Science.gov

Sample records for acoustic doppler velocity

  1. Delay and Doppler spreads in underwater acoustic particle velocity channels.

    PubMed

    Guo, Huaihai; Abdi, Ali; Song, Aijun; Badiey, Mohsen

    2011-04-01

    Signal processing and communication in acoustic particle velocity channels using vector sensors are of interest in the underwater medium. Due to the presence of multiple propagation paths, a mobile receiver collects the signal with different delays and Doppler shifts. This introduces certain delay and Doppler spreads in particle velocity channels. In this paper, these channel spreads are characterized using the zero-crossing rates of channel responses in frequency and time domain. Useful expressions for delay and Doppler spreads are derived in terms of the key channel parameters mean angle of arrival and angle spread. These results are needed for design and performance prediction of systems that utilize underwater acoustic particle velocity and pressure channels.

  2. Velocity measurements in whole blood using acoustic resolution photoacoustic Doppler.

    PubMed

    Brunker, Joanna; Beard, Paul

    2016-07-01

    Acoustic resolution photoacoustic Doppler velocimetry promises to overcome the spatial resolution and depth penetration limitations of current blood flow measuring methods. Despite successful implementation using blood-mimicking fluids, measurements in blood have proved challenging, thus preventing in vivo application. A common explanation for this difficulty is that whole blood is insufficiently heterogeneous relative to detector frequencies of tens of MHz compatible with deep tissue photoacoustic measurements. Through rigorous experimental measurements we provide new insight that refutes this assertion. We show for the first time that, by careful choice of the detector frequency and field-of-view, and by employing novel signal processing methods, it is possible to make velocity measurements in whole blood using transducers with frequencies in the tens of MHz range. These findings have important implications for the prospects of making deep tissue measurements of blood flow relevant to the study of microcirculatory abnormalities associated with cancer, diabetes, atherosclerosis and other conditions. PMID:27446707

  3. Velocity measurements in whole blood using acoustic resolution photoacoustic Doppler

    PubMed Central

    Brunker, Joanna; Beard, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Acoustic resolution photoacoustic Doppler velocimetry promises to overcome the spatial resolution and depth penetration limitations of current blood flow measuring methods. Despite successful implementation using blood-mimicking fluids, measurements in blood have proved challenging, thus preventing in vivo application. A common explanation for this difficulty is that whole blood is insufficiently heterogeneous relative to detector frequencies of tens of MHz compatible with deep tissue photoacoustic measurements. Through rigorous experimental measurements we provide new insight that refutes this assertion. We show for the first time that, by careful choice of the detector frequency and field-of-view, and by employing novel signal processing methods, it is possible to make velocity measurements in whole blood using transducers with frequencies in the tens of MHz range. These findings have important implications for the prospects of making deep tissue measurements of blood flow relevant to the study of microcirculatory abnormalities associated with cancer, diabetes, atherosclerosis and other conditions. PMID:27446707

  4. Acoustic Doppler velocity measurement system using capacitive micromachined ultrasound transducer array technology.

    PubMed

    Shin, Minchul; Krause, Joshua S; DeBitetto, Paul; White, Robert D

    2013-08-01

    This paper describes the design, fabrication, modeling, and characterization of a small (1 cm(2) transducer chip) acoustic Doppler velocity measurement system using microelectromechanical systems capacitive micromachined ultrasound transducer (cMUT) array technology. The cMUT sensor has a 185 kHz resonant frequency to achieve a 13° beam width for a 1 cm aperture. A model for the cMUT and the acoustic system which includes electrical, mechanical, and acoustic components is provided. Furthermore, this paper shows characterization of the cMUT sensor with a variety of testing procedures including Laser Doppler Vibrometry (LDV), beampattern measurement, reflection testing, and velocity testing. LDV measurements demonstrate that the membrane displacement at the center point is 0.4 nm/V(2) at 185 kHz. The maximum range of the sensor is 60 cm (30 cm out and 30 cm back). A velocity sled was constructed and used to demonstrate measureable Doppler shifts at velocities from 0.2 to 1.0 m/s. The Doppler shifts agree well with the expected frequency shifts over this range.

  5. Acoustic Doppler velocity measurement system using capacitive micromachined ultrasound transducer array technology.

    PubMed

    Shin, Minchul; Krause, Joshua S; DeBitetto, Paul; White, Robert D

    2013-08-01

    This paper describes the design, fabrication, modeling, and characterization of a small (1 cm(2) transducer chip) acoustic Doppler velocity measurement system using microelectromechanical systems capacitive micromachined ultrasound transducer (cMUT) array technology. The cMUT sensor has a 185 kHz resonant frequency to achieve a 13° beam width for a 1 cm aperture. A model for the cMUT and the acoustic system which includes electrical, mechanical, and acoustic components is provided. Furthermore, this paper shows characterization of the cMUT sensor with a variety of testing procedures including Laser Doppler Vibrometry (LDV), beampattern measurement, reflection testing, and velocity testing. LDV measurements demonstrate that the membrane displacement at the center point is 0.4 nm/V(2) at 185 kHz. The maximum range of the sensor is 60 cm (30 cm out and 30 cm back). A velocity sled was constructed and used to demonstrate measureable Doppler shifts at velocities from 0.2 to 1.0 m/s. The Doppler shifts agree well with the expected frequency shifts over this range. PMID:23927100

  6. Gulf stream velocity structure through combined inversion of hydrographic and acoustic Doppler data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierce, S. D.

    1986-01-01

    Near-surface velocities from an acoustic Doppler instrument are used in conjunction with CTD/O2 data to produce estimates of the absolute flow field off Cape Hatteras. The data set consists of two transects across the Gulf Stream made by the R/V Endeavor cruise EN88 in August 1982. An inverse procedure is applied which makes use of both the acoustic Doppler data and property conservation constraints. Velocity sections at approximately 73 deg. W and 71 deg. W are presented with formal errors of 1-2 cm/s. The net Gulf Stream transports are estimated to be 116 + or - 2 Sv across the south leg and 161 + or - 4 Sv across the north. A Deep Western Boundary Current transport of 4 + or - 1 Sv is also estimated. While these values do not necessarily represent the mean, they are accurate estimates of the synoptic flow field in the region.

  7. Visualizing flow fields using acoustic Doppler current profilers and the Velocity Mapping Toolbox

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jackson, P. Ryan

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this fact sheet is to provide examples of how the U.S. Geological Survey is using acoustic Doppler current profilers for much more than routine discharge measurements. These instruments are capable of mapping complex three-dimensional flow fields within rivers, lakes, and estuaries. Using the Velocity Mapping Toolbox to process the ADCP data allows detailed visualization of the data, providing valuable information for a range of studies and applications.

  8. Optical multi-point measurements of the acoustic particle velocity with frequency modulated Doppler global velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Andreas; König, Jörg; Haufe, Daniel; Schlüssler, Raimund; Büttner, Lars; Czarske, Jürgen

    2013-08-01

    To reduce the noise of machines such as aircraft engines, the development and propagation of sound has to be investigated. Since the applicability of microphones is limited due to their intrusiveness, contactless measurement techniques are required. For this reason, the present study describes an optical method based on the Doppler effect and its application for acoustic particle velocity (APV) measurements. While former APV measurements with Doppler techniques are point measurements, the applied system is capable of simultaneous measurements at multiple points. In its current state, the system provides linear array measurements of one component of the APV demonstrated by multi-tone experiments with tones up to 17 kHz for the first time.

  9. Optical multi-point measurements of the acoustic particle velocity with frequency modulated Doppler global velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Andreas; König, Jörg; Haufe, Daniel; Schlüssler, Raimund; Büttner, Lars; Czarske, Jürgen

    2013-08-01

    To reduce the noise of machines such as aircraft engines, the development and propagation of sound has to be investigated. Since the applicability of microphones is limited due to their intrusiveness, contactless measurement techniques are required. For this reason, the present study describes an optical method based on the Doppler effect and its application for acoustic particle velocity (APV) measurements. While former APV measurements with Doppler techniques are point measurements, the applied system is capable of simultaneous measurements at multiple points. In its current state, the system provides linear array measurements of one component of the APV demonstrated by multi-tone experiments with tones up to 17 kHz for the first time. PMID:23927110

  10. Errors in acoustic doppler profiler velocity measurements caused by flow disturbance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mueller, D.S.; Abad, J.D.; Garcia, C.M.; Gartner, J.W.; Garcia, M.H.; Oberg, K.A.

    2007-01-01

    Acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) are commonly used to measure streamflow and water velocities in rivers and streams. This paper presents laboratory, field, and numerical model evidence of errors in ADCP measurements caused by flow disturbance. A state-of-the-art three-dimensional computational fluid dynamic model is validated with and used to complement field and laboratory observations of flow disturbance and its effect on measured velocities. Results show that near the instrument, flow velocities measured by the ADCP are neither the undisturbed stream velocity nor the velocity of the flow field around the ADCP. The velocities measured by the ADCP are biased low due to the downward flow near the upstream face of the ADCP and upward recovering flow in the path of downstream transducer, which violate the flow homogeneity assumption used to transform beam velocities into Cartesian velocity components. The magnitude of the bias is dependent on the deployment configuration, the diameter of the instrument, and the approach velocity, and was observed to range from more than 25% at 5cm from the transducers to less than 1% at about 50cm from the transducers for the scenarios simulated. ?? 2007 ASCE.

  11. Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler Surveys of Velocity Downstream of Albeni Falls Dam

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, William A.; Titzler, P. Scott; Richmond, Marshall C.; Serkowski, John A.; Kallio, Sara E.; Bellgraph, Brian J.

    2010-09-30

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Seattle District, is studying the potential to locate fish bypass systems at Albeni Falls Dam. The USACE requested Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to survey velocity magnitude and direction in the dam tailrace. The empirical data collected will be used to support future numerical modeling, physical modeling, and evaluation of fish bypass system alternatives. In May 2010, PNNL conducted velocity surveys of the Albeni Falls Dam using a boat-mounted acoustic Doppler current profiler. The surveys were conducted over three days (May 25 through 27). During the survey period, total river discharge at the dam varied between 30.2 and 31.0 kcfs. A small amount of spill discharge, 2 kcfs, was present on two days (May 26 and 27). This report presents data plots showing measured velocity direction and magnitude averaged over the entire depth and over 5-ft depth increments from 5 to 30 ft.

  12. Acoustic resolution photoacoustic Doppler velocity measurements in fluids using time-domain cross-correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunker, J.; Beard, P.

    2013-03-01

    Blood flow measurements have been demonstrated using the acoustic resolution mode of photoacoustic sensing. This is unlike previous flowmetry methods using the optical resolution mode, which limits the maximum penetration depth to approximately 1mm. Here we describe a pulsed time correlation photoacoustic Doppler technique that is inherently flexible, lending itself to both resolution modes. Doppler time shifts are quantified via cross-correlation of pairs of photoacoustic waveforms generated in moving absorbers using pairs of laser light pulses, and the photoacoustic waves detected using an ultrasound transducer. The acoustic resolution mode is employed by using the transducer focal width, rather than the large illuminated volume, to define the lateral spatial resolution. The use of short laser pulses allows depth-resolved measurements to be obtained with high spatial resolution, offering the prospect of mapping flow within microcirculation. Whilst our previous work has been limited to a non-fluid phantom, we now demonstrate measurements in more realistic blood-mimicking phantoms incorporating fluid suspensions of microspheres flowing along an optically transparent tube. Velocities up to 110 mm/s were measured with accuracies approaching 1% of the known velocities, and resolutions of a few mm/s. The velocity range and resolution are scalable with excitation pulse separation, but the maximum measurable velocity was considerably smaller than the value expected from the detector focal beam width. Measurements were also made for blood flowing at velocities up to 13.5 mm/s. This was for a sample reduced to 5% of the normal haematocrit; increasing the red blood cell concentration limited the maximum measurable velocity so that no results were obtained for concentrations greater than 20% of a physiologically realistic haematocrit. There are several possible causes for this limitation; these include the detector bandwidth and irregularities in the flow pattern. Better

  13. A GIS-based Computational Tool for Multidimensional Flow Velocity by Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, D.; Winkler, M.; Muste, M.

    2015-06-01

    Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers (ADCPs) provide efficient and reliable flow measurements compared to other tools for characteristics of the riverine environments. In addition to originally targeted discharge measurements, ADCPs are increasingly utilized to assess river flow characteristics. The newly developed VMS (Velocity Mapping Software) aims at providing an efficient process for quality assurance, mapping velocity vectors for visualization and facilitating comparison with physical and numerical model results. VMS was designed to provide efficient and smooth work flows for processing groups of transects. The software allows the user to select group of files and subsequently to conduct statistical and graphical quality assurance on the files as a group or individually as appropriate. VMS also enables spatial averaging in horizontal and vertical plane for ADCP data in a single or multiple transects over the same or consecutive cross sections. The analysis results are displayed in numerical and graphical formats.

  14. Estimating Discharge using Multi-level Velocity Data from Acoustic Doppler Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bang Poulsen, J.; Rømer Rasmussen, K.; Bering Ovesen, N.

    2010-12-01

    In the majority of Danish streams, weed growth affects the effective stream width and bed roughness and therefore imposes temporal variations on the stage-discharge relationship. Small stream-gradients and firm ecology based restrictions prevent that hydraulic structures are made at the discharge stations and thus remove or limit such influences. Hence, estimation of the hydrograph is based on continuous stream gauging combined with monthly control measurements of discharge and assuming linear variation of bed roughness between the monthly measurements. As a result, any non-linear drift in weed density or structure which affect the frictional characteristics of the stream during both normal and peak flows are ignored. The present investigation studies if such temporal variation in the conveyance may be detected and eventually compensated for when estimating the hydrograph. Therefore acoustic Dopplers have been placed at the main discharge station in one of the largest Danish catchments (the Skjern). The instruments were set out in early February 2010 during the winter season and have been running since then. The long term average discharge at the station is near 14 m3/s and the cross sectional profile is roughly trapezoidal having width about 15 m., but slightly skew so that the stream is about 0.5 m. deeper off the right than off the left bank. During winter, the depths are typically near 2 m. while during summer they are about 1.5 m. During peak flows, when the discharge exceeds 35 m3/s, the depth increases to more than 3 m. The Doppler instruments (Nortek) are placed on a vertical pole about 2 m. off the right bank at three fixed elevations above the streambed (0.3, 0.6, and 1.3 m); the beams point horizontally towards the left bank perpendicularly to the average flow direction. At each depth, the Doppler sensor records 10 minute average stream velocities in the central 10 m. section of the stream. During summer periods with low flow, stream velocity has only

  15. Comparison of index velocity measurements made with a horizontal acoustic Doppler current profiler

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jackson, P. Ryan; Johnson, Kevin K.; Duncker, James J.

    2012-01-01

    The State of Illinois' annual withdrawal from Lake Michigan is limited by a U.S. Supreme Court decree, and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is responsible for monitoring flows in the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal (CSSC) near Lemont, Illinois as a part of the Lake Michigan Diversion Accounting overseen by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Chicago District. Every 5 years, a technical review committee consisting of practicing engineers and academics is convened to review the U.S. Geological Survey's streamgage practices in the CSSC near Lemont, Illinois. The sixth technical review committee raised a number of questions concerning the flows and streamgage practices in the CSSC near Lemont and this report provides answers to many of those questions. In addition, it is the purpose of this report to examine the index velocity meters in use at Lemont and determine whether the acoustic velocity meter (AVM), which is now the primary index velocity meter, can be replaced by the horizontal acoustic Doppler current profiler (H-ADCP), which is currently the backup meter. Application of the AVM and H-ADCP to index velocity measurements in the CSSC near Lemont, Illinois, has produced good ratings to date. The site is well suited to index velocity measurements in spite of the large range of velocities and highly unsteady flows at the site. Flow variability arises from a range of sources: operation of the waterway through control structures, lockage-generated disturbances, commercial and recreational traffic, industrial withdrawals and discharges, natural inflows, seiches, and storm events. The influences of these factors on the index velocity measurements at Lemont is examined in detail in this report. Results of detailed data comparisons and flow analyses show that use of bank-mounted instrumentation such as the AVM and H-ADCP appears to be the best option for index velocity measurement in the CSSC near Lemont. Comparison of the rating curves for the AVM and H-ADCP demonstrates

  16. Cause and solution for false upstream boat velocities measured with a StreamPro acoustic doppler current profiler

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mueller, David S.; Rehmel, Mike S.; Wagner, Chad R.

    2007-01-01

    In 2003, Teledyne RD Instruments introduced the StreamPro acoustic Doppler current profiler which does not include an internal compass. During stationary moving-bed tests the StreamPro often tends to swim or kite from the end of the tether (the instrument rotates then moves laterally in the direction of the rotation). Because the StreamPro does not have an internal compass, it cannot account for the rotation. This rotation and lateral movement of the StreamPro on the end of the tether generates a false upstream velocity, which cannot be easily distinguished from a moving-bed bias velocity. A field test was completed to demonstrate that this rotation and lateral movement causes a false upstream boat velocity. The vector dot product of the boat velocity and the unit vector of the depth-averaged water velocity is shown to be an effective method to account for the effect of the rotation and lateral movement.

  17. Numerical performance analysis of acoustic Doppler velocity profilers in the wake of an axial-flow marine hydrokinetic turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Richmond, Marshall C.; Harding, Samuel F.; Romero Gomez, Pedro DJ

    2015-09-01

    The use of acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) for the characterization of flow conditions in the vicinity of both experimental and full scale marine hydrokinetic (MHK) turbines is becoming increasingly prevalent. The computation of a three dimensional velocity measurement from divergent acoustic beams requires the assumption that the flow conditions are homogeneous between all beams at a particular axial distance from the instrument. In the near wake of MHK devices, the mean fluid motion is observed to be highly spatially dependent as a result of torque generation and energy extraction. This paper examines the performance of ADCP measurements in such scenarios through the modelling of a virtual ADCP (VADCP) instrument in the velocity field in the wake of an MHK turbine resolved using unsteady computational fluid dynamics (CFD). This is achieved by sampling the CFD velocity field at equivalent locations to the sample bins of an ADCP and performing the coordinate transformation from beam coordinates to instrument coordinates and finally to global coordinates. The error in the mean velocity calculated by the VADCP relative to the reference velocity along the instrument axis is calculated for a range of instrument locations and orientations. The stream-wise velocity deficit and tangential swirl velocity caused by the rotor rotation lead to significant misrepresentation of the true flow velocity profiles by the VADCP, with the most significant errors in the transverse (cross-flow) velocity direction.

  18. A Preliminary Evaluation of Near-Transducer Velocities Collected with Low-Blank Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gartner, J.W.; Ganju, N.K.

    2002-01-01

    Many streams and rivers for which the US Geological Survey must provide discharge measurements are too shallow to apply existing acoustic Doppler current profiler techniques for flow measurements of satisfactory quality. Because the same transducer is used for both transmitting and receiving acoustic signals in most Doppler current profilers, some small time delay is required for acoustic "ringing" to be damped out of transducers before meaningful measurements can be made. The result of that time delay is that velocity measurements cannot be made close to the transducer thus limiting the usefulness of these instruments in shallow regions. Manufacturers and users are constantly striving for improvements to acoustic instruments which would permit useful discharge measurements in shallow rivers and streams that are still often measured with techniques and instruments more than a century old. One promising area of advance appeared to be reduction of time delay (blank) required between transmitting and receiving signals during acoustic velocity measurements. Development of a low- or zero-blank transducer by RD Instruments3 held promise that velocity measurements could be made much closer to the transducer and thus in much shallower water. Initial experience indicates that this is not the case; limitation of measurement quality appears to be related to the physical presence of the transducer itself within the flow field. The limitation may be the result of changes to water flow pattern close to the transducer rather than transducer ringing characteristics as a function of blanking distance. Results of field experiments are discussed that support this conclusion and some minimum measurement distances from transducer are suggested based on water current speed and ADCP sample modes.

  19. An acoustic doppler current profiler survey of flow velocities in Detroit River, a connecting channel of the Great Lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holtschlag, David J.; Koschik, John A.

    2003-01-01

    Acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCP) were used to survey flow velocities in Detroit River from July 8-19, 2002, as part of a study to assess the susceptibility of public water intakes to contaminants on the St. Clair-Detroit River Waterway. More than 3.5 million point velocities were measured at 130 cross sections. Cross sections were generally spaced about 1,800 ft apart along the river from the head of Detroit River at the outlet of Lake St. Clair to the mouth of Detroit River on Lake Erie. Two transects were surveyed at each cross section, one in each direction across the river. Along each transect, velocity profiles were generally obtained 0.8-2.2 ft apart. At each velocity profile, average water velocity data were obtained at 1.64 ft intervals of depth. The raw position and velocity data from the ADCP field survey were adjusted for local magnetic anomalies using global positioning system (GPS) measurements at the end points of the transects. The adjusted velocity and ancillary data can be retrieved though the internet and extracted to column-oriented data files.

  20. An acoustic doppler current profiler survey of flow velocities in St. Clair River, a connecting channel of the Great Lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holtschlag, David J.; Koschik, John A.

    2003-01-01

    Acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCP) were used to measure flow velocities in St. Clair River during a survey in May and June of 2002, as part of a study to assess the susceptibility of public water intakes to contaminants on the St. Clair-Detroit River Waterway. The survey provides 2.7 million point velocity measurements at 104 cross sections. Sections are spaced about 1,630 ft apart along the river from Port Huron to Algonac, Michigan, a distance of 28.6 miles. Two transects were obtained at each cross section, one in each direction across the river. Along each transect, velocity profiles were obtained 2-4 ft apart. At each velocity profile, average water velocity data were obtained at 1.64 ft intervals of depth. The raw position and velocity data from the ADCP field survey were adjusted for local magnetic anomalies using global positioning system (GPS) measurements at the end points of the transects. The adjusted velocity and ancillary data can be retrieved through the internet and extracted to column-oriented data files.

  1. Measurement of velocities with an acoustic velocity meter, one side-looking and two upward-looking acoustic Doppler current profilers in the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal, Romeoville, Illinois

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oberg, Kevin A.; Duncker, James J.

    1999-01-01

    In 1998, a prototype 300 kHz, side-looking Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) was deployed in the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal (CSSC) at Romeoville, Illinois. Additionally, two upward-looking ADCP's were deployed in the same acoustic path as the side-looking ADCP and in the reach defined by the upstream and downstream acoustic velocity meter (AVM) paths. All three ADCP's were synchronized to the AVM clock at the gaging station so that data were sampled simultaneously. The three ADCP's were deployed for six weeks measuring flow velocities from 0.0 to 2.5 ft/s. Velocities measured by each ADCP were compared to AVM path velocities and to velocities measured by the other ADCP's.

  2. Velocity profiles, Reynolds stresses and bed roughness from an autonomous field deployed Acoustic Doppler Velocity Profiler in a mixed sediment tidal estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Boyle, Louise; Thorne, Peter; Cooke, Richard; Cohbed Team

    2014-05-01

    Estuaries are among some of the most important global landscapes in terms of population density, ecology and economy. Understanding the dynamics of these natural mixed sediment environments is of particular interest amid growing concerns over sea level rise, climate variations and estuarine response to these changes. Many predictors exist for bed form formation and sand transport in sandy coastal zones; however less work has been published on mixed sediments. This paper details a field study which forms part of the COHBED project aiming to increase understanding of bed forms in a biotic mixed sediment estuarine environment. The study was carried out in the Dee Estuary, in the eastern Irish Sea between England and Wales from the 21st May to 4th June 2013. A state of the art instrumentation frame, known as SEDbed, was deployed at three sites of differing sediment properties and biological makeup within the intertidal zone of the estuary. The SEDbed deployment consisted of a suite of optical and acoustic instrumentation, including an Acoustic Doppler Velocity Profiler (ADVP), Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter (ADV) and a three dimensional acoustic ripple profiler, 3D-ARP. Supplementary field samples and measurements were recorded alongside the frame during each deployment. This paper focuses on the use of new technological developments for the investigation of sediment dynamics. The hydrodynamics at each of the deployment sites are presented including centimetre resolution velocity profiles in the near bed region of the water column, obtained from the ADVP, which is presently the only autonomous field deployed coherent Doppler profiler . Based on these high resolution profiles variations in frictional velocity, bed shear stress and roughness length are calculated. Comparisons are made with theoretical models and with Reynolds stress values obtained from ADV data at a single point within the ADVP profile and from ADVP data itself. Predictions of bed roughness at each

  3. Evaluation of the Acoustic Doppler Velocity Meter for Computation of Discharge Records at Three Sites in Colorado, 2004-2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stevens, Michael R.; Diaz, Paul; Smits, Dennis E.

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Colorado Water Conservation Board, conducted a study in 2004-2005 at three sites in Colorado: Bear Creek at Morrison, Clear Creek near Empire, and Redlands Canal near Grand Junction. The study was done to evaluate acoustic Doppler velocity meter (ADVM) technology in different hydrologic settings that are characteristic of many Colorado streamflow-gaging sites. ADVMs have been tested and used extensively in many parts of the United States by USGS but not in Colorado where relatively small, shallow, clear, coarse-bed streams that ice up in the winter may affect the ADVM suitability. In this study, ADVM instrumentation was successfully used and discharge computations compared favorably, generally within 5 to 10 percent, with conventional USGS stage/discharge methods at the three Colorado sites. However, two factors, encountered in this study, may adversely affect the use of ADVM technology in Colorado. First, for some streams, the depth required (about 1.5 feet for a side-looking instrument) cannot be met during low-flow periods of the year. Second, cold temperatures and freezing-thawing cycles can produce ice effects that could prevent collection of usable ADVM (and stage) data.

  4. Synoptic Gulf Stream velocity profiles through simultaneous inversion of hydrographic and acoustic Doppler data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyce, T. M.; Wunsch, C.; Pierce, S. D.

    1986-01-01

    Data from a shipborne acoustic profiling device have been combined with conductivity, temperature, depth/O2 sections across the Gulf Stream to form estimates of the absolute flow fields. The procedure for the combination was a form of inverse method. The results suggest that at the time of the observations (June 1982) the net Gulf Stream transport off Hatteras was 107 + or - 11 Sv and that across a section near 72.5 W it had increased to 125 + or - 6 Sv. The transport of the deep western boundary current was 9 + or - 3 Sv. For comparison purposes an inversion was done using the hydrographic/O2 data alone as in previously published results and obtained qualitative agreement with the combined inversion. Inversion of the acoustic measurements alone, when corrected for instrument biases, leaves unacceptably large mass transport residuals in the deep water.

  5. Broad-band acoustic Doppler current profiler

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cobb, E.D.

    1993-01-01

    The broad-band acoustic Doppler current profiler is an instrument that determines velocity based on the Doppler principle by reflecting acoustic signals off sediment particles in the water. The instrument is capable of measuring velocity magnitude and direction throughout a water column and of measuring water depth. It is also capable of bottom tracking and can, therefore, keep track of its own relative position as it is moved across a channel. Discharge measurements can be made quickly and, based on limited tests, accurately with this instrument. ?? 1993.

  6. Evaluation of acoustic doppler velocity meters to quantify flow from Comal Springs and San Marcos Springs, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gary, Marcus O.; Gary, Robin H.; Asquith, William H.

    2008-01-01

    Comal Springs and San Marcos Springs are the two largest springs in Texas, are major discharge points for the San Antonio segment of the Edwards aquifer, and provide habitat for several Federally listed endangered species that depend on adequate springflows for survival. It is therefore imperative that the Edwards Aquifer Authority have accurate and timely springflow data to guide resource management. Discharge points for Comal Springs and San Marcos Springs are submerged in Landa Lake and in Spring Lake, respectively. Flows from the springs currently (2008) are estimated by the U.S Geological Survey in real time as surface-water discharge from conventional stage-discharge ratings at sites downstream from each spring. Recent technological advances and availability of acoustic Doppler velocity meters (ADVMs) now provide tools to collect data (stream velocity) related to springflow that could increase accuracy of real-time estimates of the springflows. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Edwards Aquifer Authority, did a study during May 2006 through September 2007 to evaluate ADVMs to quantify flow from Comal and San Marcos Springs. The evaluation was based on two monitoring approaches: (1) placement of ADVMs in important spring orifices - spring run 3 and spring 7 at Comal Springs, and diversion spring at San Marcos Springs; and (2) placement of ADVMs at the nearest flowing streams - Comal River new and old channels for Comal Springs, Spring Lake west and east outflow channels and current (2008) San Marcos River streamflow-gaging site for San Marcos Springs. For Comal Springs, ADVM application at spring run 3 and spring 7 was intended to indicate whether the flows of spring run 3 and spring 7 can be related to total springflow. The findings indicate that velocity data from both discharge features, while reflecting changes in flow, do not reliably show a direct relation to measured streamflow and thus to total Comal Springs flow. ADVMs at the Comal

  7. Acoustic velocity measurement by means of Laser Doppler Velocimetry: Development of an Extended Kalman Filter and validation in free-field measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Duff, Alain; Plantier, Guy; Valière, Jean C.; Gazengel, Bruno

    2016-03-01

    A signal processing technique, based on the use of an Extended Kalman Filter, has been developed to measure sound fields by means of Laser Doppler Velocimetry in weak flow. This method allows for the parametric estimation of both the acoustic particle and flow velocity for a forced sine-wave excitation where the acoustic frequency is known. The measurements are performed from the in-phase and the quadrature components of the Doppler downshifted signal thanks to an analog quadrature demodulation technique. Then, the estimated performance is illustrated by means of Monte-Carlo simulations obtained from synthesized signals and compared with asymptotic and analytical forms for the Cramer-Rao Bounds. Results allow the validity domain of the method to be defined and show the availability for free-field measurements in a large range. Finally, an application based on real data obtained in free field is presented.

  8. Simulating photospheric Doppler velocity fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, David H.

    1988-01-01

    A method is described for constructing artificial data that realistically simulate photospheric velocity fields. The velocity fields include rotation, differential rotation, meridional circulation, giant cell convection, supergranulation, convective limb shift, p-mode oscillations, and observer motion. Data constructed by this method can be used for testing algorithms designed to extract and analyze these velocity fields in real Doppler velocity data.

  9. Feasibility of Acoustic Doppler Velocity Meters for the Production of Discharge Records from U.S. Geological Survey Streamflow-Gaging Stations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morlock, Scott E.; Nguyen, Hieu T.; Ross, Jerry H.

    2002-01-01

    It is feasible to use acoustic Doppler velocity meters (ADVM's) installed at U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) streamflow-gaging stations to compute records of river discharge. ADVM's are small acoustic current meters that use the Doppler principle to measure water velocities in a two-dimensional plane. Records of river discharge can be computed from stage and ADVM velocity data using the 'index velocity' method. The ADVM-measured velocities are used as an estimator or 'index' of the mean velocity in the channel. In evaluations of ADVM's for the computation of records of river discharge, the USGS installed ADVM's at three streamflow-gaging stations in Indiana: Kankakee River at Davis, Fall Creek at Millersville, and Iroquois River near Foresman. The ADVM evaluation study period was from June 1999 to February 2001. Discharge records were computed, using ADVM data from each station. Discharge records also were computed using conventional stage-discharge methods of the USGS. The records produced from ADVM and conventional methods were compared with discharge record hydrographs and statistics. Overall, the records compared closely from the Kankakee River and Fall Creek stations. For the Iroquois River station, variable backwater was present and affected the comparison; because the ADVM record compensates for backwater, the ADVM record may be superior to the conventional record. For the three stations, the ADVM records were judged to be of a quality acceptable to USGS standards for publications and near realtime ADVM-computed discharges are served on USGS real-time data World Wide Web pages.

  10. Application of acoustic-Doppler current profiler and expendable bathythermograph measurements to the study of the velocity structure and transport of the Gulf Stream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyce, T. M.; Dunworth, J. A.; Schubert, D. M.; Stalcup, M. C.; Barbour, R. L.

    1988-01-01

    The degree to which Acoustic-Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) and expendable bathythermograph (XBT) data can provide quantitative measurements of the velocity structure and transport of the Gulf Stream is addressed. An algorithm is used to generate salinity from temperature and depth using an historical Temperature/Salinity relation for the NW Atlantic. Results have been simulated using CTD data and comparing real and pseudo salinity files. Errors are typically less than 2 dynamic cm for the upper 800 m out of a total signal of 80 cm (across the Gulf Stream). When combined with ADCP data for a near-surface reference velocity, transport errors in isopycnal layers are less than about 1 Sv (10 to the 6th power cu m/s), as is the difference in total transport for the upper 800 m between real and pseudo data. The method is capable of measuring the real variability of the Gulf Stream, and when combined with altimeter data, can provide estimates of the geoid slope with oceanic errors of a few parts in 10 to the 8th power over horizontal scales of 500 km.

  11. Acoustic velocity meter systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laenen, Antonius

    1985-01-01

    Acoustic velocity meter (AVM) systems operate on the principles that the point-to-point upstream traveltime of an acoustic pulse is longer than the downstream traveltime and that this difference in traveltime can be accurately measured by electronic devices. An AVM system is capable of recording water velocity (and discharge) under a wide range of conditions, but some constraints apply: 1. Accuracy is reduced and performance is degraded if the acoustic path is not a continuous straight line. The path can be bent by reflection if it is too close to a stream boundary or by refraction if it passes through density gradients resulting from variations in either water temperature or salinity. For paths of less than 100 m, a temperature gradient of 0.1' per meter causes signal bending less than 0.6 meter at midchannel, and satisfactory velocity results can be obtained. Reflection from stream boundaries can cause signal cancellation if boundaries are too close to signal path. 2. Signal strength is attenuated by particles or bubbles that absorb, spread, or scatter sound. The concentration of particles or bubbles that can be tolerated is a function of the path length and frequency of the acoustic signal. 3. Changes in streamline orientation can affect system accuracy if the variability is random. 4. Errors relating to signal resolution are much larger for a single threshold detection scheme than for multiple threshold schemes. This report provides methods for computing the effect of various conditions on the accuracy of a record obtained from an AVM. The equipment must be adapted to the site. Field reconnaissance and preinstallation analysis to detect possible problems are critical for proper installation and operation of an AVM system.

  12. Inverse Doppler Effects in Broadband Acoustic Metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Zhai, S L; Zhao, X P; Liu, S; Shen, F L; Li, L L; Luo, C R

    2016-08-31

    The Doppler effect refers to the change in frequency of a wave source as a consequence of the relative motion between the source and an observer. Veselago theoretically predicted that materials with negative refractions can induce inverse Doppler effects. With the development of metamaterials, inverse Doppler effects have been extensively investigated. However, the ideal material parameters prescribed by these metamaterial design approaches are complex and also challenging to obtain experimentally. Here, we demonstrated a method of designing and experimentally characterising arbitrary broadband acoustic metamaterials. These omni-directional, double-negative, acoustic metamaterials are constructed with 'flute-like' acoustic meta-cluster sets with seven double meta-molecules; these metamaterials also overcome the limitations of broadband negative bulk modulus and mass density to provide a region of negative refraction and inverse Doppler effects. It was also shown that inverse Doppler effects can be detected in a flute, which has been popular for thousands of years in Asia and Europe.

  13. Inverse Doppler Effects in Broadband Acoustic Metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Zhai, S L; Zhao, X P; Liu, S; Shen, F L; Li, L L; Luo, C R

    2016-01-01

    The Doppler effect refers to the change in frequency of a wave source as a consequence of the relative motion between the source and an observer. Veselago theoretically predicted that materials with negative refractions can induce inverse Doppler effects. With the development of metamaterials, inverse Doppler effects have been extensively investigated. However, the ideal material parameters prescribed by these metamaterial design approaches are complex and also challenging to obtain experimentally. Here, we demonstrated a method of designing and experimentally characterising arbitrary broadband acoustic metamaterials. These omni-directional, double-negative, acoustic metamaterials are constructed with 'flute-like' acoustic meta-cluster sets with seven double meta-molecules; these metamaterials also overcome the limitations of broadband negative bulk modulus and mass density to provide a region of negative refraction and inverse Doppler effects. It was also shown that inverse Doppler effects can be detected in a flute, which has been popular for thousands of years in Asia and Europe. PMID:27578317

  14. Inverse Doppler Effects in Broadband Acoustic Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, S. L.; Zhao, X. P.; Liu, S.; Shen, F. L.; Li, L. L.; Luo, C. R.

    2016-08-01

    The Doppler effect refers to the change in frequency of a wave source as a consequence of the relative motion between the source and an observer. Veselago theoretically predicted that materials with negative refractions can induce inverse Doppler effects. With the development of metamaterials, inverse Doppler effects have been extensively investigated. However, the ideal material parameters prescribed by these metamaterial design approaches are complex and also challenging to obtain experimentally. Here, we demonstrated a method of designing and experimentally characterising arbitrary broadband acoustic metamaterials. These omni-directional, double-negative, acoustic metamaterials are constructed with ‘flute-like’ acoustic meta-cluster sets with seven double meta-molecules; these metamaterials also overcome the limitations of broadband negative bulk modulus and mass density to provide a region of negative refraction and inverse Doppler effects. It was also shown that inverse Doppler effects can be detected in a flute, which has been popular for thousands of years in Asia and Europe.

  15. Recent applications of acoustic Doppler current profilers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oberg, K.A.; Mueller, David S.

    1994-01-01

    A Broadband acoustic Doppler current profiler (BB-ADCP) is a new instrument being used by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to measure stream discharge and velocities, and bathymetry. During the 1993 Mississippi River flood, more than 160 high-flow BB-ADCP measurements were made by the USGS at eight locations between Quincy and Cairo, Ill., from July 19 to August 20, 1993. A maximum discharge of 31,400 m3/s was measured at St. Louis, Mo., on August 2, 1993. A BB-ADCP also has been used to measure leakage through three control structures near Chicago, Ill. These measurements are unusual in that the average velocity for the measured section was as low as 0.03 m/s. BB-ADCP's are also used in support of studies of scour at bridges. During the recent Mississippi River flood, BB-ADCP's were used to measure water velocities and bathymetry upstream from, next to, and downstream from bridge piers at several bridges over the Mississippi River. Bathymetry data were collected by merging location data from Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers, laser tracking systems, and depths measured by the BB-ADCP. These techniques for collecting bathymetry data were used for documenting the channel formation downstream from the Miller City levee break and scour near two bridges on the Mississippi River.

  16. Extraction of the velocity of walking human's body segments using ultrasonic Doppler.

    PubMed

    Mehmood, Asif; Sabatier, James M; Bradley, Marshall; Ekimov, Alexander

    2010-11-01

    The focus of this paper is to experimentally extract the Doppler signatures of a walking human's individual body segments using an ultrasonic Doppler system (UDS) operating at 40 kHz. In a human's walk, the major contribution to Doppler velocities and acoustic scattering is from the foot, lower leg, thigh (upper leg) and torso. The Doppler signature of these human body segments are extracted experimentally. The measurements were made by illuminating one of these body segments at a time and blocking the remaining body segments using acoustic screens. The results obtained in our experiment were verified with the results published by Bradley using a physics-based model for Doppler sonar spectrograms.

  17. Inverse Doppler Effects in Broadband Acoustic Metamaterials

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, S. L.; Zhao, X. P.; Liu, S.; Shen, F. L.; Li, L. L.; Luo, C. R.

    2016-01-01

    The Doppler effect refers to the change in frequency of a wave source as a consequence of the relative motion between the source and an observer. Veselago theoretically predicted that materials with negative refractions can induce inverse Doppler effects. With the development of metamaterials, inverse Doppler effects have been extensively investigated. However, the ideal material parameters prescribed by these metamaterial design approaches are complex and also challenging to obtain experimentally. Here, we demonstrated a method of designing and experimentally characterising arbitrary broadband acoustic metamaterials. These omni-directional, double-negative, acoustic metamaterials are constructed with ‘flute-like’ acoustic meta-cluster sets with seven double meta-molecules; these metamaterials also overcome the limitations of broadband negative bulk modulus and mass density to provide a region of negative refraction and inverse Doppler effects. It was also shown that inverse Doppler effects can be detected in a flute, which has been popular for thousands of years in Asia and Europe. PMID:27578317

  18. Acoustic Doppler discharge-measurement system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simpson, Michael R.; Oltmann, Richard N.; ,

    1990-01-01

    A discharge-measurement system that uses a vessel-mounted acoustic Doppler current profiler has been developed and tested by the U.S. Geological Survey. Discharge measurements using the system require a fraction of the time needed for conventional current-meter discharge measurements and do not require shore-based navigational aids or tag lines for positioning the vessel.

  19. A MAGNETIC CALIBRATION OF PHOTOSPHERIC DOPPLER VELOCITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Welsch, Brian T.; Fisher, George H.; Sun, Xudong

    2013-03-10

    The zero point of measured photospheric Doppler shifts is uncertain for at least two reasons: instrumental variations (from, e.g., thermal drifts); and the convective blueshift, a known correlation between intensity and upflows. Accurate knowledge of the zero point is, however, useful for (1) improving estimates of the Poynting flux of magnetic energy across the photosphere, and (2) constraining processes underlying flux cancellation, the mutual apparent loss of magnetic flux in closely spaced, opposite-polarity magnetogram features. We present a method to absolutely calibrate line-of-sight (LOS) velocities in solar active regions (ARs) near disk center using three successive vector magnetograms and one Dopplergram coincident with the central magnetogram. It exploits the fact that Doppler shifts measured along polarity inversion lines (PILs) of the LOS magnetic field determine one component of the velocity perpendicular to the magnetic field, and optimizes consistency between changes in LOS flux near PILs and the transport of transverse magnetic flux by LOS velocities, assuming that ideal electric fields govern the magnetic evolution. Previous calibrations fitted the center-to-limb variation of Doppler velocities, but this approach cannot, by itself, account for residual convective shifts at the limb. We apply our method to vector magnetograms of AR 11158, observed by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory, and find clear evidence of offsets in the Doppler zero point in the range of 50-550 m s{sup -1}. In addition, we note that a simpler calibration can be determined from an LOS magnetogram and Dopplergram pair from the median Doppler velocity among all near-disk-center PIL pixels. We briefly discuss shortcomings in our initial implementation, and suggest ways to address these. In addition, as a step in our data reduction, we discuss the use of temporal continuity in the transverse magnetic field direction to correct apparently

  20. High velocity acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legendre, R.

    1992-09-01

    Different types of aerodynamically generated noise of practical interest are examined using a novel, physically based, approach. A simple source model for turbulence noise is proposed. The prediction for turbulent mixing layer noise, produced by this model based on a simple monopole-type source mechanism, is that the radiated sound power varies as the eighth power of the relative velocity. The model is too simple to allow calculations to be carried further to the extent of determining the radiated sound power level, so that an empirical factor must still be considered, as in the case of Lighthill's formula.

  1. Calculating "g" from Acoustic Doppler Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torres, Sebastian; Gonzalez-Espada, Wilson J.

    2006-01-01

    Traditionally, the Doppler effect for sound is introduced in high school and college physics courses. Students calculate the perceived frequency for several scenarios relating a stationary or moving observer and a stationary or moving sound source. These calculations assume a constant velocity of the observer and/or source. Although seldom…

  2. Acoustic micro-Doppler radar for human gait imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhaonian; Pouliquen, Philippe O; Waxman, Allen; Andreou, Andreas G

    2007-03-01

    A portable acoustic micro-Doppler radar system for the acquisition of human gait signatures in indoor and outdoor environments is reported. Signals from an accelerometer attached to the leg support the identification of the components in the measured micro-Doppler signature. The acoustic micro-Doppler system described in this paper is simpler and offers advantages over the widely used electromagnetic wave micro-Doppler radars.

  3. Flow velocity measurement with the nonlinear acoustic wave scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Didenkulov, Igor; Pronchatov-Rubtsov, Nikolay

    2015-10-01

    A problem of noninvasive measurement of liquid flow velocity arises in many practical applications. To this end the most often approach is the use of the linear Doppler technique. The Doppler frequency shift of signal scattered from the inhomogeneities distributed in a liquid relatively to the emitted frequency is proportional to the sound frequency and velocities of inhomogeneities. In the case of very slow flow one needs to use very high frequency sound. This approach fails in media with strong sound attenuation because acoustic wave attenuation increases with frequency and there is limit in increasing sound intensity, i.e. the cavitation threshold. Another approach which is considered in this paper is based on the method using the difference frequency Doppler Effect for flows with bubbles. This method is based on simultaneous action of two high-frequency primary acoustic waves with closed frequencies on bubbles and registration of the scattered by bubbles acoustic field at the difference frequency. The use of this method is interesting since the scattered difference frequency wave has much lower attenuation in a liquid. The theoretical consideration of the method is given in the paper. The experimental examples confirming the theoretical equations, as well as the ability of the method to be applied in medical diagnostics and in technical applications on measurement of flow velocities in liquids with strong sound attenuation is described. It is shown that the Doppler spectrum form depends on bubble concentration velocity distribution in the primary acoustic beams crossing zone that allows one to measure the flow velocity distribution.

  4. Flow velocity measurement with the nonlinear acoustic wave scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Didenkulov, Igor; Pronchatov-Rubtsov, Nikolay

    2015-10-28

    A problem of noninvasive measurement of liquid flow velocity arises in many practical applications. To this end the most often approach is the use of the linear Doppler technique. The Doppler frequency shift of signal scattered from the inhomogeneities distributed in a liquid relatively to the emitted frequency is proportional to the sound frequency and velocities of inhomogeneities. In the case of very slow flow one needs to use very high frequency sound. This approach fails in media with strong sound attenuation because acoustic wave attenuation increases with frequency and there is limit in increasing sound intensity, i.e. the cavitation threshold. Another approach which is considered in this paper is based on the method using the difference frequency Doppler Effect for flows with bubbles. This method is based on simultaneous action of two high-frequency primary acoustic waves with closed frequencies on bubbles and registration of the scattered by bubbles acoustic field at the difference frequency. The use of this method is interesting since the scattered difference frequency wave has much lower attenuation in a liquid. The theoretical consideration of the method is given in the paper. The experimental examples confirming the theoretical equations, as well as the ability of the method to be applied in medical diagnostics and in technical applications on measurement of flow velocities in liquids with strong sound attenuation is described. It is shown that the Doppler spectrum form depends on bubble concentration velocity distribution in the primary acoustic beams crossing zone that allows one to measure the flow velocity distribution.

  5. Validation of streamflow measurements made with acoustic doppler current profilers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oberg, K.; Mueller, D.S.

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey and other international agencies have collaborated to conduct laboratory and field validations of acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) measurements of streamflow. Laboratory validations made in a large towing basin show that the mean differences between tow cart velocity and ADCP bottom-track and water-track velocities were -0.51 and -1.10%, respectively. Field validations of commercially available ADCPs were conducted by comparing streamflow measurements made with ADCPs to reference streamflow measurements obtained from concurrent mechanical current-meter measurements, stable rating curves, salt-dilution measurements, or acoustic velocity meters. Data from 1,032 transects, comprising 100 discharge measurements, were analyzed from 22 sites in the United States, Canada, Sweden, and The Netherlands. Results of these analyses show that broadband ADCP streamflow measurements are unbiased when compared to the reference discharges regardless of the water mode used for making the measurement. Measurement duration is more important than the number of transects for reducing the uncertainty of the ADCP streamflow measurement. ?? 2007 ASCE.

  6. Observations on the use of acoustic Doppler velocimeters over rough beds with suspended sediment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Acoustic Doppler velocimeters provide a means for measuring velocities and turbulence in challenging circumstances, such as in flows with suspended particles, which are difficult or impossible with laser-based techniques. The relatively non-intrusive measurement resulting from the offset sampling v...

  7. Doppler velocity measurements from large and small arteries of mice

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Anilkumar K.; Madala, Sridhar; Entman, Mark L.; Michael, Lloyd H.; Taffet, George E.

    2011-01-01

    With the growth of genetic engineering, mice have become increasingly common as models of human diseases, and this has stimulated the development of techniques to assess the murine cardiovascular system. Our group has developed nonimaging and dedicated Doppler techniques for measuring blood velocity in the large and small peripheral arteries of anesthetized mice. We translated technology originally designed for human vessels for use in smaller mouse vessels at higher heart rates by using higher ultrasonic frequencies, smaller transducers, and higher-speed signal processing. With these methods one can measure cardiac filling and ejection velocities, velocity pulse arrival times for determining pulse wave velocity, peripheral blood velocity and vessel wall motion waveforms, jet velocities for the calculation of the pressure drop across stenoses, and left main coronary velocity for the estimation of coronary flow reserve. These noninvasive methods are convenient and easy to apply, but care must be taken in interpreting measurements due to Doppler sample volume size and angle of incidence. Doppler methods have been used to characterize and evaluate numerous cardiovascular phenotypes in mice and have been particularly useful in evaluating the cardiac and vascular remodeling that occur following transverse aortic constriction. Although duplex ultrasonic echo-Doppler instruments are being applied to mice, dedicated Doppler systems are more suitable for some applications. The magnitudes and waveforms of blood velocities from both cardiac and peripheral sites are similar in mice and humans, such that much of what is learned using Doppler technology in mice may be translated back to humans. PMID:21572013

  8. Doppler radar velocity measurements for wound ballistics experiments.

    PubMed

    Knudsen, P J; Svender, J

    1994-01-01

    Bullet velocity is a basic parameter in wound ballistics studies. It is usually measured electronically by means of a variety of solid or photoelectric barriers connected to equipment measuring the time elapsing between impulses, enabling the velocity to be calculated. With the advent of Doppler radar velocity measurement of large calibre artillery shells, the use of this equipment for wound ballistics experiments was investigated. Anaesthetized pigs were shot at a range of 9-10 metres and the velocities measured by Doppler radar and photocells were compared. A very good correspondence between the measured entry and exit velocities in low and medium velocity bullets was found, i.e. an average deviation of less than 1% (range 0-2%) between the two types of equipment. In high velocity bullets measurement of entry velocities was just as good, but in both methods measurement of the exit velocity was complicated by the cluttering of signals by fragments of tissue released from the exit wound and the deflection of the bullet, Doppler radar offers important benefits - simple set up, minimal risk of damage of equipment by stray bullets and very good accuracy - and may replace photocells and similar equipment in studies involving low and medium velocity bullets. Measurement of the exit velocity of high velocity bullets is unsatisfactory in both methods, and it is necessary to improve the Doppler radar method in order to measure that as well.

  9. Laser Doppler instrument measures fluid velocity without reference beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bourquin, K. R.; Shigemoto, F. H.

    1971-01-01

    Fluid velocity is measured by focusing laser beam on moving fluid and measuring Doppler shift in frequency which results when radiation is scattered by particles either originally present or deliberately injected into moving fluid.

  10. Exploratory Meeting on Airborne Doppler Lidar Wind Velocity Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, G. H. (Editor); Kaufman, J. W. (Editor); Vaughan, W. W. (Editor)

    1980-01-01

    The scientific interests and applications of the Airborne Doppler Lidar Wind Velocity Measurement System to severe storms and local weather are discussed. The main areas include convective phenomena, local circulation, atmospheric boundary layer, atmospheric dispersion, and industrial aerodynamics.

  11. Performance assessment and calibration of a profiling lab-scale acoustic Doppler velocimeter for application over mixed sand-gravel beds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Acoustic Doppler velocimetry has made high-resolution turbulence measurements in sediment-laden flows possible. Recent developments have resulted in a commercially available lab-scale acoustic Doppler profiling device, a Nortek Vectrino II, that allows for three-dimensional velocity data to be colle...

  12. Acoustic resolution photoacoustic Doppler velocimetry in blood-mimicking fluids

    PubMed Central

    Brunker, Joanna; Beard, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Photoacoustic Doppler velocimetry provides a major opportunity to overcome limitations of existing blood flow measuring methods. By enabling measurements with high spatial resolution several millimetres deep in tissue, it could probe microvascular blood flow abnormalities characteristic of many different diseases. Although previous work has demonstrated feasibility in solid phantoms, measurements in blood have proved significantly more challenging. This difficulty is commonly attributed to the requirement that the absorber spatial distribution is heterogeneous relative to the minimum detectable acoustic wavelength. By undertaking a rigorous study using blood-mimicking fluid suspensions of 3 μm absorbing microspheres, it was discovered that the perceived heterogeneity is not only limited by the intrinsic detector bandwidth; in addition, bandlimiting due to spatial averaging within the detector field-of-view also reduces perceived heterogeneity and compromises velocity measurement accuracy. These detrimental effects were found to be mitigated by high-pass filtering to select photoacoustic signal components associated with high heterogeneity. Measurement under-reading due to limited light penetration into the flow vessel was also observed. Accurate average velocity measurements were recovered using “range-gating”, which furthermore maps the cross-sectional velocity profile. These insights may help pave the way to deep-tissue non-invasive mapping of microvascular blood flow using photoacoustic methods. PMID:26892989

  13. River Bed Sediment Classification Using Acoustic Doppler Profiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shields, F. D.

    2008-12-01

    Restoration or rehabilitation of degraded stream and river habitats requires definition of a target condition and preferably post-implementation monitoring to gage progress toward the target. Stream habitat has been characterized by computing statistics based on measurements of water depth and velocity at each point of a horizontal grid. In many cases stream bed type and cover, both qualitatively assessed, were included as additional grid variables. Resultant statistics describing the central tendency, variability and spatial distribution of these three or four variables and their combinations have been used to explain key differences between more- and less-degraded streams and to infer biotic responses. Usually the required data are collected by wading observers, but application to larger rivers is problematic. Collection of water depth and velocity information may be automated across a wide range of stream sizes using an acoustic Doppler profiler (aDp). Herein we suggest that aDp data may also be used to infer bed hardness and thus type by extracting the return signal strength from the bottom track signal and using this information to compute the echo intensity at the bed. A method for computing echo intensity, along with key assumptions is presented. Echo intensity is computed for a range of river environments and related to the size and related characteristics of bed material. Habitat maps for river reaches depicting water depth, velocity and bed type developed from aDp data sets are presented.

  14. Acoustic resolution photoacoustic Doppler velocimetry in blood-mimicking fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunker, Joanna; Beard, Paul

    2016-02-01

    Photoacoustic Doppler velocimetry provides a major opportunity to overcome limitations of existing blood flow measuring methods. By enabling measurements with high spatial resolution several millimetres deep in tissue, it could probe microvascular blood flow abnormalities characteristic of many different diseases. Although previous work has demonstrated feasibility in solid phantoms, measurements in blood have proved significantly more challenging. This difficulty is commonly attributed to the requirement that the absorber spatial distribution is heterogeneous relative to the minimum detectable acoustic wavelength. By undertaking a rigorous study using blood-mimicking fluid suspensions of 3 μm absorbing microspheres, it was discovered that the perceived heterogeneity is not only limited by the intrinsic detector bandwidth; in addition, bandlimiting due to spatial averaging within the detector field-of-view also reduces perceived heterogeneity and compromises velocity measurement accuracy. These detrimental effects were found to be mitigated by high-pass filtering to select photoacoustic signal components associated with high heterogeneity. Measurement under-reading due to limited light penetration into the flow vessel was also observed. Accurate average velocity measurements were recovered using “range-gating”, which furthermore maps the cross-sectional velocity profile. These insights may help pave the way to deep-tissue non-invasive mapping of microvascular blood flow using photoacoustic methods.

  15. Characterizing Ocean Turbulence from Argo, Acoustic Doppler, and Simulation Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCaffrey, Katherine

    Turbulence is inherently chaotic and unsteady, so observing it and modeling it are no easy tasks. The ocean's sheer size makes it even more difficult to observe, and its unpredictable and ever-changing forcings introduce additional complexities. Turbulence in the oceans ranges from basin scale to the scale of the molecular viscosity. The method of energy transfer between scales is, however, an area of active research, so observations of the ocean at all scales are crucial to understanding the basic dynamics of its motions. In this collection of work, I use a variety of datasets to characterize a wide range of scales of turbulence, including observations from multiple instruments and from models with different governing equations. I analyzed the largest scales of the turbulent range using the global salinity data of the Argo profiling float network. Taking advantage of the scattered and discontinuous nature of this dataset, the second-order structure function was calculated down to 2000m depth, and shown to be useful for predicting spectral slopes. Results showed structure function slopes of 2/3 at small scales, and 0 at large scales, which corresponds with spectral slopes of -5/3 at small scales, and -1 at large scales. Using acoustic Doppler velocity measurements, I characterized the meter- to kilometer-scale turbulence at a potential tidal energy site in the Puget Sound, WA. Acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) and acoustic Doppler velocimeter (ADV) observations provided the data for an analysis that includes coherence, anisotropy, and intermittency. In order to more simply describe these features, a parameterization was done with four turbulence metrics, and the anisotropy magnitude, introduced here, was shown to most closely capture the coherent events. Then, using both the NREL TurbSim stochastic turbulence generator and the NCAR large-eddy simulation (LES) model, I calculated turbulence statistics to validate the accuracy of these methods in reproducing

  16. Influence of speckle effect on doppler velocity measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Zheng; Changming, Zhao; Haiyang, Zhang; Suhui, Yang; Dehua, Zhang; Xingyuan, Zheng; Hongzhi, Yang

    2016-06-01

    In a coherent Lidar system, velocity measurement of a target is achieved by measuring Doppler frequency shift between the echo and local oscillator (LO) signals. The measurement accuracy is proportional to the spectrum width of Doppler signal. Actually, the speckle effect caused by the scattering of laser from a target will broaden the Doppler signal's spectrum and bring uncertainty to the velocity measurement. In this paper, a theoretical model is proposed to predict the broadening of Doppler spectrum with respect to different target's surface and motion parameters. The velocity measurement uncertainty caused by the broadening of spectrum is analyzed. Based on the analysis, we design a coherent Lidar system to measure the velocity of the targets with different surface roughness and transverse velocities. The experimental results are in good agreement with theoretical analysis. It is found that the target's surface roughness and transverse velocity can significantly affect the spectrum width of Doppler signal. With the increase of surface roughness and transverse velocity, the measurement accuracy becomes worse. However, the influence of surface roughness becomes weaker when the spot size of laser beam on the target is smaller.

  17. Velocity precision measurements using laser Doppler anemometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dopheide, D.; Taux, G.; Narjes, L.

    1985-07-01

    A Laser Doppler Anemometer (LDA) was calibrated to determine its applicability to high pressure measurements (up to 10 bars) for industrial purposes. The measurement procedure with LDA and the experimental computerized layouts are presented. The calibration procedure is based on absolute accuracy of Doppler frequency and calibration of interference strip intervals. A four-quadrant detector allows comparison of the interference strip distance measurements and computer profiles. Further development of LDA is recommended to increase accuracy (0.1% inaccuracy) and to apply the method industrially.

  18. Peak velocity overestimation and linear-array spectral Doppler.

    PubMed

    Eicke, B M; Kremkau, F W; Hinson, H; Tegeler, C H

    1995-04-01

    Ultrasound instruments are used to evaluate blood flow velocities in the human body. Most clinical instruments perform velocity calculations based on the Doppler principle and measure the frequency shift of a reflected ultrasound beam. Doppler-only instruments use single-frequency, single-crystal transducers. Linear- and annular-array multiple-crystal transducers are used for duplex scanning (simultaneous B-mode image and Doppler). Clinical interpretation relies primarily on determination of peak velocities or frequency shifts as identified by the Doppler spectrum. Understanding of the validity of these measurements is important for instruments in clinical use. The present study examined the accuracy with which several ultrasound instruments could estimate velocities based on the identification of the peak of the Doppler spectrum, across a range of different angles of insonation, on a Doppler string phantom. The string was running in a water tank at constant speeds of 50, 100, and 150 cm/sec and also in a sine wave pattern at 100- or 150-cm/sec amplitude. Angles of insonation were 30, 45, 60, and 70 degrees. The single-frequency, single-crystal transducers (PC Dop 842, 2-MHz pulsed-wave, 4-MHz continuous-wave) provided acceptably accurate velocity estimates at all tested velocities independent of the angle of insonation. All duplex Doppler instruments with linear-array transducers (Philips P700, 5.0-MHz; Hewlett-Packard Sonos 1000, 7.5-MHz; ATL Ultramark 9 HDI, 7.5-MHz) exhibited a consistent overestimation of the true flow velocity due to increasing intrinsic spectral broadening with increasing angle of insonation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. High-resolution velocimetry in energetic tidal currents using a convergent-beam acoustic Doppler profiler

    SciTech Connect

    Sellar, Brian; Harding, Samuel F.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2015-07-16

    An array of convergent acoustic Doppler velocimeters has been developed and tested for the high resolution measurement of three-dimensional tidal flow velocities in an energetic tidal site. This configuration has been developed to increase spatial resolution of velocity measurements in comparison to conventional acoustic Doppler profilers (ADPs) which characteristically use diverging acoustic beams emanating from a single instrument. This is achieved using converging acoustic beams with a sample volume at the focal point of 0.03 m3. The array is also able to simultaneously measure three-dimensional velocity components in a profile throughout the water column, and as such is referred to herein as a converging-beam acoustic Doppler profiler (CADP). Mid-depth profiling is achieved through integration of the sensor platform with the operational Alstom 1MW DeepGen-IV Tidal Turbine. This proof-of-concept paper outlines system configuration and comparison to measurements provided by co-installed reference instrumentation. Comparison of CADP to standard ADP velocity measurements reveals a mean difference of 8 mm/s, standard deviation of 18 mm/s, and order-of-magnitude reduction in realizable length-scale. CADP focal point measurements compared to a proximal single-beam reference show peak cross-correlation coefficient of 0.96 over 4.0 s averaging period and a 47% reduction in Doppler noise. The dual functionality of the CADP as a profiling instrument with a high resolution focal point make this configuration a unique and valuable advancement in underwater velocimetry enabling improved turbulence, resource and structural loading quantification and validation of numerical simulations. Alternative modes of operation have been implemented including noise-reducing bi-static sampling. Since waves are simultaneously measured it is expected that derivatives of this system will be a powerful tool in wave-current interaction studies.

  20. Application of acoustic doppler velocimeters for streamflow measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rehmel, M.

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) principally has used Price AA and Price pygmy mechanical current meters for measurement of discharge. New technologies have resulted in the introduction of alternatives to the Price meters. One alternative, the FlowTracker acoustic Doppler velocimeter, was designed by SonTek/YSI to make streamflow measurements in wadeable conditions. The device measures a point velocity and can be used with standard midsection method algorithms to compute streamflow. The USGS collected 55 quality-assurance measurements with the FlowTracker at 43 different USGS streamflow-gaging stations across the United States, with mean depths from 0.05to0.67m, mean velocities from 13 to 60 cm/s, and discharges from 0.02 to 12.4m3/s. These measurements were compared with Price mechanical current meter measurements. Analysis of the comparisons shows that the FlowTracker discharges were not statistically different from the Price meter discharges at a 95% confidence level. ?? 2007 ASCE.

  1. Field Assessment of Acoustic-Doppler Based Discharge Measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mueller, D.S.; ,

    2002-01-01

    The use of equipment based on the Doppler principle for measuring water velocity and computing discharge is common within the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The instruments and software have changed appreciably during the last 5 years; therefore, the USGS has begun a field validation of the instruments currently (2002) available for making discharge measurements from a moving boat in streams of various sizes. Instruments manufactured by SonTek/YSI2 and RD Instruments, Inc. were used to collect discharge data at five different sites. One or more traditional discharge measurements were made by the use of a Price AA current meter and standard USGS procedures with the acoustic instruments at each site during data collection. The discharges measured with the acoustic instruments were compared with the discharges measured with Price AA meters and the current USGS stage-discharge rating for each site. The mean discharges measured by each acoustic instrument were within 5 percent of the Price AA-based measurement and (or) discharge from the stage-discharge rating. Additional analysis of the data collected indicates that the coefficient of variation of the discharge measurements consistently was less for the RD Instruments, Inc. Rio Grandes than it was for the SonTek/YSI RiverSurveyors. The bottom-tracking referenced measurement had a lower coefficient of variation than the differentially corrected global positioning system referenced measurements. It was observed that the higher frequency RiverSurveyors measured a moving bed more often than the lower frequency Rio Grandes. The detection of a moving bed caused RiverSurveyors to be consistently biased low when referenced to bottom tracking. Differentially corrected global positioning system data may be used to remove the bias observed in the bottom-tracking referenced measurements.

  2. Doppler Lidar Vertical Velocity Statistics Value-Added Product

    SciTech Connect

    Newsom, R. K.; Sivaraman, C.; Shippert, T. R.; Riihimaki, L. D.

    2015-07-01

    Accurate height-resolved measurements of higher-order statistical moments of vertical velocity fluctuations are crucial for improved understanding of turbulent mixing and diffusion, convective initiation, and cloud life cycles. The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility operates coherent Doppler lidar systems at several sites around the globe. These instruments provide measurements of clear-air vertical velocity profiles in the lower troposphere with a nominal temporal resolution of 1 sec and height resolution of 30 m. The purpose of the Doppler lidar vertical velocity statistics (DLWSTATS) value-added product (VAP) is to produce height- and time-resolved estimates of vertical velocity variance, skewness, and kurtosis from these raw measurements. The VAP also produces estimates of cloud properties, including cloud-base height (CBH), cloud frequency, cloud-base vertical velocity, and cloud-base updraft fraction.

  3. Experimental Acoustic Velocity Measurements in a Tidally Affected Stream

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Storm, J.B.; ,

    2002-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) constructed a continuous steamgaging station on the tidally affected Escatawpa River at Interstate 10 near Orange Grove, Mississippi, in August 2001. The gage collects water quantity parameters of stage and stream velocity, and water quality parameters of water temperature, specific conductance, and salinity. Data are transmitted to the local USGS office via the GOES satellite and are presented on a near real-time web page. Due to tidal effects, the stream has multiple flow regimes which include downstream, bi-directional, and reverse flows. Advances in acoustic technology have made it possible to gage streams of this nature where conventional methods have been unsuccessful. An experimental mount was designed in an attempt to recognize, describe, and quantify these flow regimes by using acoustic Doppler equipment.

  4. Acoustic Measurement of Potato Cannon Velocity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Courtney, Michael; Courtney, Amy

    2007-01-01

    Potato cannon velocity can be measured with a digitized microphone signal. A microphone is attached to the potato cannon muzzle, and a potato is fired at an aluminum target about 10 m away. Flight time can be determined from the acoustic waveform by subtracting the time in the barrel and time for sound to return from the target. The potato…

  5. Noise correction of turbulent spectra obtained from Acoustic Doppler Velocimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Durgesh, Vibhav; Thomson, Jim; Richmond, Marshall C.; Polagye, Brian

    2014-03-02

    Accurately estimated auto-spectral density functions are essential for characterization of turbulent flows, and they also have applications in computational fluid dynamics modeling, site and inflow characterization for hydrokinetic turbines, and inflow turbulence generation. The Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter (ADV) provides single-point temporally resolved data, that are used to characterize turbulent flows in rivers, seas, and oceans. However, ADV data are susceptible to contamination from various sources, including instrument noise, which is the intrinsic limit to the accuracy of acoustic velocity measurements. Due to the presence of instrument noise, the spectra obtained are altered at high frequencies. The focus of this study is to develop a robust and effective method for accurately estimating auto-spectral density functions from ADV data by reducing or removing the spectral contribution derived from instrument noise. For this purpose, the “Noise Auto-Correlation” (NAC) approach was developed, which exploits the correlation properties of instrument noise to identify and remove its contribution from spectra. The spectra estimated using the NAC approach exhibit increased fidelity and a slope of -5/3 in the inertial range, which is typically observed for turbulent flows. Finally, this study also compares the effectiveness of low-pass Gaussian filters in removing instrument noise with that of the NAC approach. For the data used in this study, both the NAC and Gaussian filter approaches are observed to be capable of removing instrument noise at higher frequencies from the spectra. However, the NAC results are closer to the expected frequency power of -5/3 in the inertial sub-range.

  6. A novel photonic Doppler velocimetry for transverse velocity measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Guanghua; Wang Detian; Liu Jun; Meng Jianhua; Liu Shouxian; Yang Qingguo

    2013-01-15

    A fiber interferometry for transverse velocity measurement has been developed. This diagnostic is similar to photonic Doppler velocimetry in the way in which laser propagates and couples. The interferometer mainly consists of a fiber coupler, an emitting probe, and two receiving probes. A pair of scattered laser beams mix in the coupler and generates fringes with frequency proportional to transverse velocity. Measurement of transverse velocity is independent of longitudinal velocity. The feasibility of the technique has been verified by rotating wheel experiment and shock loading experiment.

  7. Accuracy of a pulse-coherent acoustic Doppler profiler in a wave-dominated flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lacy, J.R.; Sherwood, C.R.

    2004-01-01

    The accuracy of velocities measured by a pulse-coherent acoustic Doppler profiler (PCADP) in the bottom boundary layer of a wave-dominated inner-shelf environment is evaluated. The downward-looking PCADP measured velocities in eight 10-cm cells at 1 Hz. Velocities measured by the PCADP are compared to those measured by an acoustic Doppler velocimeter for wave orbital velocities up to 95 cm s-1 and currents up to 40 cm s-1. An algorithm for correcting ambiguity errors using the resolution velocities was developed. Instrument bias, measured as the average error in burst mean speed, is -0.4 cm s-1 (standard deviation = 0.8). The accuracy (root-mean-square error) of instantaneous velocities has a mean of 8.6 cm s-1 (standard deviation = 6.5) for eastward velocities (the predominant direction of waves), 6.5 cm s-1 (standard deviation = 4.4) for northward velocities, and 2.4 cm s-1 (standard deviation = 1.6) for vertical velocities. Both burst mean and root-mean-square errors are greater for bursts with ub ??? 50 cm s-1. Profiles of burst mean speeds from the bottom five cells were fit to logarithmic curves: 92% of bursts with mean speed ??? 5 cm s-1 have a correlation coefficient R2 > 0.96. In cells close to the transducer, instantaneous velocities are noisy, burst mean velocities are biased low, and bottom orbital velocities are biased high. With adequate blanking distances for both the profile and resolution velocities, the PCADP provides sufficient accuracy to measure velocities in the bottom boundary layer under moderately energetic inner-shelf conditions.

  8. Doppler compensated underwater acoustic communication system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raj, Anand; George, Binu; Supiya, M. H.; Kurian, James; Pillai, P. R. Saseendran

    2001-05-01

    Spread spectrum methods are used in communication systems to provide a low probability of intercept in hostile environments and multiple access capability in systems shared by many users as well as to provide high processing gain in channels where the transmitted signal is distorted by multipath effects. Such systems serve to be an effective tool for underwater telemetry environments, where multipath propagation effect and Doppler spreading is seen to be more predominant. This paper describes the implementation of a Doppler compensated underwater telemetry system based on CDMA technique. The system consists of multiple CDMA transmitters and a phase locked loop based carrier recoverable CDMA receiver. The effects of the Doppler shift can be compensated by the carrier recovery subsystem in the demodulator, based on PLL technique, which extracts the carrier frequency/phase and simultaneously demodulates the signal. The decision device in the receiver consists of a PN sequence generator as well as a bank of correlators, which are used to determine the data transmitted. The system simulation has been implemented in MATLAB. The advantage of this system is that multiple transmitting stations can transmit simultaneously to a central receiver, thereby increasing the system throughput.

