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Sample records for acoustic field due

  1. Acoustic Radiation Force on a Finite-Sized Particle due to an Acoustic Field in a Viscous Compressible Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annamalai, Subramanian; Parmar, Manoj; Balachandar, S.

    2013-11-01

    Particles when subjected to acoustic waves experience a time-averaged second-order force known as the acoustic radiation force, which is of prime importance in the fields of microfluidics and acoustic levitation. Here, the acoustic radiation force on a rigid spherical particle in a viscous compressible medium due to progressive and standing waves is considered. The relevant length scales include: particle radius (a), acoustic wavelength (λ) and viscous penetration depth (δ). While a / λ and a / δ are arbitrary, δ << λ . A farfield derivation approach has been used in determining the radiated force. Expressing the flow-field as a sum of the incident and scattered fields, an analytical expression for the force is obtained as a summation over infinite series (monopole, dipole and higher sources). These results indicate that the contributions from monopole, dipole and their cross-interaction are sufficient to describe the acoustic radiation force. Subsequently, the monopole and dipole strengths are represented in terms of the particle surface and volume averages of the incoming velocity. This generalization allows one to evaluate the radiation force for an incoming wave of any functional form. However acoustic streaming effects are neglected.

  2. Aerodynamic sound generation due to vortex-aerofoil interaction. Part 2: Analysis of the acoustic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parasarathy, R.; Karamcheti, K.

    1972-01-01

    The Lighthill method was the basic procedure used to analyze the sound field associated with a vortex of modified strength interacting with an airfoil. A free vortex interacting with an airfoil in uniform motion was modeled in order to determine the sound field due to all the acoustic sources, not only on the airfoil surfaces (dipoles), but also the ones distributed on the perturbed flow field (quadrupoles) due to the vortex-airfoil interaction. Because inviscid flow is assumed in the study of the interaction, the quadrupoles considered in the perturbed flow field are entirely due to an unsteady flow field. The effects of airfoil thickness on the second radiation are examined by using a symmetric Joukowski airfoil for the vortex-airfoil interaction. Sound radiation in a plane, far field simplification, and computation of the sound field are discussed.

  3. Flow and acoustic field due to an inclined plate with a downstream splitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, C. M.; Conlisk, A. T.

    1993-01-01

    In the present work, the high Reynolds number flow past an inclined plate with a splitter plate placed in its wake is considered numerically. A numerical conformal mapping technique is employed to transform the two-plate system into the same number of cylinders: the flow field is assumed to be two-dimensional. The vortex shedding from the inclined plate is modelled using the discrete vortex method. It is shown that the splitter plate has a profound effect on the development of the flow over a range of values of a suitably defined offset parameter and for a range of positions of the leading edge of the splitter plate. The acoustic field is also calculated and the spectrum reflects the flow results.

  4. Mean force on a finite-sized spherical particle due to an acoustic field in a viscous compressible medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annamalai, Subramanian; Balachandar, S.; Parmar, Manoj K.

    2014-05-01

    An analytical expression to evaluate the second-order mean force (acoustic radiation force) on a finite-sized, rigid, spherical particle due to an acoustic wave is presented. The medium in which the particle is situated is taken to be both viscous and compressible. A far-field derivation approach has been used in determining the force, which is a function of the particle size, acoustic wavelength, and viscous boundary-layer thickness. It is assumed that the viscous length scale is negligibly small compared to the acoustic wavelength. The force expression presented here (i) reduces to the correct inviscid behavior (for both small- and finite-sized particles) and (ii) is identical to recent viscous results [M. Settnes and H. Bruus, Phys. Rev. E 85, 016327 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevE.85.016327] for small-sized particles. Further, the computed force qualitatively matches the computational fluid dynamics (finite-element) results [D. Foresti, M. Nabavi, and D. Poulikakos, J. Fluid Mech. 709, 581 (2012), 10.1017/jfm.2012.350] for finite-sized particles. Additionally, the mean force is interpreted in terms of a multipole expansion. Subsequently, considering the fact that the force expansion is an infinite series, the number of terms that are required or adequate to capture the force to a specified accuracy is also provided as a function of the particle size to acoustic wavelength ratio. The dependence of the force on particle density, kinematic viscosity, and bulk viscosity of the fluid is also investigated. Here, both traveling and standing waves are considered.

  5. Acoustic radiation force due to arbitrary incident fields on spherical particles in soft tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Treweek, Benjamin C. Ilinskii, Yurii A.; Zabolotskaya, Evgenia A.; Hamilton, Mark F.

    2015-10-28

    Acoustic radiation force is of interest in a wide variety of biomedical applications ranging from tissue characterization (e.g. elastography) to tissue treatment (e.g. high intensity focused ultrasound, kidney stone fragment removal). As tissue mechanical properties are reliable indicators of tissue health, the former is the focus of the present contribution. This is accomplished through an investigation of the acoustic radiation force on a spherical scatterer embedded in tissue. Properties of both the scatterer and the surrounding tissue are important in determining the magnitude and the direction of the force. As these properties vary, the force computation shows changes in magnitude and direction, which may enable more accurate noninvasive determination of tissue properties.

  6. Acoustic radiation force due to arbitrary incident fields on spherical particles in soft tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treweek, Benjamin C.; Ilinskii, Yurii A.; Zabolotskaya, Evgenia A.; Hamilton, Mark F.

    2015-10-01

    Acoustic radiation force is of interest in a wide variety of biomedical applications ranging from tissue characterization (e.g. elastography) to tissue treatment (e.g. high intensity focused ultrasound, kidney stone fragment removal). As tissue mechanical properties are reliable indicators of tissue health, the former is the focus of the present contribution. This is accomplished through an investigation of the acoustic radiation force on a spherical scatterer embedded in tissue. Properties of both the scatterer and the surrounding tissue are important in determining the magnitude and the direction of the force. As these properties vary, the force computation shows changes in magnitude and direction, which may enable more accurate noninvasive determination of tissue properties.

  7. Vibro-Acoustic Response of Buildings Due to Sonic Boom Exposure: July 2007 Field Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klos, Jacob

    2008-01-01

    During the month of July 2007, a series of structural response measurements were made on a house on Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB) property that was exposed to sonic booms of various amplitudes. The purpose of this report is to document the measurements that were made, the structure on which they were made, the conditions under which they were made, the sensors and other hardware that were used, and the data that were collected. To that end, Chapter 2 documents the house, its location, the physical layout of the house, the surrounding area, and summarizes the transducers placed in and around the house. Chapter 3 details the sensors and other hardware that were placed in the house during the experiment. In addition, day-to-day variations of hardware configurations and transducer calibrations are documented in Chapter 3. Chapter 4 documents the boom generation process, flight conditions, and ambient weather conditions during the test days. Chapter 5 includes information about sub-experiments that were performed to characterize the vibro-acoustic response of the structure, the acoustic environment inside the house, and the acoustic environment outside the house. Chapter 6 documents the data format and presents examples of reduced data that were collected during the test days.

  8. Transmitted sound field due to an impulsive line acoustic source bounded by a plate followed by a vortex sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miura, T.; Chao, C. C.

    1980-01-01

    The propagation of sound due to a line acoustic source in the moving stream across a semiinfinite vortex sheet which trails from a rigid plate is examined in a linear theory for the subsonic case. A solution for the transmitted sound field is obtained with the aid of multiple integral transforms and the Wiener-Hopf technique for both the steady state (time harmonic) and initial value (impulsive source) situations. The contour of inverse transform and hence the decomposition of the functions are determined through causality and radiation conditions. The solution obtained satisfies causality and the full Kutta conditions. The transmitted sound field is composed of two waves in both the stady state and initial value problems. One is the wave scattered from the edge of the plate which is associated with the bow wave and the instability wave. These waves exist in the downstream sectors. The other is the wave transmitted through the vortex sheet which is also associated with the instability wave. Regional divisions of the transmitted sound field are identified.

  9. Bioeffects due to acoustic droplet vaporization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bull, Joseph

    2015-11-01

    Encapsulated micro- and nano-droplets can be vaporized via ultrasound, a process termed acoustic droplet vaporization. Our interest is primarily motivated by a developmental gas embolotherapy technique for cancer treatment. In this methodology, infarction of tumors is induced by selectively formed vascular gas bubbles that arise from the acoustic vaporization of vascular microdroplets. Additionally, the microdroplets may be used as vehicles for localized drug delivery, with or without flow occlusion. In this talk, we examine the dynamics of acoustic droplet vaporization through experiments and theoretical/computational fluid mechanics models, and investigate the bioeffects of acoustic droplet vaporization on endothelial cells and in vivo. Early timescale vaporization events, including phase change, are directly visualized using ultra-high speed imaging, and the influence of acoustic parameters on droplet/bubble dynamics is discussed. Acoustic and fluid mechanics parameters affecting the severity of endothelial cell bioeffects are explored. These findings suggest parameter spaces for which bioeffects may be reduced or enhanced, depending on the objective of the therapy. This work was supported by NIH grant R01EB006476.

  10. Inlet total pressure loss due to acoustic wall treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, B. A.

    1977-01-01

    The effect of diffuser wall acoustic treatment on inlet total pressure loss was experimentally determined. Data were obtained by testing an inlet model with 10 different acoustically treated diffusers differing only in the design of the Helmholtz resonator acoustic treatment. Tests were conducted in a wind tunnel at forward velocities to 41 meters per second for inlet throat Mach numbers of .5 to .8 and angles of attack as high as 50 degrees. Results indicate a pressure loss penalty due to acoustic treatment that increases linearly with the porosity of the acoustic facing sheet. For a surface porosity of 14 percent the total pressure loss was 21 percent greater than that for an untreated inlet.

  11. Frustrated total internal reflection acoustic field sensor

    DOEpatents

    Kallman, Jeffrey S.

    2000-01-01

    A frustrated total internal reflection acoustic field sensor which allows the acquisition of the acoustic field over an entire plane, all at once. The sensor finds use in acoustic holography and acoustic diffraction tomography. For example, the sensor may be produced by a transparent plate with transparent support members tall enough to support one or more flexible membranes at an appropriate height for frustrated total internal reflection to occur. An acoustic wave causes the membrane to deflect away from its quiescent position and thus changes the amount of light that tunnels through the gap formed by the support members and into the membrane, and so changes the amount of light reflected by the membrane. The sensor(s) is illuminated by a uniform tight field, and the reflection from the sensor yields acoustic wave amplitude and phase information which can be picked up electronically or otherwise.

  12. Impact of Acoustic Standing Waves on Structural Responses: Reverberant Acoustic Testing (RAT) vs. Direct Field Acoustic Testing (DFAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R.; Doty, Benjamin; Chang, Zensheu

    2012-01-01

    Loudspeakers have been used for acoustic qualification of spacecraft, reflectors, solar panels, and other acoustically responsive structures for more than a decade. Limited measurements from some of the recent speaker tests used to qualify flight hardware have indicated significant spatial variation of the acoustic field within the test volume. Also structural responses have been reported to differ when similar tests were performed using reverberant chambers. To address the impact of non-uniform acoustic field on structural responses, a series of acoustic tests were performed using a flat panel and a 3-ft cylinder exposed to the field controlled by speakers and repeated in a reverberant chamber. The speaker testing was performed using multi-input-single-output (MISO) and multi-input-multi-output (MIMO) control schemes with and without the test articles. In this paper the spatial variation of the acoustic field due to acoustic standing waves and their impacts on the structural responses in RAT and DFAT (both using MISO and MIMO controls for DFAT) are discussed in some detail.

  13. Visualizing underwater acoustic matched-field processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenblum, Lawrence; Kamgar-Parsi, Behzad; Karahalios, Margarida; Heitmeyer, Richard

    1991-06-01

    Matched-field processing is a new technique for processing ocean acoustic data measured by an array of hydrophones. It produces estimates of the location of sources of acoustic energy. This method differs from source localization techniques in other disciplines in that it uses the complex underwater acoustic environment to improve the accuracy of the source localization. An unexplored problem in matched-field processing has been to separate multiple sources within a matched-field ambiguity function. Underwater acoustic processing is one of many disciplines where a synthesis of computer graphics and image processing is producing new insight. The benefits of different volume visualization algorithms for matched-field display are discussed. The authors show how this led to a template matching scheme for identifying a source within the matched-field ambiguity function that can help move toward an automated source localization process.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging of acoustic streaming: absorption coefficient and acoustic field shape estimation.

    PubMed

    Madelin, Guillaume; Grucker, Daniel; Franconi, Jean-Michel; Thiaudiere, Eric

    2006-07-01

    In this study, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is used to visualize acoustic streaming in liquids. A single-shot spin echo sequence (HASTE) with a saturation band perpendicular to the acoustic beam permits the acquisition of an instantaneous image of the flow due to the application of ultrasound. An average acoustic streaming velocity can be estimated from the MR images, from which the ultrasonic absorption coefficient and the bulk viscosity of different glycerol-water mixtures can be deduced. In the same way, this MRI method could be used to assess the acoustic field and time-average power of ultrasonic transducers in water (or other liquids with known physical properties), after calibration of a geometrical parameter that is dependent on the experimental setup. PMID:16650447

  15. Modulation of Radio Frequency Signals by Nonlinearly Generated Acoustic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Spencer Joseph

    nonlinear scattering of sound by sound as the acoustic waves propagate into the far-field. With improvements in the sensitivity of radio frequency (RF) receivers, spectral content previously below the measurable noise floor, such as the nonlinear content produced by acousto-EM scattering, can now be examined and analyzed. Through the use of a high dynamic range nonlinear measurement system based on analog cancellation, the ability to experimentally investigate the effects of nonlinear interaction between acoustic and EM waves previously unattainable is enabled. To further the understanding of the effects of acousto-EM scattering and verify experimental results, a mathematical description of the periodic change in the medium characteristics due to the propagation of a high powered acoustic wave through a medium that modulates an EM signal proportional to the acoustic frequency is developed.

  16. Acoustic vector fields in underwater waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapids, Brian

    2005-09-01

    The ability to compute the sound pressure level as well as the vectors associated with the acoustic particle motion has existed for some time. However, propagation studies and ambient noise investigations have typically focused only upon the sound pressure levels that would be observed by an omnidirectional hydrophone or array of hydrophones. Recent interest in geophones and accelerometers for use as vector and dyadic sensors should encourage the investigation and analysis of the underlying vector fields contributing to the acoustic intensity and energy density fields. The frequency domain properties of the acoustic vector field generated by monopole sources having frequencies <1kHz in a simple iso-velocity waveguide are presented in order to build a fundamental understanding of the related quantities. Subsequently, similar field quantities computed for more realistic environments such as downward refracting profiles and deep-water profiles supporting convergence zone propagation will be discussed. Regions and phenomena associated with perturbations in the energy flux density will be highlighted.

  17. Fourth-order acoustic torque in intense sound fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, T. G.; Kanber, H.; Olli, E. E.

    1978-01-01

    The observation of a fourth-order acoustic torque in intense sound fields is reported. The torque was determined by measuring the acoustically induced angular deflection of a polished cylinder suspended by a torsion fiber. This torque was measured in a sound field of amplitude greater than that in which first-order acoustic torque has been observed.

  18. Acoustic field positioning for containerless processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whymark, R. R.

    1975-01-01

    The noncontact positioning of materials in a space processing chamber is accomplished using a new type of acoustic levitator. Liquid and solid materials are positioned using a single source of sound. Fine control of position may be obtained by motion of an acoustical reflector. The electrical power required is usually less than 100 watts. The system operates satisfactorily at high and low temperatures and is adaptable as an 'add-on' feature to existing space experiments. Containerless melting and solidification can be performed and a freely suspended liquid can be shaped to the contour of the sound field. Experiments are described in which aluminum, glass and plastic materials are melted and solidified in the containerless state. The system has applications to containerless crystal growth, melting and related processes.

  19. Reverberant Acoustic Testing and Direct Field Acoustic Testing Acoustic Standing Waves and their Impact on Structural Responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R.; Doty, Benjamin; Chang, Zensheu

    2012-01-01

    The aerospace industry has been using two methods of acoustic testing to qualify flight hardware: (1) Reverberant Acoustic Test (RAT), (2) Direct Field Acoustic Test (DFAT). The acoustic field obtained by RAT is generally understood and assumed to be diffuse, expect below Schroeder cut-of frequencies. DFAT method of testing has some distinct advantages over RAT, however the acoustic field characteristics can be strongly affected by test setup such as the speaker layouts, number and location of control microphones and control schemes. In this paper the following are discussed based on DEMO tests performed at APL and JPL: (1) Acoustic wave interference patterns and acoustic standing waves, (2) The structural responses in RAT and DFAT.

  20. Transition in a Supersonic Boundary Layer due to Acoustic Disturbances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakumar, Ponnampalam

    2004-01-01

    The boundary layer receptivity process due to the interaction of three-dimensional slow and fast acoustic disturbances with a blunted flat plate is numerically investigated at a free stream Mach number of 3.5 and at a high Reynolds number of 106/inch. The computations are performed with and without two-dimensional isolated roughness element located near the leading edge. Both the steady and unsteady solutions are obtained by solving the full Navier-Stokes equations using the 5th-order accurate weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) scheme for space discretization and using third-order total-variation-diminishing (TVD) Runge-Kutta scheme for time integration. The simulations showed that the linear instability waves are generated very close to the leading edge. The wavelength of the disturbances inside the boundary layer first increases gradually and becomes longer than the wavelength for the instability waves within a short distance from the leading edge. The wavelength then decreases gradually and merges with the wavelength for the Tollmien_Schlichting wave. The initial amplitudes of the instability waves near the neutral points, the receptivity coefficients, are about 1.20 and 0.07 times the amplitude of the free-stream disturbances for the slow and the fast waves respectively. It was also revealed that small isolated roughness element does not enhance the receptivity process for the given nose bluntness.

  1. Transition in a Supersonic Boundary Layer Due to Acoustic Disturbances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakumar, P.

    2005-01-01

    The boundary layer receptivity process due to the interaction of three-dimensional slow and fast acoustic disturbances with a blunted flat plate is numerically investigated at a free stream Mach number of 3.5 and at a high Reynolds number of 10(exp 6)/inch. The computations are performed with and without two-dimensional isolated roughness element located near the leading edge. Both the steady and unsteady solutions are obtained by solving the full Navier-Stokes equations using the fifth-order accurate weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) scheme for space discretization and using third-order total-variation-diminishing (TVD) Runge-Kutta scheme for time integration. The simulations showed that the linear instability waves are generated very close to the leading edge. The wavelength of the disturbances inside the boundary layer first increases gradually and becomes longer than the wavelength for the instability waves within a short distance from the leading edge. The wavelength then decreases gradually and merges with the wavelength for the Tollmien-Schlichting wave. The initial amplitudes of the instability waves near the neutral points, the receptivity coefficients, are about 1.20 and 0.07 times the amplitude of the free-stream disturbances for the slow and the fast waves respectively. It was also revealed that small isolated roughness element does not enhance the receptivity process for the given nose bluntness.

  2. Airfoil profile drag increase due to acoustic excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shearin, John G.; Jones, Michael G.

    1989-01-01

    A two-dimensional airfoil (NACA-0009) is subjected to high intensity pure-tone sound over a 1-5 kHz frequency range while immersed in a flow with 240 ft/sec velocity in a quiet flow facility with a Reynolds number of 3 million. Wake dynamic pressures are determined, and the momentum deficit is used to calculate a two-dimensional drag coefficient. Significant increases in drag are observed when the airfoil is subjected to high-intensity sound at critical frequencies. The increased drag is accompanied by movement of the natural transition location. When the transition is fixed by roughness at 10 percent chord, no further transition movement is observed in response to an acoustic Tollmien-Schlichting disturbance. However, a 4 percent increase in the sectional drag coefficient is noted. It is believed to be due to the sound exciting the flow near the airfoil surface (shear layer), thus causing the existing turbulence to become more intense, possess a higher mixing rate (momentum), and increase the skin friction.

  3. Airfoil profile drag increase due to acoustic excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shearin, John G.; Jones, Michael G.

    1989-04-01

    A two-dimensional airfoil (NACA-0009) is subjected to high intensity pure-tone sound over a 1-5 kHz frequency range while immersed in a flow with 240 ft/sec velocity in a quiet flow facility with a Reynolds number of 3 million. Wake dynamic pressures are determined, and the momentum deficit is used to calculate a two-dimensional drag coefficient. Significant increases in drag are observed when the airfoil is subjected to high-intensity sound at critical frequencies. The increased drag is accompanied by movement of the natural transition location. When the transition is fixed by roughness at 10 percent chord, no further transition movement is observed in response to an acoustic Tollmien-Schlichting disturbance. However, a 4 percent increase in the sectional drag coefficient is noted. It is believed to be due to the sound exciting the flow near the airfoil surface (shear layer), thus causing the existing turbulence to become more intense, possess a higher mixing rate (momentum), and increase the skin friction.

  4. Driven acoustic oscillations within a vertical magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hindman, Bradley W.; Zweibel, Ellen G.; Cally, P. S.

    1995-01-01

    The effects of a vertical magnetic field on p-mode frequencies, line widths, and eigenfunctions, are examined. A solar model, consisting of a neutrally stable polytropic interior matched to an isothermal chromosphere, is applied. The p-modes are produced by a spatially distributed driver. The atmosphere is threaded by a constant vertical magnetic field. The frequency shifts due to the vertical magnetic field are found to be much smaller than the shifts caused by horizontal fields of similar strength. A large vertical field of 2000 G produces shifts of several nHz. It is found that the frequency shifts decrease with increasing frequency and increase with field strength. The coupling of the acoustic fast mode to the escaping slow modes is inefficient. Constant vertical magnetic field models are therefore incapable of explaining the high level of absorption observed in sunspots and plage.

  5. Droplet Vaporization In A Levitating Acoustic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruff, G. A.; Liu, S.; Ciobanescu, I.

    2003-01-01

    Combustion experiments using arrays of droplets seek to provide a link between single droplet combustion phenomena and the behavior of complex spray combustion systems. Both single droplet and droplet array studies have been conducted in microgravity to better isolate the droplet interaction phenomena and eliminate or reduce the effects of buoyancy-induced convection. In most experiments involving droplet arrays, the droplets are supported on fibers to keep them stationary and close together before the combustion event. The presence of the fiber, however, disturbs the combustion process by introducing a source of heat transfer and asymmetry into the configuration. As the number of drops in a droplet array increases, supporting the drops on fibers becomes less practical because of the cumulative effect of the fibers on the combustion process. To eliminate the effect of the fiber, several researchers have conducted microgravity experiments using unsupported droplets. Jackson and Avedisian investigated single, unsupported drops while Nomura et al. studied droplet clouds formed by a condensation technique. The overall objective of this research is to extend the study of unsupported drops by investigating the combustion of well-characterized drop clusters in a microgravity environment. Direct experimental observations and measurements of the combustion of droplet clusters would provide unique experimental data for the verification and improvement of spray combustion models. In this work, the formation of drop clusters is precisely controlled using an acoustic levitation system so that dilute, as well as dense clusters can be created and stabilized before combustion in microgravity is begun. While the low-gravity test facility is being completed, tests have been conducted in 1-g to characterize the effect of the acoustic field on the vaporization of single and multiple droplets. This is important because in the combustion experiment, the droplets will be formed and

  6. Transition in a Supersonic Boundary-Layer Due to Roughness and Acoustic Disturbances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakumar, P.

    2003-01-01

    The transition process induced by the interaction of an isolated roughness with acoustic disturbances in the free stream is numerically investigated for a boundary layer over a flat plate with a blunted leading edge at a free stream Mach number of 3.5. The roughness is assumed to be of Gaussian shape and the acoustic disturbances are introduced as boundary condition at the outer field. The governing equations are solved using the 5'h-rder accurate weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) scheme for space discretization and using third- order total-variation-diminishing (TVD) Runge- Kutta scheme for time integration. The steady field induced by the two and three-dimensional roughness is also computed. The flow field induced by two-dimensional roughness exhibits different characteristics depending on the roughness heights. At small roughness heights the flow passes smoothly over the roughness, at moderate heights the flow separates downstream of the roughness and at larger roughness heights the flow separates upstream and downstream of the roughness. Computations also show that disturbances inside the boundary layer is due to the direct interaction of the acoustic waves and isolated roughness plays a minor role in generating instability waves.

  7. Acoustic field in unsteady moving media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, F.; Maestrello, L.; Ting, L.

    1995-01-01

    In the interaction of an acoustic field with a moving airframe the authors encounter a canonical initial value problem for an acoustic field induced by an unsteady source distribution, q(t,x) with q equivalent to 0 for t less than or equal to 0, in a medium moving with a uniform unsteady velocity U(t)i in the coordinate system x fixed on the airframe. Signals issued from a source point S in the domain of dependence D of an observation point P at time t will arrive at point P more than once corresponding to different retarded times, Tau in the interval (0, t). The number of arrivals is called the multiplicity of the point S. The multiplicity equals 1 if the velocity U remains subsonic and can be greater when U becomes supersonic. For an unsteady uniform flow U(t)i, rules are formulated for defining the smallest number of I subdomains V(sub i) of D with the union of V(sub i) equal to D. Each subdomain has multiplicity 1 and a formula for the corresponding retarded time. The number of subdomains V(sub i) with nonempty intersection is the multiplicity m of the intersection. The multiplicity is at most I. Examples demonstrating these rules are presented for media at accelerating and/or decelerating supersonic speed.

  8. Effect of tidal internal wave fields on shallow water acoustic propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ju; Wang, Huan; Sun, Junping

    2010-09-01

    Internal waves are one of the most pronounced oceanic phenomenons to the oceanographer. During past decades much effort has been made to investigate the effect of internal waves on shallow water acoustic propagation. Even though many field observations, such as SWARM '95, have provided fruitful information about the relation between internal waves and acoustic propagation, it is necessary to conduct more numerical simulations due to their extensive feasibility. In this study, the shallow water internal wave environment is constructed by using a non-hydrostatic ocean model, the open boundary forcing is set by considering single or several internal wave modes at the M2 tidal frequency. In order to show the mode coupling caused by the internal wave field more clearly, the acoustic starting field with different single normal modes is adopted. The acoustic simulation can be used to check whether a specific combination of internal wave modes is related to the mode coupling, and which mode pair will be affected. The combination of internal wave modes can be separated into several groups. Even though the internal wave fields are different among every case in each group, the acoustic field structure and the mode coupling are similar. Different acoustic normal mode coupling occurs due to the different combinations of internal wave mode forcing. When the parameters of internal wave mode are modified gently, the acoustic mode coupling becomes quite different. It is interesting and important to investigate the sensitivity of acoustic fields to the variability of the internal mode combination.

  9. Imaging of acoustic fields using optical feedback interferometry.

    PubMed

    Bertling, Karl; Perchoux, Julien; Taimre, Thomas; Malkin, Robert; Robert, Daniel; Rakić, Aleksandar D; Bosch, Thierry

    2014-12-01

    This study introduces optical feedback interferometry as a simple and effective technique for the two-dimensional visualisation of acoustic fields. We present imaging results for several pressure distributions including those for progressive waves, standing waves, as well as the diffraction and interference patterns of the acoustic waves. The proposed solution has the distinct advantage of extreme optical simplicity and robustness thus opening the way to a low cost acoustic field imaging system based on mass produced laser diodes. PMID:25606963

  10. Field tests of acoustic telemetry for a portable coastal observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martini, M.; Butman, B.; Ware, J.; Frye, D.

    2006-01-01

    Long-term field tests of a low-cost acoustic telemetry system were carried out at two sites in Massachusetts Bay. At each site, an acoustic Doppler current profiler mounted on a bottom tripod was fitted with an acoustic modem to transmit data to a surface buoy; electronics mounted on the buoy relayed these data to shore via radio modem. The mooring at one site (24 m water depth) was custom-designed for the telemetry application, with a custom designed small buoy, a flexible electro-mechanical buoy to mooring joint using a molded chain connection to the buoy, quick-release electro-mechanical couplings, and dual hydrophones suspended 7 m above the bottom. The surface buoy at the second site (33 m water depth) was a U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) channel buoy fitted with telemetry electronics and clamps to hold the hydrophones. The telemetry was tested in several configurations for a period of about four years. The custom-designed buoy and mooring provided nearly error-free data transmission through the acoustic link under a variety of oceanographic conditions for 261 days at the 24 m site. The electro mechanical joint, cables and couplings required minimal servicing and were very reliable, lasting 862 days deployed before needing repairs. The acoustic communication results from the USCG buoy were poor, apparently due to the hard cobble bottom, noise from the all-steel buoy, and failure of the hydrophone assembly. Access to the USCG buoy at sea required ideal weather. ??2006 IEEE.

  11. Vibro-acoustic analysis of the acoustic-structure interaction of flexible structure due to acoustic excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djojodihardjo, Harijono

    2015-03-01

    The application of BE-FE acoustic-structure interaction on a structure subject to acoustic load is elaborated using the boundary element-finite element acoustic structural coupling and the utilization of the computational scheme developed earlier. The plausibility of the numerical treatment is investigated and validated through application to generic cases. The analysis carried out in the work is intended to serve as a baseline in the analysis of acoustic structure interaction for lightweight structures. Results obtained thus far exhibit the robustness of the method developed.

  12. Prediction and validation of high frequency vibration repsonses of NASA Mars Pathfinder spacecraft due to acoustic launch load using statistical energy analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, H. J.

    2002-01-01

    Mid and high frequency structural responses of a spacecraft during the launch condition are mainly dominated by the intense acoustic pressure field over the exterior of the launch vehicle. The prediction of structural responses due to the acoustic launch load is therefore an important analysis for engineers and scientists to correctly define various dynamics specifications of the spacecraft.

  13. Acoustic field effects on a negative corona discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bálek, R.; Červenka, M.; Pekárek, S.

    2014-06-01

    For a negative corona discharge under atmospheric pressure in different regimes, we investigated the effects of an acoustic field both on its electrical parameters and on the change in its visual appearance. We found that the application of an acoustic field on the true corona discharge, for particular currents, decreases the discharge voltage. The application of an acoustic field on the discharge in the filamentary streamer regime substantially extends the range of currents for which the discharge voltage remains more or less constant, i.e. it allows a substantial increase in the power delivered to the discharge. The application of an acoustic field on the discharge causes the discharge to spread within the discharge chamber and consequently, a highly reactive non-equilibrium plasma is created throughout the inter-electrode space. Finally, our experimental apparatus radiates almost no acoustic energy from the discharge chamber.

  14. Nonlinear Bubble Interactions in Acoustic Pressure Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbat, Tiberiu; Ashgriz, Nasser; Liu, Ching-Shi

    1996-01-01

    The systems consisting of a two-phase mixture, as clouds of bubbles or drops, have shown many common features in their responses to different external force fields. One of particular interest is the effect of an unsteady pressure field applied to these systems, case in which the coupling of the vibrations induced in two neighboring components (two drops or two bubbles) may result in an interaction force between them. This behavior was explained by Bjerknes by postulating that every body that is moving in an accelerating fluid is subjected to a 'kinetic buoyancy' equal with the product of the acceleration of the fluid multiplied by the mass of the fluid displaced by the body. The external sound wave applied to a system of drops/bubbles triggers secondary sound waves from each component of the system. These secondary pressure fields integrated over the surface of the neighboring drop/bubble may result in a force additional to the effect of the primary sound wave on each component of the system. In certain conditions, the magnitude of these secondary forces may result in significant changes in the dynamics of each component, thus in the behavior of the entire system. In a system containing bubbles, the sound wave radiated by one bubble at the location of a neighboring one is dominated by the volume oscillation mode and its effects can be important for a large range of frequencies. The interaction forces in a system consisting of drops are much smaller than those consisting of bubbles. Therefore, as a first step towards the understanding of the drop-drop interaction subject to external pressure fluctuations, it is more convenient to study the bubble interactions. This paper presents experimental results and theoretical predictions concerning the interaction and the motion of two levitated air bubbles in water in the presence of an acoustic field at high frequencies (22-23 KHz).

  15. Diversity of acoustic streaming in a rectangular acoustofluidic field.

    PubMed

    Tang, Qiang; Hu, Junhui

    2015-04-01

    Diversity of acoustic streaming field in a 2D rectangular chamber with a traveling wave and using water as the acoustic medium is numerically investigated by the finite element method. It is found that the working frequency, the vibration excitation source length, and the distance and phase difference between two separated symmetric vibration excitation sources can cause the diversity in the acoustic streaming pattern. It is also found that a small object in the acoustic field results in an additional eddy, and affects the eddy size in the acoustic streaming field. In addition, the computation results show that with an increase of the acoustic medium's temperature, the speed of the main acoustic streaming decreases first and then increases, and the angular velocity of the corner eddies increases monotonously, which can be clearly explained by the change of the acoustic dissipation factor and shearing viscosity of the acoustic medium with temperature. Commercialized FEM software COMSOL Multiphysics is used to implement the computation tasks, which makes our method very easy to use. And the computation method is partially verified by an established analytical solution. PMID:25541360

  16. Effect of acoustic field parameters on arc acoustic binding during ultrasonic wave-assisted arc welding.

    PubMed

    Xie, Weifeng; Fan, Chenglei; Yang, Chunli; Lin, Sanbao

    2016-03-01

    As a newly developed arc welding method, power ultrasound has been successfully introduced into arc and weld pool during ultrasonic wave-assisted arc welding process. The advanced process for molten metals can be realized by utilizing additional ultrasonic field. Under the action of the acoustic wave, the plasma arc as weld heat source is regulated and its characteristics make an obvious change. Compared with the conventional arc, the ultrasonic wave-assisted arc plasma is bound significantly and becomes brighter. To reveal the dependence of the acoustic binding force on acoustic field parameters, a two-dimensional acoustic field model for ultrasonic wave-assisted arc welding device is established. The influences of the radiator height, the central pore radius, the radiator radius, and curvature radius or depth of concave radiator surface are discussed using the boundary element method. Then the authors analyze the resonant mode by this relationship curve between acoustic radiation power and radiator height. Furthermore, the best acoustic binding ability is obtained by optimizing the geometric parameters of acoustic radiator. In addition, three concave radiator surfaces including spherical cap surface, paraboloid of revolution, and rotating single curved surface are investigated systematically. Finally, both the calculation and experiment suggest that, to obtain the best acoustic binding ability, the ultrasonic wave-assisted arc welding setup should be operated under the first resonant mode using a radiator with a spherical cap surface, a small central pore, a large section radius and an appropriate curvature radius. PMID:26558995

  17. Nondestructive acoustic electric field probe apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Migliori, Albert

    1982-01-01

    The disclosure relates to a nondestructive acoustic electric field probe and its method of use. A source of acoustic pulses of arbitrary but selected shape is placed in an oil bath along with material to be tested across which a voltage is disposed and means for receiving acoustic pulses after they have passed through the material. The received pulses are compared with voltage changes across the material occurring while acoustic pulses pass through it and analysis is made thereof to determine preselected characteristics of the material.

  18. Numerical solution of acoustic response due to hydro/aerodynamic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roknaldin, Farzam

    In this work, a new methodology has been proposed which determines the acoustic response due to interaction of unsteady hydro/aero-dynamic sources with rigid/flexible structures. This methodology is based on Lighthill's acoustic analogy in which acoustic sources are pre-determined from unsteady flow calculations. The key feature of this methodology is the numerical solution of the acoustic problem. For this purpose, a new variational formulation of Lighthill's acoustic analogy has been developed which can be solved using the finite element method. This enables the true geometry of the structure and acoustically non-compact sources to be considered with relative ease. The feasibility of the approach has been investigated by studying the trailing-edge noise of the Eppler 387 airfoil due to a single quadrupole source, and the noise due to vortices shed from the NACA 0018 airfoil. In both cases the results are compared with analytical solutions that are available for certain limits. As an application to a practical problem, this methodology is used to compute the acoustic signature due to the boundary layer/wake turbulence over and behind the Eppler 387 wing at a cruise condition. Turbulent sources were obtained via Large Eddy Simulation, over an infinite span wing, using an unstructured grid finite element method in conjunction with the Dynamic Smagorinsky subgrid model. For this problem, sufficient numbers of grid points were used to resolve the wall layer. Flow separation, transition and turbulent reattachment were all captured and compared with the experimental data available from other sources. Finally, the acoustic problem is solved to obtain directivity patterns of acoustic pressures. The analysis indicates the importance of both wing geometry and the extent of acoustic sources on directivity.

  19. Acoustic emission classification for failure prediction due to mechanical fatigue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emamian, Vahid; Kaveh, Mostafa; Tewfik, Ahmed H.

    2000-06-01

    Acoustic Emission signals (AE), generated by the formation and growth of micro-cracks in metal components, have the potential for use in mechanical fault detection in monitoring complex- shaped components in machinery including helicopters and aircraft. A major challenge for an AE-based fault detection algorithm is to distinguish crack-related AE signals from other interfering transient signals, such as fretting-related AE signals and electromagnetic transients. Although under a controlled laboratory environment we have fewer interference sources, there are other undesired sources which have to be considered. In this paper, we present some methods, which make their decision based on the features extracted from time-delay and joint time-frequency components by means of a Self- Organizing Map (SOM) neural network using experimental data collected in a laboratory by colleagues at the Georgia Institute of Technology.

  20. Properties of the Acoustic Vector Field in Underwater Waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dall'Osto, David R.

    This thesis focuses on the description and measurement of the underwater acoustic field, based on vector properties of acoustic particle velocity. The specific goal is to interpret vector sensor measurements in underwater waveguides, in particular those measurements made in littoral (shallow) waters. To that end, theoretical models, which include the effects of reflections from the waveguide boundaries, are developed for the acoustic intensity, i.e. the product of acoustic pressure and acoustic particle velocity. Vector properties of acoustic intensity are shown to correspond to a non-dimensional vector property of acoustic particle velocity, its degree of circularity, which describes the trajectory of particle motion. Both experimental measurements and simulations of this non-dimensional vector property are used to analyze characteristics of sound propagation in underwater waveguides. Two measurement techniques are utilized in the experiments described in this thesis. In the first, particle velocity is obtained indirectly by time integration of the measured pressure gradient between two closely spaced (with respect to an acoustic wavelength) conventional pressure sensitive hydrophones. This method was used in ocean experiments conducted with vertical line arrays of hydrophones. In the second technique, particle velocity is measured directly by time integration of the signal generated by an accelerometer. An additional pressure measurement from a co-located hydrophone forms what is known as a "combined sensor" in the Russian literature, which allows for estimation of the vector acoustic intensity. This method was utilized mainly in laboratory experiments.

  1. Field Measurement of the Acoustic Nonlinearity Parameter in Turbine Blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinton, Yolanda L.; Na, Jeong K.; Yost, William T.; Kessel, Gregory L.

    2000-01-01

    Nonlinear acoustics techniques were used to measure fatigue in turbine blades in a power generation plant. The measurements were made in the field using a reference based measurement technique, and a reference sample previously measured in the laboratory. The acoustic nonlinearity parameter showed significant increase with fatigue in the blades, as indicated by service age and areas of increased stress. The technique shows promise for effectively measuring fatigue in field applications and predicting subsequent failures.

  2. Non-contact transportation using near-field acoustic levitation

    PubMed

    Ueha; Hashimoto; Koike

    2000-03-01

    Near-field acoustic levitation, where planar objects 10 kg in weight can levitate stably near the vibrating plate, is successfully applied both to non-contact transportation of objects and to a non-contact ultrasonic motor. Transporting apparatuses and an ultrasonic motor have been fabricated and their characteristics measured. The theory of near-field acoustic levitation both for a piston-like sound source and a flexural vibration source is also briefly described. PMID:10829622

  3. A probability density function method for acoustic field uncertainty analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Kevin R.; Dowling, David R.

    2005-11-01

    Acoustic field predictions, whether analytical or computational, rely on knowledge of the environmental, boundary, and initial conditions. When knowledge of these conditions is uncertain, acoustic field predictions will also be uncertain, even if the techniques for field prediction are perfect. Quantifying acoustic field uncertainty is important for applications that require accurate field amplitude and phase predictions, like matched-field techniques for sonar, nondestructive evaluation, bio-medical ultrasound, and atmospheric remote sensing. Drawing on prior turbulence research, this paper describes how an evolution equation for the probability density function (PDF) of the predicted acoustic field can be derived and used to quantify predicted-acoustic-field uncertainties arising from uncertain environmental, boundary, or initial conditions. Example calculations are presented in one and two spatial dimensions for the one-point PDF for the real and imaginary parts of a harmonic field, and show that predicted field uncertainty increases with increasing range and frequency. In particular, at 500 Hz in an ideal 100 m deep underwater sound channel with a 1 m root-mean-square depth uncertainty, the PDF results presented here indicate that at a range of 5 km, all phases and a 10 dB range of amplitudes will have non-negligible probability. Evolution equations for the two-point PDF are also derived.

  4. Direct-field acoustic testing of a flight system : logistics, challenges, and results.

    SciTech Connect

    Stasiunas, Eric Carl; Gurule, David Joseph; Babuska, Vit; Skousen, Troy J.

    2010-10-01

    Before a spacecraft can be considered for launch, it must first survive environmental testing that simulates the launch environment. Typically, these simulations include vibration testing performed using an electro-dynamic shaker. For some spacecraft however, acoustic excitation may provide a more severe loading environment than base shaker excitation. Because this was the case for a Sandia Flight System, it was necessary to perform an acoustic test prior to launch in order to verify survival due to an acoustic environment. Typically, acoustic tests are performed in acoustic chambers, but because of scheduling, transportation, and cleanliness concerns, this was not possible. Instead, the test was performed as a direct field acoustic test (DFAT). This type of test consists of surrounding a test article with a wall of speakers and controlling the acoustic input using control microphones placed around the test item, with a closed-loop control system. Obtaining the desired acoustic input environment - proto-flight random noise input with an overall sound pressure level (OASPL) of 146.7 dB-with this technique presented a challenge due to several factors. An acoustic profile with this high OASPL had not knowingly been obtained using the DFAT technique prior to this test. In addition, the test was performed in a high-bay, where floor space and existing equipment constrained the speaker circle diameter. And finally, the Flight System had to be tested without contamination of the unit, which required a contamination bag enclosure of the test unit. This paper describes in detail the logistics, challenges, and results encountered while performing a high-OASPL, direct-field acoustic test on a contamination-sensitive Flight System in a high-bay environment.

  5. Microwave-Field Driven Acoustic Modes in Selected DNA Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Glenn Steven

    The direct coupling of a microwave field to selected DNA molecules is demonstrated using standard dielectrometry. The absorption is resonant with a typical lifetime of 300 picoseconds. Such a long lifetime is unexpected for DNA in aqueous solution at room temperature and has interesting implications for microscopic considerations in future models of solvent damping. Resonant absorption at fundamental and harmonic frequencies for both supercoiled circular and linear DNA agrees with an acoustic mode model. Our associated acoustic velocities for linear DNA are very close to the acoustic velocity of the longitudinal acoustic mode independently observed on DNA fibers using Brillouin Spectroscopy. The difference in acoustic velocities for supercoiled circular and linear DNA is discussed in terms of a conformation dependent model. *This research has been funded by the Office of Naval Research, the Center for Devices and Radiological Health, and the National Science Foundation.

  6. Determination of the viscous acoustic field for liquid drop positioning/forcing in an acoustic levitation chamber in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyell, Margaret J.

    1992-01-01

    The development of acoustic levitation systems has provided a technology with which to undertake droplet studies as well as do containerless processing experiments in a microgravity environment. Acoustic levitation chambers utilize radiation pressure forces to position/manipulate the drop. Oscillations can be induced via frequency modulation of the acoustic wave, with the modulated acoustic radiation vector acting as the driving force. To account for tangential as well as radial forcing, it is necessary that the viscous effects be included in the acoustic field. The method of composite expansions is employed in the determination of the acoustic field with viscous effects.

  7. Absorption of intense microwaves and ion acoustic turbulence due to heat transport

    SciTech Connect

    De Groot, J.S.; Liu, J.M.; Matte, J.P.

    1994-02-04

    Measurements and calculations of the inverse bremsstrahlung absorption of intense microwaves are presented. The isotropic component of the electron distribution becomes flat-topped in agreement with detailed Fokker-Planck calculations. The plasma heating is reduced due to the flat-topped distributions in agreement with calculations. The calculations show that the heat flux at high microwave powers is very large, q{sub max} {approx} 0.3 n{sub e}v{sub e}T{sub e}. A new particle model to, calculate the heat transport inhibition due to ion acoustic turbulence in ICF plasmas is also presented. One-dimensional PIC calculations of ion acoustic turbulence excited due to heat transport are presented. The 2-D PIC code is presently being used to perform calculations of heat flux inhibition due to ion acoustic turbulence.

  8. Acoustic field distribution of sawtooth wave with nonlinear SBE model

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xiaozhou Zhang, Lue; Wang, Xiangda; Gong, Xiufen

    2015-10-28

    For precise prediction of the acoustic field distribution of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy with an ellipsoid transducer, the nonlinear spheroidal beam equations (SBE) are employed to model acoustic wave propagation in medium. To solve the SBE model with frequency domain algorithm, boundary conditions are obtained for monochromatic and sawtooth waves based on the phase compensation. In numerical analysis, the influence of sinusoidal wave and sawtooth wave on axial pressure distributions are investigated.

  9. Nonlinear acoustic fields in acoustic metamaterial based on a cylindrical pipe with periodically arranged side holes.

    PubMed

    Fan, Li; Ge, Huan; Zhang, Shu-yi; Gao, Hai-fei; Liu, Yong-hui; Zhang, Hui

    2013-06-01

    Nonlinear acoustic fields in transmission-line acoustic metamaterials based on a cylindrical pipe with periodically arranged side holes are studied, in which the dispersions and characteristic parameters of the nonlinear acoustic waves are obtained with the Bloch theory, and meanwhile the distributions of the fundamental wave (FW) and second harmonic wave (SHW) in the metamaterial are simulated. Three characteristic frequency bands are defined according to the relations between the frequencies of the FW, SHW, and the low-frequency forbidden band (LFB) in the metamaterial. Especially, when the FW is in the LFB while the SHW is outside the LFB, the SHW can transmit through the metamaterial although the FW is blocked, which exhibits the possibility to extract the information from the SHW instead of the FW. In addition, experiments are carried out to measure the distributions of the acoustic pressures for the FW and SHW along the metamaterial and the experimental results are in agreement with the theory. PMID:23742339

  10. On the relationship between acoustic energy density flux near the jet and far field acoustic intensity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrello, L.

    1973-01-01

    The relationship between the distribution of the outflow of acoustic energy over the jet boundary and the far-field directivity and intensity distribution is established by measurement and analysis. The numerical and experimental procedures involved have been checked out by using a known source. The results indicate that the acoustic power output per unit length of the jet, in the region from which the sound emanates, peaks at approximately 9 diameters downstream. The acoustic emission for a jet Strouhal number of about 0.3 exceeds the emission for all other Strouhal numbers nearly everywhere along the measurement plane. However, the far-field peak intensity distribution obtained from the contribution of each station was found to depend on the spatial extent of the region where sound emanates from the jet, which, in turn, depends more on the far-field angle than on the Strouhal number. The implications of these results for sound suppression techniques are discussed.

  11. Field-Deployable Acoustic Digital Systems for Noise Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shams, Qamar A.; Wright, Kenneth D.; Lunsford, Charles B.; Smith, Charlie D.

    2000-01-01

    Langley Research Center (LaRC) has for years been a leader in field acoustic array measurement technique. Two field-deployable digital measurement systems have been developed to support acoustic research programs at LaRC. For several years, LaRC has used the Digital Acoustic Measurement System (DAMS) for measuring the acoustic noise levels from rotorcraft and tiltrotor aircraft. Recently, a second system called Remote Acquisition and Storage System (RASS) was developed and deployed for the first time in the field along with DAMS system for the Community Noise Flight Test using the NASA LaRC-757 aircraft during April, 2000. The test was performed at Airborne Airport in Wilmington, OH to validate predicted noise reduction benefits from alternative operational procedures. The test matrix was composed of various combinations of altitude, cutback power, and aircraft weight. The DAMS digitizes the acoustic inputs at the microphone site and can be located up to 2000 feet from the van which houses the acquisition, storage and analysis equipment. Digitized data from up to 10 microphones is recorded on a Jaz disk and is analyzed post-test by microcomputer system. The RASS digitizes and stores acoustic inputs at the microphone site that can be located up to three miles from the base station and can compose a 3 mile by 3 mile array of microphones. 16-bit digitized data from the microphones is stored on removable Jaz disk and is transferred through a high speed array to a very large high speed permanent storage device. Up to 30 microphones can be utilized in the array. System control and monitoring is accomplished via Radio Frequency (RF) link. This paper will present a detailed description of both systems, along with acoustic data analysis from both systems.

  12. Equilibrium thermodynamics and stochastic nonlinear acoustic fields. [in crystalline lattices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, J. H.

    1985-01-01

    A crystalline solid is considered to consist of a large number of incoherent nonlinear acoustic radiation sources identified with the vibrating particles of the crystalline lattice. Randomization of the field, together with the assumption of a stochastically independent, fluctuating, radiation field at the absolue zero of temperature, leads to an expression of the temperature-dependent radiation field in terms of the zero-point field. The equation is identified with the Planck distribution formula of quantum mechanics in the linear field limit. The thermodynamic state functions are also obtained in terms of the nonlinear acoustic modal energies per unit mass and reduce to the results of the Debye-Einstein stochastic quantum oscillator model in the linear field limit.

  13. On noninvasive assessment of acoustic fields acting on the fetus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonets, V. A.; Kazakov, V. V.

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study is to verify a noninvasive technique for assessing the characteristics of acoustic fields in the audible range arising in the uterus under the action of maternal voice, external sounds, and vibrations. This problem is very important in view of actively developed methods for delivery of external sounds to the uterus: music, maternal voice recordings, sounds from outside the mother's body, etc., that supposedly support development of the fetus at the prenatal stage psychologically and cognitively. However, the parameters of acoustic signals have been neither measured nor normalized, which may be dangerous for the fetus and hinder actual assessment of their impact on fetal development. The authors show that at frequencies below 1 kHz, acoustic pressure in the uterus may be measured noninvasively using a hydrophone placed in a soft capsule filled with liquid. It was found that the acoustic field at frequencies up to 1 kHz arising in the uterus under the action of an external sound field has amplitude-frequency parameters close to those of the external field; i.e., the external field penetrates the uterus with hardly any difficulty.

  14. Coupling of an acoustic wave to shear motion due to viscous heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bin; Goree, J.

    2016-07-01

    Viscous heating due to shear motion in a plasma can result in the excitation of a longitudinal acoustic wave, if the shear motion is modulated in time. The coupling mechanism is a thermal effect: time-dependent shear motion causes viscous heating, which leads to a rarefaction that can couple into a longitudinal wave, such as an acoustic wave. This coupling mechanism is demonstrated in an electrostatic three-dimensional (3D) simulation of a dusty plasma, in which a localized shear flow is initiated as a pulse, resulting in a delayed outward propagation of a longitudinal acoustic wave. This coupling effect can be profound in plasmas that exhibit localized viscous heating, such as the dusty plasma we simulated using parameters typical of the PK-4 experiment. We expect that a similar phenomenon can occur with other kinds of plasma waves.

  15. FIELD TESTING OF PROTOTYPE ACOUSTIC EMISSION SEWER FLOWMETER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This investigation concerns verifying the operating principles of the acoustic emission flowmeter (U.S. Patent 3,958,458) in the natural environment of three different storm sewer field sites in Nassau County, New York. The flowmeter is a novel, passive, nonintrusive method that ...

  16. Sources and Radiation Patterns of Volcano-Acoustic Signals Investigated with Field-Scale Chemical Explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, D. C.; Lees, J. M.; Taddeucci, J.; Graettinger, A. H.; Sonder, I.; Valentine, G.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the processes that give rise to complex acoustic signals during volcanic blasts by monitoring buried chemical explosions with infrasound and audio range microphones, strong motion sensors, and high speed imagery. Acoustic waveforms vary with scaled depth of burial (SDOB, units in meters per cube root of joules), ranging from high amplitude, impulsive, gas expansion dominated signals at low SDOB to low amplitude, longer duration, ground motion dominated signals at high SDOB. Typically, the sudden upward acceleration of the substrate above the blast produces the first acoustic arrival, followed by a second pulse due to the eruption of pressurized gas at the surface. Occasionally, a third overpressure occurs when displaced material decelerates upon impact with the ground. The transition between ground motion dominated and gas release dominated acoustics ranges between 0.0038-0.0018 SDOB, respectively. For example, one explosion registering an SDOB=0.0031 produced two overpressure pulses of approximately equal amplitude, one due to ground motion, the other to gas release. Recorded volcano infrasound has also identified distinct ground motion and gas release components during explosions at Sakurajima, Santiaguito, and Karymsky volcanoes. Our results indicate that infrasound records may provide a proxy for the depth and energy of these explosions. Furthermore, while magma fragmentation models indicate the possibility of several explosions during a single vulcanian eruption (Alidibirov, Bull Volc., 1994), our results suggest that a single explosion can also produce complex acoustic signals. Thus acoustic records alone cannot be used to distinguish between single explosions and multiple closely-spaced blasts at volcanoes. Results from a series of lateral blasts during the 2014 field experiment further indicates whether vent geometry can produce directional acoustic radiation patterns like those observed at Tungarahua volcano (Kim et al., GJI, 2012). Beside

  17. Multimodal far-field acoustic radiation pattern: An approximate equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, E. J.

    1977-01-01

    The far-field sound radiation theory for a circular duct was studied for both single mode and multimodal inputs. The investigation was intended to develop a method to determine the acoustic power produced by turbofans as a function of mode cut-off ratio. With reasonable simplifying assumptions the single mode radiation pattern was shown to be reducible to a function of mode cut-off ratio only. With modal cut-off ratio as the dominant variable, multimodal radiation patterns can be reduced to a simple explicit expression. This approximate expression provides excellent agreement with an exact calculation of the sound radiation pattern using equal acoustic power per mode.

  18. Acoustic spectroscopy: A powerful analytical method for the pharmaceutical field?

    PubMed

    Bonacucina, Giulia; Perinelli, Diego R; Cespi, Marco; Casettari, Luca; Cossi, Riccardo; Blasi, Paolo; Palmieri, Giovanni F

    2016-04-30

    Acoustics is one of the emerging technologies developed to minimize processing, maximize quality and ensure the safety of pharmaceutical, food and chemical products. The operating principle of acoustic spectroscopy is the measurement of the ultrasound pulse intensity and phase after its propagation through a sample. The main goal of this technique is to characterise concentrated colloidal dispersions without dilution, in such a way as to be able to analyse non-transparent and even highly structured systems. This review presents the state of the art of ultrasound-based techniques in pharmaceutical pre-formulation and formulation steps, showing their potential, applicability and limits. It reports in a simplified version the theory behind acoustic spectroscopy, describes the most common equipment on the market, and finally overviews different studies performed on systems and materials used in the pharmaceutical or related fields. PMID:26976503

  19. A field-deployable digital acoustic measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, David L.; Wright, Kenneth D., II; Rowland, Wayne D.

    1991-01-01

    A field deployable digital acoustic measurement system was developed to support acoustic research programs at the Langley Research Center. The system digitizes the acoustic inputs at the microphone, which can be located up to 1000 feet from the van which houses the acquisition, storage, and analysis equipment. Digitized data from up to 12 microphones is recorded on high density 8mm tape and is analyzed post-test by a microcomputer system. Synchronous and nonsynchronous sampling is available with maximum sample rates of 12,500 and 40,000 samples per second respectively. The high density tape storage system is capable of storing 5 gigabytes of data at transfer rates up to 1 megabyte per second. System overall dynamic range exceeds 83 dB.

  20. Theoretical and experimental examination of near-field acoustic levitation.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Hideyuki; Kamakura, Tomoo; Matsuda, Kazuhisa

    2002-04-01

    A planar object can be levitated stably close to a piston sound source by making use of acoustic radiation pressure. This phenomenon is called near-field acoustic levitation [Y. Hashimoto et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 100, 2057-2061 (1996)]. In the present article, the levitation distance is predicted theoretically by numerically solving basic equations in a compressible viscous fluid subject to the appropriate initial and boundary conditions. Additionally, experiments are carried out using a 19.5-kHz piston source with a 40-mm aperture and various aluminum disks of different sizes. The measured levitation distance agrees well with the theory, which is different from a conventional theory, and the levitation distance is not inversely proportional to the square root of the surface density of the levitated disk in a strict sense. PMID:12002842

  1. Sound field simulation and acoustic animation in urban squares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Jian; Meng, Yan

    2005-04-01

    Urban squares are important components of cities, and the acoustic environment is important for their usability. While models and formulae for predicting the sound field in urban squares are important for their soundscape design and improvement, acoustic animation tools would be of great importance for designers as well as for public participation process, given that below a certain sound level, the soundscape evaluation depends mainly on the type of sounds rather than the loudness. This paper first briefly introduces acoustic simulation models developed for urban squares, as well as empirical formulae derived from a series of simulation. It then presents an acoustic animation tool currently being developed. In urban squares there are multiple dynamic sound sources, so that the computation time becomes a main concern. Nevertheless, the requirements for acoustic animation in urban squares are relatively low compared to auditoria. As a result, it is important to simplify the simulation process and algorithms. Based on a series of subjective tests in a virtual reality environment with various simulation parameters, a fast simulation method with acceptable accuracy has been explored. [Work supported by the European Commission.

  2. Receptivity of Hypersonic Boundary Layers Due to Acoustic Disturbances over Blunt Cone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kara, K.; Balakumar, P.; Kandil, O. A.

    2007-01-01

    The transition process induced by the interaction of acoustic disturbances in the free-stream with boundary layers over a 5-degree straight cone and a wedge with blunt tips is numerically investigated at a free-stream Mach number of 6.0. To compute the shock and the interaction of shock with the instability waves the Navier-Stokes equations are solved in axisymmetric coordinates. The governing equations are solved using the 5th -order accurate weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) scheme for space discretization and using third-order total-variation-diminishing (TVD) Runge-Kutta scheme for time integration. After the mean flow field is computed, acoustic disturbances are introduced at the outer boundary of the computational domain and unsteady simulations are performed. Generation and evolution of instability waves and the receptivity of boundary layer to slow and fast acoustic waves are investigated. The mean flow data are compared with the experimental results. The results show that the instability waves are generated near the leading edge and the non-parallel effects are stronger near the nose region for the flow over the cone than that over a wedge. It is also found that the boundary layer is much more receptive to slow acoustic wave (by almost a factor of 67) as compared to the fast wave.

  3. Laval nozzle as an acoustic analogue of a massive field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuyubamba, M. A.

    2013-10-01

    We study a gas flow in the Laval nozzle, which is a convergent-divergent tube that has a sonic point in its throat. We show how to obtain the appropriate form of the tube, so that the acoustic perturbations of the gas flow in it satisfy any given wave-like equation. With the help of the proposed method we find the Laval nozzle, which is an acoustic analogue of the massive scalar field in the background of the Schwarzschild black hole. This gives us a possibility to observe in a laboratory the quasinormal ringing of the massive scalar field, which, for special set of the parameters, can have infinitely long-living oscillations in its spectrum.

  4. Propagation of acoustic pulses in random gravity wave fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millet, Christophe; de La Camara, Alvaro; Lott, François

    2015-11-01

    A linear solution modeling the interaction between an incoming acoustic wave and a randomly perturbed atmosphere is developed, using the normal mode method. The wave mode structure is determined by a sound speed profile that is confining. The environmental uncertainty is described by a stochastic field obtained with a multiwave stochastic parameterization of gravity waves (GW). Using the propagating modes of the unperturbed atmosphere, the wave propagation problem is reduced to solving a system of ordinary differential equations. We focus on the asymptotic behavior of the transmitted waves in the weakly heterogeneous regime. In this regime, the coupling between the acoustic pulse and the randomly perturbed waveguides is weak and the propagation distance must be large enough for the wave to experience significant scattering. A general expression for the pressure far-field is derived in terms of saddle-point contributions. The saddle-points are obtained from a WKB approximation of the vertical eigenvalue problem. We present preliminary results that show how statistics of the transmitted signal are related to some eigenvalues and how an ``optimal'' GW field can trigger large deviations in the acoustic signals. The present model is used to explain the variability of infrasound signals.

  5. Acoustic radiosity for computation of sound fields in diffuse environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muehleisen, Ralph T.; Beamer, C. Walter

    2002-05-01

    The use of image and ray tracing methods (and variations thereof) for the computation of sound fields in rooms is relatively well developed. In their regime of validity, both methods work well for prediction in rooms with small amounts of diffraction and mostly specular reflection at the walls. While extensions to the method to include diffuse reflections and diffraction have been made, they are limited at best. In the fields of illumination and computer graphics the ray tracing and image methods are joined by another method called luminous radiative transfer or radiosity. In radiosity, an energy balance between surfaces is computed assuming diffuse reflection at the reflective surfaces. Because the interaction between surfaces is constant, much of the computation required for sound field prediction with multiple or moving source and receiver positions can be reduced. In acoustics the radiosity method has had little attention because of the problems of diffraction and specular reflection. The utility of radiosity in acoustics and an approach to a useful development of the method for acoustics will be presented. The method looks especially useful for sound level prediction in industrial and office environments. [Work supported by NSF.

  6. Characterization of the Acoustic Field in Marine Environments with Anthropogenic Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Shane

    Most animals inhabit the aquatic environment are acoustical-oriented, due to the physical characteristics of water that favors sound transmission. Many aquatic animals depend on underwater sound to navigate, communicate, find prey, and avoid predators. The degradation of underwater acoustic environment due to human activities is expected to affected these animals' well-being and survival at the population level. This dissertation presents three original studies on the characteristics and behavior of underwater sound fields in three unique marine environments with anthropogenic noises. The first study examines the soundscape of the Chinese white dolphin habitat in Taiwan. Acoustic recordings were made at two coastal shallow water locations, Yunlin and Waisanding, in 2012. Results show that croaker choruses are dominant sound sources in the 1.2--2.4 kHz frequency band for both locations at night, and noises from container ships in the 150--300 Hz frequency band define the relative higher broadband sound levels at Yunlin. Results also illustrate interrelationships among different biotic, abiotic, and anthropogenic elements that shape the fine-scale soundscape in a coastal environment. The second study investigates the inter-pulse sound field during an open-water seismic survey in coastal shallow waters of the Arctic. The research uses continuous acoustic recordings collected from one bottom-mounted hydrophone deployed in the Beaufort Sea in summer 2012. Two quantitative methods were developed to examine the inter-pulse sound field characteristics and its dependence on source distances. Results show that inter-pulse sound field could raise the ambient noise floor by as much as 9 dB, depending on ambient condition and source distance. The third study examines the inter-ping sound field of simulated mid-frequency active sonar in deep waters off southern California in 2013 and 2014. The study used drifting acoustic recorder buoys to collect acoustic data during sonar

  7. Vibroacoustic analysis and experimental validation of the structural responses of NASA Mars Exploration Rover spacecraft due to acoustic launch load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, H. J.

    2003-01-01

    Structural responses of a spacecraft during liftoff are dominated by the intense acoustic pressure field imping on the exterior of the launch vehicle. Statistical Energy Analysis model of the NASA Mars Exploration Rover spacecraft has been developed and the SEA model was analyzed to predict vibroacoustic responses of the spacecraft under the diffuse acoustic loading condition.

  8. Single-shot measurements of the acoustic field of an electrohydraulic lithotripter using a hydrophone array

    PubMed Central

    Alibakhshi, Mohammad A.; Kracht, Jonathan M.; Cleveland, Robin O.; Filoux, Erwan; Ketterling, Jeffrey A.

