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Sample records for acoustic emission signals

  1. Pulse analysis of acoustic emission signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houghton, J. R.; Packman, P. F.

    1977-01-01

    A method for the signature analysis of pulses in the frequency domain and the time domain is presented. Fourier spectrum, Fourier transfer function, shock spectrum and shock spectrum ratio were examined in the frequency domain analysis and pulse shape deconvolution was developed for use in the time domain analysis. Comparisons of the relative performance of each analysis technique are made for the characterization of acoustic emission pulses recorded by a measuring system. To demonstrate the relative sensitivity of each of the methods to small changes in the pulse shape, signatures of computer modeled systems with analytical pulses are presented. Optimization techniques are developed and used to indicate the best design parameter values for deconvolution of the pulse shape. Several experiments are presented that test the pulse signature analysis methods on different acoustic emission sources. These include acoustic emission associated with (a) crack propagation, (b) ball dropping on a plate, (c) spark discharge, and (d) defective and good ball bearings. Deconvolution of the first few micro-seconds of the pulse train is shown to be the region in which the significant signatures of the acoustic emission event are to be found.

  2. Pulse analysis of acoustic emission signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houghton, J. R.; Packman, P. F.

    1977-01-01

    A method for the signature analysis of pulses in the frequency domain and the time domain is presented. Fourier spectrum, Fourier transfer function, shock spectrum and shock spectrum ratio were examined in the frequency domain analysis, and pulse shape deconvolution was developed for use in the time domain analysis. Comparisons of the relative performance of each analysis technique are made for the characterization of acoustic emission pulses recorded by a measuring system. To demonstrate the relative sensitivity of each of the methods to small changes in the pulse shape, signatures of computer modeled systems with analytical pulses are presented. Optimization techniques are developed and used to indicate the best design parameters values for deconvolution of the pulse shape. Several experiments are presented that test the pulse signature analysis methods on different acoustic emission sources. These include acoustic emissions associated with: (1) crack propagation, (2) ball dropping on a plate, (3) spark discharge and (4) defective and good ball bearings. Deconvolution of the first few micro-seconds of the pulse train are shown to be the region in which the significant signatures of the acoustic emission event are to be found.

  3. Modeling of Acoustic Emission Signal Propagation in Waveguides

    PubMed Central

    Zelenyak, Andreea-Manuela; Hamstad, Marvin A.; Sause, Markus G. R.

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) testing is a widely used nondestructive testing (NDT) method to investigate material failure. When environmental conditions are harmful for the operation of the sensors, waveguides are typically mounted in between the inspected structure and the sensor. Such waveguides can be built from different materials or have different designs in accordance with the experimental needs. All these variations can cause changes in the acoustic emission signals in terms of modal conversion, additional attenuation or shift in frequency content. A finite element method (FEM) was used to model acoustic emission signal propagation in an aluminum plate with an attached waveguide and was validated against experimental data. The geometry of the waveguide is systematically changed by varying the radius and height to investigate the influence on the detected signals. Different waveguide materials were implemented and change of material properties as function of temperature were taken into account. Development of the option of modeling different waveguide options replaces the time consuming and expensive trial and error alternative of experiments. Thus, the aim of this research has important implications for those who use waveguides for AE testing. PMID:26007731

  4. Acoustic emission descriptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witos, Franciszek; Malecki, Ignacy

    The authors present selected problems associated with acoustic emission interpreted as a physical phenomenon and as a measurement technique. The authors examine point sources of acoustic emission in isotropic, homogeneous linearly elastic media of different shapes. In the case of an unbounded medium the authors give the analytical form of the stress field and the wave shift field of the acoustic emission. In the case of a medium which is unbounded plate the authors give a form for the equations which is suitable for numerical calculation of the changes over time of selected acoustic emission values. For acoustic emission as a measurement technique, the authors represent the output signal as the resultant of a mechanical input value which describes the source, the transient function of the medium, and the transient function of specific components of the measurement loop. As an effect of this notation, the authors introduce the distinction between an acoustic measurement signal and an acoustic measurement impulse. The authors define the basic parameters of an arbitrary impulse. The authors extensively discuss the signal functions of acoustic emission impulses and acoustic emission signals defined in this article as acoustic emission descriptors (or signal functions of acoustic emission impulses) and advanced acoustic emission descriptors (which are either descriptors associated with acoustic emission applications or the signal functions of acoustic emission signals). The article also contains the results of experimental research on three different problems in which acoustic emission descriptors associated with acoustic emission pulses, acoustic emission applications, and acoustic emission signals are used. These problems are respectively: a problem of the amplitude-load characteristics of acoustic emission pulses in carbon samples subjected to compound uniaxial compression, the use of acoustic emission to predict the durability characteristics of conveyor belts, and

  5. Acoustic emission frequency discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sugg, Frank E. (Inventor); Graham, Lloyd J. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    In acoustic emission nondestructive testing, broadband frequency noise is distinguished from narrow banded acoustic emission signals, since the latter are valid events indicative of structural flaws in the material being examined. This is accomplished by separating out those signals which contain frequency components both within and beyond (either above or below) the range of valid acoustic emission events. Application to acoustic emission monitoring during nondestructive bond verification and proof loading of undensified tiles on the Space Shuttle Orbiter is considered.

  6. Acoustic Emission Signals in Thin Plates Produced by Impact Damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, William H.; Gorman, Michael R.; Humes, Donald H.

    1999-01-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) signals created by impact sources in thin aluminum and graphite/epoxy composite plates were analyzed. Two different impact velocity regimes were studied. Low-velocity (less than 0.21 km/s) impacts were created with an airgun firing spherical steel projectiles (4.5 mm diameter). High-velocity (1.8 to 7 km/s) impacts were generated with a two-stage light-gas gun firing small cylindrical nylon projectiles (1.5 mm diameter). Both the impact velocity and impact angle were varied. The impacts did not penetrate the aluminum plates at either low or high velocities. For high-velocity impacts in composites, there were both impacts that fully penetrated the plate as well as impacts that did not. All impacts generated very large amplitude AE signals (1-5 V at the sensor), which propagated as plate (extensional and/or flexural) modes. In the low-velocity impact studies, the signal was dominated by a large flexural mode with only a small extensional mode component detected. As the impact velocity was increased within the low velocity regime, the overall amplitudes of both the extensional and flexural modes increased. In addition, a relative increase in the amplitude of high-frequency components of the flexural mode was also observed. Signals caused by high-velocity impacts that did not penetrate the plate contained both a large extensional and flexural mode component of comparable amplitudes. The signals also contained components of much higher frequency and were easily differentiated from those caused by low-velocity impacts. An interesting phenomenon was observed in that the large flexural mode component, seen in every other case, was absent from the signal when the impact particle fully penetrated through the composite plates.

  7. Acoustic emission source localization based on distance domain signal representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gawronski, M.; Grabowski, K.; Russek, P.; Staszewski, W. J.; Uhl, T.; Packo, P.

    2016-04-01

    Acoustic emission is a vital non-destructive testing technique and is widely used in industry for damage detection, localisation and characterization. The latter two aspects are particularly challenging, as AE data are typically noisy. What is more, elastic waves generated by an AE event, propagate through a structural path and are significantly distorted. This effect is particularly prominent for thin elastic plates. In these media the dispersion phenomenon results in severe localisation and characterization issues. Traditional Time Difference of Arrival methods for localisation techniques typically fail when signals are highly dispersive. Hence, algorithms capable of dispersion compensation are sought. This paper presents a method based on the Time - Distance Domain Transform for an accurate AE event localisation. The source localisation is found through a minimization problem. The proposed technique focuses on transforming the time signal to the distance domain response, which would be recorded at the source. Only, basic elastic material properties and plate thickness are used in the approach, avoiding arbitrary parameters tuning.

  8. Pulse analysis of acoustic emission signals. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houghton, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    A method for the signature analysis of pulses in the frequency domain and the time domain is presented. Fourier spectrum, Fourier transfer function, shock spectrum and shock spectrum ratio are examined in the frequency domain analysis, and pulse shape deconvolution is developed for use in the time domain analysis. To demonstrate the relative sensitivity of each of the methods to small changes in the pulse shape, signatures of computer modeled systems with analytical pulses are presented. Optimization techniques are developed and used to indicate the best design parameters values for deconvolution of the pulse shape. Several experiments are presented that test the pulse signature analysis methods on different acoustic emission sources. These include acoustic emissions associated with: (1) crack propagation, (2) ball dropping on a plate, (3) spark discharge and (4) defective and good ball bearings.

  9. Estimation of the Tool Condition by Applying the Wavelet Transform to Acoustic Emission Signals

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, M. P.; Piotrkowski, R.; Ruzzante, J. E.; D'Attellis, C. E.

    2007-03-21

    This work follows the search of parameters to evaluate the tool condition in machining processes. The selected sensing technique is acoustic emission and it is applied to a turning process of steel samples. The obtained signals are studied using the wavelet transformation. The tool wear level is quantified as a percentage of the final wear specified by the Standard ISO 3685. The amplitude and relevant scale obtained of acoustic emission signals could be related with the wear level.

  10. Acoustic emission signal classification for gearbox failure detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shishino, Jun

    The purpose of this research is to develop a methodology and technique to determine the optimal number of clusters in acoustic emission (AE) data obtained from a ground test stand of a rotating H-60 helicopter tail gearbox by using mathematical algorithms and visual inspection. Signs of fatigue crack growth were observed from the AE signals acquired from the result of the optimal number of clusters in a data set. Previous researches have determined the number of clusters by visually inspecting the AE plots from number of iterations. This research is focused on finding the optimal number of clusters in the data set by using mathematical algorithms then using visual verification to confirm it. The AE data were acquired from the ground test stand that simulates the tail end of an H-60 Seahawk at Naval Air Station in Patuxant River, Maryland. The data acquired were filtered to eliminate durations that were greater than 100,000 is and 0 energy hit data to investigate the failure mechanisms occurring on the output bevel gear. From the filtered data, different AE signal parameters were chosen to perform iterations to see which clustering algorithms and number of outputs is the best. The clustering algorithms utilized are the Kohonen Self-organizing Map (SOM), k-mean and Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM). From the clustering iterations, the three cluster criterion algorithms were performed to observe the suggested optimal number of cluster by the criterions. The three criterion algorithms utilized are the Davies-Bouldin, Silhouette and Tou Criterions. After the criterions had suggested the optimal number of cluster for each data set, visual verification by observing the AE plots and statistical analysis of each cluster were performed. By observing the AE plots and the statistical analysis, the optimal number of cluster in the data set and effective clustering algorithms were determined. Along with the optimal number of clusters and effective clustering algorithm, the mechanisms

  11. Introduction to acoustic emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Possa, G.

    1983-01-01

    Typical acoustic emission signal characteristics are described and techniques which localize the signal source by processing the acoustic delay data from multiple sensors are discussed. The instrumentation, which includes sensors, amplifiers, pulse counters, a minicomputer and output devices is examined. Applications are reviewed.

  12. Surface Roughness Evaluation Based on Acoustic Emission Signals in Robot Assisted Polishing

    PubMed Central

    de Agustina, Beatriz; Marín, Marta María; Teti, Roberto; Rubio, Eva María

    2014-01-01

    The polishing process is the most common technology used in applications where a high level of surface quality is demanded. The automation of polishing processes is especially difficult due to the high level of skill and dexterity that is required. Much of this difficulty arises because of the lack of reliable data on the effect of the polishing parameters on the resulting surface roughness. An experimental study was developed to evaluate the surface roughness obtained during Robot Assisted Polishing processes by the analysis of acoustic emission signals in the frequency domain. The aim is to find out a trend of a feature or features calculated from the acoustic emission signals detected along the process. Such an evaluation was made with the objective of collecting valuable information for the establishment of the end point detection of polishing process. As a main conclusion, it can be affirmed that acoustic emission (AE) signals can be considered useful to monitor the polishing process state. PMID:25405509

  13. Surface roughness evaluation based on acoustic emission signals in robot assisted polishing.

    PubMed

    de Agustina, Beatriz; Marín, Marta María; Teti, Roberto; Rubio, Eva María

    2014-11-14

    The polishing process is the most common technology used in applications where a high level of surface quality is demanded. The automation of polishing processes is especially difficult due to the high level of skill and dexterity that is required. Much of this difficulty arises because of the lack of reliable data on the effect of the polishing parameters on the resulting surface roughness. An experimental study was developed to evaluate the surface roughness obtained during Robot Assisted Polishing processes by the analysis of acoustic emission signals in the frequency domain. The aim is to find out a trend of a feature or features calculated from the acoustic emission signals detected along the process. Such an evaluation was made with the objective of collecting valuable information for the establishment of the end point detection of polishing process. As a main conclusion, it can be affirmed that acoustic emission (AE) signals can be considered useful to monitor the polishing process state.

  14. An information processing method for acoustic emission signal inspired from musical staff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Wei; Wu, Chunxian

    2016-01-01

    This study proposes a musical-staff-inspired signal processing method for standard description expressions for discrete signals and describing the integrated characteristics of acoustic emission (AE) signals. The method maps various AE signals with complex environments into the normalized musical space. Four new indexes are proposed to comprehensively describe the signal. Several key features, such as contour, amplitude, and signal changing rate, are quantitatively expressed in a normalized musical space. The processed information requires only a small storage space to maintain high fidelity. The method is illustrated by using experiments on sandstones and computed tomography (CT) scanning to determine its validity for AE signal processing.

  15. Study of acoustic emission signals during fracture shear deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostapchuk, A. A.; Pavlov, D. V.; Markov, V. K.; Krasheninnikov, A. V.

    2016-07-01

    We study acoustic manifestations of different regimes of shear deformation of a fracture filled with a thin layer of granular material. It is established that the observed acoustic portrait is determined by the structure of the fracture at the mesolevel. Joint analysis of the activity of acoustic pulses and their spectral characteristics makes it possible to construct the pattern of internal evolutionary processes occurring in the thin layer of the interblock contact and consider the fracture deformation process as the evolution of a self-organizing system.

  16. Frequency Characteristics of Acoustic Emission Signals from Cementitious Waste-forms with Encapsulated Al

    SciTech Connect

    Spasova, Lyubka M.; Ojovan, Michael I.

    2007-07-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) signals were continuously recorded and their intrinsic frequency characteristics examined in order to evaluate the mechanical performance of cementitious wasteform samples with encapsulated Al waste. The primary frequency in the power spectrum and its range of intensity for the detected acoustic waves were potentially related with appearance of different micro-mechanical events caused by Al corrosion within the encapsulating cement system. In addition the process of cement matrix hardening has been shown as a source of AE signals characterized with essentially higher primary frequency (above 2 MHz) compared with those due to Al corrosion development (below 40 kHz) and cement cracking (above 100 kHz). (authors)

  17. Data quality enhancement and knowledge discovery from relevant signals in acoustic emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mejia, Felipe; Shyu, Mei-Ling; Nanni, Antonio

    2015-10-01

    The increasing popularity of structural health monitoring has brought with it a growing need for automated data management and data analysis tools. Of great importance are filters that can systematically detect unwanted signals in acoustic emission datasets. This study presents a semi-supervised data mining scheme that detects data belonging to unfamiliar distributions. This type of outlier detection scheme is useful detecting the presence of new acoustic emission sources, given a training dataset of unwanted signals. In addition to classifying new observations (herein referred to as "outliers") within a dataset, the scheme generates a decision tree that classifies sub-clusters within the outlier context set. The obtained tree can be interpreted as a series of characterization rules for newly-observed data, and they can potentially describe the basic structure of different modes within the outlier distribution. The data mining scheme is first validated on a synthetic dataset, and an attempt is made to confirm the algorithms' ability to discriminate outlier acoustic emission sources from a controlled pencil-lead-break experiment. Finally, the scheme is applied to data from two fatigue crack-growth steel specimens, where it is shown that extracted rules can adequately describe crack-growth related acoustic emission sources while filtering out background "noise." Results show promising performance in filter generation, thereby allowing analysts to extract, characterize, and focus only on meaningful signals.

  18. Multi-scale morphology analysis of acoustic emission signal and quantitative diagnosis for bearing fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wen-Jing; Cui, Ling-Li; Chen, Dao-Yun

    2016-04-01

    Monitoring of potential bearing faults in operation is of critical importance to safe operation of high speed trains. One of the major challenges is how to differentiate relevant signals to operational conditions of bearings from noises emitted from the surrounding environment. In this work, we report a procedure for analyzing acoustic emission signals collected from rolling bearings for diagnosis of bearing health conditions by examining their morphological pattern spectrum (MPS) through a multi-scale morphology analysis procedure. The results show that acoustic emission signals resulted from a given type of bearing faults share rather similar MPS curves. Further examinations in terms of sample entropy and Lempel-Ziv complexity of MPS curves suggest that these two parameters can be utilized to determine damage modes.

  19. Punch stretching process monitoring using acoustic emission signal analysis. II - Application of frequency domain deconvolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, Steven Y.; Dornfeld, David A.; Nickerson, Jackson A.

    1987-01-01

    The coloring effect on the acoustic emission signal due to the frequency response of the data acquisition/processing instrumentation may bias the interpretation of AE signal characteristics. In this paper, a frequency domain deconvolution technique, which involves the identification of the instrumentation transfer functions and multiplication of the AE signal spectrum by the inverse of these system functions, has been carried out. In this way, the change in AE signal characteristics can be better interpreted as the result of the change in only the states of the process. Punch stretching process was used as an example to demonstrate the application of the technique. Results showed that, through the deconvolution, the frequency characteristics of AE signals generated during the stretching became more distinctive and can be more effectively used as tools for process monitoring.

  20. Problems Associated with Statistical Pattern Recognition of Acoustic Emission Signals in a Compact Tension Fatigue Specimen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinton, Yolanda L.

    1999-01-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) data were acquired during fatigue testing of an aluminum 2024-T4 compact tension specimen using a commercially available AE system. AE signals from crack extension were identified and separated from noise spikes, signals that reflected from the specimen edges, and signals that saturated the instrumentation. A commercially available software package was used to train a statistical pattern recognition system to classify the signals. The software trained a network to recognize signals with a 91-percent accuracy when compared with the researcher's interpretation of the data. Reasons for the discrepancies are examined and it is postulated that additional preprocessing of the AE data to focus on the extensional wave mode and eliminate other effects before training the pattern recognition system will result in increased accuracy.

  1. Extruded Bread Classification on the Basis of Acoustic Emission Signal With Application of Artificial Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Świetlicka, Izabela; Muszyński, Siemowit; Marzec, Agata

    2015-04-01

    The presented work covers the problem of developing a method of extruded bread classification with the application of artificial neural networks. Extruded flat graham, corn, and rye breads differening in water activity were used. The breads were subjected to the compression test with simultaneous registration of acoustic signal. The amplitude-time records were analyzed both in time and frequency domains. Acoustic emission signal parameters: single energy, counts, amplitude, and duration acoustic emission were determined for the breads in four water activities: initial (0.362 for rye, 0.377 for corn, and 0.371 for graham bread), 0.432, 0.529, and 0.648. For classification and the clustering process, radial basis function, and self-organizing maps (Kohonen network) were used. Artificial neural networks were examined with respect to their ability to classify or to cluster samples according to the bread type, water activity value, and both of them. The best examination results were achieved by the radial basis function network in classification according to water activity (88%), while the self-organizing maps network yielded 81% during bread type clustering.

  2. Acoustic emission intrusion detector

    DOEpatents

    Carver, Donald W.; Whittaker, Jerry W.

    1980-01-01

    An intrusion detector is provided for detecting a forcible entry into a secured structure while minimizing false alarms. The detector uses a piezoelectric crystal transducer to sense acoustic emissions. The transducer output is amplified by a selectable gain amplifier to control the sensitivity. The rectified output of the amplifier is applied to a Schmitt trigger circuit having a preselected threshold level to provide amplitude discrimination. Timing circuitry is provided which is activated by successive pulses from the Schmitt trigger which lie within a selected time frame for frequency discrimination. Detected signals having proper amplitude and frequency trigger an alarm within the first complete cycle time of a detected acoustical disturbance signal.

  3. Experimental Research Into Generation of Acoustic Emission Signals in the Process of Friction of Hadfield Steel Single Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lychagin, D. V.; Filippov, A. V.; Novitskaia, O. S.; Kolubaev, E. A.; Sizova, O. V.

    2016-08-01

    The results of experimental research into dry sliding friction of Hadfield steel single crystals involving registration of acoustic emission are presented in the paper. The images of friction surfaces of Hadfield steel single crystals and wear grooves of the counterbody surface made after completion of three serial experiments conducted under similar conditions and friction regimes are given. The relation of the acoustic emission waveform envelope to the changing friction factor is revealed. Amplitude-frequency characteristics of acoustic emission signal frames are determined on the base of Fast Fourier Transform and Short Time Fourier Transform during the run-in stage of tribounits and in the process of stable friction.

  4. Influence of attenuation on acoustic emission signals in carbon fiber reinforced polymer panels.

    PubMed

    Asamene, Kassahun; Hudson, Larry; Sundaresan, Mannur

    2015-05-01

    Influence of attenuation on acoustic emission (AE) signals in Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) crossply and quasi-isotropic panels is examined in this paper. Attenuation coefficients of the fundamental antisymmetric (A0) and symmetric (S0) wave modes were determined experimentally along different directions for the two types of CFRP panels. In the frequency range from 100 kHz to 500 kHz, the A0 mode undergoes significantly greater changes due to material related attenuation compared to the S0 mode. Moderate to strong changes in the attenuation levels were noted with propagation directions. Such mode and frequency dependent attenuation introduces major changes in the characteristics of AE signals depending on the position of the AE sensor relative to the source. Results from finite element simulations of a microscopic damage event in the composite laminates are used to illustrate attenuation related changes in modal and frequency components of AE signals.

  5. Clustering reveals cavitation-related acoustic emission signals from dehydrating branches.

    PubMed

    Vergeynst, Lidewei L; Sause, Markus G R; De Baerdemaeker, Niels J F; De Roo, Linus; Steppe, Kathy

    2016-06-01

    The formation of air emboli in the xylem during drought is one of the key processes leading to plant mortality due to loss in hydraulic conductivity, and strongly fuels the interest in quantifying vulnerability to cavitation. The acoustic emission (AE) technique can be used to measure hydraulic conductivity losses and construct vulnerability curves. For years, it has been believed that all the AE signals are produced by the formation of gas emboli in the xylem sap under tension. More recent experiments, however, demonstrate that gas emboli formation cannot explain all the signals detected during drought, suggesting that different sources of AE exist. This complicates the use of the AE technique to measure emboli formation in plants. We therefore analysed AE waveforms measured on branches of grapevine (Vitis vinifera L. 'Chardonnay') during bench dehydration with broadband sensors, and applied an automated clustering algorithm in order to find natural clusters of AE signals. We used AE features and AE activity patterns during consecutive dehydration phases to identify the different AE sources. Based on the frequency spectrum of the signals, we distinguished three different types of AE signals, of which the frequency cluster with high 100-200 kHz frequency content was strongly correlated with cavitation. Our results indicate that cavitation-related AE signals can be filtered from other AE sources, which presents a promising avenue into quantifying xylem embolism in plants in laboratory and field conditions. PMID:27095256

  6. Can acoustic emissions patterns signal imminence of avalanche events in a growing sand pile?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vögtli, Melanie; Lehmann, Peter; Breitenstein, Daniel; Or, Dani

    2014-05-01

    Gravity driven mass release is often triggered abruptly with limited precursory cues to indicate imminent failure and thus limiting early warning. Evidence suggests that with increased mechanical loading of a slope, numerous local damage events marking friction between rearranged particles or breakage of roots release strain energy as elastic waves measurable as acoustic emissions. We examined the potential predictability of mass release events from preceding acoustic emission (AE) signatures in a well-known and simple model system of a growing sand pile. We installed four AE-sensors within the core of a 30 cm (diameter) sand pile fed by a constant input of grains and mounted on a balance. Subsequent to the convergence of the slope to dynamic angle of repose, sand avalanche across the bottom boundary were monitored by abrupt mass change and by the amplitudes and number of AE events (recorded at high frequency and averaged to 0.2 s). We detected a systematic change of AE-patterns characterized by systematically decreasing AE standard deviation prior to each mass release. Although the lead time following minimum AE standard deviation was relatively short (10s of seconds), the AE signature already started to change minutes before the mass release. Accordingly the information embedded in AE signal dynamics could potentially offer larger lead times for systems of practical interest.

  7. Amplitude-Frequency Analysis of Signals of Acoustic Emission from Granite Fractured at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcherbakov, I. P.; Chmel‧, A. E.

    2015-05-01

    The problem of stability of underground structures serving to store radioactive waste, to gasify carbon, and to utilize geothermal energy is associated with the action of elevated temperatures and pressures. The acoustic-emission method makes it possible to monitor the accumulation of microcracks arising in stress fields of both thermal and mechanical origin. In this report, the authors give results of a laboratory investigation into the acoustic emission from granite subjected to impact fracture at temperatures of up to 600°C. An amplitude-frequency analysis of acousticemission signals has enabled the authors to evaluate the dimension of the arising microcracks and to determine their character (intergranular or intragranular). It has been shown that intergranular faults on the boundaries between identical minerals predominate at room temperature (purely mechanical action); at a temperature of 300°C (impact plus thermoelastic stresses), there also appear cracks on the quartz-feldspar boundaries; finally, at temperatures of 500-600°C, it is intragranular faults that predominate in feldspar. The dimensions of the above three types of microcracks are approximately 2, 0.8, and 0.3 mm respectively.

  8. Periodic shock-emission from acoustically driven cavitation clouds: a source of the subharmonic signal.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Keith; Tapia-Siles, Cecilia; Gerold, Bjoern; Postema, Michiel; Cochran, Sandy; Cuschieri, Alfred; Prentice, Paul

    2014-12-01

    Single clouds of cavitation bubbles, driven by 254kHz focused ultrasound at pressure amplitudes in the range of 0.48-1.22MPa, have been observed via high-speed shadowgraphic imaging at 1×10(6) frames per second. Clouds underwent repetitive growth, oscillation and collapse (GOC) cycles, with shock-waves emitted periodically at the instant of collapse during each cycle. The frequency of cloud collapse, and coincident shock-emission, was primarily dependent on the intensity of the focused ultrasound driving the activity. The lowest peak-to-peak pressure amplitude of 0.48MPa generated shock-waves with an average period of 7.9±0.5μs, corresponding to a frequency of f0/2, half-harmonic to the fundamental driving. Increasing the intensity gave rise to GOC cycles and shock-emission periods of 11.8±0.3, 15.8±0.3, 19.8±0.2μs, at pressure amplitudes of 0.64, 0.92 and 1.22MPa, corresponding to the higher-order subharmonics of f0/3, f0/4 and f0/5, respectively. Parallel passive acoustic detection, filtered for the fundamental driving, revealed features that correlated temporally to the shock-emissions observed via high-speed imaging, p(two-tailed) < 0.01 (r=0.996, taken over all data). Subtracting the isolated acoustic shock profiles from the raw signal collected from the detector, demonstrated the removal of subharmonic spectral peaks, in the frequency domain. The larger cavitation clouds (>200μm diameter, at maximum inflation), that developed under insonations of peak-to-peak pressure amplitudes >1.0MPa, emitted shock-waves with two or more fronts suggesting non-uniform collapse of the cloud. The observations indicate that periodic shock-emissions from acoustically driven cavitation clouds provide a source for the cavitation subharmonic signal, and that shock structure may be used to study intra-cloud dynamics at sub-microsecond timescales.

  9. A framework for the damage evaluation of acoustic emission signals through Hilbert-Huang transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siracusano, Giulio; Lamonaca, Francesco; Tomasello, Riccardo; Garescì, Francesca; Corte, Aurelio La; Carnì, Domenico Luca; Carpentieri, Mario; Grimaldi, Domenico; Finocchio, Giovanni

    2016-06-01

    The acoustic emission (AE) is a powerful and potential nondestructive testing method for structural monitoring in civil engineering. Here, we show how systematic investigation of crack phenomena based on AE data can be significantly improved by the use of advanced signal processing techniques. Such data are a fundamental source of information that can be used as the basis for evaluating the status of the material, thereby paving the way for a new frontier of innovation made by data-enabled analytics. In this article, we propose a framework based on the Hilbert-Huang Transform for the evaluation of material damages that (i) facilitates the systematic employment of both established and promising analysis criteria, and (ii) provides unsupervised tools to achieve an accurate classification of the fracture type, the discrimination between longitudinal (P-) and traversal (S-) waves related to an AE event. The experimental validation shows promising results for a reliable assessment of the health status through the monitoring of civil infrastructures.

  10. Monitoring Rock Failure Processes Using the Hilbert-Huang Transform of Acoustic Emission Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ji; Peng, Weihong; Liu, Fengyu; Zhang, Haixiang; Li, Zhijian

    2016-02-01

    Rock fracturing generates acoustic emission (AE) signals that have statistical parameters referred to as AE signal parameters (AESP). Identification of rock fracturing or the failure process stage using such data raises several challenges. This study proposes a Hilbert-Huang transform-based AE processing approach to capture the time-frequency characteristics of both AE signals and AESP during rock failure processes. The damage occurring in tested rock specimens can be illustrated through analysis using this method. In this study, the specimens were 25 × 60 × 150 mm3 in size and were compressed at a displacement rate of 0.05 mm/min until failure. The recorded data included force and displacement, AE signals, and AESP. The AESP in the last third of the strain range period and 14 typical moments of strong AE signals were selected for further investigation. These results show that AE signals and AESP can be jointly used for identification of deformation stages. The transition between linear and nonlinear deformation stages was found to last for a short period in this process. The instantaneous frequency of the AE effective energy rate increased linearly from 0.5 to 1.5 Hz. Attenuation of elastic waves spreading in rock samples developed with deformation, as illustrated in the Hilbert spectra of AE signals. This attenuation is frequency dependent. Furthermore, AE signals in the softening process showed a complex frequency distribution attributed to the mechanical properties of the tested specimen. The results indicate that rock failure is predictable. The novel technology applied in this study is feasible for analysis of the entire deformation process, including softening and failure processes.

  11. Correlation of infrared thermographic patterns and acoustic emission signals with tensile deformation and fracture processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkataraman, B.; Raj, Baldev; Mukhopadhyay, C. K.; Jayakumar, T.

    2001-04-01

    During tensile deformation, part of the mechanical work done on the specimen is transformed into heat and acoustic activity. The amount of acoustic activity and the thermal emissions depend on the test conditions and the deformation behavior of the specimen during loading. Authors have used thermography and acoustic emission (AE) simultaneously for monitoring tensile deformation in AISI type 316 SS. Tensile testing was carried out at 298 K at three different strain rates. It has been shown that the simultaneous use of these techniques can provide complementary information for characterizing the tensile deformation and fracture processes.

  12. Deciphering acoustic emission signals in drought stressed branches: the missing link between source and sensor

    PubMed Central

    Vergeynst, Lidewei L.; Sause, Markus G. R.; Hamstad, Marvin A.; Steppe, Kathy

    2015-01-01

    When drought occurs in plants, acoustic emission (AE) signals can be detected, but the actual causes of these signals are still unknown. By analyzing the waveforms of the measured signals, it should, however, be possible to trace the characteristics of the AE source and get information about the underlying physiological processes. A problem encountered during this analysis is that the waveform changes significantly from source to sensor and lack of knowledge on wave propagation impedes research progress made in this field. We used finite element modeling and the well-known pencil lead break source to investigate wave propagation in a branch. A cylindrical rod of polyvinyl chloride was first used to identify the theoretical propagation modes. Two wave propagation modes could be distinguished and we used the finite element model to interpret their behavior in terms of source position for both the PVC rod and a wooden rod. Both wave propagation modes were also identified in drying-induced signals from woody branches, and we used the obtained insights to provide recommendations for further AE research in plant science. PMID:26191070

  13. A methodology to condition distorted acoustic emission signals to identify fracture timing from human cadaver spine impact tests.

    PubMed

    Arun, Mike W J; Yoganandan, Narayan; Stemper, Brian D; Pintar, Frank A

    2014-12-01

    While studies have used acoustic sensors to determine fracture initiation time in biomechanical studies, a systematic procedure is not established to process acoustic signals. The objective of the study was to develop a methodology to condition distorted acoustic emission data using signal processing techniques to identify fracture initiation time. The methodology was developed from testing a human cadaver lumbar spine column. Acoustic sensors were glued to all vertebrae, high-rate impact loading was applied, load-time histories were recorded (load cell), and fracture was documented using CT. Compression fracture occurred to L1 while other vertebrae were intact. FFT of raw voltage-time traces were used to determine an optimum frequency range associated with high decibel levels. Signals were bandpass filtered in this range. Bursting pattern was found in the fractured vertebra while signals from other vertebrae were silent. Bursting time was associated with time of fracture initiation. Force at fracture was determined using this time and force-time data. The methodology is independent of selecting parameters a priori such as fixing a voltage level(s), bandpass frequency and/or using force-time signal, and allows determination of force based on time identified during signal processing. The methodology can be used for different body regions in cadaver experiments.

  14. Detection of Cracking Levels in Brittle Rocks by Parametric Analysis of the Acoustic Emission Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradian, Zabihallah; Einstein, Herbert H.; Ballivy, Gerard

    2016-03-01

    Determination of the cracking levels during the crack propagation is one of the key challenges in the field of fracture mechanics of rocks. Acoustic emission (AE) is a technique that has been used to detect cracks as they occur across the specimen. Parametric analysis of AE signals and correlating these parameters (e.g., hits and energy) to stress-strain plots of rocks let us detect cracking levels properly. The number of AE hits is related to the number of cracks, and the AE energy is related to magnitude of the cracking event. For a full understanding of the fracture process in brittle rocks, prismatic specimens of granite containing pre-existing flaws have been tested in uniaxial compression tests, and their cracking process was monitored with both AE and high-speed video imaging. In this paper, the characteristics of the AE parameters and the evolution of cracking sequences are analyzed for every cracking level. Based on micro- and macro-crack damage, a classification of cracking levels is introduced. This classification contains eight stages (1) crack closure, (2) linear elastic deformation, (3) micro-crack initiation (white patch initiation), (4) micro-crack growth (stable crack growth), (5) micro-crack coalescence (macro-crack initiation), (6) macro-crack growth (unstable crack growth), (7) macro-crack coalescence and (8) failure.

  15. A signal processing approach for enhanced Acoustic Emission data analysis in high activity systems: Application to organic matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharrat, M.; Ramasso, E.; Placet, V.; Boubakar, M. L.

    2016-03-01

    Structural elements made of Organic Matrix Composites (OMC) under complex loading may suffer from high Acoustic Emission (AE) activity caused by the emergence of different emission sources at high rates with high noise level, which finally engender continuous emissions. The detection of hits in this situation becomes a challenge particularly during fatigue tests. This work suggests an approach based on the Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT) denoising applied on signal segments. A particular attention is paid to the adjustment of the denoising parameters based on pencil lead breaks and their influence on the quality of the denoised AE signals. The validation of the proposed approach is performed on a ring-shaped Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastics (CFRP) under in-service-like conditions involving continuous emissions with superimposed damage-related transients. It is demonstrated that errors in hit detection are greatly reduced leading to a better identification of the natural damage scenario based on AE signals.

  16. Quadratic Time-Frequency Analysis of Hydroacoustic Signals as Applied to Acoustic Emissions of Large Whales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Bras, Ronan; Victor, Sucic; Damir, Malnar; Götz, Bokelmann

    2014-05-01

    In order to enrich the set of attributes in setting up a large database of whale signals, as envisioned in the Baleakanta project, we investigate methods of time-frequency analysis. The purpose of establishing the database is to increase and refine knowledge of the emitted signal and of its propagation characteristics, leading to a better understanding of the animal migrations in a non-invasive manner and to characterize acoustic propagation in oceanic media. The higher resolution for signal extraction and a better separation from other signals and noise will be used for various purposes, including improved signal detection and individual animal identification. The quadratic class of time-frequency distributions (TFDs) is the most popular set of time-frequency tools for analysis and processing of non-stationary signals. Two best known and most studied members of this class are the spectrogram and the Wigner-Ville distribution. However, to be used efficiently, i.e. to have highly concentrated signal components while significantly suppressing interference and noise simultaneously, TFDs need to be optimized first. The optimization method used in this paper is based on the Cross-Wigner-Ville distribution, and unlike similar approaches it does not require prior information on the analysed signal. The method is applied to whale signals, which, just like the majority of other real-life signals, can generally be classified as multicomponent non-stationary signals, and hence time-frequency techniques are a natural choice for their representation, analysis, and processing. We present processed data from a set containing hundreds of individual calls. The TFD optimization method results into a high resolution time-frequency representation of the signals. It allows for a simple extraction of signal components from the TFD's dominant ridges. The local peaks of those ridges can then be used for the signal components instantaneous frequency estimation, which in turn can be used as

  17. Sonification of acoustic emission data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raith, Manuel; Große, Christian

    2014-05-01

    While loading different specimens, acoustic emissions appear due to micro crack formation or friction of already existing crack edges. These acoustic emissions can be recorded using suitable ultrasonic transducers and transient recorders. The analysis of acoustic emissions can be used to investigate the mechanical behavior of different specimens under load. Our working group has undertaken several experiments, monitored with acoustic emission techniques. Different materials such as natural stone, concrete, wood, steel, carbon composites and bone were investigated. Also the experimental setup has been varied. Fire-spalling experiments on ultrahigh performance concrete and pullout experiments on bonded anchors have been carried out. Furthermore uniaxial compression tests on natural stone and animal bone had been conducted. The analysis tools include not only the counting of events but the analysis of full waveforms. Powerful localization algorithms and automatic onset picking techniques (based on Akaikes Information Criterion) were established to handle the huge amount of data. Up to several thousand events were recorded during experiments of a few minutes. More sophisticated techniques like moment tensor inversion have been established on this relatively small scale as well. Problems are related to the amount of data but also to signal-to-noise quality, boundary conditions (reflections) sensor characteristics and unknown and changing Greens functions of the media. Some of the acoustic emissions recorded during these experiments had been transferred into audio range. The transformation into the audio range was done using Matlab. It is the aim of the sonification to establish a tool that is on one hand able to help controlling the experiment in-situ and probably adjust the load parameters according to the number and intensity of the acoustic emissions. On the other hand sonification can help to improve the understanding of acoustic emission techniques for training

  18. Acoustic emission monitoring system

    DOEpatents

    Romrell, Delwin M.

    1977-07-05

    Methods and apparatus for identifying the source location of acoustic emissions generated within an acoustically conductive medium. A plurality of acoustic receivers are communicably coupled to the surface of the medium at a corresponding number of spaced locations. The differences in the reception time of the respective sensors in response to a given acoustic event are measured among various sensor combinations prescribed by the monitoring mode employed. Acoustic reception response encountered subsequent to the reception by a predetermined number of the prescribed sensor combinations are inhibited from being communicated to the processing circuitry, while the time measurements obtained from the prescribed sensor combinations are translated into a position measurement representative of the location on the surface most proximate the source of the emission. The apparatus is programmable to function in six separate and five distinct operating modes employing either two, three or four sensory locations. In its preferred arrangement the apparatus of this invention will re-initiate a monitoring interval if the predetermined number of sensors do not respond to a particular emission within a given time period.

  19. A novel acoustic emission monitoring and signal processing to elucidate the fracture dynamics of hydrogen assisted cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, Yasuhisa; Takemoto, Makoto; Takemoto, Mikio

    1994-12-31

    An advanced Acoustic Emission (AE) monitoring and signal processing system was developed and applied to elucidate the fracture dynamics of hydrogen assisted cracking (HAC) of quenched-tempered low alloy steel. The developed system enables one to monitor an initiation of microcrack correctly and also to elucidate the dynamics of microcracks when multi-channel moment tensor analysis is jointly used. The system consists of 8-channel monitoring. One channel monitors the surface displacement in loading direction excited by the propagation of elastic wave, and gives the source wave by the deconvolution integral of it with the Green`s function of the second kind. Another 7 channels were designed to measure arrival time and relative amplitude of the P-waves, and to determine both the source location and the crack kinematics by tensor analysis. This paper introduces the developed monitoring system and signal processing method, and fracture dynamics of microcracks in HAC.

  20. Information Theory Filters for Wavelet Packet Coefficient Selection with Application to Corrosion Type Identification from Acoustic Emission Signals

    PubMed Central

    Van Dijck, Gert; Van Hulle, Marc M.

    2011-01-01

    The damage caused by corrosion in chemical process installations can lead to unexpected plant shutdowns and the leakage of potentially toxic chemicals into the environment. When subjected to corrosion, structural changes in the material occur, leading to energy releases as acoustic waves. This acoustic activity can in turn be used for corrosion monitoring, and even for predicting the type of corrosion. Here we apply wavelet packet decomposition to extract features from acoustic emission signals. We then use the extracted wavelet packet coefficients for distinguishing between the most important types of corrosion processes in the chemical process industry: uniform corrosion, pitting and stress corrosion cracking. The local discriminant basis selection algorithm can be considered as a standard for the selection of the most discriminative wavelet coefficients. However, it does not take the statistical dependencies between wavelet coefficients into account. We show that, when these dependencies are ignored, a lower accuracy is obtained in predicting the corrosion type. We compare several mutual information filters to take these dependencies into account in order to arrive at a more accurate prediction. PMID:22163921

  1. Acoustic Signal Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, William M.; Candy, James V.

    Signal processing refers to the acquisition, storage, display, and generation of signals - also to the extraction of information from signals and the re-encoding of information. As such, signal processing in some form is an essential element in the practice of all aspects of acoustics. Signal processing algorithms enable acousticians to separate signals from noise, to perform automatic speech recognition, or to compress information for more efficient storage or transmission. Signal processing concepts are the building blocks used to construct models of speech and hearing. Now, in the 21st century, all signal processing is effectively digital signal processing. Widespread access to high-speed processing, massive memory, and inexpensive software make signal processing procedures of enormous sophistication and power available to anyone who wants to use them. Because advanced signal processing is now accessible to everybody, there is a need for primers that introduce basic mathematical concepts that underlie the digital algorithms. The present handbook chapter is intended to serve such a purpose.

  2. Normalization and source separation of acoustic emission signals for condition monitoring and fault detection of multi-cylinder diesel engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Weiliang; Lin, Tian Ran; Tan, Andy C. C.

    2015-12-01

    A signal processing technique is presented in this paper to normalize and separate the source of non-linear acoustic emission (AE) signals of a multi-cylinder diesel engine for condition monitoring applications and fault detection. The normalization technique presented in the paper overcomes the long-existing non-linearity problem of AE sensors so that responses measured by different AE sensors can be quantitatively analysed and compared. A source separation algorithm is also developed in the paper to separate the mixture of the normalized AE signals produced by a multi-cylinder diesel engine by utilising the system parameters (i.e., wave attenuation constant and the arrival time delay) of AE wave propagation determined by a standard pencil lead break test on the engine cylinder head. It is shown that the source separation algorithm is able to separate the signal interference of adjacent cylinders from the monitored cylinder once the wave attenuation constant and the arrival time delay along the propagation path are known. The algorithm is particularly useful in the application of AE technique for condition monitoring of small-size diesel engines where signal interference from the neighbouring cylinders is strong.

  3. Semi-real-time monitoring of cracking on couplings by neural network analysis of acoustic emission signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godinez-Azcuaga, Valery F.; Shu, Fong; Finlayson, Richard D.; O'Donnell, Bruce W.

    2004-07-01

    This paper presents the results obtained during the development of a semi-real-time monitoring methodology based on Neural Network Pattern Recognition of Acoustic Emission (AE) signals for early detection of cracks in couplings used in aircraft and engine drive systems. AE signals were collected in order to establish a baseline of a gear-testing fixture background noise and its variations due to rotational speed and torque. Also, simulated cracking signals immersed in background noise were collected. EDM notches were machined in the driving gear and the load on the gearbox was increased until damaged was induced. Using these data, a Neural Network Signal Classifier (NNSC) was implemented and tested. The testing showed that the NNSC was capable of correctly identifying six different classes of AE signals corresponding to different gearbox operation conditions. Also, a semi-real-time classification software was implemented. This software includes functions that allow the user to view and classify AE data from a dynamic process as they are recorded at programmable time intervals. The software is capable of monitoring periodic statistics of AE data, which can be used as an indicator of damage presence and severity in a dynamic system. The semi-real-time classification software was successfully tested in situations where a delay of 10 seconds between data acquisition and classification was achieved with a hit rate of 50 hits/second per channel on eight active AE channels.

  4. Acoustic emission monitoring of polymer composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bardenheier, R.

    1981-01-01

    The techniques of acoustic emission monitoring of polymer composite materials is described. It is highly sensitive, quasi-nondestructive testing method that indicates the origin and behavior of flaws in such materials when submitted to different load exposures. With the use of sophisticated signal analysis methods it is possible the distinguish between different types of failure mechanisms, such as fiber fracture delamination or fiber pull-out. Imperfections can be detected while monitoring complex composite structures by acoustic emission measurements.

  5. Traceability of Acoustic Emission measurements for a proposed calibration method - Classification of characteristics and identification using signal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, James

    2015-01-01

    When using Acoustic Emission (AE) technologies, tensile, compressive and shear stress/strain tests can provide a detector for material deformation and dislocations. In this paper improvements are made to standardise calibration techniques for AE against known metrics such as force. AE signatures were evaluated from various calibration energy sources based on the energy from the first harmonic (dominant energy band) [1,2]. The effects of AE against its calibration identity are investigated: where signals are correlated to the average energy and distance of the detected phenomena. In addition, extra tests are investigated in terms of the tensile tests and single grit tests characterising different materials. Necessary translations to the time-frequency domain were necessary when segregating salient features between different material properties. Continuing this work the obtained AE is summarised and evaluated by a Neural Network (NN) regression classification technique which identifies how far the malformation has progressed (in terms of energy/force) during material transformation. Both genetic-fuzzy clustering and tree rule based classifier techniques were used as the second and third classification techniques respectively to verify the NN output giving a weighted three classifier system. The work discussed in this paper looks at both distance and force relationships for various prolonged Acoustic Emission stresses. Later such analysis was realised with different classifier models and finally implemented into the Simulink simulations. Further investigations were made into classifier models for different material interactions in terms of force and distance which add further dimension to this work with different materials based simulation realisations. Within the statistical analysis section there are two varying prolonged stress tests which together offer the mechanical calibration system (automated solenoid and pencil break calibration system). Taking such a

  6. Study Acoustic Emissions from Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, James L.; Workman, Gary L.

    1997-01-01

    The nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of future propulsion systems utilizing advanced composite structures for the storage of cryogenic fuels, such as liquid hydrogen or oxygen, presents many challenges. Economic justification for these structures requires, light weight, reusable components with an infrastructure allowing periodic evaluation of structural integrity after enduring demanding stresses during operation. A major focus has been placed on the use of acoustic emission NDE to detect propagating defects, in service, necessitating an extensive study into characterizing the nature of acoustic signal propagation at very low temperatures and developing the methodology of applying AE sensors to monitor cryogenic components. This work addresses the question of sensor performance in the cryogenic environment. Problems involving sensor mounting, spectral response and durability are addressed. The results of this work provides a common point of measure from which sensor selection can be made when testing composite components at cryogenic temperatures.

  7. Acoustic-emission signal-processing analog unit for locating flaws in large tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moskal, F. J.; Fageol, J. D.

    1973-01-01

    Technique monitors structural flaws in 105-in. diameter tanks. Tank surface is divided into many areas and each area is sectioned into 20 equilateral triangles that form icosahedron. Twelve transducers are equally positioned on tank surface at vertex of each triangle. Transducers monitor area for flaws by detecting any increase in acoustical activity.

  8. One sensor acoustic emission localization in plates.

    PubMed

    Ernst, R; Zwimpfer, F; Dual, J

    2016-01-01

    Acoustic emissions are elastic waves accompanying damage processes and are therefore used for monitoring the health state of structures. Most of the traditional acoustic emission techniques use a trilateration approach requiring at least three sensors on a 2D domain in order to localize sources of acoustic emission events. In this paper, we present a new approach which requires only a single sensor to identify and localize the source of acoustic emissions in a finite plate. The method proposed makes use of the time reversal principle and the dispersive nature of the flexural wave mode in a suitable frequency band. The signal shape of the transverse velocity response contains information about the propagated paths of the incoming elastic waves. This information is made accessible by a numerical time reversal simulation. The effect of dispersion is reversed and the original shape of the flexural wave is restored at the origin of the acoustic emission. The time reversal process is analyzed first for an infinite Mindlin plate, then by a 3D FEM simulation which in combination results in a novel acoustic emission localization process. The process is experimentally verified for different aluminum plates for artificially generated acoustic emissions (Hsu-Nielsen source). Good and reliable localization was achieved for a homogeneous quadratic aluminum plate with only one measurement. PMID:26372509

  9. Acoustic-emission linear-pulse holography

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, H.D.; Lemon, D.K.; Busse, L.J.

    1982-06-01

    This paper describes Acoustic Emission Linear Pulse Holography which combines the advantages of linear imaging and acoustic emission into a single NDE inspection system. This unique system produces a chronological linear holographic image of a flaw by utilizing the acoustic energy emitted during crack growth. Conventional linear holographic imaging uses an ultrasonic transducer to transmit energy into the volume being imaged. When the crack or defect reflects that energy, the crack acts as a new source of acoustic waves. To formulate an image of that source, a receiving transducer is scanned over the volume of interest and the phase of the received signals is measured at successive points on the scan. The innovation proposed here is the utilization of the crack generated acoustic emission as the acoustic source and generation of a line image of the crack as it grows. A thirty-two point sampling array is used to construct phase-only linear holograms of simulated acoustic emission sources on large metal plates. The phases are calculated using the pulse time-of-flight (TOF) times from the reference transducer to the array of receivers. Computer reconstruction of the image is accomplished using a one-dimensional FFT algorithm (i.e., backward wave). Experimental results are shown which graphically illustrate the unique acoustic emission images of a single point and a linear crack in a 100 mm x 1220 mm x 1220 mm aluminum plate.

  10. Acoustic Emissions Reveal Combustion Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramohalli, D. N. R.; Seshan, P. K.

    1983-01-01

    Turbulent-flame acoustic emissions change with air/fuel ratio variations. Acoustic emissions sensed and processed to detect inefficient operation; control system responds by adjusting fuel/air mixture for greater efficiency. Useful for diagnosis of combustion processes and fuel/air control.

  11. Acoustic emission signal processing technique to characterize reactor in-pile phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, Vivek; Tawfik, Magdy S.; Smith, James A.

    2015-03-31

    Existing and developing advanced sensor technologies and instrumentation will allow non-intrusive in-pile measurement of temperature, extension, and fission gases when coupled with advanced signal processing algorithms. The transmitted measured sensor signals from inside to the outside of containment structure are corrupted by noise and are attenuated, thereby reducing the signal strength and the signal-to-noise ratio. Identification and extraction of actual signal (representative of an in-pile phenomenon) is a challenging and complicated process. In the paper, empirical mode decomposition technique is utilized to reconstruct actual sensor signal by partially combining intrinsic mode functions. Reconstructed signal will correspond to phenomena and/or failure modes occurring inside the reactor. In addition, it allows accurate non-intrusive monitoring and trending of in-pile phenomena.

  12. Acoustic Emission Signal Processing Technique to Characterize Reactor In-Pile Phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Vivek Agarwal; Magdy Samy Tawfik; James A Smith

    2014-07-01

    Existing and developing advanced sensor technologies and instrumentation will allow non-intrusive in-pile measurement of temperature, extension, and fission gases when coupled with advanced signal processing algorithms. The transmitted measured sensor signals from inside to the outside of containment structure are corrupted by noise and are attenuated, thereby reducing the signal strength and signal-to-noise ratio. Identification and extraction of actual signal (representative of an in-pile phenomenon) is a challenging and complicated process. In this paper, empirical mode decomposition technique is proposed to reconstruct actual sensor signal by partially combining intrinsic mode functions. Reconstructed signal corresponds to phenomena and/or failure modes occurring inside the reactor. In addition, it allows accurate non-intrusive monitoring and trending of in-pile phenomena.

  13. Acoustic emission linear pulse holography

    DOEpatents

    Collins, H.D.; Busse, L.J.; Lemon, D.K.

    1983-10-25

    This device relates to the concept of and means for performing Acoustic Emission Linear Pulse Holography, which combines the advantages of linear holographic imaging and Acoustic Emission into a single non-destructive inspection system. This unique system produces a chronological, linear holographic image of a flaw by utilizing the acoustic energy emitted during crack growth. The innovation is the concept of utilizing the crack-generated acoustic emission energy to generate a chronological series of images of a growing crack by applying linear, pulse holographic processing to the acoustic emission data. The process is implemented by placing on a structure an array of piezoelectric sensors (typically 16 or 32 of them) near the defect location. A reference sensor is placed between the defect and the array.

  14. Magneto acoustic emission apparatus for testing materials for embrittlement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, Sidney G. (Inventor); Min, Namkung (Inventor); Yost, William T. (Inventor); Cantrell, John H. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A method and apparatus for testing steel components for temper embrittlement uses magneto-acoustic emission to nondestructively evaluate the component. Acoustic emission signals occur more frequently at higher levels in embrittled components. A pair of electromagnets are used to create magnetic induction in the test component. Magneto-acoustic emission signals may be generated by applying an ac current to the electromagnets. The acoustic emission signals are analyzed to provide a comparison between a component known to be unembrittled and a test component. Magnetic remanence is determined by applying a dc current to the electromagnets, then turning the magnets off and observing the residual magnetic induction.

  15. Method of characterizing residual stress in ferromagnetic materials using a pulse histogram of acoustic emission signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namkung, Min (Inventor); Yost, William T. (Inventor); Kushnick, Peter W. (Inventor); Grainger, John L. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    The invention is a method and apparatus for characterizing residual uniaxial stress in a ferromagnetic test member by distinguishing between residual stresses resulting from positive (tension) forces and negative (compression) forces by using the distinct and known magnetoacoustic (MAC) and a magnetoacoustic emission (MAE) measurement circuit means. A switch permits the selective operation of the respective circuit means.

  16. Decomposition of frequency characteristics of acoustic emission signals for different types of partial discharges sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witos, F.; Gacek, Z.; Paduch, P.

    2006-11-01

    The problem touched in the article is decomposition of frequency characteristic of AE signals into elementary form of three-parametrical Gauss function. At the first stage, for modelled curves in form of sum of three-parametrical Gauss peaks, accordance of modelled curve and a curve resulting from a solutions obtained using method with dynamic windows, Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm, genetic algorithms and differential evolution algorithm are discussed. It is founded that analyses carried out by means differential evolution algorithm are effective and the computer system served an analysis of AE signal frequency characteristics was constructed. Decomposition of frequency characteristics for selected AE signals coming from modelled PD sources using different ends of the bushing, and real PD sources in generator coil bars are carried out.

  17. Acoustic emission beamforming for enhanced damage detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaskey, Gregory C.; Glaser, Steven D.; Grosse, Christian U.

    2008-03-01

    As civil infrastructure ages, the early detection of damage in a structure becomes increasingly important for both life safety and economic reasons. This paper describes the analysis procedures used for beamforming acoustic emission techniques as well as the promising results of preliminary experimental tests on a concrete bridge deck. The method of acoustic emission offers a tool for detecting damage, such as cracking, as it occurs on or in a structure. In order to gain meaningful information from acoustic emission analyses, the damage must be localized. Current acoustic emission systems with localization capabilities are very costly and difficult to install. Sensors must be placed throughout the structure to ensure that the damage is encompassed by the array. Beamforming offers a promising solution to these problems and permits the use of wireless sensor networks for acoustic emission analyses. Using the beamforming technique, the azmuthal direction of the location of the damage may be estimated by the stress waves impinging upon a small diameter array (e.g. 30mm) of acoustic emission sensors. Additional signal discrimination may be gained via array processing techniques such as the VESPA process. The beamforming approach requires no arrival time information and is based on very simple delay and sum beamforming algorithms which can be easily implemented on a wireless sensor or mote.

  18. Study Acoustic Emissions from Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, James; Workman,Gary

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this work will be to develop techniques for monitoring the acoustic emissions from carbon epoxy composite structures at cryogenic temperatures. Performance of transducers at temperatures ranging from ambient to cryogenic and the characteristics of acoustic emission from composite structures will be studied and documented. This entire effort is directed towards characterization of structures used in NASA propulsion programs such as the X-33.

  19. Fault monitoring using acoustic emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Danlu; Venkatesan, Gopal; Kaveh, Mostafa; Tewfik, Ahmed H.; Buckley, Kevin M.

    1999-05-01

    Automatic monitoring techniques are a means to safely relax and simplify preventive maintenance and inspection procedures that are expensive and necessitate substantial down time. Acoustic emissions (AEs), that are ultrasonic waves emanating from the formation or propagation of a crack in a material, provide a possible avenue for nondestructive evaluation. Though the characteristics of AEs have been extensively studied, most of the work has been done under controlled laboratory conditions at very low noise levels. In practice, however, the AEs are buried under a wide variety of strong interference and noise. These arise due to a number of factors that, other than vibration, may include fretting, hydraulic noise and electromagnetic interference. Most of these noise events are transient and not unlike AE signals. In consequence, the detection and isolation of AE events from the measured data is not a trivial problem. In this paper we present some signal processing techniques that we have proposed and evaluated for the above problem. We treat the AE problem as the detection of an unknown transient in additive noise followed by a robust classification of the detected transients. We address the problem of transient detection using the residual error in fitting a special linear model to the data. Our group is currently working on the transient classification using neural networks.

  20. Acoustically-Induced Electrical Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, S. R.

    2014-12-01

    We have observed electrical signals excited by and moving along with an acoustic pulse propagating in a sandstone sample. Using resonance we are now studying the characteristics of this acousto-electric signal and determining its origin and the controlling physical parameters. Four rock samples with a range of porosities, permeabilities, and mineralogies were chosen: Berea, Boise, and Colton sandstones and Austin Chalk. Pore water salinity was varied from deionized water to sea water. Ag-AgCl electrodes were attached to the sample and were interfaced to a 4-wire electrical resistivity system. Under computer control, the acoustic signals were excited and the electrical response was recorded. We see strong acoustically-induced electrical signals in all samples, with the magnitude of the effect for each rock getting stronger as we move from the 1st to the 3rd harmonics in resonance. Given a particular fluid salinity, each rock has its own distinct sensitivity in the induced electrical effect. For example at the 2nd harmonic, Berea Sandstone produces the largest electrical signal per acoustic power input even though Austin Chalk and Boise Sandstone tend to resonate with much larger amplitudes at the same harmonic. Two effects are potentially responsible for this acoustically-induced electrical response: one the co-seismic seismo-electric effect and the other a strain-induced resistivity change known as the acousto-electric effect. We have designed experimental tests to separate these mechanisms. The tests show that the seismo-electric effect is dominant in our studies. We note that these experiments are in a fluid viscosity dominated seismo-electric regime, leading to a simple interpretation of the signals where the electric potential developed is proportional to the local acceleration of the rock. Toward a test of this theory we have measured the local time-varying acoustic strain in our samples using a laser vibrometer.

  1. Acoustic Localization with Infrasonic Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Threatt, Arnesha; Elbing, Brian

    2015-11-01

    Numerous geophysical and anthropogenic events emit infrasonic frequencies (<20 Hz), including volcanoes, hurricanes, wind turbines and tornadoes. These sounds, which cannot be heard by the human ear, can be detected from large distances (in excess of 100 miles) due to low frequency acoustic signals having a very low decay rate in the atmosphere. Thus infrasound could be used for long-range, passive monitoring and detection of these events. An array of microphones separated by known distances can be used to locate a given source, which is known as acoustic localization. However, acoustic localization with infrasound is particularly challenging due to contamination from other signals, sensitivity to wind noise and producing a trusted source for system development. The objective of the current work is to create an infrasonic source using a propane torch wand or a subwoofer and locate the source using multiple infrasonic microphones. This presentation will present preliminary results from various microphone configurations used to locate the source.

  2. Empirical mode decomposition for analyzing acoustical signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Norden E. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    The present invention discloses a computer implemented signal analysis method through the Hilbert-Huang Transformation (HHT) for analyzing acoustical signals, which are assumed to be nonlinear and nonstationary. The Empirical Decomposition Method (EMD) and the Hilbert Spectral Analysis (HSA) are used to obtain the HHT. Essentially, the acoustical signal will be decomposed into the Intrinsic Mode Function Components (IMFs). Once the invention decomposes the acoustic signal into its constituting components, all operations such as analyzing, identifying, and removing unwanted signals can be performed on these components. Upon transforming the IMFs into Hilbert spectrum, the acoustical signal may be compared with other acoustical signals.

  3. Analysis of the development and possibilities of the acoustic emission method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malecki, Ignacy

    The phenomenon of acoustic emission has been known for ages, but its practical use only dates back to the early 1960's to 'microseismic observations,' or farther back to the analysis of the acoustic emission generated by metals under stress. Discussed is the expansion of the measurement range by the detection of high frequency acoustic emission signals, the generation of acoustic emission by dislocation movements in metals and the brittle fracture of ceramics, the effect of material fatigue on acoustic emission activity, promising new applications in mining and construction, and efforts to improve acoustic emission transducers. A comparative analysis of trends in the development of acoustic emission techniques over the last 25 years and conclusions concerning the directions of future research are given. A description of ways to improve acoustic emission techniques which primarily focuses on electronic acoustic emission signal processing, extraction, and separation is presented. Phases of acoustic emission activity under conditions of rising stress, the 'life span' and fatigue of a material determined by means of acoustic emission, classification of acoustic emission sources, and analysis of the possibilities of acoustic emission for raw materials, processed materials, mechanical engineering, electronics, power generation, construction, and chemicals and for diagnosing motor vehicles and engineering systems are discussed. The authors also discuss the possibility of using acoustic emission in biology and medicine and the possible applications of acoustic emissions for basic research in physics and chemistry.

  4. Effects of signal attenuation in natural media on interpretation of acoustic emissions in the context early warning systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faillettaz, Jerome; Or, Dani

    2015-04-01

    Gravity driven instabilities in natural media such as rockfalls, landslides, snow avalanches or glacier break-offs represent a significant class of natural hazards. Reliable prediction of imminence of such events combined with timely evacuation remain a challenge because material failure is a non linear process involving inherent heterogeneities affecting the outcome. Nevertheless, such materials break gradually with the weakest parts breaking first, producing precursory "micro-cracks" and associated elastic waves traveling in the material. The monitoring of such acoustic/micro-seismic activity offers valuable information on the progression of damage and imminence of global failure. The main challenge is that acoustic waves are strongly attenuated during their travel through natural media thereby introducing ambiguity in the interpretation of the magnitude (severity) or leading to loss of detection for faraway events. For example, a micro-crack event would be measured as a large event if occurring close to the sensor, and as a small event if far from the sensor ( or may not be detected at all). A more complete picture of acoustic emissions or micro- seismic activity requires deployment of a dense network of sensors that enables localization of sources and thus the determination of initial energy released with each event. However, such networks are prohibitively costly difficult to analyze in real time over scales of interest. Is it possible to find a way to analyze directly in real time the measured micro-seismic activity to infer the slope mechanical status? Following a qualitative description of the observation problem and the processes leading to attenuation, a quantitative analysis is performed using a numerical model based on the classical Fiber Bundle Model. Introducing a basic attenuation law in such simple models enables to directly compare un-attenuated and attenuated acoustic activity (and also avalanche size-frequency distribution) at any location

  5. Acoustic-emission monitoring of steam turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, L. J.; Randall, R. L.; Hong, C.

    1982-04-01

    A method for the on-line detection of crack growth in steam turbine rotors based on acoustic emission (AE) monitoring is discussed. A systematic study involving a number of tasks was performed to evaluate the potential for the detection and correct identification of crack growth AE signals during various turbine operating conditions. These included acoustic wave propagation and attenuation measurements, background noise characterization, laboratory rotor material tests, monitoring equipment optimization, dynamic stress analysis of the rotor under transient operation and on-line source location and signal characterization. No crack growth was detected during the monitoring periods but there was sufficient information from the combined tasks to estimate the flaw growth detectability during different operating conditions if it occurs. The experience also suggests that AE monitoring can be useful for diagnosis of other turbine problems such as blade rubbing, out-of-balance condition, bearing deterioration, lubricating oil contamination and perhaps boiler exfoliation and blade erosion.

  6. Regularities of Acoustic Emission in the Freight Car Solebar Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekher, S.

    2016-01-01

    Acoustic emission results which were obtained during tests of the samples, which were made from foundry solebars with the developing fatigue crack, are presented. The dependences of the acoustic emission event count, the force critical value during the stationary acoustic emission process, and the growth rate of the event count from the cycles number are determined. The amplitude signal distributions relating to the crack growth were received. It is offered to use the force critical value and the amplitude threshold in the rejection criteria.

  7. Acoustic emission monitoring of wind turbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Dam, Jeremy; Bond, Leonard J.

    2015-03-01

    Damage to wind turbine blades can, if left uncorrected, evolve into catastrophic failures resulting in high costs and significant losses for the operator. Detection of damage, especially in real time, has the potential to mitigate the losses associated with such catastrophic failure. To address this need various forms of online monitoring are being investigated, including acoustic emission detection. In this paper, pencil lead breaks are used as a standard reference source and tests are performed on unidirectional glass-fiber-reinforced-polymer plates. The mechanical pencil break is used to simulate an acoustic emission (AE) that generates elastic waves in the plate. Piezoelectric sensors and a data acquisition system are used to detect and record the signals. The expected dispersion curves generated for Lamb waves in plates are calculated, and the Gabor wavelet transform is used to provide dispersion curves based on experimental data. AE sources using an aluminum plate are used as a reference case for the experimental system and data processing validation. The analysis of the composite material provides information concerning the wave speed, modes, and attenuation of the waveform, which can be used to estimate maximum AE event - receiver separation, in a particular geometry and materials combination. The foundational data provided in this paper help to guide improvements in online structural health monitoring of wind turbine blades using acoustic emission.

  8. Thermally induced acoustic emissions in thermal barrier coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Voyer, J.; Gitzhofer, F.; Boulos, M.I.; Durham, S.

    1995-12-31

    In this study, acoustic emission signals are used to monitor the degradation of plasma sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings (TBC) under thermal cycling conditions. Signal analysis both in time and frequency domains is carried out in order to identify the key parameters which can be used to classify the acoustic emission signals as a function of the damage mechanisms. This classification offers a means of prediction of the long-term behavior of the thermal barrier coating based on the acoustic emission signal signature at the early stages of bench testing. The tests were carried out using an experimental rig that was developed to reproduce thermal conditions encountered inside a combustion chamber. Twelve infrared lamps, each with a power rating of 1,200 W, are used as a heat source. The samples consist of an alloy blade coated with a duplex TBC made of a 150 {micro}m thick bond coat covered with a 300 {micro}m thick partially-stabilized zirconia coating. The maximum surface temperature of the sample was measured to be around 1,000 C. Two broadband transducers are used for acquisition of acoustic emission signals. Measuring the time between signal detection by each of the two transducers provides a means of determination of the location of the source of the acoustic signals. A classification of the signals based on their energy and their maximum peak frequency is presented.

  9. Acoustic emission location on aluminum alloy structure by using FBG sensors and PSO method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Shizeng; Jiang, Mingshun; Sui, Qingmei; Dong, Huijun; Sai, Yaozhang; Jia, Lei

    2016-04-01

    Acoustic emission location is important for finding the structural crack and ensuring the structural safety. In this paper, an acoustic emission location method by using fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors and particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm were investigated. Four FBG sensors were used to form a sensing network to detect the acoustic emission signals. According to the signals, the quadrilateral array location equations were established. By analyzing the acoustic emission signal propagation characteristics, the solution of location equations was converted to an optimization problem. Thus, acoustic emission location can be achieved by using an improved PSO algorithm, which was realized by using the information fusion of multiple standards PSO, to solve the optimization problem. Finally, acoustic emission location system was established and verified on an aluminum alloy plate. The experimental results showed that the average location error was 0.010 m. This paper provided a reliable method for aluminum alloy structural acoustic emission location.

