Science.gov

Sample records for acoustic field scattered

  1. Acoustic radiation torque on an irregularly shaped scatterer in an arbitrary sound field.

    PubMed

    Fan, Zongwei; Mei, Deqing; Yang, Keji; Chen, Zichen

    2008-11-01

    To eliminate the limitation of the conventional acoustic radiation torque theory, which is only applicable to a disklike scatterer in a plane sound field, a new theory is established to calculate the radiation torque on any irregularly shaped scatterer in any arbitrary sound field. First, with the aid of the conservation law of angular momentum, the acoustic radiation torque is expressed as the angular momentum flux through a spherical surface with the center at the scatterer's centroid. Second, the velocity potential of the scattered field is derived, taking into account the influences of the translational and rotational movements of the scatterer induced by the first order stress of the incident sound field. Finally, a general calculating formula of the acoustic radiation torque is achieved. For a disklike scatterer in a plane sound filed, results from the above formula are well identical with those conventional formulas. By studying the case of a semicircular cylinder scatterer in a standing-wave sound field, it is found that for an irregularly shaped scatterer its rotation velocity is normally nonzero and the radiation torque changes with the spatial attitude. PMID:19045760

  2. Scattered acoustic field above a grating of non-parallel rectangular cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanfir, A.; Faiz, A.; Ducourneau, J.; Chatillon, J.; Lami, S. Skali

    2016-01-01

    Geometric or acoustical irregularities induces acoustic scattering. In this paper, a generalization of the model proposed by Khanfir et al. [8] (Journal of Sound and Vibration 332 (4) (2013)) to determine the scattered acoustic field above gratings of parallel rectangular cavities is developed, addressing the case of gratings of non-parallel rectangular cavities. The results provided by the model were compared both to numerical results, obtained with the finite element method, and to experimental ones. The observed agreement between the analytical predictions and the numerical and experimental results supports the validity of the proposed model. The coupling between the different cavities was investigated, in order to attain an explanation for its dependence on frequency and on the spacing between cavities.

  3. Classification of underwater targets from autonomous underwater vehicle sampled bistatic acoustic scattered fields.

    PubMed

    Fischell, Erin M; Schmidt, Henrik

    2015-12-01

    One of the long term goals of autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) minehunting is to have multiple inexpensive AUVs in a harbor autonomously classify hazards. Existing acoustic methods for target classification using AUV-based sensing, such as sidescan and synthetic aperture sonar, require an expensive payload on each outfitted vehicle and post-processing and/or image interpretation. A vehicle payload and machine learning classification methodology using bistatic angle dependence of target scattering amplitudes between a fixed acoustic source and target has been developed for onboard, fully autonomous classification with lower cost-per-vehicle. To achieve the high-quality, densely sampled three-dimensional (3D) bistatic scattering data required by this research, vehicle sampling behaviors and an acoustic payload for precision timed data acquisition with a 16 element nose array were demonstrated. 3D bistatic scattered field data were collected by an AUV around spherical and cylindrical targets insonified by a 7-9 kHz fixed source. The collected data were compared to simulated scattering models. Classification and confidence estimation were shown for the sphere versus cylinder case on the resulting real and simulated bistatic amplitude data. The final models were used for classification of simulated targets in real time in the LAMSS MOOS-IvP simulation package [M. Benjamin, H. Schmidt, P. Newman, and J. Leonard, J. Field Rob. 27, 834-875 (2010)]. PMID:26723332

  4. Seamount acoustic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehlert, George W.

    The cover of the March 1 issue of Eos showed a time series of acoustic scattering above Southeast Hancock Seamount (29°48‧N, 178°05‧E) on July 17-18, 1984. In a comment on that cover Martin Hovland (Eos, August 2, p. 760) argued that gas or “other far reaching causes” may be involved in the observed acoustic signals. He favors a hypothesis that acoustic scattering observed above a seeping pockmark in the North Sea is a combination of bubbles, stable microbubbles, and pelagic organisms and infers that this may be a more general phenomenon and indeed plays a role in the attraction of organisms to seamounts

  5. Wave propagation characteristics of helically orthotropic cylindrical shells and resonance emergence in scattered acoustic field. Part 1. Formulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajabi, Majid

    2016-05-01

    The method of wave function expansion is adopted to study the three dimensional scattering of a plane progressive harmonic acoustic wave incident upon an arbitrarily thick-walled helically filament-wound composite cylindrical shell submerged in and filled with compressible ideal fluids. An approximate laminate model in the context of the so-called state-space formulation is employed for the construction of T-matrix solution to solve for the unknown modal scattering coefficients. Considering the nonaxisymmetric wave propagation phenomenon in anisotropic cylindrical components and following the resonance scattering theory which determines the resonance and background scattering fields, the stimulated resonance frequencies of the shell are isolated and classified due to their fundamental mode of excitation, overtone and style of propagation along the cylindrical axis (i.e., clockwise or anticlockwise propagation around the shell) and are identified as the helically circumnavigating waves.

  6. Modelling of the acoustic field of a multi-element HIFU array scattered by human ribs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gélat, Pierre; ter Haar, Gail; Saffari, Nader

    2011-09-01

    The efficacy of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) for the treatment of a range of different cancers, including those of the liver, prostate and breast, has been demonstrated. As a non-invasive focused therapy, HIFU offers considerable advantages over techniques such as chemotherapy and surgical resection in terms of reduced risk of harmful side effects. Despite this, there are a number of significant challenges which currently hinder its widespread clinical application. One of these challenges is the need to transmit sufficient energy through the rib cage to induce tissue necrosis in the required volume whilst minimizing the formation of side lobes. Multi-element random-phased arrays are currently showing great promise in overcoming the limitations of single-element transducers. Nevertheless, successful treatment of a patient with liver tumours requires a thorough understanding of the way in which the ultrasonic pressure field from a HIFU array is scattered by the rib cage. In order to address this, a boundary element approach based on a generalized minimal residual (GMRES) implementation of the Burton-Miller formulation was used in conjunction with phase conjugation techniques to focus the field of a 256-element random HIFU array behind human ribs at locations requiring intercostal and transcostal treatment. Simulations were carried out on a 3D mesh of quadratic pressure patches generated using CT scan anatomical data for adult ribs 9-12 on the right side. The methodology was validated on spherical and cylindrical scatterers. Field calculations were also carried out for idealized ribs, consisting of arrays of strip-like scatterers, demonstrating effects of splitting at the focus. This method has the advantage of fully accounting for the effect of scattering and diffraction in 3D under continuous wave excitation.

  7. Perturbation method for the second-order nonlinear effect of focused acoustic field around a scatterer in an ideal fluid.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gang; Jayathilake, Pahala Gedara; Khoo, Boo Cheong

    2014-02-01

    Two nonlinear models are proposed to investigate the focused acoustic waves that the nonlinear effects will be important inside the liquid around the scatterer. Firstly, the one dimensional solutions for the widely used Westervelt equation with different coordinates are obtained based on the perturbation method with the second order nonlinear terms. Then, by introducing the small parameter (Mach number), a dimensionless formulation and asymptotic perturbation expansion via the compressible potential flow theory is applied. This model permits the decoupling between the velocity potential and enthalpy to second order, with the first potential solutions satisfying the linear wave equation (Helmholtz equation), whereas the second order solutions are associated with the linear non-homogeneous equation. Based on the model, the local nonlinear effects of focused acoustic waves on certain volume are studied in which the findings may have important implications for bubble cavitation/initiation via focused ultrasound called HIFU (High Intensity Focused Ultrasound). The calculated results show that for the domain encompassing less than ten times the radius away from the center of the scatterer, the non-linear effect exerts a significant influence on the focused high intensity acoustic wave. Moreover, at the comparatively higher frequencies, for the model of spherical wave, a lower Mach number may result in stronger nonlinear effects. PMID:24070825

  8. Seismic inversion with generalized Radon transform based on local second-order approximation of scattered field in acoustic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Wei; Mao, Weijian; Li, Xuelei; Li, Wuqun

    2014-08-01

    Sound velocity inversion problem based on scattering theory is formulated in terms of a nonlinear integral equation associated with scattered field. Because of its nonlinearity, in practice, linearization algorisms (Born/single scattering approximation) are widely used to obtain an approximate inversion solution. However, the linearized strategy is not congruent with seismic wave propagation mechanics in strong perturbation (heterogeneous) medium. In order to partially dispense with the weak perturbation assumption of the Born approximation, we present a new approach from the following two steps: firstly, to handle the forward scattering by taking into account the second-order Born approximation, which is related to generalized Radon transform (GRT) about quadratic scattering potential; then to derive a nonlinear quadratic inversion formula by resorting to inverse GRT. In our formulation, there is a significant quadratic term regarding scattering potential, and it can provide an amplitude correction for inversion results beyond standard linear inversion. The numerical experiments demonstrate that the linear single scattering inversion is only good in amplitude for relative velocity perturbation () of background media up to 10 %, and its inversion errors are unacceptable for the perturbation beyond 10 %. In contrast, the quadratic inversion can give more accurate amplitude-preserved recovery for the perturbation up to 40 %. Our inversion scheme is able to manage double scattering effects by estimating a transmission factor from an integral over a small area, and therefore, only a small portion of computational time is added to the original linear migration/inversion process.

  9. Nonlinear ion acoustic waves scattered by vortexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohno, Yuji; Yoshida, Zensho

    2016-09-01

    The Kadomtsev-Petviashvili (KP) hierarchy is the archetype of infinite-dimensional integrable systems, which describes nonlinear ion acoustic waves in two-dimensional space. This remarkably ordered system resides on a singular submanifold (leaf) embedded in a larger phase space of more general ion acoustic waves (low-frequency electrostatic perturbations). The KP hierarchy is characterized not only by small amplitudes but also by irrotational (zero-vorticity) velocity fields. In fact, the KP equation is derived by eliminating vorticity at every order of the reductive perturbation. Here, we modify the scaling of the velocity field so as to introduce a vortex term. The newly derived system of equations consists of a generalized three-dimensional KP equation and a two-dimensional vortex equation. The former describes 'scattering' of vortex-free waves by ambient vortexes that are determined by the latter. We say that the vortexes are 'ambient' because they do not receive reciprocal reactions from the waves (i.e., the vortex equation is independent of the wave fields). This model describes a minimal departure from the integrable KP system. By the Painlevé test, we delineate how the vorticity term violates integrability, bringing about an essential three-dimensionality to the solutions. By numerical simulation, we show how the solitons are scattered by vortexes and become chaotic.

  10. Modelling acoustic scattering by suspended flocculating sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorne, Peter D.; MacDonald, Iain T.; Vincent, Christopher E.

    2014-10-01

    The development of a theoretical description of how sound interacts with flocculating sediments has been lacking and this deficiency has impeded sound being used to extract quantitative suspended sediment parameters in suspensions containing flocs. As a step towards theoretically examining this problem a relatively simple heuristic approach has been adopted to provide a description of the interaction of sound with suspensions that undergo flocculation. A model is presented for the interpretation of acoustic scattering from suspensions of fine sediments as they transition from primary particles, through an intermediate regime, to the case where low density flocs dominate the acoustic scattering. The approach is based on modified spherical elastic solid and elastic fluid scatterers and a combination of both. To evaluate the model the variation of density and compressional velocity within the flocs as they form and grow in size is required. The density can be estimated from previous studies; however, the velocity is unknown and is formulated here using a fluid mixture approach. Uncertainties in these parameters can have a significant effect on the predicted scattering characteristics and are therefore investigated in the present study. Furthermore, to assess the proposed model, outputs are compared with recently published laboratory observations of acoustic scattering by flocculating cohesive suspensions.

  11. Acoustic Scattering by a Vortex Dipole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Zhongquan; Zhang, Junjian

    2015-11-01

    Acoustic scattering in vortical flow has been an interesting and practical topic, with applications in problems such as acoustic scattering of turbulent flow. In this study, the linearized Euler equation model is employed to investigate sound wave propagation over a subsonic counter-rotating vortex dipole. Both the stationary and moving due to mutual induction vortex dipoles are studied. The numerical scheme uses a high-order WENO scheme to accommodate the highly convective background flow at high Mach numbers. The simulation results are compared with the analytical solutions and literature data. The theoretical study is focused on the effects of three characteristic length scales in this problem: the incident sound wave length, the vortex core size, and the vortex dipole size. The directivity and scaling laws related to the vortex scattering effects are discussed.

  12. Nonlinear scattering of acoustic waves by vibrating obstacles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piquette, J. C.

    1983-06-01

    The problem of the generation of sum- and difference-frequency waves produced via the scattering of an acoustic wave by an obstacle whose surface vibrates harmonically was studied both theoretically and experimentally. The theoretical approach involved solving the nonlinear wave equation, subject to appropriate boundary conditions, by the use of a perturbation expansion of the fields and a Green's function method. In addition to ordinary rigid-body scattering, Censor predicted nongrowing waves at frequencies equal to the sum and to the difference of the frequencies of the primary waves. The solution to the nonlinear wave equation also yields scattered waves at the sum and difference frequencies. However, the nonlinearity of the medium causes these waves to grow with increasing distance from the scatter's surface and, after a very small distance, dominate those predicted by Censor. The simple-source formulation of the second-order nonlinear wave equation for a lossless fluid medium has been derived for arbitrary primary wave fields. This equation was used to solve the problem of nonlinear scattering of acoustic waves by a vibrating obstacle for three geometries: (1) a plane-wave scattering by a vibrating plane, (2) cylindrical-wave scattering by a vibrating cylinder, and (3) plane-wave scattering by a vibrating cylinder. Successful experimental validation of the theory was inhibited by previously unexpected levels of nonlinearity in the hydrophones used. Such high levels of hydrophone nonlinearity appeared in hydrophones that, by their geometry of construction, were expected to be fairly linear.

  13. Acoustic multiple scattering using recursive algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amirkulova, Feruza A.; Norris, Andrew N.

    2015-10-01

    Acoustic multiple scattering by a cluster of cylinders in an acoustic medium is considered. A fast recursive technique is described which takes advantage of the multilevel Block Toeplitz structure of the linear system. A parallelization technique is described that enables efficient application of the proposed recursive algorithm for solving multilevel Block Toeplitz systems on high performance computer clusters. Numerical comparisons of CPU time and total elapsed time taken to solve the linear system using the direct LAPACK and TOEPLITZ libraries on Intel FORTRAN, show the advantage of the TOEPLITZ solver. Computations are optimized by multi-threading which displays improved efficiency of the TOEPLITZ solver with the increase of the number of scatterers and frequency.

  14. A time domain sampling method for inverse acoustic scattering problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yukun; Hömberg, Dietmar; Hu, Guanghui; Li, Jingzhi; Liu, Hongyu

    2016-06-01

    This work concerns the inverse scattering problems of imaging unknown/inaccessible scatterers by transient acoustic near-field measurements. Based on the analysis of the migration method, we propose efficient and effective sampling schemes for imaging small and extended scatterers from knowledge of time-dependent scattered data due to incident impulsive point sources. Though the inverse scattering problems are known to be nonlinear and ill-posed, the proposed imaging algorithms are totally "direct" involving only integral calculations on the measurement surface. Theoretical justifications are presented and numerical experiments are conducted to demonstrate the effectiveness and robustness of our methods. In particular, the proposed static imaging functionals enhance the performance of the total focusing method (TFM) and the dynamic imaging functionals show analogous behavior to the time reversal inversion but without solving time-dependent wave equations.

  15. Acoustic asymmetric transmission based on time-dependent dynamical scattering

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qing; Yang, Yang; Ni, Xu; Xu, Ye-Long; Sun, Xiao-Chen; Chen, Ze-Guo; Feng, Liang; Liu, Xiao-ping; Lu, Ming-Hui; Chen, Yan-Feng

    2015-01-01

    An acoustic asymmetric transmission device exhibiting unidirectional transmission property for acoustic waves is extremely desirable in many practical scenarios. Such a unique property may be realized in various configurations utilizing acoustic Zeeman effects in moving media as well as frequency-conversion in passive nonlinear acoustic systems and in active acoustic systems. Here we demonstrate a new acoustic frequency conversion process in a time-varying system, consisting of a rotating blade and the surrounding air. The scattered acoustic waves from this time-varying system experience frequency shifts, which are linearly dependent on the blade’s rotating frequency. Such scattering mechanism can be well described theoretically by an acoustic linear time-varying perturbation theory. Combining such time-varying scattering effects with highly efficient acoustic filtering, we successfully develop a tunable acoustic unidirectional device with 20 dB power transmission contrast ratio between two counter propagation directions at audible frequencies. PMID:26038886

  16. Support minimized inversion of acoustic and elastic wave scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Safaeinili, A.

    1994-04-24

    This report discusses the following topics on support minimized inversion of acoustic and elastic wave scattering: Minimum support inversion; forward modelling of elastodynamic wave scattering; minimum support linearized acoustic inversion; support minimized nonlinear acoustic inversion without absolute phase; and support minimized nonlinear elastic inversion.

  17. Acoustic scattering from phononic crystals with complex geometry.

    PubMed

    Kulpe, Jason A; Sabra, Karim G; Leamy, Michael J

    2016-05-01

    This work introduces a formalism for computing external acoustic scattering from phononic crystals (PCs) with arbitrary exterior shape using a Bloch wave expansion technique coupled with the Helmholtz-Kirchhoff integral (HKI). Similar to a Kirchhoff approximation, a geometrically complex PC's surface is broken into a set of facets in which the scattering from each facet is calculated as if it was a semi-infinite plane interface in the short wavelength limit. When excited by incident radiation, these facets introduce wave modes into the interior of the PC. Incorporation of these modes in the HKI, summed over all facets, then determines the externally scattered acoustic field. In particular, for frequencies in a complete bandgap (the usual operating frequency regime of many PC-based devices and the requisite operating regime of the presented theory), no need exists to solve for internal reflections from oppositely facing edges and, thus, the total scattered field can be computed without the need to consider internal multiple scattering. Several numerical examples are provided to verify the presented approach. Both harmonic and transient results are considered for spherical and bean-shaped PCs, each containing over 100 000 inclusions. This facet formalism is validated by comparison to an existing self-consistent scattering technique. PMID:27250192

  18. Experimental Demonstration of Underwater Acoustic Scattering Cancellation

    PubMed Central

    Rohde, Charles A.; Martin, Theodore P.; Guild, Matthew D.; Layman, Christopher N.; Naify, Christina J.; Nicholas, Michael; Thangawng, Abel L.; Calvo, David C.; Orris, Gregory J.

    2015-01-01

    We explore an acoustic scattering cancellation shell for buoyant hollow cylinders submersed in a water background. A thin, low-shear, elastic coating is used to cancel the monopole scattering from an air-filled, neutrally buoyant steel shell for all frequencies where the wavelength is larger than the object diameter. By design, the uncoated shell also has an effective density close to the aqueous background, independently canceling its dipole scattering. Due to the significantly reduced monopole and dipole scattering, the compliant coating results in a hollow cylindrical inclusion that is simultaneously impedance and sound speed matched to the water background. We demonstrate the proposed cancellation method with a specific case, using an array of hollow steel cylinders coated with thin silicone rubber shells. These experimental results are matched to finite element modeling predictions, confirming the scattering reduction. Additional calculations explore the optimization of the silicone coating properties. Using this approach, it is found that scattering cross-sections can be reduced by 20 dB for all wavelengths up to k0a = 0.85. PMID:26282067

  19. Experimental Demonstration of Underwater Acoustic Scattering Cancellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohde, Charles A.; Martin, Theodore P.; Guild, Matthew D.; Layman, Christopher N.; Naify, Christina J.; Nicholas, Michael; Thangawng, Abel L.; Calvo, David C.; Orris, Gregory J.

    2015-08-01

    We explore an acoustic scattering cancellation shell for buoyant hollow cylinders submersed in a water background. A thin, low-shear, elastic coating is used to cancel the monopole scattering from an air-filled, neutrally buoyant steel shell for all frequencies where the wavelength is larger than the object diameter. By design, the uncoated shell also has an effective density close to the aqueous background, independently canceling its dipole scattering. Due to the significantly reduced monopole and dipole scattering, the compliant coating results in a hollow cylindrical inclusion that is simultaneously impedance and sound speed matched to the water background. We demonstrate the proposed cancellation method with a specific case, using an array of hollow steel cylinders coated with thin silicone rubber shells. These experimental results are matched to finite element modeling predictions, confirming the scattering reduction. Additional calculations explore the optimization of the silicone coating properties. Using this approach, it is found that scattering cross-sections can be reduced by 20 dB for all wavelengths up to k0a = 0.85.

  20. Microparticle and Cell Characterization Using Acoustic Scattering.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roos, Mark Schaefer

    A technique is presented for measuring physical properties of particles with radii from one to five microns. Tone bursts of 30 MHz center frequency are scattered by single particles as they are carried by a coaxial jet flow past three focused acoustic transducers (one sender and two receivers). The scattered pressure is measured simultaneously at two angles, which allows the compressibility and density of the particles to be calculated given the volume of the particles and the density and compressibility of the host liquid using Rayleigh's theory for long wavelength acoustic scattering. Because the particles are measured one at a time, statistical distributions of their properties may be determined. The device is calibrated using particles whose properties are known. A study was conducted on human red blood cells in hosts of different tonicity. Density and compressibility values obtained in these experiments are compared with a model accounting for changes in red cell properties due to variations in cell water content. Other studies were conducted using polystyrene and polystyrene divinylbenzene spheres. This technique is well suited to in vitro measurement of properties of biological cells. Applications are discussed, with emphasis on the study of red blood cells.

  1. Low frequency acoustic and electromagnetic scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hariharan, S. I.; Maccamy, R. C.

    1986-01-01

    This paper deals with two classes of problems arising from acoustics and electromagnetics scattering in the low frequency stations. The first class of problem is solving Helmholtz equation with Dirichlet boundary conditions on an arbitrary two dimensional body while the second one is an interior-exterior interface problem with Helmholtz equation in the exterior. Low frequency analysis show that there are two intermediate problems which solve the above problems accurate to 0(k/2/ log k) where k is the frequency. These solutions greatly differ from the zero frequency approximations. For the Dirichlet problem numerical examples are shown to verify the theoretical estimates.

  2. Low frequency acoustic and electromagnetic scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hariharan, S. I.; Maccamy, R. C.

    1983-01-01

    This paper deals with two classes of problems arising from acoustics and electromagnetics scattering in the low frequency stations. The first class of problem is solving Helmholtz equation with Dirichlet boundary conditions on an arbitrary two dimensional body while the second one is an interior-exterior interface problem with Helmholtz equation in the exterior. Low frequency analysis show that there are two intermediate problems which solve the above problems accurate to 0(k(2) log k) where k is the frequency. These solutions greatly differ from the zero frequency approximations. For the Dirichlet problem numerical examples are shown to verify the theoretical estimates.

  3. Negative refraction induced acoustic concentrator and the effects of scattering cancellation, imaging, and mirage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Qi; Cheng, Ying; Liu, Xiao-jun

    2012-07-01

    We present a three-dimensional acoustic concentrator capable of significantly enhancing the sound intensity in the compressive region with scattering cancellation, imaging, and mirage effects. The concentrator shell is built by isotropic gradient negative-index materials, which together with an exterior host medium slab constructs a pair of complementary media. The enhancement factor, which can approach infinity by tuning the geometric parameters, is always much higher than that of a traditional concentrator made by positive-index materials with the same size. The acoustic scattering theory is applied to derive the pressure field distribution of the concentrator, which is consistent with the numerical full-wave simulations. The inherent acoustic impedance match at the interfaces of the shell as well as the inverse processes of “negative refraction—progressive curvature—negative refraction” for arbitrary sound rays can exactly cancel the scattering of the concentrator. In addition, the concentrator shell can also function as an acoustic spherical magnifying superlens, which produces a perfect image with the same shape, with bigger geometric and acoustic parameters located at a shifted position. Then some acoustic mirages are observed whereby the waves radiated from (scattered by) an object located in the center region may seem to be radiated from (scattered by) its image. Based on the mirage effect, we further propose an intriguing acoustic transformer which can transform the sound scattering pattern of one object into another object at will with arbitrary geometric, acoustic, and location parameters.

  4. Multiple scattering of a spherical acoustic wave from fluid spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, J. H.; Liu, A. Q.; Chen, H. L.; Chen, T. N.

    2006-02-01

    The multiple scattering of a spherical acoustic wave from an arbitrary number of fluid spheres is investigated theoretically. The tool to attack the multiple scattering problem is a kind of addition formulas for the spherical wave functions, which are presented in the paper, based on the bicentric expansion form of Green function in the spherical coordinates. For an arbitrary configuration of N fluid spheres, the kind of addition formulas permits the field expansions (all referred to the center of each sphere). With these the sound fields scattered by each sphere can be described by a set of N equations. The interactions between any two fluid spheres are taken into account in these equations exactly and their coefficients are coupled through double sums in the spherical wave functions. By truncating the infinite series in the equations depending on certain calculation accuracy and solving the coefficients matrix by using the Gauss-Seidel iteration method, we can obtain the scattered sound field by the configuration of the fluid spheres. Finally, the scattering calculations by using the kind of addition formulas are carried out.

  5. Modulation of Radio Frequency Signals by Nonlinearly Generated Acoustic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Spencer Joseph

    Acousto-electromagnetic scattering is a process in which an acoustic excitation is utilized to induce modulation on an electromagnetic (EM) wave. This phenomenon can be exploited in remote sensing and detection schemes whereby target objects are mechanically excited by high powered acoustic waves resulting in unique object characterizations when interrogated with EM signals. Implementation of acousto-EM sensing schemes, however, are limited by a lack of fundamental understanding of the nonlinear interaction between acoustic and EM waves and inefficient simulation methods in the determination of the radiation patterns of higher order scattered acoustic fields. To address the insufficient simulation issue, a computationally efficient mathematical model describing higher order scattered sound fields, particularly of third-order in which a 40x increase in computation speed is achieved, is derived using a multi-Gaussian beam (MGB) expansion that expresses the sound field of any arbitrary axially symmetric beam as a series of Gaussian base functions. The third-order intermodulation (IM3) frequency components are produced by considering the cascaded nonlinear second-order effects when analyzing the interaction between the first- and second-order frequency components during the nonlinear scattering of sound by sound from two noncollinear ultrasonic baffled piston sources. The theory is extended to the modeling of the sound beams generated by parametric transducer arrays, showing that the MGB model can be efficiently used to calculate both the second- and third-order sound fields of the array. Additionally, a near-to-far-field (NTFF) transformation method is developed to model the far-field characteristics of scattered sound fields, extending Kirchhoff's theorem, typically applied to EM waves, determining the far-field patterns of an acoustic source from amplitude and phase measurements made in the near-field by including the higher order sound fields generated by the

  6. Flow velocity measurement with the nonlinear acoustic wave scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Didenkulov, Igor; Pronchatov-Rubtsov, Nikolay

    2015-10-28

    A problem of noninvasive measurement of liquid flow velocity arises in many practical applications. To this end the most often approach is the use of the linear Doppler technique. The Doppler frequency shift of signal scattered from the inhomogeneities distributed in a liquid relatively to the emitted frequency is proportional to the sound frequency and velocities of inhomogeneities. In the case of very slow flow one needs to use very high frequency sound. This approach fails in media with strong sound attenuation because acoustic wave attenuation increases with frequency and there is limit in increasing sound intensity, i.e. the cavitation threshold. Another approach which is considered in this paper is based on the method using the difference frequency Doppler Effect for flows with bubbles. This method is based on simultaneous action of two high-frequency primary acoustic waves with closed frequencies on bubbles and registration of the scattered by bubbles acoustic field at the difference frequency. The use of this method is interesting since the scattered difference frequency wave has much lower attenuation in a liquid. The theoretical consideration of the method is given in the paper. The experimental examples confirming the theoretical equations, as well as the ability of the method to be applied in medical diagnostics and in technical applications on measurement of flow velocities in liquids with strong sound attenuation is described. It is shown that the Doppler spectrum form depends on bubble concentration velocity distribution in the primary acoustic beams crossing zone that allows one to measure the flow velocity distribution.

  7. Flow velocity measurement with the nonlinear acoustic wave scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Didenkulov, Igor; Pronchatov-Rubtsov, Nikolay

    2015-10-01

    A problem of noninvasive measurement of liquid flow velocity arises in many practical applications. To this end the most often approach is the use of the linear Doppler technique. The Doppler frequency shift of signal scattered from the inhomogeneities distributed in a liquid relatively to the emitted frequency is proportional to the sound frequency and velocities of inhomogeneities. In the case of very slow flow one needs to use very high frequency sound. This approach fails in media with strong sound attenuation because acoustic wave attenuation increases with frequency and there is limit in increasing sound intensity, i.e. the cavitation threshold. Another approach which is considered in this paper is based on the method using the difference frequency Doppler Effect for flows with bubbles. This method is based on simultaneous action of two high-frequency primary acoustic waves with closed frequencies on bubbles and registration of the scattered by bubbles acoustic field at the difference frequency. The use of this method is interesting since the scattered difference frequency wave has much lower attenuation in a liquid. The theoretical consideration of the method is given in the paper. The experimental examples confirming the theoretical equations, as well as the ability of the method to be applied in medical diagnostics and in technical applications on measurement of flow velocities in liquids with strong sound attenuation is described. It is shown that the Doppler spectrum form depends on bubble concentration velocity distribution in the primary acoustic beams crossing zone that allows one to measure the flow velocity distribution.

  8. Acoustic scattering from ellipses by the modal element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kreider, Kevin L.; Baumeister, Kenneth J.

    1995-01-01

    The modal element method is used to study acoustic scattering from ellipses, which may be acoustically soft (absorbing) or hard (reflecting). Because exact solutions are available, the results provide a benchmark for algorithm performance for scattering from airfoils and similar shapes. Numerical results for scattering from rigid ellipses are presented for a wide variety of eccentricities at moderate frequencies. These results indicate that the method is practical.

  9. Numerical Simulations of Radar Acoustic Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boluriaan, Said; Morris, Philip J.

    1998-11-01

    Wake vortices are produced by the lifting surfaces of all aircraft. The vortex created by a large aircraft can have a catastrophic effect on a small plane following closely behind. A vortex detection system would not only increase airport productivity by allowing adaptive spacing, but would also increase the safety of all aircraft operating around the airport by alerting controllers to hazardous conditions that might exist near the runways. In the present research, one and two-dimensional models have been considered for the study of wake vortex detection using a Radar Acoustic Sounding System (RASS). The permittivity perturbation caused by the vortex is modeled as a traveling wave with a Gaussian envelope and a variable propagation speed. The model equations are solved numerically. The one-dimensional model is also solved analytically. The main problem with a time domain simulation is the number of samples required to resolve the Doppler shift. Even for a 1D model with a typical scatterer size, the CPU time required to run the code is far beyond the currently available computer resources. One way to make the time domain simulation feasible is to recast the governing differential equation in order to remove the carrier frequency and solve only for the frequency shift in the scattered wave. The numerical stability characteristics of the resulting equation with complex coefficients are discussed. In order to validate the numerical scheme, the code is run for a fictitious speed of light.

  10. Acoustic build-up in on-chip stimulated Brillouin scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, C.; Steel, M. J.; Eggleton, B. J.; Poulton, C. G.

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the role of the spatial evolution of the acoustic field in stimulated Brillouin scattering processes in short high-gain structures. When the gain is strong enough that the gain length becomes comparable to the acoustic wave decay length of order 100 microns, standard approximations treating the acoustic field as a local response no longer apply. Treating the acoustic evolution more accurately, we find that the backward SBS gain of sub-millimetre long waveguides is significantly reduced from the value obtained by the conventional treatment because the acoustic mode requires several decay lengths to build up to its nominal value. In addition, the corresponding resonance line is broadened with the development of side bands. In contrast, we argue that intra-mode forward SBS is not expected to show these effects. Our results have implications for several recent proposals and experiments on high-gain stimulated Brillouin scattering in short semiconductor waveguides.

  11. Acoustic build-up in on-chip stimulated Brillouin scattering

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, C.; Steel, M. J.; Eggleton, B. J.; Poulton, C. G.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the role of the spatial evolution of the acoustic field in stimulated Brillouin scattering processes in short high-gain structures. When the gain is strong enough that the gain length becomes comparable to the acoustic wave decay length of order 100 microns, standard approximations treating the acoustic field as a local response no longer apply. Treating the acoustic evolution more accurately, we find that the backward SBS gain of sub-millimetre long waveguides is significantly reduced from the value obtained by the conventional treatment because the acoustic mode requires several decay lengths to build up to its nominal value. In addition, the corresponding resonance line is broadened with the development of side bands. In contrast, we argue that intra-mode forward SBS is not expected to show these effects. Our results have implications for several recent proposals and experiments on high-gain stimulated Brillouin scattering in short semiconductor waveguides. PMID:26338720

  12. Topics in electromagnetic, acoustic, and potential scattering theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuntaplook, Umaporn

    With recent renewed interest in the classical topics of both acoustic and electromagnetic aspects for nano-technology, transformation optics, fiber optics, metamaterials with negative refractive indices, cloaking and invisibility, the topic of time-independent scattering theory in quantum mechanics is becoming a useful field to re-examine in the above contexts. One of the key areas of electromagnetic theory scattering of plane electromagnetic waves --- is based on the properties of the refractive indices in the various media. It transpires that the refractive index of a medium and the potential in quantum scattering theory are intimately related. In many cases, understanding such scattering in radially symmetric media is sufficient to gain insight into scattering in more complex media. Meeting the challenge of variable refractive indices and possibly complicated boundary conditions therefore requires accurate and efficient numerical methods, and where possible, analytic solutions to the radial equations from the governing scalar and vector wave equations (in acoustics and electromagnetic theory, respectively). Until relatively recently, researchers assumed a constant refractive index throughout the medium of interest. However, the most interesting and increasingly useful cases are those with non-constant refractive index profiles. In the majority of this dissertation the focus is on media with piecewise constant refractive indices in radially symmetric media. The method discussed is based on the solution of Maxwell's equations for scattering of plane electromagnetic waves from a dielectric (or "transparent") sphere in terms of the related Helmholtz equation. The main body of the dissertation (Chapters 2 and 3) is concerned with scattering from (i) a uniform spherical inhomogeneity embedded in an external medium with different properties, and (ii) a piecewise-uniform central inhomogeneity in the external medium. The latter results contain a natural generalization of

  13. Multiscale analysis of the acoustic scattering by many scatterers of impedance type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Challa, Durga Prasad; Sini, Mourad

    2016-06-01

    We are concerned with the acoustic scattering problem, at a frequency {κ}, by many small obstacles of arbitrary shapes with impedance boundary condition. These scatterers are assumed to be included in a bounded domain {Ω} in {{R}^3} which is embedded in an acoustic background characterized by an eventually locally varying index of refraction. The collection of the scatterers {D_m, m=1,ldots,M} is modeled by four parameters: their number M, their maximum radius a, their minimum distance d and the surface impedances {λ_m, m=1,ldots,M}. We consider the parameters M, d and {λ_m}'s having the following scaling properties: {M:=M(a)=O(a^{-s}), d:=d(a)≈ a^t} and {λ_m:=λ_m(a)=λ_{m,0}a^{-β}}, as {a→ 0}, with non negative constants s, t and {β} and complex numbers {λ_{m, 0}}'s with eventually negative imaginary parts. We derive the asymptotic expansion of the far-fields with explicit error estimate in terms of a, as {a→ 0}. The dominant term is the Foldy-Lax field corresponding to the scattering by the point-like scatterers located at the centers {z_m}'s of the scatterers {D_m}'s with {λ_m \\vert partial D_m\\vert} as the related scattering coefficients. This asymptotic expansion is justified under the following conditions a ≤ a_0, \\vert Re (λ_{m,0})\\vert ≥ λ_-,quad \\vertλ_{m,0}\\vert ≤ λ_+,quad β < 1,quad 0 ≤ s ≤2-β,quads/3 ≤ t and the error of the approximation is {C a^{3-2β-s}}, as {a → 0}, where the positive constants {a_0, λ_-,λ_+} and C depend only on the a priori uniform bounds of the Lipschitz characters of the obstacles {D_m}'s and the ones of {M(a)a^s} and {d(a)/a^t}. We do not assume the periodicity in distributing the small scatterers. In addition, the scatterers can be arbitrary close since t can be arbitrary large, i.e., we can handle the mesoscale regime. Finally, for spherical scatterers, we can also allow the limit case {β=1} with a slightly better error of the approximation.

  14. Acoustic and elastic multiple scattering and radiation from cylindrical structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amirkulova, Feruza Abdukadirovna

    Multiple scattering (MS) and radiation of waves by a system of scatterers is of great theoretical and practical importance and is required in a wide variety of physical contexts such as the implementation of "invisibility" cloaks, the effective parameter characterization, and the fabrication of dynamically tunable structures, etc. The dissertation develops fast, rapidly convergent iterative techniques to expedite the solution of MS problems. The formulation of MS problems reduces to a system of linear algebraic equations using Graf's theorem and separation of variables. The iterative techniques are developed using Neumann expansion and Block Toeplitz structure of the linear system; they are very general, and suitable for parallel computations and a large number of MS problems, i.e. acoustic, elastic, electromagnetic, etc., and used for the first time to solve MS problems. The theory is implemented in Matlab and FORTRAN, and the theoretical predictions are compared to computations obtained by COMSOL. To formulate the MS problem, the transition matrix is obtained by analyzing an acoustic and an elastic single scattering of incident waves by elastic isotropic and anisotropic solids. The mathematical model of wave scattering from multilayered cylindrical and spherical structures is developed by means of an exact solution of dynamic 3D elasticity theory. The recursive impedance matrix algorithm is derived for radially heterogeneous anisotropic solids. An explicit method for finding the impedance in piecewise uniform, transverse-isotropic material is proposed; the solution is compared to elasticity theory solutions involving Buchwald potentials. Furthermore, active exterior cloaking devices are modeled for acoustic and elastic media using multipole sources. A cloaking device can render an object invisible to some incident waves as seen by some external observer. The active cloak is generated by a discrete set of multipole sources that destructively interfere with an

  15. Optimisation of an acoustically antiguiding structure for raising the stimulated Brillouin scattering threshold in optical fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khudyakov, M. M.; Likhachev, M. E.; Bubnov, M. M.; Lipatov, D. S.; Gur'yanov, A. N.; Temyanko, V.; Nagel, J.; Peyghambarian, N.

    2016-05-01

    Optical fibres having a radially nonuniform acoustically antiguiding structure produced by codoping their core with alumina and germania have been fabricated and investigated. The influence of the shape of the antiguiding acoustic refractive index profile and fibre core diameter on the stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) threshold and spectrum in the fibres has been assessed. An increase in SBS threshold by 4.4 dB with respect to a germanosilicate fibre having the same mode field diameter has been demonstrated.

  16. Frustrated total internal reflection acoustic field sensor

    DOEpatents

    Kallman, Jeffrey S.

    2000-01-01

    A frustrated total internal reflection acoustic field sensor which allows the acquisition of the acoustic field over an entire plane, all at once. The sensor finds use in acoustic holography and acoustic diffraction tomography. For example, the sensor may be produced by a transparent plate with transparent support members tall enough to support one or more flexible membranes at an appropriate height for frustrated total internal reflection to occur. An acoustic wave causes the membrane to deflect away from its quiescent position and thus changes the amount of light that tunnels through the gap formed by the support members and into the membrane, and so changes the amount of light reflected by the membrane. The sensor(s) is illuminated by a uniform tight field, and the reflection from the sensor yields acoustic wave amplitude and phase information which can be picked up electronically or otherwise.

  17. Effects of electric field on acoustic properties of 0.83Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3) -0.17PbTiO3 single crystals studied by Brillouin light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Tae Hyun; Ko, Jae-Hyeon; Kojima, Seiji

    2013-03-01

    Relaxor-based ferroelectric Pb[(Mg1/3Nb2/3)1-x Tix]O3 (PMN-xPT) single crystals have attracted great attention because of their exceptionally strong piezoelectric properties. This peculiar characteristic was attributed to the rotation of polarization directions and structural complexity. In this study, the phase transition behaviors of PMN-17PT single crystals have been investigated under an electric field applied along [001] by micro-Brillouin scattering. PMN-17PT single crystals were grown by the modified Bridgeman method. The two (001) surfaces were Au-coated to apply the electric field, and the coating was thin enough to allow the incident beam to transmit without much loss. The electric field of different values was applied to the sample along the [001] direction, and the Brillouin scattering spectrum was measured under both field-heating (FH) and field-cooling (FC) conditions. The electric field of 1kV/cm induced a new longitudinal acoustic (LA) mode component along with a broad Brillouin peak evolving continuously from the paraelectric phase during both FC and FH processes. This was attributed to the remnant polar nanoregions that were not aligned under the electric field due to quenched random fields. However, the splitting of the LA mode did not appear when the electric field was over 2kV/cm indicating a clear structural phase transition. This research was supported in part by the Marubun Research Promotion Foundation and Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology (2010-0010497).

  18. Kinetic Enhancement of Raman Backscatter, and Electron Acoustic Thomson Scatter

    SciTech Connect

    Strozzi, D J; Williams, E A; Langdon, A B; Bers, A

    2006-09-01

    1-D Eulerian Vlasov-Maxwell simulations are presented which show kinetic enhancement of stimulated Raman backscatter (SRBS) due to electron trapping in regimes of heavy linear Landau damping. The conventional Raman Langmuir wave is transformed into a set of beam acoustic modes [L. Yin et al., Phys. Rev. E 73, 025401 (2006)]. For the first time, a low phase velocity electron acoustic wave (EAW) is seen developing from the self-consistent Raman physics. Backscatter of the pump laser off the EAW fluctuations is reported and referred to as electron acoustic Thomson scatter. This light is similar in wavelength to, although much lower in amplitude than, the reflected light between the pump and SRBS wavelengths observed in single hot spot experiments, and previously interpreted as stimulated electron acoustic scatter [D. S. Montgomery et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 87, 155001 (2001)]. The EAW observed in our simulations is strongest well below the phase-matched frequency for electron acoustic scatter, and therefore the EAW is not produced by it. The beating of different beam acoustic modes is proposed as the EAW excitation mechanism, and is called beam acoustic decay. Supporting evidence for this process, including bispectral analysis, is presented. The linear electrostatic modes, found by projecting the numerical distribution function onto a Gauss-Hermite basis, include beam acoustic modes (some of which are unstable even without parametric coupling to light waves) and a strongly-damped EAW similar to the observed one. This linear EAW results from non-Maxwellian features in the electron distribution, rather than nonlinearity due to electron trapping.

  19. Experiment Observation on Acoustic Forward Scattering for Underwater Moving Object Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Bo; Ma, Yuan-Liang; Yang, Kun-De

    2011-03-01

    The problem of detecting an object in shallow water by observing changes in the acoustic field as the object passes between an acoustic source and receiver is addressed. A signal processing scheme based on forward scattering is proposed to detect the perturbed field in the presence of the moving object. The periodic LFM wideband signal is transmitted and a sudden change of field is acquired using a normalized median filter. The experimental results on the lake show that the proposed scheme is successful for the detection of a slowly moving object in the bistatic blind zone.

  20. Broadband acoustic scattering measurements of underwater unexploded ordnance (UXO).

    PubMed

    Bucaro, J A; Houston, B H; Saniga, M; Dragonette, L R; Yoder, T; Dey, S; Kraus, L; Carin, L

    2008-02-01

    In order to evaluate the potential for detection and identification of underwater unexploded ordnance (UXO) by exploiting their structural acoustic response, we carried out broadband monostatic scattering measurements over a full 360 degrees on UXO's (two mortar rounds, an artillery shell, and a rocket warhead) and false targets (a cinder block and a large rock). The measurement band, 1-140 kHz, includes a low frequency structural acoustics region in which the wavelengths are comparable to or larger than the target characteristic dimensions. In general, there are aspects that provide relatively high target strength levels ( approximately -10 to -15 dB), and from our experience the targets should be detectable in this structural acoustics band in most acoustic environments. The rigid body scattering was also calculated for one UXO in order to highlight the measured scattering features involving elastic responses. The broadband scattering data should be able to support feature-based separation of UXO versus false targets and identification of various classes of UXO as well. PMID:18247878

  1. Visualizing underwater acoustic matched-field processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenblum, Lawrence; Kamgar-Parsi, Behzad; Karahalios, Margarida; Heitmeyer, Richard

    1991-06-01

    Matched-field processing is a new technique for processing ocean acoustic data measured by an array of hydrophones. It produces estimates of the location of sources of acoustic energy. This method differs from source localization techniques in other disciplines in that it uses the complex underwater acoustic environment to improve the accuracy of the source localization. An unexplored problem in matched-field processing has been to separate multiple sources within a matched-field ambiguity function. Underwater acoustic processing is one of many disciplines where a synthesis of computer graphics and image processing is producing new insight. The benefits of different volume visualization algorithms for matched-field display are discussed. The authors show how this led to a template matching scheme for identifying a source within the matched-field ambiguity function that can help move toward an automated source localization process.

  2. Reciprocity in the scattering coefficients of acoustic waveguide modes.

    PubMed

    Tong, Yuhui; Pan, Jie

    2013-09-01

    In this Letter, a proof is provided for the reciprocity between modal scattering coefficients of the acoustic waveguides connected by a junction enclosure. The result holds for all waveguide modes and for junction enclosures with locally reactive boundary conditions away from the interfaces between the junction and waveguides. Also provided is a physical interpretation of the reciprocity of the modal scattering coefficients. The scattering of two-dimensional waveguide modes by a right-angled bend in a rectangular duct is used as an illustrating example. PMID:23967907

  3. Far field elastodynamic Born scattering revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geerits, Tim W.; Veile, Ines; Hellwig, Olaf

    2013-02-01

    This paper summarizes part of an ongoing feasibility study that investigates the possible use of the full elastic Born approximation in multipole borehole acoustics. As a first step we exclude the fluid-filled borehole with the motivation that one or two wavelengths away from the fluid-filled borehole, radiating borehole mode amplitudes (e.g., Stoneley wave, formation dipole wave, etc.) are small compared to body wave amplitudes (P-, SV- and SH-waves). Consequently, for scatterers one or two wavelengths away from the fluid-filled borehole, it suffices to only consider their interaction with body waves. In this paper we apply the contrast-source stress-velocity forward scattering (integral equation) formulation for solid configurations in its first order (Born-) approximation (De Hoop, 1995) assuming a multipole force source excitation in a zero-offset configuration. To scrutinize the validity of the Born approximation, we consider the simplest type of scatterer, i.e., one characterized by a (Heaviside) step function change in one or more of the contrast (perturbation) parameters and we derive analytic zero-offset formulas for the scattered wave particle velocity and displacement in both the space-frequency and space-time domain, respectively. We assume the scatterer to be located in the far-field. More complicated layered configurations can easily be derived by superposition of the given solution types. Explicit results are given for the dipole and quadrupole excitation, where the former is allowed to have an arbitrary orientation relative to the scatterer and where the latter one is located in a plane perpendicular to the scatterer. In the time domain it is shown, how the scattered wave field decomposes in a specular and diffuse wave field (two terms borrowed from ‘Optics'), where the former contribution vanishes in the absence of an imaging condition and where the latter is always present. For the dipole case, we subject our results to a sensitivity analysis

  4. Acoustic Phase Measurements from Volume Scatter in the Ocean.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huston, Robert Delmar

    A primary goal of this thesis has been to demonstrate that stable, useful measurements of the orientation of the acoustic signal vector as a function of range and time can be obtained from ocean backscatter, and that this orientation, or acoustic phase, can be related to the local sound speed distribution. Consistent and useful measurement of absolute phase depends upon the positions of individual scatterers, which are normally random and sparse relative to the acoustic wavelength. This difficulty has been overcome by coherent super-position of echoes from successive transmissions, such that the effective density of acoustic targets progressively increases as the summation proceeds. The theoretical basis of this type of coherent processing has been developed and examined in the limiting case, in which it approximates a scatterer continuum for which an analytic expression has been found. The theory provides fundamental insights to the behaviour of both the amplitude and phase of volume scatter. As the ratio of coherent to incoherent signal increases with successive superposition of the echoes (coherent processing), the phase statistics evolve from a uniform to a nearly Gaussian distribution. Once the phase signal is bounded to within +/-45 ^circ, the basic requirement for a coherent 'volume mirror' has been met and reliable interferometric estimates are possible. The experimental work used a bistatic configuration with a multi-beam projector and narrow beam hydrophone operating at 215 kHz. The results confirm the theoretical concepts and demonstrate that within the quite limited range of environmental conditions that were studied, the coherently processed acoustic signals are consistent with independent measurements of the evolving sound speed profile. The main contribution of this thesis has been to lay a firm theoretical and experimental foundation for the use of volume backscatter in acoustic interferometer devices. Based on these results, the potential for new

  5. Prediction of acoustic scattering in the time domain and its applications to rotorcraft noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seongkyu

    the numerical method is excellent for both stationary and moving observer cases. The formulation for the pressure gradient is first used to predict acoustic scattering in the frequency domain. The prediction is validated with the exact solution for acoustic scattering generated by a monopole source by a stationary sphere. A Bo105 helicopter and a notional heavy lift quad tilt rotor are considered to demonstrate a potential significance of acoustic scattering of rotorcraft noise. NASA's Fast Scattering Code is used for the frequency-domain scattering solver. Secondly, a new and efficient time domain acoustic scattering method using a moving equivalent source is developed to predict acoustic scattering in the time domain efficiently. The time-domain method provides entire frequency solutions in a single computation and is able to predict acoustic scattering of aperiodic signals. The method assumes an acoustically rigid surface for a scattering body and neglects the refraction effect by non-uniform flow around the scattering body. The pressure-gradient boundary condition is determined on a scattering surface and then the scattered field is calculated by using equivalent sources located within the scattering surface. Linear shape functions are used to discretize the strength of the equivalent sources in time and singular value decomposition is used to overcome potential numerical instability. The detailed numerical algorithm is addressed in the thesis. The method is more efficient numerically and easier to implement than other time-domain methods using a finite difference scheme or boundary integral equations because it is not necessary to find the solution in the entire domain, it uses a fewer number of equivalent sources than the surface mesh points, and it does not involve surface integrals. The method is validated against exact solutions for various cases including a single frequency monopole source, a dipole source, multiple sources, beat, and broadband noise sources

  6. Field Fluctuation Spectroscopy in a Reverberant Cavity with Moving Scatterers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Rosny, Julien; Roux, Philippe; Fink, Mathias; Page, J. H.

    2003-03-01

    We report a study of transient ultrasonic waves inside a reverberant cavity containing moving scatterers. We show that the elastic mean free path and the dynamics of the scatterers govern the evolution of the autocorrelation of acoustic wave field. A parallel is established between these results and a closely related technique, diffusing acoustic wave spectroscopy. Excellent agreement is found between experiment and theory for a moving stainless steel ball in a water tank, thereby elucidating the underlying physics, and a potential application, fish monitoring inside aquariums, is demonstrated.

  7. Sensitivity of room acoustic parameters to changes in scattering coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathsam, Jonathan; Wang, Lily M.

    2001-05-01

    This project uses the room acoustics computer modeling program, ODEON, to investigate the sensitivity of room acoustic parameters to changes in scattering coefficients. Particularly, the study is interested in determining if the results from certain room models are more sensitive to scattering coefficients than from other models, due to their geometry or absorption characteristics. If so, how can one quantify a model's susceptibility to being sensitive to scattering? Various models of three real spaces in Omaha, Nebraska are tested. The predicted reverberation, clarity, and spaciousness parameters are compared at various receiver locations, while the scattering coefficient of all surfaces is varied from 0 to 0.1, 0.3, 0.5, and 0.8. The resulting data are analyzed by frequency according to the (1) average absorption of the room; (2) magnitude variation of absorption within the room; (3) spatial distribution of absorption within the room; and (4) level of model detail. Initial results indicate that parameters studied may show more sensitivity to scattering coefficients in models that have a wider range of absorption values, more disparate distribution of absorption, and lower detail level. Various schemes that include these aspects are proposed for computing a model's sensitivity to changes in scattering.

  8. Experimental study of acoustic radiation force of an ultrasound beam on absorbing and scattering objects

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolaeva, Anastasiia V. Kryzhanovsky, Maxim A.; Tsysar, Sergey A.; Kreider, Wayne; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.

    2015-10-28

    Acoustic radiation force is a nonlinear acoustic effect caused by the transfer of wave momentum to absorbing or scattering objects. This phenomenon is exploited in modern ultrasound metrology for measurement of the acoustic power radiated by a source and is used for both therapeutic and diagnostic sources in medical applications. To calculate radiation force an acoustic hologram can be used in conjunction with analytical expressions based on the angular spectrum of the measured field. The results of an experimental investigation of radiation forces in two different cases are presented in this paper. In one case, the radiation force of an obliquely incident ultrasound beam on a large absorber (which completely absorbs the beam) is considered. The second case concerns measurement of the radiation force on a spherical target that is small compared to the beam diameter.

  9. Experimental Study of Acoustic Radiation Force of an Ultrasound Beam on Absorbing and Scattering Objects

    PubMed Central

    Nikolaeva, Anastasiia V.; Kryzhanovsky, Maxim A.; Tsysar, Sergey A.; Kreider, Wayne; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.

    2016-01-01

    Acoustic radiation force is a nonlinear acoustic effect caused by the transfer of wave momentum to absorbing or scattering objects. This phenomenon is exploited in modern ultrasound metrology for measurement of the acoustic power radiated by a source and is used for both therapeutic and diagnostic sources in medical applications. To calculate radiation force an acoustic hologram can be used in conjunction with analytical expressions based on the angular spectrum of the measured field. The results of an experimental investigation of radiation forces in two different cases are presented in this paper. In one case, the radiation force of an obliquely incident ultrasound beam on a large absorber (which completely absorbs the beam) is considered. The second case concerns measurement of the radiation force on a spherical target that is small compared to the beam diameter. PMID:27147775

  10. Experimental study of acoustic radiation force of an ultrasound beam on absorbing and scattering objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolaeva, Anastasiia V.; Kryzhanovsky, Maxim A.; Tsysar, Sergey A.; Kreider, Wayne; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.

    2015-10-01

    Acoustic radiation force is a nonlinear acoustic effect caused by the transfer of wave momentum to absorbing or scattering objects. This phenomenon is exploited in modern ultrasound metrology for measurement of the acoustic power radiated by a source and is used for both therapeutic and diagnostic sources in medical applications. To calculate radiation force an acoustic hologram can be used in conjunction with analytical expressions based on the angular spectrum of the measured field. The results of an experimental investigation of radiation forces in two different cases are presented in this paper. In one case, the radiation force of an obliquely incident ultrasound beam on a large absorber (which completely absorbs the beam) is considered. The second case concerns measurement of the radiation force on a spherical target that is small compared to the beam diameter.

  11. Finite Element Prediction of Acoustic Scattering and Radiation from Submerged Elastic Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everstine, G. C.; Henderson, F. M.; Lipman, R. R.

    1984-01-01

    A finite element formulation is derived for the scattering and radiation of acoustic waves from submerged elastic structures. The formulation uses as fundamental unknowns the displacement in the structure and a velocity potential in the field. Symmetric coefficient matrices result. The outer boundary of the fluid region is terminated with an approximate local wave-absorbing boundary condition which assumes that outgoing waves are locally planar. The finite element model is capable of predicting only the near-field acoustic pressures. Far-field sound pressure levels may be determined by integrating the surface pressures and velocities over the wet boundary of the structure using the Helmholtz integral. Comparison of finite element results with analytic results show excellent agreement. The coupled fluid-structure problem may be solved with general purpose finite element codes by using an analogy between the equations of elasticity and the wave equation of linear acoustics.

  12. Acoustic scattering in flexible waveguide involving step discontinuity.

    PubMed

    Afzal, Muhammad; Nawaz, Rab; Ayub, Muhammad; Wahab, Abdul

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the propagation and scattering of acoustic waves in a flexible wave-guide involving step discontinuity at an interface is considered. The emerging boundary value problem is non-Sturm-Liouville and is solved by employing a hybrid mode-matching technique. The physical scattering process and attenuation of duct modes versus frequency regime and change of height is studied. Moreover, the mode-matching solution is validated through a series of numerical experiments by testifying the power conservation identity and matching interface conditions. PMID:25084019

  13. Axisymmetric scattering of an acoustical Bessel beam by a rigid fixed spheroid.

    PubMed

    Mitri, Farid G

    2015-10-01

    Based on the partial-wave series expansion (PWSE) method in spherical coordinates, a formal analytical solution for the acoustic scattering of a zeroth-order Bessel acoustic beam centered on a rigid fixed (oblate or prolate) spheroid is provided. The unknown scattering coefficients of the spheroid are determined by solving a system of linear equations derived for the Neumann boundary condition. Numerical results for the modulus of the backscattered pressure (θ = π) in the near field and the backscattering form function in the far field for both prolate and oblate spheroids are presented and discussed, with particular emphasis on the aspect ratio (i.e., the ratio of the major axis over the minor axis of the spheroid), the half-cone angle of the Bessel beam, and the dimensionless frequency. The plots display periodic oscillations (versus the dimensionless frequency) because of the interference of specularly reflected waves in the backscattering direction with circumferential Franz' waves circumnavigating the surface of the spheroid in the surrounding fluid. Moreover, the 3-D directivity patterns illustrate the near- and far-field axisymmetric scattering. Investigations in underwater acoustics, particle levitation, scattering, and the detection of submerged elongated objects and other related applications utilizing Bessel waves would benefit from the results of the present study. PMID:26470043

  14. Surprises and anomalies in acoustical and optical scattering and radiation forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marston, Philip L.

    2015-09-01

    Experiments on radiation torques and negative radiation forces by various researchers display how the underlying wave-field geometry influences radiation forces. Other situations strongly influenced by wave-field geometry include high-order caustics present in light-scattering patterns of objects as simple as oblate drops of water or oblate bubbles of air in water. Related theoretical and experimental investigations are considered. Acoustic scattering enhancements associated with various guided waves are also examined. These include guided waves having negative group velocities and guided wave radiating wavefronts having a vanishing Gaussian curvature.

  15. Acoustic and photoacoustic scattering from transverse isotropic tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheu, Yae-lin; Ho, Yi-Ching; Li, Pai-Chi

    2013-03-01

    This research investigated anisotropic scattering of ultrasonic and photoacoustic waves from tissues consisting of transverse isotropic structures. Anisotropic scattering refers to the systematic variation in acoustic scattered energy. Take tendon as an example, the maximum occurs when the arrangement of the transducer and fiber orientation is perpendicular and minimum occurs when the arrangement is parallel. Experimental results indicate the apparent integrated backscatter (AIB), which is widely adopted to compute the scattered energy, for photoacoustic as well as ultrasonic waves decayed as the arrangement changed from perpendicular to parallel. The AIB decrement using transducers with center frequency of 3.5 MHz, 5 MHz, and 20 MHz were 10.50 dB, 18.01 dB, and 20.98 dB, respectively. Photoacoustic AIB decrement detected by transducers with center frequency of 3.5 MHz, 5 MHz, and 20 MHz were 7.63 dB, 15.54 dB, and 17.76 dB, respectively. It is shown that higher detection frequency resulted in a larger decrement. A hypothesis is proposed to explain why photoacoustic waves are less affected by the fibrous tissue. In ultrasonic scattering, incident direction for each scatterer were similar due to the relatively planar wavefront, hence the signal amplitudes scattered at the transducer direction are also similar. In photoacoustic scattering, the spherical-like wavefront causes different incident directions for different scatterers, therefore the variation of the signal amplitude collected by the transducer increases, resulting in a lower correlation with the microstructure. In addition, the decrement of backscattered energy decreased for a single scatterer when the incident wave was spherical. Experimental and simulation results verified the hypothesis. The discovery implies that photoacoustic imaging has the potential to detect tissues with transverse isotropic structure that may be overlooked by conventional ultrasound imaging.

  16. Acoustic scattering from a water-filled cylindrical shell: measurements, modeling, and interpretation.

    PubMed

    España, Aubrey L; Williams, Kevin L; Plotnick, Daniel S; Marston, Philip L

    2014-07-01

    Understanding the physics governing the interaction of sound with targets in an underwater environment is essential to improving existing target detection and classification algorithms. To illustrate techniques for identifying the key physics, an examination is made of the acoustic scattering from a water-filled cylindrical shell. Experiments were conducted that measured the acoustic scattering from a water-filled cylindrical shell in the free field, as well as proud on a sand-water interface. Two modeling techniques are employed to examine these acoustic scattering measurements. The first is a hybrid 2-D/3-D finite element (FE) model, whereby the scattering in close proximity to the target is handled via a 2-D axisymmetric FE model, and the subsequent 3-D propagation to the far field is determined via a Helmholtz integral. This model is characterized by the decomposition of the fluid pressure and its derivative in a series of azimuthal Fourier modes. The second is an analytical solution for an infinitely long cylindrical shell, coupled with a simple approximation that converts the results to an analogous finite length form function. Examining these model results on a mode-by-mode basis offers easy visualization of the mode dynamics and helps distinguish the different physics driving the target response. PMID:24993199

  17. Acoustic scattering from a suspension of flocculated sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, Iain T.; Vincent, Christopher E.; Thorne, Peter D.; Moate, Benjamin D.

    2013-05-01

    A series of controlled laboratory experiments have been conducted to investigate the backscatter of high frequency sound (3-5 MHz) from suspensions of fine sediment in its unflocculated (primary) state and at various levels of flocculation. The size and fall-velocity distributions of the flocs were determined using an optical system and a settling tube, thus allowing floc density to be determined. The measurements have conclusively demonstrated that the acoustic properties of the flocculated particles are not solely controlled by the primary particles; some aspect of the floc structure is influencing the scattering characteristics. The overall trend is for the form function (Ks) to increase as the degree of flocculation increases. This trend was also observed in the total scattering cross section (σt>¯) but this result is dependent on the assumption that viscous absorption for flocculated particles is negligible. The measured scattering properties are compared to the predicted values from two theoretical models, the elastic (ES) and fluid sphere (FS) models. While the results show that, in their current form, neither model is capable of adequately representing the scattering characteristics of a suspension of flocculated particles, the two models did provide upper (ES) and lower (FS) bounds to the measurements. In terms of the operational use of acoustics to measure the concentration of flocculated sediments, empirical relationships could be fitted to the observations but, until a better theoretical understanding of how sound interacts with flocculated particles is achieved, the fitting of such empirical relations may be somewhat premature.

  18. Detection of nonlinear picosecond acoustic pulses by time-resolved Brillouin scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Gusev, Vitalyi E.

    2014-08-14

    In time-resolved Brillouin scattering (also called picosecond ultrasonic interferometry), the time evolution of the spatial Fourier component of an optically excited acoustic strain distribution is monitored. The wave number is determined by the momentum conservation in photon-phonon interaction. For linear acoustic waves propagating in a homogeneous medium, the detected time-domain signal of the optical probe transient reflectivity shows a sinusoidal oscillation at a constant frequency known as the Brillouin frequency. This oscillation is a result of heterodyning the constant reflection from the sample surface with the Brillouin-scattered field. Here, we present an analytical theory for the nonlinear reshaping of a propagating, finite amplitude picosecond acoustic pulse, which results in a time-dependence of the observed frequency. In particular, we examine the conditions under which this information can be used to study the time-evolution of the weak-shock front speed. Depending on the initial strain pulse parameters and the time interval of its nonlinear transformation, our theory predicts the detected frequency to either be monotonically decreasing or oscillating in time. We support these theoretical predictions by comparison with available experimental data. In general, we find that picosecond ultrasonic interferometry of nonlinear acoustic pulses provides access to the nonlinear acoustic properties of a medium spanning most of the GHz frequency range.