    2013-01-01

    Piezopolymer-based hydrophone arrays consisting of 20 elements were fabricated and tested for use in measuring the acoustic field from a shock-wave lithotripter. The arrays were fabricated from piezopolymer films and were mounted in a housing to allow submersion into water. The motivation was to use the array to determine how the shot-to-shot variability of the spark discharge in an electrohydraulic lithotripter affects the resulting focused acoustic field. It was found that the dominant effect of shot-to-shot variability was to laterally shift the location of the focus by up to 5 mm from the nominal acoustic axis of the lithotripter. The effect was more pronounced when the spark discharge was initiated with higher voltages. The lateral beamwidth of individual, instantaneous shock waves were observed to range from 1.5 mm to 24 mm. Due to the spatial variation of the acoustic field, the average of instantaneous beamwidths were observed to be 1 to 2 mm narrower than beamwidths determined from traditional single-point measurements that average the pressure measured at each location before computing beamwidth. PMID:23654419

  9. Integrating Acoustic Imaging of Flow Regimes With Bathymetry: A Case Study, Main Endeavor Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bemis, K. G.; Rona, P. A.; Jackson, D. R.; Jones, C. D.

    2003-12-01

    A unified view of the seafloor and the hydrothermal flow regimes (plumes and diffuse flow) is constructed for three major vent clusters in the Main Endeavour Field (e.g., Grotto, S&M, and Salut) of the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge. The Main Endeavour Field is one of RIDGE 2000's Integrated Study Sites. A variety of visualization techniques are used to reconstruct the plumes (3D) and the diffuse flow field (2D) based on our acoustic imaging data set (July 2000 cruise). Plumes are identified as volumes of high backscatter intensity (indicating high particulate content or sharp density contrasts due to temperature variations) that remained high intensity when successive acoustic pings were subtracted (indicating that the acoustic targets producing the backscatter were in motion). Areas of diffuse flow are detected using our acoustic scintillation technique (AST). For the Grotto vent region (where a new Doppler technique was used to estimate vertical velocities in the plume), we estimate the areal partitioning between black smoker and diffuse flow in terms of volume fluxes. The volumetric and areal regions, where plume and diffuse flow were imaged, are registered over the bathymetry and compared to geologic maps of each region. The resulting images provide a unified view of the seafloor by integrating hydrothermal flow with geology.

  10. Near-Field Acoustical Characterization of Clustered Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandula, Max; Vu, Bruce T.; Lindsay Halie K.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents an approach for the prediction and characterization of the near-field acoustic levels from closely-spaced clustered rocket engines. The calculations are based on the method proposed by Eldred, wherein the flowfield from the clustered rockets is divided into two zones. Zone 1 contains the isolated nozzles which produce noise independently, and extends up to a distance where the individual flows completely mix to form an equivalent single nozzle flow. Zone 2 is occupied by the single mixed stream starting from the station where the jets merge. The acoustic fields from the two zones are computed separately on the basis of the NASA-SP method of Eldred developed for a single equivalent nozzle. A summation of the spectra for the two zones yields the total effective sound pressure level for the clustered engines. Under certain conditions of nozzle spacing and flow parameters, the combined sound pressure level spectrum for the clustered nozzles displays a double peak. Test cases are presented here to demonstrate the importance of hydrodynamic interactions responsible for the double peak in the sound spectrum in the case of clustered rocket nozzles, and the role of ground reflections in the case of non-interfering jets. A graphics interface (Rocket Acoustic Prediction Tool) has been developed to take into account the effects of clustered nozzles and ground reflections.

  11. Strategies for single particle manipulation using acoustic and flow fields.

    PubMed

    Oberti, S; Möller, D; Neild, A; Dual, J; Beyeler, F; Nelson, B J; Gutmann, S

    2010-02-01

    Acoustic radiation forces have often been used for the manipulation of large amounts of micrometer sized suspended particles. The nature of acoustic standing wave fields is such that they are present throughout the whole fluidic volume; this means they are well suited to such operations, with all suspended particles reacting at the same time upon exposure. Here, this simultaneous positioning capability is exploited to pre-align particles along the centerline of channels, so that they can successively be removed by means of an external tool for further analysis. This permits a certain degree of automation in single particle manipulation processes to be achieved as initial identification of particles' location is no longer necessary, rather predetermined. Two research fields in which applications are found have been identified. First, the manipulation of copolymer beads and cells using a microgripper is presented. Then, sample preparation for crystallographic analysis by positioning crystals into a loop using acoustic manipulation and a laminar flow will be presented. PMID:19837446

  12. Acoustic source localization in mixed field using spherical microphone arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Qinghua; Wang, Tong

    2014-12-01

    Spherical microphone arrays have been used for source localization in three-dimensional space recently. In this paper, a two-stage algorithm is developed to localize mixed far-field and near-field acoustic sources in free-field environment. In the first stage, an array signal model is constructed in the spherical harmonics domain. The recurrent relation of spherical harmonics is independent of far-field and near-field mode strengths. Therefore, it is used to develop spherical estimating signal parameter via rotational invariance technique (ESPRIT)-like approach to estimate directions of arrival (DOAs) for both far-field and near-field sources. In the second stage, based on the estimated DOAs, simple one-dimensional MUSIC spectrum is exploited to distinguish far-field and near-field sources and estimate the ranges of near-field sources. The proposed algorithm can avoid multidimensional search and parameter pairing. Simulation results demonstrate the good performance for localizing far-field sources, or near-field ones, or mixed field sources.

  13. High frequency formulation for the acoustic power spectrum due to cascade-turbulence interaction.

    PubMed

    Cheong, Cheolung; Joseph, Phillip; Lee, Soogab

    2006-01-01

    This paper investigates the noise radiated by a cascade of flat-plate airfoils interacting with homogeneous, isotropic turbulence. An analytic formulation for the spectrum of acoustic power of a two-dimensional flat-plate is derived. The main finding of this paper is that the acoustic power spectrum from the cascade of flat airfoils may be split into two distinct frequency regions of low frequency and high frequency, separated by a critical frequency. Below this frequency, cascade effects due to the interaction between neighboring airfoils are shown to be important. At frequencies above the critical frequency, cascade effects are shown to be relatively weak. In this frequency range, acoustic power is shown to be approximately proportional to the number of blades. Based on this finding at high frequencies, an approximate expression is derived for the power spectrum that is valid above the critical frequency and which is in excellent agreement with the exact expression for the broadband power spectrum. The formulation is used to perform a parametric study on the effects on the power spectrum of the blade number, stagger angle, gap-chord ratio, and Mach number. The theory is also shown to provide a close fit to the measured spectrum of rotor-stator interaction. PMID:16454269

  14. Changes in cell morphology due to plasma membrane wounding by acoustic cavitation

    PubMed Central

    Schlicher, Robyn K.; Hutcheson, Joshua D.; Radhakrishna, Harish; Apkarian, Robert P.; Prausnitz, Mark R.

    2010-01-01

    Acoustic cavitation-mediated wounding (i.e., sonoporation) has great potential to improve medical and laboratory applications requiring intracellular uptake of exogenous molecules; however, the field lacks detailed understanding of cavitation-induced morphological changes in cells and their relative importance. Here, we present an in-depth study of the effects of acoustic cavitation on cells using electron and confocal microscopy coupled with quantitative flow cytometry. High resolution images of treated cells show that morphologically different types of blebs can occur after wounding conditions caused by ultrasound exposure as well as by mechanical shear and strong laser ablation. In addition, these treatments caused wound-induced non-lytic necrotic death resulting in cell bodies we call wound-derived perikarya (WD-P). However, only cells exposed to acoustic cavitation experienced ejection of intact nuclei and nearly instant lytic necrosis. Quantitative analysis by flow cytometry indicates that wound-derived perikarya are the dominant morphology of nonviable cells, except at the strongest wounding conditions, where nuclear ejection accounts for a significant portion of cell death after ultrasound exposure. PMID:20350691

  15. The near-field acoustic levitation of high-mass rotors

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Z. Y.; Lü, P.; Geng, D. L.; Zhai, W.; Yan, N.; Wei, B.

    2014-10-15

    Here we demonstrate that spherical rotors with 40 mm diameter and 0-1 kg mass can be suspended more than tens of micrometers away from an ultrasonically vibrating concave surface by near-field acoustic radiation force. Their rotating speeds exceed 3000 rpm. An acoustic model has been developed to evaluate the near-field acoustic radiation force and the resonant frequencies of levitation system. This technique has potential application in developing acoustic gyroscope.

  16. The near-field acoustic levitation of high-mass rotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Z. Y.; Lü, P.; Geng, D. L.; Zhai, W.; Yan, N.; Wei, B.

    2014-10-01

    Here we demonstrate that spherical rotors with 40 mm diameter and 0-1 kg mass can be suspended more than tens of micrometers away from an ultrasonically vibrating concave surface by near-field acoustic radiation force. Their rotating speeds exceed 3000 rpm. An acoustic model has been developed to evaluate the near-field acoustic radiation force and the resonant frequencies of levitation system. This technique has potential application in developing acoustic gyroscope.

  17. The near-field acoustic levitation of high-mass rotors.

    PubMed

    Hong, Z Y; Lü, P; Geng, D L; Zhai, W; Yan, N; Wei, B

    2014-10-01

    Here we demonstrate that spherical rotors with 40 mm diameter and 0-1 kg mass can be suspended more than tens of micrometers away from an ultrasonically vibrating concave surface by near-field acoustic radiation force. Their rotating speeds exceed 3000 rpm. An acoustic model has been developed to evaluate the near-field acoustic radiation force and the resonant frequencies of levitation system. This technique has potential application in developing acoustic gyroscope. PMID:25362441

  18. Effects of Horizontal Magnetic Fields on Acoustic Travel Times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Rekha

    2007-02-01

    Local helioseismology techniques seek to probe the subsurface magnetic fields and flows by observing waves that emerge at the solar surface after passing through these inhomogeneities. Active regions on the surface of the Sun are distinguished by their strong magnetic fields, and techniques such as time-distance helioseismology can provide a useful diagnostic for probing these structures. Above the active regions, the fields fan out to create a horizontal magnetic canopy. We investigate the effect of a uniform horizontal magnetic field on the travel time of acoustic waves by considering vertical velocity in a simple plane-parallel adiabatically stratified polytrope. It is shown that such fields can lower the upper turning point of p-modes and hence influence their travel time. It is found that acoustic waves reflected from magnetically active regions have travel times up to a minute less than for waves similarly reflected in quiet regions. It is also found that sound speeds are increased below the active regions. These findings are consistent with time-distance measurements.

  19. Acoustic mode coupling due to subaqueous sand dunes in the South China Sea.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Linus Y S; Reeder, D Benjamin

    2013-08-01

    The large subaqueous sand dunes on the upper continental slope of the South China Sea are expected to couple acoustic propagating normal modes. In this letter, the criterion of adiabatic invariance is extended to the case of a waveguide possessing bedforms. Using the extended criterion to examine mode propagation over the bedforms observed in the sand dune field in 2012, results demonstrate that bedforms increase mode coupling strength such that the criterion for adiabatic propagation is exceeded for waveguides with small bedform amplitude to water depth ratios; increasing bedform amplitude enhances mode coupling. Numerical simulations confirm the extended criterion parameterization. PMID:23927225

  20. Acoustic waves from mechanical impulses due to fluorescence resonant energy (Förster) transfer: Blowing a whistle with light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zurita-Sánchez, J. R.; Henkel, C.

    2012-02-01

    We present a momentum transfer mechanism mediated by electromagnetic fields that originates in a system of two nearby molecules: one excited (donor D*) and the other in ground state (acceptor A). An intermolecular force related to fluorescence resonant energy or Förster transfer (FRET) arises in the unstable D*A molecular system, which differs from the equilibrium van der Waals interaction. Due to the its finite lifetime, a mechanical impulse is imparted to the relative motion in the system. We analyze the FRET impulse when the molecules are embedded in free space and find that its magnitude can be much greater than the single recoil photon momentum, getting comparable with the thermal momentum (Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution) at room temperature. In addition, we propose that this FRET impulse can be exploited in the generation of acoustic waves inside a film containing layers of donor and acceptor molecules, when a picosecond laser pulse excites the donors. This acoustic transient is distinguishable from that produced by thermal stress due to laser absorption, and may therefore play a role in photoacoustic spectroscopy. The effect can be seen as exciting a vibrating system like a string or organ pipe with light; it may be used as an opto-mechanical transducer.

  1. Acoustic and Cavitation Fields of Shock Wave Therapy Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitnis, Parag V.; Cleveland, Robin O.

    2006-05-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) is considered a viable treatment modality for orthopedic ailments. Despite increasing clinical use, the mechanisms by which ESWT devices generate a therapeutic effect are not yet understood. The mechanistic differences in various devices and their efficacies might be dependent on their acoustic and cavitation outputs. We report acoustic and cavitation measurements of a number of different shock wave therapy devices. Two devices were electrohydraulic: one had a large reflector (HMT Ossatron) and the other was a hand-held source (HMT Evotron); the other device was a pneumatically driven device (EMS Swiss DolorClast Vet). Acoustic measurements were made using a fiber-optic probe hydrophone and a PVDF hydrophone. A dual passive cavitation detection system was used to monitor cavitation activity. Qualitative differences between these devices were also highlighted using a high-speed camera. We found that the Ossatron generated focused shock waves with a peak positive pressure around 40 MPa. The Evotron produced peak positive pressure around 20 MPa, however, its acoustic output appeared to be independent of the power setting of the device. The peak positive pressure from the DolorClast was about 5 MPa without a clear shock front. The DolorClast did not generate a focused acoustic field. Shadowgraph images show that the wave propagating from the DolorClast is planar and not focused in the vicinity of the hand-piece. All three devices produced measurable cavitation with a characteristic time (cavitation inception to bubble collapse) that varied between 95 and 209 μs for the Ossatron, between 59 and 283 μs for the Evotron, and between 195 and 431 μs for the DolorClast. The high-speed camera images show that the cavitation activity for the DolorClast is primarily restricted to the contact surface of the hand-piece. These data indicate that the devices studied here vary in acoustic and cavitation output, which may imply that the

  2. Acoustic experience shapes female mate choice in field crickets

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Nathan W; Zuk, Marlene

    2008-01-01

    Female choice can drive the evolution of extravagant male traits. In invertebrates, the influence of prior social experience on female choice has only recently been considered. To better understand the evolutionary implications of experience-mediated plasticity in female choice, we investigated the effect of acoustic experience during rearing on female responsiveness to male song in the field cricket Teleogryllus oceanicus. Acoustic experience has unique biological relevance in this species: a morphological mutation has rendered over 90 per cent of males on the Hawaiian island of Kauai silent in fewer than 20 generations, impeding females' abilities to locate potential mates. Females reared in silent conditions mimicking Kauai were less discriminating of male calling song and more responsive to playbacks, compared with females that experienced song during rearing. Our results to our knowledge, are the first demonstration of long-term effects of acoustic experience in an arthropod, and suggest that female T. oceanicus may be able to compensate for the reduced availability of long-range male sexual signals by increasing their responsiveness to the few remaining signallers. Understanding the adaptive significance of experience-mediated plasticity in female choice provides insight into processes that facilitate rapid evolutionary change and shape sexual selection pressure in natural populations. PMID:18700205

  3. Modeling of spray combustion in an acoustic field

    SciTech Connect

    Dubey, R.K.; McQuay, M.Q.; Carvalho, J.A. Jr.

    1998-07-01

    Combustion characteristics of an ethanol flame in a Rijke-tube, pulse combustor was theoretically studied to analyze the effects of injection velocity, burner location, droplet size distribution, surrounding gas velocity, and droplet phase difference on Sauter-mean diameter. The effects of these parameters were studied at first (80 Hz), second (160 Hz), and third (240 Hz) acoustic modes with steady (no oscillations) case as reference. The sound pressure level was kept constant at 150 decibels for all theoretical simulations. The simulation frequencies and sound pressure level was selected to match the actual conditions inside the rector. For all simulations, actual droplet size and velocity distributions, as experimentally measured using a phase-Doppler particle analyzer, at the injector exit were used. Significant effects on spray size distributions were found when the burning droplets were placed at the locations corresponding to the maximum acoustic velocity amplitude. Also, for both simulations and experimental results, the Sauter-mean diameters were higher for oscillating conditions compared to steady value because small droplets burn faster under an acoustic field and therefore, Sauter-mean diameter, which is biased towards larger droplets, increases.

  4. Acoustic experience shapes female mate choice in field crickets.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Nathan W; Zuk, Marlene

    2008-11-22

    Female choice can drive the evolution of extravagant male traits. In invertebrates, the influence of prior social experience on female choice has only recently been considered. To better understand the evolutionary implications of experience-mediated plasticity in female choice, we investigated the effect of acoustic experience during rearing on female responsiveness to male song in the field cricket Teleogryllus oceanicus. Acoustic experience has unique biological relevance in this species: a morphological mutation has rendered over 90 per cent of males on the Hawaiian island of Kauai silent in fewer than 20 generations, impeding females' abilities to locate potential mates. Females reared in silent conditions mimicking Kauai were less discriminating of male calling song and more responsive to playbacks, compared with females that experienced song during rearing. Our results to our knowledge, are the first demonstration of long-term effects of acoustic experience in an arthropod, and suggest that female T. oceanicus may be able to compensate for the reduced availability of long-range male sexual signals by increasing their responsiveness to the few remaining signallers. Understanding the adaptive significance of experience-mediated plasticity in female choice provides insight into processes that facilitate rapid evolutionary change and shape sexual selection pressure in natural populations. PMID:18700205

  5. Determination of the Accommodation Coefficient Using Vapor/gas Bubble Dynamics in an Acoustic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gumerov, Nail A.; Hsiao, Chao-Tsung; Goumilevski, Alexei G.; Allen, Jeff (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Nonequilibrium liquid/vapor phase transformations can occur in superheated or subcooled liquids in fast processes such as in evaporation in a vacuum. The rate at which such a phase transformation occurs depends on the "condensation" or "accommodation" coefficient, Beta, which is a property of the interface. Existing measurement techniques for Beta are complex and expensive. The development of a relatively inexpensive and reliable technique for measurement of Beta for a wide range of substances and temperatures is of great practical importance. The dynamics of a bubble in an acoustic field strongly depends on the value of Beta. It is known that near the saturation temperature, small vapor bubbles grow under the action of an acoustic field due to "rectified heat transfer." This finding can be used as the basis for an effective measurement technique of Beta. We developed a theory of vapor bubble behavior in an isotropic acoustic wave and in a plane standing acoustic wave. A numerical code was developed which enables simulation of a variety of experimental situations and accurately takes into account slowly evolving temperature. A parametric study showed that the measurement of Beta can be made over a broad range of frequencies and bubble sizes. We found several interesting regimes and conditions which can be efficiently used for measurements of Beta. Measurements of Beta can be performed in both reduced and normal gravity environments.

  6. Computation of instantaneous and time-averaged active acoustic intensity field around rotating source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Yijun; Xu, Chen; Qi, Datong

    2015-02-01

    A vector aeroacoustics method is developed to analyze the acoustic energy flow path from the rotating source. In this method, the instantaneous and time-averaged active acoustic intensity vectors are evaluated from the time-domain and frequency-domain acoustic pressure and acoustic velocity formulations, respectively. With the above method, the acoustic intensity vectors and the acoustic energy streamlines are visualized to investigate the propagation feature of the noise radiated from the monopole and dipole point sources and the rotor in subsonic rotation. The result reveals that a portion of the acoustic energy spirals many circles before moving towards the far field, and another portion of the acoustic energy firstly flows inward along the radial direction and then propagates along the axial direction. Further, an acoustic black hole exists in the plane of source rotation, from which the acoustic energy cannot escape once the acoustic energy flows into it. Moreover, by visualizing the acoustic intensity field around the rotating sources, the acoustic-absorption performance of the acoustic liner built in the casing and centerbody is discussed.

  7. Fast computation of the acoustic field for ultrasound elements.

    PubMed

    Güven, H Emre; Miller, Eric L; Cleveland, Robin O

    2009-09-01

    A fast method for computing the acoustic field of ultrasound transducers is presented with application to rectangular elements that are cylindrically focused. No closed-form solutions exist for this case but several numerical techniques have been described in the ultrasound imaging literature. Our motivation is the rapid calculation of imaging kernels for physics-based diagnostic imaging for which current methods are too computationally intensive. Here, the surface integral defining the acoustic field from a baffled piston is converted to a 3-D spatial convolution of the element surface and the Green's function. A 3-D version of the overlap-save method from digital signal processing is employed to obtain a fast computational algorithm based on spatial Fourier transforms. Further efficiency is gained by using a separable approximation to the Green's function through singular value decomposition and increasing the effective sampling rate by polyphase filtering. The tradeoff between accuracy and spatial sampling rate is explored to determine appropriate parameters for a specific transducer. Comparisons with standard tools such as Field II are presented, where nearly 2 orders of magnitude improvement in computation speed is observed for similar accuracy. PMID:19811993

  8. Particle trapping and transport achieved via an adjustable acoustic field above a phononic crystal plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, T.; Ke, M.; Qiu, C.; Liu, Z.

    2016-06-01

    We present the design for an acoustic system that can achieve particle trapping and transport using the acoustic force field above a phononic crystal plate. The phononic crystal plate comprised a thin brass plate with periodic slits alternately embedded with two kinds of elastic inclusions. Enhanced acoustic transmission and localized acoustic fields were achieved when the structure was excited by external acoustic waves. Because of the different resonant frequencies of the two elastic inclusions, the acoustic field could be controlled via the working frequency. Particles were transported between adjacent traps under the influence of the adjustable acoustic field. This device provides a new and versatile avenue for particle manipulation that would complement other means of particle manipulation.

  9. Near-field acoustical holography of military jet aircraft noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wall, Alan T.; Gee, Kent L.; Neilsen, Tracianne; Krueger, David W.; Sommerfeldt, Scott D.; James, Michael M.

    2010-10-01

    Noise radiated from high-performance military jet aircraft poses a hearing-loss risk to personnel. Accurate characterization of jet noise can assist in noise prediction and noise reduction techniques. In this work, sound pressure measurements were made in the near field of an F-22 Raptor. With more than 6000 measurement points, this is the most extensive near-field measurement of a high-performance jet to date. A technique called near-field acoustical holography has been used to propagate the complex pressure from a two- dimensional plane to a three-dimensional region in the jet vicinity. Results will be shown and what they reveal about jet noise characteristics will be discussed.

  10. Prediction of the Acoustic Field Associated with Instability Wave Source Model for a Compressible Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golubev, Vladimir; Mankbadi, Reda R.; Dahl, Milo D.; Kiraly, L. James (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This paper provides preliminary results of the study of the acoustic radiation from the source model representing spatially-growing instability waves in a round jet at high speeds. The source model is briefly discussed first followed by the analysis of the produced acoustic directivity pattern. Two integral surface techniques are discussed and compared for prediction of the jet acoustic radiation field.

  11. Highly Localized Acoustic Streaming and Size-Selective Submicrometer Particle Concentration Using High Frequency Microscale Focused Acoustic Fields.

    PubMed

    Collins, David J; Ma, Zhichao; Ai, Ye

    2016-05-17

    Concentration and separation of particles and biological specimens are fundamental functions of micro/nanofluidic systems. Acoustic streaming is an effective and biocompatible way to create rapid microscale fluid motion and induce particle capture, though the >100 MHz frequencies required to directly generate acoustic body forces on the microscale have traditionally been difficult to generate and localize in a way that is amenable to efficient generation of streaming. Moreover, acoustic, hydrodynamic, and electrical forces as typically applied have difficulty manipulating specimens in the submicrometer regime. In this work, we introduce highly focused traveling surface acoustic waves (SAW) at high frequencies between 193 and 636 MHz for efficient and highly localized production of acoustic streaming vortices on microfluidic length scales. Concentration occurs via a novel mechanism, whereby the combined acoustic radiation and streaming field results in size-selective aggregation in fluid streamlines in the vicinity of a high-amplitude acoustic beam, as opposed to previous acoustic radiation induced particle concentration where objects typically migrate toward minimum pressure locations. Though the acoustic streaming is induced by a traveling wave, we are able to manipulate particles an order of magnitude smaller than possible using the traveling wave force alone. We experimentally and theoretically examine the range of particle sizes that can be captured in fluid streamlines using this technique, with rapid particle concentration demonstrated down to 300 nm diameters. We also demonstrate that locations of trapping and concentration are size-dependent, which is attributed to the combined effects of the acoustic streaming and acoustic forces. PMID:27102956

  12. Acoustic attenuation due to transformation twins in CaCl2: Analogue behaviour for stishovite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhiying; Schranz, Wilfried; Carpenter, Michael A.

    2012-09-01

    CaCl2 undergoes a tetragonal (P42/mnm) to orthorhombic (Pnnm) transition as a function of temperature which is essentially the same as occurs in stishovite at high pressures. It can therefore be used as a convenient analogue material for experimental studies. In order to investigate variations in elastic properties associated with the transition and possible anelastic loss behaviour related to the mobility of ferroelastic twin walls in the orthorhombic phase, the transition in polycrystalline CaCl2 has been examined using resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (RUS) at high frequencies (0.1-1.5 MHz) in the temperature interval 7-626 K, and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) at low frequencies (0.1-50 Hz) in the temperature interval 378-771 K. RUS data show steep softening of the shear modulus as the transition temperature is approached from above and substantial acoustic dissipation in the stability field of the orthorhombic structure. DMA data show softening of the storage modulus, which continues through to a minimum ˜20 K below the transition point and is followed by stiffening with further lowering of temperature. There is no obvious acoustic dissipation associated with the transition, as measured by tan δ, however. The elastic softening and stiffening matches the pattern expected for a pseudoproper ferroelastic transition as predicted elsewhere. Acoustic loss behaviour at high frequencies fits with the pattern of behaviour expected for a twin wall loss mechanism but with relaxation times in the vicinity of ˜10-6 s. With such short relaxation times, the shear modulus of CaCl2 at frequencies corresponding to seismic frequencies would include relaxations of the twin walls and is therefore likely to be significantly lower than the intrinsic shear modulus. If these characteristics apply also to twin wall mobility in stishovite, the seismic signature of the orthorhombic phase should be an unusually soft shear modulus but with no increase in attenuation.

  13. Acoustic tracking of a freely drifting sonobuoy field.

    PubMed

    Dosso, Stan E; Collison, Nicole E B

    2002-05-01

    This paper develops an acoustic inversion algorithm to track a field of freely drifting sonobuoys using travel-time measurements from a series of nonsimultaneous impulsive sources deployed around the field. In this scenario, the time interval between sources can be sufficiently long that significant independent movement of the individual sonobuoys occurs. In addition, the source transmission instants are unknown, and the source positions and initial sonobuoy positions are known only approximately. The formulation developed here solves for the track of each sonobuoy (parametrized by the sonobuoy positions at the time of each source transmission), allowing arbitrary, independent sonobuoy motion between transmissions, as well as for the source positions and transmission instants. This leads to a strongly underdetermined inverse problem. However, regularized inversion provides meaningful solutions by incorporating a priori information consisting of prior estimates (with uncertainties) for the source positions and initial sonobuoy positions, and a physical model for preferred sonobuoy motion. Several models for sonobuoy motion are evaluated, with the best results obtained by minimizing the second spatial derivative of the tracks to obtain the minimum-curvature or smoothest track, subject to fitting the acoustic data to a statistically appropriate level. PMID:12051436

  14. Acoustic tracking of a freely drifting sonobuoy field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dosso, Stan E.; Collison, Nicole E. B.

    2002-05-01

    This paper develops an acoustic inversion algorithm to track a field of freely drifting sonobuoys using travel-time measurements from a series of nonsimultaneous impulsive sources deployed around the field. In this scenario, the time interval between sources can be sufficiently long that significant independent movement of the individual sonobuoys occurs. In addition, the source transmission instants are unknown, and the source positions and initial sonobuoy positions are known only approximately. The formulation developed here solves for the track of each sonobuoy (parametrized by the sonobuoy positions at the time of each source transmission), allowing arbitrary, independent sonobuoy motion between transmissions, as well as for the source positions and transmission instants. This leads to a strongly underdetermined inverse problem. However, regularized inversion provides meaningful solutions by incorporating a priori information consisting of prior estimates (with uncertainties) for the source positions and initial sonobuoy positions, and a physical model for preferred sonobuoy motion. Several models for sonobuoy motion are evaluated, with the best results obtained by minimizing the second spatial derivative of the tracks to obtain the minimum-curvature or smoothest track, subject to fitting the acoustic data to a statistically appropriate level.

  15. Angular Spectrum Method for the Focused Acoustic Field of a Linear Transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belgroune, D.; de Belleval, J. F.; Djelouah, H.

    Applications involving non-destructive testing or acoustical imaging are more and more sophisticated. In this context, a model based on the angular spectrum approach is tackled in view to calculate the focused impulse field radiated by a linear transducer through a plane fluid-solid interface. It is well known that electronic focusing, based on a cylindrical delay law, like for the classical cases (lenses, curved transducer), leads to an inaccurate focusing in the solid due to geometric aberrations errors affecting refraction. Generally, there is a significant difference between the acoustic focal distance and the geometrical focal due to refraction. In our work, an optimized delay law, based on the Fermat's principle is established, particularly at an oblique incidence where the geometrical considerations, relatively simple in normal incidence, become quickly laborious. Numerical simulations of impulse field are judiciously carried out. Subsequently, the input parameters are optimally selected in order to achieve good computation accuracy and a high focusing. The overall results, involving compression and shear waves, have highlighted the focusing improvement in the solid when compared to the currently available approaches. Indeed, the acoustic focal distance is very close to geometrical focal distance and then, allows better control of the refracted angular beam profile (refraction angle, focusing depth and focal size).

  16. Nonlinear electron acoustic waves in presence of shear magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, Manjistha; Khan, Manoranjan; Ghosh, Samiran; Chakrabarti, Nikhil

    2013-12-15

    Nonlinear electron acoustic waves are studied in a quasineutral plasma in the presence of a variable magnetic field. The fluid model is used to describe the dynamics of two temperature electron species in a stationary positively charged ion background. Linear analysis of the governing equations manifests dispersion relation of electron magneto sonic wave. Whereas, nonlinear wave dynamics is being investigated by introducing Lagrangian variable method in long wavelength limit. It is shown from finite amplitude analysis that the nonlinear wave characteristics are well depicted by KdV equation. The wave dispersion arising in quasineutral plasma is induced by transverse magnetic field component. The results are discussed in the context of plasma of Earth's magnetosphere.

  17. Study of acoustic field modulation in the regenerator by double loudspeakers method.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lihua; Xie, Xiujuan; Li, Qing

    2011-11-01

    A model to modulate acoustic field in a regenerator of a thermoacoustic system by the double loudspeakers method is presented in this paper. The equations are derived for acoustic field modulation. They represent the relations among acoustic field (complex pressure p(0), complex velocity u(0), and acoustic impedance Z(0)), driving parameters of loudspeakers (voltage amplitude and its phase difference), and operating parameters involved in a matrix H (frequency, temperature of regenerator). The range of acoustic field is adjustable and limited by the maximal driving voltages of loudspeakers according to driving parameters. The range is simulated and analyzed in the amplitude-phase and complex coordinate planes for a given or variable H. The simulated results indicate that the range has its intrinsic characteristics. The expected acoustic field in a regenerator can be obtained feasibly by the modulation. PMID:22087899

  18. A hybrid numerical technique for predicting the aerodynamic and acoustic fields of advanced turboprops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homicz, G. F.; Moselle, J. R.

    1985-01-01

    A hybrid numerical procedure is presented for the prediction of the aerodynamic and acoustic performance of advanced turboprops. A hybrid scheme is proposed which in principle leads to a consistent simultaneous prediction of both fields. In the inner flow a finite difference method, the Approximate-Factorization Alternating-Direction-Implicit (ADI) scheme, is used to solve the nonlinear Euler equations. In the outer flow the linearized acoustic equations are solved via a Boundary-Integral Equation (BIE) method. The two solutions are iteratively matched across a fictitious interface in the flow so as to maintain continuity. At convergence the resulting aerodynamic load prediction will automatically satisfy the appropriate free-field boundary conditions at the edge of the finite difference grid, while the acoustic predictions will reflect the back-reaction of the radiated field on the magnitude of the loading source terms, as well as refractive effects in the inner flow. The equations and logic needed to match the two solutions are developed and the computer program implementing the procedure is described. Unfortunately, no converged solutions were obtained, due to unexpectedly large running times. The reasons for this are discussed and several means to alleviate the situation are suggested.

  19. Ion heating in a dusty plasma due to the dust/ion acoustic instability

    SciTech Connect

    Winske, D.; Gary, S.P.; Jones, M.E.

    1995-08-01

    The drift of plasma ions relative to charged grains in a dusty plasma can give rise to a dust/ion acoustic instability. The authors investigate the linear properties of the instability by numerically solving an appropriate linear dispersion equation and examine the nonlinear behavior through one-dimensional electrostatic particle simulations, in which the plasma and dust ions are treated as discrete particles and the electrons are modeled as a Boltzmann fluid. The instability is slightly weaker when the dust particles have a range of sizes, and corresponding range of charges and masses. It is argued that due to dust particles that comprise planetary rings, this process can contribute to ion heating and diffusion observed in the linear magnetosphere of Saturn. 14 refs., 4 figs.

  20. Iodine-starch clathrate complexes in low-field acoustic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadeev, G. N.; Boldyrev, V. S.; Ermolaeva, V. I.; Eliseeva, N. M.

    2013-01-01

    Experimental data on the kinetics of formation and decomposition of iodine-starch clathrate complexes (amyloiodine and amylopectoiodine) in low-frequency (5-45 Hz) acoustic fields are reported. The biological activity of these compounds suggests their use as a model of biocatalysts, in which iodine represents the coenzyme active group and starch homopolysaccharides (amylopectin and amylose) represents the apoenzyme.

  1. Active control of acoustic pressure fields using smart material technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Smith, R. C.

    1993-01-01

    An overview describing the use of piezoceramic patches in reducing noise in a structural acoustics setting is presented. The passive and active contributions due to patches which are bonded to an Euler-Bernoulli beam or thin shell are briefly discussed and the results are incorporated into a 2-D structural acoustics model. In this model, an exterior noise source causes structural vibrations which in turn lead to interior noise as a result of nonlinear fluid/structure coupling mechanism. Interior sound pressure levels are reduced via patches bonded to the flexible boundary (a beam in this case) which generate pure bending moments when an out-of-phase voltage is applied. Well-posedness results for the infinite dimensional system are discussed and a Galerkin scheme for approximating the system dynamics is outlined. Control is implemented by using linear quadratic regulator (LQR) optimal control theory to calculate gains for the linearized system and then feeding these gains back into the nonlinear system of interest. The effectiveness of this strategy for this problem is illustrated in an example.

  2. Some far-field acoustics characteristics of the XV-15 tilt-rotor aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, Robert A.; Conner, David A.; Becker, Lawrence E.; Rutledge, C. Kendall; Smith, Rita A.

    1990-01-01

    Far-field acoustics tests have been conducted on an instrumented XV-15 tilt-rotor aircraft. The purpose of these acoustic measurements was to create an encompassing, high confidence (90 percent), and accurate (-1.4/ +1/8 dB theoretical confidence interval) far-field acoustics data base to validate ROTONET and other current rotorcraft noise prediction computer codes. This paper describes the flight techniques used, with emphasis on the care taken to obtain high-quality far-field acoustic data. The quality and extensiveness of the data base collected are shown by presentation of ground acoustic contours for level flyovers for the airplane flight mode and for several forward velocities and nacelle tilts for the transition mode and helicopter flight mode. Acoustic pressure time-histories and fully analyzed ensemble averaged far-field data results (spectra) are shown for each of the ground contour cases.

  3. Numerical derivation of forces on particles and agglomerates in a resonant acoustic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knoop, Claas; Fritsching, Udo

    2013-10-01

    Particles and agglomerates are investigated in gaseous acoustic flow fields. Acoustic fields exert forces on solid objects, which can influence the shape of the exposed bodies, even to the point of breakage of the structures. Motivated by experimentally observed breakage of agglomerates in an acoustic levitator (f = 20 kHz), a numerical study is presented that derives the acoustic forces on a complex model agglomerate from the pressure and velocity fields of a resonant standing ultrasound wave, calculated by computational fluid dynamics (CFD). It is distinguished between the drag and lift/lateral forces on the overall agglomerate and on the different primary particles of the model.

  4. Application of acoustic tomography to reconstruct the horizontal flow velocity field in a shallow river

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razaz, Mahdi; Kawanisi, Kiyosi; Kaneko, Arata; Nistor, Ioan

    2015-12-01

    A novel acoustic tomographic measurement system capable of resolving sound travel time in extremely shallow rivers is introduced and the results of an extensive field measurements campaign are presented and further discussed. Acoustic pulses were transmitted over a wide frequency band of 20-35 kHz between eight transducers for about a week in a meandering reach of theBāsen River, Hiroshima, Japan. The purpose of the field experiment was validating the concept of acoustic tomography in rivers for visualizing current fields. The particular novelty of the experiment resides in its unusual tomographic features: subbasin scale (100 m × 270 m) and shallowness (0.5-3.0 m) of the physical domain, frequency of the transmitted acoustic signals (central frequency of 30 kHz), and the use of small sampling intervals (105 s). Inverse techniques with no a priori statistical information were used to estimate the depth-average current velocity components from differential travel times. Zeroth-order Tikhonov regularization, in conjunction with L-curve method deployed to stabilize the solution and to determine the weighting factor appearing in the inverse analysis. Concurrent direct environmental measurements were provided in the form of ADCP readings close to the right and left bank. Very good agreement found between along-channel velocities larger than 0.2 m/s obtained from the two techniques. Inverted quantities were, however, underestimated, perhaps due to vicinity of the ADCPs to the banks and strong effect of river geometry on the readings. In general, comparing the visualized currents with direct nodal measurements illustrate the plausibility of the tomographically reconstructed flow structures.

  5. Orbital motions of bubbles in an acoustic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirota, Minori; Yamashita, Ko; Inamura, Takao

    2012-09-01

    This experimental study aims to clarify the mechanism of orbital motion of two oscillating bubbles in an acoustic field. Trajectory of the orbital motion on the wall of a spherical levitator was observed using a high-speed video camera. Because of a good repeatability in volume oscillation of bubbles, we were also able to observe the radial motion driven at 24 kHz by stroboscopic like imaging technique. The orbital motions of bubbles raging from 0.13 to 0.18 mm were examined with different forcing amplitude and in different viscous oils. As a result, we found that pairs of bubbles revolve along an elliptic orbit around the center of mass of the bubbles. We also found that the two bubbles perform anti-phase radial oscillation. Although this radial oscillation should result in a repulsive secondary Bjerknes force, the bubbles kept a constant separate distance of about 1 mm, which indicates the existence of centripetal primary Bjerknes force.

  6. Investigation on the reproduction performance versus acoustic contrast control in sound field synthesis.

    PubMed

    Bai, Mingsian R; Wen, Jheng-Ciang; Hsu, Hoshen; Hua, Yi-Hsin; Hsieh, Yu-Hao

    2014-10-01

    A sound reconstruction system is proposed for audio reproduction with extended sweet spot and reduced reflections. An equivalent source method (ESM)-based sound field synthesis (SFS) approach, with the aid of dark zone minimization is adopted in the study. Conventional SFS that is based on the free-field assumption suffers from synthesis error due to boundary reflections. To tackle the problem, the proposed system utilizes convex optimization in designing array filters with both reproduction performance and acoustic contrast taken into consideration. Control points are deployed in the dark zone to minimize the reflections from the walls. Two approaches are employed to constrain the pressure and velocity in the dark zone. Pressure matching error (PME) and acoustic contrast (AC) are used as performance measures in simulations and experiments for a rectangular loudspeaker array. Perceptual Evaluation of Audio Quality (PEAQ) is also used to assess the audio reproduction quality. The results show that the pressure-constrained (PC) method yields better acoustic contrast, but poorer reproduction performance than the pressure-velocity constrained (PVC) method. A subjective listening test also indicates that the PVC method is the preferred method in a live room. PMID:25324063

  7. Convergent acoustic field of view in echolocating bats.

    PubMed

    Jakobsen, Lasse; Ratcliffe, John M; Surlykke, Annemarie

    2013-01-01

    Most echolocating bats exhibit a strong correlation between body size and the frequency of maximum energy in their echolocation calls (peak frequency), with smaller species using signals of higher frequency than larger ones. Size-signal allometry or acoustic detection constraints imposed on wavelength by preferred prey size have been used to explain this relationship. Here we propose the hypothesis that smaller bats emit higher frequencies to achieve directional sonar beams, and that variable beam width is critical for bats. Shorter wavelengths relative to the size of the emitter translate into more directional sound beams. Therefore, bats that emit their calls through their mouths should show a relationship between mouth size and wavelength, driving smaller bats to signals of higher frequency. We found that in a flight room mimicking a closed habitat, six aerial hawking vespertilionid species (ranging in size from 4 to 21 g, ref. 5) produced sonar beams of extraordinarily similar shape and volume. Each species had a directivity index of 11 ± 1 dB (a half-amplitude angle of approximately 37°) and an on-axis sound level of 108 ± 4 dB sound pressure level referenced to 20 μPa root mean square at 10 cm. Thus all bats adapted their calls to achieve similar acoustic fields of view. We propose that the necessity for high directionality has been a key constraint on the evolution of echolocation, which explains the relationship between bat size and echolocation call frequency. Our results suggest that echolocation is a dynamic system that allows different species, regardless of their body size, to converge on optimal fields of view in response to habitat and task. PMID:23172147

  8. Dynamic adaptive finite element analysis of acoustic wave propagation due to underwater explosion for fluid-structure interaction problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emamzadeh, Seyed Shahab; Ahmadi, Mohammad Taghi; Mohammadi, Soheil; Biglarkhani, Masoud

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, an investigation into the propagation of far field explosion waves in water and their effects on nearby structures are carried out. For the far field structure, the motion of the fluid surrounding the structure may be assumed small, allowing linearization of the governing fluid equations. A complete analysis of the problem must involve simultaneous solution of the dynamic response of the structure and the propagation of explosion wave in the surrounding fluid. In this study, a dynamic adaptive finite element procedure is proposed. Its application to the solution of a 2D fluid-structure interaction is investigated in the time domain. The research includes: a) calculation of the far-field scatter wave due to underwater explosion including solution of the time-depended acoustic wave equation, b) fluid-structure interaction analysis using coupled Euler-Lagrangian approach, and c) adaptive finite element procedures employing error estimates, and re-meshing. The temporal mesh adaptation is achieved by local regeneration of the grid using a time-dependent error indicator based on curvature of pressure function. As a result, the overall response is better predicted by a moving mesh than an equivalent uniform mesh. In addition, the cost of computation for large problems is reduced while the accuracy is improved.

  9. Acoustic multipath arrivals in the horizontal plane due to approaching nonlinear internal waves.

    PubMed

    Badiey, Mohsen; Katsnelson, Boris G; Lin, Ying-Tsong; Lynch, James F

    2011-04-01

    Simultaneous measurements of acoustic wave transmissions and a nonlinear internal wave packet approaching an along-shelf acoustic path during the Shallow Water 2006 experiment are reported. The incoming internal wave packet acts as a moving frontal layer reflecting (or refracting) sound in the horizontal plane. Received acoustic signals are filtered into acoustic normal mode arrivals. It is shown that a horizontal multipath interference is produced. This has previously been called a horizontal Lloyd's mirror. The interference between the direct path and the refracted path depends on the mode number and frequency of the acoustic signal. A mechanism for the multipath interference is shown. Preliminary modeling results of this dynamic interaction using vertical modes and horizontal parabolic equation models are in good agreement with the observed data. PMID:21476621

  10. Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The acoustics research activities of the DLR fluid-mechanics department (Forschungsbereich Stroemungsmechanik) during 1988 are surveyed and illustrated with extensive diagrams, drawings, graphs, and photographs. Particular attention is given to studies of helicopter rotor noise (high-speed impulsive noise, blade/vortex interaction noise, and main/tail-rotor interaction noise), propeller noise (temperature, angle-of-attack, and nonuniform-flow effects), noise certification, and industrial acoustics (road-vehicle flow noise and airport noise-control installations).

  11. The Dynamics of Vapor Bubbles in Acoustic Pressure Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hao, Y.; Prosperetti, A.

    1999-01-01

    In spite of a superficial similarity with gas bubbles, the intimate coupling between dynamical and thermal processes confers to oscillating vapor bubbles some unique characteristics. This paper examines numerically the validity of some asymptotic-theory predictions such as the existence of two resonant radii and a limit size for a given sound amplitude and frequency. It is found that a small vapor bubble in a sound field of sufficient amplitude grows quickly through resonance and continues to grow thereafter at a very slow rate, seemingly indefinitely. Resonance phenomena therefore play a role for a few cycles at most, and reaching a limit size-if one exists at all-is found to require far more than several tens of thousands of cycles. It is also found that some small bubbles may grow or collapse depending on the phase of the sound field. The model accounts in detail for the thermo-fluid-mechanic processes in the vapor. In the second part of the paper, an approximate formulation valid for bubbles small with respect to the thermal penetration length in the vapor is derived and its accuracy examined, The present findings have implications for acoustically enhanced boiling heat transfer and other special applications such as boiling in microgravity.

  12. Theoretical analysis of a cell's oscillations in an acoustic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, John S.; Zinin, Pavel

    2005-09-01

    The analysis and deformation of an individual cell in a high-frequency acoustic field is of fundamental interest for a variety of applications such as ultrasound cell separation and drug delivery. The oscillations of biological cells in a sound field are investigated using a shell model for the cell following an approach developed previously [Zinin, Ultrasonics, 30, 26-34 (1992)]. The model accounts for the three components which comprise the cell's motion: the internal fluid (cytoplasma), the cell membrane, and the surrounding fluid. The cell membrane whose thickness is small compared to the cell radius can be approximated as a thin elastic shell. The elastic properties of this shell together with the viscosities of the internal and external fluids determine the oscillations of the cell. The dipole oscillations of the cell depend on the surface area modulus and the maximum frequency for the relative change in cell area can be determined. Moreover, the higher order oscillations starting with the quadrupole oscillations are governed by the shell's shear modulus. Induced stresses in bacteria cell membranes in the vicinity of an oscillating bubble are investigated and cell rupture with respect to these stresses is analyzed.

  13. Tomographic reconstruction of transient acoustic fields recorded by pulsed TV holography.

    PubMed

    Gren, P; Schedin, S; Li, X

    1998-02-10

    Pulsed TV holography combined with computerized tomography (CT) are used to evaluate the three-dimensional distribution of transient acoustic fields in air. Experiments are performed with an electrical discharge between two electrodes as the sound source. Holograms from several directions of the acoustic field are recorded directly onto a CCD detector by use of a double-pulsed ruby laser as the light source. Phase maps, representing projections of the acoustic field, are evaluated quantitatively from the recorded holograms. The projections are used for the CT reconstruction to evaluate the pressure-field distribution in any cross section of the measured volume of air. PMID:18268660

  14. Development of anticavitation hydrophone using a titanium front plate: Effect of the titanium front plate in high-intensity acoustic field with generation of acoustic cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiiba, Michihisa; Okada, Nagaya; Kurosawa, Minoru; Takeuchi, Shinichi

    2016-07-01

    Novel anticavitation hydrophones were fabricated by depositing a hydrothermally synthesized lead zirconate titanate polycrystalline film at the back of a titanium front plate. These anticavitation hydrophones were not damaged by the measurement of the acoustic field formed by a high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) device. Their sensitivity was improved by approximately 20 dB over that of the conventional anticavitation hydrophone by modifying their basic structure and materials. The durability of the anticavitation hydrophone that we fabricated was compared by exposing it to a high-intensity acoustic field at the focal point of the HIFU field and in the water tank of an ultrasound cleaner. Therefore, the effect of the surface of the titanium front plate on acoustic cavitation was investigated by exposing such a surface to the high-intensity acoustic field. We found that the fabricated anticavitation hydrophone was robust and was not damaged easily, even in the focused acoustic field where acoustic cavitation occurs.

  15. Frequency dependence of the acoustic field generated from a spherical cavity transducer with open ends

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Faqi; Zeng, Deping; He, Min; Wang, Zhibiao E-mail: wangzhibiao@haifu.com.cn; Song, Dan; Lei, Guangrong; Lin, Zhou; Zhang, Dong E-mail: wangzhibiao@haifu.com.cn; Wu, Junru

    2015-12-15

    Resolution of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) focusing is limited by the wave diffraction. We have developed a spherical cavity transducer with two open ends to improve the focusing precision without sacrificing the acoustic intensity (App Phys Lett 2013; 102: 204102). This work aims to theoretically and experimentally investigate the frequency dependence of the acoustic field generated from the spherical cavity transducer with two open ends. The device emits high intensity ultrasound at the frequency ranging from 420 to 470 kHz, and the acoustic field is measured by a fiber optic probe hydrophone. The measured results shows that the spherical cavity transducer provides high acoustic intensity for HIFU treatment only in its resonant modes, and a series of resonant frequencies can be choosen. Furthermore, a finite element model is developed to discuss the frequency dependence of the acoustic field. The numerical simulations coincide well with the measured results.

  16. Frequency dependence of the acoustic field generated from a spherical cavity transducer with open ends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Faqi; Song, Dan; Zeng, Deping; Lin, Zhou; He, Min; Lei, Guangrong; Wu, Junru; Zhang, Dong; Wang, Zhibiao

    2015-12-01

    Resolution of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) focusing is limited by the wave diffraction. We have developed a spherical cavity transducer with two open ends to improve the focusing precision without sacrificing the acoustic intensity (App Phys Lett 2013; 102: 204102). This work aims to theoretically and experimentally investigate the frequency dependence of the acoustic field generated from the spherical cavity transducer with two open ends. The device emits high intensity ultrasound at the frequency ranging from 420 to 470 kHz, and the acoustic field is measured by a fiber optic probe hydrophone. The measured results shows that the spherical cavity transducer provides high acoustic intensity for HIFU treatment only in its resonant modes, and a series of resonant frequencies can be choosen. Furthermore, a finite element model is developed to discuss the frequency dependence of the acoustic field. The numerical simulations coincide well with the measured results.

  17. The acoustic field in the atmosphere and ionosphere caused by a point explosion on the ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drobzheva, Ya. V.; Krasnov, V. M.

    2003-02-01

    In this paper, we present a set of equations and their solutions which describe the propagation of acoustic pulses through a model terrestrial atmosphere due to a chemical explosion on the ground, and the effects of these pulses on the ionosphere above the explosion. Our calculations appear to agree remarkably well with acoustic and radio sounding data measured for the 1981 Mill Race explosion at seven different altitudes from approximately /10-260km. We show that (i) the acoustic wave speed depends on the viscosity and thermal conductivity of the atmosphere, (ii) the amplitude of the fluid velocity in the acoustic wave reaches a maximum at an altitude of about 120km, (iii) the altitude of the maximum does not depend on the initial launch angle of the acoustic wavefront or the size of the explosion, and (iv) the path taken by different parts of the acoustic wavefront depends on the yield of explosion.

  18. Detection of in-plane displacements of acoustic wave fields using extrinsic Fizeau fiber interferometric sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhawan, R.; Gunther, M. F.; Claus, R. O.

    1991-01-01

    Quantitative measurements of the in-plane particle displacement components of ultrasonic surface acoustic wave fields using extrinsic Fizeau fiber interferometric (EFFI) sensors are reported. Wave propagation in materials and the fiber sensor elements are briefly discussed. Calibrated experimental results obtained for simulated acoustic emission events on homogeneous metal test specimens are reported and compared to previous results obtained using piezoelectric transducers.

  19. Modified ion-acoustic solitary waves in plasmas with field-aligned shear flows

    SciTech Connect

    Saleem, H.; Haque, Q.

    2015-08-15

    The nonlinear dynamics of ion-acoustic waves is investigated in a plasma having field-aligned shear flow. A Korteweg-deVries-type nonlinear equation for a modified ion-acoustic wave is obtained which admits a single pulse soliton solution. The theoretical result has been applied to solar wind plasma at 1 AU for illustration.

  20. Improving Classroom Acoustics (ICA): A Three-Year FM Sound Field Classroom Amplification Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenberg, Gail Gegg; Blake-Rahter, Patricia; Heavner, Judy; Allen, Linda; Redmond, Beatrice Myers; Phillips, Janet; Stigers, Kathy

    1999-01-01

    The Improving Classroom Acoustics (ICA) special project was designed to determine if students' listening and learning behaviors improved as a result of an acoustical environment enhanced through the use of FM sound field classroom amplification. The 3-year project involved 2,054 students in 94 general education kindergarten, first-, and…

  1. Bias in acoustic biomass estimates of Euphausia superba due to diel vertical migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demer, David A.; Hewitt, Roger P.

    1995-04-01

    The diel vertical migration (DVM) of Antarctic krill ( Euphausia superba) can greatly bias the results of qualitative and quantitative hydroacoustic surveys which are conducted with a down-looking sonar and irrespective of the time of day. To demonstrate and quantify these negative biases on both the estimates of biomass distribution and abundance, a time-depth-density analysis was performed. Data were collected, as part of the United States Antarctic Marine Living Resources Program (AMLR), in the vicinities of Elephant Island, Antarctica, during the austral summers of 1992 and 1993. Five surveys were conducted in 1992; two covered a 105 by 105 n.mi. area centered on Elephant Island, two encompassed a 60 by 35 n.mi. area immediately to the north of the Island, and one covered a 1 n.mi. 2 area centered on a large krill swarm to the west of Seal Island. The 1993 data include repetitions of the two small-area and two large-area surveys. Average krill volume densities were calculated for each hour as well as for three daily periods: day, twilight and night. These data were normalized and presented as a probability of daily average density. With spectral analysis to identify the frequencies of migration, a four-term periodic function was fitted to the probability density function of average daily biomass versus local apparent time. This function was transformed to create a temporal compensation function (TCF) for upwardly adjusting acoustic biomass estimates. The TCF was then applied to the original 1992 survey data; the resulting biomass estimates are an average of 49.5% higher than those calculated disregarding biases due to diel vertical migration. The effect of DVM on the estimates of krill distribution are illustrated by a comparison of compensated and uncompensated density maps of two 1992 surveys. Through this technique, high density kril areas are revealed where uncompensated maps indicated low densities.

  2. Measurement and modeling of the acoustic field near an underwater vehicle and implications for acoustic source localization.

    PubMed

    Lepper, Paul A; D'Spain, Gerald L

    2007-08-01

    The performance of traditional techniques of passive localization in ocean acoustics such as time-of-arrival (phase differences) and amplitude ratios measured by multiple receivers may be degraded when the receivers are placed on an underwater vehicle due to effects of scattering. However, knowledge of the interference pattern caused by scattering provides a potential enhancement to traditional source localization techniques. Results based on a study using data from a multi-element receiving array mounted on the inner shroud of an autonomous underwater vehicle show that scattering causes the localization ambiguities (side lobes) to decrease in overall level and to move closer to the true source location, thereby improving localization performance, for signals in the frequency band 2-8 kHz. These measurements are compared with numerical modeling results from a two-dimensional time domain finite difference scheme for scattering from two fluid-loaded cylindrical shells. Measured and numerically modeled results are presented for multiple source aspect angles and frequencies. Matched field processing techniques quantify the source localization capabilities for both measurements and numerical modeling output. PMID:17672639

  3. Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Jerry R.; Grosveld, Ferdinand

    2007-01-01

    The acoustics environment in space operations is important to maintain at manageable levels so that the crewperson can remain safe, functional, effective, and reasonably comfortable. High acoustic levels can produce temporary or permanent hearing loss, or cause other physiological symptoms such as auditory pain, headaches, discomfort, strain in the vocal cords, or fatigue. Noise is defined as undesirable sound. Excessive noise may result in psychological effects such as irritability, inability to concentrate, decrease in productivity, annoyance, errors in judgment, and distraction. A noisy environment can also result in the inability to sleep, or sleep well. Elevated noise levels can affect the ability to communicate, understand what is being said, hear what is going on in the environment, degrade crew performance and operations, and create habitability concerns. Superfluous noise emissions can also create the inability to hear alarms or other important auditory cues such as an equipment malfunctioning. Recent space flight experience, evaluations of the requirements in crew habitable areas, and lessons learned (Goodman 2003; Allen and Goodman 2003; Pilkinton 2003; Grosveld et al. 2003) show the importance of maintaining an acceptable acoustics environment. This is best accomplished by having a high-quality set of limits/requirements early in the program, the "designing in" of acoustics in the development of hardware and systems, and by monitoring, testing and verifying the levels to ensure that they are acceptable.

  4. Imaging of Acoustically Coupled Oscillations Due to Flow Past a Shallow Cavity: Effect of Cavity Length Scale

    SciTech Connect

    P. Oshkai; M. Geveci; D. Rockwell; M. Pollack

    2002-12-12

    Flow-acoustic interactions due to fully turbulent inflow past a shallow axisymmetric cavity mounted in a pipe are investigated using a technique of high-image-density particle image velocimetry in conjunction with unsteady pressure measurements. This imaging leads to patterns of velocity, vorticity, streamline topology, and hydrodynamic contributions to the acoustic power integral. Global instantaneous images, as well as time-averaged images, are evaluated to provide insight into the flow physics during tone generation. Emphasis is on the manner in which the streamwise length scale of the cavity alters the major features of the flow structure. These image-based approaches allow identification of regions of the unsteady shear layer that contribute to the instantaneous hydrodynamic component of the acoustic power, which is necessary to maintain a flow tone. In addition, combined image analysis and pressure measurements allow categorization of the instantaneous flow patterns that are associated with types of time traces and spectra of the fluctuating pressure. In contrast to consideration based solely on pressure spectra, it is demonstrated that locked-on tones may actually exhibit intermittent, non-phase-locked images, apparently due to low damping of the acoustic resonator. Locked-on flow tones (without modulation or intermittency), locked-on flow tones with modulation, and non-locked-on oscillations with short-term, highly coherent fluctuations are defined and represented by selected cases. Depending on which of,these regimes occur, the time-averaged Q (quality)-factor and the dimensionless peak pressure are substantially altered.

  5. Towards field and laboratory experiments with ocean acoustic-gravity waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Tiago; Kadri, Usama; Lin, Ying-Tsong; Morozov, Andrey

    2016-04-01

    Acoustic-gravity waves (AGWs) can be generated in the ocean by mechanical energy transfer from the Earth's crust (e.g. earthquakes or volcanoes) and by energy transfer occurring at the water surface (e.g. interaction of opposing gravity waves, ice-quakes or localized pressure changes). Recent theoretical studies shed light on the underlying physics of the generation and propagation of AGWs in the ocean. However, these theories are yet to be verified further with very challenging field experiments due to the associated low frequency signals required, and ambient disturbances involved. Here, we present a unique setup of field experiments and large scale laboratory tests to verify the main physical properties of AGWs in ocean generated by different types of sources. We also present a novel methodology to generate and measure AGWs in the ocean.

  6. Axial acoustic radiation force on a sphere in Gaussian field

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Rongrong; Liu, Xiaozhou Gong, Xiufen

    2015-10-28

    Based on the finite series method, the acoustical radiation force resulting from a Gaussian beam incident on a spherical object is investigated analytically. When the position of the particles deviating from the center of the beam, the Gaussian beam is expanded as a spherical function at the center of the particles and the expanded coefficients of the Gaussian beam is calculated. The analytical expression of the acoustic radiation force on spherical particles deviating from the Gaussian beam center is deduced. The acoustic radiation force affected by the acoustic frequency and the offset distance from the Gaussian beam center is investigated. Results have been presented for Gaussian beams with different wavelengths and it has been shown that the interaction of a Gaussian beam with a sphere can result in attractive axial force under specific operational conditions. Results indicate the capability of manipulating and separating spherical spheres based on their mechanical and acoustical properties, the results provided here may provide a theoretical basis for development of single-beam acoustical tweezers.

  7. Anisotropy in MHD turbulence due to a mean magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, J. V.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Montgomery, D.

    1982-01-01

    The development of anisotropy in an initially isotropic spectrum is studied numerically for two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. The anisotropy develops due to the combined effects of an externally imposed dc magnetic field and viscous and resistive dissipation at high wave numbers. The effect is most pronounced at high mechanical and magnetic Reynolds numbers. The anisotropy is greater at the higher wave numbers.

  8. Calculation of ionospheric effects due to acoustic radiation from an underground nuclear explosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudenko, G. V.; Uralov, A. M.

    1995-03-01

    Within the framework of the ionospheric detection of underground nuclear tests, we have developed analytic computing technique for the acoustic effect of a confined nuclear explosion on upper layers of the Earth's atmosphere. The relationship is obtained, which relates the nuclear test parameters (depth, explosion yield, and mechanical properties of the rock) to the vertical displacement of the ionosphere produced by the shock wave over the explosion's epicenter. It is also shown that most of the acoustic energy produced by a confined underground nuclear explosion escapes upward, with only a small fraction being captured by the atmospheric waveguide.

  9. Field observation of low-to-mid-frequency acoustic propagation characteristics of an estuarine salt wedge.

    PubMed

    Reeder, D Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    The estuarine environment often hosts a salt wedge, the stratification of which is a function of the tide's range and speed of advance, river discharge volumetric flow rate, and river mouth morphology. Competing effects of temperature and salinity on sound speed in this stratified environment control the degree of acoustic refraction occurring along an acoustic path. A field experiment was carried out in the Columbia River Estuary to test the hypothesis: the estuarine salt wedge is acoustically observable in terms of low-to-mid-frequency acoustic propagation. Linear frequency-modulated acoustic signals in the 500-2000 Hz band were transmitted during the advance and retreat of the salt wedge during May 27-29, 2013. Results demonstrate that the salt wedge front is the dominant physical mechanism controlling acoustic propagation in this environment: received signal energy is relatively stable before and after the passage of the salt wedge front when the acoustic path consists of a single medium (either entirely fresh water or entirely salt water), and suffers a 10-15 dB loss and increased variability during salt wedge front passage. Physical parameters and acoustic propagation modeling corroborate and inform the acoustic observations. PMID:26827001

  10. Reversible swarming and separation of self-propelled chemically powered nanomotors under acoustic fields.

    PubMed

    Xu, Tailin; Soto, Fernando; Gao, Wei; Dong, Renfeng; Garcia-Gradilla, Victor; Magaña, Ernesto; Zhang, Xueji; Wang, Joseph

    2015-02-18

    The collective behavior of biological systems has inspired efforts toward the controlled assembly of synthetic nanomotors. Here we demonstrate the use of acoustic fields to induce reversible assembly of catalytic nanomotors, controlled swarm movement, and separation of different nanomotors. The swarming mechanism relies on the interaction between individual nanomotors and the acoustic field, which triggers rapid migration and assembly around the nearest pressure node. Such on-demand assembly of catalytic nanomotors is extremely fast and reversible. Controlled movement of the resulting swarm is illustrated by changing the frequency of the acoustic field. Efficient separation of different types of nanomotors, which assemble in distinct swarming regions, is illustrated. The ability of acoustic fields to regulate the collective behavior of catalytic nanomotors holds considerable promise for a wide range of practical applications. PMID:25634724

  11. Influence of Acoustic Field Structure on Polarization Characteristics of Acousto-optic Interaction in Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muromets, A. V.; Trushin, A. S.

    Influence of acoustic field structure on polarization characteristics of acousto-optic interaction is investigated. It is shown that inhomogeneity of acoustic field and mechanism of ultrasound excitation causes changes in values of acousto-optic figure of merit for ordinary and extraordinary light beams in comparison with theoretic values. The theoretic values were derived under assumption that acoustic wave is homogeneous. Experimental analysis was carried out in acousto-optic cell based on lithium niobate crystal where the acoustic wave propagates at the angle 13 degrees to Z axis of the crystal. We used three different methods of ultrasound generation in the crystal: by means of external piezotransducer, by interdigital transducer and by two sets of electrodes placed on top of the crystal surface. In the latter case, the first pair of the electrodes was directed along X crystal axis, while the second pair of the electrodes was directed orthogonally to X crystal axis and the direction of ultrasound. Obtained values for diffraction efficiencies for ordinary and extraordinary polarized optical beams were qualitatively different which may be caused by spatial inhomogeneity of the generated acoustic waves in the crystal. Structure of acoustic field generated by these sets of electrodes was examined by laser probing. We performed the analysis of the acoustic field intensity using acousto-optic method. A relation of diffraction efficiencies for ordinary and extraordinary light waves was measured during each iteration of the laser probing.

