Science.gov

Sample records for acoustic doppler velocimetry

  1. Acoustic resolution photoacoustic Doppler velocimetry in blood-mimicking fluids

    PubMed Central

    Brunker, Joanna; Beard, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Photoacoustic Doppler velocimetry provides a major opportunity to overcome limitations of existing blood flow measuring methods. By enabling measurements with high spatial resolution several millimetres deep in tissue, it could probe microvascular blood flow abnormalities characteristic of many different diseases. Although previous work has demonstrated feasibility in solid phantoms, measurements in blood have proved significantly more challenging. This difficulty is commonly attributed to the requirement that the absorber spatial distribution is heterogeneous relative to the minimum detectable acoustic wavelength. By undertaking a rigorous study using blood-mimicking fluid suspensions of 3 μm absorbing microspheres, it was discovered that the perceived heterogeneity is not only limited by the intrinsic detector bandwidth; in addition, bandlimiting due to spatial averaging within the detector field-of-view also reduces perceived heterogeneity and compromises velocity measurement accuracy. These detrimental effects were found to be mitigated by high-pass filtering to select photoacoustic signal components associated with high heterogeneity. Measurement under-reading due to limited light penetration into the flow vessel was also observed. Accurate average velocity measurements were recovered using “range-gating”, which furthermore maps the cross-sectional velocity profile. These insights may help pave the way to deep-tissue non-invasive mapping of microvascular blood flow using photoacoustic methods. PMID:26892989

  2. Acoustic resolution photoacoustic Doppler velocimetry in blood-mimicking fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunker, Joanna; Beard, Paul

    2016-02-01

    Photoacoustic Doppler velocimetry provides a major opportunity to overcome limitations of existing blood flow measuring methods. By enabling measurements with high spatial resolution several millimetres deep in tissue, it could probe microvascular blood flow abnormalities characteristic of many different diseases. Although previous work has demonstrated feasibility in solid phantoms, measurements in blood have proved significantly more challenging. This difficulty is commonly attributed to the requirement that the absorber spatial distribution is heterogeneous relative to the minimum detectable acoustic wavelength. By undertaking a rigorous study using blood-mimicking fluid suspensions of 3 μm absorbing microspheres, it was discovered that the perceived heterogeneity is not only limited by the intrinsic detector bandwidth; in addition, bandlimiting due to spatial averaging within the detector field-of-view also reduces perceived heterogeneity and compromises velocity measurement accuracy. These detrimental effects were found to be mitigated by high-pass filtering to select photoacoustic signal components associated with high heterogeneity. Measurement under-reading due to limited light penetration into the flow vessel was also observed. Accurate average velocity measurements were recovered using “range-gating”, which furthermore maps the cross-sectional velocity profile. These insights may help pave the way to deep-tissue non-invasive mapping of microvascular blood flow using photoacoustic methods.

  3. High-resolution velocimetry in energetic tidal currents using a convergent-beam acoustic Doppler profiler

    SciTech Connect

    Sellar, Brian; Harding, Samuel F.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2015-07-16

    An array of convergent acoustic Doppler velocimeters has been developed and tested for the high resolution measurement of three-dimensional tidal flow velocities in an energetic tidal site. This configuration has been developed to increase spatial resolution of velocity measurements in comparison to conventional acoustic Doppler profilers (ADPs) which characteristically use diverging acoustic beams emanating from a single instrument. This is achieved using converging acoustic beams with a sample volume at the focal point of 0.03 m3. The array is also able to simultaneously measure three-dimensional velocity components in a profile throughout the water column, and as such is referred to herein as a converging-beam acoustic Doppler profiler (CADP). Mid-depth profiling is achieved through integration of the sensor platform with the operational Alstom 1MW DeepGen-IV Tidal Turbine. This proof-of-concept paper outlines system configuration and comparison to measurements provided by co-installed reference instrumentation. Comparison of CADP to standard ADP velocity measurements reveals a mean difference of 8 mm/s, standard deviation of 18 mm/s, and order-of-magnitude reduction in realizable length-scale. CADP focal point measurements compared to a proximal single-beam reference show peak cross-correlation coefficient of 0.96 over 4.0 s averaging period and a 47% reduction in Doppler noise. The dual functionality of the CADP as a profiling instrument with a high resolution focal point make this configuration a unique and valuable advancement in underwater velocimetry enabling improved turbulence, resource and structural loading quantification and validation of numerical simulations. Alternative modes of operation have been implemented including noise-reducing bi-static sampling. Since waves are simultaneously measured it is expected that derivatives of this system will be a powerful tool in wave-current interaction studies.

  4. High-resolution velocimetry in energetic tidal currents using a convergent-beam acoustic Doppler profiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellar, Brian; Harding, Samuel; Richmond, Marshall

    2015-08-01

    An array of single-beam acoustic Doppler profilers has been developed for the high resolution measurement of three-dimensional tidal flow velocities and subsequently tested in an energetic tidal site. This configuration has been developed to increase spatial resolution of velocity measurements in comparison to conventional acoustic Doppler profilers (ADPs) which characteristically use divergent acoustic beams emanating from a single instrument. This is achieved using geometrically convergent acoustic beams creating a sample volume at the focal point of 0.03 m3. Away from the focal point, the array is also able to simultaneously reconstruct three-dimensional velocity components in a profile throughout the water column, and is referred to herein as a convergent-beam acoustic Doppler profiler (C-ADP). Mid-depth profiling is achieved through integration of the sensor platform with the operational commercial-scale Alstom 1 MW DeepGen-IV Tidal Turbine deployed at the European Marine Energy Center, Orkney Isles, UK. This proof-of-concept paper outlines the C-ADP system configuration and comparison to measurements provided by co-installed reference instrumentation. Comparison of C-ADP to standard divergent ADP (D-ADP) velocity measurements reveals a mean difference of 8 mm s-1, standard deviation of 18 mm s-1, and an order of magnitude reduction in realisable length scale. C-ADP focal point measurements compared to a proximal single-beam reference show peak cross-correlation coefficient of 0.96 over 4.0 s averaging period and a 47% reduction in Doppler noise. The dual functionality of the C-ADP as a profiling instrument with a high resolution focal point make this configuration a unique and valuable advancement in underwater velocimetry enabling improved quantification of flow turbulence. Since waves are simultaneously measured via profiled velocities, pressure measurements and surface detection, it is expected that derivatives of this system will be a powerful tool in

  5. Estimating stream discharge using stage and multi-level acoustic Doppler velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulsen, J. B.; Rasmussen, K.; Ledet Jensen, J.; Bering Ovesen, N.

    2011-12-01

    For temperate region countries with small or moderately sized streams, such as those in Denmark, seasonal weed growth imposes a significant temporal change of the stage-discharge relation. In the past such problems were often avoided by using hydraulic structures, however, firm ecology based restrictions prevent that hydraulic structures are made at the discharge stations presently. As a consequence, the nonlinear drift in weed density and structure adds a significant uncertainty to the hydrograph. Furthermore, the expected increase in extreme discharge situations due to climate changes in the Northern part of Europe may further violate a stable relation between stage and discharge in streams. Extreme high flow situations cause abrupt rise in stage, and consequently weed can be partly uprooted and partly bend down along the bed, thereby changing the conveyance of the stream. In addition, extreme high flow situations can cause the streams to flood the banks. If these hydraulic changes occur in between direct measurements of discharge they are not detected or accounted for in the stage-discharge relation, and the hydrograph can be significantly biased. The objective of this research is to investigate how both seasonal and short duration changes in weed distribution and abrupt changes in stage are recognized in the stream's velocity gradient. It is examined whether the use of multi-level acoustic Doppler velocimetry can provide an improved method for hydrograph estimation with lower uncertainty than traditional stage-discharge methods. In this presentation we shall present results from a study where, at two sites in Denmark, the stream velocity field has been mapped by the use of three Acoustic Doppler Velocity Meter (ADVM) instruments. The ADVM instruments are mounted in three different depths, continuously measuring horizontal average water velocities. Velocity and stage data are selected from one summer and two winter periods, and a method for converting velocity

  6. Optical multi-point measurements of the acoustic particle velocity with frequency modulated Doppler global velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Andreas; König, Jörg; Haufe, Daniel; Schlüssler, Raimund; Büttner, Lars; Czarske, Jürgen

    2013-08-01

    To reduce the noise of machines such as aircraft engines, the development and propagation of sound has to be investigated. Since the applicability of microphones is limited due to their intrusiveness, contactless measurement techniques are required. For this reason, the present study describes an optical method based on the Doppler effect and its application for acoustic particle velocity (APV) measurements. While former APV measurements with Doppler techniques are point measurements, the applied system is capable of simultaneous measurements at multiple points. In its current state, the system provides linear array measurements of one component of the APV demonstrated by multi-tone experiments with tones up to 17 kHz for the first time. PMID:23927110

  7. Acoustic mapping velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muste, M.; Baranya, S.; Tsubaki, R.; Kim, D.; Ho, H.; Tsai, H.; Law, D.

    2016-05-01

    Knowledge of sediment dynamics in rivers is of great importance for various practical purposes. Despite its high relevance in riverine environment processes, the monitoring of sediment rates remains a major and challenging task for both suspended and bed load estimation. While the measurement of suspended load is currently an active area of testing with nonintrusive technologies (optical and acoustic), bed load measurement does not mark a similar progress. This paper describes an innovative combination of measurement techniques and analysis protocols that establishes the proof-of-concept for a promising technique, labeled herein Acoustic Mapping Velocimetry (AMV). The technique estimates bed load rates in rivers developing bed forms using a nonintrusive measurements approach. The raw information for AMV is collected with acoustic multibeam technology that in turn provides maps of the bathymetry over longitudinal swaths. As long as the acoustic maps can be acquired relatively quickly and the repetition rate for the mapping is commensurate with the movement of the bed forms, successive acoustic maps capture the progression of the bed form movement. Two-dimensional velocity maps associated with the bed form migration are obtained by implementing algorithms typically used in particle image velocimetry to acoustic maps converted in gray-level images. Furthermore, use of the obtained acoustic and velocity maps in conjunction with analytical formulations (e.g., Exner equation) enables estimation of multidirectional bed load rates over the whole imaged area. This paper presents a validation study of the AMV technique using a set of laboratory experiments.

  8. Prospects for in vivo blood velocimetry using acoustic resolution photoacoustic Doppler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunker, J.; Beard, P.

    2016-03-01

    Acoustic resolution photoacoustic Doppler flowmetry (AR-PAF) is a technique that has the potential to overcome the spatial resolution and depth penetration limitations of current blood flow measuring methods. Previous work has shown the potential of the technique using blood-mimicking phantoms, but it has proved difficult to make accurate measurements in blood, and thus in vivo application has not yet been possible. One explanation for this difficulty is that whole blood is insufficiently heterogeneous. Through experimental measurements in red blood cell suspensions of different concentrations, as well as in whole blood, we provide new insight and evidence that refutes this assertion. We show that the velocity measurement accuracy is influenced by bandlimiting not only due to the detector frequency response, but also due to spatial averaging of absorbers within the detector field-of-view. In addition, there is a detrimental effect of limited light penetration, but this can be mitigated by selecting less attenuated wavelengths of light, and also by employing range-gating signal processing. By careful choice of these parameters as well as the detector centre frequency, bandwidth and field-of-view, it is possible to make AR-PAF measurements in whole blood using transducers with bandwidths in the tens of MHz range. These findings have profound implications for the prospects of making deep tissue measurements of blood flow relevant to the study of microcirculatory abnormalities associated with cancer, diabetes, atherosclerosis and other conditions.

  9. Linking water surface roughness to velocity patterns using terrestrial laser scanning and acoustic doppler velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heritage, George; Milan, David; Entwistle, Neil

    2010-05-01

    There are well established links between water surface characteristics and hydraulics. Biotope identification is currently an important part of the River Habitat Survey in England and Wales. Their differentiation is based upon recognition of a family of flow features exhibited on the water surface. Variability in this water surface ‘roughness' is dependent upon the interaction of flow with boundary roughness and flow depth. Past research that has attempted to differentiate biotopes based upon differences in Froude number (Fr) and Reynolds number (Re), however this linkage has only been limited to local analysis between flow velocity, depth and roughness. Milan et al. (2010) have recently demonstrated that terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) can be applied to produce fully quantitative maps of hydraulic habitat, based upon defined water surface roughness delimeters. However the nature of the linkages between water surface roughness, flow velocity and depth are still poorly understood, particularly at the reach-scale. This study attempts to provide a full spatial picture of the links between water surface roughness, flow depth and velocity. A Sontek Acoustic Doppler Velocity Profiler (ADVP) was used to provide detailed information on vertical velocity and water depth for a 300 m reach of the gravel-bed River Wharfe, Yorkshire, UK. Simultaneous to the ADVP measurements, a Riegl LMS-Z210 TLS was used to take a series of first return scans of the water surface. Categorisation of the point cloud elevation data for the water surface was achieved through the allocation of moving window standard deviation values to a regular grid, thus defining water surface roughness. The ADVP data demonstrate gross reach-scale variation in velocity and depth linked to bedforms, and more localised spatial and temporal variation within biotope units. The ADVP data was used to produce reach-scale maps of Fr and Re. The extent to which water surface roughness defined biotopes mapped onto these

  10. Laser Doppler velocimetry primer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bachalo, William D.

    1985-01-01

    Advanced research in experimental fluid dynamics required a familiarity with sophisticated measurement techniques. In some cases, the development and application of new techniques is required for difficult measurements. Optical methods and in particular, the laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV) are now recognized as the most reliable means for performing measurements in complex turbulent flows. And such, the experimental fluid dynamicist should be familiar with the principles of operation of the method and the details associated with its application. Thus, the goals of this primer are to efficiently transmit the basic concepts of the LDV method to potential users and to provide references that describe the specific areas in greater detail.

  11. Acoustic velocity measurement by means of Laser Doppler Velocimetry: Development of an Extended Kalman Filter and validation in free-field measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Duff, Alain; Plantier, Guy; Valière, Jean C.; Gazengel, Bruno

    2016-03-01

    A signal processing technique, based on the use of an Extended Kalman Filter, has been developed to measure sound fields by means of Laser Doppler Velocimetry in weak flow. This method allows for the parametric estimation of both the acoustic particle and flow velocity for a forced sine-wave excitation where the acoustic frequency is known. The measurements are performed from the in-phase and the quadrature components of the Doppler downshifted signal thanks to an analog quadrature demodulation technique. Then, the estimated performance is illustrated by means of Monte-Carlo simulations obtained from synthesized signals and compared with asymptotic and analytical forms for the Cramer-Rao Bounds. Results allow the validity domain of the method to be defined and show the availability for free-field measurements in a large range. Finally, an application based on real data obtained in free field is presented.

  12. Phononic crystal surface mode coupling and its use in acoustic Doppler velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Cicek, Ahmet; Salman, Aysevil; Kaya, Olgun Adem; Ulug, Bulent

    2016-02-01

    It is numerically shown that surface modes of two-dimensional phononic crystals, which are Bloch modes bound to the interface between the phononic crystal and the surrounding host, can couple back and forth between the surfaces in a length scale determined by the separation of two surfaces and frequency. Supercell band structure computations through the finite-element method reveal that the surface band of an isolated surface splits into two bands which support either symmetric or antisymmetric hybrid modes. When the surface separation is 3.5 times the lattice constant, a coupling length varying between 30 and 48 periods can be obtained which first increases linearly with frequency and, then, decreases rapidly. In the linear regime, variation of coupling length can be used as a means of measuring speeds of objects on the order of 0.1m/s by incorporating the Doppler shift. Speed sensitivity can be improved by increasing surface separation at the cost of larger device sizes. PMID:26565078

  13. Atmospheric laser Doppler velocimetry - An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilbro, J. W.

    1980-01-01

    Research, development, and application of atmospheric laser Doppler velocimetry are overviewed. Consideration is given to operation principles of CO2 heterodyne systems. Global wind, pollution, V/STOL flow, and true airspeed measurements are outlined. Wind energy, dust devils, water spouts, tornadoes, and aircraft wake vortices are covered.

  14. Rubidium Atomic Line Filtered (RALF) Doppler Velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fajardo, Mario; Molek, Christopher; Vesely, Annamaria; Lasem Team

    2013-06-01

    We report our progress towards adapting the well-known Global Dopper Velocimetry (GDV) technique, popular in the aerodynamics community, to the order-of-magnitude higher velocities pertinent to shock experiments. In GDV, the narrow-line illumination laser is tuned to an edge of a molecular iodine absorption line; an iodine gas cell converts the Doppler shift of the reflected light to transmitted intensity. We follow the suggestion in the original 1990 patent by Komine and broaden the absorption lines of alkali metal atoms by adding a buffer gas, thereby tuning the transmission edge spectrum to match the Doppler shift (surface velocity) range of interest. We use atomic rubidium vapor cells, with 0 to 1 atmosphere pressures of molecular nitrogen buffer gas, and coin the name ``Rubidium Atomic Line Filtered'' (RALF) Doppler velocimetry. [96ABW-2013-0036

  15. Retroreflector for photonic Doppler velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagoski, Thomas J.; Coutu, Ronald A., Jr.; Starman, LaVern A.

    2009-08-01

    In order to meet the goals of the Department of Defense (DoD) for smaller and more accurate weapons, numerous projects are currently investigating the miniaturization of weapons and munition fuze components. One of these efforts is to characterize the performance of small detonators. The velocity of the flyer, the key component needed to initiate a detonation sequence, can be measured using a photonic Doppler velocimeter (PDV). The purpose of this research was to develop a microelectromechanical system (MEMS) device that would act as an optimal retroreflective surface for the PDV. Two MEMS solutions were explored: one using the PolyMUMPsTM fabrication process and one in-house fabrication design using silicon on insulator (SOI) wafers. The in-house design consisted of an array of corner reflectors created using an SOI wafer. Each corner reflector consisted of three separate mirror plates which were self-assembled by photoresist pad hinges. When heated to a critical temperature (typically 140-160 °C), the photoresist pads melted and the resulting surface tension caused each mirror to rotate into place. The resulting array of corner reflectors was then coated with a thin layer of gold to increase reflectivity. Despite the successful assembly of a PolyMUMPsTM corner reflector, assembling an array of these reflectors was found to be unfeasible. Although the SOI corner reflector design was completed, these devices were not fabricated in time for testing during this research. However, the bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) and optical cross section (OCS) of commercially available retroreflective tapes were measured. These results can be used as a baseline comparison for future testing of a fabricated SOI corner reflector array.

  16. Comparison of Triature Doppler Velocimetry and VISAR

    SciTech Connect

    Cenobio H Gallegos, Bruce Marshall, Matthew Teel, Vincent T Romero, Abel Diaz, and Michael Berninger

    2010-01-01

    Triature Photonic Doppler Velocimetry (TDV) is an adaptation of Photonic Doppler Velocimetry (PDV) that rejects common-mode data noise after splitting PDV three ways, with each signal 120° out of phase from each other. Testing has demonstrated that TDV also improves temporal resolution from the typical five nanoseconds of PDV to a subnanosecond range. This paper compares the temporal response of TDV with that of PDV and VISAR [velocity interferometer system for any reflector] in an experiment with a subnanosecond (~120-picosecond rise time) shock source. Laboratory tests were performed using a high-power laser on targets of copper and aluminum. A Buce Marshall fast VISAR with a single-point PDV and a prototype TDV were used. A special probe that combined PDV, TDV, and fast VISAR made simultaneous velocity measurements. Breakout velocities of 1.3 km/second on copper and 2.5 km/second on aluminum were observed, where TDV resolved rise times of ~200 ps. This resolution was better than that of a fast VISAR, which can achieve ~500 ps temporal resolution. Test methods and results are presented.

  17. Planar Particle Imaging Doppler Velocimetry Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wernet, Mark P.

    2000-01-01

    Two current techniques exist for the measurement of planar, three-component velocity fields. Both techniques require multiple views of the illumination plane in order to extract all three velocity components. Particle image velocimetry (PIV) is a high-resolution, high accuracy, planar velocimetry technique that provides valuable instantaneous velocity information in aeropropulsion test facilities. PIV can provide three-component flow-field measurements using a two-camera, stereo viewing configuration. Doppler global velocimetry (DGV) is another planar velocimetry technique that can provide three component flow-field measurements; however, it requires three detector systems that must be located at oblique angles from the measurement plane. The three-dimensional configurations of either technique require multiple (DGV) or at least large (stereo PIV) optical access ports in the facility in which the measurements are being conducted. Optical access is extremely limited in aeropropulsion test facilities. In many cases, only one optical access port is available. A hybrid measurement technique has been developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center, planar particle image and Doppler velocimetry (PPIDV), which combines elements from both the PIV and DGV techniques into a single detection system that can measure all three components of velocity across a planar region of a flow field through a single optical access port. In the standard PIV technique, a pulsed laser is used to illuminate the flow field at two closely spaced instances in time, which are recorded on a "frame-straddling" camera, yielding a pair of single-exposure image frames. The PIV camera is oriented perpendicular to the light sheet, and the processed PIV data yield the two-component velocity field in the plane of the light sheet. In the standard DGV technique, an injection-seeded Nd:YAG pulsed laser light sheet illuminates the seeded flow field, and three receiver systems are used to measure three components

  18. Integrating fluorescent dye flow-curve testing and acoustic Doppler velocimetry profiling for in situ hydraulic evaluation and improvement of clarifier performance.

    PubMed

    Tarud, F; Aybar, M; Pizarro, G; Cienfuegos, R; Pastén, P

    2010-08-01

    Enhancing the performance of clarifiers requires a thorough understanding of their hydraulics. Fluorescence spectroscopy and acoustic doppler velocimeter (ADV) profiling generally have been used separately to evaluate secondary settlers. We propose that simultaneous use of these techniques is needed to obtain a more reliable and useful evaluation. Experiments were performed on laboratory- and full-scale clarifiers. Factors affecting Fluorescein and Rhodamine 6G properties were identified. Underestimations up to 500% in fluorescence intensities may be derived from differential fluorescence quenching by oxygen. A careful control and interpretation of fluorescent dye experiments is needed to minimize artifacts in real settings. While flow-curve tests constructed under controlled conditions provided a more accurate overall quantitative estimation of the hydraulic performance, ADV velocity and turbulence profiling provided a detailed spatial understanding of flow patterns that was used to troubleshoot and fix the causes of hydraulic short-circuits. PMID:20853746

  19. Validation and application of Acoustic Mapping Velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranya, Sandor; Muste, Marian

    2016-04-01

    The goal of this paper is to introduce a novel methodology to estimate bedload transport in rivers based on an improved bedform tracking procedure. The measurement technique combines components and processing protocols from two contemporary nonintrusive instruments: acoustic and image-based. The bedform mapping is conducted with acoustic surveys while the estimation of the velocity of the bedforms is obtained with processing techniques pertaining to image-based velocimetry. The technique is therefore called Acoustic Mapping Velocimetry (AMV). The implementation of this technique produces a whole-field velocity map associated with the multi-directional bedform movement. Based on the calculated two-dimensional bedform migration velocity field, the bedload transport estimation is done using the Exner equation. A proof-of-concept experiment was performed to validate the AMV based bedload estimation in a laboratory flume at IIHR-Hydroscience & Engineering (IIHR). The bedform migration was analysed at three different flow discharges. Repeated bed geometry mapping, using a multiple transducer array (MTA), provided acoustic maps, which were post-processed with a particle image velocimetry (PIV) method. Bedload transport rates were calculated along longitudinal sections using the streamwise components of the bedform velocity vectors and the measured bedform heights. The bulk transport rates were compared with the results from concurrent direct physical samplings and acceptable agreement was found. As a first field implementation of the AMV an attempt was made to estimate bedload transport for a section of the Ohio river in the United States, where bed geometry maps, resulted by repeated multibeam echo sounder (MBES) surveys, served as input data. Cross-sectional distributions of bedload transport rates from the AMV based method were compared with the ones obtained from another non-intrusive technique (due to the lack of direct samplings), ISSDOTv2, developed by the US Army

  20. Cross-correlation Doppler global velocimetry (CC-DGV)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadel, Daniel R.; Lowe, K. Todd

    2015-08-01

    A flow velocimetry method, cross-correlation Doppler global velocimetry (CC-DGV), is presented as a robust, simplified, and high dynamic range implementation of the Doppler global/planar Doppler velocimetry technique. A sweep of several gigahertz of the vapor absorption spectrum is used for each velocity sample, with signals acquired from both Doppler-shifted scattered light within the flow and a non-Doppler shifted reference beam. Cross-correlation of these signals yields the Doppler shift between them, averaged over the duration of the scan. With presently available equipment, velocities from 0 ms-1 to over 3000 ms-1 can notionally be measured simultaneously, making the technique ideal for high speed flows. The processing routine is shown to be robust against large changes in the vapor pressure of the iodine cell, benefiting performance of the system in facilities where ambient conditions cannot be easily regulated. Validation of the system was performed with measurements of a model wind turbine blade boundary layer made in a 1.83 m by 1.83 m subsonic wind tunnel for which laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV) measurements were acquired alongside the CC-DGV results. CC-DGV uncertainties of ±1.30 ms-1, ±0.64 ms-1, and ±1.11 ms-1 were determined for the orthogonal stream-wise, transverse-horizontal, and transverse-vertical velocity components, and root-mean-square deviations of 2.77 ms-1 and 1.34 ms-1 from the LDV validation results were observed for Reynolds numbers of 1.5 million and 2 million, respectively. Volumetric mean velocity measurements are also presented for a supersonic jet, with velocity uncertainties of ±4.48 ms-1, ±16.93 ms-1, and ±0.50 ms-1 for the orthogonal components, and self-validation done by collapsing the data with a physical scaling.

  1. Doppler Global Velocimetry: A New Way to Look at Velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyers, James F.; Komine, Hiroshi

    1991-01-01

    A new laser velocimetry technique, Doppler global velocimetry, is described. This technique is capable of simultaneously measuring in real time the three components of velocity of an entire particle field illuminated by a laser light sheet. A prototype one-component velocimeter is described along with the signal processing electronics. The system was tested by measuring the velocity field from a rotating wheel and a small subsonic jet flow in the laboratory. The first wind tunnel test measured the vortical velocity field above a delta wing. The results are presented and compared with fringe-type laser velocimeter and five-hole probe data.

  2. Doppler global velocimetry - A new way to look at velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyers, James F.; Komine, Hiroshi

    1991-01-01

    A new laser velocimetry technique, Doppler global velocimetry, is described. This technique is capable of simultaneously measuring in real time the three components of velocity of an entire particle field illuminated by a laser light sheet. A prototype one-component velocimeter is described along with the signal processing electronics. The system was tested by measuring the velocity field from a rotating wheel and a small subsonic jet flow in the laboratory. The first wind tunnel test measured the vortical velocity field above a delta wing. The results are presented and compared with fringe-type laser velocimeter and five-hole probe data.

  3. Planar Doppler Velocimetry for Large-Scale Wind Tunnel Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKenzie, Robert L.

    1998-01-01

    Planar Doppler Velocimetry (PDV) concepts using a pulsed laser are described and the obtainable minimum resolved velocities in large-scale wind tunnels are evaluated. Velocity-field measurements are shown to be possible at ranges of tens of meters and with single pulse resolutions as low as 2 m/s. Velocity measurements in the flow of a low-speed, turbulent jet are reported that demonstrate the ability of PDV to acquire both average velocity fields and their fluctuation amplitudes, using procedures that are compatible with large-scale facility operations. The advantages of PDV over current Laser Doppler Anemometry and Particle Image Velocimetry techniques appear to be significant for applications to large facilities.

  4. Development of Doppler Global Velocimetry for Wind Tunnel Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyers, James F.

    1994-01-01

    The development of Doppler global velocimetry is described. Emphasis is placed on the modifications necessary to advance this nonintrusive laser based measurement technique from a laboratory prototype to a viable wind tunnel flow diagnostics tool. Several example wind tunnel flow field investigations are described to illustrate the versatility of the technique. Flow conditions ranged from incompressible to Mach 2.8 with measurement distances extending from 1 to 15 m.

  5. Identification and Minimization of Errors in Doppler Global Velocimetry Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyers, James F.; Lee, Joseph W.

    2000-01-01

    A systematic laboratory investigation was conducted to identify potential measurement error sources in Doppler Global Velocimetry technology. Once identified, methods were developed to eliminate or at least minimize the effects of these errors. The areas considered included the Iodine vapor cell, optical alignment, scattered light characteristics, noise sources, and the laser. Upon completion the demonstrated measurement uncertainty was reduced to 0.5 m/sec.

  6. Doppler global velocimetry data in circular jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhlman, John; Burton, Lucinda; Scarberry, Tom

    2002-07-01

    A two-component Doppler global velocimeter (DGV) system has been improved through the use of vapour-limited iodine cells that have temperature-independent responses, along with nonpolarizing beam splitters and lower f-number lenses. Two-component DGV velocity measurements have been obtained for a 1 inch diameter uniform circular jet flow at a nominal exit velocity of 60 m s-1, as well as for an annular jet and a swirling jet. These data generally agree with earlier point Doppler velocimeter and hot wire anemometer results to within about 2-4 m s-1, and display a total variability from a smooth curve of ±2-3 m s-1. This level of accuracy has been obtained for a system that uses a cw argon ion laser and eight-bit CCD cameras and digitizers. Exceptions to this level of accuracy are noted in regions of significant secondary scattering, due to scattered laser light that is reflected off the lip of the jet nozzle, as well as in regions of low smoke seeding levels, resulting in low signal-to-noise ratios. A significant amount of the variability of the data from a smooth curve is due to the flat field correction.

  7. Zonal Flow Velocimetry in Spherical Couette Flow using Acoustic Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Matthew M.; Mautino, Anthony R.; Stone, Douglas R.; Triana, Santiago A.; Lekic, Vedran; Lathrop, Daniel P.

    2015-11-01

    We present studies of spherical Couette flows using the technique of acoustic mode Doppler velocimetry. This technique uses rotational splittings of acoustic modes to infer the azimuthal velocity profile of a rotating flow, and is of special interest in experiments where direct flow visualization is impractical. The primary experimental system consists of a 60 cm diameter outer spherical shell concentric with a 20 cm diameter sphere, with air or nitrogen gas serving as the working fluid. The geometry of the system approximates that of the Earth's core, making these studies geophysically relevant. A turbulent shear flow is established in the system by rotating the inner sphere and outer shell at different rates. Acoustic modes of the fluid volume are excited using a speaker and measured via microphones, allowingdetermination of rotational splittings. Preliminary results comparing observed splittings with those predicted by theory are presented. While the majority of these studies were performed in the 60 cm diameter device using nitrogen gas, some work has also been done looking at acoustic modes in the 3 m diameter liquid sodium spherical Couette experiment. Prospects for measuring zonal velocity profiles in a wide variety of experiments are discussed.

  8. Helioseismology in a bottle: modal acoustic velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triana, Santiago Andrés; Zimmerman, Daniel S.; Nataf, Henri-Claude; Thorette, Aurélien; Lekic, Vedran; Lathrop, Daniel P.

    2014-11-01

    Measurement of the differential rotation of the Sun's interior is one of the great achievements of helioseismology, providing important constraints for stellar physics. The technique relies on observing and analyzing rotationally-induced splittings of p-modes in the star. Here, we demonstrate the first use of the technique in a laboratory setting. We apply it in a spherical cavity with a spinning central core (spherical-Couette flow) to determine the mean azimuthal velocity of the air filling the cavity. We excite a number of acoustic resonances (analogous to p-modes in the Sun) using a speaker and record the response with an array of small microphones on the outer sphere. Many observed acoustic modes show rotationally-induced splittings, which allow us to perform an inversion to determine the air's azimuthal velocity as a function of both radius and latitude. We validate the method by comparing the velocity field obtained through inversion against the velocity profile measured with a calibrated hot film anemometer. This modal acoustic velocimetry technique has great potential for laboratory setups involving rotating fluids in axisymmetric cavities. It will be useful especially in liquid metals where direct optical methods are unsuitable and ultrasonic techniques very challenging at best.

  9. Noise Studies of Externally Dispersed Interferometry for Doppler Velocimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Erskine, D J; Edelstein, J; Lloyd, J; Muirhead, P

    2006-05-04

    Externally Dispersed Interferometry (EDI) is the series combination of a fixed-delay field-widened Michelson interferometer with a dispersive spectrograph. This combination boosts the spectrograph performance for both Doppler velocimetry and high resolution spectroscopy. The interferometer creates a periodic comb that multiplies against the input spectrum to create moire fringes, which are recorded in combination with the regular spectrum. Both regular and high-frequency spectral components can be recovered from the data--the moire component carries additional information that increases the signal to noise for velocimetry and spectroscopy. Here we present simulations and theoretical studies of the photon limited Doppler velocity noise in an EDI. We used a model spectrum of a 1600K temperature star. For several rotational blurring velocities 0, 7.5, 15 and 25 km/s we calculated the dimensionless Doppler quality index (Q) versus wavenumber v. This is the normalized RMS of the derivative of the spectrum and is proportional to the photon-limited Doppler signal to noise ratio.

  10. Method and apparatus for ultrasonic doppler velocimetry using speed of sound and reflection mode pulsed wideband doppler

    DOEpatents

    Shekarriz, Alireza; Sheen, David M.

    2000-01-01

    According to the present invention, a method and apparatus rely upon tomographic measurement of the speed of sound and fluid velocity in a pipe. The invention provides a more accurate profile of velocity within flow fields where the speed of sound varies within the cross-section of the pipe. This profile is obtained by reconstruction of the velocity profile from the local speed of sound measurement simultaneously with the flow velocity. The method of the present invention is real-time tomographic ultrasonic Doppler velocimetry utilizing a to plurality of ultrasonic transmission and reflection measurements along two orthogonal sets of parallel acoustic lines-of-sight. The fluid velocity profile and the acoustic velocity profile are determined by iteration between determining a fluid velocity profile and measuring local acoustic velocity until convergence is reached.

  11. Externally Dispersed Interferometry for Resolution Boosting and Doppler Velocimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Erskine, D J

    2003-12-01

    Externally dispersed interferometry (EDI) is a rapidly advancing technique for wide bandwidth spectroscopy and radial velocimetry. By placing a small angle-independent interferometer near the slit of an existing spectrograph system, periodic fiducials are embedded on the recorded spectrum. The multiplication of the stellar spectrum times the sinusoidal fiducial net creates a moire pattern, which manifests high detailed spectral information heterodyned down to low spatial frequencies. The latter can more accurately survive the blurring, distortions and CCD Nyquist limitations of the spectrograph. Hence lower resolution spectrographs can be used to perform high resolution spectroscopy and radial velocimetry (under a Doppler shift the entire moir{acute e} pattern shifts in phase). A demonstration of {approx}2x resolution boosting (100,000 from 50,000) on the Lick Obs. echelle spectrograph is shown. Preliminary data indicating {approx}8x resolution boost (170,000 from 20,000) using multiple delays has been taken on a linear grating spectrograph.

  12. Effect of window reflections on photonic Doppler velocimetry measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ao, T.; Dolan, D. H.

    2011-02-01

    Photonic Doppler velocimetry (PDV) has rapidly become a standard diagnostic for measuring velocities in dynamic compression research. While free surface velocity measurements are fairly straightforward, complications occur when PDV is used to measure a dynamically loaded sample through a window. Fresnel reflections can severely affect the velocity and time resolution of PDV measurements, especially for low-velocity transients. Shock experiments of quartz compressed between two sapphire plates demonstrate how optical window reflections cause ringing in the extracted PDV velocity profile. Velocity ringing is significantly reduced by using either a wedge window or an antireflective coating.

  13. Hardening Doppler Global Velocimetry Systems for Large Wind Tunnel Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyers, James F.; Lee, Joseph W.; Fletcher, Mark T.; South, Bruce W.

    2004-01-01

    The development of Doppler Global Velocimetry from a laboratory curiosity to a wind tunnel instrumentation system is discussed. This development includes system advancements from a single velocity component to simultaneous three components, and from a steady state to instantaneous measurement. Improvements to system control and stability are discussed along with solutions to real world problems encountered in the wind tunnel. This on-going development program follows the cyclic evolution of understanding the physics of the technology, development of solutions, laboratory and wind tunnel testing, and reevaluation of the physics based on the test results.

  14. SIRHEN : a data reduction program for photonic Doppler velocimetry measurements.

    SciTech Connect

    Dolan, Daniel H., III; Ao, Tommy

    2010-06-01

    SIRHEN (Sandia InfraRed HEtrodyne aNalysis) is a program for reducing data from photonic Doppler velocimetry (PDV) measurements. SIRHEN uses the short-time Fourier transform method to extract velocity information. The program can be run in MATLAB (2008b or later) or as a Windows executable. This report describes the new Sandia InfraRed HEtrodyne aNalysis program (SIRHEN; pronounced 'siren') that has been developed for efficient and robust analysis of PDV data. The program was designed for easy use within Sandia's dynamic compression community.

  15. Development of Doppler Global Velocimetry as a Flow Diagnostics Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyers, James F.

    1995-01-01

    The development of Doppler global velocimetry is described from its inception to its use as a flow diagnostics tool. Its evolution is traced from an elementary one-component laboratory prototype, to a full three-component configuration operating in a wind tunnel at focal distances exceeding 15 m. As part of the developmental process, several wind tunnel flow field investigations were conducted. These included supersonic flow measurements about an oblique shock, subsonic and supersonic measurements of the vortex flow above a delta wing, and three-component measurements of a high-speed jet.

  16. Seedless Laser Velocimetry Using Heterodyne Laser-Induced Thermal Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, Roger C.; Balla, R. Jeffrey; Herring, G. C.; Jenkins, Luther N.; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A need exists for a seedless equivalent of laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV) for use in low-turbulence or supersonic flows or elsewhere where seeding is undesirable or impractical. A compact laser velocimeter using heterodyne non-resonant laser-induced thermal acoustics (LITA) to measure a single component of velocity is described. Neither molecular (e.g. NO2) nor particulate seed is added to the flow. In non-resonant LITA two beams split from a short-pulse pump laser are crossed; interference produces two counterpropagating sound waves by electrostriction. A CW probe laser incident on the sound waves at the proper angle is directed towards a detector. Measurement of the beating between the Doppler-shifted light and a highly attenuated portion of the probe beam allows determination of one component of flow velocity, speed of sound, and temperature. The sound waves essentially take the place of the particulate seed used in LDV. The velocimeter was used to study the flow behind a rearward-facing step in NASA Langley Research Center's Basic Aerodynamics Research Tunnel. Comparison is made with pitot-static probe data in the freestream over the range 0 m/s - 55 m/s. Comparison with LDV is made in the recirculation region behind the step and in a well-developed boundary layer in front of the step. Good agreement is found in all cases.

  17. Photonic Doppler velocimetry lens array probe incorporating stereo imaging

    DOEpatents

    Malone, Robert M.; Kaufman, Morris I.

    2015-09-01

    A probe including a multiple lens array is disclosed to measure velocity distribution of a moving surface along many lines of sight. Laser light, directed to the moving surface is reflected back from the surface and is Doppler shifted, collected into the array, and then directed to detection equipment through optic fibers. The received light is mixed with reference laser light and using photonic Doppler velocimetry, a continuous time record of the surface movement is obtained. An array of single-mode optical fibers provides an optic signal to the multiple lens array. Numerous fibers in a fiber array project numerous rays to establish many measurement points at numerous different locations. One or more lens groups may be replaced with imaging lenses so a stereo image of the moving surface can be recorded. Imaging a portion of the surface during initial travel can determine whether the surface is breaking up.

  18. Multipoint photonic doppler velocimetry using optical lens elements

    DOEpatents

    Frogget, Brent Copely; Romero, Vincent Todd

    2014-04-29

    A probe including a fisheye lens is disclosed to measure the velocity distribution of a moving surface along many lines of sight. Laser light, directed to the surface and then reflected back from the surface, is Doppler shifted by the moving surface, collected into fisheye lens, and then directed to detection equipment through optic fibers. The received light is mixed with reference laser light and using photonic Doppler velocimetry, a continuous time record of the surface movement is obtained. An array of single-mode optical fibers provides an optic signal to an index-matching lens and eventually to a fisheye lens. The fiber array flat polished and coupled to the index-matching lens using index-matching gel. Numerous fibers in a fiber array project numerous rays through the fisheye lens which in turn project many measurement points at numerous different locations to establish surface coverage over a hemispherical shape with very little crosstalk.

  19. Laser-induced thermal acoustic velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlamp, Stefan

    2000-11-01

    Laser-Induced Thermal Acoustics (LITA) is a non- intrusive, remote, four-wave mixing laser diagnostic technique for measurements of the speed of sound and of the thermal diffusivity in gases. If the gas composition is known, then its temperature and density can be inferred. Beam misalignments and bulk fluid velocities can influence the time history and intensity of LITA signals. A closed-form analytic expression for LITA signals incorporating these effects is derived. The magnitude of beam misalignment and the flow velocity can be inferred from the signal shape using a least-squares fit of this model to the experimental data. High-speed velocimetry using homodyne detection is demonstrated with NO2-seeded air in a supersonic blow-down nozzle. The measured speed of sound deviates less than 2% from the theoretical value assuming isentropic quasi-1D flow. Boundary layer effects degrade the velocity measurements to errors of 20%. Heterodyne detection is used for low-speed velocimetry up to Mach number M = 0.1. The uncertainty of the velocity measurements was ~0.2 m/s. The sound speed measurements were repeatable to 0.5%. The agreement between theory and experiments is very good. A one-hidden-layer feed-forward neural network is trained using back-propagation learning and a steepest descent learning rule to extract the speed of sound and flow velocity from a heterodyne LITA signal. The effect of the network size on the performance is demonstrated. The accuracy is determined with a second set of LITA signals that were not used during the training phase. The accuracy is found to be better than that of a conventional frequency decomposition technique while being computationally as efficient. This data analysis method is robust with respect to noise, numerically stable, and fast enough for real-time data analysis. The accuracy and uncertainty of non-resonant LITA measurements is investigated. The error in measurements of the speed of sound and of the thermal diffusivity

  20. Laser Doppler and Pulsed Laser Velocimetry in Fluid Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coupland, Jeremy M.

    Since the introduction of the laser in the late 1960s, optical metrology has made a major impact in many branches of engineering. This is nowhere more apparent than in the field of fluid mechanics where laser technology has revolutionised the way in which fluid flows are studied. The light scattered from small seeding particles following the flow contains information relating to the particle position and velocity. The coherence characteristics and high power densities achievable with a laser source allow well-defined regions of flow to be investigated in a largely non-intrusive manner and on a spatial and temporal scale commensurate with he flow field of interest. This review outlines the laser-based methods of velocimetry that are now available to the fluid dynamicist and discusses their practical application. Laser Doppler velocimetry provides a means to produce time-resolved measurements of fluid velocity at a single point in the flow. The optical design of instruments of this type is addressed with reference to spatial resolution and light gathering performance. Typical Doppler signals produced at both high and low particle concentrations are analysed and signal processing techniques are briefly discussed. Pulsed laser velocimeters use imaging optics to record the position of seeding particles at two or more instants and provide information concerning the instantaneous structure of the flow field. The optical configurations and analysis procedures used for planar velocity measurements are described and whole-field three-dimensional velocity measurements using holographic techniques are introduced.

  1. Doppler Global Velocimetry Measurements for Supersonic Flow Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyers, James F.

    2005-01-01

    The application of Doppler Global Velocimetry (DGV) to high-speed flows has its origins in the original development of the technology by Komine et al (1991). Komine used a small shop-air driven nozzle to generate a 200 m/s flow. This flow velocity was chosen since it produced a fairly large Doppler shift in the scattered light, resulting in a significant transmission loss as the light passed through the Iodine vapor. This proof-of-concept investigation showed that the technology was capable of measuring flow velocity within a measurement plane defined by a single-frequency laser light sheet. The effort also proved that velocity measurements could be made without resolving individual seed particles as required by other techniques such as Fringe- Type Laser Velocimetry and Particle Image Velocimetry. The promise of making planar velocity measurements with the possibility of using 0.1-micron condensation particles for seeding, Dibble et al (1989), resulted in the investigation of supersonic jet flow fields, Elliott et al (1993) and Smith and Northam (1995) - Mach 2.0 and 1.9 respectively. Meyers (1993) conducted a wind tunnel investigation above an inclined flat plate at Mach 2.5 and above a delta wing at Mach 2.8 and 4.6. Although these measurements were crude from an accuracy viewpoint, they did prove that the technology could be used to study supersonic flows using condensation as the scattering medium. Since then several research groups have studied the technology and developed solutions and methodologies to overcome most of the measurement accuracy limitations:

  2. Assessing the Capability of Doppler Global Velocimetry To Measure Vortical Flow Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyers, James F.; Usry, Jimmy W.; Miller, L. Scott

    1994-01-01

    A new nonintrusive flow diagnostics instrumentation system, Doppler global velocimetry, is presented. The system is capable of making simultaneous, three-component velocity measurements within a selected measurement plane at video camera rates. These velocity images can provide the researcher with spatial and temporal information about the flow field in a global sense. The investigation of a vortical flow above a 75-degree delta wing comparing standard three-component, fringe-type laser velocimetry measurements with Doppler global velocimetry measurements is presented.

  3. Development of Point Doppler Velocimetry for Flow Field Investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavone, Angelo A.; Meyers, James F.; Lee, Joseph W.

    2006-01-01

    A Point Doppler Velocimeter (pDv) has been developed using a vapor-limited iodine cell as the sensing medium. The iodine cell is utilized to directly measure the Doppler shift frequency of laser light scattered from submicron particles suspended within a fluid flow. The measured Doppler shift can then be used to compute the velocity of the particles, and hence the fluid. Since this approach does not require resolution of scattered light from individual particles, the potential exists to obtain temporally continuous signals that could be uniformly sampled in the manner as a hot wire anemometer. This leads to the possibility of obtaining flow turbulence power spectra without the limitations of fringe-type laser velocimetry. The development program consisted of a methodical investigation of the technology coupled with the solution of practical engineering problems to produce a usable measurement system. The paper outlines this development along with the evaluation of the resulting system as compared to primary standards and other measurement technologies.

  4. Photonic Doppler Velocimetry Multiplexing Techniques: Evaluation of Photonic Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Edward Daykin

    2012-05-24

    This poster reports progress related to photonic technologies. Specifically, the authors developed diagnostic system architecture for a Multiplexed Photonic Doppler Velocimetry (MPDV) that incorporates frequency and time-division multiplexing into existing PDV methodology to provide increased channel count. Current MPDV design increases number of data records per digitizer channel 8x, and also operates as a laser-safe (Class 3a) system. Further, they applied heterodyne interferometry to allow for direction-of-travel determination and enable high-velocity measurements (>10 km/s) via optical downshifting. They also leveraged commercially available, inexpensive and robust components originally developed for telecom applications. Proposed MPDV architectures employ only commercially available, fiber-coupled hardware.

  5. Holographic optical system for aberration corrections in laser Doppler velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, R. C.; Case, S. K.; Schock, H. J.

    1985-01-01

    An optical system containing multifaceted holographic optical elements (HOEs) has been developed to correct for aberrations introduced by nonflat windows in laser Doppler velocimetry. The multifacet aberration correction approach makes it possible to record on one plate many sets of adjacent HOEs that address different measurement volume locations. By using 5-mm-diameter facets, it is practical to place 10-20 sets of holograms on one 10 x 12.5-cm plate, so that the procedure of moving the entire optical system to examine different locations may not be necessary. The holograms are recorded in dichromated gelatin and therefore are nonabsorptive and suitable for use with high-power argon laser beams. Low f-number optics coupled with a 90-percent efficient distortion-correcting hologram in the collection side of the system yield high optical efficiency.

  6. Application of Doppler Global Velocimetry to Supersonic Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyers, James F.

    1996-01-01

    The design and implementation of Doppler Global Velocimetry (DGV) for testing in the Langley Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel is presented. The discussion begins by outlining the characteristics of the tunnel and the test environment, with potential problem areas highlighted. Modifications to the optical system design to implement solutions for these problems are described. Since this tunnel entry was the first ever use of DGV in a supersonic wind tunnel, the test series was divided into three phases, each with its own goal. Phase I determined if condensation provided sufficient scattered light for DGV applications. Phase II studied particle lag by measuring the flow about an oblique shock above an inclined flat plate. Phase III investigated the supersonic vortical flow field above a 75-degree delta wing at 24-degrees angle of attack. Example results from these tests are presented.

  7. Investigation of Measurement Errors in Doppler Global Velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyers, James F.; Lee, Joseph W.

    1999-01-01

    While the initial development phase of Doppler Global Velocimetry (DGV) has been successfully completed, there remains a critical next phase to be conducted, namely the determination of an error budget to provide quantitative bounds for measurements obtained by this technology. This paper describes a laboratory investigation that consisted of a detailed interrogation of potential error sources to determine their contribution to the overall DGV error budget. A few sources of error were obvious; e.g., iodine vapor adsorption lines, optical systems, and camera characteristics. However, additional non-obvious sources were also discovered; e.g., laser frequency and single-frequency stability, media scattering characteristics, and interference fringes. This paper describes each identified error source, its effect on the overall error budget, and where possible, corrective procedures to reduce or eliminate its effect.

  8. Measurement Capabilities of Single-Pulse Planar Doppler Velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKenzie, Robert L.; Kutler, Paul F. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Preliminary investigations are described of a method that is capable of measuring instantaneous, 3-D, velocity vectors everywhere in a light sheet generated by a pulsed laser. The technique, here called Planar Doppler Velocimetry (PDV), is a variation of a new concept for velocity measurements that was called Doppler Global Velocimetry (DGV) in its original disclosure. The concept relies on the use of a narrowband laser and measurements of the Doppler shift of scattered light from particles moving with a flow. The Doppler shift is recorded as a variation in transmission through a sharp-edged spectral filter provided by iodine vapor in a cell. Entire fields of velocity can be determined by using a solid-state camera to record the intensity variations throughout the field of view. However, the implementation of DGV has been centered principally on the use of high power, continuous-wave, ion lasers and measurement times that are determined by the 30-ms framing times of standard video cameras. Hence, they provide velocity fields that are averaged in time at least over that period. On the other hand, the PDV concept described in this presentation incorporates a high energy, repetitively pulsed, Nd-YAG laser that is injection-seeded to make it narrowband and then frequency-doubled to provide light at frequencies absorbed by the iodine vapor. The duration of each pulse is less than 10 nanoseconds. When used in combination with nonstandard, scientific quality, solid state cameras, a sequence of images can be obtained that provides instantaneous velocity vectors everywhere in the field of view. The investigations described in this paper include an accurate characterization of the iodine cell spectral behavior and its influence on the PDV measurements, a derivation of the PDV signal analysis requirements, and the unique aspects of the pulsed laser behavior related to this application. In addition, PDV measurements are to be demonstrated using data from a rotating wheel

  9. Design, Assembly, and Testing of a Photon Doppler Velocimetry Probe

    SciTech Connect

    Malone, Robert M; Cox, Brian C; Daykin, Edward P; DeVore, Douglas O; Esquibel, David L; Frayer, Daniel K; Frogget, Brent C; Gallegos, Cenobio H; Kaufman, Morris I; McGillivray, Kevin D; Romero, Vincent T; Briggs, Matthew E; Furlanetto, Michael R; Holtkamp, David B; Pazuchanics, Peter; Primas, Lori E; Shinas, Michael A; Sorenson, Danny S

    2011-08-21

    A novel fiber-optic probe measures the velocity distribution of an imploding surface along many lines of sight. Reflected light from each spot on the moving surface is Doppler shifted with a small portion of this light propagating backwards through the launching fiber. The reflected light is mixed with a reference laser in a technique called photon Doppler velocimetry, providing continuous time records. Within the probe, a matrix array of 56 single-mode fibers sends light through an optical relay consisting of three types of lenses. Seven sets of these relay lenses are grouped into a close-packed array allowing the interrogation of seven regions of interest. A six-faceted prism with a hole drilled into its center directs the light beams to the different regions. Several types of relay lens systems have been evaluated, including doublets and molded aspheric singlets. The optical design minimizes beam diameters and also provides excellent imaging capabilities. One of the fiber matrix arrays can be replaced by an imaging coherent bundle. This close-packed array of seven relay systems provides up to 476 beam trajectories. The pyramid prism has its six facets polished at two different angles that will vary the density of surface point coverage. Fibers in the matrix arrays are angle polished at 8{sup o} to minimize back reflections. This causes the minimum beam waist to vary along different trajectories. Precision metrology on the direction cosine trajectories is measured to satisfy environmental requirements for vibration and temperature.

  10. A Fisheye Lens as a Photonic Doppler Velocimetry Probe

    SciTech Connect

    Frogget, B C; Cox, B C; DeVore, D O; Esquibel, D L; Frayer, D K; Furlanetto, M R; Holtkamp, D B; Kaufman, M I; Malone, R M; Romero, V T

    2012-09-01

    A new fisheye lens design is used as a miniature probe to measure the velocity distribution of an imploding surface along many lines of sight. Laser light, directed and scattered back along each beam on the surface, is Doppler shifted by the moving surface and collected into the launching fiber. The received light is mixed with reference laser light in each optical fiber in a technique called photonic Doppler velocimetry, providing a continuous time record. An array of single-mode optical fibers sends laser light through the fisheye lens. The lens consists of an index-matching positive element, two positive doublet groups, and two negative singlet elements. The optical design minimizes beam diameters, physical size, and back reflections for excellent signal collection. The fiber array projected through the fisheye lens provides many measurement points of surface coverage over a hemisphere with very little crosstalk. The probe measures surface movement with only a small encroachment into the center of the cavity. The fiber array is coupled to the index-matching element using index-matching gel. The array is bonded and sealed into a blast tube for ease of assembly and focusing. This configuration also allows the fiber array to be flat polished at a common object plane. In areas where increased measurement point density is desired, the fibers can be close packed. To further increase surface density coverage, smaller-diameter cladding optical fibers may be used.

  11. Conventional ultrasonography and color Doppler velocimetry of uterine leiomyomas.

    PubMed

    Caruso, A; Caforio, L; Testa, A C; Pomini, F; Ciampelli, M; Mancuso, S

    1998-01-01

    The role of uterine leiomyomas as causative factor of sterility is controversial. Submucosal myomas, in particular, can interfere with fertility and be associated to obstetric complications as abruption of placenta, post-partum metrorrhagia and puerperal sepsis. With ultrasonography, immediate and long-term information can be drawn on changes in the features of myomas. However, to-date, there are no reliable noninvasive exams to assess the nature and growth pattern of myomas. With Doppler velocimetry in ovarian malignancies a vascularization significantly different from that observed in benign tumors, is detected. It has been hypothesized that within benign tumors, as myomatous masses, tissues with different cell proliferation rates could be characterized by different vascular patterns. In a group of myomas shown to have central arterial vessels at Doppler examination, significant correlations were assessed between resistance indices of analyzed vessels and percentage of cell in the proliferative phase evaluated with cytofluorimetry. The myomatous tissue with high cell proliferation rate seems to have higher vascular resistances. PMID:10191660

  12. Doppler velocimetry of a current driven spin helix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Luyi

    2012-02-01

    We present direct observation of the translational motion of spin helices in GaAs quantum wells under the influence of applied electric fields. Previously, the lifetime of such helices was observed by time-resolving the amplitude of light diffracted from the periodic spin polarization [1]. This technique cannot be applied to tracking the motion of current-driven spin helices because diffraction amplitude is insensitive to translation of the center of mass of a periodic structure. In this talk, we describe a new experimental technique, Doppler spin velocimetry, capable of resolving displacements of spin polarization at the level of 1 nm on a picosecond time scale [2]. This is accomplished through the use of heterodyne detection to measure the optical phase of the diffracted light. We discuss experiments in which this technique is used to measure the motion of spin helices as a function of temperature, in-plane electric field, and photoinduced spin polarization amplitude. Several striking observations will be reported -- for example, the spin helix velocity changes sign as a function of wavevector and is zero at the wavevector that yields the largest spin lifetime. Another important observation is that the velocity of spin polarization packets becomes equal to the drift velocity of the high-mobility electron gas in the limit of small spin helix amplitude. Finally, we show that spin helices continue propagate at the same speed as the Fermi sea even when the electron drift velocity exceeds the Fermi velocity of 10^7 cm-s-1. In collaboration with J. D. Koralek and J. Orenstein, UC Berkeley and LBNL, D. R. Tibbetts, J. L. Reno, and M. P. Lilly, SNL. Supported by DOE under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231 and DE-AC04-94AL85000. [4pt] [1] J. D. Koralek et al., ``Emergency of the persistent spin helix in semiconductor quantum wells,'' Nature 458, 610-613 (2009). [0pt] [2] L. Yang et al, ``Doppler velocimetry of spin propagation in a two-dimensional electron gas,'' to appear

  13. Characterization of measurement error sources in Doppler global velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyers, James F.; Lee, Joseph W.; Schwartz, Richard J.

    2001-04-01

    Doppler global velocimetry uses the absorption characteristics of iodine vapour to provide instantaneous three-component measurements of flow velocity within a plane defined by a laser light sheet. Although the technology is straightforward, its utilization as a flow diagnostics tool requires hardening of the optical system and careful attention to detail during data acquisition and processing if routine use in wind tunnel applications is to be achieved. A development programme that reaches these goals is presented. Theoretical and experimental investigations were conducted on each technology element to determine methods that increase measurement accuracy and repeatability. Enhancements resulting from these investigations included methods to ensure iodine vapour calibration stability, single frequency operation of the laser and image alignment to sub-pixel accuracies. Methods were also developed to improve system calibration, and eliminate spatial variations of optical frequency in the laser output, spatial variations in optical transmissivity and perspective and optical distortions in the data images. Each of these enhancements is described and experimental examples given to illustrate the improved measurement performance obtained by the enhancement. The culmination of this investigation was the measured velocity profile of a rotating wheel resulting in a 1.75% error in the mean with a standard deviation of 0.5 m s-1. Comparing measurements of a jet flow with corresponding Pitot measurements validated the use of these methods for flow field applications.

  14. Laser Doppler Velocimetry and full-field soot volume fraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenberg, Paul S.

    1995-01-01

    Since its introduction in the mid-sixties, Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) has become one of the most widely used methods for the measurement of flows. Its remote and essentially non-intrusive nature provides an invaluable tool for a variety of difficult measurement situations which would be otherwise inaccessible. The high spatial resolution and rapid temporal response afforded by this technique are well suited to the determination of spatial and temporal details of flow fields, as well as characterization of turbulence. Advances in the understanding of the properties of LDV signals, accompanied by technological advances in coherent laser sources, detectors of high sensitivity and low noise, optical fabrication techniques and high-speed digital signal processing architectures have resulted in systems of increased accuracy and flexibility. As will be shown, recent progress in solid-state lasers and photo-detectors has been beneficial insofar as the compatibility of this method with the unique and severe constraints inherent in microgravity combustion science experiments.

  15. Characterization of Measurement Error Sources in Doppler Global Velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyers, James F.; Lee, Joseph W.; Schwartz, Richard J.

    2001-01-01

    Doppler global velocimetry uses the absorption characteristics of iodine vapor to provide instantaneous three-component measurements of flow velocity within a plane defined by a laser light sheet. Although the technology is straightforward, its utilization as a flow diagnostics tool requires hardening of the optical system and careful attention to detail during data acquisition and processing if routine use in wind tunnel applications is to be achieved. A development program that reaches these goals is presented. Theoretical and experimental investigations were conducted on each technology element to determine methods that increase measurement accuracy and repeatability. Enhancements resulting from these investigations included methods to ensure iodine vapor calibration stability, single frequency operation of the laser and image alignment to sub-pixel accuracies. Methods were also developed to improve system calibration, and eliminate spatial variations of optical frequency in the laser output, spatial variations in optical transmissivity and perspective and optical distortions in the data images. Each of these enhancements is described and experimental examples given to illustrate the improved measurement performance obtained by the enhancement. The culmination of this investigation was the measured velocity profile of a rotating wheel resulting in a 1.75% error in the mean with a standard deviation of 0.5 m/s. Comparing measurements of a jet flow with corresponding Pitot measurements validated the use of these methods for flow field applications.

  16. Development of extended field Doppler velocimetry for turbomachinery applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, H. D.; Tatam, R. P.

    1997-08-01

    The development of a portable, single component Doppler global velocimetry (DGV) head, based around a wavelength-stabilised argonion laser and a fast digital image-processing system, is described. The normalised two-dimensional DGV image, in which intensities are linearly related to velocities, can be displayed and updated at the 25 Hz camera frame rate, greatly easing the problem of system alignment. The effect of each individual system component upon the velocity resolution achieved for the system as a whole is discussed, and correction factors are calculated to account for the finite aperture and field of view of real systems and for divergence of the illuminating light sheet. Axial velocities of up to 100 m/s in a straight duct flow have been measured, demonstrating an rms velocity resolution of 2.5 m/s. The potential of the technique for gas turbine applications has been demonstrated by measuring the position of a shock in a transonic flow. At a Mach number of 2.3 and mass flow rate of 0.79 kg/s the velocity change across the shock was measured to be approximately 130 m/s.

  17. Application of Spectroscopic Doppler Velocimetry for Measurement of Streamwise Vorticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fagan, Amy; Zaman, Khairul B.; Elam, Kristie A.; Clem, Michelle M.

    2013-01-01

    A spectroscopic Doppler velocimetry technique has been developed for measuring two transverse components of velocity and hence streamwise vorticity in free jet flows. The nonintrusive optical measurement system uses Mie scattering from a 200 mW green continuous-wave laser interacting with dust and other tracer particulates naturally present in the air flow to measure the velocities. Scattered light is collected in two opposing directions to provide measurements of two orthogonal velocity components. An air-spaced Fabry-Perot interferometer is used for spectral analysis to determine the optical frequency shift between the incident laser light and the Mie scattered light. This frequency shift is directly proportional to the velocity component in the direction of the bisector of the incident and scattered light wave propagation vectors. Data were acquired for jet Mach numbers of 1.73 and 0.99 using a convergent 1.27-cm diameter round nozzle fitted with a single triangular "delta-tab". The velocity components and the streamwise vorticity calculated from the measurements are presented. The results demonstrate the ability of this novel optical system to obtain velocity and vorticity data without any artificial seeding and using a low power laser system.

  18. Forebody and leading edge vortex measurements using planar Doppler velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beutner, Thomas J.; Elliott, Gregory S.; Williams, Glenn W.; Baust, Henry D.; Crafton, Jim; Carter, Campbell D.

    2001-04-01

    The planar Doppler velocimetry (PDV) technique has been demonstrated by employing it in a large-scale wind tunnel to record velocity fields surrounding a model of a generic fighter plane. The PDV instrument employed here included the following: (i) a frequency monitoring system for measuring the laser frequency corresponding to each set of scattering images; (ii) two detector systems (each composed of two 16-bit CCD cameras), one viewing the model from the top of the wind tunnel and the second from the side; (iii) iodine vapour cells based on the starved-cell design, which eliminated the need for separate temperature control of the iodine reservoir; iv) a vibration-isolated, injection-seeded, Q-switched Nd:YAG laser and (v) custom data acquisition software for linking the four cameras, the laser and the frequency monitor. The PDV instrument was validated by comparing the PDV-derived velocity to the known value in the empty wind tunnel. An error of about 1 m s-1 out of an 18.9 m s-1 velocity component was found; the image noise component (resulting primarily from the speckle effect) was found to be about 1 m s-1. In addition, as a result of laser-sheet impingement on the model surface, velocities near the model surfaces are biased by background scattering effects. Nonetheless, it has been shown that PDV can be used effectively to map velocity fields with high spatial resolution over complex model geometries. Frame-averaged velocity images recorded at four axial stations along the model have shown the formation of forebody and leading-edge vortices and their complex interaction in the presence of the wing flow field.

  19. Characterization of detonator performance using photonic Doppler velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maisey, Matthew P.; Bowden, Mike D.

    2008-08-01

    Detonators are used to convert electrical or other energy into an explosive output. This output can then be used to initiate further explosive charges. To aid in the development of explosive systems, it is important to characterize the output of detonators, in particularly the pressure produced. Recent advances over the last five years in high-speed digitizing oscilloscopes and high-bandwidth photodiodes, driven primarily by the telecommunications industry, have enabled the development of a new type of interferometer for measuring high velocities, such as those found in detonics experiments. The Photonic Doppler Velocimeter (PDV) can be visualized as a fiber-based Michelson interferometer. The light from a single-mode fiber laser at 1550 nm is passed through a circulator, which acts to separate bi-directional light. The beam is then reflected via free-space optics off the surface of interest, and then focused back into the same fiber. This reflected light is then mixed with an approximately equal amount of non-reflected light, and the resulting interference is recorded using a high-bandwidth photodiode and oscilloscope. In contrast to more traditional Velocimetry techniques such as VISAR, only a single data channel is required. We have used our PDV system to investigate the performance of optical and electrical detonators. The detonators examined are the commercially available RISI RP-80, and an AWE DOI (Direct Optical Initiation) detonator. The RP-80 is an exploding bridgewire (EBW) detonator, utilizing Pentaerythritol Tetranitrate as the initiating explosive and a RDX output pellet. The DOI detonator uses an aluminum flyer to initiate a Hexanitrostilbene (HNS) pellet. Both detonators are canned in aluminum and the velocity of the can was measured, and from this, the output pressure of the detonator has been determined. This is compared to calculated values.

  20. Planar Doppler Velocimetry for Large-Scale Wind Tunnel Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKenzie, Robert L.

    1997-01-01

    Recently, Planar Doppler Velocimetry (PDV) has been shown by several laboratories to offer an attractive means for measuring three-dimensional velocity vectors everywhere in a light sheet placed in a flow. Unlike other optical means of measuring flow velocities, PDV is particularly attractive for use in large wind tunnels where distances to the sample region may be several meters, because it does not require the spatial resolution and tracking of individual scattering particles or the alignment of crossed beams at large distances. To date, demonstrations of PDV have been made either in low speed flows without quantitative comparison to other measurements, or in supersonic flows where the Doppler shift is large and its measurement is relatively insensitive to instrumental errors. Moreover, most reported applications have relied on the use of continuous-wave lasers, which limit the measurement to time-averaged velocity fields. This work summarizes the results of two previous studies of PDV in which the use of pulsed lasers to obtain instantaneous velocity vector fields is evaluated. The objective has been to quantitatively define and demonstrate PDV capabilities for applications in large-scale wind tunnels that are intended primarily for the production testing of subsonic aircraft. For such applications, the adequate resolution of low-speed flow fields requires accurate measurements of small Doppler shifts that are obtained at distances of several meters from the sample region. The use of pulsed lasers provides the unique capability to obtain not only time-averaged fields, but also their statistical fluctuation amplitudes and the spatial excursions of unsteady flow regions such as wakes and separations. To accomplish the objectives indicated, the PDV measurement process is first modeled and its performance evaluated computationally. The noise sources considered include those related to the optical and electronic properties of Charge-Coupled Device (CCD) arrays and to

  1. Inverse Doppler Effects in Broadband Acoustic Metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Zhai, S L; Zhao, X P; Liu, S; Shen, F L; Li, L L; Luo, C R

    2016-01-01

    The Doppler effect refers to the change in frequency of a wave source as a consequence of the relative motion between the source and an observer. Veselago theoretically predicted that materials with negative refractions can induce inverse Doppler effects. With the development of metamaterials, inverse Doppler effects have been extensively investigated. However, the ideal material parameters prescribed by these metamaterial design approaches are complex and also challenging to obtain experimentally. Here, we demonstrated a method of designing and experimentally characterising arbitrary broadband acoustic metamaterials. These omni-directional, double-negative, acoustic metamaterials are constructed with 'flute-like' acoustic meta-cluster sets with seven double meta-molecules; these metamaterials also overcome the limitations of broadband negative bulk modulus and mass density to provide a region of negative refraction and inverse Doppler effects. It was also shown that inverse Doppler effects can be detected in a flute, which has been popular for thousands of years in Asia and Europe. PMID:27578317

  2. Performance assessment and calibration of a profiling lab-scale acoustic Doppler velocimeter for application over mixed sand-gravel beds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Acoustic Doppler velocimetry has made high-resolution turbulence measurements in sediment-laden flows possible. Recent developments have resulted in a commercially available lab-scale acoustic Doppler profiling device, a Nortek Vectrino II, that allows for three-dimensional velocity data to be colle...

