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Sample records for acoustic impedance measurements

  1. Acoustic Impedance Measurement for Underground Surfaces.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cockcroft, Paul William

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. This thesis investigates the measurement of acoustic impedance for surfaces likely to be found in underground coal mines. By introducing the concepts of industrial noise, the effects of noise on the ear and relevant legislation the need for the protection of workers can be appreciated. Representative acoustic impedance values are vital as input for existing computer models that predict sound levels in various underground environments. These enable the mining engineer to predict the noise level at any point within a mine in the vicinity of noisy machinery. The concepts of acoustic intensity and acoustic impedance are investigated and different acoustic impedance measurement techniques are detailed. The possible use of either an impedance tube or an intensity meter for these kinds of measurements are suggested. The problems with acoustic intensity and acoustic impedance measurements are discussed with reference to the restraints that an underground environment imposes on any measurement technique. The impedance tube method for work in an acoustics laboratory is shown and the theory explained, accompanied by a few representative results. The use of a Metravib intensity meter in a soundproof chamber to gain impedance values is explained in detail. The accompanying software for the analysis of the two measured pressure signals is shown as well as the actual results for a variety of test surfaces. The use of a Nagra IV-SJ tape recorder is investigated to determine the effect of recording on the measurement and subsequent analysis of the input signals, particularly with reference to the phase difference introduced between the two simultaneous pressure signals. The subsequent use of a Norwegian Electronic intensity meter, including a proposal for underground work, is shown along with results for tests completed with this piece of equipment. Finally, recommendations are made on how to link up

  2. Acoustic impedance measurements of pulse tube refrigerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwase, Takashi; Biwa, Tetsushi; Yazaki, Taichi

    2010-02-01

    Complex acoustic impedance is determined in a prototype refrigerator that can mimic orifice-type, inertance-type, and double inlet-type pulse tube refrigerators from simultaneous measurements of pressure and velocity oscillations at the cold end. The impedance measurements revealed the means by which the oscillatory flow condition in the basic pulse tube refrigerator is improved by additional components such as a valve and a tank. The working mechanism of pulse tube refrigerators is explained based on an electrical circuit analogy.

  3. Optimization of Acoustic Pressure Measurements for Impedance Eduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, M. G.; Watson, W. R.; Nark, D. M.

    2007-01-01

    As noise constraints become increasingly stringent, there is continued emphasis on the development of improved acoustic liner concepts to reduce the amount of fan noise radiated to communities surrounding airports. As a result, multiple analytical prediction tools and experimental rigs have been developed by industry and academia to support liner evaluation. NASA Langley has also placed considerable effort in this area over the last three decades. More recently, a finite element code (Q3D) based on a quasi-3D implementation of the convected Helmholtz equation has been combined with measured data acquired in the Langley Grazing Incidence Tube (GIT) to reduce liner impedance in the presence of grazing flow. A new Curved Duct Test Rig (CDTR) has also been developed to allow evaluation of liners in the presence of grazing flow and controlled, higher-order modes, with straight and curved waveguides. Upgraded versions of each of these two test rigs are expected to begin operation by early 2008. The Grazing Flow Impedance Tube (GFIT) will replace the GIT, and additional capabilities will be incorporated into the CDTR. The current investigation uses the Q3D finite element code to evaluate some of the key capabilities of these two test rigs. First, the Q3D code is used to evaluate the microphone distribution designed for the GFIT. Liners ranging in length from 51 to 610 mm are investigated to determine whether acceptable impedance eduction can be achieved with microphones placed on the wall opposite the liner. This analysis indicates the best results are achieved for liner lengths of at least 203 mm. Next, the effects of moving this GFIT microphone array to the wall adjacent to the liner are evaluated, and acceptable results are achieved if the microphones are placed off the centerline. Finally, the code is used to investigate potential microphone placements in the CDTR rigid wall adjacent to the wall containing an acoustic liner, to determine if sufficient fidelity can be

  4. Specific acoustic impedance measurements of an air-filled thermoacoustic prime mover

    SciTech Connect

    Arnott, W.P.; Bass, H.E.; Raspet, R. )

    1992-12-01

    Thermoacoustic heat engines can be used to produce sound from heat and to transport heat using sound. The air-filled prime mover studied is a quarter wavelength resonator that produces sound at nominally 115 Hz for a temperature difference of [Delta]T = 176 K. Specific acoustic impedance at the mouth of the prime mover was measured as a function of the temperature difference between the hot and cold heat exchangers. The real part of the impedance changes sign for sufficiently large temperature differences, indicating the possibility of sound production. The theoretically predicted radiation impedance of an open pipe was compared to the measured impedance curves. The operating point was confirmed from the intersection of these experimental and theoretical impedance curves. These measurements allow for analysis of the prime mover as a sound source as discussed in a recent theoretical paper [T. B. Gabrielson, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 90, 2628-2636 (1991)]. 11 refs., 2 figs.

  5. The use of electro-acoustic impedance measurements in detecting early clinical otosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Van Wagoner, R S; Campbell, J D

    1976-02-01

    The first evidence that sodium fluoride (NaFl) can stop the otosclerotic process was recently presented. This development has placed new emphasis on the early detection of clinical otosclerosis. Electro-acoustic impedance measurements often detect minute changes in absolute impedance and compliance of the ossicular chain. The most valuable diagnostic information, however, is a negative on-off (biphasic) type of acoustic reflex. These results are often evident prior to the detection of positive clinical signs of otosclerosis. The negative on-off acoustic reflex is reviewed in this paper along with case discussions involving medical/surgical management of early otosclerosis.

  6. Acoustic input impedance of the avian inner ear measured in ostrich (Struthio camelus).

    PubMed

    Muyshondt, Pieter G G; Aerts, Peter; Dirckx, Joris J J

    2016-09-01

    In both mammals and birds, the mechanical behavior of the middle ear structures is affected by the mechanical impedance of the inner ear. In this study, the aim was to quantify the acoustic impedance of the avian inner ear in the ostrich, which allows us to determine the effect on columellar vibrations and middle ear power flow in future studies. To determine the inner ear impedance, vibrations of the columella were measured for both the quasi-static and acoustic stimulus frequencies. In the frequency range of 0.3-4 kHz, we used electromagnetic stimulation of the ossicle and a laser Doppler vibrometer to measure the vibration response. At low frequencies, harmonic displacements were imposed on the columella using piezo stimulation and the resulting force response was measured with a force sensor. From these measurement data, the acoustic impedance of the inner ear could be determined. A simple RLC model in series of the impedance measurements resulted in a stiffness reactance of KIE = 0.20·10(12) Pa/m³, an inertial impedance of MIE = 0.652·10(6) Pa s(2)/m³, and a resistance of RIE = 1.57·10(9) Pa s/m. We found that values of the inner ear impedance in the ostrich are one to two orders in magnitude smaller than what is found in mammal ears.

  7. Acoustic Ground-Impedance Meter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, A. J.

    1983-01-01

    Helmoltz resonator used in compact, portable meter measures acoustic impedance of ground or other surfaces. Earth's surface is subject of increasing acoustical investigations because of its importance in aircraft noise prediction and measurment. Meter offers several advantages. Is compact and portable and set up at any test site, irrespective of landscape features, weather or other environmental condition.

  8. Acoustic ground impedance meter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuckerwar, A. J.

    1981-12-01

    A compact, portable instrument was developed to measure the acoustic impedance of the ground, or other surfaces, by direct pressure-volume velocity measurement. A Helmholz resonator, constructed of heavy-walled stainless steel but open at the bottom, is positioned over the surface having the unknown impedance. The sound source, a cam-driven piston of known stroke and thus known volume velocity, is located in the neck of the resonator. The cam speed is a variable up to a maximum 3600 rpm. The sound pressure at the test surface is measured by means of a microphone flush-mounted in the wall of the chamber. An optical monitor of the piston displacement permits measurement of the phase angle between the volume velocity and the sound pressure, from which the real and imaginary parts of the impedance can be evaluated. Measurements using a 5-lobed cam can be made up to 300 Hz. Detailed design criteria and results on a soil sample are presented.

  9. Acoustic ground impedance meter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, A. J.

    1983-01-01

    A compact, portable instrument was developed to measure the acoustic impedance of the ground, or other surfaces, by direct pressure-volume velocity measurement. A Helmholtz resonator, constructed of heavy-walled stainless steel but open at the bottom, is positioned over the surface having the unknown impedance. The sound source, a cam-driven piston of known stroke and thus known volume velocity, is located in the neck of the resonator. The cam speed is a variable up to a maximum 3600 rpm. The sound pressure at the test surface is measured by means of a microphone flush-mounted in the wall of the chamber. An optical monitor of the piston displacement permits measurement of the phase angle between the volume velocity and the sound pressure, from which the real and imaginary parts of the impedance can be evaluated. Measurements using a 5-lobed cam can be made up to 300 Hz. Detailed design criteria and results on a soil sample are presented. Previously announced in STAR as N82-17476

  10. Acoustic ground impedance meter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, A. J.

    1981-01-01

    A compact, portable instrument was developed to measure the acoustic impedance of the ground, or other surfaces, by direct pressure-volume velocity measurement. A Helmholz resonator, constructed of heavy-walled stainless steel but open at the bottom, is positioned over the surface having the unknown impedance. The sound source, a cam-driven piston of known stroke and thus known volume velocity, is located in the neck of the resonator. The cam speed is a variable up to a maximum 3600 rpm. The sound pressure at the test surface is measured by means of a microphone flush-mounted in the wall of the chamber. An optical monitor of the piston displacement permits measurement of the phase angle between the volume velocity and the sound pressure, from which the real and imaginary parts of the impedance can be evaluated. Measurements using a 5-lobed cam can be made up to 300 Hz. Detailed design criteria and results on a soil sample are presented.

  11. Measurements and computational fluid dynamics predictions of the acoustic impedance of orifices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, J.; Rupp, J.; Garmory, A.; Carrotte, J. F.

    2015-09-01

    The response of orifices to incident acoustic waves, which is important for many engineering applications, is investigated with an approach combining both experimental measurements and numerical simulations. This paper presents experimental data on acoustic impedance of orifices, which is subsequently used for validation of a numerical technique developed for the purpose of predicting the acoustic response of a range of geometries with moderate computational cost. Measurements are conducted for orifices with length to diameter ratios, L/D, of 0.5, 5 and 10. The experimental data is obtained for a range of frequencies using a configuration in which a mean (or bias) flow passes from a duct through the test orifices before issuing into a plenum. Acoustic waves are provided by a sound generator on the upstream side of the orifices. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculations of the same configuration have also been performed. These have been undertaken using an unsteady Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) approach with a pressure based compressible formulation with appropriate characteristic based boundary conditions to simulate the correct acoustic behaviour at the boundaries. The CFD predictions are in very good agreement with the experimental data, predicting the correct trend with both frequency and orifice L/D in a way not seen with analytical models. The CFD was also able to successfully predict a negative resistance, and hence a reflection coefficient greater than unity for the L / D = 0.5 case.

  12. Observation of Surface Andreev Bound States of Superfluid {sup 3}He by Transverse Acoustic Impedance Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Aoki, Y.; Wada, Y.; Saitoh, M.; Nomura, R.; Okuda, Y.; Nagato, Y.; Yamamoto, M.; Higashitani, S.; Nagai, K.

    2005-08-12

    Complex transverse acoustic impedance of the superfluid {sup 3}He-B was measured at the frequencies of 10 to 80 MHz at 17.0 bar by a cw bridge method. The observed temperature dependence was well explained by the quasiclassical theory with random S-matrix model for a diffusive surface. The temperature dependence was influenced by pair breaking and by quasiparticle density of states at the surface, which was drastically modified from the bulk one by the presence of surface Andreev bound states.

  13. A Comparison Study of Normal-Incidence Acoustic Impedance Measurements of a Perforate Liner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, Todd; Liu, Fei; Cattafesta, Louis; Sheplak, Mark; Jones, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The eduction of the acoustic impedance for liner configurations is fundamental to the reduction of noise from modern jet engines. Ultimately, this property must be measured accurately for use in analytical and numerical propagation models of aircraft engine noise. Thus any standardized measurement techniques must be validated by providing reliable and consistent results for different facilities and sample sizes. This paper compares normal-incidence acoustic impedance measurements using the two-microphone method of ten nominally identical individual liner samples from two facilities, namely 50.8 mm and 25.4 mm square waveguides at NASA Langley Research Center and the University of Florida, respectively. The liner chosen for this investigation is a simple single-degree-of-freedom perforate liner with resonance and anti-resonance frequencies near 1.1 kHz and 2.2 kHz, respectively. The results show that the ten measurements have the most variation around the anti-resonance frequency, where statistically significant differences exist between the averaged results from the two facilities. However, the sample-to-sample variation is comparable in magnitude to the predicted cross-sectional area-dependent cavity dissipation differences between facilities, providing evidence that the size of the present samples does not significantly influence the results away from anti-resonance.

  14. Digital PIV Measurements of Acoustic Particle Displacements in a Normal Incidence Impedance Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphreys, William M., Jr.; Bartram, Scott M.; Parrott, Tony L.; Jones, Michael G.

    1998-01-01

    Acoustic particle displacements and velocities inside a normal incidence impedance tube have been successfully measured for a variety of pure tone sound fields using Digital Particle Image Velocimetry (DPIV). The DPIV system utilized two 600-mj Nd:YAG lasers to generate a double-pulsed light sheet synchronized with the sound field and used to illuminate a portion of the oscillatory flow inside the tube. A high resolution (1320 x 1035 pixel), 8-bit camera was used to capture double-exposed images of 2.7-micron hollow silicon dioxide tracer particles inside the tube. Classical spatial autocorrelation analysis techniques were used to ascertain the acoustic particle displacements and associated velocities for various sound field intensities and frequencies. The results show that particle displacements spanning a range of 1-60 microns can be measured for incident sound pressure levels of 100-130 dB and for frequencies spanning 500-1000 Hz. The ability to resolve 1 micron particle displacements at sound pressure levels in the 100 dB range allows the use of DPIV systems for measurement of sound fields at much lower sound pressure levels than had been previously possible. Representative impedance tube data as well as an uncertainty analysis for the measurements are presented.

  15. Random and systematic measurement errors in acoustic impedance as determined by the transmission line method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrott, T. L.; Smith, C. D.

    1977-01-01

    The effect of random and systematic errors associated with the measurement of normal incidence acoustic impedance in a zero-mean-flow environment was investigated by the transmission line method. The influence of random measurement errors in the reflection coefficients and pressure minima positions was investigated by computing fractional standard deviations of the normalized impedance. Both the standard techniques of random process theory and a simplified technique were used. Over a wavelength range of 68 to 10 cm random measurement errors in the reflection coefficients and pressure minima positions could be described adequately by normal probability distributions with standard deviations of 0.001 and 0.0098 cm, respectively. An error propagation technique based on the observed concentration of the probability density functions was found to give essentially the same results but with a computation time of about 1 percent of that required for the standard technique. The results suggest that careful experimental design reduces the effect of random measurement errors to insignificant levels for moderate ranges of test specimen impedance component magnitudes. Most of the observed random scatter can be attributed to lack of control by the mounting arrangement over mechanical boundary conditions of the test sample.

  16. A direct method for measuring acoustic ground impedance in long-range propagation experiments.

    PubMed

    Soh, Jin H; Gilbert, Kenneth E; Frazier, W M Garth; Talmadge, Carrick L; Waxler, Roger

    2010-11-01

    A method is reported for determining ground impedance in long-range propagation experiments by using the definition of impedance directly. The method is envisioned as way of measuring the impedence at multiple locations along the propagation path, using the signals broadcast during the experiment itself. In a short-range (10 m) test, the direct method was in good agreement with a more conventional model-based least-squares method. The utility of the direct method was demonstrated in a 400 m propagation experiment in a agricultural field. The resulting impedance was consistent with the impedance measured previously in the same field.

  17. Analogies between the measurement of acoustic impedance via the reaction on the source method and the automatic microwave vector network analyzer technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLean, James; Sutton, Robert; Post, John

    2003-10-01

    One useful method of acoustic impedance measurement involves the measurement of the electrical impedance ``looking into'' the electrical port of a reciprocal electroacoustic transducer. This reaction on the source method greatly facilitates the measurement of acoustic impedance by borrowing highly refined techniques to measure electrical impedance. It is also well suited for in situ acoustic impedance measurements. In order to accurately determine acoustic impedance from the measured electrical impedance, the characteristics of the transducer must be accurately known, i.e., the characteristics of the transducer must be ``removed'' completely from the data. The measurement of acoustic impedance via the measurement of the reaction on the source is analogous to modern microwave measurements made with an automatic vector network analyzer. The action of the analyzer is described as de-embedding the desired data (such as acoustic impedance) from the raw data. Such measurements are fundamentally substitution measurements in that the transducer's characteristics are determined by measuring a set of reference standards. The reaction on the source method is extended to take advantage of improvements in microwave measurement techniques which allow calibration via imperfect standard loads. This removes one of the principal weaknesses of the method in that the requirement of high-quality reference standards is relaxed.

  18. Measurement of cantilever vibration using impedance-loaded surface acoustic wave sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oishi, Masaki; Hamashima, Hiromitsu; Kondoh, Jun

    2016-07-01

    In this study, an impedance-loaded surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor was demonstrated to monitor the vibration frequency. Commercialized pressure sensors and a variable capacitor were chosen as external sensors, which were connected to a reflector on a SAW device. As the reflection coefficient of the reflector depended on the impedance, the echo amplitude was influenced by changes in the impedance of the external sensor. The vibration frequency of the cantilever was determined by monitoring the echo amplitude of the SAW device. Moreover, the attenuation constant of an envelope was estimated. The results of our feasibility study indicate that the impedance-loaded SAW sensor can be applied as a detector for structural health monitoring.

  19. An alternative approach to the measurement of the acoustic transfer impedance of the IEC 60318-1 ear simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barham, Richard; Zmierczak, Tomasz; Jackett, Richard

    2012-06-01

    Ear simulators are important measurement devices for characterizing the performance and acoustic output of earphones and other transducers designed to be coupled to human ears. For best practice in the use of these devices it is important that the acoustic transfer impedance is periodically tested against published specification. This practice has been facilitated by IEC 60318-1 : 2009, where a test method has been specified. This paper reports an alternative method offering simplifications in concept and implementation, and leads to improved measurement uncertainty. A comparison of impedance measurements on a sample of ear simulators shows that the two methods produce equivalent results, and that the proposed method offers a viable alternative to that given in IEC 60318-1.

  20. Measured and calculated acoustic attenuation rates of tuned resonator arrays for two surface impedance distribution models with flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrott, Tony L.; Abrahamson, A. Louis; Jones, Michael G.

    1988-01-01

    An experiment was performed to validate two analytical models for predicting low frequency attenuation of duct liner configurations built from an array of seven resonators that could be individually tuned via adjustable cavity depths. These analytical models had previously been developed for high frequency aero-engine inlet duct liner design. In the low frequency application, the liner surface impedance distribution is unavoidably spatially varying by virtue of available fabrication techniques. The characteristic length of this spatial variation may be a significant fraction of the acoustic wavelength. Comparison of measured and predicted attenuation rates and transmission losses for both modal decomposition and finite element propagation models were in good to excellent agreement for a test frequency range that included the first and second cavity resonance frequencies. This was true for either of two surface impedance distribution modeling procedures used to simplify the impedance boundary conditions. In the presence of mean flow, measurements revealed a fine scale structure of acoustic hot spots in the attenuation and phase profiles. These details were accurately predicted by the finite element model. Since no impedance changes due to mean flow were assumed, it is concluded that this fine scale structure was due to convective effects of the mean flow interacting with the surface impedance nonuniformities.

  1. Locating interfaces in vertically-layered materials and determining concentrations in mixed materials utilizing acoustic-impedance measurements. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Not Available

    1981-06-10

    Measurement of the relative and actual value of acoustic characteristic impedances of an unknown substance, location of the interfaces of vertically-layered materials, and the determination of the concentration of a first material mixed in a second material are presented. A highly damped ultrasonic pulse is transmitted into one side of a reference plate, such as a tank wall, where the other side of the reference plate is in physical contact with the medium to be measured. The amplitude of a return signal, which is the reflection of the transmitted pulse from the interface between the other side of the reference plate and the medium, is measured. The amplitude value indicates the acoustic characteristic impedance of the substance relative to that of the reference plate or relative to that of other tested materials. Discontinuities in amplitude with repeated measurements for various heights indicate the location of interfaces in vertically-layered materials. Standardization techniques permit the relative acoustic characteristic impedance of a substance to be converted to an actual value. Calibration techniques for mixtures permit the amplitude to be converted to the concentration of a first material mixed in a second material.

  2. Locating interfaces in vertically-layered materials and determining concentrations in mixed materials utilizing acoustic impedance measurements

    DOEpatents

    Langlois, Gary N.

    1983-09-13

    Measurement of the relative and actual value of acoustic characteristic impedances of an unknown substance, location of the interfaces of vertically-layered materials, and the determination of the concentration of a first material mixed in a second material. A highly damped ultrasonic pulse is transmitted into one side of a reference plate, such as a tank wall, where the other side of the reference plate is in physical contact with the medium to be measured. The amplitude of a return signal, which is the reflection of the transmitted pulse from the interface between the other side of the reference plate and the medium, is measured. The amplitude value indicates the acoustic characteristic impedance of the substance relative to that of the reference plate or relative to that of other tested materials. Discontinuities in amplitude with repeated measurements for various heights indicate the location of interfaces in vertically-layered materials. Standardization techniques permit the relative acoustic characteristic impedance of a substance to be converted to an actual value. Calibration techniques for mixtures permit the amplitude to be converted to the concentration of a first material mixed in a second material.

  3. Locating interfaces in vertically-layered materials and determining concentrations in mixed materials utilizing acoustic impedance measurements

    DOEpatents

    Langlois, G.N.

    1983-09-13

    Measurement of the relative and actual value of acoustic characteristic impedances of an unknown substance, location of the interfaces of vertically-layered materials, and the determination of the concentration of a first material mixed in a second material are disclosed. A highly damped ultrasonic pulse is transmitted into one side of a reference plate, such as a tank wall, where the other side of the reference plate is in physical contact with the medium to be measured. The amplitude of a return signal, which is the reflection of the transmitted pulse from the interface between the other side of the reference plate and the medium, is measured. The amplitude value indicates the acoustic characteristic impedance of the substance relative to that of the reference plate or relative to that of other tested materials. Discontinuities in amplitude with repeated measurements for various heights indicate the location of interfaces in vertically-layered materials. Standardization techniques permit the relative acoustic characteristic impedance of a substance to be converted to an actual value. Calibration techniques for mixtures permit the amplitude to be converted to the concentration of a first material mixed in a second material. 6 figs.

  4. High-Frequency Acoustic Impedance Imaging of Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Fadhel, Muhannad N; Berndl, Elizabeth S L; Strohm, Eric M; Kolios, Michael C

    2015-10-01

    Variations in the acoustic impedance throughout cells and tissue can be used to gain insight into cellular microstructures and the physiologic state of the cell. Ultrasound imaging can be used to create a map of the acoustic impedance, on which fluctuations can be used to help identify the dominant ultrasound scattering source in cells, providing information for ultrasound tissue characterization. The physiologic state of a cell can be inferred from the average acoustic impedance values, as many cellular physiologic changes are linked to an alteration in their mechanical properties. A recently proposed method, acoustic impedance imaging, has been used to measure the acoustic impedance maps of biological tissues, but the method has not been used to characterize individual cells. Using this method to image cells can result in more precise acoustic impedance maps of cells than obtained previously using time-resolved acoustic microscopy. We employed an acoustic microscope using a transducer with a center frequency of 375 MHz to calculate the acoustic impedance of normal (MCF-10 A) and cancerous (MCF-7) breast cells. The generated acoustic impedance maps and simulations suggest that the position of the nucleus with respect to the polystyrene substrate may have an effect on the measured acoustic impedance value of the cell. Fluorescence microscopy and confocal microscopy were used to correlate acoustic impedance images with the position of the nucleus within the cell. The average acoustic impedance statistically differed between normal and cancerous breast cells (1.636 ± 0.010 MRayl vs. 1.612 ± 0.006 MRayl), indicating that acoustic impedance could be used to differentiate between normal and cancerous cells. Copyright © 2015 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Effects of optimized and sub-optimum two degree of freedom lining tolerances on modeled inlet acoustic attenuation and Normal incidence impedance measurement at elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burd, David R.

    This work first investigates the effect of manufacturing tolerances on realized attenuation for two degree-of-freedom linings with the use of lining models and finite element duct propagation codes. Acoustic linings were created for two turbofan engines that optimize attenuation at takeoff/sideline and approach conditions. Lining physical and geometric parameters were set, which best meet the optimum impedance requirements at two target frequencies. Similar linings were created to investigate sub-optimum designs. Variations of these parameters representing realistic manufacturing tolerances were used to systematically examine the effect on installed impedance and predicted attenuation. Attenuation at sideline and approach conditions was found to be sensitive to manufacturing tolerances around optimum conditions. The results of the study are case dependent; however the analysis scheme presented provides a method for cost-benefit analysis of manufacturing processes. In a second study, an impedance tube, with an associated data analysis method, was developed and analyzed for temperature uncertainties that allowed the measurement of impedance of acoustic samples at elevated temperatures. This impedance measurement method was validated at room temperature by comparing the results with predicted impedance from empirically based impedance models and with impedance measurements in a standard traversing microphone impedance tube. Impedance for four samples was measured at elevated temperatures, and the results were compared to room temperature measurements. For two of the samples, the impedances measured at elevated temperatures were compared to the results of extensions of room temperature empirical models, confirming the trend of the results of the elevated temperature measurements.

  6. Acoustic impedance testing for aeroacoustic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Todd

    Accurate acoustic propagation models are required to characterize and subsequently reduce aircraft engine noise. These models ultimately rely on acoustic impedance measurements of candidate materials used in sound-absorbing liners. The standard two-microphone method (TMM) is widely used to estimate acoustic impedance but is limited in frequency range and does not provide uncertainty estimates, which are essential for data quality assessment and model validation. This dissertation presents a systematic framework to estimate uncertainty and extend the frequency range of acoustic impedance testing. Uncertainty estimation for acoustic impedance data using the TMM is made via two methods. The first employs a standard analytical technique based on linear perturbations and provides useful scaling information. The second uses a Monte Carlo technique that permits the propagation of arbitrarily large uncertainties. Both methods are applied to the TMM for simulated data representative of sound-hard and sound-soft acoustic materials. The results indicate that the analytical technique can lead to false conclusions about the magnitude and importance of specific error sources. Furthermore, the uncertainty in acoustic impedance is strongly dependent on the frequency and the uncertainty in the microphone locations. Next, an increased frequency range of acoustic impedance testing is investigated via two methods. The first method reduces the size of the test specimen (from 25.4 mm square to 8.5 mm square) and uses the standard TMM. This method has issues concerning specimen nonuniformity because the small specimens may not be representative of the material. The second method increases the duct cross section and, hence, the required complexity of the sound field propagation model. A comparison among all three methods is conducted for each of the three specimens: two different ceramic tubular specimens and a single degree-of-freedom liner. The results show good agreement between the

  7. Spectroscopic study of the surface density of states of superfluid {sup 3}He by transverse acoustic impedance measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Saitoh, Masamichi; Wada, Yuichiro; Aoki, Yuki; Murakawa, Satoshi; Nomura, Ryuji; Okuda, Yuichi

    2006-12-01

    The surface density of states (SDOS) in superfluid {sup 3}He at a diffusive wall was investigated by systematic measurements of the transverse acoustic impedance Z. The observed difference between the temperature dependence of Z in the A and B phases can be explained by a difference in the SDOS of each phase. In the B phase, an additional gap in the SDOS opened between the upper energy edge {delta}* of the surface Andreev bound states band and the bulk energy gap {delta}. The temperature dependence of {delta}* was measured and was about 30% smaller than the theoretical value. In the A phase, a flat and gapless SDOS was confirmed experimentally.

  8. Modifying the acoustic impedance of polyurea-based composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nantasetphong, Wiroj; Amirkhizi, Alireza V.; Jia, Zhanzhan; Nemat-Nasser, Sia

    2013-04-01

    Acoustic impedance is a material property that depends on mass density and acoustic wave speed. An impedance mismatch between two media leads to the partial reflection of an acoustic wave sent from one medium to another. Active sonar is one example of a useful application of this phenomenon, where reflected and scattered acoustic waves enable the detection of objects. If the impedance of an object is matched to that of the surrounding medium, however, the object may be hidden from observation (at least directly) by sonar. In this study, polyurea composites are developed to facilitate such impedance matching. Polyurea is used due to its excellent blast-mitigating properties, easy casting, corrosion protection, abrasion resistance, and various uses in current military technology. Since pure polyurea has impedance higher than that of water (the current medium of interest), low mass density phenolic microballoon particles are added to create composite materials with reduced effective impedances. The volume fraction of particles is varied to study the effect of filler quantity on the acoustic impedance of the resulting composite. The composites are experimentally characterized via ultrasonic measurements. Computational models based on the method of dilute-randomly-distributed inclusions are developed and compared with the experimental results. These experiments and models will facilitate the design of new elastomeric composites with desirable acoustic impedances.

  9. High-acoustic-impedance tantalum oxide layers for insulating acoustic reflectors.

    PubMed

    Capilla, Jose; Olivares, Jimena; Clement, Marta; Sangrador, Jesús; Iborra, Enrique; Devos, Arnaud

    2012-03-01

    This work describes the assessment of the acoustic properties of sputtered tantalum oxide films intended for use as high-impedance films of acoustic reflectors for solidly mounted resonators operating in the gigahertz frequency range. The films are grown by sputtering a metallic tantalum target under different oxygen and argon gas mixtures, total pressures, pulsed dc powers, and substrate biases. The structural properties of the films are assessed through infrared absorption spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction measurements. Their acoustic impedance is assessed by deriving the mass density from X-ray reflectometry measurements and the acoustic velocity from picosecond acoustic spectroscopy and the analysis of the frequency response of the test resonators.

  10. Manipulate acoustic waves by impedance matched acoustic metasurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ying; Mei, Jun; Aljahdali, Rasha

    We design a type of acoustic metasurface, which is composed of carefully designed slits in a rigid thin plate. The effective refractive indices of different slits are different but the impedances are kept the same as that of the host medium. Numerical simulations show that such a metasurface can redirect or reflect a normally incident wave at different frequencies, even though it is impedance matched to the host medium. We show that the underlying mechanisms can be understood by using the generalized Snell's law, and a unified analytic model based on mode-coupling theory. We demonstrate some simple realization of such acoustic metasurface with real materials. The principle is also extended to the design of planar acoustic lens which can focus acoustic waves. Manipulate acoustic waves by impedance matched acoustic metasurfaces.

  11. Development of a New Method of Measuring the Characteristic Impedance and Complex Wave Number of a Porous Acoustic Material.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-01

    4! / D 0 ra CL (7 L n~ J &~~P~~MA, APPENDIX A .’ETHOD OF SOLUTION OF THE DISPERSION RELATION AND ITS IMPLEMENTATION The mehtod used to find the roots...Constant and Characteristic Impedance of Porous Acoustical Material", J . Acoust. Soc. Am., Vol. 54, pp. 1138-1142, 1973. 6. Chung, J . Y. and Blaser, D . A...Press, 1968. 14. Johnson, D . L., Koplik, J . and Dashen, R., "Theory of Dynamic Permeability and Tortuosity in Fluid-Saturated Porous Media", submitted

  12. Effects of Liner Geometry on Acoustic Impedance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Michael G.; Tracy, Maureen B.; Watson, Willie R.; Parrott, Tony L.

    2002-01-01

    Current aircraft engine nacelles typically contain acoustic liners consisting of perforated sheets bonded onto honeycomb cavities. Numerous models have been developed to predict the acoustic impedance of these liners in the presence of grazing flow, and to use that information with aeroacoustic propagation codes to assess nacelle liner noise suppression. Recent efforts have provided advances in impedance education methodologies that offer more accurate determinations of acoustic liner properties in the presence of grazing flow. The current report provides the results of a parametric study, in which a finite element method was used to assess the effects of variations of the following geometric parameters on liner impedance, with and without the presence of grazing flow: percent open area, sheet thickness, sheet thickness-to-hole diameter ratio and cavity depth. Normal incidence acoustic impedances were determined for eight acoustic liners, consisting of punched aluminum facesheets bonded to hexcell honeycomb cavities. Similar liners were tested in the NASA Langley Research Center grazing incidence tube to determine their response in the presence of grazing flow. The resultant data provide a quantitative assessment of the effects of these perforate, single-layer liner parameters on the acoustic impedance of the liner.

  13. Method of Adjusting Acoustic Impedances for Impedance-Tunable Acoustic Segments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Kennie H (Inventor); Nark, Douglas M. (Inventor); Jones, Michael G. (Inventor); Parrott, Tony L. (Inventor); Lodding, Kenneth N. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A method is provided for making localized decisions and taking localized actions to achieve a global solution. In an embodiment of the present invention, acoustic impedances for impedance-tunable acoustic segments are adjusted. A first acoustic segment through an N-th acoustic segment are defined. To start the process, the first acoustic segment is designated as a leader and a noise-reducing impedance is determined therefor. This is accomplished using (i) one or more metrics associated with the acoustic wave at the leader, and (ii) the metric(s) associated with the acoustic wave at the N-th acoustic segment. The leader, the N-th acoustic segment, and each of the acoustic segments exclusive of the leader and the N-th acoustic segment, are tuned to the noise-reducing impedance. The current leader is then excluded from subsequent processing steps. The designation of leader is then given one of the remaining acoustic segments, and the process is repeated for each of the acoustic segments through an (N-1)-th one of the acoustic segments.

  14. Comparison of Two Acoustic Waveguide Methods for Determining Liner Impedance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Michael G.; Watson, Willie R.; Tracy, Maureen B.; Parrott, Tony L.

    2001-01-01

    Acoustic measurements taken in a flow impedance tube are used to assess the relative accuracy of two waveguide methods for impedance eduction in the presence of grazing flow. The aeroacoustic environment is assumed to contain forward and backward-traveling acoustic waves, consisting of multiple modes, and uniform mean flow. Both methods require a measurement of the complex acoustic pressure profile over the length of the test liner. The Single Mode Method assumes that the sound pressure level and phase decay-rates of a single progressive mode can be extracted from this measured complex acoustic pressure profile. No a priori assumptions are made in the Finite Element. Method regarding the modal or reflection content in the measured acoustic pressure profile. The integrity of each method is initially demonstrated by how well their no-flow impedances match those acquired in a normal incidence impedance tube. These tests were conducted using ceramic tubular and conventional perforate liners. Ceramic tubular liners were included because of their impedance insensitivity to mean flow effects. Conversely, the conventional perforate liner was included because its impedance is known to be sensitive to mean flow velocity effects. Excellent comparisons between impedance values educed with the two waveguide methods in the absence of mean flow and the corresponding values educed with the normal incident impedance tube were observed. The two methods are then compared for mean flow Mach numbers up to 0.5, and are shown to give consistent results for both types of test liners. The quality of the results indicates that the Single Mode Method should be used when the measured acoustic pressure profile is clearly dominated by a single progressive mode, and the Finite Element Method should be used for all other cases.

  15. Design and optimization of a noise reduction system for infrasonic measurements using elements with low acoustic impedance.

    PubMed

    Alcoverro, Benoit; Le Pichon, Alexis

    2005-04-01

    The implementation of the infrasound network of the International Monitoring System (IMS) for the enforcement of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) increases the effort in the design of suitable noise reducer systems. In this paper we present a new design consisting of low impedance elements. The dimensioning and the optimization of this discrete mechanical system are based on numerical simulations, including a complete electroacoustical modeling and a realistic wind-noise model. The frequency response and the noise reduction obtained for a given wind speed are compared to statistical noise measurements in the [0.02-4] Hz frequency band. The effects of the constructive parameters-the length of the pipes, inner diameters, summing volume, and number of air inlets-are investigated through a parametric study. The studied system consists of 32 air inlets distributed along an overall diameter of 16 m. Its frequency response is flat up to 4 Hz. For a 2 m/s wind speed, the maximal noise reduction obtained is 15 dB between 0.5 and 4 Hz. At lower frequencies, the noise reduction is improved by the use of a system of larger diameter. The main drawback is the high-frequency limitation introduced by acoustical resonances inside the pipes.

  16. Estimating surface acoustic impedance with the inverse method.

    PubMed

    Piechowicz, Janusz

    2011-01-01

    Sound field parameters are predicted with numerical methods in sound control systems, in acoustic designs of building and in sound field simulations. Those methods define the acoustic properties of surfaces, such as sound absorption coefficients or acoustic impedance, to determine boundary conditions. Several in situ measurement techniques were developed; one of them uses 2 microphones to measure direct and reflected sound over a planar test surface. Another approach is used in the inverse boundary elements method, in which estimating acoustic impedance of a surface is expressed as an inverse boundary problem. The boundary values can be found from multipoint sound pressure measurements in the interior of a room. This method can be applied to arbitrarily-shaped surfaces. This investigation is part of a research programme on using inverse methods in industrial room acoustics.

  17. Theoretical considerations on influence of circuit impedance on IMD2 measurement of radio-frequency bulk acoustic wave duplexers.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Ken-ya

    2011-03-01

    This paper discusses theoretically how the impedance of peripheral circuits influences the measurement of second-order inter-modulation distortion (IMD2) generated in RF BAW duplexers. First, IMD2 properties of RF BAW duplexers are expressed by a rank three tensor. Then, the tensor expression is used to evaluate how the port termination affects the IMD2 output. It is shown that variation of IMD2 output is caused mainly by five mechanisms: 1) variation of the transmit (Tx) signal intensity caused by impedance mismatching at the Tx port; 2) variation of the jammer signal intensity caused by impedance mismatching at the antenna (ANT) port; 3) variation of detector read caused by impedance mismatching at the receive (Rx) port; 4) reentry of the IMD2 signal to the ANT port caused by impedance mismatching at the ANT port; and 5) reentry of the Tx signal to the ANT port caused by impedance mismatching at the ANT port. Because input impedance of the ANT port is usually not defined for jammer signals, a large attenuator must be added to the ANT port to suppress the impedance mismatching. This result is consistent with experiments reported previously.

  18. Optimization and Control of Acoustic Liner Impedance with Bias Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Houston; Follet, Jesse

    2000-01-01

    Because communities are impacted by steady increases in aircraft traffic, aircraft noise continues to be a growing problem for the growth of commercial aviation. Research has focused on improving the design of specific high noise source areas of aircraft and on noise control measures to alleviate noise radiated from aircraft to the surrounding environment. Engine duct liners have long been a principal means of attenuating engine noise. The ability to control in-situ the acoustic impedance of a liner would provide a valuable tool to improve the performance of liners. The acoustic impedance of a liner is directly related to the sound absorption qualities of that liner. Increased attenuation rates, the ability to change liner acoustic impedance to match various operating conditions, or the ability to tune a liner to more precisely match design impedance represent some ways that in-situ impedance control could be useful. With this in mind, the research to be investigated will focus on improvements in the ability to control liner impedance using a mean flow through the liner which is referred to as bias flow.

  19. Impedance Measurement Box

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, William

    2014-11-20

    The IMB 50V software provides functionality for design of impedance measurement tests or sequences of tests, execution of these tests or sequences, processing measured responses and displaying and saving of the results. The software consists of a Graphical User Interface that allows configuration of measurement parameters and test sequencing, a core engine that controls test sequencing, execution of measurements, processing and storage of results and a hardware/software data acquisition interface with the IMB hardware system.

  20. Impedance matched joined drill pipe for improved acoustic transmission

    DOEpatents

    Moss, William C.

    2000-01-01

    An impedance matched jointed drill pipe for improved acoustic transmission. A passive means and method that maximizes the amplitude and minimize the temporal dispersion of acoustic signals that are sent through a drill string, for use in a measurement while drilling telemetry system. The improvement in signal transmission is accomplished by replacing the standard joints in a drill string with joints constructed of a material that is impedance matched acoustically to the end of the drill pipe to which it is connected. Provides improvement in the measurement while drilling technique which can be utilized for well logging, directional drilling, and drilling dynamics, as well as gamma-ray spectroscopy while drilling post shot boreholes, such as utilized in drilling post shot boreholes.

  1. Modal decomposition method for acoustic impedance testing in square ducts.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Todd; Cattafesta, Louis N; Sheplak, Mark

    2006-12-01

    Accurate duct acoustic propagation models are required to predict and reduce aircraft engine noise. These models ultimately rely on measurements of the acoustic impedance to characterize candidate engine nacelle liners. This research effort increases the frequency range of normal-incidence acoustic impedance testing in square ducts by extending the standard two-microphone method (TMM), which is limited to plane wave propagation, to include higher-order modes. The modal decomposition method (MDM) presented includes four normal modes in the model of the sound field, thus increasing the bandwidth from 6.7 to 13.5 kHz for a 25.4 mm square waveguide. The MDM characterizes the test specimen for normal- and oblique-incident acoustic impedance and mode scattering coefficients. The MDM is first formulated and then applied to the measurement of the reflection coefficient matrix for a ceramic tubular specimen. The experimental results are consistent with results from the TMM for the same specimen to within the 95% confidence intervals for the TMM. The MDM results show a series of resonances for the ceramic tubular material exhibiting a monotonic decrease in the resonant peaks of the acoustic resistance with increasing frequency, resembling a rigidly-terminated viscous tube, and also evidence of mode scattering is visible at the higher frequencies.

  2. Differences in acoustic impedance of fresh and embedded human trabecular bone samples-Scanning acoustic microscopy and numerical evaluation.

    PubMed

    Ojanen, Xiaowei; Töyräs, Juha; Inkinen, Satu I; Malo, Markus K H; Isaksson, Hanna; Jurvelin, Jukka S

    2016-09-01

    Trabecular bone samples are traditionally embedded and polished for scanning acoustic microscopy (SAM). The effect of sample processing, including dehydration, on the acoustic impedance of bone is unknown. In this study, acoustic impedance of human trabecular bone samples (n = 8) was experimentally assessed before (fresh) and after embedding using SAM and two-dimensional (2-D) finite-difference time domain simulations. Fresh samples were polished with sandpapers of different grit (P1000, P2500, and P4000). Experimental results indicated that acoustic impedance of samples increased significantly after embedding [mean values 3.7 MRayl (fresh), 6.1 MRayl (embedded), p < 0.001]. After polishing with different papers, no significant changes in acoustic impedance were found, even though higher mean values were detected after polishing with finer (P2500 and P4000) papers. A linear correlation (r = 0.854, p < 0.05) was found between the acoustic impedance values of embedded and fresh bone samples polished using P2500 SiC paper. In numerical simulations dehydration increased the acoustic impedance of trabecular bone (38%), whereas changes in surface roughness of bone had a minor effect on the acoustic impedance (-1.56%/0.1 μm). Thereby, the numerical simulations corroborated the experimental findings. In conclusion, acoustic impedance measurement of fresh trabecular bone is possible and may provide realistic material values similar to those of living bone.

  3. Impedance Measurement Box

    ScienceCinema

    Christophersen, Jon

    2016-07-12

    Energy storage devices, primarily batteries, are now more important to consumers, industries and the military. With increasing technical complexity and higher user expectations, there is also a demand for highly accurate state-of-health battery assessment techniques. IMB incorporates patented, proprietary, and tested capabilities using control software and hardware that can be part of an embedded monitoring system. IMB directly measures the wideband impedance spectrum in seconds during battery operation with no significant impact on service life. It also can be applied to batteries prior to installation, confirming health before entering active service, as well as during regular maintenance. For more information about this project, visit http://www.inl.gov/rd100/2011/impedance-measurement-box/

  4. Impedance Measurement Box

    SciTech Connect

    Christophersen, Jon

    2011-01-01

    Energy storage devices, primarily batteries, are now more important to consumers, industries and the military. With increasing technical complexity and higher user expectations, there is also a demand for highly accurate state-of-health battery assessment techniques. IMB incorporates patented, proprietary, and tested capabilities using control software and hardware that can be part of an embedded monitoring system. IMB directly measures the wideband impedance spectrum in seconds during battery operation with no significant impact on service life. It also can be applied to batteries prior to installation, confirming health before entering active service, as well as during regular maintenance. For more information about this project, visit http://www.inl.gov/rd100/2011/impedance-measurement-box/

  5. RF impedance measurement calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, P.J.; Song, J.J.

    1993-02-12

    The intent of this note is not to explain all of the available calibration methods in detail. Instead, we will focus on the calibration methods of interest for RF impedance coupling measurements and attempt to explain: (1). The standards and measurements necessary for the various calibration techniques. (2). The advantages and disadvantages of each technique. (3). The mathematical manipulations that need to be applied to the measured standards and devices. (4). An outline of the steps needed for writing a calibration routine that operated from a remote computer. For further details of the various techniques presented in this note, the reader should consult the references.

