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Sample records for acoustic energy source

  1. Energy-Based Acoustic Source Localization Methods: A Survey

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Wei; Xiao, Wendong

    2017-01-01

    Energy-based source localization is an important problem in wireless sensor networks (WSNs), which has been studied actively in the literature. Numerous localization algorithms, e.g., maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) and nonlinear-least-squares (NLS) methods, have been reported. In the literature, there are relevant review papers for localization in WSNs, e.g., for distance-based localization. However, not much work related to energy-based source localization is covered in the existing review papers. Energy-based methods are proposed and specially designed for a WSN due to its limited sensor capabilities. This paper aims to give a comprehensive review of these different algorithms for energy-based single and multiple source localization problems, their merits and demerits and to point out possible future research directions. PMID:28212281

  2. Energy-Based Acoustic Source Localization Methods: A Survey.

    PubMed

    Meng, Wei; Xiao, Wendong

    2017-02-15

    Energy-based source localization is an important problem in wireless sensor networks (WSNs), which has been studied actively in the literature. Numerous localization algorithms, e.g., maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) and nonlinear-least-squares (NLS) methods, have been reported. In the literature, there are relevant review papers for localization in WSNs, e.g., for distance-based localization. However, not much work related to energy-based source localization is covered in the existing review papers. Energy-based methods are proposed and specially designed for a WSN due to its limited sensor capabilities. This paper aims to give a comprehensive review of these different algorithms for energy-based single and multiple source localization problems, their merits and demerits and to point out possible future research directions.

  3. Energy Source Study Technical Report for Deployable Acoustic Projector System (DAPS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-23

    S SPARTON"- AD-A278 879 7097-0001-1192 ENERGY SOURCE STUDY TECHNICAL REPORT FOR DEPLOYABLE ACOUSTIC PROJECTOR SYSTEM (DAPS) Contract N62190-88-M...SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Energy Source Study Technical Report for Deployable C:N62190-88-q+0755 Acoustic Projector System (DAPS) 6. AUTHOR(S) 7...Rev 2-89) P~IýAIppd by ill* 164 it- IJs IL- 3 Fst’ rPAITON OWiENSE mac vrroNcS r 7097-0001-1192 ENERGY SOURCE STUDY TECHNICAL REPORT I FOR DEPLOYABLE

  4. Deployable Acoustic Projector System (DAPS) Energy Source Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-01

    final, etc. If Statements on Technical applicable, enter inclusive report dates (e.g. 10 Documents. Jun 87 - 30 Jun 88). DOE - See authorities...aJIUILOI NG 20C WIII OCSR L[~,CONNETICUT 0 811 LT = LECT I -w L94 5 06 036 Form Appmv’ovd REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE C No. 0A,-0pov pull efa’, m a fm thi...ONLY (Leave blank) 2. REPORT DATE 3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED Dec 88 Final 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE S. FUNDING NUMBERS Deployable Acoustic Projector

  5. Acoustic source for generating an acoustic beam

    DOEpatents

    Vu, Cung Khac; Sinha, Dipen N.; Pantea, Cristian

    2016-05-31

    An acoustic source for generating an acoustic beam includes a housing; a plurality of spaced apart piezo-electric layers disposed within the housing; and a non-linear medium filling between the plurality of layers. Each of the plurality of piezoelectric layers is configured to generate an acoustic wave. The non-linear medium and the plurality of piezo-electric material layers have a matching impedance so as to enhance a transmission of the acoustic wave generated by each of plurality of layers through the remaining plurality of layers.

  6. Investigation of the Acoustic Source Characteristics of High Energy Laser Pulses: Models and Experiment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-01

    consistent with the expected approximately 1/r relationship for pressure amplitudes under 100MPa. The modeling effort employed AUTODYN , a finite...agreed with Vogel’s measured values. The efficiency, pulse length, pulse shape, and variation of pressure amplitude with range achieved with AUTODYN ...Nonlinear Acoustics, AUTODYN , Acoustic Modeling, Shock Acoustics 16. PRICE CODE 17. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF REPORT Unclassified 18. SECURITY

  7. Growth and optimization of piezoelectric single crystal transducers for energy harvesting from acoustic sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhar, Romit

    Low power requirements of modern sensors and electronics have led to the examination of the feasibility of several energy harvesting schemes. This thesis describes the fabrication and performance of an acoustic energy harvester with single crystal piezoelectric unimorph. The unimorphs were fabricated from single crystal relaxor ferroelectric (1-x)PMN - xPT grown with x = 0.3 and 0.32 as the starting composition. It is demonstrated that significant power can be harvested using unimorph structures from an acoustic field at resonance. Passive circuit components were used for output circuit with a resistive load in series with a tunable inductor. A tuning capacitor connected in parallel to the device further increased the power output by matching the impedance of the unimorph. The power harvested can be either used directly for running low-power devices or can be stored in a rechargeable battery. A comparison of the performance of PMN-PT and PZT unimorphs at the resonance of the coupled structure under identical excitation conditions was done. For a certain optimized thickness ratio and circuit parameters, the single crystal PMN-PT unimorph generated 30 mW of power while a PZT unimorph generated 7.5 mW at resonance and room temperature. The harvested output power from the single crystal PMN-PT unimorphs depends on several material properties, physical and ambient parameters and an effort has been made to study their effect on the performance. A self-seeding high pressure Bridgman (HPB) technique was used to grow the PMN-PT single crystal ingots in a cost-effective way in our laboratories. Several techniques of material processing were developed to fabricate the PMN-PT single crystal unimorphs from as grown bulk ingots. This growth technique produced good quality single crystals for our experiments, with a k33 = 0.91 for a <001> oriented bar.

  8. Acoustic sensors using microstructures tunable with energy other than acoustic energy

    DOEpatents

    Datskos, Panagiotis G.

    2003-11-25

    A sensor for detecting acoustic energy includes a microstructure tuned to a predetermined acoustic frequency and a device for detecting movement of the microstructure. A display device is operatively linked to the movement detecting device. When acoustic energy strikes the acoustic sensor, acoustic energy having a predetermined frequency moves the microstructure, where the movement is detected by the movement detecting device.

  9. Acoustic sensors using microstructures tunable with energy other than acoustic energy

    DOEpatents

    Datskos, Panagiotis G.

    2005-06-07

    A sensor for detecting acoustic energy includes a microstructure tuned to a predetermined acoustic frequency and a device for detecting movement of the microstructure. A display device is operatively linked to the movement detecting device. When acoustic energy strikes the acoustic sensor, acoustic energy having a predetermined frequency moves the microstructure, where the movement is detected by the movement detecting device.

  10. Ultrasound acoustic wave energy transfer and harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahab, Shima; Leadenham, Stephen; Guillot, François; Sabra, Karim; Erturk, Alper

    2014-04-01

    This paper investigates low-power electricity generation from ultrasound acoustic wave energy transfer combined with piezoelectric energy harvesting for wireless applications ranging from medical implants to naval sensor systems. The focus is placed on an underwater system that consists of a pulsating source for spherical wave generation and a harvester connected to an external resistive load for quantifying the electrical power output. An analytical electro-acoustic model is developed to relate the source strength to the electrical power output of the harvester located at a specific distance from the source. The model couples the energy harvester dynamics (piezoelectric device and electrical load) with the source strength through the acoustic-structure interaction at the harvester-fluid interface. Case studies are given for a detailed understanding of the coupled system dynamics under various conditions. Specifically the relationship between the electrical power output and system parameters, such as the distance of the harvester from the source, dimensions of the harvester, level of source strength, and electrical load resistance are explored. Sensitivity of the electrical power output to the excitation frequency in the neighborhood of the harvester's underwater resonance frequency is also reported.

  11. Acoustic energy harvesting based on a planar acoustic metamaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Shuibao; Oudich, Mourad; Li, Yong; Assouar, Badreddine

    2016-06-01

    We theoretically report on an innovative and practical acoustic energy harvester based on a defected acoustic metamaterial (AMM) with piezoelectric material. The idea is to create suitable resonant defects in an AMM to confine the strain energy originating from an acoustic incidence. This scavenged energy is converted into electrical energy by attaching a structured piezoelectric material into the defect area of the AMM. We show an acoustic energy harvester based on a meta-structure capable of producing electrical power from an acoustic pressure. Numerical simulations are provided to analyze and elucidate the principles and the performances of the proposed system. A maximum output voltage of 1.3 V and a power density of 0.54 μW/cm3 are obtained at a frequency of 2257.5 Hz. The proposed concept should have broad applications on energy harvesting as well as on low-frequency sound isolation, since this system acts as both acoustic insulator and energy harvester.

  12. Note: Vibration energy harvesting based on a round acoustic fence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Xiao-bin; Huang, Cheng-ping; Hu, Jun-hui

    2015-07-01

    An energy harvester based on a round acoustic fence (RAF) has been proposed and studied. The RAF is composed of cylindrical stubs stuck in a circular array on a thin metal plate, which can confine the acoustic energy efficiently. By removing one stub and thus opening a small gap in the RAF, acoustic leakage with larger intensity can be produced at the gap opening. With the vibration source surrounded by the RAF, the energy harvesting at the gap opening has a wide bandwidth and is insensitive to the position of the vibration source. The results may have potential applications in harvesting the energy of various vibration sources in solid structure.

  13. Using Streamlines to Visualize Acoustic Energy Flow Across Boundaries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-07-01

    radiate from a point source in a homogeneous fluid and propagate across a plane boundary into a dissimilar homogeneous fluid, the acoustic field may...associated with diffraction i.e., those components that vanish with increasing frequency. The energy flow from a continuous-wave monopole point source...vector, averaged over a wave cycle. It is seen that the acoustic energy flow is not always in line with the “Snell’s law” or stationary phase path. Also

  14. Properties of acoustic sources in the Sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Pawan

    1994-01-01

    The power spectrum of solar acoustic oscillations shows peaks extending out to frequencies much greater than the acoustic cutoff frequency of approximately 5.3 mHz, where waves are no longer trapped. Kumar & Lu (1991) proposed that these peaks arise from the interference of traveling waves which are generated by turbulent convection. According to this model, the frequencies of the peaks in the power spectrum depend on the static structure of the Sun as well as the radial location of the sources. Kumar & Lu used this idea to determine the depth of the acoustic sources. However, they ignored dissipative effects and found that the theoretically computed power spectrum was falling off much more rapidly than the observed spectrum. In this paper, we include the interaction of radiation with acoustic waves in the computation of the power spectrum. We find that the theoretically calculated power spectra, when radiative damping is included are in excellent agreement with the observed power spectra over the entire observed frequency range of 5.3 to 7.5 mHz above the acoustic cutoff frequency. Moreover, by matching the peak frequencies in the observed and theoretical spectra we find the mean depth of acoustic sources to be 140 +/- 60 km below the photosphere. We show that the spectrum of solar turbulence near the top of the solar convection zone is consistent with the Kolmogorov spectrum, and that the observed high frequency power spectrum provides strong evidence that the acoustic sources in the Sun are quadrupolar. The data, in fact, rules out dipole sources as significant contributors to acoustic wave generation in the Sun. The radial extent of the sources is poorly determined and is estimated to be less than about 550 km.

  15. Method and apparatus for generating acoustic energy

    DOEpatents

    Guerrero, Hector N.

    2002-01-01

    A method and apparatus for generating and emitting amplified coherent acoustic energy. A cylindrical transducer is mounted within a housing, the transducer having an acoustically open end and an acoustically closed end. The interior of the transducer is filled with an active medium which may include scattering nuclei. Excitation of the transducer produces radially directed acoustic energy in the active medium, which is converted by the dimensions of the transducer, the acoustically closed end thereof, and the scattering nuclei, to amplified coherent acoustic energy directed longitudinally within the transducer. The energy is emitted through the acoustically open end of the transducer. The emitted energy can be used for, among other things, effecting a chemical reaction or removing scale from the interior walls of containment vessels.

  16. Pulsed-Source Interferometry in Acoustic Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shcheglov, Kirill; Gutierrez, Roman; Tang, Tony K.

    2003-01-01

    A combination of pulsed-source interferometry and acoustic diffraction has been proposed for use in imaging subsurface microscopic defects and other features in such diverse objects as integrated-circuit chips, specimens of materials, and mechanical parts. A specimen to be inspected by this technique would be mounted with its bottom side in contact with an acoustic transducer driven by a continuous-wave acoustic signal at a suitable frequency, which could be as low as a megahertz or as high as a few hundred gigahertz. The top side of the specimen would be coupled to an object that would have a flat (when not vibrating) top surface and that would serve as the acoustical analog of an optical medium (in effect, an acoustical "optic").

  17. Acoustic Source Bearing Estimation (ASBE) computer program development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiese, Michael R.

    1987-01-01

    A new bearing estimation algorithm (Acoustic Source Analysis Technique - ASAT) and an acoustic analysis computer program (Acoustic Source Bearing Estimation - ASBE) are described, which were developed by Computer Sciences Corporation for NASA Langley Research Center. The ASBE program is used by the Acoustics Division/Applied Acoustics Branch and the Instrument Research Division/Electro-Mechanical Instrumentation Branch to analyze acoustic data and estimate the azimuths from which the source signals radiated. Included are the input and output from a benchmark test case.

  18. Directivity of acoustic radiation from sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lansing, D. L.

    1979-01-01

    The radiation properties of acoustic monopoles and dipoles are described. The directivity of radiation from these sources in a free field and in the presence of an absorptive surface is described. The kinematic effects on source radiation due to translation and rotation are discussed. Experimental measurements of sound from an acoustic monopole in motion and the characteristics of helicopter rotor and propeller noise are reviewed. An introduction is provided to several essential concepts required by noise control engineers making measurements of noise from moving sources in the proximity of the ground.

  19. Directivity of acoustic radiation from sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lansing, D. L.

    1979-01-01

    The radiation properties of acoustic monopoles and dipoles are described, as well as the directivity of radiation from these sources in a free field and in the presence of an absorptive surface. The kinematic effects on source radiation due to translation and rotation are discussed. Experimental measurements of sound from an acoustic monopole in motion and the characteristics of helicopter rotor and propeller noise are reviewed. Several essential concepts required by noise control engineers making measurements of noise from moving sources in the proximity of the ground are introduced.

  20. Measurements of acoustic sources in motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrello, L.; Norum, T. D.

    1978-01-01

    Results of the far-field pressures measured from three different types of moving sources are presented. These acoustic sources consist of a point monopole, a small model jet, and an aircraft. Results for the pressure time history produced by the point source show good agreement with those predicted analytically. Both actual and simulated forward motion of the model jet show reductions in noise levels with forward speed at all angles between the source and observer. Measurement with the aircraft over both an anechoic floor and over the ground yields a method for evaluating the transfer function for ground reflections at various angles between the moving aircraft and measurement position.

  1. Acoustic energy in ducts - Further observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eversman, W.

    1979-01-01

    The transmission of acoustic energy in uniform ducts carrying uniform flow is investigated with the purpose of clarifying two points of interest. The two commonly used definitions of acoustic 'energy' flux are shown to be related by a Legendre transformation of the Lagrangian density exactly as in deriving the Hamiltonian density in mechanics. In the acoustic case the total energy density and the Hamiltonian density are not the same which accounts for two different 'energy' fluxes. When the duct has acoustically absorptive walls neither of the two flux expressions gives correct results. A reevaluation of the basis of derivation of the energy density and energy flux provides forms which yield consistent results for soft walled ducts.

  2. Mapping thunder sources by inverting acoustic and electromagnetic observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, J. F.; Johnson, J. B.; Arechiga, R. O.; Thomas, R. J.

    2014-12-01

    We present a new method of locating current flow in lightning strikes by inversion of thunder recordings constrained by Lightning Mapping Array observations. First, radio frequency (RF) pulses are connected to reconstruct conductive channels created by leaders. Then, acoustic signals that would be produced by current flow through each channel are forward modeled. The recorded thunder is considered to consist of a weighted superposition of these acoustic signals. We calculate the posterior distribution of acoustic source energy for each channel with a Markov Chain Monte Carlo inversion that fits power envelopes of modeled and recorded thunder; these results show which parts of the flash carry current and produce thunder. We examine the effects of RF pulse location imprecision and atmospheric winds on quality of results and apply this method to several lightning flashes over the Magdalena Mountains in New Mexico, USA. This method will enable more detailed study of lightning phenomena by allowing researchers to map current flow in addition to leader propagation.

  3. Acoustic power of a moving point source in a moving medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, J. E., III; Sarris, I. I.

    1976-01-01

    The acoustic power output of a moving point-mass source in an acoustic medium which is in uniform motion and infinite in extent is examined. The acoustic medium is considered to be a homogeneous fluid having both zero viscosity and zero thermal conductivity. Two expressions for the acoustic power output are obtained based on a different definition cited in the literature for the average energy-flux vector in an acoustic medium in uniform motion. The acoustic power output of the source is found by integrating the component of acoustic intensity vector in the radial direction over the surface of an infinitely long cylinder which is within the medium and encloses the line of motion of the source. One of the power expressions is found to give unreasonable results even though the flow is uniform.

  4. Methods and apparatus for measurement of the resistivity of geological formations from within cased wells in presence of acoustic and magnetic energy sources

    DOEpatents

    Vail, III, William B.

    1991-01-01

    Methods and apparatus are provided for measuring the acoustically modulated electronic properties of geological formations and cement layers adjacent to cased boreholes. Current is passed from an electrode in electrical contact with the interior of the borehole casing to an electrode on the surface of the earth. Voltage measuring electrodes in electrical contact with the interior of the casing measure the voltage at various points thereon. The voltage differences between discrete pairs of the voltage measuring electrodes provide a measurement of the leakage current conducted into formation in the vicinity of those electrodes. Simultaneously subjecting the casing and formation to an acoustic source acoustically modulates the leakage current measured thereby providing a measure of the acoustically modulated electronic properties of the adjacent formation. Similarly, methods and apparatus are also described which measure the leakage current into formation while simultaneously subjecting the casing to an applied magnetic field which therefore allows measurement of the magnetically modulated electronic properties of the casing and the adjacent formation.

  5. Methods and apparatus for measurement of the resistivity of geological formations from within cased wells in presence of acoustic and magnetic energy sources

    DOEpatents

    Vail, W.B. III.

    1991-08-27

    Methods and apparatus are provided for measuring the acoustically modulated electronic properties of geological formations and cement layers adjacent to cased boreholes. Current is passed from an electrode in electrical contact with the interior of the borehole casing to an electrode on the surface of the earth. Voltage measuring electrodes in electrical contact with the interior of the casing measure the voltage at various points thereon. The voltage differences between discrete pairs of the voltage measuring electrodes provide a measurement of the leakage current conducted into formation in the vicinity of those electrodes. Simultaneously subjecting the casing and formation to an acoustic source acoustically modulates the leakage current measured thereby providing a measure of the acoustically modulated electronic properties of the adjacent formation. Similarly, methods and apparatus are also described which measure the leakage current into formation while simultaneously subjecting the casing to an applied magnetic field which therefore allows measurement of the magnetically modulated electronic properties of the casing and the adjacent formation. 9 figures.

  6. An Expendable Source for Measuring Shallow Water Acoustic Propagation and Geo-Acoustic Bottom Properties

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. An Expendable Source for Measuring Shallow Water Acoustic ...Propagation and Geo- Acoustic Bottom Properties Harry A DeFerrari RSMAS – University of Miami 4600 Rickenbacker Causeway Miami FL. 33149...broadband source is being developed that transmits high gain m-sequence to clandestinly measure pulse response of shallow water acoustic propagation

  7. Vehicular sources in acoustic propagation experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prado, Gervasio; Fitzgerald, James; Arruda, Anthony; Parides, George

    1990-01-01

    One of the most important uses of acoustic propagation models lies in the area of detection and tracking of vehicles. Propagation models are used to compute transmission losses in performance prediction models and to analyze the results of past experiments. Vehicles can also provide the means for cost effective experiments to measure acoustic propagation conditions over significant ranges. In order to properly correlate the information provided by the experimental data and the propagation models, the following issues must be taken into consideration: the phenomenology of the vehicle noise sources must be understood and characterized; the vehicle's location or 'ground truth' must be accurately reproduced and synchronized with the acoustic data; and sufficient meteorological data must be collected to support the requirements of the propagation models. The experimental procedures and instrumentation needed to carry out propagation experiments are discussed. Illustrative results are presented for two cases. First, a helicopter was used to measure propagation losses at a range of 1 to 10 Km. Second, a heavy diesel-powered vehicle was used to measure propagation losses in the 300 to 2200 m range.

  8. Acoustic Source Elevation Angle Estimates Using Two Microphones

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    Acoustic Source Elevation Angle Estimates Using Two Microphones by Kirsten A. Walker and W.C. Kirkpatrick Alberts, II ARL-TR-6976 June...TR-6976 June 2014 Acoustic Source Elevation Angle Estimates Using Two Microphones Kirsten A. Walker and W.C. Kirkpatrick Alberts, II...3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Acoustic Source Elevation Angle Estimates Using Two Microphones 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b

  9. Passive acoustic source localization using sources of opportunity.

    PubMed

    Verlinden, Christopher M A; Sarkar, J; Hodgkiss, W S; Kuperman, W A; Sabra, K G

    2015-07-01

    The feasibility of using data derived replicas from ships of opportunity for implementing matched field processing is demonstrated. The Automatic Identification System (AIS) is used to provide the library coordinates for the replica library and a correlation based processing procedure is used to overcome the impediment that the replica library is constructed from sources with different spectra and will further be used to locate another source with its own unique spectral structure. The method is illustrated with simulation and then verified using acoustic data from a 2009 experiment for which AIS information was retrieved from the United States Coast Guard Navigation Center Nationwide AIS database.

  10. Energy Sources and Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crank, Ron

    This instructional unit is one of 10 developed by students on various energy-related areas that deals specifically with energy sources and development. Its objective is for the student to be able to discuss energy sources and development related to the historical perspective, biological development, current aspects, and future expectations…

  11. Acoustic Energy Estimates in Inhomogeneous Moving Media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farassat, F.; Farris, Mark

    1999-01-01

    In ducted fan engine noise research, there is a need for defining a simple and easy to use acoustic energy conservation law to help in quantification of noise control techniques. There is a well known conservation law relating acoustic energy and acoustic energy flux in the case of an isentropic irrotational flow. Several different approaches have been taken to generalize this conservation law. For example, Morfey finds an identity by separating out the irrotational part of the perturbed flow. Myers is able to find a series of indentities by observing an algebraic relationship between the basic conservation of energy equation for a background flow and the underlying equations of motion. In an approximate sense, this algebraic relationship is preserved under perturbation. A third approach which seems to have not been pursued in the literature is a result known as Noether's theorem. There is a Lagrangian formulation for the Euler equation of fluid mechanics. Noether's theorem says that any group action that leaves the Lagrangian action invariant leads to a conserved quantity. This presentation will include a survey of current results regarding acoustic energy and preliminary results on the symmetries of the Lagrangian.

  12. Diversification of energy sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The concept of energy source diversification was introduced as a substitution conservation action. The current status and philosophy behind a diversification program is presented in the context of a national energy policy. Advantages, disadvantages (constraints), and methods of implementation for diversification are discussed. The energy source systems for diversification are listed and an example impact assessment is outlined which deals with the water requirements of the specific energy systems.

  13. Developing general acoustic model for noise sources and parameters estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madoliat, Reza; Nouri, Nowrouz Mohammad; Rahrovi, Ali

    2017-02-01

    Noise measured at various points around the environment can be evaluated by a series of acoustic sources. Acoustic sources with wide surface can be broken down in fluid environment using some smaller acoustic sources. The aim of this study is to make a model to indicate the type, number, direction, position and strength of these sources in a way that the main sound and the sound of equivalent sources match together in an acceptable way. When position and direction of the source is given, the strength of the source can be found using inverse method. On the other hand, considering the non-uniqueness of solution in inverse method, a different acoustic strength is obtained for the sources if different positions are selected. Selecting an arrangement of general source and using the optimization algorithm, the least possible mismatch between the main sound and the sound of equivalent sources can be achieved.

  14. Experimental Characterization of Centrifugal Pumps as AN Acoustic Source at the Blade-Passing Frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rzentkowski, G.; Zbroja, S.

    2000-05-01

    Centrifugal pumps represent the primary source of acoustic energy in industrial piping. For hydraulically similar pumps, the amount of emitted energy may vary significantly between different designs and it is generally not known. The available information, typically presented as a magnitude of pressure pulsations measured at the pump discharge, is not free of resonance effects associated with the piping acoustics and, in some aspects, may be seriously misleading. In this paper, we formulate an experimental method to examine the pump acoustic characteristics at the blade-passing frequency. First, we assess the resonance effects in the test-loop. Next, we decompose the measured signal into the components associated with the pump action and with the loop acoustics by means of a simple pump model which is based on a linear superposition of pressure wave transmission and excitation. We apply this technique to examine the acoustics of a single-stage, double-volute centrifugal pump. We estimate the strength of source variables and establish the pump characteristics as an acoustic source. The results indicate that (i) the source variables represent a jump in the acoustic field and are nearly free of resonance effects in the test-loop and that (ii) the pump may act either as a pressure or as a velocity source. Based on this analysis, we postulate that the pressure wave traveling in the direction of pump discharge should be used to define the pump pulsation level for valid comparison between different designs and for acoustic modelling of piping systems.

  15. The source of solar high-frequency acoustic modes - Theoretical expectations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Timothy M.

    1991-01-01

    The source exciting the solar p-modes is likely to be acoustic noise generated in the top part of the sun's convection zone. If so, then simple arguments suggest that most of the emitted energy may come from rare localized events that are well separated from one another in space and time. This note describes the acoustic emission that would be expected from such events, based on a ray-theory analysis. Most of the acoustic energy is found to emerge very close to the source, so that observations to identify emission events will require high spatial resolution.

  16. Acoustic radiation from lined, unflanged ducts: Acoustic source distribution program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckemeyer, R. J.; Sawdy, D. T.

    1971-01-01

    An acoustic radiation analysis was developed to predict the far-field characteristics of fan noise radiated from an acoustically lined unflanged duct. This analysis is comprised of three modular digital computer programs which together provide a capability of accounting for the impedance mismatch at the duct exit plane. Admissible duct configurations include circular or annular, with or without an extended centerbody. This variation in duct configurations provides a capability of modeling inlet and fan duct noise radiation. The computer programs are described in detail.

  17. Zebra mussel control using acoustic energy

    SciTech Connect

    Tiller, G.W.; Gaucher, T.A.; Menezes, J.K.; Dolat, S.W. )

    1992-01-01

    A practical and economical device or method that reduces zebra mussel colonization without detrimental side effects is highly desirable. An ideal method is one that could be installed near, on, or in existing raw water intakes and conduits. It must have a known effect that is limited to a defined area, should have maximum effects on a targeted species, and preferably have a low life cycle cost than the current alternative methods of control and maintenance. Underwater sound could be such a desirable solution, if found to be an effective control measure for zebra mussels. Although sound most often applies specifically to acoustic energy that is audible to humans, 20 Hertz (Hz) to 20 kiloHertz (kHz), in this report we will use the terms sound and acoustic to include acoustic energy between 100 Hz and 100 MegaHertz (MHz). This research on zebra mussel biofouling is designed to effect the early developmental stages in the life cycle of Dreissena polymorpha (Pallas). Vulnerable stages in the development of D. polymorpha that might yield to site-specific acoustic deterrence measures include the free-swimming larval veliger stage, the postveliger pre-attachment demersal stage, and the immediate post-attachment stage. The proposed applications include surface treatment to prevent, reduce or eliminate colonization on underwater structures, and the stream treatment to reduce or eliminate (destroy) mussel larvae entrained in a moving volume of water.

  18. Tracking Moving Acoustic Sources With a Network of Sensors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-10-01

    Tracking Moving Acoustic Sources With a Network of Sensors by Richard J. Kozick and Brian M. Sadler ARL-TR-2750 October 2002 Approved for public...October 2002 Tracking Moving Acoustic Sources With a Network of Sensors Richard J. Kozick Bucknell University, Electrical Engineering Department Brian M...Model for a Nonmoving Source 4 2.1 Cramér-Rao Bound (CRB) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 2.2 Examples

  19. Blind deconvolution and source separation in acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibul, Leon H.; Roan, Michael J.; Coviello, Christian M.

    2005-09-01

    Blind deconvolution (BDC) and blind source separation (BSS) are active research topics with many important applications in acoustics. The goal of deconvolution is to recover original input signal from the output of a convolution filter. In blind deconvolution details of the convolution filter and input signals are not known. The fundamental assumption in BDC is that the input signal is a non-Gaussian stochastic process. A topic closely related to BDC is BSS. BSS is a process that is an inverse operation to a mixing process. In BSS it is assumed that inputs to the mixing systems are statistically independent stochastic processes, where only one input may be Gaussian, others must be non-Gaussian. Standard criterion functions for BDC and BSS are reviewed. Limitations of the second-order statistics and need for higher-order statistics (HOS) or information theoretic criteria that lead to nonlinear optimization algorithms are pointed out. Advantages of various information theoretic criteria for BDC and BSS are discussed. Because gradients of these criteria are nonlinear, resulting optimization algorithms are nonlinear. Linear and non-linear algorithms for BDC and BSS are examined. [Work supported by ONR Codes 321US and 333.

  20. Acoustic Source Localization in Aircraft Interiors Using Microphone Array Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sklanka, Bernard J.; Tuss, Joel R.; Buehrle, Ralph D.; Klos, Jacob; Williams, Earl G.; Valdivia, Nicolas

    2006-01-01

    Using three microphone array configurations at two aircraft body stations on a Boeing 777-300ER flight test, the acoustic radiation characteristics of the sidewall and outboard floor system are investigated by experimental measurement. Analysis of the experimental data is performed using sound intensity calculations for closely spaced microphones, PATCH Inverse Boundary Element Nearfield Acoustic Holography, and Spherical Nearfield Acoustic Holography. Each method is compared assessing strengths and weaknesses, evaluating source identification capability for both broadband and narrowband sources, evaluating sources during transient and steady-state conditions, and quantifying field reconstruction continuity using multiple array positions.

  1. Sparsity-driven Passive Tracking of Underwater Acoustic Sources

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-01

    bend ✴ Temperature , pressure and salinity D epth Range Source localization map (SLM) 2 Shallow water sound -speed profile Modeling...Difficult due to complexities of the propagation environment • Ocean behaves as an acoustic waveguide • Varying sound -speed causes acoustic signals to

  2. An optoacoustic point source for acoustic scale model measurements.

    PubMed

    Bolaños, Javier Gómez; Pulkki, Ville; Karppinen, Pasi; Hæggström, Edward

    2013-04-01

    A massless acoustic source is proposed for scale model work. This source is generated by focusing a pulsed laser beam to rapidly heat the air at the focal point. This produces an expanding small plasma ball which generates a sonic impulse that may be used as an acoustic point source. Repeatability, frequency response, and directivity of the source were measured to show that it can serve as a massless point source. The impulse response of a rectangular space was determined using this type of source. A good match was found between the predicted and the measured impulse responses of the space.

  3. Initial Arctic Acoustic Source Design Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-01-01

    Novgorod, Russia, 1995. This work was supported in part by Subcontract No. 31-960019-94. The United States Government has a royalty- free license...source for cable emitting complex 5. Weght-size and energy characteristics of emitting complex 6. Installation and elevation of emitting complex 7...transition of the shelf to the region of the continental boderland slope. This will permit, on the one hand, to avoid additional loss caused by - 5

  4. Alternative energy sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todd, R. W.

    1982-04-01

    Renewable energy sources and their potential contribution for solving energy needs are presented. Centralized supply technologies include those alternative fuels derived from biomass using solar energy, (supplying 57% of the energy supply in some countries), and those using directly collected solar energy to manufacture a fuel. Fuel utilization effects can be doubled by using combined heat and power stations, and other major sources include wind, wave, tidal, and solar. In terms of local supply technology, wood burning appliances are becoming more popular, and methane is being used for heating and to fuel spark ignition engines. Geothermal low temperature heating exists worldwide at a capacity of 7.2 GW, supplying heat, particularly in Hungary, parts of the U.S.S.R., and Iceland, and a geothermal research program has been established in the United States. Sweden has a potential hydroelectric capacity of 600 MW, and the United States has a 100 GW capacity. Many of these technologies are already cost effective.

  5. A fast source for quantitative acoustic emission and its application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masaki, Ryuji; Takemoto, Mikio; Ono, Kanji

    1999-12-01

    We demonstrate a new artificial fracture source for quantitative acoustic emission (AE) characterization. The source utilizes the break-down of silicone oil (or other liquids) placed inside a crack (or a slit). This is a dipole source with a rise time under 0.1 μs. It is much faster than a pencil-lead-break source and allows the calibration of a sensor-structure system to 7-10 MHz. We irradiated a focused Q-switched Nd-YAG laser beam (15 to 90 mJ energy) on silicon placed in a slit on a cylindrical block. The out-of-plane displacement produced by the resultant bulk waves was monitored on the outside surface using a heterodyne-type laser interferometer. This break-down source was employed to determine the transfer functions of an AE transducer and propagation medium. Finally, we studied AE signals due to the delayed fracture of a butt-welded dual-phase stainless steel, using the break-down source for calibration. Brittle-fracture events were successfully characterized.

  6. Acoustic source analysis of supersonic jets from complex nozzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, Joseph W.; Kreitzman, Jordan

    2015-11-01

    We compute acoustic source terms corresponding to Goldstein's generalized acoustic analogy from an unstructured high-fidelity large eddy simulation of a supersonic jet issuing from a rectangular nozzle with chevrons. The simulation data are validated against experimental measurements of mean and turbulence flow statistics as well as far-field noise. We evaluate fourth-order correlations from the simulation data to assess assumptions of quasi-normality and statistical axisymmetry that underpin reduced-order acoustic source models originally developed for round jets. A spatial analysis of these correlations in relation to the complex geometry of the nozzle reveals locations where the validity of these assumptions begins to break down. Using two point two-time correlations of the simulation data, we also directly evaluate and compare the accuracy of four different acoustic source models, including the Gaussian, moving-frame, fixed-frame, and modified distance models. Computational resources were provided by the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility.

  7. Recovery of burner acoustic source structure from far-field sound spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahan, J. R.; Jones, J. D.

    1984-01-01

    A method is presented that permits the thermal-acoustic efficiency spectrum in a long turbulent burner to be recovered from the corresponding far-field sound spectrum. An acoustic source/propagation model is used based on the perturbation solution of the equations describing the unsteady one-dimensional flow of an inviscid ideal gas with a distributed heat source. The technique is applied to a long cylindrical hydrogen-flame burner operating over power levels of 4.5-22.3 kW. The results show that the thermal-acoustic efficiency at a given frequency, defined as the fraction of the total burner power converted to acoustic energy at that frequency, is rather insensitive to burner power, having a maximum value on the order of 10 to the -4th at 150 Hz and rolling off steeply with increasing frequency. Evidence is presented that acoustic agitation of the flame at low frequencies enhances the mixing of the unburned fuel and air with the hot products of combustion. The paper establishes the potential of the technique as a useful tool for characterizing the acoustic source structure in any burner, such as a gas turbine combustor, for which a reasonable acoustic propagation model can be postulated.

  8. Modal acoustic emission source determination in silicon carbide matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morscher, G. N.

    2000-05-01

    Modal acoustic emission has been used to monitor damage accumulation in woven silicon carbide (SiC) fiber reinforced SiC matrix composites during tensile testing. There are several potential sources of damage in these systems including transverse matrix cracking, fiber/matrix interphase debonding and sliding, longitudinal cracks in between plies, and fiber breakage. In the past, it has been shown that modal AE is excellent at detecting when damage occurs and subsides, where the damage occurs along the length of the sample, and the loss in material stiffness as a consequence of damage accumulation. The next step is to determine the extent that modal AE can be used to identify specific physical sources. This study will discuss the status of this aim for this composite system. Individual events were analyzed and correlated to specific sources based on the characteristics of the received waveforms, e.g., frequency spectrum and energy, and when the event occurred during the stress-history of the tensile test. Post-test microstructural examination of the test specimens enabled some correlation between specific types of AE events and damage sources.

  9. Acoustic source inversion to estimate volume flux from volcanic explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Keehoon; Fee, David; Yokoo, Akihiko; Lees, Jonathan M.

    2015-07-01

    We present an acoustic waveform inversion technique for infrasound data to estimate volume fluxes from volcanic eruptions. Previous inversion techniques have been limited by the use of a 1-D Green's function in a free space or half space, which depends only on the source-receiver distance and neglects volcanic topography. Our method exploits full 3-D Green's functions computed by a numerical method that takes into account realistic topographic scattering. We apply this method to vulcanian eruptions at Sakurajima Volcano, Japan. Our inversion results produce excellent waveform fits to field observations and demonstrate that full 3-D Green's functions are necessary for accurate volume flux inversion. Conventional inversions without consideration of topographic propagation effects may lead to large errors in the source parameter estimate. The presented inversion technique will substantially improve the accuracy of eruption source parameter estimation (cf. mass eruption rate) during volcanic eruptions and provide critical constraints for volcanic eruption dynamics and ash dispersal forecasting for aviation safety. Application of this approach to chemical and nuclear explosions will also provide valuable source information (e.g., the amount of energy released) previously unavailable.

  10. Energy Efficient Engine acoustic supporting technology report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lavin, S. P.; Ho, P. Y.

    1985-01-01

    The acoustic development of the Energy Efficient Engine combined testing and analysis using scale model rigs and an integrated Core/Low Spool demonstration engine. The scale model tests show that a cut-on blade/vane ratio fan with a large spacing (S/C = 2.3) is as quiet as a cut-off blade/vane ratio with a tighter spacing (S/C = 1.27). Scale model mixer tests show that separate flow nozzles are the noisiest, conic nozzles the quietest, with forced mixers in between. Based on projections of ICLS data the Energy Efficient Engine (E3) has FAR 36 margins of 3.7 EPNdB at approach, 4.5 EPNdB at full power takeoff, and 7.2 EPNdB at sideline conditions.

  11. Broadband source localization using horizontal-beam acoustic intensity striations.

    PubMed

    Turgut, Altan; Orr, Marshall; Rouseff, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Waveguide invariant theory is applied to horizontal line array (HLA) beamformer output to localize moving broadband noise sources from measured acoustic intensity striation patterns. Acoustic signals emitted by ships of opportunity (merchant ships) were simultaneously recorded on a HLA and three hydrophones separated by 10 km during the RAGS03 (relationship between array gain and shelf-break fluid processes) experiment. Hough transforms are used to estimate both the waveguide invariant parameter "beta" and the ratio of source range at the closest point of approach to source speed from the observed striation patterns. Broadband (50-150-Hz) acoustic data-sets are used to demonstrate source localization capability as well as inversion capability of waveguide invariant parameter beta. Special attention is paid to bathymetric variability since the acoustic intensity striation patterns seem to be influenced by range-dependent bathymetry of the experimental area. The Hough transform method is also applied to the HLA beam-time record data and to the acoustic intensity data from three distant receivers to validate the estimation results from HLA beamformer output. Good agreement of the results from all three approaches suggests the feasibility of locating broadband noise sources and estimating waveguide invariant parameter beta in shallow waters.

  12. Broadband asymmetric acoustic transmission in a single medium by an array of heat sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Yi-Jun; Sun, Hong-Xiang; Xia, Jian-Ping; Yuan, Shou-Qi

    2017-04-01

    We report the realization of a broadband asymmetric acoustic transmission with six different-temperature heat sources in air. This exotic effect arises from the desired refractive index in propagation paths induced from heat sources of different temperatures and asymmetrical distribution, which avoids acoustic impedance differences between the heat sources and air and has no reflection energy loss. In addition, the influence of the viscosity of air, the thermal convection, and the temperature and length of the heat sources on the asymmetric transmission effect is investigated in detail. The results show that the proposed device has the advantages of broad bandwidth, high transmission contrast, and simple structure, which enable it to provide more schemes for sound manipulation. It has excellent potential applications in acoustic devices.

  13. Distribution of lateral acoustic energy in Mudejar Gothic churches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girón, S.; Galindo, M.; Zamarreño, T.

    2008-09-01

    In this work, the physical measures of spatial impression are considered in 12 Mudejar-Gothic churches in the city of Seville in the south of Spain. This study describes the spatial distribution of the early and late lateral acoustic energy, through monaural parameters derived from impulse response analysis using a maximum length sequence measurement system in each church. In the first time analysis, the two early lateral energy measures, early lateral fraction (LF) and early lateral fraction cosine (LFC) are taken in order to assess apparent source width (ASW), and the late lateral level (GLL) in the second to assess listener envelopment (LEV) are conducted. Parameters have been studied spectrally in each temple and were averaged at low- and mid-frequency values in their different naves in order to study how these two attributes of sound perception vary with source-receiver distance. Experimental results have been compared with the theoretical early lateral energy fractions and late lateral level, both of which are derived by assuming that reflected energy in these places of worship is solely dependent on source-receiver distance. This comparison is carried out in accordance with the μ-model proposed by the authors in an earlier paper in order to describe the dependence of acoustic monaural omnidirectional energy parameters on source-receiver distance. Thus, it is supposed that the directional distribution of reflections is similar to a diffuse distribution. To conclude, these spatially averaged monoaural parameters have been correlated with geometric variables by using linear regression and only weak correlations with the mean width of the churches and with the height/width ratio have been found.

  14. On the output of acoustical sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, H.

    1979-01-01

    Contents: (1) a theoretical basis for local power calculation; (2) source radiation in the presence of a half-plane; (3) radiation from a line source near an edge at which a Kutta condition holds; (4) radiation by a point source above a plane independence boundary; and (5) power output of a point source in a uniform flow.

  15. Reconstruction of moving acoustic sources in heterogeneous elastic solid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, Stephen F.; Jeong, Chanseok

    2016-04-01

    A novel computational framework for reconstructing spatial and temporal profiles of moving acoustic sources from wave responses measured at sparsely distributes sensors is introduced in this paper. This method can be applied to a broad range of acoustic-source inversion (ASI) problems for heterogeneous, complex-shaped coupled dynamic systems. The finite element method (FEM) is used to obtain wave response solutions due guessed moving sources. An adjoint-gradient based optimization technique iteratively improves the guesses so that the guessed moving sources converge on the actual moving sources. To reconstruct acoustic source profiles without a-priori knowledge of sources, we will employ high-resolution discretization of source functions in space and time. Because of such dense discretization, the order of magnitude of number of inversion parameters could range from millions to billions. Numerical experiments prove the robustness of this method by reconstructing spatial and temporal profiles of multiple dynamic moving body forces in a one-dimensional heterogeneous solid bar. The sources create stress waves propagating through the bar. The guessed source functions are spatially discretized by using linear shape functions with an element size of 1m at discrete times with a time step of 0.001s. Thus, the total number of control parameters in this example is 100,000 (i.e., 100 (in space) by 1000 (in time)). The convergence toward the target in the numerical examples is excellent, reconstructing the spatial and temporal footprints of the sources.

  16. Acoustic source analysis of a rectangular supersonic jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreitzman, Jordan; Nichols, Joseph W.

    2014-11-01

    We apply Goldstein's generalized acoustic analogy to identify acoustic sources in two high-fidelity unstructured large eddy simulation databases of a Mach 1.4 rectangular jet with and without chevrons. Two-point, two-time correlations of the acoustic source terms are evaluated at different positions in the three dimensional flow that develops downstream of the complex nozzle. Two-point statistics are compared to single-point statistics to test the quasi-normality hypothesis and other noise source models for a non-axisymmetric jet. In particular, we assess the predictive capability of a Gaussian model, a fixed-frame model and a modified-distance model. The nozzle geometries used for the simulations exactly match an experimental configuration tested at the NASA Glenn Research Center, allowing for validation in terms of both farfield noise as well as turbulence statistics. We gratefully acknowledge computational resources provided by the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility.

  17. Determining low-frequency source location from acoustic phase measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poole, Travis L.; Frisk, George V.

    2002-11-01

    For low-frequency cw sound sources in shallow water, the time rate-of-change of the measured acoustic phase is well approximated by the time rate-of-change of the source-receiver separation distance. An algorithm for determining a locus of possible source locations based on this idea has been developed. The locus has the general form of a hyperbola, which can be used to provide a bearing estimation at long ranges, and an estimate of source location at short ranges. The algorithm uses only acoustic phase data and receiver geometry as input, and can be used even when the source frequency is slightly unstable and/or imprecisely known. The algorithm has been applied to data from low-frequency experiments (20-300 Hz), both for stable and unstable source frequencies, and shown to perform well. [Work supported by ONR and WHOI Academic Programs Office.

  18. Seismo-Acoustic Observations of Explosive Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chael, E. P.; Hart, D. M.; Jones, K. R.

    2011-12-01

    Since January 2011, the Sandia National Laboratories Facility for Acceptance, Calibration and Testing (FACT) has operated a seismo-acoustic station with the purpose of recording local explosions on Kirtland Air Force Base (KAFB). Our immediate goals are to develop a catalog of events and a database of seismo-acoustic waveforms from ordnance disposal and Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) events. The catalog of events will include metadata such as shot time, size, type and location. The waveform archive includes a three-channel GS-13 seismometer and a single infrasound sensor (Chaparral 25 with 50' porous hose wind reduction system). In June of 2011 a weather station was added to complement the monitoring system by providing accurate wind conditions at the times of the explosive events. Monthly internal reports compiled by KAFB provided us with the metadata for the ordnance disposal explosions, and an agreement with DTRA has enabled us to obtain metadata on their events. To date 157 explosions have been identified, including 153 ordnance disposal events and 4 DTRA tests. Along with the catalog of events we have developed automated processing routines to extract both seismic and infrasound arrivals and measure basic waveform characteristics. These include amplitudes of pre-event noise, the direct seismic arrival, air-coupled seismic arrival, infrasound arrival, and wind speed/direction. Using the waveform measurements from the pre-event noise and air-coupled seismic arrival we calculate the SNR for the seismic component of the event. We also calculate the SNR for the infrasonic component of the event using pre-event noise and the direct infrasound arrival. Using the metadata and seismic and infrasonic SNR values we are able to calculate an air-to-ground coupling ratio for each event. For local (<10 km) explosion monitoring, the wind speed and direction can influence all of the analysis parameters. It will affect the pre-event noise level as well as the infrasound

  19. A refined wideband acoustical holography based on equivalent source method

    PubMed Central

    Ping, Guoli; Chu, Zhigang; Xu, Zhongming; Shen, Linbang

    2017-01-01

    This paper is concerned with acoustical engineering and mathematical physics problem for the near-field acoustical holography based on equivalent source method (ESM-based NAH). An important mathematical physics problem in ESM-based NAH is to solve the equivalent source strength, which has multiple solving algorithms, such as Tikhonov regularization ESM (TRESM), iterative weighted ESM (IWESM) and steepest descent iteration ESM (SDIESM). To explore a new solving algorithm which can achieve better reconstruction performance in wide frequency band, a refined wideband acoustical holography (RWAH) is proposed. RWAH adopts IWESM below a transition frequency and switches to SDIESM above that transition frequency, and the principal components of input data in RWAH have been truncated. Further, the superiority of RWAH is verified by the comparison of comprehensive performance of TRESM, IWESM, SDIESM and RWAH. Finally, the experiments are conducted, confirming that RWAH can achieve better reconstruction performance in wide frequency band. PMID:28266531

  20. A refined wideband acoustical holography based on equivalent source method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ping, Guoli; Chu, Zhigang; Xu, Zhongming; Shen, Linbang

    2017-03-01

    This paper is concerned with acoustical engineering and mathematical physics problem for the near-field acoustical holography based on equivalent source method (ESM-based NAH). An important mathematical physics problem in ESM-based NAH is to solve the equivalent source strength, which has multiple solving algorithms, such as Tikhonov regularization ESM (TRESM), iterative weighted ESM (IWESM) and steepest descent iteration ESM (SDIESM). To explore a new solving algorithm which can achieve better reconstruction performance in wide frequency band, a refined wideband acoustical holography (RWAH) is proposed. RWAH adopts IWESM below a transition frequency and switches to SDIESM above that transition frequency, and the principal components of input data in RWAH have been truncated. Further, the superiority of RWAH is verified by the comparison of comprehensive performance of TRESM, IWESM, SDIESM and RWAH. Finally, the experiments are conducted, confirming that RWAH can achieve better reconstruction performance in wide frequency band.

  1. An Energy Harvesting Underwater Acoustic Transmitter for Aquatic Animals

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huidong; Tian, Chuan; Lu, Jun; Myjak, Mitchell J.; Martinez, Jayson J.; Brown, Richard S.; Deng, Zhiqun Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Acoustic telemetry is the primary method to actively track aquatic animals for behavioral studies. However, the small storage capacities of the batteries used in the transmitters limit the time that the implanted animals can be studied. In this research, we developed and implemented a battery-free acoustic transmitter that uses a flexible piezoelectric beam to harvest energy from fish swimming as the power source. The transmitter sends out a unique identification code with a sufficiently strong signal (150 dB, ref: 1 μPa at 1 meter) that has a detection range of up to 100 meters. Two prototypes, 100 mm and 77 mm long, respectively, weighing only about 1 gram or less in air, were sub-dermally implanted in two species of live fish. Transmissions were successfully detected as the fish swam in a natural manner. This represents the first known implanted energy-harvesting transmitter demonstrated in vivo. Successful development of this transmitter greatly expands the potential for long-term studies of the behaviors of aquatic animals and for subsequently developing strategies to mitigate the environmental impacts of renewable energy systems. PMID:27647426

  2. An Energy Harvesting Underwater Acoustic Transmitter for Aquatic Animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Huidong; Tian, Chuan; Lu, Jun; Myjak, Mitchell J.; Martinez, Jayson J.; Brown, Richard S.; Deng, Zhiqun Daniel

    2016-09-01

    Acoustic telemetry is the primary method to actively track aquatic animals for behavioral studies. However, the small storage capacities of the batteries used in the transmitters limit the time that the implanted animals can be studied. In this research, we developed and implemented a battery-free acoustic transmitter that uses a flexible piezoelectric beam to harvest energy from fish swimming as the power source. The transmitter sends out a unique identification code with a sufficiently strong signal (150 dB, ref: 1 μPa at 1 meter) that has a detection range of up to 100 meters. Two prototypes, 100 mm and 77 mm long, respectively, weighing only about 1 gram or less in air, were sub-dermally implanted in two species of live fish. Transmissions were successfully detected as the fish swam in a natural manner. This represents the first known implanted energy-harvesting transmitter demonstrated in vivo. Successful development of this transmitter greatly expands the potential for long-term studies of the behaviors of aquatic animals and for subsequently developing strategies to mitigate the environmental impacts of renewable energy systems.

  3. The heliospheric energy source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, E. N.

    1986-01-01

    The solar wind and the heliosphere exist as a consequence of the heat input to the corona, particularly the coronal holes. The necessary energy input to coronal holes has been estimated to be 10 to the 6th erg/sq cm sec, requiring Alfven waves with rms fluid velocities of 100 km/sec. Observational upper limits on coronal fluid velocities are of the order of 25 km/sec, which may not apply to the transparent coronal hole. Alternatively it has been suggested that coronal holes may be heated by agitation from neighboring active regions, suggesting that the vigor of a coronal hole depends upon its location. The Ulysses Mission will provide a direct comparison of the strength of the high speed wind from coronal holes at low latitude and coronal holes at high latitude, from which the nature of the presently unknown energy sources of the coronal holes and the resulting structure of the heliosphere may be better judged. The question is fundamental to the dynamics of the windspheres of all stars.

  4. Impact of source depth on coherent underwater acoustic communications.

    PubMed

    Song, Aijun; Badiey, Mohsen; Song, H C; Hodgkiss, W S

    2010-08-01

    A recent paper [Song et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 123, 856-865 (2008)] investigated ocean variability impact on coherent underwater acoustic communications (8-16 kHz) for a single near-seafloor transmitter in shallow water during an extended period (27 h). This letter extends that investigation to various source depths and receiver subarrays. Specifically, the middle water column source, which is either in or out of the thermocline, experiences performance variability of 6-7 dB in terms of output signal-to-noise ratio. Further, the source below the thermocline consistently outperforms the source above the thermocline when the receiver subarray is located below the thermocline.

  5. Fission Energy and Other Sources of Energy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alfven, Hannes

    1974-01-01

    Discusses different forms of energy sources and basic reasons for the opposition to the use of atomic energy. Suggests that research efforts should also be aimed toward the fission technology to make it acceptable besides major research studies conducted in the development of alternative energy sources. (CC)

  6. Acoustic energy-driven fluid pump and method

    SciTech Connect

    Janus, Michael C.; Richards, George A.; Robey, Edward H.

    1997-12-01

    Bulk fluid motion is promoted in a gaseous fluid contained within a conduit system provided with a diffuser without the need for a mean pressure differential across the conduit system. The contacting of the gaseous fluid with unsteady energy at a selected frequency and pressure amplitude induces fluid flow through the conical diffuser. The unsteady energy can be provided by pulse combustors, thermoacoustic engines, or acoustic energy generators such as acoustic speakers.

  7. An Energy Harvesting Underwater Acoustic Transmitter for Aquatic Animals

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Huidong; Tian, Chuan; Lu, Jun; Myjak, Mitchell J.; Martinez, Jayson J.; Brown, Richard S.; Deng, Zhiqun Daniel

    2016-09-20

    This paper presents a self-powered underwater acoustic transmitter using a piezoelectric beam to harvest the mechanical energy from fish swimming. This transmitter does not require a battery and is demonstrated in live fish. It transmits an acoustic waveform as the implanted fish swims. It enables long-term monitoring of aquatic animals.

  8. Studies of acoustic emission from point and extended sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sachse, W.; Kim, K. Y.; Chen, C. P.

    1986-01-01

    The use of simulated and controlled acoustic emission signals forms the basis of a powerful tool for the detailed study of various deformation and wave interaction processes in materials. The results of experiments and signal analyses of acoustic emission resulting from point sources such as various types of indentation-produced cracks in brittle materials and the growth of fatigue cracks in 7075-T6 aluminum panels are discussed. Recent work dealing with the modeling and subsequent signal processing of an extended source of emission in a material is reviewed. Results of the forward problem and the inverse problem are presented with the example of a source distributed through the interior of a specimen.

  9. Determining the sources of sounds: Psychological acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yost, William A.

    2002-05-01

    Perhaps the most important task performed by an organism's sensory system is determining objects in the world surrounding the organism. This is a challenging task for the auditory system, especially when many objects exist at the same time. The peripheral auditory system provides the neural code for the spectral-temporal structure of the complex sound impinging on the ears. It does not code for the sources of the sound. Neural centers beyond the periphery most analyze this spectral-temporal code in order to form perceptual images that make up the auditory scene. Recent psychoacoustical and perceptual research on sound source determination and segregation will be described. This research is just beginning to suggest ways in which the auditory scene is determined. [Work sponsored by NIDCD.

  10. Origami acoustics: using principles of folding structural acoustics for simple and large focusing of sound energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harne, Ryan L.; Lynd, Danielle T.

    2016-08-01

    Fixed in spatial distribution, arrays of planar, electromechanical acoustic transducers cannot adapt their wave energy focusing abilities unless each transducer is externally controlled, creating challenges for the implementation and portability of such beamforming systems. Recently, planar, origami-based structural tessellations are found to facilitate great versatility in system function and properties through kinematic folding. In this research we bridge the physics of acoustics and origami-based design to discover that the simple topological reconfigurations of a Miura-ori-based acoustic array yield many orders of magnitude worth of reversible change in wave energy focusing: a potential for acoustic field morphing easily obtained through deployable, tessellated architectures. Our experimental and theoretical studies directly translate the roles of folding the tessellated array to the adaptations in spectral and spatial wave propagation sensitivities for far field energy transmission. It is shown that kinematic folding rules and flat-foldable tessellated arrays collectively provide novel solutions to the long-standing challenges of conventional, electronically-steered acoustic beamformers. While our examples consider sound radiation from the foldable array in air, linear acoustic reciprocity dictates that the findings may inspire new innovations for acoustic receivers, e.g. adaptive sound absorbers and microphone arrays, as well as concepts that include water-borne waves.

  11. Lamb waves from airborne explosion sources: Viscous effects and comparisons to ducted acoustic arrivals

    SciTech Connect

    Revelle, D.O.; Whitaker, R.W.

    1996-12-31

    Observations of large explosions in the atmosphere at long range are dominated by a leading pulse of large amplitude and long period that is often followed by a series of higher frequency impulses usually of smaller amplitude. This description can be interpreted using linearized acoustic-gravity wave theory in terms of a Lamb wave arrival followed by ducted acoustic and/or gravity waves. This pattern of arrivals is not the same at all ranges nor is it independent of the source energy or of the altitude of the source. Earlier, Pierce, using an isothermal, windless atmospheric model, theoretically formulated the distances beyond which the Lamb wave would just be discernible and also where it would dominate the arriving signals for a specified explosion source. In this work the authors have evaluated these distances for the cases of both an inviscid and a viscous fluid for the source energies of interest to the CTBT (Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty) R and D work at Los Alamos. Although the inviscid results are analytic, the fully viscous solutions are iterative. For the inviscid solutions, the authors find that the Lamb wave domination distance is proportional to wave frequency at frequencies large with respect to the acoustic waveguide cut-off frequency. Under similar conditions they also find that the computed distances are linearly proportional to the source height. At 1 Hz for example, the Lamb wave must propagate about 200 km before having a significant amplitude. For a viscous fluid they found slight increases in the distances compared to an inviscid fluid with the lower frequencies, near the acoustic cut-off frequency, exhibiting the greatest changes. During the period from 1981--1994 at Los Alamos, they have also observed infrasound from eight point source, near-surface ANFO explosions at White Sands Missile Range events even though the ducted acoustic waves were observed. In this work, they will compare the current theory against some of these observations.