  12. Underwater hybrid near-field acoustical holography based on the measurement of vector hydrophone array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Bo; Yang, Desen; Sun, Yu

    2010-06-01

    Hybrid near-field acoustical holography (NAH) is developed for reconstructing acoustic radiation from a cylindrical source in a complex underwater environment. In hybrid NAH, we combine statistically optimized near-field acoustical holography (SONAH) and broadband acoustical holography from intensity measurements (BAHIM) to reconstruct the underwater cylindrical source field. First, the BAHIM is utilized to regenerate as much acoustic pressures on the hologram surface as necessary, and then the acoustic pressures are taken as input to the formulation implemented numerically by SONAH. The main advantages of this technology are that the complex pressure on the hologram surface can be reconstructed without reference signal, and the measurement array can be smaller than the source, thus the practicability and efficiency of this technology are greatly enhanced. Numerical examples of a cylindrical source are demonstrated. Test results show that hybrid NAH can yield a more accurate reconstruction than conventional NAH. Then, an experiment has been carried out with a vector hydrophone array. The experimental results show the advantage of hybrid NAH in the reconstruction of an acoustic field and the feasibility of using a vector hydrophone array in an underwater NAH measurement, as well as the identification and localization of noise sources.

  13. Lift-Off Acoustics Prediction of Clustered Rocket Engines in the Near Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vu, Bruce; Plotkin, Ken

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation presents a method of predicting acoustics during lift-off of the clustered rocket engines in the near field. Included is a definition of the near field, and the use of deflectors and shielding. There is discussion about the use of PAD, a software system designed to calculate the acoustic levels from the lift of of clustered rocket enginee, including updates to extend the calculation to directivity, water suppression, and clustered nozzles.

  14. Acoustically Generated Flow and Temperature Fields in a Rectangular Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farouk, Bakhtier; Oran, Elaine

    1998-11-01

    Flows induced by a vibrating transducer in a gas-filled two-dimensional cavity are investigated by solving the two-dimensional compressible Navier-Stokes equations. The transducer (driver) is located along the left vertical wall of the cavity whereas the right rigid wall acts as an acoustic reflector. Both the left and right vertical walls of the cavity are considered to be conducting (isothermal) walls. The top and the bottom walls are insulated. The frequency of the driver was varied between 10 and 500 kHz. The length of the cavity was adjusted such that standing waves are formed within the cavity, which in turn create well defined vortical flows (acoustic streaming. The characteristics of the two-dimensional acoustically generated flows are studied systematically by varying the frequency and amplitude of the motion of the transducer and the aspect ratio of the cavity. The result exhibit organized flow structures within the cavity and the existence of lateral temperature gradients. Such acoustically induced temperature gradients are essential in the operation of thermoacoustic engines and refrigerators. The effect of cooling or heating the reflector wall on the acoustically generated flows are also investigated. Long time solutions of the governing equations exhibit the existence of pseudo-steady oscillatory flow conditions.

  15. Acoustic Characteristics of the Question-Statement Contrast in Severe Dysarthria Due to Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patel, Rupal

    2003-01-01

    Studies of prosodic control in severe dysarthria (DYS) have focused on differences between impaired and nonimpaired speech in terms of the range and variation of fundamental frequency (F0), intensity, and duration. Whether individuals with severe DYS can adequately signal prosodic contrasts and "which" acoustic cues they use to do so has received…

  16. On the relationship between acoustic energy density flux near the jet axis and far field acoustic intensity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrello, L.

    1973-01-01

    By measurement and analysis, the relationship between the distribution of the outflow of acoustic energy over the jet boundary and the far-field intensity is considered. The physical quantity used is the gradient of the pressure evaluated on a geometrical plane at the smallest possible radial distance from the jet axis, but outside the vortical region, in the area where the homogeneous wave equation is reasonably well satisfied. The numerical and experimental procedures involved have been checked out by using a known source. Results indicate that the acoustic power output per unit length of the jet, in the region from which the sound emanates, peaks at approximately 9 diameters downstream. The acoustic emission for a jet Strouhal number of about 0.3 exceeds the emission for all other Strouhal numbers nearly everywhere along the measurement plane. However, the far-field peak intensity distribution obtained from the contribution of each station was found to depend on the spatial extent of the region where sound emanates from the jet, which, in turn, depends more on the far-field angle than on the Strouhal number.

  17. Backcoupling of acoustic streaming on the temperature field inside high-intensity discharge lamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwieger, J.; Baumann, B.; Wolff, M.; Manders, F.; Suijker, J.

    2015-11-01

    Operating high-intensity discharge lamps in the high frequency range (20-300 kHz) provides energy-saving and cost reduction potentials. However, commercially available lamp drivers do not make use of this operating strategy because light intensity fluctuations and even lamp destruction are possible. The reason for the fluctuating discharge arc are acoustic resonances in this frequency range that are excited in the arc tube. The acoustic resonances in turn generate a fluid flow that is caused by the acoustic streaming effect. Here, we present a 3D multiphysics model to determine the influence of acoustic streaming on the temperature field in the vicinity of an acoustic eigenfrequency. In that case a transition from stable to instable behavior occurs. The model is able to predict when light flicker can be expected. The results are in very good accordance with accompanying experiments.

  18. Empirical and quadrature approximation of acoustic field and array response probability density functions.

    PubMed

    Hayward, Thomas J; Oba, Roger M

    2013-07-01

    Numerical methods are presented for approximating the probability density functions (pdf's) of acoustic fields and receiver-array responses induced by a given joint pdf of a set of acoustic environmental parameters. An approximation to the characteristic function of the random acoustic field (the inverse Fourier transform of the field pdf) is first obtained either by construction of the empirical characteristic function (ECF) from a random sample of the acoustic parameters, or by application of generalized Gaussian quadrature to approximate the integral defining the characteristic function. The Fourier transform is then applied to obtain an approximation of the pdf by a continuous function of the field variables. Application of both the ECF and generalized Gaussian quadrature is demonstrated in an example of a shallow-water ocean waveguide with two-dimensional uncertainty of sound speed and attenuation coefficient in the ocean bottom. Both approximations lead to a smoother estimate of the field pdf than that provided by a histogram, with generalized Gaussian quadrature providing a smoother estimate at the tails of the pdf. Potential applications to acoustic system performance quantification and to nonparametric acoustic signal processing are discussed. PMID:23862782

  19. An improved method for the calculation of Near-Field Acoustic Radiation Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zu-Bin; Maury, Cédric

    2016-02-01

    Sensing and controlling Acoustic Radiation Modes (ARMs) in the near-field of vibrating structures is of great interest for broadband noise reduction or enhancement, as ARMs are velocity distributions defined over a vibrating surface, that independently and optimally contribute to the acoustic power in the acoustic field. But present methods only provide far-field ARMs (FFARMs) that are inadequate for the acoustic near-field problem. The Near-Field Acoustic Radiation Modes (NFARMs) are firstly studied with an improved numerical method, the Pressure-Velocity method, which rely on the eigen decomposition of the acoustic transfers between the vibrating source and a conformal observation surface, including sound pressure and velocity transfer matrices. The active and reactive parts of the sound power are separated and lead to the active and reactive ARMs. NFARMs are studied for a 2D baffled beam and for a 3D baffled plate, and so as differences between the NFARMS and the classical FFARMs. Comparisons of the NFARMs are analyzed when varying frequency and observation distance to the source. It is found that the efficiencies and shapes of the optimal active ARMs are independent on the distance while that of the reactive ones are distinctly related on.

  20. Flow damping due to stochastization of the magnetic field

    PubMed Central

    Ida, K.; Yoshinuma, M.; Tsuchiya, H.; Kobayashi, T.; Suzuki, C.; Yokoyama, M.; Shimizu, A.; Nagaoka, K.; Inagaki, S.; Itoh, K.; Akiyama, T.; Emoto, M.; Evans, T.; Dinklage, A.; Du, X.; Fujii, K.; Goto, M.; Goto, T.; Hasuo, M.; Hidalgo, C.; Ichiguchi, K.; Ishizawa, A.; Jakubowski, M.; Kamiya, K.; Kasahara, H.; Kawamura, G.; Kato, D.; Kobayashi, M.; Morita, S.; Mukai, K.; Murakami, I.; Murakami, S.; Narushima, Y.; Nunami, M.; Ohdach, S.; Ohno, N.; Osakabe, M.; Pablant, N.; Sakakibara, S.; Seki, T.; Shimozuma, T.; Shoji, M.; Sudo, S.; Tanaka, K.; Tokuzawa, T.; Todo, Y.; Wang, H.; Yamada, H.; Takeiri, Y.; Mutoh, T.; Imagawa, S.; Mito, T.; Nagayama, Y.; Watanabe, K. Y.; Ashikawa, N.; Chikaraishi, H.; Ejiri, A.; Furukawa, M.; Fujita, T.; Hamaguchi, S.; Igami, H.; Isobe, M.; Masuzaki, S.; Morisaki, T.; Motojima, G.; Nagasaki, K.; Nakano, H.; Oya, Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Sakamoto, R.; Sakamoto, M.; Sanpei, A.; Takahashi, H.; Tokitani, M.; Ueda, Y.; Yoshimura, Y.; Yamamoto, S.; Nishimura, K.; Sugama, H.; Yamamoto, T.; Idei, H.; Isayama, A.; Kitajima, S.; Masamune, S.; Shinohara, K.; Bawankar, P. S.; Bernard, E.; von Berkel, M.; Funaba, H.; Huang, X. L.; Ii, T.; Ido, T.; Ikeda, K.; Kamio, S.; Kumazawa, R.; Moon, C.; Muto, S.; Miyazawa, J.; Ming, T.; Nakamura, Y.; Nishimura, S.; Ogawa, K.; Ozaki, T.; Oishi, T.; Ohno, M.; Pandya, S.; Seki, R.; Sano, R.; Saito, K.; Sakaue, H.; Takemura, Y.; Tsumori, K.; Tamura, N.; Tanaka, H.; Toi, K.; Wieland, B.; Yamada, I.; Yasuhara, R.; Zhang, H.; Kaneko, O.; Komori, A.

    2015-01-01

    The driving and damping mechanism of plasma flow is an important issue because flow shear has a significant impact on turbulence in a plasma, which determines the transport in the magnetized plasma. Here we report clear evidence of the flow damping due to stochastization of the magnetic field. Abrupt damping of the toroidal flow associated with a transition from a nested magnetic flux surface to a stochastic magnetic field is observed when the magnetic shear at the rational surface decreases to 0.5 in the large helical device. This flow damping and resulting profile flattening are much stronger than expected from the Rechester–Rosenbluth model. The toroidal flow shear shows a linear decay, while the ion temperature gradient shows an exponential decay. This observation suggests that the flow damping is due to the change in the non-diffusive term of momentum transport. PMID:25569268

  1. Patch nearfield acoustic holography combined with sound field separation technique applied to a non-free field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, ChuanXing; Jing, WenQian; Zhang, YongBin; Xu, Liang

    2015-02-01

    The conventional nearfield acoustic holography (NAH) is usually based on the assumption of free-field conditions, and it also requires that the measurement aperture should be larger than the actual source. This paper is to focus on the problem that neither of the above-mentioned requirements can be met, and to examine the feasibility of reconstructing the sound field radiated by partial source, based on double-layer pressure measurements made in a non-free field by using patch NAH combined with sound field separation technique. And also, the sensitivity of the reconstructed result to the measurement error is analyzed in detail. Two experiments involving two speakers in an exterior space and one speaker inside a car cabin are presented. The experimental results demonstrate that the patch NAH based on single-layer pressure measurement cannot obtain a satisfied result due to the influences of disturbing sources and reflections, while the patch NAH based on double-layer pressure measurements can successfully remove these influences and reconstruct the patch sound field effectively.

  2. Blending vocal music with a given sound field due to the characteristics of the running autocorrelation function of singing voices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Kosuke; Fujii, Kenji; Kawai, Keiji; Ando, Yoichi; Yano, Takashi

    2001-05-01

    This is a study to meet music and the opera house acoustics. It is said that singers adjust their interpretation style according to the acoustical condition of the sound field in a room. However, this mechanism of blending of musical performance with the sound field is unknown. In order to obtain a method of performance blending of opera house acoustics, we attempted to develop evaluation criteria for a singing voice in terms of the minimum value of the effective duration of the running autocorrelation function (r-ACF), (te)min, of sound source signals. This temporal factor has shown to have close correlation with the subjective response of both listeners and performers to sound fields [Y. Ando, Architectural Acoustics (AIP Press/Springer-Verlag, New York, 1998)]. As example for the control of (te)min due to performing style, effects of singing style, kind of vowel, relative pitch, vibrato extent, and intonation on the values of (te)min are demonstrated. In addition, the fine structure of the r-ACF is discussed with regard to the identification of vowels of singing voice. a)Now at 1-10-27 Yamanokami, Kumamoto, Japan.

  3. Permanent bilateral acoustic trauma due to air bag deployment in a young female adult.

    PubMed

    Kastanioudakis, Ioannis; Exarchakos, Georgios; Ziavra, Nausica; Skevas, Antonios

    2003-02-01

    Air bag safety systems have significantly reduced the number of occupant injuries from road traffic accidents (RTA). However air bag deployment is also associated with unavoidable risks. We report the acoustic trauma incurred by a young female driver who was a heavy smoker as a consequence of air-bag deployment in a low speed RTA and the sparing of her child seated in the rear. PMID:12625890

  4. Dust ion-acoustic solitary and shock waves due to dust charge fluctuation with vortexlike electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Duha, S. S.; Anowar, M. G. M.; Mamun, A. A.

    2010-10-15

    A rigorous theoretical investigation has been made of the dust ion-acoustic (DIA) solitary and shock waves in an unmagnetized dusty plasma (containing vortexlike electrons, mobile ions, and charge fluctuating static dust) by reductive perturbation method. The effects of dust grain charge fluctuation and vortexlike (trapped) electron are found to modify the properties of the DIA solitary and shock waves significantly. The implications of these results for some space and astrophysical dusty plasma systems, especially planetary ring systems, are briefly mentioned.

  5. Permeability, electrical impedance, and acoustic velocities on reservoir rocks from the Geysers geothermal field

    SciTech Connect

    Boitnott, G.N.; Boyd, P.J.

    1996-01-24

    Previous measurements of acoustic velocities on NEGU- 17 cores indicate that saturation effects are significant enough to cause Vp/Vs anomalies observed in the field. In this study we report on the results of new measurements on core recently recovered from SB-15-D along with some additional measurements on the NEGU-17 cores. The measurements indicate correlations between mechanical, transport, and water storage properties of the matrix which may prove useful for reservoir assessment and management. The SB-15-D material is found to be similar to the NEGU-17 material in terms of acoustic velocities, being characterized by a notably weak pressure dependence on the velocities and a modest Vp/Vs signature of saturation. The effect of saturation on Vp/Vs appears to result in part from a chemo-mechanical weakening of the shear modulus due to the presence of water. Electrical properties of SB-15-D material are qualitatively similar to those of the NEGU-17 cores, although resistivities of SB-15-D cores are notably lower and dielectric permittivities higher than in their NEGU- 17 counterparts. While some limited correlations of measured properties with depth are noted, no clear change in character is observed within SB-15-D cores which can be associated with the proposed cap-rock/reservoir boundary.

  6. Alignment of atmospheric mineral dust due to electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulanowski, Z.; Bailey, J.; Lucas, P. W.; Hough, J. H.; Hirst, E.

    2007-12-01

    Optical polarimetry observations on La Palma, Canary Islands, during a Saharan dust episode show dichroic extinction indicating the presence of vertically aligned particles in the atmosphere. Modelling of the extinction together with particle orientation indicates that the alignment could have been due to an electric field of the order of 2 kV/m. Two alternative mechanisms for the origin of the field are examined: the effect of reduced atmospheric conductivity and charging of the dust layer, the latter effect being a more likely candidate. It is concluded that partial alignment may be a common feature of Saharan dust layers. The modelling indicates that the alignment can significantly alter dust optical depth. This "Venetian blind effect" may have decreased optical thickness in the vertical direction by as much as 10% for the case reported here. It is also possible that the alignment and the electric field modify dust transport.

  7. Prediction of interior noise due to random acoustic or turbulent boundary layer excitation using statistical energy analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosveld, Ferdinand W.

    1990-01-01

    The feasibility of predicting interior noise due to random acoustic or turbulent boundary layer excitation was investigated in experiments in which a statistical energy analysis model (VAPEPS) was used to analyze measurements of the acceleration response and sound transmission of flat aluminum, lucite, and graphite/epoxy plates exposed to random acoustic or turbulent boundary layer excitation. The noise reduction of the plate, when backed by a shallow cavity and excited by a turbulent boundary layer, was predicted using a simplified theory based on the assumption of adiabatic compression of the fluid in the cavity. The predicted plate acceleration response was used as input in the noise reduction prediction. Reasonable agreement was found between the predictions and the measured noise reduction in the frequency range 315-1000 Hz.

  8. Biological effects due to weak magnetic field on plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyavskaya, N. A.

    2004-01-01

    Throughout the evolution process, Earth's magnetic field (MF, about 50 μT) was a natural component of the environment for living organisms. Biological objects, flying on planned long-term interplanetary missions, would experience much weaker magnetic fields, since galactic MF is known to be 0.1-1 nT. However, the role of weak magnetic fields and their influence on functioning of biological organisms are still insufficiently understood, and is actively studied. Numerous experiments with seedlings of different plant species placed in weak magnetic field have shown that the growth of their primary roots is inhibited during early germination stages in comparison with control. The proliferative activity and cell reproduction in meristem of plant roots are reduced in weak magnetic field. Cell reproductive cycle slows down due to the expansion of G 1 phase in many plant species (and of G 2 phase in flax and lentil roots), while other phases of cell cycle remain relatively stabile. In plant cells exposed to weak magnetic field, the functional activity of genome at early pre-replicate period is shown to decrease. Weak magnetic field causes intensification of protein synthesis and disintegration in plant roots. At ultrastructural level, changes in distribution of condensed chromatin and nucleolus compactization in nuclei, noticeable accumulation of lipid bodies, development of a lytic compartment (vacuoles, cytosegresomes and paramural bodies), and reduction of phytoferritin in plastids in meristem cells were observed in pea roots exposed to weak magnetic field. Mitochondria were found to be very sensitive to weak magnetic field: their size and relative volume in cells increase, matrix becomes electron-transparent, and cristae reduce. Cytochemical studies indicate that cells of plant roots exposed to weak magnetic field show Ca 2+ over-saturation in all organelles and in cytoplasm unlike the control ones. The data presented suggest that prolonged exposures of plants to weak

  9. NATO TG-53: acoustic detection of weapon firing joint field experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Dale N.; Pham, Tien; Scanlon, Michael V.; Srour, Nassy; Reiff, Christian G.; Sim, Leng K.; Solomon, Latasha; Thompson, Dorothea F.

    2006-05-01

    In this paper, we discuss the NATO Task Group 53 (TG-53) acoustic detection of weapon firing field joint experiment at Yuma Proving Ground during 31 October to 4 November 2005. The participating NATO countries include France, the Netherlands, UK and US. The objectives of the joint experiments are: (i) to collect acoustic signatures of direct and indirect firings from weapons such as sniper, mortar, artillery and C4 explosives and (ii) to share signatures among NATO partners from a variety of acoustic sensing platforms on the ground and in the air distributed over a wide area.

  10. Determination of near and far field acoustics for advanced propeller configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korkan, K. D.; Jaeger, S. M.; Kim, J. H.

    1989-01-01

    A method has been studied for predicting the acoustic field of the SR-3 transonic propfan using flow data generated by two versions of the NASPROP-E computer code. Since the flow fields calculated by the solvers include the shock-wave system of the propeller, the nonlinear quadrupole noise source term is included along with the monopole and dipole noise sources in the calculation of the acoustic near field. Acoustic time histories in the near field are determined by transforming the azimuthal coordinate in the rotating, blade-fixed coordinate system to the time coordinate in a nonrotating coordinate system. Fourier analysis of the pressure time histories is used to obtain the frequency spectra of the near-field noise.

  11. Imaging of Acoustically Coupled Oscillations Due to Flow Past a Shallow Cavity: Effect of Cavity Length Scale

    SciTech Connect

    P Oshkai; M Geveci; D Rockwell; M Pollack

    2004-05-24

    Flow-acoustic interactions due to fully turbulent inflow past a shallow axisymmetric cavity mounted in a pipe, which give rise to flow tones, are investigated using a technique of high-image-density particle image velocimetry in conjunction with unsteady pressure measurements. This imaging leads to patterns of velocity, vorticity, streamline topology, and hydrodynamic contributions to the acoustic power integral. Global instantaneous images, as well as time-averaged images, are evaluated to provide insight into the flow physics during tone generation. Emphasis is on the manner in which the streamwise length scale of the cavity alters the major features of the flow structure. These image-based approaches allow identification of regions of the unsteady shear layer that contribute to the instantaneous hydrodynamic component of the acoustic power, which is necessary to maintain a flow tone. In addition, combined image analysis and pressure measurements allow categorization of the instantaneous flow patterns that are associated with types of time traces and spectra of the fluctuating pressure. In contrast to consideration based solely on pressure spectra, it is demonstrated that locked-on tones may actually exhibit intermittent, non-phase-locked images, apparently due to low damping of the acoustic resonator. Locked-on flow tones (without modulation or intermittency), locked-on flow tones with modulation, and non-locked-on oscillations with short-term, highly coherent fluctuations are defined and represented by selected cases. Depending on which of these regimes occur, the time-averaged Q (quality)-factor and the dimensionless peak pressure are substantially altered.

  12. Experimental validation of a method for the prediction of the acoustic field produced by an acoustic source and the reflected field produced by a solid interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, Sandra; Chopra, Rajiv; Pichardo, Samuel

    2012-11-01

    In this work we present a model to calculate the acoustic pressure generated by the interaction of forward and reflected waves in the vicinity of a solid interface and compare it to experimental data. An experimental setup was designed to measure the forward and the combined forward-reflected acoustic fields produced by a solid interface. A 0.785mm-needle hydrophone was used to characterize the acoustic field produced by a 7.29MHz-ultrasound transducer focused at 6cm. The hydrophone was positioned perpendicularly to the sound propagation direction and moved between the transducer and a 9mm-thick acrylic sample using a robotic arm. Simulations were carried out using a modified Rayleigh-Sommerfeld integral that calculates the particle displacement over a reflecting surface. This particle displacement at the boundary of the interface is then used as an acoustic source to obtain the reflected particle displacement. The complex sum of the forward and reflected fields was compared to the experimental measurements. The measurements showed an interference pattern that increased the pressure amplitude in average 10.4% with peaks of up to 25.8%. The proposed model is able to represent the interference pattern produced by the reflected wave with an average absolute error of 3.4+/-0.54% and a maximal error of 5.6%. The comparison between the experimental measurements and the simulations indicates that the presented model predicts with good accuracy the acoustic field generated by ultrasound transducers facing a solid interface. This model can be used to foresee the outcome of therapeutic applications where the devices are used in proximity to a bone interface.

  13. Deformation of biological cells in the acoustic field of an oscillating bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinin, Pavel V.; Allen, John S., III

    2009-02-01

    In this work we develop a theoretical framework of the interaction of microbubbles with bacteria in the ultrasound field using a shell model of the bacteria, following an approach developed previously [P. V. Zinin , Phys. Rev. E 72, 61907 (2005)]. Within the shell model, the motion of the cell in an ultrasonic field is determined by the motion of three components: the internal viscous fluid, a thin elastic shell, and the surrounding viscous fluid. Several conclusions can be drawn from the modeling of sound interaction with a biological cell: (a) the characteristics of a cell’s oscillations in an ultrasonic field are determined both by the elastic properties of the shell the viscosities of all components of the system, (b) for dipole quadrupole oscillations the cell’s shell deforms due to a change in the shell area this oscillation depends on the surface area modulus KA , (c) the relative change in the area has a maximum at frequency fK˜(1)/(2π)KA/(ρa3) , where a is the cell’s radius and ρ is its density. It was predicted that deformation of the cell wall at the frequency fK is high enough to rupture small bacteria such as E . coli in which the quality factor of natural vibrations is less than 1 (Q<1) . For bacteria with high value quality factors (Q>1) , the area deformation has a strong peak near a resonance frequency fK ; however, the value of the deformation near the resonance frequency is not high enough to produce sufficient mechanical effect. The theoretical framework developed in this work can be extended for describing the deformation of a biological cell under any arbitrary, external periodic force including radiation forces unduced by acoustical (acoustical levitation) or optical waves (optical tweezers).

  14. Deformation of biological cells in the acoustic field of an oscillating bubble.

    PubMed

    Zinin, Pavel V; Allen, John S

    2009-02-01

    In this work we develop a theoretical framework of the interaction of microbubbles with bacteria in the ultrasound field using a shell model of the bacteria, following an approach developed previously [P. V. Zinin, Phys. Rev. E 72, 61907 (2005)]. Within the shell model, the motion of the cell in an ultrasonic field is determined by the motion of three components: the internal viscous fluid, a thin elastic shell, and the surrounding viscous fluid. Several conclusions can be drawn from the modeling of sound interaction with a biological cell: (a) the characteristics of a cell's oscillations in an ultrasonic field are determined both by the elastic properties of the shell the viscosities of all components of the system, (b) for dipole quadrupole oscillations the cell's shell deforms due to a change in the shell area this oscillation depends on the surface area modulus K{A} , (c) the relative change in the area has a maximum at frequency f{K} approximately 1/2pi square root[K{A}(rhoa;{3})] , where a is the cell's radius and rho is its density. It was predicted that deformation of the cell wall at the frequency f{K} is high enough to rupture small bacteria such as E . coli in which the quality factor of natural vibrations is less than 1 (Q<1). For bacteria with high value quality factors (Q>1) , the area deformation has a strong peak near a resonance frequency f{K} however, the value of the deformation near the resonance frequency is not high enough to produce sufficient mechanical effect. The theoretical framework developed in this work can be extended for describing the deformation of a biological cell under any arbitrary, external periodic force including radiation forces unduced by acoustical (acoustical levitation) or optical waves (optical tweezers). PMID:19391781

  15. Deformation of biological cells in the acoustic field of an oscillating bubble

    PubMed Central

    Zinin, Pavel V.; Allen, John S.

    2009-01-01

    In this work we develop a theoretical framework of the interaction of microbubbles with bacteria in the ultrasound field using a shell model of the bacteria, following an approach developed previously [P. V. Zinin et al., Phys. Rev. E 72, 61907 (2005)]. Within the shell model, the motion of the cell in an ultrasonic field is determined by the motion of three components: the internal viscous fluid, a thin elastic shell, and the surrounding viscous fluid. Several conclusions can be drawn from the modeling of sound interaction with a biological cell: (a) the characteristics of a cell’s oscillations in an ultrasonic field are determined both by the elastic properties of the shell the viscosities of all components of the system, (b) for dipole quadrupole oscillations the cell’s shell deforms due to a change in the shell area this oscillation depends on the surface area modulus KA, (c) the relative change in the area has a maximum at frequency fK∼12πKA/(ρa3), where a is the cell’s radius and ρ is its density. It was predicted that deformation of the cell wall at the frequency fK is high enough to rupture small bacteria such as E. coli in which the quality factor of natural vibrations is less than 1 (Q < 1). For bacteria with high value quality factors (Q > 1), the area deformation has a strong peak near a resonance frequency fK; however, the value of the deformation near the resonance frequency is not high enough to produce sufficient mechanical effect. The theoretical framework developed in this work can be extended for describing the deformation of a biological cell under any arbitrary, external periodic force including radiation forces unduced by acoustical (acoustical levitation) or optical waves (optical tweezers). PMID:19391781

  16. Polymer coating of glass microballoons levitated in a focused acoustic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, A. T.; Lee, M. C.; Feng, I.-A.; Elleman, D. D.; Wang, T. G.

    1982-01-01

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) glass microballoons (GMBs) levitated in a focusing radiator acoustic device can be coated with liquid materials by deploying the liquid into the levitation field with a stepped-horn atomizer. The GMB can be forced to the center of the coating liquid with a strong acoustically generated centering force. Water solutions of organic polymers, UV-curable liquid organic monomers, and paraffin waxes have been used to prepare solid coatings on the surface of GMBs using this technique.

  17. Ocean acoustic field simulations for monitoring large-scale ocean structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, E. C.; Wang, Y. Y.

    1991-04-01

    Substantial numerical simulations of low-frequency acoustic field under different ocean models have been carried out on the CYBER-205 at WPL/NOAA. The purpose of these numerical simulations is to investigate our potential ability to monitor large-scale ocean structures by using modal ocean acoustic tomography (MOAT). For example, the possibility of monitoring El Niño by using MOAT has been illustrated.

  18. On the Vertigo Due to Static Magnetic Fields

    PubMed Central

    Mian, Omar S.; Li, Yan; Antunes, Andre; Glover, Paul M.; Day, Brian L.

    2013-01-01

    Vertigo is sometimes experienced in and around MRI scanners. Mechanisms involving stimulation of the vestibular system by movement in magnetic fields or magnetic field spatial gradients have been proposed. However, it was recently shown that vestibular-dependent ocular nystagmus is evoked when stationary in homogenous static magnetic fields. The proposed mechanism involves Lorentz forces acting on endolymph to deflect semicircular canal (SCC) cupulae. To investigate whether vertigo arises from a similar mechanism we recorded qualitative and quantitative aspects of vertigo and 2D eye movements from supine healthy adults (n = 25) deprived of vision while pushed into the 7T static field of an MRI scanner. Exposures were variable and included up to 135s stationary at 7T. Nystagmus was mainly horizontal, persisted during long-exposures with partial decline, and reversed upon withdrawal. The dominant vertiginous perception with the head facing up was rotation in the horizontal plane (85% incidence) with a consistent direction across participants. With the head turned 90 degrees in yaw the perception did not transform into equivalent vertical plane rotation, indicating a context-dependency of the perception. During long exposures, illusory rotation lasted on average 50 s, including 42 s whilst stationary at 7T. Upon withdrawal, perception re-emerged and reversed, lasting on average 30 s. Onset fields for nystagmus and perception were significantly correlated (p<.05). Although perception did not persist as long as nystagmus, this is a known feature of continuous SSC stimulation. These observations, and others in the paper, are compatible with magnetic-field evoked-vertigo and nystagmus sharing a common mechanism. With this interpretation, response decay and reversal upon withdrawal from the field, are due to adaptation to continuous vestibular input. Although the study does not entirely exclude the possibility of mechanisms involving transient vestibular stimulation

  19. Customization of the acoustic field produced by a piezoelectric array through interelement delays

    PubMed Central

    Chitnis, Parag V.; Barbone, Paul E.; Cleveland, Robin O.

    2008-01-01

    A method for producing a prescribed acoustic pressure field from a piezoelectric array was investigated. The array consisted of 170 elements placed on the inner surface of a 15 cm radius spherical cap. Each element was independently driven by using individual pulsers each capable of generating 1.2 kV. Acoustic field customization was achieved by independently controlling the time when each element was excited. The set of time delays necessary to produce a particular acoustic field was determined by using an optimization scheme. The acoustic field at the focal plane was simulated by using the angular spectrum method, and the optimization searched for the time delays that minimized the least squared difference between the magnitudes of the simulated and desired pressure fields. The acoustic field was shaped in two different ways: the −6 dB focal width was increased to different desired widths and the ring-shaped pressure distributions of various prescribed diameters were produced. For both cases, the set of delays resulting from the respective optimization schemes were confirmed to yield the desired pressure distributions by using simulations and measurements. The simulations, however, predicted peak positive pressures roughly half those obtained from the measurements, which was attributed to the exclusion of nonlinearity in the simulations. PMID:18537369

  20. Experimental investigation of the interference structure in a shallow-water vector acoustic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Wangsheng; Liang, Guolong; Wang, Yan; Wang, Yilin

    2012-11-01

    The waveguide invariant concept describes the interference striations in the acoustic pressure spectrograms produced with an underwater broadband source. In this paper, the existence of interference structure in the vector acoustic field is examined using sea trial data, and the waveguide invariant is exploited to interpret fringes of the vector field. The experimental data, which recorded a merchant vessel passing on a straight path, were collected by a 2-dimensional vector sensor during an experiment in the South China Sea. The intensity and phase spectra of the energy flux density vector in the acoustic field radiated by the moving vessel are obtained from the magnitude and phase angle of the product of the pressure and the horizontal particle velocity's complex conjugate. Distinct interference patterns appear in the vector intensity and phase spectra. The characteristics of these have been analyzed by comparison with the scaled acoustic field. The equation describing the striations associated with the ship's trajectory is derived from waveguide invariant theory. The Hough transform method is used to extract the waveguide invariant from the data. To improve the quality of the patterns derived from the vector field, a better value of waveguide invariant can be estimated. Good agreement between reconstructed trajectories and real patterns suggests that it is feasible to use the interference structure in an acoustic vector field to determine the waveguide characteristics.

  1. Damping of dust-acoustic waves due to dust-dust interactions in dusty plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Angelis, U.; Shukla, P. K.

    1998-08-01

    The results of a kinetic model are presented which includes dust-dust collisions as a damping mechanism for the low-phase velocity dust-acoustic waves which have been observed [Pieper and Goree, Phys. Rev. Lett. 77 (1976) 3137] in a dusty plasma device. A comparison of our theoretical results with those of observations exhibits a good agreement, and it also leads to quantitative estimates that are close to the predictions of the modified fluid theory, which has introduced a damping rate in an ad hoc manner.

  2. Numerical Analysis of the Acoustic Field of Tip-Clearance Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alavi Moghadam, S. M.; M. Meinke Team; W. Schröder Team

    2015-11-01

    Numerical simulations of the acoustic field generated by a shrouded axial fan are studied by a hybrid fluid-dynamics-acoustics method. In a first step, large-eddy simulations are performed to investigate the dynamics of tip clearance flow for various tip gap sizes and to determine the acoustic sources. The simulations are performed for a single blade out of five blades with periodic boundary conditions in the circumferential direction on a multi-block structured mesh with 1.4 ×108 grid points. The turbulent flow is simulated at a Reynolds number of 9.36 ×105 at undisturbed inflow condition and the results are compared with experimental data. The diameter and strength of the tip vortex increase with the tip gap size, while simultaneously the efficiency of the fan decreases. In a second step, the acoustic field on the near field is determined by solving the acoustic perturbation equations (APE) on a mesh for a single blade consisting of approx. 9.8 ×108 grid points. The overall agreement of the pressure spectrum and its directivity with measurements confirm the correct identification of the sound sources and accurate prediction of the acoustic duct propagation. The results show that the longer the tip gap size the higher the broadband noise level. Senior Scientist, Institute of Aerodynamics, RWTH Aachen University.

  3. Underwater Acoustic Matched Field Imaging Based on Compressed Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Huichen; Xu, Jia; Long, Teng; Zhang, Xudong

    2015-01-01

    Matched field processing (MFP) is an effective method for underwater target imaging and localizing, but its performance is not guaranteed due to the nonuniqueness and instability problems caused by the underdetermined essence of MFP. By exploiting the sparsity of the targets in an imaging area, this paper proposes a compressive sensing MFP (CS-MFP) model from wave propagation theory by using randomly deployed sensors. In addition, the model’s recovery performance is investigated by exploring the lower bounds of the coherence parameter of the CS dictionary. Furthermore, this paper analyzes the robustness of CS-MFP with respect to the displacement of the sensors. Subsequently, a coherence-excluding coherence optimized orthogonal matching pursuit (CCOOMP) algorithm is proposed to overcome the high coherent dictionary problem in special cases. Finally, some numerical experiments are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed CS-MFP method. PMID:26457708

  4. Underwater Acoustic Matched Field Imaging Based on Compressed Sensing.

    PubMed

    Yan, Huichen; Xu, Jia; Long, Teng; Zhang, Xudong

    2015-01-01

    Matched field processing (MFP) is an effective method for underwater target imaging and localizing, but its performance is not guaranteed due to the nonuniqueness and instability problems caused by the underdetermined essence of MFP. By exploiting the sparsity of the targets in an imaging area, this paper proposes a compressive sensing MFP (CS-MFP) model from wave propagation theory by using randomly deployed sensors. In addition, the model's recovery performance is investigated by exploring the lower bounds of the coherence parameter of the CS dictionary. Furthermore, this paper analyzes the robustness of CS-MFP with respect to the displacement of the sensors. Subsequently, a coherence-excluding coherence optimized orthogonal matching pursuit (CCOOMP) algorithm is proposed to overcome the high coherent dictionary problem in special cases. Finally, some numerical experiments are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed CS-MFP method. PMID:26457708

  5. Alignment of atmospheric mineral dust due to electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulanowski, Z.; Bailey, J.; Lucas, P. W.; Hough, J. H.; Hirst, E.

    2007-09-01

    Optical polarimetry observations on La Palma, Canary Islands, during a Saharan dust episode show dichroic extinction consistent with the presence of vertically aligned particles in the atmosphere. Modelling of the extinction together with particle orientation indicates that the alignment could have been due to an electric field of the order of 2 kV/m. Two alternative mechanisms for the origin of the field are examined: the effect of reduced atmospheric conductivity and charging of the dust layer, the latter effect being a more likely candidate. It is concluded that partial alignment may be a common feature of Saharan dust layers. The modelling also indicates that the alignment can significantly alter dust optical depth. This "Venetian blind effect" may have decreased optical thickness in the vertical direction by as much as 10% for the case reported here.

  6. Coherent Excited States in Superconductors due to a Microwave Field.

    PubMed

    Semenov, A V; Devyatov, I A; de Visser, P J; Klapwijk, T M

    2016-07-22

    We describe theoretically the depairing effect of a microwave field on diffusive s-wave superconductors. The ground state of the superconductor is altered qualitatively in analogy to the depairing due to a dc current. In contrast to dc depairing, the density of states acquires, for microwaves with frequency ω_{0}, steps at multiples of the photon energy Δ±nℏω_{0} and shows an exponential-like tail in the subgap regime. We show that this ac depairing explains the measured frequency shift of a superconducting resonator with microwave power at low temperatures. PMID:27494495

  7. Characterization of damage due to stress corrosion cracking in carbon steel using nonlinear surface acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeitvogel, D. T.; Matlack, K. H.; Kim, J.-Y.; Jacobs, L. J.; Singh, P. M.; Qu, J.

    2013-01-01

    Cold rolled carbon steel 1018C is widely used in pressurized fuel pipelines. In these structures, stress corrosion cracking (SCC) can pose a significant problem because cracks initiate late in the lifetime and often unexpectedly, but grow fast once they get started. To ensure a safe operation it is crucial that any damage can be detected before the structural stability is reduced by large cracks. In the early stages of SCC, microstructural changes occur which in many cases increase the acoustic nonlinearity of the material. Therefore, an initially monochromatic Rayleigh wave is distorted and measurable higher harmonics are generated. Different levels of stress corrosion cracking is induced in five specimens. For each specimen, nonlinear ultrasonic measurements are performed before and after inducing the damage. For the measurements, oil coupled wedge transducers are used to generate and detect tone burst Rayleigh wave signals. The amplitudes of the received fundamental and second harmonic waves are measured at varying propagation distances to obtain a measure for the acoustic nonlinearity of the specimens. The results show a damage-dependent increase in nonlinearity for early stages of damage, indicating the feasibility of this nonlinear ultrasonic method to detect the initiation of stress corrosion cracking.

  8. Full-Field Imaging of GHz Film Bulk Acoustic Resonator Motion

    SciTech Connect

    Telschow, Kenneth Louis; Deason, Vance Albert; Cottle, David Lynn; Larson III, J. D.

    2003-10-01

    A full-field view laser ultrasonic imaging method has been developed that measures acoustic motion at a surface without scanning. Images are recorded at normal video frame rates by using dynamic holography with photorefractive interferometric detection. By extending the approach to ultra high frequencies, an acoustic microscope has been developed that is capable of operation at gigahertz frequency and micron length scales. Both acoustic amplitude and phase are recorded, allowing full calibration and determination of phases to within a single arbitrary constant. Results are presented of measurements at frequencies of 800-900 MHz, illustrating a multitude of normal mode behavior in electrically driven thin film acoustic resonators. Coupled with microwave electrical impedance measurements, this imaging mode provides an exceptionally fast method for evaluation of electric-to-acoustic coupling of these devices and their performance. Images of 256 /spl times/ 240 pixels are recorded at 18 fps rates synchronized to obtain both in-phase and quadrature detection of the acoustic motion. Simple averaging provides sensitivity to the subnanometer level at each pixel calibrated over the image using interferometry. Identification of specific acoustic modes and their relationship to electrical impedance characteristics show the advantages and overall high speed of the technique.

  9. Prediction of the acoustic and bubble fields in insonified freeze-drying vials.

    PubMed

    Louisnard, O; Cogné, C; Labouret, S; Montes-Quiroz, W; Peczalski, R; Baillon, F; Espitalier, F

    2015-09-01

    The acoustic field and the location of cavitation bubble are computed in vials used for freeze-drying, insonified from the bottom by a vibrating plate. The calculations rely on a nonlinear model of sound propagation in a cavitating liquid [Louisnard, Ultrason. Sonochem., 19, (2012) 56-65]. Both the vibration amplitude and the liquid level in the vial are parametrically varied. For low liquid levels, a threshold amplitude is required to form a cavitation zone at the bottom of the vial. For increasing vibration amplitudes, the bubble field slightly thickens but remains at the vial bottom, and the acoustic field saturates, which cannot be captured by linear acoustics. On the other hand, increasing the liquid level may promote the formation of a secondary bubble structure near the glass wall, a few centimeters below the free liquid surface. These predictions suggest that rather complex acoustic fields and bubble structures can arise even in such small volumes. As the acoustic and bubble fields govern ice nucleation during the freezing step, the final crystal's size distribution in the frozen product may crucially depend on the liquid level in the vial. PMID:25800984

  10. Analyzing panel acoustic contributions toward the sound field inside the passenger compartment of a full-size automobile.

    PubMed

    Wu, Sean F; Moondra, Manmohan; Beniwal, Ravi

    2015-04-01

    The Helmholtz equation least squares (HELS)-based nearfield acoustical holography (NAH) is utilized to analyze panel acoustic contributions toward the acoustic field inside the interior region of an automobile. Specifically, the acoustic power flows from individual panels are reconstructed, and relative contributions to sound pressure level and spectrum at any point of interest are calculated. Results demonstrate that by correlating the acoustic power flows from individual panels to the field acoustic pressure, one can correctly locate the panel allowing the most acoustic energy transmission into the vehicle interior. The panel on which the surface acoustic pressure amplitude is the highest should not be used as indicative of the panel responsible for the sound field in the vehicle passenger compartment. Another significant advantage of this HELS-based NAH is that measurements of the input data only need to be taken once by using a conformal array of microphones in the near field, and ranking of panel acoustic contributions to any field point can be readily performed. The transfer functions between individual panels of any vibrating structure to the acoustic pressure anywhere in space are calculated not measured, thus significantly reducing the time and effort involved in panel acoustic contributions analyses. PMID:25920860

  11. Identification of vibration excitations from acoustic measurements using near field acoustic holography and the force analysis technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pézerat, C.; Leclère, Q.; Totaro, N.; Pachebat, M.

    2009-10-01

    This study presents a method of using acoustic holography and the force analysis technique to identify vibration sources from radiated noise measurements. The structure studied is a plate excited by a shaker on which three measurements were performed: the first is a reference measurement of plate velocity obtained by scanning laser vibrometry, the second is based on sound pressure measurements in the near field of the structure, and the third is the measurement of normal acoustic velocities by using a p-U probe recently developed by Microflown Technologies. This was followed by the application of classical NAH, known as pressure-to-velocity holography and velocity-to-velocity holography to predict the plate velocity field from acoustic measurements at distances of 1 and 5 cm. Afterwards, the force analysis technique, also known as the RIFF technique, is applied with these five data sets. The principle is to inject the displacement field of the structure into its equation of motion and extract the resulting force distribution. This technique requires regularization done by a low-pass filter in the wavenumber domain. Apart from pressure-to-velocity holography at 5 cm, the reconstructed force distribution allows localizing the excitation point in the measurement area. FAT regularization is also shown to improve results as its cutoff wavenumber is optimized with the natural wavenumber of the plate. Lastly, quantitative force values are extracted from force distributions at all frequencies of the band 0-4 kHz studied and compared with the force spectrum measured directly by a piezoelectric sensor.

  12. Sound field diffusivity in NASA Langley Research Center hardwalled acoustic facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgary, M. C.

    1982-01-01

    Cross correlation measurements were performed to determine the quality of the sound fields in the ANRL reverberation room and the ANRL transmission loss facility. The results indicate the level of sound field diffuseness which may be attained in these hardwalled acoustic facilities.

  13. Gated photon correlation spectroscopy for acoustical particle velocity measurements in free-field conditions.

    PubMed

    Koukoulas, Triantafillos; Piper, Ben; Theobald, Pete

    2013-03-01

    The measurement of acoustic pressure at a point in space using optical methods has been the subject of extensive research in airborne acoustics over the last four decades. The main driver is to reliably establish the acoustic pascal, thus allowing the calibration of microphones with standard and non-standard dimensions to be realized in an absolute and direct manner. However, the research work so far has mostly been limited to standing wave tubes. This Letter reports on the development of an optical system capable of measuring acoustic particle velocities in free-field conditions; agreement within less than 0.6 dB was obtained with standard microphone measurements during these initial experiments. PMID:23464122

  14. Thermally induced secondary atomization of droplet in an acoustic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Saptarshi; Saha, Abhishek; Kumar, Ranganathan

    2012-01-01

    We study the thermal effects that lead to instability and break up in acoustically levitated vaporizing fuel droplets. For selective liquids, atomization occurs at the droplet equator under external heating. Short wavelength [Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH)] instability for diesel and bio-diesel droplets triggers this secondary atomization. Vapor pressure, latent heat, and specific heat govern the vaporization rate and temperature history, which affect the surface tension gradient and gas phase density, ultimately dictating the onset of KH instability. We develop a criterion based on Weber number to define a condition for the inception of secondary atomization.

  15. Gravitational vacuum polarization phenomena due to the Higgs field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onofrio, Roberto

    2012-05-01

    In the standard model the mass of elementary particles is considered as a dynamical property emerging from their interaction with the Higgs field. We show that this assumption implies peculiar deviations from the law of universal gravitation in its distance and mass dependence, as well as from the superposition principle. The experimental observation of the predicted deviations from the law of universal gravitation seems out of reach. However, we argue that a new class of experiments aimed at studying the influence of surrounding masses on the gravitational force—similar to the ones performed by Quirino Majorana almost a century ago—could be performed to test the superposition principle and to give direct limits on the presence of nonminimal couplings between the Higgs field and the spacetime curvature. From the conceptual viewpoint, the violation of the superposition principle for gravitational forces due to the Higgs field creates a conflict with the notion that gravitational potentials, as assumed in Newtonian gravitation or in post-Newtonian parameterizations of metric theories, are well-defined concepts to describe gravity in their non-relativistic limit.

  16. Auralization of concert hall acoustics using finite difference time domain methods and wave field synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hochgraf, Kelsey

    Auralization methods have been used for a long time to simulate the acoustics of a concert hall for different seat positions. The goal of this thesis was to apply the concept of auralization to a larger audience area that the listener could walk through to compare differences in acoustics for a wide range of seat positions. For this purpose, the acoustics of Rensselaer's Experimental Media and Performing Arts Center (EMPAC) Concert Hall were simulated to create signals for a 136 channel wave field synthesis (WFS) system located at Rensselaer's Collaborative Research Augmented Immersive Virtual Environment (CRAIVE) Laboratory. By allowing multiple people to dynamically experience the concert hall's acoustics at the same time, this research gained perspective on what is important for achieving objective accuracy and subjective plausibility in an auralization. A finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulation on a three-dimensional face-centered cubic grid, combined at a crossover frequency of 800 Hz with a CATT-Acoustic(TM) simulation, was found to have a reverberation time, direct to reverberant sound energy ratio, and early reflection pattern that more closely matched measured data from the hall compared to a CATT-Acoustic(TM) simulation and other hybrid simulations. In the CRAIVE lab, nine experienced listeners found all hybrid auralizations (with varying source location, grid resolution, crossover frequency, and number of loudspeakers) to be more perceptually plausible than the CATT-Acoustic(TM) auralization. The FDTD simulation required two days to compute, while the CATT-Acoustic(TM) simulation required three separate TUCT(TM) computations, each taking four hours, to accommodate the large number of receivers. Given the perceptual advantages realized with WFS for auralization of a large, inhomogeneous sound field, it is recommended that hybrid simulations be used in the future to achieve more accurate and plausible auralizations. Predictions are made for a

  17. Flow Field and Acoustic Predictions for Three-Stream Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simmons, Shaun Patrick; Henderson, Brenda S.; Khavaran, Abbas

    2014-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics was used to analyze a three-stream nozzle parametric design space. The study varied bypass-to-core area ratio, tertiary-to-core area ratio and jet operating conditions. The flowfield solutions from the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) code Overflow 2.2e were used to pre-screen experimental models for a future test in the Aero-Acoustic Propulsion Laboratory (AAPL) at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). Flowfield solutions were considered in conjunction with the jet-noise-prediction code JeNo to screen the design concepts. A two-stream versus three-stream computation based on equal mass flow rates showed a reduction in peak turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) for the three-stream jet relative to that for the two-stream jet which resulted in reduced acoustic emission. Additional three-stream solutions were analyzed for salient flowfield features expected to impact farfield noise. As tertiary power settings were increased there was a corresponding near nozzle increase in shear rate that resulted in an increase in high frequency noise and a reduction in peak TKE. As tertiary-to-core area ratio was increased the tertiary potential core elongated and the peak TKE was reduced. The most noticeable change occurred as secondary-to-core area ratio was increased thickening the secondary potential core, elongating the primary potential core and reducing peak TKE. As forward flight Mach number was increased the jet plume region decreased and reduced peak TKE.

  18. Suppression of sound radiation to far field of near-field acoustic communication system using evanescent sound field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Ayaka; Wakatsuki, Naoto; Mizutani, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    A method of suppressing sound radiation to the far field of a near-field acoustic communication system using an evanescent sound field is proposed. The amplitude of the evanescent sound field generated from an infinite vibrating plate attenuates exponentially with increasing a distance from the surface of the vibrating plate. However, a discontinuity of the sound field exists at the edge of the finite vibrating plate in practice, which broadens the wavenumber spectrum. A sound wave radiates over the evanescent sound field because of broadening of the wavenumber spectrum. Therefore, we calculated the optimum distribution of the particle velocity on the vibrating plate to reduce the broadening of the wavenumber spectrum. We focused on a window function that is utilized in the field of signal analysis for reducing the broadening of the frequency spectrum. The optimization calculation is necessary for the design of window function suitable for suppressing sound radiation and securing a spatial area for data communication. In addition, a wide frequency bandwidth is required to increase the data transmission speed. Therefore, we investigated a suitable method for calculating the sound pressure level at the far field to confirm the variation of the distribution of sound pressure level determined on the basis of the window shape and frequency. The distribution of the sound pressure level at a finite distance was in good agreement with that obtained at an infinite far field under the condition generating the evanescent sound field. Consequently, the window function was optimized by the method used to calculate the distribution of the sound pressure level at an infinite far field using the wavenumber spectrum on the vibrating plate. According to the result of comparing the distributions of the sound pressure level in the cases with and without the window function, it was confirmed that the area whose sound pressure level was reduced from the maximum level to -50 dB was

  19. Prediction of sound fields in acoustical cavities using the boundary element method. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kipp, C. R.; Bernhard, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    A method was developed to predict sound fields in acoustical cavities. The method is based on the indirect boundary element method. An isoparametric quadratic boundary element is incorporated. Pressure, velocity and/or impedance boundary conditions may be applied to a cavity by using this method. The capability to include acoustic point sources within the cavity is implemented. The method is applied to the prediction of sound fields in spherical and rectangular cavities. All three boundary condition types are verified. Cases with a point source within the cavity domain are also studied. Numerically determined cavity pressure distributions and responses are presented. The numerical results correlate well with available analytical results.

  20. Geodesic acoustic modes in tokamak plasmas with a radial equilibrium electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Deng

    2015-09-15

    The dispersion relation of geodesic acoustic modes in the tokamak plasma with an equilibrium radial electric field is derived and analyzed. Multiple branches of eigenmodes have been found, similar to the result given by the fluid model with a poloidal mass flow. Frequencies and damping rates of both the geodesic acoustic mode and the sound wave increase with respect to the strength of radial electric field, while the frequency and the damping rate of the lower frequency branch slightly decrease. Possible connection to the experimental observation is discussed.

  1. Field installation of an acoustic slug-detection system

    SciTech Connect

    Dhulesia, H.; Bernicot, M.; Romanet, T.

    1997-02-01

    A pipeline operating in the slug flow regime creates high fluctuations in gas and liquid flow rates at the outlet. The detection of slugs and the estimation of their length and velocity are necessary to minimize the upsets in the operation of downstream process facilities. A new method based on the acoustic principle has been developed by Total and Syminex with two variants--passive and active. The passive method gives the slug length and velocity, whereas the active method also gives the fluid density. The prototype of this system has been installed permanently on a 20-in. multiphase pipeline in Argentina. As this system detects the slugs and determines their characteristics approximately 2 minutes before they arrive at the first-stage separator, the operators take appropriate action in the case of arrival of an excessively long slug and, thus, avoid possible shutdowns. At a later stage, an automatic adjustment of the process control valves will be realized.

  2. Biological effects due to weak magnetic fields on plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyavskaya, N.

    In the evolution process, living organisms have experienced the action of the Earth's magnetic field (MF) that is a natural component of our environment. It is known that a galactic MF induction does not exceed 0.1 nT, since investigations of weak magnetic field (WMF) effects on biological systems have attracted attention of biologists due to planning long-term space flights to other planets where the magnetizing force is near 10-5 Oe. However, the role of WMF and its influence on organisms' functioning are still insufficiently investigated. A large number of experiments with seedlings of different plant species placed in WMF has found that the growth of their primary roots is inhibited during the early terms of germination in comparison with control. The proliferation activity and cell reproduction are reduced in meristem of plant roots under WMF application. The prolongation of total cell reproductive cycle is registered due to the expansion of G phase in1 different plant species as well as of G phase in flax and lentil roots along with2 relative stability of time parameters of other phases of cell cycle. In plant cells exposed to WMF, the decrease in functional activity of genome at early prereplicate period is shown. WMF causes the intensification in the processes of proteins' synthesis and break-up in plant roots. Qualitative and quantitative changes in protein spectrum in growing and differentiated cells of plant roots exposed to WMF are revealed. At ultrastructural level, there are observed such ultrastructural peculiarities as changes in distribution of condensed chromatin and nucleolus compactization in nuclei, noticeable accumulation of lipid bodies, development of a lytic compartment (vacuoles, cytosegresomes and paramural bodies), and reduction of phytoferritin in plastids in meristem cells of pea roots exposed to WMF. Mitochondria are the most sensitive organelle to WMF application: their size and relative volume in cells increase, matrix is electron

  3. Acoustic radiation force due to a diverging wave: Demonstration and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denardo, Bruce C.; Freemyers, Stanley G.; Schock, Michael P.; Sundem, Scott T.

    2014-02-01

    A radiation force is the time-averaged force exerted by any kind of wave on a body. In the case of a divergent traveling acoustic wave, it is known that a relatively small rigid body can experience a radiation force that is directed toward the source. We show that this effect can be readily demonstrated with a styrofoam sphere pendulum near a horizontally directed loudspeaker that is emitting sound of sufficiently high amplitude and low frequency. The attraction is surprising because repulsive forces are exerted by a traveling plane wave and by an outward jetting or "wind" from the loudspeaker. We argue that the attractive force near a source that is small compared to the wavelength can be roughly understood and calculated as a time-averaged Bernoulli effect, if scattering is ignored. The result is within a factor of two of rigorous published results based on scattering calculations, when these results are specialized to the case of a rigid body whose average density is much greater than the density of the fluid. However, repulsion occurs when the average density of the body is less than the density of the fluid, in which case our Bernoulli result completely fails.

  4. Receptivity of hypersonic boundary layer due to fast-slow acoustics interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jun; Luo, Ji-Sheng; Wu, Xue-Song

    2015-12-01

    The objective of receptivity is to investigate the mechanisms by which external disturbances generate unstable waves. In hypersonic boundary layers, a new receptivity process is revealed, which is that fast and slow acoustics through nonlinear interaction can excite the second mode near the lower-branch of the second mode. They can generate a sum-frequency disturbance though nonlinear interaction, which can excite the second mode. This receptivity process is generated by the nonlinear interaction and the nonparallel nature of the boundary layer. The receptivity coefficient is sensitive to the wavenumber difference between the sum-frequency disturbance and the lower-branch second mode. When the wavenumber difference is zero, the receptivity coefficient is maximum. The receptivity coefficient decreases with the increase of the wavenumber difference. It is also found that the evolution of the sum-frequency disturbance grows linearly in the beginning. It indicates that the forced term generated by the sum-frequency disturbance resonates with the second mode.

  5. Pressure transfer function of a JT15D nozzle due to acoustic and convected entropy fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, J. H.

    1982-01-01

    An acoustic transmission matrix analysis of sound propagation in a variable area duct with and without flow is extended to include convected entropy fluctuations. The boundary conditions used in the analysis are a transfer function relating entropy and pressure at the nozzle inlet and the nozzle exit impedance. The nozzle pressure transfer function calculated is compared with JT15D turbofan engine nozzle data. The one dimensional theory for sound propagation in a variable area nozzle with flow but without convected entropy is good at the low engine speeds where the nozzle exit Mach number is low (M=0.2) and the duct exit impedance model is good. The effect of convected entropy appears to be so negligible that it is obscured by the inaccuracy of the nozzle exit impedance model, the lack of information on the magnitude of the convected entropy and its phase relationship with the pressure, and the scatter in the data. An improved duct exit impedance model is required at the higher engine speeds where the nozzle exit Mach number is high (M=0.56) and at low frequencies (below 120 Hz).

  6. Acoustic receptivity due to weak surface inhomogeneities in adverse pressure gradient boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhari, Meelan; Ng, Lian; Streett, Craig

    1995-01-01

    The boundary layer receptivity to free-stream acoustic waves in the presence of localized surface disturbances is studied for the case of incompressible Falkner-Skan flows with adverse pressure gradients. These boundary layers are unstable to both viscous and inviscid (i.e., inflectional) modes, and the finite Reynolds number extension of the Goldstein-Ruban theory provides a convenient method to compare the efficiency of the localized receptivity processes in these two cases. The value of the efficiency function related to the receptivity caused by localized distortions in surface geometry is relatively insensitive to the type of instability mechanism, provided that the same reference length scale is used to normalize the efficiency function for each type of instability. In contrast, when the receptivity is induced by variations in wall suction velocity or in wall admittance distribution, the magnitudes of the related efficiency functions, as well as the resulting coupling coefficients, are smaller for inflectional (i.e., Rayleigh) modes than for the viscous Tollmien-Schlichting waves. The reduced levels of receptivity can be attributed mainly to the shorter wavelengths and higher frequencies of the inflectional modes. Because the most critical band of frequencies shifts toward higher values, the overall efficiency of the wall suction- and the wall admittance-induced receptivity decreases with an increase in the adverse pressure gradient.

  7. Field support, data analysis and associated research for the acoustic grenade sounding program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, T. G.; Bullard, E. R.

    1976-01-01

    Temperature and horizontal winds in the 30 to 90 km altitude range of the upper atmosphere, were determined by acoustic grenade soundings conducted at Wallops Island, Virginia and Kourou, French Guiana. Field support provided at these locations included deployment of the large area microphone system, supervision, maintenance and operation of sound ranging stations; and coordination of activities. Data analysis efforts included the analysis of field data to determine upper atmospheric meteorological parameters. Profiles for upper atmospheric temperature, wind and density are provided in plots and tables for each of the acoustic grenade soundings conducted during the contract period. Research efforts were directed toward a systematic comparison of temperature data from acoustic grenade with other meteorological sensor probes in the upper atmosphere.

  8. Schlieren imaging of the standing wave field in an ultrasonic acoustic levitator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rendon, Pablo Luis; Boullosa, Ricardo R.; Echeverria, Carlos; Porta, David

    2015-11-01

    We consider a model of a single axis acoustic levitator consisting of two cylinders immersed in air and directed along the same axis. The first cylinder has a flat termination and functions as a sound emitter, and the second cylinder, which is simply a refector, has the side facing the first cylinder cut out by a spherical surface. By making the first cylinder vibrate at ultrasonic frequencies a standing wave is produced in the air between the cylinders which makes it possible, by means of the acoustic radiation pressure, to levitate one or several small objects of different shapes, such as spheres or disks. We use schlieren imaging to observe the acoustic field resulting from the levitation of one or several objects, and compare these results to previous numerical approximations of the field obtained using a finite element method. The authors acknowledge financial support from DGAPA-UNAM through project PAPIIT IN109214.

  9. A mapping relationship based near-field acoustic holography with spherical fundamental solutions for Helmholtz equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Haijun; Jiang, Weikang; Zhang, Haibin

    2016-07-01

    In the procedure of the near-field acoustic holography (NAH) based on the fundamental solutions for Helmholtz equation (FS), the number of FS and the measurement setup to obtain their coefficients are two crucial issues to the successful reconstruction. The current work is motivated to develop a framework for the NAH which supplies a guideline to the determination of the number of FS as well as an optimized measurement setup. A mapping relationship between modes on surfaces of boundary and hologram is analytically derived by adopting the modes as FS in spherical coordinates. Thus, reconstruction is converted to obtain the coefficients of participant modes on holograms. In addition, an integral identity is firstly to be derived for the modes on convex surfaces, which is useful in determining the inefficient or evanescent modes for acoustic radiation in free space. To determine the number of FS adopted in the mapping relationship based NAH (MRS-based NAH), two approaches are proposed to supply reasonable estimations with criteria of point-wise pressure and energy, respectively. A technique to approximate a specific degree of mode on patches by a set of locally orthogonal patterns is explored for three widely used holograms, such as planar, cylindrical and spherical holograms, which results in an automatic determinations of the number and position of experimental setup for a given tolerance. Numerical examples are set up to validate the theory and techniques in the MRS-based NAH. Reconstructions of a cubic model demonstrate the potential of the proposed method for regular models even with corners and shapers. Worse results for the elongated cylinder with two spherical caps reveal the deficiency of the MRS-based NAH for irregular models which is largely due to the adopted modes are FS in spherical coordinates. The NAH framework pursued in the current work provides a new insight to the reconstruction procedure based on the FS in spherical coordinates.

  10. Uncertain Acoustic Field Modeling and Robust Source Localization in Shallow Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hangfang; Gong, Xianyi; Yu, Zibin

    2010-09-01

    Oceanic environmental uncertainty can cause significant performance degradation of the SONAR system. Understanding and modeling the uncertainty propagating from environment to acoustic field and then to steering vector is necessary for SONAR design and operation to mitigate the uncertainty effect and provide robust detection and location of targets. The statistical property of uncertainty can be described by the probability density functions or second-order moments of environmental parameters and acoustic fields. Based on the probability description, a stochastic response surface method is used to propagate the uncertainty from environment to acoustic field by polynomial chaos expansion. Then covariance matrix and associated ellipsoidal neighboring space are used to describe the uncertainty set of acoustic field and steering vector for sonar signal processing. Finally, a robust Minimum Variance (MV) matched-field processing method is derived by extending the constrained optimization of MV from single point to an uncertainty steering vector ellipsoid. We apply sea test data collected by a vertical array in shallow water to source localization.