  19. Acoustic scattering response of hierarchic honeycomb structures for cylindrical and spherical structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mor, Arun

    Sandwich panels with honeycomb core are often employed in structures for improved mechanical properties with lightweight. Honeycombs are defined by non-overlapping and periodic unit cells. Most research conducted on these sandwich panels focuses on stiffness and strength properties. The acoustic aspect of these panels has been focused on sound transmission loss. For acoustics, previous studies used effective honeycomb orthotropic elastic moduli based on Cartesian unit cell geometry to model the core as a homogeneous structure. While efficient, this modeling approach loses accuracy at higher frequencies. Furthermore, when used for curved panels, the effective moduli are only approximate. In this work, mechanical and acoustic characteristics of cylindrical and spherical honeycomb panels are studied using finite element analysis. The unit cell geometry core is oriented both radially and in the transverse direction. The models are analyzed for sound scattering measured by target strength with interactions between structure and the acoustic medium through coupling between the domains. Both air and water are compared for the acoustic region. Different honeycomb core geometries varying in the hexagon arrangement, number of unit cells and level of hierarchy are studied. The structures developed are constrained to have the same total mass allowing for comparisons based on only changes in stiffness properties. The effect of face sheet thickness on the mechanical and acoustic properties of the curved sandwich structures is also studied. The vibration and acoustic scattering behavior of these structures have been investigated for natural frequencies between 1-1000 Hz to predict and understand the different responses near and at resonances. The target strength response of the structures has been studied in the near field at both front and back of the structures. The effect of acoustic coupling is observed clearly on varying the outer domains properties between air and water. It

  20. Specific multiple-scattering process in acoustic cloak with multilayered homogeneous isotropic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Ying; Liu, XiaoJun

    2008-11-01

    It was qualitatively demonstrated through finite-element full-wave simulations that acoustic cloak can be constructed by using concentric multilayered structure with alternating homogeneous isotropic materials [Y. Cheng et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 92, 151913 (2008)]. Here we present a sequential in-depth analysis of the proposed cloak by means of the multiple-scattering algorithms. Calculated pressure fields demonstrate that the cloak possesses low-reflection and wavefront-bending properties. The scattering patterns further characterize the directional cloaking performance in the far field, which is consistent with the pressure fields. The mechanism of the cloaking is ascribed to a specific multiple-scattering process determined by the microscopic material distribution and structural details of the cloak. We also discuss the behavior of the multilayered cloak as a function of wavelength.

  1. Self-Characterization of Commercial Ultrasound Probes in Transmission Acoustic Inverse Scattering: Transducer Model and Volume Integral Formulation

    PubMed Central

    Haynes, Mark; Verweij, Sacha A. M.; Moghaddam, Mahta; Carson, Paul L.

    2014-01-01

    A self-contained source characterization method for commercial ultrasound probes in transmission acoustic inverse scattering is derived and experimentally tested. The method is based on modified scattered field volume integral equations that are linked to the source-scattering transducer model. The source-scattering parameters are estimated via pair-wise transducer measurements and the nonlinear inversion of an acoustic propagation model that is derived. This combination creates a formal link between the transducer characterization and the inverse scattering algorithm. The method is tested with two commercial ultrasound probes in a transmission geometry including provisions for estimating the probe locations and aligning a robotic rotator. The transducer characterization results show that the nonlinear inversion fit the measured data well. The transducer calibration and inverse scattering algorithm are tested on simple targets. Initial images show that the recovered contrasts are physically consistent with expected values. PMID:24569251

  2. Acoustic scattering of a Bessel vortex beam by a rigid fixed spheroid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitri, F. G.

    2015-12-01

    Partial-wave series representation of the acoustic scattering field of high-order Bessel vortex beams by rigid oblate and prolate spheroids using the modal matching method is developed. The method, which is applicable to slightly elongated objects at low-to-moderate frequencies, requires solving a system of linear equations which depends on the partial-wave index n and the order of the Bessel vortex beam m using truncated partial-wave series expansions (PWSEs), and satisfying the Neumann boundary condition for a rigid immovable surface in the least-squares sense. This original semi-analytical approach developed for Bessel vortex beams is demonstrated for finite oblate and prolate spheroids, where the mathematical functions describing the spheroidal geometry are written in a form involving single angular (polar) integrals that are numerically computed. The transverse (θ = π / 2) and 3D scattering directivity patterns are evaluated in the far-field for both prolate and oblate spheroids, with particular emphasis on the aspect ratio (i.e., the ratio of the major axis over the minor axis of the spheroid) not exceeding 3:1, the half-cone angle β and order m of the Bessel vortex beam, as well as the dimensionless size parameter kr0. Periodic oscillations in the magnitude plots of the far-field scattering form function are observed, which result from the interference of the reflected waves with the circumferential (Franz') waves circumnavigating the surface of the spheroid in the surrounding fluid. Moreover, the 3D directivity patterns illustrate the far-field scattering from the spheroid, that vanishes in the forward (θ = 0) and backward (θ = π) directions. Particular applications in underwater acoustics and scattering, acoustic levitation and the detection of submerged elongated objects using Bessel vortex waves to name a few, would benefit from the results of the present investigation.

  3. Acoustic swimbladder resonance spectroscopy: Fundamentals in scattering theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francis, David T. I.; Foote, Kenneth G.

    2003-04-01

    A history of the physics of acoustic resonance is given. The primary, low-frequency, resonant scattering model for air bubbles in water [Minnaert (1933)] is reviewed. Subsequent applications to swimbladdered fish, including models by Andreeva (1964), Love (1978), and Feuillade and Nero (1998), among others, are developed. Reference is made to exemplary measurements of backscattering by Holliday (1972) and Loevik and Hovem (1979), and of forward scattering, or absorption, by Weston (1967) and Diachok (2000), among others. High-frequency resonances are also described, with presentation of both analytical and numerical results for the immersed air bubble. Comparison of these validates the numerical, boundary-element method (BEM). The BEM allows high-frequency resonances to be studied for swimbladders of realistic shapes under pressure and for typical wave-number-swimbladder length products of order 10-40. Implications of high-frequency swimbladder resonance for auditory function in fish are mentioned. [Work supported by ONR.

  4. Acoustic Radiation Force on a Finite-Sized Particle due to an Acoustic Field in a Viscous Compressible Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annamalai, Subramanian; Parmar, Manoj; Balachandar, S.

    2013-11-01

    Particles when subjected to acoustic waves experience a time-averaged second-order force known as the acoustic radiation force, which is of prime importance in the fields of microfluidics and acoustic levitation. Here, the acoustic radiation force on a rigid spherical particle in a viscous compressible medium due to progressive and standing waves is considered. The relevant length scales include: particle radius (a), acoustic wavelength (λ) and viscous penetration depth (δ). While a / λ and a / δ are arbitrary, δ << λ . A farfield derivation approach has been used in determining the radiated force. Expressing the flow-field as a sum of the incident and scattered fields, an analytical expression for the force is obtained as a summation over infinite series (monopole, dipole and higher sources). These results indicate that the contributions from monopole, dipole and their cross-interaction are sufficient to describe the acoustic radiation force. Subsequently, the monopole and dipole strengths are represented in terms of the particle surface and volume averages of the incoming velocity. This generalization allows one to evaluate the radiation force for an incoming wave of any functional form. However acoustic streaming effects are neglected.

  5. Representation theorems and Green's function retrieval for scattering in acoustic media.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Ivan; Snieder, Roel; Douma, Huub

    2009-09-01

    Reciprocity theorems for perturbed acoustic media are provided in the form of convolution- and correlation-type theorems. These reciprocity relations are particularly useful in the general treatment of both forward and inverse-scattering problems. Using Green's functions to describe perturbed and unperturbed waves in two distinct wave states, representation theorems for scattered waves are derived from the reciprocity relations. While the convolution-type theorems can be manipulated to obtain scattering integrals that are analogous to the Lippmann-Schwinger equation, the correlation-type theorems can be used to retrieve the scattering response of the medium by cross correlations. Unlike previous formulations of Green's function retrieval, the extraction of scattered-wave responses by cross correlations does not require energy equipartitioning. Allowing for uneven energy radiation brings experimental advantages to the retrieval of fields scattered by remote lossless and/or attenuative scatterers. These concepts are illustrated with a number of examples, including analytic solutions to a one-dimensional scattering problem, and a numerical example in the context of seismic waves recorded on the ocean bottom. PMID:19905236

  6. Full-wave Nonlinear Inverse Scattering for Acoustic and Electromagnetic Breast Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haynes, Mark Spencer

    Acoustic and electromagnetic full-wave nonlinear inverse scattering techniques are explored in both theory and experiment with the ultimate aim of noninvasively mapping the material properties of the breast. There is evidence that benign and malignant breast tissue have different acoustic and electrical properties and imaging these properties directly could provide higher quality images with better diagnostic certainty. In this dissertation, acoustic and electromagnetic inverse scattering algorithms are first developed and validated in simulation. The forward solvers and optimization cost functions are modified from traditional forms in order to handle the large or lossy imaging scenes present in ultrasonic and microwave breast imaging. An antenna model is then presented, modified, and experimentally validated for microwave S-parameter measurements. Using the antenna model, a new electromagnetic volume integral equation is derived in order to link the material properties of the inverse scattering algorithms to microwave S-parameters measurements allowing direct comparison of model predictions and measurements in the imaging algorithms. This volume integral equation is validated with several experiments and used as the basis of a free-space inverse scattering experiment, where images of the dielectric properties of plastic objects are formed without the use of calibration targets. These efforts are used as the foundation of a solution and formulation for the numerical characterization of a microwave near-field cavity-based breast imaging system. The system is constructed and imaging results of simple targets are given. Finally, the same techniques are used to explore a new self-characterization method for commercial ultrasound probes. The method is used to calibrate an ultrasound inverse scattering experiment and imaging results of simple targets are presented. This work has demonstrated the feasibility of quantitative microwave inverse scattering by way of a self

  7. Acoustic vector fields in underwater waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapids, Brian

    2005-09-01

    The ability to compute the sound pressure level as well as the vectors associated with the acoustic particle motion has existed for some time. However, propagation studies and ambient noise investigations have typically focused only upon the sound pressure levels that would be observed by an omnidirectional hydrophone or array of hydrophones. Recent interest in geophones and accelerometers for use as vector and dyadic sensors should encourage the investigation and analysis of the underlying vector fields contributing to the acoustic intensity and energy density fields. The frequency domain properties of the acoustic vector field generated by monopole sources having frequencies <1kHz in a simple iso-velocity waveguide are presented in order to build a fundamental understanding of the related quantities. Subsequently, similar field quantities computed for more realistic environments such as downward refracting profiles and deep-water profiles supporting convergence zone propagation will be discussed. Regions and phenomena associated with perturbations in the energy flux density will be highlighted.

  8. Propagation of acoustic pulses in random gravity wave fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millet, Christophe; de La Camara, Alvaro; Lott, François

    2015-11-01

    A linear solution modeling the interaction between an incoming acoustic wave and a randomly perturbed atmosphere is developed, using the normal mode method. The wave mode structure is determined by a sound speed profile that is confining. The environmental uncertainty is described by a stochastic field obtained with a multiwave stochastic parameterization of gravity waves (GW). Using the propagating modes of the unperturbed atmosphere, the wave propagation problem is reduced to solving a system of ordinary differential equations. We focus on the asymptotic behavior of the transmitted waves in the weakly heterogeneous regime. In this regime, the coupling between the acoustic pulse and the randomly perturbed waveguides is weak and the propagation distance must be large enough for the wave to experience significant scattering. A general expression for the pressure far-field is derived in terms of saddle-point contributions. The saddle-points are obtained from a WKB approximation of the vertical eigenvalue problem. We present preliminary results that show how statistics of the transmitted signal are related to some eigenvalues and how an ``optimal'' GW field can trigger large deviations in the acoustic signals. The present model is used to explain the variability of infrasound signals.

  9. Scattering from faceted surfaces in optimized room acoustics computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, Rendell R.; Svensson, U. Peter; de Rycker, Nicolas

    2002-11-01

    To minimize the computational demands of including scattering in auralization, it is appropriate to study how many orders of scattering are necessary. For this purpose, studying edge diffraction is especially appropriate as an elementary form of surface scattering. In a previous study [Torres et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 109, 600-610 (2001)], it was found that higher orders and combinations of edge diffraction components were not usually as significant as first-order diffraction components. The primary reason was that the reference geometry (a large concert-hall stagehouse) was conservatively composed of large flat walls with dimensions larger than most wavelengths of interest. In that case, significant edge-diffractions occurred at relatively low frequencies (below about 150 Hz). Other realistic reflecting surfaces in rooms, however, also include smaller-scale surface irregularities, e.g., facets for which higher-frequency wavelengths are typically a similar order or larger. This study examines a smaller test geometry consisting of reflector panel arrays similar to those found in concert halls, and we compare computations with various orders of diffraction. Studies of diffraction order are done to determine when inclusion of higher orders is necessary or may be neglected for applications such as interactive auralization.

  10. Precision analysis based on Cramer-Rao bound for 2D acoustics and electromagnetic inverse scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diong, M. L.; Roueff, A.; Lasaygues, P.; Litman, A.

    2015-07-01

    The aim of the present article is to predict the expected precision quantitatively in inverse scattering when one tries to determine the intrinsic properties of a given target from its scattered field. To conduct such a study, we analyze the precision of contrast estimators with the Cramer-Rao bound (CRB) when the target is homogeneous, infinitely-long and with a circular cross-section and with an additive complex circular gaussian noise at the receivers. An unified framework is derived to handle acoustic or electromagnetic imaging configurations equally. Numerical tests enable to quantitatively appraise the variations of the CRB with respect to the considered physical situation parameters: transmission/reflexion, antennas arrangement, weak/strong scatterers, noise level and source frequency. These analyzes are performed with respect to the real and imaginary parts of the contrast.

  11. Fourth-order acoustic torque in intense sound fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, T. G.; Kanber, H.; Olli, E. E.

    1978-01-01

    The observation of a fourth-order acoustic torque in intense sound fields is reported. The torque was determined by measuring the acoustically induced angular deflection of a polished cylinder suspended by a torsion fiber. This torque was measured in a sound field of amplitude greater than that in which first-order acoustic torque has been observed.

  12. Acoustic field positioning for containerless processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whymark, R. R.

    1975-01-01

    The noncontact positioning of materials in a space processing chamber is accomplished using a new type of acoustic levitator. Liquid and solid materials are positioned using a single source of sound. Fine control of position may be obtained by motion of an acoustical reflector. The electrical power required is usually less than 100 watts. The system operates satisfactorily at high and low temperatures and is adaptable as an 'add-on' feature to existing space experiments. Containerless melting and solidification can be performed and a freely suspended liquid can be shaped to the contour of the sound field. Experiments are described in which aluminum, glass and plastic materials are melted and solidified in the containerless state. The system has applications to containerless crystal growth, melting and related processes.

  13. Reverberant Acoustic Testing and Direct Field Acoustic Testing Acoustic Standing Waves and their Impact on Structural Responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R.; Doty, Benjamin; Chang, Zensheu

    2012-01-01

    The aerospace industry has been using two methods of acoustic testing to qualify flight hardware: (1) Reverberant Acoustic Test (RAT), (2) Direct Field Acoustic Test (DFAT). The acoustic field obtained by RAT is generally understood and assumed to be diffuse, expect below Schroeder cut-of frequencies. DFAT method of testing has some distinct advantages over RAT, however the acoustic field characteristics can be strongly affected by test setup such as the speaker layouts, number and location of control microphones and control schemes. In this paper the following are discussed based on DEMO tests performed at APL and JPL: (1) Acoustic wave interference patterns and acoustic standing waves, (2) The structural responses in RAT and DFAT.

  14. Numerical method to compute acoustic scattering effect of a moving source.

    PubMed

    Song, Hao; Yi, Mingxu; Huang, Jun; Pan, Yalin; Liu, Dawei

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the aerodynamic characteristic of a ducted tail rotor in hover has been numerically studied using CFD method. An analytical time domain formulation based on Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings (FW-H) equation is derived for the prediction of the acoustic velocity field and used as Neumann boundary condition on a rigid scattering surface. In order to predict the aerodynamic noise, a hybrid method combing computational aeroacoustics with an acoustic thin-body boundary element method has been proposed. The aerodynamic results and the calculated sound pressure levels (SPLs) are compared with the known method for validation. Simulation results show that the duct can change the value of SPLs and the sound directivity. Compared with the isolate tail rotor, the SPLs of the ducted tail rotor are smaller at certain azimuth. PMID:27610323

  15. Efficient Solution of Three-Dimensional Problems of Acoustic and Electromagnetic Scattering by Open Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turc, Catalin; Anand, Akash; Bruno, Oscar; Chaubell, Julian

    2011-01-01

    We present a computational methodology (a novel Nystrom approach based on use of a non-overlapping patch technique and Chebyshev discretizations) for efficient solution of problems of acoustic and electromagnetic scattering by open surfaces. Our integral equation formulations (1) Incorporate, as ansatz, the singular nature of open-surface integral-equation solutions, and (2) For the Electric Field Integral Equation (EFIE), use analytical regularizes that effectively reduce the number of iterations required by iterative linear-algebra solution based on Krylov-subspace iterative solvers.

  16. The derivation of scaling relationship between acoustic and electromagnetic scattering by spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Yongpan; Ge, Junxiang; Wan, Fayu

    2013-11-15

    The rigorous theory of the conversion between the scattering of uniform plane electromagnetic wave by a perfectly conducting sphere and the scattering of uniform plane acoustic wave by a rigid sphere is studied in this paper. The conversion formula between these two different scattering based on two calibration curves is derived, which describes the quantitative relationship between acoustic and electromagnetic wave scattering at arbitrary frequencies by spheres of arbitrary sizes. In addition, the scaling relationship of the sizes of those two spheres and the corresponding frequencies are discussed in detail, and an indirect method of measurement of electromagnetic scattering by the spheres is proposed.

  17. Brillouin light scattering from surface acoustic waves in a subwavelength-diameter optical fibre.

    PubMed

    Beugnot, Jean-Charles; Lebrun, Sylvie; Pauliat, Gilles; Maillotte, Hervé; Laude, Vincent; Sylvestre, Thibaut

    2014-01-01

    Brillouin scattering in optical fibres is a fundamental interaction between light and sound with important implications ranging from optical sensors to slow and fast light. In usual optical fibres, light both excites and feels shear and longitudinal bulk elastic waves, giving rise to forward-guided acoustic wave Brillouin scattering and backward-stimulated Brillouin scattering. In a subwavelength-diameter optical fibre, the situation changes dramatically, as we here report with the first experimental observation of Brillouin light scattering from surface acoustic waves. These Rayleigh-type surface waves travel the wire surface at a specific velocity of 3,400 m s(-1) and backscatter the light with a Doppler shift of about 6 GHz. As these acoustic resonances are sensitive to surface defects or features, surface acoustic wave Brillouin scattering opens new opportunities for various sensing applications, but also in other domains such as microwave photonics and nonlinear plasmonics. PMID:25341638

  18. Droplet Vaporization In A Levitating Acoustic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruff, G. A.; Liu, S.; Ciobanescu, I.

    2003-01-01

    Combustion experiments using arrays of droplets seek to provide a link between single droplet combustion phenomena and the behavior of complex spray combustion systems. Both single droplet and droplet array studies have been conducted in microgravity to better isolate the droplet interaction phenomena and eliminate or reduce the effects of buoyancy-induced convection. In most experiments involving droplet arrays, the droplets are supported on fibers to keep them stationary and close together before the combustion event. The presence of the fiber, however, disturbs the combustion process by introducing a source of heat transfer and asymmetry into the configuration. As the number of drops in a droplet array increases, supporting the drops on fibers becomes less practical because of the cumulative effect of the fibers on the combustion process. To eliminate the effect of the fiber, several researchers have conducted microgravity experiments using unsupported droplets. Jackson and Avedisian investigated single, unsupported drops while Nomura et al. studied droplet clouds formed by a condensation technique. The overall objective of this research is to extend the study of unsupported drops by investigating the combustion of well-characterized drop clusters in a microgravity environment. Direct experimental observations and measurements of the combustion of droplet clusters would provide unique experimental data for the verification and improvement of spray combustion models. In this work, the formation of drop clusters is precisely controlled using an acoustic levitation system so that dilute, as well as dense clusters can be created and stabilized before combustion in microgravity is begun. While the low-gravity test facility is being completed, tests have been conducted in 1-g to characterize the effect of the acoustic field on the vaporization of single and multiple droplets. This is important because in the combustion experiment, the droplets will be formed and

  19. Acoustic Scattering by Three-Dimensional Stators and Rotors Using the SOURCE3D Code. Volume 2; Scattering Plots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Harold D.

    1999-01-01

    This second volume of Acoustic Scattering by Three-Dimensional Stators and Rotors Using the SOURCE3D Code provides the scattering plots referenced by Volume 1. There are 648 plots. Half are for the 8750 rpm "high speed" operating condition and the other half are for the 7031 rpm "mid speed" operating condition.

  20. Tuning Mie scattering resonances in soft materials with magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Brunet, Thomas; Zimny, Kevin; Mascaro, Benoit; Sandre, Olivier; Poncelet, Olivier; Aristégui, Christophe; Mondain-Monval, Olivier

    2013-12-27

    An original approach is proposed here to reversibly tune Mie scattering resonances occurring in random media by means of external low induction magnetic fields. This approach is valid for both electromagnetic and acoustic waves. The experimental demonstration is supported by ultrasound experiments performed on emulsions made of fluorinated ferrofluid spherical droplets dispersed in a Bingham fluid. We show that the electromagnet-induced change of droplet shape into prolate spheroids, with a moderate aspect ratio of 2.5, drastically affects the effective properties of the disordered medium. Its effective acoustic attenuation coefficient is shown to vary by a factor of 5, by controlling both the flux density and orientation of the applied magnetic field. PMID:24483797

  1. Acoustic field in unsteady moving media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, F.; Maestrello, L.; Ting, L.

    1995-01-01

    In the interaction of an acoustic field with a moving airframe the authors encounter a canonical initial value problem for an acoustic field induced by an unsteady source distribution, q(t,x) with q equivalent to 0 for t less than or equal to 0, in a medium moving with a uniform unsteady velocity U(t)i in the coordinate system x fixed on the airframe. Signals issued from a source point S in the domain of dependence D of an observation point P at time t will arrive at point P more than once corresponding to different retarded times, Tau in the interval (0, t). The number of arrivals is called the multiplicity of the point S. The multiplicity equals 1 if the velocity U remains subsonic and can be greater when U becomes supersonic. For an unsteady uniform flow U(t)i, rules are formulated for defining the smallest number of I subdomains V(sub i) of D with the union of V(sub i) equal to D. Each subdomain has multiplicity 1 and a formula for the corresponding retarded time. The number of subdomains V(sub i) with nonempty intersection is the multiplicity m of the intersection. The multiplicity is at most I. Examples demonstrating these rules are presented for media at accelerating and/or decelerating supersonic speed.

  2. Measurements and analysis of farfield scattering from a prolate spheroid. [of acoustic waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayliss, A.; Maestrello, L.

    1978-01-01

    The farfield acoustic scattering by a prolate spheroid with axial point sources near the tip of the body was measured. Data were taken for ka between 10 and 160, where a is the semimajor axis of the spheroid. Comparisons were made with numerical results obtained by an integral equation based on the simple-source method, with appropriate coordinate stretching introduced to permit high-frequency solutions with a minimal number of grid points. Theory and experiment agree within experimental error except for the highest frequencies in the shadow region, where very rapid changes in pressure make precise measurements difficult. The results show that for frequencies of aeroacoustic interest, the scattered field is very large and cannot be ignored.

  3. Analysis of scattering from an acoustic cloak in a moving fluid.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xun; Zhong, Siyang; Stalnov, Oksana

    2014-05-01

    This work develops a theoretical framework for acoustic cloak scattering analysis in a low speed non-stationary fluid that is simply described as a potential flow. The equivalent sound source induced by the moving fluid local to the cloak is analytically constructed and is then estimated using Born approximation. The far-field scattering can thereafter be obtained using the associated Green's function of the convected wave equation. The results demonstrate that the proposed analytical approach, which might be helpful in the design and evaluation of cloaking systems, effectively elucidates key characteristics of the relevant physics. In addition, it can be seen that, in a moving fluid, the so-called convected cloaking design achieves better cloaking performance than the classical cloaking design. PMID:24815241

  4. Finite difference computation of acoustic scattering by small surface inhomogeneities and discontinuities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tam, Christopher K. W.; Ju, Hongbin

    2009-09-01

    The use of finite difference schemes to compute the scattering of acoustic waves by surfaces made up of different materials with sharp surface discontinuities at the joints would, invariably, result in the generations of spurious reflected waves of numerical origin. Spurious scattered waves are produced even if a high-order scheme capable of resolving and supporting the propagation of the incident wave is used. This problem is of practical importance in jet engine duct acoustic computation. In this work, the basic reason for the generation of spurious numerical waves is first examined. It is known that when the governing partial differential equations of acoustics are discretized, one should only use the long waves of the computational scheme to represent or simulate the physical waves. The short waves of the computational scheme have entirely different propagation characteristics. They are the spurious numerical waves. A method by which high wave number components (short waves) in the wave scattering process is intentionally removed so as to minimize the scattering of spurious numerical waves is proposed. This method is implemented in several examples from computational aeroacoustics to illustrate its effectiveness, accuracy and efficiency. This method is also employed to compute the scattering of acoustic waves by scatterers, such as rigid wall acoustic liner splices, with width smaller than the computational mesh size. Good results are obtained when comparing with computed results using much smaller mesh size. The method is further extended for applications to computations of acoustic wave reflection and scattering by very small surface inhomogeneities with simple geometries.

  5. The point source method for reconstructing an inclusion from boundary measurements in electrical impedance tomography and acoustic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erhard, Klaus; Potthast, Roland

    2003-10-01

    We employ the point source method (PSM) for the reconstruction of some field u on parts of a domain Omega from the Cauchy data for the field on the boundary partialOmega of the domain. Then, the boundary condition for a perfectly conducting inclusion or a sound-soft object in Omega can be used to find the location and shape of the inhomogeneity. The results show that we can detect perfectly conducting inclusions in impedance tomography from the voltages for one injected current. For acoustic scattering a sound-soft object is found from the knowledge of one (total) field and its normal derivative on partialOmega. The work redesigns the PSM, which was first proposed in the framework of inverse scattering, to solve inverse boundary value problems. Numerical examples are provided for impedance tomography and the sound-soft acoustic boundary value problem.

  6. Imaging optical fields through heavily scattering media.

    PubMed

    Newman, Jason A; Webb, Kevin J

    2014-12-31

    Coherent imaging and communication through or within heavily scattering random media has been considered impossible due to the randomization of the information contained in the scattered electromagnetic field. We report a remarkable result based on speckle correlations over incident field position that demonstrates that the field incident on a heavily scattering random medium can be obtained using a method that is not restricted to weak scatter and is, in principle, independent of the thickness of the scattering medium. Natural motion can be exploited, and the approach can be extended to other geometries. The near-infrared optical results presented indicate that the approach is applicable to other frequency regimes, as well as other wave types. This work presents opportunities to enhance communication channel capacity in the large source and detector number regime, for a new method to view binary stars from Earth, and in biomedical applications. PMID:25615337

  7. Observed Dependence of Stimulated Raman Scattering on Ion-Acoustic Damping in Hohlraum Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, J.C.; Cobble, J.A.; Failor, B.H.; DuBois, D.F.; Montgomery, D.S.; Rose, H.A.; Vu, H.X.; Wilde, B.H.; Wilke, M.D.; Chrien, R.E. ||

    1996-09-01

    The reflectivity of a laser due to stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) from long scale-length hohlraum plasmas is shown to depend on the damping of ion-acoustic waves. This dependence is observed in plasmas with either low or high ionization states. Since the SRS process itself is unrelated to acoustic waves, these data are evidence of a nonlinear coupling of SRS to other parametric processes involving daughter acoustic waves. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  8. Imaging of acoustic fields using optical feedback interferometry.

    PubMed

    Bertling, Karl; Perchoux, Julien; Taimre, Thomas; Malkin, Robert; Robert, Daniel; Rakić, Aleksandar D; Bosch, Thierry

    2014-12-01

    This study introduces optical feedback interferometry as a simple and effective technique for the two-dimensional visualisation of acoustic fields. We present imaging results for several pressure distributions including those for progressive waves, standing waves, as well as the diffraction and interference patterns of the acoustic waves. The proposed solution has the distinct advantage of extreme optical simplicity and robustness thus opening the way to a low cost acoustic field imaging system based on mass produced laser diodes. PMID:25606963

  9. Scattering coefficients and gray-body factor for 1D BEC acoustic black holes: Exact results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabbri, Alessandro; Balbinot, Roberto; Anderson, Paul R.

    2016-03-01

    A complete set of exact analytic solutions to the mode equation is found in the region exterior to the acoustic horizon for a class of 1D Bose-Einstein condensate acoustic black holes. From these, analytic expressions for the scattering coefficients and gray-body factor are obtained. The results are used to verify previous predictions regarding the behaviors of the scattering coefficients and gray-body factor in the low-frequency limit.

  10. Reversibility of scattered fields (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Renjie; Kim, Taewoo; Popescu, Gabriel

    2016-03-01

    In recent years, tremendous efforts have been spent on deep tissue imaging using phase conjugation, a technique used to undo the effects of light scattering in a thick tissue. Despite the early debates between Yariv and Wolf, it is still not well understood physically how deep can a field propagate into biological tissue and still be phase conjugated. In order to answer this question, we developed a light scattering theory to describe the evolution of the phase associated with a field scattered by a thick tissue block. The multiple scattering through the sample is simplified to a series of single scattering through consecutive thin tissue slices. With this theory, we identify the limits of the phase conjugation operation and recover the previous results by Yariv and Wolf, which asserts that phase conjugation is rooted in small angle approximation. Importantly, we discover the fundamental principle that rules phase conjugation: the mean axial wavenumber of a field progressively decreases to zero as it scatters multiple times. At this point, phase becomes a spatially random variable and phase conjugation becomes impossible. This result describes a fundamental phenomenon: the interaction between a deterministic object and a deterministic field can result in a random scattered field. We show that this phenomenon is rooted into Heisenberg's uncertainty principle.

  11. A Advanced Boundary Element Formulation for Acoustic Radiation and Scattering in Three Dimensions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soenarko, Benjamin

    A computational method is presented for determining acoustic fields produced by arbitrary shaped three-dimensional bodies. The formulation includes both radiation and scattering problems. In particular an isoparametric element formulation is introduced in which both the surface geometry and the acoustic variables on the surface of the body are represented by second order shape functions within the local coordinate system. A general result for the surface velocity potential and the exterior field is derived. This result is applicable to non-smooth bodies, i.e. it includes the case where the surface may have a non-unique normal (e.g. at the edge of a cube). Test cases are shown involving spherical, cylindrical and cubical geometry for both radiation and scattering problems. The present formulation is also extended to include half-space problems in which the effect of the reflected wave from an infinite plane is taken into account. By selecting an appropriate Green's function, the surface integral over the plane is nullified; thus all the computational efforts can be performed only on the radiating or scattering body at issue and thereby greatly simplify the solution. A special formulation involving axisymmetric bodies and boundary conditions is also presented. For this special case, the surface integrals are reduced to line integrals and an integral over the angle of revolution. The integration over the angle is performed partly analytically in terms of elliptic integrals and partly numerically using simple Gaussian quadrature formula. Since the rest of the integrals involve only line integrals along the generator of the body, any discretization scheme can be easily obtained to achieve a desired degree of accuracy in evaluating these integrals.

  12. Acoustic vibrations contribute to the diffuse scatter produced by ribosome crystals.

    PubMed

    Polikanov, Yury S; Moore, Peter B

    2015-10-01

    The diffuse scattering pattern produced by frozen crystals of the 70S ribosome from Thermus thermophilus is as highly structured as it would be if it resulted entirely from domain-scale motions within these particles. However, the qualitative properties of the scattering pattern suggest that acoustic displacements of the crystal lattice make a major contribution to it. PMID:26457426

  13. Acoustic field effects on a negative corona discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bálek, R.; Červenka, M.; Pekárek, S.

    2014-06-01

    For a negative corona discharge under atmospheric pressure in different regimes, we investigated the effects of an acoustic field both on its electrical parameters and on the change in its visual appearance. We found that the application of an acoustic field on the true corona discharge, for particular currents, decreases the discharge voltage. The application of an acoustic field on the discharge in the filamentary streamer regime substantially extends the range of currents for which the discharge voltage remains more or less constant, i.e. it allows a substantial increase in the power delivered to the discharge. The application of an acoustic field on the discharge causes the discharge to spread within the discharge chamber and consequently, a highly reactive non-equilibrium plasma is created throughout the inter-electrode space. Finally, our experimental apparatus radiates almost no acoustic energy from the discharge chamber.

  14. Nonlinear Bubble Interactions in Acoustic Pressure Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbat, Tiberiu; Ashgriz, Nasser; Liu, Ching-Shi

    1996-01-01

    The systems consisting of a two-phase mixture, as clouds of bubbles or drops, have shown many common features in their responses to different external force fields. One of particular interest is the effect of an unsteady pressure field applied to these systems, case in which the coupling of the vibrations induced in two neighboring components (two drops or two bubbles) may result in an interaction force between them. This behavior was explained by Bjerknes by postulating that every body that is moving in an accelerating fluid is subjected to a 'kinetic buoyancy' equal with the product of the acceleration of the fluid multiplied by the mass of the fluid displaced by the body. The external sound wave applied to a system of drops/bubbles triggers secondary sound waves from each component of the system. These secondary pressure fields integrated over the surface of the neighboring drop/bubble may result in a force additional to the effect of the primary sound wave on each component of the system. In certain conditions, the magnitude of these secondary forces may result in significant changes in the dynamics of each component, thus in the behavior of the entire system. In a system containing bubbles, the sound wave radiated by one bubble at the location of a neighboring one is dominated by the volume oscillation mode and its effects can be important for a large range of frequencies. The interaction forces in a system consisting of drops are much smaller than those consisting of bubbles. Therefore, as a first step towards the understanding of the drop-drop interaction subject to external pressure fluctuations, it is more convenient to study the bubble interactions. This paper presents experimental results and theoretical predictions concerning the interaction and the motion of two levitated air bubbles in water in the presence of an acoustic field at high frequencies (22-23 KHz).

  15. Impact of Acoustic Standing Waves on Structural Responses: Reverberant Acoustic Testing (RAT) vs. Direct Field Acoustic Testing (DFAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R.; Doty, Benjamin; Chang, Zensheu

    2012-01-01

    Loudspeakers have been used for acoustic qualification of spacecraft, reflectors, solar panels, and other acoustically responsive structures for more than a decade. Limited measurements from some of the recent speaker tests used to qualify flight hardware have indicated significant spatial variation of the acoustic field within the test volume. Also structural responses have been reported to differ when similar tests were performed using reverberant chambers. To address the impact of non-uniform acoustic field on structural responses, a series of acoustic tests were performed using a flat panel and a 3-ft cylinder exposed to the field controlled by speakers and repeated in a reverberant chamber. The speaker testing was performed using multi-input-single-output (MISO) and multi-input-multi-output (MIMO) control schemes with and without the test articles. In this paper the spatial variation of the acoustic field due to acoustic standing waves and their impacts on the structural responses in RAT and DFAT (both using MISO and MIMO controls for DFAT) are discussed in some detail.

  16. Diversity of acoustic streaming in a rectangular acoustofluidic field.

    PubMed

    Tang, Qiang; Hu, Junhui

    2015-04-01

    Diversity of acoustic streaming field in a 2D rectangular chamber with a traveling wave and using water as the acoustic medium is numerically investigated by the finite element method. It is found that the working frequency, the vibration excitation source length, and the distance and phase difference between two separated symmetric vibration excitation sources can cause the diversity in the acoustic streaming pattern. It is also found that a small object in the acoustic field results in an additional eddy, and affects the eddy size in the acoustic streaming field. In addition, the computation results show that with an increase of the acoustic medium's temperature, the speed of the main acoustic streaming decreases first and then increases, and the angular velocity of the corner eddies increases monotonously, which can be clearly explained by the change of the acoustic dissipation factor and shearing viscosity of the acoustic medium with temperature. Commercialized FEM software COMSOL Multiphysics is used to implement the computation tasks, which makes our method very easy to use. And the computation method is partially verified by an established analytical solution. PMID:25541360

  17. Effect of acoustic field parameters on arc acoustic binding during ultrasonic wave-assisted arc welding.

    PubMed

    Xie, Weifeng; Fan, Chenglei; Yang, Chunli; Lin, Sanbao

    2016-03-01

    As a newly developed arc welding method, power ultrasound has been successfully introduced into arc and weld pool during ultrasonic wave-assisted arc welding process. The advanced process for molten metals can be realized by utilizing additional ultrasonic field. Under the action of the acoustic wave, the plasma arc as weld heat source is regulated and its characteristics make an obvious change. Compared with the conventional arc, the ultrasonic wave-assisted arc plasma is bound significantly and becomes brighter. To reveal the dependence of the acoustic binding force on acoustic field parameters, a two-dimensional acoustic field model for ultrasonic wave-assisted arc welding device is established. The influences of the radiator height, the central pore radius, the radiator radius, and curvature radius or depth of concave radiator surface are discussed using the boundary element method. Then the authors analyze the resonant mode by this relationship curve between acoustic radiation power and radiator height. Furthermore, the best acoustic binding ability is obtained by optimizing the geometric parameters of acoustic radiator. In addition, three concave radiator surfaces including spherical cap surface, paraboloid of revolution, and rotating single curved surface are investigated systematically. Finally, both the calculation and experiment suggest that, to obtain the best acoustic binding ability, the ultrasonic wave-assisted arc welding setup should be operated under the first resonant mode using a radiator with a spherical cap surface, a small central pore, a large section radius and an appropriate curvature radius. PMID:26558995

  18. Nondestructive acoustic electric field probe apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Migliori, Albert

    1982-01-01

    The disclosure relates to a nondestructive acoustic electric field probe and its method of use. A source of acoustic pulses of arbitrary but selected shape is placed in an oil bath along with material to be tested across which a voltage is disposed and means for receiving acoustic pulses after they have passed through the material. The received pulses are compared with voltage changes across the material occurring while acoustic pulses pass through it and analysis is made thereof to determine preselected characteristics of the material.

  19. Soliton generation via continuous stokes acoustic self-scattering of hypersonic waves in a paramagnetic crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Bugay, A. N.; Sazonov, S. V.

    2008-08-15

    A new mechanism is proposed for continuous frequency down-conversion of acoustic waves propagating in a paramagnetic crystal at a low temperature in an applied magnetic field. A transverse hypersonic pulse generating a carrier-free longitudinal strain pulse via nonlinear effects is scattered by the generated pulse. This leads to a Stokes shift in the transverse hypersonic wave proportional to its intensity, and both pulses continue to propagate in the form of a mode-locked soliton. As the transverse-pulse frequency is Stokes shifted, its spectrum becomes narrower. This process can be effectively implemented only if the linear group velocity of the transverse hypersonic pulse equals the phase velocity of the longitudinal strain wave. These velocities are renormalized by spin-phonon coupling and can be made equal by adjusting the magnitude of the applied magnetic field. The transverse structure of the soliton depends on the sign of the group velocity dispersion of the transverse component. When the dispersion is positive, planar solitons can develop whose transverse component has a topological defect of dark vortex type and longitudinal component has a hole. In the opposite case, the formation of two-component acoustic 'bullets' or vortices localized in all directions is possible.

  20. Acoustic resonance scattering from a multilayered cylindrical shell with imperfect bonding.

    PubMed

    Rajabi, M; Hasheminejad, Seyyed M

    2009-12-01

    The method of wave function expansion is adopted to study the three dimensional scattering of a time-harmonic plane progressive sound field obliquely incident upon a multi-layered hollow cylinder with interlaminar bonding imperfection. For the generality of solution, each layer is assumed to be cylindrically orthotropic. An approximate laminate model in the context of the modal state equations with variable coefficients along with the classical T-matrix solution technique is set up for each layer to solve for the unknown modal scattering and transmission coefficients. A linear spring model is used to describe the interlaminar adhesive bonding whose effects are incorporated into the global transfer matrix by introduction of proper interfacial transfer matrices. Following the classic acoustic resonance scattering theory (RST), the scattered field and response to surface waves are determined by constructing the partial waves and obtaining the non-resonance (backgrounds) and resonance components. The solution is first used to investigate the effect of interlayer imperfection of an air-filled and water submerged bilaminate aluminium cylindrical shell on the resonances associated with various modes of wave propagation (i.e., symmetric/asymmetric Lamb waves, fluid-borne A-type waves, Rayleigh and Whispering Gallery waves) appearing in the backscattered spectrum, according to their polarization and state of stress. An illustrative numerical example is also given for a multi-layered (five-layered) cylindrical shell for which the stiffness of the adhesive interlayers is artificially varied. The sensitivity of resonance frequencies associated with higher mode numbers to the stiffness coefficients is demonstrated to be a good measure of the bonding strength. Limiting cases are considered and fair agreements with solutions available in the literature are established. PMID:19586650

  1. Subjective and objective evaluations of a scattered sound field in a scale model opera house.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Jong Kwan; Jeon, Jin Yong

    2008-09-01

    Scattered sound fields in an opera house were objectively and subjectively evaluated through acoustical measurements in a 1:10 scale model and through auditory preference tests. Acoustical characteristics were measured in the stalls area with and without diffusers, both on the sidewalls close to the proscenium and in the soffit of the side balcony. Installed diffusers reduced the initial time delay gap and amplitude of the first reflected sound, and decreased sound pressure level (SPL), reverberation time (RT), and early decay time (EDT) at most seats due to the increased scattering and absorption. After diffuser installation, C(80) and 1-IACC(E3) increased at the front seats and decreased at the rear seats. Subjective evaluations showed that the preference of scattered sound fields correlates highly with loudness and reverberance. It was also found that EDT and SPL are dominant parameters describing subjective preference for scattered sounds in this experimental condition. PMID:19045645

  2. Properties of the Acoustic Vector Field in Underwater Waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dall'Osto, David R.

    This thesis focuses on the description and measurement of the underwater acoustic field, based on vector properties of acoustic particle velocity. The specific goal is to interpret vector sensor measurements in underwater waveguides, in particular those measurements made in littoral (shallow) waters. To that end, theoretical models, which include the effects of reflections from the waveguide boundaries, are developed for the acoustic intensity, i.e. the product of acoustic pressure and acoustic particle velocity. Vector properties of acoustic intensity are shown to correspond to a non-dimensional vector property of acoustic particle velocity, its degree of circularity, which describes the trajectory of particle motion. Both experimental measurements and simulations of this non-dimensional vector property are used to analyze characteristics of sound propagation in underwater waveguides. Two measurement techniques are utilized in the experiments described in this thesis. In the first, particle velocity is obtained indirectly by time integration of the measured pressure gradient between two closely spaced (with respect to an acoustic wavelength) conventional pressure sensitive hydrophones. This method was used in ocean experiments conducted with vertical line arrays of hydrophones. In the second technique, particle velocity is measured directly by time integration of the signal generated by an accelerometer. An additional pressure measurement from a co-located hydrophone forms what is known as a "combined sensor" in the Russian literature, which allows for estimation of the vector acoustic intensity. This method was utilized mainly in laboratory experiments.

  3. Compton scattering in strong magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daugherty, Joseph K.; Harding, Alice K.

    1986-01-01

    The relativistic cross section for Compton scattering by electrons in strong magnetic fields is derived. The results confirm and extend earlier work which has treated only transitions to the lowest or first excited Landau levels. For the teragauss field strengths expected in neutron star magnetospheres, the relative rates for excited state transitions are found to be significant, especially for incident photon energies several times the cyclotron frequency. Since these transitions must result in the rapid emission of one or more cyclotron photons as well as the Compton-scattered photon, the scattering process actually becomes a photon 'splitting' mechanism which acts to soften hard photon spectra, and also provides a specific mechanism for populating higher Landau levels in the electron distribution function. The results should be significant for models of gamma-ray bursters and pulsating X-ray sources.

  4. Field Measurement of the Acoustic Nonlinearity Parameter in Turbine Blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinton, Yolanda L.; Na, Jeong K.; Yost, William T.; Kessel, Gregory L.

    2000-01-01

    Nonlinear acoustics techniques were used to measure fatigue in turbine blades in a power generation plant. The measurements were made in the field using a reference based measurement technique, and a reference sample previously measured in the laboratory. The acoustic nonlinearity parameter showed significant increase with fatigue in the blades, as indicated by service age and areas of increased stress. The technique shows promise for effectively measuring fatigue in field applications and predicting subsequent failures.

  5. Non-contact transportation using near-field acoustic levitation

    PubMed

    Ueha; Hashimoto; Koike

    2000-03-01

    Near-field acoustic levitation, where planar objects 10 kg in weight can levitate stably near the vibrating plate, is successfully applied both to non-contact transportation of objects and to a non-contact ultrasonic motor. Transporting apparatuses and an ultrasonic motor have been fabricated and their characteristics measured. The theory of near-field acoustic levitation both for a piston-like sound source and a flexural vibration source is also briefly described. PMID:10829622

  6. Temperature Dependence of Brillouin Light Scattering Spectra of Acoustic Phonons in Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somerville, Kevin; Klimovich, Nikita; An, Kyongmo; Sullivan, Sean; Weathers, Annie; Shi, Li; Li, Xiaoqin

    2015-03-01

    Thermal management represents an outstanding challenge in many areas of technology. Electrons, optical phonons, and acoustic phonons are often driven out of local equilibrium in electronic devices or during laser-material interaction processes. Interest in non-equilibrium transport processes has motivated the development of Raman spectroscopy as a local temperature sensor of optical phonons and intermediate frequency acoustic phonons, whereas Brillouin light scattering (BLS) has recently been explored as a temperature sensor of low-frequency acoustic phonons. Here, we report temperature dependent BLS spectra of silicon, with Raman spectra taken simultaneously for comparison. The origins of the observed temperature dependence of the BLS peak position, linewidth, and intensity are examined in order to evaluate their potential use as temperature sensors for acoustic phonons. We determine that the integrated BLS intensity can be used measure the temperature of specific acoustic phonon modes. This work is supported by National Science Foundation (NSF) Thermal Transport Processes Program under Grant CBET-1336968.

  7. A probability density function method for acoustic field uncertainty analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Kevin R.; Dowling, David R.

    2005-11-01

    Acoustic field predictions, whether analytical or computational, rely on knowledge of the environmental, boundary, and initial conditions. When knowledge of these conditions is uncertain, acoustic field predictions will also be uncertain, even if the techniques for field prediction are perfect. Quantifying acoustic field uncertainty is important for applications that require accurate field amplitude and phase predictions, like matched-field techniques for sonar, nondestructive evaluation, bio-medical ultrasound, and atmospheric remote sensing. Drawing on prior turbulence research, this paper describes how an evolution equation for the probability density function (PDF) of the predicted acoustic field can be derived and used to quantify predicted-acoustic-field uncertainties arising from uncertain environmental, boundary, or initial conditions. Example calculations are presented in one and two spatial dimensions for the one-point PDF for the real and imaginary parts of a harmonic field, and show that predicted field uncertainty increases with increasing range and frequency. In particular, at 500 Hz in an ideal 100 m deep underwater sound channel with a 1 m root-mean-square depth uncertainty, the PDF results presented here indicate that at a range of 5 km, all phases and a 10 dB range of amplitudes will have non-negligible probability. Evolution equations for the two-point PDF are also derived.

  8. Simulation of Acoustic Scattering from a Trailing Edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singer, Bart A.; Brentner, Kenneth S.; Lockhard, David P.; Lilley, Geoffrey M.

    1999-01-01

    Three model problems were examined to assess the difficulties involved in using a hybrid scheme coupling flow computation with the the Ffowcs Williams and Hawkings equation to predict noise generated by vortices passing over a sharp edge. The results indicate that the Ffowcs Williams and Hawkings equation correctly propagates the acoustic signals when provided with accurate flow information on the integration surface. The most difficult of the model problems investigated inviscid flow over a two-dimensional thin NACA airfoil with a blunt-body vortex generator positioned at 98 percent chord. Vortices rolled up downstream of the blunt body. The shed vortices possessed similarities to large coherent eddies in boundary layers. They interacted and occasionally paired as they convected past the sharp trailing edge of the airfoil. The calculations showed acoustic waves emanating from the airfoil trailing edge. Acoustic directivity and Mach number scaling are shown.

  9. Simulation of Acoustic Scattering from a Trailing Edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SINGER, B. A.; BRENTNER, K. S.; LOCKARD, D. P.; LILLEY, G. M.

    2000-02-01

    Three model problems were examined to assess the difficulties involved in using a hybrid scheme coupling flow computation with the Ffowcs Williams and Hawkings equation to predict the noise generated by vortices passing over a sharp edge. The results indicate that the Ffowcs Williams and Hawkings equation correctly propagates the acoustic signals when provided with accurate flow information on the integration surface. The most difficult of the model problems investigated flow over a two-dimensional, thin NACA airfoil with a bluff-body vortex generator positioned at 98% chord. Vortices rolled up downstream of the bluff body. The shed vortices possessed similarities to large coherent eddies in boundary layers in that they interacted and occasionally paired as they convected past the sharp trailing edge of the airfoil. The calculations showed acoustic waves emanating from the airfoil trailing edge. Acoustic directivity and Mach number scaling were obtained.

  10. Acoustical and optical scattering and imaging of tissues: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishimaru, Akira

    2001-05-01

    This talk will first give a general discussion on the ultrasound media characteristics of blood and spectral densities of tissues. The first-order scattering theory, multiple scattering theory, Doppler spectrum, cw and pulse scattering, focused beam, beam spot-size, speckle, texture, and rough interface effects will be presented. Imaging through tissues will then be discussed in terms of temporal and spatial resolutions, contrast, MTF (modulation transfer function), SAR and confocal imaging techniques, tomographic and holographic imaging, and inverse scattering. Next, we discuss optical diffusion in blood and tissues, radiative transfer theory, photon density waves, and polarization effects.

  11. Influence of the optical-acoustic phonon hybridization on phonon scattering and thermal conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wu; Carrete, Jesús; Madsen, Georg K. H.; Mingo, Natalio

    2016-05-01

    We predict a marked effect of optical-acoustic phonon hybridization on phonon scattering and lattice thermal conductivity (κ ), and illustrate it in the case of Fe2Ge3 . This material presents very low-lying optical phonons with an energy of 1.8 meV at the Brillouin zone center, which show avoided crossings with longitudinal acoustic (LA) phonons, due to optical-acoustic phonon polarization hybridization. Because the optical phonons have nonvanishing scattering rates, even a small amount of hybridization with the optical phonon can increase the scattering rates of LA phonons by much more than one order of magnitude, causing the contribution of these phonons to κ to vanish. At low temperatures, the contributions of all LA phonons are eliminated, and thus the avoided crossing leads to a reduction of thermal conductivity by more than half. The scattering rates are very sensitive to the optical-acoustic phonon hybridization strength, characterized by the gap at the avoided crossing point and varied with the wave-vector direction. Our work presents a different reduction mechanism of κ in systems with optical-acoustic phonon hybridization, which can benefit the search for new thermoelectric materials.

  12. Microwave-Field Driven Acoustic Modes in Selected DNA Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Glenn Steven

    The direct coupling of a microwave field to selected DNA molecules is demonstrated using standard dielectrometry. The absorption is resonant with a typical lifetime of 300 picoseconds. Such a long lifetime is unexpected for DNA in aqueous solution at room temperature and has interesting implications for microscopic considerations in future models of solvent damping. Resonant absorption at fundamental and harmonic frequencies for both supercoiled circular and linear DNA agrees with an acoustic mode model. Our associated acoustic velocities for linear DNA are very close to the acoustic velocity of the longitudinal acoustic mode independently observed on DNA fibers using Brillouin Spectroscopy. The difference in acoustic velocities for supercoiled circular and linear DNA is discussed in terms of a conformation dependent model. *This research has been funded by the Office of Naval Research, the Center for Devices and Radiological Health, and the National Science Foundation.

  13. MODE CONVERSION BETWEEN DIFFERENT RADIAL ORDERS FOR SOLAR ACOUSTIC WAVES SCATTERED BY SUNSPOTS

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Hui; Chou, Dean-Yi

    2013-11-20

    We study the mode conversion between different radial orders for solar acoustic waves interacting with sunspots. Solar acoustic waves are modified in the presence of sunspots. The modification in the wave can be viewed as that the sunspot, excited by the incident wave, generates the scattered wave, and the scattered wave is added to the incident wave to form the total wave inside and around the sunspot. The wavefunction of the acoustic wave on the solar surface is computed from the cross-correlation function. The wavefunction of the scattered wave is obtained by subtracting the wavefunction of the incident wave from that of the total wave. We use the incident waves of radial order n = 0-5 to measure the scattered wavefunctions from n to another radial order n' for NOAAs 11084 and 11092. The strength of scattered waves decreases rapidly with |Δn|, where Δn ≡ n' – n. The scattered waves of Δn = ±1 are visible for n ≤ 1, and significant for n ≥ 2. For the scattered wave of Δn = ±2, only few cases are visible. None of the scattered waves of Δn = ±3 are visible. The properties of scattered waves for Δn = 0 and Δn ≠ 0 are different. The scattered wave amplitude relative to the incident wave amplitude decreases with n for Δn = 0, while it increases with n for Δn ≠ 0. The scattered wave amplitudes of Δn = 0 are greater for the larger sunspot, while those of Δn ≠ 0 are insensitive to the sunspot size.

  14. A single-scattering correction for the seismo-acoustic parabolic equation.

    PubMed

    Collins, Michael D

    2012-04-01

    An efficient single-scattering correction that does not require iterations is derived and tested for the seismo-acoustic parabolic equation. The approach is applicable to problems involving gradual range dependence in a waveguide with fluid and solid layers, including the key case of a sloping fluid-solid interface. The single-scattering correction is asymptotically equivalent to a special case of a single-scattering correction for problems that only have solid layers [Küsel et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 121, 808-813 (2007)]. The single-scattering correction has a simple interpretation (conservation of interface conditions in an average sense) that facilitated its generalization to problems involving fluid layers. Promising results are obtained for problems in which the ocean bottom interface has a small slope. PMID:22501044

  15. Determination of the viscous acoustic field for liquid drop positioning/forcing in an acoustic levitation chamber in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyell, Margaret J.

    1992-01-01

    The development of acoustic levitation systems has provided a technology with which to undertake droplet studies as well as do containerless processing experiments in a microgravity environment. Acoustic levitation chambers utilize radiation pressure forces to position/manipulate the drop. Oscillations can be induced via frequency modulation of the acoustic wave, with the modulated acoustic radiation vector acting as the driving force. To account for tangential as well as radial forcing, it is necessary that the viscous effects be included in the acoustic field. The method of composite expansions is employed in the determination of the acoustic field with viscous effects.

  16. Scattering reduction of an acoustically hard cylinder covered with layered pentamode metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Boisvert, Jeffrey E; Scandrett, Clyde L; Howarth, Thomas R

    2016-06-01

    Transformational acoustics offers the theoretical possibility of cloaking obstacles within fluids, provided metamaterials having continuously varying bulk moduli and densities can be found or constructed. Realistically, materials with the proper, continuously varying anisotropies do not presently exist. However, discretely layered cloaks having constant material parameters within each layer may be a viable alternative in practice. The present work considers a range of cloaks, from those comprised of fluid layers that are isotropic in bulk moduli with anisotropic density (inertial cloaks) to those having anisotropic bulk moduli and isotropic density (pentamode cloaks). In this paper an analytical solution is obtained for the case of plane wave scattering from a submerged rigid cylinder covered with a multilayered cylindrical cloak composed of discrete anisotropic fluid layers. An investigation of the parameter space defining such cloaks is undertaken with the goal of minimizing the far-field scattered pressure, using layer constituent anisotropic properties (density and bulk modulus) constrained to lie within reasonable ranges relative to those of water. PMID:27369167

  17. Thomson-Scattering Study of the Subharmonic Decay of Ion-Acoustic Waves Driven by the Brillouin Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandulet, H. C.; Labaune, C.; Lewis, K.; Depierreux, S.

    2004-07-01

    Thomson scattering (TS) has been used to investigate the two-ion decay instability of ion acoustic waves generated by stimulated Brillouin scattering in an underdense CH plasma. Two complementary TS diagnostics, spectrally and spatially resolved, demonstrate the occurrence of the subharmonic decay of the primary ion acoustic wave into two secondary waves. The study of the laser intensity dependence shows that the secondary ion acoustic waves are correlated with the SBS reflectivity saturation, at a level of a few percent.

  18. Acoustic field distribution of sawtooth wave with nonlinear SBE model

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xiaozhou Zhang, Lue; Wang, Xiangda; Gong, Xiufen

    2015-10-28

    For precise prediction of the acoustic field distribution of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy with an ellipsoid transducer, the nonlinear spheroidal beam equations (SBE) are employed to model acoustic wave propagation in medium. To solve the SBE model with frequency domain algorithm, boundary conditions are obtained for monochromatic and sawtooth waves based on the phase compensation. In numerical analysis, the influence of sinusoidal wave and sawtooth wave on axial pressure distributions are investigated.

  19. Nonlinear acoustic fields in acoustic metamaterial based on a cylindrical pipe with periodically arranged side holes.

    PubMed

    Fan, Li; Ge, Huan; Zhang, Shu-yi; Gao, Hai-fei; Liu, Yong-hui; Zhang, Hui

    2013-06-01

    Nonlinear acoustic fields in transmission-line acoustic metamaterials based on a cylindrical pipe with periodically arranged side holes are studied, in which the dispersions and characteristic parameters of the nonlinear acoustic waves are obtained with the Bloch theory, and meanwhile the distributions of the fundamental wave (FW) and second harmonic wave (SHW) in the metamaterial are simulated. Three characteristic frequency bands are defined according to the relations between the frequencies of the FW, SHW, and the low-frequency forbidden band (LFB) in the metamaterial. Especially, when the FW is in the LFB while the SHW is outside the LFB, the SHW can transmit through the metamaterial although the FW is blocked, which exhibits the possibility to extract the information from the SHW instead of the FW. In addition, experiments are carried out to measure the distributions of the acoustic pressures for the FW and SHW along the metamaterial and the experimental results are in agreement with the theory. PMID:23742339

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging of acoustic streaming: absorption coefficient and acoustic field shape estimation.

    PubMed

    Madelin, Guillaume; Grucker, Daniel; Franconi, Jean-Michel; Thiaudiere, Eric

    2006-07-01

    In this study, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is used to visualize acoustic streaming in liquids. A single-shot spin echo sequence (HASTE) with a saturation band perpendicular to the acoustic beam permits the acquisition of an instantaneous image of the flow due to the application of ultrasound. An average acoustic streaming velocity can be estimated from the MR images, from which the ultrasonic absorption coefficient and the bulk viscosity of different glycerol-water mixtures can be deduced. In the same way, this MRI method could be used to assess the acoustic field and time-average power of ultrasonic transducers in water (or other liquids with known physical properties), after calibration of a geometrical parameter that is dependent on the experimental setup. PMID:16650447

  1. Thomson scattering in a magnetic field. II - Arbitrary field orientation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitney, Barbara A.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents solutions to the equation of transfer for Thomson scattering in a constant magnetic field of arbitrary orientation. Results from several atmospheres are combined to give the flux from a dipole star. The results are compared to the polarization data of the magnetic white dwarf Grw + 70 deg 8247. The fit is good, though it implies a very large polarization in the ultraviolet. Thomson scattering is not thought to be an important opacity source in white dwarfs, so the good fit is either fortuitous or is perhaps explained by assuming the magnetic field affects the polarization processes in all opacities similarly.

  2. On the relationship between acoustic energy density flux near the jet and far field acoustic intensity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrello, L.

    1973-01-01

    The relationship between the distribution of the outflow of acoustic energy over the jet boundary and the far-field directivity and intensity distribution is established by measurement and analysis. The numerical and experimental procedures involved have been checked out by using a known source. The results indicate that the acoustic power output per unit length of the jet, in the region from which the sound emanates, peaks at approximately 9 diameters downstream. The acoustic emission for a jet Strouhal number of about 0.3 exceeds the emission for all other Strouhal numbers nearly everywhere along the measurement plane. However, the far-field peak intensity distribution obtained from the contribution of each station was found to depend on the spatial extent of the region where sound emanates from the jet, which, in turn, depends more on the far-field angle than on the Strouhal number. The implications of these results for sound suppression techniques are discussed.

  3. Initial Integration of Noise Prediction Tools for Acoustic Scattering Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nark, Douglas M.; Burley, Casey L.; Tinetti, Ana; Rawls, John W.

    2008-01-01

    This effort provides an initial glimpse at NASA capabilities available in predicting the scattering of fan noise from a non-conventional aircraft configuration. The Aircraft NOise Prediction Program, Fast Scattering Code, and the Rotorcraft Noise Model were coupled to provide increased fidelity models of scattering effects on engine fan noise sources. The integration of these codes led to the identification of several keys issues entailed in applying such multi-fidelity approaches. In particular, for prediction at noise certification points, the inclusion of distributed sources leads to complications with the source semi-sphere approach. Computational resource requirements limit the use of the higher fidelity scattering code to predict radiated sound pressure levels for full scale configurations at relevant frequencies. And, the ability to more accurately represent complex shielding surfaces in current lower fidelity models is necessary for general application to scattering predictions. This initial step in determining the potential benefits/costs of these new methods over the existing capabilities illustrates a number of the issues that must be addressed in the development of next generation aircraft system noise prediction tools.

  4. The effect of hemolysis on acoustic scattering from blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coussios, Constantin-C.; Ffowcs Williams, Shon E.

    2002-05-01

    In an attempt to develop a direct method for measuring the extent of red cell damage in vitro, the effect of the degree of hemolysis on ultrasonic scattering from blood was investigated. Starting with a suspension of 30% hematocrit, a series of suspensions containing different relative concentrations of healthy and damaged red cells in saline were prepared, with the total number of cells present in any one suspension being constant. For each sample, a suspension of equal concentration of healthy cells, but no lyzed cells, was also produced. Using a specially designed container, all samples were exposed to 15 MHz ultrasound in pulse-echo mode and measurements of backscattering were obtained. At high hematocrits, the samples containing damaged cells were found to scatter substantially more than the suspensions containing exclusively healthy cells. This indicates that damaged cells contribute significantly to the overall backscattered intensity. Below a concentration of 13% per volume of healthy cells, scattering levels from healthy and hemolyzed suspensions were comparable. A theoretical model, which treats healthy cells as weak-scattering spheres and damaged cells as hard thin disks, is proposed to interpret the observed scattering behavior.

  5. Temperature dependence of Brillouin light scattering spectra of acoustic phonons in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsson, Kevin S.; Klimovich, Nikita; An, Kyongmo; Sullivan, Sean; Weathers, Annie; Shi, Li; Li, Xiaoqin

    2015-02-01

    Electrons, optical phonons, and acoustic phonons are often driven out of local equilibrium in electronic devices or during laser-material interaction processes. The need for a better understanding of such non-equilibrium transport processes has motivated the development of Raman spectroscopy as a local temperature sensor of optical phonons and intermediate frequency acoustic phonons, whereas Brillouin light scattering (BLS) has recently been explored as a temperature sensor of low-frequency acoustic phonons. Here, we report the measured BLS spectra of silicon at different temperatures. The origins of the observed temperature dependence of the BLS peak position, linewidth, and intensity are examined in order to evaluate their potential use as temperature sensors for acoustic phonons.

  6. Temperature dependence of Brillouin light scattering spectra of acoustic phonons in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Olsson, Kevin S.; Klimovich, Nikita; An, Kyongmo; Sullivan, Sean; Weathers, Annie; Shi, Li E-mail: elaineli@physics.utexas.edu; Li, Xiaoqin E-mail: elaineli@physics.utexas.edu

    2015-02-02

    Electrons, optical phonons, and acoustic phonons are often driven out of local equilibrium in electronic devices or during laser-material interaction processes. The need for a better understanding of such non-equilibrium transport processes has motivated the development of Raman spectroscopy as a local temperature sensor of optical phonons and intermediate frequency acoustic phonons, whereas Brillouin light scattering (BLS) has recently been explored as a temperature sensor of low-frequency acoustic phonons. Here, we report the measured BLS spectra of silicon at different temperatures. The origins of the observed temperature dependence of the BLS peak position, linewidth, and intensity are examined in order to evaluate their potential use as temperature sensors for acoustic phonons.

  7. Thomson scattering in a magnetic field. I - Field along z

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitney, Barbara A.

    1991-01-01

    The Monte Carlo method is used here to solve the radiative transfer equation for Thomson scattering in a constant magnetic field perpendicular to the atmosphere. Emergent radiation and polarization are presented for various atmospheric thicknesses. The circular polarization peaks at frequencies near the cyclotron, omega(c), and for propagation direction along the field. At low field strengths, the circular polarization is roughly proportional to omega(c)/omega; the linear polarization is proportional to the square of omega(c)/omega and the amount of circular polarization present at each scatter and is therefore much smaller than the circular polarization. The linear polarization is large for propagation direction perpendicular to the magnetic field and at frequencies near the cyclotron and in the strong-field limit. The position angle of the linear polarization undergoes a rotation of 90 deg at a value of omega(c)/omega near the square root of three.