  9. Measurement of Turbulence with Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers - Sources of Error and Laboratory Results

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nystrom, E.A.; Oberg, K.A.; Rehmann, C.R.; ,

    2002-01-01

    Acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) provide a promising method for measuring surface-water turbulence because they can provide data from a large spatial range in a relatively short time with relative ease. Some potential sources of errors in turbulence measurements made with ADCPs include inaccuracy of Doppler-shift measurements, poor temporal and spatial measurement resolution, and inaccuracy of multi-dimensional velocities resolved from one-dimensional velocities measured at separate locations. Results from laboratory measurements of mean velocity and turbulence statistics made with two pulse-coherent ADCPs in 0.87 meters of water are used to illustrate several of inherent sources of error in ADCP turbulence measurements. Results show that processing algorithms and beam configurations have important effects on turbulence measurements. ADCPs can provide reasonable estimates of many turbulence parameters; however, the accuracy of turbulence measurements made with commercially available ADCPs is often poor in comparison to standard measurement techniques.

  10. Experimental investigation of geodesic acoustic modes on JET using Doppler backscattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, C.; Hillesheim, J. C.; Hidalgo, C.; Belonohy, E.; Delabie, E.; Gil, L.; Maggi, C. F.; Meneses, L.; Solano, E.; Tsalas, M.; Contributors, JET

    2016-10-01

    Geodesic acoustic modes (GAMs) have been investigated in JET ohmic discharges using mainly Doppler backscattering. Characteristics and scaling properties of the GAM are studied. Time and spatial resolved measurements of the perpendicular velocity indicate that GAMs are located in a narrow layer at the edge density gradient region with amplitude corresponding to about 50% of the mean local perpendicular velocity. GAMs on JET appear to be regulated by the turbulence drive rather than by their damping rate. It is also shown that the GAM amplitude is ~20% larger in deuterium than in hydrogen plasmas.

  11. An Acoustic OFDM System with Symbol-by-Symbol Doppler Compensation for Underwater Communication

    PubMed Central

    MinhHai, Tran; Rie, Saotome; Suzuki, Taisaku; Wada, Tomohisa

    2016-01-01

    We propose an acoustic OFDM system for underwater communication, specifically for vertical link communications such as between a robot in the sea bottom and a mother ship in the surface. The main contributions are (1) estimation of time varying Doppler shift using continual pilots in conjunction with monitoring the drift of Power Delay Profile and (2) symbol-by-symbol Doppler compensation in frequency domain by an ICI matrix representing nonuniform Doppler. In addition, we compare our proposal against a resampling method. Simulation and experimental results confirm that our system outperforms the resampling method when the velocity changes roughly over OFDM symbols. Overall, experimental results taken in Shizuoka, Japan, show our system using 16QAM, and 64QAM achieved a data throughput of 7.5 Kbit/sec with a transmitter moving at maximum 2 m/s, in a complicated trajectory, over 30 m vertically. PMID:27057558

  12. HF Doppler observations of acoustic waves excited by the earthquake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ichinose, T.; Takagi, K.; Tanaka, T.; Okuzawa, T.; Shibata, T.; Sato, Y.; Nagasawa, C.; Ogawa, T.

    1985-01-01

    Ionospheric disturbances caused by the earthquake of a relatively small and large epicentral distance have been detected by a network of HF-Doppler sounders in central Japan and Kyoto station, respectively. The HF-Doppler data of a small epicentral distance, together with the seismic data, have been used to formulate a mechanism whereby ionospheric disturbances are produced by the Urakawa-Oki earthquake in Japan. Comparison of the dynamic spectra of these data has revealed experimentally that the atmosphere acts as a low-pass filter for upward-propagating acoustic waves. By surveying the earthquakes for which the magnitude M is larger than 6.0, researchers found the ionospheric effect in 16 cases of 82 seismic events. As almost all these effects have occurred in the daytime, it is considered that it may result from the filtering effect of the upward-propagating acoustic waves.

  13. Measurement of vertical velocity using clear-air Doppler radars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanzandt, T. E.; Green, J. L.; Nastrom, G. D.; Gage, K. S.; Clark, W. L.; Warnock, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    A new clear air Doppler radar was constructed, called the Flatland radar, in very flat terrain near Champaign-Urbana, Illinois. The radar wavelength is 6.02 m. The radar has been measuring vertical velocity every 153 s with a range resolution of 750 m almost continuously since March 2, 1987. The variance of vertical velocity at Flatland is usually quite small, comparable to the variance at radars located near rough terrain during periods of small background wind. The absence of orographic effects over very flat terrain suggests that clear air Doppler radars can be used to study vertical velocities due to other processes, including synoptic scale motions and propagating gravity waves. For example, near rough terrain the shape of frequency spectra changes drastically as the background wind increases. But at Flatland the shape at periods shorter than a few hours changes only slowly, consistent with the changes predicted by Doppler shifting of gravity wave spectra. Thus it appears that the short period fluctuations of vertical velocity at Flatland are alsmost entirely due to the propagating gravity waves.

  14. High-resolution velocimetry in energetic tidal currents using a convergent-beam acoustic Doppler profiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellar, Brian; Harding, Samuel; Richmond, Marshall

    2015-08-01

    An array of single-beam acoustic Doppler profilers has been developed for the high resolution measurement of three-dimensional tidal flow velocities and subsequently tested in an energetic tidal site. This configuration has been developed to increase spatial resolution of velocity measurements in comparison to conventional acoustic Doppler profilers (ADPs) which characteristically use divergent acoustic beams emanating from a single instrument. This is achieved using geometrically convergent acoustic beams creating a sample volume at the focal point of 0.03 m3. Away from the focal point, the array is also able to simultaneously reconstruct three-dimensional velocity components in a profile throughout the water column, and is referred to herein as a convergent-beam acoustic Doppler profiler (C-ADP). Mid-depth profiling is achieved through integration of the sensor platform with the operational commercial-scale Alstom 1 MW DeepGen-IV Tidal Turbine deployed at the European Marine Energy Center, Orkney Isles, UK. This proof-of-concept paper outlines the C-ADP system configuration and comparison to measurements provided by co-installed reference instrumentation. Comparison of C-ADP to standard divergent ADP (D-ADP) velocity measurements reveals a mean difference of 8 mm s-1, standard deviation of 18 mm s-1, and an order of magnitude reduction in realisable length scale. C-ADP focal point measurements compared to a proximal single-beam reference show peak cross-correlation coefficient of 0.96 over 4.0 s averaging period and a 47% reduction in Doppler noise. The dual functionality of the C-ADP as a profiling instrument with a high resolution focal point make this configuration a unique and valuable advancement in underwater velocimetry enabling improved quantification of flow turbulence. Since waves are simultaneously measured via profiled velocities, pressure measurements and surface detection, it is expected that derivatives of this system will be a powerful tool in

  15. Evaluation of the MV (CAPON) Coherent Doppler Lidar Velocity Estimator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lottman, B.; Frehlich, R.

    1997-01-01

    The performance of the CAPON velocity estimator for coherent Doppler lidar is determined for typical space-based and ground-based parameter regimes. Optimal input parameters for the algorithm were determined for each regime. For weak signals, performance is described by the standard deviation of the good estimates and the fraction of outliers. For strong signals, the fraction of outliers is zero. Numerical effort was also determined.

  16. Reducing Spaceborne-Doppler-Radar Rainfall-Velocity Error

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanelli, Simone; Im, Eastwood; Durden, Stephen L.

    2008-01-01

    A combined frequency-time (CFT) spectral moment estimation technique has been devised for calculating rainfall velocity from measurement data acquired by a nadir-looking spaceborne Doppler weather radar system. Prior spectral moment estimation techniques used for this purpose are based partly on the assumption that the radar resolution volume is uniformly filled with rainfall. The assumption is unrealistic in general but introduces negligible error in application to airborne radar systems. However, for spaceborne systems, the combination of this assumption and inhomogeneities in rainfall [denoted non-uniform beam filling (NUBF)] can result in velocity measurement errors of several meters per second. The present CFT spectral moment estimation technique includes coherent processing of a series of Doppler spectra generated in a standard manner from data over measurement volumes that are partially overlapping in the along-track direction. Performance simulation of this technique using high-resolution data from an airborne rain-mapping radar shows that a spaceborne Ku-band Doppler radar operating at signal-to-noise ratios greater than 10 dB can achieve root-mean-square accuracy between 0.5 and 0.6 m/s in vertical-velocity estimates.

  17. Averaged indicators of secondary flow in repeated acoustic Doppler current profiler crossings of bends

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dinehart, R.L.; Burau, J.R.

    2005-01-01

    [1] Cross-stream velocity was measured in a large river bend at high spatial resolution over three separate survey episodes. A suite of methods for resolving cross-stream velocity distributions was tested on data collected using acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCP) in the sand-bedded Sacramento River, California. The bend was surveyed with repeated ADCP crossings at eight cross sections during a rising limb of high discharge in February 2004 and twice on recession in March 2004. By translating and interpolating repeated ADCP crossings to planar grids, velocity ensembles at similar positions along irregular boat paths could be averaged. The averaging minimized turbulent fluctuations in streamwise velocities over 1 m/s, enabling the resolution of weaker cross-stream velocities (???15-30 cm/s). Secondary-flow influence on suspended sediment was inferred from a lateral region of acoustic backscatter intensity aligned with outward flow over the point bar. A near-bed decrease in backscatter intensity across the pool corresponded with inward cross-stream flow. These suspension indicators were used to orient averaged velocity grids for unambiguously defining the cross-stream velocity magnitudes. Additional field investigations could test whether the correlation between cross-stream velocity and backscatter intensity patterns results from helical recirculation of suspended sediment to the inside of the bend. These river measurements, consistent with classic and recent laboratory studies, show that ADCP surveys can provide refined views of secondary flow and sediment movement in large rivers.

  18. Field evaluation of boat-mounted acoustic Doppler instruments used to measure streamflow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mueller, D.S.; ,

    2003-01-01

    The use of instruments based on the Doppler principle for measuring water velocity and computing discharge is common within the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The instruments and software have changed appreciably during the last 5 years; therefore, the USGS has begun field validation of the instruments used to make discharge measurements from a moving boat. Instruments manufactured by SonTek/YSI and RD Instruments, Inc. were used to collect discharge data at five different sites. One or more traditional discharge measurements were made using a Price AA current meter and standard USGS procedures concurrent with the acoustic instruments at each site. Discharges measured with the acoustic instruments were compared with discharges measured with Price AA current meters and the USGS stage-discharge rating for each site. The mean discharges measured by each acoustic instrument were within 5 percent of the Price AA-based measurement and (or) discharge from the stage-discharge rating.

  19. Estimating stream discharge using stage and multi-level acoustic Doppler velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulsen, J. B.; Rasmussen, K.; Ledet Jensen, J.; Bering Ovesen, N.

    2011-12-01

    For temperate region countries with small or moderately sized streams, such as those in Denmark, seasonal weed growth imposes a significant temporal change of the stage-discharge relation. In the past such problems were often avoided by using hydraulic structures, however, firm ecology based restrictions prevent that hydraulic structures are made at the discharge stations presently. As a consequence, the nonlinear drift in weed density and structure adds a significant uncertainty to the hydrograph. Furthermore, the expected increase in extreme discharge situations due to climate changes in the Northern part of Europe may further violate a stable relation between stage and discharge in streams. Extreme high flow situations cause abrupt rise in stage, and consequently weed can be partly uprooted and partly bend down along the bed, thereby changing the conveyance of the stream. In addition, extreme high flow situations can cause the streams to flood the banks. If these hydraulic changes occur in between direct measurements of discharge they are not detected or accounted for in the stage-discharge relation, and the hydrograph can be significantly biased. The objective of this research is to investigate how both seasonal and short duration changes in weed distribution and abrupt changes in stage are recognized in the stream's velocity gradient. It is examined whether the use of multi-level acoustic Doppler velocimetry can provide an improved method for hydrograph estimation with lower uncertainty than traditional stage-discharge methods. In this presentation we shall present results from a study where, at two sites in Denmark, the stream velocity field has been mapped by the use of three Acoustic Doppler Velocity Meter (ADVM) instruments. The ADVM instruments are mounted in three different depths, continuously measuring horizontal average water velocities. Velocity and stage data are selected from one summer and two winter periods, and a method for converting velocity

  20. Aquatic habitat mapping with an acoustic doppler current profiler: Considerations for data quality

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gaeuman, David; Jacobson, Robert B.

    2005-01-01

    When mounted on a boat or other moving platform, acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) can be used to map a wide range of ecologically significant phenomena, including measures of fluid shear, turbulence, vorticity, and near-bed sediment transport. However, the instrument movement necessary for mapping applications can generate significant errors, many of which have not been inadequately described. This report focuses on the mechanisms by which moving-platform errors are generated, and quantifies their magnitudes under typical habitat-mapping conditions. The potential for velocity errors caused by mis-alignment of the instrument?s internal compass are widely recognized, but has not previously been quantified for moving instruments. Numerical analyses show that even relatively minor compass mis-alignments can produce significant velocity errors, depending on the ratio of absolute instrument velocity to the target velocity and on the relative directions of instrument and target motion. A maximum absolute instrument velocity of about 1 m/s is recommended for most mapping applications. Lower velocities are appropriate when making bed velocity measurements, an emerging application that makes use of ADCP bottom-tracking to measure the velocity of sediment particles at the bed. The mechanisms by which heterogeneities in the flow velocity field generate horizontal velocities errors are also quantified, and some basic limitations in the effectiveness of standard error-detection criteria for identifying these errors are described. Bed velocity measurements may be particularly vulnerable to errors caused by spatial variability in the sediment transport field.

  1. Doppler velocity measurements using a phase-stabilized michelson spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smeets, G.

    1993-10-01

    Laser Doppler systems have become classical means of nonintrusively recording velocities in all kinds of flow fields. With the system mostly used, the so-called Doppler differential velocimeter, tracer particles incorporated in the flow are illuminated by two laser beams from slightly different directions, and the velocity is derived from the beating frequency of the two scattered light waves on the cathode of a photomultiplier. As the intersecting beams form equidistant light sheets within the probe volume by their interference, it is desirable, as is the case with any technique creating light barriers in space, that particles should pass the grid individually. The particles should be of a suitable size: large enough to scatter sufficient light for a good signal-to-noise ratio but small enough for negligible velocity relaxation and true indication of the turbulent velocity fluctuations. In most applications of this technique, e.g. in wind tunnel experiments, particles of controlled size and number density are seeded into the upstream flow.

  2. Doppler effects on velocity spectra observed by MST radars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheffler, A. O.; Liu, C. H.

    1986-01-01

    Recently, wind data from mesophere-stratosphere-troposphere (MST) radars have been used to study the spectra of gravity waves in the atmosphere (Scheffler and Liu, 1985; VanZandt et al., 1985). Since MST radar measures the line-of-sight Doppler velocities, it senses the components of the wave-associated velocities along its beam directions. These components are related through the polarization relations which depend on the frequency and wave number of the wave. Therfore, the radar-observed velocity spectrum will be different from the original gravity-wave spectrum. Their relationship depends on the frequency and wave number of the wave as well as the propagation geometry. This relation can be used to interpret the observed data. It can also be used to test the assumption of gravity-wave spectrum (Scheffler and Liu, 1985). In deriving this relation, the background atmosphere has been assumed to be motionless. Obviously, the Doppler shift due to the background wind will change the shape of the gravity-wave power spectrum as well as its relation with the radar-observed spectrum. Here, researcher's investigate these changes.

  3. Radar Wind Profiler Radial Velocity: A Comparison with Doppler Lidar.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohn, Stephen A.; Goodrich, R. Kent

    2002-12-01

    The accuracy of the radial wind velocity measured with a radar wind profiler will depend on turbulent variability and instrumental noise. Radial velocity estimates of a boundary layer wind profiler are compared with those estimated by a Doppler lidar over 2.3 h. The lidar resolution volume was much narrower than the profiler volume, but the samples were well matched in range and time. The wind profiler radial velocity was computed using two common algorithms [profiler online program (POP) and National Center for Atmospheric Research improved moments algorithm (NIMA)]. The squared correlation between radial velocities measured with the two instruments was R2 = 0.99, and the standard deviation of the difference was about r = 0.20-0.23 m s1 for radial velocities of greater than 1 m s1 and r = 0.16-0.35 m s1 for radial velocities of less than 1 m s1. Small radial velocities may be treated differently in radar wind profiler processing because of ground-clutter mitigation strategies. A standard deviation of r = 0.23 m s1 implies an error in horizontal winds from turbulence and noise of less than 1 m s1 for a single cycle through the profiler beam directions and of less than 0.11-0.27 m s1 for a 30-min average measurement, depending on the beam pointing sequence. The accuracy of a wind profiler horizontal wind measurement will also depend on assumptions of spatial and temporal inhomogeneity of the atmosphere, which are not considered in this comparison. The wind profiler radial velocities from the POP and NIMA are in good agreement. However, the analysis does show the need for improvements in wind profiler processing when radial velocity is close to zero.

  4. Vertical wind velocity measurements by a Doppler lidar and comparisons with a Doppler sodar.

    PubMed

    Congeduti, F; Fiocco, G; Adriani, A; Guarrella, C

    1981-06-15

    A Doppler lidar based on a single frequency Ar(+) laser and a spherical Fabry-Perot interferometer is used to study the vertical velocity field in the planetary boundary layer. The wind velocity information is obtained by spectral analysis of the aerosol backscatter. The internal consistency of the lidar measurements points to a precision of 0.1 msec(-1) obtained for scans of ~25-sec duration and a good level of the received signal at a height of a few hundred meters and a vertical resolution of 75 m. A Doppler sodar was simultaneously operated to provide independent measurements of vertical velocity. The tests were carried out during nights characterized by horizontal winds <1 msec(-1). The axes of the two systems were displaced by 53 m, and the two beams overlapped only above ~300 m. The values of the correlation coefficient function between the two outputs for 100 data sets were ~0.5. A comparison of the velocity power spectra provided by the two systems shows good agreement at small values of the frequency; at large values, because of the limited spatial resolution of the sodar, its readings were consistently lower than those of the lidar.

  5. Modelling nonstationary Doppler noise in exoplanetary radial velocity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baluev, Roman V.

    2015-08-01

    We construct a new class of analytic nonstationary noise models for exoplanetary Doppler data. The observable correlated noise is represented as a convolution of a parent activity process with a given memory function. The model honours the casuality principle, meaning that only past values of the activity may affect the observable value. This model does not approximate detailedly any real stellar activity phenomena, but it becomes mathematically simple, simultaneously satisfying the basic natural principles of physical sensibility and self-consistency.Additionally, we develop a new type of periodograms that can be used to detect periodic modulations in the Doppler noise characteristics, rather than in the observed radial velocity curve itself. We present first results of applying this technique to public Doppler time series available for a set of planet-hosting stars.This work was supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (project No. 14-02-92615 KO_a), the UK Royal Society International Exchange grant IE140055, by the President of Russia grant for young scientists (No. MK-733.2014.2), by the programme of the Presidium of Russian Academy of Sciences P21, and by the Saint Petersburg State University research grant 6.37.341.2015.

  6. Potential for coherent Doppler wind velocity lidar using neodymium lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kane, T. J.; Byer, R. L.; Zhou, B.

    1984-01-01

    Existing techniques for the frequency stabilization of Nd:YAG lasers operating at 1.06 micron, and the high-gain amplification of radiation at that wavelength, make possible the construction of a coherent Doppler wind velocity lidar using Nd:YAG. Velocity accuracy and range resolution are better at 1.06 micron than at 10.6 microns at the same level of the SNR. Backscatter from the atmosphere at 1.06 micron is greater than that at 10.6 microns by about 2 orders of magnitude, but the quantum-limited noise is higher by 100 also. Near-field attenuation and turbulent effects are more severe at 1.06 micron. In some configurations and environments, the 1.06-micron wavelength may be the better choice, and there may be technological advantages favoring the use of solid-state lasers in satellite systems.

  7. Laser Doppler velocity measurements of swirling flows with upstream influence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rloff, K. L.; Bossel, H. H.

    1973-01-01

    Swirling flow in a rotating tube is studied by flow visualization at a moderate Reynolds number, and its velocity field is measured by laser-Doppler anemometry. The tube has constant diameter, and approximately uniform initial rigid rotation of the flow is assured by passing the flow through a rotating plug of porous metal before it enters the test section. At moderate swirl values, an object mounted on the tube centerline causes a closed bubble to form upstream of the obstacle, with a clearly defined stagnation point on the axis, and recirculating flow inside the bubble. The bubble length grows upstream as the swirl is increased, until it breaks up into a Taylor column reaching all the way upstream and downstream at swirl values above a certain critical value. A vortex jump (in the sense of Benjamin) occurs downstream of the obstacle except when the Taylor column is present. Using a laser-Doppler anemometer, axial and swirl velocity profiles are obtained at several stations upstream and downstream of the bubble, and in and around the bubble.

  8. Complete velocity distribution in river cross-sections measured by acoustic instruments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cheng, R.T.; Gartner, J.W.

    2003-01-01

    To fully understand the hydraulic properties of natural rivers, velocity distribution in the river cross-section should be studied in detail. The measurement task is not straightforward because there is not an instrument that can measure the velocity distribution covering the entire cross-section. Particularly, the velocities in regions near the free surface and in the bottom boundary layer are difficult to measure, and yet the velocity properties in these regions play the most significant role in characterizing the hydraulic properties. To further characterize river hydraulics, two acoustic instruments, namely, an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP), and a "BoogieDopp" (BD) were used on fixed platforms to measure the detailed velocity profiles across the river. Typically, 20 to 25 stations were used to represent a river cross-section. At each station, water velocity profiles were measured independently and/or concurrently by an ADCP and a BD. The measured velocity properties were compared and used in computation of river discharge. In a tow-tank evaluation of a BD, it has been confirmed that BD is capable of measuring water velocity at about 11 cm below the free-surface. Therefore, the surface velocity distribution across the river was extracted from the BD velocity measurements and used to compute the river discharge. These detailed velocity profiles and the composite velocity distribution were used to assess the validity of the classic theories of velocity distributions, conventional river discharge measurement methods, and for estimates of channel bottom roughness.

  9. Estimating suspended solids concentrations from backscatter intensity measured by acoustic Doppler current profiler in San Francisco Bay, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gartner, J.W.

    2004-01-01

    The estimation of mass concentration of suspended solids is one of the properties needed to understand the characteristics of sediment transport in bays and estuaries. However, useful measurements or estimates of this property are often problematic when employing the usual methods of determination from collected water samples or optical sensors. Analysis of water samples tends to undersample the highly variable character of suspended solids, and optical sensors often become useless from biological fouling in highly productive regions. Acoustic sensors, such as acoustic Doppler current profilers that are now routinely used to measure water velocity, have been shown to hold promise as a means of quantitatively estimating suspended solids from acoustic backscatter intensity, a parameter used in velocity measurement. To further evaluate application of this technique using commercially available instruments, profiles of suspended solids concentrations are estimated from acoustic backscatter intensity recorded by 1200- and 2400-kHz broadband acoustic Doppler current profilers located at two sites in San Francisco Bay, California. ADCP backscatter intensity is calibrated using optical backscatterance data from an instrument located at a depth close to the ADCP transducers. In addition to losses from spherical spreading and water absorption, calculations of acoustic transmission losses account for attenuation from suspended sediment and correction for nonspherical spreading in the near field of the acoustic transducer. Acoustic estimates of suspended solids consisting of cohesive and noncohesive sediments are found to agree within about 8-10% (of the total range of concentration) to those values estimated by a second optical backscatterance sensor located at a depth further from the ADCP transducers. The success of this approach using commercially available Doppler profilers provides promise that this technique might be appropriate and useful under certain conditions in

  10. Blood flow velocity in monocular retinoblastoma assessed by color doppler

    PubMed Central

    Bonanomi, Maria Teresa B C; Saito, Osmar C; de Lima, Patricia Picciarelli; Bonanomi, Roberta Chizzotti; Chammas, Maria Cristina

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyze the flow of retrobulbar vessels in retinoblastoma by color Doppler imaging. METHODS: A prospective study of monocular retinoblastoma treated by enucleation between 2010 and 2014. The examination comprised fundoscopy, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasonography and color Doppler imaging. The peak blood velocities in the central retinal artery and central retinal vein of tumor-containing eyes (tuCRAv and tuCRVv, respectively) were assessed. The velocities were compared with those for normal eyes (nlCRAv and nlCRVv) and correlated with clinical and pathological findings. Tumor dimensions in the pathological sections were compared with those in magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonography and were correlated with tuCRAv and tuCRVv. In tumor-containing eyes, the resistivity index in the central retinal artery and the pulse index in the central retinal vein were studied in relation to all variables. RESULTS: Eighteen patients were included. Comparisons between tuCRAv and nlCRAv and between tuCRVv and nlCRVv revealed higher velocities in tumor-containing eyes (p<0.001 for both), with a greater effect in the central retinal artery than in the central retinal vein (p=0.024). Magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonography measurements were as reliable as pathology assessments (p=0.675 and p=0.375, respectively). A positive relationship was found between tuCRAv and the tumor volume (p=0.027). The pulse index in the central retinal vein was lower in male patients (p=0.017) and in eyes with optic nerve invasion (p=0.0088). CONCLUSIONS: TuCRAv and tuCRVv are higher in tumor-containing eyes than in normal eyes. Magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonography measurements are reliable. The tumor volume is correlated with a higher tuCRAv and a reduced pulse in the central retinal vein is correlated with male sex and optic nerve invasion. PMID:26735219

  11. Study of Doppler Shift Correction for Underwater Acoustic Communication Using Orthogonal Signal Division Multiplexing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebihara, Tadashi; Mizutani, Keiichi

    2011-07-01

    In this study, we apply Doppler shift correction schemes for underwater acoustic (UWA) communication with orthogonal signal division multiplexing (OSDM) to achieve stable communication in underwater acoustic channels. Three Doppler correction schemes, which exploit the guard interval, are applied to UWA communication with OSDM and evaluated in simulations. Through a simulation in which only the Doppler effect is considered, we confirmed that by adapting schemes to UWA communication with OSDM, we can correct large Doppler shifts, which addresses the usual speed of vehicles and ships. Moreover, by considering both the Doppler effect and channel reverberation, we propose the best possible combination of Doppler correction schemes for UWA communication with OSDM. The results suggest that UWA communication with OSDM may lead to high-quality communication by considering channel reverberation and large Doppler shifts.

  12. Doppler instrumentation for measuring blood velocity and flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gill, R. W.; Hottinger, C. F.; Meindl, J. D.

    1975-01-01

    Doppler ultrasonic blood flowmeters are reviewed in detail. The importance of measurement accuracy for transcutaneous flowmeters and their clinical application is stressed. Doppler imaging was combined with conventional pulse echo imaging, and diagnostic information was extracted from flow signals. The range and extent of applications of Doppler instruments was also presented.

  13. Acoustic resolution photoacoustic Doppler flowmetry: practical considerations for obtaining accurate measurements of blood flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunker, J.; Beard, P.

    2014-03-01

    An assessment has been made of various experimental factors affecting the accuracy of flow velocities measured using a pulsed time correlation photoacoustic Doppler technique. In this method, Doppler time shifts are quantified via crosscorrelation of pairs of photoacoustic waveforms generated in moving absorbers using pairs of laser light pulses, and the photoacoustic waves are detected using an ultrasound transducer. The acoustic resolution mode is employed by using the transducer focal width, rather than the large illuminated volume, to define the lateral spatial resolution. This enables penetration depths of several millimetres or centimetres, unlike methods using the optical resolution mode, which limits the maximum penetration depth to approximately 1 mm. In the acoustic resolution mode, it is difficult to detect time shifts in highly concentrated suspensions of flowing absorbers, such as red blood cell suspensions and whole blood, and this challenge supposedly arises because of the lack of spatial heterogeneity. However, by assessing the effect of different absorption coefficients and tube diameters, we offer an alternative explanation relating to light attenuation and parabolic flow. We also demonstrate a new signal processing method that surmounts the previous problem of measurement under-reading. This method is a form of signal range gating and enables mapping of the flow velocity profile across the tube as well as measurement of the average flow velocity. We show that, using our signal processing scheme, it is possible to measure the flow of whole blood using a relatively low frequency detector. This important finding paves the way for application of the technique to measurements of blood flow several centimetres deep in living tissue.

  14. Estimating propagation velocity through a surface acoustic wave sensor

    DOEpatents

    Xu, Wenyuan; Huizinga, John S.

    2010-03-16

    Techniques are described for estimating the propagation velocity through a surface acoustic wave sensor. In particular, techniques which measure and exploit a proper segment of phase frequency response of the surface acoustic wave sensor are described for use as a basis of bacterial detection by the sensor. As described, use of velocity estimation based on a proper segment of phase frequency response has advantages over conventional techniques that use phase shift as the basis for detection.

  15. Accuracy of velocity and power determination by the Doppler method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rottger, J.

    1984-01-01

    When designing a Mesosphere-Stratosphere-Troposphere (MST) radar antenna one has to trade between the choices to optimize the effective aperture or to optimize the sidelobe suppression. An optimization of the aperture increases the sensitivity. Suppression of side-lobes by tapering attenuates undesirable signals which spoil the estimates of reflectivity and velocity. Generally, any sidelobe effects are equivalent to a broadening of the antenna beam. The return signal is due to a product of the antenna pattern with the varying atmospheric reflectivity structures. Thus, knowing the antenna pattern, it is in principle possible to find the signal spectra, which, however, may be a tedious computational and ambiguous procedure. For vertically pointing main beams the sidelobe effects are efficiently suppressed because of the aspect sensitivity. It follows that sidelobes are a minor problem for spaced antenna methods. However, they can be crucial for Doppler methods, which need off-vertical beams. If a sidelobe is pointing towards the zenith a larger power may be received from the vertical than off-vertical directions, but quantitative estimates of this effect are not yet known. To get an error estimate of sidelobe effects with an off-vertical main beam a 1-dimensional example is considered.

  16. Unidirectional acoustic probe based on the particle velocity gradient.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shiduo; Fernández Comesaña, Daniel; Carrillo Pousa, Graciano; Yang, Yixin; Xu, Lingji

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents the foundations of a unidirectional acoustic probe based on the particle velocity gradient. Highly directional characteristics play a key role in reducing the influence of undesired acoustic sources. These characteristics can be achieved by using multiple acoustic sensors in a spatial gradient arrangement. Two particle velocity sensors possessing the figure eight directivity pattern were used in a first-order gradient configuration to yield a unidirectional probe that can reject most excitations originating from both sides and the rear. The effects of key parameters are thoroughly discussed, and the proposed theory is validated in practice. PMID:27369169

  17. Variance of discharge estimates sampled using acoustic Doppler current profilers from moving boats

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garcia, Carlos M.; Tarrab, Leticia; Oberg, Kevin; Szupiany, Ricardo; Cantero, Mariano I.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a model for quantifying the random errors (i.e., variance) of acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) discharge measurements from moving boats for different sampling times. The model focuses on the random processes in the sampled flow field and has been developed using statistical methods currently available for uncertainty analysis of velocity time series. Analysis of field data collected using ADCP from moving boats from three natural rivers of varying sizes and flow conditions shows that, even though the estimate of the integral time scale of the actual turbulent flow field is larger than the sampling interval, the integral time scale of the sampled flow field is on the order of the sampling interval. Thus, an equation for computing the variance error in discharge measurements associated with different sampling times, assuming uncorrelated flow fields is appropriate. The approach is used to help define optimal sampling strategies by choosing the exposure time required for ADCPs to accurately measure flow discharge.

  18. Group and energy velocities of acoustic surface waves in piezoelectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu

    1996-07-01

    This paper offers a simple proof of the equivalence of the energy velocity and the group velocity for acoustic waves on the flat surface of a piezoelectric half space in the usual quasistatic approximation. The interface conditions of free stresses and the open circuited electric condition are considered. Both the energy velocity and the group velocity are expressed in terms of a Lagrangian density. The energy velocity is obtained by the definition and the group velocity is derived by implicit differentiation from a dispersion equation in an implicit form.

  19. Velocity and rotation measurements in acoustically levitated droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Abhishek; Basu, Saptarshi; Kumar, Ranganathan

    2012-10-01

    The velocity scale inside an acoustically levitated droplet depends on the levitator and liquid properties. Using Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV), detailed velocity measurements have been made in a levitated droplet of different diameters and viscosity. The maximum velocity and rotation are normalized using frequency and amplitude of acoustic levitator, and droplet viscosity. The non-dimensional data are fitted for micrometer- and millimeter-sized droplets levitated in different levitators for different viscosity fluids. It is also shown that the rotational speed of nanosilica droplets at an advanced stage of vaporization compares well with that predicted by exponentially fitted parameters.

  20. Effect of velocity profile skewing on blood velocity and volume flow waveforms derived from maximum Doppler spectral velocity.

    PubMed

    Mynard, Jonathan P; Steinman, David A

    2013-05-01

    Given evidence that fully developed axisymmetric flow may be the exception rather than the rule, even in nominally straight arteries, maximum velocity (V(max)) can lie outside the Doppler sample volume (SV). The link between V(max) and derived quantities, such as volume flow (Q), may therefore be more complex than commonly thought. We performed idealized virtual Doppler ultrasound on data from image-based computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models of the normal human carotid artery and investigated how velocity profile skewing and choice of sample volume affected V(max) waveforms and derived Q variables, considering common assumptions about velocity profile shape (i.e., Poiseuille or Womersley). Severe velocity profile skewing caused substantial errors in V(max) waveforms when using a small, centered SV, although peak V(max) was reliably detected; errors with a long SV covering the vessel diameter were orientation dependent but lower overall. Cycle-averaged Q calculated from V(max) was typically within ±15%, although substantial skewing and use of a small SV caused 10%-25% underestimation. Peak Q derived from Womersley's theory was generally accurate to within ±10%. V(max) pulsatility and resistance indexes differed from Q-based values, although the Q-based resistance index could be predicted reliably. Skewing introduced significant error into V(max)-derived Q waveforms, particularly during mid-to-late systole. Our findings suggest that errors in the V(max) and Q waveforms related to velocity profile skewing and use of a small SV, or orientation-dependent errors for a long SV, could limit their use in wave analysis or for constructing characteristic or patient-specific flow boundary conditions for model studies.

  1. Theoretical analysis of the ultrasonic Doppler flowmeter for measurements of high flow velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabin, Jozef

    1987-07-01

    A geometric approach is used to analyze the ultrasonic Doppler flowmeter for measurements of flow velocities that are high but yet much smaller than the ultrasound velocity. The approach is based on the calculation of the transit time difference between the ultrasonic waves that are reflected from a moving particle at its various positions. Beam divergence is taken into account, and each path of the ultrasonic wave propagation is approximated by two rectilinear components. It is shown that the Doppler frequency shift is influenced not only by the suspended particle velocity, but also by the mean flow velocity of the fluid. This influence is of second order in the flow velocity.

  2. Field evaluation of shallow-water acoustic doppler current profiler discharge measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rehmel, M.S.

    2007-01-01

    In 2004, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Office of Surface Water staff and USGS Water Science employees began testing the StreamPro, an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) for shallow-water discharge measurements. Teledyne RD Instruments introduced the StreamPro in December of 2003. The StreamPro is designed to make a "moving boat" discharge measurement in streams with depths between 0.15 and 2 m. If the StreamPro works reliably in these conditions, it will allow for use of ADCPs in a greater number of streams than previously possible. Evaluation sites were chosen to test the StreamPro over a range of conditions. Simultaneous discharge measurements with mechanical and other acoustic meters, along with stable rating curves at established USGS streamflow-gaging stations, were used for comparisons. The StreamPro measurements ranged in mean velocity from 0.076 to 1.04 m/s and in discharge from 0.083 m 3/s to 43.4 m 3/s. Tests indicate that discharges measured with the StreamPro compare favorably to the discharges measured with the other meters when the mean channel velocity is greater than 0.25 m/s. When the mean channel velocity is less than 0.25 m/s, the StreamPro discharge measurements for individual transects have greater variability than those StreamPro measurements where the mean channel velocity is greater than 0.25 m/s. Despite this greater variation in individual transects, there is no indication that the StreamPro measured discharges (the mean discharge for all transects) are biased, provided that enough transects are used to determine the mean discharge. ?? 2007 ASCE.

  3. Active control of passive acoustic fields: passive synthetic aperture/Doppler beamforming with data from an autonomous vehicle.

    PubMed

    D'Spain, Gerald L; Terrill, Eric; Chadwell, C David; Smith, Jerome A; Lynch, Stephen D

    2006-12-01

    The maneuverability of autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) equipped with hull-mounted arrays provides the opportunity to actively modify received acoustic fields to optimize extraction of information. This paper uses ocean acoustic data collected by an AUV-mounted two-dimensional hydrophone array, with overall dimension one-tenth wavelength at 200-500 Hz, to demonstrate aspects of this control through vehicle motion. Source localization is performed using Doppler shifts measured at a set of receiver velocities by both single elements and a physical array. Results show that a source in the presence of a 10-dB higher-level interferer having exactly the same frequency content (as measured by a stationary receiver) is properly localized and that white-noise-constrained adaptive beamforming applied to the physical aperture data in combination with Doppler beamforming provides greater spatial resolution than physical-aperture-alone beamforming and significantly lower sidelobes than single element Doppler beamforming. A new broadband beamformer that adjusts for variations in vehicle velocity on a sample by sample basis is demonstrated with data collected during a high-acceleration maneuver. The importance of including the cost of energy expenditure in determining optimal vehicle motion is demonstrated through simulation, further illustrating how the vehicle characteristics are an integral part of the signal/array processing structure.

  4. Active control of passive acoustic fields: passive synthetic aperture/Doppler beamforming with data from an autonomous vehicle.

    PubMed

    D'Spain, Gerald L; Terrill, Eric; Chadwell, C David; Smith, Jerome A; Lynch, Stephen D

    2006-12-01

    The maneuverability of autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) equipped with hull-mounted arrays provides the opportunity to actively modify received acoustic fields to optimize extraction of information. This paper uses ocean acoustic data collected by an AUV-mounted two-dimensional hydrophone array, with overall dimension one-tenth wavelength at 200-500 Hz, to demonstrate aspects of this control through vehicle motion. Source localization is performed using Doppler shifts measured at a set of receiver velocities by both single elements and a physical array. Results show that a source in the presence of a 10-dB higher-level interferer having exactly the same frequency content (as measured by a stationary receiver) is properly localized and that white-noise-constrained adaptive beamforming applied to the physical aperture data in combination with Doppler beamforming provides greater spatial resolution than physical-aperture-alone beamforming and significantly lower sidelobes than single element Doppler beamforming. A new broadband beamformer that adjusts for variations in vehicle velocity on a sample by sample basis is demonstrated with data collected during a high-acceleration maneuver. The importance of including the cost of energy expenditure in determining optimal vehicle motion is demonstrated through simulation, further illustrating how the vehicle characteristics are an integral part of the signal/array processing structure. PMID:17225392

  5. Doppler velocities in the ion tail of comet Levy 1990c

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jockers, Klaus; Rauer, H.; Debi-Prasad, C.; Geyer, E. H.

    1992-01-01

    We have obtained time alternating sequences of column density maps and Doppler velocity fields in the plasma tail of comet Levy 1990c. We describe the observing technique and data analysis, and we present first results.

  6. Fiber-Based Doppler Lidar for Vector Velocity and Altitude Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amzajerdian, Farzin; Pierrottet, Diego; Hines, Glenn; Petway, Larry; Barnes, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    A coherent Doppler lidar capable of providing accurate velocity and altitude data has been developed and demonstrated for future NASA missions to the solar system bodies requiring precision navigation and controlled soft landing.

  7. Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler Data Processing System manual [ADCP

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cote, Jessica M.; Hotchkiss, Frances S.; Martini, Marinna; Denham, Charles R.; revisions by Ramsey, Andree L.; Ruane, Stephen

    2000-01-01

    This open-file report describes the data processing software currently in use by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Woods Hole Coastal and Marine Science Center (WHCMSC), to process time series of acoustic Doppler current data obtained by Teledyne RD Instruments Workhorse model ADCPs. The Sediment Transport Instrumentation Group (STG) at the WHCMSC has a long-standing commitment to providing scientists high quality oceanographic data published in a timely manner. To meet this commitment, STG has created this software to aid personnel in processing and reviewing data as well as evaluating hardware for signs of instrument malfunction. The output data format for the data is network Common Data Form (netCDF), which meets USGS publication standards. Typically, ADCP data are recorded in beam coordinates. This conforms to the USGS philosophy to post-process rather than internally process data. By preserving the original data quality indicators as well as the initial data set, data can be evaluated and reprocessed for different types of analyses. Beam coordinate data are desirable for internal and surface wave experiments, for example. All the code in this software package is intended to run using the MATLAB program available from The Mathworks, Inc. As such, it is platform independent and can be adapted by the USGS and others for specialized experiments with non-standard requirements. The software is continuously being updated and revised as improvements are required. The most recent revision may be downloaded from: http://woodshole.er.usgs.gov/operations/stg/Pubs/ADCPtools/adcp_index.htm The USGS makes this software available at the user?s discretion and responsibility.

  8. Acoustic velocity measurements in materials using a regenerative method

    DOEpatents

    Laine, Edwin F.

    1986-01-01

    Acoustic energy is propagated through earth material between an electro-acoustic generator and a receiver which converts the received acoustic energy into electrical signals. A closed loop is formed by a variable gain amplifier system connected between the receiver and the generator. The gain of the amplifier system is increased until sustained oscillations are produced in the closed loop. The frequency of the oscillations is measured as an indication of the acoustic propagation velocity through the earth material. The amplifier gain is measured as an indication of the acoustic attenuation through the earth materials. The method is also applicable to the non-destructive testing of structural materials, such as steel, aluminum and concrete.

  9. Acoustic-velocity measurements in materials using a regenerative method

    DOEpatents

    Laine, E.F.

    1982-09-30

    Acoustic energy is propatated through earth material between an electro-acoustic generator and a receiver which converts the received acoustic energy into electrical signals. A closed loop is formed by a variable gain amplifier system connected between the receiver and the generator. The gain of the amplifier system is increased until sustained oscillations are produced in the closed loop. The frequency of the oscillations is measured as an indication of the acoustic propagation velocity through the earth material. The amplifier gain is measured as an indication of the acoustic attenuation through the earth materials. The method is also applicable to the non-destructive testing of structural materials, such as steel, aluminum and concrete.

  10. Experimental Study of Doppler Effect for Underwater Acoustic Communication Using Orthogonal Signal Division Multiplexing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebihara, Tadashi; Mizutani, Keiichi

    2012-07-01

    This paper is about the underwater acoustic (UWA) communication using orthogonal signal division multiplexing (OSDM) in shallow water, whose environment is time spread and frequency spread. In this paper, the Doppler effect - Doppler shift and spread - for UWA communication using OSDM is mainly considered. The effects of Doppler shift and Doppler spread are evaluated in a test tank with a moving platform on a stable water surface and with a stable platform with a moving water surface, respectively. Doppler shift correction, which has been considered in simulation-based studies, is found to work effectively. In relation to the effect of Doppler spread, the experimental result well agrees with the simulation result. Through this study, it is confirmed that a smaller frame length is preferable because it enables the measurement of the UWA channel frequently so that it can keep up with channel changes.

  11. Discharge-measurement system using an acoustic Doppler current profiler with applications to large rivers and estuaries

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simpson, Michael R.; Oltmann, Richard N.

    1993-01-01

    Discharge measurement of large rivers and estuaries is difficult, time consuming, and sometimes dangerous. Frequently, discharge measurements cannot be made in tide-affected rivers and estuaries using conventional discharge-measurement techniques because of dynamic discharge conditions. The acoustic Doppler discharge-measurement system (ADDMS) was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey using a vessel-mounted acoustic Doppler current profiler coupled with specialized computer software to measure horizontal water velocity at 1-meter vertical intervals in the water column. The system computes discharge from water-and vessel-velocity data supplied by the ADDMS using vector-algebra algorithms included in the discharge-measurement software. With this system, a discharge measurement can be obtained by engaging the computer software and traversing a river or estuary from bank to bank; discharge in parts of the river or estuarine cross sections that cannot be measured because of ADDMS depth limitations are estimated by the system. Comparisons of ADDMS-measured discharges with ultrasonic-velocity-meter-measured discharges, along with error-analysis data, have confirmed that discharges provided by the ADDMS are at least as accurate as those produced using conventional methods. In addition, the advantage of a much shorter measurement time (2 minutes using the ADDMS compared with 1 hour or longer using conventional methods) has enabled use of the ADDMS for several applications where conventional discharge methods could not have been used with the required accuracy because of dynamic discharge conditions.

  12. Repeated surveys by acoustic Doppler current profiler for flow and sediment dynamics in a tidal river

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dinehart, R.L.; Burau, J.R.

    2005-01-01

    A strategy of repeated surveys by acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) was applied in a tidal river to map velocity vectors and suspended-sediment indicators. The Sacramento River at the junction with the Delta Cross Channel at Walnut Grove, California, was surveyed over several tidal cycles in the Fall of 2000 and 2001 with a vessel-mounted ADCP. Velocity profiles were recorded along flow-defining survey paths, with surveys repeated every 27 min through a diurnal tidal cycle. Velocity vectors along each survey path were interpolated to a three-dimensional Cartesian grid that conformed to local bathymetry. A separate array of vectors was interpolated onto a grid from each survey. By displaying interpolated vector grids sequentially with computer animation, flow dynamics of the reach could be studied in three-dimensions as flow responded to the tidal cycle. Velocity streamtraces in the grid showed the upwelling of flow from the bottom of the Sacramento River channel into the Delta Cross Channel. The sequential display of vector grids showed that water in the canal briefly returned into the Sacramento River after peak flood tides, which had not been known previously. In addition to velocity vectors, ADCP data were processed to derive channel bathymetry and a spatial indicator for suspended-sediment concentration. Individual beam distances to bed, recorded by the ADCP, were transformed to yield bathymetry accurate enough to resolve small bedforms within the study reach. While recording velocity, ADCPs also record the intensity of acoustic backscatter from particles suspended in the flow. Sequential surveys of backscatter intensity were interpolated to grids and animated to indicate the spatial movement of suspended sediment through the study reach. Calculation of backscatter flux through cross-sectional grids provided a first step for computation of suspended-sediment discharge, the second step being a calibrated relation between backscatter intensity and sediment

  13. High-overtone self-focusing acoustic transducers for high-frequency ultrasonic Doppler.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jie; Lee, Chuangyuan; Kim, Eun Sok; Wu, Dawei; Hu, Changhong; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K Kirk; Wang, Gaofeng; Yu, Hongyu

    2010-05-01

    This work reports the potential use of high-overtone self-focusing acoustic transducers for high-frequency ultrasonic Doppler. By using harmonic frequencies of a thick bulk Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT) transducer with a novel air-reflector Fresnel lens, we obtained strong ultrasound signals at 60 MHz (3rd harmonic) and 100 MHz (5th harmonic). Both experimental and theoretical analysis has demonstrated that the transducers can be applied to Doppler systems with high frequencies up to 100 MHz.

  14. Doppler shift and ambiguity velocity caused by relative motion in quantum-enhanced measurement.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yanghe; Xu, Luping; Zhang, Hua; Yang, Peng

    2015-07-13

    We study the effect of relative motion on a frequency-entangled-based ranging scheme. Two major puzzles arise, i.e., Doppler shift and ambiguity velocity. During condition of rapid relative motion, Doppler shift invalidates the measurement result of this scheme; while during condition of slow relative motion, the ambiguity velocity turns into a major limitation. If relative speed between targets and measurement platform exceeds the ambiguity velocity, an accumulated profile obtained by the coincidence measurement will be distorted, which causes a lower ranging accuracy. Theoretical analysis shows a time-varying delay can be introduced to solve the two major puzzles. PMID:26191903

  15. The Doppler Effect based acoustic source separation for a wayside train bearing monitoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haibin; Zhang, Shangbin; He, Qingbo; Kong, Fanrang

    2016-01-01

    Wayside acoustic condition monitoring and fault diagnosis for train bearings depend on acquired acoustic signals, which consist of mixed signals from different train bearings with obvious Doppler distortion as well as background noises. This study proposes a novel scheme to overcome the difficulties, especially the multi-source problem in wayside acoustic diagnosis system. In the method, a time-frequency data fusion (TFDF) strategy is applied to weaken the Heisenberg's uncertainty limit for a signal's time-frequency distribution (TFD) of high resolution. Due to the Doppler Effect, the signals from different bearings have different time centers even with the same frequency. A Doppler feature matching search (DFMS) algorithm is then put forward to locate the time centers of different bearings in the TFD spectrogram. With the determined time centers, time-frequency filters (TFF) are designed with thresholds to separate the acoustic signals in the time-frequency domain. Then the inverse STFT (ISTFT) is taken and the signals are recovered and filtered aiming at each sound source. Subsequently, a dynamical resampling method is utilized to remove the Doppler Effect. Finally, accurate diagnosis for train bearing faults can be achieved by applying conventional spectrum analysis techniques to the resampled data. The performance of the proposed method is verified by both simulated and experimental cases. It shows that it is effective to detect and diagnose multiple defective bearings even though they produce multi-source acoustic signals.

  16. [Characterization and comparison of the doppler compensation acoustic wave in Hipposideros armiger].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu-Zhong; Hu, Kai-Liang; Wei, Li; Xu, Dong; Zhang, Li-Biao

    2010-12-01

    We used the pendulum device to study Doppler-shifted compensation of great leaf-nosed bat (Hipposideros armiger). The bats' echolocation calls were recorded by the Ultrasound Detector both under the rest condition and Doppler shift condition. Then we analyzed the calls with Avisoft software. Our results suggested that when H. armiger was approaching the target, it showed positive Doppler shift compensation: call frequency and the velocity (v) were positive correlated. Call frequency fell to minimum when the bats' relative velocity reached to maximum; likewise call frequency raised to the resting condition frequency when the relative velocity became zero. Negative Doppler shift compensation occurred when bats were far away from the target. Under negative Doppler shift compensation condition, we found call frequency and velocity were positive correlated as well, and moreover, call frequency raised to maximum again while the bats had their minus direction's maximal relative velocity. However, under this status, the elevated value was much lower than the depressed value under positive compensation at the same velocity. The frequency of occurrence of negative compensation was obviously less frequent than that under positive compensation condition. Therefore, we inferred that the two characteristics of the negative Doppler shift compensation mentioned above may be the coactions consequence of the bio-structural restriction and natural selection.

  17. Filtering for unwrapping noisy Doppler optical coherence tomography images for extended microscopic fluid velocity measurement range.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yang; Darga, Donald; Smid, Jason; Zysk, Adam M; Teh, Daniel; Boppart, Stephen A; Scott Carney, P

    2016-09-01

    In this Letter, we report the first application of two phase denoising algorithms to Doppler optical coherence tomography (DOCT) velocity maps. When combined with unwrapping algorithms, significantly extended fluid velocity dynamic range is achieved. Instead of the physical upper bound, the fluid velocity dynamic range is now limited by noise level. We show comparisons between physical simulated ideal velocity maps and the experimental results of both algorithms. We demonstrate unwrapped DOCT velocity maps having a peak velocity nearly 10 times the theoretical measurement range. PMID:27607963

  18. Filtering for unwrapping noisy Doppler optical coherence tomography images for extended microscopic fluid velocity measurement range.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yang; Darga, Donald; Smid, Jason; Zysk, Adam M; Teh, Daniel; Boppart, Stephen A; Scott Carney, P

    2016-09-01

    In this Letter, we report the first application of two phase denoising algorithms to Doppler optical coherence tomography (DOCT) velocity maps. When combined with unwrapping algorithms, significantly extended fluid velocity dynamic range is achieved. Instead of the physical upper bound, the fluid velocity dynamic range is now limited by noise level. We show comparisons between physical simulated ideal velocity maps and the experimental results of both algorithms. We demonstrate unwrapped DOCT velocity maps having a peak velocity nearly 10 times the theoretical measurement range.

  19. 3D velocity measurement by a single camera using Doppler phase-shifting holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ninomiya, Nao; Kubo, Yamato; Barada, Daisuke; Kiire, Tomohiro

    2016-10-01

    In order to understand the details of the flow field in micro- and nano-fluidic devices, it is necessary to measure the 3D velocities under a microscopy. Thus, there is a strong need for the development of a new measuring technique for 3D velocity by a single camera. One solution is the use of holography, but it is well known that the accuracy in the depth direction is very poor for the commonly used in-line holography. At present, the Doppler phase-shifting holography is used for the 3D measurement of an object. This method extracts the signal of a fixed frequency caused by the Doppler beat between the object light and the reference light. It can measure the 3D shape precisely. Here, the frequency of the Doppler beat is determined by the velocity difference between the object light and the reference light. This implies that the velocity of an object can be calculated by the Doppler frequency. In this study, a Japanese 5 yen coin was traversed at a constant speed and its holography has been observed by a high-speed camera. By extracting only the first order diffraction signal at the Doppler frequency, a precise measurement of the shape and the position of a 5 yen coin has been achieved. At the same time, the longitudinal velocity of a 5 yen coin can be measured by the Doppler frequency. Furthermore, the lateral velocities are obtained by particle image velocimetry (PIV) method. A 5 yen coin has been traversed at different angles and its shapes and the 3D velocities have been measured accurately. This method can be applied to the particle flows in the micro- or nano-devices, and the 3D velocities will be measured under microscopes.

  20. Ultrasonic position and velocity measurement for a moving object by M-sequence pulse compression using Doppler velocity estimation by spectrum-pattern analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikari, Yohei; Hirata, Shinnosuke; Hachiya, Hiroyuki

    2015-07-01

    Pulse compression using a maximum-length sequence (M-sequence) can improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the reflected echo in the pulse-echo method. In the case of a moving object, however, the echo is modulated owing to the Doppler effect. The Doppler-shifted M-sequence-modulated signal cannot be correlated with the reference signal that corresponds to the transmitted M-sequence-modulated signal. Therefore, Doppler velocity estimation by spectrum-pattern analysis of a cyclic M-sequence-modulated signal and cross correlations with Doppler-shifted reference signals that correspond to the estimated Doppler velocities has been proposed. In this paper, measurements of the position and velocity of a moving object by the proposed method are described. First, Doppler velocities of the object are estimated using a microphone array. Secondly, the received signal from each microphone is correlated with each Doppler-shifted reference signal. Then, the position of the object is determined from the B-mode image formed from all cross-correlation functions. After that, the velocity of the object is calculated from velocity components estimated from the Doppler velocities and the position. Finally, the estimated Doppler velocities, determined positions, and calculated velocities are evaluated.

  1. Accuracy of acoustic velocity metering systems for measurement of low velocity in open channels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laenen, Antonius; Curtis, R.E.

    1989-01-01

    Acoustic velocity meter (AVM) accuracy depends on equipment limitations, the accuracy of acoustic-path length and angle determination, and the stability of the mean velocity to acoustic-path velocity relation. Equipment limitations depend on path length and angle, transducer frequency, timing oscillator frequency, and signal-detection scheme. Typically, the velocity error from this source is about +or-1 to +or-10 mms/sec. Error in acoustic-path angle or length will result in a proportional measurement bias. Typically, an angle error of one degree will result in a velocity error of 2%, and a path-length error of one meter in 100 meter will result in an error of 1%. Ray bending (signal refraction) depends on path length and density gradients present in the stream. Any deviation from a straight acoustic path between transducer will change the unique relation between path velocity and mean velocity. These deviations will then introduce error in the mean velocity computation. Typically, for a 200-meter path length, the resultant error is less than one percent, but for a 1,000 meter path length, the error can be greater than 10%. Recent laboratory and field tests have substantiated assumptions of equipment limitations. Tow-tank tests of an AVM system with a 4.69-meter path length yielded an average standard deviation error of 9.3 mms/sec, and the field tests of an AVM system with a 20.5-meter path length yielded an average standard deviation error of a 4 mms/sec. (USGS)

  2. Acoustic Doppler current profiling from the JGOFS Arabian Sea cruises aboard the RV T.G. Thompson

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, H.S.; Flagg, C.N.; Shi, Y.

    1996-12-01

    Acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) data is part of the core data for the US JGOFS Arabian Sea project, along with hydrographic and nutrient data. Seventeen cruises are scheduled to take place between September 1994 and January 1996 on the R/V T.G. Thompson. Seven of the cruises follow a standard cruise track, taking hydrographic, chemical and biological measurements. The rest of the cruises, which take place generally within the standard cruise region defined by a set track, are for the deployment and recovery of moored equipment and towing of a SeaSoar. Detailed description of ADCP hardware, the AutoADCP data acquisition system, and the collection of navigation and compass data on the Thompson is documented in Section 2. Followed by data collection for each cruise together with a cruise track, Section 3 presents the processing and analysis of velocity and acoustic backscatter intensity data. Section 5 shows results of profile quality diagnosis.

  3. Fiber-optic, cantilever-type acoustic motion velocity hydrophone.

    PubMed

    Cranch, G A; Miller, G A; Kirkendall, C K

    2012-07-01

    The interaction between fluid loaded fiber-optic cantilevers and a low frequency acoustic wave is investigated as the basis for an acoustic vector sensor. The displacements of the prototype cantilevers are measured with an integrated fiber laser strain sensor. A theoretical model predicting the frequency dependent shape of acoustically driven planar and cylindrical fiber-optic cantilevers incorporating effects of fluid viscosity is presented. The model demonstrates good agreement with the measured response of two prototype cantilevers, characterized with a vibrating water column, in the regime of Re ≥ 1. The performance of each cantilever geometry is also analyzed. Factors affecting the sensor performance such as fluid viscosity, laser mode profile, and support motion are considered. The planar cantilever is shown to experience the largest acoustically induced force and hence the highest acoustic responsivity. However, the cylindrical cantilever exhibits the smoothest response in water, due to the influence of viscous fluid damping, and is capable of two axis particle velocity measurement. These cantilevers are shown to be capable of achieving acoustic resolutions approaching the lowest sea-state ocean noise. PMID:22779459

  4. Stimulated acoustic emission: pseudo-Doppler shifts seen during the destruction of nonmoving microbubbles.

    PubMed

    Tiemann, K; Pohl, C; Schlosser, T; Goenechea, J; Bruce, M; Veltmann, C; Kuntz, S; Bangard, M; Becher, H

    2000-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the appearance and the characteristics of stimulated acoustic emission (SAE) as an echo contrast-specific color Doppler phenomenon with impact on myocardial contrast echocardiography (MCE). Stationary microbubbles of the new contrast agent SH-U 563A (Schering AG) were embedded within a tissue-mimicking gel material. Harmonic power Doppler imaging (H-PDI), color Doppler and pulse-wave Doppler data were acquired using an HDI-5000 equipped with a phased-array transducer (1.67/3.3 MHz). In color Doppler mode, bubble destruction resulted in random noise like Doppler signals. PW-Doppler revealed short "pseudo-Doppler" shifts with a broadband frequency spectrum. Quantification of SAE events by H-PDI demonstrated an exponential decay of signal intensities over successive frames. A strong linear relationship was found between bubble concentration and the square root of the linearized H-PDI signal for a range of concentrations of more than two orders of magnitude (R = 0.993, p < 0.0001). Intensity of the H-PDI signals correlated well with emission power (R = 0.96, p = 0.0014). SAE results from disintegration of microbubbles and can be demonstrated by all Doppler imaging modalities, including H-PDI. Intensity of SAE signals is influenced by the applied acoustic power and correlates highly with the concentration of microbubbles. Because intensity of SAE signals correlates highly with echo contrast concentrations, analysis of SAE signals might be used for quantitative MCE. PMID:11053751

  5. Optimization of Doppler velocity echocardiographic measurements using an automatic contour detection method.

    PubMed

    Gaillard, E; Kadem, L; Pibarot, P; Durand, L-G

    2009-01-01

    Intra- and inter-observer variability in Doppler velocity echocardiographic measurements (DVEM) is a significant issue. Indeed, imprecisions of DVEM can lead to diagnostic errors, particularly in the quantification of the severity of heart valve dysfunction. To minimize the variability and rapidity of DVEM, we have developed an automatic method of Doppler velocity wave contour detection, based on active contour models. To validate our new method, results obtained with this method were compared to those obtained manually by an experienced echocardiographer on Doppler echocardiographic images of left ventricular outflow tract and transvalvular flow velocity signals recorded in 30 patients, 15 with aortic stenosis and 15 with mitral stenosis. We focused on three essential variables that are measured routinely by Doppler echocardiography in the clinical setting: the maximum velocity, the mean velocity and the velocity-time integral. Comparison between the two methods has shown a very good agreement (linear correlation coefficient R(2) = 0.99 between the automatically and the manually extracted variables). Moreover, the computation time was really short, about 5s. This new method applied to DVEM could, therefore, provide a useful tool to eliminate the intra- and inter-observer variabilities associated with DVEM and thereby to improve the diagnosis of cardiovascular disease. This automatic method could also allow the echocardiographer to realize these measurements within a much shorter period of time compared to standard manual tracing method. From a practical point of view, the model developed can be easily implanted in a standard echocardiographic system. PMID:19965162

  6. Stretched-exponential Doppler spectra in underwater acoustic communication channels.

    PubMed

    van Walree, P A; Jenserud, T; Otnes, R

    2010-11-01

    The theory of underwater sound interacting with the sea surface predicts a Gaussian-spread frequency spectrum in the case of a large Rayleigh parameter. However, recent channel soundings reveal more sharply peaked spectra with heavier tails. The measured Doppler spread increases with the frequency and differs between multipath arrivals. The overall Doppler spectrum of a broadband waveform is the sum of the spectra of all constituent paths and frequencies, and is phenomenologically described by a stretched or compressed exponential. The stretched exponential also fits well to the broadband spectrum of a single propagation path, and narrowband spectra summed over all paths.

  7. A Comparison of the Electromagnetic and Acoustic Doppler Effects Using Geometrical Diagrams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bokor, Nandor

    2009-01-01

    Students often find the difference in the electromagnetic and the acoustic Doppler formulae somewhat puzzling. As is shown below, geometrical diagrams and the concept of "event"--a point in spacetime having coordinates (x,y,z,t)--can be a useful and simple way to explain the physical background behind the fundamental differences between the two…

  8. TURBULENCE SPECTRA FROM DOPPLER-BROADENED SPECTRAL LINES: TESTS OF THE VELOCITY CHANNEL ANALYSIS AND VELOCITY COORDINATE SPECTRUM TECHNIQUES

    SciTech Connect

    Chepurnov, A.; Lazarian, A.

    2009-03-10

    Turbulent motions induce Doppler shifts of observable emission and absorption lines motivating studies of turbulence using precision spectroscopy. We provide numerical testing of the two most promising techniques, velocity channel analysis and velocity coordinate spectrum (VCS). We obtain an expression for the shot noise that the discretization of the numerical data entails and successfully test it. We show that the numerical resolution required for recovering the underlying turbulent spectrum from observations depend on the spectral index of velocity fluctuations, which makes low-resolution testing misleading. We demonstrate numerically that, when dealing with absorption lines, sampling of turbulence along just a dozen directions provides a high quality spectrum with the VCS technique.

  9. Intraoperative Doppler velocity measurements to locate patent ITA grafts at reoperation.

    PubMed

    Lotto, Attilio A; Owens, W Andrew

    2006-09-01

    We are reporting a case of a patient who underwent an aortic valve replacement with previous coronary artery bypass grafting. During the operation we used a Doppler velocity probe to locate the exact position of the bilateral internal thoracic arteries. Once the vessels were identified, a suture was passed widely around each internal thoracic artery and a snare was positioned. With the aid of the Doppler velocity probe, we achieved a gentle occlusion of the vessels, applying enough traction on the snares to abolish the flow through the internal thoracic arteries. PMID:16928554

  10. Observation of Doppler-free electromagnetically induced transparency in atoms selected optically with specific velocity

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Hoon; Kim, Kwan Su; Kim, Jung Dong; Lee, Hyun Kyung; Kim, Jung Bog

    2011-11-15

    We observed an electromagnetically induced transparency signal in a four-level system with optically selected rubidium atoms at specific velocities in a room-temperature vaporized cell. Since the atoms behave like cold atoms in the selected atomic view, the observed signals coincide with a trapped atomic system. According to this result, we can observe Doppler-free signals, which correspond from 1.2 to 1.0 K in a Doppler-broadened medium. And the selected atoms have velocity components of {+-}(131 {+-} 3) MHz per wave number. Our experimental results can provide insight for research in cold media.

  11. Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler Measurements in the Tailrace at John Day Dam

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, Chris B.; Dibrani, Berhon; Serkowski, John A.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Titzler, P. Scott; Dennis, Gary W.

    2006-01-30

    Acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) were used to measure water velocities in the tailrace at John Day Dam over a two-week period in February 2005. Data were collected by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the Hydraulic Design Section, Portland District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE). The objective of this project was therefore to collect field measurements of water velocities in the near-field draft tube exit zone as well as the far-field tailrace to be used for improving these models. Field data were collected during the project using five separate ADCPs. Mobile ADCP data were collected using two ADCPs mounted on two separate boats. Data were collected by either holding the boat on-station at pre-defined locations for approximately 10 minutes or in moving transect mode when the boat would move over large distances during the data collection. Results from the mobile ADCP survey indicated a complex hydrodynamic flow field in the tailrace downstream of John Day Dam. A large gyre was noted between the skeleton section of the powerhouse and non-spilling portion of the spillway. Downstream of the spillway, the spillway flow is constrained against the navigation lock guide wall, and large velocities were noted in this region. Downstream of the guide wall, velocities decreased as the spillway jet dispersed. Near the tailrace island, the flow split was measured to be approximately equal on Day 2 (25.4 kcfs spillway/123 kcfs total). However, approximately 60% of the flow passed along the south shore of the island on Day 1 (15.0 kcfs spillway/150 kcfs total). At a distance of 9000 ft downstream of the dam, flows had equalized laterally and were generally uniform over the cross section. The collection of water velocities near the draft tube exit of an operating turbine unit is not routine, and equipment capable of measuring 3D water velocities in these zones are at the forefront of hydraulic measurement technology. Although the feasibility of

  12. Correcting acoustic Doppler current profiler discharge measurements biased by sediment transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mueller, D.S.; Wagner, C.R.

    2007-01-01

    A negative bias in discharge measurements made with an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) is attributed to the movement of sediment on or near the streambed, and is an issue widely acknowledged by the scientific community. The integration of a differentially corrected global positioning system (DGPS) to track the movement of the ADCP can be used to avoid the systematic bias associated with a moving bed. DGPS, however, cannot provide consistently accurate positions because of multipath errors and satellite signal reception problems on waterways with dense tree canopy along the banks, in deep valleys or canyons, and near bridges. An alternative method of correcting for the moving-bed bias, based on the closure error resulting from a two-way crossing of the river, is presented. The uncertainty in the mean moving-bed velocity measured by the loop method is shown to be approximately 0.6cm/s. For the 13 field measurements presented, the loop method resulted in corrected discharges that were within 5% of discharges measured utilizing DGPS to compensate for moving-bed conditions. ?? 2007 ASCE.

  13. Prospects for in vivo blood velocimetry using acoustic resolution photoacoustic Doppler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunker, J.; Beard, P.

    2016-03-01

    Acoustic resolution photoacoustic Doppler flowmetry (AR-PAF) is a technique that has the potential to overcome the spatial resolution and depth penetration limitations of current blood flow measuring methods. Previous work has shown the potential of the technique using blood-mimicking phantoms, but it has proved difficult to make accurate measurements in blood, and thus in vivo application has not yet been possible. One explanation for this difficulty is that whole blood is insufficiently heterogeneous. Through experimental measurements in red blood cell suspensions of different concentrations, as well as in whole blood, we provide new insight and evidence that refutes this assertion. We show that the velocity measurement accuracy is influenced by bandlimiting not only due to the detector frequency response, but also due to spatial averaging of absorbers within the detector field-of-view. In addition, there is a detrimental effect of limited light penetration, but this can be mitigated by selecting less attenuated wavelengths of light, and also by employing range-gating signal processing. By careful choice of these parameters as well as the detector centre frequency, bandwidth and field-of-view, it is possible to make AR-PAF measurements in whole blood using transducers with bandwidths in the tens of MHz range. These findings have profound implications for the prospects of making deep tissue measurements of blood flow relevant to the study of microcirculatory abnormalities associated with cancer, diabetes, atherosclerosis and other conditions.

  14. Feasibility of using a reliable automated Doppler flow velocity measurements for research and clinical practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolgharni, Massoud; Dhutia, Niti M.; Cole, Graham D.; Willson, Keith; Francis, Darrel P.

    2014-03-01

    Echocardiographers are often unkeen to make the considerable time investment to make additional multiple measurements of Doppler velocity. Main hurdle to obtaining multiple measurements is the time required to manually trace a series of Doppler traces. To make it easier to analyse more beats, we present an automated system for Doppler envelope quantification. It analyses long Doppler strips, spanning many heartbeats, and does not require the electrocardiogram to isolate individual beats. We tested its measurement of velocity-time-integral and peak-velocity against the reference standard defined as the average of three experts who each made three separate measurements. The automated measurements of velocity-time-integral showed strong correspondence (R2 = 0.94) and good Bland-Altman agreement (SD = 6.92%) with the reference consensus expert values, and indeed performed as well as the individual experts (R2 = 0.90 to 0.96, SD = 5.66% to 7.64%). The same performance was observed for peak-velocities; (R2 = 0.98, SD = 2.95%) and (R2 = 0.93 to 0.98, SD = 2.94% to 5.12%). This automated technology allows <10 times as many beats to be acquired and analysed compared to the conventional manual approach, with each beat maintaining its accuracy.

  15. Errors in radial velocity variance from Doppler wind lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Barthelmie, R. J.; Doubrawa, P.; Pryor, S. C.

    2016-08-01

    A high-fidelity lidar turbulence measurement technique relies on accurate estimates of radial velocity variance that are subject to both systematic and random errors determined by the autocorrelation function of radial velocity, the sampling rate, and the sampling duration. Using both statistically simulated and observed data, this paper quantifies the effect of the volumetric averaging in lidar radial velocity measurements on the autocorrelation function and the dependence of the systematic and random errors on the sampling duration. For current-generation scanning lidars and sampling durations of about 30 min and longer, during which the stationarity assumption is valid for atmospheric flows, the systematic error is negligible but the random error exceeds about 10 %.