  10. Lead-free acoustic emission sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, K. H.; Lin, D. M.; Chan, H. L. W.

    2007-11-15

    Acoustic emission (AE) sensors have been fabricated using both soft- and hard-type lead-free (Na{sub 0.5}K{sub 0.5})NbO{sub 3}-based ceramics. The acoustic and electromechanical properties of the ceramics have been determined using the resonance technique. The lead-free AE sensors were calibrated using a laser source and compared to a commercial sensor. A lead zirconate titanate (PZT) 5H ceramics AE sensor has also been fabricated and calibrated for comparison. It was found that the sensitivity of lead-free AE sensors is comparable to that of the lead-based PZT sensor. To evaluate the sensors for potential application, they have been used in the detection of AE in an impact test. The lead-free sensors can reproduce AE signals accurately without giving artifacts and have potential use in commercial AE systems.

  11. Lead-free acoustic emission sensors.

    PubMed

    Lam, K H; Lin, D M; Chan, H L W

    2007-11-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) sensors have been fabricated using both soft- and hard-type lead-free (Na0.5K0.5)NbO3-based ceramics. The acoustic and electromechanical properties of the ceramics have been determined using the resonance technique. The lead-free AE sensors were calibrated using a laser source and compared to a commercial sensor. A lead zirconate titanate (PZT) 5H ceramics AE sensor has also been fabricated and calibrated for comparison. It was found that the sensitivity of lead-free AE sensors is comparable to that of the lead-based PZT sensor. To evaluate the sensors for potential application, they have been used in the detection of AE in an impact test. The lead-free sensors can reproduce AE signals accurately without giving artifacts and have potential use in commercial AE systems.

  12. Study of Acoustic Emissions from Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, James L.; Workman, Gary L.

    1997-01-01

    The nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of future propulsion systems utilizing advanced composite structures for the storage of cryogenic fuels, such as liquid hydrogen or oxygen, presents many challenges. Economic justification for these structures requires light weight, reusable components with an infrastructure allowing periodic evaluation of structural integrity after enduring demanding stresses during operation. A major focus has been placed on the use of acoustic emission NDE to detect propagating defects, in service, necessitating an extensive study into characterizing the nature of acoustic signal propagation at very low temperatures and developing the methodology of applying AE sensors to monitor cryogenic components. This work addresses the question of sensor performance in the cryogenic environment. Problems involving sensor mounting, spectral response and durability are addressed. The results of this work provides a common point of measure from which sensor selection can be made when testing composite components at cryogenic temperatures.

  13. Measuring acoustic emissions in an avalanche slope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiweger, Ingrid; Schweizer, Jürg

    2014-05-01

    Measurements of acoustic emissions are a common technique for monitoring damage and predicting imminent failure of a material. Within natural hazards it has already been used to successfully predict the break-off of a hanging glacier. To explore the applicability of the acoustic emission (AE) technique for avalanche prediction, we installed two acoustic sensors (with 30 kHz and 60 kHz resonance frequency) in an avalanche prone slope at the Mittelgrat in the Parsenn ski area above Davos, Switzerland. The slope is north-east facing, frequently wind loaded, and approximately 35° steep. The AE signals - in particular the event energy and waiting time distributions - were compared with slope stability. The latter was determined by observing avalanche activity. The results of two winter's measurements yielded that the exponent β of the inverse cumulative distribution of event energy showed a significant drop (from a value of 3.5 to roughly 2.5) at very unstable conditions, i.e. on the three days during our measurement periods when spontaneous avalanches released on our study slope.

  14. Method and means for measuring acoustic emissions

    DOEpatents

    Renken, Jr., Claus J.

    1976-01-06

    The detection of acoustic emissions emanating from an object is achieved with a capacitive transducer coupled to the object. The capacitive transducer is charged and then allowed to discharge with the rate of discharge being monitored. Oscillations in the rate of discharge about the normally exponential discharge curve for the capacitive transducer indicate the presence of acoustic emissions.

  15. An introduction to acoustic emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scruby, C. B.

    1987-08-01

    The technique of acoustic emission (AE) uses one or more sensors to 'listen' to a wide range of events that may take place inside a solid material. Depending on the source of this high frequency sound, there are broadly three application areas: structural testing and surveillance, process monitoring and control, and materials characterization. In the first case the source is probably a defect which radiates elastic waves as it grows. Provided these waves are detectable, AE can be used in conjunction with other NDT techniques to assess structural integrity. Advances in deterministic and statistical analysis methods now enable data to be interpreted in greater detail and with more confidence than before. In the second area the acoustic signature of processes is monitored, ranging from for instance the machining of metallic components to the mixing of foodstuffs, and changes correlated with variations in the process, with the potential for feedback and process control. In the third area, AE is used as an additional diagnostic technique for the study of, for instance, fracture, because it gives unique dynamic information on defect growth.

  16. General framework for acoustic emission during plastic deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Jagadish; Sarmah, Ritupan; Ananthakrishna, G.

    2015-10-01

    importantly, our study shows that the low-amplitude continuous acoustic emission spectrum seen in both the type-B and type-A band regimes is directly correlated to small-amplitude serrations induced by propagating bands. The acoustic emission spectrum of the Lüders-like band matches with recent experiments as well. In all of these cases, acoustic emission signals are burstlike, reflecting the intermittent character of dislocation-mediated plastic flow.

  17. Acoustic signals generated in inclined granular flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Danielle S.; Jenkins, James T.; Keast, Stephen C.; Sachse, Wolfgang H.

    2015-10-01

    Spontaneous avalanching in specific deserts produces a low-frequency sound known as "booming." This creates a puzzle, because avalanches down the face of a dune result in collisions between sand grains that occur at much higher frequencies. Reproducing this phenomenon in the laboratory permits a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms for the generation of such lower frequency acoustic emissions, which may also be relevant to other dry granular flows. Here we report measurements of low-frequency acoustical signals, produced by dried "sounding" sand (sand capable of booming in the desert) flowing down an inclined chute. The amplitude of the signal diminishes over time but reappears upon drying of the sand. We show that the presence of this sound in the experiments may provide supporting evidence for a previously published "waveguide" explanation for booming. Also, we propose a model based on kinetic theory for a sheared inclined flow in which the flowing layer exhibits "breathing" modes superimposed on steady shearing. The predicted oscillation frequency is of a similar order of magnitude as the measurements, indicating that small perturbations can sustain oscillations of a low frequency. However, the frequency is underestimated, which indicates that the stiffness has been underestimated. Also, the model predicts a discrete spectrum of frequencies, instead of the broadband spectrum measured experimentally.

  18. Acoustic emission from composite materials. [nondestructive tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Visconti, I. C.; Teti, R.

    1979-01-01

    The two basic areas where the acoustic emission (AE) technique can be applied are materials research and the evaluation of structural reliability. This experimental method leads to a better understanding of fracture mechanisms and is an NDT technique particularly well suited for the study of propagating cracks. Experiments are described in which acoustic emissions were unambiguously correlated with microstructural fracture mechanisms. The advantages and limitations of the AE technique are noted.

  19. Acoustic emission and the plasticity of crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawelek, Andrzej; Malecki, Ignacy

    This treatise is mainly devoted to a discussion of the application of acoustic emission in basic research on the plastic deformation mechanisms of metal and alloy single crystals. The acoustic emission method also provides the possibility of obtaining additional information on the nature of these mechanisms. Knowledge of the basic relationships between acoustic emission and deformation mechanisms will also facilitate the use of acoustic emission in industrial conditions (for industrial process control and for early problem detection). The material contained in this article is divided into three sections. The first section discusses the basic types of plastic deformation mechanisms in metal single crystals with simple crystal structures. The rest of this section is devoted to the problem of locating deformations, which is currently one of the most important problems in plastic deformation mechanics. The next section is based on extant literature and presents experiment data on measurements of acoustic emission during the plastic deformation of single crystals. The authors also use the results of their own research in a discussion of the most frequently encountered models and theoretical concepts concerning the causes of acoustic emission during the plastic deformation of crystals. The final section describes the basic mathematics behind these concepts and a brief attempt to assess the consistency of theoretical results and extant experimental results.

  20. Acoustic emission structural health management systems (AE-SHMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finlayson, Richard D.; Friesel, Mark A.; Carlos, Mark F.; Miller, Ronnie K.; Godinez, Valery

    2000-05-01

    Many of today's methods of inspecting structures are very time consuming, labor intensive and in many cases (due to limited access), impractical. In addition, long shutdown times are required to perform the inspections, thus creating tremendous expenses associated with manpower, materials and lost production. With continuing advances in signal processing and communications a significant interest has been shown in developing new diagnostic technologies for monitoring the integrity of structures with known defects, or for detecting new defects, in real time with minimum human involvement. The continued use of aging structures, especially in regard to the airworthiness of aging aircraft, is a major area of concern. Recent developments in both active and passive Acoustic Emission monitoring as an advanced tool for 'Structural Health Management Systems (SHMS),' are illustrated by using two recently developed acoustic emission systems; the Acoustic Emission-Health and Usage Monitoring System (AE-HUMS) helicopter drivetrain health monitoring system, and the Acoustic Emission Flight Instrument System (AEFIS) composite health monitoring system. The data collected with these types of systems is processed with advanced data screening and classification techniques, which are employed to take full advantage of parametric and waveform-based acoustic emission.

  1. Damage Detection and Analysis in CFRPs Using Acoustic Emission Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitlow, Travis Laron

    Real time monitoring of damage is an important aspect of life management of critical structures. Acoustic emission (AE) techniques allow for measurement and assessment of damage in real time. Acoustic emission parameters such as signal amplitude and duration were monitored during the loading sequences. Criteria that can indicate the onset of critical damage to the structure were developed. Tracking the damage as it happens gives a better analysis of the failure evolution that will allow for a more accurate determination of structural life. The main challenge is distinguishing between legitimate damage signals and "false positives" which are unrelated to damage growth. Such false positives can be related to electrical noise, friction, or mechanical vibrations. This research focuses on monitoring signals of damage growth in carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CFRPs) and separating the relevant signals from the false ones. In this Dissertation, acoustic emission signals from CFRP specimens were experimentally recorded and analyzed. The objectives of this work are: (1) perform static and fatigue loading of CFRP composite specimens and measure the associated AE signals, (2) accurately determine the AE parameters (energy, frequency, duration, etc.) of signals generated during failure of such specimens, (3) use fiber optic sensors to monitor the strain distribution of the damage zone and relate these changes in strain measurements to AE data.

  2. Acoustic emission linear pulse holography

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, H. D.; Busse, L. J.; Lemon, D. K.

    1985-07-30

    Defects in a structure are imaged as they propagate, using their emitted acoustic energy as a monitored source. Short bursts of acoustic energy propagate through the structure to a discrete element receiver array. A reference timing transducer located between the array and the inspection zone initiates a series of time-of-flight measurements. A resulting series of time-of-flight measurements are then treated as aperture data and are transferred to a computer for reconstruction of a synthetic linear holographic image. The images can be displayed and stored as a record of defect growth.

  3. Acoustic emission linear pulse holography

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, H. Dale; Busse, Lawrence J.; Lemon, Douglas K.

    1985-01-01

    Defects in a structure are imaged as they propagate, using their emitted acoustic energy as a monitored source. Short bursts of acoustic energy propagate through the structure to a discrete element receiver array. A reference timing transducer located between the array and the inspection zone initiates a series of time-of-flight measurements. A resulting series of time-of-flight measurements are then treated as aperture data and are transferred to a computer for reconstruction of a synthetic linear holographic image. The images can be displayed and stored as a record of defect growth.

  4. Generation of Acoustic Signals from Buried Explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonner, J. L.; Reinke, R.; Waxler, R.; Lenox, E. A.

    2012-12-01

    Buried explosions generate both seismic and acoustic signals. The mechanism for the acoustic generation is generally assumed to be large ground motions above the source region that cause atmospheric pressure disturbances which can propagate locally or regionally depending on source size and weather conditions. In order to better understand the factors that control acoustic generation from buried explosions, we conducted a series of 200 lb explosions detonated in and above the dry alluvium and limestones of Kirtland AFB, New Mexico. In this experiment, nicknamed HUMBLE REDWOOD III, we detonated charges at heights of burst of 2 m (no crater) and depths of burst of 7 m (fully confined). The seismic and acoustic signals were recorded on a network of near-source (< 90 m) co-located accelerometer and overpressure sensors, circular rings of acoustic sensors at 0.3 and 1 km, and multiple seismic and infrasound sensors at local-to-regional distances. Near-source acoustic signals for the 200 lb buried explosion in limestone show an impulsive, short-duration (0.04 s) initial peak, followed by a broad duration (0.3 s) negative pressure trough, and finally a second positive pulse (0.18 s duration). The entire width of the acoustic signal generated by this small buried explosion is 0.5 s and results in a 2 Hz peak in spectral energy. High-velocity wind conditions quickly attenuate the signal with few observations beyond 1 km. We have attempted to model these acoustic waveforms by estimating near-source ground motion using synthetic spall seismograms. Spall seismograms have similar characteristics as the observed acoustics and usually include an initial positive motion P wave, followed by -1 g acceleration due to the ballistic free fall of the near surface rock units, and ends with positive accelerations due to "slapdown" of the material. Spall seismograms were synthesized using emplacement media parameters and high-speed video observations of the surface movements. We present a

  5. Locating groundwater flow in karst by acoustic emission surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Stokowski, S.J. Jr.; Clark, D.A.

    1985-01-01

    An acoustic emission survey of Newala Fm. (primarily dolomite) karst has helped to locate subsurface water flow. This survey was performed on the Rock Quarry Dome, Sevier County, Tennessee. A Dresser RS-4 recording seismograph, adjusted to provide a gain of 1000, collected acoustic emission data using Mark Products CN368 vertical geophones with 3-inch spikes. Data was collected for 5-15 second intervals. The geophones were laid out along traverses with 10, 20, or 30-ft spacing and covered with sand bags in locations of high ambient noise. Traverses were laid out: along and across lineaments known to correspond with groundwater flow in natural subsurface channels; across and along a joint-controlled sink suspected of directing groundwater flow; and across a shallow sinkhole located tangentially to the Little Pigeon River and suspected of capturing river water for the groundwater system. Acoustic emissions of channelized flowing groundwater have a characteristic erratic spiked spectral signature. These acoustic emission signatures increase in amplitude and number in the immediate vicinity of the vertical projection of channelized groundwater flow if it occurs within approximately 30 feet of the surface. If the groundwater flow occurs at greater depths the emissions may be offset from the projection of the actual flow, due to propagation of the signal along rock pinnacles or attenuation by residual soils.

  6. Analysis of acoustic signals on welding and cutting

    SciTech Connect

    Morita, Takao; Ogawa, Yoji; Sumitomo, Takashi

    1995-12-31

    The sounds emitted during the welding and cutting processes are closely related to the processing phenomena, and sometimes they provide useful information for evaluation of their processing conditions. The analyses of acoustic signals from arc welding, plasma arc cutting, oxy-flame cutting, and water jet cutting are carried out in details in order to develop effective signal processing algorithm. The sound from TIG arc welding has the typical line spectrum which principal frequency, is almost the same as that of supplied electricity. The disturbance of welding process is clearly appeared oil the acoustic emission. The sound exposure level for CO{sub 2} or MIG welding is higher than that for TIG welding, and the relative intensity of the typical line spectrum caused by supplied electricity becomes low. But the sudden transition of welding condition oil produces an apparent change of sound exposure level. On the contrary, the acoustics from cutting processes are much louder than those of arc welding and show more chaotic behavior because the supplied fluid velocity and temperature of arc for cutting processes are much higher than those for welding processes. Therefore, it requires a special technique to extract the well meaning signals from the loud acoustic sounds. Further point of view, the reduction of acoustic exposure level becomes an important research theme with the growth of application fields of cutting processes.

  7. Laser-induced acoustic emissions in experimental dental composites.

    PubMed

    Lee, S Y; Lin, C T; Keh, E S; Pan, L C; Huang, H M; Shih, Y H; Cheng, H C

    2000-07-01

    A laser thermoacoustic technique was innovated to evaluate laser-induced acoustic emissions (AEs) in experimental dental composites aged with 75% ethanol solution. Experimental composite systems of 75/25 BisGMA/TEGDMA resin filled with 0, 12.6, 30.0, and 56.5 vol% of 8-microm silanized and unsilanized BaSiO6 were analyzed. The sample size was 4.65 mm (diameter) x 0.5 mm (thick). Aging effects of immersing in 75% ethanol for up to 14 h on AEs were then evaluated. A continuous-wave CO2 laser was used to heat the samples. Acoustic emissions were collected as a function of filler fraction, laser power, silanization, and immersion time. Onset of burst-pattern acoustic signals characteristic of fracturing occurred at different laser powers for different tested groups. Acoustic emissions generally increased with laser power, in which lower laser powers produced low-amplitude (45-50 dB) signals; the amplitude distribution (50-85 dB) became more extensive as laser powers increased. After immersion, the lower laser powers could produce the same phenomenon. The higher the filler fraction, the fewer AEs generated. A large percentage AE reduction due to silanization was noted as a function of filler fraction. Unsilanized specimens showed more thermal damages than did silanized ones.

  8. Dimensional analysis of acoustically propagated signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Scott D.; Thomson, Dennis W.

    1993-01-01

    Traditionally, long term measurements of atmospherically propagated sound signals have consisted of time series of multiminute averages. Only recently have continuous measurements with temporal resolution corresponding to turbulent time scales been available. With modern digital data acquisition systems we now have the capability to simultaneously record both acoustical and meteorological parameters with sufficient temporal resolution to allow us to examine in detail relationships between fluctuating sound and the meteorological variables, particularly wind and temperature, which locally determine the acoustic refractive index. The atmospheric acoustic propagation medium can be treated as a nonlinear dynamical system, a kind of signal processor whose innards depend on thermodynamic and turbulent processes in the atmosphere. The atmosphere is an inherently nonlinear dynamical system. In fact one simple model of atmospheric convection, the Lorenz system, may well be the most widely studied of all dynamical systems. In this paper we report some results of our having applied methods used to characterize nonlinear dynamical systems to study the characteristics of acoustical signals propagated through the atmosphere. For example, we investigate whether or not it is possible to parameterize signal fluctuations in terms of fractal dimensions. For time series one such parameter is the limit capacity dimension. Nicolis and Nicolis were among the first to use the kind of methods we have to study the properties of low dimension global attractors.

  9. Acoustic emission and shape memory effect in the martensitic transformation.

    PubMed

    Sreekala, S; Ananthakrishna, G

    2003-04-01

    Acoustic emission signals are known to exhibit a high degree of reproducibility in time and show correlations with the growth and shrinkage of martensite domains when athermal martensites are subjected to repeated thermal cycling in a restricted temperature range. We show that a recently introduced two dimensional model for the martensitic transformation mimics these features. We also show that these features are related to the shape memory effect where near full reversal of morphological features are seen under these thermal cycling conditions.

  10. Sliding wear studies using acoustic emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lingard, S.; Yu, C. W.; Yau, C. F.

    1993-04-01

    Deformation processes in solids, such as dislocation movements under plastic flow, crack propagation and void crushing, produce stress waves at ultrasonic frequencies, usually described as acoustic emission (AE), which can be detected by sensitive instruments and which are related to the severity and nature of the deformations. The paper discusses the characteristics of the stress waves and their variation with wear rates, wear regimes, and friction forces, as determined during laboratory experiments on metallic specimens in relative sliding motion, both unlubricated and with elastohydrodynamic lubrication. It is shown that there are systematic relationships between the acoustic emissions, the wear rates, the frictional work inputs and established tribological contact variables. The predominant frequencies of the emissions are also evaluated and considered in relation to the materials and wear conditions.

  11. Pen-chant: Acoustic emissions of handwriting and drawing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seniuk, Andrew G.

    The sounds generated by a writing instrument ('pen-chant') provide a rich and underutilized source of information for pattern recognition. We examine the feasibility of recognition of handwritten cursive text, exclusively through an analysis of acoustic emissions. We design and implement a family of recognizers using a template matching approach, with templates and similarity measures derived variously from: smoothed amplitude signal with fixed resolution, discrete sequence of magnitudes obtained from peaks in the smoothed amplitude signal, and ordered tree obtained from a scale space signal representation. Test results are presented for recognition of isolated lowercase cursive characters and for whole words. We also present qualitative results for recognizing gestures such as circling, scratch-out, check-marks, and hatching. Our first set of results, using samples provided by the author, yield recognition rates of over 70% (alphabet) and 90% (26 words), with a confidence of +/-8%, based solely on acoustic emissions. Our second set of results uses data gathered from nine writers. These results demonstrate that acoustic emissions are a rich source of information, usable---on their own or in conjunction with image-based features---to solve pattern recognition problems. In future work, this approach can be applied to writer identification, handwriting and gesture-based computer input technology, emotion recognition, and temporal analysis of sketches.

  12. Acoustic emission feedback control for control of boiling in a microwave oven

    DOEpatents

    White, Terry L.

    1991-01-01

    An acoustic emission based feedback system for controlling the boiling level of a liquid medium in a microwave oven is provided. The acoustic emissions from the medium correlated with surface boiling is used to generate a feedback control signal proportional to the level of boiling of the medium. This signal is applied to a power controller to automatically and continuoulsly vary the power applied to the oven to control the boiling at a selected level.

  13. Detection and Classification of Whale Acoustic Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xian, Yin

    This dissertation focuses on two vital challenges in relation to whale acoustic signals: detection and classification. In detection, we evaluated the influence of the uncertain ocean environment on the spectrogram-based detector, and derived the likelihood ratio of the proposed Short Time Fourier Transform detector. Experimental results showed that the proposed detector outperforms detectors based on the spectrogram. The proposed detector is more sensitive to environmental changes because it includes phase information. In classification, our focus is on finding a robust and sparse representation of whale vocalizations. Because whale vocalizations can be modeled as polynomial phase signals, we can represent the whale calls by their polynomial phase coefficients. In this dissertation, we used the Weyl transform to capture chirp rate information, and used a two dimensional feature set to represent whale vocalizations globally. Experimental results showed that our Weyl feature set outperforms chirplet coefficients and MFCC (Mel Frequency Cepstral Coefficients) when applied to our collected data. Since whale vocalizations can be represented by polynomial phase coefficients, it is plausible that the signals lie on a manifold parameterized by these coefficients. We also studied the intrinsic structure of high dimensional whale data by exploiting its geometry. Experimental results showed that nonlinear mappings such as Laplacian Eigenmap and ISOMAP outperform linear mappings such as PCA and MDS, suggesting that the whale acoustic data is nonlinear. We also explored deep learning algorithms on whale acoustic data. We built each layer as convolutions with either a PCA filter bank (PCANet) or a DCT filter bank (DCTNet). With the DCT filter bank, each layer has different a time-frequency scale representation, and from this, one can extract different physical information. Experimental results showed that our PCANet and DCTNet achieve high classification rate on the whale

  14. Acoustic emission signatures of damage modes in concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggelis, D. G.; Mpalaskas, A. C.; Matikas, T. E.; Van Hemelrijck, D.

    2014-03-01

    The characterization of the dominant fracture mode may assist in the prediction of the remaining life of a concrete structure due to the sequence between successive tensile and shear mechanisms. Acoustic emission sensors record the elastic responses after any fracture event converting them into electric waveforms. The characteristics of the waveforms vary according to the movement of the crack tips, enabling characterization of the original mode. In this study fracture experiments on concrete beams are conducted. The aim is to examine the typical acoustic signals emitted by different fracture modes (namely tension due to bending and shear) in a concrete matrix. This is an advancement of a recent study focusing on smaller scale mortar and marble specimens. The dominant stress field and ultimate fracture mode is controlled by modification of the four-point bending setup while acoustic emission is monitored by six sensors at fixed locations. Conclusions about how to distinguish the sources based on waveform parameters of time domain (duration, rise time) and frequency are drawn. Specifically, emissions during the shear loading exhibit lower frequencies and longer duration than tensile. Results show that, combination of AE features may help to characterize the shift between dominant fracture modes and contribute to the structural health monitoring of concrete. This offers the basis for in-situ application provided that the distortion of the signal due to heterogeneous wave path is accounted for.

  15. Acoustic emission source mechanisms for steel bridge material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, M.; Yu, J.; Ziehl, P.; Caicedo, J.; Matta, F.; Guo, S.; Sutton, M.

    2013-01-01

    Over the past twenty years acoustic emission (AE) has been studied for applications to the structural health monitoring (SHM) of metallic structures. The success of AE for prognosis of in-service steel bridges depends on the reliability of the received AE signals. The emphasis of this paper is on the characterization of acoustic emission source mechanisms for ASTM A572 grade 50 steel. The source characterization was aided by Digital Imaging Correlation (DIC) and Scanning Electronic Microscopy (SEM). The results indicate that both ductile and brittle mechanisms can produce AE during fatigue crack growth in the steel. However, the fracture mechanisms are predominately ductile. A key preliminary finding is that fatigue crack extension does not generally produce AE events in the early stage of fatigue crack growth for the steel bridge material investigated.

  16. Monitoring of acoustic emission activity using thin wafer piezoelectric sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trujillo, Blaine; Zagrai, Andrei; Meisner, Daniel; Momeni, Sepand

    2014-03-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) is a well-known technique for monitoring onset and propagation of material damage. The technique has demonstrated utility in assessment of metallic and composite materials in applications ranging from civil structures to aerospace vehicles. While over the course of few decades AE hardware has changed dramatically with the sensors experiencing little changes. A traditional acoustic emission sensor solution utilizes a thickness resonance of the internal piezoelectric element which, coupled with internal amplification circuit, results in relatively large sensor footprint. Thin wafer piezoelectric sensors are small and unobtrusive, but they have seen limited AE applications due to low signal-to-noise ratio and other operation difficulties. In this contribution, issues and possible solutions pertaining to the utility of thin wafer piezoelectrics as AE sensors are discussed. Results of AE monitoring of fatigue damage using thin wafer piezoelectric and conventional AE sensors are presented.

  17. Simple discrimination method between False Acoustic Emission and Acoustic Emission revealed by piezoelectric sensors, in Gran Sasso mountain measurements (L)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diodati, Paolo; Piazza, Stefano

    2004-07-01

    Recently it was shown, studying data acquired with in-situ measurements on the Gran Sasso mountain (Italy), for about ten years, by means of a high sensitivity transducer coupled to the free-end section of a stainless steel rod fixed by cement in a rock-drill hole 10 m high, about 2500 m above sea level, that Acoustic Emission (AE) can be affected by more than 90% False Acoustic Emission (FAE) of an electromagnetic origin. A very simple method to solve the problem of the discrimination between AE events due to elastic waves, from FAE signals, due to electromagnetic noise, both coming from the same ``reception-point,'' is presented. The reliability of the obtained separation is confirmed also by the reported amplitude and time distribution of AE events, typical of fracture dynamics and those of FAE events, similar to those of noise.

  18. Wavelet-based acoustic emission detection method with adaptive thresholding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menon, Sunil; Schoess, Jeffrey N.; Hamza, Rida; Busch, Darryl

    2000-06-01

    Reductions in Navy maintenance budgets and available personnel have dictated the need to transition from time-based to 'condition-based' maintenance. Achieving this will require new enabling diagnostic technologies. One such technology, the use of acoustic emission for the early detection of helicopter rotor head dynamic component faults, has been investigated by Honeywell Technology Center for its rotor acoustic monitoring system (RAMS). This ambitious, 38-month, proof-of-concept effort, which was a part of the Naval Surface Warfare Center Air Vehicle Diagnostics System program, culminated in a successful three-week flight test of the RAMS system at Patuxent River Flight Test Center in September 1997. The flight test results demonstrated that stress-wave acoustic emission technology can detect signals equivalent to small fatigue cracks in rotor head components and can do so across the rotating articulated rotor head joints and in the presence of other background acoustic noise generated during flight operation. This paper presents the results of stress wave data analysis of the flight-test dataset using wavelet-based techniques to assess background operational noise vs. machinery failure detection results.

  19. Acoustic Emission Analysis Applet (AEAA) Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, Charles T.; Roth, Don J.

    2013-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research and NASA White Sands Test Facility have developed software supporting an automated pressure vessel structural health monitoring (SHM) system based on acoustic emissions (AE). The software, referred to as the Acoustic Emission Analysis Applet (AEAA), provides analysts with a tool that can interrogate data collected on Digital Wave Corp. and Physical Acoustics Corp. software using a wide spectrum of powerful filters and charts. This software can be made to work with any data once the data format is known. The applet will compute basic AE statistics, and statistics as a function of time and pressure (see figure). AEAA provides value added beyond the analysis provided by the respective vendors' analysis software. The software can handle data sets of unlimited size. A wide variety of government and commercial applications could benefit from this technology, notably requalification and usage tests for compressed gas and hydrogen-fueled vehicles. Future enhancements will add features similar to a "check engine" light on a vehicle. Once installed, the system will ultimately be used to alert International Space Station crewmembers to critical structural instabilities, but will have little impact to missions otherwise. Diagnostic information could then be transmitted to experienced technicians on the ground in a timely manner to determine whether pressure vessels have been impacted, are structurally unsound, or can be safely used to complete the mission.

  20. A potential means of using acoustic emission for crack detection under cyclic-load conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, A.; Klima, S. J.

    1973-01-01

    A preliminary investigation was conducted to assess the feasibility of monitoring acoustic emission signals from fatigue cracks during cyclic bend tests. Plate specimens of 6A1-4V titanium, 2219-T87 aluminum, and 18-Ni maraging steel were tested with and without crack starter notches. It was found that significant acoustic emission signals could be detected in the frequency range from 100 kHz to 400 kHz. Cracks emanating from starter notches were monitored by the ultrasonic pulse-echo technique and periodically measured by micro-optical examination. Methods used to reduce the effects of extraneous noises (i.e., machine noises, fretting) are described. A frequency spectrum analyzer was used to characterize the emissions and to evaluate methods used to acquire the signals (i.e., transducer location, bandwidth selection). The investigation indicated that it was possible to extract meaningful acoustic emission signals in a cyclic bend machine environment.

  1. Identifying Potential Noise Sources within Acoustic Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holcomb, Victoria; Lewalle, Jacques

    2013-11-01

    We test a new algorithm for its ability to detect sources of noise within random background. The goal of these tests is to better understand how to identify sources within acoustic signals while simultaneously determining the strengths and weaknesses of the algorithm in question. Unlike previously published algorithms, the antenna method does not pinpoint events by looking for the most energetic portions of a signal. The algorithm searches for the ideal lag combinations between three signals by taking excerpts of possible events. The excerpt with the lowest calculated minimum distance between possible events is how the algorithm identifies sources. At the minimum distance, the events are close in time and frequency. This method can be compared to the cross correlation and denoising methods to better understand its effectiveness. This work is supported in part by Spectral Energies LLC, under an SBIR grant from AFRL, as well as the Syracuse University MAE department.

  2. Acoustic emission classification for failure prediction due to mechanical fatigue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emamian, Vahid; Kaveh, Mostafa; Tewfik, Ahmed H.

    2000-06-01

    Acoustic Emission signals (AE), generated by the formation and growth of micro-cracks in metal components, have the potential for use in mechanical fault detection in monitoring complex- shaped components in machinery including helicopters and aircraft. A major challenge for an AE-based fault detection algorithm is to distinguish crack-related AE signals from other interfering transient signals, such as fretting-related AE signals and electromagnetic transients. Although under a controlled laboratory environment we have fewer interference sources, there are other undesired sources which have to be considered. In this paper, we present some methods, which make their decision based on the features extracted from time-delay and joint time-frequency components by means of a Self- Organizing Map (SOM) neural network using experimental data collected in a laboratory by colleagues at the Georgia Institute of Technology.

  3. Acoustic emission: The first half century

    SciTech Connect

    Drouillard, T.F.

    1994-08-01

    The technology of acoustic emission (AE) is approaching the half century mark, having had its beginning in 1950 with the work of Joseph Kaiser. During the 1950s and 1960s researchers delved into the fundamentals of acoustic emission, developed instrumentation specifically for AE, and characterized the AE behavior of many materials. AE was starting to be recognized for its unique capabilities as an NDT method for monitoring dynamic processes. In the decade of the 1970s research activities became more coordinated and directed with the formation of the working groups, and its use as an NDT method continued to increase for industrial applications. In the 1980s the computer became a basic component for both instrumentation and data analysis, and today it has sparked a resurgence of opportunities for research and development. Today we are seeing a transition to waveform-based AE analysis and a shift in AE activities with more emphasis on applications than on research. From the beginning, we have been fortunate to have had so many dedicated savants with different fields of expertise contribute in a collective way to bring AE to a mature, fully developed technology and leave a legacy of knowledge recorded in its literature. AE literature has been a key indicator of the amount of activity, the proportion of research to application, the emphasis on what was of current interest, and the direction AE has taken. The following is a brief survey of the history of acoustic emission with emphasis on development of the infrastructure over the past half century.

  4. Acoustic emission from composite-reinforced metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henneke, E. G., II; Herakovich, C. T.; Jones, G. L.; Renieri, M. P.

    1975-01-01

    Acoustic-emission (AE) count rates are presented for tensile loading of unidirectional boron-epoxy and for aluminum sheets reinforced with unidirectional boron-epoxy. It is shown that different prepreg materials have different characteristic AE patterns. Results from composite-reinforced metal specimens show that early failures are accompanied by a sharp increase in AE count rate at the knee of the bilinear stress-strain diagram. It is further shown that the count rates are a function of specimen fabrication and that higher total counts do not necessarily correspond to early failures.

  5. Acoustic emission characterization using AE (parameter) delay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. H., Jr.; Lee, S. S.

    1983-01-01

    The acoustic emission (AE) parameter delay concept is defined as that particular measured value of a parameter at which a specified baseline level of cumulative AE activity is reached. The parameter can be from any of a broad range of elastic, plastic, viscoelastic, and fracture mechanics parameters, as well as their combinations. Such parameters include stress, load, strain, displacement, time, temperature, loading cycle, unloading stress, stress intensity factor, strain energy release rate, and crack tip plasticity zone size, while the AE activity may be AE event counts, ringdown counts, energy, event duration, etc., as well as their combinations. Attention is given to examples for the AE parameter delay concept, together with various correlations.

  6. Bird population density estimated from acoustic signals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dawson, D.K.; Efford, M.G.

    2009-01-01

    Many animal species are detected primarily by sound. Although songs, calls and other sounds are often used for population assessment, as in bird point counts and hydrophone surveys of cetaceans, there are few rigorous methods for estimating population density from acoustic data. 2. The problem has several parts - distinguishing individuals, adjusting for individuals that are missed, and adjusting for the area sampled. Spatially explicit capture-recapture (SECR) is a statistical methodology that addresses jointly the second and third parts of the problem. We have extended SECR to use uncalibrated information from acoustic signals on the distance to each source. 3. We applied this extension of SECR to data from an acoustic survey of ovenbird Seiurus aurocapilla density in an eastern US deciduous forest with multiple four-microphone arrays. We modelled average power from spectrograms of ovenbird songs measured within a window of 0??7 s duration and frequencies between 4200 and 5200 Hz. 4. The resulting estimates of the density of singing males (0??19 ha -1 SE 0??03 ha-1) were consistent with estimates of the adult male population density from mist-netting (0??36 ha-1 SE 0??12 ha-1). The fitted model predicts sound attenuation of 0??11 dB m-1 (SE 0??01 dB m-1) in excess of losses from spherical spreading. 5.Synthesis and applications. Our method for estimating animal population density from acoustic signals fills a gap in the census methods available for visually cryptic but vocal taxa, including many species of bird and cetacean. The necessary equipment is simple and readily available; as few as two microphones may provide adequate estimates, given spatial replication. The method requires that individuals detected at the same place are acoustically distinguishable and all individuals vocalize during the recording interval, or that the per capita rate of vocalization is known. We believe these requirements can be met, with suitable field methods, for a significant

  7. An acoustic emission study of plastic deformation in polycrystalline aluminium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bill, R. C.; Frederick, J. R.; Felbeck, D. K.

    1979-01-01

    Acoustic emission experiments were performed on polycrystalline and single crystal 99.99% aluminum while undergoing tensile deformation. It was found that acoustic emission counts as a function of grain size showed a maximum value at a particular grain size. Furthermore, the slip area associated with this particular grain size corresponded to the threshold level of detectability of single dislocation slip events. The rate of decline in acoustic emission activity as grain size is increased beyond the peak value suggests that grain boundary associated dislocation sources are giving rise to the bulk of the detected acoustic emissions.

  8. Low-Frequency Acoustic Signals Propagation in Buried Pipelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovchinnikov, A. L.; Lapshin, B. M.

    2016-01-01

    The article deals with the issues concerning acoustic signals propagation in the large-diameter oil pipelines caused by mechanical action on the pipe body. Various mechanisms of signals attenuation are discussed. It is shown that the calculation of the attenuation caused only by internal energy loss, i.e, the presence of viscosity, thermal conductivity and liquid pipeline wall friction lead to low results. The results of experimental studies, carried out using the existing pipeline with a diameter of 1200 mm. are shown. It is experimentally proved that the main mechanism of signal attenuation is the energy emission into the environment. The numerical values of attenuation coefficients that are 0,14- 0.18 dB/m for the pipeline of 1200 mm in diameter, in the frequency range from 50 Hz to 500 Hz, are determined.

  9. Signature analysis of acoustic emission from graphite/epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, S. S.; Henneke, E. G., II

    1977-01-01

    Acoustic emissions were monitored for crack extension across and parallel to the fibers in a single ply and multiply laminates of graphite epoxy composites. Spectrum analysis was performed on the transient signal to ascertain if the fracture mode can be characterized by a particular spectral pattern. The specimens were loaded to failure quasistatically in a tensile machine. Visual observations were made via either an optical microscope or a television camera. The results indicate that several types of characteristics in the time and frequency domain correspond to different types of failure.

  10. Acoustic emission testing of composite vessels under sustained loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lark, R. F.; Moorhead, P. E.

    1978-01-01

    Acoustic emissions (AE) generated from Kevlar 49/epoxy composite pressure vessels subjected to sustained load-to-failure tests were studied. Data from two different transducer locations on the vessels were compared. It was found that AE from vessel wall-mounted transducers showed a wide variance from those for identical vessels subjected to the same pressure loading. Emissions from boss-mounted transducers did, however, yield values that were relatively consistent. It appears that the signals from the boss-mounted transducers represent an integrated average of the emissions generated by fibers fracturing during the vessel tests. The AE from boss-mounted transducers were also independent of time for vessel failure. This suggests that a similar number of fiber fractures must occur prior to initiation of vessel failure. These studies indicate a potential for developing an AE test procedure for predicting the residual service life or integrity of composite vessels.

  11. Spatial acoustic signal processing for immersive communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkins, Joshua

    Computing is rapidly becoming ubiquitous as users expect devices that can augment and interact naturally with the world around them. In these systems it is necessary to have an acoustic front-end that is able to capture and reproduce natural human communication. Whether the end point is a speech recognizer or another human listener, the reduction of noise, reverberation, and acoustic echoes are all necessary and complex challenges. The focus of this dissertation is to provide a general method for approaching these problems using spherical microphone and loudspeaker arrays.. In this work, a theory of capturing and reproducing three-dimensional acoustic fields is introduced from a signal processing perspective. In particular, the decomposition of the spatial part of the acoustic field into an orthogonal basis of spherical harmonics provides not only a general framework for analysis, but also many processing advantages. The spatial sampling error limits the upper frequency range with which a sound field can be accurately captured or reproduced. In broadband arrays, the cost and complexity of using multiple transducers is an issue. This work provides a flexible optimization method for determining the location of array elements to minimize the spatial aliasing error. The low frequency array processing ability is also limited by the SNR, mismatch, and placement error of transducers. To address this, a robust processing method is introduced and used to design a reproduction system for rendering over arbitrary loudspeaker arrays or binaurally over headphones. In addition to the beamforming problem, the multichannel acoustic echo cancellation (MCAEC) issue is also addressed. A MCAEC must adaptively estimate and track the constantly changing loudspeaker-room-microphone response to remove the sound field presented over the loudspeakers from that captured by the microphones. In the multichannel case, the system is overdetermined and many adaptive schemes fail to converge to

  12. Predicting failure: acoustic emission of berlinite under compression.

    PubMed

    Nataf, Guillaume F; Castillo-Villa, Pedro O; Sellappan, Pathikumar; Kriven, Waltraud M; Vives, Eduard; Planes, Antoni; Salje, Ekhard K H

    2014-07-01

    Acoustic emission has been measured and statistical characteristics analyzed during the stress-induced collapse of porous berlinite, AlPO4, containing up to 50 vol% porosity. Stress collapse occurs in a series of individual events (avalanches), and each avalanche leads to a jerk in sample compression with corresponding acoustic emission (AE) signals. The distribution of AE avalanche energies can be approximately described by a power law p(E)dE = E(-ε)dE (ε ~ 1.8) over a large stress interval. We observed several collapse mechanisms whereby less porous minerals show the superposition of independent jerks, which were not related to the major collapse at the failure stress. In highly porous berlinite (40% and 50%) an increase of energy emission occurred near the failure point. In contrast, the less porous samples did not show such an increase in energy emission. Instead, in the near vicinity of the main failure point they showed a reduction in the energy exponent to ~ 1.4, which is consistent with the value reported for compressed porous systems displaying critical behavior. This suggests that a critical avalanche regime with a lack of precursor events occurs. In this case, all preceding large events were 'false alarms' and unrelated to the main failure event. Our results identify a method to use pico-seismicity detection of foreshocks to warn of mine collapse before the main failure (the collapse) occurs, which can be applied to highly porous materials only.

  13. Acoustic emission assessment of interface cracking in thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Li; Zhong, Zhi-Chun; Zhou, Yi-Chun; Zhu, Wang; Zhang, Zhi-Biao; Cai, Can-Ying; Lu, Chun-Sheng

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, acoustic emission (AE) and digital image correlation methods were applied to monitor interface cracking in thermal barrier coatings under compression. The interface failure process can be identified via its AE features, including buckling, delamination incubation and spallation. According to the Fourier transformation of AE signals, there are four different failure modes: surface vertical cracks, opening and sliding interface cracks, and substrate deformation. The characteristic frequency of AE signals from surface vertical cracks is 0.21 MHz, whilst that of the two types of interface cracks are 0.43 and 0.29 MHz, respectively. The energy released of the two types of interface cracks are 0.43 and 0.29 MHz, respectively. Based on the energy released from cracking and the AE signals, a relationship is established between the interface crack length and AE parameters, which is in good agreement with experimental results.

  14. [Shape acoustical recognition and characteristics of sonar signals by the dolphin T. truncatus].

    PubMed

    Dziedzic, A; Alcuri, G

    1977-10-17

    During the shape acoustical recognition process, the signal processing reveals two phases in the T. truncatus sonar emission. In the course of the first phase, the wide-band signals are invariant, during the second phase, near the end of the approach, their temporal and spectral characteristics change along with the shape of the objects to identify.

  15. Acoustic emission monitoring of HFIR vessel during hydrostatic testing

    SciTech Connect

    Friesel, M.A.; Dawson, J.F.

    1992-08-01

    This report discusses the results and conclusions reached from applying acoustic emission monitoring to surveillance of the High Flux Isotope Reactor vessel during pressure testing. The objective of the monitoring was to detect crack growth and/or fluid leakage should it occur during the pressure test. The report addresses the approach, acoustic emission instrumentation, installation, calibration, and test results.

  16. Acoustic Emission Analysis of Shuttle Thermal Protection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, John; Hooker, Jeffery; Immer, Christopher; Walker, James

    2004-01-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) signals generated from projectile impacts on reinforced and advanced carbon/carbon (RCC and ACC) panels, fired from a compressed-gas gun, identify the type and severity of damage sustained by the target. This type of testing is vital in providing the required "return to flight" (RTF) data needed to ensure continued and safe operation of NASA's Space Shuttle fleet. The gas gun at Kennedy Space Center is capable of propelling 12-inch by 3-inch cylinders of external tank (ET) foam at exit velocities exceeding 1,000 feet per second. Conventional AE analysis techniques require time domain processing of impulse data, along with amplitude distribution analysis. It is well known that identical source excitations can produce a wide range of AE signals amplitudes. In order to satisfy RTF goals, it is necessary to identify impact energy levels above and below damage thresholds. Spectral analysis techniques involving joint time frequency analysis (JTFA) are used to reinforce time domain AE analysis. JTFA analysis of the AE signals consists of short-time Fourier transforms (STFT) and the Huang-Hilbert transform (HHT). The HHT provides a very good measure of the instantaneous frequency of impulse events dominated by a single component. Identifying failure modes and cracking of fibers from flexural and/or extensional mode acoustic signals will help support in-flight as well as postflight impact analysis.

  17. Acoustic signal detection of manatee calls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niezrecki, Christopher; Phillips, Richard; Meyer, Michael; Beusse, Diedrich O.

    2003-04-01

    The West Indian manatee (trichechus manatus latirostris) has become endangered partly because of a growing number of collisions with boats. A system to warn boaters of the presence of manatees, that can signal to boaters that manatees are present in the immediate vicinity, could potentially reduce these boat collisions. In order to identify the presence of manatees, acoustic methods are employed. Within this paper, three different detection algorithms are used to detect the calls of the West Indian manatee. The detection systems are tested in the laboratory using simulated manatee vocalizations from an audio compact disc. The detection method that provides the best overall performance is able to correctly identify ~=96% of the manatee vocalizations. However the system also results in a false positive rate of ~=16%. The results of this work may ultimately lead to the development of a manatee warning system that can warn boaters of the presence of manatees.

  18. Acoustic Emission from Breaking a Bamboo Chopstick.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Sun-Ting; Wang, Li-Min; Huang, Panpan; Yang, Zhengning; Chang, Chin-De; Hong, Tzay-Ming

    2016-01-22

    The acoustic emission from breaking a bamboo chopstick or a bundle of spaghetti is found to exhibit similar behavior as the famous seismic laws of Gutenberg and Richter, Omori, and Båth. By the use of a force-sensing detector, we establish a positive correlation between the statistics of sound intensity and the magnitude of a tremor. We also manage to derive these laws analytically without invoking the concept of a phase transition, self-organized criticality, or fractal. Our model is deterministic and relies on the existence of a structured cross section, either fibrous or layered. This success at explaining the power-law behavior supports the proposal that geometry is sometimes more important than mechanics. PMID:26849601

  19. Acoustic Emission from Breaking a Bamboo Chopstick

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Sun-Ting; Wang, Li-Min; Huang, Panpan; Yang, Zhengning; Chang, Chin-De; Hong, Tzay-Ming

    2016-01-01

    The acoustic emission from breaking a bamboo chopstick or a bundle of spaghetti is found to exhibit similar behavior as the famous seismic laws of Gutenberg and Richter, Omori, and Båth. By the use of a force-sensing detector, we establish a positive correlation between the statistics of sound intensity and the magnitude of a tremor. We also manage to derive these laws analytically without invoking the concept of a phase transition, self-organized criticality, or fractal. Our model is deterministic and relies on the existence of a structured cross section, either fibrous or layered. This success at explaining the power-law behavior supports the proposal that geometry is sometimes more important than mechanics.

  20. Acoustic emission technology for space applications

    SciTech Connect

    Friesel, M.A.; Lemon, D.K.; Skorpik, J.R.; Hutton, P.H.

    1989-05-01

    Clearly the structural and functional integrity of space station components is a primary requirement. The combinations of advanced materials, new designs, and an unusual environment increase the need for inservice monitoring to help assure component integrity. Continuous monitoring of the components using acoustic emission (AE) methods can provide early indication of structural or functional distress, thus allowing time to plan remedial action. The term ''AE'' refers to energy impulses propagated from a growing crack in a solid material or from a leak in a pressurized pipe or tube. In addition to detecting a crack or leak, AE methods can provide information on the location of the defect and an estimate of crack growth rate and leak rate. 8 figs.

  1. Acoustic emissions correlated with hydration of Saguaro Cactus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wardell, L. J.; Rowe, C. A.

    2013-12-01

    For some years it has been demonstrated that hardwood trees produce acoustic emissions during periods of drought, which arise from cavitation in the xylem as water is withdrawn. These emissions not only provide insights into the fluid transport behavior within these trees, but also the degree to which cavitation can proceed before inevitable tree mortality. Such studies can have significant impact on our understanding of forest die-off in the face of climate change. Plant mortality is not limited to woody trees, however, and it is not only the coniferous and deciduous forests whose response to climate and rainfall changes are important. In the desert Southwest we observe changes to survival rates of numerous species of flora. One of the most conspicuous of these plants is the iconic Saguaro Cactus (Carnegiea gigantean). These behemoths of the Sonoran Desert are very sensitive to small perturbations in their environment. Specifically, during the summer monsoon season when the cacti become well-hydrated, they can absorb hundreds of gallons of water within a very short time frame. We have obtained a juvenile saguaro on which we are conducting experiments to monitor acoustic emissions during hydration and dessication cycles. We will report on our observations obtained using piezoelectric ceramic accelerometers whose signals are digitized up to 44 Khz and recorded during hydration.

  2. Acoustic emissions correlated with hydration of Saguaro Cactus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wardell, L. J.; Rowe, C. A.

    2012-12-01

    For some years it has been demonstrated that hardwood trees produce acoustic emissions during periods of drought, which arise from cavitation in the xylem as water is withdrawn. These emissions not only provide insights into the fluid transport behavior within these trees, but also the degree to which cavitation can proceed before inevitable tree mortality. Such studies can have significant impact on our understanding of forest die-off in the face of climate change. Plant mortality is not limited to woody trees, however, and it is not only the coniferous and deciduous forests whose response to climate and rainfall changes are important. In the desert Southwest we observe changes to survival rates of numerous species of flora. One of the most conspicuous of these plants is the iconic Saguaro Cactus (Carnegiea gigantean). These behemoths of the Sonoran Desert are very sensitive to small perturbations in their environment. Specifically, during the summer monsoon season when the cacti become well-hydrated, they can absorb hundreds of gallons of water within a very short time frame. We have obtained a juvenile saguaro on which we are conducting experiments to monitor acoustic emissions during hydration and dessication cycles. We will report on our observations obtained using piezoelectric ceramic accelerometers whose signals are digitized up to 44 Khz and recorded during hydration.

  3. Based on optical fiber Michelson interferometer for acoustic emission detection experimental research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Yijun; Qu, Dandan; Deng, Hu

    2013-08-01

    A type of Michelson interferometer with two optical fiber loop reflectors acoustic emission sensor is proposed in the article to detect the vibrations produced by ultrasonic waves propagating in a solid body. Two optical fiber loop reflectors are equivalent to the sensing arm and the reference arm instead of traditional Michelson interferometer end reflecter Theoretical analyses indicate that the sensitivity of the system has been remarkably increased because of the decrease of the losses of light energy. The best operating point of optical fiber sensor is fixed by theoretical derivation and simulation of computer, and the signal frequency which is detected by the sensor is the frequency of input signal. PZT (Piezoelectric Ceramic) is powered by signal generator as known ultrasonic source, The Polarization controller is used to make the reflected light interference,The fiber length is changed by adjusting the DC voltage on the PZT with the fiber loop to make the sensor system response that ΔΦ is closed to π/2. the signal basis frequency detected by the sensor is the frequency of the input signal. Then impacts the surface of the marble slab with home-made mechanical acoustic emission source. And detect it. and then the frequency characteristic of acoustic emission signal is obtained by Fourier technique. The experimental results indicate that the system can identify the frequency characteristic of acoustic emission signal, and it can be also used to detect the surface feeble vibration which is generated by ultrasonic waves propagating in material structure.

  4. Using the Acoustic Emission Technique for Estimating Body Composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Solís, J. L.; Sanchis-Sabater, A.; Sosa-Aquino, M.; Gutiérrez-Juárez, G.; Vargas-Luna, M.; Bernal-Alvarado, J.; Huerta-Franco, R.

    2003-09-01

    This work proposes a new technique for estimation of body composition by using acoustic emission. A simple apparatus for the acoustic emission is proposed.The estimation of the body composition is made by analyzing the correlation between a set of acoustic resonance and skinfold measurements. One device was designed to measure the position and width of the acoustic resonances and a caliper was used to measure the skinfolds. The results show the plausibility of application of the method to measurement the human body fat.

  5. The acoustic emissions of cavitation bubbles in stretched vortices.

    PubMed

    Chang, Natasha A; Ceccio, Steven L

    2011-11-01

    Pairs of unequal strength, counter-rotating vortices were produced in order to examine the inception, dynamics, and acoustic emission of cavitation bubbles in rapidly stretching vortices. The acoustic signatures of these cavitation bubbles were characterized during their inception, growth, and collapse. Growing and collapsing bubbles often produced a sharp, broadband, pop sound. The spectrum of these bubbles, and the peak resonant frequency can generally be related to quiescent flow bubble dynamics and corresponding resonant frequencies. However, some elongated cavitation bubbles produced a short tonal burst, or chirp, with frequencies on the order of a few kilohertz. Theses frequencies are too low to be related to resonant frequencies of a bubble in a quiescent flow. Instead, the frequency content of the acoustic signal during bubble inception and growth is related to the volumetric oscillations of the bubble while it interacted with vortical flow that surrounds the bubble (i.e., the resonant frequency of the vortex-bubble system). A relationship was determined between the observed peak frequency of the oscillations, the highly stretched vortex properties, and the water nuclei content. It was found that different cavitation spectra could relate to different flow and fluid properties and therefore would not scale in the same manner.

  6. Acoustic signalling reflects personality in a social mammal

    PubMed Central

    Friel, Mary; Kunc, Hansjoerg P.; Griffin, Kym; Asher, Lucy; Collins, Lisa M.

    2016-01-01

    Social interactions among individuals are often mediated through acoustic signals. If acoustic signals are consistent and related to an individual's personality, these consistent individual differences in signalling may be an important driver in social interactions. However, few studies in non-human mammals have investigated the relationship between acoustic signalling and personality. Here we show that acoustic signalling rate is repeatable and strongly related to personality in a highly social mammal, the domestic pig (Sus scrofa domestica). Furthermore, acoustic signalling varied between environments of differing quality, with males from a poor-quality environment having a reduced vocalization rate compared with females and males from an enriched environment. Such differences may be mediated by personality with pigs from a poor-quality environment having more reactive and more extreme personality scores compared with pigs from an enriched environment. Our results add to the evidence that acoustic signalling reflects personality in a non-human mammal. Signals reflecting personalities may have far reaching consequences in shaping the evolution of social behaviours as acoustic communication forms an integral part of animal societies. PMID:27429775

  7. Acoustic signalling reflects personality in a social mammal.

    PubMed

    Friel, Mary; Kunc, Hansjoerg P; Griffin, Kym; Asher, Lucy; Collins, Lisa M

    2016-06-01

    Social interactions among individuals are often mediated through acoustic signals. If acoustic signals are consistent and related to an individual's personality, these consistent individual differences in signalling may be an important driver in social interactions. However, few studies in non-human mammals have investigated the relationship between acoustic signalling and personality. Here we show that acoustic signalling rate is repeatable and strongly related to personality in a highly social mammal, the domestic pig (Sus scrofa domestica). Furthermore, acoustic signalling varied between environments of differing quality, with males from a poor-quality environment having a reduced vocalization rate compared with females and males from an enriched environment. Such differences may be mediated by personality with pigs from a poor-quality environment having more reactive and more extreme personality scores compared with pigs from an enriched environment. Our results add to the evidence that acoustic signalling reflects personality in a non-human mammal. Signals reflecting personalities may have far reaching consequences in shaping the evolution of social behaviours as acoustic communication forms an integral part of animal societies. PMID:27429775

  8. FRP/steel composite damage acoustic emission monitoring and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dongsheng; Chen, Zhi

    2015-04-01

    FRP is a new material with good mechanical properties, such as high strength of extension, low density, good corrosion resistance and anti-fatigue. FRP and steel composite has gotten a wide range of applications in civil engineering because of its good performance. As the FRP/steel composite get more and more widely used, the monitor of its damage is also getting more important. To monitor this composite, acoustic emission (AE) is a good choice. In this study, we prepare four identical specimens to conduct our test. During the testing process, the AE character parameters and mechanics properties were obtained. Damaged properties of FRP/steel composite were analyzed through acoustic emission (AE) signals. By the growing trend of AE accumulated energy, the severity of the damage made on FRP/steel composite was estimated. The AE sentry function has been successfully used to study damage progression and fracture emerge release rate of composite laminates. This technique combines the cumulative AE energy with strain energy of the material rather than analyzes the AE information and mechanical separately.

  9. Fracture of fiber-reinforced composites analyzed via acoustic emission.

    PubMed

    Ereifej, Nadia S; Oweis, Yara G; Altarawneh, Sandra K

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the fracture resistance of composite resins using a three-point bending test and acoustic emission (AE) analysis. Three groups of specimens (n=15) were prepared: non-reinforced BelleGlass HP composite (NRC), unidirectional (UFRC) and multidirectional (MFRC) fiber-reinforced groups which respectively incorporated unidirectional Stick and multidirectional StickNet fibers. Specimens were loaded to failure in a universal testing machine while an AE system was used to detect audible signals. Initial fracture strengths and AE amplitudes were significantly lower than those at final fracture in all groups (p<0.05). Initial fracture strength of UFRC (170.0 MPa) was significantly higher than MFRC (124.6 MPa) and NRC (87.9 MPa). Final fracture strength of UFRC (198.1 MPa) was also significantly higher than MFRC (151.0 MPa) and NRC (109.2 MPa). Initial and final fracture strengths were significantly correlated (r=0.971). It was concluded that fiber reinforcement improved the fracture resistance of composite resin materials and the monitoring of acoustic signals revealed significant information regarding the fracture process. PMID:25904176

  10. Fracture of fiber-reinforced composites analyzed via acoustic emission.

    PubMed

    Ereifej, Nadia S; Oweis, Yara G; Altarawneh, Sandra K

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the fracture resistance of composite resins using a three-point bending test and acoustic emission (AE) analysis. Three groups of specimens (n=15) were prepared: non-reinforced BelleGlass HP composite (NRC), unidirectional (UFRC) and multidirectional (MFRC) fiber-reinforced groups which respectively incorporated unidirectional Stick and multidirectional StickNet fibers. Specimens were loaded to failure in a universal testing machine while an AE system was used to detect audible signals. Initial fracture strengths and AE amplitudes were significantly lower than those at final fracture in all groups (p<0.05). Initial fracture strength of UFRC (170.0 MPa) was significantly higher than MFRC (124.6 MPa) and NRC (87.9 MPa). Final fracture strength of UFRC (198.1 MPa) was also significantly higher than MFRC (151.0 MPa) and NRC (109.2 MPa). Initial and final fracture strengths were significantly correlated (r=0.971). It was concluded that fiber reinforcement improved the fracture resistance of composite resin materials and the monitoring of acoustic signals revealed significant information regarding the fracture process.

  11. Interpretation of acoustic signals from fluidzed beds

    SciTech Connect

    Halow, J.S.; Daw, C.S.; Finney, C.E.A.; Nguyen, K.

    1996-12-31

    Rhythmic {open_quotes}whooshing{close_quotes} sounds associated with rising bubbles are a characteristic feature of many fluidized beds. Although clearly distinguishable to the ear, these sounds are rather complicated in detail and seem to contain a large background of apparently irrelevant stochastic noise. While it is clear that these sounds contain some information about bed dynamics, it is not obvious how this information can be interpreted in a meaningful way. In this presentation we describe a technique for processing bed sounds that appears to work well for beds with large particles operating in a slugging or near-slugging mode. We find that our processing algorithm allows us to determine important bubble/slug features from sound measurements alone, including slug location at any point in time, the average bubble frequency and frequency variation, and corresponding dynamic pressure drops at different bed locations. We also have been able to correlate a portion of the acoustic signal with particle impacts on surfaces and particle motions near the grid. We conclude from our observations that relatively simple sound measurements can provide much diagnostic information and could be potentially used for bed control. 5 refs., 4 figs.

  12. Thirty years of underwater acoustic signal processing in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qihu

    2012-11-01

    Advances in technology and theory in 30 years of underwater acoustic signal processing and its applications in China are presented in this paper. The topics include research work in the field of underwater acoustic signal modeling, acoustic field matching, ocean waveguide and internal wave, the extraction and processing technique for acoustic vector signal information, the space/time correlation characteristics of low frequency acoustic channels, the invariant features of underwater target radiated noise, the transmission technology of underwater voice/image data and its anti-interference technique. Some frontier technologies in sonar design are also discussed, including large aperture towed line array sonar, high resolution synthetic aperture sonar, deep sea siren and deep sea manned subsea vehicle, diver detection sonar and demonstration projector of national ocean monitoring system in China, etc.

  13. Amplitude Modulations of Acoustic Communication Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turesson, Hjalmar K.

    2011-12-01

    In human speech, amplitude modulations at 3 -- 8 Hz are important for discrimination and detection. Two different neurophysiological theories have been proposed to explain this effect. The first theory proposes that, as a consequence of neocortical synaptic dynamics, signals that are amplitude modulated at 3 -- 8 Hz are propagated better than un-modulated signals, or signals modulated above 8 Hz. This suggests that neural activity elicited by vocalizations modulated at 3 -- 8 Hz is optimally transmitted, and the vocalizations better discriminated and detected. The second theory proposes that 3 -- 8 Hz amplitude modulations interact with spontaneous neocortical oscillations. Specifically, vocalizations modulated at 3 -- 8 Hz entrain local populations of neurons, which in turn, modulate the amplitude of high frequency gamma oscillations. This suggests that vocalizations modulated at 3 -- 8 Hz should induce stronger cross-frequency coupling. Similar to human speech, we found that macaque monkey vocalizations also are amplitude modulated between 3 and 8 Hz. Humans and macaque monkeys share similarities in vocal production, implying that the auditory systems subserving perception of acoustic communication signals also share similarities. Based on the similarities between human speech and macaque monkey vocalizations, we addressed how amplitude modulated vocalizations are processed in the auditory cortex of macaque monkeys, and what behavioral relevance modulations may have. Recording single neuron activity, as well as, the activity of local populations of neurons allowed us to test both of the neurophysiological theories presented above. We found that single neuron responses to vocalizations amplitude modulated at 3 -- 8 Hz resulted in better stimulus discrimination than vocalizations lacking 3 -- 8 Hz modulations, and that the effect most likely was mediated by synaptic dynamics. In contrast, we failed to find support for the oscillation-based model proposing a

  14. Acoustic Emission Analysis of Prestressed Concrete Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elfergani, H. A.; Pullin, R.; Holford, K. M.

    2011-07-01

    Corrosion is a substantial problem in numerous structures and in particular corrosion is very serious in reinforced and prestressed concrete and must, in certain applications, be given special consideration because failure may result in loss of life and high financial cost. Furthermore corrosion cannot only be considered a long term problem with many studies reporting failure of bridges and concrete pipes due to corrosion within a short period after they were constructed. The concrete pipes which transport water are examples of structures that have suffered from corrosion; for example, the pipes of The Great Man-Made River Project of Libya. Five pipe failures due to corrosion have occurred since their installation. The main reason for the damage is corrosion of prestressed wires in the pipes due to the attack of chloride ions from the surrounding soil. Detection of the corrosion in initial stages has been very important to avoid other failures and the interruption of water flow. Even though most non-destructive methods which are used in the project are able to detect wire breaks, they cannot detect the presence of corrosion. Hence in areas where no excavation has been completed, areas of serious damage can go undetected. Therefore, the major problem which faces engineers is to find the best way to detect the corrosion and prevent the pipes from deteriorating. This paper reports on the use of the Acoustic Emission (AE) technique to detect the early stages of corrosion prior to deterioration of concrete structures.

  15. Extended amplification of acoustic signals by amphibian burrows.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Matías I; Penna, Mario

    2016-07-01

    Animals relying on acoustic signals for communication must cope with the constraints imposed by the environment for sound propagation. A resource to improve signal broadcast is the use of structures that favor the emission or the reception of sounds. We conducted playback experiments to assess the effect of the burrows occupied by the frogs Eupsophus emiliopugini and E. calcaratus on the amplitude of outgoing vocalizations. In addition, we evaluated the influence of these cavities on the reception of externally generated sounds potentially interfering with conspecific communication, namely, the vocalizations emitted by four syntopic species of anurans (E. emiliopugini, E. calcaratus, Batrachyla antartandica, and Pleurodema thaul) and the nocturnal owls Strix rufipes and Glaucidium nanum. Eupsophus advertisement calls emitted from within the burrows experienced average amplitude gains of 3-6 dB at 100 cm from the burrow openings. Likewise, the incoming vocalizations of amphibians and birds were amplified on average above 6 dB inside the cavities. The amplification of internally broadcast Eupsophus vocalizations favors signal detection by nearby conspecifics. Reciprocally, the amplification of incoming conspecific and heterospecific signals facilitates the detection of neighboring males and the monitoring of the levels of potentially interfering biotic noise by resident frogs, respectively. PMID:27209276

  16. Acoustic emission spectral analysis of fiber composite failure mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egan, D. M.; Williams, J. H., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The acoustic emission of graphite fiber polyimide composite failure mechanisms was investigated with emphasis on frequency spectrum analysis. Although visual examination of spectral densities could not distinguish among fracture sources, a paired-sample t statistical analysis of mean normalized spectral densities did provide quantitative discrimination among acoustic emissions from 10 deg, 90 deg, and plus or minus 45 deg, plus or minus 45 deg sub s specimens. Comparable discrimination was not obtained for 0 deg specimens.

  17. Electron emission and acoustic emission from the fracture of graphite/epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickinson, J. T.; Jahan-Latibari, A.; Jensen, L. C.

    1985-01-01

    In past studies it has been shown that the fracture of materials leads to the emission of a variety of species, including electrons, ions, neutral molecules, and photons, all encompassed by the term 'fractoemission' (FE). In this paper, electron emission (EE) from the fracture of single graphite fibers and neat epoxy resin is examined. Measurements of EE are also combined with the detection of acoustic emission (AE) during the testing of graphite-epoxy composite specimens with various fiber orientation. The characteristics of these signals are related to known failure mechanisms in fiber-reinforced plastics. This study suggests that by comparing data from AE and FE measurements, one can detect and distinguish the onset of internal and external failure in composites. EE measurements are also shown to be sensitive to the locus of fracture in a composite material.

  18. Experimental observation of acoustic emissions generated by a pulsed proton beam from a hospital-based clinical cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Kevin C.; Solberg, Timothy D.; Avery, Stephen; Vander Stappen, François; Janssens, Guillaume; Prieels, Damien; Bawiec, Christopher R.; Lewin, Peter A.; Sehgal, Chandra M.

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: To measure the acoustic signal generated by a pulsed proton spill from a hospital-based clinical cyclotron. Methods: An electronic function generator modulated the IBA C230 isochronous cyclotron to create a pulsed proton beam. The acoustic emissions generated by the proton beam were measured in water using a hydrophone. The acoustic measurements were repeated with increasing proton current and increasing distance between detector and beam. Results: The cyclotron generated proton spills with rise times of 18 μs and a maximum measured instantaneous proton current of 790 nA. Acoustic emissions generated by the proton energy deposition were measured to be on the order of mPa. The origin of the acoustic wave was identified as the proton beam based on the correlation between acoustic emission arrival time and distance between the hydrophone and proton beam. The acoustic frequency spectrum peaked at 10 kHz, and the acoustic pressure amplitude increased monotonically with increasing proton current. Conclusions: The authors report the first observation of acoustic emissions generated by a proton beam from a hospital-based clinical cyclotron. When modulated by an electronic function generator, the cyclotron is capable of creating proton spills with fast rise times (18 μs) and high instantaneous currents (790 nA). Measurements of the proton-generated acoustic emissions in a clinical setting may provide a method for in vivo proton range verification and patient monitoring.