  8. Temporal coherence of the acoustic field forward propagated through a continental shelf with random internal waves.

    PubMed

    Gong, Zheng; Chen, Tianrun; Ratilal, Purnima; Makris, Nicholas C

    2013-11-01

    An analytical model derived from normal mode theory for the accumulated effects of range-dependent multiple forward scattering is applied to estimate the temporal coherence of the acoustic field forward propagated through a continental-shelf waveguide containing random three-dimensional internal waves. The modeled coherence time scale of narrow band low-frequency acoustic field fluctuations after propagating through a continental-shelf waveguide is shown to decay with a power-law of range to the -1/2 beyond roughly 1 km, decrease with increasing internal wave energy, to be consistent with measured acoustic coherence time scales. The model should provide a useful prediction of the acoustic coherence time scale as a function of internal wave energy in continental-shelf environments. The acoustic coherence time scale is an important parameter in remote sensing applications because it determines (i) the time window within which standard coherent processing such as matched filtering may be conducted, and (ii) the number of statistically independent fluctuations in a given measurement period that determines the variance reduction possible by stationary averaging. PMID:24180758

  9. Heterodyne signal-to-noise ratios in acoustic mode scattering experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cochran, W. R.

    1980-01-01

    The relation between the signal to noise ratio (SNR) obtained in heterodyne detection of radiation scattered from acoustic modes in crystalline solids and the scattered spectral density function is studied. It is shown that in addition to the information provided by the measured frequency shifts and line widths, measurement of the SNR provides a determination of the absolute elasto-optical (Pockel's) constants. Examples are given for cubic crystals, and acceptable SNR values are obtained for scattering from thermally excited phonons at 10.6 microns, with no external perturbation of the sample necessary. The results indicate the special advantages of the method for the study of semiconductors.

  10. Measurement and modeling of the acoustic field near an underwater vehicle and implications for acoustic source localization.

    PubMed

    Lepper, Paul A; D'Spain, Gerald L

    2007-08-01

    The performance of traditional techniques of passive localization in ocean acoustics such as time-of-arrival (phase differences) and amplitude ratios measured by multiple receivers may be degraded when the receivers are placed on an underwater vehicle due to effects of scattering. However, knowledge of the interference pattern caused by scattering provides a potential enhancement to traditional source localization techniques. Results based on a study using data from a multi-element receiving array mounted on the inner shroud of an autonomous underwater vehicle show that scattering causes the localization ambiguities (side lobes) to decrease in overall level and to move closer to the true source location, thereby improving localization performance, for signals in the frequency band 2-8 kHz. These measurements are compared with numerical modeling results from a two-dimensional time domain finite difference scheme for scattering from two fluid-loaded cylindrical shells. Measured and numerically modeled results are presented for multiple source aspect angles and frequencies. Matched field processing techniques quantify the source localization capabilities for both measurements and numerical modeling output. PMID:17672639

  11. Characterization of Biological Cells by Inverse Acoustic Scattering and Electrozone Sensing.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xucai

    A technique is presented which characterizes biological cells by their mechanical descriptors: size, compressibility and density. The experimental apparatus consists of two acoustic transducers and an electrozone sensor submerged in a bath of conducting host fluid. Diluted biological cells are convected through the apparatus by a coaxial jet. An individual cell passes through the electrozone where its volume is measured by the Coulter principle, and then through the confocal region of the two acoustic transducers. One acoustic transducer sends out tone bursts at a center frequency of 30 MHz and detects a back-scattered signal from the cell while the other transducer detects the scattered signal at 90^circ. Thus the volume, the 90^circ scattering function, and the 180^circ scattering function are recorded for each cell. The acoustic scattering functions are then inverted to provide the compressibility and density of that cell. Statistics of the mechanical properties for human red and white blood cells are generated and displayed. The size, compressibility and density of both normal and abnormal red blood cells are reported. By modeling a cell as an immiscible mixture of protein and saline solution, perfect mixture laws for compressibility and density are derived and confirmed by experimental results. With the mixture laws established, the mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC) is inferred from the compressibility and density data for red blood cells. Using only the data from the 180^circ back-scattered signal, different white cell subgroups are successfully distinguished by their locations in the two dimensional histograms of their mechanical descriptors.

  12. Near-specular acoustic scattering from a buried submarine mud volcano.

    PubMed

    Gerig, Anthony L; Holland, Charles W

    2007-12-01

    Submarine mud volcanoes are objects that form on the seafloor due to the emission of gas and fluidized sediment from the Earth's interior. They vary widely in size, can be exposed or buried, and are of interest to the underwater acoustics community as potential sources of active sonar clutter. Coincident seismic reflection data and low frequency bistatic scattering data were gathered from one such buried mud volcano located in the Straits of Sicily. The bistatic data were generated using a pulsed piston source and a 64-element horizontal array, both towed over the top of the volcano. The purpose of this work was to appropriately model low frequency scattering from the volcano using the bistatic returns, seismic bathymetry, and knowledge of the general geoacoustic properties of the area's seabed to guide understanding and model development. Ray theory, with some approximations, was used to model acoustic propagation through overlying layers. Due to the volcano's size, scattering was modeled using geometric acoustics and a simple representation of volcano shape. Modeled bistatic data compared relatively well with experimental data, although some features remain unexplained. Results of an inversion for the volcano's reflection coefficient indicate that it may be acoustically softer than expected. PMID:18247739

  13. Angular oscillation of solid scatterers in response to progressive planar acoustic waves: do fish otoliths rock?

    PubMed

    Krysl, Petr; Hawkins, Anthony D; Schilt, Carl; Cranford, Ted W

    2012-01-01

    Fish can sense a wide variety of sounds by means of the otolith organs of the inner ear. Among the incompletely understood components of this process are the patterns of movement of the otoliths vis-à-vis fish head or whole-body movement. How complex are the motions? How does the otolith organ respond to sounds from different directions and frequencies? In the present work we examine the responses of a dense rigid scatterer (representing the otolith) suspended in an acoustic fluid to low-frequency planar progressive acoustic waves. A simple mechanical model, which predicts both translational and angular oscillation, is formulated. The responses of simple shapes (sphere and hemisphere) are analyzed with an acoustic finite element model. The hemispherical scatterer is found to oscillate both in the direction of the propagation of the progressive waves and also in the plane of the wavefront as a result of angular motion. The models predict that this characteristic will be shared by other irregularly-shaped scatterers, including fish otoliths, which could provide the fish hearing mechanisms with an additional component of oscillation and therefore one more source of acoustical cues. PMID:22912710

  14. Angular Oscillation of Solid Scatterers in Response to Progressive Planar Acoustic Waves: Do Fish Otoliths Rock?

    PubMed Central

    Krysl, Petr; Hawkins, Anthony D.; Schilt, Carl; Cranford, Ted W.

    2012-01-01

    Fish can sense a wide variety of sounds by means of the otolith organs of the inner ear. Among the incompletely understood components of this process are the patterns of movement of the otoliths vis-à-vis fish head or whole-body movement. How complex are the motions? How does the otolith organ respond to sounds from different directions and frequencies? In the present work we examine the responses of a dense rigid scatterer (representing the otolith) suspended in an acoustic fluid to low-frequency planar progressive acoustic waves. A simple mechanical model, which predicts both translational and angular oscillation, is formulated. The responses of simple shapes (sphere and hemisphere) are analyzed with an acoustic finite element model. The hemispherical scatterer is found to oscillate both in the direction of the propagation of the progressive waves and also in the plane of the wavefront as a result of angular motion. The models predict that this characteristic will be shared by other irregularly-shaped scatterers, including fish otoliths, which could provide the fish hearing mechanisms with an additional component of oscillation and therefore one more source of acoustical cues. PMID:22912710

  15. Field-Deployable Acoustic Digital Systems for Noise Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shams, Qamar A.; Wright, Kenneth D.; Lunsford, Charles B.; Smith, Charlie D.

    2000-01-01

    Langley Research Center (LaRC) has for years been a leader in field acoustic array measurement technique. Two field-deployable digital measurement systems have been developed to support acoustic research programs at LaRC. For several years, LaRC has used the Digital Acoustic Measurement System (DAMS) for measuring the acoustic noise levels from rotorcraft and tiltrotor aircraft. Recently, a second system called Remote Acquisition and Storage System (RASS) was developed and deployed for the first time in the field along with DAMS system for the Community Noise Flight Test using the NASA LaRC-757 aircraft during April, 2000. The test was performed at Airborne Airport in Wilmington, OH to validate predicted noise reduction benefits from alternative operational procedures. The test matrix was composed of various combinations of altitude, cutback power, and aircraft weight. The DAMS digitizes the acoustic inputs at the microphone site and can be located up to 2000 feet from the van which houses the acquisition, storage and analysis equipment. Digitized data from up to 10 microphones is recorded on a Jaz disk and is analyzed post-test by microcomputer system. The RASS digitizes and stores acoustic inputs at the microphone site that can be located up to three miles from the base station and can compose a 3 mile by 3 mile array of microphones. 16-bit digitized data from the microphones is stored on removable Jaz disk and is transferred through a high speed array to a very large high speed permanent storage device. Up to 30 microphones can be utilized in the array. System control and monitoring is accomplished via Radio Frequency (RF) link. This paper will present a detailed description of both systems, along with acoustic data analysis from both systems.

  16. Photoacoustic tomography based on the Green's function retrieval with ultrasound interferometry for sample partially behind an acoustically scattering layer

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Jie; Tao, Chao Cai, Peng; Liu, Xiaojun

    2015-06-08

    Acoustically inhomogeneous mediums with multiple scattering are often the nightmare of photoacoustic tomography. In order to break this limitation, a photoacoustic tomography scheme combining ultrasound interferometry and time reversal is proposed to achieve images in acoustically scattering medium. An ultrasound interferometry is developed to determine the unknown Green's function of strong scattering tissue. Using the determined Greens' function, a time-reversal process is carried out to restore images behind an acoustically inhomogeneous layer from the scattering photoacoustic signals. This method effectively decreases the false contrast, noise, and position deviation of images induced by the multiple scattering. Phantom experiment is carried out to validate the method. Therefore, the proposed method could have potential value in extending the biomedical applications of photoacoustic tomography in acoustically inhomogeneous tissue.

  17. Parameter derivation for an acoustic cloak based on scattering theory and realization with tunable metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Huijie; Wen, Jihong; Païdoussis, Michael P.; Yu, Dianlong; Cai, Li; Wen, Xisen

    2013-09-01

    This work derives the set of acoustic parameters of a metamaterial for an ideal cylindrical cloak through scattering theory. A multilayered cloak with homogeneous isotropic materials is introduced to approximate the ideal cloak. An active metamaterial, consisting of active arrays of acoustic cavities separated by piezo-diaphragms, is addressed to achieve the required parameters for each layer of the multilayered cloak. In particular, with the aid of a multi-control strategy that takes into account the coupling between adjacent cells, the effective parameters for the cloak can be accurately realized.

  18. Equilibrium thermodynamics and stochastic nonlinear acoustic fields. [in crystalline lattices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, J. H.

    1985-01-01

    A crystalline solid is considered to consist of a large number of incoherent nonlinear acoustic radiation sources identified with the vibrating particles of the crystalline lattice. Randomization of the field, together with the assumption of a stochastically independent, fluctuating, radiation field at the absolue zero of temperature, leads to an expression of the temperature-dependent radiation field in terms of the zero-point field. The equation is identified with the Planck distribution formula of quantum mechanics in the linear field limit. The thermodynamic state functions are also obtained in terms of the nonlinear acoustic modal energies per unit mass and reduce to the results of the Debye-Einstein stochastic quantum oscillator model in the linear field limit.

  19. Acoustic scattering of a cylindrical quasi-Gaussian beam with arbitrary incidence focused on a rigid elliptical cylinder

    SciTech Connect

    Mitri, F. G.

    2015-11-14

    Using the partial-wave series expansion method in cylindrical coordinates, a formal analytical solution for the acoustical scattering of a 2D cylindrical quasi-Gaussian beam with an arbitrary angle of incidence θ{sub i}, focused on a rigid elliptical cylinder in a non-viscous fluid, is developed. The cylindrical focused beam expression is an exact solution of the Helmholtz equation. The scattering coefficients for the elliptical cylinder are determined by forcing the expression of the total (incident + scattered) field to satisfy the Neumann boundary condition for a rigid immovable surface, and performing the product of matrices involving an inversion procedure. Computations for the matrices elements require a single numerical integration procedure for each partial-wave mode. Numerical results are performed with particular emphasis on the focusing properties of the incident beam and its angle of incidence with respect to the major axis a of the ellipse as well as the aspect ratio a/b where b is the minor axis (assuming a > b). The method is validated and verified against previous results obtained via the T-matrix for plane waves. The present analysis is the first to consider an acoustical beam on an elliptic cylinder of variable cross-section as opposed to plane waves of infinite extent. Other 2D non-spherical and Chebyshev surfaces are mentioned that may be examined throughout this analytical formalism assuming a small deformation parameter ε.

  20. Scattering of acoustic evanescent waves by circular cylinders: Partial wave series solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marston, Philip L.

    2002-05-01

    Evanescent acoustical waves occur in a variety of situations such as when sound is incident on a fluid interface beyond the critical angle and when flexural waves on a plate are subsonic with respect to the surrounding fluid. The scattering by circular cylinders at normal incidence was calculated to give insight into the consequences on the scattering of the evanescence of the incident wave. To analyze the scattering, it is necessary to express the incident wave using a modified expansion involving cylindrical functions. For plane evanescent waves, the expansion becomes a double summation with products of modified and ordinary Bessel functions. The resulting modified series is found for the scattering by a fluid cylinder in an unbounded medium. The perfectly soft and rigid cases are also examined. Unlike the case of an ordinary incident wave, the counterpropagating partial waves of the same angular order have unequal magnitudes when the incident wave is evanescent. This is a consequence of the exponential dependence of the incident wave amplitude on the transverse coordinate. The associated exponential dependence of the scattering on the location of a scatterer was previously demonstrated [T. J. Matula and P. L. Marston, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 93, 1192-1195 (1993)].

  1. Tunneling effects in resonant acoustic scattering of an air bubble in unbounded water.

    PubMed

    Simão, André G; Guimarães, Luiz G

    2016-01-01

    The problem of acoustic scattering of a gaseous spherical bubble immersed within unbounded liquid surrounding is considered in this work. The theory of partial wave expansion related to this problem is revisited. A physical model based on the analogy between acoustic scattering and potential scattering in quantum mechanics is proposed to describe and interpret the acoustical natural oscillation modes of the bubble, namely, the resonances. In this context, a physical model is devised in order to describe the air water interface and the implications of the high density contrast on the various regimes of the scattering resonances. The main results are presented in terms of resonance lifetime periods and quality factors. The explicit numerical calculations are undertaken through an asymptotic analysis considering typical bubble dimensions and underwater sound wavelengths. It is shown that the resonance periods are scaled according to the Minnaert's period, which is the short lived resonance mode, called breathing mode of the bubble. As expected, resonances with longer lifetimes lead to impressive cavity quality Q-factor ranging from 1010 to 105. The present theoretical findings lead to a better understanding of the energy storage mechanism in a bubbly medium. PMID:27331803

  2. On noninvasive assessment of acoustic fields acting on the fetus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonets, V. A.; Kazakov, V. V.

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study is to verify a noninvasive technique for assessing the characteristics of acoustic fields in the audible range arising in the uterus under the action of maternal voice, external sounds, and vibrations. This problem is very important in view of actively developed methods for delivery of external sounds to the uterus: music, maternal voice recordings, sounds from outside the mother's body, etc., that supposedly support development of the fetus at the prenatal stage psychologically and cognitively. However, the parameters of acoustic signals have been neither measured nor normalized, which may be dangerous for the fetus and hinder actual assessment of their impact on fetal development. The authors show that at frequencies below 1 kHz, acoustic pressure in the uterus may be measured noninvasively using a hydrophone placed in a soft capsule filled with liquid. It was found that the acoustic field at frequencies up to 1 kHz arising in the uterus under the action of an external sound field has amplitude-frequency parameters close to those of the external field; i.e., the external field penetrates the uterus with hardly any difficulty.

  3. Nonlinear acoustics: Noncollinear interaction, reflection and refraction, and scattering of sound by sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackstock, David T.

    1987-07-01

    Research on four topics in nonlinear acoustics is described. (1) Dependence of three coefficients of nonlinearity for sea water on pressure, temperature, and density. Computation of the coefficients from a combination of theoretical and empirical relations is in progress. (2) Nonlinear, noncollinear interaction of sound waves. Three journal articles have been written, two on interaction in a rectangular waveguide and one on coefficient of nonlinearity for collinear and noncollinear interaction. (3) Reflection and refraction of finite amplitude sound at a plane interface between two fluids. A new form of Snell's law valid for waves of finite amplitude is derived. An experiment to test the implications of the new law is being carried out. (4) Scattering of sound by sound. The classical problem of the secondary radiation produced by interaction of two crossed sound beams is discussed. An experimental test of recent theoretical treatments is in preparation. A preliminary experiment is the measurement of the range dependence of finger lobes in the second harmonic radiation produced in the field of a monochromatically driven piston.

  4. FIELD TESTING OF PROTOTYPE ACOUSTIC EMISSION SEWER FLOWMETER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This investigation concerns verifying the operating principles of the acoustic emission flowmeter (U.S. Patent 3,958,458) in the natural environment of three different storm sewer field sites in Nassau County, New York. The flowmeter is a novel, passive, nonintrusive method that ...

  5. Depolarized guided acoustic wave Brillouin scattering in hollow-core photonic crystal fibers.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Wenjia Elser née; Stiller, Birgit; Elser, Dominique; Heim, Bettina; Marquardt, Christoph; Leuchs, Gerd

    2015-10-19

    By performing quantum-noise-limited optical heterodyne detection, we observe polarization noise in light after propagation through a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (PCF). We compare the noise spectrum to the one of a standard fiber and find an increase of noise even though the light is mainly transmitted in air in a hollow-core PCF. Combined with our simulation of the acoustic vibrational modes in the hollow-core PCF, we are offering an explanation for the polarization noise with a variation of guided acoustic wave Brillouin scattering (GAWBS). Here, instead of modulating the strain in the fiber core as in a solid core fiber, the acoustic vibrations in hollow-core PCF influence the effective refractive index by modulating the geometry of the photonic crystal structure. This induces polarization noise in the light guided by the photonic crystal structure. PMID:26480433

  6. Vertical distribution, composition and migratory patterns of acoustic scattering layers in the Canary Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariza, A.; Landeira, J. M.; Escánez, A.; Wienerroither, R.; Aguilar de Soto, N.; Røstad, A.; Kaartvedt, S.; Hernández-León, S.

    2016-05-01

    Diel vertical migration (DVM) facilitates biogeochemical exchanges between shallow waters and the deep ocean. An effective way of monitoring the migrant biota is by acoustic observations although the interpretation of the scattering layers poses challenges. Here we combine results from acoustic observations at 18 and 38 kHz with limited net sampling in order to unveil the origin of acoustic phenomena around the Canary Islands, subtropical northeast Atlantic Ocean. Trawling data revealed a high diversity of fishes, decapods and cephalopods (152 species), although few dominant species likely were responsible for most of the sound scattering in the region. We identified four different acoustic scattering layers in the mesopelagic realm: (1) at 400-500 m depth, a swimbladder resonance phenomenon at 18 kHz produced by gas-bearing migrant fish such as Vinciguerria spp. and Lobianchia dofleini, (2) at 500-600 m depth, a dense 38 kHz layer resulting primarily from the gas-bearing and non-migrant fish Cyclothone braueri, and to a lesser extent, from fluid-like migrant fauna also inhabiting these depths, (3) between 600 and 800 m depth, a weak signal at both 18 and 38 kHz ascribed either to migrant fish or decapods, and (4) below 800 m depth, a weak non-migrant layer at 18 kHz which was not sampled. All the dielly migrating layers reached the epipelagic zone at night, with the shorter-range migrations moving at 4.6 ± 2.6 cm s - 1 and the long-range ones at 11.5 ± 3.8 cm s - 1. This work reduces uncertainties interpreting standard frequencies in mesopelagic studies, while enhances the potential of acoustics for future research and monitoring of the deep pelagic fauna in the Canary Islands.

  7. Multimodal far-field acoustic radiation pattern: An approximate equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, E. J.

    1977-01-01

    The far-field sound radiation theory for a circular duct was studied for both single mode and multimodal inputs. The investigation was intended to develop a method to determine the acoustic power produced by turbofans as a function of mode cut-off ratio. With reasonable simplifying assumptions the single mode radiation pattern was shown to be reducible to a function of mode cut-off ratio only. With modal cut-off ratio as the dominant variable, multimodal radiation patterns can be reduced to a simple explicit expression. This approximate expression provides excellent agreement with an exact calculation of the sound radiation pattern using equal acoustic power per mode.

  8. Experimental Evidence of the Collective Brillouin Scattering of Multiple Laser Beams Sharing Acoustic Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuville, C.; Tassin, V.; Pesme, D.; Monteil, M.-C.; Masson-Laborde, P.-E.; Baccou, C.; Fremerye, P.; Philippe, F.; Seytor, P.; Teychenné, D.; Seka, W.; Katz, J.; Bahr, R.; Depierreux, S.

    2016-06-01

    The indirect-drive scheme to inertial confinement fusion uses a large number of laser beams arranged in a symmetric angular distribution. Collective laser plasma instabilities can therefore develop that couple all the incident laser waves located in a cone to the daughter wave growing along the cone symmetry axis [D. F. DuBois et al., Phys. Fluids B 4, 241 (1992)]. With complementary diagnostics of Thomson scattering and of the scattered light, we demonstrate the occurrence of collective stimulated Brillouin sidescattering driving collective acoustic waves in indirect-drive experiments.

  9. Experimental Evidence of the Collective Brillouin Scattering of Multiple Laser Beams Sharing Acoustic Waves.

    PubMed

    Neuville, C; Tassin, V; Pesme, D; Monteil, M-C; Masson-Laborde, P-E; Baccou, C; Fremerye, P; Philippe, F; Seytor, P; Teychenné, D; Seka, W; Katz, J; Bahr, R; Depierreux, S

    2016-06-10

    The indirect-drive scheme to inertial confinement fusion uses a large number of laser beams arranged in a symmetric angular distribution. Collective laser plasma instabilities can therefore develop that couple all the incident laser waves located in a cone to the daughter wave growing along the cone symmetry axis [D. F. DuBois et al., Phys. Fluids B 4, 241 (1992)]. With complementary diagnostics of Thomson scattering and of the scattered light, we demonstrate the occurrence of collective stimulated Brillouin sidescattering driving collective acoustic waves in indirect-drive experiments. PMID:27341238

  10. A field expansions method for scattering by periodic multilayered media.

    PubMed

    Malcolm, Alison; Nicholls, David P

    2011-04-01

    The interaction of acoustic and electromagnetic waves with periodic structures plays an important role in a wide range of problems of scientific and technological interest. This contribution focuses upon the robust and high-order numerical simulation of a model for the interaction of pressure waves generated within the earth incident upon layers of sediment near the surface. Herein described is a boundary perturbation method for the numerical simulation of scattering returns from irregularly shaped periodic layered media. The method requires only the discretization of the layer interfaces (so that the number of unknowns is an order of magnitude smaller than finite difference and finite element simulations), while it avoids not only the need for specialized quadrature rules but also the dense linear systems characteristic of boundary integral/element methods. The approach is a generalization to multiple layers of Bruno and Reitich's "Method of Field Expansions" for dielectric structures with two layers. By simply considering the entire structure simultaneously, rather than solving in individual layers separately, the full field can be recovered in time proportional to the number of interfaces. As with the original field expansions method, this approach is extremely efficient and spectrally accurate. PMID:21476635

  11. Acoustic spectroscopy: A powerful analytical method for the pharmaceutical field?

    PubMed

    Bonacucina, Giulia; Perinelli, Diego R; Cespi, Marco; Casettari, Luca; Cossi, Riccardo; Blasi, Paolo; Palmieri, Giovanni F

    2016-04-30

    Acoustics is one of the emerging technologies developed to minimize processing, maximize quality and ensure the safety of pharmaceutical, food and chemical products. The operating principle of acoustic spectroscopy is the measurement of the ultrasound pulse intensity and phase after its propagation through a sample. The main goal of this technique is to characterise concentrated colloidal dispersions without dilution, in such a way as to be able to analyse non-transparent and even highly structured systems. This review presents the state of the art of ultrasound-based techniques in pharmaceutical pre-formulation and formulation steps, showing their potential, applicability and limits. It reports in a simplified version the theory behind acoustic spectroscopy, describes the most common equipment on the market, and finally overviews different studies performed on systems and materials used in the pharmaceutical or related fields. PMID:26976503

  12. A field-deployable digital acoustic measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, David L.; Wright, Kenneth D., II; Rowland, Wayne D.

    1991-01-01

    A field deployable digital acoustic measurement system was developed to support acoustic research programs at the Langley Research Center. The system digitizes the acoustic inputs at the microphone, which can be located up to 1000 feet from the van which houses the acquisition, storage, and analysis equipment. Digitized data from up to 12 microphones is recorded on high density 8mm tape and is analyzed post-test by a microcomputer system. Synchronous and nonsynchronous sampling is available with maximum sample rates of 12,500 and 40,000 samples per second respectively. The high density tape storage system is capable of storing 5 gigabytes of data at transfer rates up to 1 megabyte per second. System overall dynamic range exceeds 83 dB.

  13. Theoretical and experimental examination of near-field acoustic levitation.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Hideyuki; Kamakura, Tomoo; Matsuda, Kazuhisa

    2002-04-01

    A planar object can be levitated stably close to a piston sound source by making use of acoustic radiation pressure. This phenomenon is called near-field acoustic levitation [Y. Hashimoto et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 100, 2057-2061 (1996)]. In the present article, the levitation distance is predicted theoretically by numerically solving basic equations in a compressible viscous fluid subject to the appropriate initial and boundary conditions. Additionally, experiments are carried out using a 19.5-kHz piston source with a 40-mm aperture and various aluminum disks of different sizes. The measured levitation distance agrees well with the theory, which is different from a conventional theory, and the levitation distance is not inversely proportional to the square root of the surface density of the levitated disk in a strict sense. PMID:12002842

  14. Sound field simulation and acoustic animation in urban squares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Jian; Meng, Yan

    2005-04-01

    Urban squares are important components of cities, and the acoustic environment is important for their usability. While models and formulae for predicting the sound field in urban squares are important for their soundscape design and improvement, acoustic animation tools would be of great importance for designers as well as for public participation process, given that below a certain sound level, the soundscape evaluation depends mainly on the type of sounds rather than the loudness. This paper first briefly introduces acoustic simulation models developed for urban squares, as well as empirical formulae derived from a series of simulation. It then presents an acoustic animation tool currently being developed. In urban squares there are multiple dynamic sound sources, so that the computation time becomes a main concern. Nevertheless, the requirements for acoustic animation in urban squares are relatively low compared to auditoria. As a result, it is important to simplify the simulation process and algorithms. Based on a series of subjective tests in a virtual reality environment with various simulation parameters, a fast simulation method with acceptable accuracy has been explored. [Work supported by the European Commission.

  15. PHENOMENOLOGICAL STUDY OF INTERACTION BETWEEN SOLAR ACOUSTIC WAVES AND SUNSPOTS FROM MEASURED SCATTERED WAVEFUNCTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Ming-Hsu; Chou, Dean-Yi; Liang, Zhi-Chao; Zhao Hui

    2012-08-10

    The solar acoustic waves around a sunspot are modified because of the interaction with the sunspot. The interaction can be viewed as that the sunspot, excited by the incident wave, generates the scattered wave, and the scattered wave is added to the incident wave to form the total wave around the sunspot. We define an interaction parameter, which could be complex, describing the interaction between the acoustic waves and the sunspot. The scattered wavefunction on the surface can be expressed as a two-dimensional integral of the product of the Green's function, the wavefunction, and the two-dimensional interaction parameter over the sunspot area for the Born approximation of different orders. We assume a simple model for the two-dimensional interaction parameter distribution: its absolute value is axisymmetric with a Gaussian distribution and its phase is a constant. The measured scattered wavefunctions of various modes for NOAAs 11084 and 11092 are fitted to the theoretical scattered wavefunctions to determine the three model parameters, magnitude, Gaussian radius, and phase, for the Born approximation of different orders. The three model parameters converge to some values at high-order Born approximations. The result of the first-order Born approximation is significantly different from the convergent value in some cases. The rate of convergence depends on the sunspot size and wavelength. It converges more rapidly for the smaller sunspot and longer wavelength. The magnitude increases with mode frequency and degree for each radial order. The Gaussian radius is insensitive to frequency and degree. The spatial range of the interaction parameter is greater than that of the continuum intensity deficit, but smaller than that of the acoustic power deficit of the sunspot. The phase versus phase speed falls into a small range. This suggests that the phase could be a function phase speed. NOAAs 11084 and 11092 have a similar magnitude and phase, although the ratio of their

  16. Acoustic Scattering by an Heterogeneous River Bed: Relationship to Bathymetry and Implications for Sediment Classification using Multibeam Echosounder Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buscombe, D.; Grams, P. E.; Kaplinski, M. A.

    2013-12-01

    Bed sediment classification using backscatter intensities from multibeam echosounder (MBES) systems in rivers is attractive due to its high coverage and resolution, limited costs compared to conventional sampling, and the potential combination of bathymetric and bottom sediment mapping in one instrument. Sediment classification by means of hydro-acoustic remote sensing is becoming an established discipline in oceanography. A number of techniques have been proposed, none of which has become the preferred method. In rivers, however, the field is relatively new and faces challenges not typically encountered in deep ocean settings. For example, river beds tend to have larger mean and maximum slopes than typical seabeds. Shallow water depths not only make MBES deployments more difficult, but also make the size of the beam footprint on the bed small which can lead to relatively noisy backscatter data. In particular, sediments can more heterogeneous in terms of: 1) range of particle sizes (both in a given area and over an entire mapped reach); 2) range of grain size over proximal bedform fields; 3) superimposed bedforms; and 4) abrupt sedimentological transitions over small scales. This sediment heterogeneity means grain-size usually changes along swath, which has a number of implications for existing sediment classification methods which use the distribution of backscatter intensities over all acoustic beams. We discuss these implications with reference to MBES data collected from the Colorado River in Grand Canyon, Arizona. We analyze the scale-dependence of probability density functions (PDF) of measured elevations in different sedimentological settings, which reveals the appropriate spatial scale at which to apply acoustic scattering theories. We also discuss the joint PDF of elevation and backscatter over different scales as a means by which to create an adaptive gridding scheme in which each grid is scaled appropriately, in situations with rapidly changing

  17. Characterizing riverbed sediment using high-frequency acoustics 1: spectral properties of scattering

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buscombe, Daniel D.; Grams, Paul E.; Kaplinski, Matt A.

    2014-01-01

    Bed-sediment classification using high-frequency hydro-acoustic instruments is challenging when sediments are spatially heterogeneous, which is often the case in rivers. The use of acoustic backscatter to classify sediments is an attractive alternative to analysis of topography because it is potentially sensitive to grain-scale roughness. Here, a new method is presented which uses high-frequency acoustic backscatter from multibeam sonar to classify heterogeneous riverbed sediments by type (sand, gravel,rock) continuously in space and at small spatial resolution. In this, the first of a pair of papers that examine the scattering signatures from a heterogeneous riverbed, methods are presented to construct spatially explicit maps of spectral properties from geo-referenced point clouds of geometrically and radiometrically corrected echoes. Backscatter power spectra are computed to produce scale and amplitude metrics that collectively characterize the length scales of stochastic measures of riverbed scattering, termed ‘stochastic geometries’. Backscatter aggregated over small spatial scales have spectra that obey a power-law. This apparently self-affine behavior could instead arise from morphological- and grain-scale roughnesses over multiple overlapping scales, or riverbed scattering being transitional between Rayleigh and geometric regimes. Relationships exist between stochastic geometries of backscatter and areas of rough and smooth sediments. However, no one parameter can uniquely characterize a particular substrate, nor definitively separate the relative contributions of roughness and acoustic impedance (hardness). Combinations of spectral quantities do, however, have the potential to delineate riverbed sediment patchiness, in a data-driven approach comparing backscatter with bed-sediment observations (which is the subject of part two of this manuscript).

  18. Scattering reduction for an acoustic sensor using a multilayered shell comprising a pair of homogeneous isotropic single-negative media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Tao; Zhu, Xue-Feng; Liang, Bin; Li, Yong; Zou, Xin-Ye; Cheng, Jian-Chun

    2012-07-01

    We have designed a cylindrical multilayered structure to reduce scattering for an acoustic sensor while allowing it to receive external information. The proposed structure consists of two alternately arranged complementary media with homogeneous isotropic single-negative parameters. Numerical results show that the acoustic scattering from the sensor is suppressed considerably when the number of bilayers is large enough and the thickness of each bilayer is much smaller than the incident wavelength. This may be particularly significant for practical applications where acoustic measurements would otherwise be disturbed by the insertion of sensors.

  19. Response to "Comment on 'Resonant acoustic scattering by swimbladder-bearing fish'" [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 64, 571-580 (1978)].

    PubMed

    Love, Richard H

    2013-11-01

    In the 1970s a model of resonant scattering from a swimbladder-bearing fish was developed. The fish was modeled as an air bubble, representing a swimbladder, encased in a viscous spherical shell, representing the fish flesh. This model has been used successfully to correlate acoustic scattering data with fish information in a number of ocean locations. Recently, questions have arisen about viscous damping of the flesh and the thickness of the shell [K. Baik, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 133, 5-8 (2013)]. This Letter responds to those questions and provides practical insight into the model's use. PMID:24180749

  20. Laval nozzle as an acoustic analogue of a massive field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuyubamba, M. A.

    2013-10-01

    We study a gas flow in the Laval nozzle, which is a convergent-divergent tube that has a sonic point in its throat. We show how to obtain the appropriate form of the tube, so that the acoustic perturbations of the gas flow in it satisfy any given wave-like equation. With the help of the proposed method we find the Laval nozzle, which is an acoustic analogue of the massive scalar field in the background of the Schwarzschild black hole. This gives us a possibility to observe in a laboratory the quasinormal ringing of the massive scalar field, which, for special set of the parameters, can have infinitely long-living oscillations in its spectrum.

  1. Observation of induced longitudinal and shear acoustic phonons by Brillouin scattering.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Taisuke; Matsukawa, Mami; Yanagitani, Takahiko

    2011-06-01

    To improve the accuracy of velocity measurements in the Brillouin scattering technique using weak thermal phonons, we have used induced coherent phonons, which intensify the scattering. To induce phonons in the gigahertz range, we used a c-axis tilted ZnO film transducer that was developed in our laboratory. This allowed us to induce longitudinal and shear acoustic phonons effectively at hypersonic frequencies. As a result, we obtained scattered light in the silica glass sample that was much more intense than that obtained from the thermal phonons. Because the Brillouin scattering from induced phonons was measured, the shift frequency was that of the electric signal applied to the ZnO transducer. Strong peaks lead to a reduction of the measurement time. This is useful for two-dimensional mapping of thin film elasticity using Brillouin scattering. Additionally, Brillouin scattering enables the simultaneous measurement of longitudinal and shear phonon velocities in the sample plane. This opens up a potential new technique for non-destructive elasticity measurements of various materials. PMID:21693407

  2. Driven acoustic oscillations within a vertical magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hindman, Bradley W.; Zweibel, Ellen G.; Cally, P. S.

    1995-01-01

    The effects of a vertical magnetic field on p-mode frequencies, line widths, and eigenfunctions, are examined. A solar model, consisting of a neutrally stable polytropic interior matched to an isothermal chromosphere, is applied. The p-modes are produced by a spatially distributed driver. The atmosphere is threaded by a constant vertical magnetic field. The frequency shifts due to the vertical magnetic field are found to be much smaller than the shifts caused by horizontal fields of similar strength. A large vertical field of 2000 G produces shifts of several nHz. It is found that the frequency shifts decrease with increasing frequency and increase with field strength. The coupling of the acoustic fast mode to the escaping slow modes is inefficient. Constant vertical magnetic field models are therefore incapable of explaining the high level of absorption observed in sunspots and plage.

  3. Acoustic radiosity for computation of sound fields in diffuse environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muehleisen, Ralph T.; Beamer, C. Walter

    2002-05-01

    The use of image and ray tracing methods (and variations thereof) for the computation of sound fields in rooms is relatively well developed. In their regime of validity, both methods work well for prediction in rooms with small amounts of diffraction and mostly specular reflection at the walls. While extensions to the method to include diffuse reflections and diffraction have been made, they are limited at best. In the fields of illumination and computer graphics the ray tracing and image methods are joined by another method called luminous radiative transfer or radiosity. In radiosity, an energy balance between surfaces is computed assuming diffuse reflection at the reflective surfaces. Because the interaction between surfaces is constant, much of the computation required for sound field prediction with multiple or moving source and receiver positions can be reduced. In acoustics the radiosity method has had little attention because of the problems of diffraction and specular reflection. The utility of radiosity in acoustics and an approach to a useful development of the method for acoustics will be presented. The method looks especially useful for sound level prediction in industrial and office environments. [Work supported by NSF.

  4. Inversion of synthetic and experimental acoustical scattering data for the comparison of two reconstruction methods employing the Born approximation.

    PubMed

    Guillermin, R; Lasaygues, P; Sessarego, J P; Wirgin, A

    2001-03-01

    This work is concerned with the reconstruction, from measured (synthetic or real) data, of a 2D penetrable fluid-like object of arbitrary cross-section embedded in a fluid of infinite extent and insonified by a plane acoustic wave. Green's theorem is used to provide a domain integral representation of the scattered field. The introduction therein of the Born approximation gives rise to a linearized form of the inverse problem. The actual inversion is carried out by two methods. The first diffraction tomography (DT), exhibits the contrast function very conveniently and explicitly in the form of a wave number/incident angle Fourier transform of the far backscattered field and thus requires measurements of this field for incident waves all around the object and at all frequencies. The second discretized domain integral equation with Born approximation method, is numerically more intensive, but enables a wider choice of configurations and requires less measurements (one or several frequencies, one or several incident waves, choice of measurement points) than the DT method. A comparison of the two methods is carried out by inversion of both simulated and experimental scattered field data. PMID:11270630

  5. Nonlinear acoustic propagation in bubbly liquids: Multiple scattering, softening and hardening phenomena.

    PubMed

    Doc, Jean-Baptiste; Conoir, Jean-Marc; Marchiano, Régis; Fuster, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    The weakly nonlinear propagation of acoustic waves in monodisperse bubbly liquids is investigated numerically. A hydrodynamic model based on the averaged two-phase fluid equations is coupled with the Rayleigh-Plesset equation to model the dynamics of bubbles at the local scale. The present model is validated in the linear regime by comparing with the Foldy approximation. The analysis of the pressure signals in the linear regime highlights two resonance frequencies: the Minnaert frequency and a multiple scattering resonance that strongly depends on the bubble concentration. For weakly nonlinear regimes, the generation of higher harmonics is observed only for the Minnaert frequency. Linear combinations between the Minnaert harmonics and the multiple scattering resonance are also observed. However, the most significant effect observed is the appearance of softening-hardening effects that share some similarities with those observed for sandstones or cracked materials. These effects are related to the multiple scattering resonance. Downward or upward resonance frequency shifts can be observed depending on the characteristic of the incident wave when increasing the excitation amplitude. It is shown that the frequency shift can be explained assuming that the acoustic wave velocity depends on a law different from those usually encountered for sandstones or cracked materials. PMID:27106317

  6. Near resonance acoustic scattering from organized schools of juvenile Atlantic bluefin tuna (Thunnus thynnus).

    PubMed

    Weber, Thomas C; Lutcavage, Molly E; Schroth-Miller, Madeline L

    2013-06-01

    Schools of Atlantic bluefin tuna (Thunnus thynnus) can exhibit highly organized spatial structure within the school. This structure was quantified for dome shaped schools using both aerial imagery collected from a commercial spotter plane and 400 kHz multibeam echo sounder data collected on a fishing vessel in 2009 in Cape Cod Bay, MA. Observations from one school, containing an estimated 263 fish within an approximately ellipsoidal volume of 1900 m(3), were used to seed an acoustic model that estimated the school target strength at frequencies between 10 and 2000 Hz. The fish's swimbladder resonance was estimated to occur at approximately 50 Hz. The acoustic model examined single and multiple scattering solutions and also a completely incoherent summation of scattering responses from the fish. Three levels of structure within the school were examined, starting with fish locations that were constrained by the school boundaries but placed according to a Poisson process, then incorporating a constraint on the distance to the nearest neighbor, and finally adding a constraint on the bearing to the nearest neighbor. Results suggest that both multiple scattering and spatial organization within the school should be considered when estimating the target strength of schools similar to the ones considered here. PMID:23742334

  7. Field tests of acoustic telemetry for a portable coastal observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martini, M.; Butman, B.; Ware, J.; Frye, D.

    2006-01-01

    Long-term field tests of a low-cost acoustic telemetry system were carried out at two sites in Massachusetts Bay. At each site, an acoustic Doppler current profiler mounted on a bottom tripod was fitted with an acoustic modem to transmit data to a surface buoy; electronics mounted on the buoy relayed these data to shore via radio modem. The mooring at one site (24 m water depth) was custom-designed for the telemetry application, with a custom designed small buoy, a flexible electro-mechanical buoy to mooring joint using a molded chain connection to the buoy, quick-release electro-mechanical couplings, and dual hydrophones suspended 7 m above the bottom. The surface buoy at the second site (33 m water depth) was a U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) channel buoy fitted with telemetry electronics and clamps to hold the hydrophones. The telemetry was tested in several configurations for a period of about four years. The custom-designed buoy and mooring provided nearly error-free data transmission through the acoustic link under a variety of oceanographic conditions for 261 days at the 24 m site. The electro mechanical joint, cables and couplings required minimal servicing and were very reliable, lasting 862 days deployed before needing repairs. The acoustic communication results from the USCG buoy were poor, apparently due to the hard cobble bottom, noise from the all-steel buoy, and failure of the hydrophone assembly. Access to the USCG buoy at sea required ideal weather. ??2006 IEEE.

  8. Control of acoustic absorption in one-dimensional scattering by resonant scatterers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merkel, A.; Theocharis, G.; Richoux, O.; Romero-García, V.; Pagneux, V.

    2015-12-01

    We experimentally report perfect acoustic absorption through the interplay of the inherent losses and transparent modes with high Q factor. These modes are generated in a two-port, one-dimensional waveguide, which is side-loaded by isolated resonators of moderate Q factor. In symmetric structures, we show that in the presence of small inherent losses, these modes lead to coherent perfect absorption associated with one-sided absorption slightly larger than 0.5. In asymmetric structures, near perfect one-sided absorption is possible (96%) with a deep sub-wavelength sample ( λ / 28 , where λ is the wavelength of the sound wave in the air). The control of strong absorption by the proper tuning of the radiation leakage of few resonators with weak losses will open possibilities in various wave-control devices.

  9. Near-Field Acoustical Characterization of Clustered Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandula, Max; Vu, Bruce T.; Lindsay Halie K.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents an approach for the prediction and characterization of the near-field acoustic levels from closely-spaced clustered rocket engines. The calculations are based on the method proposed by Eldred, wherein the flowfield from the clustered rockets is divided into two zones. Zone 1 contains the isolated nozzles which produce noise independently, and extends up to a distance where the individual flows completely mix to form an equivalent single nozzle flow. Zone 2 is occupied by the single mixed stream starting from the station where the jets merge. The acoustic fields from the two zones are computed separately on the basis of the NASA-SP method of Eldred developed for a single equivalent nozzle. A summation of the spectra for the two zones yields the total effective sound pressure level for the clustered engines. Under certain conditions of nozzle spacing and flow parameters, the combined sound pressure level spectrum for the clustered nozzles displays a double peak. Test cases are presented here to demonstrate the importance of hydrodynamic interactions responsible for the double peak in the sound spectrum in the case of clustered rocket nozzles, and the role of ground reflections in the case of non-interfering jets. A graphics interface (Rocket Acoustic Prediction Tool) has been developed to take into account the effects of clustered nozzles and ground reflections.

  10. Strategies for single particle manipulation using acoustic and flow fields.

    PubMed

    Oberti, S; Möller, D; Neild, A; Dual, J; Beyeler, F; Nelson, B J; Gutmann, S

    2010-02-01

    Acoustic radiation forces have often been used for the manipulation of large amounts of micrometer sized suspended particles. The nature of acoustic standing wave fields is such that they are present throughout the whole fluidic volume; this means they are well suited to such operations, with all suspended particles reacting at the same time upon exposure. Here, this simultaneous positioning capability is exploited to pre-align particles along the centerline of channels, so that they can successively be removed by means of an external tool for further analysis. This permits a certain degree of automation in single particle manipulation processes to be achieved as initial identification of particles' location is no longer necessary, rather predetermined. Two research fields in which applications are found have been identified. First, the manipulation of copolymer beads and cells using a microgripper is presented. Then, sample preparation for crystallographic analysis by positioning crystals into a loop using acoustic manipulation and a laminar flow will be presented. PMID:19837446

  11. Acoustic Reflection and Transmission of 2-Dimensional Rotors and Stators, Including Mode and Frequency Scattering Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, Donald B.

    1999-01-01

    A reduced order modeling scheme has been developed for the unsteady acoustic and vortical coupling between blade rows of a turbomachine. The essential behavior of the system is governed by modal scattering coefficients (i.e., reflection and transmission coefficients) of the rotor, stator, inlet and nozzle, which are calculated as if they were connected to non-reflecting ducts. The objective of this report is to identify fundamental behavior of these scattering coefficients for a better understanding of the role of blade row reflection and transmission in noise generation. A 2D flat plate unsteady cascade model is used for the analysis with the expectation that the general behavior presented herein will carry over to models that include more realistic flow and geometry. It is shown that stators scatter input waves into many modes at the same frequency whereas rotors scatter on frequency, or harmonic order. Important cases are shown here the rotor reflection coefficient is greater than unity; a mode at blade passing frequency (BPF) traveling from the stator with unit sound power is reflected by the rotor with more than unit power at 2xBPF and 3xBPE Analysis is presented to explain this unexpected phenomenon. Scattering curves are presented in a format chosen for design use and for physical interpretation. To aid in interpretation of the curves, formulas are derived for special condition where waveforms are parallel to perpendicular to the rotor.

  12. Acoustic source localization in mixed field using spherical microphone arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Qinghua; Wang, Tong

    2014-12-01

    Spherical microphone arrays have been used for source localization in three-dimensional space recently. In this paper, a two-stage algorithm is developed to localize mixed far-field and near-field acoustic sources in free-field environment. In the first stage, an array signal model is constructed in the spherical harmonics domain. The recurrent relation of spherical harmonics is independent of far-field and near-field mode strengths. Therefore, it is used to develop spherical estimating signal parameter via rotational invariance technique (ESPRIT)-like approach to estimate directions of arrival (DOAs) for both far-field and near-field sources. In the second stage, based on the estimated DOAs, simple one-dimensional MUSIC spectrum is exploited to distinguish far-field and near-field sources and estimate the ranges of near-field sources. The proposed algorithm can avoid multidimensional search and parameter pairing. Simulation results demonstrate the good performance for localizing far-field sources, or near-field ones, or mixed field sources.

  13. The near-field acoustic levitation of high-mass rotors

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Z. Y.; Lü, P.; Geng, D. L.; Zhai, W.; Yan, N.; Wei, B.

    2014-10-15

    Here we demonstrate that spherical rotors with 40 mm diameter and 0-1 kg mass can be suspended more than tens of micrometers away from an ultrasonically vibrating concave surface by near-field acoustic radiation force. Their rotating speeds exceed 3000 rpm. An acoustic model has been developed to evaluate the near-field acoustic radiation force and the resonant frequencies of levitation system. This technique has potential application in developing acoustic gyroscope.

  14. The near-field acoustic levitation of high-mass rotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Z. Y.; Lü, P.; Geng, D. L.; Zhai, W.; Yan, N.; Wei, B.

    2014-10-01

    Here we demonstrate that spherical rotors with 40 mm diameter and 0-1 kg mass can be suspended more than tens of micrometers away from an ultrasonically vibrating concave surface by near-field acoustic radiation force. Their rotating speeds exceed 3000 rpm. An acoustic model has been developed to evaluate the near-field acoustic radiation force and the resonant frequencies of levitation system. This technique has potential application in developing acoustic gyroscope.

  15. The near-field acoustic levitation of high-mass rotors.

    PubMed

    Hong, Z Y; Lü, P; Geng, D L; Zhai, W; Yan, N; Wei, B

    2014-10-01

    Here we demonstrate that spherical rotors with 40 mm diameter and 0-1 kg mass can be suspended more than tens of micrometers away from an ultrasonically vibrating concave surface by near-field acoustic radiation force. Their rotating speeds exceed 3000 rpm. An acoustic model has been developed to evaluate the near-field acoustic radiation force and the resonant frequencies of levitation system. This technique has potential application in developing acoustic gyroscope. PMID:25362441

  16. Effects of Horizontal Magnetic Fields on Acoustic Travel Times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Rekha

    2007-02-01

    Local helioseismology techniques seek to probe the subsurface magnetic fields and flows by observing waves that emerge at the solar surface after passing through these inhomogeneities. Active regions on the surface of the Sun are distinguished by their strong magnetic fields, and techniques such as time-distance helioseismology can provide a useful diagnostic for probing these structures. Above the active regions, the fields fan out to create a horizontal magnetic canopy. We investigate the effect of a uniform horizontal magnetic field on the travel time of acoustic waves by considering vertical velocity in a simple plane-parallel adiabatically stratified polytrope. It is shown that such fields can lower the upper turning point of p-modes and hence influence their travel time. It is found that acoustic waves reflected from magnetically active regions have travel times up to a minute less than for waves similarly reflected in quiet regions. It is also found that sound speeds are increased below the active regions. These findings are consistent with time-distance measurements.

  17. Plateau structures in potential scattering in a strong laser field

    SciTech Connect

    Cerkic, A.; Milosevic, D.B.

    2004-11-01

    Electron-atom scattering in a strong laser field is analyzed using the strong-field approximation and modeling elastic scattering of electrons by atoms with a realistic analytical potential derived from an independent-particle model. The results that include both direct scattering and scattering with a repeated scattering (rescattering) are presented. In the latter case, in the intermediate step of the process, the electron can absorb the energy from the laser field and additional plateau structures appear. The features of these plateaus and their cutoffs are analyzed for various incident electron energies and scattering angles, for different laser intensities, and for various atomic gases. The boundaries of these plateaus are compared with classical estimates.

  18. Acoustic and Cavitation Fields of Shock Wave Therapy Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitnis, Parag V.; Cleveland, Robin O.

    2006-05-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) is considered a viable treatment modality for orthopedic ailments. Despite increasing clinical use, the mechanisms by which ESWT devices generate a therapeutic effect are not yet understood. The mechanistic differences in various devices and their efficacies might be dependent on their acoustic and cavitation outputs. We report acoustic and cavitation measurements of a number of different shock wave therapy devices. Two devices were electrohydraulic: one had a large reflector (HMT Ossatron) and the other was a hand-held source (HMT Evotron); the other device was a pneumatically driven device (EMS Swiss DolorClast Vet). Acoustic measurements were made using a fiber-optic probe hydrophone and a PVDF hydrophone. A dual passive cavitation detection system was used to monitor cavitation activity. Qualitative differences between these devices were also highlighted using a high-speed camera. We found that the Ossatron generated focused shock waves with a peak positive pressure around 40 MPa. The Evotron produced peak positive pressure around 20 MPa, however, its acoustic output appeared to be independent of the power setting of the device. The peak positive pressure from the DolorClast was about 5 MPa without a clear shock front. The DolorClast did not generate a focused acoustic field. Shadowgraph images show that the wave propagating from the DolorClast is planar and not focused in the vicinity of the hand-piece. All three devices produced measurable cavitation with a characteristic time (cavitation inception to bubble collapse) that varied between 95 and 209 μs for the Ossatron, between 59 and 283 μs for the Evotron, and between 195 and 431 μs for the DolorClast. The high-speed camera images show that the cavitation activity for the DolorClast is primarily restricted to the contact surface of the hand-piece. These data indicate that the devices studied here vary in acoustic and cavitation output, which may imply that the

  19. Acoustic experience shapes female mate choice in field crickets

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Nathan W; Zuk, Marlene

    2008-01-01

    Female choice can drive the evolution of extravagant male traits. In invertebrates, the influence of prior social experience on female choice has only recently been considered. To better understand the evolutionary implications of experience-mediated plasticity in female choice, we investigated the effect of acoustic experience during rearing on female responsiveness to male song in the field cricket Teleogryllus oceanicus. Acoustic experience has unique biological relevance in this species: a morphological mutation has rendered over 90 per cent of males on the Hawaiian island of Kauai silent in fewer than 20 generations, impeding females' abilities to locate potential mates. Females reared in silent conditions mimicking Kauai were less discriminating of male calling song and more responsive to playbacks, compared with females that experienced song during rearing. Our results to our knowledge, are the first demonstration of long-term effects of acoustic experience in an arthropod, and suggest that female T. oceanicus may be able to compensate for the reduced availability of long-range male sexual signals by increasing their responsiveness to the few remaining signallers. Understanding the adaptive significance of experience-mediated plasticity in female choice provides insight into processes that facilitate rapid evolutionary change and shape sexual selection pressure in natural populations. PMID:18700205

  20. Modeling of spray combustion in an acoustic field

    SciTech Connect

    Dubey, R.K.; McQuay, M.Q.; Carvalho, J.A. Jr.

    1998-07-01

    Combustion characteristics of an ethanol flame in a Rijke-tube, pulse combustor was theoretically studied to analyze the effects of injection velocity, burner location, droplet size distribution, surrounding gas velocity, and droplet phase difference on Sauter-mean diameter. The effects of these parameters were studied at first (80 Hz), second (160 Hz), and third (240 Hz) acoustic modes with steady (no oscillations) case as reference. The sound pressure level was kept constant at 150 decibels for all theoretical simulations. The simulation frequencies and sound pressure level was selected to match the actual conditions inside the rector. For all simulations, actual droplet size and velocity distributions, as experimentally measured using a phase-Doppler particle analyzer, at the injector exit were used. Significant effects on spray size distributions were found when the burning droplets were placed at the locations corresponding to the maximum acoustic velocity amplitude. Also, for both simulations and experimental results, the Sauter-mean diameters were higher for oscillating conditions compared to steady value because small droplets burn faster under an acoustic field and therefore, Sauter-mean diameter, which is biased towards larger droplets, increases.

  1. Acoustic experience shapes female mate choice in field crickets.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Nathan W; Zuk, Marlene

    2008-11-22

    Female choice can drive the evolution of extravagant male traits. In invertebrates, the influence of prior social experience on female choice has only recently been considered. To better understand the evolutionary implications of experience-mediated plasticity in female choice, we investigated the effect of acoustic experience during rearing on female responsiveness to male song in the field cricket Teleogryllus oceanicus. Acoustic experience has unique biological relevance in this species: a morphological mutation has rendered over 90 per cent of males on the Hawaiian island of Kauai silent in fewer than 20 generations, impeding females' abilities to locate potential mates. Females reared in silent conditions mimicking Kauai were less discriminating of male calling song and more responsive to playbacks, compared with females that experienced song during rearing. Our results to our knowledge, are the first demonstration of long-term effects of acoustic experience in an arthropod, and suggest that female T. oceanicus may be able to compensate for the reduced availability of long-range male sexual signals by increasing their responsiveness to the few remaining signallers. Understanding the adaptive significance of experience-mediated plasticity in female choice provides insight into processes that facilitate rapid evolutionary change and shape sexual selection pressure in natural populations. PMID:18700205

  2. On unique determination of partially coated polyhedral scatterers with far field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongyu; Zou, Jun

    2007-02-01

    This work is a continuation of our early study in Liu and Zou (2006 Uniqueness in an inverse acoustic obstacle scattering problem for both sound-hard and sound-soft polyhedral scatterers Inverse Problems 22 515-24 2006 Uniqueness in determining multiple polygonal or polyhedral scatterers of mixed type Technical Report 2006-03(337) The Chinese University of Hong Kong) and addresses the unique determination of partially coated polyhedral scatterers in {\\bb R}^N (N >= 2) along with their surface impedance from far field data. Two global uniqueness results are established for this inverse problem with a scatterer consisting of multiple solid polyhedra: the first one is to determine such a scatterer of mixed sound-soft and impedance type by a single incident plane wave and the other is to determine such a scatterer of mixed sound-soft, sound-hard and impedance type by N different incident waves in the N-dimensional case with N >= 3 and by only one incident wave for the two-dimensional case. Then we present some examples to show that as long as a scatterer admits the presence of (sound-hard) crack-type obstacles, then one cannot determine the scatterer uniquely by any less than N different incident plane waves. These examples also reveal that the uniqueness results achieved earlier in [15, 16] for polyhedral scatterers are optimal. Finally, the uniqueness results that have been solved or are still unsolved for the polyhedral-type scatterers with both solid and crack components are summarized in the conclusion.

  3. Computation of instantaneous and time-averaged active acoustic intensity field around rotating source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Yijun; Xu, Chen; Qi, Datong

    2015-02-01

    A vector aeroacoustics method is developed to analyze the acoustic energy flow path from the rotating source. In this method, the instantaneous and time-averaged active acoustic intensity vectors are evaluated from the time-domain and frequency-domain acoustic pressure and acoustic velocity formulations, respectively. With the above method, the acoustic intensity vectors and the acoustic energy streamlines are visualized to investigate the propagation feature of the noise radiated from the monopole and dipole point sources and the rotor in subsonic rotation. The result reveals that a portion of the acoustic energy spirals many circles before moving towards the far field, and another portion of the acoustic energy firstly flows inward along the radial direction and then propagates along the axial direction. Further, an acoustic black hole exists in the plane of source rotation, from which the acoustic energy cannot escape once the acoustic energy flows into it. Moreover, by visualizing the acoustic intensity field around the rotating sources, the acoustic-absorption performance of the acoustic liner built in the casing and centerbody is discussed.

  4. Investigations of diffuse sound fields using systematic changes in surface scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herder, John

    Systematically varying the surface scattering in an enclosure provides insight towards the impact of field diffusion on acoustic phenomena. Two independent studies are presented, each utilizing three distinct cases of field diffusion created through the introduction of boundary irregularities. First, dodecaspherical loudspeakers used in acoustic measurement exhibit non-uniform radiation. Also, the interaction of the source sound with room boundaries impacts the degree of energy interference and decay over time. As such, the amount of variation in sound pressure level and clarity over a grid of receivers is investigated with respect to stand-alone cases as well as the promotion of field diffusion. By sequentially expanding the extent of energy mixing in a volume, it is expected that variations in the acoustic parameters over an area will be reduced. Developing a consistent aural experience over a listening area is an important topic in room acoustics, so exploring the physical impact of field diffusion on sound field variance advances this aim. The second experiment reinforces a method for understanding the time arrival of diffuse sound fields in a volume. By systematically promoting greater diffusion, it is expected that the corresponding diffuse sound field will arrive earlier. The turning point property of experimental double sloped energy decays is investigated against a diffusion equation model, relating the valid range of the numerical model to the time onset of the diffuse sound field. In this way, the time arrival of the diffuse sound field is calculated in terms of the change in mean free time between cases. The effect of overall absorption is also discussed, reinforcing the validity of the outcome.

  5. Scattered field generation and optical forces in transformation optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novitsky, A. V.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we develop an approach for making various scattered electromagnetic fields on the transformation-optics ground. To do so, we use the a special coordinate transformation from the a vacuum virtual space to physical space, which changes the boundary of the scattering device upon transformation. We explore this approach for small scatterers compared with radiation wavelength, which allows us to predict the arbitrarily directed optical forces. Obtaining scattered fields and optical forces can be useful in nano-optics and optical micromanipulation.

  6. Acoustic beam scattering and excitation of sphere resonance: Bessel beam example.

    PubMed

    Marston, Philip L

    2007-07-01

    The exact partial wave series for the scattering by a sphere centered on an ideal Bessel beam was recently given by Marston ["Scattering of a Bessel beam by a sphere," J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 121, 753-758 (2007)]. That series is applied here to solid elastic spheres in water and to an empty spherical shell in water. The examples are selected to illustrate the effect of varying the beam's conical angle so as to modify the coupling to specific resonances in the response of each type of sphere considered. The backscattering may be reduced or increased depending on properties of the resonance and of the specular contribution. Changing the conical angle is equivalent to changing the beamwidth. Some applications of the Van de Hulst localization principle to the interpretation of the partial wave series and to the interpretation of the scattering dependence on the beam's conical angle are discussed. Some potential applications to the analysis of the scattering by spheres of more general axisymmetric beams are noted. PMID:17614484

  7. Measurements of high-frequency acoustic scattering from glacially eroded rock outcrops.

    PubMed

    Olson, Derek R; Lyons, Anthony P; Sæbø, Torstein O

    2016-04-01

    Measurements of acoustic backscattering from glacially eroded rock outcrops were made off the coast of Sandefjord, Norway using a high-frequency synthetic aperture sonar (SAS) system. A method by which scattering strength can be estimated from data collected by a SAS system is detailed, as well as a method to estimate an effective calibration parameter for the system. Scattering strength measurements from very smooth areas of the rock outcrops agree with predictions from both the small-slope approximation and perturbation theory, and range between -33 and -26 dB at 20° grazing angle. Scattering strength measurements from very rough areas of the rock outcrops agree with the sine-squared shape of the empirical Lambertian model and fall between -30 and -20 dB at 20° grazing angle. Both perturbation theory and the small-slope approximation are expected to be inaccurate for the very rough area, and overestimate scattering strength by 8 dB or more for all measurements of very rough surfaces. Supporting characterization of the environment was performed in the form of geoacoustic and roughness parameter estimates. PMID:27106331

  8. Fast computation of the acoustic field for ultrasound elements.

    PubMed

    Güven, H Emre; Miller, Eric L; Cleveland, Robin O

    2009-09-01

    A fast method for computing the acoustic field of ultrasound transducers is presented with application to rectangular elements that are cylindrically focused. No closed-form solutions exist for this case but several numerical techniques have been described in the ultrasound imaging literature. Our motivation is the rapid calculation of imaging kernels for physics-based diagnostic imaging for which current methods are too computationally intensive. Here, the surface integral defining the acoustic field from a baffled piston is converted to a 3-D spatial convolution of the element surface and the Green's function. A 3-D version of the overlap-save method from digital signal processing is employed to obtain a fast computational algorithm based on spatial Fourier transforms. Further efficiency is gained by using a separable approximation to the Green's function through singular value decomposition and increasing the effective sampling rate by polyphase filtering. The tradeoff between accuracy and spatial sampling rate is explored to determine appropriate parameters for a specific transducer. Comparisons with standard tools such as Field II are presented, where nearly 2 orders of magnitude improvement in computation speed is observed for similar accuracy. PMID:19811993

  9. Comparison of temporal and spectral scattering methods using acoustically large breast models derived from magnetic resonance images

    PubMed Central

    Hesford, Andrew J.; Tillett, Jason C.; Astheimer, Jeffrey P.; Waag, Robert C.

    2014-01-01

    Accurate and efficient modeling of ultrasound propagation through realistic tissue models is important to many aspects of clinical ultrasound imaging. Simplified problems with known solutions are often used to study and validate numerical methods. Greater confidence in a time-domain k-space method and a frequency-domain fast multipole method is established in this paper by analyzing results for realistic models of the human breast. Models of breast tissue were produced by segmenting magnetic resonance images of ex vivo specimens into seven distinct tissue types. After confirming with histologic analysis by pathologists that the model structures mimicked in vivo breast, the tissue types were mapped to variations in sound speed and acoustic absorption. Calculations of acoustic scattering by the resulting model were performed on massively parallel supercomputer clusters using parallel implementations of the k-space method and the fast multipole method. The efficient use of these resources was confirmed by parallel efficiency and scalability studies using large-scale, realistic tissue models. Comparisons between the temporal and spectral results were performed in representative planes by Fourier transforming the temporal results. An RMS field error less than 3% throughout the model volume confirms the accuracy of the methods for modeling ultrasound propagation through human breast. PMID:25096103

  10. Comparison of temporal and spectral scattering methods using acoustically large breast models derived from magnetic resonance images.