  11. Acoustic characterization of high intensity focused ultrasound fields generated from a transmitter with a large aperture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Tao; Fan, Tingbo; Zhang, Wei; Qiu, Yuanyuan; Tu, Juan; Guo, Xiasheng; Zhang, Dong

    2014-03-01

    Prediction and measurement of the acoustic field emitted from a high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is essential for the accurate ultrasonic treatment. In this study, the acoustic field generated from a strongly focused HIFU transmitter was characterized by a combined experiment and simulation method. The spheroidal beam equation (SBE) was utilized to describe the nonlinear sound propagation. The curve of the source pressure amplitude versus voltage excitation was determined by fitting the measured ratio of the second harmonic to the fundamental component of the focal waveform to the simulation result; finally, the acoustic pressure field generated by the strongly focused HIFU transmitter was predicted by using the SBE model. A commercial fiber optic probe hydrophone was utilized to measure the acoustic pressure field generated from a 1.1 MHz HIFU transmitter with a large half aperture angle of 30°. The maximum measured peak-to-peak pressure was up to 72 MPa. The validity of this combined approach was confirmed by the comparison between the measured results and the calculated ones. The results indicate that the current approach might be useful to describe the HIFU field. The results also suggest that this method is not valid for low excitations owing to low sensitivity of the second harmonic.

  12. Military jet noise source imaging using multisource statistically optimized near-field acoustical holography.

    PubMed

    Wall, Alan T; Gee, Kent L; Neilsen, Tracianne B; McKinley, Richard L; James, Michael M

    2016-04-01

    The identification of acoustic sources is critical to targeted noise reduction efforts for jets on high-performance tactical aircraft. This paper describes the imaging of acoustic sources from a tactical jet using near-field acoustical holography techniques. The measurement consists of a series of scans over the hologram with a dense microphone array. Partial field decomposition methods are performed to generate coherent holograms. Numerical extrapolation of data beyond the measurement aperture mitigates artifacts near the aperture edges. A multisource equivalent wave model is used that includes the effects of the ground reflection on the measurement. Multisource statistically optimized near-field acoustical holography (M-SONAH) is used to reconstruct apparent source distributions between 20 and 1250 Hz at four engine powers. It is shown that M-SONAH produces accurate field reconstructions for both inward and outward propagation in the region spanned by the physical hologram measurement. Reconstructions across the set of engine powers and frequencies suggests that directivity depends mainly on estimated source location; sources farther downstream radiate at a higher angle relative to the inlet axis. At some frequencies and engine powers, reconstructed fields exhibit multiple radiation lobes originating from overlapped source regions, which is a phenomenon relatively recently reported for full-scale jets. PMID:27106340

  13. Acoustic characterization of high intensity focused ultrasound fields generated from a transmitter with a large aperture

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Tao; Fan, Tingbo; Zhang, Wei; Qiu, Yuanyuan; Tu, Juan E-mail: dzhang@nju.edu.cn; Guo, Xiasheng; Zhang, Dong E-mail: dzhang@nju.edu.cn

    2014-03-21

    Prediction and measurement of the acoustic field emitted from a high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is essential for the accurate ultrasonic treatment. In this study, the acoustic field generated from a strongly focused HIFU transmitter was characterized by a combined experiment and simulation method. The spheroidal beam equation (SBE) was utilized to describe the nonlinear sound propagation. The curve of the source pressure amplitude versus voltage excitation was determined by fitting the measured ratio of the second harmonic to the fundamental component of the focal waveform to the simulation result; finally, the acoustic pressure field generated by the strongly focused HIFU transmitter was predicted by using the SBE model. A commercial fiber optic probe hydrophone was utilized to measure the acoustic pressure field generated from a 1.1 MHz HIFU transmitter with a large half aperture angle of 30°. The maximum measured peak-to-peak pressure was up to 72 MPa. The validity of this combined approach was confirmed by the comparison between the measured results and the calculated ones. The results indicate that the current approach might be useful to describe the HIFU field. The results also suggest that this method is not valid for low excitations owing to low sensitivity of the second harmonic.

  14. Dynamics of a spherical particle in an acoustic field: A multiscale approach

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Jin-Han Vanneste, Jacques

    2014-10-15

    A rigid spherical particle in an acoustic wave field oscillates at the wave period but has also a mean motion on a longer time scale. The dynamics of this mean motion is crucial for numerous applications of acoustic microfluidics, including particle manipulation and flow visualisation. It is controlled by four physical effects: acoustic (radiation) pressure, streaming, inertia, and viscous drag. In this paper, we carry out a systematic multiscale analysis of the problem in order to assess the relative importance of these effects depending on the parameters of the system that include wave amplitude, wavelength, sound speed, sphere radius, and viscosity. We identify two distinguished regimes characterised by a balance among three of the four effects, and we derive the equations that govern the mean particle motion in each regime. This recovers and organises classical results by King [“On the acoustic radiation pressure on spheres,” Proc. R. Soc. A 147, 212–240 (1934)], Gor'kov [“On the forces acting on a small particle in an acoustical field in an ideal fluid,” Sov. Phys. 6, 773–775 (1962)], and Doinikov [“Acoustic radiation pressure on a rigid sphere in a viscous fluid,” Proc. R. Soc. London A 447, 447–466 (1994)], clarifies the range of validity of these results, and reveals a new nonlinear dynamical regime. In this regime, the mean motion of the particle remains intimately coupled to that of the surrounding fluid, and while viscosity affects the fluid motion, it plays no part in the acoustic pressure. Simplified equations, valid when only two physical effects control the particle motion, are also derived. They are used to obtain sufficient conditions for the particle to behave as a passive tracer of the Lagrangian-mean fluid motion.

  15. Acoustic propagation through anisotropic internal wave fields: transmission loss, cross-range coherence, and horizontal refraction.

    PubMed

    Oba, Roger; Finette, Steven

    2002-02-01

    Results of a computer simulation study are presented for acoustic propagation in a shallow water, anisotropic ocean environment. The water column is characterized by random volume fluctuations in the sound speed field that are induced by internal gravity waves, and this variability is superimposed on a dominant summer thermocline. Both the internal wave field and resulting sound speed perturbations are represented in three-dimensional (3D) space and evolve in time. The isopycnal displacements consist of two components: a spatially diffuse, horizontally isotropic component and a spatially localized contribution from an undular bore (i.e., a solitary wave packet or solibore) that exhibits horizontal (azimuthal) anisotropy. An acoustic field is propagated through this waveguide using a 3D parabolic equation code based on differential operators representing wide-angle coverage in elevation and narrow-angle coverage in azimuth. Transmission loss is evaluated both for fixed time snapshots of the environment and as a function of time over an ordered set of snapshots which represent the time-evolving sound speed distribution. Horizontal acoustic coherence, also known as transverse or cross-range coherence, is estimated for horizontally separated points in the direction normal to the source-receiver orientation. Both transmission loss and spatial coherence are computed at acoustic frequencies 200 and 400 Hz for ranges extending to 10 km, a cross-range of 1 km, and a water depth of 68 m. Azimuthal filtering of the propagated field occurs for this environment, with the strongest variations appearing when propagation is parallel to the solitary wave depressions of the thermocline. A large anisotropic degradation in horizontal coherence occurs under the same conditions. Horizontal refraction of the acoustic wave front is responsible for the degradation, as demonstrated by an energy gradient analysis of in-plane and out-of-plane energy transfer. The solitary wave packet is

  16. Acoustic propagation through anisotropic internal wave fields: Transmission loss, cross-range coherence, and horizontal refraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oba, Roger; Finette, Steven

    2002-02-01

    Results of a computer simulation study are presented for acoustic propagation in a shallow water, anisotropic ocean environment. The water column is characterized by random volume fluctuations in the sound speed field that are induced by internal gravity waves, and this variability is superimposed on a dominant summer thermocline. Both the internal wave field and resulting sound speed perturbations are represented in three-dimensional (3D) space and evolve in time. The isopycnal displacements consist of two components: a spatially diffuse, horizontally isotropic component and a spatially localized contribution from an undular bore (i.e., a solitary wave packet or solibore) that exhibits horizontal (azimuthal) anisotropy. An acoustic field is propagated through this waveguide using a 3D parabolic equation code based on differential operators representing wide-angle coverage in elevation and narrow-angle coverage in azimuth. Transmission loss is evaluated both for fixed time snapshots of the environment and as a function of time over an ordered set of snapshots which represent the time-evolving sound speed distribution. Horizontal acoustic coherence, also known as transverse or cross-range coherence, is estimated for horizontally separated points in the direction normal to the source-receiver orientation. Both transmission loss and spatial coherence are computed at acoustic frequencies 200 and 400 Hz for ranges extending to 10 km, a cross-range of 1 km, and a water depth of 68 m. Azimuthal filtering of the propagated field occurs for this environment, with the strongest variations appearing when propagation is parallel to the solitary wave depressions of the thermocline. A large anisotropic degradation in horizontal coherence occurs under the same conditions. Horizontal refraction of the acoustic wave front is responsible for the degradation, as demonstrated by an energy gradient analysis of in-plane and out-of-plane energy transfer. The solitary wave packet is

  17. Temporal coherence of the acoustic field forward propagated through a continental shelf with random internal waves.

    PubMed

    Gong, Zheng; Chen, Tianrun; Ratilal, Purnima; Makris, Nicholas C

    2013-11-01

    An analytical model derived from normal mode theory for the accumulated effects of range-dependent multiple forward scattering is applied to estimate the temporal coherence of the acoustic field forward propagated through a continental-shelf waveguide containing random three-dimensional internal waves. The modeled coherence time scale of narrow band low-frequency acoustic field fluctuations after propagating through a continental-shelf waveguide is shown to decay with a power-law of range to the -1/2 beyond roughly 1 km, decrease with increasing internal wave energy, to be consistent with measured acoustic coherence time scales. The model should provide a useful prediction of the acoustic coherence time scale as a function of internal wave energy in continental-shelf environments. The acoustic coherence time scale is an important parameter in remote sensing applications because it determines (i) the time window within which standard coherent processing such as matched filtering may be conducted, and (ii) the number of statistically independent fluctuations in a given measurement period that determines the variance reduction possible by stationary averaging. PMID:24180758

  18. Field performance of an acoustic scour-depth monitoring system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mason, Jr., Robert R.; Sheppard, D. Max

    1994-01-01

    The Herbert C. Bonner Bridge over Oregon Inlet serves as the only land link between Bodie and Hatteras Islands, part of the Outer Banks of North Carolina. Periodic soundings over the past 30 years have documented channel migration, local scour, and deposition at several pilings that support the bridge. In September 1992, a data-collection system was installed to permit the off-site monitoring of scour at 16 bridge pilings. The system records channel-bed elevations at 15-minute intervals and transmits the data to a satellite receiver. A cellular phone connection also permits downloading and reviewing of the data as they are being collected. A digitally recording, acoustic fathometer is the main component of the system. In November 1993, current velocity, water-surface elevation, wave characteristics, and water temperature measuring instruments were also deployed at the site. Several performance problems relating to the equipment and to the harsh marine environment have not been resolved, but the system has collected and transmitted reliable scour-depth and water-level data.

  19. Hydrophone arrays for instantaneous measurement of high-pressure acoustic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ketterling, Jeffrey A.; Kracht, Jonathan M.; Cleveland, Robin O.

    2010-03-01

    Electrohydraulic lithotripter acoustic fields are measured with single-element hydrophones even though the acoustic fields are not highly repeatable. The ability to obtain an instantaneous "snapshot" of the sound field would have broad implications for advancing the understanding of how lithotripters fragment stones and damage kidney tissue. To better characterize the acoustic field of lithotripters, linear hydrophone arrays were fabricated by bonding a 9 μm piezopolymer film to a copper-clad polyimide which had an array pattern etched on the copper layer. After bonding, the devices were backed with an epoxy plug in order to provide structural support. The array elements were each 0.5 by 0.5 mm, spaced 1.25 mm center to center, and there were 20 elements. The relative sensitivity of each hydrophone element was measured at 5.25 MHz for an acoustic pressure of 4.5 kPa and the elements were found to vary by ≈ 6%. The arrays were then placed in the focus of a piezoelectric lithotripter and were found to maintain their sensitivity for roughly 500 shock waves before gradually losing sensitivity.

  20. Bioacoustic Field Research: A Primer to Acoustic Analyses and Playback Experiments With Primates

    PubMed Central

    FISCHER, JULIA; NOSER, RAHEL; HAMMERSCHMIDT, KURT

    2013-01-01

    Acoustic analyses of primate vocalizations as well as playback experiments are staple methods in primatology. Acoustic analyses have been used to investigate the influence of factors such as individuality, context, sex, age, and size on variation in calls. More recent studies have expanded our knowledge on the effects of phylogenetic relatedness and the structure of primate vocal repertoires in general. Complementary playback experiments allow direct testing of hypotheses regarding the attribution of meaning to calls, the cognitive mechanisms underpinning responses, and/or the adaptive value of primate behavior. After briefly touching on the historical background of this field of research, we first provide an introduction to recording primate vocalizations and discuss different approaches to describe primate calls in terms of their temporal and spectral properties. Second, we present a tutorial regarding the preparation, execution, and interpretation of field playback experiments, including a review of studies that have used such approaches to investigate the responses to acoustic variation in calls including the integration of contextual and acoustic information, recognition of kin and social relationships, and social knowledge. Based on the review of the literature and our own experience, we make a number of recommendations regarding the most common problems and pitfalls. The power of acoustic analyses typically hinges on the quality of the recordings and the number of individuals represented in the sample. Playback experiments require profound knowledge of the natural behavior of the animals for solid interpretation; experiments should be conducted sparingly, to avoid habituation of the subjects to the occurrence of the calls; experimenter-blind designs chosen whenever possible; and researchers should brace themselves for long periods of waiting times until the appropriate moments to do the experiment arise. If all these aspects are considered, acoustic analyses

  1. Acoustic radiation and surface pressure characteristics of an airfoil due to incident turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paterson, R. W.

    1976-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental investigation of the noise and unsteady surface pressure characteristics of an isolated airfoil in a uniform mean velocity, homogeneous, nearly-isotropic turbulence field was conducted. Wind tunnel experiments were performed with a 23 cm chord, two dimensional NACA 0012 airfoil over a free stream Mach number range of 0.1 to 0.5. Far-field noise spectra and directivity were measured in an anechoic chamber that surrounded the tunnel open jet test section. Spanwise and chordwise distribution of unsteady airfoil surface pressure spectra and surface pressure cross-spectra were obtained. Incident turbulence intensities, length scales, spectra, and spanwise cross-spectra, required in the calculation of far-field noise and surface pressure characteristics were also measured.

  2. Generation and development of small-amplitude disturbances in a laminar boundary layer in the presence of an acoustic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kachanov, Y. S.; Kozlov, V. V.; Levchenko, V. Y.

    1985-01-01

    A low-turbulence subsonic wind tunnel was used to study the influence of acoustic disturbances on the development of small sinusoidal oscillations (Tollmien-Schlichting waves) which constitute the initial phase of turbulent transition. It is found that acoustic waves propagating opposite to the flow generate vibrations of the model (plate) in the flow. Neither the plate vibrations nor the acoustic field itself have any appreciable influence on the stability of the laminar boundary layer. The influence of an acoustic field on laminar boundary layer disturbances is limited to the generation of Tollmien-Schlichting waves at the leading-edge of the plate.

  3. Acoustic streaming field structure. Part II. Examples that include boundary-driven flow.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Charles

    2012-01-01

    In this paper three simple acoustic streaming problems are presented and solved. The purpose of the paper is to demonstrate the use of a previously published streaming model by Bradley [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 100(3), 1399-1408 (1996)] and illustrate, with concrete examples, some of the features of streaming flows that were predicted by the general model. In particular, the problems are intended to demonstrate cases in which the streaming field boundary condition at the face of the radiator has a nontrivial lateral dc velocity component. Such a boundary condition drives a steady solenoidal flow just like a laterally translating boundary drives Couette flow. PMID:22280567

  4. Adaptive Plasticity in Wild Field Cricket’s Acoustic Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Bertram, Susan M.; Harrison, Sarah J.; Thomson, Ian R.; Fitzsimmons, Lauren P.

    2013-01-01

    Phenotypic plasticity can be adaptive when phenotypes are closely matched to changes in the environment. In crickets, rhythmic fluctuations in the biotic and abiotic environment regularly result in diel rhythms in density of sexually active individuals. Given that density strongly influences the intensity of sexual selection, we asked whether crickets exhibit plasticity in signaling behavior that aligns with these rhythmic fluctuations in the socio-sexual environment. We quantified the acoustic mate signaling behavior of wild-caught males of two cricket species, Gryllus veletis and G. pennsylvanicus. Crickets exhibited phenotypically plastic mate signaling behavior, with most males signaling more often and more attractively during the times of day when mating activity is highest in the wild. Most male G. pennsylvanicus chirped more often and louder, with shorter interpulse durations, pulse periods, chirp durations, and interchirp durations, and at slightly higher carrier frequencies during the time of the day that mating activity is highest in the wild. Similarly, most male G. veletis chirped more often, with more pulses per chirp, longer interpulse durations, pulse periods, and chirp durations, shorter interchirp durations, and at lower carrier frequencies during the time of peak mating activity in the wild. Among-male variation in signaling plasticity was high, with some males signaling in an apparently maladaptive manner. Body size explained some of the among-male variation in G. pennsylvanicus plasticity but not G. veletis plasticity. Overall, our findings suggest that crickets exhibit phenotypically plastic mate attraction signals that closely match the fluctuating socio-sexual context they experience. PMID:23935965

  5. Acoustical phase conjugation and optical quasi-phase conjugate mirror in medical fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fargion, Daniele

    1993-09-01

    The coherent detection (and the consequent replay forward or backward in time emission) by an array of microphones (and loud speakers), in mutual phase, may mimic a dynamical acoustic hologram or a dynamical acoustic phase conjugate mirror (APCM). The ability of APCM to compensate distortions due to diffusing subjects (as part of living bodies) may in principle reverse in 3D detail (and with no hazard) the internal structure of anatomic components (tissue...) as well as absorbing ones (bones...). The resolution and the applications of APCM in medical inspections are discussed: megahertz frequencies are preferred. Anatomic subjects are generally optically opaque, but they are acoustically transparent. This is the reason to prefer APCM to optical PCM in medical as well as in geological inspections.

  6. Imaging of transient surface acoustic waves by full-field photorefractive interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Jichuan; Xu, Xiaodong E-mail: christ.glorieux@fys.kuleuven.be; Glorieux, Christ E-mail: christ.glorieux@fys.kuleuven.be; Matsuda, Osamu; Cheng, Liping

    2015-05-15

    A stroboscopic full-field imaging technique based on photorefractive interferometry for the visualization of rapidly changing surface displacement fields by using of a standard charge-coupled device (CCD) camera is presented. The photorefractive buildup of the space charge field during and after probe laser pulses is simulated numerically. The resulting anisotropic diffraction upon the refractive index grating and the interference between the polarization-rotated diffracted reference beam and the transmitted signal beam are modeled theoretically. The method is experimentally demonstrated by full-field imaging of the propagation of photoacoustically generated surface acoustic waves with a temporal resolution of nanoseconds. The surface acoustic wave propagation in a 23 mm × 17 mm area on an aluminum plate was visualized with 520 × 696 pixels of the CCD sensor, yielding a spatial resolution of 33 μm. The short pulse duration (8 ns) of the probe laser yields the capability of imaging SAWs with frequencies up to 60 MHz.

  7. Scattered acoustic field above a grating of non-parallel rectangular cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanfir, A.; Faiz, A.; Ducourneau, J.; Chatillon, J.; Lami, S. Skali

    2016-01-01

    Geometric or acoustical irregularities induces acoustic scattering. In this paper, a generalization of the model proposed by Khanfir et al. [8] (Journal of Sound and Vibration 332 (4) (2013)) to determine the scattered acoustic field above gratings of parallel rectangular cavities is developed, addressing the case of gratings of non-parallel rectangular cavities. The results provided by the model were compared both to numerical results, obtained with the finite element method, and to experimental ones. The observed agreement between the analytical predictions and the numerical and experimental results supports the validity of the proposed model. The coupling between the different cavities was investigated, in order to attain an explanation for its dependence on frequency and on the spacing between cavities.

  8. Field evaluation of boat-mounted acoustic Doppler instruments used to measure streamflow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mueller, D.S.

    2003-01-01

    The use of instruments based on the Doppler principle for measuring water velocity and computing discharge is common within the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The instruments and software have changed appreciably during the last 5 years; therefore, the USGS has begun field validation of the instruments used to make discharge measurements from a moving boat. Instruments manufactured by SonTek/YSI and RD Instruments, Inc. were used to collect discharge data at five different sites. One or more traditional discharge measurements were made using a Price AA current meter and standard USGS procedures concurrent with the acoustic instruments at each site. Discharges measured with the acoustic instruments were compared with discharges measured with Price AA current meters and the USGS stage-discharge rating for each site. The mean discharges measured by each acoustic instrument were within 5 percent of the Price AA-based measurement and (or) discharge from the stage-discharge rating.

  9. Range-dependent flexibility in the acoustic field of view of echolocating porpoises (Phocoena phocoena).

    PubMed

    Wisniewska, Danuta M; Ratcliffe, John M; Beedholm, Kristian; Christensen, Christian B; Johnson, Mark; Koblitz, Jens C; Wahlberg, Magnus; Madsen, Peter T

    2015-01-01

    Toothed whales use sonar to detect, locate, and track prey. They adjust emitted sound intensity, auditory sensitivity and click rate to target range, and terminate prey pursuits with high-repetition-rate, low-intensity buzzes. However, their narrow acoustic field of view (FOV) is considered stable throughout target approach, which could facilitate prey escape at close-range. Here, we show that, like some bats, harbour porpoises can broaden their biosonar beam during the terminal phase of attack but, unlike bats, maintain the ability to change beamwidth within this phase. Based on video, MRI, and acoustic-tag recordings, we propose this flexibility is modulated by the melon and implemented to accommodate dynamic spatial relationships with prey and acoustic complexity of surroundings. Despite independent evolution and different means of sound generation and transmission, whales and bats adaptively change their FOV, suggesting that beamwidth flexibility has been an important driver in the evolution of echolocation for prey tracking. PMID:25793440

  10. Acoustic field interaction with a boiling system under terrestrial gravity and microgravity.

    PubMed

    Sitter, J S; Snyder, T J; Chung, J N; Marston, P L

    1998-11-01

    Pool boiling experiments from a platinum wire heater in FC-72 liquid were conducted under terrestrial and microgravity conditions, both with and without the presence of a high-intensity acoustic standing wave within the fluid. The purpose of this research was to study the interaction between an acoustic field and a pool boiling system in normal gravity and microgravity. The absence of buoyancy in microgravity complicates the process of boiling. The acoustic force on a vapor bubble generated from a heated wire in a standing wave was shown to be able to play the role of buoyancy in microgravity. The microgravity environment was achieved with 0.6 and 2.1-s drop towers. The sound was transmitted through the fluid medium by means of a half wavelength sonic transducer driven at 10.18 kHz. At high enough acoustic pressure amplitudes cavitation and streaming began playing an important role in vapor bubble dynamics and heat transfer. Several different fixed heat fluxes were chosen for the microgravity experiment and the effects of acoustics on the surface temperature of the heater were recorded and the vapor bubble movement was filmed. Video images of the pool boiling processes and heat transfer data are presented. PMID:9821335

  11. A finite difference analysis of the field present behind an acoustically impenetrable two-layer barrier.

    PubMed

    Hurrell, Andrew M

    2008-06-01

    The interaction of an incident sound wave with an acoustically impenetrable two-layer barrier is considered. Of particular interest is the presence of several acoustic wave components in the shadow region of this barrier. A finite difference model capable of simulating this geometry is validated by comparison to the analytical solution for an idealized, hard-soft barrier. A panel comprising a high air-content closed cell foam backed with an elastic (metal) back plate is then examined. The insertion loss of this panel was found to exceed the dynamic range of the measurement system and was thus acoustically impenetrable. Experimental results from such a panel are shown to contain artifacts not present in the diffraction solution, when acoustic waves are incident upon the soft surface. A finite difference analysis of this experimental configuration replicates the presence of the additional field components. Furthermore, the simulated results allow the additional components to be identified as arising from the S(0) and A(0) Lamb modes traveling in the elastic plate. These Lamb mode artifacts are not found to be present in the shadow region when the acoustic waves are incident upon the elastic surface. PMID:18537372

  12. A gearbox fault diagnosis scheme based on near-field acoustic holography and spatial distribution features of sound field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Wenbo; Jiang, Weikang; Yuan, Guoqing; Yan, Li

    2013-05-01

    Vibration signal analysis is the main technique in machine condition monitoring or fault diagnosis, whereas in some cases vibration-based diagnosis is restrained because of its contact measurement. Acoustic-based diagnosis (ABD) with non-contact measurement has received little attention, although sound field may contain abundant information related to fault pattern. A new scheme of ABD for gearbox based on near-field acoustic holography (NAH) and spatial distribution features of sound field is presented in this paper. It focuses on applying distribution information of sound field to gearbox fault diagnosis. A two-stage industrial helical gearbox is experimentally studied in a semi-anechoic chamber and a lab workshop, respectively. Firstly, multi-class faults (mild pitting, moderate pitting, severe pitting and tooth breakage) are simulated, respectively. Secondly, sound fields and corresponding acoustic images in different gearbox running conditions are obtained by fast Fourier transform (FFT) based NAH. Thirdly, by introducing texture analysis to fault diagnosis, spatial distribution features are extracted from acoustic images for capturing fault patterns underlying the sound field. Finally, the features are fed into multi-class support vector machine for fault pattern identification. The feasibility and effectiveness of our proposed scheme is demonstrated on the good experimental results and the comparison with traditional ABD method. Even with strong noise interference, spatial distribution features of sound field can reliably reveal the fault patterns of gearbox, and thus the satisfactory accuracy can be obtained. The combination of histogram features and gray level gradient co-occurrence matrix features is suggested for good diagnosis accuracy and low time cost.

  13. Antifade sonar employs acoustic field diversity to recover signals from multipath fading

    SciTech Connect

    Lubman, D.

    1996-04-01

    Co-located pressure and particle motion (PM) hydrophones together with four-channel diversity combiners may be used to recover signals from multipath fading. Multipath fading is important in both shallow and deep water propagation and can be an important source of signal loss. The acoustic field diversity concept arises from the notion of conservation of signal energy and the observation that in rooms at least, the total acoustic energy density is the sum of potential energy (scalar field-sound pressure) and kinetic energy (vector field-sound PM) portions. One pressure hydrophone determines acoustic potential energy density at a point. In principle, three PM sensors (displacement, velocity, or acceleration) directed along orthogonal axes describe the kinetic energy density at a point. For a single plane wave, the time-averaged potential and kinetic field energies are identical everywhere. In multipath interference, however, potential and kinetic field energies at a point are partitioned unequally, depending mainly on relative signal phases. Thus, when pressure signals are in deep fade, abundant kinetic field signal energy may be available at that location. Performance benefits require a degree of uncorrelated fading between channels. The expectation of nearly uncorrelated fading is motivated from room theory. Performance benefits for sonar limited by independent Rayleigh fading are suggested by analogy to antifade radio. Average SNR can be improved by several decibels, holding time on target is multiplied manifold, and the bit error rate for data communication is reduced substantially. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  14. Antifade sonar employs acoustic field diversity to recover signals from multipath fading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubman, David

    1996-04-01

    Co-located pressure and particle motion (PM) hydrophones together with four-channel diversity combiners may be used to recover signals from multipath fading. Multipath fading is important in both shallow and deep water propagation and can be an important source of signal loss. The acoustic field diversity concept arises from the notion of conservation of signal energy and the observation that in rooms at least, the total acoustic energy density is the sum of potential energy (scalar field-sound pressure) and kinetic energy (vector field-sound PM) portions. One pressure hydrophone determines acoustic potential energy density at a point. In principle, three PM sensors (displacement, velocity, or acceleration) directed along orthogonal axes describe the kinetic energy density at a point. For a single plane wave, the time-averaged potential and kinetic field energies are identical everywhere. In multipath interference, however, potential and kinetic field energies at a point are partitioned unequally, depending mainly on relative signal phases. Thus, when pressure signals are in deep fade, abundant kinetic field signal energy may be available at that location. Performance benefits require a degree of uncorrelated fading between channels. The expectation of nearly uncorrelated fading is motivated from room theory. Performance benefits for sonar limited by independent Rayleigh fading are suggested by analogy to antifade radio. Average SNR can be improved by several decibels, holding time on target is multiplied manifold, and the bit error rate for data communication is reduced substantially.

  15. Underwater patch near-field acoustical holography based on particle velocity and vector hydrophone array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Bo; Yang, DeSen; Li, SiChun; Sun, Yu; Mo, ShiQi; Shi, ShengGuo

    2012-11-01

    One-step patch near-field acoustical holography (PNAH) is a powerful tool for identifying noise sources from the partially known sound pressure field. The acoustical property to be reconstructed on the surface of interest is related to the partially measured pressure on the hologram surface in terms of sampling and bandlimiting matrices, which cost more in computation. A one-step procedure based on measuring of the normal component of the particle velocity is described, including the mathematical formulation. The numerical simulation shows that one-step PNAH based on particle velocity can obtain more accurately reconstructed results and it is also less sensitive to noise than the method based on pressure. These findings are confirmed by an underwater near-field acoustical holography experiment conducted with a vector hydrophone array. The experimental results have illustrated the high performance of one-step PNAH based on particle velocity in the reconstruction of sound field and the advantages of a vector hydrophone array in an underwater near-field measurement.

  16. Acoustic radiation torque on an irregularly shaped scatterer in an arbitrary sound field.

    PubMed

    Fan, Zongwei; Mei, Deqing; Yang, Keji; Chen, Zichen

    2008-11-01

    To eliminate the limitation of the conventional acoustic radiation torque theory, which is only applicable to a disklike scatterer in a plane sound field, a new theory is established to calculate the radiation torque on any irregularly shaped scatterer in any arbitrary sound field. First, with the aid of the conservation law of angular momentum, the acoustic radiation torque is expressed as the angular momentum flux through a spherical surface with the center at the scatterer's centroid. Second, the velocity potential of the scattered field is derived, taking into account the influences of the translational and rotational movements of the scatterer induced by the first order stress of the incident sound field. Finally, a general calculating formula of the acoustic radiation torque is achieved. For a disklike scatterer in a plane sound filed, results from the above formula are well identical with those conventional formulas. By studying the case of a semicircular cylinder scatterer in a standing-wave sound field, it is found that for an irregularly shaped scatterer its rotation velocity is normally nonzero and the radiation torque changes with the spatial attitude. PMID:19045760

  17. Students drop out of STEM fields due to poor grades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2013-09-01

    College students planning to major in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields often drop out of those fields because of poorer than expected grades, according to a recent study. Conducted by Ralph Stinebrickner of Berea College in Kentucky and Todd Stinebrickner of the University of Western Ontario, the study is a National Bureau of Economic Research working paper published in June 2013.

  18. Applications of whole field interferometry in mechanics and acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molin, Nils-Erik

    1999-07-01

    A description is given of fringe formation in holographic interferometry, in electronic speckle pattern interferometry, in electro-optic or TV holography and for a newly developed system for pulsed TV-holography. A numerical example, which simulates the equations describing the different techniques, is included. A strain measuring system using defocused digital speckle photography is described. Experiments showing mode shapes of musical instruments, transient bending wave propagation in beams and plates as well as sound pressure fields in air are included.

  19. Source signature and acoustic field of seismic physical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Q.; Jackson, C.; Tang, G.; Burbach, G.

    2004-12-01

    As an important tool of seismic research and exploration, seismic physical modeling simulates the real world data acquisition by scaling the model, acquisition parameters, and some features of the source generated by a transducer. Unlike the numerical simulation where a point source is easily satisfied, the transducer can't be made small enough for approximating the point source in physical modeling, therefore yield different source signature than the sources applied in the field data acquisition. To better understand the physical modeling data, characterizing the wave field generated by ultrasonic transducers is desirable and helpful. In this study, we explode several aspects of source characterization; including their radiation pattern, directivity, sensitivity and frequency response. We also try to figure out how to improve the acquired data quality, such as minimize ambient noise, use encoded chirp to prevent ringing, apply deterministic deconvolution to enhance data resolution and t-P filtering to remove linear events. We found that the transducer and their wave field, the modeling system performance, as well as material properties of the model and their coupling conditions all play roles in the physical modeling data acquisition.

  20. Functional referents and acoustic similarity: field playback experiments with rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Hauser

    1998-06-01

    Rhesus monkeys, Macaca mulatta, on the island of Cayo Santiago, Puerto Rico produce one or more of five acoustically distinctive calls when they find food. Three of these calls ('warbles', 'harmonic arches' and 'chirps') are produced by individuals finding high-quality, rare food items, whereas the other two calls ('coos' and 'grunts') are produced upon encountering lower-quality, common food items, and in non-food contexts as well. To determine how rhesus classify such acoustic variation, I conducted habituation experiments using a subset of the five call types. I designed experiments to reveal whether classification is based primarily on acoustic features or on the basis of a call's functional referent; caller identity was held constant within sessions. Habituation to 'warbles' transferred to 'harmonic arches', and vice versa. Thus, although these two calls are acoustically distinctive, they appeared to be perceptually clustered into one category based on referential similarities. In contrast, habituation to 'grunts' was followed by dishabituation to 'warbles' or 'harmonic arches', and habituation to 'warbles' or 'harmonic arches' was followed by dishabituation to 'grunts'. Dishabituation could be due to acoustic or referential differences. Significantly, the magnitude of the dishabituating response was asymmetric and depended upon the call type used in the habituation series. Thus, when subjects were habituated to 'grunts', they responded significantly more to tests of 'warbles' or 'harmonic arches' than when the sequence was reversed. These results suggest that for rhesus monkey food-associated calls, referential differences carry more weight during perceptual classification than do acoustical differences. Copyright 1998 The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour. Copyright 1998 The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour. PMID:9642008

  1. Production and Validation of Acoustic Field to Enhance Trapping Efficiency of Microbubbles by Using a Matrix Array Transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosaka, Naoto; Koda, Ren; Onogi, Shinya; Mochizuki, Takashi; Masuda, Kohji

    2013-07-01

    We have developed a new matrix array transducer for controlling the behavior of microbubbles, which is different from that for high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy, in order to emit continuous wave by designing an acoustic field including multiple focal points. In the experiment using a thin-channel model, a wider acoustic field has an advantage for trapping microbubbles. In the experiment using a straight-path model, we have confirmed that a higher concentration of acoustic energy does not result in more aggregates. The dispersion of acoustic energy is important because the trapping performance is affected by the relationship between the shape of the acoustic field and the concentration of the suspension.

  2. Currents and electric fields in the ionosphere due to field-aligned auroral currents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nisbet, J. S.; Miller, M. J.; Carpenter, L. A.

    1978-01-01

    Birkeland (1908, 1913) did a detailed analysis of the upper atmospheric current system in the high-latitude region, and suggested that field-aligned currents flowing into and out of the auroral ionosphere were the driving mechanism for this current system. In the present paper, static electric field and current patterns due to the field-aligned Birkeland currents are examined, using a model in which currents approximating those reported by Iijima and Potemra (1976) are used as input to a global model of the ionospheric conductivities, in which interhemispheric coupling along field lines is included. The model reproduces the main features of the high-latitude current and voltage system and the penetration of these currents within the plasmasphere.

  3. Lower Atmospheric Electric Field due to Cloud Charge Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Suman; Haldar, Dilip kumar; Sundar De, Syam; Ghosh, Abhijit; Hazra, Pranab; Bandyopadhyay, Bijoy

    2016-07-01

    The distributions of electric charge in the electrified clouds introduce important effects in the ionosphere and into the region between the ionosphere and the Earth. The electrical properties of the medium are changed greatly between thundercloud altitudes and the magnetosphere. A model for the penetration of DC thundercloud electric field between the Earth's upper and lower atmosphere has been presented here. The model deals with the electromagnetic responses of the atmosphere simulated through Maxwell's equations together with a time-varying source charge distribution. The modified ellipsoidal-Gaussian profile has been taken for the charge distribution of the electrified cloud. The conductivity profile of the medium is taken to be isotropic below 70 km height and anisotropic above 70 km. The Earth's surface is considered to be perfectly conducting. A general form of equation representing the thundercloud electric field component is deduced. In spite of assumptions for axial symmetry of thundercloud charge distribution considered in the model, the results are obtained giving the electric field variation in the upper atmosphere. The vertical component of the electric field would relate the global electric circuit while the radial component showed the electrical coupling between the lower atmosphere and the ionized Earth's environment. The variations of the values of field components for different heights as well as Maxwell's current have been evaluated. Coupling between the troposphere and the ionosphere is critically dependent on the height variations of electrical conductivity. Field-aligned electron density irregularities in the ionosphere may be investigated through the present analyses.

  4. V-fields due latest monitoring, control technology

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-06-29

    Conoco (U.K.) Ltd. this spring begins the installation phase of its V-fields project in the southern basin of the British North Sea. A feature of the $1.25 billion project to develop the Vulcan, North and South Valiant, and Vanguard fields will be one of the most sophisticated control and monitoring systems in the North Sea. The Calcam system (Computer Assisted Logic Control and Monitoring) was designed, developed, and manufactured by Conoco U.K.'s southern offshore operations division. Calcam was first operated successfully on Conoco's Victor and Viking facilities in 1984. The V-fields are about 15 miles west of the Victor and Viking developments. Conoco is installing a central gas gathering complex which will handle the output from two unmanned satellite wellhead drilling platforms on the Vulcan field, two on North Valiant, and one each of Vanguard and South Valiant. The three fields have combined reserves of about 1.4 tcf. Gas will be delivered to Conoco's existing reception terminal on the coast of Lincolnshire at Theddlethorpe which handles gas from the Viking and Victor fields.

  5. Action of an electromagnetic pulse on a plasma with a high level of ion-acoustic turbulence. Field diffusion and subdiffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Ovchinnikov, K. N.; Uryupin, S. A.

    2013-09-15

    Specific features of the interaction of a relatively weak electromagnetic pulse with a nonisothermal current-carrying plasma in which the electron drift velocity is much higher than the ion-acoustic velocity, but lower than the electron thermal velocity, are studied. If the state of the plasma with ion-acoustic turbulence does not change during the pulse action, the field penetrates into the plasma in the ordinary diffusion regime, but the diffusion coefficient in this case is inversely proportional to the anomalous conductivity. If, during the pulse action, the particle temperatures and the current-driving field change due to turbulent heating, the field penetrates into the plasma in the subdiffusion regime. It is shown how the presence of subdiffusion can be detected by measuring the reflected field.

  6. Field theory for zero sound and ion acoustic wave in astrophysical matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabadadze, Gregory; Rosen, Rachel A.

    2016-02-01

    We set up a field theory model to describe the longitudinal low-energy modes in high density matter present in white dwarf stars. At the relevant scales, ions—the nuclei of oxygen, carbon, and helium—are treated as heavy pointlike spin-0 charged particles in an effective field theory approach, while the electron dynamics is described by the Dirac Lagrangian at the one-loop level. We show that there always exists a longitudinal gapless mode in the system irrespective of whether the ions are in a plasma, crystal, or quantum liquid state. For certain values of the parameters, the gapless mode can be interpreted as a zero sound mode and, for other values, as an ion acoustic wave; we show that the zero sound and ion acoustic wave are complementary to each other. We discuss possible physical consequences of these modes for properties of white dwarfs.

  7. Detection and processing of electromagnetic and near-field acoustic signals in elasmobranch fishes.

    PubMed Central

    Kalmijn, A D

    2000-01-01

    The acoustic near field of quietly moving underwater objects and the bio-electric field of aquatic animals exhibit great similarity, as both are predominantly governed by Laplace's equation. The acoustic and electrical sensory modalities thus may, in directing fishes to their prey, employ analogous processing algorithms, suggesting a common evolutionary design, founded on the salient physical features shared by the respective stimulus fields. Sharks and rays are capable of orientating to the earth's magnetic field and, hence, have a magnetic sense. The electromagnetic theory of orientation offers strong arguments for the animals using the electric fields induced by ocean currents and by their own motions in the earth's magnetic field. In the animal's frame of reference, in which the sense organs are at rest, the classical concept of motional electricity must be interpreted in relativistic terms. In the ampullae of Lorenzini, weak electric fields cause the ciliated apical receptor-cell membranes to produce graded, negative receptor currents opposite in direction to the fields applied. The observed currents form part of a positive-feedback mechanism, supporting the generation of receptor potentials much larger than the input signal. Acting across the basal cell membranes, the receptor potentials control the process of synaptic transmission. PMID:11079385

  8. Possible variations of E-layer electromagnetic fields by acoustic waves above earthquake preparation regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meister, C.-V.; Mayer, B.; Hoffmann, D. H. H.

    2012-04-01

    The many-fluid magnetohydrodynamic theory is applied to describe the modification of the electromagnetic field of the ionospheric E-layer by acoustic-type waves. These waves originate from lower altitudes and may be caused by earthquake preparation processes. In comparison to former works, the different stratification of the positively and negatively charged ionospheric particles and of the neutral constituents is taken into account. There also the influence of the mean electric field on the different hight scales of the plasma parameters is discussed. Besides, the hight scales of the electric and magnetic wave fields are modeled. It is shown that at E-layer altitudes the acoustic waves may be converted into Alfvén waves. The dependence of these waves on the height scales of the plasma parameters of the particles and on the momentum transport between the charged and neutral particles is analysed. First estimates of the temperature variations within the E-layer because of the assumed acoustic-type waves of seismic origin are made.

  9. Generalized acoustic energy density based active noise control in single frequency diffuse sound fields.

    PubMed

    Xu, Buye; Sommerfeldt, Scott D

    2014-09-01

    In a diffuse sound field, prior research has established that a secondary source can theoretically achieve perfect cancellation at an error microphone in the far field of the secondary source. However, the sound pressure level is generally only reduced in a small zone around the error sensor, and at a distance half of a wavelength away from the error sensor, the averaged sound pressure level will be increased by more than 10 dB. Recently an acoustic energy quantity, referred to as the generalized acoustic energy density (GED), has been introduced. The GED is obtained by using a weighting factor in the formulation of total acoustic energy density. Different values of the weighting factor can be chosen for different applications. When minimizing the GED at the error sensor, one can adjust the weighting factor to increase the spatial extent of the "quiet zone" and to achieve a desired balance between the degree of attenuation in the quiet zone and the total energy added into the sound field. PMID:25190386

  10. Coupled acoustic-gravity field for dynamic evaluation of ion exchange with a single resin bead.

    PubMed

    Kanazaki, Takahiro; Hirawa, Shungo; Harada, Makoto; Okada, Tetsuo

    2010-06-01

    A coupled acoustic-gravity field is efficient for entrapping a particle at the position determined by its acoustic properties rather than its size. This field has been applied to the dynamic observation of ion-exchange reactions occurring in a single resin bead. The replacement of counterions in an ion-exchange resin induces changes in its acoustic properties, such as density and compressibility. Therefore, we can visually trace the advancement of an ion-exchange reaction as a time change in the levitation position of a resin bead entrapped in the field. Cation-exchange reactions occurring in resin beads with diameters of 40-120 microm are typically completed within 100-200 s. Ion-exchange equilibrium or kinetics is often evaluated with off-line chemical analyses, which require a batch amount of ion exchangers. Measurements with a single resin particle allow us to evaluate ion-exchange dynamics and kinetics of ions including those that are difficult to measure by usual off-line analyses. The diffusion properties of ions in resins have been successfully evaluated from the time change in the levitation positions of resin beads. PMID:20462180

  11. On the slow dynamics of near-field acoustically levitated objects under High excitation frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilssar, Dotan; Bucher, Izhak

    2015-10-01

    This paper introduces a simplified analytical model describing the governing dynamics of near-field acoustically levitated objects. The simplification converts the equation of motion coupled with the partial differential equation of a compressible fluid, into a compact, second order ordinary differential equation, where the local stiffness and damping are transparent. The simplified model allows one to more easily analyse and design near-field acoustic levitation based systems, and it also helps to devise closed-loop controller algorithms for such systems. Near-field acoustic levitation employs fast ultrasonic vibrations of a driving surface and exploits the viscosity and the compressibility of a gaseous medium to achieve average, load carrying pressure. It is demonstrated that the slow dynamics dominates the transient behaviour, while the time-scale associated with the fast, ultrasonic excitation has a small presence in the oscillations of the levitated object. Indeed, the present paper formulates the slow dynamics under an ultrasonic excitation without the need to explicitly consider the latter. The simplified model is compared with a numerical scheme based on Reynolds equation and with experiments, both showing reasonably good results.

  12. Enhanced nucleation fields due to dipolar interactions in nanocomposite magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischbacher, Johann; Bance, Simon; Exl, Lukas; Gusenbauer, Markus; Oezelt, Harald; Reichel, Franz; Schrefl, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    One approach to construct powerful permanent magnets while using less rare-earth elements is to combine a hard magnetic material having a high coercive field with a soft magnetic material having a high saturation magnetization at the nanometer scale and create so-called nanocomposite magnets. If both materials are strongly coupled, exchange forces will form a stable magnet. We use finite element micromagnetics simulations to investigate the changing hysteresis properties for varying arrays of soft magnetic spherical inclusions in a hard magnetic body. We show that the anisotropy arising from dipolar interactions between soft magnetic particles in a hard magnetic matrix can enhance the nucleation field by more than 10% and strongly depends on the arrangement of the inclusions.

  13. Gaseous bubble oscillations in anisotropic non-Newtonian fluids under influence of high-frequency acoustic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golykh, R. N.

    2016-06-01

    Progress of technology and medicine dictates the ever-increasing requirements (heat resistance, corrosion resistance, strength properties, impregnating ability, etc.) for non-Newtonian fluids and materials produced on their basis (epoxy resin, coating materials, liquid crystals, etc.). Materials with improved properties obtaining is possible by modification of their physicochemical structure. One of the most promising approaches to the restructuring of non-Newtonian fluids is cavitation generated by high-frequency acoustic vibrations. The efficiency of cavitation in non-Newtonian fluid is determined by dynamics of gaseous bubble. Today, bubble dynamics in isotropic non-Newtonian fluids, in which cavitation bubble shape remains spherical, is most full investigated, because the problem reduces to ordinary differential equation for spherical bubble radius. However, gaseous bubble in anisotropic fluids which are most wide kind of non-Newtonian fluids (due to orientation of macromolecules) deviates from spherical shape due to viscosity dependence on shear rate direction. Therefore, the paper presents the mathematical model of gaseous bubble dynamics in anisotropic non-Newtonian fluids. The model is based on general equations for anisotropic non-Newtonian fluid flow. The equations are solved by asymptotic decomposition of fluid flow parameters. It allowed evaluating bubble size and shape evolution depending on rheological properties of liquid and acoustic field characteristics.

  14. Acoustic radiation from a fluid-filled, subsurface vascular tube with internal turbulent flow due to a constriction

    PubMed Central

    Yazicioglu, Yigit; Royston, Thomas J.; Spohnholtz, Todd; Martin, Bryn; Loth, Francis; Bassiouny, Hisham S.

    2006-01-01

    The vibration of a thin-walled cylindrical, compliant viscoelastic tube with internal turbulent flow due to an axisymmetric constriction is studied theoretically and experimentally. Vibration of the tube is considered with internal fluid coupling only, and with coupling to internal-flowing fluid and external stagnant fluid or external tissue-like viscoelastic material. The theoretical analysis includes the adaptation of a model for turbulence in the internal fluid and its vibratory excitation of and interaction with the tube wall and surrounding viscoelastic medium. Analytical predictions are compared with experimental measurements conducted on a flow model system using laser Doppler vibrometry to measure tube vibration and the vibration of the surrounding viscoelastic medium. Fluid pressure within the tube was measured with miniature hydrophones. Discrepancies between theory and experiment, as well as the coupled nature of the fluid–structure interaction, are described. This study is relevant to and may lead to further insight into the patency and mechanisms of vascular failure, as well as diagnostic techniques utilizing noninvasive acoustic measurements. PMID:16158674

  15. Distributed Acoustic Sensing Technology in a Magmatic Geothermal Field - First Results From a Survey in Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinsch, Thomas; Jousset, Philippe; Henninges, Jan; Blanck, Hanna

    2016-04-01

    Seismic methods are particularly suited for investigating the Earth's subsurface. Compared to surface-measurements , wellbore measurements can be used to acquire more detailed information about rock properties and possible fluid pathways within a geothermal reservoir. For high temperature geothermal wells, however, ambient temperatures are often far above the operating temperature range of conventional geophones. One way to overcome this limitation is the application of fiber optic sensor systems, where only the passive optical fiber is subjected to downhole conditions. Their applicability is thus determined by the operating temperature range of the optical fiber. Choosing appropriate fibers, such sensor systems can be operated at temperatures far above 200°C. Along an optical fiber, the distributed acoustic sensing technology (DAS) can be used to acquire acoustic signals with a high spatial and temporal resolution. Previous experiments have shown that the DAS technology is well suited for active seismic measurements. Within the framework of the EC funded project IMAGE, a fiber optic cable was deployed in a newly drilled geothermal well (RN-34) within the Reykjanes geothermal field, Iceland. Additionally, a >15 km fiber optic cable, already available at the surface, was connected to a DAS read-out unit. Acoustic data was acquired continuously for 9 days. Hammer shots were performed at the wellhead as well as along the surface cable in order to locate individual acoustic traces and calibrate the spatial distribution of the acoustic information. During the monitoring period both signals from on- and offshore explosive sources and natural seismic events could be recorded. We compare the fiber optic data to conventional seismic records from a dense seismic network deployed on the Reykjanes in the course of the IMAGE project. Here, first results from the seismic survey will be presented.

  16. Near-field/far-field array manifold of an acoustic vector-sensor near a reflecting boundary.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yue Ivan; Lau, Siu-Kit; Wong, Kainam Thomas

    2016-06-01

    The acoustic vector-sensor (a.k.a. the vector hydrophone) is a practical and versatile sound-measurement device, with applications in-room, open-air, or underwater. It consists of three identical uni-axial velocity-sensors in orthogonal orientations, plus a pressure-sensor-all in spatial collocation. Its far-field array manifold [Nehorai and Paldi (1994). IEEE Trans. Signal Process. 42, 2481-2491; Hawkes and Nehorai (2000). IEEE Trans. Signal Process. 48, 2981-2993] has been introduced into the technical field of signal processing about 2 decades ago, and many direction-finding algorithms have since been developed for this acoustic vector-sensor. The above array manifold is subsequently generalized for outside the far field in Wu, Wong, and Lau [(2010). IEEE Trans. Signal Process. 58, 3946-3951], but only if no reflection-boundary is to lie near the acoustic vector-sensor. As for the near-boundary array manifold for the general case of an emitter in the geometric near field, the far field, or anywhere in between-this paper derives and presents that array manifold in terms of signal-processing mathematics. Also derived here is the corresponding Cramér-Rao bound for azimuth-elevation-distance localization of an incident emitter, with the reflected wave shown to play a critical role on account of its constructive or destructive summation with the line-of-sight wave. The implications on source localization are explored, especially with respect to measurement model mismatch in maximum-likelihood direction finding and with regard to the spatial resolution between coexisting emitters. PMID:27369140

  17. Classification of underwater targets from autonomous underwater vehicle sampled bistatic acoustic scattered fields.

    PubMed

    Fischell, Erin M; Schmidt, Henrik

    2015-12-01

    One of the long term goals of autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) minehunting is to have multiple inexpensive AUVs in a harbor autonomously classify hazards. Existing acoustic methods for target classification using AUV-based sensing, such as sidescan and synthetic aperture sonar, require an expensive payload on each outfitted vehicle and post-processing and/or image interpretation. A vehicle payload and machine learning classification methodology using bistatic angle dependence of target scattering amplitudes between a fixed acoustic source and target has been developed for onboard, fully autonomous classification with lower cost-per-vehicle. To achieve the high-quality, densely sampled three-dimensional (3D) bistatic scattering data required by this research, vehicle sampling behaviors and an acoustic payload for precision timed data acquisition with a 16 element nose array were demonstrated. 3D bistatic scattered field data were collected by an AUV around spherical and cylindrical targets insonified by a 7-9 kHz fixed source. The collected data were compared to simulated scattering models. Classification and confidence estimation were shown for the sphere versus cylinder case on the resulting real and simulated bistatic amplitude data. The final models were used for classification of simulated targets in real time in the LAMSS MOOS-IvP simulation package [M. Benjamin, H. Schmidt, P. Newman, and J. Leonard, J. Field Rob. 27, 834-875 (2010)]. PMID:26723332

  18. Two Years of Industrial Experience in the Use of a Small, Direct Field Acoustic Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saggini, Nicola; Di Pietro, Vincenzo; Poulain, Nicolas; Herzog, Philippe

    2012-07-01

    Within Thales Alenia Space - Italy small satellite Assembly Integration and Test (AIT) plant, the need to develop a suitable facility for spacecraft acoustic noise test has arisen, with additional constraints posed by the necessity of a low impact on the existing building layout, low cost of procurement and operations, while maintaining a high reliability of the system for a theoretical maximum throughput of one test per week over an extended period of time, e.g. six months. The needs have been answered by developing a small (~40 m3 test volume), direct field (DF A T) acoustic test chamber, christened “Alpha Cabin”, where noise generation is achieved by means of commercial audio drivers equipped with custom enclosures. The paper starts with a brief presentation of the main characteristics of the system, but then concentrates on the lessons learnt and return of experience from the tests conducted in more than two years of continuous use. Starting from test article structural responses and their comparison with reverberant chambers, properties of the acoustic field and their implications on the former are analyzed.

  19. Power method for calculating the far acoustic field of the helicopter lift rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samokhin, V. F.

    2011-05-01

    A semiempirical method for calculating the far acoustic field of the lift rotor of a helicopter operating in the regime of oblique flow over it is described. The basic parametric relations for the acoustic radiation power of rotor noise components have been obtained on the basis of the Lamb idea that vortex-free motion arises under the action of a periodic force on an infinitely small volume of the medium. All sources of lift rotor noise are subdivided into two groups pertaining, respectively, to the inductive and profile parts of the total power supplied to the rotor. A comparison has been made between the results of calculation of the harmonic components of lift rotor noise made on the basis of the power method and the experimental data for the Mi-28 helicopter.

  20. On an acoustic field generated by subsonic jet at low Reynolds numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamamoto, K.; Arndt, R. E. A.

    1978-01-01

    An acoustic field generated by subsonic jets at low Reynolds numbers was investigated. This work is motivated by the need to increase the fundamental understanding of the jet noise generation mechanism which is essential to the development of further advanced techniques of noise suppression. The scope of this study consists of two major investigation. One is a study of large scale coherent structure in the jet turbulence, and the other is a study of the Reynolds number dependence of jet noise. With this in mind, extensive flow and acoustic measurements in low Reynolds number turbulent jets (8,930 less than or equal to M less than or equal to 220,000) were undertaken using miniature nozzles of the same configuration but different diameters at various exist Mach numbers (0.2 less than or equal to M less than or equal to 0.9).

  1. Dynamics of a Coagulating Polydisperse Gas Suspension in the Nonlinear Wave Field of an Acoustic Resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tukmakov, A. L.

    2015-01-01

    A model of a multivelocity multitemperature polydisperse gas suspension has been constructed with account taken of coagulation. Calculations of the dynamics of an aerosol of a polydisperse composition in an acoustic resonator have been done and the derived regularities have been described. A system of Navier-Stokes equations for a compressible heat-conducting gas was used to describe the motion of a carrier medium. The dynamics of dispersed fractions is described by a system of equations including continuity, momentum, and internal-energy equations. The equations of motion of the carrier medium and dispersed fractions have been written with account of the interphase exchange of momentum and energy. The Lagrangian model has been used to describe the process of coagulation. The change in the dispersity of the gas suspension in the nonlinear field of an acoustic resonator has been analyzed.

  2. Experimental research of the Multi-frequency Acoustic Backscatter System using the field sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, wenxiang

    2014-05-01

    The measurements of suspended sediment concentration and particle size profiles are very important to the engineering and environmental applications, especially in the estuarine and coastal areas. In recent years acoustic method has obtained increasing acceptance by many researchers. The theory of this method for measuring them is based on the acoustic backscattering and attenuation properties of the sediment in suspension. The Multi-frequency Acoustic Backscatter System (MABS), which has four acoustic sensors with different frequencies, can be measuring the profiles in the shallow water environment (no more than 10 meters). The experiments were conducted for AQUAscat1000 (MABS) (Made in UK) by the 'test tower' (φ600mm by 1500mm) in Laboratory. The frequency of the acoustic transducer is 0.5MHz, 1MHz, 2MHz and 4MHz, respectively. Two different places sediment were obtained from the Yangtze estuary. The average particle size is about 15μm and 115μm, respectively. Suspended sediment concentration in the 'test tower' was relatively constant during each phase of the sampling. The experimental procedures were as follows: (1) obtaining the background value of the instrument system; (2) add the field sediment to the tower according to the weight and allowing the mixture to homogenize; (3) obtaining water samples in different depths from the 'test tower'; (4) analyzing the water samples. These preliminary results show that (1) the MABS sensors are estimated from a complex function, depending on the receiving information (Voltage), measured at range, the speed of sound in water and the attenuation of sound by water, the sediment density and radius, and backscattering property of the sediment; (2) the appropriate calibration and regression approaches should be selected so as to obtain the reliable results of suspended sediment concentration(**R2 >0.7) and particle size(**R2 >0.5) measurements; (3) the MABS could be applied in the relative fine sediment condition, and

  3. Imaging of transient surface acoustic waves by full-field photorefractive interferometry.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Jichuan; Xu, Xiaodong; Glorieux, Christ; Matsuda, Osamu; Cheng, Liping

    2015-05-01

    A stroboscopic full-field imaging technique based on photorefractive interferometry for the visualization of rapidly changing surface displacement fields by using of a standard charge-coupled device (CCD) camera is presented. The photorefractive buildup of the space charge field during and after probe laser pulses is simulated numerically. The resulting anisotropic diffraction upon the refractive index grating and the interference between the polarization-rotated diffracted reference beam and the transmitted signal beam are modeled theoretically. The method is experimentally demonstrated by full-field imaging of the propagation of photoacoustically generated surface acoustic waves with a temporal resolution of nanoseconds. The surface acoustic wave propagation in a 23 mm × 17 mm area on an aluminum plate was visualized with 520 × 696 pixels of the CCD sensor, yielding a spatial resolution of 33 μm. The short pulse duration (8 ns) of the probe laser yields the capability of imaging SAWs with frequencies up to 60 MHz. PMID:26026514

  4. Acoustic network event classification using swarm optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burman, Jerry

    2013-05-01

    Classifying acoustic signals detected by distributed sensor networks is a difficult problem due to the wide variations that can occur in the transmission of terrestrial, subterranean, seismic and aerial events. An acoustic event classifier was developed that uses particle swarm optimization to perform a flexible time correlation of a sensed acoustic signature to reference data. In order to mitigate the effects from interference such as multipath, the classifier fuses signatures from multiple sensors to form a composite sensed acoustic signature and then automatically matches the composite signature with reference data. The approach can classify all types of acoustic events but is particularly well suited to explosive events such as gun shots, mortar blasts and improvised explosive devices that produce an acoustic signature having a shock wave component that is aperiodic and non-linear. The classifier was applied to field data and yielded excellent results in terms of reconstructing degraded acoustic signatures from multiple sensors and in classifying disparate acoustic events.

  5. Range-dependent flexibility in the acoustic field of view of echolocating porpoises (Phocoena phocoena)

    PubMed Central

    Wisniewska, Danuta M; Ratcliffe, John M; Beedholm, Kristian; Christensen, Christian B; Johnson, Mark; Koblitz, Jens C; Wahlberg, Magnus; Madsen, Peter T

    2015-01-01

    Toothed whales use sonar to detect, locate, and track prey. They adjust emitted sound intensity, auditory sensitivity and click rate to target range, and terminate prey pursuits with high-repetition-rate, low-intensity buzzes. However, their narrow acoustic field of view (FOV) is considered stable throughout target approach, which could facilitate prey escape at close-range. Here, we show that, like some bats, harbour porpoises can broaden their biosonar beam during the terminal phase of attack but, unlike bats, maintain the ability to change beamwidth within this phase. Based on video, MRI, and acoustic-tag recordings, we propose this flexibility is modulated by the melon and implemented to accommodate dynamic spatial relationships with prey and acoustic complexity of surroundings. Despite independent evolution and different means of sound generation and transmission, whales and bats adaptively change their FOV, suggesting that beamwidth flexibility has been an important driver in the evolution of echolocation for prey tracking. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05651.001 PMID:25793440

  6. Drop dynamics in space and interference with acoustic field (M-15)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamanaka, Tatsuo

    1993-01-01

    The objective of the experiment is to study contactless positioning of liquid drops, excitation of capillary waves on the surface of acoustically levitated liquid drops, and deformation of liquid drops by means of acoustic radiation pressure. Contactless positioning technologies are very important in space materials processing because the melt is processed without contacting the wall of a crucible which can easily contaminate the melt specifically for high melting temperatures and chemically reactive materials. Among the contactless positioning technologies, an acoustic technology is especially important for materials unsusceptible to electromagnetic fields such as glasses and ceramics. The shape of a levitated liquid drop in the weightless condition is determined by its surface tension and the internal and external pressure distribution. If the surface temperature is constant and there exist neither internal nor external pressure perturbations, the levitated liquid drop forms a shape of perfect sphere. If temperature gradients on the surface and internal or external pressure perturbations exist, the liquid drop forms various modes of shapes with proper vibrations. A rotating liquid drop was specifically studied not only as a classical problem of theoretical mechanics to describe the shapes of the planets of the solar system, as well as their arrangement, but it is also more a contemporary problem of modern non-linear mechanics. In the experiment, we are expecting to observe various shapes of a liquid drop such as cocoon, tri-lobed, tetropod, multi-lobed, and doughnut.

  7. The effects of external acoustic pressure fields on a free-running supercavitating projectile.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Peter J K; Rogers, Peter H; Doane, John W

    2010-12-01

    Proliferation of supercavitating torpedoes has motivated research on countermeasures against them as well as on the fluid phenomenon which makes them possible. The goal of this research was to investigate an envisaged countermeasure, an acoustic field capable of slowing or diverting the weapon by disrupting the cavitation envelope. The research focused on the interactions between high pressure amplitude sound waves and a supercavity produced by a small free-flying projectile. The flight dynamics and cavity geometry measurements were compared to control experiments and theoretical considerations were made for evaluating the effects. Corrugations on the cavity/water interface caused by the pressure signal have been observed and characterized. Results also show that the accuracy of a supercavitating projectile can be adversely affected by the sound signal. This research concludes with results that indicate that it is acoustic cavitation in the medium surrounding the supercavity, caused by the high pressure amplitude sound, that is responsible for the reduced accuracy. A hypothesis has been presented addressing the means by which the acoustic cavitation could cause this effect. PMID:21218872

  8. Wave propagation characteristics of helically orthotropic cylindrical shells and resonance emergence in scattered acoustic field. Part 1. Formulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajabi, Majid

    2016-05-01

    The method of wave function expansion is adopted to study the three dimensional scattering of a plane progressive harmonic acoustic wave incident upon an arbitrarily thick-walled helically filament-wound composite cylindrical shell submerged in and filled with compressible ideal fluids. An approximate laminate model in the context of the so-called state-space formulation is employed for the construction of T-matrix solution to solve for the unknown modal scattering coefficients. Considering the nonaxisymmetric wave propagation phenomenon in anisotropic cylindrical components and following the resonance scattering theory which determines the resonance and background scattering fields, the stimulated resonance frequencies of the shell are isolated and classified due to their fundamental mode of excitation, overtone and style of propagation along the cylindrical axis (i.e., clockwise or anticlockwise propagation around the shell) and are identified as the helically circumnavigating waves.

  9. Acoustic emission and magnification of atomic lines resolution for laser breakdown of salt water in ultrasound field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulanov, Alexey V.; Nagorny, Ivan G.

    2015-10-01

    Researches of the acoustic effects accompanying optical breakdown in a water, generated by the focused laser radiation with power ultrasound have been carried out. Experiments were performed by using 532 nm pulses from Brilliant B Nd:YAG laser. Acoustic radiation was produced by acoustic focusing systems in the form hemisphere and ring by various resonance frequencies of 10.7 kHz and 60 kHz. The experimental results are obtained, that show the sharply strengthens effects of acoustic emission from a breakdown zone by the joint influence of a laser and ultrasonic irradiation. Essentially various thresholds of breakdown and character of acoustic emission in fresh and sea water are found out. The experimental result is established, testifying that acoustic emission of optical breakdown of sea water at presence and at absence of ultrasound essentially exceeds acoustic emission in fresh water. Atomic lines of some chemical elements like a Sodium, Magnesium and so on were investigated for laser breakdown of water with ultrasound field. The effect of magnification of this lines resolution for salt water in ultrasound field was obtained.

