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Sample records for acoustic desorption combined

  1. Laser-Induced Acoustic Desorption of Natural and Functionalized Biochromophores

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Laser-induced acoustic desorption (LIAD) has recently been established as a tool for analytical chemistry. It is capable of launching intact, neutral, or low charged molecules into a high vacuum environment. This makes it ideally suited to mass spectrometry. LIAD can be used with fragile biomolecules and very massive compounds alike. Here, we apply LIAD time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF-MS) to the natural biochromophores chlorophyll, hemin, bilirubin, and biliverdin and to high mass fluoroalkyl-functionalized porphyrins. We characterize the variation in the molecular fragmentation patterns as a function of the desorption and the VUV postionization laser intensity. We find that LIAD can produce molecular beams an order of magnitude slower than matrix-assisted laser desorption (MALD), although this depends on the substrate material. Using titanium foils we observe a most probable velocity of 20 m/s for functionalized molecules with a mass m = 10 000 Da. PMID:25946522

  2. Laser-induced acoustic desorption of natural and functionalized biochromophores.

    PubMed

    Sezer, Uğur; Wörner, Lisa; Horak, Johannes; Felix, Lukas; Tüxen, Jens; Götz, Christoph; Vaziri, Alipasha; Mayor, Marcel; Arndt, Markus

    2015-06-02

    Laser-induced acoustic desorption (LIAD) has recently been established as a tool for analytical chemistry. It is capable of launching intact, neutral, or low charged molecules into a high vacuum environment. This makes it ideally suited to mass spectrometry. LIAD can be used with fragile biomolecules and very massive compounds alike. Here, we apply LIAD time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF-MS) to the natural biochromophores chlorophyll, hemin, bilirubin, and biliverdin and to high mass fluoroalkyl-functionalized porphyrins. We characterize the variation in the molecular fragmentation patterns as a function of the desorption and the VUV postionization laser intensity. We find that LIAD can produce molecular beams an order of magnitude slower than matrix-assisted laser desorption (MALD), although this depends on the substrate material. Using titanium foils we observe a most probable velocity of 20 m/s for functionalized molecules with a mass m = 10,000 Da.

  3. Laser-induced acoustic desorption (LIAD) mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Dow, Alex M; Wittrig, Ashley R; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I

    2012-01-01

    Large thermally labile molecules were not amenable to mass spectrometric analysis until the development of atmospheric pressure evaporation/ionization methods, such as electrospray ionization (ESI) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI), since attempts to evaporate these molecules by heating induces degradation of the sample. While ESI and MALDI are relatively soft desorption/ionization techniques, they are both limited to preferential ionization of acidic and basic analytes. This limitation has been the driving force for the development of other soft desorption/ionization techniques. One such method employs laser-induced acoustic desorption (LIAD) to evaporate neutral sample molecules into mass spectrometers. LIAD utilizes acoustic waves generated by a laser pulse in a thin metal foil. The acoustic waves travel through the foil and cause desorption of neutral molecules that have been deposited on the opposite side of the foil. One of the advantages of LIAD is that it desorbs low-energy molecules that can be ionized by a variety of methods, thus allowing the analysis of large molecules that are not amenable to ESI and MALDI. This review covers the generation of acoustic waves in foils via a laser pulse, the parameters affecting the generation of acoustic waves, possible mechanisms for desorption of neutral molecules, as well as the various uses of LIAD by mass spectrometrists. The conditions used to generate acoustic or stress waves in solid materials consist of three regimes: thermal, ablative, and constrained. Each regime is discussed, in addition to the mechanisms that lead to the ablation of the metal from the foil and generation of acoustic waves for two of the regimes. Previously proposed desorption mechanisms for LIAD are presented along with the flaws associated with some of them. Various experimental parameters, such as the exact characteristics of the laser pulse and foil used, are discussed. The internal and kinetic energy of the neutral

  4. Laser-Induced Acoustic Desorption Atmospheric Pressure Photoionization via VUV-Generating Microplasmas.

    PubMed

    Benham, Kevin; Hodyss, Robert; Fernández, Facundo M; Orlando, Thomas M

    2016-11-01

    We demonstrate the first application of laser-induced acoustic desorption (LIAD) and atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) as a mass spectrometric method for detecting low-polarity organics. This was accomplished using a Lyman-α (10.2 eV) photon generating microhollow cathode discharge (MHCD) microplasma photon source in conjunction with the addition of a gas-phase molecular dopant. This combination provided a soft desorption and a relatively soft ionization technique. Selected compounds analyzed include α-tocopherol, perylene, cholesterol, phenanthrene, phylloquinone, and squalene. Detectable surface concentrations as low as a few pmol per spot sampled were achievable using test molecules. The combination of LIAD and APPI provided a soft desorption and ionization technique that can allow detection of labile, low-polarity, structurally complex molecules over a wide mass range with minimal fragmentation. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  5. Laser-Induced Acoustic Desorption Atmospheric Pressure Photoionization via VUV-Generating Microplasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benham, Kevin; Hodyss, Robert; Fernández, Facundo M.; Orlando, Thomas M.

    2016-11-01

    We demonstrate the first application of laser-induced acoustic desorption (LIAD) and atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) as a mass spectrometric method for detecting low-polarity organics. This was accomplished using a Lyman-α (10.2 eV) photon generating microhollow cathode discharge (MHCD) microplasma photon source in conjunction with the addition of a gas-phase molecular dopant. This combination provided a soft desorption and a relatively soft ionization technique. Selected compounds analyzed include α-tocopherol, perylene, cholesterol, phenanthrene, phylloquinone, and squalene. Detectable surface concentrations as low as a few pmol per spot sampled were achievable using test molecules. The combination of LIAD and APPI provided a soft desorption and ionization technique that can allow detection of labile, low-polarity, structurally complex molecules over a wide mass range with minimal fragmentation.

  6. Combined acoustic and optical trapping

    PubMed Central

    Thalhammer, G.; Steiger, R.; Meinschad, M.; Hill, M.; Bernet, S.; Ritsch-Marte, M.

    2011-01-01

    Combining several methods for contact free micro-manipulation of small particles such as cells or micro-organisms provides the advantages of each method in a single setup. Optical tweezers, which employ focused laser beams, offer very precise and selective handling of single particles. On the other hand, acoustic trapping with wavelengths of about 1 mm allows the simultaneous trapping of many, comparatively large particles. With conventional approaches it is difficult to fully employ the strengths of each method due to the different experimental requirements. Here we present the combined optical and acoustic trapping of motile micro-organisms in a microfluidic environment, utilizing optical macro-tweezers, which offer a large field of view and working distance of several millimeters and therefore match the typical range of acoustic trapping. We characterize the acoustic trapping forces with the help of optically trapped particles and present several applications of the combined optical and acoustic trapping, such as manipulation of large (75 μm) particles and active particle sorting. PMID:22025990

  7. Evaluation of a Novel Approach for Peptide Sequencing: Laser-induced Acoustic Desorption Combined with P(OCH3)2+ Chemical Ionization and Collision-activated Dissociation in a Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometer

    PubMed Central

    Somuramasami, Jayalakshmi; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I.

    2007-01-01

    A novel mass spectrometric method has been developed for obtaining sequence information on small peptides. The peptides are desorbed as intact neutral molecules into a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR) by means of laser-induced acoustic desorption (LIAD). Reactions of the neutral peptides with the dimethoxyphosphenium ion, P(OCH3)2+, occur predominantly by addition of the peptide to P(OCH3)2+ followed by the loss of two methanol molecules, thus yielding product ions with the composition (peptide + P − 2H)+. Upon sustained off-resonance irradiation for collision-activated dissociation (SORI-CAD), the (peptide + P − 2H)+ ions undergo successive losses of CO and NH = CHR or H2O, CO, and NH = CHR to yield sequence-related fragment ions in addition to the regular an- and bn-type ions. Under the same conditions, SORI-CAD of the analogous protonated peptides predominantly yields the regular an- and bn-type ions. The mechanisms of the reactions of peptides with P(OCH3)2+ and the dissociation of the (peptide + P − 2H)+ ions were examined by using model peptides and molecular orbital calculations. PMID:17157527

  8. Evaluation of a novel approach for peptide sequencing: laser-induced acoustic desorption combined with P(OCH(3))(2)(+) chemical ionization and collision-activated dissociation in a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Somuramasami, Jayalakshmi; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I

    2007-03-01

    A novel mass spectrometric method has been developed for obtaining sequence information on small peptides. The peptides are desorbed as intact neutral molecules into a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR) by means of laser-induced acoustic desorption (LIAD). Reactions of the neutral peptides with the dimethoxyphosphenium ion, P(OCH(3))(2)(+), occur predominantly by addition of the peptide to P(OCH(3))(2)(+) followed by the loss of two methanol molecules, thus yielding product ions with the composition (peptide + P - 2H)(+). Upon sustained off-resonance irradiation for collision-activated dissociation (SORI-CAD), the (peptide + P - 2H)(+) ions undergo successive losses of CO and NHCHR or H(2)O, CO, and NHCHR to yield sequence-related fragment ions in addition to the regular a(n)- and b(n)-type ions. Under the same conditions, SORI-CAD of the analogous protonated peptides predominantly yields the regular a(n)- and b(n)-type ions. The mechanisms of the reactions of peptides with P(OCH(3))(2)(+) and the dissociation of the (peptide + P - 2H)(+) ions were examined by using model peptides and molecular orbital calculations.

  9. Laser-driven acoustic desorption of organic molecules from back-irradiated solid foils.

    SciTech Connect

    Zinovev, A. V.; Veryovkin, I. V.; Moore, J. F.; Pellin, M. J.; Materials Science Division; Mass Think

    2007-11-01

    Laser-induced acoustic desorption (LIAD) from thin metal foils is a promising technique for gentle and efficient volatilization of intact organic molecules from surfaces of solid substrates. Using the single-photon ionization method combined with time-of-flight mass spectrometry, we have examined the neutral component of the desorbed flux in LIAD and compared it to that from direct laser desorption. These basic studies of LIAD, conducted for molecules of various organic dyes (rhodamine B, fluorescein, anthracene, coumarin, BBQ), have demonstrated detection of intact parent molecules of the analyte even at its surface concentrations corresponding to a submonolayer coating. In some cases (rhodamine B, fluorescein, BBQ), the parent molecular ion peak was accompanied by a few fragmentation peaks of comparable intensity, whereas for others, only peaks corresponding to intact parent molecules were detected. At all measured desorbing laser intensities (from 100 to 500 MW/cm{sup 2}), the total amount of desorbed parent molecules depended exponentially on the laser intensity. Translational velocities of the desorbed intact molecules, determined for the first time in this work, were of the order of hundreds of meters per second, less than what has been observed in our experiments for direct laser desorption, but substantially greater than the possible perpendicular velocity of the substrate foil surface due to laser-generated acoustic waves. Moreover, these velocities did not depend on the desorbing laser intensity, which implies the presence of a more sophisticated mechanism of energy transfer than direct mechanical or thermal coupling between the laser pulse and the adsorbed molecules. Also, the total flux of desorbed intact molecules as a function of the total number of desorbing laser pulses, striking the same point on the target, decayed following a power law rather than an exponential function, as would have been predicted by the shake-off model. To summarize, the

  10. Thin-layer chromatography/laser-induced acoustic desorption/electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Sy-Chyi; Huang, Min-Zong; Shiea, Jentaie

    2009-11-15

    The combination of laser-induced acoustic desorption and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LIAD/ESI/MS) can be used to rapidly characterize chemical compounds separated on a thin layer chromatography (TLC) plate. We performed LIAD analysis by irradiating the rear side of an aluminum-based TLC plate with a pulsed infrared (IR) laser. To efficiently generate and transfer acoustic and shock waves to ablate the analyte-containing TLC gels, a glass slide was attached to the rear of the TLC plate and the gap between the glass slide and the TLC plate was filled with a viscous solution (glycerol). Although the diameter of the laser spot created on the rear of the TLC plate was approximately 0.35 mm, the ablated areas on the front sides of the silica gel bed and the C(18) reverse-phase gel bed had diameters of approximately 1.3 and 3 mm, respectively. The ablated analyte molecules were ionized in an ESI plume and then detected by an ion trap mass analyzer. This TLC/LIAD/ESI/MS approach allowed the components in mixtures of dye standards, drug standards, and rosemary essential oil to be separated and rapidly characterized.

  11. Laser-Induced Acoustic Desorption/Electron Ionization of Amino Acids and Small Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarrell, Tiffany M.; Owen, Benjamin C.; Riedeman, James S.; Prentice, Boone M.; Pulliam, Chris J.; Max, Joann; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I.

    2017-06-01

    Laser-induced acoustic desorption (LIAD) allows for desorption of neutral nonvolatile compounds independent of their volatility or thermal stability. Many different ionization methods have been coupled with LIAD. Hence, this setup provides a better control over the types of ions formed than other mass spectrometry evaporation/ionization methods commonly used to characterize biomolecules, such as ESI or MALDI. In this study, the utility of LIAD coupled with electron ionization (EI) was tested for the analysis of common amino acids with no derivatization. The results compared favorably with previously reported EI mass spectra obtained using thermal desorption/EI. Further, LIAD/EI mass spectra collected for hydrochloride salts of two amino acids were found to be similar to those measured for the neutral amino acids with the exception of the appearance of an HCl+● ion. However, the hydrochloride salt of arginine showed a distinctly different LIAD/EI mass spectrum than the previously published literature EI mass spectrum, likely due to its highly basic side chain that makes a specific zwitterionic form particularly favorable. Finally, EI mass spectra were measured for seven small peptides, including di-, tri-, and tetrapeptides. These mass spectra show a variety of ion types. However, an type ions are prevalent. Also, electron-induced dissociation (EID) of protonated peptides has been reported to form primarily an type ions. In addition, the loss of small neutral molecules and side-chain cleavages were observed that are reminiscent of other high-energy fragmentation methods, such as EID. Finally, the isomeric dipeptides LG and IG were found to produce drastically different EI mass spectra, thus allowing differentiation of the leucine and isoleucine amino acids in these dipeptides. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  12. Laser-Induced Acoustic Desorption/Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jinshan; Borton, David J.; Owen, Benjamin C.; Jin, Zhicheng; Hurt, Matt; Amundson, Lucas M.; Madden, Jeremy T.; Qian, Kuangnan; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I.

    2010-01-01

    Laser-induced acoustic desorption (LIAD) was successfully coupled to a conventional atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) source in a linear quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer (LQIT). Model compounds representing a wide variety of different types, including basic nitrogen and oxygen compounds, aromatic and aliphatic compounds, as well as unsaturated and saturated hydrocarbons, were tested separately and as a mixture. These model compounds were successfully evaporated into the gas phase by using LIAD and then ionized by using APCI with different reagents. Four APCI reagent systems were tested: the traditionally used mixture of methanol and water, neat benzene, neat carbon disulfide, and nitrogen gas (no liquid reagent). The mixture of methanol and water produced primarily protonated molecules, as expected. However, only the most basic compounds yielded ions under these conditions. In sharp contrast, using APCI with either neat benzene or neat carbon disulfide as the reagent resulted in the ionization of all the analytes studied to predominantly yield stable molecular ions. Benzene yielded a larger fraction of protonated molecules than carbon disulfide, which is a disadvantage. A similar amount of fragmentation was observed for these reagents. When the experiment was performed without a liquid reagent(nitrogen gas was the reagent), more fragmentation was observed. Analysis of a known mixture as well as a petroleum cut was also carried out. In summary, the new experiment presented here allows the evaporation of thermally labile compounds, both polar and nonpolar, without dissociation or aggregation, and their ionization to form stable molecular ions. PMID:21472571

  13. Laser-induced acoustic desorption/atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jinshan; Borton, David J; Owen, Benjamin C; Jin, Zhicheng; Hurt, Matt; Amundson, Lucas M; Madden, Jeremy T; Qian, Kuangnan; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I

    2011-03-01

    Laser-induced acoustic desorption (LIAD) was successfully coupled to a conventional atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) source in a commercial linear quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer (LQIT). Model compounds representing a wide variety of different types, including basic nitrogen and oxygen compounds, aromatic and aliphatic compounds, as well as unsaturated and saturated hydrocarbons, were tested separately and as a mixture. These model compounds were successfully evaporated into the gas phase by using LIAD and then ionized by using APCI with different reagents. From the four APCI reagent systems tested, neat carbon disulfide provided the best results. The mixture of methanol and water produced primarily protonated molecules, as expected. However, only the most basic compounds yielded ions under these conditions. In sharp contrast, using APCI with either neat benzene or neat carbon disulfide as the reagent resulted in the ionization of all the analytes studied to predominantly yield stable molecular ions. Benzene yielded a larger fraction of protonated molecules than carbon disulfide, which is a disadvantage. A similar but minor amount of fragmentation was observed for these two reagents. When the experiment was performed without a liquid reagent (nitrogen gas was the reagent), more fragmentation was observed. Analysis of a known mixture as well as a petroleum cut was also carried out. In summary, the new experiment presented here allows the evaporation of thermally labile compounds, both polar and nonpolar, without dissociation or aggregation, and their ionization to predominantly form stable molecular ions.

  14. A Combined Desorption Ionization by Charge Exchange (DICE) and Desorption Electrospray Ionization (DESI) Source for Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Chang-Ching; Bolgar, Mark S.; Miller, Scott A.; Attygalle, Athula B.

    2011-01-01

    A source that couples the desorption ionization by charge exchange (DICE) and desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) techniques together was demonstrated to broaden the range of compounds that can be analyzed in a single mass spectrometric experiment under ambient conditions. A tee union was used to mix the spray reagents into a partially immiscible blend before this mixture was passed through a conventional electrospray (ES) probe capillary. Using this technique, compounds that are ionized more efficiently by the DICE method and those that are ionized better with the DESI procedure could be analyzed simultaneously. For example, hydroquinone, which is not detected when subjected to DESI-MS in the positive-ion generation mode, or the sodium adduct of guaifenesin, which is not detected when examined by DICE-MS, could both be detected in one experiment when the two techniques were combined. The combined technique was able to generate the molecular ion, proton and metal adduct from the same compound. When coupled to a tandem mass spectrometer, the combined source enabled the generation of product ion spectra from the molecular ion and the [M + H]+ or [M + metal]+ ions of the same compound without the need to physically change the source from DICE to DESI. The ability to record CID spectra of both the molecular ion and adduct ions in a single mass spectrometric experiment adds a new dimension to the array of mass spectrometric methods available for structural studies.

  15. Laser-induced acoustic desorption coupled with a linear quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Habicht, Steven C; Amundson, Lucas M; Duan, Penggao; Vinueza, Nelson R; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I

    2010-01-15

    In recent years, laser-induced acoustic desorption (LIAD) coupled with a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometer has been demonstrated to provide a valuable technique for the analysis of a wide variety of nonvolatile, thermally labile compounds, including analytes that could not previously be analyzed by mass spectrometry. Although FT-ICR instruments are very powerful, they are also large and expensive and, hence, mainly used as research instruments. In contrast, linear quadrupole ion trap (LQIT) mass spectrometers are common due to several qualities that make these instruments attractive for both academic and industrial settings, such as high sensitivity, large dynamic range, and experimental versatility. Further, the relatively small size of the instruments, comparatively low cost, and the lack of a magnetic field provide some distinct advantages over FT-ICR instruments. Hence, we have coupled the LIAD technique with a commercial LQIT, the Thermo Fischer Scientific LTQ mass spectrometer. The LQIT was modified for a LIAD probe by outfitting the removable back plate of the instrument with a 6 in. ConFlat flange (CFF) port, gate valve, and sample lock. Reagent ions were created using the LQIT's atmospheric pressure ionization source and trapped in the mass analyzer for up to 10 s to allow chemical ionization reactions with the neutral molecules desorbed via LIAD. These initial experiments focused on demonstrating the feasibility of performing LIAD in the LQIT. Hence, the results are compared to those obtained using an FT-ICR mass spectrometer. Despite the lower efficiency in the transfer of desorbed neutral molecules into the ion trap, and the smaller maximum number of available laser pulses, the intrinsically higher sensitivity of the LQIT resulted in a higher sensitivity relative to the FT-ICR.

  16. A combined whelk watch suggests repeated TBT desorption pulses.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, J M; Albaina, N; Carro, B; Barreiro, R

    2015-01-01

    Environmental quality in coastal Europe has improved since the complete 2003 ban on the use of tributyltin (TBT) in antifouling paints. However, there is evidence that TBT is entering the water column, presumably from illegal practices. We determined the concentration of butyltins (BTs: TBT and derivatives) in populations of two gastropods, the rock snail Nucella lapillus (n=17) and the mud snail Nassarius reticulatus (n=18) at regular intervals from pre-ban times until 2009 and 2011, respectively, in NW Spain. Although a substantial decline in TBT occurred shortly after the ban, no significant changes were observed in either species over the last 3-year period of study. In addition, the proportion of TBT relative to the sum of BTs (a marker of recent pollution) in the most recent rock snail samples unexpectedly increased; this proportion therefore showed a generally decreasing but oscillatory trend over time. The results are consistent with the theoretical expectation of BT desorption from sediments; however, this natural phenomenon is now interpreted as a recurrent episode rather than a unique, transient event. Evidence of this subtle input improves our understanding of TBT persistence in the environment in Europe and worldwide.

  17. Coupling Laser Diode Thermal Desorption with Acoustic Sample Deposition to Improve Throughput of Mass Spectrometry-Based Screening.

    PubMed

    Haarhoff, Zuzana; Wagner, Andrew; Picard, Pierre; Drexler, Dieter M; Zvyaga, Tatyana; Shou, Wilson

    2016-02-01

    The move toward label-free screening in drug discovery has increased the demand for mass spectrometry (MS)-based analysis. Here we investigated the approach of coupling acoustic sample deposition (ASD) with laser diode thermal desorption (LDTD)-tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). We assessed its use in a cytochrome P450 (CYP) inhibition assay, where a decrease in metabolite formation signifies CYP inhibition. Metabolite levels for 3 CYP isoforms were measured as CYP3A4-1'-OH-midazolam, CYP2D6-dextrorphan, and CYP2C9-4'-OH-diclofenac. After incubation, samples (100 nL) were acoustically deposited onto a stainless steel 384-LazWell plate, then desorbed by an infrared laser directly from the plate surface into the gas phase, ionized by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI), and analyzed by MS/MS. Using this method, we achieved a sample analysis speed of 2.14 s/well, with bioanalytical performance comparable to the current online solid-phase extraction (SPE)-based MS method. An even faster readout speed was achieved when postreaction sample multiplexing was applied, where three reaction samples, one for each CYP, were transferred into the same well of the LazWell plate. In summary, LDTD coupled with acoustic sample deposition and multiplexing significantly decreased analysis time to 0.7 s/sample, making this MS-based approach feasible to support high-throughput screening (HTS) assays.

  18. Fast surface acoustic wave-matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry of cell response from islets of Langerhans.

    PubMed

    Bllaci, Loreta; Kjellström, Sven; Eliasson, Lena; Friend, James R; Yeo, Leslie Y; Nilsson, Staffan

    2013-03-05

    A desire for higher speed and performance in molecular profiling analysis at a reduced cost is driving a trend in miniaturization and simplification of procedures. Here we report the use of a surface acoustic wave (SAW) atomizer for fast sample handling in matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI MS) peptide and protein profiling of Islets of Langerhans, for future type 2 diabetes (T2D) studies. Here the SAW atomizer was used for ultrasound (acoustic) extraction of insulin and other peptide hormones released from freshly prepared islets, stimulated directly on a membrane. A high energy propagating SAW atomizes the membrane-bound liquid into approximately 2 μm diameter droplets, rich in cell-released molecules. Besides acting as a sample carrier, the membrane provides a purification step by entrapping cell clusters and other impurities within its fibers. A new SAW-based sample-matrix deposition method for MALDI MS was developed and characterized by a strong insulin signal, and a limit of detection (LOD) lower than 100 amol was achieved. Our results support previous work reporting the SAW atomizer as a fast and inexpensive tool for ultrasound, membrane-based sample extraction. When interfaced with MALDI MS, the SAW atomizer constitutes a valuable tool for rapid cell studies. Other biomedical applications of SAW-MALDI MS are currently being developed, aiming at fast profiling of biofluids. The membrane sampling is a simplistic and noninvasive collection method of limited volume biofluids such as the gingival fluid and the tearfilm.

  19. Speaker verification using combined acoustic and EM sensor signal processing

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, L C; Gable, T J; Holzrichter, J F

    2000-11-10

    Low Power EM radar-like sensors have made it possible to measure properties of the human speech production system in real-time, without acoustic interference. This greatly enhances the quality and quantity of information for many speech related applications. See Holzrichter, Burnett, Ng, and Lea, J. Acoustic. SOC. Am . 103 ( 1) 622 (1998). By combining the Glottal-EM-Sensor (GEMS) with the Acoustic-signals, we've demonstrated an almost 10 fold reduction in error rates from a speaker verification system experiment under a moderate noisy environment (-10dB).

  20. Mercury Sorption and Desorption on Gold: A Comparative Analysis of Surface Acoustic Wave and Quartz Crystal Microbalance-Based Sensors.

    PubMed

    Kabir, K M Mohibul; Sabri, Ylias M; Esmaielzadeh Kandjani, Ahmad; Matthews, Glenn I; Field, Matthew; Jones, Lathe A; Nafady, Ayman; Ippolito, Samuel J; Bhargava, Suresh K

    2015-08-04

    Microelectromechanical sensors based on surface acoustic wave (SAW) and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) transducers possess substantial potential as online elemental mercury (Hg(0)) vapor detectors in industrial stack effluents. In this study, a comparison of SAW- and QCM-based sensors is performed for the detection of low concentrations of Hg(0) vapor (ranging from 24 to 365 ppbv). Experimental measurements and finite element method (FEM) simulations allow the comparison of these sensors with regard to their sensitivity, sorption and desorption characteristics, and response time following Hg(0) vapor exposure at various operating temperatures ranging from 35 to 75 °C. Both of the sensors were fabricated on quartz substrates (ST and AT cut quartz for SAW and QCM devices, respectively) and employed thin gold (Au) layers as the electrodes. The SAW-based sensor exhibited up to ∼111 and ∼39 times higher response magnitudes than did the QCM-based sensor at 35 and 55 °C, respectively, when exposed to Hg(0) vapor concentrations ranging from 24 to 365 ppbv. The Hg(0) sorption and desorption calibration curves of both sensors were found to fit well with the Langmuir extension isotherm at different operating temperatures. Furthermore, the Hg(0) sorption and desorption rate demonstrated by the SAW-based sensor was found to decrease as the operating temperature increased, while the opposite trend was observed for the QCM-based sensor. However, the SAW-based sensor reached the maximum Hg(0) sorption rate faster than the QCM-based sensor regardless of operating temperature, whereas both sensors showed similar response times (t90) at various temperatures. Additionally, the sorption rate data was utilized in this study in order to obtain a faster response time from the sensor upon exposure to Hg(0) vapor. Furthermore, comparative analysis of the developed sensors' selectivity showed that the SAW-based sensor had a higher overall selectivity (90%) than did the QCM

  1. Moisture adsorption desorption characteristics of stainless steel tubing measured by ball surface acoustic wave trace moisture analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuji, Toshishiro; Akao, Shingo; Oizumi, Toru; Takeda, Nobuo; Tsukahara, Yusuke; Yamanaka, Kazushi

    2017-07-01

    A ball surface acoustic wave (SAW) trace moisture analyzer (TMA) was applied to measuring the adsorption and desorption (AD) characteristics of a stainless steel tube. For the first time, two-frequency measurement for precise temperature compensation was attempted at intervals of 3 s using a burst waveform undersampling circuit. We succeeded in measuring the variations of moisture transit time and dry-down dynamics caused by inner surface treatments such as bright annealing (BA), electropolishing (EP), and electrochemical buffing (ECB) using a sample-tube length of only 100 mm at a flow rate of 0.1 L/min. Net moisture adsorption was evaluated from the measured adsorption subtracted by the background adsorption. As a result, it was found that the adsorption on the ECB tube was smaller than those on EP and BA tubes by 1/3 and 1/4, respectively, at a baseline concentration of 13 ppbv. From these results, it was demonstrated that the ball SAW TMA could be used for measuring the AD characteristics of stainless steel tubes with various surface treatments.

  2. Remediation of PCB-contaminated soil using a combination of mechanochemical method and thermal desorption.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhong-Hua; Li, Xiao-Dong; Ni, Ming-Jiang; Chen, Tong; Yan, Jian-Hua

    2017-03-24

    The combination of mechanochemical method and thermal desorption for remediating polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in contaminated soil was tested in this study. The effects of grinding time and heating time on PCB removal efficiency were investigated. The contaminated soil, mixed with CaO powder at a weight ratio of 1:1, was first ground using a planetary ball mill. After 4 h of grinding, the total PCB concentration and its toxic equivalence quantity (TEQ) decreased by 74.6 and 75.8%, respectively. Then, after being heated at 500 °C for 60 min, the residual PCBs in mechanochemical + thermal treated soil decreased to 247 ng/g, resulting in a removal efficiency of 99.95%. The removal effect can be promoted by longer grinding time and heating time; however, increased energy consumption was inevitable. The combination of grinding time and heating time should be optimized in a practical remediation process.

  3. Characterization of Nonpolar Lipids and Selected Steroids by Using Laser-Induced Acoustic Desorption/Chemical Ionization, Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization, and Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry†

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Zhicheng; Daiya, Shivani; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I.

    2011-01-01

    Laser-induced acoustic desorption (LIAD) combined with ClMn(H2O)+ chemical ionization (CI) was tested for the analysis of nonpolar lipids and selected steroids in a Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR). The nonpolar lipids studied, cholesterol, 5α-cholestane, cholesta-3,5-diene, squalene, and β-carotene, were found to solely form the desired water replacement product (adduct-H2O) with the ClMn(H2O)+ ions. The steroids, androsterone, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), estrone, estradiol, and estriol, also form abundant adduct-H2O ions, but less abundant adduct-2H2O ions were also observed. Neither (+)APCI nor (+)ESI can ionize the saturated hydrocarbon lipid, cholestane. APCI successfully ionizes the unsaturated hydrocarbon lipids to form exclusively the intact protonated analytes. However, it causes extensive fragmentation for cholesterol and the steroids. The worst case is cholesterol that does not produce any stable protonated molecules. On the other hand, ESI cannot ionize any of the hydrocarbon analytes, saturated or unsaturated. However, ESI can be used to protonate the oxygen-containing analytes with substantially less fragmentation than for APCI in all cases except for cholesterol and estrone. In conclusion, LIAD/ClMn(H2O)+ chemical ionization is superior over APCI and ESI for the mass spectrometric characterization of underivatized nonpolar lipids and steroids. PMID:21528012

  4. Frequency overlap between electric and acoustic stimulation and speech-perception benefit in patients with combined electric and acoustic stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ting; Spahr, Anthony J.; Dorman, Michael F.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Our aim was to assess, for patients with a cochlear implant in one ear and low-frequency acoustic hearing in the contralateral ear, whether reducing the overlap in frequencies conveyed in the acoustic signal and those analyzed by the cochlear implant speech processor would improve speech recognition. Design The recognition of monosyllabic words in quiet and sentences in noise was evaluated in three listening configurations: electric stimulation alone, acoustic stimulation alone, and combined electric and acoustic stimulation. The acoustic stimuli were either unfiltered or low-pass (LP) filtered at 250 Hz, 500 Hz, or 750 Hz. The electric stimuli were either unfiltered or high-pass (HP) filtered at 250 Hz, 500 Hz or 750 Hz. In the combined condition the unfiltered acoustic signal was paired with the unfiltered electric signal, the 250 LP acoustic signal was paired with the 250 Hz HP electric signal, the 500 Hz LP acoustic signal was paired with the 500 Hz HP electric signal and the 750 Hz LP acoustic signal was paired with the 750 Hz HP electric signal. Results For both acoustic and electric signals performance increased as the bandwith increased. The highest level of performance in the combined condition was observed in the unfiltered acoustic plus unfiltered electric condition. Conclusions Reducing the overlap in frequency representation between acoustic and electric stimulation does not increase speech understanding scores for patients who have residual hearing in the ear contralateral to the implant. We find that acoustic information below 250 Hz significantly improves performance for patients who combine electric and acoustic stimulation and accounts for the majority of the speech-perception benefit when acoustic stimulation is combined with electric stimulation. PMID:19915474

  5. Acoustical comfort of vehicles: A combination of sound and vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genuit, Klaus; Schutte-Fortkamp, Brigitte; Fiebig, Andre

    2005-09-01

    As vehicles become more and more quiet, the customer's sensitivity to acoustical comfort increases. The acoustical comfort is not independent of the vibrations the driver can feel in the seat and at the steering. The passenger of a vehicle must be regarded as part of a vibro-acoustic system. Correspondingly, the subjective judgement which passengers make about their impression of levels of acoustic comfort encompasses both sound and vibration. Achievement in this field depends on obtaining knowledge about the interaction between sound and vibration and how these factors impact subjective evaluation. To save time and money prediction tools for the estimation of sound and vibration contributions into the vehicle cabin are very important in order to simulate the final comfort with respect to sound and vibration. Based on the binaural transfer path analysis in combination with the binaural transfer path synthesis a sound and vibration reproduction in a so-called SoundCar can be realized with a very good simulation of a real situation of a car. First research tests completed for the European research project OBELICS (Objective Evaluation of Interior Car Sound) have shown that the use of SoundCar may result in more reliable sound characteristic and quality evaluation.

  6. CO adsorption on W(100) during temperature-programmed desorption: A combined density functional theory and kinetic Monte Carlo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albao, Marvin A.; Padama, Allan Abraham B.

    2017-02-01

    Using a combined density functional theory (DFT) and kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations, we study the adsorption at 800 K and subsequent desorption of CO on W(100) at higher temperatures. The resulting TPD profiles are known experimentally to exhibit three desorption peaks β1, β2, and β3 at 930 K, 1070 K, and 1375 K, respectively. Unlike more recent theoretical studies that propose that all three aforementioned peaks are molecularly rather than associatively desorbed, our KMC analyses are in support of the latter, since at 800 K dissociation is facile and that CO exists as dissociation fragments C and O. We show that these peaks arise from desorption from the same adsorption site but whose binding energy varies depending on local environment, that is, the presence of CO as well as dissociation fragments C and O nearby. Furthermore we show that several key parameters, such as desorption, dissociation and recombination barriers all play a key role in the TPD spectra-these parameter effectively controls not only the location of the TPD peaks but the shape and width of the desorption peaks as well. Moreover, our KMC simulations reveal that varying the heating rate shifts the peaks but leaves their shape intact.

  7. Physiological Mechanisms in Combined Electric-Acoustic Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Sato, Mika; Baumhoff, Peter; Tillein, Jochen; Kral, Andrej

    2017-09-01

    Electrical stimulation is normally performed on ears that have no hearing function, i.e., lack functional hair cells. The properties of electrically-evoked responses in these cochleae were investigated in several previous studies. Recent clinical developments have introduced cochlear implantation (CI) in residually-hearing ears to improve speech understanding in noise. The present study documents the known physiological differences between electrical stimulation of hair cells and of spiral ganglion cells, respectively, and reviews the mechanisms of combined electric and acoustic stimulation in the hearing ears. Literature review from 1971 to 2016. Compared with pure electrical stimulation the combined electroacoustic stimulation provides additional low-frequency information and expands the dynamic range of the input. Physiological studies document a weaker synchronization of the evoked activity in electrically stimulated hearing ears compared with deaf ears that reduces the hypersynchronization of electrically-evoked activity. The findings suggest the possibility of balancing the information provided by acoustic and electric input using stimulus intensity. Absence of distorting acoustic-electric interactions allows exploiting these clinical benefits of electroacoustic stimulation.

  8. Mandarin Speech Perception in Combined Electric and Acoustic Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yongxin; Zhang, Guoping; Galvin, John J.; Fu, Qian-Jie

    2014-01-01

    For deaf individuals with residual low-frequency acoustic hearing, combined use of a cochlear implant (CI) and hearing aid (HA) typically provides better speech understanding than with either device alone. Because of coarse spectral resolution, CIs do not provide fundamental frequency (F0) information that contributes to understanding of tonal languages such as Mandarin Chinese. The HA can provide good representation of F0 and, depending on the range of aided acoustic hearing, first and second formant (F1 and F2) information. In this study, Mandarin tone, vowel, and consonant recognition in quiet and noise was measured in 12 adult Mandarin-speaking bimodal listeners with the CI-only and with the CI+HA. Tone recognition was significantly better with the CI+HA in noise, but not in quiet. Vowel recognition was significantly better with the CI+HA in quiet, but not in noise. There was no significant difference in consonant recognition between the CI-only and the CI+HA in quiet or in noise. There was a wide range in bimodal benefit, with improvements often greater than 20 percentage points in some tests and conditions. The bimodal benefit was compared to CI subjects’ HA-aided pure-tone average (PTA) thresholds between 250 and 2000 Hz; subjects were divided into two groups: “better” PTA (<50 dB HL) or “poorer” PTA (>50 dB HL). The bimodal benefit differed significantly between groups only for consonant recognition. The bimodal benefit for tone recognition in quiet was significantly correlated with CI experience, suggesting that bimodal CI users learn to better combine low-frequency spectro-temporal information from acoustic hearing with temporal envelope information from electric hearing. Given the small number of subjects in this study (n = 12), further research with Chinese bimodal listeners may provide more information regarding the contribution of acoustic and electric hearing to tonal language perception. PMID:25386962

  9. The distribution dynamics and desorption behaviour of mobile pharmaceuticals and caffeine to combined sewer sediments.

    PubMed

    Hajj-Mohamad, M; Darwano, H; Duy, S Vo; Sauvé, S; Prévost, M; Arp, H P H; Dorner, S

    2017-01-01

    Pharmaceuticals are discharged to the environment from wastewater resource recovery facilities, sewer overflows, and illicit sewer connections. To understand the fate of pharmaceuticals, there is a need to better understand their sorption dynamics to suspended sediments (SS) and settled sediments (StS) in sewer systems. In this study, such sorption dynamics to both SS and StS were assessed using a batch equilibrium method under both static and dynamic conditions. Experiments were performed with natively occurring and artificially modified concentrations of sewer pharmaceuticals (acetaminophen, theophylline, carbamazepine, and a metabolite of carbamazepine) and caffeine. Differences in apparent distribution coefficients, Kd,app, between SS and StS were related to differences in their organic carbon (OC) content, and the practice of artificially modifying the concentration. Kd,app values of modified contaminant concentrations and high OC sediments were substantially higher. Pseudo-second order desorption rates for these mobile compounds were also quantified. Successive flushing events to simulate the addition of stormwater to sewer networks revealed that aqueous concentrations would not necessarily decrease, because the added water will rapidly return to equilibrium concentrations with the sediments. Sorption and desorption kinetics must be considered in addition to dilution, to avoid underestimating the influence of dilution on concentrations of pharmaceuticals discharged to the environment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Acoustic Noise Removal by Combining Wiener and Wavelet Filtering Techniques

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-06-01

    effective filter and a more accurate denoised signal. Frack discusses methods which can be used to model noise for filtering purposes when adequate noise...discrete wavelet decomposition of the acoustic signal. The effectiveness of the noise removal methods is evaluated by applying them to simulated...wavelet decomposition of the acoustic signal. The effectiveness of the noise removal methods is evaluated by applying them to simulated data. The

  11. Hybrid acoustic energy harvesting using combined electromagnetic and piezoelectric conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Farid Ullah; Izhar

    2016-02-01

    This paper reports a novel hybrid acoustic energy harvester. The harvester utilizes both the electromagnetic and piezoelectric conversion mechanisms simultaneously to convert the ambient acoustical noise into electrical power for self-powered wireless sensor nodes. The proposed harvester is comprised of a Helmholtz resonator, two magnets mounted on a piezoelectric plate, and a wound coil located under the magnets. The harvester is characterized both under harmonic and real random acoustical excitations. In-lab, under harmonic acoustical excitation at a sound pressure level of 130 dB and frequency of 2.1 kHz, an optimum power of 2.86 μW (at 114 Ω optimum load) is obtained from electromagnetic conversion and 50 μW (at 1000 Ω optimum load) is generated by the piezoelectric harvester's part. Moreover, in real acoustical environment of a domestic electric generator the peak voltages of 40 and 123 mV are produced by the electromagnetic and piezoelectric portions of the acoustic energy harvester.

  12. Passive sampling in combination with thermal desorption and gas chromatography as a tool for self-assessment of chemical exposure.

    PubMed

    Sunesson, Anna-Lena; Liljelind, Ingrid; Sundgren, Margit; Pettersson-Strömbäck, Anita; Levin, Jan-Olof

    2002-10-01

    Diffusive samplers for monitoring of air quality are user-friendly devices that can normally be operated by the user himself. Hence these samplers are suitable for self-assessment. Practical and work organisational aspects of self-assessment of chemical exposure were studied in different occupational settings. It was found that the diffusive sampler used in these studies, the Perkin-Elmer tube in combination with thermal desorption, worked well for the purpose and could be correctly handled by the individuals using it. The results from self-assessments agreed well with expert measurements carried out by an occupational hygienist. However, in order to obtain a sustainable system of self-assessment strong organizational support is needed.

  13. Combined effects of DOM extracted from site soil/compost and biosurfactant on the sorption and desorption of PAHs in a soil-water system.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hui; Huang, Guo-he; An, Chun-jiang; Wei, Jia

    2011-06-15

    The combined effects of DOM and biosurfactant on the sorption/desorption behavior of phenanthrene (PHE) and pyrene (PYR) in soil water systems were systematically investigated. Two origins of DOMs (extracted from soil and extracted from food waste compost) and an anionic biosurfactant (rhamnolipid) were introduced. The presence of DOM in the aqueous phase could decrease the sorption of PAHs, thus influence their mobility. Desorption enhancement for both PHE and PYR in the system with compost DOM was greater than that in the soil DOM system. This is due to the differences in specific molecular structures and functional groups of two DOMs. With the co-existence of biosurfactant and DOM, partitioning is the predominant process and the desorption extent was much higher than the system with DOM or biosurfactant individually. For PHE, the desorption enhancement of combined DOM and biosurfactant was larger than the sum of DOM or biosurfactant; however desorption enhancement for PYR in the combined system was less than the additive enhancement in two individual system under low PAH concentration. This could be explained as the competition sorption among PAHs, DOM and biosurfactant. The results of this study will help to clarify the transport of petroleum pollutants in the remediation of HOCs-contaminated soils.

  14. Combined Helmholtz equation-least squares method for reconstructing acoustic radiation from arbitrarily shaped objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Sean F.; Zhao, Xiang

    2002-07-01

    A combined Helmholtz equation-least squares (CHELS) method is developed for reconstructing acoustic radiation from an arbitrary object. This method combines the advantages of both the HELS method and the Helmholtz integral theory based near-field acoustic holography (NAH). As such it allows for reconstruction of the acoustic field radiated from an arbitrary object with relatively few measurements, thus significantly enhancing the reconstruction efficiency. The first step in the CHELS method is to establish the HELS formulations based on a finite number of acoustic pressure measurements taken on or beyond a hypothetical spherical surface that encloses the object under consideration. Next enough field acoustic pressures are generated using the HELS formulations and taken as the input to the Helmholtz integral formulations implemented through the boundary element method (BEM). The acoustic pressure and normal component of the velocity at the discretized nodes on the surface are then determined by solving two matrix equations using singular value decomposition (SVD) and regularization techniques. Also presented are in-depth analyses of the advantages and limitations of the CHELS method. Examples of reconstructing acoustic radiation from separable and nonseparable surfaces are demonstrated. copyright 2002 Acoustical Society of America.

  15. A procedure for combining acoustically induced and mechanically induced loads (first passage failure design criterion)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crowe, D. R.; Henricks, W.

    1983-01-01

    The combined load statistics are developed by taking the acoustically induced load to be a random population, assumed to be stationary. Each element of this ensemble of acoustically induced loads is assumed to have the same power spectral density (PSD), obtained previously from a random response analysis employing the given acoustic field in the STS cargo bay as a stationary random excitation. The mechanically induced load is treated as either (1) a known deterministic transient, or (2) a nonstationary random variable of known first and second statistical moments which vary with time. A method is then shown for determining the probability that the combined load would, at any time, have a value equal to or less than a certain level. Having obtained a statistical representation of how the acoustic and mechanical loads are expected to combine, an analytical approximation for defining design levels for these loads is presented using the First Passage failure criterion.

  16. Analysis of wastewater samples by direct combination of thin-film microextraction and desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Strittmatter, Nicole; Düring, Rolf-Alexander; Takáts, Zoltán

    2012-09-07

    An analysis method for aqueous samples by the direct combination of C18/SCX mixed mode thin-film microextraction (TFME) and desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) was developed. Both techniques make analytical workflow simpler and faster, hence the combination of the two techniques enables considerably shorter analysis time compared to the traditional liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) approach. The method was characterized using carbamazepine and triclosan as typical examples for pharmaceuticals and personal care product (PPCP) components which draw increasing attention as wastewater-derived environmental contaminants. Both model compounds were successfully detected in real wastewater samples and their concentrations determined using external calibration with isotope labeled standards. Effects of temperature, agitation, sample volume, and exposure time were investigated in the case of spiked aqueous samples. Results were compared to those of parallel HPLC-MS determinations and good agreement was found through a three orders of magnitude wide concentration range. Serious matrix effects were observed in treated wastewater, but lower limits of detection were still found to be in the low ng L(-1) range. Using an Orbitrap mass spectrometer, the technique was found to be ideal for screening purposes and led to the detection of various different PPCP components in wastewater treatment plant effluents, including beta-blockers, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and UV filters.

  17. Combined Helmholtz equation-least squares method for reconstructing acoustic radiation from arbitrarily shaped objects.

    PubMed

    Wu, Sean F; Zhao, Xiang

    2002-07-01

    A combined Helmholtz equation-least squares (CHELS) method is developed for reconstructing acoustic radiation from an arbitrary object. This method combines the advantages of both the HELS method and the Helmholtz integral theory based near-field acoustic holography (NAH). As such it allows for reconstruction of the acoustic field radiated from an arbitrary object with relatively few measurements, thus significantly enhancing the reconstruction efficiency. The first step in the CHELS method is to establish the HELS formulations based on a finite number of acoustic pressure measurements taken on or beyond a hypothetical spherical surface that encloses the object under consideration. Next enough field acoustic pressures are generated using the HELS formulations and taken as the input to the Helmholtz integral formulations implemented through the boundary element method (BEM). The acoustic pressure and normal component of the velocity at the discretized nodes on the surface are then determined by solving two matrix equations using singular value decomposition (SVD) and regularization techniques. Also presented are in-depth analyses of the advantages and limitations of the CHELS method. Examples of reconstructing acoustic radiation from separable and nonseparable surfaces are demonstrated.

  18. Denoising of human speech using combined acoustic and em sensor signal processing

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, L C; Burnett, G C; Holzrichter, J F; Gable, T J

    1999-11-29

    Low Power EM radar-like sensors have made it possible to measure properties of the human speech production system in real-time, without acoustic interference. This greatly enhances the quality and quantify of information for many speech related applications. See Holzrichter, Burnett, Ng, and Lea, J. Acoustic. Soc. Am. 103 (1) 622 (1998). By using combined Glottal-EM- Sensor- and Acoustic-signals, segments of voiced, unvoiced, and no-speech can be reliably defined. Real-time Denoising filters can be constructed to remove noise from the user's corresponding speech signal.

  19. Characterization of petroleum products by laser-induced acoustic desorption in a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinkston, David S.

    Many petroleum products, in particular large nonpolar saturated hydrocarbons, have proven difficult to analyze via mass spectrometry due to their low volatility, lack of basic or acidic groups needed for most ionization methods, and low activation energies for fragmentation after ionization. The above limitation has been addressed by using laser-induced acoustic desorption (LIAD) to evaporate nonvolatile and thermally labile petroleum components for analysis in a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometer. The gaseous neutral analytes were ionized by electron impact. Model compounds were studied first to test the viability of this method. After that, different types of asphaltenes were characterized successfully. For example, the molecular weight distribution of a North American asphaltene was determined. A comparison between asphaltene samples obtained from different geographical locations showed distinct molecular weight characteristics, possibly allowing for the determination of an unknown asphaltene sample's geographic origin. Asphaltenes were also characterized via electrospray ionization (ESI) in a linear quadrupole ion trap (LQIT). The observed molecular weight distribution had an extended tail past 2000 Da. Collision-activated dissociation (CAD) experiments on isolated ions revealed that water aggregation was present in this analysis. The observed molecular weight distribution of asphaltenes reduced dramatically when water was eliminated from the system. The usefulness of a new chemical ionization reagent, ClMn(H2O) +, is also discussed. This reagent has been shown to ionize hydrocarbons without fragmentation to yield [ClMnR]+, where R is the hydrocarbon, thus providing molecular weight information. CAD of the [ClMnR]+ ions is demonstrated to allow the differentiation of isomeric hydrocarbons. Finally, the LIAD/ClMn(H2O)+ mass spectrometric method was applied to the successful analysis of various petroleum fractions and asphaltene

  20. Speech and melody recognition in binaurally combined acoustic and electric hearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Ying-Yee; Stickney, Ginger S.; Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2005-03-01

    Speech recognition in noise and music perception is especially challenging for current cochlear implant users. The present study utilizes the residual acoustic hearing in the nonimplanted ear in five cochlear implant users to elucidate the role of temporal fine structure at low frequencies in auditory perception and to test the hypothesis that combined acoustic and electric hearing produces better performance than either mode alone. The first experiment measured speech recognition in the presence of competing noise. It was found that, although the residual low-frequency (<1000 Hz) acoustic hearing produced essentially no recognition for speech recognition in noise, it significantly enhanced performance when combined with the electric hearing. The second experiment measured melody recognition in the same group of subjects and found that, contrary to the speech recognition result, the low-frequency acoustic hearing produced significantly better performance than the electric hearing. It is hypothesized that listeners with combined acoustic and electric hearing might use the correlation between the salient pitch in low-frequency acoustic hearing and the weak pitch in the envelope to enhance segregation between signal and noise. The present study suggests the importance and urgency of accurately encoding the fine-structure cue in cochlear implants. .

  1. Multivariate acoustic detection of small explosions using Fisher's combined probability test.

    PubMed

    Arrowsmith, Stephen J; Taylor, Steven R

    2013-03-01

    A methodology for the combined acoustic detection and discrimination of explosions, which uses three discriminants, is developed for the purpose of identifying weak explosion signals embedded in complex background noise. By utilizing physical models for simple explosions that are formulated as statistical hypothesis tests, the detection/discrimination approach does not require a model for the background noise, which can be highly complex and variable in practice. Fisher's Combined Probability Test is used to combine the p-values from all multivariate discriminants. This framework is applied to acoustic data from a 400 g explosion conducted at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  2. Evaluation of combined matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry experiments for peptide mass fingerprinting analysis.

    PubMed

    da Silva, David; Wasselin, Thierry; Carré, Vincent; Chaimbault, Patrick; Bezdetnaya, Lina; Maunit, Benoît; Muller, Jean-François

    2011-07-15

    Peptide Mass Fingerprinting (PMF) is still of significant interest in proteomics because it allows a large number of complex samples to be rapidly screened and characterized. The main part of post-translational modifications is generally preserved. In some specific cases, PMF suffers from ambiguous or unsuccessful identification. In order to improve its reliability, a combined approach using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOFMS) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (MALDI-FTICRMS) was evaluated. The study was carried out on bovine serum albumin (BSA) digest. The influence of several important parameters (the matrix, the sample preparation method, the amount of the analyte) on the MOWSE score and the protein sequence coverage were evaluated to allow the identification of specific effects. A careful investigation of the sequence coverage obtained by each kind of experiment ensured the detection of specific peptides for each experimental condition. Results highlighted that DHB-FTICRMS and DHB- or CHCA-TOFMS are the most suited combinations of experimental conditions to achieve PMF analysis. The association (convolution) of the data obtained by each of these techniques ensured a significant increase in the MOWSE score and the protein sequence coverage.

  3. Combination and simultaneous resonances of gas bubbles oscillating in liquids under dual-frequency acoustic excitation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuning; Zhang, Yuning; Li, Shengcai

    2017-03-01

    The multi-frequency acoustic excitation has been employed to enhance the effects of oscillating bubbles in sonochemistry for many years. In the present paper, nonlinear dynamic oscillations of bubble under dual-frequency acoustic excitation are numerically investigated within a broad range of parameters. By investigating the power spectra and the response curves of oscillating bubbles, two unique features of bubble oscillations under dual-frequency excitation (termed as "combination resonance" and "simultaneous resonance") are revealed and discussed. Specifically, the amplitudes of the combination resonances are quantitatively compared with those of other traditional resonances (e.g. main resonances, harmonics). The influences of several paramount parameters (e.g., the bubble radius, the acoustic pressure amplitude, the energy allocation between two component waves) on nonlinear bubble oscillations are demonstrated.

  4. Combining acoustic and electric stimulation in the service of speech recognition

    PubMed Central

    Dorman, Michael F.; Gifford, Rene H.

    2010-01-01

    The majority of recently implanted, cochlear implant patients can potentially benefit from a hearing aid in the ear contralateral to the implant. When patients combine electric and acoustic stimulation, word recognition in quiet and sentence recognition in noise increase significantly. Several studies suggest that the acoustic information that leads to the increased level of performance resides mostly in the frequency region of the voice fundamental, e.g. 125 Hz for a male voice. Recent studies suggest that this information aids speech recognition in noise by improving the recognition of lexical boundaries or word onsets. In some noise environments, patients with bilateral implants can achieve similar levels of performance as patients who combine electric and acoustic stimulation. Patients who have undergone hearing preservation surgery, and who have electric stimulation from a cochlear implant and who have low-frequency hearing in both the implanted and not-implanted ears, achieve the best performance in a high noise environment. PMID:20874053

  5. Combined spatial diversity and time equalization for broadband multiple channel underwater acoustic communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skoro Kaskarovska, Violeta

    High data rate acoustic communications become feasible with the use of communication systems that operate at high frequency. The high frequency acoustic transmission in shallow water endures severe distortion as a result of the extensive intersymbol interference and Doppler shift, caused by the time variable multipath nature of the channel. In this research a Single Input Multiple Output (SIMO) acoustic communication system is developed to improve the reliability of the high data rate communications at short range in the shallow water acoustic channel. The proposed SIMO communication system operates at very high frequency and combines spatial diversity and decision feedback equalizer in a multilevel adaptive configuration. The first configuration performs selective combining on the equalized signals from multiple receivers and generates quality feedback parameter for the next level of combining. The second configuration implements a form of turbo equalization to evaluate the individual receivers using the feedback parameters as decision symbols. The improved signals from individual receivers are used in the next iteration of selective combining. Multiple iterations are used to achieve optimal estimate of the received signal. The multilevel adaptive configuration is evaluated on experimental and simulated data using SIMO system with three, four and five receivers. The simulation channel model developed for this research is based on experimental channel and Rician fading channel model. The performance of the channel is evaluated in terms of Bit Error Rate (BER) and Signal-to-Noise-and-Interference Ratio (SNIR). Using experimental data with non-zero BER, multilevel adaptive spatial diversity can achieve BER of 0 % and SNIR gain of 3 dB. The simulation results show that the average BER and SNIR after multilevel combining improve dramatically compared to the single receiver, even in case of extremely high BER of individual received signals. The results demonstrate the

  6. Crack Detection Using Combinations of Acoustic Emission and Guided Wave Signals from Bonded Piezoelectric Transducers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    Mark M. Derriso , John E. Little II, and Keith A. Vehorn, Air Force Research Laboratory, Air Vehicles Directorate, 2790 D Street, Wright...data. Crack Detection Using Combinations of Acoustic Emission and Guided Wave Signals from Bonded Piezoelectric Transducers M. M. DERRISO , J. E

  7. Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Jerry R.; Grosveld, Ferdinand

    2007-01-01

    The acoustics environment in space operations is important to maintain at manageable levels so that the crewperson can remain safe, functional, effective, and reasonably comfortable. High acoustic levels can produce temporary or permanent hearing loss, or cause other physiological symptoms such as auditory pain, headaches, discomfort, strain in the vocal cords, or fatigue. Noise is defined as undesirable sound. Excessive noise may result in psychological effects such as irritability, inability to concentrate, decrease in productivity, annoyance, errors in judgment, and distraction. A noisy environment can also result in the inability to sleep, or sleep well. Elevated noise levels can affect the ability to communicate, understand what is being said, hear what is going on in the environment, degrade crew performance and operations, and create habitability concerns. Superfluous noise emissions can also create the inability to hear alarms or other important auditory cues such as an equipment malfunctioning. Recent space flight experience, evaluations of the requirements in crew habitable areas, and lessons learned (Goodman 2003; Allen and Goodman 2003; Pilkinton 2003; Grosveld et al. 2003) show the importance of maintaining an acceptable acoustics environment. This is best accomplished by having a high-quality set of limits/requirements early in the program, the "designing in" of acoustics in the development of hardware and systems, and by monitoring, testing and verifying the levels to ensure that they are acceptable.

  8. Experimental Investigations of the Internal Energy of Molecules Evaporated via Laser-induced Acoustic Desorption into a Fourier-transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometer (LIAD/FT-ICR)

    PubMed Central

    Shea, Ryan C.; Petzold, Christopher J.; Liu, Ji-ang; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I.

    2008-01-01

    The internal energy of neutral gas-phase organic and biomolecules, evaporated by means of laser-induced acoustic desorption (LIAD) into a Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR), was investigated through several experimental approaches. The desorbed molecules were demonstrated not to undergo degradation during the desorption process by collecting LIAD-evaporated molecules and subjecting them to analysis by electrospray ionization/quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometry. Previously established gas-phase basicity (GB) values were remeasured for LIAD-evaporated organic molecules and biomolecules with the use of the bracketing method. No endothermic reactions were observed. The remeasured basicity values are in close agreement with the values reported in the literature. The amount of internal energy deposited during LIAD is concluded to be less than a few kcal/mol. Chemical ionization with a series of proton transfer reagents was employed to obtain a breakdown curve for a protonated dipeptide, val-pro, evaporated by LIAD. Comparison of this breakdown curve with a previously published analogous curve obtained by using substrate-assisted laser desorption (SALD) to evaporate the peptide suggests that the molecules evaporated via LIAD have less internal energy than those evaporated via SALD. PMID:17263513

  9. Neutrophil-inspired propulsion in a combined acoustic and magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Daniel; Baasch, Thierry; Blondel, Nicolas; Läubli, Nino; Dual, Jürg; Nelson, Bradley J

    2017-10-03

    Systems capable of precise motion in the vasculature can offer exciting possibilities for applications in targeted therapeutics and non-invasive surgery. So far, the majority of the work analysed propulsion in a two-dimensional setting with limited controllability near boundaries. Here we show bio-inspired rolling motion by introducing superparamagnetic particles in magnetic and acoustic fields, inspired by a neutrophil rolling on a wall. The particles self-assemble due to dipole-dipole interaction in the presence of a rotating magnetic field. The aggregate migrates towards the wall of the channel due to the radiation force of an acoustic field. By combining both fields, we achieved a rolling-type motion along the boundaries. The use of both acoustic and magnetic fields has matured in clinical settings. The combination of both fields is capable of overcoming the limitations encountered by single actuation techniques. We believe our method will have far-reaching implications in targeted therapeutics.Devising effective swimming and propulsion strategies in microenvironments is attractive for drug delivery applications. Here Ahmed et al. demonstrate a micropropulsion strategy in which a combination of magnetic and acoustic fields is used to assemble and propel colloidal particles along channel walls.

  10. A combined microphone and camera calibration technique with application to acoustic imaging.

    PubMed

    Legg, Mathew; Bradley, Stuart

    2013-10-01

    We present a calibration technique for an acoustic imaging microphone array, combined with a digital camera. Computer vision and acoustic time of arrival data are used to obtain microphone coordinates in the camera reference frame. Our new method allows acoustic maps to be plotted onto the camera images without the need for additional camera alignment or calibration. Microphones and cameras may be placed in an ad-hoc arrangement and, after calibration, the coordinates of the microphones are known in the reference frame of a camera in the array. No prior knowledge of microphone positions, inter-microphone spacings, or air temperature is required. This technique is applied to a spherical microphone array and a mean difference of 3 mm was obtained between the coordinates obtained with this calibration technique and those measured using a precision mechanical method.

  11. The benefits of combining acoustic and electric stimulation for the recognition of speech, voice and melodies.

    PubMed

    Dorman, Michael F; Gifford, Rene H; Spahr, Anthony J; McKarns, Sharon A

    2008-01-01

    Fifteen patients fit with a cochlear implant in one ear and a hearing aid in the other ear were presented with tests of speech and melody recognition and voice discrimination under conditions of electric (E) stimulation, acoustic (A) stimulation and combined electric and acoustic stimulation (EAS). When acoustic information was added to electrically stimulated information performance increased by 17-23 percentage points on tests of word and sentence recognition in quiet and sentence recognition in noise. On average, the EAS patients achieved higher scores on CNC words than patients fit with a unilateral cochlear implant. While the best EAS patients did not outperform the best patients fit with a unilateral cochlear implant, proportionally more EAS patients achieved very high scores on tests of speech recognition than unilateral cochlear implant patients. (c) 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel

  12. Nonlinear Response of Composite Panels Under Combined Acoustic Excitation and Aerodynamic Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdel-Motagaly, K.; Duan, B.; Mei, C.

    1999-01-01

    A finite element formulation is presented for the analysis of large deflection response of composite panels subjected to aerodynamic pressure- at supersonic flow and high acoustic excitation. The first-order shear deformation theory is considered for laminated composite plates, and the von Karman nonlinear strain-displacement relations are employed for the analysis of large deflection panel response. The first-order piston theory aerodynamics and the simulated Gaussian white noise are employed for the aerodynamic and acoustic loads, respectively. The nonlinear equations of motion for an arbitrarily laminated composite panel subjected to a combined aerodynamic and acoustic pressures are formulated first in structure node degrees-of-freedom. The system equations are then transformed and reduced to a set of coupled nonlinear equations in modal coordinates. Modal participation is defined and the in-vacuo modes to be retained in the analysis are based on the modal participation values. Numerical results include root mean square values of maximum deflections, deflection and strain response time histories, probability distributions, and power spectrum densities. Results showed that combined acoustic and aerodynamic loads have to be considered for panel analysis and design at high dynamic pressure values.

  13. Fundamental frequency is critical to speech perception in noise in combined acoustic and electric hearing.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Jeff; Tiaden, Stephanie; Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2011-10-01

    Cochlear implant (CI) users have been shown to benefit from residual low-frequency hearing, specifically in pitch related tasks. It remains unclear whether this benefit is dependent on fundamental frequency (F0) or other acoustic cues. Three experiments were conducted to determine the role of F0, as well as its frequency modulated (FM) and amplitude modulated (AM) components, in speech recognition with a competing voice. In simulated CI listeners, the signal-to-noise ratio was varied to estimate the 50% correct response. Simulation results showed that the F0 cue contributes to a significant proportion of the benefit seen with combined acoustic and electric hearing, and additionally that this benefit is due to the FM rather than the AM component. In actual CI users, sentence recognition scores were collected with either the full F0 cue containing both the FM and AM components or the 500-Hz low-pass speech cue containing the F0 and additional harmonics. The F0 cue provided a benefit similar to the low-pass cue for speech in noise, but not in quiet. Poorer CI users benefited more from the F0 cue than better users. These findings suggest that F0 is critical to improving speech perception in noise in combined acoustic and electric hearing. © 2011 Acoustical Society of America

  14. Combined Use of Standard and Throat Microphones for Measurement of Acoustic Voice Parameters and Voice Categorization.