  3. Multipurpose Pressure Vessel Scanner and Photon Doppler Velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, Tayera

    2015-01-01

    Critical flight hardware typically undergoes a series of nondestructive evaluation methods to screen for defects before it is integrated into the flight system. Conventionally, pressure vessels have been inspected for flaws using a technique known as fluorescent dye penetrant, which is biased to inspector interpretation. An alternate method known as eddy current is automated and can detect small cracks better than dye penetrant. A new multipurpose pressure vessel scanner has been developed to perform internal and external eddy current scanning, laser profilometry, and thickness mapping on pressure vessels. Before this system can be implemented throughout industry, a probability of detection (POD) study needs to be performed to validate the system's eddy current crack/flaw capabilities. The POD sample set will consist of 6 flight-like metal pressure vessel liners with defects of known size. Preparation for the POD includes sample set fabrication, system operation, procedure development, and eddy current settings optimization. For this, collaborating with subject matter experts was required. This technical paper details the preparation activities leading up to the POD study currently scheduled for winter 2015/2016. Once validated, this system will be a proven innovation for increasing the safety and reliability of necessary flight hardware. Additionally, testing of frangible joint requires Photon Doppler Velocimetry (PDV) and Digital Image Correlation instrumentation. There is often noise associated with PDV data, which necessitates a frequency modulation (FM) signal-to-noise pre-test. Generally, FM radio works by varying the carrier frequency and mixing it with a fixed frequency source, creating a beat frequency which is represented by audio frequency that can be heard between about 20 to 20,000 Hz. Similarly, PDV reflects a shifted frequency (a phenomenon known as the Doppler Effect) from a moving source and mixes it with a fixed source frequency, which results in

  4. Multipurpose Pressure Vessel Scanner and Photon Doppler Velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, Tayera

    2015-01-01

    Critical flight hardware typically undergoes a series of nondestructive evaluation methods to screen for defects before it is integrated into the flight system. Conventionally, pressure vessels have been inspected for flaws using a technique known as fluorescent dye penetrant, which is biased to inspector interpretation. An alternate method known as eddy current is automated and can detect small cracks better than dye penetrant. A new multipurpose pressure vessel scanner has been developed to perform internal and external eddy current scanning, laser profilometry, and thickness mapping on pressure vessels. Before this system can be implemented throughout industry, a probability of detection (POD) study needs to be performed to validate the system’s eddy current crack/flaw capabilities. The POD sample set will consist of 6 flight-like metal pressure vessel liners with defects of known size. Preparation for the POD includes sample set fabrication, system operation, procedure development, and eddy current settings optimization. For this, collaborating with subject matter experts was required. This technical paper details the preparation activities leading up to the POD study currently scheduled for winter 2015/2016. Once validated, this system will be a proven innovation for increasing the safety and reliability of necessary flight hardware.Additionally, testing of frangible joint requires Photon Doppler Velocimetry (PDV) and Digital Image Correlation instrumentation. There is often noise associated with PDV data, which necessitates a frequency modulation (FM) signal-to-noise pre-test. Generally, FM radio works by varying the carrier frequency and mixing it with a fixed frequency source, creating a beat frequency which is represented by audio frequency that can be heard between about 20 to 20,000 Hz. Similarly, PDV reflects a shifted frequency (a phenomenon known as the Doppler Effect) from a moving source and mixes it with a fixed source frequency, which results in

  5. Developments in laser Doppler accelerometry (LDAc) and comparison with laser Doppler velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothberg, Steve; Hocknell, Alan; Coupland, Jeremy

    This paper outlines the principles and early development of an interferometric technique for remote measurement of vibration acceleration — laser Doppler accelerometry (LDAc). One of the key advantages of LDAc over laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV) is its ability to measure extremely high vibration accelerations and shocks, effectively without limit, and this point is expanded upon in the paper. Early LDAc development showed how unwanted, velocity-dependent optical beats could occur on the photodetector but novel use of a frequency shifting device, whose primary purpose was for direction discrimination, was successful in isolating the required acceleration-dependent beat. A problem remained in the rate at which the velocity-dependent and acceleration-dependent beats broadened during target motion. In a further development, it was possible to 'select' a back reflection to produce a velocity-dependent beat that was NOT modulated in the presence of target motion. The acceleration-dependent beat could then be demodulated and preliminary results are given to demonstrate this outcome.

  6. Developments in laser Doppler accelerometry (LDAc) and comparison with laser Doppler velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothberg, Steve; Hocknell, Alan; Coupland, Jeremy

    1999-12-01

    This paper outlines the principles and early development of an interferometric technique for remote measurement of vibration acceleration - laser Doppler accelerometry (LDAc). One of the key advantages of LDAc over laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV) is its ability to measure extremely high vibration accelerations and shocks, effectively without limit, and this point is expanded upon in the paper. Early LDAc development showed how unwanted, velocity-dependent optical beats could occur on the photodetector but novel use of a frequency shifting device, whose primary purpose was for direction discrimination, was successful in isolating the required acceleration-dependent beat. A problem remained in the rate at which the velocity-dependent and acceleration-dependent beats broadened during target motion. In a further development, it was possible to 'select' a back reflection to produce a velocity-dependent beat that was NOT modulated in the presence of target motion. The acceleration-dependent beat could then be demodulated and preliminary results are given to demonstrate this outcome.

  7. Doppler electron velocimetry : notes on creating a practical tool.

    SciTech Connect

    Reu, Phillip L.; Milster, Tom

    2008-11-01

    The Doppler electron velocimeter (DEV) has been shown to be theoretically possible. This report attempts to answer the next logical question: Is it a practical instrument? The answer hinges upon whether enough electrons are available to create a time-varying Doppler current to be measured by a detector with enough sensitivity and bandwidth. The answer to both of these questions is a qualified yes. A target Doppler frequency of 1 MHz was set as a minimum rate of interest. At this target a theoretical beam current signal-to-noise ratio of 25-to-1 is shown for existing electron holography equipment. A detector is also demonstrated with a bandwidth of 1-MHz at a current of 10 pA. Additionally, a Linnik-type interferometer that would increase the available beam current is shown that would offer a more flexible arrangement for Doppler electron measurements over the traditional biprism.

  8. Broad-band acoustic Doppler current profiler

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cobb, E.D.

    1993-01-01

    The broad-band acoustic Doppler current profiler is an instrument that determines velocity based on the Doppler principle by reflecting acoustic signals off sediment particles in the water. The instrument is capable of measuring velocity magnitude and direction throughout a water column and of measuring water depth. It is also capable of bottom tracking and can, therefore, keep track of its own relative position as it is moved across a channel. Discharge measurements can be made quickly and, based on limited tests, accurately with this instrument. ?? 1993.

  9. Optical frequency standards for gravitational wave detection using satellite Doppler velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vutha, Amar

    2015-06-01

    Gravitational waves (GWs) imprint apparent Doppler shifts on the frequency of photons propagating between an emitter and detector of light. This forms the basis of a method to detect GWs using Doppler velocimetry between pairs of satellites. Operating in the micro-hertz to milli-hertz gravitational frequency band, this method could lead to the direct detection of GWs. The crucial component in such detectors is the frequency standard on board the emitting and receiving satellites. Recent developments in atomic frequency standards have led to devices that are approaching the sensitivity required to detect GWs from astrophysically interesting sources. The sensitivity of satellites equipped with optical frequency standards for Doppler velocimetry is examined, and a design for a robust, space-capable optical frequency standard is presented.

  10. Directional acoustic measurements by laser Doppler velocimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazumder, M. K.; Overbey, R. L.; Testerman, M. K.

    1976-01-01

    Laser Doppler velocimeters (LDVs) are used as velocity microphones to measure sound pressure level in the range from 90 to 130 dB, spectral components, and two-point correlation functions for acoustic-noise source identification. Close agreement between LDV and microphone data is observed. Directional sensitivity and the ability to measure remotely make LDVs useful tools for acoustic measurement where placement of any physical probe is difficult or undesirable, as in the diagnosis of jet noise.

  11. Inverse Doppler Effects in Broadband Acoustic Metamaterials

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, S. L.; Zhao, X. P.; Liu, S.; Shen, F. L.; Li, L. L.; Luo, C. R.

    2016-01-01

    The Doppler effect refers to the change in frequency of a wave source as a consequence of the relative motion between the source and an observer. Veselago theoretically predicted that materials with negative refractions can induce inverse Doppler effects. With the development of metamaterials, inverse Doppler effects have been extensively investigated. However, the ideal material parameters prescribed by these metamaterial design approaches are complex and also challenging to obtain experimentally. Here, we demonstrated a method of designing and experimentally characterising arbitrary broadband acoustic metamaterials. These omni-directional, double-negative, acoustic metamaterials are constructed with ‘flute-like’ acoustic meta-cluster sets with seven double meta-molecules; these metamaterials also overcome the limitations of broadband negative bulk modulus and mass density to provide a region of negative refraction and inverse Doppler effects. It was also shown that inverse Doppler effects can be detected in a flute, which has been popular for thousands of years in Asia and Europe. PMID:27578317

  12. Velocity measurements in whole blood using acoustic resolution photoacoustic Doppler

    PubMed Central

    Brunker, Joanna; Beard, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Acoustic resolution photoacoustic Doppler velocimetry promises to overcome the spatial resolution and depth penetration limitations of current blood flow measuring methods. Despite successful implementation using blood-mimicking fluids, measurements in blood have proved challenging, thus preventing in vivo application. A common explanation for this difficulty is that whole blood is insufficiently heterogeneous relative to detector frequencies of tens of MHz compatible with deep tissue photoacoustic measurements. Through rigorous experimental measurements we provide new insight that refutes this assertion. We show for the first time that, by careful choice of the detector frequency and field-of-view, and by employing novel signal processing methods, it is possible to make velocity measurements in whole blood using transducers with frequencies in the tens of MHz range. These findings have important implications for the prospects of making deep tissue measurements of blood flow relevant to the study of microcirculatory abnormalities associated with cancer, diabetes, atherosclerosis and other conditions. PMID:27446707

  13. Velocity measurements in whole blood using acoustic resolution photoacoustic Doppler.

    PubMed

    Brunker, Joanna; Beard, Paul

    2016-07-01

    Acoustic resolution photoacoustic Doppler velocimetry promises to overcome the spatial resolution and depth penetration limitations of current blood flow measuring methods. Despite successful implementation using blood-mimicking fluids, measurements in blood have proved challenging, thus preventing in vivo application. A common explanation for this difficulty is that whole blood is insufficiently heterogeneous relative to detector frequencies of tens of MHz compatible with deep tissue photoacoustic measurements. Through rigorous experimental measurements we provide new insight that refutes this assertion. We show for the first time that, by careful choice of the detector frequency and field-of-view, and by employing novel signal processing methods, it is possible to make velocity measurements in whole blood using transducers with frequencies in the tens of MHz range. These findings have important implications for the prospects of making deep tissue measurements of blood flow relevant to the study of microcirculatory abnormalities associated with cancer, diabetes, atherosclerosis and other conditions. PMID:27446707

  14. Acoustic Doppler discharge-measurement system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simpson, Michael R.; Oltmann, Richard N.

    1990-01-01

    A discharge-measurement system that uses a vessel-mounted acoustic Doppler current profiler has been developed and tested by the U.S. Geological Survey. Discharge measurements using the system require a fraction of the time needed for conventional current-meter discharge measurements and do not require shore-based navigational aids or tag lines for positioning the vessel.

  15. Evaluation of skin vasomotor reflexes by using laser Doppler velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Low, P A; Neumann, C; Dyck, P J; Fealey, R D; Tuck, R R

    1983-09-01

    We used a laser Doppler velocimeter for measurement of skin blood flow in 63 healthy control subjects and in patients with dysautonomias. We measured vasoconstrictor responses to inspiratory gasp, standing, Valsalva maneuver, and cold stimulus. An abnormal profile was defined in terms of the percentage of abnormal test results, the results of individual tests, and the alterations in the shape of the recorded response. These measurements of vasomotor function may permit the diagnosis of focal abnormalities of peripheral nerve sympathetic failure. PMID:6310277

  16. A Fisheye Lens as a Photonic Doppler Velocimetry Probe

    SciTech Connect

    Frogget, B. C.

    2012-08-16

    These presentation visuals report an instrument that, by use of a fish-eye lens, generates a beat signal using fiber mixing of unshifted light with Doppler-shifted light and measures the beat frequency. Ray trace diagrams are shown to illustrate advantages and disadvantages. The authors find their instrument has a long tracking distance, and large angle coverage. Index matching eases assembly, reduces return loss and flattens the field.

  17. Development of Ultrasonic Doppler Velocimetry Probes for Use on Liquid Sodium MHD Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, C. M.; Forest, C. B.; Kendrick, R. D.; Nornberg, M. D.; O'Connell, R.; Spence, E. J.

    2004-11-01

    An Ultrasonic Doppler Velocimetry (UDV) system is under development for measuring the velocity field of flowing sodium in the Madison Dynamo Experiment. Magnetic field generation depends critically upon the magnitude and shape of the velocity field, and potentially upon the properties of the fluid turbulence. Several high-temperature transducers (0.5 MHz) measure the mean velocity field and velocity fluctuations at points along several chords. Half-wavelength stainless-steel windows have been developed and tested in a water version of the experiment. The need for supplementary ultrasonic reflecting particles (with proper size and physical properties) in the water and sodium experiments is evaluated. The UDV measurements are assessed through comparison with velocity measurements from an existing Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) system. The radial-velocity data from UDV is integrated with the non-radial data provided by LDV to characterize velocity fields in the water model. Initial results are presented.

  18. An automated method for analysis and visualization of laser Doppler velocimetry data.

    PubMed

    Healy, T M; Ellis, J T; Fontaine, A A; Jarrett, C A; Yoganathan, A P

    1997-01-01

    The analysis and visualization of large data sets collected by use of laser Doppler velocimetry has presented a challenge to researchers using this technique to investigate complex flow fields. This paper describes an automated procedure for analysis and animation of two- and three-dimensional laser Doppler velocimetry data. The procedure consists of a suite of FORTRAN programs for calculating phase window averages of velocity and the Reynolds stress tensor, calculating the principal normal stresses, maximum shear stresses, and preparation of data files for input into Plot-3D compatible data visualization software. An example application of these techniques to data collected from an in vitro investigation of the retrograde flow field associated with a bileaflet mechanical heart valve is also presented. PMID:9084838

  19. Rotational Doppler velocimetry to probe the angular velocity of spinning microparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, D. B.; Lee, M. P.; Speirits, F. C.; Barnett, S. M.; Simpson, S. H.; Lavery, M. P. J.; Padgett, M. J.; Gibson, G. M.

    2014-07-01

    Laser Doppler velocimetry is a technique used to measure linear velocity, ranging from that of exhaust gases to blood flow. A rotational analog of laser Doppler velocimetry was recently demonstrated, using a rotationally symmetric interference pattern to probe the angular velocity of a spinning object. In this work, we demonstrate the use of a diffraction-limited structured illumination pattern to measure the angular velocity of a micron-sized particle trapped and spinning at tens of Hz in an optical trap. The technique requires no detailed knowledge of the shape of the particle, or the distribution of scatterers within it, and is independent of the particle's chirality, transparency, and birefringence. The particle is also subjected to Brownian motion, which complicates the signal by affecting the rotation rate and the rotation axis. By careful consideration of these influences, we show how the measurement is robust to both, representing a technique with which to probe the rotational motion of microscale particles.

  20. Using ultrasonic Doppler velocimetry to investigate the mixing of non-Newtonian fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Dineshkumar; Ein-Mozaffari, Farhad; Mehrvar, Mehrab

    2012-12-01

    Mixing is a critical unit operation, which is widely used in chemical and allied industries. Mixing of non-Newtonian fluids is a challenging task due to the complex rheology exhibited by these fluids. Pseudoplastic fluids with yield stress are an important class of non-Newtonian fluids. In this study, we utilized ultrasonic Doppler velocimetry (UDV) to explore the flow field generated by different impellers in the agitation of xanthan gum solutions and pulp suspensions, which are yield-pseudoplastic fluids.

  1. Ultrasound Doppler Velocimetry Measurements in Turbulent Liquid Metal Channel Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivero, Michel; Jian, Dandan; Karcher, Christian; Cuevas, Sergio

    2010-11-01

    Control of molten metal flow using magnetic fields is important in industrial applications. The Electromagnetic Flow Control Channel (EFCO) is an experimental test facility, located at Ilmenau University of Technology, for the development of such kind of control systems. The working fluid is the low-melting liquid metal alloy GaInSn in eutectic composition. In this channel, flow control is realized by combining and coupling the non-contact flow driving technology of electromagnetic pumps based on rotating permanent magnets and the non-contact flow rate measurement technology termed Lorentz Force Velocimetry (LFV). The flow rate is adjusted by controlling the rotation rate of the permanent magnet system. Physically, LFV is based on measuring the force acting on a magnet system. This force is induced by the melt flow passing through the static magnetic field generated by the system and is proportional to the flow. To calibrate such flow meters, we apply UDV technique to measure and analyse both turbulent hydrodynamic and MHD flow profiles in EFCO at various Reynolds numbers.

  2. Two-wave photon Doppler velocimetry measurements in direct impact Hopkinson pressure bar experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lea, Lewis J.; Jardine, Andrew P.

    2015-09-01

    Direct impact Hopkinson pressure bar systems offer many potential advantages over split Hopkinson pressure bars, including access to higher strain rates, higher strains for equivalent striker velocity and system length, lower dispersion and faster achievement of force equilibrium. Currently advantages are gained at a significant cost: the fact that input bar data is unavailable removes all information about the striker impacted specimen face, preventing the determination of force equilibrium, and requiring approximations to be made on the sample deformation history. Recently photon Doppler velocimetry methods have been developed, which can replace strain gauges on Hopkinson bars. In this paper we discuss an experimental method and complementary data analysis for using Doppler velocimetry to measure surface velocities of the striker and output bars in a direct impact bar experiment, allowing similar data to be recorded as in a split bar system, with the same level of convenience. We discuss extracting velocity and force measurements, and improving the accuracy and convenience of Doppler velocimetry on Hopkinson bars. Results obtained using the technique are compared to equivalent split bar tests, showing improved stress measurements for the lowest and highest strains.

  3. Noise and Dynamic Range in Multiplexed Photonic Doppler Velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daykin, Edward; Jung, Chan; Miller, Edward; Pena, Michael; Perez, Carlos; Strand, Oliver

    2015-06-01

    We have designed and built the Multiplexed Photonic Doppler Velocimeter (MPDV) for use on any class of shock physics experiments that requires a large number of spatial points to be measured. The MPDV uses the heterodyne method to either multiplex or up-shift data channels in the frequency domain, and also employs fiber-optic delays to multiplex additional data channels in the time domain. MPDV differs in architecture from the Photonic Doppler Velocimeter (PDV) in that the MPDV employs an Erbium Doped Fiber Amplifier (EDFA) for small signal optical pre-amplification prior to photo detection. Optical amplification allows for two aspects of MPDV operation that differ from PDV: 1) use of low power (eye-safe) lasers, and 2) ability to time multiplex with minimal degradation to the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). However, use of EDFA optical amplification within PDV or MPDV architecture also contributes noise to the spectrogram. EDFA optical noise will impact the SNR of MPDV data, and is dependent on amplifier performance, laser power, as well as optical signal attenuation due to fiber-optic delays and components. We will review this dependence and the trade-offs that exist between SNR and multiplexing architectures.

  4. Planar Particle Imaging and Doppler Velocimetry System and Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wernet, Mark P. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A planar velocity measurement system (100) is operative to measure all three velocity components of a flowing fluid (106) across an illuminated plane (108) using only a single line of sight. The fluid flow is seeded with small particles which accurately follow the flow field fluctuations. The seeded flow field is illuminated with pulsed laser light source (102) and the positions of the particles in the flow are recorded on CCD cameras (122,124). The in-plane velocities are measured by determining the in-plane particle displacements. The out-of-plane velocity component is determined by measuring the Doppler shift of the light scattered by the particles. Both gas and liquid velocities can be measured, as well as two-phase flows.

  5. Research of laser Doppler velocimetry based on DSPs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Tao; Zhang, Tao; Song, Li; Zhuang, Zhao; Yuan, Jiang Zhi; Kun, Bi; Feng, Peng

    2007-12-01

    This paper analyzes and compares existing variety of LDV technologies. According to existing LDV's deficiencies such as limited signals processing ability, poor adaptability and low precision, a new design scheme of LDV based on digital signal processing is introduced in this article. Doppler signal processing systems processes the spectrum by DSP. The system consists of a filter, a wave detector, an A/D converter and buffer. DSP system samples digital signals and performs Fourier Transform, and the information of velocity is obtained. To achieve a high signal to noise ratio (SNR), many signal processing techniques are applied, such as inserting zero, signal window, the algorithm of periodic diagrams based on FFT and the algorithm of approaching peak value, all of this highly improve the noise adaptivity. In recent years, the spectrum zooming technology is developed quickly, the algorithm of Zoom-FFT based on complex modulation improves the analysis precision, calculation efficiency, resolution and flexibility effectively. In this paper, the time domain sampled signals are windowed firstly, then the zooming analysis via Zoom-FFT algorithm is implemented, and at last,the energy Centrobaric rectifying algorithm is applied to do further estimation. Simulation results indicated that the algorithm has many merits, such as anti-jamming, high accuracy and a small amount of computation.

  6. Application of a Planar Doppler Velocimetry System to a High Reynolds Number Compressible Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Michael W.

    1998-01-01

    A Planar Doppler Velocimetry (PDV) system has been constructed and used to investigate the instantaneous turbulent velocity structure of a round high-speed compressible air jet with a low-speed co-flow. The exit condition was Mach=0.85 at ambient pressure, yielding a Reynolds number of about 650,000 on diameter. The PDV system was installed at NASA Langley Research Center in the Small Anechoic Jet Facility (SAJF), a chamber in which both the acoustic and aerodynamic properties of jets can be studied. For this test, the goal was to gather data which can be used to relate the turbulence structure of the jet to the levels and character of the acoustic noise produced by the jet. The current PDV system can acquire single-velocity-component, single-shot, planar images (15ns exposures) at 30 Hz. For this paper, the primary data set consists of 240 frames of velocity data acquired with both the jet and the low-speed co-flow seeded with light-scattering articles. Thus, velocities could be measured everywhere in the jet shear layer, both in the jet fluid and in the entrained co-flow. Some data were also taken with only the jet flow seeded. These provided mixing concentration images along with the reduced velocity fields. Other images were taken with only the co-flow seeded. These produced unique quantitative images of high speed entrainment. Optical "laser speckle" noise is the largest source of random noise in pulsed PDV systems. Components for the PDV imaging system were specifically selected to minimize speckle noise. To reduce systematic velocity errors due to laser drift, a frequency monitoring reference leg with a temperature-tuned reference iodine cell, was employed. In the course of this study, a novel flow seeder was developed. It enabled continuously variable seeding of the flow with particles of Sheared Pyrogenic Amorphous Hydrophobic Silica (SPAHS). The seeder comprised a dry fluidized bed hopper and a supersonic nozzle "pickup." Shearing action in the pickup

  7. Coherent optical transients observed in rubidium atomic line filtered Doppler velocimetry experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Fajardo, Mario E. Molek, Christopher D.; Vesely, Annamaria L.

    2015-10-14

    We report the first successful results from our novel Rubidium Atomic Line Filtered (RALF) Doppler velocimetry apparatus, along with unanticipated oscillatory signals due to coherent optical transients generated within pure Rb vapor cells. RALF is a high-velocity and high-acceleration extension of the well-known Doppler Global Velocimetry (DGV) technique for constructing multi-dimensional flow velocity vector maps in aerodynamics experiments [H. Komine, U.S. Patent No. 4,919,536 (24 April 1990)]. RALF exploits the frequency dependence of pressure-broadened Rb atom optical absorptions in a heated Rb/N{sub 2} gas cell to encode the Doppler shift of reflected near-resonant (λ{sub 0} ≈ 780.24 nm) laser light onto the intensity transmitted by the cell. The present RALF apparatus combines fiber optic and free-space components and was built to determine suitable operating conditions and performance parameters for the Rb/N{sub 2} gas cells. It yields single-spot velocities of thin laser-driven-flyer test surfaces and incorporates a simultaneous Photonic Doppler Velocimetry (PDV) channel [Strand et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 77, 083108 (2006)] for validation of the RALF results, which we demonstrate here over the v = 0 to 1 km/s range. Both RALF and DGV presume the vapor cells to be simple Beer's Law optical absorbers, so we were quite surprised to observe oscillatory signals in experiments employing low pressure pure Rb vapor cells. We interpret these oscillations as interference between the Doppler shifted reflected light and the Free Induction Decay (FID) coherent optical transient produced within the pure Rb cells at the original laser frequency; this is confirmed by direct comparison of the PDV and FID signals. We attribute the different behaviors of the Rb/N{sub 2} vs. Rb gas cells to efficient dephasing of the atomic/optical coherences by Rb-N{sub 2} collisions. The minimum necessary N{sub 2} buffer gas density ≈0.3 amagat translates into a smallest

  8. Coherent optical transients observed in rubidium atomic line filtered Doppler velocimetry experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fajardo, Mario E.; Molek, Christopher D.; Vesely, Annamaria L.

    2015-10-01

    We report the first successful results from our novel Rubidium Atomic Line Filtered (RALF) Doppler velocimetry apparatus, along with unanticipated oscillatory signals due to coherent optical transients generated within pure Rb vapor cells. RALF is a high-velocity and high-acceleration extension of the well-known Doppler Global Velocimetry (DGV) technique for constructing multi-dimensional flow velocity vector maps in aerodynamics experiments [H. Komine, U.S. Patent No. 4,919,536 (24 April 1990)]. RALF exploits the frequency dependence of pressure-broadened Rb atom optical absorptions in a heated Rb/N2 gas cell to encode the Doppler shift of reflected near-resonant (λ0 ≈ 780.24 nm) laser light onto the intensity transmitted by the cell. The present RALF apparatus combines fiber optic and free-space components and was built to determine suitable operating conditions and performance parameters for the Rb/N2 gas cells. It yields single-spot velocities of thin laser-driven-flyer test surfaces and incorporates a simultaneous Photonic Doppler Velocimetry (PDV) channel [Strand et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 77, 083108 (2006)] for validation of the RALF results, which we demonstrate here over the v = 0 to 1 km/s range. Both RALF and DGV presume the vapor cells to be simple Beer's Law optical absorbers, so we were quite surprised to observe oscillatory signals in experiments employing low pressure pure Rb vapor cells. We interpret these oscillations as interference between the Doppler shifted reflected light and the Free Induction Decay (FID) coherent optical transient produced within the pure Rb cells at the original laser frequency; this is confirmed by direct comparison of the PDV and FID signals. We attribute the different behaviors of the Rb/N2 vs. Rb gas cells to efficient dephasing of the atomic/optical coherences by Rb-N2 collisions. The minimum necessary N2 buffer gas density ≈0.3 amagat translates into a smallest useful velocity range of 0 to 2 km/s, which can

  9. Influence of laser coherence on reference-matched laser Doppler velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Beuth, Thorsten; Fox, Maik; Stork, Wilhelm

    2016-03-10

    The probe length is investigated under the influence of the coherence length of Gaussian and Lorentzian spectra for the case that the focal point and the point of highest interference are matched in a strongly focused laser Doppler velocimetry setup (LDV). Isosurfaces of a -3  dB drop of the intensity maximum are estimated and suggested as an alternative, comprehensible way to define probe volumes. In the end, the equations are applied for an exemplary lidar setup to show the reduction of requirements for the coherence length of the laser source in comparison to unmatched cases. PMID:26974809

  10. Measurement of the velocities in the transient acceleration process using all-fiber photonic Doppler velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian; Wu, Chong-qing; Song, Hong-wei; Yu, Tao; Xu, Jing-jing

    2011-05-01

    Based on analysis of basic photonic Doppler velocimetry (PDV), a formula to measure velocity variation in a single cycle is put forward. PDV has been improved in three aspects, namely, the laser, the detector and the data processing. A measurement system for velocity of the initial stage of a shock motion has been demonstrated. Instantaneous velocity measurements have been performed. The experimental results have a good agreement with the values obtained from the accelerometer. Compared with the traditional fringe method, the proposed method in this paper can identify instantaneous velocity variation. So it is particularly suitable for measuring the velocity in the transient acceleration process of shock waves and detonation waves.

  11. Incident beam polarization for laser Doppler velocimetry employing a sapphire cylindrical window

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lock, J. A.; Schock, H. J.

    1985-01-01

    For laser Doppler velocimetry studies employing sapphire windows as optical access ports, the birefringency of sapphire produces an extra beam intersection volume which serves to effectively smear the acquired velocity flow field data. It is shown that for a cylindrical window geometry, the extra beam intersection volume may be eliminated with minimal decrease in the fringe visibility of the remaining intersection volume by suitably orienting the polarizations of the initial laser beams. For horizontally incident beams, these polarizations were measured at three intersection locations within the cylinder. It was found that the measured polarization angles agreed with the theoretical predictions.

  12. Note: Frequency-conversion photonic Doppler velocimetry with an inverted circulator

    SciTech Connect

    Dolan, D. H.; Ao, T.; Hernandez, O.

    2012-02-15

    Photonic Doppler velocimetry (PDV) is a fiber-based interferometer used in dynamic compression research. Conventional PDV systems are simple to construct but do not perform well in all measurement conditions, while universal PDV systems that support many different configurations are complex and expensive. A simpler approach is the use of external, inverted circulators which can be added and removed in a modular fashion. This technique permits frequency-conversion measurements with a conventional PDV system. Using a correction to remove baseline effects, frequency conversion systems can resolve low velocity transients that conventional PDV cannot.

  13. Phase-coherent detection of an optical dipole force by Doppler velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biercuk, M. J.; Uys, H.; Britton, J. W.; Vandevender, A. P.; Bollinger, J. J.

    2011-05-01

    We report phase-coherent Doppler detection of optical dipole forces using large ion crystals in a Penning trap. The technique is based on laser Doppler velocimetry using a cycling transition in $^{9}$Be$^{+}$ near 313 nm and the center-of-mass (COM) ion motional mode. The optical dipole force is tuned to excite the COM mode, and measurements of photon arrival times synchronized with the excitation potential show oscillations with a period commensurate with the COM motional frequency. Experimental results compare well with a quantitative model for a driven harmonic oscillator. This technique permits characterization of motional modes in ion crystals; the measurement of both frequency and phase information relative to the driving force is a key enabling capability -- comparable to lockin detection -- providing access to a parameter that is typically not available in time-averaged measurements. This additional information facilitates discrimination of nearly degenerate motional modes.

  14. Phase-coherent detection of an optical dipole force by Doppler velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Biercuk, M J; Uys, H; Britton, J W; Vandevender, A P; Bollinger, J J

    2011-05-23

    We report phase-coherent Doppler detection of optical dipole forces using large ion crystals in a Penning trap. The technique is based on laser Doppler velocimetry using a cycling transition in 9Be+ near 313 nm and the center-of-mass (COM) ion motional mode. The optical dipole force is tuned to excite the COM mode, and measurements of photon arrival times synchronized with the excitation potential show oscillations with a period commensurate with the COM motional frequency. Experimental results compare well with a quantitative model for a driven harmonic oscillator. This technique permits characterization of motional modes in ion crystals; the measurement of both frequency and phase information relative to the driving force is a key enabling capability--comparable to lockin detection - providing access to a parameter that is typically not available in time-averaged measurements. This additional information facilitates discrimination of nearly degenerate motional modes. PMID:21643288

  15. Validation of Doppler ultrasound measurements using particle, image velocimetry in a flow phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosgrove, John; Meagher, Siobhan; Hoskins, Peter; Greated, Clive; Black, Richard

    2001-05-01

    Cardiovascular disease is responsible for over 50% of all deaths in the world and there is a substantial amount of evidence which suggests that abnormal vessel wall shear stress is correlated with the development of atherosclerosis. Wall shear stress is calculated from wall shear rates, the measurement of which is a technically challenging problem for ultrasound. In this study a flow phantom consisting of a meshed-gear pump and corresponding control electronics is used to generate a range of flow waveforms in a straight tube. These flows are measured using Doppler ultrasound and compared to corresponding particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements and to analytical solutions of the flow equations for a range of Wormersley parameters. Although previous studies have been undertaken calibrating Doppler ultrasound in straight tubes, they have not used PIV. This study serves as a prelude to investigations using PIV to assess the accuracy of Doppler ultrasound in phantoms with anatomically realistic geometries for which there are no analytical solutions to the flow. [Research funded by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council UK.

  16. Laser Doppler velocimetry for continuous flow solar-pumped iodine laser system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tabibi, Bagher M.; Lee, Ja H.

    1991-01-01

    A laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV) system was employed to measure the flow velocity profile of iodide vapor inside laser tubes of 36 mm ID and 20 mm ID. The LDV, which was operated in the forward scatter mode used a low power (15 mW) He-Ne laser beam. Velocity ranges from 1 m/s was measured to within one percent accuracy. The flow velocity profile across the laser tube was measured and the intensity of turbulence was determined. The flow of iodide inside the laser tube demonstrated a mixture of both turbulence and laminar flow. The flowmeter used for the laser system previously was calibrated with the LDV and found to be in good agreement.

  17. An experimental study of a three-dimensional thrust augmenting ejector using laser Doppler velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Storms, Bruce Lowell

    1989-01-01

    Flow field measurements were obtained in a three-dimensional thrust augmenting ejector using laser Doppler velocimetry and hot wire anemometry. The primary nozzle, segmented into twelve slots of aspect ratio 3.0, was tested at a pressure ratio of 1.15. Results are presented on the mean velocity, turbulence intensity, and Reynolds stress progressions in the mixing chamber of the constant area ejector. The segmented nozzle was found to produce streamwise vortices that may increase the mixing efficiency of the ejector flow field. Compared to free jet results, the jet development is reduced by the presence of the ejector walls. The resulting thrust augmentation ratio of this ejector was also calculated to be 1.34.

  18. Investigation of the Vortical Flow Above an F/A-18 Using Doppler Global Velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyers, James F.; Lee, Joseph W.; Cavone, Angelo A.; Suzuki, Karen E.

    1993-01-01

    The flow above an F/A-18 model, set to 25-degrees angle of attack, was measured using a Doppler global velocimeter, (DGV). The investigation indicated that the complex flow contained many similarities to the vortical flow above a simple delta wing set to a high-angle of attack, including flow standard deviations greater than 30-percent of free- stream. These standard deviation levels were also comparable to results found during a previous investigation of the vortical flow above a YF-17 using fringe-type laser velocimetry. The global measurement capability of the DGV provided the first evidence that the burst vortices above the model were structured. These structures were found to maintain their spatial coherence while the flow varied in an overall sense.

  19. Investigation of the vortical flow above an F/A-18 using Doppler global velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, James F.; Lee, Joseph W.; Cavone, Angelo A.; Suzuki, Karen E.

    1993-08-01

    The flow above an F/A-18 model, set to 25-degrees angle of attack, was measured using a Doppler global velocimeter, (DGV). The investigation indicated that the complex flow contained many similarities to the vortical flow above a simple delta wing set to a high-angle of attack, including flow standard deviations greater than 30-percent of free-stream. These standard deviation levels were also comparable to results found during a previous investigation of the vortical flow above a YF-17 using fringe-type laser velocimetry. The global measurement capability of the DGV provided the first evidence that the burst vortices above the model were structured. These structures were found to maintain their spatial coherence while the flow varied in an overall sense.

  20. Extension of frequency modulated Doppler global velocimetry for the investigation of unsteady spray flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, A.; Wilke, U.; Schlüßler, R.; Haufe, D.; Sandner, T.; Czarske, J.

    2014-12-01

    For the optimization of fuel injection, measurement techniques with a high temporal resolution below one millisecond are required to resolve the fuel spray velocity field in time. Since the measurement rate is usually too low to capture the temporal behavior of a single injection at once, a single measurement is performed during the injection and the injection is repeated with a variable time delay of the measurement. Consequently, non-stationary characteristics of the fuel spray cannot be resolved. For this purpose, a high measurement rate ≥1 kHz is necessary in addition to the high temporal resolution. While time-resolved particle imaging velocimetry (PIV) is capable of achieving such high measurement rates, Doppler global velocimetry (DGV) is either too slow or is restricted to velocity profile (1d) measurements. However, DGV is considered to be a useful alternative or complement to PIV due to its high optical robustness. For this reason, the frequency modulated DGV is enhanced to provide field (2d) measurements with rates of ≥1 kHz. This is achieved either by using a micro scanner or by applying a high-speed camera. Both setups provided time-resolved velocity field measurements in a spray test object without repetition of the spray cycle. During each single run, the same characteristic oscillations were identified and the decrease of the velocity at the ending of the spray injection was resolved. Hence, the technique is applicable for analyzing transient, non-stationary spray phenomena.

  1. Doppler velocimetry of ductus venous in preterm fetuses with brain sparing effect: neonatal outcome

    PubMed Central

    Cosmo, Ynesmara Coelho; Júnior, Edward Araujo; de Sá, Renato Augusto Moreira; de Carvalho, Paulo Roberto Nassar; Mattar, Rosiane; Lopes, Laudelino Marques; Nardozza, Luciano Marcondes Machado; de Souza, Eduardo; Moron, Antonio Fernandes

    2012-01-01

    Summary Objective to evaluate the relationship between ductus venous (DV) and Doppler velocimetry in neonatal outcome in severe compromised preterm fetuses. Methods the study was designed as an observational and cross-sectional study with 52 premature neonates with brain sparing effect. The criteria of neonatal severe morbidity were: severe intraventricular hemorrhage (grades 3 or 4), retinopathy of prematurity (grade 3 or 4), cystic periventricular leukomalatia, bronchopneumo dysplasia and neonatal mortality. The fetuses were divided in two groups: group 0 - all the fetuses with ventricular systole/atrial contraction (S/A) in DV ratio values less them 3.4; group 1 - fetuses with values of S/A ratio greater than 3.4. Results 42% of fetuses showed abnormal S/A ratio in DV and 48% showed birth weight below percentile 3 for gestational age. There was no statistical significance comparing the 02 groups according to bronchopneumo dysplasia, retinopathy of prematurity (grade 3 or 4) and intraventricular hemorrhage (grade 3 or 4). Only one fetus presented cystic periventricular leukomalatia. We found statistically significant association between abnormal DV S/A ratio and neonatal mortality (CI 95%, 1.28 –38.22, p< 0.002). Conclusions our results suggest that abnormal DV blood flow detected by Doppler examination isn’t associated with severe neonatal morbidity but with neonatal mortality. PMID:23181172

  2. Analysis of Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) Data for Acoustic Velocity Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackshire, James L.

    1997-01-01

    Acoustic velocity measurements were taken using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) in a Normal Incidence Tube configuration at various frequency, phase, and amplitude levels. This report presents the results of the PIV analysis and data reduction portions of the test and details the processing that was done. Estimates of lower measurement sensitivity levels were determined based on PIV image quality, correlation, and noise level parameters used in the test. Comparison of measurements with linear acoustic theory are presented. The onset of nonlinear, harmonic frequency acoustic levels were also studied for various decibel and frequency levels ranging from 90 to 132 dB and 500 to 3000 Hz, respectively.

  3. Analysis of Transitional and Turbulent Flow Through the FDA Benchmark Nozzle Model Using Laser Doppler Velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Joshua O; Good, Bryan C; Paterno, Anthony V; Hariharan, Prasanna; Deutsch, Steven; Malinauskas, Richard A; Manning, Keefe B

    2016-09-01

    Transitional and turbulent flow through a simplified medical device model is analyzed as part of the FDA's Critical Path Initiative, designed to improve the process of bringing medical products to market. Computational predictions are often used in the development of devices and reliable in vitro data is needed to validate computational results, particularly estimations of the Reynolds stresses that could play a role in damaging blood elements. The high spatial resolution of laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV) is used to collect two component velocity data within the FDA benchmark nozzle model. Two flow conditions are used to produce flow encompassing laminar, transitional, and turbulent regimes, and viscous stresses, principal Reynolds stresses, and turbulence intensities are calculated from the measured LDV velocities. Axial velocities and viscous stresses are compared to data from a prior inter-laboratory study conducted with particle image velocimetry. Large velocity gradients are observed near the wall in the nozzle throat and in the jet shear layer located in the expansion downstream of the throat, with axial velocity changing as much as 4.5 m/s over 200 μm. Additionally, maximum Reynolds shear stresses of 1000-2000 Pa are calculated in the high shear regions, which are an order of magnitude higher than the peak viscous shear stresses (<100 Pa). It is important to consider the effects of both viscous and turbulent stresses when simulating flow through medical devices. Reynolds stresses above commonly accepted hemolysis thresholds are measured in the nozzle model, indicating that hemolysis may occur under certain flow conditions. As such, the presented turbulence quantities from LDV, which are also available for download at https://fdacfd.nci.nih.gov/ , provide an ideal validation test for computational simulations that seek to characterize the flow field and to predict hemolysis within the FDA nozzle geometry. PMID:27350137

  4. Performance and accuracy investigations of two Doppler global velocimetry systems applied in parallel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willert, Christian; Stockhausen, Guido; Klinner, Joachim; Lempereur, Christine; Barricau, Philippe; Loiret, Philippe; Raynal, Jean Claude

    2007-08-01

    Two Doppler global velocimetry systems were applied in parallel to assess their performance in wind tunnel environments. Both DGV systems were mounted on a common traverse surrounding the glass-walled 1.4 × 1.8 m2 test section of the wind tunnel. The traverse normally supports a three-component forward-scatter laser Doppler velocimetry system. The reproducible tip-vortex flow field generated by the blunt tip of an airfoil was chosen for this investigation and was precisely surveyed by LDA just prior to the DGV measurements. Both DGV systems shared the same continuous wave laser light source, laser frequency monitoring and fibre optic light sheet delivery system. The principal differences between the DGV implementations are with regard to the imaging configuration. One configuration relied on a single camera view that observed three successively operated light sheets. In the second configuration, three camera views simultaneously observed a single light sheet using a four-branch fibre imaging bundle. The imaging bundle system had all three viewpoints in a forward scattering arrangement which increased the scattering efficiency but reduced the frequency shift sensitivity. Since all three light sheet observation components were acquired onto the same image frame, acquisition times could be reduced to a minimum. On the other hand, the triple light sheet-single camera system observed two light sheets in forward scatter and one light sheet in backscatter. Although three separate images had to be recorded in succession, the image quality, spatial resolution and signal-to-noise ratio were superior to the imaging bundle system. Comparison of the DGV data with LDV measurements shows very good agreement to within 1-2 m s-1. The remaining discrepancy has a variety of causes, some are related to the reduced resolving power of the fibre imaging bundle system (graininess, smoothing), exact localization of the receiver head with respect to the scene, laser frequency drift or

  5. New measurements of Venus winds with ground-based Doppler velocimetry at CFHT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machado, P.; Widemann, T.; Luz, D.; Peralta, J.; Berry, D. L.

    2012-04-01

    measurements made with the VMC camera onboard the Venus Express. We will present first results from this work, comparing with previous results by the CFHT/ESPaDOnS and VLT-UVES spectrographs (Machado et al., 2012), with Galileo fly-by measurements and with VEx nominal mission observations (Peralta et al., 2007, Luz et al., 2011). Acknowledgements: The authors acknowledge support from FCT through projects PTDC/CTE-AST/110702/2009 and PEst-OE/FIS/UI2751/2011. PM and TW also acknowledge support from the Observatoire de Paris. Lellouch, E., and Witasse, O., A coordinated campaign of Venus ground-based observations and Venus Express measurements, Planetary and Space Science 56 (2008) 1317-1319. Luz, D., et al., Venus's polar vortex reveals precessing circulation, Science 332 (2011) 577-580. Machado, P., Luz, D. Widemann, T., Lellouch, E., Witasse, O, Characterizing the atmospheric dynamics of Venus from ground-based Doppler velocimetry, Icarus, submitted. Peralta J., R. Hueso, A. Sánchez-Lavega, A reanalysis of Venus winds at two cloud levels from Galileo SSI images, Icarus 190 (2007) 469-477. Widemann, T., Lellouch, E., Donati, J.-F., 2008, Venus Doppler winds at Cloud Tops Observed with ESPaDOnS at CFHT, Planetary and Space Science, 56, 1320-1334.

  6. Laser Doppler velocimetry based on the optoacoustic effect in a RF-excited CO{sub 2} laser

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Teaghee; Choi, Jong Woon; Kim, Yong Pyung

    2012-09-15

    We present a compact optoacoustic laser Doppler velocimetry method that utilizes the self-mixing effect in a RF-excited CO{sub 2} laser. A portion of a Doppler-shifted laser beam, produced by irradiating a single wavelength laser beam on a moving object, is mixed with an originally existing laser beam inside a laser cavity. The fine change of pressure in the laser cavity modulated by the Doppler-shifted frequency is detected by a condenser microphone in the laser tube. In our studies, the frequency of the Doppler signal due to the optoacoustic effect was detected as high as 50 kHz. Our measurements also confirmed that the signal varied linearly with the velocity of the external scatterer (the moving object) and the cosine of the angle between the laser beam and the velocity vector of the object.

  7. Measurement Capabilities of Planar Doppler Velocimetry in Large-Scale Wind Tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKenzie, Robert L.; Warmbrodt, William (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Over the past few years, Planar Doppler Velocimetry (PDT) has been shown by several laboratories to offer an attractive means for measuring three-dimensional velocity vectors everywhere in a light sheet placed in a flow. Unlike some other optical means of measuring flow velocities, PDT is particularly attractive for use in large wind tunnels where distances to the sample region may be several meters, because it does not require the spatial resolution and tracking of individual scattering particles or the alignment of crossed beams at large distances. To date, demonstrations of PDT (also called Doppler Global Velocimetry by some authors) have been made either in low speed flows without quantitative comparison to other measurements, or in supersonic flows where the Doppler shift is large and its measurement is relatively insensitive to instrumental errors. Moreover, most reported applications have relied on the use of continuous-wave lasers, which limit the measurement to time-averaged velocity fields. This work summarizes the results of two previous studies of PDT in which the use of pulsed lasers to obtain instantaneous velocity vector fields is evaluated. The objective has been to quantitatively define and demonstrate PDT capabilities for applications in large-scale wind tunnels that are intended primarily for the testing of rotorcraft and subsonic aircraft at speeds typically less than 100 m/s. For such applications, the adequate resolution of low-speed flow fields requires accurate measurements of small Doppler shifts that are obtained at distances of several meters from the sample region and with a field of view that is sufficient to encompass the entire region of interest. The use of pulsed lasers provides the unique capability to obtain not only time-averaged fields, but also their statistical fluctuation amplitudes and the spatial excursions of unsteady flow regions such as wakes, separations, and rotor-tip vortices. To accomplish the objectives of these

  8. Development of Miniaturized Fiber-Optic Laser Doppler Velocimetry Sensor for Measurement of Local Blood Velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajikawa, Tsutomu; Takeshige, Mitsuhiko; Ishihara, Wataru; Kohri, Shimpei; Ohba, Kenkichi

    A new miniaturized fiber-optic laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV) sensor has been developed, which is capable of measuring the local velocity in various semi-opaque and opaque fluid flows, particularly whole blood velocity in vessels. The sensor has a convex lens-like fiber tip as a pickup and an improved optical transmission system with markedly decreased stray light. This paper describes methods for fabricating fiber tips like concave and convex lens and the characteristics of the optical sensor system equipped with the fabricated fiber tip. Conventional fiber-optic LDV sensors developed up to now have not been capable of measuring such opaque fluids because scattered light from scattering particles as erythrocytes has very low intensity, which makes signal-to-noise ratio of Doppler signal received by a sensor pickup significantly decreased. To overcome these problems, convex lens-like fiber tips have been fabricated by chemical etching, in which quartz fibers of multimode graded refractive index have been etched in aqueous solutions of hydrogen fluoride and ammonium fluoride under the appropriately controlled condition of the concentration of the solution, the etching duration time and the etchant temperature to obtain the desired curvature radius of the lens-like surface of the fiber tip. In this fiber-optic sensor, a laser beam emitted from the fiber tip can be focused at any position from about 0.1 to 0.5 mm distant from the fiber tip according to its curvature radius. The convex lens-like etched tip totally reduced the intensity of undesired reflecting light at the fiber end by 1/2 to 1/6 compared with normal cut fiber tip. Consequently, this fiber-optic LDV sensor system is capable of measuring the local flow velocity in semi-opaque and opaque fluids, whose turbidity was about five times higher than by any kinds of previous sensors.

  9. Application of photon Doppler velocimetry to direct impact Hopkinson pressure bars.

    PubMed

    Lea, Lewis J; Jardine, Andrew P

    2016-02-01

    Direct impact Hopkinson pressure bar systems offer many potential advantages over split Hopkinson pressure bars, including access to higher strain rates, higher strains for equivalent striker velocity and system length, lower dispersion, and faster achievement of force equilibrium. Currently, these advantages are gained at the expense of all information about the striker impacted specimen face, preventing the experimental determination of force equilibrium, and requiring approximations to be made on the sample deformation history. In this paper, we discuss an experimental method and complementary data analysis for using photon Doppler velocimetry to measure surface velocities of the striker and output bars in a direct impact bar experiment, allowing similar data to be recorded as in a split bar system. We discuss extracting velocity and force measurements, and the precision of measurements. Results obtained using the technique are compared to equivalent split bar tests, showing improved stress measurements for the lowest and highest strains in fully dense metals, and improvement for all strains in slow and non-equilibrating materials. PMID:26931828

  10. Application of photon Doppler velocimetry to direct impact Hopkinson pressure bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lea, Lewis J.; Jardine, Andrew P.

    2016-02-01

    Direct impact Hopkinson pressure bar systems offer many potential advantages over split Hopkinson pressure bars, including access to higher strain rates, higher strains for equivalent striker velocity and system length, lower dispersion, and faster achievement of force equilibrium. Currently, these advantages are gained at the expense of all information about the striker impacted specimen face, preventing the experimental determination of force equilibrium, and requiring approximations to be made on the sample deformation history. In this paper, we discuss an experimental method and complementary data analysis for using photon Doppler velocimetry to measure surface velocities of the striker and output bars in a direct impact bar experiment, allowing similar data to be recorded as in a split bar system. We discuss extracting velocity and force measurements, and the precision of measurements. Results obtained using the technique are compared to equivalent split bar tests, showing improved stress measurements for the lowest and highest strains in fully dense metals, and improvement for all strains in slow and non-equilibrating materials.

  11. Beam pointing angle optimization and experiments for vehicle laser Doppler velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Zhe; Hu, Shuling; Zhang, Chunxi; Nie, Yanju; Li, Jun

    2015-10-01

    Beam pointing angle (BPA) is one of the key parameters that affects the operation performance of the laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV) system. By considering velocity sensitivity and echo power, for the first time, the optimized BPA of vehicle LDV is analyzed. Assuming mounting error is within ±1.0 deg, the reflectivity and roughness are variable for different scenarios, the optimized BPA is obtained in the range from 29 to 43 deg. Therefore, velocity sensitivity is in the range of 1.25 to 1.76 MHz/(m/s), and the percentage of normalized echo power at optimized BPA with respect to that at 0 deg is greater than 53.49%. Laboratory experiments with a rotating table are done with different BPAs of 10, 35, and 66 deg, and the results coincide with the theoretical analysis. Further, vehicle experiment with optimized BPA of 35 deg is conducted by comparison with microwave radar (accuracy of ±0.5% full scale output). The root-mean-square error of LDV's results is smaller than the Microstar II's, 0.0202 and 0.1495 m/s, corresponding to LDV and Microstar II, respectively, and the mean velocity discrepancy is 0.032 m/s. It is also proven that with the optimized BPA both high velocity sensitivity and acceptable echo power can simultaneously be guaranteed.

  12. Photonic-Doppler-Velocimetry, Paraxial-Scalar Diffraction Theory and Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Ambrose, W. P.

    2015-07-20

    In this report I describe current progress on a paraxial, scalar-field theory suitable for simulating what is measured in Photonic Doppler Velocimetry (PDV) experiments in three dimensions. I have introduced a number of approximations in this work in order to bring the total computation time for one experiment down to around 20 hours. My goals were: to develop an approximate method of calculating the peak frequency in a spectral sideband at an instant of time based on an optical diffraction theory for a moving target, to compare the ‘measured’ velocity to the ‘input’ velocity to gain insights into how and to what precision PDV measures the component of the mass velocity along the optical axis, and to investigate the effects of small amounts of roughness on the measured velocity. This report illustrates the progress I have made in describing how to perform such calculations with a full three dimensional picture including tilted target, tilted mass velocity (not necessarily in the same direction), and small amounts of surface roughness. With the method established for a calculation at one instant of time, measured velocities can be simulated for a sequence of times, similar to the process of sampling velocities in experiments. Improvements in these methods are certainly possible at hugely increased computational cost. I am hopeful that readers appreciate the insights possible at the current level of approximation.

  13. Simultaneous broadband laser ranging and photonic Doppler velocimetry for dynamic compression experiments.

    PubMed

    La Lone, B M; Marshall, B R; Miller, E K; Stevens, G D; Turley, W D; Veeser, L R

    2015-02-01

    A diagnostic was developed to simultaneously measure both the distance and velocity of rapidly moving surfaces in dynamic compression experiments, specifically non-planar experiments where integrating the velocity in one direction does not always give the material position accurately. The diagnostic is constructed mainly from fiber-optic telecommunications components. The distance measurement is based on a technique described by Xia and Zhang [Opt. Express 18, 4118 (2010)], which determines the target distance every 20 ns and is independent of the target speed. We have extended the full range of the diagnostic to several centimeters to allow its use in dynamic experiments, and we multiplexed it with a photonic Doppler velocimetry (PDV) system so that distance and velocity histories can be measured simultaneously using one fiber-optic probe. The diagnostic was demonstrated on a spinning square cylinder to show how integrating a PDV record can give an incorrect surface position and how the ranging diagnostic described here obtains it directly. The diagnostic was also tested on an explosive experiment where copper fragments and surface ejecta were identified in both the distance and velocity signals. We show how the distance measurements complement the velocity data. Potential applications are discussed. PMID:25725828

  14. Investigation of Point Doppler Velocimetry (PDV) for Transition Detection in Boundary Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhlman, John M.

    1999-01-01

    A two component Point Doppler Velocimetry (PDV) system has been developed and tested. Improvements were made to an earlier PDV system, in terms of experimental techniques, as well as the data acquisition and reduction software. Measurements of the streamwise and spanwise mean and fluctuating velocities for flows from a rectangular channel and over an NACA 0012 airfoil were made, and the data were compared against hot wire data. The closest to the airfoil surface that PDV measurements could be made was on the order of 0.005 m(0.2", z/c = 0.0169). When the PDV and hot wire data were compared, the time traces for each appeared similar. The mean velocities agreed to within plus or minus 2 m/sec, while the RMS velocities agreed to plus or minus 0.4 m/sec. While the PDV time autocorrelations agreed with those of the hot wire data, the PDV power spectral densities were noisier above 750 Hz. A major source of error in these experiments was determined to be the drifting of the iodine cell stem temperatures. While the stem temperatures were controlled to within plus or minus 0.1 C, this could lead to a frequency shift of as much as 6 MHz, which translates into an error of 1.6 m/sec for the back scatter channel, and up to 6.9 m/sec for the forward scatter channel. These error estimates are consistent with the observed error magnitudes.

  15. Boundary Layer Measurements in a Supersonic Wind Tunnel Using Doppler Global Velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyers, James F.; Lee, Joseph W.; Cavone, Angelo A.

    2010-01-01

    A modified Doppler Global Velocimeter (DGV) was developed to measure the velocity within the boundary layer above a flat plate in a supersonic flow. Classic laser velocimetry (LV) approaches could not be used since the model surface was composed of a glass-ceramic insulator in support of heat-transfer measurements. Since surface flare limited the use of external LV techniques and windows placed in the model would change the heat transfer characteristics of the flat plate, a novel approach was developed. The input laser beam was divided into nine equal power beams and each transmitted through optical fibers to a small cavity within the model. The beams were then directed through 1.6-mm diameter orifices to form a series of orthogonal beams emitted from the model and aligned with the tunnel centerline to approximate a laser light sheet. Scattered light from 0.1-micron diameter water condensation ice crystals was collected by four 5-mm diameter lenses and transmitted by their respective optical fiber bundles to terminate at the image plane of a standard two-camera DGV receiver. Flow measurements were made over a range from 0.5-mm above the surface to the freestream at Mach 3.51 in steady state and heat pulse injected flows. This technique provides a unique option for measuring boundary layers in supersonic flows where seeding the flow is problematic or where the experimental apparatus does not provide the optical access required by other techniques.

  16. Simultaneous broadband laser ranging and photonic Doppler velocimetry for dynamic compression experiments

    SciTech Connect

    La Lone, B. M. Marshall, B. R.; Miller, E. K.; Stevens, G. D.; Turley, W. D.; Veeser, L. R.

    2015-02-15

    A diagnostic was developed to simultaneously measure both the distance and velocity of rapidly moving surfaces in dynamic compression experiments, specifically non-planar experiments where integrating the velocity in one direction does not always give the material position accurately. The diagnostic is constructed mainly from fiber-optic telecommunications components. The distance measurement is based on a technique described by Xia and Zhang [Opt. Express 18, 4118 (2010)], which determines the target distance every 20 ns and is independent of the target speed. We have extended the full range of the diagnostic to several centimeters to allow its use in dynamic experiments, and we multiplexed it with a photonic Doppler velocimetry (PDV) system so that distance and velocity histories can be measured simultaneously using one fiber-optic probe. The diagnostic was demonstrated on a spinning square cylinder to show how integrating a PDV record can give an incorrect surface position and how the ranging diagnostic described here obtains it directly. The diagnostic was also tested on an explosive experiment where copper fragments and surface ejecta were identified in both the distance and velocity signals. We show how the distance measurements complement the velocity data. Potential applications are discussed.

  17. Detonation wave profiles measured in plastic bonded explosives using 1550 nm photon doppler velocimetry (PDV)

    SciTech Connect

    Gustavsen, Richard L; Bartram, Brian D; Sanchez, Nathaniel J

    2009-01-01

    We present detonation wave profiles measured in two TATB based explosives and two HMX based explosives. Profiles were measured at the interface of the explosive and a Lithium-Fluoride (LiF) window using 1550 nm Photon Doppler Velocimetry (PDV). Planar detonations were produced by impacting the explosive with a projectile launched in a gas-gun. The impact state was varied to produce varied distance to detonation, and therefore varied support of the Taylor wave following the Chapman-Jouget (CJ) or sonic state. Profiles from experiments with different support should be the same between the Von-Neumann (VN) spike and CJ state and different thereafter. Comparison of profiles with differing support, therefore, allows us to estimate reaction zone lengths. For the TATB based explosive, a reaction zone length of {approx} 3.9 mm, 500 ns was measured in EDC-35, and a reaction zone length of {approx} 6.3 mm, 800 ns was measured in PBX 9502 pre-cooled to -55 C. The respective VN spike state was 2.25 {+-} 0.05 km/s in EDC-35 and 2.4 {+-} 0.1 km/s in the cooled PBX 9502. We do not believe we have resolved either the VN spike state (> 2.6 km/s) nor the reaction zone length (<< 50 ns) in the HMX based explosives.

  18. Doppler Global Velocimetry at NASA Glenn Research Center: System Discussion and Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lant, Christian T.

    2003-01-01

    A ruggedized Doppler Global Velocimetry system has been built and tested at NASA Glenn Research Center. One component of planar velocity measurements of subsonic and supersonic flows from an under-expanded free jet are reported, which agree well with predicted values. An error analysis evaluates geometric and spectral error terms, and characterizes speckle noise in isotropic data. A multimode, fused fiber optic bundle is demonstrated to couple up to 650 mJ/pulse of laser light without burning or fiber ablation, and without evidence of Stimulated Brillouin Scattering or other spectral-broadening problems. Comparisons are made between spinning wheel data using illumination by freespace beam propagation and fiber optic beam delivery. The fiber bundle illumination is found to provide more spatially even and stable illumination than is typically available from pulsed Nd:YAG laser beams. The fiber bundle beam delivery is also a step toward making remote measurements and automatic real-time plume sectioning feasible in wind tunnel environments.

  19. Measurement of velocities in gas-liquid two-phase flow using Laser Doppler Velocimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Vassallo, P.F.; Trabold, T.A.; Moore, W.E.; Kirouac, G.J.

    1992-09-01

    Measurements of bubble and liquid velocities in two-phase flow have been made using a new forward/backward scattering Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) technique. This work was performed in a 6.4 by 11.1 mm vertical duct using known air/water mixtures. A standard LDV fiber optic probe was used to measure the bubble velocity, using direct backscattered light. A novel retro-reflector and lens assembly permitted the same probe to measure the liquid velocity with direct forward-scattered light. The bubble velocity was confirmed by independent measurements with a high-speed video system. The liquid velocity was confirmed by demonstrating the dominance of the liquid seed data rate in the forward-scatter measurement. Experimental data are presented to demonstrate the accuracy of the technique for a wide range of flow conditions, from bubbles as small as 0.75-mm-diam to slugs as large as 10-mm wide by 30-mm long. In the slug regime, the LDV technique performed velocity measurements for both phases, for void fractions up to 50%, which was the upper limit of our experimental investigation.

  20. Instantaneous Doppler Global Velocimetry Measurements of a Rotor Wake: Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyers, James; Fleming, Gary A.; Gorton, Susan Althoff; Berry, John D.

    1998-01-01

    A combined Doppler Global Velocimetry (DGV) and Projection Moir Interferometry (PMI) investigation of a helicopter rotor wake flow field and rotor blade deformation is presented. The three-component DGV system uses a single-frequency, frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser to obtain instantaneous velocity measurements in the flow. The PMI system uses a pulsed laser-diode bar to obtain blade bending and twist measurements at the same instant that DGV measured the flow. The application of pulse lasers to DGV and PMI in large-scale wind tunnel applications represents a major step forward in the development of these technologies. As such, a great deal was learned about the difficulties of using these instruments to obtain instantaneous measurements in large facilities. Laser speckle and other image noise in the DGV data images were found to be traceable to the Nd:YAG laser. Although image processing techniques were used to virtually eliminate laser speckle noise, the source of low-frequency image noise is still under investigation. The PMI results agreed well with theoretical predictions of blade bending and twist.

  1. A synchronized particle image velocimetry and infrared thermography technique applied to an acoustic streaming flow

    PubMed Central

    Sou, In Mei; Layman, Christopher N.; Ray, Chittaranjan

    2013-01-01

    Subsurface coherent structures and surface temperatures are investigated using simultaneous measurements of particle image velocimetry (PIV) and infrared (IR) thermography. Results for coherent structures from acoustic streaming and associated heating transfer in a rectangular tank with an acoustic horn mounted horizontally at the sidewall are presented. An observed vortex pair develops and propagates in the direction along the centerline of the horn. From the PIV velocity field data, distinct kinematic regions are found with the Lagrangian coherent structure (LCS) method. The implications of this analysis with respect to heat transfer and related sonochemical applications are discussed. PMID:24347810

  2. A synchronized particle image velocimetry and infrared thermography technique applied to an acoustic streaming flow.

    PubMed

    Sou, In Mei; Allen, John S; Layman, Christopher N; Ray, Chittaranjan

    2011-11-01

    Subsurface coherent structures and surface temperatures are investigated using simultaneous measurements of particle image velocimetry (PIV) and infrared (IR) thermography. Results for coherent structures from acoustic streaming and associated heating transfer in a rectangular tank with an acoustic horn mounted horizontally at the sidewall are presented. An observed vortex pair develops and propagates in the direction along the centerline of the horn. From the PIV velocity field data, distinct kinematic regions are found with the Lagrangian coherent structure (LCS) method. The implications of this analysis with respect to heat transfer and related sonochemical applications are discussed. PMID:24347810

  3. Characterization of acoustic streaming and heating using synchronized infrared thermography and particle image velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Layman, Christopher N; Sou, In Mei; Bartak, Rico; Ray, Chittaranjan; Allen, John S

    2011-09-01

    Real-time measurements of acoustic streaming velocities and surface temperature fields using synchronized particle image velocimetry and infrared thermography are reported. Measurements were conducted using a 20 kHz Langevin type acoustic horn mounted vertically in a model sonochemical reactor of either degassed water or a glycerin-water mixture. These dissipative phenomena are found to be sensitive to small variations in the medium viscosity, and a correlation between the heat flux and vorticity was determined for unsteady convective heat transfer. PMID:21514205

  4. Laser-induced thermal-acoustic velocimetry with heterodyne detection

    SciTech Connect

    Schlamp, Stefan; Cummings, Eric B.; Sobota, Thomas H.

    2000-02-15

    Laser-induced thermal acoustics (LITA) was used with heterodyne detection to measure simultaneously and in a single laser pulse the sound speed and flow velocity of NO{sub 2} -seeded air in a low-speed wind tunnel up to Mach number M=0.1 . The uncertainties of the velocity and the sound speed measurements were {approx}0.2 m/s and 0.5%, respectively. Measurements were obtained through a nonlinear least-squares fit to a general, analytic closed-form solution for heterodyne-detected LITA signals from thermal gratings. Agreement between theory and experiment is exceptionally good. (c) 2000 Optical Society of America.