  10. Acoustic emission and magnification of atomic lines resolution for laser breakdown of salt water in ultrasound field

    SciTech Connect

    Bulanov, Alexey V.; Nagorny, Ivan G.

    2015-10-28

    Researches of the acoustic effects accompanying optical breakdown in a water, generated by the focused laser radiation with power ultrasound have been carried out. Experiments were performed by using 532 nm pulses from Brilliant B Nd:YAG laser. Acoustic radiation was produced by acoustic focusing systems in the form hemisphere and ring by various resonance frequencies of 10.7 kHz and 60 kHz. The experimental results are obtained, that show the sharply strengthens effects of acoustic emission from a breakdown zone by the joint influence of a laser and ultrasonic irradiation. Essentially various thresholds of breakdown and character of acoustic emission in fresh and sea water are found out. The experimental result is established, testifying that acoustic emission of optical breakdown of sea water at presence and at absence of ultrasound essentially exceeds acoustic emission in fresh water. Atomic lines of some chemical elements like a Sodium, Magnesium and so on were investigated for laser breakdown of water with ultrasound field. The effect of magnification of this lines resolution for salt water in ultrasound field was obtained.

  11. Insight into morphology changes of nanoparticle laden droplets in acoustic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Saptarshi; Tijerino, Erick; Kumar, Ranganathan

    2013-04-01

    Hollow structures with unique morphologies form due to particle agglomeration in acoustically levitated nanofluid functional droplets when subjected to external heating. The final diameter of the structure depends only on the ratio of agglomeration to evaporation time scales for various nanoparticle laden droplets, and not on the type of the suspended particles. These time scales depend only on nanoparticle concentration. This valuable information may be exploited to form microstructures with desired properties from ceramic compounds. Phase diagrams for alumina and silica droplets indicate the transition from a bowl to ring structure depending on concentration.

  12. Preliminary study of the effect of the turbulent flow field around complex surfaces on their acoustic characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, W. A.; Boldman, D.

    1978-01-01

    Fairly extensive measurements have been conducted of the turbulent flow around various surfaces as a basis for a study of the acoustic characteristics involved. In the experiments the flow from a nozzle was directed upon various two-dimensional surface configurations such as the three-flap model. A turbulent flow field description is given and an estimate of the acoustic characteristics is provided. The developed equations are based upon fundamental theories for simple configurations having simple flows. Qualitative estimates are obtained regarding the radiation pattern and the velocity power law. The effect of geometry and turbulent flow distribution on the acoustic emission from simple configurations are discussed.

  13. Acoustic field in a thermoacoustic Stirling engine having a looped tube and resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, Yuki; Biwa, Tetsushi; Mizutani, Uichiro; Yazaki, Taichi

    2002-12-01

    S. Backhaus and G. W. Swift [Nature 399, 335(1999)] have built a prototype thermoacoustic Stirling engine based on traveling wave energy conversions, and demonstrated that its efficiency reached above 40% of the Carnot efficiency. We experimentally investigate an acoustic field in the engine through simultaneous measurements of velocity U and pressure P. By focusing on the phase lead Φ of U relative to P in its regenerator, we find that the engine can achieve such a high efficiency by the negative Φ about -20° rather than a traveling wave phase (Φ=0).

  14. Far-field hover acoustic characteristics of the XV-15 tiltrotor aircraft with Advanced Technology Blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conner, David A.; Wellman, Brent

    1991-05-01

    An experimental investigation has been conducted with the XV-15 tilt-rotor VTOL aircraft in order to ascertain the noise-reduction efficacy of Advanced Technology Blades (ATBs). Attention is given to acoustic directivity characteristics in the lower hemisphere of the sound field. Modest overall sound pressure levels (OASPLs) were measured near the in-plane position, showing that thickness noise is not significant in hover when ATBs are used; rotor tip-speed reductions reduced the average OASPL by nearly 8 dB in-plane and by nearly 5 dB at 12.6 deg below the rotor plane.

  15. Acoustic field characterization of the Duolith: measurements and modeling of a clinical shock wave therapy device.

    PubMed

    Perez, Camilo; Chen, Hong; Matula, Thomas J; Karzova, Maria; Khokhlova, Vera A

    2013-08-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) uses acoustic pulses to treat certain musculoskeletal disorders. In this paper the acoustic field of a clinical portable ESWT device (Duolith SD1) was characterized. Field mapping was performed in water for two different standoffs of the electromagnetic head (15 or 30 mm) using a fiber optic probe hydrophone. Peak positive pressures at the focus ranged from 2 to 45 MPa, while peak negative pressures ranged from -2 to -11 MPa. Pulse rise times ranged from 8 to 500 ns; shock formation did not occur for any machine settings. The maximum standard deviation in peak pressure at the focus was 1.2%, indicating that the Duolith SD1 generates stable pulses. The results compare qualitatively, but not quantitatively with manufacturer specifications. Simulations were carried out for the short standoff by matching a Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya-Kuznetzov equation to the measured field at a plane near the source, and then propagating the wave outward. The results of modeling agree well with experimental data. The model was used to analyze the spatial structure of the peak pressures. Predictions from the model suggest that a true shock wave could be obtained in water if the initial pressure output of the device were doubled. PMID:23927207

  16. Acoustic field characterization of the Duolith: Measurements and modeling of a clinical shock wave therapy device

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Camilo; Chen, Hong; Matula, Thomas J.; Karzova, Maria; Khokhlova, Vera A.

    2013-01-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) uses acoustic pulses to treat certain musculoskeletal disorders. In this paper the acoustic field of a clinical portable ESWT device (Duolith SD1) was characterized. Field mapping was performed in water for two different standoffs of the electromagnetic head (15 or 30 mm) using a fiber optic probe hydrophone. Peak positive pressures at the focus ranged from 2 to 45 MPa, while peak negative pressures ranged from −2 to −11 MPa. Pulse rise times ranged from 8 to 500 ns; shock formation did not occur for any machine settings. The maximum standard deviation in peak pressure at the focus was 1.2%, indicating that the Duolith SD1 generates stable pulses. The results compare qualitatively, but not quantitatively with manufacturer specifications. Simulations were carried out for the short standoff by matching a Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya-Kuznetzov equation to the measured field at a plane near the source, and then propagating the wave outward. The results of modeling agree well with experimental data. The model was used to analyze the spatial structure of the peak pressures. Predictions from the model suggest that a true shock wave could be obtained in water if the initial pressure output of the device were doubled. PMID:23927207

  17. Far-Field Acoustic Characteristics of Multiple Blade-Vane Configurations for a High Tip Speed Fan, Supplement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodward, Richard P.

    2004-01-01

    The contents of this CD-ROM include: 1) Aero Data; 2) Data Documents (Daily Acoustic Data Logs, Test Documentation, Test Photos); 3) EPNL Data (All Core Tones Removed, All Core Tones Removed and Various Bypass Tones, Core BPF Tone Removed, Core Tones Present); 4) Far-Field Acoustic Data, 5) High Speed Fan Reports; 6) Sound Power Levels (As-Measured PWL, Lossless PWL).

  18. Dust acoustic shock wave in electronegative dusty plasma: Roles of weak magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Samiran; Ehsan, Z.; Murtaza, G.

    2008-02-15

    The effects of nonsteady dust charge variations and weak magnetic field on small but finite amplitude nonlinear dust acoustic wave in electronegative dusty plasma are investigated. The dynamics of the nonlinear wave are governed by a Korteweg-de Vries Burger equation that possesses dispersive shock wave. The weak magnetic field is responsible for the dispersive term, whereas nonsteady dust charge variation is responsible for dissipative term, i.e., the Burger term. The coefficient of dissipative term depends only on the obliqueness of the magnetic field. It is found that for parallel propagation the dynamics of the nonlinear wave are governed by the Burger equation that possesses monotonic shock wave. The relevances of the findings to cometary dusty plasma, e.g., Comet Halley are briefly discussed.

  19. Canonical Acoustics and Its Application to Surface Acoustic Wave on Acoustic Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jian Qi

    2016-08-01

    In a conventional formalism of acoustics, acoustic pressure p and velocity field u are used for characterizing acoustic waves propagating inside elastic/acoustic materials. We shall treat some fundamental problems relevant to acoustic wave propagation alternatively by using canonical acoustics (a more concise and compact formalism of acoustic dynamics), in which an acoustic scalar potential and an acoustic vector potential (Φ ,V), instead of the conventional acoustic field quantities such as acoustic pressure and velocity field (p,u) for characterizing acoustic waves, have been defined as the fundamental variables. The canonical formalism of the acoustic energy-momentum tensor is derived in terms of the acoustic potentials. Both the acoustic Hamiltonian density and the acoustic Lagrangian density have been defined, and based on this formulation, the acoustic wave quantization in a fluid is also developed. Such a formalism of acoustic potentials is employed to the problem of negative-mass-density assisted surface acoustic wave that is a highly localized surface bound state (an eigenstate of the acoustic wave equations). Since such a surface acoustic wave can be strongly confined to an interface between an acoustic metamaterial (e.g., fluid-solid composite structures with a negative dynamical mass density) and an ordinary material (with a positive mass density), it will give rise to an effect of acoustic field enhancement on the acoustic interface, and would have potential applications in acoustic device design for acoustic wave control.

  20. Vibro-Acoustic Response of Buildings Due to Sonic Boom Exposure: June 2006 Field Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klos, Jacob; Buehrle, Ralph D.

    2007-01-01

    During the month of June 2006, a series of structural response measurements were made on a house on Edwards Air Force Base (AFB) property that was excited by sonic booms of various amplitudes. Many NASA personnel other than the authors of this report from both Langley Research Center and Dryden Flight Research Center participated in the planning, coordination, execution, and data reduction for the experiment documented in this report. The purpose of this report is to document the measurements that were made, the structure on which they were made, the conditions under which they were made, the sensors and other hardware that were used, and the data that were collected.

  1. The acoustic field of singing humpback whales in the vertical plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Au, Whitlow W. L.; Pack, Adam A.; Lammers, Marc O.; Herman, Louis; Andrews, Kimberly; Deakos, Mark

    2003-04-01

    A vertical array of five hydrophones was used to measure the acoustic field of singing humpback whales. Once a singer was located, two swimmers with snorkel gear were deployed to determine the orientation of the whale and to position the boat so that the array could be deployed in front of the whale at a minimum standoff distance of 10 m. The spacing of the hydrophones was 7 m with the deepest hydrophone deployed at depth of 35 m. An 8-channel TASCAM recorder having a bandwidth of 24 kHz was used to record the hydrophone signals. The location of the singer was determined by computing the time of arrival differences between the hydrophone signals. The maximum source level varied between individual units in a song, with values between 180 and 190 dB. The acoustic field determined by considering the relative intensity of higher frequency harmonics in the signals indicate that the sounds are projected in the horizontal direction with the singer's head canted downward 45 to 60°. High-frequency harmonics extended beyond 24 kHz, suggesting that humpback whales may have an upper frequency limit of hearing as high as 24 kHz.

  2. Comparison between experimental and computational methods for the acoustic and thermal characterization of therapeutic ultrasound fields.

    PubMed

    Maruvada, Subha; Liu, Yunbo; Soneson, Joshua E; Herman, Bruce A; Harris, Gerald R

    2015-04-01

    For high intensity therapeutic ultrasound (HITU) devices, pre-clinical testing can include measurement of power, pressure/intensity and temperature distribution, acoustic and thermal simulations, and assessment of targeting accuracy and treatment monitoring. Relevant International Electrotechnical Commission documents recently have been published. However, technical challenges remain because of the often focused, large amplitude pressure fields encountered. Measurement and modeling issues include using hydrophones and radiation force balances at HITU power levels, validation of simulation models, and tissue-mimicking material (TMM) development for temperature measurements. To better understand these issues, a comparison study was undertaken between simulations and measurements of the HITU acoustic field distribution in water and TMM and temperature rise in TMM. For the specific conditions of this study, the following results were obtained. In water, the simulated values for p+ and p- were 3% lower and 10% higher, respectively, than those measured by hydrophone. In TMM, the simulated values for p+ and p- were 2% and 10% higher than those measured by hydrophone, respectively. The simulated spatial-peak temporal-average intensity values in water and TMM were greater than those obtained by hydrophone by 3%. Simulated and measured end-of-sonication temperatures agreed to within their respective uncertainties (coefficients of variation of approximately 20% and 10%, respectively). PMID:25920823

  3. Translational motion of two interacting bubbles in a strong acoustic field.

    PubMed

    Doinikov, A A

    2001-08-01

    Using the Lagrangian formalism, equations of radial and translational motions of two coupled spherical gas bubbles have been derived up to terms of third order in the inverse distance between the bubbles. The equations of radial pulsations were then modified, for the purpose of allowing for effects of liquid compressibility, using Keller-Miksis' approach, and the equations of translation were added by viscous forces in the form of the Levich drag. This model was then used in a numerical investigation of the translational motion of two small, driven well below resonance, bubbles in strong acoustic fields with pressure amplitudes exceeding 1 bar. It has been found that, if the forcing is strong enough, the bubbles form a bound pair with a steady spacing rather than collide and coalesce, as classical Bjerknes theory predicts. Moreover, the viscous forces cause skewness in the system, which results in self-propulsion of the bubble pair. The latter travels as a unit along the center line in a direction that is determined by the ratio of the initial bubble radii. The results obtained are of immediate interest for understanding and modeling collective bubble phenomena in strong fields, such as acoustic cavitation streamers. PMID:11497693

  4. Coupling between plate vibration and acoustic radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frendi, Abdelkader; Maestrello, Lucio; Bayliss, Alvin

    1992-01-01

    A detailed numerical investigation of the coupling between the vibration of a flexible plate and the acoustic radiation is performed. The nonlinear Euler equations are used to describe the acoustic fluid while the nonlinear plate equation is used to describe the plate vibration. Linear, nonlinear, and quasi-periodic or chaotic vibrations and the resultant acoustic radiation are analyzed. We find that for the linear plate response, acoustic coupling is negligible. However, for the nonlinear and chaotic responses, acoustic coupling has a significant effect on the vibration level as the loading increases. The radiated pressure from a plate undergoing nonlinear or chaotic vibrations is found to propagate nonlinearly into the far-field. However, the nonlinearity due to wave propagation is much weaker than that due to the plate vibrations. As the acoustic wave propagates into the far-field, the relative difference in level between the fundamental and its harmonics and subharmonics decreases with distance.

  5. Quantitative measurement of ultrasound pressure field by optical phase contrast method and acoustic holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyama, Seiji; Yasuda, Jun; Hanayama, Hiroki; Yoshizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2016-07-01

    A fast and accurate measurement of an ultrasound field with various exposure sequences is necessary to ensure the efficacy and safety of various ultrasound applications in medicine. The most common method used to measure an ultrasound pressure field, that is, hydrophone scanning, requires a long scanning time and potentially disturbs the field. This may limit the efficiency of developing applications of ultrasound. In this study, an optical phase contrast method enabling fast and noninterfering measurements is proposed. In this method, the modulated phase of light caused by the focused ultrasound pressure field is measured. Then, a computed tomography (CT) algorithm used to quantitatively reconstruct a three-dimensional (3D) pressure field is applied. For a high-intensity focused ultrasound field, a new approach that combines the optical phase contrast method and acoustic holography was attempted. First, the optical measurement of focused ultrasound was rapidly performed over the field near a transducer. Second, the nonlinear propagation of the measured ultrasound was simulated. The result of the new approach agreed well with that of the measurement using a hydrophone and was improved from that of the phase contrast method alone with phase unwrapping.

  6. Helicopter far-field acoustic levels as a function of reduced rotor speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Arnold W.; Lemasurier, Philip; Smith, Charles D.

    1990-01-01

    This paper will present far-field measured noise levels relative to tests conducted with a model S-76A helicopter. The project was designed to provide supplemental experimental flight data which may be used to further study reduced helicopter rotor speeds (and thus, advancing blade-tip Mach number) effects on far-field acoustic levels. The aircraft was flown in straight and level flight while operating with both the rotor speed and flight speed as test variables. The rotor speed was varied over the range of 107 percent of the main-rotor speed (NR) to 90 percent NR and with the forward flight speed varied over the range of 155 to 35 knots indicated air speed. These conditions produced a wide range of advancing blade-tip Mach numbers to which the noise data are related.

  7. Acoustic experience shapes alternative mating tactics and reproductive investment in male field crickets.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Nathan W; Gray, Brian; Zuk, Marlene

    2010-05-11

    Developmental plasticity allows juvenile animals to assess environmental cues and adaptively shape behavioral and morphological traits to maximize fitness in their adult environment. Sexual signals are particularly conspicuous cues, making them likely candidates for mediating such responses. Plasticity in male reproductive traits is a common phenomenon, but empirical evidence for signal-mediated plasticity in males is lacking. We tested whether experience of acoustic sexual signals during juvenile stages influences the development of three adult traits in the continuously breeding field cricket Teleogryllus oceanicus: male mating tactics, reproductive investment, and condition. All three traits were affected by juvenile acoustic experience. Males of this species produce a long-range calling song to attract receptive females, but they can also behave as satellites by parasitizing other males' calls. Males reared in an environment mimicking a population with many calling males were less likely to exhibit satellite behavior, invested more in reproductive tissues, and attained higher condition than males reared in a silent environment. These results contrast with other studies and demonstrate how the effects of juvenile social experience on adult male morphology, reproductive investment, and behavior may subsequently influence sexual selection and phenotypic evolution. PMID:20417103

  8. Near-field acoustic microbead trapping as remote anchor for single particle manipulation

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Jae Youn; Cheon, Dong Young; Shin, Hyunjune; Kim, Hyun Bin; Lee, Jungwoo

    2015-05-04

    We recently proposed an analytical model of a two-dimensional acoustic trapping of polystyrene beads in the ray acoustics regime, where a bead diameter is larger than the wavelength used. As its experimental validation, this paper demonstrates the transverse (or lateral) trapping of individual polystyrene beads in the near field of focused ultrasound. A 100 μm bead is immobilized on the central beam axis by a focused sound beam from a 30 MHz single element lithium niobate transducer, after being laterally displaced through hundreds of micrometers. Maximum displacement, a longest lateral distance at which a trapped bead can be directed towards the central axis, is thus measured over a discrete frequency range from 24 MHz to 36 MHz. The displacement data are found to be between 323.7 μm and 470.2 μm, depending on the transducer's driving frequency and input voltage amplitude. The experimental results are compared with their corresponding model values, and their relative errors lie between 0.9% and 3.9%. The results suggest that this remote maneuvering technique may be employed to manipulate individual cells through solid microbeads, provoking certain cellular reactions to localized mechanical disturbance without direct contact.

  9. Efficient modeling of flat and homogeneous acoustic treatments for vibroacoustic finite element analysis. Direct field formulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alimonti, L.; Atalla, N.

    2016-04-01

    This paper is concerned with the development of a simplified model for noise control treatments to speed up finite element analysis in vibroacoustic applications. The methodology relies on the assumption that the acoustic treatment is flat and homogeneous. Moreover, its finite lateral extent is neglected. This hypothesis is justified by short wavelength and large dissipation, which suggest that the reflected field emanating from the acoustic treatment lateral boundaries does not substantially affect its dynamic response. Under these circumstances, the response of the noise control treatment can be formally obtained by means of convolution integrals involving simple analytical kernels (i.e. Green functions). Such fundamental solutions can be computed efficiently by the transfer matrix method. However, some arbitrariness arises in the formulation of the mathematical model, resulting in different baffling conditions at the two ends of the treatment to be considered. Thus, the paper investigates the possibility of different formulations (i.e. baffling conditions) within the same hybrid finite element-transfer matrix framework, seeking for the best strategy in terms of tradeoff between efficiency and accuracy. Numerical examples are provided to show strengths and limitations of the proposed methodology.

  10. Resonant coupling of ionization waves and acoustic gravity waves in the presence of a magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eun, H.; Gross, S. H.

    1976-01-01

    The nature of the two resonant directions that occur for a single frequency in the presence of a magnetic field is demonstrated, along with the manner in which the resonances change with the dip angle and the angle of propagation from the meridian plane. The conditions under which acoustic branch resonances may occur are outlined. It is found that the calculated frequencies and directions for resonance are in the range of observed values for TID's obtained from ground and satellite measurements. This result is indicative of a possible connection between TID's and the resonance phenomenon. It is shown that a strong resonance type of response may be possible in the F region at a particular frequency from a region that can be as great as 100 km in altitude.

  11. Novel Transfer Method Using Near-Field Acoustic Levitation and Its Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, Ryuto; Aoyagi, Manabu; Tamura, Hideki; Takano, Takehiro

    2011-07-01

    The holding of a levitated object above stator vibrators by utilizing the holding force, which is generated by near-field acoustic levitation, is possible. The holding force yields at the edge of a vibration plate and nodes of a bending vibration mode, and it is in proportion to the vibration amplitude of the vibration plate. In this paper, we describe methods of transfer and positioning of a levitated object above many aligned stator vibrators, some experimental results, and the proposition of the application as a noncontact-stepping ultrasonic motor (NCS-USM). Linear-type and rotary-type NCS-USMs can be flexibly constructed. The NCS-USM has a possibility of high torque performance compared with an ordinary noncontact USM using a traveling wave.

  12. Visualized measurement of the acoustic levitation field based on digital holography with phase multiplication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Puchao; Li, Enpu; Zhao, Jianlin; Di, Jianglei; Zhou, Wangmin; Wang, Hao; Zhang, Ruifeng

    2009-11-01

    By using digital holographic interferometory with phase multiplication, the visualized measurement of the acoustic levitation field (ALF) with single axis is carried out. The digital holograms of the ALF under different conditions are recorded by use of CCD. The corresponding digital holographic interferograms reflecting the sound pressure distribution and the interference phase distribution are obtained by numerical reconstruction and phase subtraction, which are consistent with the theoretical results. It indicates that the proposed digital holographic interferometory with phase multiplication can successfully double the fringe number of the interference phase patterns of the ALF and improve the measurement precision. Compared with the conventional optical holographic interferometory, digital holographic interferometory has the merits of quasi real-time, more exactitude and convenient operation, and it provides an effective way for studying the sound pressure distribution of the ALF.

  13. The acoustic field in the ionosphere caused by an underground nuclear explosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnov, V. M.; Drobzheva, Ya. V.

    2005-07-01

    The problem of describing the generation and propagation of an infrasonic wave emitted by a finite extended source in the inhomogeneous absorbing atmosphere is the focus of this paper. It is of interest since the role of infrasonic waves in the energy balance of the upper atmosphere remains largely unknown. We present an algorithm, which allows adaptation of a point source model for calculating the infrasonic field from an underground nuclear explosion at ionospheric altitudes. Our calculations appear to agree remarkably well with HF Doppler sounding data measured for underground nuclear explosions at the Semipalatinsk Test Site. We show that the temperature and ionospheric electron density perturbation caused by an acoustic wave from underground nuclear explosion can reach 10% of background levels.

  14. On the horizontal wobbling of an object levitated by near-field acoustic levitation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Cheol-Ho; Ih, Jeong-Guon

    2007-11-01

    A circular planar object can be levitated with several hundreds of microns by ultrasonic near-field acoustic levitation (NFAL). However, when both the sound source and the levitated object are circularly shaped and the center of the levitated object does not coincide with the source center, instability problem often occurs. When this happens, it becomes difficult to pick up or transport the object for the next process. In this study, when the center of the levitated object was offset from the source center, the moving direction of the levitated object was predicted by using the time averaged potential around the levitated object. The wobbling frequency of the levitated object was calculated by analyzing the nonlinear wobbling motion of the object. It was shown that the predicted wobbling frequencies agreed with measured ones well. Finally, a safe zone was suggested to avoid the unstable movement of an object. PMID:17590402

  15. Modeling and experimental study on near-field acoustic levitation by flexural mode.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pinkuan; Li, Jin; Ding, Han; Cao, Wenwu

    2009-12-01

    Near-field acoustic levitation (NFAL) has been used in noncontact handling and transportation of small objects to avoid contamination. We have performed a theoretical analysis based on nonuniform vibrating surface to quantify the levitation force produced by the air film and also conducted experimental tests to verify our model. Modal analysis was performed using ANSYS on the flexural plate radiator to obtain its natural frequency of desired mode, which is used to design the measurement system. Then, the levitation force was calculated as a function of levitation distance based on squeeze gas film theory using measured amplitude and phase distributions on the vibrator surface. Compared with previous fluid-structural analyses using a uniform piston motion, our model based on the nonuniform radiating surface of the vibrator is more realistic and fits better with experimentally measured levitation force. PMID:20040404

  16. Near and Far Field Acoustic Pressure Skewness in a Heated Supersonic Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutmark, Ephraim; Mora, Pablo; Kastner, Jeff; Heeb, Nick; Kailasanath, Kailas; Liu, Junhui; University of Cincinnati Collaboration; Naval Research Laboratory Collaboration

    2012-11-01

    The dominant component of turbulent mixing noise in high speed jets is the Mach wave radiation generated by large turbulent structures in the shear layer The Over-All Sound Pressure Level (OASPL) in the far field peaks in a direction near the Mach wave angle. ``Crackle'' is another important component of high speed jet noise. Crackle cannot be recognized in the spectrum of the acoustic pressure signal, but it appears in the temporal waveform of the pressure as sharply rising peaks. Skewness levels of the pressure and dP/dt have been used as a measure of crackle in high specific thrust engines and rockets. In this paper, we focus on recognizing a technique that identifies the impact of different test conditions on the near-field and far-field statistics of the pressure and dP/dt signals of a supersonic jet with a design Mach number of Md=1.5 produced by a C-D conical nozzle. Cold and hot jets, T0=300K and 600K, are tested at over, design, and under-expanded conditions, with NPRs=2.5, 3.671, 4.5, respectively. Second, Third and Forth order statistics are examined in the near and far fields. Rms, skewness and kurtosis intensity levels and propagation are better identified in the dP/dt than in the pressure signal. Statistics of the dP/dt demonstrate to be a better measure for crackle. Project funded by ONR grant.

  17. Expansions for infinite or finite plane circular time-reversal mirrors and acoustic curtains for wave-field-synthesis.

    PubMed

    Mellow, Tim; Kärkkäinen, Leo

    2014-03-01

    An acoustic curtain is an array of microphones used for recording sound which is subsequently reproduced through an array of loudspeakers in which each loudspeaker reproduces the signal from its corresponding microphone. Here the sound originates from a point source on the axis of symmetry of the circular array. The Kirchhoff-Helmholtz integral for a plane circular curtain is solved analytically as fast-converging expansions, assuming an ideal continuous array, to speed up computations and provide insight. By reversing the time sequence of the recording (or reversing the direction of propagation of the incident wave so that the point source becomes an "ideal" point sink), the curtain becomes a time reversal mirror and the analytical solution for this is given simultaneously. In the case of an infinite planar array, it is demonstrated that either a monopole or dipole curtain will reproduce the diverging sound field of the point source on the far side. However, although the real part of the sound field of the infinite time-reversal mirror is reproduced, the imaginary part is an approximation due to the missing singularity. It is shown that the approximation may be improved by using the appropriate combination of monopole and dipole sources in the mirror. PMID:24606267

  18. Chromospheric heating by acoustic shock waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Stuart D.

    1993-01-01

    Work by Anderson & Athay (1989) suggests that the mechanical energy required to heat the quiet solar chromosphere might be due to the dissipation of weak acoustic shocks. The calculations reported here demonstrate that a simple picture of chromospheric shock heating by acoustic waves propagating upward through a model solar atmosphere, free of both magnetic fields and local inhomogeneities, cannot reproduce their chromospheric model. The primary reason is the tendency for vertically propagating acoustic waves in the range of allowed periods to dissipate too low in the atmosphere, providing insufficient residual energy for the middle chromosphere. The effect of diverging magnetic fields and the corresponding expanding acoustic wavefronts on the mechanical dissipation length is then discussed as a means of preserving a quasi-acoustic heating hypothesis. It is argued that this effect, in a canopy that overlies the low chromosphere, might preserve the acoustic shock hypothesis consistent with the chromospheric radiation losses computed by Anderson & Athay.

  19. Effects of Classroom Acoustics on Performance and Well-Being in Elementary School Children: A Field Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klatte, Maria; Hellbruck, Jurgen; Seidel, Jochen; Leistner, Philip

    2010-01-01

    Children are more impaired than adults by unfavorable listening conditions such as reverberation and noise. Nevertheless, the acoustical conditions in classrooms often do not fit the specific needs of young listeners. This field study aimed to analyze the effects of classroom reverberation on children's performance and well-being at school.…

  20. A study of stone fragmentation in shock wave lithotripsy by customizing the acoustic field and waveform shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitnis, Parag Vijay

    Shock wave lithotripsy is the preferred treatment modality for kidney stones in the United States. Despite clinical use for over twenty-five years, the mechanisms of stone fragmentation are still under debate. A piezoelectric array was employed to examine the effect of waveform shape and pressure distribution on stone fragmentation in lithotripsy. The array consisted of 170 elements placed on the inner surface of a 15 cm-radius spherical cap. Each element was driven independently using a 170 individual pulsers, each capable of generating 1.2 kV. The acoustic field was characterized using a fiber optic probe hydrophone with a bandwidth of 30 MHz and a spatial resolution of 100 mum. When all elements were driven simultaneously, the focal waveform was a shock wave with peak pressures p+ = 65 +/- 3 MPa and p- = -16 +/- 2 MPa and the -6 dB focal region was 13 mm long and 2 mm wide. The delay for each element was the only control parameter for customizing the acoustic field and waveform shape, which was done with the aim of investigating the hypothesized mechanisms of stone fragmentation such as spallation, shear, squeezing, and cavitation. The acoustic field customization was achieved by employing the angular spectrum approach for modeling the forward wave propagation and regression of least square errors to determine the optimal set of delays. Results from the acoustic field customization routine and its implications on stone fragmentation will be discussed.

  1. A stochastic response surface formulation for the description of acoustic propagation through an uncertain internal wave field.

    PubMed

    Gerdes, Frank; Finette, Steven

    2012-10-01

    A modeling and simulation study is performed in a littoral ocean waveguide subject to uncertainty in four quantities: source depth, tidal forcing, initial thermocline structure, and sediment sound speed. In this partially known shelf-break environment, tidal forcing over a density-stratified water column produces internal tides and solitary wave packets. The resulting uncertainty in the space-time oceanographic field is mapped into the sound speed distribution which, in turn, introduces uncertainty into the acoustic wave field. The latter is treated as a stochastic field whose intensity is described by a polynomial chaos expansion. The expansion coefficients are estimated through constrained multivariate linear regression, and an analysis of the chaos coefficients provides insight into the relative contribution of the uncertain acoustic and oceanographic quantities. Histograms of acoustic intensity are estimated and compared to a reference solution obtained through Latin Hypercube sampling. A sensitivity analysis is performed to illustrate the relative importance of the four contributions of incomplete information about the environment. The simulation methodology represents an end-to-end analysis approach including both oceanographic and acoustic field uncertainty where the latter is quantified using stochastic basis expansions in the form of a polynomial chaos representation. PMID:23039422

  2. Acoustic characterization of high intensity focused ultrasound fields: A combined measurement and modeling approach

    PubMed Central

    Canney, Michael S.; Bailey, Michael R.; Crum, Lawrence A.; Khokhlova, Vera A.; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.

    2008-01-01

    Acoustic characterization of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) fields is important both for the accurate prediction of ultrasound induced bioeffects in tissues and for the development of regulatory standards for clinical HIFU devices. In this paper, a method to determine HIFU field parameters at and around the focus is proposed. Nonlinear pressure waveforms were measured and modeled in water and in a tissue-mimicking gel phantom for a 2 MHz transducer with an aperture and focal length of 4.4 cm. Measurements were performed with a fiber optic probe hydrophone at intensity levels up to 24 000 W∕cm2. The inputs to a Khokhlov–Zabolotskaya–Kuznetsov-type numerical model were determined based on experimental low amplitude beam plots. Strongly asymmetric waveforms with peak positive pressures up to 80 MPa and peak negative pressures up to 15 MPa were obtained both numerically and experimentally. Numerical simulations and experimental measurements agreed well; however, when steep shocks were present in the waveform at focal intensity levels higher than 6000 W∕cm2, lower values of the peak positive pressure were observed in the measured waveforms. This underrepresentation was attributed mainly to the limited hydrophone bandwidth of 100 MHz. It is shown that a combination of measurements and modeling is necessary to enable accurate characterization of HIFU fields. PMID:19062878

  3. Analytical solution based on the wavenumber integration method for the acoustic field in a Pekeris waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen-Yu, Luo; Xiao-Lin, Yu; Xue-Feng, Yang; Ren-He, Zhang

    2016-04-01

    An exact solution based on the wavenumber integration method is proposed and implemented in a numerical model for the acoustic field in a Pekeris waveguide excited by either a point source in cylindrical geometry or a line source in plane geometry. Besides, an unconditionally stable numerical solution is also presented, which entirely resolves the stability problem in previous methods. Generally the branch line integral contributes to the total field only at short ranges, and hence is usually ignored in traditional normal mode models. However, for the special case where a mode lies near the branch cut, the branch line integral can contribute to the total field significantly at all ranges. The wavenumber integration method is well-suited for such problems. Numerical results are also provided, which show that the present model can serve as a benchmark for sound propagation in a Pekeris waveguide. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11125420), the Knowledge Innovation Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, the China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (Grant No. 2014M561882), and the Doctoral Fund of Shandong Province, China (Grant No. BS2012HZ015).

  4. Low intensity dust ion-acoustic shock waves due to dust charge fluctuation in a nonextensive dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Alinejad, H.; Shahmansory, M.

    2012-08-15

    The properties of low intensity dust ion acoustic shock waves are studied in a charge varying dusty plasma with nonextensive electrons. Owing to the departure from the Maxwellian electron distribution to a nonextensive one, the modified electrostatic charging of a spherical dust particle in plasma with ion streaming speed is considered. Based on the weakly nonlinear analysis, a new relationship between the low intensity localized disturbances and nonextensive electrons is derived. It is found that both strength and steepness of shock structures arise as the electrons evolve far from their thermodynamic equilibrium in such plasma with parameter ranges corresponding to Saturn's rings. It is also shown that the ion temperature and population of electrons reduce the possibility of the formation of the shock profile.

  5. Acoustic black holes: massless scalar field analytic solutions and analogue Hawking radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, H. S.; Bezerra, V. B.

    2016-07-01

    We obtain the analytic solutions of the radial part of the massless Klein-Gordon equation in the spacetime of both three dimensional rotating and four dimensional canonical acoustic black holes, which are given in terms of the confluent Heun functions. From these solutions, we obtain the scalar waves near the acoustic horizon. We discuss the analogue Hawking radiation of massless scalar particles and the features of the spectrum associated with the radiation emitted by these acoustic black holes.

  6. Violin f-hole contribution to far-field radiation via patch near-field acoustical holography.

    PubMed

    Bissinger, George; Williams, Earl G; Valdivia, Nicolas

    2007-06-01

    The violin radiates either from dual ports (f-holes) or via surface motion of the corpus (top+ribs+back), with no clear delineation between these sources. Combining "patch" near-field acoustical holography over just the f-hole region of a violin with far-field radiativity measurements over a sphere, it was possible to separate f-hole from surface motion contributions to the total radiation of the corpus below 2.6 kHz. A0, the Helmholtz-like lowest cavity resonance, radiated essentially entirely through the f-holes as expected while A1, the first longitudinal cavity mode with a node at the f-holes, had no significant f-hole radiation. The observed A1 radiation comes from an indirect radiation mechanism, induced corpus motion approximately mirroring the cavity pressure profile seen for violinlike bowed string instruments across a wide range of sizes. The first estimates of the fraction of radiation from the f-holes F(f) indicate that some low frequency corpus modes thought to radiate only via surface motion (notably the first corpus bending modes) had significant radiation through the f-holes, in agreement with net volume changes estimated from experimental modal analysis. F(f) generally trended lower with increasing frequency, following corpus mobility decreases. The f-hole directivity (top/back radiativity ratio) was generally higher than whole-violin directivity. PMID:17552736

  7. A Review of Large Solid Rocket Motor Free Field Acoustics, Part I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilkey, Debbie; Kenny, Robert Jeremy

    2011-01-01

    At the ATK facility in Utah, large full scale solid rocket motors are tested. The largest is a five segment version of the Reusable Solid Rocket Motor, which is for use on future launch vehicles. Since 2006, Acoustic measurements have been taken on large solid rocket motors at ATK. Both the four segment RSRM and the five segment RSRMV have been instrumented. Measurements are used to update acoustic prediction models and to correlate against vibration responses of the motor. Presentation focuses on two major sections: Part I) Unique challenges associated with measuring rocket acoustics Part II) Acoustic measurements summary over past five years

  8. Improved algorithms and methods for room sound-field prediction by acoustical radiosity in arbitrary polyhedral rooms.

    PubMed

    Nosal, Eva-Marie; Hodgson, Murray; Ashdown, Ian

    2004-08-01

    This paper explores acoustical (or time-dependent) radiosity--a geometrical-acoustics sound-field prediction method that assumes diffuse surface reflection. The literature of acoustical radiosity is briefly reviewed and the advantages and disadvantages of the method are discussed. A discrete form of the integral equation that results from meshing the enclosure boundaries into patches is presented and used in a discrete-time algorithm. Furthermore, an averaging technique is used to reduce computational requirements. To generalize to nonrectangular rooms, a spherical-triangle method is proposed as a means of evaluating the integrals over solid angles that appear in the discrete form of the integral equation. The evaluation of form factors, which also appear in the numerical solution, is discussed for rectangular and nonrectangular rooms. This algorithm and associated methods are validated by comparison of the steady-state predictions for a spherical enclosure to analytical solutions. PMID:15376663

  9. Improved algorithms and methods for room sound-field prediction by acoustical radiosity in arbitrary polyhedral rooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nosal, Eva-Marie; Hodgson, Murray; Ashdown, Ian

    2004-08-01

    This paper explores acoustical (or time-dependent) radiosity-a geometrical-acoustics sound-field prediction method that assumes diffuse surface reflection. The literature of acoustical radiosity is briefly reviewed and the advantages and disadvantages of the method are discussed. A discrete form of the integral equation that results from meshing the enclosure boundaries into patches is presented and used in a discrete-time algorithm. Furthermore, an averaging technique is used to reduce computational requirements. To generalize to nonrectangular rooms, a spherical-triangle method is proposed as a means of evaluating the integrals over solid angles that appear in the discrete form of the integral equation. The evaluation of form factors, which also appear in the numerical solution, is discussed for rectangular and nonrectangular rooms. This algorithm and associated methods are validated by comparison of the steady-state predictions for a spherical enclosure to analytical solutions.

  10. Helicopter main-rotor speed effects on far-field acoustic levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Arnold W.; Childress, Otis S.; Hardesty, Mark

    1987-01-01

    The design of a helicopter is based on an understanding of many parameters and their interactions. For example, in the design stage of a helicopter, the weight, engine, and rotor speed must be considered along with the rotor geometry when considering helicopter operations. However, the relationship between the noise radiated from the helicopter and these parameters is not well understood, with only limited model and full-scale test data to study. In general, these data have shown that reduced rotor speeds result in reduced far-field noise levels. This paper reviews the status of a recent helicopter noise research project designed to provide experimental flight data to be used to better understand helicopter rotor-speed effects on far-field acoustic levels. Preliminary results are presented relative to tests conducted with a McDonnell Douglas model 500E helicopter operating with the rotor speed as the control variable over the range of 103% of the main-rotor speed (NR) to 75% NR, and with the forward speed maintained at a constant value of 80 knots.

  11. Near-field acoustic holography using sparse regularization and compressive sampling principles.

    PubMed

    Chardon, Gilles; Daudet, Laurent; Peillot, Antoine; Ollivier, François; Bertin, Nancy; Gribonval, Rémi

    2012-09-01

    Regularization of the inverse problem is a complex issue when using near-field acoustic holography (NAH) techniques to identify the vibrating sources. This paper shows that, for convex homogeneous plates with arbitrary boundary conditions, alternative regularization schemes can be developed based on the sparsity of the normal velocity of the plate in a well-designed basis, i.e., the possibility to approximate it as a weighted sum of few elementary basis functions. In particular, these techniques can handle discontinuities of the velocity field at the boundaries, which can be problematic with standard techniques. This comes at the cost of a higher computational complexity to solve the associated optimization problem, though it remains easily tractable with out-of-the-box software. Furthermore, this sparsity framework allows us to take advantage of the concept of compressive sampling; under some conditions on the sampling process (here, the design of a random array, which can be numerically and experimentally validated), it is possible to reconstruct the sparse signals with significantly less measurements (i.e., microphones) than classically required. After introducing the different concepts, this paper presents numerical and experimental results of NAH with two plate geometries, and compares the advantages and limitations of these sparsity-based techniques over standard Tikhonov regularization. PMID:22978881

  12. Acoustic holography as a metrological tool for characterizing medical ultrasound sources and fields

    PubMed Central

    Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.; Tsysar, Sergey A.; Khokhlova, Vera A.; Kreider, Wayne

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic holography is a powerful technique for characterizing ultrasound sources and the fields they radiate, with the ability to quantify source vibrations and reduce the number of required measurements. These capabilities are increasingly appealing for meeting measurement standards in medical ultrasound; however, associated uncertainties have not been investigated systematically. Here errors associated with holographic representations of a linear, continuous-wave ultrasound field are studied. To facilitate the analysis, error metrics are defined explicitly, and a detailed description of a holography formulation based on the Rayleigh integral is provided. Errors are evaluated both for simulations of a typical therapeutic ultrasound source and for physical experiments with three different ultrasound sources. Simulated experiments explore sampling errors introduced by the use of a finite number of measurements, geometric uncertainties in the actual positions of acquired measurements, and uncertainties in the properties of the propagation medium. Results demonstrate the theoretical feasibility of keeping errors less than about 1%. Typical errors in physical experiments were somewhat larger, on the order of a few percent; comparison with simulations provides specific guidelines for improving the experimental implementation to reduce these errors. Overall, results suggest that holography can be implemented successfully as a metrological tool with small, quantifiable errors. PMID:26428789

  13. Dynamics of kinetic geodesic-acoustic modes and the radial electric field in tokamak neoclassical plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, X. Q.; Belli, E.; Bodi, K.; Candy, J.; Chang, C. S.; Cohen, R. H.; Colella, P.; Dimits, A. M.; Dorr, M. R.; Gao, Z.; Hittinger, J. A.; Ko, S.; Krasheninnikov, S.; McKee, G. R.; Nevins, W. M.; Rognlien, T. D.; Snyder, P. B.; Suh, J.; Umansky, M. V.

    2009-06-01

    We present edge gyrokinetic simulations of tokamak plasmas using the fully non-linear (full-f) continuum code TEMPEST. A non-linear Boltzmann model is used for the electrons. The electric field is obtained by solving the 2D gyrokinetic Poisson equation. We demonstrate the following. (1) High harmonic resonances (n > 2) significantly enhance geodesic-acoustic mode (GAM) damping at high q (tokamak safety factor), and are necessary to explain the damping observed in our TEMPEST q-scans and consistent with the experimental measurements of the scaling of the GAM amplitude with edge q95 in the absence of obvious evidence that there is a strong q-dependence of the turbulent drive and damping of the GAM. (2) The kinetic GAM exists in the edge for steep density and temperature gradients in the form of outgoing waves, its radial scale is set by the ion temperature profile, and ion temperature inhomogeneity is necessary for GAM radial propagation. (3) The development of the neoclassical electric field evolves through different phases of relaxation, including GAMs, their radial propagation and their long-time collisional decay. (4) Natural consequences of orbits in the pedestal and scrape-off layer region in divertor geometry are substantial non-Maxwellian ion distributions and parallel flow characteristics qualitatively like those observed in experiments.

  14. Investigation of scaling characteristics for defining design environments due to transient ground winds and near-field, nonlinear acoustic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, C. C.

    1973-01-01

    In order to establish a foundation of scaling laws for the highly nonlinear waves associated with the launch vehicle, the basic knowledge of the relationships among the paramaters pertinent to the energy dissipation process associated with the propagation of nonlinear pressure waves in thermoviscous media is required. The problem of interest is to experimentally investigate the temporal and spacial velocity profiles of fluid flow in a 3-inch open-end pipe of various lengths, produced by the propagation of nonlinear pressure waves for various diaphragm burst pressures of a pressure wave generator. As a result, temporal and spacial characteristics of wave propagation for a parametric set of nonlinear pressure waves in the pipe containing air under atmospheric conditions were determined. Velocity measurements at five sections along the pipes of up to 210 ft. in length were made with hot-film anemometers for five pressure waves produced by a piston. The piston was derived with diaphragm burst pressures at 20, 40, 60, 80 and 100 psi in the driver chamber of the pressure wave generator.

  15. Towards the optimisation of acoustic fields for ablative therapies of tumours in the upper abdomen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gélat, P.; ter Haar, G.; Saffari, N.

    2013-08-01

    The efficacy of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) for the non-invasive treatment of cancer has been demonstrated for a range of different cancers including those of the liver, kidney, prostate and breast. As a non-invasive focused therapy, HIFU offers considerable advantages over other techniques such as chemotherapy and surgical resection, in terms of its non-invasiveness and low risk of harmful side effects. There is, however, a number of significant challenges which currently hinder its widespread clinical application. One of these challenges is the need to transmit sufficient energy through the ribcage to induce tissue necrosis at the required foci whilst minimising the formation of side lobes and sparing healthy tissue. Ribs both absorb and reflect ultrasound strongly. As such, a common side effect of focusing ultrasound in regions located behind the rib cage is the overheating of bone and surrounding tissue, which can lead to skin burns. Successful treatment of a patient with tumours in the upper abdomen therefore requires a thorough understanding of the way acoustic and thermal energy are deposited. This is likely to rely on a treatment planning procedure in which optimal source velocity distributions are obtained so as to maximise a dose quantity at the treatment sites, whilst ensuring that this quantity does not exceed a specified threshold at other field locations, particularly on the surface of the ribs. Previously, a boundary element approach based on a Generalised Minimal Residual (GMRES) implementation of the Burton-Miller formulation was developed to predict the field of a multi-element HIFU array scattered by human ribs, the topology of which was obtained from CT scan data [1]. This work describes the reformulation of the boundary element equations as a least-squares minimisation problem with non-linear constraints. The methodology was subsequently tested at an excitation frequency of 100 kHz on a spherical multi-element array in the presence

  16. A lateral field excited (yxl)88° LiTaO3 bulk acoustic wave sensor with interdigital electrodes.

    PubMed

    Ma, Tingfeng; Wang, Ji; Du, Jianke; Yuan, Lili; Qian, Zhenghua; Zhang, Zhitian; Zhang, Chao

    2013-03-01

    In this work, to improve the sensitivity of lateral field excited (LFE) sensors to changes of liquid conductivity, LFE bulk acoustic wave sensors with interdigital electrodes are investigated. LFE bulk acoustic wave on thickness-shear mode is excited successfully by interdigital electrodes on (yxl)88° LiTaO(3) and applied in liquid-phase sensor. The electric field direction of LFE (yxl)88° LiTaO(3) plates is determined. Based on this, several LFE bulk acoustic wave sensors with interdigital electrodes are designed and fabricated to increase the sensitivity of LiTaO(3) LFE sensors. The results show that the (yxl)88° LiTaO(3) LFE sensor with interdigital electrodes is 10.9 times and 2.1 times more sensitive to changes in liquid conductivity compared to traditional LFE devices with single gap circular electrodes and Archimedes spiral electrodes, respectively. The results are important for investigating high-sensitivity LFE bulk acoustic wave sensors by using LiTaO(3) crystal. PMID:23339996

  17. Numerical investigation of symmetry breaking and critical behavior of the acoustic streaming field in high-intensity discharge lamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, Bernd; Schwieger, Joerg; Wolff, Marcus; Manders, Freddy; Suijker, Jos

    2015-06-01

    For energy efficiency and material cost reduction it is preferred to drive high-intensity discharge lamps at frequencies of approximately 300 kHz. However, operating lamps at these high frequencies bears the risk of stimulating acoustic resonances inside the arc tube, which can result in low frequency light flicker and even lamp destruction. The acoustic streaming effect has been identified as the link between high frequency resonances and low frequency flicker. A highly coupled three-dimensional multiphysics model has been set up to calculate the acoustic streaming velocity field inside the arc tube of high-intensity discharge lamps. It has been found that the velocity field suffers a phase transition to an asymmetrical state at a critical acoustic streaming force. In certain respects the system behaves similar to a ferromagnet near the Curie point. It is discussed how the model allows to investigate the light flicker phenomenon. Concerning computer resources the procedure is considerably less demanding than a direct approach with a transient model.

  18. Relaxation of sound fields in rooms of diffusely reflecting boundaries and its application in acoustical radiosity simulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Honghu

    2006-04-01

    The acoustical radiosity method is a computationally expensive acoustical simulation algorithm that assumes an enclosure with ideal diffuse reflecting boundaries. Miles observed that for such an enclosure, the sound energy decay of every point on the boundaries will gradually converge to exponential manner with a uniform decay rate. Therefore, the ratio of radiosity between every pair of points on the boundaries will converge to a constant, and the radiosity across the boundaries will approach a fixed distribution during the sound decay process, where radiosity is defined as the acoustic power per unit area leaving (or being received by) a point on a boundary. We call this phenomenon the "relaxation" of the sound field. In this paper, we study the relaxation in rooms of different shapes with different boundary absorptions. Criteria based on the relaxation of the sound field are proposed to terminate the costly and unnecessary radiosity computation in the later phase, which can then be replaced by a fast regression step to speed up the acoustical radiosity simulation. PMID:16642833

  19. Near-field induction heating of metallic nanoparticles due to infrared magnetic dipole contribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapuis, Pierre-Olivier; Laroche, Marine; Volz, Sebastian; Greffet, Jean-Jacques

    2008-03-01

    We revisit the electromagnetic heat transfer between a metallic nanoparticle and a highly conductive metallic semi-infinite substrate, commonly studied using the electric dipole approximation. For infrared and microwave frequencies, we find that the magnetic polarizability of the particle is larger than the electric one. We also find that the local density of states in the near field is dominated by the magnetic contribution. As a consequence, the power absorbed by the particle in the near field is due to dissipation by fluctuating eddy currents. These results show that a number of near-field effects involving metallic particles should be affected by the fluctuating magnetic fields.

  20. Study on the radial vibration and acoustic field of an isotropic circular ring radiator.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shuyu; Xu, Long

    2012-01-01

    Based on the exact analytical theory, the radial vibration of an isotropic circular ring is studied and its electro-mechanical equivalent circuit is obtained. By means of the equivalent circuit model, the resonance frequency equation is derived; the relationship between the radial resonance frequency, the radial displacement amplitude magnification and the geometrical dimensions, the material property is analyzed. For comparison, numerical method is used to simulate the radial vibration of isotropic circular rings. The resonance frequency and the radial vibrational displacement distribution are obtained, and the radial radiation acoustic field of the circular ring in radial vibration is simulated. It is illustrated that the radial resonance frequencies from the analytical method and the numerical method are in good agreement when the height is much less than the radius. When the height becomes large relative to the radius, the frequency deviation from the two methods becomes large. The reason is that the exact analytical theory is limited to thin circular ring whose height must be much less than its radius. PMID:21802702

  1. Azimuthal cement evaluation with an acoustic phased-arc array transmitter: numerical simulations and field tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Che, Xiao-Hua; Qiao, Wen-Xiao; Ju, Xiao-Dong; Wang, Rui-Jia

    2016-03-01

    We developed a novel cement evaluation logging tool, named the azimuthally acoustic bond tool (AABT), which uses a phased-arc array transmitter with azimuthal detection capability. We combined numerical simulations and field tests to verify the AABT tool. The numerical simulation results showed that the radiation direction of the subarray corresponding to the maximum amplitude of the first arrival matches the azimuth of the channeling when it is behind the casing. With larger channeling size in the circumferential direction, the amplitude difference of the casing wave at different azimuths becomes more evident. The test results showed that the AABT can accurately locate the casing collars and evaluate the cement bond quality with azimuthal resolution at the casing—cement interface, and can visualize the size, depth, and azimuth of channeling. In the case of good casing—cement bonding, the AABT can further evaluate the cement bond quality at the cement—formation interface with azimuthal resolution by using the amplitude map and the velocity of the formation wave.

  2. Krylov subspace iterative methods for boundary element method based near-field acoustic holography.

    PubMed

    Valdivia, Nicolas; Williams, Earl G

    2005-02-01

    The reconstruction of the acoustic field for general surfaces is obtained from the solution of a matrix system that results from a boundary integral equation discretized using boundary element methods. The solution to the resultant matrix system is obtained using iterative regularization methods that counteract the effect of noise on the measurements. These methods will not require the calculation of the singular value decomposition, which can be expensive when the matrix system is considerably large. Krylov subspace methods are iterative methods that have the phenomena known as "semi-convergence," i.e., the optimal regularization solution is obtained after a few iterations. If the iteration is not stopped, the method converges to a solution that generally is totally corrupted by errors on the measurements. For these methods the number of iterations play the role of the regularization parameter. We will focus our attention to the study of the regularizing properties from the Krylov subspace methods like conjugate gradients, least squares QR and the recently proposed Hybrid method. A discussion and comparison of the available stopping rules will be included. A vibrating plate is considered as an example to validate our results. PMID:15759691

  3. Equations of spatial hydrodynamic interaction of weakly nonspherical gas bubbles in liquid in an acoustic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davletshin, A. I.; Khalitova, T. F.

    2016-01-01

    A mathematical model of spatial hydrodynamic interaction of gas bubbles in liquid in an acoustic field taking into account small deformations of their surfaces is proposed. It is a system of ordinary differential equations of the second order in radii of the bubbles, the position vectors of their centers and the amplitudes of deviation of their shape from the spherical one in the form of spherical harmonics. The equations derived are of the first order of accuracy in A / R and of the fourth order in R / D, where R is the characteristic radius of the bubbles, A is the amplitude of characteristic deviation of their surface from the spherical one in the form of spherical harmonics, D is the characteristic distance between bubbles. The derivation of the equations is carried out by the method of spherical functions with the use of the Bernoulli integral, the kinematic and dynamic boundary conditions on the surface of the bubbles. The effects of viscosity and compressibility of the liquid are considered approximately, the gas in the bubbles is assumed homobaric.

  4. Orbital revolution of a pair of bubbles in an acoustic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirota, Minori; Yamashita, Kou; Inamura, Takao

    2011-11-01

    This experimental study aims to clarify the mechanism of orbital motion of two oscillating bubbles in an acoustic field. Trajectory of the orbital motion was observed using a high-speed video camera. Because of a good repeatability in volume oscillation of bubbles, we were also able to observe the radial motion driven at 24 kHz by stroboscopic like imaging; the cyclic bubble oscillation was appeared to slow down by capturing images at the framing rate close to the forcing frequency. The orbital motions of bubbles raging from 0.13 to 0.18 mm were examined with different forcing amplitude and in different viscous oils. As a result, we found that pairs of bubbles revolve along a circular orbit around the center of mass of the orbiting two bubbles. We also found that the two bubbles perform anti-phase radial oscillation. Although this radial oscillation should result in a repulsive secondary Bjerknes force, the bubbles kept a constant separate distance of about 1 mm, which indicates the existence of centripetal primary Bjerknes force. The angular velocity of orbital revolution increases linearly with the increase in Bjerknes force.

  5. Scaling of plane-wave functions in statistically optimized near-field acoustic holography.

    PubMed

    Hald, Jørgen

    2014-11-01

    Statistically Optimized Near-field Acoustic Holography (SONAH) is a Patch Holography method, meaning that it can be applied in cases where the measurement area covers only part of the source surface. The method performs projections directly in the spatial domain, avoiding the use of spatial discrete Fourier transforms and the associated errors. First, an inverse problem is solved using regularization. For each calculation point a multiplication must then be performed with two transfer vectors--one to get the sound pressure and the other to get the particle velocity. Considering SONAH based on sound pressure measurements, existing derivations consider only pressure reconstruction when setting up the inverse problem, so the evanescent wave amplification associated with the calculation of particle velocity is not taken into account in the regularized solution of the inverse problem. The present paper introduces a scaling of the applied plane wave functions that takes the amplification into account, and it is shown that the previously published virtual source-plane retraction has almost the same effect. The effectiveness of the different solutions is verified through a set of simulated measurements. PMID:25373969

  6. A finite element propagation model for extracting normal incidence impedance in nonprogressive acoustic wave fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Willie R.; Jones, Michael G.; Tanner, Sharon E.; Parrott, Tony L.

    1995-01-01

    A propagation model method for extracting the normal incidence impedance of an acoustic material installed as a finite length segment in a wall of a duct carrying a nonprogressive wave field is presented. The method recasts the determination of the unknown impedance as the minimization of the normalized wall pressure error function. A finite element propagation model is combined with a coarse/fine grid impedance plane search technique to extract the impedance of the material. Results are presented for three different materials for which the impedance is known. For each material, the input data required for the prediction scheme was computed from modal theory and then contaminated by random error. The finite element method reproduces the known impedance of each material almost exactly for random errors typical of those found in many measurement environments. Thus, the method developed here provides a means for determining the impedance of materials in a nonprogressirve wave environment such as that usually encountered in a commercial aircraft engine and most laboratory settings.

  7. Improved source reconstruction in Fourier-based Near-field Acoustic Holography applied to small apertures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez Arteaga, I.; Scholte, R.; Nijmeijer, H.

    2012-10-01

    It is well known that Fourier-based Near-field Acoustic Holography fails to produce good source reconstructions when the aperture size of the microphone array is smaller than the source size. In this paper this problem is overcome by pre-conditioning the spatial hologram data using Linear Predictive Border Padding (LPBP) before it is Fourier-transformed to the wave-number domain. It is shown that LPBP allows for very small aperture sizes with a good reconstruction accuracy. An exhaustive analysis of LPBP is presented based on numerical experiments and measured data. The numerical experiments are performed on two different source types: modal patterns and point sources. These two types of sources represent the two limit situations that one can find in practice: modal patterns have a tonal spectrum in the spatial wave-number domain and are relatively easy to reconstruct accurately, while point sources have a broad-band wave-number spectrum which makes them very challenging to reconstruct. In order to illustrate the accuracy of the method in practice, results of measurements on a hard disk drive are presented as well. For a given distance to the source, the position and size of the hologram plane apertures is varied and the reconstructed source information is compared to the original source data. The reconstructed sources are compared both qualitatively and quantitatively. The results show that LPBP is an efficient and accurate extrapolation method, which leads to accurate reconstructions even for very small aperture sizes.

  8. Study on Transient Properties of Levitated Object in Near-Field Acoustic Levitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Bing; Chen, Chao; Zhao, Chun-Sheng

    2011-12-01

    A new approach to the study on the transient properties of the levitated object in near-field acoustic levitation (NFAL) is presented. In this article, the transient response characteristics, including the levitated height of an object with radius of 24 mm and thickness of 5 mm, the radial velocity and pressure difference of gas at the boundary of clearance between the levitated object and radiating surface (squeeze film), is calculated according to several velocity amplitudes of radiating surface. First, the basic equations in fluid areas on Arbitrary Lagrange—Euler (ALE) form are numerically solved by using streamline upwind petrov galerkin (SUPG) finite elements method. Second, the formed algebraic equations and solid control equations are solved by using synchronous alternating method to gain the transient messages of the levitated object and gas in the squeeze film. Through theoretical and numerical analyses, it is found that there is a oscillation time in the transient process and that the response time does not simply increase with the increasing of velocity amplitudes of radiating surface. More investigations in this paper are helpful for the understanding of the transient properties of levitated object in NFAL, which are in favor of enhancing stabilities and responsiveness of levitated object.

  9. Measurements of the force fields within an acoustic standing wave using holographic optical tweezers

    SciTech Connect

    Bassindale, P. G.; Drinkwater, B. W.; Phillips, D. B.; Barnes, A. C.

    2014-04-21

    Direct measurement of the forces experienced by micro-spheres in an acoustic standing wave device have been obtained using calibrated optical traps generated with holographic optical tweezers. A micro-sphere, which is optically trapped in three dimensions, can be moved through the acoustic device to measure forces acting upon it. When the micro-sphere is subjected to acoustic forces, it's equilibrium position is displaced to a position where the acoustic forces and optical forces are balanced. Once the optical trapping stiffness has been calibrated, observation of this displacement enables a direct measurement of the forces acting upon the micro-sphere. The measured forces are separated into a spatially oscillating component, attributed to the acoustic radiation force, and a constant force, attributed to fluid streaming. As the drive conditions of the acoustic device were varied, oscillating forces (>2.5 pN{sub pp}) and streaming forces (<0.2 pN) were measured. A 5 μm silica micro-sphere was used to characterise a 6.8 MHz standing wave, λ = 220 μm, to a spatial resolution limited by the uncertainty in the positioning of the micro-sphere (here to within 2 nm) and with a force resolution on the order of 10 fN. The results have application in the design and testing of acoustic manipulation devices.

  10. The optimization of acoustic fields for ablative therapies of tumours in the upper abdomen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gélat, P.; ter Haar, G.; Saffari, N.