  19. Fracture of human femur tissue monitored by acoustic emission sensors.

    PubMed

    Aggelis, Dimitrios G; Strantza, Maria; Louis, Olivia; Boulpaep, Frans; Polyzos, Demosthenes; van Hemelrijck, Danny

    2015-01-01

    The study describes the acoustic emission (AE) activity during human femur tissue fracture. The specimens were fractured in a bending-torsion loading pattern with concurrent monitoring by two AE sensors. The number of recorded signals correlates well with the applied load providing the onset of micro-fracture at approximately one sixth of the maximum load. Furthermore, waveform frequency content and rise time are related to the different modes of fracture (bending of femur neck or torsion of diaphysis). The importance of the study lies mainly in two disciplines. One is that, although femurs are typically subjects of surgical repair in humans, detailed monitoring of the fracture with AE will enrich the understanding of the process in ways that cannot be achieved using only the mechanical data. Additionally, from the point of view of monitoring techniques, applying sensors used for engineering materials and interpreting the obtained data pose additional difficulties due to the uniqueness of the bone structure.

  20. Fracture of Human Femur Tissue Monitored by Acoustic Emission Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Aggelis, Dimitrios. G.; Strantza, Maria; Louis, Olivia; Boulpaep, Frans; Polyzos, Demosthenes; van Hemelrijck, Danny

    2015-01-01

    The study describes the acoustic emission (AE) activity during human femur tissue fracture. The specimens were fractured in a bending-torsion loading pattern with concurrent monitoring by two AE sensors. The number of recorded signals correlates well with the applied load providing the onset of micro-fracture at approximately one sixth of the maximum load. Furthermore, waveform frequency content and rise time are related to the different modes of fracture (bending of femur neck or torsion of diaphysis). The importance of the study lies mainly in two disciplines. One is that, although femurs are typically subjects of surgical repair in humans, detailed monitoring of the fracture with AE will enrich the understanding of the process in ways that cannot be achieved using only the mechanical data. Additionally, from the point of view of monitoring techniques, applying sensors used for engineering materials and interpreting the obtained data pose additional difficulties due to the uniqueness of the bone structure. PMID:25763648

  1. Acoustic emission monitoring of recycled aggregate concrete under bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsoumani, A. A.; Barkoula, N.-M.; Matikas, T. E.

    2015-03-01

    The amount of construction and demolition waste has increased considerably over the last few years, making desirable the reuse of this waste in the concrete industry. In the present study concrete specimens are subjected at the age of 28 days to four-point bending with concurrent monitoring of their acoustic emission (AE) activity. Several concrete mixtures prepared using recycled aggregates at various percentages of the total coarse aggregate and also a reference mix using natural aggregates, were included to investigate their influence of the recycled aggregates on the load bearing capacity, as well as on the fracture mechanisms. The results reveal that for low levels of substitution the influence of using recycled aggregates on the flexural strength is negligible while higher levels of substitution lead into its deterioration. The total AE activity, as well as the AE signals emitted during failure, was related to flexural strength. The results obtained during test processing were found to be in agreement with visual observation.

  2. Fracture of human femur tissue monitored by acoustic emission sensors.

    PubMed

    Aggelis, Dimitrios G; Strantza, Maria; Louis, Olivia; Boulpaep, Frans; Polyzos, Demosthenes; van Hemelrijck, Danny

    2015-01-01

    The study describes the acoustic emission (AE) activity during human femur tissue fracture. The specimens were fractured in a bending-torsion loading pattern with concurrent monitoring by two AE sensors. The number of recorded signals correlates well with the applied load providing the onset of micro-fracture at approximately one sixth of the maximum load. Furthermore, waveform frequency content and rise time are related to the different modes of fracture (bending of femur neck or torsion of diaphysis). The importance of the study lies mainly in two disciplines. One is that, although femurs are typically subjects of surgical repair in humans, detailed monitoring of the fracture with AE will enrich the understanding of the process in ways that cannot be achieved using only the mechanical data. Additionally, from the point of view of monitoring techniques, applying sensors used for engineering materials and interpreting the obtained data pose additional difficulties due to the uniqueness of the bone structure. PMID:25763648

  3. In situ high temperature oxidation analysis of Zircaloy-4 using acoustic emission coupled with thermogravimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omar, Al Haj; Véronique, Peres; Eric, Serris; François, Grosjean; Jean, Kittel; François, Ropital; Michel, Cournil

    2015-06-01

    Zircaloy-4 oxidation behavior at high temperature (900 °C), which can be reached in case of severe accidental situations in nuclear pressurised water reactor, was studied using acoustic emission analysis coupled with thermogravimetry. Two different atmospheres were used to study the oxidation of Zircaloy-4: (a) helium and pure oxygen, (b) helium and oxygen combined with slight addition of air. The experiments with 20% of oxygen confirm the dependence on oxygen anions diffusion in the oxide scale. Under a mixture of oxygen and air in helium, an acceleration of the corrosion was observed due to the detrimental effect of nitrogen. The kinetic rate increased significantly after a kinetic transition (breakaway). This acceleration was accompanied by an acoustic emission activity. Most of the acoustic emission bursts were recorded after the kinetic transition (post-transition) or during the cooling of the sample. The characteristic features of the acoustic emission signals appear to be correlated with the different populations of cracks and their occurrence in the ZrO2 layer or in the α-Zr(O) layer. Acoustic events were recorded during the isothermal dwell time at high temperature under air. They were associated with large cracks in the zirconia porous layer. Acoustic events were also recorded during cooling after oxidation tests both under air or oxygen. For the latter, cracks were observed in the oxygen enriched zirconium metal phase and not in the dense zirconia layer after 5 h of oxidation.

  4. Laboratory Hydraulic Fracture Characterization Using Acoustic Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutierrez, M.

    2013-05-01

    For many years Acoustic Emission (AE) testing has aided in the understanding of fracture initiation and propagation in geologic materials. AEs occur when a material emits elastic waves caused by the sudden occurrence of fractures or frictional sliding along discontinuous surfaces and grain boundaries. One important application of AE is the monitoring of hydraulic fracturing of underground formations to create functional reservoirs at sites where the permeability of the rock is too limited to allow for cost effective fluid extraction. However, several challenges remain in the use of AE to locate and characterize fractures that are created hydraulically. Chief among these challenges is the often large scatter of the AE data that are generated during the fracturing process and the difficulty of interpreting the AE data so that hydraulic fractures can be reliably characterized. To improve the understanding of the link between AE and hydraulic fracturing, laboratory scale model testing of hydraulic fracturing were performed using a cubical true triaxial device. This device consist of a loading frame capable of loading a 30x30x30 cm3 rock sample with three independent principal stresses up to 13 MPa while simultaneously providing heating up to 180 degrees C. Several laboratory scale hydraulic fracture stimulation treatments were performed on granite and rock analogue fabricated using medium strength concrete. A six sensor acoustic emission (AE) array, using wideband piezoelectric transducers, is employed to monitor the fracturing process. AE monitoring of laboratory hydraulic fracturing experiments showed multiple phenomena including winged fracture growth from a borehole, cross-field well communication, fracture reorientation, borehole casing failure and much more. AE data analysis consisted of event source location determination, fracture surface generation and validation, source mechanism determination, and determining the overall effectiveness of the induced fracture

  5. Application of acoustic emission to flaw detection in engineering materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moslehy, F. A.

    1990-01-01

    Monitoring of structures under operating loads to provide an early warning of possible failure to locate flaws in test specimens subjected to uniaxial tensile loading is presented. Test specimens used are mild steel prismatic bars with small holes at different locations. When the test specimen is loaded, acoustic emission data are automatically collected by two acoustic transducers located at opposite sides of the hole and processed by an acoustic emission analyzer. The processed information yields the difference in arrival times at the transducers, which uniquely determines the flaw location. By using this technique, flaws were located to within 8 percent of their true location. The use of acoustic emission in linear location to locate a flaw in a material is demonstrated. It is concluded that this one-dimensional application could be extended to the general flaw location problem through triangulation.

  6. Acoustic emission measurement of fatigue crack closure

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.S.; Rhyim, Y.M. . Center for Advanced Aerospace Materials); Kwon, D. . Dept. of Metallurgical Engineering); Ono, K. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1995-03-01

    In this study the acoustic emission (AE) technique has been applied to measure the crack closure loads precisely and the results have been compared with those measured by the conventional techniques such as the crack opening displacement (COD) method, back face strain gage (BFS) method, and surface strain gage method. In addition, fatigue tests at high stress ratio (R=0.8) have also been conducted to compared the results with those of the above methods at R=0.1 and to verify the accuracy of each method. The material used in the present investigation was an Al-Li 8090 alloy which was supplied as a 44.5mm thick rolled plate in the solution heat treated, 6% stretched and naturally aged condition. The COD and BFS methods show relatively good agreement with each other and measure the through-thickness mean value of crack closure loads. In the plane strain condition, the crack closure levels obtained by the COD and BFS methods were lower than those by the AE and surface train gage methods. The data obtained by the surface strain gage method must be interpreted carefully, because the shape of the compliance curves is affected by the location relative to the crack tip. The intrinsic fatigue life curve (da/dN vs. [Delta]K[sub eff]) obtained by the AE technique fitted well with the curve of high stress ratio (R=0.8) test at high [Delta]K, suggesting that the AE technique is sensitive to local crack-tip behavior on a microscopic scale and can be considered as a reliable measurement method for crack closure phenomena under repetitive loads.

  7. DETECTION OF DRUGSTORE BEETLES IN 9975 PACKAGES USING ACOUSTIC EMISSIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Shull, D.

    2013-03-04

    This report documents the initial feasibility tests performed using a commercial acoustic emission instrument for the purpose of detecting beetles in Department of Energy 9975 shipping packages. The device selected for this testing was a commercial handheld instrument and probe developed for the detection of termites, weevils, beetles and other insect infestations in wooden structures, trees, plants and soil. The results of two rounds of testing are presented. The first tests were performed by the vendor using only the hand-held instrument’s indications and real-time operator analysis of the audio signal content. The second tests included hands-free positioning of the instrument probe and post-collection analysis of the recorded audio signal content including audio background comparisons. The test results indicate that the system is promising for detecting the presence of drugstore beetles, however, additional work would be needed to improve the ease of detection and to automate the signal processing to eliminate the need for human interpretation. Mechanisms for hands-free positioning of the probe and audio background discrimination are also necessary for reliable detection and to reduce potential operator dose in radiation environments.

  8. Correlation of signals of thermal acoustic radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anosov, A. A.; Passechnik, V. I.

    2003-03-01

    The spatial correlation function is measured for the pressure of thermal acoustic radiation from a source (a narrow plasticine plate) whose temperature is made both higher and lower than the temperature of the receiver. The spatial correlation function of the pressure of thermal acoustic radiation is found to be oscillatory in character. The oscillation amplitude is determined not by the absolute temperature of the source but by the temperature difference between the source and the receiver. The correlation function changes its sign when a source heated with respect to the receiver is replaced by a cooled one.

  9. Mesoscale variations in acoustic signals induced by atmospheric gravity waves.

    PubMed

    Chunchuzov, Igor; Kulichkov, Sergey; Perepelkin, Vitaly; Ziemann, Astrid; Arnold, Klaus; Kniffka, Anke

    2009-02-01

    The results of acoustic tomographic monitoring of the coherent structures in the lower atmosphere and the effects of these structures on acoustic signal parameters are analyzed in the present study. From the measurements of acoustic travel time fluctuations (periods 1 min-1 h) with distant receivers, the temporal fluctuations of the effective sound speed and wind speed are retrieved along different ray paths connecting an acoustic pulse source and several receivers. By using a coherence analysis of the fluctuations near spatially distanced ray turning points, the internal wave-associated fluctuations are filtered and their spatial characteristics (coherences, horizontal phase velocities, and spatial scales) are estimated. The capability of acoustic tomography in estimating wind shear near ground is shown. A possible mechanism describing the temporal modulation of the near-ground wind field by ducted internal waves in the troposphere is proposed.

  10. Laser Imaging of Airborne Acoustic Emission by Nonlinear Defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solodov, Igor; Döring, Daniel; Busse, Gerd

    2008-06-01

    Strongly nonlinear vibrations of near-surface fractured defects driven by an elastic wave radiate acoustic energy into adjacent air in a wide frequency range. The variations of pressure in the emitted airborne waves change the refractive index of air thus providing an acoustooptic interaction with a collimated laser beam. Such an air-coupled vibrometry (ACV) is proposed for detecting and imaging of acoustic radiation of nonlinear spectral components by cracked defects. The photoelastic relation in air is used to derive induced phase modulation of laser light in the heterodyne interferometer setup. The sensitivity of the scanning ACV to different spatial components of the acoustic radiation is analyzed. The animated airborne emission patterns are visualized for the higher harmonic and frequency mixing fields radiated by planar defects. The results confirm a high localization of the nonlinear acoustic emission around the defects and complicated directivity patterns appreciably different from those observed for fundamental frequencies.

  11. Acoustic signal characteristics during IR laser ablation and their consequences for acoustic tissue discrimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nahen, Kester; Vogel, Alfred

    2000-06-01

    IR laser ablation of skin is accompanied by acoustic signals the characteristics of which are closely linked to the ablation dynamics. A discrimination between different tissue layers, for example necrotic and vital tissue during laser burn debridement, is therefore possible by an analysis of the acoustic signal. We were able to discriminate tissue layers by evaluating the acoustic energy. To get a better understanding of the tissue specificity of the ablation noise, we investigated the correlation between sample water content, ablation dynamics, and characteristics of the acoustic signal. A free running Er:YAG laser with a maximum pulse energy of 2 J and a spot diameter of 5 mm was used to ablate gelatin samples with different water content. The ablation noise in air was detected using a piezoelectric transducer with a bandwidth of 1 MHz, and the acoustic signal generated inside the ablated sample was measured simultaneously ba a piezoelectric transducer in contact with the sample. Laser flash Schlieren photography was used to investigate the expansion velocity of the vapor plume and the velocity of the ejected material. We observed large differences between the ablation dynamics and material ejection velocity for gelatin samples with 70% and 90% water content. These differences cannot be explained by the small change of the gelatin absorption coefficient, but are largely related to differences of the mechanical properties of the sample. The different ablation dynamics are responsible for an increase of the acoustic energy by a factor of 10 for the sample with the higher water content.

  12. Speaker verification using combined acoustic and EM sensor signal processing

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, L C; Gable, T J; Holzrichter, J F

    2000-11-10

    Low Power EM radar-like sensors have made it possible to measure properties of the human speech production system in real-time, without acoustic interference. This greatly enhances the quality and quantity of information for many speech related applications. See Holzrichter, Burnett, Ng, and Lea, J. Acoustic. SOC. Am . 103 ( 1) 622 (1998). By combining the Glottal-EM-Sensor (GEMS) with the Acoustic-signals, we've demonstrated an almost 10 fold reduction in error rates from a speaker verification system experiment under a moderate noisy environment (-10dB).

  13. Low Bandwidth Vocoding using EM Sensor and Acoustic Signal Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, L C; Holzrichter, J F; Larson, P E

    2001-10-25

    Low-power EM radar-like sensors have made it possible to measure properties of the human speech production system in real-time, without acoustic interference [1]. By combining these data with the corresponding acoustic signal, we've demonstrated an almost 10-fold bandwidth reduction in speech compression, compared to a standard 2.4 kbps LPC10 protocol used in the STU-III (Secure Terminal Unit, third generation) telephone. This paper describes a potential EM sensor/acoustic based vocoder implementation.

  14. Multiplexing Technology for Acoustic Emission Monitoring of Aerospace Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, William; Percy, Daniel

    2003-01-01

    The initiation and propagation of damage mechanisms such as cracks and delaminations generate acoustic waves, which propagate through a structure. These waves can be detected and analyzed to provide the location and severity of damage as part of a structural health monitoring (SHM) system. This methodology of damage detection is commonly known as acoustic emission (AE) monitoring, and is widely used on a variety of applications on civil structures. AE has been widely considered for SHM of aerospace vehicles. Numerous successful ground and flight test demonstrations have been performed, which show the viability of the technology for damage monitoring in aerospace structures. However, one significant current limitation for application of AE techniques on aerospace vehicles is the large size, mass, and power requirements for the necessary monitoring instrumentation. To address this issue, a prototype multiplexing approach has been developed and demonstrated in this study, which reduces the amount of AE monitoring instrumentation required. Typical time division multiplexing techniques that are commonly used to monitor strain, pressure and temperature sensors are not applicable to AE monitoring because of the asynchronous and widely varying rates of AE signal occurrence. Thus, an event based multiplexing technique was developed. In the initial prototype circuit, inputs from eight sensors in a linear array were multiplexed into two data acquisition channels. The multiplexer rapidly switches, in less than one microsecond, allowing the signals from two sensors to be acquired by a digitizer. The two acquired signals are from the sensors on either side of the trigger sensor. This enables the capture of the first arrival of the waves, which cannot be accomplished with the signal from the trigger sensor. The propagation delay to the slightly more distant neighboring sensors makes this possible. The arrival time from this first arrival provides a more accurate source location

  15. Acoustic Aspects of Photoacoustic Signal Generation and Detection in Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miklós, A.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper photoacoustic signal generation and detection in gases is investigated and discussed from the standpoint of acoustics. Four topics are considered: the effect of the absorption-desorption process of modulated and pulsed light on the heat power density released in the gas; the generation of the primary sound by the released heat in an unbounded medium; the excitation of an acoustic resonator by the primary sound; and finally, the generation of the measurable PA signal by a microphone. When light is absorbed by a molecule and the excess energy is relaxed by collisions with the surrounding molecules, the average kinetic energy, thus also the temperature of an ensemble of molecules (called "particle" in acoustics) will increase. In other words heat energy is added to the energy of the particle. The rate of the energy transfer is characterized by the heat power density. A simple two-level model of absorption-desorption is applied for describing the heat power generation process for modulated and pulsed illumination. Sound generation by a laser beam in an unbounded medium is discussed by means of the Green's function technique. It is shown that the duration of the generated sound pulse depends mostly on beam geometry. A photoacoustic signal is mostly detected in a photoacoustic cell composed of acoustic resonators, buffers, filters, etc. It is not easy to interpret the measured PA signal in such a complicated acoustic system. The acoustic response of a PA detector to different kinds of excitations (modulated cw, pulsed, periodic pulse train) is discussed. It is shown that acoustic resonators respond very differently to modulated cw excitation and to excitation by a pulse train. The microphone for detecting the PA signal is also a part of the acoustic system; its properties have to be taken into account by the design of a PA detector. The moving membrane of the microphone absorbs acoustic energy; thus, it may influence the resonance frequency and

  16. Wavelet-based ground vehicle recognition using acoustic signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choe, Howard C.; Karlsen, Robert E.; Gerhart, Grant R.; Meitzler, Thomas J.

    1996-03-01

    We present, in this paper, a wavelet-based acoustic signal analysis to remotely recognize military vehicles using their sound intercepted by acoustic sensors. Since expedited signal recognition is imperative in many military and industrial situations, we developed an algorithm that provides an automated, fast signal recognition once implemented in a real-time hardware system. This algorithm consists of wavelet preprocessing, feature extraction and compact signal representation, and a simple but effective statistical pattern matching. The current status of the algorithm does not require any training. The training is replaced by human selection of reference signals (e.g., squeak or engine exhaust sound) distinctive to each individual vehicle based on human perception. This allows a fast archiving of any new vehicle type in the database once the signal is collected. The wavelet preprocessing provides time-frequency multiresolution analysis using discrete wavelet transform (DWT). Within each resolution level, feature vectors are generated from statistical parameters and energy content of the wavelet coefficients. After applying our algorithm on the intercepted acoustic signals, the resultant feature vectors are compared with the reference vehicle feature vectors in the database using statistical pattern matching to determine the type of vehicle from where the signal originated. Certainly, statistical pattern matching can be replaced by an artificial neural network (ANN); however, the ANN would require training data sets and time to train the net. Unfortunately, this is not always possible for many real world situations, especially collecting data sets from unfriendly ground vehicles to train the ANN. Our methodology using wavelet preprocessing and statistical pattern matching provides robust acoustic signal recognition. We also present an example of vehicle recognition using acoustic signals collected from two different military ground vehicles. In this paper, we will

  17. Acoustic emission intensity analysis of corrosion in prestressed concrete piles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vélez, William; Matta, Fabio; Ziehl, Paul

    2014-02-01

    Corrosion of steel strands in prestressed concrete (PC) bridges may lead to substantial damage or collapse well before the end of the design life. Acoustic Emission (AE) is a suitable nondestructive technique to detect and locate corrosion in reinforced and prestressed concrete, which is key to prioritize inspection and maintenance. An effective tool to analyze damage-related AE data is intensity analysis (IA), which is based on two data trends, namely Severity (average signal strength of high amplitude hits) and Historic Index (ratio of the average signal strength of the most recent hits to the average of all hits). IA criteria for corrosion assessment in PC were recently proposed based on empirical evidence from accelerated corrosion tests. In this paper, AE data from prestressed and non-prestressed concrete pile specimens exposed to salt water wet-dry cycling for over 600 days are used to analyze the relation between Severity and Historic Index and actual corrosion. Evidence of corrosion is gained from the inspection of decommissioned specimens. The selection of suitable J and K parameters for IA is discussed, and an IA chart with updated corrosion criteria for PC piles is presented.

  18. Phonon Emission from Acoustic Black Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Hengzhong; Zhou, Kaihu; Song, Yuming

    2012-08-01

    We study the phonon tunneling through the horizon of an acoustic black hole by solving the Hamilton-Jacobi equation. We also make use of the closed-path integral to calculate the tunneling probability, and an improved way to determine the temporal contribution is used. Both the results from the two methods agree with Hawking's initial analysis.

  19. Time reverse modeling of acoustic emissions in a reinforced concrete beam.

    PubMed

    Kocur, Georg Karl; Saenger, Erik H; Grosse, Christian U; Vogel, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    The time reverse modeling (TRM) is applied for signal-based acoustic emission (AE) analysis of reinforced concrete (RC) specimens. TRM uses signals obtained from physical experiments as input. The signals are re-emitted numerically into a structure in a time-reversed manner, where the wavefronts interfere and appear as dominant concentrations of energy at the origin of the AE. The experimental and numerical results presented for selected AE signals confirm that TRM is capable of localizing AE activity in RC caused by concrete cracking. The accuracy of the TRM results is corroborated by three-dimensional crack distributions obtained from X-ray computed tomography images.

  20. Time reverse modeling of acoustic emissions in a reinforced concrete beam.

    PubMed

    Kocur, Georg Karl; Saenger, Erik H; Grosse, Christian U; Vogel, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    The time reverse modeling (TRM) is applied for signal-based acoustic emission (AE) analysis of reinforced concrete (RC) specimens. TRM uses signals obtained from physical experiments as input. The signals are re-emitted numerically into a structure in a time-reversed manner, where the wavefronts interfere and appear as dominant concentrations of energy at the origin of the AE. The experimental and numerical results presented for selected AE signals confirm that TRM is capable of localizing AE activity in RC caused by concrete cracking. The accuracy of the TRM results is corroborated by three-dimensional crack distributions obtained from X-ray computed tomography images. PMID:26518525

  1. Acoustic emissions applications on the NASA Space Station

    SciTech Connect

    Friesel, M.A.; Dawson, J.F.; Kurtz, R.J.; Barga, R.S.; Hutton, P.H.; Lemon, D.K.

    1991-08-01

    Acoustic emission is being investigated as a way to continuously monitor the space station Freedom for damage caused by space debris impact and seal failure. Experiments run to date focused on detecting and locating simulated and real impacts and leakage. These were performed both in the laboratory on a section of material similar to a space station shell panel and also on the full-scale common module prototype at Boeing's Huntsville facility. A neural network approach supplemented standard acoustic emission detection and analysis techniques. 4 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Acoustic emission of coal in the postlimiting deformation state

    SciTech Connect

    Voznesenskii, A.S.; Tavostin, M.N.

    2005-08-01

    The features of acoustic emission in coal samples in the state of pre- and postlimiting deformation are considered. It is shown that in the postlimiting deformation stages and in the transient period, a contrary change is observed in a correlation coefficient of the acoustic emission activity N{Sigma} recorded in the upper and lower portions of a sample; whereas in the prelimiting deformation stages, this change is consistent. It is proposed to recognize the stages of deformation by the correlation coefficient of N{Sigma} recorded in different zones: a positive coefficient corresponds to the prelimiting stage of deformation, and a negative one corresponds to the postlimiting stage.

  3. Property evaluation of thermal sprayed metallic coating by acoustic emission analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ishida, Asako; Mizutani, Yoshihiro; Takemoto, Mikio; Ono, Kanji

    2000-03-01

    The authors analyzed acoustic emission signals from plasma sprayed sheets by first obtaining the Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, and density. The sheets of a high Cr-Ni alloy (55Cr-41Ni-Mo, Si, B) were made by low pressure plasma spraying (LPPS) and heat treated. Utilizing laser induced surface acoustic waves (SAWs), the group velocity dispersion data of Rayleigh waves was obtained and matched to that computed by Adler's matrix transfer method. They monitored the acoustic emissions (Lamb waves) produced by microfractures in free standing as sprayed coating subjected to bending. Fast cleavage type microfracture with source rise time of around 2 {micro}s occurred as precursors to the final brittle fracture. The velocity and time-frequency amplitude spectrograms (wavelet contour maps) of the Lamb waves were utilized for the source location and fracture kinetic analyses.

  4. Xylem cavitation resistance can be estimated based on time-dependent rate of acoustic emissions.

    PubMed

    Nolf, Markus; Beikircher, Barbara; Rosner, Sabine; Nolf, Anton; Mayr, Stefan

    2015-10-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) analysis allows nondestructive monitoring of embolism formation in plant xylem, but signal interpretation and agreement of acoustically measured hydraulic vulnerability with reference hydraulic techniques remain under debate. We compared the hydraulic vulnerability of 16 species and three crop tree cultivars using hydraulic flow measurements and acoustic emission monitoring, proposing the use of time-dependent AE rates as a novel parameter for AE analysis. There was a linear correlation between the water potential (Ψ) at 50% loss of hydraulic conductivity (P50 ) and the Ψ at maximum AE activity (Pmaxrate ), where species with lower P50 also had lower Pmaxrate (P < 0.001, R(2)  = 0.76). Using AE rates instead of cumulative counts for AE analysis allows more efficient estimation of P50 , while excluding problematic AE at late stages of dehydration.

  5. Acoustic emission testing on an F/A-18 E/F titanium bulkhead

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Christopher A.; Van Way, Craig B.; Lockyer, Allen J.; Kudva, Jayanth N.; Ziola, Steve M.

    1995-04-01

    An important opportunity recently transpired at Northrop Grumman Corporation to instrument an F/A - 18 E/F titanium bulkhead with broad band acoustic emission sensors during a scheduled structural fatigue test. The overall intention of this effort was to investigate the potential for detecting crack propagation using acoustic transmission signals for a large structural component. Key areas of experimentation and experience included (1) acoustic noise characterization, (2) separation of crack signals from extraneous noise, (3) source location accuracy, and (4) methods of acoustic transducer attachment. Fatigue cracking was observed and monitored by strategically placed acoustic emission sensors. The outcome of the testing indicated that accurate source location still remains enigmatic for non-specialist engineering personnel especially at this level of structural complexity. However, contrary to preconceived expectations, crack events could be readily separated from extraneous noise. A further dividend from the investigation materialized in the form of close correspondence between frequency domain waveforms of the bulkhead test specimen tested and earlier work with thick plates.

  6. Controlled Ultrasound-Induced Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption Using Passive Acoustic Emissions Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Arvanitis, Costas D.; Livingstone, Margaret S.; Vykhodtseva, Natalia; McDannold, Nathan

    2012-01-01

    The ability of ultrasonically-induced oscillations of circulating microbubbles to permeabilize vascular barriers such as the blood-brain barrier (BBB) holds great promise for noninvasive targeted drug delivery. A major issue has been a lack of control over the procedure to ensure both safe and effective treatment. Here, we evaluated the use of passively-recorded acoustic emissions as a means to achieve this control. An acoustic emissions monitoring system was constructed and integrated into a clinical transcranial MRI-guided focused ultrasound system. Recordings were analyzed using a spectroscopic method that isolates the acoustic emissions caused by the microbubbles during sonication. This analysis characterized and quantified harmonic oscillations that occur when the BBB is disrupted, and broadband emissions that occur when tissue damage occurs. After validating the system's performance in pilot studies that explored a wide range of exposure levels, the measurements were used to control the ultrasound exposure level during transcranial sonications at 104 volumes over 22 weekly sessions in four macaques. We found that increasing the exposure level until a large harmonic emissions signal was observed was an effective means to ensure BBB disruption without broadband emissions. We had a success rate of 96% in inducing BBB disruption as measured by in contrast-enhanced MRI, and we detected broadband emissions in less than 0.2% of the applied bursts. The magnitude of the harmonic emissions signals was significantly (P<0.001) larger for sonications where BBB disruption was detected, and it correlated with BBB permeabilization as indicated by the magnitude of the MRI signal enhancement after MRI contrast administration (R2 = 0.78). Overall, the results indicate that harmonic emissions can be a used to control focused ultrasound-induced BBB disruption. These results are promising for clinical translation of this technology. PMID:23029240

  7. Proton beam characterization by proton-induced acoustic emission: simulation studies.

    PubMed

    Jones, K C; Witztum, A; Sehgal, C M; Avery, S

    2014-11-01

    Due to their Bragg peak, proton beams are capable of delivering a targeted dose of radiation to a narrow volume, but range uncertainties currently limit their accuracy. One promising beam characterization technique, protoacoustic range verification, measures the acoustic emission generated by the proton beam. We simulated the pressure waves generated by proton radiation passing through water. We observed that the proton-induced acoustic signal consists of two peaks, labeled α and γ, with two originating sources. The α acoustic peak is generated by the pre-Bragg peak heated region whereas the source of the γ acoustic peak is the proton Bragg peak. The arrival time of the α and γ peaks at a transducer reveals the distance from the beam propagation axis and Bragg peak center, respectively. The maximum pressure is not observed directly above the Bragg peak due to interference of the acoustic signals. Range verification based on the arrival times is shown to be more effective than determining the Bragg peak position based on pressure amplitudes. The temporal width of the α and γ peaks are linearly proportional to the beam diameter and Bragg peak width, respectively. The temporal separation between compression and rarefaction peaks is proportional to the spill time width. The pressure wave expected from a spread out Bragg peak dose is characterized. The simulations also show that acoustic monitoring can verify the proton beam dose distribution and range by characterizing the Bragg peak position to within ~1 mm.

  8. Acoustic Emission and Guided Wave Monitoring of Fatigue Crack Growth on a Full Pipe Specimen

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Ryan M.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Watson, Bruce E.; Doctor, Steven R.; Bond, Leonard J.

    2011-05-06

    Continuous on-line monitoring of active and passive systems, structures and components in nuclear power plants will be critical to extending the lifetimes of nuclear power plants in the US beyond 60 years. Acoustic emission and guided ultrasonic waves are two tools for continuously monitoring passive systems, structures and components within nuclear power plants and are the focus of this study. These tools are used to monitor fatigue damage induced in a SA 312 TP304 stainless steel pipe specimen. The results of acoustic emission monitoring indicate that crack propagation signals were not directly detected. However, acoustic emission monitoring exposed crack formation prior to visual confirmation through the detection of signals caused by crack closure friction. The results of guided ultrasonic wave monitoring indicate that this technology is sensitive to the presence and size of cracks. The sensitivity and complexity of GUW signals is observed to vary with respect to signal frequency and path traveled by the guided ultrasonic wave relative to the crack orientation.

  9. Assessing corrosion damage in reinforced concrete beams using acoustic emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Dong-Jin; Weiss, W. Jason; Prine, David W.; Shah, Surendra P.

    1999-02-01

    The acoustic emission (AE) behavior of reinforced concrete beams tested under flexural loading was investigated to characterize and identify the source of damage. This research was aimed at identifying the characteristic AE response associated with micro-crack development, localized crack propagation, corrosion, and debonding of the reinforcing steel.

  10. Regularities of acoustic emission in coal samples under triaxial compression

    SciTech Connect

    Shkuratnik, V.L.; Filimonov, Y.L.; Kuchurin, S.V.

    2005-02-01

    The results are cited for the experimental study of acoustoemission processes in anthracite samples under triaxial compression by the Karman scheme at the constant rate of axial strain. From a comparison of the stress-strain and acoustoemission curves, the features of acoustic emission parameters in various deformation stages are revealed and the physicomechanical properties of coal are estimated.

  11. Digital Signal Processing in Acoustics--Part 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, H.; McNeill, D. J.

    1986-01-01

    Reviews the potential of a data acquisition system for illustrating the nature and significance of ideas in digital signal processing. Focuses on the fast Fourier transform and the utility of its two-channel format, emphasizing cross-correlation and its two-microphone technique of acoustic intensity measurement. Includes programing format. (ML)

  12. Atmospheric influence on volcano-acoustic signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matoza, Robin; de Groot-Hedlin, Catherine; Hedlin, Michael; Fee, David; Garcés, Milton; Le Pichon, Alexis

    2010-05-01

    Volcanoes are natural sources of infrasound, useful for studying infrasonic propagation in the atmosphere. Large, explosive volcanic eruptions typically produce signals that can be recorded at ranges of hundreds of kilometers propagating in atmospheric waveguides. In addition, sustained volcanic eruptions can produce smaller-amplitude repetitive signals recordable at >10 km range. These include repetitive impulsive signals and continuous tremor signals. The source functions of these signals can remain relatively invariant over timescales of weeks to months. Observed signal fluctuations from such persistent sources at an infrasound recording station may therefore be attributed to dynamic atmospheric propagation effects. We present examples of repetitive and sustained volcano infrasound sources at Mount St. Helens, Washington and Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, USA. The data recorded at >10 km range show evidence of propagation effects induced by tropospheric variability at the mesoscale and microscale. Ray tracing and finite-difference simulations of the infrasound propagation produce qualitatively consistent results. However, the finite-difference simulations indicate that low-frequency effects such as diffraction, and scattering from topography may be important factors for infrasonic propagation at this scale.

  13. Acoustic emission of fire damaged fiber reinforced concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mpalaskas, A. C.; Matikas, T. E.; Aggelis, D. G.

    2016-04-01

    The mechanical behavior of a fiber-reinforced concrete after extensive thermal damage is studied in this paper. Undulated steel fibers have been used for reinforcement. After being exposed to direct fire action at the temperature of 850°C, specimens were subjected to bending and compression in order to determine the loss of strength and stiffness in comparison to intact specimens and between the two types. The fire damage was assessed using nondestructive evaluation techniques, specifically ultrasonic pulse velocity (UPV) and acoustic emission (AE). Apart from the strong, well known, correlation of UPV to strength (both bending and compressive), AE parameters based mainly on the frequency and duration of the emitted signals after cracking events showed a similar or, in certain cases, better correlation with the mechanical parameters and temperature. This demonstrates the sensitivity of AE to the fracture incidents which eventually lead to failure of the material and it is encouraging for potential in-situ use of the technique, where it could provide indices with additional characterization capability concerning the mechanical performance of concrete after it subjected to fire.

  14. Assessment of corrosion rate in prestressed concrete with acoustic emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangual, Jesé; ElBatanouny, Mohamed K.; Vélez, William; Ziehl, Paul; Matta, Fabio; González, Miguel

    2011-04-01

    Acoustic Emission (AE) sensing was employed to assess the rate of corrosion of steel strands in small scale concrete block specimens. The corrosion process was accelerated in a laboratory environment using a potentiostat to supply a constant potential difference with a 3% NaCl solution as the electrolyte. The embedded prestressing steel strand served as the anode, and a copper plate served as the cathode. Corrosion rate, half-cell potential measurements, and AE activity were recorded continuously throughout each test and examined to assess the development of corrosion and its rate. At the end of each test the steel strands were cleaned and re-weighed to determine the mass loss and evaluate it vis-á-vis the AE data. The initiation and propagation phases of corrosion were correlated with the percentage mass loss of steel and the acquired AE signals. Results indicate that AE monitoring may be a useful aid in the detection and differentiation of the steel deterioration phases, and estimation of the locations of corroded areas.

  15. Acoustic emissions (AE) during failure of granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michlmayr, Gernot; Or, Dani

    2014-05-01

    The release of shallow landslides and other geological mass movements is the result of progressive failure accumulation. Mechanical failure in disordered geologic materials occurs in intermittent breakage episodes marking the disintegration or rearrangement of load-bearing elements. Abrupt strain energy release in such breakage episodes is associated with generation of elastic waves measurable as high-frequency (kHz range) acoustic emissions (AE). The close association of AE with progressive failure events hold a promise for using such noninvasive methods to assess the mechanical state of granular Earth materials or for the development early warning methods for shallow landslides. We present numerical simulations that incorporate damage accumulation and associated stress redistribution using a fiber-bundle model. The stress released from element failure (fibers) is redistributed to the surrounding elements and eventually triggers larger failure avalanches. AE signals generated from such events and eventually hitting a virtual sensor are modeled using visco-elastic wave propagation laws. The model captures the characteristic saw-tooth shape of the observed stress-strain curves obtained from strain-controlled experiments with glass beads, including large intermittent stress release events that stem from cascading failure avalanches. The model also reproduces characteristics of AE signatures and yield a good agreement between simulation results and experimental data. Linking mechanical and AE information in the proposed modeling framework offer a solid basis for interpretation of measured field data.

  16. Acoustic emission during quench training of superconducting accelerator magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchevsky, M.; Sabbi, G.; Bajas, H.; Gourlay, S.

    2015-07-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) sensing is a viable tool for superconducting magnet diagnostics. Using in-house developed cryogenic amplified piezoelectric sensors, we conducted AE studies during quench training of the US LARP's high-field quadrupole HQ02 and the LBNL's high-field dipole HD3. For both magnets, AE bursts were observed, with spike amplitude and frequency increasing toward the quench current during current up-ramps. In the HQ02, the AE onset upon current ramping is distinct and exhibits a clear memory of the previously-reached quench current (Kaiser effect). On the other hand, in the HD3 magnet the AE amplitude begins to increase well before the previously-reached quench current (felicity effect), suggesting an ongoing progressive mechanical motion in the coils. A clear difference in the AE signature exists between the untrained and trained mechanical states in HD3. Time intervals between the AE signals detected at the opposite ends of HD3 coils were processed using a combination of narrow-band pass filtering; threshold crossing and correlation algorithms, and the spatial distributions of AE sources and the mechanical energy release were calculated. Both distributions appear to be consistent with the quench location distribution. Energy statistics of the AE spikes exhibits a power-law scaling typical for the self-organized critical state.

  17. Crack Propagation Analysis Using Acoustic Emission Sensors for Structural Health Monitoring Systems

    DOE PAGES

    Kral, Zachary; Horn, Walter; Steck, James

    2013-01-01

    Aerospace systems are expected to remain in service well beyond their designed life. Consequently, maintenance is an important issue. A novel method of implementing artificial neural networks and acoustic emission sensors to form a structural health monitoring (SHM) system for aerospace inspection routines was the focus of this research. Simple structural elements, consisting of flat aluminum plates of AL 2024-T3, were subjected to increasing static tensile loading. As the loading increased, designed cracks extended in length, releasing strain waves in the process. Strain wave signals, measured by acoustic emission sensors, were further analyzed in post-processing by artificial neural networks (ANN).more » Several experiments were performed to determine the severity and location of the crack extensions in the structure. ANNs were trained on a portion of the data acquired by the sensors and the ANNs were then validated with the remaining data. The combination of a system of acoustic emission sensors, and an ANN could determine crack extension accurately. The difference between predicted and actual crack extensions was determined to be between 0.004 in. and 0.015 in. with 95% confidence. These ANNs, coupled with acoustic emission sensors, showed promise for the creation of an SHM system for aerospace systems.« less

  18. Crack Propagation Analysis Using Acoustic Emission Sensors for Structural Health Monitoring Systems

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Walter; Steck, James

    2013-01-01

    Aerospace systems are expected to remain in service well beyond their designed life. Consequently, maintenance is an important issue. A novel method of implementing artificial neural networks and acoustic emission sensors to form a structural health monitoring (SHM) system for aerospace inspection routines was the focus of this research. Simple structural elements, consisting of flat aluminum plates of AL 2024-T3, were subjected to increasing static tensile loading. As the loading increased, designed cracks extended in length, releasing strain waves in the process. Strain wave signals, measured by acoustic emission sensors, were further analyzed in post-processing by artificial neural networks (ANN). Several experiments were performed to determine the severity and location of the crack extensions in the structure. ANNs were trained on a portion of the data acquired by the sensors and the ANNs were then validated with the remaining data. The combination of a system of acoustic emission sensors, and an ANN could determine crack extension accurately. The difference between predicted and actual crack extensions was determined to be between 0.004 in. and 0.015 in. with 95% confidence. These ANNs, coupled with acoustic emission sensors, showed promise for the creation of an SHM system for aerospace systems. PMID:24023536

  19. Crack propagation analysis using acoustic emission sensors for structural health monitoring systems.

    PubMed

    Kral, Zachary; Horn, Walter; Steck, James

    2013-01-01

    Aerospace systems are expected to remain in service well beyond their designed life. Consequently, maintenance is an important issue. A novel method of implementing artificial neural networks and acoustic emission sensors to form a structural health monitoring (SHM) system for aerospace inspection routines was the focus of this research. Simple structural elements, consisting of flat aluminum plates of AL 2024-T3, were subjected to increasing static tensile loading. As the loading increased, designed cracks extended in length, releasing strain waves in the process. Strain wave signals, measured by acoustic emission sensors, were further analyzed in post-processing by artificial neural networks (ANN). Several experiments were performed to determine the severity and location of the crack extensions in the structure. ANNs were trained on a portion of the data acquired by the sensors and the ANNs were then validated with the remaining data. The combination of a system of acoustic emission sensors, and an ANN could determine crack extension accurately. The difference between predicted and actual crack extensions was determined to be between 0.004 in. and 0.015 in. with 95% confidence. These ANNs, coupled with acoustic emission sensors, showed promise for the creation of an SHM system for aerospace systems. PMID:24023536

  20. Evidence of high-frequency acoustic emissions from the white-beaked dolphin (Lagenorhynchus albirostris).

    PubMed

    Mitson, R B; Morris, R J

    1988-02-01

    Recordings of the signals from a school of white-beaked dolphins show that the frequency of their acoustic emissions extends to at least 305 kHz. These signals were detected by a sector scanning sonar used as a passive listening device of high bearing and time resolution. The records contain three types of signal, one of high intensity, one of a variable high repetition rate, and another showing a time-varying effect. Acoustic signals radiated by dolphins have been recorded and studied over a long period of time by many investigators. The purpose of this letter is to report evidence that acoustic emissions from white-beaked dolphins have significant energy at frequencies around 305 kHz, about one octave higher than previously observed. The observations discussed here were made aboard the fisheries research vessel CLIONE in the Wellbank flat area of the southern North Sea on 13 June 1970 between 1040 and 1110 h. When the dolphin signals were observed, the transmitter of the sector-scanning sonar in use was turned off, and the system was utilized as a passive listening device of high bearing and time resolution.

  1. The influence of source acceleration on acoustic signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, Jeffrey J.; Wilson, Mark R.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of aircraft acceleration on acoustic signals is often ignored in both analytical studies and data reduction of flight test measurements. In this study, the influence of source acceleration on acoustic signals is analyzed using computer simulated signals for an accelerating point source. Both rotating and translating sources are considered. Using a known signal allows an assessment of the influence of source acceleration on the received signal. Aircraft acceleration must also be considered in the measurement and reduction of flyover noise. Tracking of the aircraft over an array of microphones enables ensemble averaging of the acoustic signal, thus increasing the confidence in the measured data. This is only valid when both the altitude and velocity remain constant. For an accelerating aircraft, each microphone is exposed to differing flight velocities, Doppler shifts, and smear angles. Thus, averaging across the array in the normal manner is constrained by aircraft acceleration and microphone spacing. In this study computer simulated spectra, containing acceleration, are averaged across a 12 microphone array mimicking a flight test with accelerated profile in which noise data was obtained. Overlapped processing is performed is performed in the flight test measurements in order to alleviate spectral smearing.

  2. Damage Accumulation in Cyclically-Loaded Glass-Ceramic Matrix Composites Monitored by Acoustic Emission

    PubMed Central

    Aggelis, D. G.; Dassios, K. G.; Kordatos, E. Z.; Matikas, T. E.

    2013-01-01

    Barium osumilite (BMAS) ceramic matrix composites reinforced with SiC-Tyranno fibers are tested in a cyclic loading protocol. Broadband acoustic emission (AE) sensors are used for monitoring the occurrence of different possible damage mechanisms. Improved use of AE indices is proposed by excluding low-severity signals based on waveform parameters, rather than only threshold criteria. The application of such improvements enhances the accuracy of the indices as accumulated damage descriptors. RA-value, duration, and signal energy follow the extension cycles indicating moments of maximum or minimum strain, while the frequency content of the AE signals proves very sensitive to the pull-out mechanism. PMID:24381524

  3. An acoustic emission study of cutting bauxite refractory ceramics by abrasive water jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momber, A. W.; Mohan, R. S.; Kovacevic, R.

    1999-08-01

    This article discusses the material removal process in bauxite refractory ceramics cut by abrasive water jets. Several parameters of the process were changed during the experiments. The experiments were monitored online by the acoustic emission (AE) technique. It was found that AE signals are able to sense the material removal process as well as the machining performances very reliably. Unsteady material removal mode consisting of matrix removal and intergranular fracture was very well represented in the AE signals by an unsteady time dependent signal type characterized by burst emissions and a frequency domain signal associated with a twin-peak shape. The particular characteristics of the signal depend on the energy involved in the process.

  4. Tracheal activity recognition based on acoustic signals.

    PubMed

    Olubanjo, Temiloluwa; Ghovanloo, Maysam

    2014-01-01

    Tracheal activity recognition can play an important role in continuous health monitoring for wearable systems and facilitate the advancement of personalized healthcare. Neck-worn systems provide access to a unique set of health-related data that other wearable devices simply cannot obtain. Activities including breathing, chewing, clearing the throat, coughing, swallowing, speech and even heartbeat can be recorded from around the neck. In this paper, we explore tracheal activity recognition using a combination of promising acoustic features from related work and apply simplistic classifiers including K-NN and Naive Bayes. For wearable systems in which low power consumption is of primary concern, we show that with a sub-optimal sampling rate of 16 kHz, we have achieved average classification results in the range of 86.6% to 87.4% using 1-NN, 3-NN, 5-NN and Naive Bayes. All classifiers obtained the highest recognition rate in the range of 97.2% to 99.4% for speech classification. This is promising to mitigate privacy concerns associated with wearable systems interfering with the user's conversations.

  5. Multipoint dynamically reconfigure adaptive distributed fiber optic acoustic emission sensor (FAESense) system for condition based maintenance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, Edgar; Prohaska, John; Kempen, Connie; Esterkin, Yan; Sun, Sunjian; Krishnaswamy, Sridhar

    2010-09-01

    This paper describes preliminary results obtained under a Navy SBIR contract by Redondo Optics Inc. (ROI), in collaboration with Northwestern University towards the development and demonstration of a next generation, stand-alone and fully integrated, dynamically reconfigurable, adaptive fiber optic acoustic emission sensor (FAESense™) system for the in-situ unattended detection and localization of shock events, impact damage, cracks, voids, and delaminations in new and aging critical infrastructures found in ships, submarines, aircraft, and in next generation weapon systems. ROI's FAESense™ system is based on the integration of proven state-of-the-art technologies: 1) distributed array of in-line fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) sensors sensitive to strain, vibration, and acoustic emissions, 2) adaptive spectral demodulation of FBG sensor dynamic signals using two-wave mixing interferometry on photorefractive semiconductors, and 3) integration of all the sensor system passive and active optoelectronic components within a 0.5-cm x 1-cm photonic integrated circuit microchip. The adaptive TWM demodulation methodology allows the measurement of dynamic high frequnency acoustic emission events, while compensating for passive quasi-static strain and temperature drifts. It features a compact, low power, environmentally robust 1-inch x 1-inch x 4-inch small form factor (SFF) package with no moving parts. The FAESense™ interrogation system is microprocessor-controlled using high data rate signal processing electronics for the FBG sensors calibration, temperature compensation and the detection and analysis of acoustic emission signals. Its miniaturized package, low power operation, state-of-the-art data communications, and low cost makes it a very attractive solution for a large number of applications in naval and maritime industries, aerospace, civil structures, the oil and chemical industry, and for homeland security applications.

  6. Neural network/acoustic emission burst pressure prediction for impact damaged composite pressure vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, J.L.; Workman, G.L.; Russell, S.S.; Hill, E.V.K.

    1997-08-01

    Acoustic emission signal analysis has been used to measure the effect impact damage has on the burst pressure of 146 mm (5.75 in.) diameter graphite/epoxy and the organic polymer, Kevlar/epoxy filament wound pressure vessels. Burst pressure prediction models were developed by correlating the differential acoustic emission amplitude distribution collected during low level hydroproof tests to known burst pressures using backpropagation artificial neural networks. Impact damage conditions ranging from barely visible to obvious fiber breakage, matrix cracking, and delamination were included in this work. A simulated (inert) propellant was also cast into a series of the vessels from each material class, before impact loading, to provide boundary conditions during impact that would simulate those found on solid rocket motors. The results of this research effort demonstrate that a quantitative assessment of the effects that impact damage has on burst pressure can be made for both organic polymer/epoxy and graphite/epoxy pressure vessels. Here, an artificial neural network analysis of the acoustic emission parametric data recorded during low pressure hydroproof testing is used to relate burst pressure to the vessel`s acoustic signature. Burst pressure predictions within 6.0% of the actual failure pressure are demonstrated for a series of vessels.

  7. Shear-induced force fluctuations and acoustic emissions in granular material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michlmayr, Gernot; Cohen, Denis; Or, Dani

    2013-12-01

    We conducted a series of strain-controlled experiments to study the characteristics of a shear zone forming in dense flow of confined dry granular media. The primary objective was to link force fluctuations due to jamming and force network reformation with episodic release of elastic energy as passively monitored by acoustic emission sensors. Under constant deformation rate, the shear stress exhibits a characteristic sawtooth behavior reflecting the strong influence of micromechanical processes on the macroscopic stress-strain behavior. Measured shear stress jumps were highly correlated with low-frequency (< 20 kHz) acoustic emission events. High-frequency (30 kHz-80 kHz) acoustic signals that were measured with different sensors appear to be directly linked to continual grain-scale interactions (e.g., friction, rolling). A conceptual mechanical fiber bundle model (FBM) was used to represent dynamics at the shear zone of large granular assemblies. The model was capable of reproducing the dynamics of stress jumps and associated elastic energy release events. The combination of acoustic emission (AE) measurements and FBM framework offers new insights into the behavior of shear failure and enhances capabilities for resolving grain-scale mechanical processes and for predicting rapid mass movement such as shallow landslides and debris flows.

  8. Results of acoustic emission tests on Halon fire bottles

    SciTech Connect

    Beattie, A.G.; Shurtleff, W.W.

    1996-10-01

    An acoustic emission tester for aircraft Halon bottles has been developed. The necessary load is applied by heating the bottles. Acoustic emission is monitored during the heating by six sensors held in position by a special fixture. This fixture was designed to fit spheres with diameters between 5 and 16 inches. A prototype has been undergoing testing in two commercial Halon bottle repair and test facilities. Results to date indicate that about 97 percent of the bottles tested show no indications of any flaws. The other three percent have had indications of flaws in non-critical areas of the bottles. All bottles tested to date have passed the hydrostatic test required by the Department of Transportation (DOT).

  9. A Comparison of Signal Enhancement Methods for Extracting Tonal Acoustic Signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Michael G.

    1998-01-01

    The measurement of pure tone acoustic pressure signals in the presence of masking noise, often generated by mean flow, is a continual problem in the field of passive liner duct acoustics research. In support of the Advanced Subsonic Technology Noise Reduction Program, methods were investigated for conducting measurements of advanced duct liner concepts in harsh, aeroacoustic environments. This report presents the results of a comparison study of three signal extraction methods for acquiring quality acoustic pressure measurements in the presence of broadband noise (used to simulate the effects of mean flow). The performance of each method was compared to a baseline measurement of a pure tone acoustic pressure 3 dB above a uniform, broadband noise background.

  10. Signal processing methodologies for an acoustic fetal heart rate monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pretlow, Robert A., III; Stoughton, John W.

    1992-01-01

    Research and development is presented of real time signal processing methodologies for the detection of fetal heart tones within a noise-contaminated signal from a passive acoustic sensor. A linear predictor algorithm is utilized for detection of the heart tone event and additional processing derives heart rate. The linear predictor is adaptively 'trained' in a least mean square error sense on generic fetal heart tones recorded from patients. A real time monitor system is described which outputs to a strip chart recorder for plotting the time history of the fetal heart rate. The system is validated in the context of the fetal nonstress test. Comparisons are made with ultrasonic nonstress tests on a series of patients. Comparative data provides favorable indications of the feasibility of the acoustic monitor for clinical use.

  11. Fault growth and acoustic emissions in confined granite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lockner, David A.; Byerlee, James D.

    1992-01-01

    The failure process in a brittle granite was studied by using acoustic emission techniques to obtain three dimensional locations of the microfracturing events. During a creep experiment the nucleation of faulting coincided with the onset of tertiary creep, but the development of the fault could not be followed because the failure occurred catastrophically. A technique has been developed that enables the failure process to be stabilized by controlling the axial stress to maintain a constant acoustic emission rate. As a result the post-failure stress-strain curve has been followed quasi-statically, extending to hours the fault growth process that normally would occur violently in a fraction of a second. The results from the rate-controlled experiments show that the fault plane nucleated at a point on the sample surface after the stress-strain curve reached its peak. Before nucleation, the microcrack growth was distributed throughout the sample. The fault plane then grew outward from the nucleation site and was accompanied by a gradual drop in stress. Acoustic emission locations showed that the fault propagated as a fracture front (process zone) with dimensions of 1 to 3 cm. As the fracture front passed by a given fixed point on the fault plane, the subsequent acoustic emission would drop. When growth was allowed to progress until the fault bisected the sample, the stress dropped to the frictional strength. These observations are in accord with the behavior predicted by Rudnicki and Rice's bifurcation analysis but conflict with experiments used to infer that shear localization would occur in brittle rock while the material is still hardening.

  12. Acoustic emission monitoring for assessment of steel bridge details

    SciTech Connect

    Kosnik, D. E.; Corr, D. J.; Hopwood, T.

    2011-06-23

    Acoustic emission (AE) testing was deployed on details of two large steel Interstate Highway bridges: one cantilever through-truss and one trapezoidal box girder bridge. Quantitative measurements of activity levels at known and suspected crack locations were made by monitoring AE under normal service loads (e.g., live traffic and wind). AE indications were used to direct application of radiography, resulting in identification of a previously unknown flaw, and to inform selection of a retrofit detail.

  13. Damage Modes Recognition and Hilbert-Huang Transform Analyses of CFRP Laminates Utilizing Acoustic Emission Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    WenQin, Han; Ying, Luo; AiJun, Gu; Yuan, Fuh-Gwo

    2016-04-01

    Discrimination of acoustic emission (AE) signals related to different damage modes is of great importance in carbon fiber-reinforced plastic (CFRP) composite materials. To gain a deeper understanding of the initiation, growth and evolution of the different types of damage, four types of specimens for different lay-ups and orientations and three types of specimens for interlaminar toughness tests are subjected to tensile test along with acoustic emission monitoring. AE signals have been collected and post-processed, the statistical results show that the peak frequency of AE signal can distinguish various damage modes effectively. After a AE signal were decomposed by Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD) method, it may separate and extract all damage modes included in this AE signal apart from damage mode corresponding to the peak frequency. Hilbert-Huang Transform (HHT) of AE signals can clearly illustrate the frequency distribution of Intrinsic Mode Functions (IMF) components in time-scale in different damage stages, and can calculate accurate instantaneous frequency for damage modes recognition to help understanding the damage process.

  14. Crack propagation testing using a YCOB acoustic emission sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Joseph A.; Kim, Kyungrim; Zhang, Shujun; Jiang, Xiaoning

    2014-03-01

    Piezoelectric crystals are popular for passive sensors, such as accelerometers and acoustic emission sensors, due to their robustness and high sensitivity. These sensors are widespread in structural health monitoring among civil and industrial structures, but there is little application in high temperature environments (e.g. > 1000°C) due to the few materials that are capable of operating at elevated temperatures. Most piezoelectric materials suffer from a loss of electric properties above temperatures in the 500-700°C range, but rare earth oxyborate crystals, such as Yttrium calcium oxyborate (YCOB), retain their piezoelectric properties above 1000 °C. Our previous research demonstrated that YCOB can be used to detect transient lamb waves via Hsu-Nielsen tests, which replicate acoustic emission waves, up to 1000°C. In this paper, YCOB piezoelectric acoustic emission sensors were tested for their ability to detect crack progression at elevated temperatures. The sensor was fabricated using a YCOB single crystal and Inconel electrodes and wires. The sensor was mounted onto a stainless steel bar substrate, which was machined to include a pre-crack notch. A dynamic load was induced on the bar with a shaker in order to force the crack to advance along the thickness of the substrate. The obtained raw data was processed and analyzed in the frequency domain and compared to the Lamb wave modes that were evaluated in previous Hsu-Nielsen testing for the substrate.

  15. Emission Enhancement of Sound Emitters using an Acoustic Metamaterial Cavity

    PubMed Central

    Song, Kyungjun; Lee, Seong-Hyun; Kim, Kiwon; Hur, Shin; Kim, Jedo

    2014-01-01

    The emission enhancement of sound without electronic components has wide applications in a variety of remote systems, especially when highly miniaturized (smaller than wavelength) structures can be used. The recent advent of acoustic metamaterials has made it possible to realize this. In this study, we propose, design, and demonstrate a new class of acoustic cavity using a double-walled metamaterial structure operating at an extremely low frequency. Periodic zigzag elements which exhibit Fabry-Perot resonant behavior below the phononic band-gap are used to yield strong sound localization within the subwavelength gap, thus providing highly effective emission enhancement. We show, both theoretically and experimentally, 10 dB sound emission enhancement near 1060 Hz that corresponds to a wavelength approximately 30 times that of the periodicity. We also provide a general guideline for the independent tuning of the quality factor and effective volume of acoustic metamaterials. This approach shows the flexibility of our design in the efficient control of the enhancement rate. PMID:24584552

  16. Concurrent Ultrasonic Tomography and Acoustic Emission in Solid Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, Thomas M.

    A series of experiments were performed to detect stress induced changes in the elastic properties of various solid materials. A technique was developed where these changes were monitored concurrently by two methods, ultrasonic tomography and acoustic emission monitoring. This thesis discusses some experiments in which acoustic emission (AE) and ultrasonic tomography were performed on various samples of solid materials including rocks, concrete, metals, and fibre reinforced composites. Three separate techniques were used to induce stress in these samples. Disk shaped samples were subject to stress via diametral loading using an indirect tensile test geometry. Cylindrical samples of rocks and concrete were subject to hydraulic fracture tests, and rectangular samples of fibre reinforced composite were subject to direct tensile loading. The majority of the samples were elastically anisotropic. Full waveform acoustic emission and tomographic data were collected while these samples were under load to give information concerning changes in the structure of the material as it was undergoing stress change and/or failure. Analysis of this data indicates that AE and tomographic techniques mutually compliment each other to give a view of the stress induced elastic changes in the tested samples.

  17. Band-limited Green's Functions for Quantitative Evaluation of Acoustic Emission Using the Finite Element Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leser, William P.; Yuan, Fuh-Gwo; Leser, William P.

    2013-01-01

    A method of numerically estimating dynamic Green's functions using the finite element method is proposed. These Green's functions are accurate in a limited frequency range dependent on the mesh size used to generate them. This range can often match or exceed the frequency sensitivity of the traditional acoustic emission sensors. An algorithm is also developed to characterize an acoustic emission source by obtaining information about its strength and temporal dependence. This information can then be used to reproduce the source in a finite element model for further analysis. Numerical examples are presented that demonstrate the ability of the band-limited Green's functions approach to determine the moment tensor coefficients of several reference signals to within seven percent, as well as accurately reproduce the source-time function.

  18. Codetection of acoustic emissions during failure of heterogeneous media: New perspectives for natural hazard early warning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faillettaz, Jerome; Or, Dani; Reiweger, Ingrid

    2016-02-01

    A simple method for real-time early warning of gravity-driven rupture that considers both the heterogeneity of natural media and characteristics of acoustic emissions attenuation is proposed. The method capitalizes on codetection of elastic waves emanating from microcracks by multiple and spatially separated sensors. Event codetection is considered as surrogate for large event size with more frequent codetected events marking imminence of catastrophic failure. Using a spatially explicit fiber bundle numerical model with spatially correlated mechanical strength and two load redistribution rules, we constructed a range of mechanical failure scenarios and associated failure events (mapped into acoustic emission) in space and time. Analysis considering hypothetical arrays of sensors and consideration of signal attenuation demonstrate the potential of the codetection principles even for insensitive sensors to provide early warning for imminent global failure.

  19. Monitoring of Temperature Fatigue Failure Mechanism for Polyvinyl Alcohol Fiber Concrete Using Acoustic Emission Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dongsheng; Cao, Hai

    2012-01-01

    The applicability of acoustic emission (AE) techniques to monitor the mechanism of evolution of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) fiber concrete damage under temperature fatigue loading is investigated. Using the temperature fatigue test, real-time AE monitoring data of PVA fiber concrete is achieved. Based on the AE signal characteristics of the whole test process and comparison of AE signals of PVA fiber concretes with different fiber contents, the damage evolution process of PVA fiber concrete is analyzed. Finally, a qualitative evaluation of the damage degree is obtained using the kurtosis index and b-value of AE characteristic parameters. The results obtained using both methods are discussed. PMID:23012555

  20. Detection of acoustic emission from composite laminates using PVF2 transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stiffler, R.; Henneke, E. G., II; Herakovich, C. T.

    1983-01-01

    Polyvinylidene fluoride (PVF2), a semicrystalline polymer exhibiting piezoelectricity, is presently used as a sensing transducer in acoustic emission (AE) monitoring of several different composite laminate materials in order to obtain both quasi-static and fatigue loading results. AE signals obtained from PVF2 transducers are compared with those obtained by standard AE sensors. It is noted that PVF2 transducers may, through the application of spectral signal analysis, be able to distinguish between two distinct failure modes which have been observed in two composite laminates of the same material, but employing different lamina stacking sequences.

  1. Acoustic emission studies of large advanced composite rocket motor cases.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, E. Y.

    1973-01-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) patterns were measured during pressure testing of advanced composite rocket motor cases made of boron/epoxy and graphite/epoxy. Both accelerometers and high frequency AE transducers were used, and both frequency spectrum and amplitude distribution were studied. The AE patterns suggest that precursor emission might be used in certain cases to anticipate failure. The technique of hold-cycle AE monitoring was also evaluated and could become a valuable decision gate for test continuation/termination. Data presented show similarity of accelerometers and AE transducer responses despite the different frequency response, and suggest that structural AE phenomena are broadband.

  2. Finite Element and Plate Theory Modeling of Acoustic Emission Waveforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, W. H.; Hamstad, M. A.; Gary, J.; OGallagher, A.

    1998-01-01

    A comparison was made between two approaches to predict acoustic emission waveforms in thin plates. A normal mode solution method for Mindlin plate theory was used to predict the response of the flexural plate mode to a point source, step-function load, applied on the plate surface. The second approach used a dynamic finite element method to model the problem using equations of motion based on exact linear elasticity. Calculations were made using properties for both isotropic (aluminum) and anisotropic (unidirectional graphite/epoxy composite) materials. For simulations of anisotropic plates, propagation along multiple directions was evaluated. In general, agreement between the two theoretical approaches was good. Discrepancies in the waveforms at longer times were caused by differences in reflections from the lateral plate boundaries. These differences resulted from the fact that the two methods used different boundary conditions. At shorter times in the signals, before reflections, the slight discrepancies in the waveforms were attributed to limitations of Mindlin plate theory, which is an approximate plate theory. The advantages of the finite element method are that it used the exact linear elasticity solutions, and that it can be used to model real source conditions and complicated, finite specimen geometries as well as thick plates. These advantages come at a cost of increased computational difficulty, requiring lengthy calculations on workstations or supercomputers. The Mindlin plate theory solutions, meanwhile, can be quickly generated on personal computers. Specimens with finite geometry can also be modeled. However, only limited simple geometries such as circular or rectangular plates can easily be accommodated with the normal mode solution technique. Likewise, very limited source configurations can be modeled and plate theory is applicable only to thin plates.

  3. Characteristics of acoustic emissions from fluid front displacement in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möbius, F.; Canone, D.; Or, D.

    2009-12-01

    Fluid displacement in porous media is of interest for environmental, petroleum and chemical engineering. Percolation theory and pore-scale models are useful in describing filling and emptying of pores and throats but fail to capture characteristics of the fast interfacial jumps and reconfigurations occurring during fluid displacement processes such as imbibitions and drainage. Energy release caused by these rapid events generates acoustic waves which propagate through the porous medium and can be detected at its surface using acoustic emission (AE) sensors. Through a series of experiment displacing various fluids through Hele-Shaw cells filled with glass beads of different sizes we investigate correlation between acoustic emission signals, fluid and pore space properties, and energy dissipation. Acoustic emission signals were quantified by considering number of hits (events) and amplitudes. The exponent of power law relating these characteristic values varied with the displacement process and pore size. The number of AE events and amplitudes dropped with decreasing liquid surface tension for displacement within the same porous medium (water, ethanol, silicon oil). Similar trends were observed with increasing liquid viscosity, only a few hits are recorded for silicon oil with 10 mPas. The results are interpreted considering air or liquid entry pressures into the pore spaces, with increasing pressure entries for small pores and liquid with higher surface tension. The viscosity plays an important role in restraining AE-producing jump events and dumping interfacial oscillations as could be shown theoretically for simple capillaries. The study establishes direct relationships between measured AE fluid and pore properties and offer potential for quantifying energy dissipation during fluid displacement in porous media as well as other transient flow characteristics using non invasive AE signals.

  4. INSTRUMENTATION FOR SURVEYING ACOUSTIC SIGNALS IN NATURAL GAS TRANSMISSION LINES

    SciTech Connect

    John L. Loth; Gary J. Morris; George M. Palmer; Richard Guiler; Deepak Mehra

    2003-09-01

    In the U.S. natural gas is distributed through more than one million miles of high-pressure transmission pipelines. If all leaks and infringements could be detected quickly, it would enhance safety and U.S. energy security. Only low frequency acoustic waves appear to be detectable over distances up to 60 km where pipeline shut-off valves provide access to the inside of the pipeline. This paper describes a Portable Acoustic Monitoring Package (PAMP) developed to record and identify acoustic signals characteristic of: leaks, pump noise, valve and flow metering noise, third party infringement, manual pipeline water and gas blow-off, etc. This PAMP consists of a stainless steel 1/2 inch NPT plumbing tree rated for use on 1000 psi pipelines. Its instrumentation is designed to measure acoustic waves over the entire frequency range from zero to 16,000 Hz by means of four instruments: (1) microphone, (2) 3-inch water full range differential pressure transducer with 0.1% of range sensitivity, (3) a novel 3 inch to 100 inch water range amplifier, using an accumulator with needle valve and (4) a line-pressure transducer. The weight of the PAMP complete with all accessories is 36 pounds. This includes a remote control battery/switch box assembly on a 25-foot extension chord, a laptop data acquisition computer on a field table and a sun shield.

  5. Fiber-optic acoustic-emission sensors and detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borinski, Jason W.; Clark, Richard L., Jr.; Furrow, A. Paige C.; Duke, John C., Jr.; Horne, Michael R.

    2000-05-01

    Optical fiber sensors are rapidly emerging as viable alternatives to piezoelectric devices as effective means of detecting and quantifying acoustic emission (AE). Compared to traditional piezoelectric-based sensors, optical fiber sensors offer much smaller size, reduced weight, ability to operate at temperatures up to 2000 degrees Celsius, immunity to electromagnetic interference, resistance to corrosive environments, inherent safety within flammable environments, and the ability to multiplex multiple sensors on a single fiber. The authors have investigated low-profile fiber optic- based AE sensors for non-destructive evaluation (NDE) systems. In particular, broadband optical fiber sensors were developed for monitoring acoustic emission for NDE of pressurized composite vessels. The authors conducted experiments by surface attaching sensors to aluminum compact tension specimens using a piezoelectric transducer as a reference sensor. Both the fiber optic and piezoelectric sensors accurately measured a representative acoustic event. The response of the fiber optic AE sensors were also compared to existing piezoelectric sensors during pencil lead break tests on an aluminum panel. The results indicate that optical fiber AE sensors can be used as highly sensitive transducers in many applications where conventional piezoelectric transducers are not suited.