  5. Wind measurements in Saturn's atmosphere with UVES/VLT ground-based Doppler velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machado, Pedro; Silva, Miguel; Peralta, Javier; Luz, David; Sánchez-Lavega, Agustin; Hueso, Ricardo

    2016-04-01

    We will present preliminary Doppler wind velocity results of Saturn's zonal flow at cloud level. Our aim is help to constrain the characterization of the equatorial jet at cloud level and the latitudinal variation of the zonal winds, to measure its spatial and temporal variability, to contribute to monitor the variability in order to achieve a better understanding of the dynamics of Saturn's zonal winds, whose equatorial jet has a complex vertical structure and temporal variability (Sanchez-Lavega et al., Nature, 423, 623, 3003; Garcia-Melendo et al., Geophys. Res. Lett., 37, L22204. 2010). Finally, the complementarity with Cassini, providing an independent set of observations. The UVES/VLT instrument has been used, which simultaneously achieves high spectral resolving power and high spatial resolution. The field has been derotated in order to have the aperture aligned perpendicularly to Saturn's rotation axis. In this configuration, spatial information in the East-West direction is preserved in a set of spectra in the direction perpendicular to dispersion. The technique of absolute accelerometry (AA, Connes, 1985, ApSS 110, 211) has been applied to the backscattered solar spectrum in order to determine the Doppler shift associated with the zonal circulation. Our measurements have been made in the wavelength range of 480-680 nm. Previously we successfully adapted this Doppler velocimetry technique for measuring winds at Venus cloud tops (Machado et al. 2012). In the present study we will show the adaptation of this method for Saturn's case. Since the AA technique only allows to compare spectra where the line shifts are within the line width, in fast rotating atmospheres (as is the case of Saturn) the spectra must be compared by pairs from adjacent areas of the disk (adjacent pixels in the slit). We will use coordinated observations from the Cassini's Visible and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS), in order to compare with the Doppler winds obtained from the UVES

  6. Doppler Velocimetry of Current Driven Spin Helices in a Two-Dimensional Electron Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Luyi

    Spins in semiconductors provide a pathway towards the development of spin-based electronics. The appeal of spin logic devices lies in the fact that the spin current is even under time reversal symmetry, yielding non-dissipative coupling to the electric field. To exploit the energy-saving potential of spin current it is essential to be able to control it. While recent demonstrations of electrical-gate control in spin-transistor configurations show great promise, operation at room temperature remains elusive. Further progress requires a deeper understanding of the propagation of spin polarization, particularly in the high mobility semiconductors used for devices. This thesis presents the demonstration and application of a powerful new optical technique, Doppler spin velocimetry, for probing the motion of spin polarization at the level of 1 nm on a picosecond time scale. We discuss experiments in which this technique is used to measure the motion of spin helices in high mobility n-GaAs quantum wells as a function of temperature, in-plane electric field, and photoinduced spin polarization amplitude. We find that the spin helix velocity changes sign as a function of wave vector and is zero at the wave vector that yields the largest spin lifetime. This observation is quite striking, but can be explained by the random walk model that we have developed. We discover that coherent spin precession within a propagating spin density wave is lost at temperatures near 150 K. This finding is critical to understanding why room temperature operation of devices based on electrical gate control of spin current has so far remained elusive. We report that, at all temperatures, electron spin polarization co-propagates with the high-mobility electron sea, even when this requires an unusual form of separation of spin density from photoinjected electron density. Furthermore, although the spin packet co-propagates with the two-dimensional electron gas, spin diffusion is strongly suppressed

  7. Jack Rabbit Pretest 2021E PT3 Photonic Doppler Velocimetry Data Volume 3 Section 1

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, M M; Strand, O T; Bosson, S T; Bonner, R A; Hester, D M

    2008-06-25

    The Jack Rabbit Pretest (PT) 2021E PT3 was fired on March 12, 2008 at the Contained Firing Facility, Site 300, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This experiment is part of an effort to determine the properties of LX-17 in a regime where corner-turning behavior and dead-zone formation are not well understood. Photonic Doppler Velocimetry (PDV) measured diagnostic plate velocities confirming the presence of a persistent LX-17 dead-zone formation and the resultant impulse gradient applied under the diagnostic plate. The Jack Rabbit Pretest 2021E PT3, 120 millimeter diameter experiment returned data on all eight PDV probes. The probes measured on the central axis and at 10, 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, 50 millimeters from the central axis. The experiment was shot at an ambient room temperature of 65 degrees Fahrenheit. The earliest PDV signal extinction was 41.7 microseconds at 30 millimeters. The latest PDV signal extinction time was 65.0 microseconds at 10 millimeters. The measured velocity ranged from meters per second to thousands of meters per second. First detonation wave induced jump-off was measured at 40 millimeters at 10.9 microseconds. The PDV data provided an unambiguous indication of dead-zone formation and an impulse gradient applied to the diagnostic plate. The central axis had a last measured velocity of 1636 meters per second. At 40 millimeters the last measured velocity was 2056 meters per second. The low-to-high velocity ratio was 0.80. Velocity data was integrated to compute diagnostic plate cross section profiles. Velocity data was differentiated to compute a peak pressure under the diagnostic plate at the central axis of 64.6 kilobars at 15.7 microseconds. Substantial motion (>1 m/s) of the diagnostic plate over the dead-zone is followed by detonation region motion within approximately 2.2 microseconds.

  8. Jack Rabbit Pretest 2021E PT6 Photonic Doppler Velocimetry Data Volume 6 Section 1

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, M M; Strand, O T; Bosson, S T; Bonner, R A; Hester, D M

    2008-06-25

    The Jack Rabbit Pretest (PT) 2021E PT6 experiment was fired on April 1, 2008 at the Contained Firing Facility, Site 300, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This experiment is part of an effort to determine the properties of LX-17 in a regime where corner-turning behavior and dead-zone formation are not well understood. Photonic Doppler Velocimetry (PDV) measured diagnostic plate velocities confirming the presence of a persistent LX-17 dead-zone formation and the resultant impulse gradient applied under the diagnostic plate. The Jack Rabbit Pretest 2021E PT6, 160 millimeter diameter experiment returned data on all eight PDV probes. The probes measured on the central axis and at 20, 30, 35, 45, 55, 65, 75 millimeters from the central axis. The experiment was shot at an ambient room temperature of 65 degrees Fahrenheit. The earliest PDV signal extinction was 54.2 microseconds at 30 millimeters. The latest PDV signal extinction time was 64.5 microseconds at the central axis. The measured velocity ranged from meters per second to thousands of meters per second. First detonation wave induced jump-off was measured at 55 millimeters at 14.1 microseconds. The PDV data provided an unambiguous indication of dead-zone formation and an impulse gradient applied to the diagnostic plate. The central axis had a last measured velocity of 1860 meters per second. At 55 millimeters the last measured velocity was 2408 meters per second. The low-to-high velocity ratio was 0.77. Velocity data was integrated to compute diagnostic plate cross section profiles. Velocity data was differentiated to compute a peak pressure under the diagnostic plate at the central axis of 227 kilobars at 20.1 microseconds, indicating a late time chemical reaction in the LX-17 dead-zone. Substantial motion (>1 m/s) of the diagnostic plate over the dead-zone is followed by detonation region motion within approximately 1.7 microseconds.

  9. Jack Rabbit Pretest 2021E PT7 Photonic Doppler Velocimetry Data Volume 7 Section 1

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, M M; Strand, O T; Bosson, S T; Bonner, R A; Hester, D M

    2008-06-25

    The Jack Rabbit Pretest (PT) 2021E PT7 experiment was fired on April 3, 2008 at the Contained Firing Facility, Site 300, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This experiment is part of an effort to determine the properties of LX-17 in a regime where corner-turning behavior and dead-zone formation are not well understood. Photonic Doppler Velocimetry (PDV) measured diagnostic plate velocities confirming the presence of a persistent LX-17 dead-zone formation and the resultant impulse gradient applied under the diagnostic plate. The Jack Rabbit Pretest 2021E PT7, 160 millimeter diameter experiment returned data on all eight PDV probes. The probes measured on the central axis and at 20, 30, 35, 45, 55, 65, 75 millimeters from the central axis. The experiment was shot at an ambient room temperature of 65 degrees Fahrenheit. The PDV earliest signal extinction was 50.7 microseconds at 45 millimeters. The latest PDV signal extinction time was 65.0 microseconds at 20 millimeters. The measured velocity ranged from meters per second to thousands of meters per second. First detonation wave induced jump-off was measured at 55 millimeters and at 15.2 microseconds. The PDV data provided an unambiguous indication of dead-zone formation and an impulse gradient applied to the diagnostic plate. The central axis had a last measured velocity of 1447 meters per second. At 65 millimeters the last measured velocity was 2360 meters per second. The low-to-high velocity ratio was 0.61. Velocity data was integrated to compute diagnostic plate cross section profiles. Velocity data was differentiated to compute a peak pressure under the diagnostic plate at the central axis of 49 kilobars at 23.3 microseconds. Substantial motion (>1 m/s) of the diagnostic plate over the dead-zone is followed by detonation region motion within approximately 4.6 microseconds.

  10. Jack Rabbit Pretest 2021E PT5 Photonic Doppler Velocimetry Data Volume 5 Section 1

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, M M; Strand, O T; Bosson, S T; Bonner, R A; Hester, D M

    2008-06-25

    The Jack Rabbit Pretest (PT) 2021E PT5 was fired on March 17, 2008 at the Contained Firing Facility, Site 300, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This experiment is part of an effort to determine the properties of LX-17 in a regime where corner-turning behavior and dead-zone formation are not well understood. Photonic Doppler Velocimetry (PDV) measured diagnostic plate velocities confirming the presence of a persistent LX-17 dead-zone formation and the resultant impulse gradient applied under the diagnostic plate. The Jack Rabbit Pretest 2021E PT5, 160 millimeter diameter experiment returned data on all eight PDV probes. The probes measured on the central axis and at 20, 30, 35, 45, 55, 65, 75 millimeters from the central axis. The experiment was shot at an ambient room temperature of 65 degrees Fahrenheit. The earliest PDV signal extinction was 40.0 microseconds at 45 millimeters. The latest PDV signal extinction time was 64.9 microseconds at 20 millimeters. The measured velocity ranged from meters per second to thousands of meters per second. First detonation wave induced jump-off was measured at 55 millimeters at 12.8 microseconds. The PDV data provided an unambiguous indication of dead-zone formation and an impulse gradient applied to the diagnostic plate. The central axis had a last measured velocity of 1877 meters per second. At 65 millimeters the last measured velocity was 2277 meters per second. The low-to-high velocity ratio was 0.82. Velocity data was integrated to compute diagnostic plate cross section profiles. Velocity data was differentiated to compute a peak pressure under the diagnostic plate at the central axis of 78 kilobars at 11.9 and 21.2 microseconds. Substantial motion (>1 m/s) of the diagnostic plate over the dead-zone is followed by detonation region motion within approximately 4.1 microseconds.

  11. Jack Rabbit Pretest 2021E PT4 Photonic Doppler Velocimetry Data Volume 4 Section 1

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, M M; Strand, O T; Bosson, S T; Bonner, R A; Hester, D M

    2008-06-25

    The Jack Rabbit Pretest (PT) 2021E PT4 was fired on March 19, 2008 at the Contained Firing Facility, Site 300, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This experiment is part of an effort to determine the properties of LX-17 in a regime where corner-turning behavior and dead-zone formation are not well understood. Photonic Doppler Velocimetry (PDV) measured diagnostic plate velocities confirming the presence of a persistent LX-17 dead-zone formation and the resultant impulse gradient applied under the diagnostic plate. The Jack Rabbit Pretest 2021E PT4, 120 millimeter diameter experiment returned data on all eight PDV probes. The probes measured on the central axis and at 10, 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, 50 millimeters from the central axis. The experiment was shot at an ambient room temperature of 64 degrees Fahrenheit. The earliest PDV signal extinction was 44.9 microseconds at 30 millimeters. The latest PDV signal extinction time was 69.5 microseconds at 10 millimeters. The measured velocity ranged from meters per second to thousands of meters per second. First detonation wave induced jump-off was measured at 50 millimeters at 13.3 microseconds. The PDV data provided an unambiguous indication of dead-zone formation and an impulse gradient applied to the diagnostic plate. The central axis had a last measured velocity of 1558 meters per second. At 40 millimeters the last measured velocity was 2019 meters per second. The low-to-high velocity ratio was 0.77. Velocity data was integrated to compute diagnostic plate cross section profiles. Velocity data was differentiated to compute a peak pressure under the diagnostic plate at the central axis of 98.6 kilobars at 15.0 microseconds. Substantial motion (>1 m/s) of the diagnostic plate over the dead-zone is followed by detonation region motion within approximately 0.7 microseconds.

  12. Role of the fetoplacental endothelium in fetal growth restriction with abnormal umbilical artery Doppler velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Su, Emily J

    2015-10-01

    Growth-restricted fetuses with absent or reversed end-diastolic velocities in the umbilical artery are at substantially increased risk for adverse perinatal and long-term outcome, even in comparison to growth-restricted fetuses with preserved end-diastolic velocities. Translational studies show that this Doppler velocimetry correlates with fetoplacental blood flow, with absent or reversed end-diastolic velocities signifying abnormally elevated resistance within the placental vasculature. The fetoplacental vasculature is unique in that it is not subject to autonomic regulation, unlike other vascular beds. Instead, humoral mediators, many of which are synthesized by local endothelial cells, regulate placental vascular resistance. Existing data demonstrate that in growth-restricted pregnancies complicated by absent or reversed umbilical artery end-diastolic velocities, an imbalance in production of these vasoactive substances occurs, favoring vasoconstriction. Morphologically, placentas from these pregnancies also demonstrate impaired angiogenesis, whereby vessels within the terminal villi are sparsely branched, abnormally thin, and elongated. This structural deviation from normal placental angiogenesis restricts blood flow and further contributes to elevated fetoplacental vascular resistance. Although considerable work has been done in the field of fetoplacental vascular development and function, much remains unknown about the mechanisms underlying impaired development and function of the human fetoplacental vasculature, especially in the context of severe fetal growth restriction with absent or reversed umbilical artery end-diastolic velocities. Fetoplacental endothelial cells are key regulators of angiogenesis and vasomotor tone. A thorough understanding of their role in placental vascular biology carries the significant potential of discovering clinically relevant and innovative approaches to prevention and treatment of fetal growth restriction with compromised

  13. Estimation of acoustical streaming: theoretical model, Doppler measurements and optical visualisation.

    PubMed

    Nowicki, A; Kowalewski, T; Secomski, W; Wójcik, J

    1998-02-01

    An approximate solution for the streaming velocity generated by flat and weakly focused transducers was derived by directly solving the Dirichlet boundary conditions for the Poisson equation, the solution of the Navier-Stokes equation for the axial components of the streaming velocity. The theoretical model was verified experimentally using a 32 MHz pulsed Doppler unit. The experimental acoustical fields were produced by three different 4 mm diameter flat and focused transducers driven by the transmitter generating the average acoustic power within the range from 1 microW to 6 mW. The streaming velocity was measured along the ultrasonic beam from 0 to 2 cm. Streaming was induced in a solution of water and corn starch. The experimental results showed that for a given acoustic power the streaming velocity was independent of the starch density in water, changed from 0.3 to 40 grams of starch in 1 l of distilled water. For applied acoustic powers, the streaming velocity changed linearly from 0.2 to 40 mm/s. Both, the theoretical solutions for plane and focused waves and the experimental results were in good agreement. The streaming velocity field was also visualised using the particle image velocimetry (PIV) and two different evaluation methods. The first based on the FFT-based cross-correlation analysis between small sections for each pair of images and the second employing the algorithm of searching for local displacements between several images. PMID:9614292

  14. Calculating "g" from Acoustic Doppler Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torres, Sebastian; Gonzalez-Espada, Wilson J.

    2006-01-01

    Traditionally, the Doppler effect for sound is introduced in high school and college physics courses. Students calculate the perceived frequency for several scenarios relating a stationary or moving observer and a stationary or moving sound source. These calculations assume a constant velocity of the observer and/or source. Although seldom…

  15. Doppler Velocimetry of Current Driven Spin Helices in a Two-Dimensional Electron Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Luyi

    2013-05-17

    Spins in semiconductors provide a pathway towards the development of spin-based electronics. The appeal of spin logic devices lies in the fact that the spin current is even under time reversal symmetry, yielding non-dissipative coupling to the electric field. To exploit the energy-saving potential of spin current it is essential to be able to control it. While recent demonstrations of electrical-gate control in spin-transistor configurations show great promise, operation at room temperature remains elusive. Further progress requires a deeper understanding of the propagation of spin polarization, particularly in the high mobility semiconductors used for devices. This dissertation presents the demonstration and application of a powerful new optical technique, Doppler spin velocimetry, for probing the motion of spin polarization at the level of 1 nm on a picosecond time scale. We discuss experiments in which this technique is used to measure the motion of spin helices in high mobility n-GaAs quantum wells as a function of temperature, in-plane electric field, and photoinduced spin polarization amplitude. We find that the spin helix velocity changes sign as a function of wave vector and is zero at the wave vector that yields the largest spin lifetime. This observation is quite striking, but can be explained by the random walk model that we have developed. We discover that coherent spin precession within a propagating spin density wave is lost at temperatures near 150 K. This finding is critical to understanding why room temperature operation of devices based on electrical gate control of spin current has so far remained elusive. We report that, at all temperatures, electron spin polarization co-propagates with the high-mobility electron sea, even when this requires an unusual form of separation of spin density from photoinjected electron density. Furthermore, although the spin packet co-propagates with the two-dimensional electron gas, spin diffusion is strongly

  16. SDOCT Doppler velocimetry for investigating the morphological influences on blood flow in the developing chick embryo heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Anjul M.; Rothenberg, Florence G.; Law, Tzuo H.; Taber, Larry A.; Izatt, Joseph A.

    2007-02-01

    The onset of congenital heart disease (CHD) is believed to occur at very early stages of development. Investigations in the initiation and development of CHD has been hampered by the inability to image early stage heart structure and function, in vivo. Imaging small animals using optical coherence tomography (OCT) has filled a niche between the limited penetration depth of confocal microscopy and insufficient resolution from ultrasound. Previous demonstrations of chick heart imaging using OCT have entailed excision of, or arresting the heart to prevent motion artifacts. In this summary, we introduce SDOCT Doppler velocimetry as an enhancement of Doppler OCT for in vivo measurement of localized temporal blood flow dynamics. With this technique, dynamic velocity waveforms were measured in the outflow tract of the heart tube. These flow dynamics correlate to a finite element model of pulsatile flow and may lead to a further understanding of morphological influences on early heart development.

  17. Measurement of acoustic velocity in the stack of a thermoacoustic refrigerator using particle image velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berson, Arganthaël; Michard, Marc; Blanc-Benon, Philippe

    2008-06-01

    Thermoacoustic refrigeration systems generate cooling power from a high-amplitude acoustic standing wave. There has recently been a growing interest in this technology because of its simple and robust architecture and its use of environmentally safe gases. With the prospect of commercialization, it is necessary to enhance the efficiency of thermoacoustic cooling systems and more particularly of some of their components such as the heat exchangers. The characterization of the flow field at the end of the stack plates is a crucial step for the understanding and optimization of heat transfer between the stack and the heat exchangers. In this study, a specific particle image velocimetry measurement is performed inside a thermoacoustic refrigerator. Acoustic velocity is measured using synchronization and phase-averaging. The measurement method is validated inside a void resonator by successfully comparing experimental data with an acoustic plane wave model. Velocity is measured inside the oscillating boundary layers, between the plates of the stack, and compared to a linear model. The flow behind the stack is characterized, and it shows the generation of symmetric pairs of counter-rotating vortices at the end of the stack plates at low acoustic pressure level. As the acoustic pressure level increases, detachment of the vortices and symmetry breaking are observed.

  18. Technical limits in transcranial Doppler recording: inadequate acoustic windows.

    PubMed

    Marinoni, M; Ginanneschi, A; Forleo, P; Amaducci, L

    1997-01-01

    Transcranial Doppler (TCD) is a technique that evaluates blood flow velocity in intracranial vessels. It uses a 2-MHz probe and a Doppler signal analyzer. Absence of an acoustic window is a considerable problem for clinical utilization of TCD because cerebrovascular patients are frequently elderly. Previous reports suggest a higher prevalence of inadequate temporal acoustic window (TAW) in aged subjects and in females. A consecutive series of 624 subjects (376 males and 248 females, age range 2-86 y) were evaluated by standard TCD examination, to assess the contemporary absence of any signal corresponding to insonated basal arteries, defined as inadequate acoustic window. The rate of inadequate TAW was 8.2%, that of inadequate occipital acoustic window (OAW) was 9.0%. Prevalence of inadequate TAW was higher in females than in males, and OAW was higher in males than in females. Influence of aging on the presence of inadequate acoustic window is confirmed for temporal, but not for the occipital window. Different anatomical characteristics of the 2 regions could explain the different prevalence of TAW and OAW. PMID:9372576

  19. HF Doppler observations of acoustic waves excited by the earthquake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ichinose, T.; Takagi, K.; Tanaka, T.; Okuzawa, T.; Shibata, T.; Sato, Y.; Nagasawa, C.; Ogawa, T.

    1985-01-01

    Ionospheric disturbances caused by the earthquake of a relatively small and large epicentral distance have been detected by a network of HF-Doppler sounders in central Japan and Kyoto station, respectively. The HF-Doppler data of a small epicentral distance, together with the seismic data, have been used to formulate a mechanism whereby ionospheric disturbances are produced by the Urakawa-Oki earthquake in Japan. Comparison of the dynamic spectra of these data has revealed experimentally that the atmosphere acts as a low-pass filter for upward-propagating acoustic waves. By surveying the earthquakes for which the magnitude M is larger than 6.0, researchers found the ionospheric effect in 16 cases of 82 seismic events. As almost all these effects have occurred in the daytime, it is considered that it may result from the filtering effect of the upward-propagating acoustic waves.

  20. Zonal Flow Velocimetry using Acoustic Modes in Experimental Models of a Planetary Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, M. M.; Mautino, A. R.; Stone, D.; Triana, S. A.; Lekic, V.; Lathrop, D. P.

    2015-12-01

    Rotating hydromagnetic experiments can serve as models of planetary cores, matching some of the dimensionless parameters relevant to planets. One challenge with such experiments is determining the flows present. The opacity of the fluids used in these experiments (e.g. liquid sodium) prevents direct flow visualization techniques from being employed. One method allowing determination of zonal flows in such experiments is acoustic mode velocimetry. In this technique, the rotational splittings of acoustic mode spectra are used to infer the azimuthal velocity profile of the flow. Here we present the use of this technique to study flows in experimental models of the Earth's core. Most of these results were obtained in a 60 cm diameter spherical Couette device, with a 20 cm diameter inner sphere, and using nitrogen gas as the working fluid. Turbulent flow is driven in the system via differential rotation of the outer shell and inner sphere. Acoustic modes are excited in the fluid volume using a speaker, and microphones are used to measure the frequencies and rotational splittings of the modes. We compare the observed splittings with those predicted by theory as a way of validating the method, and infer mean flows from these observations. We also present some preliminary results of acoustic studies in the 3 m diameter liquid sodium spherical Couette experiment. Finally, we discuss future prospects for this experimental technique.

  1. Quantification of left to right shunt in atrial septal defect using systolic time intervals derived from pulsed Doppler velocimetry.

    PubMed Central

    Veyrat, C; Gourtchiglouian, C; Bas, S; Abitbol, G; Kalmanson, D

    1984-01-01

    Systolic time intervals derived from Doppler velocimetry measurements were used instead of direct pulmonary to systemic flow ratio measurements in adults with atrial septal defect to quantify left to right atrial shunts. Thirteen normal subjects and 25 patients with uncomplicated atrial septal defect confirmed by cardiac catheterisation were studied. The pulmonary to systemic flow ratio (Qp:Qs) expressing the shunt size was determined by the Fick method; in normal subjects the Qp:Qs ratio was assumed to be equal to 1.0. The pulsed Doppler analogue velocity recording of flow in the pulmonary artery and the ascending aorta was taken as indicating the ejection time of each ventricle and the Q wave of the electrocardiogram as indicating the onset of systole. From these measurements the ratios of the pre-ejection periods to the ejection times (haemodynamic ratio) were calculated for each ventricle and the ratios of each variable (pre-ejection period, ejection time, and haemodynamic ratio) were calculated for both ventricles. Significant differences were found between the normal subjects and the patients with atrial septal defect for all these ratios. When the Doppler findings and the Fick measurements of Qp:Qs were compared the best linear correlation coefficient was for the left to right haemodynamic ratio. It is concluded that the use of a ratio involving several variables, such as the pre-ejection period and the ejection time for both ventricles, improves the reliability of this method, which appears to be applicable in adults. Images PMID:6239641

  2. Laser Doppler velocimetry investigation and numerical prediction of the flowfield in an annular reverse-flow combustor sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, J. T. C.; Cusworth, R. A.; Sislian, J. P.

    A two-component argon-ion laser Doppler velocimetry system operating in the dual-beam, forward scatter mode, was used to measure the mean velocity components and the corresponding normal/shear stresses of a toroidal vortex reverse-flow annular combustor sector. Measurements were obtained for cold flow with or without fuel injection, and for hot flow conditions. The effects of heat addition by combustion on the flow field and the viability of the developed two-dimensional computer code for steady, turbulent compressible flows are discussed, using a two-equation turbulence model for predicting complex combustor flow field. The measured data are useful for further evaluation of combustor modeling computer codes and mathematical modeling of processes inside a practical combustor.

  3. Miteq DR-125G-A, 12-GHZ Fiber-Optic Detector Evaluations for Photonic Doppler Velocimetry Diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Araceli Rutkowski; Michael Rutkowski

    2007-04-01

    The 12.5-GHz bandwidth MITEQ DR-125G-A detector is used often in the photonic Doppler velocimetry (PDV) diagnostic of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This paper presents detector characteristics as applied to optical heterodyning. We propose a test setup to simulate the beat frequency generated when incident and reflected light from a moving surface are mixed by optically combining a small-linewidth, tunable laser with a fixed, 1550-nm, thin-linewidth, high-power laser. The detector's transfer function, harmonic content, and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) were to be measured and plotted for different optical power levels. Based on these results, appropriate light levels can be set to produce the highest dynamic range and signal level for the beat frequency. The goal is to provide insight into setting up the diagnostic for optimal detector performance using a specific optical input power.

  4. Simultaneous Photonic Doppler Velocimetry and Ultra-high Speed Imaging Techniques to Characterize Pressure Output of Detonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Michael; Clarke, Steven

    2011-06-01

    Detonator output directed into both ambient air and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) samples is simultaneously investigated using ultra-high speed, time-resolved schlieren/shadowgraph imaging and photonic Doppler velocimetry (PDV) measurements. In air, one-dimensional measurements of explosive cup position are made from the time-resolved image sequences and are compared to time-integrated velocity curves obtained from the PDV data. The results demonstrate good agreement that validates using the two methods concurrently. In PMMA, both average and instantaneous shock velocities are calculated from 1-D measurements of shock position. Velocity-Hugoniot data for PMMA is utilized to map the shock velocity calculations to corresponding values of mass velocity and shock pressure. Simultaneous PDV data describing the motion of the explosive cup/PMMA interface is used to determine the mass velocity and pressure at the interface, and to compare to the mass and shock pressures calculated from the imaging data.

  5. Photothermal excitation and laser Doppler velocimetry of higher cantilever vibration modes for dynamic atomic force microscopy in liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Nishida, Shuhei; Kobayashi, Dai; Sakurada, Takeo; Nakazawa, Tomonori; Hoshi, Yasuo; Kawakatsu, Hideki

    2008-12-15

    The authors present an optically based method combining photothermal excitation and laser Doppler velocimetry of higher cantilever vibration modes for dynamic atomic force microscopy in liquid. The frequency spectrum of a silicon cantilever measured in water over frequencies ranging up to 10 MHz shows that the method allows us to excite and detect higher modes, from fundamental to fifth flexural, without enhancing spurious resonances. By reducing the tip oscillation amplitude using higher modes, the average tip-sample force gradient due to chemical bonds is effectively increased to achieve high-spatial-resolution imaging in liquid. The method's performance is demonstrated by atomic resolution imaging of a mica surface in water obtained using the second flexural mode with a small tip amplitude of 99 pm; individual atoms on the surface with small height differences of up to 60 pm are clearly resolved.

  6. Investigations of slip in capillary flow by laser-Doppler velocimetry and their relations to melt fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Münstedt, Helmut

    2015-04-01

    Flow profiles within a slit capillary are measured by laser-Doppler velocimetry. They allow the direct determination of the slip velocity at the wall. It is demonstrated that the flow profile of the melt of a high density polyethylene (HDPE) already shows slip components at small shear rates. At high shear rates the slip is dominant and a plug flow is found. Furthermore, it is shown that the surface irregularity called "shark skin" is generated at the slit exit by the stretching of surface layers at pronounced elongational rates. These elongational rates are due to the differences between the flow velocities at the wall of the slit and those of the extruded strand. It is shown how "shark skin" may be avoided when the elongational rate is reduced by introducing slip of the melt in the slit using special additives.

  7. Conical Shock-Strength Determination on a Low-Sonic-Boom Aircraft Model by Doppler Global Velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herring, Gregory C.; Meyers, James F.

    2011-01-01

    A nonintrusive technique Doppler global velocimetry (DGV) was used to determine conical shock strengths on a supersonic-cruise low-boom aircraft model. The work was performed at approximately Mach 2 in the Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel. Water is added to the wind tunnel flow circuit, generating small ice particles used as seed particles for the laser-based velocimetry. DGV generates two-dimensional (2-D) maps of three components of velocity that span the oblique shock. Shock strength (i.e. fractional pressure increase) is determined from observation of the flow deflection angle across the shock in combination with the standard shock relations. Although DGV had conveniently and accurately determined shock strengths from the homogenous velocity fields behind 2-D planar shocks, the inhomogeneous 3-D velocity fields behind the conical shocks presented additional challenges. Shock strength measurements for the near-field conical nose shock were demonstrated and compared with previously-published static pressure probe data for the same model in the same wind tunnel. Fair agreement was found between the two sets of results.

  8. Data Quality Control for Vessel Mounted Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler. Application for the Western Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia-Gorriz, E.; Front, J.; Candela, J.

    1997-01-01

    A systematic Data Quality Checking Protocol for vessel Mounted Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler observations is proposed. Previous-to-acquisition conditions are considered along with simultaneous ones.

  9. Correlation between First and Second Trimester Uterine Artery Doppler Velocimetry and Placental Bed Histopathology

    PubMed Central

    Akbaş, Murat; Şen, Cihat; Calay, Zerrin

    2014-01-01

    Aim. To evaluate the relationship between uterine artery Doppler indices and placental bed histopathology independent of clinical outcome. Materials and Methods. Uterine artery measurements were performed to 510 pregnant women who had come for routine antenatal care in 11–14th and 20–24th weeks. Placental bed biopsies from 141 cases were taken during cesarean section. Physiological changes and abnormal placental histology findings were investigated and compared with Doppler findings. Results. 116 biopsies were accepted as adequate biopsy and included in the study. Physiological changes were seen in 100 biopsies. Statistically significant higher PI and RI values in second trimester and higher notch rate in both trimesters were detected in the abnormal placental histology group (P < 0,001). Conclusion. Strong relationship between uterine artery Doppler indices and preeclampsia or intrauterine growth retardation has been shown in previous studies. In our study, we concluded that there is significant relationship between Doppler findings and placental bed histopathology independent of clinical course.

  10. Measurement of microbubble-induced acoustic microstreaming using microparticle image velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tho, Paul; Zhu, Yonggang; Manasseh, Richard; Ooi, Andrew

    2005-02-01

    Micro particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements of the velocity fields around oscillating gas bubbles in microfluidic geometries were undertaken. Two sets of experiments were performed. The first measured the acoustic microstreaming around a gas bubble with a radius of 195 μm attached to a wall in a chamber of 30 mm× 30 mm× 0.66 mm. Under acoustic excitation, vigorous streaming in the form of a circulation around on the bubble was observed. The streaming flow was highest near the surface of the bubble with velocities around 1mm/s measured. The velocity magnitude decreased rapidly with increasing distance from the bubble. The velocity field determined by micro-PIV matched the streaklines of the fluorescent particles very well. The second set of experiments measured the streaming at the interface between a trapped air bubble and water inside a microchannel of cross section 100 μm × 90 μm. The streaming flow was limited to within a short distance from the interface and was observed as a looping flow, moving towards the interface from the top and being circulated back from the bottom of the channel. The characteristic streaming velocity was in the order of 100 μm/s.

  11. Three-component planar velocity measurements using Mach-Zehnder interferometric filter-based planar Doppler velocimetry (MZI-PDV)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Z.-H.; Charrett, T. O. H.; Tatam, R. P.

    2009-03-01

    Interferometric filter-based planar Doppler velocimetry is used in conjunction with imaging fibre bundles to make time-averaged three-component velocity measurements using a single imaging head. The Doppler frequency shifts of light scattered by particles entrained into the flow to be measured are transduced to intensity variations using a Mach-Zehnder interferometer. The free spectral range of the filter can be selected by adjusting the optical path difference of the interferometer. This allows the velocity measurement range, sensitivity and resolution to be varied. Three-component measurements are made possible by porting different views of the measurement plane to a single imaging head using the imaging fibre bundles. A comparison of three different image-processing techniques is presented and analysed with the aid of modelled images. Results are presented here for time-averaged measurements of a rotating disc with maximum velocities of ~ ±34 m s-1 in the field of view with the computed measurement error in the orthogonal velocity components being (0.89, 0.68, 1.42) m s-1 for the measurement geometry used. Three-component velocity measurements were also made on a seeded air jet with a nozzle diameter of 20 mm and an exit velocity of ~85 m s-1.

  12. Geo-Acoustic Doppler Spectroscopy: A Novel Acoustic Technique For Surveying The Seabed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckingham, Michael J.

    2010-09-01

    An acoustic inversion technique, known as Geo-Acoustic Doppler Spectroscopy, has recently been developed for estimating the geo-acoustic parameters of the seabed in shallow water. The technique is unusual in that it utilizes a low-flying, propeller-driven light aircraft as an acoustic source. Both the engine and propeller produce sound and, since they are rotating sources, the acoustic signature of each takes the form of a sequence of narrow-band harmonics. Although the coupling of the harmonics across the air-sea interface is inefficient, due to the large impedance mismatch between air and water, sufficient energy penetrates the sea surface to provide a useable underwater signal at sensors either in the water column or buried in the sediment. The received signals, which are significantly Doppler shifted due to the motion of the aircraft, will have experienced a number of reflections from the seabed and thus they contain information about the sediment. A geo-acoustic inversion of the Doppler-shifted modes associated with each harmonic yields an estimate of the sound speed in the sediment; and, once the sound speed has been determined, the known correlations between it and the remaining geo-acoustic parameters allow all of the latter to be computed. This inversion technique has been applied to aircraft data collected in the shallow water north of Scripps pier, returning values of the sound speed, shear speed, porosity, density and grain size that are consistent with the known properties of the sandy sediment in the channel.

  13. Measurement of coronary flow using high-frequency intravascular ultrasound imaging and pulsed Doppler velocimetry: in vitro feasibility studies.

    PubMed

    Grayburn, P A; Willard, J E; Haagen, D R; Brickner, M E; Alvarez, L G; Eichhorn, E J

    1992-01-01

    The recent development of intravascular ultrasound imaging offers the potential to measure blood flow as the product of vessel cross-sectional area and mean velocity derived from pulsed Doppler velocimetry. To determine the feasibility of this approach for measuring coronary artery flow, we constructed a flow model of the coronary circulation that allowed flow to be varied by adjusting downstream resistance and aortic driving pressure. Assessment of intracoronary flow velocity was accomplished using a commercially available end-mounted pulsed Doppler catheter. Cross-sectional area of the coronary artery was measured using a 20 MHz mechanical imaging transducer mounted on a 4.8 F catheter. The product of mean velocity and cross-sectional area was compared with coronary flow measured by timed collection in a graduated cylinder by linear regression analysis. Excellent correlations were obtained between coronary flow calculated by the ultrasound method and measured coronary flow at both ostial (r = 0.99, standard error of the estimate [SEE] = 13.9 ml/min) and distal (r = 0.98, SEE = 23.0 ml/min) vessel locations under steady flow conditions. During pulsatile flow, calculated and measured coronary flow also correlated well for ostial (r = 0.98, SEE = 12.7 ml/min) and downstream (r = 0.99, SEE = 9.3 ml/min) locations. That the SEE was lower for pulsatile as compared with steady flow may be explained by the blunting of the flow profile across the vessel lumen by the acceleration phase of pulsatile flow. These data establish the feasibility of measuring coronary artery blood flow using intravascular ultrasound imaging and pulsed Doppler techniques. PMID:1531416

  14. Doppler global velocimetry measurements of the vortical flow above an F/A-18

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Joseph W.; Meyers, James F.; Cavone, Angelo A.; Suzuki, Karen E.

    1993-01-01

    A Doppler global velocimeter is employed to study the vortical flow above an F/A-18 at 25 degree angle of attack. The measurements indicate that the flow possessed the same characteristics as the vortical flow above a standard delta wing. Image to image comparisons clearly indicate that the flow striking the vertical stabilizers is not chaotic.

  15. Optical and acoustical measuring techniques. [for Doppler measurement of flow velocities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliff, W. C.

    1977-01-01

    The paper reviews the techniques of laser and acoustic Doppler measurement of fluid velocities in confined and free flows. The main mathematical relations are presented, and some systems are studied. Resolution properties of coaxial, bistatic, and pulsed CO2 laser Doppler velocimeter systems are compared. Schematics for pulsed and continuous wave acoustic Doppler systems are discussed. Both of these types of systems benefit from using a bistatic configuration instead of a coaxial system. The pulsed systems avoid contamination of source noise by not sampling until after the source noise has passed the receiver. Comparison of wind velocity measured with a pulsed acoustic Doppler and with a boundary layer profile is made.

  16. [Relationship between Doppler velocimetry at middle cerebral artery and umbilical artery and status of newborn].

    PubMed

    Skotnicki, M Z; Urban, J

    2000-04-01

    Aim of investigations was qualification of account between Doppler parameters in estimation of fetal state. Investigations one passed on 30 fetuses and newborn children in pregnancies brought. Doppler parameters one priced at use of sonographic device Toshiba SSH 140 A/G and searchers of type convex about working frequency 3.75 MHz. Following Doppler flow blood parameters were analyzed: maximum blood speed (V1) average blood speed (V2) and minimum blood speed (V3), systolic/diastolic ratio (S/D), resistance index (RI), pulsatile index (PI) and proper flow in umbilical cord vein (MF) in following dishes of feto-placental circulation: middle cerebral artery (MCA) and umbilical cord artery (UA). Acid-base equilibrium and gasometry of blood in umbilical cord dishes one marked at use of device Ciba-Corning 278 Blood Gas System and parameters of oxygenation of blood at use of device Ciba-Corning 270 CO-OXIMETER. At new-born children one priced pH-metry (pH) and gasometry (pO2, pCO2, BAA) in blood umbilical cord arterial and venous were measured. The newborn children were estimated by Apgar score. There were following essential statistical correlations between Doppler parameters of fetal blood flow and with parameters of acid-base equilibrium of new-born child: 1/ between V2 and V3 in UA and with supply of rules (BAA) in UV (p = 0.027; p = 0.009) and UA (p = 0.035; p = 0.003) and venous pH (p = 0.022; p = 0.009); 2/ between RI in UA and BAA in UV (p = 0.006) and UA (p = 0.010); 3/ between PI in UA and BAA in UV (p < 0.0001) and UA (p < 0.0001) and pH venous (p < 0.0001). We can conclude that Doppler investigations only by measure of parameters of blood flow in middle cerebral artery and umbilical artery in expectation of state of birth new-born child priced across parameters of acid-base equilibrium and Apgar score are not very useful, however they are helpful. PMID:10860275

  17. Measurements of velocity spectra using time-resolving Doppler global velocimetry with laser frequency modulation and a detector array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Andreas; Büttner, Lars; Czarske, Jürgen; Eggert, Michael; Müller, Harald

    2009-10-01

    Measuring velocity spectra in turbulent flows requires methods providing a high temporal resolution and a low measurement uncertainty. Hot-wire anemometry is often used, but it is intrusive. Laser Doppler anemometry is non-intrusive, but due to the statistical arrival of individual tracers provides no constant measurement rate. We therefore propose the use of Doppler global velocimetry (DGV), which is a contactless method allowing temporally equidistant measurements of continuous signals. Additionally, 2d measurements are possible instead of single point measurements. The commonly applied slow cameras are substituted by a fibre coupled detector array consisting of 25 avalanche photo diodes, which increases temporal resolution up to 10 μs. Contrarily to conventional DGV, a sinusoidal laser frequency modulation enables omitting the reference detector array. A correction of beam splitting and image misalignment errors is thus not necessary, but disturbances due to temporal fluctuations of the scattered light can occur and have to be reduced by increasing the modulation frequency. We validate the proposed system capability of synchronously measuring velocity spectra at multiple points in turbulent flows by presenting experimental results. The acquired velocity spectra in a wind tunnel experiment show good agreement with hot-wire comparison measurements within 0.1 m/s. An uncertainty analysis is given, which allows the achievable measurement uncertainty to be estimated as a function of the desired temporal resolution. An uncertainty down to 0.2 m/s can, for example, be achieved assuming a desired temporal resolution of 1 ms. These promising results open new perspectives for turbulence and correlation studies in flows such as to investigate the turbulence characteristics behind a truncated cylinder attached to a plate or the inlet of an aircraft turbine for flow characterisation in industry.

  18. The application of laser Doppler velocimetry to trailing vortex definition and alleviation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orloff, K. L.; Grant, G. R.

    1973-01-01

    A laser Doppler velocimeter whose focal volume can be rapidly traversed through a flowfield has been used to overcome the problem introduced by excursions of the central vortex filament within a wind tunnel test section. The basic concepts of operation of the instrument are reviewed and data are presented which accurately define the trailing vortex from a square-tipped rectangular wing. Measured axial and tangential velocity distributions are given, both with and without a vortex dissipator panel installed at the wing tip. From the experimental data, circulation and vorticity distributions are obtained and the effect of turbulence injection into the vortex structure is discussed.

  19. Doppler Global Velocimetry Measurements of the Vortical Flow Above an F/A-18

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Joseph W.; Meyers, James F.; Cavone, Angelo A.; Suzuki, Karen E.

    1993-01-01

    A Doppler global velocimeter was used to investigate the vortical flow above an F/A-18 model at 25-degrees angle of attack. The measurements indicate that the flow had the same characteristics as the vortical flow above a standard delta wing. The flow pattern indicating transition from stable to burst conditions found above the delta wing was also found at the 440 station above the F/A-18. Measurements downstream at the 524 station found that the flow velocity varied considerably, with standard deviations reaching 30 percent of free stream. However, individual data images indicated that the flow was spatially coherent, and not chaotic as expected.

  20. Application and principles of photon-doppler velocimetry for explosives testing

    SciTech Connect

    Briggs, Matthew Ellsworth; Hill, Larry; Hull, Larry; Shimas, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The velocimetry technique PDV is easier to field than its predecessors VISAR and Fabry-Perot, works on a broader variety of experiments, and is more accurate and simple to analyze. Experiments and analysis have now demonstrated the accuracy, precision and interpretation of what PDV does and does not measure, and the successful application of POV to basic and applied detonation problems. We present a selection of results intended to help workers assess the capabilities of PDV. First we present general considerations about the technique: various PDV configurations, single-signal, multisignal (e.g., triature) and frequency-shifted PDV; what types of motion are sensed and missed by PDV; analysis schemes for velocity and position extraction; accuracy and precision of the results; and, experimental considerations for probe selection and positioning. We then present the status of various applications: detonation speeds and wall motion in cylinder tests, breakout velocity distributions from bare HE, ejecta, measurements from fibers embedded in HE, projectile velocity, resolving 2 and 3-D velocity vectors. This paper is an overview of work done by many groups around the world.

  1. Characterizing Ocean Turbulence from Argo, Acoustic Doppler, and Simulation Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCaffrey, Katherine

    Turbulence is inherently chaotic and unsteady, so observing it and modeling it are no easy tasks. The ocean's sheer size makes it even more difficult to observe, and its unpredictable and ever-changing forcings introduce additional complexities. Turbulence in the oceans ranges from basin scale to the scale of the molecular viscosity. The method of energy transfer between scales is, however, an area of active research, so observations of the ocean at all scales are crucial to understanding the basic dynamics of its motions. In this collection of work, I use a variety of datasets to characterize a wide range of scales of turbulence, including observations from multiple instruments and from models with different governing equations. I analyzed the largest scales of the turbulent range using the global salinity data of the Argo profiling float network. Taking advantage of the scattered and discontinuous nature of this dataset, the second-order structure function was calculated down to 2000m depth, and shown to be useful for predicting spectral slopes. Results showed structure function slopes of 2/3 at small scales, and 0 at large scales, which corresponds with spectral slopes of -5/3 at small scales, and -1 at large scales. Using acoustic Doppler velocity measurements, I characterized the meter- to kilometer-scale turbulence at a potential tidal energy site in the Puget Sound, WA. Acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) and acoustic Doppler velocimeter (ADV) observations provided the data for an analysis that includes coherence, anisotropy, and intermittency. In order to more simply describe these features, a parameterization was done with four turbulence metrics, and the anisotropy magnitude, introduced here, was shown to most closely capture the coherent events. Then, using both the NREL TurbSim stochastic turbulence generator and the NCAR large-eddy simulation (LES) model, I calculated turbulence statistics to validate the accuracy of these methods in reproducing

  2. A Data-Driven Approach for Determining Time of Initial Movement in Shock Experiments using Photonic Doppler Velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Marylesa; Diaz, Abel

    2015-06-01

    Photonic Doppler velocimetry (PDV) is a high-speed, interferometric technique for measuring the beat frequency of a moving surface, from which the calculated velocity profile of the surface can be used to describe the physical changes the material undergoes after high-impact shock. Such a technique may also be used to characterize the performance of small detonators and determine the time at which initial movement was recorded. Hundreds of PDV probes may be deployed at a time on an experiment, and extracting the time at initial movement for each probe becomes an arduous task. In this work, we develop a semi-automated technique for extracting the time at initial movement from a normalized lineout of the power spectrogram near the offset frequency of each multiplexed-PDV probe. We characterize the response bias of this method and compare with the time obtained by hand calculation of the raw voltage data. Results are shown on shock experiments from gas gun setups and explosives-driven flyer plates. This work was done by National Security Technologies, LLC, under Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25946 with the U.S. Department of Energy.

  3. Laser-driven flyer plates for shock compression science: Launch and target impact probed by photon Doppler velocimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, Alexander D.; Banishev, Alexandr A.; Shaw, William L.; Dlott, Dana D.

    2014-04-15

    We investigated the launch and target impact of laser-driven Al flyer plates using photon Doppler velocimetry (PDV). We studied different flyer designs launched by laser pulses of different energies, pulse durations and beam diameters, that produced km s{sup −1} impacts with transparent target materials. Laser-launching Al flyers 25–100 μm thick cemented to glass substrates is usually thought to involve laser vaporization of a portion of the flyer, which creates many difficulties associated with loss of integrity and heating of the flyer material. However, in the system used here, the launch mechanism was surprising and unexpected: it involved optical damage at the glass/cement/flyer interface, with very little laser light reaching the flyer itself. In fact the flyers launched in this manner behaved almost identically to multilayer flyers that were optically shielded from the laser pulses and insulated from heat generated by the pulses. Launching flyers with nanosecond laser pulses creates undesirable reverberating shocks in the flyer. In some cases, with 10 ns launch pulses, the thickest flyers were observed to lose integrity. But with stretched 20 ns pulses, we showed that the reverberations damped out prior to impact with targets, and that the flyers maintained their integrity during flight. Flyer impacts with salt, glass, fused silica, and acrylic polymer were studied by PDV, and the durations of fully supported shocks in those media were determined, and could be varied from 5 to 23 ns.

  4. Simultaneous photonic doppler velocimetry and ultra-high speed imaging techniques to characterize the pressure output of detonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Michael; Clarke, Steven A.

    2012-03-01

    Detonator output directed into both ambient air and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) windows is simultaneously investigated using ultra-high speed, time-resolved imaging and photonic Doppler velocimetry (PDV) measurements. In air, one-dimensional measurements of detonator cup position are made from timeresolved image sequences and compared to time-integrated velocity curves obtained from the PDV data. The results demonstrate good agreement that validates using the two methods concurrently to measure the motion of the detonator free-surface. In PMMA windows, instantaneous shock velocities are calculated from 1-D time-resolved measurements of shock position and known velocity-Hugoniot data are utilized to map the shock velocity calculations to corresponding values of mass velocity and shock pressure. Simultaneous PDV data describing the motion of the detonator cup/PMMA interface are used to determine the mass velocity and pressure at the interface, and to compare to the mass and shock pressures calculated from the imaging data. Experimental results are in good agreement with empirical detonation- and shock-interaction calculations, as well as 1-D numerical simulations.

  5. A technique to measure the size of particles in laser Doppler velocimetry applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, C. F.

    1985-01-01

    A method to measure the size of particles in Laser Doppler Velocimeter (LDV) applications is discussed. Since in LDV the velocity of the flow is assocated with the velocity of particles to establish how well they follow the flow, in the present method the interferometric probe volume is surrounded by a larger beam of different polarization or wavelength. The particle size is then measured from the absolute intensity scattered from the large beam by particles crossing the fringes. Experiments using polystrene particles between 1.1 and 3.3 microns and larger glass beads are reported. It is shown that the method has an excellent size resolution and its accuracy is better than 10% for the particle size studied.

  6. Optical Filters to Exclude Non-Doppler-Shifted Light in Fast Velocimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Goosman, D; Avara, G; Wade, J; Rivera, A

    2002-06-19

    We have used optical velocimetry for 25 years at LLNL to measure velocity-time histories of many dynamic experiments. In certain ones, the shifted light was often quite weak compared to non-shifted light returning from surfaces and imperfections in glass components. In an intensity-measuring VISAR system, this would mean failure, and even with Fabry-Perot (FP) based systems which handle multiple frequencies, data is lost where the fringes coincide. We designed, constructed and successfully used an experimental facility for doing experiments under such conditions by selectively eliminating most of the non-shifted light. Instead of making experimental records which were mostly non-shifted light prior to the use of the filter, we now obtain records where almost all of the light is shifted. The first system had a maximum efficiency of 25% for the desired light, but another version is under construction with a maximum efficiency of over 50%. The first version excluded the non-shifted light by a factor of 300 when manually tuned, and by 150 when run in a Window-based auto-tuning mode. Our first version used a 50 mm diameter FP as the filter with a spacing of 1.65 mm and reflectivities of 77%. It was constructed for use in one of our 5-beam velocimeters. Rather than using five separate filters, we multiplexed all five records so that the desired light would reflect from the filter FPl and image onto separate fibers. These five output fibers then fed our standard tau-table with 5 cameras as described in our report for the 1996 HSPC in Santa Fe, USA. One use of the filter system involved embedding optical fibers in long sections of explosives to make continuous detonation velocity-time histories. To date we have recently carried out 6 tests with this new facility, and two prior ones without. Explosive safety required that four shutters be used to assure that no significant light could illuminate the explosive from the end of the embedded fiber when personnel were close. An

  7. Laser Doppler velocimetry measurements in coaxial, co- and counter-swirling, isothermal jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, P. A.; Cusworth, R. A.; Sislian, J. P.

    1986-05-01

    Measured values of the three components of mean velocity and the six components of the turbulent stress tensor are reported in free, co-axial, isothermal, co- and counter-swirling jet flows representative of combustor flows. The effects of specific radial distributions of mean swirl velocity, and co- and counter-swirling annular flows on the flow field are investigated. A one-dimensional laser Doppler velocimeter is used to obtain the measurements. It consists of a 15mW He-Ne laser, DISA 55x modular optics with a Bragg cell and electronic frequency shifting to handle high turbulence intensities and reverse flow regions, and a TSI model 1980A counter processor. Measured values are presented for two tangential velocity profiles in co- and counter-swirling annular flows, in all, for four different cases. A central recirculation zone occurs in each case. Streamlines are calculated from the measured velocity distribution, and contours of turbulent kinetic energy are presented. The former show the structure of the CRZ, and the latter indicate the zones of high turbulence intensity. Experimental data indicate that the flows are more affected by the direction of rotation of the annular flow than by altering the radial distribution of mean swirl velocity. Counter-swirl tends to increase the turbulent stresses with the maxima occuring near the boundary of the CRZ.

  8. Particle flow within a transonic compressor rotor passage with application to laser-Doppler velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maxwell, B. R.

    1975-01-01

    A theoretical analysis was conducted of the dynamic behavior of micron size particles moving in the three-dimensional flow field of a rotating transonic axial-flow air compressor rotor. The particle velocity lag and angular deviation relative to the gas were determined as functions of particle diameter, mass density and radial position. Particle size and density were varied over ranges selected to correspond to typical laser-Doppler velocimeter (LDV) flow field mapping applications. It was found that the particles move essentially on gas stream surfaces and that particle tracking is relatively insensitive to the rotor radial coordinate. Velocity lag and angular deviation increased whenever particle size or mass density increased, and particle tracking was more sensitive to a change in particle diameter than to a corresponding change in mass density. Results indicated that velocity and angular deviations generally less than 1 percent and 1 degree could be achieved with 1 gm/cc tracer particles with diameters of 1 micron or less.

  9. Optical Filters to Exclude Non-Doppler-Shifted Light in Fast Velocimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Goosman, D; Avara, G; Wade, J; Rivera, A

    2002-08-22

    We frequently measure velocity-time histories of dynamic experiments. In some, the Doppler-shifted light is often weak compared to non-shifted light reflected from stationary surfaces and imperfections in components. With our Fabry-Perot (FP) based systems which handle multiple frequencies, data is lost where the fringes coincide; if we had used an intensity-measuring VISAR system, it would probably fail. We designed a facility for doing experiments under such conditions by selectively eliminating most of the non-shifted light. Our first filter excluded non-shifted light by a factor of 300 when manually tuned, and by 150 when run in an auto-tuning mode. It used a single 50 mm diameter FP as the filter with a spacing of 1.65 mm and reflectivities of 77%, and filters five channels prior to use in one of our 5-beam velocimeters. One use of the filter system was to embed optical fibers in long sections of explosives to make continuous detonation velocity-time histories. We have carried out many such tests with this filter, and two without. A special single-beam filter was constructed with a 40% efficiency for shifted light that rejected non-shifted light by 4 million times, with a bandpass of a few GHz.

  10. Investigation of Point Doppler Velocimetry (PDV) for Transition Detection in Boundary Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhlman, John; Meyers, James F. (Technical Monitor); McMichael, J. M. (Technical Monitor); Glauser, M. (Technical Monitor); Beutner, T. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    A two-component Point Doppler Velocimeter (PDV) system has been improved through the use of vapor-limited iodine cells that have responses that are insensitive to temperature variations. Two-component PDV velocity measurements have been obtained for a 1 inch diameter uniform circular jet flow at a nominal exit velocity of 60 m/sec, corresponding to a Reynolds number of 100,000. Similar data have also been obtained for an annular jet and a swirling jet, These PDV data runs have been duplicated to judge the repeatability of these measurements, and also have been compared with hot wire anemometer data for the same flow conditions. PDV mean velocity results are repeatable to within approximately 1-2 meters per second; the PDV RMS velocity results are also quite repeatable. Exit profiles of PDV mean axial velocity data generally agree with hot wire anemometer results to within about 2 meters per second as well. However, the PDV RMS velocity results are consistently lower than the hot wire results everywhere but at the exit of the standard jet, where they are too high relative to the hot wire data. This is believed to at least be partially due to the method used to compute the RMS (Root Mean Square).

  11. Maternal ophthalmic artery Doppler velocimetry in pre-eclampsia in Southwestern Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Olatunji, Richard Busayo; Adekanmi, Ademola Joseph; Obajimi, Millicent Olubunmi; Roberts, Olumuyiwa Adebola; Ojo, Temitope Olumuyiwa

    2015-01-01

    Background Pre-eclampsia (PE) poses a serious challenge to maternal and fetal health in Africa. It is associated with hemodynamic changes that may affect the internal carotid/ophthalmic artery circulation with consequent neuro-ophthalmic manifestations. Ophthalmic artery Doppler (OAD) ultrasound is an important tool that can be used to detect hemodynamic changes in PE and monitor its severity. In this study, we evaluated hemodynamic changes on OAD ultrasound in the ophthalmic arteries of pre-eclamptic women and compared these with values in healthy pregnant women. Methods OAD parameters, such as, peak systolic velocity, peak diastolic velocity, end diastolic velocity, pulsatility index, and peak ratio, were measured on transorbital triplex ultrasound scan with a 7–10 MHz multifrequency linear transducer in 42 consenting pre-eclamptic patients and 41 pregnant controls matched for maternal age, gestational age, and parity at the Department of Radiology, University College Hospital, Ibadan. Univariate, bivariate, and receiver operating characteristic curve data analyses were performed. P<0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. Results Mean resistivity index, pulsatility index, and peak systolic velocity were significantly lower in pre-eclamptic patients than in the controls. Mean peak diastolic velocity, end diastolic velocity, and peak ratio were significantly higher in the pre-eclamptic group. The receiver operating characteristic curve showed that the resistivity index (sensitivity 75%, specificity 77.8%) could distinguish mild from severe PE while the peak ratio (sensitivity 90.5%, specificity 81.3%) could accurately detect PE. Conclusion OAD ultrasound can be used to monitor patients with PE for early detection of progression to severe forms before cerebral complications develop. OAD screening of patients at high risk for PE can also detect early changes of hemodynamic derangement. PMID:26229508

  12. Noise correction of turbulent spectra obtained from Acoustic Doppler Velocimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Durgesh, Vibhav; Thomson, Jim; Richmond, Marshall C.; Polagye, Brian

    2014-03-02

    Accurately estimated auto-spectral density functions are essential for characterization of turbulent flows, and they also have applications in computational fluid dynamics modeling, site and inflow characterization for hydrokinetic turbines, and inflow turbulence generation. The Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter (ADV) provides single-point temporally resolved data, that are used to characterize turbulent flows in rivers, seas, and oceans. However, ADV data are susceptible to contamination from various sources, including instrument noise, which is the intrinsic limit to the accuracy of acoustic velocity measurements. Due to the presence of instrument noise, the spectra obtained are altered at high frequencies. The focus of this study is to develop a robust and effective method for accurately estimating auto-spectral density functions from ADV data by reducing or removing the spectral contribution derived from instrument noise. For this purpose, the “Noise Auto-Correlation” (NAC) approach was developed, which exploits the correlation properties of instrument noise to identify and remove its contribution from spectra. The spectra estimated using the NAC approach exhibit increased fidelity and a slope of -5/3 in the inertial range, which is typically observed for turbulent flows. Finally, this study also compares the effectiveness of low-pass Gaussian filters in removing instrument noise with that of the NAC approach. For the data used in this study, both the NAC and Gaussian filter approaches are observed to be capable of removing instrument noise at higher frequencies from the spectra. However, the NAC results are closer to the expected frequency power of -5/3 in the inertial sub-range.

  13. Dynamics of the detonation products of a TATB based high explosive: Photon doppler velocimetry and high-speed digital shadowgraphy of expanding species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sollier, Arnaud; Bouyer, Viviane; Terzulli, Louis-Pierre; Doucet, Michel; Hebert, Philippe; Decaris, Lionel

    2012-03-01

    We have performed time-resolved free surface velocity measurements of the expanding products from the detonation of a TATB based high explosive composition, using both Heterodyne Velocimetry (i.e. Photon Doppler Velocimetry) and digital high speed shadowgraphy. The free surface velocity waveforms exhibit features which can be directly related to charateristics of the reaction zone. This allows to estimate the von Neumann spike pressure to PVN ≃41 GPa and the duration of the reaction zone to 400-500 ns, in good agreement with previous studies. 2D Eulerian direct numerical simulations performed with the wide-ranging equation of state and reaction rate model developed by Wescott, Scott Stewart and Davis are found to be in very good agreement with our experimental results.

  14. Application of acoustic doppler velocimeters for streamflow measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rehmel, M.

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) principally has used Price AA and Price pygmy mechanical current meters for measurement of discharge. New technologies have resulted in the introduction of alternatives to the Price meters. One alternative, the FlowTracker acoustic Doppler velocimeter, was designed by SonTek/YSI to make streamflow measurements in wadeable conditions. The device measures a point velocity and can be used with standard midsection method algorithms to compute streamflow. The USGS collected 55 quality-assurance measurements with the FlowTracker at 43 different USGS streamflow-gaging stations across the United States, with mean depths from 0.05to0.67m, mean velocities from 13 to 60 cm/s, and discharges from 0.02 to 12.4m3/s. These measurements were compared with Price mechanical current meter measurements. Analysis of the comparisons shows that the FlowTracker discharges were not statistically different from the Price meter discharges at a 95% confidence level. ?? 2007 ASCE.

  15. Three-component laser Doppler velocimetry measurements in the vicinity of mechanical heart valves in a mock-circulatory loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Richard Scott

    Streakline flow visualization and three-component laser Doppler velocimetry were conducted in a mock-circulatory loop on four mechanical heart valve types in the mitral position. Measurements were conducted in the regurgitant flow region proximal to the valve. Results for the Bjork-Shiley Monostrutsp{TM} valve showed a highly non-uniform flow at valve closure, with very large velocities in the minor orifice region. These velocities were on the order of 15-20 mps and lasted less than one millisecond. Following closure, an interval of sustained regurgitant flow persisted for the duration of systole. Reynolds stresses were calculated from three-dimensional data, and yielded a maximum of 8,100 dyne/cmsp2. Values as high as 80,000 dyne/cmsp2 were calculated during the initial spike, but due to the intermittency of the spike, they are artificially high. Similar measurements were conducted in the minor orifice of the Medtronic-Hall valve, and maximum velocities of about 4 mps were measured during the sustained regurgitant flow. Maximum Reynolds shear stresses were about 7,000 dyne/cmsp2. The velocity spike at closing was noted with this valve also. Two-component measurements around the center hole in the occluder showed a sustained jet with maximum velocities of about 1 mps, and maximum Reynolds shear stresses of about 2,000 dyne/cmsp2. Measurements in the St. Jude Medical valve showed velocities and stresses to be very low. No closing spike was measured, and sustained velocities were observed in the hinge region of about 0.2 mps with maximum stresses of about 1,000 dyne/cmsp2. The CarboMedicssp{TM} valve showed a regurgitant jets emanating from the gap between the leaflet and valve housing ring, with velocities of 3.3 mps for the duration of systole, and calculated stresses of 8,100 dyne/cmsp2. No closing spike was noted. Differences between two and three-dimensional Reynolds shear stresses were significant only at locations where two-dimensional calculated values were

  16. Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler Data Processing System manual [ADCP

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cote, Jessica M.; Hotchkiss, Frances S.; Martini, Marinna; Denham, Charles R.; revisions by Ramsey, Andree L.; Ruane, Stephen

    2000-01-01

    This open-file report describes the data processing software currently in use by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Woods Hole Coastal and Marine Science Center (WHCMSC), to process time series of acoustic Doppler current data obtained by Teledyne RD Instruments Workhorse model ADCPs. The Sediment Transport Instrumentation Group (STG) at the WHCMSC has a long-standing commitment to providing scientists high quality oceanographic data published in a timely manner. To meet this commitment, STG has created this software to aid personnel in processing and reviewing data as well as evaluating hardware for signs of instrument malfunction. The output data format for the data is network Common Data Form (netCDF), which meets USGS publication standards. Typically, ADCP data are recorded in beam coordinates. This conforms to the USGS philosophy to post-process rather than internally process data. By preserving the original data quality indicators as well as the initial data set, data can be evaluated and reprocessed for different types of analyses. Beam coordinate data are desirable for internal and surface wave experiments, for example. All the code in this software package is intended to run using the MATLAB program available from The Mathworks, Inc. As such, it is platform independent and can be adapted by the USGS and others for specialized experiments with non-standard requirements. The software is continuously being updated and revised as improvements are required. The most recent revision may be downloaded from: http://woodshole.er.usgs.gov/operations/stg/Pubs/ADCPtools/adcp_index.htm The USGS makes this software available at the user?s discretion and responsibility.

  17. Effect of tank liquid acoustic velocity on Doppler string phantom measurements.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, A

    1991-03-01

    The quantitative effects of degassed water in string phantom tank Doppler measurements are derived theoretically. The Doppler parameter measurements considered are range gate registration, range gate profile, image flow angle measurements, and velocity calculation. The equipment velocity calculation is demonstrated to have an appreciable error which is due to the water acoustic velocity and the transducer acquisition geometry. A velocity calibration technique is proposed that only needs a simple multiplicative factor to compensate for the water in the tank. PMID:2027185

  18. The Doppler Effect based acoustic source separation for a wayside train bearing monitoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haibin; Zhang, Shangbin; He, Qingbo; Kong, Fanrang

    2016-01-01

    Wayside acoustic condition monitoring and fault diagnosis for train bearings depend on acquired acoustic signals, which consist of mixed signals from different train bearings with obvious Doppler distortion as well as background noises. This study proposes a novel scheme to overcome the difficulties, especially the multi-source problem in wayside acoustic diagnosis system. In the method, a time-frequency data fusion (TFDF) strategy is applied to weaken the Heisenberg's uncertainty limit for a signal's time-frequency distribution (TFD) of high resolution. Due to the Doppler Effect, the signals from different bearings have different time centers even with the same frequency. A Doppler feature matching search (DFMS) algorithm is then put forward to locate the time centers of different bearings in the TFD spectrogram. With the determined time centers, time-frequency filters (TFF) are designed with thresholds to separate the acoustic signals in the time-frequency domain. Then the inverse STFT (ISTFT) is taken and the signals are recovered and filtered aiming at each sound source. Subsequently, a dynamical resampling method is utilized to remove the Doppler Effect. Finally, accurate diagnosis for train bearing faults can be achieved by applying conventional spectrum analysis techniques to the resampled data. The performance of the proposed method is verified by both simulated and experimental cases. It shows that it is effective to detect and diagnose multiple defective bearings even though they produce multi-source acoustic signals.

  19. Directional acoustic measurements by laser Doppler velocimeters. [for jet aircraft noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazumder, M. K.; Overbey, R. L.; Testerman, M. K.

    1976-01-01

    Laser Doppler velocimeters (LDVs) were used as velocity microphones to measure sound pressure level in the range of 90-130 db, spectral components, and two-point cross correlation functions for acoustic noise source identification. Close agreement between LDV and microphone data is observed. It was concluded that directional sensitivity and the ability to measure remotely make LDVs useful tools for acoustic measurement where placement of any physical probe is difficult or undesirable, as in the diagnosis of jet aircraft noise.

  20. Laser-doppler-velocimetry measurements in a one and a half stage transonic test turbine with different angular stator-stator positions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schennach, Oliver; Woisetschläger, Jakob; Marn, Andreas; Göttlich, Emil

    2007-08-01

    A one and a half stage transonic turbine was tested using a two component laser-doppler-velocimetry system. The measurements were carried out in order to record rotor phase resolved velocity, flow angle and turbulence distributions upstream and downstream of the second stator row at several different angular stator-stator positions (“clocking” positions). Altogether, the measurements downstream of the second stator were performed for ten different clocking positions and upstream of the second stator for two different clocking positions. These different clocking positions have a significant influence on the flow field upstream and downstream of the second stator. Furthermore error estimation and a discussion of the tracer particle response are discussed.

  1. Investigation of the acoustic field in a standing wave thermoacoustic refrigerator using time-resolved particule image velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanc-Benon, Ph.; Poignand, G.; Jondeau, E.

