotechnology work—we seek to directly control fluid transport in plants using external energy. Surface acoustic waves generated from piezoelectric substrates were directly coupled into rose leaves, thereby causing water to rapidly evaporate in a highly localized manner only at the site in contact with the actuator. From fluorescent imaging, we find that the technique reliably delivers up to 6x more water/solute to the site actuated by acoustic energy as compared to normal plant transpiration rates and 2x more than heat-assisted evaporation. The technique of increasing natural plant transpiration through acoustic energy could be used to deliver biomolecules, agrochemicals, or future electronic materials at high spatiotemporal resolution to targeted areas in the plant; providing better interaction with plant physiology or to realize more sophisticated cyborg systems. PMID:28361922

  13. Surface Acoustic Waves to Drive Plant Transpiration.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Eliot F; Berggren, Magnus; Simon, Daniel T

    2017-03-31

    Emerging fields of research in electronic plants (e-plants) and agro-nanotechnology seek to create more advanced control of plants and their products. Electronic/nanotechnology plant systems strive to seamlessly monitor, harvest, or deliver chemical signals to sense or regulate plant physiology in a controlled manner. Since the plant vascular system (xylem/phloem) is the primary pathway used to transport water, nutrients, and chemical signals-as well as the primary vehicle for current e-plant and phtyo-nanotechnology work-we seek to directly control fluid transport in plants using external energy. Surface acoustic waves generated from piezoelectric substrates were directly coupled into rose leaves, thereby causing water to rapidly evaporate in a highly localized manner only at the site in contact with the actuator. From fluorescent imaging, we find that the technique reliably delivers up to 6x more water/solute to the site actuated by acoustic energy as compared to normal plant transpiration rates and 2x more than heat-assisted evaporation. The technique of increasing natural plant transpiration through acoustic energy could be used to deliver biomolecules, agrochemicals, or future electronic materials at high spatiotemporal resolution to targeted areas in the plant; providing better interaction with plant physiology or to realize more sophisticated cyborg systems.

  14. Powered-Lift Aerodynamics and Acoustics. [conferences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Powered lift technology is reviewed. Topics covered include: (1) high lift aerodynamics; (2) high speed and cruise aerodynamics; (3) acoustics; (4) propulsion aerodynamics and acoustics; (5) aerodynamic and acoustic loads; and (6) full-scale and flight research.

  15. Acoustic markers of syllabic stress in Spanish excellent oesophageal speakers.

    PubMed

    Cuenca, María Heliodora; Barrio, Marina M; Anaya, Pablo; Establier, Carmelo

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation is to explore the use by Spanish excellent oesophageal speakers of acoustic cues to mark syllabic stress. The speech material has consisted of five pairs of disyllabic words which only differed in stress position. Total 44 oesophageal and 9 laryngeal speakers were recorded and a computerised designed ad hoc perceptual test was run in order to assess the accurate realisation of stress. The items produced by eight excellent oesophageal speakers with highest accuracy levels in the perception experiment were analysed acoustically with Praat, to be compared with the laryngeal control group. Measures of duration, fundamental frequency, spectral balance and overall intensity were taken for each target vowel and syllable. Results revealed that Spanish excellent oesophageal speakers were able to retain appropriate acoustic relations between stressed and unstressed syllables. Although spectral balance revealed as a strong cue for syllabic stress in the two voicing modes, a different hierarchy of acoustic cues in each voicing mode was found.

  16. Acoustical considerations for secondary uses of government facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Jack B.

    2003-10-01

    Government buildings are by their nature, public and multi-functional. Whether in meetings, presentations, documentation processing, work instructions or dispatch, speech communications are critical. Full-time occupancy facilities may require sleep or rest areas adjacent to active spaces. Rooms designed for some other primary use may be used for public assembly, receptions or meetings. In addition, environmental noise impacts to the building or from the building should be considered, especially where adjacent to hospitals, hotels, apartments or other urban sensitive land uses. Acoustical criteria and design parameters for reverberation, background noise and sound isolation should enhance speech intelligibility and privacy. This presentation looks at unusual spaces and unexpected uses of spaces with regard to room acoustics and noise control. Examples of various spaces will be discussed, including an atrium used for reception and assembly, multi-jurisdictional (911) emergency control center, frequent or long-duration use of emergency generators, renovations of historically significant buildings, and the juxtaposition of acoustically incompatible functions. Brief case histories of acoustical requirements, constraints and design solutions will be presented, including acoustical measurements, plan illustrations and photographs. Acoustical criteria for secondary functional uses of spaces will be proposed.