    PubMed

    Hesford, Andrew J; Tillett, Jason C; Astheimer, Jeffrey P; Waag, Robert C

    2014-08-01

    Accurate and efficient modeling of ultrasound propagation through realistic tissue models is important to many aspects of clinical ultrasound imaging. Simplified problems with known solutions are often used to study and validate numerical methods. Greater confidence in a time-domain k-space method and a frequency-domain fast multipole method is established in this paper by analyzing results for realistic models of the human breast. Models of breast tissue were produced by segmenting magnetic resonance images of ex vivo specimens into seven distinct tissue types. After confirming with histologic analysis by pathologists that the model structures mimicked in vivo breast, the tissue types were mapped to variations in sound speed and acoustic absorption. Calculations of acoustic scattering by the resulting model were performed on massively parallel supercomputer clusters using parallel implementations of the k-space method and the fast multipole method. The efficient use of these resources was confirmed by parallel efficiency and scalability studies using large-scale, realistic tissue models. Comparisons between the temporal and spectral results were performed in representative planes by Fourier transforming the temporal results. An RMS field error less than 3% throughout the model volume confirms the accuracy of the methods for modeling ultrasound propagation through human breast. PMID:25096103

  11. Particle trapping and transport achieved via an adjustable acoustic field above a phononic crystal plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, T.; Ke, M.; Qiu, C.; Liu, Z.

    2016-06-01

    We present the design for an acoustic system that can achieve particle trapping and transport using the acoustic force field above a phononic crystal plate. The phononic crystal plate comprised a thin brass plate with periodic slits alternately embedded with two kinds of elastic inclusions. Enhanced acoustic transmission and localized acoustic fields were achieved when the structure was excited by external acoustic waves. Because of the different resonant frequencies of the two elastic inclusions, the acoustic field could be controlled via the working frequency. Particles were transported between adjacent traps under the influence of the adjustable acoustic field. This device provides a new and versatile avenue for particle manipulation that would complement other means of particle manipulation.

  12. Near-field acoustical holography of military jet aircraft noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wall, Alan T.; Gee, Kent L.; Neilsen, Tracianne; Krueger, David W.; Sommerfeldt, Scott D.; James, Michael M.

    2010-10-01

    Noise radiated from high-performance military jet aircraft poses a hearing-loss risk to personnel. Accurate characterization of jet noise can assist in noise prediction and noise reduction techniques. In this work, sound pressure measurements were made in the near field of an F-22 Raptor. With more than 6000 measurement points, this is the most extensive near-field measurement of a high-performance jet to date. A technique called near-field acoustical holography has been used to propagate the complex pressure from a two- dimensional plane to a three-dimensional region in the jet vicinity. Results will be shown and what they reveal about jet noise characteristics will be discussed.

  13. Prediction of the Acoustic Field Associated with Instability Wave Source Model for a Compressible Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golubev, Vladimir; Mankbadi, Reda R.; Dahl, Milo D.; Kiraly, L. James (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This paper provides preliminary results of the study of the acoustic radiation from the source model representing spatially-growing instability waves in a round jet at high speeds. The source model is briefly discussed first followed by the analysis of the produced acoustic directivity pattern. Two integral surface techniques are discussed and compared for prediction of the jet acoustic radiation field.

  14. Highly Localized Acoustic Streaming and Size-Selective Submicrometer Particle Concentration Using High Frequency Microscale Focused Acoustic Fields.

    PubMed

    Collins, David J; Ma, Zhichao; Ai, Ye

    2016-05-17

    Concentration and separation of particles and biological specimens are fundamental functions of micro/nanofluidic systems. Acoustic streaming is an effective and biocompatible way to create rapid microscale fluid motion and induce particle capture, though the >100 MHz frequencies required to directly generate acoustic body forces on the microscale have traditionally been difficult to generate and localize in a way that is amenable to efficient generation of streaming. Moreover, acoustic, hydrodynamic, and electrical forces as typically applied have difficulty manipulating specimens in the submicrometer regime. In this work, we introduce highly focused traveling surface acoustic waves (SAW) at high frequencies between 193 and 636 MHz for efficient and highly localized production of acoustic streaming vortices on microfluidic length scales. Concentration occurs via a novel mechanism, whereby the combined acoustic radiation and streaming field results in size-selective aggregation in fluid streamlines in the vicinity of a high-amplitude acoustic beam, as opposed to previous acoustic radiation induced particle concentration where objects typically migrate toward minimum pressure locations. Though the acoustic streaming is induced by a traveling wave, we are able to manipulate particles an order of magnitude smaller than possible using the traveling wave force alone. We experimentally and theoretically examine the range of particle sizes that can be captured in fluid streamlines using this technique, with rapid particle concentration demonstrated down to 300 nm diameters. We also demonstrate that locations of trapping and concentration are size-dependent, which is attributed to the combined effects of the acoustic streaming and acoustic forces. PMID:27102956

  15. Acoustic backscatter measurements with a 153 kHz ADCP in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico: determination of dominant zooplankton and micronekton scatterers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ressler, Patrick H.

    2002-11-01

    A 153 kHz narrowband acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) was used to measure volume backscattering strength ( Sv) during a deepwater oceanographic survey of cetacean and seabird habitat in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. Sv was positively related to zooplankton and micronekton biomass (wet displacement volume) in 'sea-truth' net hauls made with a 1 m 2 Multiple Opening-Closing Net Environmental Sensing System (MOCNESS). A subset of these MOCNESS tows was used to explore the relationship between the numerical densities of various taxonomic categories of zooplankton and the ADCP backscatter signal. Crustaceans, small fish, and fragments of non-gas-bearing siphonophores in the net samples all showed significant, positive correlations with the acoustic signal, while other types of gelatinous zooplankton, pteropod and atlantid molluscs, and gas-filled siphonophore floats showed no significant correlation with Sv. Previously published acoustic scattering models for zooplankton were used to calculate expected scattering for several general zooplankton types and sizes for comparison with the field data. Even though gelatinous material often made up a large fraction of the total biomass, crustaceans, small fish, and pteropods were most likely the important scatterers. Since only crustacean and small fish densities were significantly correlated with Sv, it is suggested that Sv at 153 kHz can be used as a relative proxy for the abundance of these organisms in the Gulf of Mexico.

  16. Acoustic tracking of a freely drifting sonobuoy field.

    PubMed

    Dosso, Stan E; Collison, Nicole E B

    2002-05-01

    This paper develops an acoustic inversion algorithm to track a field of freely drifting sonobuoys using travel-time measurements from a series of nonsimultaneous impulsive sources deployed around the field. In this scenario, the time interval between sources can be sufficiently long that significant independent movement of the individual sonobuoys occurs. In addition, the source transmission instants are unknown, and the source positions and initial sonobuoy positions are known only approximately. The formulation developed here solves for the track of each sonobuoy (parametrized by the sonobuoy positions at the time of each source transmission), allowing arbitrary, independent sonobuoy motion between transmissions, as well as for the source positions and transmission instants. This leads to a strongly underdetermined inverse problem. However, regularized inversion provides meaningful solutions by incorporating a priori information consisting of prior estimates (with uncertainties) for the source positions and initial sonobuoy positions, and a physical model for preferred sonobuoy motion. Several models for sonobuoy motion are evaluated, with the best results obtained by minimizing the second spatial derivative of the tracks to obtain the minimum-curvature or smoothest track, subject to fitting the acoustic data to a statistically appropriate level. PMID:12051436

  17. Acoustic tracking of a freely drifting sonobuoy field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dosso, Stan E.; Collison, Nicole E. B.

    2002-05-01

    This paper develops an acoustic inversion algorithm to track a field of freely drifting sonobuoys using travel-time measurements from a series of nonsimultaneous impulsive sources deployed around the field. In this scenario, the time interval between sources can be sufficiently long that significant independent movement of the individual sonobuoys occurs. In addition, the source transmission instants are unknown, and the source positions and initial sonobuoy positions are known only approximately. The formulation developed here solves for the track of each sonobuoy (parametrized by the sonobuoy positions at the time of each source transmission), allowing arbitrary, independent sonobuoy motion between transmissions, as well as for the source positions and transmission instants. This leads to a strongly underdetermined inverse problem. However, regularized inversion provides meaningful solutions by incorporating a priori information consisting of prior estimates (with uncertainties) for the source positions and initial sonobuoy positions, and a physical model for preferred sonobuoy motion. Several models for sonobuoy motion are evaluated, with the best results obtained by minimizing the second spatial derivative of the tracks to obtain the minimum-curvature or smoothest track, subject to fitting the acoustic data to a statistically appropriate level.

  18. Field-theoretical description of deep inelastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Geyer, B.; Robaschik, D.; Wieczorek, E.

    1980-01-01

    The most important theoretical notions concerning deep inelastic scattering are reviewed. Topics discussed are the model-independent approach, which is based on the general principles of quantum field theory, the application of quantum chromodynamics to deep inelastic scattering, approaches based on the quark--parton model, the light cone algebra, and conformal invariance, and also investigations in the framework of perturbation theory.

  19. Plate Scattering Visualization: Images, Near Fields, Currents, and Far Field Patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaeffer, John; Hom, Kam

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a case study of a simple yet robust target for demonstration of the EM visualization process. A five lambda square plate exhibits many scattering mechanisms depending on excitation angle and polarization: specular scattering, leading and trailing edge diffraction, traveling wave, and edge wave scattering. Bistatic k space radiation images, currents maps, and near scattered / total fields are examined for each of these scattering mechanisms.

  20. Analysing collimator structure effects in head-scatter calculations for IMRT class fields using scatter raytracing.

    PubMed

    Naqvi, S A; Sarfaraz, M; Holmes, T; Yu, C X; Li, X A

    2001-07-01

    The frequent blocking of the irradiated volume in intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) makes the head-scatter fraction of the incident photon fluence more significant than that in conventional therapy with open fields. On the other hand. certain collimator configurations block scatter photons directed to a given observation point while allowing primary photons to be transmitted. The 'anomalous blocking' makes the primary field a poor indicator of the scatter fluence. Since large MU-to-cGy ratios in IMRT can magnify head-scatter uncertainties, it becomes necessary to accurately model both the effective scatter source and the collimator structure that limits the scatter reaching the irradiated volume. First we obtain a dual-source model, using a Taylor series expansion to derive the effective scatter source distribution from the data measured for the Elekta SL20 linac equipped with a multi-leaf collimator (MLC). Then, using a raytracing algorithm, we calculate the transmission of scatter rays from the effective scatter source plane to points in the patient plane. The method can account for the anomalous blocking of scatter by the MLC leaves and the backup diaphragms. For a variety of collimator settings tested, the calculations agree with measurements to an accuracy of 0.002psi10 x 10, where psi10 x 10 is the total (primary + scatter) photon fluence of an open 10 x 10 cm2 field for the same MU delivered. Although the significance of collimator structure in IMRT depends strongly on fields shapes employed for the delivery, potential cumulative errors on the order of a few per cent can be avoided in fluence calculations if the proposed method is used. PMID:11474941

  1. Nonlinear electron acoustic waves in presence of shear magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, Manjistha; Khan, Manoranjan; Ghosh, Samiran; Chakrabarti, Nikhil

    2013-12-15

    Nonlinear electron acoustic waves are studied in a quasineutral plasma in the presence of a variable magnetic field. The fluid model is used to describe the dynamics of two temperature electron species in a stationary positively charged ion background. Linear analysis of the governing equations manifests dispersion relation of electron magneto sonic wave. Whereas, nonlinear wave dynamics is being investigated by introducing Lagrangian variable method in long wavelength limit. It is shown from finite amplitude analysis that the nonlinear wave characteristics are well depicted by KdV equation. The wave dispersion arising in quasineutral plasma is induced by transverse magnetic field component. The results are discussed in the context of plasma of Earth's magnetosphere.

  2. Measurements and modeling of acoustic scattering from partially and completely buried spherical shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tesei, A.; Maguer, A.; Fox, W. L. J.; Lim, R.; Schmidt, H.

    2002-11-01

    The use of low-frequency sonars (2-15 kHz) is explored to better exploit scattering features of buried targets that can contribute to their detection and classification. Compared to conventional mine countermeasure sonars, sound penetrates better into the sediment at these frequencies, and the excitation of structural waves in the targets is enhanced. The main contributions to target echo are the specular reflection, geometric diffraction effects, and the structural response, with the latter being particularly important for man-made elastic objects possessing particular symmetries such as bodies of revolution. The resonance response derives from elastic periodic phenomena such as surface circumferential waves revolving around the target. The GOATS'98 experiment, conducted jointly by SACLANTCEN and MIT off the island of Elba, involved controlled monostatic measurements of scattering by spherical shells which were partially and completely buried in sand, and suspended in the water column. The analysis mainly addresses a study of the effect of burial on the dynamics of backscattered elastic waves, which can be clearly identified in the target responses, and is based on the comparison of measurements with appropriate scattering models. Data interpretation results are in good agreement with theory. This positive result demonstrates the applicability of low-frequency methodologies based on resonance analysis to the classification of buried objects. copyright 2002 Acoustical Society of America.

  3. Determination of the complex acoustic scattering matrix of a right-angled duct.

    PubMed

    Graf, Thomas; Pan, Jie

    2013-07-01

    A method for determining the complete higher-order scattering matrix of an acoustic discontinuity is developed. The method is demonstrated for a right-angled waveguide bend, and the magnitude and phase of the reflection and transmission coefficients are extracted precisely. The procedure is straightforward and based on the solutions to the Helmholtz equation by the finite element method (FEM). The consistency of the scattering coefficients found by this method is verified by their properties of symmetry, and their accuracy is established by the conservation of energy. The reliability of the new technique is further proved by means of an arbitrary sound source and by comparing the direct FEM response to the reflection matrix calculation. Some features of the scattering matrix as a function of frequency are surprising, such as the steps and reversion of the phase evolution or the complete loss of transmission of the incoming wave. The methodology detailed in this paper can be extended to other multiport junctions, such as T-junctions or size discontinuities in ducts. PMID:23862807

  4. Measurements and analysis of far-field scattering from a prolate spheroid. [considering jet engine noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayliss, A.; Maestrello, L.

    1977-01-01

    The far-field acoustic scattering by a prolate spheroid with axial point sources near the tip of the body was measured. Data were taken for ka between 10 - 160 where (a) is the semi-major axis of the spheroidal. Comparisons were made with numerical results obtained by an integral equation based on the simple source method, with appropriate coordinate stretching introduced to permit high frequency solutions with a minimal number of grid points. Theory and experiment agree within experimental error except for the highest frequencies in the shadow region, where very rapid changes in pressure make precise measurements difficult. The results show that for frequencies of aeroacoustic interest, the scattered field is very large and cannot be ignored.

  5. Study of acoustic field modulation in the regenerator by double loudspeakers method.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lihua; Xie, Xiujuan; Li, Qing

    2011-11-01

    A model to modulate acoustic field in a regenerator of a thermoacoustic system by the double loudspeakers method is presented in this paper. The equations are derived for acoustic field modulation. They represent the relations among acoustic field (complex pressure p(0), complex velocity u(0), and acoustic impedance Z(0)), driving parameters of loudspeakers (voltage amplitude and its phase difference), and operating parameters involved in a matrix H (frequency, temperature of regenerator). The range of acoustic field is adjustable and limited by the maximal driving voltages of loudspeakers according to driving parameters. The range is simulated and analyzed in the amplitude-phase and complex coordinate planes for a given or variable H. The simulated results indicate that the range has its intrinsic characteristics. The expected acoustic field in a regenerator can be obtained feasibly by the modulation. PMID:22087899

  6. Negative refractive index and acoustic superlens from multiple scattering in single negative metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaina, Nadège; Lemoult, Fabrice; Fink, Mathias; Lerosey, Geoffroy

    2015-09-01

    Metamaterials, man-made composite media structured on a scale much smaller than a wavelength, offer surprising possibilities for engineering the propagation of waves. One of the most interesting of these is the ability to achieve superlensing--that is, to focus or image beyond the diffraction limit. This originates from the left-handed behaviour--the property of refracting waves negatively--that is typical of negative index metamaterials. Yet reaching this goal requires the design of `double negative' metamaterials, which act simultaneously on the permittivity and permeability in electromagnetics, or on the density and compressibility in acoustics; this generally implies the use of two different kinds of building blocks or specific particles presenting multiple overlapping resonances. Such a requirement limits the applicability of double negative metamaterials, and has, for example, hampered any demonstration of subwavelength focusing using left-handed acoustic metamaterials. Here we show that these strict conditions can be largely relaxed by relying on media that consist of only one type of single resonant unit cell. Specifically, we show with a simple yet general semi-analytical model that judiciously breaking the symmetry of a single negative metamaterial is sufficient to turn it into a double negative one. We then demonstrate that this occurs solely because of multiple scattering of waves off the metamaterial resonant elements, a phenomenon often disregarded in these media owing to their subwavelength patterning. We apply our approach to acoustics and verify through numerical simulations that it allows the realization of negative index acoustic metamaterials based on Helmholtz resonators only. Finally, we demonstrate the operation of a negative index acoustic superlens, achieving subwavelength focusing and imaging with spot width and resolution 7 and 3.5 times better than the diffraction limit, respectively. Our findings have profound implications for the

  7. Negative refractive index and acoustic superlens from multiple scattering in single negative metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Kaina, Nadège; Lemoult, Fabrice; Fink, Mathias; Lerosey, Geoffroy

    2015-09-01

    Metamaterials, man-made composite media structured on a scale much smaller than a wavelength, offer surprising possibilities for engineering the propagation of waves. One of the most interesting of these is the ability to achieve superlensing--that is, to focus or image beyond the diffraction limit. This originates from the left-handed behavior--the property of refracting waves negatively--that is typical of negative index metamaterials. Yet reaching this goal requires the design of 'double negative' metamaterials, which act simultaneously on the permittivity and permeability in electromagnetics, or on the density and compressibility in acoustics; this generally implies the use of two different kinds of building blocks or specific particles presenting multiple overlapping resonances. Such a requirement limits the applicability of double negative metamaterials, and has, for example, hampered any demonstration of subwavelength focusing using left-handed acoustic metamaterials. Here we show that these strict conditions can be largely relaxed by relying on media that consist of only one type of single resonant unit cell. Specifically, we show with a simple yet general semi-analytical model that judiciously breaking the symmetry of a single negative metamaterial is sufficient to turn it into a double negative one. We then demonstrate that this occurs solely because of multiple scattering of waves off the metamaterial resonant elements, a phenomenon often disregarded in these media owing to their subwavelength patterning. We apply our approach to acoustics and verify through numerical simulations that it allows the realization of negative index acoustic metamaterials based on Helmholtz resonators only. Finally, we demonstrate the operation of a negative index acoustic superlens, achieving subwavelength focusing and imaging with spot width and resolution 7 and 3.5 times better than the diffraction limit, respectively. Our findings have profound implications for the

  8. Surface Acoustic Wave Scattering from an Array of Irregularities Comparable with a Wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yankin, Sergey S.; Suchkov, Sergey G.; Shatrova, Iuliia A.; Suchkov, Dmitry S.; Komkov, Sergey V.; Pilovets, Aleksey A.; Nikitov, Sergey A.

    The properly defined reflection, transmission and scattering coefficients were numerically evaluated as functions of the reflector's thickness, from infinitively small to comparable with wavelength. It was shown that these dependencies for projections are quasi-periodic and related to excitation of Eigen resonance modes in array of reflectors. In contrast to projections scattering from deep grooves does not have periodic behavior and with the depth's growth SAW scattering into volume increases while reflection coefficient doesn't reach more than 40%. The calculation of the 2D pattern of the scattered fields makes it possible to estimate the reflecting structures efficiency and clearly shows the range of the parameters for which an intensive SAW-energy radiation into the bulk occurs.

  9. Fresnel field interaction applied to scattering from a vegetation layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fung, A. K.; Chen, M. F.; Lee, K. K.

    1987-01-01

    Models for scattering from a vegetation layer treated as a collection of discrete scatterers usually assume far field interaction among scatterers. In a real vegetation medium such as a deciduous forest or a soybean field it is not always true that each leaf is in the far field of other leaves. This paper examines the additional effect when scatterers are permitted to be in the Fresnel zone of one another. Both disc-shaped and needle-shaped leaves are considered. It is found that in general this causes the backscattering coefficient to be lower for the disk-shaped leaves and may be higher or lower for the needle-shaped leaves depending upon polarization, incidence angle, and frequency than those computed under the assumption of conventional far field interaction.

  10. Iodine-starch clathrate complexes in low-field acoustic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadeev, G. N.; Boldyrev, V. S.; Ermolaeva, V. I.; Eliseeva, N. M.

    2013-01-01

    Experimental data on the kinetics of formation and decomposition of iodine-starch clathrate complexes (amyloiodine and amylopectoiodine) in low-frequency (5-45 Hz) acoustic fields are reported. The biological activity of these compounds suggests their use as a model of biocatalysts, in which iodine represents the coenzyme active group and starch homopolysaccharides (amylopectin and amylose) represents the apoenzyme.

  11. Unified theory of near-field analysis and measurement - Scattering and inverse scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wacker, P. F.

    1981-03-01

    The scanning procedures of unified theory of near-field analysis and measurement are adapted to the determination of scattering patterns of electromagnetic and scalar systems from measurements made in the near, intermediate, or far field, with emphasis on high accuracy and efficient data processing. The scanning procedures include spherical, improved plane polar, and many types of plane rectangular, plane radial, and circular cylindrical scanning. Application of group representation to inverse scattering analysis is discussed.

  12. Nonlinear acoustics: Reflection and refraction, scattering of sound by sound, and periodic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackstock, David T.

    1988-07-01

    Research on three topics in nonlinear acoustics is described: (1) reflection and refraction at a plane interface between two fluids. Previously a modified form of Snell's law was derived; theoretical work is underway to investigate assumptions on which the derivation was based, (2) scattering of sound by sound. Work on a single beam experiment and a crossed-beams experiment is in progress, and (3) propagation in periodic media. An experiment is being designed to measure finite-amplitude distortion in a plane wave tube loaded periodically with reactive branch elements. Other work, on noncollinear interaction and on biomedical ultrasonics, is described briefly. Two journal articles, five oral papers, and one technical report are listed.

  13. Combined Immersed-Boundary/High-Order Finite Difference Methods For Simulations of Acoustic Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arias-Ramirez, Walter; Olson, Britton; Wolf, William; Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Team; University of Campinas Team

    2015-11-01

    The suitability of a continuing forcing immersed boundary method (IBM) combined with a high-order finite difference method is examined on several acoustic scattering problems. A suite of two-dimensional numerical simulations of canonical cases are conducted with the aim of analyzing the error behavior associated with the IBM, through wave reflection, wave diffraction, and the shock-boundary layer interaction phenomena. The compressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved using the Miranda code developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Comparison of analytical solution against numerical results is shown for different flow parameters. Preliminary results indicate that the continuing forcing approach has the largest error in wave reflection compared to analytical solution. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  14. Acoustic phonons in chrysotile asbestos probed by high-resolution inelastic x-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Mamontov, Eugene; Vakhrushev, S. B.; Kumzerov, Yu. A,; Alatas, A.

    2009-01-01

    Acoustic phonons in an individual, oriented fiber of chrysotile asbestos (chemical formula Mg{sub 3}Si{sub 2}O{sub 5}(OH){sub 4}) were observed at room temperature in the inelastic x-ray measurement with a very high (meV) resolution. The x-ray scattering vector was aligned along [1 0 0] direction of the reciprocal lattice, nearly parallel to the long axis of the fiber. The latter coincides with [1 0 0] direction of the direct lattice and the axes of the nano-channels. The data were analyzed using a damped harmonic oscillator model. Analysis of the phonon dispersion in the first Brillouin zone yielded the longitudinal sound velocity of (9200 {+-} 600) m/s.

  15. Some far-field acoustics characteristics of the XV-15 tilt-rotor aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, Robert A.; Conner, David A.; Becker, Lawrence E.; Rutledge, C. Kendall; Smith, Rita A.

    1990-01-01

    Far-field acoustics tests have been conducted on an instrumented XV-15 tilt-rotor aircraft. The purpose of these acoustic measurements was to create an encompassing, high confidence (90 percent), and accurate (-1.4/ +1/8 dB theoretical confidence interval) far-field acoustics data base to validate ROTONET and other current rotorcraft noise prediction computer codes. This paper describes the flight techniques used, with emphasis on the care taken to obtain high-quality far-field acoustic data. The quality and extensiveness of the data base collected are shown by presentation of ground acoustic contours for level flyovers for the airplane flight mode and for several forward velocities and nacelle tilts for the transition mode and helicopter flight mode. Acoustic pressure time-histories and fully analyzed ensemble averaged far-field data results (spectra) are shown for each of the ground contour cases.

  16. Resonant raman scattering and dispersion of polar optical and acoustic phonons in hexagonal inn

    SciTech Connect

    Davydov, V. Yu. Klochikhin, A. A.; Smirnov, A. N.; Strashkova, I. Yu.; Krylov, A. S.; Lu Hai; Schaff, William J.; Lee, H.-M.; Hong, Y.-L.; Gwo, S.

    2010-02-15

    It is shown that a study of the dependence of impurity-related resonant first-order Raman scattering on the frequency of excitation light makes it possible to observe the dispersion of polar optical and acoustic branches of vibrational spectrum in hexagonal InN within a wide range of wave vectors. It is established that the wave vectors of excited phonons are uniquely related to the energy of excitation photon. Frequencies of longitudinal optical phonons E{sub 1}(LO) and A{sub 1}(LO) in hexagonal InN were measured in the range of excitation-photon energies from 2.81 to 1.17 eV and the frequencies of longitudinal acoustic phonons were measured in the range 2.81-1.83 eV of excitation-photon energies. The obtained dependences made it possible to extrapolate the dispersion of phonons A{sub 1}(LO) and E{sub 1}(LO) to as far as the point {Gamma} in the Brillouin zone and estimate the center-band energies of these phonons (these energies have not been uniquely determined so far).

  17. Numerical derivation of forces on particles and agglomerates in a resonant acoustic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knoop, Claas; Fritsching, Udo

    2013-10-01

    Particles and agglomerates are investigated in gaseous acoustic flow fields. Acoustic fields exert forces on solid objects, which can influence the shape of the exposed bodies, even to the point of breakage of the structures. Motivated by experimentally observed breakage of agglomerates in an acoustic levitator (f = 20 kHz), a numerical study is presented that derives the acoustic forces on a complex model agglomerate from the pressure and velocity fields of a resonant standing ultrasound wave, calculated by computational fluid dynamics (CFD). It is distinguished between the drag and lift/lateral forces on the overall agglomerate and on the different primary particles of the model.

  18. Orbital motions of bubbles in an acoustic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirota, Minori; Yamashita, Ko; Inamura, Takao

    2012-09-01

    This experimental study aims to clarify the mechanism of orbital motion of two oscillating bubbles in an acoustic field. Trajectory of the orbital motion on the wall of a spherical levitator was observed using a high-speed video camera. Because of a good repeatability in volume oscillation of bubbles, we were also able to observe the radial motion driven at 24 kHz by stroboscopic like imaging technique. The orbital motions of bubbles raging from 0.13 to 0.18 mm were examined with different forcing amplitude and in different viscous oils. As a result, we found that pairs of bubbles revolve along an elliptic orbit around the center of mass of the bubbles. We also found that the two bubbles perform anti-phase radial oscillation. Although this radial oscillation should result in a repulsive secondary Bjerknes force, the bubbles kept a constant separate distance of about 1 mm, which indicates the existence of centripetal primary Bjerknes force.

  19. Convergent acoustic field of view in echolocating bats.

    PubMed

    Jakobsen, Lasse; Ratcliffe, John M; Surlykke, Annemarie

    2013-01-01

    Most echolocating bats exhibit a strong correlation between body size and the frequency of maximum energy in their echolocation calls (peak frequency), with smaller species using signals of higher frequency than larger ones. Size-signal allometry or acoustic detection constraints imposed on wavelength by preferred prey size have been used to explain this relationship. Here we propose the hypothesis that smaller bats emit higher frequencies to achieve directional sonar beams, and that variable beam width is critical for bats. Shorter wavelengths relative to the size of the emitter translate into more directional sound beams. Therefore, bats that emit their calls through their mouths should show a relationship between mouth size and wavelength, driving smaller bats to signals of higher frequency. We found that in a flight room mimicking a closed habitat, six aerial hawking vespertilionid species (ranging in size from 4 to 21 g, ref. 5) produced sonar beams of extraordinarily similar shape and volume. Each species had a directivity index of 11 ± 1 dB (a half-amplitude angle of approximately 37°) and an on-axis sound level of 108 ± 4 dB sound pressure level referenced to 20 μPa root mean square at 10 cm. Thus all bats adapted their calls to achieve similar acoustic fields of view. We propose that the necessity for high directionality has been a key constraint on the evolution of echolocation, which explains the relationship between bat size and echolocation call frequency. Our results suggest that echolocation is a dynamic system that allows different species, regardless of their body size, to converge on optimal fields of view in response to habitat and task. PMID:23172147

  20. Acoustic scattering by circular cylinders of various aspect ratios. [pressure gradient microphones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maciulaitis, A.

    1979-01-01

    The effects of acoustic scattering on the useful frequency range of pressure gradient microphones were investigated experimentally between ka values of 0.407 and 4.232 using two circular cylindrical models (L/D = 0.5 and 0.25) having a 25 cm outside diameter. Small condenser microphones, attached to preamplifiers by flexible connectors, were installed from inside the cylindrical bodies, and flush mounted on the exterior surface of the cylinders. A 38 cm diameter woofer in a large speaker enclosure was used as the sound source. Surface pressure augmentation and phase differences were computed from measured data for various sound wave incidence angles. Results are graphically compared with theoretical predictions supplied by NASA for ka = 0.407, 2.288, and 4.232. All other results are tabulated in the appendices. With minor exceptions, the experimentally determined pressure augmentations agreed within 0.75 dB with theoretical predictions. The agreement for relative phase angles was within 5 percent without any exceptions. Scattering parameter variations with ka and L/D ratio, as computed from experimental data, are also presented.

  1. Spurious fields in time domain computations of scattering problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kangro, Urve; Nicolaides, Roy

    1995-01-01

    In this paper two-dimensional electromagnetic scattering problems with a time-periodic incident field are considered. The scatterer is a perfect conductor, and an artificial boundary condition is used. The large time behavior of solutions, depending on (divergence-free) initial conditions, is characterized. It turns out that in addition to the expected time-periodic solution the limiting solution may also contain a spurious stationary field. The source of the stationary field is explained and equations describing it are obtained. Several avoidance strategies are discussed, and numerical comparisons of these techniques are given.

  2. Study of multiple scattering in high magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, Daniel M.; Roberts, Thomas J.

    2013-02-01

    Muon cooling for a neutrino factory or muon collider can be achieved using low-Z absorbers in strong focusing fields. Proposed cooling lattices place absorbers in solenoidal fields ranging up to 30 to 40 T. The cooling performance of these lattices is determined by the interplay of ionization energy loss and Molière scattering, but Bethe's classic treatment of Moliere scattering ignores the helical motion of charged particles in solenoidal fields. When this motion is taken into account, the performance of these lattices can be better than predicted by simulations using the standard treatment.

  3. Plasmonic and photonic scattering and near fields of nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Martina; Andrae, Patrick; Manley, Phillip

    2014-01-01

    We theoretically compare the scattering and near field of nanoparticles from different types of materials, each characterized by specific optical properties that determine the interaction with light: metals with their free charge carriers giving rise to plasmon resonances, dielectrics showing zero absorption in wide wavelength ranges, and semiconductors combining the two beforehand mentioned properties plus a band gap. Our simulations are based on Mie theory and on full 3D calculations of Maxwell's equations with the finite element method. Scattering and absorption cross sections, their division into the different order electric and magnetic modes, electromagnetic near field distributions around the nanoparticles at various wavelengths as well as angular distributions of the scattered light were investigated. The combined information from these calculations will give guidelines for choosing adequate nanoparticles when aiming at certain scattering properties. With a special focus on the integration into thin film solar cells, we will evaluate our results. PMID:24475923

  4. Plasmonic and photonic scattering and near fields of nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We theoretically compare the scattering and near field of nanoparticles from different types of materials, each characterized by specific optical properties that determine the interaction with light: metals with their free charge carriers giving rise to plasmon resonances, dielectrics showing zero absorption in wide wavelength ranges, and semiconductors combining the two beforehand mentioned properties plus a band gap. Our simulations are based on Mie theory and on full 3D calculations of Maxwell’s equations with the finite element method. Scattering and absorption cross sections, their division into the different order electric and magnetic modes, electromagnetic near field distributions around the nanoparticles at various wavelengths as well as angular distributions of the scattered light were investigated. The combined information from these calculations will give guidelines for choosing adequate nanoparticles when aiming at certain scattering properties. With a special focus on the integration into thin film solar cells, we will evaluate our results. PMID:24475923

  5. The applicability of Brillouin scattering to flow field diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laiosa, J.; Lederman, S.

    1979-01-01

    To fill the void between turbulence theory and experiment; particularly in the flow fields consisting of monatomic gases, for example in wind tunnels, means of measuring fluctuating quantities are needed. In the area of density fluctuation measurement, the optical method of Brillouin scattering was suggested. This was based on the theory, that the Brillouin scattered intensity is proportional to a function of density. In this investigation the potential of this method as a diagnostic tool was studied. Here the density fluctuations in gases were sought. Continuous wave lasers and interferometers were used as the primary illuminating source and scattered light filters respectively.

  6. The reciprocity theorem for the scattered field is the progenitor of the generalized optical theorem.

    PubMed

    Douma, Huub; Vasconcelos, Ivan; Snieder, Roel

    2011-05-01

    By analyzing correlation-type reciprocity theorems for wavefields in perturbed media, it is shown that the correlation-type reciprocity theorem for the scattered field is the progenitor of the generalized optical theorem. This reciprocity theorem, in contrast to the generalized optical theorem, allows for inhomogeneous background properties and does not make use of a far-field condition. This theorem specializes to the generalized optical theorem when considering a finite-size scatterer embedded in a homogeneous background medium and when utilizing the far-field condition. Moreover, it is shown that the reciprocity theorem for the scattered field is responsible for the cancellation of non-physical (spurious) arrivals in seismic interferometry, and as such provides the mathematical description of such arrivals. Even though here only acoustic waves are treated, the presented treatment is not limited to such wavefields and can be generalized to general wavefields. Therefore, this work provides the framework for deriving equivalents of the generalized optical theorem for general wavefields. PMID:21568381

  7. Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The acoustics research activities of the DLR fluid-mechanics department (Forschungsbereich Stroemungsmechanik) during 1988 are surveyed and illustrated with extensive diagrams, drawings, graphs, and photographs. Particular attention is given to studies of helicopter rotor noise (high-speed impulsive noise, blade/vortex interaction noise, and main/tail-rotor interaction noise), propeller noise (temperature, angle-of-attack, and nonuniform-flow effects), noise certification, and industrial acoustics (road-vehicle flow noise and airport noise-control installations).

  8. Influence of pump wavelength and core size on stimulated Brillouin scattering spectra of acoustically antiguiding optical fibres

    SciTech Connect

    Likhachev, M E; Alekseev, V V; Bubnov, M M; Yashkov, M V; Vechkanov, N N; Gur'yanov, A N; Peyhambarian, N; Temyanko, V; Nagel, J

    2014-11-30

    Optical fibres having an acoustically antiguiding structure produced by alumina doping of their core have been fabricated and investigated. The stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) spectra of the fibres have been measured and calculated theoretically. The results demonstrate that the shape of the SBS spectrum of the acoustically antiguiding fibres strongly depends on the pump wavelength, core size and dopant profile across the fibre. A considerable broadening of the SBS gain spectrum is only possible at certain guidance parameters of the fibre and a fixed operating wavelength. (fibre and integrated-optical structures)

  9. Effect of tidal internal wave fields on shallow water acoustic propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ju; Wang, Huan; Sun, Junping

    2010-09-01

    Internal waves are one of the most pronounced oceanic phenomenons to the oceanographer. During past decades much effort has been made to investigate the effect of internal waves on shallow water acoustic propagation. Even though many field observations, such as SWARM '95, have provided fruitful information about the relation between internal waves and acoustic propagation, it is necessary to conduct more numerical simulations due to their extensive feasibility. In this study, the shallow water internal wave environment is constructed by using a non-hydrostatic ocean model, the open boundary forcing is set by considering single or several internal wave modes at the M2 tidal frequency. In order to show the mode coupling caused by the internal wave field more clearly, the acoustic starting field with different single normal modes is adopted. The acoustic simulation can be used to check whether a specific combination of internal wave modes is related to the mode coupling, and which mode pair will be affected. The combination of internal wave modes can be separated into several groups. Even though the internal wave fields are different among every case in each group, the acoustic field structure and the mode coupling are similar. Different acoustic normal mode coupling occurs due to the different combinations of internal wave mode forcing. When the parameters of internal wave mode are modified gently, the acoustic mode coupling becomes quite different. It is interesting and important to investigate the sensitivity of acoustic fields to the variability of the internal mode combination.

  10. The Dynamics of Vapor Bubbles in Acoustic Pressure Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hao, Y.; Prosperetti, A.

    1999-01-01

    In spite of a superficial similarity with gas bubbles, the intimate coupling between dynamical and thermal processes confers to oscillating vapor bubbles some unique characteristics. This paper examines numerically the validity of some asymptotic-theory predictions such as the existence of two resonant radii and a limit size for a given sound amplitude and frequency. It is found that a small vapor bubble in a sound field of sufficient amplitude grows quickly through resonance and continues to grow thereafter at a very slow rate, seemingly indefinitely. Resonance phenomena therefore play a role for a few cycles at most, and reaching a limit size-if one exists at all-is found to require far more than several tens of thousands of cycles. It is also found that some small bubbles may grow or collapse depending on the phase of the sound field. The model accounts in detail for the thermo-fluid-mechanic processes in the vapor. In the second part of the paper, an approximate formulation valid for bubbles small with respect to the thermal penetration length in the vapor is derived and its accuracy examined, The present findings have implications for acoustically enhanced boiling heat transfer and other special applications such as boiling in microgravity.

  11. Theoretical analysis of a cell's oscillations in an acoustic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, John S.; Zinin, Pavel

    2005-09-01

    The analysis and deformation of an individual cell in a high-frequency acoustic field is of fundamental interest for a variety of applications such as ultrasound cell separation and drug delivery. The oscillations of biological cells in a sound field are investigated using a shell model for the cell following an approach developed previously [Zinin, Ultrasonics, 30, 26-34 (1992)]. The model accounts for the three components which comprise the cell's motion: the internal fluid (cytoplasma), the cell membrane, and the surrounding fluid. The cell membrane whose thickness is small compared to the cell radius can be approximated as a thin elastic shell. The elastic properties of this shell together with the viscosities of the internal and external fluids determine the oscillations of the cell. The dipole oscillations of the cell depend on the surface area modulus and the maximum frequency for the relative change in cell area can be determined. Moreover, the higher order oscillations starting with the quadrupole oscillations are governed by the shell's shear modulus. Induced stresses in bacteria cell membranes in the vicinity of an oscillating bubble are investigated and cell rupture with respect to these stresses is analyzed.

  12. Measurements of the Absorption and Scattering Cross Sections for the Interaction of Solar Acoustic Waves with Sunspots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hui; Chou, Dean-Yi

    2016-05-01

    The solar acoustic waves are modified by the interaction with sunspots. The interaction can be treated as a scattering problem: an incident wave propagating toward a sunspot is scattered by the sunspot into different modes. The absorption cross section and scattering cross section are two important parameters in the scattering problem. In this study, we use the wavefunction of the scattered wave, measured with a deconvolution method, to compute the absorption cross section σ ab and the scattering cross section σ sc for the radial order n = 0–5 for two sunspots, NOAA 11084 and NOAA 11092. In the computation of the cross sections, the random noise and dissipation in the measured acoustic power are corrected. For both σ ab and σ sc, the value of NOAA 11092 is greater than that of NOAA 11084, but their overall n dependence is similar: decreasing with n. The ratio of σ ab of NOAA 11092 to that of NOAA 11084 approximately equals the ratio of sunspot radii for all n, while the ratio of σ sc of the two sunspots is greater than the ratio of sunspot radii and increases with n. This suggests that σ ab is approximately proportional to the sunspot radius, while the dependence of σ sc on radius is faster than the linear increase.

  13. Risk of a second cancer from scattered radiation in acoustic neuroma treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Myonggeun; Lee, Hyunho; Sung, Jiwon; Shin, Dongoh; Park, Sungho; Chung, Weon Kuu; Jahng, Geon-Ho; Kim, Dong Wook

    2014-06-01

    The present study aimed to compare the risk of a secondary cancer from scattered and leakage doses in patients receiving intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), and stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Four acoustic neuroma patients were treated with IMRT, VMAT, or SRS. Their excess relative risk (ERR), excess absolute risk (EAR), and lifetime attributable risk (LAR) of a secondary cancer were estimated using the corresponding secondary doses measured at various organs by using radio-photoluminescence glass dosimeters (RPLGD) placed inside a humanoid phantom. When a prescription dose was delivered in the planning target volume of the 4 patients, the average organ equivalent doses (OED) at the thyroid, lung, liver, bowel, bladder, prostate (or ovary), and rectum were 14.6, 1.7, 0.9, 0.8, 0.6, 0.6, and 0.6 cGy, respectively, for IMRT whereas they were 19.1, 1.8, 2.0, 0.6, 0.4, 0.4, and 0.4 cGy, respectively, for VMAT, and 22.8, 4.6, 1.4, 0.7, 0.5, 0.5, and 0.5 cGy, respectively, for SRS. The OED decreased as the distance from the primary beam increased. The thyroid received the highest OED compared to other organs. A lifetime attributable risk evaluation estimated that more than 0.03% of acoustic neuroma (AN) patients would get radiation-induced cancer within 20 years of receiving radiation therapy. The organ with the highest radiation-induced cancer risk after radiation treatment for AN was the thyroid. We found that the LAR could be increased by the transmitted dose from the primary beam. No modality-specific difference in radiation-induced cancer risk was observed in our study.

  14. Mott scattering in an elliptically polarized laser field

    SciTech Connect

    Attaourti, Y.; Manaut, B.; Taj, S.

    2004-08-01

    We study Mott scattering in the presence of a strong elliptically polarized field. Using the first Born approximation and the Dirac-Volkov states for the electron, we obtain an analytic formula for the unpolarized differential cross section. This generalizes the results found for the linearly polarized field by Li et al. [ 67, 063409 (2003)] and for the circularly polarized field by Attaourti and Manaut [ 68, 067401 (2003)].

  15. Tomographic reconstruction of transient acoustic fields recorded by pulsed TV holography.

    PubMed

    Gren, P; Schedin, S; Li, X

    1998-02-10

    Pulsed TV holography combined with computerized tomography (CT) are used to evaluate the three-dimensional distribution of transient acoustic fields in air. Experiments are performed with an electrical discharge between two electrodes as the sound source. Holograms from several directions of the acoustic field are recorded directly onto a CCD detector by use of a double-pulsed ruby laser as the light source. Phase maps, representing projections of the acoustic field, are evaluated quantitatively from the recorded holograms. The projections are used for the CT reconstruction to evaluate the pressure-field distribution in any cross section of the measured volume of air. PMID:18268660

  16. Mott scattering of polarized electrons in a strong laser field

    SciTech Connect

    Manaut, B.; Taj, S.; Attaourti, Y.

    2005-04-01

    We present analytical and numerical results of the relativistic calculation of the transition matrix element S{sub fi} and differential cross sections for Mott scattering of initially polarized Dirac particles (electrons) in the presence of a strong laser field with linear polarization. We use exact Dirac-Volkov wave functions to describe the dressed electrons and the collision process is treated in the first Born approximation. The influence of the laser field on the degree of polarization of the scattered electron is reported.

  17. Transient scattering from dielectric cylinders - E-field, H-field, and combined field solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vechinski, Douglas A.; Rao, Sadasiva M.

    1992-10-01

    In this work, the problem of transient scattering by arbitrarily shaped two-dimensional dielectric cylinders is solved using the marching-on-in-time technique. The dielectric problem is approached via the equivalence principle. Three different formulations, namely, the electric field integral equation formulation, the magnetic field integral equation formulation, and the combined field integral equation formulation are considered. Numerical results are presented for two cross sections, namely, a circle and a square, and compared with inverse discrete Fourier transform (IDFT) techniques. In each case, good agreement is obtained with the IDFT solution.

  18. Transient scattering from dielectric cylinders - E-field, H-field, and combined field solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vechinski, Douglas A.; Rao, Sadasiva M.

    1992-01-01

    In this work, the problem of transient scattering by arbitrarily shaped two-dimensional dielectric cylinders is solved using the marching-on-in-time technique. The dielectric problem is approached via the equivalence principle. Three different formulations, namely, the electric field integral equation formulation, the magnetic field integral equation formulation, and the combined field integral equation formulation are considered. Numerical results are presented for two cross sections, namely, a circle and a square, and compared with inverse discrete Fourier transform (IDFT) techniques. In each case, good agreement is obtained with the IDFT solution.

  19. Development of anticavitation hydrophone using a titanium front plate: Effect of the titanium front plate in high-intensity acoustic field with generation of acoustic cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiiba, Michihisa; Okada, Nagaya; Kurosawa, Minoru; Takeuchi, Shinichi

    2016-07-01

    Novel anticavitation hydrophones were fabricated by depositing a hydrothermally synthesized lead zirconate titanate polycrystalline film at the back of a titanium front plate. These anticavitation hydrophones were not damaged by the measurement of the acoustic field formed by a high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) device. Their sensitivity was improved by approximately 20 dB over that of the conventional anticavitation hydrophone by modifying their basic structure and materials. The durability of the anticavitation hydrophone that we fabricated was compared by exposing it to a high-intensity acoustic field at the focal point of the HIFU field and in the water tank of an ultrasound cleaner. Therefore, the effect of the surface of the titanium front plate on acoustic cavitation was investigated by exposing such a surface to the high-intensity acoustic field. We found that the fabricated anticavitation hydrophone was robust and was not damaged easily, even in the focused acoustic field where acoustic cavitation occurs.

  20. Inferences of Particle Size and Composition From Video-like Images Based on Acoustic Data: Grotto Plume, Main Endeavor Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bemis, K. G.; Rona, P. A.; Santilli, K.; Dastur, J.; Silver, D.

    2004-12-01

    Optical and acoustic scattering from particles in a seafloor hydrothermal plume can be related if the particle properties and scattering mechanisms are known. We assume Rayleigh backscattering of sound and Mie forward scattering of light. We then use the particle concentrations implicit in the observed acoustic backscatter intensity to recreate the optical image a camera would see given a particular lighting level. The motivation for this study is to discover what information on particle size and composition in the buoyant plume can be inferred from a comparison of the calculated optical images (based on acoustic data) with actual video images from the acoustic acquisition cruise and the IMAX film "Volcanoes of the Deep Sea" (Stephen Low Productions, Inc.). Because the geologists, biologists and oceanographers involved in the study of seafloor hydrothermal plumes all "see" plumes in different ways, an additional motivation is to create more realistic plume images from the acoustic data. By using visualization techniques, with realistic lighting models, we can convert the plume image from mechanical waves (sound) to electromagnetic waves (light). The resulting image depends on assumptions about the particle size distribution and composition. Conversion of the volume scattering coefficients from Rayleigh to Mie scattering is accomplished by an extinction scale factor that depends on the wavelengths of light and sound and on the average particle size. We also make an adjustment to the scattered light based on the particles reflectivity (albedo) and color. We present a series of images of acoustic data for Grotto Plume, Main Endeavour Field (within the Endeavour ISS Site) using both realistic lighting models and traditional visualization techniques to investigate the dependence of the images on assumptions about particle composition and size. Sensitivity analysis suggests that the visibility of the buoyant plume increases as the intensity of supplied light increases

  1. Frequency dependence of the acoustic field generated from a spherical cavity transducer with open ends

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Faqi; Zeng, Deping; He, Min; Wang, Zhibiao E-mail: wangzhibiao@haifu.com.cn; Song, Dan; Lei, Guangrong; Lin, Zhou; Zhang, Dong E-mail: wangzhibiao@haifu.com.cn; Wu, Junru

    2015-12-15

    Resolution of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) focusing is limited by the wave diffraction. We have developed a spherical cavity transducer with two open ends to improve the focusing precision without sacrificing the acoustic intensity (App Phys Lett 2013; 102: 204102). This work aims to theoretically and experimentally investigate the frequency dependence of the acoustic field generated from the spherical cavity transducer with two open ends. The device emits high intensity ultrasound at the frequency ranging from 420 to 470 kHz, and the acoustic field is measured by a fiber optic probe hydrophone. The measured results shows that the spherical cavity transducer provides high acoustic intensity for HIFU treatment only in its resonant modes, and a series of resonant frequencies can be choosen. Furthermore, a finite element model is developed to discuss the frequency dependence of the acoustic field. The numerical simulations coincide well with the measured results.

  2. Frequency dependence of the acoustic field generated from a spherical cavity transducer with open ends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Faqi; Song, Dan; Zeng, Deping; Lin, Zhou; He, Min; Lei, Guangrong; Wu, Junru; Zhang, Dong; Wang, Zhibiao

    2015-12-01

    Resolution of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) focusing is limited by the wave diffraction. We have developed a spherical cavity transducer with two open ends to improve the focusing precision without sacrificing the acoustic intensity (App Phys Lett 2013; 102: 204102). This work aims to theoretically and experimentally investigate the frequency dependence of the acoustic field generated from the spherical cavity transducer with two open ends. The device emits high intensity ultrasound at the frequency ranging from 420 to 470 kHz, and the acoustic field is measured by a fiber optic probe hydrophone. The measured results shows that the spherical cavity transducer provides high acoustic intensity for HIFU treatment only in its resonant modes, and a series of resonant frequencies can be choosen. Furthermore, a finite element model is developed to discuss the frequency dependence of the acoustic field. The numerical simulations coincide well with the measured results.

  3. Iterative solution of multiple radiation and scattering problems in structural acoustics using the BL-QMR algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Malhotra, M.

    1996-12-31

    Finite-element discretizations of time-harmonic acoustic wave problems in exterior domains result in large sparse systems of linear equations with complex symmetric coefficient matrices. In many situations, these matrix problems need to be solved repeatedly for different right-hand sides, but with the same coefficient matrix. For instance, multiple right-hand sides arise in radiation problems due to multiple load cases, and also in scattering problems when multiple angles of incidence of an incoming plane wave need to be considered. In this talk, we discuss the iterative solution of multiple linear systems arising in radiation and scattering problems in structural acoustics by means of a complex symmetric variant of the BL-QMR method. First, we summarize the governing partial differential equations for time-harmonic structural acoustics, the finite-element discretization of these equations, and the resulting complex symmetric matrix problem. Next, we sketch the special version of BL-QMR method that exploits complex symmetry, and we describe the preconditioners we have used in conjunction with BL-QMR. Finally, we report some typical results of our extensive numerical tests to illustrate the typical convergence behavior of BL-QMR method for multiple radiation and scattering problems in structural acoustics, to identify appropriate preconditioners for these problems, and to demonstrate the importance of deflation in block Krylov-subspace methods. Our numerical results show that the multiple systems arising in structural acoustics can be solved very efficiently with the preconditioned BL-QMR method. In fact, for multiple systems with up to 40 and more different right-hand sides we get consistent and significant speed-ups over solving the systems individually.

  4. Detection of in-plane displacements of acoustic wave fields using extrinsic Fizeau fiber interferometric sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhawan, R.; Gunther, M. F.; Claus, R. O.

    1991-01-01

    Quantitative measurements of the in-plane particle displacement components of ultrasonic surface acoustic wave fields using extrinsic Fizeau fiber interferometric (EFFI) sensors are reported. Wave propagation in materials and the fiber sensor elements are briefly discussed. Calibrated experimental results obtained for simulated acoustic emission events on homogeneous metal test specimens are reported and compared to previous results obtained using piezoelectric transducers.

  5. Modified ion-acoustic solitary waves in plasmas with field-aligned shear flows

    SciTech Connect

    Saleem, H.; Haque, Q.

    2015-08-15

    The nonlinear dynamics of ion-acoustic waves is investigated in a plasma having field-aligned shear flow. A Korteweg-deVries-type nonlinear equation for a modified ion-acoustic wave is obtained which admits a single pulse soliton solution. The theoretical result has been applied to solar wind plasma at 1 AU for illustration.

  6. Improving Classroom Acoustics (ICA): A Three-Year FM Sound Field Classroom Amplification Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenberg, Gail Gegg; Blake-Rahter, Patricia; Heavner, Judy; Allen, Linda; Redmond, Beatrice Myers; Phillips, Janet; Stigers, Kathy

    1999-01-01

    The Improving Classroom Acoustics (ICA) special project was designed to determine if students' listening and learning behaviors improved as a result of an acoustical environment enhanced through the use of FM sound field classroom amplification. The 3-year project involved 2,054 students in 94 general education kindergarten, first-, and…

  7. Estimation of biological parameters of marine organisms using linear and nonlinear acoustic scattering model-based inversion methods.

    PubMed

    Chu, Dezhang; Lawson, Gareth L; Wiebe, Peter H

    2016-05-01

    The linear inversion commonly used in fisheries and zooplankton acoustics assumes a constant inversion kernel and ignores the uncertainties associated with the shape and behavior of the scattering targets, as well as other relevant animal parameters. Here, errors of the linear inversion due to uncertainty associated with the inversion kernel are quantified. A scattering model-based nonlinear inversion method is presented that takes into account the nonlinearity of the inverse problem and is able to estimate simultaneously animal abundance and the parameters associated with the scattering model inherent to the kernel. It uses sophisticated scattering models to estimate first, the abundance, and second, the relevant shape and behavioral parameters of the target organisms. Numerical simulations demonstrate that the abundance, size, and behavior (tilt angle) parameters of marine animals (fish or zooplankton) can be accurately inferred from the inversion by using multi-frequency acoustic data. The influence of the singularity and uncertainty in the inversion kernel on the inversion results can be mitigated by examining the singular values for linear inverse problems and employing a non-linear inversion involving a scattering model-based kernel. PMID:27250181

  8. An immersed boundary computational model for acoustic scattering problems with complex geometries.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaofeng; Jiang, Yongsong; Liang, An; Jing, Xiaodong

    2012-11-01

    An immersed boundary computational model is presented in order to deal with the acoustic scattering problem by complex geometries, in which the wall boundary condition is treated as a direct body force determined by satisfying the non-penetrating boundary condition. Two distinct discretized grids are used to discrete the fluid domain and immersed boundary, respectively. The immersed boundaries are represented by Lagrangian points and the direct body force determined on these points is applied on the neighboring Eulerian points. The coupling between the Lagrangian points and Euler points is linked by a discrete delta function. The linearized Euler equations are spatially discretized with a fourth-order dispersion-relation-preserving scheme and temporal integrated with a low-dissipation and low-dispersion Runge-Kutta scheme. A perfectly matched layer technique is applied to absorb out-going waves and in-going waves in the immersed bodies. Several benchmark problems for computational aeroacoustic solvers are performed to validate the present method. PMID:23145603

  9. Acoustic scattering by elastic cylinders of elliptical cross-section and splitting up of resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Ancey, S. Bazzali, E. Gabrielli, P. Mercier, M.

    2014-05-21

    The scattering of a plane acoustic wave by an infinite elastic cylinder of elliptical cross section is studied from a modal formalism by emphasizing the role of the symmetries. More precisely, as the symmetry is broken in the transition from the infinite circular cylinder to the elliptical one, the splitting up of resonances is observed both theoretically and experimentally. This phenomenon can be interpreted using group theory. The main difficulty stands in the application of this theory within the framework of the vectorial formalism in elastodynamics. This method significantly simplifies the numerical treatment of the problem, provides a full classification of the resonances, and gives a physical interpretation of the splitting up in terms of symmetry breaking. An experimental part based on ultrasonic spectroscopy complements the theoretical study. A series of tank experiments is carried out in the case of aluminium elliptical cylinders immersed in water, in the frequency range 0 ≤ kr ≤ 50, where kr is the reduced wave number in the fluid. The symmetry is broken by selecting various cylinders of increasing eccentricity. More precisely, the greater the eccentricity, the higher the splitting up of resonances is accentuated. The experimental results provide a very good agreement with the theoretical ones, the splitting up is observed on experimental form functions, and the split resonant modes are identified on angular diagrams.

  10. Time-frequency analysis of the bistatic acoustic scattering from a spherical elastic shell.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Shaun D; Sabra, Karim G; Zakharia, Manell E; Sessarego, Jean-Pierre

    2012-01-01

    The development of low-frequency sonar systems, using, for instance, a network of autonomous systems in unmanned vehicles, provides a practical means for bistatic measurements (i.e., when the source and receiver are widely separated) allowing for multiple viewpoints of the target of interest. Time-frequency analysis, in particular, Wigner-Ville analysis, takes advantage of the evolution time dependent aspect of the echo spectrum to differentiate a man-made target, such as an elastic spherical shell, from a natural object of the similar shape. A key energetic feature of fluid-loaded and thin spherical shell is the coincidence pattern, also referred to as the mid-frequency enhancement (MFE), that results from antisymmetric Lamb-waves propagating around the circumference of the shell. This article investigates numerically the bistatic variations of the MFE with respect to the monostatic configuration using the Wigner-Ville analysis. The observed time-frequency shifts of the MFE are modeled using a previously derived quantitative ray theory by Zhang et al. [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 91, 1862-1874 (1993)] for spherical shell's scattering. Additionally, the advantage of an optimal array beamformer, based on joint time delays and frequency shifts is illustrated for enhancing the detection of the MFE recorded across a bistatic receiver array when compared to a conventional time-delay beamformer. PMID:22280581

  11. Acoustic quasi-holographic images of scattering by vertical cylinders from one-dimensional bistatic scans.

    PubMed

    Baik, Kyungmin; Dudley, Christopher; Marston, Philip L

    2011-12-01

    When synthetic aperture sonar (SAS) is used to image elastic targets in water, subtle features can be present in the images associated with the dynamical response of the target being viewed. In an effort to improve the understanding of such responses, as well as to explore alternative image processing methods, a laboratory-based system was developed in which targets were illuminated by a transient acoustic source, and bistatic responses were recorded by scanning a hydrophone along a rail system. Images were constructed using a relatively conventional bistatic SAS algorithm and were compared with images based on supersonic holography. The holographic method is a simplification of one previously used to view the time evolution of a target's response [Hefner and Marston, ARLO 2, 55-60 (2001)]. In the holographic method, the space-time evolution of the scattering was used to construct a two-dimensional image with cross range and time as coordinates. Various features for vertically hung cylindrical targets were interpreted using high frequency ray theory. This includes contributions from guided surface elastic waves, as well as transmitted-wave features and specular reflection. PMID:22225041

  12. On the Assessment of Acoustic Scattering and Shielding by Time Domain Boundary Integral Equation Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Fang Q.; Pizzo, Michelle E.; Nark, Douglas M.

    2016-01-01

    Based on the time domain boundary integral equation formulation of the linear convective wave equation, a computational tool dubbed Time Domain Fast Acoustic Scattering Toolkit (TD-FAST) has recently been under development. The time domain approach has a distinct advantage that the solutions at all frequencies are obtained in a single computation. In this paper, the formulation of the integral equation, as well as its stabilization by the Burton-Miller type reformulation, is extended to cases of a constant mean flow in an arbitrary direction. In addition, a "Source Surface" is also introduced in the formulation that can be employed to encapsulate regions of noise sources and to facilitate coupling with CFD simulations. This is particularly useful for applications where the noise sources are not easily described by analytical source terms. Numerical examples are presented to assess the accuracy of the formulation, including a computation of noise shielding by a thin barrier motivated by recent Historical Baseline F31A31 open rotor noise shielding experiments. Furthermore, spatial resolution requirements of the time domain boundary element method are also assessed using point per wavelength metrics. It is found that, using only constant basis functions and high-order quadrature for surface integration, relative errors of less than 2% may be obtained when the surface spatial resolution is 5 points-per-wavelength (PPW) or 25 points-per-wavelength squared (PPW2).

  13. Collective Thomson scattering measurements of the Ion Acoustic Decay Instability. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuno, K.; DeGroot, J.S.; Drake, R.P.; Seka, W.

    1993-12-31

    We have developed an uv collective Thomson scattering system for plasma produced by a short wavelength laser. The Ion Acoustic Decay Instabilities are studied in a large ({approximately}mm) scale, hot ({approximately}keV) plasma, which is relevant to a direct-driven laser fusion plasma. The IADI primary decay process is measured by the CTS. We used a random phase plate to minimize the non uniform irradiation of the interaction laser. Nevertheless, the threshold of the most unstable mode driven by the IADI is quite low. The measured threshold value agrees favorably with the theoretical value of the large scale plasma. We have also shown that the CTS from the IADI can be a good tool for measuring a local electron temperature. The measured results agree reasonably with the SAGE computer calculations. We used the real part of the wave (frequency) to estimate T{sub e}. The real part is, in general, reliable compared to the imaginary part such as the damping, and the growth rates. We have shown that the IADI can be easily excited in a large scale, hot plasma. The IADI has potentially important applications to direct drive laser fusion, and also critical surface diagnostic.

  14. Fully automatic hp-adaptivity for acoustic and electromagnetic scattering in three dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurtz, Jason Patrick

    We present an algorithm for fully automatic hp-adaptivity for finite element approximations of elliptic and Maxwell boundary value problems in three dimensions. The algorithm automatically generates a sequence of coarse grids, and a corresponding sequence of fine grids, such that the energy norm of the error decreases exponentially with respect to the number of degrees of freedom in either sequence. At each step, we employ a discrete optimization algorithm to determine the refinements for the current coarse grid such that the projection-based interpolation error for the current fine grid solution decreases with an optimal rate with respect to the number of degrees of freedom added by the refinement. The refinements are restricted only by the requirement that the resulting mesh is at most 1-irregular, but they may be anisotropic in both element size h and order of approximation p. While we cannot prove that our method converges at all, we present numerical evidence of exponential convergence for a diverse suite of model problems from acoustic and electromagnetic scattering. In particular we show that our method is well suited to the automatic resolution of exterior problems truncated by the introduction of a perfectly matched layer. To enable and accelerate the solution of these problems on commodity hardware, we include a detailed account of three critical aspects of our implementation, namely an efficient implementation of sum factorization, several efficient interfaces to the direct multi-frontal solver MUMPS, and some fast direct solvers for the computation of a sequence of nested projections.

  15. Burton-Miller-type singular boundary method for acoustic radiation and scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Zhuo-Jia; Chen, Wen; Gu, Yan

    2014-08-01

    This paper proposes the singular boundary method (SBM) in conjunction with Burton and Miller's formulation for acoustic radiation and scattering. The SBM is a strong-form collocation boundary discretization technique using the singular fundamental solutions, which is mathematically simple, easy-to-program, meshless and introduces the concept of source intensity factors (SIFs) to eliminate the singularities of the fundamental solutions. Therefore, it avoids singular numerical integrals in the boundary element method (BEM) and circumvents the troublesome placement of the fictitious boundary in the method of fundamental solutions (MFS). In the present method, we derive the SIFs of exterior Helmholtz equation by means of the SIFs of exterior Laplace equation owing to the same order of singularities between the Laplace and Helmholtz fundamental solutions. In conjunction with the Burton-Miller formulation, the SBM enhances the quality of the solution, particularly in the vicinity of the corresponding interior eigenfrequencies. Numerical illustrations demonstrate efficiency and accuracy of the present scheme on some benchmark examples under 2D and 3D unbounded domains in comparison with the analytical solutions, the boundary element solutions and Dirichlet-to-Neumann finite element solutions.

  16. Scattering effects induced by imperfections on an acoustic black hole placed at a structural waveguide termination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denis, V.; Pelat, A.; Gautier, F.