    2012-12-01

    High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) enables highly localized, non-invasive tissue ablation and its efficacy has been demonstrated in the treatment of a range of cancers, including those of the kidney, prostate and breast. HIFU offers the ability to treat deep-seated tumours locally, and potentially bears fewer side effects than more invasive treatment modalities such as resection, chemotherapy and ionizing radiation. There remains however a number of significant challenges which currently hinder its widespread clinical application. One of these challenges is the need to transmit sufficient energy through the ribcage to ablate tissue at the required foci whilst minimizing the formation of side lobes and sparing healthy tissue. Ribs both absorb and reflect ultrasound strongly. This sometimes results in overheating of bone and overlying tissue during treatment, leading to skin burns. Successful treatment of a patient with tumours in the upper abdomen therefore requires a thorough understanding of the way acoustic and thermal energy is deposited. Previously, a boundary element approach based on a Generalized Minimal Residual (GMRES) implementation of the Burton-Miller formulation was developed to predict the field of a multi-element HIFU array scattered by human ribs, the topology of which was obtained from CT scan data (Gélat et al 2011 Phys. Med. Biol. 56 5553-81). The present paper describes the reformulation of the boundary element equations as a least-squares minimization problem with nonlinear constraints. The methodology has subsequently been tested at an excitation frequency of 1 MHz on a spherical multi-element array in the presence of ribs. A single array-rib geometry was investigated on which a 50% reduction in the maximum acoustic pressure magnitude on the surface of the ribs was achieved with only a 4% reduction in the peak focal pressure compared to the spherical focusing case. This method was then compared with a binarized apodization approach

  11. The optimization of acoustic fields for ablative therapies of tumours in the upper abdomen.

    PubMed

    Gélat, P; Ter Haar, G; Saffari, N

    2012-12-21

    High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) enables highly localized, non-invasive tissue ablation and its efficacy has been demonstrated in the treatment of a range of cancers, including those of the kidney, prostate and breast. HIFU offers the ability to treat deep-seated tumours locally, and potentially bears fewer side effects than more invasive treatment modalities such as resection, chemotherapy and ionizing radiation. There remains however a number of significant challenges which currently hinder its widespread clinical application. One of these challenges is the need to transmit sufficient energy through the ribcage to ablate tissue at the required foci whilst minimizing the formation of side lobes and sparing healthy tissue. Ribs both absorb and reflect ultrasound strongly. This sometimes results in overheating of bone and overlying tissue during treatment, leading to skin burns. Successful treatment of a patient with tumours in the upper abdomen therefore requires a thorough understanding of the way acoustic and thermal energy is deposited. Previously, a boundary element approach based on a Generalized Minimal Residual (GMRES) implementation of the Burton-Miller formulation was developed to predict the field of a multi-element HIFU array scattered by human ribs, the topology of which was obtained from CT scan data (Gélat et al 2011 Phys. Med. Biol. 56 5553-81). The present paper describes the reformulation of the boundary element equations as a least-squares minimization problem with nonlinear constraints. The methodology has subsequently been tested at an excitation frequency of 1 MHz on a spherical multi-element array in the presence of ribs. A single array-rib geometry was investigated on which a 50% reduction in the maximum acoustic pressure magnitude on the surface of the ribs was achieved with only a 4% reduction in the peak focal pressure compared to the spherical focusing case. This method was then compared with a binarized apodization approach

  12. Active control of acoustic field-of-view in a biosonar system.

    PubMed

    Yovel, Yossi; Falk, Ben; Moss, Cynthia F; Ulanovsky, Nachum

    2011-09-01

    Active-sensing systems abound in nature, but little is known about systematic strategies that are used by these systems to scan the environment. Here, we addressed this question by studying echolocating bats, animals that have the ability to point their biosonar beam to a confined region of space. We trained Egyptian fruit bats to land on a target, under conditions of varying levels of environmental complexity, and measured their echolocation and flight behavior. The bats modulated the intensity of their biosonar emissions, and the spatial region they sampled, in a task-dependant manner. We report here that Egyptian fruit bats selectively change the emission intensity and the angle between the beam axes of sequentially emitted clicks, according to the distance to the target, and depending on the level of environmental complexity. In so doing, they effectively adjusted the spatial sector sampled by a pair of clicks-the "field-of-view." We suggest that the exact point within the beam that is directed towards an object (e.g., the beam's peak, maximal slope, etc.) is influenced by three competing task demands: detection, localization, and angular scanning-where the third factor is modulated by field-of-view. Our results suggest that lingual echolocation (based on tongue clicks) is in fact much more sophisticated than previously believed. They also reveal a new parameter under active control in animal sonar-the angle between consecutive beams. Our findings suggest that acoustic scanning of space by mammals is highly flexible and modulated much more selectively than previously recognized. PMID:21931535

  13. Near-field co-seismic ionospheric response due to the northern Chile Mw 8.1 Pisagua earthquake on April 1, 2014 from GPS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, C. D.; Sunil, A. S.; González, G.; Shrivastava, Mahesh N.; Moreno, Marcos

    2015-11-01

    Large earthquakes can induce near and far-field ionospheric perturbations by direct/secondary acoustic and gravity waves through Lithosphere-Atmosphere-Ionosphere (LAI) coupling. We analyze co-seismic induced ionospheric TEC perturbations following the northern Chile Mw 8.1 Pisagua earthquake occurred on April 1, 2014. The continuous Global Positioning System (GPS) data at 15 sites from the Integrated Plate Boundary Observatory Chile (IPOC) and International GPS Service (IGS) GPS networks have been used in the present study. The nearest GPS site iqqe, ~98 km away from the epicenter, recorded the ionospheric disturbance 12 min after the event. The maximum co-seismic induced peak-to-peak TEC amplitude is ~1.25 TECU (1TECU=1016 electrons/m2), and the perturbations are confined to less than 1000 km radius around the epicenter. The observed horizontal velocity of TEC perturbations has been determined as ~1180 m/s. We could also discern the signatures of acoustic gravity waves (AGW) with velocity~650 m/s and frequency~2 mHz. The ionospheric signal components due to Rayleigh and/or Tsunami waves could not be observed. This contribution presents characteristics of near-field co-seismic ionospheric response due to the 2014 Pisagua earthquake.

  14. Plane waves at or near grazing incidence in the parabolic approximation. [acoustic equations of motion for sound fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcaninch, G. L.; Myers, M. K.

    1980-01-01

    The parabolic approximation for the acoustic equations of motion is applied to the study of the sound field generated by a plane wave at or near grazing incidence to a finite impedance boundary. It is shown how this approximation accounts for effects neglected in the usual plane wave reflection analysis which, at grazing incidence, erroneously predicts complete cancellation of the incident field by the reflected field. Examples are presented which illustrate that the solution obtained by the parabolic approximation contains several of the physical phenomena known to occur in wave propagation near an absorbing boundary.

  15. Confined acoustic phonon-mediated spin relaxation in a twodimensional quantum dot in the presence of perpendicular magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vardanyan, K. A.; Vartanian, A. L.; Stepanyan, A. G.; Kirakosyan, A. A.

    2015-10-01

    The spin-relaxation time due to the electron-acoustic phonon scattering in GaAs quantum dots is studied after the exact diagonalization of the electron Hamiltonian with the spin-orbit coupling. It has been shown that in comparison with flexural phonons, the electron coupling with the dilatational phonons causes 3 orders faster spin relaxation. We have found that the relaxation rate of the spin-flip is an order of magnitude smaller than that of the spin- conserving.

  16. Amplification of acoustic waves in armchair graphene nanoribbon in the presence of external electric and magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dompreh, K. A.; Mensah, S. Y.; Abukari, S. S.; Sam, F.; Mensah, N. G.

    2016-09-01

    Amplification of acoustic waves in Armchair Graphene Nanoribbon (AGNR) in the presence of an external electric and magnetic fields was studied using the Boltzmann's kinetic equation. The general expression for the amplification (Γ⊥ /Γ0) was obtained in the region ql ≫ 1 for the energy dispersion ε(p →) near the Fermi point. For various parameters of the quantized wave vector (β), the graphs of Γ⊥ /Γ0 against the electric field (Ex →), the acoustic wave-number (q →), the energy gap (Eg) and the dimensionless factor (Ωτ0) were numerically analyzed. The results showed a linear relation for Γ⊥ /Γ0 with Ex → but non-linear for q → and Ωτ0. The observed amplification can lead to SASER in Armchair Graphene Nanoribbon (AGNR).

  17. Prediction of the acoustic field in a three-dimensional rectangular duct using the boundary element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pates, Carl S., III

    1991-01-01

    A boundary element formulation, along with detailed solution procedure for determining the acoustic field inside a three-dimensional, rectangular duct is presented in this paper. The results of classical and boundary element solutions are compared for a typical rectangular duct by restricting the input frequency in such a way that only plane wave propagation is possible. The effect of changing the type and number of discrete boundary elements on the computed sound pressure levels inside the duct is also presented.

  18. ANALYSIS OF HIGH FIELD NON-LINEAR LOSSES ON SRF SURFACES DUE TO SPECIFIC TOPOGRAPHIC ROUGHNESS

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Xu,Charles Reece,Michael Kelley

    2012-07-01

    The high-field performance of SRF cavities will eventually be limited by the realization of fundamental material limits, whether it is Hc1 or Hsh, or some derivative thereof, at which the superconductivity is lost. Before reaching this fundamental field limit at the macro level, it must be encountered at localized, perhaps microscopic, sites of field enhancement due to local topography. If such sites are small enough, they may produce thermally stabilized normal-conducting regions which contribute non-linear losses when viewed from the macro resonant field perspective, and thus produce degradation in Q0. We have undertaken a calculation of local surface magnetic field enhancement from specific fine topographic structure by conformal mapping method and numerically. A solution of the resulting normal conducting volume has been derived and the corresponding RF Ohmic loss simulated.

  19. Deformation of a nearly hemispherical conducting drop due to an electric field: Theory and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corson, L. T.; Tsakonas, C.; Duffy, B. R.; Mottram, N. J.; Sage, I. C.; Brown, C. V.; Wilson, S. K.

    2014-12-01

    We consider, both theoretically and experimentally, the deformation due to an electric field of a pinned nearly hemispherical static sessile drop of an ionic fluid with a high conductivity resting on the lower substrate of a parallel-plate capacitor. Using both numerical and asymptotic approaches, we find solutions to the coupled electrostatic and augmented Young-Laplace equations which agree very well with the experimental results. Our asymptotic solution for the drop interface extends previous work in two ways, namely, to drops that have zero-field contact angles that are not exactly π/2 and to higher order in the applied electric field, and provides useful predictive equations for the changes in the height, contact angle, and pressure as functions of the zero-field contact angle, drop radius, surface tension, and applied electric field. The asymptotic solution requires some numerical computations, and so a surprisingly accurate approximate analytical asymptotic solution is also obtained.

  20. Modeling Long-Term Soil Losses on Agricultural Fields Due to Ephemeral Gully Erosion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It is now recognized worldwide that soil erosion on agricultural fields due to ephemeral gullies may be greater than those losses attributed to sheet and rill erosion processes. Yet it is not known whether the common practice of repairing or obliterating these gullies during annual tillage activitie...

  1. Circuit-field coupled finite element analysis method for an electromagnetic acoustic transducer under pulsed voltage excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Kuan-Sheng; Huang, Song-Ling; Zhao, Wei; Wang, Shen

    2011-06-01

    This paper presents an analytical method for electromagnetic acoustic transducers (EMATs) under voltage excitation and considers the non-uniform distribution of the biased magnetic field. A complete model of EMATs including the non-uniform biased magnetic field, a pulsed eddy current field and the acoustic field is built up. The pulsed voltage excitation is transformed to the frequency domain by fast Fourier transformation (FFT). In terms of the time harmonic field equations of the EMAT system, the impedances of the coils under different frequencies are calculated according to the circuit-field coupling method and Poynting's theorem. Then the currents under different frequencies are calculated according to Ohm's law and the pulsed current excitation is obtained by inverse fast Fourier transformation (IFFT). Lastly, the sequentially coupled finite element method (FEM) is used to calculate the Lorentz force in the EMATs under the current excitation. An actual EMAT with a two-layer two-bundle printed circuit board (PCB) coil, a rectangular permanent magnet and an aluminium specimen is analysed. The coil impedances and the pulsed current are calculated and compared with the experimental results. Their agreement verified the validity of the proposed method. Furthermore, the influences of lift-off distances and the non-uniform static magnetic field on the Lorentz force under pulsed voltage excitation are studied.

  2. Melt Motion Due to Peltier Marking During Bridgman Crystal Growth with an Axial Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellers, C. C.; Walker, John S.; Szofran, Frank R.; Motakef, Shariar

    2000-01-01

    This paper treats a liquid-metal flow inside an electrically insulating cylinder with electrically conducting solids above and below the liquid region. There is a uniform axial magnetic field, and there is an electric current through the liquid and both solids. Since the lower liquid-solid interface is concave into the solid and since the liquid is a better electrical conductor than the adjacent solid, the electric current is locally concentrated near the centerline. The return to a uniform current distribution involves a radial electric current which interacts with the axial magnetic field to drive an azimuthal flow. The axial variation of the centrifugal force due to the azimuthal velocity drives a meridional circulation with radial and axial velocities. This problem models the effects of Peltier marking during the vertical Bridgman growth of semiconductor crystals with an externally applied magnetic field, where the meridional circulation due to the Peltier Current may produce important mixing in the molten semiconductor.

  3. Surface potential at a ferroelectric grain due to asymmetric screening of depolarization fields

    SciTech Connect

    Genenko, Yuri A. Hirsch, Ofer; Erhart, Paul

    2014-03-14

    Nonlinear screening of electric depolarization fields, generated by a stripe domain structure in a ferroelectric grain of a polycrystalline material, is studied within a semiconductor model of ferroelectrics. It is shown that the maximum strength of local depolarization fields is rather determined by the electronic band gap than by the spontaneous polarization magnitude. Furthermore, field screening due to electronic band bending and due to presence of intrinsic defects leads to asymmetric space charge regions near the grain boundary, which produce an effective dipole layer at the surface of the grain. This results in the formation of a potential difference between the grain surface and its interior of the order of 1 V, which can be of either sign depending on defect transition levels and concentrations. Exemplary acceptor doping of BaTiO{sub 3} is shown to allow tuning of the said surface potential in the region between 0.1 and 1.3 V.

  4. A computer program for the determination of the acoustic pressure signature of helicopter rotors due to blade thickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mall, G. H.; Farassat, F.

    1976-01-01

    A computer program is presented for the determination of the thickness noise of helicopter rotors. The results were obtained in the form of an acoutic pressure time history. The parameters of the program are the rotor geometry and the helicopter motion descriptors, and the formulation employed is valid in the near and far fields. The blade planform must be rectangular, but the helicopter motion is arbitrary; the observer position is fixed with respect to the ground with a maximum elevation of 45 deg above or below the rotor plane. With these restrictions, the program can also be used for the calculation of thickness noise of propellers.

  5. Acoustic radiation from lifting airfoils in compressible subsonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atassi, Hafiz M.; Subramaniam, Shankar; Scott, James R.

    1990-01-01

    The far field acoustic radiation from a lifting airfoil in a three-dimensional gust is studied. The acoustic pressure is calculated using the Kirchhoff method, instead of using the classical acoustic analogy approach due to Lighthill. The pressure on the Kirchhoff surface is calculated using an existing numerical solution of the unsteady flow field. The far field acoustic pressure is calculated in terms of these values using Kirchhoff's formula. The method is validated against existing semi-analytical results for a flat plate. The method is then used to study the problem of an airfoil in a harmonic three-dimensional gust, for a wide range of Mach numbers. The effect of variation of the airfoil thickness and angle of attack on the acoustic far field is studied. The changes in the mechanism of sound generation and propagation due to the presence of steady loading and nonuniform mean flow are also studied.

  6. Acoustic radiation from lifting airfoils in compressible subsonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atassi, Hafiz M.; Subramaniam, Shankar; Scott, James R.

    1990-01-01

    The far field acoustic radiation from a lifting airfoil in a three-dimensional gust is studied. The acoustic pressure is calculated using the Kirchhoff method, instead of using the classical acoustic analogy approach due to Lighthill. The pressure on the Kirchhoff surface is calculated using an existing numerical solution of the unsteady flow field. The far field acoustic pressure is calculated in terms of these values using Kirchhoff's formula. The method is validated against existing semi-analytical results for a flat plate. The method is then used to study the problem of an airfoil in a harmonic three-dimensional gust, for a wide range of Mach numbers. The effect of variation of the airfoil thickness and angle of attack on the acoustic far field is studied. The changes in the mechanism of sound generation and propagation due to the presence of steady loading and non-uniform mean flow are also studied.

  7. Electric field variations due to resonance between ground velocity and ions motion in the Earth's magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsushima, M.; Honkura, Y.; Kuriki, M.; Ogawa, Y.

    2011-12-01

    We have so far observed clear electric field variations coincident with the passage of seismic waves. Circular polarization of electric field is the distinguishing feature in this phenomenon which can be interpreted in terms of the so-called seismic dynamo effect proposed by Honkura et al. (2009). That is, circularly polarized electric field is caused by resonance-like motion of ion in groundwater under the Earth's magnetic field. Therefore, left-handed and right-handed circular polarizations, if seen towards the direction of the magnetic field, are associated with anions with negative charge and cations with positive charge, respectively. Such polarization may be inconsistent with seismoelectric signals due to the electrokinetic mechanism, because they are mainly found in the direction of transmission of seismic compressional waves, as pointed out by Strahser et al. (2007) who examined polarization of seismoelectric signals by recording the three components of electric field. However, even such circular polarization of electric field is somehow interpreted in terms of the electrokinetic mechanism. Therefore, further convincing evidence is required to support the seismic dynamo effect. On 25-26 July 2011, an experiment for studies of crustal seismic structure was made in central Japan. We carried out simultaneous observations of ground velocity and electric field on this occasion at three sites near a blasting point using 50 kg of dynamite; about 280 m east-southeast, about 190 m east, and about 360 m northwest from the blasting point. Taking into account typical frequencies of ground velocity for artificial earthquakes by blasting higher than those for natural earthquakes, we used data loggers with sampling rate of 1 kHz and could obtain the waveforms of ground velocity and electric field very clearly. We show characteristics of electric field variations, their dependence of azimuth angle with respect to the blasting point, and frequency response functions.

  8. Forces acting on a small particle in an acoustical field in a thermoviscous fluid.

    PubMed

    Karlsen, Jonas T; Bruus, Henrik

    2015-10-01

    We present a theoretical analysis of the acoustic radiation force on a single small spherical particle, either a thermoviscous fluid droplet or a thermoelastic solid particle, suspended in a viscous and heat-conducting fluid medium. Within the perturbation assumptions, our analysis places no restrictions on the length scales of the viscous and thermal boundary-layer thicknesses δ(s) and δ(t) relative to the particle radius a, but it assumes the particle to be small in comparison to the acoustic wavelength λ. This is the limit relevant to scattering of ultrasound waves from nanometer- and micrometer-sized particles. For particles of size comparable to or smaller than the boundary layers, the thermoviscous theory leads to profound consequences for the acoustic radiation force. Not only do we predict forces orders of magnitude larger than expected from ideal-fluid theory, but for certain relevant choices of materials, we also find a sign change in the acoustic radiation force on different-sized but otherwise identical particles. These findings lead to the concept of a particle-size-dependent acoustophoretic contrast factor, highly relevant to acoustic separation of microparticles in gases, as well as to handling of nanoparticles in lab-on-a-chip systems. PMID:26565335

  9. Forces acting on a small particle in an acoustical field in a thermoviscous fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlsen, Jonas T.; Bruus, Henrik

    2015-10-01

    We present a theoretical analysis of the acoustic radiation force on a single small spherical particle, either a thermoviscous fluid droplet or a thermoelastic solid particle, suspended in a viscous and heat-conducting fluid medium. Within the perturbation assumptions, our analysis places no restrictions on the length scales of the viscous and thermal boundary-layer thicknesses δs and δt relative to the particle radius a , but it assumes the particle to be small in comparison to the acoustic wavelength λ . This is the limit relevant to scattering of ultrasound waves from nanometer- and micrometer-sized particles. For particles of size comparable to or smaller than the boundary layers, the thermoviscous theory leads to profound consequences for the acoustic radiation force. Not only do we predict forces orders of magnitude larger than expected from ideal-fluid theory, but for certain relevant choices of materials, we also find a sign change in the acoustic radiation force on different-sized but otherwise identical particles. These findings lead to the concept of a particle-size-dependent acoustophoretic contrast factor, highly relevant to acoustic separation of microparticles in gases, as well as to handling of nanoparticles in lab-on-a-chip systems.

  10. Dynamics of two interacting hydrogen bubbles in liquid aluminum under the influence of a strong acoustic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebon, Gerard S. B.; Pericleous, Koulis; Tzanakis, Iakovos; Eskin, Dmitry G.

    2015-10-01

    Ultrasonic melt processing significantly improves the properties of metallic materials. However, this promising technology has not been successfully transferred to the industry because of difficulties in treating large volumes of melt. To circumvent these difficulties, a fundamental understanding of the efficiency of ultrasonic treatment of liquid metals is required. In this endeavor, the dynamics of two interacting hydrogen bubbles in liquid aluminum are studied to determine the effect of a strong acoustic field on their behavior. It is shown that coalescence readily occurs at low frequencies in the range of 16 to 20 kHz; forcing frequencies at these values are likely to promote degassing. Emitted acoustic pressures from relatively isolated bubbles that resonate with the driving frequency are in the megapascal range and these cavitation shock waves are presumed to promote grain refinement by disrupting the growth of the solidification front.

  11. Dynamical Effects Due to Fringe Field of the Magnets in Circular Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Y.; Nosochkov, Yu.; /SLAC

    2005-05-16

    The leading Lie generators, including the chromatic effects, due to hard-edge fringe field of single multipole and solenoid are derived from the vector potentials within a Hamiltonian system. These nonlinear generators are applied to the interaction region of PEP-II to analyze the linear errors due to the feed-down from the off-centered quadrupoles and solenoid. The nonlinear effects of tune shifts at large amplitude, the synchro-betatron sidebands near half integer and their impacts on the dynamic aperture are studied in the paper.

  12. Acoustic field modeling for physiotherapy ultrasound applicators by using approximated functions of measured non-uniform radiation distributions.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Mario Ibrahín; Calás, Héctor; Ramos, Antonio; Vera, Arturo; Leija, Lorenzo

    2012-08-01

    The strongest therapeutic effects in ultrasonic physiotherapy are mainly produced at the first centimeters, i.e. close to the applicator surface and, in general, only in the near-field zone. The acoustic field produced in practice by this type of transducers differs from the classical models because the vibration distribution on the real transducer surfaces is non-uniform. However, neither models using uniform distribution, nor those using typical non-uniform distribution patterns for the source accurately represent the radiation of this kind of transducers. Although this therapy is widely used and many efforts have been made in experimentally studying the patterns of ultrasound radiation produced during physiotherapy applications (IEC-61689, 1998), additional modeling researches still would be needed in order to achieve improved models giving field patterns closer to the measured ultrasonic results. In this paper, acoustic patterns produced from two source radiation functions are proposed and evaluated for field modeling of physiotherapy applicators. Both the functions are approximations to the pressure distribution measured close to the emitting surface and they are based on the modulation of the classical simply-supported function using either sinusoidal or Bessel-type distributions. The simply-supported function is accounted for the radiator-fixing condition and the modulation function simulates the complex vibration distribution of this kind of transducer. The modulator Bessel function is based on reports about Bessel-type vibration distributions found in piezoelectric disk resonators. The use of a selected sinusoidal segment represents another analytical option for obtaining an approximated behavior of the measured data in a real applicator. Both the field models are implemented using the finite element method (FEM) to obtain the numerical solution of wave equation at each point in the radiated space. The solution is reached by considering axisymmetric

  13. Characterization of Transducer Performance and Narrowband Transient Ultrasonic Fields in Metals by Rayleigh-Sommerfeld Backpropagation of Compression Acoustic Waves Measured with Double-Pulsed Tv Holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trillo, Cristina; Doval, Ángel F.; Fernández, José L.; Rodríguez-Gómez, Pablo; López-Vázquez, J. Carlos

    2014-10-01

    This article presents a method aimed at the characterization of the narrowband transient acoustic field radiated by an ultrasonic plane transducer into a homogeneous, isotropic and optically opaque prismatic solid, and the assessment of the performance of the acoustic source. The method relies on a previous technique based on the full-field optical measurement of an acoustic wavepacket at the surface of a solid and its subsequent numerical backpropagation within the material. The experimental results show that quantitative transversal and axial profiles of the complex amplitude of the beam can be obtained at any plane between the measurement and excitation surfaces. The reconstruction of the acoustic field at the transducer face, carried out on a defective transducer model, shows that the method could also be suitable for the nondestructive testing of the performance of ultrasonic sources. In all cases, the measurements were performed with the transducer working under realistic loading conditions.

  14. Frequency shifts in NIST Cs primary frequency standards due to transverse rf field gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashby, Neil; Barlow, Stephan; Heavner, Thomas; Jefferts, Steven

    2015-03-01

    A single-particle Green's function (propagator) is introduced to study the deflection of laser-cooled cesium atoms in an atomic fountain due to microwave magnetic field gradients in the Ramsey TE011 cavity. The deflection results in a state-dependent loss of atoms at apertures in the physics package, resulting in a frequency bias. A model accounting only for motion in one dimension transverse to the symmetry axis of the fountain is discussed in detail and then generalized to two transverse dimensions. Results for fractional frequency shifts due to transverse field gradients are computed for NIST-F1 and NIST-F2 cesium fountains. The shifts are found to be negligible except in cases of higher rf power applied to the cavities.

  15. The magnetic field inside a layered anisotropic spherical conductor due to internal sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieminen, Jaakko O.; Stenroos, Matti

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in neuronal current imaging using magnetic resonance imaging and in invasive measurement of neuronal magnetic fields have given a need for methods to compute the magnetic field inside a volume conductor due to source currents that are within the conductor. In this work, we derive, verify, and demonstrate an analytical expression for the magnetic field inside an anisotropic multilayer spherically symmetric conductor due to an internal current dipole. We casted an existing solution for electric field to vector spherical harmonic (VSH) form. Next, we wrote an ansatz for the magnetic field using toroidal-poloidal decomposition that uses the same VSHs. Using properties of toroidal and poloidal components and VSHs and applying magnetic scalar potential, we then formulated a series expression for the magnetic field. The convergence of the solution was accelerated by formulating the solution using an addition-subtraction method. We verified the resulting formula against boundary-element method. The verification showed that the formulas and implementation are correct; 99th percentiles of amplitude and angle differences between the solutions were below 0.5% and 0.5°, respectively. As expected, the addition-subtraction model converged faster than the unaccelerated model; close to the source, 250 terms gave relative error below 1%, and the number of needed terms drops fast, as the distance to the source increases. Depending on model conductivities and source position, field patterns inside a layered sphere may differ considerably from those in a homogeneous sphere. In addition to being a practical modeling tool, the derived solution can be used to verify numerical methods, especially finite-element method, inside layered anisotropic conductors.

  16. Computational and experimental techniques for coupled acoustic/structure interactions.

    SciTech Connect

    Sumali, Anton Hartono; Pierson, Kendall Hugh; Walsh, Timothy Francis; Dohner, Jeffrey Lynn; Reese, Garth M.; Day, David Minot

    2004-01-01

    This report documents the results obtained during a one-year Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) initiative aimed at investigating coupled structural acoustic interactions by means of algorithm development and experiment. Finite element acoustic formulations have been developed based on fluid velocity potential and fluid displacement. Domain decomposition and diagonal scaling preconditioners were investigated for parallel implementation. A formulation that includes fluid viscosity and that can simulate both pressure and shear waves in fluid was developed. An acoustic wave tube was built, tested, and shown to be an effective means of testing acoustic loading on simple test structures. The tube is capable of creating a semi-infinite acoustic field due to nonreflecting acoustic termination at one end. In addition, a micro-torsional disk was created and tested for the purposes of investigating acoustic shear wave damping in microstructures, and the slip boundary conditions that occur along the wet interface when the Knudsen number becomes sufficiently large.

  17. Field collapse due to band-tail charge in amorphous silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Qi; Crandall, R.S.; Schiff, E.A.

    1996-05-01

    It is common for the fill factor to decrease with increasing illumination intensity in hydrogenated amorphous silicon solar cells. This is especially critical for thicker solar cells, because the decrease is more severe than in thinner cells. Usually, the fill factor under uniformly absorbed red light changes much more than under strongly absorbed blue light. The cause of this is usually assumed to arise from space charge trapped in deep defect states. The authors model this behavior of solar cells using the Analysis of Microelectronic and Photonic Structures (AMPS) simulation program. The simulation shows that the decrease in fill factor is caused by photogenerated space charge trapped in the band-tail states rather than in defects. This charge screens the applied field, reducing the internal field. Owing to its lower drift mobility, the space charge due to holes exceeds that due to electrons and is the main cause of the field screening. The space charge in midgap states is small compared with that in the tails and can be ignored under normal solar-cell operating conditions. Experimentally, the authors measured the photocapacitance as a means to probe the collapsed field. They also explored the light intensity dependence of photocapacitance and explain the decrease of FF with the increasing light intensity.

  18. Enhancement of the thermoelectric figure of merit in a quantum dot due to external ac field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qiao; Wang, Zhi-yong; Xie, Zhong-Xiang

    2013-08-01

    We investigate the figure of merit of a quantum dot (QD) system irradiated with an external microwave filed by nonequilibrium Green's function (NGF) technique. Results show that the frequency of microwave field influence the figure of merit ZT significantly. At low temperature, a sharp peak can be observed in the figure of merit ZT as the frequency of ac field increases. As the frequency varies, several zero points and resonant peaks emerge in the figure of merit ZT. By adjusting the frequency of the microwave field, we can obtain high ZT. The figure of merit ZT increases with the decreasing of linewidth function Γ. In addition, Wiedemann-Franz law does not hold, particularly in the low frequency region due to multi-photon emission and absorption. Some novel thermoelectric properties are also found in two-level QD system.

  19. Plasma heating at collisionless shocks due to the kinetic cross-field streaming instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winske, D.; Quest, K. B.; Tanaka, M.; Wu, C. S.

    1985-01-01

    Heating at collisionless shocks due to the kinetic cross-field streaming instability, which is the finite beta (ratio of plasma to magnetic pressure) extension of the modified two stream instability, is studied. Heating rates are derived from quasi-linear theory and compared with results from particle simulations to show that electron heating relative to ion heating and heating parallel to the magnetic field relative to perpendicular heating for both the electrons and ions increase with beta. The simulations suggest that electron dynamics determine the saturation level of the instability, which is manifested by the formation of a flattop electron distribution parallel to the magnetic field. As a result, both the saturation levels of the fluctuations and the heating rates decrease sharply with beta. Applications of these results to plasma heating in simulations of shocks and the earth's bow shock are described.

  20. Properties of the acoustic intensity vector field in a shallow water waveguide.

    PubMed

    Dall'Osto, David R; Dahl, Peter H; Choi, Jee Woong

    2012-03-01

    Acoustic intensity is a vector quantity described by collocated measurements of acoustic pressure and particle velocity. In an ocean waveguide, the interaction among multipath arrivals of propagating wavefronts manifests unique behavior in the acoustic intensity. The instantaneous intensity, or energy flux, contains two components: a propagating and non-propagating energy flux. The instantaneous intensity is described by the time-dependent complex intensity, where the propagating and non-propagating energy fluxes are modulated by the active and reactive intensity envelopes, respectively. Properties of complex intensity are observed in data collected on a vertical line array during the transverse acoustic variability experiment (TAVEX) that took place in August of 2008, 17 km northeast of the Ieodo ocean research station in the East China Sea, 63 m depth. Parabolic equation (PE) simulations of the TAVEX waveguide supplement the experimental data set and provide a detailed analysis of the spatial structure of the complex intensity. A normalized intensity quantity, the pressure-intensity index, is used to describe features of the complex intensity which have a functional relationship between range and frequency, related to the waveguide invariant. The waveguide invariant is used to describe the spatial structure of intensity in the TAVEX waveguide using data taken at discrete ranges. PMID:22423699

  1. Development and validation of a combined phased acoustical radiosity and image source model for predicting sound fields in rooms.

    PubMed

    Marbjerg, Gerd; Brunskog, Jonas; Jeong, Cheol-Ho; Nilsson, Erling

    2015-09-01

    A model, combining acoustical radiosity and the image source method, including phase shifts on reflection, has been developed. The model is denoted Phased Acoustical Radiosity and Image Source Method (PARISM), and it has been developed in order to be able to model both specular and diffuse reflections with complex-valued and angle-dependent boundary conditions. This paper mainly describes the combination of the two models and the implementation of the angle-dependent boundary conditions. It furthermore describes how a pressure impulse response is obtained from the energy-based acoustical radiosity by regarding the model as being stochastic. Three methods of implementation are proposed and investigated, and finally, recommendations are made for their use. Validation of the image source method is done by comparison with finite element simulations of a rectangular room with a porous absorber ceiling. Results from the full model are compared with results from other simulation tools and with measurements. The comparisons of the full model are done for real-valued and angle-independent surface properties. The proposed model agrees well with both the measured results and the alternative theories, and furthermore shows a more realistic spatial variation than energy-based methods due to the fact that interference is considered. PMID:26428783

  2. Towards Truly Quiet MRI: animal MRI magnetic field gradients as a test platform for acoustic noise reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edelstein, William; El-Sharkawy, Abdel-Monem

    2013-03-01

    Clinical MRI acoustic noise, often substantially exceeding 100 dB, causes patient anxiety and discomfort and interferes with functional MRI (fMRI) and interventional MRI. MRI acoustic noise reduction is a long-standing and difficult technical challenge. The noise is basically caused by large Lorentz forces on gradient windings--surrounding the patient bore--situated in strong magnetic fields (1.5 T, 3 T or higher). Pulsed currents of 300 A or more are switched through the gradient windings in sub-milliseconds. Experimenting with hardware noise reduction on clinical scanners is difficult and expensive because of the large scale and weight of clinical scanner components (gradient windings ~ 1000 kg) that require special handling equipment in large engineering test facilities. Our approach is to produce a Truly Quiet (<70 dB) small-scale animal imager. Results serve as a test platform for acoustic noise reduction measures that can be implemented in clinical scanners. We have so far decreased noise in an animal scale imager from 108 dB to 71 dB, a 37 dB reduction. Our noise reduction measures include: a gradient container that can be evacuated; inflatable antivibration mounts to prevent transmission of vibrations from gradient winding to gradient container; vibration damping of wires going from gradient to the outside world via the gradient container; and a copper passive shield to prevent the generation of eddy currents in the metal cryostat inner bore, which in turn can vibrate and produce noise.

  3. Detecting Acoustic Emissions With/Without Dehydration of Serpentine Outside P-T Field of Conventional Brittle Failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, H.; Fei, Y.; Silver, P. G.; Green, H. W.

    2005-12-01

    It is currently thought that earthquakes cannot be triggered at depths greater than ~60 km by unassisted brittle failure or frictional sliding, but could be triggered by dehydration embrittlement of hydrous minerals (Raleigh and Paterson, 1965; Green and Houston, 1995; Kirby, 1995; Jung et al., 2004). Using a new multianvil-based system for detecting acoustic emissions with four channels at high pressure and high temperature that was recently developed (Jung et al., 2005), we tested this hypothesis by deforming samples of serpentine. We found that acoustic emissions were detected not only during/after the dehydration of serpentine, but even in the absence of dehydration. These emissions occurred at high pressure and high temperature, and thus outside pressure-temperature field of conventional brittle failure. Backscattered-electron images of microstructures of the post-run specimen revealed fault slip at elevated pressure, with offsets of up to ~500 μm, even without dehydration. Analysis of P-wave travel times from the four sensors confirmed that the acoustic emissions originated from within the specimen during fault slip. These observations suggest that earthquakes can be triggered by slip along a fault containing serpentine at significantly higher pressure and temperature conditions than that previously thought, even without dehydration. They are thus consistent with faulting mechanisms that appeal to dehydration embrittlement, as well as those that rely solely on the rheology of non-dehydrated serpentine.

  4. Increase in Phi X174 DNA radiation sensitivity due to electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    McCormack, Percival D.; Swenberg, Charles E.

    1985-01-01

    The object of this research was to establish whether or not orientation of DNA in electric fields would result in a significant increase in its sensitivity to damage by ionizing radiation. The application of an external electric field simultaneously with gamma irradiation to an aqueous suspension of Phi X 174 (in the RFI form) is shown to increase significantly the number of strand breaks. Tritiated DNA allowed the number of single-strand breaks to be estimated from changes in the scintillation of electrophoretic gel band associated with the fastest mobility moiety. At 400 V ( approx. 2400 V/cm) the corrected increase (corrected for phoresis of DNA on the stainless steel plates) in the G-value yield is 38%. The increase in damage with field strength appears to follow the increase in reduced dichroism. Dichroism results correspond at 400 V to approximately 10% of the maximum orientation. These results support the conjecture that this significant increase in DNA-radiation interaction with an electric field is due to field-induced conformation changes in the molecule. Keywords: Polyelectrolytes, Polynucleotides, Polypeptides, Birefringence, Dipole, and Moments.

  5. Revealing giant internal magnetic fields due to spin fluctuations in magnetically doped colloidal nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Rice, William D; Liu, Wenyong; Baker, Thomas A; Sinitsyn, Nikolai A; Klimov, Victor I; Crooker, Scott A

    2016-02-01

    Strong quantum confinement in semiconductors can compress the wavefunctions of band electrons and holes to nanometre-scale volumes, significantly enhancing interactions between themselves and individual dopants. In magnetically doped semiconductors, where paramagnetic dopants (such as Mn(2+), Co(2+) and so on) couple to band carriers via strong sp-d spin exchange, giant magneto-optical effects can therefore be realized in confined geometries using few or even single impurity spins. Importantly, however, thermodynamic spin fluctuations become increasingly relevant in this few-spin limit. In nanoscale volumes, the statistical fluctuations of N spins are expected to generate giant effective magnetic fields Beff, which should dramatically impact carrier spin dynamics, even in the absence of any applied field. Here we directly and unambiguously reveal the large Beff that exist in Mn(2+)-doped CdSe colloidal nanocrystals using ultrafast optical spectroscopy. At zero applied magnetic field, extremely rapid (300-600 GHz) spin precession of photoinjected electrons is observed, indicating Beff ∼ 15 -30 T for electrons. Precession frequencies exceed 2 THz in applied magnetic fields. These signals arise from electron precession about the random fields due to statistically incomplete cancellation of the embedded Mn(2+) moments, thereby revealing the initial coherent dynamics of magnetic polaron formation, and highlighting the importance of magnetization fluctuations on carrier spin dynamics in nanomaterials. PMID:26595331

  6. Highly Effective Conductance Modulation in Planar Silicene Field Effect Devices Due to Buckling

    PubMed Central

    Al-Dirini, Feras; Hossain, Faruque M.; Mohammed, Mahmood A.; Nirmalathas, Ampalavanapillai; Skafidas, Efstratios

    2015-01-01

    Silicene is an exciting two-dimensional material that shares many of graphene’s electronic properties, but differs in its structural buckling. This buckling allows opening a bandgap in silicene through the application of a perpendicular electric field. Here we show that this buckling also enables highly effective modulation of silicene’s conductance by means of an in-plane electric field applied through silicene side gates, which can be realized concurrently within the same silicene monolayer. We illustrate this by using silicene to implement Self-Switching Diodes (SSDs), which are two-dimensional field effect nanorectifiers realized within a single silicene monolayer. Our quantum simulation results show that the atomically-thin silicene SSDs, with sub-10 nm dimensions, achieve a current rectification ratio that exceeds 200, without the need for doping, representing a 30 fold enhancement over graphene SSDs. We attribute this enhancement to a bandgap opening due to the in-plane electric field, as a consequence of silicene’s buckling. Our results suggest that silicene is a promising material for the realization of planar field effect devices. PMID:26441200

  7. LINEAR INVERSION OF TRANSMITTED ACOUSTIC WAVE FIELDS FOR THREE-DIMENSIONAL MODULUS AND DENSITY PERTURBATIONS USING A BORN-TYPE APPROXIMATION.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stauber, Douglas A.

    1985-01-01

    A Born approximation is used to linearize the relationship, in the horizontal-wavenumber and frequency domains, between lateral perturbations of modulus and density in a layered half-space and the acoustic wave field observed at the surface when a plane wave is incident from below. The resulting equations can be used to perform a linear inversion of observed acoustic wave fields to obtain lateral perturbations in modulus and density. Since modulus and density effects are separated, gravity observations can be included in the inversion procedure without any assumptions about the relationship between density and acoustic velocity. Tests with synthetic data sets reveal that the inversion method gives useful results when the spatial scales of the inhomogeneities are smaller than several acoustic wavelengths. Refs.

  8. A Multi-Transducer Near Field Acoustic Levitation System for Noncontact Transportation of Large-Sized Planar Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amano, Takafumi; Koike, Yoshikazu; Nakamura, Kentaro; Ueha, Sadayuki; Hashimoto, Yoshiki

    2000-05-01

    A new noncontact transportation system, which consists of multiple ultrasonic transducers and operates based on near-field acoustic levitation, is proposed to transport a large-sized planar object such as a glass substrate for liquid crystal devices. Using the proposed systems consisting of two and three transducers, the suspension characteristics of the levitated objects are studied as functions of both size difference and angles between the vibration systems and the levitated object. As a result, the holding force is proved to increase as the angle increases and is maximum when the horizontal dimensions of the system and the object coincide.

  9. Acoustic Faraday rotation in Weyl semimetals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Donghao; Shi, Junren

    We investigate the phonon problems in Weyl semimetals, from which both the phonon Berry curvature and the phonon Damping could be obtained. We show that even without a magnetic field, the degenerate transverse acoustic modes could also be split due to the adiabatic curvature. In three dimensional case, acoustic Faraday rotation shows up. And furthermore, since the attenuation procedure could distinguish the polarized mode, single circularly polarized acoustic wave could be realized. We study the mechanism in the novel time reversal symmetry broken Weyl semimetal. New effects rise because of the linear dispersion, which give enlightenment in the measurement of this new kind of three-dimensional material.

  10. Numerical inverse method predicting acoustic spinning modes radiated by a ducted fan from free-field test data.

    PubMed

    Lewy, Serge

    2008-07-01

    Spinning modes generated by a ducted turbofan at a given frequency determine the acoustic free-field directivity. An inverse method starting from measured directivity patterns is interesting in providing information on the noise sources without requiring tedious spinning-mode experimental analyses. According to a previous article, equations are based on analytical modal splitting inside a cylindrical duct and on a Rayleigh or a Kirchhoff integral on the duct exit cross section to get far-field directivity. Equations are equal in number to free-field measurement locations and the unknowns are the propagating mode amplitudes (there are generally more unknowns than equations). A MATLAB procedure has been implemented by using either the pseudoinverse function or the backslash operator. A constraint comes from the fact that squared modal amplitudes must be positive which involves an iterative least squares fitting. Numerical simulations are discussed along with several examples based on tests performed by Rolls-Royce in the framework of a European project. It is assessed that computation is very fast and it well fits the measured directivities, but the solution depends on the method and is not unique. This means that the initial set of modes should be chosen according to any known physical property of the acoustic sources. PMID:18646973

  11. Investigation of the acoustic field in a standing wave thermoacoustic refrigerator using time-resolved particule image velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanc-Benon, Ph.; Poignand, G.; Jondeau, E.

    2012-09-01

    In thermoacoustic devices, the full understanding of the heat transfer between the stack and the heat exchangers is a key issue to improve the global efficiency of these devices. The goal of this paper is to investigate the vortex structures, which appear at the stack plates extremities and may impact the heat transfer. Here, the aerodynamic field between a stack and a heat exchanger is characterised with a time-resolved particle image velocimetry (TR- PIV) set-up. Measurements are performed in a standing wave thermoacoustic refrigerator operating at a frequency of 200 Hz. The employed TR-PIV set-up offers the possibility to acquire 3000 instantaneous velocity fields at a frequency of 3125 Hz (15 instantaneous velocity fields per acoustic period). Measurements show that vortex shedding can occur at high pressure level, when a nonlinear acoustic regime preveals, leading to an additional heating generated by viscous dissipation in the gap between the stack and the heat exchangers and a loss of efficiency.

  12. Inferences of Particle Size and Composition From Video-like Images Based on Acoustic Data: Grotto Plume, Main Endeavor Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bemis, K. G.; Rona, P. A.; Santilli, K.; Dastur, J.; Silver, D.

    2004-12-01

    Optical and acoustic scattering from particles in a seafloor hydrothermal plume can be related if the particle properties and scattering mechanisms are known. We assume Rayleigh backscattering of sound and Mie forward scattering of light. We then use the particle concentrations implicit in the observed acoustic backscatter intensity to recreate the optical image a camera would see given a particular lighting level. The motivation for this study is to discover what information on particle size and composition in the buoyant plume can be inferred from a comparison of the calculated optical images (based on acoustic data) with actual video images from the acoustic acquisition cruise and the IMAX film "Volcanoes of the Deep Sea" (Stephen Low Productions, Inc.). Because the geologists, biologists and oceanographers involved in the study of seafloor hydrothermal plumes all "see" plumes in different ways, an additional motivation is to create more realistic plume images from the acoustic data. By using visualization techniques, with realistic lighting models, we can convert the plume image from mechanical waves (sound) to electromagnetic waves (light). The resulting image depends on assumptions about the particle size distribution and composition. Conversion of the volume scattering coefficients from Rayleigh to Mie scattering is accomplished by an extinction scale factor that depends on the wavelengths of light and sound and on the average particle size. We also make an adjustment to the scattered light based on the particles reflectivity (albedo) and color. We present a series of images of acoustic data for Grotto Plume, Main Endeavour Field (within the Endeavour ISS Site) using both realistic lighting models and traditional visualization techniques to investigate the dependence of the images on assumptions about particle composition and size. Sensitivity analysis suggests that the visibility of the buoyant plume increases as the intensity of supplied light increases

  13. Microfiber interferometric acoustic transducers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiuxin; Jin, Long; Li, Jie; Ran, Yang; Guan, Bai-Ou

    2014-04-01

    Acoustic and ultrasonic transducers are key components in biomedical information technology, which has been applied in medical diagnosis, photoacoustic endoscopy and photoacoustic imaging. In this paper, an acoustic transducer based on Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) fabricated in a microscaled optical fiber is demonstrated. The transducer is fabricated by forming two wavelength-matched Bragg gratings into the microfiber by means of side illumination with a 193nm excimer laser. When placing the transducer in water, the applied acoustic signal periodically changes the refractive index (RI) of the surrounding liquid and modulates the transmission of the FPI based on the evanescent-field interaction between the liquid and the transmitting light. As a result, the acoustic signal can be constructed with a tunable laser whose output wavelength is located at the slope of the inteferometric fringes. The transducer presents a sensitivity of 10 times higher than the counterparts fabricated in conventional singlemode fibers and has great potential to achieve higher resolution for photoacoustic imaging due to its reduced diameter. PMID:24718189

  14. An experimental study using flow visualization on the effect of an acoustic field on heat transfer from spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leung, W. W.; Baroth, E. C.

    1986-01-01

    The physical mechanisms responsible for the heat transfer process in a thermal-acoustic field were investigated using the technique of holographic interferometry for flow visualization. Experimental results were obtained with sound pressure levels in the range of 120 to 150 decibels, relative to a pressure of 0.0002 dynes/sq cm. Steady state laminar flow was observed when the vibrational Reynolds number was below 400; separated flow was observed when it was above 400. In the presence of a horizontal sound field, the data indicate that the relation between the vibrational Nusselt number, Nu(v) and the vibrational Reynolds number, Re(v) is given by Nu(v) = Re(v) exp 0.22. In the presence of a vertical sound field, the corresponding relation is Nu(v) = Re(v) exp 0.15.

  15. Ultrasonic imaging of an object at the presence of Fourier and non-Fourier transformation in the transmitted through the object acoustic field.

    PubMed

    Andreeva, A; Burova, M; Burov, J

    2007-06-01

    A metal object is computer visualized by registration of the amplitudes of the transmitted through the object short acoustic pulses. The pulses are separated by time, because of the presence of holes and internal compact components in the longitudinal section (structure along the propagation direction of acoustic wave). The acoustic field transmitted through the object is composited from a field presenting Fourier transformation of the hole shape and field, transmitted through the metal components in the longitudinal section of the object. A computer Fourier transformation of the digital data of the amplitude fields transmitted through the object components is performed instead of converging lens. The Fourier series of the object obtained as digital data after the transformation is multiplied with a term, describing the angle distribution of the field on spatial frequencies. The reconstruction of the image of the metal components is performed by reverse transformation, i.e. summing up in all spatial frequencies. 3D visualization of the transmitted through the hole acoustic field determines the hole geometry (circular, square, rectangular). It is shown that at the transmission of a short acoustic pulse through the components with different thicknesses and holes, presenting Fourier and non-Fourier transformation can be registered separately in contrast to the optics. PMID:17395232

  16. Field and laboratory tests on risk of slope failure due to weathering of rock materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qureshi, M. U.; Towhata, I.; Yamada, S.; Aziz, M.

    2009-04-01

    Authors set out the challenge to explore the mechanism of rock weathering and its effects to the geotechnical hazards. Any natural or human induced disturbances to the natural slopes speed up their weathering process. So, exploration of both disturbed and undisturbed slopes is necessary for robust understanding. Various regions in Asia were explored to experience variety of environmental and climatic conditions. Field exploration on the thickness and in-situ mechanical property was carried out by performing seismic refraction surveys, dynamic cone penetration tests and Schmidt hammer tests at various sites in Japan and Pakistan. In laboratory change in mechanical property of soft rocks due to weathering has been observed and slake durability tests were conducted on various rocks. Field exploration indicated that the thickness of weathered layer is 1 meter or its roundabouts and having S-wave velocity of 200-300 m/s. Laboratory testing differentiated the slaking potential and mechanical property degradation of various rocks. Moreover sensible correlations had been observed in thickness calculated by seismic refraction or dynamic cone penetration in field. Slake durability index showed good correlation with Schmidt hammer hardness and mechanical property. A general agreement was also observed when strength and S-wave velocities from laboratory tests were compared with the field exploration. Authors believed that the study provides the useful information on the long term prediction and assessment of landslide risk.

  17. Acoustic neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    Vestibular schwannoma; Tumor - acoustic; Cerebellopontine angle tumor; Angle tumor ... Acoustic neuromas have been linked with the genetic disorder neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2). Acoustic neuromas are uncommon.

  18. Acoustic data analysis and scenario over watch from an aerostat at the NATO SET-153 field experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiff, Christian; Scanlon, Michael

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of the NATO SET-153 field experiment was to provide an opportunity to demonstrate multiple sensor technologies in an urban environment and determine integration capabilities for future development. The Army Research Laboratory (ARL) experimental aerostat was used primarily as a persistent over watch capability as a substitute for a UAV. Continuous video was recorded on the aerostat and segments of video were captured of the scenarios on the ground that the camera was following manually. Some of the segments showing scenario activities will be presented. The captured pictures and video frames have telemetry in the headers that provides the UTM time and the Inertial Navigation System (INS) GPS location and the inertial roll, pitch, and yaw as well as the camera gimbal pan and tilt angles. The timing is useful to synchronize the images with the scenario events providing activity ground truth. The INS, GPS, and camera gimbal angle values can be used with the acoustic solution for the location of a sound source to determine the relative accuracy of the solution if the camera is pointed at the sound source. This method will be confirmed by the use of a propane cannon whose GPS location is logged. During the field experiment, other interesting acoustic events such as vehicle convoys, platoon level firefights with vehicles using blanks, and a UAV helicopter were recorded and will be presented in a quick analysis.

  19. Fan Noise Prediction System Development: Source/Radiation Field Coupling and Workstation Conversion for the Acoustic Radiation Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, H. D.

    1993-01-01

    The Acoustic Radiation Code (ARC) is a finite element program used on the IBM mainframe to predict far-field acoustic radiation from a turbofan engine inlet. In this report, requirements for developers of internal aerodynamic codes regarding use of their program output an input for the ARC are discussed. More specifically, the particular input needed from the Bolt, Beranek and Newman/Pratt and Whitney (turbofan source noise generation) Code (BBN/PWC) is described. In a separate analysis, a method of coupling the source and radiation models, that recognizes waves crossing the interface in both directions, has been derived. A preliminary version of the coupled code has been developed and used for initial evaluation of coupling issues. Results thus far have shown that reflection from the inlet is sufficient to indicate that full coupling of the source and radiation fields is needed for accurate noise predictions ' Also, for this contract, the ARC has been modified for use on the Sun and Silicon Graphics Iris UNIX workstations. Changes and additions involved in this effort are described in an appendix.

  20. Monte Carlo investigation of transient acoustic fields in partially or completely bounded medium. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thanedar, B. D.

    1972-01-01

    A simple repetitive calculation was used to investigate what happens to the field in terms of the signal paths of disturbances originating from the energy source. The computation allowed the field to be reconstructed as a function of space and time on a statistical basis. The suggested Monte Carlo method is in response to the need for a numerical method to supplement analytical methods of solution which are only valid when the boundaries have simple shapes, rather than for a medium that is bounded. For the analysis, a suitable model was created from which was developed an algorithm for the estimation of acoustic pressure variations in the region under investigation. The validity of the technique was demonstrated by analysis of simple physical models with the aid of a digital computer. The Monte Carlo method is applicable to a medium which is homogeneous and is enclosed by either rectangular or curved boundaries.

  1. Mesoscale current fields observed with a shipboard profiling acoustic current meter

    SciTech Connect

    Regier, L.

    1982-08-01

    Measurements of the near-surface currents obtained with a shipboard acoustic current meter during the POLYMODE Local Dynamics Experiment are discussed. The large-scale spatial structure of the directly measured currents is very similar to that obtained from simultaneous hydrographic observations assuming geostrophic dynamics. The vertical shear of geostrophic currents is half that observed directly, and the two are poorly correlated. Vertical shear is dominated by currents having spatial scales shorter than about 180 km and having no geostrophic signature. Although the shear of the ageostrophic component is clearly evident, estimation of the ageostrophic current is hampered by large experimental uncertainties.

  2. Field trials of a tactile acoustic monitor for the profoundly deaf.

    PubMed

    Summers, I R; Peake, M A; Martin, M C

    1981-08-01

    Profoundly deaf subjects were given information about sound level in their environment by means of a body-worn unit coupled to a small vibrator worn on the finger. Results of trials on 19 adults are discussed. The Tactile Acoustic Monitor was found to be useful for identifying domestic sounds by means of their distinctive timing patterns. No significant overall improvement in subject's control of voice level was observed, although some subjects found that having a voice level monitor gave them greater confidence to join conversations. Various design improvements were suggested by the trials. Modifications which have been incorporated into an improved unit are described. PMID:7296098

  3. Decay of electrostatic hydrogen cyclotron waves into ion acoustic modes in auroral field lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergmann, R.; Hudson, M. K.

    1987-03-01

    The coherent three-wave decay of a linearly unstable electrostatic hydrogen cyclotron (EHC) wave into stable EHC and ion acoustic modes is considered. The general problem of the three weakly interacting electrostatic normal modes in a Maxwellian plasma is discussed. EHC is examined in a fluid description, and the results are used to guide a similar study in a Vlasov plasma system intended to model the aurora acceleration region parameters. The time dependence of the decay in a simple three-wave interaction is presented in order to show how wave saturation can arise.

  4. Holding characteristics of planar objects suspended by near-field acoustic levitation

    PubMed

    Matsuo; Koike; Nakamura; Ueha; Hashimoto

    2000-03-01

    The authors have found the acoustic levitation phenomenon where planar objects of 10 kg weight can be levitated near a vibration surface. This phenomenon has been studied for non-contact transportation. A circular planar object can be suspended without contacting a circular vibration plate. We have studied the holding force which acts horizontally on the levitated objects. The horizontal position of the object is stabilized by this force. In this paper, we discuss the effect of the radius of a levitated object, levitation distance, displacement amplitude of the vibration plate and the vibration mode on the suspending force. PMID:10829629

  5. Simultaneous measurement of acoustic pressure and temperature in the HIFU fields using all-silica fiber optic Fabry-Perot hydorophone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dai-Hua; Zeng, Lu-Yu; Jia, Ping-Gang; Liu, Lei; Jiang, Xin-Yin

    2014-11-01

    Accurately measuring the acoustic pressure distributions and the size of the focal regions of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) fields, as well as the temperature induced by the HIFUs, are significant for ensuring the efficiency and safety of treatments. In our previous work, a tip-sensitive all-silica fiber-optic Fabry-Perot (TAFOFP) ultrasonic hydrophone for measuring HIFU fields is developed. In this paper, we explore the possibility that utilizing the TAFOFP ultrasonic hydrophone to simultaneously measure the acoustic pressure of HIFU fields and the induced temperature. The TAFOFP ultrasonic hydrophone for simultaneously measuring the acoustic pressure and temperature is developed and the experiment setup for measuring the HIFU fields based on the developed TAFOFP ultrasonic hydrophone is established. The developed TAFOFP ultrasonic hydrophone is experimentally tested in the degassed water and tissue phantom to verify the possibility of simultaneously measuring the acoustic pressure and temperature. Experimental results show that the sensing system can simultaneously measure the acoustic pressure and temperature.

  6. Small scale changes of geochemistry and flow field due to transient heat storage in aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, S.; Boockmeyer, A.; Li, D.; Beyer, C.

    2013-12-01

    Heat exchangers in the subsurface are increasingly installed for transient heat storage due to the need of heating or cooling of buildings as well as the interim storage of heat to compensate for the temporally fluctuating energy production by wind or solar energy. For heat storage to be efficient, high temperatures must be achieved in the subsurface. Significant temporal changes of the soil and groundwater temperatures however effect both the local flow field by temperature dependent fluid parameters as well as reactive mass transport through temperature dependent diffusion coefficients, geochemical reaction rates and mineral equilibria. As the use of heat storage will be concentrated in urban areas, the use of the subsurface for (drinking) water supply and heat storage will typically coincide and a reliable prognosis of the processes occurring is needed. In the present work, the effects of a temporal variation of the groundwater temperature, as induced by a local heat exchanger introduced into a groundwater aquifer, are studied. For this purpose, the coupled non-isothermal groundwater flow, heat transport and reactive mass transport is simulated in the near filed of such a heat exchanger. By explicitly discretizing and incorporating the borehole, the borehole cementation and the heat exchanger tubes, a realistic geometrical and process representation is obtained. The numerical simulation code OpenGeoSys is used in this work, which incorporates the required processes of coupled groundwater flow, heat and mass transport as well as temperature dependent geochemistry. Due to the use of a Finite Element Method, a close representation of the geometric effects can be achieved. Synthetic scenario simulations for typical settings of salt water formations in northern Germany are used to investigate the geochemical effects arising from a high temperature heat storage by quantifying changes in groundwater chemistry and overall reaction rates. This work presents the

  7. Pineal melatonin level disruption in humans due to electromagnetic fields and ICNIRP limits.

    PubMed

    Halgamuge, Malka N

    2013-05-01

    The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) classifies electromagnetic fields (EMFs) as 'possibly carcinogenic' to humans that might transform normal cells into cancer cells. Owing to high utilisation of electricity in day-to-day life, exposure to power-frequency (50 or 60 Hz) EMFs is unavoidable. Melatonin is a natural hormone produced by pineal gland activity in the brain that regulates the body's sleep-wake cycle. How man-made EMFs may influence the pineal gland is still unsolved. The pineal gland is likely to sense EMFs as light but, as a consequence, may decrease the melatonin production. In this study, more than one hundred experimental data of human and animal studies of changes in melatonin levels due to power-frequency electric and magnetic fields exposure were analysed. Then, the results of this study were compared with the International Committee of Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) limit and also with the existing experimental results in the literature for the biological effect of magnetic fields, in order to quantify the effects. The results show that this comparison does not seem to be consistent despite the fact that it offers an advantage of drawing attention to the importance of the exposure limits to weak EMFs. In addition to those inconsistent results, the following were also observedfrom this work: (i) the ICNIRP recommendations are meant for the well-known acute effects, because effects of the exposure duration cannot be considered and (ii) the significance of not replicating the existing experimental studies is another limitation in the power-frequency EMFs. Regardless of these issues, the above observation agrees with our earlier study in which it was confirmed that it is not a reliable method to characterise biological effects by observing only the ratio of AC magnetic field strength to frequency. This is because exposure duration does not include the ICNIRP limit. Furthermore, the results show the significance of

  8. Estimation of Surface Roughness due to Electrode Erosion in Field-Distortion Gas Switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xuandong; Wang, Hu; Li, Xiaoang; Zhang, Qiaogen; Wei, Jin; Qiu, Aici

    2013-08-01

    Field distortion gas switch is one of the crucial elements in a Marx generator, fast linear transformer driver and other pulsed power installations. The performance of the gas switch, which is dramatically affected by the surface roughness due to electrode erosion during the discharge process, directly influences the output parameters, stability and reliability of the pulsed power system. In this paper, an electrode surface roughness (ESR) calculation model has been established based on a great deal of experimental data under operating current. The discharge current waveform, the peak height of the burr, the radius and the depth of etch pits in the electrode erosion region were used to predict the ESR. Also, experimental results indicate that this calculation model can effectively estimate the ESR of the test gas switch.

  9. Characterising oil and water in porous media using decay due to diffusion in the internal field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Rhiannon T.; Djurhuus, Ketil; Seland, John Georg

    2015-10-01

    In the method Decay due to Diffusion in the Internal Field (DDIF), the diffusion behaviour of water molecules in the internal magnetic field makes it possible to determine a distribution of pore sizes in a sample. The DDIF experiment can also be extended to a DDIF-Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (DDIF-CPMG) experiment to measure correlations between the pore size and the transverse relaxation time, T2 . In this study we have for the first time applied the DDIF experiment and the DDIF-CPMG experiment to porous materials saturated with both water and oil. Because of the large difference in diffusion rates between water and oil molecules, the DDIF experiment will act as a filter for the signal from oil, and we are left with the DDIF-signal from water only. This has been verified in model systems consisting of glass beads immersed in separate layers of water and oil, and in a sandstone sample saturated with water and oil. The results show that the DDIF and DDIF-CPMG experiments enable the determination of the confining geometry of the water phase, and how this geometry is correlated to T2 . Data obtained in the sandstone sample saturated with water and oil also show that with the exception of the smallest pores there is no clear correlation between pore size and the relaxation time of water.

  10. Active control of passive acoustic fields: passive synthetic aperture/Doppler beamforming with data from an autonomous vehicle.

    PubMed

    D'Spain, Gerald L; Terrill, Eric; Chadwell, C David; Smith, Jerome A; Lynch, Stephen D

    2006-12-01

    The maneuverability of autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) equipped with hull-mounted arrays provides the opportunity to actively modify received acoustic fields to optimize extraction of information. This paper uses ocean acoustic data collected by an AUV-mounted two-dimensional hydrophone array, with overall dimension one-tenth wavelength at 200-500 Hz, to demonstrate aspects of this control through vehicle motion. Source localization is performed using Doppler shifts measured at a set of receiver velocities by both single elements and a physical array. Results show that a source in the presence of a 10-dB higher-level interferer having exactly the same frequency content (as measured by a stationary receiver) is properly localized and that white-noise-constrained adaptive beamforming applied to the physical aperture data in combination with Doppler beamforming provides greater spatial resolution than physical-aperture-alone beamforming and significantly lower sidelobes than single element Doppler beamforming. A new broadband beamformer that adjusts for variations in vehicle velocity on a sample by sample basis is demonstrated with data collected during a high-acceleration maneuver. The importance of including the cost of energy expenditure in determining optimal vehicle motion is demonstrated through simulation, further illustrating how the vehicle characteristics are an integral part of the signal/array processing structure. PMID:17225392

  11. Realization of cavitation fields based on the acoustic resonance modes in an immersion-type sonochemical reactor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi-Chun; Yao, Ming-Chung

    2013-01-01

    Different modes of cavitation zones in an immersion-type sonochemical reactor have been realized based on the concept of acoustic resonance fields. The reactor contains three main components, namely a Langevin-type piezoelectric transducer (20 kHz), a metal horn, and a circular cylindrical sonicated cell filled with tap water. In order to diminish the generation of cavitation bubbles near the horn-tip, an enlarged cone-shaped horn is designed to reduce the ultrasonic intensity at the irradiating surface and to get better distribution of energy in the sonicated cell. It is demonstrated both numerically and experimentally that the cell geometry and the horn position have prominent effects on the pressure distribution of the ultrasound in the cell. With appropriate choices of these parameters, the whole reactor works at a resonant state. Several acoustic resonance modes observed in the simulation are realized experimentally to generate a large volume of cavitation zones using a very low ultrasonic power. PMID:22959558

  12. An Acoustical Comparison of Sub-Scale and Full-Scale Far-Field Measurements for the Reusable Solid Rocket Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haynes, Jared; Kenny, R. Jeremy

    2010-01-01

    Recently, members of the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Fluid Dynamics Branch and Wyle Labs measured far-field acoustic data during a series of three Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) horizontal static tests conducted in Promontory, Utah. The test motors included the Technical Evaluation Motor 13 (TEM-13), Flight Verification Motor 2 (FVM-2), and the Flight Simulation Motor 15 (FSM-15). Similar far-field data were collected during horizontal static tests of sub-scale solid rocket motors at MSFC. Far-field acoustical measurements were taken at multiple angles within a circular array centered about the nozzle exit plane, each positioned at a radial distance of 80 nozzle-exit-diameters from the nozzle. This type of measurement configuration is useful for calculating rocket noise characteristics such as those outlined in the NASA SP-8072 "Acoustic Loads Generated by the Propulsion System." Acoustical scaling comparisons are made between the test motors, with particular interest in the Overall Sound Power, Acoustic Efficiency, Non-dimensional Relative Sound Power Spectrum, and Directivity. Since most empirical data in the NASA SP-8072 methodology is derived from small rockets, this investigation provides an opportunity to check the data collapse between a sub-scale and full-scale rocket motor.