  12. Converting acoustic energy into useful other energy forms

    DOEpatents

    Putterman, Seth J.; Barber, Bradley Paul; Hiller, Robert Anthony; Lofstedt, Ritva Maire Johanna

    1997-01-01

    Sonoluminescence is an off-equilibrium phenomenon in which the energy of a resonant sound wave in a liquid is highly concentrated so as to generate flashes of light. The conversion of sound to light represents an energy amplification of eleven orders of magnitude. The flashes which occur once per cycle of the audible or ultrasonic sound fields can be comprised of over one million photons and last for less 100 picoseconds. The emission displays a clocklike synchronicity; the jitter in time between consecutive flashes is less than fifty picoseconds. The emission is blue to the eye and has a broadband spectrum increasing from 700 nanometers to 200 nanometers. The peak power is about 100 milliWatts. The initial stage of the energy focusing is effected by the nonlinear oscillations of a gas bubble trapped in the liquid. For sufficiently high drive pressures an imploding shock wave is launched into the gas by the collapsing bubble. The reflection of the shock from its focal point results in high temperatures and pressures. The sonoluminescence light emission can be sustained by sensing a characteristic of the emission and feeding back changes into the driving mechanism. The liquid is in a sealed container and the seeding of the gas bubble is effected by locally heating the liquid after sealing the container. Different energy forms than light can be obtained from the converted acoustic energy. When the gas contains deuterium and tritium there is the feasibility of the other energy form being fusion, namely including the generation of neutrons.

  13. Fracture energy analysis via acoustic emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maslov, I. I.; Gradov, O. M.

    1986-04-01

    The results of previous studies on acoustic emission during fatigue loading are used to relate the characteristics of the acoustic signals to the fracture processes occurring at the crack tip. At stresses below the yield point of the material, discrete acoustic emissions are produced, their amplitude distribution being described by a monotonically decreasing function. At stresses near the yield point, the signals are continuous with a peak observed in the amplitude distribution function, while above the yield point the acoustic emission resumes the character it had below the yield point. It is shown that these emissions correspond to the formation of individual microfractures, to the process of macroplastic deformation and to stepwise crack propagation of the structurally disordered material, respectively.

  14. Acoustic energy transmission in cast iron pipelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiziroglou, Michail E.; Boyle, David E.; Wright, Steven W.; Yeatman, Eric M.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper we propose acoustic power transfer as a method for the remote powering of pipeline sensor nodes. A theoretical framework of acoustic power propagation in the ceramic transducers and the metal structures is drawn, based on the Mason equivalent circuit. The effect of mounting on the electrical response of piezoelectric transducers is studied experimentally. Using two identical transducer structures, power transmission of 0.33 mW through a 1 m long, 118 mm diameter cast iron pipe, with 8 mm wall thickness is demonstrated, at 1 V received voltage amplitude. A near-linear relationship between input and output voltage is observed. These results show that it is possible to deliver significant power to sensor nodes through acoustic waves in solid structures. The proposed method may enable the implementation of acoustic - powered wireless sensor nodes for structural and operation monitoring of pipeline infrastructure.

  15. Elastic parabolic equation solutions for underwater acoustic problems using seismic sources.

    PubMed

    Frank, Scott D; Odom, Robert I; Collis, Jon M

    2013-03-01

    Several problems of current interest involve elastic bottom range-dependent ocean environments with buried or earthquake-type sources, specifically oceanic T-wave propagation studies and interface wave related analyses. Additionally, observed deep shadow-zone arrivals are not predicted by ray theoretic methods, and attempts to model them with fluid-bottom parabolic equation solutions suggest that it may be necessary to account for elastic bottom interactions. In order to study energy conversion between elastic and acoustic waves, current elastic parabolic equation solutions must be modified to allow for seismic starting fields for underwater acoustic propagation environments. Two types of elastic self-starter are presented. An explosive-type source is implemented using a compressional self-starter and the resulting acoustic field is consistent with benchmark solutions. A shear wave self-starter is implemented and shown to generate transmission loss levels consistent with the explosive source. Source fields can be combined to generate starting fields for source types such as explosions, earthquakes, or pile driving. Examples demonstrate the use of source fields for shallow sources or deep ocean-bottom earthquake sources, where down slope conversion, a known T-wave generation mechanism, is modeled. Self-starters are interpreted in the context of the seismic moment tensor.

  16. Underwater acoustic source localization using closely spaced hydrophone pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sim, Min Seop; Choi, Bok-Kyoung; Kim, Byoung-Nam; Lee, Kyun Kyung

    2016-07-01

    Underwater sound source position is determined using a line array. However, performance degradation occurs owing to a multipath environment, which generates incoherent signals. In this paper, a hydrophone array is proposed for underwater source position estimation robust to a multipath environment. The array is composed of three pairs of sensors placed on the same line. The source position is estimated by performing generalized cross-correlation (GCC). The proposed system is not affected by a multipath time delay because of the close distance between closely spaced sensors. The validity of the array is confirmed by simulation using acoustic signals synthesized by eigenrays.

  17. Ultrasonic power transfer from a spherical acoustic wave source to a free-free piezoelectric receiver: Modeling and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahab, S.; Gray, M.; Erturk, A.

    2015-03-01

    Contactless powering of small electronic components has lately received growing attention for wireless applications in which battery replacement or tethered charging is undesired or simply impossible, and ambient energy harvesting is not a viable solution. As an alternative to well-studied methods of contactless energy transfer, such as the inductive coupling method, the use of ultrasonic waves transmitted and received by piezoelectric devices enables larger power transmission distances, which is critical especially for deep-implanted electronic devices. Moreover, energy transfer by means of acoustic waves is well suited in situations where no electromagnetic fields are allowed. The limited literature of ultrasonic acoustic energy transfer is mainly centered on proof-of-concept experiments demonstrating the feasibility of this method, lacking experimentally validated modeling efforts for the resulting multiphysics problem that couples the source and receiver dynamics with domain acoustics. In this work, we present fully coupled analytical, numerical, and experimental multiphysics investigations for ultrasonic acoustic energy transfer from a spherical wave source to a piezoelectric receiver bar that operates in the 33-mode of piezoelectricity. The fluid-loaded piezoelectric receiver under free-free mechanical boundary conditions is shunted to an electrical load for quantifying the electrical power output for a given acoustic source strength of the transmitter. The analytical acoustic-piezoelectric structure interaction modeling framework is validated experimentally, and the effects of system parameters are reported along with optimal electrical loading and frequency conditions of the receiver.

  18. Ultrasonic power transfer from a spherical acoustic wave source to a free-free piezoelectric receiver: Modeling and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Shahab, S.; Gray, M.; Erturk, A.

    2015-03-14

    Contactless powering of small electronic components has lately received growing attention for wireless applications in which battery replacement or tethered charging is undesired or simply impossible, and ambient energy harvesting is not a viable solution. As an alternative to well-studied methods of contactless energy transfer, such as the inductive coupling method, the use of ultrasonic waves transmitted and received by piezoelectric devices enables larger power transmission distances, which is critical especially for deep-implanted electronic devices. Moreover, energy transfer by means of acoustic waves is well suited in situations where no electromagnetic fields are allowed. The limited literature of ultrasonic acoustic energy transfer is mainly centered on proof-of-concept experiments demonstrating the feasibility of this method, lacking experimentally validated modeling efforts for the resulting multiphysics problem that couples the source and receiver dynamics with domain acoustics. In this work, we present fully coupled analytical, numerical, and experimental multiphysics investigations for ultrasonic acoustic energy transfer from a spherical wave source to a piezoelectric receiver bar that operates in the 33-mode of piezoelectricity. The fluid-loaded piezoelectric receiver under free-free mechanical boundary conditions is shunted to an electrical load for quantifying the electrical power output for a given acoustic source strength of the transmitter. The analytical acoustic-piezoelectric structure interaction modeling framework is validated experimentally, and the effects of system parameters are reported along with optimal electrical loading and frequency conditions of the receiver.

  19. S-Band Shallow Bulk Acoustic Wave (SBAW) microwave source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Techniques necessary to fabricate a high performance S-band microwave single source using state-of-the-art shallow bulk acoustic wave (SBAW) were explored. The bulk wave structures of the AlN/Al 2O3 were investigated for both the R plane and basal plane of sapphire. A 1.072 GHz SBAW delay line and oscillators were developed. A method of selecting and setting oscillator output frequency by selecting substrate orientation angle was also established.

  20. Acoustic energy relations in Mudejar-Gothic churches.

    PubMed

    Zamarreño, Teófilo; Girón, Sara; Galindo, Miguel

    2007-01-01

    Extensive objective energy-based parameters have been measured in 12 Mudejar-Gothic churches in the south of Spain. Measurements took place in unoccupied churches according to the ISO-3382 standard. Monoaural objective measures in the 125-4000 Hz frequency range and in their spatial distributions were obtained. Acoustic parameters: clarity C80, definition D50, sound strength G and center time Ts have been deduced using impulse response analysis through a maximum length sequence measurement system in each church. These parameters spectrally averaged according to the most extended criteria in auditoria in order to consider acoustic quality were studied as a function of source-receiver distance. The experimental results were compared with predictions given by classical and other existing theoretical models proposed for concert halls and churches. An analytical semi-empirical model based on the measured values of the C80 parameter is proposed in this work for these spaces. The good agreement between predicted values and experimental data for definition, sound strength, and center time in the churches analyzed shows that the model can be used for design predictions and other purposes with reasonable accuracy.

  1. Acoustic source analysis of a supersonic rectangular chevron jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreitzman, Jordan Richard

    Source terms corresponding to Goldstein's generalized acoustic analogy are computed from a high-fidelity simulation of a supersonic jet issuing from a rectangular nozzle with chevrons. Simulated data are validated against experimental data. We investigate the theoretical underpinning of reduced-order acoustic source models by testing the assumptions of quasi-normality and statistical axisymmetry. It is found that the flow is not quasi-normal in the axial direction but is quasi-normal in the transverse directions. Our analysis also shows that the flow is locally statistically axisymmetric close to the edges of the flow but not near the center. Fourth order correlation statistics are fit to previously used acoustic source models originally developed for axisymmetric jets. This thesis performs a detailed analysis of four different models: the Gaussian, moving-frame, fixed-frame, and modified-distance models. The latter three models are found to be similar in accuracy, while the Gaussian model is found to be a poorer fit.

  2. Energy Sources: An Historical Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Constance M.

    1983-01-01

    Putting the present energy situation into an historical perspective provides meaning to today's energy concerns and demonstrates how important energy has always been to our life style. Primary energy sources of the United States from 1850 to the present are examined. (RM)

  3. Acoustic noise associated with the MOD-1 wind turbine: its source, impact, and control

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, N.D.; McKenna, H.E.; Hemphill, R.R.; Etter, C.L.; Garrelts, R.L.; Linn, N.C.

    1985-02-01

    This report summarizes extensive research by staff of the Solar Energy Research Institute and its subcontractors conducted to establish the origin and possible amelioration of acoustic disturbances associated with the operation of the DOE/NASA MOD-1 wind turbine installed in 1979 near Boone, North Carolina. Results have shown that the source of this acoustic annoyance was the transient, unsteady aerodynamic lift imparted to the turbine blades as they passed through the lee wakes of the large, cylindrical tower supports. Nearby residents were annoyed by the low-frequency, acoustic impulses propagated into the structures in which the complainants lived. The situation was aggravated further by a complex sound propagation process controlled by terrain and atmospheric focusing. Several techniques for reducing the abrupt, unsteady blade load transients were researched and are discussed in the report.

  4. Prediction of the Acoustic Field Associated with Instability Wave Source Model for a Compressible Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golubev, Vladimir; Mankbadi, Reda R.; Dahl, Milo D.; Kiraly, L. James (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This paper provides preliminary results of the study of the acoustic radiation from the source model representing spatially-growing instability waves in a round jet at high speeds. The source model is briefly discussed first followed by the analysis of the produced acoustic directivity pattern. Two integral surface techniques are discussed and compared for prediction of the jet acoustic radiation field.

  5. System and method for sonic wave measurements using an acoustic beam source

    DOEpatents

    Vu, Cung Khac; Sinha, Dipen N.; Pantea, Cristian

    2015-08-11

    A method and system for investigating structure near a borehole are described herein. The method includes generating an acoustic beam by an acoustic source; directing at one or more azimuthal angles the acoustic beam towards a selected location in a vicinity of a borehole; receiving at one or more receivers an acoustic signal, the acoustic signal originating from a reflection or a refraction of the acoustic wave by a material at the selected location; and analyzing the received acoustic signal to characterize features of the material around the borehole.

  6. Simulation and analysis chain for acoustic ultra-high energy neutrino detectors in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neff, M.; Anton, G.; Enzenhöfer, A.; Graf, K.; Hößl, J.; Katz, U.; Lahmann, R.; Sieger, C.

    2013-05-01

    Acoustic neutrino detection is a promising approach for large-scale ultra-high energy neutrino detectors in water. In this article, a Monte Carlo simulation chain for acoustic neutrino detection devices in water will be presented. The simulation chain covers the generation of the acoustic pulse produced by a neutrino interaction and its propagation to the sensors within the detector. Currently, ambient and transient noise models for the Mediterranean Sea and simulations of the data acquisition hardware, equivalent to the one used in ANTARES/AMADEUS, are implemented. A pre-selection scheme for neutrino-like signals based on matched filtering is employed, as it is used for on-line filtering. To simulate the whole processing chain for experimental data, signal classification and acoustic source reconstruction algorithms are integrated in an analysis chain. An overview of design and capabilities of the simulation and analysis chain will be presented and preliminary studies will be discussed.

  7. Economics and energy sources.

    PubMed

    Munro, Malcolm G

    2013-01-01

    Energy-based instrumentation has not only facilitated the rapid adoption of laparoscopic surgery, but could be considered essential for the completion of abdominal and pelvic procedures under endoscopic guidance. For decades, relatively simple and generic reusable monopolar and bipolar systems were the only options available. More recently, the available options for energy-based surgical instrumentation have become more crowded with the introduction of ultrasound-based cutting and sealing instruments and proprietary, impedance monitoring radiofrequency coagulation devices. Such instrumentation is presented as being easier to use as well as providing greater safety and efficacy. However, these new instruments typically require the expenditure of capital for proprietary energy generators and are usually designed to be for single use, a circumstance that increases per case costs, a circumstance that begs the question of value. Do the additional costs expended for the more expensive devices translate into reduced complications, faster operating time, or even wider access to minimally invasive procedures because they enable more surgeons to offer the service? Herein is explored the complex economic issues associated with the use of energy-based surgical devices as they apply to minimal access surgery in general and to laparoscopic procedures specifically.

  8. Alternate Propulsion Energy Sources

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-12-01

    Fermilab in the USA. The antiprotons are generated by the collision of high energy protons with multiple arrays of thin metal targets. The high...UNCLASSIFIED AD NUMBER ADB088771 NEW LIMITATION CHANGE TO Approved for public release, distribution unlimited FROM Distribution authorized to U.S...EdwarsAFB CA 93523erne_ .... • ir cont-rac--o-S Report distribution limited to ... . .y, Critical Technology,14-Ne 4. .. 9A2 M - Other requests for this

  9. Accurate Simulation of Acoustic Emission Sources in Composite Plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, W. H.; Gorman, M. R.

    1994-01-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) signals propagate as the extensional and flexural plate modes in thin composite plates and plate-like geometries such as shells, pipes, and tubes. The relative amplitude of the two modes depends on the directionality of the source motion. For source motions with large out-of-plane components such as delaminations or particle impact, the flexural or bending plate mode dominates the AE signal with only a small extensional mode detected. A signal from such a source is well simulated with the standard pencil lead break (Hsu-Neilsen source) on the surface of the plate. For other sources such as matrix cracking or fiber breakage in which the source motion is primarily in-plane, the resulting AE signal has a large extensional mode component with little or no flexural mode observed. Signals from these type sources can also be simulated with pencil lead breaks. However, the lead must be fractured on the edge of the plate to generate an in-plane source motion rather than on the surface of the plate. In many applications such as testing of pressure vessels and piping or aircraft structures, a free edge is either not available or not in a desired location for simulation of in-plane type sources. In this research, a method was developed which allows the simulation of AE signals with a predominant extensional mode component in composite plates requiring access to only the surface of the plate.

  10. Acoustic source localization using a polyhedral microphone array and an improved generalized cross-correlation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padois, Thomas; Sgard, Franck; Doutres, Olivier; Berry, Alain

    2017-01-01

    Millions of workers are exposed to excessive noise levels each day. Acoustic solutions have to be developed to protect workers from hearing loss. The first step of an acoustic diagnosis is the source localization which can be performed with a microphone array. Spherical microphone arrays can be used to detect the acoustic source positions in a workplace. In this study, a spherical microphone array, with polyhedral discretization, is proposed and compared with a spherical array with a slightly different geometry. The generalized cross-correlation technique is used to detect the source positions. Moreover, two criteria are introduced to improve the noise source map. The first is based on the geometric properties of the microphone array and the scan zone whereas the second is based on the energy of the spatial likelihood function. Numerical data are used to provide a systematic comparison of both geometries and criteria. Finally, experiments in a reverberant room reveal that the polyhedral microphone array associated with both criteria provides the best noise source map.

  11. Hybrid acoustic energy harvesting using combined electromagnetic and piezoelectric conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Farid Ullah; Izhar

    2016-02-01

    This paper reports a novel hybrid acoustic energy harvester. The harvester utilizes both the electromagnetic and piezoelectric conversion mechanisms simultaneously to convert the ambient acoustical noise into electrical power for self-powered wireless sensor nodes. The proposed harvester is comprised of a Helmholtz resonator, two magnets mounted on a piezoelectric plate, and a wound coil located under the magnets. The harvester is characterized both under harmonic and real random acoustical excitations. In-lab, under harmonic acoustical excitation at a sound pressure level of 130 dB and frequency of 2.1 kHz, an optimum power of 2.86 μW (at 114 Ω optimum load) is obtained from electromagnetic conversion and 50 μW (at 1000 Ω optimum load) is generated by the piezoelectric harvester's part. Moreover, in real acoustical environment of a domestic electric generator the peak voltages of 40 and 123 mV are produced by the electromagnetic and piezoelectric portions of the acoustic energy harvester.

  12. VEDCO energy installations sources

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, A.

    1996-12-31

    A process for solid waste management is described. The approach combines materials recovery, recycling, and using refuse-derived fuel for cogeneration. A fluidized bed system is used for combustion. An example of the use of this system is briefly cited; it has extended landfill life up to 100 years for one county and allowed three counties to close municipal landfills. Over 50,000 tons of material are recycled each year, saving more than $100 million on waste disposal. Energy generation saves a chemical company over 3 million gallons of oil annually and allows the local utility company to save 75,000 tons of coal. Air emissions at the chemical company will also be reduced by over 50%.

  13. Acoustic intensity in the interaction region of a parametric source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauchle, G. C.; Gabrielson, T. B.; van Tol, D. J.; Kottke, N. F.; McConnell, J. A.

    2003-10-01

    The goal of this project was to measure acoustic intensity in the strong interaction region of a parametric source in order to obtain a clear definition of the source-generation region and to separate the local generation (the reactive field) from propagation (the real or active field). The acoustic intensity vector was mapped in the interaction region of a parametric projector at Lake Seneca. The source was driven with primary signals at 22 kHz and 27 kHz. Receiving sensors were located 8.5 meters from the projector. At that range, the secondary at 5 kHz was between 40 and 45 dB below either primary. For the primary levels used, the plane-wave shock inception distance would have been at least 14 meters. Furthermore, the Rayleigh distance for the projector was about 4 meters so the measurements at 8.5 meters were in the strong interaction region but not in saturation. Absorption was negligible over these ranges. The intensity measurements were made at fixed range but varying azimuth angle and varying depth thus developing a two-dimensional cross-section of the secondary beam. Measurements of both the active and reactive intensity vectors will be presented along with a discussion of measurement error. [Work supported by ONR Code 321SS.

  14. Acoustic source localization in mixed field using spherical microphone arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Qinghua; Wang, Tong

    2014-12-01

    Spherical microphone arrays have been used for source localization in three-dimensional space recently. In this paper, a two-stage algorithm is developed to localize mixed far-field and near-field acoustic sources in free-field environment. In the first stage, an array signal model is constructed in the spherical harmonics domain. The recurrent relation of spherical harmonics is independent of far-field and near-field mode strengths. Therefore, it is used to develop spherical estimating signal parameter via rotational invariance technique (ESPRIT)-like approach to estimate directions of arrival (DOAs) for both far-field and near-field sources. In the second stage, based on the estimated DOAs, simple one-dimensional MUSIC spectrum is exploited to distinguish far-field and near-field sources and estimate the ranges of near-field sources. The proposed algorithm can avoid multidimensional search and parameter pairing. Simulation results demonstrate the good performance for localizing far-field sources, or near-field ones, or mixed field sources.

  15. Acoustical analysis and multiple source auralizations of charismatic worship spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Richard W.

    2004-05-01

    Because of the spontaneity and high level of call and response, many charismatic churches have verbal and musical communication problems that stem from highly reverberant sound fields, poor speech intelligibility, and muddy music. This research looks at the subjective dimensions of room acoustics perception that affect a charismatic worship space, which is summarized using the acronym RISCS (reverberation, intimacy, strength, coloration, and spaciousness). The method of research is to obtain acoustical measurements for three worship spaces in order to analyze the objective parameters associated with the RISCS subjective dimensions. For the same spaces, binaural room impulse response (BRIR) measurements are done for different receiver positions in order to create an auralization for each position. The subjective descriptors of RISCS are analyzed through the use of listening tests of the three auralized spaces. The results from the measurements and listening tests are analyzed to determine if listeners' perceptions correlate with the objective parameter results, the appropriateness of the subjective parameters for the use of the space, and which parameters seem to take precedent. A comparison of the multi-source auralization to a conventional single-source auralization was done with the mixed down version of the synchronized multi-track anechoic signals.

  16. Near-field beamforming analysis for acoustic emission source localization.

    PubMed

    He, Tian; Pan, Qiang; Liu, Yaoguang; Liu, Xiandong; Hu, Dayong

    2012-07-01

    This paper attempts to introduce a near-field acoustic emission (AE) beamforming method to estimate the AE source locations by using a small array of sensors closely placed in a local region. The propagation characteristics of AE signals are investigated based on guided wave theory to discuss the feasibility of using beamforming techniques in AE signal processing. To validate the effectiveness of the AE beamforming method, a series of pencil lead break tests at various regions of a thin steel plate are conducted. The potential of this method for engineering applications are explored through rotor-stator rubbing tests. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method can effectively determine the region where rubbing occurs. It is expected that the work of this paper may provide a helpful analysis tool for near-field AE source localization.

  17. Baryon acoustic oscillation intensity mapping of dark energy.

    PubMed

    Chang, Tzu-Ching; Pen, Ue-Li; Peterson, Jeffrey B; McDonald, Patrick

    2008-03-07

    The expansion of the Universe appears to be accelerating, and the mysterious antigravity agent of this acceleration has been called "dark energy." To measure the dynamics of dark energy, baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) can be used. Previous discussions of the BAO dark energy test have focused on direct measurements of redshifts of as many as 10(9) individual galaxies, by observing the 21 cm line or by detecting optical emission. Here we show how the study of acoustic oscillation in the 21 cm brightness can be accomplished by economical three-dimensional intensity mapping. If our estimates gain acceptance they may be the starting point for a new class of dark energy experiments dedicated to large angular scale mapping of the radio sky, shedding light on dark energy.

  18. Baryon Acoustic Oscillation Intensity Mapping of Dark Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Tzu-Ching; Pen, Ue-Li; Peterson, Jeffrey B.; McDonald, Patrick

    2008-03-01

    The expansion of the Universe appears to be accelerating, and the mysterious antigravity agent of this acceleration has been called “dark energy.” To measure the dynamics of dark energy, baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) can be used. Previous discussions of the BAO dark energy test have focused on direct measurements of redshifts of as many as 109 individual galaxies, by observing the 21 cm line or by detecting optical emission. Here we show how the study of acoustic oscillation in the 21 cm brightness can be accomplished by economical three-dimensional intensity mapping. If our estimates gain acceptance they may be the starting point for a new class of dark energy experiments dedicated to large angular scale mapping of the radio sky, shedding light on dark energy.

  19. Array Receivers and Sound Sources for Three Dimensional Shallow Water Acoustic Field Experiments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-12-06

    Water Acoustic Field Experiments NOOO 14-15-1-2893 Sc. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Sd. PROJECT NUMBER Ying Tsong-Lin 132893SP Se. TASK...testing. 1S. SUBJECT TERMS acoustics, shallow water , Arctic Ocean , 3-D acoustic propagation, shelfbreak 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: R b...Approved f or public release; distribution is unlimited. Array Receivers and Sound Sources for Three-Dimensional Shallow- Water Acoustic Field

  20. Output of acoustical sources. [effects of structural elements and background flow on immobile multipolar point radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, H.

    1980-01-01

    Acoustic radiation from a source, here viewed as an immobile point singularity with periodic strength and a given multipolar nature, is affected by the presence of nearly structural elements (e.g., rigid or impedance surfaces) as well as that of a background flow in the medium. An alternative to the conventional manner of calculating the net source output by integrating the energy flux over a distant control surface is described; this involves a direct evaluation of the secondary wavefunction at the position of the primary source and obviates the need for a (prospectively difficult) flux integration. Various full and half-planar surface configurations with an adjacent source are analyzed in detail, and the explicit results obtained, in particular, for the power factor of a dipole brings out a substantial rise in its output as the source nears the sharp edge of a half-plane.

  1. Antimatter as an Energy Source

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Gerald P.

    2009-03-16

    Antiprotons and positrons are constantly generated in space, and periodically manufactured by humans here on Earth. Harvesting of these particles in space and forming stable antimatter atoms and molecules would create a significant energy source for power and propulsion. Though dedicated fabrication of these particles on Earth consumes much more energy than could be liberated upon annihilation, manufactured antimatter represents a high-density energy storage mechanism well suited for spacecraft power and propulsion. In this paper the creation, storage, and utilization of antimatter is introduced. Specific examples of electrical energy generation and deep-space propulsion based on antimatter are also reviewed.

  2. Quantitative and qualitative analyses of under-balcony acoustics with real and simulated arrays of multiple sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Youngmin

    The objective of this study was to quantitatively and qualitatively identify the acoustics of the under-balcony areas in music performance halls under realistic conditions that are close to an orchestral performance in consideration of multiple music instrumental sources and their diverse sound propagation patterns. The study executed monaural and binaural impulse response measurements with an array of sixteen directional sources (loudspeakers) for acoustical assessments. Actual measurements in a performance hall as well as computer simulations were conducted for the quantitative assessments. Psycho-acoustical listening tests were conducted for the qualitative assessments using the music signals binaurally recorded in the hall with the same source array. The results obtained from the multiple directional source tests were analyzed by comparing them to those obtained from the tests performed with a single omni-directional source. These two sets of results obtained in the under-balcony area were also compared to those obtained in the main orchestra area. The quantitative results showed that the use of a single source conforming to conventional measurement protocol seems to be competent for measurements of the room acoustical parameters such as EDTmid, RTmid, C80500-2k, IACCE3 and IACCL3. These quantitative measures, however, did not always agree with the results of the qualitative assessments. The primary reason is that, in many other acoustical analysis respects, the acoustical phenomena shown from the multiple source measurements were not similar to those shown from the single source measurements. Remarkable differences were observed in time-domain impulse responses, frequency content, spectral distribution, directional distribution of the early reflections, and in sound energy density over time. Therefore, the room acoustical parameters alone should not be the acoustical representative characterizing a performance hall or a specific area such as the under

  3. Energy source for comet outbursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patashnick, H.; Schuerman, D. W.; Rupprecht, G.

    1974-01-01

    Development of a mechanism explaining the internal source of energy of comet outbursts. A mechanism is proposed which automatically provides a source of particulate matter which creates a huge surface area which contains a substantial percentage of amorphous ice, so that the phase transition of the amorphous ice to a cubic structure provides a release of energy which may be responsible for the outbursts observed in many comets. In addition, the volume into which the transition can propagate is estimated for a spherical comet with a radius of 5 km.

  4. Detection of impulsive sources from an aerostat-based acoustic array data collection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prather, Wayne E.; Clark, Robert C.; Strickland, Joshua; Frazier, Wm. Garth; Singleton, Jere

    2009-05-01

    An aerostat based acoustic array data collection system was deployed at the NATO TG-53 "Acoustic Detection of Weapon Firing" Joint Field Experiment conducted in Bourges, France during the final two weeks of June 2008. A variety of impulsive sources including mortar, artillery, gunfire, RPG, and explosive devices were fired during the test. Results from the aerostat acoustic array will be presented against the entire range of sources.

  5. Access to patents as sources to musical acoustics inventions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brock-Nannestad, George

    2005-09-01

    Patents are important sources for the development of any technology. The paper addresses modern methods of access to patent publications relating to musical acoustics, in particular the constructions of instruments and components for instruments, methods for tuning, methods for teaching, and measuring equipment. The patent publications available are, among others, from the U.S., England, France, Germany, Japan, Russia, and the date range is from ca. 1880 to the present day. The two main searchable websites use different classification systems in their approach, and by suitable combination of the information it is possible to target the search efficiently. The paper will demonstrate the recent transfer of inventions relating to physical instruments to electronic simulations, and the fact that most recent inventions were made by independent inventors. A specific example is given by discussing the proposals for improved pipe organ and violin constructions invented in Denmark in the 1930s by Jarnak based on patented improvements for telephone reproducers.

  6. Acoustic Source Modeling for High Speed Air Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, Marvin E.; Khavaran, Abbas

    2005-01-01

    The far field acoustic spectra at 90deg to the downstream axis of some typical high speed jets are calculated from two different forms of Lilley s equation combined with some recent measurements of the relevant turbulent source function. These measurements, which were limited to a single point in a low Mach number flow, were extended to other conditions with the aid of a highly developed RANS calculation. The results are compared with experimental data over a range of Mach numbers. Both forms of the analogy lead to predictions that are in excellent agreement with the experimental data at subsonic Mach numbers. The agreement is also fairly good at supersonic speeds, but the data appears to be slightly contaminated by shock-associated noise in this case.

  7. Multiple concurrent sources localization based on a two-node distributed acoustic sensor network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jiaxin; Zhao, Zhao; Chen, Chunzeng; Xu, Zhiyong

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we propose a new approach to localize multiple concurrent sources using a distributed acoustic sensor network. Only two node-arrays are required in this sensor network, and each node-array consists of only two widely spaced sensors. Firstly, direction-of-arrivals (DOAs) of multiple sources are estimated at each node-array by utilizing a new pooled angular spectrum proposed in this paper, which can implement the spatial aliasing suppression effectively. Based on minimum variance distortionless response (MVDR) beamforming and the DOA estimates of the sources, the time-frequency spectra containing the corresponding energy distribution features associated with those sources are reconstructed in each node-array. Then, scale invariant feature transform (SIFT) is employed to solve the DOA association problem. Performance evaluation is conducted with field recordings and experimental results prove the effectivity and feasibility of the proposed method.

  8. Developing a system for blind acoustic source localization and separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Raghavendra

    This dissertation presents innovate methodologies for locating, extracting, and separating multiple incoherent sound sources in three-dimensional (3D) space; and applications of the time reversal (TR) algorithm to pinpoint the hyper active neural activities inside the brain auditory structure that are correlated to the tinnitus pathology. Specifically, an acoustic modeling based method is developed for locating arbitrary and incoherent sound sources in 3D space in real time by using a minimal number of microphones, and the Point Source Separation (PSS) method is developed for extracting target signals from directly measured mixed signals. Combining these two approaches leads to a novel technology known as Blind Sources Localization and Separation (BSLS) that enables one to locate multiple incoherent sound signals in 3D space and separate original individual sources simultaneously, based on the directly measured mixed signals. These technologies have been validated through numerical simulations and experiments conducted in various non-ideal environments where there are non-negligible, unspecified sound reflections and reverberation as well as interferences from random background noise. Another innovation presented in this dissertation is concerned with applications of the TR algorithm to pinpoint the exact locations of hyper-active neurons in the brain auditory structure that are directly correlated to the tinnitus perception. Benchmark tests conducted on normal rats have confirmed the localization results provided by the TR algorithm. Results demonstrate that the spatial resolution of this source localization can be as high as the micrometer level. This high precision localization may lead to a paradigm shift in tinnitus diagnosis, which may in turn produce a more cost-effective treatment for tinnitus than any of the existing ones.

  9. Array of piezoelectric wires in acoustic energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golestanyan, Edvin

    An acoustic energy harvesting mechanism to harvest a travelling sound wave at a low audible frequency (180 ˜ 200Hz) is further developed and studied both experimentally and numerically. The acoustic energy harvester in this study consists of a quarter-wavelength straight tube resonator and multiple piezoelectric oscillators in wire and plate shapes placed inside the tube. When the tube resonator is excited by an incident sound at its acoustic resonant frequency, the amplified acoustic pressure inside the tube drives the vibration motions of piezoelectric oscillators, resulting in generating electricity. It has been found that a single piezoelectric plate generates more power than a wire, but with placing in multiple-rows piezoelectric wires more power is produced. Parallel and series connections of multiple piezoelectric oscillators have also been studied and expressions for calculating optimum loading resistance have been presented. It has been found that the series connection generates more power than parallel connection. As the number of piezoelectric oscillators increases, the magnitude of the single loading resistance decreases. The decrease of loading resistance is more intense in multiple wires than in multiple plates and in parallel connection than in series connection.

  10. Sound source localization by hearing preservation patients with and without symmetrical low-frequency acoustic hearing.

    PubMed

    Loiselle, Louise H; Dorman, Michael F; Yost, William A; Gifford, René H

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this article was to study sound source localization by cochlear implant (CI) listeners with low-frequency (LF) acoustic hearing in both the operated ear and in the contralateral ear. Eight CI listeners had symmetrical LF acoustic hearing and 4 had asymmetrical LF acoustic hearing. The effects of two variables were assessed: (i) the symmetry of the LF thresholds in the two ears and (ii) the presence/absence of bilateral acoustic amplification. Stimuli consisted of low-pass, high-pass, and wideband noise bursts presented in the frontal horizontal plane. Localization accuracy was 23° of error for the symmetrical listeners and 76° of error for the asymmetrical listeners. The presence of a unilateral CI used in conjunction with bilateral LF acoustic hearing does not impair sound source localization accuracy, but amplification for acoustic hearing can be detrimental to sound source localization accuracy.

  11. A hydrophone prototype for ultra high energy neutrino acoustic detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotrufo, A.; Plotnikov, A.; Yershova, O.; Anghinolfi, M.; Piombo, D.

    2009-06-01

    The design of an air-backed fiber-optic hydrophone is presented. With respect to the previous models this prototype is optimized to provide a bandwidth sufficiently large to detect acoustic signals produced by high energy hadronic showers in water. In addiction to the geometrical configuration and to the choice of the materials, the preliminary results of the measured performances in air are presented.

  12. Ethanol: A Strategic Energy Source?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-04

    REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 04-05-2009 2. REPORT TYPE Program Research Paper 3 . DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...radical terrorists richer.” 3 This research project examines the viability of ethanol as an alternative fuel source. It will identify whether an ethanol...Japan in 1941 went to war to secure its energy supplies. The United States must 3 prepare for these shortages if we are to maintain our economic

  13. Rock softening due to ultrasonic acoustical energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freund, F. T.; Freund, M. M.; Hedberg, C. M.; Haller, K. C.; Dahlgren, R.; Williams, C.; Agrawal, P.

    2011-12-01

    When igneous or high-grade metamorphic rocks are subjected to deviatoric stresses, dormant defects existing in the matrix of common rock-forming minerals become activated releasing mobile positive hole charge carriers. These defects consist of pairs of oxygen anions in the 1- valence state, e.g. peroxy links such as O3Si-OO-SiO3. When the peroxy bond breaks, O3Si-O:O-SiO3, an electron is transferred from a neighboring O2- creating a trapped electron defect, O3Si-O.O-SiO3, while the donor oxygen, now O-, turns into a defect electron or hole that can propagate as a highly mobile positive charge traveling along the upper edge of the valence band. There is evidence that the wave function associated with these positive hole charge carriers is highly delocalized. The delocalization lowers the electron density at the surrounding O2-, hence the bond energy, thereby affecting fundamental properties including the mechanical strength. To demonstrate the rock softening effect we mounted a rectangular bar of fine-grained gabbro about 30 cm long in a horizontal position clamping it at one end. A piezoelectric transducer (PZT) was epoxied to the fixed end of the rock bar to send ultrasonic energy at 57 KHz toward the cantilevered end. The downward deflection of the free end of the beam was measured with an interferometer to a high degree of precision. With ultrasonic energy present, the free end of the beam sagged near-instantaneously by about 0.2 μm and continued to sag slowly by about 0.4 μm over 120 sec. Upon turning off the PZT the rock bar returned slowly to the baseline deflection value. The ultrasound waves generated by the PZT activate positive holes, changing the apparent stiffness of the beam and causing its cantilevered end to bend downward. We also conducted experiments using an Instron 5569 Dual Column Testing System to subject rectangular plates (15.2 x 3.8 x 0.5 cm) of the same gabbro to dynamic three-point flexural tests. Using electrostatic fields of different

  14. Theoretical and experimental study on the acoustic wave energy after the nonlinear interaction of acoustic waves in aqueous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Chao-feng; Li, Feng-chen; Chen, Huan; Lu, Di; Yang, De-sen; Zhang, Meng

    2015-06-01

    Based on the Burgers equation and Manley-Rowe equation, the derivation about nonlinear interaction of the acoustic waves has been done in this paper. After nonlinear interaction among the low-frequency weak waves and the pump wave, the analytical solutions of acoustic waves' amplitude in the field are deduced. The relationship between normalized energy of high-frequency and the change of acoustic energy before and after the nonlinear interaction of the acoustic waves is analyzed. The experimental results about the changes of the acoustic energy are presented. The study shows that new frequencies are generated and the energies of the low-frequency are modulated in a long term by the pump waves, which leads the energies of the low-frequency acoustic waves to change in the pulse trend in the process of the nonlinear interaction of the acoustic waves. The increase and decrease of the energies of the low-frequency are observed under certain typical conditions, which lays a foundation for practical engineering applications.

  15. Rayleigh criterion and acoustic energy balance in unconfined self-sustained oscillating flames

    SciTech Connect

    Durox, D.; Schuller, T.; Noiray, N.; Birbaud, A.L.; Candel, S.

    2008-11-15

    Instabilities of confined combustion systems are often discussed in terms of the Rayleigh criterion, which provides a necessary condition for unstable operation and is commonly used to distinguish driving and damping regions. The analysis is also carried out in some cases by making use of an acoustic energy balance in which the Rayleigh term acts as a source. The case of unconfined flames is less well documented but of importance in practical systems used in heating and drying. This study is motivated by problems of self-sustained oscillations of radiant burners for domestic or industrial processes and of various other types of open flames. Application of the Rayleigh criterion and of the balance of acoustic energy to oscillations arising in such unconfined systems is examined. The objective is to see if the Rayleigh condition is fulfilled and to show how the different perturbed variables are linked to each other to develop an unstable oscillation. These issues are investigated by experiments in two geometries. The first case relates to a single ''V''- or ''M''-shaped flame formed by a burner behaving like a Helmholtz resonator. The second geometry features a collection of conical flames (CCF) established by a multipoint injector. This system is fed by a manifold that features a set of plane modes and resonates like an organ pipe at frequencies corresponding to odd multiples of the quarter wave. The Rayleigh criterion and a related result written in the form of an acoustic energy balance are used to define conditions of instability. A link is established between the pressure signal radiated by the burner and the total heat release rate perturbation yielding the phase lag between these two variables and providing conditions for unstable operation. Systematic experiments carried out in the two burner geometries and model predictions are in good agreement indicating that the Rayleigh source term is positive and that the criterion is well fulfilled by the wavefield

  16. Rayleigh criterion and acoustic energy balance in unconfined self-sustained oscillating flames

    SciTech Connect

    Durox, D.; Schuller, T.; Noiray, N.; Birbaud, A.L.; Candel, S.

    2009-01-15

    Instabilities of confined combustion systems are often discussed in terms of the Rayleigh criterion, which provides a necessary condition for unstable operation and is commonly used to distinguish driving and damping regions. The analysis is also carried out in some cases by making use of an acoustic energy balance in which the Rayleigh term acts as a source. The case of unconfined flames is less well documented but of importance in practical systems used in heating and drying. This study is motivated by problems of self-sustained oscillations of radiant burners for domestic or industrial processes and of various other types of open flames. Application of the Rayleigh criterion and of the balance of acoustic energy to oscillations arising in such unconfined systems is examined. The objective is to see if the Rayleigh condition is fulfilled and to show how the different perturbed variables are linked to each other to develop an unstable oscillation. These issues are investigated by experiments in two geometries. The first case relates to a single ''V''- or ''M''-shaped flame formed by a burner behaving like a Helmholtz resonator. The second geometry features a collection of conical flames (CCF) established by a multipoint injector. This system is fed by a manifold that features a set of plane modes and resonates like an organ pipe at frequencies corresponding to odd multiples of the quarter wave. The Rayleigh criterion and a related result written in the form of an acoustic energy balance are used to define conditions of instability. A link is established between the pressure signal radiated by the burner and the total heat release rate perturbation yielding the phase lag between these two variables and providing conditions for unstable operation. Systematic experiments carried out in the two burner geometries and model predictions are in good agreement indicating that the Rayleigh source term is positive and that the criterion is well fulfilled by the wavefield

  17. Acoustic metamaterials capable of both sound insulation and energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Junfei; Zhou, Xiaoming; Huang, Guoliang; Hu, Gengkai

    2016-04-01

    Membrane-type acoustic metamaterials are well known for low-frequency sound insulation. In this work, by introducing a flexible piezoelectric patch, we propose sound-insulation metamaterials with the ability of energy harvesting from sound waves. The dual functionality of the metamaterial device has been verified by experimental results, which show an over 20 dB sound transmission loss and a maximum energy conversion efficiency up to 15.3% simultaneously. This novel property makes the metamaterial device more suitable for noise control applications.

  18. Diffusive Propagation of Energy in a Non-acoustic Chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komorowski, Tomasz; Olla, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    We consider a non-acoustic chain of harmonic oscillators with the dynamics perturbed by a random local exchange of momentum, such that energy and momentum are conserved. The macroscopic limits of the energy density, momentum and the curvature (or bending) of the chain satisfy a system of evolution equations. We prove that, in a diffusive space-time scaling, the curvature and momentum evolve following a linear system that corresponds to a damped E uler-B ernoulli beam equation. The macroscopic energy density evolves following a non linear diffusive equation. In particular, the energy transfer is diffusive in this dynamics. This provides a first rigorous example of a normal diffusion of energy in a one dimensional dynamics that conserves the momentum.

  19. Quantitative acoustic emission from localized sources in material fatigue processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Zhiqiang; Jarzynski, Jacek; Jacobs, Laurence

    2000-05-01

    Fretting fatigue is the phenomenon where two contacting bodies undergoing a cyclic fatigue loading experience small amplitude oscillatory motion. Fretting fatigue is characterized by crack nucleation and the subsequent propagation of these cracks. The coupling of fatigue with fretting leads to the premature nucleation and acceleration of the early growth of fatigue cracks, resulting in a significant reduction in a structure's service life. A better understanding of the mechanics of fretting fatigue is needed to prevent and reduce the severe consequences of such damage. This research uses quantitative acoustic emission (AE) techniques to study the fretting fatigue of PH 13-8 stainless steel under different loading conditions. Specifically, this work correlates AE signals to specific fretting characteristics such as frictional force history and frictional force-displacement hysteresis loops. These results indicate a close correlation between the various stages of fretting fatigue with the frequency of AE events. For example, AE waveform characteristics (such as amplitude, energy, and frequency spectrum) enable the identification and characterization of the different stages of fatigue. As a result, it is possible to establish a relationship between AE observations and fretting crack initiation and growth.

  20. Gravitational energy sources in Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flasar, F. M.

    1973-01-01

    Gravitational sources of the intrinsic luminosity of Jupiter are examined in the context of current hydrogen-helium models. When no gravitational separation of matter occurs, the amount of heat which can be released over the remaining lifetime of the planet is necessarily limited by the size of its existing reservoir of thermal energy. This conclusion rests only on the assumption that its interior is relatively cold and degenerate. If gravitational unmixing occurs, the size of the thermal reservoir does not necessarily limit the heat output. If core formation occurs, for example, then the size of the core formed will be a limiting factor. The energy released with the formation of a helium core is computed for Jupiter. A core growth rate, averaged over several billion years, of 20 trillionths of Jupiter's mass per year is required if gravitational separation is to play a significant role in the thermal evolution.

  1. Lithosphere-Atmosphere coupling: Spectral element modeling of the evolution of acoustic waves in the atmosphere from an underground source.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Averbuch, Gil; Price, Colin

    2015-04-01

    Lithosphere-Atmosphere coupling: Spectral element modeling of the evolution of acoustic waves in the atmosphere from an underground source. G. Averbuch, C. Price Department of Geosciences, Tel Aviv University, Israel Infrasound is one of the four Comprehensive Nuclear-Test Ban Treaty technologies for monitoring nuclear explosions. This technology measures the acoustic waves generated by the explosions followed by their propagation through the atmosphere. There are also natural phenomena that can act as an infrasound sources like sprites, volcanic eruptions and earthquakes. The infrasound waves generated from theses phenomena can also be detected by the infrasound arrays. In order to study the behavior of these waves, i.e. the physics of wave propagation in the atmosphere, their evolution and their trajectories, numerical methods are required. This presentation will deal with the evolution of acoustic waves generated by underground sources (earthquakes and underground explosions). A 2D Spectral elements formulation for lithosphere-atmosphere coupling will be presented. The formulation includes the elastic wave equation for the seismic waves and the momentum, mass and state equations for the acoustic waves in a moving stratified atmosphere. The coupling of the two media is made by boundary conditions that ensures the continuity of traction and velocity (displacement) in the normal component to the interface. This work has several objectives. The first is to study the evolution of acoustic waves in the atmosphere from an underground source. The second is to derive transmission coefficients for the energy flux with respect to the seismic magnitude and earth density. The third will be the generation of seismic waves from acoustic waves in the atmosphere. Is it possible?

  2. Device and method for generating a beam of acoustic energy from a borehole, and applications thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Vu, Cung Khac; Sinha, Dipen N; Pantea, Cristian; Nihei, Kurt T; Schmitt, Denis P; Skelt, Christopher

    2013-10-01

    In some aspects of the invention, a method of generating a beam of acoustic energy in a borehole is disclosed. The method includes generating a first acoustic wave at a first frequency; generating a second acoustic wave at a second frequency different than the first frequency, wherein the first acoustic wave and second acoustic wave are generated by at least one transducer carried by a tool located within the borehole; transmitting the first and the second acoustic waves into an acoustically non-linear medium, wherein the composition of the non-linear medium produces a collimated beam by a non-linear mixing of the first and second acoustic waves, wherein the collimated beam has a frequency based upon a difference between the first frequency and the second frequency; and transmitting the collimated beam through a diverging acoustic lens to compensate for a refractive effect caused by the curvature of the borehole.

  3. Characterizing, synthesizing, and/or canceling out acoustic signals from sound sources

    DOEpatents

    Holzrichter, John F.; Ng, Lawrence C.

    2007-03-13

    A system for characterizing, synthesizing, and/or canceling out acoustic signals from inanimate and animate sound sources. Electromagnetic sensors monitor excitation sources in sound producing systems, such as animate sound sources such as the human voice, or from machines, musical instruments, and various other structures. Acoustical output from these sound producing systems is also monitored. From such information, a transfer function characterizing the sound producing system is generated. From the transfer function, acoustical output from the sound producing system may be synthesized or canceled. The systems disclosed enable accurate calculation of transfer functions relating specific excitations to specific acoustical outputs. Knowledge of such signals and functions can be used to effect various sound replication, sound source identification, and sound cancellation applications.

  4. Note: Localization based on estimated source energy homogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turkaya, Semih; Toussaint, Renaud; Eriksen, Fredrik Kvalheim; Lengliné, Olivier; Daniel, Guillaume; Flekkøy, Eirik G.; Mâløy, Knut Jørgen

    2016-09-01

    Acoustic signal localization is a complex problem with a wide range of industrial and academic applications. Herein, we propose a localization method based on energy attenuation and inverted source amplitude comparison (termed estimated source energy homogeneity, or ESEH). This inversion is tested on both synthetic (numerical) data using a Lamb wave propagation model and experimental 2D plate data (recorded with 4 accelerometers sensitive up to 26 kHz). We compare the performance of this technique with classic source localization algorithms: arrival time localization, time reversal localization, and localization based on energy amplitude. Our technique is highly versatile and out-performs the conventional techniques in terms of error minimization and cost (both computational and financial).

  5. Acoustic positioning using a tetrahedral ultrashort baseline array of an acoustic modem source transmitting frequency-hopped sequences.

    PubMed

    Beaujean, Pierre-Philippe J; Mohamed, Asif I; Warin, Raphael

    2007-01-01

    Acoustic communications and positioning are vital aspects of unmanned underwater vehicle operations. The usage of separate units on each vehicle has become an issue in terms of frequency bandwidth, space, power, and cost. Most vehicles rely on acoustic modems transmitting frequency-hopped multiple frequency-shift keyed sequences for command-and-control operations, which can be used to locate the vehicle with a good level of accuracy without requiring extra signal transmission. In this paper, an ultrashort baseline acoustic positioning technique has been designed, simulated, and tested to locate an acoustic modem source in three dimensions using a tetrahedral, half-wavelength acoustic antenna. The position estimation is performed using the detection sequence contained in each message, which is a series of frequency-hopped pulses. Maximum likelihood estimation of azimuth and elevation estimation is performed using a varying number of pulse and various signal-to-noise ratios. Simulated and measured position estimation error match closely, and indicate that the accuracy of this system improves dramatically as the number of pulses processed increases, given a fixed signal-to-noise ratio.

  6. Considerations on the acoustic energy radiated by toothed gears. [model for calculating noise intensity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popinceanu, N. G.; Kremmer, I.

    1974-01-01

    A mechano-acoustic model is reported for calculating acoustic energy radiated by a working gear. According to this model, a gear is an acoustic coublet formed of the two wheels. The wheel teeth generate cylindrical acoustic waves while the front surfaces of the teeth behave like vibrating pistons. Theoretical results are checked experimentally and good agreement is obtained with open gears. The experiments show that the air noise effect is negligible as compared with the structural noise transmitted to the gear box.

  7. Renewable Sources of Energy and Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diatta, Christian Sina

    1979-01-01

    Reviewed are the status of conventional sources of energy, prospects for the development of alternative sources of energy, and the consequences of that development on countries that are in the process of industrialization. (BT)

  8. Economics of alternative energy sources.

    PubMed

    Ryle, M

    1977-05-12

    An important part of the oil and natural gas at present consumed in the UK is used for the heating of buildings, a demand which shows large diurnal, day-to-day and annual fluctuations. The replacement of this energy by nuclear-generated electricity, as at present envisaged, would require the construction of some 250 GW of additional capacity by the end of the century, a progamme which does not seem feasible. By incorporating relatively cheap, short term storage in the form of low-grade heat, the generating capacity required to fulfil peak demand could be reduced by more than 50%. As soon as such storage is provided, however, other sources of energy become viable and attractive alternatives, and the UK is well situated to make use of wind, wave, and tidal power. It seems likely that the value of North Sea oil/gas reserves as feedstock to the chemical industry will rise sufficiently to make an early reduction in their consumption as fuel of great economic importance.

  9. Source localization from an elevated acoustic sensor array in a refractive atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Ostashev, Vladimir E; Scanlon, Michael V; Wilson, D Keith; Vecherin, Sergey N

    2008-12-01

    Localization of sound sources on the ground from an acoustic sensor array elevated on a tethered aerostat is considered. To improve estimation of the source coordinates, one should take into account refraction of sound rays due to atmospheric stratification. Using a geometrical acoustics approximation for a stratified moving medium, formulas for the source coordinates are derived that account for sound refraction. The source coordinates are expressed in terms of the direction of sound propagation as measured by the sensor array, its coordinates, and the vertical profiles of temperature and wind velocity. Employing these formulas and typical temperature and wind velocity profiles in the atmosphere, it is shown numerically that sound refraction is important for accurate predictions of the source coordinates. Furthermore, it is shown that the effective sound speed approximation, which is widely used in atmospheric acoustics, fails to correctly predict the source coordinates if the grazing angle of sound propagation is relatively large.

  10. Alternative Sources of Energy: A Course in Energy Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gupta, Gian

    1983-01-01

    Describes a course designed to familiarize students with alternative sources of energy, with emphasis on problem-solving strategies. Includes list of major topics/subtopics addressed and list of textbooks and recommended readings on alternative energy sources. (JN)

  11. Supplementing Conservation Practices with Alternative Energy Sources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraetsch, Gayla A.

    1981-01-01

    Universities and colleges have two major roles: to reduce their own energy consumption and costs, and to develop and test new energy options. Alternative energy sources considered include solar energy, wind power, biomass, hydropower, ocean energy, geothermal heat, coal, and nuclear energy. (MLW)

  12. Source fields reconstruction with 3D mapping by means of the virtual acoustic volume concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forget, S.; Totaro, N.; Guyader, J. L.; Schaeffer, M.

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents the theoretical framework of the virtual acoustic volume concept and two related inverse Patch Transfer Functions (iPTF) identification methods (called u-iPTF and m-iPTF depending on the chosen boundary conditions for the virtual volume). They are based on the application of Green's identity on an arbitrary closed virtual volume defined around the source. The reconstruction of sound source fields combines discrete acoustic measurements performed at accessible positions around the source with the modal behavior of the chosen virtual acoustic volume. The mode shapes of the virtual volume can be computed by a Finite Element solver to handle the geometrical complexity of the source. As a result, it is possible to identify all the acoustic source fields at the real surface of an irregularly shaped structure and irrespective of its acoustic environment. The m-iPTF method is introduced for the first time in this paper. Conversely to the already published u-iPTF method, the m-iPTF method needs only acoustic pressure and avoids particle velocity measurements. This paper is focused on its validation, both with numerical computations and by experiments on a baffled oil pan.

  13. Estimating uncertainty in subsurface glider position using transmissions from fixed acoustic tomography sources.

    PubMed

    Van Uffelen, Lora J; Nosal, Eva-Marie; Howe, Bruce M; Carter, Glenn S; Worcester, Peter F; Dzieciuch, Matthew A; Heaney, Kevin D; Campbell, Richard L; Cross, Patrick S

    2013-10-01

    Four acoustic Seagliders were deployed in the Philippine Sea November 2010 to April 2011 in the vicinity of an acoustic tomography array. The gliders recorded over 2000 broadband transmissions at ranges up to 700 km from moored acoustic sources as they transited between mooring sites. The precision of glider positioning at the time of acoustic reception is important to resolve the fundamental ambiguity between position and sound speed. The Seagliders utilized GPS at the surface and a kinematic model below for positioning. The gliders were typically underwater for about 6.4 h, diving to depths of 1000 m and traveling on average 3.6 km during a dive. Measured acoustic arrival peaks were unambiguously associated with predicted ray arrivals. Statistics of travel-time offsets between received arrivals and acoustic predictions were used to estimate range uncertainty. Range (travel time) uncertainty between the source and the glider position from the kinematic model is estimated to be 639 m (426 ms) rms. Least-squares solutions for glider position estimated from acoustically derived ranges from 5 sources differed by 914 m rms from modeled positions, with estimated uncertainty of 106 m rms in horizontal position. Error analysis included 70 ms rms of uncertainty due to oceanic sound-speed variability.

  14. Device and method for generating a beam of acoustic energy from a borehole, and applications thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Vu, Cung Khac; Sinha, Dipen N.; Pantea, Cristian; Nihei, Kurt T.; Schmitt, Denis P.; Skelt, Chirstopher

    2013-10-15

    In some aspects of the invention, a method of generating a beam of acoustic energy in a borehole is disclosed. The method includes generating a first acoustic wave at a first frequency; generating a second acoustic wave at a second frequency different than the first frequency, wherein the first acoustic wave and second acoustic wave are generated by at least one transducer carried by a tool located within the borehole; transmitting the first and the second acoustic waves into an acoustically non-linear medium, wherein the composition of the non-linear medium produces a collimated beam by a non-linear mixing of the first and second acoustic waves, wherein the collimated beam has a frequency based upon a difference between the first frequency range and the second frequency, and wherein the non-linear medium has a velocity of sound between 100 m/s and 800 m/s.

  15. Energy-Efficient Channel Coding Strategy for Underwater Acoustic Networks.

    PubMed

    Barreto, Grasielli; Simão, Daniel H; Pellenz, Marcelo E; Souza, Richard D; Jamhour, Edgard; Penna, Manoel C; Brante, Glauber; Chang, Bruno S

    2017-03-31

    Underwater acoustic networks (UAN) allow for efficiently exploiting and monitoring the sub-aquatic environment. These networks are characterized by long propagation delays, error-prone channels and half-duplex communication. In this paper, we address the problem of energy-efficient communication through the use of optimized channel coding parameters. We consider a two-layer encoding scheme employing forward error correction (FEC) codes and fountain codes (FC) for UAN scenarios without feedback channels. We model and evaluate the energy consumption of different channel coding schemes for a K-distributed multipath channel. The parameters of the FEC encoding layer are optimized by selecting the optimal error correction capability and the code block size. The results show the best parameter choice as a function of the link distance and received signal-to-noise ratio.

  16. Enhanced vibration based energy harvesting using embedded acoustic black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, L.; Semperlotti, F.; Conlon, S. C.

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we investigate the use of dynamic structural tailoring via the concept of an Acoustic Black Hole (ABH) to enhance the performance of piezoelectric based energy harvesting from operational mechanical vibrations. The ABH is a variable thickness structural feature that can be embedded in the host structure allowing a smooth reduction of the phase velocity while minimizing the amplitude of reflected waves. The ABH thickness variation is typically designed according to power-law profiles. As a propagating wave enters the ABH, it is progressively slowed down while its wavelength is compressed. This effect results in structural areas with high energy density that can be exploited effectively for energy harvesting. The potential of ABH for energy harvesting is shown via a numerical study based on fully coupled finite element electromechanical models of an ABH tapered plate with surface mounted piezo-transducers. The performances of the novel design are evaluated by direct comparison with a non-tapered structure in terms of energy ratios and attenuation indices. Results show that the tailored structural design allows a drastic increase in the harvested energy both for steady state and transient excitation. Performance dependencies of key design parameters are also investigated.