  6. Gearbox fault diagnosis based on deep random forest fusion of acoustic and vibratory signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chuan; Sanchez, René-Vinicio; Zurita, Grover; Cerrada, Mariela; Cabrera, Diego; Vásquez, Rafael E.

    2016-08-01

    Fault diagnosis is an effective tool to guarantee safe operations in gearboxes. Acoustic and vibratory measurements in such mechanical devices are all sensitive to the existence of faults. This work addresses the use of a deep random forest fusion (DRFF) technique to improve fault diagnosis performance for gearboxes by using measurements of an acoustic emission (AE) sensor and an accelerometer that are used for monitoring the gearbox condition simultaneously. The statistical parameters of the wavelet packet transform (WPT) are first produced from the AE signal and the vibratory signal, respectively. Two deep Boltzmann machines (DBMs) are then developed for deep representations of the WPT statistical parameters. A random forest is finally suggested to fuse the outputs of the two DBMs as the integrated DRFF model. The proposed DRFF technique is evaluated using gearbox fault diagnosis experiments under different operational conditions, and achieves 97.68% of the classification rate for 11 different condition patterns. Compared to other peer algorithms, the addressed method exhibits the best performance. The results indicate that the deep learning fusion of acoustic and vibratory signals may improve fault diagnosis capabilities for gearboxes.

  7. Nonlinear ball chain waveguides for acoustic emission and ultrasound sensing of ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, Stephen H.; Huston, Dryver

    2014-03-01

    Harsh-environment acoustic emission and ultrasonic wave sensing applications often benefit from placing the sensor in a remote and more benign physical location, using waveguides to transmit elastic waves between the structural location under test and the transducer. Waveguides are normally designed with linear properties to have high fidelity over broad frequency ranges to minimize distortion - often difficult to achieve in practice. This paper reports on an examination of using nonlinear ball chain waveguides for the transmission of acoustic emission and ultrasonic waves for the monitoring of thermal protection systems undergoing severe heat loading, such as ablation and similar processes. Experiments test the nonlinear propagation of solitary, harmonic and mixed harmonic elastic waves through a copper tube filled with steel and elastomer balls. Mechanical pulses of varying time widths and amplitudes are launched into one end of the ball chain waveguide and observed at the other end in both time and frequency domains. A nonlinear mechanical model describes the motion of the ball chains. Based on the results of these studies it is anticipated that a nonlinear waveguide will be designed, built and tested as a possible replacement for the high-fidelity waveguides presently being using in an Inductively Coupled Plasma Torch facility for high heat flux thermal protection system testing. The design is intended to accentuate acoustic emission signals of interest, while suppressing other forms elastic wave noise.

  8. MEASUREMENTS OF ABSORPTION, EMISSIVITY REDUCTION, AND LOCAL SUPPRESSION OF SOLAR ACOUSTIC WAVES IN SUNSPOTS

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, D.-Y.; Liang, Z.-C.; Yang, M.-H.; Zhao Hui; Sun, M.-T.

    2009-05-01

    The power of solar acoustic waves in magnetic regions is lower relative to the quiet Sun. Absorption, emissivity reduction, and local suppression of acoustic waves contribute to the observed power reduction in magnetic regions. We propose a model for the energy budget of acoustic waves propagating through a sunspot in terms of the coefficients of absorption, emissivity reduction, and local suppression of the sunspot. Using the property that the waves emitted along the wave path between two points have no correlation with the signal at the starting point, we can separate the effects of these three mechanisms. Applying this method to helioseismic data filtered with direction and phase-velocity filters, we measure the fraction of the contribution of each mechanism to the power deficit in the umbra of the leading sunspot of NOAA 9057. The contribution from absorption is 23.3 {+-} 1.3%, emissivity reduction 8.2 {+-} 1.4%, and local suppression 68.5 {+-} 1.5%, for a wave packet corresponding to a phase velocity of 6.98 x 10{sup -5} rad s{sup -1}.

  9. Acoustic Emission Beamforming for Detection and Localization of Damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivey, Joshua Callen

    The aerospace industry is a constantly evolving field with corporate manufacturers continually utilizing innovative processes and materials. These materials include advanced metallics and composite systems. The exploration and implementation of new materials and structures has prompted the development of numerous structural health monitoring and nondestructive evaluation techniques for quality assurance purposes and pre- and in-service damage detection. Exploitation of acoustic emission sensors coupled with a beamforming technique provides the potential for creating an effective non-contact and non-invasive monitoring capability for assessing structural integrity. This investigation used an acoustic emission detection device that employs helical arrays of MEMS-based microphones around a high-definition optical camera to provide real-time non-contact monitoring of inspection specimens during testing. The study assessed the feasibility of the sound camera for use in structural health monitoring of composite specimens during tensile testing for detecting onset of damage in addition to nondestructive evaluation of aluminum inspection plates for visualizing stress wave propagation in structures. During composite material monitoring, the sound camera was able to accurately identify the onset and location of damage resulting from large amplitude acoustic feedback mechanisms such as fiber breakage. Damage resulting from smaller acoustic feedback events such as matrix failure was detected but not localized to the degree of accuracy of larger feedback events. Findings suggest that beamforming technology can provide effective non-contact and non-invasive inspection of composite materials, characterizing the onset and the location of damage in an efficient manner. With regards to the nondestructive evaluation of metallic plates, this remote sensing system allows us to record wave propagation events in situ via a single-shot measurement. This is a significant improvement over

  10. Variation of solar acoustic emission and its relation to phase of the solar cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ruizhu; Zhao, Junwei

    2016-05-01

    Solar acoustic emission is closely related to solar convection and photospheric magnetic field. Variation of acoustic emission and its relation to the phase of solar cycles are important to understand dynamics of solar cycles and excitation of acoustic waves. In this work we use 6 years of SDO/HMI Dopplergram data to study acoustic emissions of the whole sun and of the quiet-sun regions, respectively, in multiple acoustic frequency bands. We show the variation of acoustic emission from May 2010 to April 2016, covering half of the solar cycle 24, and analyze its correlation with the solar activity level indexed by daily sunspot number and total magnetic flux. Results show that the correlation between the whole-Sun acoustic emission and the solar activity level is strongly negative for low frequencies between 2.5 and 4.5 mHz, but strongly positive for high frequencies between 4.5 and 6.0 mHz. For high frequencies, the acoustic emission excess in sunspot halos overwhelms the emission deficiency in sunspot umbrae and penumbrae. The correlation between the acoustic emission in quiet regions and the solar activity level is negative for 2.5-4.0 mHz and positive for 4.0-5.5 mHz. This shows that the solar background acoustic power, with active regions excluded, also varies during a solar cycle, implying the excitation frequencies or depths are highly related to the solar magnetic field.

  11. Adaptive plasticity in wild field cricket's acoustic signaling.

    PubMed

    Bertram, Susan M; Harrison, Sarah J; Thomson, Ian R; Fitzsimmons, Lauren P

    2013-01-01

    Phenotypic plasticity can be adaptive when phenotypes are closely matched to changes in the environment. In crickets, rhythmic fluctuations in the biotic and abiotic environment regularly result in diel rhythms in density of sexually active individuals. Given that density strongly influences the intensity of sexual selection, we asked whether crickets exhibit plasticity in signaling behavior that aligns with these rhythmic fluctuations in the socio-sexual environment. We quantified the acoustic mate signaling behavior of wild-caught males of two cricket species, Gryllus veletis and G. pennsylvanicus. Crickets exhibited phenotypically plastic mate signaling behavior, with most males signaling more often and more attractively during the times of day when mating activity is highest in the wild. Most male G. pennsylvanicus chirped more often and louder, with shorter interpulse durations, pulse periods, chirp durations, and interchirp durations, and at slightly higher carrier frequencies during the time of the day that mating activity is highest in the wild. Similarly, most male G. veletis chirped more often, with more pulses per chirp, longer interpulse durations, pulse periods, and chirp durations, shorter interchirp durations, and at lower carrier frequencies during the time of peak mating activity in the wild. Among-male variation in signaling plasticity was high, with some males signaling in an apparently maladaptive manner. Body size explained some of the among-male variation in G. pennsylvanicus plasticity but not G. veletis plasticity. Overall, our findings suggest that crickets exhibit phenotypically plastic mate attraction signals that closely match the fluctuating socio-sexual context they experience.

  12. Implementation of an acoustic emission proximity detector for use in generating glass optics

    SciTech Connect

    Blaedel, K.L.; Piscotty, M.A.; Taylor, J.S.

    1996-11-11

    We are using the approach acoustic emission (AE) signal during a grinding operation to detect the proximity of the grinding wheel relative to a brittle material workpiece and are using this detection as a feed- back control signal in our CNC. The repeatability of the AE signal during the wheel approach is the key that allows AE to be used as a proximity detector and is demonstrated at LLNL to be about mm. We noted significant changes of the AE signal as process parameters are modified, but conclude that with a quick CNC calibration routine and holding the parameters constant during a given operation, the AE system can be successfully used to sense pre- contact wheel- to- workpiece separation. Additionally, the AE sensing system allows real- time monitoring during grinding to provide in- process information. The first prototype of an AE system on a commercially available generator is currently be tested at the Center for Optics Manufacturing.

  13. Magneto acoustical emission in nanocrystalline Mn–Zn ferrites

    SciTech Connect

    Praveena, K.; Murthty, S.R.

    2013-11-15

    Graphical abstract: Mn{sub 0.4}Zn{sub 0.6}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} powders were prepared by microwave hydrothermal method. The powders were characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscope. The powders were sintered at different temperatures 400, 500, 600, 700, 800 and 900 °C/30 min using microwave sintering method. The grain size was estimated by scanning electron microscope. The room temperature dielectric and magnetic properties were studied in the frequency range (100 kHz–1.8 GHz). The magnetization properties were measured upto 1.5 T. The acoustic emission has been measured along the hysteresis loops from 80 K to Curie temperature. It is found that the magneto-acoustic emission (MAE) activity along hysteresis loop is proportional to the hysteresis losses during the same loop. This law has been verified on series of polycrystalline ferrites and found that the law is valid whatever the composition, the grain size and temperature. It is also found that the domain wall creation/or annihilation processes are the origin of the MAE. - Highlights: • The AE been measured along the hysteresis loops from 80 K to Curie temperature. • The MAE activity along hysteresis loop is proportional to P{sub h} during the same loop. • It is found that the domain wall creation/or annihilation processes are the origin of the MAE. - Abstract: Mn{sub 0.4}Zn{sub 0.6}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} powders were prepared by microwave hydrothermal method. The powders were characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscope. The powders were sintered at different temperatures 400, 500, 600, 700, 800 and 900 °C/30 min using microwave sintering method. The grain size was estimated by scanning electron microscope. The room temperature dielectric and magnetic properties were studied in the frequency range (100 kHz–1.8 GHz). The magnetization properties were measured upto 1.5 T. The acoustic emission has been measured along the hysteresis loops from 80 K to Curie

  14. Deformation and failure information from composite materials via acoustic emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamstad, M. A.

    1978-01-01

    The paper reviews some principles of applying acoustic emission (AE) to the study of fiber-composite materials and structures. This review covers the basics of using AE to monitor the deformation and fracture processes that occur when fiber-composite materials are stressed. Also, new results in some areas of current research interest are presented. The following areas are emphasized: study of couplants for AE testing of composites, evaluation of a special immersion-type AE transducer, and wave propagation complications and the development of techniques for locating AE sources in Kevlar 49/epoxy composite pre

  15. Acoustic emission study of deformation behavior of nacre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Shunfei; Luo, Hongyun; Han, Zhiyuan

    2016-02-01

    A study on the acoustic emission (AE) characteristics during deformation of nacre material was performed. We found that intermittent AE events are generated during nacre deformation. These avalanches may be attributed to microfracture events of the aragonite (CaCO3) nano-asperities and bridges during tablet sliding. These events show several critical features, such as the power-law distributions of the avalanche sizes and interval. These results suggest that the underlying fracture dynamics during nacre deformation display a self-organized criticality (SOC). The results also imply that the disorder and long-range correlation between local microfracture events may play important roles in nacre deformation.

  16. Precursory acoustic signals and ground deformation in volcanic explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, D. C.; Kim, K.; Anderson, J.; Lees, J. M.; Taddeucci, J.; Graettinger, A. H.; Sonder, I.; Valentine, G.

    2013-12-01

    We investigate precursory acoustic signals that appear prior to volcanic explosions in real and experimental settings. Acoustic records of a series of experimental blasts designed to mimic maar explosions show precursory energy 0.02 to 0.05 seconds before the high amplitude overpressure arrival. These blasts consisted of 1 to 1/3 lb charges detonated in unconsolidated granular material at depths between 0.5 and 1 m, and were performed during the Buffalo Man Made Maars experiment in Springville, New York, USA. The preliminary acoustic arrival is 1 to 2 orders of magnitude lower in amplitude compared to the main blast wave. The waveforms vary from blast to blast, perhaps reflecting the different explosive yields and burial depths of each shot. Similar arrivals are present in some infrasound records at Santiaguito volcano, Guatemala, where they precede the main blast signal by about 2 seconds and are about 1 order of magnitude weaker. Precursory infrasound has also been described at Sakurajima volcano, Japan (Yokoo et al, 2013; Bull. Volc. Soc. Japan, 58, 163-181) and Suwanosejima volcano, Japan (Yokoo and Iguchi, 2010; JVGR, 196, 287-294), where it is attributed to rapid deformation of the vent region. Vent deformation has not been directly observed at these volcanoes because of the difficulty of visually observing the crater floor. However, particle image velocimetry of video records at Santiaguito has revealed rapid and widespread ground motion just prior to eruptions (Johnson et al, 2008; Nature, 456, 377-381) and may be the cause of much of the infrasound recorded at that volcano (Johnson and Lees, 2010; GRL, 37, L22305). High speed video records of the blasts during the Man Made Maars experiment also show rapid deformation of the ground immediately before the explosion plume breaches the surface. We examine the connection between source yield, burial depths, ground deformation, and the production of initial acoustic phases for each simulated maar explosion. We

  17. Computational principles underlying the recognition of acoustic signals in insects.

    PubMed

    Clemens, Jan; Hennig, R Matthias

    2013-08-01

    Many animals produce pulse-like signals during acoustic communication. These signals exhibit structure on two time scales: they consist of trains of pulses that are often broadcast in packets-so called chirps. Temporal parameters of the pulse and of the chirp are decisive for female preference. Despite these signals being produced by animals from many different taxa (e.g. frogs, grasshoppers, crickets, bushcrickets, flies), a general framework for their evaluation is still lacking. We propose such a framework, based on a simple and physiologically plausible model. The model consists of feature detectors, whose time-varying output is averaged over the signal and then linearly combined to yield the behavioral preference. We fitted this model to large data sets collected in two species of crickets and found that Gabor filters--known from visual and auditory physiology--explain the preference functions in these two species very well. We further explored the properties of Gabor filters and found a systematic relationship between parameters of the filters and the shape of preference functions. Although these Gabor filters were relatively short, they were also able to explain aspects of the preference for signal parameters on the longer time scale due to the integration step in our model. Our framework explains a wide range of phenomena associated with female preference for a widespread class of signals in an intuitive and physiologically plausible fashion. This approach thus constitutes a valuable tool to understand the functioning and evolution of communication systems in many species.

  18. Acoustic Emission Detection of Impact Damage on Space Shuttle Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, William H.; Gorman, Michael R.; Madaras, Eric I.

    2004-01-01

    The loss of the Space Shuttle Columbia as a result of impact damage from foam debris during ascent has led NASA to investigate the feasibility of on-board impact detection technologies. AE sensing has been utilized to monitor a wide variety of impact conditions on Space Shuttle components ranging from insulating foam and ablator materials, and ice at ascent velocities to simulated hypervelocity micrometeoroid and orbital debris impacts. Impact testing has been performed on both reinforced carbon composite leading edge materials as well as Shuttle tile materials on representative aluminum wing structures. Results of these impact tests will be presented with a focus on the acoustic emission sensor responses to these impact conditions. These tests have demonstrated the potential of employing an on-board Shuttle impact detection system. We will describe the present plans for implementation of an initial, very low frequency acoustic impact sensing system using pre-existing flight qualified hardware. The details of an accompanying flight measurement system to assess the Shuttle s acoustic background noise environment as a function of frequency will be described. The background noise assessment is being performed to optimize the frequency range of sensing for a planned future upgrade to the initial impact sensing system.

  19. Distance-domain based localization techniques for acoustic emission sources: a comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabowski, Krzysztof; Gawronski, Mateusz; Nakatani, Hayato; Packo, Pawel; Baran, Ireneusz; Spychalski, Wojciech; Staszewski, Wieslaw; Uhl, Tadeusz; Kundu, Tribikram

    2015-04-01

    Acoustic Emission phenomenon is of great importance for analyzing and monitoring health status of critical structural components. In acoustic emission, elastic waves generated by sources propagate through the structure and are acquired by networks of sensors. Ability to accurately locate the event strongly depends on the type of medium (e.g. geometrical features) and material properties, that result in wave signals distortion. These effects manifest themselves particularly in plate structures due to intrinsic dispersive nature of Lamb waves. In this paper two techniques for acoustic emission source localization in elastic plates are compared: one based on a time-domain distance transform and the second one is a two-step hybrid technique. A time-distance domain transform approach, transforms the time-domain waveforms into the distance domain by using wavenumber-frequency mapping. The transform reconstructs the source signal removing distortions resulting from dispersion effects. The method requires input of approximate material properties and geometrical features of the structure that are relatively easy to estimate prior to measurement. Hence, the method is of high practical interest. Subsequently, a two-step hybrid technique, which does not require apriori knowledge of material parameters, is employed. The method requires a setup of two predefined clusters of three sensors in each. The Lamb wave source is localized from the intersection point of the predicted wave propagation directions for the two clusters. The second step of the two-step hybrid technique improves the prediction by minimizing an objective function. The two methods are compared for analytic, simulated and experimental signals.

  20. Characterization of granular collapse onto hard substrates by acoustic emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farin, Maxime; Mangeney, Anne; Toussaint, Renaud; De Rosny, Julien

    2013-04-01

    Brittle deformation in granular porous media can generate gravitational instabilities such as debris flows and rock avalanches. These phenomena constitute a major natural hazard for the population in mountainous, volcanic and coastal areas but their direct observation on the field is very dangerous. Recent studies showed that gravitational instabilities can be detected and characterized (volume, duration,...) thanks to the seismic signal they generate. In an avalanche, individual block bouncing and rolling on the ground are expected to generated signals of higher frequencies than the main flow spreading. The identification of the time/frequency signature of individual blocks in the recorded signal remains however difficult. Laboratory experiments were conducted to investigate the acoustic signature of diverse simple sources corresponding to grains falling over thin plates of plexiglas and rock blocks. The elastic energy emitted by a single bouncing steel bead into the support was first quantitatively estimated and compared to the potential energy of fall and to the potential energy change during the shock. Next, we consider the collapse of granular columns made of steel spherical beads onto hard substrates. Initially, these columns were held by a magnetic field allowing to suppress suddenly the cohesion between the beads, and thus to minimize friction effects that would arise from side walls. We varied systematically the column volume, the column aspect ratio (height over length) and the grain size. This is shown to affect the signal envelope and frequency content. In the experiments, two types of acoustic sensors were used to record the signals in a wide frequency range: accelerometers (1 Hz to 56 kHz) and piezoelectric sensors (100 kHz to 1 MHz). The experiments were also monitored optically using fast cameras. We developed a technique to use quantitatively both types of sensors to evaluate the elastic energy emitted by the sources. Eventually, we looked at what

  1. Evaluation of Acoustic Emission SHM of PRSEUS Composite Pressure Cube Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horne, Michael R.; Madaras, Eric I.

    2013-01-01

    A series of tests of the Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS) pressure cube were conducted during third quarter 2011 at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) in the Combined Loads Test facility (COLTS). This is a report of the analysis of the Acoustic Emission (AE) data collected during those tests. The AE signals of the later tests are consistent with the final failure progression through two of the pressure cube panels. Calibration tests and damage precursor AE indications, from preliminary checkout pressurizations, indicated areas of concern that eventually failed. Hence those tests have potential for vehicle health monitoring.

  2. Acoustic Emission as a Tool for Exploring Deformation Mechanisms in Magnesium and Its Alloys In Situ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinogradov, Alexei; Máthis, Kristian

    2016-06-01

    Structural performance of magnesium alloys depends strongly on specific deformation mechanisms operating during mechanical loading. Therefore, in situ monitoring of the acting mechanisms is a key to performance tailoring. We review the capacity of the advanced acoustic emission (AE) technique to understand the interplay between two primary deformation mechanisms—dislocation slip and twinning—in real time scale. Details of relative contributions of dislocation slip and deformation twinning to the mechanical response of pure Mg and Mg-Al alloy are discussed in view of AE results obtained with the aid of recently proposed spectral and signal categorization algorithms in conjunction with with neutron diffraction data.

  3. Quality control of thermal barrier coatings using acoustic emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, David J.; Taylor, Jenifer A. T.

    2000-06-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are used to protect underlying metal from heat generated during combustion of fuel, especially in truck engines and jet turbines. These coatings are thin, partially stabilized zirconia, separated from the substrate metal by an interface layer, which serves to enhance bonding and reduce the thermal expansion mismatch between the metal and the ceramic. The reliability of these coatings is currently not predictable. The work described in this paper focused on the use of acoustic emission (AE) as a quality control test for TBCs. The test specimens were commercially sprayed straps. The data show that differences in spraying parameters and microstructure are clearly visible in the emissions during thermal cycling. This work indicates that the failure mechanism can be predicted from the AEs during the first thermal cycle.

  4. Granular Shear Zone Formation: Acoustic Emission Measurements and Fiber-bundle Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michlmayr, Gernot; Or, Dani

    2013-04-01

    We couple the acoustic emissions method with conceptual models of granular material behavior for investigation of granular shear zone formation and to assess eminence of landslide hazard. When granular materials are mechanically loaded or sheared, they tend to produce discrete events of force network restructuring, and frictional interaction at grain contacts. Such abrupt perturbations within the granular lattice release part of the elastic energy stored in the strained material. Elastic waves generated by such events can be measured as acoustic emissions (AE) and may be used as surrogates for intermittent structural transitions associated with shear zone formation. To experimentally investigate the connection between granular shearing and acoustic signals we performed an array of strain-controlled shear-frame tests using glass beads. AE were measured with two different systems operating at two frequency ranges. High temporal resolution measurements of the shear stresses revealed the presence of small fluctuations typically associated with low-frequency (< 20 kHz) acoustic bursts. Shear stress jumps and linked acoustic signals give account of discrete events of grain network rearrangements and obey characteristic exponential frequency-size distributions. We found that statistical features of force jumps and AE events depend on mechanical boundary conditions and evolve during the straining process. Activity characteristics of high-frequency (> 30 kHz) AE events is linked to friction between grains. To interpret failure associated AE signals, we adapted a conceptual fiber-bundle model (FBM) that describes some of the salient statistical features of failure and associated energy production. Using FBMs for the abrupt mechanical response of the granular medium and an associated grain and force chain AE generation model provides us with a full description of the mechanical-acoustical granular shearing process. Highly resolved AE may serve as a diagnostic tool not only

  5. Simultaneous multipoint acoustic emission sensing using fibre acoustic wave grating sensors with identical spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jung-Ryul; Lee, Seung-Seok; Yoon, Dong-Jin

    2008-08-01

    This paper introduces the development of a simultaneous multipoint acoustic emission (AE) sensing system using a narrowband tuneable laser with high power and fibre acoustic wave grating sensors (FAWGSs). The demodulation technique is the same as that used in existing methods where the narrowband laser peak is tuned to one mid-reflection point in the main lobe of a fibre Bragg grating (FBG) spectrum. However, the sensor head is changed to an FAWGS for which a FBG is installed in a strain-free configuration so that it can detect AE waves in a structure not directly but in the form of a fibre-guided acoustic wave. Therefore since the structural strain cannot make the Bragg wavelength change, multiple FBGs with identical spectrum can be connected with multiple optical paths realized by equal light intensity dividers. The possible temperature difference between the multiple FAWGSs is passively resolved by using short FBGs which provide a wider operating temperature region. Consequently, we can resolve the problem that the FBG spectrum is easily deviated from the lasing wavelength because of the strain. In addition, the simultaneous multipoint sensing capability based on a single laser improves the cost-performance ratio of the optical system as well as reducing the structural inspection time, and enabling in situ health monitoring of real structures exposed to large and dynamic strains. The feasibility of the system is demonstrated in typical applications of in situ structural health monitoring based on AE techniques.

  6. Modern Techniques in Acoustical Signal and Image Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J V

    2002-04-04

    Acoustical signal processing problems can lead to some complex and intricate techniques to extract the desired information from noisy, sometimes inadequate, measurements. The challenge is to formulate a meaningful strategy that is aimed at performing the processing required even in the face of uncertainties. This strategy can be as simple as a transformation of the measured data to another domain for analysis or as complex as embedding a full-scale propagation model into the processor. The aims of both approaches are the same--to extract the desired information and reject the extraneous, that is, develop a signal processing scheme to achieve this goal. In this paper, we briefly discuss this underlying philosophy from a ''bottom-up'' approach enabling the problem to dictate the solution rather than visa-versa.

  7. Monitoring Thermal Fatigue Damage In Nuclear Power Plant Materials Using Acoustic Emission

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Ryan M.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Watson, Bruce E.; Pitman, Stan G.; Roosendaal, Timothy J.; Bond, Leonard J.

    2012-04-26

    Proactive aging management of nuclear power plant passive components requires technologies to enable monitoring and accurate quantification of material condition at early stages of degradation (i.e., pre-macrocrack). Acoustic emission (AE) is well-suited to continuous monitoring of component degradation and is proposed as a method to monitor degradation during accelerated thermal fatigue tests. A key consideration is the ability to separate degradation responses from external sources such as water spray induced during thermal fatigue testing. Water spray provides a significant background of acoustic signals, which can overwhelm AE signals caused by degradation. Analysis of AE signal frequency and energy is proposed in this work as a means for separating degradation signals from background sources. Encouraging results were obtained by applying both frequency and energy filters to preliminary data. The analysis of signals filtered using frequency and energy provides signatures exhibiting several characteristics that are consistent with degradation accumulation in materials. Future work is planned to enable verification of the efficacy of AE for thermal fatigue crack initiation detection. While the emphasis has been placed on the use of AE for crack initiation detection during accelerated aging tests, this work also has implications with respect to the use of AE as a primary tool for early degradation monitoring in nuclear power plant materials. The development of NDE tools for characterization of aging in materials can also benefit from the use of a technology such as AE which can continuously monitor and detect crack initiation during accelerated aging tests.

  8. Stimulated acoustic emission: pseudo-Doppler shifts seen during the destruction of nonmoving microbubbles.

    PubMed

    Tiemann, K; Pohl, C; Schlosser, T; Goenechea, J; Bruce, M; Veltmann, C; Kuntz, S; Bangard, M; Becher, H

    2000-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the appearance and the characteristics of stimulated acoustic emission (SAE) as an echo contrast-specific color Doppler phenomenon with impact on myocardial contrast echocardiography (MCE). Stationary microbubbles of the new contrast agent SH-U 563A (Schering AG) were embedded within a tissue-mimicking gel material. Harmonic power Doppler imaging (H-PDI), color Doppler and pulse-wave Doppler data were acquired using an HDI-5000 equipped with a phased-array transducer (1.67/3.3 MHz). In color Doppler mode, bubble destruction resulted in random noise like Doppler signals. PW-Doppler revealed short "pseudo-Doppler" shifts with a broadband frequency spectrum. Quantification of SAE events by H-PDI demonstrated an exponential decay of signal intensities over successive frames. A strong linear relationship was found between bubble concentration and the square root of the linearized H-PDI signal for a range of concentrations of more than two orders of magnitude (R = 0.993, p < 0.0001). Intensity of the H-PDI signals correlated well with emission power (R = 0.96, p = 0.0014). SAE results from disintegration of microbubbles and can be demonstrated by all Doppler imaging modalities, including H-PDI. Intensity of SAE signals is influenced by the applied acoustic power and correlates highly with the concentration of microbubbles. Because intensity of SAE signals correlates highly with echo contrast concentrations, analysis of SAE signals might be used for quantitative MCE. PMID:11053751

  9. Oscillating load-induced acoustic emission in laboratory experiment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ponomarev, Alexander; Lockner, David A.; Stroganova, S.; Stanchits, S.; Smirnov, V.

    2010-01-01

    Spatial and temporal patterns of acoustic emission (AE) were studied. A pre-fractured cylinder of granite was loaded in a triaxial machine at 160 MPa confining pressure until stick-slip events occurred. The experiments were conducted at a constant strain rate of 10−7 s−1 that was modulated by small-amplitude sinusoidal oscillations with periods of 175 and 570 seconds. Amplitude of the oscillations was a few percent of the total load and was intended to simulate periodic loading observed in nature (e.g., earth tides or other sources). An ultrasonic acquisition system with 13 piezosensors recorded acoustic emissions that were generated during deformation of the sample. We observed a correlation between AE response and sinusoidal loading. The effect was more pronounced for higher frequency of the modulating force. A time-space spectral analysis for a “point” process was used to investigate details of the periodic AE components. The main result of the study was the correlation of oscillations of acoustic activity synchronized with the applied oscillating load. The intensity of the correlated AE activity was most pronounced in the “aftershock” sequences that followed large-amplitude AE events. We suggest that this is due to the higher strain-sensitivity of the failure area when the sample is in a transient, unstable mode. We also found that the synchronization of AE activity with the oscillating external load nearly disappeared in the period immediately after the stick-slip events and gradually recovered with further loading.

  10. Characterization of corrosion damage in prestressed concrete using acoustic emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangual, Jesé; ElBatanouny, Mohamed K.; Vélez, William; Ziehl, Paul; Matta, Fabio; González, Miguel

    2012-04-01

    The corrosion of reinforced concrete structures is a major issue from both a structural safety and maintenance management point of view. Early detection of the internal degradation process provides the owner with sufficient options to develop a plan of action. An accelerated corrosion test was conducted in a small scale concrete specimen reinforced with a 0.5 inch (13 mm) diameter prestressing strand to investigate the correlation between corrosion rate and acoustic emission (AE). Corrosion was accelerated in the laboratory by supplying anodic current via a rectifier while continuously monitoring acoustic emission activity. Results were correlated with traditional electrochemical techniques such as half-cell potential and linear polarization. The location of the active corrosion activity was found through a location algorithm based on time of flight of the stress waves. Intensity analysis was used to plot the relative significance of the damage states present in the specimen and a preliminary grading chart is presented. Results indicate that AE may be a useful non-intrusive technique for the detection and quantification of corrosion damage.

  11. Study on demodulated signal distribution and acoustic pressure phase sensitivity of a self-interfered distributed acoustic sensing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Ying; Yang, Yuan-Hong; Wang, Chen; Liu, Xiao-Hui; Wang, Chang; Peng, Gang-Ding

    2016-06-01

    We propose a demodulated signal distribution theory for a self-interfered distributed acoustic sensing system. The distribution region of Rayleigh backscattering including the acoustic sensing signal in the sensing fiber is investigated theoretically under different combinations of both the path difference and pulse width Additionally we determine the optimal solution between the path difference and pulse width to obtain the maximum phase change per unit length. We experimentally test this theory and realize a good acoustic pressure phase sensitivity of  -150 dB re rad/(μPa·m) of fiber in the frequency range from 200 Hz to 1 kHz.

  12. Inertial cavitation and associated acoustic emission produced during electrohydraulic shock wave lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Zhong, P; Cioanta, I; Cocks, F H; Preminger, G M

    1997-05-01

    The inertial cavitation and associated acoustic emission generated during electrohydraulic shock wave lithotripsy were studied using high-speed photography and acoustic pressure measurements. The dynamics of cavitation bubble clusters, induced in vitro by an experimental laboratory lithotripter, were recorded using a high-speed rotating drum camera at 20,000 frames/s. The acoustic emission, generated by the rapid initial expansion and subsequent violent collapse of the cavitation bubbles, was measured simultaneously using a 1-MHz focused hydrophone, The expansion duration of the cavitation bubble cluster was found to correlate closely with the time delay between the first two groups of pressure spikes in the acoustic emission signal. This correlation provides an essential physical basis to assess the inertial cavitation produced by a clinical Dornier HM-3 shock wave lithotripter, both in water and in renal parenchyma of a swine model. In the clinical output voltage range (16-24 kV), the expansion duration of the primary cavitation bubble cluster generated by the HM-3 lithotripter in water increases from 158 to 254 microseconds, whereas the corresponding values in renal parenchyma are much smaller and remain almost unchanged (from 71 to 72 microseconds). In contrast, subsequent oscillation of the bubble following its primary collapse is significantly prolonged (from 158-235 microseconds in water to 1364-1373 microseconds in renal parenchyma). These distinctive differences between lithotripsy-induced inertial cavitation in vitro and that in vivo are presumably due to the constraining effect of renal tissue on bubble expansion. PMID:9165740

  13. Signal Restoration of Non-stationary Acoustic Signals in the Time Domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babkin, Alexander S.

    1988-01-01

    Signal restoration is a method of transforming a nonstationary signal acquired by a ground based microphone to an equivalent stationary signal. The benefit of the signal restoration is a simplification of the flight test requirements because it could dispense with the need to acquire acoustic data with another aircraft flying in concert with the rotorcraft. The data quality is also generally improved because the contamination of the signal by the propeller and wind noise is not present. The restoration methodology can also be combined with other data acquisition methods, such as a multiple linear microphone array for further improvement of the test results. The methodology and software are presented for performing the signal restoration in the time domain. The method has no restrictions on flight path geometry or flight regimes. Only requirement is that the aircraft spatial position be known relative to the microphone location and synchronized with the acoustic data. The restoration process assumes that the moving source radiates a stationary signal, which is then transformed into a nonstationary signal by various modulation processes. The restoration contains only the modulation due to the source motion.

  14. High-temperature acoustic emission sensing tests using a yttrium calcium oxyborate sensor.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Joseph A; Kim, Kyungrim; Zhang, Shujun; Wu, Di; Jiang, Xiaoning

    2014-05-01

    Piezoelectric materials have been broadly utilized in acoustic emission sensors, but are often hindered by the loss of piezoelectric properties at temperatures in the 500°C to 700°C range or higher. In this paper, a piezoelectric acoustic emission sensor was designed and fabricated using yttrium calcium oxyborate (YCOB) single crystals, followed by Hsu-Nielsen tests for high-temperature (>700°C) applications. The sensitivity of the YCOB sensor was found to have minimal degradation with increasing temperature up to 1000°C. During Hsu-Nielsen tests with a steel bar, this YCOB acoustic sensor showed the ability to detect zero-order symmetric and antisymmetric modes at 30 and 120 kHz, respectively, as well as distinguish a first-order antisymmetric mode at 240 kHz at elevated temperatures up to 1000°C. The frequency characteristics of the signal were verified using a finite-element model and wavelet transformation analysis.

  15. SEEK: Signal Extraction and Emission Kartographer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akeret, Joel; Seehars, Sebastian; Chang, Chihway; Monstein, Christian; Amara, Adam; Refregier, Alexandre

    2016-07-01

    SEEK (Signal Extraction and Emission Kartographer) processes time-ordered-data from single dish radio telescopes or from the simulation pipline HIDE (ascl:1607.019), removes artifacts from Radio Frequency Interference (RFI), automatically applies flux calibration, and recovers the astronomical radio signal. With its companion code HIDE (ascl:1607.019), it provides end-to-end simulation and processing of radio survey data.

  16. Acoustic emission characteristics of copper alloys under low-cycle fatigue conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krampfner, Y.; Kawamoto, A.; Ono, K.; Green, A.

    1975-01-01

    The acoustic emission (AE) characteristics of pure copper, zirconium-copper, and several copper alloys were determined to develop nondestructive evaluation schemes of thrust chambers through AE techniques. The AE counts rms voltages, frequency spectrum, and amplitude distribution analysis evaluated AE behavior under fatigue loading conditions. The results were interpreted with the evaluation of wave forms, crack propagation characteristics, as well as scanning electron fractographs of fatigue-tested samples. AE signals at the beginning of a fatigue test were produced by a sample of annealed alloys. A sample of zirconium-containing alloys annealed repeatedly after each fatigue loading cycle showed numerous surface cracks during the subsequent fatigue cycle, emitting strong-burst AE signals. Amplitude distribution analysis exhibits responses that are characteristic of certain types of AE signals.

  17. Correlation of acoustic emissions associated with effects from diagnostic and therapeutic ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samuel, Stanley

    2007-12-01

    This research has investigated the correlation of acoustic emissions with associated contrast-mediated ultrasound bio-effects. The hypothesis that motivated this study was that during exposure with ultrasound, the cavitation occurring in tissue emits acoustical signals, which if correlated with specific bio-effects, could provide a way to monitor the potential bio-effects of exposure. A good bio-effects indicator would find immediate use in research on drug and gene delivery, and could have clinical application in avoiding bio-effects in diagnosis. Studies conducted to test the hypothesis involved investigation of (i) the influence of pulse repetition frequency (PRF) and number of exposures on cell damage, (ii) the effect of total exposure duration and pulse-to-pulse bubble distribution on acoustic emissions and corresponding cell damage, and (iii) the translation of in vitro effects to an in situ environment. Exposures were primarily conducted at a peak rarefactional pressure of 2 MPa, 2.25 MHz insonating frequency and pulse length of 46 cycles. PRFs of 1-, 10-, 100-, 500-, and 1000 Hz were compared. High speed photography (2000 fps) was employed for the investigation of pulse-to-pulse bubble distribution while intravital microscopy was used for in situ studies. A strong correlation was observed between acoustic emissions and bio-effects with the availability of bubbles of resonant size serving as a key link between the two. It was observed that total exposure duration may play an important role in cell damage. Damage increased with increasing total exposure duration from 0 ms to 100 ms with a plateau at above 100 ms. These results were consistent for all studies. There is, therefore, an implication that manipulating these parameters may allow for measurement and control of the extent of bioeffects. Moreover, the correlation of acoustic emission and extravasation observed in in situ studies reveals that cumulative function of the relative integrated power spectrum

  18. Adaptive Plasticity in Wild Field Cricket’s Acoustic Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Bertram, Susan M.; Harrison, Sarah J.; Thomson, Ian R.; Fitzsimmons, Lauren P.

    2013-01-01

    Phenotypic plasticity can be adaptive when phenotypes are closely matched to changes in the environment. In crickets, rhythmic fluctuations in the biotic and abiotic environment regularly result in diel rhythms in density of sexually active individuals. Given that density strongly influences the intensity of sexual selection, we asked whether crickets exhibit plasticity in signaling behavior that aligns with these rhythmic fluctuations in the socio-sexual environment. We quantified the acoustic mate signaling behavior of wild-caught males of two cricket species, Gryllus veletis and G. pennsylvanicus. Crickets exhibited phenotypically plastic mate signaling behavior, with most males signaling more often and more attractively during the times of day when mating activity is highest in the wild. Most male G. pennsylvanicus chirped more often and louder, with shorter interpulse durations, pulse periods, chirp durations, and interchirp durations, and at slightly higher carrier frequencies during the time of the day that mating activity is highest in the wild. Similarly, most male G. veletis chirped more often, with more pulses per chirp, longer interpulse durations, pulse periods, and chirp durations, shorter interchirp durations, and at lower carrier frequencies during the time of peak mating activity in the wild. Among-male variation in signaling plasticity was high, with some males signaling in an apparently maladaptive manner. Body size explained some of the among-male variation in G. pennsylvanicus plasticity but not G. veletis plasticity. Overall, our findings suggest that crickets exhibit phenotypically plastic mate attraction signals that closely match the fluctuating socio-sexual context they experience. PMID:23935965

  19. Integrated acoustic emission/vibration sensor for detecting damage in aircraft drive train components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godínez-Azcuaga, Valery F.; Ozevin, Didem; Finlayson, Richard D.; Anastasopoulos, Athanasios; Tsimogiannis, Apostolos

    2007-04-01

    Diaphragm-type couplings are high misalignment torque and speed transfer components used in aircrafts. Crack development in such couplings, or in the drive train in general, can lead to component failure that can bring down an aircraft. Real time detection of crack formation and growth is important to prevent such catastrophic failures. However, there is no single Nondestructive Monitoring method available that is capable of assessing the early stages of crack growth in such components. While vibration based damage identification techniques are used, they cannot detect cracks until they reach a considerable size, which makes detection of the onset of cracking extremely difficult. Acoustic Emission (AE) can detect and monitor early stage crack growth, however excessive background noise can mask acoustic emissions produced by crack initiation. Fusion of the two mentioned techniques can increase the accuracy of measurement and minimize false alarms. However, a monitoring system combining both techniques could prove too large and heavy for the already restricted space available in aircrafts. In the present work, we will present a newly developed integrated Acoustic Emission/Vibration (AE/VIB) combined sensor which can operate in the temperature range of -55°F to 257°F and in high EMI environment. This robust AE/VIB sensor has a frequency range of 5 Hz-2 kHz for the vibration component and a range of 200-400 kHz for the acoustic emission component. The sensor weight is comparable to accelerometers currently used in flying aircraft. Traditional signal processing approaches are not effective due to high signal attenuation and strong background noise conditions, commonly found in aircraft drive train systems. As an alternative, we will introduce a new Supervised Pattern Recognition (SPR) methodology that allows for simultaneous processing of the signals detected by the AE/VIB sensor and their classification in near-real time, even in these adverse conditions. Finally, we

  20. Time-frequency analysis of acoustic signals in the audio-frequency range generated during Hadfield's steel friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrynin, S. A.; Kolubaev, E. A.; Smolin, A. Yu.; Dmitriev, A. I.; Psakhie, S. G.

    2010-07-01

    Time-frequency analysis of sound waves detected by a microphone during the friction of Hadfield’s steel has been performed using wavelet transform and window Fourier transform methods. This approach reveals a relationship between the appearance of quasi-periodic intensity outbursts in the acoustic response signals and the processes responsible for the formation of wear products. It is shown that the time-frequency analysis of acoustic emission in a tribosystem can be applied, along with traditional approaches, to studying features in the wear and friction process.

  1. Signal processing and tracking of arrivals in ocean acoustic tomography.

    PubMed

    Dzieciuch, Matthew A

    2014-11-01

    The signal processing for ocean acoustic tomography experiments has been improved to account for the scattering of the individual arrivals. The scattering reduces signal coherence over time, bandwidth, and space. In the typical experiment, scattering is caused by the random internal-wave field and results in pulse spreading (over arrival-time and arrival-angle) and wander. The estimator-correlator is an effective procedure that improves the signal-to-noise ratio of travel-time estimates and also provides an estimate of signal coherence. The estimator-correlator smoothes the arrival pulse at the expense of resolution. After an arrival pulse has been measured, it must be associated with a model arrival, typically a ray arrival. For experiments with thousands of transmissions, this is a tedious task that is error-prone when done manually. An error metric that accounts for peak amplitude as well as travel-time and arrival-angle can be defined. The Viterbi algorithm can then be adapted to the task of automated peak tracking. Repeatable, consistent results are produced that are superior to a manual tracking procedure. The tracking can be adjusted by tuning the error metric in logical, quantifiable manner. PMID:25373953

  2. Signal processing and tracking of arrivals in ocean acoustic tomography.

    PubMed

    Dzieciuch, Matthew A

    2014-11-01

    The signal processing for ocean acoustic tomography experiments has been improved to account for the scattering of the individual arrivals. The scattering reduces signal coherence over time, bandwidth, and space. In the typical experiment, scattering is caused by the random internal-wave field and results in pulse spreading (over arrival-time and arrival-angle) and wander. The estimator-correlator is an effective procedure that improves the signal-to-noise ratio of travel-time estimates and also provides an estimate of signal coherence. The estimator-correlator smoothes the arrival pulse at the expense of resolution. After an arrival pulse has been measured, it must be associated with a model arrival, typically a ray arrival. For experiments with thousands of transmissions, this is a tedious task that is error-prone when done manually. An error metric that accounts for peak amplitude as well as travel-time and arrival-angle can be defined. The Viterbi algorithm can then be adapted to the task of automated peak tracking. Repeatable, consistent results are produced that are superior to a manual tracking procedure. The tracking can be adjusted by tuning the error metric in logical, quantifiable manner.

  3. The application of acoustic emission technique to fatigue crack measurement. [in aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; Davis, W. T.; Crews, J. H., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    The applicability of acoustic emission technique to measure fatigue cracks in aluminum alloy specimens was investigated. There are several variables, such as the metallurgical and the physical treatment of the specimen, that can affect the level of acoustic activity of a fatigue specimen. It is therefore recommended that the acoustic emission technique be supplemented by other nondestructive evaluation methods to obtain quantitative data on crack growth.

  4. Acoustic emission monitoring of HFIR vessel during hydrostatic testing. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Friesel, M.A.; Dawson, J.F.

    1992-08-01

    This report discusses the results and conclusions reached from applying acoustic emission monitoring to surveillance of the High Flux Isotope Reactor vessel during pressure testing. The objective of the monitoring was to detect crack growth and/or fluid leakage should it occur during the pressure test. The report addresses the approach, acoustic emission instrumentation, installation, calibration, and test results.

  5. Embedded and conventional ultrasonic sensors for monitoring acoustic emission during thermal fatigue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trujillo, Blaine; Zagrai, Andrei

    2016-04-01

    Acoustic emission is widely used for monitoring pressure vessels, pipes, critical infrastructure, as well as land, sea and air vehicles. It is one of dominant approaches to explore material degradation under fatigue and events leading to material fracture. Addressing a recent interest in structural health monitoring of space vehicles, a need has emerged to evaluate material deterioration due to thermal fatigue during spacecraft atmospheric reentry. Thermal fatigue experiments were conducted, in which aluminum plates were subjected to localized heating and acoustic emission was monitoring by embedded and conventional acoustic emission sensors positioned at various distances from a heat source. At the same time, surface temperature of aluminum plates was monitored using an IR camera. Acoustic emission counts collected by embedded sensors were compared to counts measured with conventional acoustic emission sensors. Both types of sensors show noticeable increase of acoustic emission activity as localized heating source was applied to aluminum plates. Experimental data demonstrate correlation between temperature increase on the surface of the plates and increase in measured acoustic emission activity. It is concluded that under particular conditions, embedded piezoelectric wafer active sensors can be used for acoustic emission monitoring of thermally-induced structural degradation.

  6. Remote monitoring and prognosis of fatigue cracking in steel bridges with acoustic emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jianguo Peter; Ziehl, Paul; Pollock, Adrian

    2011-04-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) monitoring is desirable to nondestructively detect fatigue damage in steel bridges. Investigations of the relationship between AE signals and crack growth behavior are of paramount importance prior to the widespread application of passive piezoelectric sensing for monitoring of fatigue crack propagation in steel bridges. Tests have been performed to detect AE from fatigue cracks in A572G50 steel. Noise induced AE signals were filtered based on friction emission tests, loading pattern, and a combined approach involving Swansong II filters and investigation of waveforms. The filtering methods based on friction emission tests and load pattern are of interest to the field evaluation using sparse datasets. The combined approach is suitable for data filtering and interpretation of actual field tests. The pattern recognition program NOESIS (Envirocoustics) was utilized for the evaluation of AE data quality. AE parameters are associated with crack length, crack growth rate, maximum stress intensity and stress intensity range. It is shown that AE hits, counts, absolute energy, and signal strength are able to provide warnings at the critical cracking level where cracking progresses from stage II (stable propagation) to stage III (unstable propagation which may result in failure). Absolute energy rate and signal strength rate may be better than count rate to assess the remaining fatigue life of inservice steel bridges.

  7. Considerations for acoustic emission monitoring of spherical Kevlar/epoxy composite pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamstad, M. A.; Patterson, R. G.

    1977-01-01

    We are continuing to research the applications of acoustic emission testing for predicting burst pressure of filament-wound Kevlar 49/epoxy pressure vessels. This study has focused on three specific areas. The first area involves development of an experimental technique and the proper instrumentation to measure the energy given off by the acoustic emission transducer per acoustic emission burst. The second area concerns the design of a test fixture in which to mount the composite vessel so that the acoustic emission transducers are held against the outer surface of the composite. Included in this study area is the calibration of the entire test setup including couplant, transducer, electronics, and the instrument measuring the energy per burst. In the third and final area of this study, we consider the number, location, and sensitivity of the acoustic emission transducers used for proof testing composite pressure vessels.

  8. Nuclear Emissions During Self-Nucleated Acoustic Cavitation

    SciTech Connect

    Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Xu, Y.; West, C.D.; Lahey, R.T. Jr.; Block, R.C.; Nigmatulin, R.I.

    2006-01-27

    A unique, new stand-alone acoustic inertial confinement nuclear fusion test device was successfully tested. Experiments using four different liquid types were conducted in which bubbles were self-nucleated without the use of external neutrons. Four independent detection systems were used (i.e., a neutron track plastic detector to provide unambiguous visible records for fast neutrons, a BF{sub 3} detector, a NE-113-type liquid scintillation detector, and a NaI {gamma} ray detector). Statistically significant nuclear emissions were observed for deuterated benzene and acetone mixtures but not for heavy water. The measured neutron energy was {<=}2.45 MeV, which is indicative of deuterium-deuterium (D-D) fusion. Neutron emission rates were in the range {approx}5x10{sup 3} n/s to {approx}10{sup 4} n/s and followed the inverse law dependence with distance. Control experiments did not result in statistically significant neutron or {gamma} ray emissions.

  9. Temporal coherence of acoustic signals in a fluctuating ocean.

    PubMed

    Voronovich, Alexander G; Ostashev, Vladimir E; Colosi, John A

    2011-06-01

    Temporal coherence of acoustic signals propagating in a fluctuating ocean is important for many practical applications and has been studied intensively experimentally. However, only a few theoretical formulations of temporal coherence exist. In the present paper, a three-dimensional (3D) modal theory of sound propagation in a fluctuating ocean is used to derive closed-form equations for the spatial-temporal coherence function of a broadband signal. The theory is applied to the analysis of the temporal coherence of a monochromatic signal propagating in an ocean perturbed by linear internal waves obeying the Garrett-Munk (G-M) spectral model. In particular, the temporal coherence function is calculated for propagation ranges up to 10(4) km and for five sound frequencies: 12, 25, 50, 75, and 100 Hz. Then, the dependence of the coherence time (i.e., the value of the time lag at which the temporal coherence decreases by a factor of e) on range and frequency is studied. The results obtained are compared with experimental data and predictions of the path-integral theory.

  10. Acoustic monitoring of gas emissions from the seafloor. Part I: quantifying the volumetric flow of bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leblond, Isabelle; Scalabrin, Carla; Berger, Laurent

    2014-09-01

    Three decades of continuous ocean exploration have led us to identify subsurface fluid related processes as a key phenomenon in marine earth science research. The number of seep areas located on the seafloor has been constantly increasing with the use of multi-scale imagery techniques. Due to recent advances in transducer technology and computer processing, multibeam echosounders are now commonly used to detect submarine gas seeps escaping from the seafloor into the water column. A growing number of en- route surveys shows that sites of gas emissions escaping from the seafloor are much more numerous than previously thought. Estimating the temporal variability of the gas flow rate and volumes escaping from the seafloor has thus become a challenge of relevant interest which could be addressed by sea-floor continuous acoustic monitoring. Here, we investigate the feasibility of estimating the volumetric flow rates of gas emissions from horizontal backscattered acoustic signals. Different models based on the acoustic backscattering theory of bubbles are presented. The forward volume backscattering strength and the inversion volumetric flow rate solutions were validated with acoustic measurements from artificial gas flow rates generated in controlled sea-water tank experiments. A sensitivity analysis was carried out to investigate the behavior of the 120-kHz forward solution with respect to model input parameters (horizontal distance between transducer and bubble stream, bubble size distribution and ascent rate). The most sensitive parameter was found to be the distance of the bubble stream which can affect the volume backscattering strength by 20 dB within the horizontal range of 0-200 m. Results were used to derive the detection probability of a bubble stream for a given volume backscattering strength threshold according to different bubble flow rates and horizontal distance.

  11. Acoustic emission evaluation of plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berndt, C. C.

    1984-01-01

    Acoustic emission techniques have recently been used in a number of studies to investigate the performance and failure behavior of plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings. Failure of the coating is a complex phenomena, especially when the composite nature of the coating is considered in the light of possible failure mechanisms. Thus it can be expected that both the metal and ceramic components (i.e., the bond coat and ceramic overlay) of a composite thermal protection system influence the macroscopic behavior and performance of the coating. The aim of the present work is to summarize the 'state-of-the-art' in terms of this initial work and indicate where future progress may be made.

  12. Monitoring damage growth in titanium matrix composites using acoustic emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakuckas, J. G., Jr.; Prosser, W. H.; Johnson, W. S.

    1993-01-01

    The application of the acoustic emission (AE) technique to locate and monitor damage growth in titanium matrix composites (TMC) was investigated. Damage growth was studied using several optical techniques including a long focal length, high magnification microscope system with image acquisition capabilities. Fracture surface examinations were conducted using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The AE technique was used to locate damage based on the arrival times of AE events between two sensors. Using model specimens exhibiting a dominant failure mechanism, correlations were established between the observed damage growth mechanisms and the AE results in terms of the events amplitude. These correlations were used to monitor the damage growth process in laminates exhibiting multiple modes of damage. Results revealed that the AE technique is a viable and effective tool to monitor damage growth in TMC.

  13. Quantitative Analysis Of Acoustic Emission From Rock Fracture Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodfellow, Sebastian David

    This thesis aims to advance the methods of quantitative acoustic emission (AE) analysis by calibrating sensors, characterizing sources, and applying the results to solve engi- neering problems. In the first part of this thesis, we built a calibration apparatus and successfully calibrated two commercial AE sensors. The ErgoTech sensor was found to have broadband velocity sensitivity and the Panametrics V103 was sensitive to surface normal displacement. These calibration results were applied to two AE data sets from rock fracture experiments in order to characterize the sources of AE events. The first data set was from an in situ rock fracture experiment conducted at the Underground Research Laboratory (URL). The Mine-By experiment was a large scale excavation response test where both AE (10 kHz - 1 MHz) and microseismicity (MS) (1 Hz - 10 kHz) were monitored. Using the calibration information, magnitude, stress drop, dimension and energy were successfully estimated for 21 AE events recorded in the tensile region of the tunnel wall. Magnitudes were in the range -7.5 < Mw < -6.8, which is consistent with other laboratory AE results, and stress drops were within the range commonly observed for induced seismicity in the field (0.1 - 10 MPa). The second data set was AE collected during a true-triaxial deformation experiment, where the objectives were to characterize laboratory AE sources and identify issues related to moving the analysis from ideal in situ conditions to more complex laboratory conditions in terms of the ability to conduct quantitative AE analysis. We found AE magnitudes in the range -7.8 < Mw < -6.7 and as with the in situ data, stress release was within the expected range of 0.1 - 10 MPa. We identified four major challenges to quantitative analysis in the laboratory, which in- hibited our ability to study parameter scaling (M0 ∝ fc -3 scaling). These challenges were 0c (1) limited knowledge of attenuation which we proved was continuously evolving, (2

  14. Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Jerry R.; Grosveld, Ferdinand

    2007-01-01

    The acoustics environment in space operations is important to maintain at manageable levels so that the crewperson can remain safe, functional, effective, and reasonably comfortable. High acoustic levels can produce temporary or permanent hearing loss, or cause other physiological symptoms such as auditory pain, headaches, discomfort, strain in the vocal cords, or fatigue. Noise is defined as undesirable sound. Excessive noise may result in psychological effects such as irritability, inability to concentrate, decrease in productivity, annoyance, errors in judgment, and distraction. A noisy environment can also result in the inability to sleep, or sleep well. Elevated noise levels can affect the ability to communicate, understand what is being said, hear what is going on in the environment, degrade crew performance and operations, and create habitability concerns. Superfluous noise emissions can also create the inability to hear alarms or other important auditory cues such as an equipment malfunctioning. Recent space flight experience, evaluations of the requirements in crew habitable areas, and lessons learned (Goodman 2003; Allen and Goodman 2003; Pilkinton 2003; Grosveld et al. 2003) show the importance of maintaining an acceptable acoustics environment. This is best accomplished by having a high-quality set of limits/requirements early in the program, the "designing in" of acoustics in the development of hardware and systems, and by monitoring, testing and verifying the levels to ensure that they are acceptable.

  15. Fatigue crack growth monitoring of idealized gearbox spline component using acoustic emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lu; Ozevin, Didem; Hardman, William; Kessler, Seth; Timmons, Alan

    2016-04-01

    The spline component of gearbox structure is a non-redundant element that requires early detection of flaws for preventing catastrophic failures. The acoustic emission (AE) method is a direct way of detecting active flaws; however, the method suffers from the influence of background noise and location/sensor based pattern recognition method. It is important to identify the source mechanism and adapt it to different test conditions and sensors. In this paper, the fatigue crack growth of a notched and flattened gearbox spline component is monitored using the AE method in a laboratory environment. The test sample has the major details of the spline component on a flattened geometry. The AE data is continuously collected together with strain gauges strategically positions on the structure. The fatigue test characteristics are 4 Hz frequency and 0.1 as the ratio of minimum to maximum loading in tensile regime. It is observed that there are significant amount of continuous emissions released from the notch tip due to the formation of plastic deformation and slow crack growth. The frequency spectra of continuous emissions and burst emissions are compared to understand the difference of sudden crack growth and gradual crack growth. The predicted crack growth rate is compared with the AE data using the cumulative AE events at the notch tip. The source mechanism of sudden crack growth is obtained solving the inverse mathematical problem from output signal to input signal. The spline component of gearbox structure is a non-redundant element that requires early detection of flaws for preventing catastrophic failures. In this paper, the fatigue crack growth of a notched and flattened gearbox spline component is monitored using the AE method The AE data is continuously collected together with strain gauges. There are significant amount of continuous emissions released from the notch tip due to the formation of plastic deformation and slow crack growth. The source mechanism of

  16. Use of Acoustic Emission During Scratch Testing for Understanding Adhesion Behavior of Aluminum Nitride Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhary, R. K.; Mishra, P.

    2016-06-01

    In this work, acoustic emission during scratch testing of the aluminum nitride coatings formed on stainless steel substrate by reactive magnetron sputtering was analyzed to assess the coating failure. The AlN coatings were formed under the variation of substrate temperature, substrate bias potential, and discharge power. The coatings deposited in the temperature range of 100 to 400 °C showed peak acoustic emission less than 1.5%, indicating ductile nature of the coating. However, for coatings formed with substrate negative bias potential of 20 to 50 V, numerous sharp acoustic bursts with maximum emission approaching 80% were observed, indicating brittle nature of the coatings with large number of defects present. The shift in the intensity of the first major acoustic peak toward higher load, with the increasing bias potential, confirmed improved adhesion of the coating. Also, the higher discharge power resulted in increased acoustic emission.

  17. Studies of Elastic Waves in Ethylene Propylene Rubber Using Acoustic Emission Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takaoka, Masanori; Sakoda, Tatsuya; Otsubo, Masahisa; Akaiwa, Shigeru; Iki, Masatoshi; Nakano, Shigeharu

    The aim of our study is to investigate the relationship between lowering of the insulation performance of cross-linked polyethylene (CV) cable and partial discharges (PDs) followed by the dielectric breakdown and to establish a diagnostic technique using an acoustic emission (AE) sensor. In this study, we focused on characterization of AE signals detected from ethylene propylene rubbers (EPRs) used as insulating materials of CV cables. Elastic waves with various frequencies were added to the surface of the EPR, and then characteristics of the detected AE signals due to the elastic waves propagated in the EPR were evaluated. We showed characteristics of Lamb waves whose low frequency components around 100 kHz were large and their small attenuation characteristics.

  18. In Situ Monitoring of Plasma Spraying Process by Laser Acoustic Emission Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Kaita; Enoki, Manabu; Watanabe, Makoto; Kuroda, Seiji

    Estimation of microfractures in ceramic coating layer during plasma spraying process is critical for its reliability. Acoustic emission (AE) method enables in-process monitoring of such microfractures. Laser AE method was adopted to realize the monitoring of plasma spraying process by non-contact detection of AE with laser interferometer. Also a high performance method for noise reduction of laser AE waveform was investigated. In this new method, laser AE signal was continuously sampled and transformed into spectrogram by time-frequency analysis to cut out noise component effectively. After this noise reduction process, inverse transform was applied to obtain a clear AE signals in time domain. Whole these processes can be done in real time. The effectiveness of this method was confirmed by a detection test of simulated AE and successfully applied to the monitoring of plasma spraying process. Two types of AE events with different duration time range were found and the sources of these AE were presumed.

  19. Noninvasive determination of in situ heating rate using KHz acoustic emissions and focused ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Ajay; Kaczkowski, Peter J.

    2009-01-01

    For High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) to be widely applicable in the clinic, robust methods of treatment planning, guidance and delivery need to be developed. These technologies would greatly benefit if patient specific tissue parameters could be provided as inputs so that the treatment planning and monitoring schemes are customized and tailored on a case by case basis. A noninvasive method of estimating the local in situ acoustic heating rate using the Heat Transfer Equation (HTE) and applying novel signal processing techniques is presented in this paper. The heating rate is obtained by experimentally measuring the time required to raise the temperature of the therapeutic focus from a baseline temperature to boiling (here assumed to be 100ºC for aqueous media) and then solving the heat transfer equation iteratively to find the heating rate that results in the onset of boiling. The onset of boiling is noninvasively detected by measuring the time instant of onset of acoustic emissions in the audible frequency range due to violent collapse of bubbles. In vitro experiments performed in a tissue mimicking alginate phantom and excised turkey breast muscle tissue demonstrate that the noninvasive estimates of heating rate are in good agreement with those obtained independently using established methods. The results show potential for the applicability of these techniques in therapy planning and monitoring for therapeutic dose optimization using real-time acoustic feedback. PMID:19699575

  20. Explosive activity at Mt. Yasur volcano: characterization of acoustic signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spina, L.; Taddeucci, J.; Scarlato, P.; Freda, C.; Gresta, S.

    2012-04-01

    Mt. Yasur (Vanuatu Islands) is an active volcano characterized by persistent Strombolian to mild Vulcanian explosive activity, well known to generate a broad variety of air pressure waves. Between 9 and 12 July 2011, we recorded explosive activity from the three active vents of Mt. Yasur by means of a multiparametric station, comprising thermal and visual high-speed cameras and two ECM microphones recording both infrasonic and sonic signals at 10 kHz sampling frequency. A total of 106 major acoustic events, lasting on average 5 seconds (up to 20 in some ash-rich explosion), correspond to visually recorded explosions at the vents and exhibit a surprisingly broad waveform variability. Major events intervene between minor transients with strongly repetitive waveforms typical of puffing activity. Spectral analyses have been computed on both major events and whole traces. Analysis of major events, carried out using a 5.12 s long window, reveals peak frequencies mostly beneath 5 Hz, only a few events displaying a notable energy content in the sonic band (up to 100 Hz ca). Peak-to-peak amplitude as well as RMS values (evaluated from event start to end) were computed on both raw and filtered (above and below 20 Hz) signals. Spectrograms of the whole traces, carried out using 1.28, 2.56, and 5.12 seconds long windows with 50% overlap, outline clearly the frequency content of major events and the occurrence of puffing ones. We also evaluated the peak frequency of each spectrum of the spectrogram, in order to detect spectral variation of the puffing signal. Considering their great variability, we classified the major events on the base of their spectral content rather than on waveform, grouping together all events having similar spectra by cross-correlating them. Three spectral families cover most of the dataset, as follows: 1) variable and irregular shaped spectra, with energy mainly below 4 Hz; 2) monochromatic events, with simple spectra corresponding in the time domain to

  1. Indirect measurement of cylinder pressure from diesel engines using acoustic emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Ghamry, M.; Steel, J. A.; Reuben, R. L.; Fog, T. L.

    2005-07-01

    Indirect measurement of the cylinder pressure from diesel engines is possible using acoustic emission (AE). A method is demonstrated for a large two-stroke marine diesel engine and a small four-stroke diesel engine, which involves reconstructing the cylinder crank angle domain diagram from the AE generated during the combustion phase. Raw AE was used for modelling and reconstructing the pressure waveform in the time domain but this could not be used to model the pressure rise (compression). To overcome this problem the signal was divided into two sections representing the compression part of the signal and the fuel injection/expansion stroke. The compression part of the pressure signal was reconstructed by using polynomial fitting. An auto-regressive technique was used during the injection/expansion stroke. The rms AE signal is well correlated with the pressure signal in the time and frequency domain and complex cepstrum analysis was used to model the pressure signal for the complete combustion phase (compression, injection and expansion). The main advantage of using cepstral analysis is that the model uses the frequency content of the rms AE signal rather than the energy content of the rms AE signal, which gives an advantage when the signal has lower energy content, during the compression process. By calculating the engine running speed from the rms AE signal and selecting the proper cepstrum model correlated to the combustion rms AE energy content, an analytical algorithm was developed to give a wide range of applicability over the different conditions of engine speed, engine type and load. The pressure reconstructed from both AE and acceleration data are compared. AE has the advantage of a much higher signal-to-noise ratio and improved time resolution and is shown to be better than the acceleration.

  2. A Fibre Bragg Grating Sensor as a Receiver for Acoustic Communications Signals

    PubMed Central

    Wild, Graham; Hinckley, Steven

    2011-01-01

    A Fibre Bragg Grating (FBG) acoustic sensor is used as a receiver for acoustic communications signals. Acoustic transmissions were generated in aluminium and Carbon Fibre Composite (CFC) panels. The FBG receiver was coupled to the bottom surface opposite a piezoelectric transmitter. For the CFC, a second FBG was embedded within the layup for comparison. We show the transfer function, frequency response, and transient response of the acoustic communications channels. In addition, the FBG receiver was used to detect Phase Shift Keying (PSK) communications signals, which was shown to be the most robust method in a highly resonant communications channel. PMID:22346585

  3. Signal processing for passive detection and classification of underwater acoustic signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Kil Woo

    2011-12-01

    This dissertation examines signal processing for passive detection, classification and tracking of underwater acoustic signals for improving port security and the security of coastal and offshore operations. First, we consider the problem of passive acoustic detection of a diver in a shallow water environment. A frequency-domain multi-band matched-filter approach to swimmer detection is presented. The idea is to break the frequency contents of the hydrophone signals into multiple narrow frequency bands, followed by time averaged (about half of a second) energy calculation over each band. Then, spectra composed of such energy samples over the chosen frequency bands are correlated to form a decision variable. The frequency bands with highest Signal/Noise ratio are used for detection. The performance of the proposed approach is demonstrated for experimental data collected for a diver in the Hudson River. We also propose a new referenceless frequency-domain multi-band detector which, unlike other reference-based detectors, does not require a diver specific signature. Instead, our detector matches to a general feature of the diver spectrum in the high frequency range: the spectrum is roughly periodic in time and approximately flat when the diver exhales. The performance of the proposed approach is demonstrated by using experimental data collected from the Hudson River. Moreover, we present detection, classification and tracking of small vessel signals. Hydroacoustic sensors can be applied for the detection of noise generated by vessels, and this noise can be used for vessel detection, classification and tracking. This dissertation presents recent improvements aimed at the measurement and separation of ship DEMON (Detection of Envelope Modulation on Noise) acoustic signatures in busy harbor conditions. Ship signature measurements were conducted in the Hudson River and NY Harbor. The DEMON spectra demonstrated much better temporal stability compared with the full ship

  4. Acoustic Emission Detection of Macro-Cracks on Engraving Tool Steel Inserts during the Injection Molding Cycle Using PZT Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Svečko, Rajko; Kusić, Dragan; Kek, Tomaž; Sarjaš, Andrej; Hančič, Aleš; Grum, Janez

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an improved monitoring system for the failure detection of engraving tool steel inserts during the injection molding cycle. This system uses acoustic emission PZT sensors mounted through acoustic waveguides on the engraving insert. We were thus able to clearly distinguish the defect through measured AE signals. Two engraving tool steel inserts were tested during the production of standard test specimens, each under the same processing conditions. By closely comparing the captured AE signals on both engraving inserts during the filling and packing stages, we were able to detect the presence of macro-cracks on one engraving insert. Gabor wavelet analysis was used for closer examination of the captured AE signals' peak amplitudes during the filling and packing stages. The obtained results revealed that such a system could be used successfully as an improved tool for monitoring the integrity of an injection molding process. PMID:23673677

  5. Constitutive acoustic-emission elastic-stress behavior of magnesium alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. H., Jr.; Emerson, G. P.