    2012-09-01

    In thermoacoustic devices, the full understanding of the heat transfer between the stack and the heat exchangers is a key issue to improve the global efficiency of these devices. The goal of this paper is to investigate the vortex structures, which appear at the stack plates extremities and may impact the heat transfer. Here, the aerodynamic field between a stack and a heat exchanger is characterised with a time-resolved particle image velocimetry (TR- PIV) set-up. Measurements are performed in a standing wave thermoacoustic refrigerator operating at a frequency of 200 Hz. The employed TR-PIV set-up offers the possibility to acquire 3000 instantaneous velocity fields at a frequency of 3125 Hz (15 instantaneous velocity fields per acoustic period). Measurements show that vortex shedding can occur at high pressure level, when a nonlinear acoustic regime preveals, leading to an additional heating generated by viscous dissipation in the gap between the stack and the heat exchangers and a loss of efficiency.

  2. Stimulated acoustic emission: pseudo-Doppler shifts seen during the destruction of nonmoving microbubbles.

    PubMed

    Tiemann, K; Pohl, C; Schlosser, T; Goenechea, J; Bruce, M; Veltmann, C; Kuntz, S; Bangard, M; Becher, H

    2000-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the appearance and the characteristics of stimulated acoustic emission (SAE) as an echo contrast-specific color Doppler phenomenon with impact on myocardial contrast echocardiography (MCE). Stationary microbubbles of the new contrast agent SH-U 563A (Schering AG) were embedded within a tissue-mimicking gel material. Harmonic power Doppler imaging (H-PDI), color Doppler and pulse-wave Doppler data were acquired using an HDI-5000 equipped with a phased-array transducer (1.67/3.3 MHz). In color Doppler mode, bubble destruction resulted in random noise like Doppler signals. PW-Doppler revealed short "pseudo-Doppler" shifts with a broadband frequency spectrum. Quantification of SAE events by H-PDI demonstrated an exponential decay of signal intensities over successive frames. A strong linear relationship was found between bubble concentration and the square root of the linearized H-PDI signal for a range of concentrations of more than two orders of magnitude (R = 0.993, p < 0.0001). Intensity of the H-PDI signals correlated well with emission power (R = 0.96, p = 0.0014). SAE results from disintegration of microbubbles and can be demonstrated by all Doppler imaging modalities, including H-PDI. Intensity of SAE signals is influenced by the applied acoustic power and correlates highly with the concentration of microbubbles. Because intensity of SAE signals correlates highly with echo contrast concentrations, analysis of SAE signals might be used for quantitative MCE. PMID:11053751

  3. Observations on the use of acoustic Doppler velocimeters over rough beds with suspended sediment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Acoustic Doppler velocimeters provide a means for measuring velocities and turbulence in challenging circumstances, such as in flows with suspended particles, which are difficult or impossible with laser-based techniques. The relatively non-intrusive measurement resulting from the offset sampling v...

  4. A Comparison of the Electromagnetic and Acoustic Doppler Effects Using Geometrical Diagrams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bokor, Nandor

    2009-01-01

    Students often find the difference in the electromagnetic and the acoustic Doppler formulae somewhat puzzling. As is shown below, geometrical diagrams and the concept of "event"--a point in spacetime having coordinates (x,y,z,t)--can be a useful and simple way to explain the physical background behind the fundamental differences between the two…

  5. HF Doppler Acoustic Imaging of the Ocean Surface and Interior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinkel, Robert; Smith, Jerome A.

    2004-11-01

    HF phased array Doppler sonar represents a new tool for obtaining Three-dimensional (r,q,t) images of the oceanic surface and interior velocity field. While the capabilities of the approach are unique, the design constraints are also unusual. Examples of both are presented in this work.

  6. Ground and space based cloud-top wind velocities using CFHT/ESPaDOnS (Doppler velocimetry) and VEx/VIRTIS (cloud tracking) coordinated measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machado, Pedro; Widemann, Thomas; Peralta, Javier; Gonçalves, Rúben; Donati, Jean-François; Luz, David

    2016-04-01

    We will present wind velocity results based in the measurements of the horizontal wind field at the cloud top level of the atmosphere of Venus, near 70 km altitude. Our aim is contribute to the characterisation of the zonal and meridional wind latitudinal profiles on hour and day-timescales. This will be done by tracking Doppler shift of solar and CO2 lines over the dayside hemisphere in coordination with ESA's Venus Express orbiter. Our observations measured winds at cloud tops at latitudes 60°S-60°N, while Vex/VIRTIS privileged southern latitudes poleward of 45°S. This coordination effort intended to provide a combined monitoring of short-term changes of wind amplitude and directions with extensive spatial coverage. We present results based on inter comparison of ground-based Doppler velocimetry of cloud-top winds and cloud tracking measurements from the Venus Express spacecraft. Doppler wind velocimetry obtained with the 3.60 m Canada-France-Hawaii telescope (CFHT) and the Visible Spectrograph ESPaDOnS in April 2014 consisted of high-resolution spectra of Fraunhofer lines in the visible range (0.37-1.05 μm) to measure the wind velocity using the Doppler shift of solar radiation scattered by cloud top particles in the observer's direction. The complete optical spectrum was collected at a phase angle Φ = (76 ± 0.3)°, at a resolution of about 80000. Both ground-based and Venus Express measurements show considerable day-to-day variability revealing wave propagation and angular momentum transport in latitude which needs to be carefully assessed. ESPaDOnS and the sequential technique of visible Doppler velocimetry has proven a reference technique to measure instantaneous winds. These measurements are necessary to help validating Global Circulation Models (GCMs), to extend the temporal coverage of available datasets. The ground-based observations in the base of this project are critical in their complementarity with Venus Express, which was recently

  7. Acoustic Doppler velocity measurement system using capacitive micromachined ultrasound transducer array technology.

    PubMed

    Shin, Minchul; Krause, Joshua S; DeBitetto, Paul; White, Robert D

    2013-08-01

    This paper describes the design, fabrication, modeling, and characterization of a small (1 cm(2) transducer chip) acoustic Doppler velocity measurement system using microelectromechanical systems capacitive micromachined ultrasound transducer (cMUT) array technology. The cMUT sensor has a 185 kHz resonant frequency to achieve a 13° beam width for a 1 cm aperture. A model for the cMUT and the acoustic system which includes electrical, mechanical, and acoustic components is provided. Furthermore, this paper shows characterization of the cMUT sensor with a variety of testing procedures including Laser Doppler Vibrometry (LDV), beampattern measurement, reflection testing, and velocity testing. LDV measurements demonstrate that the membrane displacement at the center point is 0.4 nm/V(2) at 185 kHz. The maximum range of the sensor is 60 cm (30 cm out and 30 cm back). A velocity sled was constructed and used to demonstrate measureable Doppler shifts at velocities from 0.2 to 1.0 m/s. The Doppler shifts agree well with the expected frequency shifts over this range. PMID:23927100

  8. Heart wall velocimetry and exogenous contrast-based cardiac flow imaging in Drosophila melanogaster using Doppler optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choma, Michael A.; Suter, Melissa J.; Vakoc, Benjamin J.; Bouma, Brett E.; Tearney, Guillermo J.

    2010-09-01

    Drosophila melanogaster (fruit fly) is a central organism in biology and is becoming increasingly important in the cardiovascular sciences. Prior work in optical imaging of the D. melanogaster heart has focused on static and dynamic structural anatomy. In the study, it is demonstrated that Doppler optical coherence tomography can quantify dynamic heart wall velocity and hemolymph flow in adult D. melanogaster. Since hemolymph is optically transparent, a novel exogenous contrast technique is demonstrated to increase the backscatter-based intracardiac Doppler flow signal. The results presented here open up new possibilities for functional cardiovascular phenotyping of normal and mutant D. melanogaster.

  9. A micro-Doppler sonar for acoustic surveillance in sensor networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhaonian

    Wireless sensor networks have been employed in a wide variety of applications, despite the limited energy and communication resources at each sensor node. Low power custom VLSI chips implementing passive acoustic sensing algorithms have been successfully integrated into an acoustic surveillance unit and demonstrated for detection and location of sound sources. In this dissertation, I explore active and passive acoustic sensing techniques, signal processing and classification algorithms for detection and classification in a multinodal sensor network environment. I will present the design and characterization of a continuous-wave micro-Doppler sonar to image objects with articulated moving components. As an example application for this system, we use it to image gaits of humans and four-legged animals. I will present the micro-Doppler gait signatures of a walking person, a dog and a horse. I will discuss the resolution and range of this micro-Doppler sonar and use experimental results to support the theoretical analyses. In order to reduce the data rate and make the system amenable to wireless sensor networks, I will present a second micro-Doppler sonar that uses bandpass sampling for data acquisition. Speech recognition algorithms are explored for biometric identifications from one's gait, and I will present and compare the classification performance of the two systems. The acoustic micro-Doppler sonar design and biometric identification results are the first in the field as the previous work used either video camera or microwave technology. I will also review bearing estimation algorithms and present results of applying these algorithms for bearing estimation and tracking of moving vehicles. Another major source of the power consumption at each sensor node is the wireless interface. To address the need of low power communications in a wireless sensor network, I will also discuss the design and implementation of ultra wideband transmitters in a three dimensional

  10. Common-Path Heterodyne Laser-Induced Thermal Acoustics for Seedless Laser Velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, Roger C.; Herring, G. C.; Balla, R. Jeffrey; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We demonstrate the use of a novel technique for the detection of heterodyne laser-induced thermal acoustics signals, which allows the construction of a highly stable seedless laser velocimeter. A common-path configuration is combined with quadrature detection to provide flow direction, greatly improve robustness to misalignment and vibration, and give reliable velocity measurement at low flow velocities. Comparison with Pitot tube measurements in the freestream of a wind tunnel shows root-mean-square errors of 0.67 m/s over the velocity range 0.55 m/s.

  11. Resonant Doppler velocimetry in supersonic nitrogen flow. Ph.D. Thesis. Final Report, 31 Oct. 1979 - 31 Jul. 1982

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, S. W. S.

    1982-01-01

    The development of the Resonant Doppler Velocimeter (RDV) is discussed. It is a new nonintrusive laser technique for flow diagnosis. The RDV technique is applied to supersonic nitrogen flow with sodium atoms as tracer particles. The measurements are achieved by shining a tunable single frequency laser beam into the flow. The resonant absorption spectrum of the seeded species is determined by observing the fluorescence signal intensity as a function of excitation wavelength. By comparing the peak absorption wavelength with a reference frequency marker, the flow velocity along the excitation beam can be obtained through the Doppler shift relation. By fitting the spectrum with a theoretical line profile, the static temperature and pressure of the flow an be determined.

  12. Use of Acoustic Doppler Instruments for Measuring Discharge in Streams with Appreciable Sediment Transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mueller, D.S.

    2002-01-01

    The use of Acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCP) for measuring discharge in streams with sediment transport was discussed. The studies show that the acoustic frequency of an ADCP in combination with the sediment transport characteristics in a river causes the ADCP bottom-tracking algorithms to detect a moving bottom. A moving bottom causes bottom-tracking-referenced water velocities and discharges to be biased low. The results also show that the use of differential global positioning system (DGPS) data allows accurate measurement of water velocities and discharges in such cases.

  13. Gulf stream velocity structure through combined inversion of hydrographic and acoustic Doppler data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierce, S. D.

    1986-01-01

    Near-surface velocities from an acoustic Doppler instrument are used in conjunction with CTD/O2 data to produce estimates of the absolute flow field off Cape Hatteras. The data set consists of two transects across the Gulf Stream made by the R/V Endeavor cruise EN88 in August 1982. An inverse procedure is applied which makes use of both the acoustic Doppler data and property conservation constraints. Velocity sections at approximately 73 deg. W and 71 deg. W are presented with formal errors of 1-2 cm/s. The net Gulf Stream transports are estimated to be 116 + or - 2 Sv across the south leg and 161 + or - 4 Sv across the north. A Deep Western Boundary Current transport of 4 + or - 1 Sv is also estimated. While these values do not necessarily represent the mean, they are accurate estimates of the synoptic flow field in the region.

  14. An Acoustic OFDM System with Symbol-by-Symbol Doppler Compensation for Underwater Communication.

    PubMed

    MinhHai, Tran; Rie, Saotome; Suzuki, Taisaku; Wada, Tomohisa

    2016-01-01

    We propose an acoustic OFDM system for underwater communication, specifically for vertical link communications such as between a robot in the sea bottom and a mother ship in the surface. The main contributions are (1) estimation of time varying Doppler shift using continual pilots in conjunction with monitoring the drift of Power Delay Profile and (2) symbol-by-symbol Doppler compensation in frequency domain by an ICI matrix representing nonuniform Doppler. In addition, we compare our proposal against a resampling method. Simulation and experimental results confirm that our system outperforms the resampling method when the velocity changes roughly over OFDM symbols. Overall, experimental results taken in Shizuoka, Japan, show our system using 16QAM, and 64QAM achieved a data throughput of 7.5 Kbit/sec with a transmitter moving at maximum 2 m/s, in a complicated trajectory, over 30 m vertically. PMID:27057558

  15. An Acoustic OFDM System with Symbol-by-Symbol Doppler Compensation for Underwater Communication

    PubMed Central

    MinhHai, Tran; Rie, Saotome; Suzuki, Taisaku; Wada, Tomohisa

    2016-01-01

    We propose an acoustic OFDM system for underwater communication, specifically for vertical link communications such as between a robot in the sea bottom and a mother ship in the surface. The main contributions are (1) estimation of time varying Doppler shift using continual pilots in conjunction with monitoring the drift of Power Delay Profile and (2) symbol-by-symbol Doppler compensation in frequency domain by an ICI matrix representing nonuniform Doppler. In addition, we compare our proposal against a resampling method. Simulation and experimental results confirm that our system outperforms the resampling method when the velocity changes roughly over OFDM symbols. Overall, experimental results taken in Shizuoka, Japan, show our system using 16QAM, and 64QAM achieved a data throughput of 7.5 Kbit/sec with a transmitter moving at maximum 2 m/s, in a complicated trajectory, over 30 m vertically. PMID:27057558

  16. Non-mechanical scanning laser Doppler velocimetry with sensitivity to direction of transverse velocity component using optical serrodyne frequency shifting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maru, Koichi; Watanabe, Kento

    2014-05-01

    This paper proposes a non-mechanical axial scanning laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV) with sensitivity to the direction of the transverse velocity component using optical serrodyne frequency shifting. Serrodyne modulation via the electro-optic effect of a LiNbO3 (LN) phase shifter is employed to discriminate the direction of the transverse velocity component. The measurement position is scanned without any moving mechanism in the probe by changing the wavelength of the light input to the probe. The experimental results using a sensor probe setup indicate that both the scan of the measurement position and the introduction of directional sensitivity are successfully demonstrated.

  17. In Vivo Cardiac, Acoustic-Radiation-Force-Driven, Shear Wave Velocimetry

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Stephen J.; Wolf, Patrick D.; Trahey, Gregg E.

    2009-01-01

    Shear wave elasticity imaging (SWEI) was employed to track acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) -induced shear waves in the mid-myocardium of the left ventricular free wall (LVFW) of a beating canine heart. Shear waves were generated and tracked with a linear ultrasound transducer that was placed directly on the exposed epicardium. Acquinsition was ECG-gated arid coincided with the mid-diastolic portion of the cardiac cycle. Axial displacement profiles consistent with shear wave propagation were clearly evident in all SWEI acquisitions (i.e., those including an ARFI excitation); displacement data from control cases (i.e., sequences lacking an ARFI excitation) offered no evidence of shear wave propagation and yielded a peak absolute mean displacement below 0.31 μm after motion filtering. Shear wave velocity estimates ranged from 0.82 to 2.65 m/s and were stable across multiple heartbeats for the same interrogation region, with coefficients of variation less than 19% for all matched acquisitions. Variations in velocity estimates suggest a spatial dependence of shear wave velocity through the mid-myocardium of the LVFW, with velocity estimates changing, in limited cases, through depth and lateral position. PMID:19771962

  18. Doppler global velocimetry: Development of a flight research instrumentation system for application to non-intrusive measurements of the flow field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komine, Hiroshi; Brosnan, Stephen J.; Long, William H.; Stappaerts, Eddy A.

    1994-01-01

    Doppler Global Velocimetry (DGV) is a new diagnostic tool that offers potential for flow field measurements in flight by acquiring three-component velocity data in near real-time during flight maneuvers. The feasibility of implementation of a flight DGV system aboard NASA's High-Angle-of-Attack Research Vehicle (HARV) was addressed in this work by identifying the essential characteristics of a flight measurement system and by performing calibration and error tests. Results from this work were: an outline that establishes a preliminary basis for system configurations by analyzing measurement errors, installation issues, and operating requirements; measurement of the accuracy of the DGV technique using a laboratory breadboard DGV system based on a frequency-doubled Nd: YAG laser and iodine Absorption Line Filter (ALF), which showed excellent agreement between the DGV data and pilot measurements on a laminar flow jet with velocities of up to 150 m/sec; a survey of DGV system components and technologies that are relevant to the design of a flight measurement system, including a survey of cameras for the next generation DGV receivers; an assessment of the candidate lasers and absorption line filters for the flight system, resulting in a near-term recommendation of Nd: host lasers and an iodine ALF for both flight and wind tunnel applications.

  19. Field evaluation of boat-mounted acoustic Doppler instruments used to measure streamflow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mueller, D.S.

    2003-01-01

    The use of instruments based on the Doppler principle for measuring water velocity and computing discharge is common within the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The instruments and software have changed appreciably during the last 5 years; therefore, the USGS has begun field validation of the instruments used to make discharge measurements from a moving boat. Instruments manufactured by SonTek/YSI and RD Instruments, Inc. were used to collect discharge data at five different sites. One or more traditional discharge measurements were made using a Price AA current meter and standard USGS procedures concurrent with the acoustic instruments at each site. Discharges measured with the acoustic instruments were compared with discharges measured with Price AA current meters and the USGS stage-discharge rating for each site. The mean discharges measured by each acoustic instrument were within 5 percent of the Price AA-based measurement and (or) discharge from the stage-discharge rating.

  20. Fundamental experiments in velocimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Briggs, Matthew Ellsworth; Hull, Larry; Shinas, Michael

    2009-01-01

    One can understand what velocimetry does and does not measure by understanding a few fundamental experiments. Photon Doppler Velocimetry (PDV) is an interferometer that will produce fringe shifts when the length of one of the legs changes, so we might expect the fringes to change whenever the distance from the probe to the target changes. However, by making PDV measurements of tilted moving surfaces, we have shown that fringe shifts from diffuse surfaces are actually measured only from the changes caused by the component of velocity along the beam. This is an important simplification in the interpretation of PDV results, arising because surface roughness randomizes the scattered phases.

  1. Scanning Laser Doppler Vibrometry Application to Artworks: New Acoustic and Mechanical Exciters for Structural Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agnani, A.; Esposito, E.

    After first attempts some years ago, the scanning laser Doppler vibrometer has become an effective way of diagnosing different types of artworks; successful applications regard frescoes, icons, mosaics, ceramic artefacts and wood inlays. Also application to historical bridges has been successfully developed and a recently approved European Commission project will see the employment of scanning laser Doppler Vibrometry (SLDV) for the dynamical characterization of ancient buildings. However, a critical issue consists in the adequate excitation of the structure under test. Moreover different types of defects and different kinds of artworks require different types of excitation, so this topic needs a deep consideration. In this work we will present two new types of exciters developed at our Department, namely an acoustic exciter and a mechanical one. Acoustic exciters allow remote non-invasive loading but are limited in the lower frequency range and in the amount of vibrational energy input into the structure. The proposed automatic tapping device based on a commercial impact hammer overcomes these problems. Also another acoustic exciter, a HyperSonic Sound (HSS) source has been evaluated, showing interesting features as regards sound radiation.

  2. Measurement of Turbulence with Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers - Sources of Error and Laboratory Results

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nystrom, E.A.; Oberg, K.A.; Rehmann, C.R.

    2002-01-01

    Acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) provide a promising method for measuring surface-water turbulence because they can provide data from a large spatial range in a relatively short time with relative ease. Some potential sources of errors in turbulence measurements made with ADCPs include inaccuracy of Doppler-shift measurements, poor temporal and spatial measurement resolution, and inaccuracy of multi-dimensional velocities resolved from one-dimensional velocities measured at separate locations. Results from laboratory measurements of mean velocity and turbulence statistics made with two pulse-coherent ADCPs in 0.87 meters of water are used to illustrate several of inherent sources of error in ADCP turbulence measurements. Results show that processing algorithms and beam configurations have important effects on turbulence measurements. ADCPs can provide reasonable estimates of many turbulence parameters; however, the accuracy of turbulence measurements made with commercially available ADCPs is often poor in comparison to standard measurement techniques.

  3. Quality assurance plan for discharge measurements using broadband acoustic Doppler current profilers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lipscomb, S.W.

    1995-01-01

    The recent introduction of the Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) as an instrument for measuring velocities and discharge in the riverine and estuarine environment promises to revolutionize the way these data are collected by the U.S. Geological Survey. The ADCP and associated software, however, compose a complex system and should be used only by qualifies personnel. Standard procedures should be rigorously followed to ensure that the quality of data collected is commensurate with the standards set by the Water Resources Division for all its varied activities in hydrologic investigations.

  4. Measuring two-phase particle flux with a multi-frequency acoustic Doppler profiler.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Gregory W; Hay, Alex E

    2015-12-01

    A methodology is developed and tested for simultaneously extracting time-resolved one-dimensional profiles of the mass-concentration and velocity of two different particle types in a mixed suspension, using a multi-frequency pulse-to-pulse coherent Doppler instrument. The technique involves inversion of a model for frequency-dependent acoustic backscatter amplitude and phase. Results are presented from a laboratory settling column experiment, measuring a mixture of polystyrene beads (slowly-settling, strongly-scattering) and glass beads (quickly-settling, weakly-scattering) in a vertical pipe section. PMID:26723335

  5. Laboratory evaluation of an OTT acoustic digital current meter and a SonTek Laboratory acoustic Doppler velocimeter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vermeyen, T.B.; Oberg, Kevin A.; Jackson, Patrick Ryan

    2009-01-01

    Recently, an acoustic current meter known as the OTT * acoustic digital current meter (ADC) was introduced as an alternative instrument for stream gaging measurements. The Bureau of Reclamation and the U.S. Geological Survey collaborated on a side- by-side evaluation of the ADC and a SonTek/YSI acoustic Doppler velocimeter (ADV). Measurements were carried out in a laboratory flume to evaluate the performance characteristics of the ADC under a range of flow and boundary conditions. The flume contained a physical model of a mountain river with a diversion dam and variety of bed materials ranging from smooth mortar to a cobble bed. The instruments were installed on a trolley system that allowed them to be easily moved within the flume while maintaining a consistent probe orientation. More than 50 comparison measurements were made in an effort to verify the manufacturer’s performance specifications and to evaluate potential boundary disturbance for near-bed and vertical boundary measurements. Data and results from this evaluation are presented and discussed. 

  6. Underwater Acoustic Wavefront Visualization by Scanning Laser Doppler Vibrometer for the Characterization of Focused Ultrasonic Transducers.

    PubMed

    Longo, Roberto; Vanlanduit, Steve; Arroud, Galid; Guillaume, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of acoustic wave fields is important for a large number of engineering designs, communication and health-related reasons. The visualization of wavefronts gives valuable information about the type of transducers and excitation signals more suitable for the test itself. This article is dedicated to the development of a fast procedure for acoustic fields visualization in underwater conditions, by means of laser Doppler vibrometer measurements. The ultrasonic probe is a focused transducer excited by a chirp signal. The scope of this work is to evaluate experimentally the properties of the sound beam in order to get reliable information about the transducer itself to be used in many kinds of engineering tests and transducer design. PMID:26287197

  7. Underwater Acoustic Wavefront Visualization by Scanning Laser Doppler Vibrometer for the Characterization of Focused Ultrasonic Transducers

    PubMed Central

    Longo, Roberto; Vanlanduit, Steve; Arroud, Galid; Guillaume, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of acoustic wave fields is important for a large number of engineering designs, communication and health-related reasons. The visualization of wavefronts gives valuable information about the type of transducers and excitation signals more suitable for the test itself. This article is dedicated to the development of a fast procedure for acoustic fields visualization in underwater conditions, by means of laser Doppler vibrometer measurements. The ultrasonic probe is a focused transducer excited by a chirp signal. The scope of this work is to evaluate experimentally the properties of the sound beam in order to get reliable information about the transducer itself to be used in many kinds of engineering tests and transducer design. PMID:26287197

  8. Measuring discharge with acoustic Doppler current profilers from a moving boat

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mueller, David S.; Wagner, Chad R.; Rehmel, Michael S.; Oberg, Kevin A.; Rainville, Francois

    2013-01-01

    The use of acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) from a moving boat is now a commonly used method for measuring streamflow. The technology and methods for making ADCP-based discharge measurements are different from the technology and methods used to make traditional discharge measurements with mechanical meters. Although the ADCP is a valuable tool for measuring streamflow, it is only accurate when used with appropriate techniques. This report presents guidance on the use of ADCPs for measuring streamflow; this guidance is based on the experience of U.S. Geological Survey employees and published reports, papers, and memorandums of the U.S. Geological Survey. The guidance is presented in a logical progression, from predeployment planning, to field data collection, and finally to post processing of the collected data. Acoustic Doppler technology and the instruments currently (2013) available also are discussed to highlight the advantages and limitations of the technology. More in-depth, technical explanations of how an ADCP measures streamflow and what to do when measuring in moving-bed conditions are presented in the appendixes. ADCP users need to know the proper procedures for measuring discharge from a moving boat and why those procedures are required, so that when the user encounters unusual field conditions, the procedures can be adapted without sacrificing the accuracy of the streamflow-measurement data.

  9. Three dimensional measurements of Geodesic Acoustic Mode with correlation Doppler reflectometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, W. L.; Shi, Z. B.; Xu, Y.; Zou, X. L.; Duan, X. R.; Chen, W.; Jiang, M.; Yang, Z. C.; Zhang, B. Y.; Shi, P. W.; Liu, Z. T.; Xu, M.; Song, X. M.; Cheng, J.; Ke, R.; Nie, L.; Cui, Z. Y.; Fu, B. Z.; Ding, X. T.; Dong, J. Q.; Liu, Yi.; Yan, L. W.; Yang, Q. W.; Liu, Yong; the HL-2A Team

    2015-10-01

    Correlation Doppler reflectometers have been newly developed in the HL-2A Tokamak. Owing to the flexibility of the diagnostic arrangements, the multi-channel systems allow us to study, simultaneously, the radial properties of edge turbulence and its long-range correlation in both the poloidal and toroidal direction. With these reflectometers, three-dimensional spatial structure of Geodesic Acoustic Mode (GAM) is surveyed, including the symmetric feature of Er fluctuations in both poloidal and toroidal directions, and the radial propagation of GAMs. The bi-coherence analysis for the Er fluctuations suggests that the three-wave nonlinear interaction could be the mechanism for the generation of GAM. The temporal evolution of GAM during the plasma density modulation experiments has been studied. The results show that the collisional damping plays a role in suppressing the GAM magnitudes, and hence, weakening the regulating effects of GAM on ambient turbulence. Three dimensional correlation Doppler measurements of GAM activity demonstrate that the newly developed correlation Doppler reflectometers in HL-2A are powerful tools for edge turbulence studies with high reliability. A shorter version of this contribution is due to be published in PoS at: ``1st EPS conference on Plasma Diagnostics''.

  10. Doppler effect reduction based on time-domain interpolation resampling for wayside acoustic defective bearing detector system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fang; He, Qingbo; Kong, Fanrang; Liu, Yongbin

    2014-06-01

    In the wayside Acoustic Defective Bearing Detector (ADBD) system, the recorded acoustic signal will be severely distorted by the Doppler effect because of the high moving speed of the railway vehicle, which is a barrier that would badly reduce the effectiveness of online defect detection. This paper proposes a simple and effective method, called time-domain interpolation resampling (TIR), to remove the Doppler effect embedded in the acoustic signal. The TIR is conducted in three steps. First, the time vector for resampling is calculated according to the kinematic analysis. Second, the amplitude of the distorted signal is demodulated. Third, the distorted signal is re-sampled using spline interpolation. In this method, both the spectrum structure and the amplitudes of the distorted signal can be restored. The effectiveness of TIR is verified by means of simulation studies and train roller bearing experiments with various types of defects. It is also compared to an existing Doppler effect reduction method that is based on the instantaneous frequency estimation using Hilbert transform. Results indicate that the proposed TIR method has the superior performance in removing the Doppler effect, and can be well implemented to Doppler effect reduction for the ADBD system.

  11. Monitoring suspended sediment transport in an ice-affected river using acoustic Doppler current profilers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, S. A.; Ghareh Aghaji Zare, S.; Rennie, C. D.; Ahmari, H.; Seidou, O.

    2013-12-01

    Quantifying sediment budgets and understanding the processes which control fluvial sediment transport is paramount to monitoring river geomorphology and ecological habitat. In regions that are subject to freezing there is the added complexity of ice. River ice processes impact flow distribution, water stage and sediment transport. Ice processes typically have the largest impact on sediment transport and channel morphodynamics when ice jams occur during ice cover formation and breakup. Ice jams may restrict flow and cause local acceleration when released. Additionally, ice can mechanically scour river bed and banks. Under-ice sediment transport measurements are lacking due to obvious safety and logistical reasons, in addition to a lack of adequate measurement techniques. Since some rivers can be covered in ice during six months of the year, the lack of data in winter months leads to large uncertainty in annual sediment load calculations. To address this problem, acoustic profilers are being used to monitor flow velocity, suspended sediment and ice processes in the Lower Nelson River, Manitoba, Canada. Acoustic profilers are ideal for under-ice sediment flux measurements since they can be operated autonomously and continuously, they do not disturb the flow in the zone of measurement and acoustic backscatter can be related to sediment size and concentration. In March 2012 two upward-facing profilers (1200 kHz acoustic Doppler current profiler, 546 KHz acoustic backscatter profiler) were installed through a hole in the ice on the Nelson River, 50 km downstream of the Limestone Generating Station. Data were recorded for four months, including both stable cover and breakup periods. This paper presents suspended sediment fluxes calculated from the acoustic measurements. Velocity data were used to infer the vertical distribution of sediment sizes and concentrations; this information was then used in the interpretation of the backscattered intensity data. It was found that

  12. Use of an Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) to Measure Hypersaline Bidirectional Discharge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, K.K.; Loving, B.L.

    2002-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey measures the exchange of flow between the north and south parts of Great Salt Lake, Utah, as part of a monitoring program. Turbidity and bidirectional flow through the breach in the causeway that divides the lake into two parts makes it difficult to measure discharge with conventional streamflow techniques. An acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) can be used to more accurately define the angles of flow and the location of the interface between the layers of flow. Because of the high salinity levels measured in Great Salt Lake (60-280 parts per thousand), special methods had to be developed to adjust ADCP-computed discharges for the increased speed of sound in hypersaline waters and for water entrained at the interface between flow layers.

  13. Variance of discharge estimates sampled using acoustic Doppler current profilers from moving boats

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garcia, Carlos M.; Tarrab, Leticia; Oberg, Kevin; Szupiany, Ricardo; Cantero, Mariano I.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a model for quantifying the random errors (i.e., variance) of acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) discharge measurements from moving boats for different sampling times. The model focuses on the random processes in the sampled flow field and has been developed using statistical methods currently available for uncertainty analysis of velocity time series. Analysis of field data collected using ADCP from moving boats from three natural rivers of varying sizes and flow conditions shows that, even though the estimate of the integral time scale of the actual turbulent flow field is larger than the sampling interval, the integral time scale of the sampled flow field is on the order of the sampling interval. Thus, an equation for computing the variance error in discharge measurements associated with different sampling times, assuming uncorrelated flow fields is appropriate. The approach is used to help define optimal sampling strategies by choosing the exposure time required for ADCPs to accurately measure flow discharge.

  14. A GIS-based Computational Tool for Multidimensional Flow Velocity by Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, D.; Winkler, M.; Muste, M.

    2015-06-01

    Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers (ADCPs) provide efficient and reliable flow measurements compared to other tools for characteristics of the riverine environments. In addition to originally targeted discharge measurements, ADCPs are increasingly utilized to assess river flow characteristics. The newly developed VMS (Velocity Mapping Software) aims at providing an efficient process for quality assurance, mapping velocity vectors for visualization and facilitating comparison with physical and numerical model results. VMS was designed to provide efficient and smooth work flows for processing groups of transects. The software allows the user to select group of files and subsequently to conduct statistical and graphical quality assurance on the files as a group or individually as appropriate. VMS also enables spatial averaging in horizontal and vertical plane for ADCP data in a single or multiple transects over the same or consecutive cross sections. The analysis results are displayed in numerical and graphical formats.

  15. Estimating Discharge using Multi-level Velocity Data from Acoustic Doppler Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bang Poulsen, J.; Rømer Rasmussen, K.; Bering Ovesen, N.

    2010-12-01

    In the majority of Danish streams, weed growth affects the effective stream width and bed roughness and therefore imposes temporal variations on the stage-discharge relationship. Small stream-gradients and firm ecology based restrictions prevent that hydraulic structures are made at the discharge stations and thus remove or limit such influences. Hence, estimation of the hydrograph is based on continuous stream gauging combined with monthly control measurements of discharge and assuming linear variation of bed roughness between the monthly measurements. As a result, any non-linear drift in weed density or structure which affect the frictional characteristics of the stream during both normal and peak flows are ignored. The present investigation studies if such temporal variation in the conveyance may be detected and eventually compensated for when estimating the hydrograph. Therefore acoustic Dopplers have been placed at the main discharge station in one of the largest Danish catchments (the Skjern). The instruments were set out in early February 2010 during the winter season and have been running since then. The long term average discharge at the station is near 14 m3/s and the cross sectional profile is roughly trapezoidal having width about 15 m., but slightly skew so that the stream is about 0.5 m. deeper off the right than off the left bank. During winter, the depths are typically near 2 m. while during summer they are about 1.5 m. During peak flows, when the discharge exceeds 35 m3/s, the depth increases to more than 3 m. The Doppler instruments (Nortek) are placed on a vertical pole about 2 m. off the right bank at three fixed elevations above the streambed (0.3, 0.6, and 1.3 m); the beams point horizontally towards the left bank perpendicularly to the average flow direction. At each depth, the Doppler sensor records 10 minute average stream velocities in the central 10 m. section of the stream. During summer periods with low flow, stream velocity has only

  16. Accuracy of a pulse-coherent acoustic Doppler profiler in a wave-dominated flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lacy, J.R.; Sherwood, C.R.

    2004-01-01

    The accuracy of velocities measured by a pulse-coherent acoustic Doppler profiler (PCADP) in the bottom boundary layer of a wave-dominated inner-shelf environment is evaluated. The downward-looking PCADP measured velocities in eight 10-cm cells at 1 Hz. Velocities measured by the PCADP are compared to those measured by an acoustic Doppler velocimeter for wave orbital velocities up to 95 cm s-1 and currents up to 40 cm s-1. An algorithm for correcting ambiguity errors using the resolution velocities was developed. Instrument bias, measured as the average error in burst mean speed, is -0.4 cm s-1 (standard deviation = 0.8). The accuracy (root-mean-square error) of instantaneous velocities has a mean of 8.6 cm s-1 (standard deviation = 6.5) for eastward velocities (the predominant direction of waves), 6.5 cm s-1 (standard deviation = 4.4) for northward velocities, and 2.4 cm s-1 (standard deviation = 1.6) for vertical velocities. Both burst mean and root-mean-square errors are greater for bursts with ub ??? 50 cm s-1. Profiles of burst mean speeds from the bottom five cells were fit to logarithmic curves: 92% of bursts with mean speed ??? 5 cm s-1 have a correlation coefficient R2 > 0.96. In cells close to the transducer, instantaneous velocities are noisy, burst mean velocities are biased low, and bottom orbital velocities are biased high. With adequate blanking distances for both the profile and resolution velocities, the PCADP provides sufficient accuracy to measure velocities in the bottom boundary layer under moderately energetic inner-shelf conditions.

  17. Acoustic resolution photoacoustic Doppler flowmetry: practical considerations for obtaining accurate measurements of blood flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunker, J.; Beard, P.

    2014-03-01

    An assessment has been made of various experimental factors affecting the accuracy of flow velocities measured using a pulsed time correlation photoacoustic Doppler technique. In this method, Doppler time shifts are quantified via crosscorrelation of pairs of photoacoustic waveforms generated in moving absorbers using pairs of laser light pulses, and the photoacoustic waves are detected using an ultrasound transducer. The acoustic resolution mode is employed by using the transducer focal width, rather than the large illuminated volume, to define the lateral spatial resolution. This enables penetration depths of several millimetres or centimetres, unlike methods using the optical resolution mode, which limits the maximum penetration depth to approximately 1 mm. In the acoustic resolution mode, it is difficult to detect time shifts in highly concentrated suspensions of flowing absorbers, such as red blood cell suspensions and whole blood, and this challenge supposedly arises because of the lack of spatial heterogeneity. However, by assessing the effect of different absorption coefficients and tube diameters, we offer an alternative explanation relating to light attenuation and parabolic flow. We also demonstrate a new signal processing method that surmounts the previous problem of measurement under-reading. This method is a form of signal range gating and enables mapping of the flow velocity profile across the tube as well as measurement of the average flow velocity. We show that, using our signal processing scheme, it is possible to measure the flow of whole blood using a relatively low frequency detector. This important finding paves the way for application of the technique to measurements of blood flow several centimetres deep in living tissue.

  18. Acoustic resolution photoacoustic Doppler velocity measurements in fluids using time-domain cross-correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunker, J.; Beard, P.

    2013-03-01

    Blood flow measurements have been demonstrated using the acoustic resolution mode of photoacoustic sensing. This is unlike previous flowmetry methods using the optical resolution mode, which limits the maximum penetration depth to approximately 1mm. Here we describe a pulsed time correlation photoacoustic Doppler technique that is inherently flexible, lending itself to both resolution modes. Doppler time shifts are quantified via cross-correlation of pairs of photoacoustic waveforms generated in moving absorbers using pairs of laser light pulses, and the photoacoustic waves detected using an ultrasound transducer. The acoustic resolution mode is employed by using the transducer focal width, rather than the large illuminated volume, to define the lateral spatial resolution. The use of short laser pulses allows depth-resolved measurements to be obtained with high spatial resolution, offering the prospect of mapping flow within microcirculation. Whilst our previous work has been limited to a non-fluid phantom, we now demonstrate measurements in more realistic blood-mimicking phantoms incorporating fluid suspensions of microspheres flowing along an optically transparent tube. Velocities up to 110 mm/s were measured with accuracies approaching 1% of the known velocities, and resolutions of a few mm/s. The velocity range and resolution are scalable with excitation pulse separation, but the maximum measurable velocity was considerably smaller than the value expected from the detector focal beam width. Measurements were also made for blood flowing at velocities up to 13.5 mm/s. This was for a sample reduced to 5% of the normal haematocrit; increasing the red blood cell concentration limited the maximum measurable velocity so that no results were obtained for concentrations greater than 20% of a physiologically realistic haematocrit. There are several possible causes for this limitation; these include the detector bandwidth and irregularities in the flow pattern. Better

  19. Estimating suspended solids concentrations from backscatter intensity measured by acoustic Doppler current profiler in San Francisco Bay, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gartner, J.W.

    2004-01-01

    The estimation of mass concentration of suspended solids is one of the properties needed to understand the characteristics of sediment transport in bays and estuaries. However, useful measurements or estimates of this property are often problematic when employing the usual methods of determination from collected water samples or optical sensors. Analysis of water samples tends to undersample the highly variable character of suspended solids, and optical sensors often become useless from biological fouling in highly productive regions. Acoustic sensors, such as acoustic Doppler current profilers that are now routinely used to measure water velocity, have been shown to hold promise as a means of quantitatively estimating suspended solids from acoustic backscatter intensity, a parameter used in velocity measurement. To further evaluate application of this technique using commercially available instruments, profiles of suspended solids concentrations are estimated from acoustic backscatter intensity recorded by 1200- and 2400-kHz broadband acoustic Doppler current profilers located at two sites in San Francisco Bay, California. ADCP backscatter intensity is calibrated using optical backscatterance data from an instrument located at a depth close to the ADCP transducers. In addition to losses from spherical spreading and water absorption, calculations of acoustic transmission losses account for attenuation from suspended sediment and correction for nonspherical spreading in the near field of the acoustic transducer. Acoustic estimates of suspended solids consisting of cohesive and noncohesive sediments are found to agree within about 8-10% (of the total range of concentration) to those values estimated by a second optical backscatterance sensor located at a depth further from the ADCP transducers. The success of this approach using commercially available Doppler profilers provides promise that this technique might be appropriate and useful under certain conditions in

  20. Averaged indicators of secondary flow in repeated acoustic Doppler current profiler crossings of bends

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dinehart, R.L.; Burau, J.R.

    2005-01-01

    [1] Cross-stream velocity was measured in a large river bend at high spatial resolution over three separate survey episodes. A suite of methods for resolving cross-stream velocity distributions was tested on data collected using acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCP) in the sand-bedded Sacramento River, California. The bend was surveyed with repeated ADCP crossings at eight cross sections during a rising limb of high discharge in February 2004 and twice on recession in March 2004. By translating and interpolating repeated ADCP crossings to planar grids, velocity ensembles at similar positions along irregular boat paths could be averaged. The averaging minimized turbulent fluctuations in streamwise velocities over 1 m/s, enabling the resolution of weaker cross-stream velocities (???15-30 cm/s). Secondary-flow influence on suspended sediment was inferred from a lateral region of acoustic backscatter intensity aligned with outward flow over the point bar. A near-bed decrease in backscatter intensity across the pool corresponded with inward cross-stream flow. These suspension indicators were used to orient averaged velocity grids for unambiguously defining the cross-stream velocity magnitudes. Additional field investigations could test whether the correlation between cross-stream velocity and backscatter intensity patterns results from helical recirculation of suspended sediment to the inside of the bend. These river measurements, consistent with classic and recent laboratory studies, show that ADCP surveys can provide refined views of secondary flow and sediment movement in large rivers.

  1. Discharge measurements using a broad-band acoustic Doppler current profiler

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simpson, Michael R.

    2002-01-01

    The measurement of unsteady or tidally affected flow has been a problem faced by hydrologists for many years. Dynamic discharge conditions impose an unreasonably short time constraint on conventional current-meter discharge-measurement methods, which typically last a minimum of 1 hour. Tidally affected discharge can change more than 100 percent during a 10-minute period. Over the years, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has developed moving-boat discharge-measurement techniques that are much faster but less accurate than conventional methods. For a bibliography of conventional moving-boat publications, see Simpson and Oltmann (1993, page 17). The advent of the acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) made possible the development of a discharge-measurement system capable of more accurately measuring unsteady or tidally affected flow. In most cases, an ADCP discharge-measurement system is dramatically faster than conventional discharge-measurement systems, and has comparable or better accuracy. In many cases, an ADCP discharge-measurement system is the only choice for use at a particular measurement site. ADCP systems are not yet ?turnkey;? they are still under development, and for proper operation, require a significant amount of operator training. Not only must the operator have a rudimentary knowledge of acoustic physics, but also a working knowledge of ADCP operation, the manufacturer's discharge-measurement software, and boating techniques and safety.

  2. Online Doppler Effect Elimination Based on Unequal Time Interval Sampling for Wayside Acoustic Bearing Fault Detecting System

    PubMed Central

    Ouyang, Kesai; Lu, Siliang; Zhang, Shangbin; Zhang, Haibin; He, Qingbo; Kong, Fanrang

    2015-01-01

    The railway occupies a fairly important position in transportation due to its high speed and strong transportation capability. As a consequence, it is a key issue to guarantee continuous running and transportation safety of trains. Meanwhile, time consumption of the diagnosis procedure is of extreme importance for the detecting system. However, most of the current adopted techniques in the wayside acoustic defective bearing detector system (ADBD) are offline strategies, which means that the signal is analyzed after the sampling process. This would result in unavoidable time latency. Besides, the acquired acoustic signal would be corrupted by the Doppler effect because of high relative speed between the train and the data acquisition system (DAS). Thus, it is difficult to effectively diagnose the bearing defects immediately. In this paper, a new strategy called online Doppler effect elimination (ODEE) is proposed to remove the Doppler distortion online by the introduced unequal interval sampling scheme. The steps of proposed strategy are as follows: The essential parameters are acquired in advance. Then, the introduced unequal time interval sampling strategy is used to restore the Doppler distortion signal, and the amplitude of the signal is demodulated as well. Thus, the restored Doppler-free signal is obtained online. The proposed ODEE method has been employed in simulation analysis. Ultimately, the ODEE method is implemented in the embedded system for fault diagnosis of the train bearing. The results are in good accordance with the bearing defects, which verifies the good performance of the proposed strategy. PMID:26343657

  3. Online Doppler Effect Elimination Based on Unequal Time Interval Sampling for Wayside Acoustic Bearing Fault Detecting System.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Kesai; Lu, Siliang; Zhang, Shangbin; Zhang, Haibin; He, Qingbo; Kong, Fanrang

    2015-01-01

    The railway occupies a fairly important position in transportation due to its high speed and strong transportation capability. As a consequence, it is a key issue to guarantee continuous running and transportation safety of trains. Meanwhile, time consumption of the diagnosis procedure is of extreme importance for the detecting system. However, most of the current adopted techniques in the wayside acoustic defective bearing detector system (ADBD) are offline strategies, which means that the signal is analyzed after the sampling process. This would result in unavoidable time latency. Besides, the acquired acoustic signal would be corrupted by the Doppler effect because of high relative speed between the train and the data acquisition system (DAS). Thus, it is difficult to effectively diagnose the bearing defects immediately. In this paper, a new strategy called online Doppler effect elimination (ODEE) is proposed to remove the Doppler distortion online by the introduced unequal interval sampling scheme. The steps of proposed strategy are as follows: The essential parameters are acquired in advance. Then, the introduced unequal time interval sampling strategy is used to restore the Doppler distortion signal, and the amplitude of the signal is demodulated as well. Thus, the restored Doppler-free signal is obtained online. The proposed ODEE method has been employed in simulation analysis. Ultimately, the ODEE method is implemented in the embedded system for fault diagnosis of the train bearing. The results are in good accordance with the bearing defects, which verifies the good performance of the proposed strategy. PMID:26343657

  4. Improving H-Q rating curves in temprorary streams by using Acoustic Doppler Current meters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchand, P.; Salles, C.; Rodier, C.; Hernandez, F.; Gayrard, E.; Tournoud, M.-G.

    2012-04-01

    Intermittent rivers pose different challenges to stream rating due to high spatial and temporal gradients. Long dry periods, cut by short duration flush flood events explain the difficulty to obtain reliable discharge data, for low flows as well as for floods: problems occur with standard gauging, zero flow period, etc. Our study aims to test the use of an acoustic Doppler currentmeter (ADC) for improving stream rating curves in small catchments subject to large variations of discharge, solid transport and high eutrophication levels. The study is conducted at the outlet of the river Vène, a small coastal river (67 km2) located close to the city of Montpellier (France). The low flow period lasts for more than 6 month; during this period the river flow is sustained by effluents from urban sewage systems, which allows development of algae and macrophytes in the riverbed. The ADC device (Sontek ®Argonaut SW) is a pulsed Doppler current profiling system designed for measuring water velocity profiles and levels that are used to compute volumetric flow rates. It is designed for shallow waters (less than 4 meter depth). Its main advantages are its low cost and high accuracy (±1% of the measured velocity or ±0.05 m/sec, as reported by the manufacturer). The study will evaluate the improvement in rating curves in an intermittent flow context and the effect of differences in sensitivity between low and high water level, by comparing mean flow velocity obtained by ADC to direct discharges measurements. The study will also report long-term use of ADC device, by considering effects of biofilms, algae and macrophytes, as well as solid transport on the accuracy of the measurements. In conclusion, we show the possibility to improve stream rating and continuous data collection of an intermittent river by using a ADC with some precautions.

  5. Laser-Doppler acoustic probing of granular media with in-depth property gradient and varying pore pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Bodet, L.; Dhemaied, A.; Mourgues, R.; Tournat, V.; Rejiba, F.

    2012-05-24

    Non-contacting ultrasonic techniques recently proved to be efficient in the physical modeling of seismic-wave propagation at various application scales, as for instance in the context of geological analogue and seismic modeling. An innovative experimental set-up is proposed here to perform laser-Doppler acoustic probing of unconsolidated granular media with varying pore pressures. The preliminary experiments presented here provide reproducible results and exploitable data, thus validating both the proposed medium preparation and pressure gradient generation procedure.

  6. Turbulent Fluxes of Suspended Sediment from Coupled Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoitink, T.; Sassi, M.; Vermeulen, B.

    2014-12-01

    Turbulent diffusion is a cornerstone in geophysical fluid mechanics, controlling the exchange of momentum, heat and mass in surface flows occurring in the atmosphere, in rivers and in the ocean. In fluvial and coastal systems, modeling turbulent diffusion of momentum and suspended sediment requires knowledge about turbulent diffusivities, which is generally derived from parameterizations based on laboratory experiments. Field determinations of momentum and sediment diffusivities are cumbersome, requiring an instrumental array to simultaneously sample turbulence and mean flow quantities in time and in space. Recently, a new technique to analyze geophysical surface flow turbulence was introduced, appropriate for large scale systems, based on coupling of acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs). Here, we extend this approach to obtain collocated profiles of both the Reynolds stress tensor and eddy covariance fluxes, to derive vertical profiles of turbulent momentum and sediment diffusivity in a tidal river. Shear and normal stresses are obtained by combining the variances in radial velocities measured by the ADCP beams. The covariances between radial velocities and calibrated acoustic backscatter allow to determine the three Cartesian components of the turbulent flux of suspended sediment. The main advantage of this new approach is that flow velocity and sediment concentration measurements are exactly collocated, and that it allows to profile over longer ranges, in comparison to existing techniques. Results show that vertical profiles of the inverse turbulent Prandtl-Schmidt number is coherent with corresponding profiles of the sediment diffusivity, rather than with profiles of the eddy viscosity. This implies modelling suspended sediment dynamics requires knowledge about the sediment diffusivity, as the Prandtl-Schmidt number cannot be estimated from the eddy viscosity alone.

  7. Imaging and characterizing shear wave and shear modulus under orthogonal acoustic radiation force excitation using OCT Doppler variance method.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jiang; Qu, Yueqiao; Ma, Teng; Li, Rui; Du, Yongzhao; Huang, Shenghai; Shung, K Kirk; Zhou, Qifa; Chen, Zhongping

    2015-05-01

    We report on a novel acoustic radiation force orthogonal excitation optical coherence elastography (ARFOE-OCE) technique for imaging shear wave and quantifying shear modulus under orthogonal acoustic radiation force (ARF) excitation using the optical coherence tomography (OCT) Doppler variance method. The ARF perpendicular to the OCT beam is produced by a remote ultrasonic transducer. A shear wave induced by ARF excitation propagates parallel to the OCT beam. The OCT Doppler variance method, which is sensitive to the transverse vibration, is used to measure the ARF-induced vibration. For analysis of the shear modulus, the Doppler variance method is utilized to visualize shear wave propagation instead of Doppler OCT method, and the propagation velocity of the shear wave is measured at different depths of one location with the M scan. In order to quantify shear modulus beyond the OCT imaging depth, we move ARF to a deeper layer at a known step and measure the time delay of the shear wave propagating to the same OCT imaging depth. We also quantitatively map the shear modulus of a cross-section in a tissue-equivalent phantom after employing the B scan. PMID:25927794

  8. Imaging and characterizing shear wave and shear modulus under orthogonal acoustic radiation force excitation using OCT Doppler variance method

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jiang; Qu, Yueqiao; Ma, Teng; Li, Rui; Du, Yongzhao; Huang, Shenghai; Shung, K. Kirk; Zhou, Qifa; Chen, Zhongping

    2015-01-01

    We report on a novel acoustic radiation force orthogonal excitation optical coherence elastography (ARFOE-OCE) technique for imaging shear wave and quantifying shear modulus under orthogonal acoustic radiation force (ARF) excitation using the optical coherence tomography (OCT) Doppler variance method. The ARF perpendicular to the OCT beam is produced by a remote ultrasonic transducer. A shear wave induced by ARF excitation propagates parallel to the OCT beam. The OCT Doppler variance method, which is sensitive to the transverse vibration, is used to measure the ARF-induced vibration. For analysis of the shear modulus, the Doppler variance method is utilized to visualize shear wave propagation instead of Doppler OCT method, and the propagation velocity of the shear wave is measured at different depths of one location with the M scan. In order to quantify shear modulus beyond the OCT imaging depth, we move ARF to a deeper layer at a known step and measure the time delay of the shear wave propagating to the same OCT imaging depth. We also quantitatively map the shear modulus of a cross-section in a tissue-equivalent phantom after employing the B scan. PMID:25927794

  9. The upper-ocean response to typhoons as measured at a moored acoustic Doppler current profiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ze; Hou, Yijun; Xie, Qiang; Hu, Po; Liu, Yahao

    2015-09-01

    A moored acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) data, satellite-derived sea surface wind data, and the chlorophyll- a concentration were used to examine the influence of typhoon events on the upper ocean in the central Luzon Strait. The data were collected between August 27 and October 6, 2011. Large changes in ocean dynamics and marine life were recorded in the upper layers over the short term during the transit of each of the three violent typhoons that passed over the region during the study period. The geostrophic flow during the period of ADCP monitoring was comparable to the Ekman flow, recently shown to be prominent in the upper layer. Based on the influence of the three typhoon events that swept the Luzon Strait or traversed Luzon Island on their way to the South China Sea, we postulated a typhoon-induced upwelling around the ADCP and found that upward isothermal displacements reached 11.8-39.0 m, which was confirmed by the sea-level anomaly data recorded at the same time. This variability in the upper ocean may play an important role in biological activity, especially in offshore deep-sea regions.

  10. Aquatic Habitat Mapping with an Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler: Considerations for Data Quality

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gaeuman, David; Jacobson, Robert B.

    2005-01-01

    When mounted on a boat or other moving platform, acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) can be used to map a wide range of ecologically significant phenomena, including measures of fluid shear, turbulence, vorticity, and near-bed sediment transport. However, the instrument movement necessary for mapping applications can generate significant errors, many of which have not been inadequately described. This report focuses on the mechanisms by which moving-platform errors are generated, and quantifies their magnitudes under typical habitat-mapping conditions. The potential for velocity errors caused by mis-alignment of the instrument?s internal compass are widely recognized, but has not previously been quantified for moving instruments. Numerical analyses show that even relatively minor compass mis-alignments can produce significant velocity errors, depending on the ratio of absolute instrument velocity to the target velocity and on the relative directions of instrument and target motion. A maximum absolute instrument velocity of about 1 m/s is recommended for most mapping applications. Lower velocities are appropriate when making bed velocity measurements, an emerging application that makes use of ADCP bottom-tracking to measure the velocity of sediment particles at the bed. The mechanisms by which heterogeneities in the flow velocity field generate horizontal velocities errors are also quantified, and some basic limitations in the effectiveness of standard error-detection criteria for identifying these errors are described. Bed velocity measurements may be particularly vulnerable to errors caused by spatial variability in the sediment transport field.

  11. Correcting acoustic Doppler current profiler discharge measurements biased by sediment transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mueller, D.S.; Wagner, C.R.

    2007-01-01

    A negative bias in discharge measurements made with an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) is attributed to the movement of sediment on or near the streambed, and is an issue widely acknowledged by the scientific community. The integration of a differentially corrected global positioning system (DGPS) to track the movement of the ADCP can be used to avoid the systematic bias associated with a moving bed. DGPS, however, cannot provide consistently accurate positions because of multipath errors and satellite signal reception problems on waterways with dense tree canopy along the banks, in deep valleys or canyons, and near bridges. An alternative method of correcting for the moving-bed bias, based on the closure error resulting from a two-way crossing of the river, is presented. The uncertainty in the mean moving-bed velocity measured by the loop method is shown to be approximately 0.6cm/s. For the 13 field measurements presented, the loop method resulted in corrected discharges that were within 5% of discharges measured utilizing DGPS to compensate for moving-bed conditions. ?? 2007 ASCE.

  12. Errors in acoustic doppler profiler velocity measurements caused by flow disturbance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mueller, D.S.; Abad, J.D.; Garcia, C.M.; Gartner, J.W.; Garcia, M.H.; Oberg, K.A.

    2007-01-01

    Acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) are commonly used to measure streamflow and water velocities in rivers and streams. This paper presents laboratory, field, and numerical model evidence of errors in ADCP measurements caused by flow disturbance. A state-of-the-art three-dimensional computational fluid dynamic model is validated with and used to complement field and laboratory observations of flow disturbance and its effect on measured velocities. Results show that near the instrument, flow velocities measured by the ADCP are neither the undisturbed stream velocity nor the velocity of the flow field around the ADCP. The velocities measured by the ADCP are biased low due to the downward flow near the upstream face of the ADCP and upward recovering flow in the path of downstream transducer, which violate the flow homogeneity assumption used to transform beam velocities into Cartesian velocity components. The magnitude of the bias is dependent on the deployment configuration, the diameter of the instrument, and the approach velocity, and was observed to range from more than 25% at 5cm from the transducers to less than 1% at about 50cm from the transducers for the scenarios simulated. ?? 2007 ASCE.

  13. Shipboard acoustic Doppler profiler velocity observations near Point Conception: Spring 1983

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, J. A.; Brink, K. H.

    1987-04-01

    During April 1983, shipboard Doppler acoustic log current profiles were collected in an effort to characterize the flow field near points Conception and Arguello, California. Subsurface velocity maps derived from these profiles have been used to describe spatial flow structures both on and off the shelf and to investigate flow variability as a function of time and of wind stress. Persistent westward flow out of the northern half of the Santa Barbara Channel and eastward flow into its southern half were observed regardless of the direction of the local wind stress. During one well-documented upwelling-favorable wind event, currents responded in the form of an energetic (maximum 21-m speeds of >60 cm s-1) offshore squirt of cold water. During weak or downwelling-favorable winds, currents continuous with the Santa Barbara Channel outflow were observed flowing to the northwest following the local isobaths before turning offshore west of Point Arguello. Evidence for wind forcing of current fluctuations nearshore between the points and north of Point Arguello was found. Lack of a thermal wind balance between directly measured velocity shear and horizontal density gradient was explained by the presence of large accelerations in the momentum equations. Lack of a consistent relation between velocity and temperature gradient illustrates the difficulty in estimating velocity from temperature information alone in this area.

  14. On the detection of acoustic-gravity waves generated by typhoon by use of real time HF Doppler frequency shift sounding system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yinn-Nien; Cheng, Kang; Chen, Sen-Wen

    1985-07-01

    A development of a direct vision type high-frequency Doppler frequency sounder and a setup of HF Doppler frequency sounding array at the northern part of Taiwan Island were presented. By use of all typhoons that occurred in 1982 and 1983, the detectability of the typhoon-generated acoustic-gravity waves by use of this HF Doppler frequency sounding array was presented. The results show that the acoustic-gravity waves generated by a typhoon can be detected by this sounding array; however, the detectability is only 2 out of 12.

  15. Development of Millimeter-Wave Velocimetry and Acoustic Time-of-Flight Tomography for Measurements in Densely Loaded Gas-Solid Riser Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Fort, James A.; Pfund, David M.; Sheen, David M.; Pappas, Richard A.; Morgen, Gerald P.

    2007-04-01

    The MFDRC was formed in 1998 to advance the state-of-the-art in simulating multiphase turbulent flows by developing advanced computational models for gas-solid flows that are experimentally validated over a wide range of industrially relevant conditions. The goal was to transfer the resulting validated models to interested US commercial CFD software vendors, who would then propagate the models as part of new code versions to their customers in the US chemical industry. Since the lack of detailed data sets at industrially relevant conditions is the major roadblock to developing and validating multiphase turbulence models, a significant component of the work involved flow measurements on an industrial-scale riser contributed by Westinghouse, which was subsequently installed at SNL. Model comparisons were performed against these datasets by LANL. A parallel Office of Industrial Technology (OIT) project within the consortium made similar comparisons between riser measurements and models at NETL. Measured flow quantities of interest included volume fraction, velocity, and velocity-fluctuation profiles for both gas and solid phases at various locations in the riser. Some additional techniques were required for these measurements beyond what was currently available. PNNL’s role on the project was to work with the SNL experimental team to develop and test two new measurement techniques, acoustic tomography and millimeter-wave velocimetry. Acoustic tomography is a promising technique for gas-solid flow measurements in risers and PNNL has substantial related experience in this area. PNNL is also active in developing millimeter wave imaging techniques, and this technology presents an additional approach to make desired measurements. PNNL supported the advanced diagnostics development part of this project by evaluating these techniques and then by adapting and developing the selected technology to bulk gas-solids flows and by implementing them for testing in the SNL riser

  16. Active control of passive acoustic fields: passive synthetic aperture/Doppler beamforming with data from an autonomous vehicle.

    PubMed

    D'Spain, Gerald L; Terrill, Eric; Chadwell, C David; Smith, Jerome A; Lynch, Stephen D

    2006-12-01

    The maneuverability of autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) equipped with hull-mounted arrays provides the opportunity to actively modify received acoustic fields to optimize extraction of information. This paper uses ocean acoustic data collected by an AUV-mounted two-dimensional hydrophone array, with overall dimension one-tenth wavelength at 200-500 Hz, to demonstrate aspects of this control through vehicle motion. Source localization is performed using Doppler shifts measured at a set of receiver velocities by both single elements and a physical array. Results show that a source in the presence of a 10-dB higher-level interferer having exactly the same frequency content (as measured by a stationary receiver) is properly localized and that white-noise-constrained adaptive beamforming applied to the physical aperture data in combination with Doppler beamforming provides greater spatial resolution than physical-aperture-alone beamforming and significantly lower sidelobes than single element Doppler beamforming. A new broadband beamformer that adjusts for variations in vehicle velocity on a sample by sample basis is demonstrated with data collected during a high-acceleration maneuver. The importance of including the cost of energy expenditure in determining optimal vehicle motion is demonstrated through simulation, further illustrating how the vehicle characteristics are an integral part of the signal/array processing structure. PMID:17225392

  17. A Preliminary Evaluation of Near-Transducer Velocities Collected with Low-Blank Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gartner, J.W.; Ganju, N.K.

    2002-01-01

    Many streams and rivers for which the US Geological Survey must provide discharge measurements are too shallow to apply existing acoustic Doppler current profiler techniques for flow measurements of satisfactory quality. Because the same transducer is used for both transmitting and receiving acoustic signals in most Doppler current profilers, some small time delay is required for acoustic "ringing" to be damped out of transducers before meaningful measurements can be made. The result of that time delay is that velocity measurements cannot be made close to the transducer thus limiting the usefulness of these instruments in shallow regions. Manufacturers and users are constantly striving for improvements to acoustic instruments which would permit useful discharge measurements in shallow rivers and streams that are still often measured with techniques and instruments more than a century old. One promising area of advance appeared to be reduction of time delay (blank) required between transmitting and receiving signals during acoustic velocity measurements. Development of a low- or zero-blank transducer by RD Instruments3 held promise that velocity measurements could be made much closer to the transducer and thus in much shallower water. Initial experience indicates that this is not the case; limitation of measurement quality appears to be related to the physical presence of the transducer itself within the flow field. The limitation may be the result of changes to water flow pattern close to the transducer rather than transducer ringing characteristics as a function of blanking distance. Results of field experiments are discussed that support this conclusion and some minimum measurement distances from transducer are suggested based on water current speed and ADCP sample modes.

  18. Detection of geodesic acoustic mode oscillations, using multiple signal classification analysis of Doppler backscattering signal on Tore Supra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermare, L.; Hennequin, P.; Gürcan, Ö. D.; the Tore Supra Team

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents the first observation of geodesic acoustic modes (GAMs) on Tore Supra plasmas. Using the Doppler backscattering system, the oscillations of the plasma flow velocity, localized between r/a = 0.85 and r/a = 0.95, and with a frequency, typically around 10 kHz, have been observed at the plasma edge in numerous discharges. When the additional heating power is varied, the frequency is found to scale with Cs/R. The MUltiple SIgnal Classification (MUSIC) algorithm is employed to access the temporal evolution of the perpendicular velocity of density fluctuations. The method is presented in some detail, and is validated and compared against standard methods, such as the conventional fast Fourier transform method, using a synthetic signal. It stands out as a powerful data analysis method to follow the Doppler frequency with a high temporal resolution, which is important in order to extract the dynamics of GAMs.

  19. Source motion detection, estimation, and compensation for underwater acoustics inversion by wideband ambiguity lag-Doppler filtering.

    PubMed

    Josso, Nicolas F; Ioana, Cornel; Mars, Jérôme I; Gervaise, Cédric

    2010-12-01

    Acoustic channel properties in a shallow water environment with moving source and receiver are difficult to investigate. In fact, when the source-receiver relative position changes, the underwater environment causes multipath and Doppler scale changes on the transmitted signal over low-to-medium frequencies (300 Hz-20 kHz). This is the result of a combination of multiple paths propagation, source and receiver motions, as well as sea surface motion or water column fast changes. This paper investigates underwater acoustic channel properties in a shallow water (up to 150 m depth) and moving source-receiver conditions using extracted time-scale features of the propagation channel model for low-to-medium frequencies. An average impulse response of one transmission is estimated using the physical characteristics of propagation and the wideband ambiguity plane. Since a different Doppler scale should be considered for each propagating signal, a time-warping filtering method is proposed to estimate the channel time delay and Doppler scale attributes for each propagating path. The proposed method enables the estimation of motion-compensated impulse responses, where different Doppler scaling factors are considered for the different time delays. It was validated for channel profiles using real data from the BASE'07 experiment conducted by the North Atlantic Treaty Organization Undersea Research Center in the shallow water environment of the Malta Plateau, South Sicily. This paper provides a contribution to many field applications including passive ocean tomography with unknown natural sources position and movement. Another example is active ocean tomography where sources motion enables to rapidly cover one operational area for rapid environmental assessment and hydrophones may be drifting in order to avoid additional flow noise. PMID:21218875

  20. Acoustic Doppler current profiling from the JGOFS Arabian Sea cruises aboard the RV T.G. Thompson

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, H.S.; Flagg, C.N.; Shi, Y.

    1996-12-01

    Acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) data is part of the core data for the US JGOFS Arabian Sea project, along with hydrographic and nutrient data. Seventeen cruises are scheduled to take place between September 1994 and January 1996 on the R/V T.G. Thompson. Seven of the cruises follow a standard cruise track, taking hydrographic, chemical and biological measurements. The rest of the cruises, which take place generally within the standard cruise region defined by a set track, are for the deployment and recovery of moored equipment and towing of a SeaSoar. Detailed description of ADCP hardware, the AutoADCP data acquisition system, and the collection of navigation and compass data on the Thompson is documented in Section 2. Followed by data collection for each cruise together with a cruise track, Section 3 presents the processing and analysis of velocity and acoustic backscatter intensity data. Section 5 shows results of profile quality diagnosis.