  17. Potential of renewable and alternative energy sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konovalov, V.; Pogharnitskaya, O.; Rostovshchikova, A.; Matveenko, I.

    2015-11-01

    The article deals with application potential of clean alternative renewable energy sources. By means of system analysis the forecast for consumption of electrical energy in Tomsk Oblast as well as main energy sources of existing energy system have been studied up to 2018. Engineering potential of renewable and alternative energy sources is evaluated. Besides, ranking in the order of their efficiency descending is performed. It is concluded that Tomsk Oblast has high potential of alternative and renewable energy sources, among which the most promising development perspective is implementation of gasification stations to save fuel consumed by diesel power stations as well as building wind-power plants.

  18. Characterization of Acoustic Emission Source to Identify Fracture in Concrete

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-01

    Hardy, "An Approach to Acoustic Emission Signal Analysis," Materials Evaluation, 35, 1977 , pp. 100-106. [5] Hsu, N.N. and F.R. Breckenridge...Measurements," Journal of Applied Mechanics, 53, 1986, pp. 61-68. [17] Mindess , S., "The Fracture Process Zone in Concrete," Toughening Mechanisms in

  19. System and method for investigating sub-surface features of a rock formation using compressional acoustic sources

    DOEpatents

    Vu, Cung Khac; Skelt, Christopher; Nihei, Kurt; Johnson, Paul A.; Guyer, Robert; Ten Cate, James A.; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves; Larmat, Carene S.

    2016-09-27

    A system and method for investigating rock formations outside a borehole are provided. The method includes generating a first compressional acoustic wave at a first frequency by a first acoustic source; and generating a second compressional acoustic wave at a second frequency by a second acoustic source. The first and the second acoustic sources are arranged within a localized area of the borehole. The first and the second acoustic waves intersect in an intersection volume outside the borehole. The method further includes receiving a third shear acoustic wave at a third frequency, the third shear acoustic wave returning to the borehole due to a non-linear mixing process in a non-linear mixing zone within the intersection volume at a receiver arranged in the borehole. The third frequency is equal to a difference between the first frequency and the second frequency.

  20. Generalization and extension of the law of acoustic energy conservation in a nonuniform flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, M. K.

    1986-01-01

    An exact conservation equation is derived which generalizes the familiar acoustic energy equations. The new relation is valid for arbitrary disturbances to a viscous, compressible flow. It is suggested by a development of the acoustic energy equation by means of a regular perturbation expansion of the general energy equation of fluid mechanics. A perturbation energy density and flux are defined and identified as the exact physical quantities whose leading order perturbation representations are the usual acoustic energy density and flux. The conservation equation governing the perturbation energy quantities is shown to yield previously known results for several special cases.

  1. Development and validation of a combined phased acoustical radiosity and image source model for predicting sound fields in rooms.

    PubMed

    Marbjerg, Gerd; Brunskog, Jonas; Jeong, Cheol-Ho; Nilsson, Erling

    2015-09-01

    A model, combining acoustical radiosity and the image source method, including phase shifts on reflection, has been developed. The model is denoted Phased Acoustical Radiosity and Image Source Method (PARISM), and it has been developed in order to be able to model both specular and diffuse reflections with complex-valued and angle-dependent boundary conditions. This paper mainly describes the combination of the two models and the implementation of the angle-dependent boundary conditions. It furthermore describes how a pressure impulse response is obtained from the energy-based acoustical radiosity by regarding the model as being stochastic. Three methods of implementation are proposed and investigated, and finally, recommendations are made for their use. Validation of the image source method is done by comparison with finite element simulations of a rectangular room with a porous absorber ceiling. Results from the full model are compared with results from other simulation tools and with measurements. The comparisons of the full model are done for real-valued and angle-independent surface properties. The proposed model agrees well with both the measured results and the alternative theories, and furthermore shows a more realistic spatial variation than energy-based methods due to the fact that interference is considered.

  2. Computational Acoustic Beamforming for Noise Source Identification for Small Wind Turbines

    PubMed Central

    Lien, Fue-Sang

    2017-01-01

    This paper develops a computational acoustic beamforming (CAB) methodology for identification of sources of small wind turbine noise. This methodology is validated using the case of the NACA 0012 airfoil trailing edge noise. For this validation case, the predicted acoustic maps were in excellent conformance with the results of the measurements obtained from the acoustic beamforming experiment. Following this validation study, the CAB methodology was applied to the identification of noise sources generated by a commercial small wind turbine. The simulated acoustic maps revealed that the blade tower interaction and the wind turbine nacelle were the two primary mechanisms for sound generation for this small wind turbine at frequencies between 100 and 630 Hz. PMID:28378012

  3. Toward a Nonlinear Acoustic Analogy: Turbulence as a Source of Sound and Nonlinear Propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Steven A. E.

    2015-01-01

    An acoustic analogy is proposed that directly includes nonlinear propagation effects. We examine the Lighthill acoustic analogy and replace the Green's function of the wave equation with numerical solutions of the generalized Burgers' equation. This is justified mathematically by using similar arguments that are the basis of the solution of the Lighthill acoustic analogy. This approach is superior to alternatives because propagation is accounted for directly from the source to the far-field observer instead of from an arbitrary intermediate point. Validation of a numerical solver for the generalized Burgers' equation is performed by comparing solutions with the Blackstock bridging function and measurement data. Most importantly, the mathematical relationship between the Navier- Stokes equations, the acoustic analogy that describes the source, and canonical nonlinear propagation equations is shown. Example predictions are presented for nonlinear propagation of jet mixing noise at the sideline angle

  4. Toward a Nonlinear Acoustic Analogy: Turbulence as a Source of Sound and Nonlinear Propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Steven A. E.

    2015-01-01

    An acoustic analogy is proposed that directly includes nonlinear propagation effects. We examine the Lighthill acoustic analogy and replace the Green's function of the wave equation with numerical solutions of the generalized Burgers' equation. This is justified mathematically by using similar arguments that are the basis of the solution of the Lighthill acoustic analogy. This approach is superior to alternatives because propagation is accounted for directly from the source to the far-field observer instead of from an arbitrary intermediate point. Validation of a numerical solver for the generalized Burgers' equation is performed by comparing solutions with the Blackstock bridging function and measurement data. Most importantly, the mathematical relationship between the Navier-Stokes equations, the acoustic analogy that describes the source, and canonical nonlinear propagation equations is shown. Example predictions are presented for nonlinear propagation of jet mixing noise at the sideline angle.

  5. Computational Acoustic Beamforming for Noise Source Identification for Small Wind Turbines.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ping; Lien, Fue-Sang; Yee, Eugene

    2017-01-01

    This paper develops a computational acoustic beamforming (CAB) methodology for identification of sources of small wind turbine noise. This methodology is validated using the case of the NACA 0012 airfoil trailing edge noise. For this validation case, the predicted acoustic maps were in excellent conformance with the results of the measurements obtained from the acoustic beamforming experiment. Following this validation study, the CAB methodology was applied to the identification of noise sources generated by a commercial small wind turbine. The simulated acoustic maps revealed that the blade tower interaction and the wind turbine nacelle were the two primary mechanisms for sound generation for this small wind turbine at frequencies between 100 and 630 Hz.

  6. Conservation as an alternative energy source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, D. E.

    1978-01-01

    A speech is given outlining the energy situation in the United States. It is warned that the existing energy situation cannot prevail and the time is fast running out for continued growth or even maintenance of present levels. Energy conservation measures are given as an aid to decrease U.S. energy consumption, which would allow more time to develop alternative sources of energy.

  7. Normal mode solutions for seismo-acoustic propagation resulting from shear and combined wave point sources.

    PubMed

    Nealy, Jennifer L; Collis, Jon M; Frank, Scott D

    2016-04-01

    Normal mode solutions to range-independent seismo-acoustic problems are benchmarked against elastic parabolic equation solutions and then used to benchmark the shear elastic parabolic equation self-starter [Frank, Odom, and Collis, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 133, 1358-1367 (2013)]. The Pekeris waveguide with an elastic seafloor is considered for a point source located in the ocean emitting compressional waves, or in the seafloor, emitting both compressional and shear waves. Accurate solutions are obtained when the source is in the seafloor, and when the source is at the interface between the fluid and elastic layers.

  8. An impulsive source with variable output and stable bandwidth for underwater acoustic experiments.

    PubMed

    McNeese, Andrew R; Wilson, Preston S; Sagers, Jason D; Knobles, David P

    2014-07-01

    The Combustive Sound Source (CSS) is being developed as an environmentally friendly source to be used in ocean acoustics research and surveys. It has the ability to maintain the same wide bandwidth signal over a 20 dB drop in source level. The CSS consists of a submersible combustion chamber filled with a fuel/oxidizer mixture. The mixture is ignited and the ensuing combustion and bubble activity radiates an impulsive, thus broadband, acoustic pulse. The ability to control pulse amplitude while maintaining bandwidth is demonstrated.

  9. Seismic Acoustic Ratio Estimates Using a Moving Vehicle Source

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-08-01

    Sabatier et al., 1986b). More complex models for the earth, such as incorporating layering and poroelastic material (e.g., Albert, 1993; Attenborough ...Richard Detsch, David Fisk, Stephen Decato, and Roger Berger for assistance in data collection, Dr. Donald G. Albert for several useful discussions...groundwater and bedrock in an area .of discontinuous permafrost,” Geophysics 63(5), 1573-1584. Attenborough , K. (1985). “Acoustical impedance models for

  10. Opportunities for shear energy scaling in bulk acoustic wave resonators.

    PubMed

    Jose, Sumy; Hueting, Raymond J E

    2014-10-01

    An important energy loss contribution in bulk acoustic wave resonators is formed by so-called shear waves, which are transversal waves that propagate vertically through the devices with a horizontal motion. In this work, we report for the first time scaling of the shear-confined spots, i.e., spots containing a high concentration of shear wave displacement, controlled by the frame region width at the edge of the resonator. We also demonstrate a novel methodology to arrive at an optimum frame region width for spurious mode suppression and shear wave confinement. This methodology makes use of dispersion curves obtained from finite-element method (FEM) eigenfrequency simulations for arriving at an optimum frame region width. The frame region optimization is demonstrated for solidly mounted resonators employing several shear wave optimized reflector stacks. Finally, the FEM simulation results are compared with measurements for resonators with Ta2O5/ SiO2 stacks showing suppression of the spurious modes.

  11. Design of acoustic logging signal source of imitation based on field programmable gate array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, K.; Ju, X. D.; Lu, J. Q.; Men, B. Y.

    2014-08-01

    An acoustic logging signal source of imitation is designed and realized, based on the Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA), to improve the efficiency of examining and repairing acoustic logging tools during research and field application, and to inspect and verify acoustic receiving circuits and corresponding algorithms. The design of this signal source contains hardware design and software design,and the hardware design uses an FPGA as the control core. Four signals are made first by reading the Random Access Memory (RAM) data which are inside the FPGA, then dealing with the data by digital to analog conversion, amplification, smoothing and so on. Software design uses VHDL, a kind of hardware description language, to program the FPGA. Experiments illustrate that the ratio of signal to noise for the signal source is high, the waveforms are stable, and also its functions of amplitude adjustment, frequency adjustment and delay adjustment are in accord with the characteristics of real acoustic logging waveforms. These adjustments can be used to imitate influences on sonic logging received waveforms caused by many kinds of factors such as spacing and span of acoustic tools, sonic speeds of different layers and fluids, and acoustic attenuations of different cementation planes.

  12. Effects of individual sound sources on the subjective loudness and acoustic comfort in underground shopping streets.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jian; Meng, Qi; Jin, Hong

    2012-10-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that human evaluation of subjective loudness and acoustic comfort depends on a series of factors in a particular situation rather than only on sound pressure levels. In the present study, a large-scale subjective survey has been undertaken on underground shopping streets in Harbin, China, to determine how individual sound sources influence subjective loudness and acoustic comfort evaluation. Based on the analysis of case study results, it has been shown that all individual sound sources can increase subjective loudness to a certain degree. However, their levels of influence on acoustic comfort are different. Background music and the public address system can increase acoustic comfort, with a mean difference of 0.18 to 0.32 and 0.21 to 0.27, respectively, where a five-point bipolar category scale is used. Music from shops and vendor shouts can decrease acoustic comfort, with a mean difference of -0.11 to -0.38 and -0.39 to -0.62, respectively. The feasibility of improving acoustic comfort by changing certain sound sources is thus demonstrated.

  13. B-scan based acoustic source reconstruction for magnetoacoustic tomography with magnetic induction (MAT-MI).

    PubMed

    Mariappan, Leo; Li, Xu; He, Bin

    2011-03-01

    We present in this study, an acoustic source reconstruction method using focused transducer with B-mode imaging for magnetoacoustic tomography with magnetic induction (MAT-MI). MAT-MI is an imaging modality proposed for noninvasive conductivity imaging with high spatial resolution. In MAT-MI, acoustic sources are generated in a conductive object by placing it in a static and a time-varying magnetic field. The acoustic waves from these sources propagate in all directions and are collected with transducers placed around the object. The collected signal is then used to reconstruct the acoustic source distribution and to further estimate the electrical conductivity distribution of the object. A flat piston transducer acting as a point receiver has been used in earlier MAT-MI systems to collect acoustic signals. In this study, we propose to use B-mode scan scheme with a focused transducer that gives a signal gain in its focus region and improves the MAT-MI signal quality. A simulation protocol that can take into account different transducer designs and scan schemes for MAT-MI imaging is developed and used in our evaluation of different MAT-MI system designs. It is shown in our computer simulations that as compared to the earlier approach, the MAT-MI system using B-scan with a focused transducer allows MAT-MI imaging at a closer distance and has improved system sensitivity. In addition, the B-scan imaging technique allows reconstruction of the MAT-MI acoustic sources with a discrete number of scanning locations, which greatly increases the applicability of the MAT-MI approach, especially when a continuous acoustic window is not available in real clinical applications. We have also conducted phantom experiments to evaluate the proposed method, and the reconstructed image shows a good agreement with the target phantom.

  14. Source localization with acoustic sensor arrays using generative model based fitting with sparse constraints.

    PubMed

    Velasco, Jose; Pizarro, Daniel; Macias-Guarasa, Javier

    2012-10-15

    This paper presents a novel approach for indoor acoustic source localization using sensor arrays. The proposed solution starts by defining a generative model, designed to explain the acoustic power maps obtained by Steered Response Power (SRP) strategies. An optimization approach is then proposed to fit the model to real input SRP data and estimate the position of the acoustic source. Adequately fitting the model to real SRP data, where noise and other unmodelled effects distort the ideal signal, is the core contribution of the paper. Two basic strategies in the optimization are proposed. First, sparse constraints in the parameters of the model are included, enforcing the number of simultaneous active sources to be limited. Second, subspace analysis is used to filter out portions of the input signal that cannot be explained by the model. Experimental results on a realistic speech database show statistically significant localization error reductions of up to 30% when compared with the SRP-PHAT strategies.

  15. Source Localization with Acoustic Sensor Arrays Using Generative Model Based Fitting with Sparse Constraints

    PubMed Central

    Velasco, Jose; Pizarro, Daniel; Macias-Guarasa, Javier

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a novel approach for indoor acoustic source localization using sensor arrays. The proposed solution starts by defining a generative model, designed to explain the acoustic power maps obtained by Steered Response Power (SRP) strategies. An optimization approach is then proposed to fit the model to real input SRP data and estimate the position of the acoustic source. Adequately fitting the model to real SRP data, where noise and other unmodelled effects distort the ideal signal, is the core contribution of the paper. Two basic strategies in the optimization are proposed. First, sparse constraints in the parameters of the model are included, enforcing the number of simultaneous active sources to be limited. Second, subspace analysis is used to filter out portions of the input signal that cannot be explained by the model. Experimental results on a realistic speech database show statistically significant localization error reductions of up to 30% when compared with the SRP-PHAT strategies. PMID:23202021

  16. Near- and Far-field Response to Compact Acoustic Sources in Stratified Convection Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cally, Paul S.

    2013-05-01

    The role of the acoustic continuum associated with compact sources in the Sun's interior wave field is explored for a simple polytropic model. The continuum produces a near-field acoustic structure—the so-called acoustic jacket—that cannot be represented by a superposition of discrete normal modes. Particular attention is paid to monochromatic point sources of various frequency and depth, and to the surface velocity power that results, both in the discrete f- and p-mode spectrum and in the continuum. It is shown that a major effect of the continuum is to heal the surface wave field produced by compact sources, and therefore to hide them from view. It is found that the continuous spectrum is not a significant contributor to observable inter-ridge seismic power.

  17. Quad Cities Unit 2 Main Steam Line Acoustic Source Identification and Load Reduction

    SciTech Connect

    DeBoo, Guy; Ramsden, Kevin; Gesior, Roman

    2006-07-01

    The Quad Cities Units 1 and 2 have a history of steam line vibration issues. The implementation of an Extended Power Up-rate resulted in significant increases in steam line vibration as well as acoustic loading of the steam dryers, which led to equipment failures and fatigue cracking of the dryers. This paper discusses the results of extensive data collection on the Quad Cities Unit 2 replacement dryer and the Main Steam Lines. This data was taken with the intent of identifying acoustic sources in the steam system. Review of the data confirmed that vortex shedding coupled column resonance in the relief and safety valve stub pipes were the principal sources of large magnitude acoustic loads in the main steam system. Modifications were developed in sub-scale testing to alter the acoustic properties of the valve standpipes and add acoustic damping to the system. The modifications developed and installed consisted of acoustic side branches that were attached to the Electromatic Relief Valve (ERV) and Main Steam Safety Valve (MSSV) attachment pipes. Subsequent post-modification testing was performed in plant to confirm the effectiveness of the modifications. The modifications have been demonstrated to reduce vibration loads at full Extended Power Up-rate (EPU) conditions to levels below those at Original Licensed Thermal Power (OLTP). (authors)

  18. Tracking Energy Flow Using a Volumetric Acoustic Intensity Imager (VAIM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klos, Jacob; Williams, Earl G.; Valdivia, Nicolas P.

    2006-01-01

    A new measurement device has been invented at the Naval Research Laboratory which images instantaneously the intensity vector throughout a three-dimensional volume nearly a meter on a side. The measurement device consists of a nearly transparent spherical array of 50 inexpensive microphones optimally positioned on an imaginary spherical surface of radius 0.2m. Front-end signal processing uses coherence analysis to produce multiple, phase-coherent holograms in the frequency domain each related to references located on suspect sound sources in an aircraft cabin. The analysis uses either SVD or Cholesky decomposition methods using ensemble averages of the cross-spectral density with the fixed references. The holograms are mathematically processed using spherical NAH (nearfield acoustical holography) to convert the measured pressure field into a vector intensity field in the volume of maximum radius 0.4 m centered on the sphere origin. The utility of this probe is evaluated in a detailed analysis of a recent in-flight experiment in cooperation with Boeing and NASA on NASA s Aries 757 aircraft. In this experiment the trim panels and insulation were removed over a section of the aircraft and the bare panels and windows were instrumented with accelerometers to use as references for the VAIM. Results show excellent success at locating and identifying the sources of interior noise in-flight in the frequency range of 0 to 1400 Hz. This work was supported by NASA and the Office of Naval Research.

  19. A sparse equivalent source method for near-field acoustic holography.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Grande, Efren; Xenaki, Angeliki; Gerstoft, Peter

    2017-01-01

    This study examines a near-field acoustic holography method consisting of a sparse formulation of the equivalent source method, based on the compressive sensing (CS) framework. The method, denoted Compressive-Equivalent Source Method (C-ESM), encourages spatially sparse solutions (based on the superposition of few waves) that are accurate when the acoustic sources are spatially localized. The importance of obtaining a non-redundant representation, i.e., a sensing matrix with low column coherence, and the inherent ill-conditioning of near-field reconstruction problems is addressed. Numerical and experimental results on a classical guitar and on a highly reactive dipole-like source are presented. C-ESM is valid beyond the conventional sampling limits, making wide-band reconstruction possible. Spatially extended sources can also be addressed with C-ESM, although in this case the obtained solution does not recover the spatial extent of the source.

  20. Military jet noise source imaging using multisource statistically optimized near-field acoustical holography.

    PubMed

    Wall, Alan T; Gee, Kent L; Neilsen, Tracianne B; McKinley, Richard L; James, Michael M

    2016-04-01

    The identification of acoustic sources is critical to targeted noise reduction efforts for jets on high-performance tactical aircraft. This paper describes the imaging of acoustic sources from a tactical jet using near-field acoustical holography techniques. The measurement consists of a series of scans over the hologram with a dense microphone array. Partial field decomposition methods are performed to generate coherent holograms. Numerical extrapolation of data beyond the measurement aperture mitigates artifacts near the aperture edges. A multisource equivalent wave model is used that includes the effects of the ground reflection on the measurement. Multisource statistically optimized near-field acoustical holography (M-SONAH) is used to reconstruct apparent source distributions between 20 and 1250 Hz at four engine powers. It is shown that M-SONAH produces accurate field reconstructions for both inward and outward propagation in the region spanned by the physical hologram measurement. Reconstructions across the set of engine powers and frequencies suggests that directivity depends mainly on estimated source location; sources farther downstream radiate at a higher angle relative to the inlet axis. At some frequencies and engine powers, reconstructed fields exhibit multiple radiation lobes originating from overlapped source regions, which is a phenomenon relatively recently reported for full-scale jets.

  1. Impulse source versus dodecahedral loudspeaker for measuring parameters derived from the impulse response in room acoustics.

    PubMed

    San Martín, Ricardo; Arana, Miguel; Machín, Jorge; Arregui, Abel

    2013-07-01

    This study investigates the performance of dodecahedral and impulse sources when measuring acoustic parameters in enclosures according to ISO 3382-1 [Acoustics-Measurement of room acoustic parameters. Part 1: Performance spaces (International Organization for Standardization, Geneva, Switzerland, 2009)]. In general, methods using speakers as a sound source are limited by their frequency response and directivity. On the other hand, getting impulse responses from impulse sources typically involves a lack of repeatability, and it is usually necessary to average several measurements for each position. Through experiments in different auditoriums that recreate typical situations in which the measurement standard is applied, it is found that using impulse sources leads to greater variation in the results, especially at low frequencies. However, this prevents subsequent dispersions due to variables that this technique does not require, such as the orientation of the emitting source. These dispersions may be relevant at high frequencies exceeding the established tolerance criteria for certain parameters. Finally, a new descriptor for dodecahedral sources reflecting the influence their lack of omnidirectionality produces on measuring acoustic parameters is proposed.

  2. A Deconvolution Approach for the Mapping of Acoustic Sources (DAMAS) Determined from Phased Microphone Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Thomas F.; Humphreys, William M., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    Current processing of acoustic array data is burdened with considerable uncertainty. This study reports an original methodology that serves to demystify array results, reduce misinterpretation, and accurately quantify position and strength of acoustic sources. Traditional array results represent noise sources that are convolved with array beamform response functions, which depend on array geometry, size (with respect to source position and distributions), and frequency. The Deconvolution Approach for the Mapping of Acoustic Sources (DAMAS) method removes beamforming characteristics from output presentations. A unique linear system of equations accounts for reciprocal influence at different locations over the array survey region. It makes no assumption beyond the traditional processing assumption of statistically independent noise sources. The full rank equations are solved with a new robust iterative method. DAMAS is quantitatively validated using archival data from a variety of prior high-lift airframe component noise studies, including flap edge/cove, trailing edge, leading edge, slat, and calibration sources. Presentations are explicit and straightforward, as the noise radiated from a region of interest is determined by simply summing the mean-squared values over that region. DAMAS can fully replace existing array processing and presentations methodology in most applications. It appears to dramatically increase the value of arrays to the field of experimental acoustics.

  3. A Deconvolution Approach for the Mapping of Acoustic Sources (DAMAS) Determined from Phased Microphone Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Thomas F.; Humphreys, William M.

    2006-01-01

    Current processing of acoustic array data is burdened with considerable uncertainty. This study reports an original methodology that serves to demystify array results, reduce misinterpretation, and accurately quantify position and strength of acoustic sources. Traditional array results represent noise sources that are convolved with array beamform response functions, which depend on array geometry, size (with respect to source position and distributions), and frequency. The Deconvolution Approach for the Mapping of Acoustic Sources (DAMAS) method removes beamforming characteristics from output presentations. A unique linear system of equations accounts for reciprocal influence at different locations over the array survey region. It makes no assumption beyond the traditional processing assumption of statistically independent noise sources. The full rank equations are solved with a new robust iterative method. DAMAS is quantitatively validated using archival data from a variety of prior high-lift airframe component noise studies, including flap edge/cove, trailing edge, leading edge, slat, and calibration sources. Presentations are explicit and straightforward, as the noise radiated from a region of interest is determined by simply summing the mean-squared values over that region. DAMAS can fully replace existing array processing and presentations methodology in most applications. It appears to dramatically increase the value of arrays to the field of experimental acoustics.

  4. Use of acoustic intensity measurements in the characterization of jet noise sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musafir, R. E.; Slama, J. G.; Zindeluk, M.

    The usefulness of two-microphone acoustic-intensity (AI) measurements for characterizing the acoustic field of a jet flow is investigated by means of numerical simulations. The theoretical principles and data basis for the simulations are explained, and the intensity patterns generated by the simulation are presented graphically. It is found that the vector information in AI data from the near field are useful in understanding complex sources, but that far-field intensity charts cannot locate separate sources and may be misleading if not analyzed in terms of a sound physical model.

  5. Acoustic sources in the low Mach number turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardin, Jay C.

    1991-01-01

    The sources of sound production in a low Mach number turbulent boundary layer are examined. The sources are shown to be quadrupole in nature and to result from supersonically convecting wave-number components of the fluctuating Reynolds' normal stresses. The primary Tollmien-Schlichting instability of the boundary layer is found to radiate no sound. Analysis of various vortical phenomena suggests that the primary source is the process of formation of horseshoe vortices, with viscous sublayer bursts a possible secondary source.

  6. Aero-acoustics source separation with sparsity inducing priors in the frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwander, Olivier; Picheral, José; Gac, Nicolas; Mohammad-Djafari, Ali; Blacodon, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The characterization of acoustic sources is of great interest in many industrial applications, in particular for the aeronautic or automotive industry for the development of new products. While localization of sources using observations from a wind tunnel is a well-known subject, the characterization and separation of the sources still needs to be explored. We present here a Bayesian approach for sources separation. Two prior modeling of the sources are considered: a sparsity inducing prior in the frequency domain and an autoregressive model in the time domain. The proposed methods are evaluated on synthetic data simulating noise sources emitting from an airfoil inside a wind tunnel.

  7. Power conditioning system for energy sources

    DOEpatents

    Mazumder, Sudip K.; Burra, Rajni K.; Acharya, Kaustuva

    2008-05-13

    Apparatus for conditioning power generated by an energy source includes an inverter for converting a DC input voltage from the energy source to a square wave AC output voltage, and a converter for converting the AC output voltage from the inverter to a sine wave AC output voltage.

  8. Delays in Tapping Energy Sources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abelson, Philip H.

    1975-01-01

    Summarizes factors that will create severe energy shortages by 1980. Indicates that conservation is not enough, and the quickest path toward relief is the expansion of surface mining of low-sulfur coal in the Rocky Mountain states. (GS)

  9. CADDIS Volume 2. Sources, Stressors and Responses: Urbanization - Energy Sources

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Introduction to changes in basal energy sources with urbanization, overview of terrestrial leaf litter dynamics in urban streams, overview of how urbanization can affect primary production, respiration, and dissolved organic carbon quantity and quality.

  10. The Doppler Effect based acoustic source separation for a wayside train bearing monitoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haibin; Zhang, Shangbin; He, Qingbo; Kong, Fanrang

    2016-01-01

    Wayside acoustic condition monitoring and fault diagnosis for train bearings depend on acquired acoustic signals, which consist of mixed signals from different train bearings with obvious Doppler distortion as well as background noises. This study proposes a novel scheme to overcome the difficulties, especially the multi-source problem in wayside acoustic diagnosis system. In the method, a time-frequency data fusion (TFDF) strategy is applied to weaken the Heisenberg's uncertainty limit for a signal's time-frequency distribution (TFD) of high resolution. Due to the Doppler Effect, the signals from different bearings have different time centers even with the same frequency. A Doppler feature matching search (DFMS) algorithm is then put forward to locate the time centers of different bearings in the TFD spectrogram. With the determined time centers, time-frequency filters (TFF) are designed with thresholds to separate the acoustic signals in the time-frequency domain. Then the inverse STFT (ISTFT) is taken and the signals are recovered and filtered aiming at each sound source. Subsequently, a dynamical resampling method is utilized to remove the Doppler Effect. Finally, accurate diagnosis for train bearing faults can be achieved by applying conventional spectrum analysis techniques to the resampled data. The performance of the proposed method is verified by both simulated and experimental cases. It shows that it is effective to detect and diagnose multiple defective bearings even though they produce multi-source acoustic signals.

  11. Transient nearfield acoustic holography based on an interpolated time-domain equivalent source method.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Zheng; Bi, Chuan-Xing; Zhang, Yong-Bin; Xu, Liang

    2011-09-01

    Transient nearfield acoustic holography based on an interpolated time-domain equivalent source method (ESM) is proposed to reconstruct transient acoustic fields directly in the time domain. Since the equivalent source strengths solved by the traditional time-domain ESM formulation cannot be used to reconstruct the pressure on the source surface directly, an interpolation function is introduced to develop an interpolated time-domain ESM formulation which permits one to deduce an iterative reconstruction process. As the reconstruction process is ill-conditioned and especially there exists a cumulative effect of errors, the Tikhonov regularization is used to stabilize the process. Numerical examples of reconstructing transient acoustic fields from a baffled planar piston, an impulsively accelerating sphere and a cube box, respectively, demonstrate that the proposed method not only can effectively reconstruct transient acoustic fields in the time domain, but also can visualize acoustic fields in the space domain. And, in the first numerical example, the cumulative effect of errors and the validity of using the Tikhonov regularization to suppress the errors are described.

  12. Finding radiant-energy sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaffer, G. J.

    1978-01-01

    Antenna is scanned in orthogonal directions to pinpoint interfering sources. Satellite system locates ground-based microwave transmitter to accuracy of about 100 miles. When data on misalinement of satellite antenna boresight are used to correct antenna pointing, accuracy is improved to better than 70 miles.

  13. Acoustic source characterization of impulsive Strombolian eruptions from the Mount Erebus lava lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Jeffrey; Aster, Richard; Jones, Kyle R.; Kyle, Philip; McIntosh, Bill

    2008-11-01

    We invert for acoustic source volume outflux and momentum imparted to the atmosphere using an infrasonic network distributed about the erupting lava lake at Mount Erebus, Ross Island, Antarctica. By modeling these relatively simple eruptions as monopole point sources we estimate explosively ejected gas volumes that range from 1,000 m 3 to 24,000 m 3 for 312 lava lake eruptions recorded between January 6 and April 13, 2006. Though these volumes are compatible with bubble volumes at rupture (as estimated from explosion video records), departures from isotropic radiation are evident in the recorded acoustic wavefield for many eruptions. A point-source acoustic dipole component with arbitrary axis orientation and strength provides precise fit to the recorded infrasound. This dipole source axis, corresponding to the axis of inferred short-duration material jetting, varies significantly between events. Physical interpretation of dipole orientation as being indicative of eruptive directivity is corroborated by directional emissions of ejecta observed in Erebus eruption video footage. Although three azimuthally distributed stations are insufficient to fully characterize the eruptive acoustic source we speculate that a monopole with a minor amount of oriented dipole radiation may reasonably model the primary features of the recorded infrasound for these eruptions.

  14. Localization of short-range acoustic and seismic wideband sources: Algorithms and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stafsudd, J. Z.; Asgari, S.; Hudson, R.; Yao, K.; Taciroglu, E.

    2008-04-01

    We consider the determination of the location (source localization) of a disturbance source which emits acoustic and/or seismic signals. We devise an enhanced approximate maximum-likelihood (AML) algorithm to process data collected at acoustic sensors (microphones) belonging to an array of, non-collocated but otherwise identical, sensors. The approximate maximum-likelihood algorithm exploits the time-delay-of-arrival of acoustic signals at different sensors, and yields the source location. For processing the seismic signals, we investigate two distinct algorithms, both of which process data collected at a single measurement station comprising a triaxial accelerometer, to determine direction-of-arrival. The direction-of-arrivals determined at each sensor station are then combined using a weighted least-squares approach for source localization. The first of the direction-of-arrival estimation algorithms is based on the spectral decomposition of the covariance matrix, while the second is based on surface wave analysis. Both of the seismic source localization algorithms have their roots in seismology; and covariance matrix analysis had been successfully employed in applications where the source and the sensors (array) are typically separated by planetary distances (i.e., hundreds to thousands of kilometers). Here, we focus on very-short distances (e.g., less than one hundred meters) instead, with an outlook to applications in multi-modal surveillance, including target detection, tracking, and zone intrusion. We demonstrate the utility of the aforementioned algorithms through a series of open-field tests wherein we successfully localize wideband acoustic and/or seismic sources. We also investigate a basic strategy for fusion of results yielded by acoustic and seismic arrays.

  15. Simulation of the Acoustic Pulse Expected from the Interaction of Ultra-High Energy Neutrinos and Seawater

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-01

    Acoustic Ultra-high energy Neutrino Detection (SAUND), that uses existing hydrophone arrays to detect UHE neutrinos from the acoustic pulse generated by...Ultra-High Energy (UHE) neutrino and seawater. When a neutrino interacts with seawater, the reaction creates a long, narrow shower of sub-atomic...particles. The energy from this reaction causes nearly instantaneous heating of the seawater on an acoustic timescale. The acoustic pulse created by the

  16. Acoustic emission non-destructive testing of structures using source location techniques.

    SciTech Connect

    Beattie, Alan G.

    2013-09-01

    The technology of acoustic emission (AE) testing has been advanced and used at Sandia for the past 40 years. AE has been used on structures including pressure vessels, fire bottles, wind turbines, gas wells, nuclear weapons, and solar collectors. This monograph begins with background topics in acoustics and instrumentation and then focuses on current acoustic emission technology. It covers the overall design and system setups for a test, with a wind turbine blade as the object. Test analysis is discussed with an emphasis on source location. Three test examples are presented, two on experimental wind turbine blades and one on aircraft fire extinguisher bottles. Finally, the code for a FORTRAN source location program is given as an example of a working analysis program. Throughout the document, the stress is on actual testing of real structures, not on laboratory experiments.

  17. Contactless ultrasonic energy transfer for wireless systems: acoustic-piezoelectric structure interaction modeling and performance enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahab, S.; Erturk, A.

    2014-12-01

    There are several applications of wireless electronic components with little or no ambient energy available to harvest, yet wireless battery charging for such systems is still of great interest. Example applications range from biomedical implants to sensors located in hazardous environments. Energy transfer based on the propagation of acoustic waves at ultrasonic frequencies is a recently explored alternative that offers increased transmitter-receiver distance, reduced loss and the elimination of electromagnetic fields. As this research area receives growing attention, there is an increased need for fully coupled model development to quantify the energy transfer characteristics, with a focus on the transmitter, receiver, medium, geometric and material parameters. We present multiphysics modeling and case studies of the contactless ultrasonic energy transfer for wireless electronic components submerged in fluid. The source is a pulsating sphere, and the receiver is a piezoelectric bar operating in the 33-mode of piezoelectricity with a fundamental resonance frequency above the audible frequency range. The goal is to quantify the electrical power delivered to the load (connected to the receiver) in terms of the source strength. Both the analytical and finite element models have been developed for the resulting acoustic-piezoelectric structure interaction problem. Resistive and resistive-inductive electrical loading cases are presented, and optimality conditions are discussed. Broadband power transfer is achieved by optimal resistive-reactive load tuning for performance enhancement and frequency-wise robustness. Significant enhancement of the power output is reported due to the use of a hard piezoelectric receiver (PZT-8) instead of a soft counterpart (PZT-5H) as a result of reduced material damping. The analytical multiphysics modeling approach given in this work can be used to predict and optimize the coupled system dynamics with very good accuracy and dramatically

  18. Looking for alternative energy sources.

    PubMed

    Gross, Michael

    2012-02-21

    With unrest in oil-exporting countries, backlashes against biofuels and photovoltaics, and a nuclear incident in Japan, the year 2011 rattled confidence in future energy supplies. The search for alternatives is all the more urgent, but some of the solutions investigated hark back to fossil fuels that we can't afford to burn.

  19. Sources of Information on Wind Energy (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2001-12-01

    As wind technology continues to mature and the wind industry becomes an increasingly respected member of the energy producing community, a growing number of people require more information about wind energy. Whether you are a business manager, utility engineer, scientific researcher, or an interested energy user, this brochure provides helpful information sources.

  20. Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Jerry R.; Grosveld, Ferdinand

    2007-01-01

    The acoustics environment in space operations is important to maintain at manageable levels so that the crewperson can remain safe, functional, effective, and reasonably comfortable. High acoustic levels can produce temporary or permanent hearing loss, or cause other physiological symptoms such as auditory pain, headaches, discomfort, strain in the vocal cords, or fatigue. Noise is defined as undesirable sound. Excessive noise may result in psychological effects such as irritability, inability to concentrate, decrease in productivity, annoyance, errors in judgment, and distraction. A noisy environment can also result in the inability to sleep, or sleep well. Elevated noise levels can affect the ability to communicate, understand what is being said, hear what is going on in the environment, degrade crew performance and operations, and create habitability concerns. Superfluous noise emissions can also create the inability to hear alarms or other important auditory cues such as an equipment malfunctioning. Recent space flight experience, evaluations of the requirements in crew habitable areas, and lessons learned (Goodman 2003; Allen and Goodman 2003; Pilkinton 2003; Grosveld et al. 2003) show the importance of maintaining an acceptable acoustics environment. This is best accomplished by having a high-quality set of limits/requirements early in the program, the "designing in" of acoustics in the development of hardware and systems, and by monitoring, testing and verifying the levels to ensure that they are acceptable.

  1. Numerical investigation and electro-acoustic modeling of measurement methods for the in-duct acoustical source parameters.

    PubMed

    Jang, Seung-Ho; Ih, Jeong-Guon

    2003-02-01

    It is known that the direct method yields different results from the indirect (or load) method in measuring the in-duct acoustic source parameters of fluid machines. The load method usually comes up with a negative source resistance, although a fairly accurate prediction of radiated noise can be obtained from any method. This study is focused on the effect of the time-varying nature of fluid machines on the output results of two typical measurement methods. For this purpose, a simplified fluid machine consisting of a reservoir, a valve, and an exhaust pipe is considered as representing a typical periodic, time-varying system and the measurement situations are simulated by using the method of characteristics. The equivalent circuits for such simulations are also analyzed by considering the system as having a linear time-varying source. It is found that the results from the load method are quite sensitive to the change of cylinder pressure or valve profile, in contrast to those from the direct method. In the load method, the source admittance turns out to be predominantly dependent on the valve admittance at the calculation frequency as well as the valve and load admittances at other frequencies. In the direct method, however, the source resistance is always positive and the source admittance depends mainly upon the zeroth order of valve admittance.

  2. Large-region acoustic source mapping using a movable array and sparse covariance fitting.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shengkui; Tuna, Cagdas; Nguyen, Thi Ngoc Tho; Jones, Douglas L

    2017-01-01

    Large-region acoustic source mapping is important for city-scale noise monitoring. Approaches using a single-position measurement scheme to scan large regions using small arrays cannot provide clean acoustic source maps, while deploying large arrays spanning the entire region of interest is prohibitively expensive. A multiple-position measurement scheme is applied to scan large regions at multiple spatial positions using a movable array of small size. Based on the multiple-position measurement scheme, a sparse-constrained multiple-position vectorized covariance matrix fitting approach is presented. In the proposed approach, the overall sample covariance matrix of the incoherent virtual array is first estimated using the multiple-position array data and then vectorized using the Khatri-Rao (KR) product. A linear model is then constructed for fitting the vectorized covariance matrix and a sparse-constrained reconstruction algorithm is proposed for recovering source powers from the model. The user parameter settings are discussed. The proposed approach is tested on a 30 m × 40 m region and a 60 m × 40 m region using simulated and measured data. Much cleaner acoustic source maps and lower sound pressure level errors are obtained compared to the beamforming approaches and the previous sparse approach [Zhao, Tuna, Nguyen, and Jones, Proc. IEEE Intl. Conf. on Acoustics, Speech and Signal Processing (ICASSP) (2016)].

  3. Localization of random acoustic sources in an inhomogeneous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khazaie, Shahram; Wang, Xun; Sagaut, Pierre

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, the localization of a random sound source via different source localization methods is considered, the emphasis being put on the robustness and the accuracy of classical methods in the presence of uncertainties. The sound source position is described by a random variable and the sound propagation medium is assumed to have spatially varying parameters with known values. Two approaches are used for the source identification: time reversal and beamforming. The probability density functions of the random source position are estimated using both methods. The focal spot resolutions of the time reversal estimates are also evaluated. In the numerical simulations, two media with different correlation lengths are investigated to account for two different scattering regimes: one has a correlation length relatively larger than the wavelength and the other has a correlation length comparable to the wavelength. The results show that the required sound propagation time and source estimation robustness highly depend on the ratio between the correlation length and the wavelength. It is observed that source identification methods have different robustness in the presence of uncertainties. Advantages and weaknesses of each method are discussed.

  4. On Acoustic Source Specification for Rotor-Stator Interaction Noise Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nark, Douglas M.; Envia, Edmane; Burley, Caesy L.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the use of measured source data to assess the effects of acoustic source specification on rotor-stator interaction noise predictions. Specifically, the acoustic propagation and radiation portions of a recently developed coupled computational approach are used to predict tonal rotor-stator interaction noise from a benchmark configuration. In addition to the use of full measured data, randomization of source mode relative phases is also considered for specification of the acoustic source within the computational approach. Comparisons with sideline noise measurements are performed to investigate the effects of various source descriptions on both inlet and exhaust predictions. The inclusion of additional modal source content is shown to have a much greater influence on the inlet results. Reasonable agreement between predicted and measured levels is achieved for the inlet, as well as the exhaust when shear layer effects are taken into account. For the number of trials considered, phase randomized predictions follow statistical distributions similar to those found in previous statistical source investigations. The shape of the predicted directivity pattern relative to measurements also improved with phase randomization, having predicted levels generally within one standard deviation of the measured levels.

  5. The Sun: Source of the Earth's Energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Barbara J.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Sun is the primary source of the Earth's energy. However, due to the complexity in the way the energy affects Earth, the various solar sources of the energy, and the variation exhibited by the Sun it is difficult to understand and predict the Earth's response to solar drivers. In addition to visible light the radiant energy of the Sun can exhibit variation in nearly all wavelengths, which can vary over nearly all timescales. Depending on the wavelength of the incident radiation the light can deposit energy in a wide variety or locations and drive processes from below Earth's surface to interplanetary space. Other sources of energy impacting Earth include energetic particles, magnetic fields, and mass and flow variations in the solar wind. Many of these variable energetic processes cannot be coupled and recent results continue to demonstrate that the complex dynamics of the Sun can have a great range of measurable impacts on Earth.

  6. Mesospheric airglow and ionospheric responses to upward-propagating acoustic and gravity waves above tropospheric sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snively, J. B.; Zettergren, M. D.

    2013-12-01

    The existence of acoustic waves (periods ~1-5 minutes) and gravity waves (periods >4 minutes) in the ionosphere above active tropospheric convection has been appreciated for more than forty years [e.g., Georges, Rev. Geophys. and Space Phys., 11(3), 1973]. Likewise, gravity waves exhibiting cylindrical symmetry and curvature of phase fronts have been observed via imaging of the mesospheric airglow layers [e.g., Yue et al., JGR, 118(8), 2013], clearly associated with tropospheric convection; gravity wave signatures have also recently been detected above convection in ionospheric total electron content (TEC) measurements [Lay et al., GRL, 40, 2013]. We here investigate the observable features of acoustic waves, and their relationship to upward-propagating gravity waves generated by the same sources, as they arrive in the mesosphere, lower-thermosphere, and ionosphere (MLTI). Numerical simulations using a nonlinear, cylindrically-axisymmetric, compressible atmospheric dynamics model confirm that acoustic waves generated by transient tropospheric sources may produce "concentric ring" signatures in the mesospheric hydroxyl airglow layer that precede the arrival of gravity waves. As amplitudes increase with altitude and decreasing neutral density, the modeled acoustic waves achieve temperature and vertical wind perturbations on the order of ~10s of Kelvin and m/s throughout the E- and F-region. Using a coupled multi-fluid ionospheric model [Zettergren and Semeter, JGR, 117(A6), 2012], extended for low-latitudes using a 2D dipole magnetic field coordinate system, we investigate acoustic wave perturbations to the ionosphere in the meridional direction. Resulting perturbations are predicted to be detectable by ground-based radar and GPS TEC measurements, or via in situ instrumentation. Although transient and short-lived, the acoustic waves' airglow and ionospheric signatures are likely to in some cases be observable, and may provide important insight into the regional

  7. Fusion as a future energy source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, D. J.

    2016-11-01

    Fusion remains the main source of energy generation in the Universe and is indirectly the origin of nearly all terrestrial energy (including fossil fuels) but it is the only fundamental energy source not used directly on Earth. Here we look at the characteristics of Earth-based fusion power, how it might contribute to future energy supply and what that tells us about the future direction of the R&D programme. The focus here is Magnetic Confinement Fusion although many of the points apply equally to inertial confinement fusion.

  8. Exploration of amphoteric and negative refraction imaging of acoustic sources via active metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Jihong; Shen, Huijie; Yu, Dianlong; Wen, Xisen

    2013-11-01

    The present work describes the design of three flat superlens structures for acoustic source imaging and explores an active acoustic metamaterial (AAM) to realise such a design. The first two lenses are constructed via the coordinate transform method (CTM), and their constituent materials are anisotropic. The third lens consists of a material that has both a negative density and a negative bulk modulus. In these lenses, the quality of the images is “clear” and sharp; thus, the diffraction limit of classical lenses is overcome. Finally, a multi-control strategy is developed to achieve the desired parameters and to eliminate coupling effects in the AAM.

  9. Acoustic Energy: An Innovative Technology for Stimulating Oil Wells

    SciTech Connect

    Edgar, Dorland E.; Peters, Robert W.; Johnson, Donald O.; Paulsen, P. David; Roberts, Wayne

    2006-04-30

    The objective of this investigation was to demonstrate the effectiveness of sonication in reducing the viscosity of heavy crude oils. Sonication is the use of acoustic or sound energy to produce physical and/or chemical changes in materials, usually fluids. The goal of the first project phase was to demonstrate a proof of concept for the project objective. Batch tests of three commercially available, single-weight oils (30-, 90-, and 120-wt) were performed in the laboratory. Several observations and conclusions were made from this series of experiments. These include the following: (1) In general, the lower the acoustic frequency, the greater the efficiency in reducing the viscosity of the oils; (2) Sonication treatment of the three oils resulted in reductions in viscosity that ranged from a low of 31% to a high of 75%; and (3) The results of the first phase of the project successfully demonstrated that sonication could reduce the viscosity of oils of differing viscosity. The goal of the second project phase was to demonstrate the ability of sonication to reduce the viscosity of three crude oils ranging from a light crude to a heavy crude. The experiments also were designed to examine the benefits of two proprietary chemical additives used in conjunction with sonication. Acoustic frequencies ranging from 800 Hz to 1.6 kHz were used in these tests, and a reactor chamber was designed for flow-through operation with a capacity of one gallon (3.8 liters). The three crude oils selected for use in the testing program were: (1) a heavy crude from California with a viscosity of approximately 65,000 cP (API gravity about 12{sup o}), (2) a crude from Alabama with a significant water content and a viscosity of approximately 6,000 cP (API gravity about 22 {sup o}), and (3) a light crude from the Middle East with a viscosity of approximately 700 cP (API gravity about 32{sup o}). The principal conclusions derived from the second project phase include the following: (1) The

  10. Energy Transform and Initial Acoustic Pressure Distribution in Microwave-induced Thermoacoustic Tomography.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jing; Tao, Chunjing; Wu, Shizeng

    2005-01-01

    A study of Microwave-induced Thermoacoustic Tomography is presented in this paper. Microwaves illuminate biological tissues to generate acoustic waves by thermoelastic expansion when electromagnetic energy was absorbed by human tissues. The generated acoustic waves carry information about different electromagnetic properties of different tissues which will be collected and processed to reconstruct human cross section image. In this paper, digital electromagnetic human body model with 1cm resolution was founded according to algorithm requirements. Firstly we analyzed the transform and interrelation among electromagnetic energy, heat energy and acoustic energy. On the basis of established human model: (1) we calculated initial acoustic pressure distribution in cross section image under plane microwave radiation with different frequency. It shows that microwave absorption properties and initial acoustic pressure were different with the change of frequency; (2) using single pulse to illuminate human model, initial acoustic pressure maps of thorax cross section at different time steps were analyzed. These results provided a research basis for further study and calculation of acoustic pressure in microwave-induced thermoacoustic tomography.

  11. Acoustic detection of high energy neutrinos in sea water: status and prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahmann, Robert

    2017-03-01

    The acoustic neutrino detection technique is a promising approach for future large-scale detectors with the aim of measuring the small expected flux of neutrinos at energies in the EeV-range and above. The technique is based on the thermo-acoustic model, which implies that the energy deposition by a particle cascade - resulting from a neutrino interaction in a medium with suitable thermal and acoustic properties - leads to a local heating and a subsequent characteristic pressure pulse that propagates in the surrounding medium. Current or recent test setups for acoustic neutrino detection have either been add-ons to optical neutrino telescopes or have been using acoustic arrays built for other purposes, typically for military use. While these arrays have been too small to derive competitive limits on neutrino fluxes, they allowed for detailed studies of the experimental technique. With the advent of the research infrastructure KM3NeT in the Mediterranean Sea, new possibilities will arise for acoustic neutrino detection. In this article, results from the "first generation" of acoustic arrays will be summarized and implications for the future of acoustic neutrino detection will be discussed.

  12. An evaluation of differences due to changing source directivity in room acoustic computer modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigeant, Michelle C.; Wang, Lily M.

    2001-05-01

    This project examines the effects of changing source directivity in room acoustic computer models on objective parameters and subjective perception. Acoustic parameters and auralizations calculated from omnidirectional versus directional sources were compared. Three realistic directional sources were used, measured in a limited number of octave bands from a piano, singing voice, and violin. A highly directional source that beams only within a sixteenth-tant of a sphere was also tested. Objectively, there were differences of 5% or more in reverberation time (RT) between the realistic directional and omnidirectional sources. Between the beaming directional and omnidirectional sources, differences in clarity were close to the just-noticeable-difference (jnd) criterion of 1 dB. Subjectively, participants had great difficulty distinguishing between the realistic and omnidirectional sources; very few could discern the differences in RTs. However, a larger percentage (32% vs 20%) could differentiate between the beaming and omnidirectional sources, as well as the respective differences in clarity. Further studies of the objective results from different beaming sources have been pursued. The direction of the beaming source in the room is changed, as well as the beamwidth. The objective results are analyzed to determine if differences fall within the jnd of sound-pressure level, RT, and clarity.

  13. Electromagnetic acoustic source (EMAS) for generating shock waves and cavitation in mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qi

    In the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory a vessel of liquid mercury is subjected to a proton beam. The resulting nuclear interaction produces neutrons that can be used for materials research, among other things, but also launches acoustic waves with pressures in excess of 10 MPa. The acoustic waves have high enough tensile stress to generate cavitation in the mercury which results in erosion to the steel walls of the vessel. In order to study the cavitation erosion and develop mitigation schemes it would be convenient to have a way of generating similar pressures and cavitation in mercury, without the radiation concerns associated with a proton beam. Here an electromagnetic acoustic source (EMAS) has been developed which consisted of a coil placed close to a metal plate which is in turn is in contact with a fluid. The source is driven by discharging a capacitor through the coil and results in a repulsive force on the plate launching acoustic waves in the fluid. A theoretical model is presented to predict the acoustic field from the EMAS and compares favorably with measurements made in water. The pressure from the EMAS was reported as a function of capacitance, charging voltage, number of coils, mylar thickness, and properties of the plates. The properties that resulted in the highest pressure were employed for experiments in mercury and a maximum pressure recorded was 7.1 MPa. Cavitation was assessed in water and mercury by high speed camera and by detecting acoustic emissions. Bubble clouds with lifetimes on the order of 100 µs were observed in water and on the order of 600 µs in mercury. Based on acoustic emissions the bubble radius in mercury was estimated to be 0.98 mm. Experiments to produce damage to a stainless steel plate in mercury resulted in a minimal effect after 2000 shock waves at a rate of 0.33 Hz - likely because the pressure amplitude was not high enough. In order to replicate the conditions in the SNS it is

  14. Source identification in acoustics and structural mechanics using Sierra/SD.

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, Timothy Francis; Aquino, Wilkins; Ross, Michael

    2013-03-01

    In this report we derive both time and frequency-domain methods for inverse identification of sources in elastodynamics and acoustics. The inverse/design problem is cast in a PDE-constrained optimization framework with efficient computation of gradients using the adjoint method. The implementation of source inversion in Sierra/SD is described, and results from both time and frequency domain source inversion are compared to actual experimental data for a weapon store used in captive carry on a military aircraft. The inverse methodology is advantageous in that it provides a method for creating ground based acoustic and vibration tests that can reduce the actual number of flight tests, and thus, saving costs and time for the program.

  15. An eighth-scale speech source for subjective assessments in acoustic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlowski, R. J.

    1981-08-01

    The design of a source is described which is suitable for making speech recordings in eighth-scale acoustic models of auditoria. An attempt was made to match the directionality of the source with the directionality of the human voice using data reported in the literature. A narrow aperture was required for the design which was provided by mounting an inverted conical horn over the diaphragm of a high frequency loudspeaker. Resonance problems were encountered with the use of a horn and a description is given of the electronic techniques adopted to minimize the effect of these resonances. Subjective and objective assessments on the completed speech source have proved satisfactory. It has been used in a modelling exercise concerned with the acoustic design of a theatre with a thrust-type stage.

  16. New approaches for automatic threedimensional source localization of acoustic emissions--Applications to concrete specimens.

    PubMed

    Kurz, Jochen H

    2015-12-01

    The task of locating a source in space by measuring travel time differences of elastic or electromagnetic waves from the source to several sensors is evident in varying fields. The new concepts of automatic acoustic emission localization presented in this article are based on developments from geodesy and seismology. A detailed description of source location determination in space is given with the focus on acoustic emission data from concrete specimens. Direct and iterative solvers are compared. A concept based on direct solvers from geodesy extended by a statistical approach is described which allows a stable source location determination even for partly erroneous onset times. The developed approach is validated with acoustic emission data from a large specimen leading to travel paths up to 1m and therefore to noisy data with errors in the determined onsets. The adaption of the algorithms from geodesy to the localization procedure of sources of elastic waves offers new possibilities concerning stability, automation and performance of localization results. Fracture processes can be assessed more accurately.

  17. Effect of static pressure on acoustic energy radiated by cavitation bubbles in viscous liquids under ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Yasui, Kyuichi; Towata, Atsuya; Tuziuti, Toru; Kozuka, Teruyuki; Kato, Kazumi

    2011-11-01

    The effect of static pressure on acoustic emissions including shock-wave emissions from cavitation bubbles in viscous liquids under ultrasound has been studied by numerical simulations in order to investigate the effect of static pressure on dispersion of nano-particles in liquids by ultrasound. The results of the numerical simulations for bubbles of 5 μm in equilibrium radius at 20 kHz have indicated that the optimal static pressure which maximizes the energy of acoustic waves radiated by a bubble per acoustic cycle increases as the acoustic pressure amplitude increases or the viscosity of the solution decreases. It qualitatively agrees with the experimental results by Sauter et al. [Ultrason. Sonochem. 15, 517 (2008)]. In liquids with relatively high viscosity (∼200 mPa s), a bubble collapses more violently than in pure water when the acoustic pressure amplitude is relatively large (∼20 bar). In a mixture of bubbles of different equilibrium radius (3 and 5 μm), the acoustic energy radiated by a 5 μm bubble is much larger than that by a 3 μm bubble due to the interaction with bubbles of different equilibrium radius. The acoustic energy radiated by a 5 μm bubble is substantially increased by the interaction with 3 μm bubbles.

  18. Theoretical Estimation of the Acoustic Energy Generation and Absorption Caused by Jet Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Kin'ya; Iwagami, Sho; Kobayashi, Taizo; Takami, Toshiya

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the energy transfer between the fluid field and acoustic field caused by a jet driven by an acoustic particle velocity field across it, which is the key to understanding the aerodynamic sound generation of flue instruments, such as the recorder, flute, and organ pipe. Howe's energy corollary allows us to estimate the energy transfer between these two fields. For simplicity, we consider the situation such that a free jet is driven by a uniform acoustic particle velocity field across it. We improve the semi-empirical model of the oscillating jet, i.e., exponentially growing jet model, which has been studied in the field of musical acoustics, and introduce a polynomially growing jet model so as to apply Howe's formula to it. It is found that the relative phase between the acoustic oscillation and jet oscillation, which changes with the distance from the flue exit, determines the quantity of the energy transfer between the two fields. The acoustic energy is mainly generated in the downstream area, but it is consumed in the upstream area near the flue exit in driving the jet. This theoretical examination well explains the numerical calculation of Howe's formula for the two-dimensional flue instrument model in our previous work [http://doi.org/10.1088/0169-5983/46/6/061411, Fluid Dyn. Res. 46, 061411 (2014)] as well as the experimental result of Yoshikawa et al. [http://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsv.2012.01.026, J. Sound Vib. 331, 2558 (2012)].

  19. An Acoustic Source Reactive to Tow Cable Strum

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-21

    shown in FIG. 3 in which the device is clamped to a tow cable 100 and which resembles a head mass of a Tonpilz transducer . The device 10 can be made of...steel or any other material appropriate for a transducer head mass. [0020] A Tonpilz transducer typically comprises a stack of piezoelectric...piezoelectric stack of a Tonpilz transducer that generates vibrational energy is replaced by the mile long tow cable 100 that generates vibrational

  20. Transmission of wave energy in curved ducts. [acoustic propagation within rigid walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rostafinski, W.