  17. The Identification of Nanoscale Structures According to a Parameters of Acoustic Structuroscopy Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ababkov, N. V.; Smirnov, A. N.; Bykova, N. V.

    2016-04-01

    The fracture surface of a destroyed steam turbine rotor is studied by acoustic structuroscopy method. The structural-phase state of the metal of the destroyed rotor of a steam turbine is studied using the methods of electron microscopy. It was established that in the areas of control, where the values of the acoustic characteristics have significant differences from the rest of the metal, detected nanocrystalline structure. The possibility of determining the structure of the nanoscale metal by acoustic structuroscopy is shown.

  18. Is dust acoustic wave a new plasma acoustic mode?

    SciTech Connect

    Dwivedi, C.B.

    1997-09-01

    In this Brief Communication, the claim of the novelty of the dust acoustic wave in a dusty plasma within the constant dust charge model is questioned. Conceptual lacunas behind the claim have been highlighted and appropriate physical arguments have been forwarded against the claim. It is demonstrated that the so-called dust acoustic wave could better be termed as a general acoustic fluctuation response with a dominant characteristic feature of the acoustic-like mode (ALM) fluctuation response reported by Dwivedi {ital et al.} [J. Plasma Phys. {bold 41}, 219 (1989)]. It is suggested that both correct and more usable nomenclature of the ALM should be the so-called acoustic mode. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. Acoustic mechanical feedthroughs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherrit, Stewart; Walkemeyer, Phillip; Bao, Xiaoqi; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Badescu, Mircea

    2013-04-01

    Electromagnetic motors can have problems when operating in extreme environments. In addition, if one needs to do mechanical work outside a structure, electrical feedthroughs are required to transport the electric power to drive the motor. In this paper, we present designs for driving rotary and linear motors by pumping stress waves across a structure or barrier. We accomplish this by designing a piezoelectric actuator on one side of the structure and a resonance structure that is matched to the piezoelectric resonance of the actuator on the other side. Typically, piezoelectric motors can be designed with high torques and lower speeds without the need for gears. One can also use other actuation materials such as electrostrictive, or magnetostrictive materials in a benign environment and transmit the power in acoustic form as a stress wave and actuate mechanisms that are external to the benign environment. This technology removes the need to perforate a structure and allows work to be done directly on the other side of a structure without the use of electrical feedthroughs, which can weaken the structure, pipe, or vessel. Acoustic energy is pumped as a stress wave at a set frequency or range of frequencies to produce rotary or linear motion in a structure. This method of transferring useful mechanical work across solid barriers by pumping acoustic energy through a resonant structure features the ability to transfer work (rotary or linear motion) across pressure or thermal barriers, or in a sterile environment, without generating contaminants. Reflectors in the wall of barriers can be designed to enhance the efficiency of the energy/power transmission. The method features the ability to produce a bi-directional driving mechanism using higher-mode resonances. There are a variety of applications where the presence of a motor is complicated by thermal or chemical environments that would be hostile to the motor components and reduce life and, in some instances, not be

  20. Acoustic Mechanical Feedthroughs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherrit, Stewart; Walkemeyer, Phillip; Bao, Xiaoqi; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Badescu, Mircea

    2013-01-01

    Electromagnetic motors can have problems when operating in extreme environments. In addition, if one needs to do mechanical work outside a structure, electrical feedthroughs are required to transport the electric power to drive the motor. In this paper, we present designs for driving rotary and linear motors by pumping stress waves across a structure or barrier. We accomplish this by designing a piezoelectric actuator on one side of the structure and a resonance structure that is matched to the piezoelectric resonance of the actuator on the other side. Typically, piezoelectric motors can be designed with high torques and lower speeds without the need for gears. One can also use other actuation materials such as electrostrictive, or magnetostrictive materials in a benign environment and transmit the power in acoustic form as a stress wave and actuate mechanisms that are external to the benign environment. This technology removes the need to perforate a structure and allows work to be done directly on the other side of a structure without the use of electrical feedthroughs, which can weaken the structure, pipe, or vessel. Acoustic energy is pumped as a stress wave at a set frequency or range of frequencies to produce rotary or linear motion in a structure. This method of transferring useful mechanical work across solid barriers by pumping acoustic energy through a resonant structure features the ability to transfer work (rotary or linear motion) across pressure or thermal barriers, or in a sterile environment, without generating contaminants. Reflectors in the wall of barriers can be designed to enhance the efficiency of the energy/power transmission. The method features the ability to produce a bi-directional driving mechanism using higher-mode resonances. There are a variety of applications where the presence of a motor is complicated by thermal or chemical environments that would be hostile to the motor components and reduce life and, in some instances, not be