  16. Streaming Velocities and the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation Scale.

    PubMed

    Blazek, Jonathan A; McEwen, Joseph E; Hirata, Christopher M

    2016-03-25

    At the epoch of decoupling, cosmic baryons had supersonic velocities relative to the dark matter that were coherent on large scales. These velocities subsequently slow the growth of small-scale structure and, via feedback processes, can influence the formation of larger galaxies. We examine the effect of streaming velocities on the galaxy correlation function, including all leading-order contributions for the first time. We find that the impact on the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) peak is dramatically enhanced (by a factor of ∼5) over the results of previous investigations, with the primary new effect due to advection: if a galaxy retains memory of the primordial streaming velocity, it does so at its Lagrangian, rather than Eulerian, position. Since correlations in the streaming velocity change rapidly at the BAO scale, this advection term can cause a significant shift in the observed BAO position. If streaming velocities impact tracer density at the 1% level, compared to the linear bias, the recovered BAO scale is shifted by approximately 0.5%. This new effect, which is required to preserve Galilean invariance, greatly increases the importance of including streaming velocities in the analysis of upcoming BAO measurements and opens a new window to the astrophysics of galaxy formation. PMID:27058069

  17. Streaming Velocities and the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation Scale.

    PubMed

    Blazek, Jonathan A; McEwen, Joseph E; Hirata, Christopher M

    2016-03-25

    At the epoch of decoupling, cosmic baryons had supersonic velocities relative to the dark matter that were coherent on large scales. These velocities subsequently slow the growth of small-scale structure and, via feedback processes, can influence the formation of larger galaxies. We examine the effect of streaming velocities on the galaxy correlation function, including all leading-order contributions for the first time. We find that the impact on the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) peak is dramatically enhanced (by a factor of ∼5) over the results of previous investigations, with the primary new effect due to advection: if a galaxy retains memory of the primordial streaming velocity, it does so at its Lagrangian, rather than Eulerian, position. Since correlations in the streaming velocity change rapidly at the BAO scale, this advection term can cause a significant shift in the observed BAO position. If streaming velocities impact tracer density at the 1% level, compared to the linear bias, the recovered BAO scale is shifted by approximately 0.5%. This new effect, which is required to preserve Galilean invariance, greatly increases the importance of including streaming velocities in the analysis of upcoming BAO measurements and opens a new window to the astrophysics of galaxy formation.

  18. Intensity and Doppler Velocity Oscillations in Pore Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, K.-S.; Bong, S.-C.; Nakariakov, V. M.; Lim, E.-K.; Park, Y.-D.; Chae, J. C.; Yang, H.-S.; Park, H.-M.; Yurchyshyn, V.

    2015-03-01

    We have investigated chromospheric traveling features running across two merged pores from their centers at speeds of about 55 km s‑1, in the active region AR 11828. The pores were observed on 2013 August 24 by using high-time, spatial, and spectral resolution data from the Fast Imaging Solar Spectrograph of the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope. We infer a line-of-sight (LOS) velocity by applying the lambdameter method to the Ca ii 8542 Å band and Hα band, and investigate intensity and LOS velocity changes at different wavelengths and different positions at the pores. We find that they have three-minute oscillations, and the intensity oscillation from the line center (0.0 \\overset{\\circ}A ) is preceded by that from the core (‑0.3 \\overset{\\circ}A ) of the bands. There is no phase difference between the intensity and the LOS velocity oscillations at a given wavelength. The amplitude of LOS velocity from the near core spectra ({Δ }λ =0.10-0.21 \\overset{\\circ}A ) is greater than that from the far core spectra ({Δ }λ =0.24-0.36 \\overset{\\circ}A ). These results support the interpretation of the observed wave as a slow magnetoacoustic wave propagating along the magnetic field lines in the pores. The apparent horizontal motion and a sudden decrease of its speed beyond the pores can be explained by the projection effect caused by inclination of the magnetic field with a canopy structure. We conclude that the observed wave properties of the pores are quite similar to those from the sunspot observations.

  19. A micro-Doppler sonar for acoustic surveillance in sensor networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhaonian

    Wireless sensor networks have been employed in a wide variety of applications, despite the limited energy and communication resources at each sensor node. Low power custom VLSI chips implementing passive acoustic sensing algorithms have been successfully integrated into an acoustic surveillance unit and demonstrated for detection and location of sound sources. In this dissertation, I explore active and passive acoustic sensing techniques, signal processing and classification algorithms for detection and classification in a multinodal sensor network environment. I will present the design and characterization of a continuous-wave micro-Doppler sonar to image objects with articulated moving components. As an example application for this system, we use it to image gaits of humans and four-legged animals. I will present the micro-Doppler gait signatures of a walking person, a dog and a horse. I will discuss the resolution and range of this micro-Doppler sonar and use experimental results to support the theoretical analyses. In order to reduce the data rate and make the system amenable to wireless sensor networks, I will present a second micro-Doppler sonar that uses bandpass sampling for data acquisition. Speech recognition algorithms are explored for biometric identifications from one's gait, and I will present and compare the classification performance of the two systems. The acoustic micro-Doppler sonar design and biometric identification results are the first in the field as the previous work used either video camera or microwave technology. I will also review bearing estimation algorithms and present results of applying these algorithms for bearing estimation and tracking of moving vehicles. Another major source of the power consumption at each sensor node is the wireless interface. To address the need of low power communications in a wireless sensor network, I will also discuss the design and implementation of ultra wideband transmitters in a three dimensional

  20. Toward a velocity-resolved microvascular blood flow measure by decomposition of the laser Doppler spectrum.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Marcus; Strömberg, Tomas

    2006-01-01

    Tissue microcirculation, as measured by laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF), comprises capillary, arterial, and venous blood flow. With the classical LDF approach, it has been impossible to differentiate between different vascular compartments. We suggest an alternative LDF algorithm that estimates at least three concentration measures of flowing red blood cells (RBCs), each associated with a predefined, physiologically relevant, absolute velocity in millimeters per second. As the RBC flow velocity depends on the dimension of the blood vessel, this approach might enable a microcirculatory flow differentiation. The LDF concentration estimates are derived by fitting predefined Monte Carlo simulated, single-velocity spectra to a measured, multiple-velocity LDF spectrum. Validation measurements, using both single- and double-tube flow phantoms perfused with a microsphere solution, show that it is possible to estimate velocity and concentration changes, and to differentiate between flows with different velocities. Our theory is also applied to RBC flow measurements. A Gegenbauer kernel phase function (alpha(gk)=1.05; g(gk)=0.93), with an anisotropy factor of 0.987 at 786 nm, is found suitable for modeling Doppler scattering by RBCs diluted in physiological saline. The method is developed for low concentrations of RBCs, but can in theory be extended to cover multiple Doppler scattering. PMID:16526901

  1. On the Positive Bias of Peak Horizontal Velocity from an Idealized Doppler Profiler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Short, David A.; Merceret, Francis J.

    2004-01-01

    In the presence of 3-D turbulence, peak horizontal velocity estimates from an idealized Doppler profiler are found to be positively biased due to an incomplete specification of the vertical velocity field. The magnitude of the bias was estimated by assuming that the vertical and horizontal velocities can be separated into average and perturbation values and that the vertical and horizontal velocity perturbations are normally distributed. Under these assumptions, properties of the Type-I Extreme Value Distribution for maxima, known as the Gumbel distribution, can be used to obtain an analytical solution of the bias. The bias depends on geometric properties of the profiler configuration, the variance in the horizontal velocity, and the unresolved variance in the vertical velocity. When these variances are normalized by the average horizontal velocity, the bias can be mapped as a simple function of the normalized variances.

  2. A beamforming method for plane wave Doppler imaging of high flow velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansour, Omar; Poepping, Tamie L.; Lacefield, James C.

    2016-04-01

    Plane wave imaging is desirable for its ability to achieve high frame rates, allowing the capture of fast dynamic events, and continuous Doppler data. In most implementations of plane-wave imaging, multiple low resolution image (LRI) frames from different plane wave tilt angles are compounded to form a single high resolution image (HRI) frame, thereby reducing the frame rate. Compounding is a low-pass mean filter that causes attenuation and aliasing to signals with high Doppler shifts. On the other hand, the lateral beam profile and hence the quality of the HRI frames is improved by increasing the number of compounded frames. Therefore, a tradeoff exists between the Doppler limits and beam profile. In this paper, we present a method that eliminates this tradeoff and produces high resolution images without the use of compounding. The method suppresses the off-focus (clutter) signal by spreading its spectrum, while keeping the spectrum of the in-focus signal intact. The spreading is achieved by using a random sequence of tilt angles, as opposed to a linear sweep. Experiments performed using a carotid vessel phantom with constant flow demonstrate that the spread-spectrum method more accurately measures the parabolic flow profile of the vessel and in particular outperforms conventional plane-wave Doppler at higher flow velocities. The spread-spectrum method is expected to be valuable for Doppler applications that require measurement of high velocities at high frame rates.

  3. Acoustic bed velocity and bed load dynamics in a large sand bed river

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gaeuman, D.; Jacobson, R.B.

    2006-01-01

    Development of a practical technology for rapid quantification of bed load transport in large rivers would represent a revolutionary advance for sediment monitoring and the investigation of fluvial dynamics. Measurement of bed load motion with acoustic Doppler current profiles (ADCPs) has emerged as a promising approach for evaluating bed load transport. However, a better understanding of how ADCP data relate to conditions near the stream bed is necessary to make the method practical for quantitative applications. In this paper, we discuss the response of ADCP bed velocity measurements, defined as the near-bed sediment velocity detected by the instrument's bottom-tracking feature, to changing sediment-transporting conditions in the lower Missouri River. Bed velocity represents a weighted average of backscatter from moving bed load particles and spectral reflections from the immobile bed. The ratio of bed velocity to mean bed load particle velocity depends on the concentration of the particles moving in the bed load layer, the bed load layer thickness, and the backscatter strength from a unit area of moving particles relative to the echo strength from a unit area of unobstructed bed. A model based on existing bed load transport theory predicted measured bed velocities from hydraulic and grain size measurements with reasonable success. Bed velocities become more variable and increase more rapidly with shear stress when the transport stage, defined as the ratio of skin friction to the critical shear stress for particle entrainment, exceeds a threshold of about 17. This transition in bed velocity response appears to be associated with the appearance of longer, flatter bed forms at high transport stages.

  4. Microwave acoustics handbook. Volume 4: Bulk wave velocities: Numerical data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slobodnik, A. J., Jr.; Delmonico, R. T.; Conway, E. D.

    1980-06-01

    Information useful for the design of acoustic delay lines, resonators, and other miniature, low-cost devices for use in communications and electronic sensing is given. Numerical data on bulk acoustic wave velocities and power flow angles are given for longitudinal, and two shear waves for various orientations of the following single crystalline materials: Ba2NaNb5O15, Bi12/geO20, CdS, Diamond, Eu3Fe5O15, GaAs, Gadolinium Gallium Garnet, Germanium, InSb, InAs, Lead Molybdate, PbS, LiNbO3, LiTaO3, MgO, Quartz, Rutile, Sapphire, Silicon, Spinel, TeO2, YAG, YGaG, YIG, and ZnO. This present volume is intended to be used as a supplement to Volume 3 whenever accurate numerical data is required rather than the more convenient graphical information.

  5. A modified beam-to-earth transformation to measure short-wavelength internal waves with an acoustic Doppler current profiler

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scotti, A.; Butman, B.; Beardsley, R.C.; Alexander, P.S.; Anderson, S.

    2005-01-01

    The algorithm used to transform velocity signals from beam coordinates to earth coordinates in an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) relies on the assumption that the currents are uniform over the horizontal distance separating the beams. This condition may be violated by (nonlinear) internal waves, which can have wavelengths as small as 100-200 m. In this case, the standard algorithm combines velocities measured at different phases of a wave and produces horizontal velocities that increasingly differ from true velocities with distance from the ADCP. Observations made in Massachusetts Bay show that currents measured with a bottom-mounted upward-looking ADCP during periods when short-wavelength internal waves are present differ significantly from currents measured by point current meters, except very close to the instrument. These periods are flagged with high error velocities by the standard ADCP algorithm. In this paper measurements from the four spatially diverging beams and the backscatter intensity signal are used to calculate the propagation direction and celerity of the internal waves. Once this information is known, a modified beam-to-earth transformation that combines appropriately lagged beam measurements can be used to obtain current estimates in earth coordinates that compare well with pointwise measurements. ?? 2005 American Meteorological Society.

  6. Doppler cooling with coherent trains of laser pulses and a tunable velocity comb

    SciTech Connect

    Ilinova, Ekaterina; Ahmad, Mahmoud; Derevianko, Andrei

    2011-09-15

    We explore the possibility of decelerating and Doppler cooling an ensemble of two-level atoms by a coherent train of short, nonoverlapping laser pulses. We derive analytical expressions for mechanical force exerted by the train. In frequency space the force pattern reflects the underlying frequency comb structure. The pattern depends strongly on the ratio of the atomic lifetime to the repetition time between the pulses and pulse area. For example, in the limit of short lifetimes, the frequency-space peaks of the optical force wash out. We propose to tune the carrier-envelope offset frequency to follow the Doppler-shifted detuning as atoms decelerate; this leads to compression of atomic velocity distribution about comb teeth and results in a ''velocity comb''--a series of narrow equidistant peaks in the velocity space.

  7. Velocity distribution measurements in a fishway like open channel by Laser Doppler Anemometry (LDA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayeed-Bin-Asad, S. M.; Lundström, T. S.; Andersson, A. G.; Hellström, J. G. I.

    2016-03-01

    Experiments in an open channel flume with placing a vertical half cylinder barrier have been performed in order to investigate how the upstream velocity profiles are affected by a barrier. An experimental technique using Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) was adopted to measure these velocity distributions in the channel for four different discharge rates. Velocity profiles were measured very close to wall and at 25, 50 and 100 mm upstream of the cylinder wall. For comparing these profiles with well-known logarithmic velocity profiles, velocity profiles were also measured in smooth open channel flow for all same four discharge rates. The results indicate that regaining the logarithmic velocity profiles upstream of the half cylindrical barrier occurs at 100 mm upstream of the cylinder wall.

  8. Coherent Doppler Lidar for Measuring Velocity and Altitude of Space and Arial Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amzajerdian, Farzin; Pierrottet, Diego; Hines, Glenn D.; Petway, Larry; Barnes, Bruce W.

    2016-01-01

    A coherent Doppler lidar has been developed to support future NASA missions to planetary bodies. The lidar transmits three laser beams and measures line-of-sight range and velocity along each beam using a frequency modulated continuous wave (FMCW) technique. Accurate altitude and velocity vector data, derived from the line-of-sight measurements, enables the landing vehicle to precisely navigate from several kilometers above the ground to the designated location and execute a gentle touchdown. The same lidar sensor can also benefit terrestrial applications that cannot rely on GPS or require surface-relative altitude and velocity data.

  9. Time delay and Doppler estimation for wideband acoustic signals in multipath environments.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xue; Zeng, Wen-Jun; Li, Xi-Lin

    2011-08-01

    Estimation of the parameters of a multipath underwater acoustic channel is of great interest for a variety of applications. This paper proposes a high-resolution method for jointly estimating the multipath time delays, Doppler scales, and attenuation amplitudes of a time-varying acoustical channel. The proposed method formulates the estimation of channel parameters into a sparse representation problem. With the [script-l](1)-norm as the measure of sparsity, the proposed method makes use of the basis pursuit (BP) criterion to find the sparse solution. The ill-conditioning can be effectively reduced by the [script-l](1)-norm regularization. Unlike many existing methods that are only applicable to narrowband signals, the proposed method can handle both narrowband and wideband signals. Simulation results are provided to verify the performance and effectiveness of the proposed algorithm, indicating that it has a super-resolution in both delay and Doppler domain, and it is robust to noise.

  10. An acoustic velocity measurement system for aiding barge traffic in the Colorado River locks near Matagorda, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    East, J.W.; Scheffler, C.

    2004-01-01

    In July 1999, the U.S. Geological Survey installed an acoustic Doppler velocity meter in the Colorado River, near the city of Matagorda in southeast Texas. The meter is part of an integrated system used by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to control barge traffic that passes through a lock system located at the confluence of the Colorado River and the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway. The meter was installed on the river bottom as part of a system developed and used by the National Weather Service. The upward-looking meter measures the average velocity in the top 3 meters (10 feet) of the water column. These river-velocity data are used in conjunction with additional velocity and water-stage data, from proximal sites, by the barge operators to assess conditions at the Colorado River crossing and for lock operations. Copyright ASCE 2004.

  11. Velocity profiles inside volcanic clouds from three-dimensional scanning microwave dual-polarization Doppler radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montopoli, Mario

    2016-07-01

    In this work, velocity profiles within a volcanic tephra cloud obtained by dual-polarization Doppler radar acquisitions with three-dimensional (3-D) mechanical scanning capability are analyzed. A method for segmenting the radar volumes into three velocity regimes: vertical updraft, vertical fallout, and horizontal wind advection within a volcanic tephra cloud using dual-polarization Doppler radar moments is proposed. The horizontal and vertical velocity components within the regimes are retrieved using a novel procedure that makes assumptions concerning the characteristics of the winds inside these regimes. The vertical velocities retrieved are combined with 1-D simulations to derive additional parameters including particle fallout, mass flux, and particle sizes. The explosive event occurred on 23 November 2013 at the Mount Etna volcano (Sicily, Italy), is considered a demonstrative case in which to analyze the radar Doppler signal inside the tephra column. The X-band radar (3 cm wavelength) in the Catania, Italy, airport observed the 3-D scenes of the Etna tephra cloud ~32 km from the volcano vent every 10 min. From the radar-derived vertical velocity profiles of updraft, particle fallout, and horizontal transportation, an exit velocity of 150 m/s, mass flux rate of 1.37 • 107 kg/s, particle fallout velocity of 18 m/s, and diameters of precipitating tephra particles equal to 0.8 cm are estimated on average. These numbers are shown to be consistent with theoretical 1-D simulations of plume dynamics and local reports at the ground, respectively. A thickness of 3 ± 0.36 km for the downwind ash cloud is also inferred by differentiating the radar-derived cloud top and the height of transition between the convective and buoyancy regions, the latter being inferred by the estimated vertical updraft velocity profile. The unique nature of the case study as well as the novelty of the segmentation and retrieval methods presented potentially give new insights into the

  12. Horizontal velocities of MSTIDs over Taiwan observed by continuous HF Doppler sounding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fišer, Jiří; Chum, Jaroslav

    2016-04-01

    Medium scale traveling ionospheric disturbances (MSTIDs) are signatures of gravity waves (GWs) which propagatein the termosphere. Since GWs play an important role in the coupling between the lower atmospheric layers and the thermosphere it is important to study their properties and source mechanisms. In this contribution we present an experimental study focused on horizontal velocities of MSTIDs over Taiwan in the nearly two year long period starting in April 2014. We observe MSTIDs by multipath continuous HF Doppler sounding system. The movement of ionospheric plasma induced via collisions by gravity waves is detected as Doppler shift of the sounding radio signal. We investigate seasonal and diurnal variations of MSTIDs horizontal propagation parameters and compare them with horizontal wind model (HWM) and also compare them with results obtained in other locations in middle a low latitudes where similar HF Doppler sounding systems are installed.

  13. Application of the loop method for correcting acoustic doppler current profiler discharge measurements biased by sediment transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mueller, David S.; Wagner, Chad R.

    2006-01-01

    A systematic bias in discharge measurements made with an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) is attributed to the movement of sediment near the streambed-an issue widely acknowledged by the scientific community. This systematic bias leads to an underestimation of measured velocity and discharge. The integration of a differentially corrected Global Positioning System (DGPS) to track the movement of the ADCP can be used to avoid the systematic bias associated with a moving bed. DGPS systems, however, cannot provide consistently accurate positions because of multipath errors and satellite signal reception problems on waterways with dense tree canopy along the banks, in deep valleys or canyons, and near bridges. An alternative method of correcting for the moving-bed bias was investigated by the U.S. Geological Survey.

  14. Nonperturbing measurements of spatially distributed underwater acoustic fields using a scanning laser Doppler vibrometer.

    PubMed

    Harland, Andy R; Petzing, Jon N; Tyrer, John R

    2004-01-01

    Localized changes in the density of water induced by the presence of an acoustic field cause perturbations in the localized refractive index. This relationship has given rise to a number of nonperturbing optical metrology techniques for recording measurement parameters from underwater acoustic fields. A method that has been recently developed involves the use of a Laser Doppler Vibrometer (LDV) targeted at a fixed, nonvibrating, plate through an underwater acoustic field. Measurements of the rate of change of optical pathlength along a line section enable the identification of the temporal and frequency characteristics of the acoustic wave front. This approach has been extended through the use of a scanning LDV, which facilitates the measurement of a range of spatially distributed parameters. A mathematical model is presented that relates the distribution of pressure amplitude and phase in a planar wave front with the rate of change of optical pathlength measured by the LDV along a specifically orientated laser line section. Measurements of a 1 MHz acoustic tone burst generated by a focused transducer are described and the results presented. Graphical depictions of the acoustic power and phase distribution recorded by the LDV are shown, together with images representing time history during the acoustic wave propagation.

  15. Influence of Doppler-tipped guidewire position in coronary artery on blood flow velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnik, Ivan S.; Dupouy, Patrick J.; Kvasnicka, Jan; Geschwind, Herbert J.

    1995-05-01

    A pulsatile blood flow model was used to estimate the influence of position of Doppler guide wires with 12 MHz forward looking ultrasound transducers on the average spectral peak velocity. Three 0.014-inch and three 0.018-inch Doppler guide wires were positioned in plastic tubes ranging from 1.7 mm to 8.0 mm internal diameter. Blood flow of 50, 100 and 200 ml/min was adjusted using a roller-pump. The flow velocity was lower by 54% near the wall than in the center of large tubes (diameter 8.0 mm). In tubes of 2.9 mm and 4.2 mm in diameter the maximum variations were 11% and 22.5% for the 0.014-inch guide wire and 7.5% and 20% for the 0.018-inch guide wire, respectively. No variance in velocity related to wire position was observed in small (1.7 mm) tubes. The system was not sensitive to angular displacement of the guide wire in the range of +/- 30 degree(s). These results demonstrate that intravascular Doppler ultrasound flowmeter may be accurately utilized for measurements of blood flow velocity in small coronary arteries without any need to reposition the guidewire.

  16. Method and apparatus for optical Doppler tomographic imaging of fluid flow velocity in highly scattering media

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, John Stuart; Milner, Thomas Edward; Chen, Zhongping

    1999-01-01

    Optical Doppler tomography permits imaging of fluid flow velocity in highly scattering media. The tomography system combines Doppler velocimetry with high spatial resolution of partially coherent optical interferometry to measure fluid flow velocity at discrete spatial locations. Noninvasive in vivo imaging of blood flow dynamics and tissue structures with high spatial resolutions of the order of 2 to 10 microns is achieved in biological systems. The backscattered interference signals derived from the interferometer may be analyzed either through power spectrum determination to obtain the position and velocity of each particle in the fluid flow sample at each pixel, or the interference spectral density may be analyzed at each frequency in the spectrum to obtain the positions and velocities of the particles in a cross-section to which the interference spectral density corresponds. The realized resolutions of optical Doppler tomography allows noninvasive in vivo imaging of both blood microcirculation and tissue structure surrounding the vessel which has significance for biomedical research and clinical applications.

  17. Constructing velocity distributions in crossed-molecular beam studies using Fourier Transform Doppler Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monge, Josue Roberto

    The goal of our scattering experiments is to derive the distribution the differential cross-section and elucidate the dynamics of a bimolecular collision via pure rotational spectroscopy. We have explored the use of a data reduction model to directly transform rotational line shapes into the differential cross section and speed distribution of a reactive bimolecular collision. This inversion technique, known as Fourier Transform Doppler Spectroscopy (FTDS), initially developed by James Kinsey, deconvolves the velocity information contained in one-dimensional Doppler Profiles to construct the non-thermal, state-selective three-dimensional velocity distribution. By employing an expansion in classical orthogonal polynomials, the integral transform in FTDS can be simplified into a set of purely algebraic expressions technique; i.e. the Taatjes method. In this investigation, we extend the Taatjes method for general use in recovering asymmetric velocity distributions. We have also constructed a hypothetical asymmetric distribution from adiabatic scattering in Argon-Argon to test the general method. The angle- and speed-components of the sample distribution were derived classically from a Lennard-Jones 6-12 potential, with collisions at 60 meV, and mapped onto Radon space to generate a set of discrete Doppler profiles. The sample distribution was reconstructed from these profiles using FTDS. Both distributions were compared along with derived total cross sections for the Argon--Argon system. This study serves as a template for constructing velocity distributions from bimolecular scattering experiments using the FTDS inversion technique.

  18. Microwave acoustics handbook. Volume 3: Bulk wave velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slobodnik, A. J., Jr.; Delmonico, R. T.; Conway, E. D.

    1980-05-01

    Information useful for the design of acoustic delay lines, resonators, and other miniature, low cost, reliable devices for use in communications and electronic sensing is given in this report. Computations of bulk acoustic wave velocities, power flow angles, and coupling to electric fields are plotted for various orientations of the following single crystalline materials: Ba2NaNb5O15, Bi12GeO20, CdS, Diamond, Eu3Fe5O15, Gadolinium Gallium Garnet, GaAs, Germanium, InSb, InAs, Lead Molybdate, PbS, LiNbO3, LiTaO3, MgO, Quartz, Rutile, Sapphire, Silicon, Spinel, TeO2, YAG, YGaG, YIG, and ZnO. Particular cuts of interest, including cases for common metals, are then chosen for more detailed numerical calculations of mechanical and electrical parameters governing acoustic wave propagation in these media. A list of material constants is also included.

  19. In vitro verification of multiple-receiver Doppler ultrasound for velocity estimation improvement.

    PubMed

    Hallac, Rami R; Agarwal, Mangilal; Jones, Steven A

    2010-06-01

    The coherent scattering effect, which introduces noise in Doppler-derived velocity estimates, is caused by constructive and destructive interference of sound waves scattered from multiple particles. Because the phase relationship between signals scattered from different particles depends on the orientation of the receiver, the error in a given velocity estimate depends on the receiver location. To examine this dependence, the velocity of a steady uniform flow was measured simultaneously with a transceiver and three receivers, and the cross-correlation coefficients between velocity estimates for pairs of crystals were calculated. The velocity estimates were nearly independent, with cross-correlation coefficients of approximately 0.2. This result agrees with our previously published numerical simulation studies which demonstrated that the coherent scattering noise in receivers separated by 5 degrees or more was nearly uncorrelated. Consequently, the contribution of coherent scattering noise can be reduced by averaging out noise in signals obtained from multiple receivers.

  20. Development of ultrasonic pulse-train Doppler method for velocity profile and flowrate measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, Sanehiro; Furuichi, Noriyuki; Shimada, Takashi

    2016-11-01

    We present a novel technique for measuring the velocity profile and flowrate in a pipe. This method, named the ultrasonic pulse-train Doppler method (UPTD), has the advantages of expanding the velocity range and setting the smaller measurement volume with low calculation and instrument costs in comparison with the conventional ultrasonic pulse Doppler method. The conventional method has limited measurement of the velocity range due to the Nyquist sampling theorem. In addition, previous reports indicate that a smaller measurement volume increases the accuracy of the measurement. In consideration of the application of the conventional method to actual flow fields, such as industrial facilities and power plants, the issues of velocity range and measurement volume are important. The UPTD algorithm, which exploits two pulses of ultrasound with a short interval and envelope detection, is proposed. Velocity profiles calculated by this algorithm were examined through simulations and excellent agreement was found in all cases. The influence of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) on the algorithm was also estimated. The result indicates that UPTD can measure velocity profiles with high accuracy, even under a small SNR. Experimental measurements were conducted and the results were evaluated at the national standard calibration facility of water flowrate in Japan. Every detected signal forms a set of two pulses and the enveloped line can be observed clearly. The results show that UPTD can measure the velocity profiles over the pipe diameter, even if the velocities exceed the measurable velocity range. The measured flowrates were under 0.6% and the standard deviations for all flowrate conditions were within  ±0.38%, which is the uncertainty of the flowrate measurement estimated in the previous report. In conclusion, UPTD provides superior accuracy and expansion of the velocity range.

  1. TU-A-9A-02: Analysis of Variations in Clinical Doppler Ultrasound Peak Velocity Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y; Stekel, S; Tradup, D; Hangiandreou, N

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Doppler ultrasound (US) peak velocity (Vmax) measurements show considerable variations due to intrinsic spectral broadening with different scanning techniques, machines and manufacturers. We developed a semi-automated Vmax estimation method and used this method to investigate the performance of a US system for clinical Doppler Vmax measurement. Methods: Semi-automated Vmax is defined as the velocity at which the computed mean spectral profile falls to within 1 background standard deviation of the background mean. GE LOGIQ E9 system with 9L and ML6-15 probes were studied with steady flow (5.3 – 12.5 ml/s) in a Gammex OPTIMIZER 1425A phantom. All Doppler spectra were acquired by 1 operator at the distal end of 5 mm angular tube using a modified clinical carotid artery protocol. Repeatability and variation of Vmax to scanning parameters and probes were analyzed and reported as percentage, i.e. (max-min)/mean. Results: Vmax estimation had good repeatability (3.1% over 6 days for 9L, and 3.6% for ML6-15). For 9L probe, varying gain, compression, scale, SV depth and length, and frequency had minimal impact on Vmax (all variations less than 4.0%). Beam steering had slightly higher influence (largest variations across flow rates were 4.9% for 9L and 6.9% for ML6-15). For both probes, Doppler angle had the greatest effect on Vmax. Percentage increase of Vmax was largely independent of actual flow rates. For Doppler angle varied from 30 to 60°, Vmax increased 24% for 9L, and 20% for ML6-15. Vmax measured by ML6-15 were lower than that by 9L at each Doppler angle with differences less than 5%. Conclusion: The proposed Vmax estimation method is shown to be a useful tool to evaluate clinical Doppler US system performance. For the tested system and probes, Doppler angle had largest impact in measured Vmax.

  2. Heterodyne Doppler velocity measurement of moving targets by mode-locked pulse laser.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yan; Ren, Deming; Zhao, Weijiang; Qu, Yanchen; Qian, Liming; Chen, Zhenlei

    2012-01-16

    In this study, heterodyne detection is adopted to measure the velocity of a target simulated by a rapidly rotating plate by using a mode-locked pulse laser as the resource. The coherent beat frequency of the signal light reflected by target and local oscillation light occurred on the surface of the detector. Then the waveform of beat frequency was processed by filtering to obtain the Doppler frequency shift of the signal light induced by target. With this frequency shift, the velocity of target could be obtained by calculation. Results indicate that the measurement has a high precision. The error on average is within 0.4 m/s. PMID:22274421

  3. Heterodyne Doppler velocity measurement of moving targets by mode-locked pulse laser.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yan; Ren, Deming; Zhao, Weijiang; Qu, Yanchen; Qian, Liming; Chen, Zhenlei

    2012-01-16

    In this study, heterodyne detection is adopted to measure the velocity of a target simulated by a rapidly rotating plate by using a mode-locked pulse laser as the resource. The coherent beat frequency of the signal light reflected by target and local oscillation light occurred on the surface of the detector. Then the waveform of beat frequency was processed by filtering to obtain the Doppler frequency shift of the signal light induced by target. With this frequency shift, the velocity of target could be obtained by calculation. Results indicate that the measurement has a high precision. The error on average is within 0.4 m/s.

  4. Half-year-long measurements with a buoy-mounted acoustic Doppler current profiler in the Somali Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schott, Friedrich; Johns, William

    1987-05-01

    A self-contained, upward-looking acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP), mounted in the top float of a subsurface mooring was deployed in the Somali Current at 2°14'N, 45°55'E from September 17, 1985, to April 25, 1986. The instrument operated at a frequency of 150 kHz, with a vertical beam angle of 20°. Vector-averaged profiles of horizontal and vertical velocity were recorded every 4 hours, using 200 pings per ensemble at a vertical bin length of 8.7 m. The mooring was deployed in very rough topography, settling in a trough at 337 m depth with the ADCP located at 267 m depth. Data retrieval over the entire recording period was complete, with Doppler biasing from side lobe reception of vertically traveling rays affecting only the top 20 m below the surface. Over the 7-month deployment the instrument recorded current profiles encompassing the end of the 1985 summer monsoon and entire winter monsoon and also through the spring transition into the early onset phase of the 1986 summer monsoon. Significant echo amplitude variations of week-to-month-long duration were observed, which were only partially related to horizontal flow variations associated with the monsoons. Projection of the strong horizontal currents (exceeding 150 cm/s at times) into the vertical component was not observed, attesting to fairly exact orientation of the four beams and tilt meters. This indicates that the vertical current measurement from ADCPs can be potentially useful for phenomena with vertical velocities exceeding a few millimeters per second. However, an analysis of echo amplitude and vertical current variations at the diurnal period suggests that the measured vertical velocity is, at least at that period, probably dominated by active vertical migration of biological scatterers through the water column.

  5. Thermodynamic properties of liquid gallium from picosecond acoustic velocity measurements.

    PubMed

    Ayrinhac, S; Gauthier, M; Le Marchand, G; Morand, M; Bergame, F; Decremps, F

    2015-07-15

    Due to discrepancies in the literature data the thermodynamic properties of liquid gallium are still in debate. Accurate measurements of adiabatic sound velocities as a function of pressure and temperature have been obtained by the combination of laser picosecond acoustics and surface imaging on sample loaded in diamond anvil cell. From these results the thermodynamic parameters of gallium have been extracted by a numerical procedure up to 10 GPa and 570 K. It is demonstrated that a Murnaghan equation of state accounts well for the whole data set since the isothermal bulk modulus BT has been shown to vary linearly with pressure in the whole temperature range. No evidence for a previously reported liquid-liquid transition has been found in the whole pressure and temperature range explored.

  6. Coherent Doppler Lidar for Measuring Altitude, Ground Velocity, and Air Velocity of Aircraft and Spaceborne Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amzajerdian, Farzin (Inventor); Pierrottet, Diego F. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A Doppler lidar sensor system includes a laser generator that produces a highly pure single frequency laser beam, and a frequency modulator that modulates the laser beam with a highly linear frequency waveform. A first portion of the frequency modulated laser beam is amplified, and parts thereof are transmitted through at least three separate transmit/receive lenses. A second portion of the laser beam is used as a local oscillator beam for optical heterodyne detection. Radiation from the parts of the laser beam transmitted via the transmit/receive lenses is received by the respective transmit/receive lenses that transmitted the respective part of the laser beam. The received reflected radiation is compared with the local oscillator beam to calculate the frequency difference there between to determine various navigational data.

  7. Application of acoustic doppler current profilers for measuring three-dimensional flow fields and as a surrogate measurement of bedload transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Conaway, J.S.

    2005-01-01

    Acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) have been in use in the riverine environment for nearly 20 years. Their application primarily has been focused on the measurement of streamflow discharge. ADCPs emit high-frequency sound pulses and receive reflected sound echoes from sediment particles in the water column. The Doppler shift between transmitted and return signals is resolved into a velocity component that is measured in three dimensions by simultaneously transmitting four independent acoustical pulses. To measure the absolute velocity magnitude and direction in the water column, the velocity magnitude and direction of the instrument must also be computed. Typically this is accomplished by ensonifying the streambed with an acoustical pulse that also provides a depth measurement for each of the four acoustic beams. Sediment transport on or near the streambed will bias these measurements and requires external positioning such as a differentially corrected Global Positioning Systems (GPS). Although the influence of hydraulic structures such as spur dikes and bridge piers is typically only measured and described in one or two dimensions, the use of differentially corrected GPS with ADCPs provides a fully three-dimensional measurement of the magnitude and direction of the water column at such structures. The measurement of these flow disturbances in a field setting also captures the natural pulsations of river flow that cannot be easily quantified or modeled by numerical simulations or flumes. Several examples of measured three-dimensional flow conditions at bridge sites throughout Alaska are presented. The bias introduced to the bottom-track measurement is being investigated as a surrogate measurement of bedload transport. By fixing the position of the ADCP for a known period of time the apparent velocity of the streambed at that position can be determined. Initial results and comparison to traditionally measured bedload values are presented. These initial

  8. Relationship of spaced antenna and Doppler techniques for velocity measurements (keynote paper), part 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincent, R. A.

    1984-01-01

    The Doppler, spaced-antenna and interferometric methods of measuring wind velocities all use the same basic information, the Doppler shifts imposed on backscattered radio waves, but they process it in different ways. The Doppler technique is most commonly used at VHF since the narrow radar beams are readily available. However, the spaced antenna (SA) method has been successfully used with the SOUSY and Adelaide radars. At MF/HF the spaced antenna method is widely used since the large antenna arrays (diameter 1 km) required to generate narrow beams are expensive to construct. Where such arrays of this size are available then the Doppler method has been successfully used (e.g., Adelaide and Brisbane). In principle, the factors which influence the choice of beam pointing angle, the optimum antenna spacing will be the same whether operation is at MF or VHF. Many of the parameters which govern the efficient use of wind measuring systems have been discussed at previous MST workshops. Some of the points raised by these workshops are summarized.

  9. Measurement of fast-changing low velocities by photonic Doppler velocimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Song Hongwei; Wu Xianqian; Huang Chenguang; Wei Yangpeng; Wang Xi

    2012-07-15

    Despite the increasing popularity of photonic Doppler velocimetry (PDV) in shock wave experiments, its capability of capturing low particle velocities while changing rapidly is still questionable. The paper discusses the performance of short time Fourier transform (STFT) and continuous wavelet transform (CWT) in processing fringe signals of fast-changing low velocities measured by PDV. Two typical experiments are carried out to evaluate the performance. In the laser shock peening test, the CWT gives a better interpretation to the free surface velocity history, where the elastic precursor, main plastic wave, and elastic release wave can be clearly identified. The velocities of stress waves, Hugoniot elastic limit, and the amplitude of shock pressure induced by laser can be obtained from the measurement. In the Kolsky-bar based tests, both methods show validity of processing the longitudinal velocity signal of incident bar, whereas CWT improperly interprets the radial velocity of the shocked sample at the beginning period, indicating the sensitiveness of the CWT to the background noise. STFT is relatively robust in extracting waveforms of low signal-to-noise ratio. Data processing method greatly affects the temporal resolution and velocity resolution of a given fringe signal, usually CWT demonstrates a better local temporal resolution and velocity resolution, due to its adaptability to the local frequency, also due to the finer time-frequency product according to the uncertainty principle.

  10. Measurement of fast-changing low velocities by photonic Doppler velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Hongwei; Wu, Xianqian; Huang, Chenguang; Wei, Yangpeng; Wang, Xi

    2012-07-01

    Despite the increasing popularity of photonic Doppler velocimetry (PDV) in shock wave experiments, its capability of capturing low particle velocities while changing rapidly is still questionable. The paper discusses the performance of short time Fourier transform (STFT) and continuous wavelet transform (CWT) in processing fringe signals of fast-changing low velocities measured by PDV. Two typical experiments are carried out to evaluate the performance. In the laser shock peening test, the CWT gives a better interpretation to the free surface velocity history, where the elastic precursor, main plastic wave, and elastic release wave can be clearly identified. The velocities of stress waves, Hugoniot elastic limit, and the amplitude of shock pressure induced by laser can be obtained from the measurement. In the Kolsky-bar based tests, both methods show validity of processing the longitudinal velocity signal of incident bar, whereas CWT improperly interprets the radial velocity of the shocked sample at the beginning period, indicating the sensitiveness of the CWT to the background noise. STFT is relatively robust in extracting waveforms of low signal-to-noise ratio. Data processing method greatly affects the temporal resolution and velocity resolution of a given fringe signal, usually CWT demonstrates a better local temporal resolution and velocity resolution, due to its adaptability to the local frequency, also due to the finer time-frequency product according to the uncertainty principle.

  11. Scanning Laser Doppler Vibrometry Application to Artworks: New Acoustic and Mechanical Exciters for Structural Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agnani, A.; Esposito, E.

    After first attempts some years ago, the scanning laser Doppler vibrometer has become an effective way of diagnosing different types of artworks; successful applications regard frescoes, icons, mosaics, ceramic artefacts and wood inlays. Also application to historical bridges has been successfully developed and a recently approved European Commission project will see the employment of scanning laser Doppler Vibrometry (SLDV) for the dynamical characterization of ancient buildings. However, a critical issue consists in the adequate excitation of the structure under test. Moreover different types of defects and different kinds of artworks require different types of excitation, so this topic needs a deep consideration. In this work we will present two new types of exciters developed at our Department, namely an acoustic exciter and a mechanical one. Acoustic exciters allow remote non-invasive loading but are limited in the lower frequency range and in the amount of vibrational energy input into the structure. The proposed automatic tapping device based on a commercial impact hammer overcomes these problems. Also another acoustic exciter, a HyperSonic Sound (HSS) source has been evaluated, showing interesting features as regards sound radiation.

  12. Vertical velocities within a Cirrus cloud from Doppler lidar and aircraft measurements during FIRE: Implications for particle growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gultepe, Ismail; Heymsfield, Andrew J.

    1990-01-01

    A large and comprehensive data set taken by the NOAA CO2 Doppler lidar, the NCAR King Air, and rawinsondes on 31 October 1986 during the FIRE (First ISCCP Regional Experiment) field program which took place in Wisconsin are presented. Vertical velocities are determined from the Doppler lidar data, and are compared with velocities derived from the aircraft microphysical data. The data are used for discussion of particle growth and dynamical processes operative within the cloud.

  13. The pulsed Doppler ultrasound flowmeter: experimental evaluation of velocity accuracy and range resolution.

    PubMed

    Griffith, J M; McLeod, F D; Leroy, A F

    1977-01-01

    Accurate quantitation of blood flow patterns, particularly in the physiological state, is important to the successful study of several problems in biomedical research. The pulsed Doppler ultrasonic flowmeter offers promise of overcoming some of the difficulties present in other methods. This flowmeter can be either implantable or noninvasive. Although a number of papers describe important design criteria, the design or selection of a Doppler system for a given task remains a complex matter involving many compromises based on theoretical considerations and very limited data. Experimental data from well-defined flows are needed to help identify those areas in which ultrasonic flowmeters can be most useful. This paper defines and evaluates two important parameters for the pulsed Doppler ultrasonic flowmeter by comparing experimental results with those predicted theorectically. The first parameter is velocity accuracy; the second parameter is range resolution. Findings show that centerline flow velocities in circular tubes can be estimated to within a few percent of the correct value, and that a 1.5-mm range resolution can be realized with the system tested.

  14. Retrieval of Hydrometeor Drop Size Distributions from TRMM Field Campaign Profiler Doppler Velocity Spectra Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Christopher R.; Gage, Kenneth S.

    2003-01-01

    Consistent with the original proposal and work plan, this project focused on estimating the raindrop size distributions (DSDs) retrieved from vertically pointing Doppler radar profilers and analyzing the relationship of the retrieved DSDs with the dynamics of the precipitation processes. The first phase of this project focused on developing the model to retrieve the DSD from the observed Doppler velocity spectra. The second phase used this model to perform DSD retrievals from the profiler observations made during the TRMM Ground Validation Field Campaigns of TEFLUN-B, TRMM-LBA, and KWAJEX. The third phase of this project established collaborations with scientists involved with each field campaign in order to validate the profiler DSD estimates and to enable the profiler retrievals to be used in their research. Through these collaborations, the retrieved DSDs were placed into context with the dynamical processes of the observed precipitating cloud systems.

  15. Laboratory evaluation of an OTT acoustic digital current meter and a SonTek Laboratory acoustic Doppler velocimeter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vermeyen, T.B.; Oberg, Kevin A.; Jackson, Patrick Ryan

    2009-01-01

    Recently, an acoustic current meter known as the OTT * acoustic digital current meter (ADC) was introduced as an alternative instrument for stream gaging measurements. The Bureau of Reclamation and the U.S. Geological Survey collaborated on a side- by-side evaluation of the ADC and a SonTek/YSI acoustic Doppler velocimeter (ADV). Measurements were carried out in a laboratory flume to evaluate the performance characteristics of the ADC under a range of flow and boundary conditions. The flume contained a physical model of a mountain river with a diversion dam and variety of bed materials ranging from smooth mortar to a cobble bed. The instruments were installed on a trolley system that allowed them to be easily moved within the flume while maintaining a consistent probe orientation. More than 50 comparison measurements were made in an effort to verify the manufacturer’s performance specifications and to evaluate potential boundary disturbance for near-bed and vertical boundary measurements. Data and results from this evaluation are presented and discussed. 

  16. An Analysis of Consolidation Grouting Effect of Bedrock Based on its Acoustic Velocity Increase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ming; Lu, Wen-bo; Zhang, Wen-ju; Yan, Peng; Zhou, Chuang-bing

    2015-05-01

    Acoustic velocity is an important parameter to evaluate the mechanical properties of fractured rock masses. Based on the in situ acoustic velocity measurement data of ~20 hydropower stations in China, we assessed the acoustic velocity increase of rock masses as a result of consolidation grouting in different geological conditions, such as fault sites, weathered areas and excavation-induced damage zones. We established an empirical relationship between the acoustic velocity of rock masses before and after consolidation grouting, and examined the correlation between acoustic velocity and deformation modulus. A case study is presented about a foundation consolidation grouting project for an intake tower of Pubugou Hydropower Station. The results show that different types of rock masses possess distinct ranges for resultant acoustic velocity increase by consolidation grouting. Under a confidence interval of 95 %, the ranges of the increasing rate of acoustic velocity in a faulted zone, weathered zone, and excavation-induced damage zone are observed to be 12.7-43.1, 12.3-31.2, and 6.9-14.5 %, respectively. The acoustic velocity before grouting and its increasing rate can be used to predict the effectiveness of consolidation grouting.

  17. Underwater Acoustic Wavefront Visualization by Scanning Laser Doppler Vibrometer for the Characterization of Focused Ultrasonic Transducers

    PubMed Central

    Longo, Roberto; Vanlanduit, Steve; Arroud, Galid; Guillaume, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of acoustic wave fields is important for a large number of engineering designs, communication and health-related reasons. The visualization of wavefronts gives valuable information about the type of transducers and excitation signals more suitable for the test itself. This article is dedicated to the development of a fast procedure for acoustic fields visualization in underwater conditions, by means of laser Doppler vibrometer measurements. The ultrasonic probe is a focused transducer excited by a chirp signal. The scope of this work is to evaluate experimentally the properties of the sound beam in order to get reliable information about the transducer itself to be used in many kinds of engineering tests and transducer design. PMID:26287197

  18. Underwater Acoustic Wavefront Visualization by Scanning Laser Doppler Vibrometer for the Characterization of Focused Ultrasonic Transducers.

    PubMed

    Longo, Roberto; Vanlanduit, Steve; Arroud, Galid; Guillaume, Patrick

    2015-08-13

    The analysis of acoustic wave fields is important for a large number of engineering designs, communication and health-related reasons. The visualization of wavefronts gives valuable information about the type of transducers and excitation signals more suitable for the test itself. This article is dedicated to the development of a fast procedure for acoustic fields visualization in underwater conditions, by means of laser Doppler vibrometer measurements. The ultrasonic probe is a focused transducer excited by a chirp signal. The scope of this work is to evaluate experimentally the properties of the sound beam in order to get reliable information about the transducer itself to be used in many kinds of engineering tests and transducer design.

  19. The relationship between mineral content and acoustic velocity of sandstone reservoirs in Junggar basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan; Gu, Hanming

    2015-08-01

    Sandstone reservoirs have generally high porosity in the Shawan formation of the Chunguang oil field, Junggar basin, because they developed in geological conditions of shallow and weak compaction. High porosity always links lower acoustic velocities in sandstone. However, when it is more than a certain value (approximately 27.5%), the porosity is not in accordance with acoustic velocities. In addition, cast thin sections illustrated incoherence between pore types and porosity. Fluids and mineral content are the two main factors changing acoustic velocities. This means that acoustic velocities of the high-porosity sandstone are mainly affected by the mineral content and fluid properties. Hence, data from litho-electric analysis are used to measure velocities of the compression shear waves, and thin sections are used to identify the mineral content. By the application of cross-plot maps, relations of acoustic velocities and mineral contents are proposed. Mineral contents include mainly quartz, feldspar, and tuff. In normal rock physical models, the shale content is calculated from well logs. The mineral grain is often regarded as pure quartz grain or average mineral composition. However, the application of the normal rock physics model will be inaccurate for high-porosity sandstone. Experience regression functions of the velocity model are established to estimate acoustic velocities. Also, mineral content logs could be predicted by using the P-wave acoustic log, and the rock physics model would be enhanced by using these logs of dynamic mineral contents. Shear wave velocity could also be estimated more accurately.

  20. Transcranial doppler assessment of cerebral flow velocity during perception and recognition of melodies.

    PubMed

    Matteis, M; Silvestrini, M; Troisi, E; Cupini, L M; Caltagirone, C

    1997-07-01

    The role of each cerebral hemisphere in the perception and recognition of musical information is not yet well understood. We studied cerebral blood flow changes during a melody perception task and a melody recognition task. Blood flow velocity in the two middle cerebral arteries of twenty right-handed musically naif volunteers were simultaneously measured by means of bilateral transcranial Doppler ultrasonography during two minutes of passive melody listening and two minutes of a melody recognition task. With respect to baseline values, a bilateral increase of flow velocity occurred in the middle cerebral arteries with a non-significant trend for the right artery during the melody perception task. During the melody recognition task, a significant increase in flow velocity was recorded on the right side with respect to the left side, where a slight simultaneous decrease was found. Our data suggest that melody perception requires bilateral activation of hemispheres and melody recognition mainly an activation of the right hemisphere. This study confirms the ability of transcranial Doppler ultrasonography to correlate artery flow dynamics with selective cerebral activation. PMID:9168166

  1. Accuracy of heart strain rate calculation derived from Doppler tissue velocity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Andres; Ledesma-Carbayo, Maria J.; Malpica, Norberto; Desco, Manuel; Antoranz, Jose C.; Marcos-Alberca, Pedro; Garcia-Fernandez, Miguel A.

    2001-05-01

    Strain Rate (SR) Imaging is a recent imaging technique that provides information about regional myocardial deformation by measuring local compression and expansion rates. SR can be obtained by calculating the local in-plane velocity gradients along the ultrasound beam from Doppler Tissue velocity data. However, SR calculations are very dependent on the image noise and artifacts, and different calculation algorithms may provide inconsistent results. This paper compares techniques to calculate SR. 2D Doppler Tissue Images (DTI) are acquired with an Acuson Sequoia scanner. Noise was measured with the aid of a rotating phantom. Processing is performed on polar coordinates. For each image, after removal of black spot artifacts by a selective median filter, two different SR calculation methods have been implemented. In the first one, SR is computed as the discrete velocity derivative, and noise is reduced with a variable-width gaussian filter. In the second method a smoothing cubic spine is calculated for every scan line according to the noise level and the derivative is obtained from an analytical expression. Both methods have been tested with DTI data from synthetic phantoms and normal volunteers. Results show that noise characteristics, border effects and the adequate scale are critical to obtain meaningful results.

  2. Measurement of velocities in gas-liquid two-phase flow using Laser Doppler Velocimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Vassallo, P.F.; Trabold, T.A.; Moore, W.E.; Kirouac, G.J.

    1992-09-01

    Measurements of bubble and liquid velocities in two-phase flow have been made using a new forward/backward scattering Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) technique. This work was performed in a 6.4 by 11.1 mm vertical duct using known air/water mixtures. A standard LDV fiber optic probe was used to measure the bubble velocity, using direct backscattered light. A novel retro-reflector and lens assembly permitted the same probe to measure the liquid velocity with direct forward-scattered light. The bubble velocity was confirmed by independent measurements with a high-speed video system. The liquid velocity was confirmed by demonstrating the dominance of the liquid seed data rate in the forward-scatter measurement. Experimental data are presented to demonstrate the accuracy of the technique for a wide range of flow conditions, from bubbles as small as 0.75-mm-diam to slugs as large as 10-mm wide by 30-mm long. In the slug regime, the LDV technique performed velocity measurements for both phases, for void fractions up to 50%, which was the upper limit of our experimental investigation.

  3. Experimental demonstration of noncontact pulse wave velocity monitoring using multiple Doppler radar sensors.

    PubMed

    Lu, Li; Li, Changzhi; Lie, Donald Y C

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, two Doppler radars are used to monitor the pulse movements at the heart and the calf in order to measure the pulse wave velocity (PWV) wirelessly. Both simulation and experiment have been performed to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed noncontact PWV monitoring. A three-stage calibration procedure, including DC offset calibration, circuit delay calibration and antenna radiation pattern calibration, has been developed for reliable long-term PWV monitoring. The measurement results have been verified by wired contact measurement with pulse transducers.

  4. Laser Doppler visualisation of the velocity field by excluding the influence of multiparticle scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Dubnishchev, Yu N; Chugui, Yu V; Kompenhans, J

    2009-10-31

    The method of laser Doppler visualisation and measurement of the velocity field in gas and liquid flows by suppressing the influence of multiparticle scattering is discussed. The cross section of the flow under study is illuminated by a laser beam transformed by an anamorphic optical system into a laser sheet. The effect of multiparticle scattering is eliminated by obtaining differential combinations of frequency-demodulated images of the laser sheet in different regions of the angular spectrum of scattered light. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  5. Laser Doppler measurement of relative blood velocity in the human optic nerve head.

    PubMed

    Riva, C E; Grunwald, J E; Sinclair, S H

    1982-02-01

    The Doppler shift frequency spectrum (DSFS) of laser light scattered from red blood cells (RBCs) moving in the microcirculation of the optic nerve head has been recorded in normal volunteers by means of a fundus camera laser Doppler velocimeter. The width of the DSFS, which varies in proportion to the speed of the RBCs, has been characterized by a parameter alpha. With the use of a model for the scattering of light by tissue and RBCs and for the RBC velocity distribution, values of alpha recorded at normal intraocular pressure (IOP) suggest that the RBCs that contribute to the Doppler signal are flowing in capillaries. The parameter alpha was found to vary markedly with the IOP and with the phase of the ocular pressure pulse at elevated IOP. The return of the speed of RBCs toward normal, which is observed after a step increase of IOP above normal and after a step decrease below normal, has been attributed to an autoregulatory response of the optic nerve circulation.

  6. Measuring discharge with acoustic Doppler current profilers from a moving boat

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mueller, David S.; Wagner, Chad R.; Rehmel, Michael S.; Oberg, Kevin A.; Rainville, Francois

    2013-01-01

    The use of acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) from a moving boat is now a commonly used method for measuring streamflow. The technology and methods for making ADCP-based discharge measurements are different from the technology and methods used to make traditional discharge measurements with mechanical meters. Although the ADCP is a valuable tool for measuring streamflow, it is only accurate when used with appropriate techniques. This report presents guidance on the use of ADCPs for measuring streamflow; this guidance is based on the experience of U.S. Geological Survey employees and published reports, papers, and memorandums of the U.S. Geological Survey. The guidance is presented in a logical progression, from predeployment planning, to field data collection, and finally to post processing of the collected data. Acoustic Doppler technology and the instruments currently (2013) available also are discussed to highlight the advantages and limitations of the technology. More in-depth, technical explanations of how an ADCP measures streamflow and what to do when measuring in moving-bed conditions are presented in the appendixes. ADCP users need to know the proper procedures for measuring discharge from a moving boat and why those procedures are required, so that when the user encounters unusual field conditions, the procedures can be adapted without sacrificing the accuracy of the streamflow-measurement data.

  7. Combined vector velocity and spectral Doppler imaging for improved imaging of complex blood flow in the carotid arteries.

    PubMed

    Ekroll, Ingvild Kinn; Dahl, Torbjørn; Torp, Hans; Løvstakken, Lasse

    2014-07-01

    Color flow imaging and pulsed wave (PW) Doppler are important diagnostic tools in the examination of patients with carotid artery disease. However, measurement of the true peak systolic velocity is dependent on sample volume placement and the operator's ability to provide an educated guess of the flow direction. Using plane wave transmissions and a duplex imaging scheme, we present an all-in-one modality that provides both vector velocity and spectral Doppler imaging from one acquisition, in addition to separate B-mode images of sufficient quality. The vector Doppler information was used to provide automatically calibrated (angle-corrected) PW Doppler spectra at every image point. It was demonstrated that the combined information can be used to generate spatial maps of the peak systolic velocity, highlighting regions of high velocity and the extent of the stenotic region, which could be used to automate work flow as well as improve the accuracy of measurement of true peak systolic velocity. The modality was tested in a small group (N = 12) of patients with carotid artery disease. PW Doppler, vector velocity and B-mode images could successfully be obtained from a single recording for all patients with a body mass index ranging from 21 to 31 and a carotid depth ranging from 16 to 28 mm. PMID:24785436

  8. Three dimensional measurements of Geodesic Acoustic Mode with correlation Doppler reflectometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, W. L.; Shi, Z. B.; Xu, Y.; Zou, X. L.; Duan, X. R.; Chen, W.; Jiang, M.; Yang, Z. C.; Zhang, B. Y.; Shi, P. W.; Liu, Z. T.; Xu, M.; Song, X. M.; Cheng, J.; Ke, R.; Nie, L.; Cui, Z. Y.; Fu, B. Z.; Ding, X. T.; Dong, J. Q.; Liu, Yi.; Yan, L. W.; Yang, Q. W.; Liu, Yong; the HL-2A Team

    2015-10-01

    Correlation Doppler reflectometers have been newly developed in the HL-2A Tokamak. Owing to the flexibility of the diagnostic arrangements, the multi-channel systems allow us to study, simultaneously, the radial properties of edge turbulence and its long-range correlation in both the poloidal and toroidal direction. With these reflectometers, three-dimensional spatial structure of Geodesic Acoustic Mode (GAM) is surveyed, including the symmetric feature of Er fluctuations in both poloidal and toroidal directions, and the radial propagation of GAMs. The bi-coherence analysis for the Er fluctuations suggests that the three-wave nonlinear interaction could be the mechanism for the generation of GAM. The temporal evolution of GAM during the plasma density modulation experiments has been studied. The results show that the collisional damping plays a role in suppressing the GAM magnitudes, and hence, weakening the regulating effects of GAM on ambient turbulence. Three dimensional correlation Doppler measurements of GAM activity demonstrate that the newly developed correlation Doppler reflectometers in HL-2A are powerful tools for edge turbulence studies with high reliability. A shorter version of this contribution is due to be published in PoS at: ``1st EPS conference on Plasma Diagnostics''.

  9. Evaluation of metered dose inhaler spray velocities using phase Doppler anemometry (PDA).

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaofei; Doub, William H; Guo, Changning

    2012-02-28

    Droplet velocity is an important parameter which can significantly influence inhalation drug delivery performance. Together with the droplet size, this parameter determines the efficiency of the deposition of MDI products at different sites within the lungs. In this study, phase Doppler anemometry (PDA) was used to investigate the instantaneous droplet velocity emitted from MDIs as well as the corresponding droplet size distribution. The nine commercial MDI products surveyed showed significantly different droplet velocities, indicating that droplet velocity could be used as a discriminating parameter for in vitro testing of MDI products. The droplet velocity for all tested MDI products decreased when the testing distance was increased from 3 cm to 6 cm from the front of mouthpiece, with CFC formulations showing a larger decrease than HFA formulations. The mean droplet diameters of the nine MDIs were also significantly different from one-another. Droplet size measurements made using PDA (a number-based technique) could not be directly compared to results obtained using laser light scattering measurements (a volume-based technique). This work demonstrates that PDA can provide unique information useful for characterizing MDI aerosol plumes and evaluating MDI drug delivery efficiency. PDA could also aid the evaluation of in vitro equivalence in support of formulation or manufacturing changes and in evaluation of abbreviated new drug applications (ANDAs) for MDIs. PMID:22183132

  10. Evaluation of metered dose inhaler spray velocities using phase Doppler anemometry (PDA).

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaofei; Doub, William H; Guo, Changning

    2012-02-28

    Droplet velocity is an important parameter which can significantly influence inhalation drug delivery performance. Together with the droplet size, this parameter determines the efficiency of the deposition of MDI products at different sites within the lungs. In this study, phase Doppler anemometry (PDA) was used to investigate the instantaneous droplet velocity emitted from MDIs as well as the corresponding droplet size distribution. The nine commercial MDI products surveyed showed significantly different droplet velocities, indicating that droplet velocity could be used as a discriminating parameter for in vitro testing of MDI products. The droplet velocity for all tested MDI products decreased when the testing distance was increased from 3 cm to 6 cm from the front of mouthpiece, with CFC formulations showing a larger decrease than HFA formulations. The mean droplet diameters of the nine MDIs were also significantly different from one-another. Droplet size measurements made using PDA (a number-based technique) could not be directly compared to results obtained using laser light scattering measurements (a volume-based technique). This work demonstrates that PDA can provide unique information useful for characterizing MDI aerosol plumes and evaluating MDI drug delivery efficiency. PDA could also aid the evaluation of in vitro equivalence in support of formulation or manufacturing changes and in evaluation of abbreviated new drug applications (ANDAs) for MDIs.

  11. Doppler-shifted fluorescence imaging of velocity fields in supersonic reacting flows

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.G.; Davis, S.J.; Kessler, W.J.; Sonnenfroh, D.M. )

    1992-07-01

    The application of Doppler-shifted fluorescence imaging of velocity fields in supersonic reacting flows is analyzed. Focussing on fluorescence of the OH molecule in typical H2-air Scramjet flows, the effects of uncharacterized variations in temperature, pressure, and collisional partner composition across the measurement plane are examined. Detailed measurements of the (1,0) band OH lineshape variations in H2-air combustions are used, along with single-pulse and time-averaged measurements of an excimer-pumped dye laser, to predict the performance of a model velocimeter with typical Scramjet flow properties. The analysis demonstrates the need for modification and control of the laser bandshape in order to permit accurate velocity measurements in the presence of multivariant flow properties. 13 refs.

  12. Droplet sizes and velocities in vaporizing sprays. [using laser Doppler anemometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yule, A. J.; Ereaut, P. R.; Ungut, A.

    1983-01-01

    A pulse height laser Doppler anemometer particle sizing technique has been refined to permit simultaneous particle size and velocity measurements in sprays. The improvements include (1) the use of a specially tailored 'top hat' light distribution, to provide unambiguous particle diameter-signal amplitude relations, (2) the use of back scattered light collection, and (3) the utilization of Mie theory to compute the relations between signal amplitude and particle diameter, in the backscatter mode. Twin-fluid atomized kerosene sprays have been investigated using the new technique. In these sprays distributions have been mapped of mean droplet diameters, droplet size distributions, and the local correlations between droplet diameters and velocities. The data show the variation of spray structure with atomizer input parameters, the preferential vaporization of smaller droplets, and the differing trajectories of the large and small droplets.

  13. Doppler-shifted fluorescence imaging of velocity fields in supersonic reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, M. G.; Davis, S. J.; Kessler, W. J.; Sonnenfroh, D. M.

    1992-01-01

    The application of Doppler-shifted fluorescence imaging of velocity fields in supersonic reacting flows is analyzed. Focussing on fluorescence of the OH molecule in typical H2-air Scramjet flows, the effects of uncharacterized variations in temperature, pressure, and collisional partner composition across the measurement plane are examined. Detailed measurements of the (1,0) band OH lineshape variations in H2-air combustions are used, along with single-pulse and time-averaged measurements of an excimer-pumped dye laser, to predict the performance of a model velocimeter with typical Scramjet flow properties. The analysis demonstrates the need for modification and control of the laser bandshape in order to permit accurate velocity measurements in the presence of multivariant flow properties.

  14. MEASUREMENTS OF ANISOTROPIC ION TEMPERATURES, NON-THERMAL VELOCITIES, AND DOPPLER SHIFTS IN A CORONAL HOLE

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, M.; Savin, D. W.

    2013-02-15

    We present a new diagnostic allowing one to measure the anisotropy of ion temperatures and non-thermal velocities, as well as Doppler shifts with respect to the ambient magnetic field. This method provides new results, as well as an independent test for previous measurements obtained with other techniques. Our spectral data come from observations of a low-latitude, on-disk coronal hole. A potential field source surface model was used to calculate the angle between the magnetic field lines and the line of sight for each spatial bin of the observation. A fit was performed to determine the line widths and Doppler shifts parallel and perpendicular to the magnetic field. For each line width component we derived ion temperatures T {sub i,} and T {sub i, Parallel-To} and non-thermal velocities v {sub nt,} and v {sub nt, Parallel-To }. T {sub i,} was cooler than off-limb polar coronal hole measurements, suggesting increasing collisional cooling with decreasing height. T {sub i, Parallel-To} is consistent with a uniform temperature of (1.8 {+-} 0.2) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} K for each ion. Since parallel ion heating is expected to be weak, this ion temperature should reflect the proton temperature. A comparison between our results and others implies a large proton temperature gradient around 1.02 R {sub Sun }. The non-thermal velocities are thought to be proportional to the amplitudes of various waves. Our results for v {sub nt,} agree with Alfven wave amplitudes inferred from off-limb polar coronal hole line width measurements. Our v {sub nt, Parallel-To} results are consistent with slow magnetosonic wave amplitudes inferred from Fourier analysis of time-varying intensity fluctuations. Doppler shift measurements yield outflows of Almost-Equal-To 5 km s{sup -1} for ions formed over a broad temperature range. This differs from other studies that found a strong Doppler shift dependence on formation temperature.

  15. Fully distributed absolute blood flow velocity measurement for middle cerebral arteries using Doppler optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Li; Zhu, Jiang; Hancock, Aneeka M.; Dai, Cuixia; Zhang, Xuping; Frostig, Ron D.; Chen, Zhongping

    2016-01-01

    Doppler optical coherence tomography (DOCT) is considered one of the most promising functional imaging modalities for neuro biology research and has demonstrated the ability to quantify cerebral blood flow velocity at a high accuracy. However, the measurement of total absolute blood flow velocity (BFV) of major cerebral arteries is still a difficult problem since it is related to vessel geometry. In this paper, we present a volumetric vessel reconstruction approach that is capable of measuring the absolute BFV distributed along the entire middle cerebral artery (MCA) within a large field-of-view. The Doppler angle at each point of the MCA, representing the vessel geometry, is derived analytically by localizing the artery from pure DOCT images through vessel segmentation and skeletonization. Our approach could achieve automatic quantification of the fully distributed absolute BFV across different vessel branches. Experiments on rodents using swept-source optical coherence tomography showed that our approach was able to reveal the consequences of permanent MCA occlusion with absolute BFV measurement. PMID:26977365

  16. Correcting acoustic Doppler current profiler discharge measurement bias from moving-bed conditions without global positioning during the 2004 Glen Canyon Dam controlled flood on the Colorado River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gartner, J.W.; Ganju, N.K.

    2007-01-01

    Discharge measurements were made by acoustic Doppler current profiler at two locations on the Colorado River during the 2004 controlled flood from Glen Canyon Dam, Arizona. Measurement hardware and software have constantly improved from the 1980s such that discharge measurements by acoustic profiling instruments are now routinely made over a wide range of hydrologic conditions. However, measurements made with instruments deployed from moving boats require reliable boat velocity data for accurate measurements of discharge. This is normally accomplished by using special acoustic bottom track pings that sense instrument motion over bottom. While this method is suitable for most conditions, high current flows that produce downstream bed sediment movement create a condition known as moving bed that will bias velocities and discharge to lower than actual values. When this situation exists, one solution is to determine boat velocity with satellite positioning information. Another solution is to use a lower frequency instrument. Discharge measurements made during the 2004 Glen Canyon controlled flood were subject to moving-bed conditions and frequent loss of bottom track. Due to site conditions and equipment availability, the measurements were conducted without benefit of external positioning information or lower frequency instruments. This paper documents and evaluates several techniques used to correct the resulting underestimated discharge measurements. One technique produces discharge values in good agreement with estimates from numerical model and measured hydrographs during the flood. ?? 2007, by the American Society of Limnology and Oceanography, Inc.

  17. EFFECT OF TRANSFUSION THERAPY ON TRANSCRANIAL DOPPLER ULTRASONOGRAPHY VELOCITIES IN CHILDREN WITH SICKLE CELL DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Kwiatkowski, Janet L.; Yim, Eunsil; Miller, Scott; Adams, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Children with sickle cell disease and abnormal transcranial Doppler (TCD) ultrasonography have a high risk of stroke, but this risk is greatly reduced when chronic transfusion therapy is administered. The change in TCD velocities during chronic transfusion therapy and rate and frequency of normalization of TCD findings have not been studied extensively. Procedures Using data from children with sickle cell disease enrolled as potential subjects in the Optimizing Primary Stroke Prevention in Sickle Cell Anemia (STOP 2) trial, we characterized the change in TCD velocities on transfusion therapy and identified predictors of developing a normal TCD. Results Among 88 children with serial TCD data after starting transfusions for abnormal TCD 46 (52%) converted to normal TCD after a mean of 4.3 months (median 3.0; range 0.85-14.3 months) of transfusions. TCD studies remained abnormal in 19/88 (21.6%) after a mean of 2.4 years of transfusion. The median TCD velocity was lowered by 38 cm/s within three months of initiating transfusions, followed by a more gradual decline then stabilization of velocities, although with significant individual variation. Factors associated with conversion to normal TCD included lower initial TCD velocity, younger age, and higher pre-transfusion hemoglobin level during transfusion therapy. Conclusion Younger children with higher pre-transfusion hemoglobin levels and lower abnormal TCD velocities are most likely to have rapid normalization of TCD on transfusions. Long-term follow-up of children with persistently abnormal exams or worsening velocities on transfusion is needed to determine if these children are at higher risk of stroke. PMID:21370410

  18. Results from 1984 airborne Doppler lidar wind measurement program. Flight 6: Analysis of line-of-sight elevation angle errors and apparent Doppler velocities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothermel, Jeffry

    1987-01-01

    During the summer of 1984 the Marshall Space Flight Center's Airborne Doppler Lidar System (ADLS) made a series of wind measurements in the California Central Valley. This study quantifies the lidar beam angle errors and velocity errors through analysis of ground return signals. Line-of-sight elevation (LOSE) angle errors are under 1 deg. Apparent Doppler ground velocities, as large as 2m/s, are considerably less than in a previous flight experiment in 1981. No evidence was found of a Schuler resonance phenomenon common to inertial navigation systems (INS), however the aperiodic nature of the apparent velocities implies an error in the INS-derived ground speeds. Certain features and subtleties in the ground returns are explained in terms of atmospheric structure and characteristics of the ADLS hardware and software. Finally, least squares and low-pass filtering techniques are suggested for eliminating errors during post-processing.

  19. Estimating hydrodynamic roughness in a wave-dominated environment with a high-resolution acoustic Doppler profiler

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lacy, J.R.; Sherwood, C.R.; Wilson, D.J.; Chisholm, T.A.; Gelfenbaum, G.R.

    2005-01-01

    Hydrodynamic roughness is a critical parameter for characterizing bottom drag in boundary layers, and it varies both spatially and temporally due to variation in grain size, bedforms, and saltating sediment. In this paper we investigate temporal variability in hydrodynamic roughness using velocity profiles in the bottom boundary layer measured with a high-resolution acoustic Doppler profiler (PCADP). The data were collected on the ebb-tidal delta off Grays Harbor, Washington, in a mean water depth of 9 m. Significant wave height ranged from 0.5 to 3 m. Bottom roughness has rarely been determined from hydrodynamic measurements under conditions such as these, where energetic waves and medium-to-fine sand produce small bedforms. Friction velocity due to current u*c and apparent bottom roughness z0a were determined from the PCADP burst mean velocity profiles using the law of the wall. Bottom roughness kB was estimated by applying the Grant-Madsen model for wave-current interaction iteratively until the model u*c converged with values determined from the data. The resulting kB values ranged over 3 orders of magnitude (10-1 to 10-4 m) and varied inversely with wave orbital diameter. This range of kB influences predicted bottom shear stress considerably, suggesting that the use of time-varying bottom roughness could significantly improve the accuracy of sediment transport models. Bedform height was estimated from kB and is consistent with both ripple heights predicted by empirical models and bedforms in sonar images collected during the experiment. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  20. Comparison of bottom-track to global positioning system referenced discharges measured using an acoustic Doppler current profiler

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wagner, C.R.; Mueller, D.S.