    1974-01-01

    Investigation of the ability of circular bends to transmit acoustic energy flux. A formulation of wave-energy flow is developed for motion in curved ducts. A parametric study over a range of frequencies shows the ability of circular bends to transmit energy in the case of perfectly rigid walls.

  1. A Correlated Study of the Response of a Satellite to Acoustic Radiation Using Statistical Energy Analysis and Acoustic Test Data

    SciTech Connect

    CAP,JEROME S.; TRACEY,BRIAN

    1999-11-15

    Aerospace payloads, such as satellites, are subjected to vibroacoustic excitation during launch. Sandia's MTI satellite has recently been certified to this environment using a combination of base input random vibration and reverberant acoustic noise. The initial choices for the acoustic and random vibration test specifications were obtained from the launch vehicle Interface Control Document (ICD). In order to tailor the random vibration levels for the laboratory certification testing, it was necessary to determine whether vibration energy was flowing across the launch vehicle interface from the satellite to the launch vehicle or the other direction. For frequencies below 120 Hz this issue was addressed using response limiting techniques based on results from the Coupled Loads Analysis (CLA). However, since the CLA Finite Element Analysis FEA model was only correlated for frequencies below 120 Hz, Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) was considered to be a better choice for predicting the direction of the energy flow for frequencies above 120 Hz. The existing SEA model of the launch vehicle had been developed using the VibroAcoustic Payload Environment Prediction System (VAPEPS) computer code [1]. Therefore, the satellite would have to be modeled using VAPEPS as well. As is the case for any computational model, the confidence in its predictive capability increases if one can correlate a sample prediction against experimental data. Fortunately, Sandia had the ideal data set for correlating an SEA model of the MTI satellite--the measured response of a realistic assembly to a reverberant acoustic test that was performed during MTI's qualification test series. The first part of this paper will briefly describe the VAPEPS modeling effort and present the results of the correlation study for the VAPEPS model. The second part of this paper will present the results from a study that used a commercial SEA software package [2] to study the effects of in-plane modes and to

  2. The application of inverse methods to spatially-distributed acoustic sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holland, K. R.; Nelson, P. A.

    2013-10-01

    Acoustic inverse methods, based on the output of an array of microphones, can be readily applied to the characterisation of acoustic sources that can be adequately modelled as a number of discrete monopoles. However, there are many situations, particularly in the fields of vibroacoustics and aeroacoustics, where the sources are distributed continuously in space over a finite area (or volume). This paper is concerned with the practical problem of applying inverse methods to such distributed source regions via the process of spatial sampling. The problem is first tackled using computer simulations of the errors associated with the application of spatial sampling to a wide range of source distributions. It is found that the spatial sampling criterion for minimising the errors in the radiated far-field reconstructed from the discretised source distributions is strongly dependent on acoustic wavelength but is only weakly dependent on the details of the source field itself. The results of the computer simulations are verified experimentally through the application of the inverse method to the sound field radiated by a ducted fan. The un-baffled fan source with the associated flow field is modelled as a set of equivalent monopole sources positioned on the baffled duct exit along with a matrix of complimentary non-flow Green functions. Successful application of the spatial sampling criterion involves careful frequency-dependent selection of source spacing, and results in the accurate reconstruction of the radiated sound field. Discussions of the conditioning of the Green function matrix which is inverted are included and it is shown that the spatial sampling criterion may be relaxed if conditioning techniques, such as regularisation, are applied to this matrix prior to inversion.

  3. Device and method for generating a beam of acoustic energy from a borehole, and applications thereof

    DOEpatents

    Vu, Cung Khac; Sinha, Dipen N; Pantea, Cristian; Nihei, Kurt T; Schmitt, Denis P; Skelt, Christopher

    2013-10-01

    In some aspects of the invention, a method of generating a beam of acoustic energy in a borehole is disclosed. The method includes generating a first broad-band acoustic pulse at a first broad-band frequency range having a first central frequency and a first bandwidth spread; generating a second broad-band acoustic pulse at a second broad-band frequency range different than the first frequency range having a second central frequency and a second bandwidth spread, wherein the first acoustic pulse and second acoustic pulse are generated by at least one transducer arranged on a tool located within the borehole; and transmitting the first and the second broad-band acoustic pulses into an acoustically non-linear medium, wherein the composition of the non-linear medium produces a collimated pulse by a non-linear mixing of the first and second acoustic pulses, wherein the collimated pulse has a frequency equal to the difference in frequencies between the first central frequency and the second central frequency and a bandwidth spread equal to the sum of the first bandwidth spread and the second bandwidth spread.

  4. Similarity assessment of acoustic emission signals and its application in source localization.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shiwan; Yang, Chunhe; Wang, Guibin; Liu, Wei

    2017-03-01

    In conventional AE source localization acoustic emission (AE) signals are applied directly to localize the source without any waveform identification or quality evaluation, which always leads to large errors in source localization. To improve the reliability and accuracy of acoustic emission source localization, an identification procedure is developed to assess the similarity of AE signals to select signals with high quality to localize the AE source. Magnitude square coherence (MSC), wavelet coherence and dynamic timing warping (DTW) are successively applied for similarity assessment. Results show that cluster analysis based on DTW distance is effective to select AE signals with high similarity. Similarity assessment results of the proposed method are almost completely consistent with manual identification. A novel AE source localization procedure is developed combining the selected AE signals with high quality and a direct source localization algorithm. AE data from thermal-cracking tests in Beishan granite are analyzed to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed AE localization procedure. AE events are re-localized by the proposed AE localization procedure. And the accuracy of events localization has been improved significantly. The reliability and credibility of AE source localization will be improved by the proposed method.

  5. Optimizing stepwise rotation of dodecahedron sound source to improve the accuracy of room acoustic measures.

    PubMed

    Martellotta, Francesco

    2013-09-01

    Dodecahedron sound sources are widely used for acoustical measurement purposes as they produce a good approximation of omnidirectional radiation. Evidence shows that such an assumption is acceptable only in the low-frequency range (namely below 1 kHz), while at higher frequencies sound radiation is far from being uniform. In order to improve the accuracy of acoustical measurements obtained from dodecahedron sources, international standard ISO 3382 suggests an averaging of results after a source rotation. This paper investigates the effects of such rotations, both in terms of variations in acoustical parameters and spatial distribution of sound reflections. Taking advantage of a spherical microphone array, the different reflection patterns were mapped as a function of source rotation, showing that some reflections may be considerably attenuated for different aiming directions. This paper investigates the concept of averaging results while changing rotation angles and the minimum number of rotations required to improve the accuracy of the average value. Results show that averages of three measurements carried out at 30° angular steps are closer to actual values and show much less fluctuation. In addition, an averaging of the directional intensity components of the selected responses stabilizes the spatial distribution of the reflections.

  6. Experimental Results of Underwater Cooperative Source Localization Using a Single Acoustic Vector Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Felisberto, Paulo; Rodriguez, Orlando; Santos, Paulo; Ey, Emanuel; Jesus, Sérgio M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims at estimating the azimuth, range and depth of a cooperative broadband acoustic source with a single vector sensor in a multipath underwater environment, where the received signal is assumed to be a linear combination of echoes of the source emitted waveform. A vector sensor is a device that measures the scalar acoustic pressure field and the vectorial acoustic particle velocity field at a single location in space. The amplitudes of the echoes in the vector sensor components allow one to determine their azimuth and elevation. Assuming that the environmental conditions of the channel are known, source range and depth are obtained from the estimates of elevation and relative time delays of the different echoes using a ray-based backpropagation algorithm. The proposed method is tested using simulated data and is further applied to experimental data from the Makai'05 experiment, where 8–14 kHz chirp signals were acquired by a vector sensor array. It is shown that for short ranges, the position of the source is estimated in agreement with the geometry of the experiment. The method is low computational demanding, thus well-suited to be used in mobile and light platforms, where space and power requirements are limited. PMID:23857257

  7. Experimental results of underwater cooperative source localization using a single acoustic vector sensor.

    PubMed

    Felisberto, Paulo; Rodriguez, Orlando; Santos, Paulo; Ey, Emanuel; Jesus, Sérgio M

    2013-07-12

    This paper aims at estimating the azimuth, range and depth of a cooperative broadband acoustic source with a single vector sensor in a multipath underwater environment, where the received signal is assumed to be a linear combination of echoes of the source emitted waveform. A vector sensor is a device that measures the scalar acoustic pressure field and the vectorial acoustic particle velocity field at a single location in space. The amplitudes of the echoes in the vector sensor components allow one to determine their azimuth and elevation. Assuming that the environmental conditions of the channel are known, source range and depth are obtained from the estimates of elevation and relative time delays of the different echoes using a ray-based backpropagation algorithm. The proposed method is tested using simulated data and is further applied to experimental data from the Makai'05 experiment, where 8-14 kHz chirp signals were acquired by a vector sensor array. It is shown that for short ranges, the position of the source is estimated in agreement with the geometry of the experiment. The method is low computational demanding, thus well-suited to be used in mobile and light platforms, where space and power requirements are limited.

  8. Energy Sources of T-Tauri Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvet, N.; Albarran, J.

    1984-06-01

    We empirically estimated the total energy loss from the atmospheric regions above the photo sphere in T Tauri stars. We have also estimated the flux input into the atmosphere by magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) aves produced in the subphotospheric convection zone. Within the uncertainties of both theory and observations, this flux seems to represent the basic energy input into the atmosphere provided that a large surface coverage of magnetic regions exists. In addition to this basic energy input from the convection zone the T Tauri atmospheres must have other energy sources, originating in the stellar surfitee. Among those we can include the flux of energy carried by Alfven waves resulting from the action of surface material motions on magnetic flux tubes, as well as dissipation and annihilation of magnetic fields in flare events. The observed decrease in emission line fluxes with luminosity seems to indicate that MHD wave fluxes heat the chromosphere, while the uppermost atmospheric regions require another source of heating.

  9. Numerical investigation of the seismo-acoustic responses of the Source Physics Experiment underground explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoun, T.; Ezzedine, S. M.; Vorobiev, O.; Glenn, L. A.

    2015-12-01

    We have performed three-dimensional high resolution simulations of underground explosions conducted recently in jointed rock outcrop as part of the Source Physics Experiment (SPE) being conducted at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). The main goal of the current study is to investigate the effects of the structural and geomechanical properties on the spall phenomena due to underground explosions and its subsequent effect on the seismo-acoustic signature at far distances. Two parametric studies have been undertaken to assess the impact of different 1) conceptual geological models including a single layer and two layers model, with and without joints and with and without varying geomechanical properties, and 2) depth of bursts of the explosions and explosion yields. Through these investigations we have explored not only the near-field response of the explosions but also the far-field responses of the seismic and the acoustic signatures. The near-field simulations were conducted using the Eulerian and Lagrangian codes, GEODYN and GEODYN -L, respectively, while the far-field seismic simulations were conducted using the elastic wave propagation code, WPP, and the acoustic response using the Kirchhoff-Helmholtz-Rayleigh time-dependent approximation code, KHR. Though a series of simulations, we have recorded the velocity field histories a) at the ground surface on an acoustic-source-patch for the acoustic simulations, and 2) on a seismic-source-box for the seismic simulations. We first analyzed the SPE3 and SPE4-prime experimental data and simulated results, and then simulated SPE5, SPE6/7 to anticipate their seismo-acoustic responses given conditions of uncertainties. SPE experiments were conducted in a granitic formation; we have extended the parametric study to include other geological settings such dolomite and alluvial formations. These parametric studies enabled us 1) investigating the geotechnical and geophysical key parameters that impact the seismo-acoustic

  10. Dynamical energy analysis for built-up acoustic systems at high frequencies.

    PubMed

    Chappell, D J; Giani, S; Tanner, G

    2011-09-01

    Standard methods for describing the intensity distribution of mechanical and acoustic wave fields in the high frequency asymptotic limit are often based on flow transport equations. Common techniques are statistical energy analysis, employed mostly in the context of vibro-acoustics, and ray tracing, a popular tool in architectural acoustics. Dynamical energy analysis makes it possible to interpolate between standard statistical energy analysis and full ray tracing, containing both of these methods as limiting cases. In this work a version of dynamical energy analysis based on a Chebyshev basis expansion of the Perron-Frobenius operator governing the ray dynamics is introduced. It is shown that the technique can efficiently deal with multi-component systems overcoming typical geometrical limitations present in statistical energy analysis. Results are compared with state-of-the-art hp-adaptive discontinuous Galerkin finite element simulations.

  11. Do alternative energy sources displace fossil fuels?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    York, Richard

    2012-06-01

    A fundamental, generally implicit, assumption of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change reports and many energy analysts is that each unit of energy supplied by non-fossil-fuel sources takes the place of a unit of energy supplied by fossil-fuel sources. However, owing to the complexity of economic systems and human behaviour, it is often the case that changes aimed at reducing one type of resource consumption, either through improvements in efficiency of use or by developing substitutes, do not lead to the intended outcome when net effects are considered. Here, I show that the average pattern across most nations of the world over the past fifty years is one where each unit of total national energy use from non-fossil-fuel sources displaced less than one-quarter of a unit of fossil-fuel energy use and, focusing specifically on electricity, each unit of electricity generated by non-fossil-fuel sources displaced less than one-tenth of a unit of fossil-fuel-generated electricity. These results challenge conventional thinking in that they indicate that suppressing the use of fossil fuel will require changes other than simply technical ones such as expanding non-fossil-fuel energy production.

  12. A hybrid deconvolution approach to separate static and moving single-tone acoustic sources by phased microphone array measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Pinxi; Jiang, Weikang

    2017-02-01

    Beamforming approaches are developed to locate and quantify either static or moving acoustic sources by phased microphone array measurements. They would meet difficulties in mapping combined sources consisting of both static and moving sources. In this work, a hybrid deconvolution approach is proposed to separate static and moving single-tone sources. The approach is derived based on the source independence assumption as in the Deconvolution Approach for the Mapping of Acoustic Sources (DAMAS). The static beamforming and the moving beamforming are integrated to construct a linear matrix equation. The source distributions for the static sources and moving sources are simultaneously obtained by solving the equation. Numerical simulations and experiments were implemented on the combined sources with one static source and one rotating source. From the results, the hybrid deconvolution approach shows its effectiveness in separating the two sources, even with large source strength differences.

  13. MEMS directional acoustic sensor for locating sound sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karunasiri, Gamani; Alves, Fabio; Swan, William

    2016-02-01

    The conventional directional sound sensing systems employ an array of spatially separated microphones to achieve directional sensing. However, there are insects such as Ormia ochracea fly that can determine the direction of sound using a miniature hearing organ much smaller than the wavelength of sound it detects. The MEMS based sensors mimicking the fly's hearing system was fabricated using SOI substrate with 25 micrometer device layer. The sensor was designed to operate around 1.7 kHz, consists of two 1.2 mm × 1.2 mm wings connected in the middle by a 3 mm × 30 micrometer bridge. The entire structure is connected to the substrate by two torsional legs at the center. The sensor operates at its bending resonance frequency and has cosine directional characteristics similar to that of a pressure gradient microphone. For unambiguously determining the direction of sound, two sensors were assembled with a canted angle and outputs of the two sensors were processed to uniquely locate the bearing. At the bending resonant frequency (1.7 kHz) an output voltage of about 25 V/Pa was measured. The uncertainty of the bearing of sound ranged from less than 0.3 degrees close to the normal axis (0 degree) to 3 degrees at the limits of coverage (+/- 60 degrees) based on the 30 degree canted angle used. These findings indicate the potential use of a dual MEMS direction finding sensor assembly to locate sound sources with high accuracy.

  14. Controlling hazardous energy sources (lockout/tagout)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominguez, Manuel B.

    1991-01-01

    The minimum requirements as established by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) standard 29 CFR 1910.147 are discussed for preventing the unexpected operation of equipment or release of energy which could cause injury to personnel, damage to equipment, harm to the environment, or loss or compromise of test data. Safety requirements both for government and contractor personnel are explained for potentially hazardous energy sources during work operations at LeRC (Cleveland and Plum Brook Stations). Basic rules are presented to ensure protection against harmful exposures, and baseline implementation requirements are discussed from which detailed lockout/tagout procedures can be developed for individual equipment items. Examples of energy sources covered by this document include electrical, pneumatic, mechanical, chemical, cryogenic, thermal, spring tension/compression suspended or moving loads, and other potentially hazardous sources. Activities covered by this standard include, but are not limited to, construction, maintenance, installation, calibration, inspection, cleaning, or repair.

  15. Improvement of the imaging of moving acoustic sources by the knowledge of their motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hay, J.

    1981-03-01

    An analytical and experimental study is presented showing that, due to a more precise definition of nonstationary noises of a certain class, and to the preprocessing of microphone signals (termed 'coherent dedopplerization'), one can obtain acoustic imaging for sources whose velocity is greater than may be processed by conventional methods without the generation of blurrs of the same order as the antenna field. A useful application of these techniques would be to two-dimensional antennas.

  16. Measurements of Infrared and Acoustic Source Distributions in Jet Plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agboola, Femi A.; Bridges, James; Saiyed, Naseem

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to use the linear phased array (LPA) microphones and infrared (IR) imaging to study the effects of advanced nozzle-mixing techniques on jet noise reduction. Several full-scale engine nozzles were tested at varying power cycles with the linear phased array setup parallel to the jet axis. The array consisted of 16 sparsely distributed microphones. The phased array microphone measurements were taken at a distance of 51.0 ft (15.5 m) from the jet axis, and the results were used to obtain relative overall sound pressure levels from one nozzle design to the other. The IR imaging system was used to acquire real-time dynamic thermal patterns of the exhaust jet from the nozzles tested. The IR camera measured the IR radiation from the nozzle exit to a distance of six fan diameters (X/D(sub FAN) = 6), along the jet plume axis. The images confirmed the expected jet plume mixing intensity, and the phased array results showed the differences in sound pressure level with respect to nozzle configurations. The results show the effects of changes in configurations to the exit nozzles on both the flows mixing patterns and radiant energy dissipation patterns. By comparing the results from these two measurements, a relationship between noise reduction and core/bypass flow mixing is demonstrated.

  17. Properties and Localizations of Acoustic Sources in High Speed Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kan, Pinqing; Lewalle, Jacques; Berger, Zachary; Berry, Matthew; Glauser, Mark; Syracuse University Team

    2014-11-01

    Jet noise has become one major concern for aircraft engine design in recent decades. The problem is to identify the near-field (NF) structures that produce far-field (FF) noise and develop noise control and reduction strategies. We developed an algorithm to identify the events that are responsible for NF and FF cross-correlations. Two sets of experimental data from Mach 0.6 jets are analyzed. They consist of 10 kHz TRPIV measurement and pressure sampling in both near- and far-field. Several NF diagnostics (velocity, vorticity, Q criterion, etc.) are calculated to represent the 2D velocity fields. The main contributors between these NF diagnostics and FF pressure are extracted as Diagnostic-Microphone (DM) events. The NF localization of DM event clusters will be compared to the NF triangulation of MM events, which were acquired using FF signals alone. In the time-frequency domain, the events are short wave packets, distorted by ambient perturbations. As a result, the matching of DM to MM events at physical lags is particularly difficult. We will report on different algorithms using time, frequency and space information to improve the reliability of the matches. We will also relate the event localization to the NF flow fields that correspond to FF ``loud'' POD modes (Low et al. 2013 and Berger et al. 2014). This work is supported by Spectra Energies LLC, Syracuse University MAE Department and the Glauser group at Syracuse University.

  18. Resource Evaluation and Energy Production Estimate for a Tidal Energy Conversion Installation using Acoustic Flow Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagnon, Ian; Baldwin, Ken; Wosnik, Martin

    2015-11-01

    The ``Living Bridge'' project plans to install a tidal turbine at Memorial Bridge in the Piscataqua River at Portsmouth, NH. A spatio-temporal tidal energy resource assessment was performed using long term bottom-deployed Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers ADCP. Two locations were evaluated: at the planned deployment location and mid-channel. The goal was to determine the amount of available kinetic energy that can be converted into usable electrical energy on the bridge. Changes in available kinetic energy with ebb/flood and spring/neap tidal cycles and electrical energy demand were analyzed. A system model is used to calculate the net energy savings using various tidal generator and battery bank configurations. Differences in the tidal characteristics between the two measurement locations are highlighted. Different resource evaluation methodologies were also analyzed, e.g., using a representative ADCP ``bin'' vs. a more refined, turbine-geometry-specific methodology, and using static bin height vs. bin height that move w.r.t. the free surface throughout a tidal cycle (representative of a bottom-fixed or floating turbine deployment, respectively). ADCP operating frequencies and bin sizes affect the standard deviation of measurements, and measurement uncertainties are evaluated. Supported by NSF-IIP grant 1430260.

  19. Bamboo as a renewable energy source

    SciTech Connect

    Molini, A.E.; Irizarry, J.G.

    1982-08-01

    Our complete dependence upon imported fossil fuels forces us to make a conscientious evaluation of the other energy sources the authors have readily available. Some of the approximately 1000 species of bamboo of some 50 genera, which range from plants the size of field grass to giants 120 ft. high and one ft. in diameter, and which grow from sea level in the tropics to 10,000 ft. mountain slopes, appear to be excellent alternate renewable energy sources. This paper presents the results obtained from a recently initiated research effort on the subject.

  20. Acoustic beam steering by light refraction: illustration with directivity patterns of a tilted volume photoacoustic source.

    PubMed

    Raetz, Samuel; Dehoux, Thomas; Perton, Mathieu; Audoin, Bertrand

    2013-12-01

    The symmetry of a thermoelastic source resulting from laser absorption can be broken when the direction of light propagation in an elastic half-space is inclined relatively to the surface. This leads to an asymmetry of the directivity patterns of both compressional and shear acoustic waves. In contrast to classical surface acoustic sources, the tunable volume source allows one to take advantage of the mode conversion at the surface to control the directivity of specific modes. Physical interpretations of the evolution of the directivity patterns with the increasing light angle of incidence and of the relations between the preferential directions of compressional- and shear-wave emission are proposed. In order to compare calculated directivity patterns with measurements of normal displacement amplitudes performed on plates, a procedure is proposed to transform the directivity patterns into pseudo-directivity patterns representative of the experimental conditions. The comparison of the theoretical with measured pseudo-directivity patterns demonstrates the ability to enhance bulk-wave amplitudes and to steer specific bulk acoustic modes by adequately tuning light refraction.

  1. Accounting for delay of energy transfer between coupled rooms in statistical-acoustics models of reverberant-energy decay.

    PubMed

    Summers, Jason E

    2012-08-01

    A statistical-acoustics model for energy decay in systems of two or more coupled rooms is introduced, which accounts for the distribution of delay in the transfer of energy between subrooms that results from the finite speed of sound. The method extends previous models based on systems of coupled ordinary differential equations by using functional differential equations to explicitly model dependence on prior values of energy in adjacent subrooms. Predictions of the model are illustrated for a two-room coupled system and compared with the predictions of a benchmark computational geometrical-acoustics model.

  2. Efficient source separation algorithms for acoustic fall detection using a microsoft kinect.

    PubMed

    Li, Yun; Ho, K C; Popescu, Mihail

    2014-03-01

    Falls have become a common health problem among older adults. In previous study, we proposed an acoustic fall detection system (acoustic FADE) that employed a microphone array and beamforming to provide automatic fall detection. However, the previous acoustic FADE had difficulties in detecting the fall signal in environments where interference comes from the fall direction, the number of interferences exceeds FADE's ability to handle or a fall is occluded. To address these issues, in this paper, we propose two blind source separation (BSS) methods for extracting the fall signal out of the interferences to improve the fall classification task. We first propose the single-channel BSS by using nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF) to automatically decompose the mixture into a linear combination of several basis components. Based on the distinct patterns of the bases of falls, we identify them efficiently and then construct the interference free fall signal. Next, we extend the single-channel BSS to the multichannel case through a joint NMF over all channels followed by a delay-and-sum beamformer for additional ambient noise reduction. In our experiments, we used the Microsoft Kinect to collect the acoustic data in real-home environments. The results show that in environments with high interference and background noise levels, the fall detection performance is significantly improved using the proposed BSS approaches.

  3. Energy scavenging sources for biomedical sensors.

    PubMed

    Romero, E; Warrington, R O; Neuman, M R

    2009-09-01

    Energy scavenging has increasingly become an interesting option for powering electronic devices because of the almost infinite lifetime and the non-dependence on fuels for energy generation. Moreover, the rise of wireless technologies promises new applications in medical monitoring systems, but these still face limitations due to battery lifetime and size. A trade-off of these two factors has typically governed the size, useful life and capabilities of an autonomous system. Energy generation from sources such as motion, light and temperature gradients has been established as commercially viable alternatives to batteries for human-powered flashlights, solar calculators, radio receivers and thermal-powered wristwatches, among others. Research on energy harvesting from human activities has also addressed the feasibility of powering wearable or implantable systems. Biomedical sensors can take advantage of human-based activities as the energy source for energy scavengers. This review describes the state of the art of energy scavenging technologies for powering sensors and instrumentation of physiological variables. After a short description of the human power and the energy generation limits, the different transduction mechanisms, recent developments and challenges faced are reviewed and discussed.

  4. Energy loss to intravalley acoustic modes in nano-dimensional wire structures at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nag, S.; Das, B.; Basu, A.; Das, J.; Bhattacharya, D. P.; Sarkar, C. K.

    2017-03-01

    The theory of rate of loss of energy of non-equilibrium electrons due to inelastic interaction with the intravalley acoustic phonons in a nano-dimensional semiconductor wire has been developed under the condition of low lattice temperature, when the approximations of the well known traditional theory are not valid. Numerical results are obtained for narrow-channel GaAs-GaAlAs wires structures. On comparison with other available results it is revealed that the finite energy of the intravalley acoustic phonons and, the use of the full form of the phonon distribution without truncation to the equipartition law, produce significant changes in the energy loss characteristics at low temperatures.

  5. System and method for investigating sub-surface features of a rock formation with acoustic sources generating coded signals

    SciTech Connect

    Vu, Cung Khac; Nihei, Kurt; Johnson, Paul A; Guyer, Robert; Ten Cate, James A; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves; Larmat, Carene S

    2014-12-30

    A system and a method for investigating rock formations includes generating, by a first acoustic source, a first acoustic signal comprising a first plurality of pulses, each pulse including a first modulated signal at a central frequency; and generating, by a second acoustic source, a second acoustic signal comprising a second plurality of pulses. A receiver arranged within the borehole receives a detected signal including a signal being generated by a non-linear mixing process from the first-and-second acoustic signal in a non-linear mixing zone within the intersection volume. The method also includes-processing the received signal to extract the signal generated by the non-linear mixing process over noise or over signals generated by a linear interaction process, or both.

  6. Development of an impulsive noise source to study the acoustic reflection characteristics of hard-walled wind tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salikuddin, M.; Burrin, R. H.; Ahuja, K. K.; Bartel, H. W.

    1986-01-01

    Two impulsive sound sources, one using multiple acoustic drivers and the other using a spark discharge were developed to study the acoustic reflection characteristics of hard-walled wind tunnels, and the results of laboratory tests are presented. The analysis indicates that though the intensity of the pulse generated by the spark source was higher than that obtained from the acoustic source, the number of averages needed for a particular test may require an unacceptibly long tunnel-run time due to the low spark generation repeat rate because of capacitor charging time. The additional hardware problems associated with the longevity of electrodes and electrode holders in sustaining the impact of repetitive spark discharges, show the multidriver acoustic source to be more suitable for this application.

  7. Acoustic emissions of digital data video projectors- Investigating noise sources and their change during product aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Michael Shane

    2005-09-01

    Acoustic emission testing continues to be a growing part of IT and telecommunication product design, as product noise is increasingly becoming a differentiator in the marketplace. This is especially true for digital/video display companies, such as InFocus Corporation, considering the market shift of these products to the home entertainment consumer as retail prices drop and performance factors increase. Projectors and displays using Digital Light Processing(tm) [DLP(tm)] technology incorporate a device known as a ColorWheel(tm) to generate the colors displayed at each pixel in the image. These ColorWheel(tm) devices spin at very high speeds and can generate high-frequency tones not typically heard in liquid crystal displays and other display technologies. Also, acoustic emission testing typically occurs at the beginning of product life and is a measure of acoustic energy emitted at this point in the lifecycle. Since the product is designed to be used over a long period of time, there is concern as to whether the acoustic emissions change over the lifecycle of the product, whether these changes will result in a level of nuisance to the average customer, and does this nuisance begin to develop prior to the intended lifetime of the product.

  8. Bio-inspired UAV routing, source localization, and acoustic signature classification for persistent surveillance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burman, Jerry; Hespanha, Joao; Madhow, Upamanyu; Pham, Tien

    2011-06-01

    A team consisting of Teledyne Scientific Company, the University of California at Santa Barbara and the Army Research Laboratory* is developing technologies in support of automated data exfiltration from heterogeneous battlefield sensor networks to enhance situational awareness for dismounts and command echelons. Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) provide an effective means to autonomously collect data from a sparse network of unattended ground sensors (UGSs) that cannot communicate with each other. UAVs are used to reduce the system reaction time by generating autonomous collection routes that are data-driven. Bio-inspired techniques for search provide a novel strategy to detect, capture and fuse data. A fast and accurate method has been developed to localize an event by fusing data from a sparse number of UGSs. This technique uses a bio-inspired algorithm based on chemotaxis or the motion of bacteria seeking nutrients in their environment. A unique acoustic event classification algorithm was also developed based on using swarm optimization. Additional studies addressed the problem of routing multiple UAVs, optimally placing sensors in the field and locating the source of gunfire at helicopters. A field test was conducted in November of 2009 at Camp Roberts, CA. The field test results showed that a system controlled by bio-inspired software algorithms can autonomously detect and locate the source of an acoustic event with very high accuracy and visually verify the event. In nine independent test runs of a UAV, the system autonomously located the position of an explosion nine times with an average accuracy of 3 meters. The time required to perform source localization using the UAV was on the order of a few minutes based on UAV flight times. In June 2011, additional field tests of the system will be performed and will include multiple acoustic events, optimal sensor placement based on acoustic phenomenology and the use of the International Technology Alliance (ITA

  9. Microbial production of energy sources from biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Righelato, R. C.

    1980-02-01

    The biochemical options available for the microbial production of energy sources from biomass is reviewed and some of the technology available for microbial conversion is discussed with particular reference to present limitations and how they may be overcome. Attention is given to the chemical process of anaerobic fermentation emphasizing the chemical reaction of glucose into pyruvic acid. The capital costs and energy consumption of ethanol and methane and their production are discussed. It is concluded that anaerobic fermentation of carbohydrates and digestion of biomass-containing effluents can be used as methods for achieving greater energy availability.

  10. Alternative Energy Sources in Seismic Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tün, Muammer; Pekkan, Emrah; Mutlu, Sunay; Ecevitoğlu, Berkan

    2015-04-01

    When the suitability of a settlement area is investigated, soil-amplification, liquefaction and fault-related hazards should be defined, and the associated risks should be clarified. For this reason, soil engineering parameters and subsurface geological structure of a new settlement area should be investigated. Especially, faults covered with quaternary alluvium; thicknesses, shear-wave velocities and geometry of subsurface sediments could lead to a soil amplification during an earthquake. Likewise, changes in shear-wave velocities along the basin are also very important. Geophysical methods can be used to determine the local soil properties. In this study, use of alternative seismic energy sources when implementing seismic reflection, seismic refraction and MASW methods in the residential areas of Eskisehir/Turkey, were discussed. Our home developed seismic energy source, EAPSG (Electrically-Fired-PS-Gun), capable to shoot 2x24 magnum shotgun cartridges at once to generate P and S waves; and our home developed WD-500 (500 kg Weight Drop) seismic energy source, mounted on a truck, were developed under a scientific research project of Anadolu University. We were able to reach up to penetration depths of 1200 m for EAPSG, and 800 m for WD-500 in our seismic reflection surveys. WD-500 seismic energy source was also used to perform MASW surveys, using 24-channel, 10 m apart, 4.5 Hz vertical geophone configuration. We were able to reach 100 m of penetration depth in MASW surveys.

  11. The high energy source 3C 273

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonmontigny, Corinna

    1990-01-01

    The properties of 3C 273 are reviewed and an attempt is made to find an answer to the question why 3C 273 is the only extragalactic source so far, which was detected at energies greater than or equal to 50 MeV.

  12. A Web Based Puzzle for Energy Sources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Secken, Nilgun

    2006-01-01

    At present many countries in the world consume too much fossil fuels such as petroleum, natural gas and coal to meet their energy needs. These fossil fuels are not renewable; their sources are limited and reducing gradually. More importantly they have been becoming more expensive day by day and their damage to the environment has been increasing.…

  13. Reusable Energy and Power Sources: Rechargeable Batteries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsiung, Steve C.; Ritz, John M.

    2007-01-01

    Rechargeable batteries are very popular within consumer electronics. If one uses a cell phone or portable electric tool, she/he understands the need to have a reliable product and the need to remember to use the recharging systems that follow a cycle of charge/discharge. Rechargeable batteries are being called "green" energy sources. They are a…

  14. Power conversion from environmentally scavenged energy sources.

    SciTech Connect

    Druxman, Lee Daniel

    2007-09-01

    As the power requirements for modern electronics continue to decrease, many devices which were once dependent on wired power are now being implemented as portable devices operating from self-contained power sources. The most prominent source of portable power is the electrochemical battery, which converts chemical energy into electricity. However, long lasting batteries require large amounts of space for chemical storage, and inevitably require replacement when the chemical reaction no longer takes place. There are many transducers and scavenging energy sources (SES) that are able to exploit their environment to generate low levels of electrical power over a long-term time period, including photovoltaic cells, thermoelectric generators, thermionic generators, and kinetic/piezoelectric power generators. This generated power is sustainable as long as specific environmental conditions exist and also does not require the large volume of a long lifetime battery. In addition to the required voltage generation, stable power conversion requires excess energy to be efficiently stored in an ultracapacitor or similar device and monitoring control algorithms to be implemented, while computer modeling and simulation can be used to complement experimental testing. However, building an efficient and stable power source scavenged from a varying input source is challenging.

  15. Biological sources of energy from the sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phlips, E. J.

    1982-02-01

    The use of marine plants and microscopic organisms as possible future energy sources is examined. Parallels are drawn between the coming depletion of fossil fuel resources and the first energy crisis on earth, when evolving cells began to use up the stores of organic molecules in the ocean, and photosynthesis, in the form of plant biomass, is considered as a possible solution to the present energy crisis. The energy potential of marine biomass, specifically the seaweeds, microscopic algae and photosynthetic bacteria, is then assessed, and experimental attempts at the culturing of such organisms, are noted. Microbial energy technologies, principally the replacement of chemical processes requiring fossil fuels with biological conversion systems and direct biomass conversion into hydrogen and methane fuels, are then examined. Possible applications of techniques involving genetic engineering and cell-free systems to future bioenergy research are indicated, and the impetus to the rapid development of solar energy posed by the problems of pollution and availability of present energy sources is emphasized.

  16. Compact Neutron Sources for Energy and Security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uesaka, Mitsuru; Kobayashi, Hitoshi

    We choose nuclear data and nuclear material inspection for energy application, and nondestructive testing of explosive and hidden nuclear materials for security application. Low energy (~100 keV) electrostatic accelerators of deuterium are commercially available for nondestructive testing. For nuclear data measurement, electrostatic ion accelerators and L-band (1.428GHz) and S-band (2.856GHz) electron linear accelerators (linacs) are used for the neutron source. Compact or mobile X-band (9.3, 11.424GHz) electron linac neutron sources are under development. A compact proton linac neutron source is used for nondestructive testing, especially water in solids. Several efforts for more neutron intensity using proton and deuteron accelerators are also introduced.

  17. Compact Neutron Sources for Energy and Security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uesaka, Mitsuru; Kobayashi, Hitoshi

    We choose nuclear data and nuclear material inspection for energy application, and nondestructive testing of explosive and hidden nuclear materials for security application. Low energy (˜100keV) electrostatic accelerators of deuterium are commercially available for nondestructive testing. For nuclear data measurement, electrostatic ion accelerators and L-band (1.428GHz) and S-band (2.856GHz) electron linear accelerators (linacs) are used for the neutron source. Compact or mobile X-band (9.3, 11.424GHz) electron linac neutron sources are under development. A compact proton linac neutron source is used for nondestructive testing, especially water in solids. Several efforts for more neutron intensity using proton and deuteron accelerators are also introduced.

  18. Kansas Energy Sources: A Geological Review

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Merriam, D.F.; Brady, L.L.; Newell, K.D.

    2012-01-01

    Kansas produces both conventional energy (oil, gas, and coal) and nonconventional (coalbed gas, wind, hydropower, nuclear, geothermal, solar, and biofuels) and ranks the 22nd in state energy production in the U. S. Nonrenewable conventional petroleum is the most important energy source with nonrenewable, nonconventional coalbed methane gas becoming increasingly important. Many stratigraphic units produce oil and/or gas somewhere in the state with the exception of the Salina Basin in north-central Kansas. Coalbed methane is produced from shallow wells drilled into the thin coal units in southeastern Kansas. At present, only two surface coal mines are active in southeastern Kansas. Although Kansas has been a major exporter of energy in the past (it ranked first in oil production in 1916), now, it is an energy importer. ?? 2011 International Association for Mathematical Geology.

  19. Assessing Acoustic Sound Levels Associated with Active Source Seismic Surveys in Shallow Marine Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohnenstiehl, D. R.; Tolstoy, M.; Thode, A.; Diebold, J. B.; Webb, S. C.

    2004-12-01

    The potential effect of active source seismic research on marine mammal populations is a topic of increasing concern, and controversy surrounding such operations has begun to impact the planning and permitting of academic surveys [e.g., Malakoff, 2002 Science]. Although no causal relationship between marine mammal strandings and seismic exploration has been proven, any circumstantial evidence must be thoroughly investigated. A 2002 stranding of two beaked whales in the Gulf of California within 50 km of a R/V Ewing seismic survey has been a subject of concern for both marine seismologists and environmentalists. In order to better understand possible received levels for whales in the vicinity of these operations, modeling is combined with ground-truth calibration measurements. A wide-angle parabolic equation model, which is capable of including shear within the sediment and basement layers, is used to generate predictive models of low-frequency transmission loss within the Gulf of California. This work incorporates range-dependent bathymetry, sediment thickness, sound velocity structure and sub-bottom properties. Oceanic sounds speed profiles are derived from the U.S. Navy's seasonal GDEM model and sediment thicknesses are taken from NOAA's worldwide database. The spectral content of the Ewing's 20-airgun seismic array is constrained by field calibration in the spring of 2003 [Tolstoy et al., 2004 GRL], indicating peak energies at frequencies below a few hundred Hz, with energy spectral density showing an approximate power-law decrease at higher frequencies (being ~40 dB below peak at 1 kHz). Transmission loss is estimated along a series of radials extending from multiple positions along the ship's track, with the directivity of the array accounted for by phase-shifting point sources that are scaled by the cube root of the individual airgun volumes. This allows the time-space history of low-frequency received levels to be reconstructed within the Gulf of California

  20. Perceptual factors contribute more than acoustical factors to sound localization abilities with virtual sources

    PubMed Central

    Andéol, Guillaume; Savel, Sophie; Guillaume, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Human sound localization abilities rely on binaural and spectral cues. Spectral cues arise from interactions between the sound wave and the listener's body (head-related transfer function, HRTF). Large individual differences were reported in localization abilities, even in young normal-hearing adults. Several studies have attempted to determine whether localization abilities depend mostly on acoustical cues or on perceptual processes involved in the analysis of these cues. These studies have yielded inconsistent findings, which could result from methodological issues. In this study, we measured sound localization performance with normal and modified acoustical cues (i.e., with individual and non-individual HRTFs, respectively) in 20 naïve listeners. Test conditions were chosen to address most methodological issues from past studies. Procedural training was provided prior to sound localization tests. The results showed no direct relationship between behavioral results and an acoustical metrics (spectral-shape prominence of individual HRTFs). Despite uncertainties due to technical issues with the normalization of the HRTFs, large acoustical differences between individual and non-individual HRTFs appeared to be needed to produce behavioral effects. A subset of 15 listeners then trained in the sound localization task with individual HRTFs. Training included either visual correct-answer feedback (for the test group) or no feedback (for the control group), and was assumed to elicit perceptual learning for the test group only. Few listeners from the control group, but most listeners from the test group, showed significant training-induced learning. For the test group, learning was related to pre-training performance (i.e., the poorer the pre-training performance, the greater the learning amount) and was retained after 1 month. The results are interpreted as being in favor of a larger contribution of perceptual factors than of acoustical factors to sound localization

  1. Reverberant acoustic energy in auditoria that comprise systems of coupled rooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summers, Jason E.

    2003-11-01

    A frequency-dependent model for reverberant energy in coupled rooms is developed and compared with measurements for a 1:10 scale model and for Bass Hall, Ft. Worth, TX. At high frequencies, prior statistical-acoustics models are improved by geometrical-acoustics corrections for decay within sub-rooms and for energy transfer between sub-rooms. Comparisons of computational geometrical acoustics predictions based on beam-axis tracing with scale model measurements indicate errors resulting from tail-correction assuming constant quadratic growth of reflection density. Using ray tracing in the late part corrects this error. For mid-frequencies, the models are modified to account for wave effects at coupling apertures by including power transmission coefficients. Similarly, statical-acoustics models are improved through more accurate estimates of power transmission measurements. Scale model measurements are in accord with the predicted behavior. The edge-diffraction model is adapted to study transmission through apertures. Multiple-order scattering is theoretically and experimentally shown inaccurate due to neglect of slope diffraction. At low frequencies, perturbation models qualitatively explain scale model measurements. Measurements confirm relation of coupling strength to unperturbed pressure distribution on coupling surfaces. Measurements in Bass Hall exhibit effects of the coupled stage house. High frequency predictions of statistical acoustics and geometrical acoustics models and predictions of coupling apertures all agree with measurements.

  2. Resolving the source of the solar acoustic oscillations: What will be possible with DKIST?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rast, Mark; Martinez Pillet, Valentin

    2016-05-01

    The solar p-modes are likely excited by small-scale convective dynamics in the solar photosphere, but the detailed source properties are not known. Theoretical models differ and observations are yet unable to differentiate between them. Resolving the underlying source events is more than a curiosity. It is important to the veracity of global helioseismic measurements (including local spectral methods such as ring diagram analysis) because global p-mode line shapes and thus accurate frequency determinations depend critically on the relationship between intensity and velocity during the excitation events. It is also fundamental to improving the accuracy of the local time-distance measurements because in these kernel calculations depend on knowledge of the source profile and the properties of the excitation noise. The Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope (DKIST) will have the spatial resolution and spectral range needed to resolve the solar acoustic excitation events in both time and space (horizontally and with height) using multi-wavelength observations. Inversions to determine the dynamic and thermodynamic evolution of the discrete small-scale convective events that serve as acoustic sources may also be possible, though determination of the pressure fluctuations associated with the sources is a challenge. We describe the DKIST capabilities anticipated and the preliminary work needed to prepare for them.

  3. [Physiological-occupational assessment of acoustic load with equal energy but different time and informational characteristics].

    PubMed

    Suvorov, G A; Shkarinov, L N; Kravchenko, O K; Kur'erov, N N

    1999-01-01

    The article deals with results of experimental study comparing effects of 4 types of acoustic load--noise (constant and impulse) and music (electronic symphonic one and rap)--on hearing sensitivity, processes in nervous system and subjective evaluation. All types of acoustic load were equal in energy (on evaluation according to equivalent level during the experiment). The study included 2 levels of load--90 and 95 dB. The differences revealed demonstrate importance of impulse parameters of noise and musical load for reactions of acoustic analyzer and central nervous system. The experiments show that evaluation of harm caused by temporary and impulse noises should be based not only on assessment of specific (hearing) function, but also on parameters of central nervous system state. The authors found that music of certain acoustic and informational parameters may harm hearing function.

  4. Time-distance domain transformation for Acoustic Emission source localization in thin metallic plates.

    PubMed

    Grabowski, Krzysztof; Gawronski, Mateusz; Baran, Ireneusz; Spychalski, Wojciech; Staszewski, Wieslaw J; Uhl, Tadeusz; Kundu, Tribikram; Packo, Pawel

    2016-05-01

    Acoustic Emission used in Non-Destructive Testing is focused on analysis of elastic waves propagating in mechanical structures. Then any information carried by generated acoustic waves, further recorded by a set of transducers, allow to determine integrity of these structures. It is clear that material properties and geometry strongly impacts the result. In this paper a method for Acoustic Emission source localization in thin plates is presented. The approach is based on the Time-Distance Domain Transform, that is a wavenumber-frequency mapping technique for precise event localization. The major advantage of the technique is dispersion compensation through a phase-shifting of investigated waveforms in order to acquire the most accurate output, allowing for source-sensor distance estimation using a single transducer. The accuracy and robustness of the above process are also investigated. This includes the study of Young's modulus value and numerical parameters influence on damage detection. By merging the Time-Distance Domain Transform with an optimal distance selection technique, an identification-localization algorithm is achieved. The method is investigated analytically, numerically and experimentally. The latter involves both laboratory and large scale industrial tests.

  5. Identification of blasting sources in the Dobrogea seismogenic region, Romania using seismo-acoustic signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghica, Daniela Veronica; Grecu, Bogdan; Popa, Mihaela; Radulian, Mircea

    2016-10-01

    In order to discriminate between quarry blasts and earthquakes observed in the Dobrogea seismogenic region, a seismo-acoustic analysis was performed on 520 events listed in the updated Romanian seismic catalogue from January 2011 to December 2012. During this time interval, 104 seismo-acoustic events observed from a distance between 110 and 230 km and backazimuth interval of 110-160° from the IPLOR infrasound array were identified as explosions by associating with infrasonic signals. WinPMCC software for interactive analysis was applied to detect and characterize infrasonic signals in terms of backazimuth, speed and frequency content. The measured and expected values of both backazimuths and arrival times for the study events were compared in order to identify the sources of infrasound. Two predominant directions for seismo-acoustic sources' aligning were observed, corresponding to the northern and central parts of Dobrogea, and these directions are further considered as references in the process of discriminating explosions from earthquakes. A predominance of high-frequency detections (above 1 Hz) is also observed in the infrasound data. The strong influence of seasonally dependent stratospheric winds on the IPLOR detection capability limits the efficiency of the discrimination procedure, as proposed by this study.

  6. Deconvolution methods and systems for the mapping of acoustic sources from phased microphone arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Thomas F. (Inventor); Humphreys, Jr., William M. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A method and system for mapping acoustic sources determined from a phased microphone array. A plurality of microphones are arranged in an optimized grid pattern including a plurality of grid locations thereof. A linear configuration of N equations and N unknowns can be formed by accounting for a reciprocal influence of one or more beamforming characteristics thereof at varying grid locations among the plurality of grid locations. A full-rank equation derived from the linear configuration of N equations and N unknowns can then be iteratively determined. A full-rank can be attained by the solution requirement of the positivity constraint equivalent to the physical assumption of statically independent noise sources at each N location. An optimized noise source distribution is then generated over an identified aeroacoustic source region associated with the phased microphone array in order to compile an output presentation thereof, thereby removing the beamforming characteristics from the resulting output presentation.

  7. Deconvolution Methods and Systems for the Mapping of Acoustic Sources from Phased Microphone Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Thomas F. (Inventor); Humphreys, Jr., William M. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Mapping coherent/incoherent acoustic sources as determined from a phased microphone array. A linear configuration of equations and unknowns are formed by accounting for a reciprocal influence of one or more cross-beamforming characteristics thereof at varying grid locations among the plurality of grid locations. An equation derived from the linear configuration of equations and unknowns can then be iteratively determined. The equation can be attained by the solution requirement of a constraint equivalent to the physical assumption that the coherent sources have only in phase coherence. The size of the problem may then be reduced using zoning methods. An optimized noise source distribution is then generated over an identified aeroacoustic source region associated with a phased microphone array (microphones arranged in an optimized grid pattern including a plurality of grid locations) in order to compile an output presentation thereof, thereby removing beamforming characteristics from the resulting output presentation.

  8. Method for enhancing low frequency output of impulsive type seismic energy sources and its application to a seismic energy source for use while drilling

    DOEpatents

    Radtke, Robert P; Stokes, Robert H; Glowka, David A

    2014-12-02

    A method for operating an impulsive type seismic energy source in a firing sequence having at least two actuations for each seismic impulse to be generated by the source. The actuations have a time delay between them related to a selected energy frequency peak of the source output. One example of the method is used for generating seismic signals in a wellbore and includes discharging electric current through a spark gap disposed in the wellbore in at least one firing sequence. The sequence includes at least two actuations of the spark gap separated by an amount of time selected to cause acoustic energy resulting from the actuations to have peak amplitude at a selected frequency.

  9. System and method for characterizing, synthesizing, and/or canceling out acoustic signals from inanimate sound sources

    DOEpatents

    Holzrichter, John F.; Burnett, Greg C.; Ng, Lawrence C.

    2007-10-16

    A system and method for characterizing, synthesizing, and/or canceling out acoustic signals from inanimate sound sources is disclosed. Propagating wave electromagnetic sensors monitor excitation sources in sound producing systems, such as machines, musical instruments, and various other structures. Acoustical output from these sound producing systems is also monitored. From such information, a transfer function characterizing the sound producing system is generated. From the transfer function, acoustical output from the sound producing system may be synthesized or canceled. The methods disclosed enable accurate calculation of matched transfer functions relating specific excitations to specific acoustical outputs. Knowledge of such signals and functions can be used to effect various sound replication, sound source identification, and sound cancellation applications.

  10. System and method for characterizing, synthesizing, and/or canceling out acoustic signals from inanimate sound sources

    SciTech Connect

    Holzrichter, John F; Burnett, Greg C; Ng, Lawrence C

    2013-05-21

    A system and method for characterizing, synthesizing, and/or canceling out acoustic signals from inanimate sound sources is disclosed. Propagating wave electromagnetic sensors monitor excitation sources in sound producing systems, such as machines, musical instruments, and various other structures. Acoustical output from these sound producing systems is also monitored. From such information, a transfer function characterizing the sound producing system is generated. From the transfer function, acoustical output from the sound producing system may be synthesized or canceled. The methods disclosed enable accurate calculation of matched transfer functions relating specific excitations to specific acoustical outputs. Knowledge of such signals and functions can be used to effect various sound replication, sound source identification, and sound cancellation applications.

  11. System and method for characterizing synthesizing and/or canceling out acoustic signals from inanimate sound sources

    DOEpatents

    Holzrichter, John F.; Burnett, Greg C.; Ng, Lawrence C.

    2003-01-01

    A system and method for characterizing, synthesizing, and/or canceling out acoustic signals from inanimate sound sources is disclosed. Propagating wave electromagnetic sensors monitor excitation sources in sound producing systems, such as machines, musical instruments, and various other structures. Acoustical output from these sound producing systems is also monitored. From such information, a transfer function characterizing the sound producing system is generated. From the transfer function, acoustical output from the sound producing system may be synthesized or canceled. The methods disclosed enable accurate calculation of matched transfer functions relating specific excitations to specific acoustical outputs. Knowledge of such signals and functions can be used to effect various sound replication, sound source identification, and sound cancellation applications.

  12. Radiogenic metabolism: an alternative cellular energy source.

    PubMed

    Benford, M S

    2001-01-01

    The concept of 'healing energy' is commonly used in complementary and alternative medicine; however, efforts to define this concept using contemporary scientific theory, and measure it using modern scientific methods, have been limited to date. Recent experimental testing by Benford et al. observed a uniform, substantial, and consistent decrease in gamma radiation during alternative healing sessions, thus supporting a new energy-balance paradigm hypothesizing ionizing radiation as an alternative cellular energy source. This hypothesis extends the known elements of radiogenic metabolism to potentially explain a number of presumably biopositive energy-related phenomena, including fasting and radiation hormesis, as well as to demystify unexplained anomalies such as idiopathic thermogenesis, halos and auras, and incorruptibility of human corpses.

  13. A series expansion of the acoustic power radiated from planar sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willams, E. G.

    1983-01-01

    A series expansion in ascending powers of the wavenumber k is derived for the acoustic power delivered by baffled or unbaffled planar sources. This series provides a relatively simple means of derving expressions for the power radiated by a baffled source with a known velocity distribution and can be used for unbaffled plates when the velocity field outside the plate is also known. The terms in the series are calculated from the moments of this velocity distribution in the plane containing the source. If these moments are written as derivaties in wavenumber space, it is shown that a MacLaurin expansion of the Fourier transformed velocity provides an easy technique for computing the first few terms of the acoustic power. Examples are provided for baffled, rectangular plates with various boundary conditions. The arbirarily shaped plate with free boundaries is particularly interesting. It is proven that the volume flow across it surface must be zero and as a result corner and edge mode radiation cannot exist for this kind of source.

  14. Three-dimensional localization of transient acoustic sources using an ice-mounted geophone.

    PubMed

    Dosso, Stan E

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an approach to three-dimensional (3D) localization of ocean acoustic sources using a single three-component geophone on Arctic sea ice. Source bearing is estimated by maximizing the radial signal power as a function of horizontal look angle, applying seismic polarization filters to suppress shear waves with transverse particle motion. The inherent 180° ambiguity is resolved by requiring outgoing (prograde) particle motion in the radial-vertical plane. Source range and depth estimates and uncertainties are computed by Bayesian inversion of arrival-time differences of the water-borne acoustic wave and ice seismic waves, including the horizontally-polarized shear wave and longitudinal plate wave. The 3D localization is applied to geophone recordings of impulsive sources deployed in the water column at a series of ranges (200 to 1000 m) and bearings (0° to 90°) for three sites in the Lincoln Sea characterized by smooth annual ice, rough/ridged annual ice, and thick multi-year ice. Good bearing estimates are obtained in all cases. Range-depth localization is successful for ranges over which ice seismic arrivals could be reliably detected, approximately 200 m on rough ice, 500 m on smooth ice, and 800 m on multi-year ice. Effects of environmental uncertainty on localization are quantified by marginalizing over unknown environmental parameters.

  15. Decoding Group Vocalizations: The Acoustic Energy Distribution of Chorus Howls Is Useful to Determine Wolf Reproduction

    PubMed Central

    López-Bao, José Vicente; Llaneza, Luis; Fernández, Carlos; Font, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    Population monitoring is crucial for wildlife management and conservation. In the last few decades, wildlife researchers have increasingly applied bioacoustics tools to obtain information on several essential ecological parameters, such as distribution and abundance. One such application involves wolves (Canis lupus). These canids respond to simulated howls by emitting group vocalizations known as chorus howls. These responses to simulated howls reveal the presence of wolf litters during the breeding period and are therefore often used to determine the status of wolf populations. However, the acoustic structure of chorus howls is complex and discriminating the presence of pups in a chorus is sometimes difficult, even for experienced observers. In this study, we evaluate the usefulness of analyses of the acoustic energy distribution in chorus howls to identify the presence of pups in a chorus. We analysed 110 Iberian wolf chorus howls with known pack composition and found that the acoustic energy distribution is concentrated at higher frequencies when there are pups vocalizing. We built predictive models using acoustic energy distribution features to determine the presence of pups in a chorus, concluding that the acoustic energy distribution in chorus howls can be used to determine the presence of wolf pups in a pack. The method we outline here is objective, accurate, easily implemented, and independent of the observer's experience. These advantages are especially relevant in the case of broad scale surveys or when many observers are involved. Furthermore, the analysis of the acoustic energy distribution can be implemented for monitoring other social canids that emit chorus howls such as jackals or coyotes, provides an easy way to obtain information on ecological parameters such as reproductive success, and could be useful to study other group vocalizations. PMID:27144887

  16. Decoding Group Vocalizations: The Acoustic Energy Distribution of Chorus Howls Is Useful to Determine Wolf Reproduction.

    PubMed

    Palacios, Vicente; López-Bao, José Vicente; Llaneza, Luis; Fernández, Carlos; Font, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    Population monitoring is crucial for wildlife management and conservation. In the last few decades, wildlife researchers have increasingly applied bioacoustics tools to obtain information on several essential ecological parameters, such as distribution and abundance. One such application involves wolves (Canis lupus). These canids respond to simulated howls by emitting group vocalizations known as chorus howls. These responses to simulated howls reveal the presence of wolf litters during the breeding period and are therefore often used to determine the status of wolf populations. However, the acoustic structure of chorus howls is complex and discriminating the presence of pups in a chorus is sometimes difficult, even for experienced observers. In this study, we evaluate the usefulness of analyses of the acoustic energy distribution in chorus howls to identify the presence of pups in a chorus. We analysed 110 Iberian wolf chorus howls with known pack composition and found that the acoustic energy distribution is concentrated at higher frequencies when there are pups vocalizing. We built predictive models using acoustic energy distribution features to determine the presence of pups in a chorus, concluding that the acoustic energy distribution in chorus howls can be used to determine the presence of wolf pups in a pack. The method we outline here is objective, accurate, easily implemented, and independent of the observer's experience. These advantages are especially relevant in the case of broad scale surveys or when many observers are involved. Furthermore, the analysis of the acoustic energy distribution can be implemented for monitoring other social canids that emit chorus howls such as jackals or coyotes, provides an easy way to obtain information on ecological parameters such as reproductive success, and could be useful to study other group vocalizations.

  17. Multi-source energy harvester power management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlichting, Alexander D.; Tiwari, Rashi; Garcia, Ephrahim

    2011-03-01

    Much of the work on improving energy harvesting systems currently focuses on tasks beyond geometric optimization and has shifted to using complex feedback control circuitry. While the specific technique and effectiveness of the circuits have varied, an important goal is still out of reach for many desired applications: to produce sufficient and sustained power. This is due in part to the power requirements of the control circuits themselves. One method for increasing the robustness and versatility of energy harvesting systems which has started to receive some attention would be to utilize multiple energy sources simultaneously. If some or all of the present energy sources were harvested, the amount of constant power which could be provided to the system electronics would increase dramatically. This work examines two passive circuit topologies, parallel and series, for combining multiple piezoelectric energy harvesters onto a single storage capacitor using an LTspice simulation. The issue of the relative phase between the two piezoelectric signals is explored to show that the advantages of both configurations are significantly affected by increased relative phase values.