  6. Simulating Reflex Induced Changes in the Acoustic Impedance of the Ear.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sirlin, Mindy W.; Levitt, Harry

    1991-01-01

    A simple procedure for measuring changes in the acoustic impedance of the ear is described. The technique has several applications, including simulation using a standard coupler of changes in real ear impedance produced by the acoustic reflex, and calibration of response time of an otoadmittance meter. (Author/DB)

  7. Simulating Reflex Induced Changes in the Acoustic Impedance of the Ear.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sirlin, Mindy W.; Levitt, Harry

    1991-01-01

    A simple procedure for measuring changes in the acoustic impedance of the ear is described. The technique has several applications, including simulation using a standard coupler of changes in real ear impedance produced by the acoustic reflex, and calibration of response time of an otoadmittance meter. (Author/DB)

  8. Thermal Boundary Resistance between GaN and Cubic Ice and THz Acoustic Attenuation Spectrum of Cubic Ice from Complex Acoustic Impedance Measurements.

    PubMed

    Mante, Pierre-Adrien; Chen, Chien-Cheng; Wen, Yu-Chieh; Sheu, Jinn-Kong; Sun, Chi-Kuang

    2013-11-27

    A phonon nanoscopy method, based on the picosecond ultrasonics technique, capable of studying the complex acoustic reflection coefficient at frequency up to 1 THz is proposed and demonstrated. By measuring the reflection coefficient at the same surface location at the interface between GaN and air, and between GaN and the material to characterize, we get access to the THz amplitude and phase spectra of the acoustic phonon reflection. The retrieval of both these pieces of information then allows the calculation of the attenuation in a wide range of frequency and gives new insight into the Kapitza anomaly. This method is then applied to cubic ice, and the measurements of the elastic properties, the phonon anharmonic decay spectrum up to 1 THz, as well as the measurements of the thermal phonon lifetime at 150 K are all achieved.

  9. Prediction of the acoustic impedance of duct liners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zorumski, W. E.; Tester, B. J.

    1976-01-01

    Recent research which contributes to the prediction of the acoustic impedance of duct liners is reviewed. This review includes the linear and nonlinear properties of sheet and bulk type materials and methods for the measurement of these properties. It also includes the effect of grazing flow on the acoustic properties of materials. Methods for predicting the properties of single or multilayered, point reacting or extended reaction, and flat or curved liners are discussed. Based on this review, methods for predicting the properties of the duct liners which are typically used in aircraft engines are recommended. Some areas of needed research are discussed briefly.

  10. Monolithically compatible impedance measurement

    DOEpatents

    Ericson, Milton Nance; Holcomb, David Eugene

    2002-01-01

    A monolithic sensor includes a reference channel and at least one sensing channel. Each sensing channel has an oscillator and a counter driven by the oscillator. The reference channel and the at least one sensing channel being formed integrally with a substrate and intimately nested with one another on the substrate. Thus, the oscillator and the counter have matched component values and temperature coefficients. A frequency determining component of the sensing oscillator is formed integrally with the substrate and has an impedance parameter which varies with an environmental parameter to be measured by the sensor. A gating control is responsive to an output signal generated by the reference channel, for terminating counting in the at least one sensing channel at an output count, whereby the output count is indicative of the environmental parameter, and successive ones of the output counts are indicative of changes in the environmental parameter.

  11. Bayesian identification of acoustic impedance in treated ducts.

    PubMed

    Buot de l'Épine, Y; Chazot, J-D; Ville, J-M

    2015-07-01

    The noise reduction of a liner placed in the nacelle of a turbofan engine is still difficult to predict due to the lack of knowledge of its acoustic impedance that depends on grazing flow profile, mode order, and sound pressure level. An eduction method, based on a Bayesian approach, is presented here to adjust an impedance model of the liner from sound pressures measured in a rectangular treated duct under multimodal propagation and flow. The cost function is regularized with prior information provided by Guess's [J. Sound Vib. 40, 119-137 (1975)] impedance of a perforated plate. The multi-parameter optimization is achieved with an Evolutionary-Markov-Chain-Monte-Carlo algorithm.

  12. Fluid mechanical model of the acoustic impedance of small orifices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hersh, A. S.; Rogers, T.

    1976-01-01

    A fluid mechanical model of the acoustic behavior of small orifices is presented which predicts orifice resistance and reactance as a function of incident sound pressure level, frequency, and orifice geometry. Agreement between predicted and measured values is excellent. The model shows the following: (1) The acoustic flow in immediate neighborhood of the orifice can be modeled as a locally spherical flow. Within this near field, the flow is, to a first approximation, unsteady and incompressible. (2) At very low sound pressure levels, the orifice viscous resistance is directly related to the effect of boundary-layer displacement along the walls containing the orifice, and the orifice reactance is directly related to the inertia of the oscillating flow in the neighborhood of the orifice. (3) For large values of the incident acoustic pressure, the impedance is dominated by nonlinear jet-like effects. (4) For low values of the pressure, the resistance and reactance are roughly equal.

  13. Manipulating acoustic wavefront by inhomogeneous impedance and steerable extraordinary reflection.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jiajun; Li, Baowen; Chen, Zhining; Qiu, Cheng-Wei

    2013-01-01

    We unveil the connection between the acoustic impedance along a flat surface and the reflected acoustic wavefront, in order to empower a wide wariety of novel applications in acoustic community. Our designed flat surface can generate double reflections: the ordinary reflection and the extraordinary one whose wavefront is manipulated by the proposed impedance-governed generalized Snell's law of reflection (IGSL). IGSL is based on Green's function and integral equation, instead of Fermat's principle for optical wavefront manipulation. Remarkably, via the adjustment of the designed specific acoustic impedance, extraordinary reflection can be steered for unprecedented acoustic wavefront while that ordinary reflection can be surprisingly switched on or off. The realization of the complex discontinuity of the impedance surface has been proposed using Helmholtz resonators.

  14. Manipulating Acoustic Wavefront by Inhomogeneous Impedance and Steerable Extraordinary Reflection

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jiajun; Li, Baowen; Chen, Zhining; Qiu, Cheng-Wei

    2013-01-01

    We unveil the connection between the acoustic impedance along a flat surface and the reflected acoustic wavefront, in order to empower a wide wariety of novel applications in acoustic community. Our designed flat surface can generate double reflections: the ordinary reflection and the extraordinary one whose wavefront is manipulated by the proposed impedance-governed generalized Snell's law of reflection (IGSL). IGSL is based on Green's function and integral equation, instead of Fermat's principle for optical wavefront manipulation. Remarkably, via the adjustment of the designed specific acoustic impedance, extraordinary reflection can be steered for unprecedented acoustic wavefront while that ordinary reflection can be surprisingly switched on or off. The realization of the complex discontinuity of the impedance surface has been proposed using Helmholtz resonators. PMID:23985717

  15. Tests Of Shear-Flow Model For Acoustic Impedance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrot, Tony L.; Watson, Willie R.; Jones, Michael G.

    1992-01-01

    Tests described in report conducted to validate two-dimensional shear-flow analytical model for determination of acoustic impedance of acoustic liner in grazing-incidence, grazing-flow environment by use of infinite-waveguide method. Tests successful for both upstream and downstream propagations. Work has potential for utility in testing of engine ducts in commercial aircraft.

  16. Development of an Acoustic Impedance Tube Testbed for Material Sample Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doty, Benjamin J.; Kolaini, Ali R.

    2012-01-01

    Acoustic impedance tube method: uses Traveling wave amplitudes are measured on either side of a sample in a tube. Many acoustic properties of the sample can be calculated. It is Simple and inexpensive to set up, ideal for high volume optimization tests

  17. Development of an Acoustic Impedance Tube Testbed for Material Sample Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doty, Benjamin J.; Kolaini, Ali R.

    2012-01-01

    Acoustic impedance tube method: uses Traveling wave amplitudes are measured on either side of a sample in a tube. Many acoustic properties of the sample can be calculated. It is Simple and inexpensive to set up, ideal for high volume optimization tests

  18. Matching Impedances and Modes in Acoustic Levitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, M. B.

    1985-01-01

    Temperature differences accommodated with tunable coupler. Report discusses schemes for coupling sound efficiently from cool outside atmosphere into hot acoustic-levitation chamber. Theoretical studies have practical implications for material-processing systems that employ acoustic levitation.

  19. Matching Impedances and Modes in Acoustic Levitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, M. B.

    1985-01-01

    Temperature differences accommodated with tunable coupler. Report discusses schemes for coupling sound efficiently from cool outside atmosphere into hot acoustic-levitation chamber. Theoretical studies have practical implications for material-processing systems that employ acoustic levitation.

  20. High transmission acoustic focusing by impedance-matched acoustic meta-surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Jahdali, Rasha; Wu, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Impedance is an important issue in the design of acoustic lenses because mismatched impedance is detrimental to real focusing applications. Here, we report two designs of acoustic lenses that focus acoustic waves in water and air, respectively. They are tailored by acoustic meta-surfaces, which are rigid thin plates decorated with periodically distributed sub-wavelength slits. Their respective building blocks are constructed from the coiling-up spaces in water and the layered structures in air. Analytic analysis based on coupled-mode theory and transfer matrix reveals that the impedances of the lenses are matched to those of the background media. With these impedance-matched acoustic lenses, we demonstrate the acoustic focusing effect by finite-element simulations.

  1. Validation of an Acoustic Impedance Prediction Model for Skewed Resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howerton, Brian M.; Parrott, Tony L.

    2009-01-01

    An impedance prediction model was validated experimentally to determine the composite impedance of a series of high-aspect ratio slot resonators incorporating channel skew and sharp bends. Such structures are useful for packaging acoustic liners into constrained spaces for turbofan noise control applications. A formulation of the Zwikker-Kosten Transmission Line (ZKTL) model, incorporating the Richards correction for rectangular channels, is used to calculate the composite normalized impedance of a series of six multi-slot resonator arrays with constant channel length. Experimentally, acoustic data was acquired in the NASA Langley Normal Incidence Tube over the frequency range of 500 to 3500 Hz at 120 and 140 dB OASPL. Normalized impedance was reduced using the Two-Microphone Method for the various combinations of channel skew and sharp 90o and 180o bends. Results show that the presence of skew and/or sharp bends does not significantly alter the impedance of a slot resonator as compared to a straight resonator of the same total channel length. ZKTL predicts the impedance of such resonators very well over the frequency range of interest. The model can be used to design arrays of slot resonators that can be packaged into complex geometries heretofore unsuitable for effective acoustic treatment.

  2. Development of a Multifidelity Approach to Acoustic Liner Impedance Eduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nark, Douglas M.; Jones, Michael G.

    2017-01-01

    The use of acoustic liners has proven to be extremely effective in reducing aircraft engine fan noise transmission/radiation. However, the introduction of advanced fan designs and shorter engine nacelles has highlighted a need for novel acoustic liner designs that provide increased fan noise reduction over a broader frequency range. To achieve aggressive noise reduction goals, advanced broadband liner designs, such as zone liners and variable impedance liners, will likely depart from conventional uniform impedance configurations. Therefore, educing the impedance of these axial- and/or spanwise-variable impedance liners will require models that account for three-dimensional effects, thereby increasing computational expense. Thus, it would seem advantageous to investigate the use of multifidelity modeling approaches to impedance eduction for these advanced designs. This paper describes an extension of the use of the CDUCT-LaRC code to acoustic liner impedance eduction. The proposed approach is applied to a hardwall insert and conventional liner using simulated data. Educed values compare well with those educed using two extensively tested and validated approaches. The results are very promising and provide justification to further pursue the complementary use of CDUCT-LaRC with the currently used finite element codes to increase the efficiency of the eduction process for configurations involving three-dimensional effects.

  3. Input impedance matching of acoustic transducers operating at off-resonant frequencies.

    PubMed

    Son, Kyu Tak; Lee, Chin C

    2010-12-01

    The input impedance matching technique of acoustic transducers at off-resonant frequencies is reported. It uses an inherent impedance property of transducers and thus does not need an external electric matching circuit or extra acoustic matching section. The input electrical equivalent circuit includes a radiation component and a dielectric capacitor. The radiation component consists of a radiation resistance and a radiation reactance. The total reactance is the sum of the radiation reactance and the dielectric capacitive reactance. This reactance becomes zero at two frequencies where the impedance is real. The transducer size can be properly chosen so that the impedance at one of the zero-crossing frequencies is close to 50 Ω, the output impedance of signal generators. At this off-resonant operating frequency, the reflection coefficient of the transducer is minimized without using any matching circuit. Other than the size, the impedance can also be fine tuned by adjusting the thickness of material that bonds the transducer plate to the substrates. The acoustic impedance of the substrate and that of the bonding material can also be used as design elements in the transducer structure to achieve better transducer matching. Lead titanate piezoelectric plates were bonded on Lucite, liquid crystal polymer (LCP), and bismuth (Bi) substrates to produce various transducer structures. Their input impedance was simulated using a transducer model and compared with measured values to illustrate the matching principle.

  4. Duct wall impedance control as an advanced concept for acoustic impression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, P. D.; Tester, B. J.

    1975-01-01

    Models and tests on an acoustic duct liner system which has the property of controlled-variable acoustic impedance are described. This is achieved by a novel concept which uses the effect of steady air flow through a multi-layer, locally reacting, resonant-cavity absorber. The scope of this work was limited to a 'proof of concept.' The test of the concept was implemented by means of a small-scale, square-section flow duct facility designed specifically for acoustic measurements, with one side of the duct acoustically lined. The test liners were designed with the aid of previously established duct acoustic theory and a semi-empirical impedance model of the liner system. Over the limited range tested, the liner behaved primarily as predicted, exhibiting significant changes in resistance and reactance, thus providing the necessary concept validation.

  5. Sputtered SiO2 as low acoustic impedance material for Bragg mirror fabrication in BAW resonators.

    PubMed

    Olivares, Jimena; Wegmann, Enrique; Capilla, José; Iborra, Enrique; Clement, Marta; Vergara, Lucía; Aigner, Robert

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we describe the procedure to sputter low acoustic impedance SiO(2) films to be used as a low acoustic impedance layer in Bragg mirrors for BAW resonators. The composition and structure of the material are assessed through infrared absorption spectroscopy. The acoustic properties of the films (mass density and sound velocity) are assessed through X-ray reflectometry and picosecond acoustic spectroscopy. A second measurement of the sound velocity is achieved through the analysis of the longitudinal lambda/2 resonance that appears in these silicon oxide films when used as uppermost layer of an acoustic reflector placed under an AlN-based resonator.

  6. Effects of Flow Profile on Educed Acoustic Liner Impedance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Michael G.; Watson, Willie r.; Nark, Douglas M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents results of an investigation of the effects of shear flow profile on impedance eduction processes employed at NASA Langley. Uniform and 1-D shear-flow propagation models are used to educe the acoustic impedance of three test liners based on aeroacoustic data acquired in the Langley Grazing Flow Impedance Tube, at source levels of 130, 140 and 150 dB, and at centerline Mach numbers of 0.0, 0.3 and 0.5. A ceramic tubular, calibration liner is used to evaluate the propagation models, as this liner is expected to be insensitive to SPL, grazing flow Mach number, and flow profile effects. The propagation models are then used to investigate the effects of shear flow profile on acoustic impedances educed for two conventional perforate-over-honeycomb liners. Results achieved with the uniform-flow models follow expected trends, but those educed with the 1-D shear-flow model do not, even for the calibration liner. However, when the flow profile used with the shear-flow model is varied to increase the Mach number gradient near the wall, results computed with the shear-flow model are well matched to those achieved with the uniform-flow model. This indicates the effects of flow profile on educed acoustic liner impedance are small, but more detailed investigations of the flow field throughout the duct are needed to better understand these effects.

  7. Improved phonocardiogram system based on acoustic impedance matching.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, R S; Reeves, J T; Sodal, I E; Barnes, F S

    1980-04-01

    We considered that phonocardiographic recording could be improved 1) by minimizing the acoustic impedance mismatch between the precordial tissue and transducer, 2) by optimizing the configuration of the impedance-matching medium and transducer design, and 3) by storing signals in digital form through analog-to-digital conversion of analog recordings made at the bedside. The use of an aqueous coupling medium to improve energy transmission increased signal voltage approximately 100-fold over presently used commercial devices. Further match to the crystal was achieved by a concentrating horn configuration for the aqueous medium. Measured frequency response of the device in the range 1 Hz to 1 kHz was better than two other commercially tested microphones. Inspection of comparative phonocardiograms showed more information from the new device than from the two other commercial devices. Unfiltered digitized signals, using our microphone in normal subjects, demonstrated good beat-to-beat repeatability, but analog filtering to obtain the conventional phonocardiogram showed significant loss of information. The new instrument appears to be superior to those commercial devices tested in recording heart sounds.

  8. Duct wall impedance control as an advanced concept for acoustic suppression enhancement. [engine noise reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, P. D.

    1978-01-01

    A systems concept procedure is described for the optimization of acoustic duct liner design for both uniform and multisegment types. The concept was implemented by the use of a double reverberant chamber flow duct facility coupled with sophisticated computer control and acoustic analysis systems. The optimization procedure for liner insertion loss was based on the concept of variable liner impedance produced by bias air flow through a multilayer, resonant cavity liner. A multiple microphone technique for in situ wall impedance measurements was used and successfully adapted to produce automated measurements for all liner configurations tested. The complete validation of the systems concept was prevented by the inability to optimize the insertion loss using bias flow induced wall impedance changes. This inability appeared to be a direct function of the presence of a higher order energy carrying modes which were not influenced significantly by the wall impedance changes.

  9. A comparison of impedance boundary conditions for flow acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabard, Gwénaël

    2013-02-01

    Acoustic liners remain a key technology for reducing community noise from aircraft engines. The choice of optimal impedance relies heavily on the modeling of sound absorption by liners under grazing flows. The Myers condition assumes an infinitely thin boundary layer, but several impedance conditions have recently been proposed to include a small but finite boundary layer thickness. This paper presents a comparison of these impedance conditions against an exact solution for a simple benchmark problem and for parameters representative of inlet and bypass ducts on turbofan engines. The boundary layer thickness can have a significant impact on sound absorption, although its actual influence depends strongly on the details of the incident sound field. The impedance condition proposed by Brambley seems to provide some improvements in predicting sound absorption compared to the Myers condition. The boundary layer profile is found to have little influence on sound absorption.

  10. Appraisal of broadband acoustic impedances from first principles and band-limited seismic reflection data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, A.; Ghosh, S. K.

    2015-12-01

    Seismic derived acoustic impedance is an essential output for the quantitative interpretation of seismic data. However, the band limitation of seismic data leads to a nonunique estimate of the acoustic impedance profile. The prevalent methods counter the nonuniqueness either by stabilizing the answer with respect to an initial model or by resorting to an assumption of certain criterion such as sparsity of the reflection coefficients. Making a nominal assumption of a homogeneous layered earth model, we formulate a set of linear equations where the reflection coefficients are the unknowns and the recursively integrated seismic trace constitutes the data. The approach makes a frontal assault on the problem of reconstructing reflection coefficients from band-limited data and stems from first principles, i.e., Zöppritz's equation in this case. Nonuniqueness is countered in part by the layercake assumption, and in part by the adoption of the singular value decomposition (SVD) method of finding an optimal solution to the set of linear equations, provided the objective is to reconstruct a smoothed version of the impedance profile that includes only its coarser structures. The efficacy of the method has been tested with synthetic data added with significant noise and generated from rudimentary earth models as well as from measured logs of acoustic impedance. Emergence of consistent estimates of impedance from synthetic data generated for several frequency bands increases the confidence in the method. The study also proves the successfulness of the method for (a) an accurate estimate of the impedance mean, (b) an accurate reconstruction of the direct-current (dc) frequency of the reflectivity, and (c) an acceptable reconstruction of the broad trend of the original impedance profile. All these outputs can serve as significant constraints for either more refined inversions or geological interpretations. (Keywords: Reflection data, Acoustic impedance, Broadband, Linear

  11. Influence of acoustic impedance of multilayer acoustic systems on the transfer function of ultrasonic airborne transducers.

    PubMed

    Gudra, Tadeusz; Opieliński, Krzysztof J

    2002-05-01

    In different solutions of ultrasonic transducers radiating acoustic energy into the air there occurs the problem of the proper selection of the acoustic impedance of one or more matching layers. The goal of this work was a computer analysis of the influence of acoustic impedance on the transfer function of piezoceramic transducers equipped with matching layers. Cases of resonance and non-resonance matching impedance in relation to the transfer function and the energy transmission coefficient for solid state-air systems were analysed. With stable thickness of matching layers the required shape of the transfer function can be obtained through proper choice of acoustic impedance were built (e.g. maximal flat function). The proper choice of acoustic impedance requires an elaboration of precise methods of synthesis of matching systems. Using the known matching criteria (Chebyshev's, DeSilets', Souquet's), the transfer function characteristics of transducers equipped with one, two, and three matching layers as well as the optimisation methods of the energy transmission coefficient were presented. The influence of the backside load of the transducer on the shape of transfer function was also analysed. The calculation results of this function for different loads of the transducer backside without and with the different matching layers were presented. The proper load selection allows us to obtain the desired shape of the transfer function, which determines the pulse shape generated by the transducer.

  12. Acoustic Impedance Inversion of Seismic Data Using Genetic Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eladj, Said; Djarfour, Noureddine; Ferahtia, Djalal; Ouadfeul, Sid-Ali

    2013-04-01

    The inversion of seismic data can be used to constrain estimates of the Earth's acoustic impedance structure. This kind of problem is usually known to be non-linear, high-dimensional, with a complex search space which may be riddled with many local minima, and results in irregular objective functions. We investigate here the performance and the application of a genetic algorithm, in the inversion of seismic data. The proposed algorithm has the advantage of being easily implemented without getting stuck in local minima. The effects of population size, Elitism strategy, uniform cross-over and lower mutation are examined. The optimum solution parameters and performance were decided as a function of the testing error convergence with respect to the generation number. To calculate the fitness function, we used L2 norm of the sample-to-sample difference between the reference and the inverted trace. The cross-over probability is of 0.9-0.95 and mutation has been tested at 0.01 probability. The application of such a genetic algorithm to synthetic data shows that the inverted acoustic impedance section was efficient. Keywords: Seismic, Inversion, acoustic impedance, genetic algorithm, fitness functions, cross-over, mutation.

  13. Air-ground interface: Surface waves, surface impedance and acoustic-to-seismic coupling coefficient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daigle, Gilles; Embleton, Tony

    1990-01-01

    In atmospheric acoustics, the subject of surface waves has been an area of discussion for many years. The existence of an acoustic surface wave is now well established theoretically. The mathematical solution for spherical wave propagation above an impedance boundary includes the possibility of a contribution that possesses all the standard properties for a surface wave. Surface waves exist when the surface is sufficiently porous, relative to its acoustical resistance, that it can influence the airborne particle velocity near the surface and reduce the phase velocity of sound waves in air at the surface. This traps some of the sound energy in the air to remain near the surface as it propagates. Above porous grounds, the existence of surface waves has eluded direct experimental confirmation (pulse experiments have failed to show a separate arrival expected from the reduced phase speed) and indirect evidence for its existence has appeared contradictory. The experimental evidence for the existence of an acoustical surface wave above porous boundaries is reviewed. Recent measurements including pulse experiments are also described. A few years ago the acoustic impedance of a grass-covered surface was measured in the frequency range 30 to 300 Hz. Here, further measurements on the same site are discussed. These measurements include core samples, a shallow refractive survey to determine the seismic velocities, and measurements of the acoustic-to-seismic coupling coefficient.

  14. Variance of speed of sound and correlation with acoustic impedance in canine corneas.

    PubMed

    Tang, Junhua; Liu, Jun

    2011-10-01

    The clinical standard for measuring corneal thickness is ultrasound pachymetry that assumes a constant speed of sound. The purpose of this study was to examine the variance of speed of sound and its relationship with acoustic impedance in healthy eyes of canines with a large age span. Corneal speed of sound and acoustic impedance were measured in 34 canine eyes at room temperature (21 ± 1°C). The mean speed of sound was 1577 ± 10 m/s ranging from 1553 to 1594 m/s. There was a strong correlation between speed of sound and acoustic impedance (R = 0.84, p < 0.001). Corneal speed of sound had a small variance in healthy canines over 1-year-old, but was significantly lower in younger canines suggesting an age effect. The strong correlation between corneal speed of sound and acoustic impedance may offer a potential means to noninvasively detect abnormal speed of sound for more accurate corneal thickness estimation. Copyright © 2011 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A hybrid method for determination of the acoustic impedance of an unflanged cylindrical duct for multimode wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snakowska, Anna; Jurkiewicz, Jerzy; Gorazd, Łukasz

    2017-05-01

    The paper presents derivation of the impedance matrix based on the rigorous solution of the wave equation obtained by the Wiener-Hopf technique for a semi-infinite unflanged cylindrical duct. The impedance matrix allows, in turn, calculate the acoustic impedance along the duct and, as a special case, the radiation impedance. The analysis is carried out for a multimode incident wave accounting for modes coupling on the duct outlet not only qualitatively but also quantitatively for a selected source operating inside. The quantitative evaluation of the acoustic impedance requires setting of modes amplitudes which has been obtained applying the mode decomposition method to the far-field pressure radiation measurements and theoretical formulae for single mode directivity characteristics for an unflanged duct. Calculation of the acoustic impedance for a non-uniform distribution of the sound pressure and the sound velocity on a duct cross section requires determination of the acoustic power transmitted along/radiated from a duct. In the paper, the impedance matrix, the power, and the acoustic impedance were derived as functions of Helmholtz number and distance from the outlet.

  16. Experimental validation of a two-dimensional shear-flow model for determining acoustic impedance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrott, Tony L.; Watson, Willie R.; Jones, Michael G.

    1987-01-01

    Tests were conducted to validate a two-dimensional shear-flow analytical model for determining the acoustic impedance of a liner test specimen in a grazing-incidence, grazing-flow environment. The tests were limited to a test specimen chosen to exhibit minimal effects of grazing flow so that the results obtained by using the shear-flow analytical model would be expected to match those obtained from normal-incidence impedance measurements. Impedances for both downstream and upstream sound propagation were generally consistent with those from normal-incidence measurements. However, sensitivity of the grazing-incidence impedance to small measurement or systematic errors in propagation constant varied dramatically over the range of test frequencies.

  17. Numerical analysis of acoustic impedance microscope utilizing acoustic lens transducer to examine cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Gunawan, Agus Indra; Hozumi, Naohiro; Takahashi, Kenta; Yoshida, Sachiko; Saijo, Yoshifumi; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Yamamoto, Seiji

    2015-12-01

    A new technique is proposed for non-contact quantitative cell observation using focused ultrasonic waves. This technique interprets acoustic reflection intensity into the characteristic acoustic impedance of the biological cell. The cells are cultured on a plastic film substrate. A focused acoustic beam is transmitted through the substrate to its interface with the cell. A two-dimensional (2-D) reflection intensity profile is obtained by scanning the focal point along the interface. A reference substance is observed under the same conditions. These two reflections are compared and interpreted into the characteristic acoustic impedance of the cell based on a calibration curve that was created prior to the observation. To create the calibration curve, a numerical analysis of the sound field is performed using Fourier Transforms and is verified using several saline solutions. Because the cells are suspended by two plastic films, no contamination is introduced during the observation. In a practical observation, a sapphire lens transducer with a center frequency of 300 MHz was employed using ZnO thin film. The objects studied were co-cultured rat-derived glial (astrocyte) cells and glioma cells. The result was the clear observation of the internal structure of the cells. The acoustic impedance of the cells was spreading between 1.62 and 1.72 MNs/m(3). Cytoskeleton was indicated by high acoustic impedance. The introduction of cytochalasin-B led to a significant reduction in the acoustic impedance of the glioma cells; its effect on the glial cells was less significant. It is believed that this non-contact observation method will be useful for continuous cell inspections.

  18. Broadband acoustic diode by using two structured impedance-matched acoustic metasurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao-Peng; Wan, Le-Le; Chen, Tian-Ning; Liang, Qing-Xuan; Song, Ai-Ling

    2016-07-01

    An acoustic diode (AD) is proposed and designed based on a mechanism different from the previous designs by using two structured impedance-matched acoustic metasurfaces. This AD can realize unidirectional acoustic transmission within a broad band with high transmission efficiency due to the impedance-matching condition while allowing other entities such as objects or fluids to pass freely. What is more, the backtracking waves that come from the incoming waves can be efficiently prevented and cannot disturb the source. The acoustic pressure field distribution, intensity distribution, and transmission efficiency are calculated by using the finite element method. The simulation results agree well with the theoretical predictions. Our proposed mechanism can experimentally provide a simple approach to design an AD and have potential applications in various fields such as medical ultrasound and noise insulation.

  19. Alignment of an acoustic manipulation device with cepstral analysis of electronic impedance data.

    PubMed

    Hughes, D A; Qiu, Y; Démoré, C; Weijer, C J; Cochran, S

    2015-02-01

    Acoustic particle manipulation is an emerging technology that uses ultrasonic standing waves to position objects with pressure gradients and acoustic radiation forces. To produce strong standing waves, the transducer and the reflector must be aligned properly such that they are parallel to each other. This can be a difficult process due to the need to visualise the ultrasound waves and as higher frequencies are introduced, this alignment requires higher accuracy. In this paper, we present a method for aligning acoustic resonators with cepstral analysis. This is a simple signal processing technique that requires only the electrical impedance measurement data of the resonator, which is usually recorded during the fabrication process of the device. We first introduce the mathematical basis of cepstral analysis and then demonstrate and validate it using a computer simulation of an acoustic resonator. Finally, the technique is demonstrated experimentally to create many parallel linear traps for 10 μm fluorescent beads inside an acoustic resonator.

  20. Acoustic measurements of articulator motions.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, M R; Strube, H W

    1979-01-01

    Methods for estimating articulatory data from acoustic measurements are reviewed. First, relations between the vocal-tract area function and formant or impedance data are pointed out. Then the possibility of determining a (discretized) area function from the speech signal itself is considered. Finally, we look at the estimation of certain articulatory parameters rather than the area function. By using a regression method, such parameters can even be estimated independently of any vocal-tract model. Results for real-speech data are given.

  1. Impedance-matching acoustic bend composed of perforated plates and side pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yuzhen; Jia, Han; Lu, Wenjia; Sun, Zhaoyong; Yang, Jun

    2017-08-01

    In this article, we propose a design for an impedance-matching acoustic bend. The bending structure is composed of sub-wavelength unit cells containing perforated plates and side pipes that allow the mass density and the bulk modulus of each unit cell to be tuned simultaneously. The refractive index and the impedance of the acoustic bend can therefore be modulated simultaneously to guarantee both the bending effect and high acoustic transmission. The results of simulation of the sound pressure field distribution show that the bending effect of the proposed impedance-matching acoustic bend is very good. Transmission spectra are calculated for both the impedance-matching acoustic bend and an acoustic bend composed of the perforated plates alone for comparison. The results indicate that the impedance-matching acoustic bend successfully improves the impedance ratio while also obviously increasing the transmission.

  2. A state feedback electro-acoustic transducer for active control of acoustic impedance.

    PubMed

    Samejima, Toshiya

    2003-03-01

    In this paper, a new control system in which the acoustic impedance of an electro-acoustic transducer diaphragm can be actively varied by modifying design parameters is presented and its effectiveness is theoretically investigated. The proposed control system is based on a state-space description of the control system derived from an electrical equivalent circuit of an electro-acoustic transducer to which a differentiating circuit is connected, and is designed using modem control theory. The optimal quadratic regulator is used in the control system design, with its quadratic performance index formulated for producing desired acoustic impedance. Computer simulations indicate that the acoustic impedance of the diaphragm can be significantly varied over a wide frequency range that includes the range below the resonance frequency of the electro-acoustic transducer. A computer model of the proposed control system is used to illustrate its application to semi-active noise control in a duct. It is demonstrated that the proposed control system provides substantial reductions in the noise radiating from the outlet of the duct, both in the stiffness control range and in the mass control range.

  3. Acoustic Impedance Analysis with High-Frequency Ultrasound for Identification of Fatty Acid Species in the Liver.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kazuyo; Yoshida, Kenji; Maruyama, Hitoshi; Mamou, Jonathan; Yamaguchi, Tadashi

    2017-03-01

    Acoustic properties of free fatty acids present in the liver were studied as a possible basis for non-invasive ultrasonic diagnosis of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Acoustic impedance was measured for the following types of tissue samples: Four pathologic types of mouse liver, five kinds of FFAs in solvent and five kinds of FFAs in cultured Huh-7 cells. A transducer with an 80-MHz center frequency was incorporated into a scanning acoustic microscopy system. Acoustic impedance was calculated from the amplitude of the signal reflected from the specimen surface. The Kruskal-Wallis test revealed statistically significant differences (p < 0.01) in acoustic impedance not only among pathologic types, but also among the FFAs in solvent and in cultured Huh-7 cells. These results suggest that each of the FFAs, especially palmitate, oleate and palmitoleate acid, can be distinguished from each other, regardless of whether they were in solution or absorbed by cells.

  4. Evaluation of a multi-point method for determining acoustic impedance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Michael G.; Parrott, Tony L.

    1988-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to explore potential improvements provided by a Multi-Point Method (MPM) over the Standing Wave Method (SWM) and Two-Microphone Method (TMM) for determining acoustic impedance. A wave propagation model was developed to model the standing wave pattern in an impedance tube. The acoustic impedance of a test specimen was calculated from a best fit of this standing wave pattern to pressure measurements obtained along the impedance tube centerline. Three measurement spacing distributions were examined: uniform, random, and selective. Calculated standing wave patterns match the point pressure measurement distributions with good agreement for a reflection factor magnitude range of 0.004 to 0.999. Comparisons of results using 2, 3, 6, and 18 measurement points showed that the most consistent results are obtained when using at least 6 evenly spaced pressure measurements per half-wavelength. Also, data were acquired with broadband noise added to the discrete frequency noise and impedances were calculated using the MPM and TMM algorithms. The results indicate that the MPM will be superior to the TMM in the presence of significant broadband noise levels associated with mean flow.

  5. Evaluation of Parallel-Element, Variable-Impedance, Broadband Acoustic Liner Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Michael G.; Howerton, Brian M.; Ayle, Earl

    2012-01-01

    Recent trends in aircraft engine design have highlighted the need for acoustic liners that provide broadband sound absorption with reduced liner thickness. Three such liner concepts are evaluated using the NASA normal incidence tube. Two concepts employ additive manufacturing techniques to fabricate liners with variable chamber depths. The first relies on scrubbing losses within narrow chambers to provide acoustic resistance necessary for sound absorption. The second employs wide chambers that provide minimal resistance, and relies on a perforated sheet to provide acoustic resistance. The variable-depth chambers used in both concepts result in reactance spectra near zero. The third liner concept employs mesh-caps (resistive sheets) embedded at variable depths within adjacent honeycomb chambers to achieve a desired impedance spectrum. Each of these liner concepts is suitable for use as a broadband sound absorber design, and a transmission line model is presented that provides good comparison with their respective acoustic impedance spectra. This model can therefore be used to design acoustic liners to accurately achieve selected impedance spectra. Finally, the effects of increasing the perforated facesheet thickness are demonstrated, and the validity of prediction models based on lumped element and wave propagation approaches is investigated. The lumped element model compares favorably with measured results for liners with thin facesheets, but the wave propagation model provides good comparisons for a wide range of facesheet thicknesses.

  6. Broadband liner impedance eduction for multimodal acoustic propagation in the presence of a mean flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troian, Renata; Dragna, Didier; Bailly, Christophe; Galland, Marie-Annick

    2017-03-01

    A new broadband impedance eduction method is introduced to identify the surface impedance of acoustic liners from in situ measurements on a test rig. Multimodal acoustic propagation is taken into account in order to reproduce realistic conditions. The present approach is based on the resolution of the linearized 3D Euler equations in the time domain. The broadband impedance time domain boundary condition is prescribed from a multipole impedance model, and is formulated as a differential form well-suited for high-order numerical methods. Numerical values of the model coefficients are determined by minimizing the difference between measured and simulated acoustic quantities, namely the insertion loss and wall pressure fluctuations at a few locations inside the duct. The minimization is performed through a multi-objective optimization thanks to the Non-dominated Sorting Genetic Algorithm-II (NSGA-II). The present eduction method is validated with benchmark data provided by NASA for plane wave propagation, and by synthesized numerical data for multimodal propagation.

  7. Acoustic Treatment Design Scaling Methods. Volume 2; Advanced Treatment Impedance Models for High Frequency Ranges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraft, R. E.; Yu, J.; Kwan, H. W.

    1999-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study is to develop improved models for the acoustic impedance of treatment panels at high frequencies, for application to subscale treatment designs. Effects that cause significant deviation of the impedance from simple geometric scaling are examined in detail, an improved high-frequency impedance model is developed, and the improved model is correlated with high-frequency impedance measurements. Only single-degree-of-freedom honeycomb sandwich resonator panels with either perforated sheet or "linear" wiremesh faceplates are considered. The objective is to understand those effects that cause the simple single-degree-of- freedom resonator panels to deviate at the higher-scaled frequency from the impedance that would be obtained at the corresponding full-scale frequency. This will allow the subscale panel to be designed to achieve a specified impedance spectrum over at least a limited range of frequencies. An advanced impedance prediction model has been developed that accounts for some of the known effects at high frequency that have previously been ignored as a small source of error for full-scale frequency ranges.

  8. A finite element propagation model for extracting normal incidence impedance in nonprogressive acoustic wave fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Willie R.; Jones, Michael G.; Tanner, Sharon E.; Parrott, Tony L.

    1995-04-01

    A propagation model method for extracting the normal incidence impedance of an acoustic material installed as a finite length segment in a wall of a duct carrying a nonprogressive wave field is presented. The method recasts the determination of the unknown impedance as the minimization of the normalized wall pressure error function. A finite element propagation model is combined with a coarse/fine grid impedance plane search technique to extract the impedance of the material. Results are presented for three different materials for which the impedance is known. For each material, the input data required for the prediction scheme was computed from modal theory and then contaminated by random error. The finite element method reproduces the known impedance of each material almost exactly for random errors typical of those found in many measurement environments. Thus, the method developed here provides a means for determining the impedance of materials in a nonprogressirve wave environment such as that usually encountered in a commercial aircraft engine and most laboratory settings.

  9. A Finite Element Propagation Model for Extracting Normal Incidence Impedance in Nonprogressive Acoustic Wave Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Willie R.; Jones, Michael G.; Tanner, Sharon E.; Parrott, Tony L.

    1996-04-01

    A propagation model method for extracting the normal incidence impedance of an acoustic material installed as a finite length segment in a wall of a duct carrying a nonprogressive wave field is presented. The method recasts the determination of the unknown impedance as the minimization of the normalized wall pressure error function. A finite element propagation model is combined with a coarse/fine grid impedance plane search technique to extract the impedance of the material. Results are presented for three different materials for which the impedance is known. For each material, the input data required for the prediction scheme were computed from modal theory and then contaminated by random error. The finite element method reproduces the known impedance of each material almost exactly for random errors typical of those found in many measurement environments. Thus, the method developed here provides a means for determining the impedance of materials in a nonprogressive wave environment such as that usually encountered in a commercial aircraft engine and in most laboratory settings.

  10. A finite element propagation model for extracting normal incidence impedance in nonprogressive acoustic wave fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Willie R.; Jones, Michael G.; Tanner, Sharon E.; Parrott, Tony L.

    1995-01-01

    A propagation model method for extracting the normal incidence impedance of an acoustic material installed as a finite length segment in a wall of a duct carrying a nonprogressive wave field is presented. The method recasts the determination of the unknown impedance as the minimization of the normalized wall pressure error function. A finite element propagation model is combined with a coarse/fine grid impedance plane search technique to extract the impedance of the material. Results are presented for three different materials for which the impedance is known. For each material, the input data required for the prediction scheme was computed from modal theory and then contaminated by random error. The finite element method reproduces the known impedance of each material almost exactly for random errors typical of those found in many measurement environments. Thus, the method developed here provides a means for determining the impedance of materials in a nonprogressirve wave environment such as that usually encountered in a commercial aircraft engine and most laboratory settings.

  11. Microfabricated thin film impedance sensor & AC impedance measurements.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jinsong; Liu, Chung-Chiun

    2010-01-01

    Thin film microfabrication technique was employed to fabricate a platinum based parallel-electrode structured impedance sensor. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and equivalent circuit analysis of the small amplitude (±5 mV) AC impedance measurements (frequency range: 1 MHz to 0.1 Hz) at ambient temperature were carried out. Testing media include 0.001 M, 0.01 M, 0.1 M NaCl and KCl solutions, and alumina (∼3 μm) and sand (∼300 μm) particulate layers saturated with NaCl solutions with the thicknesses ranging from 0.6 mm to 8 mm in a testing cell, and the results were used to assess the effect of the thickness of the particulate layer on the conductivity of the testing solution. The calculated resistances were approximately around 20 MΩ, 4 MΩ, and 0.5 MΩ for 0.001 M, 0.01 M, and 0.1 M NaCl solutions, respectively. The presence of the sand particulates increased the impedance dramatically (6 times and 3 times for 0.001 M and 0.1 M NaCl solutions, respectively). A cell constant methodology was also developed to assess the measurement of the bulk conductivity of the electrolyte solution. The cell constant ranged from 1.2 to 0.8 and it decreased with the increase of the solution thickness.

  12. Microfabricated Thin Film Impedance Sensor & AC Impedance Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jinsong; Liu, Chung-Chiun

    2010-01-01

    Thin film microfabrication technique was employed to fabricate a platinum based parallel-electrode structured impedance sensor. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and equivalent circuit analysis of the small amplitude (±5 mV) AC impedance measurements (frequency range: 1 MHz to 0.1 Hz) at ambient temperature were carried out. Testing media include 0.001 M, 0.01 M, 0.1 M NaCl and KCl solutions, and alumina (∼3 μm) and sand (∼300 μm) particulate layers saturated with NaCl solutions with the thicknesses ranging from 0.6 mm to 8 mm in a testing cell, and the results were used to assess the effect of the thickness of the particulate layer on the conductivity of the testing solution. The calculated resistances were approximately around 20 MΩ, 4 MΩ, and 0.5 MΩ for 0.001 M, 0.01 M, and 0.1 M NaCl solutions, respectively. The presence of the sand particulates increased the impedance dramatically (6 times and 3 times for 0.001 M and 0.1 M NaCl solutions, respectively). A cell constant methodology was also developed to assess the measurement of the bulk conductivity of the electrolyte solution. The cell constant ranged from 1.2 to 0.8 and it decreased with the increase of the solution thickness. PMID:22219690

  13. Measuring acoustic habitats.

    PubMed

    Merchant, Nathan D; Fristrup, Kurt M; Johnson, Mark P; Tyack, Peter L; Witt, Matthew J; Blondel, Philippe; Parks, Susan E

    2015-03-01

    1. Many organisms depend on sound for communication, predator/prey detection and navigation. The acoustic environment can therefore play an important role in ecosystem dynamics and evolution. A growing number of studies are documenting acoustic habitats and their influences on animal development, behaviour, physiology and spatial ecology, which has led to increasing demand for passive acoustic monitoring (PAM) expertise in the life sciences. However, as yet, there has been no synthesis of data processing methods for acoustic habitat monitoring, which presents an unnecessary obstacle to would-be PAM analysts. 2. Here, we review the signal processing techniques needed to produce calibrated measurements of terrestrial and aquatic acoustic habitats. We include a supplemental tutorial and template computer codes in matlab and r, which give detailed guidance on how to produce calibrated spectrograms and statistical analyses of sound levels. Key metrics and terminology for the characterisation of biotic, abiotic and anthropogenic sound are covered, and their application to relevant monitoring scenarios is illustrated through example data sets. To inform study design and hardware selection, we also include an up-to-date overview of terrestrial and aquatic PAM instruments. 3. Monitoring of acoustic habitats at large spatiotemporal scales is becoming possible through recent advances in PAM technology. This will enhance our understanding of the role of sound in the spatial ecology of acoustically sensitive species and inform spatial planning to mitigate the rising influence of anthropogenic noise in these ecosystems. As we demonstrate in this work, progress in these areas will depend upon the application of consistent and appropriate PAM methodologies.