    2011-01-01

    A negative bias in discharge measurements made with an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) can be caused by the movement of sediment on or near the streambed. The integration of a global positioning system (GPS) to track the movement of the ADCP can be used to avoid the systematic negative bias associated with a moving streambed. More than 500 discharge transects from 63 discharge measurements with GPS data were collected at sites throughout the US, Canada, and New Zealand with no moving bed to compare GPS and bottom-track-referenced discharges. Although the data indicated some statistical bias depending on site conditions and type of GPS data used, these biases were typically about 0.5% or less. An assessment of differential correction sources was limited by a lack of data collected in a range of different correction sources and different GPS receivers at the same sites. Despite this limitation, the data indicate that the use of Wide Area Augmentation System (WAAS) corrected positional data is acceptable for discharge measurements using GGA as the boat-velocity reference. The discharge data based on GPS-referenced boat velocities from the VTG data string, which does not require differential correction, were comparable to the discharges based on GPS-referenced boat velocities from the differentially-corrected GGA data string. Spatial variability of measure discharges referenced to GGA, VTG and bottom-tracking is higher near the channel banks. The spatial variability of VTG-referenced discharges is correlated with the spatial distribution of maximum Horizontal Dilution of Precision (HDOP) values and the spatial variability of GGA-referenced discharges is correlated with proximity to channel banks. ?? 2011 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Use of an Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) to Measure Hypersaline Bidirectional Discharge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, K.K.; Loving, B.L.

    2002-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey measures the exchange of flow between the north and south parts of Great Salt Lake, Utah, as part of a monitoring program. Turbidity and bidirectional flow through the breach in the causeway that divides the lake into two parts makes it difficult to measure discharge with conventional streamflow techniques. An acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) can be used to more accurately define the angles of flow and the location of the interface between the layers of flow. Because of the high salinity levels measured in Great Salt Lake (60-280 parts per thousand), special methods had to be developed to adjust ADCP-computed discharges for the increased speed of sound in hypersaline waters and for water entrained at the interface between flow layers.

  2. Shipboard acoustic doppler current profiler data collected during the Western Tropical Atlantic Experiment (WESTRAX) 1991. Technical memo

    SciTech Connect

    Routt, J.A.; Wilson, W.D.

    1992-11-01

    The long-term goal of ongoing and future research in the western tropical Atlantic is to estimate the cross-equatorial transport of water and heat. The overall goals of those involved in the Western Tropical Atlantic Experiment (WESTRAX) are (a) to describe the annual cycle in the large-scale structure of the velocity and hydrographic properties over the full water column in the western tropical Atlantic Ocean between the equator and 15 degrees N, and (b) to compare data and models in order to better understand the physics of the regional circulation in the broader context of Atlantic basin thermohaline circulation. The results of this combined effort will greatly improve our understanding of this complex boundary current region and establish the basis for efficient long-term climatic monitoring of the critical meridional fluxes of mass and heat across the tropical Atlantic. This report presents the Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) data obtained during (ACCP) Atlantic Climate Change Program cruises in the western subtropical and tropical Atlantic in January, June and September 1991.

  3. Validation of exposure time for discharge measurements made with two bottom-tracking acoustic doppler current profilers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Czuba, J.A.; Oberg, K.

    2008-01-01

    Previous work by Oberg and Mueller of the U.S. Geological Survey in 2007 concluded that exposure time (total time spent sampling the flow) is a critical factor in reducing measurement uncertainty. In a subsequent paper, Oberg and Mueller validated these conclusions using one set of data to show that the effect of exposure time on the uncertainty of the measured discharge is independent of stream width, depth, and range of boat speeds. Analysis of eight StreamPro acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) measurements indicate that they fall within and show a similar trend to the Rio Grande ADCP data previously reported. Four special validation measurements were made for the purpose of verifying the conclusions of Oberg and Mueller regarding exposure time for Rio Grande and StreamPro ADCPs. Analysis of these measurements confirms that exposure time is a critical factor in reducing measurement uncertainty and is independent of stream width, depth, and range of boat speeds. Furthermore, it appears that the relation between measured discharge uncertainty and exposure time is similar for both Rio Grande and StreamPro ADCPs. These results are applicable to ADCPs that make use of broadband technology using bottom-tracking to obtain the boat velocity. Based on this work, a minimum of two transects should be collected with an exposure time for all transects greater than or equal to 720 seconds in order to achieve an uncertainty of ??5 percent when using bottom-tracking ADCPs. ?? 2008 IEEE.

  4. Comparison of buoy-mounted 74-kHz acoustic Doppler current profilers with vector-measuring current meters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winant, Clinton; Mettlach, Theodore; Larson, Sigurd

    1994-01-01

    In December 1991, the National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) deployed two meteorological buoys in the Southern California Bight on a transect between San Diego and San Clemente Island. Each buoy consisted of a 10-m discus hull instrumented to measure a suite of meteorological parameters, and, for the first time in the NDBC buoy program, acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) were included to gather hourly current profiles beneath the two buoys. Moorings instrumented with seven vector-measuring current meters (VMCMs) were deployed adjacent to the NDBC buoys for several months and provided current observations for comparison with the ADCP measurements. When wave-induced buoy motion is not overly large, the observations of horizontal current made by the ADCP and the VMCM are highly correlated. Time series of differences between ADCP and VMCM measurements are characterized by a mean difference (bias error) of about 0.01 m/s and standard deviation of about 0.035 m/s for 1-h observations. Estimates of current spectra from ADCP and VMCM records suggest that the ADCP system can be characterized by a white noise level of 2 x 10(exp -3) sq m/sq s/cph. However, when the in situ environment is such that large surface waves are present (including breaking waves and whitecaps), erroneous current values are usually reported by the ADCP. Mean values of vertical velocities reported by the ADCP appear to be much larger than what could be physically expected and are therefore deemed unreliable.

  5. Acoustic Doppler current profiler applications used in rivers and estuaries by the U.S. Geological Survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gotvald, Anthony J.; Oberg, Kevin A.

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has collected streamflow information for the Nation's streams since 1889. Streamflow information is used to predict floods, manage and allocate water resources, design engineering structures, compute water-quality loads, and operate water-control structures. The current (2007) size of the USGS streamgaging network is over 7,400 streamgages nationwide. The USGS has progressively improved the streamgaging program by incorporating new technologies and techniques that streamline data collection while increasing the quality of the streamflow data that are collected. The single greatest change in streamflow measurement technology during the last 100 years has been the development and application of high frequency acoustic instruments for measuring streamflow. One such instrument, the acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP), is rapidly replacing traditional mechanical current meters for streamflow measurement (Muste and others, 2007). For more information on how an ADCP works see Simpson (2001) or visit http://hydroacoustics.usgs.gov/. The USGS has used ADCPs attached to manned or tethered boats since the mid-1990s to measure streamflow in a wide variety of conditions (fig. 1). Recent analyses have shown that ADCP streamflow measurements can be made with similar or greater accuracy, efficiency, and resolution than measurements made using conventional current-meter methods (Oberg and Mueller, 2007). ADCPs also have the ability to measure streamflow in streams where traditional current-meter measurements previously were very difficult or costly to obtain, such as streams affected by backwater or tides. In addition to streamflow measurements, the USGS also uses ADCPs for other hydrologic measurements and applications, such as computing continuous records of streamflow for tidally or backwater affected streams, measuring velocity fields with high spatial and temporal resolution, and estimating suspended-sediment concentrations. An overview

  6. Laser Doppler velocity measurements in a transferred-arc plasma torch

    SciTech Connect

    Norton, O.P.; Okhuysen, W.P.

    1995-12-31

    Laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV) is a nonintrusive method of measuring velocity. The measurement volume formed by the intersection of the two laser beams is compact, thus the method provides excellent spatial resolution. Furthermore, aside from the requirement that the flow contain scattering particles, the method is nonintrusive. Thus, no probe disturbs the flow and measurements can be made in extremely high temperature and hostile environments. Here, the LDV technique has been used to map the velocity field in the plasma jet issuing from a transferred-arc, reverse polarity plasma torch. This gas flow field is important in understanding the physics of the plasma torch. The torch was operated with nitrogen at a fixed distance of 5 inches from the graphite billet. Velocity measurements were made for combinations of current at 125 and 175 A and pressure at 22 and 55 psig. Results are presented for the high current/high pressure condition. Since the test procedure involves reestablishing the same flow conditions after swapping graphite billets, it is instructive to see how closely the torch operating variables were reproduced. The average current varied from 175.2 to 175.8 A over the eight separate time periods. The nitrogen supply pressure varied from 52.5 to 53.9 psi. The torch voltage drop ranged from 430.6 to 436.1 V, and the nitrogen flow rate from 4.8 to 5.4 scfm.

  7. Two-dimensional Laser-Doppler measurements of fluctuations of velocity in an excited jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, P.; Sava, P. G.

    Two-component laser Doppler anemometry has been used to study velocity fluctuations in excited jets for a Strouhal number of 0.5 and a Reynolds number of 600,000. Streak lines calculated from measurements of the periodic pulsations of the jet are shown to be in good agreement with the results of stroboscopic visualization experiments and analytical calculations. Their evolution in time shows that the flow is nearly stationary in a coordinate system moving with the coherent structure for the case where the coherence is strong. In such a moving system, the trajectories provide information on the motion of fluid particles and, particularly, on the entrainment of fluid by the jet.

  8. Velocity space evolution of a minority energetic electron population undergoing the anomalous Doppler instability

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, W. N.; Chapman, S. C.; Dendy, R. O.

    2015-11-15

    The kinetic evolution in velocity space of a minority suprathermal electron population that is undergoing the anomalous Doppler instability (ADI) is investigated using the results from fully nonlinear numerical simulations that self-consistently evolve particles and fields in a plasma. Electron trajectories in phase space during different stages of the ADI are captured, and are analysed in relation to the characteristics of the excited electric fields and of the overall distribution of particles. For some electrons, trapping and mirroring effects are observed during the saturation phase. A relationship between the second order moments of the perpendicular electron distribution function and time is established, and is used to investigate the range of applicability of analytical approximations drawn from classical theory, that involve a quasilinear wave-driven diffusion operator.

  9. Measurement of blood velocity using laser Doppler method for the designing module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guo-Liang; Lee, Jen-Ai; Lu, Tung-Wu; Chen, Zhao-Cheng; Chen, Chien-Ming

    2005-04-01

    We built the Dual Beam Mode of the LDA (Laser Doppler Anemometry) frame, set the photodetector at the same side with light source which collect the scattering light of blood cell. It's proper to reduce LDA optical path and convenient for our designing module. The concentration of chicken blood in this study is about 1% and we measured the relations actually between flood velocity and the angle of beams cross on particles, temperature, and the diameter of aqueduct. We found better results while the cross angle was less than 38.8 degree, diameter of aqueduct was 6 mm, and temperature of blood was set to 36 . These parameters can also provide important basis for the LDA module kit that we are designing.

  10. Navigation Doppler Lidar Sensor for Precision Altitude and Vector Velocity Measurements Flight Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierrottet, Diego F.; Lockhard, George; Amzajerdian, Farzin; Petway, Larry B.; Barnes, Bruce; Hines, Glenn D.

    2011-01-01

    An all fiber Navigation Doppler Lidar (NDL) system is under development at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) for precision descent and landing applications on planetary bodies. The sensor produces high resolution line of sight range, altitude above ground, ground relative attitude, and high precision velocity vector measurements. Previous helicopter flight test results demonstrated the NDL measurement concepts, including measurement precision, accuracies, and operational range. This paper discusses the results obtained from a recent campaign to test the improved sensor hardware, and various signal processing algorithms applicable to real-time processing. The NDL was mounted in an instrumentation pod aboard an Erickson Air-Crane helicopter and flown over vegetation free terrain. The sensor was one of several sensors tested in this field test by NASA?s Autonomous Landing and Hazard Avoidance Technology (ALHAT) project.

  11. On-chip laser Doppler vibrometer for arterial pulse wave velocity measurement.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanlu; Segers, Patrick; Dirckx, Joris; Baets, Roel

    2013-07-01

    Pulse wave velocity (PWV) is an important marker for cardiovascular risk. The Laser Doppler vibrometry has been suggested as a potential technique to measure the local carotid PWV by measuring the transit time of the pulse wave between two locations along the common carotid artery (CCA) from skin surface vibrations. However, the present LDV setups are still bulky and difficult to handle. We present in this paper a more compact LDV system integrated on a CMOS-compatible silicon-on-insulator substrate. In this system, a chip with two homodyne LDVs is utilized to simultaneously measure the pulse wave at two different locations along the CCA. Measurement results show that the dual-LDV chip can successfully conduct the PWV measurement.

  12. Feasibility of using acoustic velocity meters for estimating highly organic suspended-solids concentrations in streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patino, Eduardo

    1996-01-01

    A field experiment was conducted at the Levee 4 canal site below control structure G-88 in the Everglades agricultural area in northwestern Broward County, Florida, to study the relation of acoustic attenuation to suspended-solids concentrations. Acoustic velocity meter and temperature data were obtained with concurrent water samples analyzed for suspended-solids concentrations. Two separate acoustic velocity meter frequencies were used, 200 and 500 kilohertz, to determine the sensitivity of acoustic attenuation to frequency for the measured suspended-solids concentration range. Suspended-solids concentrations for water samples collected at the Levee 4 canal site from July 1993 to September 1994 ranged from 22 to 1,058 milligrams per liter, and organic content ranged from about 30 to 93 percent. Regression analyses showed that attenuation data from the acoustic velocity meter (automatic gain control) and temperature data alone do not provide enough information to adequately describe the concentrations of suspended solids. However, if velocity is also included as one of the independent variables in the regression model, a satisfactory correlation can be obtained. Thus, it is feasible to use acoustic velocity meter instrumentation to estimate suspended-solids concentrations in streams, even when suspended solids are primarily composed of organic material. Using the most comprehensive data set available for the study (500 kiloherz data), the best fit regression model produces a standard error of 69.7 milligrams per liter, with actual errors ranging from 2 to 128 milligrams per liter. Both acoustic velocity meter transmission frequencies of 200 and 500 hilohertz produced similar results, suggesting that transducers of either frequency could be used to collect attenuation data at the study site. Results indicate that calibration will be required for each acoustic velocity meter system to the unique suspended-solids regime existing at each site. More robust solutions may

  13. Hydrokinetic canal measurements: inflow velocity, wake flow velocity, and turbulence

    DOE Data Explorer

    Gunawan, Budi

    2014-06-11

    The dataset consist of acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) velocity measurements in the wake of a 3-meter diameter vertical-axis hydrokinetic turbine deployed in Roza Canal, Yakima, WA, USA. A normalized hub-centerline wake velocity profile and two cross-section velocity contours, 10 meters and 20 meters downstream of the turbine, are presented. Mean velocities and turbulence data, measured using acoustic Doppler velocimeter (ADV) at 50 meters upstream of the turbine, are also presented. Canal dimensions and hydraulic properties, and turbine-related information are also included.

  14. Discharge measurements using a broad-band acoustic Doppler current profiler

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simpson, Michael R.

    2002-01-01

    The measurement of unsteady or tidally affected flow has been a problem faced by hydrologists for many years. Dynamic discharge conditions impose an unreasonably short time constraint on conventional current-meter discharge-measurement methods, which typically last a minimum of 1 hour. Tidally affected discharge can change more than 100 percent during a 10-minute period. Over the years, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has developed moving-boat discharge-measurement techniques that are much faster but less accurate than conventional methods. For a bibliography of conventional moving-boat publications, see Simpson and Oltmann (1993, page 17). The advent of the acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) made possible the development of a discharge-measurement system capable of more accurately measuring unsteady or tidally affected flow. In most cases, an ADCP discharge-measurement system is dramatically faster than conventional discharge-measurement systems, and has comparable or better accuracy. In many cases, an ADCP discharge-measurement system is the only choice for use at a particular measurement site. ADCP systems are not yet ?turnkey;? they are still under development, and for proper operation, require a significant amount of operator training. Not only must the operator have a rudimentary knowledge of acoustic physics, but also a working knowledge of ADCP operation, the manufacturer's discharge-measurement software, and boating techniques and safety.

  15. Phase Control of Group Velocity in a Doppler-Broadened Λ-Type Three-Level System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Tian-Hui; Xie, Min

    2016-06-01

    We theoretically investigate the phase control role on the group velocity of a weak probe field in a Doppler-broadened Λ-type three-level atomic system with the spontaneously generated coherence effect enhanced by an incoherence pump. We find that the absorption-dispersion of the probe field behaves phase and Doppler broadening-dependent phenomena, and testify that the quite large group index can be realized. The group velocity of the probe field can be switched from subluminal to superluminal or vice versa by modulating the relative phase of the two applied light fields. In contrast to the counterpropagating setting, the copropagating case is more suitable for the purpose considered in this paper due to the effectiveness of Doppler-free.

  16. Online Doppler Effect Elimination Based on Unequal Time Interval Sampling for Wayside Acoustic Bearing Fault Detecting System.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Kesai; Lu, Siliang; Zhang, Shangbin; Zhang, Haibin; He, Qingbo; Kong, Fanrang

    2015-08-27

    The railway occupies a fairly important position in transportation due to its high speed and strong transportation capability. As a consequence, it is a key issue to guarantee continuous running and transportation safety of trains. Meanwhile, time consumption of the diagnosis procedure is of extreme importance for the detecting system. However, most of the current adopted techniques in the wayside acoustic defective bearing detector system (ADBD) are offline strategies, which means that the signal is analyzed after the sampling process. This would result in unavoidable time latency. Besides, the acquired acoustic signal would be corrupted by the Doppler effect because of high relative speed between the train and the data acquisition system (DAS). Thus, it is difficult to effectively diagnose the bearing defects immediately. In this paper, a new strategy called online Doppler effect elimination (ODEE) is proposed to remove the Doppler distortion online by the introduced unequal interval sampling scheme. The steps of proposed strategy are as follows: The essential parameters are acquired in advance. Then, the introduced unequal time interval sampling strategy is used to restore the Doppler distortion signal, and the amplitude of the signal is demodulated as well. Thus, the restored Doppler-free signal is obtained online. The proposed ODEE method has been employed in simulation analysis. Ultimately, the ODEE method is implemented in the embedded system for fault diagnosis of the train bearing. The results are in good accordance with the bearing defects, which verifies the good performance of the proposed strategy.

  17. Online Doppler Effect Elimination Based on Unequal Time Interval Sampling for Wayside Acoustic Bearing Fault Detecting System

    PubMed Central

    Ouyang, Kesai; Lu, Siliang; Zhang, Shangbin; Zhang, Haibin; He, Qingbo; Kong, Fanrang

    2015-01-01

    The railway occupies a fairly important position in transportation due to its high speed and strong transportation capability. As a consequence, it is a key issue to guarantee continuous running and transportation safety of trains. Meanwhile, time consumption of the diagnosis procedure is of extreme importance for the detecting system. However, most of the current adopted techniques in the wayside acoustic defective bearing detector system (ADBD) are offline strategies, which means that the signal is analyzed after the sampling process. This would result in unavoidable time latency. Besides, the acquired acoustic signal would be corrupted by the Doppler effect because of high relative speed between the train and the data acquisition system (DAS). Thus, it is difficult to effectively diagnose the bearing defects immediately. In this paper, a new strategy called online Doppler effect elimination (ODEE) is proposed to remove the Doppler distortion online by the introduced unequal interval sampling scheme. The steps of proposed strategy are as follows: The essential parameters are acquired in advance. Then, the introduced unequal time interval sampling strategy is used to restore the Doppler distortion signal, and the amplitude of the signal is demodulated as well. Thus, the restored Doppler-free signal is obtained online. The proposed ODEE method has been employed in simulation analysis. Ultimately, the ODEE method is implemented in the embedded system for fault diagnosis of the train bearing. The results are in good accordance with the bearing defects, which verifies the good performance of the proposed strategy. PMID:26343657

  18. Online Doppler Effect Elimination Based on Unequal Time Interval Sampling for Wayside Acoustic Bearing Fault Detecting System.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Kesai; Lu, Siliang; Zhang, Shangbin; Zhang, Haibin; He, Qingbo; Kong, Fanrang

    2015-01-01

    The railway occupies a fairly important position in transportation due to its high speed and strong transportation capability. As a consequence, it is a key issue to guarantee continuous running and transportation safety of trains. Meanwhile, time consumption of the diagnosis procedure is of extreme importance for the detecting system. However, most of the current adopted techniques in the wayside acoustic defective bearing detector system (ADBD) are offline strategies, which means that the signal is analyzed after the sampling process. This would result in unavoidable time latency. Besides, the acquired acoustic signal would be corrupted by the Doppler effect because of high relative speed between the train and the data acquisition system (DAS). Thus, it is difficult to effectively diagnose the bearing defects immediately. In this paper, a new strategy called online Doppler effect elimination (ODEE) is proposed to remove the Doppler distortion online by the introduced unequal interval sampling scheme. The steps of proposed strategy are as follows: The essential parameters are acquired in advance. Then, the introduced unequal time interval sampling strategy is used to restore the Doppler distortion signal, and the amplitude of the signal is demodulated as well. Thus, the restored Doppler-free signal is obtained online. The proposed ODEE method has been employed in simulation analysis. Ultimately, the ODEE method is implemented in the embedded system for fault diagnosis of the train bearing. The results are in good accordance with the bearing defects, which verifies the good performance of the proposed strategy. PMID:26343657

  19. A dealiasing method for use with ultrasonic pulsed Doppler in measuring velocity profiles and flow rates in pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakawa, Hideki; Muramatsu, Ei; Sugimoto, Katsumi; Takenaka, Nobuyuki; Furuichi, Noriyuki

    2015-08-01

    The ultrasonic pulsed Doppler method (UDM) is a powerful tool for measuring velocity profiles in a pipe. However, the maximum detectable velocity is limited by the Nyquist sampling theorem. Furthermore, the maximum detectable velocity (also called Nyquist velocity), vmax, and the maximum measurable length are related and cannot be increased at the same time. If the velocity is greater than vmax, velocity aliasing occurs. Hence, the higher velocity that occurs with a larger pipe diameter, i.e. under higher flow rate conditions, cannot be measured with the conventional UDM. To overcome these limitations, dual-pulse repetition frequency (dual PRF) and feedback methods were employed in this study to measure velocity profiles in a pipe. The velocity distributions obtained with the feedback method were found to be more accurate than those obtained with the dual PRF method. However, misdetection of the Nyquist folding number using the feedback method was found to increase with the flow velocity. A feedback method with a moving average is proposed to improve the measurement accuracy. The method can accurately measure the velocity distributions at a velocity five times greater than the maximum velocity that can be measured with the conventional UDM. The measurement volume was found to be among the important parameters that must be considered in assessing the traceability of the reflector during the pulse emission interval. Hence, a larger measurement volume is required to measure higher velocities using the dual PRF method. Integrating velocity distributions measured using the feedback method with a moving average makes it possible to accurately determine flow rates six times greater than those that can be determined using the conventional pulsed Doppler method.

  20. ALADIN: an atmosphere laser doppler wind lidar instrument for wind velocity measurements from space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krawczyk, Rodolphe; Ghibaudo, Jean-Bernard; Labandibar, Jean-Yves; Willetts, David V.; Vaughan, M.; Pearson, G.; Harris, M. R.; Flamant, Pierre H.; Salamitou, P.; Dabas, Alain; Charasse, R.; Midavaine, Thierri; Royer, Michel; Heimel, H.

    1995-12-01

    AEROSPATIALE, leading a European team, has just conducted a successful study, under ESA contract, to demonstrate the feasibility of a spaceborne Doppler wind lidar instrument meeting the scientific requirements of wind velocity measurements from space with high spatial resolution. A first parametric investigation, based upon the initial set of mission requirements, and supported by dedicated models and detailed trade-off studies, took account of capabilities of the most promising signal processing algorithms and calibration/validation constrains: it yielded a large conically scanned instrument deemed technologically risky. A risk analysis was then carried out to propose a less challenging instrument meeting most key mission requirements. The fixed line-of-sight concept with return signal accumulation appeared as most attractive. A second set of requirements agreed upon by scientific users was therefore issued, with relaxed constraints mainly on horizontal resolution, keeping roughly the same level of wind velocity measurement accuracy. A second instrument and subsystem trade- off was then performed to eventually produce an attractive instrument concept based upon a pair of small diameter telescopes each one associated to one scanning mirror rotating stepwise around the telescope axis, which drastically reduces the detection bandwidth. Following the main contract, studies of accommodation on the International Space Station have been performed, confirming the interest of such an instrument for wind measurements from space.

  1. ALADIN: an atmospheric laser Doppler wind lidar instrument for wind velocity measurements from space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krawczyk, Rodolphe; Ghibaudo, Jean-Bernard; Labandibar, Jean-Yves; Willetts, David V.; Vaughan, M.; Pearson, G.; Harris, M. R.; Flamant, Pierre H.; Salamitou, P.; Dabas, Alain; Lieutaud, F.; Charasse, R.; Midavaine, Thierri; Royer, Michel; Heimel, H.

    1996-10-01

    AEROSPATIALE, leading a European team, has just conducted a successful study, under ESA contract, to demonstrate the feasibility of a spaceborne Doppler wind lidar instrument meeting the scientific requirements of wind velocity measurements from space with high spatial resolution. A first parametric investigation, based upon the initial set of mission requirements, and supported by dedicated models and detailed trade-off studies, took account of capabilities of most promising signal processing algorithms and calibration/validation constraints: it yielded a large conically scanned instrument deemed technologically risky. A risk analysis was then carried out to propose a less challenging instrument meeting most key mission requirements. The fixed line-of-sight concept with return signal accumulation appeared as most attractive. A second set of requirements agreed upon by scientific users was therefore issued, with relaxed constraints mainly on horizontal resolution, keeping roughly the same level of wind velocity measurement accuracy. A second instrument and subsystem trade-off was then performed to eventually produce an attractive instrument concept based upon a pair of small diameter telescopes each one associated to one scanning mirror rotating stepwise around the telescope axis, which drastically reduces the detection bandwidth. Following the main contract, studies of accommodation on the International Space Station have been performed, confirming the interest of such an instrument for wind measurements from space.

  2. Studying Velocity Turbulence from Doppler-broadened Absorption Lines: Statistics of Optical Depth Fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Lazarian, A.; Pogosyan, D.

    2008-10-10

    We continue our work on developing techniques for studying turbulence with spectroscopic data. We show that Doppler-broadened absorption spectral lines, in particular, saturated absorption lines, can be used within the framework of the previously introduced technique termed the velocity coordinate spectrum (VCS). The VCS relates the statistics of fluctuations along the velocity coordinate to the statistics of turbulence; thus, it does not require spatial coverage by sampling directions in the plane of the sky. We consider lines with different degree of absorption and show that for lines of optical depth less than one, our earlier treatment of the VCS developed for spectral emission lines is applicable, if the optical depth is used instead of intensity. This amounts to correlating the logarithms of absorbed intensities. For larger optical depths and saturated absorption lines, we show that only wings of the line are available for the analysis. In terms of the VCS formalism, this results in introducing an additional window, whose size decreases with the increase of the optical depth. As a result, strongly saturated absorption lines only carry the information about the small-scale turbulence. Nevertheless, the contrast of the fluctuations corresponding to the small-scale turbulence increases with the increase of the optical depth, which provides advantages for studying turbulence by combining lines with different optical depths. By combining different absorption lines one can develop a tomography of the turbulence in the interstellar gas in all its complexity.

  3. Estimation of neutral wind velocity in the ionospheric heights by HF-Doppler technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kitamura, T.; Takefu, M.; Hiroshige, N.

    1985-01-01

    Three net stations located about 100 kilometers apart were set up around the station of the standard frequency and time signals (JJY) in central Japan and measurements of atmospheric gravity waves in the ionospheric heights (F-region, 200 to 400 km) were made by means of the HF-Doppler technique during the period of February 1983 to December 1983. The frequencies of the signals received are 5.0, 8.0 and 10.0 MHz, but only the 8.0 MHz signals are used for the present study, because no ambiguities due to the interference among other stations such as BPM, BSF, etc. exist by the use of 8.0 MHz. Two main results concerning the horizontal phase velocity of the atmospheric gravity waves with periods of 40 to 70 min may be summarized as follows: (1) the value of the phase velocity ranges from 50 m/s to 300 m/s; (2) the direction of the gravity wave propagation shows a definite seasonal variation. The prevailing direction of the gravity waves in winter is from north to south, which is consistent with the results obtained from other investigations. On the other hand, the two directions, from northeast to southwest and from southeast to northeast, dominate in summer.

  4. Coronal Outflow Velocities in a 3D Coronal Model Determined from UVCS Doppler Dimming Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strachan, L.; Panasyuk, A. V.; Dobrzycka, D.; Gibson, S.; Biesecker, D. A.; Ko, Y.-K.; Galvin, A. B.; Romoli, M.; Kohn, J. L.

    1998-04-01

    We constrain coronal outflow velocity solutions, resolved along the line-of-sight, by using Doppler dimming models of H I Lyman alpha and O VI 1032/1037 Angstrom emissivities obtained with data from the Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer (UVCS) on SOHO. The local emissivities, from heliocentric heights of 1.5 to 3.0 radii, were determined from 3-D reconstructions of line-of-sight intensities obtained during the Whole Sun Month Campaign (10 Aug. -- 8 Sep. 1996). The models use electron densities derived from polarized brightness measurements made with the visible light coronagraphs on UVCS and LASCO, supplemented with data from Mark III at NCAR/MLSO. Electron temperature profiles are derived from `freezing-in' temperatures obtained from an analysis of charge state data from SWICS/Ulysses. The work concentrates on O5+ outflow velocities which are determined from an analysis of the the O VI line ratios. This analysis is less sensitive to the uncertainties in the electron density and independent of the ionization balance and elemental abundance than the analyses which use individual spectral lines. This work is supported in part by NASA under grant NAG-3192 to the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, by the Italian Space Agency and by Swiss funding agencies.

  5. Phase noise in pulsed Doppler lidar and limitations on achievable single-shot velocity accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcnicholl, P.; Alejandro, S.

    1992-01-01

    The smaller sampling volumes afforded by Doppler lidars compared to radars allows for spatial resolutions at and below some sheer and turbulence wind structure scale sizes. This has brought new emphasis on achieving the optimum product of wind velocity and range resolutions. Several recent studies have considered the effects of amplitude noise, reduction algorithms, and possible hardware related signal artifacts on obtainable velocity accuracy. We discuss here the limitation on this accuracy resulting from the incoherent nature and finite temporal extent of backscatter from aerosols. For a lidar return from a hard (or slab) target, the phase of the intermediate frequency (IF) signal is random and the total return energy fluctuates from shot to shot due to speckle; however, the offset from the transmitted frequency is determinable with an accuracy subject only to instrumental effects and the signal to noise ratio (SNR), the noise being determined by the LO power in the shot noise limited regime. This is not the case for a return from a media extending over a range on the order of or greater than the spatial extent of the transmitted pulse, such as from atmospheric aerosols. In this case, the phase of the IF signal will exhibit a temporal random walk like behavior. It will be uncorrelated over times greater than the pulse duration as the transmitted pulse samples non-overlapping volumes of scattering centers. Frequency analysis of the IF signal in a window similar to the transmitted pulse envelope will therefore show shot-to-shot frequency deviations on the order of the inverse pulse duration reflecting the random phase rate variations. Like speckle, these deviations arise from the incoherent nature of the scattering process and diminish if the IF signal is averaged over times greater than a single range resolution cell (here the pulse duration). Apart from limiting the high SNR performance of a Doppler lidar, this shot-to-shot variance in velocity estimates has a

  6. Measuring Ultrasonic Acoustic Velocity in a Thin Sheet of Graphite Epoxy Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    A method for measuring the acoustic velocity in a thin sheet of a graphite epoxy composite (GEC) material was investigated. This method uses two identical acoustic-emission (AE) sensors, one to transmit and one to receive. The delay time as a function of distance between sensors determines a bulk velocity. A lightweight fixture (balsa wood in the current implementation) provides a consistent method of positioning the sensors, thus providing multiple measurements of the time delay between sensors at different known distances. A linear fit to separation, x, versus delay time, t, will yield an estimate of the velocity from the slope of the line.

  7. Interferometric measurement of acoustic velocity in PbMoO4 and TeO2

    SciTech Connect

    Vernaleken, Andreas; Cohen, Martin G.; Metcalf, Harold

    2007-10-10

    We present a novel interferometric technique for the accurate measurement of acoustic velocity based on an optical phase shifter consisting of a pair of properly aligned acousto-optic modulators (AOMs). Results for the z-axis longitudinal mode velocities in lead molybdate(PbMoO4) and tellurium dioxide(TeO2) at80 MHz are reported and compared with earlier results.A longstanding inconsistency in thePbMoO4 velocity is resolved.

  8. Hydrocarbon saturation determination using acoustic velocities obtained through casing

    DOEpatents

    Moos, Daniel

    2010-03-09

    Compressional and shear velocities of earth formations are measured through casing. The determined compressional and shear velocities are used in a two component mixing model to provides improved quantitative values for the solid, the dry frame, and the pore compressibility. These are used in determination of hydrocarbon saturation.

  9. Estimating the instantaneous velocity of randomly moving target swarms in a stratified ocean waveguide by Doppler analysis.

    PubMed

    Bertsatos, Ioannis; Makris, Nicholas C

    2011-07-01

    Doppler analysis has been extensively used in active radar and sonar sensing to estimate the speed and direction of a single target within an imaging system resolution cell following deterministic theory. For target swarms, such as fish and plankton in the ocean, and raindrops, birds and bats in the atmosphere, multiple randomly moving targets typically occupy a single resolution cell, making single-target theory inadequate. Here, a method is developed for simultaneously estimating the instantaneous mean velocity and position of a group of randomly moving targets within a resolution cell, as well as the respective standard deviations across the group by Doppler analysis in free-space and in a stratified ocean waveguide. While the variance of the field scattered from the swarm is shown to typically dominate over the mean in the range-velocity ambiguity function, cross-spectral coherence remains and maintains high Doppler velocity and position resolution even for coherent signal processing algorithms such as the matched filter. For pseudo-random signals, the mean and variance of the swarms' velocity and position can be expressed in terms of the first two moments of the measured range-velocity ambiguity function. This is shown analytically for free-space and with Monte-Carlo simulations for an ocean waveguide.

  10. Reference values for pulsed Doppler signals from the blood flow velocity on both sides of the pulmonary valve.

    PubMed

    van Oort, A; de Knecht, S; van Dam, I; Heringa, A; de Boo, T; Alsters, J; Hopman, J; Fast, J; van der Werf, T; Daniels, O

    1988-04-01

    Pulsed Doppler signals were recorded from the pulmonary artery and the right ventricular outflow tract in 215 healthy subjects (120 males, 95 females; 1-65 years). Amplitude spectra from these Doppler signals were stored in digital form together with adjustment data for the instrument and the simultaneously recorded ECG. From these Doppler spectra the median of the maximal velocity (Vmax), the maximal acceleration (Amax) and the dispersion of the velocity distribution around Vmax (width) were calculated. These three median values were used to characterize the Doppler spectra and to define normal values for bloodflow velocities. Thus, calculations were made without observer interacting using a well-defined computer program. The effect of age, gender, body surface area and heart rate were studied. Reference ranges were calculated. There is a slight decrease of the median value of Vmax and Amax in the pulmonary artery during lifetime from 80 to 70 cm s-1 and from 1,200 to 800 cm s-2, respectively. On the other hand, there is no correlation between age and Vmax and Amax in the right ventricular outflow tract. The width of the spectra increases with age at both sites. No significant changes with age were seen with the other variables. PMID:3383877

  11. An acoustic travel time method for continuous velocity monitoring in shallow tidal streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razaz, Mahdi; Kawanisi, Kiyosi; Nistor, Ioan; Sharifi, Soroosh

    2013-08-01

    Long-term variations of streamflow in a tidal channel were measured using a Fluvial Acoustic Tomography (FAT) system through one transmission path. FAT is an innovative acoustic technology that utilizes the time-of-travel method to determine velocity between two points from multiple ray paths that traverse the entire cross-section of stream. Due to high spatial variability of flow distribution stationary ADCP measurements were not likely to yield true section-averaged flow velocity and moving-boat ADCP method was therefore used to provide reference data. As such, two short-term moving boat ADCP campaigns were carried out by the authors. In the first campaign, a couple of acoustic stations were added to the FAT system in order to resolve flow angularity in addition to the mean velocity. Comparing the FAT results with corresponding ADCP section-averaged flow direction and velocity indicated remarkable consistency. Second campaign was designed to capture the influence of salt wedge intrusion on the sound propagation pattern. It was found that FAT velocity measurements bias high if acoustic stations lay inside the cooler freshwater layer. Ray-tracing hindcasts suggest that installing acoustic stations inside the salt wedge may significantly improve function of output of the system. Comparing salinities evaluated from long-term FAT travel time records with nodal salinity measurements provided by conductivity-temperature sensors reveals the potential ability of FAT in measuring salt flux.

  12. An improved version of the extended velocity-azimuth display analysis of single-Doppler radar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matejka, Thomas; Srivastava, Ramesh C.

    1991-08-01

    Extended velocity-azimuth display (EVAD) analysis is useful for obtaining vertical profiles of horizontal divergence, vertical air velocity, vertical hydrometer velocity, and hydrometeor terminal fall speed in widespread precipitation. The technique uses a volume of velocity data collected with a single Doppler radar. Several improvements to the previously reported EVAD technique are discussed. They include the weighting of Fourier series coefficients to reflect their estimated error, a correction for heteroscedasticity (the systematic variation of residuals) in the regression analysis, and the weighting of data from different elevation angles to compensate for the finite thickness of the layers in which each analysis is performed. Vertical air velocity is obtained through a variational procedure. Procedures for dealiasing the velocity data and for rejecting outliers from the dataset are summarized. Recommendations for collecting radar data for use in EVAD analysis are made.

  13. Laser-Doppler acoustic probing of granular media with in-depth property gradient and varying pore pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Bodet, L.; Dhemaied, A.; Mourgues, R.; Tournat, V.; Rejiba, F.

    2012-05-24

    Non-contacting ultrasonic techniques recently proved to be efficient in the physical modeling of seismic-wave propagation at various application scales, as for instance in the context of geological analogue and seismic modeling. An innovative experimental set-up is proposed here to perform laser-Doppler acoustic probing of unconsolidated granular media with varying pore pressures. The preliminary experiments presented here provide reproducible results and exploitable data, thus validating both the proposed medium preparation and pressure gradient generation procedure.

  14. Integrating fluorescent dye flow-curve testing and acoustic Doppler velocimetry profiling for in situ hydraulic evaluation and improvement of clarifier performance.

    PubMed

    Tarud, F; Aybar, M; Pizarro, G; Cienfuegos, R; Pastén, P

    2010-08-01

    Enhancing the performance of clarifiers requires a thorough understanding of their hydraulics. Fluorescence spectroscopy and acoustic doppler velocimeter (ADV) profiling generally have been used separately to evaluate secondary settlers. We propose that simultaneous use of these techniques is needed to obtain a more reliable and useful evaluation. Experiments were performed on laboratory- and full-scale clarifiers. Factors affecting Fluorescein and Rhodamine 6G properties were identified. Underestimations up to 500% in fluorescence intensities may be derived from differential fluorescence quenching by oxygen. A careful control and interpretation of fluorescent dye experiments is needed to minimize artifacts in real settings. While flow-curve tests constructed under controlled conditions provided a more accurate overall quantitative estimation of the hydraulic performance, ADV velocity and turbulence profiling provided a detailed spatial understanding of flow patterns that was used to troubleshoot and fix the causes of hydraulic short-circuits.

  15. Integrating fluorescent dye flow-curve testing and acoustic Doppler velocimetry profiling for in situ hydraulic evaluation and improvement of clarifier performance.

    PubMed

    Tarud, F; Aybar, M; Pizarro, G; Cienfuegos, R; Pastén, P

    2010-08-01

    Enhancing the performance of clarifiers requires a thorough understanding of their hydraulics. Fluorescence spectroscopy and acoustic doppler velocimeter (ADV) profiling generally have been used separately to evaluate secondary settlers. We propose that simultaneous use of these techniques is needed to obtain a more reliable and useful evaluation. Experiments were performed on laboratory- and full-scale clarifiers. Factors affecting Fluorescein and Rhodamine 6G properties were identified. Underestimations up to 500% in fluorescence intensities may be derived from differential fluorescence quenching by oxygen. A careful control and interpretation of fluorescent dye experiments is needed to minimize artifacts in real settings. While flow-curve tests constructed under controlled conditions provided a more accurate overall quantitative estimation of the hydraulic performance, ADV velocity and turbulence profiling provided a detailed spatial understanding of flow patterns that was used to troubleshoot and fix the causes of hydraulic short-circuits. PMID:20853746

  16. Accuracy of velocity and shear rate measurements using pulsed Doppler ultrasound: a comparison of signal analysis techniques.

    PubMed

    Markou, C P; Ku, D N

    1991-01-01

    An experimental investigation was instituted to evaluate the performance of Doppler ultrasound signal processing techniques for measuring fluid velocity under well-defined flow conditions using a 10-MHz multigated pulsed ultrasound instrument. Conditions of fully developed flow in a rigid, circular tube were varied over a Reynolds number range between 500 and 8000. The velocity across the tube was determined using analog and digital zero crossing detectors and three digital spectrum estimators. Determination of the Doppler frequency from analog or digital zero crossing detectors gave accurate velocity values for laminar and moderately turbulent flow away from the wall (0.969 less than or equal to r less than or equal to 0.986). Three digital spectrum estimators, Fast Fourier Transform, Burg autoregressive method, and minimum variance method, were slightly more accurate than the zero crossing detector (0.984 less than or equal to r less than or equal to 0.994), especially at points close to the walls and with higher levels of turbulence. Steep velocity gradients and transit-time-effects from high velocities produced significantly larger errors in velocity measurement. Wall shear rate estimates were most precise when calculated using the position of the wall and two velocity points. The calculated wall shears were within 20%-30% of theoretically predicted values. PMID:1808798

  17. Ion acoustic solitons in a plasma with finite temperature drifting ions: Limit on ion drift velocity

    SciTech Connect

    Malik, H.K.; Singh, S.; Dahiya, R.P. )

    1994-05-01

    Propagation of ion acoustic solitons in a plasma consisting of finite temperature drifting ions and nondrifting electrons has been studied. It is shown that in addition to the electron inertia and weak relativistic effects, the ion temperature also modifies the soliton behavior. By including the finite ion temperature, limit for the ion drift velocity [ital u][sub 0] for which the ion acoustic solitons are possible, is obtained. The solitons can exist for [ital v][sub [ital Te

  18. An example of scaling MST Doppler spectra using median spectra, spectral smoothing, and velocity tracing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    Although automatic, computer scaling methods appeared at the start of the MST (mesosphere stratosphere troposphere) radar technique, there is a continuing need for scaling algorithms that perform editing functions and increase the sensitivity of radar by post processing. The scaling method presented is an adaptation of the method of scaling MST Doppler spectra presented by Rastogi (1984). A brief overview of this method is as follows: a median spectrum is calculated from several sequential spectra; the median noise value is subtracted from this derived spectrum; the median spectrum is smoothed; the detection/nondetection decision is made by comparing the smoothed spectrum to the variance of the smoothed noise; and if a signal is detected, then the half-power points of the smoothed echo spectrum are used to place limits on the evaluation of the first two moments of the unsmoothed median spectrum. In all of the above steps, the algorithm is guided by tracing the expected velocity range upward from the lowest range as far as possible. The method is discussed in more detail.

  19. Determination of U, V, and W from single station Doppler radar radial velocities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, W. L.; Green, J. L.; Warnock, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    The ST/MST (stratosphere troposphere/mesosphere stratosphere troposphere) clear air Doppler radar, or wind profiler, is an important tool in observational meteorology because of its capability to remote observe dynamic parameters of the atmosphere. There are difficulties in transforming the observed radial velocities into meteorological wind components. How this problem has been treated in the past is reviewed, and some of the analysis is recast to a form more suited to the high diagnostic abilities of a number of fixed beam configurations with reference to a linear wind field. The results, in conjunction with other works which treats problems such as the effects of finite sample volumes in the presence of nonhomogeneous atmospheric reflectivity, have implications important to the design of both individual MST/ST radars and MST/ST radar networks. The key parameters to uncoupling terms in the scaling equations are w sub x and w sub y. Whenever the stratiform condition, which states that these two parameters are negligible, is satisfied, a five beam ST radar may determine unbiased values of u, v, and w for sample volumes directly above the radar. The divergence and partial deformation of the flow may also be determined. Three beam systems can determine w and w sub z, but are unable to obtain u and v wind components uncontaminated by vertical sheer terms, even when the stratiform condition is satisfied.

  20. Coupling airborne laser scanning and acoustic Doppler current profiler data to model stream rating curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, N.; Lyon, S. W.; Kean, J. W.

    2015-12-01

    The rating curve enables the translation of water depth into discharge through a reference cross section. Errors in estimating stream channel geometry can therefore result in increased discharge uncertainty. This study investigates coupling national-scale airborne laser scanning (ALS) and acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) bathymetric survey data for generating stream rating curves. Specifically, stream channel geometries were generated from coupled ALS and ADCP scanning data collected for a well-monitored site located in northern Sweden. These data were used to define the hydraulic geometry required by a physically-based 1-D hydraulic model. The results of our study demonstrate that the effects of potential scanning data errors on the model generated rating curve were less than the uncertainties due to stream gauging measurements and empirical rating curve fitting. Further analysis of the ALS data showed that an overestimation of the streambank elevation (the main scanning data error) was primarily due to vegetation that could be adjusted for through a root-mean-square-error bias correction. We consider these findings encouraging as hydrometric agencies can potentially leverage national-scale ALS and ADCP instrumentation to reduce the cost and effort required for maintaining and establish rating curves at gauging stations.

  1. Analysis of Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) Data for Acoustic Velocity Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackshire, James L.

    1997-01-01

    Acoustic velocity measurements were taken using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) in a Normal Incidence Tube configuration at various frequency, phase, and amplitude levels. This report presents the results of the PIV analysis and data reduction portions of the test and details the processing that was done. Estimates of lower measurement sensitivity levels were determined based on PIV image quality, correlation, and noise level parameters used in the test. Comparison of measurements with linear acoustic theory are presented. The onset of nonlinear, harmonic frequency acoustic levels were also studied for various decibel and frequency levels ranging from 90 to 132 dB and 500 to 3000 Hz, respectively.

  2. Acoustic Velocity Of The Sediments Offshore Southwestern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, C.; Liu, C.; Huang, P.

    2004-12-01

    Along the Manila Trench south of 21øXN, deep-sea sediments are being underthrusted beneath the Taiwan accretionary prism which is composed of the Kaoping Slope and Hengchun Ridge. Offshore southwestern Taiwan, foreland sediments and Late Miocene strata of the Tainan Basin are being accreted onto the fold-and thrust belt of the syn-collision accretionary wedge of the Kaoping Slope. The Kaoping Slope consists of thick Neogene to Recent siliciclastics deformed by fold-and-thrust structures and mud diapers. These Pliocene-Quaternary sediments deposited in the Kaoping Shelf and upper slope area are considered to be paleo-channel deposits confined by NNE-SSW trend mud diapiric structure. Seismic P-wave velocities of the sediment deposited in the Kaoping Shelf and Kaoping Slope area are derived from mutichannel seismic reflection data and wide-angle reflection and refraction profiles collected by sonobuoys. Sediment velocity structures constrained from mutichannel seismic reflection data using velocity spectrum analysis method and that derived from sonobuoy data using tau-sum inversion method are compared, and they both provide consistent velocity structures. Seismic velocities were analyzed along the seismic profile from the surface to maximum depths of about 2.0 km below the seafloor. Our model features a sediment layer1 with 400 ms in thickness and a sediment layer2 with 600 ms in thickness. For the shelf sediments, we observe a linear interval velocity trend of V=1.53+1.91T in layer1, and V=1.86+0.87T in layer2, where T is the one way travel time within the layer. For the slop sediment, the trend of V=1.47+1.93T in layer1, and V=1.70+1.55T in layer2. The layer1¡¦s velocities gradients are similar between the shelf (1.91 km/sec2) and the slope(1.93 km/sec2). It means layer1 distributes over the slope and shelf widely. The result of the sediment velocity gradients in this area are in good agreement with that reported for the south Atlantic continental margins.

  3. [Coronary artery blood flow velocity non-invasively measured using a vessel-tracking pulsed Doppler system].

    PubMed

    Tateishi, O; Aizawa, O; Okamura, T; Yoshida, T; Furuhata, H; Seo, Y; Iinuma, K; Shiki, E

    1988-09-01

    A newly-developed noninvasive method was used to measure left coronary blood flow during phantom experiments. Two techniques were used in which: (1) the sample position can always be set in a fluctuating vessel using a wall echo-tracking method with a phase-locked-loop, and (2) the Doppler reference signal was generated separately synchronous with the wall echo signal. These techniques were combined, using a commercially available pulsed Doppler apparatus (SSH-40B: Toshiba). Basic experiments were performed using a blood vessel phantom to verify the validity of these systems. Blood flow velocity in the fluctuating tube could be measured clearly using a vessel-tracking method. The blood flow velocity of the left anterior descending artery was measured in three normal subjects and in seven patients from the third intercostal space along the left sternal border. The velocity pattern was characterized by a crescendo-decrescendo shape in diastole. The peak velocity which appeared in diastole ranged from 19 to 69 cm/sec, with no difference by disease entity. However, in all cases, the blood flow velocity signals were marred by extraneous signals, making it impossible to measure blood flow velocity during systole. Further improvement of the system is mandatory in order to use this flowmeter clinically.

  4. In vivo label-free measurement of lymph flow velocity and volumetric flow rates using Doppler optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blatter, Cedric; Meijer, Eelco F. J.; Nam, Ahhyun S.; Jones, Dennis; Bouma, Brett E.; Padera, Timothy P.; Vakoc, Benjamin J.

    2016-07-01

    Direct in vivo imaging of lymph flow is key to understanding lymphatic system function in normal and disease states. Optical microscopy techniques provide the resolution required for these measurements, but existing optical techniques for measuring lymph flow require complex protocols and provide limited temporal resolution. Here, we describe a Doppler optical coherence tomography platform that allows direct, label-free quantification of lymph velocity and volumetric flow rates. We overcome the challenge of very low scattering by employing a Doppler algorithm that operates on low signal-to-noise measurements. We show that this technique can measure lymph velocity at sufficiently high temporal resolution to resolve the dynamic pulsatile flow in collecting lymphatic vessels.

  5. In vivo label-free measurement of lymph flow velocity and volumetric flow rates using Doppler optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Blatter, Cedric; Meijer, Eelco F. J.; Nam, Ahhyun S.; Jones, Dennis; Bouma, Brett E.; Padera, Timothy P.; Vakoc, Benjamin J.

    2016-01-01

    Direct in vivo imaging of lymph flow is key to understanding lymphatic system function in normal and disease states. Optical microscopy techniques provide the resolution required for these measurements, but existing optical techniques for measuring lymph flow require complex protocols and provide limited temporal resolution. Here, we describe a Doppler optical coherence tomography platform that allows direct, label-free quantification of lymph velocity and volumetric flow rates. We overcome the challenge of very low scattering by employing a Doppler algorithm that operates on low signal-to-noise measurements. We show that this technique can measure lymph velocity at sufficiently high temporal resolution to resolve the dynamic pulsatile flow in collecting lymphatic vessels. PMID:27377852

  6. In vivo label-free measurement of lymph flow velocity and volumetric flow rates using Doppler optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Blatter, Cedric; Meijer, Eelco F J; Nam, Ahhyun S; Jones, Dennis; Bouma, Brett E; Padera, Timothy P; Vakoc, Benjamin J

    2016-01-01

    Direct in vivo imaging of lymph flow is key to understanding lymphatic system function in normal and disease states. Optical microscopy techniques provide the resolution required for these measurements, but existing optical techniques for measuring lymph flow require complex protocols and provide limited temporal resolution. Here, we describe a Doppler optical coherence tomography platform that allows direct, label-free quantification of lymph velocity and volumetric flow rates. We overcome the challenge of very low scattering by employing a Doppler algorithm that operates on low signal-to-noise measurements. We show that this technique can measure lymph velocity at sufficiently high temporal resolution to resolve the dynamic pulsatile flow in collecting lymphatic vessels. PMID:27377852

  7. Acoustic and vibration performance evaluations of a velocity sensing hull array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cray, Benjamin A.; Christman, Russell A.

    1996-04-01

    Acoustic and vibration measurements were conducted at the Naval Undersea Warfare Center's Seneca Lake Facility to investigate the in situ signal response of a linear array of velocity sensors (sensors that measure either acoustic particle acceleration, velocity, or displacement have generically been denoted as velocity sensors) on a coating. The coating used at Seneca Lake consisted of air-voided elastomeric tiles with an overall coating thickness of approximately 3 inches. The accelerometer array and coating were mounted on the Seneca Lake Hull Fixture, which measures 33 feet lengthwise with an arc length of 20 feet. The fixture weighs approximately 30 tons. Specifically, measurements of in situ sensitivity, velocity reduction, reflection gain, array beam response, and equivalent planewave self-noise levels are presented.

  8. Aeroacoustics of volcanic jets: Acoustic power estimation and jet velocity dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matoza, Robin S.; Fee, David; Neilsen, Tracianne B.; Gee, Kent L.; Ogden, Darcy E.

    2013-12-01

    A fundamental goal of volcano acoustics is to relate observed infrasonic signals to the eruptive processes generating them. A link between acoustic power Πvelocity V was proposed by Woulff and McGetchin (1976) based upon the prevailing jet noise theory at the time (acoustic analogy theory). We reexamine this approach in the context of the current understanding of jet noise, using data from a laboratory jet, a full-scale military jet aircraft, and a full-scale rocket motor. Accurate estimates of Πacoustic field experiments. Typical volcano acoustic data better represent point measurements of acoustic intensity Ivelocity-scaling laws currently proposed for acoustic intensity differ from those for acoustic power and are of the form Iacoustic data and thus requires modification. Quantitative integration of field, numerical, and laboratory studies within a modern aeroacoustics framework will lead to a more accurate relationship between volcanic infrasound and eruption parameters.

  9. Determinants of diastolic myocardial tissue Doppler velocities: influences of relaxation and preload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Firstenberg, M. S.; Greenberg, N. L.; Main, M. L.; Drinko, J. K.; Odabashian, J. A.; Thomas, J. D.; Garcia, M. J.

    2001-01-01

    Myocardial tissue Doppler echocardiography (TDE) has been proposed as a tool for the assessment of diastolic function. Controversy exists regarding whether TDE measurements are influenced by preload. In this study, left ventricular volume and high-fidelity pressures were obtained in eight closed-chest dogs during intermittent caval occlusion. The time constant of isovolumic ventricular relaxation (tau) was altered with varying doses of dobutamine and esmolol. Peak early diastolic myocardial (E(m)) and transmitral (E) velocities were measured before and after preload reduction. The relative effects of changes in preload and relaxation were determined for E(m) and compared with their effects on E. The following results were observed: caval occlusion significantly decreased E (DeltaE = 16.4 +/- 3.3 cm/s, 36.6 +/- 13.7%, P < 0.01) and E(m) (DeltaE(m) = 1. 3 +/- 0.4 cm/s, 32.5 +/- 26.1%, P < 0.01) under baseline conditions. However, preload reduction was similar for E under all lusitropic conditions (P = not significant), but these effects on E(m) decreased with worsening relaxation. At tau < 50 ms, changes in E(m) with preload reduction were significantly greater (DeltaE(m) = 2.8 +/- 0.6 cm/s) than at tau = 50-65 ms (DeltaE(m) = 1.2 +/- 0.2 cm/s) and at tau >65 ms (DeltaE(m) = 0.5 +/- 0.1 cm/s, P < 0.05). We concluded that TDE E(m) is preload dependent. However, this effect decreases with worsening relaxation.

  10. Velocity surveys in a turbine stator annular-cascade facility using laser Doppler techniques. [flow measurement and flow characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, L. J.; Seasholtz, R. G.; Mclallin, K. L.

    1976-01-01

    A laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV) was used to determine the flow conditions downstream of an annular cascade of stator blades operating at an exit critical velocity ratio of 0.87. Two modes of LDV operation (continuous scan and discrete point) were investigated. Conventional pressure probe measurements were also made for comparison with the LDV results. Biasing errors that occur in the LDV measurement of velocity components were also studied. In addition, the effect of pressure probe blockage on the flow conditions was determined with the LDV. Photographs and descriptions of the test equipment used are given.

  11. Non-mechanical scanning laser Doppler velocimetry with sensitivity to direction of transverse velocity component using optical serrodyne frequency shifting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maru, Koichi; Watanabe, Kento

    2014-05-01

    This paper proposes a non-mechanical axial scanning laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV) with sensitivity to the direction of the transverse velocity component using optical serrodyne frequency shifting. Serrodyne modulation via the electro-optic effect of a LiNbO3 (LN) phase shifter is employed to discriminate the direction of the transverse velocity component. The measurement position is scanned without any moving mechanism in the probe by changing the wavelength of the light input to the probe. The experimental results using a sensor probe setup indicate that both the scan of the measurement position and the introduction of directional sensitivity are successfully demonstrated.

  12. Transcranial doppler sonography diagnostic value for the cerebral flow velocity changes in the interictal phase of classic migraine

    PubMed Central

    Sedighi, Behnaz; Ali Ebrahimi, Hossein; Jabbarpour, Shirin; Shafiee, Kaveh

    2011-01-01

    Background: An imbalance of the cerebrovascular response during functional activation of the brain has been postulated as a factor in the pathophysiology of migraine. The purpose of this study was to determine the transcranial doppler sonography (TDS) diagnostic value for the cerebral flow velocity changes in the interictal phase of classic migraine. Methods: This study was carried out on 46 patients (23 cases and 23 controls). We used Doppler instrument via trans-temporal window and detected middle cerebral artery, anterior cerebral artery and posterior cerebral artery by 2 MHz probe. The flow velocity in the posterior cerebral artery before, during and immediately after stimulation was recorded. Stimulation was done using a flickering light in 100 seconds. Results: At the baseline, the middle cerebral artery had more peak systolic velocity in migraineurs than the control group. Although peak systolic velocity changes in the mid-photic period is not statistically significant. On the other hand, post-photic peak systolic velocity increased significantly. The diagnostic accuracy of the peak systolic volume (PSV) changes in the posterior cerebral artery (PCA) for the migraine was 72.3%. Conclusion: This stimulation we found altered cerebral vasomotor reactivity in the interictal phase in migraineurs with visual aura. This seemed to be an unavoidable hindrance for the wider implementation of functional TCD in diagnostic work up of migraine patients. PMID:24024011

  13. Full bandwidth calibration procedure for acoustic probes containing a pressure and particle velocity sensor.

    PubMed

    Basten, Tom G H; de Bree, Hans-Elias

    2010-01-01

    Calibration of acoustic particle velocity sensors is still difficult due to the lack of standardized sensors to compare with. Recently it is shown by Jacobsen and Jaud [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 120, 830-837 (2006)] that it is possible to calibrate a sound pressure and particle velocity sensor in free field conditions at higher frequencies. This is done by using the known acoustic impedance at a certain distance of a spherical loudspeaker. When the sound pressure is measured with a calibrated reference microphone, the particle velocity can be calculated from the known impedance and the measured pressure. At lower frequencies, this approach gives unreliable results. The method is now extended to lower frequencies by measuring the acoustic pressure inside the spherical source. At lower frequencies, the sound pressure inside the sphere is proportional to the movement of the loudspeaker membrane. If the movement is known, the particle velocity in front of the loudspeaker can be derived. This low frequency approach is combined with the high frequency approach giving a full bandwidth calibration procedure which can be used in free field conditions using a single calibration setup. The calibration results are compared with results obtained with a standing wave tube.

  14. Validation of streamflow measurements made with M9 and RiverRay acoustic Doppler current profilers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boldt, Justin A.; Oberg, Kevin A.

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Office of Surface Water (OSW) previously validated the use of Teledyne RD Instruments (TRDI) Rio Grande (in 2007), StreamPro (in 2006), and Broadband (in 1996) acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) for streamflow (discharge) measurements made by the USGS. Two new ADCPs, the SonTek M9 and the TRDI RiverRay, were first used in the USGS Water Mission Area programs in 2009. Since 2009, the OSW and USGS Water Science Centers (WSCs) have been conducting field measurements as part of their stream-gaging program using these ADCPs. The purpose of this paper is to document the results of USGS OSW analyses for validation of M9 and RiverRay ADCP streamflow measurements. The OSW required each participating WSC to make comparison measurements over the range of operating conditions in which the instruments were used until sufficient measurements were available. The performance of these ADCPs was evaluated for validation and to identify any present and potential problems. Statistical analyses of streamflow measurements indicate that measurements made with the SonTek M9 ADCP using firmware 2.00–3.00 or the TRDI RiverRay ADCP using firmware 44.12–44.15 are unbiased, and therefore, can continue to be used to make streamflow measurements in the USGS stream-gaging program. However, for the M9 ADCP, there are some important issues to be considered in making future measurements. Possible future work may include additional validation of streamflow measurements made with these instruments from other locations in the United States and measurement validation using updated firmware and software.

  15. Acoustic beam control in biomimetic projector via velocity gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xiaowei; Zhang, Yu; Cao, Wenwu; Dong, Erqian; Song, Zhongchang; Li, Songhai; Tang, Liguo; Zhang, Sai

    2016-07-01

    A biomimetic projector (BioP) based on computerized tomography of pygmy sperm whale's biosonar system has been designed using gradient-index (GRIN) material. The directivity of this BioP device was investigated as function of frequency and the velocity gradient of the GRIN material. A strong beam control over a broad bandwidth at the subwavelength scale has been achieved. Compared with a bare subwavelength source, the main lobe pressure of the BioP is about five times as high and the angular resolution is one order of magnitude better. Our results indicate that this BioP has excellent application potential in miniaturized underwater sonars.

  16. Tidal and residual currents measured by an acoustic doppler current profiler at the west end of Carquinez Strait, San Francisco Bay, California, March to November 1988

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burau, J.R.; Simpson, M.R.; Cheng, R.T.

    1993-01-01

    Water-velocity profiles were collected at the west end of Carquinez Strait, San Francisco Bay, California, from March to November 1988, using an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP). These data are a series of 10-minute-averaged water velocities collected at 1-meter vertical intervals (bins) in the 16.8-meter water column, beginning 2.1 meters above the estuary bed. To examine the vertical structure of the horizontal water velocities, the data are separated into individual time-series by bin and then used for time-series plots, harmonic analysis, and for input to digital filters. Three-dimensional graphic renditions of the filtered data are also used in the analysis. Harmonic analysis of the time-series data from each bin indicates that the dominant (12.42 hour or M2) partial tidal currents reverse direction near the bottom, on average, 20 minutes sooner than M2 partial tidal currents near the surface. Residual (nontidal) currents derived from the filtered data indicate that currents near the bottom are pre- dominantly up-estuary during the neap tides and down-estuary during the more energetic spring tides.

  17. Accurate thermoelastic tensor and acoustic velocities of NaCl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcondes, Michel L.; Shukla, Gaurav; da Silveira, Pedro; Wentzcovitch, Renata M.

    2015-12-01

    Despite the importance of thermoelastic properties of minerals in geology and geophysics, their measurement at high pressures and temperatures are still challenging. Thus, ab initio calculations are an essential tool for predicting these properties at extreme conditions. Owing to the approximate description of the exchange-correlation energy, approximations used in calculations of vibrational effects, and numerical/methodological approximations, these methods produce systematic deviations. Hybrid schemes combining experimental data and theoretical results have emerged as a way to reconcile available information and offer more reliable predictions at experimentally inaccessible thermodynamics conditions. Here we introduce a method to improve the calculated thermoelastic tensor by using highly accurate thermal equation of state (EoS). The corrective scheme is general, applicable to crystalline solids with any symmetry, and can produce accurate results at conditions where experimental data may not exist. We apply it to rock-salt-type NaCl, a material whose structural properties have been challenging to describe accurately by standard ab initio methods and whose acoustic/seismic properties are important for the gas and oil industry.

  18. Accurate thermoelastic tensor and acoustic velocities of NaCl

    SciTech Connect

    Marcondes, Michel L.; Shukla, Gaurav; Silveira, Pedro da; Wentzcovitch, Renata M.

    2015-12-15

    Despite the importance of thermoelastic properties of minerals in geology and geophysics, their measurement at high pressures and temperatures are still challenging. Thus, ab initio calculations are an essential tool for predicting these properties at extreme conditions. Owing to the approximate description of the exchange-correlation energy, approximations used in calculations of vibrational effects, and numerical/methodological approximations, these methods produce systematic deviations. Hybrid schemes combining experimental data and theoretical results have emerged as a way to reconcile available information and offer more reliable predictions at experimentally inaccessible thermodynamics conditions. Here we introduce a method to improve the calculated thermoelastic tensor by using highly accurate thermal equation of state (EoS). The corrective scheme is general, applicable to crystalline solids with any symmetry, and can produce accurate results at conditions where experimental data may not exist. We apply it to rock-salt-type NaCl, a material whose structural properties have been challenging to describe accurately by standard ab initio methods and whose acoustic/seismic properties are important for the gas and oil industry.

  19. Remote measurement utilizing NASA's scanning laser Doppler systems. Volume 2: Laser Doppler dust devil velocity profile measurement program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howle, R. E.; Krause, M. C.; Craven, C. E.; Gorzynski, E. J.; Edwards, B. B.

    1976-01-01

    The first detailed velocity profile data on thermally induced dust vortices are presented. These dust devils will be analyzed and studied to determine their flow fields and origin in an effort to correlate this phenomena with the generation and characteristics of tornadoes. A continuing effort to increase mankind's knowledge of vortex and other meteorological phenomena will hopefully allow the prediction of tornado occurrence, their path, and perhaps eventually even lead to some technique for their destruction.

  20. Measurement of the flow velocity in unmagnetized plasmas by counter propagating ion-acoustic waves

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, J.X.; Li Yangfang; Xiao Delong; Li Jingju; Li Yiren

    2005-06-15

    The diffusion velocity of an inhomogeneous unmagnetized plasma is measured by means of the phase velocities of ion-acoustic waves propagating along and against the direction of the plasma flow. Combined with the measurement of the plasma density distributions by usual Langmuir probes, the method is applied to measure the ambipolar diffusion coefficient and effective ion collision frequency in inhomogeneous plasmas formed in an asymmetrically discharged double-plasma device. Experimental results show that the measured flow velocities, diffusion coefficients, and effective collision frequencies are in agreement with ion-neutral collision dominated diffusion theory.

  1. Velocity phase encoded MRI of gas flow in the acoustic boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archibald, Geoffrey

    This thesis explores the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to study acoustic oscillations of a gas in a cylindrical tube. It describes experiments performed under conditions where the gas is in the Acoustic Viscous Boundary Layer and its flow is laminar. Velocity maps acquired at discrete phases of the acoustic oscillation are presented, and are compared with thermoacoustic theory. This represents the first time that such information has been obtained using MRI. An important component of the work reported in this thesis involves the design, construction, and characterization of an acousto-mechanical resonator (AMR). This device can drive oscillatory gas motion and impose density variations at rates that are compatible with MRI data acquisition. To date it has been operated at frequencies ranging from 0.7 Hz to 1.65 Hz and with peak gas displacement amplitudes of up to 2.5 cm. The AMR is based on a modular design intended to permit the study of acoustic flow through a variety of different structures and under a variety of different conditions. MRI experiments were performed on a mixture of thermally-polarized 3He and O2. The latter is used to increase the 3He longitudinal nuclear relaxation rate T1 --1 to a value comparable to the acoustic frequency. In turn, measurements of T1 --1 provide a means for determining the precise composition of the gas mixture. Velocity phase-encoding techniques were then used to map acoustic flow fields: A bipolar magnetic field gradient pulse inserted into the imaging sequence stores velocity information in the phase of the complex image data. The MRI pulse sequence is synchronized with the periodic motion of the gas so that the velocity measurement can be performed at discrete and well-defined phases of the acoustic cycle. These non-invasive flow imaging experiments provide information that is complementary to that which can be obtained from other gas velocity probes, and may lead to new opportunities in the study of acoustic

  2. Laser photoacoustic technique for ultrasonic surface acoustic wave velocity evaluation on porcelain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, K.; Tu, S. J.; Gao, L.; Xu, J.; Li, S. D.; Yu, W. C.; Liao, H. H.

    2016-10-01

    A laser photoacoustic technique has been developed to evaluate the surface acoustic wave (SAW) velocity of porcelain. A Q-switched Nd:YAG laser at 1064 nm was focused by a cylindrical lens to initiate broadband SAW impulses, which were detected by an optical fiber interferometer with high spatial resolution. Multiple near-field surface acoustic waves were observed on the sample surface at various locations along the axis perpendicular to the laser line source as the detector moved away from the source in the same increments. The frequency spectrum and dispersion curves were obtained by operating on the recorded waveforms with cross-correlation and FFT. The SAW phase velocities of the porcelain of the same source are similar while they are different from those of different sources. The marked differences of Rayleigh phase velocities in our experiment suggest that this technique has the potential for porcelain identification.

  3. Measuring Solar Doppler Velocities in the He ii 30.38 nm Emission Using the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamberlin, P. C.

    2016-08-01

    The EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory has provided unprecedented measurements of the solar EUV irradiance at high temporal cadence with good spectral resolution and range since May 2010. The main purpose of EVE was to connect the Sun to the Earth by providing measurements of the EUV irradiance as a driver for space weather and Living With a Star studies, but after launch the instrument has demonstrated the significance of its measurements in contributing to studies looking at the sources of solar variability for pure solar physics purposes. This paper expands upon previous findings that EVE can in fact measure wavelength shifts during solar eruptive events and therefore provide Doppler velocities for plasma at all temperatures throughout the solar atmosphere from the chromosphere to hot flaring temperatures. This process is not straightforward as EVE was not designed or optimized for these types of measurements. In this paper we describe the many detailed instrumental characterizations needed to eliminate the optical effects in order to provide an absolute baseline for the Doppler shift studies. An example is given of a solar eruption on 7 September 2011 (SOL2011-09-07), associated with an X1.2 flare, where EVE Doppler analysis shows plasma ejected from the Sun in the He ii 30.38 nm emission at a velocity of almost 120 km s^{-1} along the line-of-sight.

  4. Source motion detection, estimation, and compensation for underwater acoustics inversion by wideband ambiguity lag-Doppler filtering.