  18. Fusion - An energy source for synthetic fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fillo, J. A.; Powell, J.; Steinberg, M.

    1980-05-01

    An important first step in the synthesis of liquid and gaseous fuels is the production of hydrogen. Thermonuclear fusion offers an inexhaustible source of energy for the production of hydrogen from water. Depending on design, electric generation efficiencies of 40 to 60% and hydrogen production efficiencies by high temperature electrolysis of 50 to 70% are projected for fusion reactors using high temperature blankets. Fusion/coal symbiotic systems appear economically promising for the first generation of commercial fusion synfuels plants. In the long term, there could be a gradual transition to an inexhaustible energy system based solely on fusion.

  19. Electric Power From Ambient Energy Sources

    SciTech Connect

    DeSteese, John G.; Hammerstrom, Donald J.; Schienbein, Lawrence A.

    2000-10-03

    This report summarizes research on opportunities to produce electric power from ambient sources as an alternative to using portable battery packs or hydrocarbon-fueled systems in remote areas. The work was an activity in the Advanced Concepts Project conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the Office of Research and Development in the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nonproliferation and National Security.

  20. Noncontact detection of surface-breaking cracks using a laser acoustic source and an electromagnetic acoustic receiver

    SciTech Connect

    Dewhurst, R.J.; Edwards, C.; Palmer, S.B.

    1986-08-01

    An electromagnetic acoustic transducer (EMAT) is used to detect laser-generated surface acoustic transients. The surface acoustic waves are broadband and can be used to detect and size surface-breaking cracks if used in conjunction with a broadband detector. A broadband EMAT is described and its use to locate artificial surface-breaking defects in both aluminum and steel is demonstrated. A second study reveals that it can also be used for the detection of real surface-breaking cracks, even on rusty steel surfaces. 10 references.

  1. Contributed Review: Recent developments in acoustic energy harvesting for autonomous wireless sensor nodes applications.

    PubMed

    Khan, Farid Ullah; Khattak, Muhammad Umair

    2016-02-01

    Rapid developments in micro electronics, micro fabrication, ultra-large scale of integration, ultra-low power sensors, and wireless technology have greatly reduced the power consumption requirements of wireless sensor nodes (WSNs) and make it possible to operate these devices with energy harvesters. Likewise, other energy harvesters, acoustic energy harvesters (AEHs), have been developed and are gaining swift interest in last few years. This paper presents a review of AEHs reported in the literature for the applications of WSNs. Based on transduction mechanism, there are two types of AEHs: piezoelectric acoustic energy harvesters (PEAEHs) and electromagnetic acoustic energy harvesters (EMAEHs). The reported AEHs are mostly characterized under the sound pressure level (SPL) that ranges from 45 to 161 dB. The range for resonant frequency of the produced AEHs is from 146 Hz to 24 kHz and these produced 0.68 × 10(-6) μW to 30 mW power. The maximum power (30 mW) is produced by a PEAEH, when the harvester is subjected to a SPL of 161 dB and 2.64 kHz frequency. However, for EMAEHs, the maximum power reported is about 1.96 mW (at 125 dB and 143 Hz). Under the comparable SPLs, the power production by the reported EMAEHs is relatively better than that of PEAEHs, moreover, due to lower resonant frequency, the EMAEHs are more feasible for the low frequency band acoustical environment.

  2. Thermal Acoustic Sensor for High Pulse Energy X-ray FEL Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, T.J.; Frisch, J.C.; Kraft, E.M.; Loos, J.; Bentsen, G.S.; /Rochester U.

    2011-12-13

    The pulse energy density of X-ray FELs will saturate or destroy conventional X-ray diagnostics, and the use of large beam attenuation will result in a beam that is dominated by harmonics. We present preliminary results at the LCLS from a pulse energy detector based on the thermal acoustic effect. In this type of detector an X-ray resistant material (boron carbide in this system) intercepts the beam. The pulse heating of the target material produces an acoustic pulse that can be detected with high frequency microphones to produce a signal that is linear in the absorbed energy. The thermal acoustic detector is designed to provide first- and second-order calorimetric measurement of X-ray FEL pulse energy. The first-order calorimetry is a direct temperature measurement of a target designed to absorb all or most of the FEL pulse power with minimal heat leak. The second-order measurement detects the vibration caused by the rapid thermoelastic expansion of the target material each time it absorbs a photon pulse. Both the temperature change and the amplitude of the acoustic signal are directly related to the photon pulse energy.

  3. Functional delay and sum beamforming for three-dimensional acoustic source identification with solid spherical arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yang; Chu, Zhigang; Shen, Linbang; Xu, Zhongming

    2016-07-01

    Solid spherical arrays have become particularly attractive tools for doing acoustic sources identification in cabin environments. Spherical harmonics beamforming (SHB) is the popular conventional algorithm. Regrettably, its results suffer from severe sidelobe contaminations and the existing solutions are incapable of removing these contaminations both significantly and efficiently. This paper focuses on conquering these problems by creating a novel functional delay and sum (FDAS) algorithm. First and foremost, a new delay and sum (DAS) algorithm is established, and for which, the point spread function (PSF) is derived, the determination principle of the truncated upper limit of the spherical harmonics degree is explored, and the performance is examined as well as compared with that of SHB. Next, the FDAS algorithm is created by combining DAS and the functional beamforming (FB) approach initially suggested for planar arrays, and its merits are demonstrated. Additionally, performances of DAS and FDAS are probed into under the situation that the source is not at the focus point. Several interesting results have emerged: (1) the truncated upper limit of the spherical harmonics degree, capable of making DAS meet FB's requirement, exists and its minimum value depends only on the wave number and the array radius. (2) DAS can accurately locate and quantify the single source and the incoherent or coherent sources, and its comprehensive performance is not inferior to that of SHB. (3) For single source or incoherent sources, FDAS can not only accurately locate and quantify the source, but also significantly and efficiently attenuate sidelobes, effectively detect weak sources and acquire somewhat better spatial resolution. In contrast to that, for coherent sources, FDAS is not available. (4) DAS can invariably quantify the source accurately, irrespectively of the focus distance, whereas FDAS is burdened with a quantification deviation growing with the increase of the exponent

  4. 10 CFR 39.53 - Energy compensation source.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Energy compensation source. 39.53 Section 39.53 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR WELL LOGGING Equipment § 39.53 Energy compensation source. The licensee may use an energy compensation source (ECS) which...

  5. 10 CFR 39.53 - Energy compensation source.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Energy compensation source. 39.53 Section 39.53 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR WELL LOGGING Equipment § 39.53 Energy compensation source. The licensee may use an energy compensation source (ECS) which...

  6. 10 CFR 39.53 - Energy compensation source.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Energy compensation source. 39.53 Section 39.53 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR WELL LOGGING Equipment § 39.53 Energy compensation source. The licensee may use an energy compensation source (ECS) which...

  7. 10 CFR 39.53 - Energy compensation source.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Energy compensation source. 39.53 Section 39.53 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR WELL LOGGING Equipment § 39.53 Energy compensation source. The licensee may use an energy compensation source (ECS) which...

  8. 10 CFR 39.53 - Energy compensation source.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Energy compensation source. 39.53 Section 39.53 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR WELL LOGGING Equipment § 39.53 Energy compensation source. The licensee may use an energy compensation source (ECS) which...

  9. Wideband spherically focused PVDF acoustic sources for calibration of ultrasound hydrophone probes.

    PubMed

    Selfridge, A; Lewin, P A

    2000-01-01

    Several broadband sources have been developed for the purpose of calibrating hydrophones. The specific configuration described is intended for the calibration of hydrophones In a frequency range of 1 to 40 MHz. All devices used 25 /spl mu/m film of PVDF bonded to a matched backing. Two had radii of curvatures (ROC) of 25.4 and 127 mm with f numbers of 3.8 and 19, respectively. Their active element diameter was 0.28 in (6.60 mm). The active diameter of the third source used was 25 mm, and it had an ROC of 254 mm and an f number of 10. The use of a focused element minimized frequency-dependent diffraction effects, resulting in a smooth variation of acoustic pressure at the focus from 1 to 40 MHz. Also, using a focused PVDF source permitted calibrations above 20 MHz without resorting to harmonic generation via nonlinear propagation.

  10. Source analysis of auditory steady-state responses in acoustic and electric hearing.

    PubMed

    Luke, Robert; De Vos, Astrid; Wouters, Jan

    2017-02-15

    Speech is a complex signal containing a broad variety of acoustic information. For accurate speech reception, the listener must perceive modulations over a range of envelope frequencies. Perception of these modulations is particularly important for cochlear implant (CI) users, as all commercial devices use envelope coding strategies. Prolonged deafness affects the auditory pathway. However, little is known of how cochlear implantation affects the neural processing of modulated stimuli. This study investigates and contrasts the neural processing of envelope rate modulated signals in acoustic and CI listeners. Auditory steady-state responses (ASSRs) are used to study the neural processing of amplitude modulated (AM) signals. A beamforming technique is applied to determine the increase in neural activity relative to a control condition, with particular attention paid to defining the accuracy and precision of this technique relative to other tomographies. In a cohort of 44 acoustic listeners, the location, activity and hemispheric lateralisation of ASSRs is characterised while systematically varying the modulation rate (4, 10, 20, 40 and 80Hz) and stimulation ear (right, left and bilateral). We demonstrate a complex pattern of laterality depending on both modulation rate and stimulation ear that is consistent with, and extends, existing literature. We present a novel extension to the beamforming method which facilitates source analysis of electrically evoked auditory steady-state responses (EASSRs). In a cohort of 5 right implanted unilateral CI users, the neural activity is determined for the 40Hz rate and compared to the acoustic cohort. Results indicate that CI users activate typical thalamic locations for 40Hz stimuli. However, complementary to studies of transient stimuli, the CI population has atypical hemispheric laterality, preferentially activating the contralateral hemisphere.

  11. A contrast source method for nonlinear acoustic wave fields in media with spatially inhomogeneous attenuation.

    PubMed

    Demi, L; van Dongen, K W A; Verweij, M D

    2011-03-01

    Experimental data reveals that attenuation is an important phenomenon in medical ultrasound. Attenuation is particularly important for medical applications based on nonlinear acoustics, since higher harmonics experience higher attenuation than the fundamental. Here, a method is presented to accurately solve the wave equation for nonlinear acoustic media with spatially inhomogeneous attenuation. Losses are modeled by a spatially dependent compliance relaxation function, which is included in the Westervelt equation. Introduction of absorption in the form of a causal relaxation function automatically results in the appearance of dispersion. The appearance of inhomogeneities implies the presence of a spatially inhomogeneous contrast source in the presented full-wave method leading to inclusion of forward and backward scattering. The contrast source problem is solved iteratively using a Neumann scheme, similar to the iterative nonlinear contrast source (INCS) method. The presented method is directionally independent and capable of dealing with weakly to moderately nonlinear, large scale, three-dimensional wave fields occurring in diagnostic ultrasound. Convergence of the method has been investigated and results for homogeneous, lossy, linear media show full agreement with the exact results. Moreover, the performance of the method is demonstrated through simulations involving steered and unsteered beams in nonlinear media with spatially homogeneous and inhomogeneous attenuation.

  12. Classification of acoustic emission sources produced by carbon/epoxy composite based on support vector machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Peng; Li, Qin; Huang, Xunlei

    2015-07-01

    Carbon/epoxy specimens were made and stretched to fracture. In the process, acoustic emission (AE) signals were collected and their parameters were set as the input parameters of the neural network. Results show that using support vector machine (SVM) network can recognize the difference of AE sources more accurately than using the BP neural network. In addition, the accuracy of the SVM increases when the number of the training set increases. It is proved that using AE signal parameters and SVM network can recognize the AE sources’ pattern well.

  13. Application of cylindrical near-field acoustical holography to the visualization of aeroacoustic sources.

    PubMed

    Lee, Moohyung; Bolton, J Stuart; Mongeau, Luc

    2003-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop methods for visualizing the sound radiation from aeroacoustic sources in order to identify their source strength distribution, radiation patterns, and to quantify the performance of noise control solutions. Here, cylindrical Near-field Acoustical Holography was used for that purpose. In a practical holographic measurement of sources comprising either partially correlated or uncorrelated subsources, it is necessary to use a number of reference microphones so that the sound field on the hologram surface can be decomposed into mutually incoherent partial fields before holographic projection. In this article, procedures are described for determining the number of reference microphones required when visualizing partially correlated aeroacoustic sources; performing source nonstationarity compensation; and applying regularization. The procedures have been demonstrated by application to a ducted fan. Holographic tests were performed to visualize the sound radiation from that source in its original form. The system was then altered to investigate the effect of two modifications on the fan's sound radiation pattern: first, leaks were created in the fan and duct assembly, and second, sound absorbing material was used to line the downstream duct section. Results in all three cases are shown at the blade passing frequency and for a broadband noise component. In the absence of leakage, both components were found to exhibit a dipole-like radiation pattern. Leakage was found to have a strong influence on the directivity of the blade passing tone. The increase of the flow resistance caused by adding the acoustical lining resulted in a nearly symmetric reduction of sound radiation.

  14. Nonlinear effects of dark energy clustering beyond the acoustic scales

    SciTech Connect

    Anselmi, Stefano; Sefusatti, Emiliano E-mail: dlopez_n@ictp.it

    2014-07-01

    We extend the resummation method of Anselmi and Pietroni (2012) to compute the total density power spectrum in models of quintessence characterized by a vanishing speed of sound. For standard ΛCDM cosmologies, this resummation scheme allows predictions with an accuracy at the few percent level beyond the range of scales where acoustic oscillations are present, therefore comparable to other, common numerical tools. In addition, our theoretical approach indicates an approximate but valuable and simple relation between the power spectra for standard quintessence models and models where scalar field perturbations appear at all scales. This, in turn, provides an educated guess for the prediction of nonlinear growth in models with generic speed of sound, particularly valuable since no numerical results are yet available.

  15. Method of monaural localization of the acoustic source direction from the standpoint of the active perception theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gai, V. E.; Polyakov, I. V.; Krasheninnikov, M. S.; Koshurina, A. A.; Dorofeev, R. A.

    2017-01-01

    Currently, the scientific and educational center of the “Transport” of NNSTU performs work on the creation of the universal rescue vehicle. This vehicle is a robot, and intended to reduce the number of human victims in accidents on offshore oil platforms. An actual problem is the development of a method for determining the location of a person overboard in low visibility conditions, when a traditional vision is not efficient. One of the most important sensory robot systems is the acoustic sensor system, because it is omnidirectional and does not require finding of an acoustic source in visibility scope. Features of the acoustic sensor robot system can complement the capabilities of the video sensor in the solution of the problem of localization of a person or some event in the environment. This paper describes the method of determination of the direction of the acoustic source using just one microphone. The proposed method is based on the active perception theory.

  16. Measurement of Acoustic Intensity Distribution and Radiation Power of Flat-Plate Phased-Array Sound Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, Tomoki; Takahashi, Kumiko; Seki, Daizaburou; Hasegawa, Akio

    2002-05-01

    The acoustic intensity distribution and radiation power of a flat-plate phased-array sound source consisting of Tonpilz-type transducers were measured. This study shows that the active acoustic intensity is skewed in the direction of wave propagation. In addition, it clarifies that if the measurement is carried out in the immediate vicinity of the sound source, the reactive acoustic intensity distribution is effective for identifying the positions of the individual sound source elements. Experimental values of active radiation power agree well with theoretical values. Conversely, experimental values of reactive radiation power do not agree with theoretical values; it is clear that they fluctuate significantly with distance from the radiating surface. The reason for this is explained in the case of a point sound source.

  17. Cyanate as an energy source for nitrifiers.

    PubMed

    Palatinszky, Marton; Herbold, Craig; Jehmlich, Nico; Pogoda, Mario; Han, Ping; von Bergen, Martin; Lagkouvardos, Ilias; Karst, Søren M; Galushko, Alexander; Koch, Hanna; Berry, David; Daims, Holger; Wagner, Michael

    2015-08-06

    Ammonia- and nitrite-oxidizing microorganisms are collectively responsible for the aerobic oxidation of ammonia via nitrite to nitrate and have essential roles in the global biogeochemical nitrogen cycle. The physiology of nitrifiers has been intensively studied, and urea and ammonia are the only recognized energy sources that promote the aerobic growth of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and archaea. Here we report the aerobic growth of a pure culture of the ammonia-oxidizing thaumarchaeote Nitrososphaera gargensis using cyanate as the sole source of energy and reductant; to our knowledge, the first organism known to do so. Cyanate, a potentially important source of reduced nitrogen in aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems, is converted to ammonium and carbon dioxide in Nitrososphaera gargensis by a cyanase enzyme that is induced upon addition of this compound. Within the cyanase gene family, this cyanase is a member of a distinct clade also containing cyanases of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria of the genus Nitrospira. We demonstrate by co-culture experiments that these nitrite oxidizers supply cyanase-lacking ammonia oxidizers with ammonium from cyanate, which is fully nitrified by this microbial consortium through reciprocal feeding. By screening a comprehensive set of more than 3,000 publically available metagenomes from environmental samples, we reveal that cyanase-encoding genes clustering with the cyanases of these nitrifiers are widespread in the environment. Our results demonstrate an unexpected metabolic versatility of nitrifying microorganisms, and suggest a previously unrecognized importance of cyanate in cycling of nitrogen compounds in the environment.

  18. Biochar As a Renewable Energy Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Richard

    2011-11-01

    Biochar is a form of charcoal prepared by heating biomass in limited air. It is porous and has high surface area, maintaining much of the morphology of the biomass. The heat for its preparation arises primarily from burning volatiles emitted upon heating. About half the chemical energy in the biomass is contained in the biochar, about 40% is used for the conversion, and about 10% may be used as a local heat source. The biochar can serve as a soil additive where it acts as a template for the growth of bacteria and fungi which then lead to improved growth of biomass by as much as several hundred percent. It remains inert in the soil for many years. Thus, it sequesters the carbon, originally coming from the carbon dioxide absorbed during the photosynthesis occurring during the growth of the biomass. Its use reduces fertilizer and water needs and to pollution arising from the run-off of fertilizer and emission of noxious vapors. Its use is best done at a local level, close to sources of biomass from farm and forest waste. The Pioneer Valley Biochar Initiative along with the Center of Agriculture of the University of Massachusetts, Amherst is promoting the use of biochar on local farms which reduces their dependence on energy arising from fossil fuel and nuclear sources.

  19. PASOTRON high-energy microwave source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goebel, Dan M.; Schumacher, Robert W.; Butler, Jennifer M.; Hyman, Jay, Jr.; Santoru, Joseph; Watkins, Ron M.; Harvey, Robin J.; Dolezal, Franklin A.; Eisenhart, Robert L.; Schneider, Authur J.

    1992-04-01

    A unique, high-energy microwave source, called PASOTRON (Plasma-Assisted Slow-wave Oscillator), has been developed. The PASOTRON utilizes a long-pulse E-gun and plasma- filled slow-wave structure (SWS) to produce high-energy pulses from a simple, lightweight device that utilizes no externally produced magnetic fields. Long pulses are obtained from a novel E-gun that employs a low-pressure glow discharge to provide a stable, high current- density electron source. The electron accelerator consists of a high-perveance, multi-aperture array. The E-beam is operated in the ion-focused regime where the plasma filling the SWS space-charge neutralizes the beam, and the self-pinch force compresses the beamlets and increases the beam current density. A scale-model PASOTRON, operating as a backward- wave oscillator in C-band with a 100-kV E-beam, has produced output powers in the 3 to 5 MW range and pulse lengths of over 100 microsecond(s) ec, corresponding to an integrated energy per pulse of up to 500 J. The E-beam to microwave-radiation power conversion efficiency is about 20%.

  20. Matter sourced anisotropic stress for dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Baorong; Lu, Jianbo; Xu, Lixin

    2014-11-01

    Usually a dark energy as a perfect fluid is characterized by the ratio of pressure to energy density (w =p /ρ ) and the ratio of their perturbations in its rest frame (cs2=δ p /δ ρ ). However, a dark energy would have other characteristics beyond its equation of state and the effective speed of sound. Here the extra property is the anisotropic stress sourced by matter as a simple extension to the perfect fluid model. At the background level, this anisotropic stress is zero with respect to the cosmological principle, but not at the first-order perturbation. We tested the viability of the existence of this kind of anisotropic stress by using the currently available cosmic observations through the geometrical and dynamical measurements. Using the Markov-chain Monte Carlo method, we found that the upper bounds on the anisotropic stress which enters into the summation of the Newtonian potentials should be of the order O (1 0-3)Δm . We did not find any strong evidence for the existence of this matter-sourced anisotropic stress, even in the 1 σ region.

  1. Enhanced acoustoelectric coupling in acoustic energy harvester using dual Helmholtz resonators.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xiao; Wen, Yumei; Li, Ping; Yang, Aichao; Bai, Xiaoling

    2013-10-01

    In this paper, enhanced acoustoelectric transduction in an acoustic energy harvester using dual Helmholtz resonators has been reported. The harvester uses a pair of cavities mechanically coupled with a compliant perforated plate to enhance the acoustic coupling between the cavity and the plate. The experimental results show that the volume optimization of the second cavity can significantly increase the generated electric voltage up to 400% and raise the output power to 16 times as large as that of a harvester using a single Helmholtz resonator at resonant frequencies primarily related to the plate.

  2. Broadband convergence of acoustic energy with binary reflected phases on planar surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Xu-Dong; Zhu, Yi-Fan; Liang, Bin; Yang, Jing; Cheng, Jian-Chun

    2016-12-01

    We propose to produce efficient three-dimensional sound converging in broadband with binary reflected phases on a planar surface with unit cells consisting of only two kinds of elements. The mechanism is experimentally demonstrated by focusing airborne sound and by forming an "acoustic needle," with handmade arrays of commercial test tubes with/without lids. Both the simulated and measured results show the precise control of converging acoustic energy despite misalignment errors obvious even to naked eyes. Our approach with extreme simplicity yet good robustness may apply in various scenarios that conventionally need complicated elements and continuous variation of parameters for focusing sound.

  3. Design and Implementation of an Acoustic X-ray Detector to Measure the LCLS Beam Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Loos, Jennifer L.; /San Jose State U. /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    On April 11, 2009, first light was seen from LCLS. The present apparatus being used to measure the x-ray beam energy is the Total Energy Sensor which uses a suite of thermal sensors. Another device is needed to cross-check the energy measurements. This new diagnostic tool utilizes radiation acoustic phenomena to determine the x-ray beam energy. A target is hit by the x-rays from the beam, and a voltage is generated in two piezoelectric sensors attached to the target in response to the consequent deformation. Once the voltage is known, the power can be obtained. Thermal sensors will also be attached to the target for calibration purposes. Material selection and design were based on: durability, ultra-high vacuum compatibility, safety and thermal properties. The target material was also chosen for its acoustic properties which were determined from tests using a frequency generator and laser. Initial tests suggest the device will function as anticipated.

  4. Radiant Energy Power Source for Jet Aircraft

    SciTech Connect

    Doellner, O.L.

    1992-02-01

    This report beings with a historical overview on the origin and early beginnings of Radiant Energy Power Source for Jet Aircraft. The report reviews the work done in Phase I (Grant DE-FG01-82CE-15144) and then gives a discussion of Phase II (Grant DE-FG01-86CE-15301). Included is a reasonably detailed discussion of photovoltaic cells and the research and development needed in this area. The report closes with a historical perspective and summary related to situations historically encountered on projects of this nature. 15 refs.

  5. Photovoltaics as a worldwide energy source

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, G.J.

    1991-12-31

    Photovoltaic energy systems have historically been treated as a bulk power generation source for the future. However, utilities and other agencies involved with electrification throughout the world are beginning to find photovoltaics a least-cost option to meet specific loads both for themselves and their customers, in both off-grid and grid-connected applications. These expanding markets offer the potential of hundreds of megawatts of sales in the coming decade, but a strategy addressing both industrial growth and user acceptance is necessary to capitalize on this opportunity. 11 refs.

  6. Energy Recovery Linacs for Light Source Applications

    SciTech Connect

    George Neil

    2011-04-01

    Energy Recovery Linacs are being considered for applications in present and future light sources. ERLs take advantage of the continuous operation of superconducting rf cavities to accelerate high average current beams with low losses. The electrons can be directed through bends, undulators, and wigglers for high brightness x ray production. They are then decelerated to low energy, recovering power so as to minimize the required rf drive and electrical draw. When this approach is coupled with advanced continuous wave injectors, very high power, ultra-short electron pulse trains of very high brightness can be achieved. This paper will review the status of worldwide programs and discuss the technology challenges to provide such beams for photon production.

  7. ENERGY SOURCES AND LIGHT CURVES OF MACRONOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Kisaka, Shota; Ioka, Kunihito; Takami, Hajime E-mail: takami@post.kek.jp

    2015-04-01

    A macronova (kilonova) was discovered with a short gamma-ray burst, GRB 130603B, which is widely believed to be powered by the radioactivity of r-process elements synthesized in the ejecta of a neutron star (NS)–binary merger. As an alternative, we propose that macronovae are energized by the central engine, i.e., a black hole or NS, and the injected energy is emitted after the adiabatic expansion of ejecta. This engine model is motivated by extended emission of short GRBs. In order to compare the theoretical models with observations, we develop analytical formulae for the light curves of macronovae. The engine model allows a wider parameter range, especially smaller ejecta mass, and a better fit to observations than the r-process model. Future observations of electromagnetic counterparts of gravitational waves should distinguish energy sources and constrain the activity of the central engine and the r-process nucleosynthesis.

  8. Fusion: an energy source for synthetic fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Fillo, J A; Powell, J; Steinberg, M

    1980-01-01

    The decreasing availability of fossil fuels emphasizes the need to develop systems which will produce synthetic fuel to substitute for and supplement the natural supply. An important first step in the synthesis of liquid and gaseous fuels is the production of hydrogen. Thermonuclear fusion offers an inexhaustible source of energy for the production of hydrogen from water. Depending on design, electric generation efficiencies of approx. 40 to 60% and hydrogen production efficiencies by high temperature electrolysis of approx. 50 to 70% are projected for fusion reactors using high temperature blankets. Fusion/coal symbiotic systems appear economically promising for the first generation of commercial fusion synfuels plants. Coal production requirements and the environmental effects of large-scale coal usage would be greatly reduced by a fusion/coal system. In the long term, there could be a gradual transition to an inexhaustible energy system based solely on fusion.

  9. Outlook for alternative energy sources. [aviation fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Card, M. E.

    1980-01-01

    Predictions are made concerning the development of alternative energy sources in the light of the present national energy situation. Particular emphasis is given to the impact of alternative fuels development on aviation fuels. The future outlook for aircraft fuels is that for the near term, there possibly will be no major fuel changes, but minor specification changes may be possible if supplies decrease. In the midterm, a broad cut fuel may be used if current development efforts are successful. As synfuel production levels increase beyond the 1990's there may be some mixtures of petroleum-based and synfuel products with the possibility of some shale distillate and indirect coal liquefaction products near the year 2000.

  10. Spin polarized low-energy positron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, V. N.; Samarin, S. N.; Sudarshan, K.; Pravica, L.; Guagliardo, P.; Williams, J. F.

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents an investigation of spin polarization of positrons from a source based on the decay of 22Na isotopes. Positrons are moderated by transmission through a tungsten film and electrostatically focussed and transported through a 90 deg deflector to produce a slow positron beam with polarization vector normal to the linear momentum. The polarization of the beam was determined to be about 10% by comparison with polarized electron scattering asymmetries from a thin Fe film on W(110) at 10-10 Torr. Low energy electron emission from Fe layer on W(100) surfaces under positron impact is explored. It is shown that the intensity asymmetry of the electron emission as a function of the incident positron energy can be used to estimate the polarization of the positron beam. Also several materials with long mean free paths for spin relaxation are considered as possible moderators with increased polarization of the emergent positrons.

  11. Measurement of Turbulence with Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers - Sources of Error and Laboratory Results

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nystrom, E.A.; Oberg, K.A.; Rehmann, C.R.; ,

    2002-01-01

    Acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) provide a promising method for measuring surface-water turbulence because they can provide data from a large spatial range in a relatively short time with relative ease. Some potential sources of errors in turbulence measurements made with ADCPs include inaccuracy of Doppler-shift measurements, poor temporal and spatial measurement resolution, and inaccuracy of multi-dimensional velocities resolved from one-dimensional velocities measured at separate locations. Results from laboratory measurements of mean velocity and turbulence statistics made with two pulse-coherent ADCPs in 0.87 meters of water are used to illustrate several of inherent sources of error in ADCP turbulence measurements. Results show that processing algorithms and beam configurations have important effects on turbulence measurements. ADCPs can provide reasonable estimates of many turbulence parameters; however, the accuracy of turbulence measurements made with commercially available ADCPs is often poor in comparison to standard measurement techniques.

  12. A high intensity acoustic source for active attenuation of exhaust noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glendinning, A. G.; Elliott, S. J.; Nelson, P. A.

    1988-04-01

    An electropneumatic sound source was developed for active noise control systems applied in hostile environments such as the exhaust systems of gas turbines and internal combustion engines. It employs a gas bearing to support the friction free motion of a sliding plate which is used to modulate the supply of compressed air. The sliding plate is driven by an electrodynamic vibrator. Experimental results demonstrate that this arrangement reduces harmonic distortion to at least 20 dB below the fundamental driving frequency for most operating conditions. A theoretical analysis of the transducer enables predictions to be made of the acoustic volume velocity (source strength) produced by the transducer as a function of the upstream pressure and displacement of the sliding valve. Applicability of the transducer to gas turbine and internal combustion engine exhaust systems was tested, and net power consumption resulting from the operation of the device was estimated.

  13. Acoustic source location in a jet-blown flap using a cross-correlation technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, R. S.; Maus, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    The acoustic source strength distribution in a turbulent flow field was measured for two far field microphones at 45 deg above and below the plane of the flap surface. A processed signal from an inclined hot-film anemometry probe was cross correlated with the signal from the appropriate far field microphone. The contribution made by the sources associated with the fluctuating pressure on the flap surface to the sound received at far field microphone was estimated by cross correlating the processed signals of microphones which were embedded in the flap surface with the far field microphone signals. In addition, detailed fluid dynamic measurements were made in the flow field of the jet flap using dual sensor hot-film anemometry probes.

  14. Acoustic emission source location in complex structures using full automatic delta T mapping technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Jumaili, Safaa Kh.; Pearson, Matthew R.; Holford, Karen M.; Eaton, Mark J.; Pullin, Rhys

    2016-05-01

    An easy to use, fast to apply, cost-effective, and very accurate non-destructive testing (NDT) technique for damage localisation in complex structures is key for the uptake of structural health monitoring systems (SHM). Acoustic emission (AE) is a viable technique that can be used for SHM and one of the most attractive features is the ability to locate AE sources. The time of arrival (TOA) technique is traditionally used to locate AE sources, and relies on the assumption of constant wave speed within the material and uninterrupted propagation path between the source and the sensor. In complex structural geometries and complex materials such as composites, this assumption is no longer valid. Delta T mapping was developed in Cardiff in order to overcome these limitations; this technique uses artificial sources on an area of interest to create training maps. These are used to locate subsequent AE sources. However operator expertise is required to select the best data from the training maps and to choose the correct parameter to locate the sources, which can be a time consuming process. This paper presents a new and improved fully automatic delta T mapping technique where a clustering algorithm is used to automatically identify and select the highly correlated events at each grid point whilst the "Minimum Difference" approach is used to determine the source location. This removes the requirement for operator expertise, saving time and preventing human errors. A thorough assessment is conducted to evaluate the performance and the robustness of the new technique. In the initial test, the results showed excellent reduction in running time as well as improved accuracy of locating AE sources, as a result of the automatic selection of the training data. Furthermore, because the process is performed automatically, this is now a very simple and reliable technique due to the prevention of the potential source of error related to manual manipulation.

  15. On optimal retreat distance for the equivalent source method-based nearfield acoustical holography.

    PubMed

    Bai, Mingsian R; Chen, Ching-Cheng; Lin, Jia-Hong

    2011-03-01

    As a basic form of the equivalent source method (ESM) that is used to nearfield acoustical holography (NAH) problems, discrete monopoles are utilized to represent the sound field of interest. When setting up the virtual source distribution, it is vital to maintain a "retreat distance" between the virtual sources and the actual source surface such that reconstruction would not suffer from singularity problems. However, one cannot increase the distance without bound because of the ill-posedness inherent in the reconstruction process with large distance. In prior research, 1-2 times lattice spacing, or the inter-element distance of microphones, is generally recommended as retreat distance in using the ESM-based NAH. While this rule has shown to yield good results in many cases, the optimal choice is a complicated issue that depends on frequency, geometry of the physical source, content of evanescent waves, distribution of sensors and virtual sources, etc. This paper deals about attaining the best compromise between the reconstruction errors induced by the point source singularity; the reconstruction ill-posedness is an interesting problem in its own right. The paper revisits this issue, with the aid of an optimization algorithm based on the golden section search and parabolic interpolation. Numerical simulations were conducted for a baffled planar piston source and a spherically baffled piston source. The results revealed that the retreat distance appropriate for the ESM ranged from 0.4 to 0.5 times the spacing for the planar piston, while from 0.8 to 1.7 times average spacing for the spherical piston. Experiments carried out for a vibrating aluminum plate also revealed that the retreat distance with 0.5 times the spacing yielded better reconstructed velocity than those with 1/20 and 1 times the spacing.

  16. Effect of wind and temperature gradients on received acoustic energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brienzo, Richard K.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of refraction due to wind and temperature gradients on energy received from low flying aircraft is examined. A series of helicopter and jet flyby's were recorded with a microphone array on two separate days, each with distinctly different meteorological conditions. Energy in the 100 to 200 Hertz band is shown as a function of aircraft range from the array, and compared with the output of the Fast Field Program.

  17. Toward a probabilistic acoustic emission source location algorithm: A Bayesian approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumacher, Thomas; Straub, Daniel; Higgins, Christopher

    2012-09-01

    Acoustic emissions (AE) are stress waves initiated by sudden strain releases within a solid body. These can be caused by internal mechanisms such as crack opening or propagation, crushing, or rubbing of crack surfaces. One application for the AE technique in the field of Structural Engineering is Structural Health Monitoring (SHM). With piezo-electric sensors mounted to the surface of the structure, stress waves can be detected, recorded, and stored for later analysis. An important step in quantitative AE analysis is the estimation of the stress wave source locations. Commonly, source location results are presented in a rather deterministic manner as spatial and temporal points, excluding information about uncertainties and errors. Due to variability in the material properties and uncertainty in the mathematical model, measures of uncertainty are needed beyond best-fit point solutions for source locations. This paper introduces a novel holistic framework for the development of a probabilistic source location algorithm. Bayesian analysis methods with Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) simulation are employed where all source location parameters are described with posterior probability density functions (PDFs). The proposed methodology is applied to an example employing data collected from a realistic section of a reinforced concrete bridge column. The selected approach is general and has the advantage that it can be extended and refined efficiently. Results are discussed and future steps to improve the algorithm are suggested.

  18. Nonlinear Kalman Filtering for acoustic emission source localization in anisotropic panels.

    PubMed

    Dehghan Niri, E; Farhidzadeh, A; Salamone, S

    2014-02-01

    Nonlinear Kalman Filtering is an established field in applied probability and control systems, which plays an important role in many practical applications from target tracking to weather and climate prediction. However, its application for acoustic emission (AE) source localization has been very limited. In this paper, two well-known nonlinear Kalman Filtering algorithms are presented to estimate the location of AE sources in anisotropic panels: the Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) and Unscented Kalman Filter (UKF). These algorithms are applied to two cases: velocity profile known (CASE I) and velocity profile unknown (CASE II). The algorithms are compared with a more traditional nonlinear least squares method. Experimental tests are carried out on a carbon-fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite panel instrumented with a sparse array of piezoelectric transducers to validate the proposed approaches. AE sources are simulated using an instrumented miniature impulse hammer. In order to evaluate the performance of the algorithms, two metrics are used: (1) accuracy of the AE source localization and (2) computational cost. Furthermore, it is shown that both EKF and UKF can provide a confidence interval of the estimated AE source location and can account for uncertainty in time of flight measurements.

  19. Energy transmission in a mechanically-linked double-wall structure coupled to an acoustic enclosure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, L.; Li, Y. Y.; Gao, J. X.

    2005-05-01

    The energy transmission in a mechanically linked double-wall structure into an acoustic enclosure is studied in this paper. Based on a fully coupled vibro-acoustic formulation, focus is put on investigating the effect of the air gap and mechanical links between the two panels on the energy transmission and noise insulation properties of such structures. An approximate formula reflecting the gap effect on the lower-order coupled frequencies of the system is proposed. A criterion, based on the ratio between the aerostatic stiffness of the gap cavity and the stiffness of the link, is proposed to predict the dominant transmitting path, with a view to provide guidelines for the design of appropriate control strategies. Numerical results reveal the existence of three distinct zones, within which energy transmission takes place following different mechanisms and transmitting paths. Corresponding effects on noise insulation properties of the double-wall structure are also investigated. .

  20. Effect of internal resistance of a Helmholtz resonator on acoustic energy reduction in enclosures.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ganghua; Li, Deyu; Cheng, Li

    2008-12-01

    The effect of internal resistance of a Helmholtz resonator on acoustic energy reduction in an enclosure and the multimodal coupling-based Helmholtz resonator design are investigated. Using the analytical solution of a resonator-enclosure interaction model, an energy reduction index is defined in a frequency band to optimize the resonator resistance. The dual process of energy dissipation and radiation of the resonator is quantified. Optimal resistance of the resonator and its physical effect on the resonator-enclosure interaction are numerically evaluated and categorized in terms of frequency bandwidths. Predictions on the resonator performance are confirmed by experiments. Comparisons with existing models based on different optimization criteria are also performed. It is shown that the proposed model serves as an effective design tool to determine the internal resistance of the resonator in order to achieve sound reduction in the frequency band enclosing acoustic resonances.

  1. Cyanate as energy source for nitrifiers

    PubMed Central

    Palatinszky, Marton; Herbold, Craig; Jehmlich, Nico; Pogoda, Mario; Han, Ping; von Bergen, Martin; Lagkouvardos, Ilias; Karst, Søren M.; Galushko, Alexander; Koch, Hanna; Berry, David; Daims, Holger; Wagner, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Ammonia- and nitrite-oxidizers are collectively responsible for the aerobic oxidation of ammonia via nitrite to nitrate and play essential roles for the global biogeochemical nitrogen cycle. The physiology of these nitrifying microbes has been intensively studied since the first experiments of Sergei Winogradsky more than a century ago. Urea and ammonia are the only recognized energy sources that promote the aerobic growth of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and archaea. Here we report the aerobic growth of a pure culture of the ammonia-oxidizing thaumarchaeote Nitrososphaera gargensis1 on cyanate as the sole source of energy and reductant, the first organism known to do so. Cyanate, which is a potentially important source of reduced nitrogen in aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems2, is converted to ammonium and CO2 by this archaeon using a cyanase that is induced upon addition of this compound. Within the cyanase gene family, this cyanase is a member of a distinct clade that also contains cyanases of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria of the genus Nitrospira. We demonstrate by co-culture experiments that these nitrite-oxidizers supply ammonia-oxidizers lacking cyanase with ammonium from cyanate, which is fully nitrified by this consortium through reciprocal feeding. Screening of a comprehensive set of more than 3,000 publically available metagenomes from environmental samples revealed that cyanase-encoding genes clustering with the cyanases of these nitrifiers are widespread in the environment. Our results demonstrate an unexpected metabolic versatility of nitrifying microbes and suggest a previously unrecognized importance of cyanate for N-cycling in the environment. PMID:26222031

  2. Building an open-source simulation platform of acoustic radiation force-based breast elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu; Peng, Bo; Jiang, Jingfeng

    2017-03-01

    Ultrasound-based elastography including strain elastography, acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging, point shear wave elastography and supersonic shear imaging (SSI) have been used to differentiate breast tumors among other clinical applications. The objective of this study is to extend a previously published virtual simulation platform built for ultrasound quasi-static breast elastography toward acoustic radiation force-based breast elastography. Consequently, the extended virtual breast elastography simulation platform can be used to validate image pixels with known underlying soft tissue properties (i.e. ‘ground truth’) in complex, heterogeneous media, enhancing confidence in elastographic image interpretations. The proposed virtual breast elastography system inherited four key components from the previously published virtual simulation platform: an ultrasound simulator (Field II), a mesh generator (Tetgen), a finite element solver (FEBio) and a visualization and data processing package (VTK). Using a simple message passing mechanism, functionalities have now been extended to acoustic radiation force-based elastography simulations. Examples involving three different numerical breast models with increasing complexity—one uniform model, one simple inclusion model and one virtual complex breast model derived from magnetic resonance imaging data, were used to demonstrate capabilities of this extended virtual platform. Overall, simulation results were compared with the published results. In the uniform model, the estimated shear wave speed (SWS) values were within 4% compared to the predetermined SWS values. In the simple inclusion and the complex breast models, SWS values of all hard inclusions in soft backgrounds were slightly underestimated, similar to what has been reported. The elastic contrast values and visual observation show that ARFI images have higher spatial resolution, while SSI images can provide higher inclusion-to-background contrast

  3. Building an open-source simulation platform of acoustic radiation force-based breast elastography.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Peng, Bo; Jiang, Jingfeng

    2017-03-07

    Ultrasound-based elastography including strain elastography, acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging, point shear wave elastography and supersonic shear imaging (SSI) have been used to differentiate breast tumors among other clinical applications. The objective of this study is to extend a previously published virtual simulation platform built for ultrasound quasi-static breast elastography toward acoustic radiation force-based breast elastography. Consequently, the extended virtual breast elastography simulation platform can be used to validate image pixels with known underlying soft tissue properties (i.e. 'ground truth') in complex, heterogeneous media, enhancing confidence in elastographic image interpretations. The proposed virtual breast elastography system inherited four key components from the previously published virtual simulation platform: an ultrasound simulator (Field II), a mesh generator (Tetgen), a finite element solver (FEBio) and a visualization and data processing package (VTK). Using a simple message passing mechanism, functionalities have now been extended to acoustic radiation force-based elastography simulations. Examples involving three different numerical breast models with increasing complexity-one uniform model, one simple inclusion model and one virtual complex breast model derived from magnetic resonance imaging data, were used to demonstrate capabilities of this extended virtual platform. Overall, simulation results were compared with the published results. In the uniform model, the estimated shear wave speed (SWS) values were within 4% compared to the predetermined SWS values. In the simple inclusion and the complex breast models, SWS values of all hard inclusions in soft backgrounds were slightly underestimated, similar to what has been reported. The elastic contrast values and visual observation show that ARFI images have higher spatial resolution, while SSI images can provide higher inclusion-to-background contrast. In

  4. Estimation of glottal source features from the spectral envelope of the acoustic speech signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, Juan Felix

    Speech communication encompasses diverse types of information, including phonetics, affective state, voice quality, and speaker identity. From a speech production standpoint, the acoustic speech signal can be mainly divided into glottal source and vocal tract components, which play distinct roles in rendering the various types of information it contains. Most deployed speech analysis systems, however, do not explicitly represent these two components as distinct entities, as their joint estimation from the acoustic speech signal becomes an ill-defined blind deconvolution problem. Nevertheless, because of the desire to understand glottal behavior and how it relates to perceived voice quality, there has been continued interest in explicitly estimating the glottal component of the speech signal. To this end, several inverse filtering (IF) algorithms have been proposed, but they are unreliable in practice because of the blind formulation of the separation problem. In an effort to develop a method that can bypass the challenging IF process, this thesis proposes a new glottal source information extraction method that relies on supervised machine learning to transform smoothed spectral representations of speech, which are already used in some of the most widely deployed and successful speech analysis applications, into a set of glottal source features. A transformation method based on Gaussian mixture regression (GMR) is presented and compared to current IF methods in terms of feature similarity, reliability, and speaker discrimination capability on a large speech corpus, and potential representations of the spectral envelope of speech are investigated for their ability represent glottal source variation in a predictable manner. The proposed system was found to produce glottal source features that reasonably matched their IF counterparts in many cases, while being less susceptible to spurious errors. The development of the proposed method entailed a study into the aspects

  5. Acoustic noise and pneumatic wave vortices energy harvesting on highways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogacian, S.; Bot, A.; Zotoiu, D.

    2012-02-01

    This paper is aimed to present the structure and the principle of a energy harvesting system that uses the air movement emanated from passing traffic to produce and accumulate electrical energy. Each of the system's elements consists of a inertial mass panel which oscillate when driving cars pass. The panel is attached to a linear electromagnetic mini generator (or/and some piezo electric micro generators) and at the time of passing, it produces energy which is store it in a supercapacitor or in a rechargeable battery. The concept can be applied to busy roads, and to high-frequented rail networks and it can work with street and road lighting, information panels and monitoring devices.

  6. A reliable acoustic path: Physical properties and a source localization method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Rui; Yang, Kun-De; Ma, Yuan-Liang; Lei, Bo

    2012-12-01

    The physical properties of a reliable acoustic path (RAP) are analysed and subsequently a weighted-subspace-fitting matched field (WSF-MF) method for passive localization is presented by exploiting the properties of the RAP environment. The RAP is an important acoustic duct in the deep ocean, which occurs when the receiver is placed near the bottom where the sound velocity exceeds the maximum sound velocity in the vicinity of the surface. It is found that in the RAP environment the transmission loss is rather low and no blind zone of surveillance exists in a medium range. The ray theory is used to explain these phenomena. Furthermore, the analysis of the arrival structures shows that the source localization method based on arrival angle is feasible in this environment. However, the conventional methods suffer from the complicated and inaccurate estimation of the arrival angle. In this paper, a straightforward WSF-MF method is derived to exploit the information about the arrival angles indirectly. The method is to minimize the distance between the signal subspace and the spanned space by the array manifold in a finite range-depth space rather than the arrival-angle space. Simulations are performed to demonstrate the features of the method, and the results are explained by the arrival structures in the RAP environment.

  7. Acoustic holography as a metrological tool for characterizing medical ultrasound sources and fields

    PubMed Central

    Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.; Tsysar, Sergey A.; Khokhlova, Vera A.; Kreider, Wayne

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic holography is a powerful technique for characterizing ultrasound sources and the fields they radiate, with the ability to quantify source vibrations and reduce the number of required measurements. These capabilities are increasingly appealing for meeting measurement standards in medical ultrasound; however, associated uncertainties have not been investigated systematically. Here errors associated with holographic representations of a linear, continuous-wave ultrasound field are studied. To facilitate the analysis, error metrics are defined explicitly, and a detailed description of a holography formulation based on the Rayleigh integral is provided. Errors are evaluated both for simulations of a typical therapeutic ultrasound source and for physical experiments with three different ultrasound sources. Simulated experiments explore sampling errors introduced by the use of a finite number of measurements, geometric uncertainties in the actual positions of acquired measurements, and uncertainties in the properties of the propagation medium. Results demonstrate the theoretical feasibility of keeping errors less than about 1%. Typical errors in physical experiments were somewhat larger, on the order of a few percent; comparison with simulations provides specific guidelines for improving the experimental implementation to reduce these errors. Overall, results suggest that holography can be implemented successfully as a metrological tool with small, quantifiable errors. PMID:26428789

  8. Acoustic holography as a metrological tool for characterizing medical ultrasound sources and fields.

    PubMed

    Sapozhnikov, Oleg A; Tsysar, Sergey A; Khokhlova, Vera A; Kreider, Wayne

    2015-09-01

    Acoustic holography is a powerful technique for characterizing ultrasound sources and the fields they radiate, with the ability to quantify source vibrations and reduce the number of required measurements. These capabilities are increasingly appealing for meeting measurement standards in medical ultrasound; however, associated uncertainties have not been investigated systematically. Here errors associated with holographic representations of a linear, continuous-wave ultrasound field are studied. To facilitate the analysis, error metrics are defined explicitly, and a detailed description of a holography formulation based on the Rayleigh integral is provided. Errors are evaluated both for simulations of a typical therapeutic ultrasound source and for physical experiments with three different ultrasound sources. Simulated experiments explore sampling errors introduced by the use of a finite number of measurements, geometric uncertainties in the actual positions of acquired measurements, and uncertainties in the properties of the propagation medium. Results demonstrate the theoretical feasibility of keeping errors less than about 1%. Typical errors in physical experiments were somewhat larger, on the order of a few percent; comparison with simulations provides specific guidelines for improving the experimental implementation to reduce these errors. Overall, results suggest that holography can be implemented successfully as a metrological tool with small, quantifiable errors.

  9. Acoustic emission source location on large plate-like structures using a local triangular sensor array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aljets, Dirk; Chong, Alex; Wilcox, Steve; Holford, Karen

    2012-07-01

    A new acoustic emission (AE) source location method was developed for large plate-like structures, which evaluates the location of the source using a combined time of flight and modal source location algorithm. Three sensors are installed in a triangular array with a sensor to sensor distance of just a few centimeters. The direction from the sensor array to the AE source can be established by analysing the arrival times of the A0 component of the signal to the three sensors whilst the distance can be evaluated using the separation of S0 and A0 mode at each sensor respectively. The close positioning of the sensors allows the array to be installed in a single housing. This simplifies mounting, wiring and calibration procedures for non-destructive testing (NDT) and structural health monitoring (SHM) applications. Furthermore, this array could reduce the number of sensors needed to monitor large structures compared to other methods. An automatic wave mode identification method is also presented.

  10. 46 CFR 111.10-5 - Multiple energy sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Multiple energy sources. 111.10-5 Section 111.10-5...-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Power Supply § 111.10-5 Multiple energy sources. Failure of any single generating set energy source such as a boiler, diesel, gas turbine, or steam turbine must not cause all generating...

  11. 46 CFR 111.10-5 - Multiple energy sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Multiple energy sources. 111.10-5 Section 111.10-5...-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Power Supply § 111.10-5 Multiple energy sources. Failure of any single generating set energy source such as a boiler, diesel, gas turbine, or steam turbine must not cause all generating...

  12. 46 CFR 111.10-5 - Multiple energy sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Multiple energy sources. 111.10-5 Section 111.10-5...-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Power Supply § 111.10-5 Multiple energy sources. Failure of any single generating set energy source such as a boiler, diesel, gas turbine, or steam turbine must not cause all generating...

  13. 46 CFR 111.10-5 - Multiple energy sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Multiple energy sources. 111.10-5 Section 111.10-5...-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Power Supply § 111.10-5 Multiple energy sources. Failure of any single generating set energy source such as a boiler, diesel, gas turbine, or steam turbine must not cause all generating...

  14. 46 CFR 111.10-5 - Multiple energy sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Multiple energy sources. 111.10-5 Section 111.10-5...-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Power Supply § 111.10-5 Multiple energy sources. Failure of any single generating set energy source such as a boiler, diesel, gas turbine, or steam turbine must not cause all generating...

  15. Review of biomass as a source of energy for Poland

    SciTech Connect

    Leszczynski, S.; Brzychczyk, P.; Sekula, R.

    1997-10-01

    To the present day, biomass has not been considered as an energy source for Poland, and over 95% of energy is generated through fossil fuel combustion. However, it is necessary to search for new energy sources because of high prices of traditional energy carriers and massive environmental pollution caused by these fuels. Biomass seems to be one of the best renewable energy sources. Basic components of biomass in Poland and estimations of energetic resources of biomass are presented.

  16. Analysis of acoustic scattering from fluid bodies using a multipoint source model.

    PubMed

    Boag, A; Leviatan, Y

    1989-01-01

    A moment-method solution is presented for the problem of acoustic scattering from homogeneous fluid bodies. It uses fictitious isotropic point sources to simulate both the field scattered by the body and the field inside the body and, in turn, point-matches the continuity conditions for the normal component of the velocity and for the pressure across the surface of the body. The procedure is simple to execute and is general in that bodies of arbitrary smooth shape can be handled effectively. Perfectly rigid bodies are treated as reduced cases of the general procedure. Results are given and compared with available analytic solutions, which demonstrate the very good performance of the procedure.

  17. Cross-correlation function of acoustic fields generated by random high-frequency sources.

    PubMed

    Godin, Oleg A

    2010-08-01

    Long-range correlations of noise fields in arbitrary inhomogeneous, moving or motionless fluids are studied in the ray approximation. Using the stationary phase method, two-point cross-correlation function of noise is shown to approximate the sum of the deterministic Green's functions describing sound propagation in opposite directions between the two points. Explicit relations between amplitudes of respective ray arrivals in the noise cross-correlation function and the Green's functions are obtained and verified against specific problems allowing an exact solution. Earlier results are extended by simultaneously accounting for sound absorption, arbitrary distribution of noise sources in a volume and on surfaces, and fluid inhomogeneity and motion. The information content of the noise cross-correlation function is discussed from the viewpoint of passive acoustic characterization of inhomogeneous flows.

  18. Negative refraction and energy funneling by hyperbolic materials: an experimental demonstration in acoustics.

    PubMed

    García-Chocano, Victor M; Christensen, Johan; Sánchez-Dehesa, José

    2014-04-11

    This Letter reports the design, fabrication, and experimental characterization of hyperbolic materials showing negative refraction and energy funneling of airborne sound. Negative refraction is demonstrated using a stack of five holey Plexiglas plates where their thicknesses, layer separation, hole diameters, and lattice periodicity have been determined to show hyperbolic dispersion around 40 kHz. The resulting hyperbolic material shows a flat band profile in the equifrequency contour allowing the gathering of acoustic energy in a broad range of incident angles and its funneling through the material. Our demonstrations foresee interesting developments based on both phenomena. Acoustic imaging with subwavelength resolution and spot-size converters that harvest and squeeze sound waves irradiating from many directions into a collimated beam are just two possible applications among many.

  19. Hydrothermal energy: a source of energy for alcohol production

    SciTech Connect

    Stiger, R.R.

    1980-01-01

    A small scale (1 gal/hr) biomass-to-alcohol still was built at the Raft River Geothermal Site to investigate difficulties in geothermal assisted biomass conversion. The unit was successfully operated, producing 95% (190 proof) ethanol from sugar beet juice. The unit was designed and built in less than eight weeks from surplus equipment using commercially available design information. This small-scale still demonstrated that 95% ethanol can be produced from sugar beet beer containing 8 to 10% alcohol using geothermal energy and present commercial technology. The geothermal resource provided both an energy source and process water. Recently, Bechtel National, Incorporated, of San Francisco, California completed a study to analyze the economic feasibility of producing ethanol from potatoes, wheat, and sugar beets using geothermal resources available in the Raft River Region of Idaho. The study concluded that a 20 million gallon per year facility can be built that will supply alcohol at $1.78 per gallon using geothermal energy. (MHR)

  20. Experimental validation of a method for the prediction of the acoustic field produced by an acoustic source and the reflected field produced by a solid interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, Sandra; Chopra, Rajiv; Pichardo, Samuel

    2012-11-01

    In this work we present a model to calculate the acoustic pressure generated by the interaction of forward and reflected waves in the vicinity of a solid interface and compare it to experimental data. An experimental setup was designed to measure the forward and the combined forward-reflected acoustic fields produced by a solid interface. A 0.785mm-needle hydrophone was used to characterize the acoustic field produced by a 7.29MHz-ultrasound transducer focused at 6cm. The hydrophone was positioned perpendicularly to the sound propagation direction and moved between the transducer and a 9mm-thick acrylic sample using a robotic arm. Simulations were carried out using a modified Rayleigh-Sommerfeld integral that calculates the particle displacement over a reflecting surface. This particle displacement at the boundary of the interface is then used as an acoustic source to obtain the reflected particle displacement. The complex sum of the forward and reflected fields was compared to the experimental measurements. The measurements showed an interference pattern that increased the pressure amplitude in average 10.4% with peaks of up to 25.8%. The proposed model is able to represent the interference pattern produced by the reflected wave with an average absolute error of 3.4+/-0.54% and a maximal error of 5.6%. The comparison between the experimental measurements and the simulations indicates that the presented model predicts with good accuracy the acoustic field generated by ultrasound transducers facing a solid interface. This model can be used to foresee the outcome of therapeutic applications where the devices are used in proximity to a bone interface.

  1. A Numerical Investigation of Turbine Noise Source Hierarchy and Its Acoustic Transmission Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanZante, Dale; Envia, Edmane

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the relative importance of the various turbine noise generation mechanisms and the characteristics of the turbine acoustic transmission loss are essential ingredients in developing robust reduced-order models for predicting the turbine noise signature. A computationally based investigation has been undertaken to help guide the development of a turbine noise prediction capability that does not rely on empiricism. The investigation relies on highly detailed numerical simulations of the unsteady flowfield inside a modern high-pressure turbine (HPT). The simulations are developed using TURBO, which is an unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) code capable of multi-stage simulations. The purpose of this study is twofold. First, to determine an estimate of the relative importance of the contributions to the coherent part of the acoustic signature of a turbine from the three potential sources of turbine noise generation, namely, blade-row viscous interaction, potential field interaction, and entropic source associated with the interaction of the blade rows with the temperature nonuniformities caused by the incomplete mixing of the hot fluid and the cooling flow. Second, to develop an understanding of the turbine acoustic transmission characteristics and to assess the applicability of existing empirical and analytical transmission loss models to realistic geometries and flow conditions for modern turbine designs. The investigation so far has concentrated on two simulations: (1) a single-stage HPT and (2) a two-stage HPT and the associated inter-turbine duct/strut segment. The simulations are designed to resolve up to the second harmonic of the blade passing frequency tone in accordance with accepted rules for second order solvers like TURBO. The calculations include blade and vane cooling flows and a radial profile of pressure and temperature at the turbine inlet. The calculation can be modified later to include the combustor pattern factor at the

  2. Source characterization of a subsonic jet by using near-field acoustical holography.

    PubMed

    Lee, Moohyung; Bolton, J Stuart

    2007-02-01

    In the present study, patch near-field acoustical holography was used in conjunction with a multireference, cross-spectral sound pressure measurement to visualize the sound field emitted by a subsonic jet and to predict its farfield radiation pattern. A strategy for microphone array design is described that accounts for the low spatial coherence of aeroacoustic sources and for microphone self-noise resulting from entrained flow near the jet. In the experiments, a 0.8-cm-diameter burner was used to produce a subsonic, turbulent jet with a Mach number of 0.26. Six fixed, linear arrays holding eight reference microphones apiece were disposed circumferentially around the jet, and a circular array holding sixteen, equally spaced field microphones was traversed along the jet axis to measure the sound field on a 30-cm-diameter cylindrical surface enclosing the jet. The results revealed that the jet could be modeled as a combination of eleven uncorrelated dipole-, quadrupole-, and octupole-like sources, and the contribution of each source type to the total radiated sound power could be identified. Both the total sound field reconstructed in a three-dimensional space and the farfield radiation directivity obtained by using the latter model were successfully validated by comparisons to directly measured results.