    PubMed

    Uloza, Virgilijus; Padervinskis, Evaldas; Uloziene, Ingrida; Saferis, Viktoras; Verikas, Antanas

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the reliability of the measurements of acoustic voice parameters obtained simultaneously using oral and contact (throat) microphones and to investigate utility of combined use of these microphones for voice categorization. Voice samples of sustained vowel /a/ obtained from 157 subjects (105 healthy and 52 pathological voices) were recorded in a soundproof booth simultaneously through two microphones: oral AKG Perception 220 microphone (AKG Acoustics, Vienna, Austria) and contact (throat) Triumph PC microphone (Clearer Communications, Inc, Burnaby, Canada) placed on the lamina of thyroid cartilage. Acoustic voice signal data were measured for fundamental frequency, percent of jitter and shimmer, normalized noise energy, signal-to-noise ratio, and harmonic-to-noise ratio using Dr. Speech software (Tiger Electronics, Seattle, WA). The correlations of acoustic voice parameters in vocal performance were statistically significant and strong (r = 0.71-1.0) for the entire functional measurements obtained for the two microphones. When classifying into healthy-pathological voice classes, the oral-shimmer revealed the correct classification rate (CCR) of 75.2% and the throat-jitter revealed CCR of 70.7%. However, combination of both throat and oral microphones allowed identifying a set of three voice parameters: throat-signal-to-noise ratio, oral-shimmer, and oral-normalized noise energy, which provided the CCR of 80.3%. The measurements of acoustic voice parameters using a combination of oral and throat microphones showed to be reliable in clinical settings and demonstrated high CCRs when distinguishing the healthy and pathological voice patient groups. Our study validates the suitability of the throat microphone signal for the task of automatic voice analysis for the purpose of voice screening. Copyright © 2015 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Optimizing the Combination of Acoustic and Electric Hearing in the Implanted Ear

    PubMed Central

    Karsten, Sue A.; Turner, Christopher W.; Brown, Carolyn J.; Jeon, Eun Kyung; Abbas, Paul J.; Gantz, Bruce J.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to determine an optimal approach to program combined acoustic plus electric (A+E) hearing devices in the same ear to maximize speech-recognition performance. Design Ten participants with at least 1 year of experience using Nucleus Hybrid (short electrode) A+E devices were evaluated across three different fitting conditions that varied in the frequency ranges assigned to the acoustically and electrically presented portions of the spectrum. Real-ear measurements were used to optimize the acoustic component for each participant, and the acoustic stimulation was then held constant across conditions. The lower boundary of the electric frequency range was systematically varied to create three conditions with respect to the upper boundary of the acoustic spectrum: Meet, Overlap, and Gap programming. Consonant recognition in quiet and speech recognition in competing-talker babble were evaluated after participants were given the opportunity to adapt by using the experimental programs in their typical everyday listening situations. Participants provided subjective ratings and evaluations for each fitting condition. Results There were no significant differences in performance between conditions (Meet, Overlap, Gap) for consonant recognition in quiet. A significant decrement in performance was measured for the Overlap fitting condition for speech recognition in babble. Subjective ratings indicated a significant preference for the Meet fitting regimen. Conclusions Participants using the Hybrid ipsilateral A+E device generally performed better when the acoustic and electric spectra were programmed to meet at a single frequency region, as opposed to a gap or overlap. Although there is no particular advantage for the Meet fitting strategy for recognition of consonants in quiet, the advantage becomes evident for speech recognition in competing-talker babble and in patient preferences. PMID:23059851

  16. Detection and quantification of bacterial biofilms combining high-frequency acoustic microscopy and targeted lipid microparticles

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Immuno-compromised patients such as those undergoing cancer chemotherapy are susceptible to bacterial infections leading to biofilm matrix formation. This surrounding biofilm matrix acts as a diffusion barrier that binds up antibiotics and antibodies, promoting resistance to treatment. Developing non-invasive imaging methods that detect biofilm matrix in the clinic are needed. The use of ultrasound in conjunction with targeted ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) may provide detection of early stage biofilm matrix formation and facilitate optimal treatment. Results Ligand-targeted UCAs were investigated as a novel method for pre-clinical non-invasive molecular imaging of early and late stage biofilms. These agents were used to target, image and detect Staphylococcus aureus biofilm matrix in vitro. Binding efficacy was assessed on biofilm matrices with respect to their increasing biomass ranging from 3.126 × 103 ± 427 UCAs per mm2 of biofilm surface area within 12 h to 21.985 × 103 ± 855 per mm2 of biofilm matrix surface area at 96 h. High-frequency acoustic microscopy was used to ultrasonically detect targeted UCAs bound to a biofilm matrix and to assess biofilm matrix mechanoelastic physical properties. Acoustic impedance data demonstrated that biofilm matrices exhibit impedance values (1.9 MRayl) close to human tissue (1.35 - 1.85 MRayl for soft tissues). Moreover, the acoustic signature of mature biofilm matrices were evaluated in terms of integrated backscatter (0.0278 - 0.0848 mm-1 × sr-1) and acoustic attenuation (3.9 Np/mm for bound UCAs; 6.58 Np/mm for biofilm alone). Conclusions Early diagnosis of biofilm matrix formation is a challenge in treating cancer patients with infection-associated biofilms. We report for the first time a combined optical and acoustic evaluation of infectious biofilm matrices. We demonstrate that acoustic impedance of biofilms is similar to the impedance of human tissues, making in vivo imaging and detection of biofilm

  17. Detection and quantification of bacterial biofilms combining high-frequency acoustic microscopy and targeted lipid microparticles.

    PubMed

    Anastasiadis, Pavlos; Mojica, Kristina D A; Allen, John S; Matter, Michelle L

    2014-07-06

    Immuno-compromised patients such as those undergoing cancer chemotherapy are susceptible to bacterial infections leading to biofilm matrix formation. This surrounding biofilm matrix acts as a diffusion barrier that binds up antibiotics and antibodies, promoting resistance to treatment. Developing non-invasive imaging methods that detect biofilm matrix in the clinic are needed. The use of ultrasound in conjunction with targeted ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) may provide detection of early stage biofilm matrix formation and facilitate optimal treatment. Ligand-targeted UCAs were investigated as a novel method for pre-clinical non-invasive molecular imaging of early and late stage biofilms. These agents were used to target, image and detect Staphylococcus aureus biofilm matrix in vitro. Binding efficacy was assessed on biofilm matrices with respect to their increasing biomass ranging from 3.126 × 103 ± 427 UCAs per mm(2) of biofilm surface area within 12 h to 21.985 × 103 ± 855 per mm(2) of biofilm matrix surface area at 96 h. High-frequency acoustic microscopy was used to ultrasonically detect targeted UCAs bound to a biofilm matrix and to assess biofilm matrix mechanoelastic physical properties. Acoustic impedance data demonstrated that biofilm matrices exhibit impedance values (1.9 MRayl) close to human tissue (1.35 - 1.85 MRayl for soft tissues). Moreover, the acoustic signature of mature biofilm matrices were evaluated in terms of integrated backscatter (0.0278 - 0.0848 mm(-1) × sr(-1)) and acoustic attenuation (3.9 Np/mm for bound UCAs; 6.58 Np/mm for biofilm alone). Early diagnosis of biofilm matrix formation is a challenge in treating cancer patients with infection-associated biofilms. We report for the first time a combined optical and acoustic evaluation of infectious biofilm matrices. We demonstrate that acoustic impedance of biofilms is similar to the impedance of human tissues, making in vivo imaging and detection of biofilm matrices difficult

  18. Combining Passive Thermography and Acoustic Emission for Large Area Fatigue Damage Growth Assessment of a Composite Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalameda, Joseph N.; Horne, Michael R.; Madaras, Eric I.; Burke, Eric R.

    2016-01-01

    Passive thermography and acoustic emission data were obtained for improved real time damage detection during fatigue loading. A strong positive correlation was demonstrated between acoustic energy event location and thermal heating, especially if the structure under load was nearing ultimate failure. An image processing routine was developed to map the acoustic emission data onto the thermal imagery. This required removing optical barrel distortion and angular rotation from the thermal data. The acoustic emission data were then mapped onto thermal data, revealing the cluster of acoustic emission event locations around the thermal signatures of interest. By combining both techniques, progression of damage growth is confirmed and areas of failure are identified. This technology provides improved real time inspections of advanced composite structures during fatigue testing.Keywords: Thermal nondestructive evaluation, fatigue damage detection, aerospace composite inspection, acoustic emission, passive thermography

  19. Combined Opto-Acoustical sensor modules for KM3NeT

    SciTech Connect

    Enzenhöfer, A.

    2013-05-23

    KM3NeT is a future multi-cubic-kilometre water Cherenkov neutrino telescope currently entering a first construction phase. It will be located in the Mediterranean Sea and comprise about 600 vertical structures called detection units. Each of these detection units has a length of several hundred metres and is anchored to the sea bed on one side and held taut by a buoy on the other side. The detection units are thus subject to permanent movement due to sea currents. Modules holding photosensors and additional equipment are equally distributed along the detection units. The relative positions of the photosensors has to be known with an uncertainty below 20 cm in order to achieve the necessary precision for neutrino astronomy. These positions can be determined with an acoustic positioning system: dedicated acoustic emitters located at known positions and acoustic receivers along each detection unit. This article describes the approach to combine an acoustic receiver with the photosensors inside one detection module using a common power supply and data readout. The advantage of this approach lies in a reduction of underwater connectors and module configurations as well as in the compactification of the detection units integrating the auxiliary devices necessary for their successful operation.

  20. Combined experimental and theoretical investigation of the gas bubble motion in an acoustic field.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaojian; Xing, Tianyu; Huang, Biao; Li, Qiuhe; Yang, Yifei

    2018-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to apply the combined experimental and theoretical method to investigate the various behaviors of gas bubbles in an acoustic field. In the experiments, high-speed video and ultrasonic processor are used to capture the transient evolution of gas bubble patterns, as well as velocity profiles. In the theoretical analysis, the theories of primary and secondary Bjerknes forces and buoyancy force are introduced to accurately demonstrate the variations of bubble volume and motion. Results are presented for gas bubbles with the radius of 1.4mm under an acoustic field with a frequency of 18kHz, for three cases, namely single bubble rising in a quiescent liquid, acoustic single bubble oscillation and two bubbles coalescence conditions. The results show that the fragments around the single gas bubble presents the periodical behaviors, namely, splitting, attraction, and secondary splitting motion. The centroid of the single gas bubble almost oscillates without motion upwards or downwards, because of the equilibrium of the primary Bjerknes force caused by acoustic waves and the effect of the buoyancy force. For the two coalescing bubbles, the resultant of buoyancy, primary and secondary Bjerknes forces acting on two bubbles are same in magnitude, but in opposite direction, which indicates that two gas bubbles attract each other and and coalesce into one. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Improved speech recognition in noise in simulated binaurally combined acoustic and electric stimulation.

    PubMed

    Kong, Ying-Yee; Carlyon, Robert P

    2007-06-01

    Speech recognition in noise improves with combined acoustic and electric stimulation compared to electric stimulation alone [Kong et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 117, 1351-1361 (2005)]. Here the contribution of fundamental frequency (F0) and low-frequency phonetic cues to speech recognition in combined hearing was investigated. Normal-hearing listeners heard vocoded speech in one ear and low-pass (LP) filtered speech in the other. Three listening conditions (vocode-alone, LP-alone, combined) were investigated. Target speech (average F0=120 Hz) was mixed with a time-reversed masker (average F0=172 Hz) at three signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs). LP speech aided performance at all SNRs. Low-frequency phonetic cues were then removed by replacing the LP speech with a LP equal-amplitude harmonic complex, frequency and amplitude modulated by the F0 and temporal envelope of voiced segments of the target. The combined hearing advantage disappeared at 10 and 15 dB SNR, but persisted at 5 dB SNR. A similar finding occurred when, additionally, F0 contour cues were removed. These results are consistent with a role for low-frequency phonetic cues, but not with a combination of F0 information between the two ears. The enhanced performance at 5 dB SNR with F0 contour cues absent suggests that voicing or glimpsing cues may be responsible for the combined hearing benefit.

  2. Early detection of melanoma with the combined use of acoustic microscopy, infrared reflectance and Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karagiannis, Georgios T.; Grivas, Ioannis; Tsingotjidou, Anastasia; Apostolidis, Georgios K.; Grigoriadou, Ifigeneia; Dori, I.; Poulatsidou, Kyriaki-Nefeli; Doumas, Argyrios; Wesarg, Stefan; Georgoulias, Panagiotis

    2015-03-01

    Malignant melanoma is a form of skin cancer, with increasing incidence worldwide. Early diagnosis is crucial for the prognosis and treatment of the disease. The objective of this study is to develop a novel animal model of melanoma and apply a combination of the non-invasive imaging techniques acoustic microscopy, infrared (IR) and Raman spectroscopies, for the detection of developing tumors. Acoustic microscopy provides information about the 3D structure of the tumor, whereas, both spectroscopic modalities give qualitative insight of biochemical changes during melanoma development. In order to efficiently set up the final devices, propagation of ultrasonic and electromagnetic waves in normal skin and melanoma simulated structures was performed. Synthetic and grape-extracted melanin (simulated tumors), endermally injected, were scanned and compared to normal skin. For both cases acoustic microscopy with central operating frequencies of 110MHz and 175MHz were used, resulting to the tomographic imaging of the simulated tumor, while with the spectroscopic modalities IR and Raman differences among spectra of normal and melanin- injected sites were identified in skin depth. Subsequently, growth of actual tumors in an animal melanoma model, with the use of human malignant melanoma cells was achieved. Acoustic microscopy and IR and Raman spectroscopies were also applied. The development of tumors at different time points was displayed using acoustic microscopy. Moreover, the changes of the IR and Raman spectra were studied between the melanoma tumors and adjacent healthy skin. The most significant changes between healthy skin and the melanoma area were observed in the range of 900-1800cm-1 and 350-2000cm-1, respectively.

  3. Combined chemical and topographic imaging at atmospheric pressure via microprobe laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry-atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Bradshaw, James A; Ovchinnikova, Olga S; Meyer, Kent A; Goeringer, Douglas E

    2009-12-01

    The operational characteristics and imaging performance are described for a new instrument comprising an atomic force microscope coupled with a pulsed laser and a linear ion trap mass spectrometer. The operating mode of the atomic force microscope is used to produce topographic surface images having sub-micrometer spatial and height resolution. Spatially resolved mass spectra of ions, produced from the same surface via microprobe-mode laser desorption/ionization at atmospheric pressure, are also used to create a 100 x 100 microm chemical image. The effective spatial resolution of the image (approximately 2 microm) was constrained by the limit of detection (estimated to be 10(9)-10(10) molecules) rather than by the diameter of the focused laser spot or the step size of the sample stage. The instrument has the potential to be particularly useful for surface analysis scenarios in which chemical analysis of targeted topographic features is desired; consequently, it should have extensive application in a number of scientific areas. Because the number density of desorbed neutral species in laser desorption/ionization is known to be orders-of-magnitude greater than that of ions, it is expected that improvements in imaging performance can be realized by implementation of post-ionization methods.

  4. Combined failure acoustical diagnosis based on improved frequency domain blind deconvolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Nan; Wu, Xing; Chi, YiLin; Liu, Xiaoqin; Liu, Chang

    2012-05-01

    According to gear box combined failure extraction in complex sound field, an acoustic fault detection method based on improved frequency domain blind deconvolution was proposed. Follow the frequency-domain blind deconvolution flow, the morphological filtering was firstly used to extract modulation features embedded in the observed signals, then the CFPA algorithm was employed to do complex-domain blind separation, finally the J-Divergence of spectrum was employed as distance measure to resolve the permutation. Experiments using real machine sound signals was carried out. The result demonstrate this algorithm can be efficiently applied to gear box combined failure detection in practice.

  5. Music-induced emotions can be predicted from a combination of brain activity and acoustic features.

    PubMed

    Daly, Ian; Williams, Duncan; Hallowell, James; Hwang, Faustina; Kirke, Alexis; Malik, Asad; Weaver, James; Miranda, Eduardo; Nasuto, Slawomir J

    2015-12-01

    It is widely acknowledged that music can communicate and induce a wide range of emotions in the listener. However, music is a highly-complex audio signal composed of a wide range of complex time- and frequency-varying components. Additionally, music-induced emotions are known to differ greatly between listeners. Therefore, it is not immediately clear what emotions will be induced in a given individual by a piece of music. We attempt to predict the music-induced emotional response in a listener by measuring the activity in the listeners electroencephalogram (EEG). We combine these measures with acoustic descriptors of the music, an approach that allows us to consider music as a complex set of time-varying acoustic features, independently of any specific music theory. Regression models are found which allow us to predict the music-induced emotions of our participants with a correlation between the actual and predicted responses of up to r=0.234,p<0.001. This regression fit suggests that over 20% of the variance of the participant's music induced emotions can be predicted by their neural activity and the properties of the music. Given the large amount of noise, non-stationarity, and non-linearity in both EEG and music, this is an encouraging result. Additionally, the combination of measures of brain activity and acoustic features describing the music played to our participants allows us to predict music-induced emotions with significantly higher accuracies than either feature type alone (p<0.01).

  6. Screening of the Binding of Small Molecules to Proteins by Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry Combined with Protein Microarray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Chenxi; Wang, Tao; Zhang, Buqing; He, Dacheng; Na, Na; Ouyang, Jin

    2015-11-01

    The interaction between bioactive small molecule ligands and proteins is one of the important research areas in proteomics. Herein, a simple and rapid method is established to screen small ligands that bind to proteins. We designed an agarose slide to immobilize different proteins. The protein microarrays were allowed to interact with different small ligands, and after washing, the microarrays were screened by desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI MS). This method can be applied to screen specific protein binding ligands and was shown for seven proteins and 34 known ligands for these proteins. In addition, a high-throughput screening was achieved, with the analysis requiring approximately 4 s for one sample spot. We then applied this method to determine the binding between the important protein matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and 88 small compounds. The molecular docking results confirmed the MS results, demonstrating that this method is suitable for the rapid and accurate screening of ligands binding to proteins.

  7. Combining passive thermography and acoustic emission for large area fatigue damage growth assessment of a composite structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalameda, Joseph N.; Horne, Michael R.; Madaras, Eric I.; Burke, Eric R.

    2016-05-01

    Passive thermography and acoustic emission data were obtained for improved real time damage detection during fatigue loading. A strong positive correlation was demonstrated between acoustic energy event location and thermal heating, especially if the structure under load was nearing ultimate failure. An image processing routine was developed to map the acoustic emission data onto the thermal imagery. This required removing optical barrel distortion and angular rotation from the thermal data. The acoustic emission data were then mapped onto thermal data, revealing the cluster of acoustic emission event locations around the thermal signatures of interest. By combining both techniques, progression of damage growth is confirmed and areas of failure are identified. This technology provides improved real time inspections of advanced composite structures during fatigue testing.

  8. Combined optical sizing and acoustical characterization of single freely-floating microbubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luan, Ying; Renaud, Guillaume; Raymond, Jason L.; Segers, Tim; Lajoinie, Guillaume; Beurskens, Robert; Mastik, Frits; Kokhuis, Tom J. A.; van der Steen, Antonius F. W.; Versluis, Michel; de Jong, Nico

    2016-12-01

    In this study we present a combined optical sizing and acoustical characterization technique for the study of the dynamics of single freely-floating ultrasound contrast agent microbubbles exposed to long burst ultrasound excitations up to the milliseconds range. A co-axial flow device was used to position individual microbubbles on a streamline within the confocal region of three ultrasound transducers and a high-resolution microscope objective. Bright-field images of microbubbles passing through the confocal region were captured using a high-speed camera synchronized to the acoustical data acquisition to assess the microbubble response to a 1-MHz ultrasound burst. Nonlinear bubble vibrations were identified at a driving pressure as low as 50 kPa. The results demonstrate good agreement with numerical simulations based on the shell-buckling model proposed by Marmottant et al. [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 118, 3499-3505 (2005)]. The system demonstrates the potential for a high-throughput in vitro characterization of individual microbubbles.

  9. Fabrication of Capacitive Acoustic Resonators Combining 3D Printing and 2D Inkjet Printing Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Haque, Rubaiyet Iftekharul; Ogam, Erick; Loussert, Christophe; Benaben, Patrick; Boddaert, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    A capacitive acoustic resonator developed by combining three-dimensional (3D) printing and two-dimensional (2D) printed electronics technique is described. During this work, a patterned bottom structure with rigid backplate and cavity is fabricated directly by a 3D printing method, and then a direct write inkjet printing technique has been employed to print a silver conductive layer. A novel approach has been used to fabricate a diaphragm for the acoustic sensor as well, where the conductive layer is inkjet-printed on a pre-stressed thin organic film. After assembly, the resulting structure contains an electrically conductive diaphragm positioned at a distance from a fixed bottom electrode separated by a spacer. Measurements confirm that the transducer acts as capacitor. The deflection of the diaphragm in response to the incident acoustic single was observed by a laser Doppler vibrometer and the corresponding change of capacitance has been calculated, which is then compared with the numerical result. Observation confirms that the device performs as a resonator and provides adequate sensitivity and selectivity at its resonance frequency. PMID:26473878

  10. Fabrication of capacitive acoustic resonators combining 3D printing and 2D inkjet printing techniques.

    PubMed

    Haque, Rubaiyet Iftekharul; Ogam, Erick; Loussert, Christophe; Benaben, Patrick; Boddaert, Xavier

    2015-10-14

    A capacitive acoustic resonator developed by combining three-dimensional (3D) printing and two-dimensional (2D) printed electronics technique is described. During this work, a patterned bottom structure with rigid backplate and cavity is fabricated directly by a 3D printing method, and then a direct write inkjet printing technique has been employed to print a silver conductive layer. A novel approach has been used to fabricate a diaphragm for the acoustic sensor as well, where the conductive layer is inkjet-printed on a pre-stressed thin organic film. After assembly, the resulting structure contains an electrically conductive diaphragm positioned at a distance from a fixed bottom electrode separated by a spacer. Measurements confirm that the transducer acts as capacitor. The deflection of the diaphragm in response to the incident acoustic single was observed by a laser Doppler vibrometer and the corresponding change of capacitance has been calculated, which is then compared with the numerical result. Observation confirms that the device performs as a resonator and provides adequate sensitivity and selectivity at its resonance frequency.

  11. A combined use of acoustic and optical devices to investigate suspended sediment in rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero, Massimo; Rüther, Nils; Haun, Stefan; Baranya, Sandor

    2017-04-01

    The use of acoustic and optic devices has become more and more common for estimating suspended sediment loads in rivers. The echo intensity levels (EIL) recorded by means of an Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) have been applied in different methods, which provided relationships between scattering particles features derived from samples (i.e., concentration and grain size) and corresponding backscattering strength and sound attenuation. At the same time, the laser diffraction was applied by an in-stream sampler (LISST-SL) to measure suspended sediment concentration and the corresponding particle size distribution (PSD). These two techniques exhibited different limitations in terms of the measured range of concentration, sensitivity to a certain spectrum of particle sizes, and instruments deploy feasibility especially in large rivers, in a way that the use of sampled PSD by LISST-SL to validate ADCP methods may not be trivial. The aim of this study was to combine the vertical profiling of EIL by an ADCP with results from LISST-SL, eventually demonstrating the possibility of using moving ADCP measurements to detect different suspended matters along a Danube River section characterized by a small tributary junction. At the same time, this work elucidates optical to acoustic method deviations that hinders an actual validation of ADCP methods based on LISST-SL rather than with physical samplings.

  12. Cochlear dead regions constrain the benefit of combining acoustic stimulation with electric stimulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ting; Dorman, Michael F; Gifford, Rene; Moore, Brian C J

    2014-01-01

    The aims of this study were to (1) detect the presence and edge frequency (fe) of a cochlear dead region in the ear with residual acoustic hearing for bimodal cochlear implant users, and (2) determine whether amplification based on the presence or absence of a dead region would improve speech understanding and sound quality. Twenty-two listeners with a cochlear implant in one ear and residual acoustic hearing in the nonimplanted ear were tested. Eleven listeners had a cochlear dead region in the acoustic-hearing ear and 11 did not. Dead regions were assessed with the threshold-equalizing noise (TEN) and the sweeping noise, psychophysical tuning curve tests. Speech understanding was assessed with monosyllabic words and the AzBio sentences at +10 dB signal-to-noise ratio. Speech- and music-quality judgments were obtained with the Judgment of Sound Quality questionnaire. Using shifted tips of the psychophysical tuning curve as a basis for diagnosis, the TEN had high sensitivity (0.91) and poor specificity (0.55) for this population. The value of fe was lower when estimated with the sweeping noise, psychophysical tuning curve test than with the TEN test. For the listeners with cochlear dead regions, speech understanding, speech quality and music quality were best when no amplification was applied for frequencies within the dead region. For listeners without dead regions, speech understanding was best with full-bandwidth amplification and was reduced when amplification was not applied when the audiometric threshold exceeded 80 dB HL. The data from this study suggest that, to improve bimodal benefit for listeners who combine electric and acoustic stimulation, audiologists should routinely test for the presence of cochlear dead regions and determine amplification bandwidth accordingly.

  13. Cochlear dead regions constrain the benefit of combining acoustic stimulation with electric stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ting; Dorman, Michael F.; Gifford, Rene; Moore, Brian C.J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aims of this study were to (i) detect the presence and edge frequency (fe) of a cochlear dead region in the ear with residual acoustic hearing for bimodal cochlear implant (CI) users, and (ii) determine whether amplification based on the presence or absence of a dead region would improve speech understanding and sound quality. Design Twenty two listeners with a CI in one ear and residual acoustic hearing in the non-implanted ear were tested. Eleven listeners had a cochlear dead region in the acoustic-hearing ear and eleven did not. Dead regions were assessed with the threshold equalizing noise (TEN) and the sweeping noise, psychophysical tuning curve (SWPTC) tests. Speech understanding was assessed with monosyllabic words and the AzBio sentences at +10 dB signal-to-noise ratio. Speech and music quality judgments were obtained with the Judgment of Sound Quality questionnaire. Results For this population, using shifted tips of the PTCs as a basis for diagnosis, the TEN had high sensitivity (0.91) and poor specificity (0.55). The value of fe was lower when estimated with the SWPTC test than with the TEN test. For the listeners with cochlear dead regions, speech understanding, speech quality and music quality were best when no amplification was applied for frequencies within the dead region. For listeners without dead regions, speech understanding was best with full-bandwidth amplification and was reduced when amplification was not applied when the audiometric threshold exceeded 80 dB HL. Conclusion Our data suggest that, to improve bimodal benefit for listeners who combine electric and acoustic stimulation, audiologists should routinely test for the presence of cochlear dead regions and determine amplification bandwidth accordingly. PMID:24950254

  14. Delivering an Automated and Integrated Approach to Combination Screening Using Acoustic-Droplet Technology.

    PubMed

    Cross, Kevin; Craggs, Richard; Swift, Denise; Sitaram, Anesh; Daya, Sandeep; Roberts, Mark; Hawley, Shaun; Owen, Paul; Isherwood, Bev

    2016-02-01

    Drug combination testing in the pharmaceutical industry has typically been driven by late-stage opportunistic strategies rather than by early testing to identify drug combinations for clinical investigation that may deliver improved efficacy. A rationale for combinations exists across a number of diseases in which pathway redundancy or resistance to therapeutics are evident. However, early assays are complicated by the absence of both assay formats representative of disease biology and robust infrastructure to screen drug combinations in a medium-throughput capacity. When applying drug combination testing studies, it may be difficult to translate a study design into the required well contents for assay plates because of the number of compounds and concentrations involved. Dispensing these plates increases in difficulty as the number of compounds and concentration points increase and compounds are subsequently rolled onto additional labware. We describe the development of a software tool, in conjunction with the use of acoustic droplet technology, as part of a compound management platform, which allows the design of an assay incorporating combinations of compounds. These enhancements to infrastructure facilitate the design and ordering of assay-ready compound combination plates and the processing of combinations data from high-content organotypic assays.

  15. An Optimized Adsorbent Sampling Combined to Thermal Desorption GC-MS Method for Trimethylsilanol in Industrial Environments

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Hwan; Jia, Chunrong; Kim, Yong Doo; Kim, Hong Hyun; Pham, Tien Thang; Choi, Young Seok; Seo, Young Un; Lee, Ike Woo

    2012-01-01

    Trimethylsilanol (TMSOH) can cause damage to surfaces of scanner lenses in the semiconductor industry, and there is a critical need to measure and control airborne TMSOH concentrations. This study develops a thermal desorption (TD)-gas chromatography (GC)-mass spectrometry (MS) method for measuring trace-level TMSOH in occupational indoor air. Laboratory method optimization obtained best performance when using dual-bed tube configuration (100 mg of Tenax TA followed by 100 mg of Carboxen 569), n-decane as a solvent, and a TD temperature of 300°C. The optimized method demonstrated high recovery (87%), satisfactory precision (<15% for spiked amounts exceeding 1 ng), good linearity (R2 = 0.9999), a wide dynamic mass range (up to 500 ng), low method detection limit (2.8 ng m−3 for a 20-L sample), and negligible losses for 3-4-day storage. The field study showed performance comparable to that in laboratory and yielded first measurements of TMSOH, ranging from 1.02 to 27.30 μg/m3, in the semiconductor industry. We suggested future development of real-time monitoring techniques for TMSOH and other siloxanes for better maintenance and control of scanner lens in semiconductor wafer manufacturing. PMID:22966229

  16. Screening of the binding of small molecules to proteins by desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry combined with protein microarray.

    PubMed

    Yao, Chenxi; Wang, Tao; Zhang, Buqing; He, Dacheng; Na, Na; Ouyang, Jin

    2015-11-01

    The interaction between bioactive small molecule ligands and proteins is one of the important research areas in proteomics. Herein, a simple and rapid method is established to screen small ligands that bind to proteins. We designed an agarose slide to immobilize different proteins. The protein microarrays were allowed to interact with different small ligands, and after washing, the microarrays were screened by desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI MS). This method can be applied to screen specific protein binding ligands and was shown for seven proteins and 34 known ligands for these proteins. In addition, a high-throughput screening was achieved, with the analysis requiring approximately 4 s for one sample spot. We then applied this method to determine the binding between the important protein matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and 88 small compounds. The molecular docking results confirmed the MS results, demonstrating that this method is suitable for the rapid and accurate screening of ligands binding to proteins. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  17. Differences in Perception of Musical Stimuli among Acoustic, Electric, and Combined Modality Listeners.

    PubMed

    Prentiss, Sandra M; Friedland, David R; Nash, John J; Runge, Christina L

    2015-05-01

    Cochlear implants have shown vast improvements in speech understanding for those with severe to profound hearing loss; however, music perception remains a challenge for electric hearing. It is unclear whether the difficulties arise from limitations of sound processing, the nature of a damaged auditory system, or a combination of both. To examine music perception performance with different acoustic and electric hearing configurations. Chord discrimination and timbre perception were tested in subjects representing four daily-use listening configurations: unilateral cochlear implant (CI), contralateral bimodal (CIHA), bilateral hearing aid (HAHA) and normal-hearing (NH) listeners. A same-different task was used for discrimination of two chords played on piano. Timbre perception was assessed using a 10-instrument forced-choice identification task. Fourteen adults were included in each group, none of whom were professional musicians. The number of correct responses was divided by the total number of presentations to calculate scores in percent correct. Data analyses were performed with Kruskal-Wallis one-way analysis of variance and linear regression. Chord discrimination showed a narrow range of performance across groups, with mean scores ranging between 72.5% (CI) and 88.9% (NH). Significant differences were seen between the NH and all hearing-impaired groups. Both the HAHA and CIHA groups performed significantly better than the CI groups, and no significant differences were observed between the HAHA and CIHA groups. Timbre perception was significantly poorer for the hearing-impaired groups (mean scores ranged from 50.3-73.9%) compared to NH (95.2%). Significantly better performance was observed in the HAHA group as compared to both groups with electric hearing (CI and CIHA). There was no significant difference in performance between the CIHA and CI groups. Timbre perception was a significantly more difficult task than chord discrimination for both the CI and CIHA

  18. Numerical simulation of the nonlinear response of composite plates under combined thermal and acoustic loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mei, Chuh; Moorthy, Jayashree

    1995-01-01

    A time-domain study of the random response of a laminated plate subjected to combined acoustic and thermal loads is carried out. The features of this problem also include given uniform static inplane forces. The formulation takes into consideration a possible initial imperfection in the flatness of the plate. High decibel sound pressure levels along with high thermal gradients across thickness drive the plate response into nonlinear regimes. This calls for the analysis to use von Karman large deflection strain-displacement relationships. A finite element model that combines the von Karman strains with the first-order shear deformation plate theory is developed. The development of the analytical model can accommodate an anisotropic composite laminate built up of uniformly thick layers of orthotropic, linearly elastic laminae. The global system of finite element equations is then reduced to a modal system of equations. Numerical simulation using a single-step algorithm in the time-domain is then carried out to solve for the modal coordinates. Nonlinear algebraic equations within each time-step are solved by the Newton-Raphson method. The random gaussian filtered white noise load is generated using Monte Carlo simulation. The acoustic pressure distribution over the plate is capable of accounting for a grazing incidence wavefront. Numerical results are presented to study a variety of cases.

  19. Uptake of gaseous formaldehyde by soil surfaces: a combination of adsorption/desorption equilibrium and chemical reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guo; Su, Hang; Li, Xin; Kuhn, Uwe; Meusel, Hannah; Hoffmann, Thorsten; Ammann, Markus; Pöschl, Ulrich; Shao, Min; Cheng, Yafang

    2016-08-01

    Gaseous formaldehyde (HCHO) is an important precursor of OH radicals and a key intermediate molecule in the oxidation of atmospheric volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Budget analyses reveal large discrepancies between modeled and observed HCHO concentrations in the atmosphere. Here, we investigate the interactions of gaseous HCHO with soil surfaces through coated-wall flow tube experiments applying atmospherically relevant HCHO concentrations of ˜ 10 to 40 ppbv. For the determination of uptake coefficients (γ), we provide a Matlab code to account for the diffusion correction under laminar flow conditions. Under dry conditions (relative humidity = 0 %), an initial γ of (1.1 ± 0.05) × 10-4 is determined, which gradually drops to (5.5 ± 0.4) × 10-5 after 8 h experiments. Experiments under wet conditions show a smaller γ that drops faster over time until reaching a plateau. The drop of γ with increasing relative humidity as well as the drop over time can be explained by the adsorption theory in which high surface coverage leads to a reduced uptake rate. The fact that γ stabilizes at a non-zero plateau suggests the involvement of irreversible chemical reactions. Further back-flushing experiments show that two-thirds of the adsorbed HCHO can be re-emitted into the gas phase while the residual is retained by the soil. This partial reversibility confirms that HCHO uptake by soil is a complex process involving both adsorption/desorption and chemical reactions which must be considered in trace gas exchange (emission or deposition) at the atmosphere-soil interface. Our results suggest that soil and soil-derived airborne particles can either act as a source or a sink for HCHO, depending on ambient conditions and HCHO concentrations.

  20. Laser desorption from a room temperature ionic liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Peter Ronald

    We report laser desorption from a Room Temperature Ionic Liquid (RTIL) as a novel source for time of flight mass spectrometry. We use the 2nd harmonic of an Nd:YAG laser to deposit intensities of 1-50 MW/cm2 via backside illumination onto our RTIL desorption sample. A microstructured metal grid situated on top of a glass microscope slide coated with RTIL serves as our desorption sample. The RTIL we use, 1-Butyl, 3-Methylimidazolium Hexafluorophosphate, remains liquid at pressures below 10-8 torr. The use of liquid desorption sample allows for improved surface conditions, homogeneity and sample life as compared to Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization (MALDI) techniques. Our desorption technique is also unique as it allows the study of both multiphoton and acoustic desorption processes within the same time of flight spectra. Our technique yields intrinsically high resolution, low noise data. We observe differences between ion species in their preference for desorption by a particular desorption method. Specifically, we observe desorption solely by acoustic means of an entire RTIL molecule adducted with an RTIL cation. Finally, we report the applicability of this technique for the desorption of biomolecules.

  1. Method and apparatus for combined cement bond and acoustic well logging

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J. R. E.

    1985-01-22

    Method and apparatus are provided for measuring acoustic signals having amplitudes of widely varying magnitude during one traversal of the borehole corresponding to indications of cement bonding along a casing as well as acoustic travel time through an increment of the formation. Variable attenuators are provided associated with acoustic receivers disposed within the logging sonde wherein attenuation may be automatically adjusted as a function of acoustic transmitter-receiver trigger pulses transmitted downhole, depending upon whether a cement bond or other log of acoustic signal information having a substantially different magnitude is desired.

  2. Detection of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus using phage amplification combined with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Rees, Jon C; Barr, John R

    2017-02-01

    Antibiotic resistance continues to contribute significantly to morbidity and mortality across the world. Developing new tests for antibiotic-resistant bacteria is a core action to combat resistant infections. We describe a method that uses phage amplification detection (PAD) combined with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) to rapidly identify Staphylococcus aureus and determine phenotypic susceptibility to cefoxitin. Samples tested for S. aureus are incubated together with bacteriophage in the presence and absence of cefoxitin and subjected to rapid trypsin digestion followed by MALDI-MS analysis. Tryptic peptides derived from amplified phage proteins can be detected by MALDI-MS, as validated by time-of-flight (TOF)/TOF analysis of each peptide combined with database searching. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus show significant phage amplification in the presence of cefoxitin, while methicillin-sensitive S. aureus show no phage amplification relative to a no-antibiotic control. We also show that PAD methodology can be implemented on an FDA-approved commercial MALDI-MS bacterial identification system to identify S. aureus and determine antibiotic susceptibility. The novelty of this assay includes the use of phage-derived tryptic peptides as detected by MALDI-MS to monitor the results of PAD on an instrument common to many modern microbiology laboratories.

  3. Kiwi fruit (Actinidia chinensis) quality determination based on surface acoustic wave resonator combined with electronic nose

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Liu; Guohua, Hui

    2015-01-01

    In this study, electronic nose (EN) combined with a 433 MHz surface acoustic wave resonator (SAWR) was used to determine Kiwi fruit quality under 12-day storage. EN responses to Kiwi samples were measured and analyzed by principal component analysis (PCA) and stochastic resonance (SR) methods. SAWR frequency eigen values were also measured to predict freshness. Kiwi fruit sample's weight loss index and human sensory evaluation were examined to characteristic its quality and freshness. Kiwi fruit's quality predictive models based on EN, SAWR, and EN combined with SAWR were developed, respectively. Weight loss and human sensory evaluation results demonstrated that Kiwi fruit's quality decline and overall acceptance decrease during the storage. Experiment result indicated that the PCA method could qualitatively discriminate all Kiwi fruit samples with different storage time. Both SR and SAWR frequency analysis methods could successfully discriminate samples with high regression coefficients (R = 0.98093 and R = 0.99014, respectively). The validation experiment results showed that the mixed predictive model developed using EN combined with SAWR present higher quality prediction accuracy than the model developed either by EN or by SAWR. This method exhibits some advantages including high accuracy, non-destructive, low cost, etc. It provides an effective way for fruit quality rapid analysis. PMID:25551334

  4. Full skin quantitative optical coherence elastography achieved by combining vibration and surface acoustic wave methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunhui; Guan, Guangying; Huang, Zhihong; Wang, Ruikang K.; Nabi, Ghulam

    2015-03-01

    By combining with the phase sensitive optical coherence tomography (PhS-OCT), vibration and surface acoustic wave (SAW) methods have been reported to provide elastography of skin tissue respectively. However, neither of these two methods can provide the elastography in full skin depth in current systems. This paper presents a feasibility study on an optical coherence elastography method which combines both vibration and SAW in order to give the quantitative mechanical properties of skin tissue with full depth range, including epidermis, dermis and subcutaneous fat. Experiments are carried out on layered tissue mimicking phantoms and in vivo human forearm and palm skin. A ring actuator generates vibration while a line actuator were used to excited SAWs. A PhS-OCT system is employed to provide the ultrahigh sensitive measurement of the generated waves. The experimental results demonstrate that by the combination of vibration and SAW method the full skin bulk mechanical properties can be quantitatively measured and further the elastography can be obtained with a sensing depth from ~0mm to ~4mm. This method is promising to apply in clinics where the quantitative elasticity of localized skin diseases is needed to aid the diagnosis and treatment.

  5. Kiwi fruit (Actinidia chinensis) quality determination based on surface acoustic wave resonator combined with electronic nose.

    PubMed

    Wei, Liu; Guohua, Hui

    2015-01-01

    In this study, electronic nose (EN) combined with a 433 MHz surface acoustic wave resonator (SAWR) was used to determine Kiwi fruit quality under 12-day storage. EN responses to Kiwi samples were measured and analyzed by principal component analysis (PCA) and stochastic resonance (SR) methods. SAWR frequency eigen values were also measured to predict freshness. Kiwi fruit sample's weight loss index and human sensory evaluation were examined to characteristic its quality and freshness. Kiwi fruit's quality predictive models based on EN, SAWR, and EN combined with SAWR were developed, respectively. Weight loss and human sensory evaluation results demonstrated that Kiwi fruit's quality decline and overall acceptance decrease during the storage. Experiment result indicated that the PCA method could qualitatively discriminate all Kiwi fruit samples with different storage time. Both SR and SAWR frequency analysis methods could successfully discriminate samples with high regression coefficients (R = 0.98093 and R = 0.99014, respectively). The validation experiment results showed that the mixed predictive model developed using EN combined with SAWR present higher quality prediction accuracy than the model developed either by EN or by SAWR. This method exhibits some advantages including high accuracy, non-destructive, low cost, etc. It provides an effective way for fruit quality rapid analysis.

  6. Decay detection in red oak trees using a combination of visual inspection, acoustic testing, and resistance microdrilling

    Treesearch

    Xiping Wang; R. Bruce Allison

    2008-01-01

    Arborists are often challenged to identify internal structural defects hidden from view within tree trunks. This article reports the results of a study using a trunk inspection protocol combining visual observation, single-path stress wave testing, acoustic tomography, and resistance microdrilling to detect internal defects. Two century-old red oak (Quercus rubra)...

  7. Effect of Digital Frequency Compression (DFC) on Speech Recognition in Candidates for Combined Electric and Acoustic Stimulation (EAS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gifford, Rene H.; Dorman, Michael F.; Spahr, Anthony J.; McKarns, Sharon A.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the effects of conventional amplification (CA) and digital frequency compression (DFC) amplification on the speech recognition abilities of candidates for a partial-insertion cochlear implant, that is, candidates for combined electric and acoustic stimulation (EAS). Method: The participants were 6 patients whose audiometric…

  8. Effect of Digital Frequency Compression (DFC) on Speech Recognition in Candidates for Combined Electric and Acoustic Stimulation (EAS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gifford, Rene H.; Dorman, Michael F.; Spahr, Anthony J.; McKarns, Sharon A.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the effects of conventional amplification (CA) and digital frequency compression (DFC) amplification on the speech recognition abilities of candidates for a partial-insertion cochlear implant, that is, candidates for combined electric and acoustic stimulation (EAS). Method: The participants were 6 patients whose audiometric…

  9. Determination of the Boltzmann constant with cylindrical acoustic gas thermometry: new and previous results combined

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, X. J.; Zhang, J. T.; Lin, H.; Gillis, K. A.; Mehl, J. B.; Moldover, M. R.; Zhang, K.; Duan, Y. N.

    2017-10-01

    We report a new determination of the Boltzmann constant k B using a cylindrical acoustic gas thermometer. We determined the length of the copper cavity from measurements of its microwave resonance frequencies. This contrasts with our previous work (Zhang et al 2011 Int. J. Thermophys. 32 1297, Lin et al 2013 Metrologia 50 417, Feng et al 2015 Metrologia 52 S343) that determined the length of a different cavity using two-color optical interferometry. In this new study, the half-widths of the acoustic resonances are closer to their theoretical values than in our previous work. Despite significant changes in resonator design and the way in which the cylinder length is determined, the value of k B is substantially unchanged. We combined this result with our four previous results to calculate a global weighted mean of our k B determinations. The calculation follows CODATA’s method (Mohr and Taylor 2000 Rev. Mod. Phys. 72 351) for obtaining the weighted mean value of k B that accounts for the correlations among the measured quantities in this work and in our four previous determinations of k B. The weighted mean {{\\boldsymbol{\\hat{k}}}{B}} is 1.380 6484(28)  ×  10‑23 J K‑1 with the relative standard uncertainty of 2.0  ×  10‑6. The corresponding value of the universal gas constant is 8.314 459(17) J K‑1 mol‑1 with the relative standard uncertainty of 2.0  ×  10‑6.

  10. Differentiation of various kinds of Fructus schisandrae by surface desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry combined with principal component analysis.

    PubMed

    Pi, Zifeng; Yue, Hao; Ma, Li; Ding, Liying; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Shuying

    2011-11-14

    Various kinds of Fructus schisandrae were studied by surface desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (DAPCI-MS) without any sample pretreatment. The volatile components in F. schisandrae were detected in the ambient environment and the analytical time for each sample was only 30s. F. schisandrae are produced mainly in 5 different geographical regions (Elunchun, Mudanjiang, Tonghua, Tieling and Shangluo), and they could be successfully differentiated according to their chemical markers by Principal Component Analysis (PCA). A total of 8 components which gave more contribution for PCA analysis were unambiguously identified by comparison of the MS(2) data of chemical markers to the data of reference compounds as reported in the literature. Similarly, wild grown and cultivatable species of F. schisandrae were well separated by the above-mentioned method. In addition, raw and processed cultivatable F. schisandrae (steamed by water, alcohol, vinegar, or honey, and fried by honey) were found to be clustered at different location, respectively. Furthermore, the clustered degree of differently processed products was correlated with their clinical effects. Our results demonstrated that DAPCI-MS in combination with PCA was a feasible technique for high-throughput differentiation of various kinds of F. schisandrae. It is also possible that DAPCI-MS could become a powerful technology in the studies of traditional Chinese medicine studies and in situ analysis of Chinese herbs. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. A novel approach for copy number variation analysis by combining multiplex PCR with matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yonghui; Chen, Xiaoli; Wang, Jianhua; Shangguan, Shaofang; Dai, Yaohua; Zhang, Ting; Liu, Junling

    2013-06-20

    With the increasing interest in copy number variation as it pertains to human genomic variation, common phenotypes, and disease susceptibility, there is a pressing need for methods to accurately identify copy number. In this study, we developed a simple approach that combines multiplex PCR with matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry for submicroscopic copy number variation detection. Two pairs of primers were used to simultaneously amplify query and endogenous control regions in the same reaction. Using a base extension reaction, the two amplicons were then distinguished and quantified in a mass spectrometry map. The peak ratio between the test region and the endogenous control region was manually calculated. The relative copy number could be determined by comparing the peak ratio between the test and control samples. This method generated a copy number measurement comparable to those produced by two other commonly used methods - multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification and quantitative real-time PCR. Furthermore, it can discriminate a wide range of copy numbers. With a typical 384-format SpectroCHIP, at least six loci on 384 samples can be analyzed simultaneously in a hexaplex assay, making this assay adaptable for high throughput, and potentially applicable for large-scale association studies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Assessment of a new method for the analysis of decomposition gases of polymers by a combining thermogravimetric solid-phase extraction and thermal desorption gas chromatography mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Duemichen, E; Braun, U; Senz, R; Fabian, G; Sturm, H

    2014-08-08

    For analysis of the gaseous thermal decomposition products of polymers, the common techniques are thermogravimetry, combined with Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (TGA-FTIR) and mass spectrometry (TGA-MS). These methods offer a simple approach to the decomposition mechanism, especially for small decomposition molecules. Complex spectra of gaseous mixtures are very often hard to identify because of overlapping signals. In this paper a new method is described to adsorb the decomposition products during controlled conditions in TGA on solid-phase extraction (SPE) material: twisters. Subsequently the twisters were analysed with thermal desorption gas chromatography mass spectrometry (TDS-GC-MS), which allows the decomposition products to be separated and identified using an MS library. The thermoplastics polyamide 66 (PA 66) and polybutylene terephthalate (PBT) were used as example polymers. The influence of the sample mass and of the purge gas flow during the decomposition process was investigated in TGA. The advantages and limitations of the method were presented in comparison to the common analysis techniques, TGA-FTIR and TGA-MS. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Design and Performance of a Novel Interface for Combined Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization at Elevated Pressure and Electrospray Ionization with Orbitrap Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Belov, Mikhail E; Ellis, Shane R; Dilillo, Marialaura; Paine, Martin R L; Danielson, William F; Anderson, Gordon A; de Graaf, Erik L; Eijkel, Gert B; Heeren, Ron M A; McDonnell, Liam A

    2017-07-18

    Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization, MALDI, has been increasingly used in a variety of biomedical applications, including tissue imaging of clinical tissue samples, and in drug discovery and development. These studies strongly depend on the performance of the analytical instrumentation and would drastically benefit from improved sensitivity, reproducibility, and mass/spatial resolution. In this work, we report on a novel combined MALDI/ESI interface, which was coupled to different Orbitrap mass spectrometers (Elite and Q Exactive Plus) and extensively characterized with peptide and protein standards, and in tissue imaging experiments. In our approach, MALDI is performed in the elevated pressure regime (5-8 Torr) at a spatial resolution of 15-30 μm, while ESI-generated ions are injected orthogonally to the interface axis. We have found that introduction of the MALDI-generated ions into an electrodynamic dual-funnel interface results in increased sensitivity characterized by a limit of detection of ∼400 zmol, while providing a mass measurement accuracy of 1 ppm and a mass resolving power of 120 000 in analysis of protein digests. In tissue imaging experiments, the MALDI/ESI interface has been employed in experiments with rat brain sections and was shown to be capable of visualizing and spatially characterizing very low abundance analytes separated only by 20 mDa. Comparison of imaging data has revealed excellent agreement between the MALDI and histological images.

  14. Combining COMSOL modeling with acoustic pressure maps to design sono-reactors.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zongsu; Weavers, Linda K

    2016-07-01

    Scaled-up and economically viable sonochemical systems are critical for increased use of ultrasound in environmental and chemical processing applications. In this study, computational simulations and acoustic pressure maps were used to design a larger-scale sono-reactor containing a multi-stepped ultrasonic horn. Simulations in COMSOL Multiphysics showed ultrasonic waves emitted from the horn neck and tip, generating multiple regions of high acoustic pressure. The volume of these regions surrounding the horn neck were larger compared with those below the horn tip. The simulated acoustic field was verified by acoustic pressure contour maps generated from hydrophone measurements in a plexiglass box filled with water. These acoustic pressure contour maps revealed an asymmetric and discrete distribution of acoustic pressure due to acoustic cavitation, wave interaction, and water movement by ultrasonic irradiation. The acoustic pressure contour maps were consistent with simulation results in terms of the effective scale of cavitation zones (∼ 10 cm and <5 cm above and below horn tip, respectively). With the mapped acoustic field and identified cavitation location, a cylindrically-shaped sono-reactor with a conical bottom was designed to evaluate the treatment capacity (∼ 5 L) for the multi-stepped horn using COMSOL simulations. In this study, verification of simulation results with experiments demonstrates that coupling of COMSOL simulations with hydrophone measurements is a simple, effective and reliable scientific method to evaluate reactor designs of ultrasonic systems.

  15. Combined microphone array and lock-in amplifier operations for outdoor photo-acoustic sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Mohammad; Lay, Joshua; Wang, Chen-Chia; Trivedi, Sudhir; Samuels, Alan; Khurgin, Jacob; Sen-Choa, Fow

    2005-05-01

    Mid-infrared (MIR) standoff photoacoustic (PA) sensing of explosive chemicals and nerve gas stimulants at calibrated concentration have been demonstrated in door. When they are operated out door, array beam forming technique has to be employed to reject ambient noise and enhance signal. Lock-in amplifier usually needs to be used to achieve weak signal detection in a noisy environment. If we can combine these two techniques we will be able to reject both spatial and temporal noise and achieve a great signal to noise ratio (SNR) performance. From the best of our knowledge no literature has described how to combine these two techniques. In this work we demonstrated combined array and lock in amplifier operation in outdoor environment. A simplified system includes a signal generator, a speaker source, a lock in amplifier, 4 spy-phones with 4 parabolic reflectors to collect the acoustic signal, a National-Instrument NI6259 data acquisition system with both A to D (ADC) and D to A converters (DAC), and a PC. To combine these two techniques, each of the array collected signals was digitized by the ADC. Their path delays were adjusted in the computer to synchronize the phase. By using a PC controlled ADC the processing time is very long (~1s). To synchronize them without using costly high-speed customer made hardware, we delayed the reference signal by send it through the same ADC- PCDAC path as the array signals. By doing so, a good lock-in operation with stable phase was obtained.

  16. Cryogenic oxygen jet response to transverse acoustic excitation with the first transverse and the first combined longitudinal-transverse modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardi, J. S.; Oschwald, M.

    2016-07-01

    The intact length of the dense oxygen core from an oxygen-hydrogen shear coaxial rocket injector was measured. The measurements were made in a rectangular rocket combustor with optical access and acoustic forcing. The combustor was operated at chamber pressures of 40 and 60 bar, with either ambient temperature or cryogenic hydrogen. The multielement injection spray is subjected to forced transverse gas oscillations of two different acoustic resonance modes; the first transverse (1T) mode at 4200 Hz and the first combined longitudinal-transverse (1L1T) at 5500 Hz. Intact core length is measured from high-speed shadowgraph imaging. The dependence of intact core length with increasing acoustic amplitude is compared for the two modes of excitation.

  17. [Estimation of age-related features of acoustic density and biometric relations of lens based on combined ultrasound scanning].

    PubMed

    Avetisov, K S; Markosian, A G

    2013-01-01

    Results of combined ultrasound scanning for estimation of acoustic lens density and biometric relations of lens and other eye structures are presented. A group of 124 patients (189 eyes) was studied; they were subdivided depending on age and length of anteroposterior axis of the eye. Examination algorithm was developed that allows selective estimation of acoustic density of different lens zones and biometric measurements including volumetric. Age-related increase of acoustic density of different lens zones was revealed that indirectly shows method efficiency. Biometric studies showed almost concurring volumetric lens measurements in "normal" and "short" eyes in spite of significantly thicker central zone of the latter. Significantly lower correlation between anterior chamber volume and width of its angle was revealed in "short" eyes and "normal" and "long" eyes (correlation coefficients 0.37, 0.68 and 0.63 respectively).

  18. Speech Perception With Combined Electric-Acoustic Stimulation: A Simulation and Model Comparison.

    PubMed

    Rader, Tobias; Adel, Youssef; Fastl, Hugo; Baumann, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to simulate speech perception with combined electric-acoustic stimulation (EAS), verify the advantage of combined stimulation in normal-hearing (NH) subjects, and then compare it with cochlear implant (CI) and EAS user results from the authors' previous study. Furthermore, an automatic speech recognition (ASR) system was built to examine the impact of low-frequency information and is proposed as an applied model to study different hypotheses of the combined-stimulation advantage. Signal-detection-theory (SDT) models were applied to assess predictions of subject performance without the need to assume any synergistic effects. Speech perception was tested using a closed-set matrix test (Oldenburg sentence test), and its speech material was processed to simulate CI and EAS hearing. A total of 43 NH subjects and a customized ASR system were tested. CI hearing was simulated by an aurally adequate signal spectrum analysis and representation, the part-tone-time-pattern, which was vocoded at 12 center frequencies according to the MED-EL DUET speech processor. Residual acoustic hearing was simulated by low-pass (LP)-filtered speech with cutoff frequencies 200 and 500 Hz for NH subjects and in the range from 100 to 500 Hz for the ASR system. Speech reception thresholds were determined in amplitude-modulated noise and in pseudocontinuous noise. Previously proposed SDT models were lastly applied to predict NH subject performance with EAS simulations. NH subjects tested with EAS simulations demonstrated the combined-stimulation advantage. Increasing the LP cutoff frequency from 200 to 500 Hz significantly improved speech reception thresholds in both noise conditions. In continuous noise, CI and EAS users showed generally better performance than NH subjects tested with simulations. In modulated noise, performance was comparable except for the EAS at cutoff frequency 500 Hz where NH subject performance was superior. The ASR system showed similar behavior

  19. Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry for Combined Species Identification and Drug Sensitivity Testing in Mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Ceyssens, Pieter-Jan; Soetaert, Karine; Timke, Markus; Van den Bossche, An; Sparbier, Katrin; De Cremer, Koen; Kostrzewa, Markus; Hendrickx, Marijke; Mathys, Vanessa

    2017-02-01

    Species identification and drug susceptibility testing (DST) of mycobacteria are important yet complex processes traditionally reserved for reference laboratories. Recent technical improvements in matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has started to facilitate routine mycobacterial identifications in clinical laboratories. In this paper, we investigate the possibility of performing phenotypic MALDI-based DST in mycobacteriology using the recently described MALDI Biotyper antibiotic susceptibility test rapid assay (MBT-ASTRA). We randomly selected 72 clinical Mycobacterium tuberculosis and nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) strains, subjected them to MBT-ASTRA methodology, and compared its results to current gold-standard methods. Drug susceptibility was tested for rifampin, isoniazid, linezolid, and ethambutol (M. tuberculosis, n = 39), and clarithromycin and rifabutin (NTM, n = 33). Combined species identification was performed using the Biotyper Mycobacteria Library 4.0. Mycobacterium-specific MBT-ASTRA parameters were derived (calculation window, m/z 5,000 to 13,000, area under the curve [AUC] of >0.015, relative growth [RG] of <0.5; see the text for details). Using these settings, MBT-ASTRA analyses returned 175/177 M. tuberculosis and 65/66 NTM drug resistance profiles which corresponded to standard testing results. Turnaround times were not significantly different in M. tuberculosis testing, but the MBT-ASTRA method delivered on average a week faster than routine DST in NTM. Databases searches returned 90.4% correct species-level identifications, which increased to 98.6% when score thresholds were lowered to 1.65. In conclusion, the MBT-ASTRA technology holds promise to facilitate and fasten mycobacterial DST and to combine it directly with high-confidence species-level identifications. Given the ease of interpretation, its application in NTM typing might be the first in finding its way to current

  20. Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry for Combined Species Identification and Drug Sensitivity Testing in Mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Ceyssens, Pieter-Jan; Soetaert, Karine; Timke, Markus; Van den Bossche, An; Sparbier, Katrin; De Cremer, Koen; Kostrzewa, Markus; Hendrickx, Marijke

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Species identification and drug susceptibility testing (DST) of mycobacteria are important yet complex processes traditionally reserved for reference laboratories. Recent technical improvements in matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has started to facilitate routine mycobacterial identifications in clinical laboratories. In this paper, we investigate the possibility of performing phenotypic MALDI-based DST in mycobacteriology using the recently described MALDI Biotyper antibiotic susceptibility test rapid assay (MBT-ASTRA). We randomly selected 72 clinical Mycobacterium tuberculosis and nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) strains, subjected them to MBT-ASTRA methodology, and compared its results to current gold-standard methods. Drug susceptibility was tested for rifampin, isoniazid, linezolid, and ethambutol (M. tuberculosis, n = 39), and clarithromycin and rifabutin (NTM, n = 33). Combined species identification was performed using the Biotyper Mycobacteria Library 4.0. Mycobacterium-specific MBT-ASTRA parameters were derived (calculation window, m/z 5,000 to 13,000, area under the curve [AUC] of >0.015, relative growth [RG] of <0.5; see the text for details). Using these settings, MBT-ASTRA analyses returned 175/177 M. tuberculosis and 65/66 NTM drug resistance profiles which corresponded to standard testing results. Turnaround times were not significantly different in M. tuberculosis testing, but the MBT-ASTRA method delivered on average a week faster than routine DST in NTM. Databases searches returned 90.4% correct species-level identifications, which increased to 98.6% when score thresholds were lowered to 1.65. In conclusion, the MBT-ASTRA technology holds promise to facilitate and fasten mycobacterial DST and to combine it directly with high-confidence species-level identifications. Given the ease of interpretation, its application in NTM typing might be the first in finding its way to

  1. Combined Electric and Contralateral Acoustic Hearing: Word and Sentence Recognition with Bimodal Hearing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gifford, Rene H.; Dorman, Michael F.; McKarns, Sharon A.; Spahr, Anthony J.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The authors assessed whether (a) a full-insertion cochlear implant would provide a higher level of speech understanding than bilateral low-frequency acoustic hearing, (b) contralateral acoustic hearing would add to the speech understanding provided by the implant, and (c) the level of performance achieved with electric stimulation plus…

  2. Combined Electric and Contralateral Acoustic Hearing: Word and Sentence Recognition with Bimodal Hearing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gifford, Rene H.; Dorman, Michael F.; McKarns, Sharon A.; Spahr, Anthony J.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The authors assessed whether (a) a full-insertion cochlear implant would provide a higher level of speech understanding than bilateral low-frequency acoustic hearing, (b) contralateral acoustic hearing would add to the speech understanding provided by the implant, and (c) the level of performance achieved with electric stimulation plus…

  3. To see or not to see: investigating detectability of Ganges River dolphins using a combined visual-acoustic survey.

    PubMed

    Richman, Nadia I; Gibbons, James M; Turvey, Samuel T; Akamatsu, Tomonari; Ahmed, Benazir; Mahabub, Emile; Smith, Brian D; Jones, Julia P G

    2014-01-01

    Detection of animals during visual surveys is rarely perfect or constant, and failure to account for imperfect detectability affects the accuracy of abundance estimates. Freshwater cetaceans are among the most threatened group of mammals, and visual surveys are a commonly employed method for estimating population size despite concerns over imperfect and unquantified detectability. We used a combined visual-acoustic survey to estimate detectability of Ganges River dolphins (Platanista gangetica gangetica) in four waterways of southern Bangladesh. The combined visual-acoustic survey resulted in consistently higher detectability than a single observer-team visual survey, thereby improving power to detect trends. Visual detectability was particularly low for dolphins close to meanders where these habitat features temporarily block the view of the preceding river surface. This systematic bias in detectability during visual-only surveys may lead researchers to underestimate the importance of heavily meandering river reaches. Although the benefits of acoustic surveys are increasingly recognised for marine cetaceans, they have not been widely used for monitoring abundance of freshwater cetaceans due to perceived costs and technical skill requirements. We show that acoustic surveys are in fact a relatively cost-effective approach for surveying freshwater cetaceans, once it is acknowledged that methods that do not account for imperfect detectability are of limited value for monitoring.

  4. To See or Not to See: Investigating Detectability of Ganges River Dolphins Using a Combined Visual-Acoustic Survey

    PubMed Central

    Richman, Nadia I.; Gibbons, James M.; Turvey, Samuel T.; Akamatsu, Tomonari; Ahmed, Benazir; Mahabub, Emile; Smith, Brian D.; Jones, Julia P. G.

    2014-01-01

    Detection of animals during visual surveys is rarely perfect or constant, and failure to account for imperfect detectability affects the accuracy of abundance estimates. Freshwater cetaceans are among the most threatened group of mammals, and visual surveys are a commonly employed method for estimating population size despite concerns over imperfect and unquantified detectability. We used a combined visual-acoustic survey to estimate detectability of Ganges River dolphins (Platanista gangetica gangetica) in four waterways of southern Bangladesh. The combined visual-acoustic survey resulted in consistently higher detectability than a single observer-team visual survey, thereby improving power to detect trends. Visual detectability was particularly low for dolphins close to meanders where these habitat features temporarily block the view of the preceding river surface. This systematic bias in detectability during visual-only surveys may lead researchers to underestimate the importance of heavily meandering river reaches. Although the benefits of acoustic surveys are increasingly recognised for marine cetaceans, they have not been widely used for monitoring abundance of freshwater cetaceans due to perceived costs and technical skill requirements. We show that acoustic surveys are in fact a relatively cost-effective approach for surveying freshwater cetaceans, once it is acknowledged that methods that do not account for imperfect detectability are of limited value for monitoring. PMID:24805782

  5. Pulp consistency determined by a combination of optical and acoustical measurement techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Törmänen, Matti; Niemi, Jan; Löfqvist, Torbjörn; Myllylä, Risto

    2006-04-01

    In this study, methods based on ultrasonic attenuation and optical time-of-flight measurements are used simultaneously in determining both the fibres and fines mass fractions, respectively, of a cellulose pulp fibre suspension. The optical measurements are done by a laser radar and the acoustical measurements are based on ultrasonic attenuation measurements in a pulse-echo set-up. Two kinds of long-fibre fractions are studied, thermo-mechanical pulp and chemical softwood pulp. Fibre and fines mass fraction ranges are 0.25-1.0% and 0-0.75%, respectively. The results show that the fibres are the predominant source for absorption and scattering of ultrasonic waves and are thus mainly contributing to the attenuation of ultrasound in the pulp. It is also found that the fines are the predominant source for optical scattering and fines are thus mainly contributing to the propagation delay of the light pulse in the laser radar set-up. By combining the ultrasonic attenuation and the optical time-of-flight measurements, it is shown that the mass fraction of fines and the mass fraction of fibres in a pulp sample could be determined, respectively.

  6. Acoustic characterization of high intensity focused ultrasound fields: A combined measurement and modeling approach

    PubMed Central

    Canney, Michael S.; Bailey, Michael R.; Crum, Lawrence A.; Khokhlova, Vera A.; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.

    2008-01-01

    Acoustic characterization of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) fields is important both for the accurate prediction of ultrasound induced bioeffects in tissues and for the development of regulatory standards for clinical HIFU devices. In this paper, a method to determine HIFU field parameters at and around the focus is proposed. Nonlinear pressure waveforms were measured and modeled in water and in a tissue-mimicking gel phantom for a 2 MHz transducer with an aperture and focal length of 4.4 cm. Measurements were performed with a fiber optic probe hydrophone at intensity levels up to 24 000 W∕cm2. The inputs to a Khokhlov–Zabolotskaya–Kuznetsov-type numerical model were determined based on experimental low amplitude beam plots. Strongly asymmetric waveforms with peak positive pressures up to 80 MPa and peak negative pressures up to 15 MPa were obtained both numerically and experimentally. Numerical simulations and experimental measurements agreed well; however, when steep shocks were present in the waveform at focal intensity levels higher than 6000 W∕cm2, lower values of the peak positive pressure were observed in the measured waveforms. This underrepresentation was attributed mainly to the limited hydrophone bandwidth of 100 MHz. It is shown that a combination of measurements and modeling is necessary to enable accurate characterization of HIFU fields. PMID:19062878

  7. Acoustic characterization of high intensity focused ultrasound fields: a combined measurement and modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Canney, Michael S; Bailey, Michael R; Crum, Lawrence A; Khokhlova, Vera A; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A

    2008-10-01

    Acoustic characterization of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) fields is important both for the accurate prediction of ultrasound induced bioeffects in tissues and for the development of regulatory standards for clinical HIFU devices. In this paper, a method to determine HIFU field parameters at and around the focus is proposed. Nonlinear pressure waveforms were measured and modeled in water and in a tissue-mimicking gel phantom for a 2 MHz transducer with an aperture and focal length of 4.4 cm. Measurements were performed with a fiber optic probe hydrophone at intensity levels up to 24,000 W/cm(2). The inputs to a Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya-Kuznetsov-type numerical model were determined based on experimental low amplitude beam plots. Strongly asymmetric waveforms with peak positive pressures up to 80 MPa and peak negative pressures up to 15 MPa were obtained both numerically and experimentally. Numerical simulations and experimental measurements agreed well; however, when steep shocks were present in the waveform at focal intensity levels higher than 6000 W/cm(2), lower values of the peak positive pressure were observed in the measured waveforms. This underrepresentation was attributed mainly to the limited hydrophone bandwidth of 100 MHz. It is shown that a combination of measurements and modeling is necessary to enable accurate characterization of HIFU fields.