    PubMed

    Josso, Nicolas F; Ioana, Cornel; Mars, Jérôme I; Gervaise, Cédric

    2010-12-01

    Acoustic channel properties in a shallow water environment with moving source and receiver are difficult to investigate. In fact, when the source-receiver relative position changes, the underwater environment causes multipath and Doppler scale changes on the transmitted signal over low-to-medium frequencies (300 Hz-20 kHz). This is the result of a combination of multiple paths propagation, source and receiver motions, as well as sea surface motion or water column fast changes. This paper investigates underwater acoustic channel properties in a shallow water (up to 150 m depth) and moving source-receiver conditions using extracted time-scale features of the propagation channel model for low-to-medium frequencies. An average impulse response of one transmission is estimated using the physical characteristics of propagation and the wideband ambiguity plane. Since a different Doppler scale should be considered for each propagating signal, a time-warping filtering method is proposed to estimate the channel time delay and Doppler scale attributes for each propagating path. The proposed method enables the estimation of motion-compensated impulse responses, where different Doppler scaling factors are considered for the different time delays. It was validated for channel profiles using real data from the BASE'07 experiment conducted by the North Atlantic Treaty Organization Undersea Research Center in the shallow water environment of the Malta Plateau, South Sicily. This paper provides a contribution to many field applications including passive ocean tomography with unknown natural sources position and movement. Another example is active ocean tomography where sources motion enables to rapidly cover one operational area for rapid environmental assessment and hydrophones may be drifting in order to avoid additional flow noise.

  5. Measurement of acoustic velocity in the stack of a thermoacoustic refrigerator using particle image velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berson, Arganthaël; Michard, Marc; Blanc-Benon, Philippe

    2008-06-01

    Thermoacoustic refrigeration systems generate cooling power from a high-amplitude acoustic standing wave. There has recently been a growing interest in this technology because of its simple and robust architecture and its use of environmentally safe gases. With the prospect of commercialization, it is necessary to enhance the efficiency of thermoacoustic cooling systems and more particularly of some of their components such as the heat exchangers. The characterization of the flow field at the end of the stack plates is a crucial step for the understanding and optimization of heat transfer between the stack and the heat exchangers. In this study, a specific particle image velocimetry measurement is performed inside a thermoacoustic refrigerator. Acoustic velocity is measured using synchronization and phase-averaging. The measurement method is validated inside a void resonator by successfully comparing experimental data with an acoustic plane wave model. Velocity is measured inside the oscillating boundary layers, between the plates of the stack, and compared to a linear model. The flow behind the stack is characterized, and it shows the generation of symmetric pairs of counter-rotating vortices at the end of the stack plates at low acoustic pressure level. As the acoustic pressure level increases, detachment of the vortices and symmetry breaking are observed.

  6. Velocity gradients in spatially resolved laser Doppler flowmetry and dynamic light scattering with confocal and coherence gating.

    PubMed

    Uribe-Patarroyo, Néstor; Bouma, Brett E

    2016-08-01

    Dynamic light scattering (DLS) is widely used to characterize diffusive motion to obtain precise information on colloidal suspensions by calculating the autocorrelation function of the signal from a heterodyne optical system. DLS can also be used to determine the flow velocity field in systems that exhibit mass transport by incorporating the effects of the deterministic motion of scatterers on the autocorrelation function, a technique commonly known as laser Doppler flowmetry. DLS measurements can be localized with confocal and coherence gating techniques such as confocal microscopy and optical coherence tomography, thereby enabling the determination of the spatially resolved velocity field in three dimensions. It has been thought that spatially resolved DLS can determine the axial velocity as well as the lateral speed in a single measurement. We demonstrate, however, that gradients in the axial velocity of scatterers exert a fundamental influence on the autocorrelation function even in well-behaved, nonturbulent flow. By obtaining the explicit functional relation between axial-velocity gradients and the autocorrelation function, we show that the velocity field and its derivatives are intimately related and their contributions cannot be separated. Therefore, a single DLS measurement cannot univocally determine the velocity field. Our extended theoretical model was found to be in good agreement with experimental measurements. PMID:27627357

  7. Velocity gradients in spatially-resolved laser Doppler flowmetry and dynamic light scattering with confocal and coherence gating

    PubMed Central

    Uribe-Patarroyo, Néstor; Bouma, Brett E.

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic light scattering (DLS) is widely used to characterize diffusive motion to obtain precise information on colloidal suspensions by calculating the autocorrelation function of the signal from a heterodyne optical system. DLS can also be used to determine the flow velocity field in systems that exhibit mass transport by incorporating the effects of the deterministic motion of scatterers on the autocorrelation function, a technique commonly known as laser Doppler flowmetry. DLS measurements can be localized with confocal and coherence gating techniques such as confocal microscopy and optical coherence tomography, thereby enabling the determination of the spatially-resolved velocity field in three dimensions. It has been thought that spatially-resolved DLS can determine the axial velocity as well as the lateral speed in a single measurement. We demonstrate, however, that gradients in the axial velocity of scatterers exert a fundamental influence on the autocorrelation function even in well-behaved, non-turbulent flow. By obtaining the explicit functional relation between axial-velocity gradients and the autocorrelation function, we show that the velocity field and its derivatives are intimately related and their contributions cannot be separated. Therefore, a single DLS measurement cannot univocally determine the velocity field. Our extended theoretical model was found to be in good agreement with experimental measurements. PMID:27627357

  8. Velocity gradients in spatially resolved laser Doppler flowmetry and dynamic light scattering with confocal and coherence gating.

    PubMed

    Uribe-Patarroyo, Néstor; Bouma, Brett E

    2016-08-01

    Dynamic light scattering (DLS) is widely used to characterize diffusive motion to obtain precise information on colloidal suspensions by calculating the autocorrelation function of the signal from a heterodyne optical system. DLS can also be used to determine the flow velocity field in systems that exhibit mass transport by incorporating the effects of the deterministic motion of scatterers on the autocorrelation function, a technique commonly known as laser Doppler flowmetry. DLS measurements can be localized with confocal and coherence gating techniques such as confocal microscopy and optical coherence tomography, thereby enabling the determination of the spatially resolved velocity field in three dimensions. It has been thought that spatially resolved DLS can determine the axial velocity as well as the lateral speed in a single measurement. We demonstrate, however, that gradients in the axial velocity of scatterers exert a fundamental influence on the autocorrelation function even in well-behaved, nonturbulent flow. By obtaining the explicit functional relation between axial-velocity gradients and the autocorrelation function, we show that the velocity field and its derivatives are intimately related and their contributions cannot be separated. Therefore, a single DLS measurement cannot univocally determine the velocity field. Our extended theoretical model was found to be in good agreement with experimental measurements.

  9. Velocity gradients in spatially resolved laser Doppler flowmetry and dynamic light scattering with confocal and coherence gating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uribe-Patarroyo, Néstor; Bouma, Brett E.

    2016-08-01

    Dynamic light scattering (DLS) is widely used to characterize diffusive motion to obtain precise information on colloidal suspensions by calculating the autocorrelation function of the signal from a heterodyne optical system. DLS can also be used to determine the flow velocity field in systems that exhibit mass transport by incorporating the effects of the deterministic motion of scatterers on the autocorrelation function, a technique commonly known as laser Doppler flowmetry. DLS measurements can be localized with confocal and coherence gating techniques such as confocal microscopy and optical coherence tomography, thereby enabling the determination of the spatially resolved velocity field in three dimensions. It has been thought that spatially resolved DLS can determine the axial velocity as well as the lateral speed in a single measurement. We demonstrate, however, that gradients in the axial velocity of scatterers exert a fundamental influence on the autocorrelation function even in well-behaved, nonturbulent flow. By obtaining the explicit functional relation between axial-velocity gradients and the autocorrelation function, we show that the velocity field and its derivatives are intimately related and their contributions cannot be separated. Therefore, a single DLS measurement cannot univocally determine the velocity field. Our extended theoretical model was found to be in good agreement with experimental measurements.

  10. Resonant Doppler velocimeter. Ph.D. Thesis. Final Report, 1 Jul. 1974 - 31 Oct. 1979; [velocity, temperature, and pressure measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmermann, M.

    1980-01-01

    A technique is presented for visualizing and quantitatively measuring velocity, temperature, and pressure by shining a single frequency laser beam into a gaseous flow which is seeded with an atomic species. The laser is tuned through the absorption frequencies of the seeded species and the absorption profile is detected by observing fluorescence as the atoms relax back to the ground state. The flow velocity is determined by observing the Doppler shift in the absorption frequency. Spectroscopic absorption line broadening mechanisms furnish information regarding the static temperature and pressure of the moving gas. Results of experiments conducted in the free stream and in the bow shock of a conical model mounted in a hypersonic wind tunnel indicate that the experimental uncertainties in the measurement of average values for the velocity, temperature and pressure of the flow are 0.1, 5 and 10 percent respectively.

  11. The determination of the acoustic parameters of volcanic rocks from compressional velocity measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carroll, R.D.

    1969-01-01

    A statistical analysis was made of the relationship of various acoustic parameters of volcanic rocks to compressional wave velocities for data obtained in a volcanic region in Nevada. Some additional samples, chiefly granitic rocks, were also included in the study to extend the range of parameters and the variety of siliceous rock types sampled. Laboratory acoustic measurements obtained on 62 dry core samples were grouped with similar measurements obtained from geophysical logging devices at several depth intervals in a hole from which 15 of the core samples had been obtained. The effects of lithostatic and hydrostatic load on changing the rock acoustic parameters measured in the hole were noticeable when compared with the laboratory measurements on the same core. The results of the analyses determined by grouping all of the data, however, indicate that dynamic Young's, shear and bulk modulus, shear velocity, shear and compressional characteristic impedance, as well as amplitude and energy reflection coefficients may be reliably estimated on the basis of the compressional wave velocities of the rocks investigated. Less precise estimates can be made of density based on the rock compressional velocity. The possible extension of these relationships to include many siliceous rocks is suggested. ?? 1969.

  12. QRev—Software for computation and quality assurance of acoustic doppler current profiler moving-boat streamflow measurements—User’s manual for version 2.8

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mueller, David S.

    2016-01-01

    The software program, QRev computes the discharge from moving-boat acoustic Doppler current profiler measurements using data collected with any of the Teledyne RD Instrument or SonTek bottom tracking acoustic Doppler current profilers. The computation of discharge is independent of the manufacturer of the acoustic Doppler current profiler because QRev applies consistent algorithms independent of the data source. In addition, QRev automates filtering and quality checking of the collected data and provides feedback to the user of potential quality issues with the measurement. Various statistics and characteristics of the measurement, in addition to a simple uncertainty assessment are provided to the user to assist them in properly rating the measurement. QRev saves an extensible markup language file that can be imported into databases or electronic field notes software. The user interacts with QRev through a tablet-friendly graphical user interface. This report is the manual for version 2.8 of QRev.

  13. QRev—Software for computation and quality assurance of acoustic doppler current profiler moving-boat streamflow measurements—User’s manual for version 2.8

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mueller, David S.

    2016-05-12

    The software program, QRev computes the discharge from moving-boat acoustic Doppler current profiler measurements using data collected with any of the Teledyne RD Instrument or SonTek bottom tracking acoustic Doppler current profilers. The computation of discharge is independent of the manufacturer of the acoustic Doppler current profiler because QRev applies consistent algorithms independent of the data source. In addition, QRev automates filtering and quality checking of the collected data and provides feedback to the user of potential quality issues with the measurement. Various statistics and characteristics of the measurement, in addition to a simple uncertainty assessment are provided to the user to assist them in properly rating the measurement. QRev saves an extensible markup language file that can be imported into databases or electronic field notes software. The user interacts with QRev through a tablet-friendly graphical user interface. This report is the manual for version 2.8 of QRev.

  14. Uncertainty of canal seepage losses estimated using flowing water balance with acoustic Doppler devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Chad A.; Gates, Timothy K.

    2014-09-01

    Seepage losses from unlined irrigation canals amount to a large fraction of the total volume of water diverted for agricultural use, posing problems to both water conservation and water quality. Quantifying these losses and identifying areas where they are most prominent are crucial for determining the severity of seepage-related complications and for assessing the potential benefits of seepage reduction technologies and materials. A relatively easy and inexpensive way to estimate losses over an extensive segment of a canal is the flowing water balance, or inflow-outflow, method. Such estimates, however, have long been considered fraught with ambiguity due both to measurement error and to spatial and temporal variability. This paper presents a water balance analysis that evaluates uncertainty in 60 tests on two typical earthen irrigation canals. Monte Carlo simulation is used to account for a number of different sources of uncertainty. Issues of errors in acoustic Doppler flow measurement, in water level readings, and in evaporation estimates are considered. Storage change and canal wetted perimeter area, affected by variability in the canal prism, as well as lagged vs. simultaneous measurements of discharge at the inflow and outflow ends also are addressed. Mean estimated seepage loss rates for the tested canal reaches ranged from about -0.005 (gain) to 0.110 m3 s-1 per hectare of canal wetted perimeter (or -0.043 to 0.95 m d-1) with estimated probability distributions revealing substantial uncertainty. Across the tests, the average coefficient of variation was about 240% and the average 90th inter-percentile range was 0.143 m3 s-1 per hectare (1.24 m d-1). Sensitivity analysis indicates that while the predominant influence on seepage uncertainty is error in measured discharge at the upstream and downstream ends of the canal test reach, the magnitude and uncertainty of storage change due to unsteady flow also is a significant influence. Recommendations are

  15. First results from Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler measurements of meltwater flux in a large supraglacial river in western Greenland compared with downstream proglacial river outflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitcher, L. H.; Smith, L. C.; Overstreet, B. T.; Chu, V. W.; Rennermalm, A. K.; Cooper, M. G.; Gleason, C. J.; Yang, K.

    2015-12-01

    A vast network of seasonally evolving, thermally eroding supraglacial rivers on the southwestern Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) is the preeminent transporter of meltwater across this area of the ablation zone. Supraglacial rivers are important for estimating surface water storage and transport into moulins and into the en-, sub-, and proglacial environments. Yet, little is known about their role in the GrIS cryo-hydrologic system. To that end, supraglacial river discharge in a large river, the "Rio Behar" (67.05°, -49.02°; ~75 km from the Kangerlussuaq International Airport), was measured in situ over 300 times: approximately four times per hour over three consecutive days from July 19 - 22, 2015. The Rio Behar drains a ~ 70 km2 ice catchment and enters a large moulin in the Watson River land-ice watershed in western Greenland. River discharge was measured using a Sontek M9 Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler. Each profile records water temperature, depth-integrated velocity, channel width and channel bathymetry. This novel dataset can be used to assess diurnal variations in river discharge, slope, velocity, stream power, and channel incision in order to enhance process-level understanding of GrIS meltwater routing, storage and transport. Future work will compare supraglacial river discharge in the Rio Behar with in situ estimates of proglacial river outflow upstream of the Watson River bridge in Kangerlussuaq, Greenland.

  16. Klamath River Water Quality and Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler Data from Link River Dam to Keno Dam, 2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sullivan, Annett B.; Deas, Michael L.; Asbill, Jessica; Kirshtein, Julie D.; Butler, Kenna; Stewart, Marc A.; Wellman, Roy W.; Vaughn, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    In 2007, the U.S. Geological Survey, Watercourse Engineering, and the Bureau of Reclamation began a project to construct and calibrate a water quality and hydrodynamic model of the 21-mile reach of the Klamath River from Link River Dam to Keno Dam. To provide a basis for this work, data collection and experimental work were planned for 2007 and 2008. This report documents sampling and analytical methods and presents data from the first year of work. To determine water velocities and discharge, a series of cross-sectional acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) measurements were made on the mainstem and four canals on May 30 and September 19, 2007. Water quality was sampled weekly at five mainstem sites and five tributaries from early April through early November, 2007. Constituents reported here include field parameters (water temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen concentration, specific conductance); total nitrogen and phosphorus; particulate carbon and nitrogen; filtered orthophosphate, nitrite, nitrite plus nitrate, ammonia, organic carbon, iron, silica, and alkalinity; specific UV absorbance at 254 nm; phytoplankton and zooplankton enumeration and species identification; and bacterial abundance and morphological subgroups. The ADCP measurements conducted in good weather conditions in May showed that four major canals accounted for most changes in discharge along the mainstem on that day. Direction of velocity at measured locations was fairly homogeneous across the channel, while velocities were generally lowest near the bottom, and highest near surface, ranging from 0.0 to 0.8 ft/s. Measurements in September, made in windy conditions, raised questions about the effect of wind on flow. Most nutrient and carbon concentrations were lowest in spring, increased and remained elevated in summer, and decreased in fall. Dissolved nitrite plus nitrate and nitrite had a different seasonal cycle and were below detection or at low concentration in summer. Many nutrient and

  17. Feasibility Study of Velocity and Temperature Measurements of an Arcjet Flow using Laser Resonance Doppler Velocimetric (LRDV) Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rob, Mohammad A.

    1996-01-01

    Thermal Protection System (TPS) materials are used in space vehicles to shield from high heating environment encountered during their atmospheric reentry. Arcjet wind tunnels are used to simulate the flowfield encountered by the spacecrafts, and are used for testing TPS materials. How well these tests simulate the actual heating environment encountered by space vehicles depends on the characteristics of the simulated flow. The flow characterization requires the determination of temperature, concentration, and velocity of the various atomic and molecular species present in the flow. However, determining these parameters requires a complex set of both analytical and experimental procedures. The ability to properly simulate the flight environment is directly related to the accuracy with which these techniques can be used to define the arcjet Laser Resonance Doppler Velocimetric (LRDV) technique can be used to accurately determine the velocity and temperature of a gaseous species. In this technique, the medium is probed with a laser beam that is in resonance with an absorbing transition of the species. The absorption lineshape is Doppler-shifted due to the flow velocity of the species, and the frequency shift is detected as the variation in intensity of the fluorescence emitted by the species. Thus a measurement of the Doppler shift and the width of a spectral line can give both the temperature and the velocity of the flowfield. This summer, our project was to make a feasibility study to set up an experimental arrangement for the laser resonance Doppler velocimetric technique using a ring dye laser. Experiments required troubleshooting, cleaning, testing, and alignment of two lasers and several diagnostics instruments. All instruments and lasers necessary for the project worked well, but the output power of the broadband fundamental dye laser was limited to about 20 mW. This was quite low as compared to that necessary to obtain second harmonic oscillation at 327.49 nm

  18. Non-invasive measurement of pulse wave velocity using transputer-based analysis of Doppler flow audio signals.

    PubMed

    Stewart, W R; Ramsey, M W; Jones, C J

    1994-08-01

    A system for the measurement of arterial pulse wave velocity is described. A personal computer (PC) plug-in transputer board is used to process the audio signals from two pocket Doppler ultrasound units. The transputer is used to provide a set of bandpass digital filters on two channels. The times of excursion of power through thresholds in each filter are recorded and used to estimate the onset of systolic flow. The system does not require an additional spectrum analyser and can work in real time. The transputer architecture provides for easy integration into any wider physiological measurement system. PMID:7994208

  19. Finite element analysis of solitary wave propagation by acoustic velocity method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruoka, Akira; Uchiyama, Ichiro; Kawahara, Mutsuto

    2016-10-01

    There is discontinuity between compressible and incompressible states in fluid flows. If we subtract the thermal effect from compressible fluid flows, we obtain adiabatic fluid flows, from which incompressible fluid flows are obtained if we let the acoustic velocity tend to infinity. Thus, we employ the idea of adiabatic fluid flows to solve incompressible flows. In the computation, the physical value of the acoustic velocity is employed. This idea corresponds to an extension of artificial compressibility under physical considerations. We present the new SUPG formulation of adiabatic fluid flows, by which not only the effect of SUPG but also those of PSPG and LSIC of incompressible fluid flows are derived. After the numerical verifications, three-dimensional solitary wave propagations are computed. Close agreement between computed and experimental values is obtained.

  20. Near field acoustic holography based on the equivalent source method and pressure-velocity transducers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong-Bin; Jacobsen, Finn; Bi, Chuan-Xing; Chen, Xin-Zhao

    2009-09-01

    The advantage of using the normal component of the particle velocity rather than the sound pressure in the hologram plane as the input of conventional spatial Fourier transform based near field acoustic holography (NAH) and also as the input of the statistically optimized variant of NAH has recently been demonstrated. This paper examines whether there might be a similar advantage in using the particle velocity as the input of NAH based on the equivalent source method (ESM). Error sensitivity considerations indicate that ESM-based NAH is less sensitive to measurement errors when it is based on particle velocity input data than when it is based on measurements of sound pressure data, and this is confirmed by a simulation study and by experimental results. A method that combines pressure- and particle velocity-based reconstructions in order to distinguish between contributions to the sound field generated by sources on the two sides of the hologram plane is also examined.

  1. Coupling of dust acoustic and shear mode through velocity shear in a strongly coupled dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Garai, S. Janaki, M. S.; Chakrabarti, N.

    2015-07-15

    In the strongly coupled limit, the generalized hydrodynamic model shows that a dusty plasma, acquiring significant rigidity, is able to support a “shear” like mode. It is being demonstrated here that in presence of velocity shear gradient, this shear like mode gets coupled with the dust acoustic mode which is generated by the compressibility effect of the dust fluid due to the finite temperatures of the dust, electron, and ion fluids. In the local analysis, the dispersion relation shows that velocity shear gradient not only couples the two modes but is also responsible for the instabilities of that coupled mode which is confirmed by nonlocal analysis with numerical techniques.

  2. Impact of acoustic velocity structure to measurement of ocean bottom crustal deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikuta, R.; Tadokoro, K.; Okuda, T.; Sugimoto, S.; Watanabe, T.; Eto, S.; Ando, M.

    2010-12-01

    We are developing a geodetic method of monitoring crustal deformation under the ocean using kinematic GPS and acoustic ranging. The goal of our research is to achieve sub-centimeter accuracy in measuring oceanic crustal deformation by a very short-time measurement like 10 hours. In this study, we focused on lateral variation of acoustic velocity structure in seawater and introduced an inclined acoustic velocity structure model to improve accuracy of the measurement. We have a few measurement sites along Nankai trough, Japan. In each sites, we deployed a trio of transponders on ocean floor (seafloor benchmark units) within distance comparable with the depth. An ultrasonic signal is generated from a surface vessel drifting over the benchmark unit, which is received and replied by the benchmark unit. In this system, both acoustic velocity structure and the benchmark unit positions were determined simultaneously for the each measurement using a tomographic technique. This tomographic technique was adopted on an assumption that the acoustic velocity structure is horizontally layered and changes only in time, not in space. Ikuta et al., (AGU fall meeting 2009) reported an approach to improve accuracy of benchmark positioning using a new additional assumption. The additional assumption was that the configuration of the transponders trio constituting one benchmark unit does not change. They determined the time evolution of weight center for the fixed transponder triangle between different measurements using all repetitively obtained data sets at once. This is contrasting to the previous method in which each data set for different measurement was solved independently. This assumption worked well in reducing number of unknown parameters. As a result, repeatability of benchmark positioning improved from 5 cm to 3 cm. We conducted numerical experiments synthesizing acoustic travel-time data to evaluate the robustness of this new approach. When acoustic travel-time data is

  3. Doppler effect for sound emitted by a moving airborne source and received by acoustic sensors located above and below the sea surface.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, B G

    1993-12-01

    The acoustic emissions from a propeller-driven aircraft are received by a microphone mounted just above ground level and then by a hydrophone located below the sea surface. The dominant feature in the output spectrum of each acoustic sensor is the spectral line corresponding to the propeller blade rate. A frequency estimation technique is applied to the acoustic data from each sensor so that the Doppler shift in the blade rate can be observed at short time intervals during the aircraft's transit overhead. For each acoustic sensor, the observed variation with time of the Doppler-shifted blade rate is compared with the variation predicted by a simple ray-theory model that assumes the atmosphere and the sea are distinct isospeed sound propagation media separated by a plane boundary. The results of the comparison are shown for an aircraft flying with a speed of about 250 kn at altitudes of 500, 700, and 1000 ft.

  4. Blood flow velocity vector field reconstruction from dual-beam bidirectional Doppler OCT measurements in retinal veins

    PubMed Central

    Aschinger, Gerold C.; Schmetterer, Leopold; Doblhoff-Dier, Veronika; Leitgeb, Rainer A.; Garhöfer, Gerhard; Gröschl, Martin; Werkmeister, René M.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the possibility to reconstruct the actual blood flow velocity vector field in retinal microvessels from dual-beam bidirectional Doppler optical coherence tomography measurements. First, for a better understanding of measured phase patterns, several flow situations were simulated on the basis of the known dual beam measurement geometry. We were able to extract the vector field parameters that determine the measured phase pattern, allowing for the development of an algorithm to reconstruct the velocity vector field from measured phase data. In a next step, measurements were performed at a straight vessel section and at a venous convergence; the obtained phase data were evaluated by means of the new approach. For the straight vessel section, the reconstructed flow velocity vector field yielded a parabolic flow. For the venous convergence, however, the reconstructed vector field deviated from a parabolic profile, but was in very good accordance with the simulated vector field for the given vessel geometry. The proposed algorithm allows predictions of the velocity vector field. Moreover, the algorithm is also sensitive to directional changes of the flow velocity as small as <1°, thereby offering insight in the flow characteristics of the non-Newtonian fluid blood in microvessels. PMID:26137367

  5. Blood flow velocity vector field reconstruction from dual-beam bidirectional Doppler OCT measurements in retinal veins.

    PubMed

    Aschinger, Gerold C; Schmetterer, Leopold; Doblhoff-Dier, Veronika; Leitgeb, Rainer A; Garhöfer, Gerhard; Gröschl, Martin; Werkmeister, René M

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the possibility to reconstruct the actual blood flow velocity vector field in retinal microvessels from dual-beam bidirectional Doppler optical coherence tomography measurements. First, for a better understanding of measured phase patterns, several flow situations were simulated on the basis of the known dual beam measurement geometry. We were able to extract the vector field parameters that determine the measured phase pattern, allowing for the development of an algorithm to reconstruct the velocity vector field from measured phase data. In a next step, measurements were performed at a straight vessel section and at a venous convergence; the obtained phase data were evaluated by means of the new approach. For the straight vessel section, the reconstructed flow velocity vector field yielded a parabolic flow. For the venous convergence, however, the reconstructed vector field deviated from a parabolic profile, but was in very good accordance with the simulated vector field for the given vessel geometry. The proposed algorithm allows predictions of the velocity vector field. Moreover, the algorithm is also sensitive to directional changes of the flow velocity as small as <1°, thereby offering insight in the flow characteristics of the non-Newtonian fluid blood in microvessels. PMID:26137367

  6. Blood flow velocity vector field reconstruction from dual-beam bidirectional Doppler OCT measurements in retinal veins.

    PubMed

    Aschinger, Gerold C; Schmetterer, Leopold; Doblhoff-Dier, Veronika; Leitgeb, Rainer A; Garhöfer, Gerhard; Gröschl, Martin; Werkmeister, René M

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the possibility to reconstruct the actual blood flow velocity vector field in retinal microvessels from dual-beam bidirectional Doppler optical coherence tomography measurements. First, for a better understanding of measured phase patterns, several flow situations were simulated on the basis of the known dual beam measurement geometry. We were able to extract the vector field parameters that determine the measured phase pattern, allowing for the development of an algorithm to reconstruct the velocity vector field from measured phase data. In a next step, measurements were performed at a straight vessel section and at a venous convergence; the obtained phase data were evaluated by means of the new approach. For the straight vessel section, the reconstructed flow velocity vector field yielded a parabolic flow. For the venous convergence, however, the reconstructed vector field deviated from a parabolic profile, but was in very good accordance with the simulated vector field for the given vessel geometry. The proposed algorithm allows predictions of the velocity vector field. Moreover, the algorithm is also sensitive to directional changes of the flow velocity as small as <1°, thereby offering insight in the flow characteristics of the non-Newtonian fluid blood in microvessels.

  7. Use of Doppler radar to assess ice cloud particle fall velocity-size relations for remote sensing and climate studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matrosov, Sergey Y.; Heymsfield, Andrew J.

    2000-09-01

    Knowledge of ice crystal terminal velocities, both for individual crystals and for size distributions, is important for an adequate representation of ice particle sedimentation in climate models. While the terminal velocities (υt) of individual crystals of simple shapes have been measured, theoretical relations of the form υt = ADB (where D is the maximum particle dimension), obtained using expressions for the aerodynamic drag force, are often more useful because they can be applied to a wide range of particle sizes and heights and temperatures in the atmosphere. For high tropospheric ice clouds the coefficient A has been found to vary over 1 order of magnitude; the exponent B is generally within the range 0.7-1.4. Aerodynamic drag force calculations show that A and B are related. A and B can also be used to characterize terminal-velocity-particle characteristic size relations for size distributions. In this study we use collocated, vertically pointing measurements of ice cloud radar reflectivity, Doppler velocity, and IR brightness temperatures to estimate the vertical profiles of cloud particle characteristic size, cloud ice water content, and vertically averaged value of the coefficient A, emphasizing cirrus clouds. We analyze variations in terminal-velocity-size relations for individual particles and corresponding variations for ensembles of particles: for example, in relations between the reflectivity-weighted terminal velocity and the median volume size and between the mass-weighted terminal velocity and the median volume size. The retrievals indicate that A ranges from ˜250 to almost 4000 (cgs units), similar to the range found from the theoretical calculations. The coefficient A tends to decrease as a characteristic particle size (e.g., median size) increases. As a simplification for climate modeling efforts, we present an empirical relation between median size and A, although there is a fair amount of variability about this relation. Using the Doppler

  8. Effects of volume averaging on the line spectra of vertical velocity from multiple-Doppler radar observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gal-Chen, T.; Wyngaard, J. C.

    1982-01-01

    Calculations of the ratio of the true one-dimensional spectrum of vertical velocity and that measured with multiple-Doppler radar beams are presented. It was assumed that the effects of pulse volume averaging and objective analysis routines is replacement of a point measurement with a volume integral. A u and v estimate was assumed to be feasible when orthogonal radars are not available. Also, the target fluid was configured as having an infinite vertical dimension, zero vertical velocity at the top and bottom, and having homogeneous and isotropic turbulence with a Kolmogorov energy spectrum. The ratio obtained indicated that equal resolutions among radars yields a monotonically decreasing, wavenumber-dependent response function. A gain of 0.95 was demonstrated in an experimental situation with 40 levels. Possible errors introduced when using unequal resolution radars were discussed. Finally, it was found that, for some flows, the extent of attenuation depends on the number of vertical levels resolvable by the radars.

  9. First Scientific Working Group Meeting of Airborne Doppler Lidar Wind Velocity Measurement Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, J. W. (Editor)

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of the first scientific working group meeting was fourfold: (1) to identify flight test options for engineering verification of the MSFC Doppler Lidar; (2) to identify flight test options for gathering data for scientific/technology applications; (3) to identify additional support equipment needed on the CV 990 aircraft for the flight tests; and (4) to identify postflight data processing and data sets requirements. The working group identified approximately ten flight options for gathering data on atmospheric dynamics processes, including turbulence, valley breezes, and thunderstorm cloud anvil and cold air outflow dynamics. These test options will be used as a basis for planning the fiscal year 1981 tests of the Doppler Lidar system.

  10. Multi-channel laser Doppler velocimetry using a two-dimensional optical fiber array for obtaining instantaneous velocity distribution characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyoden, Tomoaki; Yasue, Youichi; Ishida, Hiroki; Akiguchi, Shunsuke; Andoh, Tsugunobu; Takada, Yogo; Teranishi, Tsunenobu; Hachiga, Tadashi

    2015-01-01

    A laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV) has been developed that is capable of performing two-dimensional (2D) cross-sectional measurements. It employs two horizontal laser light sheets that intersect at an angle of 13.3°. Since the intersection region is thin, it can be used to approximately determine the 2D flow field. An 8 × 8 array of optical fibers is used to simultaneously measure Doppler frequencies at 64 points. Experiments were conducted to assess the performance of the LDV, and it was found to be capable of obtaining spatial and temporal velocity information at multiple points in a flow field. The technique is fast, noninvasive, and accurate over long sampling periods. Furthermore, its applicability to an actual flow field was confirmed by measuring the temporal velocity distribution of a pulsatile flow in a rectangular flow channel with an obstruction. The proposed device is thus a useful, compact optical instrument for conducting simultaneous 2D cross-sectional multipoint measurements.

  11. Embedded Fiber Optic Probes to Measure Detonation Velocities Using the Photonic Doppler Velocimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Hare, D E; Holtkamp, D B; Strand, O T

    2010-03-02

    Detonation velocities for high explosives can be in the 7 to 8 km/s range. Previous work has shown that these velocities may be measured by inserting an optical fiber probe into the explosive assembly and recording the velocity time history using a Fabry-Perot velocimeter. The measured velocity using this method, however, is the actual velocity multiplied times the refractive index of the fiber core, which is on the order of 1.5. This means that the velocimeter diagnostic must be capable of measuring velocities as high as 12 km/s. Until recently, a velocity of 12 km/s was beyond the maximum velocity limit of a homodyne-based velocimeter. The limiting component in a homodyne system is usually the digitizer. Recently, however, digitizers have come on the market with 20 GHz bandwidth and 50 GS/s sample rate. Such a digitizer coupled with high bandwidth detectors now have the total bandwidth required to make velocity measurements in the 12 km/s range. This paper describes measurements made of detonation velocities using a high bandwidth homodyne system.

  12. Abnormal acoustic wave velocities in basaltic and (Fe,Al)-bearing silicate glasses at high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jin; Lin, Jung-Fu

    2014-12-01

    We have measured acoustic VP and VS velocities of (Fe,Al)-bearing MgSiO3 silicate glasses and an Icelandic basalt glass up to 25 GPa. The velocity profiles of the (Fe,Al)-bearing and basaltic silicate glasses display decreased VP and VS with minima at approximately 5 and 2 GPa, respectively, which could be explained by the mode softening in the aluminosilicate networks. Our results represent the first observation of such velocity softening extending into the chemically complex basaltic glass at a relatively low transition pressure, which is likely due to its degree of polymerization, while the Fe and Al substitutions reduce sound velocities in MgSiO3 glass. If the velocity softening in the basaltic and silicate glasses can be used as analogs for understanding melts in Earth's interior, these observations suggest that the melt fraction needed to account for the velocity reduction in the upper mantle low-velocity zone may be smaller than previously thought.

  13. Acoustic impedance of micro perforated membranes: Velocity continuity condition at the perforation boundary.

    PubMed

    Li, Chenxi; Cazzolato, Ben; Zander, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    The classic analytical model for the sound absorption of micro perforated materials is well developed and is based on a boundary condition where the velocity of the material is assumed to be zero, which is accurate when the material vibration is negligible. This paper develops an analytical model for finite-sized circular micro perforated membranes (MPMs) by applying a boundary condition such that the velocity of air particles on the hole wall boundary is equal to the membrane vibration velocity (a zero-slip condition). The acoustic impedance of the perforation, which varies with its position, is investigated. A prediction method for the overall impedance of the holes and the combined impedance of the MPM is also provided. The experimental results for four different MPM configurations are used to validate the model and good agreement between the experimental and predicted results is achieved. PMID:26827008

  14. Acoustic and aerodynamic performance investigation of inverted velocity profile coannular plug nozzles. [variable cycle engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knott, P. R.; Blozy, J. T.; Staid, P. S.

    1981-01-01

    The results of model scale parametric static and wind tunnel aerodynamic performance tests on unsuppressed coannular plug nozzle configurations with inverted velocity profile are discussed. The nozzle configurations are high-radius-ratio coannular plug nozzles applicable to dual-stream exhaust systems typical of a variable cycle engine for Advanced Supersonic Transport application. In all, seven acoustic models and eight aerodynamic performance models were tested. The nozzle geometric variables included outer stream radius ratio, inner stream to outer stream ratio, and inner stream plug shape. When compared to a conical nozzle at the same specific thrust, the results of the static acoustic tests with the coannular nozzles showed noise reductions of up to 7 PNdB. Extensive data analysis showed that the overall acoustic results can be well correlated using the mixed stream velocity and the mixed stream density. Results also showed that suppression levels are geometry and flow regulation dependent with the outer stream radius ratio, inner stream-to-outer stream velocity ratio and inner stream velocity ratio and inner stream plug shape, as the primary suppression parameters. In addition, high-radius ratio coannular plug nozzles were found to yield shock associated noise level reductions relative to a conical nozzle. The wind tunnel aerodynamic tests showed that static and simulated flight thrust coefficient at typical takeoff conditions are quite good - up to 0.98 at static conditions and 0.974 at a takeoff Mach number of 0.36. At low inner stream flow conditions significant thrust loss was observed. Using an inner stream conical plug resulted in 1% to 2% higher performance levels than nozzle geometries using a bent inner plug.

  15. The leicester Doppler phantom--a digital electronic phantom for ultrasound pulsed Doppler system testing.

    PubMed

    Gittins, John; Martin, Kevin

    2010-04-01

    Doppler flow and string phantoms have been used to assess the performance of ultrasound Doppler systems in terms of parameters such as sensitivity, velocity accuracy and sample volume registration. However, because of the nature of their construction, they cannot challenge the accuracy and repeatability of modern digital ultrasound systems or give objective measures of system performance. Electronic Doppler phantoms are able to make use of electronically generated test signals, which may be controlled precisely in terms of frequency, amplitude and timing. The Leicester Electronic Doppler Phantom uses modern digital signal processing methods and field programmable gate array technology to overcome some of the limitations of previously described electronic phantoms. In its present form, it is able to give quantitative graphical assessments of frequency response and range gate characteristics, as well as measures of dynamic range and velocity measurement accuracy. The use of direct acoustic coupling eliminates uncertainties caused by Doppler beam effects, such as intrinsic spectral broadening, but prevents their evaluation.

  16. Aerodynamic and acoustic investigation of inverted velocity profile coannular exhaust nozzle models and development of aerodynamic and acoustic prediction procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, R. S.; Nelson, D. P.; Stevens, B. S.

    1979-01-01

    Five co-annular nozzle models, covering a systematic variation of nozzle geometry, were tested statically over a range of exhaust conditions including inverted velocity profile (IVP) (fan to primary stream velocity ratio 1) and non IVP profiles. Fan nozzle pressure ratio (FNPR) was varied from 1.3 to 4.1 at primary nozzle pressure ratios (PNPR) of 1.53 and 2.0. Fan stream temperatures of 700 K (1260 deg R) and 1089 K(1960 deg R) were tested with primary stream temperatures of 700 K (1260 deg R), 811 K (1460 deg R), and 1089 K (1960 deg R). At fan and primary stream velocities of 610 and 427 m/sec (2000 and 1400 ft/sec), respectively, increasing fan radius ratio from 0.69 to 0.83 reduced peak perceived noise level (PNL) 3 dB, and an increase in primary radius ratio from 0 to 0.81 (fan radius ratio constant at 0.83) reduced peak PNL an additional 1.0 dB. There were no noise reductions at a fan stream velocity of 853 m/sec (2800 ft/sec). Increasing fan radius ratio from 0.69 to 0.83 reduced nozzle thrust coefficient 1.2 to 1.5% at a PNPR of 1.53, and 1.7 to 2.0% at a PNPR of 2.0. The developed acoustic prediction procedure collapsed the existing data with standard deviation varying from + or - 8 dB to + or - 7 dB. The aerodynamic performance prediction procedure collapsed thrust coefficient measurements to within + or - .004 at a FNPR of 4.0 and a PNPR of 2.0.

  17. Investigation of contact acoustic nonlinearity in delaminations by shearographic imaging, laser doppler vibrometric scanning and finite difference modeling.

    PubMed

    Sarens, Bart; Verstraeten, Bert; Glorieux, Christ; Kalogiannakis, Georgios; Van Hemelrijck, Danny

    2010-06-01

    Full-field dynamic shearography and laser Doppler vibrometric scanning are used to investigate the local contact acoustic nonlinear generation of delamination-induced effects on the vibration of a harmonically excited composite plate containing an artificial defect. Nonlinear elastic behavior caused by the stress-dependent boundary conditions at the delamination interfaces of a circular defect is also simulated by a 3-D second-order, finite-difference, staggered-grid model (displacement-stress formulation). Both the experimental and simulated data reveal an asymmetric motion of the layer above the delamination, which acts as a membrane vibrating with enhanced displacement amplitude around a finite offset displacement. The spectrum of the membrane motion is enriched with clapping-induced harmonics of the excitation frequency. In case of a sufficiently thin and soft membrane, the simulations reveal clear modal behavior at sub-harmonic frequencies caused by inelastic clapping. PMID:20529713

  18. Application of acoustic tomography to reconstruct the horizontal flow velocity field in a shallow river

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razaz, Mahdi; Kawanisi, Kiyosi; Kaneko, Arata; Nistor, Ioan

    2015-12-01

    A novel acoustic tomographic measurement system capable of resolving sound travel time in extremely shallow rivers is introduced and the results of an extensive field measurements campaign are presented and further discussed. Acoustic pulses were transmitted over a wide frequency band of 20-35 kHz between eight transducers for about a week in a meandering reach of theBāsen River, Hiroshima, Japan. The purpose of the field experiment was validating the concept of acoustic tomography in rivers for visualizing current fields. The particular novelty of the experiment resides in its unusual tomographic features: subbasin scale (100 m × 270 m) and shallowness (0.5-3.0 m) of the physical domain, frequency of the transmitted acoustic signals (central frequency of 30 kHz), and the use of small sampling intervals (105 s). Inverse techniques with no a priori statistical information were used to estimate the depth-average current velocity components from differential travel times. Zeroth-order Tikhonov regularization, in conjunction with L-curve method deployed to stabilize the solution and to determine the weighting factor appearing in the inverse analysis. Concurrent direct environmental measurements were provided in the form of ADCP readings close to the right and left bank. Very good agreement found between along-channel velocities larger than 0.2 m/s obtained from the two techniques. Inverted quantities were, however, underestimated, perhaps due to vicinity of the ADCPs to the banks and strong effect of river geometry on the readings. In general, comparing the visualized currents with direct nodal measurements illustrate the plausibility of the tomographically reconstructed flow structures.

  19. Retrieval of Raindrop Size Distribution, Vertical Air Velocity and Water Vapor Attenuation Using Dual-Wavelength Doppler Radar Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heymsfield, Gerald M.; Tian, Lin; Li, Lihua; Srivastava, C.

    2005-01-01

    Two techniques for retrieving the slope and intercept parameters of an assumed exponential raindrop size distribution (RSD), vertical air velocity, and attenuation by precipitation and water vapor in light stratiform rain using observations by airborne, nadir looking dual-wavelength (X-band, 3.2 cm and W-band, 3.2 mm) radars are presented. In both techniques, the slope parameter of the RSD and the vertical air velocity are retrieved using only the mean Doppler velocities at the two wavelengths. In the first method, the intercept of the RSD is estimated from the observed reflectivity at the longer wavelength assuming no attenuation at that wavelength. The attenuation of the shorter wavelength radiation by precipitation and water vapor are retrieved using the observed reflectivity at the shorter wavelength. In the second technique, it is assumed that the longer wavelength suffers attenuation only in the melting band. Then, assuming a distribution of water vapor, the melting band attenuation at both wavelengths and the rain attenuation at the shorter wavelength are retrieved. Results of the retrievals are discussed and several physically meaningful results are presented.

  20. The effect of maternal betamethasone administration on Doppler flow velocity parameters of the fetal branch pulmonary artery.

    PubMed

    Ustunyurt, O B; Ustunyurt, E; Korkmazer, E; Altug, N; Bilge, U; Danisman, N

    2014-08-01

    To investigate the effects of antenatal betamethasone on fetal pulmonary blood flow velocity waveforms. The study comprised 28 women with singleton pregnancies at high risk for preterm delivery. They were treated with two doses of 12 mg betamethasone intramuscularly 24 h apart to enhance lung maturity. Flow velocity waveforms were recorded with Doppler ultrasound from the middle segment of pulmonary artery (PA). Compared with the pretreatment mean value, a significant decrease in the pulmonary artery pulsatility (PI) and the resistance indexes (RI) was noted at 24 h and 48 h after the administration of first dose of betamethasone (p = 0.022 and p = 0.018 for PI and p = 0.001 and p = 0.004 for RI, respectively). After 7 days, the pulmonary artery velocity waveforms returned to the types of waveform observed before treatment (p = 0.216 for PI and p = 0.249 for RI). Maternal antenatal betamethasone resulted in a significant transient decrease in the pulsatility and the resistance indexes in the pulmonary artery. These findings indicate a direct effect of betamethasone on fetal pulmonary circulation.

  1. An experimental investigation of throughflow velocities in two-dimensional fluidized bed bubbles: Laser Doppler anemometer measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Gautam, M. . Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering); Jurewicz, J.T. ); Kale, S.R. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1994-09-01

    Detailed nonintrusive measurements have been made to determine the throughflow velocity in isolated fluidized bed bubbles. In air-fluidized beds, the throughflow component has been rather neglected and measurements of the visible bubbleflow alone have, therefore, failed to clarify the overall distribution of gas flow between the phases. A single component fiber optic laser Doppler anemometer was used to map the fluid flow through a bubble rising in a two-dimensional bed. The bed was fluidized at a superficial velocity slightly than incipient. The conditioned sampling technique developed to characterize the periodic nature of the bubble phase flow revealed that the throughflow velocity in two-dimensional beds increases linearly with increasing distance from the distributor, thereby enhancing the convective component in the interphase mass transfer process. Bubble growth was accounted for and the end-effects were minimized. Dependence of the bubble throughflow on the elongation of the bubble was observed thus confirming the theoretical analysis of some previous investigators. However, experimental evidence presented in this paper showed that the existing models fail to accurately predict the convective component in the bubble phase of two-dimensional fluidized beds.

  2. Acoustic wave velocities in two-dimensional composite structures based on acousto-optical crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mal'neva, P. V.; Trushin, A. S.

    2015-04-01

    Sound velocities in two-dimensional composite structures based on isotropic and anisotropic acousto-optical crystals have been determined by numerical simulations. The isotropic materials are represented by fused quartz (SiO2) and flint glass, while anisotropic materials include tetragonal crystals of paratellurite (TeO2) and rutile (TiO2) and a trigonal crystal of tellurium (Te). It is established that the acoustic anisotropy of periodic composite structures strongly depends on both the chemical composition and geometric parameters of components.

  3. Real-time three-dimensional color Doppler echocardiography for characterizing the spatial velocity distribution and quantifying the peak flow rate in the left ventricular outflow tract

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsujino, H.; Jones, M.; Shiota, T.; Qin, J. X.; Greenberg, N. L.; Cardon, L. A.; Morehead, A. J.; Zetts, A. D.; Travaglini, A.; Bauer, F.; Panza, J. A.; Thomas, J. D.

    2001-01-01

    Quantification of flow with pulsed-wave Doppler assumes a "flat" velocity profile in the left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT), which observation refutes. Recent development of real-time, three-dimensional (3-D) color Doppler allows one to obtain an entire cross-sectional velocity distribution of the LVOT, which is not possible using conventional 2-D echo. In an animal experiment, the cross-sectional color Doppler images of the LVOT at peak systole were derived and digitally transferred to a computer to visualize and quantify spatial velocity distributions and peak flow rates. Markedly skewed profiles, with higher velocities toward the septum, were consistently observed. Reference peak flow rates by electromagnetic flow meter correlated well with 3-D peak flow rates (r = 0.94), but with an anticipated underestimation. Real-time 3-D color Doppler echocardiography was capable of determining cross-sectional velocity distributions and peak flow rates, demonstrating the utility of this new method for better understanding and quantifying blood flow phenomena.

  4. Effect of Anisotropic Velocity Structure on Acoustic Emission Source Location during True-Triaxial Deformation Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghofrani Tabari, Mehdi; Goodfellow, Sebastian; Young, R. Paul

    2016-04-01

    Although true-triaxial testing (TTT) of rocks is now more extensive worldwide, stress-induced heterogeneity due to the existence of several loading boundary effects is not usually accounted for and simplified anisotropic models are used. This study focuses on the enhanced anisotropic velocity structure to improve acoustic emission (AE) analysis for an enhanced interpretation of induced fracturing. Data from a TTT on a cubic sample of Fontainebleau sandstone is used in this study to evaluate the methodology. At different stages of the experiment the True-Triaxial Geophysical Imaging Cell (TTGIC), armed with an ultrasonic and AE monitoring system, performed several velocity surveys to image velocity structure of the sample. Going beyond a hydrostatic stress state (poro-elastic phase), the rock sample went through a non-dilatational elastic phase, a dilatational non-damaging elasto-plastic phase containing initial AE activity and finally a dilatational and damaging elasto-plastic phase up to the failure point. The experiment was divided into these phases based on the information obtained from strain, velocity and AE streaming data. Analysis of the ultrasonic velocity survey data discovered that a homogeneous anisotropic core in the center of the sample is formed with ellipsoidal symmetry under the standard polyaxial setup. Location of the transducer shots were improved by implementation of different velocity models for the sample starting from isotropic and homogeneous models going toward anisotropic and heterogeneous models. The transducer shot locations showed a major improvement after the velocity model corrections had been applied especially at the final phase of the experiment. This location improvement validated our velocity model at the final phase of the experiment consisting lower-velocity zones bearing partially saturated fractures. The ellipsoidal anisotropic velocity model was also verified at the core of the cubic rock specimen by AE event location of

  5. Ultrasonic database development for the acoustic inspection device: the velocity-attenuation measurement system (VAMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, Aaron A.; Burghard, Brion J.; Valencia, Juan D.; Samuel, Todd J.

    2004-07-01

    The inspection of sealed containers is a critical task for personnel charged with enforcing government policies, maintaining public safety, and ensuring national security. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has developed a portable, handheld acoustic inspection device (AID) that provides non-invasive container interrogation and material identification capabilities. The AID technology has been deployed worldwide and user"s are providing feedback and requesting additional capabilities and functionality. Recently, PNNL has developed a laboratory-based system for automated, ultrasonic characterization of fluids to support database development for the AID. Using pulse-echo ultrasound, ultrasonic pulses are launched into a container or bulk-solid commodity. The return echoes from these pulses are analyzed in terms of time-of-flight and frequency content (as a function of temperature) to extract physical property measurements (acoustic velocity and attenuation) of the material under test. These measured values are then compared to a tailored database of materials and fluids property data acquired using the Velocity-Attenuation Measurement System (VAMS). This bench-top platform acquires key ultrasonic property measurements as a function of temperature and frequency. This paper describes the technical basis for operation of the VAMS, recent enhancements to the measurement algorithms for both the VAMS and AID technologies, and new measurement data from laboratory testing and performance demonstration activities. Applications for homeland security and counterterrorism, law enforcement, drug-interdiction and fuel transportation compliance activities will be discussed.

  6. Method and apparatus for ultrasonic doppler velocimetry using speed of sound and reflection mode pulsed wideband doppler

    DOEpatents

    Shekarriz, Alireza; Sheen, David M.

    2000-01-01

    According to the present invention, a method and apparatus rely upon tomographic measurement of the speed of sound and fluid velocity in a pipe. The invention provides a more accurate profile of velocity within flow fields where the speed of sound varies within the cross-section of the pipe. This profile is obtained by reconstruction of the velocity profile from the local speed of sound measurement simultaneously with the flow velocity. The method of the present invention is real-time tomographic ultrasonic Doppler velocimetry utilizing a to plurality of ultrasonic transmission and reflection measurements along two orthogonal sets of parallel acoustic lines-of-sight. The fluid velocity profile and the acoustic velocity profile are determined by iteration between determining a fluid velocity profile and measuring local acoustic velocity until convergence is reached.

  7. Evaluation of coronary flow velocity reserve in homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia by transthoracic Doppler echocardiography and dual-source computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ya; Zhang, Xiaoshan; Li, Rongjuan; Ren, Hongyan; Wang, Zheng; Li, Zhian; Lin, Jie; Wang, Luya; Yu, Wei; Zhang, Zhaoqi

    2010-10-01

    Homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HoFH) is a rare disorder characterized by the early onset of atherosclerosis and usually occurs at the ostia of coronary arteries. In this study, we used transthoracic Doppler echocardiography (TTDE) to evaluate the dynamic changes of coronary flow in HoFH patients and to detect aortic and coronary atherosclerosis by dual-source computed tomography (DSCT). We studied 20 HoFH patients (12 females, 8 males, mean age 13.1 ± 5.3 years, with a mean low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol of 583 ± 113 mg/dL) and 15 control patients (8 females, 7 males, mean age 15.2 ± 6.9 years, with a mean LDL cholesterol 128 ± 71 mg/dL) using TTDE and DSCT. None of the patients showed evidence of ischemia with standard exercise testing. Though the baseline coronary flow was similar between HoFH patients and normal controls, the hyperemic flow velocities and, thus, the coronary flow velocity reserve (CFVR) were significantly lower in those with HoFH. All HoFH patients had aortic plaques, nine of them with the coronary artery ostia simultaneously, who had significantly higher LDL-cholesterol and lower CFVR than those without ostia plaques. Our data demonstrated that TTDE together with DSCT could be a useful noninvasive method for detection of coronary flow dynamics and atherosclerosis specifically in HoFH subjects with coronary ostia. PMID:20800956

  8. Acoustic radiation- and streaming-induced microparticle velocities determined by microparticle image velocimetry in an ultrasound symmetry plane.

    PubMed

    Barnkob, Rune; Augustsson, Per; Laurell, Thomas; Bruus, Henrik

    2012-11-01

    We present microparticle image velocimetry measurements of suspended microparticles of diameters from 0.6 to 10 μm undergoing acoustophoresis in an ultrasound symmetry plane in a microchannel. The motion of the smallest particles is dominated by the Stokes drag from the induced acoustic streaming flow, while the motion of the largest particles is dominated by the acoustic radiation force. For all particle sizes we predict theoretically how much of the particle velocity is due to radiation and streaming, respectively. These predictions include corrections for particle-wall interactions and ultrasonic thermoviscous effects and match our measurements within the experimental uncertainty. Finally, we predict theoretically and confirm experimentally that the ratio between the acoustic radiation- and streaming-induced particle velocities is proportional to the actuation frequency, the acoustic contrast factor, and the square of the particle size, while it is inversely proportional to the kinematic viscosity.

  9. Measurements of the hole boring velocity from Doppler shifted harmonic emission from solid targets

    SciTech Connect

    Zepf, M.; Castro-Colin, M.; Chambers, D.; Preston, S.G.; Wark, J.S.; Zhang, J.; Danson, C.N.; Neely, D.; Norreys, P.A.; Dangor, A.E.; Dyson, A.; Lee, P.; Fews, A.P.; Gibbon, P.; Moustaizis, S.

    1996-09-01

    The fast ignitor scheme for inertial confinement fusion requires forward driving of the critical density surface by light pressure (hole boring) to allow energy deposition close to the dense fuel. The recession velocity of the critical density surface has been observed to be {ital v}/{ital c}=0.015 at an irradiance of 1.0{times}10{sup 19} Wcm{sup {minus}2} at a wavelength of 1.05 micron, in quantitative agreement with modeling. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  10. Measurement and Analysis of Coherent Flow Structures over Sand Dunes in the Missouri River near St. Louis, MO, by means of an Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler and a Multibeam Echo Sounder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boldt, J.; Oberg, K. A.; Best, J. L.; Parsons, D. R.

    2011-12-01

    The topology, magnitude, and sediment transport capabilities of large-scale turbulence generated over alluvial sand dunes is influential in creating and maintaining dune morphology and in dominating both the flow field and the transport of suspended sediment above dune-covered beds. Combined measurements by means of an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) and a multibeam echo sounder (MBES) were made in order to examine flow over a series of sand dunes in the Missouri River, near St. Louis, MO, USA in October 2007. The bed topography of the Missouri River was mapped using a RESON 7125 MBES immediately before the ADCP data collection. Time series of velocity and acoustic backscatter were measured using a down-looking 1200 kHz ADCP while anchored at two locations in the dune field. The ADCP used in this study has a sampling rate of 2-3 Hz with 20-25 cm bin sizes. Two time series were collected having durations of 712 and 589 seconds at one location, while the third time series, collected about 4 meters upstream, was 2,270 seconds in duration. Measured streamwise velocities ranged from 0.1 to 2.7 ms-1 for all three stationary time series. Sediment concentration profiles were obtained at the same two locations as the stationary ADCP data using a P-61 sediment sampler and were compared to ADCP acoustic backscatter. Characteristics of turbulent flow structures in a sand bed river are presented. This paper presents data that can be used to investigate the issue of obtaining reliable estimates of turbulence parameters with an ADCP. The analyses will include mean velocity profiles, turbulence intensities, Reynolds shear stresses, quadrant analysis, power spectra, cross-correlation, and frequency analysis. Semi-periodic patterns were observed in each time series, characterized by periods of elevated acoustic backscatter with positive vertical velocities, followed by reduced acoustic backscatter with negative vertical velocities. The utility and limitations of combined

  11. Label-free in-vivo measurement of lymph flow velocity using Doppler optical coherence tomography (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blatter, Cedric; Meijer, Eelco F. J.; Nam, Ahhyun S.; Jones, Dennis; Padera, Timothy P.; Vakoc, Benjamin J.

    2016-03-01

    Alterations in lymphatic network function contribute to the lymphedema development, cancer progression and impairment in regional immune function. However, there are limited tools available to directly measure lymphatic vessel function and transport in vivo. Existing approaches such as fluorescence recovery after photo-bleaching (FRAP) require injection of exogenous labels which intrinsically alter the physiology of the local lymphatic network. A label-free approach to imaging lymph flow in vivo would provide direct and unaltered measurements of lymphatic vessel transport and could catalyze research in lymphatic biology. Here, we demonstrate and validate the use of Doppler optical coherence tomography (DOCT) to measure lymph flow in vivo at speeds as low as 50µm/s. Compared to blood, lymph is relatively acellular (under normal conditions), but contains similar soluble components to blood plasma. We demonstrate that the small but detectable scattering signal from lymph can be used to extract fluid velocity using a dedicated algorithm optimized for Doppler analysis in low signal-to-noise settings (0 to 6 dB typical). We demonstrate the accuracy of this technique by comparing DOCT to FRAP measurements, using an intralipid lymph proxy in microfluidic devices and in vivo in the mouse ear. Finally, we demonstrate the label free measurement of lymph speed in the hind-limb of mice with a temporal resolution of 0.25s that agree well with prior literature reports. We anticipate that DOCT can become a powerful new tool in preclinical lymphatic biology research—including the relationship between lymphatic function and metastasis formation—with the potential to later expand also to clinical settings.

  12. Application of acoustic velocity meters for gaging discharge of three low-velocity tidal streams in the St. Johns River basin, northeast Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sloat, J.V.; Gain, W.S.

    1995-01-01

    Index-velocity data collected with acoustic velocity meters, stage data, and cross-sectional area data were used to calculate discharge at three low-velocity, tidal streamflow stations in north-east Florida. Discharge at three streamflow stations was computed as the product of the channel cross-sectional area and the mean velocity as determined from an index velocity measured in the stream using an acoustic velocity meter. The tidal streamlflow stations used in the study were: Six Mile Creek near Picolata, Fla.; Dunns Creek near Satsuma, Fla.; and the St. Johns River at Buffalo Bluff. Cross-sectional areas at the measurement sections ranged from about 3,000 square feet at Six Mile Creek to about 18,500 square feet at St. Johns River at Buffalo Bluff. Physical characteristics for all three streams were similar except for drainage area. The topography primarily is low-relief, swampy terrain; stream velocities ranged from about -2 to 2 feet per second; and the average change in stage was about 1 foot. Instantaneous discharge was measured using a portable acoustic current meter at each of the three streams to develop a relation between the mean velocity in the stream and the index velocity measured by the acoustic velocity meter. Using least-squares linear regression, a simple linear relation between mean velocity and index velocity was determined. Index velocity was the only significant linear predictor of mean velocity for Six Mile Creek and St. Johns River at Buffalo Bluff. For Dunns Creek, both index velocity and stage were used to develop a multiple-linear predictor of mean velocity. Stage-area curves for each stream were developed from bathymetric data. Instantaneous discharge was computed by multiplying results of relations developed for cross-sectional area and mean velocity. Principal sources of error in the estimated discharge are identified as: (1) instrument errors associated with measurement of stage and index velocity, (2) errors in the representation of

  13. Low-frequency acoustic pressure, velocity, and intensity thresholds in a bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) and white whale (Delphinapterus leucas)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finneran, James J.; Carder, Donald A.; Ridgway, Sam H.

    2002-01-01

    The relative contributions of acoustic pressure and particle velocity to the low-frequency, underwater hearing abilities of the bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) and white whale (Delphinapterus leucas) were investigated by measuring (masked) hearing thresholds while manipulating the relationship between the pressure and velocity. This was accomplished by varying the distance within the near field of a single underwater sound projector (experiment I) and using two underwater sound projectors and an active sound control system (experiment II). The results of experiment I showed no significant change in pressure thresholds as the distance between the subject and the sound source was changed. In contrast, velocity thresholds tended to increase and intensity thresholds tended to decrease as the source distance decreased. These data suggest that acoustic pressure is a better indicator of threshold, compared to particle velocity or mean active intensity, in the subjects tested. Interpretation of the results of experiment II (the active sound control system) was difficult because of complex acoustic conditions and the unknown effects of the subject on the generated acoustic field; however, these data also tend to support the results of experiment I and suggest that odontocete thresholds should be reported in units of acoustic pressure, rather than intensity.

  14. Surface acoustic wave velocity of gold films deposited on silicon substrates at different temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Salas, E.; Jimenez Rioboo, R. J.; Prieto, C.; Every, A. G.

    2011-07-15

    Au thin films have been deposited by DC magnetron sputtering on Si (001) substrates at different substrate temperatures, ranging from 200 K to 450 K. With increasing temperature, the expected crystallinity and morphology of the Au thin film are clearly improved, as shown by x ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy experiments. Parallel to this, the surface acoustic wave propagation velocity shows a clear enhancement toward the ideal values obtained from numerical simulations of a Au thin film on Si (001) substrate. Moreover, a very thin and slightly rough interlayer between the Si (001) substrate and the Au thin film is developed for temperatures above 350 K. The composition and nature of this interlayer is not known. This interlayer may be responsible for the steep change in the structural and elastic properties of the Au thin films at the higher temperatures and possibly also for an improvement of the adhesion properties of the Au on the Si (001) substrate.

  15. Morphology and flow fields of three-dimensional dunes, Rio Paraná, Argentina: Results from simultaneous multibeam echo sounding and acoustic Doppler current profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, D. R.; Best, J. L.; Orfeo, O.; Hardy, R. J.; Kostaschuk, R.; Lane, S. N.

    2005-12-01

    Most past studies of river dune dynamics have concentrated on two-dimensional (2-D) bed forms, with constant heights and straight crest lines transverse to the flow, and their associated turbulent flow structure. This morphological simplification imposes inherent limitations on the interpretation and understanding of dune form and flow dynamics in natural channels, where dune form is predominantly three-dimensional. For example, studies over 2-D forms neglect the significant influence that lateral flows and secondary circulation may have on the flow structure and thus dune morphology. This paper details a field study of a swath of 3-D dunes in the Rio Paraná, Argentina. A large (0.35 km wide, 1.2 km long) area of dunes was surveyed using a multibeam echo sounder (MBES) that provided high-resolution 3-D detail of the river bed. Simultaneous with the MBES survey, 3-D flow information was obtained with an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP), revealing a complicated pattern of dune morphology and associated flow structure within the swath. Dune three-dimensionality appears intimately connected to the morphology of the upstream dune, with changes in crest line curvature and crest line bifurcations/junctions significantly influencing the downstream dune form. Dunes with lobe or saddle-shaped crest lines were found to have larger, more structured regions of vertical velocity with smaller separation zones than more 2-D straight-crested dunes. These results represent the first integrated study of 3-D dune form and mean flow structure from the field and show several similarities to recent laboratory models of flow over 3-D dunes.

  16. Comparison of acoustic doppler current profiler and Price AA mechanical current meter measurements made during the 2011 Mississippi River Flood

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Brien, Patrick; Mueller, David; Pratt, Thad

    2012-01-01

    The Mississippi River and Tributaries project performed as designed during the historic 2011 Mississippi River flood, with many of the operational decisions based on discharge targets as opposed to stage. Measurement of discharge at the Tarbert Landing, Mississippi range provides critical information used in operational decisions for the floodways located in Louisiana. Historically, discharge measurements have been made using a Price AA current meter and the mid-section method, and a long record exists based on these types of measurements, including historical peak discharges. Discharge measurements made using an acoustic Doppler current profiler from a moving boat have been incorporated into the record since the mid 1990's, and are used along with the Price AA mid-section measurements. During the 2011 flood event, both methods were used and appeared to provide different results at times. The apparent differences between the measurement techniques are due to complex hydrodynamics at this location that created large spatial and temporal fluctuations in the flow. The data and analysis presented herein show the difference between the two methods to be within the expected accuracy of the measurements when the measurements are made concurrently. The observed fluctuations prevent valid comparisons of data collected sequentially or even with different observation durations.

  17. Evaluation of the Temporal Acoustic Window for Transcranial Doppler in a Multi-Ethnic Population in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Bazan, Rodrigo; Braga, Gabriel Pereira; Luvizutto, Gustavo José; Hueb, João Carlos; Hokama, Newton Key; Zanati Bazan, Silméia Garcia; de Carvalho Nunes, Hélio Rubens; Leite, João Pereira; Pontes-Neto, Octávio Marques

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to relate the presence of a temporal acoustic window (TAW) to the variables sex, age and race. This observational study was conducted in patients under etiologic investigation after stroke, sickle-cell anemia and hospitalization in an intensive therapy neurologic unit. TAW presence was confirmed by bilateral assessment by two neurologists via transcranial Doppler (TCD). Multiple logistic regression was performed to explain the presence of the window as a function of sex, age and race. In 20% of the 262 patients evaluated, a TAW was not present. The incidence of TAW presence was greater in men (odds ratio [OR] = 5.4, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.5-11.7, p < 0.01); lower with increased age (OR = 0.9, 95% CI = 0.92-0.97, p < 0.01); and lower among those of African and Asian descent (OR = 0.32, 95% CI = 0.14-0.70, p = 0.005). On the basis of the results, more men than women had TAWs, and the decrease in TAWs was associated with increased age and African or Asian descent.

  18. Acoustic Doppler current profiling from the JGOFS Arabian sea cruises aboard the RV T.G. Thompson

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyun-Sook; Flagg, C.N.; Shi, Yan

    1996-06-01

    Acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) data is part of the core data for the U.S. JGOFS Arabian Sea project, along with hydrographic and nutrient data. Seventeen cruises are scheduled to take place between September 1994 and January 1996 on the R/V T.G. Thompson. They are numbered consecutively from the ship`s commissioning with the first JGOFS cruise designated TN039. Table 1 lists start and end dates of each cruise with its mission. All but the first cruise have been or will be staged from Muscat, Oman. Each cruise is scheduled for a duration of between two weeks and one month. Seven of the cruises, referred to as process cruises, follow a standard cruise track, taking hydrographic, chemical and biological measurements. The rest of the cruises, which take place generally within the standard cruise region defined by a set track, are for the deployment and recovery of moored equipments and towing of a SeaSoar. ADCP data are collected using an autonomous data acquisition system developed for ship-of-opportunity cruises, named the AutoADCP system. The system is an extension of RD instrument`s DAS version 2.48 using enhancements made possible with {open_quotes}user-exit{close_quotes} programs. It makes it possible to collect ADCP data without the constant monitoring usually necessary and insures constant data coverage and uniform data quality.

  19. Acoustic and Doppler radar detection of buried land mines using high-pressure water jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denier, Robert; Herrick, Thomas J.; Mitchell, O. Robert; Summers, David A.; Saylor, Daniel R.

    1999-08-01

    The goal of the waterjet-based mine location and identification project is to find a way to use waterjets to locate and differentiate buried objects. When a buried object is struck with a high-pressure waterjets, the impact will cause characteristic vibrations in the object depending on the object's shape and composition. These vibrations will be transferred to the ground and then to the water stream that is hitting the object. Some of these vibrations will also be transferred to the air via the narrow channel the waterjet cuts in the ground. Currently the ground vibrations are detected with Doppler radar and video camera sensing, while the air vibrations are detected with a directional microphone. Data is collected via a Labview based data acquisition system. This data is then manipulated in Labview to produce the associated power spectrums. These power spectra are fed through various signal processing and recognition routines to determine the probability of there being an object present under the current test location and what that object is likely to be. Our current test area consists of a large X-Y positioning system placed over approximately a five-foot circular test area. The positioning system moves both the waterjet and the sensor package to the test location specified by the Labview control software. Currently we are able to locate buried land mine models at a distance of approximately three inches with a high degree of accuracy.

  20. Phononic crystal surface mode coupling and its use in acoustic Doppler velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Cicek, Ahmet; Salman, Aysevil; Kaya, Olgun Adem; Ulug, Bulent

    2016-02-01

    It is numerically shown that surface modes of two-dimensional phononic crystals, which are Bloch modes bound to the interface between the phononic crystal and the surrounding host, can couple back and forth between the surfaces in a length scale determined by the separation of two surfaces and frequency. Supercell band structure computations through the finite-element method reveal that the surface band of an isolated surface splits into two bands which support either symmetric or antisymmetric hybrid modes. When the surface separation is 3.5 times the lattice constant, a coupling length varying between 30 and 48 periods can be obtained which first increases linearly with frequency and, then, decreases rapidly. In the linear regime, variation of coupling length can be used as a means of measuring speeds of objects on the order of 0.1m/s by incorporating the Doppler shift. Speed sensitivity can be improved by increasing surface separation at the cost of larger device sizes.

  1. Sound velocity of iron up to 152 GPa by picosecond acoustics in diamond anvil cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decremps, F.; Antonangeli, D.; Gauthier, M.; Ayrinhac, S.; Morand, M.; Marchand, G. Le; Bergame, F.; Philippe, J.

    2014-03-01

    High-pressure method combining diamond anvil cell with picosecond ultrasonics technique is demonstrated to be a very suitable tool to measure the acoustic properties of iron up to 152 GPa. Such innovative approach allows to measure directly the longitudinal sound velocity under pressure of hundreds of GPa in laboratory, overcoming most of the drawbacks of traditional techniques. The very high accuracy, comparable to piezoacoustics technique, allows to observe the kink in elastic properties at the body-centered cubic-hexagonal close packed transition and to show with a good confidence that the Birch's law still stands up to 1.5 Mbar and ambient temperature. The linear extrapolation of the measured sound velocities versus densities of hcp iron is out of the preliminary reference Earth model, arguing for alloying effects or anharmonic high-temperature effects. A comparison between our measurements and shock wave experiments allowed us to quantify temperature corrections at constant pressure in ~-0.35 and ~-0.30 m s-1/K at 100 and 150 GPa, respectively. More in general, the here-presented technique allows detailed elastic and viscoelastic studies under extreme thermodynamic conditions on a wide variety of systems as liquids, crystalline, or polycrystalline solids, metallic or not, with very broad applications in Earth and planetary science.