  13. Computation of the pressure field generated by surface acoustic waves in microchannels.

    PubMed

    Darinskii, A N; Weihnacht, M; Schmidt, H

    2016-07-01

    The high-frequency pressure induced by a surface acoustic wave in the fluid filling a microchannel is computed by solving the full scattering problem. The microchannel is fabricated inside a container attached to the top of a piezoelectric substrate where the surface wave propagates. The finite element method is used. The pressure found in this way is compared with the pressure obtained by solving boundary-value problems formulated on the basis of simplifications which have been introduced in earlier papers by other research studies. The considered example shows that the difference between the results can be significant, ranging from several tens of percent up to several times in different points inside the channel. PMID:27314212

  14. Numerical analysis of sound propagation for acoustic lens array in different fluid mediums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujisawa, Kei; Asada, Akira

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, an acoustic sound focusing method using acoustic lens array is investigated numerically. To understand the sound propagation in the acoustic field in water with a lens material of glycerin, compressible Navier-Stokes equation, the mass conservation, energy equation, state equation in cylindrical coordinate system are solved without applying parabolic approximation. The numerical method is based on the finite difference time domain method. The numerical calculation of the sound propagation is carried out in the near field of the acoustic lens array of variable thickness normal to the acoustic beam. The numerical result shows that the sound pressure level along the beam axis increases due to the influence of the acoustic lens array, which indicates the capability of the acoustic lens array to the sound focusing.

  15. Acoustic forcing of a liquid drop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyell, M. J.

    1992-01-01

    The development of systems such as acoustic levitation chambers will allow for the positioning and manipulation of material samples (drops) in a microgravity environment. This provides the capability for fundamental studies in droplet dynamics as well as containerless processing work. Such systems use acoustic radiation pressure forces to position or to further manipulate (e.g., oscillate) the sample. The primary objective was to determine the effect of a viscous acoustic field/tangential radiation pressure forcing on drop oscillations. To this end, the viscous acoustic field is determined. Modified (forced) hydrodynamic field equations which result from a consistent perturbation expansion scheme are solved. This is done in the separate cases of an unmodulated and a modulated acoustic field. The effect of the tangential radiation stress on the hydrodynamic field (drop oscillations) is found to manifest as a correction to the velocity field in a sublayer region near the drop/host interface. Moreover, the forcing due to the radiation pressure vector at the interface is modified by inclusion of tangential stresses.

  16. Validation of Vehicle Panel/Equipment Response from Diffuse Acoustic Field Excitation Using Spatially Correlated Transfer Function Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Andrew; LaVerde, Bruce; Fulcher, Clay; Hunt, Ron

    2012-01-01

    An approach for predicting the vibration, strain, and force responses of a flight-like vehicle panel assembly to acoustic pressures is presented. Important validation for the approach is provided by comparison to ground test measurements in a reverberant chamber. The test article and the corresponding analytical model were assembled in several configurations to demonstrate the suitability of the approach for response predictions when the vehicle panel is integrated with equipment. Critical choices in the analysis necessary for convergence of the predicted and measured responses are illustrated through sensitivity studies. The methodology includes representation of spatial correlation of the pressure field over the panel surface. Therefore, it is possible to demonstrate the effects of hydrodynamic coincidence in the response. The sensitivity to pressure patch density clearly illustrates the onset of coincidence effects on the panel response predictions.

  17. Ion wake field effects on the dust-ion-acoustic surface mode in a semi-bounded Lorentzian dusty plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Myoung-Jae; Jung, Young-Dae

    2016-03-01

    The dispersion relation for the dust ion-acoustic surface waves propagating at the interface of semi-bounded Lorentzian dusty plasma with supersonic ion flow has been kinetically derived to investigate the nonthermal property and the ion wake field effect. We found that the supersonic ion flow creates the upper and the lower modes. The increase in the nonthermal particles decreases the wave frequency for the upper mode whereas it increases the frequency for the lower mode. The increase in the supersonic ion flow velocity is found to enhance the wave frequency for both modes. We also found that the increase in nonthermal plasmas is found to enhance the group velocity of the upper mode. However, the nonthermal particles suppress the lower mode group velocity. The nonthermal effects on the group velocity will be reduced in the limit of small or large wavelength limit.

  18. Helicopter far-field acoustic levels as a function of reduced main-rotor advancing blade-tip Mach number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Arnold W.; Smith, Charles D.; Lemasurier, Philip

    1990-07-01

    During the design of a helicopter, the weight, engine, rotor speed, and rotor geometry are given significant attention when considering the specific operations for which the helicopter will be used. However, the noise radiated from the helicopter and its relationship to the design variables is currently not well modeled with only a limited set of full-scale field test data to study. In general, limited field data have shown that reduced main-rotor advancing blade-tip Mach numbers result in reduced far-field noise levels. The status of a recent helicopter noise research project is reviewed. It is designed to provide flight experimental data which may be used to further understand helicopter main-rotor advancing blade-tip Mach number effects on far-field acoustic levels. Preliminary results are presented relative to tests conducted with a Sikorsky S-76A helicopter operating with both the rotor speed and the flight speed as the control variable. The rotor speed was operated within the range of 107 to 90 percent NR at nominal forward speeds of 35, 100, and 155 knots.

  19. Helicopter far-field acoustic levels as a function of reduced main-rotor advancing blade-tip Mach number

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Arnold W.; Smith, Charles D.; Lemasurier, Philip

    1990-01-01

    During the design of a helicopter, the weight, engine, rotor speed, and rotor geometry are given significant attention when considering the specific operations for which the helicopter will be used. However, the noise radiated from the helicopter and its relationship to the design variables is currently not well modeled with only a limited set of full-scale field test data to study. In general, limited field data have shown that reduced main-rotor advancing blade-tip Mach numbers result in reduced far-field noise levels. The status of a recent helicopter noise research project is reviewed. It is designed to provide flight experimental data which may be used to further understand helicopter main-rotor advancing blade-tip Mach number effects on far-field acoustic levels. Preliminary results are presented relative to tests conducted with a Sikorsky S-76A helicopter operating with both the rotor speed and the flight speed as the control variable. The rotor speed was operated within the range of 107 to 90 percent NR at nominal forward speeds of 35, 100, and 155 knots.

  20. On the applicability of the spherical wave expansion with a single origin for near-field acoustical holography.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Jesper; Hald, Jorgen; Juhl, Peter; Jacobsen, Finn

    2009-03-01

    The spherical wave expansion with a single origin is sometimes used in connection with near-field acoustical holography to determine the sound field on the surface of a source. The radiated field is approximated by a truncated expansion, and the expansion coefficients are determined by matching the sound field model to the measured pressure close to the source. This problem is ill posed, and therefore regularization is required. The present paper investigates the consequence of using only the expansion truncation as regularization approach and compares it with results obtained when additional regularization (the truncated singular value decomposition) is introduced. Important differences between applying the method when using a microphone array surrounding the source completely and an array covering only a part of the source are described. Another relevant issue is the scaling of the wave functions. It is shown that it is important for the additional regularization to work properly that the wave functions are scaled in such a way that their magnitude on the measurement surface decreases with the order. Finally, the method is applied on nonspherical sources using a vibrating plate in both simulations and an experiment, and the performance is compared with the equivalent source method. PMID:19275311

  1. Dielectrophoretic sphere-wall repulsion due to a uniform electric field.

    PubMed

    Yariv, Ehud

    2016-07-20

    When a zero-net-charge particle is placed under a uniform electric field, the decay of the Maxwell stress with the third power of distance ensures a nil electric force. A nonzero force may nonetheless be generated in the presence of a planar wall due to a mechanism which resembles conventional dielectrophoresis under nonuniform fields. In the prototypical case of a spherical particle this force acts perpendicular to the wall; its magnitude depends upon the pertinent boundary conditions governing the electric potential. When a particle is suspended in an electrolyte solution, where the double-layer structure ensures zero net charge, these conditions are electrokinetic in nature; they involve a balance between bulk conduction and diffusion, represented by normal derivatives, and an effective surface-conduction mechanism, represented by surface-Laplacian terms whose magnitude is quantified by appropriate Dukhin numbers. The dimensionless force depends upon the particle and wall Dukhin numbers as well as the ratio λ of the size of the particle to its distance from the wall. The remote-particle limit λ ≪ 1 is addressed using successive reflections. Calculation of the first few terms in the asymptotic expansion of the force only requires the evaluation of a single reflection from the wall. The leading-order term, scaling as λ(4), is repulsive, with a magnitude that varies non-monotonically with the particle Dukhin number and is independent of the wall Dukhin number. Surface conditions on the wall enter only at the O(λ(5)) leading-order correction. PMID:27384257

  2. OBSERVATIONS OF THE INTERACTION OF ACOUSTIC WAVES AND SMALL-SCALE MAGNETIC FIELDS IN A QUIET SUN

    SciTech Connect

    Chitta, Lakshmi Pradeep; Kariyappa, R.; Jain, Rekha; Jefferies, Stuart M. E-mail: rkari@iiap.res.in E-mail: stuartj@ifa.hawaii.edu

    2012-01-10

    The effect of the magnetic field on photospheric intensity and velocity oscillations at the sites of small-scale magnetic fields (SMFs) in a quiet Sun near the solar disk center is studied. We use observations made by the G-band filter in the Solar Optical Telescope on board Hinode for intensity oscillations; Doppler velocity, magnetic field, and continuum intensity are derived from an Ni I photospheric absorption line at 6767.8 A using the Michelson Doppler Imager on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory. Our analysis shows that both the high-resolution intensity observed in the G band and velocity oscillations are influenced by the presence of a magnetic field. While intensity oscillations are suppressed at all frequencies in strong magnetic field regions compared to weak magnetic field regions, velocity oscillations show an enhancement of power in the frequency band 5.5-7 mHz. We find that there is a drop of 20%-30% in the p-mode power of velocity oscillations within the SMFs when compared to the regions surrounding them. Our findings indicate that the nature of the interaction of acoustic waves with the quiet Sun SMFs is similar to that of large-scale magnetic fields in active regions. We also report the first results of the center-to-limb variation of such effects using the observations of the quiet Sun from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). The independent verification of these interactions using SDO/HMI suggests that the velocity power drop of 20%-30% in p-modes is fairly constant across the solar disk.

  3. Combined acoustic and optical trapping

    PubMed Central

    Thalhammer, G.; Steiger, R.; Meinschad, M.; Hill, M.; Bernet, S.; Ritsch-Marte, M.

    2011-01-01

    Combining several methods for contact free micro-manipulation of small particles such as cells or micro-organisms provides the advantages of each method in a single setup. Optical tweezers, which employ focused laser beams, offer very precise and selective handling of single particles. On the other hand, acoustic trapping with wavelengths of about 1 mm allows the simultaneous trapping of many, comparatively large particles. With conventional approaches it is difficult to fully employ the strengths of each method due to the different experimental requirements. Here we present the combined optical and acoustic trapping of motile micro-organisms in a microfluidic environment, utilizing optical macro-tweezers, which offer a large field of view and working distance of several millimeters and therefore match the typical range of acoustic trapping. We characterize the acoustic trapping forces with the help of optically trapped particles and present several applications of the combined optical and acoustic trapping, such as manipulation of large (75 μm) particles and active particle sorting. PMID:22025990

  4. Does Attention Play a Role in Dynamic Receptive Field Adaptation to Changing Acoustic Salience in A1?

    PubMed Central

    Fritz, Jonathan; Elhilali, Mounya; David, Stephen; Shamma, Shihab

    2007-01-01

    Acoustic filter properties of A1 neurons can dynamically adapt to stimulus statistics, classical conditioning, instrumental learning and the changing auditory attentional focus. We have recently developed an experimental paradigm that allows us to view cortical receptive field plasticity on-line as the animal meets different behavioral challenges by attending to salient acoustic cues and changing its cortical filters to enhance performance. We propose that attention is the key trigger that initiates a cascade of events leading to the dynamic receptive field changes that we observe. In our paradigm, ferrets were initially trained, using conditioned avoidance training techniques, to discriminate between background noise stimuli (temporally orthogonal ripple combinations) and foreground tonal target stimuli. They learned to generalize the task for a wide variety of distinct background and foreground target stimuli. We recorded cortical activity in the awake behaving animal and computed on-line spectrotemporal receptive fields (STRFs) of single neurons in A1. We observed clear, predictable task-related changes in STRF shape while the animal performed spectral tasks (including single tone and multi-tone detection, and two-tone discrimination) with different tonal targets. A different set of task-related changes occurred when the animal performed temporal tasks (including gap detection and click-rate discrimination). Distinctive cortical STRF changes may constitute a “task-specific signature”. These spectral and temporal changes in cortical filters occur quite rapidly, within 2 minutes of task onset, and fade just as quickly after task completion, or in some cases, persisted for hours. The same cell could multiplex by differentially changing its receptive field in different task conditions. On-line dynamic task-related changes, as well as persistent plastic changes, were observed at a single-unit, multi-unit and population level. Auditory attention is likely to be

  5. Parametric Study of Preferential Ion Heating Due to Intermittent Magnetic Fields in the Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbajal Gomez, L.; Chapman, S. C.; Dendy, R. O.; Watkins, N. W.

    2014-12-01

    In situ observations and remote measurements of the solar wind show strong preferential heating of ions along the ambient magnetic field. Understanding the mechanism for this heating process is an open problem. The observed broad-band spectrum of Alfven waves permeating the fast solar wind provide a candidate mechanism for this preferential heating through wave-particle interactions on ion kinetic scales. Previous analytical and numerical studies have considered a single pump wave [1, 2] or a turbulent, broad-band spectra of Alfven waves [3, 4, 5] to drive the ion heating. The latter studies investigated the effects on ion heating due to different initial 1/fγpower spectral exponents and number of modes and the signals were random phase. However, the observed solar wind fluctuations are intermittent so that the phases of the modes comprising the power spectrum are not random. Non-Gaussian fluctuations are seen both on scales identified with the inertial range of Alfvenic turbulence [6], and on longer scales typified by '1/f' spectra [7]. We present results of the first parametric numerical simulations on the effects of different levels of intermittency of the broad-band spectra of Alfven waves on the preferential heating of ions in the solar wind. We performed hybrid simulations for the local heating of the solar wind, which resolves the full kinetic physics of the ions and treats the electrons as a charge-neutralizing fluid. Our simulations evolve the full vector velocities and electromagnetic fields in one configuration space coordinate and in time.We compare the efficiency of different levels of intermittency of the initial turbulent fields and their effect on the efficiency of the wave-particle interactions which are a mechanism for driving preferential ion heating in the solar wind. [1] J. A. Araneda, E. Marsh, A. F. Viñas, J. Geophys. Res. 112, A04104 (2007). [2] J. A. Araneda, E. Marsh, A. F. Viñas, Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 125003 (2008) [3] Y. G. Maneva, A

  6. Generation of currents in the solar atmosphere by acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riutov, D. D.; Riutova, M. P.

    The novel mechanism presented for current and magnetic field generation by acoustic-wave fluxes in solar plasmas is especially potent in the region where acoustic-wave damping is due to such nonlinear effects as weak-shock formation. An evaluation is made of the significance of this effect for the solar atmosphere, under the proviso that this treatment is restricted to effects due to the usual acoustic waves. Wave absorption is governed by the classical collisional effects of thermal conductivity, viscosity, and ohmic losses.

  7. Relaxation of virtual cathode oscillations due to transverse effects in a crossed-field diode

    SciTech Connect

    Cartwright, K.L.; Verboncoeur, J.P.; Gopinath, V.P.; Birdsall, C.K.

    1996-12-31

    Recent studies of cylindrical and planar cross-field diodes indicate the transverse dimension plays a role in delaying the onset of virtual cathode oscillations for currents injected above the theoretical limiting current. For 1d and 2d planar devices, the limiting current for the magnetized and unmagnetized diodes is examined for cold and thermal injection. A significant difference between the 1d and 2d smooth diodes is that the transverse direction gives an extra degree of freedom which is found to warm the electrons rapidly. The mechanism of this warming appears to be an instability in the transverse direction. The simulations show three different states; laminar flow, virtual cathode oscillation and warm flow. Warm flow occurs when the electron has a spread of energy, either due to an instability or by thermal injection, when they pas through the potential minimum. Birdsall and Bridges showed that a small thermal spread of injected electrons damps virtual cathode oscillations. This warming effect allows warm flow to exist on the 2d state diagram which is not found on the 1d state diagram for cold emission. Parameter space is explored on these state diagrams for B = 0 and B = B{sub Hull} for J near state transitions (J {approx_equal} J{sub C}).

  8. Modeling surface deformation due to CO2 injection at an enhanced oil recovery field in Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Q.; Abdollahzadeh, M.; Dixon, T. H.; Malservisi, R.; Hosseini, S.

    2013-12-01

    The Geodesy Laboratory at the University of South Florida has operated 3 C-GPS stations at an enhanced oil recovery field in Texas since October 2011. Our GPS sites recorded vertical uplift during the injection phase when the reservoir was initially pressurized, and localized subsidence in phase with reservoir pressure after oil extraction started. In this study, we use analytical and numerical models to better understand the small-scale surface deformation observed by GPS due to CO2 injection. First, we use an analytical model of a pressurized horizontal circular crack in an elastic half-space to fit the surface deformation data. Then, constrained by the analytical modeling results, we develop a poroelastic Finite Element Model (FEM) to investigate the influence of reservoir geometry and overlying stratigraphy on surface displacement. A sensitivity study is carried out to understand the effects of realistic geometry and material properties on surface deformation. Our preliminary results show that a poroelastic FEM can explain the location-dependant time delay between the injection and surface response.

  9. Deep diving odontocetes foraging strategies and their prey field as determined by acoustic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giorli, Giacomo

    Deep diving odontocetes, like sperm whales, beaked whales, Risso's dolphins, and pilot whales are known to forage at deep depths in the ocean on squid and fish. These marine mammal species are top predators and for this reason are very important for the ecosystems they live in, since they can affect prey populations and control food web dynamics through top-down effects. The studies presented in this thesis investigate deep diving odontocetes. foraging strategies, and the density and size of their potential prey in the deep ocean using passive and active acoustic techniques. Ecological Acoustic Recorders (EAR) were used to monitor the foraging activity of deep diving odontocetes at three locations around the world: the Josephine Seamount High Sea Marine Protected Area (JHSMPA), the Ligurian Sea, and along the Kona coast of the island of Hawaii. In the JHSMPA, sperm whales. and beaked whales. foraging rates do not differ between night-time and day-time. However, in the Ligurian Sea, sperm whales switch to night-time foraging as the winter approaches, while beaked whales alternate between hunting mainly at night, and both at night and at day. Spatial differences were found in deep diving odontocetes. foraging activity in Hawaii where they forage most in areas with higher chlorophyll concentrations. Pilot whales (and false killer whales, clustered together in the category "blackfishes") and Risso's dolphins forage mainly at night at all locations. These two species adjust their foraging activity with the length of the night. The density and size of animals living in deep sea scattering layers was studied using a DIDSON imaging sonar at multiple stations along the Kona coast of Hawaii. The density of animals was affected by location, depth, month, and the time of day. The size of animals was influenced by station and month. The DIDSON proved to be a successful, non-invasive technique to study density and size of animals in the deep sea. Densities were found to be an

  10. The Sounds of Nanoscience: Acoustic STM Analogues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Euler, Manfred

    2013-01-01

    A hands-on model of scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) is presented. It uses near-field imaging with sound and computer assisted visualization to create acoustic mappings of resonator arrangements. Due to the (partial) analogy of matter and sound waves the images closely resemble STM scans of atoms. Moreover, the method can be extended to build…

  11. Problem of intensity reduction of acoustic fields generated by gas-dynamic jets of motors of the rocket-launch vehicles at launch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorobyov, A. M.; Abdurashidov, T. O.; Bakulev, V. L.; But, A. B.; Kuznetsov, A. B.; Makaveev, A. T.

    2015-04-01

    The present work experimentally investigates suppression of acoustic fields generated by supersonic jets of the rocket-launch vehicles at the initial period of launch by water injection. Water jets are injected to the combined jet along its perimeter at an angle of 0° and 60°. The solid rocket motor with the rocket-launch vehicles simulator case is used at tests. Effectiveness of reduction of acoustic loads on the rocket-launch vehicles surface by way of creation of water barrier was proved. It was determined that injection angle of 60° has greater effectiveness to reduce pressure pulsation levels.

  12. A field evaluation of an external and neutrally buoyant acoustic transmitter for juvenile salmon: implications for estimating hydroturbine passage survival.

    PubMed

    Brown, Richard S; Deng, Z Daniel; Cook, Katrina V; Pflugrath, Brett D; Li, Xinya; Fu, Tao; Martinez, Jayson J; Li, Huidong; Trumbo, Bradly A; Ahmann, Martin L; Seaburg, Adam G

    2013-01-01

    Turbine-passed fish are exposed to rapid decreases in pressure which can cause barotrauma. The presence of an implanted telemetry tag increases the likelihood of injury or death from exposure to pressure changes, thus potentially biasing studies evaluating survival of turbine-passed fish. Therefore, a neutrally buoyant externally attached tag was developed to eliminate this bias in turbine passage studies. This new tag was designed not to add excess mass in water or take up space in the coelom, having an effective tag burden of zero with the goal of reducing pressure related biases to turbine survival studies. To determine if this new tag affects fish performance or susceptibility to predation, it was evaluated in the field relative to internally implanted acoustic transmitters (JSATS; Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System) used widely for survival studies of juvenile salmonids. Survival and travel time through the study reach was compared between fish with either tag type in an area of high predation in the Snake and Columbia rivers, Washington. An additional group of fish affixed with neutrally-buoyant dummy external tags were implanted with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags and recovered further downstream to assess external tag retention and injury. There were no significant differences in survival to the first detection site, 12 river kilometers (rkm) downstream of release. Travel times were also similar between groups. Conversely, externally-tagged fish had reduced survival (or elevated tag loss) to the second detection site, 65 rkm downstream. In addition, the retention study revealed that tag loss was first observed in fish recaptured approximately 9 days after release. Results suggest that this new tag may be viable for short term (<8 days) single-dam turbine-passage studies and under these situations, may alleviate the turbine passage-related bias encountered when using internal tags, however further research is needed to confirm this. PMID

  13. A Field Evaluation of an External and Neutrally Buoyant Acoustic Transmitter for Juvenile Salmon: Implications for Estimating Hydroturbine Passage Survival

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Richard S.; Deng, Z. Daniel; Cook, Katrina V.; Pflugrath, Brett D.; Li, Xinya; Fu, Tao; Martinez, Jayson J.; Li, Huidong; Trumbo, Bradly A.; Ahmann, Martin L.; Seaburg, Adam G.

    2013-01-01

    Turbine-passed fish are exposed to rapid decreases in pressure which can cause barotrauma. The presence of an implanted telemetry tag increases the likelihood of injury or death from exposure to pressure changes, thus potentially biasing studies evaluating survival of turbine-passed fish. Therefore, a neutrally buoyant externally attached tag was developed to eliminate this bias in turbine passage studies. This new tag was designed not to add excess mass in water or take up space in the coelom, having an effective tag burden of zero with the goal of reducing pressure related biases to turbine survival studies. To determine if this new tag affects fish performance or susceptibility to predation, it was evaluated in the field relative to internally implanted acoustic transmitters (JSATS; Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System) used widely for survival studies of juvenile salmonids. Survival and travel time through the study reach was compared between fish with either tag type in an area of high predation in the Snake and Columbia rivers, Washington. An additional group of fish affixed with neutrally-buoyant dummy external tags were implanted with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags and recovered further downstream to assess external tag retention and injury. There were no significant differences in survival to the first detection site, 12 river kilometers (rkm) downstream of release. Travel times were also similar between groups. Conversely, externally-tagged fish had reduced survival (or elevated tag loss) to the second detection site, 65 rkm downstream. In addition, the retention study revealed that tag loss was first observed in fish recaptured approximately 9 days after release. Results suggest that this new tag may be viable for short term (<8 days) single-dam turbine-passage studies and under these situations, may alleviate the turbine passage-related bias encountered when using internal tags, however further research is needed to confirm this. PMID

  14. Field Trial of Distributed Acoustic Sensing Using Active Sources at Garner Valley, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H. F.; Lord, N. E.; Chalari, A.; Lancelle, C.; Baldwin, J. A.; Castongia, E.; Fratta, D.; Nigbor, R. L.; Karaulanov, R.

    2014-12-01

    An optical fiber Distributed Acoustic Sensor array was deployed in a shallow trench at the site of the Garner Valley Downhole Array (GVDA) in southern California. The site was operated as a collaborator of the Network for Earthquake Engineering Simulation (NEES) by UCSB. The fiber-optic cable layout approximated a rectangle whose dimensions were roughly 160 meters by 80 meters. The layout included two subdiagonals to provide a variety of orientations of the cable relative to source locations. The study included different seismic sources deployed at a number of surveyed positions: a 45 kN shear shaker operated at the site by NEES@UCLA, a portable 450 N shaker, a small Vibroseis truck, and hammer blows on a steel plate to map cable locations. Several dozen separate tests were recorded in which each test typically included ten repeats. The data were utilized for several studies. First, the characteristics of the recorded signals were analyzed for directivity and sensitivity of the cable response (Lancelle et al., 2014, this meeting). The DAS system recorded dynamic ground events in the direction of the cable and hence comparisons with geophones required signal processing. The one-meter spacing of DAS traces could be well correlated over distances of a few meters. Second, swept-sine sources were used to obtain surface-wave velocity dispersion to determine near-surface shear-wave velocity distribution using Multispectral Analysis of Surface Waves (MASW) (Baldwin et al., 2014, this meeting). The results were in good agreement with previous Vibroseis results at the site (Stokoe et al. 2004). Third, a new method for time-frequency filtering was developed for extracting the surface-wave phase velocities from uncorrelated receiver traces (Lord et al., 2014, this meeting).

  15. Near- to far-field characteristics of acoustic radiation through plug flow jets.

    PubMed

    Gabard, G

    2008-11-01

    This paper reports a theoretical study of the radiation of sound through jet exhausts. It focuses on the transition from near field to far field by considering the features of the near-field solution and how these features translate to the far field. The main focus of this work is the importance in some cases of lateral waves radiating from the jet. While the presence of lateral waves has long been recognized, there has been no systematic investigation of the practical consequences of these waves in the prediction of sound propagation through round jets. The physical mechanisms involved in the generation of these waves are presented as well as the conditions under which they become significant. Another issue is the possibility of "channeled waves" inside the jet associated with strong sound radiation in the forward arc. This paper also discusses the validity of the far-field approximation when lateral waves are present. It is shown that the standard far-field approximation can be improved by adding correction terms that account for the presence of the lateral waves and channeled waves. The challenge posed to computational aeroacoustics by these near-field effects is also discussed. PMID:19045763

  16. Sequencing of acoustic events in the near field of subsonic jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewalle, Jacques; Kan, Pinqing

    2013-11-01

    Our group has developed several pattern recognition algorithms to identify short events common to near-and far-field signals. Here we are treating far-field and near-field pressure data as well as TR-PIV (10kHz) sections through the near jet. Our algorithms are based on wavelet transforms (band-pass filtering) and cross-correlations, identifying short excerpts in the time-frequency-lag domain that contribute most to the correlations. Matching such events between multiple signal pairs exposes the sequencing of near-field activity. We consider only near-field events (NFEs) matched with a loud far-field event (FFE). The NFEs are based on the correlation of velocity, vorticity, 2-D divergence, Q-index and Kulite signals with far-field pressure. The timing of the NFEs maps out possible sequences of events related to loud coherent noise emission. Results at several subsonic Mach numbers are compared. This work is supported in part by Spectral Energies LLC, under an SBIR grant from AFRL; by a Syracuse University Graduate Fellowship; and by the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at SU.

  17. Modeling solar flare conduction fronts. I - Homogeneous plasmas and ion-acoustic turbulence. II - Inhomogeneous plasmas and ambipolar electric fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckean, M. E.; Winglee, R. M.; Dulk, G. A.

    1990-01-01

    A one-dimensional, electrostatic, particle-in-cell simulation is used here to model the expansion of a heated electron population in a coronal loop during a solar flare and the characteristics of the associated X-ray emissions. The hot electrons expand outward from the localized region, creating an ambipolar electric field which accelerates a return current of cooler, ambient electrons. Ion-acoustic waves are generated by the return currents as proposed by Brown et al. (1979), but they play little or no role in containing energetic electrons and the conduction front proposed by Brown et al. does not form. The X-ray emission efficiency of the electrons is too low in the corona for them to be the source of hard X-ray bursts. The particle dynamics changes dramatically if the heated plasma is at low altitudes and expands upward into the more tenuous plasma at higher altitudes. Two important applications of this finding are the radio-frequency heating of the corona and the collisional heating of the chromosphere by precipitating energetic electrons. In both cases, the overlying plasma has a density that is too low to supply a balancing return current to the expanding hot electrons. As a result, an ambipolar electric field develops that tends to confine the energetic electrons behind a front that propagate outward at about the speed of sound.

  18. Signatures of the Primordial Universe from Its Emptiness: Measurement of Baryon Acoustic Oscillations from Minima of the Density Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Liang, Yu; Zhao, Cheng; Tao, Charling; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Gil-Marín, Héctor; Kneib, Jean-Paul; McBride, Cameron; Percival, Will J.; Ross, Ashley J.; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Tinker, Jeremy; Tojeiro, Rita; Vargas-Magana, Mariana; Zhao, Gong-Bo

    2016-04-01

    Sound waves from the primordial fluctuations of the Universe imprinted in the large-scale structure, called baryon acoustic oscillations (BAOs), can be used as standard rulers to measure the scale of the Universe. These oscillations have already been detected in the distribution of galaxies. Here we propose to measure BAOs from the troughs (minima) of the density field. Based on two sets of accurate mock halo catalogues with and without BAOs in the seed initial conditions, we demonstrate that the BAO signal cannot be obtained from the clustering of classical disjoint voids, but it is clearly detected from overlapping voids. The latter represent an estimate of all troughs of the density field. We compute them from the empty circumsphere centers constrained by tetrahedra of galaxies using Delaunay triangulation. Our theoretical models based on an unprecedented large set of detailed simulated void catalogues are remarkably well confirmed by observational data. We use the largest recently publicly available sample of luminous red galaxies from SDSS-III BOSS DR11 to unveil for the first time a >3 σ BAO detection from voids in observations. Since voids are nearly isotropically expanding regions, their centers represent the most quiet places in the Universe, keeping in mind the cosmos origin and providing a new promising window in the analysis of the cosmological large-scale structure from galaxy surveys.

  19. Signatures of the Primordial Universe from Its Emptiness: Measurement of Baryon Acoustic Oscillations from Minima of the Density Field.

    PubMed

    Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Liang, Yu; Zhao, Cheng; Tao, Charling; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Gil-Marín, Héctor; Kneib, Jean-Paul; McBride, Cameron; Percival, Will J; Ross, Ashley J; Sánchez, Ariel G; Tinker, Jeremy; Tojeiro, Rita; Vargas-Magana, Mariana; Zhao, Gong-Bo

    2016-04-29

    Sound waves from the primordial fluctuations of the Universe imprinted in the large-scale structure, called baryon acoustic oscillations (BAOs), can be used as standard rulers to measure the scale of the Universe. These oscillations have already been detected in the distribution of galaxies. Here we propose to measure BAOs from the troughs (minima) of the density field. Based on two sets of accurate mock halo catalogues with and without BAOs in the seed initial conditions, we demonstrate that the BAO signal cannot be obtained from the clustering of classical disjoint voids, but it is clearly detected from overlapping voids. The latter represent an estimate of all troughs of the density field. We compute them from the empty circumsphere centers constrained by tetrahedra of galaxies using Delaunay triangulation. Our theoretical models based on an unprecedented large set of detailed simulated void catalogues are remarkably well confirmed by observational data. We use the largest recently publicly available sample of luminous red galaxies from SDSS-III BOSS DR11 to unveil for the first time a >3σ BAO detection from voids in observations. Since voids are nearly isotropically expanding regions, their centers represent the most quiet places in the Universe, keeping in mind the cosmos origin and providing a new promising window in the analysis of the cosmological large-scale structure from galaxy surveys. PMID:27176512

  20. Barometric and magnetic observations of vertical acoustic resonance and resultant generation of field-aligned current associated with earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyemori, Toshihiko; Tanaka, Yoshikazu; Odagi, Yoko; Sano, Yasuharu; Takeda, Masahiko; Nose, Masahito; Utsugi, Mitsuru; Rosales, Domingo; Choque, Edwin; Ishitsuka, Jose; Yamanaka, Sadato; Nakanishi, Kunihito; Matsumura, Mitsuru; Shinagawa, Hiroyuki

    2013-08-01

    Three rare occasions are introduced, where the excitation of vertical acoustic resonance between the ground and the ionosphere, and the resultant generation of a field-aligned current, just after earthquakes are observationally confirmed. In the case of two inland earthquakes, barometric observations very close to the epicenters (i.e., only 30 km apart) were available, and they showed a sharp spectral peak which appeared within one hour after the origin time and lasted a few hours. The observed periods of the spectral peaks around 260 seconds are close to the period of the theoretically-expected fundamental mode of the resonance. On the other hand, magnetic observations on the ground showed a dominant period at 220-230 seconds which corresponds to the first overtone among theoretically-expected major resonance peaks. In the third case, i.e., during the 2010 Chile earthquake, a long-period magnetic oscillation in the east-west direction, which has two major resonance periods at 265 and 190-195 seconds, was observed on the night-side magnetic dip equator in Peru, where the distance is more than 2600 km from the epicenter, under a very quiet geomagnetic condition. The oscillation was interpreted as the effect of field-aligned current generated through a dynamo process in the ionosphere over the epicenter caused by the resonance.

  1. Compression and Cavitation of Externally Applied Magnetic Field on a Hohlraum due to Non-Local Heat Flow Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joglekar, Archis; Thomas, Alec; Ridgers, Chris; Kingham, Rob

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we present full-scale 2D kinetic modeling of externally imposed magnetic fields on hohlraums with laser heating. We observe magnetic field cavitation and compression due to thermal energy transport. Self-consistent modeling of the electron momentum equation allows for a complete treatment of the heat flow equation and Ohm's Law. A complete Ohm's Law contains magnetic field advection through the Nernst mechanism that arises due to the heat flow. Magnetic field amplification by a factor of 3 occurs due to magnetic flux pile-up from Nernst convection. The magnetic field cavitates towards the hohlraum axis over a 0.5 ns time scale due to Nernst convection. This results in significantly different magnetic field profiles and slower cavitation than can be expected due to the plasma bulk flow. Non-local electrons contribute to the heat flow down the density gradient resulting in an augmented Nernst convection mechanism that is included self-consistently through kinetic modeling. In addition to showing the prevalence of non-local heat flows, we show effects such as anomalous heat flow up the density gradient induced by inverse bremsstrahlung heating. This research was supported by the DOE through Grant No. DE SC0010621 and in part through computational resources and services provided by Advanced Research Computing at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

  2. The acoustic far-field of rigid bodies in arbitrary motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farassat, F.

    1974-01-01

    The far-field sound produced by a rigid body in arbitrary motion, with shock discontinuities close to the body, is studied. The analysis is based on the work of Ffowcs Williams and Hawkings (1969). An expression for the far-field sound pressure is obtained in the form of surface and line integrals carried out over a contracting sphere and its intersection with the body and shock surfaces. It is also found that in addition to the quadrupole distribution, the discontinuities in Lighthill stress at the shock, the fluid stresses at the body surface, and the curvatures (principal and mean) of the body and shock surfaces contribute to the sound field. Two examples are worked out.

  3. Primary beam steering due to field leakage from superconducting SHMS magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Michael H.; Waidyawansa, Buddhini P.; Covrig, Silviu; Carlini, Roger; Benesch, Jay

    2014-11-05

    In this study, simulations of the magnetic fields from the Super High Momentum Spectrometer in Hall C at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility show significant field leakage into the region of the primary beam line between the target and the beam dump. Without mitigation, these remnant fields will steer the unscattered beam enough to limit beam operations at small scattering angles. Presented here are magnetic field simulations of the spectrometer magnets and a solution using optimal placement of a minimal amount of shielding iron around the beam line.

  4. Inner Core Anisotropy Due to the Magnetic Field--induced Preferred Orientation of Iron.

    PubMed

    Karato, S

    1993-12-10

    Anisotropy of the inner core of the Earth is proposed to result from the lattice preferred orientation of anisotropic iron crystals during their solidification in the presence of a magnetic field. The resultant seismic anisotropy is related to the geometry of the magnetic field in the core. This hypothesis implies that the observed anisotropy (fast velocity along the rotation axis) indicates a strong toroidal field in the core, which supports a strong field model for the geodynamo if the inner core is made of hexagonal close-packed iron. PMID:17781788

  5. Primary beam steering due to field leakage from superconducting SHMS magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, M. H.; Waidyawansa, B. P.; Covrig, S.; Carlini, R.; Benesch, J.

    2014-11-01

    Simulations of the magnetic fields from the Super High Momentum Spectrometer in Hall C at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility show significant field leakage into the region of the primary beam line between the target and the beam dump. Without mitigation, these remnant fields will steer the unscattered beam enough to limit beam operations at small scattering angles. Presented here are magnetic field simulations of the spectrometer magnets and a solution using optimal placement of a minimal amount of shielding iron around the beam line.

  6. Acoustic spin pumping in magnetoelectric bulk acoustic wave resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polzikova, N. I.; Alekseev, S. G.; Pyataikin, I. I.; Kotelyanskii, I. M.; Luzanov, V. A.; Orlov, A. P.

    2016-05-01

    We present the generation and detection of spin currents by using magnetoelastic resonance excitation in a magnetoelectric composite high overtone bulk acoustic wave (BAW) resonator (HBAR) formed by a Al-ZnO-Al-GGG-YIG-Pt structure. Transversal BAW drives magnetization oscillations in YIG film at a given resonant magnetic field, and the resonant magneto-elastic coupling establishes the spin-current generation at the Pt/YIG interface. Due to the inverse spin Hall effect (ISHE) this BAW-driven spin current is converted to a dc voltage in the Pt layer. The dependence of the measured voltage both on magnetic field and frequency has a resonant character. The voltage is determined by the acoustic power in HBAR and changes its sign upon magnetic field reversal. We compare the experimentally observed amplitudes of the ISHE electrical field achieved by our method and other approaches to spin current generation that use surface acoustic waves and microwave resonators for ferromagnetic resonance excitation, with the theoretically expected values.

  7. Acoustic assessments of the severity of grub infestations in Queensland sugarcane fields

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Effective management of sugarcane, Queensland's 2nd-most-important crop, currently requires the digging-up of large numbers of cane stools to estimate populations of Dermolepida albohirtum and Antitrogus parvulus grubs. In recent field tests, these relatively large, active grubs were easily detecte...

  8. Laminar and turbulent nozzle-jet flows and their acoustic near-field

    SciTech Connect

    Bühler, Stefan; Obrist, Dominik; Kleiser, Leonhard

    2014-08-15

    We investigate numerically the effects of nozzle-exit flow conditions on the jet-flow development and the near-field sound at a diameter-based Reynolds number of Re{sub D} = 18 100 and Mach number Ma = 0.9. Our computational setup features the inclusion of a cylindrical nozzle which allows to establish a physical nozzle-exit flow and therefore well-defined initial jet-flow conditions. Within the nozzle, the flow is modeled by a potential flow core and a laminar, transitional, or developing turbulent boundary layer. The goal is to document and to compare the effects of the different jet inflows on the jet flow development and the sound radiation. For laminar and transitional boundary layers, transition to turbulence in the jet shear layer is governed by the development of Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities. With the turbulent nozzle boundary layer, the jet flow development is characterized by a rapid changeover to a turbulent free shear layer within about one nozzle diameter. Sound pressure levels are strongly enhanced for laminar and transitional exit conditions compared to the turbulent case. However, a frequency and frequency-wavenumber analysis of the near-field pressure indicates that the dominant sound radiation characteristics remain largely unaffected. By applying a recently developed scaling procedure, we obtain a close match of the scaled near-field sound spectra for all nozzle-exit turbulence levels and also a reasonable agreement with experimental far-field data.

  9. Electomagnetic field due to a non-axisymmetric current loop around Kerr blackhole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, U. S.; Dubey, G. S.

    1983-12-01

    The authors derive expressions for the electromagnetic field of a non-axisymmetric current loop around a Kerr blackhole. Complete solution for the "inside" as well as the "outside" regions of the current loop are determined using vacuum solutions of King (1977). A particular solution, the electromagnetic field of an equatorial current loop, is explicitly derived.

  10. Flute stabilization due to ponderomotive force created by an rf field with a variable gradient

    SciTech Connect

    Yasaka, Y.; Itatani, R.

    1986-06-30

    An rf-stabilization experiment was performed in the axisymmetric single-mirror device HIEI by controlling the radial-gradient scale length of the rf field with the aid of an azimuthally phased antenna array. The flute stability depends sensitively on the scale length of the perpendicular rf electric field, which shows that rf stabilization is caused by the ponderomotive force for ions.

  11. Acoustic velocity measurement by means of Laser Doppler Velocimetry: Development of an Extended Kalman Filter and validation in free-field measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Duff, Alain; Plantier, Guy; Valière, Jean C.; Gazengel, Bruno

    2016-03-01

    A signal processing technique, based on the use of an Extended Kalman Filter, has been developed to measure sound fields by means of Laser Doppler Velocimetry in weak flow. This method allows for the parametric estimation of both the acoustic particle and flow velocity for a forced sine-wave excitation where the acoustic frequency is known. The measurements are performed from the in-phase and the quadrature components of the Doppler downshifted signal thanks to an analog quadrature demodulation technique. Then, the estimated performance is illustrated by means of Monte-Carlo simulations obtained from synthesized signals and compared with asymptotic and analytical forms for the Cramer-Rao Bounds. Results allow the validity domain of the method to be defined and show the availability for free-field measurements in a large range. Finally, an application based on real data obtained in free field is presented.

  12. Heating in the MRI environment due to superparamagnetic fluid suspensions in a rotating magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantillon-Murphy, P.; Wald, L. L.; Adalsteinsson, E.; Zahn, M.

    2010-03-01

    In the presence of alternating-sinusoidal or rotating magnetic fields, magnetic nanoparticles will act to realign their magnetic moment with the applied magnetic field. The realignment is characterized by the nanoparticle's time constant, τ. As the magnetic field frequency is increased, the nanoparticle's magnetic moment lags the applied magnetic field at a constant angle for a given frequency, Ω, in rad/s. Associated with this misalignment is a power dissipation that increases the bulk magnetic fluid's temperature which has been utilized as a method of magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia, particularly suited for cancer in low-perfusion tissue (e.g., breast) where temperature increases of between 4 and 7 degree Centigrade above the ambient in vivo temperature cause tumor hyperthermia. This work examines the rise in the magnetic fluid's temperature in the MRI environment which is characterized by a large DC field, B0. Theoretical analysis and simulation is used to predict the effect of both alternating-sinusoidal and rotating magnetic fields transverse to B0. Results are presented for the expected temperature increase in small tumors (approximately 1 cm radius) over an appropriate range of magnetic fluid concentrations (0.002-0.01 solid volume fraction) and nanoparticle radii (1-10 nm). The results indicate that significant heating can take place, even in low-field MRI systems where magnetic fluid saturation is not significant, with careful selection of the rotating or sinusoidal field parameters (field frequency and amplitude). The work indicates that it may be feasible to combine low-field MRI with a magnetic hyperthermia system using superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles.

  13. Heating in the MRI environment due to superparamagnetic fluid suspensions in a rotating magnetic field

    PubMed Central

    Wald, L.L.; Adalsteinsson, E.; Zahn, M.

    2009-01-01

    In the presence of alternating-sinusoidal or rotating magnetic fields, magnetic nanoparticles will act to realign their magnetic moment with the applied magnetic field. The realignment is characterized by the nanoparticle’s time constant, τ. As the magnetic field frequency is increased, the nanoparticle’s magnetic moment lags the applied magnetic field at a constant angle for a given frequency, Ω, in rad/s. Associated with this misalignment is a power dissipation that increases the bulk magnetic fluid’s temperature which has been utilized as a method of magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia, particularly suited for cancer in low-perfusion tissue (e.g., breast) where temperature increases of between 4°C and 7°C above the ambient in vivo temperature cause tumor hyperthermia. This work examines the rise in the magnetic fluid’s temperature in the MRI environment which is characterized by a large DC field, B0. Theoretical analysis and simulation is used to predict the effect of both alternating-sinusoidal and rotating magnetic fields transverse to B0. Results are presented for the expected temperature increase in small tumors (~1 cm radius) over an appropriate range of magnetic fluid concentrations (0.002 to 0.01 solid volume fraction) and nanoparticle radii (1 to 10 nm). The results indicate that significant heating can take place, even in low-field MRI systems where magnetic fluid saturation is not significant, with careful selection of the rotating or sinusoidal field parameters (field frequency and amplitude). The work indicates that it may be feasible to combine low-field MRI with a magnetic hyperthermia system using superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. PMID:20161608

  14. Acoustical Environment of School Buildings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzroy, Dariel; Reid, John L.

    A field study was made of the acoustical environment of schools designed for increased flexibility to meet the spatial requirements of new teaching methods. The object of the study was to define all the criteria for the acoustical design of this type of classroom including the determination of--(1) minimum acoustical separation required for…

  15. ACOUSTICAL ENVIRONMENT OF SCHOOL BUILDINGS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FITZROY, DARIEL; REID, JOHN L.

    A FIELD STUDY WAS MADE OF THE ACOUSTICAL ENVIRONMENT OF SCHOOLS DESIGNED FOR INCREASED FLEXIBILITY TO MEET THE SPATIAL REQUIREMENTS OF NEW TEACHING METHODS. THE OBJECT OF THE STUDY WAS TO DEFINE ALL THE CRITERIA FOR THE ACOUSTICAL DESIGN OF THIS TYPE OF CLASSROOM INCLUDING THE DETERMINATION OF--(1) MINIMUM ACOUSTICAL SEPARATION REQUIRED FOR…

  16. Ducted fan acoustic radiation including the effects of nonuniform mean flow and acoustic treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eversman, Walter; Roy, Indranil Danda

    1993-01-01

    Forward and aft acoustic propagation and radiation from a ducted fan is modeled using a finite element discretization of the acoustic field equations. The fan noise source is introduced as equivalent body forces representing distributed blade loading. The flow in and around the nacelle is assumed to be nonuniform, reflecting the effects of forward flight and flow into the inlet. Refraction due to the fan exit jet shear layer is not represented. Acoustic treatment on the inlet and exhaust duct surfaces provides a mechanism for attenuation. In a region enclosing the fan a pressure formulation is used with the assumption of locally uniform flow. Away from the fan a velocity potential formulation is used and the flow is assumed nonuniform but irrotational. A procedure is developed for matching the two regions by making use of local duct modal amplitudes as transition state variables and determining the amplitudes by enforcing natural boundary conditions at the interface between adjacent regions in which pressure and velocity potential are used. Simple models of rotor alone and rotor/exit guide vane generated noise are used to demonstrate the calculation of the radiated acoustic field and to show the effect of acoustic treatment. The model has been used to assess the success of four techniques for acoustic lining optimization in reducing far field noise.

  17. Near-Field Acoustic Power Level Analysis of F31/A31 Open Rotor Model at Simulated Cruise Conditions, Technical Report II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sree, Dave

    2015-01-01

    Near-field acoustic power level analysis of F31A31 open rotor model has been performed to determine its noise characteristics at simulated cruise flight conditions. The non-proprietary parts of the test data obtained from experiments in the 8x6 supersonic wind tunnel were provided by NASA-Glenn Research Center. The tone and broadband components of total noise have been separated from raw test data by using a new data analysis tool. Results in terms of sound pressure levels, acoustic power levels, and their variations with rotor speed, freestream Mach number, and input shaft power, with different blade-pitch setting angles at simulated cruise flight conditions, are presented and discussed. Empirical equations relating models acoustic power level and input shaft power have been developed. The near-field acoustic efficiency of the model at simulated cruise conditions is also determined. It is hoped that the results presented in this work will serve as a database for comparison and improvement of other open rotor blade designs and also for validating open rotor noise prediction codes.

  18. Fresh and evolutionary-type field-aligned irregularities generated near sunrise terminator due to overshielding electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tulasi Ram, S.; Ajith, K. K.; Yamamoto, M.; Otsuka, Y.; Yokoyama, T.; Niranjan, K.; Gurubaran, S.

    2015-07-01

    The unusual evolution of fresh and intense field-aligned irregularities (FAI) near sunrise terminator which further sustained for more than 90 min of postsunrise period was observed by Equatorial Atmosphere Radar at Kototabang during a minor geomagnetic storm period. These FAI echoes were initially observed around 250-350 km altitudes, growing upward under eastward polarization electric fields indicating the plasma bubbles that are fully depleted along the flux tube. The background low-latitude F layer dynamics that lead to the development of these dawn time FAI have been investigated from two ionosondes at near magnetic conjugate low-latitude locations. A minor geomagnetic storm was in progress which did not appear to cause any large electric field perturbations at preceding postsunset to midnight period over Indonesian sector. However, the prompt penetration of overshielding electric fields associated with sudden northward turning of interplanetary magnetic field Bz caused spectacular ascent of F layer and development of fresh, intense, and upward evolutionary plasma bubbles near sunrise terminator.

  19. Transient electric field at high altitudes due to lightning: Possible role of induction field in the formation of elves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Gaopeng

    2006-01-01

    Space and time behaviors of electric field perturbation vector at high altitudes driven by lightning return stroke are examined in terms of its three individual components (i.e., electrostatic, induction, and radiation) with transmission line model, by specifying the current form in a return stroke channel, which is presumed to be vertically oriented. The result shows that at 90 km altitude, the induction E-field dominates in a small region with a radius of ˜11 km (depending on the speed of return stroke) directly above the lightning region, with a magnitude comparable to radiation field and a relatively longer timescale. We conclude that in addition to the radiation field considered in previous theoretical modeling, the induction component in lightning E-field is likely one new energy source for the creation of elves. This might be able to explain the observed pancake shape of some elves with a luminous central part, while the more complete modeling including the formation mechanism of elves is required.

  20. Multi-field characteristics and eigenmode spatial structure of geodesic acoustic modes in DIII-D L-mode plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, G.; Peebles, W. A.; Rhodes, T. L.; Doyle, E. J.; Hillesheim, J. C.; Schmitz, L.; Zeng, L.; Austin, M. E.; Yan, Z.; McKee, G. R.; La Haye, R. J.; Burrell, K. H.; Lanctot, M. J.; Petty, C. C.; Smith, S.; Strait, E. J.; Van Zeeland, M.; Nazikian, R.

    2013-09-15

    The geodesic acoustic mode (GAM), a coherent form of the zonal flow, plays a critical role in turbulence regulation and cross-magnetic-field transport. In the DIII-D tokamak, unique information on multi-field characteristics and radial structure of eigenmode GAMs has been measured. Two simultaneous and distinct, radially overlapping eigenmode GAMs (i.e., constant frequency vs. radius) have been observed in the poloidal E×B flow in L-mode plasmas. As the plasma transitions from an L-mode to an Ohmic regime, one of these eigenmode GAMs becomes a continuum GAM (frequency responds to local parameters), while the second decays below the noise level. The eigenmode GAMs occupy a radial range of ρ = 0.6–0.8 and 0.75–0.95, respectively. In addition, oscillations at the GAM frequency are observed for the first time in multiple plasma parameters, including n{sub e}, T{sub e}, and B{sub θ}. The magnitude of T(tilde sign){sub e}/T{sub e} at the GAM frequency (the magnitude is similar to that of ñ{sub e}/n{sub e}) and measured n{sub e}–T{sub e} cross-phase (∼140° at the GAM frequency) together indicate that the GAM pressure perturbation is not determined solely by ñ{sub e}. The magnetic GAM behavior, a feature only rarely reported, is significantly stronger (×18) on the high-field side of the tokamak, suggesting an anti-ballooning nature. Finally, the GAM is also observed to directly modify intermediate-wavenumber ñ{sub e} levels (kρ{sub s} ∼ 1.1). The simultaneous temperature, density, flow fluctuations, density-temperature cross-phase, and magnetic behavior present a new perspective on the underlying physics of the GAM.

  1. Acoustic loading in straight pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Raheb, M.

    1980-01-01

    Based on linear one-dimensional acoustics, a geometrically perfect elastic waveguide would respond to an oscillatory internal pressure only in the presence of path deflectors (elbows and branches). In practice, a significant elasto-acoustic interaction results even in straight conduits as a result of manufacturing tolerances. A theoretical model of the linear acoustic loading in straight pipes is developed that considers the acoustic wave distortion due to perimeter, axial, and wall thickness nonuniformities.

  2. Near-field acoustic characteristics of a single-rotor propfan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartel, H. W.; Swift, G.

    1989-01-01

    The near-field noise characteristics of the SR-7L, an eight-blade, single-rotor, wing-mounted, tractor propfan have been determined. It is found that the noise is dominated by discrete tones, usually at the first order (and occasionally at the second or third order) of the blade-passage frequency. The highest noise levels were noted at conditions of high tip helical speeds and high dynamic pressures.

  3. Acoustical modal analysis of the pressure field in the tailpipe of a turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krejsa, E. A.; Karchmer, A. M.

    1983-01-01

    The results of a modal analysis of the pressure field in the tailpipe of a turbofan engine are presented. Modal amplitudes, at the tailpipe inlet and exit, are presented, as a function of frequency, for several operating conditions. The modal amplitudes were obtained using an optimization routine to obtain a best fit between measured cross spectra and an analytical expression for the cross spectra between pressures at circumferentially spaced locations. The measured pressure field was decomposed into a set of five modal amplitudes corresponding to the (0,0), (1,0), (2,0), (3,0), and (4,0) modes. The analysis was limited to frequencies below 1500 Hz where higher order modes are cutoff. The results of the analysis showed that at low frequencies, up to the cuton frequency of the (1,0) mode, the (0,0) mode (plane wave) dominated the pressure field. The frequency range from the cuton of the (1,0) mode to the cuton of the (2,0) mode was dominated by the (1,0) mode. The (2,0) mode dominated from its cuton frequency to the upper limit of the analysis, i.e., 1500 Hz. The contribution of modes other than the dominant mode was usually small.

  4. Accelerated adsorption by activated carbon powders in the presence of an acoustic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, Timothy W.; Meegan, G. Douglas; Peterson, Chris E.

    2003-10-01

    Vaporous contaminants can be removed from a gas stream by adsorption into powdered activated carbon (PAC). For example, the injection of PAC upstream of particle collectors is the leading approach for the removal of mercury vapor from the exhaust streams of incinerators and coal fired power plants. The removal of dilute vapors, though, can require significant time and significant quantities of PAC. A numerical model will be described that suggests that the adsorption process can be accelerated by applying an intense sound field to the gas after the PAC is injected. It is theorized that a sound field improves diffusion limited adsorption reactions by creating an oscillatory motion of the gas relative to the activated carbon particles. The translation effectively mixes the particles and gas on a microscopic scale and improves the concentration gradient at the surface of the PAC. Results from the numerical model suggest that adsorption rates can be increased by over 50% with the application of an appropriate sound field. Simple laboratory experiments have been performed studying the adsorption of dilute vaporous ethanol in air, and the results support the model. Data has also been collected at a coal fired power plant that demonstrates the improved adsorption of mercury vapor.

  5. Kilotesla Magnetic Field due to a Capacitor-Coil Target Driven by High Power Laser

    PubMed Central

    Fujioka, Shinsuke; Zhang, Zhe; Ishihara, Kazuhiro; Shigemori, Keisuke; Hironaka, Youichiro; Johzaki, Tomoyuki; Sunahara, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Naoji; Nakashima, Hideki; Watanabe, Tsuguhiro; Shiraga, Hiroyuki; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Azechi, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Laboratory generation of strong magnetic fields opens new frontiers in plasma and beam physics, astro- and solar-physics, materials science, and atomic and molecular physics. Although kilotesla magnetic fields have already been produced by magnetic flux compression using an imploding metal tube or plasma shell, accessibility at multiple points and better controlled shapes of the field are desirable. Here we have generated kilotesla magnetic fields using a capacitor-coil target, in which two nickel disks are connected by a U-turn coil. A magnetic flux density of 1.5 kT was measured using the Faraday effect 650 μm away from the coil, when the capacitor was driven by two beams from the GEKKO-XII laser (at 1 kJ (total), 1.3 ns, 0.53 or 1 μm, and 5 × 1016 W/cm2). PMID:23378905

  6. Primary Beam Steering Due To Field Leakage From Superconducting SHMS Magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Michael; Covrig, Silviu; Carlini, Roger; Waidyawansa, Buddhini; Benesch, Jay

    2014-03-01

    The Super High Momentum Spectrometer (SHMS) was designed for the 12 GeV/c physics program in Hall C at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator (JLab). At JLab an electron beam impinges on a fixed target and scattered particles are analyzed with magnetic spectrometers. The SHMS angular acceptance is 5 .5° <= θ <=40° . When positioned at θ = 5 .5° and full field strength the external fields from the magnets are large enough to steer the unscattered primary beam away from the beam dump window located 51.8 m from the target. The effects of these magnetic fields on the primary beam line downstream of the target are studied using Opera 3-D and TOSCA. A solution is presented that uses passive elements to shape these fields and assure that the primary beam is steered onto the beam dump window.

  7. Computation of induced electric field and temperature elevation in human due to lightning current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagai, T.; Hirata, A.

    2010-05-01

    The present study investigated induced electric field and temperature elevation in specific tissues/organs of an anatomically based human body model for the lightning current. The threshold amplitude of the current inducing ventricular fibrillation and skin burning are estimated from computed induced electric field and temperature elevation with formulas for electrical stimulation and thermal damage. The computational results obtained herein were reasonably consistent with clinical observation.

  8. Alignment of Iron Nanoparticles in a Magnetic Field Due to Shape Anisotropy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Radhakrishnan, Balasubramaniam; Nicholson, Don M; Eisenbach, Markus; Ludtka, Gerard Michael; Rios, Orlando; Parish, Chad M

    2015-07-09

    During high magnetic field processing there is evidence for alignment of non-spherical metallic particles above the Curie temperature in alloys with negligible magneto-crystalline anisotropy. The main driving force for alignment is the magnetic shape anisotropy. Current understanding of the phenomenon is not adequate to quantify the effect of particle size, aspect ratio, temperature and the magnetic field on particle alignment. We demonstrate a Monte Carlo approach coupled with size scaling to show the conditions under which alignment is possible.

  9. Simulations of magnetic field gradients due to micro-magnets on a triple quantum dot circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulin-Lamarre, G.; Bureau-Oxton, C.; Kam, A.; Zawadzki, P.; Studenikin, S.; Aers, G.; Pioro-Ladrière, M.; Sachrajda, A. S.

    2013-12-01

    To quantify the effects of local magnetic fields on triple quantum dots, the Heisenberg Hamiltonian has been diagonalized for three electrons coupled via the exchange interaction. In particular, we have investigated different geometries of micro-magnets located on top of the triple dot in order to optimize the field gradient characteristics. In this paper, we focus on two geometries which are candidates for an addressable EDSR triple quantum dot device.

  10. Simulations of magnetic field gradients due to micro-magnets on a triple quantum dot circuit

    SciTech Connect

    Poulin-Lamarre, G.; Bureau-Oxton, C.; Kam, A.; Zawadzki, P.; Aers, G.; Studenikin, S.; Pioro-Ladrière, M.; Sachrajda, A. S.

    2013-12-04

    To quantify the effects of local magnetic fields on triple quantum dots, the Heisenberg Hamiltonian has been diagonalized for three electrons coupled via the exchange interaction. In particular, we have investigated different geometries of micro-magnets located on top of the triple dot in order to optimize the field gradient characteristics. In this paper, we focus on two geometries which are candidates for an addressable EDSR triple quantum dot device.

  11. Phase shifts in precision atom interferometry due to the localization of atoms and optical fields

    SciTech Connect

    Wicht, A.; Sarajlic, E.; Hensley, J.M.; Chu, S.

    2005-08-15

    We discuss details of momentum transfer in the interaction between localized atoms and localized optical fields which are relevant to precision atom interferometry. Specifically, we consider a {lambda}-type atom coherently driven between its ground states by a bichromatic optical field. We assume that the excited state can be eliminated adiabatically from the time evolution. It is shown that the average recoil momentum is given by the phase gradient of the two-photon field at the 'position' of the atom, provided that the optical field can be described by a function which is separable in position and time and that the atomic wave function is symmetric and well localized within the optical field envelope. The result does not require the optical fields to have a Gaussian spatial dependence. Our discussion provides the basis for the analysis of systematic errors in precision atom interferometry arising from optical wave-front curvature, wave-front distortion, and the Gouy phase shift of Gaussian beams. We apply our result to the atom interferometer experiment of Chu and co-workers which measures the fine-structure constant.

  12. A Small Acoustic Goniometer for General Purpose Research

    PubMed Central

    Pook, Michael L.; Loo, Sin Ming

    2016-01-01

    Understanding acoustic events and monitoring their occurrence is a useful aspect of many research projects. In particular, acoustic goniometry allows researchers to determine the source of an event based solely on the sound it produces. The vast majority of acoustic goniometry research projects used custom hardware targeted to the specific application under test. Unfortunately, due to the wide range of sensing applications, a flexible general purpose hardware/firmware system does not exist for this purpose. This article focuses on the development of such a system which encourages the continued exploration of general purpose hardware/firmware and lowers barriers to research in projects requiring the use of acoustic goniometry. Simulations have been employed to verify system feasibility, and a complete hardware implementation of the acoustic goniometer has been designed and field tested. The results are reported, and suggested areas for improvement and further exploration are discussed. PMID:27136563

  13. A Small Acoustic Goniometer for General Purpose Research.

    PubMed

    Pook, Michael L; Loo, Sin Ming

    2016-01-01

    Understanding acoustic events and monitoring their occurrence is a useful aspect of many research projects. In particular, acoustic goniometry allows researchers to determine the source of an event based solely on the sound it produces. The vast majority of acoustic goniometry research projects used custom hardware targeted to the specific application under test. Unfortunately, due to the wide range of sensing applications, a flexible general purpose hardware/firmware system does not exist for this purpose. This article focuses on the development of such a system which encourages the continued exploration of general purpose hardware/firmware and lowers barriers to research in projects requiring the use of acoustic goniometry. Simulations have been employed to verify system feasibility, and a complete hardware implementation of the acoustic goniometer has been designed and field tested. The results are reported, and suggested areas for improvement and further exploration are discussed. PMID:27136563

  14. Modelling of the acoustic field of a multi-element HIFU array scattered by human ribs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gélat, Pierre; ter Haar, Gail; Saffari, Nader

    2011-09-01

    The efficacy of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) for the treatment of a range of different cancers, including those of the liver, prostate and breast, has been demonstrated. As a non-invasive focused therapy, HIFU offers considerable advantages over techniques such as chemotherapy and surgical resection in terms of reduced risk of harmful side effects. Despite this, there are a number of significant challenges which currently hinder its widespread clinical application. One of these challenges is the need to transmit sufficient energy through the rib cage to induce tissue necrosis in the required volume whilst minimizing the formation of side lobes. Multi-element random-phased arrays are currently showing great promise in overcoming the limitations of single-element transducers. Nevertheless, successful treatment of a patient with liver tumours requires a thorough understanding of the way in which the ultrasonic pressure field from a HIFU array is scattered by the rib cage. In order to address this, a boundary element approach based on a generalized minimal residual (GMRES) implementation of the Burton-Miller formulation was used in conjunction with phase conjugation techniques to focus the field of a 256-element random HIFU array behind human ribs at locations requiring intercostal and transcostal treatment. Simulations were carried out on a 3D mesh of quadratic pressure patches generated using CT scan anatomical data for adult ribs 9-12 on the right side. The methodology was validated on spherical and cylindrical scatterers. Field calculations were also carried out for idealized ribs, consisting of arrays of strip-like scatterers, demonstrating effects of splitting at the focus. This method has the advantage of fully accounting for the effect of scattering and diffraction in 3D under continuous wave excitation.

  15. Analytical and experimental study of the acoustics and the flow field characteristics of cavitating self-resonating water jets

    SciTech Connect

    Chahine, G.L.; Genoux, P.F.; Johnson, V.E. Jr.; Frederick, G.S.