    1977-01-01

    Repeated laoding and unloading of a magnesium alloy below the macroscopic yield stress result in continuous acoustic emissions which are generally repeatable for a given specimen and which are reproducible between different specimens having the same load history. An acoustic emission Bauschinger strain model is proposed to describe the unloading emission behavior. For the limited range of stress examined, loading and unloading stress delays of the order of 50 MN/sq m are observed, and they appear to be dependent upon the direction of loading, the stress rate, and the stress history. The stress delay is hypothesized to be the manifestation of an effective friction stress. The existence of acoustic emission elastic stress constitutive relations is concluded, which provides support for a previously proposed concept for the monitoring of elastic stresses by acoustic emission.

  6. Fluids and Combustion Facility Acoustic Emissions Controlled by Aggressive Low-Noise Design Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Beth A.; Young, Judith A.

    2004-01-01

    The Fluids and Combustion Facility (FCF) is a dual-rack microgravity research facility that is being developed by Northrop Grumman Information Technology (NGIT) for the International Space Station (ISS) at the NASA Glenn Research Center. As an on-orbit test bed, FCF will host a succession of experiments in fluid and combustion physics. The Fluids Integrated Rack (FIR) and the Combustion Integrated Rack (CIR) must meet ISS acoustic emission requirements (ref. 1), which support speech communication and hearing-loss-prevention goals for ISS crew. To meet these requirements, the NGIT acoustics team implemented an aggressive low-noise design effort that incorporated frequent acoustic emission testing for all internal noise sources, larger-scale systems, and fully integrated racks (ref. 2). Glenn's Acoustical Testing Laboratory (ref. 3) provided acoustical testing services (see the following photograph) as well as specialized acoustical engineering support as part of the low-noise design process (ref. 4).

  7. Acoustic Emission Monitoring of the Syracuse Athena Temple: Scale Invariance in the Timing of Ruptures

    SciTech Connect

    Niccolini, G.; Carpinteri, A.; Lacidogna, G.; Manuello, A.

    2011-03-11

    We perform a comparative statistical analysis between the acoustic-emission time series from the ancient Greek Athena temple in Syracuse and the sequence of nearby earthquakes. We find an apparent association between acoustic-emission bursts and the earthquake occurrence. The waiting-time distributions for acoustic-emission and earthquake time series are described by a unique scaling law indicating self-similarity over a wide range of magnitude scales. This evidence suggests a correlation between the aging process of the temple and the local seismic activity.

  8. A study of the possibility of using acoustic emission to diagnose the cracking of dried materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, Stefan J.; Musielak, Grzegorz

    The purpose of this article is to demonstrate the possibility of using an acoustic emission method to diagnose the cracking of materials in the process of drying them. Among other things, the article contains information on the course of the drying process, dryer stresses, acoustic emission as a phenomenon, and the research method as well as its engineering applications. The authors discuss the development of acoustic emission analysis of cracking during drying and also demonstrate how this method should be used to optimize the drying process.

  9. A combined complex electrical impedance and acoustic emission study in limestone samples under uniaxial loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saltas, V.; Fitilis, I.; Vallianatos, F.

    2014-12-01

    In the present work, complex electrical impedance measurements in the frequency range of 10 mHz to 1 MHz were carried out in conjunction with acoustic emission monitoring in limestone samples subjected to linear and stepped-like uniaxial loading, up to ultimate failure. Cole-Cole plots of the complex impedance during the stepped loading of limestone have been used to discriminate the contributions of grains interior, grain boundaries and electrode polarization effects to the overall electrical behavior. The latter is well-described with an equivalent-circuit model which comprises components of constant phase elements and resistances in parallel connection. Electrical conductivity increases upon uniaxial loading giving rise to negative values of effective activation volume. This is a strong experimental evidence for the generation of transient electric signals recorded prior to seismic events and may be attributed to charge transfer (proton conduction) due to cracks generation and propagation as a result of the applied stress. The time-series of ac-conductivity at two distinct frequencies (10 kHz, 200 kHz) during linear loading of limestone samples exhibits a strong correlation with the acoustic emission activity obeying the same general self-similar law for critical phenomena that has been reported for the energy release before materials fracture.

  10. SPATIAL DISTRIBUTIONS OF ABSORPTION, LOCAL SUPPRESSION, AND EMISSIVITY REDUCTION OF SOLAR ACOUSTIC WAVES IN MAGNETIC REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, D.-Y.; Yang, M.-H.; Zhao Hui; Liang Zhichao; Sun, M.-T.

    2009-11-20

    Observed acoustic power in magnetic regions is lower than the quiet Sun because of absorption, emissivity reduction, and local suppression of solar acoustic waves in magnetic regions. In the previous studies, we have developed a method to measure the coefficients of absorption, emissivity reduction, and local suppression of sunspots. In this study, we go one step further to measure the spatial distributions of three coefficients in two active regions, NOAA 9055 and 9057. The maps of absorption, emissivity reduction, and local suppression coefficients correlate with the magnetic map, including plage regions, except the emissivity reduction coefficient of NOAA 9055 where the emissivity reduction coefficient is too weak and lost among the noise.

  11. Acoustic emission analysis as a non-destructive test procedure for fiber compound structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Block, J.

    1983-01-01

    The concept of acoustic emission analysis is explained in scientific terms. The detection of acoustic events, their localization, damage discrimination, and event summation curves are discussed. A block diagram of the concept of damage-free testing of fiber-reinforced synthetic materials is depicted. Prospects for application of the concept are assessed.

  12. Filtering of Acoustic Signals within the Hearing Organ

    PubMed Central

    Ramamoorthy, Sripriya; Chen, Fangyi; Jacques, Steven L.; Wang, Ruikang; Choudhury, Niloy; Fridberger, Anders

    2014-01-01

    The detection of sound by the mammalian hearing organ involves a complex mechanical interplay among different cell types. The inner hair cells, which are the primary sensory receptors, are stimulated by the structural vibrations of the entire organ of Corti. The outer hair cells are thought to modulate these sound-evoked vibrations to enhance hearing sensitivity and frequency resolution, but it remains unclear whether other structures also contribute to frequency tuning. In the current study, sound-evoked vibrations were measured at the stereociliary side of inner and outer hair cells and their surrounding supporting cells, using optical coherence tomography interferometry in living anesthetized guinea pigs. Our measurements demonstrate the presence of multiple vibration modes as well as significant differences in frequency tuning and response phase among different cell types. In particular, the frequency tuning at the inner hair cells differs from other cell types, causing the locus of maximum inner hair cell activation to be shifted toward the apex of the cochlea compared with the outer hair cells. These observations show that additional processing and filtering of acoustic signals occur within the organ of Corti before inner hair cell excitation, representing a departure from established theories. PMID:24990925

  13. Continuous acoustic emission monitoring of reinforced concrete under accelerated corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Benedetti, M.; Loreto, G.; Nanni, A.; Matta, F.; Gonzalez-Nunez, M. A.

    2011-04-01

    The development of techniques capable of evaluating deterioration of reinforced concrete (RC) structures is instrumental to the advancement of techniques for the structural health monitoring (SHM) and service life estimate for constructed facilities. One of the main causes leading to degradation of RC is the corrosion of the steel reinforcement. This process can be modeled phenomenologically, while laboratory tests aimed at studying durability responses are typically accelerated in order to provide useful results within a realistic period of time. To assess the condition of damage in RC, a number of nondestructive methods have been recently studied. Acoustic emission (AE) is emerging as a nondestructive tool to detect the onset and progression of deterioration mechanisms. In this paper, the development of accelerated corrosion and continuous AE monitoring test set-up for RC specimens are presented. Relevant information are provided with regard to the characteristics of the corrosion circuit, continuous measurement and acquisition of corrosion potential, selection of AE sensors and AE parameter setting. The effectiveness of the setup in detecting and characterizing the initiation and progression of the corrosion phenomenon is discussed on the basis of preliminary results from small-scale, pre-cracked RC specimens, which are representative of areas near the clear cover in typical RC bridge members.

  14. CORROSION PROCESS IN REINFORCED CONCRETE IDENTIFIED BY ACOUSTIC EMISSION

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawasaki, Yuma; Kitaura, Misuzu; Tomoda, Yuichi; Ohtsu, Masayasu

    Deterioration of Reinforced Concrete (RC) due to salt attack is known as one of serious problems. Thus, development of non-destructive evaluation (NDE) techniques is important to assess the corrosion process. Reinforcement in concrete normally does not corrode because of a passive film on the surface of reinforcement. When chloride concentration at reinfo rcement exceeds the threshold level, the passive film is destroyed. Thus maintenance is desirable at an early stage. In this study, to identify the onset of corrosion and the nucleation of corrosion-induced cracking in concrete due to expansion of corrosion products, continuous acoustic emission (AE) monitoring is applied. Accelerated corrosion and cyclic wet and dry tests are performed in a laboratory. The SiGMA (Simplified Green's functions for Moment tensor Analysis) proce dure is applied to AE waveforms to clarify source kinematics of micro-cracks locations, types and orientations. Results show that the onset of corrosion and the nu cleation of corrosion-induced cracking in concrete are successfully identified. Additionally, cross-sections inside the reinforcement are observed by a scanning electron microscope (SEM). From these results, a great promise for AE techniques to monitor salt damage at an early stage in RC structures is demonstrated.

  15. Transient cavitation and acoustic emission produced by different laser lithotripters.

    PubMed

    Zhong, P; Tong, H L; Cocks, F H; Pearle, M S; Preminger, G M

    1998-08-01

    Transient cavitation and shockwave generation produced by pulsed-dye and holmium:YAG laser lithotripters were studied using high-speed photography and acoustic emission measurements. In addition, stone phantoms were used to compare the fragmentation efficiency of various laser and electrohydraulic lithotripters. The pulsed-dye laser, with a wavelength (504 nm) strongly absorbed by most stone materials but not by water, and a short pulse duration of approximately 1 microsec, induces plasma formation on the surface of the target calculi. Subsequently, the rapid expansion of the plasma forms a cavitation bubble, which expands spherically to a maximum size and then collapses violently, leading to strong shockwave generation and microjet impingement, which comprises the primary mechanism for stone fragmentation with short-pulse lasers. In contrast, the holmium laser, with a wavelength (2100 nm) most strongly absorbed by water as well as by all stone materials and a long pulse duration of 250 to 350 microsec, produces an elongated, pear-shaped cavitation bubble at the tip of the optical fiber that forms a vapor channel to conduct the ensuing laser energy to the target stone (Moss effect). The expansion and subsequent collapse of the elongated bubble is asymmetric, resulting in weak shockwave generation and microjet impingement. Thus, stone fragmentation in holmium laser lithotripsy is caused primarily by thermal ablation (drilling effect).

  16. Early corrosion monitoring of prestressed concrete piles using acoustic emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vélez, William; Matta, Fabio; Ziehl, Paul H.

    2013-04-01

    The depassivation and corrosion of bonded prestressing steel strands in concrete bridge members may lead to major damage or collapse before visual inspections uncover evident signs of damage, and well before the end of the design life. Recognizing corrosion in its early stage is desirable to plan and prioritize remediation strategies. The Acoustic Emission (AE) technique is a rational means to develop structural health monitoring and prognosis systems for the early detection and location of corrosion in concrete. Compelling features are the sensitivity to events related to micro- and macrodamage, non-intrusiveness, and suitability for remote and wireless applications. There is little understanding of the correlation between AE and the morphology and extent of early damage on the steel surface. In this paper, the evidence collected from prestressed concrete (PC) specimens that are exposed to salt water is discussed vis-à-vis AE data from continuous monitoring. The specimens consist of PC strips that are subjected to wet/dry salt water cycles, representing portions of bridge piles that are exposed to tidal action. Evidence collected from the specimens includes: (a) values of half-cell potential and linear polarization resistance to recognize active corrosion in its early stage; and (b) scanning electron microscopy micrographs of steel areas from two specimens that were decommissioned once the electrochemical measurements indicated a high probability of active corrosion. These results are used to evaluate the AE activity resulting from early corrosion.

  17. Transmission of acoustic emission in bones, implants and dental materials.

    PubMed

    Ossi, Zannar; Abdou, Wael; Reuben, Robert L; Ibbetson, Richard J

    2013-11-01

    There is considerable interest in using acoustic emission (AE) and ultrasound to assess the quality of implant-bone interfaces and to monitor for micro-damage leading to loosening. However, remarkably little work has been done on the transmission of ultrasonic waves though the physical and biological structures involved. The aim of this in vitro study is to assess any differences in transmission between various dental materials and bovine rib bones with various degrees of hydration. Two types of tests have been carried out using pencil lead breaks as a standard AE source. The first set of tests was configured to assess the surface propagation of AE on various synthetic materials compared with fresh bovine rib bone. The second is a set of transmission tests on fresh, dried and hydrated bones each fitted with dental implants with various degrees of fixity, which includes components due to bone and interface transmission. The results indicate that transmission through glass ionomer cement is closest to the bone. This would suggest that complete osseointegration could potentially be simulated using such cement. The transmission of AE energy through bone was found to be dependent on its degree of hydration. It was also found that perfusing samples of fresh bone with water led to an increase in transmitted energy, but this appeared to affect transmission across the interface more than transmission through the bone. These findings have implications not only for implant interface inspection but also for passive AE monitoring of implants.

  18. Hydraulic Fracturing of Heterogeneous Rock Monitored by Acoustic Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanchits, Sergey; Burghardt, Jeffrey; Surdi, Aniket

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, the results of laboratory studies of hydraulic fracture in homogeneous sandstone blocks with man-made interfaces and heterogeneous shale blocks with weak natural interfaces are reported. Tests were conducted under similar stress conditions, with fluids of different viscosity and at different injection rates. The measurements and analysis allows the identification of fracture initiation and behavior. Fracturing with high-viscosity fluids resulted in stable fracture propagation initiated before breakdown, while fracturing with low-viscosity fluids resulted in unstable fracture propagation initiated almost simultaneously with breakdown. Analysis also allows us to measure the fluid volume entering the fracture and the fracture volume. Monitoring of acoustic emission hypocenter localizations, indicates the development of created fractured area including the intersection with interfaces, fluid propagation along interfaces, crossing interfaces, and approaching the boundaries of the block. We observe strong differences in hydraulic fracture behavior, fracture geometry and fracture propagation speed, when fracturing with water and high-viscosity fluids. We also observed distinct differences between sandstone blocks and shale blocks, when a certain P-wave velocity ray path is intersected by the hydraulic fracture. The velocity increases in sandstones and decreases in shale.

  19. Acoustic Emission, b-values and Foliation Plane Anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sehizadeh, Mahdi; Nasseri, Mohammad H.; Ye, Sheng; Young, R. Paul

    2016-04-01

    The b-value and D-value are two parameters related to size and distance distribution of earthquakes. There are many different factors affecting b-value such as stress state, thermal gradients, focal mechanism and heterogeneity. For example, the literature shows that the b-value changes systematically with respect to the focal mechanism. In laboratory experiments, foliation planes introduce a weakness in samples and can be considered as a potential for rupture or pre-existing faults, so they may exhibit similar relationships. The D-value defines the degree of clustering of earthquakes and would be expected to have a defined relationship with respect to the anisotropy. Using a unique facility in the Rock Fracture Dynamics laboratory at the University of Toronto, three sets of polyaxial experiments have been performed on cubic samples with foliation planes systematically oriented at different angles to the principal stress direction. During these tests, samples were loaded under controlled true-triaxial stress conditions until they failed or had severe damage and acoustic emission events were recorded using 18 sensors around the samples. The paper describes how the combination of stress state and foliation planes affects the b-value and D-value under laboratory conditions.

  20. Acoustic emission analysis of tooth-composite interfacial debonding.

    PubMed

    Cho, N Y; Ferracane, J L; Lee, I B

    2013-01-01

    This study detected tooth-composite interfacial debonding during composite restoration by means of acoustic emission (AE) analysis and investigated the effects of composite properties and adhesives on AE characteristics. The polymerization shrinkage, peak shrinkage rate, flexural modulus, and shrinkage stress of a methacrylate-based universal hybrid, a flowable, and a silorane-based composite were measured. Class I cavities on 49 extracted premolars were restored with 1 of the 3 composites and 1 of the following adhesives: 2 etch-and-rinse adhesives, 2 self-etch adhesives, and an adhesive for the silorane-based composite. AE analysis was done for 2,000 sec during light-curing. The silorane-based composite exhibited the lowest shrinkage (rate), the longest time to peak shrinkage rate, the lowest shrinkage stress, and the fewest AE events. AE events were detected immediately after the beginning of light-curing in most composite-adhesive combinations, but not until 40 sec after light-curing began for the silorane-based composite. AE events were concentrated at the initial stage of curing in self-etch adhesives compared with etch-and-rinse adhesives. Reducing the shrinkage (rate) of composites resulted in reduced shrinkage stress and less debonding, as evidenced by fewer AE events. AE is an effective technique for monitoring, in real time, the debonding kinetics at the tooth-composite interface. PMID:23100273

  1. Acoustic emission analysis of tooth-composite interfacial debonding.

    PubMed

    Cho, N Y; Ferracane, J L; Lee, I B

    2013-01-01

    This study detected tooth-composite interfacial debonding during composite restoration by means of acoustic emission (AE) analysis and investigated the effects of composite properties and adhesives on AE characteristics. The polymerization shrinkage, peak shrinkage rate, flexural modulus, and shrinkage stress of a methacrylate-based universal hybrid, a flowable, and a silorane-based composite were measured. Class I cavities on 49 extracted premolars were restored with 1 of the 3 composites and 1 of the following adhesives: 2 etch-and-rinse adhesives, 2 self-etch adhesives, and an adhesive for the silorane-based composite. AE analysis was done for 2,000 sec during light-curing. The silorane-based composite exhibited the lowest shrinkage (rate), the longest time to peak shrinkage rate, the lowest shrinkage stress, and the fewest AE events. AE events were detected immediately after the beginning of light-curing in most composite-adhesive combinations, but not until 40 sec after light-curing began for the silorane-based composite. AE events were concentrated at the initial stage of curing in self-etch adhesives compared with etch-and-rinse adhesives. Reducing the shrinkage (rate) of composites resulted in reduced shrinkage stress and less debonding, as evidenced by fewer AE events. AE is an effective technique for monitoring, in real time, the debonding kinetics at the tooth-composite interface.

  2. Acoustic Emission Measurement with Fiber Bragg Gratings for Structure Health Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Curtis E.; Walker, James L.; Russell, Sam; Roth, Don; Mabry, Nehemiah; Wilson, Melissa

    2010-01-01

    Structural Health monitoring (SHM) is a way of detecting and assessing damage to large scale structures. Sensors used in SHM for aerospace structures provide real time data on new and propagating damage. One type of sensor that is typically used is an acoustic emission (AE) sensor that detects the acoustic emissions given off from a material cracking or breaking. The use of fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors to provide acoustic emission data for damage detection is studied. In this research, FBG sensors are used to detect acoustic emissions of a material during a tensile test. FBG sensors were placed as a strain sensor (oriented parallel to applied force) and as an AE sensor (oriented perpendicular to applied force). A traditional AE transducer was used to collect AE data to compare with the FBG data. Preliminary results show that AE with FBGs can be a viable alternative to traditional AE sensors.

  3. Acoustic Emission Technique for Characterizing Deformation and Fatigue Crack Growth in Austenitic Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raj, Baldev; Mukhopadhyay, C. K.; Jayakumar, T.

    2003-03-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) during tensile deformation and fatigue crack growth (FCG) of austenitic stainless steels has been studied. In AISI type 316 stainless steel (SS), AE has been used to detect micro plastic yielding occurring during macroscopic plastic deformation. In AISI type 304 SS, relation of AE with stress intensity factor and plastic zone size has been studied. In AISI type 316 SS, fatigue crack growth has been characterised using acoustic emission.

  4. Acoustic emission monitoring from a lab scale high shear granulator--a novel approach.

    PubMed

    Watson, N J; Povey, M J W; Reynolds, G K; Xu, B H; Ding, Y

    2014-04-25

    A new approach to the monitoring of granulation processes using passive acoustics together with precise control over the granulation process has highlighted the importance of particle-particle and particle-bowl collisions in acoustic emission. The results have shown that repeatable acoustic results could be obtained but only when a spray nozzle water addition system was used. Acoustic emissions were recorded from a transducer attached to the bowl and an airborne transducer. It was found that the airborne transducer detected very little from the granulation and only experienced small changes throughout the process. The results from the bowl transducer showed that during granulation the frequency content of the acoustic emission shifted towards the lower frequencies. Results from the discrete element model indicate that when larger particles are used the number of collisions the particles experience reduces. This is a result of the volume conservation methodology used in this study, therefore larger particles results in less particles. These simulation results coupled with previous theoretical work on the frequency content of an impacting sphere explain why the frequency content of the acoustic emissions reduces during granule growth. The acoustic system used was also clearly able to identify when large over-wetted granules were present in the system, highlighting its benefit for detecting undesirable operational conditions. High-speed photography was used to study if visual changes in the granule properties could be linked with the changing acoustic emissions. The high speed photography was only possible towards the latter stages of the granulation process and it was found that larger granules produced a higher magnitude of acoustic emission across a broader frequency range.

  5. Acoustic emission monitoring from a lab scale high shear granulator--a novel approach.

    PubMed

    Watson, N J; Povey, M J W; Reynolds, G K; Xu, B H; Ding, Y

    2014-04-25

    A new approach to the monitoring of granulation processes using passive acoustics together with precise control over the granulation process has highlighted the importance of particle-particle and particle-bowl collisions in acoustic emission. The results have shown that repeatable acoustic results could be obtained but only when a spray nozzle water addition system was used. Acoustic emissions were recorded from a transducer attached to the bowl and an airborne transducer. It was found that the airborne transducer detected very little from the granulation and only experienced small changes throughout the process. The results from the bowl transducer showed that during granulation the frequency content of the acoustic emission shifted towards the lower frequencies. Results from the discrete element model indicate that when larger particles are used the number of collisions the particles experience reduces. This is a result of the volume conservation methodology used in this study, therefore larger particles results in less particles. These simulation results coupled with previous theoretical work on the frequency content of an impacting sphere explain why the frequency content of the acoustic emissions reduces during granule growth. The acoustic system used was also clearly able to identify when large over-wetted granules were present in the system, highlighting its benefit for detecting undesirable operational conditions. High-speed photography was used to study if visual changes in the granule properties could be linked with the changing acoustic emissions. The high speed photography was only possible towards the latter stages of the granulation process and it was found that larger granules produced a higher magnitude of acoustic emission across a broader frequency range. PMID:24491527

  6. Ecology of acoustic signalling and the problem of masking interference in insects.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Arne K D; Balakrishnan, Rohini

    2015-01-01

    The efficiency of long-distance acoustic signalling of insects in their natural habitat is constrained in several ways. Acoustic signals are not only subjected to changes imposed by the physical structure of the habitat such as attenuation and degradation but also to masking interference from co-occurring signals of other acoustically communicating species. Masking interference is likely to be a ubiquitous problem in multi-species assemblages, but successful communication in natural environments under noisy conditions suggests powerful strategies to deal with the detection and recognition of relevant signals. In this review we present recent work on the role of the habitat as a driving force in shaping insect signal structures. In the context of acoustic masking interference, we discuss the ecological niche concept and examine the role of acoustic resource partitioning in the temporal, spatial and spectral domains as sender strategies to counter masking. We then examine the efficacy of different receiver strategies: physiological mechanisms such as frequency tuning, spatial release from masking and gain control as useful strategies to counteract acoustic masking. We also review recent work on the effects of anthropogenic noise on insect acoustic communication and the importance of insect sounds as indicators of biodiversity and ecosystem health.

  7. Accumulated damage process of thermal sprayed coating under rolling contact by acoustic emission technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jia; Zhou, Zhen-yu; Piao, Zhong-yu

    2016-09-01

    The accumulated damage process of rolling contact fatigue (RCF) of plasma-sprayed coatings was investigated. The influences of surface roughness, loading condition, and stress cycle frequency on the accumulated damage status of the coatings were discussed. A ball-ondisc machine was employed to conduct RCF experiments. Acoustic emission (AE) technique was introduced to monitor the RCF process of the coatings. AE signal characteristics were investigated to reveal the accumulated damage process. Result showed that the polished coating would resist the asperity contact and remit accumulated damage. The RCF lifetime would then extend. Heavy load would aggravate the accumulated damage status and induce surface fracture. Wear became the main failure mode that reduced the RCF lifetime. Frequent stress cycle would aggravate the accumulated damage status and induce interface fracture. Fatigue then became the main failure mode that also reduced the RCF lifetime.

  8. Accumulated damage process of thermal sprayed coating under rolling contact by acoustic emission technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jia; Zhou, Zhen-yu; Piao, Zhong-yu

    2016-07-01

    The accumulated damage process of rolling contact fatigue (RCF) of plasma-sprayed coatings was investigated. The influences of surface roughness, loading condition, and stress cycle frequency on the accumulated damage status of the coatings were discussed. A ball-ondisc machine was employed to conduct RCF experiments. Acoustic emission (AE) technique was introduced to monitor the RCF process of the coatings. AE signal characteristics were investigated to reveal the accumulated damage process. Result showed that the polished coating would resist the asperity contact and remit accumulated damage. The RCF lifetime would then extend. Heavy load would aggravate the accumulated damage status and induce surface fracture. Wear became the main failure mode that reduced the RCF lifetime. Frequent stress cycle would aggravate the accumulated damage status and induce interface fracture. Fatigue then became the main failure mode that also reduced the RCF lifetime.

  9. Avalanches in compressed Ti-Ni shape-memory porous alloys: An acoustic emission study.

    PubMed

    Soto-Parra, Daniel; Zhang, Xiaoxin; Cao, Shanshan; Vives, Eduard; Salje, Ekhard K H; Planes, Antoni

    2015-06-01

    Mechanical avalanches during compression of martensitic porous Ti-Ni have been characterized by high-frequency acoustic emission (AE). Two sequences of AE signals were found in the same sample. The first sequence is mainly generated by detwinning at the early stages of compression while fracture dominates the later stages. Fracture also determines the catastrophic failure (big crash). For high-porosity samples, the AE energies of both sequences display power-law distributions with exponents ɛ≃2 (twinning) and 1.7 (fracture). The two power laws confirm that twinning and fracture both lead to avalanche criticality during compression. As twinning precedes fracture, the observation of twinning allows us to predict incipient fracture of the porous shape memory material as an early warning sign (i.e., in bone implants) before the fracture collapse actually happens.

  10. Avalanches in compressed Ti-Ni shape-memory porous alloys: An acoustic emission study.

    PubMed

    Soto-Parra, Daniel; Zhang, Xiaoxin; Cao, Shanshan; Vives, Eduard; Salje, Ekhard K H; Planes, Antoni

    2015-06-01

    Mechanical avalanches during compression of martensitic porous Ti-Ni have been characterized by high-frequency acoustic emission (AE). Two sequences of AE signals were found in the same sample. The first sequence is mainly generated by detwinning at the early stages of compression while fracture dominates the later stages. Fracture also determines the catastrophic failure (big crash). For high-porosity samples, the AE energies of both sequences display power-law distributions with exponents ɛ≃2 (twinning) and 1.7 (fracture). The two power laws confirm that twinning and fracture both lead to avalanche criticality during compression. As twinning precedes fracture, the observation of twinning allows us to predict incipient fracture of the porous shape memory material as an early warning sign (i.e., in bone implants) before the fracture collapse actually happens. PMID:26172646

  11. Detection of Delamination in Composite Beams Using Broadband Acoustic Emission Signatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okafor, A. C.; Chandrashekhara, K.; Jiang, Y. P.

    1996-01-01

    Delamination in composite structure may be caused by imperfections introduced during the manufacturing process or by impact loads by foreign objects during the operational life. There are some nondestructive evaluation methods to detect delamination in composite structures such as x-radiography, ultrasonic testing, and thermal/infrared inspection. These methods are expensive and hard to use for on line detection. Acoustic emission testing can monitor the material under test even under the presence of noise generated under load. It has been used extensively in proof-testing of fiberglass pressure vessels and beams. In the present work, experimental studies are conducted to investigate the use of broadband acoustic emission signatures to detect delaminations in composite beams. Glass/epoxy beam specimens with full width, prescribed delamination sizes of 2 inches and 4 inches are investigated. The prescribed delamination is produced by inserting Teflon film between laminae during the fabrication of composite laminate. The objectives of this research is to develop a method for predicting delamination size and location in laminated composite beams by combining smart materials concept and broadband AE analysis techniques. More specifically, a piezoceramic (PZT) patch is bonded on the surface of composite beams and used as a pulser. The piezoceramic patch simulates the AE wave source as a 3 cycles, 50KHz, burst sine wave. One broadband AE sensor is fixed near the PZT patch to measure the AE wave near the AE source. A second broadband AE sensor, which is used as a receiver, is scanned along the composite beams at 0.25 inch step to measure propagation of AE wave along the composite beams. The acquired AE waveform is digitized and processed. Signal strength, signal energy, cross-correlation of AE waveforms, and tracking of specific cycle of AE waveforms are used to detect delamination size and location.

  12. Acoustic emission (AE) health monitoring of diaphragm type couplings using neural network analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godinez-Azcuaga, Valery F.; Shu, Fong; Finlayson, Richard D.; O'Donnell, Bruce

    2005-05-01

    This paper presents the latest results obtained from Acoustic Emission (AE) monitoring and detection of cracks and/or damage in diaphragm couplings, which are used in some aircraft and engine drive systems. Early detection of mechanical failure in aircraft drive train components is a key safety and economical issue with both military and civil sectors of aviation. One of these components is the diaphragm-type coupling, which has been evaluated as the ideal drive coupling for many application requirements such as high speed, high torque, and non-lubrication. Its flexible axial and angular displacement capabilities have made it indispensable for aircraft drive systems. However, diaphragm-type couplings may develop cracks during their operation. The ability to monitor, detect, identify, and isolate coupling cracks on an operational aircraft system is required in order to provide sufficient advance warning to preclude catastrophic failure. It is known that metallic structures generate characteristic Acoustic Emission (AE) during crack growth/propagation cycles. This phenomenon makes AE very attractive among various monitoring techniques for fault detection in diaphragm-type couplings. However, commercially available systems capable of automatic discrimination between signals from crack growth and normal mechanical noise are not readily available. Positive classification of signals requires experienced personnel and post-test data analysis, which tend to be a time-consuming, laborious, and expensive process. With further development of automated classifiers, AE can become a fully autonomous fault detection technique requiring no human intervention after implementation. AE has the potential to be fully integrated with automated query and response mechanisms for system/process monitoring and control.

  13. Acoustic emission-based sensor analysis and damage classification for structural health monitoring of composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uprety, Bibhisha

    Within the aerospace industry the need to detect and locate impact events, even when no visible damage is present, is important both from the maintenance and design perspectives. This research focused on the use of Acoustic Emission (AE) based sensing technologies to identify impact events and characterize damage modes in composite structures for structural health monitoring. Six commercially available piezoelectric AE sensors were evaluated for use with impact location estimation algorithms under development at the University of Utah. Both active and passive testing were performed to estimate the time of arrival and plate wave mode velocities for impact location estimation. Four sensors were recommended for further comparative investigations. Furthermore, instrumented low-velocity impact experiments were conducted on quasi-isotropic carbon/epoxy composite laminates to initiate specific types of damage: matrix cracking, delamination and fiber breakage. AE signal responses were collected during impacting and the test panels were ultrasonically C-scanned after impact to identify the internal damage corresponding to the AE signals. Matrix cracking and delamination damage produced using more compliant test panels and larger diameter impactor were characterized by lower frequency signals while fiber breakage produced higher frequency responses. The results obtained suggest that selected characteristics of sensor response signals can be used both to determine whether damage is produced during impacting and to characterize the types of damage produced in an impacted composite structure.

  14. Synergy of seismic, acoustic, and video signals in blast analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D.P.; Stump, B.W.; Weigand, J.

    1997-09-01

    The range of mining applications from hard rock quarrying to coal exposure to mineral recovery leads to a great variety of blasting practices. A common characteristic of many of the sources is that they are detonated at or near the earth`s surface and thus can be recorded by camera or video. Although the primary interest is in the seismic waveforms that these blasts generate, the visual observations of the blasts provide important constraints that can be applied to the physical interpretation of the seismic source function. In particular, high speed images can provide information on detonation times of individuals charges, the timing and amount of mass movement during the blasting process and, in some instances, evidence of wave propagation away from the source. All of these characteristics can be valuable in interpreting the equivalent seismic source function for a set of mine explosions and quantifying the relative importance of the different processes. This paper documents work done at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and Southern Methodist University to take standard Hi-8 video of mine blasts, recover digital images from them, and combine them with ground motion records for interpretation. The steps in the data acquisition, processing, display, and interpretation are outlined. The authors conclude that the combination of video with seismic and acoustic signals can be a powerful diagnostic tool for the study of blasting techniques and seismology. A low cost system for generating similar diagnostics using consumer-grade video camera and direct-to-disk video hardware is proposed. Application is to verification of the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty.

  15. Graph-based sensor fusion for classification of transient acoustic signals.

    PubMed

    Srinivas, Umamahesh; Nasrabadi, Nasser M; Monga, Vishal

    2015-03-01

    Advances in acoustic sensing have enabled the simultaneous acquisition of multiple measurements of the same physical event via co-located acoustic sensors. We exploit the inherent correlation among such multiple measurements for acoustic signal classification, to identify the launch/impact of munition (i.e., rockets, mortars). Specifically, we propose a probabilistic graphical model framework that can explicitly learn the class conditional correlations between the cepstral features extracted from these different measurements. Additionally, we employ symbolic dynamic filtering-based features, which offer improvements over the traditional cepstral features in terms of robustness to signal distortions. Experiments on real acoustic data sets show that our proposed algorithm outperforms conventional classifiers as well as the recently proposed joint sparsity models for multisensor acoustic classification. Additionally our proposed algorithm is less sensitive to insufficiency in training samples compared to competing approaches. PMID:25014986

  16. Denoising of human speech using combined acoustic and em sensor signal processing

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, L C; Burnett, G C; Holzrichter, J F; Gable, T J

    1999-11-29

    Low Power EM radar-like sensors have made it possible to measure properties of the human speech production system in real-time, without acoustic interference. This greatly enhances the quality and quantify of information for many speech related applications. See Holzrichter, Burnett, Ng, and Lea, J. Acoustic. Soc. Am. 103 (1) 622 (1998). By using combined Glottal-EM- Sensor- and Acoustic-signals, segments of voiced, unvoiced, and no-speech can be reliably defined. Real-time Denoising filters can be constructed to remove noise from the user's corresponding speech signal.

  17. Detection of acoustic emission from cavitation in tissue during clinical extracorporeal lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Coleman, A J; Choi, M J; Saunders, J E

    1996-01-01

    A 1-MHz focused hydrophone has been used to search for acoustic emission expected to arise from cavitation occurring in tissue during clinical extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy (ESWL). The hydrophone is acoustically coupled to the patient's skin and the focus directed at depth in tissue under ultrasound guidance. The measured amplitude-time variation of the acoustic emission from tissue near the shock-wave focus of the Storz Modulith SL20 lithotripter has been examined in four patients. There is evidence of increased amplitude acoustic emission at 1 MHz from regions within tissue that also appear hyperechoic in simultaneously acquired ultrasound images. The acoustic emission from these regions decays from an initial peak to the noise level in about 500 microseconds following each shock-wave pulse. Within this period, a second peak, often of higher amplitude than the first, is typically observed about 100 microseconds after the shockwave. The time between the initial and second peaks is found to increase with increasing shock-wave amplitude. The results are similar to those previously observed from cavitation induced by shock-wave exposure in water and indicate that the 1-MHz acoustic emission arises from inertial cavitation in tissue during clinical ESWL.

  18. Acoustic emission monitoring of cement-based structures immobilising radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect

    Spasova, L.M.; Ojovan, M.I.; Hayes, M.; Godfrey, H.

    2007-07-01

    The long term performance of cementitious structures immobilising radioactive waste can be affected by physical and chemical processes within the encapsulating materials such as formation of new phases (e.g., vaterite, brucite), degradation of cement phases (e.g., CSH gel, portlandite), degradation of some waste components (e.g., organics), corrosion of metallic constituents (aluminium, magnesium), gas emission, further hydration etc. The corrosion of metals in the high pH cementitious environment is of especial concern as it can potentially cause wasteform cracking. One of the perspective non-destructive methods used to monitor and assess the mechanical properties of materials and structures is based on an acoustic emission (AE) technique. In this study an AE non-destructive technique was used to evaluate the mechanical performance of cementitious structures with encapsulated metallic waste such as aluminium. AE signals generated as a result of aluminium corrosion in a small-size blast furnace slag (BFS)/ordinary Portland cement (OPC) sample were detected, recorded and analysed. A procedure for AE data analysis including conventional parameter-based AE approach and signal-based analysis was applied and demonstrated to provide information on the aluminium corrosion process and its impact on the mechanical performance of the encapsulating cement matrix. (authors)

  19. Multiscale monitoring of interface failure of brittle coating/ductile substrate systems: A non-destructive evaluation method combined digital image correlation with acoustic emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, W. G.; Wu, D. J.; Yao, W. B.; Zhou, M.; Lu, C.

    2011-10-01

    In this paper, we proposed a non-destructive evaluation method combined digital image correlation with acoustic emission techniques. The method was used to in situ monitor interface failure and internal damage of brittle coating/ductile substrate systems with different size scales. The results show that there is a good relationship between digital image correlation and acoustic emission signals, which can be applied to judge cracking formation and coating delamination and to determine fracture toughness of a thermal barrier coating system subjected to bending.

  20. Investigation of correlation of LF power modulation of light in natural and artificial illumination situations and acoustic emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleeberg, Florian P.; Gutzmann, Holger L.; Weyer, Cornelia; Weiß, Jürgen; Dörfler, Joachim; Hahlweg, Cornelius F.

    2014-09-01

    The present paper is a follow up of a paper presented in 2013 at the Novel Optical Systems conference in the session on Optics and Music. It is derived from an ongoing study on the human perception of combined optical and acoustical periodical stimuli. Originating from problems concerning artificial illumination and certain machinery with coherent optical and acoustical emissions there are effects to be observed which are interesting in the context of occupational medicine. It seems, that acoustic stimuli in the frequency range of the flicker fusion and below might lead to unexpected perceptible effects beyond those of the single stimuli. The effect of infrasound stimuli as a whole body perception seems to be boosted. Because of the difficulties in evaluation of physical and psychological effects of such coherent stimuli in a first step we question if such coherence is perceivable at all. Further, the problem of modulation of optical signals by acoustical signal is concerned. A catalogue of scenarios and 'effects to look for' including measurement concepts is presented and discussed.

  1. System and method for characterizing voiced excitations of speech and acoustic signals, removing acoustic noise from speech, and synthesizing speech

    DOEpatents

    Burnett, Greg C.; Holzrichter, John F.; Ng, Lawrence C.

    2006-08-08

    The present invention is a system and method for characterizing human (or animate) speech voiced excitation functions and acoustic signals, for removing unwanted acoustic noise which often occurs when a speaker uses a microphone in common environments, and for synthesizing personalized or modified human (or other animate) speech upon command from a controller. A low power EM sensor is used to detect the motions of windpipe tissues in the glottal region of the human speech system before, during, and after voiced speech is produced by a user. From these tissue motion measurements, a voiced excitation function can be derived. Further, the excitation function provides speech production information to enhance noise removal from human speech and it enables accurate transfer functions of speech to be obtained. Previously stored excitation and transfer functions can be used for synthesizing personalized or modified human speech. Configurations of EM sensor and acoustic microphone systems are described to enhance noise cancellation and to enable multiple articulator measurements.

  2. System and method for characterizing voiced excitations of speech and acoustic signals, removing acoustic noise from speech, and synthesizing speech

    DOEpatents

    Burnett, Greg C.; Holzrichter, John F.; Ng, Lawrence C.

    2004-03-23

    The present invention is a system and method for characterizing human (or animate) speech voiced excitation functions and acoustic signals, for removing unwanted acoustic noise which often occurs when a speaker uses a microphone in common environments, and for synthesizing personalized or modified human (or other animate) speech upon command from a controller. A low power EM sensor is used to detect the motions of windpipe tissues in the glottal region of the human speech system before, during, and after voiced speech is produced by a user. From these tissue motion measurements, a voiced excitation function can be derived. Further, the excitation function provides speech production information to enhance noise removal from human speech and it enables accurate transfer functions of speech to be obtained. Previously stored excitation and transfer functions can be used for synthesizing personalized or modified human speech. Configurations of EM sensor and acoustic microphone systems are described to enhance noise cancellation and to enable multiple articulator measurements.

  3. System and method for characterizing voiced excitations of speech and acoustic signals, removing acoustic noise from speech, and synthesizing speech

    DOEpatents

    Burnett, Greg C.; Holzrichter, John F.; Ng, Lawrence C.

    2006-02-14

    The present invention is a system and method for characterizing human (or animate) speech voiced excitation functions and acoustic signals, for removing unwanted acoustic noise which often occurs when a speaker uses a microphone in common environments, and for synthesizing personalized or modified human (or other animate) speech upon command from a controller. A low power EM sensor is used to detect the motions of windpipe tissues in the glottal region of the human speech system before, during, and after voiced speech is produced by a user. From these tissue motion measurements, a voiced excitation function can be derived. Further, the excitation function provides speech production information to enhance noise removal from human speech and it enables accurate transfer functions of speech to be obtained. Previously stored excitation and transfer functions can be used for synthesizing personalized or modified human speech. Configurations of EM sensor and acoustic microphone systems are described to enhance noise cancellation and to enable multiple articulator measurements.

  4. System And Method For Characterizing Voiced Excitations Of Speech And Acoustic Signals, Removing Acoustic Noise From Speech, And Synthesizi

    DOEpatents

    Burnett, Greg C.; Holzrichter, John F.; Ng, Lawrence C.

    2006-04-25

    The present invention is a system and method for characterizing human (or animate) speech voiced excitation functions and acoustic signals, for removing unwanted acoustic noise which often occurs when a speaker uses a microphone in common environments, and for synthesizing personalized or modified human (or other animate) speech upon command from a controller. A low power EM sensor is used to detect the motions of windpipe tissues in the glottal region of the human speech system before, during, and after voiced speech is produced by a user. From these tissue motion measurements, a voiced excitation function can be derived. Further, the excitation function provides speech production information to enhance noise removal from human speech and it enables accurate transfer functions of speech to be obtained. Previously stored excitation and transfer functions can be used for synthesizing personalized or modified human speech. Configurations of EM sensor and acoustic microphone systems are described to enhance noise cancellation and to enable multiple articulator measurements.

  5. Acoustic Emission Patterns and the Transition to Ductility in Sub-Micron Scale Laboratory Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaffari, H.; Xia, K.; Young, R.

    2013-12-01

    We report observation of a transition from the brittle to ductile regime in precursor events from different rock materials (Granite, Sandstone, Basalt, and Gypsum) and Polymers (PMMA, PTFE and CR-39). Acoustic emission patterns associated with sub-micron scale laboratory earthquakes are mapped into network parameter spaces (functional damage networks). The sub-classes hold nearly constant timescales, indicating dependency of the sub-phases on the mechanism governing the previous evolutionary phase, i.e., deformation and failure of asperities. Based on our findings, we propose that the signature of the non-linear elastic zone around a crack tip is mapped into the details of the evolutionary phases, supporting the formation of a strongly weak zone in the vicinity of crack tips. Moreover, we recognize sub-micron to micron ruptures with signatures of 'stiffening' in the deformation phase of acoustic-waveforms. We propose that the latter rupture fronts carry critical rupture extensions, including possible dislocations faster than the shear wave speed. Using 'template super-shear waveforms' and their network characteristics, we show that the acoustic emission signals are possible super-shear or intersonic events. Ref. [1] Ghaffari, H. O., and R. P. Young. "Acoustic-Friction Networks and the Evolution of Precursor Rupture Fronts in Laboratory Earthquakes." Nature Scientific reports 3 (2013). [2] Xia, Kaiwen, Ares J. Rosakis, and Hiroo Kanamori. "Laboratory earthquakes: The sub-Rayleigh-to-supershear rupture transition." Science 303.5665 (2004): 1859-1861. [3] Mello, M., et al. "Identifying the unique ground motion signatures of supershear earthquakes: Theory and experiments." Tectonophysics 493.3 (2010): 297-326. [4] Gumbsch, Peter, and Huajian Gao. "Dislocations faster than the speed of sound." Science 283.5404 (1999): 965-968. [5] Livne, Ariel, et al. "The near-tip fields of fast cracks." Science 327.5971 (2010): 1359-1363. [6] Rycroft, Chris H., and Eran Bouchbinder

  6. Identification of the fragmentation of brittle particles during compaction process by the acoustic emission technique.

    PubMed

    Favretto-Cristini, Nathalie; Hégron, Lise; Sornay, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    Some nuclear fuels are currently manufactured by a powder metallurgy process that consists of three main steps, namely preparation of the powders, powder compaction, and sintering of the compact. An optimum between size, shape and cohesion of the particles of the nuclear fuels must be sought in order to obtain a compact with a sufficient mechanical strength, and to facilitate the release of helium and fission gases during irradiation through pores connected to the outside of the pellet after sintering. Being simple to adapt to nuclear-oriented purposes, the Acoustic Emission (AE) technique is used to control the microstructure of the compact by monitoring the compaction of brittle Uranium Dioxide (UO2) particles of a few hundred micrometers. The objective is to identify in situ the mechanisms that occur during the UO2 compaction, and more specifically the particle fragmentation that is linked to the open porosity of the nuclear matter. Three zones of acoustic activity, strongly related to the applied stress, can be clearly defined from analysis of the continuous signals recorded during the compaction process. They correspond to particle rearrangement and/or fragmentation. The end of the noteworthy fragmentation process is clearly defined as the end of the significant process that increases the compactness of the material. Despite the fact that the wave propagation strongly evolves during the compaction process, the acoustic signature of the fragmentation of a single UO2 particle and a bed of UO2 particles under compaction is well identified. The waveform, with a short rise time and an exponential-like decay of the signal envelope, is the most reliable descriptor. The impact of the particle size and cohesion on the AE activity, and then on the fragmentation domain, is analyzed through the discrete AE signals. The maximum amplitude of the burst signals, as well as the mean stress corresponding to the end of the recorded AE, increase with increasing mean diameter of

  7. Ductile Deformation of Dehydrating Serpentinite Evidenced by Acoustic Signal Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasc, J.; Hilairet, N.; Wang, Y.; Schubnel, A. J.

    2012-12-01

    Serpentinite dehydration is believed to be responsible for triggering earthquakes at intermediate depths (i.e., 60-300 km) in subduction zones. Based on experimental results, some authors have proposed mechanisms that explain how brittle deformation can occur despite high pressure and temperature conditions [1]. However, reproducing microseismicity in the laboratory associated with the deformation of dehydrating serpentinite remains challenging. A recent study showed that, even for fast dehydration kinetics, ductile deformation could take place rather than brittle faulting in the sample [2]. This latter study was conducted in a multi-anvil apparatus without the ability to control differential stress during dehydration. We have since conducted controlled deformation experiments in the deformation-DIA (D-DIA) on natural serpentinite samples at sector 13 (GSECARS) of the APS. Monochromatic radiation was used with both a 2D MAR-CCD detector and a CCD camera to determine the stress and the strain of the sample during the deformation process [3]. In addition, an Acoustic Emission (AE) recording setup was used to monitor the microseismicity from the sample, using piezo-ceramic transducers glued on the basal truncation of the anvils. The use of six independent transducers allows locating the AEs and calculating the corresponding focal mechanisms. The samples were deformed at strain rates of 10-5-10-4 s-1 under confining pressures of 3-5 GPa. Dehydration was triggered during the deformation by heating the samples at rates ranging from 5 to 60 K/min. Before the onset of the dehydration, X-ray diffraction data showed that the serpentinite sustained ~1 GPa of stress which plummeted when dehydration occurred. Although AEs were recorded during the compression and decompression stages, no AEs ever accompanied this stress drop, suggesting ductile deformation of the samples. Hence, unlike many previous studies, no evidence for fluid embrittlement and anticrack generation was found

  8. Limited condition dependence of male acoustic signals in the grasshopper Chorthippus biguttulus

    PubMed Central

    Franzke, Alexandra; Reinhold, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    In many animal species, male acoustic signals serve to attract a mate and therefore often play a major role for male mating success. Male body condition is likely to be correlated with male acoustic signal traits, which signal male quality and provide choosy females indirect benefits. Environmental factors such as food quantity or quality can influence male body condition and therefore possibly lead to condition-dependent changes in the attractiveness of acoustic signals. Here, we test whether stressing food plants influences acoustic signal traits of males via condition-dependent expression of these traits. We examined four male song characteristics, which are vital for mate choice in females of the grasshopper Chorthippus biguttulus. Only one of the examined acoustic traits, loudness, was significantly altered by changing body condition because of drought- and moisture-related stress of food plants. No condition dependence could be observed for syllable to pause ratio, gap duration within syllables, and onset accentuation. We suggest that food plant stress and therefore food plant quality led to shifts in loudness of male grasshopper songs via body condition changes. The other three examined acoustic traits of males do not reflect male body condition induced by food plant quality. PMID:22957192

  9. Design of acoustic logging signal source of imitation based on field programmable gate array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, K.; Ju, X. D.; Lu, J. Q.; Men, B. Y.

    2014-08-01

    An acoustic logging signal source of imitation is designed and realized, based on the Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA), to improve the efficiency of examining and repairing acoustic logging tools during research and field application, and to inspect and verify acoustic receiving circuits and corresponding algorithms. The design of this signal source contains hardware design and software design,and the hardware design uses an FPGA as the control core. Four signals are made first by reading the Random Access Memory (RAM) data which are inside the FPGA, then dealing with the data by digital to analog conversion, amplification, smoothing and so on. Software design uses VHDL, a kind of hardware description language, to program the FPGA. Experiments illustrate that the ratio of signal to noise for the signal source is high, the waveforms are stable, and also its functions of amplitude adjustment, frequency adjustment and delay adjustment are in accord with the characteristics of real acoustic logging waveforms. These adjustments can be used to imitate influences on sonic logging received waveforms caused by many kinds of factors such as spacing and span of acoustic tools, sonic speeds of different layers and fluids, and acoustic attenuations of different cementation planes.

  10. A unique method to study acoustic transmission through ducts using signal synthesis and averaging of acoustic pulses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salikuddin, M.; Ramakrishnan, R.; Ahuja, K. K.; Brown, W. H.

    1981-01-01

    An acoustic impulse technique using a loudspeaker driver is developed to measure the acoustic properties of a duct/nozzle system. A signal synthesis method is used to generate a desired single pulse with a flat spectrum. The convolution of the desired signal and the inverse Fourier transform of the reciprocal of the driver's response are then fed to the driver. A signal averaging process eliminates the jet mixing noise from the mixture of jet noise and the internal noise, thereby allowing very low intensity signals to be measured accurately, even for high velocity jets. A theoretical analysis is carried out to predict the incident sound field; this is used to help determine the number and locations of the induct measurement points to account for the contributions due to higher order modes present in the incident tube method. The impulse technique is validated by comparing experimentally determined acoustic characteristics of a duct-nozzle system with similar results obtained by the impedance tube method. Absolute agreement in the comparisons was poor, but the overall shapes of the time histories and spectral distributions were much alike.

  11. Diagnostics of DC and Induction Motors Based on the Analysis of Acoustic Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glowacz, A.

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, a non-invasive method of early fault diagnostics of electric motors was proposed. This method uses acoustic signals generated by electric motors. Essential features were extracted from acoustic signals of motors. A plan of study of acoustic signals of electric motors was proposed. Researches were carried out for faultless induction motor, induction motor with one faulty rotor bar, induction motor with two faulty rotor bars and flawless Direct Current, and Direct Current motor with shorted rotor coils. Researches were carried out for methods of signal processing: log area ratio coefficients, Multiple signal classification, Nearest Neighbor classifier and the Bayes classifier. A pattern creation process was carried out using 40 samples of sound. In the identification process 130 five-second test samples were used. The proposed approach will also reduce the costs of maintenance and the number of faulty motors in the industry.

  12. Call transmission efficiency in native and invasive anurans: competing hypotheses of divergence in acoustic signals.

    PubMed

    Llusia, Diego; Gómez, Miguel; Penna, Mario; Márquez, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Invasive species are a leading cause of the current biodiversity decline, and hence examining the major traits favouring invasion is a key and long-standing goal of invasion biology. Despite the prominent role of the advertisement calls in sexual selection and reproduction, very little attention has been paid to the features of acoustic communication of invasive species in nonindigenous habitats and their potential impacts on native species. Here we compare for the first time the transmission efficiency of the advertisement calls of native and invasive species, searching for competitive advantages for acoustic communication and reproduction of introduced taxa, and providing insights into competing hypotheses in evolutionary divergence of acoustic signals: acoustic adaptation vs. morphological constraints. Using sound propagation experiments, we measured the attenuation rates of pure tones (0.2-5 kHz) and playback calls (Lithobates catesbeianus and Pelophylax perezi) across four distances (1, 2, 4, and 8 m) and over two substrates (water and soil) in seven Iberian localities. All factors considered (signal type, distance, substrate, and locality) affected transmission efficiency of acoustic signals, which was maximized with lower frequency sounds, shorter distances, and over water surface. Despite being broadcast in nonindigenous habitats, the advertisement calls of invasive L. catesbeianus were propagated more efficiently than those of the native species, in both aquatic and terrestrial substrates, and in most of the study sites. This implies absence of optimal relationship between native environments and propagation of acoustic signals in anurans, in contrast to what predicted by the acoustic adaptation hypothesis, and it might render these vertebrates particularly vulnerable to intrusion of invasive species producing low frequency signals, such as L. catesbeianus. Our findings suggest that mechanisms optimizing sound transmission in native habitat can play a less

  13. Call Transmission Efficiency in Native and Invasive Anurans: Competing Hypotheses of Divergence in Acoustic Signals

    PubMed Central

    Llusia, Diego; Gómez, Miguel; Penna, Mario; Márquez, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Invasive species are a leading cause of the current biodiversity decline, and hence examining the major traits favouring invasion is a key and long-standing goal of invasion biology. Despite the prominent role of the advertisement calls in sexual selection and reproduction, very little attention has been paid to the features of acoustic communication of invasive species in nonindigenous habitats and their potential impacts on native species. Here we compare for the first time the transmission efficiency of the advertisement calls of native and invasive species, searching for competitive advantages for acoustic communication and reproduction of introduced taxa, and providing insights into competing hypotheses in evolutionary divergence of acoustic signals: acoustic adaptation vs. morphological constraints. Using sound propagation experiments, we measured the attenuation rates of pure tones (0.2–5 kHz) and playback calls (Lithobates catesbeianus and Pelophylax perezi) across four distances (1, 2, 4, and 8 m) and over two substrates (water and soil) in seven Iberian localities. All factors considered (signal type, distance, substrate, and locality) affected transmission efficiency of acoustic signals, which was maximized with lower frequency sounds, shorter distances, and over water surface. Despite being broadcast in nonindigenous habitats, the advertisement calls of invasive L. catesbeianus were propagated more efficiently than those of the native species, in both aquatic and terrestrial substrates, and in most of the study sites. This implies absence of optimal relationship between native environments and propagation of acoustic signals in anurans, in contrast to what predicted by the acoustic adaptation hypothesis, and it might render these vertebrates particularly vulnerable to intrusion of invasive species producing low frequency signals, such as L. catesbeianus. Our findings suggest that mechanisms optimizing sound transmission in native habitat can play a

  14. Can acoustic emission detect the initiation of fatigue cracks: Application to high-strength light alloys used in aeronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bathias, C.; Brinet, B.; Sertour, G.

    1978-01-01

    Acoustic emission was used for the detection of fatigue cracking in a number of high-strength light alloys used in aeronautical structures. Among the features studied were: the influence of emission frequency, the effect of surface oxidation, and the influence of grains. It was concluded that acoustic emission is an effective nondestructive technique for evaluating the initiation of fatigue cracking in such materials.

  15. Regularities of acoustic emission and thermoemission memory effect in coal specimens under varying thermal conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Shkuratnik, V.L.; Kuchurin, S.V.; Vinnikov, V.A.

    2007-07-15

    The experimental data on acoustic emission regularities are presented for specimens of different genetic coal types exposed to a wide range of cyclic heating modes. Peculiarities of formation and manifestation of thermal-emission memory effect depending on amplitude and duration of the thermal-field action are revealed.

  16. Nonlinear ball chain waveguides for acoustic emission and ultrasound sensing of ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, Stephen H.

    packed with 17 steel particles are studied with a frequency sweep. The deformation experienced by a single steel particle in the dimer chain is approximated. Steel ball waveguides and steel rods are fitted with piezoelectric sensors to monitor the force at different points inside the waveguide during testing. The corresponding frequency responses, including intermodulation products, are compared based on amplitude and preloads. A nonlinear mechanical model describes the motion of the dimer chains in a vacuum. Based on the results of these studies it is anticipated that a nonlinear waveguide will be designed, built, and tested as a possible replacement for the high-fidelity waveguides presently being used in an Inductively Coupled Plasma Torch facility for high heat flux thermal protection system testing. The design is intended to accentuate acoustic emission signals of interest, while suppressing other forms of elastic wave noise.

  17. Dolphin's echolocation signals in a complicated acoustic environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, M. P.

    2004-07-01

    Echolocation abilities of a dolphin ( Tursiops truncatus ponticus) were investigated in laboratory conditions. The experiment was carried out in an open cage using an acoustic control over the behavior of the animal detecting underwater objects in a complicated acoustic environment. Targets of different strength were used as test objects. The dolphin was found to be able to detect objects at distances exceeding 650 m. For the target location, the dolphin used both single-pulse and multipulse echolocation modes. Time characteristics of echolocation pulses and time sequences of pulses as functions of the distance to the target were obtained.

  18. A robust calibration technique for acoustic emission systems based on momentum transfer from a ball drop

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McLaskey, Gregory C.; Lockner, David A.; Kilgore, Brian D.; Beeler, Nicholas M.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a technique to estimate the seismic moment of acoustic emissions and other extremely small seismic events. Unlike previous calibration techniques, it does not require modeling of the wave propagation, sensor response, or signal conditioning. Rather, this technique calibrates the recording system as a whole and uses a ball impact as a reference source or empirical Green’s function. To correctly apply this technique, we develop mathematical expressions that link the seismic moment $M_{0}$ of internal seismic sources (i.e., earthquakes and acoustic emissions) to the impulse, or change in momentum $\\Delta p $, of externally applied seismic sources (i.e., meteor impacts or, in this case, ball impact). We find that, at low frequencies, moment and impulse are linked by a constant, which we call the force‐moment‐rate scale factor $C_{F\\dot{M}} = M_{0}/\\Delta p$. This constant is equal to twice the speed of sound in the material from which the seismic sources were generated. Next, we demonstrate the calibration technique on two different experimental rock mechanics facilities. The first example is a saw‐cut cylindrical granite sample that is loaded in a triaxial apparatus at 40 MPa confining pressure. The second example is a 2 m long fault cut in a granite sample and deformed in a large biaxial apparatus at lower stress levels. Using the empirical calibration technique, we are able to determine absolute source parameters including the seismic moment, corner frequency, stress drop, and radiated energy of these magnitude −2.5 to −7 seismic events.

  19. Fluid displacement fronts in porous media: pore scale interfacial jumps, pressure bursts and acoustic emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moebius, Franziska; Or, Dani

    2014-05-01

    The macroscopically smooth and regular motion of fluid fronts in porous media is composed of numerous rapid pore-scale interfacial jumps and pressure bursts that involve intense interfacial energy release in the form of acoustic emissions. The characteristics of these pore scale events affect residual phase entrapment and transport properties behind the front. We present experimental studies using acoustic emission technique (AE), rapid imaging, and liquid pressure measurements to characterize these processes during drainage and imbibition in simple porous media. Imbibition and drainage produce different AE signatures (AE amplitudes obey a power law). For rapid drainage, AE signals persist long after cessation of front motion reflecting fluid redistribution and interfacial relaxation. Imaging revealed that the velocity of interfacial jumps often exceeds front velocity by more than 50 fold and is highly inertial component (Re>1000). Pore invasion volumes reduced deduced from pressure fluctuations waiting times (for constant withdrawal rates) show remarkable agreement with geometrically-deduced pore volumes. Discrepancies between invaded volumes and geometrical pores increase with increasing capillary numbers due to constraints on evacuation opportunity times and simultaneous invasion events. A mechanistic model for interfacial motions in a pore-throat network was developed to investigate interfacial dynamics focusing on the role of inertia. Results suggest that while pore scale dynamics were sensitive to variations in pore geometry and boundary conditions, inertia exerted only a minor effect on phase entrapment. The study on pore scale invasion events paints a complex picture of rapid and inertial motions and provides new insights on mechanisms at displacement fronts that are essential for improved macroscopic description of multiphase flows in porous media.

  20. Acoustic emissions in rock deformation experiments under micro-CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tisato, Nicola; Goodfellow, Sebastian D.; Moulas, Evangelos; Di Toro, Giulio; Young, Paul; Grasselli, Giovanni

    2016-04-01

    The study of acoustic emissions (AE) generated by rocks undergoing deformation has become, in the last decades, one of the most powerful tools for boosting our understanding of the mechanisms which are responsible for rock failures. AE are elastic waves emitted by the local failure of micro- or milli-metric portions of the tested specimen. At the same time, X-ray micro computed tomography (micro-CT) has become an affordable, reliable and powerful tool for imaging the internal structure of rock samples. In particular, micro-CT coupled with a deformation apparatus offers the unique opportunity for observing, without perturbing, the sample while the deformation and the formation of internal structures, such as shear bands, is ongoing. Here we present some preliminary results gathered with an innovative apparatus formed by the X-ray transparent pressure vessel called ERDμ equipped with AE sensors, an AE acquisition system and a micro-CT apparatus available at the University of Toronto. The experiment was performed on a 12 mm diameter 36 mm long porous glass sample which was cut on a 60 deg inclined plane (i.e. saw-cut sample). Etna basaltic sand with size ~1 mm was placed between the two inclined faces forming an inclined fault zone with ~2 mm thickness. The sample assembly was jacketed with a polyefin shrink tube and two AE sensors were glued onto the glass samples above and below the fault zone. The sample was then enclosed in the pressure vessel and confined with compressed air up to 3 MPa. A third AE sensor was placed outside the vessel. The sample was saturated with water and AE were generated by varying the fluid and confining pressure or the vertical force, causing deformations concentrated in the fault zone. Mechanical data and AE traces were collected throughout the entire experiment which lasted ~24 hours. At the same time multiple micro-CT 3D datasets and 2D movie-radiographies were collected, allowing the 3D reconstruction of the deformed sample at

  1. System and method for investigating sub-surface features of a rock formation with acoustic sources generating coded signals

    SciTech Connect

    Vu, Cung Khac; Nihei, Kurt; Johnson, Paul A; Guyer, Robert; Ten Cate, James A; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves; Larmat, Carene S

    2014-12-30

    A system and a method for investigating rock formations includes generating, by a first acoustic source, a first acoustic signal comprising a first plurality of pulses, each pulse including a first modulated signal at a central frequency; and generating, by a second acoustic source, a second acoustic signal comprising a second plurality of pulses. A receiver arranged within the borehole receives a detected signal including a signal being generated by a non-linear mixing process from the first-and-second acoustic signal in a non-linear mixing zone within the intersection volume. The method also includes-processing the received signal to extract the signal generated by the non-linear mixing process over noise or over signals generated by a linear interaction process, or both.

  2. Copula filtration of spoken language signals on the background of acoustic noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolchenko, Lilia V.; Sinitsyn, Rustem B.

    2010-09-01

    This paper is devoted to the filtration of acoustic signals on the background of acoustic noise. Signal filtering is done with the help of a nonlinear analogue of a correlation function - a copula. The copula is estimated with the help of kernel estimates of the cumulative distribution function. At the second stage we suggest a new procedure of adaptive filtering. The silence and sound intervals are detected before the filtration with the help of nonparametric algorithm. The results are confirmed by experimental processing of spoken language signals.

  3. Combining Passive Thermography and Acoustic Emission for Large Area Fatigue Damage Growth Assessment of a Composite Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalameda, Joseph N.; Horne, Michael R.; Madaras, Eric I.; Burke, Eric R.

    2016-01-01

    Passive thermography and acoustic emission data were obtained for improved real time damage detection during fatigue loading. A strong positive correlation was demonstrated between acoustic energy event location and thermal heating, especially if the structure under load was nearing ultimate failure. An image processing routine was developed to map the acoustic emission data onto the thermal imagery. This required removing optical barrel distortion and angular rotation from the thermal data. The acoustic emission data were then mapped onto thermal data, revealing the cluster of acoustic emission event locations around the thermal signatures of interest. By combining both techniques, progression of damage growth is confirmed and areas of failure are identified. This technology provides improved real time inspections of advanced composite structures during fatigue testing.Keywords: Thermal nondestructive evaluation, fatigue damage detection, aerospace composite inspection, acoustic emission, passive thermography

  4. Characterizing, synthesizing, and/or canceling out acoustic signals from sound sources

    DOEpatents

    Holzrichter, John F.; Ng, Lawrence C.

    2007-03-13

    A system for characterizing, synthesizing, and/or canceling out acoustic signals from inanimate and animate sound sources. Electromagnetic sensors monitor excitation sources in sound producing systems, such as animate sound sources such as the human voice, or from machines, musical instruments, and various other structures. Acoustical output from these sound producing systems is also monitored. From such information, a transfer function characterizing the sound producing system is generated. From the transfer function, acoustical output from the sound producing system may be synthesized or canceled. The systems disclosed enable accurate calculation of transfer functions relating specific excitations to specific acoustical outputs. Knowledge of such signals and functions can be used to effect various sound replication, sound source identification, and sound cancellation applications.

  5. The acoustic emission of a distributed mode loudspeaker near a porous layer.

    PubMed

    Prokofieva, E Yu; Horoshenkov, Kirill V; Harris, N

    2002-06-01

    Experimental and theoretical modeling of the vibro-acoustic performance of a distributed mode loudspeaker (DML) suggest that their acoustic emission can be significantly affected by the presence of a porous layer. The amplitude of the surface velocity of the panel and the acoustic pressure on the porous surface are reduced largely in the vicinity of structural resonances due to the additional radiation damping and visco-thermal absorption phenomenon in the porous layer. The experimental results suggest that a porous layer between a rigid base and a DML panel can considerably alter its acoustic emission in the near field and in the far field. This is illustrated by a reduction in the level of fluctuations in the emitted acoustic pressure spectra. These fluctuations are normally associated with the interference between the sound emitted by the front surface of the speaker and that emitted from the back. Another contribution comes from the pronounced structural resonances in the surface velocity spectrum. The results of this work suggest that the acoustic boundary conditions near a DML can be modified by the porous layer so that a desired acoustic output can be attained.