  8. Direct Identification of Urinary Tract Pathogens from Urine Samples, Combining Urine Screening Methods and Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Íñigo, Melania; Coello, Andreu; Fernández-Rivas, Gema; Rivaya, Belén; Hidalgo, Jessica; Quesada, María Dolores; Ausina, Vicente

    2016-04-01

    Early diagnosis of urinary tract infections (UTIs) is essential to avoid inadequate or unnecessary empirical antibiotic therapy. Microbiological confirmation takes 24 to 48 h. The use of screening methods, such as cytometry and automated microscopic analysis of urine sediment, allows the rapid prediction of negative samples. In addition, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) is a widely established technique in clinical microbiology laboratories used to identify microorganisms. We evaluated the ability of MALDI-TOF MS to identify microorganisms from direct urine samples and the predictive value of automated analyzers for the identification of microorganisms in urine by MALDI-TOF MS. A total of 451 urine samples from patients with suspected UTIs were first analyzed using the Sysmex UF-1000iflow cytometer, an automatic sediment analyzer with microscopy (SediMax), culture, and then processed by MALDI-TOF MS with a simple triple-centrifuged procedure to obtain a pellet that was washed and centrifuged and finally applied directly to the MALDI-TOF MS plate. The organisms in 336 samples were correctly identified, mainly those with Gram-negative bacteria (86.10%). No microorganisms were misidentified, and noCandidaspp. were correctly identified. Regarding the data from autoanalyzers, the best bacteriuria cutoffs were 1,000 and 200 U/μl for UF-1000iand SediMax, respectively. It was concluded that the combination of a urine screening method and MALDI-TOF MS provided a reliable identification from urine samples, especially in those containing Gram-negative bacteria.

  9. Direct Identification of Urinary Tract Pathogens from Urine Samples, Combining Urine Screening Methods and Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Coello, Andreu; Fernández-Rivas, Gema; Rivaya, Belén; Hidalgo, Jessica; Quesada, María Dolores; Ausina, Vicente

    2016-01-01

    Early diagnosis of urinary tract infections (UTIs) is essential to avoid inadequate or unnecessary empirical antibiotic therapy. Microbiological confirmation takes 24 to 48 h. The use of screening methods, such as cytometry and automated microscopic analysis of urine sediment, allows the rapid prediction of negative samples. In addition, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) is a widely established technique in clinical microbiology laboratories used to identify microorganisms. We evaluated the ability of MALDI-TOF MS to identify microorganisms from direct urine samples and the predictive value of automated analyzers for the identification of microorganisms in urine by MALDI-TOF MS. A total of 451 urine samples from patients with suspected UTIs were first analyzed using the Sysmex UF-1000i flow cytometer, an automatic sediment analyzer with microscopy (SediMax), culture, and then processed by MALDI-TOF MS with a simple triple-centrifuged procedure to obtain a pellet that was washed and centrifuged and finally applied directly to the MALDI-TOF MS plate. The organisms in 336 samples were correctly identified, mainly those with Gram-negative bacteria (86.10%). No microorganisms were misidentified, and no Candida spp. were correctly identified. Regarding the data from autoanalyzers, the best bacteriuria cutoffs were 1,000 and 200 U/μl for UF-1000i and SediMax, respectively. It was concluded that the combination of a urine screening method and MALDI-TOF MS provided a reliable identification from urine samples, especially in those containing Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:26818668

  10. Adsorption of acrolein, propanal, and allyl alcohol on Pd(111): a combined infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy and temperature programmed desorption study.

    PubMed

    Dostert, Karl-Heinz; O'Brien, Casey P; Mirabella, Francesca; Ivars-Barceló, Francisco; Schauermann, Swetlana

    2016-05-18

    Atomistic-level understanding of the interaction of α,β-unsaturated aldehydes and their derivatives with late transition metals is of fundamental importance for the rational design of new catalytic materials with the desired selectivity towards C[double bond, length as m-dash]C vs. C[double bond, length as m-dash]O bond partial hydrogenation. In this study, we investigate the interaction of acrolein, and its partial hydrogenation products propanal and allyl alcohol, with Pd(111) as a prototypical system. A combination of infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy (IRAS) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) experiments was applied under well-defined ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions to obtain detailed information on the adsorption geometries of acrolein, propanal, and allyl alcohol as a function of coverage. We compare the IR spectra obtained for multilayer coverages, reflecting the molecular structure of unperturbed molecules, with the spectra acquired for sub-monolayer coverages, at which the chemical bonds of the molecules are strongly distorted. Coverage-dependent IR spectra of acrolein on Pd(111) point to the strong changes in the adsorption geometry with increasing acrolein coverage. Acrolein adsorbs with the C[double bond, length as m-dash]C and C[double bond, length as m-dash]O bonds lying parallel to the surface in the low coverage regime and changes its geometry to a more upright orientation with increasing coverage. TPD studies indicate decomposition of the species adsorbed in the sub-monolayer regime upon heating. Similar strong coverage dependence of the IR spectra were found for propanal and allyl alcohol. For all investigated molecules a detailed assignment of vibrational bands is reported.

  11. Adsorption of acrolein, propanal, and allyl alcohol on Pd(111): a combined infrared reflection–absorption spectroscopy and temperature programmed desorption study

    PubMed Central

    Dostert, Karl-Heinz; O'Brien, Casey P.; Mirabella, Francesca; Ivars-Barceló, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Atomistic-level understanding of the interaction of α,β-unsaturated aldehydes and their derivatives with late transition metals is of fundamental importance for the rational design of new catalytic materials with the desired selectivity towards C 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 1111111111111111111111111111111111 1111111111111111111111111111111111 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 1111111111111111111111111111111111 1111111111111111111111111111111111 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 C vs. CO bond partial hydrogenation. In this study, we investigate the interaction of acrolein, and its partial hydrogenation products propanal and allyl alcohol, with Pd(111) as a prototypical system. A combination of infrared reflection–absorption spectroscopy (IRAS) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) experiments was applied under well-defined ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions to obtain detailed information on the adsorption geometries of acrolein, propanal, and allyl alcohol as a function of coverage. We compare the IR spectra obtained for

  12. Clinical and microbiological features of a cystic fibrosis patient chronically colonized with Pandoraea sputorum identified by combining 16S rRNA sequencing and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Olmos, A; Morosini, M I; Lamas, A; García-Castillo, M; García-García, L; Cantón, R; Máiz, L

    2012-03-01

    Clonal isolates identified as various nonfermentative Gram-negative bacilli over a 5-year period from sputum cultures of a 30-year-old cystic fibrosis patient were successfully reidentified as Pandoraea sputorum by combining 16S rRNA sequencing and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). Decreased lung function improved after 1 year of azithromycin and inhaled 7%-hypertonic saline treatment.

  13. Clinical and Microbiological Features of a Cystic Fibrosis Patient Chronically Colonized with Pandoraea sputorum Identified by Combining 16S rRNA Sequencing and Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Olmos, A.; Morosini, M. I.; Lamas, A.; García-Castillo, M.; García-García, L.; Máiz, L.

    2012-01-01

    Clonal isolates identified as various nonfermentative Gram-negative bacilli over a 5-year period from sputum cultures of a 30-year-old cystic fibrosis patient were successfully reidentified as Pandoraea sputorum by combining 16S rRNA sequencing and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). Decreased lung function improved after 1 year of azithromycin and inhaled 7%-hypertonic saline treatment. PMID:22170922

  14. Small scale model static acoustic investigation of hybrid high lift systems combining upper surface blowing with the internally blown flap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, T. W.; Rathburn, E. A.

    1974-01-01

    A static acoustic and propulsion test of a small radius Jacobs-Hurkamp and a large radius Flex Flap combined with four upper surface blowing (USB) nozzles was performed. Nozzle force and flow data, flap trailing edge total pressure survey data, and acoustic data were obtained. Jacobs-Hurkamp flap surface pressure data, flow visualization photographs, and spoiler acoustic data from the limited mid-year tests are reported. A pressure ratio range of 1.2 to 1.5 was investigated for the USB nozzles and for the auxiliary blowing slots. The acoustic data were scaled to a four-engine STOL airplane of roughly 110,000 kilograms or 50,000 pounds gross weight, corresponding to a model scale of approximately 0.2 for the nozzles without deflector. The model nozzle scale is actually reduced to about .17 with deflector although all results in this report assume 0.2 scale factor. Trailing edge pressure surveys indicated that poor flow attachment was obtained even at large flow impingement angles unless a nozzle deflector plate was used. Good attachment was obtained with the aspect ratio four nozzle with deflector, confirming the small scale wind tunnel tests.

  15. Detection of dead regions in the cochlea: relevance for combined electric and acoustic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Moore, Brian C J; Glasberg, Brian; Schlueter, Anne

    2010-01-01

    A dead region is a region in the cochlea where the inner hair cells and/or the auditory neurones are functioning very poorly, if at all. People who are being considered for a combination of a cochlear implant and a hearing aid typically have a dead region in the parts of the cochlea that normally respond to medium and high frequencies, but have some functional hearing at lower frequencies. For such people, it may be useful to determine the edge frequency, f(e), of any dead region. This may be relevant to choosing the most appropriate insertion depth of the electrode array, and to the way that frequencies in the input signal are mapped to acoustic and electric stimulation. It may also be helpful in interpreting the results of research studies. This paper reviews methods for diagnosing dead regions and defining the value of f(e). It is argued that the value of f(e) cannot be determined reliably from the audiogram, although a dead region is likely to be present at a given frequency when the hearing loss at that frequency is 70 dB or more. When a sinusoidal signal is reported as sounding highly distorted or noise-like, a dead region may be present at the signal frequency, but again this is not a reliable indicator. The TEN test is a simple clinical method for diagnosis of dead regions. Where this test gives a positive diagnosis, it is recommended that psychophysical tuning curves be measured to define the value of f(e) more precisely.

  16. Development and validation of a combined phased acoustical radiosity and image source model for predicting sound fields in rooms.

    PubMed

    Marbjerg, Gerd; Brunskog, Jonas; Jeong, Cheol-Ho; Nilsson, Erling

    2015-09-01

    A model, combining acoustical radiosity and the image source method, including phase shifts on reflection, has been developed. The model is denoted Phased Acoustical Radiosity and Image Source Method (PARISM), and it has been developed in order to be able to model both specular and diffuse reflections with complex-valued and angle-dependent boundary conditions. This paper mainly describes the combination of the two models and the implementation of the angle-dependent boundary conditions. It furthermore describes how a pressure impulse response is obtained from the energy-based acoustical radiosity by regarding the model as being stochastic. Three methods of implementation are proposed and investigated, and finally, recommendations are made for their use. Validation of the image source method is done by comparison with finite element simulations of a rectangular room with a porous absorber ceiling. Results from the full model are compared with results from other simulation tools and with measurements. The comparisons of the full model are done for real-valued and angle-independent surface properties. The proposed model agrees well with both the measured results and the alternative theories, and furthermore shows a more realistic spatial variation than energy-based methods due to the fact that interference is considered.

  17. MOF-5 metal-organic framework as sorbent for in-field sampling and preconcentration in combination with thermal desorption GC/MS for determination of atmospheric formaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Gu, Zhi-Yuan; Wang, Gen; Yan, Xiu-Ping

    2010-02-15

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are one kind of highly porous crystalline materials, which are constructed by metal-containing inorganic nodes and organic linkers. With large surface area and high thermal stability, MOFs have great potential as sorbents for the preconcentration of trace analytes. However, such application of MOFs to the analysis of real samples has not been reported before. Here we report the utilization of MOF-5 as sorbent for in-field sampling and preconcentration of atmospheric formaldehyde before thermal desorption (TD) GC/MS (TD-GC/MS) determination without the need for any chemical derivatization. MOF-5 gave a 53 and 73 times better concentration effect than Tenax TA (organic polymers) and Carbograph 1TD (graphitized carbon black), respectively, for TD-GC/MS determination of formaldehyde. MOF-5 showed good performance for in-field sampling and preconcentration of formaldehyde from air samples with a relative humidity less than 45%. The collected formaldehyde on MOF-5 sorbent was stable for at least 72 h at room temperature before TD-GC/MS analysis. One tube packed with 300 mg of MOF-5 lasted 200 cycles of adsorption/TD without significant loss of collection efficiency. The breakthrough volume of such a tube was 1.2 L of 28.35 mg m(-3) formaldehyde at a sampling flow rate of 100 mL min(-1). The use of MOF-5 for in-field sampling and preconcentration in combination with TD-GC/MS for the determination of formaldehyde offered a linear range covering 3 orders of magnitude, and a detection limit of 0.6 microg m(-3). The precision for six replicate cycles of in-field sampling and preconcentration for TD-GC/MS determination using one 300 mg MOF-5 packed tube ranged from 2.8% to 5.3%. The tube-to-tube reproducibility of three MOF-5 tubes prepared in parallel was 7.7%. The developed method was applied to analysis of local indoor and outdoor air samples for formaldehyde and validated by the standard method TO-11A of the United States Environmental

  18. Normal mode solutions for seismo-acoustic propagation resulting from shear and combined wave point sources.

    PubMed

    Nealy, Jennifer L; Collis, Jon M; Frank, Scott D

    2016-04-01

    Normal mode solutions to range-independent seismo-acoustic problems are benchmarked against elastic parabolic equation solutions and then used to benchmark the shear elastic parabolic equation self-starter [Frank, Odom, and Collis, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 133, 1358-1367 (2013)]. The Pekeris waveguide with an elastic seafloor is considered for a point source located in the ocean emitting compressional waves, or in the seafloor, emitting both compressional and shear waves. Accurate solutions are obtained when the source is in the seafloor, and when the source is at the interface between the fluid and elastic layers.

  19. Validation of TOF-SIMS and FE-SEM/EDS Techniques Combined with Sorption and Desorption Experiments to Check Competitive and Individual Pb2+ and Cd2+ Association with Components of B Soil Horizons.

    PubMed

    Cerqueira, Beatriz; Arenas-Lago, Daniel; Andrade, María Luisa; Vega, Flora A

    2015-01-01

    Sorption and desorption experiments were performed by the batch method on the B horizons of five natural soils: Umbric Cambisol, Endoleptic Luvisol, Mollic Umbrisol, Dystric Umbrisol, and Dystric Fluvisol. Individual and competitive sorption and desorption capacity and hysteresis were determined. The results showed that Pb2+ was sorbed and retained in a greater quantity than Cd2+ and that the hysteresis of the first was greater than that of the second. The most influential characteristics of the sorption and retention of Pb2+ were pH, ECEC, Fe and Mn oxides and clay contents. For Cd2+ they were mainly pH and, to a lesser extent, Mn oxides and clay content. The combined use of TOF-SIMS, FE-SEM/EDS and sorption and desorption analyses was suitable for achieving a better understanding of the interaction between soil components and the two heavy metals. They show the preferential association of Pb2+ with vermiculite, chlorite, Fe and Mn oxides, and of Cd2+ with the same components, although to a much lesser extent and intensity. This was due to the latter's higher mobility as it competed unfavourably with the Pb2+ sorption sites. TOF-SIMS and FE-SEM/EDS techniques confirmed the results of the sorption experiments, and also provided valuable information on whether the soil components (individually or in association) retain Cd2+ and/or Pb2+; this could help to propose effective measures for the remediation of contaminated soils.

  20. Validation of TOF-SIMS and FE-SEM/EDS Techniques Combined with Sorption and Desorption Experiments to Check Competitive and Individual Pb2+ and Cd2+ Association with Components of B Soil Horizons

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, María Luisa; Vega, Flora A.

    2015-01-01

    Sorption and desorption experiments were performed by the batch method on the B horizons of five natural soils: Umbric Cambisol, Endoleptic Luvisol, Mollic Umbrisol, Dystric Umbrisol, and Dystric Fluvisol. Individual and competitive sorption and desorption capacity and hysteresis were determined. The results showed that Pb2+ was sorbed and retained in a greater quantity than Cd2+ and that the hysteresis of the first was greater than that of the second. The most influential characteristics of the sorption and retention of Pb2+ were pH, ECEC, Fe and Mn oxides and clay contents. For Cd2+ they were mainly pH and, to a lesser extent, Mn oxides and clay content. The combined use of TOF-SIMS, FE-SEM/EDS and sorption and desorption analyses was suitable for achieving a better understanding of the interaction between soil components and the two heavy metals. They show the preferential association of Pb2+ with vermiculite, chlorite, Fe and Mn oxides, and of Cd2+ with the same components, although to a much lesser extent and intensity. This was due to the latter’s higher mobility as it competed unfavourably with the Pb2+ sorption sites. TOF-SIMS and FE-SEM/EDS techniques confirmed the results of the sorption experiments, and also provided valuable information on whether the soil components (individually or in association) retain Cd2+ and / or Pb2+; this could help to propose effective measures for the remediation of contaminated soils. PMID:25893518

  1. Combined Atomic Force Microscope-Based Topographical Imaging and Nanometer Scale Resolved Proximal Probe Thermal Desorption/Electrospray Ionization-Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Ovchinnikova, Olga S; Nikiforov, Maxim; Bradshaw, James A; Jesse, Stephen; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2011-01-01

    Nanometer scale proximal probe thermal desorption/electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (TD/ESI-MS) was demonstrated for molecular surface sampling of caffeine from a thin film using a 30 nm diameter nano-thermal analysis (nano-TA) probe tip in an atomic force microscope (AFM) coupled via a vapor transfer line and ESI interface to a MS detection platform. Using a probe temperature of 350 C and a spot sampling time of 30 s, conical desorption craters 250 nm in diameter and 100 nm deep were created as shown through subsequent topographical imaging of the surface within the same system. Automated sampling of a 5 x 2 array of spots, with 2 m spacing between spots, and real time selective detection of the desorbed caffeine using tandem mass spectrometry was also demonstrated. Estimated from the crater volume (~2x106 nm3), only about 10 amol (2 fg) of caffeine was liberated from each thermal desorption crater in the thin film. These results illustrate a relatively simple experimental setup and means to acquire in automated fashion sub-micrometer scale spatial sampling resolution and mass spectral detection of materials amenable to TD. The ability to achieve MS-based chemical imaging with 250 nm scale spatial resolution with this system is anticipated.

  2. Strouhal number dependency of the aero-acoustic response of wall perforations under combined grazing-bias flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moers, E. M. T.; Tonon, D.; Hirschberg, A.

    2017-02-01

    The influence of low Mach number grazing-bias flow on the linear acoustic response of slit shaped wall perforations is determined in terms of a dimensionless acoustical impedance for Strouhal numbers based on the perforation width of order unity. The influence of edge geometries is studied by experiments. In particular, slanted slits under an angle of 30° with respect to the grazing flow direction are considered. Sound production, i.e. whistling potentiality corresponding to a negative real part of the impedance, is observed for various geometries and flow conditions. Sound production restricts the largest perforation size which can be used in practice for acoustical liners. Whistling in the limit cases of purely bias and purely grazing flows can be explained qualitatively in terms of Vortex Sound Theory. For combined bias/grazing flow, most of the oscillations in the impedance as a function of the Strouhal number are related to these limit behaviours. A configuration with thin sharp edges both upstream and downstream corresponds to commonly used theoretical models assuming an infinite thin wall. This configuration displays a behaviour drastically different from a more realistic perforation geometry with sharp square edges.

  3. Desorption in Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Usmanov, Dilshadbek Tursunbayevich; Ninomiya, Satoshi; Chen, Lee Chuin; Saha, Subhrakanti; Mandal, Mridul Kanti; Sakai, Yuji; Takaishi, Rio; Habib, Ahsan; Hiraoka, Kenzo; Yoshimura, Kentaro; Takeda, Sen; Wada, Hiroshi; Nonami, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    In mass spectrometry, analytes must be released in the gas phase. There are two representative methods for the gasification of the condensed samples, i.e., ablation and desorption. While ablation is based on the explosion induced by the energy accumulated in the condensed matrix, desorption is a single molecular process taking place on the surface. In this paper, desorption methods for mass spectrometry developed in our laboratory: flash heating/rapid cooling, Leidenfrost phenomenon-assisted thermal desorption (LPTD), solid/solid friction, liquid/solid friction, electrospray droplet impact (EDI) ionization/desorption, and probe electrospray ionization (PESI), will be described. All the methods are concerned with the surface and interface phenomena. The concept of how to desorb less-volatility compounds from the surface will be discussed.

  4. Desorption in Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Usmanov, Dilshadbek Tursunbayevich; Ninomiya, Satoshi; Chen, Lee Chuin; Saha, Subhrakanti; Mandal, Mridul Kanti; Sakai, Yuji; Takaishi, Rio; Habib, Ahsan; Hiraoka, Kenzo; Yoshimura, Kentaro; Takeda, Sen; Wada, Hiroshi; Nonami, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    In mass spectrometry, analytes must be released in the gas phase. There are two representative methods for the gasification of the condensed samples, i.e., ablation and desorption. While ablation is based on the explosion induced by the energy accumulated in the condensed matrix, desorption is a single molecular process taking place on the surface. In this paper, desorption methods for mass spectrometry developed in our laboratory: flash heating/rapid cooling, Leidenfrost phenomenon-assisted thermal desorption (LPTD), solid/solid friction, liquid/solid friction, electrospray droplet impact (EDI) ionization/desorption, and probe electrospray ionization (PESI), will be described. All the methods are concerned with the surface and interface phenomena. The concept of how to desorb less-volatility compounds from the surface will be discussed. PMID:28337398

  5. Sensitivity to interaural time differences with combined cochlear implant and acoustic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Francart, Tom; Brokx, Jan; Wouters, Jan

    2009-03-01

    The interaural time difference (ITD) is an important cue to localize sound sources. Sensitivity to ITD was measured in eight users of a cochlear implant (CI) in the one ear and a hearing aid (HA) in the other severely impaired ear. The stimulus consisted of an electric pulse train of 100 pps and an acoustic filtered click train. Just-noticeable differences (JNDs) in ITD were measured using a lateralization paradigm. Four subjects exhibited median JNDs in ITD of 156, 341, 254, and 91 mus; the other subjects could not lateralize the stimuli consistently. Only the subjects who could lateralize had average acoustic hearing thresholds at 1,000 and 2,000 Hz better than 100-dB SPL. The electric signal had to be delayed by 1.5 ms to achieve synchronous stimulation at the auditory nerves.

  6. Gulf stream velocity structure through combined inversion of hydrographic and acoustic Doppler data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierce, S. D.

    1986-01-01

    Near-surface velocities from an acoustic Doppler instrument are used in conjunction with CTD/O2 data to produce estimates of the absolute flow field off Cape Hatteras. The data set consists of two transects across the Gulf Stream made by the R/V Endeavor cruise EN88 in August 1982. An inverse procedure is applied which makes use of both the acoustic Doppler data and property conservation constraints. Velocity sections at approximately 73 deg. W and 71 deg. W are presented with formal errors of 1-2 cm/s. The net Gulf Stream transports are estimated to be 116 + or - 2 Sv across the south leg and 161 + or - 4 Sv across the north. A Deep Western Boundary Current transport of 4 + or - 1 Sv is also estimated. While these values do not necessarily represent the mean, they are accurate estimates of the synoptic flow field in the region.

  7. Combined effect of noise and room acoustics on vocal effort in simulated classrooms.

    PubMed

    Cipriano, Marcella; Astolfi, Arianna; Pelegrín-García, David

    2017-01-01

    This work investigated the relationships between room acoustics, background noise level, and vocal effort of a speaker in simulated classrooms of various volumes. Under simulated acoustic environments, talkers adjusted their vocal effort linearly with the voice support, i.e., the degree of amplification offered by the room to the voice of a speaker, at his own ears. The slope of this relationship, called the room effect, of -0.24 dB/dB was significant only in the case of the highest noise levels of 62 dB. The vocal comfort for the speaker, however, was found to be more closely related to noise annoyance than to room reverberance.

  8. Smart Acoustic Network Using Combined Fsk-Psk, Adaptive Beamforming and Equalization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-09-30

    500m 1500m 1500m 4500m 500m End Surface 10’ 20’ 10’ 35’ 0’ Beginning Surface 0’ Millscross Morpheus 10’ 750m 750m 35’ Figure 4. High-Speed Data...Transmission from a Morpheus UUV to the HPAL. 4 RESULTS High-speed acoustic communication using FAU-HPAL: 1) Using this multiple-stage method, bit

  9. OTEC gas-desorption studies

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, F.C.; Golshani, A.

    1981-01-01

    OTEC gas desorption studies were initiated with the goal of mitigating these effects and were carried out in four areas: (1) vacuum deaeration in a packed column, (2) deaeration in a barometric water intake system, (3) noncondensibles disposal through hydraulic air compression, and (4) OTEC deaeration subsystems' analysis. Laboratory experiments to date have completed the vacuum deaeration test of three different kinds of packings, barometric intake deaeration experiments, and a series of hydraulic air compression tests. Preliminary analyses based on the experimental data have shown that, as compared to the previous baseline study, reduction both in deaerator cost and pumping power can be realized with a combination of barometric intake and packed column deaeration. The design and operation of the gas desorption test loop, experimental and computer simulation results obtained, and an analysis of OTEC deaeration subsystem design based on the test results and their implication on OTEC open-cycle power systems are presented.

  10. Combined semi-analytical and numerical vibro-acoustic design approach for anisotropic fibre-reinforced composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dannemann, Martin; Täger, Olaf; Modler, Niels

    2017-09-01

    In many applications, lightweight structures need to combine outstanding component properties and low weight. Here, fibre-reinforced polymers offer particular advantages, as their material-inherent anisotropic material damping behaviour facilitates the design of lightweight structures with both low sound radiation levels and low mass. At the same time, composite structures often have to fulfil a high level of stiffness and strength. These manifold requirements result in a complex design process with optimisation scenarios often involving contrary objectives in terms of weight, stiffness and sound radiation. Those objectives are in turn accompanied by many different design variables. The aim of the work presented in this paper was therefore to develop a material-specific design strategy for scenarios of this type. The authors developed semi-analytical models for the calculation of structural dynamics and sound radiation in composite structures before combining them with optimisation algorithms in order to perform effective sensitivity analyses. Parametric studies were used to define material-specific input parameters for physical characteristics, which in turn provided a basis for the detailed numerical simulation of the vibro-acoustic behaviour of complex geometries. This paper uses a trough-shaped structure as an application-oriented example of the optimisation of vibro-acoustic behaviour with the aid of the numerical model developed by the authors.

  11. Combining passive acoustics and imaging sonar techniques to study sperm whales' foraging strategies.

    PubMed

    Giorli, Giacomo; Au, Whitlow W L

    2017-09-01

    Sperm whales forage in the deep ocean, hunting for squid. An innovative approach for the study of sperm whale foraging behavior and habitat selection is reported in this letter. A DIDSON imaging sonar mounted on a profiler with a conductivity, temperature, and depth sensor was used to count and measure potential prey in the deep ocean during sperm whales' acoustical foraging encounters in Hawaii. Preliminary results show how this technique can be applied to the study of deep diving whale foraging and habitat selection. Sperm whales foraged where the density of prey decreased with depth and where the size of prey increased with depth.

  12. A combined complex electrical impedance and acoustic emission study in limestone samples under uniaxial loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saltas, V.; Fitilis, I.; Vallianatos, F.

    2014-12-01

    In the present work, complex electrical impedance measurements in the frequency range of 10 mHz to 1 MHz were carried out in conjunction with acoustic emission monitoring in limestone samples subjected to linear and stepped-like uniaxial loading, up to ultimate failure. Cole-Cole plots of the complex impedance during the stepped loading of limestone have been used to discriminate the contributions of grains interior, grain boundaries and electrode polarization effects to the overall electrical behavior. The latter is well-described with an equivalent-circuit model which comprises components of constant phase elements and resistances in parallel connection. Electrical conductivity increases upon uniaxial loading giving rise to negative values of effective activation volume. This is a strong experimental evidence for the generation of transient electric signals recorded prior to seismic events and may be attributed to charge transfer (proton conduction) due to cracks generation and propagation as a result of the applied stress. The time-series of ac-conductivity at two distinct frequencies (10 kHz, 200 kHz) during linear loading of limestone samples exhibits a strong correlation with the acoustic emission activity obeying the same general self-similar law for critical phenomena that has been reported for the energy release before materials fracture.

  13. Technologies Beyond Turbidity for Sediment Monitoring - Laser diffraction, High Frequency Acoustics and a new Combined acousto-optic method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Yogesh C.

    2017-04-01

    Sediment monitoring was transformed when optical turbidity was first introduced 3 decades ago, creating a capacity to monitor sediments continuously. Despite many papers that have since noted that turbidity measures particle area concentration not volume, turbidity remains widely in use. In fact, the sensitivity to area rather than volume implies a 1/diameter variation with size on concentration measurement (Volts/volume). Consequently, small amounts of fine sediments can dominate larger amounts of sands - a phenomenon that has masked suspended load in many river profiles, as we will show. Laser diffraction, on the other hand, has constant sensitivity to a wide range of grain sizes, e.g. from 2-500 microns, and obtains size distribution at 1 4-phi size intervals, with LISST instruments. However, it is expensive. An 8MHz acoustic system has recently been introduced, LISST-ABS that has advantages of a flatter response to varying grain sizes than turbidity, a higher sensitivity to suspended load than wash load, and a greater tolerance to turbidity. The response (Volts/volume) is still not flat, exhibiting a size-dependence that is inverse of turbidity at small sizes where particles are in Rayleigh regime, i.e. where ka<1 at 8MHz - diameters smaller than 60 microns. This opposing tendency of optics and acoustics lead us to the concept of combining the two methods, and this is a new idea that we call acousto-optics. Over the 1-500 micron size range, instead of 3 orders of magnitude variation in sensitivity for optics, this sensor achieves constancy within a factor of 3 even for narrow size particles, and better for distributions. The acoustic and acousto-optic sensors should significantly enhance measurement quality for sediments. We shall review and present the new concept.

  14. Direct Analysis of Oil Additives by High-Field Asymmetric Waveform Ion Mobility Spectrometry-Mass Spectrometry Combined with Electrospray Ionization and Desorption Electrospray Ionization.

    PubMed

    Da Costa, Caitlyn; Turner, Matthew; Reynolds, James C; Whitmarsh, Samuel; Lynch, Tom; Creaser, Colin S

    2016-02-16

    The analysis of corrosion inhibitors in the presence and absence of an oil matrix is reported using electrospray ionization (ESI) and desorption electrospray ionization (DESI), hyphenated with miniaturized high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) and mass spectrometry (MS). The target analytes were successfully ionized in solution by ESI and directly from steel surfaces using DESI ambient ionization at levels ≥0.0004% w/w (4 ppm) in oil. Differences in the mass spectral profiles observed for the additive/oil mixture are attributed to differences between the ESI and DESI ionization processes. The use of FAIMS improved selectivity for ESI generated analyte ions through reduction in the chemical noise resulting from the oil matrix. DESI enabled the direct, rapid, native state interrogation of oil samples on steel surfaces without sample pretreatment, and the hyphenation of DESI with the miniaturized FAIMS enhanced the relative analyte responses of the surface-active corrosion inhibitors.

  15. Kinetic effects on geodesic acoustic mode from combined collisions and impurities

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Shangchuan; Xie, Jinlin Liu, Wandong

    2015-04-15

    The dispersion relation for geodesic acoustic mode (GAM) is derived by applying a gyrokinetic model that accounts for the effects from both collisions and impurities. Based on the dispersion relation, an analysis is performed for the non-monotonic behavior of GAM damping versus the characteristic collision rate at various impurity levels. As the effective charge increases, the maximum damping rate is found to shift towards lower collision rates, nearer to the parameter range of a typical tokamak edge plasma. The relative strengths of ion-ion and impurity-induced collision effects, which are illustrated by numerical calculations, are found to be comparable. Impurity-induced collisions help decrease the frequency of GAM, while their effects on the damping rate are non-monotonic, resulting in a weaker total damping in the high collision regime. The results presented suggest considering collision effects as well as impurity effects in GAM analysis.

  16. Dislodgement and removal of dust-particles from a surface by a technique combining acoustic standing wave and airflow.

    PubMed

    Chen, Di; Wu, Junru

    2010-01-01

    It is known that there are many fine particles on the moon and Mars. Their existence may cause risk for the success of a long-term project for NASA, i.e., exploration and habitation of the moon and Mars. These dust-particles might cover the solar panels, making them fail to generate electricity, and they might also penetrate through seals on space suits, hatches, and vehicle wheels causing many incidents. The fine particles would be hazardous to human health if they were inhaled. Development of robust dust mitigation technology is urgently needed for the viable long-term exploration and habilitation of either the moon or Mars. A feasibility study to develop a dust removal technique, which may be used in space-stations or other enclosures for habitation, is reported. It is shown experimentally that the acoustic radiation force produced by a 13.8 kHz 128 dB sound-level standing wave between a 3 cm-aperture tweeter and a reflector separated by 9 cm is strong enough to overcome the van der Waals adhesive force between the dust-particles and the reflector-surface. Thus the majority of fine particles (>2 microm diameter) on a reflector-surface can be dislodged and removed by a technique combining acoustic levitation and airflow methods. The removal efficiency deteriorates for particles of less than 2 microm in size.

  17. Acoustic test of a model rotor and tail rotor: Results for the isolated rotors and combined configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, R. M.; Burley, C. L.; Elliott, J. W.

    1989-01-01

    Acoustic data from a model scale main rotor and tail rotor experiment in the NASA Langley 14 by 22 Foot Subsonic Tunnel are presented for the main rotor and trail rotor in isolation and for the two rotors operating together. Results for the isolated main rotor show the importance of the rotor flapping conditions on mid-frequency noise content. High levels of main rotor retreating side blade-vortex interaction noise are shown to radiate downstream of the model. The isolated tail rotor noise results show the dominance of harmonic noise in the thrusting direction. The occurrence of tail rotor broadband noise is seen by the broadening of the tail rotor harmonics and is attributed to fuselage wake turbulence. The combined main and tail rotor data are presented to show the dominance of each rotor's different noise sources at different directivity locations.

  18. Acoustic measurement and morphological features of organic sediment deposits in combined sewer networks.

    PubMed

    Carnacina, Iacopo; Larrarte, Frédérique; Leonardi, Nicoletta

    2017-04-01

    The performance of sewer networks has important consequences from an environmental and social point of view. Poor functioning can result in flood risk and pollution at a large scale. Sediment deposits forming in sewer trunks might severely compromise the sewer line by affecting the flow field, reducing cross-sectional areas, and increasing roughness coefficients. In spite of numerous efforts, the morphological features of these depositional environments remain poorly understood. The interface between water and sediment remains inefficiently identified and the estimation of the stock of deposit is frequently inaccurate. In part, this is due to technical issues connected to difficulties in collecting accurate field measurements without disrupting existing morphologies. In this paper, results from an extensive field campaign are presented; during the campaign a new survey methodology based on acoustic techniques has been tested. Furthermore, a new algorithm for the detection of the soil-water interface, and therefore for the correct esteem of sediment stocks is proposed. Finally, results in regard to bed topography, and morphological features at two different field sites are presented and reveal that a large variability in bed forms is present along sewer networks.

  19. Combining AFM and Acoustic Probes to Reveal Changes in the Elastic Stiffness Tensor of Living Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nijenhuis, Nadja; Zhao, Xuegen; Carisey, Alex; Ballestrem, Christoph; Derby, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of how the elastic stiffness of a cell affects its communication with its environment is of fundamental importance for the understanding of tissue integrity in health and disease. For stiffness measurements, it has been customary to quote a single parameter quantity, e.g., Young’s modulus, rather than the minimum of two terms of the stiffness tensor required by elasticity theory. In this study, we use two independent methods (acoustic microscopy and atomic force microscopy nanoindentation) to characterize the elastic properties of a cell and thus determine two independent elastic constants. This allows us to explore in detail how the mechanical properties of cells change in response to signaling pathways that are known to regulate the cell’s cytoskeleton. In particular, we demonstrate that altering the tensioning of actin filaments in NIH3T3 cells has a strong influence on the cell's shear modulus but leaves its bulk modulus unchanged. In contrast, altering the polymerization state of actin filaments influences bulk and shear modulus in a similar manner. In addition, we can use the data to directly determine the Poisson ratio of a cell and show that in all cases studied, it is less than, but very close to, 0.5 in value. PMID:25296302

  20. Experimental study of ultra-thin films mechanical integrity by combined nanoindentation and nano-acoustic emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zihou

    Advancement of interconnect technology has imposed significant challenge on interface characterization and reliability for blurred interfaces between layers. There is a need for material properties and these miniaturized length scales and assessment of reliability; including the intrinsic film fracture toughness and the interfacial fracture toughness. The nano-meter range of film thicknesses currently employed, impose significant challenges on evaluating these physical quantities and thereby impose significant challenge on the design cycle. In this study we attempted to use a combined nano-indentation and nano-acoustic emission to qualitatively and quantitatively characterize the failure modes in ultra-thin blanket films on Si substrates or stakes of different characteristics. We have performed and analyzed an exhaustive group of testes that cove many diverge combination of film-substrate combination, provided by both Intel and IBM. When the force-indentation depth curve shows excursion, a direct measure of the total energy release rate is estimated. The collected acoustic emission signal is then used to partition the total energy into two segments, one associated with the cohesive fracture toughness of the film and the other is for the adhesive fracture toughness of the interface. The acoustic emission signal is analyzed in both the time and frequency domain to achieve such energy division. In particular, the signal time domain analysis for signal skewness, time of arrival and total energy content are employed with the proper signal to noise ratio. In the frequency domain, an expansive group of acoustic emission signals are utilized to construct the details of the power spectral density. A bank of band-pass filters are designed to sort the individual signals to those associated with adhesive interlayer cracking, cohesive channel cracking, or other system induced noise. The attenuation time and the energy content within each spectral frequency were the key elements

  1. Detection of bacteria from biological mixtures using immunomagnetic separation combined with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Madonna, A.J.; Basile, F.; Furlong, E.; Voorhees, K.J.

    2001-01-01

    A rapid method for identifying specific bacteria from complex biological mixtures using immunomagnetic separation coupled to matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry has been developed. The technique employs commercially available magnetic beads coated with polycolonal antibodies raised against specific bacteria and whole cell analysis by MALDI-MS. A suspension of a bacterial mixture is mixed with the immunomagnetic beads specific for the target microorganism. After a short incubation period (20 mins) the bacteria captured by the beads are washed, resuspended in deionized H2O and directly applied onto a MALDI probe. Liquid suspensions containing bacterial mixtures can be screened within 1 h total analysis time. Positive tests result in the production of a fingerprint mass spectrum primarily consisting of protein biomarkers characteristic of the targeted microorganism. Using this procedure, Salmonella choleraesuis was isolated and detected from standard bacterial mixtures and spiked samples of river water, human urine, and chicken blood. Copyright ?? 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Combining Capillary Electrophoresis Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry and Stable Isotopic Labeling Techniques for Comparative Crustacean Peptidomics

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Junhua; Zhang, Yuzhuo; Xiang, Feng; Zhang, Zichuan; Li, Lingjun

    2010-01-01

    Herein we describe a sensitive and straightforward off-line capillary electrophoresis (CE) matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) interface in conjunction with stable isotopic labeling (SIL) technique for comparative neuropeptidomic analysis in crustacean model organisms. Two SIL schemes, including a binary H/D formaldehyde labeling technique and novel, laboratory-developed multiplexed dimethylated leucine-based isobaric tagging reagents, have been evaluated in these proof-of-concept experiments. We employ these isotopic labeling techniques in conjunction with CE-MALDI MS for quantitative peptidomic analyses of the pericardial organs isolated from two crustacean species, the European green crab Carcinus maenas and the blue crab Callinectes sapidus. Isotopically labeled peptide pairs are found to co-migrate in CE fractions and quantitative changes in relative abundances of peptide pairs are obtained by comparing peak intensities of respective peptide pairs. Several neuropeptide families exhibit changes in response to salinity stress, suggesting potential physiological functions of these signaling peptides. PMID:20334868

  3. Determination of polyethylene glycol end group functionalities by combination of selective reactions and characterization by matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Boyu; Zhang, Hong; Myers, Brittany K; Elupula, Ravinder; Jayawickramarajah, Janarthanan; Grayson, Scott M

    2014-03-13

    End groups play a critical role in macromolecular coupling reactions for building complex polymer architectures, yet their identity and purity can be difficult to ascertain using traditional analytical technique. Recent advances in mass spectrometry techniques have made matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-fight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry a rapid and powerful tool for providing detailed information about the identity and purity of homopolymer end groups. In this work, MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry was used to study end groups of linear polyethylene glycols. In particular, the identifications of alcohol, amine and thiol end groups are investigated because these nucleophilic moieties are among the most common within biological and synthetic macromolecules. Through comparative characterization of alcohol, amine, and thiol end groups, the exact identification of these end groups could be confirmed by selective and quantitative modification. The precision of this technique enables the unambiguous differentiation of primary amino groups relative to hydroxyl groups, which differ by only 1 mass unit. In addition, the quantitative conversion of various polyethylene glycol end groups using highly efficient coupling reactions such as the thiol-ene and azide-alkyne click reactions can be confirmed using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry.

  4. Analysis of complex phthalic acid based polyesters by the combination of size exclusion chromatography and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pretorius, Nadine O; Rode, Karsten; Simpson, Jaylin M; Pasch, Harald

    2014-01-15

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) was used in conjunction with size exclusion chromatography (SEC) to investigate a model polyester system based on phthalic anhydride-1,2-propylene glycol. The polyesters were synthesized with a 30% molar excess of glycol, with kinetic samples being removed during different intervals of the polyesterification reaction. SEC was used to track the course of the reaction by determining the molecular weight and molecular weight distributions before subsequent off-line coupling with MALDI-TOF MS as a selective detection method to determine the chemical composition, identify the functionality type distributions as well as assist in assigning structural conformations. Mass spectrometry analysis proved to be a highly effective tool to facilitate the identification of the narrowly dispersed fractions obtained from the chromatographic separations as well as serve as a core method to investigate the heterogeneous nature of the bulk kinetic samples. Through the hyphenation of these sophisticated polymer characterization techniques, information on the molecular heterogeneity of the model polyesters, showing a complex variety of possible distributions, was obtained.

  5. Principle component analysis combined with matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry for rapid diagnosing the sera of patients with major depression.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tiao-Lai; Cho, Yi-Tzu; Su, Hong; Shiea, Jentaie

    2013-09-23

    Previously, we demonstrated that 6M HCl hydrolysis followed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry is a useful technique to detect potential protein biomarkers in the sera collected from major depression (MD) patients and from healthy controls. In this study, the effects of various organic acids in hydrolyzing proteins in serum were first examined. The organic matrixes commonly used in MALDI analysis were also examined for characterizing the hydrolyzed peptides. Finally, principle component analysis (PCA) was used to analyze the MALDI mass spectra of acid-hydrolyzed serum samples. It was found that 20% TFA and sinapinic acid were the optimal reagents for hydrolysis and MALDI matrix. Samples collected from MD patients and healthy controls were readily classified through PCA analysis. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve based on the ratio of the intensities of the two fragment ions (m/z 8606 and 9287) indicated by PCA plot was also constructed. The area under the curve was 0.845; the sensitivity and specificity were both 80%. An analytical platform employing trifluoroacetic acid to hydrolyze serum proteins followed by MALDI-TOF/MS and PCA analysis was developed to rapidly differentiate the sera between MD patients and healthy controls. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Direct identification of bacteria causing urinary tract infections by combining matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry with UF-1000i urine flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, X-H; Zhang, G; Fan, Y-Y; Yang, X; Sui, W-J; Lu, X-X

    2013-03-01

    Rapid identification of bacterial pathogens from clinical specimens is essential to establish an adequate empirical antibiotic therapy to treat urinary tract infections (UTIs). We used matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) combined with UF-1000i urine flow cytometry of urine specimens to quickly and accurately identify bacteria causing UTIs. We divided each urine sample into three aliquots for conventional identification, UF-1000i, and MALDI-TOF MS, respectively. We compared the results of the conventional method with those of MALDI-TOF MS combined with UF-1000i, and discrepancies were resolved by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. We analyzed 1456 urine samples from patients with UTI symptoms, and 932 (64.0%) were negative using each of the three testing methods. The combined method used UF-1000i to eliminate negative specimens and then MALDI-TOF MS to identify the remaining positive samples. The combined method was consistent with the conventional method in 1373 of 1456 cases (94.3%), and gave the correct result in 1381 of 1456 cases (94.8%). Therefore, the combined method described here can directly provide a rapid, accurate, definitive bacterial identification for the vast majority of urine samples, though the MALDI-TOF MS software analysis capabilities should be improved, with regard to mixed bacterial infection. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Coding Acoustic Metasurfaces.

    PubMed

    Xie, Boyang; Tang, Kun; Cheng, Hua; Liu, Zhengyou; Chen, Shuqi; Tian, Jianguo

    2017-02-01

    Coding acoustic metasurfaces can combine simple logical bits to acquire sophisticated functions in wave control. The acoustic logical bits can achieve a phase difference of exactly π and a perfect match of the amplitudes for the transmitted waves. By programming the coding sequences, acoustic metasurfaces with various functions, including creating peculiar antenna patterns and waves focusing, have been demonstrated.

  8. Laser-induced desorption of organic molecules from front- and back-irradiated metal foils

    SciTech Connect

    Zinovev, Alexander V.; Veryovkin, Igor V.; Pellin, Michael J.

    2009-03-17

    Laser-Induced Acoustic Desorption (LIAD) from thin metal foils is a promising technique for gentle and efficient volatilization of intact organic molecules from surfaces of solid substrates. Using the Single Photon Ionization (SPI) method combined with time-of-flight mass-spectrometry (TOF MS), desorbed flux in LIAD was examined and compared to that from direct laser desorption (LD). Molecules of various organic dyes were used in experiments. Translational velocities of the desorbed intact molecules did not depend on the desorbing laser intensity, which implies the presence of more sophisticated mechanism of energy transfer than the direct mechanical or thermal coupling between the laser pulse and the adsorbed molecules. The results of our experiments indicate that the LIAD phenomenon cannot be described in terms of a simple mechanical shake-off nor the direct laser desorption. Rather, they suggest that multi-step energy transfer processes are involved. Possible qualitative mechanism of LIAD that are based on formation of non-equilibrium energy states in the adsorbate-substrate system are proposed and discussed.

  9. Laser-induced desorption of organic molecules from front- and back-irradiated metal foils.

    SciTech Connect

    Zinovev, A. V.; Veryovkin, I. V.; Pellin, M. J.; Materials Science Division

    2009-01-01

    Laser-Induced Acoustic Desorption (LIAD) from thin metal foils is a promising technique for gentle and efficient volatilization of intact organic molecules from surfaces of solid substrates. Using the Single Photon Ionization (SPI) method combined with time-of-flight mass-spectrometry (TOF MS), desorbed flux in LIAD was examined and compared to that from direct laser desorption (LD). Molecules of various organic dyes were used in experiments. Translational velocities of the desorbed intact molecules did not depend on the desorbing laser intensity, which implies the presence of more sophisticated mechanism of energy transfer than the direct mechanical or thermal coupling between the laser pulse and the adsorbed molecules. The results of our experiments indicate that the LIAD phenomenon cannot be described in terms of a simple mechanical shake-off nor the direct laser desorption. Rather, they suggest that multi-step energy transfer processes are involved. Possible qualitative mechanism of LIAD that are based on formation of non-equilibrium energy states in the adsorbate-substrate system are proposed and discussed.

  10. Acoustic neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    Vestibular schwannoma; Tumor - acoustic; Cerebellopontine angle tumor; Angle tumor; Hearing loss - acoustic; Tinnitus - acoustic ... Acoustic neuromas have been linked with the genetic disorder neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2). Acoustic neuromas are uncommon.

  11. Pulse echo and combined resonance techniques: a full set of LGT acoustic wave constants and temperature coefficients.

    PubMed

    Sturtevant, Blake T; Davulis, Peter M; da Cunha, Mauricio Pereira

    2009-04-01

    This work reports on the determination of langatate elastic and piezoelectric constants and their associated temperature coefficients employing 2 independent methods, the pulse echo overlap (PEO) and a combined resonance technique (CRT) to measure bulk acoustic wave (BAW) phase velocities. Details on the measurement techniques are provided and discussed, including the analysis of the couplant material in the PEO technique used to couple signal to the sample, which showed to be an order of magnitude more relevant than the experimental errors involved in the data extraction. At room temperature, elastic and piezoelectric constants were extracted by the PEO and the CRT methods and showed results consistent to within a few percent for the elastic constants. Both raw acquired data and optimized constants, based on minimization routines applied to all the modes involved in the measurements, are provided and discussed. Comparison between the elastic constants and their temperature behavior with the literature reveals the recent efforts toward the consistent growth and characterization of LGT, in spite of significant variations (between 1 and 30%) among the constants extracted by different groups at room temperature. The density, dielectric permittivity constants, and respective temperature coefficients used in this work have also been independently determined based on samples from the same crystal boule. The temperature behavior of the BAW modes was extracted using the CRT technique, which has the advantage of not relying on temperature dependent acoustic couplants. Finally, the extracted temperature coefficients for the elastic and piezoelectric constants between room temperature and 120 degrees C are reported and discussed in this work.

  12. geoPebble: Combined Seismic, Acoustic, and GPS Sensor with Wireless Communications for Glaciological Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anandakrishnan, S.; Burkett, P. G.; Long, B.

    2009-12-01

    Glaciologist and geophysicists study many dynamic processes in glaciated environments such as sliding, crevasse formation, and water flow. These processes generate signals that can be interpreted for fundamental parameters needed for numerical models of glacier and ice sheet flow. These signals include microearthquakes beneath glaciers and ice streams during stick-slip processes; seismically identifiable harmonic tremors associated with subglacial water flow; supraglacial lake drainage which can produce rapid uplift of the 1 m/hr. In addition, researchers use active seismic experiments to determine bed properties such as roughness and lubrication. Currently, each process requires different instrumentation and/or different field equipment to collect the data such as a GPS receiver for displacement, a passive seismic instrument for microearthquakes, and a multichannel seismic recorder for active seismic experiments. We report on the development of an instrument specifically designed for observing dynamic glaciated environments in a single platform, reducing the need for multiple field systems and reducing the cost considerably. The geoPebble wireless seismic acquisition system, designed and built at the Pennsylvania State University, comprises 4 channels of 24-bit seismic and acoustic digitizing, an L1 GPS engine, onboard data storage and an 802.15 ZigBee radio. Three of the four ADC channels are intended to be used with a 3 component seismic sensor. The fourth channel is a dedicated to an audio frequency microphone. The 1 Hz L1 GPS system is capable of horizontal position accuracy to better than 10 cm when post-processed against L1/L2 stations within 10 km. Onboard storage is achieved with a Secure Digital card where volumes now exceed 32 GB. The ZigBee radio is capable of forming a mesh network which reduces transmit and receive power requirements while maintaing communication throughout the array and provides state-of-health information as well as sufficient data

  13. Non-contact test set-up for aeroelasticity in a rotating turbomachine combining a novel acoustic excitation system with tip-timing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freund, O.; Montgomery, M.; Mittelbach, M.; Seume, J. R.

    2014-03-01

    Due to trends in aero-design, aeroelasticity becomes increasingly important in modern turbomachines. Design requirements of turbomachines lead to the development of high aspect ratio blades and blade integral disc designs (blisks), which are especially prone to complex modes of vibration. Therefore, experimental investigations yielding high quality data are required for improving the understanding of aeroelastic effects in turbomachines. One possibility to achieve high quality data is to excite and measure blade vibrations in turbomachines. The major requirement for blade excitation and blade vibration measurements is to minimize interference with the aeroelastic effects to be investigated. Thus in this paper, a non-contact—and thus low interference—experimental set-up for exciting and measuring blade vibrations is proposed and shown to work. A novel acoustic system excites rotor blade vibrations, which are measured with an optical tip-timing system. By performing measurements in an axial compressor, the potential of the acoustic excitation method for investigating aeroelastic effects is explored. The basic principle of this method is described and proven through the analysis of blade responses at different acoustic excitation frequencies and at different rotational speeds. To verify the accuracy of the tip-timing system, amplitudes measured by tip-timing are compared with strain gage measurements. They are found to agree well. Two approaches to vary the nodal diameter (ND) of the excited vibration mode by controlling the acoustic excitation are presented. By combining the different excitable acoustic modes with a phase-lag control, each ND of the investigated 30 blade rotor can be excited individually. This feature of the present acoustic excitation system is of great benefit to aeroelastic investigations and represents one of the main advantages over other excitation methods proposed in the past. In future studies, the acoustic excitation method will be used

  14. Gravimetric and density profiling using the combination of surface acoustic waves and neutron reflectivity.

    PubMed

    Toolan, Daniel T W; Barker, Robert; Gough, Tim; Topham, Paul D; Howse, Jonathan R; Glidle, Andrew

    2017-02-01

    A new approach is described herein, where neutron reflectivity measurements that probe changes in the density profile of thin films as they absorb material from the gas phase have been combined with a Love wave based gravimetric assay that measures the mass of absorbed material. This combination of techniques not only determines the spatial distribution of absorbed molecules, but also reveals the amount of void space within the thin film (a quantity that can be difficult to assess using neutron reflectivity measurements alone). The uptake of organic solvent vapours into spun cast films of polystyrene has been used as a model system with a view to this method having the potential for extension to the study of other systems. These could include, for example, humidity sensors, hydrogel swelling, biomolecule adsorption or transformations of electroactive and chemically reactive thin films. This is the first ever demonstration of combined neutron reflectivity and Love wave-based gravimetry and the experimental caveats, limitations and scope of the method are explored and discussed in detail.

  15. Combined acoustic-photoacoustic and fluorescence imaging catheter for the detection of the atherosclerotic plaque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abran, Maxime; Matteau-Pelletier, Carl; Zerouali-Boukhal, Karim; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Lesage, Frédéric

    2011-03-01

    In industrialized countries, cardiovascular diseases remain the main cause of mortality. The detection of atherosclerosis and its associated plaque using imaging techniques allows studying the efficacy of new drugs in vivo. Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) imaging has been demonstrated to be a powerful tool to uncover structural information of atherosclerotic plaques. Recently, intravascular photoacoustic (IVPA) has been combined with IVUS imaging to add functional and/or molecular information. The IVPA/IVUS combination has been demonstrated in phantoms and ex vivo tissues to provide relevant information about the composition of the plaque, as well as its vulnerability. In this work, we extend previous work by developing a combined IVPA/IVUS system using a rotating ultrasound transducer in a catheter to which an optical fiber is attached. In addition, a third modality was included through fluorescence detection in the same fiber at a distinct wavelength from PA, opening the door to complementary information using fluorescence activatable probes. Cylindrical silicon phantoms with inclusions containing fluorophores or ink were used to validate the system. Bleaching of the fluorophore by the pulsed laser used for photoacoustic was quantified. IVUS images were obtained continuously and used to co-register photoacoustic and fluorescence signals.

  16. Imipenem-avibactam: a novel combination for the rapid detection of carbapenemase activity in Enterobacteriaceae and Acinetobacter baumannii by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Oviaño, Marina; Bou, Germán

    2017-02-01

    In the present study, we propose a novel matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS)-based method for detecting carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae and Acinetobacter baumannii. For this, we analyzed a series of 131 isolates. Among them, a total of 115 Enterobacteriaceae: 79 of them carrying a carbapenemase enzyme (15blaKPC, 7blaNDM, 11blaIMP, 12blaVIM, and 34blaOXA-48) and 16 A. baumannii isolates: 15 of them carrying carbapenemases (10blaOXA-23, 2blaOXA-58, 2blaOXA-24, and 1blaOXA-237). The rest of the isolates were noncarbapenemase producers and used as negative controls. The isolates were submitted to susceptibility testing using a combination of imipenem-avibactam and analysis by the MALDI-TOF Biotyper Compass software (Bruker Daltonik, Germany). The assay showed an overall sensitivity and specificity for carbapenemase detection of 98% and 100%, respectively. The combination of imipenem and avibactam displayed activity against KPC and OXA-48-producing Enterobacteriaceae and thus represents a new strategy for identifying and confirming these carbapenemases. However, the combination did not provide any benefit over A. baumannii.

  17. Mass Spectrometry of Acoustically Levitated Droplets

    PubMed Central

    Westphall, Michael S.; Jorabchi, Kaveh; Smith, Lloyd M.

    2008-01-01

    Containerless sample handling techniques such as acoustic levitation offer potential advantages for mass spectrometry, by eliminating surfaces where undesired adsorption/desorption processes can occur. In addition, they provide a unique opportunity to study fundamental aspects of the ionization process as well as phenomena occurring at the air–droplet interface. Realizing these advantages is contingent, however, upon being able to effectively interface levitated droplets with a mass spectrometer, a challenging task that is addressed in this report. We have employed a newly developed charge and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (CALDI) technique to obtain mass spectra from a 5-μL acoustically levitated droplet containing peptides and an ionic matrix. A four-ring electrostatic lens is used in conjunction with a corona needle to produce bursts of corona ions and to direct those ions toward the droplet, resulting in droplet charging. Analyte ions are produced from the droplet by a 337-nm laser pulse and detected by an atmospheric sampling mass spectrometer. The ion generation and extraction cycle is repeated at 20 Hz, the maximum operating frequency of the laser employed. It is shown in delayed ion extraction experiments that both positive and negative ions are produced, behavior similar to that observed for atmospheric pressure matrix-assisted laser absorption/ionization. No ion signal is observed in the absence of droplet charging. It is likely, although not yet proven, that the role of the droplet charging is to increase the strength of the electric field at the surface of the droplet, reducing chargere combination after ion desorption. PMID:18582090

  18. Rapid determination of floral aroma compounds of lilac blossom by fast gas chromatography combined with surface acoustic wave sensor.

    PubMed

    Oh, Se Yeon; Shin, Hyun Du; Kim, Sung Jean; Hong, Jongki

    2008-03-07

    A novel analytical method using fast gas chromatography combined with surface acoustic wave sensor (GC/SAW) has been developed for the detection of volatile aroma compounds emanated from lilac blossom (Syringa species: Syringa vulgaris variginata and Syringa dilatata). GC/SAW could detect and quantify various fragrance emitted from lilac blossom, enabling to provide fragrance pattern analysis results. The fragrance pattern analysis could easily characterize the delicate differences in aromas caused by the substantial difference of chemical composition according to different color and shape of petals. Moreover, the method validation of GC/SAW was performed for the purpose of volatile floral actual aroma analysis, achieving a high reproducibility and excellent sensitivity. From the validation results, GC/SAW could serve as an alternative analytical technique for the analysis of volatile floral actual aroma of lilac. In addition, headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) GC-MS was employed to further confirm the identification of fragrances emitted from lilac blossom and compared to GC/SAW.

  19. Effect of Digital Frequency Compression (DFC) on Speech Recognition in Candidates for Combined Electric and Acoustic Stimulation (EAS)

    PubMed Central

    Gifford, René H.; Dorman, Michael F.; Spahr, Anthony J.; McKarns, Sharon A.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To compare the effects of conventional amplification (CA) and digital frequency compression (DFC) amplification on the speech recognition abilities of candidates for a partial-insertion cochlear implant, that is, candidates for combined electric and acoustic stimulation (EAS). Method The participants were 6 patients whose audiometric thresholds at 500 Hz and below were ≤60 dB HL and whose thresholds at 2000 Hz and above were ≥80 dB HL. Six tests of speech understanding were administered with CA and DFC. The Abbreviated Profile of Hearing Aid Benefit (APHAB) was also administered following use of CA and DFC. Results Group mean scores were not statistically different in the CA and DFC conditions. However, 2 patients received substantial benefit in DFC conditions. APHAB scores suggested increased ease of communication, but also increased aversive sound quality. Conclusion Results suggest that a relatively small proportion of individuals who meet EAS candidacy will receive substantial benefit from a DFC hearing aid and that a larger proportion will receive at least a small benefit when speech is presented against a background of noise. This benefit, however, comes at a cost—aversive sound quality. PMID:17905905

  20. Patch nearfield acoustic holography combined with sound field separation technique applied to a non-free field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, ChuanXing; Jing, WenQian; Zhang, YongBin; Xu, Liang

    2015-02-01

    The conventional nearfield acoustic holography (NAH) is usually based on the assumption of free-field conditions, and it also requires that the measurement aperture should be larger than the actual source. This paper is to focus on the problem that neither of the above-mentioned requirements can be met, and to examine the feasibility of reconstructing the sound field radiated by partial source, based on double-layer pressure measurements made in a non-free field by using patch NAH combined with sound field separation technique. And also, the sensitivity of the reconstructed result to the measurement error is analyzed in detail. Two experiments involving two speakers in an exterior space and one speaker inside a car cabin are presented. The experimental results demonstrate that the patch NAH based on single-layer pressure measurement cannot obtain a satisfied result due to the influences of disturbing sources and reflections, while the patch NAH based on double-layer pressure measurements can successfully remove these influences and reconstruct the patch sound field effectively.

  1. Combination of acoustic radiation force impulse imaging, serological indexes and contrast-enhanced ultrasound for diagnosis of liver lesions.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiao-Lan; Yao, Hui; Men, Qiong; Hou, Ke-Zhu; Chen, Zhen; Xu, Chang-Qing; Liang, Li-Wei

    2017-08-14

    To assess the value of combined acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging, serological indexes and contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) in distinguishing between benign and malignant liver lesions. Patients with liver lesions treated at our hospital were included in this study. The lesions were divided into either a malignant tumor group or a benign tumor group according to pathological or radiological findings. ARFI quantitative detection, serological testing and CEUS quantitative detection were performed and compared. A comparative analysis of the measured indexes was performed between these groups. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were constructed to compare the diagnostic accuracy of ARFI imaging, serological indexes and CEUS, alone or in different combinations, in identifying benign and malignant liver lesions. A total of 112 liver lesions in 43 patients were included, of which 78 were malignant and 34 were benign. Shear wave velocity (SWV) value, serum alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) content and enhancement rate were significantly higher in the malignant tumor group than in the benign tumor group (2.39 ± 1.20 m/s vs 1.50 ± 0.49 m/s, 18.02 ± 5.01 ng/mL vs 15.96 ± 4.33 ng/mL, 2.14 ± 0.21 dB/s vs 2.01 ± 0.31 dB/s; P < 0.05). The ROC curve analysis revealed that the areas under the curves (AUCs) of SWV value alone, AFP content alone, enhancement rate alone, SWV value + AFP content, SWV value + enhancement rate, AFP content + enhancement rate and SWV value + AFP content + enhancement rate were 85.1%, 72.1%, 74.5%, 88.3%, 90.4%, 82.0% and 92.3%, respectively. The AUC of SWV value + AFP content + enhancement rate was higher than those of SWV value + AFP content and SWV value + enhancement rate, and significantly higher than those of any single parameter or the combination of any two of parameters. The combination of SWV, AFP and enhancement rate had better diagnostic performance in distinguishing between benign and malignant liver lesions than the

  2. Beryllium Desorption from Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boschi, V.; Willenbring, J. K.

    2015-12-01

    Beryllium isotopes have provided a useful tool in the field of geochronology and geomorphology over the last 25 years. The amount of cosmogenic meteoric 10Be and native 9Be absorbed to soils often scales with the residence time and chemical weathering of sediments in a landscape, respectively. Thus, the concentrations in river sediment may be used to quantify the denudation of specific watersheds. When deposited in ocean sediment, these concentrations are thought to record the history of denudation on Earth over the last ~10 Ma. The use of both isotopes often relies on the premise of beryllium retention to sediment surfaces in order to preserve a landscape's erosion and weathering signature. Changes in setting, en route from the soil to fluvial system to the ocean, can cause beryllium desorption and may preclude some applications of the 10Be/9Be system. Four mechanisms were tested to determine the desorption potential of beryllium including a reduction in pH, an increase in ionic strength and complexation with soluble organic and inorganic species. These processes have the potential to mobilize beryllium into solution. For example, by both reducing the pH and increasing the ionic strength, competition for adsorption sites increases, potentially liberating beryllium from the sediment surface. In addition, organic and inorganic ligands can complex beryllium causing it to become mobilized. To determine which of these alterations influence beryllium desorption and to quantify the effect, we prepared separate solutions of beryllium bound to minerals and organic compounds and measured beryllium concentrations in solution before and after adjusting the pH, ionic strength, and changing inorganic and organic ligand concentrations. We conclude from our observations that overall, beryllium sorbed to organic compounds was more resistant to desorption relative to mineral-associated beryllium. Among the methods tested, a reduction in pH resulted in the greatest amount of

  3. Effective finite-difference modelling methods with 2-D acoustic wave equation using a combination of cross and rhombus stencils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Enjiang; Liu, Yang; Sen, Mrinal K.

    2016-09-01

    The 2-D acoustic wave equation is commonly solved numerically by finite-difference (FD) methods in which the accuracy of solution is significantly affected by the FD stencils. The commonly used cross stencil can reach either only second-order accuracy for space domain dispersion-relation-based FD method or (2M)th-order accuracy along eight specific propagation directions for time-space domain dispersion-relation-based FD method, if the conventional (2M)th-order spatial FD and second-order temporal FD are used to discretize the equation. One other newly developed rhombus stencil can reach arbitrary even-order accuracy. However, this stencil adds significantly to computational cost when the operator length is large. To achieve a balance between the solution accuracy and efficiency, we develop a new FD stencil to solve the 2-D acoustic wave equation. This stencil is a combination of the cross stencil and rhombus stencil. A cross stencil with an operator length parameter M is used to approximate the spatial partial derivatives while a rhombus stencil with an operator length parameter N together with the conventional second-order temporal FD is employed in approximating the temporal partial derivatives. Using this stencil, a new FD scheme is developed; we demonstrate that this scheme can reach (2M)th-order accuracy in space and (2N)th-order accuracy in time when spatial FD coefficients and temporal FD coefficients are derived from respective dispersion relation using Taylor-series expansion (TE) method. To further increase the accuracy, we derive the FD coefficients by employing the time-space domain dispersion relation of this FD scheme using TE. We also use least-squares (LS) optimization method to reduce dispersion at high wavenumbers. Dispersion analysis, stability analysis and modelling examples demonstrate that our new scheme has greater accuracy and better stability than conventional FD schemes, and thus can adopt large time steps. To reduce the extra

  4. Combined photoacoustic and acoustic imaging of human breast specimens in the mammographic geometry.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zhixing; Hooi, Fong Ming; Fowlkes, J Brian; Pinsky, Renee W; Wang, Xueding; Carson, Paul L

    2013-11-01

    A photoacoustic volume imaging (PAVI) system was designed to study breast cancer detection and diagnosis in the mammographic geometry in combination with automated 3-D ultrasound (AUS). The goal of the work described here was to validate the design and evaluate its performance in human breast tissues for non-invasive imaging of deeply positioned structures covering such geometry. The good penetration of near-infrared light and high receiving sensitivity of a broad-bandwidth, 572-element, 2-D polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) array at a low center frequency of 1 MHz were used with 20 channel simultaneous acquisition. Pseudo-lesions filled with dilute blood were imaged in three human breast specimens at various depths up to 49 mm. With near-infrared light illumination and 256-sample averaging, the extrapolated maximum depth in imaging a 2.4-mm blood-rich lesion with a 3-dB contrast-to-noise ratio in a compressed breast was 54 mm. Three-dimensional photoacoustic volume image stacks of the breasts were co-registered with 3-D ultrasound image stacks, suggesting for the first time that PAVI, based on the intrinsic tissue contrast, can visualize tissue interfaces other than those with blood, including the inner skin surface and connective tissue sheets. With the designed system, PAVI revealed satisfactory imaging depth and sensitivity for coverage of the entire breast when imaged from both sides in the mammographic geometry with mild compression.