    1984-09-01

    Waterjet nozzles (STRATOJETS) have been developed which achieve passive structuring of cavitating submerged jets into discrete ring vortices, and which possess cavitation incipient numbers six times higher than obtained with conventional cavitating jet nozzles. In this study we developed analytical and numerical techniques and conducted experimental work to gain an understanding of the basic phenomena involved. The achievements are: (1) a thorough analysis of the acoustic dynamics of the feed pipe to the nozzle; (2) a theory for bubble ring growth and collapse; (3) a numerical model for jet simulation; (4) an experimental observation and analysis of candidate second-generation low-sigma STRATOJETS. From this study we can conclude that intensification of bubble ring collapse and design of highly resonant feed tubes can lead to improved drilling rates. The models here described are excellent tools to analyze the various parameters needed for STRATOJET optimizations. Further analysis is needed to introduce such important factors as viscosity, nozzle-jet interaction, and ring-target interaction, and to develop the jet simulation model to describe the important fine details of the flow field at the nozzle exit.

  16. Numerical analysis of the transportation characteristics of a self-running sliding stage based on near-field acoustic levitation.

    PubMed

    Feng, Kai; Liu, Yuanyuan; Cheng, Miaomiao

    2015-12-01

    Owing to its distinct non-contact and oil-free characteristics, a self-running sliding stage based on near-field acoustic levitation can be used in an environment, which demands clean rooms and zero noise. This paper presents a numerical analysis on the lifting and transportation capacity of a non-contact transportation system. Two simplified structure models, namely, free vibration and force vibration models, are proposed for the study of the displacement amplitude distribution of two cases using the finite element method. After coupling the stage displacement into the film thickness, the Reynolds equation is solved by the finite difference method to obtain the lifting and thrusting forces. Parametric analyses of the effects of amplitude, frequency, and standing wave ratio (SWR) on the sliding stage dynamic performance are investigated. Numerical results show good agreement with published experimental values. The predictions also reveal that greater transportation capacity of the self-running sliding stage is generally achieved at less SWR and at higher amplitude. PMID:26723328

  17. Quantitative measurement of in-plane acoustic field components using surface-mounted fiber sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Claus, Richard O.; Dhawan, Rajat R.; Gunther, Michael F.; Murphy, Kent A.

    1993-01-01

    Extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometric sensors have been used to obtain calibrated, quantitative measurements of the in-plane displacement components associated with the propagation of ultrasonic elastic stress waves on the surfaces of solids. The frequency response of the sensor is determined by the internal spacing between the two reflecting fiber endface surfaces which form the Fabry-Perot cavity, a distance which is easily controlled during fabrication. With knowledge of the material properties of the solid, the out-of-plane displacement component of the wave may also be determined, giving full field data.

  18. Noise due to field- and current instabilities in CdS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böer, Karl W.

    1999-04-01

    In this review paper, we summerize the field and current instabilities that occur when the conductivity decreases more than linearly with increasing field, or increases sufficient steeply with increased current density. In both cases well defined transition ranges exist that causes a chaotic development of field-or current-inhomogeneities, respectively. These are the ranges in which substantial additional low-frequency electronic noise is generated that shows a typical 1/f behavior. Field instabilities occur in a range of an N-shaped current-voltage characteristic that result in high-field domains which can be stationary or move through the device and cause a stationary or oscillating reduction in current. The latter, as the Gunn effect, enjoys technical application as an ac generator. In CdS the negative differential conductivity regime is trap-controlled and thereby kinetic effects are slowed down so that they can be observed visually, using the Franz-Keldysh effect. During such observation, chaotic effects can be seen before the periodic oscillations are organized, and cause a substantial increase in low-frequency noise. The chaotic initiation of well organized periodically moving high-field domains are discussed in a phase-portrait analysis of the nonlinear dynamics for pattern formation in semiconductor devices. Also in an S-shaped characteristic that is initiated by substantial Joule's heating and yields current channel formation, current instabilities can occur that lead to low frequency noise. The related phenomena are briefly summerized in this review. The experimental evidence of these chaotic developments of field- and current-instabilities is shown during the oral presentation in a movie, using electro-optical or electro-thermo-optical effects for visualization.

  19. Towards direct realisation of the SI unit of sound pressure in the audible hearing range based on optical free-field acoustic particle measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koukoulas, Triantafillos; Piper, Ben

    2015-04-01

    Since the introduction of the International System of Units (the SI system) in 1960, weights, measures, standardised approaches, procedures, and protocols have been introduced, adapted, and extensively used. A major international effort and activity concentrate on the definition and traceability of the seven base SI units in terms of fundamental constants, and consequently those units that are derived from the base units. In airborne acoustical metrology and for the audible range of frequencies up to 20 kHz, the SI unit of sound pressure, the pascal, is realised indirectly and without any knowledge or measurement of the sound field. Though the principle of reciprocity was originally formulated by Lord Rayleigh nearly two centuries ago, it was devised in the 1940s and eventually became a calibration standard in the 1960s; however, it can only accommodate a limited number of acoustic sensors of specific types and dimensions. International standards determine the device sensitivity either through coupler or through free-field reciprocity but rely on the continuous availability of specific acoustical artefacts. Here, we show an optical method based on gated photon correlation spectroscopy that can measure sound pressures directly and absolutely in fully anechoic conditions, remotely, and without disturbing the propagating sound field. It neither relies on the availability or performance of any measurement artefact nor makes any assumptions of the device geometry and sound field characteristics. Most importantly, the required units of sound pressure and microphone sensitivity may now be experimentally realised, thus providing direct traceability to SI base units.

  20. Towards direct realisation of the SI unit of sound pressure in the audible hearing range based on optical free-field acoustic particle measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Koukoulas, Triantafillos Piper, Ben

    2015-04-20

    Since the introduction of the International System of Units (the SI system) in 1960, weights, measures, standardised approaches, procedures, and protocols have been introduced, adapted, and extensively used. A major international effort and activity concentrate on the definition and traceability of the seven base SI units in terms of fundamental constants, and consequently those units that are derived from the base units. In airborne acoustical metrology and for the audible range of frequencies up to 20 kHz, the SI unit of sound pressure, the pascal, is realised indirectly and without any knowledge or measurement of the sound field. Though the principle of reciprocity was originally formulated by Lord Rayleigh nearly two centuries ago, it was devised in the 1940s and eventually became a calibration standard in the 1960s; however, it can only accommodate a limited number of acoustic sensors of specific types and dimensions. International standards determine the device sensitivity either through coupler or through free-field reciprocity but rely on the continuous availability of specific acoustical artefacts. Here, we show an optical method based on gated photon correlation spectroscopy that can measure sound pressures directly and absolutely in fully anechoic conditions, remotely, and without disturbing the propagating sound field. It neither relies on the availability or performance of any measurement artefact nor makes any assumptions of the device geometry and sound field characteristics. Most importantly, the required units of sound pressure and microphone sensitivity may now be experimentally realised, thus providing direct traceability to SI base units.

  1. Acoustic dispersive prism.

    PubMed

    Esfahlani, Hussein; Karkar, Sami; Lissek, Herve; Mosig, Juan R

    2016-01-01

    The optical dispersive prism is a well-studied element, which allows separating white light into its constituent spectral colors, and stands in nature as water droplets. In analogy to this definition, the acoustic dispersive prism should be an acoustic device with capability of splitting a broadband acoustic wave into its constituent Fourier components. However, due to the acoustical nature of materials as well as the design and fabrication difficulties, there is neither any natural acoustic counterpart of the optical prism, nor any artificial design reported so far exhibiting an equivalent acoustic behaviour. Here, based on exotic properties of the acoustic transmission-line metamaterials and exploiting unique physical behaviour of acoustic leaky-wave radiation, we report the first acoustic dispersive prism, effective within the audible frequency range 800 Hz-1300 Hz. The dispersive nature, and consequently the frequency-dependent refractive index of the metamaterial are exploited to split the sound waves towards different and frequency-dependent directions. Meanwhile, the leaky-wave nature of the structure facilitates the sound wave radiation into the ambient medium. PMID:26739504

  2. Acoustic dispersive prism

    PubMed Central

    Esfahlani, Hussein; Karkar, Sami; Lissek, Herve; Mosig, Juan R.

    2016-01-01

    The optical dispersive prism is a well-studied element, which allows separating white light into its constituent spectral colors, and stands in nature as water droplets. In analogy to this definition, the acoustic dispersive prism should be an acoustic device with capability of splitting a broadband acoustic wave into its constituent Fourier components. However, due to the acoustical nature of materials as well as the design and fabrication difficulties, there is neither any natural acoustic counterpart of the optical prism, nor any artificial design reported so far exhibiting an equivalent acoustic behaviour. Here, based on exotic properties of the acoustic transmission-line metamaterials and exploiting unique physical behaviour of acoustic leaky-wave radiation, we report the first acoustic dispersive prism, effective within the audible frequency range 800 Hz–1300 Hz. The dispersive nature, and consequently the frequency-dependent refractive index of the metamaterial are exploited to split the sound waves towards different and frequency-dependent directions. Meanwhile, the leaky-wave nature of the structure facilitates the sound wave radiation into the ambient medium. PMID:26739504

  3. Acoustic dispersive prism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esfahlani, Hussein; Karkar, Sami; Lissek, Herve; Mosig, Juan R.

    2016-01-01

    The optical dispersive prism is a well-studied element, which allows separating white light into its constituent spectral colors, and stands in nature as water droplets. In analogy to this definition, the acoustic dispersive prism should be an acoustic device with capability of splitting a broadband acoustic wave into its constituent Fourier components. However, due to the acoustical nature of materials as well as the design and fabrication difficulties, there is neither any natural acoustic counterpart of the optical prism, nor any artificial design reported so far exhibiting an equivalent acoustic behaviour. Here, based on exotic properties of the acoustic transmission-line metamaterials and exploiting unique physical behaviour of acoustic leaky-wave radiation, we report the first acoustic dispersive prism, effective within the audible frequency range 800 Hz-1300 Hz. The dispersive nature, and consequently the frequency-dependent refractive index of the metamaterial are exploited to split the sound waves towards different and frequency-dependent directions. Meanwhile, the leaky-wave nature of the structure facilitates the sound wave radiation into the ambient medium.

  4. Formation of electric dipoles in pea stem tissue due to an electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadi, Fatemeh; Farahani, Elham

    2016-07-01

    For examining the effect of an electrical field (DC) on pea seed, we exposed the pea seeds to electric fields with intensities 1, 4 and 7 kV/cm for 30, 230, 430 and 630 seconds. The tests were repeated three times, and each iteration had 5 seeds. Then, the seeds were moved to packaged plates. Finally, microscopic observation of the pea stem tissue showed that the application of a DC electrical field caused a deformation in the pea stem tissue. The results led us to examine the deformation of the tissue theoretically and to address that deformation as an electrostatic problem. In this regard, we modeled the pea stem based on the formation of electric dipoles. Then, theoretically, we calculated the force acting on each xylem section by coding, and the results were consistent with the experimental data.

  5. Decrease of electron spin lifetime in external electric field due to intervalley phonon scattering in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qing, Lan; Dery, Hanan; Li, Jing; Appelbaum, Ian

    2012-02-01

    We derive a simple approximate expression of the spin lifetime of drifting electrons in silicon. This expression agrees well with elaborate Monte Carlo simulations of the charge transport and spin relaxation of conduction electrons heated by the electric field. Already at low temperatures, the drifting electrons become hot enough to undergo f-processes (scattering between valleys of different crystal axes following emission of a shortwave phonon). Such a process involves a direct coupling of valence and conduction bands and dominates the spin relaxation. A sharp decrease of spin lifetime can then be expected in intermediate electric fields in between ˜100 V/cm and ˜1 kV/cm. When electrons are transported between a spin injector and a spin-resolved detector, the decrease of both transit time and spin lifetime results in a non-monotonic behavior of the detected spin polarization with the electric field. The theory shows excellent agreement with empirical results.

  6. On the gravitational potential and field anomalies due to thin mass layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ockendon, J. R.; Turcotte, D. L.

    1977-01-01

    The gravitational potential and field anomalies for thin mass layers are derived using the technique of matched asymptotic expansions. An inner solution is obtained using an expansion in powers of the thickness and it is shown that the outer solution is given by a surface distribution of mass sources and dipoles. Coefficients are evaluated by matching the inner expansion of the outer solution with the outer expansion of the inner solution. The leading term in the inner expansion for the normal gravitational field gives the Bouguer formula. The leading term in the expansion for the gravitational potential gives an expression for the perturbation to the geoid. The predictions given by this term are compared with measurements by satellite altimetry. The second-order terms in the expansion for the gravitational field are required to predict the gravity anomaly at a continental margin. The results are compared with observations.

  7. Neoclassical Drift of Circulating Orbits Due toToroidal Electric Field in Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Qin; Guan, Xiaoyin; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2011-07-19

    In tokamaks, Ware pinch is a well known neoclassical effect for trapped particles in response to a toroidal electric field. It is generally believed that there exists no similar neoclassical effect for circulating particles without collisions. However, this belief is erroneous, and misses an important effect. We show both analytically and numerically that under the influence of a toroidal electric field parallel to the current, the circulating orbits drift outward toward the outer wall with a characteristic velocity O ({var_epsilon}{sup -1}) larger than the E x B velocity, where {var_epsilon} is the inverse aspect-ratio of a tokamak. During a RF overdrive, the toroidal electric field is anti-parallel to the current. As a consequence, all charged particles, including backward runaway electrons, will drift inward towards the inner wall.

  8. A platform to study magnetic field amplification of laser driven shocks due to induced turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meinecke, Jena; Doyle, Hugo; Bell, A. R.; Crowston, Robert; Drake, Paul; Fatenejad, M.; Hartley, Nick; Koenig, Michel; Kuramitsu, Y.; Kuranz, Carolyn; Lamb, Don; MacDonald, Mike; Miniati, F.; Murphy, Chris; Pelka, Alex; Ravasio, Alessandra; Reville, Brian; Sakawa, Y.; Schekochihin, A. A.; Scopatz, Anthony; Tzeferacos, Petros; Wan, Wesley; Woolsey, Nigel; Gregori, Gianluca

    2012-10-01

    Misaligned pressure and temperature gradients associated with asymmetrical shock waves generate currents which seed magnetic fields (Biermann battery process). These fields could then be further amplified by increasing particle gyration driven by vorticity and turbulence. Studies of such phenomena have been conducted at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory and scaled to astrophysical conditions (e.g., protogalacitc structure formation) using magnetohydrodynamic scaling techniques. Shock waves were driven in a 1 mbar Argon gas filled chamber from ablation of 500 micron Carbon rods using 300 J of 527 nm, 1 ns pulse light. A plastic grid was positioned 1 cm from the target to drive turbulence with outer scale ˜1 mm (the size of the grid opening). An induction coil, located 2 cm from the grid, was used to measure the magnetic field while optical diagnostics were used to track the fluid flow. Preliminary results and comparisons with hydrodynamic codes will be shown.

  9. Magnetic Field Due to a Finite Length Current-Carrying Wire Using the Concept of Displacement Current

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buschauer, Robert

    2014-01-01

    In undergraduate E&M courses the magnetic field due to a finite length, current-carrying wire can be calculated using the Biot-Savart law. However, to the author's knowledge, no textbook presents the calculation of this field using the Ampere-Maxwell law: ?B [multiplied by] dl = µ[subscript 0] (I + e[subscript 0] dF/dt) [multiplied by] 1

  10. SEISMIC PERFORMANCE OF RC BRIDGE COLUMNS UNDER VARYING AXIAL FORCE DUE TO NEAR-FIELD VERTICAL GROUND MOTIONS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuzaki, Hiroshi; Kumagai, Yuji; Kawashima, Kazuhiko

    Recently, high acceleration and high frequency near-field vertical ground motions were recorded at several sites. The extreme vertical ground motions can induce high frequency varying axial force which develop even tensile force in reinforced concrete bridge columns. Cyclic loading experiments of RC columns were conducted to clarify the seismic performance of RC bridge columns under near-field vertical ground motions. It is shown that core concrete is crushed extensively due to varying axial force after longitudinal bars buckle.

  11. Transient particle acceleration in strongly magnetized neutron stars. II - Effects due to a dipole field geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fatuzzo, Marco; Melia, Fulvio

    1991-01-01

    Sheared Alfven waves generated by nonradial crustal disturbances above the polar cap of a strongly magnetized neutron star induce an electric field component parallel to B. An attempt is made to determine the manner in which the strong radial dependence of B affects the propagation of these sheared Alfven waves, and whether this MHD process is still an effective particle accelerator. It is found that although the general field equation is quite complicated, a simple wavelike solution can still be obtained under the conditions of interest for which the Alfven phase velocity decouples from the wave equation. The results may be applicable to gamma-ray burst sources.

  12. Poloidal electric field due to ICRH and its effect on neoclassical transport

    SciTech Connect

    Vacca, L. )

    1994-10-15

    We study the transport of a plasma in which a minority ion species is heated by fast Alfven waves. The strong anisotropy of the minority distribution function gives origin to a poloidal electric field. We calculate the poloidal dependence of the electric potential by numerically integrating the leading order minority distribution function. When the amplitude of this field is such that electrostatic trapping is not negligible in comparison to the magnetic trapping then neoclassical transport can be enhanced as found in previous work. The linearized kinetic equations are solved using a variational method in the banana regime. Approximate analytic expressions for the transport coefficients are given.

  13. Electro-elastic fields due to a point charge in a flexoelectric medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Rajdeep

    2015-10-01

    Flexoelectricity provides a two-way connection between strain gradients and polarization that is pronounced at the nanoscale for isotropic materials which cannot link electromechanically via piezoelectricity. In this paper, the general equations for an isotropic, flexoelectric material were formulated, with contributions from strain gradients included. The electromechanical fields associated with a point charge in an infinite medium were derived, and results for GaAs were obtained. Our formulation yields two electromechanical length-scales, instead of one obtained from previous theories, and enables us to capture local fields accurately. Results from this paper provide insight into the electro-mechanical behavior of materials with charged defects.

  14. Calculating the electromagnetic field on the earth due to an electrodynamic tethered system in the ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estes, Robert D.

    1989-01-01

    A method is presented for calculating the electromagnetic wave field on the earth's surface associated with the operation of an electrodynamic tethered satellite system of constant or slowly varying current in the upper ionosphere. The wave field at the ionospheric boundary and on the earth's surface is obtained by numerical integration. The results suggest that the ionospheric waves do not propagate into the atmosphere and that the image of the Alfven wings from a steady-current tether should be greatly broadened on the earth's surface.

  15. Non-locality in quantum field theory due to general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calmet, Xavier; Croon, Djuna; Fritz, Christopher

    2015-12-01

    We show that general relativity coupled to a quantum field theory generically leads to non-local effects in the matter sector. These non-local effects can be described by non-local higher dimensional operators which remarkably have an approximate shift symmetry. When applied to inflationary models, our results imply that small non-Gaussianities are a generic feature of models based on general relativity coupled to matter fields. However, these effects are too small to be observable in the cosmic microwave background.

  16. NASA powered lift facility internally generated noise and its transmission to the acoustic far field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huff, Ronald G.

    1988-01-01

    Noise tests of NASA Lewis Research Center's Powered Lift Facility (PLF) were performed to determine the frequency content of the internally generated noise that reaches the far field. The sources of the internally generated noise are the burner, elbows, valves, and flow turbulence. Tests over a range of nozzle pressure ratios from 1.2 to 3.5 using coherence analysis revealed that low frequency noise below 1200 Hz is transmitted through the nozzle. Broad banded peaks at 240 and 640 Hz were found in the transmitted noise. Aeroacoustic excitation effects are possible in this frequency range. The internal noise creates a noise floor that limits the amount of jet noise suppression that can be measured on the PLF and similar facilities.

  17. Acoustic Longitudinal Field NIF Optic Feature Detection Map Using Time-Reversal & MUSIC

    SciTech Connect

    Lehman, S K

    2006-02-09

    We developed an ultrasonic longitudinal field time-reversal and MUltiple SIgnal Classification (MUSIC) based detection algorithm for identifying and mapping flaws in fused silica NIF optics. The algorithm requires a fully multistatic data set, that is one with multiple, independently operated, spatially diverse transducers, each transmitter of which, in succession, launches a pulse into the optic and the scattered signal measured and recorded at every receiver. We have successfully localized engineered ''defects'' larger than 1 mm in an optic. We confirmed detection and localization of 3 mm and 5 mm features in experimental data, and a 0.5 mm in simulated data with sufficiently high signal-to-noise ratio. We present the theory, experimental results, and simulated results.

  18. Evidence of stochastic diffusion across a cross-field sheath due to Kelvin-Helmholtz vortices

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, S.E.; Xu, X.Q.; Lichtenberg, A.J.; Birdsall, C.K. )

    1992-03-15

    We identify mechanisms for particle transport across a cross-field sheath. We present a study of {bold E}{times}{bold B} drift motion in a vortex in which the ion drifts are perturbed by their finite gyroradii and electron drifts are perturbed by one or more traveling waves. Large-scale vortices, which are the result of nonlinear saturation of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability resulting from shear in the {bold E}{times}{bold B} drift velocity, have been observed in plasma simulations of the cross-field sheath (K. Theilhaber and C. K. Birdsall, Phys. Rev. Lett. 62, 772 (1989); Phys. Fluids B 1, 2241 (1989); 1, 2260 (1989)). Small-scale turbulence is also present, and ions and electrons are transported across the sheath. A vortex alone does not allow for the observed electron transport because the electron drift orbits simply circulate. On the other hand, the ion motion can be stochastic from resonant interaction between harmonics of the drift motion and the gyromotion, independent of the background turbulence. The fluctuations in the ion density would then give rise to a small-amplitude wave spectrum. The combined action of the vortex fields and traveling-wave fields on the electron motion can then lead to stochastic electron diffusion. We study these effects, showing that the values of vortex fields observed in the simulation are sufficient to lead to both ion and electron stochasticity. Furthermore, the rate of the resulting diffusion is sufficient to account for the diffusion observed in the simulation.

  19. Relativistic electron loss process by pitch angle scattering due to field curvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. J.; Parks, G. K.; Lee, E.; McCarthy, M. P.; Min, K.; Kim, H.; Park, J.; Hwang, J.

    2006-12-01

    Relativistic electron dropout (RED) events are characterized by fast electron flux decrease at the geostationary orbit. It is known that the main loss process is non adiabatic and more effective for the high energy particles. RED events generally start to occur at midnight sector and propagate to noon sector and are correlated with magnetic field stretching. We discuss this kind of event can be caused from pitch angle diffusion induced when the gyro radius of the electrons is comparable to the radius of curvature of the magnetic field and the magnetic moment is not conserved any more. While this process has been studied theoretically, the question is whether electron precipitation could be explained with this process for the real field configuration. This paper will show that this process can successfully explain the precipitation that occurred on June 14, 2004 observed by the low-altitude (680 km) polar orbiting Korean satellite, STSAT-1. In this precipitation event, the energy dispersion showed higher energy electron precipitation occurred at lower L values. This feature is a good indicator that precipitation was caused by the magnetic moment scattering in the geomagnetic tail. This interpretation is supported by the geosynchronous satellite GOES observations that showed significant magnetic field distortion occurred on the night side accompanying the electron flux depletion. Tsyganenko-01 model also shows the magnetic moment scattering could occur under the geomagnetic conditions existing at that time. We suggest the pitch angle scattering by field curvature violating the first adiabatic invariant as a possible candidate for loss mechanism of relativistic electrons in radiation belt.

  20. Stochastic simulation for the propagation of high-frequency acoustic waves through a random velocity field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, B.; Darmon, M.; Leymarie, N.; Chatillon, S.; Potel, C.

    2012-05-01

    In-service inspection of Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactors (SFR) requires the development of non-destructive techniques adapted to the harsh environment conditions and the examination complexity. From past experiences, ultrasonic techniques are considered as suitable candidates. The ultrasonic telemetry is a technique used to constantly insure the safe functioning of reactor inner components by determining their exact position: it consists in measuring the time of flight of the ultrasonic response obtained after propagation of a pulse emitted by a transducer and its interaction with the targets. While in-service the sodium flow creates turbulences that lead to temperature inhomogeneities, which translates into ultrasonic velocity inhomogeneities. These velocity variations could directly impact the accuracy of the target locating by introducing time of flight variations. A stochastic simulation model has been developed to calculate the propagation of ultrasonic waves in such an inhomogeneous medium. Using this approach, the travel time is randomly generated by a stochastic process whose inputs are the statistical moments of travel times known analytically. The stochastic model predicts beam deviations due to velocity inhomogeneities, which are similar to those provided by a determinist method, such as the ray method.

  1. Stochastic simulation for the propagation of high-frequency acoustic waves through a random velocity field

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, B.; Darmon, M.; Leymarie, N.; Chatillon, S.; Potel, C.

    2012-05-17

    In-service inspection of Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactors (SFR) requires the development of non-destructive techniques adapted to the harsh environment conditions and the examination complexity. From past experiences, ultrasonic techniques are considered as suitable candidates. The ultrasonic telemetry is a technique used to constantly insure the safe functioning of reactor inner components by determining their exact position: it consists in measuring the time of flight of the ultrasonic response obtained after propagation of a pulse emitted by a transducer and its interaction with the targets. While in-service the sodium flow creates turbulences that lead to temperature inhomogeneities, which translates into ultrasonic velocity inhomogeneities. These velocity variations could directly impact the accuracy of the target locating by introducing time of flight variations. A stochastic simulation model has been developed to calculate the propagation of ultrasonic waves in such an inhomogeneous medium. Using this approach, the travel time is randomly generated by a stochastic process whose inputs are the statistical moments of travel times known analytically. The stochastic model predicts beam deviations due to velocity inhomogeneities, which are similar to those provided by a determinist method, such as the ray method.

  2. Solving the diffusion equation with a finite element solver: Calculation of diffuse sound field in room acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valeau, Vincent; Sakout, Anas; Li, Feng; Picaut, Judicael

    2002-11-01

    Over the last years, some publications [e.g., Picaut, Simon, and Hardy, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 106, 2638-2645 (1999)] showed that the acoustic energy density in closed or semiclosed spaces is the solution of a diffusion equation. This approach allows the nonuniform repartition of energy, and is especially relevant in room acoustics for complex spaces or long rooms. In this work, the 3-D diffusion equation is solved directly by using a finite element solver, for a set of long rooms and absorbing rooms. The stationary equation is first solved. A constant-power acoustic source is modelized by setting appropriate boundary conditions. The time-dependent problem is also solved to simulate the sound decay, with an impulse source defined in a subregion with relevant initial conditions. Results concerning sound attenuation and reverberation times match satisfactorily with other theoretical and numerical models. An application is also given for two coupled rooms.

  3. The effect of space charge fields due to finite length electron beams in the free-electron laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, C.-M.; Sprangle, P.; Freund, H.; Colson, W.

    1982-01-01

    The space charge electric field of a finite length electron beam in the free electron laser amplifier with a tapered wiggler is analyzed. In the free drift region between the accelerator and laser, expressions for the increase of energy spread due to the self field are presented. In the FEL interaction region, the general conditions on the importance of the self electric field in the equations of motion is obtained. A numerical example of the FEL experiment at 10.6 microns is given.

  4. Enhanced excitonic photoconductivity due to built-in internal electric field in TlGaSe{sub 2} layered semiconductor

    SciTech Connect

    Seyidov, MirHasan Yu. Suleymanov, Rauf A.; Şale, Yasin; Balaban, Ertan

    2014-12-07

    The strong enhancement, by several orders of magnitude, of the excitonic peak within the photoconductivity spectrum of TlGaSe{sub 2} semiconductor was observed. The samples were polarized in external dc electric field, which was applied prior to the measurements. Due to the accumulation of charges near the surface, an internal electric field was formed. Electron-hole pairs that were created after the absorption of light are fallen in and then separated by the built-in electric field, which prevents radiative recombination process.

  5. Comparison of Methods for Identifying Noise Sources in Far-Field Acoustic Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenney, Andrew; Lewalle, Jacques

    2013-11-01

    Three different methods of extracting intermittent wave packets from unstructured background within complex time series signals were analyzed and compared. The algorithms are denoted ``cross correlation,'' ``denoising,'' and ``TFLE (Time-Frequency-Lag event)'' methods respectively. All three methods utilize Mexican Hat or Morlet wavelets for the transformation of time domain signals into time-frequency domain signals. Within the denoising and cross correlation algorithms, events are identified through comparison of high energy excerpts of each signal captured by individual far-field microphones, while the TFLE algorithm simply defines events by their contributions to positive correlation values. The goal of this analysis is to quantify the advantages and disadvantages of each of these methods. The results lend themselves to determining the validity of these methods as noise source identification algorithms to be used in jet noise characterization. This work is supported in part by Spectral Energies LLC, under an SBIR grant from AFRL; and by the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering REU Program at SU.

  6. Acoustic energy density distribution and sound intensity vector field inside coupled spaces.

    PubMed

    Meissner, Mirosław

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, the modal expansion method supported by a computer implementation has been used to predict steady-state distributions of the potential and kinetic energy densities, and the active and reactive sound intensities inside two coupled enclosures. The numerical study was dedicated to low-frequency room responses. Calculation results have shown that the distribution of energetic quantities in coupled spaces is strongly influenced by the modal localization. Appropriate descriptors of the localization effect were introduced to identify localized modes. As was evidenced by numerical data, the characteristic objects in the active intensity field are vortices positioned irregularly inside the room. It was found that vortex centers lie exactly on the lines corresponding to zeros of the eigenfunction for a dominant mode. Finally, an impact of the wall impedance on the quantitative relationship between the active and reactive intensities was analyzed and it was concluded that for very small sound damping the behavior of the sound intensity inside the room space is essentially only oscillatory. PMID:22779472

  7. Finding the Shadows: Local Variations in the Stress Field due to Large Magnitude Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latimer, C.; Tiampo, K.; Rundle, J.

    2009-05-01

    Stress shadows, regions of static stress decrease associated with large magnitude earthquake have typically been described through several characteristics or parameters such as location, duration, and size. These features can provide information about the physics of the earthquake itself, as static stress changes are dependent on the following parameters: the regional stress orientations, the coefficient of friction, as well as the depth of interest (King et al, 1994). Areas of stress decrease, associated with a decrease in the seismicity rate, while potentially stable in nature, have been difficult to identify in regions of high rates of background seismicity (Felzer and Brodsky, 2005; Hardebeck et al., 1998). In order to obtain information about these stress shadows, we can determine their characteristics by using the Pattern Informatics (PI) method (Tiampo et al., 2002; Tiampo et al., 2006). The PI method is an objective measure of seismicity rate changes that can be used to locate areas of increases and/or decreases relative to the regional background rate. The latter defines the stress shadows for the earthquake of interest, as seismicity rate changes and stress changes are related (Dieterich et al., 1992; Tiampo et al., 2006). Using the data from the PI method, we can invert for the parameters of the modeled half-space using a genetic algorithm inversion technique. Stress changes will be calculated using coulomb stress change theory (King et al., 1994) and the Coulomb 3 program is used as the forward model (Lin and Stein, 2004; Toda et al., 2005). Changes in the regional stress orientation (using PI results from before and after the earthquake) are of the greatest interest as it is the main factor controlling the pattern of the coulomb stress changes resulting from any given earthquake. Changes in the orientation can lead to conclusions about the local stress field around the earthquake and fault. The depth of interest and the coefficient of friction both

  8. Heat flux due to poloidal electric field in the banana regime

    SciTech Connect

    Taguchi, M. )

    1992-02-01

    The heat flux due to poloidally varying electrostatic potential is calculated in the banana regime. This electrostatic potential determined self-consistently from charge neutrality is shown to increase the electron heat flux by a factor {radical}{ital m}{sub {ital i}}/{ital m}{sub {ital e}} compared with that when this potential is neglected, where {ital m}{sub {ital e}} and {ital m}{sub {ital i}} are the masses of electron and ion, respectively.

  9. Time-convoluted hotspot temperature field on a metal skin due to sustained arc stroke heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, T. S.; Su, W. Y.

    A previously developed time-convoluted heat-conduction theory is applied to the case of a metal plate whose heat source is sustained over time. Integral formulas are formally derived, and their utilization in practical arc-heating work is examined. The results are compared with experimental ones from titanium and aluminum plates subjected to sustained heating due to step switch-on dc arc sources, and reasonable agreement is found.

  10. Modelling of 3D fields due to ferritic inserts and test blanket modules in toroidal geometry at ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yueqiang; Äkäslompolo, Simppa; Cavinato, Mario; Koechl, Florian; Kurki-Suonio, Taina; Li, Li; Parail, Vassili; Saibene, Gabriella; Särkimäki, Konsta; Sipilä, Seppo; Varje, Jari

    2016-06-01

    Computations in toroidal geometry are systematically performed for the plasma response to 3D magnetic perturbations produced by ferritic inserts (FIs) and test blanket modules (TBMs) for four ITER plasma scenarios: the 15 MA baseline, the 12.5 MA hybrid, the 9 MA steady state, and the 7.5 MA half-field helium plasma. Due to the broad toroidal spectrum of the FI and TBM fields, the plasma response for all the n  =  1–6 field components are computed and compared. The plasma response is found to be weak for the high-n (n  >  4) components. The response is not globally sensitive to the toroidal plasma flow speed, as long as the latter is not reduced by an order of magnitude. This is essentially due to the strong screening effect occurring at a finite flow, as predicted for ITER plasmas. The ITER error field correction coils (EFCC) are used to compensate the n  =  1 field errors produced by FIs and TBMs for the baseline scenario for the purpose of avoiding mode locking. It is found that the middle row of the EFCC, with a suitable toroidal phase for the coil current, can provide the best correction of these field errors, according to various optimisation criteria. On the other hand, even without correction, it is predicted that these n  =  1 field errors will not cause substantial flow damping for the 15 MA baseline scenario.

  11. Resonance tuning due to Coulomb interaction in strong near-field coupled metamaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Roy Chowdhury, Dibakar; Xu, Ningning; Zhang, Weili; Singh, Ranjan

    2015-07-14

    Coulomb's law is one of the most fundamental laws of physics that describes the electrostatic interaction between two like or unlike point charges. Here, we experimentally observe a strong effect of Coulomb interaction in tightly coupled terahertz metamaterials where the split-ring resonator dimers in a unit cell are coupled through their near fields across the capacitive split gaps. Using a simple analytical model, we evaluated the Coulomb parameter that switched its sign from negative to positive values indicating the transition in the nature of Coulomb force from being repulsive to attractive depending upon the near field coupling between the split ring resonators. Apart from showing interesting effects in the strong coupling regime between meta-atoms, Coulomb interaction also allows an additional degree of freedom to achieve frequency tunable dynamic metamaterials.

  12. Spinmotive force due to motion of magnetic bubble arrays driven by magnetic field gradient

    PubMed Central

    Yamane, Yuta; Hemmatiyan, Shayan; Ieda, Jun'ichi; Maekawa, Sadamichi; Sinova, Jairo

    2014-01-01

    Interaction between local magnetization and conduction electrons is responsible for a variety of phenomena in magnetic materials. It has been recently shown that spin current and associated electric voltage can be induced by magnetization that depends on both time and space. This effect, called spinmotive force, provides for a powerful tool for exploring the dynamics and the nature of magnetic textures, as well as a new source for electromotive force. Here we theoretically demonstrate the generation of electric voltages in magnetic bubble array systems subjected to a magnetic field gradient. It is shown by deriving expressions for the electric voltages that the present system offers a direct measure of phenomenological parameter β that describes non-adiabaticity in the current induced magnetization dynamics. This spinmotive force opens a door for new types of spintronic devices that exploit the field-gradient. PMID:25365971

  13. Alignment of iron nanoparticles in a magnetic field due to shape anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radhakrishnan, B.; Nicholson, D. M.; Eisenbach, M.; Parish, C.; Ludtka, G. M.; Rios, O.

    2015-11-01

    During high magnetic field solidification processing there is evidence for the alignment of nanoscale metallic particles with elongated morphologies that nucleate from a liquid metal. Such alignment occurs well above the Curie temperature of the particle where the magneto-crystalline anisotropy energy and exchange energy contributions are negligible. The main driving force for alignment is the magnetic shape anisotropy. Current understanding of the phenomenon is not adequate to quantify the effect of particle size, aspect ratio, temperature and the magnetic field on particle alignment. We demonstrate a Monte Carlo approach coupled with a scaling law for the dipole-dipole interaction energy as a function of the particle size to identify the conditions under which such alignment is possible.

  14. Velocity-Space Diffusion Coefficients Due to Full-Wave ICRF Fields in Toroidal Geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, R.W.; Jaeger, F.; Berry, L.A.; Batchelor, D.B.; D'Azevedo, E.; Carter, M.D.; Ershov, N.M.; Smirnov, A.P.; Bonoli, P.; Wright, J.C.; Smithe, D.N.

    2005-09-26

    Jaeger et al. have calculated bounce-averaged QL diffusion coefficients from AORSA full-wave fields, based on non-Maxwellian distributions from CQL3D Fokker-Planck code. A zero banana-width approximation is employed. Complementing this calculation, a fully numerical calculation of ion velocity diffusion coefficients using the full-wave fields in numerical tokamak equilibria has been implemented to determine the finite orbit width effects. The un-approximated Lorentz equation of motion is integrated to obtain the change in velocity after one complete poloidal transit of the tokamak. Averaging velocity changes over initial starting gyro-phase and toroidal angle gives bounce-averaged diffusion coefficients. The coefficients from the full-wave and Lorentz orbit methods are compared for an ITER DT second harmonic tritium ICRF heating case: the diffusion coefficients are similar in magnitude but reveal substantial finite orbit effects.

  15. Resonance tuning due to Coulomb interaction in strong near-field coupled metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy Chowdhury, Dibakar; Xu, Ningning; Zhang, Weili; Singh, Ranjan

    2015-07-01

    Coulomb's law is one of the most fundamental laws of physics that describes the electrostatic interaction between two like or unlike point charges. Here, we experimentally observe a strong effect of Coulomb interaction in tightly coupled terahertz metamaterials where the split-ring resonator dimers in a unit cell are coupled through their near fields across the capacitive split gaps. Using a simple analytical model, we evaluated the Coulomb parameter that switched its sign from negative to positive values indicating the transition in the nature of Coulomb force from being repulsive to attractive depending upon the near field coupling between the split ring resonators. Apart from showing interesting effects in the strong coupling regime between meta-atoms, Coulomb interaction also allows an additional degree of freedom to achieve frequency tunable dynamic metamaterials.

  16. Ultrasonic propagation velocity in magnetic and magnetorheological fluids due to an external magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Bramantya, M A; Motozawa, M; Sawada, T

    2010-08-18

    Ultrasonic propagation velocity in a magnetic fluid (MF) and magnetorheological fluid (MRF) changes with the application of an external magnetic field. The formation of clustering structures inside the MF and MRF clearly has an influence on the ultrasonic propagation velocity. Therefore, we propose a qualitative analysis of these structures by measuring properties of ultrasonic propagation. Since MF and MRF are opaque, non-contact inspection using the ultrasonic technique can be very useful for analyzing the inner structures of MF and MRF. In this study, we measured ultrasonic propagation velocity in a hydrocarbon-based MF and MRF precisely. Based on these results, the clustering structures of these fluids are analyzed experimentally in terms of elapsed time dependence and the effect of external magnetic field strength. The results reveal hysteresis and anisotropy in the ultrasonic propagation velocity. We also discuss differences of ultrasonic propagation velocity between MF and MRF. PMID:21386478

  17. Superdiffusion of two-dimensional Yukawa liquids due to a perpendicular magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yan; Goree, J; Liu, Bin; Intrator, T P; Murillo, M S

    2014-07-01

    Stochastic transport of a two-dimensional (2D) dusty plasma liquid with a perpendicular magnetic field is studied. Superdiffusion is found to occur especially at higher magnetic fields with β of order unity. Here, β = ω(c)/ω(pd) is the ratio of the cyclotron and plasma frequencies for dust particles. The mean-square displacement MSD = 4D(α)t(α) is found to have an exponent α > 1, indicating superdiffusion, with α increasing monotonically to 1.1 as β increases to unity. The 2D Langevin molecular dynamics simulation used here also reveals that another indicator of random particle motion, the velocity autocorrelation function, has a dominant peak frequency ω(peak) that empirically obeys ω(peak)(2) = ω(c)(2) + ω(pd)(2)/4. PMID:25122399

  18. New experimental method of visualizing the electric field due to surface charges on circuit elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Rebecca; de Salazar, Alex; Nassar, Antonio

    2010-12-01

    Although static surface charges on circuit elements are of enormous interest, recent papers and textbooks have only discussed the problem theoretically using analytical or numerical approaches. The only well-known experimental method to visualize the structure of electric fields around circuit elements was reported by Jefimenko almost half a century ago. In our paper, we report on a simple method to visualize the electric field produced by static surface charges on current-carrying circuit elements. Our method uses a mixture of PTFE (Teflon) sealant and mineral oil, a copper wire placed in the mixture's container, and two 6 kV power supplies. We believe that our new method can be used directly in the classroom.

  19. Particle acceleration due to shocks in the interplanetary field: High time resolution data and simulation results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kessel, R. L.; Armstrong, T. P.; Nuber, R.; Bandle, J.

    1985-01-01

    Data were examined from two experiments aboard the Explorer 50 (IMP 8) spacecraft. The Johns Hopkins University/Applied Lab Charged Particle Measurement Experiment (CPME) provides 10.12 second resolution ion and electron count rates as well as 5.5 minute or longer averages of the same, with data sampled in the ecliptic plane. The high time resolution of the data allows for an explicit, point by point, merging of the magnetic field and particle data and thus a close examination of the pre- and post-shock conditions and particle fluxes associated with large angle oblique shocks in the interplanetary field. A computer simulation has been developed wherein sample particle trajectories, taken from observed fluxes, are allowed to interact with a planar shock either forward or backward in time. One event, the 1974 Day 312 shock, is examined in detail.

  20. VISCOUS EVOLUTION AND PHOTOEVAPORATION OF CIRCUMSTELLAR DISKS DUE TO EXTERNAL FAR ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Kassandra R.; Adams, Fred C.; Calvet, Nuria

    2013-09-01

    This paper explores the effects of FUV radiation fields from external stars on circumstellar disk evolution. Disks residing in young clusters can be exposed to extreme levels of FUV flux from nearby OB stars, and observations show that disks in such environments are being actively photoevaporated. Typical FUV flux levels can be factors of {approx}10{sup 2}-10{sup 4} higher than the interstellar value. These fields are effective in driving mass loss from circumstellar disks because they act at large radial distance from the host star, i.e., where most of the disk mass is located, and where the gravitational potential well is shallow. We combine viscous evolution (an {alpha}-disk model) with an existing FUV photoevaporation model to derive constraints on disk lifetimes, and to determine disk properties as functions of time, including mass-loss rates, disk masses, and radii. We also consider the effects of X-ray photoevaporation from the host star using an existing model, and show that for disks around solar-mass stars, externally generated FUV fields are often the dominant mechanism in depleting disk material. For sufficiently large viscosities, FUV fields can efficiently photoevaporate disks over the entire range of parameter space. Disks with viscosity parameter {alpha} = 10{sup -3} are effectively dispersed within 1-3 Myr; for higher viscosities ({alpha} = 10{sup -2}) disks are dispersed within {approx}0.25-0.5 Myr. Furthermore, disk radii are truncated to less than {approx}100 AU, which can possibly affect the formation of planets. Our model predictions are consistent with the range of observed masses and radii of proplyds in the Orion Nebula Cluster.

  1. False vacuum bubble nucleation due to a nonminimally coupled scalar field

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Wonwoo; Park, Chanyong; Lee, Bum-Hoon; Lee, Chul H.

    2006-12-15

    We study the possibility of forming the false vacuum bubble nucleated within the true vacuum background via the true-to-false vacuum phase transition in curved spacetime. We consider a semiclassical Euclidean bubble in the Einstein theory of gravity with a nonminimally coupled scalar field. In this paper we present the numerical computations as well as the approximate analytical computations. We mention the evolution of the false vacuum bubble after nucleation.

  2. False vacuum bubble nucleation due to a nonminimally coupled scalar field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wonwoo; Lee, Bum-Hoon; Lee, Chul H.; Park, Chanyong

    2006-12-01

    We study the possibility of forming the false vacuum bubble nucleated within the true vacuum background via the true-to-false vacuum phase transition in curved spacetime. We consider a semiclassical Euclidean bubble in the Einstein theory of gravity with a nonminimally coupled scalar field. In this paper we present the numerical computations as well as the approximate analytical computations. We mention the evolution of the false vacuum bubble after nucleation.

  3. Undulation instability in a bilayer lipid membrane due to electric field interaction with lipid dipoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bingham, Richard J.; Olmsted, Peter D.; Smye, Stephen W.

    2010-05-01

    Bilayer lipid membranes (BLMs) are an essential component of all biological systems, forming a functional barrier for cells and organelles from the surrounding environment. The lipid molecules that form membranes contain both permanent and induced dipoles, and an electric field can induce the formation of pores when the transverse field is sufficiently strong (electroporation). Here, a phenomenological free energy is constructed to model the response of a BLM to a transverse static electric field. The model contains a continuum description of the membrane dipoles and a coupling between the headgroup dipoles and the membrane tilt. The membrane is found to become unstable through buckling modes, which are weakly coupled to thickness fluctuations in the membrane. The thickness fluctuations, along with the increase in interfacial area produced by membrane buckling, increase the probability of localized membrane breakdown, which may lead to pore formation. The instability is found to depend strongly on the strength of the coupling between the dipolar headgroups and the membrane tilt as well as the degree of dipolar ordering in the membrane.

  4. The onset of layer undulations in smectic A liquid crystals due to a strong magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras, A.; Garcia-Azpeitia, C.; García-Cervera, C. J.; Joo, S.

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the effect of a strong magnetic field on a three dimensional smectic A liquid crystal. We identify a critical field above which the uniform layered state loses stability; this is associated to the onset of layer undulations. In a previous work García-Cervera and Joo (2012 Arch. Ration. Mech. Anal. 203 1–43), García-Cervera and Joo considered the two dimensional case and analyzed the transition to the undulated state via a simple bifurcation. In dimension n  =  3 the situation is more delicate because the first eigenvalue of the corresponding linearized problem is not simple. We overcome the difficulties inherent to this higher dimensional setting by identifying the irreducible representations for natural actions on the functional that take into account the invariances of the problem thus allowing for reducing the bifurcation analysis to a subspace with symmetries. We are able to describe at least two bifurcation branches, highlighting the richer landscape of energy critical states in the three dimensional setting. Finally, we analyze a reduced two dimensional problem, assuming the magnetic field is very strong, and are able to relate this to a model in micromagnetics studied in Alouges et al (2002 ESAIM Control Optim. Calc. Var. 8 31–68), from where we deduce the periodicity property of minimizers.

  5. In-flight near- and far-field acoustic data measured on the Propfan Test Assessment (PTA) testbed and with an adjacent aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodward, Richard P.; Loeffler, Irvin J.

    1993-01-01

    Flight tests to define the far-field tone source at cruise conditions were completed on the full-scale SR-7L advanced turboprop that was installed on the left wing of a Gulfstream 2 aircraft. This program, designated Propfan Test Assessment (PTA), involved aeroacoustic testing of the propeller over a range of test conditions. These measurements defined source levels for input into long-distance propagation models to predict en route noise. In-flight data were taken for seven test cases. Near-field acoustic data were taken on the Gulfstream fuselage and on a microphone boom that was mounted on the Gulfstream wing outboard of the propeller. Far-field acoustic data were taken by an acoustically instrumented Learjet that flew in formation with the Gulfstream. These flight tests were flown from El Paso, Texas, and from the NASA Lewis Research Center. A comprehensive listing of the aeroacoustic results from these flight tests which may be used for future analysis are presented.

  6. Acoustically Induced Vibration of Structures: Reverberant Vs. Direct Acoustic Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R.; O'Connell, Michael R.; Tsoi, Wan B.

    2009-01-01

    Large reverberant chambers have been used for several decades in the aerospace industry to test larger structures such as solar arrays and reflectors to qualify and to detect faults in the design and fabrication of spacecraft and satellites. In the past decade some companies have begun using direct near field acoustic testing, employing speakers, for qualifying larger structures. A limited test data set obtained from recent acoustic tests of the same hardware exposed to both direct and reverberant acoustic field testing has indicated some differences in the resulting structural responses. In reverberant acoustic testing, higher vibration responses were observed at lower frequencies when compared with the direct acoustic testing. In the case of direct near field acoustic testing higher vibration responses appeared to occur at higher frequencies as well. In reverberant chamber testing and direct acoustic testing, standing acoustic modes of the reverberant chamber or the speakers and spacecraft parallel surfaces can strongly couple with the fundamental structural modes of the test hardware. In this paper data from recent acoustic testing of flight hardware, that yielded evidence of acoustic standing wave coupling with structural responses, are discussed in some detail. Convincing evidence of the acoustic standing wave/structural coupling phenomenon will be discussed, citing observations from acoustic testing of a simple aluminum plate. The implications of such acoustic coupling to testing of sensitive flight hardware will be discussed. The results discussed in this paper reveal issues with over or under testing of flight hardware that could pose unanticipated structural and flight qualification issues. Therefore, it is of paramount importance to understand the structural modal coupling with standing acoustic waves that has been observed in both methods of acoustic testing. This study will assist the community to choose an appropriate testing method and test setup in

  7. West Texas array experiment: Noise and source characterization of short-range infrasound and acoustic signals, along with lab and field evaluation of Intermountain Laboratories infrasound microphones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Aileen

    spatial wind noise filtering hoses or pipes. The grid was within the distance limits of a single gauge's normal hose array, and data were used to perform a spatial noise correlation study. The highest correlation values were not found in the lower frequencies as anticipated, owing to a lack of sources in the lower range and the uncorrelated nature of wind noise. The highest values, with cross-correlation averages between 0.4 and 0.7 from 3 to 17 m between gauges, were found at night from 10 and 20 Hz due to a continuous local noise source and low wind. Data from the larger array were used to identify continuous and impulsive signals in the area that comprise the ambient noise field. Ground truth infrasound and acoustic, time and location data were taken for a highway site, a wind farm, and a natural gas compressor. Close-range sound data were taken with a single IML "traveler" gauge. Spectrograms and spectrum peaks were used to identify their source signatures. Two regional location techniques were also tested with data from the large array by using a propane cannon as a controlled, impulsive source. A comparison is presented of the Multiple Signal Classification Algorithm (MUSIC) to a simple, quadratic, circular wavefront algorithm. MUSIC was unable to effectively separate noise and source eignenvalues and eigenvectors due to spatial aliasing of the propane cannon signal and a lack of incoherent noise. Only 33 out of 80 usable shots were located by MUSIC within 100 m. Future work with the algorithm should focus on location of impulsive and continuous signals with development of methods for accurate separation of signal and noise eigenvectors in the presence of coherent noise and possible spatial aliasing. The circular wavefront algorithm performed better with our specific dataset and successfully located 70 out of 80 propane cannon shots within 100 m of the original location, 66 of which were within 20 m. This method has low computation requirements, making it well

  8. Estimating the change in asymptotic direction due to secular changes in the geomagnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flueckiger, E. O.; Smart, D. F.; Shea, M. A.; Gentile, L. C.; Bathurat, A. A.

    1985-01-01

    The concept of geomagnetic optics, as described by the asymptotic directions of approach, is extremely useful in the analysis of cosmic radiation data. However, when changes in cutoff occur as a result of evolution in the geomagnetic field, there are corresponding changes in the asymptotic cones of acceptance. A method is introduced of estimating the change in the asymptotic direction of approach for vertically incident cosmic ray particles from a reference set of directions at a specific epoch by considering the change in the geomagnetic cutoff.

  9. Comments on "Evaluation of interactions of electric fields due to electrostatic discharge with human tissue".

    PubMed

    Seaman, Ronald L; Comeaux, James A

    2006-06-01

    Attention is drawn to recent paper by Rogers et al. (Aug., 2004) in which ultra-wideband pulses are applied to an isolated muscle as part of deriving a strength-duration curve for threshold stimulation. The paper extends the strength-duration threshold curve for unipolar pulses down to a pulse duration of about 1 ns, on the order of 1000 times shorter than previously studied. Results of the work justify use of traditional mathematical models of the strength-duration curve for nanosecond pulses, as done recently for the electric field resulting from electrostatic discharge through the body (Dawson, et al., 2004). PMID:16761853

  10. Ocean acoustic hurricane classification.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Joshua D; Makris, Nicholas C

    2006-01-01

    Theoretical and empirical evidence are combined to show that underwater acoustic sensing techniques may be valuable for measuring the wind speed and determining the destructive power of a hurricane. This is done by first developing a model for the acoustic intensity and mutual intensity in an ocean waveguide due to a hurricane and then determining the relationship between local wind speed and underwater acoustic intensity. From this it is shown that it should be feasible to accurately measure the local wind speed and classify the destructive power of a hurricane if its eye wall passes directly over a single underwater acoustic sensor. The potential advantages and disadvantages of the proposed acoustic method are weighed against those of currently employed techniques. PMID:16454274

  11. Screening of external magnetic perturbation fields due to sheared plasma flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L.; Liu, Y. Q.; Liang, Y.; Wang, N.; Luan, Q.; Zhong, F. C.; Liu, Y.

    2016-09-01

    Within the single fluid resistive magnetohydrodynamic model, systematic toroidal modelling efforts are devoted to investigate the plasma response induced screening of the applied external 3D magnetic field perturbations in the presence of sheared toroidal flow. One particular issue of interest is addressed, when the local flow speed approaches zero at the perturbation rational surface inside the plasma. Subtle screening physics, associated with the favourable averaged toroidal curvature effect (the GGJ effect (Glasser et al 1975 Phys. Fluids 7 875)), is found to play an essential role during slow flow near the rational surface by enhancing the screening at reduced flow. A strong cancellation effect between different terms of Ohm’s law is discovered, leading to different screening physics in the GGJ regime, as compared to that of conventional screening of the typical resistive-inertial regime occurring at faster flow. These modelling results may be applicable to interpret certain mode locking experiments, as well as type-I edge localized mode suppression experiments, with resonant magnetic field perturbations being applied to tokamak plasmas at low input toroidal torque.

  12. Electron residual energy due to stochastic heating in field-ionized plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalilzadeh, Elnaz; Yazdanpanah, Jam; Jahanpanah, Jafar; Chakhmachi, Amir; Yazdani, Elnaz

    2015-11-01

    The electron residual energy originated from the stochastic heating in under-dense field-ionized plasma is investigated here. Initially, the optical response of plasma is modeled by using two counter-propagating electromagnetic waves. In this case, the solution of motion equation of a single electron indicates that by including the ionization, the electron with higher residual energy compared with that without ionization could be obtained. In agreement with chaotic nature of the motion, it is found that the electron residual energy will be significantly changed by applying a minor change in the initial conditions. Extensive kinetic 1D-3V particle-in-cell simulations have been performed in order to resolve full plasma reactions. In this way, two different regimes of plasma behavior are observed by varying the pulse length. The results indicate that the amplitude of scattered fields in a proper long pulse length is high enough to act as a second counter-propagating wave and trigger the stochastic electron motion. On the contrary, the analyses of intensity spectrum reveal the fact that the dominant scattering mechanism tends to Thomson rather than Raman scattering by increasing the pulse length. A covariant formalism is used to describe the plasma heating so that it enables us to measure electron temperature inside and outside of the pulse region.

  13. Vibroacoustic Response of Residential Housing due to Sonic Boom Exposure: A Summary of two Field Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klos, Jacob; Buehrle, Ralph; Sullivan, Brenda; Gavin, Joseph; Salamone, Joseph; Haering, Edward A., jr.; Miller, Denise M.

    2008-01-01

    Two experiments have been performed to measure the vibroacoustic response of houses exposed to sonic booms. In 2006, an old home in the base housing area of Edwards Air Force Base, built around 1960 and demolished in 2007, was instrumented with 288 transducers. During a 2007 follow-on test, a newer home in the base housing area, built in 1997, was instrumented with 112 transducers. For each experiment, accelerometers were placed on walls, windows and ceilings in bedrooms of the house to measure the vibration response of the structure. Microphones were placed outside and inside the house to measure the excitation field and resulting interior sound field. The vibroacoustic response of each house was measured for sonic boom amplitudes spanning from 2.4 to 96 Pa (0.05 to 2 lbf/sq ft). The boom amplitudes were systematically varied using a unique dive maneuver of an F/A-18 airplane. In total, the database for both houses contains vibroacoustic response data for 154 sonic booms. In addition, several tests were performed with mechanical shaker excitation of the structure to characterize the forced response of the houses. The purpose of this paper is to summarize all the data from these experiments that are available to the research community, and to compare and contrast the vibroacoustic behavior of these two dissimilar houses.

  14. Excessive magnetic field flux density distribution from overhead isolated powerline conductors due to neutral line current.

    PubMed

    Netzer, Moshe

    2013-06-01

    Overhead isolated powerline conductors (hereinafter: "OIPLC") are the most compact form for distributing low voltage currents. From the known physics of magnetic field emission from 3-phase power lines, it is expected that excellent symmetry of the 120° shifted phase currents and where compact configuration of the 3-phase+neutral line exist, the phase current vectorial summation of the magnetic field flux density (MFFD) is expected to be extremely low. However, despite this estimation, an unexpectedly very high MFFD was found in at least three towns in Israel. This paper explains the reasons leading to high MFFD emissions from compact OIPLC and the proper technique to fix it. Analysis and measurement results had led to the failure hypothsis of neutral line poor connection design and poor grounding design of the HV-LV utility transformers. The paper elaborates on the low MFFD exposure level setup by the Israeli Environmental Protection Office which adopted a rather conservative precaution principal exposure level (2 mG averaged over 24 h). PMID:23675630

  15. Excitation of dayside chorus waves due to magnetic field line compression in response to interplanetary shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chen; Li, Wen; Thorne, Richard M.; Bortnik, Jacob; Ma, Qianli; An, Xin; Zhang, Xiao-jia; Angelopoulos, Vassilis; Ni, Binbin; Gu, Xudong; Fu, Song; Zhao, Zhengyu

    2015-10-01

    The excitation of magnetospheric whistler-mode chorus in response to interplanetary (IP) shocks is investigated using wave data from the Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) spacecraft. As an example, we show a typical chorus wave excitation following an IP shock event that was observed by THEMIS in the postnoon sector near the magnetopause on 3 August 2010. We then analyze characteristic changes during this event and perform a survey of similar events during the period 2008-2014 using the THEMIS and OMNI data set. Our statistical analysis demonstrates that the chorus wave excitation/intensification in response to IP shocks occurs only at high L shells (L > 8) on the dayside. We analyzed the variations of magnetic curvature following the arrival of the IP shock and found that IP shocks lead to more homogeneous background magnetic field configurations in the near-equatorial dayside magnetosphere; and therefore, the threshold of nonlinear chorus wave growth is likely to be reduced, favoring chorus wave generation. Our results provide the observational evidence to support the concept that the geomagnetic field line configuration plays a key role in the excitation of dayside chorus.

  16. Mobility overestimation due to gated contacts in organic field-effect transistors

    PubMed Central

    Bittle, Emily G.; Basham, James I.; Jackson, Thomas N.; Jurchescu, Oana D.; Gundlach, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Parameters used to describe the electrical properties of organic field-effect transistors, such as mobility and threshold voltage, are commonly extracted from measured current–voltage characteristics and interpreted by using the classical metal oxide–semiconductor field-effect transistor model. However, in recent reports of devices with ultra-high mobility (>40 cm2 V−1 s−1), the device characteristics deviate from this idealized model and show an abrupt turn-on in the drain current when measured as a function of gate voltage. In order to investigate this phenomenon, here we report on single crystal rubrene transistors intentionally fabricated to exhibit an abrupt turn-on. We disentangle the channel properties from the contact resistance by using impedance spectroscopy and show that the current in such devices is governed by a gate bias dependence of the contact resistance. As a result, extracted mobility values from d.c. current–voltage characterization are overestimated by one order of magnitude or more. PMID:26961271

  17. Global Simulation of Proton Precipitation Due to Field Line Curvature During Substorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilson, M. L.; Raeder, J.; Donovan, E.; Ge, Y. S.; Kepko, L.

    2012-01-01

    The low latitude boundary of the proton aurora (known as the Isotropy Boundary or IB) marks an important boundary between empty and full downgoing loss cones. There is significant evidence that the IB maps to a region in the magnetosphere where the ion gyroradius becomes comparable to the local field line curvature. However, the location of the IB in the magnetosphere remains in question. In this paper, we show simulated proton precipitation derived from the Field Line Curvature (FLC) model of proton scattering and a global magnetohydrodynamic simulation during two substorms. The simulated proton precipitation drifts equatorward during the growth phase, intensifies at onset and reproduces the azimuthal splitting published in previous studies. In the simulation, the pre-onset IB maps to 7-8 RE for the substorms presented and the azimuthal splitting is caused by the development of the substorm current wedge. The simulation also demonstrates that the central plasma sheet temperature can significantly influence when and where the azimuthal splitting takes place.

  18. SOI detector with drift field due to majority carrier flow - an alternative to biasing in depletion

    SciTech Connect

    Trimpl, M.; Deptuch, G.; Yarema, R.; /Fermilab

    2010-11-01

    This paper reports on a SOI detector with drift field induced by the flow of majority carriers. It is proposed as an alternative method of detector biasing compared to standard depletion. N-drift rings in n-substrate are used at the front side of the detector to provide charge collecting field in depth as well as to improve the lateral charge collection. The concept was verified on a 2.5 x 2.5 mm{sup 2} large detector array with 20 {micro}m and 40 {micro}m pixel pitch fabricated in August 2009 using the OKI semiconductor process. First results, obtained with a radioactive source to demonstrate spatial resolution and spectroscopic performance of the detector for the two different pixel sizes will be shown and compared to results obtained with a standard depletion scheme. Two different diode designs, one using a standard p-implantation and one surrounded by an additional BPW implant will be compared as well.

  19. Electron residual energy due to stochastic heating in field-ionized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Khalilzadeh, Elnaz; Yazdanpanah, Jam Chakhmachi, Amir; Jahanpanah, Jafar; Yazdani, Elnaz

    2015-11-15

    The electron residual energy originated from the stochastic heating in under-dense field-ionized plasma is investigated here. Initially, the optical response of plasma is modeled by using two counter-propagating electromagnetic waves. In this case, the solution of motion equation of a single electron indicates that by including the ionization, the electron with higher residual energy compared with that without ionization could be obtained. In agreement with chaotic nature of the motion, it is found that the electron residual energy will be significantly changed by applying a minor change in the initial conditions. Extensive kinetic 1D-3V particle-in-cell simulations have been performed in order to resolve full plasma reactions. In this way, two different regimes of plasma behavior are observed by varying the pulse length. The results indicate that the amplitude of scattered fields in a proper long pulse length is high enough to act as a second counter-propagating wave and trigger the stochastic electron motion. On the contrary, the analyses of intensity spectrum reveal the fact that the dominant scattering mechanism tends to Thomson rather than Raman scattering by increasing the pulse length. A covariant formalism is used to describe the plasma heating so that it enables us to measure electron temperature inside and outside of the pulse region.

  20. Mobility overestimation due to gated contacts in organic field-effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Bittle, Emily G; Basham, James I; Jackson, Thomas N; Jurchescu, Oana D; Gundlach, David J

    2016-01-01

    Parameters used to describe the electrical properties of organic field-effect transistors, such as mobility and threshold voltage, are commonly extracted from measured current-voltage characteristics and interpreted by using the classical metal oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor model. However, in recent reports of devices with ultra-high mobility (>40 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1)), the device characteristics deviate from this idealized model and show an abrupt turn-on in the drain current when measured as a function of gate voltage. In order to investigate this phenomenon, here we report on single crystal rubrene transistors intentionally fabricated to exhibit an abrupt turn-on. We disentangle the channel properties from the contact resistance by using impedance spectroscopy and show that the current in such devices is governed by a gate bias dependence of the contact resistance. As a result, extracted mobility values from d.c. current-voltage characterization are overestimated by one order of magnitude or more. PMID:26961271