  14. Measuring acoustic habitats

    PubMed Central

    Merchant, Nathan D; Fristrup, Kurt M; Johnson, Mark P; Tyack, Peter L; Witt, Matthew J; Blondel, Philippe; Parks, Susan E

    2015-01-01

    1. Many organisms depend on sound for communication, predator/prey detection and navigation. The acoustic environment can therefore play an important role in ecosystem dynamics and evolution. A growing number of studies are documenting acoustic habitats and their influences on animal development, behaviour, physiology and spatial ecology, which has led to increasing demand for passive acoustic monitoring (PAM) expertise in the life sciences. However, as yet, there has been no synthesis of data processing methods for acoustic habitat monitoring, which presents an unnecessary obstacle to would-be PAM analysts. 2. Here, we review the signal processing techniques needed to produce calibrated measurements of terrestrial and aquatic acoustic habitats. We include a supplemental tutorial and template computer codes in matlab and r, which give detailed guidance on how to produce calibrated spectrograms and statistical analyses of sound levels. Key metrics and terminology for the characterisation of biotic, abiotic and anthropogenic sound are covered, and their application to relevant monitoring scenarios is illustrated through example data sets. To inform study design and hardware selection, we also include an up-to-date overview of terrestrial and aquatic PAM instruments. 3. Monitoring of acoustic habitats at large spatiotemporal scales is becoming possible through recent advances in PAM technology. This will enhance our understanding of the role of sound in the spatial ecology of acoustically sensitive species and inform spatial planning to mitigate the rising influence of anthropogenic noise in these ecosystems. As we demonstrate in this work, progress in these areas will depend upon the application of consistent and appropriate PAM methodologies. PMID:25954500

  15. Sensing the characteristic acoustic impedance of a fluid utilizing acoustic pressure waves

    PubMed Central

    Antlinger, Hannes; Clara, Stefan; Beigelbeck, Roman; Cerimovic, Samir; Keplinger, Franz; Jakoby, Bernhard

    2012-01-01

    Ultrasonic sensors can be used to determine physical fluid parameters like viscosity, density, and speed of sound. In this contribution, we present the concept for an integrated sensor utilizing pressure waves to sense the characteristic acoustic impedance of a fluid. We note that the basic setup generally allows to determine the longitudinal viscosity and the speed of sound if it is operated in a resonant mode as will be discussed elsewhere. In this contribution, we particularly focus on a modified setup where interferences are suppressed by introducing a wedge reflector. This enables sensing of the liquid's characteristic acoustic impedance, which can serve as parameter in condition monitoring applications. We present a device model, experimental results and their evaluation. PMID:23565036

  16. Acoustics, computers and measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truchard, James J.

    2003-10-01

    The human ear has created a high standard for the requirements of acoustical measurements. The transient nature of most acoustical signals has limited the success of traditional volt meters. Professor Hixson's pioneering work in electroacoustical measurements at ARL and The University of Texas helped set the stage for modern computer-based measurements. The tremendous performance of modern PCs and extensive libraries of signal processing functions in virtual instrumentation application software has revolutionized the way acoustical measurements are made. Today's analog to digital converters have up to 24 bits of resolution with a dynamic range of over 120 dB and a single PC processor can process 112 channels of FFTs at 4 kHz in real time. Wavelet technology further extends the capabilities for analyzing transients. The tools available for measurements in speech, electroacoustics, noise, and vibration represent some of the most advanced measurement tools available. During the last 50 years, Professor Hixson has helped drive this revolution from simple oscilloscope measurements to the modern high performance computer-based measurements.

  17. Structural health monitoring using piezoelectric impedance measurements.

    PubMed

    Park, Gyuhae; Inman, Daniel J

    2007-02-15

    This paper presents an overview and recent advances in impedance-based structural health monitoring. The basic principle behind this technique is to apply high-frequency structural excitations (typically greater than 30kHz) through surface-bonded piezoelectric transducers, and measure the impedance of structures by monitoring the current and voltage applied to the piezoelectric transducers. Changes in impedance indicate changes in the structure, which in turn can indicate that damage has occurred. An experimental study is presented to demonstrate how this technique can be used to detect structural damage in real time. Signal processing methods that address damage classifications and data compression issues associated with the use of the impedance methods are also summarized. Finally, a modified frequency-domain autoregressive model with exogenous inputs (ARX) is described. The frequency-domain ARX model, constructed by measured impedance data, is used to diagnose structural damage with levels of statistical confidence.

  18. Waveform-preserved unidirectional acoustic transmission based on impedance-matched acoustic metasurface and phononic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Ai-Ling; Chen, Tian-Ning; Wang, Xiao-Peng; Wan, Le-Le

    2016-08-01

    The waveform distortion happens in most of the unidirectional acoustic transmission (UAT) devices proposed before. In this paper, a novel type of waveform-preserved UAT device composed of an impedance-matched acoustic metasurface (AMS) and a phononic crystal (PC) structure is proposed and numerically investigated. The acoustic pressure field distributions and transmittance are calculated by using the finite element method. The subwavelength AMS that can modulate the wavefront of the transmitted wave at will is designed and the band structure of the PC structure is calculated and analyzed. The sound pressure field distributions demonstrate that the unidirectional acoustic transmission can be realized by the proposed UAT device without changing the waveforms of the output waves, which is the distinctive feature compared with the previous UAT devices. The physical mechanism of the unidirectional acoustic transmission is discussed by analyzing the refraction angle changes and partial band gap map. The calculated transmission spectra show that the UAT device is valid within a relatively broad frequency range. The simulation results agree well with the theoretical predictions. The proposed UAT device provides a good reference for designing waveform-preserved UAT devices and has potential applications in many fields, such as medical ultrasound, acoustic rectifiers, and noise insulation.

  19. Wireless Acoustic Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Paul D.; Dorland, Wade D.

    2005-01-01

    A prototype wireless acoustic measurement system (WAMS) is one of two main subsystems of the Acoustic Prediction/Measurement Tool, which comprises software, acoustic instrumentation, and electronic hardware combined to afford integrated capabilities for predicting and measuring noise emitted by rocket and jet engines. The other main subsystem is described in "Predicting Rocket or Jet Noise in Real Time" (SSC-00215-1), which appears elsewhere in this issue of NASA Tech Briefs. The WAMS includes analog acoustic measurement instrumentation and analog and digital electronic circuitry combined with computer wireless local-area networking to enable (1) measurement of sound-pressure levels at multiple locations in the sound field of an engine under test and (2) recording and processing of the measurement data. At each field location, the measurements are taken by a portable unit, denoted a field station. There are ten field stations, each of which can take two channels of measurements. Each field station is equipped with two instrumentation microphones, a micro-ATX computer, a wireless network adapter, an environmental enclosure, a directional radio antenna, and a battery power supply. The environmental enclosure shields the computer from weather and from extreme acoustically induced vibrations. The power supply is based on a marine-service lead-acid storage battery that has enough capacity to support operation for as long as 10 hours. A desktop computer serves as a control server for the WAMS. The server is connected to a wireless router for communication with the field stations via a wireless local-area network that complies with wireless-network standard 802.11b of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. The router and the wireless network adapters are controlled by use of Linux-compatible driver software. The server runs custom Linux software for synchronizing the recording of measurement data in the field stations. The software includes a module that

  20. Wireless Acoustic Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Paul D.; Dorland, Wade D.; Jolly, Ronald L.

    2007-01-01

    A prototype wireless acoustic measurement system (WAMS) is one of two main subsystems of the Acoustic Prediction/ Measurement Tool, which comprises software, acoustic instrumentation, and electronic hardware combined to afford integrated capabilities for predicting and measuring noise emitted by rocket and jet engines. The other main subsystem is described in the article on page 8. The WAMS includes analog acoustic measurement instrumentation and analog and digital electronic circuitry combined with computer wireless local-area networking to enable (1) measurement of sound-pressure levels at multiple locations in the sound field of an engine under test and (2) recording and processing of the measurement data. At each field location, the measurements are taken by a portable unit, denoted a field station. There are ten field stations, each of which can take two channels of measurements. Each field station is equipped with two instrumentation microphones, a micro- ATX computer, a wireless network adapter, an environmental enclosure, a directional radio antenna, and a battery power supply. The environmental enclosure shields the computer from weather and from extreme acoustically induced vibrations. The power supply is based on a marine-service lead-acid storage battery that has enough capacity to support operation for as long as 10 hours. A desktop computer serves as a control server for the WAMS. The server is connected to a wireless router for communication with the field stations via a wireless local-area network that complies with wireless-network standard 802.11b of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. The router and the wireless network adapters are controlled by use of Linux-compatible driver software. The server runs custom Linux software for synchronizing the recording of measurement data in the field stations. The software includes a module that provides an intuitive graphical user interface through which an operator at the control server

  1. Bonding and impedance matching of acoustic transducers using silver epoxy.

    PubMed

    Son, Kyu Tak; Lee, Chin C

    2012-04-01

    Silver epoxy was selected to bond transducer plates on glass substrates. The properties and thickness of the bonding medium affect the electrical input impedance of the transducer. Thus, the thickness of the silver epoxy bonding layer was used as a design parameter to optimize the structure for the transducer input impedance to match the 50 Ω output impedance of most radio frequency (RF) generators. Simulation and experimental results show that nearly perfect matching is achieved without using any matching circuit. At the matching condition, the transducer operates at a frequency band a little bit below the half-wavelength resonant frequency of the piezoelectric plate. In experiments, lead titanate (PT) piezoelectric plates were employed. Both full-size, 11.5 mm × 2 mm × 0.4 mm, and half-size, 5.75 mm × 2 mm × 0.4 mm, can be well matched using optimal silver epoxy thickness. The transducer assemblies demonstrate high efficiency. The conversion loss from electrical power to acoustic power in soda-lime glass is 4.3 dB. This loss is low considering the fact that the transducers operate at off-resonance by 12%. With proper choice of silver epoxy thickness, the transducer can be matched at the fundamental, the 3rd and 5th harmonic frequencies. This leads to the possible realization of triple-band transducers. Reliability was assessed with thermal cycling test according to Telcordia GR-468-Core recommendation. Of the 30 transducer assemblies tested, none broke until 2900 cycles and 27 have sustained beyond 4050 cycles. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Gas hydrate saturation from acoustic impedance and resistivity logs in the shenhu area, south china sea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, X.; Wu, S.; Lee, M.; Guo, Y.; Yang, S.; Liang, J.

    2011-01-01

    During the China's first gas hydrate drilling expedition -1 (GMGS-1), gas hydrate was discovered in layers ranging from 10 to 25 m above the base of gas hydrate stability zone in the Shenhu area, South China Sea. Water chemistry, electrical resistivity logs, and acoustic impedance were used to estimate gas hydrate saturations. Gas hydrate saturations estimated from the chloride concentrations range from 0 to 43% of the pore space. The higher gas hydrate saturations were present in the depth from 152 to 177 m at site SH7 and from 190 to 225 m at site SH2, respectively. Gas hydrate saturations estimated from the resistivity using Archie equation have similar trends to those from chloride concentrations. To examine the variability of gas hydrate saturations away from the wells, acoustic impedances calculated from the 3 D seismic data using constrained sparse inversion method were used. Well logs acquired at site SH7 were incorporated into the inversion by establishing a relation between the water-filled porosity, calculated using gas hydrate saturations estimated from the resistivity logs, and the acoustic impedance, calculated from density and velocity logs. Gas hydrate saturations estimated from acoustic impedance of seismic data are ???10-23% of the pore space and are comparable to those estimated from the well logs. The uncertainties in estimated gas hydrate saturations from seismic acoustic impedances were mainly from uncertainties associated with inverted acoustic impedance, the empirical relation between the water-filled porosities and acoustic impedances, and assumed background resistivity. ?? 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Characterizing the ear canal acoustic impedance and reflectance by pole-zero fitting.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Sarah R; Nguyen, Cac T; Allen, Jont B

    2013-07-01

    This study characterizes middle ear complex acoustic reflectance (CAR) and impedance by fitting poles and zeros to real-ear measurements. The goal of this work is to establish a quantitative connection between pole-zero locations and the underlying physical properties of CAR data. Most previous studies have analyzed CAR magnitude; while the magnitude accounts for reflected power, it does not encode latency information. Thus, an analysis that studies the real and imaginary parts of the data together, being more general, should be more powerful. Pole-zero fitting of CAR data is examined using data compiled from various studies, dating back to Voss and Allen (1994). Recent CAR measurements were taken using the Mimosa Acoustics HearID system, which makes complex acoustic impedance and reflectance measurements in the ear canal over a 0.2-6.0 [kHz] frequency range. Pole-zero fits to measurements over this range are achieved with an average RMS relative error of less than 3% with 12 poles. Factoring the reflectance fit into its all-pass and minimum-phase components estimates the effect of the residual ear canal, allowing for comparison of the eardrum impedance and admittance across measurements. It was found that individual CAR magnitude variations for normal middle ears in the 1-4 [kHz] range often give rise to closely-placed pole-zero pairs, and that the locations of the poles and zeros in the s-plane may systematically differ between normal and pathological middle ears. This study establishes a methodology for examining the physical and mathematical properties of CAR using a concise parametric model. Pole-zero modeling accurately parameterizes CAR data, providing a foundation for detection and identification of middle ear pathologies. This article is part of a special issue entitled "MEMRO 2012".

  4. Effects of grazing flow on the steady-state flow resistance and acoustic impedance of thin porous-faced liners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hersh, A. S.; Walker, B.

    1978-01-01

    The effects of grazing flow on the steady state flow resistance and acoustic impedance of seven Feltmetal and three Rigimesh thin porous faced liners were studied. The steady-state flow resistance of the ten specimens was measured using standard fluid mechanical experimental techniques. The acoustic impedance was measured using the two microphone method. The principal findings of the study are that the effects of grazing flow were measured and found to be small; small differences were measured between steady-state and acoustic resistance, and a semi-empirical model was derived that correlated the steady-state resistance data of the seven Feltmetal liners and the face sheet reactance of both the Feltmetal and Rigimesh liners.

  5. Reflectance measurement validation using acoustic horns.

    PubMed

    Rasetshwane, Daniel M; Neely, Stephen T

    2015-10-01

    Variability in wideband acoustic reflectance (and absorbance) measurements adversely affects the clinical utility of reflectance for diagnosis of middle-ear disorders. A reflectance standard would encourage consistency across different measurement systems and help identify calibration related issues. Theoretical equations exist for the reflectance of finite-length exponential, conical, and parabolic acoustic horns. Reflectance measurements were repeatedly made in each of these three horn shapes and the results were compared to the corresponding theoretical reflectance. A method is described of adjusting acoustic impedance measurements to compensate for spreading of the wave front that propagates from the small diameter sound port of the probe to the larger diameter of the acoustic cavity. Agreement between measured and theoretical reflectance was less than 1 dB at most frequencies in the range from 0.2 to 10 kHz. Pearson correlation coefficients were greater than 0.95 between measured and theoretical time-domain reflectance within the flare region of the horns. The agreement suggests that the distributed reflectance of acoustic horns may be useful for validating reflectance measurements made in human ear canals; however, refinements to reflectance measurement methods may still be needed.

  6. Reflectance measurement validation using acoustic horns

    PubMed Central

    Rasetshwane, Daniel M.; Neely, Stephen T.

    2015-01-01

    Variability in wideband acoustic reflectance (and absorbance) measurements adversely affects the clinical utility of reflectance for diagnosis of middle-ear disorders. A reflectance standard would encourage consistency across different measurement systems and help identify calibration related issues. Theoretical equations exist for the reflectance of finite-length exponential, conical, and parabolic acoustic horns. Reflectance measurements were repeatedly made in each of these three horn shapes and the results were compared to the corresponding theoretical reflectance. A method is described of adjusting acoustic impedance measurements to compensate for spreading of the wave front that propagates from the small diameter sound port of the probe to the larger diameter of the acoustic cavity. Agreement between measured and theoretical reflectance was less than 1 dB at most frequencies in the range from 0.2 to 10 kHz. Pearson correlation coefficients were greater than 0.95 between measured and theoretical time-domain reflectance within the flare region of the horns. The agreement suggests that the distributed reflectance of acoustic horns may be useful for validating reflectance measurements made in human ear canals; however, refinements to reflectance measurement methods may still be needed. PMID:26520306

  7. Breathing detection with a portable impedance measurement system: first measurements.

    PubMed

    Cordes, Axel; Foussier, Jerome; Leonhardt, Steffen

    2009-01-01

    For monitoring the health status of individuals, detection of breathing and heart activity is important. From an electrical point of view, it is known that breathing and heart activity change the electrical impedance distribution in the human body over the time due to ventilation (high impedance) and blood shifts (low impedance). Thus, it is possible to detect both important vital parameters by measuring the impedance of the thorax or the region around lung and heart. For some measurement scenarios it is also essential to detect these parameters contactless. For instance, monitoring bus drivers health could help to limit accidents, but directly connected systems limit the drivers free moving space. One measurement technology for measuring the impedance changes in the chest without cables is the magnetic impedance tomography (MIT). This article describes a portable measurement system we developed for this scenario that allows to measure breathing contactless. Furthermore, first measurements with five volunteers were performed and analyzed.

  8. Constant current loop impedance measuring system that is immune to the effects of parasitic impedances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Karl F. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A constant current loop measuring system is provided for measuring a characteristic of an environment. The system comprises a first impedance positionable in the environment, a second impedance coupled in series with said first impedance and a parasitic impedance electrically coupled to the first and second impedances. A current generating device, electrically coupled in series with the first and second impedances, provides a constant current through the first and second impedances to produce first and second voltages across the first and second impedances, respectively, and a parasitic voltage across the parasitic impedance. A high impedance voltage measuring device measures a voltage difference between the first and second voltages independent of the parasitic voltage to produce a characteristic voltage representative of the characteristic of the environment.

  9. Inverse acoustic scattering problem in half-space with anisotropic random impedance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helin, Tapio; Lassas, Matti; Päivärinta, Lassi

    2017-02-01

    We study an inverse acoustic scattering problem in half-space with a probabilistic impedance boundary value condition. The Robin coefficient (surface impedance) is assumed to be a Gaussian random function with a pseudodifferential operator describing the covariance. We measure the amplitude of the backscattered field averaged over the frequency band and assume that the data is generated by a single realization of λ. Our main result is to show that under certain conditions the principal symbol of the covariance operator of λ is uniquely determined. Most importantly, no approximations are needed and we can solve the full non-linear inverse problem. We concentrate on anisotropic models for the principal symbol, which leads to the analysis of a novel anisotropic spherical Radon transform and its invertibility.

  10. Metamaterial buffer for broadband non-resonant impedance matching of obliquely incident acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Fleury, Romain; Alù, Andrea

    2014-12-01

    Broadband impedance matching and zero reflection of acoustic waves at a planar interface between two natural materials is a rare phenomenon, unlike its optical counterpart, frequently observed for polarized light incident at the Brewster angle. In this article, it is shown that, by inserting a metamaterial layer between two acoustic materials with different impedance, it is possible to artificially realize an extremely broadband Brewster-like acoustic intromission angle window, in which energy is totally transmitted from one natural medium to the other. The metamaterial buffer, composed of acoustically hard materials with subwavelength tapered apertures, provides an interesting way to match the impedances of two media in a broadband fashion, different from traditional methods like quarter-wave matching or Fabry-Pérot resonances, inherently narrowband due to their resonant nature. This phenomenon may be interesting for a variety of applications including energy harvesting, acoustic imaging, ultrasonic transducer technology, and noise control.

  11. Protein Aggregation Measurement through Electrical Impedance Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Affanni, A.; Corazza, A.; Esposito, G.; Fogolari, F.; Polano, M.

    2013-09-01

    The paper presents a novel methodology to measure the fibril formation in protein solutions. We designed a bench consisting of a sensor having interdigitated electrodes, a PDMS hermetic reservoir and an impedance meter automatically driven by calculator. The impedance data are interpolated with a lumped elements model and their change over time can provide information on the aggregation process. Encouraging results have been obtained by testing the methodology on K-casein, a protein of milk, with and without the addition of a drug inhibiting the aggregation. The amount of sample needed to perform this measurement is by far lower than the amount needed by fluorescence analysis.

  12. Deduction of the acoustic impedance of the ground via a simulated three-dimensional microphone array.

    PubMed

    Alberts, W C Kirkpatrick; Sanchez, Kevin J

    2013-11-01

    While commonly used ground impedance deduction methods often utilize pairs of vertically separated microphones, deployed arrays rarely have this configuration, which increases the difficulty in automatically deducing local ground impedance from these arrays. The ability to deduce ground impedance using random sounds incident on a three-dimensional array would increase, for example, the accuracy of estimated elevation angles. The methods described by the American National Standards Institute Method for Determining the Acoustic Impedance of Ground Surfaces are extended to simulate deducing ground impedance by a three-dimensional array. Ground parameters indicative of grassland are successfully determined using a simulated three-dimensional array.

  13. Optimization of Microphone Locations for Acoustic Liner Impedance Eduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, M. G.; Watson, W. R.; June, J. C.

    2015-01-01

    Two impedance eduction methods are explored for use with data acquired in the NASA Langley Grazing Flow Impedance Tube. The first is an indirect method based on the convected Helmholtz equation, and the second is a direct method based on the Kumaresan and Tufts algorithm. Synthesized no-flow data, with random jitter to represent measurement error, are used to evaluate a number of possible microphone locations. Statistical approaches are used to evaluate the suitability of each set of microphone locations. Given the computational resources required, small sample statistics are employed for the indirect method. Since the direct method is much less computationally intensive, a Monte Carlo approach is employed to gather its statistics. A comparison of results achieved with full and reduced sets of microphone locations is used to determine which sets of microphone locations are acceptable. For the indirect method, each array that includes microphones in all three regions (upstream and downstream hard wall sections, and liner test section) provides acceptable results, even when as few as eight microphones are employed. The best arrays employ microphones well away from the leading and trailing edges of the liner. The direct method is constrained to use microphones opposite the liner. Although a number of arrays are acceptable, the optimum set employs 14 microphones positioned well away from the leading and trailing edges of the liner. The selected sets of microphone locations are also evaluated with data measured for ceramic tubular and perforate-over-honeycomb liners at three flow conditions (Mach 0.0, 0.3, and 0.5). They compare favorably with results attained using all 53 microphone locations. Although different optimum microphone locations are selected for the two impedance eduction methods, there is significant overlap. Thus, the union of these two microphone arrays is preferred, as it supports usage of both methods. This array contains 3 microphones in the upstream

  14. Spatial distribution of anisotropic acoustic impedance assessed by time-resolved 50-MHz scanning acoustic microscopy and its relation to porosity in human cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Saïed, A; Raum, K; Leguerney, I; Laugier, P

    2008-07-01

    difference between the inner cortical layer (8.25+/-0.4 Mrayl) and peripheral layer (8.0+/-0.5 Mrayl) (unilateral paired t-test, p<10(-4)), the values in the anterior region (8.2+/-0.5 Mrayl) were found to be significantly higher than those of the posterior region (7.9+/-0.6 Mrayl). Impedance mean value of longitudinal sections was lower than mean value measured in transverse cross-sections, resulting in an impedance acoustic anisotropy ratio of 1.17+/-0.03 in the inner cortical layer and 1.19+/-0.02 in the peripheral layer. SAM is a valuable tool to provide data on the spatial distribution of microstructural and microelastic bone properties that is useful to improve our understanding of the impact of bone microstructure on tissue material properties.

  15. Experimental requirements for measuring pneumatochemical impedances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millet, P.; Decaux, C.; Ngameni, R.; Guymont, M.

    2007-12-01

    Hydrogen storage remains a bottleneck process on the way to the hydrogen economy. For practical applications, metal hydride systems offer interesting features, in particular, the possibility of reversibly storing large amounts of hydrogen at low or moderate pressure. However, they still suffer from unfavorable specific energy, with mass-fraction values ranging from 0 up to 5wt% whereas transport applications require 6wt% and more. Besides this, higher sorption/desorption kinetics and better chemical stability over long-term cycling are also needed. This is why many studies are carried out in the research community on hydride-forming systems, to develop new materials meeting these requirements. Development and optimization of metal hydride reactors require coupled thermodynamic and kinetic characterization of metal-hydrogen systems. In particular, it is necessary to analyze the kinetics in terms of reaction mechanism, in order to identify the different steps of commonly observed multistep reaction paths, and to measure their individual rate parameters. By analyzing hydriding kinetics in the frequency (Fourier) domain, pneumatochemical impedance spectroscopy (PIS) now offers the possibility of measuring experimental impedances and identifying reaction steps. However, measurement of such impedances is indirect and nontrivial. The purpose of this paper is to detail the experimental requirements needed for correctly measuring gas-phase impedance diagrams. In particular, practical conditions of data sampling and data treatment are described. Experimental results obtained with the model LaNi5-H2(g ) system are presented to illustrate the potentialities of PIS analysis.

  16. Broadband gradient impedance matching using an acoustic metamaterial for ultrasonic transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zheng; Yang, Dan-Qing; Liu, Shi-Lei; Yu, Si-Yuan; Lu, Ming-Hui; Zhu, Jie; Zhang, Shan-Tao; Zhu, Ming-Wei; Guo, Xia-Sheng; Wu, Hao-Dong; Wang, Xin-Long; Chen, Yan-Feng

    2017-02-01

    High-quality broadband ultrasound transducers yield superior imaging performance in biomedical ultrasonography. However, proper design to perfectly bridge the energy between the active piezoelectric material and the target medium over the operating spectrum is still lacking. Here, we demonstrate a new anisotropic cone-structured acoustic metamaterial matching layer that acts as an inhomogeneous material with gradient acoustic impedance along the ultrasound propagation direction. When sandwiched between the piezoelectric material unit and the target medium, the acoustic metamaterial matching layer provides a broadband window to support extraordinary transmission of ultrasound over a wide frequency range. We fabricated the matching layer by etching the peeled silica optical fibre bundles with hydrofluoric acid solution. The experimental measurement of an ultrasound transducer equipped with this acoustic metamaterial matching layer shows that the corresponding -6 dB bandwidth is able to reach over 100%. This new material fully enables new high-end piezoelectric materials in the construction of high-performance ultrasound transducers and probes, leading to considerably improved resolutions in biomedical ultrasonography and compact harmonic imaging systems.

  17. Broadband gradient impedance matching using an acoustic metamaterial for ultrasonic transducers.

    PubMed

    Li, Zheng; Yang, Dan-Qing; Liu, Shi-Lei; Yu, Si-Yuan; Lu, Ming-Hui; Zhu, Jie; Zhang, Shan-Tao; Zhu, Ming-Wei; Guo, Xia-Sheng; Wu, Hao-Dong; Wang, Xin-Long; Chen, Yan-Feng

    2017-02-17

    High-quality broadband ultrasound transducers yield superior imaging performance in biomedical ultrasonography. However, proper design to perfectly bridge the energy between the active piezoelectric material and the target medium over the operating spectrum is still lacking. Here, we demonstrate a new anisotropic cone-structured acoustic metamaterial matching layer that acts as an inhomogeneous material with gradient acoustic impedance along the ultrasound propagation direction. When sandwiched between the piezoelectric material unit and the target medium, the acoustic metamaterial matching layer provides a broadband window to support extraordinary transmission of ultrasound over a wide frequency range. We fabricated the matching layer by etching the peeled silica optical fibre bundles with hydrofluoric acid solution. The experimental measurement of an ultrasound transducer equipped with this acoustic metamaterial matching layer shows that the corresponding -6 dB bandwidth is able to reach over 100%. This new material fully enables new high-end piezoelectric materials in the construction of high-performance ultrasound transducers and probes, leading to considerably improved resolutions in biomedical ultrasonography and compact harmonic imaging systems.

  18. Broadband gradient impedance matching using an acoustic metamaterial for ultrasonic transducers

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zheng; Yang, Dan-Qing; Liu, Shi-Lei; Yu, Si-Yuan; Lu, Ming-Hui; Zhu, Jie; Zhang, Shan-Tao; Zhu, Ming-Wei; Guo, Xia-Sheng; Wu, Hao-Dong; Wang, Xin-Long; Chen, Yan-Feng

    2017-01-01

    High-quality broadband ultrasound transducers yield superior imaging performance in biomedical ultrasonography. However, proper design to perfectly bridge the energy between the active piezoelectric material and the target medium over the operating spectrum is still lacking. Here, we demonstrate a new anisotropic cone-structured acoustic metamaterial matching layer that acts as an inhomogeneous material with gradient acoustic impedance along the ultrasound propagation direction. When sandwiched between the piezoelectric material unit and the target medium, the acoustic metamaterial matching layer provides a broadband window to support extraordinary transmission of ultrasound over a wide frequency range. We fabricated the matching layer by etching the peeled silica optical fibre bundles with hydrofluoric acid solution. The experimental measurement of an ultrasound transducer equipped with this acoustic metamaterial matching layer shows that the corresponding −6 dB bandwidth is able to reach over 100%. This new material fully enables new high-end piezoelectric materials in the construction of high-performance ultrasound transducers and probes, leading to considerably improved resolutions in biomedical ultrasonography and compact harmonic imaging systems. PMID:28211510

  19. Pressure Dependence of the Transverse Acoustic Impedance of Superfluid 3He-B

    SciTech Connect

    Wada, Y.; Aoki, Y.; Saitoh, M.; Nishida, R.; Nomura, R.; Okuda, Y.

    2006-09-07

    We measured the pressure dependence of the complex transverse acoustic impedance of superfluid 3HE-B using an AC-cut quartz transducer. The measurements were performed by a CW bridge method at the third harmonics of the fundamental resonance frequency 9.56 MHz. We obtained the real (Z') and the imaginary (Z'') parts of the transverse acoustic impedance independently. Z' and Z'' did not change from the normal state values at Tc, but Z' started to increase at the pair breaking edge temperature Tpb upon cooling. The slope of the increase changed at a temperature defined as T* which was lower than Tpb. With further cooling, it reached a maximum and then decreased slowly. Z'' had a small peak at T* and decreased rapidly with decreasing temperature. These temperature dependences were possibly influenced by quasi-particle density of states within the energy gap originating from the surface Andreev bound states. At lower pressure the maximum of Z' and the small peak of Z'' moved to smaller T/Tc and became larger due to the pressure dependence of the energy gap.

  20. Absorption and impedance boundary conditions for phased geometrical-acoustics methods.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Cheol-Ho

    2012-10-01

    Defining accurate acoustical boundary conditions is of crucial importance for room acoustic simulations. In predicting sound fields using phased geometrical acoustics methods, both absorption coefficients and surface impedances of the boundary surfaces can be used, but no guideline has been developed on which boundary condition produces accurate results. In this study, various boundary conditions in terms of normal, random, and field incidence absorption coefficients and normal incidence surface impedance are used in a phased beam tracing model, and the simulated results are validated with boundary element solutions. Two rectangular rooms with uniform and non-uniform absorption distributions are tested. Effects of the neglect of reflection phase shift are also investigated. It is concluded that the impedance, random incidence, and field incidence absorption boundary conditions produce reasonable results with some exceptions at low frequencies for acoustically soft materials.

  1. Acoustic reflex measurement.

    PubMed

    Schairer, Kim S; Feeney, M Patrick; Sanford, Chris A

    2013-07-01

    Middle ear muscle reflex (MEMR) measurements have been a part of the standard clinical immittance test battery for decades as a cross-check with the behavioral audiogram and as a way to separate cochlear from retrocochlear pathologies. MEMR responses are measured in the ear canal by using a probe stimulus (e.g., single frequency or broadband noise) to monitor admittance changes elicited by a reflex-activating stimulus. In the clinical MEMR procedures, one test yields changes in a single measurement (i.e., admittance) at a single pure tone (e.g., 226 or 1000 Hz). In contrast, for the wideband acoustic immittance (WAI) procedure,one test yields information about multiple measurements (e.g., admittance, power reflectance, absorbance) across a wide frequency range (e.g., 250 to 8000 Hz analysis bandwidth of the probe). One benefit of the WAI method is that the MEMR can be identified in a single test regardless of the frequency at which the maximum shift in the immittance measurement occurs; this is beneficial because maximal shifts in immittance vary as a function of age and other factors. Another benefit is that the wideband response analysis yields lower MEMR thresholds than with the clinical procedures. Lower MEMR thresholds would allow for MEMR decay tests in ears in which the activator levels could not be safely presented. Finally, the WAI procedures can be automated with objective identification of the MEMR, which would allow for use in newborn and other screening programs in which the tests are completed by nonaudiological personnel.

  2. A combined complex electrical impedance and acoustic emission study in limestone samples under uniaxial loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saltas, V.; Fitilis, I.; Vallianatos, F.

    2014-12-01

    In the present work, complex electrical impedance measurements in the frequency range of 10 mHz to 1 MHz were carried out in conjunction with acoustic emission monitoring in limestone samples subjected to linear and stepped-like uniaxial loading, up to ultimate failure. Cole-Cole plots of the complex impedance during the stepped loading of limestone have been used to discriminate the contributions of grains interior, grain boundaries and electrode polarization effects to the overall electrical behavior. The latter is well-described with an equivalent-circuit model which comprises components of constant phase elements and resistances in parallel connection. Electrical conductivity increases upon uniaxial loading giving rise to negative values of effective activation volume. This is a strong experimental evidence for the generation of transient electric signals recorded prior to seismic events and may be attributed to charge transfer (proton conduction) due to cracks generation and propagation as a result of the applied stress. The time-series of ac-conductivity at two distinct frequencies (10 kHz, 200 kHz) during linear loading of limestone samples exhibits a strong correlation with the acoustic emission activity obeying the same general self-similar law for critical phenomena that has been reported for the energy release before materials fracture.

  3. Readout electrode assembly for measuring biological impedance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, L. D.; Moody, D. L., Jr. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    The invention comprises of a pair of readout ring electrodes which are used in conjunction with apparatus for measuring the electrical impedance between different points in the body of a living animal to determine the amount of blood flow therebetween. The readout electrodes have independently adjustable diameters to permit attachment around different parts of the body between which it is desired to measure electric impedance. The axial spacing between the electrodes is adjusted by a pair of rods which have a first pair of ends fixedly attached to one electrode and a second pair of ends slidably attached to the other electrode. Indicia are provided on the outer surface of the ring electrodes and on the surface of the rods to permit measurement of the circumference and spacing between the ring electrodes.

  4. Evaluation of a Variable-Impedance Ceramic Matrix Composite Acoustic Liner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, M. G.; Watson, W. R.; Nark, D. M.; Howerton, B. M.

    2014-01-01

    As a result of significant progress in the reduction of fan and jet noise, there is growing concern regarding core noise. One method for achieving core noise reduction is via the use of acoustic liners. However, these liners must be constructed with materials suitable for high temperature environments and should be designed for optimum absorption of the broadband core noise spectrum. This paper presents results of tests conducted in the NASA Langley Liner Technology Facility to evaluate a variable-impedance ceramic matrix composite acoustic liner that offers the potential to achieve each of these goals. One concern is the porosity of the ceramic matrix composite material, and whether this might affect the predictability of liners constructed with this material. Comparisons between two variable-depth liners, one constructed with ceramic matrix composite material and the other constructed via stereolithography, are used to demonstrate this material porosity is not a concern. Also, some interesting observations are noted regarding the orientation of variable-depth liners. Finally, two propagation codes are validated via comparisons of predicted and measured acoustic pressure profiles for a variable-depth liner.

  5. Acoustical Measurement Of Mine-Shaft Length

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, Joseph S.

    1988-01-01

    Acoustical system proposed to measure depth of a "blind" shaft. Acoustic wave guided by shaft and provides estimate of shaft length, from which volume estimated. Acoustic-generator system determines resonant-frequency difference to measure shaft length.

  6. Equivalent acoustic impedance model. Part 1: experiments and semi-physical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faverjon, B.; Soize, C.

    2004-09-01

    The context of this research is devoted to the construction of an equivalent acoustic impedance model for a soundproofing scheme consisting of a three-dimensional porous medium inserted between two thin plates. Part 1 of this paper presents the experiments performed and a probabilistic algebraic model of the wall acoustic impedance constructed using the experimental data basis for the medium- and high-frequency ranges. The probabilistic algebraic model is constructed by using the general mathematical properties of wall acoustic impedance operators (symmetry, odd and even functions with respect to the frequency, decreasing functions when frequency goes to infinity, behaviour when frequency goes to zero and so on). The parameters introduced in this probabilistic algebraic model are fitted with the experimental data basis. Finally, this probabilistic algebraic model summarizes all the experimental data bases and consequently can be reused for other researches.

  7. Method for Improving Acoustic Impedance of Epoxy Resins

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-11

    neoprene, ethylene propylene diene monomer ( EPDM ) and polyurethane rubbers . Typical applications of these materials encapsulate and protect acoustic...different material (e.g., rubber ) cannot be used. Thus, a hard, strong and acoustically transparent material is needed. Suitable high modulus...epoxy resin. In this method, an epoxy resin component is mixed with a rubber component. The epoxy resin component is preferably a bisphenol A

  8. Algorithmic Error Correction of Impedance Measuring Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Starostenko, Oleg; Alarcon-Aquino, Vicente; Hernandez, Wilmar; Sergiyenko, Oleg; Tyrsa, Vira

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes novel design concepts and some advanced techniques proposed for increasing the accuracy of low cost impedance measuring devices without reduction of operational speed. The proposed structural method for algorithmic error correction and iterating correction method provide linearization of transfer functions of the measuring sensor and signal conditioning converter, which contribute the principal additive and relative measurement errors. Some measuring systems have been implemented in order to estimate in practice the performance of the proposed methods. Particularly, a measuring system for analysis of C-V, G-V characteristics has been designed and constructed. It has been tested during technological process control of charge-coupled device CCD manufacturing. The obtained results are discussed in order to define a reasonable range of applied methods, their utility, and performance. PMID:22303177

  9. The acoustical impedance at the junction of an extended inlet or outlet duct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peat, K. S.

    1991-10-01

    At low frequencies only plane waves can continuously propagate along a uniform duct, but at a discontinuity in the duct cross-section higher order, evanescent acoustic waves are produced. The accuracy of a plane-wave analysis can be increased by the introduction of an equivalent impedance to account for these nonplanar waves. Previous work has concentrated upon the equivalent impedance at sudden expansions or contractions of the duct cross-section. In this paper, equivalent impedance formulas are developed for the junctions of extended inlet and extended outlet duct systems. Such formulas are of practical importance in the accurate low-frequency analysis of reactive silencer systems.

  10. Acoustic Intensity Measurements in the Presence of Low Mach Number Flow

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-09-01

    broadband acoustic holography ,3 intensity measurements in the presence of flow,"𔄁𔄀. 7 in-situ evaluation of the acoustic impedance and sound absorption...Cross Spectra" Ph.D. Thesis, Catholic University, (1987). 3. Loyau, T., Pascal, J., Gaillard, P., "Broadband Acoustic Holography Reconstruction From...AD-A269 995 The Pennsylvania State University APPLIED RESEARCH LABORATORY P.O. Box 30 State College, PA 16804 ACOUSTIC INTENSITY MEASUREMENTS IN THE

  11. Underwater asymmetric acoustic transmission structure using the medium with gradient change of impedance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bo, Hu; Jie, Shi; Sheng-Guo, Shi; Yu, Sun; Zhong-Rui, Zhu

    2016-02-01

    We propose an underwater asymmetric acoustic transmission structure comprised of two media each with a gradient change of acoustic impedance. By gradually increasing the acoustic impedances of the media, the propagating direction of the acoustic wave can be continuously bent, resulting in allowing the acoustic wave to pass through along the positive direction and blocking acoustic waves from the negative one. The main advantages of this structure are that the asymmetric transmission effect of this structure can be realized and enhanced more easily in water. We investigate both numerically and experimentally the asymmetric transmission effect. The experimental results show that a highly efficient asymmetric acoustic transmission can be yielded within a remarkable broadband frequency range, which agrees well with the numerical prediction. It is of potential practical significance for various underwater applications such as reducing vibration and noise. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11204049 and 11204050), the Program for Changjiang Scholars and Innovative Research Team in University of Ministry of Education of China (Grant No. IRT1228), and the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (Grant Nos. 20122304120023 and 20122304120011).

  12. Nanocomposite cerium oxide polymer matching layers with adjustable acoustic impedance between 4 MRayl and 7 MRayl.

    PubMed

    Tiefensee, Frank; Becker-Willinger, Carsten; Heppe, Gisela; Herbeck-Engel, Petra; Jakob, Anette

    2010-03-01

    A new class of materials for ultrasonic matching layers is presented. The materials consist of nanoscale cerium oxide particles in an epoxy functionalized organic inorganic hybrid polymer matrix. The cerium oxide agglomerates to particles with 20 nm diameters. The content of particles in the polymer matrix could be increased to 75 wt.% which corresponds to 37 vol.%. The most technical important piezoelectrical ceramics have an acoustic impedance of about 30 MRayl, to improve coupling into water or biological tissue with an acoustic impedance of about 1.5 MRayl a matching layer should have an acoustic impedance of about 6.8 MRayl. With a filling degree of 75 wt.% the new composite material reaches an acoustic impedance of 7 MRayl. The materials are synthesized by a hydrolytic condensation combined with polymerization. This way of synthesis allows the use of organic solvents to adjust the viscosity of the sol and the application of different coating techniques. Ultrasound transducers (100 MHz) were built to test the new matching layers and an increase of the voltage signal amplitude of about 100% could be detected. 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Effects of anticancer drugs on glia-glioma brain tumor model characterized by acoustic impedance microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soon, Thomas Tiong Kwong; Chean, Tan Wei; Yamada, Hikari; Takahashi, Kenta; Hozumi, Naohiro; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Yoshida, Sachiko

    2017-07-01

    An ultrasonic microscope is a useful tool for observing living tissue without chemical fixation or histochemical processing. Two-dimensional (2D) acoustic impedance microscopy developed in our previous study for living cell observation was employed to visualize intracellular changes. We proposed a brain tumor model by cocultivating rat glial cells and C6 gliomas to quantitatively analyze the effects of two types of anticancer drugs, cytochalasin B (CyB) and temozolomide (TMZ), when they were applied. We reported that CyB treatment (25 µg/ml, T = 90 min) significantly reduced the acoustic impedance of gliomas and has little effect on glial cells. Meanwhile, TMZ treatment (2 mg/ml, T = 90 min) impacted both cells equally, in which both cells’ acoustic impedances were decreased. As CyB targets the actin filament polymerization of the cells, we have concluded that the decrease in acoustic impedance was in fact due to actin filament depolymerization and the data can be quantitatively assessed for future studies in novel drug development.

  14. LDV measurement of bird ear vibrations to determine inner ear impedance and middle ear power flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muyshondt, Pieter G. G.; Pires, Felipe; Dirckx, Joris J. J.

    2016-06-01

    The mechanical behavior of the middle ear structures in birds and mammals is affected by the fluids in the inner ear (IE) that are present behind the oval window. In this study, the aim was to gather knowledge of the acoustic impedance of the IE in the ostrich, to be able to determine the effect on vibrations and power flow in the single-ossicle bird middle ear for future studies. To determine the IE impedance, vibrations of the ossicle were measured for both the quasi-static and acoustic stimulus frequencies. In the acoustic regime, vibrations were measured with a laser Doppler vibrometer and electromagnetic stimulation of the ossicle. The impedance of the inner ear could be determined by means of a simple RLC model in series, which resulted in a stiffness reactance of KIE = 0.20.1012 Pa/m3, an inertial impedance of MIE = 0.652.106 Pa s2/m3, and a resistance of RIE = 1.57.109 Pa s/m. The measured impedance is found to be considerably smaller than what is found for the human IE.

  15. Bioelectrical impedance analysis. What does it measure?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoeller, D. A.