  1. Comparison between color Doppler twinkling artifact and acoustic shadowing for renal calculus detection: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Shabana, Wael; Bude, Ronald O; Rubin, Jonathan M

    2009-02-01

    To assess the ability of the color Doppler twinkling artifact to detect renal stones relative to acoustic shadowing, we scanned seven uric acid calculi embedded in a tissue mimicking phantom and in sheep kidneys using a high frequency linear array and a standard curved linear array ultrasound scanheads (L12-5 and C5-2; Philips Ultrasound, Bothel, WA, USA). The stones were scanned in and out of focus. The scans were optimized for shadow formation in gray-scale imaging and for color twinkling in color Doppler imaging. The images were analyzed using Image J (http://rsb.info.nih.gov/ij/). We calculated the contrast to noise ratios (C/N) for the acoustic shadows and the color twinkling artifact compared with background. These measurements were then evaluated using a single factor analysis of variance (ANOVA) and paired two-tailed t tests. With these comparisons, the C/Ns for twinkling were significantly higher than for acoustic shadowing. On average, twinkling produced 19.2 dB greater C/Ns for stones in the phantom and 17.6 dB more for the stones in the kidneys. In addition, ANOVA showed that twinkling is resistant to focusing and scanning frequency differences. The results suggest that the twinkling artifact is a robust method for detecting the presence of renal calculi. The color signature is easier to detect than is acoustic shadowing. Twinkling may be relatively resistant to many of the problems that plague ultrasound examinations for renal stones, i.e., out-of-focus scans that might be caused by beam aberration effects due to patient body habitus. PMID:19041171

  2. Uncertainty of canal seepage losses estimated using flowing water balance with acoustic Doppler devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Chad A.; Gates, Timothy K.

    2014-09-01

    Seepage losses from unlined irrigation canals amount to a large fraction of the total volume of water diverted for agricultural use, posing problems to both water conservation and water quality. Quantifying these losses and identifying areas where they are most prominent are crucial for determining the severity of seepage-related complications and for assessing the potential benefits of seepage reduction technologies and materials. A relatively easy and inexpensive way to estimate losses over an extensive segment of a canal is the flowing water balance, or inflow-outflow, method. Such estimates, however, have long been considered fraught with ambiguity due both to measurement error and to spatial and temporal variability. This paper presents a water balance analysis that evaluates uncertainty in 60 tests on two typical earthen irrigation canals. Monte Carlo simulation is used to account for a number of different sources of uncertainty. Issues of errors in acoustic Doppler flow measurement, in water level readings, and in evaporation estimates are considered. Storage change and canal wetted perimeter area, affected by variability in the canal prism, as well as lagged vs. simultaneous measurements of discharge at the inflow and outflow ends also are addressed. Mean estimated seepage loss rates for the tested canal reaches ranged from about -0.005 (gain) to 0.110 m3 s-1 per hectare of canal wetted perimeter (or -0.043 to 0.95 m d-1) with estimated probability distributions revealing substantial uncertainty. Across the tests, the average coefficient of variation was about 240% and the average 90th inter-percentile range was 0.143 m3 s-1 per hectare (1.24 m d-1). Sensitivity analysis indicates that while the predominant influence on seepage uncertainty is error in measured discharge at the upstream and downstream ends of the canal test reach, the magnitude and uncertainty of storage change due to unsteady flow also is a significant influence. Recommendations are

  3. Inference of tidal elevation in shallow water using a vessel-towed acoustic Doppler current profiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunyan; Valle-Levinson, Arnoldo; Atkinson, Larry P.; Royer, Tom C.

    2000-11-01

    Vessel-towed acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) have been widely used to measure velocity profiles. Since the instrument is usually mounted on a catamaran floating on the surface, previous studies have used the water surface as the reference level from which the vertical coordinate for the velocity profile is defined. However, because of the tidal oscillation, the vertical coordinate thus defined is time-dependent in an Earth-coordinate system, which introduces an error to the estimated harmonic constants for the velocity. As a result, the total transport will also be in error. This is particularly a problem in shallow waters where the tidal elevation is relatively large. Therefore tidal elevation needs to be resolved to make a correct harmonic analysis for the velocity. The present study is aimed at resolving the tidal elevation change in shallow water using a vessel-towed ADCP. Semidiurnal and diurnal tidal elevations across the lower Chesapeake Bay have been determined using a vessel-towed ADCP. Data from four cruises ranging from 25 to 92 hours in 1996 and 1997 are used. Water depth averaged every 30 s by the ADCP is studied by harmonic and statistical analysis. By selecting only the data within a narrow band (˜320 m) over the planned transect, we are able to improve the reliability of the data. We then grid the depth data along the 16 km transect into 200 equal segments and use harmonic analysis to resolve the semidiurnal and diurnal tidal variations within each segment. We find that (1) the depth data from the ADCP contain both semidiurnal and diurnal signals that can be resolved, from which the surface elevation can be inferred, (2) the major error appears to come from spatial variation of the depth, (3) the semidiurnal and diurnal tidal variations of elevation inferred over flat bottom topography account for almost 100% of the total variability, while those measurements over large bottom slopes account for a much lower percentage of the total

  4. QRev—Software for computation and quality assurance of acoustic doppler current profiler moving-boat streamflow measurements—User’s manual for version 2.8

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mueller, David S.

    2016-01-01

    The software program, QRev computes the discharge from moving-boat acoustic Doppler current profiler measurements using data collected with any of the Teledyne RD Instrument or SonTek bottom tracking acoustic Doppler current profilers. The computation of discharge is independent of the manufacturer of the acoustic Doppler current profiler because QRev applies consistent algorithms independent of the data source. In addition, QRev automates filtering and quality checking of the collected data and provides feedback to the user of potential quality issues with the measurement. Various statistics and characteristics of the measurement, in addition to a simple uncertainty assessment are provided to the user to assist them in properly rating the measurement. QRev saves an extensible markup language file that can be imported into databases or electronic field notes software. The user interacts with QRev through a tablet-friendly graphical user interface. This report is the manual for version 2.8 of QRev.

  5. Comparison of index velocity measurements made with a horizontal acoustic Doppler current profiler

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jackson, P. Ryan; Johnson, Kevin K.; Duncker, James J.

    2012-01-01

    The State of Illinois' annual withdrawal from Lake Michigan is limited by a U.S. Supreme Court decree, and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is responsible for monitoring flows in the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal (CSSC) near Lemont, Illinois as a part of the Lake Michigan Diversion Accounting overseen by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Chicago District. Every 5 years, a technical review committee consisting of practicing engineers and academics is convened to review the U.S. Geological Survey's streamgage practices in the CSSC near Lemont, Illinois. The sixth technical review committee raised a number of questions concerning the flows and streamgage practices in the CSSC near Lemont and this report provides answers to many of those questions. In addition, it is the purpose of this report to examine the index velocity meters in use at Lemont and determine whether the acoustic velocity meter (AVM), which is now the primary index velocity meter, can be replaced by the horizontal acoustic Doppler current profiler (H-ADCP), which is currently the backup meter. Application of the AVM and H-ADCP to index velocity measurements in the CSSC near Lemont, Illinois, has produced good ratings to date. The site is well suited to index velocity measurements in spite of the large range of velocities and highly unsteady flows at the site. Flow variability arises from a range of sources: operation of the waterway through control structures, lockage-generated disturbances, commercial and recreational traffic, industrial withdrawals and discharges, natural inflows, seiches, and storm events. The influences of these factors on the index velocity measurements at Lemont is examined in detail in this report. Results of detailed data comparisons and flow analyses show that use of bank-mounted instrumentation such as the AVM and H-ADCP appears to be the best option for index velocity measurement in the CSSC near Lemont. Comparison of the rating curves for the AVM and H-ADCP demonstrates

  6. An investigation of the motion of small particles as related to the formulation of zero gravity experiments. [experimental design using laser doppler velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sastry, V. S.

    1980-01-01

    The nature of Brownian motion and historical theoretical investigations of the phenomemon are reviewed. The feasibility of using a laser anemometer to perform small particle experiments in an orbiting space laboratory was investigated using latex particles suspended in water in a plastic container. The optical equipment and the particle Doppler analysis processor are described. The values of the standard deviation obtained for the latex particle motion experiment were significantly large compared to corresponding velocity, therefore, their accuracy was suspect and no attempt was made to draw meaningful conclusions from the results.

  7. Discharge-measurement system using an acoustic Doppler current profiler with applications to large rivers and estuaries

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simpson, Michael R.; Oltmann, Richard N.

    1993-01-01

    Discharge measurement of large rivers and estuaries is difficult, time consuming, and sometimes dangerous. Frequently, discharge measurements cannot be made in tide-affected rivers and estuaries using conventional discharge-measurement techniques because of dynamic discharge conditions. The acoustic Doppler discharge-measurement system (ADDMS) was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey using a vessel-mounted acoustic Doppler current profiler coupled with specialized computer software to measure horizontal water velocity at 1-meter vertical intervals in the water column. The system computes discharge from water-and vessel-velocity data supplied by the ADDMS using vector-algebra algorithms included in the discharge-measurement software. With this system, a discharge measurement can be obtained by engaging the computer software and traversing a river or estuary from bank to bank; discharge in parts of the river or estuarine cross sections that cannot be measured because of ADDMS depth limitations are estimated by the system. Comparisons of ADDMS-measured discharges with ultrasonic-velocity-meter-measured discharges, along with error-analysis data, have confirmed that discharges provided by the ADDMS are at least as accurate as those produced using conventional methods. In addition, the advantage of a much shorter measurement time (2 minutes using the ADDMS compared with 1 hour or longer using conventional methods) has enabled use of the ADDMS for several applications where conventional discharge methods could not have been used with the required accuracy because of dynamic discharge conditions.

  8. Optical frequency standards for gravitational wave detection using satellite velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vutha, Amar

    2015-04-01

    Satellite Doppler velocimetry, building on the work of Kaufmann and Estabrook and Wahlquist, is a complementary technique to interferometric methods of gravitational wave detection. This method is based on the fact that the gravitational wave amplitude appears in the apparent Doppler shift of photons propagating from an emitter to a receiver. This apparent Doppler shift can be resolved provided that a frequency standard, capable of quickly averaging down to a high stability, is available. We present a design for a space-capable optical atomic frequency standard, and analyze the sensitivity of satellite Doppler velocimetry for gravitational wave astronomy in the milli-hertz frequency band.

  9. [Characterization and comparison of the doppler compensation acoustic wave in Hipposideros armiger].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu-Zhong; Hu, Kai-Liang; Wei, Li; Xu, Dong; Zhang, Li-Biao

    2010-12-01

    We used the pendulum device to study Doppler-shifted compensation of great leaf-nosed bat (Hipposideros armiger). The bats' echolocation calls were recorded by the Ultrasound Detector both under the rest condition and Doppler shift condition. Then we analyzed the calls with Avisoft software. Our results suggested that when H. armiger was approaching the target, it showed positive Doppler shift compensation: call frequency and the velocity (v) were positive correlated. Call frequency fell to minimum when the bats' relative velocity reached to maximum; likewise call frequency raised to the resting condition frequency when the relative velocity became zero. Negative Doppler shift compensation occurred when bats were far away from the target. Under negative Doppler shift compensation condition, we found call frequency and velocity were positive correlated as well, and moreover, call frequency raised to maximum again while the bats had their minus direction's maximal relative velocity. However, under this status, the elevated value was much lower than the depressed value under positive compensation at the same velocity. The frequency of occurrence of negative compensation was obviously less frequent than that under positive compensation condition. Therefore, we inferred that the two characteristics of the negative Doppler shift compensation mentioned above may be the coactions consequence of the bio-structural restriction and natural selection. PMID:21174358

  10. SURVEY OF OPTICAL VELOCIMETRY EXPERIMENTS - APPLICATIONS OF PDV, A HETERODYNE VELOCIMETER

    SciTech Connect

    HOLTKAMP, DAVID B.

    2007-02-12

    Optical velocimetry has been an important experimental diagnostic for many experiments. Recent improvements to heterodyne techniques have resulted in compact, inexpensive and high performance velocimetry measurement systems. We report on developments and improvements in this area and illustrate the performance of Photon Doppler Velocimetry (PDV) by showing several experimental examples.

  11. Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler Measurements in the Tailrace at John Day Dam

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, Chris B.; Dibrani, Berhon; Serkowski, John A.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Titzler, P. Scott; Dennis, Gary W.

    2006-01-30

    Acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) were used to measure water velocities in the tailrace at John Day Dam over a two-week period in February 2005. Data were collected by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the Hydraulic Design Section, Portland District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE). The objective of this project was therefore to collect field measurements of water velocities in the near-field draft tube exit zone as well as the far-field tailrace to be used for improving these models. Field data were collected during the project using five separate ADCPs. Mobile ADCP data were collected using two ADCPs mounted on two separate boats. Data were collected by either holding the boat on-station at pre-defined locations for approximately 10 minutes or in moving transect mode when the boat would move over large distances during the data collection. Results from the mobile ADCP survey indicated a complex hydrodynamic flow field in the tailrace downstream of John Day Dam. A large gyre was noted between the skeleton section of the powerhouse and non-spilling portion of the spillway. Downstream of the spillway, the spillway flow is constrained against the navigation lock guide wall, and large velocities were noted in this region. Downstream of the guide wall, velocities decreased as the spillway jet dispersed. Near the tailrace island, the flow split was measured to be approximately equal on Day 2 (25.4 kcfs spillway/123 kcfs total). However, approximately 60% of the flow passed along the south shore of the island on Day 1 (15.0 kcfs spillway/150 kcfs total). At a distance of 9000 ft downstream of the dam, flows had equalized laterally and were generally uniform over the cross section. The collection of water velocities near the draft tube exit of an operating turbine unit is not routine, and equipment capable of measuring 3D water velocities in these zones are at the forefront of hydraulic measurement technology. Although the feasibility of

  12. Simultaneous three-dimensional velocity and mixing measurements by use of laser Doppler velocimetry and fluorescence probes in a water tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neuhart, Dan H.; Wing, David J.; Henderson, Uleses C., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    A water tunnel investigation was conducted to demonstrate the capabilities of a laser-based instrument that can measure velocity and fluorescence intensity simultaneously. Fluorescence intensity of an excited fluorescent dye is directly related to concentration level and is used to indicate the extent of mixing in flow. This instrument is a three-dimensional laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV) in combination with a fluorometer for measuring fluorescence intensity variations. This capability allows simultaneous flow measurements of the three orthogonal velocity components and mixing within the same region. Two different flows which were generated by two models were studied: a generic nonaxisymmetric nozzle propulsion simulation model with an auxiliary internal water source that generated a jet flow and an axisymmetric forebody model with a circular sector strake that generated a vortex flow. The off-body flow fields around these models were investigated in the Langley 16- by 24-Inch Water Tunnel. The experimental results were used to calculate 17 quantities that included mean and fluctuating velocities, Reynolds stresses, mean and fluctuating dye fluorescence intensities (proportional to concentration), and fluctuating velocity and dye concentration correlations. An uncertainty analysis was performed to establish confidence levels in the experimental results. In general, uncertainties in mean velocities varied between 1 and 7 percent of free-stream velocity; uncertainties in fluctuating velocities varied between 1 and 5 percent of reference values. The results show characteristics that are unique to each type of flow.

  13. Skew photonic Doppler velocimetry to investigate the expansion of a cloud of droplets created by micro-spalling of laser shock-melted metal foils

    SciTech Connect

    Loison, D.; Resseguier, T. de; Dragon, A.; Mercier, P.; Benier, J.; Deloison, G.; Lescoute, E.; Sollier, A.

    2012-12-01

    Dynamic fragmentation in the liquid state after shock-induced melting, usually referred to as micro-spallation, is an issue of great interest for both basic and applied sciences. Recent efforts have been devoted to the characterization of the resulting ejecta, which consist in a cloud of fine molten droplets. Major difficulties arise from the loss of free surface reflectivity at shock breakout and from the wide distribution of particle velocities within this cloud. We present laser shock experiments on tin and aluminium, to pressures ranging from about 70 to 160 GPa, with complementary diagnostics including a photonic Doppler velocimeter set at a small tilt angle from the normal to the free surface, which enables probing the whole cloud of ejecta. The records are roughly consistent with a one-dimensional theoretical description accounting for laser shock loading, wave propagation, phase transformations, and fragmentation. The main discrepancies between measured and calculated velocity profiles are discussed in terms of edge effects evidenced by transverse shadowgraphy.

  14. Cause and solution for false upstream boat velocities measured with a StreamPro acoustic doppler current profiler

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mueller, David S.; Rehmel, Mike S.; Wagner, Chad R.

    2007-01-01

    In 2003, Teledyne RD Instruments introduced the StreamPro acoustic Doppler current profiler which does not include an internal compass. During stationary moving-bed tests the StreamPro often tends to swim or kite from the end of the tether (the instrument rotates then moves laterally in the direction of the rotation). Because the StreamPro does not have an internal compass, it cannot account for the rotation. This rotation and lateral movement of the StreamPro on the end of the tether generates a false upstream velocity, which cannot be easily distinguished from a moving-bed bias velocity. A field test was completed to demonstrate that this rotation and lateral movement causes a false upstream boat velocity. The vector dot product of the boat velocity and the unit vector of the depth-averaged water velocity is shown to be an effective method to account for the effect of the rotation and lateral movement.

  15. Application of the loop method for correcting acoustic doppler current profiler discharge measurements biased by sediment transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mueller, David S.; Wagner, Chad R.

    2006-01-01

    A systematic bias in discharge measurements made with an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) is attributed to the movement of sediment near the streambed-an issue widely acknowledged by the scientific community. This systematic bias leads to an underestimation of measured velocity and discharge. The integration of a differentially corrected Global Positioning System (DGPS) to track the movement of the ADCP can be used to avoid the systematic bias associated with a moving bed. DGPS systems, however, cannot provide consistently accurate positions because of multipath errors and satellite signal reception problems on waterways with dense tree canopy along the banks, in deep valleys or canyons, and near bridges. An alternative method of correcting for the moving-bed bias was investigated by the U.S. Geological Survey.

  16. Validation of HF radar probing of the vertical shear of surface currents by acoustic Doppler current profiler measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivonin, Dmitry V.; Broche, Pierre; Devenon, Jean-Luc; Shrira, Victor I.

    2004-04-01

    There exists no practical way of measuring vertical shear in the water just below the air/sea interface that contains information on air/water momentum fluxes. The paper is concerned with the validation of a recently proposed method of remote sensing of sea subsurface shear by means of a commonly used single-frequency HF radar based on the use of the second-order Bragg echo. To this end a dedicated field experiment was carried out off the French Mediterranean coast. In parallel with the HF radar probing, the independent simultaneous measurements of the subsurface shear profile were obtained by means of acoustic Doppler current profiler mounted on a floating platform, whose position was monitored by GPS. The comparison shows a fairly good agreement of the results (the discrepancy does not exceed 15%) and suggests a higher accuracy of the HF probing.

  17. Investigation of contact acoustic nonlinearity in delaminations by shearographic imaging, laser doppler vibrometric scanning and finite difference modeling.

    PubMed

    Sarens, Bart; Verstraeten, Bert; Glorieux, Christ; Kalogiannakis, Georgios; Van Hemelrijck, Danny

    2010-06-01

    Full-field dynamic shearography and laser Doppler vibrometric scanning are used to investigate the local contact acoustic nonlinear generation of delamination-induced effects on the vibration of a harmonically excited composite plate containing an artificial defect. Nonlinear elastic behavior caused by the stress-dependent boundary conditions at the delamination interfaces of a circular defect is also simulated by a 3-D second-order, finite-difference, staggered-grid model (displacement-stress formulation). Both the experimental and simulated data reveal an asymmetric motion of the layer above the delamination, which acts as a membrane vibrating with enhanced displacement amplitude around a finite offset displacement. The spectrum of the membrane motion is enriched with clapping-induced harmonics of the excitation frequency. In case of a sufficiently thin and soft membrane, the simulations reveal clear modal behavior at sub-harmonic frequencies caused by inelastic clapping. PMID:20529713

  18. Numerical performance analysis of acoustic Doppler velocity profilers in the wake of an axial-flow marine hydrokinetic turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Richmond, Marshall C.; Harding, Samuel F.; Romero Gomez, Pedro DJ

    2015-09-01

    The use of acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) for the characterization of flow conditions in the vicinity of both experimental and full scale marine hydrokinetic (MHK) turbines is becoming increasingly prevalent. The computation of a three dimensional velocity measurement from divergent acoustic beams requires the assumption that the flow conditions are homogeneous between all beams at a particular axial distance from the instrument. In the near wake of MHK devices, the mean fluid motion is observed to be highly spatially dependent as a result of torque generation and energy extraction. This paper examines the performance of ADCP measurements in such scenarios through the modelling of a virtual ADCP (VADCP) instrument in the velocity field in the wake of an MHK turbine resolved using unsteady computational fluid dynamics (CFD). This is achieved by sampling the CFD velocity field at equivalent locations to the sample bins of an ADCP and performing the coordinate transformation from beam coordinates to instrument coordinates and finally to global coordinates. The error in the mean velocity calculated by the VADCP relative to the reference velocity along the instrument axis is calculated for a range of instrument locations and orientations. The stream-wise velocity deficit and tangential swirl velocity caused by the rotor rotation lead to significant misrepresentation of the true flow velocity profiles by the VADCP, with the most significant errors in the transverse (cross-flow) velocity direction.

  19. Velocimetry signal synthesis with fringen.

    SciTech Connect

    Dolan, Daniel H., III

    2011-02-01

    An important part of velocimetry analysis is the recovery of a known velocity history from simulated data signals. The fringen program synthesizes VISAR and PDV signals, given a specified velocity history, using exact formulations for the optical signal. Time-dependent light conditions, non-ideal measurement conditions, and various diagnostic limitations (noise, etc.) may be incorporated into the simulated signals. This report describes the fringen program, which performs forward VISAR (Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector) and PDV (Photonic Doppler Velocimetry, also known as heterodyne velocimetry) analysis. Nearly all effects that might occur in VISAR/PDV measurement of a single velocity can be modeled by fringen. The program operates in MATLAB, either within a graphical interface or as a user-callable function. The current stable version of fringen is 0.3, which was released in October 2010. The following sections describe the operation and use of fringen. Section 2 gives a brief overview of VISAR and PDV synthesis. Section 3 illustrates the graphical and console interface of fringen. Section 4 presents several example uses of the program. Section 5 summarizes program capabilities and discusses potential future work.

  20. Synoptic Gulf Stream velocity profiles through simultaneous inversion of hydrographic and acoustic Doppler data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyce, T. M.; Wunsch, C.; Pierce, S. D.

    1986-01-01

    Data from a shipborne acoustic profiling device have been combined with conductivity, temperature, depth/O2 sections across the Gulf Stream to form estimates of the absolute flow fields. The procedure for the combination was a form of inverse method. The results suggest that at the time of the observations (June 1982) the net Gulf Stream transport off Hatteras was 107 + or - 11 Sv and that across a section near 72.5 W it had increased to 125 + or - 6 Sv. The transport of the deep western boundary current was 9 + or - 3 Sv. For comparison purposes an inversion was done using the hydrographic/O2 data alone as in previously published results and obtained qualitative agreement with the combined inversion. Inversion of the acoustic measurements alone, when corrected for instrument biases, leaves unacceptably large mass transport residuals in the deep water.

  1. Relative contributions of sand and gravel bedload transport to acoustic Doppler bedload- velocity magnitudes in the Trinity River, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaeuman, D.; Pittman, S.

    2007-12-01

    Apparent bedload velocities measured using the bottom-track feature of acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) have received attention over the past few years as potential surrogate technique for estimating bedload transport rates and for investigating bedload dynamics. This poster reports findings from perhaps the first use of ADCP bedload velocity measurements in an applied sediment monitoring program. Sediment transport data reported here were collected under the auspices of the Trinity River Restoration Program as part of an intensive sediment monitoring effort to assess the effects of the 2006 flow release in the Trinity River of Northern California. A 1200-kHz ADCP was deployed for a subset of bedload samples collected during the release to evaluate whether acoustic bedload velocities can be used to aid interpolation between less-frequent physical samples. Paired conventional bedload samples and acoustic bedload velocity samples supplemented by underwater video showed that the instrument used in this study is sensitive primarily to the motion of sand-sized particles at the bed, but comparatively insensitive to the motion of gravel- and cobble-sized particles. High bed velocities were measured at times and in locations where sand transport rates at the bed were high, as determined by both physical samples and video. Low bed velocities were measured where both the video and bedload samples indicated that little or no bedload was being transported, irrespective of the persistence of fast-moving sand particles in the near-bed water column. To the extent that suspended or saltating particles influence the bottom- track signal, they are near enough to the bed to be captured in the physical sampler. Thus, contamination of the bottom-track signal by suspended particles (commonly referred to as water bias) is not a significant problem with this instrument in streams with low to moderate suspended sediment concentrations. These results demonstrate that acoustic

  2. Half-year-long measurements with a buoy-mounted acoustic Doppler current profiler in the Somali Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schott, Friedrich; Johns, William

    1987-05-01

    A self-contained, upward-looking acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP), mounted in the top float of a subsurface mooring was deployed in the Somali Current at 2°14'N, 45°55'E from September 17, 1985, to April 25, 1986. The instrument operated at a frequency of 150 kHz, with a vertical beam angle of 20°. Vector-averaged profiles of horizontal and vertical velocity were recorded every 4 hours, using 200 pings per ensemble at a vertical bin length of 8.7 m. The mooring was deployed in very rough topography, settling in a trough at 337 m depth with the ADCP located at 267 m depth. Data retrieval over the entire recording period was complete, with Doppler biasing from side lobe reception of vertically traveling rays affecting only the top 20 m below the surface. Over the 7-month deployment the instrument recorded current profiles encompassing the end of the 1985 summer monsoon and entire winter monsoon and also through the spring transition into the early onset phase of the 1986 summer monsoon. Significant echo amplitude variations of week-to-month-long duration were observed, which were only partially related to horizontal flow variations associated with the monsoons. Projection of the strong horizontal currents (exceeding 150 cm/s at times) into the vertical component was not observed, attesting to fairly exact orientation of the four beams and tilt meters. This indicates that the vertical current measurement from ADCPs can be potentially useful for phenomena with vertical velocities exceeding a few millimeters per second. However, an analysis of echo amplitude and vertical current variations at the diurnal period suggests that the measured vertical velocity is, at least at that period, probably dominated by active vertical migration of biological scatterers through the water column.

  3. Acoustic Doppler current profiler applications used in rivers and estuaries by the U.S. Geological Survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gotvald, Anthony J.; Oberg, Kevin A.

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has collected streamflow information for the Nation's streams since 1889. Streamflow information is used to predict floods, manage and allocate water resources, design engineering structures, compute water-quality loads, and operate water-control structures. The current (2007) size of the USGS streamgaging network is over 7,400 streamgages nationwide. The USGS has progressively improved the streamgaging program by incorporating new technologies and techniques that streamline data collection while increasing the quality of the streamflow data that are collected. The single greatest change in streamflow measurement technology during the last 100 years has been the development and application of high frequency acoustic instruments for measuring streamflow. One such instrument, the acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP), is rapidly replacing traditional mechanical current meters for streamflow measurement (Muste and others, 2007). For more information on how an ADCP works see Simpson (2001) or visit http://hydroacoustics.usgs.gov/. The USGS has used ADCPs attached to manned or tethered boats since the mid-1990s to measure streamflow in a wide variety of conditions (fig. 1). Recent analyses have shown that ADCP streamflow measurements can be made with similar or greater accuracy, efficiency, and resolution than measurements made using conventional current-meter methods (Oberg and Mueller, 2007). ADCPs also have the ability to measure streamflow in streams where traditional current-meter measurements previously were very difficult or costly to obtain, such as streams affected by backwater or tides. In addition to streamflow measurements, the USGS also uses ADCPs for other hydrologic measurements and applications, such as computing continuous records of streamflow for tidally or backwater affected streams, measuring velocity fields with high spatial and temporal resolution, and estimating suspended-sediment concentrations. An overview

  4. Study of high speed combustion flows by laser velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, H. J.

    1984-01-01

    The feasibility of laser velocimetry in a high temperature jet was assessed in a model of an aircraft engine combustor. Experiments show that the problems encountered in measuring combustion flow can flow can be overcome by a carefully designed optical set-up and an appropriate signal processing and data acquisition system. Laser Doppler velocimetry provides useful information about coherent structures in hot free jets. The measurements agree with measurements in an isothermal jet.

  5. An Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler Survey of Flow Velocities in Detroit River, a Connecting Channel of the Great Lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holtschlag, David J.; Koschik, John A.

    2003-01-01

    Acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCP) were used to survey flow velocities in Detroit River from July 8-19, 2002, as part of a study to assess the susceptibility of public water intakes to contaminants on the St. Clair-Detroit River Waterway. More than 3.5 million point velocities were measured at 130 cross sections. Cross sections were generally spaced about 1,800 ft apart along the river from the head of Detroit River at the outlet of Lake St. Clair to the mouth of Detroit River on Lake Erie. Two transects were surveyed at each cross section, one in each direction across the river. Along each transect, velocity profiles were generally obtained 0.8-2.2 ft apart. At each velocity profile, average water velocity data were obtained at 1.64 ft intervals of depth. The raw position and velocity data from the ADCP field survey were adjusted for local magnetic anomalies using global positioning system (GPS) measurements at the end points of the transects. The adjusted velocity and ancillary data can be retrieved though the internet and extracted to column-oriented data files.

  6. A modified beam-to-earth transformation to measure short-wavelength internal waves with an acoustic Doppler current profiler

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scotti, A.; Butman, B.; Beardsley, R.C.; Alexander, P.S.; Anderson, S.

    2005-01-01

    The algorithm used to transform velocity signals from beam coordinates to earth coordinates in an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) relies on the assumption that the currents are uniform over the horizontal distance separating the beams. This condition may be violated by (nonlinear) internal waves, which can have wavelengths as small as 100-200 m. In this case, the standard algorithm combines velocities measured at different phases of a wave and produces horizontal velocities that increasingly differ from true velocities with distance from the ADCP. Observations made in Massachusetts Bay show that currents measured with a bottom-mounted upward-looking ADCP during periods when short-wavelength internal waves are present differ significantly from currents measured by point current meters, except very close to the instrument. These periods are flagged with high error velocities by the standard ADCP algorithm. In this paper measurements from the four spatially diverging beams and the backscatter intensity signal are used to calculate the propagation direction and celerity of the internal waves. Once this information is known, a modified beam-to-earth transformation that combines appropriately lagged beam measurements can be used to obtain current estimates in earth coordinates that compare well with pointwise measurements. ?? 2005 American Meteorological Society.

  7. An acoustic doppler current profiler survey of flow velocities in St. Clair River, a connecting channel of the Great Lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holtschlag, David J.; Koschik, John A.

    2003-01-01

    Acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCP) were used to measure flow velocities in St. Clair River during a survey in May and June of 2002, as part of a study to assess the susceptibility of public water intakes to contaminants on the St. Clair-Detroit River Waterway. The survey provides 2.7 million point velocity measurements at 104 cross sections. Sections are spaced about 1,630 ft apart along the river from Port Huron to Algonac, Michigan, a distance of 28.6 miles. Two transects were obtained at each cross section, one in each direction across the river. Along each transect, velocity profiles were obtained 2-4 ft apart. At each velocity profile, average water velocity data were obtained at 1.64 ft intervals of depth. The raw position and velocity data from the ADCP field survey were adjusted for local magnetic anomalies using global positioning system (GPS) measurements at the end points of the transects. The adjusted velocity and ancillary data can be retrieved through the internet and extracted to column-oriented data files.

  8. Observations of near-inertial waves in acoustic Doppler current profiler measurements made during the Mixed Layer Dynamics Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chereskin, T. K.; Levine, M. D.; Harding, A. J.; Regier, L. A.

    1989-06-01

    Measurements of upper ocean shear made during the Mixed Layer Dynamics Experiment (MILDEX) provide evidence of large horizontal scale motion at near-inertial frequency. The measurements consist of shipboard acoustic Doppler current profiles. Four large-scale spatial surveys of 2-4 days duration were made by the R/V Wecoma as a set of boxes approximately 60 km per side around a drifting current meter buoy. Velocity time series from the drifting buoy and from sonar measurements made from FLIP also indicated the presence of motions at near-inertial frequency. Horizontal length and time scales of the motion are estimated from the phase of the shear vector measured during the spatial surveys. Estimates of the length scale of the waves range from 500 to 1000 km, and the frequency is approximately 1.1f. The behavior of the phase is found to be consistent with a model of narrow-band inertial waves with vertical structure such that there is a zero crossing in velocity at the base of the mixed layer (40-60 m).

  9. Diel vertical migrations of Meganyctiphanes norvegica in the Kattegat: Comparison of net catches and measurements with Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchholz, F.; Buchholz, C.; Reppin, J.; Fischer, J.

    1995-03-01

    Diel vertical migration of a stable and well-defined population of Nordic krill, Meganyctiphanes norvegica (Crustacea, Euphausiacea) was investigated during eight days in August 1989, in the Läsö-Deep, East of the Danish island Läsö. Net catches with a multi-net (MOCNESS) and measurements with a moored and a shipboard Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) were compared. Backscattered energy as a measure for biomass gave good correlations to the dry weight of M. norvegica and smaller zooplankton from net catches. Diel migratory patterns matched well, as determined, parallel with both methods. Migratory vertical velocity was determined with ADCP at 2 3 cm sec-1. The potential for the use of ADCPs for biological investigation is discussed. Vertical migration was dependent on environmental parameters. The krill did not cross a temperature barrier of 14°C, although rich food sources were situated beyond it. Differences in salinity did not play a role. Currents were involved in plankton distribution. Light was an important Zeitgeber (synchronizer) and determined the density of the krill aggregations. Feeding behaviour did not interfere with the light-induced migratory pattern of Nordic krill at the Läsö-Deep.

  10. Shipboard acoustic doppler current profiler data collected during the Western Tropical Atlantic Experiment (WESTRAX) 1991. Technical memo

    SciTech Connect

    Routt, J.A.; Wilson, W.D.

    1992-11-01

    The long-term goal of ongoing and future research in the western tropical Atlantic is to estimate the cross-equatorial transport of water and heat. The overall goals of those involved in the Western Tropical Atlantic Experiment (WESTRAX) are (a) to describe the annual cycle in the large-scale structure of the velocity and hydrographic properties over the full water column in the western tropical Atlantic Ocean between the equator and 15 degrees N, and (b) to compare data and models in order to better understand the physics of the regional circulation in the broader context of Atlantic basin thermohaline circulation. The results of this combined effort will greatly improve our understanding of this complex boundary current region and establish the basis for efficient long-term climatic monitoring of the critical meridional fluxes of mass and heat across the tropical Atlantic. This report presents the Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) data obtained during (ACCP) Atlantic Climate Change Program cruises in the western subtropical and tropical Atlantic in January, June and September 1991.

  11. Evaluation of the Acoustic Doppler Velocity Meter for Computation of Discharge Records at Three Sites in Colorado, 2004-2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stevens, Michael R.; Diaz, Paul; Smits, Dennis E.

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Colorado Water Conservation Board, conducted a study in 2004-2005 at three sites in Colorado: Bear Creek at Morrison, Clear Creek near Empire, and Redlands Canal near Grand Junction. The study was done to evaluate acoustic Doppler velocity meter (ADVM) technology in different hydrologic settings that are characteristic of many Colorado streamflow-gaging sites. ADVMs have been tested and used extensively in many parts of the United States by USGS but not in Colorado where relatively small, shallow, clear, coarse-bed streams that ice up in the winter may affect the ADVM suitability. In this study, ADVM instrumentation was successfully used and discharge computations compared favorably, generally within 5 to 10 percent, with conventional USGS stage/discharge methods at the three Colorado sites. However, two factors, encountered in this study, may adversely affect the use of ADVM technology in Colorado. First, for some streams, the depth required (about 1.5 feet for a side-looking instrument) cannot be met during low-flow periods of the year. Second, cold temperatures and freezing-thawing cycles can produce ice effects that could prevent collection of usable ADVM (and stage) data.

  12. Applicability of acoustic Doppler devices for flow velocity measurements and discharge estimation in flows with sediment transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nord, Guillaume; Gallart, Francesc; Gratiot, Nicolas; Soler, Montserrat; Reid, Ian; Vachtman, Dina; Latron, Jérôme; Martín-Vide, Juan Pedro; Laronne, Jonathan B.

    2014-02-01

    Acoustic Doppler devices (Unidata Starflow) have been deployed for velocity measurements and discharge estimates in five contrasted open-channel flow environments, with particular attention given to the influence of sediment transport on instrument performance. The analysis is based on both field observations and flume experiments. These confirm the ability of the Starflow to provide reliable discharge time-series, but point out its limitations when sediment is being transported. (i) After calibration of the instrument by the Index Velocity Method, the deviation from reference discharge measurements was < 20% at the 95% confidence level. (ii) In ungauged conditions at high flows, the Starflow was particularly useful in providing velocity data for approximating measurements of discharge. (iii) However, channel and flume experiments revealed the effects of mobilised sediment on velocity estimates: coarse particles (⩾ 150 μm) transported by way of saltation or as bedload caused a significant underestimation of velocity by as much as 50%; a slight underestimation (10-15%) was also observed when significant quantities of fine particles (⩽150 μm) were transported in suspension; this underestimation was shown to reach 20-30% when suspended sediment concentrations were very high (c. 50-100 g L-1).

  13. Comparison of acoustic doppler current profiler and Price AA mechanical current meter measurements made during the 2011 Mississippi River Flood

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Brien, Patrick; Mueller, David; Pratt, Thad

    2012-01-01

    The Mississippi River and Tributaries project performed as designed during the historic 2011 Mississippi River flood, with many of the operational decisions based on discharge targets as opposed to stage. Measurement of discharge at the Tarbert Landing, Mississippi range provides critical information used in operational decisions for the floodways located in Louisiana. Historically, discharge measurements have been made using a Price AA current meter and the mid-section method, and a long record exists based on these types of measurements, including historical peak discharges. Discharge measurements made using an acoustic Doppler current profiler from a moving boat have been incorporated into the record since the mid 1990's, and are used along with the Price AA mid-section measurements. During the 2011 flood event, both methods were used and appeared to provide different results at times. The apparent differences between the measurement techniques are due to complex hydrodynamics at this location that created large spatial and temporal fluctuations in the flow. The data and analysis presented herein show the difference between the two methods to be within the expected accuracy of the measurements when the measurements are made concurrently. The observed fluctuations prevent valid comparisons of data collected sequentially or even with different observation durations.

  14. Acoustic Doppler current profiling from the JGOFS Arabian sea cruises aboard the RV T.G. Thompson

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyun-Sook; Flagg, C.N.; Shi, Yan

    1996-06-01

    Acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) data is part of the core data for the U.S. JGOFS Arabian Sea project, along with hydrographic and nutrient data. Seventeen cruises are scheduled to take place between September 1994 and January 1996 on the R/V T.G. Thompson. They are numbered consecutively from the ship`s commissioning with the first JGOFS cruise designated TN039. Table 1 lists start and end dates of each cruise with its mission. All but the first cruise have been or will be staged from Muscat, Oman. Each cruise is scheduled for a duration of between two weeks and one month. Seven of the cruises, referred to as process cruises, follow a standard cruise track, taking hydrographic, chemical and biological measurements. The rest of the cruises, which take place generally within the standard cruise region defined by a set track, are for the deployment and recovery of moored equipments and towing of a SeaSoar. ADCP data are collected using an autonomous data acquisition system developed for ship-of-opportunity cruises, named the AutoADCP system. The system is an extension of RD instrument`s DAS version 2.48 using enhancements made possible with {open_quotes}user-exit{close_quotes} programs. It makes it possible to collect ADCP data without the constant monitoring usually necessary and insures constant data coverage and uniform data quality.

  15. Digital Image Velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cho, Y.-C.

    1991-01-01

    Digital image velocimetry is technique for extracting two-dimensional (in image planes) velocities of objects from multiple photographs or video images of objects. Devised to overcome disadvantages of particle-image velocimetry and laser-speckle velocimetry, both of which involve use of illuminated seed particles to make flows visible. Directions of velocity vectors determined unambiguously, and dynamic range limited only by speed of camera or, equivalently, by speed of stroboscopic illumination.

  16. Acoustic and Doppler radar detection of buried land mines using high-pressure water jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denier, Robert; Herrick, Thomas J.; Mitchell, O. Robert; Summers, David A.; Saylor, Daniel R.

    1999-08-01

    The goal of the waterjet-based mine location and identification project is to find a way to use waterjets to locate and differentiate buried objects. When a buried object is struck with a high-pressure waterjets, the impact will cause characteristic vibrations in the object depending on the object's shape and composition. These vibrations will be transferred to the ground and then to the water stream that is hitting the object. Some of these vibrations will also be transferred to the air via the narrow channel the waterjet cuts in the ground. Currently the ground vibrations are detected with Doppler radar and video camera sensing, while the air vibrations are detected with a directional microphone. Data is collected via a Labview based data acquisition system. This data is then manipulated in Labview to produce the associated power spectrums. These power spectra are fed through various signal processing and recognition routines to determine the probability of there being an object present under the current test location and what that object is likely to be. Our current test area consists of a large X-Y positioning system placed over approximately a five-foot circular test area. The positioning system moves both the waterjet and the sensor package to the test location specified by the Labview control software. Currently we are able to locate buried land mine models at a distance of approximately three inches with a high degree of accuracy.

  17. The investigation of sediment processes in rivers by means of the Acoustic Doppler Profiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero, M.

    2014-09-01

    The measurement of sediment processes at the scale of a river cross-section is desirable for the evaluation of many issues related to river hydro-morphodynamics, such as the calibration and validation of numerical models for predicting the climate change impacts on water resources and efforts of maintenance of the navigation channel and other hydraulic works. Suspended- and bed-load have traditionally been measured by cumbersome techniques that are difficult to apply in large rivers. The acoustics for the investigation of small-scale sedimentological processes gained acceptance in the marine community because of its ability to simultaneously profile sediment concentration and size distribution, non-intrusively, and with high temporal and spatial resolution. The application of these methods in true riverine case studies presents additional difficulties, mainly related to water depths and stream currents that limit sound propagation into water and challenge the instruments deployment, especially during floods. This article introduces the motivations for using the ADCP for sediment processes investigation other than for flow discharge measurement, summarizes the developed methods and indicates future desirable improvements. In addition, an application on the Po River in Italy is presented, focusing on the calibration of the existing software by means of ADCP recordings. The calibrated model will assist in planning the dredging activities to maintain the navigation channel and the intake of a pump station for irrigation that is periodically obstructed with a sandbar.

  18. Use of a 600-kHz Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler to measure estuarine bottom type, relative abundance of submerged aquatic vegetation, and eelgrass canopy height

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Joseph D.; Peterson, Bradley J.

    2007-03-01

    The acoustic backscatter intensity signal from a high-frequency (600 kHz) Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) was used to categorize four different types of bottom habitat (sand, mud, sparse and dense vegetation) in a shallow-water estuary (Shinnecock Bay, NY, USA). A diver survey of the bay measured sediment and bottom vegetation characteristics at 85 sites within the bay. These data were used to groundtruth the acoustic data. Acoustic data were collected at four sites with known bottom types and used to develop an algorithm that could categorize the bottom type. The slope of the echo intensity profile close to the bottom was used to determine the bottom type and the relative numerical density (sparse or dense) of Submerged Aquatic Vegetation (SAV). In areas where eelgrass ( Zostera marina) was the dominant SAV species, the intensity profile data were analyzed to measure the height of the vegetation canopy. An acoustic survey which categorized the bottom type of the bay was conducted from a small vessel. The percentage of sampled sites categorized as each bottom habitat type from the acoustic survey was similar to those obtained by the diver survey. These methods may provide a means to rapidly survey estuarine habitats and measure spatial and temporal variations in SAV populations, as well as changes in the height of the eelgrass canopy.

  19. Continuous measurements of suspended sediment loads using dual frequency acoustic Doppler profile signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonini, Alessandro; Guerrero, Massimo; Rüther, Nils; Stokseth, Siri

    2016-04-01

    A huge thread to Hydropower plants (HPP) is incoming sediments in suspension from the rivers upstream. The sediments settle in the reservoir and reduce the effective head as well as the volume and reduce consequently the lifetime of the reservoir. In addition are the fine sediments causing severe damages to turbines and infrastructure of a HPP. For estimating the amount of in-coming sediments in suspension and the consequent planning of efficient counter measures, it is essential to monitor the rivers within the catchment of the HPP for suspended sediments. This work is considerably time consuming and requires highly educated personnel and is therefore expensive. Surrogate-indirect methods using acoustic and optic devices have bee developed since the last decades that may be efficiently applied for the continuous monitoring of suspended sediment loads. The presented study proposes therefore to establish a research station at a cross section of a river which is the main tributary to a reservoir of a HPP and equip this station with surrogate as well as with common method of measuring suspended load concentrations and related flow discharge and level. The logger at the research station delivers data automatically to a server. Therefore it is ensured that also large flood events are covered. Data during flood are of high interest to the HPP planners since they carried the most part of the sediment load in a hydrological year. Theses peaks can hardly be measured with common measurement methods. Preliminary results of the wet season 2015/2016 are presented. The data gives insight in the applicable range, in terms of scattering particles concentration-average size and corresponding flow discharge and level, eventually enabling the study of suspended sediment load-water flow correlations during peak events. This work is carried out as part of a larger research project on sustainable hydro power plants exposed to high sediment yield, SediPASS. SediPASS is funded by the

  20. Comparison of bottom-track to global positioning system referenced discharges measured using an acoustic Doppler current profiler

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wagner, C.R.; Mueller, D.S.

    2011-01-01

    A negative bias in discharge measurements made with an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) can be caused by the movement of sediment on or near the streambed. The integration of a global positioning system (GPS) to track the movement of the ADCP can be used to avoid the systematic negative bias associated with a moving streambed. More than 500 discharge transects from 63 discharge measurements with GPS data were collected at sites throughout the US, Canada, and New Zealand with no moving bed to compare GPS and bottom-track-referenced discharges. Although the data indicated some statistical bias depending on site conditions and type of GPS data used, these biases were typically about 0.5% or less. An assessment of differential correction sources was limited by a lack of data collected in a range of different correction sources and different GPS receivers at the same sites. Despite this limitation, the data indicate that the use of Wide Area Augmentation System (WAAS) corrected positional data is acceptable for discharge measurements using GGA as the boat-velocity reference. The discharge data based on GPS-referenced boat velocities from the VTG data string, which does not require differential correction, were comparable to the discharges based on GPS-referenced boat velocities from the differentially-corrected GGA data string. Spatial variability of measure discharges referenced to GGA, VTG and bottom-tracking is higher near the channel banks. The spatial variability of VTG-referenced discharges is correlated with the spatial distribution of maximum Horizontal Dilution of Precision (HDOP) values and the spatial variability of GGA-referenced discharges is correlated with proximity to channel banks. ?? 2011 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Estimating hydrodynamic roughness in a wave-dominated environment with a high-resolution acoustic Doppler profiler

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lacy, J.R.; Sherwood, C.R.; Wilson, D.J.; Chisholm, T.A.; Gelfenbaum, G.R.

    2005-01-01

    Hydrodynamic roughness is a critical parameter for characterizing bottom drag in boundary layers, and it varies both spatially and temporally due to variation in grain size, bedforms, and saltating sediment. In this paper we investigate temporal variability in hydrodynamic roughness using velocity profiles in the bottom boundary layer measured with a high-resolution acoustic Doppler profiler (PCADP). The data were collected on the ebb-tidal delta off Grays Harbor, Washington, in a mean water depth of 9 m. Significant wave height ranged from 0.5 to 3 m. Bottom roughness has rarely been determined from hydrodynamic measurements under conditions such as these, where energetic waves and medium-to-fine sand produce small bedforms. Friction velocity due to current u*c and apparent bottom roughness z0a were determined from the PCADP burst mean velocity profiles using the law of the wall. Bottom roughness kB was estimated by applying the Grant-Madsen model for wave-current interaction iteratively until the model u*c converged with values determined from the data. The resulting kB values ranged over 3 orders of magnitude (10-1 to 10-4 m) and varied inversely with wave orbital diameter. This range of kB influences predicted bottom shear stress considerably, suggesting that the use of time-varying bottom roughness could significantly improve the accuracy of sediment transport models. Bedform height was estimated from kB and is consistent with both ripple heights predicted by empirical models and bedforms in sonar images collected during the experiment. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  2. Seasonal suspended particles distribution patterns in Western South Yellow Sea based on Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianchao; Li, Guangxue; Xu, Jishang; Qiao, Lulu; Dong, Ping; Ding, Dong; Liu, Shidong; Sun, Pingkuo

    2015-06-01

    An Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) observation site was set up in the Western South Yellow Sea from 2012 to 2013 to study the local suspended particle matters (SPM) distribution pattern. The SPM concentration could be semi-quantitatively represented by backscatter intensity (Sv), converted by the echo intensity (EI) of ADCP. Results show two types of SPM in the water column: the quasi-biological SPM and quasi-mineral SPM. The quasi-biological SPM mainly exists in summer half year and is concentrated above the thermocline. It has periodically diurnal variations with high concentration at night and low concentration in the daytime. The quasi-mineral SPM is located in lower part of the water column, with similar relation to monthly tidal current variation all year round. However, the daily quasi-mineral SPM distribution patterns vary between summer and winter half year. The sunlight is thought to be the origin factor leading to the diurnally vertical motion of the biological features, which might cause the diurnal Sv variation. Unlike in winter half year when tidal current is relatively single driving force of the monthly SPM pattern, the high speed current near the thermocline is also responsible for the concentration of quasi-mineral SPM in summer half year. The sediment input difference between summer and winter half year contribute to the varied daily variation of quasi-mineral SPM with re-suspended SPM in winter and sediments from Yellow Sea Mud Area (YSMA) in summer. The seasonal variations in hydrodynamics, water structure and heavy-wind incidents are the primary factors influencing the differential seasonal SPM distribution patterns.

  3. Acoustic doppler current profiling from the JGOFS Arabian Sea cruises aboard the RV T.G. Thompson

    SciTech Connect

    Flagg, C.N.; Shi, Y.

    1995-04-01

    Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) data from the R/V T.G. THOMPSON is part of the core data for the US JGOFS Arabian Sea project along with hydrographic and nutrient data. Seventeen cruises on the THOMPSON are scheduled to take place between September 1994 and January 1996. The first of these cruises, a transit of the R/V THOMPSON into the northern Arabian Sea area from Singapore, was a calibration and training cruise that took place between September 18 and October 7, 1994. (The cruises on the THOMPSON are numbered consecutively from the ship`s commissioning with the first JOGFS cruise designated TN039.) The remaining cruises have been and will be staged from Muscat, Oman. Seven of these cruises, referred to as process cruises, will follow a set cruise track, making hydrographic, chemical and biological measurements. The remainder of the cruises while not restricted to the set cruise track, will generally stay within the region defined by the track during the deployment and retrieval of moored equipment and the towing of a SeaSoar. Each cruise will last between two weeks and one month. ADCP data will be collected on all the JGOFS Arabian Sea cruises using an autonomous data acquisition system developed for ship-of-opportunity cruises. This system, referred to as the AutoADCP, makes it possible to collect the ADCP data without the constant monitoring usually necessary and assures constant data coverage and uniform data quality. The AutoADCP system is an extension of RD Instrument`s DAS version 2.48 using enhancements made possible with ``user exit`` programs. This data report presents ADCP results from the first four JGOFS cruises, TN039 through TN042, concentrating on the data collection and processing methods.

  4. Measurement of velocities with an acoustic velocity meter, one side-looking and two upward-looking acoustic Doppler current profilers in the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal, Romeoville, Illinois

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oberg, Kevin A.; Duncker, James J.

    1999-01-01

    In 1998, a prototype 300 kHz, side-looking Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) was deployed in the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal (CSSC) at Romeoville, Illinois. Additionally, two upward-looking ADCP's were deployed in the same acoustic path as the side-looking ADCP and in the reach defined by the upstream and downstream acoustic velocity meter (AVM) paths. All three ADCP's were synchronized to the AVM clock at the gaging station so that data were sampled simultaneously. The three ADCP's were deployed for six weeks measuring flow velocities from 0.0 to 2.5 ft/s. Velocities measured by each ADCP were compared to AVM path velocities and to velocities measured by the other ADCP's.

  5. Digital image velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cho, Y.-C.

    1989-01-01

    Digital image velocimetry is proposed for the measurement of the instantaneous velocity fields of time dependent flows. This technique improves the flow measurement by eliminating some of the restrictions on existing optical methods (i.e., laser speckle velocimetry and particle image velocimetry). Among these restrictions are the limited dynamic range of the velocity measurement, directional ambiguity of the velocity vector, and the difficulty of a real-time capability. The present technique greatly enhances the dynamic range of the velocity measurement and unequivocally determines the direction of the velocity vector.

  6. Bathymetric surveys of Morse and Geist Reservoirs in central Indiana made with acoustic Doppler current profiler and global positioning system technology, 1996

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, J.T.; Morlock, S.E.; Baker, N.T.

    1997-01-01

    Acoustic Doppler current profiler, global positioning system, and geographic information system technology were used to map the bathymetry of Morse and Geist Reservoirs, two artificial lakes used for public water supply in central Indiana. The project was a pilot study to evaluate the use of the technologies for bathymetric surveys. Bathymetric surveys were last conducted in 1978 on Morse Reservoir and in 1980 on Geist Reservoir; those surveys were done with conventional methods using networks of fathometer transects. The 1996 bathymetric surveys produced updated estimates of reservoir volumes that will serve as base-line data for future estimates of storage capacity and sedimentation rates.An acoustic Doppler current profiler and global positioning system receiver were used to collect water-depth and position data from April 1996 through October 1996. All water-depth and position data were imported to a geographic information system to create a data base. The geographic information system then was used to generate water-depth contour maps and to compute the volumes for each reservoir.The computed volume of Morse Reservoir was 22,820 acre-feet (7.44 billion gallons), with a surface area of 1,484 acres. The computed volume of Geist Reservoir was 19,280 acre-feet (6.29 billion gallons), with a surface area of 1,848 acres. The computed 1996 reservoir volumes are less than the design volumes and indicate that sedimentation has occurred in both reservoirs. Cross sections were constructed from the computer-generated surfaces for 1996 and compared to the fathometer profiles from the 1978 and 1980 surveys; analysis of these cross sections also indicates that some sedimentation has occurred in both reservoirs.The acoustic Doppler current profiler, global positioning system, and geographic information system technologies described in this report produced bathymetric maps and volume estimates more efficiently and with comparable or greater resolution than conventional

  7. Velocity profiles, Reynolds stresses and bed roughness from an autonomous field deployed Acoustic Doppler Velocity Profiler in a mixed sediment tidal estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Boyle, Louise; Thorne, Peter; Cooke, Richard; Cohbed Team

    2014-05-01

    Estuaries are among some of the most important global landscapes in terms of population density, ecology and economy. Understanding the dynamics of these natural mixed sediment environments is of particular interest amid growing concerns over sea level rise, climate variations and estuarine response to these changes. Many predictors exist for bed form formation and sand transport in sandy coastal zones; however less work has been published on mixed sediments. This paper details a field study which forms part of the COHBED project aiming to increase understanding of bed forms in a biotic mixed sediment estuarine environment. The study was carried out in the Dee Estuary, in the eastern Irish Sea between England and Wales from the 21st May to 4th June 2013. A state of the art instrumentation frame, known as SEDbed, was deployed at three sites of differing sediment properties and biological makeup within the intertidal zone of the estuary. The SEDbed deployment consisted of a suite of optical and acoustic instrumentation, including an Acoustic Doppler Velocity Profiler (ADVP), Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter (ADV) and a three dimensional acoustic ripple profiler, 3D-ARP. Supplementary field samples and measurements were recorded alongside the frame during each deployment. This paper focuses on the use of new technological developments for the investigation of sediment dynamics. The hydrodynamics at each of the deployment sites are presented including centimetre resolution velocity profiles in the near bed region of the water column, obtained from the ADVP, which is presently the only autonomous field deployed coherent Doppler profiler . Based on these high resolution profiles variations in frictional velocity, bed shear stress and roughness length are calculated. Comparisons are made with theoretical models and with Reynolds stress values obtained from ADV data at a single point within the ADVP profile and from ADVP data itself. Predictions of bed roughness at each

  8. Application of acoustic doppler current profilers for measuring three-dimensional flow fields and as a surrogate measurement of bedload transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Conaway, J.S.

    2005-01-01

    Acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) have been in use in the riverine environment for nearly 20 years. Their application primarily has been focused on the measurement of streamflow discharge. ADCPs emit high-frequency sound pulses and receive reflected sound echoes from sediment particles in the water column. The Doppler shift between transmitted and return signals is resolved into a velocity component that is measured in three dimensions by simultaneously transmitting four independent acoustical pulses. To measure the absolute velocity magnitude and direction in the water column, the velocity magnitude and direction of the instrument must also be computed. Typically this is accomplished by ensonifying the streambed with an acoustical pulse that also provides a depth measurement for each of the four acoustic beams. Sediment transport on or near the streambed will bias these measurements and requires external positioning such as a differentially corrected Global Positioning Systems (GPS). Although the influence of hydraulic structures such as spur dikes and bridge piers is typically only measured and described in one or two dimensions, the use of differentially corrected GPS with ADCPs provides a fully three-dimensional measurement of the magnitude and direction of the water column at such structures. The measurement of these flow disturbances in a field setting also captures the natural pulsations of river flow that cannot be easily quantified or modeled by numerical simulations or flumes. Several examples of measured three-dimensional flow conditions at bridge sites throughout Alaska are presented. The bias introduced to the bottom-track measurement is being investigated as a surrogate measurement of bedload transport. By fixing the position of the ADCP for a known period of time the apparent velocity of the streambed at that position can be determined. Initial results and comparison to traditionally measured bedload values are presented. These initial

  9. Evaluation of acoustic doppler velocity meters to quantify flow from Comal Springs and San Marcos Springs, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gary, Marcus O.; Gary, Robin H.; Asquith, William H.

    2008-01-01

    Comal Springs and San Marcos Springs are the two largest springs in Texas, are major discharge points for the San Antonio segment of the Edwards aquifer, and provide habitat for several Federally listed endangered species that depend on adequate springflows for survival. It is therefore imperative that the Edwards Aquifer Authority have accurate and timely springflow data to guide resource management. Discharge points for Comal Springs and San Marcos Springs are submerged in Landa Lake and in Spring Lake, respectively. Flows from the springs currently (2008) are estimated by the U.S Geological Survey in real time as surface-water discharge from conventional stage-discharge ratings at sites downstream from each spring. Recent technological advances and availability of acoustic Doppler velocity meters (ADVMs) now provide tools to collect data (stream velocity) related to springflow that could increase accuracy of real-time estimates of the springflows. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Edwards Aquifer Authority, did a study during May 2006 through September 2007 to evaluate ADVMs to quantify flow from Comal and San Marcos Springs. The evaluation was based on two monitoring approaches: (1) placement of ADVMs in important spring orifices - spring run 3 and spring 7 at Comal Springs, and diversion spring at San Marcos Springs; and (2) placement of ADVMs at the nearest flowing streams - Comal River new and old channels for Comal Springs, Spring Lake west and east outflow channels and current (2008) San Marcos River streamflow-gaging site for San Marcos Springs. For Comal Springs, ADVM application at spring run 3 and spring 7 was intended to indicate whether the flows of spring run 3 and spring 7 can be related to total springflow. The findings indicate that velocity data from both discharge features, while reflecting changes in flow, do not reliably show a direct relation to measured streamflow and thus to total Comal Springs flow. ADVMs at the Comal

  10. The Physical Context of the Southern Ocean Iron Experiment as Observed by Shipboard Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewster, J.; Pierce, S. D.

    2002-12-01

    The Southern Ocean Iron Experiment in January-February 2002 involved three ships making numerous measurements to help quantify and study two iron-infused patches of water. The main purpose of the study was to investigate the biological and chemical effects of iron fertilization on phytoplankton productivity. Physical processes in the Southern Ocean play a large role in the formation, evolution, and eventual dispersion of natural phytoplankton patches. The Northern (56 S) and Southern (66.5 S) patches were infused with iron sulfate three and four times, respectively, and tracked over a seven week period. Two of the ships, the R/V Revelle and the R/V Melville, were outfitted with 150 kHz narrowband acoustic Doppler current profilers. Good quality velocity data between 20 and 300 m depths are available continuously along the shiptracks. The available transects running south in the vicinity of 170 W, from 52-66.5 S, reveal the zonally banded velocity structure characteristic of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current. To the north of the 59-61 S Polar Frontal zone, mesoscale bands of eastward currents up to 0.4 m/s alternate with generally smaller westward bands. Farther south, the alternating structure continues but with smaller eastward velocities of about 0.2 m/s. The Northern iron patch was successfully created in a relatively low-velocity region amidst strong velocities immediately north and south. The overall mean velocity during the initial Northern patch occupation by the R/V Revelle (12-19 January) was small and northward at 0.1 m/s. By the second Revelle occupation of the Northern patch (8-10 February), however, the mean patch velocity was 0.2 m/s to the east-northeast. Significantly, the patch at this time extended across the flank of a strong eastward jet, associated with a sharp surface temperature change from 8-11 C. Whereas the northern end of the North patch experienced a strong 0.5 m/s northeast velocity, the southern end remained in a low-velocity region

  11. Integration of a laser doppler vibrometer and adaptive optics system for acoustic-optical detection in the presence of random water wave distortions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Land, Phillip; Robinson, Dennis; Roeder, James; Cook, Dean; Majumdar, Arun K.

    2016-05-01

    A new technique has been developed for improving the Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) of underwater acoustic signals measured above the water's surface. This technique uses a Laser Doppler Vibrometer (LDV) and an Adaptive Optics (AO) system (consisting of a fast steering mirror, deformable mirror, and Shack-Hartmann Wavefront Sensor) for mitigating the effect of surface water distortions encountered while remotely recording underwater acoustic signals. The LDV is used to perform non-contact vibration measurements of a surface via a two beam laser interferometer. We have demonstrated the feasibility of this technique to overcome water distortions artificially generated on the surface of the water in a laboratory tank. In this setup, the LDV beam penetrates the surface of the water and travels down to be reflected off a submerged acoustic transducer. The reflected or returned beam is then recorded by the LDV as a vibration wave measurement. The LDV extracts the acoustic wave information while the AO mitigates the water surface distortions, increasing the overall SNR. The AO system records the Strehl ratio, which is a measure of the quality of optical image formation. In a perfect optical system the Strehl ratio is unity, however realistic systems with imperfections have Strehl ratios below one. The operation of the AO control system in open-loop and closed-loop configurations demonstrates the utility of the AO-based LDV for many applications.

  12. Dispersed interferometry for infrared exoplanet velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edelstein, Jerry; Muterspaugh, Matthew W.; Erskine, David; Marckwordt, Mario; Feuerstein, W. Michael; Mercer, Tony; Czeszumska, Agnieszka; Schwer, Jaclyn; Halverson, Sam; Lloyd, James P.; Muirhead, Philip S.; Wright, Jason T.; Herter, Terry

    2008-07-01

    The TEDI (TripleSpec - Exoplanet Discovery Instrument) is the first instrument dedicated to the near infrared radial velocity search for planetary companions to low-mass stars. The TEDI uses Externally Dispersed Interferometry (EDI), a combination of interferometry and multichannel dispersive spectroscopy. We have joined a white-light interferometer with the Cornell TripleSpec (0.9 - 2.4 μm) spectrograph at the Palomar Observatory 200" telescope and begun an experimental program to establish both the experimental and analytical techniques required for precision IR velocimetry and the Doppler-search for planets orbiting low mass stars and brown dwarfs.

  13. Klamath River Water Quality and Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler Data from Link River Dam to Keno Dam, 2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sullivan, Annett B.; Deas, Michael L.; Asbill, Jessica; Kirshtein, Julie D.; Butler, Kenna; Stewart, Marc A.; Wellman, Roy W.; Vaughn, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    In 2007, the U.S. Geological Survey, Watercourse Engineering, and the Bureau of Reclamation began a project to construct and calibrate a water quality and hydrodynamic model of the 21-mile reach of the Klamath River from Link River Dam to Keno Dam. To provide a basis for this work, data collection and experimental work were planned for 2007 and 2008. This report documents sampling and analytical methods and presents data from the first year of work. To determine water velocities and discharge, a series of cross-sectional acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) measurements were made on the mainstem and four canals on May 30 and September 19, 2007. Water quality was sampled weekly at five mainstem sites and five tributaries from early April through early November, 2007. Constituents reported here include field parameters (water temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen concentration, specific conductance); total nitrogen and phosphorus; particulate carbon and nitrogen; filtered orthophosphate, nitrite, nitrite plus nitrate, ammonia, organic carbon, iron, silica, and alkalinity; specific UV absorbance at 254 nm; phytoplankton and zooplankton enumeration and species identification; and bacterial abundance and morphological subgroups. The ADCP measurements conducted in good weather conditions in May showed that four major canals accounted for most changes in discharge along the mainstem on that day. Direction of velocity at measured locations was fairly homogeneous across the channel, while velocities were generally lowest near the bottom, and highest near surface, ranging from 0.0 to 0.8 ft/s. Measurements in September, made in windy conditions, raised questions about the effect of wind on flow. Most nutrient and carbon concentrations were lowest in spring, increased and remained elevated in summer, and decreased in fall. Dissolved nitrite plus nitrate and nitrite had a different seasonal cycle and were below detection or at low concentration in summer. Many nutrient and

  14. Correcting acoustic Doppler current profiler discharge measurement bias from moving-bed conditions without global positioning during the 2004 Glen Canyon Dam controlled flood on the Colorado River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gartner, J.W.; Ganju, N.K.

    2007-01-01

    Discharge measurements were made by acoustic Doppler current profiler at two locations on the Colorado River during the 2004 controlled flood from Glen Canyon Dam, Arizona. Measurement hardware and software have constantly improved from the 1980s such that discharge measurements by acoustic profiling instruments are now routinely made over a wide range of hydrologic conditions. However, measurements made with instruments deployed from moving boats require reliable boat velocity data for accurate measurements of discharge. This is normally accomplished by using special acoustic bottom track pings that sense instrument motion over bottom. While this method is suitable for most conditions, high current flows that produce downstream bed sediment movement create a condition known as moving bed that will bias velocities and discharge to lower than actual values. When this situation exists, one solution is to determine boat velocity with satellite positioning information. Another solution is to use a lower frequency instrument. Discharge measurements made during the 2004 Glen Canyon controlled flood were subject to moving-bed conditions and frequent loss of bottom track. Due to site conditions and equipment availability, the measurements were conducted without benefit of external positioning information or lower frequency instruments. This paper documents and evaluates several techniques used to correct the resulting underestimated discharge measurements. One technique produces discharge values in good agreement with estimates from numerical model and measured hydrographs during the flood. ?? 2007, by the American Society of Limnology and Oceanography, Inc.