    2016-02-01

    The so-called "acoustic black hole" (ABH) effect is a passive vibration control technique based on the flexural waves properties in thin structure of varying thickness. A usual implementation consists in using a plate with tapered extremity with a power-law profile, covered with a thin damping layer. The inhomogeneity of the structure leads to a decrease of flexural wave speed and an increase of their amplitude, therefore resulting in an efficient energy dissipation if damping layer is placed where the thickness is minimal. The manufacture of an efficient extremity is difficult because of the small thickness, and often generates imperfections and tearing. Moreover, previous works suggest that multiple flexural modes are propagating across the width of the ABH tip. A model of an ABH multimodal waveguide taking into account an imperfect termination is developed. It shows that an elementary imperfection can affect the reflection coefficient of the extremity and reduce it. Scattering and propagation properties of the extremity are also studied. An incident mode excites several modes that are localised in the tapered region and local resonances explain the drops in the reflection coefficient. Experimental evidence of the influence of the imperfection on the reflection coefficient is provided. A key result of the paper is that manufacturing imperfections are not detrimental to the ABH effect.

  17. Concurrent identification of aero-acoustic scattering and noise sources at a flow duct singularity in low Mach number flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sovardi, Carlo; Jaensch, Stefan; Polifke, Wolfgang

    2016-09-01

    A numerical method to concurrently characterize both aeroacoustic scattering and noise sources at a duct singularity is presented. This approach combines Large Eddy Simulation (LES) with techniques of System Identification (SI): In a first step, a highly resolved LES with external broadband acoustic excitation is carried out. Subsequently, time series data extracted from the LES are post-processed by means of SI to model both acoustic propagation and noise generation. The present work studies the aero-acoustic characteristics of an orifice placed in a duct at low flow Mach numbers with the "LES-SI" method. Parametric SI based on the Box-Jenkins mathematical structure is employed, with a prediction error approach that utilizes correlation analysis of the output residuals to avoid overfitting. Uncertainties of model parameters due to the finite length of times series are quantified in terms of confidence intervals. Numerical results for acoustic scattering matrices and power spectral densities of broad-band noise are validated against experimental measurements over a wide range of frequencies below the cut-off frequency of the duct.

  18. Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Jerry R.; Grosveld, Ferdinand

    2007-01-01

    The acoustics environment in space operations is important to maintain at manageable levels so that the crewperson can remain safe, functional, effective, and reasonably comfortable. High acoustic levels can produce temporary or permanent hearing loss, or cause other physiological symptoms such as auditory pain, headaches, discomfort, strain in the vocal cords, or fatigue. Noise is defined as undesirable sound. Excessive noise may result in psychological effects such as irritability, inability to concentrate, decrease in productivity, annoyance, errors in judgment, and distraction. A noisy environment can also result in the inability to sleep, or sleep well. Elevated noise levels can affect the ability to communicate, understand what is being said, hear what is going on in the environment, degrade crew performance and operations, and create habitability concerns. Superfluous noise emissions can also create the inability to hear alarms or other important auditory cues such as an equipment malfunctioning. Recent space flight experience, evaluations of the requirements in crew habitable areas, and lessons learned (Goodman 2003; Allen and Goodman 2003; Pilkinton 2003; Grosveld et al. 2003) show the importance of maintaining an acceptable acoustics environment. This is best accomplished by having a high-quality set of limits/requirements early in the program, the "designing in" of acoustics in the development of hardware and systems, and by monitoring, testing and verifying the levels to ensure that they are acceptable.

  19. Mie scattering of highly focused, scalar fields: an analytic approach.

    PubMed

    Moore, Nicole J; Alonso, Miguel A

    2016-07-01

    We present a method for modeling the scattering of a focused scalar field incident on a spherical particle. This approach involves the expansion of the incident field in an orthonormal basis of closed-form solutions of the Helmholtz equation which are nonparaxial counterparts of Laguerre-Gaussian beams. This method also allows for the analytic calculation of the forces and torques exerted on a particle at any position with respect to the beam's focus. PMID:27409679

  20. Coulomb field scattering in Born-Infeld electrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Tennant, Daniel

    2011-02-15

    In the context of Born-Infeld electrodynamics, the electromagnetic fields interact with each other via their nonlinear couplings. A calculation will be performed where an incoming electromagnetic plane wave scatters off a Coulomb field in the geometrical optics approximation. In addition to finding the first-order angle of deflection, exact solutions for the trajectory will also be found. The possibility of electromagnetic bound states will be discussed.

  1. Axial acoustic radiation force on a sphere in Gaussian field

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Rongrong; Liu, Xiaozhou Gong, Xiufen

    2015-10-28

    Based on the finite series method, the acoustical radiation force resulting from a Gaussian beam incident on a spherical object is investigated analytically. When the position of the particles deviating from the center of the beam, the Gaussian beam is expanded as a spherical function at the center of the particles and the expanded coefficients of the Gaussian beam is calculated. The analytical expression of the acoustic radiation force on spherical particles deviating from the Gaussian beam center is deduced. The acoustic radiation force affected by the acoustic frequency and the offset distance from the Gaussian beam center is investigated. Results have been presented for Gaussian beams with different wavelengths and it has been shown that the interaction of a Gaussian beam with a sphere can result in attractive axial force under specific operational conditions. Results indicate the capability of manipulating and separating spherical spheres based on their mechanical and acoustical properties, the results provided here may provide a theoretical basis for development of single-beam acoustical tweezers.

  2. Blind source separation based on time-frequency morphological characteristics for rigid acoustic scattering by underwater objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yang; Li, Xiukun

    2016-06-01

    Separation of the components of rigid acoustic scattering by underwater objects is essential in obtaining the structural characteristics of such objects. To overcome the problem of rigid structures appearing to have the same spectral structure in the time domain, time-frequency Blind Source Separation (BSS) can be used in combination with image morphology to separate the rigid scattering components of different objects. Based on a highlight model, the separation of the rigid scattering structure of objects with time-frequency distribution is deduced. Using a morphological filter, different characteristics in a Wigner-Ville Distribution (WVD) observed for single auto term and cross terms can be simplified to remove any cross-term interference. By selecting time and frequency points of the auto terms signal, the accuracy of BSS can be improved. An experimental simulation has been used, with changes in the pulse width of the transmitted signal, the relative amplitude and the time delay parameter, in order to analyzing the feasibility of this new method. Simulation results show that the new method is not only able to separate rigid scattering components, but can also separate the components when elastic scattering and rigid scattering exist at the same time. Experimental results confirm that the new method can be used in separating the rigid scattering structure of underwater objects.

  3. Blind source separation based on time-frequency morphological characteristics for rigid acoustic scattering by underwater objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yang; Li, Xiukun

    2016-04-01

    Separation of the components of rigid acoustic scattering by underwater objects is essential in obtaining the structural characteristics of such objects. To overcome the problem of rigid structures appearing to have the same spectral structure in the time domain, time-frequency Blind Source Separation (BSS) can be used in combination with image morphology to separate the rigid scattering components of different objects. Based on a highlight model, the separation of the rigid scattering structure of objects with time-frequency distribution is deduced. Using a morphological filter, different characteristics in a Wigner-Ville Distribution (WVD) observed for single auto term and cross terms can be simplified to remove any cross-term interference. By selecting time and frequency points of the auto terms signal, the accuracy of BSS can be improved. An experimental simulation has been used, with changes in the pulse width of the transmitted signal, the relative amplitude and the time delay parameter, in order to analyzing the feasibility of this new method. Simulation results show that the new method is not only able to separate rigid scattering components, but can also separate the components when elastic scattering and rigid scattering exist at the same time. Experimental results confirm that the new method can be used in separating the rigid scattering structure of underwater objects.

  4. Dynamics of Dollard asymptotic variables. Asymptotic fields in Coulomb scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morchio, G.; Strocchi, F.

    2016-03-01

    Generalizing Dollard’s strategy, we investigate the structure of the scattering theory associated to any large time reference dynamics UD(t) allowing for the existence of Møller operators. We show that (for each scattering channel) UD(t) uniquely identifies, for t →±∞, asymptotic dynamics U±(t); they are unitary groups acting on the scattering spaces, satisfy the Møller interpolation formulas and are interpolated by the S-matrix. In view of the application to field theory models, we extend the result to the adiabatic procedure. In the Heisenberg picture, asymptotic variables are obtained as LSZ-like limits of Heisenberg variables; their time evolution is induced by U±(t), which replace the usual free asymptotic dynamics. On the asymptotic states, (for each channel) the Hamiltonian can by written in terms of the asymptotic variables as H = H±(qout/in,pout/in), H±(q,p) the generator of the asymptotic dynamics. As an application, we obtain the asymptotic fields ψout/in in repulsive Coulomb scattering by an LSZ modified formula; in this case, U±(t) = U0(t), so that ψout/in are free canonical fields and H = H0(ψout/in).

  5. Field observation of low-to-mid-frequency acoustic propagation characteristics of an estuarine salt wedge.

    PubMed

    Reeder, D Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    The estuarine environment often hosts a salt wedge, the stratification of which is a function of the tide's range and speed of advance, river discharge volumetric flow rate, and river mouth morphology. Competing effects of temperature and salinity on sound speed in this stratified environment control the degree of acoustic refraction occurring along an acoustic path. A field experiment was carried out in the Columbia River Estuary to test the hypothesis: the estuarine salt wedge is acoustically observable in terms of low-to-mid-frequency acoustic propagation. Linear frequency-modulated acoustic signals in the 500-2000 Hz band were transmitted during the advance and retreat of the salt wedge during May 27-29, 2013. Results demonstrate that the salt wedge front is the dominant physical mechanism controlling acoustic propagation in this environment: received signal energy is relatively stable before and after the passage of the salt wedge front when the acoustic path consists of a single medium (either entirely fresh water or entirely salt water), and suffers a 10-15 dB loss and increased variability during salt wedge front passage. Physical parameters and acoustic propagation modeling corroborate and inform the acoustic observations. PMID:26827001

  6. Reversible swarming and separation of self-propelled chemically powered nanomotors under acoustic fields.

    PubMed

    Xu, Tailin; Soto, Fernando; Gao, Wei; Dong, Renfeng; Garcia-Gradilla, Victor; Magaña, Ernesto; Zhang, Xueji; Wang, Joseph

    2015-02-18

    The collective behavior of biological systems has inspired efforts toward the controlled assembly of synthetic nanomotors. Here we demonstrate the use of acoustic fields to induce reversible assembly of catalytic nanomotors, controlled swarm movement, and separation of different nanomotors. The swarming mechanism relies on the interaction between individual nanomotors and the acoustic field, which triggers rapid migration and assembly around the nearest pressure node. Such on-demand assembly of catalytic nanomotors is extremely fast and reversible. Controlled movement of the resulting swarm is illustrated by changing the frequency of the acoustic field. Efficient separation of different types of nanomotors, which assemble in distinct swarming regions, is illustrated. The ability of acoustic fields to regulate the collective behavior of catalytic nanomotors holds considerable promise for a wide range of practical applications. PMID:25634724

  7. A modification of the factorization method for the classical acoustic inverse scattering problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirsch, Andreas; Liu, Xiaodong

    2014-03-01

    It is well-known that sampling type methods for solving inverse scattering problems fail if the wave number is an eigenvalue of a corresponding interior eigenvalue problem. By adding the far field patterns corresponding to an artificial ball lying within the obstacle and imposing an impedance boundary condition on the boundary of this ball we propose a modification of the factorization method which provides the characterization of the unknown obstacle for all wave numbers. Some numerical experiments are presented to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of our method.

  8. Influence of Acoustic Field Structure on Polarization Characteristics of Acousto-optic Interaction in Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muromets, A. V.; Trushin, A. S.

    Influence of acoustic field structure on polarization characteristics of acousto-optic interaction is investigated. It is shown that inhomogeneity of acoustic field and mechanism of ultrasound excitation causes changes in values of acousto-optic figure of merit for ordinary and extraordinary light beams in comparison with theoretic values. The theoretic values were derived under assumption that acoustic wave is homogeneous. Experimental analysis was carried out in acousto-optic cell based on lithium niobate crystal where the acoustic wave propagates at the angle 13 degrees to Z axis of the crystal. We used three different methods of ultrasound generation in the crystal: by means of external piezotransducer, by interdigital transducer and by two sets of electrodes placed on top of the crystal surface. In the latter case, the first pair of the electrodes was directed along X crystal axis, while the second pair of the electrodes was directed orthogonally to X crystal axis and the direction of ultrasound. Obtained values for diffraction efficiencies for ordinary and extraordinary polarized optical beams were qualitatively different which may be caused by spatial inhomogeneity of the generated acoustic waves in the crystal. Structure of acoustic field generated by these sets of electrodes was examined by laser probing. We performed the analysis of the acoustic field intensity using acousto-optic method. A relation of diffraction efficiencies for ordinary and extraordinary light waves was measured during each iteration of the laser probing.

  9. Underwater hybrid near-field acoustical holography based on the measurement of vector hydrophone array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Bo; Yang, Desen; Sun, Yu

    2010-06-01

    Hybrid near-field acoustical holography (NAH) is developed for reconstructing acoustic radiation from a cylindrical source in a complex underwater environment. In hybrid NAH, we combine statistically optimized near-field acoustical holography (SONAH) and broadband acoustical holography from intensity measurements (BAHIM) to reconstruct the underwater cylindrical source field. First, the BAHIM is utilized to regenerate as much acoustic pressures on the hologram surface as necessary, and then the acoustic pressures are taken as input to the formulation implemented numerically by SONAH. The main advantages of this technology are that the complex pressure on the hologram surface can be reconstructed without reference signal, and the measurement array can be smaller than the source, thus the practicability and efficiency of this technology are greatly enhanced. Numerical examples of a cylindrical source are demonstrated. Test results show that hybrid NAH can yield a more accurate reconstruction than conventional NAH. Then, an experiment has been carried out with a vector hydrophone array. The experimental results show the advantage of hybrid NAH in the reconstruction of an acoustic field and the feasibility of using a vector hydrophone array in an underwater NAH measurement, as well as the identification and localization of noise sources.

  10. Acoustic backscattering enhancements for circular elastic plates and acrylic targets, the application of acoustic holography to the study of scattering from planar elastic objects, and other research on the radiation of sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hefner, Brian Todd

    2000-08-01

    Backscattering enhancements on both circular elastic plates and acrylic targets are investigated as well as several techniques for the study of the radiation of sound. For sound scattered from a circular plate, two backscattering enhancements associated with the extensional wave are observed. The first of these enhancements involves extensional wave excitation along the diameter of the plate. When the extensional wave strikes the plate edge, reflection occurs which produces radiation into the backscattering direction. For those portions of the leaky wave which strike the edge at oblique incidence, there is mode conversion into a trapped shear wave. For certain angles of incidence on the plate edge, this wave can undergo multiple reflections and convert back into a leaky wave directed in the backscattering direction. Each of these enhancements are modeled using quantitative ray methods. Acoustic holography is also used to image the surface motion of the plate to identify the causes of these enhancements and to assess the validity of the ray model. Backscattering enhancements associated with antisymmetric Lamb wave excitation are also investigated. Scattering at the first-order antisymmetric wave coupling angle is studied using acoustic holography. Significant mode- conversion between the zeroth and first-order antisymmetric waves is observed which plays a significant role in the scattering processes. Quantitative ray models were also used to examine the backscattering from acrylic targets. Polymer solids typically have shear and Rayleigh wave phase velocities which are less than the speed of sound in water. For solid acrylic spheres, low frequency resonances are observed both experimentally and in the exact backscattering form functions which are due to coupling between the incident field and the subsonic Rayleigh wave on the sphere. The effects of material absorption, which is generally high in polymers, is examined in both the exact solutions and the quantitative

  11. Controlled and in situ target strengths of the jumbo squid Dosidicus gigas and identification of potential acoustic scattering sources.

    PubMed

    Benoit-Bird, Kelly J; Gilly, William F; Au, Whitlow W L; Mate, Bruce

    2008-03-01

    This study presents the first target strength measurements of Dosidicus gigas, a large squid that is a key predator, a significant prey, and the target of an important fishery. Target strength of live, tethered squid was related to mantle length with values standardized to the length squared of -62.0, -67.4, -67.9, and -67.6 dB at 38, 70, 120, and 200 kHz, respectively. There were relatively small differences in target strength between dorsal and anterior aspects and none between live and freshly dead squid. Potential scattering mechanisms in squid have been long debated. Here, the reproductive organs had little effect on squid target strength. These data support the hypothesis that the pen may be an important source of squid acoustic scattering. The beak, eyes, and arms, probably via the sucker rings, also play a role in acoustic scattering though their effects were small and frequency specific. An unexpected source of scattering was the cranium of the squid which provided a target strength nearly as high as that of the entire squid though the mechanism remains unclear. Our in situ measurements of the target strength of free-swimming squid support the use of the values presented here in D. gigas assessment studies. PMID:18345820

  12. Lift-Off Acoustics Prediction of Clustered Rocket Engines in the Near Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vu, Bruce; Plotkin, Ken

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation presents a method of predicting acoustics during lift-off of the clustered rocket engines in the near field. Included is a definition of the near field, and the use of deflectors and shielding. There is discussion about the use of PAD, a software system designed to calculate the acoustic levels from the lift of of clustered rocket enginee, including updates to extend the calculation to directivity, water suppression, and clustered nozzles.

  13. Acoustically Generated Flow and Temperature Fields in a Rectangular Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farouk, Bakhtier; Oran, Elaine

    1998-11-01

    Flows induced by a vibrating transducer in a gas-filled two-dimensional cavity are investigated by solving the two-dimensional compressible Navier-Stokes equations. The transducer (driver) is located along the left vertical wall of the cavity whereas the right rigid wall acts as an acoustic reflector. Both the left and right vertical walls of the cavity are considered to be conducting (isothermal) walls. The top and the bottom walls are insulated. The frequency of the driver was varied between 10 and 500 kHz. The length of the cavity was adjusted such that standing waves are formed within the cavity, which in turn create well defined vortical flows (acoustic streaming. The characteristics of the two-dimensional acoustically generated flows are studied systematically by varying the frequency and amplitude of the motion of the transducer and the aspect ratio of the cavity. The result exhibit organized flow structures within the cavity and the existence of lateral temperature gradients. Such acoustically induced temperature gradients are essential in the operation of thermoacoustic engines and refrigerators. The effect of cooling or heating the reflector wall on the acoustically generated flows are also investigated. Long time solutions of the governing equations exhibit the existence of pseudo-steady oscillatory flow conditions.

  14. Thomson scattering in magnetic fields. [of white dwarf stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitney, Barbara

    1989-01-01

    The equation of transfer in Thomson scattering atmospheres with magnetic fields is solved using Monte Carlo methods. Two cases, a plane parallel atmosphere with a magnetic field perpendicular to the atmosphere, and a dipole star, are investigated. The wavelength dependence of polarization from plane-parallel atmosphere is qualitatively similar to that observed in the magnetic white dwarf Grw+70 deg 8247, and the field strength determined by the calculation, 320 MG, is quantitatively similar to that determined from the line spectrum. The dipole model does not resemble the data as well as the single plane-parallel atmosphere.

  15. Towards the optimisation of acoustic fields for ablative therapies of tumours in the upper abdomen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gélat, P.; ter Haar, G.; Saffari, N.

    2013-08-01

    The efficacy of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) for the non-invasive treatment of cancer has been demonstrated for a range of different cancers including those of the liver, kidney, prostate and breast. As a non-invasive focused therapy, HIFU offers considerable advantages over other techniques such as chemotherapy and surgical resection, in terms of its non-invasiveness and low risk of harmful side effects. There is, however, a number of significant challenges which currently hinder its widespread clinical application. One of these challenges is the need to transmit sufficient energy through the ribcage to induce tissue necrosis at the required foci whilst minimising the formation of side lobes and sparing healthy tissue. Ribs both absorb and reflect ultrasound strongly. As such, a common side effect of focusing ultrasound in regions located behind the rib cage is the overheating of bone and surrounding tissue, which can lead to skin burns. Successful treatment of a patient with tumours in the upper abdomen therefore requires a thorough understanding of the way acoustic and thermal energy are deposited. This is likely to rely on a treatment planning procedure in which optimal source velocity distributions are obtained so as to maximise a dose quantity at the treatment sites, whilst ensuring that this quantity does not exceed a specified threshold at other field locations, particularly on the surface of the ribs. Previously, a boundary element approach based on a Generalised Minimal Residual (GMRES) implementation of the Burton-Miller formulation was developed to predict the field of a multi-element HIFU array scattered by human ribs, the topology of which was obtained from CT scan data [1]. This work describes the reformulation of the boundary element equations as a least-squares minimisation problem with non-linear constraints. The methodology was subsequently tested at an excitation frequency of 100 kHz on a spherical multi-element array in the presence

  16. Linac head scatter factor for asymmetric radiation field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soubra, Mazen Ahmed

    1997-11-01

    The head scatter factor, Sh is an important dosimetric quantity used in radiation therapy dose calculation. It is empirically determined and its field size dependence reflects changes in photon scatter from components in the linac treatment head. In this work a detailed study of the physical factors influencing the determination of Sh was performed with particular attention given to asymmetric field geometries. Ionization measurements for 6 and 18 MV photon beams were made to examine the factors which determine Sh. These include: phantom size and material, collimator backscatter, non-lateral electronic equilibrium (LEE) conditions, electron contamination, collimator-exchange, photon energy, flattening filter and off-axis distance (OAD). Results indicated that LEE is not required for Sh measurements if electron contamination is minimized. Brass caps or polystyrene miniphantoms can both be used in Sh measurements provided the phantom thickness is large enough to stop contaminant electrons. Backscatter radiation effects into the monitor chamber were found to be negligible for the Siemens linac. It was found that the presence and shape of the flattening filter had a significant effect on the empirically determined value of Sh was also shown to be a function of OAD, particularly for small fields. For fields larger than 12×12 cm2/ Sh was independent of OAD. A flattening filter mass model was introduced to explain qualitatively the above results. A detailed Monte Carlo simulation of the Siemens KD2 linac head in 6 MV mode was performed to investigate the sources of head scatter which contribute to the measured Sh. The simulated head components include the flattening filter, the electron beam stopper, the primary collimator, the photon monitor chamber and the secondary collimators. The simulations showed that the scatter from the head of the Siemens linac is a complex function of the head components. On the central axis the flattening filter played the dominant role in

  17. On the relationship between acoustic energy density flux near the jet axis and far field acoustic intensity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrello, L.

    1973-01-01

    By measurement and analysis, the relationship between the distribution of the outflow of acoustic energy over the jet boundary and the far-field intensity is considered. The physical quantity used is the gradient of the pressure evaluated on a geometrical plane at the smallest possible radial distance from the jet axis, but outside the vortical region, in the area where the homogeneous wave equation is reasonably well satisfied. The numerical and experimental procedures involved have been checked out by using a known source. Results indicate that the acoustic power output per unit length of the jet, in the region from which the sound emanates, peaks at approximately 9 diameters downstream. The acoustic emission for a jet Strouhal number of about 0.3 exceeds the emission for all other Strouhal numbers nearly everywhere along the measurement plane. However, the far-field peak intensity distribution obtained from the contribution of each station was found to depend on the spatial extent of the region where sound emanates from the jet, which, in turn, depends more on the far-field angle than on the Strouhal number.

  18. Acoustic Scattering by Three-Dimensional Stators and Rotors Using the SOURCE3D Code. Volume 1; Analysis and Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Harold D.

    1999-01-01

    This report provides a study of rotor and stator scattering using the SOURCE3D Rotor Wake/Stator Interaction Code. SOURCE3D is a quasi-three-dimensional computer program that uses three-dimensional acoustics and two-dimensional cascade load response theory to calculate rotor and stator modal reflection and transmission (scattering) coefficients. SOURCE3D is at the core of the TFaNS (Theoretical Fan Noise Design/Prediction System), developed for NASA, which provides complete fully coupled (inlet, rotor, stator, exit) noise solutions for turbofan engines. The reason for studying scattering is that we must first understand the behavior of the individual scattering coefficients provided by SOURCE3D, before eventually understanding the more complicated predictions from TFaNS. To study scattering, we have derived a large number of scattering curves for vane and blade rows. The curves are plots of output wave power divided by input wave power (in dB units) versus vane/blade ratio. Some of these plots are shown in this report. All of the plots are provided in a separate volume. To assist in understanding the plots, formulas have been derived for special vane/blade ratios for which wavefronts are either parallel or normal to rotor or stator chords. From the plots, we have found that, for the most part, there was strong transmission and weak reflection over most of the vane/blade ratio range for the stator. For the rotor, there was little transmission loss.

  19. Backcoupling of acoustic streaming on the temperature field inside high-intensity discharge lamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwieger, J.; Baumann, B.; Wolff, M.; Manders, F.; Suijker, J.

    2015-11-01

    Operating high-intensity discharge lamps in the high frequency range (20-300 kHz) provides energy-saving and cost reduction potentials. However, commercially available lamp drivers do not make use of this operating strategy because light intensity fluctuations and even lamp destruction are possible. The reason for the fluctuating discharge arc are acoustic resonances in this frequency range that are excited in the arc tube. The acoustic resonances in turn generate a fluid flow that is caused by the acoustic streaming effect. Here, we present a 3D multiphysics model to determine the influence of acoustic streaming on the temperature field in the vicinity of an acoustic eigenfrequency. In that case a transition from stable to instable behavior occurs. The model is able to predict when light flicker can be expected. The results are in very good accordance with accompanying experiments.

  20. An effective field theory for forward scattering and factorization violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothstein, Ira Z.; Stewart, Iain W.

    2016-08-01

    Starting with QCD, we derive an effective field theory description for forward scattering and factorization violation as part of the soft-collinear effective field theory (SCET) for high energy scattering. These phenomena are mediated by long distance Glauber gluon exchanges, which are static in time, localized in the longitudinal distance, and act as a kernel for forward scattering where | t| ≪ s. In hard scattering, Glauber gluons can induce corrections which invalidate factorization. With SCET, Glauber exchange graphs can be calculated explicitly, and are distinct from graphs involving soft, collinear, or ultrasoft gluons. We derive a complete basis of operators which describe the leading power effects of Glauber exchange. Key ingredients include regulating light-cone rapidity singularities and subtractions which prevent double counting. Our results include a novel all orders gauge invariant pure glue soft operator which appears between two collinear rapidity sectors. The 1-gluon Feynman rule for the soft operator coincides with the Lipatov vertex, but it also contributes to emissions with ≥ 2 soft gluons. Our Glauber operator basis is derived using tree level and one-loop matching calculations from full QCD to both SCETII and SCETI. The one-loop amplitude's rapidity renormalization involves mixing of color octet operators and yields gluon Reggeization at the amplitude level. The rapidity renormalization group equation for the leading soft and collinear functions in the forward scattering cross section are each given by the BFKL equation. Various properties of Glauber gluon exchange in the context of both forward scattering and hard scattering factorization are described. For example, we derive an explicit rule for when eikonalization is valid, and provide a direct connection to the picture of multiple Wilson lines crossing a shockwave. In hard scattering operators Glauber subtractions for soft and collinear loop diagrams ensure that we are not sensitive to

  1. Empirical and quadrature approximation of acoustic field and array response probability density functions.

    PubMed

    Hayward, Thomas J; Oba, Roger M

    2013-07-01

    Numerical methods are presented for approximating the probability density functions (pdf's) of acoustic fields and receiver-array responses induced by a given joint pdf of a set of acoustic environmental parameters. An approximation to the characteristic function of the random acoustic field (the inverse Fourier transform of the field pdf) is first obtained either by construction of the empirical characteristic function (ECF) from a random sample of the acoustic parameters, or by application of generalized Gaussian quadrature to approximate the integral defining the characteristic function. The Fourier transform is then applied to obtain an approximation of the pdf by a continuous function of the field variables. Application of both the ECF and generalized Gaussian quadrature is demonstrated in an example of a shallow-water ocean waveguide with two-dimensional uncertainty of sound speed and attenuation coefficient in the ocean bottom. Both approximations lead to a smoother estimate of the field pdf than that provided by a histogram, with generalized Gaussian quadrature providing a smoother estimate at the tails of the pdf. Potential applications to acoustic system performance quantification and to nonparametric acoustic signal processing are discussed. PMID:23862782

  2. An improved method for the calculation of Near-Field Acoustic Radiation Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zu-Bin; Maury, Cédric

    2016-02-01

    Sensing and controlling Acoustic Radiation Modes (ARMs) in the near-field of vibrating structures is of great interest for broadband noise reduction or enhancement, as ARMs are velocity distributions defined over a vibrating surface, that independently and optimally contribute to the acoustic power in the acoustic field. But present methods only provide far-field ARMs (FFARMs) that are inadequate for the acoustic near-field problem. The Near-Field Acoustic Radiation Modes (NFARMs) are firstly studied with an improved numerical method, the Pressure-Velocity method, which rely on the eigen decomposition of the acoustic transfers between the vibrating source and a conformal observation surface, including sound pressure and velocity transfer matrices. The active and reactive parts of the sound power are separated and lead to the active and reactive ARMs. NFARMs are studied for a 2D baffled beam and for a 3D baffled plate, and so as differences between the NFARMS and the classical FFARMs. Comparisons of the NFARMs are analyzed when varying frequency and observation distance to the source. It is found that the efficiencies and shapes of the optimal active ARMs are independent on the distance while that of the reactive ones are distinctly related on.

  3. Scattering detection of a solenoidal Poynting vector field.

    PubMed

    Fardad, Shima; Salandrino, Alessandro; Samadi, Akbar; Heinrich, Matthias; Chen, Zhigang; Christodoulides, Demetrios N

    2016-08-01

    The Poynting vector S plays a central role in electrodynamics as it is directly related to the power and the momentum carried by an electromagnetic wave. In the presence of multiple electromagnetic waves with different polarizations and propagation directions, the Poynting vector may exhibit solenoidal components which are not associated to any power flow. Here, we demonstrate theoretically and experimentally that the presence of such solenoidal components has physical consequences, and it is not a mere artifact of the gauge invariance of S. In particular, we identify a simple field configuration displaying solenoidal components of S and theoretically show that a judiciously designed scatterer can act as a "Poynting vector detector" which when immersed in such field distribution would experience a transverse optical force orthogonal to the incidence plane. We experimentally validate our theoretical predictions by observing a pronounced asymmetry in the scattering pattern of a spherical nanoparticle. PMID:27472632

  4. Direct-field acoustic testing of a flight system : logistics, challenges, and results.

    SciTech Connect

    Stasiunas, Eric Carl; Gurule, David Joseph; Babuska, Vit; Skousen, Troy J.

    2010-10-01

    Before a spacecraft can be considered for launch, it must first survive environmental testing that simulates the launch environment. Typically, these simulations include vibration testing performed using an electro-dynamic shaker. For some spacecraft however, acoustic excitation may provide a more severe loading environment than base shaker excitation. Because this was the case for a Sandia Flight System, it was necessary to perform an acoustic test prior to launch in order to verify survival due to an acoustic environment. Typically, acoustic tests are performed in acoustic chambers, but because of scheduling, transportation, and cleanliness concerns, this was not possible. Instead, the test was performed as a direct field acoustic test (DFAT). This type of test consists of surrounding a test article with a wall of speakers and controlling the acoustic input using control microphones placed around the test item, with a closed-loop control system. Obtaining the desired acoustic input environment - proto-flight random noise input with an overall sound pressure level (OASPL) of 146.7 dB-with this technique presented a challenge due to several factors. An acoustic profile with this high OASPL had not knowingly been obtained using the DFAT technique prior to this test. In addition, the test was performed in a high-bay, where floor space and existing equipment constrained the speaker circle diameter. And finally, the Flight System had to be tested without contamination of the unit, which required a contamination bag enclosure of the test unit. This paper describes in detail the logistics, challenges, and results encountered while performing a high-OASPL, direct-field acoustic test on a contamination-sensitive Flight System in a high-bay environment.

  5. Longwave scattering effects on fluxes in broken cloud fields

    SciTech Connect

    Takara, E.E.; Ellingson, R.G.

    1996-04-01

    The optical properties of clouds in the radiative energy balance are important. Most works on the effects of scattering have been in the shortwave; but longwave effects can be significant. In this work, the fluxes above and below a single cloud layer are presented, along with the errors in assuming flat black plate clouds or black clouds. The predicted fluxes are the averaged results of analysis of several fields with the same cloud amount.

  6. Reflection and Scattering of Acoustical Waves from a Discontinuity in Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, J. P.; Leeman, S.; Nolan, E.; Lee, D.

    The reflection and transmission of a plane acoustical wave from a planar boundary at the interface between two homogeneous media of different acoustical properties is a classical problem in acoustics that has served as a basis for many developments in acoustics for over 100 years. This problem, detailed in virtually every textbook on acoustics, provides us with the acoustical analogue to Snell's Law in optics and gives us correspondingly simple results. Classical acoustics predicts that a reflection from a boundary occurs only if the characteristic acoustical impedances of the two media are different. Here we show that a reflection also occurs if the media have the same impedances but different absorption coefficients. Our analysis yields some surprising results. For example, a reflection will occur at a discontinuity in absorption even if the impedance is uniform and continuous across the interface. In addition, a discontinuity in impedance at an interface between two media that have constant and equal, but non-zero absorption, results in a reflection coefficient that is dependent on absorption as well as impedance. In general, reflection coefficients now become frequency dependent. To experimentally test our results, we measured the reflection at the interface between water and castor oil, two liquids with similar impedances but very different absorption coefficients. Measurement of the reflection coefficient between 1 and 50 MHz demonstrated a frequency dependence that was in good agreement with our analysis.

  7. A thorough look at the nonuniqueness of the electromagnetic scattering integral equation solutions as compared to the scalar acoustic ones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langenberg, Karl J.

    2003-04-01

    It is well-known that solutions of electromagnetic scattering integral equations of the first or second kind (EFIE and MFIE) for perfectly electric or perfectly magnetic conducting scatterers are nonunique for those frequencies which correspond to interior Maxwell resonances of the scatterer; hence, the null spaces of the respective interior problem operators are under concern. In principle, all mathematical facts and proofs regarding this problem and cited in this paper are available from the book by [1983], yet, these authors mainly concentrate on single and double layer potentials for the scalar acoustic (Dirichlet and Neumann) as well as the magnetic dipole layer ansatz for the perfectly electric conducting (Maxwell) problem and treat the Huygens-type representation, which is more common in the electrical engineering community, not in the same detail. This might be the reason that part of the electrical engineering literature suffers from some confusion regarding the proper null spaces and their physical relevance, in particular, if the electromagnetic problem is considered in 2-D, where it reduces to scalar TM/TE-problems. The present contribution comments on these issues emphasizing that the null spaces of 2-D electromagnetics are the nonphysical null spaces originating from the Huygens-type representation of scalar acoustics.

  8. Seismic scattering and absorption parameters in the W-Bohemia/Vogtland region from elastic and acoustic radiative transfer theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaebler, Peter J.; Eulenfeld, Tom; Wegler, Ulrich

    2015-12-01

    In this study, frequency-dependent seismic scattering and intrinsic attenuation parameters for the crustal structure beneath the W-Bohemia/Vogtland swarm earthquake region close to the border of Czech Republic and Germany are estimated. Synthetic seismogram envelopes are modelled using elastic and acoustic radiative transfer theory. Scattering and absorption parameters are determined by fitting these synthetic envelopes to observed seismogram envelopes from 14 shallow local events from the October 2008 W-Bohemia/Vogtland earthquake swarm. The two different simulation approaches yield similar results for the estimated crustal parameters and show a comparable frequency dependence of both transport mean free path and intrinsic absorption path length. Both methods suggest that intrinsic attenuation is dominant over scattering attenuation in the W-Bohemia/Vogtland region for the investigated epicentral distance range and frequency bands from 3 to 24 Hz. Elastic simulations of seismogram envelopes suggest that forward scattering is required to explain the data, however, the degree of forward scattering is not resolvable. Errors in the parameter estimation are smaller in the elastic case compared to results from the acoustic simulations. The frequency decay of the transport mean free path suggests a random medium described by a nearly exponential autocorrelation function. The fluctuation strength and correlation length of the random medium cannot be estimated independently, but only a combination of the parameters related to the transport mean free path of the medium can be computed. Furthermore, our elastic simulations show, that using our numerical method, it is not possible to resolve the value of the mean free path of the random medium.

  9. NATO TG-53: acoustic detection of weapon firing joint field experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Dale N.; Pham, Tien; Scanlon, Michael V.; Srour, Nassy; Reiff, Christian G.; Sim, Leng K.; Solomon, Latasha; Thompson, Dorothea F.

    2006-05-01

    In this paper, we discuss the NATO Task Group 53 (TG-53) acoustic detection of weapon firing field joint experiment at Yuma Proving Ground during 31 October to 4 November 2005. The participating NATO countries include France, the Netherlands, UK and US. The objectives of the joint experiments are: (i) to collect acoustic signatures of direct and indirect firings from weapons such as sniper, mortar, artillery and C4 explosives and (ii) to share signatures among NATO partners from a variety of acoustic sensing platforms on the ground and in the air distributed over a wide area.

  10. Determination of near and far field acoustics for advanced propeller configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korkan, K. D.; Jaeger, S. M.; Kim, J. H.

    1989-01-01

    A method has been studied for predicting the acoustic field of the SR-3 transonic propfan using flow data generated by two versions of the NASPROP-E computer code. Since the flow fields calculated by the solvers include the shock-wave system of the propeller, the nonlinear quadrupole noise source term is included along with the monopole and dipole noise sources in the calculation of the acoustic near field. Acoustic time histories in the near field are determined by transforming the azimuthal coordinate in the rotating, blade-fixed coordinate system to the time coordinate in a nonrotating coordinate system. Fourier analysis of the pressure time histories is used to obtain the frequency spectra of the near-field noise.

  11. A new way to calculate scattering of acoustic and elastic waves. I - Theory illustrated for scalar waves. II - Application to elastic waves scattered from voids and fixed rigid obstacles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visscher, W. M.

    1980-02-01

    The paper presents a new method of calculation of elastic and acoustic wave scattering. The method of optimal truncation (MOOT) uses a family of integral equations solved by matrix methods; the scattered wave is expanded in a truncated series of eigenfunctions of the unperturbed wave equation, and expansion coefficients are determined by requiring that the mean square of the deviance from the boundary conditions at the surface of the scatterer be minimized. This results in matrix equations for the scattered amplitudes which can be easily solved; the method can compute the scattering of acoustic, elastic, or electromagnetic waves from defects which are internally piecewise homogeneous, so that conditions on the wave function derivatives and values at the boundaries characterize the scatterers.

  12. Experimental validation of a method for the prediction of the acoustic field produced by an acoustic source and the reflected field produced by a solid interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, Sandra; Chopra, Rajiv; Pichardo, Samuel

    2012-11-01

    In this work we present a model to calculate the acoustic pressure generated by the interaction of forward and reflected waves in the vicinity of a solid interface and compare it to experimental data. An experimental setup was designed to measure the forward and the combined forward-reflected acoustic fields produced by a solid interface. A 0.785mm-needle hydrophone was used to characterize the acoustic field produced by a 7.29MHz-ultrasound transducer focused at 6cm. The hydrophone was positioned perpendicularly to the sound propagation direction and moved between the transducer and a 9mm-thick acrylic sample using a robotic arm. Simulations were carried out using a modified Rayleigh-Sommerfeld integral that calculates the particle displacement over a reflecting surface. This particle displacement at the boundary of the interface is then used as an acoustic source to obtain the reflected particle displacement. The complex sum of the forward and reflected fields was compared to the experimental measurements. The measurements showed an interference pattern that increased the pressure amplitude in average 10.4% with peaks of up to 25.8%. The proposed model is able to represent the interference pattern produced by the reflected wave with an average absolute error of 3.4+/-0.54% and a maximal error of 5.6%. The comparison between the experimental measurements and the simulations indicates that the presented model predicts with good accuracy the acoustic field generated by ultrasound transducers facing a solid interface. This model can be used to foresee the outcome of therapeutic applications where the devices are used in proximity to a bone interface.

  13. Scatterer size and concentration estimation technique based on a 3D acoustic impedance map from histologic sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamou, Jonathan; Oelze, Michael L.; O'Brien, William D.; Zachary, James F.

    2001-05-01

    Accurate estimates of scatterer parameters (size and acoustic concentration) are beneficial adjuncts to characterize disease from ultrasonic backscatterer measurements. An estimation technique was developed to obtain parameter estimates from the Fourier transform of the spatial autocorrelation function (SAF). A 3D impedance map (3DZM) is used to obtain the SAF of tissue. 3DZMs are obtained by aligning digitized light microscope images from histologic preparations of tissue. Estimates were obtained for simulated 3DZMs containing spherical scatterers randomly located: relative errors were less than 3%. Estimates were also obtained from a rat fibroadenoma and a 4T1 mouse mammary tumor (MMT). Tissues were fixed (10% neutral-buffered formalin), embedded in paraffin, serially sectioned and stained with H&E. 3DZM results were compared to estimates obtained independently against ultrasonic backscatter measurements. For the fibroadenoma and MMT, average scatterer diameters were 91 and 31.5 μm, respectively. Ultrasonic measurements yielded average scatterer diameters of 105 and 30 μm, respectively. The 3DZM estimation scheme showed results similar to those obtained by the independent ultrasonic measurements. The 3D impedance maps show promise as a powerful tool to characterize ultrasonic scattering sites of tissue. [Work supported by the University of Illinois Research Board.

  14. Modeling and analysis of multiple scattering of acoustic waves in complex media: application to the trabecular bone.

    PubMed

    Wojcik, J; Litniewski, J; Nowicki, A

    2011-10-01

    The integral equations that describe scattering in the media with step-rise changing parameters have been numerically solved for the trabecular bone model. The model consists of several hundred discrete randomly distributed elements. The spectral distribution of scattering coefficients in subsequent orders of scattering has been presented. Calculations were carried on for the ultrasonic frequency ranging from 0.5 to 3 MHz. Evaluation of the contribution of the first, second, and higher scattering orders to total scattering of the ultrasounds in trabecular bone was done. Contrary to the approaches that use the μCT images of trabecular structure to modeling of the ultrasonic wave propagation condition, the 3D numerical model consisting of cylindrical elements mimicking the spatial matrix of trabeculae, was applied. The scattering, due to interconnections between thick trabeculae, usually neglected in trabecular bone models, has been included in calculations when the structure backscatter was evaluated. Influence of the absorption in subsequent orders of scattering is also addressed. Results show that up to 1.5 MHz, the influence of higher scattering orders on the total scattered field characteristic can be neglected while for the higher frequencies, the relatively high amplitude interference peaks in higher scattering orders clearly occur. PMID:21973345

  15. Polymer coating of glass microballoons levitated in a focused acoustic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, A. T.; Lee, M. C.; Feng, I.-A.; Elleman, D. D.; Wang, T. G.

    1982-01-01

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) glass microballoons (GMBs) levitated in a focusing radiator acoustic device can be coated with liquid materials by deploying the liquid into the levitation field with a stepped-horn atomizer. The GMB can be forced to the center of the coating liquid with a strong acoustically generated centering force. Water solutions of organic polymers, UV-curable liquid organic monomers, and paraffin waxes have been used to prepare solid coatings on the surface of GMBs using this technique.

  16. Ocean acoustic field simulations for monitoring large-scale ocean structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, E. C.; Wang, Y. Y.

    1991-04-01

    Substantial numerical simulations of low-frequency acoustic field under different ocean models have been carried out on the CYBER-205 at WPL/NOAA. The purpose of these numerical simulations is to investigate our potential ability to monitor large-scale ocean structures by using modal ocean acoustic tomography (MOAT). For example, the possibility of monitoring El Niño by using MOAT has been illustrated.

  17. Customization of the acoustic field produced by a piezoelectric array through interelement delays

    PubMed Central

    Chitnis, Parag V.; Barbone, Paul E.; Cleveland, Robin O.

    2008-01-01

    A method for producing a prescribed acoustic pressure field from a piezoelectric array was investigated. The array consisted of 170 elements placed on the inner surface of a 15 cm radius spherical cap. Each element was independently driven by using individual pulsers each capable of generating 1.2 kV. Acoustic field customization was achieved by independently controlling the time when each element was excited. The set of time delays necessary to produce a particular acoustic field was determined by using an optimization scheme. The acoustic field at the focal plane was simulated by using the angular spectrum method, and the optimization searched for the time delays that minimized the least squared difference between the magnitudes of the simulated and desired pressure fields. The acoustic field was shaped in two different ways: the −6 dB focal width was increased to different desired widths and the ring-shaped pressure distributions of various prescribed diameters were produced. For both cases, the set of delays resulting from the respective optimization schemes were confirmed to yield the desired pressure distributions by using simulations and measurements. The simulations, however, predicted peak positive pressures roughly half those obtained from the measurements, which was attributed to the exclusion of nonlinearity in the simulations. PMID:18537369

  18. Experimental investigation of the interference structure in a shallow-water vector acoustic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Wangsheng; Liang, Guolong; Wang, Yan; Wang, Yilin

    2012-11-01

    The waveguide invariant concept describes the interference striations in the acoustic pressure spectrograms produced with an underwater broadband source. In this paper, the existence of interference structure in the vector acoustic field is examined using sea trial data, and the waveguide invariant is exploited to interpret fringes of the vector field. The experimental data, which recorded a merchant vessel passing on a straight path, were collected by a 2-dimensional vector sensor during an experiment in the South China Sea. The intensity and phase spectra of the energy flux density vector in the acoustic field radiated by the moving vessel are obtained from the magnitude and phase angle of the product of the pressure and the horizontal particle velocity's complex conjugate. Distinct interference patterns appear in the vector intensity and phase spectra. The characteristics of these have been analyzed by comparison with the scaled acoustic field. The equation describing the striations associated with the ship's trajectory is derived from waveguide invariant theory. The Hough transform method is used to extract the waveguide invariant from the data. To improve the quality of the patterns derived from the vector field, a better value of waveguide invariant can be estimated. Good agreement between reconstructed trajectories and real patterns suggests that it is feasible to use the interference structure in an acoustic vector field to determine the waveguide characteristics.

  19. Acoustic radiation force due to arbitrary incident fields on spherical particles in soft tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Treweek, Benjamin C. Ilinskii, Yurii A.; Zabolotskaya, Evgenia A.; Hamilton, Mark F.

    2015-10-28

    Acoustic radiation force is of interest in a wide variety of biomedical applications ranging from tissue characterization (e.g. elastography) to tissue treatment (e.g. high intensity focused ultrasound, kidney stone fragment removal). As tissue mechanical properties are reliable indicators of tissue health, the former is the focus of the present contribution. This is accomplished through an investigation of the acoustic radiation force on a spherical scatterer embedded in tissue. Properties of both the scatterer and the surrounding tissue are important in determining the magnitude and the direction of the force. As these properties vary, the force computation shows changes in magnitude and direction, which may enable more accurate noninvasive determination of tissue properties.

  20. Acoustic radiation force due to arbitrary incident fields on spherical particles in soft tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treweek, Benjamin C.; Ilinskii, Yurii A.; Zabolotskaya, Evgenia A.; Hamilton, Mark F.

    2015-10-01

    Acoustic radiation force is of interest in a wide variety of biomedical applications ranging from tissue characterization (e.g. elastography) to tissue treatment (e.g. high intensity focused ultrasound, kidney stone fragment removal). As tissue mechanical properties are reliable indicators of tissue health, the former is the focus of the present contribution. This is accomplished through an investigation of the acoustic radiation force on a spherical scatterer embedded in tissue. Properties of both the scatterer and the surrounding tissue are important in determining the magnitude and the direction of the force. As these properties vary, the force computation shows changes in magnitude and direction, which may enable more accurate noninvasive determination of tissue properties.

  1. Strong-field cyclotron scattering. I - Scattering amplitudes and natural line width

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graziani, Carlo

    1993-07-01

    The introduction of resonance line width into the QED cyclotron scattering amplitudes is considered. It is shown that the width arises from loop corrections to the electron propagator, which also bring about shifts in the Landau energy levels. A formalism is developed that allows the dressed electron propagator to be derived. It is shown that the states of Herold et al. (1982) and of Sokolov and Ternov (1968), which diagonalize the component of the magnetic moment operator parallel to the external magnetic field, are appropriate for calculation of the scattering amplitudes, whereas the states of Johnson and Lippmann (1949) are not. In addition, it is shown that the Breit-Wigner broadening approximation E tends to E - i(Gamma)/2 is consistent with the perturbation-theoretic order of the calculation, if the former basis states are chosen, but not the latter.

  2. Numerical Analysis of the Acoustic Field of Tip-Clearance Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alavi Moghadam, S. M.; M. Meinke Team; W. Schröder Team

    2015-11-01

    Numerical simulations of the acoustic field generated by a shrouded axial fan are studied by a hybrid fluid-dynamics-acoustics method. In a first step, large-eddy simulations are performed to investigate the dynamics of tip clearance flow for various tip gap sizes and to determine the acoustic sources. The simulations are performed for a single blade out of five blades with periodic boundary conditions in the circumferential direction on a multi-block structured mesh with 1.4 ×108 grid points. The turbulent flow is simulated at a Reynolds number of 9.36 ×105 at undisturbed inflow condition and the results are compared with experimental data. The diameter and strength of the tip vortex increase with the tip gap size, while simultaneously the efficiency of the fan decreases. In a second step, the acoustic field on the near field is determined by solving the acoustic perturbation equations (APE) on a mesh for a single blade consisting of approx. 9.8 ×108 grid points. The overall agreement of the pressure spectrum and its directivity with measurements confirm the correct identification of the sound sources and accurate prediction of the acoustic duct propagation. The results show that the longer the tip gap size the higher the broadband noise level. Senior Scientist, Institute of Aerodynamics, RWTH Aachen University.

  3. A compact neutron scatter camera for field deployment.

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, John E M; Gerling, Mark D; Brennan, James S

    2016-08-01

    We describe a very compact (0.9 m high, 0.4 m diameter, 40 kg) battery operable neutron scatter camera designed for field deployment. Unlike most other systems, the configuration of the sixteen liquid-scintillator detection cells are arranged to provide omnidirectional (4π) imaging with sensitivity comparable to a conventional two-plane system. Although designed primarily to operate as a neutron scatter camera for localizing energetic neutron sources, it also functions as a Compton camera for localizing gamma sources. In addition to describing the radionuclide source localization capabilities of this system, we demonstrate how it provides neutron spectra that can distinguish plutonium metal from plutonium oxide sources, in addition to the easier task of distinguishing AmBe from fission sources. PMID:27587113

  4. Radiography by selective detection of scatter field velocity components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, Alan M. (Inventor); Dugan, Edward T. (Inventor); Shedlock, Daniel (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A reconfigurable collimated radiation detector, system and related method includes at least one collimated radiation detector. The detector has an adjustable collimator assembly including at least one feature, such as a fin, optically coupled thereto. Adjustments to the adjustable collimator selects particular directions of travel of scattered radiation emitted from an irradiated object which reach the detector. The collimated detector is preferably a collimated detector array, where the collimators are independently adjustable. The independent motion capability provides the capability to focus the image by selection of the desired scatter field components. When an array of reconfigurable collimated detectors is provided, separate image data can be obtained from each of the detectors and the respective images cross-correlated and combined to form an enhanced image.

  5. Full-Field Imaging of GHz Film Bulk Acoustic Resonator Motion

    SciTech Connect

    Telschow, Kenneth Louis; Deason, Vance Albert; Cottle, David Lynn; Larson III, J. D.

    2003-10-01

    A full-field view laser ultrasonic imaging method has been developed that measures acoustic motion at a surface without scanning. Images are recorded at normal video frame rates by using dynamic holography with photorefractive interferometric detection. By extending the approach to ultra high frequencies, an acoustic microscope has been developed that is capable of operation at gigahertz frequency and micron length scales. Both acoustic amplitude and phase are recorded, allowing full calibration and determination of phases to within a single arbitrary constant. Results are presented of measurements at frequencies of 800-900 MHz, illustrating a multitude of normal mode behavior in electrically driven thin film acoustic resonators. Coupled with microwave electrical impedance measurements, this imaging mode provides an exceptionally fast method for evaluation of electric-to-acoustic coupling of these devices and their performance. Images of 256 /spl times/ 240 pixels are recorded at 18 fps rates synchronized to obtain both in-phase and quadrature detection of the acoustic motion. Simple averaging provides sensitivity to the subnanometer level at each pixel calibrated over the image using interferometry. Identification of specific acoustic modes and their relationship to electrical impedance characteristics show the advantages and overall high speed of the technique.

  6. Prediction of the acoustic and bubble fields in insonified freeze-drying vials.

    PubMed

    Louisnard, O; Cogné, C; Labouret, S; Montes-Quiroz, W; Peczalski, R; Baillon, F; Espitalier, F

    2015-09-01

    The acoustic field and the location of cavitation bubble are computed in vials used for freeze-drying, insonified from the bottom by a vibrating plate. The calculations rely on a nonlinear model of sound propagation in a cavitating liquid [Louisnard, Ultrason. Sonochem., 19, (2012) 56-65]. Both the vibration amplitude and the liquid level in the vial are parametrically varied. For low liquid levels, a threshold amplitude is required to form a cavitation zone at the bottom of the vial. For increasing vibration amplitudes, the bubble field slightly thickens but remains at the vial bottom, and the acoustic field saturates, which cannot be captured by linear acoustics. On the other hand, increasing the liquid level may promote the formation of a secondary bubble structure near the glass wall, a few centimeters below the free liquid surface. These predictions suggest that rather complex acoustic fields and bubble structures can arise even in such small volumes. As the acoustic and bubble fields govern ice nucleation during the freezing step, the final crystal's size distribution in the frozen product may crucially depend on the liquid level in the vial. PMID:25800984

  7. Analyzing panel acoustic contributions toward the sound field inside the passenger compartment of a full-size automobile.

    PubMed

    Wu, Sean F; Moondra, Manmohan; Beniwal, Ravi

    2015-04-01

    The Helmholtz equation least squares (HELS)-based nearfield acoustical holography (NAH) is utilized to analyze panel acoustic contributions toward the acoustic field inside the interior region of an automobile. Specifically, the acoustic power flows from individual panels are reconstructed, and relative contributions to sound pressure level and spectrum at any point of interest are calculated. Results demonstrate that by correlating the acoustic power flows from individual panels to the field acoustic pressure, one can correctly locate the panel allowing the most acoustic energy transmission into the vehicle interior. The panel on which the surface acoustic pressure amplitude is the highest should not be used as indicative of the panel responsible for the sound field in the vehicle passenger compartment. Another significant advantage of this HELS-based NAH is that measurements of the input data only need to be taken once by using a conformal array of microphones in the near field, and ranking of panel acoustic contributions to any field point can be readily performed. The transfer functions between individual panels of any vibrating structure to the acoustic pressure anywhere in space are calculated not measured, thus significantly reducing the time and effort involved in panel acoustic contributions analyses. PMID:25920860

  8. Theory of weak scattering of stochastic electromagnetic fields from deterministic and random media

    SciTech Connect

    Tong Zhisong; Korotkova, Olga

    2010-09-15

    The theory of scattering of scalar stochastic fields from deterministic and random media is generalized to the electromagnetic domain under the first-order Born approximation. The analysis allows for determining the changes in spectrum, coherence, and polarization of electromagnetic fields produced on their propagation from the source to the scattering volume, interaction with the scatterer, and propagation from the scatterer to the far field. An example of scattering of a field produced by a {delta}-correlated partially polarized source and scattered from a {delta}-correlated medium is provided.

  9. Forces acting on a small particle in an acoustical field in a thermoviscous fluid.

    PubMed

    Karlsen, Jonas T; Bruus, Henrik

    2015-10-01

    We present a theoretical analysis of the acoustic radiation force on a single small spherical particle, either a thermoviscous fluid droplet or a thermoelastic solid particle, suspended in a viscous and heat-conducting fluid medium. Within the perturbation assumptions, our analysis places no restrictions on the length scales of the viscous and thermal boundary-layer thicknesses δ(s) and δ(t) relative to the particle radius a, but it assumes the particle to be small in comparison to the acoustic wavelength λ. This is the limit relevant to scattering of ultrasound waves from nanometer- and micrometer-sized particles. For particles of size comparable to or smaller than the boundary layers, the thermoviscous theory leads to profound consequences for the acoustic radiation force. Not only do we predict forces orders of magnitude larger than expected from ideal-fluid theory, but for certain relevant choices of materials, we also find a sign change in the acoustic radiation force on different-sized but otherwise identical particles. These findings lead to the concept of a particle-size-dependent acoustophoretic contrast factor, highly relevant to acoustic separation of microparticles in gases, as well as to handling of nanoparticles in lab-on-a-chip systems. PMID:26565335

  10. Forces acting on a small particle in an acoustical field in a thermoviscous fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlsen, Jonas T.; Bruus, Henrik

    2015-10-01

    We present a theoretical analysis of the acoustic radiation force on a single small spherical particle, either a thermoviscous fluid droplet or a thermoelastic solid particle, suspended in a viscous and heat-conducting fluid medium. Within the perturbation assumptions, our analysis places no restrictions on the length scales of the viscous and thermal boundary-layer thicknesses δs and δt relative to the particle radius a , but it assumes the particle to be small in comparison to the acoustic wavelength λ . This is the limit relevant to scattering of ultrasound waves from nanometer- and micrometer-sized particles. For particles of size comparable to or smaller than the boundary layers, the thermoviscous theory leads to profound consequences for the acoustic radiation force. Not only do we predict forces orders of magnitude larger than expected from ideal-fluid theory, but for certain relevant choices of materials, we also find a sign change in the acoustic radiation force on different-sized but otherwise identical particles. These findings lead to the concept of a particle-size-dependent acoustophoretic contrast factor, highly relevant to acoustic separation of microparticles in gases, as well as to handling of nanoparticles in lab-on-a-chip systems.

  11. Effects of a near-field rigid sphere scatterer on the performance of linear microphone array beamformers.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yuxiang; Zhou, Haoran; Lu, Jing; Qiu, Xiaojun

    2016-08-01

    Beamformers enable a microphone array to capture acoustic signals from a sound source with high signal to noise ratio in a noisy environment, and the linear microphone array is of particular importance, in practice, due to its simplicity and easy implementation. A linear microphone array sometimes is used near some scattering objects, which affect its beamforming performance. This paper develops a numerical model with a linear microphone array near a rigid sphere for both far-field plane wave and near-field sources. The effects of the scatterer on two typical beamformers, i.e., the delay-and-sum beamformer and the superdirective beamformer, are investigated by both simulations and experiments. It is found that the directivity factor of both beamformers improves due to the increased equivalent array aperture when the size of the array is no larger than that of the scatter. With the increase of the array size, the directivity factor tends to deteriorate at high frequencies because of the rising side-lobes. When the array size is significantly larger than that of the scatterer, the scattering has hardly any influence on the beamforming performance. PMID:27586725

  12. Identification of vibration excitations from acoustic measurements using near field acoustic holography and the force analysis technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pézerat, C.; Leclère, Q.; Totaro, N.; Pachebat, M.

    2009-10-01

    This study presents a method of using acoustic holography and the force analysis technique to identify vibration sources from radiated noise measurements. The structure studied is a plate excited by a shaker on which three measurements were performed: the first is a reference measurement of plate velocity obtained by scanning laser vibrometry, the second is based on sound pressure measurements in the near field of the structure, and the third is the measurement of normal acoustic velocities by using a p-U probe recently developed by Microflown Technologies. This was followed by the application of classical NAH, known as pressure-to-velocity holography and velocity-to-velocity holography to predict the plate velocity field from acoustic measurements at distances of 1 and 5 cm. Afterwards, the force analysis technique, also known as the RIFF technique, is applied with these five data sets. The principle is to inject the displacement field of the structure into its equation of motion and extract the resulting force distribution. This technique requires regularization done by a low-pass filter in the wavenumber domain. Apart from pressure-to-velocity holography at 5 cm, the reconstructed force distribution allows localizing the excitation point in the measurement area. FAT regularization is also shown to improve results as its cutoff wavenumber is optimized with the natural wavenumber of the plate. Lastly, quantitative force values are extracted from force distributions at all frequencies of the band 0-4 kHz studied and compared with the force spectrum measured directly by a piezoelectric sensor.

  13. Sound field diffusivity in NASA Langley Research Center hardwalled acoustic facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgary, M. C.

    1982-01-01

    Cross correlation measurements were performed to determine the quality of the sound fields in the ANRL reverberation room and the ANRL transmission loss facility. The results indicate the level of sound field diffuseness which may be attained in these hardwalled acoustic facilities.

  14. Scattered-field FDTD and PSTD algorithms with CPML absorbing boundary conditions for light scattering by aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Wenbo; Videen, Gorden; Fu, Qiang; Hu, Yongxiang

    2013-12-01

    As fundamental parameters for polarized-radiative-transfer calculations, the single-scattering phase matrix of irregularly shaped aerosol particles must be accurately modeled. In this study, a scattered-field finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) model and a scattered-field pseudo-spectral time-domain (PSTD) model are developed for light scattering by arbitrarily shaped dielectric aerosols. The convolutional perfectly matched layer (CPML) absorbing boundary condition (ABC) is used to truncate the computational domain. It is found that the PSTD method is generally more accurate than the FDTD in calculation of the single-scattering properties given similar spatial cell sizes. Since the PSTD can use a coarser grid for large particles, it can lower the memory requirement in the calculation. However, the Fourier transformations in the PSTD need significantly more CPU time than simple subtractions in the FDTD, and the fast Fourier transform requires a power of 2 elements in calculations, thus using the PSTD could not significantly reduce the CPU time required in the numerical modeling. Furthermore, because the scattered-field FDTD/PSTD equations include incident-wave source terms, the FDTD/PSTD model allows for the inclusion of an arbitrarily incident wave source, including a plane parallel wave or a Gaussian beam like those emitted by lasers usually used in laboratory particle characterizations, etc. The scattered-field FDTD and PSTD light-scattering models can be used to calculate single-scattering properties of arbitrarily shaped aerosol particles over broad size and wavelength ranges.

  15. Gated photon correlation spectroscopy for acoustical particle velocity measurements in free-field conditions.

    PubMed

    Koukoulas, Triantafillos; Piper, Ben; Theobald, Pete

    2013-03-01

    The measurement of acoustic pressure at a point in space using optical methods has been the subject of extensive research in airborne acoustics over the last four decades. The main driver is to reliably establish the acoustic pascal, thus allowing the calibration of microphones with standard and non-standard dimensions to be realized in an absolute and direct manner. However, the research work so far has mostly been limited to standing wave tubes. This Letter reports on the development of an optical system capable of measuring acoustic particle velocities in free-field conditions; agreement within less than 0.6 dB was obtained with standard microphone measurements during these initial experiments. PMID:23464122

  16. Thermally induced secondary atomization of droplet in an acoustic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Saptarshi; Saha, Abhishek; Kumar, Ranganathan

    2012-01-01

    We study the thermal effects that lead to instability and break up in acoustically levitated vaporizing fuel droplets. For selective liquids, atomization occurs at the droplet equator under external heating. Short wavelength [Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH)] instability for diesel and bio-diesel droplets triggers this secondary atomization. Vapor pressure, latent heat, and specific heat govern the vaporization rate and temperature history, which affect the surface tension gradient and gas phase density, ultimately dictating the onset of KH instability. We develop a criterion based on Weber number to define a condition for the inception of secondary atomization.

  17. Thomson scattering measurements in the RFX reversed field pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Bassan, M.; Bilato, R.; Giudicotti, L.; Pasqualotto, R.; Sardella, A.

    1997-01-01

    The first systematic measurements of the electron temperature (T{sub e}) spatial profile have been obtained in the reversed field pinch experiment RFX with a single pulse Thomson scattering (TS) diagnostic. Scattered light from a ruby laser pulse (E{le}15 J, {Delta}t=30 ns) is collected through three objectives from 10 positions along a diameter in the plasma equatorial plane, with a spatial resolution of 2.5 cm. Plasma discharges with current in the range 700{endash}900 kA have been investigated finding evidence of a quite flat T{sub e} profile. Data dispersion significantly greater than experimental uncertainties provides an indication of remarkable plasma fluctuations. Results are in good agreement with T{sub e} measurements from other single chord spectroscopic diagnostics (SiLi detector and SXR double filter), showing a reliable operation down to an electron density n{sub e}=3{times}10{sup 19} m{sup {minus}3}. Integration of this apparatus with a ND:YLF laser system for multipulse Thomson scattering measurements, sharing the same input optics, is under way. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  18. Measuring the complex field scattered by single submicron particles

    SciTech Connect

    Potenza, Marco A. C. Sanvito, Tiziano

    2015-11-15

    We describe a method for simultaneous measurements of the real and imaginary parts of the field scattered by single nanoparticles illuminated by a laser beam, exploiting a self-reference interferometric scheme relying on the fundamentals of the Optical Theorem. Results obtained with calibrated spheres of different materials are compared to the expected values obtained through a simplified analytical model without any free parameters, and the method is applied to a highly polydisperse water suspension of Poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) nanoparticles. Advantages with respect to existing methods and possible applications are discussed.