  2. Phase-resolved optical coherence tomography and optical Doppler tomography for imaging blood flow in human skin with fast scanning speed and high velocity sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Yonghua; Chen, Zhongping; Saxer, Christopher; Xiang, Shaohua; Boer, Johannes F. de; Nelson, J. Stuart

    2000-01-15

    We have developed a novel phase-resolved optical coherence tomography (OCT) and optical Doppler tomography (ODT) system that uses phase information derived from a Hilbert transformation to image blood flow in human skin with fast scanning speed and high velocity sensitivity. Using the phase change between sequential scans to construct flow-velocity imaging, this technique decouples spatial resolution and velocity sensitivity in flow images and increases imaging speed by more than 2 orders of magnitude without compromising spatial resolution or velocity sensitivity. The minimum flow velocity that can be detected with an axial-line scanning speed of 400 Hz and an average phase change over eight sequential scans is as low as 10 {mu}m/s , while a spatial resolution of 10 {mu}m is maintained. Using this technique, we present what are to our knowledge the first phase-resolved OCT/ODT images of blood flow in human skin. (c) 2000 Optical Society of America.

  3. Imaging velocity and attenuation anomalies in mining environments using Acoustic Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesca, S.; Monna, S.; Kaiser, D.; Dahm, T.

    2012-04-01

    Imaging structural properties and monitoring fracturing processes in mining environments is of importance for mining exploitation. It is also helpful to characterize damages induced by mining activities, thus it is of primary interest for mining engineering and civil protection. Additionally, the development of improved monitoring and imaging methods is of great importance for salt deposits as potential reservoirs for CO2 sequestration. The analysis of Acoustic Emission (AE) and microseismicity data, which are routinely used in mining survey, is typically limited to estimate location of induced microcracks and seismicity. AE data will be here further analysed to obtain images of the seismic structure. We focus on an AE dataset recorded at the Morsleben salt mine, in Germany; the dataset contains more than 1 million events, recorded during a period of two months, with AE magnitudes spanning 5 units. Arrival times of first P and S onsets, as well as maximal amplitudes recorded for both seismic phases, are used to assess the seismic velocities and attenuation properties of the mining environment. Given the large size of the considered dataset, a spatial clustering of the events is first performed and a spatial homogeneous catalog of averaged "pseudoevents" is built. This new catalog is then used to provide first averaged images of the attenuation and velocity anomalies at specific depths. Results points to clear velocity and attenuation anomalies, which are correlated with the main structural features and the geometry of the salt body. The potential of the dataset for tomographic applications is investigated, both including synthetic simulations and considering real data. This study is funded by the project MINE, which is part of the R&D-Programme GEOTECHNOLOGIEN. The project MINE is funded by the German Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF), Grant of project BMBF03G0737.

  4. Use of a 600-kHz Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler to measure estuarine bottom type, relative abundance of submerged aquatic vegetation, and eelgrass canopy height

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Joseph D.; Peterson, Bradley J.

    2007-03-01

    The acoustic backscatter intensity signal from a high-frequency (600 kHz) Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) was used to categorize four different types of bottom habitat (sand, mud, sparse and dense vegetation) in a shallow-water estuary (Shinnecock Bay, NY, USA). A diver survey of the bay measured sediment and bottom vegetation characteristics at 85 sites within the bay. These data were used to groundtruth the acoustic data. Acoustic data were collected at four sites with known bottom types and used to develop an algorithm that could categorize the bottom type. The slope of the echo intensity profile close to the bottom was used to determine the bottom type and the relative numerical density (sparse or dense) of Submerged Aquatic Vegetation (SAV). In areas where eelgrass ( Zostera marina) was the dominant SAV species, the intensity profile data were analyzed to measure the height of the vegetation canopy. An acoustic survey which categorized the bottom type of the bay was conducted from a small vessel. The percentage of sampled sites categorized as each bottom habitat type from the acoustic survey was similar to those obtained by the diver survey. These methods may provide a means to rapidly survey estuarine habitats and measure spatial and temporal variations in SAV populations, as well as changes in the height of the eelgrass canopy.

  5. A method for crack sizing using Laser Doppler Vibrometer measurements of Surface Acoustic Waves.

    PubMed

    Longo, Roberto; Vanlanduit, Steve; Vanherzeele, Joris; Guillaume, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    The goal of non-destructive testing (NDT) is to determine the position and size of structural defects, in order to measure the quality and evaluate the safety of building materials. Most NDT techniques are rather complex, however, requiring specialized knowledge. In this article, we introduce an experimental method for crack detection that uses Surface Acoustic Waves (SAWs) and optical measurements. The method is tested on a steel beam engraved with slots of known depth. A simple model to determine the cracks size is also proposed. At the end of the article, we describe a possible application: fatigue crack sizing on a damaged slat track. This technique represents a first step toward a better understanding of the crack growth, especially in its early stages (preferably when the cracks can still be repaired) and when it is possible to assume a linear propagation of the crack front. The ultimate goal of this research program is to develop a useful method of monitoring aircraft components during fatigue testing. PMID:19732928

  6. The investigation of sediment processes in rivers by means of the Acoustic Doppler Profiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero, M.

    2014-09-01

    The measurement of sediment processes at the scale of a river cross-section is desirable for the evaluation of many issues related to river hydro-morphodynamics, such as the calibration and validation of numerical models for predicting the climate change impacts on water resources and efforts of maintenance of the navigation channel and other hydraulic works. Suspended- and bed-load have traditionally been measured by cumbersome techniques that are difficult to apply in large rivers. The acoustics for the investigation of small-scale sedimentological processes gained acceptance in the marine community because of its ability to simultaneously profile sediment concentration and size distribution, non-intrusively, and with high temporal and spatial resolution. The application of these methods in true riverine case studies presents additional difficulties, mainly related to water depths and stream currents that limit sound propagation into water and challenge the instruments deployment, especially during floods. This article introduces the motivations for using the ADCP for sediment processes investigation other than for flow discharge measurement, summarizes the developed methods and indicates future desirable improvements. In addition, an application on the Po River in Italy is presented, focusing on the calibration of the existing software by means of ADCP recordings. The calibrated model will assist in planning the dredging activities to maintain the navigation channel and the intake of a pump station for irrigation that is periodically obstructed with a sandbar.

  7. A method for crack sizing using Laser Doppler Vibrometer measurements of Surface Acoustic Waves.

    PubMed

    Longo, Roberto; Vanlanduit, Steve; Vanherzeele, Joris; Guillaume, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    The goal of non-destructive testing (NDT) is to determine the position and size of structural defects, in order to measure the quality and evaluate the safety of building materials. Most NDT techniques are rather complex, however, requiring specialized knowledge. In this article, we introduce an experimental method for crack detection that uses Surface Acoustic Waves (SAWs) and optical measurements. The method is tested on a steel beam engraved with slots of known depth. A simple model to determine the cracks size is also proposed. At the end of the article, we describe a possible application: fatigue crack sizing on a damaged slat track. This technique represents a first step toward a better understanding of the crack growth, especially in its early stages (preferably when the cracks can still be repaired) and when it is possible to assume a linear propagation of the crack front. The ultimate goal of this research program is to develop a useful method of monitoring aircraft components during fatigue testing.

  8. Laser Doppler visualisation of the fields of three-dimensional velocity vectors with the help of a minimal number of CCD cameras

    SciTech Connect

    Dubnishchev, Yu N

    2010-08-27

    We discuss the possibility of laser Doppler visualisation and measurement of the field of three-dimensional velocity vectors by suppressing the multiparticle scattering influence on the measurement results, when using one CCD camera. The coordinate measuring basis is formed due to switching of the directions and the frequency of spatially combined laser sheets, the frequency being synchronised with the CCD-camera operation. The field of the velocity vectors without the contribution from the multiparticle scattering is produced from the linear combinations of normalised laser sheet images detected with a CCD camera in a frequency-demodulated scattered light. The method can find applications not only in laser diagnostics of gas and condensed media but also in the Doppler spectroscopy of light fields scattered by multiparticle dynamic structures. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  9. Reliability of Phase Velocity Measurements of Flexural Acoustic Waves in the Human Tibia In-Vivo

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Axial-transmission acoustics have shown to be a promising technique to measure individual bone properties and detect bone pathologies. With the ultimate goal being the in-vivo application of such systems, quantification of the key aspects governing the reliability is crucial to bring this method towards clinical use. Materials and Methods This work presents a systematic reliability study quantifying the sources of variability and their magnitudes of in-vivo measurements using axial-transmission acoustics. 42 healthy subjects were measured by an experienced operator twice per week, over a four-month period, resulting in over 150000 wave measurements. In a complementary study to assess the influence of different operators performing the measurements, 10 novice operators were trained, and each measured 5 subjects on a single occasion, using the same measurement protocol as in the first part of the study. Results The estimated standard error for the measurement protocol used to collect the study data was ∼ 17 m/s (∼ 4% of the grand mean) and the index of dependability, as a measure of reliability, was Φ = 0.81. It was shown that the method is suitable for multi-operator use and that the reliability can be improved efficiently by additional measurements with device repositioning, while additional measurements without repositioning cannot improve the reliability substantially. Phase velocity values were found to be significantly higher in males than in females (p < 10−5) and an intra-class correlation coefficient of r = 0.70 was found between the legs of each subject. Conclusions The high reliability of this non-invasive approach and its intrinsic sensitivity to mechanical properties opens perspectives for the rapid and inexpensive clinical assessment of bone pathologies, as well as for monitoring programmes without any radiation exposure for the patient. PMID:27015093

  10. Density, ultrasound velocity, acoustic impedance, reflection and absorption coefficient determination of liquids via multiple reflection method.

    PubMed

    Hoche, S; Hussein, M A; Becker, T

    2015-03-01

    The accuracy of density, reflection coefficient, and acoustic impedance determination via multiple reflection method was validated experimentally. The ternary system water-maltose-ethanol was used to execute a systematic, temperature dependent study over a wide range of densities and viscosities aiming an application as inline sensor in beverage industries. The validation results of the presented method and setup show root mean square errors of: 1.201E-3 g cm(-3) (±0.12%) density, 0.515E-3 (0.15%) reflection coefficient and 1.851E+3 kg s(-1) m(-2) (0.12%) specific acoustic impedance. The results of the diffraction corrected absorption showed an average standard deviation of only 0.12%. It was found that the absorption change shows a good correlation to concentration variations and may be useful for laboratory analysis of sufficiently pure liquids. The main part of the observed errors can be explained by the observed noise, temperature variation and the low signal resolution of 50 MHz. In particular, the poor signal-to-noise ratio of the second reflector echo was found to be a main accuracy limitation. Concerning the investigation of liquids the unstable properties of the reference material PMMA, due to hygroscopicity, were identified to be an additional, unpredictable source of uncertainty. While dimensional changes can be considered by adequate methodology, the impact of the time and temperature dependent water absorption on relevant reference properties like the buffer's sound velocity and density could not be considered and may explain part of the observed deviations.

  11. Organised Coherent Motion in Atmospheric Boundary Layer Flow in the Proximity to Tall Plant Canopies as Detected in Acoustic Doppler Profiler and Tower-based Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foken, T.; Thomas, C. K.

    2007-12-01

    We investigated coherent structures above and in a tall plant canopy during a field campaign at a mountainous site in Germany (WALDATEM-2003). Data from a remote sensing acoustic Doppler system in concert with in-situ point measurements of turbulence in flow velocity and scalars deployed on towers yielded continuous observations from the forest ground to 200 m above the ground with a vertical resolution of 10 m at a sampling frequency of 0.4 and 20 Hz respectively. Coherent structures were extracted from time series utilizing wavelet transform techniques allowing for single structure analysis and averaged statistics of detected events. In addition to their spatiotemporal scales, we focused on the identification of generating mechanisms and surface parameters affecting coherent structures. Time scales were on the order of 20 to 36 s depending on the upstream topography and canopy morphology. Lateral transport dominated scalar coherent exchange. Vertical profiles of time scales in longitudinal and vertical velocities were mirror images showing an increase/ decrease, respectively, with height. Time scales in scalars were nearly height-constant. The ratio of the contribution of coherent structures to total vertical exchange was 0.2 for momentum and 0.25 to 0.4 for sensible heat. Analysis of power spectra confirmed an interaction between inactive eddies of atmospheric boundary layer scale and the horizontal flow in 4 % of all studied cases only, mainly under near-neutral stratification. Evaluation of the Mixing-Layer Analogy suggested that vertical shear caused by the immense canopy drag was the dominant generating mechanism. However, daytime coherent structures were found to be a superposition of shear generated events and convectional eddies. The latter led to an increase of vertical coherency in the flow around noon. At night, terrain induced linear gravity waves showed similar time scales as coherent structures emphasizing the need to differentiate between these two

  12. Peak Systolic Velocity Measurements with Transcranial Doppler Ultrasound Is a Predictor of Incident Stroke among the General Population in China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hai-Bo; Laskowitz, Daniel T.; Dodds, Jodi A.; Xie, Gao-Qiang; Zhang, Pu-Hong; Huang, Yi-Ning; Wang, Bo; Wu, Yang-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective It is necessary to develop an effective and low-cost screening tool for identifying Chinese people at high risk of stroke. Transcranial Doppler ultrasound (TCD) is a powerful predictor of stroke in the pediatric sickle cell disease population, as demonstrated in the STOP trial. Our study was conducted to determine the prediction value of peak systolic velocities as measured by TCD on subsequent stroke risk in a prospective cohort of the general population from Beijing, China. Methods In 2002, a prospective cohort study was conducted among 1392 residents from 11 villages of the Shijingshan district of Beijing, China. The cohort was scheduled for follow up with regard to incident stroke in 2005, 2007, and 2012 by a study team comprised of epidemiologists, nurses, and physicians. Univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to determine the factors associated with incident stroke. Results Participants identified by TCD criteria as having intracranial stenosis had a 3.6-fold greater risk of incident stroke (hazard ratio (HR) 3.57, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.86–6.83, P<0.01) than those without TCD evidence of intracranial stenosis. The association remained significant in multivariate analysis (HR 2.53, 95% CI 1.31–4.87) after adjusting for other risk factors or confounders. Older age, cigarette smoking, hypertension, and diabetes mellitus remained statistically significant as risk factors after controlling for other factors. Conclusions The study confirmed the screening value of TCD among the general population in urban China. Increasing the availability of TCD screening may help identify subjects as higher risk for stroke. PMID:27513983

  13. Acoustic doppler current profiling from the JGOFS Arabian Sea cruises aboard the RV T.G. Thompson

    SciTech Connect

    Flagg, C.N.; Shi, Y.

    1995-04-01

    Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) data from the R/V T.G. THOMPSON is part of the core data for the US JGOFS Arabian Sea project along with hydrographic and nutrient data. Seventeen cruises on the THOMPSON are scheduled to take place between September 1994 and January 1996. The first of these cruises, a transit of the R/V THOMPSON into the northern Arabian Sea area from Singapore, was a calibration and training cruise that took place between September 18 and October 7, 1994. (The cruises on the THOMPSON are numbered consecutively from the ship`s commissioning with the first JOGFS cruise designated TN039.) The remaining cruises have been and will be staged from Muscat, Oman. Seven of these cruises, referred to as process cruises, will follow a set cruise track, making hydrographic, chemical and biological measurements. The remainder of the cruises while not restricted to the set cruise track, will generally stay within the region defined by the track during the deployment and retrieval of moored equipment and the towing of a SeaSoar. Each cruise will last between two weeks and one month. ADCP data will be collected on all the JGOFS Arabian Sea cruises using an autonomous data acquisition system developed for ship-of-opportunity cruises. This system, referred to as the AutoADCP, makes it possible to collect the ADCP data without the constant monitoring usually necessary and assures constant data coverage and uniform data quality. The AutoADCP system is an extension of RD Instrument`s DAS version 2.48 using enhancements made possible with ``user exit`` programs. This data report presents ADCP results from the first four JGOFS cruises, TN039 through TN042, concentrating on the data collection and processing methods.

  14. Noninvasive Method for Measuring Local Pulse Wave Velocity by Dual Pulse Wave Doppler: In Vitro and In Vivo Studies

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhen; Yang, Yong; Yuan, Li-jun; Liu, Jie; Duan, Yun-you; Cao, Tie-sheng

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the validity and reproducibility of a noninvasive dual pulse wave Doppler (DPWD) method, which involves simultaneous recording of flow velocity of two independent sample volumes with a measurable distance, for measuring the local arterial pulse wave velocity (PWV) through in vitro and in vivo studies. Methods The DPWD mode of Hitachi HI Vision Preirus ultrasound system with a 5–13MHz transducer was used. An in vitro model was designed to compare the PWV of a homogeneous rubber tubing with the local PWV of its middle part measured by DPWD method. In the in vivo study, local PWV of 45 hypertensive patients (25 male, 49.8±3.1 years) and 45 matched healthy subjects (25 male, 49.3±3.0 years) were investigated at the left common carotid artery (LCCA) by DPWD method. Results In the in vitro study, the local PWV measured by DPWP method and the PWV of the homogeneous rubber tubing did not show statistical difference (5.16 ± 0.28 m/s vs 5.03 ± 0.15 m/s, p = 0.075). The coefficient of variation (CV) of the intra- and inter- measurements for local PWV were 3.46% and 4.96%, for the PWV of the homogeneous rubber tubing were 0.99% and 1.98%. In the in vivo study, a significantly higher local PWV of LCCA was found in the hypertensive patients as compared to that in healthy subjects (6.29±1.04m/s vs. 5.31±0.72m/s, P = 0.019). The CV of the intra- and inter- measurements in hypertensive patients were 2.22% and 3.94%, in healthy subjects were 2.07% and 4.14%. Conclusions This study demonstrated the feasibility of the noninvasive DPWD method to determine the local PWV, which was accurate and reproducible not only in vitro but also in vivo studies. This noninvasive echocardiographic method may be illuminating to clinical use. PMID:25786124

  15. Continuous measurements of suspended sediment loads using dual frequency acoustic Doppler profile signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonini, Alessandro; Guerrero, Massimo; Rüther, Nils; Stokseth, Siri

    2016-04-01

    A huge thread to Hydropower plants (HPP) is incoming sediments in suspension from the rivers upstream. The sediments settle in the reservoir and reduce the effective head as well as the volume and reduce consequently the lifetime of the reservoir. In addition are the fine sediments causing severe damages to turbines and infrastructure of a HPP. For estimating the amount of in-coming sediments in suspension and the consequent planning of efficient counter measures, it is essential to monitor the rivers within the catchment of the HPP for suspended sediments. This work is considerably time consuming and requires highly educated personnel and is therefore expensive. Surrogate-indirect methods using acoustic and optic devices have bee developed since the last decades that may be efficiently applied for the continuous monitoring of suspended sediment loads. The presented study proposes therefore to establish a research station at a cross section of a river which is the main tributary to a reservoir of a HPP and equip this station with surrogate as well as with common method of measuring suspended load concentrations and related flow discharge and level. The logger at the research station delivers data automatically to a server. Therefore it is ensured that also large flood events are covered. Data during flood are of high interest to the HPP planners since they carried the most part of the sediment load in a hydrological year. Theses peaks can hardly be measured with common measurement methods. Preliminary results of the wet season 2015/2016 are presented. The data gives insight in the applicable range, in terms of scattering particles concentration-average size and corresponding flow discharge and level, eventually enabling the study of suspended sediment load-water flow correlations during peak events. This work is carried out as part of a larger research project on sustainable hydro power plants exposed to high sediment yield, SediPASS. SediPASS is funded by the

  16. Channel Analysis and Estimation and Compensation of Doppler Shift in Underwater Acoustic Communication and Mitigation of IFI, ISI in Ultra-wideband Radio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Sadia

    Water occupies three fourth of earth's surface. The remaining one fourth is land. Although human habitats reside on land, there is no denying of the vital connection between land and water. The future sustainability of human species on this planet depends on wise utilization of all available resources, including that provided by the vast water world. Therefore, it is imperative to explore, understand, and define this massive, varying, and in many areas, unexplored water domain. The water domain exploration and data collection can be conducted using manned or unmanned vehicles, as allowed by the water environment. This dissertation addresses three of the key difficulties that occur during underwater acoustic communication among manned and/or unmanned vehicles and proposes feasible solutions to resolve those difficulties. The focus and the contributions of this research involve the following perspectives: 1) Representation of Underwater Acoustic Communication (UAC) Channels: Providing a comprehensive classification and representation of the underwater acoustic communication channel based on the channel environment. 2) Estimation and Compensation of Doppler Shift: Providing compensation algorithm to mitigate varying Doppler shift effect over subcarriers in UAC Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM) systems. 3) Mitigation of Inter-symbol Interference (ISI): Providing feasible solution to long delay spread causing ISI in Ultra-wideband channels.

  17. A new three-component signal model to objectively select power Doppler wall filter cut-off velocity for quantitative microvascular imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elfarnawany, Mai; Lacefield, James C.

    2013-03-01

    The wall-filter selection curve (WFSC) method was developed to automatically select cut-off velocities for high-frequency power Doppler imaging. Selection curves are constructed by plotting color pixel density (CPD) as a function of wall filter cut-off velocity. A new three-component mathematical model is developed to guide the design of an online implementation of the method for in vivo imaging. The model treats Doppler imaging as a signal detection task in which the scanner must distinguish intravascular pixels from perivascular and extravascular pixels and includes a cost function to identify the optimum cut-off velocity that provides accurate vascular quantification and minimizes the effect of color pixel artifacts on visualization of vascular structures. The goodness of fit of the three-component model to flow-phantom data is significantly improved compared to a previous two-component model (F test, p < 0:005). Simulations using the new model indicate that selection curves should be sampled using at least 100 cut-off velocities to ensure robust performance of the automated WFSC method and determine an upper bound on CPD variability that ensures reliable vascular quantification accuracy, defined as CPD within 5% of the reference vascular volume fraction. Results of the simulations also provide evidence that limiting the selection of the cut-off velocity to a binary choice between the middle and right end of the characteristic interval is sufficient to meet the quantification accuracy goal. The model provides an intuitive, empirical description of the relationship between system settings and blood-flow detection performance in power Doppler imaging.

  18. Color M-mode Doppler flow propagation velocity is a preload insensitive index of left ventricular relaxation: animal and human validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, M. J.; Smedira, N. G.; Greenberg, N. L.; Main, M.; Firstenberg, M. S.; Odabashian, J.; Thomas, J. D.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the effect of preload in color M-mode Doppler flow propagation velocity (v(p)). BACKGROUND: The interpretation of Doppler filling patterns is limited by confounding effects of left ventricular (LV) relaxation and preload. Color M-mode v(p) has been proposed as a new index of LV relaxation. METHODS: We studied four dogs before and during inferior caval (IVC) occlusion at five different inotropic stages and 14 patients before and during partial cardiopulmonary bypass. Left ventricular (LV) end-diastolic volumes (LV-EDV), the time constant of isovolumic relaxation (tau), left atrial (LA) pre-A and LV end-diastolic pressures (LV-EDP) were measured. Peak velocity during early filling (E) and v(p) were extracted by digital analysis of color M-mode Doppler images. RESULTS: In both animals and humans, LV-EDV and LV-EDP decreased significantly from baseline to IVC occlusion (both p < 0.001). Peak early filling (E) velocity decreased in animals from 56 +/- 21 to 42 +/- 17 cm/s (p < 0.001) without change in v(p) (from 35 +/- 15 to 35 +/- 16, p = 0.99). Results were similar in humans (from 69 +/- 15 to 53 +/- 22 cm/s, p < 0.001, and 37 +/- 12 to 34 +/- 16, p = 0.30). In both species, there was a strong correlation between LV relaxation (tau) and v(p) (r = 0.78, p < 0.001, r = 0.86, p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate that color M-mode Doppler v(p) is not affected by preload alterations and confirms that LV relaxation is its main physiologic determinant in both animals during varying lusitropic conditions and in humans with heart disease.

  19. Acoustic emission monitoring of low velocity impact damage in graphite/epoxy laminates during tensile loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Bradford H.

    1992-01-01

    An acoustic emission (AE) system was set up in a linear location data acquisition mode to monitor the tensile loading of eight-ply quasi-isotropic graphite/epoxy specimens containing low velocity impact damage. The impact damage was induced using an instrumented drop weight tower. During impact, specimens were supported by either an aluminum plate or a membrane configuration. Cross-sectional examinations revealed that the aluminum plate configuration resulted in primarily matrix cracking and back surface fiber failure. The membrane support resulted in only matrix cracking and delamination damage. Penetrant enhanced radiography and immersion ultrasonics were used in order to assess the amount of impact damage in each tensile specimen. During tensile loading, AE reliably detected and located the damage sites which included fiber failure. All specimens with areas of fiber breakage ultimately failed at the impact site. AE did not reliably locate damage which consisted of only delaminations and matrix cracking. Specimens with this type of damage did not ultimately fail at the impact site. In summary, AE demonstrated the ability to increase the reliability of structural proof tests; however, the successful use of this technique requires extensive baseline testing.

  20. Loss reduction of leaky surface acoustic wave by loading with high-velocity thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakio, Shoji; Hosaka, Keiko

    2016-07-01

    The propagation properties of a leaky surface acoustic wave (LSAW) on rotated Y-cut X-propagating lithium niobate (YX-LN) substrates loaded with an aluminum nitride (AlN) thin film with a higher phase velocity than that of the substrate were investigated theoretically and experimentally. From the theoretical calculation, it was found that the minimum attenuation can be obtained at a certain thickness of the AlN thin film for a cut angle ranging from 0 to 60° because the cut angle giving the minimum attenuation shifts toward a smaller cut angle as the film thickness is increased. The propagation properties of an LSAW on several rotated YX-LN substrates were measured by using an interdigital transducer (IDT) pair with a wavelength λ of 8 µm, and the predicted shifts of the minimum attenuation toward a smaller cut angle were demonstrated experimentally. For 0° and 10°YX-LN samples, the measured insertion loss and propagation loss were markedly reduced by loading with the AlN thin film. A larger electromechanical coupling factor (16.9%) than that at the cut angle giving zero attenuation without a film and a propagation loss less of 0.02 dB/λ were obtained simultaneously at a film thickness of 0.125 λ for the 10°YX-LN sample.

  1. Causal determination of acoustic group velocity and frequency derivative of attenuation with finite-bandwidth Kramers-Kronig relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mobley, Joel; Waters, Kendall R.; Miller, James G.

    2005-07-01

    Kramers-Kronig (KK) analyses of experimental data are complicated by the extrapolation problem, that is, how the unexamined spectral bands impact KK calculations. This work demonstrates the causal linkages in resonant-type data provided by acoustic KK relations for the group velocity (cg) and the derivative of the attenuation coefficient (α') (components of the derivative of the acoustic complex wave number) without extrapolation or unmeasured parameters. These relations provide stricter tests of causal consistency relative to previously established KK relations for the phase velocity (cp) and attenuation coefficient (α) (components of the undifferentiated acoustic wave number) due to their shape invariance with respect to subtraction constants. For both the group velocity and attenuation derivative, three forms of the relations are derived. These relations are equivalent for bandwidths covering the entire infinite spectrum, but differ when restricted to bandlimited spectra. Using experimental data from suspensions of elastic spheres in saline, the accuracy of finite-bandwidth KK predictions for cg and α' is demonstrated. Of the multiple methods, the most accurate were found to be those whose integrals were expressed only in terms of the phase velocity and attenuation coefficient themselves, requiring no differentiated quantities.

  2. Causal determination of acoustic group velocity and frequency derivative of attenuation with finite-bandwidth Kramers-Kronig relations.

    PubMed

    Mobley, Joel; Waters, Kendall R; Miller, James G

    2005-07-01

    Kramers-Kronig (KK) analyses of experimental data are complicated by the extrapolation problem, that is, how the unexamined spectral bands impact KK calculations. This work demonstrates the causal linkages in resonant-type data provided by acoustic KK relations for the group velocity (c(g)) and the derivative of the attenuation coefficient (alpha') (components of the derivative of the acoustic complex wave number) without extrapolation or unmeasured parameters. These relations provide stricter tests of causal consistency relative to previously established KK relations for the phase velocity (c(p)) and attenuation coefficient (alpha) (components of the undifferentiated acoustic wave number) due to their shape invariance with respect to subtraction constants. For both the group velocity and attenuation derivative, three forms of the relations are derived. These relations are equivalent for bandwidths covering the entire infinite spectrum, but differ when restricted to bandlimited spectra. Using experimental data from suspensions of elastic spheres in saline, the accuracy of finite-bandwidth KK predictions for c(g) and alpha' is demonstrated. Of the multiple methods, the most accurate were found to be those whose integrals were expressed only in terms of the phase velocity and attenuation coefficient themselves, requiring no differentiated quantities.

  3. Acoustically-observable properties of adult gait.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Marshall; Sabatier, James M

    2012-03-01

    An approach has been developed for extracting human gait parameters from micro Doppler sonar grams. Key parameters include average speed of walking, torso velocity, walk cycle time, and peak leg velocity. The approach is a modification of a technique previously used in radar data analysis. It has been adapted because of differences between sonar and radar micro Doppler grams. The approach has been applied to an acoustic data set of 16 female and 60 male walkers. Statistics have been tabulated that illustrate the similarities and dissimilarities between female and male gait. Males tend to walk with larger walk cycle times and peak leg velocities than females.

  4. Acoustically-observable properties of adult gait.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Marshall; Sabatier, James M

    2012-03-01

    An approach has been developed for extracting human gait parameters from micro Doppler sonar grams. Key parameters include average speed of walking, torso velocity, walk cycle time, and peak leg velocity. The approach is a modification of a technique previously used in radar data analysis. It has been adapted because of differences between sonar and radar micro Doppler grams. The approach has been applied to an acoustic data set of 16 female and 60 male walkers. Statistics have been tabulated that illustrate the similarities and dissimilarities between female and male gait. Males tend to walk with larger walk cycle times and peak leg velocities than females. PMID:22423810

  5. The effects of probe placement on measured flow velocity in transcranial Doppler ultrasound imaging in-vitro and in-vivo experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jong, Daan L. K.; Meel-van den Abeelen, Aisha S. S.; Lagro, Joep; Claassen, Jurgen A. H. R.; Slump, Cornelis H.

    2014-03-01

    The measurement of the blood flow in the middle cerebral artery (MCA) using transcranial Doppler ultrasound (US) imaging is clinically relevant for the study of cerebral autoregulation. Especially in the aging population, impairement of the autoregulation may coincide or relate to loss of perfusion and consequently loss of brain function. The cerebral autoregulation can be assessed by relating the blood pressure to the blood flow in the brain. Doppler US is a widely used, non-invasive method to measure the blood flow in the MCA. However, Doppler flow imaging is known to produce results that are dependent of the operator. The angle of the probe insonation with respect to the centerline of the blood vessel is a well known factor for output variability. In patients also the skull must be traversed and the MCA must be detected, influencing the US signal intensity. In this contribution we report two studies. We describe first an in-vitro setup to study the Doppler flow in a situation where the ground truth is known. Secondly, we report on a study with healthy volunteers where the effects of small probe displacements on the flow velocity signals are investigated. For the latter purpose, a special probe holder was designed to control the experiment.

  6. Extreme Value Analysis of Tidal Stream Velocity Perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, Samuel; Thomson, Jim; Polagye, Brian; Richmond, Marshall C.; Durgesh, Vibhav; Bryden, Ian

    2011-04-26

    This paper presents a statistical extreme value analysis of maximum velocity perturbations from the mean flow speed in a tidal stream. This study was performed using tidal velocity data measured using both an Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter (ADV) and an Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) at the same location which allows for direct comparison of predictions. The extreme value analysis implements of a Peak-Over-Threshold method to explore the effect of perturbation length and time scale on the magnitude of a 50-year perturbation.

  7. Bathymetric surveys of Morse and Geist Reservoirs in central Indiana made with acoustic Doppler current profiler and global positioning system technology, 1996

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, J.T.; Morlock, S.E.; Baker, N.T.

    1997-01-01

    Acoustic Doppler current profiler, global positioning system, and geographic information system technology were used to map the bathymetry of Morse and Geist Reservoirs, two artificial lakes used for public water supply in central Indiana. The project was a pilot study to evaluate the use of the technologies for bathymetric surveys. Bathymetric surveys were last conducted in 1978 on Morse Reservoir and in 1980 on Geist Reservoir; those surveys were done with conventional methods using networks of fathometer transects. The 1996 bathymetric surveys produced updated estimates of reservoir volumes that will serve as base-line data for future estimates of storage capacity and sedimentation rates.An acoustic Doppler current profiler and global positioning system receiver were used to collect water-depth and position data from April 1996 through October 1996. All water-depth and position data were imported to a geographic information system to create a data base. The geographic information system then was used to generate water-depth contour maps and to compute the volumes for each reservoir.The computed volume of Morse Reservoir was 22,820 acre-feet (7.44 billion gallons), with a surface area of 1,484 acres. The computed volume of Geist Reservoir was 19,280 acre-feet (6.29 billion gallons), with a surface area of 1,848 acres. The computed 1996 reservoir volumes are less than the design volumes and indicate that sedimentation has occurred in both reservoirs. Cross sections were constructed from the computer-generated surfaces for 1996 and compared to the fathometer profiles from the 1978 and 1980 surveys; analysis of these cross sections also indicates that some sedimentation has occurred in both reservoirs.The acoustic Doppler current profiler, global positioning system, and geographic information system technologies described in this report produced bathymetric maps and volume estimates more efficiently and with comparable or greater resolution than conventional

  8. Applications of Fresnel-Kirchhoff diffraction theory in the analysis of human-motion Doppler sonar grams.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Marshall; Sabatier, James M

    2010-11-01

    Observed human-gait features in Doppler sonar grams are explained by using the Boulic-Thalmann (BT) model to predict joint angle time histories and the temporal displacements of the body center of mass. Body segments are represented as ellipsoids. Temporally dependent velocities at the proximal and distal end of key body segments are determined from BT. Doppler sonar grams are computed by mapping velocity-time dependent spectral acoustic-cross sections for the body segments onto time-velocity space, mimicking the Short Time Fourier Transform used in the Doppler sonar processing. Comparisons to measured data indicate that dominant returns come from trunk, thigh and lower leg.

  9. Acoustic radar sounding of the lower atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcallister, L. G.

    1972-01-01

    Acoustic radar sounding techniques were used to measure the wind velocity and direction in the first 300 m of the atmosphere. Angle-of-arrival and Doppler techniques were developed to obtain two independent measurements of the wind field. These techniques and preliminary experimental results are described briefly.

  10. Measurement of surface acoustic wave velocity using phase shift mask and application on thin film of thermoelectric material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dongyao; Zhao, Peng; Gunning, Noel; Johnson, David; Zhao, Ji-Cheng; Cahill, David

    2014-03-01

    We describe a convenient approach for measuring the velocity vSAW of surface acoustic waves (SAWs) of the near-surface layer of a material through optical pump-probe measurements and apply this method, in combination with conventional picosecond acoustics, to determine a subset of the elastic constants of thin films of semiconducting misfit layered compounds. SAWs with a wavelength of 700 nm are generated and detected using an elastomeric polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) phase-shift mask which is fabricated using a commercially-available Si grating as a mold. The velocity of SAWs of [(SnSe)1.04]m[MoSe2]n synthesized by elemental reactants show subtle variations in their elastic constants as a function of m and n. Precise measurements of elastic constants will enable a better understanding of interfacial stiffness in nanoscale multilayers and the effects of phonon focusing on thermal conductivity.

  11. The Velocity and Attenuation of Acoustic Emission Waves in SiC/SiC Composites Loaded in Tension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morscher, Gregory N.; Gyekenyesi, Andrew L.; Gray, Hugh R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The behavior of acoustic waves produced by microfracture events and from pencil lead breaks was studied for two different silicon carbide fiber-reinforced silicon carbide matrix composites. The two composite systems both consisted of Hi-Nicalon (trademark) fibers and carbon interfaces but had different matrix compositions that led to considerable differences in damage accumulation and acoustic response. This behavior was primarily due to an order of magnitude difference in the interfacial shear stress for the two composite systems. Load/unload/reload tensile tests were performed and measurements were made over the entire stress range in order to determine the stress-dependence of acoustic activity for increasing damage states. It was found that using the extensional wave velocities from acoustic emission (AE) events produced from pencil lead breaks performed outside of the transducers enabled accurate measurements of the stiffness of the composite. The extensional wave velocities changed as a function of the damage state and the stress where the measurement was taken. Attenuation for AE waveforms from the pencil lead breaks occurred only for the composite possessing the lower interfacial shear stress and only at significantly high stresses. At zero stress after unloading from a peak stress, no attenuation occurred for this composite because of crack closure. For the high interfacial stress composite no attenuation was discernable at peak or zero stress over the entire stress-range of the composite. From these observations, it is believed that attenuation of AE waveforms is dependent on the magnitude of matrix crack opening.

  12. AWESoMe: A code for the calculation of phase and group velocities of acoustic waves in homogeneous solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz-Santiburcio, Daniel; Hernández-Laguna, Alfonso; Soto, Juan I.

    2015-07-01

    We present AWESoMe, an implementation of a method for the evaluation of acoustic wave velocities in homogeneous solid media. The code computes the phase and group velocities for all the possible propagation directions, as well as some related parameters such as the polarization vectors, the power flow angle and the enhancement factor. The code is conveniently interfaced with GNUPLOT, thus offering immediate visualization of the results. AWESoMe is open-source software, available under the GNU General Public License v3.

  13. Simultaneous three-dimensional velocity and mixing measurements by use of laser Doppler velocimetry and fluorescence probes in a water tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neuhart, Dan H.; Wing, David J.; Henderson, Uleses C., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    A water tunnel investigation was conducted to demonstrate the capabilities of a laser-based instrument that can measure velocity and fluorescence intensity simultaneously. Fluorescence intensity of an excited fluorescent dye is directly related to concentration level and is used to indicate the extent of mixing in flow. This instrument is a three-dimensional laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV) in combination with a fluorometer for measuring fluorescence intensity variations. This capability allows simultaneous flow measurements of the three orthogonal velocity components and mixing within the same region. Two different flows which were generated by two models were studied: a generic nonaxisymmetric nozzle propulsion simulation model with an auxiliary internal water source that generated a jet flow and an axisymmetric forebody model with a circular sector strake that generated a vortex flow. The off-body flow fields around these models were investigated in the Langley 16- by 24-Inch Water Tunnel. The experimental results were used to calculate 17 quantities that included mean and fluctuating velocities, Reynolds stresses, mean and fluctuating dye fluorescence intensities (proportional to concentration), and fluctuating velocity and dye concentration correlations. An uncertainty analysis was performed to establish confidence levels in the experimental results. In general, uncertainties in mean velocities varied between 1 and 7 percent of free-stream velocity; uncertainties in fluctuating velocities varied between 1 and 5 percent of reference values. The results show characteristics that are unique to each type of flow.

  14. Automated calculation of stenosis diameters from the width of the velocity jet with the use of a multi-gate pulsed Doppler system.

    PubMed

    de Knecht, S; Hopman, J C; Alsters, J L; Daniëls, O; Hoeks, A P; Reneman, R S

    1988-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate an algorithm for automated estimation of the width of a jet stream originating from a stenosis. The evaluation was performed in a pulsatile flow model. The width of the jetstream was assessed by measuring the diameter of the region with relatively high velocities (the jet) in the velocity profiles, as recorded with a multi-gate pulsed Doppler system. Measurements were performed at 3, 6, and 9 mm downstream of three different stenoses (stenosis diameter: 3, 5, or 8 mm) at different Reynolds numbers (200-1600) based on time averaged flow velocity for a tube of diameter 15 mm. The developed algorithm was used successfully for automated detection and quantification of jet flow diameters downstream to a stenosis. The algorithm can be used for calculating the stenosis diameter notwithstanding a theoretically predictable overestimation of about 1 mm, depending on the Reynolds number and the distance from the stenosis. PMID:2974211

  15. Integration of a laser doppler vibrometer and adaptive optics system for acoustic-optical detection in the presence of random water wave distortions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Land, Phillip; Robinson, Dennis; Roeder, James; Cook, Dean; Majumdar, Arun K.

    2016-05-01

    A new technique has been developed for improving the Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) of underwater acoustic signals measured above the water's surface. This technique uses a Laser Doppler Vibrometer (LDV) and an Adaptive Optics (AO) system (consisting of a fast steering mirror, deformable mirror, and Shack-Hartmann Wavefront Sensor) for mitigating the effect of surface water distortions encountered while remotely recording underwater acoustic signals. The LDV is used to perform non-contact vibration measurements of a surface via a two beam laser interferometer. We have demonstrated the feasibility of this technique to overcome water distortions artificially generated on the surface of the water in a laboratory tank. In this setup, the LDV beam penetrates the surface of the water and travels down to be reflected off a submerged acoustic transducer. The reflected or returned beam is then recorded by the LDV as a vibration wave measurement. The LDV extracts the acoustic wave information while the AO mitigates the water surface distortions, increasing the overall SNR. The AO system records the Strehl ratio, which is a measure of the quality of optical image formation. In a perfect optical system the Strehl ratio is unity, however realistic systems with imperfections have Strehl ratios below one. The operation of the AO control system in open-loop and closed-loop configurations demonstrates the utility of the AO-based LDV for many applications.

  16. Analysis of Supergranule Sizes and Velocities Using Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/Helioseismic Magnetic Imager (HMI) and Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO)/Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) Dopplergrams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Peter E.; Pesnell, W. Dean; Beck, John G.; Lee, Shannon

    2013-01-01

    Co-temporal Doppler images from Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO)/ Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) and Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/Helioseismic Magnetic Imager (HMI) have been analyzed to extract quantitative information about global properties of the spatial and temporal characteristics of solar supergranulation. Preliminary comparisons show that supergranules appear to be smaller and have stronger horizontal velocity flows within HMI data than was measured with MDI. There appears to be no difference in their evolutionary timescales. Supergranule sizes and velocities were analyzed over a ten-day time period at a 15-minute cadence. While the averages of the time-series retain the aforementioned differences, fluctuations of these parameters first observed in MDI data were seen in both MDI and HMI time-series, exhibiting a strong cross-correlation. This verifies that these fluctuations are not instrumental, but are solar in origin. The observed discrepancies between the averaged values from the two sets of data are a consequence of instrument resolution. The lower spatial resolution of MDI results in larger observed structures with lower velocities than is seen in HMI. While these results offer a further constraint on the physical nature of supergranules, they also provide a level of calibration between the two instruments.

  17. In vivo visualization method by absolute blood flow velocity based on speckle and fringe pattern using two-beam multipoint laser Doppler velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyoden, Tomoaki; Naruki, Shoji; Akiguchi, Shunsuke; Ishida, Hiroki; Andoh, Tsugunobu; Takada, Yogo; Momose, Noboru; Homae, Tomotaka; Hachiga, Tadashi

    2016-08-01

    Two-beam multipoint laser Doppler velocimetry (two-beam MLDV) is a non-invasive imaging technique able to provide an image of two-dimensional blood flow and has potential for observing cancer as previously demonstrated in a mouse model. In two-beam MLDV, the blood flow velocity can be estimated from red blood cells passing through a fringe pattern generated in the skin. The fringe pattern is created at the intersection of two beams in conventional LDV and two-beam MLDV. Being able to choose the depth position is an advantage of two-beam MLDV, and the position of a blood vessel can be identified in a three-dimensional space using this technique. Initially, we observed the fringe pattern in the skin, and the undeveloped or developed speckle pattern generated in a deeper position of the skin. The validity of the absolute velocity value detected by two-beam MLDV was verified while changing the number of layers of skin around a transparent flow channel. The absolute velocity value independent of direction was detected using the developed speckle pattern, which is created by the skin construct and two beams in the flow channel. Finally, we showed the relationship between the signal intensity and the fringe pattern, undeveloped speckle, or developed speckle pattern based on the skin depth. The Doppler signals were not detected at deeper positions in the skin, which qualitatively indicates the depth limit for two-beam MLDV.

  18. Relation between three-dimensional geometry of the inflow tract to the orifice and the area, shape, and velocity of regurgitant color Doppler jets: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Nicolosi, G L; Budano, S; Grenci, G M; Mangano, S; Cervesato, E; Zanuttini, D

    1990-01-01

    The relation between three-dimensional geometry of the inflow tract to the orifice and the area, shape, and velocity of regurgitant jets was studied in a pulsatile in vitro color Doppler flow model. A 2.5 MHz transducer connected to a diagnostic ultrasound machine was placed in a water tank facing pulsatile jets (duration, 0.5 second) obtained by a calibrated injector. Flow rate from 6 to 52 ml/sec were tested through a 5 mm diameter circular orifice. Four different three-dimensional inflow tract geometries were compared: (A) sharp-edged, (B) Venturi (funnel), (C) converging conical, and (D) diverging conical. Mean velocities of jets were measured by continuous-wave Doppler echocardiography. Driving pressures were also measured by means of a fluid-filled catheter. Two observers independently digitized contours of maximal color jet areas by computer system from two separate sets of experiments. Results are given as the mean values of the four measurements for each parameter. Jet areas were correlated to flow rate, with no difference from A through D. The shape (eccentricity) of jets was different between A and B (p less than 0.05), between B and D (p less than 0.01), and between C and D (p less than 0.01). The shape of jets was correlated with flow rate, continuous-wave velocity, and pressure gradient in B, C, and D but not in A. Measured pressure gradients and estimated gradients by continuous-wave Doppler echocardiography were similarly correlated from A through D.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. The Göttingen Solar Radial Velocity Project: Sub-m s-1 Doppler Precision from FTS Observations of the Sun as a Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemke, U.; Reiners, A.

    2016-09-01

    Radial velocity observations of stars are entering the sub-m s-1 domain revealing fundamental barriers for Doppler precision experiments. Observations of the Sun as a star can easily overcome the m s-1 photon limit but face other obstacles. We introduce the Göttingen Solar Radial Velocity Project with the goal of obtaining high-precision (cm s-1) radial velocity measurements of the Sun as a star with a Fourier Transform Spectrograph. In this first paper, we present the project and first results. The photon limit of our 2 minute observations is at the 2 cm s-1 level but is currently limited by strong instrumental systematics. A drift of a few m s-1 hr-1 is visible in all observing days, probably caused by vignetting of the solar disk in our fiber-coupled setup, and imperfections of our guiding system add further offsets in our data. Binning the data into 30 minute groups shows m s-1 stability after correcting for a daily and linear instrumental trend. Our results show the potential of Sun-as-a-star radial velocity measurements that can possibly be achieved after a substantial upgrade of our spectrograph coupling strategy. Sun-as-a-star observations can provide crucial empirical information about the radial velocity signal of convective motion and stellar activity and on the wavelength dependence of radial velocity signals caused by stellar line profile variations.

  20. The Göttingen Solar Radial Velocity Project: Sub-m s‑1 Doppler Precision from FTS Observations of the Sun as a Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemke, U.; Reiners, A.

    2016-09-01

    Radial velocity observations of stars are entering the sub-m s‑1 domain revealing fundamental barriers for Doppler precision experiments. Observations of the Sun as a star can easily overcome the m s‑1 photon limit but face other obstacles. We introduce the Göttingen Solar Radial Velocity Project with the goal of obtaining high-precision (cm s‑1) radial velocity measurements of the Sun as a star with a Fourier Transform Spectrograph. In this first paper, we present the project and first results. The photon limit of our 2 minute observations is at the 2 cm s‑1 level but is currently limited by strong instrumental systematics. A drift of a few m s‑1 hr‑1 is visible in all observing days, probably caused by vignetting of the solar disk in our fiber-coupled setup, and imperfections of our guiding system add further offsets in our data. Binning the data into 30 minute groups shows m s‑1 stability after correcting for a daily and linear instrumental trend. Our results show the potential of Sun-as-a-star radial velocity measurements that can possibly be achieved after a substantial upgrade of our spectrograph coupling strategy. Sun-as-a-star observations can provide crucial empirical information about the radial velocity signal of convective motion and stellar activity and on the wavelength dependence of radial velocity signals caused by stellar line profile variations.

  1. Velocity Field Characteristics at the Inlet to a Pipe Culvert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolerski, Tomasz; Wielgat, Paweł

    2014-12-01

    A poorly designed culvert inlet structure causes scouring, which can lead to the collapse of the culvert and significant damage to the neighboring land. A set of laboratory tests was evaluated to examine velocity distribution at the culvert inlet. A three-dimensional acoustic Doppler velocimeter was used to measure instantaneous flow velocity upstream of the culvert. The analysis of mean velocities, turbulence strength, and Reynolds stresses was performed to understand the flow structure near the culvert entrance.

  2. Self-mixing detection of backscattered radiation in a single-mode erbium fibre laser for Doppler spectroscopy and velocity measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Dmitriev, A K; Konovalov, A N; Ul'yanov, V A

    2014-04-28

    We report an experimental study of the self-mixing effect in a single-mode multifrequency erbium fibre laser when radiation backscattered from an external moving object arrives at its cavity. To eliminate resulting chaotic pulsations in the laser, we have proposed a technique for suppressing backscattered radiation through the use of multimode fibre for radiation delivery. The multifrequency operation of the laser has been shown to lead to strong fluctuations of the amplitude of the Doppler signal and a nonmonotonic variation of the amplitude with distance to the scattering object. In spite of these features, the self-mixing signal was detected with a high signal-to-noise ratio (above 10{sup 2}) when the radiation was scattered by a rotating disc, and the Doppler frequency shift, evaluated as the centroid of its spectrum, had high stability (0.15%) and linearity relative to the rotation rate. We conclude that the self-mixing effect in this type of fibre laser can be used for measuring the velocity of scattering objects and in Doppler spectroscopy for monitoring the laser evaporation of materials and biological tissues. (control of laser radiation parameters)

  3. Acousto-optic effect compensation for optical determination of the normal velocity distribution associated with acoustic transducer radiation.

    PubMed

    Foote, Kenneth G; Theobald, Peter D

    2015-09-01

    The acousto-optic effect, in which an acoustic wave causes variations in the optical index of refraction, imposes a fundamental limitation on the determination of the normal velocity, or normal displacement, distribution on the surface of an acoustic transducer or optically reflecting pellicle by a scanning heterodyne, or homodyne, laser interferometer. A general method of compensation is developed for a pulsed harmonic pressure field, transmitted by an acoustic transducer, in which the laser beam can transit the transducer nearfield. By representing the pressure field by the Rayleigh integral, the basic equation for the unknown normal velocity on the surface of the transducer or pellicle is transformed into a Fredholm equation of the second kind. A numerical solution is immediate when the scanned points on the surface correspond to those of the surface area discretization. Compensation is also made for oblique angles of incidence by the scanning laser beam. The present compensation method neglects edge waves, or those due to boundary diffraction, as well as effects due to baffles, if present. By allowing measurement in the nearfield of the radiating transducer, the method can enable quantification of edge-wave and baffle effects on transducer radiation. A verification experiment has been designed. PMID:26428801

  4. Reduced Arteriovenous Shunting Capacity After Local Heating and Redistribution of Baseline Skin Blood Flow in Type 2 Diabetes Assessed With Velocity-Resolved Quantitative Laser Doppler Flowmetry

    PubMed Central

    Fredriksson, Ingemar; Larsson, Marcus; Nyström, Fredrik H.; Länne, Toste; Östgren, Carl J.; Strömberg, Tomas

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To compare the microcirculatory velocity distribution in type 2 diabetic patients and nondiabetic control subjects at baseline and after local heating. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The skin blood flow response to local heating (44°C for 20 min) was assessed in 28 diabetic patients and 29 control subjects using a new velocity-resolved quantitative laser Doppler flowmetry technique (qLDF). The qLDF estimates erythrocyte (RBC) perfusion (velocity × concentration), in a physiologically relevant unit (grams RBC per 100 g tissue × millimeters per second) in a fixed output volume, separated into three velocity regions: v <1 mm/s, v 1–10 mm/s, and v >10 mm/s. RESULTS The increased blood flow occurs in vessels with a velocity >1 mm/s. A significantly lower response in qLDF total perfusion was found in diabetic patients than in control subjects after heat provocation because of less high-velocity blood flow (v >10 mm/s). The RBC concentration in diabetic patients increased sevenfold for v between 1 and 10 mm/s, and 15-fold for v >10 mm/s, whereas no significant increase was found for v <1 mm/s. The mean velocity increased from 0.94 to 7.3 mm/s in diabetic patients and from 0.83 to 9.7 mm/s in control subjects. CONCLUSIONS The perfusion increase occurs in larger shunting vessels and not as an increase in capillary flow. Baseline diabetic patient data indicated a redistribution of flow to higher velocity regions, associated with longer duration of diabetes. A lower perfusion was associated with a higher BMI and a lower toe-to-brachial systolic blood pressure ratio. PMID:20393143

  5. Some experiments in swirling flows: Detailed velocity measurements of a vortex breakdown using a laser Doppler anemometer. Ph.D. Thesis - Cornell Univ. Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faler, J. H.

    1976-01-01

    The results of an experimental study of spiraling flows in a slightly diverging, circular duct are reported. Seven types of flow disturbances were observed. In addition to the spiral and axisymmetric vortex breakdowns and the double helix mode, four other forms were identified and are reported. The type and axial location of the disturbance depended on the Reynolds and circulation numbers of the flow. Detailed velocity measurements were made by using a laser Doppler anemometer. Measurements made far upstream of any disturbance showed that the introduction of swirl resulted in the formation of a high axial velocity jet centered around the vortex center. A mapping of the velocity field of a so-called axisymmetric breakdown, formed at a Reynolds number of 2560, revealed that the recirculation zone is a two-celled structure, with four stagnation points on the vortex axis marking the axial extremes of the concentric cells. The dominant feature of the flow inside the bubble was the strong, periodic velocity fluctuations. Existing theoretical models do not predict the two-celled structure and the temporal velocity fluctuations that were observed.

  6. Comparison of wind velocity in thunderstorms determined from measurements by a ground-based Doppler radar and an F-106B airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Usry, J. W.; Dunham, R. E., Jr.; Lee, J. T.

    1985-01-01

    As a part of the NASA Storm Hazards Program, the wind velocity in several thunderstorms was measured by an F-106B instrumented airplane and a ground-based Doppler radar. The results of five airplane penetrations of two storms in 1980 and six penetrations of one storm in 1981 are given. Comparisons were made between the radial wind velocity components measured by the radar and the airplane. The correlation coefficients for the 1980 data and part of the 1981 data were 0.88 and 0.78, respectively. It is suggested that larger values for these coefficients may be obtained by improving the experimental technique and in particular by slaving the radar to track the airplane during such tests.

  7. Separation of Main and Tail Rotor Noise Sources from Ground-Based Acoustic Measurements Using Time-Domain De-Dopplerization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenwood, Eric II; Schmitz, Fredric H.

    2009-01-01

    A new method of separating the contributions of helicopter main and tail rotor noise sources is presented, making use of ground-based acoustic measurements. The method employs time-domain de-Dopplerization to transform the acoustic pressure time-history data collected from an array of ground-based microphones to the equivalent time-history signals observed by an array of virtual inflight microphones traveling with the helicopter. The now-stationary signals observed by the virtual microphones are then periodically averaged with the main and tail rotor once per revolution triggers. The averaging process suppresses noise which is not periodic with the respective rotor, allowing for the separation of main and tail rotor pressure time-histories. The averaged measurements are then interpolated across the range of directivity angles captured by the microphone array in order to generate separate acoustic hemispheres for the main and tail rotor noise sources. The new method is successfully applied to ground-based microphone measurements of a Bell 206B3 helicopter and demonstrates the strong directivity characteristics of harmonic noise radiation from both the main and tail rotors of that helicopter.

  8. Superharmonic microbubble Doppler effect in ultrasound therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pouliopoulos, Antonios N.; Choi, James J.

    2016-08-01

    The introduction of microbubbles in focused ultrasound therapies has enabled a diverse range of non-invasive technologies: sonoporation to deliver drugs into cells, sonothrombolysis to dissolve blood clots, and blood-brain barrier opening to deliver drugs into the brain. Current methods for passively monitoring the microbubble dynamics responsible for these therapeutic effects can identify the cavitation position by passive acoustic mapping and cavitation mode by spectral analysis. Here, we introduce a new feature that can be monitored: microbubble effective velocity. Previous studies have shown that echoes from short imaging pulses had a Doppler shift that was produced by the movement of microbubbles. Therapeutic pulses are longer (>1 000 cycles) and thus produce a larger alteration of microbubble distribution due to primary and secondary acoustic radiation force effects which cannot be monitored using pulse-echo techniques. In our experiments, we captured and analyzed the Doppler shift during long therapeutic pulses using a passive cavitation detector. A population of microbubbles (5  ×  104-5  ×  107 microbubbles ml-1) was embedded in a vessel (inner diameter: 4 mm) and sonicated using a 0.5 MHz focused ultrasound transducer (peak-rarefactional pressure: 75-366 kPa, pulse length: 50 000 cycles or 100 ms) within a water tank. Microbubble acoustic emissions were captured with a coaxially aligned 7.5 MHz passive cavitation detector and spectrally analyzed to measure the Doppler shift for multiple harmonics above the 10th harmonic (i.e. superharmonics). A Doppler shift was observed on the order of tens of kHz with respect to the primary superharmonic peak and is due to the axial movement of the microbubbles. The position, amplitude and width of the Doppler peaks depended on the acoustic pressure and the microbubble concentration. Higher pressures increased the effective velocity of the microbubbles up to 3 m s-1, prior to the onset of

  9. Superharmonic microbubble Doppler effect in ultrasound therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pouliopoulos, Antonios N.; Choi, James J.

    2016-08-01

    The introduction of microbubbles in focused ultrasound therapies has enabled a diverse range of non-invasive technologies: sonoporation to deliver drugs into cells, sonothrombolysis to dissolve blood clots, and blood-brain barrier opening to deliver drugs into the brain. Current methods for passively monitoring the microbubble dynamics responsible for these therapeutic effects can identify the cavitation position by passive acoustic mapping and cavitation mode by spectral analysis. Here, we introduce a new feature that can be monitored: microbubble effective velocity. Previous studies have shown that echoes from short imaging pulses had a Doppler shift that was produced by the movement of microbubbles. Therapeutic pulses are longer (>1 000 cycles) and thus produce a larger alteration of microbubble distribution due to primary and secondary acoustic radiation force effects which cannot be monitored using pulse-echo techniques. In our experiments, we captured and analyzed the Doppler shift during long therapeutic pulses using a passive cavitation detector. A population of microbubbles (5  ×  104–5  ×  107 microbubbles ml‑1) was embedded in a vessel (inner diameter: 4 mm) and sonicated using a 0.5 MHz focused ultrasound transducer (peak-rarefactional pressure: 75–366 kPa, pulse length: 50 000 cycles or 100 ms) within a water tank. Microbubble acoustic emissions were captured with a coaxially aligned 7.5 MHz passive cavitation detector and spectrally analyzed to measure the Doppler shift for multiple harmonics above the 10th harmonic (i.e. superharmonics). A Doppler shift was observed on the order of tens of kHz with respect to the primary superharmonic peak and is due to the axial movement of the microbubbles. The position, amplitude and width of the Doppler peaks depended on the acoustic pressure and the microbubble concentration. Higher pressures increased the effective velocity of the microbubbles up to 3 m s‑1, prior to the onset

  10. Superharmonic microbubble Doppler effect in ultrasound therapy.

    PubMed

    Pouliopoulos, Antonios N; Choi, James J

    2016-08-21

    The introduction of microbubbles in focused ultrasound therapies has enabled a diverse range of non-invasive technologies: sonoporation to deliver drugs into cells, sonothrombolysis to dissolve blood clots, and blood-brain barrier opening to deliver drugs into the brain. Current methods for passively monitoring the microbubble dynamics responsible for these therapeutic effects can identify the cavitation position by passive acoustic mapping and cavitation mode by spectral analysis. Here, we introduce a new feature that can be monitored: microbubble effective velocity. Previous studies have shown that echoes from short imaging pulses had a Doppler shift that was produced by the movement of microbubbles. Therapeutic pulses are longer (>1 000 cycles) and thus produce a larger alteration of microbubble distribution due to primary and secondary acoustic radiation force effects which cannot be monitored using pulse-echo techniques. In our experiments, we captured and analyzed the Doppler shift during long therapeutic pulses using a passive cavitation detector. A population of microbubbles (5  ×  10(4)-5  ×  10(7) microbubbles ml(-1)) was embedded in a vessel (inner diameter: 4 mm) and sonicated using a 0.5 MHz focused ultrasound transducer (peak-rarefactional pressure: 75-366 kPa, pulse length: 50 000 cycles or 100 ms) within a water tank. Microbubble acoustic emissions were captured with a coaxially aligned 7.5 MHz passive cavitation detector and spectrally analyzed to measure the Doppler shift for multiple harmonics above the 10th harmonic (i.e. superharmonics). A Doppler shift was observed on the order of tens of kHz with respect to the primary superharmonic peak and is due to the axial movement of the microbubbles. The position, amplitude and width of the Doppler peaks depended on the acoustic pressure and the microbubble concentration. Higher pressures increased the effective velocity of the microbubbles up to 3 m s(-1), prior to the onset

  11. Superharmonic microbubble Doppler effect in ultrasound therapy.

    PubMed

    Pouliopoulos, Antonios N; Choi, James J

    2016-08-21

    The introduction of microbubbles in focused ultrasound therapies has enabled a diverse range of non-invasive technologies: sonoporation to deliver drugs into cells, sonothrombolysis to dissolve blood clots, and blood-brain barrier opening to deliver drugs into the brain. Current methods for passively monitoring the microbubble dynamics responsible for these therapeutic effects can identify the cavitation position by passive acoustic mapping and cavitation mode by spectral analysis. Here, we introduce a new feature that can be monitored: microbubble effective velocity. Previous studies have shown that echoes from short imaging pulses had a Doppler shift that was produced by the movement of microbubbles. Therapeutic pulses are longer (>1 000 cycles) and thus produce a larger alteration of microbubble distribution due to primary and secondary acoustic radiation force effects which cannot be monitored using pulse-echo techniques. In our experiments, we captured and analyzed the Doppler shift during long therapeutic pulses using a passive cavitation detector. A population of microbubbles (5  ×  10(4)-5  ×  10(7) microbubbles ml(-1)) was embedded in a vessel (inner diameter: 4 mm) and sonicated using a 0.5 MHz focused ultrasound transducer (peak-rarefactional pressure: 75-366 kPa, pulse length: 50 000 cycles or 100 ms) within a water tank. Microbubble acoustic emissions were captured with a coaxially aligned 7.5 MHz passive cavitation detector and spectrally analyzed to measure the Doppler shift for multiple harmonics above the 10th harmonic (i.e. superharmonics). A Doppler shift was observed on the order of tens of kHz with respect to the primary superharmonic peak and is due to the axial movement of the microbubbles. The position, amplitude and width of the Doppler peaks depended on the acoustic pressure and the microbubble concentration. Higher pressures increased the effective velocity of the microbubbles up to 3 m s(-1), prior to the onset

  12. Influence of orographic and canopy conditions on friction velocities observed during frontal events using Doppler sodar observations

    SciTech Connect

    Kotroni, V.; Amory-Mazaudier, C. )

    1993-03-01

    Sodar friction velocities, obtained during frontal events traversing areas characterized by different orographic and canopy conditions (flat, bare ground, small hills and valleys with agricultural crops and trees, agricultural crops and forest on a flat ground, bare ground on the side of a mountain), are compared in order to identify the influence of topography on this parameter. For some case studies, sounding and sodar data are combined in order to provide a relation between the friction velocity and the low-level jet presence. For the cases analyzed in this paper, the following results are obtained: the frontal passage is associated with a decrease of the horizontal wind speed (about 50% in magnitude) in the surface layer, and an increase of the friction velocity before the frontal passage followed by a decrease just at the time of the frontal passage or with a little delay. Friction velocity is more intense in the cold side of the low-level jet and its maximum represents 2% of the low-level jet maximum magnitude. As it concerns the influence of the terrain conditions on friction velocity, mountain effects yield to more intense friction-velocity values and to a superposition of an oscillating behavior on the time variation of friction velocity, while forest effects induce a shift of the frontal signature on the time variation of friction velocity at higher height levels. 25 refs., 18 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Conduct overall test operations and evaluate two Doppler systems to detect, track and measure velocities in aircraft wake vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, D. J.; Krause, M. C.; Craven, C. E.; Edwards, B. B.; Coffey, E. W.; Huang, C. C.; Jetton, J. L.; Morrison, L. K.

    1974-01-01

    A program plan for system evaluation of the two-dimensional Scanning Laser Doppler System (SLDS) is presented. In order to meet system evaluation and optimization objectives the following tests were conducted: (1) noise tests; (2) wind tests; (3) blower flowfield tests; (4) single unit (1-D) flyby tests; and (5) dual unit (2-D) flyby tests. Test results are reported. The final phase of the program included logistics preparation, equipment interface checkouts, and data processing. It is concluded that the SLDS is capable of accurately tracking aircraft wake vortices from small or large aircraft, and in any type of weather.

  14. Feasibility of using an acoustic velocity meter to measure flow in the Chipps Island channel, Suisun Bay, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoffard, Stuart H.

    1980-01-01

    Tests were conducted in 1978 to determine the feasibility of using an acoustic velocity meter to measure the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta outflow in the Chipps Island Channel, Suisun Bay, Calif. Three parts of transducers with frequencies of 100, 40, and 24 kilohertz were installed on a cross-channel test path and operated at three elevations, 15.5, 8.0, and 4.0 feet below mean lower low water, to test signal transmission at varying depths. Transmission was most reliable at the lowest depth, and the 24-kilohertz transducers at the 7-millivolt threshold of signal strength met the study 's criterion of no persistent signal loss of more than one hour 's duration in any phase of the tidal cycle. Signal strength was statistically correlated with the environmental factors of wind velocity, wind direction, solar insolation, electrical conductivity, water temperature, water velocity, stage, rate of change in stage, and the acceleration of the rate of change in stage. All correlations were weak. Signal strength is apparently a function of the interaction of several environmental factors. A 32-day test to observe if aquatic growth on the transducers would affect signal transmission showed no reduction in signal strength. Suspended-sediment samples indicated that both the size and concentration of particles are greater than presumed in earlier studies. According to the results of this study, chances are good for reliable transmission of acoustic velocity meter signals. Usually some signals were much stronger than the average 20-second signal strength at 15-minute intervals used for correlation and the frequency analysis. Superior equipment is now being developed specifically for the Chipps Island site to transmit signals several times stronger than the signals analyzed in these tests. (USGS)

  15. Basic investigation on acoustic velocity change imaging method for quantitative assessment of fat content in human liver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mano, Kazune; Tanigawa, Shohei; Hori, Makoto; Yokota, Daiki; Wada, Kenji; Matsunaka, Toshiyuki; Morikawa, Hiroyasu; Horinaka, Hiromichi

    2016-07-01

    Fatty liver is a disease caused by the excess accumulation of fat in the human liver. The early diagnosis of fatty liver is very important, because fatty liver is the major marker linked to metabolic syndrome. We already proposed the ultrasonic velocity change imaging method to diagnose fatty liver by using the fact that the temperature dependence of ultrasonic velocity is different in water and in fat. For the diagonosis of a fatty liver stage, we attempted a feasibility study of the quantitative assessment of the fat content in the human liver using our ultrasonic velocity change imaging method. Experimental results showed that the fat content in the tissue mimic phantom containing lard was determined by its ultrasonic velocity change in the flat temperature region formed by a circular warming ultrasonic transducer with an acoustic lens having an appropriate focal length. By considering the results of our simulation using a thermal diffusion equation, we determined whether this method could be applied to fatty liver assessment under the condition that the tissue had the thermal relaxation effect caused by blood flow.

  16. Analysis of contributions of nonlinear material constants to temperature-induced velocity shifts of quartz surface acoustic wave resonators.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haifeng; Kosinski, John A; Zuo, Lei

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we examine the significance of the various higher-order effects regarding calculating temperature behavior from a set of material constants and their temperature coefficients. Temperature-induced velocity shifts have been calculated for quartz surface acoustic wave (SAW) resonators and the contributions of different groups of nonlinear material constants (third-order elastic constants (TOE), third-order piezoelectric constants (TOP), third-order dielectric constants (TOD) and electrostrictive constants (EL)) to the temperature-induced velocity shifts have been analyzed. The analytical methodology has been verified through the comparison of experimental and analytical results for quartz resonators. In general, the third-order elastic constants were found to contribute most significantly to the temperature-induced shifts in the SAW velocity. The contributions from the third-order dielectric constants and electrostrictive constants were found to be negligible. For some specific cases, the third-order piezoelectric constants were found to make a significant contribution to the temperature-induced shifts. The significance of each third-order elastic constant as a contributor to the temperature-velocity effect was analyzed by applying a 10% variation to each of the third-order elastic constants separately. Additionally, we have considered the issues arising from the commonly used thermoelastic expansions that provide a good but not exact description of the temperature effects on frequency in piezoelectric resonators as these commonly used expansions do not include the effects of higher-order material constants. PMID:27392205

  17. Analysis of contributions of nonlinear material constants to temperature-induced velocity shifts of quartz surface acoustic wave resonators.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haifeng; Kosinski, John A; Zuo, Lei

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we examine the significance of the various higher-order effects regarding calculating temperature behavior from a set of material constants and their temperature coefficients. Temperature-induced velocity shifts have been calculated for quartz surface acoustic wave (SAW) resonators and the contributions of different groups of nonlinear material constants (third-order elastic constants (TOE), third-order piezoelectric constants (TOP), third-order dielectric constants (TOD) and electrostrictive constants (EL)) to the temperature-induced velocity shifts have been analyzed. The analytical methodology has been verified through the comparison of experimental and analytical results for quartz resonators. In general, the third-order elastic constants were found to contribute most significantly to the temperature-induced shifts in the SAW velocity. The contributions from the third-order dielectric constants and electrostrictive constants were found to be negligible. For some specific cases, the third-order piezoelectric constants were found to make a significant contribution to the temperature-induced shifts. The significance of each third-order elastic constant as a contributor to the temperature-velocity effect was analyzed by applying a 10% variation to each of the third-order elastic constants separately. Additionally, we have considered the issues arising from the commonly used thermoelastic expansions that provide a good but not exact description of the temperature effects on frequency in piezoelectric resonators as these commonly used expansions do not include the effects of higher-order material constants.

  18. SonTek SL3G Side-Looking Doppler Current Meter application in Complex Flow Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagenaar, D.