  3. Integration of Acoustical Information in the Perception of Impacted Sound Sources: The Role of Information Accuracy and Exploitability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giordano, Bruno L.; Rocchesso, Davide; McAdams, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Sound sources are perceived by integrating information from multiple acoustical features. The factors influencing the integration of information are largely unknown. We measured how the perceptual weighting of different features varies with the accuracy of information and with a listener's ability to exploit it. Participants judged the hardness of…

  4. Acoustic Scattering by Three-Dimensional Stators and Rotors Using the SOURCE3D Code. Volume 2; Scattering Plots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Harold D.

    1999-01-01

    This second volume of Acoustic Scattering by Three-Dimensional Stators and Rotors Using the SOURCE3D Code provides the scattering plots referenced by Volume 1. There are 648 plots. Half are for the 8750 rpm "high speed" operating condition and the other half are for the 7031 rpm "mid speed" operating condition.

  5. Acoustic Source Characteristics, Across-Formant Integration, and Speech Intelligibility Under Competitive Conditions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    An important aspect of speech perception is the ability to group or select formants using cues in the acoustic source characteristics—for example, fundamental frequency (F0) differences between formants promote their segregation. This study explored the role of more radical differences in source characteristics. Three-formant (F1+F2+F3) synthetic speech analogues were derived from natural sentences. In Experiment 1, F1+F3 were generated by passing a harmonic glottal source (F0 = 140 Hz) through second-order resonators (H1+H3); in Experiment 2, F1+F3 were tonal (sine-wave) analogues (T1+T3). F2 could take either form (H2 or T2). In some conditions, the target formants were presented alone, either monaurally or dichotically (left ear = F1+F3; right ear = F2). In others, they were accompanied by a competitor for F2 (F1+F2C+F3; F2), which listeners must reject to optimize recognition. Competitors (H2C or T2C) were created using the time-reversed frequency and amplitude contours of F2. Dichotic presentation of F2 and F2C ensured that the impact of the competitor arose primarily through informational masking. In the absence of F2C, the effect of a source mismatch between F1+F3 and F2 was relatively modest. When F2C was present, intelligibility was lowest when F2 was tonal and F2C was harmonic, irrespective of which type matched F1+F3. This finding suggests that source type and context, rather than similarity, govern the phonetic contribution of a formant. It is proposed that wideband harmonic analogues are more effective informational maskers than narrowband tonal analogues, and so become dominant in across-frequency integration of phonetic information when placed in competition. PMID:25751040

  6. Acoustic emission source localization in thin metallic plates: A single-sensor approach based on multimodal edge reflections.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimkhanlou, A; Salamone, S

    2017-03-14

    This paper presents a new acoustic emission (AE) source localization for isotropic plates with reflecting boundaries. This approach that has no blind spot leverages multimodal edge reflections to identify AE sources with only a single sensor. The implementation of the proposed approach involves three main steps. First, the continuous wavelet transform (CWT) and the dispersion curves of the fundamental Lamb wave modes are utilized to estimate the distance between an AE source and a sensor. This step uses a modal acoustic emission approach. Then, an analytical model is proposed that uses the estimated distances to simulate the edge-reflected waves. Finally, the correlation between the experimental and the simulated waveforms is used to estimate the location of AE sources. Hsu-Nielsen pencil lead break (PLB) tests were performed on an aluminum plate to validate this algorithm and promising results were achieved. Based on these results, the paper reports the statistics of the localization errors.

  7. Device and method for generating a beam of acoustic energy from a borehole, and applications thereof

    DOEpatents

    Vu, Cung Khac; Sinha, Dipen N.; Pantea, Cristian; Nihei, Kurt; Schmitt, Denis P.; Skelt, Christopher

    2010-11-23

    In some aspects of the invention, a device, positioned within a well bore, configured to generate and direct an acoustic beam into a rock formation around a borehole is disclosed. The device comprises a source configured to generate a first signal at a first frequency and a second signal at a second frequency; a transducer configured to receive the generated first and the second signals and produce acoustic waves at the first frequency and the second frequency; and a non-linear material, coupled to the transducer, configured to generate a collimated beam with a frequency equal to the difference between the first frequency and the second frequency by a non-linear mixing process, wherein the non-linear material includes one or more of a mixture of liquids, a solid, a granular material, embedded microspheres, or an emulsion.

  8. System for generating a beam of acoustic energy from a borehole, and applications thereof

    DOEpatents

    Vu, Cung Khac [Houston, TX; Sinha, Dipen N [Los Alamos, NM; Pantea, Cristian [Los Alamos, NM; Nihei, Kurt T [Oakland, CA; Schmitt, Denis P [Katy, TX; Skelt, Christopher [Houston, TX

    2012-07-31

    In some aspects of the invention, a device, positioned within a well bore, configured to generate and direct an acoustic beam into a rock formation around a borehole is disclosed. The device comprises a source configured to generate a first signal at a first frequency and a second signal at a second frequency; a transducer configured to receive the generated first and the second signals and produce acoustic waves at the first frequency and the second frequency; and a non-linear material, coupled to the transducer, configured to generate a collimated beam with a frequency equal to the difference between the first frequency and the second frequency by a non-linear mixing process, wherein the non-linear material includes one or more of a mixture of liquids, a solid, a granular material, embedded microspheres, or an emulsion.

  9. System for generating a beam of acoustic energy from a borehole, and applications thereof

    DOEpatents

    Vu, Cung Khac; Sinha, Dipen N.; Pantea, Cristian; Nihei, Kurt T.; Schmitt, Denis P.; Skelt, Christopher

    2012-09-04

    In some aspects of the invention, a device, positioned within a well bore, configured to generate and direct an acoustic beam into a rock formation around a borehole is disclosed. The device comprises a source configured to generate a first signal at a first frequency and a second signal at a second frequency; a transducer configured to receive the generated first and the second signals and produce acoustic waves at the first frequency and the second frequency; and a non-linear material, coupled to the transducer, configured to generate a collimated beam with a frequency equal to the difference between the first frequency and the second frequency by a non-linear mixing process, wherein the non-linear material includes one or more of a mixture of liquids, a solid, a granular material, embedded microspheres, or an emulsion.

  10. Periodic shock-emission from acoustically driven cavitation clouds: a source of the subharmonic signal.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Keith; Tapia-Siles, Cecilia; Gerold, Bjoern; Postema, Michiel; Cochran, Sandy; Cuschieri, Alfred; Prentice, Paul

    2014-12-01

    Single clouds of cavitation bubbles, driven by 254kHz focused ultrasound at pressure amplitudes in the range of 0.48-1.22MPa, have been observed via high-speed shadowgraphic imaging at 1×10(6) frames per second. Clouds underwent repetitive growth, oscillation and collapse (GOC) cycles, with shock-waves emitted periodically at the instant of collapse during each cycle. The frequency of cloud collapse, and coincident shock-emission, was primarily dependent on the intensity of the focused ultrasound driving the activity. The lowest peak-to-peak pressure amplitude of 0.48MPa generated shock-waves with an average period of 7.9±0.5μs, corresponding to a frequency of f0/2, half-harmonic to the fundamental driving. Increasing the intensity gave rise to GOC cycles and shock-emission periods of 11.8±0.3, 15.8±0.3, 19.8±0.2μs, at pressure amplitudes of 0.64, 0.92 and 1.22MPa, corresponding to the higher-order subharmonics of f0/3, f0/4 and f0/5, respectively. Parallel passive acoustic detection, filtered for the fundamental driving, revealed features that correlated temporally to the shock-emissions observed via high-speed imaging, p(two-tailed) < 0.01 (r=0.996, taken over all data). Subtracting the isolated acoustic shock profiles from the raw signal collected from the detector, demonstrated the removal of subharmonic spectral peaks, in the frequency domain. The larger cavitation clouds (>200μm diameter, at maximum inflation), that developed under insonations of peak-to-peak pressure amplitudes >1.0MPa, emitted shock-waves with two or more fronts suggesting non-uniform collapse of the cloud. The observations indicate that periodic shock-emissions from acoustically driven cavitation clouds provide a source for the cavitation subharmonic signal, and that shock structure may be used to study intra-cloud dynamics at sub-microsecond timescales.

  11. Sources and characteristics of acoustic emissions from mechanically stressed geologic granular media — A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michlmayr, Gernot; Cohen, Denis; Or, Dani

    2012-05-01

    The formation of cracks and emergence of shearing planes and other modes of rapid macroscopic failure in geologic granular media involve numerous grain scale mechanical interactions often generating high frequency (kHz) elastic waves, referred to as acoustic emissions (AE). These acoustic signals have been used primarily for monitoring and characterizing fatigue and progressive failure in engineered systems, with only a few applications concerning geologic granular media reported in the literature. Similar to the monitoring of seismic events preceding an earthquake, AE may offer a means for non-invasive, in-situ, assessment of mechanical precursors associated with imminent landslides or other types of rapid mass movements (debris flows, rock falls, snow avalanches, glacier stick-slip events). Despite diverse applications and potential usefulness, a systematic description of the AE method and its relevance to mechanical processes in Earth sciences is lacking. This review is aimed at providing a sound foundation for linking observed AE with various micro-mechanical failure events in geologic granular materials, not only for monitoring of triggering events preceding mass mobilization, but also as a non-invasive tool in its own right for probing the rich spectrum of mechanical processes at scales ranging from a single grain to a hillslope. We review first studies reporting use of AE for monitoring of failure in various geologic materials, and describe AE generating source mechanisms in mechanically stressed geologic media (e.g., frictional sliding, micro-crackling, particle collisions, rupture of water bridges, etc.) including AE statistical features, such as frequency content and occurrence probabilities. We summarize available AE sensors and measurement principles. The high sampling rates of advanced AE systems enable detection of numerous discrete failure events within a volume and thus provide access to statistical descriptions of progressive collapse of systems

  12. Effective parameters in beam acoustic metamaterials based on energy band structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Li; Wu, Jiu Hui; Guan, Dong; Hou, Mingming; Kuan, Lu; Shen, Li

    2016-07-01

    We present a method to calculate the effective material parameters of beam acoustic metamaterials. The effective material parameters of a periodic beam are calculated as an example. The dispersion relations and energy band structures of this beam are calculated. Subsequently, the effective material parameters of the beam are investigated by using the energy band structures. Then, the modal analysis and transmission properties of the beams with finite cells are simulated in order to confirm the correctness of effective approximation. The results show that the periodic beam can be equivalent to the homogeneous beam with dynamic effective material parameters in passband.

  13. Ultra-directional source of longitudinal acoustic waves based on a two-dimensional solid/solid phononic crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Morvan, B.; Tinel, A.; Sainidou, R.; Rembert, P.; Vasseur, J. O.; Hladky-Hennion, A.-C.; Swinteck, N.; Deymier, P. A.

    2014-12-07

    Phononic crystals (PC) can be used to control the dispersion properties of acoustic waves, which are essential to direct their propagation. We use a PC-based two-dimensional solid/solid composite to demonstrate experimentally and theoretically the spatial filtering of a monochromatic non-directional wave source and its emission in a surrounding water medium as an ultra-directional beam with narrow angular distribution. The phenomenon relies on square-shaped equifrequency contours (EFC) enabling self-collimation of acoustic waves within the phononic crystal. Additionally, the angular width of collimated beams is controlled via the EFC size-shrinking when increasing frequency.

  14. Alternative biomass sources for thermal energy generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steensen, Torge; Müller, Sönke; Dresen, Boris; Büscher, Olaf

    2015-04-01

    Traditionally, renewable biomass energy sources comprise forests, agriculture and other large vegetation units. With the increasing demand on those landscape elements, including conflicts of interest to nature conservation and food production, the research focus should also incorporate smaller vegetation entities. In this study, we highlight the availability of small-scale features like roadside vegetation or hedges, which are rarely featured in maps. Roadside vegetation, however, is well known and regularly trimmed to allow the passing of traffic but the cut material is rarely harvested. Here, we combine a remote-sensing-based approach to quantify the seasonal biomass harvests with a GIS-based method to outline optimal transportation routes to, and the location of, storage units and power plants. Our main data source will be ESA's upcoming Sentinel-2 optical satellite. Spatial resolution of 10 meters in the visible and near infrared requires the use of spectral unmixing to derive end member spectra of the targeted biomass objects. Additional stereo-matching and LIDAR measurements allow the accompanying height estimate to derive the biomass volume and its changes over time. GIS data bases from the target areas allow the discrimination between traditional, large features (e.g. forests and agriculture) as well as previously unaccounted for, smaller vegetation units. With the mapped biomass occurrence and additional, GIS-based infrastructure information, we can outline transport routes that take into account local restrictions like nature reserve areas, height or weight limitations as well as transport costs in relation to potential gains. This information can then be processed to outline optimal places for power plants. To simulate the upcoming Sentinel-2 data sets, we use airborne data from the AISA Eagle, spatially and spectrally down-sampled to match Sentinel 2's resolution. Our test scenario is an area in western Germany, the Kirchheller Heide, close to the city

  15. Note: High-efficiency broadband acoustic energy harvesting using Helmholtz resonator and dual piezoelectric cantilever beams

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Aichao; Li, Ping Wen, Yumei; Lu, Caijiang; Peng, Xiao; He, Wei; Zhang, Jitao; Wang, Decai; Yang, Feng

    2014-06-15

    A high-efficiency broadband acoustic energy harvester consisting of a compliant-top-plate Helmholtz resonator (HR) and dual piezoelectric cantilever beams is proposed. Due to the high mechanical quality factor of beams and the strong multimode coupling of HR cavity, top plate and beams, the high efficiency in a broad bandwidth is obtained. Experiment exhibits that the proposed harvester at 170–206 Hz has 28–188 times higher efficiency than the conventional harvester using a HR with a piezoelectric composite diaphragm. For input acoustic pressure of 2.0 Pa, the proposed harvester exhibits 0.137–1.43 mW output power corresponding to 0.035–0.36 μW cm{sup −3} volume power density at 170–206 Hz.

  16. Note: High-efficiency broadband acoustic energy harvesting using Helmholtz resonator and dual piezoelectric cantilever beams.

    PubMed

    Yang, Aichao; Li, Ping; Wen, Yumei; Lu, Caijiang; Peng, Xiao; He, Wei; Zhang, Jitao; Wang, Decai; Yang, Feng

    2014-06-01

    A high-efficiency broadband acoustic energy harvester consisting of a compliant-top-plate Helmholtz resonator (HR) and dual piezoelectric cantilever beams is proposed. Due to the high mechanical quality factor of beams and the strong multimode coupling of HR cavity, top plate and beams, the high efficiency in a broad bandwidth is obtained. Experiment exhibits that the proposed harvester at 170-206 Hz has 28-188 times higher efficiency than the conventional harvester using a HR with a piezoelectric composite diaphragm. For input acoustic pressure of 2.0 Pa, the proposed harvester exhibits 0.137-1.43 mW output power corresponding to 0.035-0.36 μW cm(-3) volume power density at 170-206 Hz.

  17. A hybrid algorithm for robust acoustic source localization in noisy and reverberant environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajagopalan, Ramesh; Dessonville, Timothy

    2014-09-01

    Acoustic source localization using microphone arrays is widely used in videoconferencing and surveillance systems. However, it still remains a challenging task to develop efficient algorithms for accurate estimation of source location using distributed data processing. In this work, we propose a new algorithm for efficient localization of a speaker in noisy and reverberant environments such as videoconferencing. We propose a hybrid algorithm that combines generalized cross correlation based phase transform method (GCC-PHAT) and Tabu search to obtain a robust and accurate estimate of the speaker location. The Tabu Search algorithm iteratively improves the time difference of arrival (TDOA) estimate of GCC-PHAT by examining the neighboring solutions until a convergence in the TDOA value is obtained. Experiments were performed based on real world data recorded from a meeting room in the presence of noise such as computer and fans. Our results demonstrate that the proposed hybrid algorithm outperforms GCC-PHAT especially when the noise level is high. This shows the robustness of the proposed algorithm in noisy and realistic videoconferencing systems.

  18. Extension of the angular spectrum method to calculate pressure from a spherically curved acoustic source.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Urvi; Christensen, Douglas A

    2011-11-01

    The angular spectrum method is an accurate and computationally efficient method for modeling acoustic wave propagation. The use of the typical 2D fast Fourier transform algorithm makes this a fast technique but it requires that the source pressure (or velocity) be specified on a plane. Here the angular spectrum method is extended to calculate pressure from a spherical transducer-as used extensively in applications such as magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound surgery-to a plane. The approach, called the Ring-Bessel technique, decomposes the curved source into circular rings of increasing radii, each ring a different distance from the intermediate plane, and calculates the angular spectrum of each ring using a Fourier series. Each angular spectrum is then propagated to the intermediate plane where all the propagated angular spectra are summed to obtain the pressure on the plane; subsequent plane-to-plane propagation can be achieved using the traditional angular spectrum method. Since the Ring-Bessel calculations are carried out in the frequency domain, it reduces calculation times by a factor of approximately 24 compared to the Rayleigh-Sommerfeld method and about 82 compared to the Field II technique, while maintaining accuracies of better than 96% as judged by those methods for cases of both solid and phased-array transducers.

  19. Noise disturbance in open-plan study environments: a field study on noise sources, student tasks and room acoustic parameters.

    PubMed

    Braat-Eggen, P Ella; van Heijst, Anne; Hornikx, Maarten; Kohlrausch, Armin

    2017-04-03

    The aim of this study is to gain more insight in the assessment of noise in open-plan study environments and to reveal correlations between noise disturbance experienced by students and the noise sources they perceive, the tasks they perform and the acoustic parameters of the open-plan study environment they work in. Data were collected in five open-plan study environments at universities in the Netherlands. A questionnaire was used to investigate student tasks, perceived sound sources and their perceived disturbance, and sound measurements were performed to determine the room acoustic parameters. This study shows that 38% of the surveyed students are disturbed by background noise in an open-plan study environment. Students are mostly disturbed by speech when performing complex cognitive tasks like studying for an exam, reading and writing. Significant but weak correlations were found between the room acoustic parameters and noise disturbance of students. Practitioner Summary: A field study was conducted to gain more insight in the assessment of noise in open-plan study environments at universities in the Netherlands. More than one third of the students was disturbed by noise. An interaction effect was found for task type, source type and room acoustic parameters.

  20. Lead-Zirconate-Titanate Acoustic Energy Harvesters with Dual Top Electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomioka, Shungo; Kimura, Shu; Tsujimoto, Kyohei; Iizumi, Satoshi; Uchida, Yusuke; Tomii, Kazuki; Matsuda, Tomohiro; Nishioka, Yasushiro

    2011-09-01

    In this paper, we present the power generation performances of a lead-zirconate-titanate (PZT) microelectromechanical system (MEMS) acoustic energy harvester having dual top electrodes to utilize the different polarizations of charges on the surface of a vibrating PZT diaphragm at first resonance. The PZT acoustic energy harvester had a diaphragm with a diameter of 2 mm consisting of Al (0.1 µm)/PZT (1 µm)/Pt (0.1 µm)/Ti (0.1 µm)/SiO2 (1.5 µm), and the diaphragm vibrations were excited by sound pressure. The top Al electrodes independently cover the peripheral surface and the central surface of the PZT diaphragm. The peripheral energy harvester generated a power of 5.28×10-11 W, and the central energy harvester generated a power of 4.25×10-11 W at a sound pressure level of 100 dB (0.01 W/m2) at 4.92 kHz. Thus, nearly 80% of the total power of the energy harvesters can be increased by utilizing the polarization at the central part of the diaphragm, which was usually not considered when only the peripheral part of the diaphragm was utilized.

  1. Energy cost and energy sources during a simulated firefighting activity.

    PubMed

    Perroni, Fabrizio; Tessitore, Antonio; Cortis, Cristina; Lupo, Corrado; D'artibale, Emanuele; Cignitti, Lamberto; Capranica, Laura

    2010-12-01

    This study aimed to 1) analyze the energy requirement (VO2eq) and the contribution of the aerobic (VO2ex), anaerobic alactic (VO2al), and anaerobic lactic (VO2la-) energy sources of a simulated intervention; 2) ascertain differences in mean VO2 and heart rate (HR) during firefighting tasks; and 3) verify the relationship between time of job completion and the fitness level of firefighters. Twenty Italian firefighters (age = 32 ± 6 yr, VO2peak = 43.1 ± 4.9 mL·kg·min) performed 4 consecutive tasks (i.e., child rescue; 250-m run; find an exit; 250-m run) that required a VO2eq of 406.26 ± 73.91 mL·kg (VO2ex = 86 ± 5%; VO2al = 9 ± 3%; VO2la- = 5 ± 3%). After 30 minutes, the recovery HR (108 ± 15 beats·min) and VO2 (8.86±2.67mL·kg·min) were higher (p < 0.0001) than basal values (HR = 66 ± 8 beats·min; VO2 = 4.57 ± 1.07 mL·kg·min), indicating that passive recovery is insufficient in reducing the cardiovascular and thermoregulatory strain of the previous workload. Differences (p < 0.001) between tasks emerged for mean VO2 and HR, with a lack of significant correlation between the time of job completion and the firefighters' aerobic fitness. These findings indicate that unpredictable working conditions highly challenge expert firefighters who need adequate fitness levels to meet the requirements of their work. Practically, to enhance the fitness level of firefighters, specific interval training programs should include a wide variety of tasks requiring different intensities and decision-making strategies.

  2. 47 CFR 80.1099 - Ship sources of energy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ship sources of energy. 80.1099 Section 80.1099... Stations § 80.1099 Ship sources of energy. (a) There must be available at all times, while the ship is at sea, a supply of electrical energy sufficient to operate the radio installations and to charge...

  3. 47 CFR 80.1099 - Ship sources of energy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ship sources of energy. 80.1099 Section 80.1099... Stations § 80.1099 Ship sources of energy. (a) There must be available at all times, while the ship is at sea, a supply of electrical energy sufficient to operate the radio installations and to charge...

  4. 47 CFR 80.1099 - Ship sources of energy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Ship sources of energy. 80.1099 Section 80.1099... Stations § 80.1099 Ship sources of energy. (a) There must be available at all times, while the ship is at sea, a supply of electrical energy sufficient to operate the radio installations and to charge...

  5. 47 CFR 80.1099 - Ship sources of energy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ship sources of energy. 80.1099 Section 80.1099... Stations § 80.1099 Ship sources of energy. (a) There must be available at all times, while the ship is at sea, a supply of electrical energy sufficient to operate the radio installations and to charge...

  6. 47 CFR 80.1099 - Ship sources of energy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ship sources of energy. 80.1099 Section 80.1099... Stations § 80.1099 Ship sources of energy. (a) There must be available at all times, while the ship is at sea, a supply of electrical energy sufficient to operate the radio installations and to charge...

  7. Panchromatic spectral energy distributions of Herschel sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berta, S.; Lutz, D.; Santini, P.; Wuyts, S.; Rosario, D.; Brisbin, D.; Cooray, A.; Franceschini, A.; Gruppioni, C.; Hatziminaoglou, E.; Hwang, H. S.; Le Floc'h, E.; Magnelli, B.; Nordon, R.; Oliver, S.; Page, M. J.; Popesso, P.; Pozzetti, L.; Pozzi, F.; Riguccini, L.; Rodighiero, G.; Roseboom, I.; Scott, D.; Symeonidis, M.; Valtchanov, I.; Viero, M.; Wang, L.

    2013-03-01

    Combining far-infrared Herschel photometry from the PACS Evolutionary Probe (PEP) and Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey (HerMES) guaranteed time programs with ancillary datasets in the GOODS-N, GOODS-S, and COSMOS fields, it is possible to sample the 8-500 μm spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of galaxies with at least 7-10 bands. Extending to the UV, optical, and near-infrared, the number of bands increases up to 43. We reproduce the distribution of galaxies in a carefully selected restframe ten colors space, based on this rich data-set, using a superposition of multivariate Gaussian modes. We use this model to classify galaxies and build median SEDs of each class, which are then fitted with a modified version of the magphys code that combines stellar light, emission from dust heated by stars and a possible warm dust contribution heated by an active galactic nucleus (AGN). The color distribution of galaxies in each of the considered fields can be well described with the combination of 6-9 classes, spanning a large range of far- to near-infrared luminosity ratios, as well as different strength of the AGN contribution to bolometric luminosities. The defined Gaussian grouping is used to identify rare or odd sources. The zoology of outliers includes Herschel-detected ellipticals, very blue z ~ 1 Ly-break galaxies, quiescent spirals, and torus-dominated AGN with star formation. Out of these groups and outliers, a new template library is assembled, consisting of 32 SEDs describing the intrinsic scatter in the restframe UV-to-submm colors of infrared galaxies. This library is tested against L(IR) estimates with and without Herschel data included, and compared to eightother popular methods often adopted in the literature. When implementing Herschel photometry, these approaches produce L(IR) values consistent with each other within a median absolute deviation of 10-20%, the scatter being dominated more by fine tuning of the codes, rather than by the choice of

  8. Ultralow frequency acoustic bandgap and vibration energy recovery in tetragonal folding beam phononic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Nansha; Wu, Jiu Hui; Yu, Lie; Hou, Hong

    2016-06-01

    This paper investigates ultralow frequency acoustic properties and energy recovery of tetragonal folding beam phononic crystal (TFBPC) and its complementary structure. The dispersion curve relationships, transmission spectra and displacement fields of the eigenmodes are studied with FEA in detail. Compared with the traditional three layer phononic crystal (PC) structure, this structure proposed in this paper not only unfold bandgaps (BGs) in lower frequency range (below 300 Hz), but also has lighter weight because of beam structural cracks. We analyze the relevant physical mechanism behind this phenomenon, and discuss the effects of the tetragonal folding beam geometric parameters on band structure maps. FEM proves that the multi-cell structures with different arrangements have different acoustic BGs when compared with single cell structure. Harmonic frequency response and piezoelectric properties of TFBPC are specifically analyzed. The results confirm that this structure does have the recovery ability for low frequency vibration energy in environment. These conclusions in this paper could be indispensable to PC practical applications such as BG tuning and could be applied in portable devices, wireless sensor, micro-electro mechanical systems which can recycle energy from vibration environment as its own energy supply.

  9. Alternative Natural Energy Sources in Building Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Albert J.; Schubert, Robert P.

    This publication provides a discussion of various energy conserving building systems and design alternatives. The information presented here covers alternative space and water heating systems, and energy conserving building designs incorporating these systems and other energy conserving techniques. Besides water, wind, solar, and bio conversion…

  10. Estimation of Acoustic Particle Motion and Source Bearing Using a Drifting Hydrophone Array Near a River Current Turbine to Assess Disturbances to Fish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Paul G.

    River hydrokinetic turbines may be an economical alternative to traditional energy sources for small communities on Alaskan rivers. However, there is concern that sound from these turbines could affect sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka), an important resource for small, subsistence based communities, commercial fisherman, and recreational anglers. The hearing sensitivity of sockeye salmon has not been quantified, but behavioral responses to sounds at frequencies less than a few hundred Hertz have been documented for Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar), and particle motion is thought to be the primary mode of stimulation. Methods of measuring acoustic particle motion are well-established, but have rarely been necessary in energetic areas, such as river and tidal current environments. In this study, the acoustic pressure in the vicinity of an operating river current turbine is measured using a freely drifting hydrophone array. Analysis of turbine sound reveals tones that vary in frequency and magnitude with turbine rotation rate, and that may sockeye salmon may sense. In addition to pressure, the vertical components of particle acceleration and velocity are estimated by calculating the finite difference of the pressure signals from the hydrophone array. A method of determining source bearing using an array of hydrophones is explored. The benefits and challenges of deploying drifting hydrophone arrays for marine renewable energy converter monitoring are discussed.

  11. Efficient modeling of flat and homogeneous acoustic treatments for vibroacoustic finite element analysis. Finite size correction by image sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alimonti, L.; Atalla, N.

    2017-02-01

    This work is concerned with the hybrid finite element-transfer matrix methodology recently proposed by the authors. The main assumption behind this hybrid method consists in neglecting the actual finite lateral extent of the acoustic treatment. Although a substantial increase of the computational efficiency can be achieved, the effect of the reflected field (i.e. finite size effects) may be sometimes important, preventing the hybrid model from giving quantitative meaningful results. For this reason, a correction to account for wave reflections at the lateral boundaries of the acoustic treatment is sought. It is shown in the present paper that the image source method can be successfully employed to retrieve such finite size effects. Indeed, such methodology is known to be effective when the response of the system is a smooth function of the frequency, like in the case of highly dissipative acoustic treatments. The main concern of this paper is to assess accuracy and feasibility of the image source method in the context of acoustic treatments modeling. Numerical examples show that the performance of the standard hybrid model can be substantially improved by the proposed correction without deteriorating excessively the computational efficiency.

  12. Characterization and Simulation of an Acoustic Source Moving through an Oceanic Waveguide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-09-01

    algorithms, classical spectrum estimation methods are employed [1, 2] to estimate the auto- and cross-spectra of data received at the array of...Acoust. Soc. Am., 65(3):675-681 (March). [4] Rao, Kodali V., Thomas M. Michaud, and Henrik Schmidt. 1991. "Doppler shifts in underwater acoustics using

  13. Energy accounting for solar and alternative energy sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devine, W. D., Jr.

    Shortcomings in energy data collection, display and accounting practices are of minor consequence in an economy of today in which most end use services are provided via fossil fuels and electricity. However, the emergence of a variety of alternative technologies that might be used to provide these services suggests that present accounting practices be reexamined and a more appropriate system devised. The paper proposes an energy accounting framework based upon the actual services provided to end users. An energy service is a measure of the service actually provided to ultimate consumers by their own use of energy, quantified, for example, using units of work or of heat at various temperatures. Fifteen categories of energy service are described and some of their characteristics are identified. The proposed energy accounting framework consists of two matrices - an energy service matrix and an energy carrier matrix. The energy service matrix displays quantities of energy carriers used to provide energy services. The energy carrier matrix displays quantities of energy carriers used to produce and distribute energy carriers to ultimate consumers.

  14. Advances in microbial biofilm prevention on indwelling medical devices with emphasis on usage of acoustic energy.

    PubMed

    Dror, Naama; Mandel, Mathilda; Hazan, Zadik; Lavie, Gad

    2009-01-01

    Microbial biofilms are a major impediment to the use of indwelling medical devices, generating device-related infections with high morbidity and mortality. Major efforts directed towards preventing and eradicating the biofilm problem face difficulties because biofilms protect themselves very effectively by producing a polysaccharide coating, reducing biofilm sensitivity to antimicrobial agents. Techniques applied to combating biofilms have been primarily chemical. These have met with partial and limited success rates, leading to current trends of eradicating biofilms through physico-mechanical strategies. Here we review the different approaches that have been developed to control biofilm formation and removal, focusing on the utilization of acoustic energy to achieve these objectives.

  15. Study of Acoustic Ultra-High Energy Neutrino Detection Phase II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurahashi, N.

    The Study of Acoustic Ultra-high energy Neutrino Detection has started its second phase (SAUND II). Although the general location of the hydrophones has not changed, SAUND II uses a new hydrophone array that uses a fiber-optic cable to connect to shore. Changes associated with the new hydrophone array as well as a new DAQ system that incorporates multiprocessor computing and accurate GPS timestamping are reported. Initial data of lightbulb calibration conducted in March 2005, and a future plan for a more accurate calibration are also presented.

  16. Acoustic-emission linear-pulse holography

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, H.D.; Lemon, D.K.; Busse, L.J.

    1982-06-01

    This paper describes Acoustic Emission Linear Pulse Holography which combines the advantages of linear imaging and acoustic emission into a single NDE inspection system. This unique system produces a chronological linear holographic image of a flaw by utilizing the acoustic energy emitted during crack growth. Conventional linear holographic imaging uses an ultrasonic transducer to transmit energy into the volume being imaged. When the crack or defect reflects that energy, the crack acts as a new source of acoustic waves. To formulate an image of that source, a receiving transducer is scanned over the volume of interest and the phase of the received signals is measured at successive points on the scan. The innovation proposed here is the utilization of the crack generated acoustic emission as the acoustic source and generation of a line image of the crack as it grows. A thirty-two point sampling array is used to construct phase-only linear holograms of simulated acoustic emission sources on large metal plates. The phases are calculated using the pulse time-of-flight (TOF) times from the reference transducer to the array of receivers. Computer reconstruction of the image is accomplished using a one-dimensional FFT algorithm (i.e., backward wave). Experimental results are shown which graphically illustrate the unique acoustic emission images of a single point and a linear crack in a 100 mm x 1220 mm x 1220 mm aluminum plate.

  17. Comments on inferring the properties of the solar acoustic sources by modeling the velocity and/or intensity fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jefferies, Stuart M.; Moretti, Pier-Francesco; Oliviero, Maurizio; Giebink, Cynthia

    2003-02-01

    We model the observed velocity and intensity power spectra and the intensity-velocity cross-spectrum using an updated version of the Severino et al. (2001) model that includes the effects of the acoustic source. We find that in order to accurately describe the data it is necessary to include a correlated background component in both the V and I signals at low frequencies, and in the I signal at high frequencies. Preliminary results show that even using the new model we can not uniquely determine the phase that is related to the acoustic source depth at low frequencies, or the amplitudes and phases of the individual correlated background signals. It appears that further physical or observational constraints are needed before we can obtain this information.

  18. Continuous wavelet transform analysis and modal location analysis acoustic emission source location for nuclear piping crack growth monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Mohd, Shukri; Holford, Karen M.; Pullin, Rhys

    2014-02-12

    Source location is an important feature of acoustic emission (AE) damage monitoring in nuclear piping. The ability to accurately locate sources can assist in source characterisation and early warning of failure. This paper describe the development of a novelAE source location technique termed 'Wavelet Transform analysis and Modal Location (WTML)' based on Lamb wave theory and time-frequency analysis that can be used for global monitoring of plate like steel structures. Source location was performed on a steel pipe of 1500 mm long and 220 mm outer diameter with nominal thickness of 5 mm under a planar location test setup using H-N sources. The accuracy of the new technique was compared with other AE source location methods such as the time of arrival (TOA) techniqueand DeltaTlocation. Theresults of the study show that the WTML method produces more accurate location resultscompared with TOA and triple point filtering location methods. The accuracy of the WTML approach is comparable with the deltaT location method but requires no initial acoustic calibration of the structure.

  19. Energy Efficiency and Importance of Renewable Energy Sources in Latvia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skapare, I.; Kreslins, A.

    2007-10-01

    The main goal of Latvian energy policy is to ensure safe and environmentally friendly long-term energy supply at cost-effective prices, contributing to enhance competitiveness, and to ensure safe energy transit. The Latvian Parliament approved an Energy Efficiency Strategy in 2000. Its objective is to decrease energy consumption per unit of GDP by 25% by 2010. Awareness raising, implementation of standards and economic incentives for self financing are the main instruments to increase energy efficiency, mentioned in the strategy. Latvia, as many other European Union member states, is dependent on the import of primary energy resources. The Latvian Renewable Energy strategy is still under development. The only recent study on RES was developed in the framework of a PHARE program in year 2000: "Renewable energy resource program", where three main objectives for a future RES strategy were proposed: 1. To increase the use of wood waste and low value wood and forest residues. 2. To improve efficiency of combustion technologies and to replace outdated plants. 3. To increase the use of renewables in Combined Heat and Power plants (CHP). Through the Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Partnership, partners will develop a set of new shared activities, and coordinate and strengthen existing efforts in this area.

  20. Alternate policies for alternate energy sources

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, F.F.

    1985-09-01

    Some ''alternates within alternates'' are studied and possible improvement of our energy policies are explored. The viability of a hydrogen fuel economy is reviewed. Methanol, ethanol or ammonia versus hydrogen is one area of interest. Others include liquid hydrogen versus jet fuels, the use of geothermal, solar, wind or water energy for production of hydrogen gas versus development of deep earth supplies of natural gas is another. Energy enhancement as opposed to energy conservation is investigated with regard to polar climate and what might be done to improve natural energy balances, particularly in the northern hemisphere. Pumping Arctic Ocean water out into the Pacific Ocean via the Bering Strait would be an energy debit as opposed to energy gains such as biomass conversion of future plant growth throughout the Siberian and Canadian tundra regions and presently very arid desert regions, improved access to northern region fuel, metal ore and mineral resources, year-round shipping and fishing fleet operations in the Arctic Ocean and development of the tremendous Greenland hydro-electric power potential.

  1. Alternative Energy Sources. Experiments You Can Do...from Edison.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benrey, Ronald M.; Schultz, Robert F.

    Eight experiments dealing with alternative energy sources are presented. Each experiment includes an introductory section which provides background information and discusses the promises and problems of the particular energy source, a list of materials needed to complete the experiment, and the procedures to be used. The experiments involve:…

  2. Effect of Carbon and Energy Source on Bacterial Chromate Reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, William Aaron; Apel, William Arnold; Petersen, J. N.; Peyton, Brent Michael

    2002-07-01

    Studies were conducted to evaluate carbon and energy sources suitable to support hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) reduction by a bacterial consortium enriched from dichromate-contaminated aquifer sediments. The consortium was cultured under denitrifying conditions in a minimal, synthetic groundwater medium that was amended with various individual potential carbon and energy sources. The effects of these individual carbon and energy sources on Cr(VI) reduction and growth were measured. The consortium was found to readily reduce Cr(VI) with sucrose, acetate, L-asparagine, hydrogen plus carbon dioxide, ethanol, glycerol, glycolate, propylene glycol, or D-xylose as a carbon and energy source. Minimal Cr(VI) reduction was observed when the consortium was cultured with citrate, 2-ketoglutarate, L-lactate, pyruvate, succinate, or thiosulfate plus carbon dioxide as a carbon and energy source when compared with abiotic controls. The consortium grew on all of the above carbon and energy sources, with the highest cell densities reached using D-xylose and sucrose, demonstrating that the consortium is metabolically diverse and can reduce Cr(VI) using a variety of different carbon and energy sources. The results suggest that the potential exists for the enrichment of Cr(VI)-reducing microbial populations in situ by the addition of a sucrose-containing feedstock such as molasses, which is an economical and readily available carbon and energy source.

  3. Energy Balanced Strategies for Maximizing the Lifetime of Sparsely Deployed Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Hanjiang; Guo, Zhongwen; Wu, Kaishun; Hong, Feng; Feng, Yuan

    2009-01-01

    Underwater acoustic sensor networks (UWA-SNs) are envisioned to perform monitoring tasks over the large portion of the world covered by oceans. Due to economics and the large area of the ocean, UWA-SNs are mainly sparsely deployed networks nowadays. The limited battery resources is a big challenge for the deployment of such long-term sensor networks. Unbalanced battery energy consumption will lead to early energy depletion of nodes, which partitions the whole networks and impairs the integrity of the monitoring datasets or even results in the collapse of the entire networks. On the contrary, balanced energy dissipation of nodes can prolong the lifetime of such networks. In this paper, we focus on the energy balance dissipation problem of two types of sparsely deployed UWA-SNs: underwater moored monitoring systems and sparsely deployed two-dimensional UWA-SNs. We first analyze the reasons of unbalanced energy consumption in such networks, then we propose two energy balanced strategies to maximize the lifetime of networks both in shallow and deep water. Finally, we evaluate our methods by simulations and the results show that the two strategies can achieve balanced energy consumption per node while at the same time prolong the networks lifetime. PMID:22399970

  4. Concurrent identification of aero-acoustic scattering and noise sources at a flow duct singularity in low Mach number flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sovardi, Carlo; Jaensch, Stefan; Polifke, Wolfgang

    2016-09-01

    A numerical method to concurrently characterize both aeroacoustic scattering and noise sources at a duct singularity is presented. This approach combines Large Eddy Simulation (LES) with techniques of System Identification (SI): In a first step, a highly resolved LES with external broadband acoustic excitation is carried out. Subsequently, time series data extracted from the LES are post-processed by means of SI to model both acoustic propagation and noise generation. The present work studies the aero-acoustic characteristics of an orifice placed in a duct at low flow Mach numbers with the "LES-SI" method. Parametric SI based on the Box-Jenkins mathematical structure is employed, with a prediction error approach that utilizes correlation analysis of the output residuals to avoid overfitting. Uncertainties of model parameters due to the finite length of times series are quantified in terms of confidence intervals. Numerical results for acoustic scattering matrices and power spectral densities of broad-band noise are validated against experimental measurements over a wide range of frequencies below the cut-off frequency of the duct.

  5. Investigation of acoustic gravity waves created by anomalous heat sources: experiments and theoretical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradipta, R.; Lee, M. C.

    2013-07-01

    We have been investigating high-power radio wave-induced acoustic gravity waves (AGWs) at Gakona, Alaska, using the High-frequency Active Aurora Research Program (HAARP) heating facility (i.e. HF heater) and extensive diagnostic instruments. This work was aimed at performing a controlled study of the space plasma turbulence triggered by the AGWs originating from anomalous heat sources, as observed in our earlier experiments at Arecibo, Puerto Rico (Pradipta 2007 MS Thesis MIT Press, Cambridge, MA). The HF heater operated in continuous wave (CW) O-mode can heat ionospheric plasmas effectively to yield a depleted magnetic flux tube as rising plasma bubbles (Lee et al 1998 Geophys. Res. Lett. 25 579). Two processes are responsible for the depletion of the magnetic flux tube: (i) thermal expansion and (ii) chemical reactions caused by heated ions. The depleted plasmas create large density gradients that can augment spread F processes via generalized Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities (Lee et al 1999 Geophys. Res. Lett. 26 37). It is thus expected that the temperature of neutral particles in the heated ionospheric region can be increased. Such a heat source in the neutral atmosphere may potentially generate AGWs in the form of traveling ionospheric plasma disturbances (TIPDs). We should point out that these TIPDs have features distinctively different from electric and magnetic field (ExB) drifts of HF wave-induced large-scale non-propagating plasma structures. Moreover, it was noted in our recent study of naturally occurring AGW-induced TIDs that only large-scale AGWs can propagate upward to reach higher altitudes. Thus, in our Gakona experiments we select optimum heating schemes for HF wave-induced AGWs that can be distinguished from the naturally occurring ones. The generation and propagation of AGWs are monitored by MUIR (Modular Ultra high-frequency Ionospheric Radar), Digisonde and GPS/low-earth-orbit satellites. Our theoretical and experimental studies have shown that

  6. Lightweight filter architecture for energy efficient mobile vehicle localization based on a distributed acoustic sensor network.

    PubMed

    Kim, Keonwook

    2013-08-23

    The generic properties of an acoustic signal provide numerous benefits for localization by applying energy-based methods over a deployed wireless sensor network (WSN). However, the signal generated by a stationary target utilizes a significant amount of bandwidth and power in the system without providing further position information. For vehicle localization, this paper proposes a novel proximity velocity vector estimator (PVVE) node architecture in order to capture the energy from a moving vehicle and reject the signal from motionless automobiles around the WSN node. A cascade structure between analog envelope detector and digital exponential smoothing filter presents the velocity vector-sensitive output with low analog circuit and digital computation complexity. The optimal parameters in the exponential smoothing filter are obtained by analytical and mathematical methods for maximum variation over the vehicle speed. For stationary targets, the derived simulation based on the acoustic field parameters demonstrates that the system significantly reduces the communication requirements with low complexity and can be expected to extend the operation time considerably.

  7. Lightweight Filter Architecture for Energy Efficient Mobile Vehicle Localization Based on a Distributed Acoustic Sensor Network

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Keonwook

    2013-01-01

    The generic properties of an acoustic signal provide numerous benefits for localization by applying energy-based methods over a deployed wireless sensor network (WSN). However, the signal generated by a stationary target utilizes a significant amount of bandwidth and power in the system without providing further position information. For vehicle localization, this paper proposes a novel proximity velocity vector estimator (PVVE) node architecture in order to capture the energy from a moving vehicle and reject the signal from motionless automobiles around the WSN node. A cascade structure between analog envelope detector and digital exponential smoothing filter presents the velocity vector-sensitive output with low analog circuit and digital computation complexity. The optimal parameters in the exponential smoothing filter are obtained by analytical and mathematical methods for maximum variation over the vehicle speed. For stationary targets, the derived simulation based on the acoustic field parameters demonstrates that the system significantly reduces the communication requirements with low complexity and can be expected to extend the operation time considerably. PMID:23979482

  8. Analysis of Different Methods for Computing Source Energy in the Context of Zero Energy Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Torcellini, Paul A.; Bonnema, Eric; Goldwasser, David; Pless, Shanti

    2016-08-26

    Building energy consumption can only be measured at the site or at the point of utility interconnection with a building. Often, to evaluate the total energy impact, this site-based energy consumption is translated into source energy, that is, the energy at the point of fuel extraction. Consistent with this approach, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) definition of zero energy buildings uses source energy as the metric to account for energy losses from the extraction, transformation, and delivery of energy. Other organizations, as well, use source energy to characterize the energy impacts. Four methods of making the conversion from site energy to source energy were investigated in the context of the DOE definition of zero energy buildings. These methods were evaluated based on three guiding principles--improve energy efficiency, reduce and stabilize power demand, and use power from nonrenewable energy sources as efficiently as possible. This study examines relative trends between strategies as they are implemented on very low-energy buildings to achieve zero energy. A typical office building was modeled and variations to this model performed. The photovoltaic output that was required to create a zero energy building was calculated. Trends were examined with these variations to study the impacts of the calculation method on the building's ability to achieve zero energy status. The paper will highlight the different methods and give conclusions on the advantages and disadvantages of the methods studied.

  9. Potential Energy Sources Pose Mining Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1974

    1974-01-01

    Summarizes the discussions of a Division of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry symposium on solids handling for synthetic fuels production. Included is a description of technical difficulties with the use of coal seams and deposits of oil shale and oil sand as potential sources of fuel. (CC)

  10. High energy efficient solid state laser sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, Robert L.

    1989-01-01

    Recent progress in the development of highly efficient coherent optical sources was reviewed. This work has focused on nonlinear frequency conversion of the highly coherent output of the non-planar ring laser oscillators developed earlier in the program, and includes high efficiency second harmonic generation and the operation of optical parametric oscillators for wavelength diversity and tunability.

  11. High energy efficient solid state laser sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, Robert L.

    1988-01-01

    Recent progress in the development of highly efficient coherent optical sources is reviewed. This work focusses on nonlinear frequency conversion of the highly coherent output of the Non-Planar Ring Laser Oscillators developed earlier in the program, and includes high efficiency second harmonic generation and the operation of optical parametric oscillators for wavelength diversity and tunability.

  12. Reverberant acoustic energy in auditoria that comprise systems of coupled rooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summers, Jason Erik

    A frequency-dependent model for levels and decay rates of reverberant energy in systems of coupled rooms is developed and compared with measurements conducted in a 1:10 scale model and in Bass Hall, Fort Worth, TX. Schroeder frequencies of subrooms, fSch, characteristic size of coupling apertures, a, relative to wavelength lambda, and characteristic size of room surfaces, l, relative to lambda define the frequency regions. At high frequencies [HF (f >> f Sch, a >> lambda, l >> lambda)], this work improves upon prior statistical-acoustics (SA) coupled-ODE models by incorporating geometrical-acoustics (GA) corrections for the model of decay within subrooms and the model of energy transfer between subrooms. Previous researchers developed prediction algorithms based on computational GA. Comparisons of predictions derived from beam-axis tracing with scale-model measurements indicate that systematic errors for coupled rooms result from earlier tail-correction procedures that assume constant quadratic growth of reflection density. A new algorithm is developed that uses ray tracing rather than tail correction in the late part and is shown to correct this error. At midfrequencies [MF (f >> f Sch, a ˜ lambda)], HF models are modified to account for wave effects at coupling apertures by including analytically or heuristically derived power transmission coefficients tau. This work improves upon prior SA models of this type by developing more accurate estimates of random-incidence tau. While the accuracy of the MF models is difficult to verify, scale-model measurements evidence the expected behavior. The Biot-Tolstoy-Medwin-Svensson (BTMS) time-domain edge-diffraction model is newly adapted to study transmission through apertures. Multiple-order BTMS scattering is theoretically and experimentally shown to be inaccurate due to the neglect of slope diffraction. At low frequencies (f ˜ f Sch), scale-model measurements have been qualitatively explained by application of

  13. Efficient Structure Resonance Energy Transfer from Microwaves to Confined Acoustic Vibrations in Viruses.

    PubMed

    Yang, Szu-Chi; Lin, Huan-Chun; Liu, Tzu-Ming; Lu, Jen-Tang; Hung, Wan-Ting; Huang, Yu-Ru; Tsai, Yi-Chun; Kao, Chuan-Liang; Chen, Shih-Yuan; Sun, Chi-Kuang

    2015-12-09

    Virus is known to resonate in the confined-acoustic dipolar mode with microwave of the same frequency. However this effect was not considered in previous virus-microwave interaction studies and microwave-based virus epidemic prevention. Here we show that this structure-resonant energy transfer effect from microwaves to virus can be efficient enough so that airborne virus was inactivated with reasonable microwave power density safe for the open public. We demonstrate this effect by measuring the residual viral infectivity of influenza A virus after illuminating microwaves with different frequencies and powers. We also established a theoretical model to estimate the microwaves power threshold for virus inactivation and good agreement with experiments was obtained. Such structure-resonant energy transfer induced inactivation is mainly through physically fracturing the virus structure, which was confirmed by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. These results provide a pathway toward establishing a new epidemic prevention strategy in open public for airborne virus.

  14. Efficient Structure Resonance Energy Transfer from Microwaves to Confined Acoustic Vibrations in Viruses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Szu-Chi; Lin, Huan-Chun; Liu, Tzu-Ming; Lu, Jen-Tang; Hung, Wan-Ting; Huang, Yu-Ru; Tsai, Yi-Chun; Kao, Chuan-Liang; Chen, Shih-Yuan; Sun, Chi-Kuang

    2015-12-01

    Virus is known to resonate in the confined-acoustic dipolar mode with microwave of the same frequency. However this effect was not considered in previous virus-microwave interaction studies and microwave-based virus epidemic prevention. Here we show that this structure-resonant energy transfer effect from microwaves to virus can be efficient enough so that airborne virus was inactivated with reasonable microwave power density safe for the open public. We demonstrate this effect by measuring the residual viral infectivity of influenza A virus after illuminating microwaves with different frequencies and powers. We also established a theoretical model to estimate the microwaves power threshold for virus inactivation and good agreement with experiments was obtained. Such structure-resonant energy transfer induced inactivation is mainly through physically fracturing the virus structure, which was confirmed by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. These results provide a pathway toward establishing a new epidemic prevention strategy in open public for airborne virus.

  15. Acoustic dose and acoustic dose-rate.

    PubMed

    Duck, Francis

    2009-10-01

    Acoustic dose is defined as the energy deposited by absorption of an acoustic wave per unit mass of the medium supporting the wave. Expressions for acoustic dose and acoustic dose-rate are given for plane-wave conditions, including temporal and frequency dependencies of energy deposition. The relationship between the acoustic dose-rate and the resulting temperature increase is explored, as is the relationship between acoustic dose-rate and radiation force. Energy transfer from the wave to the medium by means of acoustic cavitation is considered, and an approach is proposed in principle that could allow cavitation to be included within the proposed definitions of acoustic dose and acoustic dose-rate.

  16. A seismic field test with a Low-level Acoustic Combustion Source and Pseudo-Noise codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Askeland, Bjørn; Ruud, Bent Ole; Hobæk, Halvor; Mjelde, Rolf

    2009-01-01

    The Low-level Acoustic Combustion Source (LACS) which can fire its pulses at a high rate, has been tested successfully as a seismic marine source on shallow ice-age sediments in Byfjorden at Bergen, Norway. Pseudo-Noise pulsed signals with spiky autocorrelation functions were used to detect the sediments. Each transmitted sequence lasted 10 s and contained 43 pulses. While correlation gave a blurry result, deconvolution between the near-field recordings and the streamer recordings gave a clear seismic section. Compared to the section acquired with single air-gun shots along the same profile, the LACS gave a more clear presentation of the sediments and basement.

  17. HH55 and its energy source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyer, Mark H.; Graham, J. A.

    1990-01-01

    Imaging and spectroscopic observations of HH55 in the Lupus molecular cloud are presented. Cohen and Schwartz (1987) have shown that HH55 is apparently not excited by the nearby T Tau star RU Lup as once thought but rather by the coincident FIR point source 15533 - 3742 extracted from IRAS coadded images. The optical counterpart of this IR source is identified as an active, relatively unobscured M-dwarf star. The forbidden emission lines observed in the stellar spectrum exhibit slight asymmetries to blueshifted velocities. Deconvolution of the emission lines reveals a weak moderate-velocity (-100 km/sec) wind component and a stronger emission component whose velocity is very close to that of the star.

  18. HH55 and its energy source

    SciTech Connect

    Heyer, M.H.; Graham, J.A. )

    1990-02-01

    Imaging and spectroscopic observations of HH55 in the Lupus molecular cloud are presented. Cohen and Schwartz (1987) have shown that HH55 is apparently not excited by the nearby T Tau star RU Lup as once thought but rather by the coincident FIR point source 15533 - 3742 extracted from IRAS coadded images. The optical counterpart of this IR source is identified as an active, relatively unobscured M-dwarf star. The forbidden emission lines observed in the stellar spectrum exhibit slight asymmetries to blueshifted velocities. Deconvolution of the emission lines reveals a weak moderate-velocity (-100 km/sec) wind component and a stronger emission component whose velocity is very close to that of the star. 28 refs.

  19. High energy efficient solid state laser sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, Robert L.

    1987-01-01

    Investigations continue of diode-laser-pumped solid-state laser oscillators and nonlinear processes using them as sources. Diode laser array pumped Nd:YAG and Nd:glass lasers have been demonstrated. Theoretical studies of non-planar oscillators have been advanced, producing new designs which should be more resistant to feedback and offer better frequency stability. A monolithic, singly resonant Optical Parametric Oscillator in MgO:LiNbO3 has been operated.

  20. Education and Training in New and Renewable Sources of Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beresovski, T.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Identifies past and present efforts and future directions for UNESCO activities related to energy but focusing on alternative energy sources. Reports results of an international survey and analysis of programs, facilities, and needs in alternative energy education and training. Outlines curricula for policymakers, specialists, and technicians. (DC)

  1. The Effectiveness of the Aquaflex Gel Pad in the Transmission of Acoustic Energy

    PubMed Central

    Klucinec, Brian

    1996-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to assess the effectiveness of the Aquaflex Gel Pad in the transmission of acoustic energy. Design and Setting: This was a comparative study that utilized descriptive statistics for result interpretation. The independent variables included ultrasound intensity, interposed materials, and trials. The dependent variable was peak-to-peak voltage output recorded via an oscilloscope. The study was conducted in a ventilated research laboratory. Measurements: Three trials were conducted with six combinations of material interposed between a conducting (1 MHz) and a receiving sound head. The interposed materials were as follows: 1) ultrasound gel, 2) gel plus a gel pad, 3) gel plus a gel pad and pig tissue sample (0.90 cm of subcutaneous fat), 4) gel plus a gel pad and a pig tissue sample (1.8 cm of subcutaneous fat), 5) gel plus thin pig tissue sample, and 6) gel plus thick pig tissue sample. Each interposed material combination was tested at the intensities (W/cm2) as follows: 0.10, 0.25, 0.50, 1.00, 1.50, and 2.50. Results: The gel pad proved to be an efficient couplant in the delivery of high-frequency acoustic energy. Using ultrasound gel as the base line (100% transmissivity) it was concluded that the gel pad transmitted more acoustic energy at every intensity except at 0.1 W/cm2. The gel pad used with the two thicknesses of subcutaneous fat gave comparable results. Gel used with the two thicknesses of subcutaneous fat yielded results that warrant further investigation. Conclusions: I believe gel pads are a practical choice for clinical applications of ultrasound over uneven surfaces. The reusable gel pads offer the clinician a convenient and reliable method for delivering ultrasound energy to the patient. I believe it is preferable to use the gel pad with ultrasound gel directly applied to the patient and at the sound head-gel pad interface as opposed to using the traditional water bath immersion method. ImagesFig 1. PMID

  2. High-energy X-ray spectra of five sources.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricker, G. R.; Mcclintock, J. E.; Gerassimenko, M.; Lewin , W. H. G.

    1973-01-01

    On October 15-16, 1970, we carried out balloon X-ray observations from Australia at energies above 15 keV. We present the high-energy X-ray spectra of three sources discovered by us, GX 301-2, GX 304-1, and GX 1 + 4. The data suggest that these high-energy sources correspond to the sources 2U 1223-62, 2U 1258-61, and 2U 1728-24 respectively. We also present the spectra for two additional sources, GX 5-1 (2U 1757-25) and GX 3 + 1 (2U 1744-26). The average intensity of the highly variable source GX 301-2 was observed to be as great as Tau X-1 in the energy range 15-50 keV.

  3. Integration of acoustical information in the perception of impacted sound sources: the role of information accuracy and exploitability.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Bruno L; Rocchesso, Davide; McAdams, Stephen

    2010-04-01

    Sound sources are perceived by integrating information from multiple acoustical features. The factors influencing the integration of information are largely unknown. We measured how the perceptual weighting of different features varies with the accuracy of information and with a listener's ability to exploit it. Participants judged the hardness of two objects whose interaction generates an impact sound: a hammer and a sounding object. In a first discrimination experiment, trained listeners focused on the most accurate information, although with greater difficulty when perceiving the hammer. We inferred a limited exploitability for the most accurate hammer-hardness information. In a second rating experiment, listeners focused on the most accurate information only when estimating sounding-object hardness. In a third rating experiment, we synthesized sounds by independently manipulating source properties that covaried in Experiments 1 and 2: sounding-object hardness and impact properties. Sounding-object hardness perception relied on the most accurate acoustical information, whereas impact-properties influenced more strongly hammer hardness perception. Overall, perceptual weight increased with the accuracy of acoustical information, although information that was not easily exploited was perceptually secondary, even if accurate.