  19. Reconstruction of the fine structure of an acoustic scatterer against the distorting influence of its large-scale inhomogeneities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burov, V. A.; Grishina, I. M.; Lapshenkina, O. I.; Morozov, S. A.; Rumyantseva, O. D.; Sukhov, E. G.

    2003-11-01

    In the ultrasonic diagnostics of small-size neoplasms of biological tissues at the earliest stage of their development, an efficient way to eliminate the distorting influence of high-contrast or large inhomogeneities of the biological medium is to apply the iterative technique. A simple approach is proposed, which makes it possible with only two iteration steps to achieve an efficient focusing of the tomograph array. At the first step, the unknown distribution of the large-scale inhomogeneities of sound velocity and absorption over the scatterer is reconstructed, where the large-scale inhomogeneities are those whose size exceeds several wavelengths. At the second step, the fine structure of the scatterer is reconstructed against the large-scale background, which can be performed with a high accuracy owing to the evaluation of the background at the first step. The possibility of simultaneous reconstruction of the large-scale and fine structures by the noniterative Grinevich-Novikov algorithm is considered as an alternative. This algorithm reconstructs in an explicit form two-dimensional refractive-absorbing acoustic scatterers of almost arbitrary shape and strength. Taking into account the effects of multiple scattering, this algorithm provides resolution of the fine structure almost as good as that achieved in reconstructing the same structure against an undistorting homogeneous background. The results of numerical simulations of both algorithms are presented.

  20. Measurement of the dispersion of thermal ion-acoustic fluctuations in high-temperature laser plasmas using multiple-wavelength Thomson scattering.

    PubMed

    Froula, D H; Davis, P; Divol, L; Ross, J S; Meezan, N; Price, D; Glenzer, S H; Rousseaux, C

    2005-11-01

    The dispersion of ion-acoustic fluctuations has been measured using a novel technique that employs multiple color Thomson-scattering diagnostics to measure the frequency spectrum for two separate thermal ion-acoustic fluctuations with significantly different wave vectors. The plasma fluctuations are shown to become dispersive with increasing electron temperature. We demonstrate that this technique allows a time resolved local measurement of electron density and temperature in inertial confinement fusion plasmas. PMID:16383991

  1. Auralization of concert hall acoustics using finite difference time domain methods and wave field synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hochgraf, Kelsey

    Auralization methods have been used for a long time to simulate the acoustics of a concert hall for different seat positions. The goal of this thesis was to apply the concept of auralization to a larger audience area that the listener could walk through to compare differences in acoustics for a wide range of seat positions. For this purpose, the acoustics of Rensselaer's Experimental Media and Performing Arts Center (EMPAC) Concert Hall were simulated to create signals for a 136 channel wave field synthesis (WFS) system located at Rensselaer's Collaborative Research Augmented Immersive Virtual Environment (CRAIVE) Laboratory. By allowing multiple people to dynamically experience the concert hall's acoustics at the same time, this research gained perspective on what is important for achieving objective accuracy and subjective plausibility in an auralization. A finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulation on a three-dimensional face-centered cubic grid, combined at a crossover frequency of 800 Hz with a CATT-Acoustic(TM) simulation, was found to have a reverberation time, direct to reverberant sound energy ratio, and early reflection pattern that more closely matched measured data from the hall compared to a CATT-Acoustic(TM) simulation and other hybrid simulations. In the CRAIVE lab, nine experienced listeners found all hybrid auralizations (with varying source location, grid resolution, crossover frequency, and number of loudspeakers) to be more perceptually plausible than the CATT-Acoustic(TM) auralization. The FDTD simulation required two days to compute, while the CATT-Acoustic(TM) simulation required three separate TUCT(TM) computations, each taking four hours, to accommodate the large number of receivers. Given the perceptual advantages realized with WFS for auralization of a large, inhomogeneous sound field, it is recommended that hybrid simulations be used in the future to achieve more accurate and plausible auralizations. Predictions are made for a

  2. Approximation by Multipoles of the Multiple Acoustic Scattering by Small Obstacles in Three Dimensions and Application to the Foldy Theory of Isotropic Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendali, Abderrahmane; Cocquet, Pierre-Henri; Tordeux, Sébastien

    2016-03-01

    The asymptotic analysis carried out in this paper for the problem of a multiple scattering in three dimensions of a time-harmonic wave by obstacles whose size is small as compared with the wavelength establishes that the effect of the small bodies can be approximated at any order of accuracy by the field radiated by point sources. Among other issues, this asymptotic expansion of the wave furnishes a mathematical justification with optimal error estimates of Foldy's method that consists in approximating each small obstacle by a point isotropic scatterer. Finally, it is shown how this theory can be further improved by adequately locating the center of phase of the point scatterers and the taking into account of self-interactions. In this way, it is established that the usual Foldy model may lead to an approximation whose asymptotic behavior is the same than that obtained when the multiple scattering effects are completely neglected.

  3. Flow Field and Acoustic Predictions for Three-Stream Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simmons, Shaun Patrick; Henderson, Brenda S.; Khavaran, Abbas

    2014-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics was used to analyze a three-stream nozzle parametric design space. The study varied bypass-to-core area ratio, tertiary-to-core area ratio and jet operating conditions. The flowfield solutions from the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) code Overflow 2.2e were used to pre-screen experimental models for a future test in the Aero-Acoustic Propulsion Laboratory (AAPL) at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). Flowfield solutions were considered in conjunction with the jet-noise-prediction code JeNo to screen the design concepts. A two-stream versus three-stream computation based on equal mass flow rates showed a reduction in peak turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) for the three-stream jet relative to that for the two-stream jet which resulted in reduced acoustic emission. Additional three-stream solutions were analyzed for salient flowfield features expected to impact farfield noise. As tertiary power settings were increased there was a corresponding near nozzle increase in shear rate that resulted in an increase in high frequency noise and a reduction in peak TKE. As tertiary-to-core area ratio was increased the tertiary potential core elongated and the peak TKE was reduced. The most noticeable change occurred as secondary-to-core area ratio was increased thickening the secondary potential core, elongating the primary potential core and reducing peak TKE. As forward flight Mach number was increased the jet plume region decreased and reduced peak TKE.

  4. Active control of acoustic pressure fields using smart material technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Smith, R. C.

    1993-01-01

    An overview describing the use of piezoceramic patches in reducing noise in a structural acoustics setting is presented. The passive and active contributions due to patches which are bonded to an Euler-Bernoulli beam or thin shell are briefly discussed and the results are incorporated into a 2-D structural acoustics model. In this model, an exterior noise source causes structural vibrations which in turn lead to interior noise as a result of nonlinear fluid/structure coupling mechanism. Interior sound pressure levels are reduced via patches bonded to the flexible boundary (a beam in this case) which generate pure bending moments when an out-of-phase voltage is applied. Well-posedness results for the infinite dimensional system are discussed and a Galerkin scheme for approximating the system dynamics is outlined. Control is implemented by using linear quadratic regulator (LQR) optimal control theory to calculate gains for the linearized system and then feeding these gains back into the nonlinear system of interest. The effectiveness of this strategy for this problem is illustrated in an example.

  5. Suppression of sound radiation to far field of near-field acoustic communication system using evanescent sound field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Ayaka; Wakatsuki, Naoto; Mizutani, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    A method of suppressing sound radiation to the far field of a near-field acoustic communication system using an evanescent sound field is proposed. The amplitude of the evanescent sound field generated from an infinite vibrating plate attenuates exponentially with increasing a distance from the surface of the vibrating plate. However, a discontinuity of the sound field exists at the edge of the finite vibrating plate in practice, which broadens the wavenumber spectrum. A sound wave radiates over the evanescent sound field because of broadening of the wavenumber spectrum. Therefore, we calculated the optimum distribution of the particle velocity on the vibrating plate to reduce the broadening of the wavenumber spectrum. We focused on a window function that is utilized in the field of signal analysis for reducing the broadening of the frequency spectrum. The optimization calculation is necessary for the design of window function suitable for suppressing sound radiation and securing a spatial area for data communication. In addition, a wide frequency bandwidth is required to increase the data transmission speed. Therefore, we investigated a suitable method for calculating the sound pressure level at the far field to confirm the variation of the distribution of sound pressure level determined on the basis of the window shape and frequency. The distribution of the sound pressure level at a finite distance was in good agreement with that obtained at an infinite far field under the condition generating the evanescent sound field. Consequently, the window function was optimized by the method used to calculate the distribution of the sound pressure level at an infinite far field using the wavenumber spectrum on the vibrating plate. According to the result of comparing the distributions of the sound pressure level in the cases with and without the window function, it was confirmed that the area whose sound pressure level was reduced from the maximum level to -50 dB was

  6. Application of relativistic mean field and effective field theory densities to scattering observables for Ca isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhuyan, M.; Panda, R. N.; Routray, T. R.; Patra, S. K.

    2010-12-01

    In the framework of relativistic mean field (RMF) theory, we have calculated the density distribution of protons and neutrons for Ca40,42,44,48 with NL3 and G2 parameter sets. The microscopic proton-nucleus optical potentials for p+Ca40,42,44,48 systems are evaluated from the Dirac nucleon-nucleon scattering amplitude and the density of the target nucleus using relativistic-Love-Franey and McNeil-Ray-Wallace parametrizations. We have estimated the scattering observables, such as the elastic differential scattering cross section, analyzing power and the spin observables with the relativistic impulse approximation (RIA). The results have been compared with the experimental data for a few selective cases and we find that the use of density as well as the scattering matrix parametrizations are crucial for the theoretical prediction.

  7. Application of relativistic mean field and effective field theory densities to scattering observables for Ca isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Bhuyan, M.; Panda, R. N.; Routray, T. R.; Patra, S. K.

    2010-12-15

    In the framework of relativistic mean field (RMF) theory, we have calculated the density distribution of protons and neutrons for {sup 40,42,44,48}Ca with NL3 and G2 parameter sets. The microscopic proton-nucleus optical potentials for p+{sup 40,42,44,48}Ca systems are evaluated from the Dirac nucleon-nucleon scattering amplitude and the density of the target nucleus using relativistic-Love-Franey and McNeil-Ray-Wallace parametrizations. We have estimated the scattering observables, such as the elastic differential scattering cross section, analyzing power and the spin observables with the relativistic impulse approximation (RIA). The results have been compared with the experimental data for a few selective cases and we find that the use of density as well as the scattering matrix parametrizations are crucial for the theoretical prediction.

  8. Modelling acoustic scattering, sound speed, and attenuation in gassy soft marine sediments.

    PubMed

    Mantouka, A; Dogan, H; White, P R; Leighton, T G

    2016-07-01

    A model for nonlinear gas bubble pulsation in marine sediments is presented. This model is then linearized to determine the resonance frequency and the damping terms for linear radial oscillations. The linear model is then used to predict the effects that such bubble pulsations will have on the sound speed and attenuation of acoustic waves propagating in gassy marine sediment. The results are compared for monodisperse populations against the predictions of a model of Anderson and Hampton and, furthermore, the additional abilities of the model introduced in this paper are discussed. These features include the removal of the sign ambiguities in the expressions, the straightforward implementation for acoustic propagation through polydisperse bubble populations, the capability to estimate bubble size distributions through a full acoustic inversion, and the capability to predict nonlinear effects. PMID:27475152

  9. Prediction of sound fields in acoustical cavities using the boundary element method. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kipp, C. R.; Bernhard, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    A method was developed to predict sound fields in acoustical cavities. The method is based on the indirect boundary element method. An isoparametric quadratic boundary element is incorporated. Pressure, velocity and/or impedance boundary conditions may be applied to a cavity by using this method. The capability to include acoustic point sources within the cavity is implemented. The method is applied to the prediction of sound fields in spherical and rectangular cavities. All three boundary condition types are verified. Cases with a point source within the cavity domain are also studied. Numerically determined cavity pressure distributions and responses are presented. The numerical results correlate well with available analytical results.

  10. Geodesic acoustic modes in tokamak plasmas with a radial equilibrium electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Deng

    2015-09-15

    The dispersion relation of geodesic acoustic modes in the tokamak plasma with an equilibrium radial electric field is derived and analyzed. Multiple branches of eigenmodes have been found, similar to the result given by the fluid model with a poloidal mass flow. Frequencies and damping rates of both the geodesic acoustic mode and the sound wave increase with respect to the strength of radial electric field, while the frequency and the damping rate of the lower frequency branch slightly decrease. Possible connection to the experimental observation is discussed.

  11. Effective Field Theories from Soft Limits of Scattering Amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Clifford; Kampf, Karol; Novotny, Jiri; Trnka, Jaroslav

    2015-06-01

    We derive scalar effective field theories—Lagrangians, symmetries, and all—from on-shell scattering amplitudes constructed purely from Lorentz invariance, factorization, a fixed power counting order in derivatives, and a fixed order at which amplitudes vanish in the soft limit. These constraints leave free parameters in the amplitude which are the coupling constants of well-known theories: Nambu-Goldstone bosons, Dirac-Born-Infeld scalars, and Galilean internal shift symmetries. Moreover, soft limits imply conditions on the Noether current which can then be inverted to derive Lagrangians for each theory. We propose a natural classification of all scalar effective field theories according to two numbers which encode the derivative power counting and soft behavior of the corresponding amplitudes. In those cases where there is no consistent amplitude, the corresponding theory does not exist.

  12. Effective Field Theories from Soft Limits of Scattering Amplitudes.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Clifford; Kampf, Karol; Novotny, Jiri; Trnka, Jaroslav

    2015-06-01

    We derive scalar effective field theories-Lagrangians, symmetries, and all-from on-shell scattering amplitudes constructed purely from Lorentz invariance, factorization, a fixed power counting order in derivatives, and a fixed order at which amplitudes vanish in the soft limit. These constraints leave free parameters in the amplitude which are the coupling constants of well-known theories: Nambu-Goldstone bosons, Dirac-Born-Infeld scalars, and Galilean internal shift symmetries. Moreover, soft limits imply conditions on the Noether current which can then be inverted to derive Lagrangians for each theory. We propose a natural classification of all scalar effective field theories according to two numbers which encode the derivative power counting and soft behavior of the corresponding amplitudes. In those cases where there is no consistent amplitude, the corresponding theory does not exist. PMID:26196613

  13. Wigner representation of ionization and scattering in strong laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, C.; Kull, H.-J.; Fraiman, G. M.

    2015-12-01

    The interaction of single-electron atoms with a strong laser field is studied in the Wigner representation. The Wigner function is a quasiprobability function in phase space that allows one to study position-momentum correlations. These correlations give a physical interpretation of the emergence of the above-threshold-ionization (ATI) energy spectrum. Conversely, the quantum-mechanical interference between electrons from neighboring photon orders can explain the spatial bunching of the electron density by the laser field. Furthermore, the Wigner function offers one a rather accurate and relatively efficient quasiclassical estimate of the bound-state population. This method is applied to laser-induced electron-ion scattering and the stationary regime of the bound-state population can be determined. The present calculations are performed for a one-dimensional Rosen-Morse potential. Extensions to general spherically symmetric atomic potentials are indicated.

  14. Numerical simulation of scattering of acoustic waves by inelastic bodies using hypersingular boundary integral equation

    SciTech Connect

    Daeva, S.G.; Setukha, A.V.

    2015-03-10

    A numerical method for solving a problem of diffraction of acoustic waves by system of solid and thin objects based on the reduction the problem to a boundary integral equation in which the integral is understood in the sense of finite Hadamard value is proposed. To solve this equation we applied piecewise constant approximations and collocation methods numerical scheme. The difference between the constructed scheme and earlier known is in obtaining approximate analytical expressions to appearing system of linear equations coefficients by separating the main part of the kernel integral operator. The proposed numerical scheme is tested on the solution of the model problem of diffraction of an acoustic wave by inelastic sphere.

  15. Comparison of acoustic and seismic excitation, propagation, and scattering at an air-ground interface containing a mine-like inclusion.

    PubMed

    Muir, Thomas G; Costley, R Daniel; Sabatier, James M

    2014-01-01

    Finite element methods are utilized to model and compare the use of both a remote loudspeaker and a vertical shaker in the generation of sound and shear and interface waves in an elastic solid containing an imbedded elastic scatterer, which is resonant. Results for steady state and transient insonification are presented to illustrate excitation, propagation, and scattering mechanisms and effects. Comparisons of acoustic and vibratory excitation of the solid interface are made, with a view towards remote sensing of induced vibratory motion through optical measurement of the ground interface motion above the imbedded inclusion. Some advantages of the acoustic excitation method for exciting plate mode resonances in the target are observed. PMID:24437744

  16. Field installation of an acoustic slug-detection system

    SciTech Connect

    Dhulesia, H.; Bernicot, M.; Romanet, T.

    1997-02-01

    A pipeline operating in the slug flow regime creates high fluctuations in gas and liquid flow rates at the outlet. The detection of slugs and the estimation of their length and velocity are necessary to minimize the upsets in the operation of downstream process facilities. A new method based on the acoustic principle has been developed by Total and Syminex with two variants--passive and active. The passive method gives the slug length and velocity, whereas the active method also gives the fluid density. The prototype of this system has been installed permanently on a 20-in. multiphase pipeline in Argentina. As this system detects the slugs and determines their characteristics approximately 2 minutes before they arrive at the first-stage separator, the operators take appropriate action in the case of arrival of an excessively long slug and, thus, avoid possible shutdowns. At a later stage, an automatic adjustment of the process control valves will be realized.

  17. The optimization of acoustic fields for ablative therapies of tumours in the upper abdomen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gélat, P.; ter Haar, G.; Saffari, N.

    2012-12-01

    High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) enables highly localized, non-invasive tissue ablation and its efficacy has been demonstrated in the treatment of a range of cancers, including those of the kidney, prostate and breast. HIFU offers the ability to treat deep-seated tumours locally, and potentially bears fewer side effects than more invasive treatment modalities such as resection, chemotherapy and ionizing radiation. There remains however a number of significant challenges which currently hinder its widespread clinical application. One of these challenges is the need to transmit sufficient energy through the ribcage to ablate tissue at the required foci whilst minimizing the formation of side lobes and sparing healthy tissue. Ribs both absorb and reflect ultrasound strongly. This sometimes results in overheating of bone and overlying tissue during treatment, leading to skin burns. Successful treatment of a patient with tumours in the upper abdomen therefore requires a thorough understanding of the way acoustic and thermal energy is deposited. Previously, a boundary element approach based on a Generalized Minimal Residual (GMRES) implementation of the Burton-Miller formulation was developed to predict the field of a multi-element HIFU array scattered by human ribs, the topology of which was obtained from CT scan data (Gélat et al 2011 Phys. Med. Biol. 56 5553-81). The present paper describes the reformulation of the boundary element equations as a least-squares minimization problem with nonlinear constraints. The methodology has subsequently been tested at an excitation frequency of 1 MHz on a spherical multi-element array in the presence of ribs. A single array-rib geometry was investigated on which a 50% reduction in the maximum acoustic pressure magnitude on the surface of the ribs was achieved with only a 4% reduction in the peak focal pressure compared to the spherical focusing case. This method was then compared with a binarized apodization approach

  18. The optimization of acoustic fields for ablative therapies of tumours in the upper abdomen.

    PubMed

    Gélat, P; Ter Haar, G; Saffari, N

    2012-12-21

    High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) enables highly localized, non-invasive tissue ablation and its efficacy has been demonstrated in the treatment of a range of cancers, including those of the kidney, prostate and breast. HIFU offers the ability to treat deep-seated tumours locally, and potentially bears fewer side effects than more invasive treatment modalities such as resection, chemotherapy and ionizing radiation. There remains however a number of significant challenges which currently hinder its widespread clinical application. One of these challenges is the need to transmit sufficient energy through the ribcage to ablate tissue at the required foci whilst minimizing the formation of side lobes and sparing healthy tissue. Ribs both absorb and reflect ultrasound strongly. This sometimes results in overheating of bone and overlying tissue during treatment, leading to skin burns. Successful treatment of a patient with tumours in the upper abdomen therefore requires a thorough understanding of the way acoustic and thermal energy is deposited. Previously, a boundary element approach based on a Generalized Minimal Residual (GMRES) implementation of the Burton-Miller formulation was developed to predict the field of a multi-element HIFU array scattered by human ribs, the topology of which was obtained from CT scan data (Gélat et al 2011 Phys. Med. Biol. 56 5553-81). The present paper describes the reformulation of the boundary element equations as a least-squares minimization problem with nonlinear constraints. The methodology has subsequently been tested at an excitation frequency of 1 MHz on a spherical multi-element array in the presence of ribs. A single array-rib geometry was investigated on which a 50% reduction in the maximum acoustic pressure magnitude on the surface of the ribs was achieved with only a 4% reduction in the peak focal pressure compared to the spherical focusing case. This method was then compared with a binarized apodization approach

  19. Sources and Radiation Patterns of Volcano-Acoustic Signals Investigated with Field-Scale Chemical Explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, D. C.; Lees, J. M.; Taddeucci, J.; Graettinger, A. H.; Sonder, I.; Valentine, G.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the processes that give rise to complex acoustic signals during volcanic blasts by monitoring buried chemical explosions with infrasound and audio range microphones, strong motion sensors, and high speed imagery. Acoustic waveforms vary with scaled depth of burial (SDOB, units in meters per cube root of joules), ranging from high amplitude, impulsive, gas expansion dominated signals at low SDOB to low amplitude, longer duration, ground motion dominated signals at high SDOB. Typically, the sudden upward acceleration of the substrate above the blast produces the first acoustic arrival, followed by a second pulse due to the eruption of pressurized gas at the surface. Occasionally, a third overpressure occurs when displaced material decelerates upon impact with the ground. The transition between ground motion dominated and gas release dominated acoustics ranges between 0.0038-0.0018 SDOB, respectively. For example, one explosion registering an SDOB=0.0031 produced two overpressure pulses of approximately equal amplitude, one due to ground motion, the other to gas release. Recorded volcano infrasound has also identified distinct ground motion and gas release components during explosions at Sakurajima, Santiaguito, and Karymsky volcanoes. Our results indicate that infrasound records may provide a proxy for the depth and energy of these explosions. Furthermore, while magma fragmentation models indicate the possibility of several explosions during a single vulcanian eruption (Alidibirov, Bull Volc., 1994), our results suggest that a single explosion can also produce complex acoustic signals. Thus acoustic records alone cannot be used to distinguish between single explosions and multiple closely-spaced blasts at volcanoes. Results from a series of lateral blasts during the 2014 field experiment further indicates whether vent geometry can produce directional acoustic radiation patterns like those observed at Tungarahua volcano (Kim et al., GJI, 2012). Beside

  20. Field support, data analysis and associated research for the acoustic grenade sounding program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, T. G.; Bullard, E. R.

    1976-01-01

    Temperature and horizontal winds in the 30 to 90 km altitude range of the upper atmosphere, were determined by acoustic grenade soundings conducted at Wallops Island, Virginia and Kourou, French Guiana. Field support provided at these locations included deployment of the large area microphone system, supervision, maintenance and operation of sound ranging stations; and coordination of activities. Data analysis efforts included the analysis of field data to determine upper atmospheric meteorological parameters. Profiles for upper atmospheric temperature, wind and density are provided in plots and tables for each of the acoustic grenade soundings conducted during the contract period. Research efforts were directed toward a systematic comparison of temperature data from acoustic grenade with other meteorological sensor probes in the upper atmosphere.

  1. Schlieren imaging of the standing wave field in an ultrasonic acoustic levitator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rendon, Pablo Luis; Boullosa, Ricardo R.; Echeverria, Carlos; Porta, David

    2015-11-01

    We consider a model of a single axis acoustic levitator consisting of two cylinders immersed in air and directed along the same axis. The first cylinder has a flat termination and functions as a sound emitter, and the second cylinder, which is simply a refector, has the side facing the first cylinder cut out by a spherical surface. By making the first cylinder vibrate at ultrasonic frequencies a standing wave is produced in the air between the cylinders which makes it possible, by means of the acoustic radiation pressure, to levitate one or several small objects of different shapes, such as spheres or disks. We use schlieren imaging to observe the acoustic field resulting from the levitation of one or several objects, and compare these results to previous numerical approximations of the field obtained using a finite element method. The authors acknowledge financial support from DGAPA-UNAM through project PAPIIT IN109214.

  2. A search for lower-hybrid-drift fluctuations in a field-reversed configuration using CO2 heterodyne scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Arthur W.

    1987-05-01

    An upper bound of (ñe/ne) <10-4 for frequencies and wavenumbers relevant to the lower-hybrid-drift (LHD) instability is set on fluctuations in field-reversed configurations (FRC's) produced by TRX-2 [Fusion Techn. 9, 48 (1986)]. LHD is a well-studied microinstability that is often invoked to explain particle loss rates in FRC's. The conventional technique of CO2 laser scattering with heterodyne detection is here modified to compensate for severe refraction. The calibration of the system is verified by scattering from acoustic waves in salt. The measured bound is two orders of magnitude below both the fluctuation level usually predicted and the level needed to account for observed particle loss rates. Electron collisionality is identified as the most likely LHD stabilization mechanism. Some alternative explanations of anomalous loss rates are discussed.

  3. Uncertain Acoustic Field Modeling and Robust Source Localization in Shallow Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hangfang; Gong, Xianyi; Yu, Zibin

    2010-09-01

    Oceanic environmental uncertainty can cause significant performance degradation of the SONAR system. Understanding and modeling the uncertainty propagating from environment to acoustic field and then to steering vector is necessary for SONAR design and operation to mitigate the uncertainty effect and provide robust detection and location of targets. The statistical property of uncertainty can be described by the probability density functions or second-order moments of environmental parameters and acoustic fields. Based on the probability description, a stochastic response surface method is used to propagate the uncertainty from environment to acoustic field by polynomial chaos expansion. Then covariance matrix and associated ellipsoidal neighboring space are used to describe the uncertainty set of acoustic field and steering vector for sonar signal processing. Finally, a robust Minimum Variance (MV) matched-field processing method is derived by extending the constrained optimization of MV from single point to an uncertainty steering vector ellipsoid. We apply sea test data collected by a vertical array in shallow water to source localization.

  4. Acoustic characterization of high intensity focused ultrasound fields generated from a transmitter with a large aperture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Tao; Fan, Tingbo; Zhang, Wei; Qiu, Yuanyuan; Tu, Juan; Guo, Xiasheng; Zhang, Dong

    2014-03-01

    Prediction and measurement of the acoustic field emitted from a high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is essential for the accurate ultrasonic treatment. In this study, the acoustic field generated from a strongly focused HIFU transmitter was characterized by a combined experiment and simulation method. The spheroidal beam equation (SBE) was utilized to describe the nonlinear sound propagation. The curve of the source pressure amplitude versus voltage excitation was determined by fitting the measured ratio of the second harmonic to the fundamental component of the focal waveform to the simulation result; finally, the acoustic pressure field generated by the strongly focused HIFU transmitter was predicted by using the SBE model. A commercial fiber optic probe hydrophone was utilized to measure the acoustic pressure field generated from a 1.1 MHz HIFU transmitter with a large half aperture angle of 30°. The maximum measured peak-to-peak pressure was up to 72 MPa. The validity of this combined approach was confirmed by the comparison between the measured results and the calculated ones. The results indicate that the current approach might be useful to describe the HIFU field. The results also suggest that this method is not valid for low excitations owing to low sensitivity of the second harmonic.

  5. Military jet noise source imaging using multisource statistically optimized near-field acoustical holography.

    PubMed

    Wall, Alan T; Gee, Kent L; Neilsen, Tracianne B; McKinley, Richard L; James, Michael M

    2016-04-01

    The identification of acoustic sources is critical to targeted noise reduction efforts for jets on high-performance tactical aircraft. This paper describes the imaging of acoustic sources from a tactical jet using near-field acoustical holography techniques. The measurement consists of a series of scans over the hologram with a dense microphone array. Partial field decomposition methods are performed to generate coherent holograms. Numerical extrapolation of data beyond the measurement aperture mitigates artifacts near the aperture edges. A multisource equivalent wave model is used that includes the effects of the ground reflection on the measurement. Multisource statistically optimized near-field acoustical holography (M-SONAH) is used to reconstruct apparent source distributions between 20 and 1250 Hz at four engine powers. It is shown that M-SONAH produces accurate field reconstructions for both inward and outward propagation in the region spanned by the physical hologram measurement. Reconstructions across the set of engine powers and frequencies suggests that directivity depends mainly on estimated source location; sources farther downstream radiate at a higher angle relative to the inlet axis. At some frequencies and engine powers, reconstructed fields exhibit multiple radiation lobes originating from overlapped source regions, which is a phenomenon relatively recently reported for full-scale jets. PMID:27106340

  6. Acoustic characterization of high intensity focused ultrasound fields generated from a transmitter with a large aperture

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Tao; Fan, Tingbo; Zhang, Wei; Qiu, Yuanyuan; Tu, Juan E-mail: dzhang@nju.edu.cn; Guo, Xiasheng; Zhang, Dong E-mail: dzhang@nju.edu.cn

    2014-03-21

    Prediction and measurement of the acoustic field emitted from a high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is essential for the accurate ultrasonic treatment. In this study, the acoustic field generated from a strongly focused HIFU transmitter was characterized by a combined experiment and simulation method. The spheroidal beam equation (SBE) was utilized to describe the nonlinear sound propagation. The curve of the source pressure amplitude versus voltage excitation was determined by fitting the measured ratio of the second harmonic to the fundamental component of the focal waveform to the simulation result; finally, the acoustic pressure field generated by the strongly focused HIFU transmitter was predicted by using the SBE model. A commercial fiber optic probe hydrophone was utilized to measure the acoustic pressure field generated from a 1.1 MHz HIFU transmitter with a large half aperture angle of 30°. The maximum measured peak-to-peak pressure was up to 72 MPa. The validity of this combined approach was confirmed by the comparison between the measured results and the calculated ones. The results indicate that the current approach might be useful to describe the HIFU field. The results also suggest that this method is not valid for low excitations owing to low sensitivity of the second harmonic.

  7. Dynamics of a spherical particle in an acoustic field: A multiscale approach

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Jin-Han Vanneste, Jacques

    2014-10-15

    A rigid spherical particle in an acoustic wave field oscillates at the wave period but has also a mean motion on a longer time scale. The dynamics of this mean motion is crucial for numerous applications of acoustic microfluidics, including particle manipulation and flow visualisation. It is controlled by four physical effects: acoustic (radiation) pressure, streaming, inertia, and viscous drag. In this paper, we carry out a systematic multiscale analysis of the problem in order to assess the relative importance of these effects depending on the parameters of the system that include wave amplitude, wavelength, sound speed, sphere radius, and viscosity. We identify two distinguished regimes characterised by a balance among three of the four effects, and we derive the equations that govern the mean particle motion in each regime. This recovers and organises classical results by King [“On the acoustic radiation pressure on spheres,” Proc. R. Soc. A 147, 212–240 (1934)], Gor'kov [“On the forces acting on a small particle in an acoustical field in an ideal fluid,” Sov. Phys. 6, 773–775 (1962)], and Doinikov [“Acoustic radiation pressure on a rigid sphere in a viscous fluid,” Proc. R. Soc. London A 447, 447–466 (1994)], clarifies the range of validity of these results, and reveals a new nonlinear dynamical regime. In this regime, the mean motion of the particle remains intimately coupled to that of the surrounding fluid, and while viscosity affects the fluid motion, it plays no part in the acoustic pressure. Simplified equations, valid when only two physical effects control the particle motion, are also derived. They are used to obtain sufficient conditions for the particle to behave as a passive tracer of the Lagrangian-mean fluid motion.

  8. Acoustic propagation through anisotropic internal wave fields: transmission loss, cross-range coherence, and horizontal refraction.

    PubMed

    Oba, Roger; Finette, Steven

    2002-02-01

    Results of a computer simulation study are presented for acoustic propagation in a shallow water, anisotropic ocean environment. The water column is characterized by random volume fluctuations in the sound speed field that are induced by internal gravity waves, and this variability is superimposed on a dominant summer thermocline. Both the internal wave field and resulting sound speed perturbations are represented in three-dimensional (3D) space and evolve in time. The isopycnal displacements consist of two components: a spatially diffuse, horizontally isotropic component and a spatially localized contribution from an undular bore (i.e., a solitary wave packet or solibore) that exhibits horizontal (azimuthal) anisotropy. An acoustic field is propagated through this waveguide using a 3D parabolic equation code based on differential operators representing wide-angle coverage in elevation and narrow-angle coverage in azimuth. Transmission loss is evaluated both for fixed time snapshots of the environment and as a function of time over an ordered set of snapshots which represent the time-evolving sound speed distribution. Horizontal acoustic coherence, also known as transverse or cross-range coherence, is estimated for horizontally separated points in the direction normal to the source-receiver orientation. Both transmission loss and spatial coherence are computed at acoustic frequencies 200 and 400 Hz for ranges extending to 10 km, a cross-range of 1 km, and a water depth of 68 m. Azimuthal filtering of the propagated field occurs for this environment, with the strongest variations appearing when propagation is parallel to the solitary wave depressions of the thermocline. A large anisotropic degradation in horizontal coherence occurs under the same conditions. Horizontal refraction of the acoustic wave front is responsible for the degradation, as demonstrated by an energy gradient analysis of in-plane and out-of-plane energy transfer. The solitary wave packet is

  9. Acoustic propagation through anisotropic internal wave fields: Transmission loss, cross-range coherence, and horizontal refraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oba, Roger; Finette, Steven

    2002-02-01

    Results of a computer simulation study are presented for acoustic propagation in a shallow water, anisotropic ocean environment. The water column is characterized by random volume fluctuations in the sound speed field that are induced by internal gravity waves, and this variability is superimposed on a dominant summer thermocline. Both the internal wave field and resulting sound speed perturbations are represented in three-dimensional (3D) space and evolve in time. The isopycnal displacements consist of two components: a spatially diffuse, horizontally isotropic component and a spatially localized contribution from an undular bore (i.e., a solitary wave packet or solibore) that exhibits horizontal (azimuthal) anisotropy. An acoustic field is propagated through this waveguide using a 3D parabolic equation code based on differential operators representing wide-angle coverage in elevation and narrow-angle coverage in azimuth. Transmission loss is evaluated both for fixed time snapshots of the environment and as a function of time over an ordered set of snapshots which represent the time-evolving sound speed distribution. Horizontal acoustic coherence, also known as transverse or cross-range coherence, is estimated for horizontally separated points in the direction normal to the source-receiver orientation. Both transmission loss and spatial coherence are computed at acoustic frequencies 200 and 400 Hz for ranges extending to 10 km, a cross-range of 1 km, and a water depth of 68 m. Azimuthal filtering of the propagated field occurs for this environment, with the strongest variations appearing when propagation is parallel to the solitary wave depressions of the thermocline. A large anisotropic degradation in horizontal coherence occurs under the same conditions. Horizontal refraction of the acoustic wave front is responsible for the degradation, as demonstrated by an energy gradient analysis of in-plane and out-of-plane energy transfer. The solitary wave packet is

  10. Stimulated Brillouin scattering in the field of a two-dimensionally localized pumping wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solikhov, D. K.; Dvinin, S. A.

    2016-06-01

    Stimulated Brillouin scattering of electromagnetic waves in the field of a two-dimensionally localized pump wave at arbitrary scattering angles in the regime of forward scattering is analyzed. Spatial variations in the amplitudes of interacting waves are studied for different values of the pump field and different dimensions of the pump wave localization region. The intensity of scattered radiation is determined as a function of the scattering angle and the dimensions of the pump wave localization region. It is shown that the intensity increases with increasing scattering angle.

  11. Reciprocity principle for scattered fields from discontinuities in waveguides.

    PubMed

    Pau, Annamaria; Capecchi, Danilo; Vestroni, Fabrizio

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the scattering of guided waves from a discontinuity exploiting the principle of reciprocity in elastodynamics, written in a form that applies to waveguides. The coefficients of reflection and transmission for an arbitrary mode can be derived as long as the principle of reciprocity is satisfied at the discontinuity. Two elastodynamic states are related by the reciprocity. One is the response of the waveguide in the presence of the discontinuity, with the scattered fields expressed as a superposition of wave modes. The other state is the response of the waveguide in the absence of the discontinuity oscillating according to an arbitrary mode. The semi-analytical finite element method is applied to derive the needed dispersion relation and wave mode shapes. An application to a solid cylinder with a symmetric double change of cross-section is presented. This model is assumed to be representative of a damaged rod. The coefficients of reflection and transmission of longitudinal waves are investigated for selected values of notch length and varying depth. PMID:25172113

  12. Field performance of an acoustic scour-depth monitoring system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mason, Jr., Robert R.; Sheppard, D. Max

    1994-01-01

    The Herbert C. Bonner Bridge over Oregon Inlet serves as the only land link between Bodie and Hatteras Islands, part of the Outer Banks of North Carolina. Periodic soundings over the past 30 years have documented channel migration, local scour, and deposition at several pilings that support the bridge. In September 1992, a data-collection system was installed to permit the off-site monitoring of scour at 16 bridge pilings. The system records channel-bed elevations at 15-minute intervals and transmits the data to a satellite receiver. A cellular phone connection also permits downloading and reviewing of the data as they are being collected. A digitally recording, acoustic fathometer is the main component of the system. In November 1993, current velocity, water-surface elevation, wave characteristics, and water temperature measuring instruments were also deployed at the site. Several performance problems relating to the equipment and to the harsh marine environment have not been resolved, but the system has collected and transmitted reliable scour-depth and water-level data.

  13. Hydrophone arrays for instantaneous measurement of high-pressure acoustic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ketterling, Jeffrey A.; Kracht, Jonathan M.; Cleveland, Robin O.

    2010-03-01

    Electrohydraulic lithotripter acoustic fields are measured with single-element hydrophones even though the acoustic fields are not highly repeatable. The ability to obtain an instantaneous "snapshot" of the sound field would have broad implications for advancing the understanding of how lithotripters fragment stones and damage kidney tissue. To better characterize the acoustic field of lithotripters, linear hydrophone arrays were fabricated by bonding a 9 μm piezopolymer film to a copper-clad polyimide which had an array pattern etched on the copper layer. After bonding, the devices were backed with an epoxy plug in order to provide structural support. The array elements were each 0.5 by 0.5 mm, spaced 1.25 mm center to center, and there were 20 elements. The relative sensitivity of each hydrophone element was measured at 5.25 MHz for an acoustic pressure of 4.5 kPa and the elements were found to vary by ≈ 6%. The arrays were then placed in the focus of a piezoelectric lithotripter and were found to maintain their sensitivity for roughly 500 shock waves before gradually losing sensitivity.

  14. Bioacoustic Field Research: A Primer to Acoustic Analyses and Playback Experiments With Primates

    PubMed Central

    FISCHER, JULIA; NOSER, RAHEL; HAMMERSCHMIDT, KURT

    2013-01-01

    Acoustic analyses of primate vocalizations as well as playback experiments are staple methods in primatology. Acoustic analyses have been used to investigate the influence of factors such as individuality, context, sex, age, and size on variation in calls. More recent studies have expanded our knowledge on the effects of phylogenetic relatedness and the structure of primate vocal repertoires in general. Complementary playback experiments allow direct testing of hypotheses regarding the attribution of meaning to calls, the cognitive mechanisms underpinning responses, and/or the adaptive value of primate behavior. After briefly touching on the historical background of this field of research, we first provide an introduction to recording primate vocalizations and discuss different approaches to describe primate calls in terms of their temporal and spectral properties. Second, we present a tutorial regarding the preparation, execution, and interpretation of field playback experiments, including a review of studies that have used such approaches to investigate the responses to acoustic variation in calls including the integration of contextual and acoustic information, recognition of kin and social relationships, and social knowledge. Based on the review of the literature and our own experience, we make a number of recommendations regarding the most common problems and pitfalls. The power of acoustic analyses typically hinges on the quality of the recordings and the number of individuals represented in the sample. Playback experiments require profound knowledge of the natural behavior of the animals for solid interpretation; experiments should be conducted sparingly, to avoid habituation of the subjects to the occurrence of the calls; experimenter-blind designs chosen whenever possible; and researchers should brace themselves for long periods of waiting times until the appropriate moments to do the experiment arise. If all these aspects are considered, acoustic analyses

  15. Dark matter effective field theory scattering in direct detection experiments

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Schneck, K.; Cabrera, B.; Cerdeño, D. G.; Mandic, V.; Rogers, H. E.; Agnese, R.; Anderson, A. J.; Asai, M.; Balakishiyeva, D.; Barker, D.; et al

    2015-05-18

    We examine the consequences of the effective field theory (EFT) of dark matter-nucleon scattering for current and proposed direct detection experiments. Exclusion limits on EFT coupling constants computed using the optimum interval method are presented for SuperCDMS Soudan, CDMS II, and LUX, and the necessity of combining results from multiple experiments in order to determine dark matter parameters is discussed. Here. we demonstrate that spectral differences between the standard dark matter model and a general EFT interaction can produce a bias when calculating exclusion limits and when developing signal models for likelihood and machine learning techniques. In conclusion, we discussmore » the implications of the EFT for the next-generation (G2) direct detection experiments and point out regions of complementarity in the EFT parameter space.« less

  16. Dark matter effective field theory scattering in direct detection experiments

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Schneck, K.

    2015-05-01

    We examine the consequences of the effective field theory (EFT) of dark matter–nucleon scattering for current and proposed direct detection experiments. Exclusion limits on EFT coupling constants computed using the optimum interval method are presented for SuperCDMS Soudan, CDMS II, and LUX, and the necessity of combining results from multiple experiments in order to determine dark matter parameters is discussed. We demonstrate that spectral differences between the standard dark matter model and a general EFT interaction can produce a bias when calculating exclusion limits and when developing signal models for likelihood and machine learning techniques. We also discuss the implicationsmore » of the EFT for the next-generation (G2) direct detection experiments and point out regions of complementarity in the EFT parameter space.« less

  17. Scattering bright solitons: Quantum versus mean-field behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gertjerenken, Bettina; Billam, Thomas P.; Khaykovich, Lev; Weiss, Christoph

    2012-09-01

    We investigate scattering bright solitons off a potential using both analytical and numerical methods. Our paper focuses on low kinetic energies for which differences between the mean-field description via the Gross-Pitaevskii equation (GPE) and the quantum behavior are particularly large. On the N-particle quantum level, adding an additional harmonic confinement leads to a simple signature to distinguish quantum superpositions from statistical mixtures. While the nonlinear character of the GPE does not allow quantum superpositions, the splitting of GPE solitons takes place only partially. When the potential strength is increased, the fraction of the soliton which is transmitted or reflected jumps noncontinuously. We explain these jumps via energy conservation and interpret them as indications for quantum superpositions on the N-particle level. On the GPE level, we also investigate the transition from this stepwise behavior to the continuous case.

  18. Dark matter effective field theory scattering in direct detection experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Schneck, K.

    2015-05-01

    We examine the consequences of the effective field theory (EFT) of dark matter–nucleon scattering for current and proposed direct detection experiments. Exclusion limits on EFT coupling constants computed using the optimum interval method are presented for SuperCDMS Soudan, CDMS II, and LUX, and the necessity of combining results from multiple experiments in order to determine dark matter parameters is discussed. We demonstrate that spectral differences between the standard dark matter model and a general EFT interaction can produce a bias when calculating exclusion limits and when developing signal models for likelihood and machine learning techniques. We also discuss the implications of the EFT for the next-generation (G2) direct detection experiments and point out regions of complementarity in the EFT parameter space.

  19. Dark matter effective field theory scattering in direct detection experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Schneck, K.; Cabrera, B.; Cerdeño, D. G.; Mandic, V.; Rogers, H. E.; Agnese, R.; Anderson, A. J.; Asai, M.; Balakishiyeva, D.; Barker, D.; Basu Thakur, R.; Bauer, D. A.; Billard, J.; Borgland, A.; Brandt, D.; Brink, P. L.; Bunker, R.; Caldwell, D. O.; Calkins, R.; Chagani, H.; Chen, Y.; Cooley, J.; Cornell, B.; Crewdson, C. H.; Cushman, P.; Daal, M.; Di Stefano, P. C. F.; Doughty, T.; Esteban, L.; Fallows, S.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Godfrey, G. L.; Golwala, S. R.; Hall, J.; Harris, H. R.; Hofer, T.; Holmgren, D.; Hsu, L.; Huber, M. E.; Jardin, D. M.; Jastram, A.; Kamaev, O.; Kara, B.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kennedy, A.; Leder, A.; Loer, B.; Lopez Asamar, E.; Lukens, P.; Mahapatra, R.; McCarthy, K. A.; Mirabolfathi, N.; Moffatt, R. A.; Morales Mendoza, J. D.; Oser, S. M.; Page, K.; Page, W. A.; Partridge, R.; Pepin, M.; Phipps, A.; Prasad, K.; Pyle, M.; Qiu, H.; Rau, W.; Redl, P.; Reisetter, A.; Ricci, Y.; Roberts, A.; Saab, T.; Sadoulet, B.; Sander, J.; Schnee, R. W.; Scorza, S.; Serfass, B.; Shank, B.; Speller, D.; Toback, D.; Upadhyayula, S.; Villano, A. N.; Welliver, B.; Wilson, J. S.; Wright, D. H.; Yang, X.; Yellin, S.; Yen, J. J.; Young, B. A.; Zhang, J.

    2015-05-18

    We examine the consequences of the effective field theory (EFT) of dark matter-nucleon scattering for current and proposed direct detection experiments. Exclusion limits on EFT coupling constants computed using the optimum interval method are presented for SuperCDMS Soudan, CDMS II, and LUX, and the necessity of combining results from multiple experiments in order to determine dark matter parameters is discussed. Here. we demonstrate that spectral differences between the standard dark matter model and a general EFT interaction can produce a bias when calculating exclusion limits and when developing signal models for likelihood and machine learning techniques. In conclusion, we discuss the implications of the EFT for the next-generation (G2) direct detection experiments and point out regions of complementarity in the EFT parameter space.

  20. Generation and development of small-amplitude disturbances in a laminar boundary layer in the presence of an acoustic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kachanov, Y. S.; Kozlov, V. V.; Levchenko, V. Y.

    1985-01-01

    A low-turbulence subsonic wind tunnel was used to study the influence of acoustic disturbances on the development of small sinusoidal oscillations (Tollmien-Schlichting waves) which constitute the initial phase of turbulent transition. It is found that acoustic waves propagating opposite to the flow generate vibrations of the model (plate) in the flow. Neither the plate vibrations nor the acoustic field itself have any appreciable influence on the stability of the laminar boundary layer. The influence of an acoustic field on laminar boundary layer disturbances is limited to the generation of Tollmien-Schlichting waves at the leading-edge of the plate.

  1. Acoustic streaming field structure. Part II. Examples that include boundary-driven flow.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Charles

    2012-01-01

    In this paper three simple acoustic streaming problems are presented and solved. The purpose of the paper is to demonstrate the use of a previously published streaming model by Bradley [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 100(3), 1399-1408 (1996)] and illustrate, with concrete examples, some of the features of streaming flows that were predicted by the general model. In particular, the problems are intended to demonstrate cases in which the streaming field boundary condition at the face of the radiator has a nontrivial lateral dc velocity component. Such a boundary condition drives a steady solenoidal flow just like a laterally translating boundary drives Couette flow. PMID:22280567

  2. Sound scattering from rough bubbly ocean surface based on modified sea surface acoustic simulator and consideration of various incident angles and sub-surface bubbles' radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolghasi, Alireza; Ghadimi, Parviz; Chekab, Mohammad A. Feizi

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the present study is to improve the capabilities and precision of a recently introduced Sea Surface Acoustic Simulator (SSAS) developed based on optimization of the Helmholtz-Kirchhoff-Fresnel (HKF) method. The improved acoustic simulator, hereby known as the Modified SSAS (MSSAS), is capable of determining sound scattering from the sea surface and includes an extended Hall-Novarini model and optimized HKF method. The extended Hall-Novarini model is used for considering the effects of sub-surface bubbles over a wider range of radii of sub-surface bubbles compared to the previous SSAS version. Furthermore, MSSAS has the capability of making a three-dimensional simulation of scattered sound from the rough bubbly sea surface with less error than that of the Critical Sea Tests (CST) experiments. Also, it presents scattered pressure levels from the rough bubbly sea surface based on various incident angles of sound. Wind speed, frequency, incident angle, and pressure level of the sound source are considered as input data, and scattered pressure levels and scattering coefficients are provided. Finally, different parametric studies were conducted on wind speeds, frequencies, and incident angles to indicate that MSSAS is quite capable of simulating sound scattering from the rough bubbly sea surface, according to the scattering mechanisms determined by Ogden and Erskine. Therefore, it is concluded that MSSAS is valid for both scattering mechanisms and the transition region between them that are defined by Ogden and Erskine.

  3. Adaptive Plasticity in Wild Field Cricket’s Acoustic Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Bertram, Susan M.; Harrison, Sarah J.; Thomson, Ian R.; Fitzsimmons, Lauren P.

    2013-01-01

    Phenotypic plasticity can be adaptive when phenotypes are closely matched to changes in the environment. In crickets, rhythmic fluctuations in the biotic and abiotic environment regularly result in diel rhythms in density of sexually active individuals. Given that density strongly influences the intensity of sexual selection, we asked whether crickets exhibit plasticity in signaling behavior that aligns with these rhythmic fluctuations in the socio-sexual environment. We quantified the acoustic mate signaling behavior of wild-caught males of two cricket species, Gryllus veletis and G. pennsylvanicus. Crickets exhibited phenotypically plastic mate signaling behavior, with most males signaling more often and more attractively during the times of day when mating activity is highest in the wild. Most male G. pennsylvanicus chirped more often and louder, with shorter interpulse durations, pulse periods, chirp durations, and interchirp durations, and at slightly higher carrier frequencies during the time of the day that mating activity is highest in the wild. Similarly, most male G. veletis chirped more often, with more pulses per chirp, longer interpulse durations, pulse periods, and chirp durations, shorter interchirp durations, and at lower carrier frequencies during the time of peak mating activity in the wild. Among-male variation in signaling plasticity was high, with some males signaling in an apparently maladaptive manner. Body size explained some of the among-male variation in G. pennsylvanicus plasticity but not G. veletis plasticity. Overall, our findings suggest that crickets exhibit phenotypically plastic mate attraction signals that closely match the fluctuating socio-sexual context they experience. PMID:23935965

  4. Imaging of transient surface acoustic waves by full-field photorefractive interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Jichuan; Xu, Xiaodong E-mail: christ.glorieux@fys.kuleuven.be; Glorieux, Christ E-mail: christ.glorieux@fys.kuleuven.be; Matsuda, Osamu; Cheng, Liping

    2015-05-15

    A stroboscopic full-field imaging technique based on photorefractive interferometry for the visualization of rapidly changing surface displacement fields by using of a standard charge-coupled device (CCD) camera is presented. The photorefractive buildup of the space charge field during and after probe laser pulses is simulated numerically. The resulting anisotropic diffraction upon the refractive index grating and the interference between the polarization-rotated diffracted reference beam and the transmitted signal beam are modeled theoretically. The method is experimentally demonstrated by full-field imaging of the propagation of photoacoustically generated surface acoustic waves with a temporal resolution of nanoseconds. The surface acoustic wave propagation in a 23 mm × 17 mm area on an aluminum plate was visualized with 520 × 696 pixels of the CCD sensor, yielding a spatial resolution of 33 μm. The short pulse duration (8 ns) of the probe laser yields the capability of imaging SAWs with frequencies up to 60 MHz.

  5. Characterization of the Acoustic Field in Marine Environments with Anthropogenic Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Shane

    Most animals inhabit the aquatic environment are acoustical-oriented, due to the physical characteristics of water that favors sound transmission. Many aquatic animals depend on underwater sound to navigate, communicate, find prey, and avoid predators. The degradation of underwater acoustic environment due to human activities is expected to affected these animals' well-being and survival at the population level. This dissertation presents three original studies on the characteristics and behavior of underwater sound fields in three unique marine environments with anthropogenic noises. The first study examines the soundscape of the Chinese white dolphin habitat in Taiwan. Acoustic recordings were made at two coastal shallow water locations, Yunlin and Waisanding, in 2012. Results show that croaker choruses are dominant sound sources in the 1.2--2.4 kHz frequency band for both locations at night, and noises from container ships in the 150--300 Hz frequency band define the relative higher broadband sound levels at Yunlin. Results also illustrate interrelationships among different biotic, abiotic, and anthropogenic elements that shape the fine-scale soundscape in a coastal environment. The second study investigates the inter-pulse sound field during an open-water seismic survey in coastal shallow waters of the Arctic. The research uses continuous acoustic recordings collected from one bottom-mounted hydrophone deployed in the Beaufort Sea in summer 2012. Two quantitative methods were developed to examine the inter-pulse sound field characteristics and its dependence on source distances. Results show that inter-pulse sound field could raise the ambient noise floor by as much as 9 dB, depending on ambient condition and source distance. The third study examines the inter-ping sound field of simulated mid-frequency active sonar in deep waters off southern California in 2013 and 2014. The study used drifting acoustic recorder buoys to collect acoustic data during sonar

  6. Raman Scattering Spectra of the Folded Acoustic Phonon in AlxGa1-xAs/GaAs Superlattices for Various Al Mole Fractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukasawa, Ryoichi; Okubo, Yusei; Abe, Osamu; Ohta, Kimihiro

    1992-03-01

    We report the Raman scattering spectra of the folded longitudinal acoustic phonon of AlxGa1-xAs/GaAs superlattices for various aluminium (Al) mole fractions. The effect of Al mole fraction increases on the Raman intensities and the frequencies was studied.

  7. Collective acoustic modes as renormalized damped oscillators: Unified description of neutron and x-ray scattering data from classical fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bafile, Ubaldo; Guarini, Eleonora; Barocchi, Fabrizio

    2006-06-01

    In the Q range where inelastic x-ray and neutron scattering are applied to the study of acoustic collective excitations in fluids, various models of the dynamic structure factor S(Q,ω) generalize in different ways the results obtained from linearized-hydrodynamics theory in the Q→0 limit. Here we show that the models most commonly fitted to experimental S(Q,ω) spectra can be given a unified formulation. In this way, direct comparisons among the results obtained by fitting different models become now possible to a much larger extent than ever. We also show that a consistent determination of the dispersion curve and of the propagation Q range of the excitations is possible, whichever model is used. We derive an exact formula which describes in all cases the dispersion curve and allows for the first quantitative understanding of its shape, by assigning specific and distinct roles to the various structural, thermal, and damping effects that determine the Q dependence of the mode frequencies. The emerging picture describes the acoustic modes as Q -dependent harmonic oscillators whose characteristic frequency is explicitly renormalized in an exact way by the relaxation processes, which also determine, through the widths of both the inelastic and the elastic lines, the whole shape of collective-excitation spectra.

  8. Collective acoustic modes as renormalized damped oscillators: unified description of neutron and x-ray scattering data from classical fluids.

    PubMed

    Bafile, Ubaldo; Guarini, Eleonora; Barocchi, Fabrizio

    2006-06-01

    In the Q range where inelastic x-ray and neutron scattering are applied to the study of acoustic collective excitations in fluids, various models of the dynamic structure factor S(Q, omega) generalize in different ways the results obtained from linearized-hydrodynamics theory in the Q-->0 limit. Here we show that the models most commonly fitted to experimental S(Q, omega) spectra can be given a unified formulation. In this way, direct comparisons among the results obtained by fitting different models become now possible to a much larger extent than ever. We also show that a consistent determination of the dispersion curve and of the propagation Q range of the excitations is possible, whichever model is used. We derive an exact formula which describes in all cases the dispersion curve and allows for the first quantitative understanding of its shape, by assigning specific and distinct roles to the various structural, thermal, and damping effects that determine the Q dependence of the mode frequencies. The emerging picture describes the acoustic modes as Q-dependent harmonic oscillators whose characteristic frequency is explicitly renormalized in an exact way by the relaxation processes, which also determine, through the widths of both the inelastic and the elastic lines, the whole shape of collective-excitation spectra. PMID:16906814

  9. Acoustic behavior of a rigidly backed poroelastic layer with periodic resonant inclusions by a multiple scattering approach.

    PubMed

    Weisser, Thomas; Groby, Jean-Philippe; Dazel, Olivier; Gaultier, François; Deckers, Elke; Futatsugi, Sideto; Monteiro, Luciana

    2016-02-01

    The acoustic response of a rigidly backed poroelastic layer with a periodic set of elastic cylindrical inclusions embedded is studied. A semi-analytical approach is presented, based on Biot's 1956 theory to account for the deformation of the skeleton, coupling mode matching technique, Bloch wave representation, and multiple scattering theory. This model is validated by comparing the derived absorption coefficients to finite element simulations. Numerical results are further exposed to investigate the influence of the properties of the inclusions (type, material properties, size) of this structure, while a modal analysis is performed to characterize the dynamic behaviors leading to high acoustic absorption. Particularly, in the case of thin viscoelastic membranes, an absorption coefficient larger than 0.8 is observed on a wide frequency band. This property is found to be due to the coupling between the first volume mode of the inclusion and the trapped mode induced by the periodic array and the rigid backing, for a wavelength in the air smaller than 11 times the material thickness. PMID:26936546

  10. Collective acoustic modes as renormalized damped oscillators: Unified description of neutron and x-ray scattering data from classical fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Bafile, Ubaldo; Guarini, Eleonora

    2006-06-15

    In the Q range where inelastic x-ray and neutron scattering are applied to the study of acoustic collective excitations in fluids, various models of the dynamic structure factor S(Q,{omega}) generalize in different ways the results obtained from linearized-hydrodynamics theory in the Q{yields}0 limit. Here we show that the models most commonly fitted to experimental S(Q,{omega}) spectra can be given a unified formulation. In this way, direct comparisons among the results obtained by fitting different models become now possible to a much larger extent than ever. We also show that a consistent determination of the dispersion curve and of the propagation Q range of the excitations is possible, whichever model is used. We derive an exact formula which describes in all cases the dispersion curve and allows for the first quantitative understanding of its shape, by assigning specific and distinct roles to the various structural, thermal, and damping effects that determine the Q dependence of the mode frequencies. The emerging picture describes the acoustic modes as Q-dependent harmonic oscillators whose characteristic frequency is explicitly renormalized in an exact way by the relaxation processes, which also determine, through the widths of both the inelastic and the elastic lines, the whole shape of collective-excitation spectra.

  11. Field evaluation of boat-mounted acoustic Doppler instruments used to measure streamflow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mueller, D.S.

    2003-01-01

    The use of instruments based on the Doppler principle for measuring water velocity and computing discharge is common within the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The instruments and software have changed appreciably during the last 5 years; therefore, the USGS has begun field validation of the instruments used to make discharge measurements from a moving boat. Instruments manufactured by SonTek/YSI and RD Instruments, Inc. were used to collect discharge data at five different sites. One or more traditional discharge measurements were made using a Price AA current meter and standard USGS procedures concurrent with the acoustic instruments at each site. Discharges measured with the acoustic instruments were compared with discharges measured with Price AA current meters and the USGS stage-discharge rating for each site. The mean discharges measured by each acoustic instrument were within 5 percent of the Price AA-based measurement and (or) discharge from the stage-discharge rating.

  12. Range-dependent flexibility in the acoustic field of view of echolocating porpoises (Phocoena phocoena).

    PubMed

    Wisniewska, Danuta M; Ratcliffe, John M; Beedholm, Kristian; Christensen, Christian B; Johnson, Mark; Koblitz, Jens C; Wahlberg, Magnus; Madsen, Peter T

    2015-01-01

    Toothed whales use sonar to detect, locate, and track prey. They adjust emitted sound intensity, auditory sensitivity and click rate to target range, and terminate prey pursuits with high-repetition-rate, low-intensity buzzes. However, their narrow acoustic field of view (FOV) is considered stable throughout target approach, which could facilitate prey escape at close-range. Here, we show that, like some bats, harbour porpoises can broaden their biosonar beam during the terminal phase of attack but, unlike bats, maintain the ability to change beamwidth within this phase. Based on video, MRI, and acoustic-tag recordings, we propose this flexibility is modulated by the melon and implemented to accommodate dynamic spatial relationships with prey and acoustic complexity of surroundings. Despite independent evolution and different means of sound generation and transmission, whales and bats adaptively change their FOV, suggesting that beamwidth flexibility has been an important driver in the evolution of echolocation for prey tracking. PMID:25793440

  13. Single-shot measurements of the acoustic field of an electrohydraulic lithotripter using a hydrophone array

    PubMed Central

    Alibakhshi, Mohammad A.; Kracht, Jonathan M.; Cleveland, Robin O.; Filoux, Erwan; Ketterling, Jeffrey A.

    2013-01-01

    Piezopolymer-based hydrophone arrays consisting of 20 elements were fabricated and tested for use in measuring the acoustic field from a shock-wave lithotripter. The arrays were fabricated from piezopolymer films and were mounted in a housing to allow submersion into water. The motivation was to use the array to determine how the shot-to-shot variability of the spark discharge in an electrohydraulic lithotripter affects the resulting focused acoustic field. It was found that the dominant effect of shot-to-shot variability was to laterally shift the location of the focus by up to 5 mm from the nominal acoustic axis of the lithotripter. The effect was more pronounced when the spark discharge was initiated with higher voltages. The lateral beamwidth of individual, instantaneous shock waves were observed to range from 1.5 mm to 24 mm. Due to the spatial variation of the acoustic field, the average of instantaneous beamwidths were observed to be 1 to 2 mm narrower than beamwidths determined from traditional single-point measurements that average the pressure measured at each location before computing beamwidth. PMID:23654419

  14. Integrating Acoustic Imaging of Flow Regimes With Bathymetry: A Case Study, Main Endeavor Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bemis, K. G.; Rona, P. A.; Jackson, D. R.; Jones, C. D.

    2003-12-01

    A unified view of the seafloor and the hydrothermal flow regimes (plumes and diffuse flow) is constructed for three major vent clusters in the Main Endeavour Field (e.g., Grotto, S&M, and Salut) of the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge. The Main Endeavour Field is one of RIDGE 2000's Integrated Study Sites. A variety of visualization techniques are used to reconstruct the plumes (3D) and the diffuse flow field (2D) based on our acoustic imaging data set (July 2000 cruise). Plumes are identified as volumes of high backscatter intensity (indicating high particulate content or sharp density contrasts due to temperature variations) that remained high intensity when successive acoustic pings were subtracted (indicating that the acoustic targets producing the backscatter were in motion). Areas of diffuse flow are detected using our acoustic scintillation technique (AST). For the Grotto vent region (where a new Doppler technique was used to estimate vertical velocities in the plume), we estimate the areal partitioning between black smoker and diffuse flow in terms of volume fluxes. The volumetric and areal regions, where plume and diffuse flow were imaged, are registered over the bathymetry and compared to geologic maps of each region. The resulting images provide a unified view of the seafloor by integrating hydrothermal flow with geology.