    2014-12-01

    The SonTek Argonaut SL Side-Looking Doppler Current Meters are well established products in the measurement of real-time water velocity in open channels. With the development of acoustic doppler technology the decision was made to incorporate latest technology in the Argonaut SL and hence the SonTek SL3G was born.The SonTek SL3G Acoustic Doppler instrument incorporates a number of innovations that improves velocity measurements and quality assurance of data for Side-Looking Doppler Current Meters. SmartPulseHD was originally introduced with the launch of the SonTek M9/S5 RiverSurveyor Acoustic Doppler Instruments and the increased accuracy and resolution of velocity measurements made it obvious to include into the new SL3G instruments. SmartPulseHD continuously tracks the water conditions and selects the optimum processing configuration required using multiple ping types and processing techniques. The new SL3G design makes it the smallest Side Looking Acoustic Doppler Velocity Meter on the market reducing flow disturbance caused by the instrument and the distance of first measurement cell from boundary.The application of the SL3G Acoustic Doppler instrument is designed for complex flow conditions where the use of conventional stage-discharge relationships is economically not viable and therefore requires the use of velocity index methodology. The case-study presented in this paper is situated in the Colorado River downstream of Imperial Dam affected by controlled releases, drainage from adjacent irrigation areas and backwater from a weir situated downstream of the monitoring site. The paper analyses the relationship between measured mean velocity and index velocity and if additional variables such as stage and or Y-velocity need to be incorporated in the development of the index velocity rating. In addition, to determine the variables impacting on the index velocity rating, the index velocity applied will be evaluated by the best linear relationship between the

  19. Velocity and Sediment Concentration Measurements over Bedforms in Sand-Bed Rivers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holmes, R.R.; Garcia, M.H.; ,

    2002-01-01

    Bedforms often are present on the bed of alluvial sand-bed rivers. Bedforms, such as dunes, impact the flow field. In this field study, velocity and suspended-sediment concentration measurements were made longitudinally along a dune field in large (5-15 meters deep) alluvial sand-bed rivers. The velocity and suspended-sediment concentration data was collected using an acoustic Doppler current profiler, acoustic Doppler velocimeters, an optical backscatter sensor, and, two sediment intakes. This paper presents a description of these measurement devices and techniques for the collection of this data. Some preliminary results observed at the Missouri River at St. Charles, Missouri are presented.

  20. Impact of assimilating airborne Doppler radar velocity data using the ARPS 3DVAR on the analysis and prediction of Hurricane Ike (2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Ningzhu; Xue, Ming; Zhao, Kun; Min, Jinzhong

    2012-09-01

    The ARPS 3DVAR data assimilation system is enhanced and used for the first time to assimilate airborne Doppler radar wind observations. It is applied to Hurricane Ike (2008), where radar observations taken along four flight legs through the hurricane vortex 14 to 18 h before it made landfall are assimilated. An optimal horizontal de-correlation scale for the background error is determined through sensitivity experiments. A comparison is made between assimilating retrieved winds and assimilating radial velocity data directly. The effect of the number of assimilation cycles, each analyzing data from one flight leg, is also examined. The assimilation of retrieved wind data and of radial velocity data produces similar results. However, direct assimilation of radial velocity data is recommended for both theoretical and practical reasons. In both cases, velocity data assimilation improves the analyzed hurricane structure and intensity as well as leads to better prediction of the intensity. Improvement to the track forecasting is also found. The assimilation of radial velocity observations from all four flight legs through intermittent assimilation cycles produces the best analyses and forecasts. The first analysis in the first cycle tends to produce the largest analysis increment. It is through the mutual adjustments among model variables during the forecast periods that a balanced vortex with lowered central pressure is established. The wind speeds extracted from the assimilated model state agree very well with independent surface wind measurements by the stepped-frequency microwave radiometer onboard the aircraft, and with independent flight-level wind speeds detected by the NOAA P-3 aircraft in-flight measurements. Twenty-four hour accumulated precipitation is noticeably improved over the case without radar data assimilation.

  1. The other side of abnormal: a case series of low transcranial Doppler velocities associated with stroke in children with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, Iris D; James-Herry, Anne; Osunkwo, Ifeyinwa

    2013-10-01

    The prevalence of cerebrovascular events in sickle cell disease (SCD) can be as low as 10% by the age of 18 for overt cerebral infarction or strokes, up to 35% for silent cerebral infarction, and as high as 43/100 patient years for acute silent cerebral ischemic events. These events typically occur during childhood with a peak incidence between the age of 4 and 7 years. The cumulative risk of central nervous system events in SCD increases with age. Transcranial Doppler (TCD) ultrasonography is an established screening tool for detecting children with SCD at highest risk for stroke by measuring the flow velocity in the large intracranial vessels. Velocities are considered abnormal with readings >200 cm/s and chronic red cell transfusions are recommended to reduce further risk or progression. Red cell transfusions have reduced the rate of cerebrovascular accidents by 90%. We describe the case of 5 children with sickle cell anemia, whose antecedent screening TCD velocities were measured to be ≤70 cm/s in the study. All patients developed some form of cerebral insults, an overt cerebral infarctions, silent stroke or transient ischemic attack, and are now receiving chronic transfusion to prevent further progression. On the basis of these cases, low TCD velocities may identify another group of children at risk for cerebrovascular disease. We suggest TCD velocities <70 cm/s in major vessels (MCA, ACA, and ICA) be considered another type of "abnormal," prompting more sensitive evaluations (such as a brain MRI and MRA) for the presence of central nervous system disease, and, if negative, decrease intervals between subsequent TCD assessments.

  2. Patterns of distribution of sound-scattering zooplankton in warm- and cold-core eddies in the Gulf of Mexico, from a narrowband acoustic Doppler current profiler survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, Robert A.; Biggs, Douglas C.

    1999-03-01

    The acoustic backscatter intensity (ABI) reflected from epipelagic zooplankton communities in the central Gulf of Mexico was measured during June 1995 with a vessel-mounted, narrowband-153-kHz acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP). Horizontal and vertical variations in ABI were documented in three kinds of mesoscale hydrographic features commonly found in the Gulf of Mexico: the warm-core Loop Current (LC), a warm-core Loop Current eddy (LCE), and a cold-core region that separated the two warm-core features. Since new nitrogen domes close to surface waters in cold-core features whereas surface waters of warm-core features are nutrient depleted, the cold-core region was expected to have higher biological stocks as a result of locally higher primary production. Both ABI and net tow data confirmed that the cold-core region was in fact a zone of local aggregation of zooplankton and micronekton. During both day and night, ABI when integrated for the upper 50 and 100 m in the cold-core region was significantly greater than in the LC or in the LCE, and ABI was positively correlated with standing stock biomass taken by the net tows. Further investigations into the biological differences between Gulf of Mexico divergence and convergence regimes are warranted, and the ADCP will be a useful tool for examination of the distribution of sound scatterers in such features.

  3. Performance comparison of an all-fiber-based laser Doppler vibrometer for remote acoustical signal detection using short and long coherence length lasers.

    PubMed

    Li, Rui; Madampoulos, Nicholas; Zhu, Zhigang; Xie, Liangping

    2012-07-20

    All-fiber laser Doppler vibrometer systems have great potential in the application of remote acoustic detection. However, due to the requirement for a long operating distance, a long coherence length laser is required, which can drive the system cost high. In this paper, a system using a short coherence length laser is proposed and demonstrated. Experimental analysis indicates that the multi-longitudinal modes of the laser cause detection noise and that the unequal length between two paths (local oscillator path and transmission path) increases the intensity and the frequency components of the noise. In order to reduce the noise, the optical length of the two paths needs to be balanced, within the coherence length of the source. We demonstrate that adopting a tunable optical delay to compensate the unequal length significantly reduces the noise. In a comparison of the detection results by using a short coherence laser and a long coherence laser, our developed system gives a good performance on the acoustic signal detection from three meters away.

  4. Time-dependent flow velocity measurement using two-dimensional color Doppler flow imaging and evaluation by Hagen-Poiseuille equation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Sun, Yuqing; Xia, Lianghua; Gu, Junyi

    2015-12-01

    This paper aims to develop a technique to assess velocity flow profile and wall shear stress (WSS) spatial distribution across a vessel phantom representing an artery. Upon confirming the reliability of the technique, it was then used on a set of carotid arteries from a cohort of human subjects. We implemented color Doppler flow imaging (CDFI) for measurement of velocity profile in the artery cross section. Two dimensional instantaneous and time-dependent flow velocity and WSS vector fields were measured and their waveforms of peak velocities based on the technique were compared with WSS values generated by Hagen-Poiseuille equation. Seventy-five patients with intima-media thickening were prospectively enrolled and were divided into an IMT group. At the same time, another 75 healthy volunteers were enrolled as the control group. All the subjects were scanned and the DICOM files were imported into our in-house program. Next, we determine the velocity profile of carotid arteries in a set of 150 human subjects and compared them again. The peak velocities by the CDFI and Hagen-Poiseuille equation techniques were compared and statistically evaluated. The amounts of deviation for the two measured WSS profiles were performed and we demonstrated that they are not significantly different. At two different flow settings with peak flow velocity of 0.1, 0.5 (×10(-11)) m/s, the obtained WSS were 0.021 ± 0.04, 0.038 ± 0.05 m/s, respectively. For the patient population study, the mean WSS value calculated by Hagen-Poiseuille equation was 2.98 ± 0.15 dyne/cm(2), while it was 2.31 ± 0.14 dyne/cm(2) by our CDFI analysis program. The difference was not statistically significant (t = -1.057, P = 0.259). Similar to the Hagen-Poiseuille equation, a negative linear correlation was also found between the calculated WSS and intima-media thickness (P = 0.000). Using CDFI analysis, we found that the WSS distribution at the middle of the proximal plaque shoulder was larger than the top

  5. Laser Doppler velocimeter measurements of boundary layer velocity and turbulent intensities in Mach 2.5 flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sewell, Jesse; Chew, Larry

    1994-01-01

    In recent years, the interest in developing a high-speed civil transport has increased. This has led to an increase in research activity on compressible supersonic flows, in particular the boundary layer. The structure of subsonic boundary layers has been extensively documented using conditional sampling techniques which exploit the knowledge of both u and v velocities. Researchers using these techniques have been able to explore some of the complex three-dimensional motions which are responsible for Reynolds stress production and transport in the boundary layer. As interest in turbulent structure has grown to include supersonic flows, a need for simultaneous multicomponent velocity measurements in these flows has developed. The success of conditional analysis in determining the characteristics of coherent motions and structures in the boundary layer relies on accurate, simultaneous measurement of two instantaneous velocity components.

  6. Use of acoustic backscatter and vertical velocity to estimate concentration and dynamics of suspended solids in Upper Klamath Lake, south-central Oregon: Implications for Aphanizomenon flos-aquae

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wood, Tamara M.; Gartner, Jeffrey W.

    2010-01-01

    Vertical velocity and acoustic backscatter measurements by acoustic Doppler current profilers were used to determine seasonal, subseasonal (days to weeks), and diel variation in suspended solids in a freshwater lake where massive cyanobacterial blooms occur annually. During the growing season, the suspended material in the lake is dominated by the buoyancy-regulating cyanobacteria, Aphanizomenon flos-aquae. Measured variables (water velocity, relative backscatter [RB], wind speed, and air and water temperatures) were averaged over the deployment season at each sample time of day to determine average diel cycles. Phase shifts between diel cycles in RB and diel cycles in wind speed, vertical water temperature differences (delta T(degree)), and horizontal current speeds were found by determining the lead or lag that maximized the linear correlation between the respective diel cycles. Diel cycles in RB were more in phase with delta T(degree) cycles, and, to a lesser extent, wind cycles, than to water current cycles but were out of phase with the cycle that would be expected if the vertical movement of buoyant cyanobacteria colonies was controlled primarily by light. Clear evidence of a diel cycle in vertical velocity was found only at the two deepest sites in the lake. Cycles of vertical velocity, where present, were out of phase with expected vertical motion of cyanobacterial colonies based on the theoretical cycle for light-driven vertical movement. This suggests that water column stability and turbulence were more important factors in controlling vertical distribution of colonies than light. Variations at subseasonal time scales were determined by filtering data to pass periods between 1.2 and 15 days. At subseasonal time scales, correlations between RB and currents or air temperature were consistent with increased concentration of cyanobacterial colonies near the surface when water column stability increased (higher air temperatures or weaker currents) and

  7. Ground and space based cloud-top wind velocities using CFHT/ESPaDOnS (Doppler velocimetry) and VEx/VIRTIS (cloud tracking) coordinated measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machado, Pedro; Widemann, Thomas; Peralta, Javier; Gonçalves, Rúben; Donati, Jean-François; Luz, David

    2016-04-01

    We will present wind velocity results based in the measurements of the horizontal wind field at the cloud top level of the atmosphere of Venus, near 70 km altitude. Our aim is contribute to the characterisation of the zonal and meridional wind latitudinal profiles on hour and day-timescales. This will be done by tracking Doppler shift of solar and CO2 lines over the dayside hemisphere in coordination with ESA's Venus Express orbiter. Our observations measured winds at cloud tops at latitudes 60°S-60°N, while Vex/VIRTIS privileged southern latitudes poleward of 45°S. This coordination effort intended to provide a combined monitoring of short-term changes of wind amplitude and directions with extensive spatial coverage. We present results based on inter comparison of ground-based Doppler velocimetry of cloud-top winds and cloud tracking measurements from the Venus Express spacecraft. Doppler wind velocimetry obtained with the 3.60 m Canada-France-Hawaii telescope (CFHT) and the Visible Spectrograph ESPaDOnS in April 2014 consisted of high-resolution spectra of Fraunhofer lines in the visible range (0.37-1.05 μm) to measure the wind velocity using the Doppler shift of solar radiation scattered by cloud top particles in the observer's direction. The complete optical spectrum was collected at a phase angle Φ = (76 ± 0.3)°, at a resolution of about 80000. Both ground-based and Venus Express measurements show considerable day-to-day variability revealing wave propagation and angular momentum transport in latitude which needs to be carefully assessed. ESPaDOnS and the sequential technique of visible Doppler velocimetry has proven a reference technique to measure instantaneous winds. These measurements are necessary to help validating Global Circulation Models (GCMs), to extend the temporal coverage of available datasets. The ground-based observations in the base of this project are critical in their complementarity with Venus Express, which was recently

  8. Ground and space based cloud-top wind velocities using CFHT/ESPaDOnS (Doppler velocimetry) and VEx/VIRTIS (cloud tracking) coordinated measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machado, Pedro; Widemann, Thomas; Peralta, Javier; Gonçalves, Rúben; Donati, Jean-François; Luz, David

    2016-04-01

    We will present wind velocity results based in the measurements of the horizontal wind field at the cloud top level of the atmosphere of Venus, near 70 km altitude. Our aim is contribute to the characterisation of the zonal and meridional wind latitudinal profiles on hour and day-timescales. This will be done by tracking Doppler shift of solar and CO2 lines over the dayside hemisphere in coordination with ESA's Venus Express orbiter. Our observations measured winds at cloud tops at latitudes 60°S-60°N, while Vex/VIRTIS privileged southern latitudes poleward of 45°S. This coordination effort intended to provide a combined monitoring of short-term changes of wind amplitude and directions with extensive spatial coverage. We present results based on inter comparison of ground-based Doppler velocimetry of cloud-top winds and cloud tracking measurements from the Venus Express spacecraft. Doppler wind velocimetry obtained with the 3.60 m Canada-France-Hawaii telescope (CFHT) and the Visible Spectrograph ESPaDOnS in April 2014 consisted of high-resolution spectra of Fraunhofer lines in the visible range (0.37-1.05 μm) to measure the wind velocity using the Doppler shift of solar radiation scattered by cloud top particles in the observer's direction. The complete optical spectrum was collected at a phase angle Φ = (76 ± 0.3)°, at a resolution of about 80000. Both ground-based and Venus Express measurements show considerable day-to-day variability revealing wave propagation and angular momentum transport in latitude which needs to be carefully assessed. ESPaDOnS and the sequential technique of visible Doppler velocimetry has proven a reference technique to measure instantaneous winds. These measurements are necessary to help validating Global Circulation Models (GCMs), to extend the temporal coverage of available datasets. The ground-based observations in the base of this project are critical in their complementarity with Venus Express, which was recently

  9. Phase Velocity and Full-Waveform Analysis of Co-located Distributed Acoustic Sensing (DAS) Channels and Geophone Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, L.; Mellors, R. J.; Thurber, C. H.; Wang, H. F.; Zeng, X.

    2015-12-01

    A 762-meter Distributed Acoustic Sensing (DAS) array with a channel spacing of one meter was deployed at the Garner Valley Downhole Array in Southern California. The array was approximately rectangular with dimensions of 180 meters by 80 meters. The array also included two subdiagonals within the rectangle along which three-component geophones were co-located. Several active sources were deployed, including a 45-kN, swept-frequency, shear-mass shaker, which produced strong Rayleigh waves across the array. Both DAS and geophone traces were filtered in 2-Hz steps between 4 and 20 Hz to obtain phase velocities as a function of frequency from fitting the moveout of travel times over distances of 35 meters or longer. As an alternative to this traditional means of finding phase velocity, it is theoretically possible to find the Rayleigh-wave phase velocity at each point of co-location as the ratio of DAS and geophone responses, because DAS is sensitive to ground strain and geophones are sensitive to ground velocity, after suitable corrections for instrument response (Mikumo & Aki, 1964). The concept was tested in WPP, a seismic wave propagation program, by first validating and then using a 3D synthetic, full-waveform seismic model to simulate the effect of increased levels of noise and uncertainty as data go from ideal to more realistic. The results obtained from this study provide a better understanding of the DAS response and its potential for being combined with traditional seismometers for obtaining phase velocity at a single location. This analysis is part of the PoroTomo project (Poroelastic Tomography by Adjoint Inverse Modeling of Data from Seismology, Geodesy, and Hydrology, http://geoscience.wisc.edu/feigl/porotomo).

  10. Overview of hydro-acoustic current-measurement applications by the U.S. geological survey in Indiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morlock, Scott E.; Stewart, James A.

    1999-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) maintains a network of 170 streamflow-gaging stations in Indiana to collect data from which continuous records of river discharges are produced. Traditionally, the discharge record from a station is produced by recording river stage and making periodic discharge measurements through a range of stage, then developing a relation between stage and discharge. Techniques that promise to increase data collection accuracy and efficiency include the use of hydro-acoustic instrumentation to measure river velocities. The velocity measurements are used to compute river discharge. In-situ applications of hydro-acoustic instruments by the USGS in Indiana include acoustic velocity meters (AVM's) at six streamflow-gaging stations and newly developed Doppler velocity meters (DVM's) at two stations. AVM's use reciprocal travel times of acoustic signals to measure average water velocities along acoustic paths, whereas DVM's use the Doppler shift of backscattered acoustic signals to compute water velocities. In addition to the in-situ applications, three acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCP's) are used to make river-discharge measurements from moving boats at streamflow-gaging stations in Indiana. The USGS has designed and is testing an innovative unmanned platform from which to make ADCP discharge measurements.

  11. Measurement of velocity distribution for longitudinal acoustic waves in welds by a laser optoacoustic technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivochkin, A. Yu.; Karabutov, A. A.; Lyamshev, M. L.; Pelivanov, I. M.; Rohatgi, U.; Subudhi, M.

    2007-07-01

    An optoacoustic technique for diagnostics of residual stress in metals is proposed. The theoretical part of the technique employs acoustoelastic relations establishing a linear relationship between the biaxial residual stress and the relative variation of the velocity of longitudinal ultrasonic waves. The experimental technique is based on laser excitation of nanosecond ultrasonic pulses at the surface of samples under investigation and their detection with a high time resolution. Distributions of the relative variation of longitudinal wave velocities due to the presence of residual stress in the samples are obtained.

  12. Relative velocity measurement from the spectral phase of a match-filtered linear frequency modulated pulse.

    PubMed

    Pinson, Samuel; Holland, Charles W

    2016-08-01

    Linear frequency modulated signals are commonly used to perform underwater acoustic measurements since they can achieve high signal-to-noise ratios with relatively low source levels. However, such signals present a drawback if the source or receiver or target is moving. The Doppler effect affects signal amplitude, delay, and resolution. To perform a correct match filtering that includes the Doppler shift requires prior knowledge of the relative velocity. In this paper, the relative velocity is extracted directly from the Doppler cross-power spectrum. More precisely, the quadratic coefficient of the Doppler cross-power-spectrum phase is proportional to the relative velocity. The proposed method achieves velocity estimates that compare favorably with Global Positioning System ground truth and the ambiguity method. PMID:27586779

  13. Simulated flight acoustic investigation of treated ejector effectiveness on advanced mechanical suppresors for high velocity jet noise reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brausch, J. F.; Motsinger, R. E.; Hoerst, D. J.

    1986-01-01

    Ten scale-model nozzles were tested in an anechoic free-jet facility to evaluate the acoustic characteristics of a mechanically suppressed inverted-velocity-profile coannular nozzle with an accoustically treated ejector system. The nozzle system used was developed from aerodynamic flow lines evolved in a previous contract, defined to incorporate the restraints imposed by the aerodynamic performance requirements of an Advanced Supersonic Technology/Variable Cycle Engine system through all its mission phases. Accoustic data of 188 test points were obtained, 87 under static and 101 under simulated flight conditions. The tests investigated variables of hardwall ejector application to a coannular nozzle with 20-chute outer annular suppressor, ejector axial positioning, treatment application to ejector and plug surfaces, and treatment design. Laser velocimeter, shadowgraph photograph, aerodynamic static pressure, and temperature measurement were acquired on select models to yield diagnositc information regarding the flow field and aerodynamic performance characteristics of the nozzles.

  14. Studies of the acoustic transmission characteristics of coaxial nozzles with inverted velocity profiles: Comprehensive data report. [nozzle transfer functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, P. D.; Salikuddin, M.; Ahuja, K. K.; Plumblee, H. E.; Mungur, P.

    1979-01-01

    The efficiency of internal noise radiation through a coannular exhaust nozzle with an inverted velocity profile was studied. A preliminary investigation was first undertaken (1) to define the test parameters which influence the internal noise radiation; (2) to develop a test methodology which could realistically be used to examine the effects of the test parameters; and (3) to validate this methodology. The result was the choice of an acoustic impulse as the internal noise source in the jet nozzles. Noise transmission characteristics of a coannular nozzle system were then investigated. In particular, the effects of fan convergence angle, core extension length to annulus height ratio and flow Mach numbers and temperatures were studied. Relevant spectral data only is presented in the form of normalized nozzle transfer function versus nondimensional frequency.

  15. Finnish Meteorological Institute Doppler Lidar

    SciTech Connect

    Ewan OConnor

    2015-03-27

    This doppler lidar system provides co-polar and cross polar attenuated backscatter coefficients,signal strength, and doppler velocities in the cloud and in the boundary level, including uncertainties for all parameters. Using the doppler beam swinging DBS technique, and Vertical Azimuthal Display (VAD) this system also provides vertical profiles of horizontal winds.

  16. Measuring sea ice permeability as a function of the attenuation and phase velocity shift of an acoustic wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudier, E. J.; Bahoura, M.

    2012-12-01

    Sea ice is a two-phase porous medium consisting of a solid matrix of pure ice and a salty liquid phase. At spring when ice permeability increases, it has been observed that pressure gradients induced at the ice-water interface upstream and downstream of pressure ridge keels can cause sea water and brine to be forced through the ice water boundary. It suggests that salt and heat fluxes through the bottom ice layers may be a major factor controlling the decay of an ice sheet. Knowing how water flows through the ice matrix is fundamental to a modeling of ocean-ice heat exchanges integrating the advective import/export of latent heat that result from melting/freezing within the ice. Permeability is the measurement of the ease with which fluids flow through a porous medium, however one of the most tricky to measure without altering the porosity of the sampled medium. To further complicate the challenge, horizontal and vertical permeability of the ice, referred as ice anisotropy, is significant. Acoustic wave propagation through porous media have been theorized to relate the acoustic velocity and attenuation to the physical properties of the tested material. It is a non-invasive technique, and as such could provide more reliable measurements of sea ice permeability than anything presently used. Simulations combining the Biot's and squirt flow mechanisms are performed to investigate the effect of permeability on the attenuation and phase velocity as a function of frequency. We first present the attenuation dispersion curves for an isotropic sea ice, then low-frequency and high-frequency limits are determined. Optimal frequency range and resolution requirements are evaluated for testing.

  17. Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Jerry R.; Grosveld, Ferdinand

    2007-01-01

    The acoustics environment in space operations is important to maintain at manageable levels so that the crewperson can remain safe, functional, effective, and reasonably comfortable. High acoustic levels can produce temporary or permanent hearing loss, or cause other physiological symptoms such as auditory pain, headaches, discomfort, strain in the vocal cords, or fatigue. Noise is defined as undesirable sound. Excessive noise may result in psychological effects such as irritability, inability to concentrate, decrease in productivity, annoyance, errors in judgment, and distraction. A noisy environment can also result in the inability to sleep, or sleep well. Elevated noise levels can affect the ability to communicate, understand what is being said, hear what is going on in the environment, degrade crew performance and operations, and create habitability concerns. Superfluous noise emissions can also create the inability to hear alarms or other important auditory cues such as an equipment malfunctioning. Recent space flight experience, evaluations of the requirements in crew habitable areas, and lessons learned (Goodman 2003; Allen and Goodman 2003; Pilkinton 2003; Grosveld et al. 2003) show the importance of maintaining an acceptable acoustics environment. This is best accomplished by having a high-quality set of limits/requirements early in the program, the "designing in" of acoustics in the development of hardware and systems, and by monitoring, testing and verifying the levels to ensure that they are acceptable.

  18. Comparison of turbidity to multi-frequency sideways-looking acoustic-Doppler data and suspended-sediment data in the Colorado River in Grand Canyon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Voichick, Nicholas; Topping, David J.

    2010-01-01

    Water clarity is important to biologists when studying fish and other fluvial fauna and flora. Turbidity is an indicator of the cloudiness of water, or reduced water clarity, and is commonly measured using nephelometric sensors that record the scattering and absorption of light by particles in the water. Unfortunately, nephelometric sensors only operate over a narrow range of the conditions typically encountered in rivers dominated by suspended-sediment transport. For example, sediment inputs into the Colorado River in Grand Canyon caused by tributary floods often result in turbidity levels that exceed the maximum recording level of nephelometric turbidity sensors. The limited range of these sensors is one reason why acoustic Doppler profiler instrument data, not turbidity, has been used as a surrogate for suspended sediment concentration and load of the Colorado River in Grand Canyon. However, in addition to being an important water-quality parameter to biologists, turbidity of the Colorado River in Grand Canyon has been used to strengthen the suspended-sediment record through the process of turbidity-threshold sampling; high turbidity values trigger a pump sampler to collect samples of the river at critical times for gathering suspended-sediment data. Turbidity depends on several characteristics of suspended sediment including concentration, particle size, particle shape, color, and the refractive index of particles. In this paper, turbidity is compared with other parameters coupled to suspended sediment, namely suspended-silt and clay concentration and multifrequency acoustic attenuation. These data have been collected since 2005 at four stations with different sediment-supply characteristics on the Colorado River in Grand Canyon. These comparisons reveal that acoustic attenuation is a particularly useful parameter, because it is strongly related to turbidity and it can be measured by instruments that experience minimal fouling and record over the entire range

  19. P-wave ray velocities and the inverse acoustic problem for anisotropic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zel, I. Yu.; Ivankina, T. I.; Levin, D. M.; Lokajicek, T.

    2016-07-01

    The specific features of the calculation of ray velocities of quasi-longitudinal waves in anisotropic media have been considered. A technique for calculating elastic constants using P-wave ray velocities measured in an ultrasonic experiment on spherical samples is presented. It is shown by an example of tabular data that elastic constants C11, C22, and C33 and combinations of constants ( C12 + 2 C66), ( C13 + 2 C55), ( C23 + 2 C44), ( C14 + 2 C56), ( C25 + 2 C46), and ( C36 + 2 C45) can be calculated most accurately for the general case of anisotropic media with elastic properties of arbitrary symmetry. Since the determining system of equations is illconditioned, the values of elastic constants entering these combinations depend on the choosed initial approximation.

  20. Stochastic simulation for the propagation of high-frequency acoustic waves through a random velocity field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, B.; Darmon, M.; Leymarie, N.; Chatillon, S.; Potel, C.

    2012-05-01

    In-service inspection of Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactors (SFR) requires the development of non-destructive techniques adapted to the harsh environment conditions and the examination complexity. From past experiences, ultrasonic techniques are considered as suitable candidates. The ultrasonic telemetry is a technique used to constantly insure the safe functioning of reactor inner components by determining their exact position: it consists in measuring the time of flight of the ultrasonic response obtained after propagation of a pulse emitted by a transducer and its interaction with the targets. While in-service the sodium flow creates turbulences that lead to temperature inhomogeneities, which translates into ultrasonic velocity inhomogeneities. These velocity variations could directly impact the accuracy of the target locating by introducing time of flight variations. A stochastic simulation model has been developed to calculate the propagation of ultrasonic waves in such an inhomogeneous medium. Using this approach, the travel time is randomly generated by a stochastic process whose inputs are the statistical moments of travel times known analytically. The stochastic model predicts beam deviations due to velocity inhomogeneities, which are similar to those provided by a determinist method, such as the ray method.

  1. Stochastic simulation for the propagation of high-frequency acoustic waves through a random velocity field

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, B.; Darmon, M.; Leymarie, N.; Chatillon, S.; Potel, C.

    2012-05-17

    In-service inspection of Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactors (SFR) requires the development of non-destructive techniques adapted to the harsh environment conditions and the examination complexity. From past experiences, ultrasonic techniques are considered as suitable candidates. The ultrasonic telemetry is a technique used to constantly insure the safe functioning of reactor inner components by determining their exact position: it consists in measuring the time of flight of the ultrasonic response obtained after propagation of a pulse emitted by a transducer and its interaction with the targets. While in-service the sodium flow creates turbulences that lead to temperature inhomogeneities, which translates into ultrasonic velocity inhomogeneities. These velocity variations could directly impact the accuracy of the target locating by introducing time of flight variations. A stochastic simulation model has been developed to calculate the propagation of ultrasonic waves in such an inhomogeneous medium. Using this approach, the travel time is randomly generated by a stochastic process whose inputs are the statistical moments of travel times known analytically. The stochastic model predicts beam deviations due to velocity inhomogeneities, which are similar to those provided by a determinist method, such as the ray method.

  2. To assess the intimal thickness, flow velocities, and luminal diameter of carotid arteries using high-resolution B-mode ultrasound doppler imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vemuru, Madhuri; Jabbar, Afzal; Chandra, Suman

    2004-04-01

    Carotid imaging is a Gold Standard test that provides useful information about the structure and functions of carotid arteries. Spectral imaging helps to evaluate the vessel and hemodynamic changes. High resolution B-mode imaging has emerged as one of the methods of choice for determining the anatomic extent of atherosclerosis and its progression and for assessing cardiovascular risks. The measurements made with Doppler correlate well with pathologic measurements. Recent prospective studies have clearly demonstrated that these measurements of carotid intimal thickness are potent predictors of Myocardial Infarction and Stroke. This method appears very attractive as it is non-invasive, extremely safe, well accepted by the patient and relatively inexpensive. It can be performed serially and has the advantage of visualizing the arterial wall in contrast to angiographic techniques which provide only an outline of the arterial lumen. Recently, there has been an interest in the clinical use of this technique in making difficult clinical decisions like deciding on preventive therapies. 30 subjects aged 21-60 years and 30 subjects aged 61-85 years of both sexes are selected after doing a baseline study to exclude Hypertension, Diabetes, Obesity and Hyperlipidemia. The carotid arteries were examined for intimal thickening, blood flow velocities and luminal diameter. With aging there is a narrowing of the carotid vessels and significant increase in intimal thickening with a consequent increase in the blood flow velocities. Inter-observer, intra-observer and instrument variations are seen and there is no significant change in the values when the distal flow pattern is considered for measurements. Aging produces major cardiovascular changes including decreased elasticity and compliance of great arteries leading to structural and functional alterations in heart and vessels. With aging there is increased intimal thickness and increased pulse wave velocity which is clearly

  3. Influences of shear in the ion parallel drift velocity and of inhomogeneous perpendicular electric field on generation of oblique ion acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilyasov, Askar; Chernyshov, Alexander; Mogilevsky, Mikhail; Golovchanskaya, Irina; Kozelov, Boris

    2016-03-01

    It is well known that the broadband electrostatic turbulence observed in the topside auroral ionosphere can be identified with electrostatic ion cyclotron and/or oblique ion acoustic waves. Under certain conditions generation of the ion cyclotron modes is inhibited, so that the oblique ion acoustic waves become the prevailing part of the broadband noise. While generation of ion cyclotron waves by the inhomogeneous distribution of energy density (IEDD) instability has been actively studied in recent years, much less attention was paid to the excitation of ion acoustic waves by means of the IEDD instability. In this work, influence of shear in the ion parallel drift velocities and of inhomogeneous perpendicular electric field on generation of nonlocal oblique ion acoustic mode is studied. It is demonstrated that the shear of the ion parallel drift velocities can generate ion acoustic waves. It is shown that this mechanism of instability development provides broadband spectrum in the frequency range around 0.1 of ion gyrofrequency, and thus, this instability can be invoked to explain the observed broadband electrostatic turbulence in the auroral region. Effect of the main background plasma parameters on excitation of oblique ion acoustic waves is analyzed.

  4. Determination of elastic properties of a MnO{sub 2} coating by surface acoustic wave velocity dispersion analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sermeus, J.; Glorieux, C.; Sinha, R.; Vereecken, P. M.; Vanstreels, K.

    2014-07-14

    MnO{sub 2} is a material of interest in the development of high energy-density batteries, specifically as a coating material for internal 3D structures, thus ensuring rapid energy deployment. Its electrochemical properties have been mapped extensively, but there are, to the best of the authors' knowledge, no records of the elastic properties of thin film MnO{sub 2}. Impulsive stimulated thermal scattering (ISTS), also known as the heterodyne diffraction or transient grating technique, was used to determine the Young's modulus (E) and porosity (ψ) of a 500 nm thick MnO{sub 2} coating on a Si(001) substrate. ISTS is an all optical method that is able to excite and detect surface acoustic waves (SAWs) on opaque samples. From the measured SAW velocity dispersion, the Young's modulus and porosity were determined to be E = 25 ± 1 GPa and ψ=42±1%, respectively. These values were confirmed by independent techniques and determined by a most-squares analysis of the carefully fitted SAW velocity dispersion. This study demonstrates the ability of the presented technique to determine the elastic parameters of a thin, porous film on an anisotropic substrate.

  5. Transesophageal Doppler echocardiographic assessment of systolic and diastolic coronary blood flow velocities at baseline and during adenosine triphosphate-induced coronary vasodilation in chronic aortic regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Kisanuki, A; Matsushita, R; Murayama, T; Otsuji, Y; Miyazono, Y; Toyonaga, K; Nakao, S; Taira, A; Tanaka, H

    1997-01-01

    Few reports exist on the changes in systolic and diastolic coronary flow velocities (CFVs) at baseline and during coronary vasodilation in patients with chronic aortic regurgitation (AR). We examined the left anterior descending CFVs in 21 patients with AR (11 patients with mild AR and 10 patients with moderate to severe AR), 9 patients without AR (no AR group), and 6 patients who had undergone surgery for moderate to severe AR (postoperation group) with transesophageal Doppler echocardiography. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) was infused into a peripheral right arm vein at four different doses (35, 70, 100, and 140 micrograms/kg/min). Coronary flow velocity response in systole and diastole was calculated as the ratio of systolic peak and mean and diastolic peak and mean CFVs during maximal ATP infusion to those at baseline. The systolic peak and mean CFVs and the diastolic peak and mean CFVs at baseline were significantly increased in the moderate to severe group compared with those in the other groups (p < 0.05, respectively). Systolic and diastolic CFVs were significantly increased during ATP infusions in the four groups. No significant differences of systolic and diastolic CFVs were observed among the four groups during maximal ATP infusion. The coronary flow velocity response calculated from the peak and mean diastolic CFVs were significantly decreased in the moderate to severe group (1.6 +/- 0.3 and 1.7 +/- 0.4) compared with those in the other three groups (3.6 +/- 0.7 and 3.2 +/- 1.1 in the no AR group, 2.6 +/- 0.6 and 2.5 +/- 0.4 in the mild group, and 2.5 +/- 0.7 and 2.4 +/- 0.6 in the postoperation group) (p < 0.05, respectively). In conclusion, the systolic and diastolic left CFVs at baseline appeared to be significantly increased in patients with moderate to severe chronic AR. However, the velocities during coronary vasodilation by ATP were equal to those in other groups, resulting in a decrease of coronary flow velocity response in systole and diastole

  6. In vivo acoustic super-resolution and super-resolved velocity mapping using microbubbles.

    PubMed

    Christensen-Jeffries, Kirsten; Browning, Richard J; Tang, Meng-Xing; Dunsby, Christopher; Eckersley, Robert J

    2015-02-01

    The structure of microvasculature cannot be resolved using standard clinical ultrasound (US) imaging frequencies due to the fundamental diffraction limit of US waves. In this work, we use a standard clinical US system to perform in vivo sub-diffraction imaging on a CD1, female mouse aged eight weeks by localizing isolated US signals from microbubbles flowing within the ear microvasculature, and compare our results to optical microscopy. Furthermore, we develop a new technique to map blood velocity at super-resolution by tracking individual bubbles through the vasculature. Resolution is improved from a measured lateral and axial resolution of 112 μm and 94 μ m respectively in original US data, to super-resolved images of microvasculature where vessel features as fine as 19 μm are clearly visualized. Velocity maps clearly distinguish opposing flow direction and separated speed distributions in adjacent vessels, thereby enabling further differentiation between vessels otherwise not spatially separated in the image. This technique overcomes the diffraction limit to provide a noninvasive means of imaging the microvasculature at super-resolution, to depths of many centimeters. In the future, this method could noninvasively image pathological or therapeutic changes in the microvasculature at centimeter depths in vivo.

  7. Elastic constants measured from acoustic wave velocities in barium titanate piezoelectric ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Toshio; Ikegaya, Taiki

    2015-01-01

    The longitudinal and transverse wave velocities in barium titanate (BT) ceramics sintered at different firing temperatures were measured using an ultrasonic precision thickness gauge with high-frequency pulse generation to evaluate elastic constants, such as Young’s modulus and Poisson’s ratio. With increasing firing temperature, the longitudinal and transverse wave velocities increased; as a result, Young’s modulus increased because of BT ceramics being mechanically hard. Poisson’s ratio after DC poling, however, was almost independent of the firing temperature. It was confirmed that there was an important factor for generating piezoelectricity regarding changes in Young’s modulus and Poisson’s ratio after DC poling compared with those before DC poling, that is, lowering Young’s modulus and increasing Poisson’s ratio. Furthermore, the modulus of rigidity and bulk modulus increased with the firing temperature because of the increase in ceramic bulk density. The modulus of rigidity decreased and the bulk modulus increased during DC poling because of domain alignment.

  8. PAPERS DEVOTED TO THE 250TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE MOSCOW STATE UNIVERSITY: Monte Carlo simulation of an optical coherence Doppler tomograph signal: the effect of the concentration of particles in a flow on the reconstructed velocity profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bykov, A. V.; Kirillin, M. Yu; Priezzhev, A. V.

    2005-02-01

    Model signals of an optical coherence Doppler tomograph (OCDT) are obtained by the Monte Carlo method from a flow of a light-scattering suspension of lipid vesicles (intralipid) at concentrations from 0.7% to 1.5% with an a priori specified parabolic velocity profile. The velocity profile parameters reconstructed from the OCDT signal and scattering orders of the photons contributing to the signal are studied as functions of the suspension concentration. It is shown that the maximum of the reconstructed velocity profile at high concentrations shifts with respect to the symmetry axis of the flow and its value decreases due to a greater contribution from multiply scattered photons.

  9. Sounding out erosion on the Mekong river banks: insights from combined terrestrial laser scanning, multibeam echo sounding and acoustic Doppler profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Best, J.; Hackney, C. R.; Leyland, J.; Darby, S. E.; Parsons, D. R.; Aalto, R. E.; Nicholas, A. P.

    2015-12-01

    Knowledge of bank erosion processes and rates along very large rivers remains incomplete, primarily due to the difficulties of obtaining morphological and flow data close to the bank across various flow stages. Moreover, obtaining such process information through the entire flow and bank depth has also proved challenging. Here, we present data from a series of high spatial resolution topographic (Terrestrial Laser Scanner and Multibeam Echo Sounder) and flow (Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler) surveys undertaken on the Mekong River, Cambodia, which reveal the temporal and spatial evolution of a series of embayments on the outer bank of a large meander. These techniques yield unique data that reveal how the flow field responds to the morphology of the outer bank and subaqueous slump blocks. Specifically, we show that in the early stage of embayment growth, deposited slump blocks induce flow upwelling and bank-directed flow that enhances bank erosion. Our data also suggest that as the initial erosion process continues, a threshold embayment size is reached. Below this threshold, flow separation acts to enhance embayment growth along with the fluid dynamic effects of slump blocks, but above the threshold size, the separation zone in the embayments acts as a protective layer, thus slowing erosion. This field data allows proposition of a new conceptual model of embayment evolution.

  10. Temporal characteristics of coherent flow structures generated over alluvial sand dunes, Mississippi River, revealed by acoustic doppler current profiling and multibeam echo sounding

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Czuba, John A.; Oberg, Kevin A.; Best, Jim L.; Parsons, Daniel R.; Simmons, S. M.; Johnson, K.K.; Malzone, C.

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigates the flow in the lee of a large sand dune located at the confluence of the Mississippi and Missouri Rivers, USA. Stationary profiles collected from an anchored boat using an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) were georeferenced with data from a real-time kinematic differential global positioning system. A multibeam echo sounder was used to map the bathymetry of the confluence and provided a morphological context for the ADCP measurements. The flow in the lee of a low-angle dune shows good correspondence with current conceptual models of flow over dunes. As expected, quadrant 2 events (upwellings of low-momentum fluid) are associated with high backscatter intensity. Turbulent events generated in the lower lee of a dune near the bed are associated with periods of vortex shedding and wake flapping. Remnant coherent structures that advect over the lower lee of the dune in the upper portion of the water column, have mostly dissipated and contribute little to turbulence intensities. The turbulent events that occupy most of the water column in the upper lee of the dune are associated with periods of wake flapping.

  11. Doppler flowmeter

    DOEpatents

    Karplus, H.H.B.; Raptis, A.C.

    1981-11-13

    A Doppler flowmeter impulses an ultrasonic fixed-frequency signal obliquely into a slurry flowing in a pipe and a reflected signal is detected after having been scattered off of the slurry particles, whereby the shift in frequencies between the signals is proportional to the slurry velocity and hence slurry flow rate. This flowmeter filters the Doppler frequency-shift signal, compares the filtered and unfiltered shift signals in a divider to obtain a ratio, and then further compares this ratio against a preset fractional ratio. The flowmeter utilizes a voltage-to-frequency convertor to generate a pulsed signal having a determinable rate of repetition precisely proportional to the divergence of the ratios. The pulsed signal serves as the input control for a frequency-controlled low-pass filter, which provides thereby that the cutoff frequency of the filtered signal is known. The flowmeter provides a feedback control by minimizing the divergence. With the cutoff frequency and preset fractional ratio known, the slurry velocity and hence flow will also be determinable.

  12. Characterization of sub-cloud vertical velocity distributions and precipitation-driven outflow dynamics using a ship-based, scanning Doppler lidar during VOCALS-Rex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewer, A.; Feingold, G.; Tucker, S. C.; Covert, D. S.; Hardesty, R.

    2010-12-01

    During the VOCALS Regional Experiment NOAA's High Resolution Doppler Lidar (HRDL) operated from the RV Ronald H. Brown and made continuous measurements of sub-cloud horizontal and vertical wind speed and aerosol backscatter signal strength. We will present averaged profiles of vertical velocity distributions and turbulence parameters, stratified by a range of conditions including diurnal variation, precipitation, and distance from shore. The results point to a strong diurnal dependence in the strength of turbulence with nighttime conditions exhibiting stronger subcloud variance. Skewness shows less diurnal sensitivity with a trend towards more negative skewness near cloud base. Combining HRDL’s scanning horizontal wind speed measurements with other ship based in-situ and remote sensing measurements, we investigate the dynamics of precipitation-driven outflows and their impact on surface thermodynamic and aerosol properties. Using a sample of over 150 airmass transitions over the course of the 5 week deployment, we observed that warmer outflow air is typically drier, has less aerosol scattering and tends to have higher ozone concentrations (indicating the transport of air from above the boundary layer top). Transitions to cooler air are generally moister, have more aerosol scattering and show no significant change in ozone concentration. We will present animations of combined lidar/radar/GOES imagery that were used to facilitate visualization and interpretation of the dynamics of the outflows.

  13. Acoustic Emission and Velocity Measurements using a Modular Borehole Prototype Tool to Provide Real Time Rock Mass Characterization.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, D. S.; Pettitt, W. S.; Young, R. P.

    2003-04-01

    Permanent changes to rock mass properties can occur due to the application of excavation or thermal induced stresses. This project involves the design of hardware and software for the long term monitoring of a rock volume, and the real time analysis and interpretation of induced microcracks and their properties. A set of borehole sondes have been designed with each sonde containing up to 6 sensor modules. Each piezoelectric sensor is dual mode allowing it to either transmit an ultrasonic pulse through a rock mass, or receive ultrasonic waveform data. Good coupling of the sensors with the borehole wall is achieved through a motorized clamping mechanism. The borehole sondes are connected to a surface interface box and digital acquisition system and controlled by a laptop computer. The system allows acoustic emission (AE) data to be recorded at all times using programmable trigger logic. The AE data is processed in real time for 3D source location and magnitude, with further analysis such as mechanism type available offline. Additionally the system allows velocity surveys to be automatically performed at pre-defined times. A modelling component of the project, using a 3D dynamic finite difference code, is investigating the effect that different microcrack distributions have on velocity waveform data in terms of time and frequency amplitude. The modelling codes will be validated using data recorded from laboratory tests on rocks with known crack fabrics, and then used in insitu experimental tests. This modelling information will be used to help interpret, in real time, microcrack characteristics such as crack density, size, and fluid content. The technology has applications in a number of branches of geotechnical and civil engineering including radioactive waste storage, mining, dams, bridges, and oil reservoir monitoring.

  14. Temperature and velocity determination of shock-heated flows with non-resonant heterodyne laser-induced thermal acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Förster, F. J.; Baab, S.; Lamanna, G.; Weigand, B.

    2015-12-01

    Non-resonant laser-induced thermal acoustics (LITA), a four-wave mixing technique, was applied to post-shock flows within a shock tube. Simultaneous single-shot determination of temperature, speed of sound and flow velocity behind incident and reflected shock waves at different pressure and temperature levels are presented. Measurements were performed non-intrusively and without any seeding. The paper describes the technique and outlines its advantages compared to more established laser-based methods with respect to the challenges of shock tube experiments. The experiments include argon and nitrogen as test gas at temperatures of up to 1000 K and pressures of up to 43 bar. The experimental data are compared to calculated values based on inviscid one-dimensional shock wave theory. The single-shot uncertainty of the technique is investigated for worst-case test conditions resulting in relative standard deviations of 1, 1.7 and 3.4 % for Mach number, speed of sound and temperature, respectively. For all further experimental conditions, calculated values stay well within the 95 % confidence intervals of the LITA measurement.

  15. The effective ratio of acoustic impedance in predicting stress and velocity of wave propagation in viscoelastic material (standard linear solid model)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musa, Abu Bakar

    2013-09-01

    The study is about impact of a short elastic rod(or slug) on a stationary semi-infinite viscoelastic rod. The viscoelastic materials are modeled as standard linear solid which involve three material parameters and the motion is treated as one-dimensional. We first establish the governing equations pertaining to the impact of viscoelastic materials subject to certain boundary conditions for the case when an elastic slug moving at a speed V impacts a semi-infinite stationary viscoelastic rod. The objective is to predict stresses and velocities at the interface following wave transmissions and reflections in the slug after the impact using viscoelastic discontinuity. If the stress at the interface becomes tensile and the velocity changes its sign, then the slug and the rod part company. If the stress at the interface is compressive after the impact, the slug and the rod remain in contact. In the process of predicting the stress and velocity of wave propagation using viscoelastic discontinuity, the Z-effective which is the effective ratio of acoustic impedance plays important role. It can be shown that effective ratio of acoustic impedance can help us to determine whether the slug and the rod move together or part company after the impact. After modeling the impact and solve the governing system of partial differential equations in the Laplace transform domain. We invert the Laplace transformed solution numerically to obtain the stresses and velocities at the interface for several viscosity time constants and ratios of acoustic impedances. In inverting the Laplace transformed equations, we used the complex inversion formula because there is a branch cut and infinitely many poles within the Bromwich contour. In the discontinuity analysis, we look at the moving discontinuities in stress and velocity using the impulse-momentum relation and kinematical condition of compatibility. Finally, we discussed the relationship of the stresses and velocities using numeric and the

  16. Simultaneous estimation of cortical bone thickness and acoustic wave velocity using a multivariable optimization approach: Bone phantom and in-vitro study.

    PubMed

    Tasinkevych, Yuriy; Podhajecki, Jerzy; Falińska, Katarzyna; Litniewski, Jerzy

    2016-02-01

    The paper presents a method that allows the thickness of a compact bone layer and longitudinal wave velocity in the bone to be determined simultaneously with the use of reflected waves, with particular emphasis on the case of layers when the propagation time through the layer is shorter than the time duration of the interrogating pulse. The proposed method estimates simultaneously the thickness of the cortical bone layer and acoustic wave velocity by fitting the temporal spectrum of the simulated reflected wave to the spectrum of the reflected wave measured experimentally. For the purpose of echo-simulations the model of "soft tissue - compact bone layer - cancellous bone" was developed. Next, the cost function was defined as the least square error between the measured and simulated temporal spectra. Minimization of the cost function allowed us to determine the values of the parameters of the cortical bone layer which best fitted the measurements. To solve the optimization problem a simulated annealing algorithm was used. The method was tested using acoustic data obtained at the frequency of 0.6 MHz and 1 MHz respectively for a custom designed bone mimicking phantom and a calf femur. For the cortical shell of the calf femur whose thickness varies from 2.1 mm to 2.4 mm and velocity of 2910 m/s, the relative errors of the thickness estimation ranged from 0.4% to 5.5%. The corresponding error of the acoustic wave velocity estimation in the layer was 3.1%. In the case of artificial bone the thickness of the cortical layer was equal to 1.05 and 1.2 mm and acoustic wave velocity was 2900 m/s. These parameters were determined with the errors ranging from 1.9% to 10.8% and from 3.9% to 4.5% respectively.

  17. Simultaneous estimation of cortical bone thickness and acoustic wave velocity using a multivariable optimization approach: Bone phantom and in-vitro study.

    PubMed

    Tasinkevych, Yuriy; Podhajecki, Jerzy; Falińska, Katarzyna; Litniewski, Jerzy

    2016-02-01

    The paper presents a method that allows the thickness of a compact bone layer and longitudinal wave velocity in the bone to be determined simultaneously with the use of reflected waves, with particular emphasis on the case of layers when the propagation time through the layer is shorter than the time duration of the interrogating pulse. The proposed method estimates simultaneously the thickness of the cortical bone layer and acoustic wave velocity by fitting the temporal spectrum of the simulated reflected wave to the spectrum of the reflected wave measured experimentally. For the purpose of echo-simulations the model of "soft tissue - compact bone layer - cancellous bone" was developed. Next, the cost function was defined as the least square error between the measured and simulated temporal spectra. Minimization of the cost function allowed us to determine the values of the parameters of the cortical bone layer which best fitted the measurements. To solve the optimization problem a simulated annealing algorithm was used. The method was tested using acoustic data obtained at the frequency of 0.6 MHz and 1 MHz respectively for a custom designed bone mimicking phantom and a calf femur. For the cortical shell of the calf femur whose thickness varies from 2.1 mm to 2.4 mm and velocity of 2910 m/s, the relative errors of the thickness estimation ranged from 0.4% to 5.5%. The corresponding error of the acoustic wave velocity estimation in the layer was 3.1%. In the case of artificial bone the thickness of the cortical layer was equal to 1.05 and 1.2 mm and acoustic wave velocity was 2900 m/s. These parameters were determined with the errors ranging from 1.9% to 10.8% and from 3.9% to 4.5% respectively. PMID:26522955

  18. Normalisation of a severely abnormal ductus venosus Doppler flow velocity waveform in a growth-retarded fetus with absent end-diastolic flow in the umbilical artery and congenital anomalies.

    PubMed

    Müller, T; Rehn, M; Girschick, G; Kristen, P; Dietl, J

    2001-01-01

    Doppler recordings of fetal venous blood flow seem to be superior to arterial velocimetry and CTG concerning the prediction of fetal outcome and optimal time of delivery in pregnancies with fetal growth retardation and AREDV. An improvement of arterial Doppler flow velocities has been described. We report the reappearance of a normal end-diastolic flow velocity in a ductus venosus temporarily showing reversed end-diastolic flow in a growth-retarded fetus with congenital anomalies. This normalization was accompanied by an improvement of the CTG, a loss of umbilical vein pulsations, a reappearance of umbilical diastolic flow and a progressive return of cerebral and venous blood flow into the 'normal' range. Improvement of fetal condition may be the explanation for our observation.

  19. Doppler Lidar (DL) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Newsom, RK

    2012-02-13

    The Doppler lidar (DL) is an active remote sensing instrument that provides range- and time-resolved measurements of radial velocity and attenuated backscatter. The principle of operation is similar to radar in that pulses of energy are transmitted into the atmosphere; the energy scattered back to the transceiver is collected and measured as a time-resolved signal. From the time delay between each outgoing transmitted pulse and the backscattered signal, the distance to the scatterer is inferred. The radial or line-of-sight velocity of the scatterers is determined from the Doppler frequency shift of the backscattered radiation. The DL uses a heterodyne detection technique in which the return signal is mixed with a reference laser beam (i.e., local oscillator) of known frequency. An onboard signal processing computer then determines the Doppler frequency shift from the spectra of the heterodyne signal. The energy content of the Doppler spectra can also be used to determine attenuated backscatter.

  20. Evaluation of Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler to Measure Discharge at New York Power Authority's Niagara Power Project, Niagara Falls, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zajd, Henry J.

    2007-01-01

    The need for accurate real-time discharge in the International Niagara River hydro power system requires reliable, accurate and reproducible data. The U.S. Geological Survey has been widely using Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers (ADCP) to accurately measure discharge in riverine channels since the mid-1990s. The use of the ADCP to measure discharge has remained largely untested at hydroelectric-generation facilities such as the New York Power Authority's (NYPA) Niagara Power Project in Niagara Falls, N.Y. This facility has a large, engineered diversion channel with the capacity of high volume discharges in excess of 100,000 cubic feet per second (ft3/s). Facilities such as this could benefit from the use of an ADCP, if the ADCP discharge measurements prove to be more time effective and accurate than those obtained from the flow-calculation techniques that are currently used. Measurements of diversion flow by an ADCP in the 'Pant Leg' diversion channel at the Niagara Power Project were made on November 6, 7, and 8, 2006, and compared favorably (within 1 percent) with those obtained concurrently by a conventional Price-AA current-meter measurement during one of the ADCP measurement sessions. The mean discharge recorded during each 2-hour individual ADCP measurement session compared favorably with (3.5 to 6.8 percent greater than) the discharge values computed by the flow-calculation method presently in use by NYPA. The use of ADCP technology to measure discharge could ultimately permit increased power-generation efficiency at the NYPA Niagara Falls Power Project by providing improved predictions of the amount of water (and thus the power output) available.

  1. Using Principal Component and Tidal Analysis as a Quality Metric for Detecting Systematic Heading Uncertainty in Long-Term Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morley, M. G.; Mihaly, S. F.; Dewey, R. K.; Jeffries, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Ocean Networks Canada (ONC) operates the NEPTUNE and VENUS cabled ocean observatories to collect data on physical, chemical, biological, and geological ocean conditions over multi-year time periods. Researchers can download real-time and historical data from a large variety of instruments to study complex earth and ocean processes from their home laboratories. Ensuring that the users are receiving the most accurate data is a high priority at ONC, requiring quality assurance and quality control (QAQC) procedures to be developed for all data types. While some data types have relatively straightforward QAQC tests, such as scalar data range limits that are based on expected observed values or measurement limits of the instrument, for other data types the QAQC tests are more comprehensive. Long time series of ocean currents from Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers (ADCP), stitched together from multiple deployments over many years is one such data type where systematic data biases are more difficult to identify and correct. Data specialists at ONC are working to quantify systematic compass heading uncertainty in long-term ADCP records at each of the major study sites using the internal compass, remotely operated vehicle bearings, and more analytical tools such as principal component analysis (PCA) to estimate the optimal instrument alignments. In addition to using PCA, some work has been done to estimate the main components of the current at each site using tidal harmonic analysis. This paper describes the key challenges and presents preliminary PCA and tidal analysis approaches used by ONC to improve long-term observatory current measurements.

  2. The Doppler signal: where does it come from and what does it mean?

    PubMed

    Nelson, T R; Pretorius, D H

    1988-09-01

    Doppler sonographic measurement of blood velocity and associated physiologic parameters is a powerful diagnostic technique. State-of-the-art instrumentation incorporates velocity measurement with two-dimensional imaging capability; it uses intensity and color coding to display complex physiologic and anatomic data to the observer in an easily understood format. Although the concepts underlying Doppler sonography are not complex, mastery of the technique requires extra training and commitment. The principal features and clinical practicalities associated with Doppler sonography are summarized in the following paragraphs. Continuous-wave Doppler is very sensitive to small vessels and has no upper velocity limit. In addition, the instrumentation is not complex and produces relatively low acoustic power. A significant drawback to continuous-wave Doppler is that there is no depth sensitivity, and thus complex structures or multiple vessels can give conflicting information. Pulsed Doppler (including duplex and color-flow) instrumentation has the capability of depth resolution and a variable sample volume. Pulsed Doppler equipment is prone to aliasing (false velocity indications) under some circumstances and also produces higher peak power levels than does continuous-wave equipment. Duplex equipment is more complex and expensive than continuous-wave equipment because the two-dimensional and Doppler modes must be synchronized in operation and display. Color-flow equipment is extremely complex and expensive. Color flow provides information of a qualitative and limited quantitative value. Absolute measurement still requires range-gate measurements. Technical and anatomic factors will affect the measured velocity profiles. Thus, it is important to fully appreciate the anatomy of the vessel and the angle between the vessel and the ultrasound beam when making quantitative measurements. Measurements that evaluate the velocity waveform and make use of ratios, such as the

  3. LASER APPLICATIONS IN MEDICINE: Analysis of distortions in the velocity profiles of suspension flows inside a light-scattering medium upon their reconstruction from the optical coherence Doppler tomograph signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bykov, A. V.; Kirillin, M. Yu; Priezzhev, A. V.

    2005-11-01

    Model signals from one and two plane flows of a particle suspension are obtained for an optical coherence Doppler tomograph (OCDT) by the Monte-Carlo method. The optical properties of particles mimic the properties of non-aggregating erythrocytes. The flows are considered in a stationary scattering medium with optical properties close to those of the skin. It is shown that, as the flow position depth increases, the flow velocity determined from the OCDT signal becomes smaller than the specified velocity and the reconstructed profile extends in the direction of the distant boundary, which is accompanied by the shift of its maximum. In the case of two flows, an increase in the velocity of the near-surface flow leads to the overestimated values of velocity of the reconstructed profile of the second flow. Numerical simulations were performed by using a multiprocessor parallel-architecture computer.

  4. Measurements in the Turbulent Boundary Layer at Constant Pressure in Subsonic and Supersonic Flow. Part 2: Laser-Doppler Velocity Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimotakis, P. E.; Collins, D. J.; Lang, D. B.

    1979-01-01

    A description of both the mean and the fluctuating components of the flow, and of the Reynolds stress as observed using a dual forward scattering laser-Doppler velocimeter is presented. A detailed description of the instrument and of the data analysis techniques were included in order to fully document the data. A detailed comparison was made between the laser-Doppler results and those presented in Part 1, and an assessment was made of the ability of the laser-Doppler velocimeter to measure the details of the flows involved.

  5. Field trial of a Doppler sonar system for fisheries applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tollefsen, Cristina D. S.; Zedel, Len

    2003-10-01

    Various deployments of commercial Doppler current profiling systems have demonstrated that these instruments can detect fish and measure their swimming speeds. However, research into the possible application of Doppler sonar to fisheries problems is limited and has not taken advantage of coherent signal processing schemes. A field trial was undertaken in August 2002 to explore the capabilities of a coherent Doppler sonar when applied to detecting discrete targets. The passage of migrating salmon on the Fraser River in British Columbia provided an ideal test opportunity with fish of well-defined swimming behavior and allowed for comparisons with conventional fisheries acoustics techniques. The instrument tested was a 250-kHz sonar which provided for phase coding of transmit pulses and coherent sampling of successive acoustic returns. The field trial resulted in 11 consecutive days of Doppler sonar data acquired during the peak of the sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) migration. A total of 7425 individual fish were identified and their swimming speed was measured with an accuracy of between 10 cms-1 and 20 cms-1, which depended on pulse length, pulse spacing, and target range. By comparison, water velocity measurements made with the same instrument can only achieve a theoretical accuracy of 60 cms-1.

  6. Split Hopkinson Resonant Bar Test for Sonic-Frequency Acoustic Velocity and Attenuation Measurements of Small, Isotropic Geologic Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Nakagawa, S.

    2011-04-01

    Mechanical properties (seismic velocities and attenuation) of geological materials are often frequency dependent, which necessitates measurements of the properties at frequencies relevant to a problem at hand. Conventional acoustic resonant bar tests allow measuring seismic properties of rocks and sediments at sonic frequencies (several kilohertz) that are close to the frequencies employed for geophysical exploration of oil and gas resources. However, the tests require a long, slender sample, which is often difficult to obtain from the deep subsurface or from weak and fractured geological formations. In this paper, an alternative measurement technique to conventional resonant bar tests is presented. This technique uses only a small, jacketed rock or sediment core sample mediating a pair of long, metal extension bars with attached seismic source and receiver - the same geometry as the split Hopkinson pressure bar test for large-strain, dynamic impact experiments. Because of the length and mass added to the sample, the resonance frequency of the entire system can be lowered significantly, compared to the sample alone. The experiment can be conducted under elevated confining pressures up to tens of MPa and temperatures above 100 C, and concurrently with x-ray CT imaging. The described Split Hopkinson Resonant Bar (SHRB) test is applied in two steps. First, extension and torsion-mode resonance frequencies and attenuation of the entire system are measured. Next, numerical inversions for the complex Young's and shear moduli of the sample are performed. One particularly important step is the correction of the inverted Young's moduli for the effect of sample-rod interfaces. Examples of the application are given for homogeneous, isotropic polymer samples and a natural rock sample.

  7. Brief history of vector Doppler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunmire, Barbrina; Beach, Kirk W.

    2001-05-01

    Since the development of the directional Doppler by McLeod in 1967, methods of acquiring, analyzing, and displaying blood velocity information have been under constant exploration. These efforts are motivated by a variety of interest and objectives including, to: a) simplify clinical examination, examiner training, and study interpretation, b) provide more hemodynamic information, and c) reduce examination variability and improve accuracy. The vector Doppler technique has been proposed as one potential avenue to achieve these objects. Vector Doppler systems are those that determine the true 2D or 3D blood flow velocity by combining multiple independent velocity component measurements. Most instruments can be divided into two broad categories: 1) cross-beam and 2) time-domain. This paper provides a brief synopsis of the progression of vector Doppler techniques, from its onset in 1970 to present, as well as possible avenues for future work. This is not intended to be a comprehensive review of all vector Doppler systems.

  8. Ultrasonic colour Doppler imaging

    PubMed Central

    Evans, David H.; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Nielsen, Michael Bachmann

    2011-01-01

    Ultrasonic colour Doppler is an imaging technique that combines anatomical information derived using ultrasonic pulse-echo techniques with velocity information derived using ultrasonic Doppler techniques to generate colour-coded maps of tissue velocity superimposed on grey-scale images of tissue anatomy. The most common use of the technique is to image the movement of blood through the heart, arteries and veins, but it may also be used to image the motion of solid tissues such as the heart walls. Colour Doppler imaging is now provided on almost all commercial ultrasound machines, and has been found to be of great value in assessing blood flow in many clinical conditions. Although the method for obtaining the velocity information is in many ways similar to the method for obtaining the anatomical information, it is technically more demanding for a number of reasons. It also has a number of weaknesses, perhaps the greatest being that in conventional systems, the velocities measured and thus displayed are the components of the flow velocity directly towards or away from the transducer, while ideally the method would give information about the magnitude and direction of the three-dimensional flow vectors. This review briefly introduces the principles behind colour Doppler imaging and describes some clinical applications. It then describes the basic components of conventional colour Doppler systems and the methods used to derive velocity information from the ultrasound signal. Next, a number of new techniques that seek to overcome the vector problem mentioned above are described. Finally, some examples of vector velocity images are presented. PMID:22866227

  9. Flowfield characteristics of an aerodynamic acoustic levitator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarin, A. L.; Brenn, G.; Keller, J.; Pfaffenlehner, M.; Ryssel, E.; Tropea, C.

    1997-11-01

    A droplet held in a single-axis ultrasonic levitator will principally sustain a certain external blowing along the levitation axis, which introduces the possibility of investigating heat and/or mass transfer from the droplet under conditions which are not too remote from those in spray systems. The focus of the present work is on the influence of the acoustic field on the external flow. More specifically, an axisymmetric submerged gas jet in an axial standing acoustic wave is examined, both in the absence and presence of a liquid droplet. Flow visualization is first presented to illustrate the global flow effects and the operating windows of jet velocities and acoustic powers which are suitable for further study. An analytic and numeric solution, based on the parabolic boundary layer equations are then given for the case of no levitated droplet, providing quantitative estimates of the acoustic field/flow interaction. Detailed velocity measurements using a laser Doppler anemometer verify the analytic results and extend these to the case of a levitated droplet. Some unresolved discrepancy remains in predicting the maximum velocity attainable before the droplet is blown out of the levitator. Two methods are developed to estimate the sound pressure level in the levitator by comparing flowfield patterns with analytic results. These results and observations are used to estimate to what extent acoustic aerodynamic levitators can be used in the future for investigating transport properties of individual droplets.

  10. Photonic doppler velocimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Lowry, M E; Molau, N E; Sargis, P D; Strand, O T; Sweider, D

    1999-01-01

    We are developing a novel fiber-optic approach to laser Doppler velocimetry as a diagnostic for high explosives tests. Using hardware that was originally developed for the telecommunications industry, we are able to measure surface velocities ranging from centimeters per second to kilometers per second. Laboratory measurements and field trials have shown excellent agreement with other diagnostics.

  11. Acoustic attenuation, phase and group velocities in liquid-filled pipes III: nonaxisymmetric propagation and circumferential modes in lossless conditions.

    PubMed

    Baik, Kyungmin; Jiang, Jian; Leighton, Timothy G

    2013-03-01

    Equations for the nonaxisymmetric modes that are axially and circumferentially propagating in a liquid-filled tube with elastic walls surrounded by air/vacuum are presented using exact elasticity theory. Dispersion curves for the axially propagating modes are obtained and verified through comparison with measurements. The resulting theory is applied to the circumferential modes, and the pressures and the stresses in the liquid-filled pipe are calculated under external forced oscillation by an acoustic source. This provides the theoretical foundation for the narrow band acoustic bubble detector that was subsequently deployed at the Target Test Facility (TTF) of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), TN.

  12. Use of acoustic velocity methodology and remote sensing techniques to measure unsteady flow on the lower Yazoo River in Mississippi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Turnipseed, D. Phil; Cooper, Lance M.; Davis, Angela A.

    1998-01-01

    Methodologies have been developed for computing continuous discharge during varied, non-uniform low and medium flows on the Yazoo River at the U.S. Geological Survey streamgage below Steele Bayou near Long Lake, Mississippi, using acoustic signal processing and conventional streamgaging techniques. Procedures were also developed to compute locations of discharges during future high flow events when the stream reach is subject to hi-directional and reverse flow caused by rising stages on the Mississippi River using a combination of acoustic equipment and remote sensing technology. A description of the study area is presented. Selected results of these methods are presented for the period from March through September 1997.

  13. Correction of Doppler Rada Data for Aircraft Motion Using Surface Measurements and Recursive Least-Squares Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durden, S.; Haddad, Z.

    1998-01-01

    Observations of Doppler velocity of hydrometeors form airborne Doppler weather radars normally contains a component due to the aircraft motion. Accurate hydrometeor velocity measurements thus require correction by subtracting this velocity from the observed velocity.

  14. Cosmology with Doppler lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacon, David J.; Andrianomena, Sambatra; Clarkson, Chris; Bolejko, Krzysztof; Maartens, Roy

    2014-09-01

    Doppler lensing is the apparent change in object size and magnitude due to peculiar velocities. Objects falling into an overdensity appear larger on its near side, and smaller on its far side, than typical objects at the same redshifts. This effect dominates over the usual gravitational lensing magnification at low redshift. Doppler lensing is a promising new probe of cosmology, and we explore in detail how to utilize the effect with forthcoming surveys. We present cosmological simulations of the Doppler and gravitational lensing effects based on the Millennium simulation. We show that Doppler lensing can be detected around stacked voids or unvirialized overdensities. New power spectra and correlation functions are proposed which are designed to be sensitive to Doppler lensing. We consider the impact of gravitational lensing and intrinsic size correlations on these quantities. We compute the correlation functions and forecast the errors for realistic forthcoming surveys, providing predictions for constraints on cosmological parameters. Finally, we demonstrate how we can make 3D potential maps of large volumes of the Universe using Doppler lensing.

  15. Navy Applications of High-Frequency Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Henry

    2004-11-01

    Although the emphasis in underwater acoustics for the last few decades has been in low-frequency acoustics, motivated by long range detection of submarines, there has been a continuing use of high-frequency acoustics in traditional specialized applications such as bottom mapping, mine hunting, torpedo homing and under ice navigation. The attractive characteristics of high-frequency sonar, high spatial resolution, wide bandwidth, small size and relatively low cost must be balanced against the severe range limitation imposed by attenuation that increases approximately as frequency-squared. Many commercial applications of acoustics are ideally served by high-frequency active systems. The small size and low cost, coupled with the revolution in small powerful signal processing hardware has led to the consideration of more sophisticated systems. Driven by commercial applications, there are currently available several commercial-off-the-shelf products including acoustic modems for underwater communication, multi-beam fathometers, side scan sonars for bottom mapping, and even synthetic aperture side scan sonar. Much of the work in high frequency sonar today continues to be focused on specialized applications in which the application is emphasized over the underlying acoustics. Today's vision for the Navy of the future involves Autonomous Undersea Vehicles (AUVs) and off-board ASW sensors. High-frequency acoustics will play a central role in the fulfillment of this vision as a means of communication and as a sensor. The acoustic communication problems for moving AUVs and deep sensors are discussed. Explicit relationships are derived between the communication theoretic description of channel parameters in terms of time and Doppler spreads and ocean acoustic parameters, group velocities, phase velocities and horizontal wavenumbers. Finally the application of synthetic aperture sonar to the mine hunting problems is described.

  16. Impact of layer and substrate properties on the surface acoustic wave velocity in scandium doped aluminum nitride based SAW devices on sapphire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillinger, M.; Shaposhnikov, K.; Knobloch, T.; Schneider, M.; Kaltenbacher, M.; Schmid, U.