  6. Real-time GMAW quality classification using an artificial neural network with airborne acoustic signals as inputs

    SciTech Connect

    Matteson, A.; Morris, R.; Tate, R.

    1993-12-31

    The acoustic signal produced by the gas metal arc welding (GMAW) arc contains information about the behavior of the arc column, the molten pool and droplet transfer. It is possible to detect some defect producing conditions from the acoustic signal from the GMAW arc. An intelligent sensor, called the Weld Acoustic Monitor (WAM) has been developed to take advantage of this acoustic information in order to provide real-time quality assessment information for process control. The WAM makes use of an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) to classify the characteristic arc acoustic signals of acceptable and unacceptable welds. The ANN used in the Weld Acoustic Monitor developed its own set of rules for this classification problem by learning a data base of known GMAW acoustic signals.

  7. Sources and Radiation Patterns of Volcano-Acoustic Signals Investigated with Field-Scale Chemical Explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, D. C.; Lees, J. M.; Taddeucci, J.; Graettinger, A. H.; Sonder, I.; Valentine, G.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the processes that give rise to complex acoustic signals during volcanic blasts by monitoring buried chemical explosions with infrasound and audio range microphones, strong motion sensors, and high speed imagery. Acoustic waveforms vary with scaled depth of burial (SDOB, units in meters per cube root of joules), ranging from high amplitude, impulsive, gas expansion dominated signals at low SDOB to low amplitude, longer duration, ground motion dominated signals at high SDOB. Typically, the sudden upward acceleration of the substrate above the blast produces the first acoustic arrival, followed by a second pulse due to the eruption of pressurized gas at the surface. Occasionally, a third overpressure occurs when displaced material decelerates upon impact with the ground. The transition between ground motion dominated and gas release dominated acoustics ranges between 0.0038-0.0018 SDOB, respectively. For example, one explosion registering an SDOB=0.0031 produced two overpressure pulses of approximately equal amplitude, one due to ground motion, the other to gas release. Recorded volcano infrasound has also identified distinct ground motion and gas release components during explosions at Sakurajima, Santiaguito, and Karymsky volcanoes. Our results indicate that infrasound records may provide a proxy for the depth and energy of these explosions. Furthermore, while magma fragmentation models indicate the possibility of several explosions during a single vulcanian eruption (Alidibirov, Bull Volc., 1994), our results suggest that a single explosion can also produce complex acoustic signals. Thus acoustic records alone cannot be used to distinguish between single explosions and multiple closely-spaced blasts at volcanoes. Results from a series of lateral blasts during the 2014 field experiment further indicates whether vent geometry can produce directional acoustic radiation patterns like those observed at Tungarahua volcano (Kim et al., GJI, 2012). Beside

  8. The evolutionary origins of ritualized acoustic signals in caterpillars.

    PubMed

    Scott, Jaclyn L; Kawahara, Akito Y; Skevington, Jeffrey H; Yen, Shen-Horn; Sami, Abeer; Smith, Myron L; Yack, Jayne E

    2010-01-01

    Animal communication signals can be highly elaborate, and researchers have long sought explanations for their evolutionary origins. For example, how did signals such as the tail-fan display of a peacock, a firefly flash or a wolf howl evolve? Animal communication theory holds that many signals evolved from non-signalling behaviours through the process of ritualization. Empirical evidence for ritualization is limited, as it is necessary to examine living relatives with varying degrees of signal evolution within a phylogenetic framework. We examine the origins of vibratory territorial signals in caterpillars using comparative and molecular phylogenetic methods. We show that a highly ritualized vibratory signal--anal scraping--originated from a locomotory behaviour--walking. Furthermore, comparative behavioural analysis supports the hypothesis that ritualized vibratory signals derive from physical fighting behaviours. Thus, contestants signal their opponents to avoid the cost of fighting. Our study provides experimental evidence for the origins of a complex communication signal, through the process of ritualization.

  9. Calorimetric and acoustic emission study of martensitic transformation in single-crystalline Ni2MnGa alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tóth, László Z.; Szabó, Sándor; Daróczi, Lajos; Beke, Dezső L.

    2014-12-01

    The jerky character of austenite-martensite phase transformation in Ni2MnGa single crystals (with 10M martensite structure) has been investigated by thermal cycling using a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) and by detection of acoustic emissions (AEs) at low cooling and heating rates (0.1 K/min and below). It is illustrated that, besides the low cooling and heating rate, mass and surface roughness are also important parameters in optimizing the best signal/noise ratio in order to obtain individual peaks suitable for statistical analysis. Three types of samples, differing in the twin structure and twin boundary behavior, were investigated with and without surface roughening made by electro-erosion. The statistical analysis, carried out for both (thermal and acoustic) types of signals, provided power-law behavior. In calorimetric measurements the energy exponents, obtained in cooling, were the same within the experimental errors (ɛ =1.7 ±0.2 ) for the three samples investigated. In acoustic emission experiments the energy and amplitude, α , exponents were determined both for cooling and heating. The exponents for cooling and heating runs are slightly different. They are larger for heating for both α and ɛ , in accordance with the asymmetric acoustic activity: we observed higher acoustic activity (higher number of hits) during cooling. The effect of the surface roughness is negligible in the exponents (but higher acoustic activity corresponds to higher roughness) and the following values were obtained: ɛ =1.5 ±0.1 and α =2.1 ±0.1 for cooling as well as ɛ =1.8 ±0.1 and α =2.6 ±0.1 for heating. Our results are in accordance with the results of Gallardo et al. [Phys. Rev. B 81, 174102 (2010), 10.1103/PhysRevB.81.174102] obtained in Cu based alloys: the exponents of the energy distributions, for both DSC and AE signals, were the same within the experimental errors. Furthermore, our exponents obtained from the AE measurements are close to the values

  10. Initiation of acoustic emission in fluid-saturated sandstone samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapshin, V. B.; Patonin, A. V.; Ponomarev, A. V.; Potanina, M. G.; Smirnov, V. B.; Stroganova, S. M.

    2016-07-01

    A rock behavior experiment with uniaxial compression revealed the effect of acoustic activity in loaded fluid-saturated Berea sandstone samples in response to an electric current. It is established that it is substantially intensified in periods of the current impact and decreases after its cut-off. The current impact also results in a growth of radial deformation indicating an increase in the sample volume. The effect of acoustic activation increases in response to increased heat emitted by the electric current during its flow through the sample, which allows the discovered effect to be explained by initiation of its destruction due to thermal expansion of the fluid in rock interstices and fissures.

  11. A nondestructive test for aircraft Halon bottles, the development of an acoustic emission application

    SciTech Connect

    Beattie, A.G.

    1996-12-01

    An acoustic emission test for aircraft Halon bottles has been developed in response to a need expressed by the US Airline Industry. During this development many choices had to be made about test methods, procedures and analysis techniques. This paper discusses these choices and how successful they were. The test itself was designed to replace the currently required hydrostatic test for these bottles. The necessary load is applied by heating the sealed bottles. Acoustic emission is monitored, during the heating, by six sensors held in position by a special fixture. A prototype of the test apparatus was constructed and used in two commercial Halon bottle repair and test facilities. Results to date indicate that about 97% of the bottles tested show no indications of flaws. The other 3% have had indications of possible flaws in non-critical areas of the bottles. All bottles tested to date have passed the hydrostatic test subsequent to the acoustic emission test.

  12. The application of Shuffled Frog Leaping Algorithm to Wavelet Neural Networks for acoustic emission source location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Xinmin; Zhang, Xiaodan; Zhao, Li; Deng, Aideng; Bao, Yongqiang; Liu, Yong; Jiang, Yunliang

    2014-04-01

    When using acoustic emission to locate the friction fault source of rotating machinery, the effects of strong noise and waveform distortion make accurate locating difficult. Applying neural network for acoustic emission source location could be helpful. In the BP Wavelet Neural Network, BP is a local search algorithm, which falls into local minimum easily. The probability of successful search is low. We used Shuffled Frog Leaping Algorithm (SFLA) to optimize the parameters of the Wavelet Neural Network, and the optimized Wavelet Neural Network to locate the source. After having performed the experiments of friction acoustic emission's source location on the rotor friction test machine, the results show that the calculation of SFLA is simple and effective, and that locating is accurate with proper structure of the network and input parameters.

  13. The pattern of acoustic emission under fluid initiation of failure: Laboratory modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potanina, M. G.; Smirnov, V. B.; Ponomarev, A. V.; Bernard, P.; Lyubushin, A. A.; Shoziyoev, Sh. P.

    2015-03-01

    The results of the laboratory experiment on the initiation of acoustic emission in a loaded specimen by wetting a part of its surface without a material increase in the pore pressure are analyzed. The experiment was conducted on the lever press at the Schmidt Institute of Physics of the Earth, Russian Academy of Sciences (Sobolev and Ponomarev, 2011). Infusion of water into the surface of the specimen initiated the swarm acoustic emission, which, after having migrated to the area with higher stresses, culminated in the formation of a macrofracture. The analysis revealed the regularities in the excitation and relaxation of the acoustic activity in response to different types of initiation: the forced excitation by stepwise increasing the load at the initial stage of the experiment; excitation resulting from fluid diffusion, which can be associated with the reduction in the material strength due to wetting; excitation that reflects the preparation for the emergence of a macrofracture in the area with the highest Coulomb stresses; and spontaneous excitation of swarm activity at the stage of relaxation of the acoustic emission after the formation of a macrofracture. The features revealed in the acoustic time series at the stages of excitation and decay of the emission are qualitatively similar to the trends identified in the variations of seismic parameters during the natural swarms, preparation of the sources of the strong earthquakes, and relaxation of the aftershocks. In particular, the obtained results support the hypothesis of fluid initiation of nonvolcanic seismic swarms.

  14. Gearbox Tooth Cut Fault Diagnostics Using Acoustic Emission and Vibration Sensors — A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Yongzhi; He, David; Yoon, Jae; Van Hecke, Brandon; Bechhoefer, Eric; Zhu, Junda

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, acoustic emission (AE) sensors and AE-based techniques have been developed and tested for gearbox fault diagnosis. In general, AE-based techniques require much higher sampling rates than vibration analysis-based techniques for gearbox fault diagnosis. Therefore, it is questionable whether an AE-based technique would give a better or at least the same performance as the vibration analysis-based techniques using the same sampling rate. To answer the question, this paper presents a comparative study for gearbox tooth damage level diagnostics using AE and vibration measurements, the first known attempt to compare the gearbox fault diagnostic performance of AE- and vibration analysis-based approaches using the same sampling rate. Partial tooth cut faults are seeded in a gearbox test rig and experimentally tested in a laboratory. Results have shown that the AE-based approach has the potential to differentiate gear tooth damage levels in comparison with the vibration-based approach. While vibration signals are easily affected by mechanical resonance, the AE signals show more stable performance. PMID:24424467

  15. Acoustic Emission Source Location Using a Distributed Feedback Fiber Laser Rosette

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wenzhu; Zhang, Wentao; Li, Fang

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes an approach for acoustic emission (AE) source localization in a large marble stone using distributed feedback (DFB) fiber lasers. The aim of this study is to detect damage in structures such as those found in civil applications. The directional sensitivity of DFB fiber laser is investigated by calculating location coefficient using a method of digital signal analysis. In this, autocorrelation is used to extract the location coefficient from the periodic AE signal and wavelet packet energy is calculated to get the location coefficient of a burst AE source. Normalization is processed to eliminate the influence of distance and intensity of AE source. Then a new location algorithm based on the location coefficient is presented and tested to determine the location of AE source using a Delta (Δ) DFB fiber laser rosette configuration. The advantage of the proposed algorithm over the traditional methods based on fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) include the capability of: having higher strain resolution for AE detection and taking into account two different types of AE source for location. PMID:24141266

  16. Acoustic emission studies for characterization of fatigue crack growth behavior in HSLA steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Jalaj; Ahmad, S.; Mukhopadhyay, C. K.; Jayakumar, T.; Kumar, Vikas

    2016-01-01

    High strength low alloy (HSLA) steels are a group of low carbon steels and used in oil and gas pipelines, automotive components, offshore structures and shipbuilding. Fatigue crack growth (FCG) characteristics of a HSLA steel have been studied at two different stress ratios (R = 0.3 and 0.5). Acoustic emission (AE) signals generated during the FCG tests have been used to understand the FCG processes. The AE signals were captured by mounting two piezoelectric sensors on compact tension specimens in liner location configuration. The AE generated in stage II of the linear Paris region of FCG has been attributed to the presence of two sub-stages with two different slopes. The AE generated at higher values of stress intensity factor is found to be useful to identify the transition from stage II to stage III of the FCG. AE location analysis has provided support for increased damage at the crack tip for higher stress ratio. The peak stress intensity (Kmax) values at the crack tip have shown good correlation with the transitions from stage IIa to stage IIb and stage II to stage III of the FCG for the two stress ratios.

  17. Gearbox tooth cut fault diagnostics using acoustic emission and vibration sensors--a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Qu, Yongzhi; He, David; Yoon, Jae; Van Hecke, Brandon; Bechhoefer, Eric; Zhu, Junda

    2014-01-14

    In recent years, acoustic emission (AE) sensors and AE-based techniques have been developed and tested for gearbox fault diagnosis. In general, AE-based techniques require much higher sampling rates than vibration analysis-based techniques for gearbox fault diagnosis. Therefore, it is questionable whether an AE-based technique would give a better or at least the same performance as the vibration analysis-based techniques using the same sampling rate. To answer the question, this paper presents a comparative study for gearbox tooth damage level diagnostics using AE and vibration measurements, the first known attempt to compare the gearbox fault diagnostic performance of AE- and vibration analysis-based approaches using the same sampling rate. Partial tooth cut faults are seeded in a gearbox test rig and experimentally tested in a laboratory. Results have shown that the AE-based approach has the potential to differentiate gear tooth damage levels in comparison with the vibration-based approach. While vibration signals are easily affected by mechanical resonance, the AE signals show more stable performance.

  18. Acoustic emission source location using a distributed feedback fiber laser rosette.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wenzhu; Zhang, Wentao; Li, Fang

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes an approach for acoustic emission (AE) source localization in a large marble stone using distributed feedback (DFB) fiber lasers. The aim of this study is to detect damage in structures such as those found in civil applications. The directional sensitivity of DFB fiber laser is investigated by calculating location coefficient using a method of digital signal analysis. In this, autocorrelation is used to extract the location coefficient from the periodic AE signal and wavelet packet energy is calculated to get the location coefficient of a burst AE source. Normalization is processed to eliminate the influence of distance and intensity of AE source. Then a new location algorithm based on the location coefficient is presented and tested to determine the location of AE source using a Delta (Δ) DFB fiber laser rosette configuration. The advantage of the proposed algorithm over the traditional methods based on fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) include the capability of: having higher strain resolution for AE detection and taking into account two different types of AE source for location. PMID:24141266

  19. Fatigue features study on the crankshaft material of 42CrMo steel using acoustic emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yue; Dong, Lihong; Wang, Haidou; Li, Guolu; Liu, Shenshui

    2016-09-01

    Crankshaft is regarded as an important component of engines, and it is an important application of remanufacturing because of its high added value. However, the fatigue failure research of remanufactured crankshaft is still in its primary stage. Thus, monitoring and investigating the fatigue failure of the remanufacturing crankshaft is crucial. In this paper, acoustic emission (AE) technology and machine vision are used to monitor the four-point bending fatigue of 42CrMo, which is the material of crankshaft. The specimens are divided into two categories, namely, pre-existing crack and non-preexisting crack, which simulate the crankshaft and crankshaft blank, respectively. The analysis methods of parameter-based AE techniques, wavelet transform (WT) and SEM analysis are combined to identify the stage of fatigue failure. The stage of fatigue failure is the basis of using AE technology in the field of remanufacturing crankshafts. The experiment results show that the fatigue crack propagation style is a transgranular fracture and the fracture is a brittle fracture. The difference mainly depends on the form of crack initiation. Various AE signals are detected by parameter analysis method. Wavelet threshold denoising and WT are combined to extract the spectral features of AE signals at different fatigue failure stages.

  20. Sources and characteristics of acoustic emissions from mechanically stressed geologic granular media — A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michlmayr, Gernot; Cohen, Denis; Or, Dani

    2012-05-01

    The formation of cracks and emergence of shearing planes and other modes of rapid macroscopic failure in geologic granular media involve numerous grain scale mechanical interactions often generating high frequency (kHz) elastic waves, referred to as acoustic emissions (AE). These acoustic signals have been used primarily for monitoring and characterizing fatigue and progressive failure in engineered systems, with only a few applications concerning geologic granular media reported in the literature. Similar to the monitoring of seismic events preceding an earthquake, AE may offer a means for non-invasive, in-situ, assessment of mechanical precursors associated with imminent landslides or other types of rapid mass movements (debris flows, rock falls, snow avalanches, glacier stick-slip events). Despite diverse applications and potential usefulness, a systematic description of the AE method and its relevance to mechanical processes in Earth sciences is lacking. This review is aimed at providing a sound foundation for linking observed AE with various micro-mechanical failure events in geologic granular materials, not only for monitoring of triggering events preceding mass mobilization, but also as a non-invasive tool in its own right for probing the rich spectrum of mechanical processes at scales ranging from a single grain to a hillslope. We review first studies reporting use of AE for monitoring of failure in various geologic materials, and describe AE generating source mechanisms in mechanically stressed geologic media (e.g., frictional sliding, micro-crackling, particle collisions, rupture of water bridges, etc.) including AE statistical features, such as frequency content and occurrence probabilities. We summarize available AE sensors and measurement principles. The high sampling rates of advanced AE systems enable detection of numerous discrete failure events within a volume and thus provide access to statistical descriptions of progressive collapse of systems

  1. Thick-film acoustic emission sensors for use in structurally integrated condition-monitoring applications.

    PubMed

    Pickwell, Andrew J; Dorey, Robert A; Mba, David

    2011-09-01

    Monitoring the condition of complex engineering structures is an important aspect of modern engineering, eliminating unnecessary work and enabling planned maintenance, preventing failure. Acoustic emissions (AE) testing is one method of implementing continuous nondestructive structural health monitoring. A novel thick-film (17.6 μm) AE sensor is presented. Lead zirconate titanate thick films were fabricated using a powder/sol composite ink deposition technique and mechanically patterned to form a discrete thick-film piezoelectric AE sensor. The thick-film sensor was benchmarked against a commercial AE device and was found to exhibit comparable responses to simulated acoustic emissions.

  2. Acoustic emission analysis: A test method for metal joints bonded by adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brockmann, W.; Fischer, T.

    1978-01-01

    Acoustic emission analysis is applied to study adhesive joints which had been subjected to mechanical and climatic stresses, taking into account conditions which make results applicable to adhesive joints used in aerospace technology. Specimens consisting of the alloy AlMgSi0.5 were used together with a phenolic resin adhesive, an epoxy resin modified with a polyamide, and an epoxy resin modified with a nitrile. Results show that the acoustic emission analysis provides valuable information concerning the behavior of adhesive joints under load and climatic stresses.

  3. Application of a novel optical fiber sensor to detection of acoustic emissions by various damages in CFRP laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qi; Yu, Fengming; Okabe, Yoji; Kobayashi, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    In this research, we applied a novel optical fiber sensor, phase-shifted fiber Bragg grating balanced sensor with high sensitivity and broad bandwidth, to acoustic emission (AE) detection in carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRPs). AE signals generated in the tensile testing of angle-ply and cross-ply CFRP laminates were both detected by the novel optical fiber sensor and traditional PZT sensors. The cumulative hits detected by both sensors coincided after applying simple data processing to eliminate the noise, and clearly exhibited Kaiser effect and Felicity effect. Typical AE signals detected by both sensors were discussed and were tried to relate to micro CFRP damages observed via microscope. These results demonstrate that this novel optical fiber sensor can reliably detect AE signals from various damages. It has the potential to be used in practical AE detection, as an alternative to the piezoelectric PZT sensor.

  4. Wear detection by means of wavelet-based acoustic emission analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baccar, D.; Söffker, D.

    2015-08-01

    Wear detection and monitoring during operation are complex and difficult tasks especially for materials under sliding conditions. Due to the permanent contact and repetitive motion, the material surface remains during tests non-accessible for optical inspection so that attrition of the contact partners cannot be easily detected. This paper introduces the relevant scientific components of reliable and efficient condition monitoring system for online detection and automated classification of wear phenomena by means of acoustic emission (AE) and advanced signal processing approaches. The related experiments were performed using a tribological system consisting of two martensitic plates, sliding against each other. High sensitive piezoelectric transducer was used to provide the continuous measurement of AE signals. The recorded AE signals were analyzed mainly by time-frequency analysis. A feature extraction module using a novel combination of Short-Time Fourier Transform (STFT) and Continuous Wavelet Transform (CWT) were used for the first time. A detailed correlation analysis between complex signal characteristics and the surface damage resulting from contact fatigue was investigated. Three wear process stages were detected and could be distinguished. To obtain quantitative and detailed information about different wear phases, the AE energy was calculated using STFT and decomposed into a suitable number of frequency levels. The individual energy distribution and the cumulative AE energy of each frequency components were analyzed using CWT. Results show that the behavior of individual frequency component changes when the wear state changes. Here, specific frequency ranges are attributed to the different wear states. The study reveals that the application of the STFT-/CWT-based AE analysis is an appropriate approach to distinguish and to interpret the different damage states occurred during sliding contact. Based on this results a new generation of condition monitoring

  5. Detection of bond failure in the anchorage zone of reinforced concrete beams via acoustic emission monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abouhussien, Ahmed A.; Hassan, Assem A. A.

    2016-07-01

    In this study, acoustic emission (AE) monitoring was utilised to identify the onset of bond failure in reinforced concrete beams. Beam anchorage specimens were designed and tested to fail in bond in the anchorage zone. The specimens included four 250 × 250 × 1500 mm beams with four variable bonded lengths (100, 200, 300, and 400 mm). Meanwhile, an additional 250 × 250 × 2440 mm beam, with 200 mm bonded length, was tested to investigate the influence of sensor location on the identification of bond damage. All beams were tested under four-point loading setup and continuously monitored using three distributed AE sensors. These attached sensors were exploited to record AE signals resulting from both cracking and bond deterioration until failure. The variations in the number of AE hits and cumulative signal strength (CSS) versus test time were evaluated to achieve early detection of crack growth and bar slippage. In addition, AE intensity analysis was performed on signal strength of collected AE signals to develop two additional parameters: historic index (H (t)) and severity (S r). The analysis of these AE parameters enabled an early detection of both first cracks (at almost the mid-span of the beam) and bar slip in either of the anchorage zones at the beams’ end before their visual observation, regardless of sensor location. The results also demonstrated a clear correlation between the damage level in terms of crack development/measured free end bar slip and AE parameters (number of hits, CSS, H(t), and S r).

  6. The effect of habitat acoustics on common marmoset vocal signal transmission.

    PubMed

    Morrill, Ryan J; Thomas, A Wren; Schiel, Nicola; Souto, Antonio; Miller, Cory T

    2013-09-01

    Noisy acoustic environments present several challenges for the evolution of acoustic communication systems. Among the most significant is the need to limit degradation of spectro-temporal signal structure in order to maintain communicative efficacy. This can be achieved by selecting for several potentially complementary processes. Selection can act on behavioral mechanisms permitting signalers to control the timing and occurrence of signal production to avoid acoustic interference. Likewise, the signal itself may be the target of selection, biasing the evolution of its structure to comprise acoustic features that avoid interference from ambient noise or degrade minimally in the habitat. Here, we address the latter topic for common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) long-distance contact vocalizations, known as phee calls. Our aim was to test whether this vocalization is specifically adapted for transmission in a species-typical forest habitat, the Atlantic forests of northeastern Brazil. We combined seasonal analyses of ambient habitat acoustics with experiments in which pure tones, clicks, and vocalizations were broadcast and rerecorded at different distances to characterize signal degradation in the habitat. Ambient sound was analyzed from intervals throughout the day and over rainy and dry seasons, showing temporal regularities across varied timescales. Broadcast experiment results indicated that the tone and click stimuli showed the typically inverse relationship between frequency and signaling efficacy. Although marmoset phee calls degraded over distance with marked predictability compared with artificial sounds, they did not otherwise appear to be specially designed for increased transmission efficacy or minimal interference in this habitat. We discuss these data in the context of other similar studies and evidence of potential behavioral mechanisms for avoiding acoustic interference in order to maintain effective vocal communication in common marmosets.

  7. The Effect of Habitat Acoustics on Common Marmoset Vocal Signal Transmission

    PubMed Central

    MORRILL, RYAN J.; THOMAS, A. WREN; SCHIEL, NICOLA; SOUTO, ANTONIO; MILLER, CORY T.

    2013-01-01

    Noisy acoustic environments present several challenges for the evolution of acoustic communication systems. Among the most significant is the need to limit degradation of spectro-temporal signal structure in order to maintain communicative efficacy. This can be achieved by selecting for several potentially complementary processes. Selection can act on behavioral mechanisms permitting signalers to control the timing and occurrence of signal production to avoid acoustic interference. Likewise, the signal itself may be the target of selection, biasing the evolution of its structure to comprise acoustic features that avoid interference from ambient noise or degrade minimally in the habitat. Here, we address the latter topic for common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) long-distance contact vocalizations, known as phee calls. Our aim was to test whether this vocalization is specifically adapted for transmission in a species-typical forest habitat, the Atlantic forests of northeastern Brazil. We combined seasonal analyses of ambient habitat acoustics with experiments in which pure tones, clicks, and vocalizations were broadcast and rerecorded at different distances to characterize signal degradation in the habitat. Ambient sound was analyzed from intervals throughout the day and over rainy and dry seasons, showing temporal regularities across varied timescales. Broadcast experiment results indicated that the tone and click stimuli showed the typically inverse relationship between frequency and signaling efficacy. Although marmoset phee calls degraded over distance with marked predictability compared with artificial sounds, they did not otherwise appear to be specially designed for increased transmission efficacy or minimal interference in this habitat. We discuss these data in the context of other similar studies and evidence of potential behavioral mechanisms for avoiding acoustic interference in order to maintain effective vocal communication in common marmosets. PMID

  8. System and method for investigating sub-surface features of a rock formation with acoustic sources generating conical broadcast signals

    SciTech Connect

    Vu, Cung Khac; Skelt, Christopher; Nihei, Kurt; Johnson, Paul A.; Guyer, Robert; Ten Cate, James A.; Le Bas, Pierre -Yves; Larmat, Carene S.

    2015-08-18

    A method of interrogating a formation includes generating a conical acoustic signal, at a first frequency--a second conical acoustic signal at a second frequency each in the between approximately 500 Hz and 500 kHz such that the signals intersect in a desired intersection volume outside the borehole. The method further includes receiving, a difference signal returning to the borehole resulting from a non-linear mixing of the signals in a mixing zone within the intersection volume.

  9. Beeping and piping: characterization of two mechano-acoustic signals used by honey bees in swarming.

    PubMed

    Schlegel, Thomas; Visscher, P Kirk; Seeley, Thomas D

    2012-12-01

    Of the many signals used by honey bees during the process of swarming, two of them--the stop signal and the worker piping signal--are not easily distinguished for both are mechano-acoustic signals produced by scout bees who press their bodies against other bees while vibrating their wing muscles. To clarify the acoustic differences between these two signals, we recorded both signals from the same swarm and at the same time, and compared them in terms of signal duration, fundamental frequency, and frequency modulation. Stop signals and worker piping signals differ in all three variables: duration, 174 ± 64 vs. 602 ± 377 ms; fundamental frequency, 407 vs. 451 Hz; and frequency modulation, absent vs. present. While it remains unclear which differences the bees use to distinguish the two signals, it is clear that they do so for the signals have opposite effects. Stop signals cause inhibition of actively dancing scout bees whereas piping signals cause excitation of quietly resting non-scout bees. PMID:23149930

  10. Acoustic emission from magnetic flux tubes in the solar network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigeesh, G.; Hasan, S. S.

    2013-06-01

    We present the results of three-dimensional numerical simulations to investigate the excitation of waves in the magnetic network of the Sun due to footpoint motions of a magnetic flux tube. We consider motions that typically mimic granular buffeting and vortex flows and implement them as driving motions at the base of the flux tube. The driving motions generates various MHD modes within the flux tube and acoustic waves in the ambient medium. The response of the upper atmosphere to the underlying photospheric motion and the role of the flux tube in channeling the waves is investigated. We compute the acoustic energy flux in the various wave modes across different boundary layers defined by the plasma and magnetic field parameters and examine the observational implications for chromospheric and coronal heating.

  11. Search for acoustic signals from high energy cascades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, R.; Bowen, T.

    1985-01-01

    High energy cosmic ray secondaries can be detected by means of the cascades they produce when they pass through matter. When the charged particles of these cascades ionize the matter they are traveling through, the heat produced and resulting thermal expansion causes a thermoacoustic wave. These sound waves travel at about one hundred-thousandth the speed of light, and should allow an array of acoustic transducers to resolve structure in the cascade to about 1 cm without high speed electronics or segmentation of the detector.

  12. Search for acoustic signals from high energy cascades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, R.; Bowen, T.

    1985-08-01

    High energy cosmic ray secondaries can be detected by means of the cascades they produce when they pass through matter. When the charged particles of these cascades ionize the matter they are traveling through, the heat produced and resulting thermal expansion causes a thermoacoustic wave. These sound waves travel at about one hundred-thousandth the speed of light, and should allow an array of acoustic transducers to resolve structure in the cascade to about 1 cm without high speed electronics or segmentation of the detector.

  13. Research on power-law acoustic transient signal detection based on wavelet transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jian-hui; Yang, Ri-jie; Wang, Wei

    2007-11-01

    Aiming at the characteristics of acoustic transient signal emitted from antisubmarine weapon which is being dropped into water (torpedo, aerial sonobuoy and rocket assisted depth charge etc.), such as short duration, low SNR, abruptness and instability, based on traditional power-law detector, a new method to detect acoustic transient signal is proposed. Firstly wavelet transform is used to de-noise signal, removes random spectrum components and improves SNR. Then Power- Law detector is adopted to detect transient signal. The simulation results show the method can effectively extract envelop characteristic of transient signal on the condition of low SNR. The performance of WT-Power-Law markedly outgoes that of traditional Power-Law detection method.

  14. Beeping and piping: characterization of two mechano-acoustic signals used by honey bees in swarming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlegel, Thomas; Visscher, P. Kirk; Seeley, Thomas D.

    2012-12-01

    Of the many signals used by honey bees during the process of swarming, two of them—the stop signal and the worker piping signal—are not easily distinguished for both are mechano-acoustic signals produced by scout bees who press their bodies against other bees while vibrating their wing muscles. To clarify the acoustic differences between these two signals, we recorded both signals from the same swarm and at the same time, and compared them in terms of signal duration, fundamental frequency, and frequency modulation. Stop signals and worker piping signals differ in all three variables: duration, 174 ± 64 vs. 602 ± 377 ms; fundamental frequency, 407 vs. 451 Hz; and frequency modulation, absent vs. present. While it remains unclear which differences the bees use to distinguish the two signals, it is clear that they do so for the signals have opposite effects. Stop signals cause inhibition of actively dancing scout bees whereas piping signals cause excitation of quietly resting non-scout bees.

  15. Acoustic emission non-destructive testing of structures using source location techniques.

    SciTech Connect

    Beattie, Alan G.

    2013-09-01

    The technology of acoustic emission (AE) testing has been advanced and used at Sandia for the past 40 years. AE has been used on structures including pressure vessels, fire bottles, wind turbines, gas wells, nuclear weapons, and solar collectors. This monograph begins with background topics in acoustics and instrumentation and then focuses on current acoustic emission technology. It covers the overall design and system setups for a test, with a wind turbine blade as the object. Test analysis is discussed with an emphasis on source location. Three test examples are presented, two on experimental wind turbine blades and one on aircraft fire extinguisher bottles. Finally, the code for a FORTRAN source location program is given as an example of a working analysis program. Throughout the document, the stress is on actual testing of real structures, not on laboratory experiments.

  16. Results obtained during acoustic emission monitoring of proof testing of a large Kevlar/epoxy rocket motor case

    SciTech Connect

    Hamstad, M.A.

    1982-12-01

    A total of 15 acoustic emission (AE) sensors were used to monitor a large Kevlar 49/epoxy rocket motor case during proof cycles to successively higher levels. Fourteen of the sensors were placed on the composite surface and one sensor was coupled to a stainless steel waveguide which penetrated the full length of the inside of the hydraulically pressurized motor case. To reduce signal propagation losses, the bandpass was chosen to be 5 to 10 kHz. In addition to an Acoustic Emission Technology (AET) 5000 system, Hewlett Packard 3400 A root-mean-square voltmeters, and a 1010 Biomation transient recorder were used to record AE data. The AET system measured rise time, event duration, peak amplitude, and energy (calculated from event duration and peak amplitude) for each AE event. The main purpose of this paper is to present and discuss the AE data obtained by hand post-processing of event listings generated for each proof cycle of the AE data taped by the 5000 system during the test. Real AE signal propagation losses are compared to the losses from Pentel pencil-lead breaks. We present first-hit sensor data for events with high amplitude, energy, and event duration. This data indicated that a certain area of the composite case is the potential region of failure.

  17. The application of compressed sensing to long-term acoustic emission-based structural health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cattaneo, Alessandro; Park, Gyuhae; Farrar, Charles; Mascareñas, David

    2012-04-01

    The acoustic emission (AE) phenomena generated by a rapid release in the internal stress of a material represent a promising technique for structural health monitoring (SHM) applications. AE events typically result in a discrete number of short-time, transient signals. The challenge associated with capturing these events using classical techniques is that very high sampling rates must be used over extended periods of time. The result is that a very large amount of data is collected to capture a phenomenon that rarely occurs. Furthermore, the high energy consumption associated with the required high sampling rates makes the implementation of high-endurance, low-power, embedded AE sensor nodes difficult to achieve. The relatively rare occurrence of AE events over long time scales implies that these measurements are inherently sparse in the spike domain. The sparse nature of AE measurements makes them an attractive candidate for the application of compressed sampling techniques. Collecting compressed measurements of sparse AE signals will relax the requirements on the sampling rate and memory demands. The focus of this work is to investigate the suitability of compressed sensing techniques for AE-based SHM. The work explores estimating AE signal statistics in the compressed domain for low-power classification applications. In the event compressed classification finds an event of interest, ι1 norm minimization will be used to reconstruct the measurement for further analysis. The impact of structured noise on compressive measurements is specifically addressed. The suitability of a particular algorithm, called Justice Pursuit, to increase robustness to a small amount of arbitrary measurement corruption is investigated.

  18. Bridging aero-fracture evolution with the characteristics of the acoustic emissions in a porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turkaya, Semih; Toussaint, Renaud; Eriksen, Fredrik; Zecevic, Megan; Daniel, Guillaume; Flekkøy, Eirik; Måløy, Knut Jørgen

    2015-09-01

    The characterization and understanding of rock deformation processes due to fluid flow is a challenging problem with numerous applications. The signature of this problem can be found in Earth Science and Physics, notably with applications in natural hazard understanding, mitigation or forecast (e.g. earthquakes, landslides with hydrological control, volcanic eruptions), or in industrial applications such as hydraulic-fracturing, steam-assisted gravity drainage, CO sequestration operations or soil remediation. Here we investigate the link between the visual deformation and the mechanical wave signals generated due to fluid injection into porous media. In a rectangular Hele-Shaw Cell, side air injection causes burst movement and compaction of grains along with channeling (creation of high permeability channels empty of grains). During the initial compaction and emergence of the main channel, the hydraulic fracturing in the medium generates a large non-impulsive low frequency signal in the frequency range 100 Hz - 10 kHz. When the channel network is established, the relaxation of the surrounding medium causes impulsive aftershock-like events, with high frequency (above 10 kHz) acoustic emissions, the rate of which follows an Omori Law. These signals and observations are comparable to seismicity induced by fluid injection. Compared to the data obtained during hydraulic fracturing operations, low frequency seismicity with evolving spectral characteristics have also been observed. An Omori-like decay of microearthquake rates is also often observed after injection shut-in, with a similar exponent p≃0.5 as observed here, where the decay rate of aftershock follows a scaling law dN/dt ∝(t-t₀ )-p . The physical basis for this modified Omori law is explained by pore pressure diffusion affecting the stress relaxation.

  19. A quantitative acoustic emission study on fracture processes in ceramics based on wavelet packet decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Ning, J. G.; Chu, L.; Ren, H. L.

    2014-08-28

    We base a quantitative acoustic emission (AE) study on fracture processes in alumina ceramics on wavelet packet decomposition and AE source location. According to the frequency characteristics, as well as energy and ringdown counts of AE, the fracture process is divided into four stages: crack closure, nucleation, development, and critical failure. Each of the AE signals is decomposed by a 2-level wavelet package decomposition into four different (from-low-to-high) frequency bands (AA{sub 2}, AD{sub 2}, DA{sub 2}, and DD{sub 2}). The energy eigenvalues P{sub 0}, P{sub 1}, P{sub 2}, and P{sub 3} corresponding to these four frequency bands are calculated. By analyzing changes in P{sub 0} and P{sub 3} in the four stages, we determine the inverse relationship between AE frequency and the crack source size during ceramic fracture. AE signals with regard to crack nucleation can be expressed when P{sub 0} is less than 5 and P{sub 3} more than 60; whereas AE signals with regard to dangerous crack propagation can be expressed when more than 92% of P{sub 0} is greater than 4, and more than 95% of P{sub 3} is less than 45. Geiger location algorithm is used to locate AE sources and cracks in the sample. The results of this location algorithm are consistent with the positions of fractures in the sample when observed under a scanning electronic microscope; thus the locations of fractures located with Geiger's method can reflect the fracture process. The stage division by location results is in a good agreement with the division based on AE frequency characteristics. We find that both wavelet package decomposition and Geiger's AE source locations are suitable for the identification of the evolutionary process of cracks in alumina ceramics.

  20. Acoustic emission during tensile deformation of M250 grade maraging steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Chandan Kumar; Rajkumar, Kesavan Vadivelu; Chandra Rao, Bhaghi Purna; Jayakumar, Tamanna

    2012-05-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) generated during room temperature tensile deformation of varyingly heat treated (solution annealed and thermally aged) M250 grade maraging steel specimens have been studied. Deformation of microstructure corresponding to different heat treated conditions in this steel could be distinctly characterized using the AE parameters such as RMS voltage, counts and peak amplitude of AE hits (events).

  1. Advanced Computing Methods for Knowledge Discovery and Prognosis in Acoustic Emission Monitoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mejia, Felipe

    2012-01-01

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) has gained significant popularity in the last decade. This growing interest, coupled with new sensing technologies, has resulted in an overwhelming amount of data in need of management and useful interpretation. Acoustic emission (AE) testing has been particularly fraught by the problem of growing data and is…

  2. Investigation of hydrogen embrittlement in 4130 steel using acoustic emission techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Susetka, S.L.

    1986-01-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement has long been a problem in certain quenched and tempered steel weldments since it reduces fracture strength and ductility. Although the phenomenon has been studied extensively, controversy still exists over the interaction between hydrogen and the lattice. For this investigation the acoustic emission response from fracture roughness tests on a variety of microstructures of AISI 4130 steel was used to gain insight into the micromechanism of the fracture process. The data indicate the acoustic emission represents the onset of brittle crack extension and, further, that the summation of the square of the acoustic emission amplitude, ..sigma..g/sup 2/, represents the elastic energy released during the fracture process. A comparison of the acoustic emission response from hydrogen charged and uncharged samples reveals that hydrogen increases the elastic energy released for the same crack extension. The 20% increase in the brittle fracture are in hydrogen charged samples is insufficient to explain the two fold increase in ..sigma..g/sup 2/. The data also support the view that hydrogen can act to alter the relationship between the surface energy, ..gamma../sub s/, and the plastic work term, ..gamma../sub p/, as Thomson, McMahon, and Gilman have proposed.

  3. Development of an Acoustic Signal Analysis Tool “Auto-F” Based on the Temperament Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modegi, Toshio

    The MIDI interface is originally designed for electronic musical instruments but we consider this music-note based coding concept can be extended for general acoustic signal description. We proposed applying the MIDI technology to coding of bio-medical auscultation sound signals such as heart sounds for retrieving medical records and performing telemedicine. Then we have tried to extend our encoding targets including vocal sounds, natural sounds and electronic bio-signals such as ECG, using Generalized Harmonic Analysis method. Currently, we are trying to separate vocal sounds included in popular songs and encode both vocal sounds and background instrumental sounds into separate MIDI channels. And also, we are trying to extract articulation parameters such as MIDI pitch-bend parameters in order to reproduce natural acoustic sounds using a GM-standard MIDI tone generator. In this paper, we present an overall algorithm of our developed acoustic signal analysis tool, based on those research works, which can analyze given time-based signals on the musical temperament scale. The prominent feature of this tool is producing high-precision MIDI codes, which reproduce the similar signals as the given source signal using a GM-standard MIDI tone generator, and also providing analyzed texts in the XML format.

  4. Acoustic Emission and Guided Ultrasonic Waves for Detection and Continuous Monitoring of Cracks in Light Water Reactor Components

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Ryan M.; Coble, Jamie B.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Watson, Bruce E.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Doctor, Steven R.; Bond, Leonard J.

    2012-06-28

    Acoustic emission (AE) and guided ultrasonic waves (GUW) are considered for continuous monitoring and detection of cracks in Light Water Reactor (LWR) components. In this effort, both techniques are applied to the detection and monitoring of fatigue crack growth in a full scale pipe component. AE results indicated crack initiation and rapid growth in the pipe, and significant GUW responses were observed in response to the growth of the fatigue crack. After initiation, the crack growth was detectable with AE for approximately 20,000 cycles. Signals associated with initiation and rapid growth where distinguished based on total rate of activity and differences observed in the centroid frequency of hits. An intermediate stage between initiation and rapid growth was associated with significant energy emissions, though few hits. GUW exhibit a nearly monotonic trend with crack length with an exception of measurements obtained at 41 mm and 46 mm.

  5. Mode tomography using signals from the Long Range Ocean Acoustic Propagation EXperiment (LOAPEX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandrayadula, Tarun K.

    Ocean acoustic tomography uses acoustic signals to infer the environmental properties of the ocean. The procedure for tomography consists of low frequency acoustic transmissions at mid-water depths to receivers located at hundreds of kilometer ranges. The arrival times of the signal at the receiver are then inverted for the sound speed of the background environment. Using this principle, experiments such as the 2004 Long Range Ocean Acoustic Propagation EXperiment have used acoustic signals recorded across Vertical Line Arrays (VLAs) to infer the Sound Speed Profile (SSP) across depth. The acoustic signals across the VLAs can be represented in terms of orthonormal basis functions called modes. The lower modes of the basis set concentrated around mid-water propagate longer distances and can be inverted for mesoscale effects such as currents and eddies. In spite of these advantages, mode tomography has received less attention. One of the important reasons for this is that internal waves in the ocean cause significant amplitude and travel time fluctuations in the modes. The amplitude and travel time fluctuations cause errors in travel time estimates. The absence of a statistical model and the lack of signal processing techniques for internal wave effects have precluded the modes from being used in tomographic inversions. This thesis estimates a statistical model for modes affected by internal waves and then uses the estimated model to design appropriate signal processing methods to obtain tomographic observables for the low modes. In order to estimate a statistical model, this thesis uses both the LOAPEX signals and also numerical simulations. The statistical model describes the amplitude and phase coherence across different frequencies for modes at different ranges. The model suggests that Matched Subspace Detectors (MSDs) based on the amplitude statistics of the modes are the optimum detectors to make travel time estimates for modes up to 250 km. The mean of the

  6. Validation and verification of the acoustic emission technique for structural health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagar, Daniel Omatsola

    The performance of the Acoustic Emission (AE) technique was investigated to establish its reliability in detecting and locating fatigue crack damage as well as distinguishing between different AE sources in potential SHM applications. Experiments were conducted to monitor the AE signals generated during fatigue crack growth in coupon 2014 T6 aluminium. The influence of stress ratio, stress range, sample geometry and whether or not the load spectrum was of constant or variable amplitude were all investigated. AE signals detected were correlated with values of applied cyclic load throughout the tests. Measurements of time difference of arrival were taken for assessment of errors in location estimates obtained using time of flight algorithms with a 1D location setup. At the onset of crack growth high AE Hit rates were observed for the first few millimetres after which they rapidly declined to minimal values for an extended period of crack growth. Another peak and then decline in AE Hit rates was observed for subsequent crack growth before yet another increase as the sample approached final failure.. AE signals were seen to occur in the lower two-thirds of the maximum load in the first few millimetres of crack growth before occurring at progressively smaller values as the crack length increased. A separate set of AE signals were observed close to the maximum cyclic stress throughout the entire crack growth process. At the failure crack length AE signals were generated across the entire loading range. Novel metrics were developed to statistically characterise variability of AE generation with crack growth and at particular crack lengths across different samples. A novel approach for fatigue crack length estimation was developed based on monitoring applied loads to the sample corresponding with generated AE signals. An acousto-ultrasonic method was used to calibrate the AE wave velocity in a representative wing-box structure which was used to successfully locate the

  7. Acoustic Signal Processing for Pipe Condition Assessment (WaterRF Report 4360)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Unique to prestressed concrete cylinder pipe (PCCP), individual wire breaks create an excitation in the pipe wall that may vary in response to the remaining compression of the pipe core. This project was designed to improve acoustic signal processing for pipe condition assessment...

  8. Detection of Adult Beetles Inside the Stored Wheat Mass Based on Their Acoustic Emissions.

    PubMed

    Eliopoulos, P A; Potamitis, I; Kontodimas, D Ch; Givropoulou, E G

    2015-12-01

    The efficacy of bioacoustics in detecting the presence of adult beetles inside the grain mass was evaluated in the laboratory. A piezoelectric sensor and a portable acoustic emission amplifier connected with a computer were used. Adults of the most common beetle pests of stored wheat have been detected in varying population densities (0.1, 0.5, 1, and 2 adults per kilogram of wheat). The verification of the presence of the insect individuals was achieved through automated signal parameterization and classification. We tried out two different ways to detect impulses: 1) by applying a Hilbert transform on the audio recording and 2) by subtracting a noise estimation of the recording from the spectral content of the recording, thus allowing the frequency content of possible impulses to emerge. Prediction for infestation was rated falsely negative in 60-74%, 48-60%, 0-28%, and 0-4% of the cases when actual population density was 0.1, 0.5, 1, and 2 adults per kilogram, respectively, irrespective of pest species. No significant differences were recorded in positive predictions among different species in almost all cases. The system was very accurate (72-100%) in detecting 1 or 2 insects per kilogram of hard wheat grain, which is the standard threshold for classifying a grain mass "clean" or "infested." Our findings are discussed on the basis of enhancing the use of bioacoustics in stored-product IPM framework.

  9. Development of Methodology to Assess the Failure Behaviour of Bamboo Single Fibre by Acoustic Emission Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Md. Saiful; Gulshan, Fahmida; Ahsan, Qumrul; Wevers, Martine; Pfeiffer, Helge; van Vuure, Aart-Willem; Osorio, Lina; Verpoest, Ignaas

    2016-06-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) was used as a tool for detecting, evaluating and for better understanding of the damage mechanism and failure behavior in composites during mechanical loading. Methodology was developed for tensile test of natural fibres (bamboo single fibre). A series of experiments were performed and load drops (one or two) were observed in the load versus time graphs. From the observed AE parameters such as amplitude, energy, duration etc. significant information corresponding to the load drops were found. These AE signals from the load drop occurred from such failure as debonding between two elementary fibre or from join of elementary fibre at edge. The various sources of load at first load drop was not consistent for the different samples (for a particular sample the value is 8 N, stress: 517.51 MPa). Final breaking of fibre corresponded to saturated level AE amplitude of preamplifier (99.9 dB) for all samples. Therefore, it was not possible to determine the exact AE energy value for final breaking. Same methodology was used for tensile test of three single fibres, which gave clear indication of load drop before the final breaking of first and second fibre.

  10. Identification of the Onset of Cracking in Gear Teeth Using Acoustic Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pullin, R.; Clarke, A.; Eaton, M. J.; Pearson, M. R.; Holford, K. M.

    2012-08-01

    The development of diagnostic methods for gear tooth faults in aerospace power transmission systems is an active research area being driven largely by the interests of military organisations or large aerospace organisations. In aerospace applications, the potential results of gear failure are serious, ranging from increased asset downtime to, at worst, catastrophic failure with life-threatening consequences. New monitoring techniques which can identify the onset of failure at earlier stages are in demand. Acoustic Emission (AE) is the most sensitive condition monitoring tool and is a passive technique that detects the stress wave emitted by a structure as cracks propagate. In this study a gear test rig that allows the fatigue loading of an individual gear tooth was utilised. The rig allows a full AE analysis of damage signatures in gear teeth without the presence of constant background noise due to rotational and frictional sources. Furthermore this approach allows validation of AE results using crack gauges or strain gauges. Utilising a new approach to AE monitoring a sensor was mounted on the gear and used to continuously capture AE data for a complete fatigue load cycle of data, rather than the traditional approach where discrete signals are captured on a threshold basis. Data was captured every 10th load cycle for the duration of the test. A developed fast fourier transform analysis technique was compared with traditional analytical methods. In this investigation the developed techniques were validated against visual inspection and were shown to be far superior to the traditional approach.

  11. Analytical modelling of acoustic emission from buried or surface-breaking cracks under stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Khalifa, W.; Jezzine, K.; Hello, G.; Grondel, S.

    2012-03-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) is a non-destructive testing method used in various industries (aerospace, petrochemical and pressure-vessel industries in general, power generation, civil engineering, mechanical engineering, etc...) for the examination of large structures subjected to various stresses (e.g. mechanical loading).The energy released by a defect under stress (the AE phenomenon) can propagate as guided waves in thin structures or as surface Rayleigh waves in thick ones. Sensors (possibly permanently) are positioned at various locations on the structure under examination and are assumed to be sensitive to these waves. Then, post-processing tools typically based on signal processing and triangulation algorithms can be used to inverse these data, allowing one to estimate the position of the defect from which emanates the waves measured. The French Atomic Energy Commission is engaged in the development of tools for simulating AE examinations. These tools are based on specific models for the AE sources, for the propagation of guided or Rayleigh waves and for the behaviour of AE sensors. Here, the coupling of a fracture mechanics based model for AE source and surface/guided wave propagation models is achieved through an integral formulation relying on the elastodynamic reciprocity principle. As a first approximation, a simple piston-like model is used to predict the sensitivity of AE sensors. Predictions computed by our simulation tool are compared to results from the literature for validation purpose.

  12. Diamond wheel wear sensing with acoustic emission --wheel wear mechanisms and the effects of process variables

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Jianshe; Dornfeld, D.; Syoji, Katsuo

    1996-12-31

    The wear of diamond wheels has significant influence on the surface finish of ground ceramics and the resulting subsurface fracture damage. For optimization and control of the grinding process it is necessary to monitor the wear states of the grinding wheels. A project on diamond wheel wear sensing with acoustic emission was started recently in the Laboratory of Manufacturing Automation at the University of California at Berkeley. The main aims of the project are: (a) to identify the possible wheel wear patterns at different combinations of bond materials, grits, and grinding conditions; (b) to develop suitable AE signal processing methods to extract the AE features to represent the wheel wear characteristics, and establish a strategy for using AE for in-process monitoring of diamond wheel wear in grinding of ceramics. This paper presents the results of part of the project. It mainly focuses on the diamond wheel wear mechanisms, the effects of process variables including basic wheel elements and grinding parameters, and the relationship with AErms and AE frequency content.

  13. Fiber-optic sensor-based remote acoustic emission measurement of composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Fengming; Okabe, Yoji; Wu, Qi; Shigeta, Naoki

    2016-10-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) detection functioning at high temperatures could clarify the damage process in high heat-resistant composites. To achieve the high-temperature AE detection, a remote AE measurement based on a phase-shifted fiber Bragg grating (PS-FBG) sensor with a high sensitivity over a broad bandwidth was proposed. The common optical fibers were made from glass with good heat resistance. Hence, in this method, optical fiber was used as the waveguide to propagate the AE in the composite from a high-temperature environment to the room-temperature environment wherein the PS-FBG was located. Owing to the special AE detection configuration, this method was a new adhesive method for remote measurement (ADRM). The experiment and numerical simulation revealed that the PS-FBG sensor in the ADRM configuration demonstrated accurate remote sensing for the AE signals. This was because of the good waveguide system provided by the thin optical fiber and the sensitivity of the PS-FBG sensor to the axial strain in the core of the fiber. Consequently, the remote measurement utilizing the PS-FBG sensor in the ADRM configuration has a high potential for AE detection in high-temperature conditions.

  14. A novel technique for acoustic emission monitoring in civil structures with global fiber optic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verstrynge, E.; Pfeiffer, H.; Wevers, M.

    2014-06-01

    The application of acoustic emission (AE)-based damage detection is gaining interest in the field of civil structural health monitoring. Damage progress can be detected and located in real time and the recorded AEs hold information on the fracture process which produced them. One of the drawbacks for on-site application in large-scale concrete and masonry structures is the relatively high attenuation of the ultrasonic signal, which limits the detection range of the AE sensors. Consequently, a large number of point sensors are required to cover a certain area. To tackle this issue, a global damage detection system, based on AE detection with a polarization-modulated, single mode fiber optic sensor (FOS), has been developed. The sensing principle, data acquisition and analysis in time and frequency domain are presented. During experimental investigations, this AE-FOS is applied for the first time as a global sensor for the detection of crack-induced AEs in a full-scale concrete beam. Damage progress is monitored during a cyclic four-point bending test and the AE activity, detected with the FOS, is related to the subsequent stages of damage progress in the concrete element. The results obtained with the AE-FOS are successfully linked to the mechanical behavior of the concrete beam and a qualitative correspondence is found with AE data obtained by a commercial system.

  15. Investigation of acoustic emission and surface treatment to improve tool materials and metal forming process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Deming

    Silicon nitride and WC-Co cermet tools are used for metal forming processes including extrusion and drawing. These materials are used to make tool dies which are exposed to deformation caused by friction and wear. Surface treatments such as ion implantation, laser blazing and coating have been found to improve surface properties, to optimize tribological behavior between the metal and die, as well as to extend service life of the tool dies. Early detection and continuous monitoring processes by non destructive testing (NDT) methods are needed in order to ensure the functionality of the wear process and extend the tool service life. Acoustic emission is one of the promising NDT methods for this application. The surface treatment chosen for this investigation was ion implantation. Three types of wear resistant materials with and without surface treatment were selected for this project; silicon nitride and two tungsten carbides (6% Cobalt and 10% Cobalt). This investigation was conducted using a pin-on-disk device for wear/friction tests of the selected materials with lubrication and/or without lubrication against both a stainless steel disk and an aluminum disk. The acoustic emissions generated during the experiments were recorded and analyzed. The results of this investigation showed that the ion implantation improved the tribological properties of the materials and reduced acoustic emission and coefficient of friction. A linear relationship between the average amplitude of the acoustic emission and the coefficient of friction of the tested materials was found. The investigation demonstrated that the acoustic emission method could be used to monitor the wear/friction processes.

  16. A comparative evaluation of piezoelectric sensors for acoustic emission-based impact location estimation and damage classification in composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uprety, Bibhisha; Kim, Sungwon; Mathews, V. John; Adams, Daniel O.

    2015-03-01

    Acoustic Emission (AE) based Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) is of great interest for detecting impact damage in composite structures. Within the aerospace industry the need to detect and locate these events, even when no visible damage is present, is important both from the maintenance and design perspectives. In this investigation, four commercially available piezoelectric sensors were evaluated for usage in an AE-based SHM system. Of particular interest was comparing the acoustic response of the candidate piezoelectric sensors for impact location estimations as well as damage classification resulting from the impact in fiber-reinforced composite structures. Sensor assessment was performed based on response signal characterization and performance for active testing at 300 kHz and steel-ball drop testing using both aluminum and carbon/epoxy composite plates. Wave mode velocities calculated from the measured arrival times were found to be in good agreement with predictions obtained using both the Disperse code and finite element analysis. Differences in the relative strength of the received wave modes, the overall signal strengths and signal-to-noise ratios were observed through the use of both active testing as well as passive steel-ball drop testing. Further comparative is focusing on assessing AE sensor performance for use in impact location estimation algorithms as well as detecting and classifying damage produced in composite structures due to impact events.

  17. Combining passive thermography and acoustic emission for large area fatigue damage growth assessment of a composite structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalameda, Joseph N.; Horne, Michael R.; Madaras, Eric I.; Burke, Eric R.

    2016-05-01

    Passive thermography and acoustic emission data were obtained for improved real time damage detection during fatigue loading. A strong positive correlation was demonstrated between acoustic energy event location and thermal heating, especially if the structure under load was nearing ultimate failure. An image processing routine was developed to map the acoustic emission data onto the thermal imagery. This required removing optical barrel distortion and angular rotation from the thermal data. The acoustic emission data were then mapped onto thermal data, revealing the cluster of acoustic emission event locations around the thermal signatures of interest. By combining both techniques, progression of damage growth is confirmed and areas of failure are identified. This technology provides improved real time inspections of advanced composite structures during fatigue testing.

  18. Acoustic emission study of the plastic deformation of quenched and partitioned 35CrMnSiA steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yang; Xiao, Gui-yong; Chen, Lu-bin; Lu, Yu-peng

    2014-12-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) monitored tensile tests were performed on 35CrMnSiA steel subjected to different heat treatments. The results showed that quenching and partitioning (Q-P) heat treatments enhanced the combined mechanical properties of high strength and high ductility for commercial 35CrMnSiA steel, as compared with traditional heat treatments such as quenching and tempering (Q-T) and austempering (AT). AE signals with high amplitude and high energy were produced during the tensile deformation of 35CrMnSiA steel with retained austenite (RA) in the microstructure (obtained via Q-P and AT heat treatments) due to an austenite-to-martensite phase transformation. Moreover, additional AE signals would not appear again and the mechanical properties would degenerate to a lower level once RA degenerated by tempering for the Q-P treated steel.

  19. Antifade sonar employs acoustic field diversity to recover signals from multipath fading

    SciTech Connect

    Lubman, D.

    1996-04-01

    Co-located pressure and particle motion (PM) hydrophones together with four-channel diversity combiners may be used to recover signals from multipath fading. Multipath fading is important in both shallow and deep water propagation and can be an important source of signal loss. The acoustic field diversity concept arises from the notion of conservation of signal energy and the observation that in rooms at least, the total acoustic energy density is the sum of potential energy (scalar field-sound pressure) and kinetic energy (vector field-sound PM) portions. One pressure hydrophone determines acoustic potential energy density at a point. In principle, three PM sensors (displacement, velocity, or acceleration) directed along orthogonal axes describe the kinetic energy density at a point. For a single plane wave, the time-averaged potential and kinetic field energies are identical everywhere. In multipath interference, however, potential and kinetic field energies at a point are partitioned unequally, depending mainly on relative signal phases. Thus, when pressure signals are in deep fade, abundant kinetic field signal energy may be available at that location. Performance benefits require a degree of uncorrelated fading between channels. The expectation of nearly uncorrelated fading is motivated from room theory. Performance benefits for sonar limited by independent Rayleigh fading are suggested by analogy to antifade radio. Average SNR can be improved by several decibels, holding time on target is multiplied manifold, and the bit error rate for data communication is reduced substantially. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. Effects of contralateral white noise stimulation on transitory evoked otoacoustic emissions in patients with acoustic neuroma.

    PubMed

    Maurer, J; Hinni, M; Beck, A; Mann, W

    1995-03-01

    Transitory evoked otoacoustic emissions are normal phenomena observed in most persons with hearing levels greater than 35 dB. Further, masking of the contralateral ear produces amplitude reductions in the transitory evoked otoacoustic emissions. We have undertaken a study of transitory evoked otoacoustic emissions in 20 patients with acoustic neuroma. All patients were assessed for transitory evoked otoacoustic emissions bilaterally, with and without contralateral masking with white band noise at 40, 50, and 60 dB. We found that transitory evoked otoacoustic emissions were present in 30% of ears with tumor and that the presence of transitory evoked otoacoustic emissions is associated with improved preoperative hearing levels, but that tumor size is not associated with the presence or absence of transitory evoked otoacoustic emissions. The amplitude of transitory evoked otoacoustic emissions from ears with tumor, when present, is decreased when compared with normal ears of normal patients. Further, with contralateral masking little of the amplitude reduction observed in normal patients is observed in the ears with acoustic neuroma. However, with masking of the contralateral ear, the ear without tumor demonstrated significantly greater amplitude reductions than normal ears from normal patients (p = 0.0006). Pertinent anatomy and possible explanations for these findings are discussed. PMID:7870435

  1. Acoustic emissions of digital data video projectors- Investigating noise sources and their change during product aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Michael Shane

    2005-09-01

    Acoustic emission testing continues to be a growing part of IT and telecommunication product design, as product noise is increasingly becoming a differentiator in the marketplace. This is especially true for digital/video display companies, such as InFocus Corporation, considering the market shift of these products to the home entertainment consumer as retail prices drop and performance factors increase. Projectors and displays using Digital Light Processing(tm) [DLP(tm)] technology incorporate a device known as a ColorWheel(tm) to generate the colors displayed at each pixel in the image. These ColorWheel(tm) devices spin at very high speeds and can generate high-frequency tones not typically heard in liquid crystal displays and other display technologies. Also, acoustic emission testing typically occurs at the beginning of product life and is a measure of acoustic energy emitted at this point in the lifecycle. Since the product is designed to be used over a long period of time, there is concern as to whether the acoustic emissions change over the lifecycle of the product, whether these changes will result in a level of nuisance to the average customer, and does this nuisance begin to develop prior to the intended lifetime of the product.

  2. An echolocation model for the restoration of an acoustic image from a single-emission echo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuo, Ikuo; Yano, Masafumi

    2004-12-01

    Bats can form a fine acoustic image of an object using frequency-modulated echolocation sound. The acoustic image is an impulse response, known as a reflected-intensity distribution, which is composed of amplitude and phase spectra over a range of frequencies. However, bats detect only the amplitude spectrum due to the low-time resolution of their peripheral auditory system, and the frequency range of emission is restricted. It is therefore necessary to restore the acoustic image from limited information. The amplitude spectrum varies with the changes in the configuration of the reflected-intensity distribution, while the phase spectrum varies with the changes in its configuration and location. Here, by introducing some reasonable constraints, a method is proposed for restoring an acoustic image from the echo. The configuration is extrapolated from the amplitude spectrum of the restricted frequency range by using the continuity condition of the amplitude spectrum at the minimum frequency of the emission and the minimum phase condition. The determination of the location requires extracting the amplitude spectra, which vary with its location. For this purpose, the Gaussian chirplets with a carrier frequency compatible with bat emission sweep rates were used. The location is estimated from the temporal changes of the amplitude spectra. .

  3. Experimental study of ultra-thin films mechanical integrity by combined nanoindentation and nano-acoustic emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zihou

    Advancement of interconnect technology has imposed significant challenge on interface characterization and reliability for blurred interfaces between layers. There is a need for material properties and these miniaturized length scales and assessment of reliability; including the intrinsic film fracture toughness and the interfacial fracture toughness. The nano-meter range of film thicknesses currently employed, impose significant challenges on evaluating these physical quantities and thereby impose significant challenge on the design cycle. In this study we attempted to use a combined nano-indentation and nano-acoustic emission to qualitatively and quantitatively characterize the failure modes in ultra-thin blanket films on Si substrates or stakes of different characteristics. We have performed and analyzed an exhaustive group of testes that cove many diverge combination of film-substrate combination, provided by both Intel and IBM. When the force-indentation depth curve shows excursion, a direct measure of the total energy release rate is estimated. The collected acoustic emission signal is then used to partition the total energy into two segments, one associated with the cohesive fracture toughness of the film and the other is for the adhesive fracture toughness of the interface. The acoustic emission signal is analyzed in both the time and frequency domain to achieve such energy division. In particular, the signal time domain analysis for signal skewness, time of arrival and total energy content are employed with the proper signal to noise ratio. In the frequency domain, an expansive group of acoustic emission signals are utilized to construct the details of the power spectral density. A bank of band-pass filters are designed to sort the individual signals to those associated with adhesive interlayer cracking, cohesive channel cracking, or other system induced noise. The attenuation time and the energy content within each spectral frequency were the key elements

  4. Multi Reflection of Lamb Wave Emission in an Acoustic Waveguide Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, Martin; Olfert, Sergei; Rautenberg, Jens; Lindner, Gerhard; Henning, Bernd; Reindl, Leonhard Michael

    2013-01-01

    Recently, an acoustic waveguide sensor based on multiple mode conversion of surface acoustic waves at the solid—liquid interfaces has been introduced for the concentration measurement of binary and ternary mixtures, liquid level sensing, investigation of spatial inhomogenities or bubble detection. In this contribution the sound wave propagation within this acoustic waveguide sensor is visualized by Schlieren imaging for continuous and burst operation the first time. In the acoustic waveguide the antisymmetrical zero order Lamb wave mode is excited by a single phase transducer of 1 MHz on thin glass plates of 1 mm thickness. By contact to the investigated liquid Lamb waves propagating on the first plate emit pressure waves into the adjacent liquid, which excites Lamb waves on the second plate, what again causes pressure waves traveling inside the liquid back to the first plate and so on. The Schlieren images prove this multi reflection within the acoustic waveguide, which confirms former considerations and calculations based on the receiver signal. With this knowledge the sensor concepts with the acoustic waveguide sensor can be interpreted in a better manner. PMID:23447010

  5. Premonitory acoustic emissions and stick-slip in natural and smooth-faulted Westerly granite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thompson, B.D.; Young, R.P.; Lockner, D.A.

    2009-01-01

    A stick-slip event was induced in a cylindrical sample of Westerly granite containing a preexisting natural fault by loading at constant confining pressure of 150 MPa. Continuously recorded acoustic emission (AE) data and computer tomography (CT)-generated images of the fault plane were combined to provide a detailed examination of microscale processes operating on the fault. The dynamic stick-slip event, considered to be a laboratory analog of an earthquake, generated an ultrasonic signal that was recorded as a large-amplitude AE event. First arrivals of this event were inverted to determine the nucleation site of slip, which is associated with a geometric asperity on the fault surface. CT images and AE locations suggest that a variety of asperities existed in the sample because of the intersection of branch or splay faults with the main fault. This experiment is compared with a stick-slip experiment on a sample prepared with a smooth, artificial saw-cut fault surface. Nearly a thousand times more AE were observed for the natural fault, which has a higher friction coefficient (0.78 compared to 0.53) and larger shear stress drop (140 compared to 68 MPa). However at the measured resolution, the ultrasonic signal emitted during slip initiation does not vary significantly between the two experiments, suggesting a similar dynamic rupture process. We propose that the natural faulted sample under triaxial compression provides a good laboratory analogue for a field-scale fault system in terms of the presence of asperities, fault surface heterogeneity, and interaction of branching faults. ?? 2009.