  15. Acoustic field interaction with a boiling system under terrestrial gravity and microgravity.

    PubMed

    Sitter, J S; Snyder, T J; Chung, J N; Marston, P L

    1998-11-01

    Pool boiling experiments from a platinum wire heater in FC-72 liquid were conducted under terrestrial and microgravity conditions, both with and without the presence of a high-intensity acoustic standing wave within the fluid. The purpose of this research was to study the interaction between an acoustic field and a pool boiling system in normal gravity and microgravity. The absence of buoyancy in microgravity complicates the process of boiling. The acoustic force on a vapor bubble generated from a heated wire in a standing wave was shown to be able to play the role of buoyancy in microgravity. The microgravity environment was achieved with 0.6 and 2.1-s drop towers. The sound was transmitted through the fluid medium by means of a half wavelength sonic transducer driven at 10.18 kHz. At high enough acoustic pressure amplitudes cavitation and streaming began playing an important role in vapor bubble dynamics and heat transfer. Several different fixed heat fluxes were chosen for the microgravity experiment and the effects of acoustics on the surface temperature of the heater were recorded and the vapor bubble movement was filmed. Video images of the pool boiling processes and heat transfer data are presented. PMID:9821335

  16. A finite difference analysis of the field present behind an acoustically impenetrable two-layer barrier.

    PubMed

    Hurrell, Andrew M

    2008-06-01

    The interaction of an incident sound wave with an acoustically impenetrable two-layer barrier is considered. Of particular interest is the presence of several acoustic wave components in the shadow region of this barrier. A finite difference model capable of simulating this geometry is validated by comparison to the analytical solution for an idealized, hard-soft barrier. A panel comprising a high air-content closed cell foam backed with an elastic (metal) back plate is then examined. The insertion loss of this panel was found to exceed the dynamic range of the measurement system and was thus acoustically impenetrable. Experimental results from such a panel are shown to contain artifacts not present in the diffraction solution, when acoustic waves are incident upon the soft surface. A finite difference analysis of this experimental configuration replicates the presence of the additional field components. Furthermore, the simulated results allow the additional components to be identified as arising from the S(0) and A(0) Lamb modes traveling in the elastic plate. These Lamb mode artifacts are not found to be present in the shadow region when the acoustic waves are incident upon the elastic surface. PMID:18537372

  17. A gearbox fault diagnosis scheme based on near-field acoustic holography and spatial distribution features of sound field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Wenbo; Jiang, Weikang; Yuan, Guoqing; Yan, Li

    2013-05-01

    Vibration signal analysis is the main technique in machine condition monitoring or fault diagnosis, whereas in some cases vibration-based diagnosis is restrained because of its contact measurement. Acoustic-based diagnosis (ABD) with non-contact measurement has received little attention, although sound field may contain abundant information related to fault pattern. A new scheme of ABD for gearbox based on near-field acoustic holography (NAH) and spatial distribution features of sound field is presented in this paper. It focuses on applying distribution information of sound field to gearbox fault diagnosis. A two-stage industrial helical gearbox is experimentally studied in a semi-anechoic chamber and a lab workshop, respectively. Firstly, multi-class faults (mild pitting, moderate pitting, severe pitting and tooth breakage) are simulated, respectively. Secondly, sound fields and corresponding acoustic images in different gearbox running conditions are obtained by fast Fourier transform (FFT) based NAH. Thirdly, by introducing texture analysis to fault diagnosis, spatial distribution features are extracted from acoustic images for capturing fault patterns underlying the sound field. Finally, the features are fed into multi-class support vector machine for fault pattern identification. The feasibility and effectiveness of our proposed scheme is demonstrated on the good experimental results and the comparison with traditional ABD method. Even with strong noise interference, spatial distribution features of sound field can reliably reveal the fault patterns of gearbox, and thus the satisfactory accuracy can be obtained. The combination of histogram features and gray level gradient co-occurrence matrix features is suggested for good diagnosis accuracy and low time cost.

  18. Dynamic scattering theory for dark-field electron holography of 3D strain fields.

    PubMed

    Lubk, Axel; Javon, Elsa; Cherkashin, Nikolay; Reboh, Shay; Gatel, Christophe; Hÿtch, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Dark-field electron holography maps strain in crystal lattices into reconstructed phases over large fields of view. Here we investigate the details of the lattice strain-reconstructed phase relationship by applying dynamic scattering theory both analytically and numerically. We develop efficient analytic linear projection rules for 3D strain fields, facilitating a straight-forward calculation of reconstructed phases from 3D strained materials. They are used in the following to quantify the influence of various experimental parameters like strain magnitude, specimen thickness, excitation error and surface relaxation. PMID:24012934

  19. Antifade sonar employs acoustic field diversity to recover signals from multipath fading

    SciTech Connect

    Lubman, D.

    1996-04-01

    Co-located pressure and particle motion (PM) hydrophones together with four-channel diversity combiners may be used to recover signals from multipath fading. Multipath fading is important in both shallow and deep water propagation and can be an important source of signal loss. The acoustic field diversity concept arises from the notion of conservation of signal energy and the observation that in rooms at least, the total acoustic energy density is the sum of potential energy (scalar field-sound pressure) and kinetic energy (vector field-sound PM) portions. One pressure hydrophone determines acoustic potential energy density at a point. In principle, three PM sensors (displacement, velocity, or acceleration) directed along orthogonal axes describe the kinetic energy density at a point. For a single plane wave, the time-averaged potential and kinetic field energies are identical everywhere. In multipath interference, however, potential and kinetic field energies at a point are partitioned unequally, depending mainly on relative signal phases. Thus, when pressure signals are in deep fade, abundant kinetic field signal energy may be available at that location. Performance benefits require a degree of uncorrelated fading between channels. The expectation of nearly uncorrelated fading is motivated from room theory. Performance benefits for sonar limited by independent Rayleigh fading are suggested by analogy to antifade radio. Average SNR can be improved by several decibels, holding time on target is multiplied manifold, and the bit error rate for data communication is reduced substantially. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. Antifade sonar employs acoustic field diversity to recover signals from multipath fading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubman, David

    1996-04-01

    Co-located pressure and particle motion (PM) hydrophones together with four-channel diversity combiners may be used to recover signals from multipath fading. Multipath fading is important in both shallow and deep water propagation and can be an important source of signal loss. The acoustic field diversity concept arises from the notion of conservation of signal energy and the observation that in rooms at least, the total acoustic energy density is the sum of potential energy (scalar field-sound pressure) and kinetic energy (vector field-sound PM) portions. One pressure hydrophone determines acoustic potential energy density at a point. In principle, three PM sensors (displacement, velocity, or acceleration) directed along orthogonal axes describe the kinetic energy density at a point. For a single plane wave, the time-averaged potential and kinetic field energies are identical everywhere. In multipath interference, however, potential and kinetic field energies at a point are partitioned unequally, depending mainly on relative signal phases. Thus, when pressure signals are in deep fade, abundant kinetic field signal energy may be available at that location. Performance benefits require a degree of uncorrelated fading between channels. The expectation of nearly uncorrelated fading is motivated from room theory. Performance benefits for sonar limited by independent Rayleigh fading are suggested by analogy to antifade radio. Average SNR can be improved by several decibels, holding time on target is multiplied manifold, and the bit error rate for data communication is reduced substantially.

  1. Experimental evidence of the effect of heat flux on thomson scattering off ion acoustic waves

    PubMed

    Amiranoff; Baton; Huller; Malka; Modena; Mounaix; Galloudec; Rousseaux; Salvati

    2000-02-01

    Thomson self-scattering measurements are performed in a preionized helium gas jet plasma at different locations along the laser propagation direction. A systematic and important variation of the intensity ratio between the blue and the red ion spectral components is observed, depending on whether the location of the probed region is in front of or behind the focal plane. A simple theoretical calculation of Thomson scattering shows that this behavior can be qualitatively understood in terms of a deformation of the electron distribution function due to the return current correlated with the classical thermal heat flux. PMID:11046481

  2. Underwater patch near-field acoustical holography based on particle velocity and vector hydrophone array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Bo; Yang, DeSen; Li, SiChun; Sun, Yu; Mo, ShiQi; Shi, ShengGuo

    2012-11-01

    One-step patch near-field acoustical holography (PNAH) is a powerful tool for identifying noise sources from the partially known sound pressure field. The acoustical property to be reconstructed on the surface of interest is related to the partially measured pressure on the hologram surface in terms of sampling and bandlimiting matrices, which cost more in computation. A one-step procedure based on measuring of the normal component of the particle velocity is described, including the mathematical formulation. The numerical simulation shows that one-step PNAH based on particle velocity can obtain more accurately reconstructed results and it is also less sensitive to noise than the method based on pressure. These findings are confirmed by an underwater near-field acoustical holography experiment conducted with a vector hydrophone array. The experimental results have illustrated the high performance of one-step PNAH based on particle velocity in the reconstruction of sound field and the advantages of a vector hydrophone array in an underwater near-field measurement.

  3. Determination of the Accommodation Coefficient Using Vapor/gas Bubble Dynamics in an Acoustic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gumerov, Nail A.; Hsiao, Chao-Tsung; Goumilevski, Alexei G.; Allen, Jeff (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Nonequilibrium liquid/vapor phase transformations can occur in superheated or subcooled liquids in fast processes such as in evaporation in a vacuum. The rate at which such a phase transformation occurs depends on the "condensation" or "accommodation" coefficient, Beta, which is a property of the interface. Existing measurement techniques for Beta are complex and expensive. The development of a relatively inexpensive and reliable technique for measurement of Beta for a wide range of substances and temperatures is of great practical importance. The dynamics of a bubble in an acoustic field strongly depends on the value of Beta. It is known that near the saturation temperature, small vapor bubbles grow under the action of an acoustic field due to "rectified heat transfer." This finding can be used as the basis for an effective measurement technique of Beta. We developed a theory of vapor bubble behavior in an isotropic acoustic wave and in a plane standing acoustic wave. A numerical code was developed which enables simulation of a variety of experimental situations and accurately takes into account slowly evolving temperature. A parametric study showed that the measurement of Beta can be made over a broad range of frequencies and bubble sizes. We found several interesting regimes and conditions which can be efficiently used for measurements of Beta. Measurements of Beta can be performed in both reduced and normal gravity environments.

  4. Thomson-Scattering Measurements of Ion-Acoustic Wave Amplitudes Driven by the Two-Plasmon-Decay Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Follett, R. K.; Michel, D. T.; Myatt, J. F.; Hu, S. X.; Yaakobi, B.; Froula, D. H.

    2012-10-01

    Thomson scattering was used to measure enhanced ion-acoustic waves (IAW's) driven by the two-plasmon-decay (TPD) instability. The IAW amplitude scales with the 3/2φ emission (a TPD signature). Up to 20 beams with 860-μm-diam laser spots generated by 2-ns-long pulses of 3φ (0.351-μm) light with overlapped intensities up to 4 x 10^14 W/cm^2 were used to produce ˜300-μm density-scale lengths. The IAW amplitudes were measured using 4φ Thomson scattering near 3φ quarter-critical densities. Time-resolved 3/2φ spectroscopy was used to compare the amplitude of 3/2φ emission to the IAW amplitude. QZAKfootnotetext K. Y. Sanbonmatsu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 932 (1999).^,footnotetext K. Y. Sanbonmatsu et al., Phys. Plasmas 7, 2824 (2000). modeling shows a similar onset threshold and wave amplitude as the experiments. The model suggests that the source of the IAW growth is from the beating of electron-plasma waves, which drive density perturbations through the ponderomotive force. This conclusion is supported by the experimental geometry. This process is shown to be a saturation mechanism for TPD from simulations.footnotetext R. Yan et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 175002 (2009). This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC52-08NA28302.

  5. Applications of whole field interferometry in mechanics and acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molin, Nils-Erik

    1999-07-01

    A description is given of fringe formation in holographic interferometry, in electronic speckle pattern interferometry, in electro-optic or TV holography and for a newly developed system for pulsed TV-holography. A numerical example, which simulates the equations describing the different techniques, is included. A strain measuring system using defocused digital speckle photography is described. Experiments showing mode shapes of musical instruments, transient bending wave propagation in beams and plates as well as sound pressure fields in air are included.

  6. Source signature and acoustic field of seismic physical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Q.; Jackson, C.; Tang, G.; Burbach, G.

    2004-12-01

    As an important tool of seismic research and exploration, seismic physical modeling simulates the real world data acquisition by scaling the model, acquisition parameters, and some features of the source generated by a transducer. Unlike the numerical simulation where a point source is easily satisfied, the transducer can't be made small enough for approximating the point source in physical modeling, therefore yield different source signature than the sources applied in the field data acquisition. To better understand the physical modeling data, characterizing the wave field generated by ultrasonic transducers is desirable and helpful. In this study, we explode several aspects of source characterization; including their radiation pattern, directivity, sensitivity and frequency response. We also try to figure out how to improve the acquired data quality, such as minimize ambient noise, use encoded chirp to prevent ringing, apply deterministic deconvolution to enhance data resolution and t-P filtering to remove linear events. We found that the transducer and their wave field, the modeling system performance, as well as material properties of the model and their coupling conditions all play roles in the physical modeling data acquisition.

  7. Short-range order and near-field effects on optical scattering and structural coloration

    SciTech Connect

    Liew, S.F.; Forster, J.; Noh, H.; Schreck, C.F.; Saranathan, V.; Lu, X.; Yang, L.; Prum, Richard O.; O’Hern, C.S.; Dufresne, E.R.; Cao, H.

    2012-03-26

    We have investigated wavelength-dependent light scattering in biomimetic structures with short-range order. Coherent backscattering experiments are performed to measure the transport mean free path over a wide wavelength range. Overall scattering strength is reduced significantly due to short-range order and near-field effects. Our analysis explains why single scattering of light is dominant over multiple scattering in similar biological structures and is responsible for color generation.

  8. Short-range Order and Near-field Effects on Optical Scattering and Structural Coloration

    SciTech Connect

    S Liew; J Forster; H Noh; C Schreck; V Saranathan; X Lu; L Yang; E Dufresne; H Cao; et al.

    2011-12-31

    We have investigated wavelength-dependent light scattering in biomimetic structures with short-range order. Coherent backscattering experiments are performed to measure the transport mean free path over a wide wavelength range. Overall scattering strength is reduced significantly due to short-range order and near-field effects. Our analysis explains why single scattering of light is dominant over multiple scattering in similar biological structures and is responsible for color generation.

  9. Production and Validation of Acoustic Field to Enhance Trapping Efficiency of Microbubbles by Using a Matrix Array Transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosaka, Naoto; Koda, Ren; Onogi, Shinya; Mochizuki, Takashi; Masuda, Kohji

    2013-07-01

    We have developed a new matrix array transducer for controlling the behavior of microbubbles, which is different from that for high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy, in order to emit continuous wave by designing an acoustic field including multiple focal points. In the experiment using a thin-channel model, a wider acoustic field has an advantage for trapping microbubbles. In the experiment using a straight-path model, we have confirmed that a higher concentration of acoustic energy does not result in more aggregates. The dispersion of acoustic energy is important because the trapping performance is affected by the relationship between the shape of the acoustic field and the concentration of the suspension.

  10. Acoustic and electromagnetic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Douglas Samuel

    Theoretical models of EM and acoustic wave propagation are presented in an introductory text intended for intermediate-level science and engineering students. Chapters are devoted to the mathematical representation of acoustic and EM fields, the special theory of relativity, radiation, resonators, waveguide theory, refraction, surface waves, scattering by smooth objects, diffraction by edges, and transient waves. The mathematical tools required for the analysis (Bessel, Legendre, Mathieu, parabolic-cylinder, and spheroidal functions; tensor calculus; and the asymptotic evaluation of integrals) are covered in appendices.

  11. A full-field perturbation approach to scattering and reverberation in range-dependent environments with rough interfaces.

    PubMed

    Ivakin, Anatoliy N

    2016-07-01

    A perturbation approach to roughness scattering and reverberation in range-dependent environments is developed treating each interface as a superposition of a smooth reference interface, which may include large-scale deterministic features (such as bathymetry changes), and small compared to the acoustic wavelength vertical deviations from this interface that are considered as random roughness perturbations. The reference interface is assumed to be smooth enough to allow analytic or numerical solution for the field in the vicinity of this interface that can then be used in perturbation theory. Expressions for both the reverberation field and average reverberation intensity in a general case of an arbitrary number of rough interfaces are obtained in a form convenient for numerical simulations. In the case of long-range ocean reverberation, several approximations for these expressions are developed, relevant to various environmental scenarios and different types of interfaces: sea-surface, water-sediment interface, buried sediment interfaces, and bottom basement. The results are presented in a simple form and provide a direct relationship of the reverberation intensity with three critical characteristics defined at each interface: (1) local spectrum of roughness, (2) local contrast of acoustic parameters, and (3) two-way full-field transmission intensity calculated taking into account only large-scale changes of the environment. PMID:27475187

  12. Photoreflectance investigation of exciton-acoustic phonon scattering in GaN grown by MOVPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouzidi, M.; Soltani, S.; Halidou, I.; Chine, Z.; El Jani, B.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we report a systematic investigation of the near band edge (NBE) excitonic states in GaN using low temperature photoluminescence (PL) and photoreflectance (PR) measurements. For this purpose, GaN films of different thicknesses have been grown on silicon nitride (SiN) treated c-plane sapphire substrates by atmospheric pressure metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE). Low temperature PR spectra exhibit well-defined spectral features related to the A, B and C free excitons denoted by FXA FXB and FXC, respectively. In contrast, PL spectra are essentially dominated by the A free and donor bound excitons. By combining PR spectra and Hall measurements a strong correlation between residual electron concentration and exciton linewidths is observed. From the temperature dependence of the excitonic linewidths, the exciton-acoustic phonon coupling constant is determined for FXA, FXB and FXC. We show that this coupling constant is strongly related to the exciton kinetic energy and to the strain level.

  13. Underwater Acoustic Matched Field Imaging Based on Compressed Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Huichen; Xu, Jia; Long, Teng; Zhang, Xudong

    2015-01-01

    Matched field processing (MFP) is an effective method for underwater target imaging and localizing, but its performance is not guaranteed due to the nonuniqueness and instability problems caused by the underdetermined essence of MFP. By exploiting the sparsity of the targets in an imaging area, this paper proposes a compressive sensing MFP (CS-MFP) model from wave propagation theory by using randomly deployed sensors. In addition, the model’s recovery performance is investigated by exploring the lower bounds of the coherence parameter of the CS dictionary. Furthermore, this paper analyzes the robustness of CS-MFP with respect to the displacement of the sensors. Subsequently, a coherence-excluding coherence optimized orthogonal matching pursuit (CCOOMP) algorithm is proposed to overcome the high coherent dictionary problem in special cases. Finally, some numerical experiments are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed CS-MFP method. PMID:26457708

  14. Underwater Acoustic Matched Field Imaging Based on Compressed Sensing.

    PubMed

    Yan, Huichen; Xu, Jia; Long, Teng; Zhang, Xudong

    2015-01-01

    Matched field processing (MFP) is an effective method for underwater target imaging and localizing, but its performance is not guaranteed due to the nonuniqueness and instability problems caused by the underdetermined essence of MFP. By exploiting the sparsity of the targets in an imaging area, this paper proposes a compressive sensing MFP (CS-MFP) model from wave propagation theory by using randomly deployed sensors. In addition, the model's recovery performance is investigated by exploring the lower bounds of the coherence parameter of the CS dictionary. Furthermore, this paper analyzes the robustness of CS-MFP with respect to the displacement of the sensors. Subsequently, a coherence-excluding coherence optimized orthogonal matching pursuit (CCOOMP) algorithm is proposed to overcome the high coherent dictionary problem in special cases. Finally, some numerical experiments are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed CS-MFP method. PMID:26457708

  15. Near-field evanescent waves scattered from a spatially deterministic and anisotropic medium.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia; Chang, Liping; Wu, Zhefu

    2015-06-15

    The scattering of light from an anisotropic medium, which may present either spatially random or deterministic statistics, has attracted substantial interest where the measurement of structural properties of scatterers is concerned. To date, however, no literature has studied near-zone evanescent waves scattered from a spatially deterministic and anisotropic medium. In this Letter, integral expressions are derived to represent electric fields of evanescent waves in the near-zone scattered field. In addition, the dependences of spectral densities of scattered field on the propagation distance of evanescent waves and effective radius of the scattering potential (ERSP) are also shown by numerical graphs, respectively. Potential applications of our study include the near-field optical microscopy and biomedical sensing. PMID:26076235

  16. Classifying onset durations of early VLF events: Scattered field analysis and new insights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotovsky, D. A.; Moore, R. C.

    2015-08-01

    The physical processes responsible for a variety of early VLF scattering events have not yet been satisfactorily identified. Properly categorizing the early VLF event type is imperative to understand the causative physical processes involved. In this paper, the onset durations of 26 exceptionally high signal-to-noise ratio early VLF scattering events are analyzed, using scattered fields to classify events. New observations of events that exhibit "slow" amplitude changes, but "fast" scattered field changes are presented, which call into question previous analyses of early/slow events. We separately identify and analyze three early VLF events that definitively exhibit slow scattered field behavior. Additionally, we identify a significant number of events which have onset durations between the current definitions of fast and slow. Four events are observed which unambiguously exhibit a rapid initial rotation of the scattered field phasor during the first few seconds of the recovery stage. Possible physical mechanisms are discussed.

  17. Transmitted sound field due to an impulsive line acoustic source bounded by a plate followed by a vortex sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miura, T.; Chao, C. C.

    1980-01-01

    The propagation of sound due to a line acoustic source in the moving stream across a semiinfinite vortex sheet which trails from a rigid plate is examined in a linear theory for the subsonic case. A solution for the transmitted sound field is obtained with the aid of multiple integral transforms and the Wiener-Hopf technique for both the steady state (time harmonic) and initial value (impulsive source) situations. The contour of inverse transform and hence the decomposition of the functions are determined through causality and radiation conditions. The solution obtained satisfies causality and the full Kutta conditions. The transmitted sound field is composed of two waves in both the stady state and initial value problems. One is the wave scattered from the edge of the plate which is associated with the bow wave and the instability wave. These waves exist in the downstream sectors. The other is the wave transmitted through the vortex sheet which is also associated with the instability wave. Regional divisions of the transmitted sound field are identified.

  18. Field theory for zero sound and ion acoustic wave in astrophysical matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabadadze, Gregory; Rosen, Rachel A.

    2016-02-01

    We set up a field theory model to describe the longitudinal low-energy modes in high density matter present in white dwarf stars. At the relevant scales, ions—the nuclei of oxygen, carbon, and helium—are treated as heavy pointlike spin-0 charged particles in an effective field theory approach, while the electron dynamics is described by the Dirac Lagrangian at the one-loop level. We show that there always exists a longitudinal gapless mode in the system irrespective of whether the ions are in a plasma, crystal, or quantum liquid state. For certain values of the parameters, the gapless mode can be interpreted as a zero sound mode and, for other values, as an ion acoustic wave; we show that the zero sound and ion acoustic wave are complementary to each other. We discuss possible physical consequences of these modes for properties of white dwarfs.

  19. Detection and processing of electromagnetic and near-field acoustic signals in elasmobranch fishes.

    PubMed Central

    Kalmijn, A D

    2000-01-01

    The acoustic near field of quietly moving underwater objects and the bio-electric field of aquatic animals exhibit great similarity, as both are predominantly governed by Laplace's equation. The acoustic and electrical sensory modalities thus may, in directing fishes to their prey, employ analogous processing algorithms, suggesting a common evolutionary design, founded on the salient physical features shared by the respective stimulus fields. Sharks and rays are capable of orientating to the earth's magnetic field and, hence, have a magnetic sense. The electromagnetic theory of orientation offers strong arguments for the animals using the electric fields induced by ocean currents and by their own motions in the earth's magnetic field. In the animal's frame of reference, in which the sense organs are at rest, the classical concept of motional electricity must be interpreted in relativistic terms. In the ampullae of Lorenzini, weak electric fields cause the ciliated apical receptor-cell membranes to produce graded, negative receptor currents opposite in direction to the fields applied. The observed currents form part of a positive-feedback mechanism, supporting the generation of receptor potentials much larger than the input signal. Acting across the basal cell membranes, the receptor potentials control the process of synaptic transmission. PMID:11079385

  20. Aerodynamic sound generation due to vortex-aerofoil interaction. Part 2: Analysis of the acoustic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parasarathy, R.; Karamcheti, K.

    1972-01-01

    The Lighthill method was the basic procedure used to analyze the sound field associated with a vortex of modified strength interacting with an airfoil. A free vortex interacting with an airfoil in uniform motion was modeled in order to determine the sound field due to all the acoustic sources, not only on the airfoil surfaces (dipoles), but also the ones distributed on the perturbed flow field (quadrupoles) due to the vortex-airfoil interaction. Because inviscid flow is assumed in the study of the interaction, the quadrupoles considered in the perturbed flow field are entirely due to an unsteady flow field. The effects of airfoil thickness on the second radiation are examined by using a symmetric Joukowski airfoil for the vortex-airfoil interaction. Sound radiation in a plane, far field simplification, and computation of the sound field are discussed.

  1. Possible variations of E-layer electromagnetic fields by acoustic waves above earthquake preparation regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meister, C.-V.; Mayer, B.; Hoffmann, D. H. H.

    2012-04-01

    The many-fluid magnetohydrodynamic theory is applied to describe the modification of the electromagnetic field of the ionospheric E-layer by acoustic-type waves. These waves originate from lower altitudes and may be caused by earthquake preparation processes. In comparison to former works, the different stratification of the positively and negatively charged ionospheric particles and of the neutral constituents is taken into account. There also the influence of the mean electric field on the different hight scales of the plasma parameters is discussed. Besides, the hight scales of the electric and magnetic wave fields are modeled. It is shown that at E-layer altitudes the acoustic waves may be converted into Alfvén waves. The dependence of these waves on the height scales of the plasma parameters of the particles and on the momentum transport between the charged and neutral particles is analysed. First estimates of the temperature variations within the E-layer because of the assumed acoustic-type waves of seismic origin are made.

  2. Generalized acoustic energy density based active noise control in single frequency diffuse sound fields.

    PubMed

    Xu, Buye; Sommerfeldt, Scott D

    2014-09-01

    In a diffuse sound field, prior research has established that a secondary source can theoretically achieve perfect cancellation at an error microphone in the far field of the secondary source. However, the sound pressure level is generally only reduced in a small zone around the error sensor, and at a distance half of a wavelength away from the error sensor, the averaged sound pressure level will be increased by more than 10 dB. Recently an acoustic energy quantity, referred to as the generalized acoustic energy density (GED), has been introduced. The GED is obtained by using a weighting factor in the formulation of total acoustic energy density. Different values of the weighting factor can be chosen for different applications. When minimizing the GED at the error sensor, one can adjust the weighting factor to increase the spatial extent of the "quiet zone" and to achieve a desired balance between the degree of attenuation in the quiet zone and the total energy added into the sound field. PMID:25190386

  3. A hybrid numerical technique for predicting the aerodynamic and acoustic fields of advanced turboprops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homicz, G. F.; Moselle, J. R.

    1985-01-01

    A hybrid numerical procedure is presented for the prediction of the aerodynamic and acoustic performance of advanced turboprops. A hybrid scheme is proposed which in principle leads to a consistent simultaneous prediction of both fields. In the inner flow a finite difference method, the Approximate-Factorization Alternating-Direction-Implicit (ADI) scheme, is used to solve the nonlinear Euler equations. In the outer flow the linearized acoustic equations are solved via a Boundary-Integral Equation (BIE) method. The two solutions are iteratively matched across a fictitious interface in the flow so as to maintain continuity. At convergence the resulting aerodynamic load prediction will automatically satisfy the appropriate free-field boundary conditions at the edge of the finite difference grid, while the acoustic predictions will reflect the back-reaction of the radiated field on the magnitude of the loading source terms, as well as refractive effects in the inner flow. The equations and logic needed to match the two solutions are developed and the computer program implementing the procedure is described. Unfortunately, no converged solutions were obtained, due to unexpectedly large running times. The reasons for this are discussed and several means to alleviate the situation are suggested.

  4. Coupled acoustic-gravity field for dynamic evaluation of ion exchange with a single resin bead.

    PubMed

    Kanazaki, Takahiro; Hirawa, Shungo; Harada, Makoto; Okada, Tetsuo

    2010-06-01

    A coupled acoustic-gravity field is efficient for entrapping a particle at the position determined by its acoustic properties rather than its size. This field has been applied to the dynamic observation of ion-exchange reactions occurring in a single resin bead. The replacement of counterions in an ion-exchange resin induces changes in its acoustic properties, such as density and compressibility. Therefore, we can visually trace the advancement of an ion-exchange reaction as a time change in the levitation position of a resin bead entrapped in the field. Cation-exchange reactions occurring in resin beads with diameters of 40-120 microm are typically completed within 100-200 s. Ion-exchange equilibrium or kinetics is often evaluated with off-line chemical analyses, which require a batch amount of ion exchangers. Measurements with a single resin particle allow us to evaluate ion-exchange dynamics and kinetics of ions including those that are difficult to measure by usual off-line analyses. The diffusion properties of ions in resins have been successfully evaluated from the time change in the levitation positions of resin beads. PMID:20462180

  5. On the slow dynamics of near-field acoustically levitated objects under High excitation frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilssar, Dotan; Bucher, Izhak

    2015-10-01

    This paper introduces a simplified analytical model describing the governing dynamics of near-field acoustically levitated objects. The simplification converts the equation of motion coupled with the partial differential equation of a compressible fluid, into a compact, second order ordinary differential equation, where the local stiffness and damping are transparent. The simplified model allows one to more easily analyse and design near-field acoustic levitation based systems, and it also helps to devise closed-loop controller algorithms for such systems. Near-field acoustic levitation employs fast ultrasonic vibrations of a driving surface and exploits the viscosity and the compressibility of a gaseous medium to achieve average, load carrying pressure. It is demonstrated that the slow dynamics dominates the transient behaviour, while the time-scale associated with the fast, ultrasonic excitation has a small presence in the oscillations of the levitated object. Indeed, the present paper formulates the slow dynamics under an ultrasonic excitation without the need to explicitly consider the latter. The simplified model is compared with a numerical scheme based on Reynolds equation and with experiments, both showing reasonably good results.

  6. Effects of a rough boundary surface on polarization of the scattered field from an inhomogeneous medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fung, A. K.; Eom, H. J.

    1983-01-01

    A combination of the standard Kirchhoff method for rough surface scattering with the Rayleigh phase function radiative transfer method for volume scattering is employed in the present study of the effect of surface roughness on the polarization of the scattered field. It is found that for pure surface scattering, the polarization ratio between zero and 20 deg incidence angles is sensitive to surface roughness change. When both surface and volume scattering are present, however, copolarization nulls by colatitude or degree of polarization at zero to 15 deg incidence angle, and copolarization or crosspolarization nulls by longitude at large incidence angles, are better indicators of surface roughness changes. It is noted that degree of polarization and copolarization nulls by colatitude vary monotonously with incidence angle, while in combined surface and volume scattering these have, respectively, a minimum and a maximum. This characteristic allows the separation of combined surface and volume scattering from pure surface or volume scattering.

  7. Light comfort zones of mesopelagic acoustic scattering layers in two contrasting optical environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Røstad, Anders; Kaartvedt, Stein; Aksnes, Dag L.

    2016-07-01

    We make a comparison of the mesopelagic sound scattering layers (SLs) in two contrasting optical environments; the clear Red Sea and in murkier coastal waters of Norway (Masfjorden). The depth distributions of the SL in Masfjorden are shallower and narrower than those of the Red Sea. This difference in depth distribution is consistent with the hypothesis that the organisms of the SL distribute according to similar light comfort zones (LCZ) in the two environments. Our study suggest that surface and underwater light measurements ranging more than 10 orders of magnitude is required to assess the controlling effects of light on SL structure and dynamics.

  8. Characteristics of Poker Flat Incoherent Scatter Radar (PFISR) naturally enhanced ion-acoustic lines (NEIALs) in relation to auroral forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michell, R. G.; Grydeland, T.; Samara, M.

    2014-10-01

    Naturally enhanced ion-acoustic lines (NEIALs) have been observed with the Poker Flat Incoherent Scatter Radar (PFISR) ever since it began operating in 2006. The nearly continuous operation of PFISR since then has led to a large number of NEIAL observations from there, where common-volume, high-resolution auroral imaging data are available. We aim to systematically distinguish the different types of auroral forms that are associated with different NEIAL features, including spectral shape and altitude extent. We believe that NEIALs occur with a continuum of morphological characteristics, although we find that most NEIALs observed with PFISR fall into two general categories. The first group occurs at fairly low altitudes - F region or below - and have power at, and spread between, the ion-acoustic peaks. The second group contains the type of NEIALs that have previously been observed with the EISCAT radars, those that extend to high altitudes (600 km or more) and often have large asymmetries in the power enhancements between the two ion-acoustic shoulders. We find that there is a correlation between the auroral structures and the type of NEIALs observed, and that the auroral structures present during NEIAL events are consistent with the likely NEIAL generation mechanisms inferred in each case. The first type of NEIAL - low altitude - is the most commonly observed with PFISR and is most often associated with active, structured auroral arcs, such as substorm growth phase, and onset arcs and are likely generated by Langmuir turbulence. The second type of NEIAL - high altitude - occurs less frequently in the PFISR radar and is associated with aurora that contains large fluxes of low-energy electrons, as can happen in poleward boundary intensifications as well as at substorm onset and is likely the result of current-driven instabilities and in some cases Langmuir turbulence as well. In addition, a preliminary auroral photometry analysis revealed that there is an

  9. Mie scattering and optical forces from evanescent fields: a complex-angle approach.

    PubMed

    Bekshaev, Aleksandr Y; Bliokh, Konstantin Y; Nori, Franco

    2013-03-25

    Mie theory is one of the main tools describing scattering of propagating electromagnetic waves by spherical particles. Evanescent optical fields are also scattered by particles and exert radiation forces which can be used for optical near-field manipulations. We show that the Mie theory can be naturally adopted for the scattering of evanescent waves via rotation of its standard solutions by a complex angle. This offers a simple and powerful tool for calculations of the scattered fields and radiation forces. Comparison with other, more cumbersome, approaches shows perfect agreement, thereby validating our theory. As examples of its application, we calculate angular distributions of the scattered far-field irradiance and radiation forces acting on dielectric and conducting particles immersed in an evanescent field. PMID:23546090

  10. IN VITRO CHARACTERIZATION OF LIPOSOMES AND OPTISON® BY ACOUSTIC SCATTERING AT 3.5 MHZ

    PubMed Central

    Coussios, Constantin-C.; Holland, Christy K.; Jakubowska, Ludwika; Huang, Shao-Ling; Macdonald, Robert C.; Nagaraj, Ashwin; McPherson, David D.

    2016-01-01

    Liposomes are phospholipid vesicles that can encapsulate both gas and fluid. With antibody conjugation, new formulations, known as immunoliposomes, can be targeted to atheroma and other pathologic components and are, thus, being developed as novel diagnostic ultrasound (US) echo contrast agents to enhance atherosclerosis imaging. The majority of these echogenic liposomes range in diameter from 0.25 to 5.0 µm. To quantify the echogenicity of liposome suspensions of varying concentrations, the backscattering coefficient at 3.5 MHz was determined experimentally. The backscattering coefficient was also estimated theoretically as a function of air volume fraction by modeling the encapsulated air as a free air bubble and assuming single bubble scattering. For most of the liposome concentrations examined in this study (on the order of 108/mL), the backscattering coefficient equals or exceeds that of Optison® at the human clinical dosage (on the order of 104/mL). Experimental measurement of the decrease in backscattering coefficient shows promise as a sensitive method for determining whether liposomes are left intact or destroyed during imaging; thus, helping to explore their potential as a vehicle for targeted drug delivery. In addition, the attenuation of US through liposome suspensions is negligible at 3.5 MHz relative to the attenuation through Optison® (0.25 dB/cm), suggesting that liposomes have a much higher scatter-to-attenuation ratio and could be more efficient as contrast agents. PMID:14998670

  11. Application of acoustic tomography to reconstruct the horizontal flow velocity field in a shallow river

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razaz, Mahdi; Kawanisi, Kiyosi; Kaneko, Arata; Nistor, Ioan

    2015-12-01

    A novel acoustic tomographic measurement system capable of resolving sound travel time in extremely shallow rivers is introduced and the results of an extensive field measurements campaign are presented and further discussed. Acoustic pulses were transmitted over a wide frequency band of 20-35 kHz between eight transducers for about a week in a meandering reach of theBāsen River, Hiroshima, Japan. The purpose of the field experiment was validating the concept of acoustic tomography in rivers for visualizing current fields. The particular novelty of the experiment resides in its unusual tomographic features: subbasin scale (100 m × 270 m) and shallowness (0.5-3.0 m) of the physical domain, frequency of the transmitted acoustic signals (central frequency of 30 kHz), and the use of small sampling intervals (105 s). Inverse techniques with no a priori statistical information were used to estimate the depth-average current velocity components from differential travel times. Zeroth-order Tikhonov regularization, in conjunction with L-curve method deployed to stabilize the solution and to determine the weighting factor appearing in the inverse analysis. Concurrent direct environmental measurements were provided in the form of ADCP readings close to the right and left bank. Very good agreement found between along-channel velocities larger than 0.2 m/s obtained from the two techniques. Inverted quantities were, however, underestimated, perhaps due to vicinity of the ADCPs to the banks and strong effect of river geometry on the readings. In general, comparing the visualized currents with direct nodal measurements illustrate the plausibility of the tomographically reconstructed flow structures.

  12. Distributed Acoustic Sensing Technology in a Magmatic Geothermal Field - First Results From a Survey in Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinsch, Thomas; Jousset, Philippe; Henninges, Jan; Blanck, Hanna

    2016-04-01

    Seismic methods are particularly suited for investigating the Earth's subsurface. Compared to surface-measurements , wellbore measurements can be used to acquire more detailed information about rock properties and possible fluid pathways within a geothermal reservoir. For high temperature geothermal wells, however, ambient temperatures are often far above the operating temperature range of conventional geophones. One way to overcome this limitation is the application of fiber optic sensor systems, where only the passive optical fiber is subjected to downhole conditions. Their applicability is thus determined by the operating temperature range of the optical fiber. Choosing appropriate fibers, such sensor systems can be operated at temperatures far above 200°C. Along an optical fiber, the distributed acoustic sensing technology (DAS) can be used to acquire acoustic signals with a high spatial and temporal resolution. Previous experiments have shown that the DAS technology is well suited for active seismic measurements. Within the framework of the EC funded project IMAGE, a fiber optic cable was deployed in a newly drilled geothermal well (RN-34) within the Reykjanes geothermal field, Iceland. Additionally, a >15 km fiber optic cable, already available at the surface, was connected to a DAS read-out unit. Acoustic data was acquired continuously for 9 days. Hammer shots were performed at the wellhead as well as along the surface cable in order to locate individual acoustic traces and calibrate the spatial distribution of the acoustic information. During the monitoring period both signals from on- and offshore explosive sources and natural seismic events could be recorded. We compare the fiber optic data to conventional seismic records from a dense seismic network deployed on the Reykjanes in the course of the IMAGE project. Here, first results from the seismic survey will be presented.

  13. Methods And Systems For Using Reference Images In Acoustic Image Processing

    DOEpatents

    Moore, Thomas L.; Barter, Robert Henry

    2005-01-04

    A method and system of examining tissue are provided in which a field, including at least a portion of the tissue and one or more registration fiducials, is insonified. Scattered acoustic information, including both transmitted and reflected waves, is received from the field. A representation of the field, including both the tissue and the registration fiducials, is then derived from the received acoustic radiation.

  14. Gold nanoparticle tips for optical field confinement in infrared scattering near-field optical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wenzel, Marc Tobias; Härtling, Thomas; Olk, Phillip; Kehr, Susanne C; Grafström, Stefan; Winnerl, Stephan; Helm, Manfred; Eng, Lukas M

    2008-08-01

    We report on the implementation of metal nanoparticles as probes for scattering and apertureless near-field optical investigations in the mid-infrared (mid-IR) spectral regime. At these wavelengths, an efficient electric-field confinement is necessary and achieved here through a gold metal nanoparticle of 80 nm in diameter (Au80-MNP) acting as the optical antenna. The Au80-MNP is attached to a standard AFM cantilever used as the spatial manipulator. When approached to a sample surface while being illuminated with an infrared beam, the Au80-MNP produces a considerably improved spatial confinement of the electric field compared to an ordinary scattering AFM tip. We demonstrate here the confinement normal to the sample surface by making use of a sample-induced phonon polariton resonance in a ferroelectric lithium niobate sample. Our experimental findings are in very good agreement with the quasistatic dipole model and show improved optical resolution via well-selected antenna particles. PMID:18679508

  15. Scatter radiation intensities around full-field digital mammography units.

    PubMed

    Judge, M A; Keavey, E; Phelan, N

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the scatter radiation intensity around digital mammography systems and apply these data to standard shielding calculations to reveal whether shielding design of existing breast screening rooms is adequate for the use of digital mammography systems. Three digital mammography systems from GE Healthcare, Hologic and Philips were employed in the study. A breast-equivalent phantom was imaged under clinical workload conditions and scatter radiation intensities around the digital mammography systems were measured for a range of angles in three planes using an ionisation chamber. The results were compared with those from previous studies of film-screen systems. It may be deduced from the results that scattering in the backward direction is significant for all three systems, while scattering in the forward direction can be significant for some planes around the GE and Hologic systems. Measurements at typical clinical settings on each system revealed the Philips system to have markedly lower scatter radiation intensities than the other systems. Substituting the measured scattered radiation intensity into shielding calculations yielded barrier requirements similar to those already in place at the screening centres operating these systems. Current radiation protection requirements based on film-screen technology remain sufficient when applied to rooms with digital mammography installations and no alteration is required to the structural shielding. PMID:23239693

  16. Near-field/far-field array manifold of an acoustic vector-sensor near a reflecting boundary.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yue Ivan; Lau, Siu-Kit; Wong, Kainam Thomas

    2016-06-01

    The acoustic vector-sensor (a.k.a. the vector hydrophone) is a practical and versatile sound-measurement device, with applications in-room, open-air, or underwater. It consists of three identical uni-axial velocity-sensors in orthogonal orientations, plus a pressure-sensor-all in spatial collocation. Its far-field array manifold [Nehorai and Paldi (1994). IEEE Trans. Signal Process. 42, 2481-2491; Hawkes and Nehorai (2000). IEEE Trans. Signal Process. 48, 2981-2993] has been introduced into the technical field of signal processing about 2 decades ago, and many direction-finding algorithms have since been developed for this acoustic vector-sensor. The above array manifold is subsequently generalized for outside the far field in Wu, Wong, and Lau [(2010). IEEE Trans. Signal Process. 58, 3946-3951], but only if no reflection-boundary is to lie near the acoustic vector-sensor. As for the near-boundary array manifold for the general case of an emitter in the geometric near field, the far field, or anywhere in between-this paper derives and presents that array manifold in terms of signal-processing mathematics. Also derived here is the corresponding Cramér-Rao bound for azimuth-elevation-distance localization of an incident emitter, with the reflected wave shown to play a critical role on account of its constructive or destructive summation with the line-of-sight wave. The implications on source localization are explored, especially with respect to measurement model mismatch in maximum-likelihood direction finding and with regard to the spatial resolution between coexisting emitters. PMID:27369140

  17. Two Years of Industrial Experience in the Use of a Small, Direct Field Acoustic Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saggini, Nicola; Di Pietro, Vincenzo; Poulain, Nicolas; Herzog, Philippe

    2012-07-01

    Within Thales Alenia Space - Italy small satellite Assembly Integration and Test (AIT) plant, the need to develop a suitable facility for spacecraft acoustic noise test has arisen, with additional constraints posed by the necessity of a low impact on the existing building layout, low cost of procurement and operations, while maintaining a high reliability of the system for a theoretical maximum throughput of one test per week over an extended period of time, e.g. six months. The needs have been answered by developing a small (~40 m3 test volume), direct field (DF A T) acoustic test chamber, christened “Alpha Cabin”, where noise generation is achieved by means of commercial audio drivers equipped with custom enclosures. The paper starts with a brief presentation of the main characteristics of the system, but then concentrates on the lessons learnt and return of experience from the tests conducted in more than two years of continuous use. Starting from test article structural responses and their comparison with reverberant chambers, properties of the acoustic field and their implications on the former are analyzed.

  18. Angular Spectrum Method for the Focused Acoustic Field of a Linear Transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belgroune, D.; de Belleval, J. F.; Djelouah, H.

    Applications involving non-destructive testing or acoustical imaging are more and more sophisticated. In this context, a model based on the angular spectrum approach is tackled in view to calculate the focused impulse field radiated by a linear transducer through a plane fluid-solid interface. It is well known that electronic focusing, based on a cylindrical delay law, like for the classical cases (lenses, curved transducer), leads to an inaccurate focusing in the solid due to geometric aberrations errors affecting refraction. Generally, there is a significant difference between the acoustic focal distance and the geometrical focal due to refraction. In our work, an optimized delay law, based on the Fermat's principle is established, particularly at an oblique incidence where the geometrical considerations, relatively simple in normal incidence, become quickly laborious. Numerical simulations of impulse field are judiciously carried out. Subsequently, the input parameters are optimally selected in order to achieve good computation accuracy and a high focusing. The overall results, involving compression and shear waves, have highlighted the focusing improvement in the solid when compared to the currently available approaches. Indeed, the acoustic focal distance is very close to geometrical focal distance and then, allows better control of the refracted angular beam profile (refraction angle, focusing depth and focal size).

  19. Investigation on the reproduction performance versus acoustic contrast control in sound field synthesis.

    PubMed

    Bai, Mingsian R; Wen, Jheng-Ciang; Hsu, Hoshen; Hua, Yi-Hsin; Hsieh, Yu-Hao

    2014-10-01

    A sound reconstruction system is proposed for audio reproduction with extended sweet spot and reduced reflections. An equivalent source method (ESM)-based sound field synthesis (SFS) approach, with the aid of dark zone minimization is adopted in the study. Conventional SFS that is based on the free-field assumption suffers from synthesis error due to boundary reflections. To tackle the problem, the proposed system utilizes convex optimization in designing array filters with both reproduction performance and acoustic contrast taken into consideration. Control points are deployed in the dark zone to minimize the reflections from the walls. Two approaches are employed to constrain the pressure and velocity in the dark zone. Pressure matching error (PME) and acoustic contrast (AC) are used as performance measures in simulations and experiments for a rectangular loudspeaker array. Perceptual Evaluation of Audio Quality (PEAQ) is also used to assess the audio reproduction quality. The results show that the pressure-constrained (PC) method yields better acoustic contrast, but poorer reproduction performance than the pressure-velocity constrained (PVC) method. A subjective listening test also indicates that the PVC method is the preferred method in a live room. PMID:25324063

  20. A theoretical and numerical resolution of an acoustic multiple scattering problem in three-dimensional case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amamou, Manel L.

    2016-05-01

    This paper develops an analytical solution for sound, electromagnetic or any other wave propagation described by the Helmholtz equation in three-dimensional case. First, a theoretical investigation based on multipole expansion method and spherical wave functions was established, through which we show that the resolution of the problem is reduced to solving an infinite, complex and large linear system. Second, we explain how to suitably truncate the last infinite dimensional system to get an accurate stable and fast numerical solution of the problem. Then, we evaluate numerically the theoretical solution of scattering problem by multiple ideal rigid spheres. Finally, we made a numerical study to present the "Head related transfer function" with respect to different physical and geometrical parameters of the problem.

  1. Brillouin light scattering spectra as local temperature sensors for thermal magnons and acoustic phonons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birt, Daniel R.; An, Kyongmo; Weathers, Annie; Shi, Li; Tsoi, Maxim; Li, Xiaoqin

    2013-02-01

    We demonstrate the use of the micro-Brillouin light scattering (micro-BLS) technique as a local temperature sensor for magnons in a permalloy (Py) thin film and phonons in the glass substrate. When the Py film is uniformly heated, we observe a systematic shift in the frequencies of two thermally excited perpendicular standing spin wave modes. Fitting the temperature dependent magnon spectra allows us to achieve a temperature resolution better than 2.5 K. In addition, we demonstrate that the micro-BLS spectra can be used to measure the local temperature of magnons and the relative temperature shift of phonons across a thermal gradient. Such local temperature sensors are useful for investigating spin caloritronic and thermal transport phenomena in general.

  2. Power method for calculating the far acoustic field of the helicopter lift rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samokhin, V. F.

    2011-05-01

    A semiempirical method for calculating the far acoustic field of the lift rotor of a helicopter operating in the regime of oblique flow over it is described. The basic parametric relations for the acoustic radiation power of rotor noise components have been obtained on the basis of the Lamb idea that vortex-free motion arises under the action of a periodic force on an infinitely small volume of the medium. All sources of lift rotor noise are subdivided into two groups pertaining, respectively, to the inductive and profile parts of the total power supplied to the rotor. A comparison has been made between the results of calculation of the harmonic components of lift rotor noise made on the basis of the power method and the experimental data for the Mi-28 helicopter.

  3. On an acoustic field generated by subsonic jet at low Reynolds numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamamoto, K.; Arndt, R. E. A.

    1978-01-01

    An acoustic field generated by subsonic jets at low Reynolds numbers was investigated. This work is motivated by the need to increase the fundamental understanding of the jet noise generation mechanism which is essential to the development of further advanced techniques of noise suppression. The scope of this study consists of two major investigation. One is a study of large scale coherent structure in the jet turbulence, and the other is a study of the Reynolds number dependence of jet noise. With this in mind, extensive flow and acoustic measurements in low Reynolds number turbulent jets (8,930 less than or equal to M less than or equal to 220,000) were undertaken using miniature nozzles of the same configuration but different diameters at various exist Mach numbers (0.2 less than or equal to M less than or equal to 0.9).

  4. Dynamics of a Coagulating Polydisperse Gas Suspension in the Nonlinear Wave Field of an Acoustic Resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tukmakov, A. L.

    2015-01-01

    A model of a multivelocity multitemperature polydisperse gas suspension has been constructed with account taken of coagulation. Calculations of the dynamics of an aerosol of a polydisperse composition in an acoustic resonator have been done and the derived regularities have been described. A system of Navier-Stokes equations for a compressible heat-conducting gas was used to describe the motion of a carrier medium. The dynamics of dispersed fractions is described by a system of equations including continuity, momentum, and internal-energy equations. The equations of motion of the carrier medium and dispersed fractions have been written with account of the interphase exchange of momentum and energy. The Lagrangian model has been used to describe the process of coagulation. The change in the dispersity of the gas suspension in the nonlinear field of an acoustic resonator has been analyzed.

  5. Computation of the pressure field generated by surface acoustic waves in microchannels.

    PubMed

    Darinskii, A N; Weihnacht, M; Schmidt, H

    2016-07-01

    The high-frequency pressure induced by a surface acoustic wave in the fluid filling a microchannel is computed by solving the full scattering problem. The microchannel is fabricated inside a container attached to the top of a piezoelectric substrate where the surface wave propagates. The finite element method is used. The pressure found in this way is compared with the pressure obtained by solving boundary-value problems formulated on the basis of simplifications which have been introduced in earlier papers by other research studies. The considered example shows that the difference between the results can be significant, ranging from several tens of percent up to several times in different points inside the channel. PMID:27314212

  6. High-energy scatterings in infinite-derivative field theory and ghost-free gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talaganis, Spyridon; Mazumdar, Anupam

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we will consider scattering diagrams in the context of infinite-derivative theories. First, we examine a finite-order, higher-derivative scalar field theory and find that we cannot eliminate the growth of scattering diagrams for large external momenta. Then, we employ an infinite-derivative scalar toy model and obtain that the external momentum dependence of scattering diagrams is convergent as the external momenta become very large. In order to eliminate the external momentum growth, one has to dress the bare vertices of the scattering diagrams by considering renormalised propagator and vertex loop corrections to the bare vertices. Finally, we investigate scattering diagrams in the context of a scalar toy model which is inspired by a ghost-free and singularity-free infinite-derivative theory of gravity, where we conclude that infinite derivatives can eliminate the external momentum growth of scattering diagrams and make the scattering diagrams convergent in the ultraviolet.

  7. An eigenvalue correction due to scattering by a rough wall of an acoustic waveguide.

    PubMed

    Krynkin, Anton; Horoshenkov, Kirill V; Tait, Simon J

    2013-08-01

    In this paper a derivation of the attenuation factor in a waveguide with stochastic walls is presented. The perturbation method and Fourier analysis are employed to derive asymptotically consistent boundary-value problems at each asymptotic order. The derived approximation predicts the attenuation of the propagating mode in a rough waveguide through a correction to the eigenvalue corresponding to smooth walls. The proposed approach can be used to derive results that are consistent with those obtained by Bass et al. [IEEE Trans. Antennas Propag. 22, 278-288 (1974)]. The novelty of the method is that it does not involve the integral Dyson-type equation and, as a result, the large number of statistical moments included in the equation in the form of the mass operator of the volume scattering theory. The derived eigenvalue correction is described by the correlation function of the randomly rough surface. The averaged solution in the plane wave regime is approximated by the exponential function dependent on the derived eigenvalue correction. The approximations are compared with numerical results obtained using the finite element method (FEM). An approach to retrieve the correct deviation in roughness height and correlation length from multiple numerical realizations of the stochastic surface is proposed to account for the oversampling of the rough surface occurring in the FEM meshing procedure. PMID:23927093

  8. Experimental research of the Multi-frequency Acoustic Backscatter System using the field sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, wenxiang

    2014-05-01

    The measurements of suspended sediment concentration and particle size profiles are very important to the engineering and environmental applications, especially in the estuarine and coastal areas. In recent years acoustic method has obtained increasing acceptance by many researchers. The theory of this method for measuring them is based on the acoustic backscattering and attenuation properties of the sediment in suspension. The Multi-frequency Acoustic Backscatter System (MABS), which has four acoustic sensors with different frequencies, can be measuring the profiles in the shallow water environment (no more than 10 meters). The experiments were conducted for AQUAscat1000 (MABS) (Made in UK) by the 'test tower' (φ600mm by 1500mm) in Laboratory. The frequency of the acoustic transducer is 0.5MHz, 1MHz, 2MHz and 4MHz, respectively. Two different places sediment were obtained from the Yangtze estuary. The average particle size is about 15μm and 115μm, respectively. Suspended sediment concentration in the 'test tower' was relatively constant during each phase of the sampling. The experimental procedures were as follows: (1) obtaining the background value of the instrument system; (2) add the field sediment to the tower according to the weight and allowing the mixture to homogenize; (3) obtaining water samples in different depths from the 'test tower'; (4) analyzing the water samples. These preliminary results show that (1) the MABS sensors are estimated from a complex function, depending on the receiving information (Voltage), measured at range, the speed of sound in water and the attenuation of sound by water, the sediment density and radius, and backscattering property of the sediment; (2) the appropriate calibration and regression approaches should be selected so as to obtain the reliable results of suspended sediment concentration(**R2 >0.7) and particle size(**R2 >0.5) measurements; (3) the MABS could be applied in the relative fine sediment condition, and

  9. Experimental analysis of thermo-acoustic instabilities in a generic gas turbine combustor by phase-correlated PIV, chemiluminescence, and laser Raman scattering measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arndt, Christoph M.; Severin, Michael; Dem, Claudiu; Stöhr, Michael; Steinberg, Adam M.; Meier, Wolfgang

    2015-04-01

    A gas turbine model combustor for partially premixed swirl flames was equipped with an optical combustion chamber and operated with CH4 and air at atmospheric pressure. The burner consisted of two concentric nozzles for separately controlled air flows and a ring of holes 12 mm upstream of the nozzle exits for fuel injection. The flame described here had a thermal power of 25 kW, a global equivalence ratio of 0.7, and exhibited thermo-acoustic instabilities at a frequency of approximately 400 Hz. The phase-dependent variations in the flame shape and relative heat release rate were determined by OH* chemiluminescence imaging; the flow velocities by stereoscopic particle image velocimetry (PIV); and the major species concentrations, mixture fraction, and temperature by laser Raman scattering. The PIV measurements showed that the flow field performed a "pumping" mode with varying inflow velocities and extent of the inner recirculation zone, triggered by the pressure variations in the combustion chamber. The flow field oscillations were accompanied by variations in the mixture fraction in the inflow region and at the flame root, which in turn were mainly caused by the variations in the CH4 concentration. The mean phase-dependent changes in the fluxes of CH4 and N2 through cross-sectional planes of the combustion chamber at different heights above the nozzle were estimated by combining the PIV and Raman data. The results revealed a periodic variation in the CH4 flux by more than 150 % in relation to the mean value, due to the combined influence of the oscillating flow velocity, density variations, and CH4 concentration. Based on the experimental results, the feedback mechanism of the thermo-acoustic pulsations could be identified as a periodic fluctuation of the equivalence ratio and fuel mass flow together with a convective delay for the transport of fuel from the fuel injector to the flame zone. The combustor and the measured data are well suited for the validation of

  10. Imaging of transient surface acoustic waves by full-field photorefractive interferometry.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Jichuan; Xu, Xiaodong; Glorieux, Christ; Matsuda, Osamu; Cheng, Liping

    2015-05-01

    A stroboscopic full-field imaging technique based on photorefractive interferometry for the visualization of rapidly changing surface displacement fields by using of a standard charge-coupled device (CCD) camera is presented. The photorefractive buildup of the space charge field during and after probe laser pulses is simulated numerically. The resulting anisotropic diffraction upon the refractive index grating and the interference between the polarization-rotated diffracted reference beam and the transmitted signal beam are modeled theoretically. The method is experimentally demonstrated by full-field imaging of the propagation of photoacoustically generated surface acoustic waves with a temporal resolution of nanoseconds. The surface acoustic wave propagation in a 23 mm × 17 mm area on an aluminum plate was visualized with 520 × 696 pixels of the CCD sensor, yielding a spatial resolution of 33 μm. The short pulse duration (8 ns) of the probe laser yields the capability of imaging SAWs with frequencies up to 60 MHz. PMID:26026514

  11. Intermediate regime of charged particle scattering in the field-reversal configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Shustov, P. I. Yushkov, E. V.; Artemyev, A. V.

    2015-12-15

    In this paper, we investigate the charged particle scattering in the magnetic field configuration with stretched magnetic field lines. This scattering results from the violation of the adiabaticity of charged particle motion in the region with the strong gradient of the magnetic field. We consider the intermediate regime of charged particle dynamics, when the violation of the adiabaticity is significant enough, but particle motion is not chaotic. We demonstrate and describe the significant scattering of particles with large adiabatic invariants (magnetic moment). We discuss a possible application of obtained results for description of the peculiarities of pitch-angle diffusion of relativistic electrons in the Earth radiation belts.

  12. Range-dependent flexibility in the acoustic field of view of echolocating porpoises (Phocoena phocoena)

    PubMed Central

    Wisniewska, Danuta M; Ratcliffe, John M; Beedholm, Kristian; Christensen, Christian B; Johnson, Mark; Koblitz, Jens C; Wahlberg, Magnus; Madsen, Peter T

    2015-01-01

    Toothed whales use sonar to detect, locate, and track prey. They adjust emitted sound intensity, auditory sensitivity and click rate to target range, and terminate prey pursuits with high-repetition-rate, low-intensity buzzes. However, their narrow acoustic field of view (FOV) is considered stable throughout target approach, which could facilitate prey escape at close-range. Here, we show that, like some bats, harbour porpoises can broaden their biosonar beam during the terminal phase of attack but, unlike bats, maintain the ability to change beamwidth within this phase. Based on video, MRI, and acoustic-tag recordings, we propose this flexibility is modulated by the melon and implemented to accommodate dynamic spatial relationships with prey and acoustic complexity of surroundings. Despite independent evolution and different means of sound generation and transmission, whales and bats adaptively change their FOV, suggesting that beamwidth flexibility has been an important driver in the evolution of echolocation for prey tracking. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05651.001 PMID:25793440

  13. Drop dynamics in space and interference with acoustic field (M-15)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamanaka, Tatsuo

    1993-01-01

    The objective of the experiment is to study contactless positioning of liquid drops, excitation of capillary waves on the surface of acoustically levitated liquid drops, and deformation of liquid drops by means of acoustic radiation pressure. Contactless positioning technologies are very important in space materials processing because the melt is processed without contacting the wall of a crucible which can easily contaminate the melt specifically for high melting temperatures and chemically reactive materials. Among the contactless positioning technologies, an acoustic technology is especially important for materials unsusceptible to electromagnetic fields such as glasses and ceramics. The shape of a levitated liquid drop in the weightless condition is determined by its surface tension and the internal and external pressure distribution. If the surface temperature is constant and there exist neither internal nor external pressure perturbations, the levitated liquid drop forms a shape of perfect sphere. If temperature gradients on the surface and internal or external pressure perturbations exist, the liquid drop forms various modes of shapes with proper vibrations. A rotating liquid drop was specifically studied not only as a classical problem of theoretical mechanics to describe the shapes of the planets of the solar system, as well as their arrangement, but it is also more a contemporary problem of modern non-linear mechanics. In the experiment, we are expecting to observe various shapes of a liquid drop such as cocoon, tri-lobed, tetropod, multi-lobed, and doughnut.

  14. The effects of external acoustic pressure fields on a free-running supercavitating projectile.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Peter J K; Rogers, Peter H; Doane, John W

    2010-12-01

    Proliferation of supercavitating torpedoes has motivated research on countermeasures against them as well as on the fluid phenomenon which makes them possible. The goal of this research was to investigate an envisaged countermeasure, an acoustic field capable of slowing or diverting the weapon by disrupting the cavitation envelope. The research focused on the interactions between high pressure amplitude sound waves and a supercavity produced by a small free-flying projectile. The flight dynamics and cavity geometry measurements were compared to control experiments and theoretical considerations were made for evaluating the effects. Corrugations on the cavity/water interface caused by the pressure signal have been observed and characterized. Results also show that the accuracy of a supercavitating projectile can be adversely affected by the sound signal. This research concludes with results that indicate that it is acoustic cavitation in the medium surrounding the supercavity, caused by the high pressure amplitude sound, that is responsible for the reduced accuracy. A hypothesis has been presented addressing the means by which the acoustic cavitation could cause this effect. PMID:21218872

  15. Acoustic integrated extinction

    PubMed Central

    Norris, Andrew N.

    2015-01-01

    The integrated extinction (IE) is defined as the integral of the scattering cross section as a function of wavelength. Sohl et al. (2007 J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 122, 3206–3210. (doi:10.1121/1.2801546)) derived an IE expression for acoustic scattering that is causal, i.e. the scattered wavefront in the forward direction arrives later than the incident plane wave in the background medium. The IE formula was based on electromagnetic results, for which scattering is causal by default. Here, we derive a formula for the acoustic IE that is valid for causal and non-causal scattering. The general result is expressed as an integral of the time-dependent forward scattering function. The IE reduces to a finite integral for scatterers with zero long-wavelength monopole and dipole amplitudes. Implications for acoustic cloaking are discussed and a new metric is proposed for broadband acoustic transparency. PMID:27547100

  16. Acoustic emission and magnification of atomic lines resolution for laser breakdown of salt water in ultrasound field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulanov, Alexey V.; Nagorny, Ivan G.

    2015-10-01

    Researches of the acoustic effects accompanying optical breakdown in a water, generated by the focused laser radiation with power ultrasound have been carried out. Experiments were performed by using 532 nm pulses from Brilliant B Nd:YAG laser. Acoustic radiation was produced by acoustic focusing systems in the form hemisphere and ring by various resonance frequencies of 10.7 kHz and 60 kHz. The experimental results are obtained, that show the sharply strengthens effects of acoustic emission from a breakdown zone by the joint influence of a laser and ultrasonic irradiation. Essentially various thresholds of breakdown and character of acoustic emission in fresh and sea water are found out. The experimental result is established, testifying that acoustic emission of optical breakdown of sea water at presence and at absence of ultrasound essentially exceeds acoustic emission in fresh water. Atomic lines of some chemical elements like a Sodium, Magnesium and so on were investigated for laser breakdown of water with ultrasound field. The effect of magnification of this lines resolution for salt water in ultrasound field was obtained.

  17. Acoustic emission and magnification of atomic lines resolution for laser breakdown of salt water in ultrasound field

    SciTech Connect

    Bulanov, Alexey V.; Nagorny, Ivan G.

    2015-10-28

    Researches of the acoustic effects accompanying optical breakdown in a water, generated by the focused laser radiation with power ultrasound have been carried out. Experiments were performed by using 532 nm pulses from Brilliant B Nd:YAG laser. Acoustic radiation was produced by acoustic focusing systems in the form hemisphere and ring by various resonance frequencies of 10.7 kHz and 60 kHz. The experimental results are obtained, that show the sharply strengthens effects of acoustic emission from a breakdown zone by the joint influence of a laser and ultrasonic irradiation. Essentially various thresholds of breakdown and character of acoustic emission in fresh and sea water are found out. The experimental result is established, testifying that acoustic emission of optical breakdown of sea water at presence and at absence of ultrasound essentially exceeds acoustic emission in fresh water. Atomic lines of some chemical elements like a Sodium, Magnesium and so on were investigated for laser breakdown of water with ultrasound field. The effect of magnification of this lines resolution for salt water in ultrasound field was obtained.

  18. Preliminary study of the effect of the turbulent flow field around complex surfaces on their acoustic characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, W. A.; Boldman, D.

    1978-01-01

    Fairly extensive measurements have been conducted of the turbulent flow around various surfaces as a basis for a study of the acoustic characteristics involved. In the experiments the flow from a nozzle was directed upon various two-dimensional surface configurations such as the three-flap model. A turbulent flow field description is given and an estimate of the acoustic characteristics is provided. The developed equations are based upon fundamental theories for simple configurations having simple flows. Qualitative estimates are obtained regarding the radiation pattern and the velocity power law. The effect of geometry and turbulent flow distribution on the acoustic emission from simple configurations are discussed.