    2000-01-01

    Bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) has been proposed for measuring fat-free mass, total body water, percent fat, body cell mass, intracellular water, and extracellular water: a veritable laboratory in a box. Although it is unlikely that BIA is quite this versatile, correlations have been demonstrated between BIA and all of these body compartments. At the same time, it is known that all of the compartments are correlated among themselves. Because of this, it is difficult to determine whether BIA is specific for any or all of these compartments. To investigate this question, we induced acute changes in total body water and its compartments over a 3-h period. Using this approach, we demonstrated that multifrequency BIA, using the Cole-Cole model to calculate the zero frequency and infinite frequency resistance, measures extracellular and intracellular water.

  16. Determination of sound velocity and acoustic impedance of thin chitosan films by phase-sensitive acoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamanyi, Albert E.; Ahmed Mohamed, Esam T.; Ngwa, Wilfred; Grill, Wolfgang

    2010-03-01

    The biomaterial chitosan is used in the paper manufacturing industry, as a wound healing agent and in filtration amongst others. In this paper the longitudinal sound velocity and acoustic impedance of thin films of chitosan of varying thicknesses are determined by vector-contrast acoustic microscopy. The exploitation of the relative reflectivity information from the maximum amplitude images and a comparison of the experimentally obtained V(z) curves with simulations using appropriate models are applied for the evaluation of the sound velocity. These results were compared to those previously obtained results with the same instrument.

  17. Acoustic Liner Drag: Measurements on Novel Facesheet Perforate Geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howerton, Brian M.; Jones, Michael G.

    2016-01-01

    Interest in characterization of the aerodynamic drag of acoustic liners has increased in the past several years. This paper details experiments in the NASA Langley Grazing Flow Impedance Tube to quantify the relative drag of several perforate-over-honeycomb liner configurations at flow speeds of centerline flow Mach number equals 0.3 and 0.5. Various perforate geometries and orientations are investigated to determine their resistance factors using a static pressure drop approach. Comparison of these resistance factors gives a relative measurement of liner drag. For these same flow conditions, acoustic measurements are performed with tonal excitation from 400 to 3000 hertz at source sound pressure levels of 140 and 150 decibels. Educed impedance and attenuation spectra are used to determine the impact of variations in perforate geometry on acoustic performance.

  18. Acoustic Propagation and Barrier Diffraction Over an Impedance Plane.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-10-13

    propagation solution into a barrier model so that ground reflections in addition to edge diffraction could be accounted for. Only the first term in the...model so that ground reflections in addition to edge N diffraction could be accounted for. Only the first term in the asymptotic ground propagation... contemporary research needs-particularly those of underwater acoustics as weil as community and aircraft noise control-a re-evaluation of previous results has

  19. Method for Improving Acoustic Impedance of Epoxy Resins

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-21

    include neoprene, ethylene propylene diene monomer ( EPDM ) and polyurethane rubbers . Typical applications of these materials encapsulate and protect...a different material (e.g., rubber ) cannot be used. Thus, a hard, strong and acoustically transparent material is needed. Suitable high modulus...an epoxy resin. In this method, an epoxy resin component is mixed with a rubber component. The epoxy resin component is preferably a bisphenol A

  20. Fundamentals of Acoustics. Psychoacoustics and Hearing. Acoustical Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Begault, Durand R.; Ahumada, Al (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    These are 3 chapters that will appear in a book titled "Building Acoustical Design", edited by Charles Salter. They are designed to introduce the reader to fundamental concepts of acoustics, particularly as they relate to the built environment. "Fundamentals of Acoustics" reviews basic concepts of sound waveform frequency, pressure, and phase. "Psychoacoustics and Hearing" discusses the human interpretation sound pressure as loudness, particularly as a function of frequency. "Acoustic Measurements" gives a simple overview of the time and frequency weightings for sound pressure measurements that are used in acoustical work.

  1. Fundamentals of Acoustics. Psychoacoustics and Hearing. Acoustical Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Begault, Durand R.; Ahumada, Al (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    These are 3 chapters that will appear in a book titled "Building Acoustical Design", edited by Charles Salter. They are designed to introduce the reader to fundamental concepts of acoustics, particularly as they relate to the built environment. "Fundamentals of Acoustics" reviews basic concepts of sound waveform frequency, pressure, and phase. "Psychoacoustics and Hearing" discusses the human interpretation sound pressure as loudness, particularly as a function of frequency. "Acoustic Measurements" gives a simple overview of the time and frequency weightings for sound pressure measurements that are used in acoustical work.

  2. On the Propagation of Plane Acoustic Waves in a Duct With Flexible and Impedance Walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frendi, Abdelkader; Vu, Bruce

    2003-01-01

    This Technical Memorandum (TM) discusses the harmonic and random plane acoustic waves propagating from inside a duct to its surroundings. Various duct surfaces are considered, such as rigid, flexible, and impedance. In addition, the effects of a mean flow are studied when the duct alone is considered. Results show a significant reduction in overall sound pressure levels downstream of the impedance wall for both mean flow and no mean flow cases and for a narrow duct. When a wider duct is used, the overall sound pressure level (OSPL) reduction downstream of the impedance wall is much smaller. In the far field, the directivity is such that the overall sound pressure level is reduced by about 5 decibels (dB) on the side of the impedance wall. When a flexible surface is used, the far field directivity becomes asymmetric with an increase in the OSPL on the side of the flexible surface of about 7 dB.

  3. Baseline impedance measured during high-resolution esophageal impedance manometry reliably discriminates GERD patients.

    PubMed

    Ravi, K; Geno, D M; Vela, M F; Crowell, M D; Katzka, D A

    2017-05-01

    Baseline impedance measured with ambulatory impedance pH monitoring (MII-pH) and a mucosal impedance catheter detects gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). However, these tools are limited by cost or patient tolerance. We investigated whether baseline impedance measured during high-resolution impedance manometry (HRIM) distinguishes GERD patients from controls. Consecutive patients with clinical HRIM and MII-pH testing were identified. Gastroesophageal reflux disease was defined by esophageal pH <4 for ≥5% of both the supine and total study time, whereas controls had an esophageal pH <4 for ≤3% of the study performed off PPI. Baseline impedance was measured over 15 seconds during the landmark period of HRIM and over three 10 minute intervals during the overnight period of MII-pH. Among 29 GERD patients and 26 controls, GERD patients had a mean esophageal acid exposure time of 22.7% compared to 1.2% in controls (P<.0001). Mean baseline impedance during HRIM was lower in GERD (1061 Ω) than controls (2814 Ω) (P<.0001). Baseline mucosal impedance measured during HRIM and MII-pH correlated (r=0.59, P<.0001). High-resolution esophageal manometry baseline impedance had high diagnostic accuracy for GERD, with an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.931 on receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis. A HRIM baseline impedance threshold of 1582 Ω had a sensitivity of 86.2% and specificity of 88.5% for GERD, with a positive predictive value of 89.3% and negative predictive value of 85.2%. Baseline impedance measured during HRIM can reliably discriminate GERD patients with at least moderate esophageal acid exposure from controls. This diagnostic tool may represent an accurate, cost-effective, and less invasive test for GERD. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Measurement of surface acoustic wave resonances in ferroelectric domains by microwave microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Scott R.; Yang, Yongliang; Cui, Yong-Tao; Ma, Eric Yue; Kämpfe, Thomas; Eng, Lukas M.; Zhou, Jian; Chen, Yan-Feng; Lu, Minghui; Shen, Zhi-Xun

    2017-08-01

    Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) resonances were imaged within a closed domain in the ferroelectric LiTaO3 via scanning Microwave Impedance Microscopy (MIM). The MIM probe is used for both SAW generation and measurement, allowing the contact-less measurement within a mesoscopic structure. Measurements taken over a range of microwave frequencies are consistent with a constant acoustic velocity, demonstrating the acoustic nature of the measurement.

  5. Acoustical Measurement Of Furnace Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parthasarathy, Shakkottai; Venkateshan, Shakkottai P.

    1989-01-01

    Simple probes withstand severe conditions, yet give spatially-resolved temperature readings. Prototype acoustical system developed to measure temperatures from ambient to 1,800 degree F in such structures as large industrial lime kilns and recovery-boiler furnaces. Pulses of sound reflected from obstructions in sensing tube. Speed of sound and temperature in each segment deduced from travel times of pulses.

  6. Acoustical Measurement Of Furnace Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parthasarathy, Shakkottai; Venkateshan, Shakkottai P.

    1989-01-01

    Simple probes withstand severe conditions, yet give spatially-resolved temperature readings. Prototype acoustical system developed to measure temperatures from ambient to 1,800 degree F in such structures as large industrial lime kilns and recovery-boiler furnaces. Pulses of sound reflected from obstructions in sensing tube. Speed of sound and temperature in each segment deduced from travel times of pulses.

  7. Acoustic impedance characterization via numerical resolution of the inverse Helmholtz problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalo, Carlo; Patel, Danish; Gupta, Prateek

    2016-11-01

    Impedance boundary conditions (IBCs) regulate the relative phasing and amplitudes of pressure and velocity fluctuations and, therefore, the acoustic energy flux. We present a numerical method to determine the acoustic impedance at the surface of an arbitrarily shaped cavity as seen by a generically oriented incident external harmonic planar wave. The proposed method (conceptually) inverts the usual eigenvalue-solving procedure underlying Helmholtz solvers: the impedance at one or multiple (but not all) boundaries is an output of the calculation and is obtained via implicit reconstruction the linear acoustic waveform at the frequency of the incident wave. The linearized governing equations are discretized via a mixed finite-difference/finite-volume approach and are closed with a generalized equation of state. Results are validated against quasi one-dimensional cases derived via direct application of Rott's linear thermoacoustic theory and by comparison against fully compressible Navier-Stokes simulations. This work is motivated by the need to develop a comprehensive suite of predictive tools capable of performing high-fidelity simulations of compressible boundary layers over assigned IBCs, accurately representing the acoustic response of arbitrarily shaped porous cavities.

  8. Directional Reflective Surface Formed via Gradient-Impeding Acoustic Meta-Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Kyungjun; Kim, Jedo; Hur, Shin; Kwak, Jun-Hyuk; Lee, Seong-Hyun; Kim, Taesung

    2016-08-01

    Artificially designed acoustic meta-surfaces have the ability to manipulate sound energy to an extraordinary extent. Here, we report on a new type of directional reflective surface consisting of an array of sub-wavelength Helmholtz resonators with varying internal coiled path lengths, which induce a reflection phase gradient along a planar acoustic meta-surface. The acoustically reshaped reflective surface created by the gradient-impeding meta-surface yields a distinct focal line similar to a parabolic cylinder antenna, and is used for directive sound beamforming. Focused beam steering can be also obtained by repositioning the source (or receiver) off axis, i.e., displaced from the focal line. Besides flat reflective surfaces, complex surfaces such as convex or conformal shapes may be used for sound beamforming, thus facilitating easy application in sound reinforcement systems. Therefore, directional reflective surfaces have promising applications in fields such as acoustic imaging, sonic weaponry, and underwater communication.

  9. Directional Reflective Surface Formed via Gradient-Impeding Acoustic Meta-Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Song, Kyungjun; Kim, Jedo; Hur, Shin; Kwak, Jun-Hyuk; Lee, Seong-Hyun; Kim, Taesung

    2016-01-01

    Artificially designed acoustic meta-surfaces have the ability to manipulate sound energy to an extraordinary extent. Here, we report on a new type of directional reflective surface consisting of an array of sub-wavelength Helmholtz resonators with varying internal coiled path lengths, which induce a reflection phase gradient along a planar acoustic meta-surface. The acoustically reshaped reflective surface created by the gradient-impeding meta-surface yields a distinct focal line similar to a parabolic cylinder antenna, and is used for directive sound beamforming. Focused beam steering can be also obtained by repositioning the source (or receiver) off axis, i.e., displaced from the focal line. Besides flat reflective surfaces, complex surfaces such as convex or conformal shapes may be used for sound beamforming, thus facilitating easy application in sound reinforcement systems. Therefore, directional reflective surfaces have promising applications in fields such as acoustic imaging, sonic weaponry, and underwater communication. PMID:27562634

  10. A critique of impedance measurements in cardiac tissue.

    PubMed

    Plonsey, R; Barr, R C

    1986-01-01

    The specific impedance of cardiac tissue cannot be measured directly. Instead, the investigator obtains voltage and current measurements and places them into a model of the tissue's structure to infer the impedances of elements of the model. If the model fails to describe major aspects of the real tissue, the results may be worthless, although possibly self-consistent. In the literature of impedance measurement in cardiac tissue, only rarely is the model explicitly described; more commonly, the tissue model is adopted implicitly when equations giving the impedance in terms of voltage and current measurements are adopted. This paper examines the series of models that have been used in specific impedance measurements of cardiac tissue and shows how the same or similar measurements can accurately describe tissue impedivity or can lead to significant errors when inadequate models such as isotropic and anisotropic monodomains (although a part of work of historical merit) are used.

  11. Reflection of an acoustic line source by an impedance surface with uniform flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brambley, E. J.; Gabard, G.

    2014-10-01

    An exact analytic solution is derived for the 2D acoustic pressure field generated by a time-harmonic line mass source located above an impedance surface with uniform grazing flow. Closed-form asymptotic solutions in the far field are also provided. The analysis is valid for both locally-reacting and nonlocally-reacting impedances, as is demonstrated by analyzing a nonlocally reacting effective impedance representing the presence of a thin boundary layer over the surface. The analytic solution may be written in a form suggesting a generalization of the method of images to account for the impedance surface. The line source is found to excite surface waves on the impedance surface, some of which may be leaky waves which contradict the assumption of decay away from the surface predicted in previous analyses of surface waves with flow. The surface waves may be treated either (correctly) as unstable waves or (artificially) as stable waves, enabling comparison with previous numerical or mathematical studies which make either of these assumptions. The computer code for evaluating the analytic solution and far-field asymptotics is provided in the supplementary material. It is hoped this work will provide a useful benchmark solution for validating 2D numerical acoustic codes.

  12. A review of impedance measurements of whole cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Youchun; Xie, Xinwu; Duan, Yong; Wang, Lei; Cheng, Zhen; Cheng, Jing

    2016-03-15

    Impedance measurement of live biological cells is widely accepted as a label free, non-invasive and quantitative analytical method to assess cell status. This method is easy-to-use and flexible for device design and fabrication. In this review, three typical techniques for impedance measurement, i.e., electric cell-substrate impedance sensing, Impedance flow cytometry and electric impedance spectroscopy, are reviewed from the aspects of theory, to electrode design and fabrication, and applications. Benefiting from the integration of microelectronic and microfluidic techniques, impedance sensing methods have expanded their applications to nearly all aspects of biology, including living cell counting and analysis, cell biology research, cancer research, drug screening, and food and environmental safety monitoring. The integration with other techniques, the fabrication of devices for certain biological assays, and the development of point-of-need diagnosis devices is predicted to be future trend for impedance sensing techniques. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Multi-stage pulse tube cryocooler with acoustic impedance constructed to reduce transient cool down time and thermal loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gedeon, David R. (Inventor); Wilson, Kyle B. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    The cool down time for a multi-stage, pulse tube cryocooler is reduced by configuring at least a portion of the acoustic impedance of a selected stage, higher than the first stage, so that it surrounds the cold head of the selected stage. The surrounding acoustic impedance of the selected stage is mounted in thermally conductive connection to the warm region of the selected stage for cooling the acoustic impedance and is fabricated of a high thermal diffusivity, low thermal radiation emissivity material, preferably aluminum.

  14. Influence of exit impedance on finite difference solutions of transient acoustic mode propagation in ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J.

    1981-01-01

    The cutoff mode instability problem associated with a transient finite difference solution to the wave equation is explained. The steady-state impedance boundary condition is found to produce acoustic reflections during the initial transient, which cause finite instabilities in the cutoff modes. The stability problem is resolved by extending the duct length to prevent transient reflections. Numerical calculations are presented at forcing frequencies above, below, and nearly at the cutoff frequency, and exit impedance models are presented for use in the practical design of turbofan inlets.

  15. Acoustic impedance matching of piezoelectric transducers to the air.

    PubMed

    Gómez Alvarez-Arenas, Tomás E

    2004-05-01

    The purpose of this work is threefold: to investigate material requirements to produce impedance matching layers for air-coupled piezoelectric transducers, to identify materials that meet these requirements, and to propose the best solution to produce air-coupled piezoelectric transducers for the low megahertz frequency range. Toward this end, design criteria for the matching layers and possible configurations are reviewed. Among the several factors that affect the efficiency of the matching layer, the importance of attenuation is pointed out. A standard characterization procedure is applied to a wide collection of candidate materials to produce matching layers. In particular, some types of filtration membranes are studied. From these results, the best materials are identified, and the better matching configuration is proposed. Four pairs of air-coupled piezoelectric transducers also are produced to illustrate the performance of the proposed solution. The lowest two-way insertion loss figure is -24 dB obtained at 0.45 MHz. This increases for higher frequency transducers up to -42 dB at 1.8 MHz and -50 at 2.25 MHz. Typical bandwidth is about 15-20%.

  16. Scale Model Thruster Acoustic Measurement Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, R. Jeremy; Vargas, Magda B.

    2013-01-01

    Subscale rocket acoustic data is used to predict acoustic environments for full scale rockets. Over the last several years acoustic data has been collected during horizontal tests of solid rocket motors. Space Launch System (SLS) Scale Model Acoustic Test (SMAT) was designed to evaluate the acoustics of the SLS vehicle including the liquid engines and solid rocket boosters. SMAT is comprised of liquid thrusters scalable to the Space Shuttle Main engines (SSME) and Rocket Assisted Take Off (RATO) motors scalable to the 5-segment Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSTMV). Horizontal testing of the liquid thrusters provided an opportunity to collect acoustic data from liquid thrusters to characterize the acoustic environments. Acoustic data was collected during the horizontal firings of a single thruster and a 4-thruster (Quad) configuration. Presentation scope. Discuss the results of the single and 4-thruster acoustic measurements. Compare the measured acoustic levels of the liquid thrusters to the Solid Rocket Test Motor V - Nozzle 2 (SRTMV-N2).

  17. Measurement of the acoustic reflex without a pressure seal.

    PubMed

    Surr, R K; Schuchman, G I

    1976-03-01

    Obtaining a hermetic seal in the external auditory canal is often a major obstacle in impedance audiometry. In the present study, the acoustic reflex threshold was determined for three groups of subjects, first with and then without a pressure-tight seal. It was found that for subjects with normal hearing or sensorineural hearing loss and normal tympanograms, 96% of the measurements obtained without a pressure seal were within 5 dB of those obtained with a seal. Among the subjects who exhibited negative middle ear pressure, the acoustic reflex could be measured consistently at the point of maximum compliance, while no response was observed without a pressure seal.

  18. Quantitative non-linear ultrasonic imaging of targets with significant acoustic impedance contrast--an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Guillermin, Régine; Lasaygues, Philippe; Rabau, Guy; Lefebvre, Jean-Pierre

    2013-08-01

    This study deals with the reconstruction, from ultrasonic measured data, of the sound speed profile of a penetrable two-dimensional target of arbitrary cross-section embedded in an infinite medium. Green's theorem is used to obtain a domain integral representation of the acoustical scattered field, and a discrete formulation of the inverse problem is obtained using a moment method. An iterative non-linear algorithm minimizing the discrepancy between the measured and computed scattered fields is used to reconstruct the sound speed profile in the region of interest. The minimization process is performed using a conjugated-gradient method. An experimental study with significant acoustical impedance contrast targets immersed in water was performed. Images of the sound speed profile obtained by inversion of experimental data are presented.

  19. Transverse impedance measurement in RHIC and the AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Biancacci, Nicolo; Blaskiewicz, M.; Dutheil, Y.; Liu, C.; Mernick, M.; Minty, M.; White, S. M.

    2014-05-12

    The RHIC luminosity upgrade program aims for an increase of the polarized proton luminosity by a factor 2. To achieve this goal a significant increase in the beam intensity is foreseen. The beam coupling impedance could therefore represent a source of detrimental effects for beam quality and stability at high bunch intensities. For this reason it is essential to quantify the accelerator impedance budget and the major impedance sources, and possibly cure them. In this MD note we summarize the results of the 2013 transverse impedance measurements in the AGS and RHIC. The studies have been performed measuring the tune shift as a function of bunch intensity and deriving the total accelerator machine transverse impedance. For RHIC, we could obtain first promising results of impedance localization measurements as well.

  20. A two electrode apparatus for electrical impedance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merriam, J. B.

    2009-12-01

    A two electrode cell for complex impedance measurements on core samples in the range 1 mHz - 0.3 kHz is described. Two electrode cells are more convenient than four electrode cells but some restrictions need to be observed. I will show that the contact impedance between the electrodes and the sample can be controlled and reduced to less than fifty ohms in most cases. The contact impedance is repeatable, with a peak phase near 10 Hz of less than one degree and a maximum change in impedance magnitude of less than fifty ohm. A model for the contact impedance is used to correct impedance measurements, leaving an un-modeled contact impedance of a few ohms. There is typically a drift of about 100 ohm during a measurement sequence due to diffusion between the ceramic frits at the ends of the sample. This is corrected by repeat measurements at 100 Hz. Un-modeled impedance changes due to drift are about ten ohm. The un-modeled impedance changes mean that the relative error on conductive samples is greater than on resistive samples. Repeat measurements on a sandstone sample with conductive pore water (0.14 S/m) yield a mean of 492 ohms with a standard deviation of 20 ohm, or about five percent. Measurements on mineralized core and on cells constructed from mixtures of silica sand and polarizable minerals demonstrate that the two electrode set up can be used even on heavily mineralized samples.

  1. Wind turbines acoustic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trematerra, Amelia; Iannace, Gino

    2017-07-01

    The importance of wind turbines has increased over the last few years throughout the European Community. The European energy policy guidelines state that for the year 2020 20% of all energy must be produced by alternative energy sources. Wind turbines are an important type of energy production without petrol. A wind speed in a range from 2.5 m/s to 25.0 m/s is needed. One of the obstacles to the widespread diffusion of wind turbine is noise generation. This work presents some noise measurements of wind turbines in the South of Italy, and discusses the noise problems for the people living near wind farms.

  2. Acoustic impedance studies in Triassic reservoirs in the Netherlands - application to development and exploration

    SciTech Connect

    Griffiths, M.; Ford, J.

    1995-08-01

    Simple and cost effective seismic forward modelling techniques have been used in conjunction with petrophysical and geological data to provide an integrated approach to understanding the seismic response of Triassic gas reservoirs onshore and offshore Netherlands. Analysis shows that for the Volpriehausen Sandstone in the offshore sector a relationship exists between reservoir acoustic impedance and porosity such that an increase in porosity leads to a decrease in acoustic impedance. Data can be sub-divided on the basis of fluid fill and cementation with trends for both gas and water cases. Regression analysis has defined the optimum relationship for each fluid case and these relationships have been used to predict the acoustic impedance profiles for a variety of reservoir scenarios. Modelling shows that the highest seismic amplitudes and the greatest relative amplitude variation with fluid fill are related to high porosity reservoir. In the onshore sector, analysis for the Roet Sandstone has shown that even small scale variations in reservoir properties can be recorded within the detail of the seismic response. Results from seismic forward modelling compare with amplitude variations observed in real data and suggest that, within the limitations of the dataset and methodology, the technique can be used to predict reservoir attributes from the seismic response. So far, the technique has been sucessfully applied to both exploration and field development projects.

  3. Investigation of ground reflection and impedance from flyover noise measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapkis, R. L.; Marsh, A. H.

    1978-01-01

    An extensive series of flyover noise tests was conducted for the primary purpose of studying meteorological effects on propagation of aircraft noise. The test airplane, a DC 9-10, flew several level-flight passes at various heights over a taxiway. Two microphone stations were located under the flight path. A total of 37 runs was selected for analysis and processed to obtain a consistant set of 1/3 octave band sound pressure levels at half-second intervals. The goal of the present study was to use the flyover noise data to deduce acoustical reflection coefficients and hence, acoustical impedances.

  4. Impedance measurements for detecting pathogens attached to antibodies

    DOEpatents

    Miles, Robin R.; Venkateswaran, Kodumudi S.; Fuller, Christopher K.

    2004-12-28

    The use of impedance measurements to detect the presence of pathogens attached to antibody-coated beads. In a fluidic device antibodies are immobilized on a surface of a patterned interdigitated electrode. Pathogens in a sample fluid streaming past the electrode attach to the immobilized antibodies, which produces a change in impedance between two adjacent electrodes, which impedance change is measured and used to detect the presence of a pathogen. To amplify the signal, beads coated with antibodies are introduced and the beads would stick to the pathogen causing a greater change in impedance between the two adjacent electrodes.

  5. Mutual conversion between B-mode image and acoustic impedance image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chean, Tan Wei; Hozumi, Naohiro; Yoshida, Sachiko; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Ogura, Yuki

    2017-07-01

    To study the acoustic properties of a B-mode image, two ways of analysis methods were proposed in this report. The first method is the conversion of an acoustic impedance image into a B-mode image (Z to B). The time domain reflectometry theory and transmission line model were used as reference in the calculation. The second method is the direct a conversion of B-mode image into an acoustic impedance image (B to Z). The theoretical background of the second method is similar to that of the first method; however, the calculation is in the opposite direction. Significant scatter, refraction, and attenuation were assumed not to take place during the propagation of an ultrasonic wave. Hence, they were ignored in both calculations. In this study, rat cerebellar tissue and human cheek skin were used to determine the feasibility of the first and second methods respectively. Some good results are obtained and hence both methods showed their possible applications in the study of acoustic properties of B-mode images.

  6. Plasma Diagnostics by Antenna Impedance Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swenson, C. M.; Baker, K. D.; Pound, E.; Jensen, M. D.

    1993-01-01

    The impedance of an electrically short antenna immersed in a plasma provides an excellent in situ diagnostic tool for electron density and other plasma parameters. By electrically short we mean that the wavelength of the free-space electromagnetic wave that would be excited at the driving frequency is much longer than the physical size of the antenna. Probes using this impedance technique have had a long history with sounding rockets and satellites, stretching back to the early 1960s. This active technique could provide information on composition and temperature of plasmas for comet or planetary missions. Advantages of the impedance probe technique are discussed and two classes of instruments built and flown by SDL-USU for determining electron density (the capacitance and plasma frequency probes) are described.

  7. A practical approach to electrode-skin impedance unbalance measurement.

    PubMed

    Spinelli, Enrique M; Mayosky, Miguel A; Pallás-Areny, Ramon

    2006-07-01

    Unbalance between electrode-skin impedances is a major problem in biopotential recordings, leading to increased power-line interference. This paper proposes a simple, direct method to measure that unbalance at power-line frequency (50-60 Hz), thus allowing the determination of actual recording conditions for biopotential amplifiers. The method is useful in research, amplifier testing, electrode design and teaching purposes. It has been experimentally validated by using both phantom impedances and real electrode-skin impedances.

  8. Comparison of Acoustic Impedance Eduction Techniques for Locally-Reacting Liners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, M. G.; Parrott, T. L.; Watson, W. R.

    2003-01-01

    Typical acoustic liners used in current aircraft inlets and aft-fan ducts consist of some type of perforated facesheet bonded to a honeycomb core. A number of techniques for determining the acoustic impedance of these locallyreacting liners have been developed over the last five decades. In addition, a number of models have been developed to predict the acoustic impedance of locallyreacting liners in the presence of grazing flow, and to use that information together with aeroacoustic propagation codes to assess the noise absorption provided by these liners. These prediction models have incorporated the results from databases acquired with specific impedance eduction techniques. Thus, while these prediction models are acceptable for liners that are similar to those tested in these databases, their application to new liner configurations must be viewed with caution. The primary purpose of this paper is to provide a comparison of impedance eduction techniques that have been implemented at various aerospace research laboratories in the United States (NASA Langley Research Center, General Electric Aircraft Engines, B. F. Goodrich and Boeing). A secondary purpose is to provide data for liner configurations that extend the porosity range beyond that which has been previously used in common aircraft engine nacelles. Two sets of liners were designed to study the effects of three parameters: perforate hole diameter, facesheet thickness and porosity. These two sets of liners were constructed for testing in each of the laboratories listed above. The first set of liners was designed to fit into the NASA Langley and Boeing test facilities. The second set was designed to fit into the General Electric Aircraft Engines and B. F. Goodrich test facilities. By using the same parent material, both sets of liners were identical to within the limits of material and fabrication variability. Baseline data were obtained in the normal incidence impedance tubes at NASA Langley and B. F

  9. A frequency-response-based method of sound velocity measurement in an impedance tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenjie; Thomas, P. J.; Wang, Tongqing

    2017-04-01

    A stable and accurate new method for the measurement of the velocity of sound is proposed. The method is based on the characteristics of the frequency response measured at different positions in an impedance tube and it eliminates adverse effects caused by reflections from the transmitting transducer at the bottom of the impedance tube. A series of experiments is conducted, at different water temperatures, different positions in the impedance tube and under constant pressure, to validate the feasibility and stability of the new method. The new technique is also extended to hydrostatic pressure conditions with stable sound velocity. Our method generates an accurate measurement result in comparison to the estimated or average value obtained with currently existing methods. The novel method is suitable to be widely used in underwater acoustics.

  10. Viscous effects on the acoustics and stability of a shear layer over an impedance wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khamis, Doran; Brambley, Edward James

    2017-01-01

    The effect of viscosity and thermal conduction on the acoustics in a shear layer above an impedance wall is investigated numerically and asymptotically by solving the compressible linearised Navier-Stokes equations. It is found that viscothermal effects can be as important as shear, and therefore including shear while neglecting viscothermal effects by solving the linearised Euler equations is questionable. In particular, the damping rate of upstream propagating waves is found to be dramatically under-predicted by the LEE in certain instances. The effects of viscosity on stability are also found to be important. Short wavelength disturbances are stabilised by viscosity, greatly altering the characteristic wavelength and maximum growth rate of instability. For the parameters typical of aeroacoustic simulations considered here, the Reynolds number below which the flow stabilizes ranges from $10^5$ to $10^7$. By assuming a thin but nonzero-thickness boundary layer, asymptotic analysis leads to a system of boundary layer governing equations for the acoustics. This system may be solved numerically to produce an effective impedance boundary condition, applicable at the wall of a uniform inviscid flow, that accounts for both the shear and viscosity within the boundary layer. An alternative asymptotic analysis in the high frequency limit yields a different set of equations with analytic solutions. The acoustic mode shapes and axial wavenumbers from both asymptotic analyses compare well with numerical solutions of the full LNSE. A closed-form effective impedance boundary condition is derived from the high-frequency asymptotics, suitable for application in frequency-domain numerical simulations. Finally, surface waves are considered, and it is shown that a viscous flow over an impedance lining supports a greater number of surface wave modes than an inviscid flow.

  11. Electrochemical impedance measurement of a carbon nanotube probe electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inaba, Akira; Takei, Yusuke; Kan, Tetsuo; Matsumoto, Kiyoshi; Shimoyama, Isao

    2012-12-01

    We measured and analyzed the electrochemical impedance of carbon nanotube (CNT) probe electrodes fabricated through the physical separation of insulated CNT bridges. The fabricated CNT electrodes were free-standing CNTs that were completely covered with an insulator, except for their tips. Typical dimensions of the nanoelectrodes were 1-10 nm in CNT diameter, 80-300 nm in insulator diameter, 0.5-4 μm in exposed CNT length and 1-10 μm in probe length. The electrochemical impedance at frequencies ranging from 40 Hz to 1 MHz was measured in physiological saline. The measured impedance of the CNT electrode was constant at 32 MΩ at frequencies below 1 kHz and was inversely proportional to frequency at frequencies above 10 kHz. By means of comparison with the parasitic capacitive impedance of the insulator membrane, we confirmed that the electrode was sufficiently insulated such that the measured constant impedance was given by the exposed CNT tip. Consequently, we can use the CNT electrode for highly localized electrochemical impedance measurements below 1 kHz. Considering an equivalent circuit and the nanoscopic dimensions of the CNT electrode, we demonstrated that the constant impedance was governed by diffusion impedance, whereas the solution resistance, charge-transfer resistance and double-layer capacitance were negligible.

  12. Effect of Feeding and Suction on Gastric Impedance Spectroscopy Measurements.

    PubMed

    Beltran, Nohra E; Sánchez-Miranda, Gustavo; Sacristan, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    A specific device and system has been developed and tested for clinical monitoring of gastric mucosal reactance in the critically ill as an early warning of splanchnic hypoperfusion associated with shock and sepsis. This device has been proven effective in clinical trials and is expected to become commercially available next year. The system uses a combination nasogastric tube and impedance spectroscopy probe as a single catheter. Because this device has a double function, the question is: Does enteral feeding or suction affect the gastric reactance measurements? This study was designed to evaluate the effect of feeding and suction on the measurement of gastric impedance spectroscopy in healthy volunteers. Impedance spectra were obtained from the gastric wall epithelia of 18 subjects. The spectra were measured for each of the following conditions: postinsertion of gastric probe, during active suction, postactive suction, and during enteral feeding (236 ml of nutritional supplement). Impedance spectra were reproducible in all volunteers under all conditions tested. There was a slight increase in impedance parameters after suction, and a decrease in impedance after feeding; however, these observed differences were insignificant compared to patient-to-patient variability, and truly negligible compared with previously observed changes associated with splanchnic ischemia in critically ill patients. Our results demonstrate that suction or feeding when using the impedance spectro-metry probe/nasogastric tube does not significantly interfere with gastric impedance spectrometer measurements.

  13. Influence of exit impedance on finite difference solutions of transient acoustic mode propagation in ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J.

    1981-01-01

    The time-dependent governing acoustic-difference equations and boundary conditions are developed and solved for sound propagation in an axisymmetric (cylindrical) hard-wall duct without flow and with spinning acoustic modes. The analysis begins with a harmonic sound source radiating into a quiescent duct. This explicit iteration method then calculates stepwise in real time to obtain the steady solutions of the acoustic field. The transient method did not converge to the steady-state solution for cutoff acoustic duct modes. This has implications as to its use in a variable-area duct, where modes may become cutoff in the smal-area portion of the duct. For single cutoff mode propagation the steady-state impedance boundary condition produced acoustic reflections during the initial transient that caused finite instabilities in the numerical calculations. The stability problem is resolved by reformulating the exit boundary condition. Example calculations show good agreement with exact analytical and numerical results for forcing frequencies above, below, and nearly at the cutoff frequency.

  14. Utilization of impedance measurements in pallidotomy using a monopolar electrode.

    PubMed

    Limonadi, F M; Roberts, D W; Darcey, T M; Holtzheimer, P E; Ip, J T

    1999-01-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the reliability and utility of using monopolar impedance monitoring for estimation of the location of the thermocouple electrode during a pallidotomy procedure. In 26 patients, impedance profiles were measured at 2-mm intervals and anatomical boundaries were marked on postoperative MRI studies in 19 patients. The pattern of change in impedance as the electrode was towards the target coordinates in the globus pallidus was studied empirically in relation to MRI-defined anatomy and by electrical stimulations. The pattern of impedance change was of greater reliability than absolute impedance values. A drop in impedance was noted in 10 cases where the electrode entered the putamen or globus pallidus upon exiting the internal capsule, and in 9 of these this drop was measured before or at the distal boundary of the internal capsule. A variable pattern in the region of the base of the globus pallidus was observed, with 10 of 19 cases demonstrating a decrease and 8 cases an increase, consistent with the proximity of a CSF cistern in the former and the ansa lenticularis and optic tract in the latter. Simulations showed that the monopolar electrode was more sensitive to the approach of a boundary than the bipolar electrode. Our measurements and simulations suggest that a monopolar electrode could predict a nearby region of high or low impedance before penetrating it and a trend of decreasing impedance as the distal edge of the globus pallidus is approached. Copyright 2000 S. Karger AG, Basel

  15. Measurement of hand volume by bioelectrical impedance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ward, L C; Dylke, E S; Kilbreath, S L

    2012-06-01

    Assessment of lymphedema is frequently based upon measuring the increase in volume of the affected region compared to that of a comparable unaffected region. This requires methods that can measure the volume of body regions that are not only accurate and sensitive but also suitable for use in clinical practice. To date, bioimpedance spectroscopy has been used to measure volume increase due to lymphedema in whole arms but excluding the hand. We report here an impedance-based method for the measurement of hand volume. Impedance measurement electrodes were located on the dorsum of the hand, with the sense electrodes at the level of ulnar styloid and metacarpal-phalangeal joint of the third finger and current drive electrodes on the forearm and at the nail bed of the third finger. The impedances of the hands of 50 participants were measured and hand volumes computed. These were compared with the hand volumes measured by perometry. The region of the hand defined by the impedance measurements was determined, both in vivo and using a hand phantom. The region of the hand measured by the impedance technique was limited to the palmar volume (i.e., excluding the thumb). Palmar volumes computed from impedance measurements were significantly correlated (r=0.88) with those measured by perometry but were, on average, 8% larger. The impedance technique was sufficiently sensitive to detect the change in hand volume elicited by decrease in vascular volume due to blood draining from the hand on elevation. An impedance technique was developed that has the potential to measure the change in hand volume when affected by lymphedema. Bioimpedance spectroscopy has the advantage over currently used perometric or water displacement techniques in that it can measure specifically the change in extracellular fluid, including lymph, rather than simply total hand volume.

  16. The acoustic field of a point source in a uniform boundary layer over an impedance plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zorumski, W. E.; Willshire, W. L., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The acoustic field of a point source in a boundary layer above an impedance plane is investigated anatytically using Obukhov quasi-potential functions, extending the normal-mode theory of Chunchuzov (1984) to account for the effects of finite ground-plane impedance and source height. The solution is found to be asymptotic to the surface-wave term studies by Wenzel (1974) in the limit of vanishing wind speed, suggesting that normal-mode theory can be used to model the effects of an atmospheric boundary layer on infrasonic sound radiation. Model predictions are derived for noise-generation data obtained by Willshire (1985) at the Medicine Bow wind-turbine facility. Long-range downwind propagation is found to behave as a cylindrical wave, with attention proportional to the wind speed, the boundary-layer displacement thickness, the real part of the ground admittance, and the square of the frequency.

  17. The acoustical impedance at discontinuities of ducts in the presence of a mean flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peat, K. S.

    1988-11-01

    At low frequencies only plane waves can continuously propagate along a uniform duct, but at a discontinuity in the duct cross-section higher order, evanescent acoustic waves are produced. The accuracy of a plane-wave analysis can be increased by the introduction of an equivalent impedance to account for these non-planar waves. In this paper, previous work in the field is extended to consider both the effects of a superimposed mean flow along the duct and the effects of high frequencies up to the plane-wave cut-off limit. It is shown that mean flow effects are negligible but that the variation of impedance with frequency is important.

  18. International Congress on Acoustic Intensity Measurement: Measurement Techniques and Applications, 2nd, Senlis, France, September 23-26, 1985, Proceedings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Recent developments in acoustic-intensity measurement are discussed in reviews and reports of theoretical and experimental investigations. Instrumentation, vector acoustics, sound radiation, intensity in the presence of flow, intensity in structures, sound power, source localization, impedance, absorption, and transmission are the fields covered by the contributions. Specific topics addressed include microphone configurations for intensity probes, the rotational structure of intensity fields, acoustic intensity and numerical simulation, sound-power measurement in the presence of background noise, and techniques for measuring the absorption coefficient of acoustic materials. Graphs, drawings, diagrams, tables of numerical data, and photographs of test setups are provided.

  19. Measurement and simulation of the RHIC abort kicker longitudinal impedence

    SciTech Connect

    Abreu,N.P.; Hahn,H.; Choi, E.

    2009-09-01

    In face of the new upgrades for RHIC the longitudinal impedance of the machine plays an important role in setting the threshold for instabilities and the efficacy of some systems. In this paper we describe the measurement of the longitudinal impedance of the abort kicker for RHIC as well as computer simulations of the structure. The impedance measurement was done by the S{sub 21} wire method covering the frequency range from 9 kHz to 2.5 GHz. We observed a sharp resonance peak around 10 MHz and a broader peak around 20 MHz in both, the real and imaginary part, of the Z/n. These two peaks account for a maximum imaginary longitudinal impedance of j15 {Omega}, a value an order of magnitude larger than the estimated value of j0.2 {Omega}, which indicates that the kicker is one of the main sources of longitudinal impedance in the machine. A computer model was constructed for simulations in the CST MWS program. Results for the magnet input and the also the beam impedance are compared to the measurements. A more detail study of the system properties and possible changes to reduce the coupling impedance are presented.

  20. Damage detection technique by measuring laser-based mechanical impedance

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hyeonseok; Sohn, Hoon

    2014-02-18

    This study proposes a method for measurement of mechanical impedance using noncontact laser ultrasound. The measurement of mechanical impedance has been of great interest in nondestructive testing (NDT) or structural health monitoring (SHM) since mechanical impedance is sensitive even to small-sized structural defects. Conventional impedance measurements, however, have been based on electromechanical impedance (EMI) using contact-type piezoelectric transducers, which show deteriorated performances induced by the effects of a) Curie temperature limitations, b) electromagnetic interference (EMI), c) bonding layers and etc. This study aims to tackle the limitations of conventional EMI measurement by utilizing laser-based mechanical impedance (LMI) measurement. The LMI response, which is equivalent to a steady-state ultrasound response, is generated by shooting the pulse laser beam to the target structure, and is acquired by measuring the out-of-plane velocity using a laser vibrometer. The formation of the LMI response is observed through the thermo-mechanical finite element analysis. The feasibility of applying the LMI technique for damage detection is experimentally verified using a pipe specimen under high temperature environment.

  1. Bioelectric impedance measurement for fluid status assessment.

    PubMed

    Piccoli, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Adequacy of body fluid volume improves short- and long-term outcomes inpatients with heart and kidney disorders. Bioelectrical impedance vector analysis (BIVA) has the potential to be used as a routine method at the bedside for assessment and management of body fluids. Impedance (Z vector) is a combination of resistance, R (function of intra- and extracellular fluid volume) and reactance, Xc (function of the dielectric material of tissue cells), with the best signal to noise ratio at 50 kHz. BIVA allows a direct assessment of body fluid volume through patterns of vector distribution on the R-Xc plane without the knowledge of the body weight. Reference tolerance ellipses (50, 75 and 95%) for the individual vector were previously calculated in the healthy population. We determined the optimal vector distribution in patients undergoing hemodialysis without hypotension or intradialytic symptoms. Most vectors lay within the reference 75% tolerance ellipse of the healthy population indicating full electrical restoration of tissues. We also determined the optimal vector distribution of patients undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis without edema and with a residual urine output. The vector distribution was close to the distribution of both healthy subjects and pre-session distribution of hemodialysis patients. We established the relationship between central venous pressure and BIVA in critically ill patients. Shorter vectors (overhydration) were associated with increasing venous pressure, whereas longer vectors were associated with decreasing venous pressure. The association between BIVA and NT-proBNP has been evaluated in patients with acute cardiac-related dyspnea. In the 'gray zone' of NT-proBNP values between 'ruling out' and 'ruling in' acute heart failure, BIVA detected latent peripheral congestion. Simple patterns of BIVA allow detection, monitoring, and control of hydration status using vector displacement for the feedback on treatment. Copyright (c

  2. Characterizing a porous road pavement using surface impedance measurement: a guided numerical inversion procedure.

    PubMed

    Benoit, Gaëlle; Heinkélé, Christophe; Gourdon, Emmanuel

    2013-12-01

    This paper deals with a numerical procedure to identify the acoustical parameters of road pavement from surface impedance measurements. This procedure comprises three steps. First, a suitable equivalent fluid model for the acoustical properties porous media is chosen, the variation ranges for the model parameters are set, and a sensitivity analysis for this model is performed. Second, this model is used in the parameter inversion process, which is performed with simulated annealing in a selected frequency range. Third, the sensitivity analysis and inversion process are repeated to estimate each parameter in turn. This approach is tested on data obtained for porous bituminous concrete and using the Zwikker and Kosten equivalent fluid model. This work provides a good foundation for the development of non-destructive in situ methods for the acoustical characterization of road pavements.