  6. Contralateral acoustic stimulation induces a phase advance in evoked otoacoustic emissions in humans.

    PubMed

    Giraud, A L; Perrin, E; Chéry-Croze, S; Chays, A; Collet, L

    1996-05-01

    In 28 normal-hearing human subjects, the medial olivocochlear efferent system was activated by contralateral acoustic stimulation which is able to mimic the inhibitory effects of electrical stimulation of the crossed olivocochlear bundle. A first experiment on 16 subjects demonstrated that a contralateral white noise of 35 dB SL was able to induce temporal changes on transiently evoked otoacoustic emissions in response to clicks of 63 dB SPL. These temporal changes consisted of an advance of click-evoked otoacoustic signals in 87% of cases and is referred to as phase-shift effect. The phase advance, quantified using two signal processing methods in both time and frequency domains, was found to be mainly associated with lower frequencies, with a maximal effect at 1.5 kHz and minimal effects around 3.5 and 4 kHz. In a second experiment, carried out on 12 subjects, a negative relationship was found to exist between the ipsilateral stimulation level (level of clicks ranging from 57 to 69 dB SPL) and the phase-shift effect (PSE). Specifically in the range of levels tested (25-45 dB SL), a linear relationship presenting no obvious saturation effect was observed between the contralateral level and the PSE. The PSE was examined in 6 additional subjects exhibiting pathological symptoms; 2 of 3 individuals, who had no contralateral stapedial reflexes unilaterally, showed the PSE whereas this response was reduced or absent in 3 other subjects in the ear with severed efferents associated with a vestibular neurotomy. The integrity of olivocochlear efferents was, therefore, necessary to obtain a full effect, but the absence of stapedial reflex did not prevent the effect from occurring. PMID:8789811

  7. Acoustic tweezers for studying intracellular calcium signaling in SKBR-3 human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jae Youn; Yoon, Chi Woo; Lim, Hae Gyun; Park, Jin Man; Yoon, Sangpil; Lee, Jungwoo; Shung, K Kirk

    2015-12-01

    Extracellular matrix proteins such as fibronectin (FNT) play crucial roles in cell proliferation, adhesion, and migration. For better understanding of these associated cellular activities, various microscopic manipulation tools have been used to study their intracellular signaling pathways. Recently, it has appeared that acoustic tweezers may possess similar capabilities in the study. Therefore, we here demonstrate that our newly developed acoustic tweezers with a high-frequency lithium niobate ultrasonic transducer have potentials to study intracellular calcium signaling by FNT-binding to human breast cancer cells (SKBR-3). It is found that intracellular calcium elevations in SKBR-3 cells, initially occurring on the microbead-contacted spot and then eventually spreading over the entire cell, are elicited by attaching an acoustically trapped FNT-coated microbead. Interestingly, they are suppressed by either extracellular calcium elimination or phospholipase C (PLC) inhibition. Hence, this suggests that our acoustic tweezers may serve as an alternative tool in the study of intracellular signaling by FNT-binding activities.

  8. Temperature and Pressure Dependence of Signal Amplitudes for Electrostriction Laser-Induced Thermal Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herring, Gregory C.

    2015-01-01

    The relative signal strength of electrostriction-only (no thermal grating) laser-induced thermal acoustics (LITA) in gas-phase air is reported as a function of temperature T and pressure P. Measurements were made in the free stream of a variable Mach number supersonic wind tunnel, where T and P are varied simultaneously as Mach number is varied. Using optical heterodyning, the measured signal amplitude (related to the optical reflectivity of the acoustic grating) was averaged for each of 11 flow conditions and compared to the expected theoretical dependence of a pure-electrostriction LITA process, where the signal is proportional to the square root of [P*P /( T*T*T)].

  9. [Research on Time-frequency Characteristics of Magneto-acoustic Signal of Different Thickness Medium Based on Wave Summing Method].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shunqi; Yin, Tao; Ma, Ren; Liu, Zhipeng

    2015-08-01

    Functional imaging method of biological electrical characteristics based on magneto-acoustic effect gives valuable information of tissue in early tumor diagnosis, therein time and frequency characteristics analysis of magneto-acoustic signal is important in image reconstruction. This paper proposes wave summing method based on Green function solution for acoustic source of magneto-acoustic effect. Simulations and analysis under quasi 1D transmission condition are carried out to time and frequency characteristics of magneto-acoustic signal of models with different thickness. Simulation results of magneto-acoustic signal were verified through experiments. Results of the simulation with different thickness showed that time-frequency characteristics of magneto-acoustic signal reflected thickness of sample. Thin sample, which is less than one wavelength of pulse, and thick sample, which is larger than one wavelength, showed different summed waveform and frequency characteristics, due to difference of summing thickness. Experimental results verified theoretical analysis and simulation results. This research has laid a foundation for acoustic source and conductivity reconstruction to the medium with different thickness in magneto-acoustic imaging.

  10. Detection and Location of Transverse Matrix Cracks in Cross-Ply Gr/Ep Composites Using Acoustic Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, W. H.; Jackson, K. E.; Kellas, S.; Smith, B. T.; McKeon, J.; Friedman, A.

    1995-01-01

    Transverse matrix cracking in cross-ply gr/ep laminates was studied with advanced acoustic emission (AE) techniques. The primary goal of this research was to measure the load required to initiate the first transverse matrix crack in cross-ply laminates of different thicknesses. Other methods had been previously used for these measurements including penetrant enhanced radiography, optical microscopy, and audible acoustic microphone measurements. The former methods required that the mechanical test be paused for measurements at load intervals. This slowed the test procedure and did not provide the required resolution in load. With acoustic microphones, acoustic signals from cracks could not be clearly differentiated from other noise sources such as grip damage, specimen slippage, or test machine noise. A second goal for this work was to use the high resolution source location accuracy of the advanced acoustic emission techniques to determine whether the crack initiation site was at the specimen edge or in the interior of the specimen.In this research, advanced AE techniques using broad band sensors, high capture rate digital waveform acquisition, and plate wave propagation based analysis were applied to cross-ply composite coupons with different numbers of 0 and 90 degree plies. Noise signals, believed to be caused by grip damage or specimen slipping, were eliminated based on their plate wave characteristics. Such signals were always located outside the sensor gage length in the gripped region of the specimen. Cracks were confirmed post-test by microscopic analysis of a polished specimen edge, backscatter ultrasonic scans, and in limited cases, by penetrant enhanced radiography. For specimens with three or more 90 degree plies together, there was an exact 1-1 correlation between AE crack signals and observed cracks. The ultrasonic scans and some destructive sectioning analysis showed that the cracks extended across the full width of the specimen. Furthermore, the

  11. Acoustic cardiac signals analysis: a Kalman filter-based approach.

    PubMed

    Salleh, Sheik Hussain; Hussain, Hadrina Sheik; Swee, Tan Tian; Ting, Chee-Ming; Noor, Alias Mohd; Pipatsart, Surasak; Ali, Jalil; Yupapin, Preecha P

    2012-01-01

    Auscultation of the heart is accompanied by both electrical activity and sound. Heart auscultation provides clues to diagnose many cardiac abnormalities. Unfortunately, detection of relevant symptoms and diagnosis based on heart sound through a stethoscope is difficult. The reason GPs find this difficult is that the heart sounds are of short duration and separated from one another by less than 30 ms. In addition, the cost of false positives constitutes wasted time and emotional anxiety for both patient and GP. Many heart diseases cause changes in heart sound, waveform, and additional murmurs before other signs and symptoms appear. Heart-sound auscultation is the primary test conducted by GPs. These sounds are generated primarily by turbulent flow of blood in the heart. Analysis of heart sounds requires a quiet environment with minimum ambient noise. In order to address such issues, the technique of denoising and estimating the biomedical heart signal is proposed in this investigation. Normally, the performance of the filter naturally depends on prior information related to the statistical properties of the signal and the background noise. This paper proposes Kalman filtering for denoising statistical heart sound. The cycles of heart sounds are certain to follow first-order Gauss-Markov process. These cycles are observed with additional noise for the given measurement. The model is formulated into state-space form to enable use of a Kalman filter to estimate the clean cycles of heart sounds. The estimates obtained by Kalman filtering are optimal in mean squared sense.

  12. Biological invasions and the acoustic niche: the effect of bullfrog calls on the acoustic signals of white-banded tree frogs.

    PubMed

    Both, Camila; Grant, Taran

    2012-10-23

    Invasive species are known to affect native species in a variety of ways, but the effect of acoustic invaders has not been examined previously. We simulated an invasion of the acoustic niche by exposing calling native male white-banded tree frogs (Hypsiboas albomarginatus) to recorded invasive American bullfrog (Lithobates catesbeianus) calls. In response, tree frogs immediately shifted calls to significantly higher frequencies. In the post-stimulus period, they continued to use higher frequencies while also decreasing signal duration. Acoustic signals are the primary basis of mate selection in many anurans, suggesting that such changes could negatively affect the reproductive success of native species. The effects of bullfrog vocalizations on acoustic communities are expected to be especially severe due to their broad frequency band, which masks the calls of multiple species simultaneously. PMID:22675139

  13. Biological invasions and the acoustic niche: the effect of bullfrog calls on the acoustic signals of white-banded tree frogs

    PubMed Central

    Both, Camila; Grant, Taran

    2012-01-01

    Invasive species are known to affect native species in a variety of ways, but the effect of acoustic invaders has not been examined previously. We simulated an invasion of the acoustic niche by exposing calling native male white-banded tree frogs (Hypsiboas albomarginatus) to recorded invasive American bullfrog (Lithobates catesbeianus) calls. In response, tree frogs immediately shifted calls to significantly higher frequencies. In the post-stimulus period, they continued to use higher frequencies while also decreasing signal duration. Acoustic signals are the primary basis of mate selection in many anurans, suggesting that such changes could negatively affect the reproductive success of native species. The effects of bullfrog vocalizations on acoustic communities are expected to be especially severe due to their broad frequency band, which masks the calls of multiple species simultaneously. PMID:22675139

  14. Biological invasions and the acoustic niche: the effect of bullfrog calls on the acoustic signals of white-banded tree frogs.

    PubMed

    Both, Camila; Grant, Taran

    2012-10-23

    Invasive species are known to affect native species in a variety of ways, but the effect of acoustic invaders has not been examined previously. We simulated an invasion of the acoustic niche by exposing calling native male white-banded tree frogs (Hypsiboas albomarginatus) to recorded invasive American bullfrog (Lithobates catesbeianus) calls. In response, tree frogs immediately shifted calls to significantly higher frequencies. In the post-stimulus period, they continued to use higher frequencies while also decreasing signal duration. Acoustic signals are the primary basis of mate selection in many anurans, suggesting that such changes could negatively affect the reproductive success of native species. The effects of bullfrog vocalizations on acoustic communities are expected to be especially severe due to their broad frequency band, which masks the calls of multiple species simultaneously.

  15. Extraction of fault component from abnormal sound in diesel engines using acoustic signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dayong, Ning; Changle, Sun; Yongjun, Gong; Zengmeng, Zhang; Jiaoyi, Hou

    2016-06-01

    In this paper a method for extracting fault components from abnormal acoustic signals and automatically diagnosing diesel engine faults is presented. The method named dislocation superimposed method (DSM) is based on the improved random decrement technique (IRDT), differential function (DF) and correlation analysis (CA). The aim of DSM is to linearly superpose multiple segments of abnormal acoustic signals because of the waveform similarity of faulty components. The method uses sample points at the beginning of time when abnormal sound appears as the starting position for each segment. In this study, the abnormal sound belonged to shocking faulty type; thus, the starting position searching method based on gradient variance was adopted. The coefficient of similar degree between two same sized signals is presented. By comparing with a similar degree, the extracted fault component could be judged automatically. The results show that this method is capable of accurately extracting the fault component from abnormal acoustic signals induced by faulty shocking type and the extracted component can be used to identify the fault type.

  16. Acoustic emission measurements of aerospace materials and structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sachse, Wolfgang; Gorman, Michael R.

    1993-01-01

    A development status evaluation is given for aerospace applications of AE location, detection, and source characterization. Attention is given to the neural-like processing of AE signals for graphite/epoxy. It is recommended that development efforts for AE make connections between the material failure process and source dynamics, and study the effects of composite material anisotropy and inhomogeneity on the propagation of AE waves. Broadband, as well as frequency- and wave-mode selective sensors, need to be developed.

  17. The role of acoustic emission in the study of rock fracture

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lockner, D.

    1993-01-01

    The development of faults and shear fracture systems over a broad range of temperature and pressure and for a variety of rock types involves the growth and interaction of microcracks. Acoustic emission (AE), which is produced by rapid microcrack growth, is a ubiquitous phenomenon associated with brittle fracture and has provided a wealth of information regarding the failure process in rock. This paper reviews the successes and limitations of AE studies as applied to the fracture process in rock with emphasis on our ability to predict rock failure. Application of laboratory AE studies to larger scale problems related to the understanding of earthquake processes is also discussed. In this context, laboratory studies can be divided into the following categories. 1) Simple counting of the number of AE events prior to sample failure shows a correlation between AE rate and inelastic strain rate. Additional sorting of events by amplitude has shown that AE events obey the power law frequency-magnitude relation observed for earthquakes. These cumulative event count techniques are being used in conjunction with damage mechanics models to determine how damage accumulates during loading and to predict failure. 2) A second area of research involves the location of hypocenters of AE source events. This technique requires precise arrival time data of AE signals recorded over an array of sensors that are essentially a miniature seismic net. Analysis of the spatial and temporal variation of event hypocenters has improved our understanding of the progression of microcrack growth and clustering leading to rock failure. Recently, fracture nucleation and growth have been studied under conditions of quasi-static fault propagation by controlling stress to maintain constant AE rate. 3) A third area of study involves the analysis of full waveform data as recorded at receiver sites. One aspect of this research has been to determine fault plane solutions of AE source events from first motion

  18. An acoustic emission and acousto-ultrasonic analysis of impact damaged composite pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L. (Principal Investigator); Walker, James L.

    1996-01-01

    The use of acoustic emission to characterize impact damage in composite structures is being performed on composite bottles wrapped with graphite epoxy and kevlar bottles. Further development of the acoustic emission methodology will include neural net analysis and/or other multivariate techniques to enhance the capability of the technique to identify dominant failure mechanisms during fracture. The acousto-ultrasonics technique will also continue to be investigated to determine its ability to predict regions prone to failure prior to the burst tests. Characterization of the stress wave factor before, and after impact damage will be useful for inspection purposes in manufacturing processes. The combination of the two methods will also allow for simple nondestructive tests capable of predicting the performance of a composite structure prior to its being placed in service and during service.

  19. Evaluation of Fracture in Concrete with Recycled Aggregate by Acoustic Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishibata, Sayaka; Watanabe, Takeshi; Hashimoro, Chikanori; Kohno, Kiyoshi

    This research revealed fracture behavior of concrete in using recycled aggregates by Acoustic Emission as one of the Non-destructive Inspection. The phenomenon of acoustic emission (AE) is the propagation of elastic waves generated from a source, known as a micro-crack in an elastic material. There were taken to use low-treated recycled aggregate, crushed returned ready mixed concrete for aggregate and normal aggregate. Examination measured AE under the uniaxial compression test. The condition of load is repeated loading. As a result, fracture behavior due to low treated recycled aggregate was detected by AE. It is clarified that AE of concrete with low treated recycled aggregate appeared in low stress level. It has been understood that difference of aggregates becomes clear from Kaiser effect in repeated loading. In relation between RA value and average frequency, it has been understood the adhesion properties of the cement paste in recycled aggregate are appreciable.

  20. Evaluation of Acoustic Emission NDE of Kevlar Composite Over Wrapped Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horne, Michael R.; Madaras, Eric I.

    2008-01-01

    Pressurization and failure tests of small Kevlar/epoxy COPV bottles were conducted during 2006 and 2007 by Texas Research Institute Austin, Inc., at TRI facilities. This is a report of the analysis of the Acoustic Emission (AE) data collected during those tests. Results of some of the tests indicate a possibility that AE can be used to track the stress-rupture degradation of COPV vessels.

  1. Near- Source, Seismo-Acoustic Signals Accompanying a NASCAR Race at the Texas Motor Speedway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stump, B. W.; Hayward, C.; Underwood, R.; Howard, J. E.; MacPhail, M. D.; Golden, P.; Endress, A.

    2014-12-01

    Near-source, seismo-acoustic observations provide a unique opportunity to characterize urban sources, remotely sense human activities including vehicular traffic and monitor large engineering structures. Energy separately coupled into the solid earth and atmosphere provides constraints on not only the location of these sources but also the physics of the generating process. Conditions and distances at which these observations can be made are dependent upon not only local geological conditions but also atmospheric conditions at the time of the observations. In order to address this range of topics, an empirical, seismo-acoustic study was undertaken in and around the Texas Motor Speedway in the Dallas-Ft. Worth area during the first week of April 2014 at which time a range of activities associated with a series of NASCAR races occurred. Nine, seismic sensors were deployed around the 1.5-mile track for purposes of documenting the direct-coupled seismic energy from the passage of the cars and other vehicles on the track. Six infrasound sensors were deployed on a rooftop in a rectangular array configuration designed to provide high frequency beam forming for acoustic signals. Finally, a five-element infrasound array was deployed outside the track in order to characterize how the signals propagate away from the sources in the near-source region. Signals recovered from within the track were able to track and characterize the motion of a variety of vehicles during the race weekend including individual racecars. Seismic data sampled at 1000 sps documented strong Doppler effects as the cars approached and moved away from individual sensors. There were faint seismic signals that arrived at seismic velocity but local acoustic to seismic coupling as supported by the acoustic observations generated the majority of seismic signals. Actual seismic ground motions were small as demonstrated by the dominance of regional seismic signals from a magnitude 4.0 earthquake that arrived at

  2. Initial Evaluation of Acoustic Emission SHM of PRSEUS Multi-bay Box Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horne, Michael R.; Madaras, Eric I.

    2016-01-01

    A series of tests of the Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS) HWB Multi-Bay Test Article were conducted during the second quarter of 2015 at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) in the Combined Loads Test facility (COLTS). This report documents the Acoustic Emission (AE) data collected during those tests along with an initial analysis of the data. A more detailed analysis will be presented in future publications.

  3. Acoustic Emission Monitoring of the DC-XA Composite Liquid Hydrogen Tank During Structural Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkerson, C.

    1996-01-01

    The results of acoustic emission (AE) monitoring of the DC-XA composite liquid hydrogen tank are presented in this report. The tank was subjected to pressurization, tensile, and compressive loads at ambient temperatures and also while full of liquid nitrogen. The tank was also pressurized with liquid hydrogen. AE was used to monitor the tank for signs of structural defects developing during the test.

  4. Time delay and Doppler estimation for wideband acoustic signals in multipath environments.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xue; Zeng, Wen-Jun; Li, Xi-Lin

    2011-08-01

    Estimation of the parameters of a multipath underwater acoustic channel is of great interest for a variety of applications. This paper proposes a high-resolution method for jointly estimating the multipath time delays, Doppler scales, and attenuation amplitudes of a time-varying acoustical channel. The proposed method formulates the estimation of channel parameters into a sparse representation problem. With the [script-l](1)-norm as the measure of sparsity, the proposed method makes use of the basis pursuit (BP) criterion to find the sparse solution. The ill-conditioning can be effectively reduced by the [script-l](1)-norm regularization. Unlike many existing methods that are only applicable to narrowband signals, the proposed method can handle both narrowband and wideband signals. Simulation results are provided to verify the performance and effectiveness of the proposed algorithm, indicating that it has a super-resolution in both delay and Doppler domain, and it is robust to noise.

  5. Seismo-acoustic signals associated with degassing explosions recorded at Shishaldin Volcano, Alaska, 2003-2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Petersen, T.

    2007-01-01

    In summer 2003, a Chaparral Model 2 microphone was deployed at Shishaldin Volcano, Aleutian Islands, Alaska. The pressure sensor was co-located with a short-period seismometer on the volcano’s north flank at a distance of 6.62 km from the active summit vent. The seismo-acoustic data exhibit a correlation between impulsive acoustic signals (1–2 Pa) and long-period (LP, 1–2 Hz) earthquakes. Since it last erupted in 1999, Shishaldin has been characterized by sustained seismicity consisting of many hundreds to two thousand LP events per day. The activity is accompanied by up to ∼200 m high discrete gas puffs exiting the small summit vent, but no significant eruptive activity has been confirmed. The acoustic waveforms possess similarity throughout the data set (July 2003–November 2004) indicating a repetitive source mechanism. The simplicity of the acoustic waveforms, the impulsive onsets with relatively short (∼10–20 s) gradually decaying codas and the waveform similarities suggest that the acoustic pulses are generated at the fluid–air interface within an open-vent system. SO2 measurements have revealed a low SO2 flux, suggesting a hydrothermal system with magmatic gases leaking through. This hypothesis is supported by the steady-state nature of Shishaldin’s volcanic system since 1999. Time delays between the seismic LP and infrasound onsets were acquired from a representative day of seismo-acoustic data. A simple model was used to estimate source depths. The short seismo-acoustic delay times have revealed that the seismic and acoustic sources are co-located at a depth of 240±200 m below the crater rim. This shallow depth is confirmed by resonance of the upper portion of the open conduit, which produces standing waves with f=0.3 Hz in the acoustic waveform codas. The infrasound data has allowed us to relate Shishaldin’s LP earthquakes to degassing explosions, created by gas volume ruptures from a fluid–air interface.

  6. Lateralization of acoustic signals by dichotically listening budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus).

    PubMed

    Welch, Thomas E; Dent, Micheal L

    2011-10-01

    Sound localization allows humans and animals to determine the direction of objects to seek or avoid and indicates the appropriate position to direct visual attention. Interaural time differences (ITDs) and interaural level differences (ILDs) are two primary cues that humans use to localize or lateralize sound sources. There is limited information about behavioral cue sensitivity in animals, especially animals with poor sound localization acuity and small heads, like budgerigars. ITD and ILD thresholds were measured behaviorally in dichotically listening budgerigars equipped with headphones in an identification task. Budgerigars were less sensitive than humans and cats, and more similar to rabbits, barn owls, and monkeys, in their abilities to lateralize dichotic signals. Threshold ITDs were relatively constant for pure tones below 4 kHz, and were immeasurable at higher frequencies. Threshold ILDs were relatively constant over a wide range of frequencies, similar to humans. Thresholds in both experiments were best for broadband noise stimuli. These lateralization results are generally consistent with the free field localization abilities of these birds, and add support to the idea that budgerigars may be able to enhance their cues to directional hearing (e.g., via connected interaural pathways) beyond what would be expected based on head size. PMID:21973385

  7. New approaches for automatic threedimensional source localization of acoustic emissions--Applications to concrete specimens.

    PubMed

    Kurz, Jochen H

    2015-12-01

    The task of locating a source in space by measuring travel time differences of elastic or electromagnetic waves from the source to several sensors is evident in varying fields. The new concepts of automatic acoustic emission localization presented in this article are based on developments from geodesy and seismology. A detailed description of source location determination in space is given with the focus on acoustic emission data from concrete specimens. Direct and iterative solvers are compared. A concept based on direct solvers from geodesy extended by a statistical approach is described which allows a stable source location determination even for partly erroneous onset times. The developed approach is validated with acoustic emission data from a large specimen leading to travel paths up to 1m and therefore to noisy data with errors in the determined onsets. The adaption of the algorithms from geodesy to the localization procedure of sources of elastic waves offers new possibilities concerning stability, automation and performance of localization results. Fracture processes can be assessed more accurately.

  8. New approaches for automatic threedimensional source localization of acoustic emissions--Applications to concrete specimens.

    PubMed

    Kurz, Jochen H

    2015-12-01

    The task of locating a source in space by measuring travel time differences of elastic or electromagnetic waves from the source to several sensors is evident in varying fields. The new concepts of automatic acoustic emission localization presented in this article are based on developments from geodesy and seismology. A detailed description of source location determination in space is given with the focus on acoustic emission data from concrete specimens. Direct and iterative solvers are compared. A concept based on direct solvers from geodesy extended by a statistical approach is described which allows a stable source location determination even for partly erroneous onset times. The developed approach is validated with acoustic emission data from a large specimen leading to travel paths up to 1m and therefore to noisy data with errors in the determined onsets. The adaption of the algorithms from geodesy to the localization procedure of sources of elastic waves offers new possibilities concerning stability, automation and performance of localization results. Fracture processes can be assessed more accurately. PMID:26233938

  9. Delayed Alumina Scale Spallation on Rene'n5+y: Moisture Effects and Acoustic Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.; Morscher, Gregory N.

    2001-01-01

    The single crystal superalloy Rene'N5 (with or without Y-doping and hydrogen annealing) was cyclically oxidized at 1150 C for 1000 hours. After considerable scale growth (>= 500 hours), even the adherent alumina scales formed on Y-doped samples exhibited delayed interfacial spallation during subsequent water immersion tests, performed up to one year after oxidation. Spallation was characterized by weight loss, the amount of spalled area, and acoustic emission response. Hydrogen annealing (prior to oxidation) reduced spallation both before and after immersion, but without measurably reducing the bulk sulfur content of the Y-doped alloys. The duration and frequency of sequential, co-located acoustic emission events implied an interfacial crack growth rate at least 10(exp -3) m/s, but possibly higher than 10(exp 2) m/s. This is much greater than classic moisture-assisted slow crack growth rates in bulk alumina (10(exp -6) to 10(exp -3) m/s), which may still have occurred undetected by acoustic emission. An alternative failure sequence is proposed: an incubation process for preferential moisture ingress leads to a local decrease in interfacial toughness, thus allowing fast fracture driven by stored strain energy.

  10. Circuit for echo and noise suppression of acoustic signals transmitted through a drill string

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, D.S.; Scott, D.D.

    1993-12-28

    An electronic circuit for digitally processing analog electrical signals produced by at least one acoustic transducer is presented. In a preferred embodiment of the present invention, a novel digital time delay circuit is utilized which employs an array of First-in-First-out (FiFo) microchips. Also, a bandpass filter is used at the input to this circuit for isolating drill string noise and eliminating high frequency output. 20 figures.

  11. [study of acoustic trauma in hunters using otoacoustic emission recording].

    PubMed

    Santaolalla Montoya, F; Martínez Ibargüen, A; Sánchez del Rey, A

    1998-03-01

    Transitory otoacoustic emissions (TOAE) were analyzed in 48 ears of male hunters (age range: 30-45 years: mean age: 37 years) and in a population with normal hearing. All the ears had TOAE. The incidence of TOAE for the 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 KHz frequential bands was significantly lower in hunters than in the normal subjects (p < 0.001). The mean amplitude of TOAE was significantly lower in hunters (9.2 dB SPL) than in the control group (16 dB SPL; p < 0.001). The amplitude of the TOAE for the frequencies 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 KHz was significantly lower in hunters than in controls (p < 0.001). PMID:9650309

  12. Non-invasive estimation of static and pulsatile intracranial pressure from transcranial acoustic signals.

    PubMed

    Levinsky, Alexandra; Papyan, Surik; Weinberg, Guy; Stadheim, Trond; Eide, Per Kristian

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine whether a method for estimation of non-invasive ICP (nICP) from transcranial acoustic (TCA) signals mixed with head-generated sounds estimate the static and pulsatile invasive ICP (iICP). For that purpose, simultaneous iICP and mixed TCA signals were obtained from patients undergoing continuous iICP monitoring as part of clinical management. The ear probe placed in the right outer ear channel sent a TCA signal with fixed frequency (621 Hz) that was picked up by the left ear probe along with acoustic signals generated by the intracranial compartment. Based on a mathematical model of the association between mixed TCA and iICP, the static and pulsatile nICP values were determined. Total 39 patients were included in the study; the total number of observations for prediction of static and pulsatile iICP were 5789 and 6791, respectively. The results demonstrated a good agreement between iICP/nICP observations, with mean difference of 0.39 mmHg and 0.53 mmHg for static and pulsatile ICP, respectively. In summary, in this cohort of patients, mixed TCA signals estimated the static and pulsatile iICP with rather good accuracy. Further studies are required to validate whether mixed TCA signals may become useful for measurement of nICP. PMID:26997563

  13. Acoustic effects of the ATOC signal (75 Hz, 195 dB) on dolphins and whales.

    PubMed

    Au, W W; Nachtigall, P E; Pawloski, J L

    1997-05-01

    The Acoustic Thermometry of Ocean Climate (ATOC) program of Scripps Institution of Oceanography and the Applied Physics Laboratory, University of Washington, will broadcast a low-frequency 75-Hz phase modulated acoustic signal over ocean basins in order to study ocean temperatures on a global scale and examine the effects of global warming. One of the major concerns is the possible effect of the ATOC signal on marine life, especially on dolphins and whales. In order to address this issue, the hearing sensitivity of a false killer whale (Pseudorca crassidens) and a Risso's dolphin (Grampus griseus) to the ATOC sound was measured behaviorally. A staircase procedure with the signal levels being changed in 1-dB steps was used to measure the animals' threshold to the actual ATOC coded signal. The results indicate that small odontocetes such as the Pseudorca and Grampus swimming directly above the ATOC source will not hear the signal unless they dive to a depth of approximately 400 m. A sound propagation analysis suggests that the sound-pressure level at ranges greater than 0.5 km will be less than 130 dB for depths down to about 500 m. Several species of baleen whales produce sounds much greater than 170-180 dB. With the ATOC source on the axis of the deep sound channel (greater than 800 m), the ATOC signal will probably have minimal physical and physiological effects on cetaceans.

  14. Stress Corrosion Cracking—Crevice Interaction in Austenitic Stainless Steels Characterized By Acoustic Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leinonen, H.; Schildt, T.; Hänninen, H.

    2011-02-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) susceptibility of austenitic EN1.4301 (AISI 304) and EN1.4404 (AISI 316L) stainless steels was studied using the constant load method and polymer (PTFE) crevice former in order to study the effects of crevice on SCC susceptibility. The uniaxial active loading tests were performed in 50 pct CaCl2 at 373 K (100 °C) and in 0.1 M NaCl at 353 K (80 °C) under open-circuit corrosion potential (OCP) and electrochemical polarization. Pitting, crevice, and SCC corrosion were characterized and identified by acoustic emission (AE) analysis using ∆ t filtering and the linear locationing technique. The correlation of AE parameters including amplitude, duration, rise time, counts, and energy were used to identify the different types of corrosion. The stages of crevice corrosion and SCC induced by constant active load/crevice former were monitored by AE. In the early phase of the tests, some low amplitude AE activity was detected. In the steady-state phase, the AE activity was low, and toward the end of the test, it increased with the increasing amplitude of the impulses. AE allowed a good correlation between AE signals and corrosion damage. Although crevice corrosion and SCC induced AE signals overlapped slightly, a good correlation between them and microscopical characterization and stress-strain data was found. Especially, the activity of AE signals increased in the early and final stages of the SCC experiment under constant active load conditions corresponding to the changes in the measured steady-state creep strain rate of the specimen. The results of the constant active load/crevice former test indicate that a crevice can initiate SCC even in the mild chloride solution at low temperatures. Based on the mechanistic model of SCC, the rate determining step in SCC is thought to be the generation of vacancies by selective dissolution, which is supported by the low activity phase of AE during the steady-state creep strain rate region.

  15. Detection of transverse cracking in a hybrid composite laminate using acoustic emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jong, Hwai-Jiang

    Transverse cracking detection in a uniaxially-loaded symmetric cross-ply hybrid laminate containing 0° IM7/8552 carbon/epoxy and a very thin 90° 52/8552 glass/epoxy layer is studied using the acoustic emission (AE) technique. By conducting modal-based AE experiments and analysis, we investigate some parameters that can be used as the waveform signatures to identify transverse crack growth in the hybrid laminate. Wave dispersion relations of the hybrid laminate are established, and a comparison with those from a material homogenization model based on the equivalent stiffness is made. It is found that material homogenization is not accurate for predicting wave dispersion in the hybrid laminate. Wave dispersion for a homogeneous IM7/8552 unidirectional plate is also constructed. Cut-off frequencies belonging to various wave modes are discussed concerning their significance in interpreting AE signals. The wave attenuation behaviors that exist in the hybrid laminate and in the homogeneous IM7/8552 plate are compared and discussed using the finite element method (FEM). The use of singular elements dealing with the high strain gradient near the crack tip is addressed for convergence purposes. It is shown by the FEM results and demonstrated in the AE experiments that wave attenuation in the cross-ply hybrid laminate is much stronger than in the plain IM7/8552 plate. A simple calibration method for the AE sensors is discussed. Some important aspects in conducting an AE experiment, such as the sensor averaging effect and sensor frequency response range, are addressed. A new source location method based on the waveform's first peak search and the associated primary frequency content is proposed. The accuracy of the source location method is verified by pencil-lead break experiments. The so-called symmetric energy fraction (SEF) of the AE signals in conjunction with the finite element analysis result in identification of the transverse cracking event. Lastly, a material

  16. Damage characterization on human femur bone by means of ultrasonics and acoustic emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strantza, M.; Polyzos, D.; Louis, O.; Boulpaep, F.; Van Hemelrijck, D.; Aggelis, D. G.

    2015-07-01

    Human bone tissue is characterized as a material with high brittleness. Due to this nature, visible signs of cracking are not easy to be detected before final failure. The main objective of this work is to investigate if the acoustic emission (AE) technique can offer valuable insight to the fracture process of human femur specimens as in other engineering materials characterization. This study describes the AE activity during fracture of whole femur bones under flexural load. Before fracture, broadband AE sensors were used in order to measure parameters like wave velocity dispersion and attenuation. Waveform parameters like the duration, rise time and average frequency, were also examined relatively to the propagation distance as a preparation for the AE monitoring during fracture. After the ultrasonic study, the samples were partly cast in concrete and fixed as cantilevers. A point load was applied on the femur head, which due to the test geometry resulted in a combination of two different patterns of fracture, bending and torsion. Two AE broadband sensors were placed in different points of the sample, one near the fixing end and the other near the femur head. Preliminary analysis shows that parameters like the number of acquired AE signals and their amplitude are well correlated with the load history. Furthermore, the parameters of rise time and frequency can differentiate the two fracture patterns. Additionally, AE allows the detection of the load at the onset of fracture from the micro-cracking events that occur at the early loading stages, allowing monitoring of the whole fracture process. Parameters that have been used extensively for monitoring and characterization of fracture modes of engineering materials seem to poses characterization power in the case of bone tissue monitoring as well.

  17. Ultrasonic Acoustic Emissions from the Sapwood of Cedar and Hemlock 1

    PubMed Central

    Tyree, Melvin T.; Dixon, Michael A.; Tyree, E. Loeta; Johnson, Robert

    1984-01-01

    Measurements are reported of ultrasonic acoustic emissions (AEs) measured from sapwood samples of Thuja occidentalis L. and Tsuga canadensis (L.) Carr. during air dehydration. The measurements were undertaken to test the following three hypotheses: (a) Each cavitation event produces one ultrasonic AE. (b) Large tracheids are more likely to cavitate than small tracheids. (c) When stem water potentials are >−0.4 MPa, a significant fraction of the water content of sapwood is held by `capillary forces.' The last two hypotheses were recently discussed at length by M. H. Zimmermann. Experimental evidence consistent with all three hypotheses was obtained. The evidence for each hypothesis respectively is: (a) the cumulative number of AEs nearly equals the number of tracheids in small samples; (b) more water is lost per AE event at the beginning of the dehydration process than at the end, and (c) sapwood samples dehydrated from an initial water potential of 0 MPa lost significantly more water before AEs started than lost by samples dehydrated from an initial water potential of about −0.4 MPa. The extra water held by fully hydrated sapwood samples may have been capillary water as defined by Zimmerman. We also report an improved method for the measurement of the `intensity' of ultrasonic AEs. Intensity is defined here as the area under the positive spikes of the AE signal (plotted as voltage versus time). This method was applied to produce a frequency histogram of the number of AEs versus intensity. A large fraction of the total number of AEs were of low intensity even in small samples (4 mm diameter by 10 mm length). This suggests that the effective `listening distance' for most AEs was less than 5 to 10 mm. PMID:16663774

  18. Characteristics of ultrasonic acoustic emissions from walnut branches during freeze-thaw-induced embolism formation.

    PubMed

    Kasuga, Jun; Charrier, Guillaume; Uemura, Matsuo; Améglio, Thierry

    2015-04-01

    Ultrasonic acoustic emission (UAE) methods have been applied for the detection of freeze-thaw-induced embolism formation in water conduits of tree species. Until now, however, the exact source(s) of UAE has not been identified especially in angiosperm species, in which xylem tissues are composed of diverse types of cells. In this study, UAE was recorded from excised branches of walnut (Juglans regia cv. Franquette) during freeze-thaw cycles, and attempts were made to characterize UAEs generated by cavitation events leading to embolism formation according to their properties. During freeze-thaw cycles, a large number of UAEs were generated from the sample segments. However, the cumulative numbers of total UAE during freeze-thawing were not correlated with the percentage loss of hydraulic conductivity after thawing, suggesting that the sources of UAE were not only cavitation leading to embolism formation in vessels. Among the UAEs, cumulative numbers of UAEs with absolute energy >10.0 fJ strongly correlated with the increase in percentage loss of hydraulic conductivity. The high absolute energy of the UAEs might reflect the formation of large bubbles in the large lumen of vessels. Therefore, UAEs generated by cavitation events in vessels during freeze-thawing might be distinguished from other signals according to their magnitudes of absolute energy. On the other hand, the freezing of xylem parenchyma cells was followed by a certain number of UAEs. These results indicate the possibility that UAE methods can be applied to the detection of both freeze-thaw-induced embolism and supercooling breakdown in parenchyma cells in xylem.

  19. Characteristics of ultrasonic acoustic emissions from walnut branches during freeze–thaw-induced embolism formation

    PubMed Central

    Kasuga, Jun; Charrier, Guillaume; Uemura, Matsuo; Améglio, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasonic acoustic emission (UAE) methods have been applied for the detection of freeze–thaw-induced embolism formation in water conduits of tree species. Until now, however, the exact source(s) of UAE has not been identified especially in angiosperm species, in which xylem tissues are composed of diverse types of cells. In this study, UAE was recorded from excised branches of walnut (Juglans regia cv. Franquette) during freeze–thaw cycles, and attempts were made to characterize UAEs generated by cavitation events leading to embolism formation according to their properties. During freeze–thaw cycles, a large number of UAEs were generated from the sample segments. However, the cumulative numbers of total UAE during freeze–thawing were not correlated with the percentage loss of hydraulic conductivity after thawing, suggesting that the sources of UAE were not only cavitation leading to embolism formation in vessels. Among the UAEs, cumulative numbers of UAEs with absolute energy >10.0 fJ strongly correlated with the increase in percentage loss of hydraulic conductivity. The high absolute energy of the UAEs might reflect the formation of large bubbles in the large lumen of vessels. Therefore, UAEs generated by cavitation events in vessels during freeze–thawing might be distinguished from other signals according to their magnitudes of absolute energy. On the other hand, the freezing of xylem parenchyma cells was followed by a certain number of UAEs. These results indicate the possibility that UAE methods can be applied to the detection of both freeze–thaw-induced embolism and supercooling breakdown in parenchyma cells in xylem. PMID:25662846

  20. Acoustic emission and fatigue damage induced in plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite coating layers.

    PubMed

    Laonapakul, Teerawat; Otsuka, Yuichi; Nimkerdphol, Achariya Rakngarm; Mutoh, Yoshiharu

    2012-04-01

    In order to improve the adhesive strength of hydroxyapatite (HAp) coatings, grit blasting with Al(2)O(3) powder and then wet blasting with HAp/Ti mixed powders was carried out on a commercially pure Ti (cp-Ti) substrate. Subsequently, an HAp/Ti bond coat layer and HAp top coat layer were deposited by plasma spraying. Fatigue tests of the HAp-coated specimens were carried out under four-point bending. Acoustic emission (AE) signals during the entire fatigue test were monitored to investigate the fatigue cracking behavior of the HAp-coated specimens. The HAp-coated specimens could survive up to 10(7) cycles without spallation of the HAp coating layers at the stress amplitude of 120 MPa. The HAp-coated specimens without HAp/Ti bond coat layer showed shorter fatigue life and easy crack nucleation compared to the HAp-coated specimens with HAp/Ti bond coat layer. The delamination and spallation of the HAp top coat with HAp/Ti bond coat on cp-Ti was not observed until the crack propagated into the cp-Ti during the final fracture stage of the fatigue cycle. Therefore, the HAp/Ti bond coat layer was found to greatly improve the fatigue damage resistance of the HAp coating layer. Three stages of the fatigue failure behavior of the HAp top coat with HAp/Ti bond coat on a cp-Ti substrate can be clearly estimated by the AE monitoring technique. These stages are cracks nucleating and propagating in the coating layer, cracks propagating in the substrate, and cracks propagating unstably to final fracture.

  1. The Acoustic Structure and Information Content of Female Koala Vocal Signals

    PubMed Central

    Charlton, Benjamin D.

    2015-01-01

    Determining the information content of animal vocalisations can give valuable insights into the potential functions of vocal signals. The source-filter theory of vocal production allows researchers to examine the information content of mammal vocalisations by linking variation in acoustic features with variation in relevant physical characteristics of the caller. Here I used a source-filter theory approach to classify female koala vocalisations into different call-types, and determine which acoustic features have the potential to convey important information about the caller to other conspecifics. A two-step cluster analysis classified female calls into bellows, snarls and tonal rejection calls. Additional results revealed that female koala vocalisations differed in their potential to provide information about a given caller’s phenotype that may be of importance to receivers. Female snarls did not contain reliable acoustic cues to the caller’s identity and age. In contrast, female bellows and tonal rejection calls were individually distinctive, and the tonal rejection calls of older female koalas had consistently lower mean, minimum and maximum fundamental frequency. In addition, female bellows were significantly shorter in duration and had higher fundamental frequency, formant frequencies, and formant frequency spacing than male bellows. These results indicate that female koala vocalisations have the potential to signal the caller’s identity, age and sex. I go on to discuss the anatomical basis for these findings, and consider the possible functional relevance of signalling this type of information in the koala’s natural habitat. PMID:26465340

  2. The Acoustic Structure and Information Content of Female Koala Vocal Signals.

    PubMed

    Charlton, Benjamin D

    2015-01-01

    Determining the information content of animal vocalisations can give valuable insights into the potential functions of vocal signals. The source-filter theory of vocal production allows researchers to examine the information content of mammal vocalisations by linking variation in acoustic features with variation in relevant physical characteristics of the caller. Here I used a source-filter theory approach to classify female koala vocalisations into different call-types, and determine which acoustic features have the potential to convey important information about the caller to other conspecifics. A two-step cluster analysis classified female calls into bellows, snarls and tonal rejection calls. Additional results revealed that female koala vocalisations differed in their potential to provide information about a given caller's phenotype that may be of importance to receivers. Female snarls did not contain reliable acoustic cues to the caller's identity and age. In contrast, female bellows and tonal rejection calls were individually distinctive, and the tonal rejection calls of older female koalas had consistently lower mean, minimum and maximum fundamental frequency. In addition, female bellows were significantly shorter in duration and had higher fundamental frequency, formant frequencies, and formant frequency spacing than male bellows. These results indicate that female koala vocalisations have the potential to signal the caller's identity, age and sex. I go on to discuss the anatomical basis for these findings, and consider the possible functional relevance of signalling this type of information in the koala's natural habitat.

  3. Moisture estimation in power transformer oil using acoustic signals and spectral kurtosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leite, Valéria C. M. N.; Veloso, Giscard F. C.; Borges da Silva, Luiz Eduardo; Lambert-Torres, Germano; Borges da Silva, Jonas G.; Onofre Pereira Pinto, João

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this paper is to present a new technique for estimating the contamination by moisture in power transformer insulating oil based on the spectral kurtosis analysis of the acoustic signals of partial discharges (PDs). Basically, in this approach, the spectral kurtosis of the PD acoustic signal is calculated and the correlation between its maximum value and the moisture percentage is explored to find a function that calculates the moisture percentage. The function can be easily implemented in DSP, FPGA, or any other type of embedded system for online moisture monitoring. To evaluate the proposed approach, an experiment is assembled with a piezoelectric sensor attached to a tank, which is filled with insulating oil samples contaminated by different levels of moisture. A device generating electrical discharges is submerged into the oil to simulate the occurrence of PDs. Detected acoustic signals are processed using fast kurtogram algorithm to extract spectral kurtosis values. The obtained data are used to find the fitting function that relates the water contamination to the maximum value of the spectral kurtosis. Experimental results show that the proposed method is suitable for online monitoring system of power transformers.

  4. The Acoustic Structure and Information Content of Female Koala Vocal Signals.

    PubMed

    Charlton, Benjamin D

    2015-01-01

    Determining the information content of animal vocalisations can give valuable insights into the potential functions of vocal signals. The source-filter theory of vocal production allows researchers to examine the information content of mammal vocalisations by linking variation in acoustic features with variation in relevant physical characteristics of the caller. Here I used a source-filter theory approach to classify female koala vocalisations into different call-types, and determine which acoustic features have the potential to convey important information about the caller to other conspecifics. A two-step cluster analysis classified female calls into bellows, snarls and tonal rejection calls. Additional results revealed that female koala vocalisations differed in their potential to provide information about a given caller's phenotype that may be of importance to receivers. Female snarls did not contain reliable acoustic cues to the caller's identity and age. In contrast, female bellows and tonal rejection calls were individually distinctive, and the tonal rejection calls of older female koalas had consistently lower mean, minimum and maximum fundamental frequency. In addition, female bellows were significantly shorter in duration and had higher fundamental frequency, formant frequencies, and formant frequency spacing than male bellows. These results indicate that female koala vocalisations have the potential to signal the caller's identity, age and sex. I go on to discuss the anatomical basis for these findings, and consider the possible functional relevance of signalling this type of information in the koala's natural habitat. PMID:26465340

  5. Observations of premonitory acoustic emission and slip nucleation during a stick slip experiment in smooth faulted Westerly granite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thompson, B.D.; Young, R.P.; Lockner, D.A.

    2005-01-01

    To investigate laboratory earthquakes, stick-slip events were induced on a saw-cut Westerly granite sample by triaxial loading at 150 MPa confining pressure. Acoustic emissions (AE) were monitored using an innovative continuous waveform recorder. The first motion of each stick slip was recorded as a large-amplitude AE signal. These events source locate onto the saw-cut fault plane, implying that they represent the nucleation sites of the dynamic failure stick-slip events. The precise location of nucleation varied between events and was probably controlled by heterogeneity of stress or surface conditions on the fault. The initial nucleation diameter of each dynamic instability was inferred to be less than 3 mm. A small number of AE were recorded prior to each macro slip event. For the second and third slip events, premonitory AE source mechanisms mimic the large scale fault plane geometry. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  6. Acoustic effects of the ATOC signal (75 Hz, 195 dB) on dolphins and whales

    SciTech Connect

    Au, W.W.; Nachtigall, P.E.; Pawloski, J.L.

    1997-05-01

    The Acoustic Thermometry of Ocean Climate (ATOC) program of Scripps Institution of Oceanography and the Applied Physics Laboratory, University of Washington, will broadcast a low-frequency 75-Hz phase modulated acoustic signal over ocean basins in order to study ocean temperatures on a global scale and examine the effects of global warming. One of the major concerns is the possible effect of the ATOC signal on marine life, especially on dolphins and whales. In order to address this issue, the hearing sensitivity of a false killer whale ({ital Pseudorca crassidens}) and a Risso{close_quote}s dolphin ({ital Grampus griseus}) to the ATOC sound was measured behaviorally. A staircase procedure with the signal levels being changed in 1-dB steps was used to measure the animals{close_quote} threshold to the actual ATOC coded signal. The results indicate that small odontocetes such as the {ital Pseudorca} and {ital Grampus} swimming directly above the ATOC source will not hear the signal unless they dive to a depth of approximately 400 m. A sound propagation analysis suggests that the sound-pressure level at ranges greater than 0.5 km will be less than 130 dB for depths down to about 500 m. Several species of baleen whales produce sounds much greater than 170{endash}180 dB. With the ATOC source on the axis of the deep sound channel (greater than 800 m), the ATOC signal will probably have minimal physical and physiological effects on cetaceans. {copyright} {ital 1997 Acoustical Society of America.}

  7. Simultaneous investigation of thermal, acoustic, and magnetic emission during martensitic transformation in single-crystalline Ni2MnGa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tóth, László Z.; Daróczi, Lajos; Szabó, Sándor; Beke, Dezső L.

    2016-04-01

    Simultaneous thermal, acoustic, and magnetic emission (AE and ME) measurements during thermally induced martensitic transformation in Ni2MnGa single crystals demonstrate that all three types of the above noises display many coincident peaks and the same start and finish temperatures. The amplitude and energy distribution functions for AE and ME avalanches satisfy power-law behavior, corresponding to the symmetry of the martensite. At zero external magnetic field asymmetry in the exponents was obtained: their value was larger for heating than for cooling. Application of constant, external magnetic fields (up to B =722 mT) leads to the disappearance of the above asymmetry, due to the decrease of the multiplicity of the martensite variants. Time correlations (i.e., the existence of nonhomogeneous temporal processes) within AE as well as ME emission events are demonstrated by deviations from the uncorrelated behavior on probability distributions of waiting times as well as of a sequence of number of events. It is shown that the above functions collapse on universal master curves for cooling and heating as well as for AE and ME noises. The analysis of the existence of temporal correlations between AE and ME events revealed that at short times the acoustic signals show a time delay relative to the magnetic one, due to the time necessary for the propagation of the ultrasound. At intermediate times, as expected, the magnetic signal is delayed, i.e., the magnetic domain rearrangement followed the steps of structural transformation. At much longer times the deviation from an uncorrelated (Poisson-type) behavior is attributed to the nonhomogeneity of the avalanche statistics.

  8. Acoustic emission and magnification of atomic lines resolution for laser breakdown of salt water in ultrasound field

    SciTech Connect

    Bulanov, Alexey V.; Nagorny, Ivan G.

    2015-10-28

    Researches of the acoustic effects accompanying optical breakdown in a water, generated by the focused laser radiation with power ultrasound have been carried out. Experiments were performed by using 532 nm pulses from Brilliant B Nd:YAG laser. Acoustic radiation was produced by acoustic focusing systems in the form hemisphere and ring by various resonance frequencies of 10.7 kHz and 60 kHz. The experimental results are obtained, that show the sharply strengthens effects of acoustic emission from a breakdown zone by the joint influence of a laser and ultrasonic irradiation. Essentially various thresholds of breakdown and character of acoustic emission in fresh and sea water are found out. The experimental result is established, testifying that acoustic emission of optical breakdown of sea water at presence and at absence of ultrasound essentially exceeds acoustic emission in fresh water. Atomic lines of some chemical elements like a Sodium, Magnesium and so on were investigated for laser breakdown of water with ultrasound field. The effect of magnification of this lines resolution for salt water in ultrasound field was obtained.

  9. Are mussels able to distinguish underwater sounds? Assessment of the reactions of Mytilus galloprovincialis after exposure to lab-generated acoustic signals.

    PubMed

    Vazzana, Mirella; Celi, Monica; Maricchiolo, Giulia; Genovese, Lucrezia; Corrias, Valentina; Quinci, Enza Maria; de Vincenzi, Giovanni; Maccarrone, Vincenzo; Cammilleri, Gaetano; Mazzola, Salvatore; Buscaino, Giuseppa; Filiciotto, Francesco

    2016-11-01

    This study examined the effects of lab-generated acoustic signals on the behaviour and biochemistry of Mediterranean mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis). The experiment was carried out in a tank equipped with a video-recording system using six groups of five mussels exposed to five acoustic treatments (each treatment was replicated three times) for 30min. The acoustic signals, with a maximum sound pressure level of 150dB rms re 1μPa, differed in frequency range as follows: low (0.1-5kHz), mid-low (5-10kHz), mid (10-20kHz), mid-high (20-40kHz) and high (40-60kHz). The exposure to sweeps did not produce any significant changes in the mussels' behaviour. Conversely, the specimens exposed to the low frequency band treatment showed significantly higher values of the following biochemical stress parameters measured in their plasma and tissues: glucose, total proteins, total haemocyte number (THC), heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) expression, and Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity. The responses observed in the mussels exposed to low frequency sweeps enable us to suppose a biological and ecological role for this sound, which contains the main frequencies produced by both shipping traffic and the acoustic emissions of fish. PMID:27371112

  10. Are mussels able to distinguish underwater sounds? Assessment of the reactions of Mytilus galloprovincialis after exposure to lab-generated acoustic signals.

    PubMed

    Vazzana, Mirella; Celi, Monica; Maricchiolo, Giulia; Genovese, Lucrezia; Corrias, Valentina; Quinci, Enza Maria; de Vincenzi, Giovanni; Maccarrone, Vincenzo; Cammilleri, Gaetano; Mazzola, Salvatore; Buscaino, Giuseppa; Filiciotto, Francesco

    2016-11-01

    This study examined the effects of lab-generated acoustic signals on the behaviour and biochemistry of Mediterranean mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis). The experiment was carried out in a tank equipped with a video-recording system using six groups of five mussels exposed to five acoustic treatments (each treatment was replicated three times) for 30min. The acoustic signals, with a maximum sound pressure level of 150dB rms re 1μPa, differed in frequency range as follows: low (0.1-5kHz), mid-low (5-10kHz), mid (10-20kHz), mid-high (20-40kHz) and high (40-60kHz). The exposure to sweeps did not produce any significant changes in the mussels' behaviour. Conversely, the specimens exposed to the low frequency band treatment showed significantly higher values of the following biochemical stress parameters measured in their plasma and tissues: glucose, total proteins, total haemocyte number (THC), heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) expression, and Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity. The responses observed in the mussels exposed to low frequency sweeps enable us to suppose a biological and ecological role for this sound, which contains the main frequencies produced by both shipping traffic and the acoustic emissions of fish.

  11. Behavioral assessment of acoustic parameters relevant to signal recognition and preference in a vocal fish.

    PubMed

    McKibben, J R; Bass, A H

    1998-12-01

    Acoustic signal recognition depends on the receiver's processing of the physical attributes of a sound. This study takes advantage of the simple communication sounds produced by plainfin midshipman fish to examine effects of signal variation on call recognition and preference. Nesting male midshipman generate both long duration (> 1 min) sinusoidal-like "hums" and short duration "grunts." The hums of neighboring males often overlap, creating beat waveforms. Presentation of humlike, single tone stimuli, but not grunts or noise, elicited robust attraction (phonotaxis) by gravid females. In two-choice tests, females differentiated and chose between acoustic signals that differed in duration, frequency, amplitude, and fine temporal content. Frequency preferences were temperature dependent, in accord with the known temperature dependence of hum fundamental frequency. Concurrent hums were simulated with two-tone beat stimuli, either presented from a single speaker or produced more naturally by interference between adjacent sources. Whereas certain single-source beats reduced stimulus attractiveness, beats which resolved into unmodulated tones at their sources did not affect preference. These results demonstrate that phonotactic assessment of stimulus relevance can be applied in a teleost fish, and that multiple signal parameters can affect receiver response in a vertebrate with relatively simple communication signals. PMID:9857511

  12. Seismo-acoustic Signals Recorded at KSIAR, the Infrasound Array Installed at PS31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, T. S.; Che, I. Y.; Jeon, J. S.; Chi, H. C.; Kang, I. B.

    2014-12-01

    One of International Monitoring System (IMS)'s primary seismic stations, PS31, called Korea Seismic Research Station (KSRS), was installed around Wonju, Korea in 1970s. It has been operated by US Air Force Technical Applications Center (AFTAC) for more than 40 years. KSRS is composed of 26 seismic sensors including 19 short period, 6 long period and 1 broad band seismometers. The 19 short period sensors were used to build an array with a 10-km aperture while the 6 long period sensors were used for a relatively long period array with a 40-km aperture. After KSRS was certified as an IMS station in 2006 by Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO), Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (KIGAM) which is the Korea National Data Center started to take over responsibilities on the operation and maintenance of KSRS from AFTAC. In April of 2014, KIGAM installed an infrasound array, KSIAR, on the existing four short period seismic stations of KSRS, the sites KS05, KS06, KS07 and KS16. The collocated KSIAR changed KSRS from a seismic array into a seismo-acoustic array. The aperture of KSIAR is 3.3 km. KSIAR also has a 100-m small aperture infrasound array at KS07. The infrasound data from KSIAR except that from the site KS06 is being transmitted in real time to KIGAM with VPN and internet line. An initial analysis on seismo-acoustic signals originated from local and regional distance ranges has been performed since May 2014. The analysis with the utilization of an array process called Progressive Multi-Channel Correlation (PMCC) detected seismo-acoustic signals caused by various sources including small explosions in relation to constructing local tunnels and roads. Some of them were not found in the list of automatic bulletin of KIGAM. The seismo-acoustic signals recorded by KSIAR are supplying a useful information for discriminating local and regional man-made events from natural events.

  13. Studies of horizontal refraction and scattering of low-frequency acoustic signals using a modal approach in signal processing of NPAL data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voronovich, Alexander G.; Ostashev, Vladimir E.

    2003-04-01

    In our previous paper [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 112, 2232], we obtained a time dependence of the horizontal refraction angle (HRA) of acoustic signals propagating over a range of about 4000 km in the ocean. This dependence was computed by processing of acoustic signals recorded during the North Pacific Acoustic Laboratory (NPAL) experiment using a ray-type approach. In the present paper, we consider the results obtained in signal processing of the same data using a modal approach. In this approach, the acoustic field is represented as a sum of local acoustic modes with amplitudes depending on a frequency and arrival angle. We obtained a time dependence of HRA for a time interval of about a year. Time evolution of HRA exhibits long-period variations which could be associated with seasonal trends in the sound speed profiles. The results are consistent with those obtained by the ray approach. Different horizontal angles within arrivals were impossible to resolve due to sound scattering by internal waves. A theoretical estimate of the angular width of the acoustic signals in a horizontal plane was obtained. It appears to be consistent with the observed variance of HRA data. [Work supported by ONR.] a)J. A. Colosi, B. D. Cornuelle, B. D. Dushaw, M. A. Dzieciuch, B. M. Howe, J. A. Mercer, R. C. Spindel, and P. F. Worcester.

  14. Secondary emission and acoustic-phonon scattering induced by strong magnetic fields in multiple quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapega, V. F.; Belitsky, V. I.; Ruf, T.; Fuchs, H. D.; Cardona, M.; Ploog, K.

    1992-12-01

    A strong increase of low-frequency Raman scattering has been observed in GaAs/AlxGa1-xAs multiple quantum wells in magnetic fields up to 14 T. The spectra, consisting of background scattering, folded acoustic phonons, and additional features, show resonant behavior with respect to the laser frequency and the strength of the magnetic field. The broad background, usually related to geminate recombination, has its origin in a continuum of Raman processes with the emission of longitudinal-acoustic phonons where crystal momentum is not conserved. Such processes can become dominant when interface fluctuations allow for resonant scattering in individual quantum wells only. Thus phonons with all possible energies contribute to the background scattering efficiency. The observed folded longitudinal-acoustic phonons are in good agreement with calculated frequencies. Additional features, detected in all samples measured, are attributed to local vibrational modes tied to the gaps at the folded Brillouin-zone center and edge. Other peculiarities observed correspond to modes localized at crossings of the folded longitudinal- and transverse-acoustic branches inside the Brillouin zone. The appearance of these local modes is attributed to fluctuations in the well and barrier thicknesses of the quantum wells.

  15. Generation of desired signals from acoustic drivers. [for aircraft engine internal noise propagation experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramakrishnan, R.; Salikuddin, M.; Ahuja, K. K.

    1982-01-01

    A procedure to control transient signal generation is developed for the study of internal noise propagation from aircraft engines. A simple algorithm incorporating transform techniques is used to produce signals of any desired waveform from acoustic drivers. The accurate driver response is then calculated, and from this the limiting frequency characteristics are determined and the undesirable frequencies where the driver response is poor are eliminated from the analysis. A synthesized signal is then produced by convolving the inverse of the response function with the desired signal. Although the shape of the synthesized signal is in general quite awkward, the driver generates the desired signal when the distorted signal is fed into the driver. The results of operating the driver in two environments, in a free field and in a duct, are presented in order to show the impedance matching effect of the driver. In addition, results using a high frequency cut-off value as a parameter is presented in order to demonstrate the extent of the applicability of the synthesis procedure. It is concluded that the desired signals can be generated through the signal synthesis procedure.

  16. Acoustic alarm signalling facilitates predator protection of treehoppers by mutualist ant bodyguards

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Manuel A; Barone, Jennifer L; Henry, Charles S

    2008-01-01

    Mutualism is a net positive interaction that includes varying degrees of both costs and benefits. Because tension between the costs and benefits of mutualism can lead to evolutionary instability, identifying mechanisms that regulate investment between partners is critical to understanding the evolution and maintenance of mutualism. Recently, studies have highlighted the importance of interspecific signalling as one mechanism for regulating investment between mutualist partners. Here, we provide evidence for interspecific alarm signalling in an insect protection mutualism and we demonstrate a functional link between this acoustic signalling and efficacy of protection. The treehopper Publilia concava Say (Hemiptera: Membracidae) is an insect that provides ants with a carbohydrate-rich excretion called honeydew in return for protection from predators. Adults of this species produce distinct vibrational signals in the context of predator encounters. In laboratory trials, putative alarm signal production significantly increased following initial contact with ladybeetle predators (primarily Harmonia axyridis Pallas, Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), but not following initial contact with ants. In field trials, playback of a recorded treehopper alarm signal resulted in a significant increase in both ant activity and the probability of ladybeetle discovery by ants relative to both silence and treehopper courtship signal controls. Our results show that P. concava treehoppers produce alarm signals in response to predator threat and that this signalling can increase effectiveness of predator protection by ants. PMID:18480015

  17. Acoustic signal perception in a noisy habitat: lessons from synchronising insects.

    PubMed

    Hartbauer, M; Siegert, M E; Fertschai, I; Römer, H

    2012-06-01

    Acoustically communicating animals often have to cope with ambient noise that has the potential to interfere with the perception of conspecific signals. Here we use the synchronous display of mating signals in males of the tropical katydid Mecopoda elongata in order to assess the influence of nocturnal rainforest noise on signal perception. Loud background noise may disturb chorus synchrony either by masking the signals of males or by interaction of noisy events with the song oscillator. Phase-locked synchrony of males was studied under various signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) using either native noise or the audio component of noise (<9 kHz). Synchronous entrainment was lost at a SNR of -3 dB when native noise was used, whereas with the audio component still 50% of chirp periods matched the pacer period at a SNR of -7 dB. Since the chirp period of solo singing males remained almost unaffected by noise, our results suggest that masking interference limits chorus synchrony by rendering conspecific signals ambiguous. Further, entrainment with periodic artificial signals indicates that synchrony is achieved by ignoring heterospecific signals and attending to a conspecific signal period. Additionally, the encoding of conspecific chirps was studied in an auditory neuron under the same background noise regimes.

  18. Earthquake-like patterns of acoustic emission in crumpled plastic sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendes, R. S.; Malacarne, L. C.; Santos, R. P. B.; Ribeiro, H. V.; Picoli, S., Jr.

    2010-10-01

    We report remarkable similarities in the output signal of two distinct out-of-equilibrium physical systems —earthquakes and the intermittent acoustic noise emitted by crumpled plastic sheets, i.e. Biaxially Oriented Polypropylene (BOPP) films. We show that both signals share several statistical properties including the distribution of energy, distribution of energy increments for distinct time scales, distribution of return intervals and correlations in the magnitude and sign of energy increments. This analogy is consistent with the concept of universality in complex systems and could provide some insight on the mechanisms behind the complex behavior of earthquakes.

  19. Monitoring Induced Seismicity with Acoustic-Emission Sensors : The Calibration Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plenkers, K.; Kwiatek, G.

    2012-12-01

    We study the effect that an uncalibrated acoustic-emission (AE) sensor has on source parameters using data of the JAGUARS project. The JAGUARS project recorded mining-induced seismicity in Mponeng Gold mine in Carletonville, South Africa in the frequency range 1 kHz < f < 180 kHz combining AE-sensors and accelerometers. Advanced monitoring of induced seismicity in underground structures sometimes includes today the use of high-frequency (f >> 1 kHz) AE monitoring systems. High-frequency monitoring allows the detection of seismic fractures on the centimeter scale and provides therefore important information about the migration of instabilities in the rock. Whereas the temporal-spatial analysis of seismic events recorded with AE sensors provides stable results, the analysis of source parameters including the estimation of magnitudes remains more challenging, because AE sensors are normally not well calibrated and exploit resonance frequencies to allow for high sensitivity. In our study the AE sensors are first calibrated in the frequency range 1kHz to 17 kHz relative to the well calibrated accelerometer. The calibration is possible due to the close employment of both sensor types, which allows to extract the sensor response (including the coupling effect) using signal deconvolution. We estimate three main resonance frequencies at about 2.5 kHz, 6 kHz and 10 kHz. Furthermore we calculate the directivity effect of the AE-sensor that influences the amplitude of the signal by up to - 15 dB. Second, we calculate the effect of the instrument response on the calculation of magnitude, magnitude-frequency distribution and static source parameters. We study magnitudes, magitude-frequency distributions and static source parameters using both the calibrated sensors, as well as the uncalibrated AE sensors. We show the significant uncertainty that is indroduced owing to the AE sensor response and conclude that source parameters often have high uncertainties and are not reliable

  20. Waves on a Hele-Shaw Cell: Simulations of Acoustic Emissions During Aerofracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turkaya, Semih; Toussaint, Renaud; Kvalheim Eriksen, Fredrik; Daniel, Guillaume; Grude Flekkøy, Eirik; Jørgen Måløy, Knut

    2016-04-01

    acoustic emissions in a porous medium." Front. Phys., 3 (2015): 70. doi: 10.3389/fphy.2015.00070 2. Niebling MJ, Toussaint R, Flekkøy EG, Maløy KJ. "Dynamic aerofracture of dense granular packings." Phys Rev E, 86 (2012): 061315. 3. Goyder, H. G. D. and White, R. G. "Vibrational power flow from machines into built-up structures, part I: introduction and approximate analyses of beam and plate-like foundations." Journal of sound and vibration, 68.1 (1980): 59-75.

  1. Temporal patterns in the acoustic signals of beaked whales at Cross Seamount.

    PubMed

    Johnston, D W; McDonald, M; Polovina, J; Domokos, R; Wiggins, S; Hildebrand, J

    2008-04-23

    Seamounts may influence the distribution of marine mammals through a combination of increased ocean mixing, enhanced local productivity and greater prey availability. To study the effects of seamounts on the presence and acoustic behaviour of cetaceans, we deployed a high-frequency acoustic recording package on the summit of Cross Seamount during April through October 2005. The most frequently detected cetacean vocalizations were echolocation sounds similar to those produced by ziphiid and mesoplodont beaked whales together with buzz-type signals consistent with prey-capture attempts. Beaked whale signals occurred almost entirely at night throughout the six-month deployment. Measurements of prey presence with a Simrad EK-60 fisheries acoustics echo sounder indicate that Cross Seamount may enhance local productivity in near-surface waters. Concentrations of micronekton were aggregated over the seamount in near-surface waters at night, and dense concentrations of nekton were detected across the surface of the summit. Our results suggest that seamounts may provide enhanced foraging opportunities for beaked whales during the night through a combination of increased productivity, vertical migrations by micronekton and local retention of prey. Furthermore, the summit of the seamount may act as a barrier against which whales concentrate prey. PMID:18252660

  2. Temporal patterns in the acoustic signals of beaked whales at Cross Seamount.

    PubMed

    Johnston, D W; McDonald, M; Polovina, J; Domokos, R; Wiggins, S; Hildebrand, J

    2008-04-23

    Seamounts may influence the distribution of marine mammals through a combination of increased ocean mixing, enhanced local productivity and greater prey availability. To study the effects of seamounts on the presence and acoustic behaviour of cetaceans, we deployed a high-frequency acoustic recording package on the summit of Cross Seamount during April through October 2005. The most frequently detected cetacean vocalizations were echolocation sounds similar to those produced by ziphiid and mesoplodont beaked whales together with buzz-type signals consistent with prey-capture attempts. Beaked whale signals occurred almost entirely at night throughout the six-month deployment. Measurements of prey presence with a Simrad EK-60 fisheries acoustics echo sounder indicate that Cross Seamount may enhance local productivity in near-surface waters. Concentrations of micronekton were aggregated over the seamount in near-surface waters at night, and dense concentrations of nekton were detected across the surface of the summit. Our results suggest that seamounts may provide enhanced foraging opportunities for beaked whales during the night through a combination of increased productivity, vertical migrations by micronekton and local retention of prey. Furthermore, the summit of the seamount may act as a barrier against which whales concentrate prey.