  4. Use of beamforming for detecting an acoustic source inside a cylindrical shell filled with a heavy fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriot, J.; Maxit, L.; Guyader, J. L.; Gastaldi, O.; Périsse, J.

    2015-02-01

    The acoustic detection of defects or leaks inside a cylindrical shell containing a fluid is of prime importance in the industry, particularly in the nuclear field. This paper examines the beamforming technique which is used to detect and locate the presence of an acoustic monopole inside a cylindrical elastic shell by measuring the external shell vibrations. In order to study the effect of fluid-structure interactions and the distance of the source from the array of sensors, a vibro-acoustic model of the fluid-loaded shell is first considered for numerical experiments. The beamforming technique is then applied to radial velocities of the shell calculated with the model. Different parameters such as the distance between sensors, the radial position of the source, the damping loss factor of the shell, or of the fluid, and modifications of fluid properties can be considered without difficulty. Analysis of these different results highlight how the behaviour of the fluid-loaded shell influences the detection. Finally, a test in a water-filled steel pipe is achieved for confirming experimentally the interest of the presented approach.

  5. A "looming bias" in spatial hearing? Effects of acoustic intensity and spectrum on categorical sound source localization.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Lisa; Olsen, Kirk N

    2017-01-01

    Continuous increases of acoustic intensity (up-ramps) can indicate a looming (approaching) sound source in the environment, whereas continuous decreases of intensity (down-ramps) can indicate a receding sound source. From psychoacoustic experiments, an "adaptive perceptual bias" for up-ramp looming tonal stimuli has been proposed (Neuhoff, 1998). This theory postulates that (1) up-ramps are perceptually salient because of their association with looming and potentially threatening stimuli in the environment; (2) tonal stimuli are perceptually salient because of an association with single and potentially threatening biological sound sources in the environment, relative to white noise, which is more likely to arise from dispersed signals and nonthreatening/nonbiological sources (wind/ocean). In the present study, we extrapolated the "adaptive perceptual bias" theory and investigated its assumptions by measuring sound source localization in response to acoustic stimuli presented in azimuth to imply looming, stationary, and receding motion in depth. Participants (N = 26) heard three directions of intensity change (up-ramps, down-ramps, and steady state, associated with looming, receding, and stationary motion, respectively) and three levels of acoustic spectrum (a 1-kHz pure tone, the tonal vowel /ә/, and white noise) in a within-subjects design. We first hypothesized that if up-ramps are "perceptually salient" and capable of eliciting adaptive responses, then they would be localized faster and more accurately than down-ramps. This hypothesis was supported. However, the results did not support the second hypothesis. Rather, the white-noise and vowel conditions were localized faster and more accurately than the pure-tone conditions. These results are discussed in the context of auditory and visual theories of motion perception, auditory attentional capture, and the spectral causes of spatial ambiguity.

  6. Electric Discharge Excitation and Energy Source Integration.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-01-06

    only one side of the machined bar connecting the mounting plate to the cathode. An electrical schematic of the PFN utilized for the discharge studies...for the initial charge voltage to be 2 VG for optimum energy transfer is still present. All arrangements of transmision lines studied showed the... side of the anode screen are used to achieve a smooth physical transition and, thereby, minimize flow-generated turbulence. With this arrangement the

  7. Alternative energy sources could support life on Europa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulze-Makuch, Dirk; Irwin, Louis N.

    Energy pervades the solar system in a variety of forms, including electromagnetic and particle radiation, magnetism, heat, kinetic motion, and gravitational interactions. Life on Earth is sustained by the conversion of light and chemical energy into proton gradients across membranes that drive the phosphorylation of high-energy intermediate metabolites.The use of light and reduced chemical bonds as energy sources is not surprising on Earth, where the intensity of light is strong and an oxidizing atmosphere favors energy-yielding chemical reactions. However, any naturally occurring energy gradient that generates charge separation across boundary layers could theoretically yield the free energy needed to sustain life. Using specific, plausible examples from Jupiter's ice-covered satellite Europa, we propose that alternative energy sources could sustain life where neither light nor an oxidizing atmosphere is available.

  8. History of energy sources and their utilization in Nigeria

    SciTech Connect

    Ogunsola, O.I. )

    1990-01-01

    Nigeria, a major oil producer, is rich in other energy sources. These include wood, coal, gas, tar sands, and hydro power. Although oil has been the most popular, some other energy sources have a longer history. This article discusses the historical trends in the production and utilization of Nigerian energy sources. Wood has the longest history. However,its utilization was limited to domestic cooking. Imported coal was first used in 1896, but it was not discovered in Nigeria until 1909 and was first produced in 1916. Although oil exploration started in 1901, it was first discovered in commercial quantity in 1956 and produced in 1958. Oil thereafter took over the energy scene from coal until 1969, when hydro energy was first produced. Energy consumption has been mainly from hydro. Tar sands account for about 55% of total proven non-renewable reserves.

  9. The energy situation. [emphasizing various energy sources, costs, and environmental effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Energy reserves from the principal energy sources other than petroleum and natural gas are summarized. It was found that energy sources are being consumed at rates which exceed the ability to replace them through new discoveries and technology improvements. The costs and implications to environment for using coal and nuclear energy are discussed. Tables are presented on energy consumption, cost of reclamation, and water power capacity.

  10. Canonical Acoustics and Its Application to Surface Acoustic Wave on Acoustic Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jian Qi

    2016-08-01

    In a conventional formalism of acoustics, acoustic pressure p and velocity field u are used for characterizing acoustic waves propagating inside elastic/acoustic materials. We shall treat some fundamental problems relevant to acoustic wave propagation alternatively by using canonical acoustics (a more concise and compact formalism of acoustic dynamics), in which an acoustic scalar potential and an acoustic vector potential (Φ ,V), instead of the conventional acoustic field quantities such as acoustic pressure and velocity field (p,u) for characterizing acoustic waves, have been defined as the fundamental variables. The canonical formalism of the acoustic energy-momentum tensor is derived in terms of the acoustic potentials. Both the acoustic Hamiltonian density and the acoustic Lagrangian density have been defined, and based on this formulation, the acoustic wave quantization in a fluid is also developed. Such a formalism of acoustic potentials is employed to the problem of negative-mass-density assisted surface acoustic wave that is a highly localized surface bound state (an eigenstate of the acoustic wave equations). Since such a surface acoustic wave can be strongly confined to an interface between an acoustic metamaterial (e.g., fluid-solid composite structures with a negative dynamical mass density) and an ordinary material (with a positive mass density), it will give rise to an effect of acoustic field enhancement on the acoustic interface, and would have potential applications in acoustic device design for acoustic wave control.

  11. Test of acoustic tone source and propulsion performance of C8A Buffalo suppressor nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marrs, C. C.; Harkonen, D. L.; Okeefe, J. V.

    1974-01-01

    Results are presented for a static acoustic and propulsion performance ground test conducted at the Boeing hot nozzle facility on the C8A Buffalo noise suppressor nozzle. Various methods to remove a nozzle-associated 2000-Hz tone are evaluated. Results of testing this rectangular-array lobed nozzle for propulsion performance and acoustic directivity are reported. Recommendations for future nozzle modifications and further testing are included. Appendix A contains the test plan. Appendix B presents the test log. Appendix C contains plots of the one-third octave sound pressure levels recorded during the test. Appendix D describes the acoustic data recording and reduction systems. The performance data is tabulated in Appendix E.

  12. Redox Disproportionation of Glucose as a Major Biosynthetic Energy Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, Arthur L.

    1996-01-01

    Previous studies have concluded that very little if any energy is required for the microbial biosynthesis of amino acids and lipids from glucose -- processes that yield almost as much ATP (adenosine triphosphate) as they consume. However, these studies did not establish the strength nor the nature of the energy source driving these biological transformations. To identify and estimate the strength of the energy source behind these processes, we calculated the free energy change due to the redox disproportionation of substrate carbon of (a) 26 redox-balanced fermentation reactions, and (b) the biosynthesis of amino acids, lipids, and nucleotides of E. coli from glucose. A plot of the negative free energy of these reactions per mmole of carbon as a function of the number of disproportionative electron transfers per mmol of carbon showed that the energy yields of these fermentations and biosyntheses were directly proportional to the degree of redox disproportionation of carbon. Since this linear relationship showed that redox disproportionation was the dominant energy source of these reactions, we were able to establish that amino acid and lipid biosynthesis obtained most of their energy from redox disproportionation (greater than 94%). In contrast nucleotide biosynthesis was not driven by redox disproportionation of carbon, and consequently depended completely on ATP for energy. This crucial and previously unrecognized role of sugars as an energy source of biosynthesis suggests that sugars were involved at the earliest stage in the origin of anabolic metabolism.

  13. Passive Acoustic Source Localization at a Low Sampling Rate Based on a Five-Element Cross Microphone Array

    PubMed Central

    Kan, Yue; Wang, Pengfei; Zha, Fusheng; Li, Mantian; Gao, Wa; Song, Baoyu

    2015-01-01

    Accurate acoustic source localization at a low sampling rate (less than 10 kHz) is still a challenging problem for small portable systems, especially for a multitasking micro-embedded system. A modification of the generalized cross-correlation (GCC) method with the up-sampling (US) theory is proposed and defined as the US-GCC method, which can improve the accuracy of the time delay of arrival (TDOA) and source location at a low sampling rate. In this work, through the US operation, an input signal with a certain sampling rate can be converted into another signal with a higher frequency. Furthermore, the optimal interpolation factor for the US operation is derived according to localization computation time and the standard deviation (SD) of target location estimations. On the one hand, simulation results show that absolute errors of the source locations based on the US-GCC method with an interpolation factor of 15 are approximately from 1/15- to 1/12-times those based on the GCC method, when the initial same sampling rates of both methods are 8 kHz. On the other hand, a simple and small portable passive acoustic source localization platform composed of a five-element cross microphone array has been designed and set up in this paper. The experiments on the established platform, which accurately locates a three-dimensional (3D) near-field target at a low sampling rate demonstrate that the proposed method is workable. PMID:26057042

  14. Passive Acoustic Source Localization at a Low Sampling Rate Based on a Five-Element Cross Microphone Array.

    PubMed

    Kan, Yue; Wang, Pengfei; Zha, Fusheng; Li, Mantian; Gao, Wa; Song, Baoyu

    2015-06-05

    Accurate acoustic source localization at a low sampling rate (less than 10 kHz) is still a challenging problem for small portable systems, especially for a multitasking micro-embedded system. A modification of the generalized cross-correlation (GCC) method with the up-sampling (US) theory is proposed and defined as the US-GCC method, which can improve the accuracy of the time delay of arrival (TDOA) and source location at a low sampling rate. In this work, through the US operation, an input signal with a certain sampling rate can be converted into another signal with a higher frequency. Furthermore, the optimal interpolation factor for the US operation is derived according to localization computation time and the standard deviation (SD) of target location estimations. On the one hand, simulation results show that absolute errors of the source locations based on the US-GCC method with an interpolation factor of 15 are approximately from 1/15- to 1/12-times those based on the GCC method, when the initial same sampling rates of both methods are 8 kHz. On the other hand, a simple and small portable passive acoustic source localization platform composed of a five-element cross microphone array has been designed and set up in this paper. The experiments on the established platform, which accurately locates a three-dimensional (3D) near-field target at a low sampling rate demonstrate that the proposed method is workable.

  15. SWOT analysis of the renewable energy sources in Romania - case study: solar energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupu, A. G.; Dumencu, A.; Atanasiu, M. V.; Panaite, C. E.; Dumitrașcu, Gh; Popescu, A.

    2016-08-01

    The evolution of energy sector worldwide triggered intense preoccupation on both finding alternative renewable energy sources and environmental issues. Romania is considered to have technological potential and geographical location suitable to renewable energy usage for electricity generation. But this high potential is not fully exploited in the context of policies and regulations adopted globally, and more specific, European Union (EU) environmental and energy strategies and legislation related to renewable energy sources. This SWOT analysis of solar energy source presents the state of the art, potential and future prospects for development of renewable energy in Romania. The analysis concluded that the development of solar energy sector in Romania depends largely on: viability of legislative framework on renewable energy sources, increased subsidies for solar R&D, simplified methodology of green certificates, and educating the public, investors, developers and decision-makers.

  16. Development of Electricity Generation from Renewable Energy Sources in Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kentel, E.

    2011-12-01

    Electricity is mainly produced from coal, natural gas and hydropower in Turkey. However, almost all the natural gas and high quality coal are imported. Thus, increasing the shares of both hydro and other renewables in energy supply is necessary to decrease dependency of the country on foreign sources. In 2008, the total installed capacity of Turkey was around 42000 MW and 66 % of this was from thermal sources. The remaining 33 % was from hydro, which leaves only one percent for the other renewable energy sources. The share of renewable energy in the energy budget of Turkey has increased in the last two decades; however, in 2008, only 17 % of the total electricity generation was realized from renewable sources most of which was hydro. According to State Hydraulic Works (SHW) which is the primary executive state agency responsible for the planning, operating and managing of Turkey's water resources, Turkey utilizes only around 35% of its economically viable hydro potential. The current situation clearly demonstrates the need for increasing the share of renewables in the energy budget. New laws, such as the Electricity Market Law, have been enacted and the following items were identified by the Ministry of Energy and Natural Resources of Turkey among primary energy policies and priorities: (i) decreasing dependency on foreign resources by prioritizing utilization of natural resources, (ii) increasing the share of renewable energy resources in the energy budget of Turkey; (iii) minimization of adverse environmental impacts of production and utilization of natural resources. The government's energy policy increased investments in renewable energy resources; however lack of a needed legal framework brought various environmental and social problems with this fast development. The development of the share of renewable resources in the energy budget, current government policy, and environmental concerns related with renewables, and ideas to improve the overall benefits of

  17. Internal energy and fragmentation of ions produced in electrospray sources.

    PubMed

    Gabelica, Valérie; De Pauw, Edwin

    2005-01-01

    This review addresses the determination of the internal energy of ions produced by electrospray ionization (ESI) sources, and the influence of the internal energy on analyte fragmentation. A control of the analyte internal energy is crucial for several applications of electrospray mass spectrometry, like structural studies, construction of reproducible and exportable spectral libraries, analysis of non-covalent complexes. Sections II and III summarize the Electrospray mechanisms and source design considerations which are relevant to the problem of internal energy, and Section IV gives an overview of the inter-relationships between ion internal energy, reaction time scale, and analyte fragmentation. In these three sections we tried to make the most important theoretical elements understandable by all ESI users, and their understanding requires a minimal background in physical chemistry. We then present the different approaches used to experimentally determine the ion internal energy, as well as various attempts in modeling the internal energy uptake in electrospray sources. Finally, a tentative comparison between electrospray and other ionization sources is made. As the reader will see, although many reports appeared on the subject, the knowledge in the field of internal energy of ions produced by soft ionization sources is still scarce, because of the complexity of the system, and this is what makes this area of research so interesting. The last section presents some perspectives for future research.

  18. Comparative studies of energy sources in gynecologic laparoscopy.

    PubMed

    Law, Kenneth S K; Lyons, Stephen D

    2013-01-01

    Energy sources incorporating "vessel sealing" capabilities are being increasingly used in gynecologic laparoscopic surgery although conventional monopolar and bipolar electrosurgery remain popular. The preference for one device over another is based on a combination of factors, including the surgeon's subjective experience, availability, and cost. Although comparative clinical studies and meta-analyses of laparoscopic energy sources have reported small but statistically significant differences in volumes of blood loss, the clinical significance of such small volumes is questionable. The overall usefulness of the various energy sources available will depend on a number of factors including vessel burst pressure and seal time, lateral thermal spread, and smoke production. Animal studies and laboratory-based trials are useful in providing a controlled environment to investigate such parameters. At present, there is insufficient evidence to support the use of one energy source over another.

  19. A power conditioning system for radioisotope thermoelectric generator energy sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillis, J. A., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    The use of radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTG) as the primary source of energy in unmanned spacecraft is discussed. RTG output control, power conditioning system requirements, the electrical design, and circuit performance are also discussed.

  20. [Applications of GIS in biomass energy source research].

    PubMed

    Su, Xian-Ming; Wang, Wu-Kui; Li, Yi-Wei; Sun, Wen-Xiang; Shi, Hai; Zhang, Da-Hong

    2010-03-01

    Biomass resources have the characteristics of widespread and dispersed distribution, which have close relations to the environment, climate, soil, and land use, etc. Geographic information system (GIS) has the functions of spatial analysis and the flexibility of integrating with other application models and algorithms, being of predominance to the biomass energy source research. This paper summarized the researches on the GIS applications in biomass energy source research, with the focus in the feasibility study of bioenergy development, assessment of biomass resources amount and distribution, layout of biomass exploitation and utilization, evaluation of gaseous emission from biomass burning, and biomass energy information system. Three perspectives of GIS applications in biomass energy source research were proposed, i. e., to enrich the data source, to improve the capacity on data processing and decision-support, and to generate the online proposal.

  1. Cassava as an energy source: a selected bibliography

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, C.

    1980-01-01

    This selected bibliography includes 250 articles on cassava as a potential energy source. Factors included are things which influence cassava growth; such as weeding, fertilizer, diseases and genetic selection, as well as the conversion of cassava to ethanol. (DP)

  2. Effects of Acoustic Emission and Energy Evolution of Rock Specimens Under the Uniaxial Cyclic Loading and Unloading Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Qingbin; Zhang, Mingwei; Han, Lijun; Pu, Hai; Nie, Taoyi

    2016-10-01

    Characteristics of energy accumulation, evolution, and dissipation in uniaxial cyclic loading and unloading compression of 30 sandstone rock specimens under six different loading rates were explored. Stress-strain relations and acoustic emission characteristics of the deformation and failure of rock specimens were analyzed. The densities and rates of stored energy, elastic energy, and dissipated energy under different loading rates were confirmed, and an effective approach for the equivalent energy surface was presented. The energy evolution of rock deformation and failure were revealed. It turns out that the rock deformation behavior under uniaxial cyclic loading and unloading compression remained almost unchanged compared with that of uniaxial compression. The degree of match between reloading stress-strain curves and previous unloading curves was high, thereby demonstrating the memory function of rock masses. The intensity of acoustic emission fluctuated continually during the entire cyclic process. Emissions significantly increased as the stress exceeded the unloading level. The peak of acoustic emission increased with increasing loading stress level. Relationships between energy density and axial load indicate that the rock mass possesses a certain energy storage limitation. The energy evolution of rock masses is closely related to the axial loading stress, rather than to the axial loading rate. With increasing axial loading stress, stored energy varied most rapidly, followed by that of the elastic energy, then dissipated energy. Energy accumulation dominates prior to the axial load reaching peak strength; thereafter, energy dissipation becomes dominant. The input energy causes the irreversible initiation and extension of microcracks in the rock body. Elastic energy release leads to sudden instability of rock bodies and drives rock damage.

  3. UV emissions from low energy artificial light sources.

    PubMed

    Fenton, Leona; Moseley, Harry

    2014-01-01

    Energy efficient light sources have been introduced across Europe and many other countries world wide. The most common of these is the Compact Fluorescent Lamp (CFL), which has been shown to emit ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) are an alternative technology that has minimal UV emissions. This brief review summarises the different energy efficient light sources available on the market and compares the UV levels and the subsequent effects on the skin of normal individuals and those who suffer from photodermatoses.

  4. Vibro-acoustic modelling of aircraft double-walls with structural links using Statistical Energy Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campolina, Bruno L.

    The prediction of aircraft interior noise involves the vibroacoustic modelling of the fuselage with noise control treatments. This structure is composed of a stiffened metallic or composite panel, lined with a thermal and acoustic insulation layer (glass wool), and structurally connected via vibration isolators to a commercial lining panel (trim). The goal of this work aims at tailoring the noise control treatments taking design constraints such as weight and space optimization into account. For this purpose, a representative aircraft double-wall is modelled using the Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) method. Laboratory excitations such as diffuse acoustic field and point force are addressed and trends are derived for applications under in-flight conditions, considering turbulent boundary layer excitation. The effect of the porous layer compression is firstly addressed. In aeronautical applications, compression can result from the installation of equipment and cables. It is studied analytically and experimentally, using a single panel and a fibrous uniformly compressed over 100% of its surface. When compression increases, a degradation of the transmission loss up to 5 dB for a 50% compression of the porous thickness is observed mainly in the mid-frequency range (around 800 Hz). However, for realistic cases, the effect should be reduced since the compression rate is lower and compression occurs locally. Then the transmission through structural connections between panels is addressed using a four-pole approach that links the force-velocity pair at each side of the connection. The modelling integrates experimental dynamic stiffness of isolators, derived using an adapted test rig. The structural transmission is then experimentally validated and included in the double-wall SEA model as an equivalent coupling loss factor (CLF) between panels. The tested structures being flat, only axial transmission is addressed. Finally, the dominant sound transmission paths are

  5. Opportunities for renewable energy sources in Central Asia countries

    SciTech Connect

    Obozov, A.J.; Loscutoff, W.V.

    1998-07-01

    This report presents an overview of the state of conventional energy sources and the potential for development of renewable energy sources in the Central Asia countries of Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, Kyrgyzstan, Turkmenistan, and Tajikistan. The region has a population of about 50 million in an area of more than four million square kilometers. The per capita gross internal product is more than $2,500, although the economy has been declining the past five years. The area has substantial coal, oil, uranium, and natural gas reserves, although they are not distributed equally among the five countries. Energy production is such that the countries do not have to rely heavily on imports. One of the problems in Central Asia is that the energy prices are substantially below the world prices. This is a factor in development of renewable energy sources. The primary renewable energy resources available are wind in Kazakhstan, solar in the entire region, biomass in Kyrgyzstan, and micro-hydropower stations in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan. All of these have the potential to provide a significant amount of the required energy for the region. However, all of the countries have an abundance of various renewable energy resources. To effectively use these resources, however, a number of barriers to their development and commercialization must be overcome. These include low prices of conventional energy sources, absence of legislative support, lack of financing for new technologies, and lack of awareness of renewable energy sources by the population. A number of specific actions are proposed to overcome these barriers. These include establishment of a Central Asia coordinating council for renewable energy, development of a regional renewable energy program, and setting up a number of large demonstration projects. 16 figs.

  6. Electron energy recovery system for negative ion sources

    DOEpatents

    Dagenhart, W.K.; Stirling, W.L.

    1979-10-25

    An electron energy recovery system for negative ion sources is provided. The system, employing crossed electric and magnetic fields, separates the electrons from the ions as they are extracted from the ion source plasma generator and before the ions are accelerated to their full energy. With the electric and magnetic fields oriented 90/sup 0/ to each other, the electrons remain at approximately the electrical potential at which they were generated. The electromagnetic forces cause the ions to be accelerated to the full accelerating supply voltage energy while being deflected through an angle of less than 90/sup 0/. The electrons precess out of the accelerating field region into an electron recovery region where they are collected at a small fraction of the full accelerating supply energy. It is possible, by this method, to collect > 90% of the electrons extracted along with the negative ions from a negative ion source beam at < 4% of full energy.

  7. Sources of high-energy protons in Saturn's magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, J. F.; Simpson, J. A.

    1980-01-01

    The passage of Pioneer 11 through Saturn's magnetosphere revealed an especially intense region of high-energy particle fluxes that places unique constraints on models for sources of high-energy protons in the innermost radiation zones. Of special interest is the flux of protons with energies above 35 MeV which was measured with a fission cell in the innermost magnetosphere between the A ring and the orbit of Mimas. The negative phase space density gradients derived from the proton and electron observations in this region imply that steady-state inward diffusion from the outer magnetosphere is not an adequate source for these high-energy protons. In the present paper, the nature of the Crand source at Saturn is examined, and its significance for injection of high-energy protons into the region inside L = 4 is estimated.

  8. Method and apparatus for sizing and separating warp yarns using acoustical energy

    DOEpatents

    Sheen, Shuh-Haw; Chien, Hual-Te; Raptis, Apostolos C.; Kupperman, David S.

    1998-01-01

    A slashing process for preparing warp yarns for weaving operations including the steps of sizing and/or desizing the yarns in an acoustic resonance box and separating the yarns with a leasing apparatus comprised of a set of acoustically agitated lease rods. The sizing step includes immersing the yarns in a size solution contained in an acoustic resonance box. Acoustic transducers are positioned against the exterior of the box for generating an acoustic pressure field within the size solution. Ultrasonic waves that result from the acoustic pressure field continuously agitate the size solution to effect greater mixing and more uniform application and penetration of the size onto the yarns. The sized yarns are then separated by passing the warp yarns over and under lease rods. Electroacoustic transducers generate acoustic waves along the longitudinal axis of the lease rods, creating a shearing motion on the surface of the rods for splitting the yarns.

  9. Method and apparatus for sizing and separating warp yarns using acoustical energy

    DOEpatents

    Sheen, S.H.; Chien, H.T.; Raptis, A.C.; Kupperman, D.S.

    1998-05-19

    A slashing process is disclosed for preparing warp yarns for weaving operations including the steps of sizing and/or desizing the yarns in an acoustic resonance box and separating the yarns with a leasing apparatus comprised of a set of acoustically agitated lease rods. The sizing step includes immersing the yarns in a size solution contained in an acoustic resonance box. Acoustic transducers are positioned against the exterior of the box for generating an acoustic pressure field within the size solution. Ultrasonic waves that result from the acoustic pressure field continuously agitate the size solution to effect greater mixing and more uniform application and penetration of the size onto the yarns. The sized yarns are then separated by passing the warp yarns over and under lease rods. Electroacoustic transducers generate acoustic waves along the longitudinal axis of the lease rods, creating a shearing motion on the surface of the rods for splitting the yarns. 2 figs.

  10. The importance of the different kinds of energy sources for energy future of Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, Yusuf Alper; Aladağ, Canan

    2016-11-01

    Nowadays, the need of energy has been increasing day by day with the population growth and the advancements of technology. In this study, the current state of nuclear, wind and solar energy on the worldwide has been generally investigated. The general assessments have been made based on Turkey's energy potential and the evaluation situation of this potential. The current political structures of countries are generally assessed and under this policy, the last situation and the latest implemented innovations are given. Turkey's energy demand is constantly increasing and Turkey is a country that needs to energy imports. This is a need for new energy sources to meet the growing need for energy. Nuclear, wind and solar energy are the new sources of energy to the fore in our country recently. In this study is given general information on the usage of energy sources of making and some deficiencies were been emphasized by political considerations in this regard.

  11. Biogas as a source of rural energy

    SciTech Connect

    Kalia, A.K.

    2000-01-01

    The hilly state of Himachal Pradesh, with nearly 2.15 million cattle and 0.7 million buffalo, has the potential to install 0.64 million biogas plants of 1 m{sup 3} size. These plants could generate nearly 4.90 x 105 m{sup 3} of biogas, equivalent to 3.07 x 10{sup 5} L kerosene per day to meet domestic energy needs of nearly one-fourth of its rural population. During 1982--1998, only 12.8% of this potential was achieved. The percent of possible potential achieved in plant installations in 12 districts of this state, namely, Bilaspur, Chamba, Hamirpur, Kangra, Kinnaur, Kullu, Lahul-Spiti, Mandi, Shimla, Sirmour, Solan, and Una, are 35.35, 1.70, 20.96, 8.67, 1.54, 6.96, 0.00, 18.49, 3.84, 8.521, 18.29, and 13.23%, respectively. There is a need to strengthen biogas promotion, particularly in the districts of Kangra, Mandi, Solan, and Una, which range from mid-hill to low-hill terrain and which have large potential due to high concentration of bovine population. Increased costs and comparatively low rate of subsidies has resulted in a decreasing rate of plant installation annually, from 3,500 during 1987--1992 to fewer than 1,200 during 1995--1998. The percentage of functioning plants was 82% in 1987--1988 but has decreased to 63%. To ensure proper installation and functionality of plants, the authors discuss the needed improvements in the biogas promotion program.

  12. Proceedings of the conference on alternative energy sources for Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Rothman, I.N.

    1981-01-01

    Four primary areas of study for alternative energy sources for Texas are considered. These are: energy demand supply and economics; prospects for energy resources (oil, lignite, coal, nuclear, goethermal and solar) and conservation; financial and technical constraints; and future planning. The following papers are presented: US energy outlook to 1990; energy supply and demand projections; comparative economics of solar energy in the generation of big power; gas present and future prospects; prospects for enhanced recovery of oil in Texas; the outlook for coal in USA; implementation of nuclear power in Texas; future outlook - geopressured-geothermal energy for Texas; future prospects for conservation and solar energy; financing and money supply constraints; technical constraints to energy supply increase; planning for the future - the crisis that drones on. Two papers have been abstracted separately.

  13. Alternative energy sources and new energy technologies for Turkish rural areas

    SciTech Connect

    Ultanir, M.O.

    1983-12-01

    Modern agriculture is an energy consumer sector, also agriculture is an energy conversion process. In addition to biomass energy's raw materials are harvested by agriculture. The concept of energy in agriculture, energy is one of the main and outstanding factor which renders the realization of the overall development of the agriculture and rural areas. Agricultural income depends on total mechanical power in agricultural mechanization; general energy consumption of rural sector; cultural energy consumption by agricultural inputs which are fertilizer, pesticides, indirect energy in machinery, irrigation equipments, buildings and other services; direct energy consumption in agricultural mechanization which are fuel and electricity etc. In general, energy input in the rural areas is classified as direct and indirect. Direct energy input reflects demands for mechanical energy, electrical energy and heat energy. Indirect energy consists of inputs which have been produced by industrial sector and introduced into rural sector. Although conventional energy sources, especially petroleum products are used in meeting direct energy input requirements, alternative energy sources may be used as well in this respect. Especially emphasis is being given to new and renewable alternative sources for heat and electrical energy requirements.

  14. Distance, Growth Factor, and Dark Energy Constraints from Photometric Baryon Acoustic Oscillation and Weak Lensing Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Hu; Knox, Lloyd; Tyson, J. Anthony

    2009-01-01

    Baryon acoustic oscillations (BAOs) and weak lensing (WL) are complementary probes of cosmology. We explore the distance and growth factor measurements from photometric BAO and WL techniques, and investigate the roles of the distance and growth factor in constraining dark energy. We find for WL that the growth factor has a great impact on dark energy constraints, but is much less powerful than the distance. Dark energy constraints from WL are concentrated in considerably fewer distance eigenmodes than those from BAO, with the largest contributions from modes that are sensitive to the absolute distance. Both techniques have some well-determined distance eigenmodes that are not very sensitive to the dark energy equation-of-state parameters w0 and wa, suggesting that they can accommodate additional parameters for dark energy and for the control of systematic uncertainties. A joint analysis of BAO and WL is far more powerful than either technique alone, and the resulting constraints on the distance and growth factor will be useful for distinguishing dark energy and modified gravity models. The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) will yield both WL and angular BAO over a sample of several billion galaxies. Joint LSST BAO and WL can yield 0.5% level precision on ten comoving distances evenly spaced in log(1 + z) between redshift 0.3 and 3 with cosmic microwave background priors from Planck. In addition, since the angular diameter distance, which directly affects the observables, is linked to the comoving distance solely by the curvature radius in the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker metric solution, the LSST can achieve a pure metric constraint of 0.017 on the mean curvature parameter Ω k of the universe simultaneously with the constraints on the comoving distances.

  15. Distinguishing interacting dark energy from wCDM with CMB, lensing, and baryon acoustic oscillation data

    SciTech Connect

    Väliviita, Jussi; Palmgren, Elina E-mail: elina.palmgren@helsinki.fi

    2015-07-01

    We employ the Planck 2013 CMB temperature anisotropy and lensing data, and baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) data to constrain a phenomenological wCDM model, where dark matter and dark energy interact. We assume time-dependent equation of state parameter for dark energy, and treat dark matter and dark energy as fluids whose energy-exchange rate is proportional to the dark-matter density. The CMB data alone leave a strong degeneracy between the interaction rate and the physical CDM density parameter today, ω{sub c}, allowing a large interaction rate |Γ| ∼ H{sub 0}. However, as has been known for a while, the BAO data break this degeneracy. Moreover, we exploit the CMB lensing potential likelihood, which probes the matter perturbations at redshift z ∼ 2 and is very sensitive to the growth of structure, and hence one of the tools for discerning between the ΛCDM model and its alternatives. However, we find that in the non-phantom models (w{sub de}>−1), the constraints remain unchanged by the inclusion of the lensing data and consistent with zero interaction, −0.14 < Γ/H{sub 0} < 0.02 at 95% CL. On the contrary, in the phantom models (w{sub de}<−1), energy transfer from dark energy to dark matter is moderately favoured over the non-interacting model; 0−0.57 < Γ/H{sub 0} < −0.1 at 95% CL with CMB+BAO, while addition of the lensing data shifts this to −0.46 < Γ/H{sub 0} < −0.01.

  16. Fan Noise Prediction System Development: Source/Radiation Field Coupling and Workstation Conversion for the Acoustic Radiation Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, H. D.

    1993-01-01

    The Acoustic Radiation Code (ARC) is a finite element program used on the IBM mainframe to predict far-field acoustic radiation from a turbofan engine inlet. In this report, requirements for developers of internal aerodynamic codes regarding use of their program output an input for the ARC are discussed. More specifically, the particular input needed from the Bolt, Beranek and Newman/Pratt and Whitney (turbofan source noise generation) Code (BBN/PWC) is described. In a separate analysis, a method of coupling the source and radiation models, that recognizes waves crossing the interface in both directions, has been derived. A preliminary version of the coupled code has been developed and used for initial evaluation of coupling issues. Results thus far have shown that reflection from the inlet is sufficient to indicate that full coupling of the source and radiation fields is needed for accurate noise predictions ' Also, for this contract, the ARC has been modified for use on the Sun and Silicon Graphics Iris UNIX workstations. Changes and additions involved in this effort are described in an appendix.

  17. Study on the Non-contact Acoustic Inspection Method for Concrete Structures by using Strong Ultrasonic Sound source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, Tsuneyoshi; Uechi, Itsuki; Sugimoto, Kazuko; Utagawa, Noriyuki; Katakura, Kageyoshi

    Hammering test is widely used to inspect the defects in concrete structures. However, this method has a major difficulty in inspect at high-places, such as a tunnel ceiling or a bridge girder. Moreover, its detection accuracy is dependent on a tester's experience. Therefore, we study about the non-contact acoustic inspection method of the concrete structure using the air borne sound wave and a laser Doppler vibrometer. In this method, the concrete surface is excited by air-borne sound wave emitted with a long range acoustic device (LRAD), and the vibration velocity on the concrete surface is measured by a laser Doppler vibrometer. A defect part is detected by the same flexural resonance as the hammer method. It is already shown clearly that detection of a defect can be performed from a long distance of 5 m or more using a concrete test object. Moreover, it is shown that a real concrete structure can also be applied. However, when the conventional LRAD was used as a sound source, there were problems, such as restrictions of a measurement angle and the surrounding noise. In order to solve these problems, basic examination which used the strong ultrasonic wave sound source was carried out. In the experiment, the concrete test object which includes an imitation defect from 5-m distance was used. From the experimental result, when the ultrasonic sound source was used, restrictions of a measurement angle become less severe and it was shown that circumference noise also falls dramatically.

  18. Ultrasonic condition monitoring of composite structures using a low-profile acoustic source and an embedded optical fiber sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, S. Gareth; Staszewski, Wieslaw J.; Gachagan, Anthony; James, I. R.; Philip, Wayne R.; Worden, Keith; Culshaw, Brian; McNab, Alistair; Tomlinson, Geoffrey R.; Hayward, Gordon

    1997-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide a concise introduction to the developments and recent findings of a BRITE-EURAM program of work (BRE2.CT94-0990 , structurally integrated system for the comprehensive evaluation of composites). The aim of the program has been to develop an acoustic/ultrasonic based structural monitoring system for composite structures using material compatible sensors. Since plate-like structures have been investigated, it has been a requirement to utilize the propagation of ultrasonic Lamb waves through the sample materials. Preliminary investigations utilized conventional piezo-electric sources coupled to the sample via perspex wedges. The Lamb waves generated by these sources were monitored using either a fully embedded or surface mounted optical fiber sensors. The system was tested with a variety of different carbon and glass fiber reinforced panels, and the interaction of the lamb waves with different defects in these materials was monitored. Conventional signal processing allowed the location of defects such as impact damage sites, delaminations and holes. Subsequent investigations have endeavored to refine the system. This paper reports the development of advanced wavelet based signal processing techniques to enhance defect visibility, the optical connectorization of composite panels, and the development of flexible low profile acoustic sources for efficient Lamb wave generation.

  19. Acoustic Emission Source Location in Unidirectional Carbon-Fibre-Reinforced Plastic Plates Using Virtually Trained Artificial Neural Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Caprino, G.; Lopresto, V.; Leone, C.; Papa, I.

    2010-06-02

    Acoustic emission source location in a unidirectional carbon-fibre-reinforced plastic plate was attempted employing Artificial Neural Network (ANN) technology. The acoustic emission events were produced by a lead break, and the response wave received by piezoelectric sensors, type VS150-M resonant at 150 kHz. The waves were detected by a Vallen AMSY4 eight-channel instrumentation. The time of arrival, determined through the conventional threshold crossing technique, was used to measure the dependence of wave velocity on fibre orientation. A simple empirical formula, relying on classical lamination and suggested by wave propagation theory, was able to accurately model the experimental trend. Based on the formula, virtual training and testing data sets were generated for the case of a plate monitored by three transducers, and adopted to select two potentially effective ANN architectures. For final validation, experimental tests were carried out, positioning the source at predetermined points evenly distributed within the plate area. A very satisfactory correlation was found between the actual source locations and the ANN predictions.

  20. Time-domain delay-and-sum beamforming for time-reversal detection of intermittent acoustic sources in flows.

    PubMed

    Rakotoarisoa, Ifanila; Fischer, Jeoffrey; Valeau, Vincent; Marx, David; Prax, Christian; Brizzi, Laurent-Emmanuel

    2014-11-01

    This study focuses on the identification of intermittent aeroacoustic sources in flows by using the time-domain beamforming technique. It is first shown that this technique can be seen as a time-reversal (TR) technique, working with approximate Green functions in the case of a shear flow. Some numerical experiments investigate the case of an array measurement of a generic acoustic pulse emitted in a wind-tunnel flow, with a realistic multi-arm spiral array. The results of the time-domain beamforming successfully match those given by a numerical TR technique over a wide range of flow speeds (reaching the transonic regime). It is shown how the results should be analyzed in a focusing plane parallel to the microphone array in order to estimate the location and emission time of the pulse source. An experimental application dealing with the aeroacoustic radiation of a bluff body in a wind-tunnel flow is also considered, and shows that some intermittent events can be clearly identified in the noise radiation. Time-domain beamforming is then an efficient tool for analyzing intermittent acoustic sources in flows, and is a computationally cheaper alternative to the numerical TR technique, which should be used for complex configurations where the Green function is not available.

  1. Writable electrochemical energy source based on graphene oxide

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Di

    2015-01-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) was mainly used as raw material for various types of reduced graphene oxide (rGO) as a cost effective method to make graphene like materials. However, applications of its own unique properties such as extraordinary proton conductivity and super-permeability to water were overlooked. Here GO based battery-like planar energy source was demonstrated on arbitrary insulating substrate (e.g. polymer sheet/paper) by coating PEDOT, GO ink and rGO on Ag charge collectors. Energy from such GO battery depends on its length and one unit cell with length of 0.5 cm can generate energy capacity of 30 Ah/L with voltage up to 0.7 V when room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) is added. With power density up to 0.4 W/cm3 and energy density of 4 Wh/L, GO battery was demonstrated to drive an electrochromic device. This work is the first attempt to generate decent energy using the fast transported water molecules inside GO. It provides very safe energy source that enables new applications otherwise traditional battery technology can not make including building a foldable energy source on paper and platform for futuristic wearable electronics. A disposable energy source made of GO was also written on a plastic glove to demonstrate wearability. PMID:26462557

  2. Writable electrochemical energy source based on graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Wei, Di

    2015-10-14

    Graphene oxide (GO) was mainly used as raw material for various types of reduced graphene oxide (rGO) as a cost effective method to make graphene like materials. However, applications of its own unique properties such as extraordinary proton conductivity and super-permeability to water were overlooked. Here GO based battery-like planar energy source was demonstrated on arbitrary insulating substrate (e.g. polymer sheet/paper) by coating PEDOT, GO ink and rGO on Ag charge collectors. Energy from such GO battery depends on its length and one unit cell with length of 0.5 cm can generate energy capacity of 30 Ah/L with voltage up to 0.7 V when room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) is added. With power density up to 0.4 W/cm(3) and energy density of 4 Wh/L, GO battery was demonstrated to drive an electrochromic device. This work is the first attempt to generate decent energy using the fast transported water molecules inside GO. It provides very safe energy source that enables new applications otherwise traditional battery technology can not make including building a foldable energy source on paper and platform for futuristic wearable electronics. A disposable energy source made of GO was also written on a plastic glove to demonstrate wearability.

  3. Very High-Energy Gamma-Ray Sources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weekes, Trevor C.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses topics related to high-energy, gamma-ray astronomy (including cosmic radiation, gamma-ray detectors, high-energy gamma-ray sources, and others). Also considers motivation for the development of this field, the principal results to date, and future prospects. (JN)

  4. Determining the energy level of laser induced cracks in alumina substrate via acoustic emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslan, M.; Beausang, J.; Tittmann, B. R.

    2000-05-01

    The electronics industry relies on alumina (Al2O3) substrates to isolate, electrically and thermally, the computer chip from the rest of the circuit. In order to improve the manufacturing process of these chips, it is desirable to machine the substrates with a laser rather than the conventional techniques. Unfortunately, the high thermal stresses due to the intensity of the laser cause the extremely brittle ceramic to crack and sometimes fail. The purpose of this research was to study the response of a thin alumina ceramic substrate while it was slowly drilled with a CO2 laser. The energy released by the cracks were measured in-situ via acoustic emission (AE). AE is ideal for capturing the stress wave emissions emitted from the cracking events, while the ceramic is being drilled with the laser. One of the components of the AE system, the Digital Wave Fracture Wave Detector™, recorded the AE signals emitted during slow laser drilling of the alumina plates. Total crack length was correlated with total AE energy emitted, and these data were compared in two experiments, slow drilling and crack extension. A fundamental trend of increasing AE energy with increasing crack length was verified in these experiments.—This work has been partially supported by National Science Foundation Grant #CMS-9634744.

  5. Multi-source energy harvester for wildlife tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, You; Zuo, Lei; Zhou, Wanlu; Liang, Changwei; McCabe, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Sufficient power supply to run GPS machinery and transmit data on a long-term basis remains to be the key challenge for wildlife tracking technology. Traditional way of replacing battery periodically is not only time and money consuming but also dangerous to live-trapping wild animals. In this paper, an innovative wildlife tracking device with multi-source energy harvester with advantage of high efficiency and reliability is investigated and developed. This multi-source energy harvester entails a solar energy harvester and an innovative rotational electromagnetic energy harvester is mounted on the "wildlife tracking collar" which will remarkably extend the duration of wild life tracking. A feedforward and feedback control of DC-DC converter circuit is adopted to passively realize the Maximum Power Point Tracking (MPPT) logic for the solar energy harvester. The rotational electromagnetic energy harvester can mechanically rectify the irregular bidirectional motion into unidirectional motion has been modeled and demonstrated.

  6. Energy sources, self-organization, and the origin of life.

    PubMed

    Boiteau, Laurent; Pascal, Robert

    2011-02-01

    The emergence and early developments of life are considered from the point of view that contingent events that inevitably marked evolution were accompanied by deterministic driving forces governing the selection between different alternatives. Accordingly, potential energy sources are considered for their propensity to induce self-organization within the scope of the chemical approach to the origin of life. Requirements in terms of quality of energy locate thermal or photochemical activation in the atmosphere as highly likely processes for the formation of activated low-molecular weight organic compounds prone to induce biomolecular self-organization through their ability to deliver quanta of energy matching the needs of early biochemical pathways or the reproduction of self-replicating entities. These lines of reasoning suggest the existence of a direct connection between the free energy content of intermediates of early pathways and the quanta of energy delivered by available sources of energy.

  7. Energy Sources, Self-organization, and the Origin of Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boiteau, Laurent; Pascal, Robert

    2011-02-01

    The emergence and early developments of life are considered from the point of view that contingent events that inevitably marked evolution were accompanied by deterministic driving forces governing the selection between different alternatives. Accordingly, potential energy sources are considered for their propensity to induce self-organization within the scope of the chemical approach to the origin of life. Requirements in terms of quality of energy locate thermal or photochemical activation in the atmosphere as highly likely processes for the formation of activated low-molecular weight organic compounds prone to induce biomolecular self-organization through their ability to deliver quanta of energy matching the needs of early biochemical pathways or the reproduction of self-replicating entities. These lines of reasoning suggest the existence of a direct connection between the free energy content of intermediates of early pathways and the quanta of energy delivered by available sources of energy.

  8. Methods of performing downhole operations using orbital vibrator energy sources

    DOEpatents

    Cole, Jack H.; Weinberg, David M.; Wilson, Dennis R.

    2004-02-17

    Methods of performing down hole operations in a wellbore. A vibrational source is positioned within a tubular member such that an annulus is formed between the vibrational source and an interior surface of the tubular member. A fluid medium, such as high bulk modulus drilling mud, is disposed within the annulus. The vibrational source forms a fluid coupling with the tubular member through the fluid medium to transfer vibrational energy to the tubular member. The vibrational energy may be used, for example, to free a stuck tubular, consolidate a cement slurry and/or detect voids within a cement slurry prior to the curing thereof.

  9. Source motion detection, estimation, and compensation for underwater acoustics inversion by wideband ambiguity lag-Doppler filtering.

    PubMed

    Josso, Nicolas F; Ioana, Cornel; Mars, Jérôme I; Gervaise, Cédric

    2010-12-01

    Acoustic channel properties in a shallow water environment with moving source and receiver are difficult to investigate. In fact, when the source-receiver relative position changes, the underwater environment causes multipath and Doppler scale changes on the transmitted signal over low-to-medium frequencies (300 Hz-20 kHz). This is the result of a combination of multiple paths propagation, source and receiver motions, as well as sea surface motion or water column fast changes. This paper investigates underwater acoustic channel properties in a shallow water (up to 150 m depth) and moving source-receiver conditions using extracted time-scale features of the propagation channel model for low-to-medium frequencies. An average impulse response of one transmission is estimated using the physical characteristics of propagation and the wideband ambiguity plane. Since a different Doppler scale should be considered for each propagating signal, a time-warping filtering method is proposed to estimate the channel time delay and Doppler scale attributes for each propagating path. The proposed method enables the estimation of motion-compensated impulse responses, where different Doppler scaling factors are considered for the different time delays. It was validated for channel profiles using real data from the BASE'07 experiment conducted by the North Atlantic Treaty Organization Undersea Research Center in the shallow water environment of the Malta Plateau, South Sicily. This paper provides a contribution to many field applications including passive ocean tomography with unknown natural sources position and movement. Another example is active ocean tomography where sources motion enables to rapidly cover one operational area for rapid environmental assessment and hydrophones may be drifting in order to avoid additional flow noise.

  10. Virtual acoustic prototyping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Marty

    2003-10-01

    In this paper the re-creation of 3-D sound fields so the full psycho-acoustic impact of sound sources can be assessed before the manufacture of a product or environment is examined. Using head related transfer functions (HRTFs) coupled with a head tracked set of headphones the sound field at the left and right ears of a listener can be re-created for a set of sound sources. However, the HRTFs require that sources have a defined location and this is not the typical output from numerical codes which describe the sound field as a set of distributed modes. In this paper a method of creating a set of equivalent sources is described such that the standard set of HRTFs can be applied in real time. A structural-acoustic model of a cylinder driving an enclosed acoustic field will be used as an example. It will be shown that equivalent sources can be used to recreate all of the reverberation of the enclosed space. An efficient singular value decomposition technique allows the large number of sources required to be simulated in real time. An introduction to the requirements necessary for 3-D virtual prototyping using high frequency Statistical Energy Analysis models will be presented. [Work supported by AuSim and NASA.

  11. Low energy spread ion source with a coaxial magnetic filter

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Lee, Yung-Hee Yvette

    2000-01-01

    Multicusp ion sources are capable of producing ions with low axial energy spread which are necessary in applications such as ion projection lithography (IPL) and radioactive ion beam production. The addition of a radially extending magnetic filter consisting of a pair of permanent magnets to the multicusp source reduces the energy spread considerably due to the improvement in the uniformity of the axial plasma potential distribution in the discharge region. A coaxial multicusp ion source designed to further reduce the energy spread utilizes a cylindrical magnetic filter to achieve a more uniform axial plasma potential distribution. The coaxial magnetic filter divides the source chamber into an outer annular discharge region in which the plasma is produced and a coaxial inner ion extraction region into which the ions radially diffuse but from which ionizing electrons are excluded. The energy spread in the coaxial source has been measured to be 0.6 eV. Unlike other ion sources, the coaxial source has the capability of adjusting the radial plasma potential distribution and therefore the transverse ion temperature (or beam emittance).

  12. Polarimeter for Low Energy X-ray Astrophysical Sources (PLEXAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, Stephen S.; Pierce, David L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Polarimeter for Low Energy X-ray Astrophysical Sources (PLEXAS) is an astrophysics mission concept for measuring the polarization of X-ray sources at low energies below the C-K band (less than 277 eV). PLEXAS uses the concept of variations in the reflectivity of a multilayered X-ray telescope as a function of the orientation of an X-rays polarization vector with respect to the reflecting surface of the optic. By selecting an appropriate multilayer, and rotating the X-ray telescope while pointing to a source, there will be a modulation in the source intensity, as measured at the focus of the telescope, which is proportional to the degree of polarization in the source.

  13. Broadband Acoustic Environment at a Tidal Energy Site in Puget Sound

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Jinshan; Deng, Zhiqun; Martinez, Jayson J.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Myers, Joshua R.; Weiland, Mark A.

    2012-04-04

    Admiralty Inlet has been selected as a potential tidal energy site. It is located near shipping lanes, is a highly variable acoustic environment, and is frequented by the endangered southern resident killer whale (SRKW). Resolving environmental impacts is the first step to receiving approval to deploy tidal turbines. Several monitoring technologies are being considered to determine the presence of SRKW near the turbines. Broadband noise level measurements are critical for determining design and operational specifications of these technologies. Acoustic environment data at the proposed site was acquired at different depths using a cabled vertical line array from three different cruises during high tidal period in February, May, and June 2011. The ambient noise level decreases approximately 25 dB re 1 μPa per octave from frequency ranges of 1 kHz to 70 kHz, and increases approximately 20 dB re 1 μPa per octave for the frequency from 70 kHz to 200 kHz. The difference of noise pressure levels in different months varies from 10 to 30 dB re 1 μPa for the frequency range below 70 kHz. Commercial shipping and ferry vessel traffic were found to be the most significant contributors to sound pressure levels for the frequency range from 100 Hz to 70 kHz, and the variation could be as high as 30 dB re 1 μPa. These noise level measurements provide the basic information for designing and evaluating both active and passive monitoring systems proposed for deploying and operating for tidal power generation alert system.

  14. Acoustic Monitoring of Beluga Whale Interactions with Cook Inlet Tidal Energy Project

    SciTech Connect

    Worthington, Monty

    2014-02-05

    Cook Inlet, Alaska is home to some of the greatest tidal energy resources in the U.S., as well as an endangered population of beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas). Successfully permitting and operating a tidal power project in Cook Inlet requires a biological assessment of the potential and realized effects of the physical presence and sound footprint of tidal turbines on the distribution, relative abundance, and behavior of Cook Inlet beluga whales. ORPC Alaska, working with the Project Team—LGL Alaska Research Associates, University of Alaska Anchorage, TerraSond, and Greeneridge Science—undertook the following U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) study to characterize beluga whales in Cook Inlet – Acoustic Monitoring of Beluga Whale Interactions with the Cook Inlet Tidal Energy Project (Project). ORPC Alaska, LLC, is a wholly-owned subsidiary of Ocean Renewable Power Company, LLC, (collectively, ORPC). ORPC is a global leader in the development of hydrokinetic power systems and eco-conscious projects that harness the power of ocean and river currents to create clean, predictable renewable energy. ORPC is developing a tidal energy demonstration project in Cook Inlet at East Foreland where ORPC has a Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) preliminary permit (P-13821). The Project collected baseline data to characterize pre-deployment patterns of marine mammal distribution, relative abundance, and behavior in ORPC’s proposed deployment area at East Foreland. ORPC also completed work near Fire Island where ORPC held a FERC preliminary permit (P-12679) until March 6, 2013. Passive hydroacoustic devices (previously utilized with bowhead whales in the Beaufort Sea) were adapted for study of beluga whales to determine the relative abundance of beluga whale vocalizations within the proposed deployment areas. Hydroacoustic data collected during the Project were used to characterize the ambient acoustic environment of the project site pre-deployment to inform the

  15. Numerical method to compute acoustic scattering effect of a moving source.

    PubMed

    Song, Hao; Yi, Mingxu; Huang, Jun; Pan, Yalin; Liu, Dawei

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the aerodynamic characteristic of a ducted tail rotor in hover has been numerically studied using CFD method. An analytical time domain formulation based on Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings (FW-H) equation is derived for the prediction of the acoustic velocity field and used as Neumann boundary condition on a rigid scattering surface. In order to predict the aerodynamic noise, a hybrid method combing computational aeroacoustics with an acoustic thin-body boundary element method has been proposed. The aerodynamic results and the calculated sound pressure levels (SPLs) are compared with the known method for validation. Simulation results show that the duct can change the value of SPLs and the sound directivity. Compared with the isolate tail rotor, the SPLs of the ducted tail rotor are smaller at certain azimuth.

  16. Wireless acoustic-electric feed-through for power and signal transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherrit, Stewart (Inventor); Bar-Cohen, Yoseph (Inventor); Bao, Xiaoqi (Inventor); Doty, Benjamin (Inventor); Badescu, Mircea (Inventor); Chang, Zensheu (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    An embodiment provides electrical energy from a source on one side of a medium to a load on the other side of the medium, the embodiment including a first piezoelectric to generate acoustic energy in response to electrical energy from the source, and a second piezoelectric to convert the received acoustic energy to electrical energy used by the load. Other embodiments are described and claimed.

  17. Discrete-Mode Source Development and Testing for New Seismo-Acoustic Sonar

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-03-01

    the English scientist, Lord Rayleigh (J.W. Strutt ) [Ref. 6] demonstrated theoretically that there exist waves that can propagate over the planar...and T.G. Muir, Aug. 1994. 6. Rayleigh , Lord (J.W. Strutt ), "On Waves Propagated along the Plane Surface of an Elastic Solid," Proceedings London...13. ABSTRACT (maximum 200 words) A seismo-acoustic sonar concept that uses guided interface waves ( Rayleigh or Schölte) is being developed to

  18. Application of Acoustic Signal Processing Techniques for Improved Underwater Source Detection and Localization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-08-31

    Systems Center, San Diego; the Electric Boat Division of General ambiguities in the beam patterns, provided the bearmforming is done with Dynamics. ] the...Am. Suppl. 1. Vol. 60. Fall 1986 112th Meeting: Acoustical Socity of America A wearable multichannel signal processor for stimulation of single... electrical dynamic range 1Hi4 & Channel interaction measured by forward-masked "pla of the patient. Several processor configurations with different resonator

  19. Acoustic emission linear pulse holography

    DOEpatents

    Collins, H. Dale; Busse, Lawrence J.; Lemon, Douglas K.

    1985-01-01

    Defects in a structure are imaged as they propagate, using their emitted acoustic energy as a monitored source. Short bursts of acoustic energy propagate through the structure to a discrete element receiver array. A reference timing transducer located between the array and the inspection zone initiates a series of time-of-flight measurements. A resulting series of time-of-flight measurements are then treated as aperture data and are transferred to a computer for reconstruction of a synthetic linear holographic image. The images can be displayed and stored as a record of defect growth.

  20. Acoustic emission linear pulse holography

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, H. D.; Busse, L. J.; Lemon, D. K.

    1985-07-30

    Defects in a structure are imaged as they propagate, using their emitted acoustic energy as a monitored source. Short bursts of acoustic energy propagate through the structure to a discrete element receiver array. A reference timing transducer located between the array and the inspection zone initiates a series of time-of-flight measurements. A resulting series of time-of-flight measurements are then treated as aperture data and are transferred to a computer for reconstruction of a synthetic linear holographic image. The images can be displayed and stored as a record of defect growth.

  1. Can seismic (destructive) energy be stored after conversion into useful electrical or acoustic energy?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Umesh P.; Sinha, Madhurendra N.