  15. Separation of Main and Tail Rotor Noise Sources from Ground-Based Acoustic Measurements Using Time-Domain De-Dopplerization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenwood, Eric II; Schmitz, Fredric H.

    2009-01-01

    A new method of separating the contributions of helicopter main and tail rotor noise sources is presented, making use of ground-based acoustic measurements. The method employs time-domain de-Dopplerization to transform the acoustic pressure time-history data collected from an array of ground-based microphones to the equivalent time-history signals observed by an array of virtual inflight microphones traveling with the helicopter. The now-stationary signals observed by the virtual microphones are then periodically averaged with the main and tail rotor once per revolution triggers. The averaging process suppresses noise which is not periodic with the respective rotor, allowing for the separation of main and tail rotor pressure time-histories. The averaged measurements are then interpolated across the range of directivity angles captured by the microphone array in order to generate separate acoustic hemispheres for the main and tail rotor noise sources. The new method is successfully applied to ground-based microphone measurements of a Bell 206B3 helicopter and demonstrates the strong directivity characteristics of harmonic noise radiation from both the main and tail rotors of that helicopter.

  16. Externally Dispersed Interferometry for Precision Radial Velocimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Erskine, D J; Muterspaugh, M W; Edelstein, J; Lloyd, J; Herter, T; Feuerstein, W M; Muirhead, P; Wishnow, E

    2007-03-27

    Externally Dispersed Interferometry (EDI) is the series combination of a fixed-delay field-widened Michelson interferometer with a dispersive spectrograph. This combination boosts the spectrograph performance for both Doppler velocimetry and high resolution spectroscopy. The interferometer creates a periodic spectral comb that multiplies against the input spectrum to create moire fringes, which are recorded in combination with the regular spectrum. The moire pattern shifts in phase in response to a Doppler shift. Moire patterns are broader than the underlying spectral features and more easily survive spectrograph blurring and common distortions. Thus, the EDI technique allows lower resolution spectrographs having relaxed optical tolerances (and therefore higher throughput) to return high precision velocity measurements, which otherwise would be imprecise for the spectrograph alone.

  17. Feasibility of Acoustic Doppler Velocity Meters for the Production of Discharge Records from U.S. Geological Survey Streamflow-Gaging Stations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morlock, Scott E.; Nguyen, Hieu T.; Ross, Jerry H.

    2002-01-01

    It is feasible to use acoustic Doppler velocity meters (ADVM's) installed at U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) streamflow-gaging stations to compute records of river discharge. ADVM's are small acoustic current meters that use the Doppler principle to measure water velocities in a two-dimensional plane. Records of river discharge can be computed from stage and ADVM velocity data using the 'index velocity' method. The ADVM-measured velocities are used as an estimator or 'index' of the mean velocity in the channel. In evaluations of ADVM's for the computation of records of river discharge, the USGS installed ADVM's at three streamflow-gaging stations in Indiana: Kankakee River at Davis, Fall Creek at Millersville, and Iroquois River near Foresman. The ADVM evaluation study period was from June 1999 to February 2001. Discharge records were computed, using ADVM data from each station. Discharge records also were computed using conventional stage-discharge methods of the USGS. The records produced from ADVM and conventional methods were compared with discharge record hydrographs and statistics. Overall, the records compared closely from the Kankakee River and Fall Creek stations. For the Iroquois River station, variable backwater was present and affected the comparison; because the ADVM record compensates for backwater, the ADVM record may be superior to the conventional record. For the three stations, the ADVM records were judged to be of a quality acceptable to USGS standards for publications and near realtime ADVM-computed discharges are served on USGS real-time data World Wide Web pages.

  18. Long-term ferry-based observations of the suspended sediment fluxes through the Marsdiep inlet using acoustic Doppler current profilers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nauw, J. J.; Merckelbach, L. M.; Ridderinkhof, H.; van Aken, H. M.

    2014-03-01

    Long-term measurements with a hull mounted acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) under the ferry, crossing the Marsdiep inlet between the mainland and the island of Texel (the Netherlands), were used to determine the volume flux and the flux of suspended particulate matter (SPM) through this inlet for the period 2003-2005. Profiles of the SPM concentration were estimated from profiles of the acoustic backscatter intensity in which the shift between the low and the high turbulent regime is taken into account. Calibration constants and tuning parameters were estimated by using data collected during 7 different 13 hour anchor stations. The residual (water) volume flux through the inlet appears to vary strongly on a variety of time scales from daily to inter-annual. A regression analysis indicates that the daily residual volume transport correlates well with the daily mean wind component from the south; the latter likely drives the residual flow along the coast of Holland. The observed residual SPM transport of 7 to 11 Mton/yr is dominated by the correlation between tidal velocity and SPM concentration variations. This leads to an import as currents and SPM concentrations during flood were higher than those during ebb, a process generally known as tidal asymmetry. Our analysis has shown that regular observations with a ferry mounted ADCP is an effective method to monitor the volume and SPM transport processes in an estuary.

  19. Digital Image Velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cho, Y. C.

    1991-01-01

    Proposed technique for production of velocity maps from sequences of photographic video images of flows seeded with small particles. In digital image velocimetry, image analyzed by digital Fourier tranformation. Process free of noise, more precise, and consumes less time. Eliminates need to process photographs, indicates directions of velocity vectors unambiguously, and offers increased dynamic ranges. Because all processing performed electronically, eventually capable of mapping flow-velocity fields in real time.

  20. High-Definition Optical Velocimetry: A New Diagnostic Paradigm for Nuclear Security

    SciTech Connect

    Daykin, E; Diaz, A; Gallegos, C; Iverson, A; Perez, C; Rutkowski, A; Holtkamp, D; Strand, T

    2012-06-01

    This slide-show describes work done to address the challenge of high-definition optical velocimetry with hundred(s) of high-fidelity velocity vs. time measurements. After a review of the historical context and a general technical description of how optical velocimetry, particularly photonic Doppler velocimetry, works, the innovation of multiplexed photonic Doppler velocimetry (MPDV) is described as implemented with commercially available telecom products and dense wavelength division multiplexing (DWDM). High amplification of small signals allows for laser-safe operations. The authors have evaluated and leveraged telecom components– optical amplifiers, wavelength multiplexers, and seed lasers–to provide an economical, compact and rugged approach to system architecture. Fourier transform data analysis is seen to be robust and capable of discriminating simultaneous data traces recorded onto a single digitizer channel. The authors successfully fielded demonstration MPDV system on shock driven experiments.

  1. Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The acoustics research activities of the DLR fluid-mechanics department (Forschungsbereich Stroemungsmechanik) during 1988 are surveyed and illustrated with extensive diagrams, drawings, graphs, and photographs. Particular attention is given to studies of helicopter rotor noise (high-speed impulsive noise, blade/vortex interaction noise, and main/tail-rotor interaction noise), propeller noise (temperature, angle-of-attack, and nonuniform-flow effects), noise certification, and industrial acoustics (road-vehicle flow noise and airport noise-control installations).

  2. Comparison of turbidity to multi-frequency sideways-looking acoustic-Doppler data and suspended-sediment data in the Colorado River in Grand Canyon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Voichick, Nicholas; Topping, David J.

    2010-01-01

    Water clarity is important to biologists when studying fish and other fluvial fauna and flora. Turbidity is an indicator of the cloudiness of water, or reduced water clarity, and is commonly measured using nephelometric sensors that record the scattering and absorption of light by particles in the water. Unfortunately, nephelometric sensors only operate over a narrow range of the conditions typically encountered in rivers dominated by suspended-sediment transport. For example, sediment inputs into the Colorado River in Grand Canyon caused by tributary floods often result in turbidity levels that exceed the maximum recording level of nephelometric turbidity sensors. The limited range of these sensors is one reason why acoustic Doppler profiler instrument data, not turbidity, has been used as a surrogate for suspended sediment concentration and load of the Colorado River in Grand Canyon. However, in addition to being an important water-quality parameter to biologists, turbidity of the Colorado River in Grand Canyon has been used to strengthen the suspended-sediment record through the process of turbidity-threshold sampling; high turbidity values trigger a pump sampler to collect samples of the river at critical times for gathering suspended-sediment data. Turbidity depends on several characteristics of suspended sediment including concentration, particle size, particle shape, color, and the refractive index of particles. In this paper, turbidity is compared with other parameters coupled to suspended sediment, namely suspended-silt and clay concentration and multifrequency acoustic attenuation. These data have been collected since 2005 at four stations with different sediment-supply characteristics on the Colorado River in Grand Canyon. These comparisons reveal that acoustic attenuation is a particularly useful parameter, because it is strongly related to turbidity and it can be measured by instruments that experience minimal fouling and record over the entire range

  3. Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Jerry R.; Grosveld, Ferdinand

    2007-01-01

    The acoustics environment in space operations is important to maintain at manageable levels so that the crewperson can remain safe, functional, effective, and reasonably comfortable. High acoustic levels can produce temporary or permanent hearing loss, or cause other physiological symptoms such as auditory pain, headaches, discomfort, strain in the vocal cords, or fatigue. Noise is defined as undesirable sound. Excessive noise may result in psychological effects such as irritability, inability to concentrate, decrease in productivity, annoyance, errors in judgment, and distraction. A noisy environment can also result in the inability to sleep, or sleep well. Elevated noise levels can affect the ability to communicate, understand what is being said, hear what is going on in the environment, degrade crew performance and operations, and create habitability concerns. Superfluous noise emissions can also create the inability to hear alarms or other important auditory cues such as an equipment malfunctioning. Recent space flight experience, evaluations of the requirements in crew habitable areas, and lessons learned (Goodman 2003; Allen and Goodman 2003; Pilkinton 2003; Grosveld et al. 2003) show the importance of maintaining an acceptable acoustics environment. This is best accomplished by having a high-quality set of limits/requirements early in the program, the "designing in" of acoustics in the development of hardware and systems, and by monitoring, testing and verifying the levels to ensure that they are acceptable.

  4. Temporal characteristics of coherent flow structures generated over alluvial sand dunes, Mississippi River, revealed by acoustic doppler current profiling and multibeam echo sounding

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Czuba, John A.; Oberg, Kevin A.; Best, Jim L.; Parsons, Daniel R.; Simmons, S. M.; Johnson, K.K.; Malzone, C.

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigates the flow in the lee of a large sand dune located at the confluence of the Mississippi and Missouri Rivers, USA. Stationary profiles collected from an anchored boat using an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) were georeferenced with data from a real-time kinematic differential global positioning system. A multibeam echo sounder was used to map the bathymetry of the confluence and provided a morphological context for the ADCP measurements. The flow in the lee of a low-angle dune shows good correspondence with current conceptual models of flow over dunes. As expected, quadrant 2 events (upwellings of low-momentum fluid) are associated with high backscatter intensity. Turbulent events generated in the lower lee of a dune near the bed are associated with periods of vortex shedding and wake flapping. Remnant coherent structures that advect over the lower lee of the dune in the upper portion of the water column, have mostly dissipated and contribute little to turbulence intensities. The turbulent events that occupy most of the water column in the upper lee of the dune are associated with periods of wake flapping.

  5. Sounding out erosion on the Mekong river banks: insights from combined terrestrial laser scanning, multibeam echo sounding and acoustic Doppler profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Best, J.; Hackney, C. R.; Leyland, J.; Darby, S. E.; Parsons, D. R.; Aalto, R. E.; Nicholas, A. P.

    2015-12-01

    Knowledge of bank erosion processes and rates along very large rivers remains incomplete, primarily due to the difficulties of obtaining morphological and flow data close to the bank across various flow stages. Moreover, obtaining such process information through the entire flow and bank depth has also proved challenging. Here, we present data from a series of high spatial resolution topographic (Terrestrial Laser Scanner and Multibeam Echo Sounder) and flow (Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler) surveys undertaken on the Mekong River, Cambodia, which reveal the temporal and spatial evolution of a series of embayments on the outer bank of a large meander. These techniques yield unique data that reveal how the flow field responds to the morphology of the outer bank and subaqueous slump blocks. Specifically, we show that in the early stage of embayment growth, deposited slump blocks induce flow upwelling and bank-directed flow that enhances bank erosion. Our data also suggest that as the initial erosion process continues, a threshold embayment size is reached. Below this threshold, flow separation acts to enhance embayment growth along with the fluid dynamic effects of slump blocks, but above the threshold size, the separation zone in the embayments acts as a protective layer, thus slowing erosion. This field data allows proposition of a new conceptual model of embayment evolution.

  6. Application of acoustic-Doppler current profiler and expendable bathythermograph measurements to the study of the velocity structure and transport of the Gulf Stream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyce, T. M.; Dunworth, J. A.; Schubert, D. M.; Stalcup, M. C.; Barbour, R. L.

    1988-01-01

    The degree to which Acoustic-Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) and expendable bathythermograph (XBT) data can provide quantitative measurements of the velocity structure and transport of the Gulf Stream is addressed. An algorithm is used to generate salinity from temperature and depth using an historical Temperature/Salinity relation for the NW Atlantic. Results have been simulated using CTD data and comparing real and pseudo salinity files. Errors are typically less than 2 dynamic cm for the upper 800 m out of a total signal of 80 cm (across the Gulf Stream). When combined with ADCP data for a near-surface reference velocity, transport errors in isopycnal layers are less than about 1 Sv (10 to the 6th power cu m/s), as is the difference in total transport for the upper 800 m between real and pseudo data. The method is capable of measuring the real variability of the Gulf Stream, and when combined with altimeter data, can provide estimates of the geoid slope with oceanic errors of a few parts in 10 to the 8th power over horizontal scales of 500 km.

  7. Estimating sea-ice coverage, draft, and velocity in Marguerite Bay (Antarctica) using a subsurface moored upward-looking acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyatt, Jason; Visbeck, Martin; Beardsley, Robert C.; Brechner Owens, W.

    2008-02-01

    A technique for the analysis of data from a subsurface moored upward-looking acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) to determine ice coverage, draft and velocity is presented and applied to data collected in Marguerite Bay on the western Antarctic Peninsula shelf. This method provides sea-ice information when no dedicated upward-looking sonar (ULS) data are available. Ice detection is accomplished using windowed variances of ADCP vertical velocity, vertical error velocity, and surface horizontal speed. ADCP signal correlation and backscatter intensity were poor indicators of the presence of ice at this site. Ice draft is estimated using a combination of ADCP backscatter data, atmospheric and oceanic pressure data, and information about the thermal stratification. This estimate requires corrections to the ADCP-derived range for instrument tilt and sound speed profile. Uncertainties of ±0.20 m during midwinter and ±0.40 m when the base of the surface mixed layer is above the ADCP for ice draft are estimated based on: (a) a Monte Carlo simulation, (b) uncertainty in the sound speed correction, and (c) performance of the zero-draft estimate during times of known open water. Ice velocity is taken as the ADCP horizontal velocity in the depth bin specified by the range estimate.

  8. A Mobile System for Measuring Water Surface Velocities Using Unmanned Aerial Vehicle and Large-Scale Particle Image Velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y. L.

    2015-12-01

    Measurement technologies for velocity of river flow are divided into intrusive and nonintrusive methods. Intrusive method requires infield operations. The measuring process of intrusive methods are time consuming, and likely to cause damages of operator and instrument. Nonintrusive methods require fewer operators and can reduce instrument damages from directly attaching to the flow. Nonintrusive measurements may use radar or image velocimetry to measure the velocities at the surface of water flow. The image velocimetry, such as large scale particle image velocimetry (LSPIV) accesses not only the point velocity but the flow velocities in an area simultaneously. Flow properties of an area hold the promise of providing spatially information of flow fields. This study attempts to construct a mobile system UAV-LSPIV by using an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) with LSPIV to measure flows in fields. The mobile system consists of a six-rotor UAV helicopter, a Sony nex5T camera, a gimbal, an image transfer device, a ground station and a remote control device. The activate gimbal helps maintain the camera lens orthogonal to the water surface and reduce the extent of images being distorted. The image transfer device can monitor the captured image instantly. The operator controls the UAV by remote control device through ground station and can achieve the flying data such as flying height and GPS coordinate of UAV. The mobile system was then applied to field experiments. The deviation of velocities measured by UAV-LSPIV of field experiments and handhold Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter (ADV) is under 8%. The results of the field experiments suggests that the application of UAV-LSPIV can be effectively applied to surface flow studies.

  9. Lorentz force velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Thess, A; Votyakov, E V; Kolesnikov, Y

    2006-04-28

    We describe a noncontact technique for velocity measurement in electrically conducting fluids. The technique, which we term Lorentz force velocimetry (LFV), is based on exposing the fluid to a magnetic field and measuring the drag force acting upon the magnetic field lines. Two series of measurements are reported, one in which the force is determined through the angular velocity of a rotary magnet system and one in which the force on a fixed magnet system is measured directly. Both experiments confirm that the measured signal is a linear function of the flow velocity. We then derive the scaling law that relates the force on a localized distribution of magnetized material to the velocity of an electrically conducting fluid. This law shows that LFV, if properly designed, has a wide range of potential applications in metallurgy, semiconductor crystal growth, and glass manufacturing. PMID:16712237

  10. Stereo Imaging Velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDowell, Mark (Inventor); Glasgow, Thomas K. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A system and a method for measuring three-dimensional velocities at a plurality of points in a fluid employing at least two cameras positioned approximately perpendicular to one another. The cameras are calibrated to accurately represent image coordinates in world coordinate system. The two-dimensional views of the cameras are recorded for image processing and centroid coordinate determination. Any overlapping particle clusters are decomposed into constituent centroids. The tracer particles are tracked on a two-dimensional basis and then stereo matched to obtain three-dimensional locations of the particles as a function of time so that velocities can be measured therefrom The stereo imaging velocimetry technique of the present invention provides a full-field. quantitative, three-dimensional map of any optically transparent fluid which is seeded with tracer particles.

  11. An Investigation of Surface Velocimetry of Shocked Polyethylene Using Hetv

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Routley, N. R.; Price, E.; Keightley, P. T.; Millett, J. C. F.; Bourne, N. K.; Brown, E. N.; Gray, G. T.

    2007-12-01

    The velocity history of a shocked free surface has traditionally been measured using established techniques such as VISAR or Fabry-Perot. In recent years a third type of velocimetry has been developed by LLNL which uses Heterodyne techniques, Photon Doppler Velocimetry (PDV). This technique generates a Doppler beat frequency between light incident on the surface and light internally reflected within the system. Unlike the other two techniques PDV does not use an interferometer, instead it relies upon having the ability to directly record the high beat frequency. The setting up and fielding of PDV is therefore much simpler. A low power (Class 1 laser) system using this principal, locally known as Heterodyne Velocimetry (HetV) has been developed and assembled. A series of experiments has been carried out to investigate the Hugoniot of polyethylene using HetV and embedded stress gauges. The results obtained with HetV have been directly compared with the embedded gauge data from the same experiment.

  12. Evaluation of Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler to Measure Discharge at New York Power Authority's Niagara Power Project, Niagara Falls, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zajd, Henry J., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    The need for accurate real-time discharge in the International Niagara River hydro power system requires reliable, accurate and reproducible data. The U.S. Geological Survey has been widely using Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers (ADCP) to accurately measure discharge in riverine channels since the mid-1990s. The use of the ADCP to measure discharge has remained largely untested at hydroelectric-generation facilities such as the New York Power Authority's (NYPA) Niagara Power Project in Niagara Falls, N.Y. This facility has a large, engineered diversion channel with the capacity of high volume discharges in excess of 100,000 cubic feet per second (ft3/s). Facilities such as this could benefit from the use of an ADCP, if the ADCP discharge measurements prove to be more time effective and accurate than those obtained from the flow-calculation techniques that are currently used. Measurements of diversion flow by an ADCP in the 'Pant Leg' diversion channel at the Niagara Power Project were made on November 6, 7, and 8, 2006, and compared favorably (within 1 percent) with those obtained concurrently by a conventional Price-AA current-meter measurement during one of the ADCP measurement sessions. The mean discharge recorded during each 2-hour individual ADCP measurement session compared favorably with (3.5 to 6.8 percent greater than) the discharge values computed by the flow-calculation method presently in use by NYPA. The use of ADCP technology to measure discharge could ultimately permit increased power-generation efficiency at the NYPA Niagara Falls Power Project by providing improved predictions of the amount of water (and thus the power output) available.

  13. Using Principal Component and Tidal Analysis as a Quality Metric for Detecting Systematic Heading Uncertainty in Long-Term Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morley, M. G.; Mihaly, S. F.; Dewey, R. K.; Jeffries, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Ocean Networks Canada (ONC) operates the NEPTUNE and VENUS cabled ocean observatories to collect data on physical, chemical, biological, and geological ocean conditions over multi-year time periods. Researchers can download real-time and historical data from a large variety of instruments to study complex earth and ocean processes from their home laboratories. Ensuring that the users are receiving the most accurate data is a high priority at ONC, requiring quality assurance and quality control (QAQC) procedures to be developed for all data types. While some data types have relatively straightforward QAQC tests, such as scalar data range limits that are based on expected observed values or measurement limits of the instrument, for other data types the QAQC tests are more comprehensive. Long time series of ocean currents from Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers (ADCP), stitched together from multiple deployments over many years is one such data type where systematic data biases are more difficult to identify and correct. Data specialists at ONC are working to quantify systematic compass heading uncertainty in long-term ADCP records at each of the major study sites using the internal compass, remotely operated vehicle bearings, and more analytical tools such as principal component analysis (PCA) to estimate the optimal instrument alignments. In addition to using PCA, some work has been done to estimate the main components of the current at each site using tidal harmonic analysis. This paper describes the key challenges and presents preliminary PCA and tidal analysis approaches used by ONC to improve long-term observatory current measurements.

  14. Holographic particle image velocimetry measurements in a rectangular jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanEck, A.; Lourenco, L.; Riethmuller, M. L.

    1995-01-01

    The development and testing of a holographic technique capable of measuring the three velocity components in selected regions of the flow field are described. Several techniques, including laser Doppler velocimetry, hot wire and particle image velocimetry (PIV) are commonly used to measure a flow field. The advantage of the PIV technique is that it provides instantaneous measurements in a selected plane of the flow field. The aim is to extend the conventional two dimensional PIV technique to simultaneously record several planes by means of the holographic technique. In the holographic technique, parallel laser sheets are used to increase the intensity of the light in specific planes of the flow field. Particles as small as 5 microns can be recorded.

  15. Echo particle image velocimetry.

    PubMed

    DeMarchi, Nicholas; White, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    The transport of mass, momentum, and energy in fluid flows is ultimately determined by spatiotemporal distributions of the fluid velocity field.(1) Consequently, a prerequisite for understanding, predicting, and controlling fluid flows is the capability to measure the velocity field with adequate spatial and temporal resolution.(2) For velocity measurements in optically opaque fluids or through optically opaque geometries, echo particle image velocimetry (EPIV) is an attractive diagnostic technique to generate "instantaneous" two-dimensional fields of velocity.(3,4,5,6) In this paper, the operating protocol for an EPIV system built by integrating a commercial medical ultrasound machine(7) with a PC running commercial particle image velocimetry (PIV) software(8) is described, and validation measurements in Hagen-Poiseuille (i.e., laminar pipe) flow are reported. For the EPIV measurements, a phased array probe connected to the medical ultrasound machine is used to generate a two-dimensional ultrasound image by pulsing the piezoelectric probe elements at different times. Each probe element transmits an ultrasound pulse into the fluid, and tracer particles in the fluid (either naturally occurring or seeded) reflect ultrasound echoes back to the probe where they are recorded. The amplitude of the reflected ultrasound waves and their time delay relative to transmission are used to create what is known as B-mode (brightness mode) two-dimensional ultrasound images. Specifically, the time delay is used to determine the position of the scatterer in the fluid and the amplitude is used to assign intensity to the scatterer. The time required to obtain a single B-mode image, t, is determined by the time it take to pulse all the elements of the phased array probe. For acquiring multiple B-mode images, the frame rate of the system in frames per second (fps) = 1/δt. (See 9 for a review of ultrasound imaging.) For a typical EPIV experiment, the frame rate is between 20-60 fps

  16. Organised Coherent Motion in Atmospheric Boundary Layer Flow in the Proximity to Tall Plant Canopies as Detected in Acoustic Doppler Profiler and Tower-based Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foken, T.; Thomas, C. K.

    2007-12-01

    We investigated coherent structures above and in a tall plant canopy during a field campaign at a mountainous site in Germany (WALDATEM-2003). Data from a remote sensing acoustic Doppler system in concert with in-situ point measurements of turbulence in flow velocity and scalars deployed on towers yielded continuous observations from the forest ground to 200 m above the ground with a vertical resolution of 10 m at a sampling frequency of 0.4 and 20 Hz respectively. Coherent structures were extracted from time series utilizing wavelet transform techniques allowing for single structure analysis and averaged statistics of detected events. In addition to their spatiotemporal scales, we focused on the identification of generating mechanisms and surface parameters affecting coherent structures. Time scales were on the order of 20 to 36 s depending on the upstream topography and canopy morphology. Lateral transport dominated scalar coherent exchange. Vertical profiles of time scales in longitudinal and vertical velocities were mirror images showing an increase/ decrease, respectively, with height. Time scales in scalars were nearly height-constant. The ratio of the contribution of coherent structures to total vertical exchange was 0.2 for momentum and 0.25 to 0.4 for sensible heat. Analysis of power spectra confirmed an interaction between inactive eddies of atmospheric boundary layer scale and the horizontal flow in 4 % of all studied cases only, mainly under near-neutral stratification. Evaluation of the Mixing-Layer Analogy suggested that vertical shear caused by the immense canopy drag was the dominant generating mechanism. However, daytime coherent structures were found to be a superposition of shear generated events and convectional eddies. The latter led to an increase of vertical coherency in the flow around noon. At night, terrain induced linear gravity waves showed similar time scales as coherent structures emphasizing the need to differentiate between these two

  17. Velocimetry Using Heterodyne Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Strand, O T; Berzins, L V; Goosman, D R; Kuhlow, W W; Sargis, P D; Whitworth, T L

    2004-08-10

    At LLNL, we have been using heterodyne techniques for the past year and a half to measure velocities up to several kilometers-per-second on different types of experiments. We assembled this diagnostic, which we call the Heterodyne Velocimeter (HetV), using commercially available products developed for the communications industry. We use a 1550 nm fiber laser and single mode fibers to deliver light to and from the target. The return Doppler-shifted light is mixed with the original laser light to generate a beat frequency proportional to the velocity. At a velocity of 1000 m/s, the beat signal has a frequency of 1.29 GHz. We record the beat signals directly onto fast digitizers. The maximum velocity is limited by the bandwidth of the electronics and the sampling rate of the digitizers. The record length is limited by the amount of memory contained in the digitizers. This paper describes our approach to measuring velocities with this technique and presents recent data obtained with the HetV.

  18. High-speed velocimetry inside imploding cylindrical liners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolan, Daniel; Lemke, Ray; Dalton, Devon; Harding, Eric; McBride, Ryan; Martin, Matthew; Blue, Brent; Walker, Scott

    2014-03-01

    Dynamic planar compression is conceptually simple but difficult to maintain at extreme pressure (>5 Mbar). Higher pressures are attainable with imploding cylindrical liners, using Photonic Doppler velocimetry (PDV) to track the liner interior. PDV measures Doppler shift directly--1 GHz of beat frequency for every 1 km/s of velocity--requiring a special ``leapfrog'' approach for liners traveling in excess of 20 km/s. Single-point and multi-point PDV measurements have been performed in aluminum, beryllium, and tantalum liners under ramp compression, and the technique can readily applied to other implosion experiments. Combined with electrical current diagnostics, these measurements test thermodynamic equations of state at pressures up to 10 MBar and beyond. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85.

  19. Laser velocimetry with fluorescent dye-doped polystyrene microspheres.

    PubMed

    Lowe, K Todd; Maisto, Pietro; Byun, Gwibo; Simpson, Roger L; Verkamp, Max; Danehy, Paul M; Tiemsin, Pacita I; Wohl, Christopher J

    2013-04-15

    Simultaneous Mie scattering and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) signals are obtained from individual polystyrene latex microspheres dispersed in an air flow. Microspheres less than 1 μm mean diameter were doped with two organic fluorescent dyes, Rhodamine B (RhB) and dichlorofluorescein (DCF), intended either to provide improved particle-based flow velocimetry in the vicinity of surfaces or to provide scalar flow information (e.g., marking one of two fluid streams). Both dyes exhibit measureable fluorescence signals that are on the order of 10(-3) to 10(-4) times weaker than the simultaneously measured Mie signals. It is determined that at the conditions measured, 95.5% of RhB LIF signals and 32.2% of DCF signals provide valid laser-Doppler velocimetry measurements compared with the Mie scattering validation rate with 6.5 W of 532 nm excitation, while RhB excited with 1.0 W incident laser power still exhibits 95.4% valid velocimetry signals from the LIF channel. The results suggest that the method is applicable to wind tunnel measurements near walls where laser flare can be a limiting factor and monodisperse particles are essential. PMID:23595429

  20. Uterine artery Doppler and prediction of preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Lovgren, Todd R; Dugoff, Lorraine; Galan, Henry L

    2010-12-01

    Identifying patients at risk for preeclampsia would allow an increase in perinatal surveillance and possibly decrease the inherent maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality associated with severe preeclampsia and eclampsia. First and second trimester uterine artery Doppler velocimetry is a sensitive screening tool for the detection of preeclampsia and intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) requiring delivery before 34 weeks. The performance of uterine artery Doppler velocimetry as a screening test depends on the prevalence of the adverse outcome in the studied population and whether the adverse outcomes are assessed individually or collectively as a group. Future research in this area should focus on identification of additional markers that may be incorporated into a prediction model for early identification of patients at risk for adverse outcomes. PMID:21048456

  1. Design, Construction, Alignment, and Calibration of a Compact Velocimetry Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Kaufman, Morris I.; Malone, Robert M.; Frogget, Brent C.; Esquibel, David L.; Romero, Vincent T.; Lare, Gregory A.; Briggs, Bart; Iverson, Adam J.; Frayer, Daniel K.; DeVore, Douglas; Cata, Brian

    2007-09-21

    A velocimetry experiment has been designed to measure shock properties for small cylindrical metal targets (8-mm-diameter by 2-mm thick). A target is accelerated by high explosives, caught, and retrieved for later inspection. The target is expected to move at a velocity of 0.1 to 3 km/sec. The complete experiment canister is approximately 105 mm in diameter and 380 mm long. Optical velocimetry diagnostics include the Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector (VISAR) and Photon Doppler Velocimetry (PDV). The packaging of the velocity diagnostics is not allowed to interfere with the catchment or an X-ray imaging diagnostic. A single optical relay, using commercial lenses, collects Doppler-shifted light for both VISAR and PDV. The use of fiber optics allows measurement of point velocities on the target surface during accelerations occurring over 15 mm of travel. The VISAR operates at 532 nm and has separate illumination fibers requiring alignment. The PDV diagnostic operates at 1550 nm, but is aligned and focused at 670 nm. The VISAR and PDV diagnostics are complementary measurements and they image spots in close proximity on the target surface. Because the optical relay uses commercial glass, the axial positions of the optical fibers for PDV and VISAR are offset to compensate for chromatic aberrations. The optomechanical design requires careful attention to fiber management, mechanical assembly and disassembly, positioning of the foam catchment, and X-ray diagnostic field-of-view. Calibration and alignment data are archived at each stage of the assembly sequence.

  2. Particle Image Velocimetry Applications Using Fluorescent Dye-Doped Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrosky, Brian J.; Maisto, Pietro; Lowe, K. Todd; Andre, Matthieu A.; Bardet, Philippe M.; Tiemsin, Patsy I.; Wohl, Christopher J.; Danehy, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    Polystyrene latex sphere particles are widely used to seed flows for velocimetry techniques such as Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV). These particles may be doped with fluorescent dyes such that signals spectrally shifted from the incident laser wavelength may be detected via Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF). An attractive application of the LIF signal is achieving velocimetry in the presence of strong interference from laser scatter, opening up new research possibilities very near solid surfaces or at liquid/gas interfaces. Additionally, LIF signals can be used to tag different fluid streams to study mixing. While fluorescence-based PIV has been performed by many researchers for particles dispersed in water flows, the current work is among the first in applying the technique to micron-scale particles dispersed in a gas. A key requirement for such an application is addressing potential health hazards from fluorescent dyes; successful doping of Kiton Red 620 (KR620) has enabled the use of this relatively safe dye for fluorescence PIV for the first time. In this paper, basic applications proving the concept of PIV using the LIF signal from KR620-doped particles are exhibited for a free jet and a twophase flow apparatus. Results indicate that while the fluorescence PIV techniques are roughly 2 orders of magnitude weaker than Mie scattering, they provide a viable method for obtaining data in flow regions previously inaccessible via standard PIV. These techniques have the potential to also complement Mie scattering signals, for example in multi-stream and/or multi-phase experiments.

  3. Review of Fluorescence-Based Velocimetry Techniques to Study High-Speed Compressible Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bathel, Brett F.; Johansen, Criag; Inman, Jennifer A.; Jones, Stephen B.; Danehy, Paul M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper reviews five laser-induced fluorescence-based velocimetry techniques that have been used to study high-speed compressible flows at NASA Langley Research Center. The techniques discussed in this paper include nitric oxide (NO) molecular tagging velocimetry (MTV), nitrogen dioxide photodissociation (NO2-to-NO) MTV, and NO and atomic oxygen (O-atom) Doppler-shift-based velocimetry. Measurements of both single-component and two-component velocity have been performed using these techniques. This paper details the specific application and experiment for which each technique has been used, the facility in which the experiment was performed, the experimental setup, sample results, and a discussion of the lessons learned from each experiment.

  4. Advances in holographic particle velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmons, Scott; Meng, Hui; Hussain, Fazle; Liu, David

    1993-12-01

    Holographic particle velocimetry (HPV) is a promising technique for 3D flow velocity and hence vorticity measurements to study turbulence, coherent structures and vortex interactions. We discuss various aspects in the development of this technique ranging from hologram recording configurations such as in-line, off-axis and multibeam to data processing. Difficulties in implementation are analyzed and solutions are discussed. We also present preliminary measurement results in a 3D vortex flow using one of our prototype HPV systems.

  5. Doppler photoacoustic and Doppler ultrasound in blood with optical contrast agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheinfeld, Adi; Eyal, Avishay

    2013-03-01

    Photoacoustic Doppler flowmetry as well as Doppler ultrasound were performed in acoustic resolution regime on tubes filled with flowing blood with indocyanine green (ICG) at different concentrations. The photoacoustic excitation utilized a pair of directly-modulated fiber-coupled 830nm laser-diodes, modulated with either CW or tone-bursts for depthresolved measurements. The amplitude of the Doppler peak in photoacoustic Doppler measurements was found to be proportional to the ICG concentration. Photoacoustic Doppler was measured in ICG at human safe concentrations, but not in whole blood. Comparing the results between the two modalities implied that using a wavelength with higher optical absorption may improve the photoacoustic signal in blood.

  6. Doppler echocardiography

    SciTech Connect

    Labovitz, A.J.; Williams, G.A.

    1988-01-01

    The authors are successful in presenting a basic book on clinical quantitative Doppler echocardiography. It is not intended to be a comprehensive text, but it does cover clinical applications in a succinct fashion. Only the more common diseases in the adult are considered. The subjects are presented logically and are easy to comprehend. The illustrations are good, and the book is paperbound. The basic principles of Doppler echocardiography are presented briefly. The book ends with chapters on left ventricular function (stroke volume and cardiac output), congenital heart disease, and color Doppler echo-cardiography. There are numerous references and a good glossary and index.

  7. Measurement of an Explosively Driven Hemispherical Shell Using 96 Points of Optical Velocimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Danielson, J. R.; Daykin, E P; Diaz, A. B.; Doty, D. L.; Frogget, B. C.; Furlanetto, M. R.; Gallegos, C. H.; Gibo, M; Garza, A; Holtkamp, D B; Hutchins, M S; Perez, C; Perez, C; Pena, M; Romero, V T; Shinas, M A; Teel, M G; Tabaka, L J

    2014-04-01

    We report the measurement of the surface motion of a hemispherical copper shell driven by high explosives. This measurement was made using three 32-channel multiplexed photonic Doppler velocimetry (PDV) systems, in combination with a novel compound optical probe. Clearly visible are detailed features of the motion of the shell over time, enhanced by spatial correlation. Significant non-normal motion is apparent, and challenges in measuring such a geometry are discussed.

  8. Future Development for Laser-Induced Thermal Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlamp, Stefan

    2002-07-01

    The development of novel flow diagnostic techniques typically proceeds in certain stages from a proof of principle in a laboratory to a commercial product either for use in industry or as turn-key research tool. While the first usable versions are brought to market, further progress is made in the laboratory by improvements, refinements, and extensions of the technique. Consider Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV), which started by double-exposing a photographic film with the image of an illuminated particle-laden flow and where today turn-key, off-the-shelf CCD systems are available for purchase, which include the necessary data analysis software. At the same time, 3d PIV, dual-plane PIV, Doppler Global Velocimetry (DGV), etc. are being used in laboratories and will doubtless be available as integrated systems in the near future. In this paper, the origin, an overview over the current status and an outlook on the future potential of Laser-Induced Thermal Acoustics (LITA) will be given, where the focus will be on the possible technique extensions to other than the current applications. As such, it represents a collection of ideas and avenues for future research, which have not been applied as of yet, but are conceptually feasible.

  9. Laser-Induced Thermal Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummings, Eric Bryant

    1995-01-01

    Laser-induced thermal acoustics (LITA) is a new technique for remote nonintrusive measurement of thermophysical gas properties. LITA involves forming, via opto-acoustic effects, grating-shaped perturbations of gas properties by the use of intersecting beams from a short-pulse laser. A third beam scatters coherently into a signal beam off the perturbation grating via acousto-optical effects. The evolution of the gas perturbations modulates the scattered signal beam. Accurate values of the sound speed, transport properties, and composition of the gas can be extracted by analyzing the signal beam. An analytical expression for the spectrum, absolute magnitude, and time history of the LITA signal is derived. The optoacoustic effects of thermalization and electrostriction are treated. Finite beam-diameter, beam-duration, and thermalization-rate effects are included in the analysis. The expression accurately models experimental signals over a wide range of gas conditions. Experimental tests using LITA have been conducted on pure and NO_2-seeded air and helium at pressures ranging from {~ }0.1 kPa-14 MPa. Carbon dioxide has been explored near its liquid-vapor critical point. Accuracies of 0.1% in sound speed measurements have been achieved in these tests. Accuracies of {~}1% have been achieved in measurements of thermal diffusivity, although beam misalignment effects have typically degraded this accuracy by a factor of {~} 10-20. Using LITA, susceptibility spectra have been taken of approximately a femtogram of NO_2 . The effects of fluid motion and turbulence have been explored. LITA velocimetry has been demonstrated, in which the Doppler shift of light scattered from a flowing fluid is measured. LITA velocimetry requires no particle seeding, has a coherent signal beam, and can be applied to pulsed flows. LITA has also been applied to measure single-shot |chi^{(1) }|^2 or "Rayleigh scattering" spectra of a gas by the use of a technique of wavelength -division multiplexing

  10. Laser-induced thermal acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummings, Eric B.

    Laser-induced thermal acoustics (LITA) is a new technique for remote nonintrusive measurement of thermophysical gas properties. LITA involves forming, via opto-acoustic effects, grating-shaped perturbations of gas properties using intersecting beams from a short-pulse laser. A third beam scatters coherently into a signal beam off the perturbation grating via acousto-optical effects. The evolution of the gas perturbations modulates the scattered signal beam. Accurate values of the sound speed, transport properties, and composition of the gas can be extracted by analyzing the signal beam.An analytical expression for the spectrum, absolute magnitude, and time history of the LITA signal is derived. The optoacoustic effects of thermalization and electrostriction are treated. Finite beam-diameter, beam-duration, and thermalization-rate effects are included in the analysis. The expression accurately models experimental signals over a wide range of gas conditions.Experimental tests using LITA have been conducted on pure and [...]-seeded air and helium at pressures ranging from ~0.1 kPa-14 MPa. Carbon dioxide has been explored near its liquid-vapor critical point. Accuracies of 0.1% in sound speed measurements have been achieved in these tests. Accuracies of ~1% have been achieved in measurements of thermal diffusivity, although beam misalignment effects have typically degraded this accuracy by a factor of ~10-20. Using LITA, susceptibility spectra have been taken of approximately a femtogram of [...]. The effects of fluid motion and turbulence have been explored. LITA velocimetry has been demonstrated, in which the Doppler shift of light scattered from a flowing fluid is measured. LITA velocimetry requires no particle seeding, has a coherent signal beam, and can be applied to pulsed flows. LITA has also been applied to measure single-shot [...] or "Rayleigh scattering" spectra of a gas using a technique of wavelength-division multiplexing, called multiplex LITA. The LITA

  11. Fast acoustic streaming in standing waves: generation of an additional outer streaming cell.

    PubMed

    Reyt, Ida; Daru, Virginie; Bailliet, Hélène; Moreau, Solène; Valière, Jean-Christophe; Baltean-Carlès, Diana; Weisman, Catherine

    2013-09-01

    Rayleigh streaming in a cylindrical acoustic standing waveguide is studied both experimentally and numerically for nonlinear Reynolds numbers from 1 to 30 [Re(NL)=(U0/c0)(2)(R/δν)(2), with U0 the acoustic velocity amplitude at the velocity antinode, c0 the speed of sound, R the tube radius, and δν the acoustic boundary layer thickness]. Streaming velocity is measured by means of laser Doppler velocimetry in a cylindrical resonator filled with air at atmospheric pressure at high intensity sound levels. The compressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved numerically with high resolution finite difference schemes. The resonator is excited by shaking it along the axis at imposed frequency. Results of measurements and of numerical calculation are compared with results given in the literature and with each other. As expected, the axial streaming velocity measured and calculated agrees reasonably well with the slow streaming theory for small ReNL but deviates significantly from such predictions for fast streaming (ReNL>1). Both experimental and numerical results show that when ReNL is increased, the center of the outer streaming cells are pushed toward the acoustic velocity nodes until counter-rotating additional vortices are generated near the acoustic velocity antinodes. PMID:23967913

  12. Ion Velocimetry In Magnetized DC Sheaths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Christopher; Lucca Fabris, Andrea; Cappelli, Mark

    2013-09-01

    Particle dynamics near the magnetic cusps in cusped field plasma thrusters are still not well understood; characterizing the ion velocity distribution functions in these regions can help thruster designs maximize electron trapping and minimize erosion of the channel wall. To that end, a robust argon ion velocity sensor is developed using a three-level laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) technique. The 3d4F7 / 2 --> 4p4D5/ 2 0 ArII transition at 668.61 nm is pumped with a 25 mW tunable external cavity diode laser, and fluorescence down to the 4s4P3 / 2 state at 442.72 nm is collected with phase-sensitive detection. The Doppler shift in the acquired signal peak, compared to a stationary reference, gives the ion velocity component parallel to the exciting laser. We demonstrate this LIF scheme by obtaining the argon ion velocity profile through a magnetized DC sheath. The LIF measurement is used to validate a new optogalvanic velocimetry technique in which two lasers (chopped at different frequencies) intersect one another at 90° in the measurement volume. Using a lock-in amplifier, changes observed in the DC discharge current at the sum and difference of the two chopping frequencies may be related back to the mean ion velocity at that point. The authors acknowledge support from the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR). CY acknowledges support from the DOE NNSA Stewardship Science Graduate Fellowship under contract DE-FC52-08NA28752.

  13. Acoustic and Laser Doppler Anemometer Results for Confluent, 22-Lobed, and Unique-Lobed Mixer Exhaust Systems for Subsonic Jet Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salikuddin, M.; Martens, S.; Shin, H.; Majjigi, R. K.; Krejsa, Gene (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this task was to develop a design methodology and noise reduction concepts for high bypass exhaust systems which could be applied to both existing production and new advanced engine designs. Special emphasis was given to engine cycles with bypass ratios in the range of 4:1 to 7:1, where jet mixing noise was a primary noise source at full power takeoff conditions. The goal of this effort was to develop the design methodology for mixed-flow exhaust systems and other novel noise reduction concepts that would yield 3 EPNdB noise reduction relative to 1992 baseline technology. Two multi-lobed mixers, a 22-lobed axisymmetric and a 21-lobed with a unique lobe, were designed. These mixers along with a confluent mixer were tested with several fan nozzles of different lengths with and without acoustic treatment in GEAE's Cell 41 under the current subtask (Subtask C). In addition to the acoustic and LDA tests for the model mixer exhaust systems, a semi-empirical noise prediction method for mixer exhaust system is developed. Effort was also made to implement flowfield data for noise prediction by utilizing MGB code. In general, this study established an aero and acoustic diagnostic database to calibrate and refine current aero and acoustic prediction tools.

  14. Is Doppler ultrasound useful for evaluating gestational trophoblastic disease?

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Lawrence H; Bernardes, Lisandra S; Hase, Eliane A; Fushida, Koji; Francisco, Rossana P V

    2015-01-01

    Doppler ultrasound is a non-invasive method for evaluating vascularization and is widely used in clinical practice. Gestational trophoblastic neoplasia includes a group of highly vascularized malignancies derived from placental cells. This review summarizes data found in the literature regarding the applications of Doppler ultrasound in managing patients with gestational trophoblastic neoplasia. The PubMed/Medline, Web of Science, Cochrane and LILACS databases were searched for articles published in English until 2014 using the following keywords: “Gestational trophoblastic disease AND Ultrasonography, Doppler.” Twenty-eight articles met the inclusion criteria and were separated into the 4 following groups according to the aim of the study. 1 Doppler ultrasound does not seem to be capable of differentiating partial from complete moles, but it might be useful when evaluating pregnancies in which a complete mole coexists with a normal fetus. 2 There is controversy in the role of uterine artery Doppler velocimetry in the prediction of development of gestational trophoblastic neoplasia. 3 Doppler ultrasound is a useful tool in the diagnosis of gestational trophoblastic neoplasia because abnormal myometrial vascularization and lower uterine artery Doppler indices seem to be correlated with invasive disease. 4 Lower uterine artery Doppler indices in the diagnosis of gestational trophoblastic neoplasia are associated with methotrexate resistance and might play a role in prognosis. CONCLUSION: Several studies support the importance of Doppler ultrasound in the management of patients with gestational trophoblastic neoplasia, particularly the role of Doppler velocimetry in the prediction of trophoblastic neoplasia and the chemoresistance of trophoblastic tumors. Doppler findings should be used as ancillary tools, along with human chorionic gonadotropin assessment, in the diagnosis of gestational trophoblastic neoplasia. PMID:26735221

  15. The NASA Subsonic Jet Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) Dataset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, James; Wernet, Mark P.

    2011-01-01

    Many tasks in fluids engineering require prediction of turbulence of jet flows. The present document documents the single-point statistics of velocity, mean and variance, of cold and hot jet flows. The jet velocities ranged from 0.5 to 1.4 times the ambient speed of sound, and temperatures ranged from unheated to static temperature ratio 2.7. Further, the report assesses the accuracies of the data, e.g., establish uncertainties for the data. This paper covers the following five tasks: (1) Document acquisition and processing procedures used to create the particle image velocimetry (PIV) datasets. (2) Compare PIV data with hotwire and laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV) data published in the open literature. (3) Compare different datasets acquired at the same flow conditions in multiple tests to establish uncertainties. (4) Create a consensus dataset for a range of hot jet flows, including uncertainty bands. (5) Analyze this consensus dataset for self-consistency and compare jet characteristics to those of the open literature. The final objective was fulfilled by using the potential core length and the spread rate of the half-velocity radius to collapse of the mean and turbulent velocity fields over the first 20 jet diameters.

  16. The experimental study on Doppler echo signals with different scattering surfaces for velocity measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Leng-ping; Feng, Di; Ou, Pan; Yang, De-zhao

    2011-06-01

    Laser Doppler velocimetry has the ability to measure speed and surface vibrations non-intrusively with high precision. In this study the Doppler spectrum shift and spectrum broadening of echo signals by moving targets are investigated. The interaction between moving object and the laser beam of laser Doppler velocimetry have been described by varying rotating velocity, the angular velocity, distance and incident facula. By using different scattering surfaces, such as Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and sandpaper with different grain sizes, the characteristics of echo signals' Doppler spectra have been studied experimentally in detail. The results show that Doppler spectrum distribution is changed with different scattering surfaces. Meanwhile, in order to get a high measuring accuracy, the moving object's scattering characteristics must be considered carefully.

  17. Fuzzy logic particle tracking velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wernet, Mark P.

    1993-01-01

    Fuzzy logic has proven to be a simple and robust method for process control. Instead of requiring a complex model of the system, a user defined rule base is used to control the process. In this paper the principles of fuzzy logic control are applied to Particle Tracking Velocimetry (PTV). Two frames of digitally recorded, single exposure particle imagery are used as input. The fuzzy processor uses the local particle displacement information to determine the correct particle tracks. Fuzzy PTV is an improvement over traditional PTV techniques which typically require a sequence (greater than 2) of image frames for accurately tracking particles. The fuzzy processor executes in software on a PC without the use of specialized array or fuzzy logic processors. A pair of sample input images with roughly 300 particle images each, results in more than 200 velocity vectors in under 8 seconds of processing time.

  18. Dynamics and particle image velocimetry measurements of miniaturized thermoacoustic refrigerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Gendy, Husam El-Deen Mohamad

    This research deals with the design and characterization of the dynamics of miniaturized thermoacoustic refrigerators (in the audible frequency range ˜ 4000 Hz) using a random array of cotton wool as the stack and a commercial piezoelectric loudspeaker as the acoustic driver. Also of primary interest is the optimization of the refrigerator by investigating the factors affecting its performance such as the stack configuration, the acoustic drive ratio, the acoustic pressure and the mean pressure in the refrigerator. Experimental measurements of cooling power, and stray heat leaks were conducted. Digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV) was used to study the acoustic flow field in the refrigerator and to correlate measurements using PIV to the characteristic acoustic measurements. A temperature difference between the refrigerator's cold and hot heat exchangers of 13°C was obtained under optimized experimental conditions. Air at atmospheric pressure was used as the working gas, and an electric power to the acoustic driver of 2 W produced 159 dB of sound, which pumped heat by the stack. Higher sound levels would raise the performance. Results showed that the cotton stack performs well at atmospheric pressure rather than higher mean pressures where nonlinear and viscous losses affect its performance. PIV measurements, such as imaged velocity fields and gas flows, showed an excellent correlation with the acoustic pressure measurements in the refrigerator. Extreme care was taken, by investigating different PIV parameters, to fulfill the conditions that distinguish between the oscillating first-order velocity field, such as the acoustic particle velocity, and the second-order nonoscillating (steady state) fields, such as acoustic streaming. Results also showed that Rayleigh streaming, produced by and superimposed on, the oscillating particle velocity, is one of the effects affecting the performance of the refrigerator, where the time it takes the streaming to be in the

  19. Accurate phase-shift velocimetry in rock.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Matsyendra Nath; Vallatos, Antoine; Phoenix, Vernon R; Holmes, William M

    2016-06-01

    Spatially resolved Pulsed Field Gradient (PFG) velocimetry techniques can provide precious information concerning flow through opaque systems, including rocks. This velocimetry data is used to enhance flow models in a wide range of systems, from oil behaviour in reservoir rocks to contaminant transport in aquifers. Phase-shift velocimetry is the fastest way to produce velocity maps but critical issues have been reported when studying flow through rocks and porous media, leading to inaccurate results. Combining PFG measurements for flow through Bentheimer sandstone with simulations, we demonstrate that asymmetries in the molecular displacement distributions within each voxel are the main source of phase-shift velocimetry errors. We show that when flow-related average molecular displacements are negligible compared to self-diffusion ones, symmetric displacement distributions can be obtained while phase measurement noise is minimised. We elaborate a complete method for the production of accurate phase-shift velocimetry maps in rocks and low porosity media and demonstrate its validity for a range of flow rates. This development of accurate phase-shift velocimetry now enables more rapid and accurate velocity analysis, potentially helping to inform both industrial applications and theoretical models. PMID:27111139

  20. Accurate phase-shift velocimetry in rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Matsyendra Nath; Vallatos, Antoine; Phoenix, Vernon R.; Holmes, William M.

    2016-06-01

    Spatially resolved Pulsed Field Gradient (PFG) velocimetry techniques can provide precious information concerning flow through opaque systems, including rocks. This velocimetry data is used to enhance flow models in a wide range of systems, from oil behaviour in reservoir rocks to contaminant transport in aquifers. Phase-shift velocimetry is the fastest way to produce velocity maps but critical issues have been reported when studying flow through rocks and porous media, leading to inaccurate results. Combining PFG measurements for flow through Bentheimer sandstone with simulations, we demonstrate that asymmetries in the molecular displacement distributions within each voxel are the main source of phase-shift velocimetry errors. We show that when flow-related average molecular displacements are negligible compared to self-diffusion ones, symmetric displacement distributions can be obtained while phase measurement noise is minimised. We elaborate a complete method for the production of accurate phase-shift velocimetry maps in rocks and low porosity media and demonstrate its validity for a range of flow rates. This development of accurate phase-shift velocimetry now enables more rapid and accurate velocity analysis, potentially helping to inform both industrial applications and theoretical models.

  1. Flight and echolocation behaviour of whiskered bats commuting along a hedgerow: range-dependent sonar signal design, Doppler tolerance and evidence for 'acoustic focussing'.

    PubMed

    Holderied, Marc W; Jones, Gareth; von Helversen, Otto

    2006-05-01

    Echolocating bats obtain three-dimensional images of their surroundings in complete darkness by emitting sonar signals and evaluating returning echoes. When flying close to objects, bats risk collision and therefore depend on the accuracy of images--particularly in the perceived distance of obstacles, which is coded by the time delay between call and echo. Yet, during flight, such accuracy is perturbed first because bats call and receive echoes at different positions and second because echoes are modified by Doppler shifts. Certain call designs avoid both sources of ranging error, but only for a limited range of distances [the 'distance of focus' (DOF)]. Here, we show that whiskered bats (Myotis mystacinus) using broadband echolocation calls adjust call design in a range-dependent manner so that nearby obstacles are localised accurately. Such behaviour is adaptive because it reduces collision risk. The bats also reduced call duration to some extent as they approached obstacles so that most returning echoes arrived after they finished calling. This reduction in call duration during the approach to obstacles was neither the only nor the main factor that influenced DOF. Indeed, both duration and bandwidth of calls influenced DOF independently, with lower bandwidths and longer durations giving greater DOF. Our findings give a new perspective on the adaptive significance of echolocation call design in nature and have implications for sonar engineering. PMID:16651548

  2. Lipid Microdomain Formation: Characterization by Infrared Spectroscopy and Ultrasonic Velocimetry

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Zachary D.; Levin, Ira W.

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate the use of vibrational infrared spectroscopy applied to characterize lipid microdomain sizes derived from a model raft-like system consisting of nonhydroxy galactocerebroside, cholesterol, and dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine components. The resulting spectroscopic correlation field components of the lipid acyl chain CH2 methylene deformation modes, observed when lipid multilamellar assemblies are rapidly frozen from the liquid crystalline state to the gel phase, indicate the existence of lipid microdomains on a scale of several nanometers. The addition of cholesterol disrupts the glycosphingolipid selectively but perturbs the di-saturated chain phospholipid matrix. Complementary acoustic velocimetry measurements indicate that the microdomain formation decreases the total volume adiabatic compressibilities of the multilamellar vesicle assemblies. The addition of cholesterol, however, disrupts the galactocerebroside domains, resulting in a slight increase in the lipid assemblies' total adiabatic compressibility. The combination of these two physical approaches offers new insight into microdomain formation and their properties in model bilayer systems. PMID:18192352

  3. An improved instantaneous laser Doppler velocity system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desio, Charles V.; Olcmen, Semih; Schinetsky, Philip

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, improvements made on a single velocity component instantaneous laser Doppler velocimetry (ILDV) system are detailed. The ILDV system developed in this research effort is capable of measuring a single velocity component at a rate as high as two megahertz. The current system accounts for the effects of the laser intensity variation on the measured velocity and eliminates the use of a Pockels cell used in previous ILDV systems. The system developed in the current effort was tested using compressible, subsonic jet flows. The ILDV system developed would be most beneficial where a high data capture rate is needed such as in shock tubes, and high-speed wind tunnels.

  4. Catadioptric optics for laser Doppler velocimeter applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunagan, Stephen E.

    1989-01-01

    This paper examines the adaptation of low-cost Schmidt-Cassegrain astronomical telescopes to perform the laser-beam-focusing and scattered-light collection tasks associated with dual-beam laser Doppler velocimetry. A generic telescope design is analyzed using ray-tracing methods and Gaussian beam-propagation theory. A straightforward modification procedure to convert from infinite to near unity conjugate-ratio operation with very low residual aberration is identified and tested with a 200-mm-aperture telescope modified for f/10 operation. Performance data for this modified telescope configuration are near the diffraction limit and agree well with predictions.

  5. Optical diagnostics for turbulent and multiphase flows: Particle image velocimetry and photorefractive optics

    SciTech Connect

    O`Hern, T.J.; Torczynski, J.R.; Shagam, R.N.; Blanchat, T.K.; Chu, T.Y.; Tassin-Leger, A.L.; Henderson, J.A.

    1997-01-01

    This report summarizes the work performed under the Sandia Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project ``Optical Diagnostics for Turbulent and Multiphase Flows.`` Advanced optical diagnostics have been investigated and developed for flow field measurements, including capabilities for measurement in turbulent, multiphase, and heated flows. Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) includes several techniques for measurement of instantaneous flow field velocities and associated turbulence quantities. Nonlinear photorefractive optical materials have been investigated for the possibility of measuring turbulence quantities (turbulent spectrum) more directly. The two-dimensional PIV techniques developed under this LDRD were shown to work well, and were compared with more traditional laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV). Three-dimensional PIV techniques were developed and tested, but due to several experimental difficulties were not as successful. The photorefractive techniques were tested, and both potential capabilities and possible problem areas were elucidated.

  6. Doppler tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Christopher Jacob

    This study addresses the development of a methodology using the Doppler Effect for high-resolution, short-range tracking of small projectiles and vehicles. Minimal impact on the design of the moving object is achieved by incorporating only a transmitter in it and using ground stations for all other components. This is particularly useful for tracking objects such as sports balls that have configurations and materials that are not conducive to housing onboard instrumentation. The methodology developed here uses four or more receivers to monitor a constant frequency signal emitted by the object. Efficient and accurate schemes for filtering the raw signals, determining the instantaneous frequencies, time synching the frequencies from each receiver, smoothing the synced frequencies, determining the relative velocity and radius of the object and solving the nonlinear system of equations for object position in three dimensions as a function of time are developed and described here.

  7. The leicester Doppler phantom--a digital electronic phantom for ultrasound pulsed Doppler system testing.

    PubMed

    Gittins, John; Martin, Kevin

    2010-04-01

    Doppler flow and string phantoms have been used to assess the performance of ultrasound Doppler systems in terms of parameters such as sensitivity, velocity accuracy and sample volume registration. However, because of the nature of their construction, they cannot challenge the accuracy and repeatability of modern digital ultrasound systems or give objective measures of system performance. Electronic Doppler phantoms are able to make use of electronically generated test signals, which may be controlled precisely in terms of frequency, amplitude and timing. The Leicester Electronic Doppler Phantom uses modern digital signal processing methods and field programmable gate array technology to overcome some of the limitations of previously described electronic phantoms. In its present form, it is able to give quantitative graphical assessments of frequency response and range gate characteristics, as well as measures of dynamic range and velocity measurement accuracy. The use of direct acoustic coupling eliminates uncertainties caused by Doppler beam effects, such as intrinsic spectral broadening, but prevents their evaluation. PMID:20350689

  8. Particle Image Velocimetry During Injection Molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bress, Thomas; Dowling, David

    2012-11-01

    Injection molding involves the unsteady non-isothermal flow of a non-Newtonian polymer melt. An optical-access mold has been used to perform particle image velocimetry (PIV) on molten polystyrene during injection molding. Velocimetry data of the mold-filling flow will be presented. Statistical assessments of the velocimetry data and scaled residuals of the continuity equation suggest that PIV can be conducted in molten plastics with an uncertainty of +/-2 percent. Simulations are often used to model polymer flow during injection molding to design molds and select processing parameters but it is difficult to determine the accuracy of these simulations due to a lack of in-mold velocimetry and melt-front progression data. Moldflow was used to simulate the filling of the optical-access mold, and these simulated results are compared to the appropriately-averaged time-varying velocity field measurements. Simulated results for melt-front progression are also compared with the experimentally observed flow fronts. The ratio of the experimentally measured average velocity magnitudes to the simulation magnitudes was found on average to be 0.99 with a standard deviation of 0.25, and the difference in velocity orientations was found to be 0.9 degree with a standard deviation of 3.2 degrees. formerly at the University of Michigan.

  9. Ultrasonic bistatic Doppler sonar in air for personnel motion detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekimov, Alexander; Hickey, Craig J.

    2012-06-01

    The National Center for Physical Acoustics (NCPA) at the University of Mississippi is working on the application of ultrasonic Doppler sonars in air for personnel motion detection. Two traditional Doppler sonar configurations, a monostatic and a bistatic, are being studied. In the monostatic configuration, the distance between the transmitter and the receiver is small. The proximity of the source to the receiver places a limitation on the system associated with the overloading of the receivers' input due to acoustic energy leakage from the transmitters' output. The maximum range of detection is therefore limited by the dynamic range of the acquisition system. In a bistatic Doppler ultrasonic sonar, the source and receiver are spaced apart and the acoustic energy along the direct path does not constrain the maximum acoustic power level output of the transmitter. In a monostatic configuration the acoustic signal suffers from beam spreading and natural absorption during propagation from the transmitter to the target and from the target back to the receiver. In a bistatic configuration the acoustic propagation is in one direction only and theoretically the detection distance can be twice the monostatic distance. For comparison the experiments of a human walking in a building hallway using the bistatic and monostaic Doppler sonars in air were conducted. The experimental results for human signatures from these Doppler sonars are presented and discussed.

  10. Detonation Wave Profiles in Plastic Bonded Explosives Measured using 1550 nm Heterodyne Velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustavsen, Rick

    2009-06-01

    We have measured detonation wave profiles in several triaminotrinitrobenzene (TATB) and cyclotetramethylene tetranitramine (HMX or octogen) based plastic bonded explosives using 1550 nm Heterodyne Velocimetry. (Heterodyne Velocimetry is also called Photon Doppler Velocimetry or PDV.) Planar detonations were produced by impacting the explosive with projectiles launched in a gas gun. Particle velocity wave profiles were measured at the mirror/interface of the explosive and either a LiF or PMMA window. Mirrors consisted of either a thin vapor deposited aluminum layer, or a 6 micron thick aluminum foil. Focusing and collimating light collection probes were used. Time-Frequency-Analysis of the fringe data was carried out using both Wavelet and Short-Time-Fourier-Transform (STFT) methods. With clean fringe data, good profiles can be obtained with a 1 ns full width half maximum (FWHM) analysis window (STFT) or about 3 to 4 oscillations in the wavelet. Some profiles, however, have a noisy character which is correlated with intensity fluctuations in the raw fringe data. Wave profiles show a ZND reaction zone structure with a single reaction in the HMX based explosives and both fast and slow reactions in the TATB based explosives.

  11. Seeding for laser velocimetry in confined supersonic flows with shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepicovsky, J.; Bruckner, R. J.

    1996-01-01

    There is a lack of firm conclusions or recommendations in the open literature to guide laser velocimeter (LV) users in minimizing the uncertainty of LV data acquired in confined supersonic flows with steep velocity gradients. This fact led the NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) in Cleveland (Ohio, USA), and the Institute of Propulsion Technology of DLR in Cologne (Germany) to a joint research effort to improve reliability of LV measurements in supersonic flows. Over the years, NASA and DLR have developed different expertise in laser velocimetry, using different LV systems: Doppler and two-spot (L2F). The goal of the joint program is to improve the reliability of LV measurements by comparing results from experiments in confined supersonic flows performed under identical test conditions but using two different LV systems and several seed particle generators. Initial experiments conducted at the NASA LERC are reported in this paper. The experiments were performed in a narrow channel with Mach number 2.5 flow containing an oblique shock wave generated by an immersed 25-dg wedge.

  12. [Comparative study of pathological Doppler and non-stress test in IUGR].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, B; Malinova, M

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the timing of delivery and the relationship between pathological Doppler ultrasonography and NST in IUGR fetuses. The prospective study included 84 fetuses with ultrasound diagnosis of IUGR and 100 fetuses of normal pregnancy The study group underwent Doppler velocimetry study of UA, MCA, DV and UV twice weekly, AFI twice weekly and NST daily. Apgar score, need of intubation, RDS, IVH, days of NICU hospitalization were available and related to neonatal outcome. Patients were stratified into groups: Preeclampsia with IUGR (Group 1) and IUGR only (group 2). In the group 1 the stillbirth was 3/44 (6,8%), in the group 2 the stillbirth was 8/40 (20%). Sensitivity for NST was 60%, and for Doppler velocimetry of DV was 71%. Specificity for NST was 87%, and for Doppler velocimetry of DV was 90%, respectively. Doppler changes occur first in chronic hypoxia while abnormal NST represent late stage of fetal compromise. PMID:22452172

  13. Extending the turbidity record: making additional use of continuous data from turbidity, acoustic-Doppler, and laser diffraction instruments and suspended-sediment samples in the Colorado River in Grand Canyon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Voichick, Nicholas; Topping, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Turbidity is a measure of the scattering and absorption of light in water, which in rivers is primarily caused by particles, usually sediment, suspended in the water. Turbidity varies significantly with differences in the design of the instrument measuring turbidity, a point that is illustrated in this study by side-by-side comparisons of two different models of instruments. Turbidity also varies with changes in the physical parameters of the particles in the water, such as concentration, grain size, grain shape, and color. A turbidity instrument that is commonly used for continuous monitoring of rivers has a light source in the near-infrared range (860±30 nanometers) and a detector oriented 90 degrees from the incident light path. This type of optical turbidity instrument has a limited measurement range (depending on pathlength) that is unable to capture the high turbidity levels of rivers that carry high suspended-sediment loads. The Colorado River in Grand Canyon is one such river, in which approximately 60 percent of the range in suspended-sediment concentration during the study period had unmeasurable turbidity using this type of optical instrument. Although some optical turbidimeters using backscatter or other techniques can measure higher concentrations of suspended sediment than the models used in this study, the maximum turbidity measurable using these other turbidimeters may still be exceeded in conditions of especially high concentrations of suspended silt and clay. In Grand Canyon, the existing optical turbidity instruments remain in use in part to provide consistency over time as new techniques are investigated. As a result, during these periods of high suspended-sediment concentration, turbidity values that could not be measured with the optical turbidity instruments were instead estimated from concurrent acoustic attenuation data collected using side-looking acoustic-Doppler profiler (ADP) instruments. Extending the turbidity record to the full

  14. Electrochemical velocimetry on centrifugal microfluidic platforms.

    PubMed

    Abi-Samra, Kameel; Kim, Tae-Hyeong; Park, Dong-Kyu; Kim, Nahui; Kim, Jintae; Kim, Hanshin; Cho, Yoon-Kyoung; Madou, Marc

    2013-08-21

    Expanding upon recent applications of interfacing electricity with centrifugal microfluidic platforms, we introduce electrochemical velocimetry to monitor flow in real-time on rotating fluidic devices. Monitoring flow by electrochemical techniques requires a simple, compact setup of miniaturized electrodes that are embedded within a microfluidic channel and are connected to a peripherally-located potentiostat. On-disc flow rates, determined by electrochemical velocimetry, agreed well with theoretically expected values and with optical measurements. As an application of the presented techniques, the dynamic process of droplet formation and release was recorded, yielding critical information about droplet frequency and volume. Overall, the techniques presented in this work advance the field of centrifugal microfluidics by offering a powerful tool, previously unavailable, to monitor flow in real-time on rotating microfluidic systems. PMID:23787459

  15. Developing an ultrasound correlation velocimetry system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surup, Gerrit; White, Christopher; UNH Team

    2011-11-01

    The process of building an ultrasound correlation velocimetry (UCV) system by integrating a commercial medical ultrasound with a PC running commercial PIV software is described and preliminary validation measurements in pipe flow using UCV and optical particle image velocimetry (PIV) are reported. In principles of operation, UCV is similar to the technique of PIV, differing only in the image acquisition process. The benefits of UCV are that it does not require optical access to the flow field and can be used for measuring flows of opaque fluids. While the limitations of UVC are the inherently low frame rates (limited by the imaging capabilities of the commercial ultrasound system) and low spatial resolution, which limits the range of velocities and transient flow behavior that can be measured. The support of the NSF (CBET0846359, grant monitor Horst Henning Winter) is gratefully acknowledged.