  3. Incident signal power comparison for localization of concurrent multiple acoustic sources.

    PubMed

    Salvati, Daniele; Canazza, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a method to solve the localization of concurrent multiple acoustic sources in large open spaces is presented. The problem of the multisource localization in far-field conditions is to correctly associate the direction of arrival (DOA) estimated by a network array system to the same source. The use of systems implementing a Bayesian filter is a traditional approach to address the problem of localization in multisource acoustic scenario. However, in a real noisy open space the acoustic sources are often discontinuous with numerous short-duration events and thus the filtering methods may have difficulty to track the multiple sources. Incident signal power comparison (ISPC) is proposed to compute DOAs association. ISPC is based on identifying the incident signal power (ISP) of the sources on a microphone array using beamforming methods and comparing the ISP between different arrays using spectral distance (SD) measurement techniques. This method solves the ambiguities, due to the presence of simultaneous sources, by identifying sounds through a minimization of an error criterion on SD measures of DOA combinations. The experimental results were conducted in an outdoor real noisy environment and the ISPC performance is reported using different beamforming techniques and SD functions. PMID:24701179

  4. Incident Signal Power Comparison for Localization of Concurrent Multiple Acoustic Sources

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a method to solve the localization of concurrent multiple acoustic sources in large open spaces is presented. The problem of the multisource localization in far-field conditions is to correctly associate the direction of arrival (DOA) estimated by a network array system to the same source. The use of systems implementing a Bayesian filter is a traditional approach to address the problem of localization in multisource acoustic scenario. However, in a real noisy open space the acoustic sources are often discontinuous with numerous short-duration events and thus the filtering methods may have difficulty to track the multiple sources. Incident signal power comparison (ISPC) is proposed to compute DOAs association. ISPC is based on identifying the incident signal power (ISP) of the sources on a microphone array using beamforming methods and comparing the ISP between different arrays using spectral distance (SD) measurement techniques. This method solves the ambiguities, due to the presence of simultaneous sources, by identifying sounds through a minimization of an error criterion on SD measures of DOA combinations. The experimental results were conducted in an outdoor real noisy environment and the ISPC performance is reported using different beamforming techniques and SD functions. PMID:24701179

  5. A custom acoustic emission monitoring system for harsh environments: application to freezing-induced damage in alpine rock-walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girard, L.; Beutel, J.; Gruber, S.; Hunziker, J.; Lim, R.; Weber, S.

    2012-06-01

    We present a custom acoustic emission (AE) monitoring system designed to perform long-term measurements on high-alpine rock-walls. AE monitoring is a common technique for characterizing damage evolution in solid materials. The system is based on a two-channel AE sensor node (AE-node) integrated into a Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) customized for operation in harsh environments. This wireless architecture offers flexibility in the deployment of AE-nodes at any position of the rock-wall that needs to be monitored, within a range of a few hundred meters from a core station connected to the internet. The system achieves near real-time data delivery and allows the user to remotely control the AE detection threshold. In order to protect AE sensors and capture acoustic signals from specific depths of the rock-wall, a special casing was developed. The monitoring system is completed by two probes that measure rock temperature and liquid water content, both probes being also integrated into the WSN. We report a first deployment of the monitoring system on a rock-wall at Jungfraujoch, 3500 m a.s.l., Switzerland. While this first deployment of the monitoring system aims to support fundamental research on processes that damage rock under cold climate, the system could serve a number of other applications, including rock-fall hazard surveillance or structural monitoring of concrete structures.

  6. A custom acoustic emission monitoring system for harsh environments: application to freezing-induced damage in alpine rock walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girard, L.; Beutel, J.; Gruber, S.; Hunziker, J.; Lim, R.; Weber, S.

    2012-11-01

    We present a custom acoustic emission (AE) monitoring system designed to perform long-term measurements on high-alpine rock walls. AE monitoring is a common technique for characterizing damage evolution in solid materials. The system is based on a two-channel AE sensor node (AE-node) integrated into a wireless sensor network (WSN) customized for operation in harsh environments. This wireless architecture offers flexibility in the deployment of AE-nodes at any position of the rock wall that needs to be monitored, within a range of a few hundred meters from a core station connected to the internet. The system achieves near real-time data delivery and allows the user to remotely control the AE detection threshold. In order to protect AE sensors and capture acoustic signals from specific depths of the rock wall, a special casing was developed. The monitoring system is completed by two probes that measure rock temperature and liquid water content, both probes being also integrated into the WSN. We report a first deployment of the monitoring system on a rock wall at Jungfraujoch, 3500 m a.s.l., Switzerland. While this first deployment of the monitoring system aims to support fundamental research on processes that damage rock under cold climate, the system could serve a number of other applications, including rock fall hazard surveillance or structural monitoring of concrete structures.

  7. Localization of quenches and mechanical disturbances in the Mu2e transport solenoid prototype using acoustic emission technique

    DOE PAGES

    Marchevsky, M.; Ambrosio, G.; Lamm, M.; Tartaglia, M. A.; Lopes, M. L.

    2016-02-12

    Acoustic emission (AE) detection is a noninvasive technique allowing the localization of the mechanical events and quenches in superconducting magnets. Application of the AE technique is especially advantageous in situations where magnet integrity can be jeopardized by the use of voltage taps or inductive pickup coils. As the prototype module of the transport solenoid (TS) for the Mu2e experiment at Fermilab represents such a special case, we have developed a dedicated six-channel AE detection system and accompanying software aimed at localizing mechanical events during the coil cold testing. The AE sensors based on transversely polarized piezoceramic washers combined with cryogenicmore » preamplifiers were mounted at the outer surface of the solenoid aluminum shell, with a 60° angular step around the circumference. Acoustic signals were simultaneously acquired at a rate of 500 kS/s, prefiltered and sorted based on their arrival time. Next, based on the arrival timing, angular and axial coordinates of the AE sources within the magnet structure were calculated. Furthermore, we present AE measurement results obtained during cooldown, spot heater firing, and spontaneous quenching of the Mu2e TS module prototype and discuss their relevance for mechanical stability assessment and quench localization.« less

  8. Demodulation of acoustic telemetry binary phase shift keying signal based on high-order Duffing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Bing-Nan; Liu, Chong-Xin; Ni, Jun-Kang; Zhao, Liang

    2016-10-01

    In order to grasp the downhole situation immediately, logging while drilling (LWD) technology is adopted. One of the LWD technologies, called acoustic telemetry, can be successfully applied to modern drilling. It is critical for acoustic telemetry technology that the signal is successfully transmitted to the ground. In this paper, binary phase shift keying (BPSK) is used to modulate carrier waves for the transmission and a new BPSK demodulation scheme based on Duffing chaos is investigated. Firstly, a high-order system is given in order to enhance the signal detection capability and it is realized through building a virtual circuit using an electronic workbench (EWB). Secondly, a new BPSK demodulation scheme is proposed based on the intermittent chaos phenomena of the new Duffing system. Finally, a system variable crossing zero-point equidistance method is proposed to obtain the phase difference between the system and the BPSK signal. Then it is determined that the digital signal transmitted from the bottom of the well is ‘0’ or ‘1’. The simulation results show that the demodulation method is feasible. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51177117) and the National Key Science & Technology Special Projects, China (Grant No. 2011ZX05021-005).

  9. A hardware model of the auditory periphery to transduce acoustic signals into neural activity

    PubMed Central

    Tateno, Takashi; Nishikawa, Jun; Tsuchioka, Nobuyoshi; Shintaku, Hirofumi; Kawano, Satoyuki

    2013-01-01

    To improve the performance of cochlear implants, we have integrated a microdevice into a model of the auditory periphery with the goal of creating a microprocessor. We constructed an artificial peripheral auditory system using a hybrid model in which polyvinylidene difluoride was used as a piezoelectric sensor to convert mechanical stimuli into electric signals. To produce frequency selectivity, the slit on a stainless steel base plate was designed such that the local resonance frequency of the membrane over the slit reflected the transfer function. In the acoustic sensor, electric signals were generated based on the piezoelectric effect from local stress in the membrane. The electrodes on the resonating plate produced relatively large electric output signals. The signals were fed into a computer model that mimicked some functions of inner hair cells, inner hair cell–auditory nerve synapses, and auditory nerve fibers. In general, the responses of the model to pure-tone burst and complex stimuli accurately represented the discharge rates of high-spontaneous-rate auditory nerve fibers across a range of frequencies greater than 1 kHz and middle to high sound pressure levels. Thus, the model provides a tool to understand information processing in the peripheral auditory system and a basic design for connecting artificial acoustic sensors to the peripheral auditory nervous system. Finally, we discuss the need for stimulus control with an appropriate model of the auditory periphery based on auditory brainstem responses that were electrically evoked by different temporal pulse patterns with the same pulse number. PMID:24324432

  10. A hardware model of the auditory periphery to transduce acoustic signals into neural activity.

    PubMed

    Tateno, Takashi; Nishikawa, Jun; Tsuchioka, Nobuyoshi; Shintaku, Hirofumi; Kawano, Satoyuki

    2013-01-01

    To improve the performance of cochlear implants, we have integrated a microdevice into a model of the auditory periphery with the goal of creating a microprocessor. We constructed an artificial peripheral auditory system using a hybrid model in which polyvinylidene difluoride was used as a piezoelectric sensor to convert mechanical stimuli into electric signals. To produce frequency selectivity, the slit on a stainless steel base plate was designed such that the local resonance frequency of the membrane over the slit reflected the transfer function. In the acoustic sensor, electric signals were generated based on the piezoelectric effect from local stress in the membrane. The electrodes on the resonating plate produced relatively large electric output signals. The signals were fed into a computer model that mimicked some functions of inner hair cells, inner hair cell-auditory nerve synapses, and auditory nerve fibers. In general, the responses of the model to pure-tone burst and complex stimuli accurately represented the discharge rates of high-spontaneous-rate auditory nerve fibers across a range of frequencies greater than 1 kHz and middle to high sound pressure levels. Thus, the model provides a tool to understand information processing in the peripheral auditory system and a basic design for connecting artificial acoustic sensors to the peripheral auditory nervous system. Finally, we discuss the need for stimulus control with an appropriate model of the auditory periphery based on auditory brainstem responses that were electrically evoked by different temporal pulse patterns with the same pulse number. PMID:24324432

  11. Wavelet Transform Of Acoustic Signal From A Ranque- Hilsch Vortex Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Istihat, Y.; Wisnoe, W.

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents the frequency analysis of flow in a Ranque-Hilsch Vortex Tube (RHVT) obtained from acoustic signal using microphones in an isolated formation setup. Data Acquisition System (DAS) that incorporates Analog to Digital Converter (ADC) with laptop computer has been used to acquire the wave data. Different inlet pressures (20, 30, 40, 50 and 60 psi) are supplied and temperature differences are recorded. Frequencies produced from a RHVT are experimentally measured and analyzed by means of Wavelet Transform (WT). Morlet Wavelet is used and relation between Pressure variation, Temperature and Frequency are studied. Acoustic data has been analyzed using Matlab® and time-frequency analysis (Scalogram) is presented. Results show that the Pressure is proportional with the Frequency inside the RHVT whereby two distinct working frequencies is pronounced in between 4-8 kHz.

  12. Study of Doppler Shift Correction for Underwater Acoustic Communication Using Orthogonal Signal Division Multiplexing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebihara, Tadashi; Mizutani, Keiichi

    2011-07-01

    In this study, we apply Doppler shift correction schemes for underwater acoustic (UWA) communication with orthogonal signal division multiplexing (OSDM) to achieve stable communication in underwater acoustic channels. Three Doppler correction schemes, which exploit the guard interval, are applied to UWA communication with OSDM and evaluated in simulations. Through a simulation in which only the Doppler effect is considered, we confirmed that by adapting schemes to UWA communication with OSDM, we can correct large Doppler shifts, which addresses the usual speed of vehicles and ships. Moreover, by considering both the Doppler effect and channel reverberation, we propose the best possible combination of Doppler correction schemes for UWA communication with OSDM. The results suggest that UWA communication with OSDM may lead to high-quality communication by considering channel reverberation and large Doppler shifts.

  13. The effect of artificial rain on backscattered acoustic signal: first measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titchenko, Yuriy; Karaev, Vladimir; Meshkov, Evgeny; Goldblat, Vladimir

    The problem of rain influencing on a characteristics of backscattered ultrasonic and microwave signal by water surface is considered. The rain influence on backscattering process of electromagnetic waves was investigated in laboratory and field experiments, for example [1-3]. Raindrops have a significant impact on backscattering of microwave and influence on wave spectrum measurement accuracy by string wave gauge. This occurs due to presence of raindrops in atmosphere and modification of the water surface. For measurements of water surface characteristics during precipitation we propose to use an acoustic system. This allows us obtaining of the water surface parameters independently on precipitation in atmosphere. The measurements of significant wave height of water surface using underwater acoustical systems are well known [4, 5]. Moreover, the variance of orbital velocity can be measure using these systems. However, these methods cannot be used for measurements of slope variance and the other second statistical moments of water surface that required for analyzing the radar backscatter signal. An original design Doppler underwater acoustic wave gauge allows directly measuring the surface roughness characteristics that affect on electromagnetic waves backscattering of the same wavelength [6]. Acoustic wave gauge is Doppler ultrasonic sonar which is fixed near the bottom on the floating disk. Measurements are carried out at vertically orientation of sonar antennas towards water surface. The first experiments were conducted with the first model of an acoustic wave gauge. The acoustic wave gauge (8 mm wavelength) is equipped with a transceiving antenna with a wide symmetrical antenna pattern. The gauge allows us to measure Doppler spectrum and cross section of backscattered signal. Variance of orbital velocity vertical component can be retrieved from Doppler spectrum with high accuracy. The result of laboratory and field experiments during artificial rain is presented

  14. Acoustic Emission Analysis of Damage Progression in Thermal Barrier Coatings Under Thermal Cyclic Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appleby, Matthew; Zhu, Dongming; Morscher, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Damage evolution of electron beam-physical vapor deposited (EBVD-PVD) ZrO2-7 wt.% Y2O3 thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) under thermal cyclic conditions was monitored using an acoustic emission (AE) technique. The coatings were heated using a laser heat flux technique that yields a high reproducibility in thermal loading. Along with AE, real-time thermal conductivity measurements were also taken using infrared thermography. Tests were performed on samples with induced stress concentrations, as well as calcium-magnesium-alumino-silicate (CMAS) exposure, for comparison of damage mechanisms and AE response to the baseline (as-produced) coating. Analysis of acoustic waveforms was used to investigate damage development by comparing when events occurred, AE event frequency, energy content and location. The test results have shown that AE accumulation correlates well with thermal conductivity changes and that AE waveform analysis could be a valuable tool for monitoring coating degradation and provide insight on specific damage mechanisms.

  15. Acoustic emission: Towards a real-time diagnosis technique for Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legros, B.; Thivel, P.-X.; Bultel, Y.; Boinet, M.; Nogueira, R. P.

    This paper deals with one of the needs for PEMFC to be economically reliable: diagnosis tool for water management. This issue is actually a key parameter for both performance and durability improvement. Acoustic emission (AE) technique was employed to survey PEM single cell under various operating conditions. AE events coming from different sources have thus been identified, classified and finally ascribed to different phenomena induced by MEA water uptake and/or biphasic flow in the gas channel thanks to a statistical post-treatment of the acoustic data. Results, although qualitative, seems trusty enough to unravel hidden correlations between AE hits and physicochemical phenomena taking place during the cell operation and open up the way for an innovative and non-invasive online diagnosis tool.

  16. Separating medial olivocochlear from acoustic reflex effects on transient evoked otoacoustic emissions in unanesthetized mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yingyue; Cheatham, Mary Ann; Siegel, Jonathan

    2015-12-01

    Descending neural pathways in the mammalian auditory system are believed to modulate the function of the peripheral auditory system [3, 8, 10]. These pathways include the medial olivocochlear (MOC) efferent innervation to the cochlear outer hair cells (OHCs) and the acoustic reflex pathways mediating middle ear muscle (MEM) contractions. The MOC effects can be monitored noninvasively using otoacoustic emissions (OAEs) [5, 6], which are acoustic byproducts of cochlear function [7]. In this study, we applied a sensitive method to determine when and to what degree contralateral MEM suppression contaminated MOC efferent effects on TEOAEs in unanesthetized mice. The lowest contralateral broadband noise evoking MEM contractions varied across animals. Examples of potential MOC-mediated TEOAE suppression with contralateral noise below MEM contraction thresholds were seen, but this behavior did not occur in the majority of cases.

  17. Phylogenetic signal in the acoustic parameters of the advertisement calls of four clades of anurans

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Anuran vocalizations, especially their advertisement calls, are largely species-specific and can be used to identify taxonomic affiliations. Because anurans are not vocal learners, their vocalizations are generally assumed to have a strong genetic component. This suggests that the degree of similarity between advertisement calls may be related to large-scale phylogenetic relationships. To test this hypothesis, advertisement calls from 90 species belonging to four large clades (Bufo, Hylinae, Leptodactylus, and Rana) were analyzed. Phylogenetic distances were estimated based on the DNA sequences of the 12S mitochondrial ribosomal RNA gene, and, for a subset of 49 species, on the rhodopsin gene. Mean values for five acoustic parameters (coefficient of variation of root-mean-square amplitude, dominant frequency, spectral flux, spectral irregularity, and spectral flatness) were computed for each species. We then tested for phylogenetic signal on the body-size-corrected residuals of these five parameters, using three statistical tests (Moran’s I, Mantel, and Blomberg’s K) and three models of genetic distance (pairwise distances, Abouheif’s proximities, and the variance-covariance matrix derived from the phylogenetic tree). Results A significant phylogenetic signal was detected for most acoustic parameters on the 12S dataset, across statistical tests and genetic distance models, both for the entire sample of 90 species and within clades in several cases. A further analysis on a subset of 49 species using genetic distances derived from rhodopsin and from 12S broadly confirmed the results obtained on the larger sample, indicating that the phylogenetic signals observed in these acoustic parameters can be detected using a variety of genetic distance models derived either from a variable mitochondrial sequence or from a conserved nuclear gene. Conclusions We found a robust relationship, in a large number of species, between anuran phylogenetic relatedness and

  18. Estimates of the prevalence of anomalous signal losses in the Yellow Sea derived from acoustic and oceanographic computer model simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin-Bing, Stanley A.; King, David B.; Warn-Varnas, Alex C.; Lamb, Kevin G.; Hawkins, James A.; Teixeira, Marvi

    2002-05-01

    The results from collocated oceanographic and acoustic simulations in a region of the Yellow Sea near the Shandong peninsula have been presented [Chin-Bing et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 108, 2577 (2000)]. In that work, the tidal flow near the peninsula was used to initialize a 2.5-dimensional ocean model [K. G. Lamb, J. Geophys. Res. 99, 843-864 (1994)] that subsequently generated internal solitary waves (solitons). The validity of these soliton simulations was established by matching satellite imagery taken over the region. Acoustic propagation simulations through this soliton field produced results similar to the anomalous signal loss measured by Zhou, Zhang, and Rogers [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 90, 2042-2054 (1991)]. Analysis of the acoustic interactions with the solitons also confirmed the hypothesis that the loss mechanism involved acoustic mode coupling. Recently we have attempted to estimate the prevalence of these anomalous signal losses in this region. These estimates were made from simulating acoustic effects over an 80 hour space-time evolution of soliton packets. Examples will be presented that suggest the conditions necessary for anomalous signal loss may be more prevalent than previously thought. [Work supported by ONR/NRL and by a High Performance Computing DoD grant.

  19. An online emission spectral tomography system with digital signal processor.

    PubMed

    Wan, Xiong; Xiong, Wenlin; Zhang, Zhimin; Chang, Fangfei

    2009-03-30

    Emission spectral tomography (EST) has been adopted to test the three-dimensional distribution parameters of fluid fields, such as burning gas, flame and plasma etc. In most cases, emission spectral data received by the video cameras are enormous so that the emission spectral tomography calculation is often time-consuming. Hence, accelerating calculation becomes the chief factor that one must consider for the practical application of EST. To solve the problem, a hardware implementation method was proposed in this paper, which adopted a digital signal processor (DSP) DM642 in an emission spectral tomography test system. The EST algorithm was fulfilled in the DSP, then calculation results were transmitted to the main computer via the user datagram protocol. Compared with purely VC++ software implementations, this new approach can decrease the calculation time significantly.

  20. Pipe wall damage detection by electromagnetic acoustic transducer generated guided waves in absence of defect signals.

    PubMed

    Vasiljevic, Milos; Kundu, Tribikram; Grill, Wolfgang; Twerdowski, Evgeny

    2008-05-01

    Most investigators emphasize the importance of detecting the reflected signal from the defect to determine if the pipe wall has any damage and to predict the damage location. However, often the small signal from the defect is hidden behind the other arriving wave modes and signal noise. To overcome the difficulties associated with the identification of the small defect signal in the time history plots, in this paper the time history is analyzed well after the arrival of the first defect signal, and after different wave modes have propagated multiple times through the pipe. It is shown that the defective pipe can be clearly identified by analyzing these late arriving diffuse ultrasonic signals. Multiple reflections and scattering of the propagating wave modes by the defect and pipe ends do not hamper the defect detection capability; on the contrary, it apparently stabilizes the signal and makes it easier to distinguish the defective pipe from the defect-free pipe. This paper also highlights difficulties associated with the interpretation of the recorded time histories due to mode conversion by the defect. The design of electro-magnetic acoustic transducers used to generate and receive the guided waves in the pipe is briefly described in the paper.

  1. Noise affects the shape of female preference functions for acoustic signals.

    PubMed

    Reichert, Michael S; Ronacher, Bernhard

    2015-02-01

    The shape of female mate preference functions influences the speed and direction of sexual signal evolution. However, the expression of female preferences is modulated by interactions between environmental conditions and the female's sensory processing system. Noise is an especially relevant environmental condition because it interferes directly with the neural processing of signals. Although noise is therefore likely a significant force in the evolution of communication systems, little is known about its effects on preference function shape. In the grasshopper Chorthippus biguttulus, female preferences for male calling song characteristics are likely to be affected by noise because its auditory system is sensitive to fine temporal details of songs. We measured female preference functions for variation in male song characteristics in several levels of masking noise and found strong effects of noise on preference function shape. The overall responsiveness to signals in noise generally decreased. Preference strength increased for some signal characteristics and decreased for others, largely corresponding to expectations based on neurophysiological studies of acoustic signal processing. These results suggest that different signal characteristics will be favored under different noise conditions, and thus that signal evolution may proceed differently depending on the extent and temporal patterning of environmental noise.

  2. Phenomenological Description of Acoustic Emission Processes Occurring During High-Pressure Sand Compaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado-Martín, Jordi; Muñoz-Ibáñez, Andrea; Grande-García, Elisa; Rodríguez-Cedrún, Borja

    2016-04-01

    Compaction, pore collapse and grain crushing have a significant impact over the hydrodynamic properties of sand formations. The assessment of the crushing stress threshold constitutes valuable information in order to assess the behavior of these formations provided that it can be conveniently identified. Because of the inherent complexities of the direct observation of sand crushing, different authors have developed several indirect methods, being acoustic emission a promising one. However, previous researches have evidenced that there are different processes triggering acoustic emissions which need to be carefully accounted. Worth mentioning among them are grain bearing, grain to container friction, intergranular friction and crushing. The work presented here addresses this purpose. A broadband acoustic emission sensor (PA MicroHF200) connected to a high-speed data acquisition system and control software (AeWIN for PCI1 2.10) has been attached to a steel ram and used to monitor the different processes occurring during the oedometric compaction of uniform quartz sand up to an axial load of about 110 MPa and constant temperature. Load was stepwise applied using a servocontrolled hydraulic press acting at a constant load rate. Axial strain was simultaneously measured with the aid of a LDT device. Counts, energy, event duration, rise time and amplitude were recorded along each experiment and after completion selected waveforms were transformed from the time to the frequency domain via FFT transform. Additional simplified tests were performed in order to isolate the frequency characteristics of the dominant processes occurring during sand compaction. Our results show that, from simple tests, it is possible to determine process-dependent frequency components. When considering more complex experiments, many of the studied processes overlap but it is still possible to identify when a particular one dominates as well as the likely onset of crushing.

  3. Quantitative evaluation of rejuvenators to restore embrittlement temperatures in oxidized asphalt mixtures using acoustic emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhe; Farace, Nicholas; Arnold, Jacob; Behnia, Behzad; Buttlar, William G.; Reis, Henrique

    2015-03-01

    Towards developing a method capable to assess the efficiency of rejuvenators to restore embrittlement temperatures of oxidized asphalt binders towards their original, i.e., unaged values, three gyratory compacted specimens were manufactured with mixtures oven-aged for 36 hours at 135 °C. In addition, one gyratory compacted specimen manufactured using a short-term oven-aged mixture for two hours at 155 °C was used for control to simulate aging during plant production. Each of these four gyratory compacted specimens was then cut into two cylindrical specimen 5 cm thick for a total of six 36-hour oven-aged specimens and two short term aging specimens. Two specimens aged for 36 hours and the two short-term specimens were then tested using an acoustic emission approach to obtain base acoustic emission response of short-term and severely-aged specimens. The remaining four specimens oven-aged for 36 hours were then treated by spreading their top surface with rejuvenator in the amount of 10% of the binder by weight. These four specimens were then tested using the same acoustic emission approach after two, four, six, and eight weeks of dwell time. It was observed that the embrittlement temperatures of the short-term aged and severely oven-aged specimens were -25 °C and - 15 °C, respectively. It was also observed that after four weeks of dwell time, the rejuvenator-treated samples had recuperated the original embrittlement temperatures. In addition, it was also observed that the rejuvenator kept acting upon the binder after four weeks of dwell time; at eight weeks of dwell time, the specimens had an embrittlement temperature about one grade cooler than the embrittlement temperature corresponding to the short-term aged specimen.

  4. Signal diversification in Oecanthus tree crickets is shaped by energetic, morphometric, and acoustic trade-offs.

    PubMed

    Symes, L B; Ayres, M P; Cowdery, C P; Costello, R A

    2015-06-01

    Physiology, physics, and ecological interactions can generate trade-offs within species, but may also shape divergence among species. We tested whether signal divergence in Oecanthus tree crickets is shaped by acoustic, energetic, and behavioral trade-offs. We found that species with faster pulse rates, produced by opening and closing wings up to twice as many times per second, did not have higher metabolic costs of calling. The relatively constant energetic cost across species is explained by trade-offs between the duration and repetition rate of acoustic signals-species with fewer stridulatory teeth closed their wings more frequently such that the number of teeth struck per second of calling and the resulting duty cycle were relatively constant across species. Further trade-offs were evident in relationships between signals and body size. Calling was relatively inexpensive for small males, permitting them to call for much of the night, but at low amplitude. Large males produced much louder calls, reaching up to four times more area, but the energetic costs increased substantially with increasing size and the time spent calling dropped to only 20% of the night. These trade-offs indicate that the trait combinations that arise in these species represent a limited subset of conceivable trait combinations.

  5. Signal diversification in Oecanthus tree crickets is shaped by energetic, morphometric, and acoustic trade-offs.

    PubMed

    Symes, L B; Ayres, M P; Cowdery, C P; Costello, R A

    2015-06-01

    Physiology, physics, and ecological interactions can generate trade-offs within species, but may also shape divergence among species. We tested whether signal divergence in Oecanthus tree crickets is shaped by acoustic, energetic, and behavioral trade-offs. We found that species with faster pulse rates, produced by opening and closing wings up to twice as many times per second, did not have higher metabolic costs of calling. The relatively constant energetic cost across species is explained by trade-offs between the duration and repetition rate of acoustic signals-species with fewer stridulatory teeth closed their wings more frequently such that the number of teeth struck per second of calling and the resulting duty cycle were relatively constant across species. Further trade-offs were evident in relationships between signals and body size. Calling was relatively inexpensive for small males, permitting them to call for much of the night, but at low amplitude. Large males produced much louder calls, reaching up to four times more area, but the energetic costs increased substantially with increasing size and the time spent calling dropped to only 20% of the night. These trade-offs indicate that the trait combinations that arise in these species represent a limited subset of conceivable trait combinations. PMID:25903317

  6. The potential influence of morphology on the evolutionary divergence of an acoustic signal

    PubMed Central

    Pitchers, W. R.; Klingenberg, C.P.; Tregenza, Tom; Hunt, J.; Dworkin, I.

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of acoustic behaviour and that of the morphological traits mediating its production are often coupled. Lack of variation in the underlying morphology of signalling traits has the potential to constrain signal evolution. This relationship is particularly likely in field crickets, where males produce acoustic advertisement signals to attract females by stridulating with specialized structures on their forewings. In this study, we characterise the size and geometric shape of the forewings of males from six allopatric populations of the black field cricket (Teleogryllus commodus) known to have divergent advertisement calls. We sample from each of these populations using both wild-caught and common-garden reared cohorts, allowing us to test for multivariate relationships between wing morphology and call structure. We show that the allometry of shape has diverged across populations. However, there was a surprisingly small amount of covariation between wing shape and call structure within populations. Given the importance of male size for sexual selection in crickets, the divergence we observe among populations has the potential to influence the evolution of advertisement calls in this species. PMID:25223712

  7. Long Recording Sequences: How to Track the Intra-Individual Variability of Acoustic Signals

    PubMed Central

    Lengagne, Thierry; Gomez, Doris; Josserand, Rémy; Voituron, Yann

    2015-01-01

    Recently developed acoustic technologies - like automatic recording units - allow the recording of long sequences in natural environments. These devices are used for biodiversity survey but they could also help researchers to estimate global signal variability at various (individual, population, species) scales. While sexually-selected signals are expected to show a low intra-individual variability at relatively short time scale, this variability has never been estimated so far. Yet, measuring signal variability in controlled conditions should prove useful to understand sexual selection processes and should help design acoustic sampling schedules and to analyse long call recordings. We here use the overall call production of 36 male treefrogs (Hyla arborea) during one night to evaluate within-individual variability in call dominant frequency and to test the efficiency of different sampling methods at capturing such variability. Our results confirm that using low number of calls underestimates call dominant frequency variation of about 35% in the tree frog and suggest that the assessment of this variability is better by using 2 or 3 short and well-distributed records than by using samples made of consecutive calls. Hence, 3 well-distributed 2-minutes records (beginning, middle and end of the calling period) are sufficient to capture on average all the nightly variability, whereas a sample of 10 000 consecutive calls captures only 86% of it. From a biological point of view, the call dominant frequency variability observed in H. arborea (116Hz on average but up to 470 Hz of variability during the course of the night for one male) challenge about its reliability in mate quality assessment. Automatic acoustic recording units will provide long call sequences in the near future and it will be then possible to confirm such results on large samples recorded in more complex field conditions. PMID:25970183

  8. Study of fracture mechanisms of short fiber reinforced AS composite by acoustic emission technique

    SciTech Connect

    Kida, Sotoaki; Suzuki, Megumu

    1995-11-01

    The fracture mechanisms of short fiber reinforced AS composites are studied by acoustic emission technique for examining the effects of fiber contents. The loads P{sub b} and P{sub c} which the damage mechanisms change are obtained at the inflection points of the total AE energy curve the energy gradient method. The damages are generated by fiber breaking at the load point of P{sub b} and P{sub c} in B material, and by the fiber breaking and the debonding between resin and fiber at the load points of P{sub b} and P{sub c} in C material.

  9. Surface acoustic wave regulated single photon emission from a coupled quantum dot-nanocavity system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiß, M.; Kapfinger, S.; Reichert, T.; Finley, J. J.; Wixforth, A.; Kaniber, M.; Krenner, H. J.

    2016-07-01

    A coupled quantum dot-nanocavity system in the weak coupling regime of cavity-quantumelectrodynamics is dynamically tuned in and out of resonance by the coherent elastic field of a fSAW ≃ 800 MHz surface acoustic wave. When the system is brought to resonance by the sound wave, light-matter interaction is strongly increased by the Purcell effect. This leads to a precisely timed single photon emission as confirmed by the second order photon correlation function, g(2). All relevant frequencies of our experiment are faithfully identified in the Fourier transform of g(2), demonstrating high fidelity regulation of the stream of single photons emitted by the system.

  10. Amplification and directional emission of surface acoustic waves by a two-dimensional electron gas

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Lei; Pipe, Kevin P.

    2015-01-12

    Amplification of surface acoustic waves (SAWs) by electron drift in a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) is analyzed analytically and confirmed experimentally. Calculations suggest that peak power gain per SAW radian occurs at a more practical carrier density for a 2DEG than for a bulk material. It is also shown that SAW emission with tunable directionality can be achieved by modulating a 2DEG's carrier density (to effect SAW generation) in the presence of an applied DC field that amplifies SAWs propagating in a particular direction while attenuating those propagating in the opposite direction.

  11. Characterization of delamination and transverse cracking in graphite/epoxy laminates by acoustic emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, A.; Ishaei, O.

    1983-01-01

    Efforts to characterize and differentiate between two major failure processes in graphite/epoxy composites - transverse cracking and Mode I delamination are described. Representative laminates were tested in uniaxial tension and flexure. The failure processes were monitored and identified by acoustic emission (AE). The effect of moisture on AE was also investigated. Each damage process was found to have a distinctive AE output that is significantly affected by moisture conditions. It is concluded that AE can serve as a useful tool for detecting and identifying failure modes in composite structures in laboratory and in service environments.

  12. Characterization of delamination and transverse cracking in graphite/epoxy laminates by acoustic emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, A.; Ishai, O.

    1983-01-01

    Efforts to characterize and differentiate between two major failure processes in graphite/epoxy composites - transverse cracking and Mode I delamination - are described. Representative laminates were tested in uniaxial tension and flexure. The failure processes were monitored and identified by acoustic emission (AE). The effect of moisture on AE was also investigated. Each damage process was found to have a distinctive AE output that is significantly affected by moisture conditions. It is concluded that AE can serve as a useful tool for detecting and identifying failure modes in composite structures in laboratory and in service environments.

  13. Mechanical degradation of cross-ply laminates monitored by acoustic emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paipetis, A.; Xyrafa, M.; Barkoula, N. M.; Matikas, T. E.; Aggelis, D. G.

    2011-04-01

    This study deals with the investigation of cross ply composites failure by acoustic emission (AE). Broadband AE sensors monitor the different sources of failure in coupons of this material during a tensile loading-unloading test. The cumulative number of AE activity, and other qualitative indices based on the shape of the waves, were well correlated to the sustained load. AE parameters indicate the shift of failure mechanisms within the composite as the load increases. The ultimate goal is a methodology based on NDT techniques for real time characterization of the degradation and identification of the fracture stage of advanced composite materials.

  14. Damage Source Identification of Reinforced Concrete Structure Using Acoustic Emission Technique

    PubMed Central

    Panjsetooni, Alireza; Bunnori, Norazura Muhamad; Vakili, Amir Hossein

    2013-01-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) technique is one of the nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques that have been considered as the prime candidate for structural health and damage monitoring in loaded structures. This technique was employed for investigation process of damage in reinforced concrete (RC) frame specimens. A number of reinforced concrete RC frames were tested under loading cycle and were simultaneously monitored using AE. The AE test data were analyzed using the AE source location analysis method. The results showed that AE technique is suitable to identify the sources location of damage in RC structures. PMID:23997681

  15. Mate preference in the painted goby: the influence of visual and acoustic courtship signals.

    PubMed

    Amorim, M Clara P; da Ponte, Ana Nunes; Caiano, Manuel; Pedroso, Silvia S; Pereira, Ricardo; Fonseca, Paulo J

    2013-11-01

    We tested the hypothesis that females of a small vocal marine fish with exclusive paternal care, the painted goby, prefer high parental-quality mates such as large or high-condition males. We tested the effect of male body size and male visual and acoustic courtship behaviour (playback experiments) on female mating preferences by measuring time spent near one of a two-choice stimuli. Females did not show preference for male size but preferred males that showed higher levels of courtship, a trait known to advertise condition (fat reserves). Also, time spent near the preferred male depended on male courtship effort. Playback experiments showed that when sound was combined with visual stimuli (a male confined in a small aquarium placed near each speaker), females spent more time near the male associated with courtship sound than with the control male (associated with white noise or silence). Although male visual courtship effort also affected female preference in the pre-playback period, this effect decreased during playback and disappeared in the post-playback period. Courtship sound stimuli alone did not elicit female preference in relation to a control. Taken together, the results suggest that visual and mainly acoustic courtship displays are subject to mate preference and may advertise parental quality in this species. Our results indicate that visual and acoustic signals interplay in a complex fashion and highlight the need to examine how different sensory modalities affect mating preferences in fish and other vertebrates. PMID:23948469

  16. Multichannel signal processing at Bell Labs Acoustics Research-Sampled by a postdoc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellermann, Walter

    2001-05-01

    In the mid 1980's, the first large microphone arrays for audio capture were designed and realized by Jim Flanagan and Gary Elko. After the author joined Bell Labs in 1989, the first real-time digital beamformer for teleconferencing applications was implemented and formed a starting point for the development of several novel beamforming techniques. In parallel, multichannel loudspeaker systems were already investigated and research on acoustic echo cancellation, small-aperture directional microphones, and sensor technology complemented the research scenario aiming at seamless hands-free acoustic communication. Arrays of many sensors and loudspeakers for sampling the spatial domain combined with advanced signal processing sparked new concepts that are still fueling ongoing research around the world-including the author's research group. Here, robust adaptive beamforming has found its way from large-scale arrays into many applications using smaller apertures. Blind source separation algorithms allow for effective spatial filtering without a priori information on source positions. Full-duplex communication using multiple channels for both reproduction and recording is enabled by multichannel acoustic echo cancellation combined with beamforming. Recently, wave domain adaptive filtering, a new concept for handling many sensors and many loudspeakers, has been verified for arrays that may well remind some observers of former Bell Labs projects.

  17. Neural Mechanisms for Acoustic Signal Detection under Strong Masking in an Insect

    PubMed Central

    Römer, Heiner

    2015-01-01

    Communication is fundamental for our understanding of behavior. In the acoustic modality, natural scenes for communication in humans and animals are often very noisy, decreasing the chances for signal detection and discrimination. We investigated the mechanisms enabling selective hearing under natural noisy conditions for auditory receptors and interneurons of an insect. In the studied katydid Mecopoda elongata species-specific calling songs (chirps) are strongly masked by signals of another species, both communicating in sympatry. The spectral properties of the two signals are similar and differ only in a small frequency band at 2 kHz present in the chirping species. Receptors sharply tuned to 2 kHz are completely unaffected by the masking signal of the other species, whereas receptors tuned to higher audio and ultrasonic frequencies show complete masking. Intracellular recordings of identified interneurons revealed two mechanisms providing response selectivity to the chirp. (1) Response selectivity is when several identified interneurons exhibit remarkably selective responses to the chirps, even at signal-to-noise ratios of −21 dB, since they are sharply tuned to 2 kHz. Their dendritic arborizations indicate selective connectivity with low-frequency receptors tuned to 2 kHz. (2) Novelty detection is when a second group of interneurons is broadly tuned but, because of strong stimulus-specific adaptation to the masker spectrum and “novelty detection” to the 2 kHz band present only in the conspecific signal, these interneurons start to respond selectively to the chirp shortly after the onset of the continuous masker. Both mechanisms provide the sensory basis for hearing at unfavorable signal-to-noise ratios. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Animal and human acoustic communication may suffer from the same “cocktail party problem,” when communication happens in noisy social groups. We address solutions for this problem in a model system of two katydids, where one

  18. Neural Mechanisms for Acoustic Signal Detection under Strong Masking in an Insect.

    PubMed

    Kostarakos, Konstantinos; Römer, Heiner

    2015-07-22

    Communication is fundamental for our understanding of behavior. In the acoustic modality, natural scenes for communication in humans and animals are often very noisy, decreasing the chances for signal detection and discrimination. We investigated the mechanisms enabling selective hearing under natural noisy conditions for auditory receptors and interneurons of an insect. In the studied katydid Mecopoda elongata species-specific calling songs (chirps) are strongly masked by signals of another species, both communicating in sympatry. The spectral properties of the two signals are similar and differ only in a small frequency band at 2 kHz present in the chirping species. Receptors sharply tuned to 2 kHz are completely unaffected by the masking signal of the other species, whereas receptors tuned to higher audio and ultrasonic frequencies show complete masking. Intracellular recordings of identified interneurons revealed two mechanisms providing response selectivity to the chirp. (1) Response selectivity is when several identified interneurons exhibit remarkably selective responses to the chirps, even at signal-to-noise ratios of -21 dB, since they are sharply tuned to 2 kHz. Their dendritic arborizations indicate selective connectivity with low-frequency receptors tuned to 2 kHz. (2) Novelty detection is when a second group of interneurons is broadly tuned but, because of strong stimulus-specific adaptation to the masker spectrum and "novelty detection" to the 2 kHz band present only in the conspecific signal, these interneurons start to respond selectively to the chirp shortly after the onset of the continuous masker. Both mechanisms provide the sensory basis for hearing at unfavorable signal-to-noise ratios. Significance statement: Animal and human acoustic communication may suffer from the same "cocktail party problem," when communication happens in noisy social groups. We address solutions for this problem in a model system of two katydids, where one species

  19. Characteristics of acoustic emissions generated by drying front displacement in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grapsas, N. K.; Shokri, N.; Or, D.

    2011-12-01

    Fluid displacement fronts in porous media may produce acoustic emissions (AE) primarily due to rapid interfacial jumps at pore scale. We investigated acoustical signatures of propagating drying fronts in porous media during evaporation from Hele-Shaw cells packed with four types of sand, initially water saturated, with average particle sizes of 0.16 mm, 0.48 mm, 0.61 mm, and 1.76 mm. Evaporation rates were deduced from mass loss measured using digital balances. Evaporation experiments were conducted in an environmental chamber set to 35° C and 40% RH. An AE sensor was fixed to each glass column to monitor AEs associated with Haines jumps from a receding drying front. The characteristics of measured AEs such as amplitude, frequency, absolute energy, number of hits, and wave forms were recorded using an AE acquisition system. Preliminary results indicate a strong relationship between the cumulative number of AE hits and the columns' evaporative mass loss. Our results reveal that particle size significantly impacts the characteristics of the emitted acoustic waves. Larger particle sizes increase AE amplitudes, energies, and durations. Conversely, average hit frequency and the total number of hits are inversely related to particle size-- i.e. the smaller the particle size, the higher the frequency and total number of hits. These results suggest that AE techniques can be used to non-invasively characterize the texture of porous media and bring insights into their drying patterns.

  20. A new setup for studying thermal microcracking through acoustic emission monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, Luke; Heap, Michael; Baud, Patrick; Schmittbuhl, Jean

    2016-04-01

    Thermal stressing is common in geothermal environments and has been shown in the laboratory to induce changes in the physical and mechanical properties of rocks. These changes are generally considered to be a consequence of the generation of thermal microcracks and debilitating chemical reactions. Thermal microcracks form as a result of the build-up of internal stresses due to: (1) the thermal expansion mismatch between the different phases present in the material, (2) thermal expansion anisotropy within individual minerals, and (3) thermal gradients. The generation of cracks during thermal stressing has been monitored in previous studies using the output of acoustic emissions (AE), a common proxy for microcrack damage, and through microstructural observations. Here we present a new experimental setup which is optimised to record AE from a rock sample at high temperatures and under a servo-controlled uniaxial stress. The design is such that the AE transducer is embedded in the top of the piston, which acts as a continuous wave guide to the sample. In this way, we simplify the ray path geometry whilst minimising the number of interfaces between the microcrack and the transducer, maximising the quality of the signal. This allows for an in-depth study of waveform attributes such as energy, amplitude, counts and duration. Furthermore, the capability of this device to apply a servo-controlled load on the sample, whilst measuring strain in real time, leads to a spectrum of possible tests combining mechanical and thermal stress. It is also an essential feature to eliminate the build-up of stresses through thermal expansion of the pistons and the sample. We plan a systematic experimental study of the AE of thermally stressed rock during heating and cooling cycles. We present results from pilot tests performed on Darley Dale sandstone and Westerly granite. Understanding the effects of thermal stressing in rock is of particular interest at a geothermal site, where

  1. Optical observations of meteors generating infrasound-I: Acoustic signal identification and phenomenology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silber, Elizabeth A.; Brown, Peter G.

    2014-11-01

    We analyse infrasound signals from 71 bright meteors/fireballs simultaneously detected by video to investigate the phenomenology and characteristics of meteor-generated near-field infrasound (<300 km) and shock production. A taxonomy for meteor generated infrasound signal classification has been developed using the time-pressure signal of the infrasound arrivals. Based on the location along the meteor trail where the infrasound signal originates, we find most signals are associated with cylindrical shocks, with about a quarter of events evidencing spherical shocks associated with fragmentation episodes and optical flares. The video data indicate that all events with ray launch angles >117° from the trajectory heading are most likely generated by a spherical shock, while infrasound produced by the meteors with ray launch angles ≤117° can be attributed to both a cylindrical line source and a spherical shock. We find that meteors preferentially produce infrasound toward the end of their trails with a smaller number showing a preference for mid-trail production. Meteors producing multiple infrasound arrivals show a strong infrasound source height skewness to the end of trails and are much more likely to be associated with optical flares. We find that about 1% of all our optically-recorded meteors have associated detected infrasound and estimate that regional meteor infrasound events should occur on the order of once per week and dominate in numbers over infrasound associated with more energetic (but rarer) bolides. While a significant fraction of our meteors generating infrasound (~1/4 of single arrivals) are produced by fragmentation events, we find no instances where acoustic radiation is detectable more than about 60° beyond the ballistic regime at our meteoroid sizes (grams to tens of kilograms) emphasizing the strong anisotropy in acoustic radiation for meteors which are dominated by cylindrical line source geometry, even in the presence of fragmentation.

  2. Multiple target tracking and classification improvement using data fusion at node level using acoustic signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damarla, T. R.; Whipps, Gene

    2005-05-01

    Target tracking and classification using passive acoustic signals is difficult at best as the signals are contaminated by wind noise, multi-path effects, road conditions, and are generally not deterministic. In addition, microphone characteristics, such as sensitivity, vary with the weather conditions. The problem is further compounded if there are multiple targets, especially if some are measured with higher signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) than the others and they share spectral information. At the U. S. Army Research Laboratory we have conducted several field experiments with a convoy of two, three, four and five vehicles traveling on different road surfaces, namely gravel, asphalt, and dirt roads. The largest convoy is comprised of two tracked vehicles and three wheeled vehicles. Two of the wheeled vehicles are heavy trucks and one is a light vehicle. We used a super-resolution direction-of-arrival estimator, specifically the minimum variance distortionless response, to compute the bearings of the targets. In order to classify the targets, we modeled the acoustic signals emanated from the targets as a set of coupled harmonics, which are related to the engine-firing rate, and subsequently used a multivariate Gaussian classifier. Independent of the classifier, we find tracking of wheeled vehicles to be intermittent as the signals from vehicles with high SNR dominate the much quieter wheeled vehicles. We used several fusion techniques to combine tracking and classification results to improve final tracking and classification estimates. We will present the improvements (or losses) made in tracking and classification of all targets. Although improvements in the estimates for tracked vehicles are not noteworthy, significant improvements are seen in the case of wheeled vehicles. We will present the fusion algorithm used.

  3. Energy monitoring and analysis during deformation of bedded-sandstone: use of acoustic emission.

    PubMed

    Wasantha, P L P; Ranjith, P G; Shao, S S

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the mechanical behaviour and energy releasing characteristics of bedded-sandstone with bedding layers in different orientations, under uniaxial compression. Cylindrical sandstone specimens (54 mm diameter and 108 mm height) with bedding layers inclined at angles of 10°, 20°, 35°, 55°, and 83° to the minor principal stress direction, were produced to perform a series of Uniaxial Compressive Strength (UCS) tests. One of the two identical sample sets was fully-saturated with water before testing and the other set was tested under dry conditions. An acoustic emission system was employed in all the testing to monitor the acoustic energy release during the whole deformation process of specimens. From the test results, the critical joint orientation was observed as 55° for both dry and saturated samples and the peak-strength losses due to water were 15.56%, 20.06%, 13.5%, 13.2%, and 13.52% for the bedding orientations 10°, 20°, 35°, 55°, and 83°, respectively. The failure mechanisms for the specimens with bedding layers in 10°, 20° orientations showed splitting type failure, while the specimens with bedding layers in 55°, 83° orientations were failed by sliding along a weaker bedding layer. The failure mechanism for the specimens with bedding layers in 35° orientation showed a mixed failure mode of both splitting and sliding types. Analysis of the acoustic energy, captured from the acoustic emission detection system, revealed that the acoustic energy release is considerably higher in dry specimens than that of the saturated specimens at any bedding orientation. In addition, higher energy release was observed for specimens with bedding layers oriented in shallow angles (which were undergoing splitting type failures), whereas specimens with steeply oriented bedding layers (which were undergoing sliding type failures) showed a comparatively less energy release under both dry and saturated conditions. Moreover, a considerable amount of

  4. Energy monitoring and analysis during deformation of bedded-sandstone: use of acoustic emission.

    PubMed

    Wasantha, P L P; Ranjith, P G; Shao, S S

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the mechanical behaviour and energy releasing characteristics of bedded-sandstone with bedding layers in different orientations, under uniaxial compression. Cylindrical sandstone specimens (54 mm diameter and 108 mm height) with bedding layers inclined at angles of 10°, 20°, 35°, 55°, and 83° to the minor principal stress direction, were produced to perform a series of Uniaxial Compressive Strength (UCS) tests. One of the two identical sample sets was fully-saturated with water before testing and the other set was tested under dry conditions. An acoustic emission system was employed in all the testing to monitor the acoustic energy release during the whole deformation process of specimens. From the test results, the critical joint orientation was observed as 55° for both dry and saturated samples and the peak-strength losses due to water were 15.56%, 20.06%, 13.5%, 13.2%, and 13.52% for the bedding orientations 10°, 20°, 35°, 55°, and 83°, respectively. The failure mechanisms for the specimens with bedding layers in 10°, 20° orientations showed splitting type failure, while the specimens with bedding layers in 55°, 83° orientations were failed by sliding along a weaker bedding layer. The failure mechanism for the specimens with bedding layers in 35° orientation showed a mixed failure mode of both splitting and sliding types. Analysis of the acoustic energy, captured from the acoustic emission detection system, revealed that the acoustic energy release is considerably higher in dry specimens than that of the saturated specimens at any bedding orientation. In addition, higher energy release was observed for specimens with bedding layers oriented in shallow angles (which were undergoing splitting type failures), whereas specimens with steeply oriented bedding layers (which were undergoing sliding type failures) showed a comparatively less energy release under both dry and saturated conditions. Moreover, a considerable amount of

  5. System and method for characterizing, synthesizing, and/or canceling out acoustic signals from inanimate sound sources

    DOEpatents

    Holzrichter, John F; Burnett, Greg C; Ng, Lawrence C

    2013-05-21

    A system and method for characterizing, synthesizing, and/or canceling out acoustic signals from inanimate sound sources is disclosed. Propagating wave electromagnetic sensors monitor excitation sources in sound producing systems, such as machines, musical instruments, and various other structures. Acoustical output from these sound producing systems is also monitored. From such information, a transfer function characterizing the sound producing system is generated. From the transfer function, acoustical output from the sound producing system may be synthesized or canceled. The methods disclosed enable accurate calculation of matched transfer functions relating specific excitations to specific acoustical outputs. Knowledge of such signals and functions can be used to effect various sound replication, sound source identification, and sound cancellation applications.

  6. System and method for characterizing, synthesizing, and/or canceling out acoustic signals from inanimate sound sources

    DOEpatents

    Holzrichter, John F.; Burnett, Greg C.; Ng, Lawrence C.

    2007-10-16

    A system and method for characterizing, synthesizing, and/or canceling out acoustic signals from inanimate sound sources is disclosed. Propagating wave electromagnetic sensors monitor excitation sources in sound producing systems, such as machines, musical instruments, and various other structures. Acoustical output from these sound producing systems is also monitored. From such information, a transfer function characterizing the sound producing system is generated. From the transfer function, acoustical output from the sound producing system may be synthesized or canceled. The methods disclosed enable accurate calculation of matched transfer functions relating specific excitations to specific acoustical outputs. Knowledge of such signals and functions can be used to effect various sound replication, sound source identification, and sound cancellation applications.

  7. System and method for characterizing synthesizing and/or canceling out acoustic signals from inanimate sound sources

    DOEpatents

    Holzrichter, John F.; Burnett, Greg C.; Ng, Lawrence C.

    2003-01-01

    A system and method for characterizing, synthesizing, and/or canceling out acoustic signals from inanimate sound sources is disclosed. Propagating wave electromagnetic sensors monitor excitation sources in sound producing systems, such as machines, musical instruments, and various other structures. Acoustical output from these sound producing systems is also monitored. From such information, a transfer function characterizing the sound producing system is generated. From the transfer function, acoustical output from the sound producing system may be synthesized or canceled. The methods disclosed enable accurate calculation of matched transfer functions relating specific excitations to specific acoustical outputs. Knowledge of such signals and functions can be used to effect various sound replication, sound source identification, and sound cancellation applications.

  8. Acoustic emission and guided ultrasonic waves for detection and continuous monitoring of cracks in light water reactor components

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, R. M.; Coble, J.; Ramuhalli, P.; Watson, B.; Cumblidge, S. E.; Doctor, S. R.; Bond, L. J.

    2012-07-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) and guided ultrasonic waves (GUW) are considered for continuous monitoring and detection of cracks in Light Water Reactor (LWR) components. In this effort, both techniques are applied to the detection and monitoring of fatigue crack growth in a full scale pipe component. AE results indicated crack initiation and rapid growth in the pipe, and significant GUW responses were observed in response to the growth of the fatigue crack. After initiation, the crack growth was detectable with AE for approximately 20,000 cycles. Signals associated with initiation and rapid growth were distinguished based on total rate of activity and differences observed in the centroid frequency of hits. An intermediate stage between initiation and rapid growth was associated with significant energy emissions, though few hits. GUW exhibit a nearly monotonic trend with crack length with an exception of measurements obtained at crack lengths of 41 mm and 46 mm. Coupling variability and shadowing by the electro-discharge machining (EDM) starter notch set the lower limit of detectability. (authors)

  9. Acoustic Emission Weld Monitoring in the 2195 Aluminum-Lithium Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, James L.

    2005-01-01

    Due to its low density, the 2195 aluminum-lithium alloy was developed as a replacement for alloy 2219 in the Space Shuttle External Tank (ET). The external tank is the single largest component of the space shuttle system. It is 154 feet long and 27.6 feet in diameter, and serves as the structural backbone for the shuttle during launch, absorbing most of the 7 million plus pounds of thrust produced. The almost 4% decrease in density between the two materials provides an extra 7500 pounds of payload capacity necessary to put the International Space Station components into orbit. The ET is an all-welded structure; hence, the requirement is for up to five rewelds without hot cracking. Unfortunately, hot cracking during re-welding or repair operations was occurring and had to be dealt with before the new super lightweight tank could be used. Weld metal porosity formation was also of concern because it leads to hot cracking during weld repairs. Accordingly, acoustic emission (AE) nondestructive testing was employed to monitor the formation of porosity and hot cracks in order to select the best filler metal and optimize the weld schedule. The purpose of this work is to determine the feasibility of detecting hot cracking in welded aluminum-lithium (Al-Li) structures through the analysis of acoustic emission data. By acoustically characterizing the effects of reheating during a repair operation, the potential for hidden flaws coalescing and becoming "unstable" as the panel is repaired could be reduced. Identification of regions where microcrack growth is likely to occur and the location of active flaw growth in the repair weld will provide the welder with direct feedback as to the current weld quality enabling adjustments to the repair process be made in the field. An acoustic emission analysis of the source mechanisms present during welding has been conducted with the goals of locating regions in the weld line that are susceptible to damage from a repair operation

  10. A study of aluminum-lithium alloy solidification using acoustic emission techniques. Ph.D. Thesis, 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henkel, Daniel P.

    1992-01-01

    Physical phenomena associated with the solidification of an aluminum lithium alloy was characterized using acoustic emission (AE) techniques. It is shown that repeatable patterns of AE activity may be correlated to microstructural changes that occur during solidification. The influence of the experimental system on generated signals was examined in the time and frequency domains. The analysis was used to show how an AE signal from solidifying aluminum is changed by each component in the detection system to produce a complex waveform. Conventional AE analysis has shown that a period of high AE activity occurs in pure aluminum, an Al-Cu alloy, and the Al-Li alloy, as the last fraction of solid forms. A model attributes this to the internal stresses of grain boundary formation. An additional period of activity occurs as the last fraction of solid forms, but only in the two alloys. A model attributes this to the formation of interdendritic porosity which was not present in the pure aluminum. The AE waveforms were dominated by resonant effects of the waveguide and the transducer.

  11. Damage Characterization of Glass/Epoxy Composite Under Three-Point Bending Test Using Acoustic Emission Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pashmforoush, Farzad; Fotouhi, Mohamad; Ahmadi, Mehdi

    2012-07-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) technique is an efficient non-destructive method for detection and identification of various damage mechanisms in composite materials. Discrimination of AE signals related to different damage modes is of great importance in the use of this technique. For this purpose, integration of k-means algorithm and genetic algorithm (GA) was used in this study to cluster AE events of glass/epoxy composite during three-point bending test. Performing clustering analysis, three clusters with separate frequency ranges were obtained, each one representing a distinct damage mechanism. Furthermore, time-frequency analysis of AE signals was performed based on wavelet packet transform (WPT). In order to find the dominant components associated with different damage mechanisms, the energy distribution criterion was used. The frequency ranges of the dominant components were then compared with k-means genetic algorithm (KGA) outputs. Finally, SEM observation was utilized to validate the results. The obtained results indicate good performance of the proposed methods in the damage characterization of composite materials.

  12. Silent katydid females are at higher risk of bat predation than acoustically signalling katydid males.

    PubMed

    Raghuram, Hanumanthan; Deb, Rittik; Nandi, Diptarup; Balakrishnan, Rohini

    2015-01-01

    Males that produce conspicuous mate attraction signals are often at high risk of predation from eavesdropping predators. Females of such species typically search for signalling males and their higher motility may also place them at risk. The relative predation risk faced by males and females in the context of mate-finding using long-distance signals has rarely been investigated. In this study, we show, using a combination of diet analysis and behavioural experiments, that katydid females, who do not produce acoustic signals, are at higher risk of predation from a major bat predator, Megaderma spasma, than calling males. Female katydids were represented in much higher numbers than males in the culled remains beneath roosts of M. spasma. Playback experiments using katydid calls revealed that male calls were approached in only about one-third of the trials overall, whereas tethered, flying katydids were always approached and attacked. Our results question the idea that necessary costs of mate-finding, including risk of predation, are higher in signalling males than in searching females.

  13. Silent katydid females are at higher risk of bat predation than acoustically signalling katydid males

    PubMed Central

    Raghuram, Hanumanthan; Deb, Rittik; Nandi, Diptarup; Balakrishnan, Rohini

    2015-01-01

    Males that produce conspicuous mate attraction signals are often at high risk of predation from eavesdropping predators. Females of such species typically search for signalling males and their higher motility may also place them at risk. The relative predation risk faced by males and females in the context of mate-finding using long-distance signals has rarely been investigated. In this study, we show, using a combination of diet analysis and behavioural experiments, that katydid females, who do not produce acoustic signals, are at higher risk of predation from a major bat predator, Megaderma spasma, than calling males. Female katydids were represented in much higher numbers than males in the culled remains beneath roosts of M. spasma. Playback experiments using katydid calls revealed that male calls were approached in only about one-third of the trials overall, whereas tethered, flying katydids were always approached and attacked. Our results question the idea that necessary costs of mate-finding, including risk of predation, are higher in signalling males than in searching females. PMID:25429019

  14. When males whistle at females: complex FM acoustic signals in cockroaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sueur, Jérôme; Aubin, Thierry

    2006-10-01

    Male cockroaches of the species Elliptorhina chopardi expel air through a pair of modified abdominal spiracles during courtship. This air expulsion simultaneously produces air and substrate-borne vibrations. We described and compared in details these two types of vibrations. Our analysis of the air-borne signals shows that males can produce three categories of signals with distinct temporal and frequency parameters. “Pure whistles” consist of two independent harmonic series fast frequency modulated with independent harmonics that can cross each other. “Noisy whistles” also possess two independent voices but include a noisy broad-band frequency part in the middle. Hiss sounds are more noise-like, being made of a broad-band frequency spectrum. All three call types are unusually high in dominant frequency (>5 kHz) for cockroaches. The substrate-borne signals are categorised similarly. Some harmonics of the substrate-borne signals were filtered out, however, making the acoustic energy centered on fewer frequency bands. Our analysis shows that cockroach signals are complex, with fast frequency modulations and two distinct voices. These results also readdress the question of what system could potentially receive and decode the information contained within such complex sounds.

  15. Silent katydid females are at higher risk of bat predation than acoustically signalling katydid males.

    PubMed

    Raghuram, Hanumanthan; Deb, Rittik; Nandi, Diptarup; Balakrishnan, Rohini

    2015-01-01

    Males that produce conspicuous mate attraction signals are often at high risk of predation from eavesdropping predators. Females of such species typically search for signalling males and their higher motility may also place them at risk. The relative predation risk faced by males and females in the context of mate-finding using long-distance signals has rarely been investigated. In this study, we show, using a combination of diet analysis and behavioural experiments, that katydid females, who do not produce acoustic signals, are at higher risk of predation from a major bat predator, Megaderma spasma, than calling males. Female katydids were represented in much higher numbers than males in the culled remains beneath roosts of M. spasma. Playback experiments using katydid calls revealed that male calls were approached in only about one-third of the trials overall, whereas tethered, flying katydids were always approached and attacked. Our results question the idea that necessary costs of mate-finding, including risk of predation, are higher in signalling males than in searching females. PMID:25429019

  16. Processing of simple and complex acoustic signals in a tonotopically organized ear

    PubMed Central

    Hummel, Jennifer; Wolf, Konstantin; Kössl, Manfred; Nowotny, Manuela

    2014-01-01

    Processing of complex signals in the hearing organ remains poorly understood. This paper aims to contribute to this topic by presenting investigations on the mechanical and neuronal response of the hearing organ of the tropical bushcricket species Mecopoda elongata to simple pure tone signals as well as to the conspecific song as a complex acoustic signal. The high-frequency hearing organ of bushcrickets, the crista acustica (CA), is tonotopically tuned to frequencies between about 4 and 70 kHz. Laser Doppler vibrometer measurements revealed a strong and dominant low-frequency-induced motion of the CA when stimulated with either pure tone or complex stimuli. Consequently, the high-frequency distal area of the CA is more strongly deflected by low-frequency-induced waves than by high-frequency-induced waves. This low-frequency dominance will have strong effects on the processing of complex signals. Therefore, we additionally studied the neuronal response of the CA to native and frequency-manipulated chirps. Again, we found a dominant influence of low-frequency components within the conspecific song, indicating that the mechanical vibration pattern highly determines the neuronal response of the sensory cells. Thus, we conclude that the encoding of communication signals is modulated by ear mechanics. PMID:25339727

  17. Processing of simple and complex acoustic signals in a tonotopically organized ear.

    PubMed

    Hummel, Jennifer; Wolf, Konstantin; Kössl, Manfred; Nowotny, Manuela

    2014-12-01

    Processing of complex signals in the hearing organ remains poorly understood. This paper aims to contribute to this topic by presenting investigations on the mechanical and neuronal response of the hearing organ of the tropical bushcricket species Mecopoda elongata to simple pure tone signals as well as to the conspecific song as a complex acoustic signal. The high-frequency hearing organ of bushcrickets, the crista acustica (CA), is tonotopically tuned to frequencies between about 4 and 70 kHz. Laser Doppler vibrometer measurements revealed a strong and dominant low-frequency-induced motion of the CA when stimulated with either pure tone or complex stimuli. Consequently, the high-frequency distal area of the CA is more strongly deflected by low-frequency-induced waves than by high-frequency-induced waves. This low-frequency dominance will have strong effects on the processing of complex signals. Therefore, we additionally studied the neuronal response of the CA to native and frequency-manipulated chirps. Again, we found a dominant influence of low-frequency components within the conspecific song, indicating that the mechanical vibration pattern highly determines the neuronal response of the sensory cells. Thus, we conclude that the encoding of communication signals is modulated by ear mechanics.

  18. Multi-bearing defect detection with trackside acoustic signal based on a pseudo time-frequency analysis and Dopplerlet filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haibin; Lu, Siliang; He, Qingbo; Kong, Fanrang

    2016-03-01

    The diagnosis of train bearing defects based on the acoustic signal acquired by a trackside microphone plays a significant role in the transport system. However, the wayside acoustic signal suffers from the Doppler distortion due to the high moving speed and also contains the multi-source signals from different train bearings. This paper proposes a novel solution to overcome the two difficulties in trackside acoustic diagnosis. In the method a pseudo time-frequency analysis (PTFA) based on an improved Dopplerlet transform (IDT) is presented to acquire the time centers for different bearings. With the time centers, we design a series of Dopplerlet filters (DF) in time-frequency domain to work on the signal's time-frequency distribution (TFD) gained by the short time Fourier transform (STFT). Then an inverse STFT (ISTFT) is utilized to get the separated signals for each sound source which means bearing here. Later the resampling method based on certain motion parameters eliminates the Doppler Effect and finally the diagnosis can be made effectively according to the envelope spectrum of each separated signal. With the effectiveness of the technique validated by both simulated and experimental cases, the proposed wayside acoustic diagnostic scheme is expected to be available in wayside defective bearing detection.

  19. The broadband social acoustic signaling behavior of spinner and spotted dolphins.

    PubMed

    Lammers, Marc O; Au, Whitlow W L; Herzing, Denise L

    2003-09-01

    Efforts to study the social acoustic signaling behavior of delphinids have traditionally been restricted to audio-range (<20 kHz) analyses. To explore the occurrence of communication signals at ultrasonic frequencies, broadband recordings of whistles and burst pulses were obtained from two commonly studied species of delphinids, the Hawaiian spinner dolphin (Stenella longirostris) and the Atlantic spotted dolphin (Stenella frontalis). Signals were quantitatively analyzed to establish their full bandwidth, to identify distinguishing characteristics between each species, and to determine how often they occur beyond the range of human hearing. Fundamental whistle contours were found to extend beyond 20 kHz only rarely among spotted dolphins, but with some regularity in spinner dolphins. Harmonics were present in the majority of whistles and varied considerably in their number, occurrence, and amplitude. Many whistles had harmonics that extended past 50 kHz and some reached as high as 100 kHz. The relative amplitude of harmonics and the high hearing sensitivity of dolphins to equivalent frequencies suggest that harmonics are biologically relevant spectral features. The burst pulses of both species were found to be predominantly ultrasonic, often with little or no energy below 20 kHz. The findings presented reveal that the social signals produced by spinner and spotted dolphins span the full range of their hearing sensitivity, are spectrally quite varied, and in the case of burst pulses are probably produced more frequently than reported by audio-range analyses. PMID:14514216

  20. The broadband social acoustic signaling behavior of spinner and spotted dolphins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lammers, Marc O.; Au, Whitlow W. L.; Herzing, Denise L.

    2003-09-01

    Efforts to study the social acoustic signaling behavior of delphinids have traditionally been restricted to audio-range (<20 kHz) analyses. To explore the occurrence of communication signals at ultrasonic frequencies, broadband recordings of whistles and burst pulses were obtained from two commonly studied species of delphinids, the Hawaiian spinner dolphin (Stenella longirostris) and the Atlantic spotted dolphin (Stenella frontalis). Signals were quantitatively analyzed to establish their full bandwidth, to identify distinguishing characteristics between each species, and to determine how often they occur beyond the range of human hearing. Fundamental whistle contours were found to extend beyond 20 kHz only rarely among spotted dolphins, but with some regularity in spinner dolphins. Harmonics were present in the majority of whistles and varied considerably in their number, occurrence, and amplitude. Many whistles had harmonics that extended past 50 kHz and some reached as high as 100 kHz. The relative amplitude of harmonics and the high hearing sensitivity of dolphins to equivalent frequencies suggest that harmonics are biologically relevant spectral features. The burst pulses of both species were found to be predominantly ultrasonic, often with little or no energy below 20 kHz. The findings presented reveal that the social signals produced by spinner and spotted dolphins span the full range of their hearing sensitivity, are spectrally quite varied, and in the case of burst pulses are probably produced more frequently than reported by audio-range analyses.