  19. Acoustic field in a thermoacoustic Stirling engine having a looped tube and resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, Yuki; Biwa, Tetsushi; Mizutani, Uichiro; Yazaki, Taichi

    2002-12-01

    S. Backhaus and G. W. Swift [Nature 399, 335(1999)] have built a prototype thermoacoustic Stirling engine based on traveling wave energy conversions, and demonstrated that its efficiency reached above 40% of the Carnot efficiency. We experimentally investigate an acoustic field in the engine through simultaneous measurements of velocity U and pressure P. By focusing on the phase lead Φ of U relative to P in its regenerator, we find that the engine can achieve such a high efficiency by the negative Φ about -20° rather than a traveling wave phase (Φ=0).

  20. Far-field hover acoustic characteristics of the XV-15 tiltrotor aircraft with Advanced Technology Blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conner, David A.; Wellman, Brent

    1991-05-01

    An experimental investigation has been conducted with the XV-15 tilt-rotor VTOL aircraft in order to ascertain the noise-reduction efficacy of Advanced Technology Blades (ATBs). Attention is given to acoustic directivity characteristics in the lower hemisphere of the sound field. Modest overall sound pressure levels (OASPLs) were measured near the in-plane position, showing that thickness noise is not significant in hover when ATBs are used; rotor tip-speed reductions reduced the average OASPL by nearly 8 dB in-plane and by nearly 5 dB at 12.6 deg below the rotor plane.

  1. Theoretical and experimental verification of acoustic focusing in metal cylinder structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Jian-ping; Sun, Hong-xiang; Cheng, Qian; Xu, Zheng; Chen, Hao; Yuan, Shou-qi; Zhang, Shu-yi; Ge, Yong; Guan, Yi-jun

    2016-05-01

    We report the realization of a multifocal acoustic focusing lens using a simple metal cylinder structure immersed in water, as determined both experimentally and theoretically. The acoustic waves can be focused on one or more points, because the Mie-resonance modes are excited in the cylinder structure. The acoustic pressure fields measured in the Schlieren imaging system agree with the results calculated using the acoustic scattering theory. Interesting applications of multifocal focusing in the acoustic encryption communication are further discussed. Our work should be helpful in understanding the focusing mechanism and experimentally measuring the acoustic phenomena in cylinder structures.

  2. Surface contributions to scattered sound power using non-negative intensity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Daipei; Peters, Herwig; Marburg, Steffen; Kessissoglou, Nicole

    2016-08-01

    Non-negative intensity is used to identify the surface areas of a structure that contributes to the scattered sound power. In the acoustic near field, the scattered sound power is predicted using non-negative intensity, as well as the scattered acoustic intensity integrated directly over the scatterer's surface area. In the acoustic far field, the scattered acoustic intensity and the scattered sound power are evaluated for three different receiver surface areas, corresponding to a sphere representing a far-field area that fully circumscribes the scatterer, and two hemispherical surfaces that correspond to partial far-field areas that do not fully circumscribe the scatterer. Back-calculated non-negative intensity that defines the sound scattered from the full or partial far-field receiver surface areas is also calculated and compared to the non-negative intensity obtained directly from the surface of the scatterer. To illustrate the numerical technique, the scattered acoustic intensity and scattered sound power of a rigid sphere, a rigid cylinder, and a rigid hemispherical shell are examined. PMID:27586749

  3. Acoustic field characterization of the Duolith: measurements and modeling of a clinical shock wave therapy device.

    PubMed

    Perez, Camilo; Chen, Hong; Matula, Thomas J; Karzova, Maria; Khokhlova, Vera A

    2013-08-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) uses acoustic pulses to treat certain musculoskeletal disorders. In this paper the acoustic field of a clinical portable ESWT device (Duolith SD1) was characterized. Field mapping was performed in water for two different standoffs of the electromagnetic head (15 or 30 mm) using a fiber optic probe hydrophone. Peak positive pressures at the focus ranged from 2 to 45 MPa, while peak negative pressures ranged from -2 to -11 MPa. Pulse rise times ranged from 8 to 500 ns; shock formation did not occur for any machine settings. The maximum standard deviation in peak pressure at the focus was 1.2%, indicating that the Duolith SD1 generates stable pulses. The results compare qualitatively, but not quantitatively with manufacturer specifications. Simulations were carried out for the short standoff by matching a Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya-Kuznetzov equation to the measured field at a plane near the source, and then propagating the wave outward. The results of modeling agree well with experimental data. The model was used to analyze the spatial structure of the peak pressures. Predictions from the model suggest that a true shock wave could be obtained in water if the initial pressure output of the device were doubled. PMID:23927207

  4. Acoustic field characterization of the Duolith: Measurements and modeling of a clinical shock wave therapy device

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Camilo; Chen, Hong; Matula, Thomas J.; Karzova, Maria; Khokhlova, Vera A.

    2013-01-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) uses acoustic pulses to treat certain musculoskeletal disorders. In this paper the acoustic field of a clinical portable ESWT device (Duolith SD1) was characterized. Field mapping was performed in water for two different standoffs of the electromagnetic head (15 or 30 mm) using a fiber optic probe hydrophone. Peak positive pressures at the focus ranged from 2 to 45 MPa, while peak negative pressures ranged from −2 to −11 MPa. Pulse rise times ranged from 8 to 500 ns; shock formation did not occur for any machine settings. The maximum standard deviation in peak pressure at the focus was 1.2%, indicating that the Duolith SD1 generates stable pulses. The results compare qualitatively, but not quantitatively with manufacturer specifications. Simulations were carried out for the short standoff by matching a Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya-Kuznetzov equation to the measured field at a plane near the source, and then propagating the wave outward. The results of modeling agree well with experimental data. The model was used to analyze the spatial structure of the peak pressures. Predictions from the model suggest that a true shock wave could be obtained in water if the initial pressure output of the device were doubled. PMID:23927207

  5. Theory and imaging applications of the angular correlation of multiply-scattered optical fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoover, Brian Gilday

    Through analysis of the field angular correlation the scattering of quasimonochromatic optical fields is considered as a coherence-based process well into the multiple scattering regime. Coherence analysis leads to the prediction of coherent effects in multiply-scattered light that can be applied to perform computed amplitude- phase imaging through turbid media and noninvasive laser material characterization. With the incentive of improved imaging through turbid media an experiment is described that directly compares the degradations, with the number of scattering mean free paths, of the field angular correlation and the correlation of the scattered wave with an unscattered reference wave, both of which can be used to form gates for imaging techniques in scattered light. Results for 20μ m polymer spheres show that the former correlation is consistently larger well into the multiple scattering regime (up to 10 mean free paths) for wavevector separations less than at least 50mm -1, and that the two correlations tend to merge in this scattering regime for larger wavevector separations. The implications of the results for imaging applications are considered. Complementary theoretical formulations of coherence effects in multiply-scattered fields are presented. Relations of the spatial coherence properties to the angular characteristics of the scattered field are established. A coherence-based model of multiple scattering processes is derived. The model predicts radiative-transfer-like behavior for restricted observational parameters, but also shows that the coherence-based process is required for an accurate description of the scattered field over an observational parameters. The applicability of the model to noninvasive laser material characterization is emphasized. A wavefront-sensor method is presented for measurement of the complex field angular correlation function of a three-dimensional turbid medium. The angular correlation function is measured at a series of

  6. Far-Field Acoustic Characteristics of Multiple Blade-Vane Configurations for a High Tip Speed Fan, Supplement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodward, Richard P.

    2004-01-01

    The contents of this CD-ROM include: 1) Aero Data; 2) Data Documents (Daily Acoustic Data Logs, Test Documentation, Test Photos); 3) EPNL Data (All Core Tones Removed, All Core Tones Removed and Various Bypass Tones, Core BPF Tone Removed, Core Tones Present); 4) Far-Field Acoustic Data, 5) High Speed Fan Reports; 6) Sound Power Levels (As-Measured PWL, Lossless PWL).

  7. Effects of static magnetic fields on light scattering in red chromatophore of goldfish scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaka, M.

    2010-05-01

    Light scattering in a guanine crystal plate of goldfish scales was observed with and without static magnetic field exposure. Under a microscopic image with dark-field-illumination, the structural color of the scale by guanine plates was observed, and isolated chromatophores showed a twinkling which was the intermittent light scattering of the light from the side. The light scattering was quenched by static magnetic fields of more than 0.26 tesla (T). The quenching was reversibly occurred when the applied external magnetic fields were changed between ambient fields and 5 T. The quenched light scattering did not improve when the magnetic field was decreased from 5 to 0.3 T. It recovered to the original twinkling state about one minute after reaching an ambient geomagnetic field level. The mechanism of the quenched light scattering was speculated to be concerned with the possible magnetic orientation of guanine crystal plates, which were sustained by protein fibers in the red chromatophore. The diamagnetic complex of guanine crystal plates and protein fibers are the candidates for the nanosized light scattering controller based on the magnetic orientation mechanism.

  8. Dust acoustic shock wave in electronegative dusty plasma: Roles of weak magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Samiran; Ehsan, Z.; Murtaza, G.

    2008-02-15

    The effects of nonsteady dust charge variations and weak magnetic field on small but finite amplitude nonlinear dust acoustic wave in electronegative dusty plasma are investigated. The dynamics of the nonlinear wave are governed by a Korteweg-de Vries Burger equation that possesses dispersive shock wave. The weak magnetic field is responsible for the dispersive term, whereas nonsteady dust charge variation is responsible for dissipative term, i.e., the Burger term. The coefficient of dissipative term depends only on the obliqueness of the magnetic field. It is found that for parallel propagation the dynamics of the nonlinear wave are governed by the Burger equation that possesses monotonic shock wave. The relevances of the findings to cometary dusty plasma, e.g., Comet Halley are briefly discussed.

  9. Inelastic scattering of electrons by metastable hydrogen atoms in a laser field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buica, Gabriela

    2015-09-01

    The inelastic scattering of fast electrons by metastable hydrogen atoms in the presence of a linearly polarized laser field is theoretically studied in the domain of field intensities below 1010 W/cm2. The interaction of the hydrogen atom with the laser field is described by first-order time-dependent perturbation theory, while the projectile electrons interacting with the laser field are described by the Gordon-Volkov wave functions. An analytic expression is obtained for the differential scattering cross section in the first-order Born approximation for laser-assisted inelastic e--H (2 s ) scattering for the 2 s →n l excitation. Detailed analytical and numerical results are presented for inelastic scattering accompanied by one-photon absorption, and the angular dependence and resonance structure of the differential cross sections are discussed for the 2 s →4 l excitation of metastable hydrogen.

  10. Near-Field Scattering due to Topography and Lateral Velocity Heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imperatori, Walter; Mai, Martin

    2014-05-01

    The scattering of seismic waves traveling in the Earth is not only caused by velocity heterogeneity, but also by rough surface topography. Both factors are known to play an important role on ground motion complexity even at short distances from the source. In this study, we simulate ground motion with a 3D finite-difference wave propagation solver in the frequency band 0-5 Hz using different rough topography models and realistic heterogeneous media characterized by Von Karman correlation functions. We analyze the characteristics of the scattered wave-field, focusing in particular on coda waves. Our study shows that topography and velocity heterogeneity scattering generate coda waves with different characteristics. We notice that, while coda waves originated by velocity heterogeneity have a more diffusive nature presenting envelope broadening as a result of forward scattering, coda waves caused by topography scattering are composed of more coherent body and surface waves reflected and diffracted by irregular topography surface. Results indicate that, for shallow sources, topography scattering can generate more intense early-coda waves at short and intermediate distances from the source. As distance increases, velocity heterogeneity scattering starts to dominate. However results show a rather high degree of variability as topography scattering is very sensitive to source position and features of the topography model. On the other hand, velocity perturbations generate more intense late-coda waves We conclude that topography scattering cannot be used as a proxy for velocity heterogeneity scattering.

  11. Confined acoustic phonon-mediated spin relaxation in a twodimensional quantum dot in the presence of perpendicular magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vardanyan, K. A.; Vartanian, A. L.; Stepanyan, A. G.; Kirakosyan, A. A.

    2015-10-01

    The spin-relaxation time due to the electron-acoustic phonon scattering in GaAs quantum dots is studied after the exact diagonalization of the electron Hamiltonian with the spin-orbit coupling. It has been shown that in comparison with flexural phonons, the electron coupling with the dilatational phonons causes 3 orders faster spin relaxation. We have found that the relaxation rate of the spin-flip is an order of magnitude smaller than that of the spin- conserving.

  12. Development of hydroacoustical techniques for the monitoring and classification of benthic habitats in Puck Bay: Modeling of acoustic waves scattering by seagrass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raczkowska, A.; Gorska, N.

    2012-12-01

    Puck Bay is an area of high species biodiversity belonging to the Coastal Landscape Park of Baltic Sea Protected Areas (BSPA) and is also included in the list of the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) and covered by the protection program "Natura 2000". The underwater meadows of the Puck Bay are important for Europe's natural habitats due to their role in enhancing the productivity of marine ecosystems and providing shelter and optimal feeding conditions for many marine organisms. One of the dominant species comprising the underwater meadows of the Southern Baltic Sea is the seagrass Zostera marina. The spatial extent of underwater seagrass meadows is altered by pollution and eutrophication; therefore, to properly manage the area one must monitor its ecological state. Remote acoustic methods are useful tools for the monitoring of benthic habitats in many marine areas because they are non-invasive and allow researchers to obtain data from a large area in a short period of time. Currently there is a need to apply these methods in the Baltic Sea. Here we present an analysis of the mechanism of scattering of acoustic waves on seagrass in the Southern Baltic Sea based on the numerical modeling of acoustic wave scattering by the biological tissues of plants. The study was conducted by adapting a model developed on the basis of DWBA (Distorted Wave Born Approximation) developed by Stanton and Chu (2005) for fluid-like objects, including the characteristics of the Southern Baltic seagrass. Input data for the model, including the morphometry of seagrass leaves, their angle of inclination and the density plant cover, was obtained through the analysis of biological materials collected in the Puck Bay in the framework of a research project financed by the Polish Government (Development of hydroacoustic methods for studies of underwater meadows of Puck Bay, 6P04E 051 20). On the basis of the developed model, we have analyzed the dependence of the target strength of a single

  13. Field and temperature dependence of electromagnon scattering in TbMnO3 studied by inelastic neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holbein, S.; Steffens, P.; Finger, T.; Komarek, A. C.; Sidis, Y.; Link, P.; Braden, M.

    2015-01-01

    Inelastic neutron scattering techniques have been used to study the field-induced multiferroic transition and the temperature dependence of magnetic excitations in TbMnO3. The significant changes in the spin-wave spectra across the field-induced transition perfectly agree with a rotation of the cycloidal spiral plane and with efficient pinning in the commensurate high-field phase. Further analysis of the Q dependence allows the identification of an electromagnon in the multiferroic high-field phase whose energy and polarization precisely matches previous infrared data. This and the zero-field temperature dependence of a zone-center magnon, which exactly agrees with that of an optically detected excitation, document that the inverse Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction induces an electromagnon hybrid excitation in TbMnO3.

  14. Relativistic electron scattering from a freely movable proton in a strong laser field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ai-Hua; Li, Shu-Min

    2014-11-01

    We study the electron scattering from the freely movable spin-1/2 proton in the presence of a linearly polarized laser field in the first Born approximation. The dressed state of the electron is described by a time-dependent wave function derived from a perturbation treatment (in a laser field). With the aid of numerical results we explore the dependencies of the differential cross section (DCS) on the electron-impact energy. Due to the mobility of the target, the DCS of this process is modified compared to the Mott scattering, especially in large scattering angles.

  15. Canonical Acoustics and Its Application to Surface Acoustic Wave on Acoustic Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jian Qi

    2016-08-01

    In a conventional formalism of acoustics, acoustic pressure p and velocity field u are used for characterizing acoustic waves propagating inside elastic/acoustic materials. We shall treat some fundamental problems relevant to acoustic wave propagation alternatively by using canonical acoustics (a more concise and compact formalism of acoustic dynamics), in which an acoustic scalar potential and an acoustic vector potential (Φ ,V), instead of the conventional acoustic field quantities such as acoustic pressure and velocity field (p,u) for characterizing acoustic waves, have been defined as the fundamental variables. The canonical formalism of the acoustic energy-momentum tensor is derived in terms of the acoustic potentials. Both the acoustic Hamiltonian density and the acoustic Lagrangian density have been defined, and based on this formulation, the acoustic wave quantization in a fluid is also developed. Such a formalism of acoustic potentials is employed to the problem of negative-mass-density assisted surface acoustic wave that is a highly localized surface bound state (an eigenstate of the acoustic wave equations). Since such a surface acoustic wave can be strongly confined to an interface between an acoustic metamaterial (e.g., fluid-solid composite structures with a negative dynamical mass density) and an ordinary material (with a positive mass density), it will give rise to an effect of acoustic field enhancement on the acoustic interface, and would have potential applications in acoustic device design for acoustic wave control.

  16. The acoustic field of singing humpback whales in the vertical plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Au, Whitlow W. L.; Pack, Adam A.; Lammers, Marc O.; Herman, Louis; Andrews, Kimberly; Deakos, Mark

    2003-04-01

    A vertical array of five hydrophones was used to measure the acoustic field of singing humpback whales. Once a singer was located, two swimmers with snorkel gear were deployed to determine the orientation of the whale and to position the boat so that the array could be deployed in front of the whale at a minimum standoff distance of 10 m. The spacing of the hydrophones was 7 m with the deepest hydrophone deployed at depth of 35 m. An 8-channel TASCAM recorder having a bandwidth of 24 kHz was used to record the hydrophone signals. The location of the singer was determined by computing the time of arrival differences between the hydrophone signals. The maximum source level varied between individual units in a song, with values between 180 and 190 dB. The acoustic field determined by considering the relative intensity of higher frequency harmonics in the signals indicate that the sounds are projected in the horizontal direction with the singer's head canted downward 45 to 60°. High-frequency harmonics extended beyond 24 kHz, suggesting that humpback whales may have an upper frequency limit of hearing as high as 24 kHz.

  17. Comparison between experimental and computational methods for the acoustic and thermal characterization of therapeutic ultrasound fields.

    PubMed

    Maruvada, Subha; Liu, Yunbo; Soneson, Joshua E; Herman, Bruce A; Harris, Gerald R

    2015-04-01

    For high intensity therapeutic ultrasound (HITU) devices, pre-clinical testing can include measurement of power, pressure/intensity and temperature distribution, acoustic and thermal simulations, and assessment of targeting accuracy and treatment monitoring. Relevant International Electrotechnical Commission documents recently have been published. However, technical challenges remain because of the often focused, large amplitude pressure fields encountered. Measurement and modeling issues include using hydrophones and radiation force balances at HITU power levels, validation of simulation models, and tissue-mimicking material (TMM) development for temperature measurements. To better understand these issues, a comparison study was undertaken between simulations and measurements of the HITU acoustic field distribution in water and TMM and temperature rise in TMM. For the specific conditions of this study, the following results were obtained. In water, the simulated values for p+ and p- were 3% lower and 10% higher, respectively, than those measured by hydrophone. In TMM, the simulated values for p+ and p- were 2% and 10% higher than those measured by hydrophone, respectively. The simulated spatial-peak temporal-average intensity values in water and TMM were greater than those obtained by hydrophone by 3%. Simulated and measured end-of-sonication temperatures agreed to within their respective uncertainties (coefficients of variation of approximately 20% and 10%, respectively). PMID:25920823

  18. Translational motion of two interacting bubbles in a strong acoustic field.

    PubMed

    Doinikov, A A

    2001-08-01

    Using the Lagrangian formalism, equations of radial and translational motions of two coupled spherical gas bubbles have been derived up to terms of third order in the inverse distance between the bubbles. The equations of radial pulsations were then modified, for the purpose of allowing for effects of liquid compressibility, using Keller-Miksis' approach, and the equations of translation were added by viscous forces in the form of the Levich drag. This model was then used in a numerical investigation of the translational motion of two small, driven well below resonance, bubbles in strong acoustic fields with pressure amplitudes exceeding 1 bar. It has been found that, if the forcing is strong enough, the bubbles form a bound pair with a steady spacing rather than collide and coalesce, as classical Bjerknes theory predicts. Moreover, the viscous forces cause skewness in the system, which results in self-propulsion of the bubble pair. The latter travels as a unit along the center line in a direction that is determined by the ratio of the initial bubble radii. The results obtained are of immediate interest for understanding and modeling collective bubble phenomena in strong fields, such as acoustic cavitation streamers. PMID:11497693

  19. Quantitative measurement of ultrasound pressure field by optical phase contrast method and acoustic holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyama, Seiji; Yasuda, Jun; Hanayama, Hiroki; Yoshizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2016-07-01

    A fast and accurate measurement of an ultrasound field with various exposure sequences is necessary to ensure the efficacy and safety of various ultrasound applications in medicine. The most common method used to measure an ultrasound pressure field, that is, hydrophone scanning, requires a long scanning time and potentially disturbs the field. This may limit the efficiency of developing applications of ultrasound. In this study, an optical phase contrast method enabling fast and noninterfering measurements is proposed. In this method, the modulated phase of light caused by the focused ultrasound pressure field is measured. Then, a computed tomography (CT) algorithm used to quantitatively reconstruct a three-dimensional (3D) pressure field is applied. For a high-intensity focused ultrasound field, a new approach that combines the optical phase contrast method and acoustic holography was attempted. First, the optical measurement of focused ultrasound was rapidly performed over the field near a transducer. Second, the nonlinear propagation of the measured ultrasound was simulated. The result of the new approach agreed well with that of the measurement using a hydrophone and was improved from that of the phase contrast method alone with phase unwrapping.

  20. Mitigating stimulated scattering processes in gas-filled Hohlraums via external magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, Tao; Zheng, Jian; Li, Zhichao; Ding, Yongkun; Yang, Dong; Hu, Guangyue; Zhao, Bin

    2015-09-15

    A simple model, based on energy and pressure equilibrium, is proposed to deal with the effect of external magnetic fields on the plasma parameters inside the laser path, which shows that the electron temperature can be significantly enhanced as the intensity of the external magnetic fields increases. With the combination of this model and a 1D three-wave coupling code, the effect of external magnetic fields on the reflectivities of stimulated scattering processes is studied. The results indicate that a magnetic field with an intensity of tens of Tesla can decrease the reflectivities of stimulated scattering processes by several orders of magnitude.

  1. Scattering measurements on natural and model trees

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, James C.; Lee, Sung M.

    1990-01-01

    The acoustical back scattering from a simple scale model of a tree has been experimentally measured. The model consisted of a trunk and six limbs, each with 4 branches; no foliage or twigs were included. The data from the anechoic chamber measurements were then mathematically combined to construct the effective back scattering from groups of trees. Also, initial measurements have been conducted out-of-doors on a single tree in an open field in order to characterize its acoustic scattering as a function of azimuth angle. These measurements were performed in the spring, prior to leaf development. The data support a statistical model of forest scattering; the scattered signal spectrum is highly irregular but with a remarkable general resemblance to the incident signal spectrum. Also, the scattered signal's spectra showed little dependence upon scattering angle.

  2. Far field scattering pattern of differently structured butterfly scales

    PubMed Central

    Yoshioka, S.; Stavenga, D. G.

    2007-01-01

    The angular and spectral reflectance of single scales of five different butterfly species was measured and related to the scale anatomy. The scales of the pierids Pieris rapae and Delias nigrina scatter white light randomly, in close agreement with Lambert’s cosine law, which can be well understood from the randomly organized beads on the scale crossribs. The reflectance of the iridescent blue scales of Morpho aega is determined by multilayer structures in the scale ridges, causing diffraction in approximately a plane. The purple scales in the dorsal wing tips of the male Colotis regina act similarly as the Morpho scale in the blue, due to multilayers in the ridges, but the scattering in the red occurs as in the Pieris scale, because the scales contain beads with pigment that does not absorb in the red wavelength range. The green–yellow scales of Urania fulgens backscatter light in a narrow spatial angle, because of a multilayer structure in the scale body. PMID:18094977

  3. Towards field and laboratory experiments with ocean acoustic-gravity waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Tiago; Kadri, Usama; Lin, Ying-Tsong; Morozov, Andrey

    2016-04-01

    Acoustic-gravity waves (AGWs) can be generated in the ocean by mechanical energy transfer from the Earth's crust (e.g. earthquakes or volcanoes) and by energy transfer occurring at the water surface (e.g. interaction of opposing gravity waves, ice-quakes or localized pressure changes). Recent theoretical studies shed light on the underlying physics of the generation and propagation of AGWs in the ocean. However, these theories are yet to be verified further with very challenging field experiments due to the associated low frequency signals required, and ambient disturbances involved. Here, we present a unique setup of field experiments and large scale laboratory tests to verify the main physical properties of AGWs in ocean generated by different types of sources. We also present a novel methodology to generate and measure AGWs in the ocean.

  4. Flow and acoustic field due to an inclined plate with a downstream splitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, C. M.; Conlisk, A. T.

    1993-01-01

    In the present work, the high Reynolds number flow past an inclined plate with a splitter plate placed in its wake is considered numerically. A numerical conformal mapping technique is employed to transform the two-plate system into the same number of cylinders: the flow field is assumed to be two-dimensional. The vortex shedding from the inclined plate is modelled using the discrete vortex method. It is shown that the splitter plate has a profound effect on the development of the flow over a range of values of a suitably defined offset parameter and for a range of positions of the leading edge of the splitter plate. The acoustic field is also calculated and the spectrum reflects the flow results.

  5. Helicopter far-field acoustic levels as a function of reduced rotor speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Arnold W.; Lemasurier, Philip; Smith, Charles D.

    1990-01-01

    This paper will present far-field measured noise levels relative to tests conducted with a model S-76A helicopter. The project was designed to provide supplemental experimental flight data which may be used to further study reduced helicopter rotor speeds (and thus, advancing blade-tip Mach number) effects on far-field acoustic levels. The aircraft was flown in straight and level flight while operating with both the rotor speed and flight speed as test variables. The rotor speed was varied over the range of 107 percent of the main-rotor speed (NR) to 90 percent NR and with the forward flight speed varied over the range of 155 to 35 knots indicated air speed. These conditions produced a wide range of advancing blade-tip Mach numbers to which the noise data are related.

  6. Solving outside-axial-field-of-view scatter correction problem in PET via digital experimentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreyev, Andriy; Zhu, Yang-Ming; Ye, Jinghan; Song, Xiyun; Hu, Zhiqiang

    2016-03-01

    Unaccounted scatter impact from unknown outside-axial-field-of-view (outside-AFOV) activity in PET is an important degrading factor for image quality and quantitation. Resource consuming and unpopular way to account for the outside- AFOV activity is to perform an additional PET/CT scan of adjacent regions. In this work we investigate a solution to the outside-AFOV scatter problem without performing a PET/CT scan of the adjacent regions. The main motivation for the proposed method is that the measured random corrected prompt (RCP) sinogram in the background region surrounding the measured object contains only scattered events, originating from both inside- and outside-AFOV activity. In this method, the scatter correction simulation searches through many randomly-chosen outside-AFOV activity estimates along with known inside-AFOV activity, generating a plethora of scatter distribution sinograms. This digital experimentation iterates until a decent match is found between a simulated scatter sinogram (that include supposed outside-AFOV activity) and the measured RCP sinogram in the background region. The combined scatter impact from inside- and outside-AFOV activity can then be used for scatter correction during final image reconstruction phase. Preliminary results using measured phantom data indicate successful phantom length estimate with the method, and, therefore, accurate outside-AFOV scatter estimate.

  7. Electron-nucleus scattering at small angles in the field of a pulsed laser wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebed', A. A.

    2016-04-01

    We study scattering of an electron by a screened potential of a nucleus in the field of a pulsed laser wave at small scattering angles. The interaction of an electron with the field of a nucleus is considered in the first Born approximation. An external field of a pulsed laser is accounted accurately as a quasimonochromatic wave. Analytical expressions are obtained for the transition amplitude and the cross section of the considered process. Scattering kinematics is defined at the minimal value of a transferred momentum. In this case the cross section contains a peak near the preferred scattering direction. It is shown that the maximum value of the cross section is determined by both the initial-electron energy and the energy of an external-field photon. Thus, the cross section of electron-nucleus scattering in a pulsed laser field can exceed in two orders of magnitude the cross section in absence of an external field in the case of ultrarelativistic energies and external field of a free-electron laser with keV-order photon energy.

  8. Patch nearfield acoustic holography combined with sound field separation technique applied to a non-free field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, ChuanXing; Jing, WenQian; Zhang, YongBin; Xu, Liang

    2015-02-01

    The conventional nearfield acoustic holography (NAH) is usually based on the assumption of free-field conditions, and it also requires that the measurement aperture should be larger than the actual source. This paper is to focus on the problem that neither of the above-mentioned requirements can be met, and to examine the feasibility of reconstructing the sound field radiated by partial source, based on double-layer pressure measurements made in a non-free field by using patch NAH combined with sound field separation technique. And also, the sensitivity of the reconstructed result to the measurement error is analyzed in detail. Two experiments involving two speakers in an exterior space and one speaker inside a car cabin are presented. The experimental results demonstrate that the patch NAH based on single-layer pressure measurement cannot obtain a satisfied result due to the influences of disturbing sources and reflections, while the patch NAH based on double-layer pressure measurements can successfully remove these influences and reconstruct the patch sound field effectively.

  9. Dark matter effective field theory scattering in direct detection experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Schneck, K.; Cabrera, B.; Cerdeno, D. G.; Mandic, V.; Rogers, H. E.; Agnese, R.; Anderson, A. J.; Asai, M.; Balakishiyeva, D.; Barker, D.; Basu Thakur, R.; Bauer, D. A.; Billard, J.; Borgland, A.; Brandt, D.; Brink, P. L.; Bunker, R.; Caldwell, D. O.; Calkins, R.; Chagani, H.; Chen, Y.; Cooley, J.; Cornell, B.; Crewdson, C. H.; Cushman, Priscilla B.; Daal, M.; Di Stefano, P. C.; Doughty, T.; Esteban, L.; Fallows, S.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Godfrey, G. L.; Golwala, S. R.; Hall, Jeter C.; Harris, H. R.; Hofer, T.; Holmgren, D.; Hsu, L.; Huber, M. E.; Jardin, D. M.; Jastram, A.; Kamaev, O.; Kara, B.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kennedy, A.; Leder, A.; Loer, B.; Lopez Asamar, E.; Lukens, W.; Mahapatra, R.; McCarthy, K. A.; Mirabolfathi, N.; Moffatt, R. A.; Morales Mendoza, J. D.; Oser, S. M.; Page, K.; Page, W. A.; Partridge, R.; Pepin, M.; Phipps, A.; Prasad, K.; Pyle, M.; Qiu, H.; Rau, W.; Redl, P.; Reisetter, A.; Ricci, Y.; Roberts, A.; Saab, T.; Sadoulet, B.; Sander, J.; Schnee, R. W.; Scorza, S.; Serfass, B.; Shank, B.; Speller, D.; Toback, D.; Upadhyayula, S.; Villano, A. N.; Welliver, B.; Wilson, J. S.; Wright, D. H.; Yang, X.; Yellin, S.; Yen, J. J.; Young, B. A.; Zhang, J.

    2015-05-01

    We examine the consequences of the effective eld theory (EFT) of dark matter-nucleon scattering or current and proposed direct detection experiments. Exclusion limits on EFT coupling constants computed using the optimum interval method are presented for SuperCDMS Soudan, CDMS II, and LUX, and the necessity of combining results from multiple experiments in order to determine dark matter parameters is discussed. We demonstrate that spectral di*erences between the standard dark matter model and a general EFT interaction can produce a bias when calculating exclusion limits and when developing signal models for likelihood and machine learning techniques. We also discuss the implications of the EFT for the next-generation (G2) direct detection experiments and point out regions of complementarity in the EFT parameter space.

  10. Imaging of Passive Scalar Fields by Filtered Rayleigh Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kearney, Sean; Grasser, Thomas; Beresh, Steven; Schefer, Robert

    2002-11-01

    Filtered Rayleigh Scattering (FRS) is a molecular-filter-based, laser-diagnostic approach for multiparameter flowfield imaging that has been gaining popularity over the past 5-10 years [1]. Advantages of FRS for noninvasive gas-phase imaging include: (1) elimination of particle or chemical seeding requirements, (2) increased optical noise rejection allowing imaging close to walls and in "dirty" laboratory environments, (3) imaging of multiple flowfield parameters with a single diagnostic. In this work, the construction and performance of a FRS optical system for passive scalar imaging at Sandia National Laboratories is presented. Data were obtained in an open lab where no special precautions for the elimination of room particulate were made. Results from nonreacting jets and from a premixed flame are shown. Temperature imaging in a nonreacting, steady calibration jet reveals the precision of the time-averaged FRS thermometry results to be ±20 K, or 4of the characteristic temperature difference, while the single-laser-pulse precision is degraded to approximately ±40-50 K. These results are adequate for combustion thermometry purposes. Relative to the jet temperature measurements, species concentration imaging of a buoyant helium jet displays increased signal dynamic range and further improved precision. Reacting flow measurements from the combustion-product region of a methane-air Hencken-type premixed flame are also presented and a comparison of FRS and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) experiments to calculated adiabatic-equilibrium product temperatures is made which validates the suitability of our FRS instrument for combustion temperature imaging. [1]G.S. Elliott, N. Glumac, and C.D. Carter, Meas. Sci. Tech., 12, 452, 2001.

  11. Acoustic radiation torque and the conservation of angular momentum (L).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Likun; Marston, Philip L

    2011-04-01

    This note concerns the evaluation of the static acoustic radiation torque exerted by an acoustic field on a scatterer immersed in a nonviscous fluid based on far-field scattering. The radiation torque is expressed as the integral of the time-averaged flux of angular momentum over a spherical surface far removed from the scattering object with its center at the centroid of the object. That result was given previously [G. Maidanik, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 30, 620-623 (1956)]. Another expression given recently [Z. W. Fan et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 124, 2727-2732 (2008)] is simplified to this formula. Comments are made on obtaining it directly from the general theorem of angular momentum conservation in the integral form. PMID:21476624

  12. Rapid computation of the amplitude and phase of tightly focused optical fields distorted by scattering particles.

    PubMed

    Ranasinghesagara, Janaka C; Hayakawa, Carole K; Davis, Mitchell A; Dunn, Andrew K; Potma, Eric O; Venugopalan, Vasan

    2014-07-01

    We develop an efficient method for accurately calculating the electric field of tightly focused laser beams in the presence of specific configurations of microscopic scatterers. This Huygens-Fresnel wave-based electric field superposition (HF-WEFS) method computes the amplitude and phase of the scattered electric field in excellent agreement with finite difference time-domain (FDTD) solutions of Maxwell's equations. Our HF-WEFS implementation is 2-4 orders of magnitude faster than the FDTD method and enables systematic investigations of the effects of scatterer size and configuration on the focal field. We demonstrate the power of the new HF-WEFS approach by mapping several metrics of focal field distortion as a function of scatterer position. This analysis shows that the maximum focal field distortion occurs for single scatterers placed below the focal plane with an offset from the optical axis. The HF-WEFS method represents an important first step toward the development of a computational model of laser-scanning microscopy of thick cellular/tissue specimens. PMID:25121440

  13. Rapid computation of the amplitude and phase of tightly focused optical fields distorted by scattering particles

    PubMed Central

    Ranasinghesagara, Janaka C.; Hayakawa, Carole K.; Davis, Mitchell A.; Dunn, Andrew K.; Potma, Eric O.; Venugopalan, Vasan

    2014-01-01

    We develop an efficient method for accurately calculating the electric field of tightly focused laser beams in the presence of specific configurations of microscopic scatterers. This Huygens–Fresnel wave-based electric field superposition (HF-WEFS) method computes the amplitude and phase of the scattered electric field in excellent agreement with finite difference time-domain (FDTD) solutions of Maxwell’s equations. Our HF-WEFS implementation is 2–4 orders of magnitude faster than the FDTD method and enables systematic investigations of the effects of scatterer size and configuration on the focal field. We demonstrate the power of the new HF-WEFS approach by mapping several metrics of focal field distortion as a function of scatterer position. This analysis shows that the maximum focal field distortion occurs for single scatterers placed below the focal plane with an offset from the optical axis. The HF-WEFS method represents an important first step toward the development of a computational model of laser-scanning microscopy of thick cellular/tissue specimens. PMID:25121440

  14. Permeability, electrical impedance, and acoustic velocities on reservoir rocks from the Geysers geothermal field

    SciTech Connect

    Boitnott, G.N.; Boyd, P.J.

    1996-01-24

    Previous measurements of acoustic velocities on NEGU- 17 cores indicate that saturation effects are significant enough to cause Vp/Vs anomalies observed in the field. In this study we report on the results of new measurements on core recently recovered from SB-15-D along with some additional measurements on the NEGU-17 cores. The measurements indicate correlations between mechanical, transport, and water storage properties of the matrix which may prove useful for reservoir assessment and management. The SB-15-D material is found to be similar to the NEGU-17 material in terms of acoustic velocities, being characterized by a notably weak pressure dependence on the velocities and a modest Vp/Vs signature of saturation. The effect of saturation on Vp/Vs appears to result in part from a chemo-mechanical weakening of the shear modulus due to the presence of water. Electrical properties of SB-15-D material are qualitatively similar to those of the NEGU-17 cores, although resistivities of SB-15-D cores are notably lower and dielectric permittivities higher than in their NEGU- 17 counterparts. While some limited correlations of measured properties with depth are noted, no clear change in character is observed within SB-15-D cores which can be associated with the proposed cap-rock/reservoir boundary.

  15. Acoustic experience shapes alternative mating tactics and reproductive investment in male field crickets.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Nathan W; Gray, Brian; Zuk, Marlene

    2010-05-11

    Developmental plasticity allows juvenile animals to assess environmental cues and adaptively shape behavioral and morphological traits to maximize fitness in their adult environment. Sexual signals are particularly conspicuous cues, making them likely candidates for mediating such responses. Plasticity in male reproductive traits is a common phenomenon, but empirical evidence for signal-mediated plasticity in males is lacking. We tested whether experience of acoustic sexual signals during juvenile stages influences the development of three adult traits in the continuously breeding field cricket Teleogryllus oceanicus: male mating tactics, reproductive investment, and condition. All three traits were affected by juvenile acoustic experience. Males of this species produce a long-range calling song to attract receptive females, but they can also behave as satellites by parasitizing other males' calls. Males reared in an environment mimicking a population with many calling males were less likely to exhibit satellite behavior, invested more in reproductive tissues, and attained higher condition than males reared in a silent environment. These results contrast with other studies and demonstrate how the effects of juvenile social experience on adult male morphology, reproductive investment, and behavior may subsequently influence sexual selection and phenotypic evolution. PMID:20417103

  16. Near-field acoustic microbead trapping as remote anchor for single particle manipulation

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Jae Youn; Cheon, Dong Young; Shin, Hyunjune; Kim, Hyun Bin; Lee, Jungwoo

    2015-05-04

    We recently proposed an analytical model of a two-dimensional acoustic trapping of polystyrene beads in the ray acoustics regime, where a bead diameter is larger than the wavelength used. As its experimental validation, this paper demonstrates the transverse (or lateral) trapping of individual polystyrene beads in the near field of focused ultrasound. A 100 μm bead is immobilized on the central beam axis by a focused sound beam from a 30 MHz single element lithium niobate transducer, after being laterally displaced through hundreds of micrometers. Maximum displacement, a longest lateral distance at which a trapped bead can be directed towards the central axis, is thus measured over a discrete frequency range from 24 MHz to 36 MHz. The displacement data are found to be between 323.7 μm and 470.2 μm, depending on the transducer's driving frequency and input voltage amplitude. The experimental results are compared with their corresponding model values, and their relative errors lie between 0.9% and 3.9%. The results suggest that this remote maneuvering technique may be employed to manipulate individual cells through solid microbeads, provoking certain cellular reactions to localized mechanical disturbance without direct contact.

  17. Efficient modeling of flat and homogeneous acoustic treatments for vibroacoustic finite element analysis. Direct field formulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alimonti, L.; Atalla, N.

    2016-04-01

    This paper is concerned with the development of a simplified model for noise control treatments to speed up finite element analysis in vibroacoustic applications. The methodology relies on the assumption that the acoustic treatment is flat and homogeneous. Moreover, its finite lateral extent is neglected. This hypothesis is justified by short wavelength and large dissipation, which suggest that the reflected field emanating from the acoustic treatment lateral boundaries does not substantially affect its dynamic response. Under these circumstances, the response of the noise control treatment can be formally obtained by means of convolution integrals involving simple analytical kernels (i.e. Green functions). Such fundamental solutions can be computed efficiently by the transfer matrix method. However, some arbitrariness arises in the formulation of the mathematical model, resulting in different baffling conditions at the two ends of the treatment to be considered. Thus, the paper investigates the possibility of different formulations (i.e. baffling conditions) within the same hybrid finite element-transfer matrix framework, seeking for the best strategy in terms of tradeoff between efficiency and accuracy. Numerical examples are provided to show strengths and limitations of the proposed methodology.

  18. Deformation of biological cells in the acoustic field of an oscillating bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinin, Pavel V.; Allen, John S., III

    2009-02-01

    In this work we develop a theoretical framework of the interaction of microbubbles with bacteria in the ultrasound field using a shell model of the bacteria, following an approach developed previously [P. V. Zinin , Phys. Rev. E 72, 61907 (2005)]. Within the shell model, the motion of the cell in an ultrasonic field is determined by the motion of three components: the internal viscous fluid, a thin elastic shell, and the surrounding viscous fluid. Several conclusions can be drawn from the modeling of sound interaction with a biological cell: (a) the characteristics of a cell’s oscillations in an ultrasonic field are determined both by the elastic properties of the shell the viscosities of all components of the system, (b) for dipole quadrupole oscillations the cell’s shell deforms due to a change in the shell area this oscillation depends on the surface area modulus KA , (c) the relative change in the area has a maximum at frequency fK˜(1)/(2π)KA/(ρa3) , where a is the cell’s radius and ρ is its density. It was predicted that deformation of the cell wall at the frequency fK is high enough to rupture small bacteria such as E . coli in which the quality factor of natural vibrations is less than 1 (Q<1) . For bacteria with high value quality factors (Q>1) , the area deformation has a strong peak near a resonance frequency fK ; however, the value of the deformation near the resonance frequency is not high enough to produce sufficient mechanical effect. The theoretical framework developed in this work can be extended for describing the deformation of a biological cell under any arbitrary, external periodic force including radiation forces unduced by acoustical (acoustical levitation) or optical waves (optical tweezers).

  19. Deformation of biological cells in the acoustic field of an oscillating bubble.

    PubMed

    Zinin, Pavel V; Allen, John S

    2009-02-01

    In this work we develop a theoretical framework of the interaction of microbubbles with bacteria in the ultrasound field using a shell model of the bacteria, following an approach developed previously [P. V. Zinin, Phys. Rev. E 72, 61907 (2005)]. Within the shell model, the motion of the cell in an ultrasonic field is determined by the motion of three components: the internal viscous fluid, a thin elastic shell, and the surrounding viscous fluid. Several conclusions can be drawn from the modeling of sound interaction with a biological cell: (a) the characteristics of a cell's oscillations in an ultrasonic field are determined both by the elastic properties of the shell the viscosities of all components of the system, (b) for dipole quadrupole oscillations the cell's shell deforms due to a change in the shell area this oscillation depends on the surface area modulus K{A} , (c) the relative change in the area has a maximum at frequency f{K} approximately 1/2pi square root[K{A}(rhoa;{3})] , where a is the cell's radius and rho is its density. It was predicted that deformation of the cell wall at the frequency f{K} is high enough to rupture small bacteria such as E . coli in which the quality factor of natural vibrations is less than 1 (Q<1). For bacteria with high value quality factors (Q>1) , the area deformation has a strong peak near a resonance frequency f{K} however, the value of the deformation near the resonance frequency is not high enough to produce sufficient mechanical effect. The theoretical framework developed in this work can be extended for describing the deformation of a biological cell under any arbitrary, external periodic force including radiation forces unduced by acoustical (acoustical levitation) or optical waves (optical tweezers). PMID:19391781

  20. Deformation of biological cells in the acoustic field of an oscillating bubble

    PubMed Central

    Zinin, Pavel V.; Allen, John S.

    2009-01-01

    In this work we develop a theoretical framework of the interaction of microbubbles with bacteria in the ultrasound field using a shell model of the bacteria, following an approach developed previously [P. V. Zinin et al., Phys. Rev. E 72, 61907 (2005)]. Within the shell model, the motion of the cell in an ultrasonic field is determined by the motion of three components: the internal viscous fluid, a thin elastic shell, and the surrounding viscous fluid. Several conclusions can be drawn from the modeling of sound interaction with a biological cell: (a) the characteristics of a cell’s oscillations in an ultrasonic field are determined both by the elastic properties of the shell the viscosities of all components of the system, (b) for dipole quadrupole oscillations the cell’s shell deforms due to a change in the shell area this oscillation depends on the surface area modulus KA, (c) the relative change in the area has a maximum at frequency fK∼12πKA/(ρa3), where a is the cell’s radius and ρ is its density. It was predicted that deformation of the cell wall at the frequency fK is high enough to rupture small bacteria such as E. coli in which the quality factor of natural vibrations is less than 1 (Q < 1). For bacteria with high value quality factors (Q > 1), the area deformation has a strong peak near a resonance frequency fK; however, the value of the deformation near the resonance frequency is not high enough to produce sufficient mechanical effect. The theoretical framework developed in this work can be extended for describing the deformation of a biological cell under any arbitrary, external periodic force including radiation forces unduced by acoustical (acoustical levitation) or optical waves (optical tweezers). PMID:19391781

  1. The Derivation of the Gradient of the Acoustic Pressure on a Moving Surface for Application to the Fast Scattering Code (FSC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farassat, F.; Brentner, Kenneth S.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we develop an analytic expression for calculation of the the acoustic pressure from a rotating blade on a moving surface for application to the Fast Scattering Code (FSC). The analytic result is intended to be used in the helicopter noise prediction code PSU-WOPWOP. One of the goals of the derivation is obtaining a result that will not use any more information than are needed for the prediction of the thickness and loading noise. The result derived here achieves this goal and its incorporation in PSU-WOPWOP is straight forward and attainable.

  2. Proton scattering on carbon nuclei in bichromatic laser field at moderate energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barna, I. F.; Varró, S.

    2016-02-01

    We present the general theory for proton nuclei scattering in a bichromatic laser field. As a physical example we consider proton collision on 12C at 49 MeV/amu moderate energies in the field of a titan sapphire laser with its second harmonic.

  3. Resonant coupling of ionization waves and acoustic gravity waves in the presence of a magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eun, H.; Gross, S. H.

    1976-01-01

    The nature of the two resonant directions that occur for a single frequency in the presence of a magnetic field is demonstrated, along with the manner in which the resonances change with the dip angle and the angle of propagation from the meridian plane. The conditions under which acoustic branch resonances may occur are outlined. It is found that the calculated frequencies and directions for resonance are in the range of observed values for TID's obtained from ground and satellite measurements. This result is indicative of a possible connection between TID's and the resonance phenomenon. It is shown that a strong resonance type of response may be possible in the F region at a particular frequency from a region that can be as great as 100 km in altitude.

  4. Novel Transfer Method Using Near-Field Acoustic Levitation and Its Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, Ryuto; Aoyagi, Manabu; Tamura, Hideki; Takano, Takehiro

    2011-07-01

    The holding of a levitated object above stator vibrators by utilizing the holding force, which is generated by near-field acoustic levitation, is possible. The holding force yields at the edge of a vibration plate and nodes of a bending vibration mode, and it is in proportion to the vibration amplitude of the vibration plate. In this paper, we describe methods of transfer and positioning of a levitated object above many aligned stator vibrators, some experimental results, and the proposition of the application as a noncontact-stepping ultrasonic motor (NCS-USM). Linear-type and rotary-type NCS-USMs can be flexibly constructed. The NCS-USM has a possibility of high torque performance compared with an ordinary noncontact USM using a traveling wave.

  5. Visualized measurement of the acoustic levitation field based on digital holography with phase multiplication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Puchao; Li, Enpu; Zhao, Jianlin; Di, Jianglei; Zhou, Wangmin; Wang, Hao; Zhang, Ruifeng

    2009-11-01

    By using digital holographic interferometory with phase multiplication, the visualized measurement of the acoustic levitation field (ALF) with single axis is carried out. The digital holograms of the ALF under different conditions are recorded by use of CCD. The corresponding digital holographic interferograms reflecting the sound pressure distribution and the interference phase distribution are obtained by numerical reconstruction and phase subtraction, which are consistent with the theoretical results. It indicates that the proposed digital holographic interferometory with phase multiplication can successfully double the fringe number of the interference phase patterns of the ALF and improve the measurement precision. Compared with the conventional optical holographic interferometory, digital holographic interferometory has the merits of quasi real-time, more exactitude and convenient operation, and it provides an effective way for studying the sound pressure distribution of the ALF.

  6. The acoustic field in the ionosphere caused by an underground nuclear explosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnov, V. M.; Drobzheva, Ya. V.

    2005-07-01

    The problem of describing the generation and propagation of an infrasonic wave emitted by a finite extended source in the inhomogeneous absorbing atmosphere is the focus of this paper. It is of interest since the role of infrasonic waves in the energy balance of the upper atmosphere remains largely unknown. We present an algorithm, which allows adaptation of a point source model for calculating the infrasonic field from an underground nuclear explosion at ionospheric altitudes. Our calculations appear to agree remarkably well with HF Doppler sounding data measured for underground nuclear explosions at the Semipalatinsk Test Site. We show that the temperature and ionospheric electron density perturbation caused by an acoustic wave from underground nuclear explosion can reach 10% of background levels.

  7. On the horizontal wobbling of an object levitated by near-field acoustic levitation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Cheol-Ho; Ih, Jeong-Guon

    2007-11-01

    A circular planar object can be levitated with several hundreds of microns by ultrasonic near-field acoustic levitation (NFAL). However, when both the sound source and the levitated object are circularly shaped and the center of the levitated object does not coincide with the source center, instability problem often occurs. When this happens, it becomes difficult to pick up or transport the object for the next process. In this study, when the center of the levitated object was offset from the source center, the moving direction of the levitated object was predicted by using the time averaged potential around the levitated object. The wobbling frequency of the levitated object was calculated by analyzing the nonlinear wobbling motion of the object. It was shown that the predicted wobbling frequencies agreed with measured ones well. Finally, a safe zone was suggested to avoid the unstable movement of an object. PMID:17590402

  8. Modeling and experimental study on near-field acoustic levitation by flexural mode.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pinkuan; Li, Jin; Ding, Han; Cao, Wenwu

    2009-12-01

    Near-field acoustic levitation (NFAL) has been used in noncontact handling and transportation of small objects to avoid contamination. We have performed a theoretical analysis based on nonuniform vibrating surface to quantify the levitation force produced by the air film and also conducted experimental tests to verify our model. Modal analysis was performed using ANSYS on the flexural plate radiator to obtain its natural frequency of desired mode, which is used to design the measurement system. Then, the levitation force was calculated as a function of levitation distance based on squeeze gas film theory using measured amplitude and phase distributions on the vibrator surface. Compared with previous fluid-structural analyses using a uniform piston motion, our model based on the nonuniform radiating surface of the vibrator is more realistic and fits better with experimentally measured levitation force. PMID:20040404

  9. Near and Far Field Acoustic Pressure Skewness in a Heated Supersonic Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutmark, Ephraim; Mora, Pablo; Kastner, Jeff; Heeb, Nick; Kailasanath, Kailas; Liu, Junhui; University of Cincinnati Collaboration; Naval Research Laboratory Collaboration

    2012-11-01

    The dominant component of turbulent mixing noise in high speed jets is the Mach wave radiation generated by large turbulent structures in the shear layer The Over-All Sound Pressure Level (OASPL) in the far field peaks in a direction near the Mach wave angle. ``Crackle'' is another important component of high speed jet noise. Crackle cannot be recognized in the spectrum of the acoustic pressure signal, but it appears in the temporal waveform of the pressure as sharply rising peaks. Skewness levels of the pressure and dP/dt have been used as a measure of crackle in high specific thrust engines and rockets. In this paper, we focus on recognizing a technique that identifies the impact of different test conditions on the near-field and far-field statistics of the pressure and dP/dt signals of a supersonic jet with a design Mach number of Md=1.5 produced by a C-D conical nozzle. Cold and hot jets, T0=300K and 600K, are tested at over, design, and under-expanded conditions, with NPRs=2.5, 3.671, 4.5, respectively. Second, Third and Forth order statistics are examined in the near and far fields. Rms, skewness and kurtosis intensity levels and propagation are better identified in the dP/dt than in the pressure signal. Statistics of the dP/dt demonstrate to be a better measure for crackle. Project funded by ONR grant.

  10. Scattering in an external electric field asymptotically constant in time

    SciTech Connect

    Adachi, Tadayoshi; Ishida, Atsuhide

    2011-06-15

    We show the asymptotic completeness for two-body quantum systems in an external electric field asymptotically non-zero constant in time. One of the main ingredients of this paper is to give some propagation estimates for physical propagators generated by time-dependent Hamiltonians which govern the systems under consideration.

  11. Neutron Scattering at Highest Magnetic Fields at the Helmholtz Centre Berlin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smeibidl, P.; Tennant, A.; Ehmler, H.; Bird, M.

    2010-04-01

    The Helmholtz Centre Berlin (HZB), formerly Hahn-Meitner Institute is a user facility for the study of structure and dynamics with neutrons and synchrotron radiation with special emphasis on experiments under extreme conditions. Neutron scattering is uniquely suited to study magnetic properties on a microscopic length scale, because neutrons have comparable wavelengths and, due to their magnetic moment, they interact with the atomic magnetic moments. At HZB a dedicated instrument for neutron scattering at extreme fields is under construction, the Extreme Environment Diffractometer ExED. It is projected according to the “time-of-flight” principle for elastic and inelastic neutron scattering and for the special geometric constraints of analysing samples in a high field magnet. The new magnet will not only allow for novel experiments, it will be at the forefront of development in magnet technology itself. The design of the magnet will follow the Series Connected Hybrid System Technology (SCH) developed at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL) in Tallahassee, Florida. To compromise between the needs of the magnet design for highest fields and the concept of the neutron instrument, the magnetic field will be generated by means of a coned solenoid with horizontal field orientation. By using resistive insert coils, which are mounted in the room temperature bore of a superconducting cable-in-conduit (CIC) magnet, fields above 30 Tesla can be obtained in a geometry optimised for the demands of neutron scattering.

  12. Observation of Marine Animals Using Underwater Acoustic Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iida, Kohji; Takahashi, Rika; Tang, Yong; Mukai, Tohru; Sato, Masanori

    2006-05-01

    An underwater acoustic camera enclosed in a pressure-resistant case was constructed to observe underwater marine animals. This enabled the measurement of the size, shape, and behavior of living marine animals in the detection range up to 240 cm. The transducer array of the acoustic camera was driven by 3.5 MHz ultrasonic signals, and B-mode acoustic images were obtained. Observations were conducted for captive animals in a water tank and for natural animals in a field. The captive animals, including fish, squid and jellyfish, were observed, and a three-dimensional internal structure of animals was reconstructed using multiple acoustical images. The most important contributors of acoustic scattering were the swimbladder and vertebra of bladdered fish, and the liver and reproductive organs of invertebrate animals. In a field experiment, the shape, size, and swimming behavior of wild animals were observed. The possibilities and limitations of the underwater acoustic camera for fishery applications were discussed.

  13. Computational ocean acoustics: Advances in 3D ocean acoustic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Henrik; Jensen, Finn B.

    2012-11-01

    The numerical model of ocean acoustic propagation developed in the 1980's are still in widespread use today, and the field of computational ocean acoustics is often considered a mature field. However, the explosive increase in computational power available to the community has created opportunities for modeling phenomena that earlier were beyond reach. Most notably, three-dimensional propagation and scattering problems have been prohibitive computationally, but are now addressed routinely using brute force numerical approaches such as the Finite Element Method, in particular for target scattering problems, where they are being combined with the traditional wave theory propagation models in hybrid modeling frameworks. Also, recent years has seen the development of hybrid approaches coupling oceanographic circulation models with acoustic propagation models, enabling the forecasting of sonar performance uncertainty in dynamic ocean environments. These and other advances made over the last couple of decades support the notion that the field of computational ocean acoustics is far from being mature. [Work supported by the Office of Naval Research, Code 321OA].

  14. Light scattering from liquid crystal director fluctuations in steady magnetic fields up to 25 tesla

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Challa, Pavan K.; Curtiss, O.; Williams, J. C.; Twieg, R.; Toth, J.; McGill, S.; Jákli, A.; Gleeson, J. T.; Sprunt, S. N.

    2012-07-01

    We report on homodyne dynamic light scattering measurements of orientational fluctuation modes in both calamitic and bent-core nematic liquid crystals, carried out in the new split-helix resistive magnet at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory. The relaxation rate and inverse scattered intensity of director fluctuations exhibit a linear dependence on field-squared up to 25 tesla, which is consistent with strictly lowest order coupling of the tensor order parameter Q to field (QαβBαBβ) in the nematic free energy. However, we also observe evidence of field dependence of certain nematic material parameters, an effect which may be expected from the mean field scaling of these quantities with the magnitude of Q and the predicted variation of Q with field.

  15. Light scattering from liquid crystal director fluctuations in steady magnetic fields up to 25 tesla.

    PubMed

    Challa, Pavan K; Curtiss, O; Williams, J C; Twieg, R; Toth, J; McGill, S; Jákli, A; Gleeson, J T; Sprunt, S N

    2012-07-01

    We report on homodyne dynamic light scattering measurements of orientational fluctuation modes in both calamitic and bent-core nematic liquid crystals, carried out in the new split-helix resistive magnet at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory. The relaxation rate and inverse scattered intensity of director fluctuations exhibit a linear dependence on field-squared up to 25 tesla, which is consistent with strictly lowest order coupling of the tensor order parameter Q to field (Q(αβ)B(α)B(β)) in the nematic free energy. However, we also observe evidence of field dependence of certain nematic material parameters, an effect which may be expected from the mean field scaling of these quantities with the magnitude of Q and the predicted variation of Q with field. PMID:23005438

  16. Analysis of resonances in Moeller scattering in a laser field of relativistic radiation power

    SciTech Connect

    Panek, P.; Kaminski, J.Z.; Ehlotzky, F.

    2004-01-01

    Presently available laser sources can yield powers for which the ponderomotive energy U{sub p} of an electron can be equal to or even larger than the rest energy mc{sup 2} of an electron. Therefore it has become of interest to consider fundamental radiation-induced or assisted processes in such powerful laser fields. In the present work we consider laser-assisted electron-electron scattering in such a field, assuming that the laser beam has linear polarization. We investigate in detail the angular and polarization dependence of the differential cross sections of the laser-assisted nonlinear processes as a function of the order N of absorbed or emitted laser photons {omega}. The present work is a continuation of our previous analysis of Compton scattering and of Mott scattering in a linearly polarized laser field [Phys. Rev. A 65, 022712 (2002); 65, 033408 (2002)].

  17. Deep diving odontocetes foraging strategies and their prey field as determined by acoustic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giorli, Giacomo

    Deep diving odontocetes, like sperm whales, beaked whales, Risso's dolphins, and pilot whales are known to forage at deep depths in the ocean on squid and fish. These marine mammal species are top predators and for this reason are very important for the ecosystems they live in, since they can affect prey populations and control food web dynamics through top-down effects. The studies presented in this thesis investigate deep diving odontocetes. foraging strategies, and the density and size of their potential prey in the deep ocean using passive and active acoustic techniques. Ecological Acoustic Recorders (EAR) were used to monitor the foraging activity of deep diving odontocetes at three locations around the world: the Josephine Seamount High Sea Marine Protected Area (JHSMPA), the Ligurian Sea, and along the Kona coast of the island of Hawaii. In the JHSMPA, sperm whales. and beaked whales. foraging rates do not differ between night-time and day-time. However, in the Ligurian Sea, sperm whales switch to night-time foraging as the winter approaches, while beaked whales alternate between hunting mainly at night, and both at night and at day. Spatial differences were found in deep diving odontocetes. foraging activity in Hawaii where they forage most in areas with higher chlorophyll concentrations. Pilot whales (and false killer whales, clustered together in the category "blackfishes") and Risso's dolphins forage mainly at night at all locations. These two species adjust their foraging activity with the length of the night. The density and size of animals living in deep sea scattering layers was studied using a DIDSON imaging sonar at multiple stations along the Kona coast of Hawaii. The density of animals was affected by location, depth, month, and the time of day. The size of animals was influenced by station and month. The DIDSON proved to be a successful, non-invasive technique to study density and size of animals in the deep sea. Densities were found to be an

  18. Mechanical spectra of glass-forming liquids. II. Gigahertz-frequency longitudinal and shear acoustic dynamics in glycerol and DC704 studied by time-domain Brillouin scattering.

    PubMed

    Klieber, Christoph; Hecksher, Tina; Pezeril, Thomas; Torchinsky, Darius H; Dyre, Jeppe C; Nelson, Keith A

    2013-03-28

    This paper presents and discusses the temperature and frequency dependence of the longitudinal and shear viscoelastic response at MHz and GHz frequencies of the intermediate glass former glycerol and the fragile glass former tetramethyl-tetraphenyl-trisiloxane (DC704). Measurements were performed using the recently developed time-domain Brillouin scattering technique, in which acoustic waves are generated optically, propagated through nm thin liquid layers of different thicknesses, and detected optically after transmission into a transparent detection substrate. This allows for a determination of the frequency dependence of the speed of sound and the sound-wave attenuation. When the data are converted into mechanical moduli, a linear relationship between longitudinal and shear acoustic moduli is revealed, which is consistent with the generalized Cauchy relation. In glycerol, the temperature dependence of the shear acoustic relaxation time agrees well with literature data for dielectric measurements. In DC704, combining the new data with data from measurements obtained previously by piezo-ceramic transducers yields figures showing the longitudinal and shear sound velocities at frequencies from mHz to GHz over an extended range of temperatures. The shoving model's prediction for the relaxation time's temperature dependence is fairly well obeyed for both liquids as demonstrated from a plot with no adjustable parameters. Finally, we show that for both liquids the instantaneous shear modulus follows an exponential temperature dependence to a good approximation, as predicted by Granato's interstitialcy model. PMID:23556795

  19. Inelastic neutron scattering investigation of crystal-field splittings in UBr 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murasik, A.; Furrer, A.

    1980-10-01

    An inelastic neutron scattering technique was used to measure the crystal-field splittings in UBr 3 at various temperatures and momentum transfers. In the interpretation of the observed energy spectra it turns out that the Russell-Saunders coupling scheme is a reasonable approximation. The crystal-field level scheme could be unambiguously assigned. The detailed nature of the crystal-field transition from the ground state to the first-excited state is not yet fully understood.

  20. Effect of the ultrasonic frequency on the multiple X-ray scattering from a LiNbO{sub 3} crystal modulated by a surface acoustic wave

    SciTech Connect

    Punegov, V. I.; Roshchupkin, D. V.

    2012-01-15

    The effect of multiple scattering on the formation of the {theta}-2{theta} scan curves for a crystal modulated by a surface acoustic wave (SAW), depending on the ultrasonic frequency, has been investigated in the frame-work of the dynamical theory of X-ray diffraction. A model of a Rayleigh surface wave has been analyzed as applied to X-ray diffraction with allowance for the transverse and longitudinal elastic lattice strains. Using the example of the 127 Degree-Sign Y Prime cut of the LiNbO{sub 3} crystal, it is established that the effects of multiple scattering can be neglected for ultrasonic frequencies above 650 MHz; this finding significantly simplifies the numerical calculations of X-ray diffraction from a crystal modulated by a short-wavelength SAW. A comparative quantitative analysis of the experimental data on synchrotron scattering from the 127 Degree-Sign Y Prime cut of a LiNbO{sub 3} crystal modulated by a 952-MHz SAW have been performed, both taking into account and neglecting the effects of multiple scattering. It is shown that the computation time can be reduced by 2 to 3 orders of magnitude.