  5. Water desorption from nanostructured graphite surfaces.

    PubMed

    Clemens, Anna; Hellberg, Lars; Grönbeck, Henrik; Chakarov, Dinko

    2013-12-21

    Water interaction with nanostructured graphite surfaces is strongly dependent on the surface morphology. In this work, temperature programmed desorption (TPD) in combination with quadrupole mass spectrometry (QMS) has been used to study water ice desorption from a nanostructured graphite surface. This model surface was fabricated by hole-mask colloidal lithography (HCL) along with oxygen plasma etching and consists of a rough carbon surface covered by well defined structures of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). The results are compared with those from pristine HOPG and a rough (oxygen plasma etched) carbon surface without graphite nanostructures. The samples were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The TPD experiments were conducted for H2O coverages obtained after exposures between 0.2 and 55 langmuir (L) and reveal a complex desorption behaviour. The spectra from the nanostructured surface show additional, coverage dependent desorption peaks. They are assigned to water bound in two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) hydrogen-bonded networks, defect-bound water, and to water intercalated into the graphite structures. The intercalation is more pronounced for the nanostructured graphite surface in comparison to HOPG surfaces because of a higher concentration of intersheet openings. From the TPD spectra, the desorption energies for water bound in 2D and 3D (multilayer) networks were determined to be 0.32 ± 0.06 and 0.41 ± 0.03 eV per molecule, respectively. An upper limit for the desorption energy for defect-bound water was estimated to be 1 eV per molecule.

  6. DIASCoPE: Directly integrated acoustic system combined with pressure experiments—A new method for fast acoustic velocity measurements at high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitaker, Matthew L.; Baldwin, Kenneth J.; Huebsch, William R.

    2017-03-01

    A new experimental system to measure elastic wave velocities in samples in situ under extreme conditions of pressure and temperature in a multi-anvil apparatus has been installed at Beamline 6-BM-B of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory. This system allows for measurement of acoustic velocities via ultrasonic interferometry, and makes use of the synchrotron beam to measure sample densities via X-ray diffraction and sample lengths using X-radiographic imaging. This system is fully integrated into the automated software controls of the beamline and is capable of collecting robust data on elastic wave travel times in less than 1 s, which is an improvement of more than one to two orders of magnitude over existing systems. Moreover, this fast data collection time has been shown to have no effect on the obtained travel time results. This allows for more careful study of time-dependent phenomena with tighter snapshots in time of processes that would otherwise be lost or averaged out in other acoustic measurement systems.

  7. Combination of spatial diversity and parallel decision feedback equalizer in a Single Input Multiple Output underwater acoustic communication system operating at very high frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skoro Kaskarovska, Violeta; Beaujean, Pierre-Philippe

    2013-05-01

    Single Input Multiple Output (SIMO) acoustic communication system using an adaptive spatial diversity combined with parallel Decision Feedback Equalizer (DFE) is presented in this document. The SIMO system operates at high frequencies with high data rate over a limited range (less than 200 m) in very shallow waters. The SIMO system consists of a single source transmitting Phase Shift Keying (PSK) messages modulated at 300 kHz and received by multiple receivers. In a first configuration, the symbols collected at each receiver are equalized using a decision feedback equalizer and combined using Maximum Ratio Combining (MRC). In a second configuration, the MRC outputs are used as decision symbols in the DFE. This second configuration is a form of turbo equalization: the process can be repeated over and over, leading to a better estimate of the received message as the number of iterations increases. The adaptive process of diversity is repeated until the best possible result is achieved or a predefined error criterion is met. Bit Error Rate (BER) and Signal-to-Noise-and-Interference Ratio (SNIR) are used as performance metrics of the acoustic channel. Experimental results using SIMO system with three, four or five receivers and pre-processed real recorded data demonstrate ability to improve the performance of the acoustic channel in challenging environments. Using received messages with non-zero BER, adaptive spatial diversity can achieve BER of 0% and increased SNIR of 3 dB with number of iterations depending on the number of receivers used.

  8. Evaluation of the solid-phase extraction (SPE) cartridge method in combination with thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TD-GC-MS) for the analysis of different VOCs in liquid matrices in varying pH conditions.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Sudhir Kumar; Kim, Ki-Hyun

    2012-08-01

    In this study, the solid-phase extraction (SPE) method combined with thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TD-GC-MS) method is evaluated for the analysis of liquid-phase volatile organic compounds (LVOCs). Calibration experiments were performed on a number of polar and nonpolar LVOCs (including aromatic compounds, ester, ketones, and alcohol) as a function of solution pH. If the relative sensitivity of the SPE-TD-GC-MS method is compared between different VOCs across a wide range of pH (1, 4, 7, 10, and 13), optimum sensitivities for most VOCs are derived at the neutral pH. However, there were some exceptions to the general trend with the maximum sensitivity occurring either at a moderately basic pH (methyl isobutyl ketone and butyl acetate) or extremely acidic conditions (isobutyl alcohol). It was also noticed that the relative ordering of sensitivity was changed, as the pH conditions of the solution vary. The use of internal standard (IS: chlorobenzene) resulted in a notable improvement in both relative sensitivity and reproducibility for most compounds. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Size exclusion chromatography with multi detection in combination with matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry as a tool for unraveling the mechanism of the enzymatic polymerization of polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Ciric, Jelena; Oostland, Jorrit; de Vries, Jan Willem; Woortman, Albert J J; Loos, Katja

    2012-12-04

    Determination of the size distributions of natural polysaccharides is a challenging task. More advantageous for characterization are well-defined synthetic (hyper)-branched polymers. In this study we concentrated on synthetic amylopectin analogues in order to obtain and compare all available data for different distributions and size dependence of molecular weights. Two groups of well-defined synthetic branched polysaccharides were synthesized via an in vitro enzyme-catalyzed reaction using the enzyme phosphorylase b from rabbit muscle and Deinococcus geothermalis glycogen branching enzyme. Synthetic polymers had a tunable degree of branching (2%-13% determined via (1)H NMR) and a tunable degree of polymerization (30-350 determined indirectly via UV spectrometry). The systems used for separation and characterization of branched polysaccharides were SEC-DMSO/LiBr and multi detection (refractive index detector, viscosity detector, and multi angle light scattering detector) and SEC-water/0.02% NaN(3); and SEC-50 mM NaNO(3)/0.02% NaN(3) and multi detection. Additionally the side chain length distribution of enzymatically debranched polysaccharides was investigated by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) analysis. With this combination of characterization techniques, we were able not only to characterize the amylopectin analogues but also to solve parts of the molecular mechanism of their enzymatic polymerization. Moreover our materials showed potential to be standards in the field of natural polysaccharides characterization.

  10. Quantitative method for analysis of monensin in soil, water, and urine by direct combination of single-drop microextraction with atmospheric pressure matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sekar, Ramaiyan; Wu, Hui-Fen

    2006-09-15

    A simple and selective analytical method for the quantitative determination of low concentrations of monensin in soil, surface water, and human urine has been developed. Prior to atmospheric pressure matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (AP-MALDI-MS) analysis, the samples were preconcentrated by using the single-drop microextraction (SDME) technique. Several factors that affect the analyte's extraction, including selection of solvent, microdrop volume, extraction time, and ionic strength, were investigated. Chloroform-toluene (1:1, v/v) was selected as the extraction solvent. Reliable results were obtained using dibenzo-30-crown-10-ether as an internal standard. The proposed method has been successfully applied for the determination of monensin in soil, surface water, and human urine spiked samples. Under the optimized conditions, the limits of quantification of the analyte in surface water, soil, and human urine were 6.7, 12.4 and 7.8 ng/mL, respectively. The intraday and interday precision variation and accuracy of the present method is within the acceptable ranges. The present method avoids the pre- and postderivatization of weak UV absorbing monensin determination using high performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet detection (HPLC-UV). Furthermore, these techniques are time-consuming, nonreproducible at trace levels, and form undesirable products. The proposed SDME combined with AP-MALDI-MS is simple, fast, and selective for the determination of monensin in environmental and urine samples.

  11. Improved fatty acid detection in micro-algae and aquatic meiofauna species using a direct thermal desorption interface combined with comprehensive gas chromatography-time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Akoto, Lawrence; Stellaard, Frans; Irth, Hubertus; Vreuls, René J J; Pel, Roel

    2008-04-04

    Comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC x GC) with time-of-flight mass spectrometry detection is used to profile the fatty acid composition of whole/intact aquatic microorganisms such as the common fresh water green algae Scenedesmus acutus and the filamentous cyanobacterium Limnothrix sp. strain MRI without any sample preparation steps. It is shown that the technique can be useful in the identification of lipid markers in food-web as well as environmental studies. For instance, new mono- and diunsaturated fatty acids were found in the C(16) and C(18) regions of the green algae S. acutus and the filamentous cyanobacterium Limnothrix sp. strain MRI samples. These fatty acids have not, to our knowledge, been detected in the conventional one-dimensional (1D) GC analysis of these species due to either co-elution and/or their presence in low amounts in the sample matrix. In GC x GC, all congeners of the fatty acids in these microorganisms could be detected and identified due to the increased analyte detectability and ordered structures in the two-dimensional separation space. The combination of direct thermal desorption (DTD)-GC x GC-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ToF-MS) promises to be an excellent tool for a more accurate profiling of biological samples and can therefore be very useful in lipid biomarker research as well as food-web and ecological studies.

  12. Determination of molecular mass distribution of silicone oils by supercritical fluid chromatography, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry and their off-line combination.

    PubMed

    Chmelík, J; Planeta, J; Rehulka, P; Chmelík, J

    2001-07-01

    Silicone oil samples were characterized by supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC), matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI--TOF MS), and their off-line combination. SFC was used to separate samples of silicone oils on micropacked capillary columns. The fractions for the identification studies were obtained from SFC runs at defined time intervals, when the restrictor was pulled out from the chromatographic flame ionization detector (FID) and inserted into a glass vial with acetone. MALDI--TOF MS was used for the identification of individual oligomers in the fractions separated. The molecular mass distributions determined based on SFC and MALDI--TOF MS measurements were compared. From this comparison, it follows that the results are in good agreement. However, certain differences were observed: MALDI--TOF MS was capable of detecting somewhat larger oligomers than the SFC-FID, but the lower molecular mass oligomers were not present in the MALDI spectra. Differences in the region of lower molecular masses can be explained by evaporation of the more volatile low molecular mass oligomers resulting from heating of the sample during the MALDI--TOF MS measurements as a result of the absorption of the laser shot energy. The fact that no high mass discrimination effects of the MALDI--TOF MS measurements, compared with SFC, were observed is very promising for further applications of MALDI--TOF MS in characterizing synthetic polymers of moderate polydispersity.

  13. Surface changes on AlH3 during the hydrogen desorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Shunsuke; Bielmann, Michael; Ikeda, Kazutaka; Orimo, Shin-ichi; Borgschulte, Andreas; Züttel, Andreas

    2010-02-01

    Surface change of α-AlH3 during the hydrogen desorption was investigated by means of in situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy combined with thermal desorption spectroscopy. The surface of AlH3 covered by an oxide layer significantly changes upon hydrogen desorption and the hydrogen desorption rate increases remarkably. In this study, the role of the surface oxide layer on AlH3 in view of the hydrogen desorption kinetics was investigated. AlH3 only decomposes into Al and H2 at the free surface and not in the bulk. Therefore, a closed surface oxide layer prevents the thermodynamically unstable AlH3 from decomposition.

  14. Stability of Low-Frequency Residual Hearing in Patients Who Are Candidates for Combined Acoustic Plus Electric Hearing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yao, Wai Na; Turner, Christopher W.; Gantz, Bruce J.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the stability over time of low-frequency auditory thresholds to better determine if the new technique of using a short-electrode cochlear implant that preserves residual low-frequency acoustic hearing can be a long-term solution for those with severe-to-profound hearing loss at high frequencies. The…

  15. 247 Health-Related Quality of Life and Prognostic Value of Acoustic Rhinometry in Patients With Perennial Allergic Rhinitis Treated with Fix Combination of Montelukast Plus Desloratadine

    PubMed Central

    Cingi, Cemal; Oghan, Fatih; Eskiizmir, Gorkem; Yaz, Aytekin; Ural, Ahmet; Erdogmus, Nagehan

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine prognostic value of acoustic rhinometry in patients with perennial allergic rhinitis (PAR) treated with montelukast in fix combination with desloratidine and to assess effectiveness of this medication on health-related quality of life (HRQL). Study design A randomized, double-blind, prospective and multicentric clinical study. Setting Tertiary university hospitals. Methods Patients 20 years of age and older with PAR were assessed over 3 months of treatment with fix combination of montelukast 10 mg plus desloratidine 5 mg once daily (n = 40). Comparative acoustic rhinometric evaluation was used to compare nasal changes in before and after treatments. For evaluation of HRQL between before and after treatments at the first and third months, the Rhinoconjunctivitis Quality of Life Questionnaire (RQLQ) was used. Results Nasal symptoms and findings including itching, sneezing, discharge, congestion and edema and color change of turbinates have been decreased after treatment. In acoustic rhinometry, minimum cross-sectional area (MCA) measurements and volume results were statistically higher than in before treatment (P < 0.001). Correlation was found that between the volume results and nasal discharged and/or congestion in right nasal passages. In left nasal passages, statistical relation was described between the MCA measurements and itching and/or change of turbinate color (P < 0.05). There was a larger decrease in the overall RQLQ score for the group using montelukast plus desloratidine compared with the pre-treatment scores (P < 0.001). The difference between scores at baseline versus the end of the first and third months for all domains was statically significant (P < 0.001). The treatment difference in change from first month to the end of the third month was statically significant, in favor of the third month, for eye, nose, and non- nose/eye symptoms, sleep, practical problems, emotions and activities that have been limited by nose or eye

  16. Combined passive acoustic mapping and magnetic resonance thermometry for monitoring phase-shift nanoemulsion enhanced focused ultrasound therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crake, Calum; Meral, F. Can; Burgess, Mark T.; Papademetriou, Iason T.; McDannold, Nathan J.; Porter, Tyrone M.

    2017-08-01

    Focused ultrasound (FUS) has the potential to enable precise, image-guided noninvasive surgery for the treatment of cancer in which tumors are identified and destroyed in a single integrated procedure. However, success of the method in highly vascular organs has been limited due to heat losses to perfusion, requiring development of techniques to locally enhance energy absorption and heating. In addition, FUS procedures are conventionally monitored using MRI, which provides excellent anatomical images and can map temperature, but is not capable of capturing the full gamut of available data such as the acoustic emissions generated during this inherently acoustically-driven procedure. Here, we employed phase-shift nanoemulsions (PSNE) embedded in tissue phantoms to promote cavitation and hence temperature rise induced by FUS. In addition, we incorporated passive acoustic mapping (PAM) alongside simultaneous MR thermometry in order to visualize both acoustic emissions and temperature rise, within the bore of a full scale clinical MRI scanner. Focal cavitation of PSNE could be resolved using PAM and resulted in accelerated heating and increased the maximum elevated temperature measured via MR thermometry compared to experiments without nanoemulsions. Over time, the simultaneously acquired acoustic and temperature maps show translation of the focus of activity towards the FUS transducer, and the magnitude of the increase in cavitation and focal shift both increased with nanoemulsion concentration. PAM results were well correlated with MRI thermometry and demonstrated greater sensitivity, with the ability to detect cavitation before enhanced heating was observed. The results suggest that PSNE could be beneficial for enhancement of thermal focused ultrasound therapies and that PAM could be a critical tool for monitoring this process.

  17. Analysis of the differentially expressed low molecular weight peptides in human serum via an N-terminal isotope labeling technique combining nano-liquid chromatography/matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Leng, Jiapeng; Zhu, Dong; Wu, Duojiao; Zhu, Tongyu; Zhao, Ningwei; Guo, Yinlong

    2012-11-15

    Peptidomics analysis of human serum is challenging due to the low abundance of serum peptides and interference from the complex matrix. This study analyzed the differentially expressed (DE) low molecular weight peptides in human serum integrating a DMPITC-based N-terminal isotope labeling technique with nano-liquid chromatography and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (nano-LC/MALDI-MS). The workflow introduced a [d(6)]-4,6-dimethoxypyrimidine-2-isothiocyanate (DMPITC)-labeled mixture of aliquots from test samples as the internal standard. The spiked [d(0)]-DMPITC-labeled samples were separated by nano-LC then spotted on the MALDI target. Both quantitative and qualitative studies for serum peptides were achieved based on the isotope-labeled peaks. The DMPITC labeling technique combined with nano-LC/MALDI-MS not only minimized the errors in peptide quantitation, but also allowed convenient recognition of the labeled peptides due to the 6 Da mass difference. The data showed that the entire research procedure as well as the subsequent data analysis method were effective, reproducible, and sensitive for the analysis of DE serum peptides. This study successfully established a research model for DE serum peptides using DMPITC-based N-terminal isotope labeling and nano-LC/MALDI-MS. Application of the DMPITC-based N-terminal labeling technique is expected to provide a promising tool for the investigation of peptides in vivo, especially for the analysis of DE peptides under different biological conditions. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Combining two-dimensional diffusion-ordered nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, imaging desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, and direct analysis in real-time mass spectrometry for the integral investigation of counterfeit pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Nyadong, Leonard; Harris, Glenn A; Balayssac, Stéphane; Galhena, Asiri S; Malet-Martino, Myriam; Martino, Robert; Parry, R Mitchell; Wang, May Dongmei; Fernández, Facundo M; Gilard, Véronique

    2009-06-15

    During the past decade, there has been a marked increase in the number of reported cases involving counterfeit medicines in developing and developed countries. Particularly, artesunate-based antimalarial drugs have been targeted, because of their high demand and cost. Counterfeit antimalarials can cause death and can contribute to the growing problem of drug resistance, particularly in southeast Asia. In this study, the complementarity of two-dimensional diffusion-ordered (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (2D DOSY (1)H NMR) with direct analysis in real-time mass spectrometry (DART MS) and desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI MS) was assessed for pharmaceutical forensic purposes. Fourteen different artesunate tablets, representative of what can be purchased from informal sources in southeast Asia, were investigated with these techniques. The expected active pharmaceutical ingredient was detected in only five formulations via both nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and mass spectrometry (MS) methods. Common organic excipients such as sucrose, lactose, stearate, dextrin, and starch were also detected. The graphical representation of DOSY (1)H NMR results proved very useful for establishing similarities among groups of samples, enabling counterfeit drug "chemotyping". In addition to bulk- and surface-average analyses, spatially resolved information on the surface composition of counterfeit and genuine antimalarial formulations was obtained using DESI MS that was performed in the imaging mode, which enabled one to visualize the homogeneity of both genuine and counterfeit drug samples. Overall, this study suggests that 2D DOSY (1)H NMR, combined with ambient MS, comprises a powerful suite of instrumental analysis methodologies for the integral characterization of counterfeit antimalarials.

  19. A Combined One-Class SVM and Template-Matching Approach for User-Aided Human Fall Detection by Means of Floor Acoustic Features

    PubMed Central

    Ferretti, Daniele; Piazza, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    The primary cause of injury-related death for the elders is represented by falls. The scientific community devoted them particular attention, since injuries can be limited by an early detection of the event. The solution proposed in this paper is based on a combined One-Class SVM (OCSVM) and template-matching classifier that discriminate human falls from nonfalls in a semisupervised framework. Acoustic signals are captured by means of a Floor Acoustic Sensor; then Mel-Frequency Cepstral Coefficients and Gaussian Mean Supervectors (GMSs) are extracted for the fall/nonfall discrimination. Here we propose a single-sensor two-stage user-aided approach: in the first stage, the OCSVM detects abnormal acoustic events. In the second, the template-matching classifier produces the final decision exploiting a set of template GMSs related to the events marked as false positives by the user. The performance of the algorithm has been evaluated on a corpus containing human falls and nonfall sounds. Compared to the OCSVM only approach, the proposed algorithm improves the performance by 10.14% in clean conditions and 4.84% in noisy conditions. Compared to Popescu and Mahnot (2009) the performance improvement is 19.96% in clean conditions and 8.08% in noisy conditions. PMID:28638405

  20. A new strategy toward Internet of Things: structural health monitoring using a combined fiber optic and acoustic emission wireless sensor platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, A. D.; Page, C.; Wilson, C. L.

    2016-04-01

    This paper investigates a new low-power structural health monitoring (SHM) strategy where fiber Bragg grating (FBG) rosettes can be used to continuously monitor for changes in a host structure's principal strain direction, suggesting damage and thus enabling the immediate triggering of a higher power acoustic emissions (AE) sensor to provide for better characterization of the damage. Unlike traditional "always on" AE platforms, this strategy has the potential for low power, while the wireless communication between different sensor types supports the Internet of Things (IoT) approach. A combination of fiber-optic sensor rosettes for strain monitoring and a fiber-optic sensor for acoustic emissions monitoring was attached to a sample and used to monitor crack initiation. The results suggest that passive principal strain direction monitoring could be used as a damage initiation trigger for other active sensing elements such as acoustic emissions. In future work, additional AE sensors can be added to provide for damage location; and a strategy where these sensors can be powered on periodically to further establish reliability while preserving an energy efficient scheme can be incorporated.

  1. Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    ... search IRSA's site Unique Hits since January 2003 Acoustic Neuroma Click Here for Acoustic Neuroma Practice Guideline ... to microsurgery. One doctor's story of having an acoustic neuroma In August 1991, Dr. Thomas F. Morgan ...

  2. Azelastine and budesonide (nasal sprays): Effect of combination therapy monitored by acoustic rhinometry and clinical symptom score in the treatment of allergic rhinitis

    PubMed Central

    Fabbri, Natalia Zanellato; Abib-Jr, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to objectively evaluate the effects of intranasal therapy with azelastine (AZE), budesonide (BUD), and combined AZE plus BUD (AZE/BUD) using a nasal provocation test (NPT) and acoustic rhinometry in patients with allergic rhinitis. A randomized, single-blind, crossover study with three treatment sequences was used. Thirty patients with persistent AR received the three treatments using a nasal spray twice daily for 30 days and were evaluated by an NPT with histamine before and after each period of treatment. The treatment comparison, assessed by the nasal responsiveness to histamine, was monitored based on subjective (symptom score) and objective parameters (acoustic rhinometry). The minimal cross-area 2 (MCA2) was measured by acoustic rhinometry at 1, 4, 8, and 12 minutes after NPT for each histamine concentration administered (0.5, 1, 2, 4, and 6 mg/mL) up to at least a 20% reduction in the MCA2 from baseline (NPT20). The subjects were scored regarding nasal response encompassing histamine dose and time after histamine administration that caused nasal obstruction (NPT20 score) to assess the treatments' effects. Combination therapy produced a significant increase in baseline MCA2, viz., the improvement of nasal patency (p = 0.005). The symptoms score was significantly decreased after treatment with AZE (p = 0.03), BUD (p < 0.0001), and AZE/BUD (p < 0.0001), compared with pretreatment. The NPT20 score was significantly higher (p = 0.0009) after AZE/BUD, compared with AZE and BUD on their own. Thus, AZE therapy combined with BUD might provide more therapeutic benefits than the isolated drugs for improving nasal patency. PMID:24988550

  3. Evaluation of non-reassuring fetal heart rate patterns with fetal pulse oximetry combined with vibratory acoustic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Salamalekis, E; Vitoratos, N; Loghis, C; Kassanos, D; Salloum, I; Batalias, L; Creatsas, G

    2003-02-01

    To determine the value of fetal pulse oximetry and vibratory acoustic stimulation in the presence of non-reassuring fetal heart rate patterns during labor. Prospective study in women monitored by cardiotocography and fetal pulse oximetry during labor. During a period of 18 months, 907 consecutive parturients in labor were monitored by cardiotocography. Out of these women, 63 were selected on the basis of a non-reassuring fetal heart rate tracing during the first stage of labor. In these cases, fetal pulse oximetry was applied. Vibratory acoustic stimulation was applied in fetuses without spontaneous reactivity in order to evaluate the fetal status. Our cases were classified into three groups, according to the lower fetal oxygen saturation levels, from the time of oximetry application until delivery. Group A consisted of 29 cases where fetal oxygen saturation levels were > or = 41%, group B (20 cases) with fetal oxygen saturation of 31-40% and group C (14 cases) with levels of < 30%. Spontaneous reactivity was observed in 15 fetuses of group A and seven of group B, while no case of reactivity was noted in group C. Vibratory acoustic-induced reactivity was associated with low fetal oxygen saturation levels. The mean umbilical artery pH levels were 7.29 +/- 0.051 in group A, 7.21 +/- 0.057 in group B and 7.04 +/- 0.05 in group C. Fetal pulse oximetry should be indicated not only in fetuses without any reactivity but also in those with induced reactivity, after the application of vibratory acoustic stimulation.

  4. Real-time temperature estimation and monitoring of HIFU ablation through a combined modeling and passive acoustic mapping approach.

    PubMed

    Jensen, C R; Cleveland, R O; Coussios, C C

    2013-09-07

    Passive acoustic mapping (PAM) has been recently demonstrated as a method of monitoring focused ultrasound therapy by reconstructing the emissions created by inertially cavitating bubbles (Jensen et al 2012 Radiology 262 252-61). The published method sums energy emitted by cavitation from the focal region within the tissue and uses a threshold to determine when sufficient energy has been delivered for ablation. The present work builds on this approach to provide a high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment monitoring software that displays both real-time temperature maps and a prediction of the ablated tissue region. This is achieved by determining heat deposition from two sources: (i) acoustic absorption of the primary HIFU beam which is calculated via a nonlinear model, and (ii) absorption of energy from bubble acoustic emissions which is estimated from measurements. The two sources of heat are used as inputs to the bioheat equation that gives an estimate of the temperature of the tissue as well as estimates of tissue ablation. The method has been applied to ex vivo ox liver samples and the estimated temperature is compared to the measured temperature and shows good agreement, capturing the effect of cavitation-enhanced heating on temperature evolution. In conclusion, it is demonstrated that by using PAM and predictions of heating it is possible to produce an evolving estimate of cell death during exposure in order to guide treatment for monitoring ablative HIFU therapy.

  5. Highly directional acoustic receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cray, Benjamin A.; Evora, Victor M.; Nuttall, Albert H.

    2003-03-01

    The theoretical directivity of a single combined acoustic receiver, a device that can measure many quantities of an acoustic field at a collocated point, is presented here. The formulation is developed using a Taylor series expansion of acoustic pressure about the origin of a Cartesian coordinate system. For example, the quantities measured by a second-order combined receiver, denoted a dyadic sensor, are acoustic pressure, the three orthogonal components of acoustic particle velocity, and the nine spatial gradients of the velocity vector. The power series expansion, which can be of any order, is cast into an expression that defines the directivity of a single receiving element. It is shown that a single highly directional dyadic sensor can have a directivity index of up to 9.5 dB. However, there is a price to pay with highly directive sensors; these sensors can be significantly more sensitive to nonacoustic noise sources.

  6. Combination of acoustic levitation with small angle scattering techniques and synchrotron radiation circular dichroism. Application to the study of protein solutions.

    PubMed

    Cristiglio, Viviana; Grillo, Isabelle; Fomina, Margarita; Wien, Frank; Shalaev, Evgenyi; Novikov, Alexey; Brassamin, Séverine; Réfrégiers, Matthieu; Pérez, Javier; Hennet, Louis

    2017-01-01

    The acoustic levitation technique is a useful sample handling method for small solid and liquids samples, suspended in air by means of an ultrasonic field. This method was previously used at synchrotron sources for studying pharmaceutical liquids and protein solutions using x-ray diffraction and small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS). In this work we combined for the first time this containerless method with small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and synchrotron radiation circular dichroism (SRCD) to study the structural behavior of proteins in solutions during the water evaporation. SANS results are also compared with SAXS experiments. The aggregation behavior of 45μl droplets of lysozyme protein diluted in water was followed during the continuous increase of the sample concentration by evaporating the solvent. The evaporation kinetics was followed at different drying stage by SANS and SAXS with a good data quality. In a prospective work using SRCD, we also studied the evolution of the secondary structure of the myoglobin protein in water solution in the same evaporation conditions. Acoustic levitation was applied for the first time with SANS and the high performances of the used neutron instruments made it possible to monitor fast container-less reactions in situ. A preliminary work using SRCD shows the potentiality of its combination with acoustic levitation for studying the evolution of the protein structure with time. This multi-techniques approach could give novel insights into crystallization and self-assembly phenomena of biological compound with promising potential applications in pharmaceutical, food and cosmetics industry. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Science for Life" Guest Editor: Dr. Austen Angell, Dr. Salvatore Magazù and Dr. Federica Migliardo. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Introducing DIASCoPE: Directly Integrated Acoustic System Combined with Pressure Experiments — Changing the Paradigm from Product to Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitaker, M. L.; Baldwin, K. J.; Huebsch, W. B.; Tercé, N.; Bejina, F.; Bystricky, M.; Chen, H.; Vaughan, M. T.; Weidner, D. J.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the properties and behaviors of materials and multi-phase aggregates under conditions of high pressure and temperature is vital to unraveling the mysteries that lie beneath the surface of the planet. Advances in in situexperimental techniques using synchrotron radiation at these extreme conditions have helped to provide answers to fundamental questions that were previously unattainable. Synchrotron-based ultrasonic interferometry measurements have proven to be especially important in determining acoustic velocities and thermoelastic properties of materials at high pressures and temperatures. However, due to relatively slow data collection times, it has been difficult to measure the effects of processes as they occur, and instead the measurement is made on the end product of these processes. DIASCoPE is an important step toward addressing this problem.Over the last three years, we have designed and developed an on-board ultrasonic acoustic velocity measurement system that cuts data collection time down by over an order of magnitude. We can now measure P- and S-wave travel times in samples at extreme conditions in less than one second. Moreover, the system has been fully integrated with the multi-anvil apparatus and the EPICS control system at beamline X17B2 of the National Synchrotron Light Source, allowing for greater ease of control andfull automation of experimental data collection. The DIASCoPE has completed the testing and commissioning phase, and the first data collected using this powerful new system will be presented here.DIASCoPE represents a major step forward in acoustic velocity collection time reduction that will finally allow us to begin to witness what effects various processes in the deep Earth may have on the physical properties of materials at extreme conditions as they occur. These new capabilities will allow us to change the focus of study from the product to the process itself and will lead to a greater understanding of the

  8. Virtual Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lokki, Tapio; Savioja, Lauri

    The term virtual acoustics is often applied when sound signal is processed to contain features of a simulated acoustical space and sound is spatially reproduced either with binaural or with multichannel techniques. Therefore, virtual acoustics consists of spatial sound reproduction and room acoustics modeling.

  9. Use of Preoperation Acoustic Modeling Combined with Real-Time Sound Level Monitoring to Mitigate Behavioral Effects of Seismic Surveys.

    PubMed

    Racca, Roberto; Austin, Melanie

    2016-01-01

    Underwater acoustic modeling is often used to estimate the injury radius around a seismic exploration source; only occasionally has it been applied to the mitigation of behavioral effects, where the safety boundary may extend to many kilometers. Such a mitigation strategy requires precise estimation of the sound field for many source locations and likely entails field validation over the course of the operation to ensure that mitigation regions are accurate. This article reviews the enactment of such an approach for a seismic survey off Sakhalin Island and examines how similar principles may be applied to other surveys under suitable conditions.

  10. Prediction of cervical lymph node metastasis in patients with papillary thyroid cancer using combined conventional ultrasound, strain elastography, and acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) elastography.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jun-Mei; Xu, Xiao-Hong; Xu, Hui-Xiong; Zhang, Yi-Feng; Guo, Le-Hang; Liu, Lin-Na; Liu, Chang; Bo, Xiao-Wan; Qu, Shen; Xing, Mingzhao; Li, Xiao-Long

    2016-08-01

    To investigate the value of combined conventional ultrasound (US), strain elastography (SE) and acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) elastography for prediction of cervical lymph node metastasis (CLNM) in papillary thyroid cancer (PTC). A consecutive series of 203 patients with 222 PTCs were preoperatively evaluated by US, SE, and ARFI including virtual touch tissue imaging (VTI) and virtual touch tissue quantification (VTQ). A multivariate analysis was performed to predict CLNM by 22 independent variables. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was used to evaluate the diagnostic performance. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that VTI area ratio (VAR) > 1 was the best predictor for CLNM, followed by abnormal cervical lymph node (ACLN), capsule contact, microcalcification, capsule involvement, and multiple nodules (all P < 0.05). ROC analyses of these characteristics showed the areas under the curve (Az), sensitivity, and specificity were 0.600-0.630, 47.7 %-93.2 %, and 26.9 %-78.4 % for US, respectively; and they were 0.784, 83.0 %, and 73.9 %, respectively, for VAR > 1. As combination of US characteristics with and without VAR, the Az, sensitivity, and specificity were 0.803 and 0.556, 83.0 % and 100.0 %, and 77.6 % and 11.2 %, respectively (P < 0.001). ARFI elastography shows superior performance over conventional US, particularly when combined with US, in predicting CLNM in PTC patients. • Conventional ultrasound is useful in predicting cervical lymph node metastasis preoperatively. • Virtual touch tissue imaging area ratio is the strongest predicting factor. • Predictive performance is markedly improved by combining ultrasound characteristics with VAR. • Acoustic radiation force impulse elastography may be a promising complementary tool.

  11. Neutrino-recoil induced desorption

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, L.; Avci, R.; Lapeyre, G.J. ); Hindi, M.M.; Kozub, R.L.; Robinson, S.J. )

    1994-07-01

    Nuclear decay induced [sup 37]Cl ion desorption from the electron capture decay [sup 37]Ar[r arrow][sup 37]Cl+[nu] is reported for the first time. A mixture of one part [sup 36]Ar and [similar to]5[times]10[sup [minus]5] parts [sup 37]Ar ([sup 36/37]Ar) is physisorbed on a gold-plated Si wafer kept at 16 K under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. The time of flight (TOF) of recoiled [sup 37]Cl ions is measured using coincidence techniques. The observed kinetic energy distribution of the [sup 37]Cl ions is approximately Gaussian in shape, with a maximum at [approx]9.0 eV and a full width at half-maximum of [similar to]3 eV. Considering the binding energy of physisorbed [sup 37]Ar is [similar to]80 meV, the 9-eV peak energy compares well with that of the gas-phase value, where conservation of the energy and momentum fixes the kinetic energy of [sup 37]Cl ions at 9.54 eV. Using a combination of TOF and retarding field energy analysis, the charge states of detected ions for 1 ML (monolayer) of [sup 36/37]Ar are determined as 53%+1[ital e], 21%+2[ital e], and 26%+[ital ne], where [ital n][ge]3. The fraction of decaying [sup 37]Ar atoms which emerge from the surface as positive [sup 37]Cl ions is found to be 10%. Finally, a strong charge exchange reaction between a [sup 37]Cl ion and near-neighbor atoms causes a Coulomb explosion within the multilayers, increasing the kinetic energy of desorbing ions by as much as [similar to]7 eV.

  12. Thermal desorption from ordered chemisorbed phases studied by helium scattering: Oxygen on Ag(110)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canepa, M.; Terreni, S.; Narducci, E.; Mattera, L.

    1999-01-01

    We relate the helium specular beam intensity during adsorbate desorption (He desorption curve) to the instantaneous surface coverage. In this way the He desorption curve is shown to provide a picture of the desorption process which can be fruitfully compared to the one coming from thermal desorption mass spectra (TDS), obtained under strictly comparable experimental conditions. We tested the combination of thermal energy atom scattering (TEAS) and TDS in the case of the associative desorption from long range ordered O(2×1)-Ag(110) phase. Using the so-called overlap approach and assuming intense adsorbate-adsorbate (and vacancy-vacancy) attractions along Ag-O-Ag rows we obtain an instantaneous coverage which is in good agreement with TDS results. He desorption curves confirm the extreme sharpness of the desorption transition further indicating that the tails of the TDS peak bear small contributions from oxygen which did not belong to the O(2×1) phase. Opportunities and limitations inherent to the use of the He desorption curve (and its first derivative) as a marker of the temperature position and sharpness of the desorption transition are also addressed.

  13. Cochlear bionic acoustic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Fuyin; Wu, Jiu Hui; Huang, Meng; Fu, Gang; Bai, Changan

    2014-11-01

    A design of bionic acoustic metamaterial and acoustic functional devices was proposed by employing the mammalian cochlear as a prototype. First, combined with the experimental data in previous literatures, it is pointed out that the cochlear hair cells and stereocilia cluster are a kind of natural biological acoustic metamaterials with the negative stiffness characteristics. Then, to design the acoustic functional devices conveniently in engineering application, a simplified parametric helical structure was proposed to replace actual irregular cochlea for bionic design, and based on the computational results of such a bionic parametric helical structure, it is suggested that the overall cochlear is a local resonant system with the negative dynamic effective mass characteristics. There are many potential applications in the bandboard energy recovery device, cochlear implant, and acoustic black hole.

  14. The study of 'microsurfaces' using thermal desorption spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, M. E.; Poppa, H.; Pound, G. M.

    1979-01-01

    The use of a newly combined ultrahigh vacuum technique for studying continuous and particulate evaporated thin films using thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and transmission electron diffraction (TED) is discussed. It is shown that (1) CO thermal desorption energies of epitaxially deposited (111) Ni and (111) Pd surfaces agree perfectly with previously published data on bulk (111) single crystal, (2) contamination and surface structural differences can be detected using TDS as a surface probe and TEM as a complementary technique, and (3) CO desorption signals from deposited metal coverages of one-thousandth of a monolayer should be detectable. These results indicate that the chemisorption properties of supported 'microsurfaces' of metals can now be investigated with very high sensitivity. The combined use of TDS and TEM-TED experimental methods is a very powerful technique for fundamental studies in basic thin film physics and in catalysis.

  15. The study of 'microsurfaces' using thermal desorption spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, M. E.; Poppa, H.; Pound, G. M.

    1979-01-01

    The use of a newly combined ultrahigh vacuum technique for studying continuous and particulate evaporated thin films using thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and transmission electron diffraction (TED) is discussed. It is shown that (1) CO thermal desorption energies of epitaxially deposited (111) Ni and (111) Pd surfaces agree perfectly with previously published data on bulk (111) single crystal, (2) contamination and surface structural differences can be detected using TDS as a surface probe and TEM as a complementary technique, and (3) CO desorption signals from deposited metal coverages of one-thousandth of a monolayer should be detectable. These results indicate that the chemisorption properties of supported 'microsurfaces' of metals can now be investigated with very high sensitivity. The combined use of TDS and TEM-TED experimental methods is a very powerful technique for fundamental studies in basic thin film physics and in catalysis.

  16. Novel cell design for combined in situ acoustic emission and x-ray diffraction study during electrochemical cycling of batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, Kevin; Meisner, Roberta; Daniel, Claus; Kirkham, Melanie; Parish, Chad M.; Dudney, Nancy

    2011-07-15

    An in situ acoustic emission (AE) and x-ray diffraction cell for use in the study of battery electrode materials has been designed and tested. This cell uses commercially available coin cell hardware retrofitted with a metalized polyethylene terephthalate (PET) disk, which acts as both an x-ray window and a current collector. In this manner, the use of beryllium and its associated cost and hazards is avoided. An AE sensor may be affixed to the cell face opposite the PET window in order to monitor degradation effects, such as particle fracture, during cell cycling. Silicon particles, which were previously studied by the AE technique, were tested in this cell as a model material. The performance of these cells compared well with unmodified coin cells, while providing information about structural changes in the active material as the cell is repeatedly charged and discharged.

  17. Novel cell design for combined in situ acoustic emission and x-ray diffraction study during electrochemical cycling of batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, Kevin; Kirkham, Melanie; Meisner, Roberta; Parish, Chad M.; Dudney, Nancy; Daniel, Claus

    2011-07-01

    An in situ acoustic emission (AE) and x-ray diffraction cell for use in the study of battery electrode materials has been designed and tested. This cell uses commercially available coin cell hardware retrofitted with a metalized polyethylene terephthalate (PET) disk, which acts as both an x-ray window and a current collector. In this manner, the use of beryllium and its associated cost and hazards is avoided. An AE sensor may be affixed to the cell face opposite the PET window in order to monitor degradation effects, such as particle fracture, during cell cycling. Silicon particles, which were previously studied by the AE technique, were tested in this cell as a model material. The performance of these cells compared well with unmodified coin cells, while providing information about structural changes in the active material as the cell is repeatedly charged and discharged.

  18. Buried targets in layered media: A combined finite element/physical acoustics model and comparison to data on a half buried 2:1 cylinder.

    PubMed

    Williams, Kevin L

    2016-12-01

    Previously, a combined finite element/physical acoustics model for proud targets [K. L. Williams, S. G. Kargl, E. I. Thorsos, D. S. Burnett, J. L. Lopes, M. Zampolli, and P. L. Marston, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 127, 3356-3371 (2010)] was compared to both higher fidelity finite element models and to experimental data for a proud 2:1 aluminum cylinder. Here that expression is generalized to address the case of a target buried in a layered media. The result is compared to data acquired for the same 2:1 cylinder but half buried in a mud layer that covers the sand sediment (considered here as infinite in extent below the mud layer). The generalized expression reduces to both the previous proud result and to the result for a target buried in an infinite medium under the appropriate limiting conditions. The model/data comparisons shown include both the previous proud model and data results along with the ones for the half buried cylinder. The comparison quantifies the reduction in target strength as a function of frequency in the half buried case relative to the proud case.

  19. Investigations into ultraviolet matrix-assisted laser desorption

    SciTech Connect

    Heise, T.W.

    1993-07-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption (MALD) is a technique for converting large biomolecules into gas phase ions. Some characteristics of the commonly used uv matrices are determined. Solubilities in methanol range from 0.1 to 0.5 M. Solid phase absorption spectra are found to be similar to solution, but slightly red-shifted. Acoustic and quartz crystal microbalance signals are investigated as possible means of uv-MALD quantitation. Evidence for the existence of desorption thresholds is presented. Threshold values are determined to be in the range of 2 to 3 MW/cm{sup 2}. A transient imaging technique based on laser-excited fluorescence for monitoring MALD plumes is described. Sensitivity is well within the levels required for studying matrix-assisted laser desorption, where analyte concentrations are significantly lower than those in conventional laser desorption. Results showing the effect of film morphology, particularly film thickness, on plume dynamics are presented. In particular, MALD plumes from thicker films tend to exhibit higher axial velocities. Fluorescent labeling of protein and of DNA is used to allow imaging of their uv-MALD generated plumes. Integrated concentrations are available with respect to time, making it possible to assess the rate of fragmentation. The spatial and temporal distributions are important for the design of secondary ionization schemes to enhance ion yields and for the optimization of ion collection in time-of-flight MS instruments to maximize resolution. Such information could also provide insight into whether ionization is closely associated with the desorption step or whether it is a result of subsequent collisions with the matrix gas (e.g., proton transfer). Although the present study involves plumes in a normal atmosphere, adaptation to measurements in vacuum (e.g., inside a mass spectrometer) should be straightforward.

  20. Hybrid optical and acoustic force based sorting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Mahoney, Paul; Brodie, Graham W.; Wang, Han; Demore, Christine E. M.; Cochran, Sandy; Spalding, Gabriel C.; MacDonald, Michael P.

    2014-09-01

    We report the combined use of optical sorting and acoustic levitation to give particle sorting. Differing sizes of microparticles are sorted optically both with and without the aid of acoustic levitation, and the results compared to show that the use of acoustic trapping can increase sorting efficiency. The use of a transparent ultrasonic transducer is also shown to streamline the integration of optics and acoustics. We also demonstrate the balance of optical radiation pressure and acoustic levitation to achieve vertical sorting.

  1. Evidence of Key Tinnitus-Related Brain Regions Documented by a Unique Combination of Manganese-Enhanced MRI and Acoustic Startle Reflex Testing

    PubMed Central

    Holt, Avril Genene; Bissig, David; Mirza, Najab; Rajah, Gary; Berkowitz, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    Animal models continue to improve our understanding of tinnitus pathogenesis and aid in development of new treatments. However, there are no diagnostic biomarkers for tinnitus-related pathophysiology for use in awake, freely moving animals. To address this disparity, two complementary methods were combined to examine reliable tinnitus models (rats repeatedly administered salicylate or exposed to a single noise event): inhibition of acoustic startle and manganese-enhanced MRI. Salicylate-induced tinnitus resulted in wide spread supernormal manganese uptake compared to noise-induced tinnitus. Neither model demonstrated significant differences in the auditory cortex. Only in the dorsal cortex of the inferior colliculus (DCIC) did both models exhibit supernormal uptake. Therefore, abnormal membrane depolarization in the DCIC appears to be important in tinnitus-mediated activity. Our results provide the foundation for future studies correlating the severity and longevity of tinnitus with hearing loss and neuronal activity in specific brain regions and tools for evaluating treatment efficacy across paradigms. PMID:21179508

  2. Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    An acoustic neuroma is a benign tumor that develops on the nerve that connects the ear to the brain. ... can press against the brain, becoming life-threatening. Acoustic neuroma can be difficult to diagnose, because the ...

  3. Talker-identification training using simulations of binaurally combined electric and acoustic hearing: generalization to speech and emotion recognition.

    PubMed

    Krull, Vidya; Luo, Xin; Iler Kirk, Karen

    2012-04-01

    Understanding speech in background noise, talker identification, and vocal emotion recognition are challenging for cochlear implant (CI) users due to poor spectral resolution and limited pitch cues with the CI. Recent studies have shown that bimodal CI users, that is, those CI users who wear a hearing aid (HA) in their non-implanted ear, receive benefit for understanding speech both in quiet and in noise. This study compared the efficacy of talker-identification training in two groups of young normal-hearing adults, listening to either acoustic simulations of unilateral CI or bimodal (CI+HA) hearing. Training resulted in improved identification of talkers for both groups with better overall performance for simulated bimodal hearing. Generalization of learning to sentence and emotion recognition also was assessed in both subject groups. Sentence recognition in quiet and in noise improved for both groups, no matter if the talkers had been heard during training or not. Generalization to improvements in emotion recognition for two unfamiliar talkers also was noted for both groups with the simulated bimodal-hearing group showing better overall emotion-recognition performance. Improvements in sentence recognition were retained a month after training in both groups. These results have potential implications for aural rehabilitation of conventional and bimodal CI users.

  4. Talker-identification training using simulations of binaurally combined electric and acoustic hearing: Generalization to speech and emotion recognitiona

    PubMed Central

    Krull, Vidya; Luo, Xin; Iler Kirk, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Understanding speech in background noise, talker identification, and vocal emotion recognition are challenging for cochlear implant (CI) users due to poor spectral resolution and limited pitch cues with the CI. Recent studies have shown that bimodal CI users, that is, those CI users who wear a hearing aid (HA) in their non-implanted ear, receive benefit for understanding speech both in quiet and in noise. This study compared the efficacy of talker-identification training in two groups of young normal-hearing adults, listening to either acoustic simulations of unilateral CI or bimodal (CI+HA) hearing. Training resulted in improved identification of talkers for both groups with better overall performance for simulated bimodal hearing. Generalization of learning to sentence and emotion recognition also was assessed in both subject groups. Sentence recognition in quiet and in noise improved for both groups, no matter if the talkers had been heard during training or not. Generalization to improvements in emotion recognition for two unfamiliar talkers also was noted for both groups with the simulated bimodal-hearing group showing better overall emotion-recognition performance. Improvements in sentence recognition were retained a month after training in both groups. These results have potential implications for aural rehabilitation of conventional and bimodal CI users. PMID:22501080

  5. The Acoustic Lens Design and in Vivo Use of a Multifunctional Catheter Combining Intracardiac Ultrasound Imaging and Electrophysiology Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, Douglas N.; Cannata, Jonathan; Liu, Ruibin; Zhao, Jian Zhong; Shung, K. Kirk; Nguyen, Hien; Chia, Raymond; Dentinger, Aaron; Wildes, Douglas; Thomenius, Kai E.; Mahajan, Aman; Shivkumar, Kalyanam; Kim, Kang; O’Donnell, Matthew; Sahn, David

    2009-01-01

    A multifunctional 9F intracardiac imaging and electrophysiology mapping catheter was developed and tested to help guide diagnostic and therapeutic intracardiac electrophysiology (EP) procedures. The catheter tip includes a 7.25-MHz, 64-element, side-looking phased array for high resolution sector scanning. Multiple electrophysiology mapping sensors were mounted as ring electrodes near the array for electrocardiographic synchronization of ultrasound images. The catheter array elevation beam performance in particular was investigated. An acoustic lens for the distal tip array designed with a round cross section can produce an acceptable elevation beam shape; however, the velocity of sound in the lens material should be approximately 155 m/s slower than in tissue for the best beam shape and wide bandwidth performance. To help establish the catheter’s unique ability for integration with electrophysiology interventional procedures, it was used in vivo in a porcine animal model, and demonstrated both useful intracardiac echocardiographic visualization and simultaneous 3-D positional information using integrated electroanatomical mapping techniques. The catheter also performed well in high frame rate imaging, color flow imaging, and strain rate imaging of atrial and ventricular structures. PMID:18407850

  6. Acoustic Seaglider

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-07

    a national naval responsibility. Acoustic sensors on mobile, autonomous platforms will enable basic research topics on temporal and spatial...problem and acoustic navigation and communications within the context of distributed autonomous persistent undersea surveillance sensor networks...Acoustic sensors on mobile, autonomous platforms will enable basic research topics on temporal and spatial coherence and the description of ambient

  7. Acoustic seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention relates to a sealing device having an acoustic resonator. The acoustic resonator is adapted to create acoustic waveforms to generate a sealing pressure barrier blocking fluid flow from a high pressure area to a lower pressure area. The sealing device permits noncontacting sealing operation. The sealing device may include a resonant-macrosonic-synthesis (RMS) resonator.

  8. Acoustic Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention relates to a sealing device having an acoustic resonator. The acoustic resonator is adapted to create acoustic waveforms to generate a sealing pressure barrier blocking fluid flow from a high pressure area to a lower pressure area. The sealing device permits noncontacting sealing operation. The sealing device may include a resonant-macrosonic-synthesis (RMS) resonator.

  9. Rapid Detection and Identification of Candidemia by Direct Blood Culturing on Solid Medium by Use of Lysis-Centrifugation Method Combined with Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS).

    PubMed

    Idelevich, Evgeny A; Grünastel, Barbara; Becker, Karsten

    2017-01-01

    Candida sepsis is a life-threatening condition with increasing prevalence. In this study, direct blood culturing on solid medium using a lysis-centrifugation procedure enabled successful Candida species identification by matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization time of flight mass spectrometry on average 3.8 h (Sabouraud agar) or 7.4 h (chocolate agar) before the positivity signal for control samples in Bactec mycosis-IC/F or Bactec Plus aerobic/F bottles, respectively. Direct culturing on solid medium accelerated candidemia diagnostics compared to that with automated broth-based systems. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Microbiology.

  10. Erbium hydride thermal desorption : controlling kinetics.

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrizz, Robert Matthew

    2007-08-01

    Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) is used to study the decomposition kinetics of erbium hydride thin films. The TDS results presented in this report show that hydride film processing parameters directly impact thermal stability. Issues to be addressed include desorption kinetics for dihydrides and trihydrides, and the effect of film growth parameters, loading parameters, and substrate selection on desorption kinetics.

  11. High throughput screening using acoustic droplet ejection to combine protein crystals and chemical libraries on crystallization plates at high density

    DOE PAGES

    Teplitsky, Ella; Joshi, Karan; Ericson, Daniel L.; ...

    2015-07-01

    We describe a high throughput method for screening up to 1728 distinct chemicals with protein crystals on a single microplate. Acoustic droplet ejection (ADE) was used to co-position 2.5 nL of protein, precipitant, and chemicals on a MiTeGen in situ-1 crystallization plate™ for screening by co-crystallization or soaking. ADE-transferred droplets follow a precise trajectory which allows all components to be transferred through small apertures in the microplate lid. The apertures were large enough for 2.5 nL droplets to pass through them, but small enough so that they did not disrupt the internal environment created by the mother liquor. Using thismore » system, thermolysin and trypsin crystals were efficiently screened for binding to a heavy-metal mini-library. Fluorescence and X-ray diffraction were used to confirm that each chemical in the heavy-metal library was correctly paired with the intended protein crystal. Moreover, a fragment mini-library was screened to observe two known lysozyme We describe a high throughput method for screening up to 1728 distinct chemicals with protein crystals on a single microplate. Acoustic droplet ejection (ADE) was used to co-position 2.5 nL of protein, precipitant, and chemicals on a MiTeGen in situ-1 crystallization plate™ for screening by co-crystallization or soaking. ADE-transferred droplets follow a precise trajectory which allows all components to be transferred through small apertures in the microplate lid. The apertures were large enough for 2.5 nL droplets to pass through them, but small enough so that they did not disrupt the internal environment created by the mother liquor. Using this system, thermolysin and trypsin crystals were efficiently screened for binding to a heavy-metal mini-library. Fluorescence and X-ray diffraction were used to confirm that each chemical in the heavy-metal library was correctly paired with the intended protein crystal. A fragment mini-library was screened to observe two known

  12. Effects of combined exposure to pyridostigmine bromide and shaker stress on acoustic startle response, pre-pulse inhibition and open field behavior in mice.

    PubMed

    Dubovicky, M; Paton, S; Morris, M; Mach, M; Lucot, J B

    2007-01-01

    The present study investigated the effect of combined exposure of pyridostigmine bromide (PB) and chronic shaker stress on acoustic startle responses (ASR), pre-pulse inhibition (PPI) and open field behavior of adult C57BL/6J mice. PB (10 mg kg(-1) day(-1) for 7 days) or saline was administered subcutaneously using osmotic Alzet minipumps implanted under the skin on the back of the mice. At the same time, the mice were exposed to 7 days of intermittent shaker stress. They were tested for ASR (100 dB and 120 dB stimuli) and PPI (70 dB + 100 dB and 70 dB + 120 dB) in the acoustic startle monitor system. The mice were assessed during the shaker stress on days 2 and 7 and 7, 14, 21 and 28 days after discontinuation of treatment. Separate groups of mice were tested in the open field in 15 min sessions on days 1, 3 and 6 during shaker stress and PB treatment. Exposure of mice to PB resulted in an exaggerated ASR, reduced PPI and non-significant decrease in locomotor activity. These behavioral changes were apparent only during exposure to PB. Repeated shaker stress did not have any effect on sensorimotor functions or open field behavior of mice. There was no prolonged or delayed effect of PB and/or stress on individual behavioral variables. The study found C57BL/6J mice to be behaviorally sensitive to PB treatment. (c) 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Acoustic mapping velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muste, M.; Baranya, S.; Tsubaki, R.; Kim, D.; Ho, H.; Tsai, H.; Law, D.

    2016-05-01

    Knowledge of sediment dynamics in rivers is of great importance for various practical purposes. Despite its high relevance in riverine environment processes, the monitoring of sediment rates remains a major and challenging task for both suspended and bed load estimation. While the measurement of suspended load is currently an active area of testing with nonintrusive technologies (optical and acoustic), bed load measurement does not mark a similar progress. This paper describes an innovative combination of measurement techniques and analysis protocols that establishes the proof-of-concept for a promising technique, labeled herein Acoustic Mapping Velocimetry (AMV). The technique estimates bed load rates in rivers developing bed forms using a nonintrusive measurements approach. The raw information for AMV is collected with acoustic multibeam technology that in turn provides maps of the bathymetry over longitudinal swaths. As long as the acoustic maps can be acquired relatively quickly and the repetition rate for the mapping is commensurate with the movement of the bed forms, successive acoustic maps capture the progression of the bed form movement. Two-dimensional velocity maps associated with the bed form migration are obtained by implementing algorithms typically used in particle image velocimetry to acoustic maps converted in gray-level images. Furthermore, use of the obtained acoustic and velocity maps in conjunction with analytical formulations (e.g., Exner equation) enables estimation of multidirectional bed load rates over the whole imaged area. This paper presents a validation study of the AMV technique using a set of laboratory experiments.

  14. Enhanced selective hydrogen desorption from metals

    SciTech Connect

    Knize, R.J.; Cecchi, J.L.

    1982-12-01

    The thermal desorption of hydrogen isotopes from a metal is usually a second order process, the rate for which becomes asymptotically slow. We present a method for enhancing the desorption rate of one particular isotope by maintaining a constant pressure of another molecular species. This results in an effective first order desorption and concomitant exponential decay of the concentration of the selected isotope. Data are presented for the enhanced desorption of deuterium from a Zr-Al getter. The results agree well with a theoretical model, which is discussed. This enhanced desorption method should be particularly useful for tritium operation in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor.

  15. Enhanced selective hydrogen desorption from metals

    SciTech Connect

    Knize, R.J.; Cecchi, J.L.

    1983-04-01

    The thermal desorption of hydrogen isotopes from a metal is usually a second order process the rate for which becomes asymptotically slow. We present a method for enhancing the desorption rate of one particular isotope by maintaining a constant pressure of another molecular species. This results in an effective first order desorption and concommitant exponential decay of the concentration of the selected isotope. Data is presented for the enhanced desorption of deuterium from a Zr--Al getter. The results agree well with a theoretical model, which is discussed. This enhanced desorption method should be particularly useful for tritium operation in the tokamak fusion test reactor.

  16. Using Combined X-ray Computed Tomography and Acoustic Resonance to Understand Supercritical CO2 Behavior in Fractured Sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kneafsey, T. J.; Nakagawa, S.

    2015-12-01

    Distribution of supercritical (sc) CO2 has a large impact on its flow behavior as well as on the properties of seismic waves used for monitoring. Simultaneous imaging of scCO2 distribution in a rock core using X-ray computed tomography (CT) and measurements of seismic waves in the laboratory can help understand how the distribution evolves as scCO2 invades through rock, and the resulting seismic signatures. To this end, we performed a series of laboratory scCO2 core-flood experiments in intact and fractured anisotropic Carbon Tan sandstone samples. In these experiments, we monitored changes in the CO2 saturation distribution and sonic-frequency acoustic resonances (yielding both seismic velocity and attenuation) over the course of the floods. A short-core resonant bar test system (Split-Hopkinson Resonant Bar Apparatus) custom fit into a long X-ray transparent pressure vessel was used for the seismic measurements, and a modified General Electric medical CT scanner was used to acquire X-ray CT data from which scCO2 saturation distributions were determined. The focus of the experiments was on the impact of single fractures on the scCO2 distribution and the seismic properties. For this reason, we examined several cases including 1. intact, 2. a closely mated fracture along the core axis, 3. a sheared fracture along the core axis (both vertical and horizontal for examining the buoyancy effect), and 4. a sheared fracture perpendicular to the core axis. For the intact and closely mated fractured cores, Young's modulus declined with increasing CO2 saturation, and attenuation increased up to about 15% CO2 saturation after which attenuation declined. For cores having wide axial fractures, the Young's modulus was lower than for the intact and closely mated cases, however did not change much with CO2 pore saturation. Much lower CO2 pore saturations were achieved in these cases. Attenuation increased more rapidly however than for the intact sample. For the core

  17. Desorption and ionization mechanisms in desorption atmospheric pressure photoionization.

    PubMed

    Luosujärvi, Laura; Arvola, Ville; Haapala, Markus; Pól, Jaroslav; Saarela, Ville; Franssila, Sami; Kotiaho, Tapio; Kostiainen, Risto; Kauppila, Tiina J

    2008-10-01

    The factors influencing desorption and ionization in newly developed desorption atmospheric pressure photoionization-mass spectrometry (DAPPI-MS) were studied. Redirecting the DAPPI spray was observed to further improve the versatility of the technique: for dilute samples, parallel spray with increased analyte signal was found to be the best suited, while for more concentrated samples, the orthogonal spray with less risk for contamination is recommended. The suitability of various spray solvents and sampling surface materials was tested for a variety of analytes with different polarities and molecular weights. As in atmospheric pressure photoionization, the analytes formed [M + H](+), [M - H](-), M(+*), M(-*), [M - H + O](-), or [M - 2H + 2O](-) ions depending on the analyte, spray solvent, and ionization mode. In positive ion mode, anisole and toluene as spray solvents promoted the formation of M(+*) ions and were therefore best suited for the analysis of nonpolar compounds (anthracene, benzo[a]pyrene, and tetracyclone). Acetone and hexane were optimal spray solvents for polar compounds (MDMA, testosterone, and verapamil) since they produced intensive [M + H](+) ion peaks of the analytes. In negative ion mode, the type of spray solvent affected the signal intensity, but not the ion composition. M(-*) ions were formed from 1,4-dinitrobenzene, and [M - H + O](-) and [M - 2H + 2O](-) ions from 1,4-naphthoquinone, whereas acidic compounds (naphthoic acid and paracetamol) formed [M - H](-) ions. The tested sampling surfaces included various materials with different thermal conductivities. The materials with low thermal conductivity, i.e., polymers like poly(methyl methacrylate) and poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (Teflon) were found to be the best, since they enable localized heating of the sampling surface, which was found to be essential for efficient analyte desorption. Nevertheless, the sampling surface material did not affect the ionization mechanisms.

  18. DESORPTION OF PYRETHROIDS FROM SUSPENDED SOLIDS

    PubMed Central

    Fojut, Tessa L.; Young, Thomas M.

    2014-01-01

    Pyrethroid insecticides have been widely detected in sediments at concentrations that can cause toxicity to aquatic organisms. Desorption rates play an important role in determining the bioavailability of hydrophobic organic compounds, such as pyrethroids, because these compounds are more likely to be sorbed to solids in the environment and times to reach sorptive equilibrium can be long. In this study, sequential Tenax desorption experiments were performed with three sorbents, three aging times, and four pyrethroids. A biphasic rate model was fit to the desorption data with r2 > 0.99 and the rapid and slow compartment desorption rate constants and compartment fractions are reported. Suspended solids from irrigation runoff water collected from a field that had been sprayed with permethrin one day prior were used in the experiments to compare desorption rates for field-applied pyrethroids to those for laboratory-spiked materials. Suspended solids were used in desorption experiments because suspended solids can be a key source of hydrophobic compounds to surface waters. The rapid desorption rate parameters of field-applied permethrin were not statistically different than those of laboratory spiked permethrin, indicating that the desorption of the spiked pyrethroids is comparable to those added and aged in the field. Sorbent characteristics had the greatest effect on desorption rate parameters; as organic carbon content of the solids increased, the rapid desorption fractions and rapid desorption rate constants both decreased. The desorption rate constant of the slow compartment for sediment containing permethrin aged for 28 d was significantly different from those aged 1 d and 7 d, while desorption in the rapid and slow compartments did not differ between these treatments. PMID:21538493

  19. Acoustic emission monitoring system

    DOEpatents

    Romrell, Delwin M.

    1977-07-05

    Methods and apparatus for identifying the source location of acoustic emissions generated within an acoustically conductive medium. A plurality of acoustic receivers are communicably coupled to the surface of the medium at a corresponding number of spaced locations. The differences in the reception time of the respective sensors in response to a given acoustic event are measured among various sensor combinations prescribed by the monitoring mode employed. Acoustic reception response encountered subsequent to the reception by a predetermined number of the prescribed sensor combinations are inhibited from being communicated to the processing circuitry, while the time measurements obtained from the prescribed sensor combinations are translated into a position measurement representative of the location on the surface most proximate the source of the emission. The apparatus is programmable to function in six separate and five distinct operating modes employing either two, three or four sensory locations. In its preferred arrangement the apparatus of this invention will re-initiate a monitoring interval if the predetermined number of sensors do not respond to a particular emission within a given time period.

  20. Binding energies: New values and impact on the efficiency of chemical desorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakelam, V.; Loison, J.-C.; Mereau, R.; Ruaud, M.

    2017-03-01

    Recent laboratory measurements have confirmed that chemical desorption (desorption of products due to exothermic surface reactions) can be an efficient process. The impact of including this process into gas-grain chemical models entirely depends on the formalism used and the associated parameters. Among these parameters, binding energies are probably the most uncertain ones for the moment. We propose a new model to compute binding energy of species to water ice surfaces. We have also compared the model results using either the new chemical desorption model proposed by Minissale et al. (2016) or the one of Garrod et al. (2007). The new binding energies have a strong impact on the formation of complex organic molecules. In addition, the new chemical desorption model from Minissale produces a much smaller desorption of these species and also of methanol. Combining the two effects, the abundances of CH3OH and COMs observed in cold cores cannot be reproduced by astrochemical models anymore.

  1. Heating of carriers as controlled by the combined interactions with acoustic and piezoelectric phonons in degenerate III-V semiconductors at low lattice temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, D. P.; Das, J.; Basu, A.; Das, B.