  3. Correcting electrode impedance effects in broadband SIP measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huisman, Johan Alexander; Zimmermann, Egon; Esser, Odilia; Haegel, Franz-Hubert; Vereecken, Harry

    2016-04-01

    Broadband spectral induced polarization (SIP) measurements of the complex electrical resistivity can be affected by the contact impedance of the potential electrodes above 100 Hz. In this study, we present a correction procedure to remove electrode impedance effects from SIP measurements. The first step in this correction procedure is to estimate the electrode impedance using a measurement with reversed current and potential electrodes. In a second step, this estimated electrode impedance is used to correct SIP measurements based on a simplified electrical model of the SIP measurement system. We evaluated this new correction procedure using SIP measurements on water because of the well-defined dielectric properties. It was found that the difference between the corrected and expected phase of the complex electrical resistivity of water was below 0.1 mrad at 1 kHz for a wide range of electrode impedances. In addition, SIP measurements on a saturated unconsolidated sediment sample with two types of potential electrodes showed that the measured phase of the electrical resistivity was very similar (difference <0.2 mrad) up to a frequency of 10 kHz after the effect of the different electrode impedances was removed. Finally, SIP measurements on variably saturated unconsolidated sand were made. Here, the plausibility of the phase of the electrical resistivity was improved for frequencies up to 1 kHz, but errors remained for higher frequencies due to the approximate nature of the electrode impedance estimates and some remaining unknown parasitic capacitances that led to current leakage. It was concluded that the proposed correction procedure for SIP measurements improved the accuracy of the phase measurements by an order of magnitude in the kHz frequency range. Further improvement of this accuracy requires a method to accurately estimate parasitic capacitances in situ.

  4. Plasma Impedance Spectrum Analyzer (PISA): an advanced impedance probe for measuring plasma density and other parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowland, D. E.; Pfaff, R. F.; Uribe, P.; Burchill, J.

    2006-12-01

    High-accuracy, high-cadence measurements of ionospheric electron density between 100 and a few x 106 / cc and electron temperature from 200 K to a few thousand K are of critical importance for understanding conductivity, Joule heating rates, and instability growth rates. We present results from the development of an impedance probe at NASA GSFC and show its strengths relative to other measurement techniques. Complementary measurement techniques such as Langmuir Probes, while providing extremely high measurement cadence, suffer from uncertainties in calibration, surface contamination effects, and wake/sheath effects. Impedance Probes function by measuring the phase shift between the voltage on a long antenna and the current flowing from the antenna into the plasma as a function of frequency. At frequencies for which the phase shift is zero, a plasma resonance is assumed to exist. These resonances depend on a variety of plasma parameters, including the electron density, electron temperature, and magnetic field strength, as well as the antenna geometry, angle between the antenna and the magnetic field, and sheath / Debye length effects, but do not depend on the surface properties of the antenna. Previous impedance probe designs which "lock" onto the upper hybrid resonance are susceptible to losing lock in low-density environments. Information about other resonances, including the series resonance (which strongly depends on temperature) and other resonances which may occur near the upper hybrid, confounding its identification, are typically not transmitted. The novel features of the GSFC Impedance Probe (PISA) include: 1) A white noise generator that stimulates a wide range of frequencies simultaneously, allowing the instrument to send down the entire impedance frequency spectrum every few milliseconds. This allows identification of all resonance frequencies, including the series resonance which depends on temperature. 2) DC bias voltage stepping to bring the antenna

  5. Microfluidic device for cell capture and impedance measurement.

    PubMed

    Jang, Ling-Sheng; Wang, Min-How

    2007-10-01

    This work presents a microfluidic device to capture physically single cells within microstructures inside a channel and to measure the impedance of a single HeLa cell (human cervical epithelioid carcinoma) using impedance spectroscopy. The device includes a glass substrate with electrodes and a PDMS channel with micro pillars. The commercial software CFD-ACE+ is used to study the flow of the microstructures in the channel. According to simulation results, the probability of cell capture by three micro pillars is about 10%. An equivalent circuit model of the device is established and fits closely to the experimental results. The circuit can be modeled electrically as cell impedance in parallel with dielectric capacitance and in series with a pair of electrode resistors. The system is operated at low frequency between 1 and 100 kHz. In this study, experiments show that the HeLa cell is successfully captured by the micro pillars and its impedance is measured by impedance spectroscopy. The magnitude of the HeLa cell impedance declines at all operation voltages with frequency because the HeLa cell is capacitive. Additionally, increasing the operation voltage reduces the magnitude of the HeLa cell because a strong electric field may promote the exchange of ions between the cytoplasm and the isotonic solution. Below an operating voltage of 0.9 V, the system impedance response is characteristic of a parallel circuit at under 30 kHz and of a series circuit at between 30 and 100 kHz. The phase of the HeLa cell impedance is characteristic of a series circuit when the operation voltage exceeds 0.8 V because the cell impedance becomes significant.

  6. Electrical impedance measurements: rapid method for detecting and monitoring microorganisms.

    PubMed Central

    Cady, P; Dufour, S W; Shaw, J; Kraeger, S J

    1978-01-01

    A conceptually simple and east-to-use technique is described that uses continuous impedance measurements for automated monitoring of microbial growth and metabolism. The method has been applied to a wide range of microorganisms. Optical clarity is not required. The sensitivity and reproducibility of the method are demonstrated. The mechanism whereby microbial growth alters the impedance of the medium is discussed, as well as potential applications of the method to clinical microbiology. Images PMID:348718

  7. Propagation of sound through the Earth's atmosphere. 1: Measurement of sound absorption in the air. 2: Measurement of ground impedance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becher, J.; Meredith, R. W.; Zuckerwar, A. J.

    1981-01-01

    The fabrication of parts for the acoustic ground impedance meter was completed, and the instrument tested. Acoustic ground impedance meter, automatic data processing system, cooling system for the resonant tube, and final results of sound absorption in N2-H2O gas mixtures at elevated temperatures are described.

  8. Electrode-less measurement of cell layers impedance.

    PubMed

    Krůšek, J; Ďaďo, S

    2014-01-01

    This paper is devoted to yet unpublished electrode-less methods (ELM) of cell layers impedance measurement based on transformer principle. The main advantage of ELM is elimination uncertainties caused by interface between electrodes and measured electrolyte. The method of avoiding distortion caused by non-ideal transformer transfer function ("deconvolution") and errors caused by residual voltage is described. The modification of original transformer based method allowing to measure an impedance of inserted object is proposed. Results of several calibration measurements confirming the proper function of ELM including example of transepithelial resistance of cells layer are presented. Crucial parts of measuring system and recommendation for their realization are included.

  9. Scatterer size and concentration estimation technique based on a 3D acoustic impedance map from histologic sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamou, Jonathan; Oelze, Michael L.; O'Brien, William D.; Zachary, James F.

    2004-05-01

    Accurate estimates of scatterer parameters (size and acoustic concentration) are beneficial adjuncts to characterize disease from ultrasonic backscatterer measurements. An estimation technique was developed to obtain parameter estimates from the Fourier transform of the spatial autocorrelation function (SAF). A 3D impedance map (3DZM) is used to obtain the SAF of tissue. 3DZMs are obtained by aligning digitized light microscope images from histologic preparations of tissue. Estimates were obtained for simulated 3DZMs containing spherical scatterers randomly located: relative errors were less than 3%. Estimates were also obtained from a rat fibroadenoma and a 4T1 mouse mammary tumor (MMT). Tissues were fixed (10% neutral-buffered formalin), embedded in paraffin, serially sectioned and stained with H&E. 3DZM results were compared to estimates obtained independently against ultrasonic backscatter measurements. For the fibroadenoma and MMT, average scatterer diameters were 91 and 31.5 μm, respectively. Ultrasonic measurements yielded average scatterer diameters of 105 and 30 μm, respectively. The 3DZM estimation scheme showed results similar to those obtained by the independent ultrasonic measurements. The 3D impedance maps show promise as a powerful tool to characterize ultrasonic scattering sites of tissue. [Work supported by the University of Illinois Research Board.

  10. Microbial Sulfate Reduction Measured by an Automated Electrical Impedance Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oremland, R. S.; Silverman, M. P.

    1979-01-01

    Electrical impedance measurements are used to investigate the rates of sulfate reduction by pure cultures of and sediments containing sulfur-reducing bacteria. Changes in the electrical impedance ratios of pure cultures of Desulfovibrio aestuarii and samples of reduced sediments from San Francisco Bay were measured by a Bactometer 32, and sulfate reduction was followed by measuring the incorporation of (S-35) sulfate into metal sulfides. The growth of the bacteria in pure culture is found to result in an increase of 0.2200 in the impedance ratio within 24 h, accompanied by increases in protein, ATP, sulfide and absorptance at 660 nm, all of which are inhibited by the addition of molybdate. Similar responses were observed in the sediments, although impedance ratio responses were not completely inhibited upon the addition of molybdate, due to the presence of nonsulfate-respiring microorganisms. Experiments conducted with sterile media and autoclaved sediments indicate that the presence of H2S together with iron is responsible for the impedance effect, and sulfate reduction rates ranging between 0.85 and 1.78 mmol/l per day are estimated for the sediments by the impedance technique.

  11. Feasibility of Bioelectrical Impedance Spectroscopy Measurement before and after Thoracentesis

    PubMed Central

    Weyer, Sören; Pauly, Karolin; Napp, Andreas; Dreher, Michael; Leonhardt, Steffen; Marx, Nikolaus; Schauerte, Patrick; Mischke, Karl

    2015-01-01

    Background. Bioelectrical impedance spectroscopy is applied to measure changes in tissue composition. The aim of this study was to evaluate its feasibility in measuring the fluid shift after thoracentesis in patients with pleural effusion. Methods. 45 participants (21 with pleural effusion and 24 healthy subjects) were included. Bioelectrical impedance was analyzed for “Transthoracic,” “Foot to Foot,” “Foot to Hand,” and “Hand to Hand” vectors in low and high frequency domain before and after thoracentesis. Healthy subjects were measured at a single time point. Results. The mean volume of removed pleural effusion was 1169 ± 513 mL. The “Foot to Foot,” “Hand to Hand,” and “Foot to Hand” vector indicated a trend for increased bioelectrical impedance after thoracentesis. Values for the low frequency domain in the “Transthoracic” vector increased significantly (P < 0.001). A moderate correlation was observed between the amount of removed fluid and impedance change in the low frequency domain using the “Foot to Hand” vector (r = −0.7). Conclusion. Bioelectrical impedance changes in correlation with the thoracic fluid level. It was feasible to monitor significant fluid shifts and loss after thoracentesis in the “Transthoracic” vector by means of bioelectrical impedance spectroscopy. The trial is registered with Registration Numbers IRB EK206/11 and NCT01778270. PMID:25861647

  12. Acoustic of a perforated liner with grazing flow: Floquet-Bloch periodical approach versus impedance continuous approach.

    PubMed

    Dai, Xiwen; Aurégan, Yves

    2016-09-01

    The effect of a shear flow on an acoustic liner consisting of a perforated plate backed by cavities is studied. Two different approaches are investigated: First, the duct and the liner are considered as a periodic system while in the second approach the liner is considered as homogeneous and described by an impedance. Those two approaches coincide perfectly without flow for a small hole spacing compared to the acoustic wavelength. This work demonstrates that those two approaches are not wholly consistent when a shear flow is present and reveals some problems in the use of the local impedance with flow. The no-flow impedance cannot be used to describe the liner when a shear flow is present. An equivalent impedance with flow can be defined but it depends on the direction of the incident waves and loses its local characteristic.

  13. Acoustic Measurements of Small Solid Rocket Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargas, Magda B.; Kenny, R. Jeremy

    2010-01-01

    Rocket acoustic noise can induce loads and vibration on the vehicle as well as the surrounding structures. Models have been developed to predict these acoustic loads based on scaling existing solid rocket motor data. The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center acoustics team has measured several small solid rocket motors (thrust below 150,000 lbf) to anchor prediction models. This data will provide NASA the capability to predict the acoustic environments and consequent vibro-acoustic response of larger rockets (thrust above 1,000,000 lbf) such as those planned for the NASA Constellation program. This paper presents the methods used to measure acoustic data during the static firing of small solid rocket motors and the trends found in the data.

  14. Acoustic Measurements of Small Solid Rocket Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargas, Magda B.; Kenny, R. Jeremy

    2010-01-01

    Rocket acoustic noise can induce loads and vibration on the vehicle as well as the surrounding structures. Models have been developed to predict these acoustic loads based on scaling existing solid rocket motor data. The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center acoustics team has measured several small solid rocket motors (thrust below 150,000 lbf) to anchor prediction models. This data will provide NASA the capability to predict the acoustic environments and consequent vibro-acoustic response of larger rockets (thrust above 1,000,000 lbf) such as those planned for the NASA Constellation program. This paper presents the methods used to measure acoustic data during the static firing of small solid rocket motors and the trends found in the data.

  15. Smart mug to measure hand's geometrical mechanical impedance.

    PubMed

    Hondori, Hossein Mousavi; Tech, Ang Wei

    2011-01-01

    A novel device, which looks like a mug, has been proposed for measuring the impedance of human hand. The device is designed to have convenient size and light weight similar to an ordinary coffee mug. It contains a 2-axis inertia sensor to monitor vibration and a small motor to carry an eccentric mass (m=100 gr, r=2 cm, rpm=600). The centrifugal force due to the rotating mass applies a dynamic force to the hand that holds the mug. Correlation of the acceleration signals with the perturbing force gives the geometrical mechanical impedance. Experimental results on a healthy subject shows that impedance is posture dependant while it changes with the direction of the applied perturbing force. For nine postures the geometrical impedance is obtained all of which have elliptical shapes. The method can be used for assessment of spasticity and monitoring stability in patients with stroke or similar problems.

  16. Detection of modiolar proximity through bipolar impedance measurements.

    PubMed

    Pile, Jason; Sweeney, Alex D; Kumar, Shaun; Simaan, Nabil; Wanna, George B

    2017-06-01

    To test the hypothesis that bipolar electrical impedance measurements in perimodiolar cochlear implants (CIs) may be used to differentiate between perimodiolar insertion technique favoring proximity to the modiolus or lateral wall. Bipolar impedances are a measure of electrical resistance between pairs of electrode contacts in a CI. Stimulation is through biphasic pulses at fixed frequency. Impedance measurements were made in real time through sequential sampling of electrode pairs. Perimodiolar electrodes were inserted in temporal bones using one of two techniques: 1) In the standard insertion technique (SIT), the electrode array slides along the lateral wall during insertion. 2) In the Advance Off Stylet (Cochlear Ltd. Sydney) technique (AOS), the electrode maintains modiolar contact throughout the insertion process. A set of 22 insertions were performed in temporal bone specimens using perimodiolar electrode arrays with both AOS and SIT. Buffered saline was used as a substitute for natural perilymph based on similar electrical conductivity properties. Impedance with and without stylet removal were recorded with a 30-second sampling window at final insertion depth. There is a significant difference in bipolar impedance measures between AOS and SIT, with impedances rising in measurements with stylet removal. Evaluation was based on two-sided analysis of variance considering technique and electrode with P < 0.025. Bipolar electrical impedance can be used to detect relative motion toward the modiolus inside the cochlea. This detection method has the potential to optimize intraoperative placement of perimodiolar electrode arrays during implantation. We anticipate that this will result in lower excitation thresholds and improved hearing outcome. NA. Laryngoscope, 127:1413-1419, 2017. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  17. Calibration of ipsilateral stimulus transducer for acoustic reflex measurements.

    PubMed

    Olsen, S; Osterhammel, P A; Rasmussen, A N; Nielsen, L H

    1995-01-01

    Pure-tone Reference Equivalent Threshold Sound Pressure Level (RETSPL) of the ipsilateral stimulus receiver for acoustic reflex measurements on Madsen Electronics type Zodiac 901 impedance audiometer is provided. The results, obtained from 20 normal-hearing subjects, are achieved by comparing hearing threshold levels measured using a TDH 39 telephone (calibrated to ISO 389) with thresholds recorded using the ipsilateral stimulus insert phone. The calibration is referenced to an IEC-711 ear simulator and comprises the following frequencies: 125, 250, 500, 750, 1000, 1500, 2000, 3000, 4000, 6000, 8000 Hz.

  18. Measurement and modelling the sensitivity of tetrapolar transfer impedance measurements.

    PubMed

    Naydenova, E; Cavendish, S; Wilson, A J

    2016-10-01

    Finite element method (FEM) modelling of a small disk in a homogeneous saline medium showed that the sensitivity distribution for tetrapolar transfer impedance measurements was dependant on the ratio, σdisk/σsaline, and not absolute conductivity values. In addition, the amplitude of the negative sensitivity regions between the drive and receive electrodes decreased non-linearly with σdisk/σsaline for σdisk/σsaline < 1, eventually becoming zero. This non-linear behaviour determined the limit of the assumption of a small change in conductivity in Geselowitz's lead theorem with 0.5 <σdisk/σsaline <1.5 for the measurements reported. The modelling supported the design of a sensitivity measurement system using an insulating support and a metal disk in a saline filled tank. Measurements were shown to give good agreement with sensitivity predictions from Geselowitz's lead theorem. Replacing the homogeneous medium in the FEM model with layers of different conductivity parallel to the plane of the electrodes changed the sensitivity distribution when the thickness of the layers adjacent to the electrodes were less than ½ the electrode spacing. A layer of greater conductivity over a layer of lesser conductivity next to the electrodes gave a peak in the sensitivity distribution and extended regions of negative sensitivity further into the tissue.

  19. Impedance spectral measurements made through a membrane infection barrier.

    PubMed

    Brown, Brian H; Gonzalez-Correa, Carlos A; Bremner, John; Tidy, John A

    2006-12-01

    Impedance spectra of superficial tissues can be used to detect pre-malignant changes in the cervix but require electrical contact to be made between a probe and the tissue. Using a membrane which is permeable to ions but forms a barrier to agents of infection should enable impedance spectra to be measured without causing an infection risk to the patient. The properties required of such a membrane are considered and measurements on two suitable membranes are presented. It is shown that impedance spectra can be measured through a thin natural cellulose based membrane (Cuprophan) and that these are not significantly different from directly measured spectra. The ability of the membranes to block a virus is tested using expired polio virus vaccine.

  20. Wideband acoustic immittance: tympanometric measures.

    PubMed

    Sanford, Chris A; Hunter, Lisa L; Feeney, M Patrick; Nakajima, Hideko Heidi

    2013-07-01

    Wideband tympanometry (WT) measurements provide a view of the acoustic response properties of the middle ear over a broad range of frequencies and ear-canal pressures. These measurements show sensitivity to trends in ear-canal/middle ear maturation and changes in middle ear status as a result of different types of dysfunction. While results from early WT work showed improvements over ambient wideband tests in terms of test performance for identifying middle ear dysfunction and conductive hearing loss (CHL), more recent studies have shown high, but similar test performance for both ambient and tympanometric wideband tests. Case study and group results presented in this article, demonstrating the sensitivity of WT to middle ear dysfunction, CHL, and maturational changes in the middle ear, are promising and suggest the need for additional investigations in individual subjects and large subject populations. Future research should focus on identifying key predictors of developmental trends, middle ear dysfunction, and CHL in an effort to develop middle ear tests with high sensitivity and specificity. Technological advances, more accessibility to equipment, and evolving data analysis techniques should encourage progress in the areas of WT research and clinical application.

  1. A semi-analytical model for the acoustic impedance of finite length circular holes with mean flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Dong; Morgans, Aimee S.

    2016-12-01

    The acoustic response of a circular hole with mean flow passing through it is highly relevant to Helmholtz resonators, fuel injectors, perforated plates, screens, liners and many other engineering applications. A widely used analytical model [M.S. Howe. "Onthe theory of unsteady high Reynolds number flow through a circular aperture", Proc. of the Royal Soc. A. 366, 1725 (1979), 205-223] which assumes an infinitesimally short hole was recently shown to be insufficient for predicting the impedance of holes with a finite length. In the present work, an analytical model based on Green's function method is developed to take the hole length into consideration for "short" holes. The importance of capturing the modified vortex noise accurately is shown. The vortices shed at the hole inlet edge are convected to the hole outlet and further downstream to form a vortex sheet. This couples with the acoustic waves and this coupling has the potential to generate as well as absorb acoustic energy in the low frequency region. The impedance predicted by this model shows the importance of capturing the path of the shed vortex. When the vortex path is captured accurately, the impedance predictions agree well with previous experimental and CFD results, for example predicting the potential for generation of acoustic energy at higher frequencies. For "long" holes, a simplified model which combines Howe's model with plane acoustic waves within the hole is developed. It is shown that the most important effect in this case is the acoustic non-compactness of the hole.

  2. Flow Duct Data for Validation of Acoustic Liner Codes for Impedance Eduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahuja, K. K.; Munro, Scott; Gaeta, R. J., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    The objective of the study reported here was to acquire acoustic and flow data with hard and lined duct wall duct sections for validation of a liner prediction code being developed at NASA LaRC. Both the mean flowfield and acoustic flowfields were determined in a cross-plane of the rectangular duct. A flow duct facility with acoustic drivers connected to a rectangular (4.7 x 2.0 inch) source section and a linear acoustic liner mounted downstream of the source section was used in this study. The liner section was designed to allow liner materials to be placed on all 4 walls of the duct. The test liner was of the locally-reacting type and was made from a ceramic material. The material, consisting of a tubular structure, was provided by NASA LaRC. The liner was approximately 8.89 cm (3.5 inches) thick. For the current study, only the two "short" sides of the duct were lined with liner material. The other two sides were hard walls. Two especially built instrumentation sections were attached on either sides of the liner section to allow acoustic and flow measurements to be made upstream and downstream of the liner. The two instrumentation duct sections were built to allow measurement of acoustic and flow properties at planes perpendicular to flow upstream and downstream of the liner section. The instrumentation section was also designed to provide a streamwise gradient in acoustic (complex) pressure from which the acoustic particle velocity, needed for the model validation, can be computed. Flow measurements included pressure, temperature, and velocity profiles upstream of the liner section. The in-flow sound pressure levels and phases were obtained with a microphone probe equipped with a nose cone in two cross planes upstream of the liner and two cross plane downstream of the liner. In addition to the acoustic measurements at the cross planes. axial centerline acoustic data was acquired using an axially traversing microphone probe which was traversed from a location

  3. Possibilities for predictive measurement of the transthoracic impedance in defibrillation.

    PubMed

    Krasteva, V; Hatib, F A; Trendafilova, E; Daskalov, I

    2001-01-01

    Transthoracic electrical defibrillation is administered by high voltages and currents applied through large size electrodes. Therefore, the defibrillator load impedance becomes an essential factorfor the efficacy of the procedure. Attempts at prediction of transthoracic impedance by pre-shock measurement with low-amplitude high-frequency current have yielded apparently promising results. A reassessment was undertaken of the comparison between transthoracic impedance measured over a wide frequency range (bioimpedance spectroscopy) and measured during the shock. An estimation of the possibilities for pre-shock 'prediction ' of the impedance was performed, to allow adequate selection of the defibrillation energy or current with the intention of increasing the possibility for positive results with the first shock. Data were obtained from experimental fibrillation/defibrillation cycles on dogs andfrom cardioversion of atrial fibrillation or flutter in patients. The final results suggest that high-frequency low-amplitude impedance measurements cannot predict the corresponding value during the shock with very high accuracy, as differences up to 15-17% were found using biphasic pulses in patients. However, the method can be used for approximate assessments.

  4. In situ impedance measurement of microwave atmospheric pressure plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S. T.; Nam, W. J.; Lee, J. K.; Yun, G. S.

    2017-04-01

    The impedance of atmospheric pressure argon plasma jets driven by microwave frequency is determined in situ by a novel ‘two frequency method’. In the conventional method of reflection coefficient ({{S}}11) measurement, the frequency of the driving microwave power is scanned, which inevitably affects the plasma characters and leads to uncertainty in the estimated plasma impedance. In our proposed method, the frequency-scanning signal additional to the driving power is used to measure {{S}}11 over a wide frequency range, which enables accurate determination of the plasma impedance based on an equivalent circuit model. The measured resistance and reactance of the plasma increase with the driving power in agreement with the transmission line theory. Based on this in situ measurement of the plasma impedance, the net power coupled to the plasma has been determined. The overall power efficiency remains approximately unchanged around 45% for different input power levels owing to the competing effects between the impedance mismatch and the volume change of the plasma.

  5. Functional monitoring of peripheral nerves from electrical impedance measurements.

    PubMed

    Fouchard, Alexandre; Coizet, Véronique; Sinniger, Valérie; Clarençon, Didier; Pernet-Gallay, Karin; Bonnet, Stéphane; David, Olivier

    2016-11-01

    Medical electrical stimulators adapted to peripheral nerves use multicontact cuff electrodes (MCC) to provide selective neural interfaces. However, neuroprostheses are currently limited by their inability to locate the regions of interest to focus. Intended until now either for stimulation or recording, MCC can also be used as a means of transduction to characterize the nerve by impedancemetry. In this study, we investigate the feasibility of using electrical impedance (EI) measurements as an in vivo functional nerve monitoring technique. The monitoring paradigm includes the synchronized recording of both the evoked endogenous activity as compound action potentials (CAP) and the superimposed sine signal from the EI probe. Measurements were conducted on the sciatic nerve of rodents, chosen for its branchings towards the peroneal and tibial nerves, with both mono- and multi-contact per section electrodes. During stimulation phases, recordings showed CAP with consistent fiber conduction velocities. During coupled phases of both stimulation and sine perturbation, impedance variations were extracted using the mono-contact electrode type for certain frequencies, e.g. 2.941kHz, and were temporally coherent with the previous recorded CAP. Using a MCC, localized evoked CAP were also recorded but the signal to noise ratio (SNR) was too low to distinguish the expected associated impedance variation and deduce an image of impedance spatial changes within the nerve. The conducted in vivo measurements allowed to distinguish both evoked CAP and associated impedance variations with a strong temporal correlation. This indicates the feasibility of functional EI monitoring, aiming at detecting the impedance variations in relation to neural activity. Further work is needed to improve the in vivo system, namely in terms of SNR, and to integrate new multicontact devices in order to move towards EI tomography with the detection of spatially-localized impedance variations. Eventually

  6. Effect of grazing flow on the acoustic impedance of Helmholtz resonators consisting of single and clustered orifices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hersch, A. S.; Walker, B.

    1979-01-01

    A semiempirical fluid mechanical model is derived for the acoustic behavior of thin-walled single orifice Helmholtz resonators in a grazing flow environment. The incident and cavity sound fields are connected in terms of an orifice discharge coefficient whose values are determined experimentally using the two-microphone method. Measurements show that at high grazing flow speeds, acoustical resistance is almost linearly proportional to the grazing flow speed and almost independent of incident sound pressure. The corresponding values of reactance are much smaller and tend towards zero. For thicker-walled orifice plates, resistance and reactance were observed to be less sensitive to grazing flow as the ratio of plate thickness to orifice diameter increased. Loud tones were observed to radiate from a single orifice Helmholtz resonator due to interaction between the grazing flow shear layer and the resonator cavity. Measurements showed that the tones radiated at a Strouhal number equal to 0.26. The effects of grazing flow on the impedance of Helmholtz resonators consisting of clusters of orifices was also studied. In general, both resistance and reaction were found to be virtually independent of orifice relative spacing and number. These findings are valid with and without grazing flow.

  7. A model for the pressure excitation spectrum and acoustic impedance of sound absorbers in the presence of grazing flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, E. J.

    1973-01-01

    The acoustic impedance of sound absorbers in the presence of grazing flow is essential information when analyzing sound propagation within ducts. A unification of the theory of the nonlinear acoustic resistance of Helmholtz resonators including grazing flow is presented. The nonlinear resistance due to grazing flow is considered to be caused by an exciting pressure spectrum produced by the interaction of the grazing flow and the jets flowing from the resonator orifices. With this exciting pressure spectrum the resonator can be treated in the same manner as a resonator without grazing flow but with an exciting acoustic spectrum.

  8. Implementation of the TRL Algorithm for Improved Impedance Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Mane, Vibha; Shea, Tom

    1993-05-03

    The thru-reflect-line algorithm for deembedding the scattering parameters and hence the impedance of a device under test has been implemented in LabVIEW. This algorithm helps obtain the correct impedance of a device placed between mismatched ports. The nonideal por at each end of the two-port DUT is modeled by an ideal port in cascade with an error box. The scattering parameters are measured for three known conditions between the measurement planes M1 and M2, using the Network Analyzer.

  9. [An instrument for estimating human body composition using impedance measurement].

    PubMed

    Yin, J; Peng, C

    1997-03-01

    According to the impedance feature of biological tissue, the instrument was designed at 1, 5, 10, 50, 100kHz to measure human impedance, and then to calculate human FAT, FFM, FAT%, TBW, ECW, ICW and so on. A 8031 singlechip microprocessor contacuting used as a control center in the instrument. The part of electric circuit contacuting human body in the instrument was unreally earthing. The instrument was safty, effective, repeatable, and easily manpulative. Prelimintary clinical experiment showed the results measured with the instrument could effectively reflect practical, status of human composition.

  10. Analogy electromagnetism-acoustics: Validation and application to local impedance active control for sound absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolas, L.; Furstoss, M.; Galland, M. A.

    1998-10-01

    An analogy between electromagnetism and acoustics is presented in 2D. The propagation of sound in presence of absorbing material is modeled using an open boundary microwave package. Validation is performed through analytical and experimental results. Application to local impedance active control for free field sound absorption is finally described. Une analogie entre acoustique et électromagnétisme est présentée en 2D, afin de modéliser la propagation d'ondes acoustiques, en présence de matériau absorbant et à l'aide d'un logiciel de micro-ondes en domaine ouvert. Cette analogie est validée par des résultats analytiques et expérimentaux. Une application au contrôle actif de l'impédance acoustique de surface de matériaux poreux est finalement décrite.

  11. Minimization of sonic-boom parameters in real and isothermal atmospheres. [overpressure and acoustic impedance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darden, C. M.

    1975-01-01

    The procedure for sonic-boom minimization introduced by Seebass and George for an isothermal atmosphere was converted for use in the real atmosphere by means of the appropriate equations for sonic-boom pressure signature advance, ray-tube area, and acoustic impedance. Results of calculations using both atmospheres indicate that except for low Mach numbers or high altitudes, the isothermal atmosphere with a scale height of 7620 m (25 000 ft) gives a reasonable estimate of the values of overpressure, impulse, and characteristic overpressure obtained by using the real atmosphere. The results also show that for aircraft design studies, propagation of a known F-function, or minimization studies at low supersonic Mach numbers, the isothermal approximation is not adequate.

  12. Contribution to classification of buried objects based on acoustic impedance matching.

    PubMed

    Stepanić, J; Wüstenberg, H; Krstelj, V; Mrasek, H

    2003-03-01

    Determination of material the buried objects are made of could contribute significantly to their recognition, or classification. This is important in detecting buried antipersonnel landmines within the context of humanitarian demining, as well as in a variety of other applications. In this article the concept has been formulated of the approach to buried object's material determination starting with ultrasonic impulse propagation analysis in a particular testing set configuration. The impulse propagates through a characterized transfer material in such a way that a part of it, a reflected wave, carries the information about the buried object's surface material acoustic impedance. The limit of resolution capability is theoretically analyzed and experimentally evaluated and the influencing factors described. Among these, the contact between clean surfaces of the transfer material and buried object is emphasized.

  13. Density, ultrasound velocity, acoustic impedance, reflection and absorption coefficient determination of liquids via multiple reflection method.

    PubMed

    Hoche, S; Hussein, M A; Becker, T

    2015-03-01

    The accuracy of density, reflection coefficient, and acoustic impedance determination via multiple reflection method was validated experimentally. The ternary system water-maltose-ethanol was used to execute a systematic, temperature dependent study over a wide range of densities and viscosities aiming an application as inline sensor in beverage industries. The validation results of the presented method and setup show root mean square errors of: 1.201E-3 g cm(-3) (±0.12%) density, 0.515E-3 (0.15%) reflection coefficient and 1.851E+3 kg s(-1) m(-2) (0.12%) specific acoustic impedance. The results of the diffraction corrected absorption showed an average standard deviation of only 0.12%. It was found that the absorption change shows a good correlation to concentration variations and may be useful for laboratory analysis of sufficiently pure liquids. The main part of the observed errors can be explained by the observed noise, temperature variation and the low signal resolution of 50 MHz. In particular, the poor signal-to-noise ratio of the second reflector echo was found to be a main accuracy limitation. Concerning the investigation of liquids the unstable properties of the reference material PMMA, due to hygroscopicity, were identified to be an additional, unpredictable source of uncertainty. While dimensional changes can be considered by adequate methodology, the impact of the time and temperature dependent water absorption on relevant reference properties like the buffer's sound velocity and density could not be considered and may explain part of the observed deviations.

  14. Acoustic measurements in sheared granular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzinski, Theodore; Daniels, Karen

    2014-03-01

    Acoustic measurements in static, jammed granular materials have revealed an excess of low-frequency vibrational modes which decreases as the confining pressure is increased. This behavior may be analogous to the excess in low-frequency modes associated with the loss of rigidity in molecular and colloidal glasses. To test this analogy, we measure the acoustic emissions from jammed, quasi-2D granular packings under shear. In contrast to static experiments, shear enables direct comparison of acoustic properties as a packing approaches failure. We use a split-bottom geometry with flexible boundaries held under controlled tension, allowing experiments to be conducted at a set confining pressure.

  15. Measuring the acoustic response of Helmholtz resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteiro, Martín; Marti, Arturo C.; Vogt, Patrik; Kasper, Lutz; Quarthal, Dominik

    2015-04-01

    Many experiments have been proposed to investigate acoustic phenomena in college and early undergraduate levels, in particular the speed of sound,1-9 by means of different methods, such as time of flight, transit time, or resonance in tubes. In this paper we propose to measure the acoustic response curves of a glass beaker filled with different gases, used as an acoustic resonator. We show that these curves expose many interesting peaks and features, one of which matches the resonance peak predicted for a Helmholtz resonator fairly well, and gives a decent estimate for the speed of sound in some cases. The measures are obtained thanks to the capabilities of smartphones.

  16. Bunch Length and Impedance Measurements at SPEAR3

    SciTech Connect

    Corbett, W.J.; Cheng, W.X.; Fisher, A.S.; Huang, X.; /SLAC

    2011-11-02

    Streak camera measurements were made at SPEAR3 to characterize longitudinal coupling impedance. For the nominal optics, data was taken at three rf voltages and a single-bunch current range of 0-20mA. Both bunchcentroid phase shift and bunch lengthening were recorded to extract values for resistive and reactive impedance. An (R+L) and a Q=1 model were then back-substituted into the Haissinski equation and compared with raw profile data. In the short bunch (low-{alpha}) mode, distribution 'bursting' was observed.

  17. Degradation in nickel-cadmium cells studied by impedance measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haak, R.; Ogden, C.; Tench, D.; Di Stefano, S.

    1984-01-01

    The impedance characteristics of various Ni-Cd cells were measured at different times during accelerated charge/discharge trials to identify characteristics indicative of cell lifetime and cycle history. The tests were performed as part of an attempt to develop nondestructive testing techniques to detect flaws in batteries installed on low-earth orbit satellites. Trials consisted of 60 min charging and 40 min discharging, covering 20, 30, and 40 C temperatures, 20, 35, and 50 percent depth of discharge, and the average cycle life. No correlations were derived between impedance characteristics and cycle life. Other possible techniques for evaluating predictors of battery performance are discussed.

  18. Sensorless battery temperature measurements based on electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raijmakers, L. H. J.; Danilov, D. L.; van Lammeren, J. P. M.; Lammers, M. J. G.; Notten, P. H. L.

    2014-02-01

    A new method is proposed to measure the internal temperature of (Li-ion) batteries. Based on electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements, an intercept frequency (f0) can be determined which is exclusively related to the internal battery temperature. The intercept frequency is defined as the frequency at which the imaginary part of the impedance is zero (Zim = 0), i.e. where the phase shift between the battery current and voltage is absent. The advantage of the proposed method is twofold: (i) no hardware temperature sensors are required anymore to monitor the battery temperature and (ii) the method does not suffer from heat transfer delays. Mathematical analysis of the equivalent electrical-circuit, representing the battery performance, confirms that the intercept frequency decreases with rising temperatures. Impedance measurements on rechargeable Li-ion cells of various chemistries were conducted to verify the proposed method. These experiments reveal that the intercept frequency is clearly dependent on the temperature and does not depend on State-of-Charge (SoC) and aging. These impedance-based sensorless temperature measurements are therefore simple and convenient for application in a wide range of stationary, mobile and high-power devices, such as hybrid- and full electric vehicles.

  19. Time-Lapse Acoustic Impedance Inversion in CO2 Sequestration Study (Weyburn Field, Canada)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Morozov, I. B.

    2016-12-01

    Acoustic-impedance (AI) pseudo-logs are useful for characterising subtle variations of fluid content during seismic monitoring of reservoirs undergoing enhanced oil recovery and/or geologic CO2 sequestration. However, highly accurate AI images are required for time-lapse analysis, which may be difficult to achieve with conventional inversion approaches. In this study, two enhancements of time-lapse AI analysis are proposed. First, a well-known uncertainty of AI inversion is caused by the lack of low-frequency signal in reflection seismic data. To resolve this difficulty, we utilize an integrated AI inversion approach combining seismic data, acoustic well logs and seismic-processing velocities. The use of well logs helps stabilizing the recursive AI inverse, and seismic-processing velocities are used to complement the low-frequency information in seismic records. To derive the low-frequency AI from seismic-processing velocity data, an empirical relation is determined by using the available acoustic logs. This method is simple and does not require subjective choices of parameters and regularization schemes as in the more sophisticated joint inversion methods. The second improvement to accurate time-lapse AI imaging consists in time-variant calibration of reflectivity. Calibration corrections consist of time shifts, amplitude corrections, spectral shaping and phase rotations. Following the calibration, average and differential reflection amplitudes are calculated, from which the average and differential AI are obtained. The approaches are applied to a time-lapse 3-D 3-C dataset from Weyburn CO2 sequestration project in southern Saskatchewan, Canada. High quality time-lapse AI volumes are obtained. Comparisons with traditional recursive and colored AI inversions (obtained without using seismic-processing velocities) show that the new method gives a better representation of spatial AI variations. Although only early stages of monitoring seismic data are available, time

  20. Rotating Microphone Rake Measures Spinning Acoustic Modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Konno, Kevin E.; Hausmann, Clifford R.

    1996-01-01

    Rotating rake of pressure transducers developed for use in experimental studies of sources and propagation of noise generated by subsonic fan engines. Pressure transducers used as microphones to measure acoustic modes generated by, and spin with, fans. Versatility of control software used in rake-drive system enables measurements of acoustic modes on wide range of test-engine configurations. Rake-drive hardware easily adapted to different engines because not mechanically coupled to engine under test.

  1. Electrical impedance measurements in reentrant Au-Fe alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barco, R.; Fraga, G. L. F.; Pureur, P.

    2017-08-01

    We report on impedance experiments carried out in the reentrant alloys Au-Fe 18 at.% and Au-Fe 21 at.%. A spin-glass system Au-Fe 13.5 at.% was also studied for comparison. Measurements cover an extended temperature interval including the paramagnetic state, the intermediate ferromagnetic-like phase and the low temperature reentrant regime. Several frequencies in the range 0.1-1.8 MHz were applied. Magneto-impedance measurements were also performed in low magnetic fields applied parallel to the current orientation. From the impedance versus temperature data, the real and imaginary components of the circumferential permeability were extracted. A Hopkinson maximum is observed in both permeability components of the reentrant magnets. Also observed in these systems is a downwards inflexion in the permeability versus temperature curves at the canting temperature TK where the reentrant regime sets in. The anisotropy field HK was obtained from the magneto-impedance measurements in several temperatures spanning the ferromagnetic and reentrant states. A marked increase of the HK magnitude occurs in temperatures below TK , indicating the stabilization of the reentrant phase by the anisotropic Dzyaloshisnskii-Moriya coupling. These results are in agreement with predictions of the mean-field theory that explains canting and the reentrant state with basis on the freezing of the spin components which are transverse to the field orientation.

  2. Reproducibility experiments on measuring acoustical properties of rigid-frame porous media (round-robin tests).

    PubMed

    Horoshenkov, Kirill V; Khan, Amir; Bécot, François-Xavier; Jaouen, Luc; Sgard, Franck; Renault, Amélie; Amirouche, Nesrine; Pompoli, Francesco; Prodi, Nicola; Bonfiglio, Paolo; Pispola, Giulio; Asdrubali, Francesco; Hübelt, Jörn; Atalla, Noureddine; Amédin, Celse K; Lauriks, Walter; Boeckx, Laurens

    2007-07-01

    This paper reports the results of reproducibility experiments on the interlaboratory characterization of the acoustical properties of three types of consolidated porous media: granulated porous rubber, reticulated foam, and fiberglass. The measurements are conducted in several independent laboratories in Europe and North America. The studied acoustical characteristics are the surface complex acoustic impedance at normal incidence and plane wave absorption coefficient which are determined using the standard impedance tube method. The paper provides detailed procedures related to sample preparation and installation and it discusses the dispersion in the acoustical material property observed between individual material samples and laboratories. The importance of the boundary conditions, homogeneity of the porous material structure, and stability of the adopted signal processing method are highlighted.

  3. High Dynamic Range Complex Impedance Measurement System for Petrophysical Usage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, R.; He, X.; Yao, H.; Tan, S.; Shi, H.; Shen, R.; Yan, C.; Zeng, P.; He, L.; Qiao, N.; Xi, F.; Zhang, H.; Xie, J.

    2015-12-01

    Spectral induced polarization method (SIP) or complex resistivity method is increasing its application in metalliferous ore exploration, hydrocarbon exploration, underground water exploration, monitoring of environment pollution, and the evaluation of environment remediation. And the measurement of complex resistivity or complex impedance of rock/ore sample and polluted water plays a fundamental role in improving the application effect of SIP and the application scope of SIP. However, current instruments can't guaranty the accuracy of measurement when the resistance of sample is less than 10Ω or great than 100kΩ. A lot of samples, such as liquid, polluted sea water, igneous rock, limestone, and sandstone, can't be measured with reliable complex resistivity result. Therefore, this problem projects a shadow in the basic research and application research of SIP. We design a high precision measurement system from the study of measurement principle, sample holder, and measurement instrument. We design input buffers in a single board. We adopt operation amplifier AD549 in this system because of its ultra-high input impedance and ultra-low current noise. This buffer is good in acquiring potential signal across high impedance sample. By analyzing the sources of measurement error and errors generated by the measurement system, we propose a correction method to remove the error in order to achieve high quality complex impedance measurement for rock and ore samples. This measurement system can improve the measurement range of the complex impedance to 0.1 Ω ~ 10 GΩ with amplitude error less than 0.1% and phase error less than 0.1mrad when frequency ranges as 0.01 Hz ~ 1 kHz. We tested our system on resistors with resistance as 0.1Ω ~ 10 GΩ in frequency range as 1 Hz ~ 1000 Hz, and the measurement error is less than 0.1 mrad. We also compared the result with LCR bridge and SCIP, we can find that the bridge's measuring range only reaches 100 MΩ, SCIP's measuring range

  4. Using Impedance Measurements to Characterize Surface Modified with Gold Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    MacKay, Scott; Abdelrasoul, Gaser N.; Tamura, Marcus; Yan, Zhimin

    2017-01-01

    With the increased practice of preventative healthcare to help reduce costs worldwide, sensor technology improvement is vital to patient care. Point-of-care (POC) diagnostics can reduce time and lower labor in testing, and can effectively avoid transporting costs because of portable designs. Label-free detection allows for greater versatility in the detection of biological molecules. Here, we describe the use of an impedance-based POC biosensor that can detect changes in the surface modification of a micro-fabricated chip using impedance spectroscopy. Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) have been employed to evaluate the sensing ability of our new chip using impedance measurements. Furthermore, we used impedance measurements to monitor surface functionalization progress on the sensor’s interdigitated electrodes (IDEs). Electrodes made from aluminum and gold were employed and the results were analyzed to compare the impact of electrode material. GNPs coated with mercaptoundecanoic acid were also used as a model of biomolecules to greatly enhance chemical affinity to the silicon substrate. The portable sensor can be used as an alternative technology to ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based techniques. This system has advantages over PCR and ELISA both in the amount of time required for testing and the ease of use of our sensor. With other techniques, larger, expensive equipment must be utilized in a lab environment, and procedures have to be carried out by trained professionals. The simplicity of our sensor system can lead to an automated and portable sensing system.