    2014-06-01

    Since the dawn of precursory revolution in the seismology and electromagnetic radiation platform., F.T. Freund (2010) et.al, have used piezoelectric effect on the crustal geo-materials and emanation of seismic pre signals frequently. Their effect in form of ULF and VHF are commonly detected (by Greece and American seismologists)in the upper ionosphere from surface of globe. TEC, OLR. MMC are the consequent instrumentation in acquiring data to these pre-earthquake signals. Our attempt is to detect the signals prior to earthquake due to impending stress in the area and store the spreading destructive energy to electrical voltage applying the mathematics of piezoelectric equations and algebra. Energy released during seismic eruption is in the range of 10 13 to 1018 Joule for each event of 6 to 8 Mw. Spread and propagation of energy follows the Maxwell theory of wave equation and fundamental law of electricity and electromagnetism. Stress accumulated within the crustal block is triggered into bringing about geophysical and geochemical changes within the reservoir rocks interacting stress. Study made by pioneers in the seismic precursory development states generation of charge and coronal discharge prior seismicity within the rocks under stress. This is consequence to admixing of positive charge developed at unstressed volume and negative at stressed sub volume of rocks1 [F.T.Freidemann2010]. Ionosphere proturbance in form of ULF, ELF, ELS and EQL, EQS are the projected consequence of electromagnetic wave propagation 2 [10,11,15 ] Harnessing of electrical components from the energy propagated due to stress inducing EM waves is the aim of paper. Electrical discharge prior to seismicity within geo-materials is established phenomena which can be calibrated with the piezoelectric sensors application implanted for detection and harnessing the signals. These prior signals induced in form of electromagnetic response are felicitated into being converted into electrical energy

  2. Analogies between the measurement of acoustic impedance via the reaction on the source method and the automatic microwave vector network analyzer technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLean, James; Sutton, Robert; Post, John

    2003-10-01

    One useful method of acoustic impedance measurement involves the measurement of the electrical impedance ``looking into'' the electrical port of a reciprocal electroacoustic transducer. This reaction on the source method greatly facilitates the measurement of acoustic impedance by borrowing highly refined techniques to measure electrical impedance. It is also well suited for in situ acoustic impedance measurements. In order to accurately determine acoustic impedance from the measured electrical impedance, the characteristics of the transducer must be accurately known, i.e., the characteristics of the transducer must be ``removed'' completely from the data. The measurement of acoustic impedance via the measurement of the reaction on the source is analogous to modern microwave measurements made with an automatic vector network analyzer. The action of the analyzer is described as de-embedding the desired data (such as acoustic impedance) from the raw data. Such measurements are fundamentally substitution measurements in that the transducer's characteristics are determined by measuring a set of reference standards. The reaction on the source method is extended to take advantage of improvements in microwave measurement techniques which allow calibration via imperfect standard loads. This removes one of the principal weaknesses of the method in that the requirement of high-quality reference standards is relaxed.

  3. Changes in Humpback Whale Song Occurrence in Response to an Acoustic Source 200 km Away

    PubMed Central

    Risch, Denise; Corkeron, Peter J.; Ellison, William T.; Van Parijs, Sofie M.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of underwater anthropogenic sound on marine mammals is of increasing concern. Here we show that humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae) song in the Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary (SBNMS) was reduced, concurrent with transmissions of an Ocean Acoustic Waveguide Remote Sensing (OAWRS) experiment approximately 200 km away. We detected the OAWRS experiment in SBNMS during an 11 day period in autumn 2006. We compared the occurrence of song for 11 days before, during and after the experiment with song over the same 33 calendar days in two later years. Using a quasi-Poisson generalized linear model (GLM), we demonstrate a significant difference in the number of minutes with detected song between periods and years. The lack of humpback whale song during the OAWRS experiment was the most substantial signal in the data. Our findings demonstrate the greatest published distance over which anthropogenic sound has been shown to affect vocalizing baleen whales, and the first time that active acoustic fisheries technology has been shown to have this effect. The suitability of Ocean Acoustic Waveguide Remote Sensing technology for in-situ, long term monitoring of marine ecosystems should be considered, bearing in mind its possible effects on non-target species, in particular protected species. PMID:22253769

  4. Identification of rocket-induced acoustic waves in the ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mabie, Justin; Bullett, Terence; Moore, Prentiss; Vieira, Gerald

    2016-10-01

    Acoustic waves can create plasma disturbances in the ionosphere, but the number of observations is limited. Large-amplitude acoustic waves generated by energetic sources like large earthquakes and tsunamis are more readily observed than acoustic waves generated by weaker sources. New observations of plasma displacements caused by rocket-generated acoustic waves were made using the Vertically Incident Pulsed Ionospheric Radar (VIPIR), an advanced high-frequency radar. Rocket-induced acoustic waves which are characterized by low amplitudes relative to those induced by more energetic sources can be detected in the ionosphere using the phase data from fixed frequency radar observations of a plasma layer. This work is important for increasing the number and quality of observations of acoustic waves in the ionosphere and could help improve the understanding of energy transport from the lower atmosphere to the thermosphere.

  5. Waveform inversion of acoustic waves for explosion yield estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.; Rodgers, A. J.

    2016-07-08

    We present a new waveform inversion technique to estimate the energy of near-surface explosions using atmospheric acoustic waves. Conventional methods often employ air blast models based on a homogeneous atmosphere, where the acoustic wave propagation effects (e.g., refraction and diffraction) are not taken into account, and therefore, their accuracy decreases with increasing source-receiver distance. In this study, three-dimensional acoustic simulations are performed with a finite difference method in realistic atmospheres and topography, and the modeled acoustic Green's functions are incorporated into the waveform inversion for the acoustic source time functions. The strength of the acoustic source is related to explosion yield based on a standard air blast model. The technique was applied to local explosions (<10 km) and provided reasonable yield estimates (<~30% error) in the presence of realistic topography and atmospheric structure. In conclusion, the presented method can be extended to explosions recorded at far distance provided proper meteorological specifications.

  6. Energy Efficiency of Biogas Produced from Different Biomass Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begum, Shahida; Nazri, A. H.

    2013-06-01

    Malaysia has different sources of biomass like palm oil waste, agricultural waste, cow dung, sewage waste and landfill sites, which can be used to produce biogas and as a source of energy. Depending on the type of biomass, the biogas produced can have different calorific value. At the same time the energy, being used to produce biogas is dependent on transportation distance, means of transportation, conversion techniques and for handling of raw materials and digested residues. An energy systems analysis approach based on literature is applied to calculate the energy efficiency of biogas produced from biomass. Basically, the methodology is comprised of collecting data, proposing locations and estimating the energy input needed to produce biogas and output obtained from the generated biogas. The study showed that palm oil and municipal solid waste is two potential sources of biomass. The energy efficiency of biogas produced from palm oil residues and municipal solid wastes is 1.70 and 3.33 respectively. Municipal solid wastes have the higher energy efficiency due to less transportation distance and electricity consumption. Despite the inherent uncertainties in the calculations, it can be concluded that the energy potential to use biomass for biogas production is a promising alternative.

  7. A compact, versatile low-energy electron beam ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Zschornack, G.; König, J.; Schmidt, M.; Thorn, A.

    2014-02-15

    A new compact Electron Beam Ion Source, the Dresden EBIT-LE, is introduced as an ion source working at low electron beam energies. The EBIT-LE operates at an electron energy ranging from 100 eV to some keV and can easily be modified to an EBIT also working at higher electron beam energies of up to 15 keV. We show that, depending on the electron beam energy, electron beam currents from a few mA in the low-energy regime up to about 40 mA in the high-energy regime are possible. Technical solutions as well as first experimental results of the EBIT-LE are presented. In ion extraction experiments, a stable production of low and intermediate charged ions at electron beam energies below 2 keV is demonstrated. Furthermore, X-ray spectroscopy measurements confirm the possibility of using the machine as a source of X-rays from ions excited at low electron energies.

  8. A compact, versatile low-energy electron beam ion source.

    PubMed

    Zschornack, G; König, J; Schmidt, M; Thorn, A

    2014-02-01

    A new compact Electron Beam Ion Source, the Dresden EBIT-LE, is introduced as an ion source working at low electron beam energies. The EBIT-LE operates at an electron energy ranging from 100 eV to some keV and can easily be modified to an EBIT also working at higher electron beam energies of up to 15 keV. We show that, depending on the electron beam energy, electron beam currents from a few mA in the low-energy regime up to about 40 mA in the high-energy regime are possible. Technical solutions as well as first experimental results of the EBIT-LE are presented. In ion extraction experiments, a stable production of low and intermediate charged ions at electron beam energies below 2 keV is demonstrated. Furthermore, X-ray spectroscopy measurements confirm the possibility of using the machine as a source of X-rays from ions excited at low electron energies.

  9. Absolute calorimetric calibration of low energy brachytherapy sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stump, Kurt E.

    In the past decade there has been a dramatic increase in the use of permanent radioactive source implants in the treatment of prostate cancer. A small radioactive source encapsulated in a titanium shell is used in this type of treatment. The radioisotopes used are generally 125I or 103Pd. Both of these isotopes have relatively short half-lives, 59.4 days and 16.99 days, respectively, and have low-energy emissions and a low dose rate. These factors make these sources well suited for this application, but the calibration of these sources poses significant metrological challenges. The current standard calibration technique involves the measurement of ionization in air to determine the source air-kerma strength. While this has proved to be an improvement over previous techniques, the method has been shown to be metrologically impure and may not be the ideal means of calbrating these sources. Calorimetric methods have long been viewed to be the most fundamental means of determining source strength for a radiation source. This is because calorimetry provides a direct measurement of source energy. However, due to the low energy and low power of the sources described above, current calorimetric methods are inadequate. This thesis presents work oriented toward developing novel methods to provide direct and absolute measurements of source power for low-energy low dose rate brachytherapy sources. The method is the first use of an actively temperature-controlled radiation absorber using the electrical substitution method to determine total contained source power of these sources. The instrument described operates at cryogenic temperatures. The method employed provides a direct measurement of source power. The work presented here is focused upon building a metrological foundation upon which to establish power-based calibrations of clinical-strength sources. To that end instrument performance has been assessed for these source strengths. The intent is to establish the limits of

  10. High-Efficiency Photovoltaic Energy Conversion using Surface Acoustic Waves in Piezoelectric Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakovenko, Victor

    2010-03-01

    We propose a radically new design for photovoltaic energy conversion using surface acoustic waves (SAWs) in piezoelectric semiconductors. The periodically modulated electric field from SAW spatially separates photogenerated electrons and holes to the maxima and minima of SAW, thus preventing their recombination. The segregated electrons and holes are transported by the moving SAW to the collecting electrodes of two types, which produce dc electric output. Recent experiments [1] using SAWs in GaAs have demonstrated the photon to current conversion efficiency of 85%. These experiments were designed for photon counting, but we propose to adapt these techniques for highly efficient photovoltaic energy conversion. The advantages are that the electron-hole segregation takes place in the whole volume where SAW is present, and the electrons and holes are transported in the organized, collective manner at high speed, as opposed to random diffusion in conventional devices.[4pt] [1] S. J. Jiao, P. D. Batista, K. Biermann, R. Hey, and P. V. Santos, J. Appl. Phys. 106, 053708 (2009).

  11. Efficient Structure Resonance Energy Transfer from Microwaves to Confined Acoustic Vibrations in Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Szu-Chi; Lin, Huan-Chun; Liu, Tzu-Ming; Lu, Jen-Tang; Hung, Wan-Ting; Huang, Yu-Ru; Tsai, Yi-Chun; Kao, Chuan-Liang; Chen, Shih-Yuan; Sun, Chi-Kuang

    2015-01-01

    Virus is known to resonate in the confined-acoustic dipolar mode with microwave of the same frequency. However this effect was not considered in previous virus-microwave interaction studies and microwave-based virus epidemic prevention. Here we show that this structure-resonant energy transfer effect from microwaves to virus can be efficient enough so that airborne virus was inactivated with reasonable microwave power density safe for the open public. We demonstrate this effect by measuring the residual viral infectivity of influenza A virus after illuminating microwaves with different frequencies and powers. We also established a theoretical model to estimate the microwaves power threshold for virus inactivation and good agreement with experiments was obtained. Such structure-resonant energy transfer induced inactivation is mainly through physically fracturing the virus structure, which was confirmed by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. These results provide a pathway toward establishing a new epidemic prevention strategy in open public for airborne virus. PMID:26647655

  12. Embedded Acoustic Sensor Array for Engine Fan Noise Source Diagnostic Test: Feasibility of Noise Telemetry via Wireless Smart Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaman, Afroz; Bauch, Matthew; Raible, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Aircraft engines have evolved into a highly complex system to meet ever-increasing demands. The evolution of engine technologies has primarily been driven by fuel efficiency, reliability, as well as engine noise concerns. One of the sources of engine noise is pressure fluctuations that are induced on the stator vanes. These local pressure fluctuations, once produced, propagate and coalesce with the pressure waves originating elsewhere on the stator to form a spinning pressure pattern. Depending on the duct geometry, air flow, and frequency of fluctuations, these spinning pressure patterns are self-sustaining and result in noise which eventually radiate to the far-field from engine. To investigate the nature of vane pressure fluctuations and the resulting engine noise, unsteady pressure signatures from an array of embedded acoustic sensors are recorded as a part of vane noise source diagnostics. Output time signatures from these sensors are routed to a control and data processing station adding complexity to the system and cable loss to the measured signal. "Smart" wireless sensors have data processing capability at the sensor locations which further increases the potential of wireless sensors. Smart sensors can process measured data locally and transmit only the important information through wireless communication. The aim of this wireless noise telemetry task was to demonstrate a single acoustic sensor wireless link for unsteady pressure measurement, and thus, establish the feasibility of distributed smart sensors scheme for aircraft engine vane surface unsteady pressure data transmission and characterization.

  13. Controlled and in situ target strengths of the jumbo squid Dosidicus gigas and identification of potential acoustic scattering sources.

    PubMed

    Benoit-Bird, Kelly J; Gilly, William F; Au, Whitlow W L; Mate, Bruce

    2008-03-01

    This study presents the first target strength measurements of Dosidicus gigas, a large squid that is a key predator, a significant prey, and the target of an important fishery. Target strength of live, tethered squid was related to mantle length with values standardized to the length squared of -62.0, -67.4, -67.9, and -67.6 dB at 38, 70, 120, and 200 kHz, respectively. There were relatively small differences in target strength between dorsal and anterior aspects and none between live and freshly dead squid. Potential scattering mechanisms in squid have been long debated. Here, the reproductive organs had little effect on squid target strength. These data support the hypothesis that the pen may be an important source of squid acoustic scattering. The beak, eyes, and arms, probably via the sucker rings, also play a role in acoustic scattering though their effects were small and frequency specific. An unexpected source of scattering was the cranium of the squid which provided a target strength nearly as high as that of the entire squid though the mechanism remains unclear. Our in situ measurements of the target strength of free-swimming squid support the use of the values presented here in D. gigas assessment studies.

  14. Analysis and modeling of 255 source levels of merchant ships from an acoustic observatory along St. Lawrence Seaway.

    PubMed

    Simard, Yvan; Roy, Nathalie; Gervaise, Cédric; Giard, Samuel

    2016-09-01

    An ensemble of 255 spectral source levels (SSLs) of merchant ships were measured with an opportunistic seaway acoustic observatory adhering to the American National Standards Institute/Acoustical Society of America S12.64-2009 standard as much as possible, and deployed in the 350-m deep lower St. Lawrence Seaway in eastern Canada. The estimated SSLs were sensitive to the transmission loss model. The best transmission loss model at the three measuring depths was an empirical in situ function for ranges larger than 300 m, fused with estimates from a wavenumber integration propagation model fed with inverted local geoacoustic properties for [300 to 1 m] ranges. Resulting SSLs still showed a high variability. Uni- and multi-variate analyses showed weak intermingled relations with ship type, length, breadth, draught, speed, age, and other variables. Cluster analyses distinguished six different SSL patterns, which did not correspond to distinctive physical characteristics of the ships. The broadband [20-500 Hz] source levels varied by 30 dB or more within all four 50-m length categories. Common SSL models based on frequency, length and speed failed to unbiasly replicate the observations. This article presents unbiased SSL models that explain 75%-88% of the variance using frequency, ship speed, and three other automatic identification system ship characteristics.

  15. Geothermal, an alternate energy source for power generation

    SciTech Connect

    Espinosa, H.A.

    1985-02-01

    The economic development of nations depends on an escalating use of energy sources. With each passing year the dependence increases, reaching a point where the world will require, in the next six years, a volume of energetics equal to that consumed during the last hundred years. Statistics show that in 1982 about 70% of the world's energy requirements were supplied by oil, natural gas and coal. The remaining 30% came from other sources such as nuclear energy, hydroelectricity, and geothermal. In Mexico the situation is more extreme. For the same year (1982) 85% of the total energy consumed was supplied through the use of hydrocarbons, and only 15% through power generated by the other sources of electricity. Of the 15%, 65% used hydrocarbons somewhere in the power generation system. Geothermal is an energy source that can help solve the problem, particularly in Mexico, because the geological and structural characteristics of Mexico make it one of the countries in the world with a tremendous geothermal potential. The potential of geothermal energy for supplying part of Mexico's needs is discussed.

  16. Spatiotemporal reconstruction of auditory steady-state responses to acoustic amplitude modulations: Potential sources beyond the auditory pathway.

    PubMed

    Farahani, Ehsan Darestani; Goossens, Tine; Wouters, Jan; van Wieringen, Astrid

    2017-03-01

    Investigating the neural generators of auditory steady-state responses (ASSRs), i.e., auditory evoked brain responses, with a wide range of screening and diagnostic applications, has been the focus of various studies for many years. Most of these studies employed a priori assumptions regarding the number and location of neural generators. The aim of this study is to reconstruct ASSR sources with minimal assumptions in order to gain in-depth insight into the number and location of brain regions that are activated in response to low- as well as high-frequency acoustically amplitude modulated signals. In order to reconstruct ASSR sources, we applied independent component analysis with subsequent equivalent dipole modeling to single-subject EEG data (young adults, 20-30 years of age). These data were based on white noise stimuli, amplitude modulated at 4, 20, 40, or 80Hz. The independent components that exhibited a significant ASSR were clustered among all participants by means of a probabilistic clustering method based on a Gaussian mixture model. Results suggest that a widely distributed network of sources, located in cortical as well as subcortical regions, is active in response to 4, 20, 40, and 80Hz amplitude modulated noises. Some of these sources are located beyond the central auditory pathway. Comparison of brain sources in response to different modulation frequencies suggested that the identified brain sources in the brainstem, the left and the right auditory cortex show a higher responsiveness to 40Hz than to the other modulation frequencies.

  17. Numerical wave modelling for seismo-acoustic noise sources: wave model accuracy issues and evidence for variable seismic attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardhuin, F.; Lavanant, T.; Obrebski, M. J.; Marié, L.; Royer, J.

    2012-12-01

    Nonlinear wave-wave interactions generate noise that numerical ocean wave models may simulate. The accuracy of the noise source predicted by the theory of Longuet-Higgins (1950) and Hasselmann (1963) depends on the realism of the directional wave distribution, which is generally not very well known. Numerical noise models developed by Kedar et al. (2008) and Ardhuin et al. (2010) also suffer from poorly known seismic wave propagation and attenuation properties. Here, several seismic and ocean pressure records are used here to assess the effects of wave modelling errors on the magnitude of noise sources. Measurements within 200~m from the sea surface are dominated by acoustic-gravity modes, for which bottom effects are negligible. These data show that directional wave spectra are well enough reproduced to estimate seismo-acoustic noise sources at frequencies below 0.3~Hz, whith an underestimation of the noise level by about 50%. In larger water depths, the comparison of a numerical noise model with hydrophone records from two open-ocean sites near Hawaii and Kerguelen islands reveal that a) deep ocean acoustic noise at frequencies 0.1 to 1 Hz is consistent with the Rayleigh wave theory, and is well predicted up to 0.4~Hz. b) In particular, evidence of the vertical modes expected theoretically is given by the local maxima in the noise spectrum. c) noise above 0.6 Hz is not well modeled probably due to a poor estimate of the directional properties of high frequency wind-waves, d) the noise level is strongly influenced by bottom properties, in particular the presence of sediments. Further, for continental coastal seismic stations, an accurate model of noise level variability near the noise spectral peak requires an accurate modelling of coastal reflection (Ardhuin and Roland JGR 2012). In cases where noise sources are confined to a small area (e.g. Obrebski et al. GRL 2012), the source amplitude may be factored out, allowing an estimate of seismic attenuation rates

  18. On the statistical errors in the estimate of acoustical energy density by using two microphones in a one dimensional field.

    PubMed

    Pascal, Jean-Claude; Thomas, Jean-Hugh; Li, Jing-Fang

    2008-10-01

    It was recently shown that the statistical errors of the measurement in the acoustic energy density by the two microphone method in waveguide have little variation when the losses of coherence between microphones increase. To explain these intervals of uncertainty, the variance of the measurement is expressed in this paper as a function of the various energy quantities of the acoustic fields--energy densities and sound intensities. The necessary conditions to reach the lower bound are clarified. The results obtained are illustrated by an example of a one-dimensional partially coherent field, which allows one to specify the relationship between the coherence functions of the pressure and particle velocity and those of the two microphone signals.

  19. Analysis of energy sources for Mycoplasma penetrans gliding motility.

    PubMed

    Jurkovic, Dominika A; Hughes, Michael R; Balish, Mitchell F

    2013-01-01

    Mycoplasma penetrans, a potential human pathogen found mainly in HIV-infected individuals, uses a tip structure for both adherence and gliding motility. To improve our understanding of the molecular mechanism of M. penetrans gliding motility, we used chemical inhibitors of energy sources associated with motility of other organisms to determine which of these is used by M. penetrans and also tested whether gliding speed responded to temperature and pH. Mycoplasma penetrans gliding motility was not eliminated in the presence of a proton motive force inhibitor, a sodium motive force inhibitor, or an agent that depletes cellular ATP. At near-neutral pH, gliding speed increased as temperature increased. The absence of a clear chemical energy source for gliding motility and a positive correlation between speed and temperature suggest that energy derived from heat provides the major source of power for the gliding motor of M. penetrans.

  20. Understanding and accepting fusion as an alternative energy source

    SciTech Connect

    Goerz, D.A.

    1987-12-10

    Fusion, the process that powers our sun, has long promised to be a virtually inexhaustible source of energy for mankind. No other alternative energy source holds such bright promise, and none has ever presentd such formidable scientific and engineering challenges. Serious research efforts have continued for over 30 years in an attempt to harness and control fusion here on earth. Scientists have made considerable progress in the last decade toward achieving the conditions required for fusion power, and recent experimental results and technological progress have made the scientific feasibility of fusion a virtual certainty. With this knowledge and confidence, the emphasis can now shift toward developing power plants that are practical and economical. Although the necessary technology is not in hand today, the extension to an energy producing system in 20 years is just as attainable as was putting a man on the moon. In the next few decades, the world's population will likely double while the demand for energy will nearly quadruple. Realistic projections show that within the next generation a significant fraction of our electric power must come from alternative energy sources. Increasing environmental concerns may further accelerate this timetable in which new energy sources must be introduced. The continued development of fusion systems to help meet the energy needs of the future will require greater public understanding and support of this technology. The fusion community must do more to make the public aware of the fact that energy is a critical international issue and that fusion is a viable and necessary energy technology that will be safe and economical. 12 refs., 8 figs.

  1. Understanding and accepting fusion as an alternative energy source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goerz, D. A.

    1987-12-01

    Fusion, the process that powers our Sun, has long promised to be a virtually inexhaustible source of energy for mankind. No other alternative energy source holds such bright promise, and none has ever presentd such formidable scientific and engineering challenges. Serious research efforts have continued for over 30 years in an attempt to harness and control fusion here on Earth. Scientists have made considerable progress in the last decade toward achieving the conditions required for fusion power, and recent experimental results and technological progress have made the scientific feasibility of fusion a virtual certainty. With this knowledge and confidence, the emphasis can now shift toward developing power plants that are practical and economical. Although the necessary technology is not in hand today, the extension to an energy producing system in 20 years is just as attainable as was putting a man on the Moon. In the next few decades, the world's population will likely double while the demand for energy will nearly quadruple. Realistic projections show that within the next generation a significant fraction of our electric power must come from alternative energy sources. Increasing environmental concerns may further accelerate this timetable in which new energy sources must be introduced. The continued development of fusion systems to help meet the energy needs of the future will require greater public understanding and support of this technology. The fusion community must do more to make the public aware of the fact that energy is a critical international issue and that fusion is a viable and necessary energy technology that will be safe and economical.

  2. Vibro-Acoustic Analysis of Computer Disk Drive Components with Emphasis on Electro-Mechanical Noise Sources.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ming-Ran

    Vibro-acoustic characteristics of compact electro -mechanical devices are not well understood. This study examines fundamental research issues in this area through the example case of a 3.5" personal computer hard disk drive. In particular, a narrow band mathematical model of the drive has been developed to predict prominent pure tones over the high frequency range (1-6.5 KHz). Through detailed analytical studies, it has been found that the motor torque pulsation of the brushless d.c. motor is the source for this noise problem. Accordingly, a simplified disk drive model consisting of motor driving a single disk is used to investigate key components, with emphasis on the development of new mathematical models to describe the source, path and radiator characteristics. Two different mathematical models have been developed for brushless d.c. motor to predict the torque spectrum associated with invertor switching logic, pulse width modulation control scheme, eccentricity, and magnetic saturation. Frequency contents of predicted variables are identified and matched with measured sound data. Additionally, the Galerkin's method (or modified harmonic balance) is also employed successfully to develop an efficient computational scheme which predicts the Fourier coefficients of torque pulsations directly including various effects associated with inductance harmonics and the fluctuation of rotor angular velocity. For the radiator (annular disk), modal base formulations of sound radiation have been developed by approximating disk eigen-functions. Specifically, the effects of modal coupling and source rotation on radiated sound are investigated. Analytical predictions match well with numerical results obtained by using a boundary element program. New mobility transfer functions (path) are derived to couple the source and radiator formulations in order to construct an overall vibro-acoustic model. Potential areas of further research including experimental validation are discussed.

  3. Negative ions as a source of low energy neutral beams

    SciTech Connect

    Fink, J.H.

    1980-01-01

    Little consideration has been given to the impact of recent developments in negative ion source technology on the design of low energy neutral beam injectors. However, negative ion sources of improved operating efficiency, higher gas efficiency, and smaller beam divergence will lead to neutral deuterium injectors, operating at less than 100 keV, with better operating efficiencies and more compact layouts than can be obtained from positive ion systems.

  4. Development of a continuous broad-energy-spectrum electron source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamo, R. C.; Nanevicz, J. E.

    1985-01-01

    The development of a practical prototype, large-area, continuous-spectrum, multienergy electron source to simulate the lower energy (approx = 1 to 30 keV) portion of the geosynchronous orbit electron environment was investigated. The results of future materials-charging tests using this multienergy source should significantly improve the understanding of actual in-orbit charging processes and should help to resolve some of the descrepancies between predicted and observed spacecraft materials performance.

  5. Energy sources in gamma-ray burst models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taam, Ronald E.

    1987-01-01

    The current status of energy sources in models of gamma-ray bursts is examined. Special emphasis is placed on the thermonuclear flash model which has been the most developed model to date. Although there is no generally accepted model, if the site for the gamma-ray burst is on a strongly magnetized neutron star, the thermonuclear model can qualitatively explain the energetics of some, but probably not all burst events. The critical issues that may differentiate between the possible sources of energy for gamma-ray bursts are listed and briefly discussed.

  6. The source of multi spectral energy of solar energetic electron

    SciTech Connect

    Herdiwijaya, Dhani

    2015-04-16

    We study the solar energetic electron distribution obtained from ACE and GOES satellites which have different altitudes and electron spectral energy during the year 1997 to 2011. The electron spectral energies were 0.038–0.315 MeV from EPAM instrument onboard ACE satellite and >2 MeV from GOES satellite. We found that the low electron energy has no correlation with high energy. In spite of we have corrected to the altitude differences. It implied that they originated from time dependent events with different sources and physical processes at the solar atmosphere. The sources of multi spectral energetic electron were related to flare and CME phenomena. However, we also found that high energetic electron comes from coronal hole.

  7. MODEL-INDEPENDENT EVIDENCE FOR DARK ENERGY EVOLUTION FROM BARYON ACOUSTIC OSCILLATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Sahni, V.; Shafieloo, A.; Starobinsky, A. A. E-mail: arman@apctp.org

    2014-10-01

    Baryon acoustic oscillations (BAOs) allow us to determine the expansion history of the universe, thereby shedding light on the nature of dark energy. Recent observations of BAOs in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) DR9 and DR11 have provided us with statistically independent measurements of H(z) at redshifts of 0.57 and 2.34, respectively. We show that these measurements can be used to test the cosmological constant hypothesis in a model-independent manner by means of an improved version of the Om diagnostic. Our results indicate that the SDSS DR11 measurement of H(z) = 222 ± 7 km s{sup –1} Mpc{sup –1} at z = 2.34, when taken in tandem with measurements of H(z) at lower redshifts, imply considerable tension with the standard ΛCDM model. Our estimation of the new diagnostic Omh {sup 2} from SDSS DR9 and DR11 data, namely, Omh {sup 2} ≈ 0.122 ± 0.01, which is equivalent to Ω{sub 0m} h {sup 2} for the spatially flat ΛCDM model, is in tension with the value Ω{sub 0m} h {sup 2} = 0.1426 ± 0.0025 determined for ΛCDM from Planck+WP. This tension is alleviated in models in which the cosmological constant was dynamically screened (compensated) in the past. Such evolving dark energy models display a pole in the effective equation of state of dark energy at high redshifts, which emerges as a smoking gun test for these theories.

  8. Model-independent Evidence for Dark Energy Evolution from Baryon Acoustic Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahni, V.; Shafieloo, A.; Starobinsky, A. A.

    2014-10-01

    Baryon acoustic oscillations (BAOs) allow us to determine the expansion history of the universe, thereby shedding light on the nature of dark energy. Recent observations of BAOs in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) DR9 and DR11 have provided us with statistically independent measurements of H(z) at redshifts of 0.57 and 2.34, respectively. We show that these measurements can be used to test the cosmological constant hypothesis in a model-independent manner by means of an improved version of the Om diagnostic. Our results indicate that the SDSS DR11 measurement of H(z) = 222 ± 7 km s-1 Mpc-1 at z = 2.34, when taken in tandem with measurements of H(z) at lower redshifts, imply considerable tension with the standard ΛCDM model. Our estimation of the new diagnostic Omh 2 from SDSS DR9 and DR11 data, namely, Omh 2 ≈ 0.122 ± 0.01, which is equivalent to Ω0m h 2 for the spatially flat ΛCDM model, is in tension with the value Ω0m h 2 = 0.1426 ± 0.0025 determined for ΛCDM from Planck+WP. This tension is alleviated in models in which the cosmological constant was dynamically screened (compensated) in the past. Such evolving dark energy models display a pole in the effective equation of state of dark energy at high redshifts, which emerges as a smoking gun test for these theories.

  9. Deconvolution of acoustic emissions for source localization using time reverse modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocur, Georg Karl

    2017-01-01

    Impact experiments on small-scale slabs made of concrete and aluminum were carried out. Wave motion radiated from the epicenter of the impact was recorded as voltage signals by resonant piezoelectric transducers. Numerical simulations of the elastic wave propagation are performed to simulate the physical experiments. The Hertz theory of contact is applied to estimate the force impulse, which is subsequently used for the numerical simulation. Displacements at the transducer positions are calculated numerically. A deconvolution function is obtained by comparing the physical (voltage signal) and the numerical (calculated displacement) experiments. Acoustic emission signals due to pencil-lead breaks are recorded, deconvolved and applied for localization using time reverse modeling.

  10. The use of hydrazine as an alternate source of energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carvalho, J. A., Jr.; Bressan, C.; Ferreira, J. L.

    1984-01-01

    The potentials of using hydrazine as an alternative source of energy was studied. Three chemical reactions are considered: oxidation with air, oxidation with hydrogen peroxide, and thermocatalytic decomposition. Performance data of gasoline, ethylic alcohol, and propane are compared. An item about the NO(x) emissions by the various investigated reactions is included. Promising results are shown, mainly those regarding the available energy per unit volume of unburned gases (vaporized fuel and oxidizer).

  11. Renewable energy sources for sustainable tourism in the Carpathian region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandryk, O. M.; Arkhypova, L. M.; Pobigun, O. V.; Maniuk, O. R.

    2016-08-01

    The use of renewable energy in sustainable tourism development of the region is grounded in the paper. There are three stages of selecting areas for projects of renewable energy sources: selection of potentially suitable area; consideration of exclusion criteria, detailed assessment of potential sites or areas. The factors of impact on spatial constraints and opportunities for building wind, solar and small hydro power plants on the parameters of sustainable tourism development in the Carpathian region were determined.

  12. Energy: Sources and Issues. Science Syllabus for Middle and Junior High Schools. Block I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cappiello, Jane E.; O'Neil, Karen E.

    This syllabus provides a list of concepts and understandings related to four areas of energy. They are: (1) the nature of energy (an energy definition, basic categories of energy, forms of energy, laws of energy conversion, and measuring energy); (2) energy sources of the past and present (history of energy use and present major sources of…

  13. Properties of the Solar Acoustic Source Inferred from Nonadiabatic Oscillation Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wachter, R.; Kosovichev, A. G.

    2005-07-01

    Severino et al. suggested in 2001 that observed power and cross spectra of medium-degree p-modes in velocity and intensity can be described by splitting the solar background noise into correlated, coherent, and uncoherent components. We account for the nonadiabatic nature of solar oscillations by including the perturbations of the radiative energy flux in our model for the oscillations. Our calculations show the potential to explain the observations without the ad hoc phase differences between velocity and intensity oscillations introduced in the model of Severino et al. The phases and amplitudes of the correlated noise components are obtained by fitting our nonadiabatic model to the SOHO MDI power and cross spectra. These parameters provide information about the p-mode excitation process. We show that the type and location of the source can not be uniquely determined by the properties of the resonant p-modes in power and cross spectra of velocity and intensity oscillations. However, we obtain estimates for the phases and amplitudes of the correlated noise, which we interpret in terms of isolated rapid downdrafts in intergranular lanes. This idea is supported by three-dimensional simulations of the upper solar convection zone.

  14. Characterization of intense ion beam energy density and beam induced pressure on the target with acoustic diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Pushkarev, A. I.; Isakova, Yu. I.; Khailov, I. P.; Yu, Xiao

    2013-08-15

    We have developed the acoustic diagnostics based on a piezoelectric transducer for characterization of high-intensity pulsed ion beams. The diagnostics was tested using the TEMP-4M accelerator (150 ns, 250–300 kV). The beam is composed of C{sup +} ions (85%) and protons, the beam energy density is 0.5–5 J/cm{sup 2} (depending on diode geometry). A calibration dependence of the signal from a piezoelectric transducer on the ion beam energy density is obtained using thermal imaging diagnostics. It is shown that the acoustic diagnostics allows for measurement of the beam energy density in the range of 0.1–2 J/cm{sup 2}. The dependence of the beam generated pressure on the input energy density is also determined and compared with the data from literature. The developed acoustic diagnostics do not require sophisticated equipment and can be used for operational control of pulsed ion beam parameters with a repetition rate of 10{sup 3} pulses/s.

  15. Room Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuttruff, Heinrich; Mommertz, Eckard

    The traditional task of room acoustics is to create or formulate conditions which ensure the best possible propagation of sound in a room from a sound source to a listener. Thus, objects of room acoustics are in particular assembly halls of all kinds, such as auditoria and lecture halls, conference rooms, theaters, concert halls or churches. Already at this point, it has to be pointed out that these conditions essentially depend on the question if speech or music should be transmitted; in the first case, the criterion for transmission quality is good speech intelligibility, in the other case, however, the success of room-acoustical efforts depends on other factors that cannot be quantified that easily, not least it also depends on the hearing habits of the listeners. In any case, absolutely "good acoustics" of a room do not exist.

  16. Acoustic guide for noise-transmission testing of aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaicaitis, Rimas (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    Selective testing of aircraft or other vehicular components without requiring disassembly of the vehicle or components was accomplished by using a portable guide apparatus. The device consists of a broadband noise source, a guide to direct the acoustic energy, soft sealing insulation to seal the guide to the noise source and to the vehicle component, and noise measurement microphones, both outside the vehicle at the acoustic guide output and inside the vehicle to receive attenuated sound. By directing acoustic energy only to selected components of a vehicle via the acoustic guide, it is possible to test a specific component, such as a door or window, without picking up extraneous noise which may be transmitted to the vehicle interior through other components or structure. This effect is achieved because no acoustic energy strikes the vehicle exterior except at the selected component. Also, since the test component remains attached to the vehicle, component dynamics with vehicle frame are not altered.

  17. Measurement of Insertion Loss of an Acoustic Treatment in the Presence of Additional Uncorrelated Sound Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klos, Jacob; Palumbo, Daniel L.

    2003-01-01

    A method to intended for measurement of the insertion loss of an acoustic treatment applied to an aircraft fuselage in-situ is documented in this paper. Using this method, the performance of a treatment applied to a limited portion of an aircraft fuselage can be assessed even though the untreated fuselage also radiates into the cabin, corrupting the intensity measurement. This corrupting noise in the intensity measurement incoherent with the panel vibration of interest is removed by correlating the intensity to reference transducers such as accelerometers. Insertion loss of the acoustic treatments is estimated from the ratio of correlated intensity measurements with and without a treatment applied. In the case of turbulent boundary layer excitation of the fuselage, this technique can be used to assess the performance of noise control methods without requiring treatment of the entire fuselage. Several experimental studies and numerical simulations have been conducted, and results from three case studies are documented in this paper. Conclusions are drawn about the use of this method to study aircraft sidewall treatments.

  18. Testing Special Relativity at High Energies with Astrophysical Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.

    2007-01-01

    Since the group of Lorentz boosts is unbounded, there is a question as to whether Lorentz invariance (LI) holds to infinitely short distances. However, special and general relativity may break down at the Planck scale. Various quantum gravity scenarios such as loop quantum gravity, as well as some forms of string theory and extra dimension models may imply Lorentz violation (LV) at ultrahigh energies. The Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST), to be launched in mid-December, will measure the spectra of distant extragalactic sources of high energy gamma-rays, particularly active galactic nuclei and gamma-ray bursts. GLAST can look for energy-dependent gamma-ray propagation effects from such sources as a signal of Lorentz invariance violation. These sources may also exhibit the high energy cutoffs predicted to be the result of intergalactic annihilation interactions with low energy photons having a flux level as determined by various astronomical observations. With LV the threshold for such interactions can be significantly raised, changing the predicted absorption turnover in the observed spectrum of the sources. Stecker and Glashow have shown that the existence such absorption features in the spectra of extragalactic sources puts constraints on LV. Such constraints have important implications for some quantum gravity and large extra dimension models. Future spaceborne detectors dedicated to measuring gamma-ray polarization can look for birefringence effects as a possible signal of loop quantum gravity. A very small LV may also result in the modification or elimination of the GZK effect, thus modifying the spectrum of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays. This possibility can be explored with ground-based arrays such as Auger or with a space based detector system such as the proposed OWL satellite mission.

  19. Supernova and baryon acoustic oscillation constraints on (new) polynomial dark energy parametrizations: current results and forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sendra, Irene; Lazkoz, Ruth

    2012-05-01

    In this work we introduce two new polynomial parametrizations of dark energy and explore their correlation properties. The parameters to fit are the equation-of-state values at z= 0 and z= 0.5, which have naturally low correlation and have already been shown to improve the popular Chevallier-Polarski-Linder (CPL) parametrization. We test our models with low-redshift astronomical probes: type Ia supernovae and baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO), in the form of both current and synthetic data. Specifically, we present simulations of measurements of the radial and transversal BAO scales similar to those expected in a BAO high-precision spectroscopic redshift survey such as EUCLID. According to the Bayesian deviance information criterion (DIC), which penalizes large errors and correlations, we show that our models perform better than the CPL reparametrization proposed by Wang (in terms of z= 0 and z= 0.5). This is due to the combination of lower correlation and smaller relative errors. The same holds for a frequentist perspective: the figure-of-merit is larger for our parametrizations.

  20. Health sensor for human body by using infrared, acoustic energy and magnetic signature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jerry

    2013-05-01

    There is a general chain of events that applies to infections. Human body infection could causes by many different types of bacteria and virus in different areas or organ systems. In general, doctor can't find out the right solution/treatment for infections unless some certain types of bacteria or virus are detected. These detecting processes, usually, take few days to one week to accomplish. However, some infections of the body may not be able to detect at first round and the patient may lose the timing to receive the proper treatment. In this works, we base on Chi's theory which is an invisible circulation system existed inside the body and propose a novel health sensor which summarizes human's infrared, acoustic energy and magnetic signature and find out, in minutes, the most possible area or organ system that cause the infection just like what Chi-Kung master can accomplish. Therefore, the detection process by doctor will be shortened and it raises the possibility to give the proper treatment to the patient in the earliest timing.

  1. Throughput and energy efficiency of a cooperative hybrid ARQ protocol for underwater acoustic sensor networks.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Arindam; Lee, Jae-Won; Cho, Ho-Shin

    2013-11-08

    Due to its efficiency, reliability and better channel and resource utilization, cooperative transmission technologies have been attractive options in underwater as well as terrestrial sensor networks. Their performance can be further improved if merged with forward error correction (FEC) techniques. In this paper, we propose and analyze a retransmission protocol named Cooperative-Hybrid Automatic Repeat reQuest (C-HARQ) for underwater acoustic sensor networks, which exploits both the reliability of cooperative ARQ (CARQ) and the efficiency of incremental redundancy-hybrid ARQ (IR-HARQ) using rate-compatible punctured convolution (RCPC) codes. Extensive Monte Carlo simulations are performed to investigate the performance of the protocol, in terms of both throughput and energy efficiency. The results clearly reveal the enhancement in performance achieved by the C-HARQ protocol, which outperforms both CARQ and conventional stop and wait ARQ (S&W ARQ). Further, using computer simulations, optimum values of various network parameters are estimated so as to extract the best performance out of the C-HARQ protocol.

  2. Characterisation of acoustic energy content in an experimental combustion chamber with and without external forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, S.; Hardi, J.; Oschwald, M.

    2015-03-01

    The influence of injection conditions on rocket engine combustion stability is investigated for a sub-scale combustion chamber with shear coaxial injection elements and the propellant combination hydrogen-oxygen. The experimental results presented are from a series of tests conducted at subcritical and supercritical pressures for oxygen and for both ambient and cryogenic temperature hydrogen. The stability of the system is characterised by the root mean squared amplitude of dynamic combustion chamber pressure in the upper part of the acoustic spectrum relevant for high frequency combustion instabilities. Results are presented for both unforced and externally forced combustion chamber configurations. It was found that, for both the unforced and externally forced configurations, the injection velocity had the strongest influence on combustion chamber stability. Through the use of multivariate linear regression the influence of hydrogen injection temperature and hydrogen injection mass flow rate were best able to explain the variance in stability for dependence on injection velocity ratio. For unforced tests turbulent jet noise from injection was found to dominate the energy content of the signal. For the externally forced configuration a non-linear regression model was better able to predict the variance, suggesting the influence of non-linear behaviour. The response of the system to variation of injection conditions was found to be small; suggesting that the combustion chamber investigated in the experiment is highly stable.

  3. Turbulence generation through intense localized sources of energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maqui, Agustin; Donzis, Diego

    2015-11-01

    Mechanisms to generate turbulence in controlled conditions have been studied for nearly a century. Most common methods include passive and active grids with a focus on incompressible turbulence. However, little attention has been given to compressible flows, and even less to hypersonic flows, where phenomena such as thermal non-equilibrium can be present. Using intense energy from lasers, extreme molecule velocities can be generated from photo-dissociation. This creates strong localized changes in both the hydrodynamics and thermodynamics of the flow, which may perturb the flow in a way similar to an active grid to generate turbulence in hypersonic flows. A large database of direct numerical simulations (DNS) are used to study the feasibility of such an approach. An extensive analysis of single and two point statistics, as well as spectral dynamics is used to characterize the evolution of the flow towards realistic turbulence. Local measures of enstrophy and dissipation are studied to diagnose the main mechanisms for energy exchange. As commonly done in compressible flows, dilatational and solenoidal components are separated to understand the effect of acoustics on the development of turbulence. Further results for cases that assimilate laboratory conditions will be discussed. The authors gratefully acknowledge the support of AFOSR.

  4. Energy sources of the high latitude upper atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, P. M.

    1981-01-01

    Electrodynamic (Joule) dissipation and plasma wave heating are reviewed as sources of energy for the upper atmosphere at high latitudes. Electrodynamic heating in the thermosphere is described by a generalized energy balance equation taking into account a variety of inelastic processes and energy losses, and the use of height-integrated values of the Joule heating rate to estimate the importance of electrodynamic heating at high latitudes is discussed. Observations of electrons between 95 and 115 km altitude that are up to 1000 K hotter than the neutral atmosphere is presented as evidence for atmospheric heating due to unstable plasma waves arising from the Farley-Buneman modified two-stream instability.

  5. In Theory: Dark Energy as a Power Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemiroff, Robert J.; Russell, David; Tangmatitham, Matipon

    2017-01-01

    In theory, it is possible to use the dark energy of the universe as a power source. In practice, the amount of energy that could be liberated in a local setting is many orders of magnitude too small to be useful or even detectable. Nevertheless, in the interests of education and amusement, simple machines that could, in theory, extract local power from the gravitationally repulsive cosmological constant are discussed. The gravitational neutral buoyancy distance -- the distance where local Newtonian gravity balances cosmological dark energy in a concordance cosmology -- is computed between two point objects of low mass.

  6. Acoustic attenuation, phase and group velocities in liquid-filled pipes II: simulation for Spallation Neutron Sources and planetary exploration.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jian; Baik, Kyungmin; Leighton, Timothy G

    2011-08-01

    This paper uses a finite element method (FEM) to compare predictions of the attenuation and sound speeds of acoustic modes in a fluid-filled pipe with those of the analytical model presented in the first paper in this series. It explains why, when the predictions of the earlier paper were compared with experimental data from a water-filled PMMA pipe, the uncertainties and agreement for attenuation data were worse than those for sound speed data. Having validated the FEM approach in this way, the versatility of FEM is thereafter demonstrated by modeling two practical applications which are beyond the analysis of the earlier paper. These applications model propagation in the mercury-filled steel pipework of the Spallation Neutron Source at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (Tennessee), and in a long-standing design for acoustic sensors for use on planetary probes. The results show that strong coupling between the fluid and the solid walls means that erroneous interpretations are made of the data if they assume that the sound speed and attenuation in the fluid in the pipe are the same as those that would be measured in an infinite volume of identical fluid, assumptions which are common when such data have previously been interpreted.

  7. Using Alternate Energy Sources. The Illinois Plan for Industrial Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois State Univ., Normal.

    This guide, which is one in the "Exploration" series of curriculum guides intended to assist junior high and middle school industrial educators in helping their students explore diverse industrial situations and technologies used in industry, deals with using alternate energy sources. The following topics are covered in the individual lessons:…

  8. A Directory of Federal Sources of Information on Solar Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dierker, Janet

    This directory lists federal solar energy programs and sources of information. Each listing gives a brief description of the nature of the program or type of information that is available. In addition, names, addresses, and phone numbers of contact personnel are given. The listings are grouped by agency or branch of the government. (BB)

  9. High energy pulsewidth tunable CPA free picosecond source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pouysegur, Julien; Guichard, Florent; Zaouter, Yoann; Hanna, Marc; Druon, Frédéric; Hönninger, Clemens; Mottay, Eric; Georges, Patrick

    2016-03-01

    A hybrid ytterbium-doped fiber - bulk laser source generating up to 116MW peak power for 3ps pulse duration at 50kHz repetition rate and 1030nm wavelength is presented. Tunability of the pulse duration is made by spectral compression occurring into the seeder. Divided Pulse Amplification scheme is investigated to study energy capabilities of the setup.

  10. EnergyPlus Air Source Integrated Heat Pump Model

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Bo; Adams, Mark B.; New, Joshua Ryan

    2016-03-30

    This report summarizes the development of the EnergyPlus air-source integrated heat pump model. It introduces its physics, sub-models, working modes, and control logic. In addition, inputs and outputs of the new model are described, and input data file (IDF) examples are given.

  11. Compact, energy EFFICIENT neutron source: enabling technology for various applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hershcovitch, A.; Roser, T.

    2009-12-01

    A novel neutron source comprising of a deuterium beam (energy of about 100 KeV) injected into a tube filled with tritium gas and/or tritium plasma that generates D-T fusion reactions, whose products are 14.06 MeV neutrons and 3.52 MeV alpha particles, is described. At the opposite end of the tube, the energy of deuterium ions that did not interact is recovered. Beryllium walls of proper thickness can be utilized to absorb 14 MeV neutrons and release 2-3 low energy neutrons. Each ion source and tube forms a module. Larger systems can be formed from multiple units. Unlike currently proposed methods, where accelerator-based neutron sources are very expensive, large, and require large amounts of power for operation, this neutron source is compact, inexpensive, easy to test and to scale up. Among possible applications for this neutron source concept are sub-critical nuclear breeder reactors and transmutation of radioactive waste.

  12. Cassava: a basic energy source in the tropics

    SciTech Connect

    Cock, J.H.

    1982-11-19

    Cassava (Manihot esculenta) is the fourth most important source of food energy in the tropics. More than two-thirds of the total production of this crop is used as food for humans, with lesser amounts being used for animal feed and industrial purposes. The ingestion of high levels of cassava has been associated with chronic cyanide toxicity in parts of Africa, but this appears to be related to inadequate processing of the root and poor overall nutrition. Although cassava is not a complete food it is important as a cheap source of calories. The crop has a high yield potential under good conditions, and compared to other crops it excels under suboptimal conditions, thus offering the possibility of using marginal land to increase total agricultural production. Breeding programs that bring together germ plasm from different regions coupled with improved agronomic practices can markedly increase yields. The future demand for fresh cassava may depend on improved storage methods. The markets for cassava as a substitute for cereal flours in bakery products and as an energy source in animal feed rations are likely to expand. The use of cassava as a source of ethanol for fuel depends on finding an efficient source of energy for distillation or an improved method of separating ethanol from water. 7 figures, 8 tables.

  13. Energy Efficiency: Information Sources for New and Emerging Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, Steven A.

    2007-12-31

    The purpose of this article is to share a list of useful organizations that provide reliable information on new and emerging energy-efficient technologies based on research and experience. Experienced energy managers may use the information provided by these organizations to enhance their knowledge and understanding, thereby improving their energy management programs. The scope is limited to publicly-available and open-membership organizations that deal with new and emerging, energy-efficient technologies, strategies, and products. The sources identified should not be considered exhaustive but rather a first step “go to” list suggested by the author when searching for useful information on new and emerging energy-efficient technologies.

  14. Optical arc sensor using energy harvesting power source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Kyoo Nam; Rho, Hee Hyuk

    2016-06-01

    Wireless sensors without external power supply gained considerable attention due to convenience both in installation and operation. Optical arc detecting sensor equipping with self sustaining power supply using energy harvesting method was investigated. Continuous energy harvesting method was attempted using thermoelectric generator to supply standby power in micro ampere scale and operating power in mA scale. Peltier module with heat-sink was used for high efficiency electricity generator. Optical arc detecting sensor with hybrid filter showed insensitivity to fluorescent and incandescent lamps under simulated distribution panel condition. Signal processing using integrating function showed selective arc discharge detection capability to different arc energy levels, with a resolution below 17J energy difference, unaffected by bursting arc waveform. The sensor showed possibility for application to arc discharge detecting sensor in power distribution panel. Also experiment with proposed continuous energy harvesting method using thermoelectric power showed possibility as a self sustainable power source of remote sensor.

  15. Acoustic Scattering by Three-Dimensional Stators and Rotors Using the SOURCE3D Code. Volume 1; Analysis and Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Harold D.

    1999-01-01

    This report provides a study of rotor and stator scattering using the SOURCE3D Rotor Wake/Stator Interaction Code. SOURCE3D is a quasi-three-dimensional computer program that uses three-dimensional acoustics and two-dimensional cascade load response theory to calculate rotor and stator modal reflection and transmission (scattering) coefficients. SOURCE3D is at the core of the TFaNS (Theoretical Fan Noise Design/Prediction System), developed for NASA, which provides complete fully coupled (inlet, rotor, stator, exit) noise solutions for turbofan engines. The reason for studying scattering is that we must first understand the behavior of the individual scattering coefficients provided by SOURCE3D, before eventually understanding the more complicated predictions from TFaNS. To study scattering, we have derived a large number of scattering curves for vane and blade rows. The curves are plots of output wave power divided by input wave power (in dB units) versus vane/blade ratio. Some of these plots are shown in this report. All of the plots are provided in a separate volume. To assist in understanding the plots, formulas have been derived for special vane/blade ratios for which wavefronts are either parallel or normal to rotor or stator chords. From the plots, we have found that, for the most part, there was strong transmission and weak reflection over most of the vane/blade ratio range for the stator. For the rotor, there was little transmission loss.

  16. Preserving Source Location Privacy for Energy Harvesting WSNs.

    PubMed

    Huang, Changqin; Ma, Ming; Liu, Yuxin; Liu, Anfeng

    2017-03-30

    Fog (From cOre to edGe) computing employs a huge number of wireless embedded devices to enable end users with anywhere-anytime-to-anything connectivity. Due to their operating nature, wireless sensor nodes often work unattended, and hence are exposed to a variety of attacks. Preserving source-location privacy plays a key role in some wireless sensor network (WSN) applications. In this paper, a redundancy branch convergence-based preserved source location privacy scheme (RBCPSLP) is proposed for energy harvesting sensor networks, with the following advantages: numerous routing branches are created in non-hotspot areas with abundant energy, and those routing branches can merge into a few routing paths before they reach the hotspot areas. The generation time, the duration of routing, and the number of routing branches are then decided independently based on the amount of energy obtained, so as to maximize network energy utilization, greatly enhance privacy protection, and provide long network lifetimes. Theoretical analysis and experimental results show that the RBCPSLP scheme allows a several-fold improvement of the network energy utilization as well as the source location privacy preservation, while maximizing network lifetimes.

  17. Exotic X-ray Sources from Intermediate Energy Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Chouffani, K.; Wells, D.; Harmon, F.; Jones, J.L.; Lancaster, G.

    2003-08-26

    High intensity x-ray beams are used in a wide variety of applications in solid-state physics, medicine, biology and material sciences. Synchrotron radiation (SR) is currently the primary, high-quality x-ray source that satisfies both brilliance and tunability. The high cost, large size and low x-ray energies of SR facilities, however, are serious limitations. Alternatively, 'novel' x-ray sources are now possible due to new small linear accelerator (LINAC) technology, such as improved beam emittance, low background, sub-Picosecond beam pulses, high beam stability and higher repetition rate. These sources all stem from processes that produce Radiation from relativistic Electron beams in (crystalline) Periodic Structures (REPS), or the periodic 'structure' of laser light. REPS x-ray sources are serious candidates for bright, compact, portable, monochromatic, and tunable x-ray sources with varying degrees of polarization and coherence. Despite the discovery and early research into these sources over the past 25 years, these sources are still in their infancy. Experimental and theoretical research are still urgently needed to answer fundamental questions about the practical and ultimate limits of their brightness, mono-chromaticity etc. We present experimental results and theoretical comparisons for three exotic REPS sources. These are Laser-Compton Scattering (LCS), Channeling Radiation (CR) and Parametric X-Radiation (PXR)

  18. Eddy energy sources and flux in the Red Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Peng; Subramanian, Aneesh C.; Kartadikaria, Aditya R.; Hoteit, Ibrahim

    2015-04-01

    In the Red Sea, eddies are reported to be one of the key features of hydrodynamics in the basin. They play a significant role in converting the energy among the large-scale circulation, the available potential energy (APE) and the eddy kinetic energy (EKE). Not only do eddies affect the horizontal circulation, deep-water formation and overturning circulation in the basin, but they also have a strong impact on the marine ecosystem by efficiently transporting heat, nutrients and carbon across the basin and by pumping the nutrient-enriched subsurface water to sustain the primary production. Previous observations and modeling work suggest that the Red Sea is rich of eddy activities. In this study, the eddy energy sources and sinks have been studied based on a high-resolution MITgcm. We have also investigated the possible mechanisms of eddy generation in the Red Sea. Eddies with high EKE are found more likely to appear in the central and northern Red Sea, with a significant seasonal variability. They are more inclined to occur during winter when they acquire their energy mainly from the conversion of APE. In winter, the central and especially the northern Red Sea are subject to important heat loss and extensive evaporation. The resultant densified upper-layer water tends to sink and release the APE through baroclinic instability, which is about one order larger than the barotropic instability contribution and is the largest source term for the EKE in the Red Sea. As a consequence, the eddy energy is confined to the upper layer but with a slope deepening from south to north. In summer, the positive surface heat flux helps maintain the stratification and impedes the gain of APE. The EKE is, therefore, much lower than that in winter despite a higher wind power input. Unlike many other seas, the wind energy is not the main source of energy to the eddies in the Red Sea.

  19. A quest for sources of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotera, Kumiko

    2012-03-01

    The origin of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays (UHECRs, particles arriving on the Earth with energy 10^17- 10^21 eV) is still a mystery. I will review the experimental and theoretical efforts that are being deployed by the community to solve this long-standing enigma, including the recent results from the Auger Observatory. I will discuss the observable signatures that help narrow down the list of possible candidate sources, namely the distribution of the arrival directions of UHECRs in the sky, their energy spectrum, their chemical composition, and their multi-messenger signatures (in neutrinos, gamma-rays and gravitational waves). I will focus in particular on one candidate source that has been little discussed in the literature: young rotation-powered pulsars. The production of UHECRs in these objects could give a picture that is surprisingly consistent with the latest data measured with the Auger Observatory.

  20. Constraining high-energy cosmic neutrino sources: Implications and prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murase, Kohta; Waxman, Eli

    2016-11-01

    We consider limits on the local (z =0 ) density (n0) of extragalactic neutrino sources set by the nondetection of steady high-energy neutrino sources producing ≳50 TeV muon multiplets in the present IceCube data, taking into account the redshift evolution, luminosity function, and neutrino spectrum of the sources. We show that the lower limit depends moderately on source spectra and strongly on redshift evolution. We find n0≳10-8- 10-7 Mpc-3 for standard candle sources evolving rapidly, ns∝(1+z ) 3 , and n0≳10-6- 10-5 Mpc-3 for nonevolving sources. The corresponding upper limits on their neutrino luminosity are Lνμ eff≲1 042- 1 043 erg s-1 and Lνμ eff≲1 041- 1 042 erg s-1 , respectively. Applying these results to a wide range of classes of potential sources, we show that powerful "blazar" jets associated with active galactic nuclei are unlikely to be the dominant sources. For almost all other steady candidate source classes (including starbursts, radio galaxies, and galaxy clusters and groups), an order of magnitude increase in the detector sensitivity at ˜0.1 - 1 PeV will enable a detection (as point sources) of the few brightest objects. Such an increase, which may be provided by next-generation detectors like IceCube-Gen2 and an upgraded KM3NET, can improve the limit on n0 by more than 2 orders of magnitude. Future gamma-ray observations (by Fermi, the High-Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory, and the Cherenkov Telescope Array) will play a key role in confirming the association of the neutrinos with their sources.