    2017-09-01

    In compound semiconductors which lack inversion symmetry, the combined interaction of the electrons with both acoustic and piezoelectric phonons is dominant at low lattice temperatures ( 20 K). The field dependence of the effective electron temperature under these conditions, has been calculated by solving the modified energy balance equation that takes due account of the degeneracy. The traditionally used heated Fermi-Dirac (F.D.) function for the non-equilibrium distribution function is approximated by some well tested model distribution. This makes it possible to carry out the integrations quite easily and, thus to obtain some more realistic results in a closed form, without taking recourse to any oversimplified approximations. The numerical results that follow for InSb, InAs and GaN, from the present analysis, are then compared with the available theoretical and experimental data. The degeneracy and the piezoelectric interaction, both are seen to bring about significant changes in the electron temperature characteristics. The scope for further refinement is discussed.

  2. Musical Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gough, Colin

    This chapter provides an introduction to the physical and psycho-acoustic principles underlying the production and perception of the sounds of musical instruments. The first section introduces generic aspects of musical acoustics and the perception of musical sounds, followed by separate sections on string, wind and percussion instruments.

  3. Acoustical oceanography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Acoustical Society of America has formed a Technical Specialty Group on Acoustical Oceanography. At ASA meetings the new group will have special sessions where they will give invited and contributed papers and have panel discussions about ocean parameters that are measured effectively by acoustical techniques.The first special sessions will be May 22-23, 1990, at the ASA meeting at Pennsylvania State University, University Park. The focus on May 22 will be acoustical techniques for detection and measurement of internal waves and turbulence; conveners are Robert Pinkel of Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, Calif., and Herman Medwin of the Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, Calif. Acoustical studies of the physical and biological characteristics of ocean mass boundaries are the discussion topic on May 23. The convener is C. S. Clay, University of Wisconsin, Madison.

  4. Desorption of ciprofloxacin from clay mineral surfaces.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qingfeng; Li, Zhaohui; Hong, Hanlie; Li, Rongbiao; Jiang, Wei-Teh

    2013-01-01

    Desorption from soil clay components may affect the transport and fate of antibiotics in the environment. In this study, ciprofloxacin (CIP) desorption from a kaolinite and a montmorillonite was investigated under different pHs, different concentrations of metal cations of various valencies (Na(+), Ca(2+) and Al(3+)) and a cationic surfactant hexadecyltrimethylammonium (HDTMA), and different desorption cycles. Desorption of CIP from kaolinite and montmorillonite was strongly pH-dependent and desorption isotherms were well fitted with the Langmuir equation. The percentage of CIP desorbed increased with increasing initial CIP loadings, desorbing cation concentrations, and desorption cycles. Comparatively, CIP was more readily desorbed from kaolinite than from montmorillonite. Moreover, the hysteresis index values were all negative, suggesting that the presence of metal cations and HDTMA in solution promoted CIP desorption from clay minerals, owing to cation exchange. The XRD analyses indicated that desorption of CIP occurred from both external and interlayer surfaces of montmorillonite. Formation of Al-CIP complex on solid surface and then detachment of Al-CIP from the solid surface may contribute to the higher CIP desorption by Al(3+) in comparison to Na(+) and Ca(2+). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Thermal Programmed Desorption of C32 H 66

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cisternas, M.; Del Campo, V.; Cabrera, A. L.; Volkmann, U. G.; Hansen, F. Y.; Taub, H.

    2011-03-01

    Alkanes are of interest as prototypes for more complex molecules and membranes. In this work we study the desorption kinetics of dotriacontane C32 adsorbed on Si O2 /Si substrate. We combine in our instrument High Resolution Ellipsometry (HRE) and Thermal Programmed Desorption (TPD). C32 monolayers were deposited in high vacuum from a Knudsen cell on the substrate, monitorizing sample thickness in situ with HRE. Film thickness was in the range of up to 100 AA, forming a parallel bilayer and perpendicular C32 layer. The Mass Spectrometer (RGA) of the TPD section was detecting the shift of the desorption peaks at different heating rates applied to the sample. The mass registered with the RGA was AMU 57 for parallel and perpendicular layers, due to the abundance of this mass value in the disintegration process of C32 in the mass spectrometers ionizer. Moreover, the AMU 57 signal does not interfere with other signals coming from residual gases in the vacuum chamber. The desorption energies obtained were ΔEdes = 11,9 kJ/mol for the perpendicular bilayer and ΔEdes = 23 ,5 kJ/mol for the parallel bilayer.

  6. Dynamic changes following combined treatment with gentamicin and ethacrynic acid with and without acoustic stimulation. Cellular uptake and functional correlates.

    PubMed

    Hayashida, T; Hiel, H; Dulon, D; Erre, J P; Guilhaume, A; Aran, J M

    1989-01-01

    Regional selectivity of gentamicin (GM) ototoxicity was studied in guinea pigs (GPs) using electrophysiological, morphological, autoradiographic and immunohistological observations following combined treatment with GM (150 mg/kg i.m.) and ethacrynic acid (EA) (30 mg/kg i.c. or i.v., 1.5 h after GM injection). The GPs were either continuously stimulated every 5 min with a series of 256 clicks (70 dB peSPL, 10/s) during 3 h for monitoring fast changes in VIII nerve compound action potential (CAP) after the EA injection, and thereafter kept in the animal quarters (background noise of 60 dB SPL) (group I), or similarly monitored for only 10 min after the EA injection and thereafter kept in a soundproof room (around 0 dB SPL) (group II). Whenever GM labelling was observed it was localized only in the sensory hair cells. From 3 h after EA injection, the GPs in group I presented threshold elevations in the high-frequency region, which progressed to 60-80 dB at all frequencies at and after 48 h. Parallel to the threshold pattern, GM uptake in outer hair cells (OHCs) was seen with an increasing concentration from apex toward base from 3 to 24 h, while after 48 h almost all OHCs were destroyed and inner hair cells (IHCs) were marked by GM. In group II no changes in CAP thresholds were observed until more than 24 h, although GM was detected in the hair cells from 6 h on. At this early stage, the distribution of GM lacked a clear pattern, particularly without a clear apex-base gradient, and GM deposits were found only around the basal body. However in both groups, in late stage (greater than 24 h), the base-apex gradient was more pronounced and GM was found throughout the cell body, with a marked concentration below the cuticular plate. These results suggest that GM may penetrate hair cells around the basal body and that activating the cells by sound potentiates both GM uptake and its intracellular toxicity.

  7. Laser desorption in an ion trap mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Eiden, G.C.; Cisper, M.E.; Alexander, M.L.; Hemberger, P.H.; Nogar, N.S.

    1993-02-01

    Laser desorption in a ion-trap mass spectrometer shows significant promise for both qualitative and trace analysis. Several aspects of this methodology are discussed in this work. We previously demonstrated the generation of both negative and positive ions by laser desorption directly within a quadrupole ion trap. In the present work, we explore various combinations of d.c., r.f., and time-varying fields in order to optimize laser generated signals. In addition, we report on the application of this method to analyze samples containing compounds such as amines, metal complexes, carbon clusters, and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons. In some cases the ability to rapidly switch between positive and negative ion modes provides sufficient specificity to distinguish different compounds of a mixture with a single stage of mass spectrometry. In other experiments, we combined intensity variation studies with tandem mass spectrometry experiments and positive and negative ion detection to further enhance specificity.

  8. First-principles calculations of helium and neon desorption from cavities in silicon.

    PubMed

    Eddin, A Charaf; Pizzagalli, L

    2012-05-02

    Combining density functional theory, the nudged elastic band technique, and the ultradense fluid model, we investigated the desorption process of He and Ne in silicon. Our results show that the internal surfaces of gas-filled bubbles are not a limiting factor during desorption experiments, since the surface reconstruction opens diffusion paths easier than in the bulk. We show that the vibrational contribution to the energy of helium in the bulk has to be considered in order to determine realistic pressures in the bubbles, when comparing experiments and simulations. At the maximum of desorption, an average pressure of 1-2 GPa is computed. © 2012 IOP Publishing Ltd

  9. Stir-bar-sorptive extraction and liquid desorption combined with large-volume injection gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for ultra-trace analysis of musk compounds in environmental water matrices.

    PubMed

    Silva, Ana Rita M; Nogueira, J M F

    2010-03-01

    Stir-bar-sorptive extraction with liquid desorption followed by large-volume injection and capillary gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry in selected ion monitoring acquisition mode (SBSE-LD/LVI-GC-MS(SIM)) has been developed to monitor ultra-traces of four musks (celestolide (ADBI), galaxolide (HHCB), tonalide (AHTN) and musk ketone (MK)) in environmental water matrices. Instrumental calibration (LVI-GC-MS(SIM)) and experimental conditions that could affect the SBSE-LD efficiency are discussed. Assays performed on 30-mL water samples spiked at 200 ng L(-1) under optimized experimental conditions yielded recoveries ranging from 83.7 ± 8.1% (MK) to 107.6 ± 10.8% (HHCB). Furthermore, the experimental data were in very good agreement with predicted theoretical equilibria described by octanol-water partition coefficients (K (PDMS/W) ≈ K (O/W)). The methodology also showed excellent linear dynamic ranges for the four musks studied, with correlation coefficients higher than 0.9961, limits of detection and quantification between 12 and 19 ng L(-1) and between 41 and 62 ng L(-1), respectively, and suitable precision (< 20%). Application of this method for analysis of the musks in real water matrices such as tap, river, sea, and urban wastewater samples resulted in convenient selectivity, high sensitivity and accuracy using the standard addition methodology. The proposed method (SBSE-LD/LVI-GC-MS(SIM)) was shown to be feasible and sensitive, with a low-sample volume requirement, for determination of musk compounds in environmental water matrices at the ultra-trace level, overcoming several disadvantages presented by other sample-preparation techniques.

  10. Network generation enhances interpretation of proteomics data sets by a combination of two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xijun; Zhang, Aihua; Sun, Hui; Wu, Gelin; Sun, Wenjun; Yan, Guangli

    2012-10-21

    Recent advances in proteomic technologies have enabled us to create detailed protein-protein interaction maps in diseases. As the size of the interaction dataset increases, powerful computational methods are required in order to effectively interpret network models from large scale interactome data. In this study, we carried out comparative proteomics to construct and identify the proteins networks associated with hepatic injury (HI) which are largely unknown, as a case study. All proteins expressed were separated and identified by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF MS). Protein-interacting networks and pathways were mapped using STRING analysis program. We have performed for the first time a comprehensive profiling of changes in protein expression of HI rats, to uncover the networks altered by treated with CCl(4). Identification of fifteen spots (seven over-expressed and eight under-expressed) were established by MALDI-TOF/TOF MS. These proteins were subjected to functional pathway analysis using STRING software for better understanding of the biological context of the identified proteins. It suggested that modulation of multiple vital physiological pathways including DNA repair process, cell apoptosis, oxidation reduction, signal transduction, metabolic process, intracellular signaling cascade, regulation of biological processes, cell communication, regulation of cellular process, and molecular transport. In summary, the present study provides the first protein-interacting network maps and novel insights into the biological responses and potential pathways of HI. The generation of protein interaction networks clearly enhances the interpretation of proteomic data, particularly in respect of understanding molecular mechanisms of panel protein biomarkers.

  11. The combined use of vibration, acoustic emission and oil debris on-line monitoring towards a more effective condition monitoring of rotating machinery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loutas, T. H.; Roulias, D.; Pauly, E.; Kostopoulos, V.

    2011-05-01

    The monitoring of progressive wear in gears using various non-destructive technologies as well as the use of advanced signal processing techniques upon the acquired recordings to the direction of more effective diagnostic schemes, is the scope of the present work. For this reason multi-hour tests were performed in healthy gears in a single-stage lab scale gearbox until they were seriously damaged. Three on-line monitoring techniques are implemented in the tests. Vibration and acoustic emission recordings in combination with data coming from oil debris monitoring (ODM) of the lubricating oil are utilized in order to assess the condition of the gears. A plethora of parameters/features were extracted from the acquired waveforms via conventional (in time and frequency domain) and non-conventional (wavelet-based) signal processing techniques. Data fusion was accomplished in the level of integration of the most representative among the extracted features from all three measurement technologies in a single data matrix. Principal component analysis (PCA) was utilized to reduce the dimensionality of the data matrix whereas independent component analysis (ICA) was further applied to identify the independent components among the data and correlate them to different damage modes of the gearbox. Finally heuristic rules based on characteristic values of the resulted independent components were set, realizing thus a health monitoring scheme for gearboxes. The integration of vibration, AE and ODM data increases the diagnostic capacity and reliability of the condition monitoring scheme concluding to very interesting results. The present work summarizes the joint efforts of two research groups towards a more reliable condition monitoring of rotating machinery and gearboxes specifically.

  12. Room Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuttruff, Heinrich; Mommertz, Eckard

    The traditional task of room acoustics is to create or formulate conditions which ensure the best possible propagation of sound in a room from a sound source to a listener. Thus, objects of room acoustics are in particular assembly halls of all kinds, such as auditoria and lecture halls, conference rooms, theaters, concert halls or churches. Already at this point, it has to be pointed out that these conditions essentially depend on the question if speech or music should be transmitted; in the first case, the criterion for transmission quality is good speech intelligibility, in the other case, however, the success of room-acoustical efforts depends on other factors that cannot be quantified that easily, not least it also depends on the hearing habits of the listeners. In any case, absolutely "good acoustics" of a room do not exist.

  13. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry combined with multidimensional scaling, binary hierarchical cluster tree and selected diagnostic masses improves species identification of Neolithic keratin sequences from furs of the Tyrolean Iceman Oetzi.

    PubMed

    Hollemeyer, Klaus; Altmeyer, Wolfgang; Heinzle, Elmar; Pitra, Christian

    2012-08-30

    The identification of fur origins from the 5300-year-old Tyrolean Iceman's accoutrement is not yet complete, although definite identification is essential for the socio-cultural context of his epoch. Neither have all potential samples been identified so far, nor there has a consensus been reached on the species identified using the classical methods. Archaeological hair often lacks analyzable hair scale patterns in microscopic analyses and polymer chain reaction (PCR)-based techniques are often inapplicable due to the lack of amplifiable ancient DNA. To overcome these drawbacks, a matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) method was used exclusively based on hair keratins. Thirteen fur specimens from his accoutrement were analyzed after tryptic digest of native hair. Peptide mass fingerprints (pmfs) from ancient samples and from reference species mostly occurring in the Alpine surroundings at his lifetime were compared to each other using multidimensional scaling and binary hierarchical cluster tree analysis. Both statistical methods highly reflect spectral similarities among pmfs as close zoological relationships. While multidimensional scaling was useful to discriminate specimens on the zoological order level, binary hierarchical cluster tree reached the family or subfamily level. Additionally, the presence and/or absence of order, family and/or species-specific diagnostic masses in their pmfs allowed the identification of mammals mostly down to single species level. Red deer was found in his shoe vamp, goat in the leggings, cattle in his shoe sole and at his quiver's closing flap as well as sheep and chamois in his coat. Canid species, like grey wolf, domestic dog or European red fox, were discovered in his leggings for the first time, but could not be differentiated to species level. This is widening the spectrum of processed fur-bearing species to at least one member of the Canidae family. His fur cap was

  14. Acoustic emission linear pulse holography

    DOEpatents

    Collins, H.D.; Busse, L.J.; Lemon, D.K.

    1983-10-25

    This device relates to the concept of and means for performing Acoustic Emission Linear Pulse Holography, which combines the advantages of linear holographic imaging and Acoustic Emission into a single non-destructive inspection system. This unique system produces a chronological, linear holographic image of a flaw by utilizing the acoustic energy emitted during crack growth. The innovation is the concept of utilizing the crack-generated acoustic emission energy to generate a chronological series of images of a growing crack by applying linear, pulse holographic processing to the acoustic emission data. The process is implemented by placing on a structure an array of piezoelectric sensors (typically 16 or 32 of them) near the defect location. A reference sensor is placed between the defect and the array.

  15. Clinical feasibility study of combined opto-acoustic and ultrasonic imaging modality providing coregistered functional and anatomical maps of breast tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalev, Jason; Clingman, Bryan; Smith, Remie J.; Herzog, Don; Miller, Tom; Stavros, A. Thomas; Ermilov, Sergey; Conjusteau, André; Tsyboulski, Dmitri; Oraevsky, Alexander A.; Kist, Kenneth; Dornbluth, N. C.; Otto, Pamela

    2013-03-01

    We report on findings from the clinical feasibility study of the ImagioTM. Breast Imaging System, which acquires two-dimensional opto-acoustic (OA) images co-registered with conventional ultrasound using a specialized duplex hand-held probe. Dual-wavelength opto-acoustic technology is used to generate parametric maps based upon total hemoglobin and its oxygen saturation in breast tissues. This may provide functional diagnostic information pertaining to tumor metabolism and microvasculature, which is complementary to morphological information obtained with conventional gray-scale ultrasound. We present co-registered opto-acoustic and ultrasonic images of malignant and benign tumors from a recent clinical feasibility study. The clinical results illustrate that the technology may have the capability to improve the efficacy of breast tumor diagnosis. In doing so, it may have the potential to reduce biopsies and to characterize cancers that were not seen well with conventional gray-scale ultrasound alone.

  16. Acoustic biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Fogel, Ronen; Seshia, Ashwin A.

    2016-01-01

    Resonant and acoustic wave devices have been researched for several decades for application in the gravimetric sensing of a variety of biological and chemical analytes. These devices operate by coupling the measurand (e.g. analyte adsorption) as a modulation in the physical properties of the acoustic wave (e.g. resonant frequency, acoustic velocity, dissipation) that can then be correlated with the amount of adsorbed analyte. These devices can also be miniaturized with advantages in terms of cost, size and scalability, as well as potential additional features including integration with microfluidics and electronics, scaled sensitivities associated with smaller dimensions and higher operational frequencies, the ability to multiplex detection across arrays of hundreds of devices embedded in a single chip, increased throughput and the ability to interrogate a wider range of modes including within the same device. Additionally, device fabrication is often compatible with semiconductor volume batch manufacturing techniques enabling cost scalability and a high degree of precision and reproducibility in the manufacturing process. Integration with microfluidics handling also enables suitable sample pre-processing/separation/purification/amplification steps that could improve selectivity and the overall signal-to-noise ratio. Three device types are reviewed here: (i) bulk acoustic wave sensors, (ii) surface acoustic wave sensors, and (iii) micro/nano-electromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS) sensors. PMID:27365040

  17. Acoustic biosensors.

    PubMed

    Fogel, Ronen; Limson, Janice; Seshia, Ashwin A

    2016-06-30

    Resonant and acoustic wave devices have been researched for several decades for application in the gravimetric sensing of a variety of biological and chemical analytes. These devices operate by coupling the measurand (e.g. analyte adsorption) as a modulation in the physical properties of the acoustic wave (e.g. resonant frequency, acoustic velocity, dissipation) that can then be correlated with the amount of adsorbed analyte. These devices can also be miniaturized with advantages in terms of cost, size and scalability, as well as potential additional features including integration with microfluidics and electronics, scaled sensitivities associated with smaller dimensions and higher operational frequencies, the ability to multiplex detection across arrays of hundreds of devices embedded in a single chip, increased throughput and the ability to interrogate a wider range of modes including within the same device. Additionally, device fabrication is often compatible with semiconductor volume batch manufacturing techniques enabling cost scalability and a high degree of precision and reproducibility in the manufacturing process. Integration with microfluidics handling also enables suitable sample pre-processing/separation/purification/amplification steps that could improve selectivity and the overall signal-to-noise ratio. Three device types are reviewed here: (i) bulk acoustic wave sensors, (ii) surface acoustic wave sensors, and (iii) micro/nano-electromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS) sensors.

  18. Plasma Desorption Mass Spectrometry: Coming of Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cotter, Robert J.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the history and development of Plasma Desorption Mass Spectrometry to determine molecular weights and structures of proteins and polymers. Outlines theory, instrumentation, and sample preparation commonly used. Gives several examples of resulting spectra. (ML)

  19. Plasma Desorption Mass Spectrometry: Coming of Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cotter, Robert J.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the history and development of Plasma Desorption Mass Spectrometry to determine molecular weights and structures of proteins and polymers. Outlines theory, instrumentation, and sample preparation commonly used. Gives several examples of resulting spectra. (ML)

  20. Acoustic Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, Joseph S.

    1993-01-01

    Pump uses acoustic-radiation forces. Momentum transferred from sound waves to sound-propagating material in way resulting in net pumping action on material. Acoustic pump is solid-state pump. Requires no moving parts, entirely miniaturized, and does not invade pumped environment. Silent, with no conventional vibration. Used as pump for liquid, suspension, gas, or any other medium interacting with radiation pressure. Also used where solid-state pump needed for reliability and controllability. In microgravity environment, device offers unusual control for low flow rates. For medical or other applications in which contamination cannot be allowed, offers noninvasive pumping force.

  1. Hydrogen desorption from hydrogen fluoride and remote hydrogen plasma cleaned silicon carbide (0001) surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    King, Sean W. Tanaka, Satoru; Davis, Robert F.; Nemanich, Robert J.

    2015-09-15

    Due to the extreme chemical inertness of silicon carbide (SiC), in-situ thermal desorption is commonly utilized as a means to remove surface contamination prior to initiating critical semiconductor processing steps such as epitaxy, gate dielectric formation, and contact metallization. In-situ thermal desorption and silicon sublimation has also recently become a popular method for epitaxial growth of mono and few layer graphene. Accordingly, numerous thermal desorption experiments of various processed silicon carbide surfaces have been performed, but have ignored the presence of hydrogen, which is ubiquitous throughout semiconductor processing. In this regard, the authors have performed a combined temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) investigation of the desorption of molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}) and various other oxygen, carbon, and fluorine related species from ex-situ aqueous hydrogen fluoride (HF) and in-situ remote hydrogen plasma cleaned 6H-SiC (0001) surfaces. Using XPS, the authors observed that temperatures on the order of 700–1000 °C are needed to fully desorb C-H, C-O and Si-O species from these surfaces. However, using TPD, the authors observed H{sub 2} desorption at both lower temperatures (200–550 °C) as well as higher temperatures (>700 °C). The low temperature H{sub 2} desorption was deconvoluted into multiple desorption states that, based on similarities to H{sub 2} desorption from Si (111), were attributed to silicon mono, di, and trihydride surface species as well as hydrogen trapped by subsurface defects, steps, or dopants. The higher temperature H{sub 2} desorption was similarly attributed to H{sub 2} evolved from surface O-H groups at ∼750 °C as well as the liberation of H{sub 2} during Si-O desorption at temperatures >800 °C. These results indicate that while ex-situ aqueous HF processed 6H-SiC (0001) surfaces annealed at <700 °C remain terminated by some surface C–O and

  2. Dynamic effects of promoters on associative desorption.

    PubMed

    Sales, J L; Uñac, R O; Gargiulo, M V; Zgrablich, G

    2000-04-04

    The kinetics of the associative desorption of A(2) in the presence of coadsorbed promoter species B is studied under conditions of nonequilibrium by the analysis of thermal desorption spectra obtained by Monte Carlo simulation. A rich variety of behaviors is found and discussed with regard to the interplay between the concentrations of promoter species, the surface mobility of A and B, and the interparticle interactions.

  3. Acoustic methodology review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, R. G.

    1982-01-01

    It is important for industry and NASA to assess the status of acoustic design technology for predicting and controlling helicopter external noise in order for a meaningful research program to be formulated which will address this problem. The prediction methodologies available to the designer and the acoustic engineer are three-fold. First is what has been described as a first principle analysis. This analysis approach attempts to remove any empiricism from the analysis process and deals with a theoretical mechanism approach to predicting the noise. The second approach attempts to combine first principle methodology (when available) with empirical data to formulate source predictors which can be combined to predict vehicle levels. The third is an empirical analysis, which attempts to generalize measured trends into a vehicle noise prediction method. This paper will briefly address each.

  4. Shape optimization: Good looks and acoustics too!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Antonio, Peter; Cox, Trevor J.; Haas, Steve

    2003-04-01

    One of the challenges in the architectural acoustic design of museums and other public spaces is to develop contemporary scattering surfaces that complement contemporary architecture in the way that statuary, coffered ceilings, columns, and relief ornamentation complemented classic architecture. Often acoustic surfaces satisfy the acoustics, but may or may not satisfy the aesthetics. One approach that has been successful employs a combination of boundary element and multidimensional optimization techniques. The architect supplies the desired shape motif and the acoustician supplies the acoustical performance requirements. The optimization program then provides an Arcousthetic surface, which simultaneously satisfies the architecture, the acoustics, and the aesthetics. The program can be used with diffusive or diffsorptive surfaces. Photos of installations using these acoustic tools and a description of the design of the National Museum of the American Indian will also be presented to illustrate the usefulness of these devices and their impact on architectural acoustics.

  5. Effect of equilibration time on Pu desorption from goethite

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Jennifer C.; Zavarin, Mavrik; Begg, James D.; Kersting, Annie B.; Powell, Brian A.

    2015-01-28

    Strongly sorbing ions such as plutonium may become irreversibly bound to mineral surfaces over time implicates near- and far-field transport of Pu. Batch adsorption–desorption data were collected as a function of time and pH to study the surface stability of Pu on goethite. Pu(IV) was adsorbed to goethite over the pH range 4.2 to 6.6 for different periods of time (1, 6, 15, 34 and 116 d). Moreover, following adsorption, Pu was leached from the mineral surface with desferrioxamine B (DFOB), a complexant capable of effectively competing with the goethite surface for Pu. The amount of Pu desorbed from the goethite was found to vary as a function of the adsorption equilibration time, with less Pu removed from the goethite following longer adsorption periods. This effect was most pronounced at low pH. Logarithmic desorption distribution ratios for each adsorption equilibration time were fit to a pH-dependent model. Model slopes decreased between 1 and 116 d adsorption time, indicating that overall Pu(IV) surface stability on goethite surfaces becomes less dependent on pH with greater adsorption equilibration time. The combination of adsorption and desorption kinetic data suggest that non-redox aging processes affect Pu sorption behavior on goethite.

  6. Effect of equilibration time on Pu desorption from goethite

    DOE PAGES

    Wong, Jennifer C.; Zavarin, Mavrik; Begg, James D.; ...

    2015-01-28

    Strongly sorbing ions such as plutonium may become irreversibly bound to mineral surfaces over time implicates near- and far-field transport of Pu. Batch adsorption–desorption data were collected as a function of time and pH to study the surface stability of Pu on goethite. Pu(IV) was adsorbed to goethite over the pH range 4.2 to 6.6 for different periods of time (1, 6, 15, 34 and 116 d). Moreover, following adsorption, Pu was leached from the mineral surface with desferrioxamine B (DFOB), a complexant capable of effectively competing with the goethite surface for Pu. The amount of Pu desorbed from the goethitemore » was found to vary as a function of the adsorption equilibration time, with less Pu removed from the goethite following longer adsorption periods. This effect was most pronounced at low pH. Logarithmic desorption distribution ratios for each adsorption equilibration time were fit to a pH-dependent model. Model slopes decreased between 1 and 116 d adsorption time, indicating that overall Pu(IV) surface stability on goethite surfaces becomes less dependent on pH with greater adsorption equilibration time. The combination of adsorption and desorption kinetic data suggest that non-redox aging processes affect Pu sorption behavior on goethite.« less

  7. Combined Electric and Acoustic Stimulation With Hearing Preservation: Effect of Cochlear Implant Low-Frequency Cutoff on Speech Understanding and Perceived Listening Difficulty.

    PubMed

    Gifford, René H; Davis, Timothy J; Sunderhaus, Linsey W; Menapace, Christine; Buck, Barbara; Crosson, Jillian; O'Neill, Lori; Beiter, Anne; Segel, Phil

    The primary objective of this study was to assess the effect of electric and acoustic overlap for speech understanding in typical listening conditions using semidiffuse noise. This study used a within-subjects, repeated measures design including 11 experienced adult implant recipients (13 ears) with functional residual hearing in the implanted and nonimplanted ear. The aided acoustic bandwidth was fixed and the low-frequency cutoff for the cochlear implant (CI) was varied systematically. Assessments were completed in the R-SPACE sound-simulation system which includes a semidiffuse restaurant noise originating from eight loudspeakers placed circumferentially about the subject's head. AzBio sentences were presented at 67 dBA with signal to noise ratio varying between +10 and 0 dB determined individually to yield approximately 50 to 60% correct for the CI-alone condition with full CI bandwidth. Listening conditions for all subjects included CI alone, bimodal (CI + contralateral hearing aid), and bilateral-aided electric and acoustic stimulation (EAS; CI + bilateral hearing aid). Low-frequency cutoffs both below and above the original "clinical software recommendation" frequency were tested for all patients, in all conditions. Subjects estimated listening difficulty for all conditions using listener ratings based on a visual analog scale. Three primary findings were that (1) there was statistically significant benefit of preserved acoustic hearing in the implanted ear for most overlap conditions, (2) the default clinical software recommendation rarely yielded the highest level of speech recognition (1 of 13 ears), and (3) greater EAS overlap than that provided by the clinical recommendation yielded significant improvements in speech understanding. For standard-electrode CI recipients with preserved hearing, spectral overlap of acoustic and electric stimuli yielded significantly better speech understanding and less listening effort in a laboratory-based, restaurant

  8. Acoustic asymmetric transmission based on time-dependent dynamical scattering

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qing; Yang, Yang; Ni, Xu; Xu, Ye-Long; Sun, Xiao-Chen; Chen, Ze-Guo; Feng, Liang; Liu, Xiao-ping; Lu, Ming-Hui; Chen, Yan-Feng

    2015-01-01

    An acoustic asymmetric transmission device exhibiting unidirectional transmission property for acoustic waves is extremely desirable in many practical scenarios. Such a unique property may be realized in various configurations utilizing acoustic Zeeman effects in moving media as well as frequency-conversion in passive nonlinear acoustic systems and in active acoustic systems. Here we demonstrate a new acoustic frequency conversion process in a time-varying system, consisting of a rotating blade and the surrounding air. The scattered acoustic waves from this time-varying system experience frequency shifts, which are linearly dependent on the blade’s rotating frequency. Such scattering mechanism can be well described theoretically by an acoustic linear time-varying perturbation theory. Combining such time-varying scattering effects with highly efficient acoustic filtering, we successfully develop a tunable acoustic unidirectional device with 20 dB power transmission contrast ratio between two counter propagation directions at audible frequencies. PMID:26038886

  9. Acoustic asymmetric transmission based on time-dependent dynamical scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qing; Yang, Yang; Ni, Xu; Xu, Ye-Long; Sun, Xiao-Chen; Chen, Ze-Guo; Feng, Liang; Liu, Xiao-Ping; Lu, Ming-Hui; Chen, Yan-Feng

    2015-06-01

    An acoustic asymmetric transmission device exhibiting unidirectional transmission property for acoustic waves is extremely desirable in many practical scenarios. Such a unique property may be realized in various configurations utilizing acoustic Zeeman effects in moving media as well as frequency-conversion in passive nonlinear acoustic systems and in active acoustic systems. Here we demonstrate a new acoustic frequency conversion process in a time-varying system, consisting of a rotating blade and the surrounding air. The scattered acoustic waves from this time-varying system experience frequency shifts, which are linearly dependent on the blade’s rotating frequency. Such scattering mechanism can be well described theoretically by an acoustic linear time-varying perturbation theory. Combining such time-varying scattering effects with highly efficient acoustic filtering, we successfully develop a tunable acoustic unidirectional device with 20 dB power transmission contrast ratio between two counter propagation directions at audible frequencies.

  10. Controlling sound with acoustic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummer, Steven A.; Christensen, Johan; Alù, Andrea

    2016-03-01

    Acoustic metamaterials can manipulate and control sound waves in ways that are not possible in conventional materials. Metamaterials with zero, or even negative, refractive index for sound offer new possibilities for acoustic imaging and for the control of sound at subwavelength scales. The combination of transformation acoustics theory and highly anisotropic acoustic metamaterials enables precise control over the deformation of sound fields, which can be used, for example, to hide or cloak objects from incident acoustic energy. Active acoustic metamaterials use external control to create effective material properties that are not possible with passive structures and have led to the development of dynamically reconfigurable, loss-compensating and parity-time-symmetric materials for sound manipulation. Challenges remain, including the development of efficient techniques for fabricating large-scale metamaterial structures and converting laboratory experiments into useful devices. In this Review, we outline the designs and properties of materials with unusual acoustic parameters (for example, negative refractive index), discuss examples of extreme manipulation of sound and, finally, provide an overview of future directions in the field.

  11. Theoretical and experimental studies of hydrogen adsorption and desorption on Ir surfaces.

    PubMed

    Kaghazchi, Payam; Jacob, Timo; Chen, Wenhua; Bartynski, Robert A

    2013-08-21

    We report adsorption and desorption of hydrogen on planar Ir(210) and faceted Ir(210), consisting of nanoscale {311} and (110) facets, by means of temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and density functional theory (DFT) in combination with the ab initio atomistic thermodynamics approach. TPD spectra show that only one H2 peak is seen from planar Ir(210) at all coverages whereas a single H2 peak is observed at around 440 K (F1) at fractional monolayer (ML) coverage and an additional H2 peak appears at around 360 K (F2) at 1 ML coverage on faceted Ir(210), implying structure sensitivity in recombination and desorption of hydrogen on faceted Ir(210) versus planar Ir(210), but no evidence is found for size effects in recombination and desorption of hydrogen on faceted Ir(210) for average facet sizes of 5-14 nm. Calculations indicate that H prefers to bind at the two-fold short-bridge sites of the Ir surfaces. In addition, we studied the stability of the Ir surfaces in the presence of hydrogen at different H coverages through surface free energy plots as a function of the chemical potential, which is also converted to a temperature scale. Moreover, the calculations revealed the origin of the two TPD peaks of H2 from faceted Ir(210): F1 from desorption of H2 on {311} facets while F2 from desorption of H2 on (110) facets.

  12. A Systematic Review of Electric-Acoustic Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Ching, Teresa Y. C.; Cowan, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Cochlear implant systems that combine electric and acoustic stimulation in the same ear are now commercially available and the number of patients using these devices is steadily increasing. In particular, electric-acoustic stimulation is an option for patients with severe, high frequency sensorineural hearing impairment. There have been a range of approaches to combining electric stimulation and acoustic hearing in the same ear. To develop a better understanding of fitting practices for devices that combine electric and acoustic stimulation, we conducted a systematic review addressing three clinical questions: what is the range of acoustic hearing in the implanted ear that can be effectively preserved for an electric-acoustic fitting?; what benefits are provided by combining acoustic stimulation with electric stimulation?; and what clinical fitting practices have been developed for devices that combine electric and acoustic stimulation? A search of the literature was conducted and 27 articles that met the strict evaluation criteria adopted for the review were identified for detailed analysis. The range of auditory thresholds in the implanted ear that can be successfully used for an electric-acoustic application is quite broad. The effectiveness of combined electric and acoustic stimulation as compared with electric stimulation alone was consistently demonstrated, highlighting the potential value of preservation and utilization of low frequency hearing in the implanted ear. However, clinical procedures for best fitting of electric-acoustic devices were varied. This clearly identified a need for further investigation of fitting procedures aimed at maximizing outcomes for recipients of electric-acoustic devices. PMID:23539259

  13. Ocean Variability Effects On Underwater Acoustic Communications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-30

    have developed a time reversal combining/decision feedback equalization (TRC/DFE) structure for underwater acoustic multiple - input / multiple - output ...T. Akal, and M. Stevenson, “ Multiple - input / multiple - output coherent time reversal communications in a shallow water acoustic channel,” IEEE J...acoustic multiple - input / multiple - output systems”, submitted, IEEE J. Oceanic Eng. (2008) [refereed]. [2] D. Rouseff, M. Badiey, and A. Song, “Effect of

  14. Acoustic 3D imaging of dental structures

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, D.K.; Hume, W.R.; Douglass, G.D.

    1997-02-01

    Our goals for the first year of this three dimensional electodynamic imaging project was to determine how to combine flexible, individual addressable; preprocessing of array source signals; spectral extrapolation or received signals; acoustic tomography codes; and acoustic propagation modeling code. We investigated flexible, individually addressable acoustic array material to find the best match in power, sensitivity and cost and settled on PVDF sheet arrays and 3-1 composite material.

  15. Acoustic transducer for acoustic microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Khuri-Yakub, B.T.; Chou, C.H.

    1990-03-20

    A shear acoustic transducer-lens system is described in which a shear polarized piezoelectric material excites shear polarized waves at one end of a buffer rod having a lens at the other end which excites longitudinal waves in a coupling medium by mode conversion at selected locations on the lens. 9 figs.

  16. Acoustic transducer for acoustic microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T.; Chou, Ching H.

    1990-01-01

    A shear acoustic transducer-lens system in which a shear polarized piezoelectric material excites shear polarized waves at one end of a buffer rod having a lens at the other end which excites longitudinal waves in a coupling medium by mode conversion at selected locations on the lens.

  17. Acoustic chaos

    SciTech Connect

    Lauterborn, W.; Parlitz, U.; Holzfuss, J.; Billo, A.; Akhatov, I.

    1996-06-01

    Acoustic cavitation, a complex, spatio-temporal dynamical system, is investigated with respect to its chaotic properties. The sound output, the {open_quote}{open_quote}noise{close_quote}{close_quote}, is subjected to time series analysis. The spatial dynamics of the bubble filaments is captured by high speed holographic cinematography and subsequent digital picture processing from the holograms. Theoretical models are put forward for describing the pattern formation. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  18. Medical Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beach, Kirk W.; Dunmire, Barbrina

    Medical acoustics can be subdivided into diagnostics and therapy. Diagnostics are further separated into auditory and ultrasonic methods, and both employ low amplitudes. Therapy (excluding medical advice) uses ultrasound for heating, cooking, permeablizing, activating and fracturing tissues and structures within the body, usually at much higher amplitudes than in diagnostics. Because ultrasound is a wave, linear wave physics are generally applicable, but recently nonlinear effects have become more important, even in low-intensity diagnostic applications.

  19. Electromagnetic acoustic imaging.

    PubMed

    Emerson, Jane F; Chang, David B; McNaughton, Stuart; Jeong, Jong Seob; Shung, K K; Cerwin, Stephen A

    2013-02-01

    Electromagnetic acoustic imaging (EMAI) is a new imaging technique that uses long-wavelength RF electromagnetic (EM) waves to induce ultrasound emission. Signal intensity and image contrast have been found to depend on spatially varying electrical conductivity of the medium in addition to conventional acoustic properties. The resultant conductivity- weighted ultrasound data may enhance the diagnostic performance of medical ultrasound in cancer and cardiovascular applications because of the known changes in conductivity of malignancy and blood-filled spaces. EMAI has a potential advantage over other related imaging techniques because it combines the high resolution associated with ultrasound detection with the generation of the ultrasound signals directly related to physiologically important electrical properties of the tissues. Here, we report the theoretical development of EMAI, implementation of a dual-mode EMAI/ultrasound apparatus, and successful demonstrations of EMAI in various phantoms designed to establish feasibility of the approach for eventual medical applications.

  20. Acoustic dose and acoustic dose-rate.

    PubMed

    Duck, Francis

    2009-10-01

    Acoustic dose is defined as the energy deposited by absorption of an acoustic wave per unit mass of the medium supporting the wave. Expressions for acoustic dose and acoustic dose-rate are given for plane-wave conditions, including temporal and frequency dependencies of energy deposition. The relationship between the acoustic dose-rate and the resulting temperature increase is explored, as is the relationship between acoustic dose-rate and radiation force. Energy transfer from the wave to the medium by means of acoustic cavitation is considered, and an approach is proposed in principle that could allow cavitation to be included within the proposed definitions of acoustic dose and acoustic dose-rate.

  1. Ionic Adsorption and Desorption of CNT Nanoropes

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Jun-Jun; Yang, Qing-Sheng; Yan, Xiao-Hui; He, Xiao-Qiao; Liew, Kim-Meow

    2016-01-01

    A nanorope is comprised of several carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with different chiralities. A molecular dynamic model is built to investigate the ionic adsorption and desorption of the CNT nanoropes. The charge distribution on the nanorope is obtained by using a modified gradient method based on classical electrostatic theory. The electrostatic interactions among charged carbon atoms are calculated by using the Coulomb law. It was found here that the charged nanorope can adsorb heavy metal ions, and the adsorption and desorption can be realized by controlling the strength of applied electric field. The distance between the ions and the nanorope as well as the amount of ions have an effect on the adsorption capacity of the nanorope. The desorption process takes less time than that of adsorption. The study indicates that the CNT nanorope can be used as a core element of devices for sewage treatment. PMID:28335306

  2. Ionic Adsorption and Desorption of CNT Nanoropes.

    PubMed

    Shang, Jun-Jun; Yang, Qing-Sheng; Yan, Xiao-Hui; He, Xiao-Qiao; Liew, Kim-Meow

    2016-09-28

    A nanorope is comprised of several carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with different chiralities. A molecular dynamic model is built to investigate the ionic adsorption and desorption of the CNT nanoropes. The charge distribution on the nanorope is obtained by using a modified gradient method based on classical electrostatic theory. The electrostatic interactions among charged carbon atoms are calculated by using the Coulomb law. It was found here that the charged nanorope can adsorb heavy metal ions, and the adsorption and desorption can be realized by controlling the strength of applied electric field. The distance between the ions and the nanorope as well as the amount of ions have an effect on the adsorption capacity of the nanorope. The desorption process takes less time than that of adsorption. The study indicates that the CNT nanorope can be used as a core element of devices for sewage treatment.

  3. Diffusion Analysis Of Hydrogen-Desorption Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, Merlin D.

    1988-01-01

    Distribution of hydrogen in metal explains observed desorption rate. Report describes application of diffusion theory to anaylsis of experimental data on uptake and elimination of hydrogen in high-strength alloys of 25 degree C. Study part of program aimed at understanding embrittlement of metals by hydrogen. Two nickel-base alloys, Rene 41 and Waspaloy, and one ferrous alloy, 4340 steel, studied. Desorption of hydrogen explained by distribution of hydrogen in metal. "Fast" hydrogen apparently not due to formation of hydrides on and below surface as proposed.

  4. Acoustic Tooth Cleaner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, J. S.

    1984-01-01

    Acoustically-energized water jet aids in plaque breakdown. Acoustic Wand includes acoustic transducer 1/4 wave plate, and tapered cone. Together elements energize solution of water containing mild abrasive injected into mouth to help prevent calculous buildup.

  5. Synthesis of soluble conducting polymers by acoustic mixing

    DOEpatents

    Kane, Marie C.

    2016-09-13

    A method including combining an aniline monomer, an oxidant, water and an organic solvent; subjecting the combination to acoustic mixing to form an emulsion; and recovering a polyaniliine from the combination. A method including combining a aniline monomer, an oxidant, water and an organic solvent; forming a polyaniline by acoustic mixing the combination; and recovering the polyaniliine from the combination. A method including forming a combination of an aniline monomer, an oxidant, water and an organic solvent in the absence of an emulsifier; acoustic mixing the combination for a time period to form a polyaniline; and recovering a polyaniliine from the combination.

  6. Porous silicon bulk acoustic wave resonator with integrated transducer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We report that porous silicon acoustic Bragg reflectors and AlN-based transducers can be successfully combined and processed in a commercial solidly mounted resonator production line. The resulting device takes advantage of the unique acoustic properties of porous silicon in order to form a monolithically integrated bulk acoustic wave resonator. PMID:22776697

  7. Remediation and desorption kinetics of pyrene from kaolinite co-contaminated with heavy metals at various organic matter contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeedi, Mohsen; Li, Loretta Y.; Grace, John R.

    2017-04-01

    Soils co-contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and heavy metals are challenging for remediation. In the present study desorption of pyrene in kaolinite, co-contaminated by Ni, Pb and Zn, was examined by combinations of surfactants and chelating agents such as Triton X-100, Tween 80, Ethylene diamine tetra acetic acid (EDTA) and citric acid. Results showed that a combination of Triton X-100 (7.5 % w/w) + EDTA (0.01 M) and Tween 80 (7.5 % w/w) + EDTA (0.01 M) were effective in simultaneously desorbing both types of contaminants. Batch desorption tests were conducted using single and combined enhancing agents containing Triton X-100 and Tween 80 as non-ionic surfactants, EDTA as a chelating agent, and citric acid as an organic acid. The solution with the highest removal efficiency was the combined solution containing Triton X-100 (7.5 % w/w) + EDTA (0.01M). Triton X-100 (7.5% w/w) + EDTA (0.01M) led to removal efficiencies of 88% for pyrene in base kaolinite. Batch desorption kinetic experiments were performed using Triton X-100 (7.5% w/w) + EDTA (0.01M). During the first 24 h, desorption was rapid. Organic matter content in the kaolinite led to a reduction in the desorption rate of the contaminants. The desorption kinetic data were well fitted by a pseudo-second-order kinetic model.

  8. Asphaltene adsorption and desorption from mineral surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Dubey, S.T. ); Waxman, M.H.

    1991-02-01

    This paper reports results of asphaltene adsorption/desorption on clay minerals, silica, and carbonates. It also describes the effect of adsorbed asphaltenes on rock wettability and a screening pyrolysis-flame-ionization-detection (P-FID) test to evaluate the ability of solvents to remove asphaltene from kaolin and formation core material.

  9. Laser desorption mass spectrometry for molecular diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C. H. Winston; Taranenko, N. I.; Zhu, Y. F.; Allman, S. L.; Tang, K.; Matteson, K. J.; Chang, L. Y.; Chung, C. N.; Martin, Steve; Haff, Lawrence

    1996-04-01

    Laser desorption mass spectrometry has been used for molecular diagnosis of cystic fibrosis. Both 3-base deletion and single-base point mutation have been successfully detected by clinical samples. This new detection method can possibly speed up the diagnosis by one order of magnitude in the future. It may become a new biotechnology technique for population screening of genetic disease.

  10. Quantum theory of laser-stimulated desorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slutsky, M. S.; George, T. F.

    1978-01-01

    A quantum theory of laser-stimulated desorption (LSDE) is presented and critically analyzed. It is shown how LSDE depends on laser-pulse characteristics and surface-lattice dynamics. Predictions of the theory for a Debye model of the lattice dynamics are compared to recent experimental results.

  11. Fluorescence imaging of the desorption of dye from fused silica versus silica gel.

    PubMed

    Ludes, Melody D; Anthony, Shyroine R; Wirth, Mary J

    2003-07-01

    The desorption rate constants for a cationic dye from strong adsorption sites are compared for the same chromatographic interface but for two different substrates, fused silica and chromatographic silica gel. The dye is 1,1'-didodecyl-3,3,3'3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (DiI). The interface consists of acetonitrile and a hydrocarbon monolayer (C8) covalently bound to the silica substrate. To measure slow desorption from fused silica, fluorescence imaging combined with correlation spectroscopy is used. To measure slow desorption from silica gel, fluorescence movies of silica gel particles are used. In both cases, the results show that there are two types of slow desorption processes on time scales exceeding 1 s. The desorption time from one type of site is within an experimental error of 7 s for both silica substrates. The adsorption kinetics for this type of site are slow, and the equilibrium population of DiI on these sites is comparable to that for DiI weakly adsorbed to the hydrocarbon monolayer. For the second type of site, for fused silica, the population of DiI is even higher than that of weakly adsorbed DiI, and the desorption time constant is approximately 2 min, although this is likely shortened by photobleaching. For silica gel, the relative population of DiI on this ultrastrong site is more than an order of magnitude lower, and the desorption time constant is 4.0 +/- 0.1 min. Both silica substrates thus show two types of sites whose time constants agree within experimental error, suggesting that the strong adsorption sites on fused silica are chemically the same as those on chromatographic silica gel.

  12. APPLICATION OF THERMAL DESORPTION TECHNOLOGIES TO HAZARDOUS WASTE SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thermal desorption is a separation process frequently used to remediate many Superfund sites. Thermal desorption technologies are recommended and used because of (1) the wide range of organic contaminants effectively treated, (2) availability and mobility of commercial systems, ...

  13. APPLICATION OF THERMAL DESORPTION TECHNOLOGIES TO HAZARDOUS WASTE SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thermal desorption is a separation process frequently used to remediate many Superfund sites. Thermal desorption technologies are recommended and used because of (1) the wide range of organic contaminants effectively treated, (2) availability and mobility of commercial systems, ...

  14. Acoustic transducer

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, Douglas S.

    1997-01-01

    An acoustic transducer comprising a one-piece hollow mandrel into the outer surface of which is formed a recess with sides perpendicular to the central axis of the mandrel and separated by a first distance and with a bottom parallel to the central axis and within which recess are a plurality of washer-shaped discs of a piezoelectric material and at least one disc of a temperature-compensating material with the discs being captured between the sides of the recess in a pre-stressed interference fit, typically at 2000 psi of compressive stress. The transducer also includes a power supply and means to connect to a measurement device. The transducer is intended to be used for telemetry between a measurement device located downhole in an oil or gas well and the surface. The transducer is of an construction that is stronger with fewer joints that could leak fluids into the recess holding the piezoelectric elements than is found in previous acoustic transducers.

  15. Acoustic transducer

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, D.S.

    1997-12-30

    An acoustic transducer is described comprising a one-piece hollow mandrel into the outer surface of which is formed a recess with sides perpendicular to the central axis of the mandrel and separated by a first distance and with a bottom parallel to the central axis and within which recess are a plurality of washer-shaped discs of a piezoelectric material and at least one disc of a temperature-compensating material with the discs being captured between the sides of the recess in a pre-stressed interference fit, typically at 2,000 psi of compressive stress. The transducer also includes a power supply and means to connect to a measurement device. The transducer is intended to be used for telemetry between a measurement device located downhole in an oil or gas well and the surface. The transducer is of an construction that is stronger with fewer joints that could leak fluids into the recess holding the piezoelectric elements than is found in previous acoustic transducers. 4 figs.

  16. Acoustic iridescence.

    PubMed

    Cox, Trevor J

    2011-03-01

    An investigation has been undertaken into acoustic iridescence, exploring how a device can be constructed which alter sound waves, in a similar way to structures in nature that act on light to produce optical iridescence. The main construction had many thin perforated sheets spaced half a wavelength apart for a specified design frequency. The sheets create the necessary impedance discontinuities to create backscattered waves, which then interfere to create strongly reflected sound at certain frequencies. Predictions and measurements show a set of harmonics, evenly spaced in frequency, for which sound is reflected strongly. And the frequency of these harmonics increases as the angle of observation gets larger, mimicking the iridescence seen in natural optical systems. Similar to optical systems, the reflections become weaker for oblique angles of reflection. A second construction was briefly examined which exploited a metamaterial made from elements and inclusions which were much smaller than the wavelength. Boundary element method predictions confirmed the potential for creating acoustic iridescence from layers of such a material.

  17. Wireless Acoustic Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Paul D.; Dorland, Wade D.

    2005-01-01

    A prototype wireless acoustic measurement system (WAMS) is one of two main subsystems of the Acoustic Prediction/Measurement Tool, which comprises software, acoustic instrumentation, and electronic hardware combined to afford integrated capabilities for predicting and measuring noise emitted by rocket and jet engines. The other main subsystem is described in "Predicting Rocket or Jet Noise in Real Time" (SSC-00215-1), which appears elsewhere in this issue of NASA Tech Briefs. The WAMS includes analog acoustic measurement instrumentation and analog and digital electronic circuitry combined with computer wireless local-area networking to enable (1) measurement of sound-pressure levels at multiple locations in the sound field of an engine under test and (2) recording and processing of the measurement data. At each field location, the measurements are taken by a portable unit, denoted a field station. There are ten field stations, each of which can take two channels of measurements. Each field station is equipped with two instrumentation microphones, a micro-ATX computer, a wireless network adapter, an environmental enclosure, a directional radio antenna, and a battery power supply. The environmental enclosure shields the computer from weather and from extreme acoustically induced vibrations. The power supply is based on a marine-service lead-acid storage battery that has enough capacity to support operation for as long as 10 hours. A desktop computer serves as a control server for the WAMS. The server is connected to a wireless router for communication with the field stations via a wireless local-area network that complies with wireless-network standard 802.11b of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. The router and the wireless network adapters are controlled by use of Linux-compatible driver software. The server runs custom Linux software for synchronizing the recording of measurement data in the field stations. The software includes a module that

  18. Wireless Acoustic Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Paul D.; Dorland, Wade D.; Jolly, Ronald L.

    2007-01-01

    A prototype wireless acoustic measurement system (WAMS) is one of two main subsystems of the Acoustic Prediction/ Measurement Tool, which comprises software, acoustic instrumentation, and electronic hardware combined to afford integrated capabilities for predicting and measuring noise emitted by rocket and jet engines. The other main subsystem is described in the article on page 8. The WAMS includes analog acoustic measurement instrumentation and analog and digital electronic circuitry combined with computer wireless local-area networking to enable (1) measurement of sound-pressure levels at multiple locations in the sound field of an engine under test and (2) recording and processing of the measurement data. At each field location, the measurements are taken by a portable unit, denoted a field station. There are ten field stations, each of which can take two channels of measurements. Each field station is equipped with two instrumentation microphones, a micro- ATX computer, a wireless network adapter, an environmental enclosure, a directional radio antenna, and a battery power supply. The environmental enclosure shields the computer from weather and from extreme acoustically induced vibrations. The power supply is based on a marine-service lead-acid storage battery that has enough capacity to support operation for as long as 10 hours. A desktop computer serves as a control server for the WAMS. The server is connected to a wireless router for communication with the field stations via a wireless local-area network that complies with wireless-network standard 802.11b of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. The router and the wireless network adapters are controlled by use of Linux-compatible driver software. The server runs custom Linux software for synchronizing the recording of measurement data in the field stations. The software includes a module that provides an intuitive graphical user interface through which an operator at the control server

  19. Direct Analysis of Xanthine Stimulants in Archaeological Vessels by Laser Desorption Resonance Enhanced Multiphoton Ionization.

    PubMed

    Owens, Shawn C; Berenbeim, Jacob A; Ligare, Marshall R; Gulian, Lisa E; Siouri, Faady M; Boldissar, Samuel; Tyson-Smith, Stuart; Wilson, Gregory; Ford, Anabel; de Vries, Mattanjah S

    2017-03-07

    Resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization spectroscopy (REMPI) generates simultaneous vibronic spectroscopy and fragment free mass spectrometry to identify molecules within a complex matrix. We combined laser desorption with REMPI spectroscopy to study organic residues within pottery sherds from Maya vessels (600-900 CE) and Mississippian vessels (1100-1200 CE), successfully detecting three molecular markers, caffeine, theobromine, and theophylline, associated with the use of cacao. This analytical approach provides a high molecular specificity, based on both wavelength and mass identification. At the same time, the high detection limit allows for direct laser desorption from sherd scrapings, avoiding the need for extracting organic constituents from the sherd matrix.

  20. Acoustic Sensing for Area Protection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-01

    of 3 main components that are combined to create a number of different configurations, each with specific features: - a foldable Acoustic Sensor...results. Figure 4 presents results with 4 vehicles classes coming from the TG25 campaign. The learning base for supervised phase represents only 4% of

  1. Acoustic Parametric Array for Identifying Standoff Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinders, M. K.; Rudd, K. E.

    2010-02-01

    An integrated simulation method for investigating nonlinear sound beams and 3D acoustic scattering from any combination of complicated objects is presented. A standard finite-difference simulation method is used to model pulsed nonlinear sound propagation from a source to a scattering target via the KZK equation. Then, a parallel 3D acoustic simulation method based on the finite integration technique is used to model the acoustic wave interaction with the target. Any combination of objects and material layers can be placed into the 3D simulation space to study the resulting interaction. Several example simulations are presented to demonstrate the simulation method and 3D visualization techniques. The combined simulation method is validated by comparing experimental and simulation data and a demonstration of how this combined simulation method assisted in the development of a nonlinear acoustic concealed weapons detector is also presented.

  2. Desorption of intrinsic cesium from smectite: inhibitive effects of clay particle organization on cesium desorption.

    PubMed

    Fukushi, Keisuke; Sakai, Haruka; Itono, Taeko; Tamura, Akihiro; Arai, Shoji

    2014-09-16

    Fine clay particles have functioned as transport media for radiocesium in terrestrial environments after nuclear accidents. Because radiocesium is expected to be retained in clay minerals by a cation-exchange reaction, ascertaining trace cesium desorption behavior in response to changing solution conditions is crucially important. This study systematically investigated the desorption behavior of intrinsic Cs (13 nmol/g) in well-characterized Na-montmorillonite in electrolyte solutions (NaCl, KCl, CaCl2, and MgCl2) under widely differing cation concentrations (0.2 mM to 0.2 M). Batch desorption experiments demonstrated that Cs(+) desorption was inhibited significantly in the presence of the environmental relevant concentrations of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) (>0.5 mM) and high concentrations of K(+). The order of ability for Cs desorption was Na(+) = K(+) > Ca(2+) = Mg(2+) at the highest cation concentration (0.2 M), which is opposite to the theoretical prediction based on the cation-exchange selectivity. Laser diffraction grain-size analyses revealed that the inhibition of Cs(+) desorption coincided with the increase of the clay tactoid size. Results suggest that radiocesium in the dispersed fine clay particles adheres on the solid phase when the organization of swelling clay particles occurs because of changes in solution conditions caused by both natural processes and artificial treatments.

  3. MEMS Based Acoustic Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheplak, Mark (Inventor); Nishida, Toshikaza (Inventor); Humphreys, William M. (Inventor); Arnold, David P. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Embodiments of the present invention described and shown in the specification aid drawings include a combination responsive to an acoustic wave that can be utilized as a dynamic pressure sensor. In one embodiment of the present invention, the combination has a substrate having a first surface and an opposite second surface, a microphone positioned on the first surface of the substrate and having an input and a first output and a second output, wherein the input receives a biased voltage, and the microphone generates an output signal responsive to the acoustic wave between the first output and the second output. The combination further has an amplifier positioned on the first surface of the substrate and having a first input and a second input and an output, wherein the first input of the amplifier is electrically coupled to the first output of the microphone and the second input of the amplifier is electrically coupled to the second output of the microphone for receiving the output sinual from the microphone. The amplifier is spaced from the microphone with a separation smaller than 0.5 mm.

  4. Method of enhancing selective isotope desorption from metals

    DOEpatents

    Knize, R.J.; Cecchi, J.L.

    1983-07-26

    This invention relates generally to the field of gas desorption from metals; and, more particularly, to a method of enhancing the selective desorption of a particular isotope of a gas from metals. Enhanced selective desorption is especially useful in the operation of fusion devices.

  5. Measurements of VOC adsorption/desorption characteristics of typical interior building materials

    SciTech Connect

    An, Y.; Zhang, J.S.; Shaw, C.Y.

    2000-07-01

    The adsorption/desorption of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) on interior building material surfaces (i.e., the sink effect) can affect the VOC concentrations in a building, and thus need to be accounted for an indoor air quality (IAQ) prediction model. In this study, the VOC adsorption/desorption characteristics (sink effect) were measured for four typical interior building materials including carpet, vinyl floor tile, painted drywall, and ceiling tile. The VOCs tested were ethylbenzene, cyclohexanone, 1,4-dichlorobenzene, benzaldehyde, and dodecane. These five VOCs were selected because they are representative of hydrocarbons, aromatics, ketones, aldehydes, and chlorine substituted compounds. The first order reversible adsorption/desorption model was based on the Langmuir isotherm was used to analyze the data and to determine the equilibrium constant of each VOC-material combination. It was found that the adsorption/desorption equilibrium constant, which is a measure of the sink capacity, increased linearly with the inverse of the VOC vapor pressure. For each compound, the adsorption/desorption equilibrium constant, and the adsorption rate constant differed significantly among the four materials tested. A detailed characterization of the material structure in the micro-scale would improve the understanding and modeling of the sink effect in the future. The results of this study can be used to estimate the impact of sink effect on the VOC concentrations in buildings.

  6. [Sorption and desorption of phenanthrene by organo-mineral complexes with different bridge cations].

    PubMed

    Ni, Jin-zhi; Luo, Yong-ming; Wei, Ran; Li, Xiu-hua; Qian, Wei

    2008-12-01

    Sorption and desorption of phenanthrene by organo-mineral complexes with Ca2+, Fe3+ and Al3+ as bridge cations were studied according to the association type between organic matter and minerals in natural soils. The results showed that the data of phenanthrene sorption and desorption by different cation saturated montmorillonite and their corresponding humic acid and mineral complexes could be fitted with Freundlich model, and the order of the sorption capacities (Kf) were Ca-Mont (0.184) > Fe-Mont (0.028) > Al-Mont (0.015) and Fe-Mont-HA (2.341) > Ca-Mont-HA (1.557) > Al-Mont-HA (1.136), respectively. The Kf values of humic acid and mineral complexes were far greater than those of minerals, which demonstrated that humic acid made great contributions to the sorption of phenanthrene in the organo-mineral complexes. However, the Kf values of the organo-mineral complexes with different bridge cations were not consistent with their organic carbon content, which indicated that both the organic carbon content and the combined types between organic matter and mineral could affect the sorption capacity of phenanthrene by the organo-mineral complexes. The desorption hysteresis of phenanthrene was significant for Ca2+ and Al3+ bridged organo-mineral complexes. Desorption hysteresis of phenanthrene was mainly from the sorption of phenanthrene by organic matter, and the contributions of mineral to the desorption hysteresis were not significant.

  7. Theoretical and experimental studies of hydrogen adsorption and desorption on Ir surfaces

    DOE PAGES

    Kaghazchi, Payam; Jacob, Timo; Chen, Wenhua; ...

    2013-06-03

    Here, we report adsorption and desorption of hydrogen on planar Ir(210) and faceted Ir(210), consisting of nanoscale {311} and (110) facets, by means of temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and density functional theory (DFT) in combination with the ab initio atomistic thermodynamics approach. TPD spectra show that only one H2 peak is seen from planar Ir(210) at all coverages whereas a single H2 peak is observed at around 440 K (F1) at fractional monolayer (ML) coverage and an additional H2 peak appears at around 360 K (F2) at 1 ML coverage on faceted Ir(210), implying structure sensitivity in recombination and desorptionmore » of hydrogen on faceted Ir(210) versus planar Ir(210), but no evidence is found for size effects in recombination and desorption of hydrogen on faceted Ir(210) for average facet sizes of 5-14 nm. Calculations indicate that H prefers to bind at the two-fold short-bridge sites of the Ir surfaces. In addition, we studied the stability of the Ir surfaces in the presence of hydrogen at different H coverages through surface free energy plots as a function of the chemical potential, which is also converted to a temperature scale. Moreover, the calculations revealed the origin of the two TPD peaks of H2 from faceted Ir(210): F1 from desorption of H2 on {311} facets while F2 from desorption of H2 on (110) facets.« less

  8. Characterization of a multi-metal binding biosorbent: Chemical modification and desorption studies.

    PubMed

    Abdolali, Atefeh; Ngo, Huu Hao; Guo, Wenshan; Zhou, John L; Du, Bin; Wei, Qin; Wang, Xiaochang C; Nguyen, Phuoc Dan

    2015-10-01

    This work attends to preparation and characterization of a novel multi-metal binding biosorbent after chemical modification and desorption studies. Biomass is a combination of tea waste, maple leaves and mandarin peels with a certain proportion to adsorb cadmium, copper, lead and zinc ions from aqueous solutions. The mechanism involved in metal removal was investigated by SEM, SEM/EDS and FTIR. SEM/EDS showed the presence of different chemicals and adsorbed heavy metal ions on the surface of biosorbent. FTIR of both unmodified and modified biosorbents revealed the important role of carboxylate groups in heavy metal biosorption. Desorption using different eluents and 0.1 M HCl showed the best desorption performance. The effectiveness of regeneration step by 1 M CaCl2 on five successive cycles of sorption and desorption displays this multi-metal binding biosorbent (MMBB) can effectively be utilized as an adsorbent to remove heavy metal ions from aqueous solutions in five cycles of sorption/desorption/regeneration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Effect of grain microstructure on thermal helium desorption from pure iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefaix-Jeuland, H.; Moll, S.; Jourdan, T.; Legendre, F.

    2013-03-01

    Experiments were carried out to evidence the role played by grain boundaries on He/Fe interactions. Three microstructures involving grain sizes from 2 to 100 μm in average diameter were irradiated with 8-keV 4He+ ions at 298 K and helium desorption was then studied during constant rate heating by thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) from room temperature to 1330 K. The two larger microstructures (40 and 100 μm) could be characterised with the same multiple desorption groups, combining helium involved in small and large clusters as well as in bubbles. The finer microstructural scale (2 μm) was peculiar due to the existence of a broad split of desorption peak (at 856 and 917 K). Such a peak is ascribed to the movement of grain boundaries during recrystallization which drains helium towards surface. The high density of grain boundaries in the finer microstructure also explains the thermal shift and the larger desorption at low temperatures. As a first step towards the quantitative assessment of this effect, cluster dynamics simulation have been performed in order to give the quantity of helium trapped in grain boundaries for the different microstructures.

  10. A Holistic Approach to Understanding the Desorption of Phosphorus in Soils.

    PubMed

    Menezes-Blackburn, Daniel; Zhang, Hao; Stutter, Marc; Giles, Courtney D; Darch, Tegan; George, Timothy S; Shand, Charles; Lumsdon, David; Blackwell, Martin; Wearing, Catherine; Cooper, Patricia; Wendler, Renate; Brown, Lawrie; Haygarth, Philip M

    2016-04-05

    The mobility and resupply of inorganic phosphorus (P) from the solid phase were studied in 32 soils from the UK. The combined use of diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT), diffusive equilibration in thin films (DET) and the "DGT-induced fluxes in sediments" model (DIFS) were adapted to explore the basic principles of solid-to-solution P desorption kinetics in previously unattainable detail. On average across soil types, the response time (Tc) was 3.6 h, the desorption rate constant (k-1) was 0.0046 h(-1), and the desorption rate was 4.71 nmol l(-1) s(-1). While the relative DGT-induced inorganic P flux responses in the first hour is mainly a function of soil water retention and % Corg, at longer times it is a function of the P resupply from the soil solid phase. Desorption rates and resupply from solid phase were fundamentally influenced by P status as reflected by their high correlation with P concentration in FeO strips, Olsen, NaOH-EDTA and water extracts. Soil pH and particle size distribution showed no significant correlation with the evaluated mobility and resupply parameters. The DGT and DET techniques, along with the DIFS model, were considered accurate and practical tools for studying parameters related to soil P desorption kinetics.