  5. Acoustic Measurements for Small Solid Rocket Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargas, Magda B.; Kenny, R. Jeremy

    2010-01-01

    Models have been developed to predict large solid rocket motor acoustic loads based on the scaling of small solid rocket motors. MSFC has measured several small solid rocket motors in horizontal and launch configurations to anchor these models. Solid Rocket Test Motor (SRTM) has ballistics similar to the Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) therefore a good choice for acoustic scaling. Acoustic measurements were collected during the test firing of the Insulation Configuration Extended Length (ICXL) 7,6, and 8 (in firing order) in order to compare to RSRM horizontal firing data. The scope of this presentation includes: Acoustic test procedures and instrumentation implemented during the three SRTM firings and Data analysis method and general trends observed in the data.

  6. Measurement of the Impedance of Frog Skeletal Muscle Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Valdiosera, R.; Clausen, C.; Eisenberg, R. S.

    1974-01-01

    Impedance measurements are necessary to determine the passive electrical properties of cells including the equivalent circuits of the several pathways for current flow. Such measurements are usually made with microelectrodes of high impedance (some 15 MΩ) over a wide frequency range (1-10,000 Hz) and so are subject to many errors. An input amplifier has been developed which has negligible phase shift in this frequency range because it uses negative feedback to keep tiny the voltage on top of the microelectrode. An important source of artifact is the extracellular potential produced by capacitive current flow through the wall of the microelectrodes and the effective resistance of the bathing solution. This artifact is reduced some 10 times by shielding the current microelectrode with a conductive paint. The residual artifact is analyzed, measured, and subtracted from our results. The interelectrode coupling capacitance is reduced below 2 × 10-17 F and can be neglected. Phase and amplitude measurements are made with phase-sensitive detectors insensitive to noise. The entire apparatus is calibrated at different signal to noise ratios and the nature of the extracellular potential is investigated. The phase shift in the last 5-20 μm of the microelectrode tip is shown to be small and quite independent of frequency under several conditions. Experimental measurements of the phase characteristic of muscle fibers in normal Ringer are presented. The improvements in apparatus and the physiological significance of impedance measurements are discussed. It is suggested that the interpretation of impedance measurements is sensitive to small errors and so it is necessary to present objective evidence of the reliability of one's apparatus and measurements. PMID:4857358

  7. Acoustic streaming measurements in annular thermoacoustic engines.

    PubMed

    Joba, Stéphane; Gusev, Vitalyi; Lotton, Pierrick; Bruneau, Michel

    2003-04-01

    Experiments with an annular thermoacoustic engine employing quasiadiabatic interaction between traveling acoustic waves and an inhomogeneously heated porous material indicate the presence of a closed-loop mass flux. A qualitative modeling of the enthalpy flux in the thermoacoustic core provides an opportunity to estimate the thermal convection associated with this mass flux, by using temperature measurement at different positions in the system. The estimated acoustically induced mass flux is in accordance with recent theoretical results.

  8. Determination of Complex Microcalorimeter Parameters with Impedance Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saab, T.; Bandler, S. R.; Chervenak, J.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Finkbeiner, F.; Iyomoto, N.; Kelley, R.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Lindeman, M. A.; Porter, F. S.; hide

    2005-01-01

    The proper understanding and modeling of a microcalorimeter s response requires the accurate knowledge of a handful of parameters, such as C, G, alpha, . . . . While a few of these, such 8s the normal state resistance and the total thermal conductance to the heat bath (G) are directly determined from the DC IV characteristics, some others, notoriously the heat capacity (C) and alpha, appear in degenerate combinations in most measurable quantities. The case of a complex microcalorimeter, i.e. one in which the absorber s heat capacity is connected by a finite thermal impedance to the sensor, and subsequently by another thermal impedance to the heat bath, results in an added ambiguity in the determination of the individual C's and G's. In general, the dependence of the microcalorimeter s complex impedance on these parameters varies with frequency. This variation allows us to determine the individual parameters by fitting the prediction of the microcalorimeter model to the impedance data. We describe in this paper our efforts at characterizing the Goddard X-ray microcalorimeters. Using the parameters determined with this method we them compare the pulse shape and noise spectra predicted by the microcalorimeter model to data taken with the same devices.

  9. Contactless impedance sensors and their application to flow measurements.

    PubMed

    Opekar, František; Tůma, Petr; Stulík, Karel

    2013-02-27

    The paper provides a critical discussion of the present state of the theory of high-frequency impedance sensors (now mostly called contactless impedance or conductivity sensors), the principal approaches employed in designing impedance flow-through cells and their operational parameters. In addition to characterization of traditional types of impedance sensors, the article is concerned with the use of less common sensors, such as cells with wire electrodes or planar cells. There is a detailed discussion of the effect of the individual operational parameters (width and shape of the electrodes, detection gap, frequency and amplitude of the input signal) on the response of the detector. The most important problems to be resolved in coupling these devices with flow-through measurements in the liquid phase are also discussed. Examples are given of cell designs for continuous flow and flow-injection analyses and of detection systems for miniaturized liquid chromatography and capillary electrophoresis. New directions for the use of these sensors in molecular biology and chemical reactors and some directions for future development are outlined.

  10. Determination of Complex Microcalorimeter Parameters with Impedance Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saab, T.; Bandler, S. R.; Chervenak, J.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Finkbeiner, F.; Iyomoto, N.; Kelley, R.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Lindeman, M. A.; Porter, F. S.; Sadleir, J.

    2005-01-01

    The proper understanding and modeling of a microcalorimeter s response requires the accurate knowledge of a handful of parameters, such as C, G, alpha, . . . . While a few of these, such 8s the normal state resistance and the total thermal conductance to the heat bath (G) are directly determined from the DC IV characteristics, some others, notoriously the heat capacity (C) and alpha, appear in degenerate combinations in most measurable quantities. The case of a complex microcalorimeter, i.e. one in which the absorber s heat capacity is connected by a finite thermal impedance to the sensor, and subsequently by another thermal impedance to the heat bath, results in an added ambiguity in the determination of the individual C's and G's. In general, the dependence of the microcalorimeter s complex impedance on these parameters varies with frequency. This variation allows us to determine the individual parameters by fitting the prediction of the microcalorimeter model to the impedance data. We describe in this paper our efforts at characterizing the Goddard X-ray microcalorimeters. Using the parameters determined with this method we them compare the pulse shape and noise spectra predicted by the microcalorimeter model to data taken with the same devices.

  11. Contactless Impedance Sensors and Their Application to Flow Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Opekar, František; Tůma, Petr; Štulík, Karel

    2013-01-01

    The paper provides a critical discussion of the present state of the theory of high-frequency impedance sensors (now mostly called contactless impedance or conductivity sensors), the principal approaches employed in designing impedance flow-through cells and their operational parameters. In addition to characterization of traditional types of impedance sensors, the article is concerned with the use of less common sensors, such as cells with wire electrodes or planar cells. There is a detailed discussion of the effect of the individual operational parameters (width and shape of the electrodes, detection gap, frequency and amplitude of the input signal) on the response of the detector. The most important problems to be resolved in coupling these devices with flow-through measurements in the liquid phase are also discussed. Examples are given of cell designs for continuous flow and flow-injection analyses and of detection systems for miniaturized liquid chromatography and capillary electrophoresis. New directions for the use of these sensors in molecular biology and chemical reactors and some directions for future development are outlined. PMID:23447011

  12. Noninvasive measurement of transdermal drug delivery by impedance spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Arpaia, Pasquale; Cesaro, Umberto; Moccaldi, Nicola

    2017-01-01

    The effectiveness in transdermal delivery of skin permeation strategies (e.g., chemical enhancers, vesicular carrier systems, sonophoresis, iontophoresis, and electroporation) is poorly investigated outside of laboratory. In therapeutic application, the lack of recognized techniques for measuring the actually-released drug affects the scientific concept itself of dosage for topically- and transdermally-delivered drugs. Here we prove the suitability of impedance measurement for assessing the amount of drug penetrated into the skin after transdermal delivery. In particular, the measured amount of drug depends linearly on the impedance magnitude variation normalized to the pre-treated value. Three experimental campaigns, based on the electrical analysis of the biological tissue behavior due to the drug delivery, are reported: (i) laboratory emulation on eggplants, (ii) ex-vivo tests on pig ears, and finally (iii) in-vivo tests on human volunteers. Results point out that the amount of delivered drug can be assessed by reasonable metrological performance through a unique measurement of the impedance magnitude at one single frequency. In particular, in-vivo results point out sensitivity of 23 ml−1, repeatability of 0.3%, non-linearity of 3.3%, and accuracy of 5.7%. Finally, the measurement resolution of 0.20 ml is compatible with clinical administration standards. PMID:28338008

  13. Multiscale analysis of the acoustic scattering by many scatterers of impedance type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Challa, Durga Prasad; Sini, Mourad

    2016-06-01

    We are concerned with the acoustic scattering problem, at a frequency {κ}, by many small obstacles of arbitrary shapes with impedance boundary condition. These scatterers are assumed to be included in a bounded domain {Ω} in {{R}^3} which is embedded in an acoustic background characterized by an eventually locally varying index of refraction. The collection of the scatterers {D_m, m=1,ldots,M} is modeled by four parameters: their number M, their maximum radius a, their minimum distance d and the surface impedances {λ_m, m=1,ldots,M}. We consider the parameters M, d and {λ_m}'s having the following scaling properties: {M:=M(a)=O(a^{-s}), d:=d(a)≈ a^t} and {λ_m:=λ_m(a)=λ_{m,0}a^{-β}}, as {a→ 0}, with non negative constants s, t and {β} and complex numbers {λ_{m, 0}}'s with eventually negative imaginary parts. We derive the asymptotic expansion of the far-fields with explicit error estimate in terms of a, as {a→ 0}. The dominant term is the Foldy-Lax field corresponding to the scattering by the point-like scatterers located at the centers {z_m}'s of the scatterers {D_m}'s with {λ_m \\vert partial D_m\\vert} as the related scattering coefficients. This asymptotic expansion is justified under the following conditions a ≤ a_0, \\vert Re (λ_{m,0})\\vert ≥ λ_-,quad \\vertλ_{m,0}\\vert ≤ λ_+,quad β < 1,quad 0 ≤ s ≤2-β,quads/3 ≤ t and the error of the approximation is {C a^{3-2β-s}}, as {a → 0}, where the positive constants {a_0, λ_-,λ_+} and C depend only on the a priori uniform bounds of the Lipschitz characters of the obstacles {D_m}'s and the ones of {M(a)a^s} and {d(a)/a^t}. We do not assume the periodicity in distributing the small scatterers. In addition, the scatterers can be arbitrary close since t can be arbitrary large, i.e., we can handle the mesoscale regime. Finally, for spherical scatterers, we can also allow the limit case {β=1} with a slightly better error of the approximation.

  14. Acoustic Doppler discharge-measurement system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simpson, Michael R.; Oltmann, Richard N.; ,

    1990-01-01

    A discharge-measurement system that uses a vessel-mounted acoustic Doppler current profiler has been developed and tested by the U.S. Geological Survey. Discharge measurements using the system require a fraction of the time needed for conventional current-meter discharge measurements and do not require shore-based navigational aids or tag lines for positioning the vessel.

  15. A new method to measure viscosity and intrinsic sound velocity of liquids using impedance tube principles at sonic frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mert, Behic; Sumali, Hartono; Campanella, Osvaldo H.

    2004-08-01

    The attenuation of the sound energy produced by a liquid contained in a cylindrical tube (wave guide) depends on the liquid's viscosity, sound frequency, tube wall thickness, and tube material. By measuring the acoustic impedance of plane sound waves in a cylindrical wave guide, one can obtain the liquid's viscosity. Impedance measurements can also provide sound velocity in the liquid medium as another important physical characteristic. In this study a method using the impedance tube technique is presented. This research details the instrument's principles of operation along pertinent analytical equations and reports experimental results conducted using viscosity standard liquids. It is shown that the instrument can measure both liquid's viscosity and intrinsic sound velocity with reasonable precision.

  16. Drag Measurements of Porous Plate Acoustic Liners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolter, John D.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents the results of direct drag measurements on a variety of porous plate acoustic liners. The existing literature describes numerous studies of drag on porous walls with injection or suction, but relatively few of drag on porous plates with neither injection nor suction. Furthermore, the porosity of the porous plate in existing studies is much lower than typically used in acoustic liners. In the present work, the acoustic liners consisted of a perforated face sheet covering a bulk acoustic absorber material. Factors that were varied in the experiment were hole diameter, hole pattern, face sheet thickness, bulk material type, and size of the gap (if any) between the face sheet and the absorber material.

  17. Probe impedance measurements for millimeter-wave integrated horn antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guo, Yong; Chiao, Jung-Chih; Potter, Kent A.; Rutledge, David B.

    1993-01-01

    In order to achieve an impedance-matched millimeter-wave integrated horn antenna mixer array, the characteristics of the antenna probes inside the horn must be known. This paper describes impedance measurements for various probes in low-frequency model horns of two different types: (1) a 3 x 3 array made of aluminum by electric discharge machining and (2) a half horn made of copper sheet placed on a big copper-clad circuit board that was used as an image plane. The results of measurements indicate that the presence of the horn increases the effective length of the probe element, in agreement with reports of Guo et al. (1991) and theoretical analysis of Eleftheriades et al. (1991). It was also found that the resonant frequencies can be controlled by changing the length of the probes or by loading the probes.

  18. Determination of soil moisture distribution from impedance and gravimetric measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ungar, Stephen G.; Layman, Robert; Campbell, Jeffrey E.; Walsh, John; Mckim, Harlan J.

    1992-01-01

    Daily measurements of the soil dielectric properties at 5 and 10 cm were obtained at five locations throughout the First ISLSCP Field Experiment (FIFE) test site during the 1987 intensive field campaigns (IFCs). An automated vector voltmeter was used to monitor the complex electrical impedance, at 10 MHz, of cylindrical volumes of soil delineated by specially designed soil moisture probes buried at these locations. The objective of this exercise was to test the hypothesis that the soil impedance is sensitive to the moisture content of the soil and that the imaginary part (that is, capacitive reactance) can be used to calculate the volumetric water content of the soil. These measurements were compared with gravimetric samples collected at these locations by the FIFE staff science team.

  19. The neonatal acoustic reflex.

    PubMed

    Weatherby, L A; Bennett, M J

    1980-01-01

    Probe tones from 220 Hz to 2 000 Hz were used to measure the static and dynamic acoustic impedance of 44 neonates. Acoustic reflex thresholds to broad band noise were obtained from every neonate tested when employing the higher frequency probe tones. The reflex threshold levels measured are similar to those of adults. The static impedance values are discussed to give a possible explanation of why reflex thresholds cannot be detected using conventional 220 Hz impedance bridges.

  20. Damage Diagnosis in Semiconductive Materials Using Electrical Impedance Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Richard W.; Hinton, Yolanda L.

    2008-01-01

    Recent aerospace industry trends have resulted in an increased demand for real-time, effective techniques for in-flight structural health monitoring. A promising technique for damage diagnosis uses electrical impedance measurements of semiconductive materials. By applying a small electrical current into a material specimen and measuring the corresponding voltages at various locations on the specimen, changes in the electrical characteristics due to the presence of damage can be assessed. An artificial neural network uses these changes in electrical properties to provide an inverse solution that estimates the location and magnitude of the damage. The advantage of the electrical impedance method over other damage diagnosis techniques is that it uses the material as the sensor. Simple voltage measurements can be used instead of discrete sensors, resulting in a reduction in weight and system complexity. This research effort extends previous work by employing finite element method models to improve accuracy of complex models with anisotropic conductivities and by enhancing the computational efficiency of the inverse techniques. The paper demonstrates a proof of concept of a damage diagnosis approach using electrical impedance methods and a neural network as an effective tool for in-flight diagnosis of structural damage to aircraft components.

  1. Unfolding plasma density from cylindrical monopole impedance measurements in ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiraga, A.

    2003-04-01

    Several common problems occur in measurement techniques and interpretation of plasma natural emissions and impedance data. Antenna characteristics are of prime importance in equivalent circuit analysis. Spacecraft - plasma interaction contributes to variability of equivalent circuit impedances and e.m.f. components and imposes constrains on usefulness of experimental data. In order to have independent, built in estimate of local plasma frequency and to get deeper insight into properties of equivalent circuit for wave diagnostics, impedance measurement was integrated with radio receivers on the ACTIVE, APEX and CORONAS satellites. Impedance measurements of 7.5m long monopole were performed in frequency range .1-10MHz with the frequency step of 50kHz, in voltage divider configuration. Due to high inclination of 82.5deg and altitude range of 500-3000km, data from very different plasmas were collected. Data can be split into quasi normal, disturbed and very disturbed measurements. Equivalent circuit structure evolved in attempt to match even very disturbed measurements. For quasi normal measurements, satisfactory matching is obtained with computed gyrofrequency fc and fitted plasma frequency fn, stray capacitance Cs and capacitance Cv of phenomenological vacuum sheath. With formulas for monopole impedance in cold magnetoplasma, two basic pectral structures are explained. For sufficiently magnetized plasma (roughly fn/fc<2 if Cs=20pF), circuit parallel resonance frequency Fr falls into upper hybrid band (max(fn,fc),fu), resonance amplitude is reduced by high antenna resistance and horn like absolute maximum points fu. For values of fn/fc ratio, greater then critical, Fr is less than fn and broad absolute maximum at Fr follows from low antenna resistance. Further increase of fn/fc results in increasing lag of Fr behind fn. Critical ratio fn/fc increases with decreasing stray capacitance Cs. It follows from data analysis that stray capacitance may change in flight, at

  2. Cryogenic calibration setup for broadband complex impedance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diener, P.; Couëdo, F.; Marrache-Kikuchi, C.; Aprili, M.; Gabelli, J.

    2014-08-01

    Reflection measurements give access to the complex impedance of a material on a wide frequency range. This is of interest to study the dynamical properties of various materials, for instance disordered superconductors. However reflection measurements made at cryogenic temperature suffer from the difficulty to reliably subtract the circuit contribution. Here we report on the design and first tests of a setup able to precisely calibrate in situ the sample reflection, at 4.2 K and up to 2 GHz, by switching and measuring, during the same cool down, the sample and three calibration standards.

  3. Nuclear radiation-warning detector that measures impedance

    DOEpatents

    Savignac, Noel Felix; Gomez, Leo S; Yelton, William Graham; Robinson, Alex; Limmer, Steven

    2013-06-04

    This invention is a nuclear radiation-warning detector that measures impedance of silver-silver halide on an interdigitated electrode to detect light or radiation comprised of alpha particles, beta particles, gamma rays, X rays, and/or neutrons. The detector is comprised of an interdigitated electrode covered by a layer of silver halide. After exposure to alpha particles, beta particles, X rays, gamma rays, neutron radiation, or light, the silver halide is reduced to silver in the presence of a reducing solution. The change from the high electrical resistance (impedance) of silver halide to the low resistance of silver provides the radiation warning that detected radiation levels exceed a predetermined radiation dose threshold.

  4. Design of broadband time-domain impedance boundary conditions using the oscillatory-diffusive representation of acoustical models.

    PubMed

    Monteghetti, Florian; Matignon, Denis; Piot, Estelle; Pascal, Lucas

    2016-09-01

    A methodology to design broadband time-domain impedance boundary conditions (TDIBCs) from the analysis of acoustical models is presented. The derived TDIBCs are recast exclusively as first-order differential equations, well-suited for high-order numerical simulations. Broadband approximations are yielded from an elementary linear least squares optimization that is, for most models, independent of the absorbing material geometry. This methodology relies on a mathematical technique referred to as the oscillatory-diffusive (or poles and cuts) representation, and is applied to a wide range of acoustical models, drawn from duct acoustics and outdoor sound propagation, which covers perforates, semi-infinite ground layers, as well as cavities filled with a porous medium. It is shown that each of these impedance models leads to a different TDIBC. Comparison with existing numerical models, such as multi-pole or extended Helmholtz resonator, provides insights into their suitability. Additionally, the broadly-applicable fractional polynomial impedance models are analyzed using fractional calculus.

  5. Effect of borehole design on electrical impedance tomography measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mozaffari, Amirpasha; Huisman, Johan Alexander; Treichel, Andrea; Zimmermann, Egon; Kelter, Matthias; Vereecken, Harry

    2015-04-01

    Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT) is a sophisticated non-invasive tool to investigate the subsurface in engineering and environmental studies. To increase the depth of investigation, EIT measurements can be made in boreholes. However, the presence of the borehole may affect EIT measurements. Here, we aim to investigate the effect of different borehole components on EIT measurements using 2,5-D and 3D finite element modeling and unstructured meshes. To investigate the effect of different borehole components on EIT measurements, a variety of scenarios were designed. In particular, the effect of the water-filled borehole, the PVC casing, and the gravel filter were investigated relative to complex resistivity simulations for a homogenous medium with chain and electrode modules. It was found that the results of the complex resistivity simulations were best understood using the sensitivity distribution of the electrode configuration under consideration. In all simulations, the sensitivity in the vicinity of the borehole was predominantly negative. Therefore, the introduction of the water-filled borehole caused an increase in the real part of the impedance, and a decrease (more negative) in the imaginary part of the simulated impedance. The PVC casing mostly enhanced the effect of the water-filled borehole described above, although this effect was less clear for some electrode configuration. The effect of the gravel filter mostly reduced the effect of the water-filled borehole with PVC casing. For EIT measurements in a single borehole, the highest simulated phase error was 12% for a Wenner configuration with electrode spacing of 0.33 m. This error decreased with increasing electrode spacing. In the case of cross-well configurations, the error in the phase shit was as high as 6%. Here, it was found that the highest errors occur when both current electrodes are located in the same borehole. These results indicated that cross-well measurements are less affected by the

  6. Stability analysis and design of time-domain acoustic impedance boundary conditions for lined duct with mean flow.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin; Huang, Xun; Zhang, Xin

    2014-11-01

    This work develops the so-called compensated impedance boundary conditions that enable stable time domain simulations of sound propagation in a lined duct with uniform mean flow, which has important practical interest for noise emission by aero-engines. The proposed method is developed analytically from an unusual perspective of control that shows impedance boundary conditions act as closed-loop feedbacks to an overall duct acoustic system. It turns out that those numerical instabilities of time domain simulations are caused by deficient phase margins of the corresponding control-oriented model. A particular instability of very low frequencies in the presence of steady uniform background mean flow, in addition to the well known high frequency numerical instabilities at the grid size, can be identified using this analysis approach. Stable time domain impedance boundary conditions can be formulated by including appropriate phaselead compensators to achieve desired phase margins. The compensated impedance boundary conditions can be simply designed with no empirical parameter, straightforwardly integrated with ordinary linear acoustic models, and efficiently calculated with no need of resolving sheared boundary layers. The proposed boundary conditions are validated by comparing against asymptotic solutions of spinning modal sound propagation in a duct with a hard-soft interface and reasonable agreement is achieved.

  7. Body Fat Measurement: Weighing the Pros and Cons of Electrical Impedance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nash, Heyward L.

    1985-01-01

    Research technologists have developed electrical impedance units in response to demand for a convenient and reliable method of measuring body fat. Accuracy of impedance measures versus calipers and underwater weighing are discussed. (MT)

  8. Body Fat Measurement: Weighing the Pros and Cons of Electrical Impedance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nash, Heyward L.

    1985-01-01

    Research technologists have developed electrical impedance units in response to demand for a convenient and reliable method of measuring body fat. Accuracy of impedance measures versus calipers and underwater weighing are discussed. (MT)

  9. Study of surfactant-skin interactions by skin impedance measurements.

    PubMed

    Lu, Guojin; Moore, David J

    2012-02-01

    The stratum corneum (SC) plays a very critical physiological role as skin barrier in regulating water loss through the skin and protects the body from a wide range of physical and chemical exogenous insults. Surfactant-containing formulations can induce skin damage and irritation owing to surfactant absorption and penetration. It is generally accepted that reduction in skin barrier properties occurs only after surfactants have penetrated/permeated into the skin barrier. To mitigate the harshness of surfactant-based cleansing products, penetration/permeation of surfactants should be reduced. Skin impedance measurements have been taken in vitro on porcine skin using vertical Franz diffusion cells to investigate the impact of surfactants, temperature and pH on skin barrier integrity. These skin impedance results demonstrate excellent correlation with other published methods for assessing skin damage and irritation from different surfactant chemistry, concentration, pH, time of exposure and temperature. This study demonstrates that skin impedance can be utilized as a routine approach to screen surfactant-containing formulations for their propensity to compromise the skin barrier and hence likely lead to skin irritation.

  10. Acoustical measurements in ancient Roman theatres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farnetani, Andrea; Fausti, Patrizio; Pompoli, Roberto; Prodi, Nicola

    2004-05-01

    The Greek and Roman theatres are among the most precious and spectacular items of cultural heritage in the Mediterranean countries. The theatres are famous not only for their impressive architecture, but also for the acoustic qualities. For this reason it is important to consider these theatres as an acoustical heritage and to study their sound field. Within the activities of the ERATO (identification Evaluation and Revival of the Acoustical heritage of ancient Theatres and Odea) project, acoustical measurements were taken in well-preserved ancient Roman theatres at Aspendos (Turkey) and Jerash (Jordan). Roman theatres have an impressive stage building that forms a back wall in the orchestra area, and it was found that, from the analysis of the acoustical parameters, the reverberation time (e.g., 1.7 s at middle frequencies in the theatre of Aspendos) is quite long compared not only with other open-space theatres but also with closed spaces. Contrary to modern halls the clarity is high and this fact, together with a low sound level in most of the seats, gives the sound field a unique character.

  11. Acoustic Measurement of Potato Cannon Velocity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Courtney, Michael; Courtney, Amy

    2007-01-01

    Potato cannon velocity can be measured with a digitized microphone signal. A microphone is attached to the potato cannon muzzle, and a potato is fired at an aluminum target about 10 m away. Flight time can be determined from the acoustic waveform by subtracting the time in the barrel and time for sound to return from the target. The potato…

  12. Acoustic Measurement of Potato Cannon Velocity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Courtney, Michael; Courtney, Amy

    2007-01-01

    Potato cannon velocity can be measured with a digitized microphone signal. A microphone is attached to the potato cannon muzzle, and a potato is fired at an aluminum target about 10 m away. Flight time can be determined from the acoustic waveform by subtracting the time in the barrel and time for sound to return from the target. The potato…

  13. Bayesian seismic inversion based on rock-physics prior modeling for the joint estimation of acoustic impedance, porosity and lithofacies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Figueiredo, Leandro Passos; Grana, Dario; Santos, Marcio; Figueiredo, Wagner; Roisenberg, Mauro; Schwedersky Neto, Guenther

    2017-05-01

    We propose a Bayesian approach for seismic inversion to estimate acoustic impedance, porosity and lithofacies within the reservoir conditioned to post-stack seismic and well data. The link between elastic and petrophysical properties is given by a joint prior distribution for the logarithm of impedance and porosity, based on a rock-physics model. The well conditioning is performed through a background model obtained by well log interpolation. Two different approaches are presented: in the first approach, the prior is defined by a single Gaussian distribution, whereas in the second approach it is defined by a Gaussian mixture to represent the well data multimodal distribution and link the Gaussian components to different geological lithofacies. The forward model is based on a linearized convolutional model. For the single Gaussian case, we obtain an analytical expression for the posterior distribution, resulting in a fast algorithm to compute the solution of the inverse problem, i.e. the posterior distribution of acoustic impedance and porosity as well as the facies probability given the observed data. For the Gaussian mixture prior, it is not possible to obtain the distributions analytically, hence we propose a Gibbs algorithm to perform the posterior sampling and obtain several reservoir model realizations, allowing an uncertainty analysis of the estimated properties and lithofacies. Both methodologies are applied to a real seismic dataset with three wells to obtain 3D models of acoustic impedance, porosity and lithofacies. The methodologies are validated through a blind well test and compared to a standard Bayesian inversion approach. Using the probability of the reservoir lithofacies, we also compute a 3D isosurface probability model of the main oil reservoir in the studied field.

  14. Crosstalk Compensation for a Rapid, Higher Resolution Impedance Spectrum Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Jon P. Christophersen; John L. Morrison; David M. Rose; William H. Morrison; Chester G. Motloch

    2012-03-01

    Batteries and other energy storage devices are playing larger roles in various industries (e.g., military, automotive, electric utilities, etc.) as the U.S. seeks to reduce its dependence on foreign energy resources. As such, there exists a significant need for accurate, robust state-of-health assessment techniques. Present techniques tend to focus on simple, passive monitoring of voltage and current at a given ambient temperature. However, this approach has the disadvantage of ignoring key elements of health, that is, changes in resistance growth and power fade. Impedance spectroscopy is considered a useful laboratory tool in gauging changes in the resistance and power performance, but it has not been widely considered as an onboard diagnostic tool due to the length of time required to complete the measurement. Cross-Talk Compensation (CTC) is a novel approach that enables rapid, high resolution impedance spectra measurements using a hardware platform that could be designed as an embedded system. This input signal consists of a sum-of-sines excitation current that has a known frequency spread and a duration of one period of the lowest frequency. The voltage response is then captured at a sufficiently fast sample rate. Previously developed rapid impedance spectrum measurement techniques either required a longer excitation signal or a sum-of-sines signal that was separated by harmonic frequencies to reduce or eliminate, respectively, the cross-talk interference in the calculated results. The distinct advantage of CTC, however, is that non-harmonic frequencies can now be included within the excitation signal while still keeping the signal duration at one period of the lowest frequency. Since the frequency spread of the input signal is known, the crosstalk interference between sinusoidal signals within the sum-of-sines at a given frequency of interest can be pre-determined and assigned to an error matrix. Consequently, the real and imaginary components of the

  15. Determinants of pulmonary perfusion measured by electrical impedance tomography.

    PubMed

    Smit, Henk J; Vonk Noordegraaf, Anton; Marcus, J Tim; Boonstra, Anco; de Vries, Peter M; Postmus, Pieter E

    2004-06-01

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is a non-invasive imaging technique for detecting blood volume changes that can visualize pulmonary perfusion. The two studies reported here tested the hypothesis that the size of the pulmonary microvascular bed, rather than stroke volume (SV), determines the EIT signal. In the first study, the impedance changes relating to the maximal pulmonary pulsatile blood volume during systole (Delta Z(sys)) were measured in ten healthy subjects, ten patients diagnosed with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, who were considered to have a reduced pulmonary vascular bed, and ten heart failure patients with an assumed low cardiac output but with a normal lung parenchyma. Mean Delta Z(sys) (SD) in these groups was 261 (34)x10(-5), 196 (39)x10(-5) ( P<0.001) and 233 (61)x10(-5) arbitrary units (AU) (P=NS), respectively. In the second study, including seven healthy volunteers, Delta Z(sys) was measured at rest and during exercise on a recumbent bicycle while SV was measured by means of magnetic resonance imaging. The Delta Z(sys) at rest was 352 (53)x10(-5 ) and 345 (112)x10(-5 )AU during exercise (P=NS), whereas SV increased from 83 (21) to 105 (34) ml (P<0.05). The EIT signal likely reflects the size of the pulmonary microvascular bed, since neither a low cardiac output nor a change in SV of the heart appear to influence EIT.

  16. System for simultaneous measurements of bilaterally symmetrical acupoints multifrequency impedances.

    PubMed

    Su, Mi-Yong; Tan, Yong-Hong; Wang, Zi-Min; Gan, Cai-Jun; Chen, Shou-Hong

    2013-01-01

    Devices which can obtain comparable bilaterally symmetrical acupoints (BSA) multifrequency impedances (MFI) are often needed in the detection of the energy balance states of acupoints in traditional Chinese medicine. To satisfy these needs, a two-channel impedance measurement system has been introduced which is capable of accurately and simultaneously measuring BSA MFI. The system includes a set of five electrodes, two of which are injected with exciting current signal to synchronously and equally excite BSA; the other three electrodes are used as sensors to simultaneously sense the response signal from both sides. The system also includes a PC-based time-domain signal testing platform with arbitrary current waveform generation and three channels (one exciting current and two response voltages) simultaneously sampling, and a set of MFI simultaneously unbiased computing algorithms based on special odd multisine current signal input. Preliminary validating experiments suggest that the system allows accurate and synchronous measurement of BSA MFI at least in the frequency range of 10 Hz to 60 kHz, and the obtained BSA MFI are well comparable.

  17. Auditory evoked field measurement using magneto-impedance sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, K.; Tajima, S.; Song, D.; Hamada, N.; Cai, C.; Uchiyama, T.

    2015-05-01

    The magnetic field of the human brain is extremely weak, and it is mostly measured and monitored in the magnetoencephalography method using superconducting quantum interference devices. In this study, in order to measure the weak magnetic field of the brain, we constructed a Magneto-Impedance sensor (MI sensor) system that can cancel out the background noise without any magnetic shield. Based on our previous studies of brain wave measurements, we used two MI sensors in this system for monitoring both cerebral hemispheres. In this study, we recorded and compared the auditory evoked field signals of the subject, including the N100 (or N1) and the P300 (or P3) brain waves. The results suggest that the MI sensor can be applied to brain activity measurement.

  18. Measurement of limb blood flow by electrical impedance plethysmography.

    PubMed Central

    Porter, J. M.; Swain, I. D.; Shakespeare, P. G.

    1985-01-01

    Limb blood flow has been measured in 72 individuals by the noninvasive technique of electrical impedance plethysmography. Venous occlusion was not used. Blood flow was measured in 230 limbs in which 195 limbs were either in normal individuals or the clinically normal limbs of patients (normal limbs). Thirty-five limbs were clinically abnormal. Measurements on limbs with clinical abnormalities showed that blood flow values often fell within the limits of the normal range. However 3 cases of known vascular injury and 2 cases studied after hand surgery under tourniquet showed lowered blood flow values by comparison with the unaffected limb. A simultaneously recorded range of cardiac output and stroke volume measurements gave similar results to those obtained in a previous, unconnected study. Images Fig. 1 PMID:4004047

  19. Auditory evoked field measurement using magneto-impedance sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, K. Tajima, S.; Song, D.; Uchiyama, T.; Hamada, N.; Cai, C.

    2015-05-07

    The magnetic field of the human brain is extremely weak, and it is mostly measured and monitored in the magnetoencephalography method using superconducting quantum interference devices. In this study, in order to measure the weak magnetic field of the brain, we constructed a Magneto-Impedance sensor (MI sensor) system that can cancel out the background noise without any magnetic shield. Based on our previous studies of brain wave measurements, we used two MI sensors in this system for monitoring both cerebral hemispheres. In this study, we recorded and compared the auditory evoked field signals of the subject, including the N100 (or N1) and the P300 (or P3) brain waves. The results suggest that the MI sensor can be applied to brain activity measurement.

  20. Determination of acoustic impedances of multi matching layers for narrowband ultrasonic airborne transducers at frequencies <2.5 MHz - Application of a genetic algorithm.

    PubMed

    Saffar, Saber; Abdullah, Amir

    2012-01-01

    The effective ultrasonic energy radiation into the air of piezoelectric transducers requires using multilayer matching systems with accurately selected acoustic impedances and the thickness of particular layers. One major problem of ultrasonic transducers, radiating acoustic energy into air, is to find the proper acoustic impedances of one or more matching layers. This work aims at developing an original solution to the acoustic impedance mismatch between transducer and air. If the acoustic impedance defences between transducer and air be more, then finding best matching layer(s) is harder. Therefore we consider PZT (lead zirconate titanate piezo electric) transducer and air that has huge acoustic impedance deference. The vibration source energy (PZT), which is used to generate the incident wave, consumes a part of the mechanical energy and converts it to an electrical one in theoretical calculation. After calculating matching layers, we consider the energy source as layer to design a transducer. However, this part of the mechanical energy will be neglected during the mathematical work. This approximation is correct only if the transducer is open-circuit. Since the possibilities of choosing material with required acoustic impedance are limited (the counted values cannot always be realized and applied in practice) it is necessary to correct the differences between theoretical values and the possibilities of practical application of given acoustic impedances. Such a correction can be done by manipulating other parameters of matching layers (e.g. by changing their thickness). The efficiency of the energy transmission from the piezoceramic transducer through different layers with different thickness and different attenuation enabling a compensation of non-ideal real values by changing their thickness was computer analyzed (base on genetic algorithm). Firstly, three theoretical solutions were investigated. Namely, Chebyshev, Desilets and Souquet theories. However, the

  1. Detection of Chamber Conditioning Through Optical Emission and Impedance Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruden, Brett A.; Rao, M. V. V. S.; Sharma, Surendra P.; Meyyappan, Meyya

    2001-01-01

    During oxide etch processes, buildup of fluorocarbon residues on reactor sidewalls can cause run-to-run drift and will necessitate some time for conditioning and seasoning of the reactor. Though diagnostics can be applied to study and understand these phenomena, many of them are not practical for use in an industrial reactor. For instance, measurements of ion fluxes and energy by mass spectrometry show that the buildup of insulating fluorocarbon films on the reactor surface will cause a shift in both ion energy and current in an argon plasma. However, such a device cannot be easily integrated into a processing system. The shift in ion energy and flux will be accompanied by an increase in the capacitance of the plasma sheath. The shift in sheath capacitance can be easily measured by a common commercially available impedance probe placed on the inductive coil. A buildup of film on the chamber wall is expected to affect the production of fluorocarbon radicals, and thus the presence of such species in the optical emission spectrum of the plasma can be monitored as well. These two techniques are employed on a GEC (Gaseous Electronics Conference) Reference Cell to assess the validity of optical emission and impedance monitoring as a metric of chamber conditioning. These techniques are applied to experimental runs with CHF3 and CHF3/O2/Ar plasmas, with intermediate monitoring of pure argon plasmas as a reference case for chamber conditions.

  2. Detection of Chamber Conditioning Through Optical Emission and Impedance Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruden, Brett A.; Rao, M. V. V. S.; Sharma, Surendra P.; Meyyappan, Meyya

    2001-01-01

    During oxide etch processes, buildup of fluorocarbon residues on reactor sidewalls can cause run-to-run drift and will necessitate some time for conditioning and seasoning of the reactor. Though diagnostics can be applied to study and understand these phenomena, many of them are not practical for use in an industrial reactor. For instance, measurements of ion fluxes and energy by mass spectrometry show that the buildup of insulating fluorocarbon films on the reactor surface will cause a shift in both ion energy and current in an argon plasma. However, such a device cannot be easily integrated into a processing system. The shift in ion energy and flux will be accompanied by an increase in the capacitance of the plasma sheath. The shift in sheath capacitance can be easily measured by a common commercially available impedance probe placed on the inductive coil. A buildup of film on the chamber wall is expected to affect the production of fluorocarbon radicals, and thus the presence of such species in the optical emission spectrum of the plasma can be monitored as well. These two techniques are employed on a GEC (Gaseous Electronics Conference) Reference Cell to assess the validity of optical emission and impedance monitoring as a metric of chamber conditioning. These techniques are applied to experimental runs with CHF3 and CHF3/O2/Ar plasmas, with intermediate monitoring of pure argon plasmas as a reference case for chamber conditions.

  3. An Expendable Source for Measuring Shallow Water Acoustic Propagation and Geo-Acoustic Bottom Properties

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. An Expendable Source for Measuring Shallow Water Acoustic ...Propagation and Geo- Acoustic Bottom Properties Harry A DeFerrari RSMAS – University of Miami 4600 Rickenbacker Causeway Miami FL. 33149...broadband source is being developed that transmits high gain m-sequence to clandestinly measure pulse response of shallow water acoustic propagation

  4. DC and AC Techniques for Resistance and Impedance Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delahaye, F.

    1992-01-01

    Techniques related to the establishment and the comparison of primary standards of resistance and capacitance are described and discussed. In the field of resistance, the characteristics of primary standard resistors of 1 Ω and 10 000 Ω are presented and dc resistance-ratio measurement techniques reviewed, including the series-parallel method, the Warshawsky bridge and the cryogenic current comparator bridge. A review of techniques and results regarding very low-frequency ac measurements of dc standard resistors is also given. In the field of capacitance, the realization of the farad using calculable standards is discussed as well as the techniques for accurate measurements of four terminal-pair impedances used in particular for linking the farad and the ohm.

  5. Quantitative assessment of impedance tomography for temperature measurements in hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Blad, B; Persson, B; Lindström, K

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this study is a non-invasive assessment of the thermal dose in hyperthermia. Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) has previously been given a first trial as a temperature monitoring method together with microwave-induced hyperthermia treatment, but it has not been thoroughly investigated. In the present work we have examined this method in order to investigate the correlation in vitro between the true spatial temperature distribution and the corresponding measured relative resistivity changes. Different hyperthermia techniques, such as interstitial water tubings, microwave-induced, laser-induced and ferromagnetic seeds have been used. The results show that it is possible to find a correlation between the measured temperature values and the tomographically measured relative resistivity changes in tissue-equivalent phantoms. But the uncertainty of the temperature coefficients, which has been observed, shows that the method has to be improved before it can be applied to clinical in vivo applications.

  6. Simultaneous backward data transmission and power harvesting in an ultrasonic transcutaneous energy transfer link employing acoustically dependent electric impedance modulation.

    PubMed

    Ozeri, Shaul; Shmilovitz, Doron

    2014-09-01

    The advancement and miniaturization of body implanted medical devices pose several challenges to Ultrasonic Transcutaneous Energy Transfer (UTET), such as the need to reduce the size of the piezoelectric resonator, and the need to maximize the UTET link power-transfer efficiency. Accordingly, the same piezoelectric resonator that is used for energy harvesting at the body implant, may also be used for ultrasonic backward data transfer, for instance, through impedance modulation. This paper presents physical considerations and design guidelines of the body implanted transducer of a UTET link with impedance modulation for a backward data transfer. The acoustic matching design procedure was based on the 2×2 transfer matrix chain analysis, in addition to the Krimholtz Leedom and Matthaei KLM transmission line model. The UTET power transfer was carried out at a frequency of 765 kHz, continuous wave (CW) mode. The backward data transfer was attained by inserting a 9% load resistance variation around its matched value (550 Ohm), resulting in a 12% increase in the acoustic reflection coefficient. A backward data transmission rate of 1200 bits/s was experimentally demonstrated using amplitude shift keying, simultaneously with an acoustic power transfer of 20 mW to the implant. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Antenna impedance measurements in a magnetized plasma. I. Spherical antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Blackwell, David D.; Walker, David N.; Messer, Sarah J.; Amatucci, William E.

    2007-09-15

    The input impedance of a metal sphere immersed in a magnetized plasma is measured with a network analyzer at frequencies up to 1 GHz. The experiments were done in the Space Physics Simulation Chamber at the Naval Research Laboratory. The hot-filament argon plasma was varied between weakly ({omega}{sub ce}<{omega}{sub pe}) and strongly ({omega}{sub ce}>{omega}{sub pe}) magnetized plasma with electron densities in the range 10{sup 7}-10{sup 10} cm{sup -3}. It is observed that the lower-frequency resonance of the impedance characteristic previously associated with series sheath resonance {omega}{sub sh} in the unmagnetized plasma occurs at a hybrid sheath frequency of {omega}{sub r}{sup 2}={omega}{sub sh}{sup 2}+{kappa}{omega}{sub ce}{sup 2}, where {kappa} is a constant 0.5<{kappa}<1. As seen in previous experiments, the higher frequency resonance associated with the electron plasma frequency {omega}{sub pe} in the unmagnetized plasma is relocated to the upper hybrid frequency {omega}{sub uh}{sup 2}={omega}{sub pe}{sup 2}+{omega}{sub ce}{sup 2}. As with the unmagnetized plasma, the maximum power deposition occurs at the lower frequency resonance {omega}{sub r}.

  8. Grinding process monitoring based on electromechanical impedance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchi, Marcelo; Guimarães Baptista, Fabricio; de Aguiar, Paulo Roberto; Bianchi, Eduardo Carlos

    2015-04-01

    Grinding is considered one of the last processes in precision parts manufacturing, which makes it indispensable to have a reliable monitoring system to evaluate workpiece surface integrity. This paper proposes the use of the electromechanical impedance (EMI) method to monitor the surface grinding operation in real time, particularly the surface integrity of the ground workpiece. The EMI method stands out for its simplicity and for using low-cost components such as PZT (lead zirconate titanate) piezoelectric transducers. In order to assess the feasibility of applying the EMI method to the grinding process, experimental tests were performed on a surface grinder using a CBN grinding wheel and a SAE 1020 steel workpiece, with PZT transducers mounted on the workpiece and its holder. During the grinding process, the electrical impedance of the transducers was measured and damage indices conventionally used in the EMI method were calculated and compared with workpiece wear, indicating the surface condition of the workpiece. The experimental results indicate that the EMI method can be an efficient and cost-effective alternative for monitoring precision workpieces during the surface grinding process.