    2016-06-01

    This paper investigates the performance of surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices consisting of reactively sputter deposited scandium doped aluminum nitride (ScxAl1-xN) thin films as piezoelectric layers on sapphire substrates for wireless sensor or for RF-MEMS applications. To investigate the influence of piezoelectric film thickness on the device properties, samples with thickness ranging from 500 nm up to 3000 nm are fabricated. S21 measurements and simulations demonstrate that the phase velocity is predominantly influenced by the mass density of the electrode material rather than by the thickness of the piezoelectric film. Additionally, the wave propagation direction is varied by rotating the interdigital transducer structures with respect to the crystal orientation of the substrate. The phase velocity is about 2.5% higher for a-direction compared to m-direction of the sapphire substrate, which is in excellent agreement with the difference in the anisotropic Young's modulus of the substrate corresponding to these directions.

  17. Alternative dust-ion acoustic waves in a magnetized charge varying dusty plasma with nonthermal electrons having a vortex-like velocity distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadjaz, Idir; Tribeche, Mouloud

    2014-06-01

    Alternative localized dust-ion acoustic waves are investigated in a magnetized charge varying dusty plasma with nonthermal electrons having a vortex-like velocity distribution. The correct non-Maxwellian charging currents are obtained based on the well-known orbit limited motion theory. Following the standard reductive perturbation technique, a Schamel-Zakharov Kuznetsov Burgers (S-ZKB) equation is derived. It is shown that due to an interplay between trapping and nonthermality, our dusty plasma model may support solitary as well as shock waves the main quantities (phase velocity, amplitude and width) of which are drastically influenced by trapping, nonthermality and charge variation. Due to the flexibility provided by the outlined distribution function (two concepts of non isothermality), we stress that our model should provide a good fit of the space observations.

  18. Evaluation of a pulsed ultrasonic Doppler flowmeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, M. K.

    1973-01-01

    The in vivo application of the pulsed ultrasound Doppler velocity meter (PUDVM) for measuring arterial velocity waveforms is reported. In particular, the performance of the PUDVM is compared with a hot film anemometer of proven accuracy.

  19. Determination of the pair correlation of OH rotational states from the 266 nm photolysis of H 2O 2 using velocity-aligned doppler spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, R. N.; Nightingale, J.; Western, C. M.; Yang, X.

    1988-10-01

    Time-delayed Doppler-split line profiles have been measured at high resolution for many rotational states of OH generated by the 266 nm photolysis of H 2O 2. The mean rotational energy of the partner OH increases linearly with that of the probed OH with a constant of proportionality of 0.28. These measurements lead to an HO-OH bond dissociation energy Δ H00 = 220±5 kJ/mole.

  20. Measuring discharge with ADCPs: Inferences from synthetic velocity profiles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rehmann, C.R.; Mueller, D.S.; Oberg, K.A.

    2009-01-01

    Synthetic velocity profiles are used to determine guidelines for sampling discharge with acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs). The analysis allows the effects of instrument characteristics, sampling parameters, and properties of the flow to be studied systematically. For mid-section measurements, the averaging time required for a single profile measurement always exceeded the 40 s usually recommended for velocity measurements, and it increased with increasing sample interval and increasing time scale of the large eddies. Similarly, simulations of transect measurements show that discharge error decreases as the number of large eddies sampled increases. The simulations allow sampling criteria that account for the physics of the flow to be developed. ?? 2009 ASCE.

  1. Acoustic velocity log numerical simulation and saturation estimation of gas hydrate reservoir in Shenhu area, South China Sea.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Kun; Zou, Changchun; Xiang, Biao; Liu, Jieqiong

    2013-01-01

    Gas hydrate model and free gas model are established, and two-phase theory (TPT) for numerical simulation of elastic wave velocity is adopted to investigate the unconsolidated deep-water sedimentary strata in Shenhu area, South China Sea. The relationships between compression wave (P wave) velocity and gas hydrate saturation, free gas saturation, and sediment porosity at site SH2 are studied, respectively, and gas hydrate saturation of research area is estimated by gas hydrate model. In depth of 50 to 245 m below seafloor (mbsf), as sediment porosity decreases, P wave velocity increases gradually; as gas hydrate saturation increases, P wave velocity increases gradually; as free gas saturation increases, P wave velocity decreases. This rule is almost consistent with the previous research result. In depth of 195 to 220 mbsf, the actual measurement of P wave velocity increases significantly relative to the P wave velocity of saturated water modeling, and this layer is determined to be rich in gas hydrate. The average value of gas hydrate saturation estimated from the TPT model is 23.2%, and the maximum saturation is 31.5%, which is basically in accordance with simplified three-phase equation (STPE), effective medium theory (EMT), resistivity log (Rt), and chloride anomaly method.

  2. Canonical Acoustics and Its Application to Surface Acoustic Wave on Acoustic Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jian Qi

    2016-08-01

    In a conventional formalism of acoustics, acoustic pressure p and velocity field u are used for characterizing acoustic waves propagating inside elastic/acoustic materials. We shall treat some fundamental problems relevant to acoustic wave propagation alternatively by using canonical acoustics (a more concise and compact formalism of acoustic dynamics), in which an acoustic scalar potential and an acoustic vector potential (Φ ,V), instead of the conventional acoustic field quantities such as acoustic pressure and velocity field (p,u) for characterizing acoustic waves, have been defined as the fundamental variables. The canonical formalism of the acoustic energy-momentum tensor is derived in terms of the acoustic potentials. Both the acoustic Hamiltonian density and the acoustic Lagrangian density have been defined, and based on this formulation, the acoustic wave quantization in a fluid is also developed. Such a formalism of acoustic potentials is employed to the problem of negative-mass-density assisted surface acoustic wave that is a highly localized surface bound state (an eigenstate of the acoustic wave equations). Since such a surface acoustic wave can be strongly confined to an interface between an acoustic metamaterial (e.g., fluid-solid composite structures with a negative dynamical mass density) and an ordinary material (with a positive mass density), it will give rise to an effect of acoustic field enhancement on the acoustic interface, and would have potential applications in acoustic device design for acoustic wave control.

  3. Doppler photoacoustic and Doppler ultrasound in blood with optical contrast agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheinfeld, Adi; Eyal, Avishay

    2013-03-01

    Photoacoustic Doppler flowmetry as well as Doppler ultrasound were performed in acoustic resolution regime on tubes filled with flowing blood with indocyanine green (ICG) at different concentrations. The photoacoustic excitation utilized a pair of directly-modulated fiber-coupled 830nm laser-diodes, modulated with either CW or tone-bursts for depthresolved measurements. The amplitude of the Doppler peak in photoacoustic Doppler measurements was found to be proportional to the ICG concentration. Photoacoustic Doppler was measured in ICG at human safe concentrations, but not in whole blood. Comparing the results between the two modalities implied that using a wavelength with higher optical absorption may improve the photoacoustic signal in blood.

  4. Simultaneously measuring thickness, density, velocity and attenuation of thin layers using V(z,t) data from time-resolved acoustic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian; Bai, Xiaolong; Yang, Keji; Ju, Bing-Feng

    2015-02-01

    To meet the need of efficient, comprehensive and automatic characterization of the properties of thin layers, a nondestructive method using ultrasonic testing to simultaneously measure thickness, density, sound velocity and attenuation through V(z,t) data, recorded by time-resolved acoustic microscopy is proposed. The theoretical reflection spectrum of the thin layer at normal incidence is established as a function of three dimensionless parameters. The measured reflection spectrum R(θ,ω) is obtained from V(z,t) data and the measured thickness is derived from the signals when the lens is focused on the front and back surface of the thin layer, which are picked up from the V(z,t) data. The density, sound velocity and attenuation are then determined by the measured thickness and inverse algorithm utilizing least squares method to fit the theoretical and measured reflection spectrum at normal incidence. It has the capability of simultaneously measuring thickness, density, sound velocity and attenuation of thin layer in a single V(z,t) acquisition. An example is given for a thin plate immersed in water and the results are satisfactory. The method greatly simplifies the measurement apparatus and procedures, which improves the efficiency and automation for simultaneous measurement of basic mechanical and geometrical properties of thin layers.

  5. Reconstruction of normal velocity distribution at the face of an ultrasound source in liquid on the base of acoustic waveform measurements along a surface in front of the source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.; Pishchalnikov, Yuriy A.; Morozov, Andrey V.

    2002-05-01

    Normal velocity distribution along a vibrating surface is an important characteristic of any acoustic source. When it is known, the acoustic pressure field can be predicted using Rayleigh integral or similar approach. However, up to now there are no reliable methods of the velocity distribution measurement in liquids or solids. Due to strong acousto-optic interaction in condensed medium, the well-developed laser vibrometers can be employed only when the transducer is contacting vacuum or gas. In this work a novel method is developed and tested for evaluation of the velocity distribution along the vibrating surface of a piezoceramic transducer in liquid. The technique consists of measuring acoustic wave amplitude and phase along a surface surrounding the source, changing the sign of the phase, and theoretically backpropagating it to the source using the Rayleigh integral. The method was studied numerically and tested experimentally. The acoustic field of ultrasound source was registered using a needle hydrophone, which was scanned along a plane surface in front of the transducer. It is shown that the proposed approach enables accurate detection of the normal velocity. The method can be used for a wide variety of acoustically radiating structures. [Work supported by CRDF, NIH-Fogarty, and RFBR.

  6. Modulational instability of ion-acoustic waves in a plasma with a q-nonextensive electron velocity distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Bains, A. S.; Gill, T. S.; Tribeche, Mouloud

    2011-02-15

    The modulational instability (MI) of ion-acoustic waves (IAWs) in a two-component plasma is investigated in the context of the nonextensive statistics proposed by Tsallis [J. Stat. Phys. 52, 479 (1988)]. Using the reductive perturbation method, the nonlinear Schroedinger equation (NLSE) which governs the MI of the IAWs is obtained. The presence of the nonextensive electron distribution is shown to influence the MI of the waves. Three different ranges of the nonextensive q-parameter are considered and in each case the MI sets in under different conditions. Furthermore, the effects of the q-parameter on the growth rate of MI are discussed in detail.

  7. Evaluation of mean velocity and turbulence measurements with ADCPs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nystrom, E.A.; Rehmann, C.R.; Oberg, K.A.

    2007-01-01

    To test the ability of acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) to measure turbulence, profiles measured with two pulse-to-pulse coherent ADCPs in a laboratory flume were compared to profiles measured with an acoustic Doppler velocimeter, and time series measured in the acoustic beam of the ADCPs were examined. A four-beam ADCP was used at a downstream station, while a three-beam ADCP was used at a downstream station and an upstream station. At the downstream station, where the turbulence intensity was low, both ADCPs reproduced the mean velocity profile well away from the flume boundaries; errors near the boundaries were due to transducer ringing, flow disturbance, and sidelobe interference. At the upstream station, where the turbulence intensity was higher, errors in the mean velocity were large. The four-beam ADCP measured the Reynolds stress profile accurately away from the bottom boundary, and these measurements can be used to estimate shear velocity. Estimates of Reynolds stress with a three-beam ADCP and turbulent kinetic energy with both ADCPs cannot be computed without further assumptions, and they are affected by flow inhomogeneity. Neither ADCP measured integral time scales to within 60%. ?? 2007 ASCE.

  8. Acoustic and Laser Doppler Anemometer Results for Confluent and 12-Lobed E(exp 3) Mixer Exhaust Systems for Subsonic Jet Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salikuddin, M.; Babbit, R. R.; Shin, H.; Wisler, S.; Janardan, B. A.; Majjigi, R. K.; Bridges, James (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The research described in this report has been funded by NASA Glenn Research Center as part of the Advanced Subsonic Technologies (AST) initiative. The program operates under the Large Engine Technologies (LET) as Task Order #3 1. Task Order 31 is a three year research program divided into three subtasks. Subtask A develops the experimental acoustic and aerodynamic subsonic mixed flow exhaust system databases. Subtask B seeks to develop and assess CFD-based aero-acoustic methods for subsonic mixed flow exhaust systems. Subtask B relies on the data obtained from Subtask A to direct and calibrate the aero-acoustic methods development. Subtask C then seeks to utilize both the aero-acoustic data bases developed in Subtask A and the analytical methods developed in Subtask B to define improved subsonic mixed-flow exhaust systems. The mixed flow systems defined in Subtask C will be experimentally demonstrated for improved noise reduction in a scale model aero-acoustic test conducted similarly to the test performed in Subtask A. The overall object of this Task Order is to develop and demonstrate the technology to define a -3EPNdB exhaust system relative to 1992 exhaust system technology.

  9. Doppler echocardiography

    SciTech Connect

    Labovitz, A.J.; Williams, G.A.

    1988-01-01

    The authors are successful in presenting a basic book on clinical quantitative Doppler echocardiography. It is not intended to be a comprehensive text, but it does cover clinical applications in a succinct fashion. Only the more common diseases in the adult are considered. The subjects are presented logically and are easy to comprehend. The illustrations are good, and the book is paperbound. The basic principles of Doppler echocardiography are presented briefly. The book ends with chapters on left ventricular function (stroke volume and cardiac output), congenital heart disease, and color Doppler echo-cardiography. There are numerous references and a good glossary and index.

  10. Measurement of velocity deficit at the downstream of a 1:10 axial hydrokinetic turbine model

    SciTech Connect

    Gunawan, Budi; Neary, Vincent S; Hill, Craig; Chamorro, Leonardo

    2012-01-01

    Wake recovery constrains the downstream spacing and density of turbines that can be deployed in turbine farms and limits the amount of energy that can be produced at a hydrokinetic energy site. This study investigates the wake recovery at the downstream of a 1:10 axial flow turbine model using a pulse-to-pulse coherent Acoustic Doppler Profiler (ADP). In addition, turbine inflow and outflow velocities were measured for calculating the thrust on the turbine. The result shows that the depth-averaged longitudinal velocity recovers to 97% of the inflow velocity at 35 turbine diameter (D) downstream of the turbine.

  11. Acoustic attenuation, phase and group velocities in liquid-filled pipes II: simulation for Spallation Neutron Sources and planetary exploration.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jian; Baik, Kyungmin; Leighton, Timothy G

    2011-08-01

    This paper uses a finite element method (FEM) to compare predictions of the attenuation and sound speeds of acoustic modes in a fluid-filled pipe with those of the analytical model presented in the first paper in this series. It explains why, when the predictions of the earlier paper were compared with experimental data from a water-filled PMMA pipe, the uncertainties and agreement for attenuation data were worse than those for sound speed data. Having validated the FEM approach in this way, the versatility of FEM is thereafter demonstrated by modeling two practical applications which are beyond the analysis of the earlier paper. These applications model propagation in the mercury-filled steel pipework of the Spallation Neutron Source at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (Tennessee), and in a long-standing design for acoustic sensors for use on planetary probes. The results show that strong coupling between the fluid and the solid walls means that erroneous interpretations are made of the data if they assume that the sound speed and attenuation in the fluid in the pipe are the same as those that would be measured in an infinite volume of identical fluid, assumptions which are common when such data have previously been interpreted. PMID:21877784

  12. Mathematical Models for Doppler Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lear, William M.

    1987-01-01

    Error analysis increases precision of navigation. Report presents improved mathematical models of analysis of Doppler measurements and measurement errors of spacecraft navigation. To take advantage of potential navigational accuracy of Doppler measurements, precise equations relate measured cycle count to position and velocity. Drifts and random variations in transmitter and receiver oscillator frequencies taken into account. Mathematical models also adapted to aircraft navigation, radar, sonar, lidar, and interferometry.

  13. Studies of the acoustic transmission characteristics of coaxial nozzles with inverted velocity profiles, volume 1. [jet engine noise radiation through coannular exhaust nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, P. D.; Salikuddin, M.; Ahuja, K. K.; Plumblee, H. E.; Mungur, P.

    1979-01-01

    The efficiency of internal noise radiation through coannular exhaust nozzle with an inverted velocity profile was studied. A preliminary investigation was first undertaken to: (1) define the test parameters which influence the internal noise radiation; (2) develop a test methodology which could realistically be used to examine the effects of the test parameters; (3) and to validate this methodology. The result was the choice of an acoustic impulse as the internal noise source in the in the jet nozzles. Noise transmission characteristics of a nozzle system were then investigated. In particular, the effects of fan nozzle convergence angle, core extention length to annulus height ratio, and flow Mach number and temperatures were studied. The results are presented as normalized directivity plots.

  14. Chaotic system for self-synchronizing Doppler measurement.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Thomas L

    2005-03-01

    In a radar system, it is necessary to measure both range and velocity of a target. The movement of the target causes a Doppler shift of the radar signal, and the size of the Doppler shift is used to measure the velocity of the target. In this work, a chaotic drive-response system is simulated that detects a Doppler shift in a chaotic signal. The response system can detect Doppler shifts in more than one signal at a time.

  15. Comparison of ultrasound B-mode, strain imaging, acoustic radiation force impulse displacement and shear wave velocity imaging using real time clinical breast images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manickam, Kavitha; Machireddy, Ramasubba Reddy; Raghavan, Bagyam

    2016-04-01

    It has been observed that many pathological process increase the elastic modulus of soft tissue compared to normal. In order to image tissue stiffness using ultrasound, a mechanical compression is applied to tissues of interest and local tissue deformation is measured. Based on the mechanical excitation, ultrasound stiffness imaging methods are classified as compression or strain imaging which is based on external compression and Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) imaging which is based on force generated by focused ultrasound. When ultrasound is focused on tissue, shear wave is generated in lateral direction and shear wave velocity is proportional to stiffness of tissues. The work presented in this paper investigates strain elastography and ARFI imaging in clinical cancer diagnostics using real time patient data. Ultrasound B-mode imaging, strain imaging, ARFI displacement and ARFI shear wave velocity imaging were conducted on 50 patients (31 Benign and 23 malignant categories) using Siemens S2000 machine. True modulus contrast values were calculated from the measured shear wave velocities. For ultrasound B-mode, ARFI displacement imaging and strain imaging, observed image contrast and Contrast to Noise Ratio were calculated for benign and malignant cancers. Observed contrast values were compared based on the true modulus contrast values calculated from shear wave velocity imaging. In addition to that, student unpaired t-test was conducted for all the four techniques and box plots are presented. Results show that, strain imaging is better for malignant cancers whereas ARFI imaging is superior than strain imaging and B-mode for benign lesions representations.

  16. Modulational instability of ion-acoustic waves in plasma with a q-nonextensive nonthermal electron velocity distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Bouzit, Omar Tribeche, Mouloud E-mail: mtribeche@usthb.dz; Bains, A. S.

    2015-08-15

    Modulation instability of ion-acoustic waves (IAWs) is investigated in a collisionless unmagnetized one dimensional plasma, containing positive ions and electrons following the mixed nonextensive nonthermal distribution [Tribeche et al., Phys. Rev. E 85, 037401 (2012)]. Using the reductive perturbation technique, a nonlinear Schrödinger equation which governs the modulation instability of the IAWs is obtained. Valid range of plasma parameters has been fixed and their effects on the modulational instability discussed in detail. We find that the plasma supports both bright and dark solutions. The valid domain for the wave number k where instabilities set in varies with both nonextensive parameter q as well as non thermal parameter α. Moreover, the analysis is extended for the rational solutions of IAWs in the instability regime. Present study is useful for the understanding of IAWs in the region where such mixed distribution may exist.

  17. Dust ion-acoustic shock waves in charge varying dusty plasmas with electrons having vortexlike velocity distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Alinejad, H.; Tribeche, M.

    2010-12-15

    A weakly nonlinear analysis is carried out to investigate the properties of dust ion-acoustic shock waves in a charge varying dusty plasma with vortexlike electron distribution. We use the ionization model, hot ions with equilibrium streaming speed and a trapped electron charging current derived from the well-known orbit limited motion theory. A new modified Burger equation is derived. Besides nonlinear trapping, this equation involves two kinds of dissipation (the anomalous one inherent to nonadiabatic dust charge fluctuation and the one due to the particle loss and ionization). These two kinds of dissipation can act concurrently. The traveling wave solution has been acquired by employing the modified extended tanh-function method. The shocklike solution is numerically analyzed based on the typical numerical data from laboratory dusty plasma devices. It is found that ion temperature, trapped particles, and weak dissipations significantly modify the shock structures.

  18. Variable charge dust acoustic solitary waves in a dusty plasma with a q-nonextensive electron velocity distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Amour, Rabia; Tribeche, Mouloud

    2010-06-15

    A first theoretical work is presented to study variable charge dust acoustic solitons within the theoretical framework of the Tsallis statistical mechanics. Our results reveal that the spatial patterns of the variable charge solitary wave are significantly modified by electron nonextensive effects. In particular, it may be noted that for -11. As the electrons deviate from their thermodynamic equilibrium, the dust grain charge Q{sub d} becomes more negative and the dust grains localization (accumulation) less pronounced. The electrons are locally expelled and pushed out of the region of the soliton's localization. This electron depletion becomes less effective as the electrons evolve far away from their thermal equilibrium. The case q>1 provides qualitatively opposite results: electron nonextensivity makes the solitary structure more spiky. Our results should help in providing a good fit between theoretical and experimental results.

  19. Acoustic and Laser Doppler Anemometer Results for Confluent, 22-Lobed, and Unique-Lobed Mixer Exhaust Systems for Subsonic Jet Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salikuddin, M.; Martens, S.; Shin, H.; Majjigi, R. K.; Krejsa, Gene (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this task was to develop a design methodology and noise reduction concepts for high bypass exhaust systems which could be applied to both existing production and new advanced engine designs. Special emphasis was given to engine cycles with bypass ratios in the range of 4:1 to 7:1, where jet mixing noise was a primary noise source at full power takeoff conditions. The goal of this effort was to develop the design methodology for mixed-flow exhaust systems and other novel noise reduction concepts that would yield 3 EPNdB noise reduction relative to 1992 baseline technology. Two multi-lobed mixers, a 22-lobed axisymmetric and a 21-lobed with a unique lobe, were designed. These mixers along with a confluent mixer were tested with several fan nozzles of different lengths with and without acoustic treatment in GEAE's Cell 41 under the current subtask (Subtask C). In addition to the acoustic and LDA tests for the model mixer exhaust systems, a semi-empirical noise prediction method for mixer exhaust system is developed. Effort was also made to implement flowfield data for noise prediction by utilizing MGB code. In general, this study established an aero and acoustic diagnostic database to calibrate and refine current aero and acoustic prediction tools.

  20. Staggered Multiple-PRF Ultrafast Color Doppler.

    PubMed

    Posada, Daniel; Poree, Jonathan; Pellissier, Arnaud; Chayer, Boris; Tournoux, Francois; Cloutier, Guy; Garcia, Damien

    2016-06-01

    Color Doppler imaging is an established pulsed ultrasound technique to visualize blood flow non-invasively. High-frame-rate (ultrafast) color Doppler, by emissions of plane or circular wavefronts, allows severalfold increase in frame rates. Conventional and ultrafast color Doppler are both limited by the range-velocity dilemma, which may result in velocity folding (aliasing) for large depths and/or large velocities. We investigated multiple pulse-repetition-frequency (PRF) emissions arranged in a series of staggered intervals to remove aliasing in ultrafast color Doppler. Staggered PRF is an emission process where time delays between successive pulse transmissions change in an alternating way. We tested staggered dual- and triple-PRF ultrafast color Doppler, 1) in vitro in a spinning disc and a free jet flow, and 2) in vivo in a human left ventricle. The in vitro results showed that the Nyquist velocity could be extended to up to 6 times the conventional limit. We found coefficients of determination r(2) ≥ 0.98 between the de-aliased and ground-truth velocities. Consistent de-aliased Doppler images were also obtained in the human left heart. Our results demonstrate that staggered multiple-PRF ultrafast color Doppler is efficient for high-velocity high-frame-rate blood flow imaging. This is particularly relevant for new developments in ultrasound imaging relying on accurate velocity measurements.

  1. Differential Doppler as a diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Dzieciuch, M.; Munk, W. )

    1994-10-01

    Differential Doppler compression and travel time of individual peaks in the arrival sequence (relative to an overall average) are measured for the 5500-km acoustic transmissions from a moving source at Heard Island to Christmas (Crab) Island. The differentials cannot be explained by simple adiabatic propagation models. A hybrid theory, coupling polar and temperate models at the Antarctic Front can account for some of the qualitative features. Differential Doppler could be a useful tool for identifying ray arrivals. 10 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Fast acoustic streaming in standing waves: generation of an additional outer streaming cell.

    PubMed

    Reyt, Ida; Daru, Virginie; Bailliet, Hélène; Moreau, Solène; Valière, Jean-Christophe; Baltean-Carlès, Diana; Weisman, Catherine

    2013-09-01

    Rayleigh streaming in a cylindrical acoustic standing waveguide is studied both experimentally and numerically for nonlinear Reynolds numbers from 1 to 30 [Re(NL)=(U0/c0)(2)(R/δν)(2), with U0 the acoustic velocity amplitude at the velocity antinode, c0 the speed of sound, R the tube radius, and δν the acoustic boundary layer thickness]. Streaming velocity is measured by means of laser Doppler velocimetry in a cylindrical resonator filled with air at atmospheric pressure at high intensity sound levels. The compressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved numerically with high resolution finite difference schemes. The resonator is excited by shaking it along the axis at imposed frequency. Results of measurements and of numerical calculation are compared with results given in the literature and with each other. As expected, the axial streaming velocity measured and calculated agrees reasonably well with the slow streaming theory for small ReNL but deviates significantly from such predictions for fast streaming (ReNL>1). Both experimental and numerical results show that when ReNL is increased, the center of the outer streaming cells are pushed toward the acoustic velocity nodes until counter-rotating additional vortices are generated near the acoustic velocity antinodes.

  3. Pulsed photoacoustic Doppler flowmetry using a cross correlation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunker, J.; Beard, P.

    2010-02-01

    The feasibility of making spatially resolved measurements of blood flow using pulsed photoacoustic Doppler techniques has been explored. Doppler time shifts were quantified via cross-correlation of pairs of photoacoustic waveforms generated within a blood-simulating phantom using pairs of laser light pulses. The photoacoustic waves were detected using a focussed or planar PZT ultrasound transducer. This approach was found to be effective for quantifying the linear motion of micron-scale absorbers imprinted on an acetate sheet moving with velocities in the range 0.15 to 1.50 ms-1. The effect of the acoustic spot diameter and the time separation between the laser pulses on measurement resolution and the maximum measurable velocity is discussed. The distinguishing advantage of pulsed rather than continuous-wave excitation is that spatially resolved velocity measurements can be made. This offers the prospect of mapping flow within the microcirculation and thus providing insights into the perfusion of tumours and other pathologies characterised by abnormalities in flow status.

  4. Hepatic and Splenic Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Shear Wave Velocity Elastography in Children with Liver Disease Associated with Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Cañas, Teresa; Maciá, Araceli; Muñoz-Codoceo, Rosa Ana; Fontanilla, Teresa; González-Rios, Patricia; Miralles, María; Gómez-Mardones, Gloria

    2015-01-01

    Background. Liver disease associated with cystic fibrosis (CFLD) is the second cause of mortality in these patients. The diagnosis is difficult because none of the available tests are specific enough. Noninvasive elastographic techniques have been proven to be useful to diagnose hepatic fibrosis. Acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging is an elastography imaging system. The purpose of the work was to study the utility of liver and spleen ARFI Imaging in the detection of CFLD. Method. 72 patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) were studied and received ARFI imaging in the liver and in the spleen. SWV values were compared with the values of 60 healthy controls. Results. Comparing the SWV values of CFLD with the control healthy group, values in the right lobe were higher in patients with CFLD. We found a SWV RHL cut-off value to detect CFLD of 1.27 m/s with a sensitivity of 56.5% and a specificity of 90.5%. CF patients were found to have higher SWC spleen values than the control group. Conclusions. ARFI shear wave elastography in the right hepatic lobe is a noninvasive technique useful to detect CFLD in our sample of patients. Splenic SWV values are higher in CF patients, without any clinical consequence. PMID:26609528

  5. Assessment of myocardial perfusion by harmonic power doppler imaging at rest and during adenosine triphosphate stress: comparison with coronary flow velocity reserve in the left anterior descending coronary arter.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Masaaki; Yoshitani, Hidetoshi; Miyazaki, Chinami; Otani, Shinichiro; Sakamoto, Kazuo; Yoshikawa, Junichi

    2002-02-01

    To clarify whether the myocardial perfusion abnormalities observed on harmonic power Doppler imaging (HPDI) during hyperemia are related to a decrease in coronary flow velocity reserve (CFVR), HPDI and CFVR were measured in the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) territory of 75 patients. During continuous infusion of Levovist, dual-frame triggered apical 4-chamber views were obtained at rest and during adenosine triphosphate (ATP) infusion. The persistence of perfusion defects during ATP infusion or stress-induced defects in the LAD territory was defined as abnormal. Both HPDI and coronary flow velocity recordings of adequate quality were successfully obtained in 73 patients, and 37 patients showed abnormal myocardial perfusion. CFVR was significantly lower in patients with abnormal perfusion than in patients who had normal findings (1.38+/-0.38 vs 2.60+/-0.76, p<0.001). A CFVR less than 1.9 had a sensitivity of 89% (33/37) and a specificity of 89% (32/36) for predicting the presence of abnormal myocardial perfusion. This study demonstrates that myocardial perfusion abnormalities observed during HPDI using ATP stress are closely correlated to a decrease in CFVR and may reflect significant stenosis or microvascular damage in the LAD territory. PMID:11999642

  6. Doppler Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Leitgeb, Rainer A.; Werkmeister, René M.; Blatter, Cedric; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2014-01-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) has revolutionized ophthalmology. Since its introduction in the early 1990s it has continuously improved in terms of speed, resolution and sensitivity. The technique has also seen a variety of extensions aiming to assess functional aspects of the tissue in addition to morphology. One of these approaches is Doppler OCT (DOCT), which aims to visualize and quantify blood flow. Such extensions were already implemented in time domain systems, but have gained importance with the introduction of Fourier domain OCT. Nowadays phase-sensitive detection techniques are most widely used to extract blood velocity and blood flow from tissues. A common problem with the technique is that the Doppler angle is not known and several approaches have been realized to obtain absolute velocity and flow data from the retina. Additional studies are required to elucidate which of these techniques is most promising. In the recent years, however, several groups have shown that data can be obtained with high validity and reproducibility. In addition, several groups have published values for total retinal blood flow. Another promising application relates to non-invasive angiography. As compared to standard techniques such as fluorescein and indocyanine-green angiography the technique offers two major advantages: no dye is required and depth resolution is required is provided. As such Doppler OCT has the potential to improve our abilities to diagnose and monitor ocular vascular diseases. PMID:24704352

  7. Doppler optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Leitgeb, Rainer A; Werkmeister, René M; Blatter, Cedric; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2014-07-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) has revolutionized ophthalmology. Since its introduction in the early 1990s it has continuously improved in terms of speed, resolution and sensitivity. The technique has also seen a variety of extensions aiming to assess functional aspects of the tissue in addition to morphology. One of these approaches is Doppler OCT (DOCT), which aims to visualize and quantify blood flow. Such extensions were already implemented in time domain systems, but have gained importance with the introduction of Fourier domain OCT. Nowadays phase-sensitive detection techniques are most widely used to extract blood velocity and blood flow from tissues. A common problem with the technique is that the Doppler angle is not known and several approaches have been realized to obtain absolute velocity and flow data from the retina. Additional studies are required to elucidate which of these techniques is most promising. In the recent years, however, several groups have shown that data can be obtained with high validity and reproducibility. In addition, several groups have published values for total retinal blood flow. Another promising application relates to non-invasive angiography. As compared to standard techniques such as fluorescein and indocyanine-green angiography the technique offers two major advantages: no dye is required and depth resolution is required is provided. As such Doppler OCT has the potential to improve our abilities to diagnose and monitor ocular vascular diseases. PMID:24704352

  8. SonTek IQ Plus Velocity Index Discharge Compared to Historical Stage Discharge Curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, I.

    2014-12-01

    The SonTek IQ Plus bottom-mounted, up-looking Doppler Current meter is relatively new, low profile instrument specifically designed to measure water velocity in open channels through a wide range of conditions and water depth. The predecessor to the IQ, the SonTek Argonaut SW, is a well-established tool for measuring discharge in open channels utilizing a velocity index equation. The IQ builds upon this with velocity indexing capabilities and the addition of two skew beams and the implementation of SmartPulseHD. The SonTek IQ Plus measures velocity with 4-acoustic transducers and the water level using a fifth vertically oriented transducer integrated with a pressure sensor. This improves upon previous and other bottom-mounted, up-looking, acoustic Doppler current meters by measuring the velocity at more points across the channel using its 4-monostatic acoustic transducers. Additionally, the vertically oriented transducer measures the water level and works in conjunction with the pressure sensor to provide a highly accurate water level/stage measurement. The implementation of SmartPulseHD enables the IQ to change ping type and processing technique based on water depth and velocity, in order to provide the most accurate velocity data possible. The IQ was designed specifically for measuring open channel flow in irrigation canals and similar open channels, either by utilizing SonTek's theoretical flow algorithm or using a velocity index equation. The study presented here demonstrates data collected by an IQ installed in an irrigation canal and the discharge computed using a developed index velocity equation. These data are then compared to discharge data determined by a conventional stage discharge curve developed over many years. The data presented demonstrate the capability of the SonTek IQ to compute accurate discharge values based on an index velocity equation that was developed over a relatively short period of time.

  9. A unified approach to modeling the backscattered Doppler ultrasound from blood.

    PubMed

    Mo, L Y; Cobbold, R S

    1992-05-01

    A unified approach to modeling the backscattered Doppler ultrasound signal from blood is presented. The approach consists of summing the contributions from elemental acoustic voxels each containing many red blood cells (RBC's). For an insonified region that is large compared to a wavelength, it is shown that the Doppler signal is a Gaussian random process that arises from fluctuation scattering, which implies that the backscattered power is proportional to the variance of local RBC concentrations. As a result, some common misconceptions about the relationship between the backscattering coefficient and hematocrit can be readily resolved. The unified approach was also used to derive a Doppler signal simulation model which shows that, regardless of flow condition, the power in the Doppler frequency spectrum is governed by the exponential distribution. For finite beamwidth and paraxial flow, it is further shown that the digitized Doppler signal can be modeled by a moving average random process whose order is determined by the signal sampling rate as well as the flow velocity profile.

  10. Doppler characteristics of sea clutter.

    SciTech Connect

    Raynal, Ann Marie; Doerry, Armin Walter

    2010-06-01

    Doppler radars can distinguish targets from clutter if the target's velocity along the radar line of sight is beyond that of the clutter. Some targets of interest may have a Doppler shift similar to that of clutter. The nature of sea clutter is different in the clutter and exo-clutter regions. This behavior requires special consideration regarding where a radar can expect to find sea-clutter returns in Doppler space and what detection algorithms are most appropriate to help mitigate false alarms and increase probability of detection of a target. This paper studies the existing state-of-the-art in the understanding of Doppler characteristics of sea clutter and scattering from the ocean to better understand the design and performance choices of a radar in differentiating targets from clutter under prevailing sea conditions.

  11. Feasibility study of the use of the acoustic velocity meter for measurement of net outflow from the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta in California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Winchell

    1969-01-01

    A reliable measure of the fresh-water outflow from the Sacramento-San Joaquin delta is needed for the operation of the California Water Project and for the evaluation of the interrelated water problems of the delta and San Francisco Bay regions. The Chipps Island channel, immediately downstream from the confluence of the Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers, is the most promising site for this flow measurement, but the conventional techniques used for evaluating steady flows cannot be employed there because the channel reach is in the tidal zone, and reversals of flow occur during each tidal cycle. Net outflows, which may be as little-as 2,000 cubic feet per second must necessarily be computed as the difference between the large ebbflow and floodflow volumes that move back and forth between the delta region and San Francisco Bay. Discharges during peak periods of the ebb and flood tidal cycles may exceed 300,000 cubic feet per second. In consequence, a very high degree of precision must be maintained in the gross flow measurements if meaningful computations of net outflow are to be made. This report evaluates the probable accuracies that might be achieved by use of an AVM (acoustic velocity meter), a device which measures the stream velocity along a diagonal line across the channel. The study indicates that this line velocity will provide a stable index of the mean velocity in the channel and that such an index could be used as a primary parameter for the computation of discharge. Therefore, net outflows probably could be computed with the required accuracy by the use of such a device. The significant factors controlling the precision of measurement would be the stability of the channel geometry and streamline orientation, the precision with which the current-meter measurements needed for calibration of the system could be made, the instrumental calibration stability of the AVM system, and the length of period over which net outflows were computed. The AVM system

  12. Bragg cell laser intensity modulation: effect on laser Doppler velocimetry measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Mychkovsky, Alexander G.; Chang, Natasha A.; Ceccio, Steven L.

    2009-06-20

    In most laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV) systems, the frequency of one of the two laser beams that intersect to create the probe volume is shifted with an acousto-optic element. It is shown here that Bragg shifting can impose a problematic fluctuation in intensity on the frequency-shifted beam, producing spurious velocity measurements. This fluctuation occurs at twice the Bragg cell frequency, and its relative amplitude to the time average intensity is a function of the ratio of the laser beam diameter to the Bragg cell acoustic wavelength. A physical model and a configuration procedure to minimize adverse effects of the intensity modulations are presented.

  13. Comparison, analysis, and estimation of discharge data from two acoustic velocity meters on the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal at Romeoville, Illinois

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Melching, Charles S.; Oberg, Kevin A.

    1993-01-01

    The acoustic velocity meter (AVM) on the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal (the Canal) at Romeoville, Ill., provides vital information for the accounting of the diversion of water from Lake Michigan. A detailed analysis of the discharge record on the Canal at Romeoville was done by the U.S. Geological Survey to establish the most accurate estimates of discharge for water years 1986-91. The analysis involved (1) checking the consistency of the discharges estimated by two different AVM's installed at Romeoville for consecutive time periods by statistical and regression analyses, (2) adjusting the discharge record to account for corrections to the width and depth of the Canal determined by field measurements, and (3) development of equations for estimating discharge on days when the AVM was inoperative using discharge estimates made by the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District of Greater Chicago at the lock, powerhouse, and controlling works at Lockport, Ill. No signi- ficant difference in the discharge estimates made by the two AVM's could be documented. The estimation equations combined regression analysis with physical principles of the outlet-works operation. The estimation equations simulated the verification period of October 1, 1991, to May 31, 1992, within 0.22, 5.15, and 0.66 percent for the mean, standard deviation, and skewness coefficient, respectively. Discharges were recalculated for the corrected width and depth, estimated for the periods of AVM inoperation, and entered into the discharge record for the station.

  14. Dual-Doppler Feasibility Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huddleston, Lisa L.

    2012-01-01

    When two or more Doppler weather radar systems are monitoring the same region, the Doppler velocities can be combined to form a three-dimensional (3-D) wind vector field thus providing for a more intuitive analysis of the wind field. A real-time display of the 3-D winds can assist forecasters in predicting the onset of convection and severe weather. The data can also be used to initialize local numerical weather prediction models. Two operational Doppler Radar systems are in the vicinity of Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS); these systems are operated by the 45th Space Wing (45 SW) and the National Weather Service Melbourne, Fla. (NWS MLB). Dual-Doppler applications were considered by the 45 SW in choosing the site for the new radar. Accordingly, the 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS), NWS MLB and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration tasked the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) to investigate the feasibility of establishing dual-Doppler capability using the two existing systems. This study investigated technical, hardware, and software requirements necessary to enable the establishment of a dual-Doppler capability. Review of the available literature pertaining to the dual-Doppler technique and consultation with experts revealed that the physical locations and resulting beam crossing angles of the 45 SW and NWS MLB radars make them ideally suited for a dual-Doppler capability. The dual-Doppler equations were derived to facilitate complete understanding of dual-Doppler synthesis; to determine the technical information requirements; and to determine the components of wind velocity from the equation of continuity and radial velocity data collected by the two Doppler radars. Analysis confirmed the suitability of the existing systems to provide the desired capability. In addition, it is possible that both 45 SW radar data and Terminal Doppler Weather Radar data from Orlando International Airport could be used to alleviate any

  15. Flight and echolocation behaviour of whiskered bats commuting along a hedgerow: range-dependent sonar signal design, Doppler tolerance and evidence for 'acoustic focussing'.

    PubMed

    Holderied, Marc W; Jones, Gareth; von Helversen, Otto

    2006-05-01

    Echolocating bats obtain three-dimensional images of their surroundings in complete darkness by emitting sonar signals and evaluating returning echoes. When flying close to objects, bats risk collision and therefore depend on the accuracy of images--particularly in the perceived distance of obstacles, which is coded by the time delay between call and echo. Yet, during flight, such accuracy is perturbed first because bats call and receive echoes at different positions and second because echoes are modified by Doppler shifts. Certain call designs avoid both sources of ranging error, but only for a limited range of distances [the 'distance of focus' (DOF)]. Here, we show that whiskered bats (Myotis mystacinus) using broadband echolocation calls adjust call design in a range-dependent manner so that nearby obstacles are localised accurately. Such behaviour is adaptive because it reduces collision risk. The bats also reduced call duration to some extent as they approached obstacles so that most returning echoes arrived after they finished calling. This reduction in call duration during the approach to obstacles was neither the only nor the main factor that influenced DOF. Indeed, both duration and bandwidth of calls influenced DOF independently, with lower bandwidths and longer durations giving greater DOF. Our findings give a new perspective on the adaptive significance of echolocation call design in nature and have implications for sonar engineering.

  16. Brillouin light scattering from surface acoustic waves in a subwavelength-diameter optical fibre

    PubMed Central

    Beugnot, Jean-Charles; Lebrun, Sylvie; Pauliat, Gilles; Maillotte, Hervé; Laude, Vincent; Sylvestre, Thibaut

    2014-01-01

    Brillouin scattering in optical fibres is a fundamental interaction between light and sound with important implications ranging from optical sensors to slow and fast light. In usual optical fibres, light both excites and feels shear and longitudinal bulk elastic waves, giving rise to forward-guided acoustic wave Brillouin scattering and backward-stimulated Brillouin scattering. In a subwavelength-diameter optical fibre, the situation changes dramatically, as we here report with the first experimental observation of Brillouin light scattering from surface acoustic waves. These Rayleigh-type surface waves travel the wire surface at a specific velocity of 3,400 m s−1 and backscatter the light with a Doppler shift of about 6 GHz. As these acoustic resonances are sensitive to surface defects or features, surface acoustic wave Brillouin scattering opens new opportunities for various sensing applications, but also in other domains such as microwave photonics and nonlinear plasmonics. PMID:25341638

  17. Doppler echocardiography in stress testing.

    PubMed

    Teague, S M

    1991-06-01

    Doppler ultrasound may have a role in the stress testing laboratory for the identification of patients with coronary disease through the assessment of dynamic ventricular systolic function. Quantitative systolic ejection phase indexes of maximal acceleration, peak velocity, and volume of blood ejected from the left ventricle can be obtained in the exercising patient. Trials comparing stress Doppler ultrasound with ST-segment changes, gated blood pool radionuclide or echocardiographic studies of ejection fraction or wall motion abnormality, and thallium scintigraphic perfusion defects have returned comparable or better sensitivity and specificity referencing coronary angiography. Graded treadmill exercise, stationary bicycle exercise, and pharmacological stress (dipyridamole) have been used. The normal Doppler stress response is a near linear increase in peak ejection velocity with increasing cardiac work, as reflected in heart rate. Patients with coronary artery disease show blunted augmentation of Doppler ejection dynamics between rest and peak stress, and the degree of blunting appears to be proportional to the anatomic extent of coronary disease and the magnitude of ventricular perfusion and performance impairment. Stress Doppler ultrasound achieves diagnostic power for coronary disease with ultrasonic technology, inexpensive equipment, without ionizing radiation, and few personnel.

  18. Computing discharge using the index velocity method

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Levesque, Victor A.; Oberg, Kevin A.

    2012-01-01

    Application of the index velocity method for computing continuous records of discharge has become increasingly common, especially since the introduction of low-cost acoustic Doppler velocity meters (ADVMs) in 1997. Presently (2011), the index velocity method is being used to compute discharge records for approximately 470 gaging stations operated and maintained by the U.S. Geological Survey. The purpose of this report is to document and describe techniques for computing discharge records using the index velocity method. Computing discharge using the index velocity method differs from the traditional stage-discharge method by separating velocity and area into two ratings—the index velocity rating and the stage-area rating. The outputs from each of these ratings, mean channel velocity (V) and cross-sectional area (A), are then multiplied together to compute a discharge. For the index velocity method, V is a function of such parameters as streamwise velocity, stage, cross-stream velocity, and velocity head, and A is a function of stage and cross-section shape. The index velocity method can be used at locations where stage-discharge methods are used, but it is especially appropriate when more than one specific discharge can be measured for a specific stage. After the ADVM is selected, installed, and configured, the stage-area rating and the index velocity rating must be developed. A standard cross section is identified and surveyed in order to develop the stage-area rating. The standard cross section should be surveyed every year for the first 3 years of operation and thereafter at a lesser frequency, depending on the susceptibility of the cross section to change. Periodic measurements of discharge are used to calibrate and validate the index rating for the range of conditions experienced at the gaging station. Data from discharge measurements, ADVMs, and stage sensors are compiled for index-rating analysis. Index ratings are developed by means of regression

  19. [Doppler ultrasound of penis arteries].

    PubMed

    Jünemann, K P; Siegsmund, M; Löbelenz, M; Alken, P

    1990-05-01

    In addition to pharmaco testing, pharmaco-Doppler sonography of the penile arteries is part of the basic work-up for erectile dysfunction. Insufficient training with the Doppler method, lack of standardized criteria for evaluation of the penis, and analysis of the Doppler curves all make it difficult to use Doppler sonography for the evaluation of impotent men. The aim of this study was to explain the principal criteria of the method and demonstrate the most important details for analyzing the form of the Doppler waves. Pharmaco-Doppler sonography includes the evaluation of blood-flow velocities within the dorsal and deep cavernous arteries of the penis before and after intracavernous application of a vasoactive drug. The following main criteria have proven to be most important for analysis of the Doppler curves: evaluation of the amplitude height, the actual wave form, differences between the left and right arteries and along the individual vessel, amplitude increase, and elevation of the curve baseline after pharmaco stimulation. The most frequent mistakes made during evaluation of the penile arteries are changes in the probe angle, pressure put on the artery by the probe during evaluation and a false estimation of the evaluation time after pharmaco stimulation. Recently, duplex sonography of the penile arteries has been introduced, and this method allows an accurate measurement of the blood-flow velocity and arterial diameter changes before and after application of the drug. Furthermore, additional calculation of the resistancy index permits determination of the vascular resistance and optimizes the evaluation of the penile arterial status. The technical details, the method, and the analyzation criteria are all explained in detail.

  20. Optical Doppler tomography and spectral Doppler imaging of localized ischemic stroke in a mouse model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Lingfeng; Nguyen, Elaine; Liu, Gangjun; Rao, Bin; Choi, Bernard; Chen, Zhongping

    2010-02-01

    We present a combined optical Doppler tomography/spectral Doppler imaging modality to quantitatively evaluate the dynamic blood circulation and the artery blockage before and after a localized ischemic stroke in a mouse model. Optical Doppler Tomography (ODT) combines the Doppler principle with optical coherence tomography for noninvasive localization and measurement of particle flow velocity in highly scattering media with micrometer scale spatial resolution. Spectral Doppler imaging (SDI) provides complementary temporal flow information to the spatially distributed flow information of Doppler imaging. Fast, repeated, ODT scans across an entire vessel were performed to record flow dynamic information with high temporal resolution of cardiac cycles. Spectral Doppler analysis of continuous Doppler images demonstrates how the velocity components and longitudinally projected flow-volume-rate change over time for scatters within the imaging volume using spectral Doppler waveforms. Furthermore, vascular conditions can be quantified with various Doppler-angle-independent flow indices. Non-invasive in-vivo mice experiments were performed to evaluate microvascular blood circulation of a localized ischemic stroke mouse model.

  1. Rain Fallspeeds and Rates Derived from Airborne Nadir-Pointing Doppler Radar Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heymsfield, Gerald M.; Tian, L.; Geerts, Bart

    1999-01-01

    The use of vertical-incidence Doppler velocity in addition to radar reflectivity may yield information on drop size distribution and therefore result in better rainrate estimates. Doppler velocity can provide useful information on the raindrop size distribution. Doppler velocities from a zenith-pointing radar represent the sum of the mean reflectivity-weighted hydrometeor fallspeed and the vertical air motion. Dual-parameter rain estimation methods using the Doppler velocity, require that the latter can be removed, or is negligible. Atlas et al. (1972) derived relations between Doppler velocity, reflectivity, and rain rate assuming an exponential size distribution for rain. Ulbrich (1994) expanded on this work by deriving the relation between the Doppler velocity and the reflectivity assuming a Gamma size distribution. This distribution provides a more realistic representation of the small rain drops. To get accurate information on raindrop size distributions with the above method, the air motions must be removed from the observed Doppler velocities

  2. Stability of ion acoustic solitary waves in a magnetized plasma consisting of warm adiabatic ions and non-thermal electrons having vortex-like velocity distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Jayasree; Bandyopadhyay, Anup; Das, K. P.; Das

    2014-02-01

    Schamel's modified Korteweg-de Vries-Zakharov-Kuznetsov (S-ZK) equation, governing the behavior of long wavelength, weak nonlinear ion acoustic waves propagating obliquely to an external uniform static magnetic field in a plasma consisting of warm adiabatic ions and non-thermal electrons (due to the presence of fast energetic electrons) having vortex-like velocity distribution function (due to the presence of trapped electrons), immersed in a uniform (space-independent) and static (time-independent) magnetic field, admits solitary wave solutions having a sech 4 profile. The higher order stability of this solitary wave solution of the S-ZK equation has been analyzed with the help of multiple-scale perturbation expansion method of Allen and Rowlands (Allen, M. A. and Rowlands, G. 1993 J. Plasma Phys. 50, 413; 1995 J. Plasma Phys. 53, 63). The growth rate of instability is obtained correct to the order k 2, where k is the wave number of a long wavelength plane wave perturbation. It is found that the lowest order (at the order k) instability condition is strongly sensitive to the angle of propagation (δ) of the solitary wave with the external uniform static magnetic field, whereas at the next order (at the order k 2) the solitary wave solutions of the S-ZK equation are unstable irrespective of δ. It is also found that the growth rate of instability up to the order k 2 for the electrons having Boltzmann distribution is higher than that of the non-thermal electrons having vortex-like distribution for any fixed δ.

  3. Modeling of spray combustion in an acoustic field

    SciTech Connect

    Dubey, R.K.; McQuay, M.Q.; Carvalho, J.A. Jr.

    1998-07-01

    Combustion characteristics of an ethanol flame in a Rijke-tube, pulse combustor was theoretically studied to analyze the effects of injection velocity, burner location, droplet size distribution, surrounding gas velocity, and droplet phase difference on Sauter-mean diameter. The effects of these parameters were studied at first (80 Hz), second (160 Hz), and third (240 Hz) acoustic modes with steady (no oscillations) case as reference. The sound pressure level was kept constant at 150 decibels for all theoretical simulations. The simulation frequencies and sound pressure level was selected to match the actual conditions inside the rector. For all simulations, actual droplet size and velocity distributions, as experimentally measured using a phase-Doppler particle analyzer, at the injector exit were used. Significant effects on spray size distributions were found when the burning droplets were placed at the locations corresponding to the maximum acoustic velocity amplitude. Also, for both simulations and experimental results, the Sauter-mean diameters were higher for oscillating conditions compared to steady value because small droplets burn faster under an acoustic field and therefore, Sauter-mean diameter, which is biased towards larger droplets, increases.

  4. Doppler tomography in fusion plasmas and astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salewski, M.; Geiger, B.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Jacobsen, A. S.; Korsholm, S. B.; Leipold, F.; Madsen, J.; Moseev, D.; Nielsen, S. K.; Rasmussen, J.; Stagner, L.; Steeghs, D.; Stejner, M.; Tardini, G.; Weiland, M.

    2015-01-01

    Doppler tomography is a well-known method in astrophysics to image the accretion flow, often in the shape of thin discs, in compact binary stars. As accretion discs rotate, all emitted line radiation is Doppler-shifted. In fast-ion Dα (FIDA) spectroscopy measurements in magnetically confined plasma, the Dα-photons are likewise Doppler-shifted ultimately due to gyration of the fast ions. In either case, spectra of Doppler-shifted line emission are sensitive to the velocity distribution of the emitters. Astrophysical Doppler tomography has lead to images of accretion discs of binaries revealing bright spots, spiral structures and flow patterns. Fusion plasma Doppler tomography has led to an image of the fast-ion velocity distribution function in the tokamak ASDEX Upgrade. This image matched numerical simulations very well. Here we discuss achievements of the Doppler tomography approach, its promise and limits, analogies and differences in astrophysical and fusion plasma Doppler tomography and what can be learned by comparison of these applications.

  5. Normal Echocardiographic Measurements in a Korean Population Study: Part II. Doppler and Tissue Doppler Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jin-Oh; Shin, Mi-Seung; Kim, Mi-Jeong; Jung, Hae Ok; Park, Jeong Rang; Sohn, Il Suk; Kim, Hyungseop; Park, Seong-Mi; Yoo, Nam Jin; Choi, Jung Hyun; Kim, Hyung-Kwan; Cho, Goo-Yeong; Lee, Mi-Rae; Park, Jin-Sun; Shim, Chi Young; Kim, Dae-Hee; Shin, Dae-Hee; Shin, Gil Ja; Shin, Sung Hee; Kim, Kye Hun; Park, Jae-Hyeong; Lee, Sang Yeub; Kim, Woo-Shik

    2016-01-01

    Background Hemodynamic and functional evaluation with Doppler and tissue Doppler study as a part of comprehensive echocardiography is essential but normal reference values have never been reported from Korean normal population especially according to age and sex. Methods Using Normal echOcaRdiographic Measurements in a KoreAn popuLation study subjects, we obtained normal reference values for Doppler and tissue Doppler echocardiography including tricuspid annular velocities according to current guidelines and compared values according to gender and age groups. Results Mitral early diastolic (E) and late diastolic (A) velocity as well as E/A ratio were significantly higher in women compared to those in men. Conversely, mitral peak systolic and late diastolic annular velocity in both septal and lateral mitral annulus were significantly lower in women compared to those in men. However, there were no significant differences in both septal and lateral mitral early diastolic annular (e') velocity between men and women. In both men and women, mitral E velocity and its deceleration time as well as both E/A and E/e' ratio considerably increased with age. There were no significant differences in tricuspid inflow velocities and tricuspid lateral annular velocities between men and women except e' velocity, which was significantly higher in women compared to that in men. However, changes in both tricuspid inflow and lateral annular velocities according to age were similar to those in mitral velocities. Conclusion Since there were significant differences in Doppler and tissue Doppler echocardiographic variables between men and women and changes according to age were even more considerable in both gender groups, normal Doppler echocardiographic values should be differentially applied based on age and sex. PMID:27358707

  6. Doppler lidar results from the San Gorgonio Pass experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliff, W. C.; Skarda, J. R.; Renne, D. S.

    1984-01-01

    During FY-84, the Doppler Lidar data from the San Gorgonio Pass experiments were analyzed, evaluated, and interpreted with regard to signal strength, signal width, magnitude and direction of velocity component and a goodness parameter associated with the expected noise level of the signal. From these parameters, a screening criteria was developed to eliminate questionable data. For the most part analysis supports the validity of Doppler Lidar data obtained at San Gorgonio Pass with respect to the mean velocity magnitude and direction. The question as to whether the Doppler width could be interpreted as a measure of the variance of the turbulence within the Doppler Lidar System (DLS) focal volume was not resolved. The stochastic nature of the Doppler broadening from finite residence time of the particles in the beam as well as other Doppler broadening phenomenon tend to mask the Doppler spread associated with small scale turbulence. Future tests with longer pulses may assist in better understanding.

  7. Acoustic biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Fogel, Ronen; Seshia, Ashwin A.

    2016-01-01

    Resonant and acoustic wave devices have been researched for several decades for application in the gravimetric sensing of a variety of biological and chemical analytes. These devices operate by coupling the measurand (e.g. analyte adsorption) as a modulation in the physical properties of the acoustic wave (e.g. resonant frequency, acoustic velocity, dissipation) that can then be correlated with the amount of adsorbed analyte. These devices can also be miniaturized with advantages in terms of cost, size and scalability, as well as potential additional features including integration with microfluidics and electronics, scaled sensitivities associated with smaller dimensions and higher operational frequencies, the ability to multiplex detection across arrays of hundreds of devices embedded in a single chip, increased throughput and the ability to interrogate a wider range of modes including within the same device. Additionally, device fabrication is often compatible with semiconductor volume batch manufacturing techniques enabling cost scalability and a high degree of precision and reproducibility in the manufacturing process. Integration with microfluidics handling also enables suitable sample pre-processing/separation/purification/amplification steps that could improve selectivity and the overall signal-to-noise ratio. Three device types are reviewed here: (i) bulk acoustic wave sensors, (ii) surface acoustic wave sensors, and (iii) micro/nano-electromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS) sensors. PMID:27365040

  8. Acoustic biosensors.

    PubMed

    Fogel, Ronen; Limson, Janice; Seshia, Ashwin A

    2016-06-30

    Resonant and acoustic wave devices have been researched for several decades for application in the gravimetric sensing of a variety of biological and chemical analytes. These devices operate by coupling the measurand (e.g. analyte adsorption) as a modulation in the physical properties of the acoustic wave (e.g. resonant frequency, acoustic velocity, dissipation) that can then be correlated with the amount of adsorbed analyte. These devices can also be miniaturized with advantages in terms of cost, size and scalability, as well as potential additional features including integration with microfluidics and electronics, scaled sensitivities associated with smaller dimensions and higher operational frequencies, the ability to multiplex detection across arrays of hundreds of devices embedded in a single chip, increased throughput and the ability to interrogate a wider range of modes including within the same device. Additionally, device fabrication is often compatible with semiconductor volume batch manufacturing techniques enabling cost scalability and a high degree of precision and reproducibility in the manufacturing process. Integration with microfluidics handling also enables suitable sample pre-processing/separation/purification/amplification steps that could improve selectivity and the overall signal-to-noise ratio. Three device types are reviewed here: (i) bulk acoustic wave sensors, (ii) surface acoustic wave sensors, and (iii) micro/nano-electromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS) sensors. PMID:27365040

  9. Improvement of Velocity Measurement Accuracy of Leaky Surface Acoustic Waves for Materials with Highly Attenuated Waveform of the V(z) curve by the Line-Focus-Beam Ultrasonic Material Characterization System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohashi, Yuji; Arakawa, Mototaka; Kushibiki, Jun‑ichi

    2006-05-01

    Measurement accuracies of leaky surface acoustic wave (LSAW) velocities for materials with highly attenuated waveforms of V(z) curves obtained by the line-focus-beam ultrasonic material characterization (LFB-UMC) system are investigated. Theoretical investigations were carried out and experiments were performed for TiO2-SiO2 glass (C-7972), Li2O-Al2O3-SiO2 glass ceramic (Zerodur\\textregistered), and (111) gadolinium gallium garnet (GGG) single crystal as specimens. Waveform attenuations of V(z) curves for C-7972 and Zerodur\\textregistered are greater than those for the (111) GGG single crystal. Frequency dependences of the waveform attenuations were calculated for each specimen by considering the propagation attenuation of LSAWs. The theoretical results revealed that the waveform attenuation dominantly depends upon the acoustic energy loss due to the water loading effect on the specimen surface, and that the waveform attenuation becomes smaller with decreasing frequency. Significant improvement of the measurement precision of LSAW velocities was demonstrated for each specimen using three LFB ultrasonic devices with different curvature radii R of the cylindrical acoustic lenses: R=2.0 mm at 75 MHz, R=1.5 mm at 110 MHz, and R=1.0 mm at 225 MHz; for C-7972, the precisions were improved from ± 0.0053% at 225 MHz to ± 0.0020% at 75 MHz.

  10. SU-D-210-07: The Dependence On Acoustic Velocity of Medium On the Needle Template and Electronic Grid Alignment in Ultrasound QA for Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kapoor, P; Kapoor, R; Curran, B

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To analyze the impact on acoustic velocity (AV) of two different media (water and milk) using the needle template/electronic grid alignment test. Water, easily available, makes a good material to test the alignment of the template and grid although water’s AV (1498 m/s at 25°C) is significantly different from tissue (1540 m/s). Milk, with an AV much closer (1548 m/s) to prostate tissue, may be a good substitute for water in ultrasound quality assurance testing. Methods: Tests were performed using a Hitachi ultrasound unit with a mechanical arrangement designed to position needles parallel to the transducer. In this work, two materials – distilled water and homogenized whole milk (AVs of 1498 and 1548 m/s at 25°C) were used in a phantom to test ultrasound needle/grid alignment. The images were obtained with both materials and analyzed for their placement accuracy. Results: The needle template/electronic grid alignment tests showed displacement errors between measured and calculated values. The measurements showed displacements of 2.3mm (water) and 0.4mm (milk), and 1.6mm (water) and 0.3mm (milk) at depths of 7cm and 5cm respectively from true needle positions. The calculated results showed a displacement of 2.36 mm (water); 0.435mm (milk), and 1.66mm (water) and 0.31mm (milk) at a depth of 7cm and 5cm respectively. The displacements in the X and Y directions were also calculated. At depths of 7cm and 5cm, the (ΔX,ΔY) displacements in water were (0.829mm, 2.21mm) and (0.273mm, 1.634mm) and for milk were (0.15mm, 0.44mm) and (0.05mm, 0.302mm) respectively. Conclusion: The measured and calculated values were in good agreement for all tests. They show that milk provides superior results when performing needle template and electronic grid alignment tests for ultrasound units used in prostate brachytherapy.

  11. Ultrasonic bistatic Doppler sonar in air for personnel motion detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekimov, Alexander; Hickey, Craig J.

    2012-06-01

    The National Center for Physical Acoustics (NCPA) at the University of Mississippi is working on the application of ultrasonic Doppler sonars in air for personnel motion detection. Two traditional Doppler sonar configurations, a monostatic and a bistatic, are being studied. In the monostatic configuration, the distance between the transmitter and the receiver is small. The proximity of the source to the receiver places a limitation on the system associated with the overloading of the receivers' input due to acoustic energy leakage from the transmitters' output. The maximum range of detection is therefore limited by the dynamic range of the acquisition system. In a bistatic Doppler ultrasonic sonar, the source and receiver are spaced apart and the acoustic energy along the direct path does not constrain the maximum acoustic power level output of the transmitter. In a monostatic configuration the acoustic signal suffers from beam spreading and natural absorption during propagation from the transmitter to the target and from the target back to the receiver. In a bistatic configuration the acoustic propagation is in one direction only and theoretically the detection distance can be twice the monostatic distance. For comparison the experiments of a human walking in a building hallway using the bistatic and monostaic Doppler sonars in air were conducted. The experimental results for human signatures from these Doppler sonars are presented and discussed.

  12. Tangential velocity measurement using interferometric MTI radar

    DOEpatents

    Doerry, Armin W.; Mileshosky, Brian P.; Bickel, Douglas L.

    2006-01-03

    Radar systems use time delay measurements between a transmitted signal and its echo to calculate range to a target. Ranges that change with time cause a Doppler offset in phase and frequency of the echo. Consequently, the closing velocity between target and radar can be measured by measuring the Doppler offset of the echo. The closing velocity is also known as radial velocity, or line-of-sight velocity. Doppler frequency is measured in a pulse-Doppler radar as a linear phase shift over a set of radar pulses during some Coherent Processing Interval (CPI). An Interferometric Moving Target Indicator (MTI) radar can be used to measure the tangential velocity component of a moving target. Multiple baselines, along with the conventional radial velocity measurement, allow estimating the true 3-D velocity of a target.

  13. Three-channel three-dimensional self-mixing thin-slice solid-state laser-Doppler measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Ohtomo, Takayuki; Sudo, Seiichi; Otsuka, Kenju

    2009-01-20

    We report successful real-time three-channel self-mixing laser-Doppler measurements with extreme optical sensitivity using a laser-diode-pumped thin-slice Nd:GdVO4 laser in the carrier-frequency-division-multiplexing scheme with three pairs of acoustic optical modulators (i.e., frequency shifters) and a three-channel FM-wave demodulation circuit. We demonstrate (1) simultaneous independent measurement of three different nanometer-vibrating targets, (2) simultaneous measurements of small particles in Brownian motion from three directions, and (3) identification of the velocity vector of small particles moving in water flowing in a small-diameter glass pipe.

  14. Transcranial Doppler ultrasonography: From methodology to major clinical applications

    PubMed Central

    D’Andrea, Antonello; Conte, Marianna; Cavallaro, Massimo; Scarafile, Raffaella; Riegler, Lucia; Cocchia, Rosangela; Pezzullo, Enrica; Carbone, Andreina; Natale, Francesco; Santoro, Giuseppe; Caso, Pio; Russo, Maria Giovanna; Bossone, Eduardo; Calabrò, Raffaele

    2016-01-01

    Non-invasive Doppler ultrasonographic study of cerebral arteries [transcranial Doppler (TCD)] has been extensively applied on both outpatient and inpatient settings. It is performed placing a low-frequency (≤ 2 MHz) transducer on the scalp of the patient over specific acoustic windows, in order to visualize the intracranial arterial vessels and to evaluate the cerebral blood flow velocity and its alteration in many different conditions. Nowadays the most widespread indication for TCD in outpatient setting is the research of right to left shunting, responsable of so called “paradoxical embolism”, most often due to patency of foramen ovale which is responsable of the majority of cryptogenic strokes occuring in patients younger than 55 years old. TCD also allows to classify the grade of severity of such shunts using the so called “microembolic signal grading score”. In addition TCD has found many useful applications in neurocritical care practice. It is useful on both adults and children for day-to-day bedside assessment of critical conditions including vasospasm in subarachnoidal haemorrhage (caused by aneurysm rupture or traumatic injury), traumatic brain injury, brain stem death. It is used also to evaluate cerebral hemodynamic changes after stroke. It also allows to investigate cerebral pressure autoregulation and for the clinical evaluation of cerebral autoregulatory reserve. PMID:27468332

  15. Transcranial Doppler ultrasonography: From methodology to major clinical applications.

    PubMed

    D'Andrea, Antonello; Conte, Marianna; Cavallaro, Massimo; Scarafile, Raffaella; Riegler, Lucia; Cocchia, Rosangela; Pezzullo, Enrica; Carbone, Andreina; Natale, Francesco; Santoro, Giuseppe; Caso, Pio; Russo, Maria Giovanna; Bossone, Eduardo; Calabrò, Raffaele

    2016-07-26

    Non-invasive Doppler ultrasonographic study of cerebral arteries [transcranial Doppler (TCD)] has been extensively applied on both outpatient and inpatient settings. It is performed placing a low-frequency (≤ 2 MHz) transducer on the scalp of the patient over specific acoustic windows, in order to visualize the intracranial arterial vessels and to evaluate the cerebral blood flow velocity and its alteration in many different conditions. Nowadays the most widespread indication for TCD in outpatient setting is the research of right to left shunting, responsable of so called "paradoxical embolism", most often due to patency of foramen ovale which is responsable of the majority of cryptogenic strokes occuring in patients younger than 55 years old. TCD also allows to classify the grade of severity of such shunts using the so called "microembolic signal grading score". In addition TCD has found many useful applications in neurocritical care practice. It is useful on both adults and children for day-to-day bedside assessment of critical conditions including vasospasm in subarachnoidal haemorrhage (caused by aneurysm rupture or traumatic injury), traumatic brain injury, brain stem death. It is used also to evaluate cerebral hemodynamic changes after stroke. It also allows to investigate cerebral pressure autoregulation and for the clinical evaluation of cerebral autoregulatory reserve. PMID:27468332

  16. Transcranial Doppler ultrasonography: From methodology to major clinical applications.

    PubMed

    D'Andrea, Antonello; Conte, Marianna; Cavallaro, Massimo; Scarafile, Raffaella; Riegler, Lucia; Cocchia, Rosangela; Pezzullo, Enrica; Carbone, Andreina; Natale, Francesco; Santoro, Giuseppe; Caso, Pio; Russo, Maria Giovanna; Bossone, Eduardo; Calabrò, Raffaele

    2016-07-26

    Non-invasive Doppler ultrasonographic study of cerebral arteries [transcranial Doppler (TCD)] has been extensively applied on both outpatient and inpatient settings. It is performed placing a low-frequency (≤ 2 MHz) transducer on the scalp of the patient over specific acoustic windows, in order to visualize the intracranial arterial vessels and to evaluate the cerebral blood flow velocity and its alteration in many different conditions. Nowadays the most widespread indication for TCD in outpatient setting is the research of right to left shunting, responsable of so called "paradoxical embolism", most often due to patency of foramen ovale which is responsable of the majority of cryptogenic strokes occuring in patients younger than 55 years old. TCD also allows to classify the grade of severity of such shunts using the so called "microembolic signal grading score". In addition TCD has found many useful applications in neurocritical care practice. It is useful on both adults and children for day-to-day bedside assessment of critical conditions including vasospasm in subarachnoidal haemorrhage (caused by aneurysm rupture or traumatic injury), traumatic brain injury, brain stem death. It is used also to evaluate cerebral hemodynamic changes after stroke. It also allows to investigate cerebral pressure autoregulation and for the clinical evaluation of cerebral autoregulatory reserve.

  17. Eulerian mean surface velocity field derived by combining drifter and satellite altimeter data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, Hiroshi; Imawaki, Shiro

    2003-03-01

    Combining surface drifter and satellite altimeter data,we estimate Eulerian mean sea-surface velocity with a resolution of quarter degrees in both latitude and longitude. The Eulerian mean velocity is calculated by subtracting the altimeter-derived velocity anomaly (i.e., deviation from the temporal mean) at the time when a drifter measured the surface velocity, from this drifter-measured velocity. The method is applied to the surface flow of the North Pacific, using TOPEX/POSEIDON and ERS-1/2 altimeter data, and WOCE-TOGA surface drifter data obtained during October 1992 to January 2001. The estimated Eulerian mean velocities for the Kuroshio south of Japan and the Kuroshio Extension region tend to be smaller than simple averages of drifter-derived velocities by 20 to 50 cm sec-1. The instantaneous velocities are obtained every ten days as sums of the Eulerian mean velocities and velocity anomalies. They agree well with in situ surface velocities measured by acoustic Doppler current profilers.

  18. An inexpensive instrument for measuring wave exposure and water velocity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Figurski, J.D.; Malone, D.; Lacy, J.R.; Denny, M.

    2011-01-01

    Ocean waves drive a wide variety of nearshore physical processes, structuring entire ecosystems through their direct and indirect effects on the settlement, behavior, and survivorship of marine organisms. However, wave exposure remains difficult and expensive to measure. Here, we report on an inexpensive and easily constructed instrument for measuring wave-induced water velocities. The underwater relative swell kinetics instrument (URSKI) is a subsurface float tethered by a short (<1 m) line to the seafloor. Contained within the float is an accelerometer that records the tilt of the float in response to passing waves. During two field trials totaling 358 h, we confirmed the accuracy and precision of URSKI measurements through comparison to velocities measured by an in situ acoustic Doppler velocimeter and those predicted by a standard swell model, and we evaluated how the dimensions of the devices, its buoyancy, and sampli