  11. Apparatus for low temperature thermal desorption spectroscopy of portable samples.

    PubMed

    Stuckenholz, S; Büchner, C; Ronneburg, H; Thielsch, G; Heyde, M; Freund, H-J

    2016-04-01

    An experimental setup for low temperature thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) integrated in an ultrahigh vacuum-chamber housing a high-end scanning probe microscope for comprehensive multi-tool surface science analysis is described. This setup enables the characterization with TDS at low temperatures (T > 22 K) of portable sample designs, as is the case for scanning probe optimized setups or high-throughput experiments. This combination of techniques allows a direct correlation between surface morphology, local spectroscopy, and reactivity of model catalysts. The performance of the multi-tool setup is illustrated by measurements of a model catalyst. TDS of CO from Mo(001) and from Mo(001) supported MgO thin films were carried out and combined with scanning tunneling microscopy measurements.

  12. Apparatus for low temperature thermal desorption spectroscopy of portable samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuckenholz, S.; Büchner, C.; Ronneburg, H.; Thielsch, G.; Heyde, M.; Freund, H.-J.

    2016-04-01

    An experimental setup for low temperature thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) integrated in an ultrahigh vacuum-chamber housing a high-end scanning probe microscope for comprehensive multi-tool surface science analysis is described. This setup enables the characterization with TDS at low temperatures (T > 22 K) of portable sample designs, as is the case for scanning probe optimized setups or high-throughput experiments. This combination of techniques allows a direct correlation between surface morphology, local spectroscopy, and reactivity of model catalysts. The performance of the multi-tool setup is illustrated by measurements of a model catalyst. TDS of CO from Mo(001) and from Mo(001) supported MgO thin films were carried out and combined with scanning tunneling microscopy measurements.

  13. Desorption of Furfural from Bimetallic Pt-Fe Oxides/Alumina Catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Dimas-Rivera, Gloria Lourdes; de la Rosa, Javier Rivera; Lucio-Ortiz, Carlos J.; De los Reyes Heredia, José Antonio; González, Virgilio González; Hernández, Tomás

    2014-01-01

    In this work, the desorption of furfural, which is a competitive intermediate during the production of biofuel and valuable aromatic compounds, was studied using pure alumina, as well as alumina impregnated with iron and platinum oxides both individually and in combination, using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The bimetallic sample exhibited the lowest desorption percentage for furfural. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) imaging revealed the intimate connection between the iron and platinum oxide species on the alumina support. The mechanism of furfural desorption from the Pt-Fe/Al2O3 0.5%-0.5% sample was determined using physisorbed furfural instead of chemisorbed furfural; this mechanism involved the oxidation of the C=O group on furfural by the catalyst. The oxide nanoparticles on γ-Al2O3 support helped to stabilize the furfural molecule on the surface. PMID:28788472

  14. Thermal dissociation and desorption of PH3 on Si(001): A reinterpretation of spectroscopic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, H. F.; Warschkow, O.; Marks, N. A.; Curson, N. J.; Schofield, S. R.; Reusch, T. C. G.; Radny, M. W.; Smith, P. V.; McKenzie, D. R.; Simmons, M. Y.

    2006-11-01

    It was recently shown that low-coverage PH3 dosing of the Si(001) surface is fully dissociative at room temperature with PH2+H , PH+2H , and P+3H as intermediate species. Here, we consider high-coverage PH3 dosing and show that the increased density of adsorbates leads to qualitatively different behavior due to competition between thermal dissociation and desorption. Using a combination of existing temperature-programmed desorption data and density functional theory simulations, we present a detailed mechanistic understanding of phosphine adsorption, dissociation, and desorption on the surface. This understanding provides a consistent interpretation of existing infrared and x-ray spectroscopic data, as well as an explanation of the dependence of the phosphorus saturation coverage on dosing conditions.

  15. Dynamic and static adsorption and desorption of Hg(II) ions on chitosan membranes and spheres.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Rodrigo S; Beppu, Marisa M

    2006-05-01

    The adsorption and desorption of Hg(II) ions was studied using static and dynamic methods, employing membranes and spheres of chitosan as the adsorbent. The quantity of adsorption was influenced by chitosan crosslinking and by the adsorbent shape. The Langmuir model was applied to fit the experimental equilibrium data. Glutaraldehyde-crosslinked membranes presented a lower desorption capacity, when compared to natural membranes, but could be regenerated for use in successive cycles. Dynamic adsorption experiments suggested that the adsorption capacity depended mainly on adsorbent geometry, due to differences between surface area to mass ratio and initial concentration of Hg(II) ions. The adsorption capacity determined by the dynamic method was 65% and 77% for membranes and spheres, respectively of the value obtained static method results. A process combining dynamic adsorption and static desorption can be used to concentrate the Hg(II) ions by a factor of nearly seven (7x), when compared to the initially treated volume.

  16. Applications of plasma desorption mass spectrometry to the analysis of bioactive peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Alai, M.

    1988-01-01

    The applications of Cf-252 plasma desorption mass spectrometry to the analysis of peptides is evaluated. Sample preparation is a critical stage in such type of analyses. The plasma desorption mass spectra of compounds dissolved and electrosprayed in solutions containing reduced glutathione, showed increased molecular ion signal, reduced peak widths and an increase in multiply charged ions. Plasma desorption mass spectrometry was also evaluated for the analysis of glycopeptides, especially the glycosylation site microheterogeneity. The three N-linked sites of bovine fetuin, as a model glycoprotein, digested with trypsin and treated with neuraminidase, were identified by a combination of amino acid composition, amino acid sequence and molecular ions obtained by mass spectrometry. Methodology has also been developed for the study of mixed disulfides formed between the Cys residue of peptides and glutathione by mass spectrometry.

  17. Acoustic cryocooler

    SciTech Connect

    Swift, G.W.; Martin, R.A.; Radebaugh, R.

    1989-09-26

    An acoustic cryocooler with no moving parts is formed from a thermoacoustic driver (TAD) driving a pulse tube refrigerator (PTR) through a standing wave tube. Thermoacoustic elements in the TAD are spaced apart a distance effective to accommodate the increased thermal penetration length arising from the relatively low TAD operating frequency in the range of 15-60 Hz. At these low operating frequencies, a long tube is required to support the standing wave. The tube may be coiled to reduce the overall length of the cryocooler. One or two PTR's are located on the standing wave tube adjacent antinodes in the standing wave to be driven by the standing wave pressure oscillations. It is predicted that a heat input of 1000 W at 1000 K will maintain a cooling load of 5 W at 80 K. 3 figs.

  18. Acoustic cryocooler

    SciTech Connect

    Swift, G.W.; Martin, R.A.; Radebaugh, R.

    1990-09-04

    This patent describes an acoustic cryocooler with no moving parts is formed from a thermoacoustic driver (TAD) driving a pulse tube refrigerator (PTR) through a standing wave tube. Thermoacoustic elements in the TAD are spaced apart a distance effect to accommodate the increased thermal penetration length arising from the relatively low TAD operating frequency in the range of 15--60 Hz. At these low operating frequencies, a long tube is required to support the standing wave. The tube may be coiled to reduce the overall length of the cryocooler. One or two PTR's are located on the standing wave tube adjacent antinodes in the standing wave to be driven by the standing wave pressure oscillations. It is predicted that a heat input of 1000 W at 1000 K will maintain a cooling load of 5 W at 80 K.

  19. Acoustic cryocooler

    DOEpatents

    Swift, Gregory W.; Martin, Richard A.; Radenbaugh, Ray

    1990-01-01

    An acoustic cryocooler with no moving parts is formed from a thermoacoustic driver (TAD) driving a pulse tube refrigerator (PTR) through a standing wave tube. Thermoacoustic elements in the TAD are spaced apart a distance effective to accommodate the increased thermal penetration length arising from the relatively low TAD operating frequency in the range of 15-60 Hz. At these low operating frequencies, a long tube is required to support the standing wave. The tube may be coiled to reduce the overall length of the cryocooler. One or two PTR's are located on the standing wave tube adjacent antinodes in the standing wave to be driven by the standing wave pressure oscillations. It is predicted that a heat input of 1000 W at 1000 K will maintian a cooling load of 5 W at 80 K.

  20. Acoustic transducer

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, Douglas S.

    2000-01-01

    An active acoustic transducer tool for use down-hole applications. The tool includes a single cylindrical mandrel including a shoulder defining the boundary of a narrowed portion over which is placed a sandwich-style piezoelectric tranducer assembly. The piezoelectric transducer assembly is prestressed by being placed in a thermal interference fit between the shoulder of the mandrel and the base of an anvil which is likewise positioned over the narrower portion of the mandrel. In the preferred embodiment, assembly of the tool is accomplished using a hydraulic jack to stretch the mandrel prior to emplacement of the cylindrical sandwich-style piezoelectric transducer assembly and anvil. After those elements are positioned and secured, the stretched mandrel is allowed to return substantially to its original (pre-stretch) dimensions with the result that the piezoelectric transducer elements are compressed between the anvil and the shoulder of the mandrel.

  1. Acoustic hemostasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crum, L.; Andrew, M.; Bailey, M.; Beach, K.; Brayman, A.; Curra, F.; Kaczkowski, P.; Kargl, S.; Martin, R.; Vaezy, S.

    2003-04-01

    Over the past several years, the Center for Industrial and Medical Ultrasound (CIMU) at the Applied Physics Laboratory in the University of Washington has undertaken a broad research program in the general area of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU). Our principal emphasis has been on the use of HIFU to induce hemostasis; in particular, CIMU has sought to develop a small, lightweight, portable device that would use ultrasound for both imaging and therapy. Such a technology is needed because nearly 50% of combat casualty mortality results from exsanguinations, or uncontrolled bleeding. A similar percentage occurs for civilian death due to trauma. In this general review, a presentation of the general problem will be given, as well as our recent approaches to the development of an image-guided, transcutaneous, acoustic hemostasis device. [Work supported in part by the USAMRMC, ONR and the NIH.

  2. Acoustic performance of membrane absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frommhold, W.; Fuchs, H. V.; Sheng, S.

    1994-03-01

    This paper is a report on the acoustic properties of absorbing elements, which consist of metal membranes and show good sound absorption at low and medium frequencies over more than one octave. The studies refer to the sound absorption coefficient and acoustic impedance at normal incidence of the sound waves. It is shown that the behavior of the absorbing element is mainly determined by a combination of Helmholtz resonance and plate resonance. The parameters of the separate resonators are determined both by theory and experiment and serve as input data for a simplified calculation model, which can be used as an auxiliary tool for designing membrane absorber silencers.

  3. Acoustic telemetry.

    SciTech Connect

    Drumheller, Douglas Schaeffer; Kuszmaul, Scott S.

    2003-08-01

    Broadcasting messages through the earth is a daunting task. Indeed, broadcasting a normal telephone conversion through the earth by wireless means is impossible with todays technology. Most of us don't care, but some do. Industries that drill into the earth need wireless communication to broadcast navigation parameters. This allows them to steer their drill bits. They also need information about the natural formation that they are drilling. Measurements of parameters such as pressure, temperature, and gamma radiation levels can tell them if they have found a valuable resource such as a geothermal reservoir or a stratum bearing natural gas. Wireless communication methods are available to the drilling industry. Information is broadcast via either pressure waves in the drilling fluid or electromagnetic waves in the earth and well tubing. Data transmission can only travel one way at rates around a few baud. Given that normal Internet telephone modems operate near 20,000 baud, these data rates are truly very slow. Moreover, communication is often interrupted or permanently blocked by drilling conditions or natural formation properties. Here we describe a tool that communicates with stress waves traveling through the steel drill pipe and production tubing in the well. It's based on an old idea called Acoustic Telemetry. But what we present here is more than an idea. This tool exists, it's drilled several wells, and it works. Currently, it's the first and only acoustic telemetry tool that can withstand the drilling environment. It broadcasts one way over a limited range at much faster rates than existing methods, but we also know how build a system that can communicate both up and down wells of indefinite length.

  4. Acoustic pressure-vector sensor array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Dehua; Elswick, Roy C.; McEachern, James F.

    2004-05-01

    Pressure-vector sensors measure both scalar and vector components of the acoustic field. December 2003 measurements at the NUWC Seneca Lake test facility verify previous observations that acoustic ambient noise spectrum levels measured by acoustic intensity sensors are reduced relative to either acoustic pressure or acoustic vector sensor spectrum levels. The Seneca measurements indicate a reduction by as much as 15 dB at the upper measurement frequency of 2500 Hz. A nonlinear array synthesis theory for pressure-vector sensors will be introduced that allows smaller apertures to achieve narrow beams. The significantly reduced ambient noise of individual pressure-vector elements observed in the ocean by others, and now at Seneca Lake, should allow a nonlinearly combined array to detect significantly lower levels than has been observed in previous multiplicative processing of pressure sensors alone. Nonlinear array synthesis of pressure-vector sensors differs from conventional super-directive algorithms that linearly combine pressure elements with positive and negative weights, thereby reducing the sensitivity of conventional super-directive arrays. The much smaller aperture of acoustic pressure-vector sensor arrays will be attractive for acoustic systems on underwater vehicles, as well as for other applications that require narrow beam acoustic receivers. [The authors gratefully acknowledge the support of ONR and NUWC.

  5. [Effect of soil organic matter and cadmium (II) on adsorption and desorption of chlortetracycline in soil].

    PubMed

    Wan, Ying; Bao, Yan-Yu; Zhou, Qi-Xing

    2010-12-01

    Chlortetracycline (CTC) has been widely used in veterinary medicines and disease treatment. Heavy metals and antibiotics often coexist in soil due to land application of animal wastes and other sources of inputs. On the basis of the OECD Guideline 106, the batch equilibrium experimental method was employed to investigate sorption and desorption processes of CTC in cinnamon soil with and without soil organic matter (SOM) and examine the effect of Cd2+ on these processes. Results showed that the Freundlich model was the best isotherm to describe the experimental data for adsorption and desorption of CTC in soil on single and combined pollution conditions. In these a single chlortetracycline pollution and chlortetracycline-Cd combined pollution conditions, removal of SOM could increase the CTC adsorption capacity (K(f)) and adsorption intensity (1/n). The apparent adsorption-desorption hysteresis was found in cinnamon soil with and without SOM. In single pollution condition, the removal of SOM could significantly increase HI in cinnamon soil from 0.81 to 1.06. In all cases of CTC combined with Cd desorption studies, it had been known that HI of CTC in soils with SOM (1.11) were higher than those without SOM (0.84). This study was provided available data and parameters to set a more complete model to predict environmental concentration of CTC and evaluation their environmental risk.

  6. Acoustically Enhanced Electroplating Being Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oeftering, Richard C.

    2002-01-01

    In cooperation with the NASA Glenn Research Center, Alchemitron Corp. is developing the Acoustically Enhanced Electroplating Process (AEEP), a new technique of employing nonlinear ultrasonics to enhance electroplating. The applications range from electroplating full-panel electronic circuit boards to electroplating microelectronics and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) devices. In a conventional plating process, the surface area to be plated is separated from the nonplated areas by a temporary mask. The mask may take many forms, from a cured liquid coating to a simple tape. Generally, the mask is discarded when the plating is complete, creating a solid waste product that is often an environmental hazard. The labor and materials involved with the layout, fabrication, and tooling of masks is a primary source of recurring and nonrecurring production costs. The objective of this joint effort, therefore, is to reduce or eliminate the need for masks. AEEP improves selective plating processes by using directed beams of high-intensity acoustic waves to create nonlinear effects that alter the fluid dynamic and thermodynamic behavior of the plating process. It relies on two effects: acoustic streaming and acoustic heating. Acoustic streaming is observed when a high-intensity acoustic beam creates a liquid current within the beam. The liquid current can be directed as the beam is directed and, thus, users can move liquid around as desired without using pumps and nozzles. The current of the electroplating electrolyte, therefore, can be directed at distinct target areas where electroplating is desired. The current delivers fresh electrolyte to the target area while flushing away the spent electrolyte. This dramatically increases the plating rate in the target area. In addition, acoustic heating of both the liquid in the beam and the target surface increases the chemical reaction rate, which further increases the plating rate. The combined effects of acoustic streaming and

  7. Thermal desorption of PCB-contaminated soil with sodium hydroxide.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Qi, Zhifu; Zhao, Zhonghua; Li, Xiaodong; Buekens, Alfons; Yan, Jianhua; Ni, Mingjiang

    2015-12-01

    The thermal desorption was combined with sodium hydroxide to remediate polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-contaminated soil. The experiments were conducted at different temperatures ranging from 300 to 600 °C with three NaOH contents of 0.1, 0.5, and 1 %. The results showed that thermal desorption was effective for PCB removal, destruction, and detoxication, and the presence of NaOH enhanced the process by significant dechlorination. After treatment with 0.1 % NaOH, the removal efficiency (RE) increased from 84.8 % at 300 °C to 98.0 % at 600 °C, corresponding to 72.7 and 91.7 % of destruction efficiency (DE). With 1 % NaOH content treated at 600 °C, the RE and DE were 99.0 and 93.6 %, respectively. The effect of NaOH content on PCB removal was significant, especially at lower temperature, yet it weakened under higher temperature. The interaction between NaOH content and temperature influenced the PCB composition. The higher temperature with the help of NaOH effectively increased the RE and DE of 12 dioxin-like PCBs (based on WHO-TEQ).

  8. Uptake and desorption of hydrophilic compounds from human stratum corneum.

    PubMed

    Miller, Matthew A; Yu, Fang; Kim, Keun-Il; Kasting, Gerald B

    2017-09-10

    Small, polar compounds, both ionic and uncharged, partition into human stratum corneum immersed in aqueous solutions to an extent comparable to the water volume fraction of the tissue, then desorb in two phases. The fast phase has a time constant on the order of a few minutes, whereas the slow phase occurs over many hours. A physical model for this behavior involving a combination of tranverse diffusion through the tissue and lateral diffusion and exchange with skin appendages is presented. This concept is probed using excised human stratum corneum exposed to aqueous solutions of radiolabeled sodium chloride, tetraethyl ammonium bromide and mannitol, plus previously published data on six other compounds of varying molecular size and polarity. The fast phase desorption process becomes unimportant for lipophilic compounds. Slow phase desorption rates are size-selective, with larger species desorbing much more slowly than smaller ones. Interpreting the size-selectivity in terms of smooth cylindrical pores using the centerline approximation leads to an optimum pore radius of about 8-12Å, depending on the model chosen. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Quantifying fluxes and characterizing compositional changes of dissolved organic matter in aquatic systems in situ using combined acoustic and optical measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Downing, B.D.; Boss, E.; Bergamaschi, B.A.; Fleck, J.A.; Lionberger, M.A.; Ganju, N.K.; Schoellhamer, D.H.; Fujii, R.

    2009-01-01

    Studying the dynamics and geochemical behavior of dissolved and particulate organic material is difficult because concentration and composition may rapidly change in response to aperiodic as well as periodic physical and biological forcing. Here we describe a method useful for quantifying fluxes and analyzing dissolved organic matter (DOM) dynamics. The method uses coupled optical and acoustic measurements that provide robust quantitative estimates of concentrations and constituent characteristics needed to investigate processes and calculate fluxes of DOM in tidal and other lotic environments. Data were collected several times per hour for 2 weeks or more, with the frequency and duration limited only by power consumption and data storage capacity. We assessed the capabilities and limitations of the method using data from a winter deployment in a natural tidal wetland of the San Francisco Bay estuary. We used statistical correlation of in situ optical data with traditional laboratory analyses of discrete water samples to calibrate optical properties suited as proxies for DOM concentrations and characterizations. Coupled with measurements of flow velocity, we calculated long-term residual horizontal fluxes of DOC into and out from a tidal wetland. Subsampling the dataset provides an estimate for the maximum sampling interval beyond which the error in flux estimate is significantly increased.?? 2009, by the American Society of Limnology and Oceanography, Inc.

  10. Understanding Secondary Flows in Rivers Using a Combination of Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler Measurements and a Finite Volume solution to the Navier-Stokes Equations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furtak-Cole, E.

    2016-12-01

    Hydraulic processes in rivers are central to issues of river ecosystem health, contaminant transport, and essential to understanding meander dynamics. In particular, large scale secondary flows are often cited as being the driving force behind river bend shape and migration. We seek to understand the fundamental flow patterns in rivers by augmenting field-collected bathymetry and velocity data with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation. This approach has successfully been applied to flume studies, but rarely used in a natural setting. Here, complex geometries, lack of data, large woody debris, riprap, and biased measurements all present difficulties. Velocity and bathymetry data were collected over multiple consecutive days on a reach of the Minnesota river in Belle Plaine with an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP). Time averaging and interpolation of velocity vectors along transects reveal coarse scale secondary flow patterns, including an outer bank cell. A mesh was created from bathymetry data for use with the openFOAM C++ library. A hydraulics study is conducted by solving the Navier-Stokes equations with a slip condition free-surface and large eddy simulation turbulence model. Results are compared to field-measured data, and areas affected by downed trees and riprap are identified. We show that modelling at the coarse scale can provide useful information for understanding river hydraulics and predicting sediment transport over large domains.

  11. Sounding out erosion on the Mekong river banks: insights from combined terrestrial laser scanning, multibeam echo sounding and acoustic Doppler profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Best, J.; Hackney, C. R.; Leyland, J.; Darby, S. E.; Parsons, D. R.; Aalto, R. E.; Nicholas, A. P.

    2015-12-01

    Knowledge of bank erosion processes and rates along very large rivers remains incomplete, primarily due to the difficulties of obtaining morphological and flow data close to the bank across various flow stages. Moreover, obtaining such process information through the entire flow and bank depth has also proved challenging. Here, we present data from a series of high spatial resolution topographic (Terrestrial Laser Scanner and Multibeam Echo Sounder) and flow (Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler) surveys undertaken on the Mekong River, Cambodia, which reveal the temporal and spatial evolution of a series of embayments on the outer bank of a large meander. These techniques yield unique data that reveal how the flow field responds to the morphology of the outer bank and subaqueous slump blocks. Specifically, we show that in the early stage of embayment growth, deposited slump blocks induce flow upwelling and bank-directed flow that enhances bank erosion. Our data also suggest that as the initial erosion process continues, a threshold embayment size is reached. Below this threshold, flow separation acts to enhance embayment growth along with the fluid dynamic effects of slump blocks, but above the threshold size, the separation zone in the embayments acts as a protective layer, thus slowing erosion. This field data allows proposition of a new conceptual model of embayment evolution.

  12. Sample Desorption/Onization From Mesoporous Silica

    DOEpatents

    Iyer, Srinivas; Dattelbaum, Andrew M.

    2005-10-25

    Mesoporous silica is shown to be a sample holder for laser desorption/ionization of mass spectrometry. Supported mesoporous silica was prepared by coating an ethanolic silicate solution having a removable surfactant onto a substrate to produce a self-assembled, ordered, nanocomposite silica thin film. The surfactant was chosen to provide a desired pore size between about 1 nanometer diameter and 50 nanometers diameter. Removal of the surfactant resulted in a mesoporous silica thin film on the substrate. Samples having a molecular weight below 1000, such as C.sub.60 and tryptophan, were adsorbed onto and into the mesoporous silica thin film sample holder and analyzed using laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

  13. Sorption and desorption characteristics of methyl bromide during and after fumigation of pine (Pinus radiata D. Don) logs.

    PubMed

    Hall, Matthew; Najar-Rodriguez, Adriana; Adlam, Anthony; Hall, Alistair; Brash, Don

    2017-05-01

    The sorption and desorption characteristics of methyl bromide (MB) were determined during and after fumigation of recently harvested pine (Pinus radiata D. Don) logs. The effects of dose (48 or 120 g m(-3) ), degree of bark cover (0, 50 or 100%) and end-grain sealing (sealed or unsealed) on sorption and desorption were determined over time. Sorption of MB was proportional to the dose applied and dependent on the amount of end-grain sealed. After 16 h, an average of 70.7 ± 2.5% of the initial concentration remained in the treated space when end-grains were sealed, whereas only 47.3 ± 2.5% remained when unsealed. During aeration, MB was released from logs, initially ranging from 2.8 to 8.8 g · h m(-3) , depending on the treatment. The rate of desorption quickly decreased during aeration. The surface area of a log is the most important factor influencing MB sorption and desorption rates, with greater surface area resulting in greater (de)sorption rates. Sorption data can now be combined with insect toxicity data to estimate a minimum effective dose of MB for further evaluation, while desorption data can be combined with fumigant plume modelling to assess worker safety. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  14. Desorption Kinetics of Methanol, Ethanol, and Water from Graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R. Scott; Matthiesen, Jesper; Kay, Bruce D.

    2014-09-18

    The desorption kinetics of methanol, ethanol, and water from graphene covered Pt(111) are investigated. The temperature programmed desorption (TPD) spectra for both methanol and ethanol have well-resolved first, second, third, and multilayer layer desorption peaks. The alignment of the leading edges is consistent with zero-order desorption kinetics from all layers. In contrast, for water the first and second layers are not resolved. At low water coverages (< 1 ML) the initial desorption leading edges are aligned but then fall out of alignment at higher temperatures. For thicker water layers (10 to 100 ML), the desorption leading edges are in alignment throughout the desorption of the film. The coverage dependence of the desorption behavoir suggests that at low water coverages the non-alignment of the desorption leading edges is due to water dewetting from the graphene substrate. Kinetic simulations reveal that the experimental results are consistent with zero-order desorption. The simulations also show that fractional order desorption kinetics would be readily apparent in the experimental TPD spectra.

  15. Existence and stability of alternative ion-acoustic solitary wave solution of the combined MKdV-KdV-ZK equation in a magnetized nonthermal plasma consisting of warm adiabatic ions

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Jayasree; Bandyopadhyay, Anup; Das, K. P.

    2007-09-15

    The purpose of this paper is to present the recent work of Das et al. [J. Plasma Phys. 72, 587 (2006)] on the existence and stability of the alternative solitary wave solution of fixed width of the combined MKdV-KdV-ZK (Modified Korteweg-de Vries-Korteweg-de Vries-Zakharov-Kuznetsov) equation for the ion-acoustic wave in a magnetized nonthermal plasma consisting of warm adiabatic ions in a more generalized form. Here we derive the alternative solitary wave solution of variable width instead of fixed width of the combined MKdV-KdV-ZK equation along with the condition for its existence and find that this solution assumes the sech profile of the MKdV-ZK (Modified Korteweg-de Vries-Zakharov-Kuznetsov) equation, when the coefficient of the nonlinear term of the KdV-ZK (Korteweg-de Vries-Zakharov-Kuznetsov) equation tends to zero. The three-dimensional stability analysis of the alternative solitary wave solution of variable width of the combined MKdV-KdV-ZK equation shows that the instability condition and the first order growth rate of instability are exactly the same as those of the solitary wave solution (the sech profile) of the MKdV-ZK equation, when the coefficient of the nonlinear term of the KdV-ZK equation tends to zero.

  16. Thermal desorption study of physical forces at the PTFE surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, D. R.; Pepper, S. V.

    1985-01-01

    Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) of the polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) surface was successfully employed to study the possibile role of physical forces in the enhancement of metal-PTFE adhesion by radiation. The thermal desorption spectra were analyzed without assumptions to yield the activation energy for desorption over a range of xenon coverage from less than 0.1 monolayer to more than 100 monolayers. For multilayer coverage, the desorption is zero-order with an activation energy equal to the sublimation energy of xenon. For submonolayer coverages, the order for desorption from the unirradiated PTFE surface is 0.73 and the activation energy for desorption is between 3.32 and 3.36 kcal/mol; less than the xenon sublimation energy. The effect of irradiation is to increase the activation energy for desorption to as high as 4 kcal/mol at low coverage.

  17. PAH desorption from river floodplain soils using supercritical fluid extraction.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi; Cajthaml, Tomás; Hofmann, Thilo

    2008-12-01

    Sequential supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) was performed in order to estimate desorption of PAHs from river floodplain soils which contain coal and coal-derived particles. Original soils, soils' light fractions (rho<2 g cm(-3)), and <63 microm fractions were studied for PAHs' desorption kinetics. Desorption data were successfully described using a two-site model. Desorption rate constants were one order of magnitude lower than those of "slow" and "very slow" desorption rates from other studies. This suggests very slow and extremely slow desorption. Estimated time scales releasing 99% of total extractable contaminants ranged from decades for 2-4-ring PAHs and hundreds of years for 5-6-ring PAHs. We demonstrate that, despite high soil PAH concentrations which are due to coal and coal-derived particles, the general environmental risk is reduced by the very slow and extremely slow desorption rates.

  18. Thermal desorption study of physical forces at the PTFE surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, D. R.; Pepper, S. V.

    Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) of the polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) surface was successfully employed to study the possibile role of physical forces in the enhancement of metal-PTFE adhesion by radiation. The thermal desorption spectra were analyzed without assumptions to yield the activation energy for desorption over a range of xenon coverage from less than 0.1 monolayer to more than 100 monolayers. For multilayer coverage, the desorption is zero-order with an activation energy equal to the sublimation energy of xenon. For submonolayer coverages, the order for desorption from the unirradiated PTFE surface is 0.73 and the activation energy for desorption is between 3.32 and 3.36 kcal/mol; less than the xenon sublimation energy. The effect of irradiation is to increase the activation energy for desorption to as high as 4 kcal/mol at low coverage.

  19. Plutonium sorption and desorption behavior on bentonite.

    PubMed

    Begg, James D; Zavarin, Mavrik; Tumey, Scott J; Kersting, Annie B

    2015-03-01

    Understanding plutonium (Pu) sorption to, and desorption from, mineral phases is key to understanding its subsurface transport. In this work we study Pu(IV) sorption to industrial grade FEBEX bentonite over the concentration range 10(-7)-10(-16) M to determine if sorption at typical environmental concentrations (≤10(-12) M) is the same as sorption at Pu concentrations used in most laboratory experiments (10(-7)-10(-11) M). Pu(IV) sorption was broadly linear over the 10(-7)-10(-16) M concentration range during the 120 d experimental period; however, it took up to 100 d to reach sorption equilibrium. At concentrations ≥10(-8) M, sorption was likely affected by additional Pu(IV) precipitation/polymerization reactions. The extent of sorption was similar to that previously reported for Pu(IV) sorption to SWy-1 Na-montmorillonite over a narrower range of Pu concentrations (10(-11)-10(-7) M). Sorption experiments with FEBEX bentonite and Pu(V) were also performed across a concentration range of 10(-11)-10(-7) M and over a 10 month period which allowed us to estimate the slow apparent rates of Pu(V) reduction on a smectite-rich clay. Finally, a flow cell experiment with Pu(IV) loaded on FEBEX bentonite demonstrated continued desorption of Pu over a 12 day flow period. Comparison with a desorption experiment performed with SWy-1 montmorillonite showed a strong similarity and suggested the importance of montorillonite phases in controlling Pu sorption/desorption reactions on FEBEX bentonite.

  20. Thermal desorption of deuterium implanted into beryllium

    SciTech Connect

    Markin, A.V.; Chernikov, V.N.; Zakharov, A.P.

    1995-09-01

    By means of TDS measurements it is shown that the desorption of deuterium from Be implanted with 5 keV D ions to fluences, {Phi}, from 1x10{sup 20} D/m{sup 2} to 1x10{sup 21} D/m{sup 2} proceeds in one high temperature stage B, while at {Phi} {ge} 1.2x10{sup 21}D/m{sup 2} one more stage A is added. The desorption maximum A is narrow and consists of two peaks A{sub 1} and A{sub 2} at about 460 K and 490 K, respectively. Peak A{sub 1} is attributed to the desorption of deuterium from the walls of opened channels formed under D ion implantation. Peak {sub A}2 is a consequence of the opening of a part of closed bubbles/channels to the outer surface. The position of maximum B shifts noticeably and nonsteadily on the fluence in a range from 850 to 1050 K. The origin of this maximum is the liberation of D atoms bound at vacancy complexes discussed previously by Wampler. The dependence of Tm(B) on the fluence is governed by the interaction of freely migrating D atoms with partly opened or fully closed gas cavity arrangements which are created under temperature ramping, but differently in specimens implanted with D ions to different fluences.

  1. Sonolytic desorption of mercury from aluminum oxide.

    PubMed

    He, Ziqi; Traina, Samuel J; Bigham, Jerry M; Weavers, Linda K

    2005-02-15

    As discrete particles and/or as coatings on other mineral surfaces in natural systems, aluminum (hydr)oxides are efficient sinks for Hg(II). Ultrasound at 20 kHz was applied to enhance the desorption of Hg(II) from aluminum oxide particles (5.0 micromol of Hg g(-1)). Results showed that at short times ultrasound enhanced Hg(II) release at pH 4.0 compared to both that from hydrodynamic mixing and that expected on the basis of the Hg(II) sorption isotherm. The higher the input power of sonication, the higher the desorption of Hg(II). However, with longer times, much less desorption occurred by ultrasound than by hydrodynamic mixing, with mass balance measurements demonstrating that the desorbed Hg(II) was resorbed back to the particles. The particles were characterized to explore the mechanism for resorption of Hg(II) by prolonged sonication. No surface area change was observed even though ultrasound dramatically reduced the particle size and changed the surface morphology. Although a decrease in the point of zero charge (PZC) due to sonication was observed, it was excluded as the primary mechanism for Hg(II) resorption. Hg(II) occlusion by aluminum hydroxide precipitation was supported by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results and the formation of solutions supersaturated with AI. Experiments on presonicated particles verified the occlusion theory by ruling out the effects of the surface area and PZC.

  2. Mass spectrometry of acoustically levitated droplets.

    PubMed

    Westphall, Michael S; Jorabchi, Kaveh; Smith, Lloyd M

    2008-08-01

    Containerless sample handling techniques such as acoustic levitation offer potential advantages for mass spectrometry, by eliminating surfaces where undesired adsorption/desorption processes can occur. In addition, they provide a unique opportunity to study fundamental aspects of the ionization process as well as phenomena occurring at the air-droplet interface. Realizing these advantages is contingent, however, upon being able to effectively interface levitated droplets with a mass spectrometer, a challenging task that is addressed in this report. We have employed a newly developed charge and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (CALDI) technique to obtain mass spectra from a 5-microL acoustically levitated droplet containing peptides and an ionic matrix. A four-ring electrostatic lens is used in conjunction with a corona needle to produce bursts of corona ions and to direct those ions toward the droplet, resulting in droplet charging. Analyte ions are produced from the droplet by a 337-nm laser pulse and detected by an atmospheric sampling mass spectrometer. The ion generation and extraction cycle is repeated at 20 Hz, the maximum operating frequency of the laser employed. It is shown in delayed ion extraction experiments that both positive and negative ions are produced, behavior similar to that observed for atmospheric pressure matrix-assisted laser absorption/ionization. No ion signal is observed in the absence of droplet charging. It is likely, although not yet proven, that the role of the droplet charging is to increase the strength of the electric field at the surface of the droplet, reducing charge recombination after ion desorption.

  3. Pulsed-Source Interferometry in Acoustic Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shcheglov, Kirill; Gutierrez, Roman; Tang, Tony K.

    2003-01-01

    A combination of pulsed-source interferometry and acoustic diffraction has been proposed for use in imaging subsurface microscopic defects and other features in such diverse objects as integrated-circuit chips, specimens of materials, and mechanical parts. A specimen to be inspected by this technique would be mounted with its bottom side in contact with an acoustic transducer driven by a continuous-wave acoustic signal at a suitable frequency, which could be as low as a megahertz or as high as a few hundred gigahertz. The top side of the specimen would be coupled to an object that would have a flat (when not vibrating) top surface and that would serve as the acoustical analog of an optical medium (in effect, an acoustical "optic").

  4. Piezoelectric materials used in underwater acoustic transducers

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Huidong; Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2012-07-07

    Piezoelectric materials have been used in underwater acoustic transducers for nearly a century. In this paper, we reviewed four different types of piezoelectric materials: piezoelectric ceramics, single crystals, composites, and polymers, which are widely used in underwater acoustic transducers nowadays. Piezoelectric ceramics are the most dominant material type and are used as a single-phase material or one of the end members in composites. Piezoelectric single crystals offer outstanding electromechanical response but are limited by their manufacturing cost. Piezoelectric polymers provide excellent acoustic impedance matching and transducer fabrication flexibility although their piezoelectric properties are not as good as ceramics and single crystals. Composites combined the merits of ceramics and polymers and are receiving increased attention. The typical structure and electromechanical properties of each type of materials are introduced and discussed with respect to underwater acoustic transducer applications. Their advantages and disadvantages are summarized. Some of the critical design considerations when developing underwater acoustic transducers with these materials are also touched upon.

  5. Acoustic Aspects of Photoacoustic Signal Generation and Detection in Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miklós, A.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper photoacoustic signal generation and detection in gases is investigated and discussed from the standpoint of acoustics. Four topics are considered: the effect of the absorption-desorption process of modulated and pulsed light on the heat power density released in the gas; the generation of the primary sound by the released heat in an unbounded medium; the excitation of an acoustic resonator by the primary sound; and finally, the generation of the measurable PA signal by a microphone. When light is absorbed by a molecule and the excess energy is relaxed by collisions with the surrounding molecules, the average kinetic energy, thus also the temperature of an ensemble of molecules (called "particle" in acoustics) will increase. In other words heat energy is added to the energy of the particle. The rate of the energy transfer is characterized by the heat power density. A simple two-level model of absorption-desorption is applied for describing the heat power generation process for modulated and pulsed illumination. Sound generation by a laser beam in an unbounded medium is discussed by means of the Green's function technique. It is shown that the duration of the generated sound pulse depends mostly on beam geometry. A photoacoustic signal is mostly detected in a photoacoustic cell composed of acoustic resonators, buffers, filters, etc. It is not easy to interpret the measured PA signal in such a complicated acoustic system. The acoustic response of a PA detector to different kinds of excitations (modulated cw, pulsed, periodic pulse train) is discussed. It is shown that acoustic resonators respond very differently to modulated cw excitation and to excitation by a pulse train. The microphone for detecting the PA signal is also a part of the acoustic system; its properties have to be taken into account by the design of a PA detector. The moving membrane of the microphone absorbs acoustic energy; thus, it may influence the resonance frequency and

  6. Acoustic hemostasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crum, Lawrence; Beach, Kirk; Carter, Stephen; Chandler, Wayne; Curra, Francesco; Kaczkowski, Peter; Keilman, George; Khokhlova, Vera; Martin, Roy; Mourad, Pierre; Vaezy, Shahram

    2000-07-01

    In cases of severe injury, physicians speak of a "golden hour"—a brief grace period in which quickly applied, proper therapy can save the life of the patient. Much of this mortality results from exsanguination, i.e., bleeding to death—often from internal hemorrhage. The inability of a paramedic to treat breaches in the vascular system deep within the body or to stem the loss of blood from internal organs is a major reason for the high level of mortality associated with blunt trauma. We have undertaken an extensive research program to treat the problem of internal bleeding. Our approach is as follows: (a) We use scanning ultrasound to identify internal bleeding and hemorrhage, (b) we use ultrasound imaging to locate specific breaches in the vascular system, both from damaged vessels and gross damage to the capillary bed, and (c) we use High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) to treat the damaged region and to induce hemostasis. We present a general review of this research with some emphasis on the role of nonlinear acoustics.

  7. Acoustic streaming jets: A scaling and dimensional analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Botton, V. Henry, D.; Millet, S.; Ben-Hadid, H.; Garandet, J. P.

    2015-10-28

    We present our work on acoustic streaming free jets driven by ultrasonic beams in liquids. These jets are steady flows generated far from walls by progressive acoustic waves. As can be seen on figure 1, our set-up, denominated AStrID for Acoustic Streaming Investigation Device, is made of a water tank in which a 29 mm plane source emits continuous ultrasonic waves at typically 2 MHz. Our approach combines an experimental characterization of both the acoustic pressure field (hydrophone) and the obtained acoustic streaming velocity field (PIV visualization) on one hand, with CFD using an incompressible Navier-Stokes solver on the other hand.

  8. Acoustic streaming jets: A scaling and dimensional analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botton, V.; Moudjed, B.; Henry, D.; Millet, S.; Ben-Hadid, H.; Garandet, J. P.

    2015-10-01

    We present our work on acoustic streaming free jets driven by ultrasonic beams in liquids. These jets are steady flows generated far from walls by progressive acoustic waves. As can be seen on figure 1, our set-up, denominated AStrID for Acoustic Streaming Investigation Device, is made of a water tank in which a 29 mm plane source emits continuous ultrasonic waves at typically 2 MHz. Our approach combines an experimental characterization of both the acoustic pressure field (hydrophone) and the obtained acoustic streaming velocity field (PIV visualization) on one hand, with CFD using an incompressible Navier-Stokes solver on the other hand.

  9. The adsorption and desorption of hydrogen and carbon monoxide on bimetallic RePt(111) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godbey, David J.; Somorjai, G. A.

    1988-10-01

    Bimetallic surfaces of rhenium on Pt(111) were prepared by vapor depositing rhenium on Pt(111). The adsorption and desorption behavior of CO and H 2 on bimetallic PtRe surfaces were studied using temperature programmed desorption, and compared to the behavior of CO and H 2 on the monometallic Pt(111) and Re(0001) counterparts. Depositing rhenium on a Pt(111) surface decreased the activation energy of desorption of hydrogen, and a surface composed of 0.37 monolayers of rhenium on Pt(111) showed an activation energy of hydrogen desorption that was 2.5 {kcal}/{mol} less than the 19 {kcal}/{mol} displayed by the monometallic Pt(111) surface. In contrast, the activation energy of desorption of CO from bimetallic surfaces depended very little on the bimetallic surface composition, and a value of 27 {kcal}/{mol} was observed for low CO coverages. At saturation exposures of both H 2 and CO, maximum adsorption capacities were obtained for bimetallic surfaces. A surface composed of 0.2 monolayers of rhenium on Pt(111) adsorbed 20% more hydrogen than did Pt(111) alone, while a surface composed of 0.3 monolayers of rhenium on Pt(111) adsorbed 40% more CO than did Pt(111) alone. The results obtained show that surfaces exposing both rhenium and platinum atoms show adsorption/desorption behavior towards hydrogen and CO that is different than the behavior shown by either monometallic platinum or rhenium surfaces. Since the chemisorption behavior cannot be explained as a simple combination of the two metallic components of the surface, it is concluded that an electronic interaction between the two metals at the platinum-rhenium interface modifies the bonding of adsorbates at the mixed metal sites.

  10. Laser desorption fast gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in supersonic molecular beams.

    PubMed

    Shahar, T; Dagan, S; Amirav, A

    1998-06-01

    A novel method for fast analysis is presented. It is based on laser desorption injection followed by fast gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) in supersonic molecular beams. The sample was placed in an open air or purged laser desorption compartment, held at atmospheric pressure and near room temperature conditions. Desorption was performed with a XeCl Excimer pulsed laser with pulse energy of typically 3 mJ on the surface. About 20 pulses at 50 Hz were applied for sample injection, resulting in about 0.4 s injection time and one or a few micrograms sample vapor or small particles. The laser desorbed sample was further thermally vaporized at a heated frit glass filter located at the fast GC inlet. Ultrafast GC separation and quantification was achieved with a 50-cm-long megabore column operated with a high carrier gas flow rate of up to 240 mL/min. The high carrier gas flow rate provided effective and efficient entrainment of the laser desorbed species in the sweeping gas. Following the fast GC separation, the sample was analyzed by mass spectrometry in supersonic molecular beams. Both electron ionization and hyperthermal surface ionization were employed for enhanced selectivity and sensitivity. Typical laser desorption analysis time was under 10 s. The laser desorption fast GC-MS was studied and demonstrated with the following sample/matrices combinations, all without sample preparation or extraction: (a) traces of dioctylphthalate plasticizer oil on stainless steel surface and the efficiency of its cleaning; (b) the detection of methylparathion and aldicarb pesticides on orange leaves; (c) water surface analysis for the presence of methylparathion pesticide; (d) caffeine analysis in regular and decaffeinated coffee powder; (e) paracetamol and codeine drug analysis in pain relieving drug tablets; (f) caffeine trace analysis in raw urine; (g) blood analysis for the presence of 1 ppm lidocaine drug. The features and advantages of the laser desorption fast GC

  11. Theoretical and experimental studies of hydrogen adsorption and desorption on Ir surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Kaghazchi, Payam; Jacob, Timo; Chen, Wenhua; Bartynski, Robert A.

    2013-06-03

    Here, we report adsorption and desorption of hydrogen on planar Ir(210) and faceted Ir(210), consisting of nanoscale {311} and (110) facets, by means of temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and density functional theory (DFT) in combination with the ab initio atomistic thermodynamics approach. TPD spectra show that only one H2 peak is seen from planar Ir(210) at all coverages whereas a single H2 peak is observed at around 440 K (F1) at fractional monolayer (ML) coverage and an additional H2 peak appears at around 360 K (F2) at 1 ML coverage on faceted Ir(210), implying structure sensitivity in recombination and desorption of hydrogen on faceted Ir(210) versus planar Ir(210), but no evidence is found for size effects in recombination and desorption of hydrogen on faceted Ir(210) for average facet sizes of 5-14 nm. Calculations indicate that H prefers to bind at the two-fold short-bridge sites of the Ir surfaces. In addition, we studied the stability of the Ir surfaces in the presence of hydrogen at different H coverages through surface free energy plots as a function of the chemical potential, which is also converted to a temperature scale. Moreover, the calculations revealed the origin of the two TPD peaks of H2 from faceted Ir(210): F1 from desorption of H2 on {311} facets while F2 from desorption of H2 on (110) facets.

  12. Acoustic source for generating an acoustic beam

    DOEpatents

    Vu, Cung Khac; Sinha, Dipen N.; Pantea, Cristian

    2016-05-31

    An acoustic source for generating an acoustic beam includes a housing; a plurality of spaced apart piezo-electric layers disposed within the housing; and a non-linear medium filling between the plurality of layers. Each of the plurality of piezoelectric layers is configured to generate an acoustic wave. The non-linear medium and the plurality of piezo-electric material layers have a matching impedance so as to enhance a transmission of the acoustic wave generated by each of plurality of layers through the remaining plurality of layers.

  13. Acoustic-emission linear-pulse holography

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, H.D.; Lemon, D.K.; Busse, L.J.

    1982-06-01

    This paper describes Acoustic Emission Linear Pulse Holography which combines the advantages of linear imaging and acoustic emission into a single NDE inspection system. This unique system produces a chronological linear holographic image of a flaw by utilizing the acoustic energy emitted during crack growth. Conventional linear holographic imaging uses an ultrasonic transducer to transmit energy into the volume being imaged. When the crack or defect reflects that energy, the crack acts as a new source of acoustic waves. To formulate an image of that source, a receiving transducer is scanned over the volume of interest and the phase of the received signals is measured at successive points on the scan. The innovation proposed here is the utilization of the crack generated acoustic emission as the acoustic source and generation of a line image of the crack as it grows. A thirty-two point sampling array is used to construct phase-only linear holograms of simulated acoustic emission sources on large metal plates. The phases are calculated using the pulse time-of-flight (TOF) times from the reference transducer to the array of receivers. Computer reconstruction of the image is accomplished using a one-dimensional FFT algorithm (i.e., backward wave). Experimental results are shown which graphically illustrate the unique acoustic emission images of a single point and a linear crack in a 100 mm x 1220 mm x 1220 mm aluminum plate.

  14. Current-Driven Hydrogen Desorption from Graphene: Experiment and Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, L.; Pal, Partha P.; Seideman, Tamar; Guisinger, Nathan P.; Guest, Jeffrey R.

    2016-02-04

    Electron-stimulated desorption of hydrogen from the graphene/SiC(0001) surface at room temperature was investigated with ultrahigh vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy and ab initio calculations in order to elucidate the desorption mechanisms and pathways. Two different desorption processes were observed. In the high electron energy regime (4-8 eV), the desorption yield is independent of both voltage and current, which is attributed to the direct electronic excitation of the C-H bond. In the low electron energy regime (2-4 eV), however, the desorption yield exhibits a threshold dependence on voltage, which is explained by the vibrational excitation of the C-H bond via transient ionization induced by inelastic tunneling electrons. The observed current-independence of the desorption yield suggests that the vibrational excitation is a singleelectron process. We also observed that the curvature of graphene dramatically affects hydrogen desorption. Desorption from concave regions was measured to be much more probable than desorption from convex regions in the low electron energy regime (~ 2 eV), as would be expected from the identified desorption mechanism

  15. MTCI acoustic agglomeration particulate control

    SciTech Connect

    Chandran, R.R.; Mansour, M.N.; Scaroni, A.W.; Koopmann, G.H.; Loth, J.L.

    1994-10-01

    The overall objective of this project is to demonstrate pulse combination induced acoustic enhancement of coal ash agglomeration and sulfur capture at conditions typical of direct coal-fired turbines and PFBC hot gas cleanup. MTCI has developed an advanced compact pulse combustor island for direct coal-firing in combustion gas turbines. This combustor island comprises a coal-fired pulse combustor, a combined ash agglomeration and sulfur capture chamber (CAASCC), and a hot cyclone. In the MTCI proprietary approach, the pulse combustion-induced high intensity sound waves improve sulfur capture efficiency and ash agglomeration. The resulting agglomerates allow the use of commercial cyclones and achieve very high particulate collection efficiency. In the MTCI proprietary approach, sorbent particles are injected into a gas stream subjected to an intense acoustic field. The acoustic field serves to improve sulfur capture efficiency by enhancing both gas film and intra-particle mass transfer rates. In addition, the sorbent particles act as dynamic filter foci, providing a high density of stagnant agglomerating centers for trapping the finer entrained (in the oscillating flow field) fly ash fractions. A team has been formed with MTCI as the prime contractor and Penn State University and West Virginia University as subcontractors to MTCI. MTCI is focusing on hardware development and system demonstration, PSU is investigating and modeling acoustic agglomeration and sulfur capture, and WVU is studying aerovalve fluid dynamics. Results are presented from all three studies.

  16. Canonical Acoustics and Its Application to Surface Acoustic Wave on Acoustic Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jian Qi

    2016-08-01

    In a conventional formalism of acoustics, acoustic pressure p and velocity field u are used for characterizing acoustic waves propagating inside elastic/acoustic materials. We shall treat some fundamental problems relevant to acoustic wave propagation alternatively by using canonical acoustics (a more concise and compact formalism of acoustic dynamics), in which an acoustic scalar potential and an acoustic vector potential (Φ ,V), instead of the conventional acoustic field quantities such as acoustic pressure and velocity field (p,u) for characterizing acoustic waves, have been defined as the fundamental variables. The canonical formalism of the acoustic energy-momentum tensor is derived in terms of the acoustic potentials. Both the acoustic Hamiltonian density and the acoustic Lagrangian density have been defined, and based on this formulation, the acoustic wave quantization in a fluid is also developed. Such a formalism of acoustic potentials is employed to the problem of negative-mass-density assisted surface acoustic wave that is a highly localized surface bound state (an eigenstate of the acoustic wave equations). Since such a surface acoustic wave can be strongly confined to an interface between an acoustic metamaterial (e.g., fluid-solid composite structures with a negative dynamical mass density) and an ordinary material (with a positive mass density), it will give rise to an effect of acoustic field enhancement on the acoustic interface, and would have potential applications in acoustic device design for acoustic wave control.

  17. Acoustic Holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yang-Hann

    One of the subtle problems that make noise control difficult for engineers is the invisibility of noise or sound. A visual image of noise often helps to determine an appropriate means for noise control. There have been many attempts to fulfill this rather challenging objective. Theoretical (or numerical) means for visualizing the sound field have been attempted, and as a result, a great deal of progress has been made. However, most of these numerical methods are not quite ready for practical applications to noise control problems. In the meantime, rapid progress with instrumentation has made it possible to use multiple microphones and fast signal-processing systems. Although these systems are not perfect, they are useful. A state-of-the-art system has recently become available, but it still has many problematic issues; for example, how can one implement the visualized noise field. The constructed noise or sound picture always consists of bias and random errors, and consequently, it is often difficult to determine the origin of the noise and the spatial distribution of the noise field. Section 26.2 of this chapter introduces a brief history, which is associated with "sound visualization," acoustic source identification methods and what has been accomplished with a line or surface array. Section 26.2.3 introduces difficulties and recent studies, including de-Dopplerization and de-reverberation methods, both essentialfor visualizing a moving noise source, such as occurs for cars or trains. This section also addresses what produces ambiguity in realizing real sound sources in a room or closed space. Another major issue associated with sound/noise visualization is whether or not we can distinguish between mutual dependencies of noise in space (Sect. 26.2.4); for example, we are asked to answer the question, "Can we see two birds singing or one bird with two beaks?"

  18. Acoustic Holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yang-Hann

    One of the subtle problems that make noise control difficult for engineers is the invisibility of noise or sound. A visual image of noise often helps to determine an appropriate means for noise control. There have been many attempts to fulfill this rather challenging objective. Theoretical (or numerical) means for visualizing the sound field have been attempted, and as a result, a great deal of progress has been made. However, most of these numerical methods are not quite ready for practical applications to noise control problems. In the meantime, rapid progress with instrumentation has made it possible to use multiple microphones and fast signal-processing systems. Although these systems are not perfect, they are useful. A state-of-the-art system has recently become available, but it still has many problematic issues; for example, how can one implement the visualized noise field. The constructed noise or sound picture always consists of bias and random errors, and consequently, it is often difficult to determine the origin of the noise and the spatial distribution of the noise field. Section 26.2 of this chapter introduces a brief history, which is associated with sound visualization, acoustic source identification methods and what has been accomplished with a line or surface array. Section 26.2.3 introduces difficulties and recent studies, including de-Dopplerization and de-re verberation methods, both essential for visualizing a moving noise source, such as occurs for cars or trains. This section also addresses what produces ambiguity in realizing real sound sources in a room or closed space. Another major issue associated with sound/noise visualization is whether or not we can distinguish between mutual dependencies of noise in space (Sect. 26.2.4); for example, we are asked to answer the question, Can we see two birds singing or one bird with two beaks?

  19. Nonlinear acoustic propagation in rectangular ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nayfeh, A. H.; Tsai, M.-S.

    1974-01-01

    The method of multiple scales is used to obtain a second-order uniformly valid expansion for nonlinear acoustic wave propagation in a rectangular duct whose walls are treated with a nonlinear acoustic material. The wave propagation in the duct is characterized by the unsteady nonlinear Euler equations. The results show that nonlinear materials attenuate sound more than linear materials except at high acoustic frequencies. The nonlinear materials produce higher and combination tones which have higher attenuation rates than the fundamentals. Moreover, the attenuation rates of the fundamentals increase with increasing amplitude.

  20. Interactions of coupled acoustic and vortical instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, T. J.; Sohn, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    In the past, the acoustic combustion instability was studied independently of the hydrodynamic instability induced by vortex motions. This paper is intended to combine the two different sources of energy everywhere within the spatial domain and determine the effect of one upon the other. This can be achieved by calculating the mean flow velocities and vorticities and their fluctuating parts of velocities and vortices, as well as the fluctuating pressure. The Orr-Sommerfeld equation is utilized to determine the wavenumbers and unsteady stream functions from which vortically coupled acoustic instability growth constants are calculated. This process demonstrates that there are two different frequencies, acoustic and hydrodynamic, various combinations of which contribute to either damping or amplification. It is found that stability boundaries for coupled acoustic and vortical oscillations are somewhat similar to the classical hydrodynamic stability boundaries, but they occur in the form of multiple islands.

  1. Symptoms of Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions to Ask Yourself ... Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions to Ask Yourself ...

  2. Identifying the Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions to Ask Yourself ... Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions to Ask Yourself ...

  3. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    MedlinePlus

    ... Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions to Ask Yourself ... Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions to Ask Yourself ...

  4. Acoustic Neuroma Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions to Ask Yourself ... Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions to Ask Yourself ...

  5. Treatment of Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    ... acoustic neuroma. There are several different commercially-available machines that are used to treat acoustic neuromas with ... how the radiation is precisely delivered. Gamma Knife® machines derive their radiation from a fixed-array of ...

  6. NPL closes acoustics department

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Extance, Andy

    2016-11-01

    The UK's National Physical Laboratory (NPL) has withdrawn funding for its acoustics, polymer and thermoelectrics groups, triggering concern among airborne acoustics specialists that the move could undermine the country's noise-management policies.

  7. Environmental Acoustics and Intensity Vector Acoustics with Emphasis on Shallow Water Effects and the Sea Surface

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    as MORAY) consisting of a combined pressure and vector sensor (4 channels ), a 7- element vertical line array and a 4-elment horizontal line array of...pressure sensors (Fig. 3.). The combined set of vector sensors and array elements established a set of 15 channels that were coherently recorded...Streamlines Interference among modes or rays can establish a null, or dislocation , where the acoustic pressure field vanishes. Measurements of the acoustic

  8. Modelling of field desorption of monocrystal nanotip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikiforov, K. A.; Krasnova, A. A.

    2015-11-01

    Mathematical and computer model of field desorption process from metal nanocrystal tip is proposed. The radius of curvature on the top of the emitter is about 50 lattice parameters. The model includes initial calculation of intersection between the crystal lattice and emitter shape for bcc and fcc crystal structures. Arbitrary axisymmetric shapes (figures of rotation) can be used for the emitter model. The algorithm for allocation of atoms being desorbed at given time step is based on an analysis of geometric environment with specified local electric field. Polyhedron nanostructured shape of emitter is obtained as result of evaporation. Computer program realization (Matlab stand alone application) is presented.

  9. Synchrotron radiation stimulated gas desorption from metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marin, P. C.

    1994-05-01

    The main trends of photon stimulated desorption, from vacuum chamber walls in synchrotron radiation sources and e + e - circular colliders are shortly reminded as well as its relevance to the machine performances. The results of a detailed study performed with a beam of critical energy 3.75 keV on an OFHC test chamber, at the X-ray radiation source, DCI, at Orsay are then presented. Other experiments carried out elsewhere are shortly discussed. In conclusion, a few remarks are made on what could be the future trends in such investigations.

  10. HYDROGEN AND ITS DESORPTION IN RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    HSEUH,H.C.

    2002-11-11

    Hydrogen is the dominating gas specie in room temperature, ultrahigh vacuum systems of particle accelerators and storage rings, such as the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven. Rapid pressure increase of a few decades in hydrogen and other residual gases was observed during RHIC's recent high intensity gold and proton runs. The type and magnitude of the pressure increase were analyzed and compared with vacuum conditioning, beam intensity, number of bunches and bunch spacing. Most of these pressure increases were found to be consistent with those induced by beam loss and/or electron stimulated desorption from electron multipacting.

  11. Thermal desorption mass spectrometer for mass metrology.

    PubMed

    Silvestri, Z; Azouigui, S; Bouhtiyya, S; Macé, S; Plimmer, M D; Pinot, P; Tayeb-Chandoul, F; Hannachi, R

    2014-04-01

    This article presents a device for the study of physisorbed elements on polished surfaces (diameter ⩽56 mm) of the kind used in mass metrology. The technique is based on mass spectrometry of molecules desorbed after heating under vacuum of the analyzed surface. We describe a first application of the device to study current and future mass standards in order to understand how their surface reactivity depends on storage conditions, cleaning processes, and polishing methods. Surface contamination analysis by thermal desorption mass spectrometry to examine the effect of cleaning on pure iridium is given as an example.

  12. Highly Localized Acoustic Streaming and Size-Selective Submicrometer Particle Concentration Using High Frequency Microscale Focused Acoustic Fields.

    PubMed

    Collins, David J; Ma, Zhichao; Ai, Ye

    2016-05-17

    Concentration and separation of particles and biological specimens are fundamental functions of micro/nanofluidic systems. Acoustic streaming is an effective and biocompatible way to create rapid microscale fluid motion and induce particle capture, though the >100 MHz frequencies required to directly generate acoustic body forces on the microscale have traditionally been difficult to generate and localize in a way that is amenable to efficient generation of streaming. Moreover, acoustic, hydrodynamic, and electrical forces as typically applied have difficulty manipulating specimens in the submicrometer regime. In this work, we introduce highly focused traveling surface acoustic waves (SAW) at high frequencies between 193 and 636 MHz for efficient and highly localized production of acoustic streaming vortices on microfluidic length scales. Concentration occurs via a novel mechanism, whereby the combined acoustic radiation and streaming field results in size-selective aggregation in fluid streamlines in the vicinity of a high-amplitude acoustic beam, as opposed to previous acoustic radiation induced particle concentration where objects typically migrate toward minimum pressure locations. Though the acoustic streaming is induced by a traveling wave, we are able to manipulate particles an order of magnitude smaller than possible using the traveling wave force alone. We experimentally and theoretically examine the range of particle sizes that can be captured in fluid streamlines using this technique, with rapid particle concentration demonstrated down to 300 nm diameters. We also demonstrate that locations of trapping and concentration are size-dependent, which is attributed to the combined effects of the acoustic streaming and acoustic forces.

  13. Deep Water Ocean Acoustics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-07

    OASIS, INC. 1 Report No. QSR-14C0172- Ocean Acoustics-093016 Quarterly Progress Report Technical and Financial Deep Water Ocean Acoustics...Award No.: N00014-14-C-0172 Report No. QSR-14C0172- Ocean Acoustics-093016 Prepared for: Office of Naval Research For the period: July 1, 2016...to September 30, 2016 Submitted by: Principal Investigator/Author: Kevin Heaney Ocean Acoustical Services and Instrumentation Systems, Inc. 5

  14. Deep Water Ocean Acoustics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-08-03

    OASIS, INC. 1 Report No. QSR-14C0172- Ocean Acoustics-063016 Quarterly Progress Report Technical and Financial Deep Water Ocean Acoustics...Award No.: N00014-14-C-0172 Report No. QSR-14C0172- Ocean Acoustics-063016 Prepared for: Office of Naval Research For the period: April 1...2016 to June 30, 2016 Submitted by: Principal Investigator/Author: Kevin Heaney Ocean Acoustical Services and Instrumentation Systems, Inc. 5

  15. Deep Water Ocean Acoustics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-30

    OASIS, INC. 1 Report No. QSR-14C0172- Ocean Acoustics-043016 Quarterly Progress Report Technical and Financial Deep Water Ocean Acoustics...Award No.: N00014-14-C-0172 Report No. QSR-14C0172- Ocean Acoustics-093015 Prepared for: Office of Naval Research For the period: January 1...2016 to March 31, 2015 Submitted by: Principal Investigator/Author: Kevin Heaney Ocean Acoustical Services and Instrumentation Systems, Inc. 5

  16. Shallow Water Acoustics Studies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    this year towards publishing one of the last SW06 papers, on acoustic scattering from crossing nonlinear internal wave trains. This is submitted for...1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Shallow Water Acoustics Studies James F. Lynch MS #12...N00014-14-1-0040 http://acoustics.whoi.edu/sw06/ LONG TERM GOALS The long term goals of our shallow water acoustics work are to: 1) understand the

  17. Acoustic emission frequency discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sugg, Frank E. (Inventor); Graham, Lloyd J. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    In acoustic emission nondestructive testing, broadband frequency noise is distinguished from narrow banded acoustic emission signals, since the latter are valid events indicative of structural flaws in the material being examined. This is accomplished by separating out those signals which contain frequency components both within and beyond (either above or below) the range of valid acoustic emission events. Application to acoustic emission monitoring during nondestructive bond verification and proof loading of undensified tiles on the Space Shuttle Orbiter is considered.

  18. Deep Water Ocean Acoustics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-17

    under-ice scattering , bathymetric diffraction and the application of the ocean acoustic Parabolic Equation to infrasound. 2. Tasks a. Task 1...QSR-14C0172-Ocean Acoustics -063015 Figure 10. Estimated reflection coefficient as a function of frequency by taking the difference of downgoing and...OASIS, INC. 1 Report No. QSR-14C0172-Ocean Acoustics -063015 Quarterly Progress Report Technical and Financial Deep Water Ocean Acoustics

  19. Protective coatings preventing hydrogen desorption from titanium during ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evsin, A. E.; Begrambekov, L. B.; Dovganyuk, S. S.; Kaplevsky, A. S.; Shutikova, M. I.

    2017-05-01

    Effect of yttria and titanium nitride coatings on features of deuterium desorption from titanium layer is investigated. It is shown that both coatings significantly raise the temperature of maximum of deuterium thermal desorption from titanium under linear heating and prevent desorption under prolonged keeping at the operating temperature of a neutron tube target. However, under irradiation with ions of H2 + O2 plasma the barrier properties of titanium nitride appear to degrade.

  20. Tutorial on architectural acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Neil; Talaske, Rick; Bistafa, Sylvio

    2002-11-01

    This tutorial is intended to provide an overview of current knowledge and practice in architectural acoustics. Topics covered will include basic concepts and history, acoustics of small rooms (small rooms for speech such as classrooms and meeting rooms, music studios, small critical listening spaces such as home theatres) and the acoustics of large rooms (larger assembly halls, auditoria, and performance halls).

  1. Acoustic Casing Treatment Test

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-02-14

    Acoustic Casing Treatment Testing Completed in the W-8 Single Stage Axial Compressor Facility at NASA Glenn. Four different over-the-rotor acoustic casing treatment concepts were tested along with two baseline configurations. Testing included steady-aerodynamic measurements of fan performance, hotfilm turbulence measurements, and inlet acoustic measurements with an in-duct array.