  9. Measurements and empirical model of the acoustic properties of reticulated vitreous carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muehleisen, Ralph T.; Beamer, C. Walter; Tinianov, Brandon D.

    2005-02-01

    Reticulated vitreous carbon (RVC) is a highly porous, rigid, open cell carbon foam structure with a high melting point, good chemical inertness, and low bulk thermal conductivity. For the proper design of acoustic devices such as acoustic absorbers and thermoacoustic stacks and regenerators utilizing RVC, the acoustic properties of RVC must be known. From knowledge of the complex characteristic impedance and wave number most other acoustic properties can be computed. In this investigation, the four-microphone transfer matrix measurement method is used to measure the complex characteristic impedance and wave number for 60 to 300 pore-per-inch RVC foams with flow resistivities from 1759 to 10 782 Pa s m-2 in the frequency range of 330 Hz-2 kHz. The data are found to be poorly predicted by the fibrous material empirical model developed by Delany and Bazley, the open cell plastic foam empirical model developed by Qunli, or the Johnson-Allard microstructural model. A new empirical power law model is developed and is shown to provide good predictions of the acoustic properties over the frequency range of measurement. Uncertainty estimates for the constants of the model are also computed. .

  10. Improved multimodal method for the acoustic propagation in waveguides with a wall impedance and a uniform flow

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We present an efficient multimodal method to describe the acoustic propagation in the presence of a uniform flow in a waveguide with locally a wall impedance treatment. The method relies on a variational formulation of the problem, which allows to derive a multimodal formulation within a rigorous mathematical framework, notably to properly account for the boundary conditions on the walls (being locally the Myers condition and the Neumann condition otherwise). Also, the method uses an enriched basis with respect to the usual cosine basis, able to absorb the less converging part of the modal series and thus, to improve the convergence of the method. Using the cosine basis, the modal method has a low convergence, 1/N, with N the order of truncation. Using the enriched basis, the improvement in the convergence is shown to depend on the Mach number, from 1/N5 to roughly 1/N1.5 for M=0 to M close to unity. The case of a continuously varying wall impedance is considered, and we discuss the limiting case of piecewise constant impedance, which defines pressure edge conditions at the impedance discontinuities. PMID:27436978

  11. Improved multimodal method for the acoustic propagation in waveguides with a wall impedance and a uniform flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercier, Jean-François; Maurel, Agnès

    2016-06-01

    We present an efficient multimodal method to describe the acoustic propagation in the presence of a uniform flow in a waveguide with locally a wall impedance treatment. The method relies on a variational formulation of the problem, which allows to derive a multimodal formulation within a rigorous mathematical framework, notably to properly account for the boundary conditions on the walls (being locally the Myers condition and the Neumann condition otherwise). Also, the method uses an enriched basis with respect to the usual cosine basis, able to absorb the less converging part of the modal series and thus, to improve the convergence of the method. Using the cosine basis, the modal method has a low convergence, 1/N, with N the order of truncation. Using the enriched basis, the improvement in the convergence is shown to depend on the Mach number, from 1/N5 to roughly 1/N1.5 for M=0 to M close to unity. The case of a continuously varying wall impedance is considered, and we discuss the limiting case of piecewise constant impedance, which defines pressure edge conditions at the impedance discontinuities.

  12. Boundary element method calculation of individual head-related transfer function. II. Impedance effects and comparisons to real measurements.

    PubMed

    Katz, B F

    2001-11-01

    Following previous work by the author involving the calculation of an individual head-related transfer function (HRTF) using a Boundary Element Method (BEM) approach, impedance conditions are now included to take account of the acoustic properties of human hair. In addition, comparisons are made here between calculations and measured values for the HRTF of a specific individual. Numerous works have been published regarding the measurement of HRTFs, but rarely are several methods compared for the same individual. The results presented in the work compare two different measurement techniques and a computational BEM for acquiring an individual HRTF. Impedance effects have been incorporated in the BEM model for hair based on measured data, providing a final set for comparison. Measurement results show significant variations for the same individual. Computational results show good agreement within the range of experimental variations. Definite trends are observed for many directions, while the limitations of the methods are also highlighted for others. The effects of incorporating hair impedance are shown to provide an improvement in the correlation of computational results, indicating an affect of hair impedance on the HRTF.

  13. Method of establishing a stratigraphic model of the subsurface from an acoustic impedance profile and a seismic section

    SciTech Connect

    Carron, D.

    1990-10-16

    This patent describes a method of establishing a stratigraphic model of the subsurface from an acoustic impedance profile A{sub {ital 0}} = {minus} {l brace}a{sub {ital 0}}(n),n = 1,N{r brace} corresponding to a series of reflection coefficients R{sub {ital 0}} = {l brace}r{sub {ital 0}}(n),n = 1,N{r brace}, where n is an index relating to the depth sampled in time t, and from a seismic section comprising a plurality of seismic traces T{sub {ital i}}(t),i = 0, I recorded in response to the emission of a seismic wave of signature W(t). It comprises: successively determining each series of coefficients R{sub {ital i}} = {minus} {l brace}r{sub {ital i}}(n), N = 1,N{r brace} by minimizing a cross-entropy function H(R{sub {ital i}}/R{sub {ital i}}) between firstly a series R{sub {ital i}} obtained from the series R{sub 1{minus}1} and a set of one or more seismic traces {l brace}T{sub {ital i{minus}j}},T{sub {ital i + j}}{r brace}, and secondly the looked-for series R{sub {ital i}}, the minimization being performed under pre-established constraints; determining the acoustic impedance profiles A{sub {ital i}} = {l brace}a{sub {ital i}}(n){r brace} corresponding to the series R{sub {ital i}}, and establishing the stratigraphic model of the subsurface from the acoustic impedance profiles A{sub {ital i}}.

  14. [The influences of vowel ae and a: on acoustic measures].

    PubMed

    Wei, C; Chen, F; Wang, W

    1999-03-01

    To study the influences of vowel ae and a: on acoustics measures. Fifty-three cases of laryngeal diseases were measured acoustically. The acoustic sampling were vowels ae and a:. The results showed that Fo, Jitter and Shimmer were similar between two groups, and NNE of vowel a: was much lower than that of ae, indicating larger glottal closure in vowel a:. Vowels have something to do with glottal closure, therefore influencs acoustical measures.

  15. Measuring Acoustic Noise around Kahoolawe Island.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-10-01

    NAVAL OCEAN SYSTEMS CENTER SAN DIEGO, CALIFORNIA 92152 C y 2 .V ANAVAL OCEAN SYSTEMS CENTER, SAN DIEGO, CA 92152 AN ACTIV IT Y OF THE NAVAL... Ocean Systems Center (NOSC), Code 512, on NSAP Project TH-1 -80, "Measurement of Acoustic Noise Around Kahoolawe". CDR J. W. Carlmark, USN, COMTHIRDFLT N...Bioacoustics & Bionics Division Biosciences Department ,or -.. .- ?---1 1 : ’" " "’ .... .-j UNCLASSIFIED SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE (When Data

  16. Measuring acoustic emissions in an avalanche slope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiweger, Ingrid; Schweizer, Jürg

    2014-05-01

    Measurements of acoustic emissions are a common technique for monitoring damage and predicting imminent failure of a material. Within natural hazards it has already been used to successfully predict the break-off of a hanging glacier. To explore the applicability of the acoustic emission (AE) technique for avalanche prediction, we installed two acoustic sensors (with 30 kHz and 60 kHz resonance frequency) in an avalanche prone slope at the Mittelgrat in the Parsenn ski area above Davos, Switzerland. The slope is north-east facing, frequently wind loaded, and approximately 35° steep. The AE signals - in particular the event energy and waiting time distributions - were compared with slope stability. The latter was determined by observing avalanche activity. The results of two winter's measurements yielded that the exponent β of the inverse cumulative distribution of event energy showed a significant drop (from a value of 3.5 to roughly 2.5) at very unstable conditions, i.e. on the three days during our measurement periods when spontaneous avalanches released on our study slope.

  17. Acoustic Doppler velocimeter-induced acoustic streaming and its implications for measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poindexter, C. M.; Rusello, P. J.; Variano, E. A.

    2011-05-01

    The acoustic Doppler velocimeter (ADV) is widely used for the characterization of fluid flow. Secondary flows ("acoustic streaming") generated by the ADV's acoustic pulses may affect the accuracy of measurements in experiments with small velocities. We assessed the impact of acoustic streaming on flow measurement using particle image velocimetry. The probes of two different ADVs were successively mounted in a tank of quiescent water. The probes' ultrasound emitters were aligned with a laser light sheet. Observed flow was primarily in the axial direction, accelerating from the ultrasound emitter and peaking within centimeters of the velocimeter sampling volume before dropping off. We measured the dependence of acoustic streaming velocity on ADV configuration, finding that different settings induce streaming ranging from negligible to more than 2.0 cm s-1. From these results, we describe cases where acoustic streaming affects velocity measurements and also cases where ADVs accurately measure their own acoustic streaming.

  18. Prediction of All-Cause Mortality Based on the Direct Measurement of Intrathoracic Impedance.

    PubMed

    Zile, Michael R; Sharma, Vinod; Johnson, James W; Warman, Eduardo N; Baicu, Catalin F; Bennett, Tom D

    2016-01-01

    Intrathoracic impedance-derived OptiVol fluid index calculated using implanted devices has been shown to predict mortality; direct measurements of impedance have not been examined. We hypothesized that baseline measured impedance predicts all-cause mortality; changes in measured impedance result in a change in the predicted mortality; and the prognostic value of measured impedance is additive to the calculated OptiVol fluid index. A retrospective analysis of 146,238 patients within the Medtronic CareLink database with implanted devices was performed. Baseline measured impedance was determined using daily values averaged from month 6 to 9 after implant and were used to divide patients into tertiles: group L = low impedance, ≤ 65 ohms; group M = medium impedance, 66 to 72 ohms; group H = high impedance, ≥ 73 ohms. Change in measured impedance was determined from values averaged from month 9 to 12 post implant compared with the 6- to 9-month values. OptiVol fluid index was calculated using published methods. All-cause mortality was assessed beginning 9 months post implant; changes in mortality was assessed beginning 12 months post implant. Baseline measured impedance predicted all-cause mortality; 5-year mortality for group L was 41%, M was 29%, and H was 25%, P < 0.001 among all groups. Changes in measured impedance resulted in a change in the predicted mortality; the prognostic value of measured impedance was additive to the OptiVol fluid index. Direct measurements of intrathoracic impedance using an implanted device can be used to stratify patients at varying mortality risk. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. Prediction of All-Cause Mortality Based on the Direct Measurement of Intrathoracic Impedance

    PubMed Central

    Zile, Michael R.; Sharma, Vinod; Johnson, James W.; Warman, Eduardo N.; Baicu, Catalin F.; Bennett, Tom D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Intrathoracic impedance-derived OptiVol fluid index calculated using implanted devices has been shown to predict mortality; direct measurements of impedance have not been examined. We hypothesized that baseline measured impedance predicts all-cause mortality; changes in measured impedance result in a change in the predicted mortality; and the prognostic value of measured impedance is additive to the calculated OptiVol fluid index. Methods and Results A retrospective analysis of 146,238 patients within the Medtronic CareLink data base with implanted devices was performed. Baseline measured impedance was determined using daily values averaged from month 6 to 9 post implant and were used to divide patients into tertiles; Group L= Low Impedance: ≤ 65 ohms, M= Medium Impedance: 66–72 ohms, H= High Impedance: ≥ 73 ohms. Change in measured impedance was determined from values averaged from month 9 to 12 post implant compared to the 6 to 9 month values. OptiVol fluid index was calculated using published methods. All-cause mortality was assessed beginning 9 months post implant; changes in mortality beginning 12 months post implant. Baseline measured impedance predicted all-cause mortality; 5 year mortality for group L was 41%, M was 29%, H was 25%, p < 0.001 among all groups. Changes in measured impedance resulted in a change in the predicted mortality; the prognostic value of measured impedance was additive to the OptiVol fluid index. Conclusions Direct measurements of intrathoracic impedance using an implanted device can be used to stratify patients at varying mortality risk. PMID:26699393

  20. Measurements of acoustic sources in motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrello, L.; Norum, T. D.

    1978-01-01

    Results of the far-field pressures measured from three different types of moving sources are presented. These acoustic sources consist of a point monopole, a small model jet, and an aircraft. Results for the pressure time history produced by the point source show good agreement with those predicted analytically. Both actual and simulated forward motion of the model jet show reductions in noise levels with forward speed at all angles between the source and observer. Measurement with the aircraft over both an anechoic floor and over the ground yields a method for evaluating the transfer function for ground reflections at various angles between the moving aircraft and measurement position.

  1. Measurement of ion diffusion using magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography.

    PubMed

    Hamamura, Mark J; Muftuler, L Tugan; Birgul, Ozlem; Nalcioglu, Orhan

    2006-06-07

    In magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT), currents are applied to an object, the resulting magnetic flux density measured using MRI and the conductivity distribution reconstructed using these MRI data. In this study, we assess the ability of MREIT to monitor changes in the conductivity distribution of an agarose gel phantom, using injected current pulses of 900 microA. The phantom initially contained a distinct region of high sodium chloride concentration which diffused into the background over time. MREIT data were collected over a 12 h span, and conductivity images were reconstructed using the iterative sensitivity matrix method with Tikhonov regularization. The results indicate that MREIT was able to monitor the changing conductivity and concentration distributions resulting from the diffusion of ions within the agarose gel phantom.

  2. Measured acoustic properties of variable and low density bulk absorbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahl, M. D.; Rice, E. J.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental data were taken to determine the acoustic absorbing properties of uniform low density and layered variable density samples using a bulk absober with a perforated plate facing to hold the material in place. In the layered variable density case, the bulk absorber was packed such that the lowest density layer began at the surface of the sample and progressed to higher density layers deeper inside. The samples were placed in a rectangular duct and measurements were taken using the two microphone method. The data were used to calculate specific acoustic impedances and normal incidence absorption coefficients. Results showed that for uniform density samples the absorption coefficient at low frequencies decreased with increasing density and resonances occurred in the absorption coefficient curve at lower densities. These results were confirmed by a model for uniform density bulk absorbers. Results from layered variable density samples showed that low frequency absorption was the highest when the lowest density possible was packed in the first layer near the exposed surface. The layers of increasing density within the sample had the effect of damping the resonances.

  3. Acoustic levitation methods for density measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, E. H.; Hsu, C. J.

    1986-01-01

    The capability of ultrasonic levitators operating in air to perform density measurements has been demonstrated. The remote determination of the density of ordinary liquids as well as low density solid metals can be carried out using levitated samples with size on the order of a few millimeters and at a frequency of 20 kHz. Two basic methods may be used. The first one is derived from a previously known technique developed for acoustic levitation in liquid media, and is based on the static equilibrium position of levitated samples in the earth's gravitational field. The second approach relies on the dynamic interaction between a levitated sample and the acoustic field. The first technique appears more accurate (1 percent uncertainty), but the latter method is directly applicable to a near gravity-free environment such as that found in space.

  4. Perturbation method for the measurement of longitudinal and transverse beam impedance

    SciTech Connect

    Barry, W.; Lambertson, G.R.

    1987-03-01

    A perturbation method utilizing metallic and dielectric spheres to measure longitudinal and transverse beam and pickup impedances in accelerator components is described. The method was used to measure the longitudinal and transverse beam impedances of the 1 to 2 GeV light source beam pipe. In addition, the technique was used to measure the transverse pickup impedance of a 2 GHz cavity type Schottky signal monitor currently being installed in the FNAL Tevatron. Measurement results for both cases are presented.

  5. Hyperaemia evaluation in clinical diathermy by four-electrode impedance measurements.

    PubMed

    Olmi, R; Bini, M; Ignesti, A; Feroldi, P; Spiazzi, L; Bodini, G

    1997-01-01

    The four-electrode electrical impedance measurement technique is proposed for the evaluation of the hyperaemia variation in tissues treated by diathermic therapy. An impedance meter suitable for such measurements is described, and an electrical model of the heated tissues, concerning the impedance variation during diathermy and its relation with hyperaemia, is presented. The occurrence of the substantial contribution of blood to the overall transverse impedance is demonstrated by comparing the experimental results with those arising from a 2D electrical/thermal model of the treated tissues. A two-admittance model is proposed to explain the electrical behaviour of the tissues treated by diathermy. The model allows us to separate the impedance violation due to the temperature dependence of tissue conductivity from that due to the change of tissue blood content. The results of preliminary measurements of tissue impedance on healthy volunteers treated by electromagnetic diathermy are presented and discussed, showing the feasibility of impedance detection of hyperaemia variations inside tissues.

  6. Acoustic Treatment Design Scaling Methods. Volume 4; Numerical Simulation of the Nonlinear Acoustic Impedance of a Perforated Plate Single-Degree-of-Freedom Resonator Using a Time-Domain Finite Difference Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraft, R. E.

    1999-01-01

    Single-degree-of-freedom resonators consisting of honeycomb cells covered by perforated facesheets are widely used as acoustic noise suppression liners in aircraft engine ducts. The acoustic resistance and mass reactance of such liners are known to vary with the intensity of the sound incident upon the panel. Since the pressure drop across a perforated liner facesheet increases quadratically with the flow velocity through the facesheet, this is known as the nonlinear resistance effect. In the past, two different empirical frequency domain models have been used to predict the Sound Pressure Level effect of the incident wave on the perforated liner impedance, one that uses the incident particle velocity in isolated narrowbands, and one that models the particle velocity as the overall velocity. In the absence of grazing flow, neither frequency domain model is entirely accurate in predicting the nonlinear effect that is measured for typical perforated sheets. The time domain model is developed in an attempt to understand and improve the model for the effect of spectral shape and amplitude of multi-frequency incident sound pressure on the liner impedance. A computer code for the time-domain finite difference model is developed and predictions using the models are compared to current frequency-domain models.

  7. Measurements of thermo-acoustic coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pun, Winston

    The problem of combustion instabilities has existed since the early 1940s, when they were observed during the development of solid and liquid rocket engines. While various engineering solutions have served well in these fields, the problem is revisited in modern gas-turbine engines. The purpose of this work is to provide experimental measurements of laboratory devices that exhibit thermo-acoustic coupling, similar to the interaction observed during combustion instabilities, which will aid in the design and development of stable systems. Possibly the simplest device which exhibits these characteristics is a Rijke tube. An electrical, horizontally mounted, 1 m long version of the original Rijke tube is presented, with measurements taken during unstable and stable operation. An accurate stability boundary with uncertainty is determined for a heater position of x/L = ¼, as a function of mass flow rate and heater power. Hysteresis, not previously reported, is observed at flow rates above 3 g/s. A one-dimensional model of the stability boundary with linear acoustics is shown to have qualitative agreement with experimental data. A novel technique has also been devised which can provide insight into the local dynamic response of a flame to an acoustic field. In the experiments, a test chamber is acoustically excited by a pair of low-frequency drivers. The response of the flame is visualized by two techniques; chemiluminescence and planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) of the hydroxyl (OH) radical, both of which are well-known indicators for heat release in flames. The resulting images are phase-resolved and averaged to yield a qualitative picture of the fluctuation of the heat release. The images are correlated with a pressure transducer near the flame, which allows stability to be evaluated using Rayleigh's criterion and a combustion response function. This is the first known measurement of the combustion dynamics of a flame over a range of frequencies. Results

  8. Propagation of sound through the Earth's atmosphere. 1: Measurement of sound absorption in the air: 2: Measurement of ground impedance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meredith, R. W.; Becher, J.

    1981-01-01

    Parts were fabricated for the acoustic ground impedance meter and the instrument was tested. A rubber hose was used to connect the resonator neck to the chamber in order to suppress vibration from the volume velocity source which caused chatter. An analog to digital converter was successfully hardwired to the computer detection system. The cooling system for the resonant tube was modified to use liquid nitrogen cooling. This produced the required temperature for the tube, but the temperature gradients within each of the four tube sections reached unacceptable levels. Final measurements of the deexcitation of nitrogen by water vapor indicate that the responsible physical process is not the direct vibration-translation energy transfer, but is a vibration-vibration energy transfer.

  9. Propagation of sound through the Earth's atmosphere. 1: Measurement of sound absorption in the air: 2: Measurement of ground impedance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meredith, R. W.; Becher, J.

    1981-09-01

    Parts were fabricated for the acoustic ground impedance meter and the instrument was tested. A rubber hose was used to connect the resonator neck to the chamber in order to suppress vibration from the volume velocity source which caused chatter. An analog to digital converter was successfully hardwired to the computer detection system. The cooling system for the resonant tube was modified to use liquid nitrogen cooling. This produced the required temperature for the tube, but the temperature gradients within each of the four tube sections reached unacceptable levels. Final measurements of the deexcitation of nitrogen by water vapor indicate that the responsible physical process is not the direct vibration-translation energy transfer, but is a vibration-vibration energy transfer.

  10. Acoustic measuring techniques for suspended sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruber, P.; Felix, D.; Storti, G.; Lattuada, M.; Fleckenstein, P.; Deschwanden, F.

    2016-11-01

    Acoustic signals can be used in various ways for suspended sediment monitoring. One possibility which lends itself particularly well in the context of hydropower plants (HPPs), is to use installations for acoustic discharge measurement (ADM). Such installations already exist at waterways of many HPPs. Similar to certain turbidimeters, the attenuation of the forward scattered signal travelling through the water-sediment mixture is correlated with suspended sediment concentration (SSC). This correlation can be based on reference SSCs, e.g. from gravimetric analyses of bottle samples. Without the need of additional sensors and practically maintenance-free, this method is used successfully in the HPP Fieschertal to warn the HPP operator of high SSC to prevent excessive turbine abrasion. Acoustic methods and systems that allow for estimating both SSC and particle size distribution (PSD) are under development. The simultaneous determination of SSC and PSD is not possible using a single frequency. Therefore, multi-frequency approaches are investigated for generally scattered signals. When backscattered signals are used, a stronger frequency dependency can be exploited. However, the reliable simultaneous determination of particle size (and distribution) and concentration is still a major challenge due to a low signal-to-noise ratio and an ill- posed problem of estimating concentration and size from recorded signals. The optimal setup configuration (angles, frequencies) for such a system is not unique and further investigations are recommended.

  11. Use of neural networks for prediction of lateral reservoir porosity from seismic acoustic impedance: A case study from Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alamoudi, Waleed Ahmad

    Reservoir porosity controls the strategies for reservoir management. Porosity is the primary key to a reliable reservoir model. The most economic method of evaluating reservoir porosity on a foot-by-foot basis is from core and well log data analysis. Lateral reservoir porosity is estimated using geostatistical method from well log data or from the integration of well log data and seismic data. However, the petroleum industry needs more accurate, reliable methods to estimate porosity from seismic data. Neural network analysis is one of the latest technologies available to the petroleum industry. In this study, I report results of an investigation of the use of neural network to predict lateral reservoir porosity. The approach is based on using average seismic acoustic impedances extracted from a 3D seismic volume to predict lateral average porosity for 13 reservoir geological layers. A neural network was trained using different subsets of well log data from 9 hydrocarbon wells and validated using the reminder of the wells. Data from the Unayzah reservoir in CNR field located in central basin of Saudi Arabia was used in this study. Model-based post-stack seismic inversion was used to produce a seismic acoustic impedance volume. Average impedance maps were then created for 13 layers from the Unayzah reservoir interval in the CNR field. Back-propagation neural network technique successfully estimated lateral reservoir porosity from seismic acoustic impedance and density attributes. The neural network performance using data from 6 wells (C, D, F, G, I, J), more or less distributed along the field axis, provided a better correlation and less scatter than other well training geometries in the testing phase. The A, B, and H wells were used for validation. Goodness of fit was 0.9985. The good neural network prediction in the testing phase reflects the neural network capability to estimate average reservoir porosities. Predicted lateral porosity maps incorporate

  12. [Universal measuring site for the determination of tissue-impedance variations in relation to blood perfusion].

    PubMed

    Tischmeyer, M; Hummel, I; Schilling, K

    1975-01-01

    In view of the importance of impedance plethysmography requirements are formulated for a modern impedance measuring device basing on a long experience with this method of measurement. The principle mode of action of the measuring equipment and the pneumatics with the timing element are described. A number of recordings is shown to illustrate the universality of the measuring equipment.

  13. Using impedance measurements for detecting pathogens trapped in an electric field

    DOEpatents

    Miles, Robin R.

    2004-07-20

    Impedance measurements between the electrodes in an electric field is utilized to detect the presence of pathogens trapped in the electric field. Since particles trapped in a field using the dielectiphoretic force changes the impedance between the electrodes by changing the dielectric material between the electrodes, the degree of particle trapping can be determined by measuring the impedance. This measurement is used to determine if sufficient pathogen have been collected to analyze further or potentially to identify the pathogen.

  14. Measurement and calculation of individual head-related transfer functions using a boundary element model including the measurement and effect of skin and hair impedance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, Brian Fredrick Gray

    1998-12-01

    This research investigates various aspects of the Head- Related Transfer Function (HRTF), which is a description of the acoustic frequency filtering performed by the geometry of the head as a function of incident angle. The effects of this filtering are used in the brain to determine the location of sound sources in space. Initially, various methods for measuring the HRTF are examined, as well as several means of normalizing or equalizing the data. One method is chosen which best represents the informational content of the measured data for comparisons between experimental methods. The question as to whether the acoustic properties of skin and hair contribute to the HRTF is also examined. Measurements are made of the acoustic absorption and impedance of various skin and hair samples using a plane wave tube and two microphones. The limitations of this technique and published standards are also included. Finally, an individual HRTF is calculated using an optically generated surface mesh and a numerical boundary element (BEM) solution. The results of the impedance measurements are included in the calculations. Final analysis consists of comparing the various calculated HRTFs and measured HRTFs. Geometric variations in the head mesh such as removal of the pinna are also included. Good agreement is found given the assumptions made in the generation of the computational model (i.e. lack of torso) throughout the frequency range of the model, which extends from 1-6 kHz. Computational speed and size of the numerical problem limit the work to this region.

  15. An impulse test technique with application to acoustic measurements. [for engine noise absorbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salikuddin, M.; Dean, P. D.; Plumblee, H. E., Jr.; Ahuja, K. K.

    1979-01-01

    A method has been presented for measuring the acoustic properties of an absorbent material and a duct/nozzle system (with or without airflow) using a high voltage spark discharge as an impulse source of sound. The cross-spectra of the incident, reflected and transmitted acoustic pressure transients are analyzed by way of a FFT digital processor in the form of complex transfer functions. These transfer functions have a direct relationship to the termination impedance and radiation directivity. The impulse method has been justified by comparisons, with data obtained from existing methods (both experimental and theoretical), that show excellent agreement. Reflection coefficients and radiation impedances of various duct-nozzle systems and their associated far-field directivities are also presented as some of the applications of the impulse technique.

  16. In-Vivo Electrical Impedance Measurement in Mastoid Bone.

    PubMed

    Wyss Balmer, Thomas; Ansó, Juan; Muntane, Enric; Gavaghan, Kate; Weber, Stefan; Stahel, Andreas; Büchler, Philippe

    2017-04-01

    Nerve monitoring is a safety mechanism to detect the proximity between surgical instruments and important nerves during surgical bone preparation. In temporal bone, this technique is highly specific and sensitive at distances below 0.1 mm, but remains unreliable for distances above this threshold. A deeper understanding of the patient-specific bone electric properties is required to improve this range of detection. A sheep animal model has been used to characterize bone properties in vivo. Impedance measurements have been performed at low frequencies (<1 kHz) between two electrodes placed inside holes drilled into the sheep mastoid bone. An electric circuit composed of a resistor and a Fricke constant phase element was able to accurately describe the experimental measurements. Bone resistivity was shown to be linearly dependent on the inter-electrode distance and the local bone density. Based on this model, the amount of bone material between the electrodes could be predicted with an error of 0.7 mm. Our results indicate that bone could be described as an ideal resistor while the electrochemical processes at the electrode-tissue interface are characterized by a constant phase element. These results should help increasing the safety of surgical drilling procedures by better predicting the distance to critical nerve structures.

  17. A multichannel continuously selectable multifrequency electrical impedance spectroscopy measurement system.

    PubMed

    Hartov, A; Mazzarese, R A; Reiss, F R; Kerner, T E; Osterman, K S; Williams, D B; Paulsen, K D

    2000-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that alterations in the electrical property spectrum of tissues below 10 MHz is diagnostic for tissue pathology and/or pathophysiology. Yet, the complexity associated with constructing a high-fidelity multichannel, multifrequency data acquisition instrument has limited widespread development of spectroscopic electrical impedance imaging concepts. To contribute to the relatively sparse experience with multichannel spectroscopy systems this paper reports on the design, realization and evaluation of a prototype 32-channel instrument. The salient features of the system include a continuously selectable driving frequency up to 1 MHz, either voltage or current source modes of operation and simultaneous measurement of both voltage and current on each channel in either of these driving configurations. Comparisons of performance with recently reported fixed-frequency systems is favorable. Volts dc (VDC) signal-to-noise ratios of 75-80 dB are achieved and the noise floor for ac signals is near 100 dB below the signal strength of interest at 10 kHz and 60 dB down at 1 MHz. The added benefit of being able to record multispectral information on source and sense signal amplitudes and phases has also been realized. Phase-sensitive detection schemes and multiperiod undersampling techniques have been deployed to ensure measurement fidelity over the full bandwidth of system operation.

  18. Acoustics measurements in normal jet impingement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleis, S. J.

    1977-01-01

    The dependence of far field acoustic measurements for a uniform jet on nozzle to plate spacing for small dimensionless spacings (h/d - 0.75 to 3.0) was investigated. Spectra from a real time analyzer were read and processed by an HP 2116 minicomputer in on-line mode. Similar data was generated for a fully developed pipe flow exit condition jet to compare with other investigations. The data base for normal jet impingement was extended to smaller values of nozzle to plate spacing. The effects of slight noise heating (30 deg rise) of the jet on the far field noise produced by the impinging jet are demonstrated.

  19. Impedance Measurement for the Analysis of Corrosion Induced Failures.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-02-01

    for a C-Mn Steel (C1117) in 1 M Na3PO4 , pH=4, T-21 C and in 1.0 M NaHCO3/0.1 M Na CO, T=70 C at controlled potentials with continuous recording of the...Impedance Parameters for C1117 Steel in 1 N Na3PO4 , pH = 4.............................................. 25 IV A.C. Impedance Parameters for Al 7075...CERT with continuous recording of the ac impedance.........................5 2 Anodic potentiodynamic polarization curves for 1008 steel in 1N Na3PO4

  20. Local impedance measurement of an electrode/single-pentacene-grain interface by frequency-modulation scanning impedance microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, Tomoharu; Yamada, Hirofumi; Kobayashi, Kei

    2015-08-07

    The device performances of organic thin film transistors are often limited by the metal–organic interface because of the disordered molecular layers at the interface and the energy barriers against the carrier injection. It is important to study the local impedance at the interface without being affected by the interface morphology. We combined frequency modulation atomic force microscopy with scanning impedance microscopy (SIM) to sensitively measure the ac responses of the interface to an ac voltage applied across the interface and the dc potential drop at the interface. By using the frequency-modulation SIM (FM-SIM) technique, we characterized the interface impedance of a Pt electrode and a single pentacene grain as a parallel circuit of a contact resistance and a capacitance. We found that the reduction of the contact resistance was caused by the reduction of the energy level mismatch at the interface by the FM-SIM measurements, demonstrating the usefulness of the FM-SIM technique for investigation of the local interface impedance without being affected by its morphology.

  1. Flight Acoustics Measurement Techniques and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Preisser, J. S.; Marcolini, M. A.

    1998-01-01

    Careful consideration must be given to data acquisition and analysis techniques in the design of experiments for the measurement of noise generated by flight vehicles. Although noise measurement locations and data reduction procedures are specified for aircraft certification by FAA and ICAO directives, for example, there are virtually no established procedures for aircraft noise measurement for other purposes. To optimize the quality and quantity of information obtained in a flight acoustics experiment, microphone layout, data acquisition, and analysis must be tailored to the specific test objective. This paper will review flight acoustics technology at NASA Langley Research Center developed over the past decade. In particular, the paper will focus on flight experiments performed for three diverse objectives: (1) research applications, such as noise prediction code validation, (2) noise impact modeling, and (3) noise abatement flight procedures. To best achieve these diverse objectives, different deployments of microphone systems on the ground are required, and different data analysis techniques are needed. In all cases, accurate positioning of the aircraft synchronized in time with the data recording is necessary. However, there are some restrictions on flight operations unique to each case for the methods to properly work.

  2. Outdoor synthetic aperture acoustic ground target measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, Steven; Ngaya, Therese-Ann; Vignola, Joe; Judge, John; Marble, Jay; Gugino, Peter; Soumekh, Mehrdad; Rosen, Erik

    2010-04-01

    A novel outdoor synthetic aperture acoustic (SAA) system consists of a microphone and loudspeaker traveling along a 6.3-meter rail system. This is an extension from a prior indoor laboratory measurement system in which selected targets were insonified while suspended in air. Here, the loudspeaker and microphone are aimed perpendicular to their direction of travel along the rail. The area next to the rail is insonified and the microphone records the reflected acoustic signal, while the travel of the transceiver along the rail creates a synthetic aperture allowing imaging of the scene. Ground surfaces consisted of weathered asphalt and short grass. Several surface-laid objects were arranged on the ground for SAA imaging. These included rocks, concrete masonry blocks, grout covered foam blocks; foliage obscured objects and several spherical canonical targets such as a bowling ball, and plastic and metal spheres. The measured data are processed and ground targets are further analyzed for characteristics and features amenable for discrimination. This paper includes a description of the measurement system, target descriptions, synthetic aperture processing approach and preliminary findings with respect to ground surface and target characteristics.

  3. Precision of Four Acoustic Bone Measurement Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Christopher; Feiveson, Alan H.; Shackelford, Linda; Rianon, Nahida; LeBlanc, Adrian

    2000-01-01

    Though many studies have quantified the precision of various acoustic bone measurement devices, it is difficult to directly compare the results among the studies, because they used disparate subject pools, did not specify the estimation methodology, or did not use consistent definitions for various precision characteristics. In this study, we used a repeated measures design protocol to directly determine the precision characteristics of four acoustic bone measurement devices: the Mechanical Response Tissue Analyzer (MRTA), the UBA-575+, the SoundScan 2000 (S2000), and the Sahara Ultrasound Done Analyzer. Ten men and ten women were scanned on all four devices by two different operators at five discrete time points: Week 1, Week 2, Week 3, Month 3 and Month 6. The percent coefficient of variation (%CV) and standardized coefficient of variation were computed for the following precision characteristics: interoperator effect, operator-subject interaction, short-term error variance, and long-term drift, The MRTA had high interoperator errors for its ulnar and tibial stiffness measures and a large long-term drift in its tibial stiffness measurement. The UBA-575+ exhibited large short-term error variances and long-term drift for all three of its measurements. The S2000's tibial speed of sound measurement showed a high short-term error variance and a significant operator-subject interaction but very good values ( < 1%) for the other precision characteristics. The Sahara seemed to have the best overall performance, but was hampered by a large %CV for short-term error variance in its broadband ultrasound attenuation measure.

  4. Precision of Four Acoustic Bone Measurement Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Christopher; Rianon, Nahid; Feiveson, Alan; Shackelford, Linda; LeBlanc, Adrian

    2000-01-01

    Though many studies have quantified the precision of various acoustic bone measurement devices, it is difficult to directly compare the results among the studies, because they used disparate subject pools, did not specify the estimation methodology, or did not use consistent definitions for various precision characteristics. In this study, we used a repeated measures design protocol to directly determine the precision characteristics of four acoustic bone measurement devices: the Mechanical Response Tissue Analyzer (MRTA), the UBA-575+, the SoundScan 2000 (S2000), and the Sahara Ultrasound Bone Analyzer. Ten men and ten women were scanned on all four devices by two different operators at five discrete time points: Week 1, Week 2, Week 3, Month 3 and Month 6. The percent coefficient of variation (%CV) and standardized coefficient of variation were computed for the following precision characteristics: interoperator effect, operator-subject interaction, short-term error variance, and long-term drift. The MRTA had high interoperator errors for its ulnar and tibial stiffness measures and a large long-term drift in its tibial stiffness measurement. The UBA-575+ exhibited large short-term error variances and long-term drift for all three of its measurements. The S2000's tibial speed of sound measurement showed a high short-term error variance and a significant operator-subject interaction but very good values (less than 1%) for the other precision characteristics. The Sahara seemed to have the best overall performance, but was hampered by a large %CV for short-term error variance in its broadband ultrasound attenuation measure.

  5. Precision of Four Acoustic Bone Measurement Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Christopher; Rianon, Nahid; Feiveson, Alan; Shackelford, Linda; LeBlanc, Adrian

    2000-01-01

    Though many studies have quantified the precision of various acoustic bone measurement devices, it is difficult to directly compare the results among the studies, because they used disparate subject pools, did not specify the estimation methodology, or did not use consistent definitions for various precision characteristics. In this study, we used a repeated measures design protocol to directly determine the precision characteristics of four acoustic bone measurement devices: the Mechanical Response Tissue Analyzer (MRTA), the UBA-575+, the SoundScan 2000 (S2000), and the Sahara Ultrasound Bone Analyzer. Ten men and ten women were scanned on all four devices by two different operators at five discrete time points: Week 1, Week 2, Week 3, Month 3 and Month 6. The percent coefficient of variation (%CV) and standardized coefficient of variation were computed for the following precision characteristics: interoperator effect, operator-subject interaction, short-term error variance, and long-term drift. The MRTA had high interoperator errors for its ulnar and tibial stiffness measures and a large long-term drift in its tibial stiffness measurement. The UBA-575+ exhibited large short-term error variances and long-term drift for all three of its measurements. The S2000's tibial speed of sound measurement showed a high short-term error variance and a significant operator-subject interaction but very good values (less than 1%) for the other precision characteristics. The Sahara seemed to have the best overall performance, but was hampered by a large %CV for short-term error variance in its broadband ultrasound attenuation measure.

  6. Longitudinal impedance of capacitive pick-up electrodes: Calculations and comparison with measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Blaskiewicz, M.; Luccio, A.; Ratti, A.; Shea, T.J.

    1992-01-01

    In order to obtain high sensitivity over a broad frequency range, split cylinder capacitive pick-up electrodes have been adopted as the beam position monitors (BPMs) for the AGS booster. Numerical simulation and prototype measurements have been employed to find the coupling impedance of a BPM. The impedance was calculated using the MAFIA computer codes, and measurements were made using a coaxial wire. We found that the measured impedance depended strongly on external electronics, which could not be modeled using the computer code. Additionally, the calculated impedance is a function of beam velocity, which was not studied in the measurements. Only by using both could a reliable bound on the shunt impedance be obtained. We find that the longitudinal impedance of the BPMs is negligible for normal operating conditions in the booster.

  7. Longitudinal impedance of capacitive pick-up electrodes: Calculations and comparison with measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Blaskiewicz, M.; Luccio, A.; Ratti, A.; Shea, T.J.

    1992-09-01

    In order to obtain high sensitivity over a broad frequency range, split cylinder capacitive pick-up electrodes have been adopted as the beam position monitors (BPMs) for the AGS booster. Numerical simulation and prototype measurements have been employed to find the coupling impedance of a BPM. The impedance was calculated using the MAFIA computer codes, and measurements were made using a coaxial wire. We found that the measured impedance depended strongly on external electronics, which could not be modeled using the computer code. Additionally, the calculated impedance is a function of beam velocity, which was not studied in the measurements. Only by using both could a reliable bound on the shunt impedance be obtained. We find that the longitudinal impedance of the BPMs is negligible for normal operating conditions in the booster.

  8. Lorentz force electrical impedance tomography using magnetic field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zengin, Reyhan; Güneri Gençer, Nevzat

    2016-08-01

    In this study, magnetic field measurement technique is investigated to image the electrical conductivity properties of biological tissues using Lorentz forces. This technique is based on electrical current induction using ultrasound together with an applied static magnetic field. The magnetic field intensity generated due to induced currents is measured using two coil configurations, namely, a rectangular loop coil and a novel xy coil pair. A time-varying voltage is picked-up and recorded while the acoustic wave propagates along its path. The forward problem of this imaging modality is defined as calculation of the pick-up voltages due to a given acoustic excitation and known body properties. Firstly, the feasibility of the proposed technique is investigated analytically. The basic field equations governing the behaviour of time-varying electromagnetic fields are presented. Secondly, the general formulation of the partial differential equations for the scalar and magnetic vector potentials are derived. To investigate the feasibility of this technique, numerical studies are conducted using a finite element method based software. To sense the pick-up voltages a novel coil configuration (xy coil pairs) is proposed. Two-dimensional numerical geometry with a 16-element linear phased array (LPA) ultrasonic transducer (1 MHz) and a conductive body (breast fat) with five tumorous tissues is modeled. The static magnetic field is assumed to be 4 Tesla. To understand the performance of the imaging system, the sensitivity matrix is analyzed. The sensitivity matrix is obtained for two different locations of LPA transducer with eleven steering angles from -{{25}\\circ} to {{25}\\circ} at intervals of {{5}\\circ} . The characteristics of the imaging system are shown with the singular value decomposition (SVD) of the sensitivity matrix. The images are reconstructed with the truncated SVD algorithm. The signal-to-noise ratio in measurements is assumed 80 dB. Simulation studies

  9. Theory and cardiac applications of electrical impedance measurements.

    PubMed

    Penney, B C

    1986-01-01

    The methodology of the two-electrode, four-electrode, and guard-ring techniques is presented following a brief history of impedance plethysmography. The theoretical basis for predicting the sampling fields for conductivity and volume changes is presented. Theoretical and experimental studies of the sampling field associated with various electrode arrays are reviewed. With this background, the use of impedance plethysmography for cardiac monitoring and diagnosis is reviewed. The basic methodology is presented and models used to interpret the signal are reviewed. Theoretical and experimental studies of what is sampled are summarized. The accuracy of impedance stroke volume estimates is evaluated by surveying the results of human studies and examining critical animal studies. The usefulness of impedance cardiography for ventricular performance evaluation is also reviewed. Additional uses for cardiopulmonary diagnosis are briefly presented.

  10. A comparison between acoustic mode measurements and acoustic finite element analysis performed for SAAB SF 340

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goeransson, P.; Green, I.

    1986-03-01

    In order to verify an acoustic finite element package, measured and calculated eigenmodes and eigenfrequencies for Saab SF 340 cabin acoustics were compared. The measurements were performed in an acoustic mockup. For the analysis, a two dimensional model of the cross section of the fuselage was used. The comparison shows quite good agreement, the discrepancies being due to the representation of the flexible wall of the fuselage as rigid in the analysis.

  11. A digital measurement of earth fault loop; Impedence using a parameter estimation algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Soliman, S.A. ); Christiansen, G.S.; El-Naggar, K.M. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

    1992-12-01

    In electrical low voltage power system, a neutral earthing is used for protection against electrical shock hazards. Testing of the effectiveness of the earthing system could be achieved by measuring the system fault loop impedance Z. This paper presents a new application of least error squares (LES) parameter estimation algorithm for measurement of earth fault impedance, the proposed method uses the digitized samples of the instantaneous voltage across the fault loop impedance, effects of data window size, sampling rate and the voltage frequency drift on the accuracy of the impedance measurements are studied. Simulated test results are reported in this paper, which form the basis of our conclusion.