  16. Some comments on particle image displacement velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lourenco, L. M.

    1988-01-01

    Laser speckle velocimetry (LSV) or particle image displacement velocimetry, is introduced. This technique provides the simultaneous visualization of the two-dimensional streamline pattern in unsteady flows as well as the quantification of the velocity field over an entire plane. The advantage of this technique is that the velocity field can be measured over an entire plane of the flow field simultaneously, with accuracy and spatial resolution. From this the instantaneous vorticity field can be easily obtained. This constitutes a great asset for the study of a variety of flows that evolve stochastically in both space and time. The basic concept of LSV; methods of data acquisition and reduction, examples of its use, and parameters that affect its utilization are described.

  17. Ultrasonic Measurement of Microdisplacement Induced by Acoustic Radiation Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaoka, Ryo; Izumi, Takuya; Komatsu, Yosuke; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Saijo, Yoshifumi

    2013-07-01

    Quantitative evaluation of human skin aging is achieved by measuring the viscoelasticity of the skin. In the present study, microdisplacement induced by acoustic radiation force (ARF) is quantitatively measured by high-frequency ultrasonography (HFUS) and the result is confirmed by laser-Doppler velocimetry (LDV). Poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) with 1% cellulose particles was used as the biological phantom. A concave piezoelectric zirconate titanate (PZT) transducer with a diameter and focal length of 3 cm was used as an applicator to generate ARF. Microdisplacement at each depth of PVA was measured by the phased tracking method at 100 MHz of ultrasound with a repetition rate of 2000 Hz. When 80 tone-burst pulses were applied, the displacement measured by HFUS was 9 µm and the same result was obtained by LDV. As the displacement at each depth of PVA is measurable using ARF and the HFUS system, the system could be applied to measuring the viscoelasticity of the layered structure of the human skin.

  18. Particle Streak Velocimetry of Supersonic Nozzle Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willits, J. D.; Pourpoint, T. L.

    2016-01-01

    A novel velocimetry technique to probe the exhaust flow of a laboratory scale combustor is being developed. The technique combines the advantages of standard particle velocimetry techniques and the ultra-fast imaging capabilities of a streak camera to probe high speed flows near continuously with improved spatial and velocity resolution. This "Particle Streak Velocimetry" technique tracks laser illuminated seed particles at up to 236 picosecond temporal resolution allowing time-resolved measurement of one-dimensional flows exceeding 2000 m/s as are found in rocket nozzles and many other applications. Developmental tests with cold nitrogen have been performed to validate and troubleshoot the technique with supersonic flows of much lower velocity and without background noise due to combusting flow. Flow velocities on the order of 500 m/s have been probed with titanium dioxide particles and a continuous-wave laser diode. Single frame images containing multiple streaks are analyzed to find the average slope of all incident particles corresponding to the centerline axial flow velocity. Long term objectives for these tests are correlation of specific impulse to theoretical combustion predictions and direct comparisons between candidate green fuels and the industry standard, monomethylhydrazine, each tested under identical conditions.

  19. Experimental investigation of acoustic streaming in a cylindrical wave guide up to high streaming Reynolds numbers.

    PubMed

    Reyt, Ida; Bailliet, Hélène; Valière, Jean-Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Measurements of streaming velocity are performed by means of Laser Doppler Velocimetry and Particle Image Velociimetry in an experimental apparatus consisting of a cylindrical waveguide having one loudspeaker at each end for high intensity sound levels. The case of high nonlinear Reynolds number ReNL is particularly investigated. The variation of axial streaming velocity with respect to the axial and to the transverse coordinates are compared to available Rayleigh streaming theory. As expected, the measured streaming velocity agrees well with the Rayleigh streaming theory for small ReNL but deviates significantly from such predictions for high ReNL. When the nonlinear Reynolds number is increased, the outer centerline axial streaming velocity gets distorted towards the acoustic velocity nodes until counter-rotating additional vortices are generated near the acoustic velocity antinodes. This kind of behavior is followed by outer streaming cells only and measurements in the near wall region show that inner streaming vortices are less affected by this substantial evolution of fast streaming pattern. Measurements of the transient evolution of streaming velocity provide an additional insight into the evolution of fast streaming. PMID:24437742

  20. Laser velocimetry for measurement of non-sinusoidal vibration in sub-nanometer scale without lock-in amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, How-foo; Lin, Rung-Fu; Chiang, Wei-Lun

    2015-08-01

    Laser velocimetry capable of measuring nanoscale motion or displacement normal to vibrational surface is always important in industry and scientific applications. However, measurement sensitivity down to sub-nanometer scale is always a challenge, and utilization of lock-in amplifiers is unavoidable. Measurement is then also limited to single-point detection. Here we report a laser Doppler velocimetry capable of non-contact detection in sub-nanometer scale down to sub-Hertz frequency in a Mach-Zehnder configuration without lock-in amplifiers. Environment perturbation in tens of nanometer scale can be removed by empirical mode decomposition. Lack of lock-in amplifiers promises this technology not limited to single-point detection.

  1. Flow Visualization and Laser Velocimetry for Wind Tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, W. W., Jr. (Editor); Foughner, J. T., Jr. (Editor)

    1982-01-01

    The need for flow visualization and laser velocimetry were discussed. The purpose was threefold: (1) provide a state-of-the-art overview; (2) provide a forum for industry, universities, and government agencies to address problems in developing useful and productive flow visualization and laser velocimetry measurement techniques; and (3) provide discussion of recent developments and applications of flow visualization and laser velocimetry measurement techniques and instrumentation systems for wind tunnels including the 0.3-Meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel.

  2. DOPPLER WEATHER SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Berlin, Gary J.

    2002-08-05

    The SRS Doppler Weather System consists of a Doppler Server, A Master Server (also known as the Weather Server), several Doppler Slave Servers, and client-side software program called the Doppler Radar Client. This system is used to display near rel-time images taken from the SRS Weather Center's Doppler Radar computer. The Doppler Server is software that resides on the SRS Doppler Computer. It gathers raw data, 24-bit color weather images via screen scraping ever five minutes as requested by the Master Server. The Doppler Server then reduces the 24-bit color images to 8-bit color using a fixed color table for analysis and compression. This preserves the fidelity of the image color and arranges the colors in specific order for display. At the time of color reduction, the white color used for the city names on the background images are remapped to a different index (color) of white that the white on the weather scale. The Weather Server places a time stamp on the image, then compresses the image and passes it to all Doppler Slave servers. Each of the Doppler Slave servers mainitain a circular buffer of the eight most current images representing the last 40 minutes of weather data. As a new image is added, the oldest drops off. The Doppler Radar Client is an optional install program for any site-wide workstation. When a Client session is started, the Client requests Doppler Slave server assignment from the Master Server. Upon its initial request to the Slave Server, the Client obtains all eight current images and maintains its own circular buffer, updating its images every five minutes as the Doppler Slave is updated. Three background reference images are stored as part of the Client. The Client brings up the appropriate background image, decompresses the doppler data, and displays the doppler data on the background image.

  3. DOPPLER WEATHER SYSTEM

    2002-08-05

    The SRS Doppler Weather System consists of a Doppler Server, A Master Server (also known as the Weather Server), several Doppler Slave Servers, and client-side software program called the Doppler Radar Client. This system is used to display near rel-time images taken from the SRS Weather Center's Doppler Radar computer. The Doppler Server is software that resides on the SRS Doppler Computer. It gathers raw data, 24-bit color weather images via screen scraping ever fivemore » minutes as requested by the Master Server. The Doppler Server then reduces the 24-bit color images to 8-bit color using a fixed color table for analysis and compression. This preserves the fidelity of the image color and arranges the colors in specific order for display. At the time of color reduction, the white color used for the city names on the background images are remapped to a different index (color) of white that the white on the weather scale. The Weather Server places a time stamp on the image, then compresses the image and passes it to all Doppler Slave servers. Each of the Doppler Slave servers mainitain a circular buffer of the eight most current images representing the last 40 minutes of weather data. As a new image is added, the oldest drops off. The Doppler Radar Client is an optional install program for any site-wide workstation. When a Client session is started, the Client requests Doppler Slave server assignment from the Master Server. Upon its initial request to the Slave Server, the Client obtains all eight current images and maintains its own circular buffer, updating its images every five minutes as the Doppler Slave is updated. Three background reference images are stored as part of the Client. The Client brings up the appropriate background image, decompresses the doppler data, and displays the doppler data on the background image.« less

  4. Acoustic neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    Vestibular schwannoma; Tumor - acoustic; Cerebellopontine angle tumor; Angle tumor ... Acoustic neuromas have been linked with the genetic disorder neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2). Acoustic neuromas are uncommon.

  5. [Discordant growth in twin pregnancy--value of Doppler ultrasound].

    PubMed

    Grab, D; Hütter, W; Haller, T; Sterzik, K; Terinde, R

    1993-01-01

    A 4 MHz continuous-wave Doppler device was used to study uterine and umbilical arterial wave forms in 91 pairs of twins between 18th and 40th week of gestation. Biometry and cord localisation were effected by real-time ultrasound. The results of 182 Doppler flow examinations showed that umbilical flow velocimetry may prove relevant for early identification of twin pregnancies with discordant growth. Depending on the interval between examination and delivery, sensitivity and specificity values between 44% and 66%, and 66% and 73%, respectively, were obtained. A high resistance index in umbilical arteries was indicative of intrauterine growth retardation, at a specificity of 69% and a sensitivity of 44%. For uteroplacental as well as foetoplacental flow velocity waveform assessment, singleton reference values may be used, whereas, by reason of its low sensitivity, Doppler flow velocimetry does not lend itself as a primary diagnostic tool for intrauterine growth retardation. It can signal pathologic blood flow profiles, which are often associated with added risks, such as pregnancy-induced hypertension, foetal acidosis and stillbirth and can contribute to early detection of twin pregnancies that require close clinical and cardiotocographic surveillance. PMID:8440457

  6. Seeding requirements for scanning laser velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hackett, C. E.

    1985-01-01

    To measure the velocity distributions within time dependent turbulent flow fields, a continuously scanning laser velocimeter system is being developed at Sandia National Laboratories Livermore (SNLL). A prototype of this system has produced results which show that spatial and temporal variations in particle seed distribution seriously compromise the overall performance and operation of this device. To alleviate some of these problems, alternate flow seeding concepts are explored. The most promising appear to be those that actively induce laser sparks within the gas flow, the velocity of which may be measured by a Fourier transformed velocimetry system.

  7. Christian Doppler and the Doppler effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toman, Kurt

    1984-04-01

    A summary is given of Doppler's life and career. He was born 180 years ago on November 29, 1803, in Salzburg, Austria. He died on March 17, 1853 in Venice. The effect bearing his name was first announced in a presentation before the Royal Bohemian Society of the Sciences in Prague on May 25, 1842. Doppler considered his work a generalization of the aberration theorem as discovered by Bradley. With it came the inference that the perception of physical phenomena can change with the state of motion of the observer. Acceptance of the principle was not without controversy. In 1852, the mathematician Petzval claimed that no useful scientific deductions can be made from Doppler's elementary equations. In 1860, Ernst Mach resolved the misunderstanding that clouded this controversy. The Doppler effect is alive and well. Its role in radio science and related disciplines is enumerated.

  8. Superharmonic microbubble Doppler effect in ultrasound therapy.

    PubMed

    Pouliopoulos, Antonios N; Choi, James J

    2016-08-21

    The introduction of microbubbles in focused ultrasound therapies has enabled a diverse range of non-invasive technologies: sonoporation to deliver drugs into cells, sonothrombolysis to dissolve blood clots, and blood-brain barrier opening to deliver drugs into the brain. Current methods for passively monitoring the microbubble dynamics responsible for these therapeutic effects can identify the cavitation position by passive acoustic mapping and cavitation mode by spectral analysis. Here, we introduce a new feature that can be monitored: microbubble effective velocity. Previous studies have shown that echoes from short imaging pulses had a Doppler shift that was produced by the movement of microbubbles. Therapeutic pulses are longer (>1 000 cycles) and thus produce a larger alteration of microbubble distribution due to primary and secondary acoustic radiation force effects which cannot be monitored using pulse-echo techniques. In our experiments, we captured and analyzed the Doppler shift during long therapeutic pulses using a passive cavitation detector. A population of microbubbles (5  ×  10(4)-5  ×  10(7) microbubbles ml(-1)) was embedded in a vessel (inner diameter: 4 mm) and sonicated using a 0.5 MHz focused ultrasound transducer (peak-rarefactional pressure: 75-366 kPa, pulse length: 50 000 cycles or 100 ms) within a water tank. Microbubble acoustic emissions were captured with a coaxially aligned 7.5 MHz passive cavitation detector and spectrally analyzed to measure the Doppler shift for multiple harmonics above the 10th harmonic (i.e. superharmonics). A Doppler shift was observed on the order of tens of kHz with respect to the primary superharmonic peak and is due to the axial movement of the microbubbles. The position, amplitude and width of the Doppler peaks depended on the acoustic pressure and the microbubble concentration. Higher pressures increased the effective velocity of the microbubbles up to 3 m s(-1), prior to the onset

  9. Superharmonic microbubble Doppler effect in ultrasound therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pouliopoulos, Antonios N.; Choi, James J.

    2016-08-01

    The introduction of microbubbles in focused ultrasound therapies has enabled a diverse range of non-invasive technologies: sonoporation to deliver drugs into cells, sonothrombolysis to dissolve blood clots, and blood-brain barrier opening to deliver drugs into the brain. Current methods for passively monitoring the microbubble dynamics responsible for these therapeutic effects can identify the cavitation position by passive acoustic mapping and cavitation mode by spectral analysis. Here, we introduce a new feature that can be monitored: microbubble effective velocity. Previous studies have shown that echoes from short imaging pulses had a Doppler shift that was produced by the movement of microbubbles. Therapeutic pulses are longer (>1 000 cycles) and thus produce a larger alteration of microbubble distribution due to primary and secondary acoustic radiation force effects which cannot be monitored using pulse-echo techniques. In our experiments, we captured and analyzed the Doppler shift during long therapeutic pulses using a passive cavitation detector. A population of microbubbles (5  ×  104–5  ×  107 microbubbles ml‑1) was embedded in a vessel (inner diameter: 4 mm) and sonicated using a 0.5 MHz focused ultrasound transducer (peak-rarefactional pressure: 75–366 kPa, pulse length: 50 000 cycles or 100 ms) within a water tank. Microbubble acoustic emissions were captured with a coaxially aligned 7.5 MHz passive cavitation detector and spectrally analyzed to measure the Doppler shift for multiple harmonics above the 10th harmonic (i.e. superharmonics). A Doppler shift was observed on the order of tens of kHz with respect to the primary superharmonic peak and is due to the axial movement of the microbubbles. The position, amplitude and width of the Doppler peaks depended on the acoustic pressure and the microbubble concentration. Higher pressures increased the effective velocity of the microbubbles up to 3 m s‑1, prior to the onset

  10. Krypton tagging velocimetry of an underexpanded jet.

    PubMed

    Parziale, N J; Smith, M S; Marineau, E C

    2015-06-01

    In this work, we present the excitation/emission strategy, experimental setup, and results of an implementation of krypton tagging velocimetry (KTV). KTV is performed as follows: (i) seed a base flow with krypton; (ii) photosynthesize metastable krypton atoms with a frequency-doubled dye laser to form the tagged tracer; (iii) record the translation of the tagged metastable krypton by imaging the laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) that is produced with an additional dye laser. The principle strength of KTV, relative to other tagging velocimetry techniques, is the use of a chemically inert tracer. KTV results are presented for an underexpanded jet of three mixtures of varying Kr/N2 concentration. It is demonstrated that KTV can be used in gas mixtures of relatively low krypton mole fraction (0.5% Kr/99.5% N2), and the KTV data from that experiment are found to be in good agreement with an empirical fit found in the literature. We find that KTV is useful to perform instantaneous velocity measurements with metastable krypton as a chemically inert, dilute, long-lifetime tracer in gas-phase flows. PMID:26192670

  11. Advances in Doppler OCT

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Gangjun; Chen, Zhongping

    2014-01-01

    We review the principle and some recent applications of Doppler optical coherence tomography (OCT). The advances of the phase-resolved Doppler OCT method are described. Functional OCT algorithms which are based on an extension of the phase-resolved scheme are also introduced. Recent applications of Doppler OCT for quantification of flow, imaging of microvasculature and vocal fold vibration, and optical coherence elastography are briefly discussed. PMID:24443649

  12. Advanced Doppler tracking experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, J. W.

    1989-01-01

    The Doppler tracking method is currently the only technique available for broadband gravitational wave searches in the approx. 10(exp -4) to 10(exp -1) Hz low frequency band. A brief review is given of the Doppler method, a discussion of the main noise sources, and a review of experience with current spacecraft and the prospects for sensitivity improvements in an advanced Doppler tracking experiment.

  13. Classical Cepheids: High-precision Velocimetry, Cluster Membership, and the Effect of Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Richard I.

    2013-12-01

    Classical Cepheids are crucial calibrators of the extragalactic distance scale. Despite the adjective 'classical' and their use as 'standard candles', many open problems remain and ensure a steady scientific interest in these objects. This thesis has contributed to the understanding of Cepheids via three different topics: (1) an unprecedented observational program dedicated to studying highly precise Doppler measurements (velocimetry), which as has enabled several observational discoveries; (2) a newly-developed astro-statistical method for conducting an all-sky census of Cepheids belonging to Galactic open clusters, which is suitable for the era of large surveys (big data) such as the ESA's Gaia space mission; (3) the first detailed investigation of the effect of rotation on populations of classical Cepheids using Geneva stellar evolution models, which provides an explanation for the 45-year old Cepheid mass discrepancy problem. Last, but not least, I investigated the implications of my work for the extragalactic distance scale.

  14. High Dynamic Velocity Range Particle Image Velocimetry Using Multiple Pulse Separation Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Persoons, Tim; O’Donovan, Tadhg S.

    2011-01-01

    The dynamic velocity range of particle image velocimetry (PIV) is determined by the maximum and minimum resolvable particle displacement. Various techniques have extended the dynamic range, however flows with a wide velocity range (e.g., impinging jets) still challenge PIV algorithms. A new technique is presented to increase the dynamic velocity range by over an order of magnitude. The multiple pulse separation (MPS) technique (i) records series of double-frame exposures with different pulse separations, (ii) processes the fields using conventional multi-grid algorithms, and (iii) yields a composite velocity field with a locally optimized pulse separation. A robust criterion determines the local optimum pulse separation, accounting for correlation strength and measurement uncertainty. Validation experiments are performed in an impinging jet flow, using laser-Doppler velocimetry as reference measurement. The precision of mean flow and turbulence quantities is significantly improved compared to conventional PIV, due to the increase in dynamic range. In a wide range of applications, MPS PIV is a robust approach to increase the dynamic velocity range without restricting the vector evaluation methods. PMID:22346564

  15. Velocity measurements in a thermoacoustic refrigerator using Time-Resolved Particle Image Velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanc-Benon, Philippe; Poignand, Gaelle; Berson, Arganthael; Jondeau, Emmanuel

    2011-11-01

    A standing-wave thermoacoustic refrigerator consists of a stack of plates placed in an acoustic resonator with two heat exchangers located at each end of the stack. The full understanding of the heat transfer between the stack and the heat exchangers of thermoacoustic systems is a key issue to improve the global efficiency of such devices. The aim of this work is to investigate the generation of vortices near the ends of the stack, which affects heat transfer. The aerodynamic field in the gap between the stack and the heat exchanger is characterized using a time-resolved particle image velocimetry technique. Measurements are performed in a standing-wave refrigerator operating at a frequency of 200 Hz. Instantaneous velocity fields are recorded at a frequency of 3125 Hz (i.e. 15 velocity fields per acoustic period). Measurements show that vortex shedding occurs at high pressure levels, when the nonlinear acoustic regime prevails and they validate previous experiments [Berson & Blanc-Benon, J. Acoust. Soc. Am., 2007, 122(4), EL122-127]. The increased viscous dissipation generates additional heating and a loss of efficiency.

  16. Stellar velocimetry with a novel high efficiency interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Erskine, D J; Ge, J

    2000-11-03

    The search for extra-solar planets continues to be one of the most exciting fields in astronomy, with great interest shown by the public. The detection of planets via the Doppler effect, measuring the gravitational tugging of the planet on the parent star, is the most popular method. Jupiter and Saturn-like planets create 12 and 3 m/s signatures, respectively. Many institutions endeavor to join the search. They are hampered by the lack of affordable instruments having sufficient velocity resolution. Conventional high spectral resolution grating spectrometers are extremely expensive and massive due to their large size (5 meters). Due to their extreme sensitivity to input beam path, the most accurate velocimeters must use the iodine vapor cell as a spectral reference, (which does not deviate the beam due to its absorptive nature.) However, this operates only with green light. Hence, most of the photons from a star are wasted, particularly from red stars. In spite of constituting more than 60% of stars near Earth, red stars are currently under-represented on planet search surveys due to their relative weakness in the green. We have developed a new method for measuring Doppler shifts of starlight having many practical benefits. It is based on the combination of an interferometer with a small, low resolution diffraction grating. Since the Doppler effect is measured by fringe shifts, and not directly by the grating, the required grating spectral resolution can be reduced by a factor of 3 to 10 times. Secondly, the tolerance to imperfections in the grating is much higher. These properties allow the overall instrument to be dramatically smaller (TV-sized vs. kitchen sized), inexpensive and portable. Airborne and spaceborne platforms are now possible for the first time. Furthermore, the interferometer is 1000 times less sensitive to errors in the beam path. This enables use of an emission lamp as a spectral reference, which would allow the velocimeter to use all the colors

  17. Optical Coherence Tomography Velocimetry with Complex Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malm, A.; Waigh, T. A.; Jaradat, S.; Tomlin, R.

    2015-04-01

    We present recent results obtained with an Optical Coherence Tomography Velocimetry technique. An optical interferometer measures the velocity of a sheared fluid at specific depths of the sample using the coherence length of the light source. The technique allows the dynamics of 3 pico liter volumes to be probed inside opaque complex fluids. In a study of opaque starch suspensions, classical bulk rheology experiments show non-linear shear thickening, whereas observations of the velocity profiles as a function of distance across the gap show Newtonian behavior. The ability of the technique to measure velocity fluctuations is also discussed for the case of polyacrylamide samples which were observed to display shear banding behavior. A relationship between the viscoelasticity of the sample and the size of the apparent fluctuations is observed.

  18. Single port access holographic particle image velocimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Woodruff, S.D.; Richards, G.A.; Cha, D.J.

    1995-07-01

    An optical system, which requires only a single optical window mounted on a test volume, is proposed for holographic particle image velocimetry (HPIV). The optical system is a derivative of the double-exposure, double-reference-beam, off-axis HPIV system, but the innovative idea behind the system is to use back scattered light from the particles as the object wave. A 45{degree} beam splitter inserted in front of the window serves to admit the illuminating beam and extract the back scattered light. This concept can be of great engineering interest because optical access is often limited to one window in practical devices. The preliminary results of the technique appear quite promising, with current studies aimed at defining the optical resolution capabilities.

  19. Objective speckle velocimetry for autonomous vehicle odometry.

    PubMed

    Francis, D; Charrett, T O H; Waugh, L; Tatam, R P

    2012-06-01

    Speckle velocimetry is investigated as a means of determining odometry data with potential for application on autonomous robotic vehicles. The technique described here relies on the integration of translation measurements made by normalized cross-correlation of speckle patterns to determine the change in position over time. The use of objective (non-imaged) speckle offers a number of advantages over subjective (imaged) speckle, such as a reduction in the number of optical components, reduced modulation of speckles at the edges of the image, and improved light efficiency. The influence of the source/detector configuration on the speckle translation to vehicle translation scaling factor for objective speckle is investigated using a computer model and verified experimentally. Experimental measurements are presented at velocities up to 80  mm s(-1) which show accuracy better than 0.4%. PMID:22695586

  20. Particle Image Velocimetry Around Swimming Paramecia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giarra, Matthew; Jana, Saikat; Jung, Sunghwan; Vlachos, Pavlos

    2011-11-01

    Microorganisms like paramecia propel themselves by synchronously beating thousands of cilia that cover their bodies. Using micro-particle image velocimetry (μPIV), we quantitatively measured velocity fields created by the movement of Paramecium multimicronucleatum through a thin (~100 μm) film of water. These velocity fields exhibited different features during different swimming maneuvers, which we qualitatively categorized as straight forward, turning, or backward motion. We present the velocity fields measured around organisms during each type of motion, as well as calculated path lines and fields of vorticity. For paramecia swimming along a straight path, we observed dipole-like flow structures that are characteristic of a prolate-spheroid translating axially in a quiescent fluid. Turning and backward-swimming organisms showed qualitatively different patterns of vortices around their bodies. Finally, we offer hypotheses about the roles of these different flow patterns in the organism's ability to maneuver.

  1. Stereo imaging velocimetry for microgravity applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Brian B.; Meyer, Maryjo B.; Bethea, Mark D.

    1994-01-01

    Stereo imaging velocimetry is the quantitative measurement of three-dimensional flow fields using two sensors recording data from different vantage points. The system described in this paper, under development at NASA Lewis Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio, uses two CCD cameras placed perpendicular to one another, laser disk recorders, an image processing substation, and a 586-based computer to record data at standard NTSC video rates (30 Hertz) and reduce it offline. The flow itself is marked with seed particles, hence the fluid must be transparent. The velocimeter tracks the motion of the particles, and from these we deduce a multipoint (500 or more), quantitative map of the flow. Conceptually, the software portion of the velocimeter can be divided into distinct modules. These modules are: camera calibration, particle finding (image segmentation) and centroid location, particle overlap decomposition, particle tracking, and stereo matching. We discuss our approach to each module, and give our currently achieved speed and accuracy for each where available.

  2. The Cognitive Doppler.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kozoil, Micah E.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the learning needs of students in the concrete operational stage in mathematics. Identifies the phenomenon of reduced cognitive performance in an out-of-class environment as the "Cognitive Doppler." Suggests methods of reducing the pronounced effects of the Cognitive Doppler by capitalizing on the students' ability to memorize effective…

  3. Molecular velocimetry using stimulated Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Exton, R. J.; Hillard, M. E.

    1984-01-01

    Molecular flow velocity of N2 was measured in a supersonic wind tunnel using inverse Raman spectroscopy. This technique employs the large Doppler shift exhibited by the molecules when the pump and probe laser beams are counter-propagating (backward scattering). A retrometer system is employed to yield a vibration-free optical configuration which has the additional advantage of obtaining both the forward and backward scattered spectra simultaneously. The linebreadths and their relative Doppler shift can be used to determine the static pressure, translational temperature, and molecular flow velocity. A demonstration of the concept was performed in a supersonic wind tunnel and included: (1) measurements over the Mach number range 2.50 to 4.63; (2) static pressure measurements (at Mach 2.50) corresponding to a Reynolds number per foot range of 1 to 5 x 10 to the 6th power; and (3) measurements behind the shock wave of a flat plate model.

  4. New Sensors For Flow Velocity And Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cho, Y. C.

    1991-01-01

    Paper describes two sensor-development programs at Fluid Mechanics Laboratory at NASA Ames Research Center. One program for digital image velocimetry (DIV) sensors, and other program, for advanced acoustic sensors for wind tunnels. DIV measures, in real time, instantaneous velocity fields of time-varying flow or of collection of objects moving with varying velocities. Advanced acoustic sensors for wind tunnels being developed to reduce effects of interference from wind noise, noise from interactions between flows and sensors, flow-induced vibrations of sensors, deflections of accoustic waves by boundary layers induced by sensors, and reflections from walls and sensor supports.

  5. Cross-frequency Doppler sensitive signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagstaff, Ronald A.

    2005-04-01

    When there is relative motion between an acoustic source and a receiver, a signal can be Doppler shifted in frequency and enter or leave the processing bins of the conventional signal processor. The amount of the shift is determined by the frequency and the rate of change in the distance between the source and the receiver. This frequency Doppler shifting can cause severe reductions in the processors performance. Special cross-frequency signal processing algorithms have recently been developed to mitigate the effects of Doppler. They do this by using calculation paths that cut across frequency bins in order to follow signals during frequency shifting. Cross-frequency spectral grams of a fast-flying sound source were compared to conventional grams, to evaluate the performance of this new signal processing method. The Doppler shifts in the data ranged up to 70 contiguous frequency bins. The resulting cross-frequency grams showed that three paths provided small to no improvement. Four paths showed improvements for either up-frequency or down-frequency shifting, but not for both. Two paths showed substantial improvement for both up-frequency and down-frequency shifting. The cross-frequency paths will be defined, and comparisons between conventional and cross-frequency grams will be presented. [Work supported by Miltec Corporation.

  6. Laser-Doppler velocimetry measurements in a motored IC engine simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gany, A.; Sirignano, W. A.; Larrea, J.-J.

    1980-01-01

    A measurement technique and experimental results are presented for mean velocity and velocity fluctuations in a motored, axisymmetric engine chamber simulation. Three valve configurations are considered: open orifice, open valve, and operating valve. Measurements of axial and tangential velocity components have been taken at various axial and radial positions for one compression ratio (7:1) and one rpm level (31). The measurements show that the intake stroke (in both two and four stroke operations) result in a recirculating flow with substantial turbulence generation even at the low rpm value. The four-stroke results in an axisymmetric design are novel and especially significant since the ability exists to make comparisons with theoretical, axisymmetric, turbulent results.

  7. Turbulence averaging techniques for IC engine unsteady flow using Laser Doppler Velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schinetsky, Philip; Olcmen, Semih; Drabo, Mebougna; Ashford, Marcus

    2008-11-01

    Turbulence in unsteady flow fields is complex in nature not only because of the cycle-to-cycle variations of the turbulence but also the time dependent mean velocity. Defining and quantifying turbulence in unsteady flow fields is important since the level of turbulence applies directly to processes such as the mixing of gasoline and air in internal combustion engines. This same analysis method can also be used in fields where unsteady time-dependent data is obtained. In this study one component LDV velocity measurements made in an off the shelf IC engine were used to study unsteady turbulence. Phase and cyclic averaging techniques, along with wavelet transform analysis techniques were used to determine the unsteady turbulence levels. In addition, these techniques were applied to a predetermined sinusoidal signal with a known turbulence level to choose the best method to identify turbulence in unsteady flows.

  8. Doppler radar flowmeter

    DOEpatents

    Petlevich, Walter J.; Sverdrup, Edward F.

    1978-01-01

    A Doppler radar flowmeter comprises a transceiver which produces an audio frequency output related to the Doppler shift in frequency between radio waves backscattered from particulate matter carried in a fluid and the radiated radio waves. A variable gain amplifier and low pass filter are provided for amplifying and filtering the transceiver output. A frequency counter having a variable triggering level is also provided to determine the magnitude of the Doppler shift. A calibration method is disclosed wherein the amplifier gain and frequency counter trigger level are adjusted to achieve plateaus in the output of the frequency counter and thereby allow calibration without the necessity of being able to visually observe the flow.

  9. Laser-diode based 10MHz photoacoustic Doppler flowmetry at 830 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheinfeld, Adi; Eyal, Avishay

    2012-02-01

    Photoacoustic Doppler Flowmetry has several potential advantages over its purely acoustical counterpart. The key ones are better inherent contrast and potential molecular information. It is therefore highly desired to continue to develop this modality into a viable complementary tool alongside with Doppler Ultrasound flowmetry. Working towards this goal we have constructed a Photoacoustic Doppler setup based on a combined pair of laser diodes at 830nm and a 10MHz focused acoustical transducer. Using tone-burst intensity modulation, depth-resolved Doppler spectrograms of a phantom vessel containing flowing suspension of carbon particles, were obtained. In order to investigate the conditions required for successful photoacoustic Doppler measurement in blood a k-space photoacoustic simulation was performed. It tested the photoacoustic response which is obtained for moving random spatial distributions of red blood cells and the effect of several parameters, such as particles density, ultrasonic frequency and optical spot size.

  10. Particle image velocimetry and infrared thermography in a levitated droplet with nanosilica suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Abhishek; Basu, Saptarshi; Kumar, Ranganathan

    2012-03-01

    Preferential accumulation and agglomeration kinetics of nanoparticles suspended in an acoustically levitated water droplet under radiative heating has been studied. Particle image velocimetry performed to map the internal flow field shows a single cell recirculation with increasing strength for decreasing viscosities. Infrared thermography and high speed imaging show details of the heating process for various concentrations of nanosilica droplets. Initial stage of heating is marked by fast vaporization of liquid and sharp temperature rise. Following this stage, aggregation of nanoparticles is seen resulting in various structure formations. At low concentrations, a bowl structure of the droplet is dominant, maintained at a constant temperature. At high concentrations, viscosity of the solution increases, leading to rotation about the levitator axis due to the dominance of centrifugal motion. Such complex fluid motion inside the droplet due to acoustic streaming eventually results in the formation of a ring structure. This horizontal ring eventually reorients itself due to an imbalance of acoustic forces on the ring, exposing larger area for laser absorption and subsequent sharp temperature rise.

  11. Doppler Lidar (DL) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Newsom, RK

    2012-02-13

    The Doppler lidar (DL) is an active remote sensing instrument that provides range- and time-resolved measurements of radial velocity and attenuated backscatter. The principle of operation is similar to radar in that pulses of energy are transmitted into the atmosphere; the energy scattered back to the transceiver is collected and measured as a time-resolved signal. From the time delay between each outgoing transmitted pulse and the backscattered signal, the distance to the scatterer is inferred. The radial or line-of-sight velocity of the scatterers is determined from the Doppler frequency shift of the backscattered radiation. The DL uses a heterodyne detection technique in which the return signal is mixed with a reference laser beam (i.e., local oscillator) of known frequency. An onboard signal processing computer then determines the Doppler frequency shift from the spectra of the heterodyne signal. The energy content of the Doppler spectra can also be used to determine attenuated backscatter.

  12. Particle image velocimetry measurements in thermoacoustic refrigerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanc-Benon, Philippe

    2003-10-01

    The knowledge of flow fields in the microchannels and at the edges of the stack plates becomes an increasingly important issue in the design of heat exchangers for thermoacoustic engines. We have developed numerical simulations and conducted experiments in a resonant standing wave thermoacoustic refrigerator model. Recent computational evidence indicates that near the edges of the plates the flow field is dominated by concentrated eddies, whose complex motion significantly affects the performance of the device. Consequently, the effective design and optimization of thermoacoustic refrigerators necessitates a fundamental understanding of these vortical motions, and their dependence on geometric parameters and operating conditions. We present experimental data obtained using Particle Image Velocimetry: velocity profiles across the microchannels, 2D velocity maps including a zoom for the edges of the stack, and vorticity fields calculated with a criterion based on a normalized angular momentum. Results are obtained for two distinct configurations, involving thin and thick stack plates. In the first case, the flow field around the edge of the stack exhibits elongated vorticity layers, while in the latter it is dominated by the shedding and impingement of concentrated vortices. Time-resolved PIV measurements of the velocity and vorticity fields are compared with computational predictions.

  13. Bichromatic particle streak velocimetry bPSV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voss, Björn; Stapf, Julian; Berthe, André; Garbe, Christoph S.

    2012-11-01

    We propose a novel technique for three-dimensional three-component (3D3C) interfacial flow measurement. It is based on the particle streak velocimetry principle. A relatively long integration time of the camera is used for capturing the movement of tracer particles as streaks on the sensor. The velocity along these streaks is extracted by periodically changing the illumination using a known pattern. A dye with different absorption characteristics in two distinct wavelengths is used to color the fluid. The depth of particles relative to the fluid interface can then be computed from their intensities when illuminated with light sources at those two different wavelengths. Hence, from our approach, a bichromatic, periodical illumination together with an image processing routine for precisely extracting particle streak features is used for measuring 3D3C fluid flow with a single camera. The technique is applied to measuring turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection at the free air--water interface. Using Lagrangian statistics, we are able to demonstrate a clear transition from the Batchelor regime to the Richardson regime, both of which were postulated for isotropic turbulence. The relative error of the velocity extraction of our new technique was found to be below 0.5 %.

  14. Ultrasound image velocimetry for rheological measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurung, A.; Haverkort, J. W.; Drost, S.; Norder, B.; Westerweel, J.; Poelma, C.

    2016-09-01

    Ultrasound image velocimetry (UIV) allows for the non-intrusive measurement of a wide range of flows without the need for optical transparency. In this study, we used UIV to measure the local velocity field of a model drilling fluid that exhibits yield stress flow behavior. The radial velocity profile was used to determine the yield stress and the Herschel–Bulkley model flow index n and the consistency index k. Reference data were obtained using the conventional offline Couette rheometry. A comparison showed reasonable agreement between the two methods. The discrepancy in model parameters could be attributed to inherent differences between the methods, which cannot be captured by the three-parameter model used. Overall, with a whole flow field measurement technique such as UIV, we were able to quantify the complex rheology of a model drilling fluid. These preliminary results show that UIV can be used as a non-intrusive diagnostic for in situ, real-time measurement of complex opaque flow rheology.

  15. Color Doppler flow imaging.

    PubMed

    Foley, W D; Erickson, S J

    1991-01-01

    The performance requirements and operational parameters of a color Doppler system are outlined. The ability of an operator to recognize normal and abnormal variations in physiologic flow and artifacts caused by noise and aliasing is emphasized. The use of color Doppler flow imaging is described for the vessels of the neck and extremities, upper abdomen and abdominal transplants, obstetrics and gynecology, dialysis fistulas, and testicular and penile flow imaging. PMID:1898567

  16. Acoustic Holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yang-Hann

    One of the subtle problems that make noise control difficult for engineers is the invisibility of noise or sound. A visual image of noise often helps to determine an appropriate means for noise control. There have been many attempts to fulfill this rather challenging objective. Theoretical (or numerical) means for visualizing the sound field have been attempted, and as a result, a great deal of progress has been made. However, most of these numerical methods are not quite ready for practical applications to noise control problems. In the meantime, rapid progress with instrumentation has made it possible to use multiple microphones and fast signal-processing systems. Although these systems are not perfect, they are useful. A state-of-the-art system has recently become available, but it still has many problematic issues; for example, how can one implement the visualized noise field. The constructed noise or sound picture always consists of bias and random errors, and consequently, it is often difficult to determine the origin of the noise and the spatial distribution of the noise field. Section 26.2 of this chapter introduces a brief history, which is associated with sound visualization, acoustic source identification methods and what has been accomplished with a line or surface array. Section 26.2.3 introduces difficulties and recent studies, including de-Dopplerization and de-re verberation methods, both essential for visualizing a moving noise source, such as occurs for cars or trains. This section also addresses what produces ambiguity in realizing real sound sources in a room or closed space. Another major issue associated with sound/noise visualization is whether or not we can distinguish between mutual dependencies of noise in space (Sect. 26.2.4); for example, we are asked to answer the question, Can we see two birds singing or one bird with two beaks?

  17. Acoustic Holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yang-Hann

    One of the subtle problems that make noise control difficult for engineers is the invisibility of noise or sound. A visual image of noise often helps to determine an appropriate means for noise control. There have been many attempts to fulfill this rather challenging objective. Theoretical (or numerical) means for visualizing the sound field have been attempted, and as a result, a great deal of progress has been made. However, most of these numerical methods are not quite ready for practical applications to noise control problems. In the meantime, rapid progress with instrumentation has made it possible to use multiple microphones and fast signal-processing systems. Although these systems are not perfect, they are useful. A state-of-the-art system has recently become available, but it still has many problematic issues; for example, how can one implement the visualized noise field. The constructed noise or sound picture always consists of bias and random errors, and consequently, it is often difficult to determine the origin of the noise and the spatial distribution of the noise field. Section 26.2 of this chapter introduces a brief history, which is associated with "sound visualization," acoustic source identification methods and what has been accomplished with a line or surface array. Section 26.2.3 introduces difficulties and recent studies, including de-Dopplerization and de-reverberation methods, both essentialfor visualizing a moving noise source, such as occurs for cars or trains. This section also addresses what produces ambiguity in realizing real sound sources in a room or closed space. Another major issue associated with sound/noise visualization is whether or not we can distinguish between mutual dependencies of noise in space (Sect. 26.2.4); for example, we are asked to answer the question, "Can we see two birds singing or one bird with two beaks?"

  18. [Ductus venosus blood flow prior to intrauterine foetal death in severe placental insufficiency can be unaffected as shown by doppler sonography].

    PubMed

    Frauenschuh, I; Frambach, T; Karl, S; Dietl, J; Müller, T

    2014-10-01

    Significant placental insufficiency with Doppler ultrasound findings of absent or reverse end-diastolic flow velocities (AREDV) is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. An analysis of blood flow in the ductus venosus assists in the early recognition of threatened foetuses. However, the prognostic value of multivessel Doppler assessment for the timing of delivery is being questioned. Four high-risk pregnancies with umbilical AREDV were repeatedly examined prior to intrauterine foetal demise. Our results demonstrate that ductus venosus Doppler flow velocimetry can be normal prior to intrauterine foetal death. PMID:25353216

  19. Global Doppler frequency shift detection with near-resonant interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landolt, Andrin; Roesgen, Thomas

    2009-10-01

    The recent development in measuring 2D Doppler shift distributions for flow velocimetry using the dispersive properties of atomic line filters is presented. On the basis of velocity field measurements on a subsonic jet flow and a tip vortex flow in a medium-sized wind tunnel, the technique was assessed. Atomic line filters near a resonant transition combine imaging capabilities with a sharp frequency cutoff and an associated region of strong anomalous dispersion. While conventional Doppler global velocimetry relies on the absorption of the filter to convert frequency shifts to intensity variations, near-resonant interferometry uses its dispersion to detect frequency shifts as phase changes in an interference pattern. In the present setup, an iodine vapor cell in an imaging Michelson interferometer is used. With the illuminating laser frequency tuned near a resonant transition, the cell’s dispersion converts the frequency content of the field of view into a distortion of the carrier-fringe pattern recorded at the image plane of the interferometer. The phase distribution in the fringe images is reconstructed by filtering the individual images with a 2D Gabor filter pair tuned to the spatial frequencies of the basic carrier-fringe pattern. The post-processing is concluded with subsequent phase-unwrapping and subtraction of the carrier reference fringe phase. The method and the setup were demonstrated and calibrated experimentally on a rotating disc. The capability of the technique to operate in a real experimental environment was validated in a free subsonic jet and a tip vortex flow behind a wing section in a medium-sized wind tunnel facility. The measurements were found to be in generally good agreement with the theoretically predicted system characteristics and the reference measurements. As with other Doppler global techniques, the stability of the pulsed laser system and the secondary scattering in the test volume were identified as the main error sources.

  20. Ultrasonic Doppler Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tortoli, Piero; Fidanzati, Paolo; Luca, Bassi

    Any US equipment includes Doppler facilities capable of providing information about moving structures inside the human body. In most cases, the primary interest is in the investigation of blood flow dynamics, since this may be helpful for early diagnosis of cardiovascular diseases. However, there is also an increasing interest in tracking the movements of human tissues, since such movements can give an indirect evaluation of their elastic properties, which are valuable indicators of the possible presence of pathologies. This paper aims at presenting an overview of the different ways in which the Doppler technique has been developed and used in medical ultrasound (US), from early continuous wave (CW) systems to advanced pulsed wave (PW) colour-Doppler equipment. In particular, the most important technical features and clinical applications of CW, single-gate PW, multi-gate PW and flow-imaging systems are reviewed. The main signal processing approaches used for detection of Doppler frequencies are described, including time-domain and frequency-domain (spectral) methods, as well as novel strategies like, e.g., harmonic Doppler mode, which have been recently introduced to exploit the benefits of US contrast agents.

  1. {ital In vivo} bidirectional color Doppler flow imaging of picoliter blood volumes using optical coherence tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Izatt, J.A.; Kulkarni, M.D.; Yazdanfar, S.; Barton, J.K.; Welch, A.J.

    1997-09-01

    We describe a novel optical system for bidirectional color Doppler imaging of flow in biological tissues with micrometer-scale resolution and demonstrate its use for {ital in vivo} imaging of blood flow in an animal model. Our technique, color Doppler optical coherence tomography (CDOCT), performs spatially localized optical Doppler velocimetry by use of scanning low-coherence interferometry. CDOCT is an extension of optical coherence tomography (OCT), employing coherent signal-acquisition electronics and joint time-frequency analysis algorithms to perform flow imaging simultaneous with conventional OCT imaging. Cross-sectional maps of blood flow velocity with {lt}50{minus}{mu}m spatial resolution and {lt}0.6{minus}mm/s velocity precision were obtained through intact skin in living hamster subdermal tissue. This technology has several potential medical applications. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital Optical Society of America}

  2. Development of a laser-Doppler system for measurement of velocity fields in PVT crystal growth systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, O. C.; Glicksman, M. E.; Lin, J. T.; Kim, G. T.; Singh, N. B.

    1991-01-01

    A laser-Doppler velocimetry (LDV) system capable of measuring velocities as low as 10 exp -5 m/s is presented, and a calibration system for determining the accuracy of the LDV system at these velocities is described. The results obtained in mercurous chloride crystal grown in cylindrical ampoules at 300 C, using physical vapor transport (PVT) methods, are presented. It is concluded that the overall flow pattern observed is a unicellular, asymmetric pattern between Rayleigh number of 125 and 250.

  3. Polarimetric Doppler Weather Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bringi, V. N.; Chandrasekar, V.

    2001-10-01

    This work provides a detailed introduction to the principles of Doppler and polarimetric radar, focusing in particular on their use in the analysis of weather systems. The authors first discuss underlying topics such as electromagnetic scattering, polarization, and wave propagation. They then detail the engineering aspects of pulsed Doppler polarimetric radar, before examining key applications in meteorology and remote sensing. The book is aimed at graduate students of electrical engineering and atmospheric science as well as practitioners involved in the applications of polarimetric radar.

  4. Acoustic Doppler current profiling from the JGOFS Arabian Sea cruises aboard the RV T.G. THOMPSON: TN043, January 8, 1995--February 4, 1995; TN044, February 8, 1995--February 25, 1995; TN045, March 14, 1995--April 10, 1995; TN046, April 14, 1995--April 29, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Flagg, C.N.; Kim, H.S.; Shi, Y.

    1995-09-01

    Acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) data from the R/V T.G. THOMPSON is part of the core data for the US JGOFS Arabian Sea project along with hydrographic and nutrient data. Seventeen cruises on the THOMPSON are scheduled to take place between September 1994 and January 1996. This is the second in a series of data reports covering the ADCP data from the Arabian Sea JGOFS cruises TNO43 through TNO46. ADCP data are being collected on all the JGOFS Arabian Sea cruises using an autonomous data acquisition system developed for ship-of-opportunity cruises. This system, referred to as the AutoADCP, makes it possible to collect the ADCP data without the constant monitoring usually necessary and assures constant data coverage and uniform data quality. This data report presents ADCP results from the second group of four JGOFS cruises, TNO43 through TNO46, concentrating on the data collection and processing methods. The ADCP data itself reside in a CODAS data base at Brookhaven National Laboratory and is generally available to JGOFS investigators through contact with the authors. The CODAS data base and associated ADCP processing software were developed over a number of years by Eric Firing and his group at the University of Hawaii. The CODAS software is shareware available for PC`s or Unix computers and is the single most widely used ADCP processing program for ship mounted units.

  5. Three-dimensional X-ray micro-velocimetry

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wah-Keat; Fezzaa, Kamel; Uemura, Tomomasa

    2011-01-01

    A direct measurement of three-dimensional X-ray velocimetry with micrometer spatial resolution is presented. The key to this development is the use of a Laue crystal as an X-ray beam splitter and mirror. Three-dimensional flow velocities in a 0.4 mm-diameter tubing were recorded, with <5 µm spatial resolution and speeds of 0.7 mm s−1. This development paves the way for three-dimensional velocimetry in many cases where visible-light techniques are not effective, such as multiphase flow or flow of optically opaque liquids. PMID:21335921

  6. Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    An acoustic neuroma is a benign tumor that develops on the nerve that connects the ear to the brain. ... can press against the brain, becoming life-threatening. Acoustic neuroma can be difficult to diagnose, because the ...

  7. Acoustic radar sounding of the lower atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcallister, L. G.

    1972-01-01

    Acoustic radar sounding techniques were used to measure the wind velocity and direction in the first 300 m of the atmosphere. Angle-of-arrival and Doppler techniques were developed to obtain two independent measurements of the wind field. These techniques and preliminary experimental results are described briefly.

  8. Finnish Meteorological Institute Doppler Lidar

    SciTech Connect

    Ewan OConnor

    2015-03-27

    This doppler lidar system provides co-polar and cross polar attenuated backscatter coefficients,signal strength, and doppler velocities in the cloud and in the boundary level, including uncertainties for all parameters. Using the doppler beam swinging DBS technique, and Vertical Azimuthal Display (VAD) this system also provides vertical profiles of horizontal winds.

  9. The Doppler Pendulum Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, C. K.; Wong, H. K.

    2011-01-01

    An experiment to verify the Doppler effect of sound waves is described. An ultrasonic source is mounted at the end of a simple pendulum. As the pendulum swings, the rapid change of frequency can be recorded by a stationary receiver using a simple frequency-to-voltage converter. The experimental results are in close agreement with the Doppler…

  10. Acoustic Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention relates to a sealing device having an acoustic resonator. The acoustic resonator is adapted to create acoustic waveforms to generate a sealing pressure barrier blocking fluid flow from a high pressure area to a lower pressure area. The sealing device permits noncontacting sealing operation. The sealing device may include a resonant-macrosonic-synthesis (RMS) resonator.

  11. Acoustic seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention relates to a sealing device having an acoustic resonator. The acoustic resonator is adapted to create acoustic waveforms to generate a sealing pressure barrier blocking fluid flow from a high pressure area to a lower pressure area. The sealing device permits noncontacting sealing operation. The sealing device may include a resonant-macrosonic-synthesis (RMS) resonator.

  12. L2F and LDV velocimetry measurement and analysis of the 3-D flow field in a centrifugal compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fagan, John R., Jr.; Fleeter, Sanford

    1989-01-01

    The flow field in the Purdue Research Centrifugal Compressor is studied using a laser two-focus (L2F) velocimeter. L2F data are obtained which quantify: (1) the compressor inlet flow field; (2) the steady-state velocity field in the impeller blade passages; and (3) the flow field in the radial diffuser. The L2F data are compared with both laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV) data and predictions from three-dimensional inviscid and viscous flow models. In addition, a model is developed to calculate the effect on the measurement volume geometry of refraction by curved windows. Finally, the advantages and disadvantages of using the L2F for turbomachinery measurements is discussed in terms of measurement accuracy, ease of use, including sample time per correlated event and the ability to make measurements in regions of high noise due to stray radiation from wall reflections.

  13. Lidar-radar velocimetry using a pulse-to-pulse coherent rf-modulated Q-switched laser.

    PubMed

    Vallet, M; Barreaux, J; Romanelli, M; Pillet, G; Thévenin, J; Wang, L; Brunel, M

    2013-08-01

    An rf-modulated pulse train from a passively Q-switched Nd:YAG laser has been generated using an extra-cavity acousto-optic modulator. The rf modulation reproduces the spectral quality of the local oscillator. It leads to a high pulse-to-pulse phase coherence, i.e., phase memory, over thousands of pulses. The potentialities of this transmitter for lidar-radar are demonstrated by performing Doppler velocimetry on indoor moving targets. The experimental results are in good agreement with a model based on elementary signal processing theory. In particular, we show experimentally and theoretically that lidar-radar is a promising technique that allows discrimination between translation and rotation movements. Being independent of the laser internal dynamics, this scheme can be applied to any Q-switched laser. PMID:23913058

  14. Harmonic Motion Microwave Doppler Imaging method for breast tumor detection.

    PubMed

    Top, Can Barıs; Tafreshi, Azadeh Kamali; Gençer, Nevzat G

    2014-01-01

    Harmonic Motion Microwave Doppler Imaging (HMMDI) method is recently proposed as a non-invasive hybrid breast imaging technique for tumor detection. The acquired data depend on acoustic, elastic and electromagnetic properties of the tissue. The potential of the method is analyzed with simulation studies and phantom experiments. In this paper, the results of these studies are summarized. It is shown that HMMDI method has a potential to detect malignancies inside fibro-glandular tissue. PMID:25571382

  15. Application of tomographic particle image velocimetry to complex (dusty) plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Jeremiah

    2011-11-29

    Over the past decade, particle image velocimetry (PIV) techniques have been used to obtain detailed measurements of the thermal and transport properties of weakly-coupled dusty plasmas. This paper reports on the application of an extension of these techniques, tomographic PIV (tom-PIV), which provides an instantaneous volumetric measurement of the particle transport.

  16. The ORTEGA experiment: A study of damage with radiography and velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furlanetto, Michael

    2011-06-01

    The ORTEGA experiment consisted of two identical samples of lead (4% antimony) driven by small charges of high explosive (HE). Flash x-radiography formed the key measurement. A short pulse of x-rays ``froze'' the motion much like a flash camera system and thereby permitted examination of the instantaneous internal spatial density distribution of the rapidly moving material. Two radiographs were taken encompassing both samples in each image and separated in time by ~4 microseconds to allow observation of the evolution of the samples. Over a longer period of time, the pressure loading of the lead was determined by measuring the velocity of the leading surface at six points on each sample. One of these points recorded velocity histories with the Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector (VISAR) diagnostic, while the other five were recorded with Photonic Doppler Velocimetry (PDV). Simultaneously, detonation symmetry in each package was monitored by electrical pins embedded in the HE. This presentation will review the experimental motivation, setup, and data, illustrating the reproducibility of shock measurements in HE-driven spall experiments by simultaneous measurement of two nominally-identical samples. Subsequent presentation will review pre-shot hydrocode calculations and will discuss the radiographic measurements in more detail.

  17. Surface evolution effects observed in velocimetry of materials at high strain rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moro, Erik; Briggs, Matthew; Hull, Lawrence

    2014-03-01

    According to the accepted model for photon Doppler velocimetry (PDV), a particular probe measures the bulk (or average) motion of a surface moving along its beam axis. Utilizing this model, a surface's velocity vector may be reconstructed via a number of probes, at distinct angles of incidence, all of which view the same region on the surface. However, this approach does not account for localized effects of surface evolution, which may interact with PDV's interferometer in ways that are not yet fully appreciated. Consider, for example, that the material flow of a straining surface occurs tangent to the surface and may project along the beam axes of non-normal probes. We present a recent series of explosive tests, whose results suggest that non-normal PDV probes measure the effects of surface evolution as it projects along their beam axes. We believe that these effects have not been observed before. The implication is that PDV probes are capable of measuring the bulk motion of a surface, as well as measuring discrete events associated with surface evolution and failure.

  18. Down-Bore Two-Laser Heterodyne Velocimetry of an Implosion-Driven Hypervelocity Launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hildebrand, Myles; Huneault, Justin; Loiseau, Jason; Higgins, Andrew J.

    2015-06-01

    The implosion-driven launcher uses explosives to shock-compress helium, driving well-characterized projectiles to velocities exceeding 10 km/s. The masses of projectiles range between 0.1 - 10 g, and the design shows excellent scalability, reaching similar velocities across different projectile sizes. In the past, velocity measurements have been limited to muzzle velocity obtained via a high-speed videography upon the projectile exiting the launch tube. Recently, Photonic Doppler Velocimetry (PDV) has demonstrated the ability to continuously measure in-bore velocity, even in the presence of significant blow-by of high temperature helium propellant past the projectile. While a single-laser PDV is limited to approximately 8 km/s, a two-laser PDV system is developed that uses two lasers operating near 1550 nm to provide velocity measurement capabilities up to 16 km/s. The two laser PDV system is used to obtain a continuous velocity history of the projectile throughout the entire launch cycle. These continuous velocity data are used to validate models of the launcher cycle and compare different advanced concepts aimed at increasing the projectile velocity to well beyond 10 km/s.

  19. Effects of red blood cell aggregates dissociation on the estimation of ultrasound speckle image velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Yeom, Eunseop; Nam, Kweon-Ho; Paeng, Dong-Guk; Lee, Sang-Joon

    2014-08-01

    Ultrasound speckle image of blood is mainly attributed by red blood cells (RBCs) which tend to form RBC aggregates. RBC aggregates are separated into individual cells when the shear force is over a certain value. The dissociation of RBC aggregates has an influence on the performance of ultrasound speckle image velocimetry (SIV) technique in which a cross-correlation algorithm is applied to the speckle images to get the velocity field information. The present study aims to investigate the effect of the dissociation of RBC aggregates on the estimation quality of SIV technique. Ultrasound B-mode images were captured from the porcine blood circulating in a mock-up flow loop with varying flow rate. To verify the measurement performance of SIV technique, the centerline velocity measured by the SIV technique was compared with that measured by Doppler spectrograms. The dissociation of RBC aggregates was estimated by using decorrelation of speckle patterns in which the subsequent window was shifted as much as the speckle displacement to compensate decorrelation caused by in-plane loss of speckle patterns. The decorrelation of speckles is considerably increased according to shear rate. Its variations are different along the radial direction. Because the dissociation of RBC aggregates changes ultrasound speckles, the estimation quality of SIV technique is significantly correlated with the decorrelation of speckles. This degradation of measurement quality may be improved by increasing the data acquisition rate. This study would be useful for simultaneous measurement of hemodynamic and hemorheological information of blood flows using only speckle images. PMID:24794508

  20. Doppler radar results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bracalente, Emedio M.

    1992-01-01

    The topics are covered in viewgraph form and include the following: (1) a summary of radar flight data collected; (2) a video of combined aft cockpit, nose camera, and radar hazard displays; (3) a comparison of airborne radar F-factor measurements with in situ and Terminal Doppler Weather Radar (TDWR) F-factors for some sample events; and (4) a summary of wind shear detection performance.

  1. Laser double Doppler flowmeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poffo, L.; Goujon, J.-M.; Le Page, R.; Lemaitre, J.; Guendouz, M.; Lorrain, N.; Bosc, D.

    2014-05-01

    The Laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) is a non-invasive method for estimating the tissular blood flow and speed at a microscopic scale (microcirculation). It is used for medical research as well as for the diagnosis of diseases related to circulatory system tissues and organs including the issues of microvascular flow (perfusion). It is based on the Doppler effect, created by the interaction between the laser light and tissues. LDF measures the mean blood flow in a volume formed by the single laser beam, that penetrate into the skin. The size of this measurement volume is crucial and depends on skin absorption, and is not directly reachable. Therefore, current developments of the LDF are focused on the use of always more complex and sophisticated signal processing methods. On the other hand, laser Double Doppler Flowmeter (FL2D) proposes to use two laser beams to generate the measurement volume. This volume would be perfectly stable and localized at the intersection of the two laser beams. With FL2D we will be able to determine the absolute blood flow of a specific artery. One aimed application would be to help clinical physicians in health care units.

  2. Doppler Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Leitgeb, Rainer A.; Werkmeister, René M.; Blatter, Cedric; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2014-01-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) has revolutionized ophthalmology. Since its introduction in the early 1990s it has continuously improved in terms of speed, resolution and sensitivity. The technique has also seen a variety of extensions aiming to assess functional aspects of the tissue in addition to morphology. One of these approaches is Doppler OCT (DOCT), which aims to visualize and quantify blood flow. Such extensions were already implemented in time domain systems, but have gained importance with the introduction of Fourier domain OCT. Nowadays phase-sensitive detection techniques are most widely used to extract blood velocity and blood flow from tissues. A common problem with the technique is that the Doppler angle is not known and several approaches have been realized to obtain absolute velocity and flow data from the retina. Additional studies are required to elucidate which of these techniques is most promising. In the recent years, however, several groups have shown that data can be obtained with high validity and reproducibility. In addition, several groups have published values for total retinal blood flow. Another promising application relates to non-invasive angiography. As compared to standard techniques such as fluorescein and indocyanine-green angiography the technique offers two major advantages: no dye is required and depth resolution is required is provided. As such Doppler OCT has the potential to improve our abilities to diagnose and monitor ocular vascular diseases. PMID:24704352

  3. Doppler optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Leitgeb, Rainer A; Werkmeister, René M; Blatter, Cedric; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2014-07-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) has revolutionized ophthalmology. Since its introduction in the early 1990s it has continuously improved in terms of speed, resolution and sensitivity. The technique has also seen a variety of extensions aiming to assess functional aspects of the tissue in addition to morphology. One of these approaches is Doppler OCT (DOCT), which aims to visualize and quantify blood flow. Such extensions were already implemented in time domain systems, but have gained importance with the introduction of Fourier domain OCT. Nowadays phase-sensitive detection techniques are most widely used to extract blood velocity and blood flow from tissues. A common problem with the technique is that the Doppler angle is not known and several approaches have been realized to obtain absolute velocity and flow data from the retina. Additional studies are required to elucidate which of these techniques is most promising. In the recent years, however, several groups have shown that data can be obtained with high validity and reproducibility. In addition, several groups have published values for total retinal blood flow. Another promising application relates to non-invasive angiography. As compared to standard techniques such as fluorescein and indocyanine-green angiography the technique offers two major advantages: no dye is required and depth resolution is required is provided. As such Doppler OCT has the potential to improve our abilities to diagnose and monitor ocular vascular diseases. PMID:24704352

  4. Topological Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhaoju; Gao, Fei; Shi, Xihang; Lin, Xiao; Gao, Zhen; Chong, Yidong; Zhang, Baile

    2015-03-01

    The manipulation of acoustic wave propagation in fluids has numerous applications, including some in everyday life. Acoustic technologies frequently develop in tandem with optics, using shared concepts such as waveguiding and metamedia. It is thus noteworthy that an entirely novel class of electromagnetic waves, known as "topological edge states," has recently been demonstrated. These are inspired by the electronic edge states occurring in topological insulators, and possess a striking and technologically promising property: the ability to travel in a single direction along a surface without backscattering, regardless of the existence of defects or disorder. Here, we develop an analogous theory of topological fluid acoustics, and propose a scheme for realizing topological edge states in an acoustic structure containing circulating fluids. The phenomenon of disorder-free one-way sound propagation, which does not occur in ordinary acoustic devices, may have novel applications for acoustic isolators, modulators, and transducers.

  5. Topological acoustics.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhaoju; Gao, Fei; Shi, Xihang; Lin, Xiao; Gao, Zhen; Chong, Yidong; Zhang, Baile

    2015-03-20

    The manipulation of acoustic wave propagation in fluids has numerous applications, including some in everyday life. Acoustic technologies frequently develop in tandem with optics, using shared concepts such as waveguiding and metamedia. It is thus noteworthy that an entirely novel class of electromagnetic waves, known as "topological edge states," has recently been demonstrated. These are inspired by the electronic edge states occurring in topological insulators, and possess a striking and technologically promising property: the ability to travel in a single direction along a surface without backscattering, regardless of the existence of defects or disorder. Here, we develop an analogous theory of topological fluid acoustics, and propose a scheme for realizing topological edge states in an acoustic structure containing circulating fluids. The phenomenon of disorder-free one-way sound propagation, which does not occur in ordinary acoustic devices, may have novel applications for acoustic isolators, modulators, and transducers. PMID:25839273

  6. Acoustic neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    Vestibular schwannoma; Tumor - acoustic; Cerebellopontine angle tumor; Angle tumor ... 177. Battista RA. Gamma knife radiosurgery for vestibular schwannoma. Otolaryngol Clin North Am . 2009;42:635-654. ...

  7. Velocity and rotation measurements in acoustically levitated droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Abhishek; Basu, Saptarshi; Kumar, Ranganathan

    2012-10-01

    The velocity scale inside an acoustically levitated droplet depends on the levitator and liquid properties. Using Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV), detailed velocity measurements have been made in a levitated droplet of different diameters and viscosity. The maximum velocity and rotation are normalized using frequency and amplitude of acoustic levitator, and droplet viscosity. The non-dimensional data are fitted for micrometer- and millimeter-sized droplets levitated in different levitators for different viscosity fluids. It is also shown that the rotational speed of nanosilica droplets at an advanced stage of vaporization compares well with that predicted by exponentially fitted parameters.

  8. Clinical applications of doppler ultrasound

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, K.J.W.; Burns, P.N.; Well, P.N.T.

    1987-01-01

    This book introduces a guide to the physical principles and instrumentation of duplex Doppler ultrasound and its applications in obstetrics, gynecology, neonatology, gastroentology, and evaluation of peripheral vascular disease. The book provides information needed to perform Doppler ultrasound examinations and interpret the results. An introduction to Doppler physics and instrumentation is followed by a thorough review of hemodynamics, which explains the principles underlying interpretation of Doppler signals. Of special note is the state-of-the-art coverage of new applications of Doppler in recognition of high-risk pregnancy, diagnosis of intrauterine growth retardation, investigation of neonatal blood flow, evaluation of first-trimester pregnancy, and diagnosis of gastrointestinal disease. The book also offers guidelines on the use of Doppler ultrasound in diagnosing carotid disease, deep venous thrombosis, and aorta/femoral disease.

  9. Laser Doppler diagnostics for orthodontia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryzhkova, Anastasia V.; Lebedeva, Nina G.; Sedykh, Alexey V.; Ulyanov, Sergey S.; Lepilin, Alexander V.; Kharish, Natalia A.

    2004-06-01

    The results of statistical analysis of Doppler spectra of intensity fluctuations of light, scattered from mucous membrane of oral cavity of healthy volunteers and patients, abused by the orthodontic diseases, are presented. Analysis of Doppler spectra, obtained from tooth pulp of patients, is carried out. New approach to monitoring of blood microcirculation in orthodontics is suggested. Influence of own noise of Doppler measuring system on formation of the output signal is studied.