  2. Sorption and desorption of glyphosate in Mollisols and Ultisols soils of Argentina.

    PubMed

    Gómez Ortiz, Ana Maria; Okada, Elena; Bedmar, Francisco; Costa, José Luis

    2017-10-01

    In Argentina, glyphosate use has increased exponentially in recent years as a result of the widespread adoption of no-till management combined with genetically modified glyphosate-resistant crops. This massive use of glyphosate has created concern about its potential environmental impact. Sorption-desorption of glyphosate was studied in 3 Argentinean soils with contrasting characteristics. Glyphosate sorption isotherms were modeled using the Freundlich equation to estimate the sorption coefficient (Kf ). Glyphosate sorption was high, and the Kf varied from 115.6 to 1612 mg(1-1/n) L(1/n) /kg. Cerro Azul soil had the highest glyphosate sorption capacity as a result of a combination of factors such as higher clay content, cation exchange capacity, total iron, and aluminum oxides, and lower available phosphorus and pH. Desorption isotherms were also modeled using the Freundlich equation. In general, desorption was very low (<12%). The low values of hysteresis coefficient confirm that glyphosate strongly sorbs to the soils and that it is almost an irreversible process. Anguil soil had a significantly higher desorption coefficient (Kfd ) than the other soils, associated with its lower clay content and higher pH and phosphorus. Glyphosate high sorption and low desorption to the studied soils may prevent groundwater contamination. However, it may also affect its bioavailability, increasing its persistence and favoring its accumulation in the environment. The results of the present study contribute to the knowledge and characterization of glyphosate retention in different soils. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:2587-2592. © 2017 SETAC. © 2017 SETAC.

  3. Direct measurement of desorption and diffusion energies of O and N atoms physisorbed on amorphous surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minissale, M.; Congiu, E.; Dulieu, F.

    2016-01-01

    Context. Physisorbed atoms on the surface of interstellar dust grains play a central role in solid state astrochemistry. Their surface reactivity is one source of the observed molecular complexity in space. In experimental astrophysics, the high reactivity of atoms also constitutes an obstacle to measuring two of the fundamental properties in surface physics, namely desorption and diffusion energies, and so far direct measurements are non-existent for O and N atoms. Aims: We investigated the diffusion and desorption processes of O and N atoms on cold surfaces in order to give boundary conditions to astrochemical models. Methods: Here we propose a new technique for directly measuring the N- and O-atom mass signals. Including the experimental results in a simple model allows us to almost directly derive the desorption and diffusion barriers of N atoms on amorphous solid water ice (ASW) and O atoms on ASW and oxidized graphite. Results: We find a strong constraint on the values of desorption and thermal diffusion energy barriers. The measured barriers for O atoms are consistent with recent independent estimations and prove to be much higher than previously believed ( Edes = 1410-160+290; Edif = 990 -360+530 K on ASW). As for oxygen atoms, we propose that the combination Edes - Edif = 1320-750 K is a sensible choice among the possible pairs of solutions. Also, we managed to measure the desorption and diffusion energy of N atoms for the first time (Edes = 720-80+160; Edif = 525-200+260 K on ASW) in the thermal hopping regime and propose that the combination Edes-Edif = 720-400 K can be reasonably adopted in models. The value of Edif for N atoms is slightly lower than previously suggested, which implies that the N chemistry on dust grains might be richer.

  4. Computational ocean acoustics: Advances in 3D ocean acoustic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Henrik; Jensen, Finn B.

    2012-11-01

    The numerical model of ocean acoustic propagation developed in the 1980's are still in widespread use today, and the field of computational ocean acoustics is often considered a mature field. However, the explosive increase in computational power available to the community has created opportunities for modeling phenomena that earlier were beyond reach. Most notably, three-dimensional propagation and scattering problems have been prohibitive computationally, but are now addressed routinely using brute force numerical approaches such as the Finite Element Method, in particular for target scattering problems, where they are being combined with the traditional wave theory propagation models in hybrid modeling frameworks. Also, recent years has seen the development of hybrid approaches coupling oceanographic circulation models with acoustic propagation models, enabling the forecasting of sonar performance uncertainty in dynamic ocean environments. These and other advances made over the last couple of decades support the notion that the field of computational ocean acoustics is far from being mature. [Work supported by the Office of Naval Research, Code 321OA].

  5. Field desorption of Na and Cs from graphene on iridium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernatskii, D. P.; Pavlov, V. G.

    2015-08-01

    Field electron and desorption microscopy has been used to study specific features of the field desorption of sodium and cesium ions adsorbed on the surface of iridium with graphene. It was found that adsorbed sodium atoms most strongly reduce the work function on graphene islands situated over densely packed faces of iridium. A strong electric field qualitatively similarly affects the sodium and cesium desorption processes from a field emitter to give two desorption phases and has no noticeable effect on the disintegration of the graphene layer.

  6. Absorption-Desorption Compressor for Spaceborne/Airborne Cryogenic Refrigerators.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Refrigerant compressors, *Refrigeration systems), Spaceborne, Airborne, Cryogenics, Gases, Absorption, Desorption, Hydrogen, Hydrides, Lanthanum compounds, Nickel alloys, Joule Thomson effect , Heat transfer

  7. New insights into the electrochemical desorption of alkanethiol SAMs on gold

    PubMed Central

    Pensa, Evangelina; Vericat, Carolina; Grumelli, Doris; Salvarezza, Roberto C.; Park, Sung Hyun; Longo, Gabriel S.; Szleifer, Igal

    2012-01-01

    A combination of Polarization Modulation Infrared Reflection Absorption Spectroscopy (PMIRRAS) under electrochemical control, Electrochemical Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (ECSTM) and Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations has been used to shed light on the reductive desorption process of dodecanethiol (C12) and octadecanethiol (C18) SAMs on gold in aqueous electrolytes. Experimental PMIRRAS, ECSTM and MD simulations data for C12 desorption are consistent with formation of randomly distributed micellar aggregates stabilized by Na+ ions, coexisting with a lying-down phase of molecules. The analysis of pit and Au island coverage before and after desorption is consistent with the thiolate-Au adatoms models. On the other hand, PMIRRAS and MD data for C18 indicate that the desorbed alkanethiolates adopt a Na+ ion-stabilized bilayer of interdigitated alkanethiolates, with no evidence of lying down molecules. MD simulations also show that both the degree of order and tilt angle of the desorbed alkanethiolates change with the surface charge on the metal, going from bilayers to micelles. These results demonstrate the complexity of the alkanethiol desorption in the presence of water and the fact that chain length and counterions play a key role in a complex structure. PMID:22870508

  8. Double DCO+ Rings Reveal CO Ice Desorption in the Outer Disk Around IM Lup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öberg, Karin I.; Furuya, Kenji; Loomis, Ryan; Aikawa, Yuri; Andrews, Sean M.; Qi, Chunhua; van Dishoeck, Ewine F.; Wilner, David J.

    2015-09-01

    In a protoplanetary disk, a combination of thermal and non-thermal desorption processes regulate where volatiles are liberated from icy grain mantles into the gas phase. Non-thermal desorption should result in volatile-enriched gas in disk-regions where complete freeze-out is otherwise expected. We present Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array observations of the disk around the young star IM Lup in 1.4 mm continuum, C18O 2-1, H13CO+ 3-2 and DCO+ 3-2 emission at ˜0.″5 resolution. The images of these dust and gas tracers are clearly resolved. The DCO+ line exhibits a striking pair of concentric rings of emission that peak at radii of ˜0.″6 and 2″ (˜90 and 300 AU, respectively). Based on disk chemistry model comparison, the inner DCO+ ring is associated with the balance of CO freeze-out and thermal desorption due to a radial decrease in disk temperature. The outer DCO+ ring is explained by non-thermal desorption of CO ice in the low-column-density outer disk, repopulating the disk midplane with cold CO gas. The CO gas then reacts with abundant H2D+ to form the observed DCO+ outer ring. These observations demonstrate that spatially resolved DCO+ emission can be used to trace otherwise hidden cold gas reservoirs in the outmost disk regions, opening a new window onto their chemistry and kinematics.

  9. Desorption of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from a soot surface: three- to five-ring PAHs.

    PubMed

    Guilloteau, Angélique; Bedjanian, Yuri; Nguyen, Mai Lan; Tomas, Alexandre

    2010-01-21

    The kinetics of the thermal desorption of a set of three- to five-ring polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from a laboratory-generated kerosene soot surface was studied over the temperature range 250-355 K in a low-pressure flow reactor combined with an electron-impact mass spectrometer. Two methods were used to measure the desorption rate constants: monitoring of the surface-bound PAH decays due to desorption using off-line HPLC measurements of their concentrations in soot samples and monitoring of the desorbed molecules (anthracene and phenanthtrene) in the gas phase using in situ mass spectrometric detection. The Arrhenius parameters (A factors and activation energies) for the desorption rate constants of 10 soot-bound PAHs were determined. The PAH-soot binding energies were found to be similar for PAHs with the same number of carbon atoms and to increase with increasing number of PAH carbon atoms. The experimental data are discussed in the frame of the existing theoretical gas to particle partitioning model.

  10. Characterization of HafSOx inorganic photoresists using electron stimulated desorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frederick, Ryan T.; Herman, Gregory S.

    2016-03-01

    Inorganic resists are of interest for nanomanufacturing due to the potential for high resolution, low line width roughness, and high sensitivity. The combination of high absorption coefficient elements and radiation sensitive ligands can improve inorganic resist sensitivity while still allowing high contrast for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography. A prototypical resist is Hf(OH)4-2x-2y(O2)x(SO4)y·qH2O (HafSOx), which has both high absorption coefficient elements (Hf) and radiation sensitive ligands (peroxides). Herein, we evaluate the use of electron stimulated desorption (ESD) to characterize HafSOx. These results indicate that the peroxo species are extremely radiation sensitive, even for low kinetic energy electrons that approximate the range of electron energies expected during EUV exposures. The primary desorption products from HafSOx are O2 and H2O, where the time evolution suggest much faster desorption kinetics for O2. These data provide insight into the radiation-induced changes responsible for the solubility transition upon exposure and dissolution during development, and the role of low kinetic energy electrons in these processes. The following describes our experimental methodology for the ESD studies, and the specific kinetic model used to extract total desorption cross sections from the ESD data.

  11. Sorption and desorption studies on chitin gels.

    PubMed

    Vachoud, L; Zydowicz, N; Domard, A

    2001-01-10

    The aim of this work was to study various transport phenomena in chitin gels obtained by N-acetylation of chitosan in a water-alcohol mixture. Three kinds of transport were investigated: the sorption of solutes interacting with chitin, the desorption of solutes without significant interaction with the polymer, and osmosis phenomena. In the case of interactive sorption, dyes having different chemical structures such as C.I. Acid Blue 74, C.I. Reactive Violet 5 or C.I. Direct Red 28 were tested. Sorptions of C.I. Acid Blue 74 and C.I. Reactive Violet 5 depend on the charge density of the polymer network and, as a consequence, on DA, pH and the dielectric constant of the media. This result reveals the importance of electrostatic interactions. On the other hand, the sorption of C.I. Direct Red 28 is mainly due to hydrophobic interactions and H-bonding, it is limited to the extreme surface of the gel. Concerning the non-interactive desorption, solutes of different steric hindrance such as PP vitamin, B1 vitamin and caffeine exhibit similar diffusion coefficients located within 3.7-5.6x10(-6) cm(2) s(-1). Finally, the osmotic behaviour of the gel immersed in a concentrated solution of gelatin allows us to multiply by 25 the concentration of chitin in the gel without any penetration of gelatin.

  12. Indoor acoustic gain design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Concha-Abarca, Justo Andres

    2002-11-01

    The design of sound reinforcement systems includes many variables and usually some of these variables are discussed. There are criteria to optimize the performance of the sound reinforcement systems under indoor conditions. The equivalent acoustic distance, the necessary acoustic gain, and the potential acoustic gain are parameters which must be adjusted with respect to the loudspeaker array, electric power and directionality of loudspeakers, the room acoustics conditions, the distance and distribution of the audience, and the type of the original sources. The design and installation of front of the house and monitoring systems have individual criteria. This article is about this criteria and it proposes general considerations for the indoor acoustic gain design.

  13. [Effect of nonionic surfactant Tween80 and DOM on the behaviors of desorption of phenanthrene and pyrene in soil-water systems].

    PubMed

    Wang, Gen-Mei; Sun, Cheng; Xie, Xue-Qun

    2007-04-01

    Batch experiments were conducted to study the effects of dissolved organic matter (DOM) and nonionic surfactant (Tween80) on the desorption of phenanthrene and pyrene in soil-water systems. The results showed that DOM derived from pig manure and pig manure compost increased the desorption of phenanthrene and pyrene in soil-water systems, and the effect of pig manure compost DOM was better than that of pig manure DOM; with the increase of Tween80, the desorption rate of phenanthrene and pyrene also increased compared with the control, especially at high concentration of Tween80 (150 mg x L(-)). And at this concentration, the desorption rates were increased by 1.7 times for phenanthrene and 6.2 times for pyrene than that of the control. The combined effects of Tween80 and DOM on the desorption of phenanthrene and pyrene were influenced by the concentration of Tween80. When Tween80 at low concentration, the combined effects were not significant. Howerver, with 150 mg x L(-1) Tween80 in soil-water systems, the desorption rates of phenanthrene and pyrene were drastically higher than the sum of DOM and Tween80. The results also indicated that DOMs with high molecular-size fraction ( > 25 000 could attain a higher desorption of both phenanthrene and pyrene in soil-water systems than their lowmolecular-size counterpart (< 1000) under the same experiments conditions.

  14. ACOUSTICAL STANDARDS NEWS

    PubMed Central

    Stremmel, Neil B.; Struck, Christopher J.

    2017-01-01

    American National Standards (ANSI Standards) developed by Accredited Standards Committees S1, S2, S3, S3/SC 1, and S12 in the areas of acoustics, mechanical vibration and shock, bioacoustics, animal bioacoustics, and noise, respectively, are published by the Acoustical Society of America (ASA). In addition to these standards, ASA publishes a catalog of Acoustical American National Standards. To receive a copy of the latest Standards catalog, please contact Neil Stremmel. Comments are welcomed on all material in Acoustical Standards News. This Acoustical Standards News section in JASA, as well as the national catalog of Acoustical Standards and other information on the Standards Program of the Acoustical Society of America, are available via the ASA home page: http://acousticalsociety.org. PMID:28599517

  15. N2 and CO Desorption Energies from Water Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fayolle, Edith C.; Balfe, Jodi; Loomis, Ryan; Bergner, Jennifer; Graninger, Dawn; Rajappan, Mahesh; Öberg, Karin I.

    2016-01-01

    The relative desorption energies of CO and N2 are key to interpretations of observed interstellar CO and N2 abundance patterns, including the well-documented CO and N2H+ anti-correlations in disks, protostars, and molecular cloud cores. Based on laboratory experiments on pure CO and N2 ice desorption, the difference between CO and N2 desorption energies is small; the N2-to-CO desorption energy ratio is 0.93 ± 0.03. Interstellar ices are not pure, however, and in this study we explore the effect of water ice on the desorption energy ratio of the two molecules. We present temperature programmed desorption experiments of different coverages of 13CO and 15N2 on porous and compact amorphous water ices and, for reference, of pure ices. In all experiments, 15N2 desorption begins a few degrees before the onset of 13CO desorption. The 15N2 and 13CO energy barriers are 770 and 866 K for the pure ices, 1034-1143 K and 1155-1298 K for different submonolayer coverages on compact water ice, and 1435 and 1575 K for ˜1 ML of ice on top of porous water ice. For all equivalent experiments, the N2-to-CO desorption energy ratio is consistently 0.9. Whenever CO and N2 ice reside in similar ice environments (e.g., experience a similar degree of interaction with water ice) their desorption temperatures should thus be within a few degrees of one another. A smaller N2-to-CO desorption energy ratio may be present in interstellar and circumstellar environments if the average CO ice molecules interacts more with water ice compared to the average N2 molecules.

  16. A sound future for acoustic metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Cummer, Steven

    2017-05-01

    The field of acoustic metamaterials borrowed ideas from electromagnetics and optics to create engineered structures that exhibit desired fluid or fluid-like properties for the propagation of sound. These metamaterials offer the possibility of manipulating and controlling sound waves in ways that are challenging or impossible with conventional materials. Metamaterials with zero, or negative, refractive index for sound offer new possibilities for acoustic imaging and for the control of sound at subwavelength scales. The combination of transformation acoustics theory and highly anisotropic acoustic metamaterials enables precise control over the deformation of sound fields, which can be used, for example, to hide or cloak objects from incident acoustic energy. And active acoustic metamaterials use external control and power to create effective material properties that are fundamentally not possible with passive structures. Challenges remain, including the development of efficient techniques for fabricating large-scale metamaterial structures and, critically, converting exciting laboratory experiments into practically useful devices. In this presentation, I will outline the recent history of the field, describe some of the designs and properties of materials with unusual acoustic parameters, discuss examples of extreme manipulation of sound, and finally, provide a personal perspective on future directions in the field.

  17. Valveless micropump driven by acoustic streaming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choe, Youngki; Sok Kim, Eun

    2013-04-01

    This paper describes two valveless micropumps built on a 260 µm thick PZT with 20 µm thick parylene acoustic Fresnel lenses with air cavities. The micropumps produce in-plane body force through acoustic streaming effect of high-intensity acoustic beam that is generated by acoustic wave interference. The fabricated micropumps were shown to move microspheres, which have a diameter of 70-90 µm and a density of 0.99 g cm-3, on the water surface to form U-shape streams of microspheres with a drift velocity of 7.3 cm s-1 when the micropumps were located 4 mm below the water surface and driven by 160 Vpeak-to-peak pulsed sinusoidal waves. The driven microspheres formed U-shape streaming even without any fluidic channel according to the serial connection of the pie-shaped lenses and top electrodes. A micropump with a straight-lined fluidic channel was also fabricated and tested to show a 9.2 cm s-1 microspheres' drift velocity and a 9.5 mL min-1 volume pumping rate when combined with the acrylic acoustic wave reflector. Both the Fresnel lens and top electrode were patterned in a pie-shape with its apex angle of 90° to form asymmetric acoustic pressure distribution at the focal plane of the acoustic Fresnel lenses in order to push water in one direction.

  18. The Development of the Acoustic Design of NASA Glenn Research Center's New Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, William O.; McNelis, Mark E.; Hozman, Aron D.; McNelis, Anne M.

    2011-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center (GRC) is leading the design and build of the new world-class vibroacoustic test capabilities at the NASA GRC's Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio, USA. Benham Companies, LLC is currently constructing modal, base-shake sine and reverberant acoustic test facilities to support the future testing needs of NASA s space exploration program. The large Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility (RATF) will be approximately 101,000 ft3 in volume and capable of achieving an empty chamber acoustic overall sound pressure level (OASPL) of 163 dB. This combination of size and acoustic power is unprecedented amongst the world s known active reverberant acoustic test facilities. The key to achieving the expected acoustic test spectra for a range of many NASA space flight environments in the RATF is the knowledge gained from a series of ground acoustic tests. Data was obtained from several NASA-sponsored test programs, including testing performed at the National Research Council of Canada s acoustic test facility in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, and at the Redstone Technical Test Center acoustic test facility in Huntsville, Alabama, USA. The majority of these tests were performed to characterize the acoustic performance of the modulators (noise generators) and representative horns that would be required to meet the desired spectra, as well as to evaluate possible supplemental gas jet noise sources. The knowledge obtained in each of these test programs enabled the design of the RATF sound generation system to confidently advance to its final acoustic design and subsequent on-going construction.

  19. The Development of the Acoustic Design of NASA Glenn Research Center's New Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, William O.; McNelis, Mark E.; Hozman, Aron D.; McNelis, Anne M.

    2011-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center (GRC) is leading the design and build of the new world-class vibroacoustic test capabilities at the NASA GRC s Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio. Benham Companies, LLC is currently constructing modal, base-shake sine and reverberant acoustic test facilities to support the future testing needs of NASA s space exploration program. The large Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility (RATF) will be approximately 101,000 ft3 in volume and capable of achieving an empty chamber acoustic overall sound pressure level (OASPL) of 163 dB. This combination of size and acoustic power is unprecedented amongst the world s known active reverberant acoustic test facilities. The key to achieving the expected acoustic test spectra for a range of many NASA space flight environments in the RATF is the knowledge gained from a series of ground acoustic tests. Data was obtained from several NASA-sponsored test programs, including testing performed at the National Research Council of Canada s acoustic test facility in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, and at the Redstone Technical Test Center acoustic test facility in Huntsville, Alabama. The majority of these tests were performed to characterize the acoustic performance of the modulators (noise generators) and representative horns that would be required to meet the desired spectra, as well as to evaluate possible supplemental gas jet noise sources. The knowledge obtained in each of these test programs enabled the design of the RATF sound generation system to confidently advance to its final acoustic design and subsequent on-going construction.

  20. Acoustic attenuation analysis program for ducts with mean flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunze, R. K., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    A computerized acoustic attenuation prediction procedure has been developed to evaluate acoustically lined ducts for various geometric and environmental parameters. The analysis procedure is based on solutions to the acoustic wave equation, assuming uniform airflow on a duct cross section, combined with appropriate mathematical lining impedance models. The impedance models included in the analysis procedure are representative of either perforated sheet or porous polyimide impregnated fiberglass facing sheet coupled with a cellular backing space. Advantages and limitations of the analysis procedure are reviewed.

  1. Sorption and desorption of indaziflam degradates in several agricultural soils

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Processes regulating pesticide fate in the environment are influenced by the physicochemical properties of pesticides and soils. Sorption-desorption are important processes as they regulate movement of pesticides in soil. Although sorption-desorption is widely studied for herbicides, studies involvi...

  2. Desorption of pentachlorophenol from soils using mixed solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Khodadoust, A.P.; Suidan, M.T.; Sorial, G.A.; Dionysiou, D.D.; Brenner, R.C.

    1999-12-15

    Desorption of pentachlorophenol (PCP) from contaminated soils in mixed solvents of water and ethanol was investigated using desorption isotherm experiments. The following cosolvent volume fractions of ethanol in the mixed solvent were considered: 0.03, 0.56, 0.79. 0.95, and 1.0. Three fractions of a synthetic soil (Edison soil) with approximately 1% organic matter were the main soils used in this study in addition to K-10 montmorillonite clay and Ottawa sand. The effect of soil organic matter and soil surface area on desorption in mixed solvents was evaluated. Analysis of desorption data revealed that PCP desorption increased with PCP solubility in mixed solvent up to 0.79, 0.95, and 0.56 fraction ethanol for Edison soil, K-10 montmorillonite, and Ottawa sand, respectively. Lower desorption of PCP from Edison soil in solvents with more than 0.79 fraction ethanol resulted from interactions between solvent and soil organic matter. For Edison soil, highest PCP desorption in all mixed solvents was obtained for the soil fraction with the smallest surface area. Desorption of PCP in mixed solvents containing more than 0.79 fraction ethanol was lower for soils with organic matter than for other soils.

  3. Kinetics of alkanethiol monolayer desorption from gold in air.

    PubMed

    Shadnam, Mohammad Reza; Amirfazli, A

    2005-10-14

    Thermal desorption of an alkanethiol monolayer from a gold substrate into a gaseous medium under ambient pressure was investigated using XPS and it was found that there exist 2 consecutive 1st order kinetics mechanisms with activation energies of 29.9 and 32.7 kcal mol(-1), respectively, i.e. on average approximately 15% higher than reports for liquid media desorption.

  4. Desorption kinetics of fluoranthene and trifluralin from Lake Huron and Lake Erie, USA, sediments.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Marc S; Burton, G Allen; Landrum, Peter F; Leppänen, Matti T; Kukkonen, Jussi V K

    2005-01-01

    Desorption kinetics were determined for fluoranthene (FLU) and trifluralin (TF) spiked onto Lake Erie and Lake Huron, USA, sediments at three concentrations (10, 40, 100 mg/kg dry wt). Following four months of equilibration, desorption was measured by extraction with Tenax and the data were fit to a first-order three-compartment kinetic model. The rate constants of the rapidly (k(rap)), slowly (k(slow)), and very slowly (k(vs)) desorbing fractions were on the order of 10(-1)/h, 10(-2-3)/h, and 10(-4)/h, respectively. The t99.9 (time required for 99.9% of the FLU and TF to desorb from each pool value) for each compartment indicated that FLU and TF desorption from rapid, slow, and very slow compartments were on the order of hours, days, and years, respectively. Higher rates of desorption were observed for FLU and TF from the Lake Huron sediments and this was not apparently related to the total organic carbon (TOC), particle size distribution, or polarity (carbon-to-nitrogen ratio) of the sediments. In general, the total fraction of the initial contaminant amounts that desorbed over the time course was directly related to concentration, which we hypothesized was due to the combined effects of saturation of high-energy (slow and very slow) binding sites in the organic carbon matrix and hysteresis. In extrapolations to field conditions, FLU and TF were predicted to persist in the sediments for years due to the very slow desorption of an estimated 31 to 53% of the bulk concentrations. Based on the rapidly desorbing fractions, the bioavailable amounts of the contaminants were predicted to be between 31 to 55% of bulk sediment concentrations.

  5. Prediction and Measurement of the Vibration and Acoustic Radiation of Panels Subjected to Acoustic Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Travis L.; Rizzi, Stephen A.

    1995-01-01

    Interior noise and sonic fatigue are important issues in the development and design of advanced subsonic and supersonic aircraft. Conventional aircraft typically employ passive treatments, such as constrained layer damping and acoustic absorption materials, to reduce the structural response and resulting acoustic levels in the aircraft interior. These techniques require significant addition of mass and only attenuate relatively high frequency noise transmitted through the fuselage. Although structural acoustic coupling is in general very important in the study of aircraft fuselage interior noise, analysis of noise transmission through a panel supported in an infinite rigid baffle (separating two semi-infinite acoustic domains) can be useful in evaluating the effects of active/adaptive materials, complex loading, etc. Recent work has been aimed at developing adaptive and/or active methods of controlling the structural acoustic response of panels to reduce the transmitted noise1. A finite element formulation was recently developed to study the dynamic response of shape memory alloy (SMA) hybrid composite panels (conventional composite panel with embedded SMA fibers) subject to combined acoustic and thermal loads2. Further analysis has been performed to predict the far-field acoustic radiation using the finite element dynamic panel response prediction3. The purpose of the present work is to validate the panel vibration and acoustic radiation prediction methods with baseline experimental results obtained from an isotropic panel, without the effect of SMA.

  6. Prediction and Measurement of the Vibration and Acoustic Radiation of Panels Subjected to Acoustic Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Travis L.; Rizzi, Stephen A.

    1995-01-01

    Interior noise and sonic fatigue are important issues in the development and design of advanced subsonic and supersonic aircraft. Conventional aircraft typically employ passive treatments, such as constrained layer damping and acoustic absorption materials, to reduce the structural response and resulting acoustic levels in the aircraft interior. These techniques require significant addition of mass and only attenuate relatively high frequency noise transmitted through the fuselage. Although structural acoustic coupling is in general very important in the study of aircraft fuselage interior noise, analysis of noise transmission through a panel supported in an infinite rigid baffle (separating two semi-infinite acoustic domains) can be useful in evaluating the effects of active/adaptive materials, complex loading, etc. Recent work has been aimed at developing adaptive and/or active methods of controlling the structural acoustic response of panels to reduce the transmitted noise1. A finite element formulation was recently developed to study the dynamic response of shape memory alloy (SMA) hybrid composite panels (conventional composite panel with embedded SMA fibers) subject to combined acoustic and thermal loads2. Further analysis has been performed to predict the far-field acoustic radiation using the finite element dynamic panel response prediction3. The purpose of the present work is to validate the panel vibration and acoustic radiation prediction methods with baseline experimental results obtained from an isotropic panel, without the effect of SMA.

  7. Integrated field emission array for ion desorption

    DOEpatents

    Resnick, Paul J; Hertz, Kristin L; Holland, Christopher; Chichester, David; Schwoebel, Paul

    2013-09-17

    An integrated field emission array for ion desorption includes an electrically conductive substrate; a dielectric layer lying over the electrically conductive substrate comprising a plurality of laterally separated cavities extending through the dielectric layer; a like plurality of conically-shaped emitter tips on posts, each emitter tip/post disposed concentrically within a laterally separated cavity and electrically contacting the substrate; and a gate electrode structure lying over the dielectric layer, including a like plurality of circular gate apertures, each gate aperture disposed concentrically above an emitter tip/post to provide a like plurality of annular gate electrodes and wherein the lower edge of each annular gate electrode proximate the like emitter tip/post is rounded. Also disclosed herein are methods for fabricating an integrated field emission array.

  8. Desorption/ionization on silicon nanowires.

    PubMed

    Go, E P; Apon, J V; Luo, G; Saghatelian, A; Daniels, R H; Sahi, V; Dubrow, R; Cravatt, B F; Vertes, A; Siuzdak, G

    2005-03-15

    Dense arrays of single-crystal silicon nanowires (SiNWs) have been used as a platform for laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry of small molecules, peptides, protein digests, and endogenous and xenobiotic metabolites in biofluids. Sensitivity down to the attomole level has been achieved on the nanowire surfaces by optimizing laser energy, surface chemistry, nanowire diameter, length, and growth orientation. An interesting feature of the nanowire surface is that it requires lower laser energy as compared to porous silicon and MALDI to desorb/ionize small molecules, therefore reducing background ion interference. Taking advantage of their high surface area and fluid wicking capabilities, SiNWs were used to perform chromatographic separation followed by mass analysis of the separated molecules providing a unique platform that can integrate separation and mass spectrometric detection on a single surface.

  9. Integrated field emission array for ion desorption

    DOEpatents

    Resnick, Paul J; Hertz, Kristin L.; Holland, Christopher; Chichester, David

    2016-08-23

    An integrated field emission array for ion desorption includes an electrically conductive substrate; a dielectric layer lying over the electrically conductive substrate comprising a plurality of laterally separated cavities extending through the dielectric layer; a like plurality of conically-shaped emitter tips on posts, each emitter tip/post disposed concentrically within a laterally separated cavity and electrically contacting the substrate; and a gate electrode structure lying over the dielectric layer, including a like plurality of circular gate apertures, each gate aperture disposed concentrically above an emitter tip/post to provide a like plurality of annular gate electrodes and wherein the lower edge of each annular gate electrode proximate the like emitter tip/post is rounded. Also disclosed herein are methods for fabricating an integrated field emission array.

  10. Modeling Organic Contaminant Desorption from Municipal Solid Waste Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knappe, D. R.; Wu, B.; Barlaz, M. A.

    2002-12-01

    Approximately 25% of the sites on the National Priority List (NPL) of Superfund are municipal landfills that accepted hazardous waste. Unlined landfills typically result in groundwater contamination, and priority pollutants such as alkylbenzenes are often present. To select cost-effective risk management alternatives, better information on factors controlling the fate of hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs) in landfills is required. The objectives of this study were (1) to investigate the effects of HOC aging time, anaerobic sorbent decomposition, and leachate composition on HOC desorption rates, and (2) to simulate HOC desorption rates from polymers and biopolymer composites with suitable diffusion models. Experiments were conducted with individual components of municipal solid waste (MSW) including polyvinyl chloride (PVC), high-density polyethylene (HDPE), newsprint, office paper, and model food and yard waste (rabbit food). Each of the biopolymer composites (office paper, newsprint, rabbit food) was tested in both fresh and anaerobically decomposed form. To determine the effects of aging on alkylbenzene desorption rates, batch desorption tests were performed after sorbents were exposed to toluene for 30 and 250 days in flame-sealed ampules. Desorption tests showed that alkylbenzene desorption rates varied greatly among MSW components (PVC slowest, fresh rabbit food and newsprint fastest). Furthermore, desorption rates decreased as aging time increased. A single-parameter polymer diffusion model successfully described PVC and HDPE desorption data, but it failed to simulate desorption rate data for biopolymer composites. For biopolymer composites, a three-parameter biphasic polymer diffusion model was employed, which successfully simulated both the initial rapid and the subsequent slow desorption of toluene. Toluene desorption rates from MSW mixtures were predicted for typical MSW compositions in the years 1960 and 1997. For the older MSW mixture, which had a

  11. Reconfigurable origami-inspired acoustic waveguides

    PubMed Central

    Babaee, Sahab; Overvelde, Johannes T. B.; Chen, Elizabeth R.; Tournat, Vincent; Bertoldi, Katia

    2016-01-01

    We combine numerical simulations and experiments to design a new class of reconfigurable waveguides based on three-dimensional origami-inspired metamaterials. Our strategy builds on the fact that the rigid plates and hinges forming these structures define networks of tubes that can be easily reconfigured. As such, they provide an ideal platform to actively control and redirect the propagation of sound. We design reconfigurable systems that, depending on the externally applied deformation, can act as networks of waveguides oriented along one, two, or three preferential directions. Moreover, we demonstrate that the capability of the structure to guide and radiate acoustic energy along predefined directions can be easily switched on and off, as the networks of tubes are reversibly formed and disrupted. The proposed designs expand the ability of existing acoustic metamaterials and exploit complex waveguiding to enhance control over propagation and radiation of acoustic energy, opening avenues for the design of a new class of tunable acoustic functional systems. PMID:28138527

  12. Vibro-acoustic analysis of composite plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarigül, A. S.; Karagözlü, E.

    2014-03-01

    Vibro-acoustic analysis plays a vital role on the design of aircrafts, spacecrafts, land vehicles and ships produced from thin plates backed by closed cavities, with regard to human health and living comfort. For this type of structures, it is required a coupled solution that takes into account structural-acoustic interaction which is crucial for sensitive solutions. In this study, coupled vibro-acoustic analyses of plates produced from composite materials have been performed by using finite element analysis software. The study has been carried out for E-glass/Epoxy, Kevlar/Epoxy and Carbon/Epoxy plates with different ply angles and numbers of ply. The effects of composite material, ply orientation and number of layer on coupled vibro-acoustic characteristics of plates have been analysed for various combinations. The analysis results have been statistically examined and assessed.

  13. Reconfigurable origami-inspired acoustic waveguides.

    PubMed

    Babaee, Sahab; Overvelde, Johannes T B; Chen, Elizabeth R; Tournat, Vincent; Bertoldi, Katia

    2016-11-01

    We combine numerical simulations and experiments to design a new class of reconfigurable waveguides based on three-dimensional origami-inspired metamaterials. Our strategy builds on the fact that the rigid plates and hinges forming these structures define networks of tubes that can be easily reconfigured. As such, they provide an ideal platform to actively control and redirect the propagation of sound. We design reconfigurable systems that, depending on the externally applied deformation, can act as networks of waveguides oriented along one, two, or three preferential directions. Moreover, we demonstrate that the capability of the structure to guide and radiate acoustic energy along predefined directions can be easily switched on and off, as the networks of tubes are reversibly formed and disrupted. The proposed designs expand the ability of existing acoustic metamaterials and exploit complex waveguiding to enhance control over propagation and radiation of acoustic energy, opening avenues for the design of a new class of tunable acoustic functional systems.

  14. Charge Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry of Droplets

    PubMed Central

    Jorabchi, Kaveh; Westphall, Michael S.; Smith, Lloyd M.

    2008-01-01

    We propose and evaluate a new mechanism to account for analyte ion signal enhancement in ultraviolet-laser desorption mass spectrometry of droplets in the presence of corona ions. Our new insights are based on timing control of corona ion production, laser desorption, and peptide ion extraction achieved by a novel pulsed corona apparatus. We demonstrate that droplet charging rather than gas-phase ion-neutral reactions is the major contributor to analyte ion generation from an electrically isolated droplet. Implications of the new mechanism, termed charge assisted laser desorption/ionization (CALDI), are discussed and contrasted to those of the laser desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization method (LD-APCI). It is also demonstrated that analyte ion generation in CALDI occurs with external electric fields about one order of magnitude lower than those needed for atmospheric pressure matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization or electrospray ionization of droplets. PMID:18387311

  15. Characteristics of mercury desorption from sorbents at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, T.C.; Yang, P.; Kuo, T.H.; Hopper, J.R.

    1998-12-31

    This study investigated the dynamic desorption characteristics of mercury during the thermal treatment of mercury-loaded sorbents at elevated temperatures under fixed-bed operations. Experiments were carried out in a 25.4 mm ID quartz bed enclosed in an electric furnace. Elemental mercury and mercuric chloride were tested with activated carbon and bauxite. The experimental results indicated that mercury desorption from sorbents was strongly affected by the desorption temperature and the mercury-sorbent pair. Elemental mercury was observed to desorb faster than mercuric chloride and activated carbon appeared to have higher desorption limits than bauxite at low temperatures. A kinetic model considering the mechanisms of surface equilibrium, pore diffusion and external mass transfer was proposed to simulate the observed desorption profiles. The model was found to describe reasonably well the experimental results.

  16. Copper desorption from Gelidium algal biomass.

    PubMed

    Vilar, Vítor J P; Botelho, Cidália M S; Boaventura, Rui A R

    2007-04-01

    Desorption of divalent copper from marine algae Gelidium sesquipedale, an algal waste (from agar extraction industry) and a composite material (the algal waste immobilized in polyacrylonitrile) was studied in a batch system. Copper ions were first adsorbed until saturation and then desorbed by HNO(3) and Na(2)EDTA solutions. Elution efficiency using HNO(3) increases as pH decreases. At pH=1, for a solid to liquid ratio S/L=4gl(-1), elution efficiency was 97%, 95% and 88%, the stoichiometric coefficient for the ionic exchange, 0.70+/-0.02, 0.73+/-0.05 and 0.76+/-0.06 and the selectivity coefficient, 0.93+/-0.07, 1.0+/-0.3 and 1.1+/-0.3, respectively, for algae Gelidium, algal waste and composite material. Complexation of copper ions by EDTA occurs in a molar proportion of 1:1 and the elution efficiency increases with EDTA concentration. For concentrations of 1.4, 0.88 and 0.57 mmoll(-1), the elution efficiency for S/L=4gl(-1), was 91%, 86% and 78%, respectively, for algae Gelidium, algal waste and composite material. The S/L ratio, in the range 1-20gl(-1), has little influence on copper recovery by using 0.1M HNO(3). Desorption kinetics was very fast for all biosorbents. Kinetic data using HNO(3) as eluant were well described by the mass transfer model, considering the average metal concentration in the solid phase and the equilibrium relationship given by the mass action law. The homogeneous diffusion coefficient varied between 1.0 x 10(-7)cm(2)s(-1) for algae Gelidium and 3.0 x 10(-7)cm(2)s(-1) for the composite material.

  17. AST Launch Vehicle Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houston, Janice; Counter, D.; Giacomoni, D.

    2015-01-01

    The liftoff phase induces acoustic loading over a broad frequency range for a launch vehicle. These external acoustic environments are then used in the prediction of internal vibration responses of the vehicle and components which result in the qualification levels. Thus, predicting these liftoff acoustic (LOA) environments is critical to the design requirements of any launch vehicle. If there is a significant amount of uncertainty in the predictions or if acoustic mitigation options must be implemented, a subscale acoustic test is a feasible pre-launch test option to verify the LOA environments. The NASA Space Launch System (SLS) program initiated the Scale Model Acoustic Test (SMAT) to verify the predicted SLS LOA environments and to determine the acoustic reduction with an above deck water sound suppression system. The SMAT was conducted at Marshall Space Flight Center and the test article included a 5% scale SLS vehicle model, tower and Mobile Launcher. Acoustic and pressure data were measured by approximately 250 instruments. The SMAT liftoff acoustic results are presented, findings are discussed and a comparison is shown to the Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) results.

  18. Acoustic Translation of an Acoustically Levitated Sample

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, M. B.; Allen, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    Acoustic-levitation apparatus uses only one acoustic mode to move sample from one region of chamber to another. Sample heated and cooled quickly by translation between hot and cold regions of levitation chamber. Levitated sample is raised into furnace region by raising plunger. Frequency of sound produced by transducers adjusted by feedback system to maintain (102) resonant mode, which levitates sample midway between transducers and plunger regardless of plunger position.

  19. Underwater Acoustic Carbon Nanotube Thermophone

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-23

    Attorney Docket No. 300042 1 of 10 UNDERWATER ACOUSTIC CARBON NANOTUBE THERMOPHONE STATEMENT OF GOVERNMENT INTEREST [0001] The invention...the Invention [0003] The present invention is an acoustically transparent carbon nanotube underwater acoustic source which acts as a thermophone...development of underwater acoustic carbon nanotube (CNT) yarn sheets capable of producing high acoustic output at low frequencies with broad bandwidth. An

  20. Atmospheric Pressure-Thermal Desorption (AP-TD)/Electrospray Ionization-Mass Spectrometry for the Rapid Analysis of Bacillus Spores

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A technique is described where an atmospheric pressure-thermal desorption (AP-TD) device and electrospray ionization (ESI)-mass spectrometry are coupled and used for the rapid analysis of Bacillus spores in complex matrices. The resulting AP-TD/ESI-MS technique combines the generation of volatile co...

  1. Acoustic modes in fluid networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michalopoulos, C. D.; Clark, Robert W., Jr.; Doiron, Harold H.

    1992-01-01

    Pressure and flow rate eigenvalue problems for one-dimensional flow of a fluid in a network of pipes are derived from the familiar transmission line equations. These equations are linearized by assuming small velocity and pressure oscillations about mean flow conditions. It is shown that the flow rate eigenvalues are the same as the pressure eigenvalues and the relationship between line pressure modes and flow rate modes is established. A volume at the end of each branch is employed which allows any combination of boundary conditions, from open to closed, to be used. The Jacobi iterative method is used to compute undamped natural frequencies and associated pressure/flow modes. Several numerical examples are presented which include acoustic modes for the Helium Supply System of the Space Shuttle Orbiter Main Propulsion System. It should be noted that the method presented herein can be applied to any one-dimensional acoustic system involving an arbitrary number of branches.

  2. Generalized acoustic energy density.

    PubMed

    Xu, Buye; Sommerfeldt, Scott D; Leishman, Timothy W

    2011-09-01

    The properties of acoustic kinetic energy density and total energy density of sound fields in lightly damped enclosures have been explored thoroughly in the literature. Their increased spatial uniformity makes them more favorable measurement quantities for various applications than acoustic potential energy density (or squared pressure), which is most often used. In this paper, a generalized acoustic energy density (GED), will be introduced. It is defined by introducing weighting factors into the formulation of total acoustic energy density. With an additional degree of freedom, the GED can conform to the traditional acoustic energy density quantities, or it can be optimized for different applications. The properties of the GED will be explored in this paper for individual room modes, a diffuse sound field, and a sound field below the Schroeder frequency. © 2011 Acoustical Society of America

  3. Reduced acoustic and electric integration in concurrent-vowel recognition

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hsin-I; Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2013-01-01

    The present study used concurrent-vowel recognition to measure integration efficiency of combined acoustic and electric stimulation in eight actual cochlear-implant subjects who had normal or residual low-frequency acoustic hearing contralaterally. Although these subjects could recognize single vowels (>90% correct) with either electric or combined stimulation, their performance degraded significantly in concurrent-vowel recognition. Compared with previous simulation results using normal-hearing subjects, the present subjects produced similar performance with acoustic or electric stimulation alone, but significantly lower performance with combined stimulation. A probabilistic model found reduced integration efficiency between acoustic and electric stimulation in the present subjects. The integration efficiency was negatively correlated with residual acoustic hearing in the non-implanted ear and duration of deafness in the implanted ear. The present result suggests a central origin of the integration deficit and that this integration be evaluated and considered in future management of hearing impairment and design of auditory prostheses. PMID:23474462

  4. Deep Water Ocean Acoustics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-12-22

    Final Report 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 7/1/15 to 12/22/16 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Deep Water Ocean Acoustics 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...NUMBER Ocean Acoustical Services and Instrumentation Systems, Inc. 5 Militia Drive, Ste. 104 Lexington, MA 02421-4706...FR-14C0172- Ocean Acoustics- 123116 9. SPONSORING / MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 10. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM(S) Office of Naval

  5. Asymmetric acoustic gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zhaojian; Peng, Shasha; Ye, Yangtao; Dai, Zhongwei; Qiu, Chunyin; Ke, Manzhu; Liu, Zhengyou

    2011-02-01

    The unidirectional transmission of acoustic waves is realized by a simple geometrically asymmetric steel grating structure. This exotic phenomenon stems from the one-way diffraction effect induced by the different periods of the slits on the both surfaces of the sample. And the frequency range of unidirectional transmission is simply determined by the structure periods. The experimental results agree well with the theoretical simulation. This remarkable effect is expected potential applications in ultrasonic devices, such as acoustic rectifiers and acoustic diodes.

  6. Nearfield Acoustical Holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayek, Sabih I.

    Nearfield acoustical holography (NAH) is a method by which a set of acoustic pressure measurements at points located on a specific surface (called a hologram) can be used to image sources on vibrating surfaces on the acoustic field in three-dimensional space. NAH data are processed to take advantage of the evanescent wavefield to image sources that are separated less that one-eighth of a wavelength.

  7. Low Frequency Acoustics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-13

    understanding of very low frequency (VLF) acoustics in the deep ocean as applicable to naval warfare and coexistence with marine mammals. OBJECTIVES The...characteristics in the deep ocean; (3) encourage a cooperative interagency working relationship to investigate acoustic impact on marine mammals; and...with NOAA(NMFS) and other parties has dealt with ocean acoustics related to issues stimulated by the Marine Mammal Protection Act. A focal point has

  8. Resonant acoustic transducer system for a well drilling string

    DOEpatents

    Nardi, Anthony P.

    1981-01-01

    For use in transmitting acoustic waves propated along a well drilling string, a piezoelectric transducer is provided operating in the relatively low loss acoustic propagation range of the well drilling string. The efficiently coupled transmitting transducer incorporates a mass-spring-piezoelectric transmitter combination permitting a resonant operation in the desired low frequency range.

  9. Resonant acoustic transducer system for a well drilling string

    DOEpatents

    Kent, William H.; Mitchell, Peter G.

    1981-01-01

    For use in transmitting acoustic waves propagated along a well drilling string, a piezoelectric transducer is provided operating in the relatively low loss acoustic propagation range of the well drilling string. The efficiently coupled transmitting transducer incorporates a mass-spring-piezoelectric transmitter combination permitting resonant operation in the desired low frequency range.

  10. Assessing sequestration of selected polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by use of adsorption modeling and temperature-programmed desorption.

    PubMed

    Abu, Abdul; Smith, Steve

    2005-10-01

    Sequestration of phenanthrene and pyrene was investigated in two soils--a sandy soil designated SBS and a silt-loam designated LHS--by combining long-term batch sorption studies with thermal desorption and pyrolysis of amended soil samples. The Polanyi-based adsorption volume and the adsorbed solute mass increased with aging for both soils, thus demonstrating the mechanism for observed sequestration. Despite rigorous thermal analysis, 30-62% (SBS sand) and 8-30% (LHS silt-loam) of phenanthrene could not be recovered after 30-270 days of sorption, with the increase in desorption resistance showing greater significance in SBS sand. For both soils, these values were 20-65% of adsorbed phenanthrene mass. Activation energies estimated from the temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) of sorbed phenanthrene at < or = 375 degrees C were 51-53 kJ/mol, consistent with values derived for desorption of organic compounds from humic materials. The activated first-order model fitting of observed TPD data supports the conclusion that the desorption-resistant fraction of phenanthrene has become sequestered onto condensed organic domains and requires temperatures exceeding 600 degrees C to be released. The work demonstrates the use of thermal analysis in complementing the Polanyi-based adsorption modeling approach for assessing the mechanistic basis for sequestration of organic contaminants in soils.

  11. Low frequency acoustic microscope

    DOEpatents

    Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T.

    1986-11-04

    A scanning acoustic microscope is disclosed for the detection and location of near surface flaws, inclusions or voids in a solid sample material. A focused beam of acoustic energy is directed at the sample with its focal plane at the subsurface flaw, inclusion or void location. The sample is scanned with the beam. Detected acoustic energy specularly reflected and mode converted at the surface of the sample and acoustic energy reflected by subsurface flaws, inclusions or voids at the focal plane are used for generating an interference signal which is processed and forms a signal indicative of the subsurface flaws, inclusions or voids.

  12. Acoustic dispersive prism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esfahlani, Hussein; Karkar, Sami; Lissek, Herve; Mosig, Juan R.

    2016-01-01

    The optical dispersive prism is a well-studied element, which allows separating white light into its constituent spectral colors, and stands in nature as water droplets. In analogy to this definition, the acoustic dispersive prism should be an acoustic device with capability of splitting a broadband acoustic wave into its constituent Fourier components. However, due to the acoustical nature of materials as well as the design and fabrication difficulties, there is neither any natural acoustic counterpart of the optical prism, nor any artificial design reported so far exhibiting an equivalent acoustic behaviour. Here, based on exotic properties of the acoustic transmission-line metamaterials and exploiting unique physical behaviour of acoustic leaky-wave radiation, we report the first acoustic dispersive prism, effective within the audible frequency range 800 Hz–1300 Hz. The dispersive nature, and consequently the frequency-dependent refractive index of the metamaterial are exploited to split the sound waves towards different and frequency-dependent directions. Meanwhile, the leaky-wave nature of the structure facilitates the sound wave radiation into the ambient medium.

  13. Acoustic dispersive prism.

    PubMed

    Esfahlani, Hussein; Karkar, Sami; Lissek, Herve; Mosig, Juan R

    2016-01-07

    The optical dispersive prism is a well-studied element, which allows separating white light into its constituent spectral colors, and stands in nature as water droplets. In analogy to this definition, the acoustic dispersive prism should be an acoustic device with capability of splitting a broadband acoustic wave into its constituent Fourier components. However, due to the acoustical nature of materials as well as the design and fabrication difficulties, there is neither any natural acoustic counterpart of the optical prism, nor any artificial design reported so far exhibiting an equivalent acoustic behaviour. Here, based on exotic properties of the acoustic transmission-line metamaterials and exploiting unique physical behaviour of acoustic leaky-wave radiation, we report the first acoustic dispersive prism, effective within the audible frequency range 800 Hz-1300 Hz. The dispersive nature, and consequently the frequency-dependent refractive index of the metamaterial are exploited to split the sound waves towards different and frequency-dependent directions. Meanwhile, the leaky-wave nature of the structure facilitates the sound wave radiation into the ambient medium.

  14. Acoustic dispersive prism

    PubMed Central

    Esfahlani, Hussein; Karkar, Sami; Lissek, Herve; Mosig, Juan R.

    2016-01-01

    The optical dispersive prism is a well-studied element, which allows separating white light into its constituent spectral colors, and stands in nature as water droplets. In analogy to this definition, the acoustic dispersive prism should be an acoustic device with capability of splitting a broadband acoustic wave into its constituent Fourier components. However, due to the acoustical nature of materials as well as the design and fabrication difficulties, there is neither any natural acoustic counterpart of the optical prism, nor any artificial design reported so far exhibiting an equivalent acoustic behaviour. Here, based on exotic properties of the acoustic transmission-line metamaterials and exploiting unique physical behaviour of acoustic leaky-wave radiation, we report the first acoustic dispersive prism, effective within the audible frequency range 800 Hz–1300 Hz. The dispersive nature, and consequently the frequency-dependent refractive index of the metamaterial are exploited to split the sound waves towards different and frequency-dependent directions. Meanwhile, the leaky-wave nature of the structure facilitates the sound wave radiation into the ambient medium. PMID:26739504

  15. Adsorption-desorption induced structural changes of Cu-MOF evidenced by solid state NMR and EPR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yijiao; Huang, Jun; Kasumaj, Besnik; Jeschke, Gunnar; Hunger, Michael; Mallat, Tamas; Baiker, Alfons

    2009-02-18

    Adsorption-desorption induced structural changes of Cu(bpy)(H(2)O)(2)(BF(4)),(bpy) (bpy = 4,4'-bipyridine) [Cu-MOF] have been evidenced by combined NMR and EPR spectroscopy. Upon adsorption of probe molecules even at a few mbar, EPR spectra show that they are activated to form complexes at Cu(II) sites, which results in a change of the Cu-MOF's structure as indicated by a high-field shift of the (11)B MAS NMR. After desorption, both EPR and (11)B MAS NMR spectra evidenced that the structure of the Cu-MOF reversibly shifted to the original state. This observation indicates that MOFs can undergo structural changes during processes where adsorption-desorption steps are involved such as gas storage, separation, and catalysis.

  16. Size-dependent kinetic enhancement in hydrogen absorption and desorption of the Li-Mg-N-H system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yongfeng; Zhong, Kai; Luo, Kun; Gao, Mingxia; Pan, Hongge; Wang, Qidong

    2009-02-11

    High operating temperature and slow kinetics retard the practical applications of the Li-Mg-N-H system for hydrogen storage. To alleviate these problems, a first attempt was carried out by synthesizing Li(2)MgN(2)H(2) through sintering a mixture of Mg(NH(2))(2)-2LiNH(2) and investigating its size-dependent hydrogen storage performance. A dramatically enhanced kinetics for hydrogen absorption/desorption was achieved with a reduction in the particle size. For the dehydrogenation reaction, a three-dimensional diffusion-controlled kinetic mechanism was identified for the first time by analyzing isothermal hydrogen desorption curves with a linear plot method. The experimental improvement and mechanistic understanding on the dehydrogenation kinetics of the Li-Mg-N-H system shed light on how to further decrease the operating temperature and enhance the hydrogen absorption/desorption rate of the amide/hydride combined materials.

  17. Acoustic Levitation With Less Equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, M. B.; Jacobi, N.

    1983-01-01

    Certain chamber shapes require fewer than three acoustic drivers. Levitation at center of spherical chamber attained using only one acoustic driver. Exitation of lowest spherical mode produces asymmetric acoustic potential well.

  18. Water adsorption-desorption isotherms of two-dimensional hexagonal mesoporous silica around freezing point.

    PubMed

    Endo, Akira; Yamaura, Toshio; Yamashita, Kyohei; Matsuoka, Fumio; Hihara, Eiji; Daiguji, Hirofumi

    2012-02-01

    Zr-doped mesoporous silica with a diameter of approximately 3.8 nm was synthesized via an evaporation-induced self-assembly process, and the adsorption-desorption isotherms of water vapor were measured in the temperature range of 263-298 K. The measured adsorption-desorption isotherms below 273 K indicated that water confined in the mesopores did not freeze at any relative pressure. All isotherms had a steep curve, resulting from capillary condensation/evaporation, and a pronounced hysteresis. The hysteresis loop, which is associated with a delayed adsorption process, increased with a decrease in temperature. Furthermore, the curvature radius where capillary evaporation/condensation occurs was evaluated by the combined Kelvin and Gibbs-Tolman-Koening-Buff (GTKB) equations for the modification of the interfacial tension due to the interfacial curvature. The thickness of the water adsorption layer for capillary condensation was slightly larger, whereas that for capillary evaporation was slightly smaller than 0.7 nm.

  19. Effect of Titanium Doping of Al(111) Surfaces on Alane Formation Mobility, and Desorption

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra I. S.; Graetz J.; Chaudhuri, S.; Veyan, J.-F.; Chabal, Y. J.

    2011-07-05

    Alanes are critical intermediates in hydrogen storage reactions for mass transport during the formation of complex metal hydrides. Titanium has been shown to promote hydrogen desorption and hydrogenation, but its role as a catalyst is not clear. Combining surface infrared (IR) spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT), the role of Ti is explored during the interaction of atomic hydrogen with Ti-doped Al(111) surfaces. Titanium is found to reduce the formation of large alanes, due to a decrease of hydrogen mobility and to trapping of small alanes on Ti sites, thus hindering oligomerization. For high doping levels ({approx}0.27 ML Ti) on Al(111), only chemisorbed AlH{sub 3} is observed on Ti sites, with no evidence for large alanes. Titanium also dramatically lowers the desorption temperature of large alanes from 290 to 190 K, due to a more restricted translational motion of these alanes.

  20. Laser desorption of NO from a thick C 60 film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoger, T.; Marzok, C.; Jongma, R. T.; Zacharias, H.

    2006-09-01

    The desorption of NO molecules from a thick C 60 film is reported. A thermal desorption spectrum indicates two adsorption sites with binding energies of Eb = 0.30 eV and 0.55 eV. For laser desorption the fullerene surface is exposed to NO and excited by 7 ns UV laser pulses. Desorbing NO molecules are recorded state selectively as well as time resolved. The time-of-flight measurement indicates three different desorption pathways. A fast channel shows rovibronic temperatures of Trot( v″ = 0) = 370 K, Trot( v″ = 1) = 390 K and Tvib = 610 K as well as strong rotational-translational coupling. The desorption yield for the fast channel increases linearly with pulse energy with a desorption cross section of σ = (5.1 ± 0.9) × 10 -17 cm 2. Dominating the signal for small J″ values is a slow channel with low rotational and translational temperatures of about 110 K. We assign this peak to a laser-induced thermal desorption. For large pump-probe delays the data deviate from the Maxwellian flux distribution and a third channel appears with extremely late arrival times.

  1. Acoustic hologram formation with a frequency shifted reference beam.

    PubMed

    Whitman, R L

    1970-06-01

    This paper discusses an interference technique that makes it possible to directly observe and record the usually very weak light diffracted by an acoustical surface perturbation. This is accomplished by using spatial filtering techniques in combination with a frequency shifted reference beam. It is shown that the acoustically diffracted light may be visualized even in the presence of statically scattered light of much higher intensity. An experiment is described in which this technique is used to view the surface perturbations of piezoelectric ceramic material caused by acoustic surface waves. The application of this system to acoustic holography is discussed in detail. This application makes use of the fact that bulk acoustic waves in a material, upon striking the surface at some acute angle, cause surface ripple patterns which form a dynamic hologram of the acoustic field. A photographic image of this hologram frozen in time may then be recorded using the process discussed above.

  2. [Desorption of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in soils assisted by SPMD].

    PubMed

    Sun, Hong-Wen; Huo, Chong; Wang, Cui-Ping

    2007-08-01

    In order to develop a new method to study the desorption and bioavailability of hydrophobic organic chemicals (HOCs) in soils, a method using semi-permeable membrane device (SPMD) to study desorption of HOCs in soils has been set up, and assisted desorption of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), phenanthrene(PHE), pyrene(PYE), and benzo[a] pyrene (B[a]PYE) in three different kinds of soils was studied using SPMD. The results show that SPMD is a good measurement to study the desorption and bioavailability of HOCs in soils. SPMD assisted desorption of PAHs is highly dependent on the properties of the soils and the chemicals. PHE and PYE desorption percentages increase with the reduction of the content of soil organic matter (SOM), so that the desorption of the two chemicals increases from 56.45% and 48.28% to almost 100% when SOM content was reduced from 18.68% to 0.3%. However, clay has a significant holding effect on B[a]PYE, and PYE desorption is only 66.97% in Soil 3 with SOM of 0.3% and clay content of 39.05%. There is a great variety in the desorption among the different PAHs. With the reduction of SOM content and the elevation of contamination concentration, the difference between PHE and PYE decreases gradually, while B[a]PYE exhibits a significant difference from them. This could be attributed to the high lipophilicity and large molecular size of B[a]PYE, which make the molecule of B[a]PYE to be more easier to be held in the nanopores of clay and the dense region of SOM.

  3. The relationship between water vapor absorption and desorption by phospholipids and bilayer phase transitions.

    PubMed

    Mansour, Heidi M; Zografi, George

    2007-02-01

    Water vapor absorption and desorption at 25 degrees C and phase transition temperatures of phospholipid bilayers were measured as a function of relative humidity (RH) to better understand how the patterns of water vapor absorption and desorption are linked to corresponding phase changes induced by the level of hydration. Comparisons were made of the dipalmitoyl and palmitoyloleyol esters of glycerol derivatized with phosphatidyl-choline, -glycerol, -ethanolamine and with phosphatidic acid. The results suggest that the extent of water vapor absorption and desorption at a given RH reflects the combined effects of water-polar group interaction and access of water to the polar region as controlled by intra- and interbilayer molecular packing and intermolecular attractive and repulsive interactions. The results further suggest that the extent of water vapor absorption and desorption over a range of relative humidities reflects the combined effects of the polar group's ability to interact with water, the access that water has to the polar groups as determined by molecular size and various intermolecular and intrabilayer forces of attraction and repulsion, and interbilayer interactions which influence the degree of order/disorder present in the overall solid-state structure. This behavior is also reflected in the changes observed in the various bilayer phase transition temperatures as a function of RH. Analyses of absorption isotherms suggests that after exceeding a critical RH, water initially interacting with these phospholipids most likely forms either stoichiometric or nonstoichiometric crystal hydrates, as with the disaturated derivatives, or hydrated mesophases, as with the gel states of the monounsaturated derivatives.

  4. The Application of Ultrafast Laser Pulses to Laser Desorption Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Yang

    Ultrashort femtosecond laser pulses display exceptional performance for the selective ablation of materials, includes metals, semiconductors, and biological tissues. They do not damage the remaining unablated portion of a sample, which permits the possibility of depth profiling by repeat sampling at the same location. With sufficiently micro-focused fs laser pulse length beam, high lateral resolution mass spectrometry imaging is possible, while sample damage may degrade ultimate lateral resolution in some other methods. Combining imaging and depth profiling could ultimately leads to tomographical mass spectrometry or 3D imaging MS. Laser postionization, a "soft" ionization method, was combined with ultrafast laser desorption for enhanced molecular analysis. A customized femtosecond laser desorption/ablation postionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer was designed and built. The construction and performance of both phases including the VUV source are detailed. Instrument control software was written to operate this instrument, and many automated experiments were successfully demonstrated by this software. Elemental and molecular analysis was carried out on the instrument and demonstrated exceptional performance for fs laser pulse sampling of small areas. Studies demonstrated the imaging and depth profiling capability of fs-LDPI on metals, semiconductors and intact biofilm tissues. Attempts were made to reach the limit of lateral resolution of imaging by fs-LDPI-MS. The results showed similar lateral resolution of <2 mum for both fs 800 nm and 400 nm desorption beams. To improve the repetition rate for high speed imaging application, an alternative LDPI scheme was designed and constructed. The fs 800 beam was tripled to 267 nm and delivered into the ion source as an ionization laser, while a ns 349 nm pulse laser was used for desorption. Preliminary data showed certain intact molecular ions can be detected. Fragmentation tendency was measured against various

  5. Temperature programmed desorption of weakly bound adsorbates on Au(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelhart, Daniel P.; Wagner, Roman J. V.; Meling, Artur; Wodtke, Alec M.; Schäfer, Tim

    2016-08-01

    We have performed temperature programmed desorption (TPD) experiments to analyze the desorption kinetics of Ar, Kr, Xe, C2H2, SF6, N2, NO and CO on Au(111). We report desorption activation energies (Edes), which are an excellent proxy for the binding energies. The derived binding energies scale with the polarizability of the molecules, consistent with the conclusion that the surface-adsorbate bonds arise due to dispersion forces. The reported results serve as a benchmark for theories of dispersion force interactions of molecules at metal surfaces.

  6. Moisture desorption rates from TATB formulations: experiments and kinetic models.

    PubMed

    Glascoe, Elizabeth A; Dinh, Long N; Small, Ward; Overturf, George E

    2012-06-07

    The rate of water desorption from PBX-9502, a formulation containing 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TATB), is measured using temperature-programmed desorption and modeled using conventional kinetic modeling methods. The results of these studies show two stages of moisture release. At lower temperatures, the release is likely assisted by thermal expansion of the TATB and melting of the Kel-F binder. At higher temperatures, a considerable amount of water is released and is attributed to sublimation of the TATB, which exposes new surfaces for water desorption.

  7. Acoustic communications and autonomous underwater vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitag, Lee; Grund, Matthew; Preisig, James; Stojanovic, Milica

    2004-05-01

    Acoustic communications systems used on autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) provide supervisory control, access to real-time data, and also allow multiple vehicles to cooperate in undertaking adaptive sampling missions. However, the use of acoustic systems on AUVs presents special challenges because of limited space for optimal placement of transducers, and potential conflicts with other acoustic systems such as side-scan sonars and transponders. In addition, radiated and structure-borne acoustic interference from thrusters and actuators reduces the sensitivity of on-board receivers. Recent work in acoustic communications and AUVs has included combining some navigation functions into communications equipment, development of operating modes that remove conflicts between different subsystems, design of vehicle components to avoid or remove interference, and other approaches to improving performance. While these efforts have been successful for specific installations, many challenges remain. This talk addresses problems and solutions for supervised and completely autonomous multi-vehicle communications to support complex AUV missions. Also presented are recent results which demonstrate that acoustic communications can be used successfully on a variety of AUV platforms for many different applications. [Work supported by ONR.

  8. Desorption kinetics of benzene in a sandy soil in the presence of powdered activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Choi, J-W; Kim, S-B; Kim, D-J

    2007-02-01

    Desorption kinetics of benzene was investigated with a modified biphasic desorption model in a sandy soil with five different powdered activated carbon (PAC) contents (0, 1, 2, 5, 10% w/w) as sorbents. Sorption experiments followed by series dilution desorption were conducted for each sorbent. Desorption of benzene was successively performed at two stages using deionized water and hexane. Modeling was performed on both desorption isotherm and desorption rate for water-induced desorption to elucidate the presence of sorption-desorption hysteresis and biphasic desorption and if present to quantify the desorption-resistant fraction (q (irr)) and labile fraction (F) of desorption site responsible for rapid process. Desorption isotherms revealed that sorption-desorption exhibited a severe hysteresis with a significant fraction of benzene being irreversibly adsorbed onto both pure sand and PAC, and that desorption-resistant fraction (q (irr)) increased with PAC content. Desorption kinetic modeling showed that desorption of benzene was biphasic with much higher (4-40 times) rate constant for rapid process (k (1)) than that for slow process (k (2)), and that the difference in the rate constant increased with PAC content. The labile fraction (F) of desorption site showed a decreasing tendency with PAC. The experimental results would provide valuable information on remediation methods for soils and groundwater contaminated with BTEX.

  9. Materials for Bulk Acoustic Resonators and Filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loebl, Hans-Peter

    2003-03-01

    Highly selective solidly mounted bulk acoustic wave (BAW) band pass filters are suited for mobile and wireless systems in the GHz frequency range between 0.8 and 10 GHz. Electro-acoustic thin film BAW resonators are the building blocks these BAW filters. Piezoelectric materials used in these resonators include mainly AlN or ZnO which can be deposited by dedicated thin film sputter deposition techniques. Using these piezo-electric materials and using suited materials for the acoustic Bragg reflector, BAW resonators with high quality factors can be fabricated. The achievable filter bandwidth is approximately 4Alternatively, also ferroelectric thin films might be used to achieve higher coupling coefficient and thus filter bandwidth. BAW resonators and filters have been designed and fabricated on 6" Silicon and glass wafers. Results are presented for resonators and filters operating between 1.95 and 8 GHz. The talk will give an overview of the material aspects which are important for BAW devices. It will be shown that modeling of the resonator and filter response using 1D electro-acoustic simulation (1,2) which includes losses is essential to extract acoustic and electrical material parameters. (1) Solidly Mounted Bulk Acoustic Wave Filters for the Ghz Frequency Range, H.P. Loebl, C. Metzmacher , D.N.Peligrad , R. Mauczok , M. Klee , W. Brand , R.F. Milsom , P.Lok , F.van Straten , A. Tuinhout , J.W.Lobeek, IEEE 2002 Ultrasonics Symposium Munich, October 2002. (2) Combined Acoustic-Electromagnetic Simulation Of Thin-Film Bulk Acoustic Wave Filters, R.F. Milsom, H-P. Löbl, D.N. Peligrad, J-W. Lobeek, A. Tuinhout, R. H. ten Dolle IEEE 2002 Ultrasonics Symposium Munich, October 2002.

  10. Multiexpert automatic speech recognition using acoustic and myoelectric signals.

    PubMed

    Chan, Adrian D C; Englehart, Kevin B; Hudgins, Bernard; Lovely, Dennis F

    2006-04-01

    Classification accuracy of conventional automatic speech recognition (ASR) systems can decrease dramatically under acoustically noisy conditions. To improve classification accuracy and increase system robustness a multiexpert ASR system is implemented. In this system, acoustic speech information is supplemented with information from facial myoelectric signals (MES). A new method of combining experts, known as the plausibility method, is employed to combine an acoustic ASR expert and a MES ASR expert. The plausibility method of combining multiple experts, which is based on the mathematical framework of evidence theory, is compared to the Borda count and score-based methods of combination. Acoustic and facial MES data were collected from 5 subjects, using a 10-word vocabulary across an 18-dB range of acoustic noise. As expected the performance of an acoustic expert decreases with increasing acoustic noise; classification accuracies of the acoustic ASR expert are as low as 11.5%. The effect of noise is significantly reduced with the addition of the MES ASR expert. Classification accuracies remain above 78.8% across the 18-dB range of acoustic noise, when the plausibility method is used to combine the opinions of multiple experts. In addition, the plausibility method produced classification accuracies higher than any individual expert at all noise levels, as well as the highest classification accuracies, except at the 9-dB noise level. Using the Borda count and score-based multiexpert systems, classification accuracies are improved relative to the acoustic ASR expert but are as low as 51.5% and 59.5%, respectively.

  11. Salt Tolerance of Desorption Electrospray Ionization (DESI)

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Ayanna U.; Talaty, Nari; Cooks, R G; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2007-01-01

    Suppression of ion intensity in the presence of high salt matrices is common in most mass spectrometry ionization techniques. Desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) is an ionization method that exhibits salt tolerance, and this is investigated. DESI analysis was performed on three different drug mixtures in the presence of 0, 0.2, 2, 5, 10, and 20% NaCl:KCl weight by volume from seven different surfaces. At physiological concentrations individual drugs in each mixture were observed with each surface. Collision-induced dissociation (CID) was used to provide additional confirmation for select compounds. Multiple stage experiments, to MS5, were performed for select compounds. Even in the absence of added salt, the benzodiazepine containing mixture yielded sodium and potassium adducts of carbamazepine which masked the ions of interest. These adducts were eliminated by adding 0.1% 7M ammonium acetate to the standard methanol:water (1:1) spray solvent. Comparison of the salt tolerance of DESI with that of electrospray ionization (ESI) demonstrated much better signal/noise characteristics for DESI in this study. The salt tolerance of DESI was also studied by performing limit of detection and dynamic range experiments. Even at a salt concentration significantly above physiological concentrations, select surfaces were effective in providing spectra that allowed the ready identification of the compounds of interest. The already high salt tolerance of DESI can be optimized further by appropriate choices of surface and spray solution.

  12. Acoustic diffusers III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bidondo, Alejandro

    2002-11-01

    This acoustic diffusion research presents a pragmatic view, based more on effects than causes and 15 very useful in the project advance control process, where the sound field's diffusion coefficient, sound field diffusivity (SFD), for its evaluation. Further research suggestions are presented to obtain an octave frequency resolution of the SFD for precise design or acoustical corrections.

  13. The Acoustical Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Melissa

    Asserting that without an adequate acoustical environment, learning activities can be hindered, this paper reviews the literature on classroom acoustics, particularly noise, reverberation, signal-to-noise ratio, task performance, and recommendations for improvement. Through this review, the paper seeks to determine whether portable classrooms…

  14. Acoustics Critical Readiness Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballard, Kenny

    2010-01-01

    This presentation reviews the status of the acoustic equipment from the medical operations perspective. Included is information about the acoustic dosimeters, sound level meter, and headphones that are planned for use while on orbit. Finally there is information about on-orbit hearing assessments.

  15. Cystic acoustic schwannomas.

    PubMed

    Lunardi, P; Missori, P; Mastronardi, L; Fortuna, A

    1991-01-01

    Three cases with large space-occupying cysts in the cerebellopontine angle are reported. CT and MRI findings were not typical for acoustic schwannomas but at operation, besides the large cysts, small acoustic schwannomas could be detected and removed. The clinical and neuroradiological features of this unusual variety and the CT and MRI differential diagnosis of cerebellopontine angle lesions are discussed.

  16. Multi-dimensional analysis of subjective acoustical ratings and acoustical measures in existing concert halls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okano, Toshiyuki

    2004-05-01

    Correlations between subjective acoustical ratings and hall-averaged values of acoustical measures are studied among existing worldwide major concert halls. It was shown that the classified acoustical ratings by Beranek [Concert and Opera Halls, How They Sound (ASA, 1996)] are discriminated correctly by combining binaural quality index (BQI) with some other acoustical measures. BQI is determined by the arithmetic average of inter-aural cross correlation coefficient in three octave bands of 500, 1000, and 2000 Hz, subtracted from unity, calculated from the early 80-ms part of binaural impulse response. Considering that the upper limit value of BQI not to cause disturbing image shift is approximately 0.85 at individual seat [Okano, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 2219-2230 (2000)], the values of 0.6 or higher in hall averaged value of BQI, 0.85 or smaller in individual seat value of BQI, and approximately 5 dB or higher in strength factor at middle frequencies are proposed as design objectives to attain a high acoustical quality. It should be provided that other acoustical measures are also optimized. These target values will be very effective in studying room shape of halls, using scale models or computer models.

  17. Acoustical scattering cross section of gas bubbles under dual-frequency acoustic excitation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuning; Li, Shengcai

    2015-09-01

    The acoustical scattering cross section is a paramount parameter determining the scattering ability of cavitation bubbles when they are excited by the incident acoustic waves. This parameter is strongly related with many important applications of acoustic cavitation including facilitating the reaction of chemical process, boosting bubble sonoluminescence, and performing non-invasive therapy and drug delivery. In present paper, both the analytical and numerical solutions of acoustical scattering cross section of gas bubbles under dual-frequency excitation are obtained. The validity of the analytical solution is shown with demonstrating examples. The nonlinear characteristics (e.g., harmonics, subharmonics and ultraharmonics) of the scattering cross section curve under dual-frequency approach are investigated. Compared with single-frequency approach, the dual-frequency approach displays more resonances termed as "combination resonances" and could promote the acoustical scattering cross section significantly within a much broader range of bubble sizes due to the generation of more resonances. The influence of several paramount parameters (e.g., acoustic pressure amplitude, power allocations between two acoustic components, and the ratio of the frequencies) in the dual-frequency system on the predictions of scattering cross section has been discussed.

  18. Zero-Headspace Coal-Core Gas Desorption Canister, Revised Desorption Data Analysis Spreadsheets and a Dry Canister Heating System

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barker, Charles E.; Dallegge, Todd A.

    2005-01-01

    Coal desorption techniques typically use the U.S. Bureau of Mines (USBM) canister-desorption method as described by Diamond and Levine (1981), Close and Erwin (1989), Ryan and Dawson (1993), McLennan and others (1994), Mavor and Nelson (1997) and Diamond and Schatzel (1998). However, the coal desorption canister designs historically used with this method have an inherent flaw that allows a significant gas-filled headspace bubble to remain in the canister that later has to be compensated for by correcting the measured desorbed gas volume with a mathematical headspace volume correction (McLennan and others, 1994; Mavor and Nelson, 1997).

  19. Organic and inorganic decomposition products from the thermal desorption of atmospheric particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, B. J.; Zhang, Y.; Zuo, X.; Martinez, R. E.; Walker, M. J.; Kreisberg, N. M.; Goldstein, A. H.; Docherty, K. S.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2015-12-01

    signal found in the traditional compound elution time period reveals higher correlations with AMS hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA) combined with the fraction of OOA that is less oxygenated. Potential to quantify nitrate and sulfate aerosol mass concentrations using the TAG system is explored through analysis of ammonium sulfate and ammonium nitrate standards. While chemical standards display a linear response in the TAG system, re-desorptions of the CTD cell following ambient sample analysis shows some signal carryover on sulfate and organics, and new desorption methods should be developed to improve throughput. Future standards should be composed of complex organic/inorganic mixtures, similar to what is found in the atmosphere, and perhaps will more accurately account for any aerosol mixture effects on compositional quantification.

  20. Acoustic integrated extinction

    PubMed Central

    Norris, Andrew N.

    2015-01-01

    The integrated extinction (IE) is defined as the integral of the scattering cross section as a function of wavelength. Sohl et al. (2007 J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 122, 3206–3210. (doi:10.1121/1.2801546)) derived an IE expression for acoustic scattering that is causal, i.e. the scattered wavefront in the forward direction arrives later than the incident plane wave in the background medium. The IE formula was based on electromagnetic results, for which scattering is causal by default. Here, we derive a formula for the acoustic IE that is valid for causal and non-causal scattering. The general result is expressed as an integral of the time-dependent forward scattering function. The IE reduces to a finite integral for scatterers with zero long-wavelength monopole and dipole amplitudes. Implications for acoustic cloaking are discussed and a new metric is proposed for broadband acoustic transparency. PMID:27547100

  1. Direct Field Acoustic Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larkin, Paul; Goldstein, Bob

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an update to the methods and procedures used in Direct Field Acoustic Testing (DFAT). The paper will discuss some of the recent techniques and developments that are currently being used and the future publication of a reference standard. Acoustic testing using commercial sound system components is becoming a popular and cost effective way of generating a required acoustic test environment both in and out of a reverberant chamber. This paper will present the DFAT test method, the usual setup and procedure and the development and use of a closed-loop, narrow-band control system. Narrow-band control of the acoustic PSD allows all standard techniques and procedures currently used in random control to be applied to acoustics and some examples are given. The paper will conclude with a summary of the development of a standard practice guideline that is hoped to be available in the first quarter of next year.

  2. Acoustic suspension system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, M. C.; Wang, T. G. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    An acoustic levitation system is described, with single acoustic source and a small reflector to stably levitate a small object while the object is processed as by coating or heating it. The system includes a concave acoustic source which has locations on opposite sides of its axis that vibrate towards and away from a focal point to generate a converging acoustic field. A small reflector is located near the focal point, and preferably slightly beyond it, to create an intense acoustic field that stably supports a small object near the reflector. The reflector is located about one-half wavelength from the focal point and is concavely curved to a radius of curvature (L) of about one-half the wavelength, to stably support an object one-quarter wavelength (N) from the reflector.

  3. Direct Field Acoustic Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larkin, Paul; Goldstein, Bob

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an update to the methods and procedures used in Direct Field Acoustic Testing (DFAT). The paper will discuss some of the recent techniques and developments that are currently being used and the future publication of a reference standard. Acoustic testing using commercial sound system components is becoming a popular and cost effective way of generating a required acoustic test environment both in and out of a reverberant chamber. This paper will present the DFAT test method, the usual setup and procedure and the development and use of a closed-loop, narrow-band control system. Narrow-band control of the acoustic PSD allows all standard techniques and procedures currently used in random control to be applied to acoustics and some examples are given. The paper will conclude with a summary of the development of a standard practice guideline that is hoped to be available in the first quarter of next year.

  4. Virtual acoustics displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenzel, Elizabeth M.; Fisher, Scott S.; Stone, Philip K.; Foster, Scott H.

    1991-03-01

    The real time acoustic display capabilities are described which were developed for the Virtual Environment Workstation (VIEW) Project at NASA-Ames. The acoustic display is capable of generating localized acoustic cues in real time over headphones. An auditory symbology, a related collection of representational auditory 'objects' or 'icons', can be designed using ACE (Auditory Cue Editor), which links both discrete and continuously varying acoustic parameters with information or events in the display. During a given display scenario, the symbology can be dynamically coordinated in real time with 3-D visual objects, speech, and gestural displays. The types of displays feasible with the system range from simple warnings and alarms to the acoustic representation of multidimensional data or events.

  5. Virtual acoustics displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenzel, Elizabeth M.; Fisher, Scott S.; Stone, Philip K.; Foster, Scott H.

    1991-01-01

    The real time acoustic display capabilities are described which were developed for the Virtual Environment Workstation (VIEW) Project at NASA-Ames. The acoustic display is capable of generating localized acoustic cues in real time over headphones. An auditory symbology, a related collection of representational auditory 'objects' or 'icons', can be designed using ACE (Auditory Cue Editor), which links both discrete and continuously varying acoustic parameters with information or events in the display. During a given display scenario, the symbology can be dynamically coordinated in real time with 3-D visual objects, speech, and gestural displays. The types of displays feasible with the system range from simple warnings and alarms to the acoustic representation of multidimensional data or events.

  6. Acoustic Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowling, David R.; Sabra, Karim G.

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic waves carry information about their source and collect information about their environment as they propagate. This article reviews how these information-carrying and -collecting features of acoustic waves that travel through fluids can be exploited for remote sensing. In nearly all cases, modern acoustic remote sensing involves array-recorded sounds and array signal processing to recover multidimensional results. The application realm for acoustic remote sensing spans an impressive range of signal frequencies (10-2 to 107 Hz) and distances (10-2 to 107 m) and involves biomedical ultrasound imaging, nondestructive evaluation, oil and gas exploration, military systems, and Nuclear Test Ban Treaty monitoring. In the past two decades, approaches have been developed to robustly localize remote sources; remove noise and multipath distortion from recorded signals; and determine the acoustic characteristics of the environment through which the sound waves have traveled, even when the recorded sounds originate from uncooperative sources or are merely ambient noise.

  7. Acoustic emission monitoring of activation behavior of LaNi5 hydrogen storage alloy

    PubMed Central

    De Rosa, Igor Maria; Dell'Era, Alessandro; Pasquali, Mauro; Santulli, Carlo; Sarasini, Fabrizio

    2011-01-01

    The acoustic emission technique is proposed for assessing the irreversible phenomena occurring during hydrogen absorption/desorption cycling in LaNi5. In particular, we have studied, through a parametric analysis of in situ detected signals, the correlation between acoustic emission (AE) parameters and the processes occurring during the activation of an intermetallic compound. Decreases in the number and amplitude of AE signals suggest that pulverization due to hydrogen loading involves progressively smaller volumes of material as the number of cycles increases. This conclusion is confirmed by electron microscopy observations and particle size distribution measurements. PMID:27877423

  8. Laser desorption mass spectrometry for biomolecule detection and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winston Chen, C. H.; Sammartano, L. J.; Isola, N. R.; Allman, S. L.

    2001-08-01

    During the past few years, we developed and used laser desorption mass spectrometry for biomolecule detections. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) was successfully used to detect DNA fragments with the size larger than 3000 base pairs. It was also successfully used to sequence DNA with both enzymatic and chemical degradation methods to produce DNA ladders. We also developed MALDI with fragmentation for direct DNA sequencing for short DNA probes. Since laser desorption mass spectrometry for DNA detection has the advantages of fast speed and no need of labeling, it has a great potential for molecular diagnosis for disease and person identification by DNA fingerprinting. We applied laser desorption mass spectrometry to succeed in the diagnosis of cystic fibrosis and several other nerve degenerative diseases such as Huntington's disease. We also succeeded in demonstrating DNA typing for forensic applications.

  9. Hydrogen Desorption and Adsorption Measurements on Graphite Nanofibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahn, C. C.; Ye, Y.; Ratnakumar, B. V.; Witham, C. K.; Bowman, R. C., Jr.; Fultz, B.

    1998-01-01

    Graphite nanofibers were synthesized and their hydrogen desorption and adsorption properties are reported for 77 and 300 K. Catalysts were made by several different methods including chemical routes, mechanical alloying and gas condensation.

  10. Irreversible adsorption/desorption of PAHs in sediment/water

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, G.; Kan, A.T.; Tomson, M.B.

    1996-10-01

    Successive adsorption isotherm of phenanthrene on soil corresponds to a constant partition of phenanthrene between the bulk solution and solid phase. This shows that the hydrophobic reaction is a dominant mechanism in adsorption process. However, desorption of PAHs appears irreversibility. Cyclic and multiple adsorption and desorption experiments indicated that there is an irreversibly adsorbed intrinsic capacity in the interaction of PAHs (naphthalene and phenanthrene) and soil in aqueous solution. This irreversible fraction for PAHs (naphthalene and phenanthrene) is about 1000-5000 {mu}g/g normalized on the basis of soil organic carbon. The desorption of PAHs from soil appears biphasic when the total adsorbed capacity is greater than the intrinsic irreversibly adsorbed value. In phase, the partitioning coefficient of desorption of PAHs is similar to that of adsorption. However, the other mechanism may be responsible to control the release of PAHs in phase 2.

  11. Molecular beam-thermal hydrogen desorption from palladium

    SciTech Connect

    Lobo, R. F. M.; Berardo, F. M. V.; Ribeiro, J. H. F.

    2010-04-15

    Among the most efficient techniques for hydrogen desorption monitoring, thermal desorption mass spectrometry is a very sensitive one, but in certain cases can give rise to uptake misleading results due to residual hydrogen partial pressure background variations. In this work one develops a novel thermal desorption variant based on the effusive molecular beam technique that represents a significant improvement in the accurate determination of hydrogen mass absorbed on a solid sample. The enhancement in the signal-to-noise ratio for trace hydrogen is on the order of 20%, and no previous calibration with a chemical standard is required. The kinetic information obtained from the hydrogen desorption mass spectra (at a constant heating rate of 1 deg. C/min) accounts for the consistency of the technique.

  12. Hydrogen Desorption and Adsorption Measurements on Graphite Nanofibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahn, C. C.; Ye, Y.; Ratnakumar, B. V.; Witham, C. K.; Bowman, R. C., Jr.; Fultz, B.

    1998-01-01

    Graphite nanofibers were synthesized and their hydrogen desorption and adsorption properties are reported for 77 and 300 K. Catalysts were made by several different methods including chemical routes, mechanical alloying and gas condensation.

  13. High temperature acoustic and hybrid microwave/acoustic levitators for materials processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, Martin

    1990-01-01

    The physical acoustics group at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory developed a single mode acoustic levitator technique for advanced containerless materials processing. The technique was successfully demonstrated in ground based studies to temperatures of about 1000 C in a uniform temperature furnace environment and to temperatures of about 1500 C using laser beams to locally heat the sample. Researchers are evaluating microwaves as a more efficient means than lasers for locally heating a positioned sample. Recent tests of a prototype single mode hybrid microwave/acoustic levitator successfully demonstrated the feasibility of using microwave power as a heating source. The potential advantages of combining acoustic positioning forces and microwave heating for containerless processing investigations are presented in outline form.

  14. Tunable acoustic double negativity metamaterial.

    PubMed

    Liang, Z; Willatzen, M; Li, J; Christensen, J

    2012-01-01

    Man-made composite materials called "metamaterials" allow for the creation of unusual wave propagation behavior. Acoustic and elastic metamaterials in particular, can pave the way for the full control of sound in realizing cloaks of invisibility, perfect lenses and much more. In this work we design acousto-elastic surface modes that are similar to surface plasmons in metals and on highly conducting surfaces perforated by holes. We combine a structure hosting these modes together with a gap material supporting negative modulus and collectively producing negative dispersion. By analytical techniques and full-wave simulations we attribute the observed behavior to the mass density and bulk modulus being simultaneously negative.

  15. Experiments on the Acoustics of Whistling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shadle, Christine H.

    1983-01-01

    The acoustics of speech production allows the prediction of resonances for a given vocal tract configuration. Combining these predictions with aerodynamic theory developed for mechanical whistles makes theories about human whistling more complete. Several experiments involving human whistling are reported which support the theory and indicate new…

  16. Experiments on the Acoustics of Whistling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shadle, Christine H.

    1983-01-01

    The acoustics of speech production allows the prediction of resonances for a given vocal tract configuration. Combining these predictions with aerodynamic theory developed for mechanical whistles makes theories about human whistling more complete. Several experiments involving human whistling are reported which support the theory and indicate new…

  17. Laser-induced thermal desorption of aniline from silica surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voumard, Pierre; Zenobi, Renato

    1995-10-01

    A complete study on the energy partitioning upon laser-induced thermal desorption of aniline from silica surfaces was undertaken. The measurements include characterization of the aniline-quartz adsorption system using temperature-programmed desorption, the extrapolation of quasiequilibrium desorption temperatures to the regime of laser heating rates on the order of 109-1010 K/s by computational means, measurement of the kinetic energy distributions of desorbing aniline using a pump-probe method, and the determination of internal energies with resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization spectroscopy. The measurements are compared to calculations of the surface temperature rise and the resulting desorption rates, based on a finite-difference mathematical description of pulsed laser heating. While the surface temperature of laser-heated silica reaches about 600-700 K at the time of desorption, the translational temperature of laser-desorbed aniline was measured to be Tkin=420±60 K, Tvib was 360±60 K, and Trot was 350±100 K. These results are discussed using different models for laser-induced thermal desorption from surfaces.

  18. Desorption rate of volatile compounds in polishing ponds.

    PubMed

    Alves, Eudes M; Cavalcanti, Paula F C; van Haandel, Adrianus

    2011-01-01

    Increase of pH in polishing ponds can be predicted quantitatively from variations in alkalinity and acidity. These variables are affected by processes that develop simultaneously in ponds: (1) CO(2) desorption, (2) biological CO(2) removal by photosynthesis and (3) NH(3) desorption. An experimental investigation was carried out to determine the desorption rate of carbon dioxide and ammonium. It is shown that CO(2) and NH(3) desorption can be described by Fick's law, which describes desorption of a gaseous compounds from water as a first order process with respect to the degree of oversaturation, which is the driving force of the process. An experimental investigation was carried out to determine the desorption rate constants. The value of the constant proved to be inversely proportional to the depth of the pond (H) and its value for H=1 m and at 26°C was established as K(CO2)=0.34/H d(-1) for carbon dioxide and K(NH3)=0.33/H d(-1) for ammonium.

  19. Uranium and Neptunium Desorption from Yucca Mountain Alluvium

    SciTech Connect

    C.D. Scism; P.W. Reimus; M. Ding; S.J. Chipera

    2006-03-16

    Uranium and neptunium were used as reactive tracers in long-term laboratory desorption studies using saturated alluvium collected from south of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The objective of these long-term experiments is to make detailed observations of the desorption behavior of uranium and neptunium to provide Yucca Mountain with technical bases for a more realistic and potentially less conservative approach to predicting the transport of adsorbing radionuclides in the saturated alluvium. This paper describes several long-term desorption experiments using a flow-through experimental method and groundwater and alluvium obtained from boreholes along a potential groundwater flow path from the proposed repository site. In the long term desorption experiments, the percentages of uranium and neptunium sorbed as a function of time after different durations of sorption was determined. In addition, the desorbed activity as a function of time was fit using a multi-site, multi-rate model to demonstrate that different desorption rate constants ranging over several orders of magnitude exist for the desorption of uranium from Yucca Mountain saturated alluvium. This information will be used to support the development of a conceptual model that ultimately results in effective K{sub d} values much larger than those currently in use for predicting radionuclide transport at Yucca Mountain.

  20. Impact of neutron irradiation on thermal helium desorption from iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xunxiang; Field, Kevin G.; Taller, Stephen; Katoh, Yutai; Wirth, Brian D.

    2017-06-01

    The synergistic effect of neutron irradiation and transmutant helium production is an important concern for the application of iron-based alloys as structural materials in fission and fusion reactors. In this study, we investigated the impact of neutron irradiation on thermal helium desorption behavior in high purity iron. Single crystalline and polycrystalline iron samples were neutron irradiated in HFIR to 5 dpa at 300 °C and in BOR-60 to 16.6 dpa at 386 °C, respectively. Following neutron irradiation, 10 keV He ion implantation was performed at room temperature on both samples to a fluence of 7 × 1018 He/m2. Thermal desorption spectrometry (TDS) was conducted to assess the helium diffusion and clustering kinetics by analyzing the desorption spectra. The comparison of He desorption spectra between unirradiated and neutron irradiated samples showed that the major He desorption peaks shift to higher temperatures for the neutron-irradiated iron samples, implying that strong trapping sites for He were produced during neutron irradiation, which appeared to be nm-sized cavities through TEM examination. The underlying mechanisms controlling the helium trapping and desorption behavior were deduced by assessing changes in the microstructure, as characterized by TEM, of the neutron irradiated samples before and after TDS measurements.

  1. Thermal helium desorption behavior in advanced ferritic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Akihiko; Sugano, R.; Matsushita, Y.; Ukai, S.

    2005-02-01

    Thermal helium desorption measurements were performed to investigate the difference in the helium trapping and accumulation behavior among a reduced activation ferritic (RAF) steel and oxide dispersion strengthening (ODS) steels after implantation of He+ ions at room temperature. Thermal helium desorption spectra (THDS) were obtained during annealing to 1200 °C at a heating rate of 1 °C/s. The THDS of the ODS steels are very similar to that of the RAF steel, except for the presence of the peak in the temperature range from 800 to 1000 °C, where the α γ transformation related helium desorption from the γ-phase is considered to occur in the 9Cr-ODS martensitic steels. The fraction of helium desorption becomes larger at higher temperatures, and this trend is increased with the amount of implanted helium. In the 9Cr-ODS steels, the fraction of helium desorption by bubble migration mechanism was smaller than that in the RAF steel. This suggests that the bubble formation was suppressed in the ODS steels. In the 12Cr-ODS steel, the fraction of helium desorption by bubble migration reached more than 90%, suggesting that the trapping capacity of martensite phase in the 9Cr-ODS steel is rather large.

  2. Enhanced desorption of persistent organic pollutants from microplastics under simulated physiological conditions.

    PubMed

    Bakir, Adil; Rowland, Steven J; Thompson, Richard C

    2014-02-01

    Microplastics have the potential to uptake and release persistent organic pollutants (POPs); however, subsequent transfer to marine organisms is poorly understood. Some models estimating transfer of sorbed contaminants to organisms neglect the role of gut surfactants under differing physiological conditions in the gut (varying pH and temperature), examined here. We investigated the potential for polyvinylchloride (PVC) and polyethylene (PE) to sorb and desorb (14)C-DDT, (14)C-phenanthrene (Phe), (14)C-perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and (14)C-di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP). Desorption rates of POPs were quantified in seawater and under simulated gut conditions. Influence of pH and temperature was examined in order to represent cold and warm blooded organisms. Desorption rates were faster with gut surfactant, with a further substantial increase under conditions simulating warm blooded organisms. Desorption under gut conditions could be up to 30 times greater than in seawater alone. Of the POP/plastic combinations examined Phe with PE gave the highest potential for transport to organisms.

  3. A kinetic Monte Carlo approach to diffusion-controlled thermal desorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schablitzki, T.; Rogal, J.; Drautz, R.

    2017-06-01

    Atomistic simulations of thermal desorption spectra for effusion from bulk materials to characterize binding or trapping sites are a challenging task as large system sizes as well as extended time scales are required. Here, we introduce an approach where we combine kinetic Monte Carlo with an analytic approximation of the superbasins within the framework of absorbing Markov chains. We apply our approach to the effusion of hydrogen from BCC iron, where the diffusion within bulk grains is coarse grained using absorbing Markov chains, which provide an exact solution of the dynamics within a superbasin. Our analytic approximation to the superbasin is transferable with respect to grain size and elliptical shapes and can be applied in simulations with constant temperature as well as constant heating rate. The resulting thermal desorption spectra are in close agreement with direct kinetic Monte Carlo simulations, but the calculations are computationally much more efficient. Our approach is thus applicable to much larger system sizes and provides a first step towards an atomistic understanding of the influence of structural features on the position and shape of peaks in thermal desorption spectra. This article is part of the themed issue 'The challenges of hydrogen and metals'.

  4. Excitation and desorption of physisorbed H2 via theΣ2u electron scattering resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, Stig; Svensson, Krister

    2017-09-01

    Our high-resolution electron energy-loss measurements concern physisorbed H2 and comprise differential cross sections for the excitation of the internal H2 modes and the H2-surface bonding mode and their combinations and extend over the electron impact energy range of the classical low-energy H2 Σ2u resonance. Comparison with corresponding data for the excitation of the internal modes of gas phase H2 reveals that strong elastic electron reflectivity from the Cu(100) substrate profoundly distorts the inelastic scattering pattern for physisorbed H2. We find that this influence can be corrected for and that the resulting peak cross sections agree with the H2 gas phase data, in accordance with theoretical predictions for the excitation of the internal H2 vibration. We have used corrected cross sections for the rotational mode spectra of physisorbed H2, HD, and D2 in a model concerning electron induced desorption via rotation-translation energy conversion. These spectra include transitions from the ground state as well as excited levels of the physisorption potential well. H2 and HD can desorb from all levels while D2, for energetic reason, can only desorb from the excited levels. This model gives a satisfactory account of the observed desorption cross sections and predicts characteristic velocity distributions of the desorbing molecules. The cross section data for H2 and HD reveals that direct bound-free transitions also contribute to the electron induced desorption.

  5. Excitation and desorption of physisorbed H2 via theΣu2 electron scattering resonance.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Stig; Svensson, Krister

    2017-09-21

    Our high-resolution electron energy-loss measurements concern physisorbed H2 and comprise differential cross sections for the excitation of the internal H2 modes and the H2-surface bonding mode and their combinations and extend over the electron impact energy range of the classical low-energy H2 Σu2 resonance. Comparison with corresponding data for the excitation of the internal modes of gas phase H2 reveals that strong elastic electron reflectivity from the Cu(100) substrate profoundly distorts the inelastic scattering pattern for physisorbed H2. We find that this influence can be corrected for and that the resulting peak cross sections agree with the H2 gas phase data, in accordance with theoretical predictions for the excitation of the internal H2 vibration. We have used corrected cross sections for the rotational mode spectra of physisorbed H2, HD, and D2 in a model concerning electron induced desorption via rotation-translation energy conversion. These spectra include transitions from the ground state as well as excited levels of the physisorption potential well. H2 and HD can desorb from all levels while D2, for energetic reason, can only desorb from the excited levels. This model gives a satisfactory account of the observed desorption cross sections and predicts characteristic velocity distributions of the desorbing molecules. The cross section data for H2 and HD reveals that direct bound-free transitions also contribute to the electron induced desorption.

  6. Molecular mechanism of adsorption/desorption hysteresis: dynamics of shale gas in nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jie; Wang, FengChao; Liu, He; Wu, HengAn

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the adsorption and desorption behavior of methane has received considerable attention since it is one of the crucial aspects of the exploitation of shale gas. Unexpectedly, obvious hysteresis is observed from the ideally reversible physical sorption of methane in some experiments. However, the underlying mechanism still remains an open problem. In this study, Monte Carlo (MC) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are carried out to explore the molecular mechanisms of adsorption/desorption hysteresis. First, a detailed analysis about the capillary condensation of methane in micropores is presented. The influence of pore width, surface strength, and temperature on the hysteresis loop is further investigated. It is found that a disappearance of hysteresis occurs above a temperature threshold. Combined with the phase diagram of methane, we explicitly point out that capillary condensation is inapplicable for the hysteresis of shale gas under normal temperature conditions. Second, a new mechanism, variation of pore throat size, is proposed and studied. For methane to pass through the throat, a certain energy is required due to the repulsive interaction. The required energy increases with shrinkage of the throat, such that the originally adsorbed methane cannot escape through the narrowed throat. These trapped methane molecules account for the hysteresis. Furthermore, the hysteresis loop is found to increase with the increasing pressure and decreasing temperature. We suggest that the variation of pore throat size can explain the adsorption/desorption hysteresis of shale gas. Our conclusions and findings are of great significance for guiding the efficient exploitation of shale gas.

  7. Biodegradation of persistent organics can overcome adsorption-desorption hysteresis in biological activated carbon systems.

    PubMed

    Abromaitis, V; Racys, V; van der Marel, P; Meulepas, R J W

    2016-04-01

    In Biological Activated Carbon (BAC) systems, persistent organic pollutants can be removed through a combination of adsorption, desorption and biodegradation. These processes might be affected by the presence of other organics, especially by the more abundant easily-biodegradable organics, like acetate. In this research these relations are quantified for the removal of the persistent pharmaceutical metoprolol. Acetate did not affect the adsorption and desorption of metoprolol, but it did greatly enhance the metoprolol biodegradation. At least part of the BAC biomass growing on acetate was also able to metabolise metoprolol, although metoprolol was only converted after the acetate was depleted. The presence of easily-degradable organics like acetate in the feeding water is therefore beneficial for the removal of metoprolol in BAC systems. The isotherms obtained from metoprolol adsorption and desorption experiments showed that BAC systems are subject to hysteresis; for AC bioregeneration to take place the microbial biomass has to reduce the concentration at the AC-biomass interface 2.7 times compared to the concentration at which the carbon was being loaded. However, given the threshold concentration of the MET degrading microorganisms (<0.08 μg/L) versus the average influent concentration (1.3 μg/L), bioregeneration is feasible.

  8. Laser-desorption tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry with continuous liquid introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Evan R.; Jones, Glenn C., Jr.; Fang, LiLing; Nagata, Takeshi; Zare, Richard N.

    1992-05-01

    A new method to combine aqueous sample introduction with matrix assisted laser desorption mass spectrometry (MS) for interfacing liquid-chromatographic techniques, such as capillary electrophoresis, to MS is described. Aqueous sample solution is introduced directly into the ion source of a time-of-. flight (TOF) mass spectrometer through a fused silica capillary; evaporative cooling results in ice formation at the end of the capillary. The ice can be made to extrude continuously by using localized resistive heating. With direct laser desorption, molecular ions from proteins as large as bovine insulin (5734 Da) can be produced. Two-step desorption/photoionization with a variety of wavelengths is demonstrated, and has the advantages of improved resolution and shot-to-shot reproducibility. Ion structural information is obtained using surface-induced dissociation with an in-line collision device in the reflectron mirror of the TOF instrument. Product ion resolution of ~70 is obtained at m/z77. Extensive fragmentation can be produced with dissociation efficiencies between 7-15% obtained for molecular ions of small organic molecules. Efficiencies approaching 30% are obtained for larger peptide ions.

  9. Molecular mechanism of adsorption/desorption hysteresis: dynamics of shale gas in nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jie; Wang, FengChao; Liu, He; Wu, HengAn

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the adsorption and desorption behavior of methane has received considerable attention since it is one of the crucial aspects of the exploitation of shale gas. Unexpectedly, obvious hysteresis is observed from the ideally reversible physical sorption of methane in some experiments. However, the underlying mechanism still remains an open problem. In this study, Monte Carlo (MC) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are carried out to explore the molecular mechanisms of adsorption/desorption hysteresis. First, a detailed analysis about the capillary condensation of methane in micropores is presented. The influence of pore width, surface strength, and temperature on the hysteresis loop is further investigated. It is found that a disappearance of hysteresis occurs above a temperature threshold. Combined with the phase diagram of methane, we explicitly point out that capillary condensation is inapplicable for the hysteresis of shale gas under normal temperature conditions. Second, a new mechanism, variation of pore throat size, is proposed and studied. For methane to pass through the throat, a certain energy is required due to the repulsive interaction. The required energy increases with shrinkage of the throat, such that the originally adsorbed methane cannot escape through the narrowed throat. These trapped methane molecules account for the hysteresis. Furthermore, the hysteresis loop is found to increase with the increasing pressure and decreasing temperature. We suggest that the variation of pore throat size can explain the adsorption/desorption hysteresis of shale gas. Our conclusions and findings are of great significance for guiding the efficient exploitation of shale gas.

  10. Low coverage spontaneous etching and hyperthermal desorption of aluminum chlorides from Cl2/Al(111).

    PubMed

    Grassman, Tyler J; Poon, Gary C; Kummel, Andrew C

    2004-11-08

    Nonresonant multiphoton ionization with time-of-flight mass spectrometry has been used to monitor the desorption of aluminum chloride (Al(x)Cl(y)) etch products from the Al(111) surface at 100 and 500 K during low-coverage (<5% monolayer) monoenergetic Cl(2) (0.11-0.65 eV) dosing. The desorption products in this low-coverage range show predominantly hyperthermal exit velocities under all dosing conditions. For example, with 0.27 eV incident Cl(2), the etch product was found to have a most-probable velocity of 517+/-22 m/s at an Al(111) surface temperature of 100 K. This corresponds to 22 times the expected thermal desorption translational energy for AlCl(3). Cl(2) sticking probability measurements and Al(x)Cl(y) etch rate measurements show etching even at Cl(2) coverages of less than 5% monolayer at surface temperatures between 100 and 500 K. These experimental results are consistent with a combination of fast-time-scale surface diffusion and agglomeration of the adsorbed chlorine to form aluminum chlorides and the presence of activated AlCl(3) chemisorption states having potential energies above the vacuum level. Density functional theory calculations yield results that are consistent with both our experimental findings and mechanistic descriptions.

  11. Using chemical desorption of PAHs from sediment to model biodegradation during bioavailability assessment.

    PubMed

    Spasojević, Jelena M; Maletić, Snežana P; Rončević, Srđan D; Radnović, Dragan V; Cučak, Dragana I; Tričković, Jelena S; Dalmacija, Božo D

    2015-01-01

    This work compares the biodegradation potential of four polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) (phenanthrene, pyrene, chrysene and benzo(a)pyrene, chosen as representatives of the 3, 4 and 5 ring PAHs) with their desorption from sediment by XAD4 resin and methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MCD). The biodegradation study was conducted under various conditions (biostimulation, bioaugmentation and their combination). The results show that total PAH removal in all treatments except biostimulation gave similar results, whereby the total amount of PAHs was decreased by about 30-35%. The desorption experiment showed that XAD4 desorbed a greater fraction of phenanthrene (77% versus 52%), and benzo(a)pyrene (44% versus 25%) than MCD. The results for four ring PAHs were similar for both desorption agents (about 30%). Comparing the maximum biodegraded amount of each PAH with the rapidly desorbed XAD4 and MCD fraction, XAD4 was found to correlate better with biodegradation for the high molecular PAHs (pyrene, chrysene, benzo(a)pyrene), although it overestimated the availability of phenanthrene. In contrast, MCD showed better correlation with the biodegradation of low molecular weight PAHs.

  12. Effect of surfactant alkyl chain length on soil cadmium desorption using surfactant/ligand systems.

    PubMed

    Shin, Mari; Barrington, Suzelle F; Marshall, William D; Kim, Jin-Woo

    2005-02-01

    The effect of surfactant alkyl chain length on soil Cd desorption was studied using nonionic surfactants of polyethylene oxide (PEO) of PEO chain lengths of 7.5 (Triton X-114), 9.5 (Triton X-100), 30 (Triton X-305), or 40 units (Triton X-405) in combination with the I- ligand. Triplicate 1 g soil samples were equilibrated with 15 ml of surfactant-ligand mixture, at concentrations of 0.025, 0.50 or 0.10, and 0.0, 0.168 or 0.336 mol/l, respectively. After shaking the samples for 24 h, the supernatant fraction was analyzed for Cd content to determine the percent of Cd desorbed from the soil. After five successive washings, 53%, 40% and 25% of Cd had been desorbed by 0.025, 0.050 or 0.10 mol/l of Triton X-114, respectively, in the presence of 0.336 mol/l of I-, whereas with the same conditions, Triton X-100 desorbed 61%, 57% and 56% Cd and either Triton X-305 or Triton X-405 desorbed 51, 40 and 14 to 16% Cd. The most efficient Cd desorption was obtained using 0.025 mol/l Triton X-100 in admixture with 0.336 mol/l I-. Increased surfactant concentration was detrimental to Cd desorption consistent with a process that blocked ligand access to the soil particle surface. After 5 washings,the cumulative cadmium desorption decreased with increasing surfactant alkyl chain length, indicating that the metal-ligand complexes are preferably stabilized by the micelles' hydrophobic octyl phenyl (OP) group rather than by the hydrophilic PEO group. In the absence of ligand, the surfactants alone desorbed less than 1% Cd from the contaminated soil, suggesting that the ligand, rather than the surfactant, extracts the metal, to be subsequently stabilized within the surfactant micelles.

  13. DOUBLE DCO{sup +} RINGS REVEAL CO ICE DESORPTION IN THE OUTER DISK AROUND IM LUP

    SciTech Connect

    Öberg, Karin I.; Loomis, Ryan; Andrews, Sean M.; Qi, Chunhua; Wilner, David J.; Furuya, Kenji; Dishoeck, Ewine F. van; Aikawa, Yuri

    2015-09-10

    In a protoplanetary disk, a combination of thermal and non-thermal desorption processes regulate where volatiles are liberated from icy grain mantles into the gas phase. Non-thermal desorption should result in volatile-enriched gas in disk-regions where complete freeze-out is otherwise expected. We present Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array observations of the disk around the young star IM Lup in 1.4 mm continuum, C{sup 18}O 2–1, H{sup 13}CO{sup +} 3–2 and DCO{sup +} 3–2 emission at ∼0.″5 resolution. The images of these dust and gas tracers are clearly resolved. The DCO{sup +} line exhibits a striking pair of concentric rings of emission that peak at radii of ∼0.″6 and 2″ (∼90 and 300 AU, respectively). Based on disk chemistry model comparison, the inner DCO{sup +} ring is associated with the balance of CO freeze-out and thermal desorption due to a radial decrease in disk temperature. The outer DCO{sup +} ring is explained by non-thermal desorption of CO ice in the low-column-density outer disk, repopulating the disk midplane with cold CO gas. The CO gas then reacts with abundant H{sub 2}D{sup +} to form the observed DCO{sup +} outer ring. These observations demonstrate that spatially resolved DCO{sup +} emission can be used to trace otherwise hidden cold gas reservoirs in the outmost disk regions, opening a new window onto their chemistry and kinematics.

  14. Measurement of organic matter on Si wafer by thermal desorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Chizuko; Takahashi, Isao; Kobayashi, Hiroyuki; Ryuta, Jiro; Shingyouji, Takayuki

    1993-09-01

    Organic matter on a Si surface was investigated using thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). It was clarified that acetone, ethanol, and toluene contaminants on a bare Si surface can be detected by the TDS system, ESCO EMD-WA1000 K, and these organic contaminants have different desorption temperatures and fragment patterns. Therefore organic contaminants on Si wafers were thought to be separated by desorption temperature, and characterized from the fragment pattern at that desorption temperature. Here, the desorption temperature is thought to be proportional to the activation energy for desorption. Thus bonding strength between organic contaminants and the Si surface is qualitatively estimated from the desorption temperature.

  15. Measurement of Organic Matter on Si Wafer by Thermal Desorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Chizuko; Takahashi, Isao; Kobayashi, Hiroyuki; Ryuta, Jiro; Shingyouji, Takayuki

    1993-09-01

    Organic matter on a Si surface was investigated using thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). It was clarified that acetone, ethanol and toluene contaminants on a bare Si surface can be detected by the TDS system, ESCO EMD-WA1000K, and these organic contaminants have different desorption temperatures and fragment patterns. Therefore organic contaminants on Si wafers were thought to be separated by desorption temperature, and characterized from the fragment pattern at that desorption temperature. Here, the desorption temperature is thought to be proportional to the activation energy for desorption. Thus bonding strength between organic contaminants and the Si surface is qualitatively estimated from the desorption temperature.

  16. Translational illusion of acoustic sources by transformation acoustics.

    PubMed

    Sun, Fei; Li, Shichao; He, Sailing

    2017-09-01

    An acoustic illusion of creating a translated acoustic source is designed by utilizing transformation acoustics. An acoustic source shifter (ASS) composed of layered acoustic metamaterials is designed to achieve such an illusion. A practical example where the ASS is made with naturally available materials is also given. Numerical simulations verify the performance of the proposed device. The designed ASS may have some applications in, e.g., anti-sonar detection.

  17. Acoustic sniper localization system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prado, Gervasio; Dhaliwal, Hardave; Martel, Philip O.

    1997-02-01

    Technologies for sniper localization have received increased attention in recent months as American forces have been deployed to various trouble spots around the world. Among the technologies considered for this task acoustics is a natural choice for various reasons. The acoustic signatures of gunshots are loud and distinctive, making them easy to detect even in high noise background environments. Acoustics provides a passive sensing technology with excellent range and non line of sight capabilities. Last but not least, an acoustic sniper location system can be built at a low cost with off the shelf components. Despite its many advantages, the performance of acoustic sensors can degrade under adverse propagation conditions. Localization accuracy, although good, is usually not accurate enough to pinpoint a sniper's location in some scenarios (for example which widow in a building or behind which tree in a grove). For these more demanding missions, the acoustic sensor can be used in conjunction with an infra red imaging system that detects the muzzle blast of the gun. The acoustic system can be used to cue the pointing system of the IR camera in the direction of the shot's source.

  18. Acoustic cooling engine

    DOEpatents

    Hofler, Thomas J.; Wheatley, John C.; Swift, Gregory W.; Migliori, Albert

    1988-01-01

    An acoustic cooling engine with improved thermal performance and reduced internal losses comprises a compressible fluid contained in a resonant pressure vessel. The fluid has a substantial thermal expansion coefficient and is capable of supporting an acoustic standing wave. A thermodynamic element has first and second ends and is located in the resonant pressure vessel in thermal communication with the fluid. The thermal response of the thermodynamic element to the acoustic standing wave pumps heat from the second end to the first end. The thermodynamic element permits substantial flow of the fluid through the thermodynamic element. An acoustic driver cyclically drives the fluid with an acoustic standing wave. The driver is at a location of maximum acoustic impedance in the resonant pressure vessel and proximate the first end of the thermodynamic element. A hot heat exchanger is adjacent to and in thermal communication with the first end of the thermodynamic element. The hot heat exchanger conducts heat from the first end to portions of the resonant pressure vessel proximate the hot heat exchanger. The hot heat exchanger permits substantial flow of the fluid through the hot heat exchanger. The resonant pressure vessel can include a housing less than one quarter wavelength in length coupled to a reservoir. The housing can include a reduced diameter portion communicating with the reservoir. The frequency of the acoustic driver can be continuously controlled so as to maintain resonance.

  19. Some Problems of modern acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stan, A.

    1974-01-01

    The multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary character of acoustics is considered and its scientific, technological, economical and social implications, as well as the role of acoustics in creating new machines and equipment and improving the quality of products are outlined. Research beyond audible frequencies, as well as to extremely high acoustic intensities, which requires the development of a nonlinear acoustics is elaborated.

  20. Deterministic-statistical analysis of a structural-acoustic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xu

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to develop an efficient approach for vibro-acoustic analysis. Being simple and representative, an exited plate-acoustic system is selected as a validation case for the vibro-acoustic analysis as the system presents one two-dimensional statistical component (modal dense structure panel—plate) connected to the other component (deterministic acoustic volume—cavity) through the area junction over a surface domain, rather than at a line boundary. Potential industrial applications of the system vibro-acoustic analysis would be in acoustic modelling of vehicle body panels such as the cabin roof panel, and door panels for the boom noise analysis. A new deterministic-statistical analysis approach is proposed from a combination or hybrid of deterministic analysis and statistical energy analysis (SEA) approaches. General theory of the new deterministic-statistical analysis approach is introduced. The main advantage of the new deterministic-statistical analysis approach is its possibility in place of the time consuming Monte Carlo simulation. In order to illustrate and validate the new deterministic-statistical analysis approach, three approaches of the deterministic analysis, the statistical energy analysis and the new deterministic-statistical analysis are then applied to conduct the plate-acoustic system modelling, and their results will be compared. The vibro-acoustic energy coupling characteristic of the plate-acoustic system will be studied. The most suitable frequency range for the new approach will be identified in consideration of computational accuracy, information and speed.

  1. Hybrid CFD/CAA Modeling for Liftoff Acoustic Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strutzenberg, Louise L.; Liever, Peter A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents development efforts at the NASA Marshall Space flight Center to establish a hybrid Computational Fluid Dynamics and Computational Aero-Acoustics (CFD/CAA) simulation system for launch vehicle liftoff acoustics environment analysis. Acoustic prediction engineering tools based on empirical jet acoustic strength and directivity models or scaled historical measurements are of limited value in efforts to proactively design and optimize launch vehicles and launch facility configurations for liftoff acoustics. CFD based modeling approaches are now able to capture the important details of vehicle specific plume flow environment, identifY the noise generation sources, and allow assessment of the influence of launch pad geometric details and sound mitigation measures such as water injection. However, CFD methodologies are numerically too dissipative to accurately capture the propagation of the acoustic waves in the large CFD models. The hybrid CFD/CAA approach combines the high-fidelity CFD analysis capable of identifYing the acoustic sources with a fast and efficient Boundary Element Method (BEM) that accurately propagates the acoustic field from the source locations. The BEM approach was chosen for its ability to properly account for reflections and scattering of acoustic waves from launch pad structures. The paper will present an overview of the technology components of the CFD/CAA framework and discuss plans for demonstration and validation against test data.

  2. Virtual acoustic displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenzel, Elizabeth M.

    1991-01-01

    A 3D auditory display can potentially enhance information transfer by combining directional and iconic information in a quite naturalistic representation of dynamic objects in the interface. Another aspect of auditory spatial clues is that, in conjunction with other modalities, it can act as a potentiator of information in the display. For example, visual and auditory cues together can reinforce the information content of the display and provide a greater sense of presence or realism in a manner not readily achievable by either modality alone. This phenomenon will be particularly useful in telepresence applications, such as advanced teleconferencing environments, shared electronic workspaces, and monitoring telerobotic activities in remote or hazardous situations. Thus, the combination of direct spatial cues with good principles of iconic design could provide an extremely powerful and information-rich display which is also quite easy to use. An alternative approach, recently developed at ARC, generates externalized, 3D sound cues over headphones in realtime using digital signal processing. Here, the synthesis technique involves the digital generation of stimuli using Head-Related Transfer Functions (HRTF's) measured in the two ear-canals of individual subjects. Other similar approaches include an analog system developed by Loomis, et. al., (1990) and digital systems which make use of transforms derived from normative mannikins and simulations of room acoustics. Such an interface also requires the careful psychophysical evaluation of listener's ability to accurately localize the virtual or synthetic sound sources. From an applied standpoint, measurement of each potential listener's HRTF's may not be possible in practice. For experienced listeners, localization performance was only slightly degraded compared to a subject's inherent ability. Alternatively, even inexperienced listeners may be able to adapt to a particular set of HRTF's as long as they provide adequate

  3. Acoustic well cleaner

    DOEpatents

    Maki, Jr., Voldi E.; Sharma, Mukul M.

    1997-01-21

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for cleaning the wellbore and the near wellbore region. A sonde is provided which is adapted to be lowered into a borehole and which includes a plurality of acoustic transducers arranged around the sonde. Electrical power provided by a cable is converted to acoustic energy. The high intensity acoustic energy directed to the borehole wall and into the near wellbore region, redissolves or resuspends the material which is reducing the permeability of the formation and/or restricting flow in the wellbore.

  4. Acoustic broadband metacouplers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kun; Liang, Bin; Yang, Jing; Yang, Jun; Cheng, Jian-chun

    2017-05-01

    We present the concept of acoustic metacoupler for broadband impedance match between two media with different impedances and cross sections. An implementation is demonstrated that produces spatial gradient of effective acoustic impedance by utilizing helical-like structure with continuously varying pitch instead of changing the cross-section or employing multiple layers. Numerical results verify the effectiveness of our design in achieving near-unity coupling efficiency in a broad band. We anticipate the proposed metacoupler with capability and flexibility to open route to broadband impedance matching and to have a wide realm of potential applications such as transducer design, acoustic imaging and energy harvesting.

  5. Acoustical heat pumping engine

    DOEpatents

    Wheatley, J.C.; Swift, G.W.; Migliori, A.

    1983-08-16

    The disclosure is directed to an acoustical heat pumping engine without moving seals. A tubular housing holds a compressible fluid capable of supporting an acoustical standing wave. An acoustical driver is disposed at one end of the housing and the other end is capped. A second thermodynamic medium is disposed in the housing near to but spaced from the capped end. Heat is pumped along the second thermodynamic medium toward the capped end as a consequence both of the pressure oscillation due to the driver and imperfect thermal contact between the fluid and the second thermodynamic medium. 2 figs.

  6. PRSEUS Acoustic Panel Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicolette, Velicki; Yovanof, Nicolette P.; Baraja, Jaime; Mathur, Gopal; Thrash, Patrick; Pickell, Robert

    2011-01-01

    This report describes the development of a novel structural concept, Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS), that addresses the demanding fuselage loading requirements for the Hybrid Wing or Blended Wing Body (BWB) airplane configuration with regards to acoustic response. A PRSEUS panel was designed and fabricated and provided to NASA-LaRC for acoustic response testing in the Structural Acoustics Loads and Transmission (SALT) facility). Preliminary assessments of the sound transmission characteristics of a PRSEUS panel subjected to a representative Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) operating environment were completed for the NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Program.

  7. Acoustical heat pumping engine

    DOEpatents

    Wheatley, John C.; Swift, Gregory W.; Migliori, Albert

    1983-08-16

    The disclosure is directed to an acoustical heat pumping engine without moving seals. A tubular housing holds a compressible fluid capable of supporting an acoustical standing wave. An acoustical driver is disposed at one end of the housing and the other end is capped. A second thermodynamic medium is disposed in the housing near to but spaced from the capped end. Heat is pumped along the second thermodynamic medium toward the capped end as a consequence both of the pressure oscillation due to the driver and imperfect thermal contact between the fluid and the second thermodynamic medium.

  8. The room acoustic rendering equation.

    PubMed

    Siltanen, Samuel; Lokki, Tapio; Kiminki, Sami; Savioja, Lauri

    2007-09-01

    An integral equation generalizing a variety of known geometrical room acoustics modeling algorithms is presented. The formulation of the room acoustic rendering equation is adopted from computer graphics. Based on the room acoustic rendering equation, an acoustic radiance transfer method, which can handle both diffuse and nondiffuse reflections, is derived. In a case study, the method is used to predict several acoustic parameters of a room model. The results are compared to measured data of the actual room and to the results given by other acoustics prediction software. It is concluded that the method can predict most acoustic parameters reliably and provides results as accurate as current commercial room acoustic prediction software. Although the presented acoustic radiance transfer method relies on geometrical acoustics, it can be extended to model diffraction and transmission through materials in future.

  9. Ion Desorption Stability in Superconducting High Energy Physics Proton Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, W.C.

    1995-05-29

    In this paper we extend our previous analysis of cold beam tube vacuum in a superconducting proton collider to include ion desorption in addition to thermal desorption and synchrotron radiation induced photodesorption. The new ion desorption terms introduce the possibility of vacuum instability. This is similar to the classical room temperature case but now modified by the inclusion of ion desorption coefficients for cryosorbed (physisorbed) molecules which can greatly exceed the coefficients for tightly bound molecules. The sojourn time concept for physisorbed H{sub 2} is generalized to include photodesorption and ion desorption as well as the usually considered thermal desorption. The ion desorption rate is density dependent and divergent so at the onset of instability the sojourn time goes to zero. Experimental data are used to evaluate the H{sub 2} sojourn time for the conditions of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and the situation is found to be stable. The sojourn time is dominated by photodesorption for surface density s(H{sub 2}) less than a monolayer and by thermal deposition for s(H{sub 2}) greater than a monolayer. For a few percent of a monolayer, characteristic of a beam screen, the photodesorption rate exceeds ion desorption rate by more than two orders of magnitude. The photodesorption rate corresponds to a sojourn time of approximately 100 sec. The paper next turns to the evaluation of stability margins and inclusion of gases heavier than H{sub 2} (CO, CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4}), where ion desorption introduces coupling between molecular species. Stability conditions are worked out for a simple cold beam tube, a cold beam tube pumped from the ends and a cold beam tube with a co-axial perforated beam screen. In each case a simple inequality for stability of a single component is replaced by a determinant that must be greater than zero for a gas mixture. The connection with the general theory of feedback stability is made and it is shown that the gains

  10. Investigation into the Effect of Acoustic Radiation Force and Acoustic Streaming on Particle Patterning in Acoustic Standing Wave Fields

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yanye; Ni, Zhengyang; Guo, Xiasheng; Luo, Linjiao; Tu, Juan; Zhang, Dong

    2017-01-01

    Acoustic standing waves have been widely used in trapping, patterning, and manipulating particles, whereas one barrier remains: the lack of understanding of force conditions on particles which mainly include acoustic radiation force (ARF) and acoustic streaming (AS). In this paper, force conditions on micrometer size polystyrene microspheres in acoustic standing wave fields were investigated. The COMSOL® Mutiphysics particle tracing module was used to numerically simulate force conditions on various particles as a function of time. The velocity of particle movement was experimentally measured using particle imaging velocimetry (PIV). Through experimental and numerical simulation, the functions of ARF and AS in trapping and patterning were analyzed. It is shown that ARF is dominant in trapping and patterning large particles while the impact of AS increases rapidly with decreasing particle size. The combination of using both ARF and AS for medium size particles can obtain different patterns with only using ARF. Findings of the present study will aid the design of acoustic-driven microfluidic devices to increase the diversity of particle patterning. PMID:28753955

  11. Investigation into the Effect of Acoustic Radiation Force and Acoustic Streaming on Particle Patterning in Acoustic Standing Wave Fields.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shilei; Yang, Yanye; Ni, Zhengyang; Guo, Xiasheng; Luo, Linjiao; Tu, Juan; Zhang, Dong; Zhang, And Jie

    2017-07-19

    Acoustic standing waves have been widely used in trapping, patterning, and manipulating particles, whereas one barrier remains: the lack of understanding of force conditions on particles which mainly include acoustic radiation force (ARF) and acoustic streaming (AS). In this paper, force conditions on micrometer size polystyrene microspheres in acoustic standing wave fields were investigated. The COMSOL(®) Mutiphysics particle tracing module was used to numerically simulate force conditions on various particles as a function of time. The velocity of particle movement was experimentally measured using particle imaging velocimetry (PIV). Through experimental and numerical simulation, the functions of ARF and AS in trapping and patterning were analyzed. It is shown that ARF is dominant in trapping and patterning large particles while the impact of AS increases rapidly with decreasing particle size. The combination of using both ARF and AS for medium size particles can obtain different patterns with only using ARF. Findings of the present study will aid the design of acoustic-driven microfluidic devices to increase the diversity of particle patterning.

  12. Post Test Evaluation of HSCT Nozzle Acoustic Liner Subcomponents Subjected to a Hot Acoustic Durability Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verrilli, Michael J.; Lee, Kuan

    2008-01-01

    its insulative capability throughout the durability test. The durability test results demonstrate damage-tolerant CMC tile, CMC fastener, TPS, and T-foam absorber designs for the combined thermal and acoustic engine nozzle environment.

  13. Effect of short-chain organic acids on the enhanced desorption of phenanthrene by rhamnolipid biosurfactant in soil-water environment.

    PubMed

    An, Chun-jiang; Huang, Guo-he; Wei, Jia; Yu, Hui

    2011-11-01

    This study investigated the effect of short-chain organic acids on biosurfactant-enhanced mobilization of phenanthrene in soil-water system. The desorption characteristics of phenanthrene by soils were assessed in the presence of rhamnolipid and four SCOAs, including acetic acid, oxalic acid, tartaric acid and citric acid. The tests with rhamnolipid and different organic acids could attain the higher desorption of phenanthrene compared to those with only rhamnolipid. Among the different combinations, the series with rhamnolipid and citric acid exhibited more significant effect on the desorption performance. The removal of phenanthrene using rhamnolipid and SCOAs gradually increased as the SCOA concentration increased up to a concentration of 300 mmol/L. The effects of pH, soil dissolved organic matter and ionic strength were further evaluated in the presence of both biosurfactant and SCOAs. The results showed that the extent of phenanthrene desorption was more significant at pH 6 and 9. Desorption of phenanthrene was relatively lower in the DOM-removed soils with the addition of biosurfactant and SCOAs. The presence of more salt ions made phenanthrene more persistent on the solid phase and adversely affected its desorption from contaminated soil. The results from this study may have important implications for soil washing technologies used to treat PAH-contaminated soil and groundwater.

  14. Atomic Oxygen Desorption from an Amorphous Silicate Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jiao; Vidali, Gianfranco

    2014-06-01

    Oxygen is the third most abundant element in space. How oxygen-containing molecules form in space, and whether they form through gas-phase or grain-surface reactions, depends largely on the availability of atomic oxygen in gas-phase versus on surfaces of dust grains. The relative abundance of O in gas-phase versus on grain surfaces is determined by the residence time, or equivalently, desorption energy, of atomic oxygen on grain surfaces. Though important in astrochemical modeling, experimental investigations of atomic oxygen desorption from grain surfaces are lacking in the literature. In most astrochemical models, the O desorption energy value has been taken to be 800 K, which is a guessed value without experimental support. Based on this value, the predicted molecular oxygen abundance in space is at least 2 orders of magnitude higher than what space observations have found. This long running discrepancy of molecular oxygen abundance could be resolved if the O desorption energy is twice as the widely used value (Melnick, G., Tolls, V., et al. 2012, Astrophys. J., 752, 26). We performed TPD (thermal programmed desorption) experiments to study the ozone formation process via O+O2 on an amorphous silicate surface that emulates interstellar conditions. A rate equation model was used to characterize the surface kinetics of both atomic and molecular oxygen. The O desorption energy was extracted from rate equation simulations that best fit the TPD data. The value was found to be 1764±232 K, which agrees with what Melnick et al. proposed. We suggest that the newly found value for the O desorption energy should be used in astrochemical modeling. This work is supported by NSF, Astronomy & Astrophysics Division (Grants No. 0908108 and 1311958), and NASA (Grant No. NNX12AF38G). We thank Dr. J.Brucato of the Astrophysical Observatory of Arcetri for providing the samples used in these experiments.

  15. Atrazine sorption-desorption hysteresis by sugarcane mulch residue.

    PubMed

    Selim, H M; Zhu, H

    2005-01-01

    Sorption and desorption kinetics are essential components for modeling the movement and retention of applied agricultural chemicals in soils and the fraction of chemicals susceptible to runoff. In this study, we investigated the retention characteristics of sugarcane (Saccharum spp. hybrid) mulch residue for atrazine (2-chloro-4-ethylamino-6-isopropylamino-1,3,5-triazine) based on studies of sorption-desorption kinetics. A sorption kinetic batch method was used to quantify retention of the mulch residue for a wide range of atrazine concentrations and reaction times. Desorption was performed following 504 h of sorption using successive dilutions, followed by methanol extraction. Atrazine retention by the mulch residue was well described using a linear model where the partitioning coefficient (K(d)) increased with reaction time from 10.40 to 23.4 cm3 g(-1) after 2 and 504 h, respectively. Values for mulch residue K(d) were an order of magnitude higher than those found for Commerce silt loam (fine-silty, mixed, superactive, nonacid, thermic Fluvaquentic Endoaquepts) where the sugarcane crop was grown. A kinetic multireaction model was successful in describing sorption behavior with reaction time. The model was equally successful in describing observed hysteretic atrazine behavior during desorption for all input concentrations. The model was concentration independent where one set of model parameters, which was derived from all batch results, was valid for the entire atrazine concentration range. Average atrazine recovery following six successive desorption steps were 63.67 +/- 4.38% of the amount adsorbed. Moreover, a hysteresis coefficient based on the difference in the area between sorption and desorption isotherms was capable of quantifying hysteresis of desorption isotherms.

  16. Scale Model Thruster Acoustic Measurement Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargas, Magda; Kenny, R. Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    The Space Launch System (SLS) Scale Model Acoustic Test (SMAT) is a 5% scale representation of the SLS vehicle, mobile launcher, tower, and launch pad trench. The SLS launch propulsion system will be comprised of the Rocket Assisted Take-Off (RATO) motors representing the solid boosters and 4 Gas Hydrogen (GH2) thrusters representing the core engines. The GH2 thrusters were tested in a horizontal configuration in order to characterize their performance. In Phase 1, a single thruster was fired to determine the engine performance parameters necessary for scaling a single engine. A cluster configuration, consisting of the 4 thrusters, was tested in Phase 2 to integrate the system and determine their combined performance. Acoustic and overpressure data was collected during both test phases in order to characterize the system's acoustic performance. The results from the single thruster and 4- thuster system are discussed and compared.

  17. Acoustic Ridge Waveguide Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-08-01

    P. E. Lagasse, I. M. Mason, and E. A. Ash, "Acoustic Surface Waveguides - Analysis and Assessment," IEEE Trans. Microwave Theory and Techniques MTT-2i»t i», 225-236 (April 1973). yt^^^^ HMMMM . . .

  18. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    MedlinePlus

    ... provider Request a patient kit Treatment Options Overview Observation Radiation Surgery What is acoustic neuroma Diagnosing Symptoms ... effects Question To Ask Treatment Options Back Overview Observation Radiation Surgery Choosing a healthcare provider Request a ...

  19. Symptoms of Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    ... provider Request a patient kit Treatment Options Overview Observation Radiation Surgery What is acoustic neuroma Diagnosing Symptoms ... effects Question To Ask Treatment Options Back Overview Observation Radiation Surgery Choosing a healthcare provider Request a ...

  20. Diagnosing Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    ... provider Request a patient kit Treatment Options Overview Observation Radiation Surgery What is acoustic neuroma Diagnosing Symptoms ... effects Question To Ask Treatment Options Back Overview Observation Radiation Surgery Choosing a healthcare provider Request a ...