  10. Analysis of hydroelastic slamming through particle image velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panciroli, R.; Porfiri, M.

    2015-07-01

    Predicting the hydrodynamic loading experienced by lightweight structures during water impact is central to the design of marine vessels and aircraft. Here, hydroelastic effects of flexible panels during water entry are studied through particle image velocimetry. Experiments are conducted on a compliant wedge entering the water surface in free fall for varying entry velocities, and the pressure field is indirectly evaluated from particle image velocimetry. Results show that the impact is responsible for prominent multimodal vibrations of the wedge, and, vice versa, that the wedge flexibility strongly influences the hydrodynamic loading. With respect to rigid wedges, the hydrodynamic loading exhibits marked spatial variations, which control the location of the minimum and maximum pressure on the wetted surface, and temporal oscillations, which modulate the direction of the hydrodynamic force. These experimental results are expected to aid in refining computational schemes for the analysis of hydroelastic phenomena and provide guidelines for structural design.

  11. Frame rate free image velocimetry for microfluidic devices

    PubMed Central

    Keinan, Eliezer; Ezra, Elishai; Nahmias, Yaakov

    2013-01-01

    Here, we introduce Streamline Image Velocimetry, a method to derive fluid velocity fields in fully developed laminar flow from long-exposure images of streamlines. Streamlines confine streamtubes, in which the volumetric flow is constant for incompressible fluid. Using an explicit analytical solution as a boundary condition, velocity fields and emerging properties such as shear force and pressure can be quantified throughout. Numerical and experimental validations show a high correlation between anticipated and measured results, with R2 > 0.91. We report spatial resolution of 2 μm in a flow rate of 0.15 m/s, resolution that can only be achieved with 75 kHz frame rate in traditional particle tracking velocimetry. PMID:24023394

  12. Laser Velocimetry In Low-Speed Wind Tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orloff, Kenneth L.; Snyder, Philip K.; Reinath, Michael S.

    1990-01-01

    Design and performance of three-dimensional and two-dimensional backscatter laser velocimeter, both used in low-speed wind tunnels, described in report together with historical overview of development of laser velocimetry (LV). Provides measurements of airflow in wind-tunnel tests without perturbing effects of probes and probe-supporting structures. Applicable in such related fields as ventilation engineering and possibly in detection of wing vortexes from large aircraft at airports.

  13. Terminal Doppler weather radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michelson, M.; Shrader, W. W.; Wieler, J. G.

    1990-02-01

    The terminal Doppler weather radar (TDWR) system, now under development, will provide automatic detection of microbursts and low-level wind shear. This paper discusses the TDWR performance parameters and describes its structural elements, including the antenna subsystem, the transmitter, the receiver/exciter, the digital signal processor, and the radar product generator/remote monitoring subsystem. Attention is also given to the processes of the base data formation, point target removal, signal-to-noise thresholding, and velocity de-aliasing and to the TDWR algorithms and displays. A schematic diagram of the TDWR system is presented.

  14. In-vivo imaging of blood flow in human retinal vessels using color Doppler optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazdanfar, Siavash; Rollins, Andrew M.; Izatt, Joseph A.

    1999-04-01

    Quantification of retinal blood flow may lead to a better understanding of the progression and treatment of several ocular disorders, including diabetic retinopathy, age- related macular degeneration, and glaucoma. Current techniques, such as fluorescein angiography and laser Doppler velocimetry are limited, failing to provide sufficient information to the clinician. Color Doppler optical coherence tomography (CDOCT) is a novel technique using coherent heterodyne detection for simultaneous cross- sectional imaging of tissue microstructure and blood flow. This technique is capable of high spatial and velocity resolution imaging in highly scattering media. We implemented CDOCT for retinal blood flow mapping in human subjects. No dilation of the pupil was necessary. CDOCT is demonstrated for determining bidirectional flow in sub- 100micrometers diameter vessels in the retina. Additionally, we calculated Doppler broadening using the variance of depth- resolved spectra to identify regions with large velocity gradients within the Xenopus heart. This technique may be useful in quantifying local tissue perfusion in highly vascular retinal tissue.

  15. Musical Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gough, Colin

    This chapter provides an introduction to the physical and psycho-acoustic principles underlying the production and perception of the sounds of musical instruments. The first section introduces generic aspects of musical acoustics and the perception of musical sounds, followed by separate sections on string, wind and percussion instruments.

  16. Iodine Tagging Velocimetry in a Mach 10 Wake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balla, Robert Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    A variation on molecular tagging velocimetry (MTV) [1] designated iodine tagging velocimetry (ITV) is demonstrated. Molecular iodine is tagged by two-photon absorption using an Argon Fluoride (ArF) excimer laser. A single camera measures fluid displacement using atomic iodine emission at 206 nm. Two examples ofMTVfor cold-flowmeasurements areN2OMTV [2] and Femtosecond Laser Electronic Excitation Tagging [3]. These, like most MTV methods, are designed for atmospheric pressure applications. Neither can be implemented at the low pressures (0.1- 1 Torr) in typical hypersonic wakes. Of all the single-laser/singlecamera MTV approaches, only Nitric-Oxide Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence-based MTV [4] has been successfully demonstrated in a Mach 10 wake. Oxygen quenching limits transit times to 500 ns and accuracy to typically 30%. The present note describes the photophysics of the ITV method. Off-body velocimetry along a line is demonstrated in the aerothermodynamically important and experimentally challenging region of a hypersonic low-pressure near-wake in a Mach 10 air wind tunnel. Transit times up to 10 µs are demonstrated with conservative errors of 10%.

  17. Laser velocimetry measurements in non-isothermal CVD systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, E. J.; Hyer, P. V.; Culotta, P. W.; Clark, I. O.

    1991-01-01

    Researchers at the NASA Langley Research Center are applying laser velocimetry (LV) techniques to characterize the fluid dynamics of non-isothermal flows inside fused silica chambers designed for chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Experimental issues involved in the application of LV techniques to this task include thermophoretic effects on the LV seed particles, seeding the hazardous gases, index of refraction gradients in the flow field and surrounding media, optical access, relatively low flow velocities, and analysis and presentation of sparse data. An overview of the practical difficulties these issues represent to the use of laser velocimetry instrumentation for CVD applications is given. A fundamental limitation on the application of LV techniques in non-isothermal systems is addressed which involves a measurement bias due to the presence of thermal gradients. This bias results from thermophoretic effects which cause seed particle trajectories to deviate from gas streamlines. Data from a research CVD reactor are presented which indicate that current models for the interaction of forces such as Stokes drag, inertia, gravity, and thermophoresis are not adequate to predict thermophoretic effects on particle-based velocimetry measurements in arbitrary flow configurations.

  18. ANL Doppler flowmeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karplus, H. B.; Raptis, A. C.; Lee, S.; Simpson, T.

    1985-10-01

    A flowmeter has been developed for measuring flow velocity in hot slurries. The flowmeter works on an ultrasonic Doppler principle in which ultrasound is injected into the flowing fluid through the solid pipe wall. Isolating waveguides separate the hot pipe from conventional ultrasonic transducers. Special clamp-on high-temperature transducers also can be adapted to work well in this application. Typical flows in pilot plants were found to be laminar, giving rise to broad-band Doppler spectra. A special circuit based on a servomechanism sensor was devised to determine the frequency average of such a broad spectrum. The device was tested at different pilot plants. Slurries with particulates greater than 70 microns (0.003 in.) yielded good signals, but slurries with extremely fine particulates were unpredictable. Small bubbles can replace the coarse particles to provide a good signal if there are not too many. Successful operation with very fine particulate slurries may have been enhanced by the presence of microbubbles.

  19. Acoustic microstreaming applied to batch micromixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manasseh, Richard; Petkovic-Duran, Karolina; Tho, Paul; Zhu, Yonggang; Ooi, Andrew

    2006-01-01

    Experiments are presented in which acoustic microstreaming is investigated and applied to a batch micromixing case appropriate to a point-of-care pathology screening test. The flows presented can be created without complex engineering of contacts or surfaces in the microdevice, which could thus be made disposable. Fundamental flow patterns are measured with a micro-Particle-Image Velocimetry (micro-PIV) system, enabling a quantification of the fluiddynamical processes causing the flows. The design of micromixers based on this principle requires a quantification of the mixing. A simple technique based on digital image processing is presented that enables an assessment of the improvement in mixing due to acoustic microstreaming. The digital image processing technique developed was shown to be non-intrusive, convenient and able to generate useful quantitative data. Preliminary indications are that microstreaming can at least halve the time required to mix quantities of liquid typical of a point-of-care test, and significantly greater improvements seem feasible.

  20. Doppler Beats or Interference Fringes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Paul S.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses the following: another version of Doppler beats; alternate proof of spin-1 sin-1/2 problems; some mechanisms related to Dirac's strings; Doppler redshift in oblique approach of source and observer; undergraduate experiment on noise thermometry; use of the time evolution operator; resolution of an entropy maximization controversy;…

  1. On observing acoustic backscattering from salinity turbulence.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Louis; Sastre-Cordova, Marcos M

    2011-08-01

    It has been hypothesized that at sufficiently high levels of oceanic salinity turbulence it should be possible to observe acoustic backscattering. However, there have been limited in situ measurements to confirm this hypothesis. Using an autonomous underwater vehicle equipped with upward and downward looking 1.2 MHz acoustic Doppler current profilers and with turbulence and fine scale sensors, measurements were performed in a region of intense turbulence and a strong salinity gradient. The approach taken was to correlate variations in the backscattered acoustic intensity, I, with a theoretical acoustic backscattering cross section per volume for salinity turbulence, σ(s), to obtain an estimated scattering cross section per volume, σ(e). Results indicated that of order 50% of the observed region was characterized by salinity turbulence induced backscattering. PMID:21877785

  2. Design of a tri-monostatic doppler sodar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Yoshiki

    This paper outlined the general purpose Doppler sodar AR410. Together with the acoustic antenna design and the circuit function, the present author suggested the signal processing technique to estimate the Doppler frequency shift based on the FFT method and the way to reject unavailable signals. It may be helpful to refer to the nomogram to estimate the maximum altitude of acoustic sounding. Some results on the wind data compared with in situ measurements show the reliability of the Doppler sodar. The correlation coefficient of wind speed is better than 0.9, and the standard deviation of the difference of wind speed and wind direction is 0.7 to 2.3 m/s and 10 to 35 deg respectively dependent on wind speed. The sodar system helps the meteorological observation of the lower atmospheric boundary layer. It gives wind profile up to several hundred meters with the condition in which the annual data loss rate is less than 2% at the height of 100 m and is less than 10% at 200 m. Saying about turbulent parameters, w seems to be the available function, whereas u and v are under development to make a better estimation. The detection of temperature inversion and qualitative monitoring of thermal structure from echo intensity is reliably carried out, but the quantitative analysis with sufficient accuracy such as the temperature fluctuation or the temperature lapse remains as future works.

  3. High resolution Doppler lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abreu, Vincent J.; Hays, Paul B.; Barnes, John E.

    1989-01-01

    A high resolution lidar system was implemented to measure winds in the lower atmosphere. The wind speed along the line of sight was determined by measuring the Doppler shift of the aerosol backscattered laser signal. The system in its present configuration is stable, and behaves as indicated by theoretical simulations. This system was built to demonstrate the capabilities of the detector system as a prototype for a spaceborne lidar. The detector system investigated consisted of a plane Fabry-Perot etalon, and a 12-ring anode detector. This system is generically similar to the Fabry-Perot interferometer developed for passive wind measurements on board the Dynamics Explorer satellite. That this detector system performs well in a lidar configuration was demonstrated.

  4. Room Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuttruff, Heinrich; Mommertz, Eckard

    The traditional task of room acoustics is to create or formulate conditions which ensure the best possible propagation of sound in a room from a sound source to a listener. Thus, objects of room acoustics are in particular assembly halls of all kinds, such as auditoria and lecture halls, conference rooms, theaters, concert halls or churches. Already at this point, it has to be pointed out that these conditions essentially depend on the question if speech or music should be transmitted; in the first case, the criterion for transmission quality is good speech intelligibility, in the other case, however, the success of room-acoustical efforts depends on other factors that cannot be quantified that easily, not least it also depends on the hearing habits of the listeners. In any case, absolutely "good acoustics" of a room do not exist.

  5. Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    ... slow growing tumor which arise primarily from the vestibular portion of the VIII cranial nerve and lie ... you have a "brain tumor" called acoustic neuroma (vestibular schwannoma). You think you are the only one ...

  6. Underwater Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuperman, William A.; Roux, Philippe

    It is well underwater established that sound waves, compared to electromagnetic waves, propagate long distances in the ocean. Hence, in the ocean as opposed to air or a vacuum, one uses sound navigation and ranging (SONAR) instead navigation and ranging (SONAR) of radar, acoustic communication instead of radio, and acoustic imaging and tomography instead of microwave or optical imaging or X-ray tomography. Underwater acoustics is the science of sound in water (most commonly in the ocean) and encompasses not only the study of sound propagation, but also the masking of sound signals by interfering phenomenon and signal processing for extracting these signals from interference. This chapter we will present the basics physics of ocean acoustics and then discuss applications.

  7. Velocimetry of cathode particles in a magnetoplasmadynamic thruster discharge plasma.

    PubMed

    Walker, J; Langendorf, S; Walker, M; Polzin, K; Kimberlin, A

    2015-07-01

    With high-speed imaging, it is possible to directly observe the time-evolution of the macroscopic behavior of the discharge plasma in a magnetoplasmadynamic thruster (MPDT). By utilizing direct high-speed imaging capable of capturing many images over the course of a single discharge, the velocity of the cathode erosion particles can be measured, opening the possibility of a novel, noninvasive technique for discharge plasma flow field velocimetry. In this work, an 8 kA argon MPDT discharge is imaged at 26 173 fps utilizing a 0.9 neutral density filter. The camera is aligned with thruster centerline 4 m downstream of the thruster exit plane. By tracking visible particles appearing in the multiple images, the particle motion in the radial and azimuthal directions is directly imaged. Through the use of traditional techniques in digital particle image velocimetry, the cathode particles emanating from the discharge are measured to have a mean radial velocity of 44.6 ± 6.0 m/s with a 95% confidence interval and a statistically insignificant azimuthal velocity. The setup and analysis employed permits measurement of the particle velocity in orthogonal direction to the image sensor plane using a single camera. By combining a background removal subtraction technique and knowledge of the optical focal plane, the estimated mean axial velocity of the particles is 1.59 km/s. This investigation ends with a discussion of important factors to consider for future MPDT high-speed imaging particle velocimetry, such as frame-rate, image size, spatial resolution, optics, and data handling selections. PMID:26233389

  8. Velocimetry of cathode particles in a magnetoplasmadynamic thruster discharge plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, J.; Langendorf, S.; Walker, M.; Polzin, K.; Kimberlin, A.

    2015-07-01

    With high-speed imaging, it is possible to directly observe the time-evolution of the macroscopic behavior of the discharge plasma in a magnetoplasmadynamic thruster (MPDT). By utilizing direct high-speed imaging capable of capturing many images over the course of a single discharge, the velocity of the cathode erosion particles can be measured, opening the possibility of a novel, noninvasive technique for discharge plasma flow field velocimetry. In this work, an 8 kA argon MPDT discharge is imaged at 26 173 fps utilizing a 0.9 neutral density filter. The camera is aligned with thruster centerline 4 m downstream of the thruster exit plane. By tracking visible particles appearing in the multiple images, the particle motion in the radial and azimuthal directions is directly imaged. Through the use of traditional techniques in digital particle image velocimetry, the cathode particles emanating from the discharge are measured to have a mean radial velocity of 44.6 ± 6.0 m/s with a 95% confidence interval and a statistically insignificant azimuthal velocity. The setup and analysis employed permits measurement of the particle velocity in orthogonal direction to the image sensor plane using a single camera. By combining a background removal subtraction technique and knowledge of the optical focal plane, the estimated mean axial velocity of the particles is 1.59 km/s. This investigation ends with a discussion of important factors to consider for future MPDT high-speed imaging particle velocimetry, such as frame-rate, image size, spatial resolution, optics, and data handling selections.

  9. Development of Hydroxyl Tagging Velocimetry for Low Velocity Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andre, Matthieu A.; Bardet, Philippe M.; Burns, Ross A.; Danehy, Paul M.

    2016-01-01

    Hydroxyl tagging velocimetry (HTV) is a molecular tagging technique that relies on the photo-dissociation of water vapor into OH radicals and their subsequent tracking using laser induced fluorescence. Velocities are then obtained from time-of-flight calculations. At ambient temperature in air, the OH species lifetime is relatively short (<50 µs), making it suited for high speed flows. Lifetime and radicals formation increases with temperature, which allows HTV to also probe low-velocity, high-temperature flows or reacting flows such as flames. The present work aims at extending the domain of applicability of HTV, particularly towards low-speed (<10 m/s) and moderate (<500 K) temperature flows. Results are compared to particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements recorded in identical conditions. Single shot and averaged velocity profiles are obtained in an air jet at room temperature. By modestly raising the temperature (100-200 degC) the OH production increases, resulting in an improvement of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Use of nitrogen - a non-reactive gas with minimal collisional quenching - extends the OH species lifetime (to over 500 µs), which allows probing of slower flows or, alternately, increases the measurement precision at the expense of spatial resolution. Instantaneous velocity profiles are resolved in a 100degC nitrogen jet (maximum jet-center velocity of 6.5 m/s) with an uncertainty down to 0.10 m/s (1.5%) at 68% confidence level. MTV measurements are compared with particle image velocimetry and show agreement within 2%.

  10. First-Trimester Uterine Artery Doppler Analysis in the Prediction of Later Pregnancy Complications

    PubMed Central

    Khong, Su Lynn; Kane, Stefan C.; Brennecke, Shaun P.; da Silva Costa, Fabrício

    2015-01-01

    Uterine artery Doppler waveform analysis has been extensively studied in the second trimester of pregnancy as a predictive marker for the later development of preeclampsia and fetal growth restriction. The use of Doppler interrogation of this vessel in the first trimester has gained momentum in recent years. Various measurement techniques and impedance indices have been used to evaluate the relationship between uterine artery Doppler velocimetry and adverse pregnancy outcomes. Overall, first-trimester Doppler interrogation of the uterine artery performs better in the prediction of early-onset than late-onset preeclampsia. As an isolated marker of future disease, its sensitivity in predicting preeclampsia and fetal growth restriction in low risk pregnant women is moderate, at 40–70%. Multiparametric predictive models, combining first-trimester uterine artery pulsatility index with maternal characteristics and biochemical markers, can achieve a detection rate for early-onset preeclampsia of over 90%. The ideal combination of these tests and validation of them in various patient populations will be the focus of future research. PMID:25972623

  11. Doppler ultrasound--basics revisited.

    PubMed

    Eagle, Mary

    Palpation of pedal pulses alone is known to be an unreliable indicator for the presence of arterial disease. Using portable Doppler ultrasound to measure the resting ankle brachial pressure index is superior to palpation of peripheral pulses as an assessment of the adequacy pf the arterial supply in the lower limb. Revisiting basics, this article aims to aid the clinician to understand and perform hand-held Doppler ultrasound effectively while involving the client or patient in the process. The author describes the basics of Doppler ultrasound, how to select correct equipment for the process, and interpretation of results to further enhance clinicians' knowledge. PMID:16835512

  12. Digital Doppler measurement with spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinman, Peter W.; Hinedi, Sami M.; Labelle, Remi C.; Bevan, Roland P.; Del Castillo, Hector M.; Chong, Dwayne C.

    1991-01-01

    Digital and analog phase-locked loop (PLL) receivers were operated in parallel, each tracking the residual carrier from a spacecraft. The PLL tracked the downlink carrier and measured its instantaneous phase. This information, combined with a knowledge of the uplink carrier and the transponder ratio, permitted the computation of a Doppler observable. In this way, two separate Doppler measurements were obtained for one observation window. The two receivers agreed on the magnitude of the Doppler effect to within 1 mHz. There was less jitter on the data from the digital receiver. This was due to its smaller noise bandwidth. The demonstration and its results are described.

  13. How to study the Doppler effect with Audacity software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adriano Dias, Marco; Simeão Carvalho, Paulo; Rodrigues Ventura, Daniel

    2016-05-01

    The Doppler effect is one of the recurring themes in college and high school classes. In order to contextualize the topic and engage the students in their own learning process, we propose a simple and easily accessible activity, i.e. the analysis of the videos available on the internet by the students. The sound of the engine of the vehicle passing by the camera is recorded on the video; it is then analyzed with the free software Audacity by measuring the frequency of the sound during approach and recede of the vehicle from the observer. The speed of the vehicle is determined due to the application of Doppler effect equations for acoustic waves.

  14. Nanoscale resolution microchannel flow velocimetry by atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piorek, Brian; Mechler, Ádám; Lal, Ratnesh; Freudenthal, Patrick; Meinhart, Carl; Banerjee, Sanjoy

    2006-10-01

    The velocity of a microchannel flow was determined by atomic force microscopy (AFM) using a 50nm wide "whisker," which was partially submerged and scanned transverse to the flow while drag was recorded. A peaked, near parabolic, flow velocity profile was found. Particle image velocity (PIV) measurements using 70nm diameter quantum-dot-coated polystyrene spheres confirmed the shape of the AFM-measured velocity profile. AFM-based nanometer resolution velocimetry confirms that the drag-velocity relationship for the whisker remains consistent over a wide range of shear values and appears to successfully resolve submicron scale flows, which are beyond the limits of conventional PIV measurements.

  15. Brief review of uncertainty quantification for particle image velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farias, M. H.; Teixeira, R. S.; Koiller, J.; Santos, A. M.

    2016-07-01

    Metrological studies for particle image velocimetry (PIV) are recent in literature. An attempt to evaluate the uncertainty quantifications (UQ) of the PIV velocity field are in evidence. Therefore, a short review on main sources of uncertainty in PIV and available methodologies for its quantification are presented. In addition, the potential of some mathematical techniques, coming from the area of geometric mechanics and control, that could interest the fluids UQ community are highlighted as good possibilities. “We must measure what is measurable and make measurable what cannot be measured” (Galileo)

  16. Evaluation of meteorological airborne Doppler radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hildebrand, P. H.; Mueller, C. K.

    1984-01-01

    This paper will discuss the capabilities of airborne Doppler radar for atmospheric sciences research. The evaluation is based on airborne and ground based Doppler radar observations of convective storms. The capability of airborne Doppler radar to measure horizontal and vertical air motions is evaluated. Airborne Doppler radar is shown to be a viable tool for atmospheric sciences research.

  17. Digital Particle Image Velocimetry (DPIV) Used for Space-Time Correlations in Nozzle Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wernet, Mark P.; Bridges, James E.

    2003-01-01

    An optical measurement technique known as Digital Particle Image Velocimetry (DPIV) was used previously to characterize the first- and second-order statistical properties of both cold and hot jet flows from externally mixed nozzles in NASA Glenn Research Center's Nozzle Acoustic Test Rig. In this technique, an electronic camera records particles entrained in a flow as a laser light sheet is pulsed at two instances in time. Correlation processing of the recorded particle image pairs yields the two-component velocity field across the imaged plane of the flow. The information acquired using DPIV is being used to improve our understanding of the decay of turbulence in jet flows-a critical element for understanding the acoustic properties of the flow. Recently, two independent DPIV systems were installed in Glenn's Small Hot Jet Acoustic Rig, enabling multiplane correlations in time and space. The data were collected over a range of different Mach numbers and temperature ratios. DPIV system 1 was fixed to a large traverse rig, and DPIV system 2 was mounted on a small traverse system mounted on the large traverse frame. The light sheets from the two DPIV systems were aligned to lie in the same axial plane, with DPIV system 2 being independently traversed downstream along the flow direction. For each measurement condition, the DPIV systems were started at a fully overlapping orientation. A polarization separation technique was used to avoid cross-talk between the two systems. Then, the DPIV systems fields were shifted axially apart, in successively increasing steps. The downstream DPIV system 2 was triggered at a short time delay after the upstream DPIV system 1, where the time delay was proportional to the convective flow velocity in the shear layer of the jet flow and the axial separation of the two DPIV systems. The acquired data were processed to obtain the instantaneous velocity vector maps over a range of time delays and spatial separations. The velocity fields from

  18. Dual-Doppler Feasibility Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huddleston, Lisa L.

    2012-01-01

    When two or more Doppler weather radar systems are monitoring the same region, the Doppler velocities can be combined to form a three-dimensional (3-D) wind vector field thus providing for a more intuitive analysis of the wind field. A real-time display of the 3-D winds can assist forecasters in predicting the onset of convection and severe weather. The data can also be used to initialize local numerical weather prediction models. Two operational Doppler Radar systems are in the vicinity of Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS); these systems are operated by the 45th Space Wing (45 SW) and the National Weather Service Melbourne, Fla. (NWS MLB). Dual-Doppler applications were considered by the 45 SW in choosing the site for the new radar. Accordingly, the 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS), NWS MLB and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration tasked the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) to investigate the feasibility of establishing dual-Doppler capability using the two existing systems. This study investigated technical, hardware, and software requirements necessary to enable the establishment of a dual-Doppler capability. Review of the available literature pertaining to the dual-Doppler technique and consultation with experts revealed that the physical locations and resulting beam crossing angles of the 45 SW and NWS MLB radars make them ideally suited for a dual-Doppler capability. The dual-Doppler equations were derived to facilitate complete understanding of dual-Doppler synthesis; to determine the technical information requirements; and to determine the components of wind velocity from the equation of continuity and radial velocity data collected by the two Doppler radars. Analysis confirmed the suitability of the existing systems to provide the desired capability. In addition, it is possible that both 45 SW radar data and Terminal Doppler Weather Radar data from Orlando International Airport could be used to alleviate any

  19. Doppler tracking of planetary spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinman, Peter W.

    1992-01-01

    This article concerns the measurement of Doppler shift on microwave links that connect planetary spacecraft with the Deep Space Network. Such measurements are made by tracking the Doppler effect with phase-locked loop receivers. A description of equipment and techniques as well as a summary of the appropriate mathematical models are given. The two-way Doppler shift is measured by transmitting a highly-stable microwave (uplink) carrier from a ground station, having the spacecraft coherently transpond this carrier, and using a phase-locked loop receiver at the ground station to track the returned (downlink) carrier. The largest sources of measurement error are usually plasma noise and thermal noise. The plasma noise, which may originate in the ionosphere or the solar corona, is discussed; and a technique to partially calibrate its effect, involving the use of two simultaneous downlink carriers that are coherently related, is described. Range measurements employing Doppler rate-aiding are also described.

  20. Doppler characteristics of sea clutter.

    SciTech Connect

    Raynal, Ann Marie; Doerry, Armin Walter

    2010-06-01

    Doppler radars can distinguish targets from clutter if the target's velocity along the radar line of sight is beyond that of the clutter. Some targets of interest may have a Doppler shift similar to that of clutter. The nature of sea clutter is different in the clutter and exo-clutter regions. This behavior requires special consideration regarding where a radar can expect to find sea-clutter returns in Doppler space and what detection algorithms are most appropriate to help mitigate false alarms and increase probability of detection of a target. This paper studies the existing state-of-the-art in the understanding of Doppler characteristics of sea clutter and scattering from the ocean to better understand the design and performance choices of a radar in differentiating targets from clutter under prevailing sea conditions.

  1. Acoustic biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Fogel, Ronen; Seshia, Ashwin A.

    2016-01-01

    Resonant and acoustic wave devices have been researched for several decades for application in the gravimetric sensing of a variety of biological and chemical analytes. These devices operate by coupling the measurand (e.g. analyte adsorption) as a modulation in the physical properties of the acoustic wave (e.g. resonant frequency, acoustic velocity, dissipation) that can then be correlated with the amount of adsorbed analyte. These devices can also be miniaturized with advantages in terms of cost, size and scalability, as well as potential additional features including integration with microfluidics and electronics, scaled sensitivities associated with smaller dimensions and higher operational frequencies, the ability to multiplex detection across arrays of hundreds of devices embedded in a single chip, increased throughput and the ability to interrogate a wider range of modes including within the same device. Additionally, device fabrication is often compatible with semiconductor volume batch manufacturing techniques enabling cost scalability and a high degree of precision and reproducibility in the manufacturing process. Integration with microfluidics handling also enables suitable sample pre-processing/separation/purification/amplification steps that could improve selectivity and the overall signal-to-noise ratio. Three device types are reviewed here: (i) bulk acoustic wave sensors, (ii) surface acoustic wave sensors, and (iii) micro/nano-electromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS) sensors. PMID:27365040

  2. Acoustic biosensors.

    PubMed

    Fogel, Ronen; Limson, Janice; Seshia, Ashwin A

    2016-06-30

    Resonant and acoustic wave devices have been researched for several decades for application in the gravimetric sensing of a variety of biological and chemical analytes. These devices operate by coupling the measurand (e.g. analyte adsorption) as a modulation in the physical properties of the acoustic wave (e.g. resonant frequency, acoustic velocity, dissipation) that can then be correlated with the amount of adsorbed analyte. These devices can also be miniaturized with advantages in terms of cost, size and scalability, as well as potential additional features including integration with microfluidics and electronics, scaled sensitivities associated with smaller dimensions and higher operational frequencies, the ability to multiplex detection across arrays of hundreds of devices embedded in a single chip, increased throughput and the ability to interrogate a wider range of modes including within the same device. Additionally, device fabrication is often compatible with semiconductor volume batch manufacturing techniques enabling cost scalability and a high degree of precision and reproducibility in the manufacturing process. Integration with microfluidics handling also enables suitable sample pre-processing/separation/purification/amplification steps that could improve selectivity and the overall signal-to-noise ratio. Three device types are reviewed here: (i) bulk acoustic wave sensors, (ii) surface acoustic wave sensors, and (iii) micro/nano-electromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS) sensors. PMID:27365040

  3. Mathematical Models for Doppler Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lear, William M.

    1987-01-01

    Error analysis increases precision of navigation. Report presents improved mathematical models of analysis of Doppler measurements and measurement errors of spacecraft navigation. To take advantage of potential navigational accuracy of Doppler measurements, precise equations relate measured cycle count to position and velocity. Drifts and random variations in transmitter and receiver oscillator frequencies taken into account. Mathematical models also adapted to aircraft navigation, radar, sonar, lidar, and interferometry.

  4. Analysis of particle kinematics in spheronization via particle image velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Koester, Martin; Thommes, Markus

    2013-02-01

    Spheronization is a wide spread technique in pellet production for many pharmaceutical applications. Pellets produced by spheronization are characterized by a particularly spherical shape and narrow size distribution. The particle kinematic during spheronization is currently not well-understood. Therefore, particle image velocimetry (PIV) was implemented in the spheronization process to visualize the particle movement and to identify flow patterns, in order to explain the influence of various process parameters. The spheronization process of a common formulation was recorded with a high-speed camera, and the images were processed using particle image velocimetry software. A crosscorrelation approach was chosen to determine the particle velocity at the surface of the pellet bulk. Formulation and process parameters were varied systematically, and their influence on the particle velocity was investigated. The particle stream shows a torus-like shape with a twisted rope-like motion. It is remarkable that the overall particle velocity is approximately 10-fold lower than the tip speed of the friction plate. The velocity of the particle stream can be correlated to the water content of the pellets and the load of the spheronizer, while the rotation speed was not relevant. In conclusion, PIV was successfully applied to the spheronization process, and new insights into the particle velocity were obtained. PMID:23000404

  5. Particle response analysis for particle image velocimetry in supersonic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Owen J. H.; Nguyen, Tue; Schreyer, Anne-Marie; Smits, Alexander J.

    2015-07-01

    We examine the effects of compressibility, slip, and fluid inertia on the frequency response of particle-based velocimetry techniques for supersonic and hypersonic flows by solving the quasi-steady drag equation for solid, spherical particles. We demonstrate that non-continuum and fluid inertial effects significantly affect the particle response under all typical supersonic flow conditions. In particular, the particle frequency response obtained from a shock response test depends on the strength of the shock, decreasing with shock strength as non-continuum effects become more prominent. For weak disturbances, such as those typical of turbulence, the actual particle frequency response can therefore be much lower than that obtained from a typical shock response. The greatest variability in the response was found to occur at low supersonic Mach numbers. The results were found to be typical of solid particles used for velocimetry under a wide range of wind tunnel conditions, and so, previous particle frequency response analyses based solely on shock response tests may well have overestimated the response to turbulence.

  6. High Resolution Doppler Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This Grant supported the development of an incoherent lidar system to measure winds and aerosols in the lower atmosphere. During this period the following activities occurred: (1) an active feedback system was developed to improve the laser frequency stability; (2) a detailed forward model of the instrument was developed to take into account many subtle effects, such as detector non-linearity; (3) a non-linear least squares inversion method was developed to recover the Doppler shift and aerosol backscatter without requiring assumptions about the molecular component of the signal; (4) a study was done of the effects of systematic errors due to multiple etalon misalignment. It was discovered that even for small offsets and high aerosol loadings, the wind determination can be biased by as much as 1 m/s. The forward model and inversion process were modified to account for this effect; and (5) the lidar measurements were validated using rawinsonde balloon measurements. The measurements were found to be in agreement within 1-2 m/s.

  7. Compact Doppler magnetograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruzmaikin, Alexander; Moynihan, Philip I.; Vaughan, Arthur H.; Cacciani, Alessandro

    1998-11-01

    We designed a low-cost flight instrument that images the full solar disk through two narrow band filters at the red nd blue 'wings' of the solar potassium absorption line. The images are produced on a 1024 X 1024 charge-coupled device with a resolution of 2 arcsec per pixel. Four filtergrams taken in a very short time at both wings in the left and right states of circular polarization are used to yield a Dopplergram and a magnetogram simultaneously. The noise-equivalent velocity associated with each pixel is less than 3 m/s. The measured signal is linearly proportional to the velocity in the range +/- 4000 m/s. The range of magnetic fields is from 3 to 3000 Gauss. The optical system of the instrument is simple and easily aligned. With a pixel size of 12 micrometers , the effective focal length is 126 cm. A Raleigh resolution limit of 4 arcsec is achieved with a 5-cm entrance apertures, providing an f/25 focal ratio. The foreoptic is a two-component telephoto lens serving to limit the overall optical length to 89 cm or less. The mass of the instrument is 14 kg. the power required is less than 30 Watts. The Compact Doppler Magnetograph can be used in space mission with severe mass and power requirements. It can also be effectively used for ground-based observations: large telescope, dome or other observatory facilities are not required.

  8. High Resolution Doppler Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hays, Paul B.

    1999-01-01

    This report summarizes the accomplishments of the High Resolution Doppler Imager (HRDI) on UARS spacecraft during the period 4/l/96 - 3/31/99. During this period, HRDI operation, data processing, and data analysis continued, and there was a high level of vitality in the HRDI project. The HRDI has been collecting data from the stratosphere, mesosphere, and lower thermosphere since instrument activation on October 1, 1991. The HRDI team has stressed three areas since operations commenced: 1) operation of the instrument in a manner which maximizes the quality and versatility of the collected data; 2) algorithm development and validation to produce a high-quality data product; and 3) scientific studies, primarily of the dynamics of the middle atmosphere. There has been no significant degradation in the HRDI instrument since operations began nearly 8 years ago. HRDI operations are fairly routine, although we have continued to look for ways to improve the quality of the scientific product, either by improving existing modes, or by designing new ones. The HRDI instrument has been programmed to collect data for new scientific studies, such as measurements of fluorescence from plants, measuring cloud top heights, and lower atmosphere H2O.

  9. Applications of Fresnel-Kirchhoff diffraction theory in the analysis of human-motion Doppler sonar grams.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Marshall; Sabatier, James M

    2010-11-01

    Observed human-gait features in Doppler sonar grams are explained by using the Boulic-Thalmann (BT) model to predict joint angle time histories and the temporal displacements of the body center of mass. Body segments are represented as ellipsoids. Temporally dependent velocities at the proximal and distal end of key body segments are determined from BT. Doppler sonar grams are computed by mapping velocity-time dependent spectral acoustic-cross sections for the body segments onto time-velocity space, mimicking the Short Time Fourier Transform used in the Doppler sonar processing. Comparisons to measured data indicate that dominant returns come from trunk, thigh and lower leg. PMID:21110534

  10. Doppler effect in a solid medium: Spin wave emission by a precessing domain wall drifting in spin current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Hong; Chen, Jie; Zeng, Xiaoyan; Yan, Ming

    2016-04-01

    The Doppler effect is a fundamental physical phenomenon observed for waves propagating in vacuum or various media, commonly gaseous or liquid. Here, we report on the occurrence of a Doppler effect in a solid medium. Instead of a real object, a topological soliton, i.e., a magnetic domain wall (DW) traveling in a current-carrying ferromagnetic nanowire, plays the role of the moving wave source. The Larmor precession of the DW in an external field stimulates emission of monochromatic spin waves (SWs) during its motion, which show a significant Doppler effect, comparable to the acoustic one of a train whistle. This process involves two prominent spin-transfer-torque effects simultaneously, the current-driven DW motion and the current-induced SW Doppler shift. The latter gives rise to an interesting feature, i.e., the observed SW Doppler effect appears resulting from a stationary source and a moving observer, contrary to the laboratory frame.

  11. Minimizing vehicle noise and weight using panel acoustic contribution analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Gordon M.

    1998-05-01

    Panel acoustic contribution analysis (PACA) is an advanced engineering tool to improve noise, vibration, and harshness quality and minimize weight of vehicles. It is a technique to categorize areas of vehicle body panels as positive (sound level increases as vibration amplitude increases), negative or neutral according to their contribution to the total sound. PACA is a hybrid of computer aided engineering and experimental methods. Computer aided holometry, scanning laser velocimetry, or an accelerometer net is used to experimentally measure structure vibration complex velocities. These velocities are the boundary conditions for a boundary element model of the acoustic cavity. Boundary element analysis is then used to predict the vehicle interior sound and calculate panel acoustic contributions. Experimental results for a welded steel box (validation) and vehicle application are presented.

  12. An investigation of natural and forced transition in a laminar separation bubble via time-resolved Particle Image Velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurelek, John; Yarusevych, Serhiy

    2015-11-01

    The transition process in a laminar separation bubble (LSB) formed on the suction surface of a NACA 0018 airfoil at a chord Reynolds number of 100,000 and an angle of attack of 5° is studied experimentally. Both natural and forced transition are evaluated using controlled acoustic disturbances. Time-resolved Particle Image Velocimetry and surface pressure measurements are used to investigate the streamwise and spanwise flow development in the bubble. For all the cases examined, the transition process is characterized by the formation of strongly periodic shear layer vortices in the LSB due to the amplification of disturbances in the bubble's fore portion. These structures feature strong spanwise coherence at roll-up; however, they deform rapidly and begin to break down upstream of the mean reattachment point. The vortex breakup is shown to be initiated by spanwise deformation of the vortex filaments, linked to the formation of streamwise structures. This is followed by the formation of turbulent spots, which expand rapidly near mean reattachment. The results demonstrate that the acoustic disturbance environment can have a strong influence on the characteristics of the vortices and their breakup, thereby affecting flow transition and the overall dynamics of the LSB.

  13. Power Doppler imaging: clinical experience and correlation with color Doppler US and other imaging modalities.

    PubMed

    Hamper, U M; DeJong, M R; Caskey, C I; Sheth, S

    1997-01-01

    Power Doppler imaging has recently gained attention as an additional color flow imaging technique that overcomes some of the limitations of conventional color Doppler ultrasound (US). Limitations of conventional color Doppler US include angle dependence, aliasing, and difficulty in separating background noise from true flow in slow-flow states. Owing to its increased sensitivity to flow, power Doppler sonography is valuable in low-flow states and when optimal Doppler angles cannot be obtained. Longer segments of vessels and more individual vessels can be visualized with power Doppler US than with conventional color Doppler sonography. Power Doppler sonography increases diagnostic confidence when verifying or excluding testicular or ovarian torsion and confirming thrombosis or occlusion of vessels. Power Doppler sonography also improves evaluation of parenchymal flow and decreases examination times in technically challenging cases. Power Doppler US is a useful adjunct to mean-frequency color Doppler sonography, especially when color Doppler US cannot adequately obtain or display diagnostic information. PMID:9084086

  14. Doppler laser imaging predicts response to topical minoxidil in the treatment of female pattern hair loss.

    PubMed

    McCoy, J; Kovacevic, M; Situm, M; Stanimirovic, A; Bolanca, Z; Goren, A

    2016-01-01

    Topical minoxidil is the only drug approved by the US FDA for the treatment of female pattern hair loss. Unfortunately, following 16 weeks of daily application, less than 40% of patients regrow hair. Several studies have demonstrated that sulfotransferase enzyme activity in plucked hair follicles predicts topical minoxidil response in female pattern hair loss patients. However, due to patients’ discomfort with the procedure, and the time required to perform the enzymatic assay it would be ideal to develop a rapid, non-invasive test for sulfotransferase enzyme activity. Minoxidil is a pro-drug converted to its active form, minoxidil sulfate, by sulfotransferase enzymes in the outer root sheath of hair. Minoxidil sulfate is the active form required for both the promotion of hair regrowth and the vasodilatory effects of minoxidil. We thus hypothesized that laser Doppler velocimetry measurement of scalp blood perfusion subsequent to the application of topical minoxidil would correlate with sulfotransferase enzyme activity in plucked hair follicles. In this study, plucked hair follicles from female pattern hair loss patients were analyzed for sulfotransferase enzyme activity. Additionally, laser Doppler velocimetry was used to measure the change in scalp perfusion at 15, 30, 45, and 60 minutes, after the application of minoxidil. In agreement with our hypothesis, we discovered a correlation (r=1.0) between the change in scalp perfusion within 60 minutes after topical minoxidil application and sulfotransferase enzyme activity in plucked hairs. To our knowledge, this is the first study demonstrating the feasibility of using laser Doppler imaging as a rapid, non-invasive diagnostic test to predict topical minoxidil response in the treatment of female pattern hair loss. PMID:27049083

  15. Identifying and discriminating phase transitions along decaying shocks with line imaging Doppler interferometric velocimetry and streaked optical pyrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millot, Marius

    2016-01-01

    Ultrafast line-imaging velocity interferometer system for any reflector and streaked optical pyrometry are now commonly used to obtain high precision equation of state and electronic transport data under dynamic compression at major high energy density science facilities. We describe a simple way to improve distinguishing phase transformation signatures from other signals when monitoring decaying shock waves. The line-imaging capability of these optical diagnostics offers additional supporting evidence to the assignment of particular anomalies—such as plateaus or reversals—to the occurrence of a phase transition along the Hugoniot. We illustrate the discussion with two example datasets collected during laser driven shock compression of quartz and stishovite.

  16. Laser doppler velocimetry measurements in a one and a half stage transonic test turbine with different angular stator stator positions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schennach, Oliver; Woisetschläger, Jakob; Marn, Andreas; Göttlich, Emil

    2007-10-01

    Metal insulator metal (M I M) structures involving transition-metal oxides and, more recently, also perovskite oxides with resistive switching effects have attracted substantial interest in research aimed at nonvolatile memories of nanometer dimensions. Although some models are presently under discussion, it is still not clear whether the fundamental switching mechanism is an interface or a bulk property, or a combination of both. Extended defects, such as dislocation lines and changes in the oxygen vacancy concentration, are considered responsible for the conducting state, and local reduction/oxidation processes have been proposed to be responsible for the resistive switching. In addition, the role of dopants has not been discussed in depth. Here we report on an electric-field-controlled electron trapping/detrapping process involved in the resistive switching in Cr-doped SrTiO3. Electroluminescence (EL) measurements reveal that during resistive switching, light emission is observed only in the switching transition from high to low conductivity. The EL spectrum is typical for Cr3+ in an octahedral ligand field, indicating that the switching process involves trapping/detrapping of electrons at the Cr site. With increasing conductivity of SrTiO3, we observe a change from the predominant 2{E}to4{A}_{2g} (R-line) to the vibronically red-shifted 4{T}2to4{A}_{2g} transition, which points to a modification of the Cr-occupied lattice sites.

  17. Measuring Black Smoker Fluid Flow Rates Using Image Correlation Velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crone, T. J.; Wilcock, W. S.; McDuff, R. E.

    2006-12-01

    Motivated by a desire to find non-invasive methods for obtaining time-series measurements of fluid flow rates through mid-ocean ridge black smokers, we are developing an image-based velocimetry technique that will provide this information through the analysis of video sequences showing the turbulent structures of black smoker effluent jets. Our ultimate goal is to develop an autonomous seafloor instrument suitable for use with a cabled seafloor observatory that can provide extended time-series measurements of black smoker discharge rates with little user intervention. The method we are developing is based on the two-dimensional cross-correlation of an array of overlapping subimages from two sequential image frames within a sequence. For each pair of images this yields a two- dimensional representation of the instantaneous velocity field in the imaged flow. For each video sequence, the set of these "image velocity fields" from all image pairs is temporally averaged to yield a smoothed representation of the time-averaged image flow field. A transformation is then applied to convert the image flow fields into a relative discharge rate. We have developed a computational algorithm to implement this technique and have successfully applied it to video sequences collected in the late 1980s and early 1990s showing the discharge of black smokers in the Main Endeavour field of the Juan de Fuca Ridge over the course of weeks and months. We are able to resolve velocity fields that are qualitatively consistent with those predicted by plume theory from 5 seconds of video (150 image pairs), but it is difficult to calibrate or assess the precision of the technique with field data alone. In order to address these issues, as well as refine the computational algorithm, we have conducted laboratory simulations of black smoker jets with known discharge rates over a range of Reynolds numbers. We have recorded these simulations to obtain video image sequences that are similar to those

  18. Scaling and dimensional analysis of acoustic streaming jets

    SciTech Connect

    Moudjed, B.; Botton, V.; Henry, D.; Ben Hadid, H.

    2014-09-15

    This paper focuses on acoustic streaming free jets. This is to say that progressive acoustic waves are used to generate a steady flow far from any wall. The derivation of the governing equations under the form of a nonlinear hydrodynamics problem coupled with an acoustic propagation problem is made on the basis of a time scale discrimination approach. This approach is preferred to the usually invoked amplitude perturbations expansion since it is consistent with experimental observations of acoustic streaming flows featuring hydrodynamic nonlinearities and turbulence. Experimental results obtained with a plane transducer in water are also presented together with a review of the former experimental investigations using similar configurations. A comparison of the shape of the acoustic field with the shape of the velocity field shows that diffraction is a key ingredient in the problem though it is rarely accounted for in the literature. A scaling analysis is made and leads to two scaling laws for the typical velocity level in acoustic streaming free jets; these are both observed in our setup and in former studies by other teams. We also perform a dimensional analysis of this problem: a set of seven dimensionless groups is required to describe a typical acoustic experiment. We find that a full similarity is usually not possible between two acoustic streaming experiments featuring different fluids. We then choose to relax the similarity with respect to sound attenuation and to focus on the case of a scaled water experiment representing an acoustic streaming application in liquid metals, in particular, in liquid silicon and in liquid sodium. We show that small acoustic powers can yield relatively high Reynolds numbers and velocity levels; this could be a virtue for heat and mass transfer applications, but a drawback for ultrasonic velocimetry.

  19. Visualization of aerocolloidal biological particles using 2D particle image velocimetry (PIV)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Carsie A., III; Masabattula, Sree; Akyuzlu, Kazim M.; Russo, Edwin P.; Klich, Maren A.

    2003-11-01

    Recent concerns over the possible use of airborne biological particles as weapons of mass destruction have significantly increased the attention that researchers are giving to this threat. The size of these particles, ranging from a fraction of a micrometer to several tens of micrometers, allows them to travel over long distances before settling out of the airstreams carrying these particles. Furthermore, the odd shapes of many of these particles along with uncertainties about their light scattering characteristics make detection and tracking quite a challenge. In the present paper, results are reported on the visualization of airborne biological particles using two-dimensional particle image velocimetry (PIV). These initial results show the utility of PIV in illuminating and tracking airborne biological particles. A compressed air nebulizer is used to aerosolize the biological particles inside a Plexiglas test section. The biological particles prepared for the nebulizer are first inoculated and cultured onto agar media, gypsum board, and acoustic ceiling tile to achieve an abundant growth of spores. A colloidal suspension of biological particles is then made using sterilized, de-ionized water and a mild surfactant to de-agglomerate the biological particles in the suspension. The concentration of biological particles in the colloidal suspension is determined using a hemacytometer. In the visualization experiments, images are captured for polystyrene latex (PSL) test particles, liquid water droplets, and spores of the fungal species Aspergillus versicolor. During the PIV system operation, two successive images are captured with a time delay of 50 μm to develop flow field velocities of the PSL test particles, liquid water droplets, and the A. versicolor spores.

  20. Rapid MRI and velocimetry of cylindrical Couette flow.

    PubMed

    Hanlon, A D; Gibbs, S J; Hall, L D; Haycock, D E; Frith, W J; Ablett, S

    1998-10-01

    A narrow-gap, temperature-controlled Couette flow rheometer has been developed to study fluid velocities within the annular gap between two concentric cylinders by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging and velocimetry. Alternative pulsed-field-gradient-based nuclear magnetic resonance imaging strategies which may be used for measurement of velocity within the Couette flow device have been evaluated. These include two-dimensional (2-D) imaging techniques with acquisition times of several minutes and a one-dimensional (1-D) projection method which exploits the symmetry of the device to reduce overall measurement time to less than 1 min. Velocity measurements made using each technique are presented for a Newtonian fluid undergoing Couette flow at shear rates of approximately 20 and 60 s(-1). PMID:9814778

  1. Holographic Particle Image Velocimetry and its Application in Engine Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coupland, J. M.; Garner, C. P.; Alcock, R. D.; Halliwell, N. A.

    2006-07-01

    This paper reviews Holographic Particle Image Velocimetry (HPIV) as a means to make three-component velocity measurements throughout a three-dimensional flow-field of interest. A simplified treatment of three-dimensional scalar wave propagation is outlined and subsequently used to illustrate the principles of complex correlation analysis. It is shown that this type of analysis provides the three-dimensional correlation of the propagating, monochromatic fields recorded by the hologram. A similar approach is used to analyse the Object Conjugate Reconstruction (OCR) technique to resolve directional ambiguity by introducing an artificial image shift to the reconstructed particle images. An example of how these methods are used together to measure the instantaneous flow fields within a motored Diesel engine is then described.

  2. Towards metering tap water by Lorentz force velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilyan, Suren; Ebert, Reschad; Weidner, Markus; Rivero, Michel; Halbedel, Bernd; Resagk, Christian; Fröhlich, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we present enhanced flow rate measurement by applying the contactless Lorentz Force Velocimetry (LFV) technique. Particularly, we show that the LFV is a feasible technique for metering the flow rate of salt water in a rectangular channel. The measurements of the Lorentz forces as a function of the flow rate are presented for different electrical conductivities of the salt water. The smallest value of conductivity is achieved at 0.06 S·m-1, which corresponds to the typical value of tap water. In comparison with previous results, the performance of LFV is improved by approximately 2 orders of magnitude by means of a high-precision differential force measurement setup. Furthermore, the sensitivity curve and the calibration factor of the flowmeter are provided based on extensive measurements for the flow velocities ranging from 0.2 to 2.5 m·s-1 and conductivities ranging from 0.06 to 10 S·m-1.

  3. Application of optical correlation techniques to particle imaging velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wernet, Mark P.; Edwards, Robert V.

    1988-01-01

    Pulsed laser sheet velocimetry yields nonintrusive measurements of velocity vectors across an extended 2-dimensional region of the flow field. The application of optical correlation techniques to the analysis of multiple exposure laser light sheet photographs can reduce and/or simplify the data reduction time and hardware. Here, Matched Spatial Filters (MSF) are used in a pattern recognition system. Usually MSFs are used to identify the assembly line parts. In this application, the MSFs are used to identify the iso-velocity vector contours in the flow. The patterns to be recognized are the recorded particle images in a pulsed laser light sheet photograph. Measurement of the direction of the partical image displacements between exposures yields the velocity vector. The particle image exposure sequence is designed such that the velocity vector direction is determined unambiguously. A global analysis technique is used in comparison to the more common particle tracking algorithms and Young's fringe analysis technique.

  4. Single-camera, three-dimensional particle tracking velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Kevin; Regaard, Boris; Heinemann, Stefan; Sick, Volker

    2012-04-01

    This paper introduces single-camera, three-dimensional particle tracking velocimetry (SC3D-PTV), an image-based, single-camera technique for measuring 3-component, volumetric velocity fields in environments with limited optical access, in particular, optically accessible internal combustion engines. The optical components used for SC3D-PTV are similar to those used for two-camera stereoscopic-µPIV, but are adapted to project two simultaneous images onto a single image sensor. A novel PTV algorithm relying on the similarity of the particle images corresponding to a single, physical particle produces 3-component, volumetric velocity fields, rather than the 3-component, planar results obtained with stereoscopic PIV, and without the reconstruction of an instantaneous 3D particle field. The hardware and software used for SC3D-PTV are described, and experimental results are presented. PMID:22513613

  5. Laser velocimetry measurements in a gas turbine research combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Driscoll, J. F.; Pelaccio, D. G.

    1979-01-01

    The effects of turbulence on the production of pollutant species in a gas-turbine research combustor are studied using laser diffraction velocimetry (LDV) techniques. Measurements that were made in the primary combustion zone include mean velocity, rms velocity fluctuations, velocity probability distributions, and autocorrelation functions. A unique combustor design provides relatively uniform flow conditions and independent control of drop size, equivalence ratio, inlet temperature, and combustor pressure. Parameters which characterize the nature of the spray combustion (i.e., whether single droplet or group combustion occurs), were determined from the LDV data. Turbulent diffusivity (eddy viscosity) reaches a value of 2930 sq cm/sec, corresponding to a convective integral length scale of 1.8 cm. The group combustion number, based on turbulent diffusivity, is measured to be 6.2

  6. Stereoscopic particle image velocimetry in a transonic turbine stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, H.; Mørck, T.; Woisetschläger, J.

    2002-06-01

    In order to investigate the flow field in axial turbine stages, a continuously operating transonic test turbine facility for high pressure ratios was designed at Graz University of Technology, Austria. This test facility allows optical access to the rotor and to the stator trailing edge. The three-dimensional velocity distribution in the region of stator-rotor interaction was investigated by stereoscopic particle image velocimetry. To obtain the three-dimensional velocity vectors in one plane at the mid-section of the turbine blades, a calibration-based method was used. Light-sheet delivery, seeding and triggering to four pre-defined rotor-stator positions are discussed, and an insight into the rotor-stator interaction is given, including vortex shedding in the stator wake.

  7. Preparation of polystyrene microspheres for laser velocimetry in wind tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, Cecil E., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Laser Velocimetry (L/V) had made great strides in replacing intrusive devices for wind tunnel flow measurements. The weakness of the L/V has not been the L/V itself, but proper size seeding particles having known drag characteristics. For many Langley Wind Tunnel applications commercial polystyrene latex microspheres suspended in ethanol, injected through a fluid nozzle provides excellent seeding but was not used due to the high cost. This paper provides the instructions, procedures, and formulations for producing polystyrene latex monodisperse microspheres of 0.6, 1.0, 1.7, 2.0, and 2.7 micron diameters. These are presently being used at Langley Research Center as L/V seeding particles.

  8. Laser velocimetry applied to transonic and supersonic aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, D. A.; Bachalo, W. D.; Moddaress, D.

    1976-01-01

    Measurements obtained with laser velocimetry in a Mach 2.9 separated turbulent boundary layer and in the transonic flow past a two-dimensional airfoil section are presented and compared to data realized by conventional techniques. Agreement in mean velocities was realized where the pressure measurements could be considered reliable; however, in regions of instantaneous reverse velocities, the laser results were found to be consistent with the physics of the flow whereas the pressure data were not. Streamwise turbulence intensities are also presented. In the transonic airfoil study, velocity measurements obtained immediately outside the upper surface boundary layer of a 6-inch chord NACA 64A010 airfoil are compared to edge velocities inferred from surface pressure measurements. For free-stream Mach numbers of 0.6 and 0.8, the agreement in results was very good. "Dual scatter" optical arrangements in conjunction with a single particle, counter-type signal processor were employed in these investigations.

  9. Planetary Doppler Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, N.; Jefferies, S.; Hart, M.; Hubbard, W. B.; Showman, A. P.; Hernandez, G.; Rudd, L.

    2014-12-01

    Determining the internal structure of the solar system's gas and ice giant planets is key to understanding their formation and evolution (Hubbard et al., 1999, 2002, Guillot 2005), and in turn the formation and evolution of the solar system. While internal structure can be constrained theoretically, measurements of internal density distributions are needed to uncover the details of the deep interior where significant ambiguities exist. To date the interiors of giant planets have been probed by measuring gravitational moments using spacecraft passing close to, or in orbit around the planet. Gravity measurements are effective in determining structure in the outer envelope of a planet, and also probing dynamics (e.g. the Cassini and Juno missions), but are less effective in probing deep structure or the presence of discrete boundaries. A promising technique for overcoming this limitation is planetary seismology (analogous to helioseismology in the solar case), postulated by Vorontsov, 1976. Using trapped pressure waves to probe giant planet interiors allows insight into the density and temperature distribution (via the sound speed) down to the planetary core, and is also sensitive to sharp boundaries, for example at the molecular to metallic hydrogen transition or at the core-envelope interface. Detecting such boundaries is not only important in understanding the overall structure of the planet, but also has implications for our understanding of the basic properties of matter at extreme pressures. Recent Doppler measurements of Jupiter by Gaulme et al (2011) claimed a promising detection of trapped oscillations, while Hedman and Nicholson (2013) have shown that trapped waves in Saturn cause detectable perturbations in Saturn's C ring. Both these papers have fueled interest in using seismology as a tool for studying the solar system's giant planets. To fully exploit planetary seismology as a tool for understanding giant planet structure, measurements need to be made

  10. Understanding brownout using dual-phase particle image velocimetry measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sydney, Anish Joshua

    To better understand the development of brownout dust clouds generated by rotor- craft, the dual-phase flow environment produced by one- and two-bladed laboratory-scale rotors operating over a mobile sediment bed were studied. Three size ranges of characterized glass microspheres were used to represent the sediment particles. Time-resolved flow visualization, particle image velocimetry, and particle tracking velocimetry were used to make the flow measurements. The high imaging rate of these systems allowed the time-history of the rotor wake interactions with the sediment bed to be documented, providing a better understanding of the transient processes and mechanisms that lead to the uplift of sediment and the formation of dust clouds near a rotor in ground effect operation. In particular, the fluid dynamics of the blade tip vortices near the bed were examined in detail, which were shown to have a primary influence on the mobilization of sediment. In general, the near-wall measurements documented at least five fundamental uplift and sediment transport mechanisms below the rotor: 1. Creep, 2. Modified saltation and saltation bombardment, 3. Vortex induced trapping, 4. Reingestion bombardment (local and global), and 5. Secondary suspension. In addition, a further mechanism related to the local unsteady pressure field induced by the convecting wake vortices was hypothesized to contribute to the uplift of sediment. The highest sediment entrainment levels occurred within the wake impingement zone, mainly from the erosion aspects of the tip vortices on the bed. Once entrained, significant quantities of sediment were intermittently trapped in the vortex-induced upwash field. Secondary sediment suspension was found to be more prevalent with the two-bladed rotor because of the propensity for merging of adjacent blade tip vortices and the resulting higher upwash velocities. The trapping of suspended sediment particles into the vortex flow was shown to cause recirculation of

  11. Acoustic transducer for acoustic microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T.; Chou, Ching H.

    1990-01-01

    A shear acoustic transducer-lens system in which a shear polarized piezoelectric material excites shear polarized waves at one end of a buffer rod having a lens at the other end which excites longitudinal waves in a coupling medium by mode conversion at selected locations on the lens.

  12. Acoustic transducer for acoustic microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Khuri-Yakub, B.T.; Chou, C.H.

    1990-03-20

    A shear acoustic transducer-lens system is described in which a shear polarized piezoelectric material excites shear polarized waves at one end of a buffer rod having a lens at the other end which excites longitudinal waves in a coupling medium by mode conversion at selected locations on the lens. 9 figs.

  13. Estimation of two-dimensional intraventricular velocity and pressure maps by digital processing conventional color-Doppler sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Damien; Del Alamo, Juan C.; Tanne, David; Cortina, Cristina; Yotti, Raquel; Fernandez-Aviles, Francisco; Bermejo, Javier

    2008-11-01

    Clinical echocardiographic quantification of blood flow in the left ventricle is limited because Doppler methods only provide one velocity component. We developed a new technique to obtain two-dimensional flow maps from conventional transthoracic echocardiographic acquisitions. Velocity and pressure maps were calculated from color-Doppler velocity (apical long-axis view) by solving the continuity and Euler equations under the assumptions of zero transverse fluxes of mass and momentum. This technique is fast, clinically-compliant and does not require any specific training. Particle image velocimetry experiments performed in an atrioventricular duplicator showed that the circulation and size of the diastolic vortex was quantified accurately. Micromanometer measurements in pigs showed that apex-base pressure differences extracted from two-dimensional maps qualitatively agreed with micromanometer data. Initial clinical measurements in healthy volunteers showed a large prograde vortex. Additional retrograde vortices appeared in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy and left ventricular hypertrophy.

  14. Volumetric measurements of a spatially growing dust acoustic wave

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Jeremiah D.

    2012-11-15

    In this study, tomographic particle image velocimetry (tomo-PIV) techniques are used to make volumetric measurements of the dust acoustic wave (DAW) in a weakly coupled dusty plasma system in an argon, dc glow discharge plasma. These tomo-PIV measurements provide the first instantaneous volumetric measurement of a naturally occurring propagating DAW. These measurements reveal over the measured volume that the measured wave mode propagates in all three spatial dimensional and exhibits the same spatial growth rate and wavelength in each spatial direction.

  15. Medical Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beach, Kirk; Dunmire, Barbrina

    Medical acoustics can be subdivided into diagnostics and therapy. Diagnostics are further separated into auditory and ultrasonic methods, and both employ low amplitudes. Therapy (excluding medical advice) uses ultrasound for heating, cooking, permeablizing, activating and fracturing tissues and structures within the body, usually at much higher amplitudes than in diagnostics. Because ultrasound is a wave, linear wave physics are generally applicable, but recently nonlinear effects have become more important, even in low-intensity diagnostic applications.

  16. Acoustic chaos

    SciTech Connect

    Lauterborn, W.; Parlitz, U.; Holzfuss, J.; Billo, A.; Akhatov, I.

    1996-06-01

    Acoustic cavitation, a complex, spatio-temporal dynamical system, is investigated with respect to its chaotic properties. The sound output, the {open_quote}{open_quote}noise{close_quote}{close_quote}, is subjected to time series analysis. The spatial dynamics of the bubble filaments is captured by high speed holographic cinematography and subsequent digital picture processing from the holograms. Theoretical models are put forward for describing the pattern formation. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  17. Pyroclast Tracking Velocimetry: A particle tracking velocimetry-based tool for the study of Strombolian explosive eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaudin, Damien; Moroni, Monica; Taddeucci, Jacopo; Scarlato, Piergiorgio; Shindler, Luca

    2014-07-01

    Image-based techniques enable high-resolution observation of the pyroclasts ejected during Strombolian explosions and drawing inferences on the dynamics of volcanic activity. However, data extraction from high-resolution videos is time consuming and operator dependent, while automatic analysis is often challenging due to the highly variable quality of images collected in the field. Here we present a new set of algorithms to automatically analyze image sequences of explosive eruptions: the pyroclast tracking velocimetry (PyTV) toolbox. First, a significant preprocessing is used to remove the image background and to detect the pyroclasts. Then, pyroclast tracking is achieved with a new particle tracking velocimetry algorithm, featuring an original predictor of velocity based on the optical flow equation. Finally, postprocessing corrects the systematic errors of measurements. Four high-speed videos of Strombolian explosions from Yasur and Stromboli volcanoes, representing various observation conditions, have been used to test the efficiency of the PyTV against manual analysis. In all cases, >106 pyroclasts have been successfully detected and tracked by PyTV, with a precision of 1 m/s for the velocity and 20% for the size of the pyroclast. On each video, more than 1000 tracks are several meters long, enabling us to study pyroclast properties and trajectories. Compared to manual tracking, 3 to 100 times more pyroclasts are analyzed. PyTV, by providing time-constrained information, links physical properties and motion of individual pyroclasts. It is a powerful tool for the study of explosive volcanic activity, as well as an ideal complement for other geological and geophysical volcano observation systems.

  18. Multi-Component, Multi-Point Interferometric Rayleigh/Mie Doppler Velocimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danehy, Paul M.; Lee, Joseph W.; Bivolaru, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    An interferometric Rayleigh scattering system was developed to enable the measurement of multiple, orthogonal velocity components at several points within very-high-speed or high-temperature flows. The velocity of a gaseous flow can be optically measured by sending laser light into the gas flow, and then measuring the scattered light signal that is returned from matter within the flow. Scattering can arise from either gas molecules within the flow itself, known as Rayleigh scattering, or from particles within the flow, known as Mie scattering. Measuring Mie scattering is the basis of all commercial laser Doppler and particle imaging velocimetry systems, but particle seeding is problematic when measuring high-speed and high-temperature flows. The velocimeter is designed to measure the Doppler shift from only Rayleigh scattering, and does not require, but can also measure, particles within the flow. The system combines a direct-view, large-optic interferometric setup that calculates the Doppler shift from fringe patterns collected with a digital camera, and a subsystem to capture and re-circulate scattered light to maximize signal density. By measuring two orthogonal components of the velocity at multiple positions in the flow volume, the accuracy and usefulness of the flow measurement increase significantly over single or nonorthogonal component approaches.

  19. Method and apparatus for optical Doppler tomographic imaging of fluid flow velocity in highly scattering media

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, John Stuart; Milner, Thomas Edward; Chen, Zhongping

    1999-01-01

    Optical Doppler tomography permits imaging of fluid flow velocity in highly scattering media. The tomography system combines Doppler velocimetry with high spatial resolution of partially coherent optical interferometry to measure fluid flow velocity at discrete spatial locations. Noninvasive in vivo imaging of blood flow dynamics and tissue structures with high spatial resolutions of the order of 2 to 10 microns is achieved in biological systems. The backscattered interference signals derived from the interferometer may be analyzed either through power spectrum determination to obtain the position and velocity of each particle in the fluid flow sample at each pixel, or the interference spectral density may be analyzed at each frequency in the spectrum to obtain the positions and velocities of the particles in a cross-section to which the interference spectral density corresponds. The realized resolutions of optical Doppler tomography allows noninvasive in vivo imaging of both blood microcirculation and tissue structure surrounding the vessel which has significance for biomedical research and clinical applications.

  20. Understanding Doppler Broadening of Gamma Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Rawool-Sullivan, Mohini; Sullivan, John P.

    2014-07-03

    Doppler-broadened gamma ray peaks are observed routinely in the collection and analysis of gamma-ray spectra. If not recognized and understood, the appearance of Doppler broadening can complicate the interpretation of a spectrum and the correct identification of the gamma ray-emitting material. We have conducted a study using a simulation code to demonstrate how Doppler broadening arises and provide a real-world example in which Doppler broadening is found. This report describes that study and its results.