  12. Simultaneous Measurement of Nonlinearity and Electrochemical Impedance for Protein Sensing Using Two-Tone Excitation

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Jonathan S.; Anderson, Erik P.; Lee, Thomas H.; Pourmand, Nader

    2009-01-01

    Impedance biosensors detect the binding of a target to an immobilized probe by quantifying changes in the impedance of the electrode-electrolyte interface. The interface's I-V relationship is inherently nonlinear, varying with DC bias, and target binding can alter the degree of nonlinearity. We propose and demonstrate a method to simultaneously measure the nonlinearity and conventional small-signal impedance using intermodulation products from a two-tone input. Intermodulation amplitudes accurately reflect the impedance's manually-measured voltage dependence. We demonstrate that changes in nonlinearity can discriminate protein binding. Our measurements suggest that target binding can alter nonlinearity via the voltage dependence of the ionic double layer. PMID:19164024

  13. Acoustic systems for the measurement of streamflow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laenen, Antonius; Smith, Winchell

    1982-01-01

    Very little information is available concerning acoustic velocity meter (AVM) operation, performance, and limitations. This report provides a better understanding about the application of AVM instrumentation to streamflow measurment. Operational U.S. Geological Survey systems have proven that AVM equipment is accurate and dependable. AVM equipment has no practical upper limit of measureable velocity if sonic transducers are securely placed and adequately protected, and will measure velocitites as low as 0.1 meter per second which is normally less than the threshold level for mechanical or head-loss meters. In some situations the performance of AVM equipment may be degraded by multipath interference, signal bending, signal attenuation, and variable streamline orientation. Smaller, less-expensive, more conveniently operable microprocessor equipment is now available which should increase use of AVM systems in streamflow applications. (USGS)

  14. Kinetic assay of antitrypsin in human serum by a surface acoustic wave(SAW)-impedance sensor.

    PubMed

    Cai, Q; Wei, W; Wang, R; Nie, L; Yao, S

    1996-08-01

    Antitrypsin in human serum was determined by using both the SAW-impedance sensor system and spectrophotometry, indicating that the mean value for women was significantly higher than the mean value for men; the value for acute pancreasis patients is about 2-folds of the normal values, and there is no significant difference between the acute pancreasis patients and the pancreatic cancer patients.

  15. Membrane hydrophone phase characteristics through nonlinear acoustics measurements.

    PubMed

    Bloomfield, Philip E; Gandhi, Gaurav; Lewin, Peter A

    2011-11-01

    This work considers the need for both the amplitude and phase to fully characterize polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membrane hydrophones and presents a comprehensive discussion of the nonlinear acoustic measurements utilized to extract the phase information and the experimental results taken with two widely used PVDF membrane hydrophones up to 100 MHz. A semi-empirical computer model utilized the hyperbolic propagation operator to predict the nonlinear pressure field and provide the complex frequency response of the corresponding source transducer. The PVDF hydrophone phase characteristics, which were obtained directly from the difference between the computer-modeled nonlinear field simulation and the corresponding measured harmonic frequency phase values, agree to within 10% with the phase predictions obtained from receive-transfer-function simulations based on software modeling of the membrane's physical properties. Cable loading effects and membrane hydrophone resonances were distinguished and identified through a series of impedance measurements and receive transfer function simulations on the hydrophones including their hard-wired coaxial cables. The results obtained indicate that the PVDF membrane hydrophone's phase versus frequency plot exhibits oscillations about a monotonically decreasing line. The maxima and minima inflection point slopes occur at the membrane thickness resonances and antiresonances, respectively. A cable resonance was seen at 100 MHz for the hydrophone with a 1-m cable attached, but not seen for the hydrophone with a shorter 0.65-m cable.

  16. Acoustic absorption measurement of human hair and skin within the audible frequency range.

    PubMed

    Katz, B F

    2000-11-01

    Utilizing the two-microphone impedance tube method, the acoustic absorption of human skin and hair is measured in the frequency range 1-6 kHz. Various locations on a number of human subjects are measured to determine if the presence of bone or an air pocket affects the acoustic absorption of human skin. The absorption coefficient of human hair is also measured. Additional techniques are utilized to minimize errors due to sample mounting methods. Techniques are employed to minimize potential errors in sensor and sample locations. The results of these measurements are compared to relevant historical papers on similar investigations. Results for skin measurements compare well with previous work. Measured hair absorption data do not agree with previous work in the area but do coincide with expected trends, which previous works do not.

  17. Measuring impedance in congestive heart failure: Current options and clinical applications

    PubMed Central

    Tang, W. H. Wilson; Tong, Wilson

    2011-01-01

    Measurement of impedance is becoming increasingly available in the clinical setting as a tool for assessing hemodynamics and volume status in patients with heart failure. The 2 major categories of impedance assessment are the band electrode method and the implanted device lead method. The exact sources of the impedance signal are complex and can be influenced by physiologic effects such as blood volume, fluid, and positioning. This article provides a critical review of our current understanding and promises of impedance measurements, the techniques that have evolved, as well as the evidence and limitations regarding their clinical applications in the setting of heart failure management. PMID:19249408

  18. Resin characterization by electro-acoustic measurements.

    PubMed

    Müller, Egbert; Mann, Christian

    2007-03-09

    The electro-acoustic effects, namely the ion vibration potential (IVP) and the colloidal vibration current (CVI), colloidal vibration potential (CVP) first described by P. Debye [P. Debye, J. Chem. Phys. 1 (1933) 13], are a result of charge separation of bound or free ions at different degrees by ultrasonic waves. Today commercial instruments are available to investigate liquid homogeneous and heterogeneous systems. In the present paper the application of this technique for the characterization of salts, protein solutions and resins for biochromatography is shown and valuable information about resins can be derived in a short time. Various resins were investigated with the following results: (1) the CVI magnitude is dependent of several parameters (such as particle size distribution, volume fraction, density difference); (2) the CVI is influenced by the surface modification of the resins. Polymeric modifications decrease the value of CVI. The CVI is generally lower for high capacity resins; (3) the measurement of the electro-acoustic effects can be used to detect small changes in resins. The CVI is dependent of the amount of adsorbed protein in "native" and denatured state.

  19. Acoustic Measurements of Rectangular Nozzles With Bevel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, James E.

    2012-01-01

    A series of convergent rectangular nozzles of aspect ratios 2:1, 4:1, and 8:1 were constructed with uniform exit velocity profiles. Additional nozzles were constructed that extended the wide lip on one side of these nozzles to form beveled nozzles. Far-field acoustic measurements were made and analyzed, and the results presented. The impact of aspect ratio on jet noise was similar to that of enhanced mixing devices: reduction in aft, peak frequency noise with an increase in broadside, high frequency noise. Azimuthally, it was found that rectangular jets produced more noise directed away from their wide sides than from their narrow sides. The azimuthal dependence decreased at aft angles where noise decreased. The effect of temperature, keeping acoustic Mach number constant, was minimal. Since most installations would have the observer on the wide size of the nozzle, the increased high frequency noise has a deleterious impact on the observer. Extending one wide side of the rectangular nozzle, evocative of an aft deck in an installed propulsion system, increased the noise of the jet with increasing length. The impact of both aspect ratio and bevel length were relatively well behaved, allowing a simple bilinear model to be constructed relative to a simple round jet.

  20. Acoustic Measurements of Rectangular Nozzles with Bevel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, James E.

    2012-01-01

    A series of convergent rectangular nozzles of aspect ratios 2:1, 4:1, and 8:1 were constructed with uniform exit velocity profiles. Additional nozzles were constructed that extended the wide lip on one side of these nozzles to form beveled nozzles. Far-field acoustic measurements were made and analyzed, and the results presented. The impact of aspect ratio on jet noise was similar to that of enhanced mixing devices: reduction in aft, peak frequency noise with an increase in broadside, high frequency noise. Azimuthally, it was found that rectangular jets produced more noise directed away from their wide sides than from their narrow sides. The azimuthal dependence decreased at aft angles where noise decreased. The effect of temperature, keeping acoustic Mach number constant, was minimal. Since most installations would have the observer on the wide size of the nozzle, the increased high frequency noise has a deleterious impact on the observer. Extending one wide side of the rectangular nozzle, evocative of an aft deck in an installed propulsion system, increased the noise of the jet with increasing length. The impact of both aspect ratio and bevel length were relatively well behaved, allowing a simple bilinear model to be constructed relative to a simple round jet.

  1. Identification of fluids and an interface between fluids by measuring complex impedance

    DOEpatents

    Lee, David O.; Wayland, Jr., James R.

    1989-01-01

    Complex impedance measured over a predefined frequency range is used to determine the identity of different oils in a column. The location of an interface between the oils is determined from the percent frequency effects of the complex impedance measured across the interface.

  2. Identification of fluids and an interface between fluids by measuring complex impedance

    DOEpatents

    Lee, D.O.; Wayland, J.R. Jr.

    1989-12-05

    Complex impedance measured over a predefined frequency range is used to determine the identity of different oils in a column. The location of an interface between the oils is determined from the percent frequency effects of the complex impedance measured across the interface. 5 figs.

  3. Measurement of acoustical characteristics of mosques in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Abdou, Adel A

    2003-03-01

    The study of mosque acoustics, with regard to acoustical characteristics, sound quality for speech intelligibility, and other applicable acoustic criteria, has been largely neglected. In this study a background as to why mosques are designed as they are and how mosque design is influenced by worship considerations is given. In the study the acoustical characteristics of typically constructed contemporary mosques in Saudi Arabia have been investigated, employing a well-known impulse response. Extensive field measurements were taken in 21 representative mosques of different sizes and architectural features in order to characterize their acoustical quality and to identify the impact of air conditioning, ceiling fans, and sound reinforcement systems on their acoustics. Objective room-acoustic indicators such as reverberation time (RT) and clarity (C50) were measured. Background noise (BN) was assessed with and without the operation of air conditioning and fans. The speech transmission index (STI) was also evaluated with and without the operation of existing sound reinforcement systems. The existence of acoustical deficiencies was confirmed and quantified. The study, in addition to describing mosque acoustics, compares design goals to results obtained in practice and suggests acoustical target values for mosque design. The results show that acoustical quality in the investigated mosques deviates from optimum conditions when unoccupied, but is much better in the occupied condition.

  4. Measurement of acoustical characteristics of mosques in Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdou, Adel A.

    2003-03-01

    The study of mosque acoustics, with regard to acoustical characteristics, sound quality for speech intelligibility, and other applicable acoustic criteria, has been largely neglected. In this study a background as to why mosques are designed as they are and how mosque design is influenced by worship considerations is given. In the study the acoustical characteristics of typically constructed contemporary mosques in Saudi Arabia have been investigated, employing a well-known impulse response. Extensive field measurements were taken in 21 representative mosques of different sizes and architectural features in order to characterize their acoustical quality and to identify the impact of air conditioning, ceiling fans, and sound reinforcement systems on their acoustics. Objective room-acoustic indicators such as reverberation time (RT) and clarity (C50) were measured. Background noise (BN) was assessed with and without the operation of air conditioning and fans. The speech transmission index (STI) was also evaluated with and without the operation of existing sound reinforcement systems. The existence of acoustical deficiencies was confirmed and quantified. The study, in addition to describing mosque acoustics, compares design goals to results obtained in practice and suggests acoustical target values for mosque design. The results show that acoustical quality in the investigated mosques deviates from optimum conditions when unoccupied, but is much better in the occupied condition.

  5. Application of BP neural network in acoustic wave measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Meifeng

    2017-07-01

    Acoustic wave measurement technology is the supporting technology in acoustic wave field. It is important to study acoustic wave with high precision and reliability testing equipment and scientific testing methods. The mathematical model of this acoustic wave measurement system was analyzed on the building of the system. The BP neural network algorithm was used in order to attain the higher accuracy for the acoustic wave measurement system. Frequency domain calibration was carried out by which the amplitude/frequency character curve of this system could be obtained. Then the model of the system was established by BP neural network algorithm. Finally, the validity of the established model was tested. The conclusion was that the math model reflected the original acoustic wave measurement system’s character through the regression result in the frequency domain.

  6. Measuring aeolian sand transport using acoustic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poortinga, Ate; van Rheenen, Hans; Ellis, Jean T.; Sherman, Douglas J.

    2015-03-01

    Acoustic sensors are frequently used to measure aeolian saltation. Different approaches are used to process the signals from these instruments. The goal of this paper is to describe and discuss a method to measure aeolian saltation with acoustic sensors. In a laboratory experiment, we measured the output from an advanced signal processing scheme on the circuit board of the saltiphone. We use a software implementation of this processing scheme to re-analyse data from four miniphones obtained during a field experiment. It is shown that a set of filters remove background noise outside the frequency spectrum of aeolian saltation (at 8 kHz), whereas signals within this frequency spectrum are amplified. The resulting analogue signal is a proxy of the energy. Using an AC pulse convertor, this signal can be converted into a digital and analogue count signal or an analogue energy signal, using a rectifier and integrator. Spatio-temporal correlation between field deployed miniphones increases by using longer integration times for signal processing. To quantify aeolian grain impact, it is suggested to use the analogue energy output, as this mode is able to detect changes in frequency and amplitude. The analogue and digital count signals are able to detect an increase in frequency, but are not able to detect an increase in signal amplitude. We propose a two-stage calibration scheme consisting of (1) a factory calibration, to set the frequency spectrum of the sensor and (2) a standardized drop-test conducted before and after the experiment to evaluate the response of the sensor.

  7. Evaluation for Electrochemical Impedance Measurement of Carbon Nanotube Taste Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Naoki; Hirata, Takamichi; Akiya, Masahiro

    In our laboratory, a nano-bio taste sensor based on carbon nanotubes has been developed. However, previous technique cannot separate elements such as CNT random network or electrode surface etc., because of sensor impedance change in fixed frequency. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) revealed CNT taste sensor with two R/C parallel circuits. Experimental complex plane plots were reproduced using a computer simulation program based upon the lumped equivalent circuit approach. It was found that the sensor has two relaxation times, and also that these circuits consist of two elements such as electrode surface and CNT random network.

  8. Investigation of bacterial biofilm in the human middle ear using optical coherence tomography and acoustic measurements

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Cac T.; Robinson, Sarah R.; Jung, Woonggyu; Novak, Michael A.; Boppart, Stephen A.; Allen, Jont B.

    2013-01-01

    Children with chronic otitis media (OM) often have conductive hearing loss which results in communication difficulties and requires surgical treatment. Recent studies have provided clinical evidence that there is a one-to-one correspondence between chronic OM and the presence of a bacterial biofilm behind the tympanic membrane (TM). Here we investigate the acoustic effects of bacterial biofilms, confirmed using optical coherence tomography (OCT), in adult ears. Non-invasive OCT images are collected to visualize the cross-sectional structure of the middle ear, verifying the presence of a biofilm behind the TM. Wideband measurements of acoustic reflectance and impedance (0.2 to 6 [kHz]) are used to study the acoustic properties of ears with confirmed bacterial biofilms. Compared to known acoustic properties of normal middle ears, each of the ears with a bacterial biofilm has an elevated power reflectance in the 1 to 3 [kHz] range, corresponding to an abnormally small resistance (real part of the impedance). These results provide assistance for the clinical diagnosis of a bacterial biofilm, which could lead to improved treatment of chronic middle ear infection and further understanding of the impact of chronic OM on conductive hearing loss. PMID:23588039

  9. Measuring Acoustic Nonlinearity by Collinear Mixing Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, M.; Tang, G.; Jacobs, L. J.; Qu, J.

    2011-06-01

    It is well known that the acoustic nonlinearity parameter β is correlated to fatigue damage in metallic materials. Various methods have been developed to measure β. One of the most often used methods is the harmonic generation technique, in which β is obtained by measuring the magnitude of the second order harmonic waves. An inherent weakness of this method is the difficulty in distinguishing material nonlinearity from the nonlinearity of the measurement system. In this paper, we demonstrate the possibility of using collinear mixing waves to measure β. The wave mixing method is based on the interaction between two incident waves in a nonlinear medium. Under certain conditions, such interactions generate a third wave of different frequency. This generated third wave is also called resonant wave, because its amplitude is unbounded if the medium has no attenuation. Such resonant waves are less sensitive to the nonlinearity of the measurement system, and have the potential to identify the source location of the nonlinearity. In this work, we used a longitudinal wave and a shear wave as the incident waves. The resonant shear wave is measured experimentally on samples made of aluminum and steel, respectively. Numerical simulations of the tests were also performed using a finite difference method.

  10. Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Tests Instrumentation for Acoustic and Pressure Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargas, Magda B.; Counter, Douglas D.

    2011-01-01

    The Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) was a development test performed at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) East Test Area (ETA) Test Stand 116. The test article included a 5% scale Ares I vehicle model and tower mounted on the Mobile Launcher. Acoustic and pressure data were measured by approximately 200 instruments located throughout the test article. There were four primary ASMAT instrument suites: ignition overpressure (IOP), lift-off acoustics (LOA), ground acoustics (GA), and spatial correlation (SC). Each instrumentation suite incorporated different sensor models which were selected based upon measurement requirements. These requirements included the type of measurement, exposure to the environment, instrumentation check-outs and data acquisition. The sensors were attached to the test article using different mounts and brackets dependent upon the location of the sensor. This presentation addresses the observed effect of the sensors and mounts on the acoustic and pressure measurements.

  11. Extreme Low Frequency Acoustic Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shams, Qamar A. (Inventor); Zuckerwar, Allan J. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    The present invention is an extremely low frequency (ELF) microphone and acoustic measurement system capable of infrasound detection in a portable and easily deployable form factor. In one embodiment of the invention, an extremely low frequency electret microphone comprises a membrane, a backplate, and a backchamber. The backchamber is sealed to allow substantially no air exchange between the backchamber and outside the microphone. Compliance of the membrane may be less than ambient air compliance. The backplate may define a plurality of holes and a slot may be defined between an outer diameter of the backplate and an inner wall of the microphone. The locations and sizes of the holes, the size of the slot, and the volume of the backchamber may be selected such that membrane motion is substantially critically damped.

  12. Extreme low frequency acoustic measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shams, Qamar A. (Inventor); Zuckerwar, Allan J. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention is an extremely low frequency (ELF) microphone and acoustic measurement system capable of infrasound detection in a portable and easily deployable form factor. In one embodiment of the invention, an extremely low frequency electret microphone comprises a membrane, a backplate, and a backchamber. The backchamber is sealed to allow substantially no air exchange between the backchamber and outside the microphone. Compliance of the membrane may be less than ambient air compliance. The backplate may define a plurality of holes and a slot may be defined between an outer diameter of the backplate and an inner wall of the microphone. The locations and sizes of the holes, the size of the slot, and the volume of the backchamber may be selected such that membrane motion is substantially critically damped.

  13. Pediatric applications of wideband acoustic immittance measures.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Lisa L; Prieve, Beth A; Kei, Joseph; Sanford, Chris A

    2013-07-01

    Wideband acoustic immittance (WAI) measures have potential capability to improve newborn hearing screening outcomes and middle ear diagnosis for infants and children. To fully capitalize on these immittance measures for pediatric hearing care, developmental and pathologic effects need to be fully understood. Published literature on wideband immittance (reflectance, absorbance, tympanometry, and acoustic reflexes) is reviewed in this article to determine pathologic effects in newborns, infants, and children relative to standard audiologic tests such as otoacoustic emissions (OAEs), standard tympanometry, air and bone conduction auditory brainstem response, and otoscopy. Infants and children with surgically confirmed otitis media with effusion have lower absorbance in the mid-frequency range (1 to 3 kHz) for the affected ear(s). Newborns that do not pass OAE screening at birth also have lower absorbance for frequencies from 1 to 3 kHz, suggesting that nonpass results are frequently associated with middle ear issues at birth. In Newborn Hearing Screening Programs, WAI may help to interpret hearing screening results. Conclusions are limited by the fact that the true status of the middle ear and cochlea are not known for newborns and infants in studies that use OAE or tympanometry as the reference standard. Likelihood ratios for reflectance against surgery gold standards range from diagnostically suggestive to informative. Although some of the results are promising, limited evidence and methodological considerations restrict the conclusions that can be drawn regarding the diagnostic accuracy of WAI technologies in infants and children. Additional investigations using stronger gold standard comparisons are needed to determine which tools can most accurately predict middle ear status in the pediatric population.

  14. Focused impedance measurement (FIM). A new technique with improved zone localization.

    PubMed

    Rabbani, K S; Sarker, M; Akond, M H; Akter, T

    1999-04-20

    Conventional four-electrode impedance measurements (FEIM) cannot localize a zone of interest in a volume conductor. On the other hand, the recently developed electrical impedance tomography (EIT) system offers an image with reasonable resolution, but is complex and needs many electrodes. By placing two FEIM systems perpendicular to each other over a common zone at the center and combining the two results, it is possible to obtain enhanced sensitivity over this central zone. This is the basis of the proposed new method of focused impedance measurement (FIM). Sensitivity maps in both 2D and 3D show the desired improvement. A comparison of stomach-emptying studies also indicates the improvement achieved. This new method may be useful for impedance measurements of large organs like stomach, heart, and lungs. Being much simpler in comparison to EIT, multifrequency systems can be simply built for FIM. Besides, FIM may have utility in other fields like geology where impedance measurements are performed.

  15. Outdoor Synthetic Aperture Acoustic Ground Target Measurements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-19

    1341 (2003). [11] C. A. Dimarzio, T. Shi, F. J. Blonigen et al., “ Laser -Induced Acoustic Landmine Detection,” The Journal Of The Acoustical Society...High Frequency A/S Coupling For Ap Buried Landmine Detection Using Laser Doppler Vibrometers,” Proc. SPIE 5415(1), 35-41 (2004). [16] Bishop, S... Dolphin Echolocation Clicks For Target Discrimination,” The Journal Of The Acoustical Society Of America 124(1), 657-666 (2008). [20] Y. Nakamura

  16. Electron density dependence of impedance probe plasma potential measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, D. N.; Blackwell, D. D.; Amatucci, W. E.

    2015-08-15

    In earlier works, we used spheres of various sizes as impedance probes in demonstrating a method of determining plasma potential, φ{sub p}, when the probe radius is much larger than the Debye length, λ{sub D}. The basis of the method in those works [Walker et al., Phys. Plasmas 13, 032108 (2006); ibid. 15, 123506 (2008); ibid. 17, 113503 (2010)] relies on applying a small amplitude signal of fixed frequency to a probe in a plasma and, through network analyzer-based measurements, determining the complex reflection coefficient, Γ, for varying probe bias, V{sub b}. The frequency range of the applied signal is restricted to avoid sheath resonant effects and ion contributions such that ω{sub pi} ≪ ω ≪ ω{sub pe}, where ω{sub pi} is the ion plasma frequency and ω{sub pe} is the electron plasma frequency. For a given frequency and applied bias, both Re(Z{sub ac}) and Im(Z{sub ac}) are available from Γ. When Re(Z{sub ac}) is plotted versus V{sub b}, a minimum predicted by theory occurs at φ{sub p} [Walker et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 113503 (2010)]. In addition, Im(Z{sub ac}) appears at, or very near, a maximum at φ{sub p}. As n{sub e} decreases and the sheath expands, the minimum becomes harder to discern. The purpose of this work is to demonstrate that when using network analyzer-based measurements, Γ itself and Im(Z{sub ac}) and their derivatives are useful as accompanying indicators to Re(Z{sub ac}) in these difficult cases. We note the difficulties encountered by the most commonly used plasma diagnostic, the Langmuir probe. Spherical probe data is mainly used in this work, although we present limited data for a cylinder and a disk. To demonstrate the effect of lowered density as a function of probe geometry, we compare the cylinder and disk using only the indicator Re(Z{sub ac})

  17. A model for the acoustic impedance of a perforated plate liner with multiple frequency excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, E. J.

    1971-01-01

    A nonlinear resistance model is used in the one-dimensional equations of motion with an arbitrary exciting pressure function. The effects of high amplitude fluid motion, grazing flow, and spectral excitation can be studied together. Sample calculations of acoustic resistances are presented using a high amplitude discrete tone superimposed upon a simulated white noise spectrum. The tone amplitude is varied and its effect is shown both with and without a grazing flow velocity.

  18. [Effect of increase and decrease of measurement voltage on skin impedance].

    PubMed

    Wu, B; Hu, X; Xu, J

    1993-01-01

    The skin impedance has been used as an index to plot out the meridian courses. In most of this kind of methods during measurement voltage was necessary to deliver to the subject's skin. It is unknown whether increasing the measuring voltage can change non-low skin impedance points (non-LSIP) into low skin impedance points (LSIP). In order to clarify the problem, we made an investigation on the effect of increasing and decreasing the measuring voltage on skin impedance. Subjects under observation were 12 healthy volunteers. On the medial side of forearm two levels were selected for measurement. Four or twenty non-LISP were observed on each level. The measuring system worked on the basis of bioelectrode method. The measurement and data processing were controlled by microcomputer. During measurement impedance of LSIP decreased correspondingly with the increase of voltage and vice versa, but the value of impedance was not exceeded 100k omega in spite of increasing or decreasing the voltage. That is, low impedance is the inherent characteristics of LSIP. On the contrary, the impedance of non-LSIP remained in higher than 600k omega in most of cases during increasing voltage from 10 to 50v. As the voltage increased to 65v, the impedance in a part of non-LSIP decreased to such a low level as LSIP. However, their impedance increased rapidly to high level again once the measuring voltage decreased. The above results reveal that the response of non-LSIPs and LSIPs were different from each other in nature. Increasing the voltage could not change a non-LSIP into LSIP.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Hybrid system for magnetic and acoustic measurement.

    PubMed

    Bruno, A C; Baffa, O; Carneiro, A O

    2009-01-01

    In order to improve the spatial resolution of Biosusceptometry of Alternate Current (BAC), we are suggesting the coupling of a Doppler ultrasonic transducer with the BAC system. The Doppler transducer obtains information from the vibration of ferromagnetic particles immersed in a visco-elastic medium when it is excited by an alternating magnetic field. In this case, the same magnetic particles used as contrast for susceptometric measurement also will work as contrast for the Doppler measurement. In this work, we present the characterization of the hybrid system for susceptometric and acoustic measurements simultaneously. It was observed that the susceptometric and Doppler ultrasound signal have the same profile and maximum amplitude for frequency of magnetizing field about 200 Hz. When using ferrite particles as magnetic contrast mixed with yogurt as based material, the susceptometric and Doppler measurement have sensitivity for concentration of particles as low as 1%. The sensitivity of the Doppler is dependent of the gradient of magnetic field over the sample. In this work, the magnetic field 5 cm far from the face of the transducer was 70 microT/volts.

  20. Cosmological implications of baryon acoustic oscillation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubourg, Éric; Bailey, Stephen; Bautista, Julian E.; Beutler, Florian; Bhardwaj, Vaishali; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Blanton, Michael; Blomqvist, Michael; Bolton, Adam S.; Bovy, Jo; Brewington, Howard; Brinkmann, J.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Burden, Angela; Busca, Nicolás G.; Carithers, William; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Comparat, Johan; Croft, Rupert A. C.; Cuesta, Antonio J.; Dawson, Kyle S.; Delubac, Timothée; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Ge, Jian; Le Goff, J.-M.; Gontcho, Satya Gontcho A.; Gott, J. Richard; Gunn, James E.; Guo, Hong; Guy, Julien; Hamilton, Jean-Christophe; Ho, Shirley; Honscheid, Klaus; Howlett, Cullan; Kirkby, David; Kitaura, Francisco S.; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Lee, Khee-Gan; Long, Dan; Lupton, Robert H.; Magaña, Mariana Vargas; Malanushenko, Viktor; Malanushenko, Elena; Manera, Marc; Maraston, Claudia; Margala, Daniel; McBride, Cameron K.; Miralda-Escudé, Jordi; Myers, Adam D.; Nichol, Robert C.; Noterdaeme, Pasquier; Nuza, Sebastián E.; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Oravetz, Daniel; Pâris, Isabelle; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Pan, Kaike; Pellejero-Ibanez, Marcos; Percival, Will J.; Petitjean, Patrick; Pieri, Matthew M.; Prada, Francisco; Reid, Beth; Rich, James; Roe, Natalie A.; Ross, Ashley J.; Ross, Nicholas P.; Rossi, Graziano; Rubiño-Martín, Jose Alberto; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Samushia, Lado; Génova-Santos, Ricardo Tanausú; Scóccola, Claudia G.; Schlegel, David J.; Schneider, Donald P.; Seo, Hee-Jong; Sheldon, Erin; Simmons, Audrey; Skibba, Ramin A.; Slosar, Anže; Strauss, Michael A.; Thomas, Daniel; Tinker, Jeremy L.; Tojeiro, Rita; Vazquez, Jose Alberto; Viel, Matteo; Wake, David A.; Weaver, Benjamin A.; Weinberg, David H.; Wood-Vasey, W. M.; Yèche, Christophe; Zehavi, Idit; Zhao, Gong-Bo; BOSS Collaboration

    2015-12-01

    We derive constraints on cosmological parameters and tests of dark energy models from the combination of baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) measurements with cosmic microwave background (CMB) data and a recent reanalysis of Type Ia supernova (SN) data. In particular, we take advantage of high-precision BAO measurements from galaxy clustering and the Lyman-α forest (LyaF) in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). Treating the BAO scale as an uncalibrated standard ruler, BAO data alone yield a high confidence detection of dark energy; in combination with the CMB angular acoustic scale they further imply a nearly flat universe. Adding the CMB-calibrated physical scale of the sound horizon, the combination of BAO and SN data into an "inverse distance ladder" yields a measurement of H0=67.3 ±1.1 km s-1 Mpc-1 , with 1.7% precision. This measurement assumes standard prerecombination physics but is insensitive to assumptions about dark energy or space curvature, so agreement with CMB-based estimates that assume a flat Λ CDM cosmology is an important corroboration of this minimal cosmological model. For constant dark energy (Λ ), our BAO +SN +CMB combination yields matter density Ωm=0.301 ±0.008 and curvature Ωk=-0.003 ±0.003 . When we allow more general forms of evolving dark energy, the BAO +SN +CMB parameter constraints are always consistent with flat Λ CDM values at ≈1 σ . While the overall χ2 of model fits is satisfactory, the LyaF BAO measurements are in moderate (2 - 2.5 σ ) tension with model predictions. Models with early dark energy that tracks the dominant energy component at high redshift remain consistent with our expansion history constraints, and they yield a higher H0 and lower matter clustering amplitude, improving agreement with some low redshift observations. Expansion history alone yields an upper limit on the summed mass of neutrino species, ∑mν<0.56 eV (95% confidence), improving to ∑mν<0.25 eV if we include the

  1. Thick Films acoustic sensors devoted to MTR environment measurements. Thick Films acoustic sensors devoted to Material Testing Reactor environment measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Very, F.; Rosenkrantz, E.; Combette, P.; Ferrandis, J.Y.; Fourmentel, D.; Destouches, C.; Villard, J.F.

    2015-07-01

    The development of advanced instrumentation for in-pile experiments in Material Testing Reactor constitutes a main goal for the improvement of the nuclear fuel behavior knowledge. An acoustic method for fission gas release detection was tested with success during a first experiment called REMORA 3 in 2010 and 2011, and the results were used to differentiate helium and fission gas release kinetics under transient operating conditions. This experiment was lead at OSIRIS reactor (CEA Saclay, France). The maximal temperature on the sensor during the irradiation was about 150 deg. C. In this paper we present a thick film transducer produce by screen printing process. The screen printing of piezoelectric offers a wide range of possible applications for the development of acoustic sensors and piezoelectric structure for measurements in high temperature environment. We firstly produced a Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT) based paste composed of Pz27 powder from Ferroperm, CF7575 glass, and organic solvent ESL 400. Likewise a Bismuth Titanate based paste synthesized in our laboratory was produced. With these inks we produced thick film up to 130 μm by screen printing process. Material properties characterizations of these thick-film resonators are essential for device design and applications. The piezoelectric coefficients d33 and pyro-electric P(T) coefficient are investigated. The highest P(T) and d33 are respectively 80 μC.m{sup -2}.K{sup -1} and 130 μC.N{sup -1} for the PZT transducer -which validates the fabrication process-. In view of the development of this transducer oriented for high temperature and irradiation environment, we investigated the electrical properties of the transducers for different ranges of frequencies and temperature - from 20 Hz up to 40 MHz between 30 and 400 deg. C. We highlight the evolution of the impedance response and piezoelectric parameters of screen printed piezoelectric structures on alumina. Shortly an irradiation will be realized in

  2. Nondestructive Determination of Moisture Content in Dry Fruits by Impedance and Phase angle measurements

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Impedance (Z), and phase angle (') of a cylindrical parallel-plate capacitor with dry fruits between the plates was measured using a CI meter (Chari’s Impedance meter), at 1 and 9 MHz . Capacitance, C was derived from Z and ', and using the C, ', and Z values of a set of cherries whose moisture con...

  3. Accurate position estimation methods based on electrical impedance tomography measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergara, Samuel; Sbarbaro, Daniel; Johansen, T. A.

    2017-08-01

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is a technology that estimates the electrical properties of a body or a cross section. Its main advantages are its non-invasiveness, low cost and operation free of radiation. The estimation of the conductivity field leads to low resolution images compared with other technologies, and high computational cost. However, in many applications the target information lies in a low intrinsic dimensionality of the conductivity field. The estimation of this low-dimensional information is addressed in this work. It proposes optimization-based and data-driven approaches for estimating this low-dimensional information. The accuracy of the results obtained with these approaches depends on modelling and experimental conditions. Optimization approaches are sensitive to model discretization, type of cost function and searching algorithms. Data-driven methods are sensitive to the assumed model structure and the data set used for parameter estimation. The system configuration and experimental conditions, such as number of electrodes and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), also have an impact on the results. In order to illustrate the effects of all these factors, the position estimation of a circular anomaly is addressed. Optimization methods based on weighted error cost functions and derivate-free optimization algorithms provided the best results. Data-driven approaches based on linear models provided, in this case, good estimates, but the use of nonlinear models enhanced the estimation accuracy. The results obtained by optimization-based algorithms were less sensitive to experimental conditions, such as number of electrodes and SNR, than data-driven approaches. Position estimation mean squared errors for simulation and experimental conditions were more than twice for the optimization-based approaches compared with the data-driven ones. The experimental position estimation mean squared error of the data-driven models using a 16-electrode setup was less

  4. Method and means for measuring acoustic emissions

    DOEpatents

    Renken, Jr., Claus J.

    1976-01-06

    The detection of acoustic emissions emanating from an object is achieved with a capacitive transducer coupled to the object. The capacitive transducer is charged and then allowed to discharge with the rate of discharge being monitored. Oscillations in the rate of discharge about the normally exponential discharge curve for the capacitive transducer indicate the presence of acoustic emissions.

  5. Acoustic systems for the measurement of streamflow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laenen, Antonius; Smith, Winchell

    1983-01-01

    The acoustic velocity meter (AVM), also referred to as an ultrasonic flowmeter, has been an operational tool for the measurement of streamflow since 1965. Very little information is available concerning AVM operation, performance, and limitations. The purpose of this report is to consolidate information in such a manner as to provide a better understanding about the application of this instrumentation to streamflow measurement. AVM instrumentation is highly accurate and nonmechanical. Most commercial AVM systems that measure streamflow use the time-of-travel method to determine a velocity between two points. The systems operate on the principle that point-to-point upstream travel-time of sound is longer than the downstream travel-time, and this difference can be monitored and measured accurately by electronics. AVM equipment has no practical upper limit of measurable velocity if sonic transducers are securely placed and adequately protected. AVM systems used in streamflow measurement generally operate with a resolution of ?0.01 meter per second but this is dependent on system frequency, path length, and signal attenuation. In some applications the performance of AVM equipment may be degraded by multipath interference, signal bending, signal attenuation, and variable streamline orientation. Presently used minicomputer systems, although expensive to purchase and maintain, perform well. Increased use of AVM systems probably will be realized as smaller, less expensive, and more conveniently operable microprocessor-based systems become readily available. Available AVM equipment should be capable of flow measurement in a wide variety of situations heretofore untried. New signal-detection techniques and communication linkages can provide additional flexibility to the systems so that operation is possible in more river and estuary situations.

  6. A spherically-shaped PZT thin film ultrasonic transducer with an acoustic impedance gradient matching layer based on a micromachined periodically structured flexible substrate.

    PubMed

    Feng, Guo-Hua; Liu, Wei-Fan

    2013-10-09

    This paper presents the microfabrication of an acoustic impedance gradient matching layer on a spherically-shaped piezoelectric ultrasonic transducer. The acoustic matching layer can be designed to achieve higher acoustic energy transmission and operating bandwidth. Also included in this paper are a theoretical analysis of the device design and a micromachining technique to produce the novel transducer. Based on a design of a lead titanium zirconium (PZT) micropillar array, the constructed gradient acoustic matching layer has much better acoustic transmission efficiency within a 20-50 MHz operation range compared to a matching layer with a conventional quarter-wavelength thickness Parylene deposition. To construct the transducer, periodic microcavities are built on a flexible copper sheet, and then the sheet forms a designed curvature with a ball shaping. After PZT slurry deposition, the constructed PZT micropillar array is released onto a curved thin PZT layer. Following Parylene conformal coating on the processed PZT micropillars, the PZT micropillars and the surrounding Parylene comprise a matching layer with gradient acoustic impedance. By using the proposed technique, the fabricated transducer achieves a center frequency of 26 MHz and a -6 dB bandwidth of approximately 65%.

  7. A Spherically-Shaped PZT Thin Film Ultrasonic Transducer with an Acoustic Impedance Gradient Matching Layer Based on a Micromachined Periodically Structured Flexible Substrate

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Guo-Hua; Liu, Wei-Fan

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the microfabrication of an acoustic impedance gradient matching layer on a spherically-shaped piezoelectric ultrasonic transducer. The acoustic matching layer can be designed to achieve higher acoustic energy transmission and operating bandwidth. Also included in this paper are a theoretical analysis of the device design and a micromachining technique to produce the novel transducer. Based on a design of a lead titanium zirconium (PZT) micropillar array, the constructed gradient acoustic matching layer has much better acoustic transmission efficiency within a 20–50 MHz operation range compared to a matching layer with a conventional quarter-wavelength thickness Parylene deposition. To construct the transducer, periodic microcavities are built on a flexible copper sheet, and then the sheet forms a designed curvature with a ball shaping. After PZT slurry deposition, the constructed PZT micropillar array is released onto a curved thin PZT layer. Following Parylene conformal coating on the processed PZT micropillars, the PZT micropillars and the surrounding Parylene comprise a matching layer with gradient acoustic impedance. By using the proposed technique, the fabricated transducer achieves a center frequency of 26 MHz and a −6 dB bandwidth of approximately 65%. PMID:24113683

  8. Insulator-based DEP with impedance measurements for analyte detection

    DOEpatents

    Davalos, Rafael V.; Simmons, Blake A.; Crocker, Robert W.; Cummings, Eric B.

    2010-03-16

    Disclosed herein are microfluidic devices for assaying at least one analyte specie in a sample comprising at least one analyte concentration area in a microchannel having insulating structures on or in at least one wall of the microchannel which provide a nonuniform electric field in the presence of an electric field provided by off-chip electrodes; and a pair of passivated sensing electrodes for impedance detection in a detection area. Also disclosed are assay methods and methods of making.

  9. Local transverse coupling impedance measurements in a synchrotron light source from turn-by-turn acquisitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlà, Michele; Benedetti, Gabriele; Günzel, Thomas; Iriso, Ubaldo; Martí, Zeus

    2016-12-01

    Transverse beam coupling impedance is a source of beam instabilities that limits the machine performance in circular accelerators. Several beam based techniques have been used to measure the transverse impedance of an accelerator, usually based on the optics distortion produced by the impedance source itself. Beam position monitor turn-by-turn analysis for impedance characterization has been usually employed in large circumference machines, while synchrotron light sources have mainly used slow orbit based techniques. Instead, the work presented in this paper uses for the first time turn-by-turn data at ALBA to advance the measurement technique into the range of the typically small impedance values of modern light sources. We have measured local impedance contributions through the observation of phase advance versus bunch charge using the betatron oscillations excited with a fast dipole kicker. The ALBA beam position monitor system and the precision of the turn-by-turn analysis allowed to characterize the main sources of transverse impedance, in good agreement with the model values, including the impedance of an in-vacuum undulator.

  10. Anisotropy of human muscle via non invasive impedance measurements. Frequency dependence of the impedance changes during isometric contractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashuri, Hektor

    In this thesis we present non invasive muscle impedance measurements using rotatable probes extending the work done by Aaron et al. (1997) by measuring not only the real part of the impedance but the imaginary part as well. The results reveal orientations of underlying muscle fibers via minima in resistance and reactance versus angle curves, suggesting this method as potentially useful for studying muscle properties in clinical and physiological research. Calculations of the current distribution for a slab of material with anisotropic conductivity show that the current distribution depends strongly on the separation of two current electrodes and as well as on its conducting anisotropy. Forearm muscle impedance measurements at 50 kHz done by Shiffman et al. (2003) had shown that both resistance (R) and reactance (X) increase during isometric contraction. We have extended these measurements in the 3 to 100 kHz range and we found that resistance (R) and reactance (X) both increase and their changes increased or decreased at frequency dependent rates. Analysis based on circuit models of changes in R and X during the short contraction pulses showed that the extra cellular fluid resistance increased by 3.9 +/- 1.4 %, while the capacitance increased by 5.6 +/- 2 %. For long contraction pulses at very low frequencies: (1) there was practically no change in R during contraction, which implies that these changes are due to cellular membrane or intracellular effects with the extra cellular water component not participating, and (2) in post contraction stage there were no morphological changes which means that drifts in R can only be due to physiological changes. Following Shiffman et al. (2003) we measured impedance changes of R and X during a triangular shaped pulse of force generated via isometric forearm muscle contraction at 50 kHz. We measured these changes in 3-100 kHz frequency range for a stair case pulse of forces and the results showed that they are frequency

  11. In situ measurement of tissue impedance using an inductive coupling interface circuit.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Hung-Wei; Chuang, Jia-min; Lu, Chien-Chi; Lin, Wei-Tso; Lin, Chii-Wann; Lin, Mu-Lien

    2013-06-01

    In this work, a method of an inductive coupling impedance measurement (ICIM) is proposed for measuring the nerve impedance of a dorsal root ganglion (DRG) under PRF stimulation. ICIM provides a contactless interface for measuring the reflected impedance by an impedance analyzer with a low excitation voltage of 7 mV. The paper develops a calibration procedure involving a 50-Ω reference resistor to calibrate the reflected resistance for measuring resistance of the nerve in the test. A de-embedding technique to build the equivalent transformer circuit model for the ICIM circuit is also presented. A batteryless PRF stimulator with ICIM circuit demonstrated good accuracy for the acute measurement of DRG impedance both in situ and in vivo. Besides, an in vivo animal experiment was conducted to show that the effectiveness of pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) stimulation in relieving pain gradually declined as the impedance of the stimulated nerve increased. The experiment also revealed that the excitation voltage for measuring impedance below 25 mV can prevent the excitation of a nonlinear response of DRG.

  12. Field Measurement of the Acoustic Nonlinearity Parameter in Turbine Blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinton, Yolanda L.; Na, Jeong K.; Yost, William T.; Kessel, Gregory L.

    2000-01-01

    Nonlinear acoustics techniques were used to measure fatigue in turbine blades in a power generation plant. The measurements were made in the field using a reference based measurement technique, and a reference sample previously measured in the laboratory. The acoustic nonlinearity parameter showed significant increase with fatigue in the blades, as indicated by service age and areas of increased stress. The technique shows promise for effectively measuring fatigue in field applications and predicting subsequent failures.

  13. Coupling impedance of an in-vacuum undulator. Measurement, simulation, and analytical estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Simaluk, Victor; Blednykh, Alexei; Fielder, Richard; Rehm, Guenther; Bartolini, Riccardo

    2014-07-25

    One of the important issues of the in-vacuum undulator design is the coupling impedance of the vacuum chamber, which includes tapered transitions with variable gap size. In order to get complete and reliable information on the impedance, analytical estimate, numerical simulations and beam-based measurements have been performed at Diamond Light Source, a forthcoming upgrade of which includes introducing additional insertion device (ID) straights. Moreover, the impedance of an already existing ID vessel geometrically similar to the new one has been measured using the orbit bump method. The measurement results in comparison with analytical estimations and numerical simulations are discussed in this paper.

  14. Skin-electrode impedance measurement during ECG acquisition: method’s validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casal, Leonardo; La Mura, Guillermo

    2016-04-01

    Skm-electrode impedance measurement can provide valuable information prior. dunng and post electrocardiographic (ECG) or electroencephalographs (EEG) acquisitions. In this work we validate a method for skm-electrode impedance measurement using test circuits with known resistance and capacitor values, at different frequencies for injected excitation current. Finally the method is successfully used for impedance measurement during ECG acquisition on a subject usmg 125 Hz and 6 nA square wave excitation signal at instrumentation amplifier mput. The method can be used for many electrodes configuration.

  15. Coupling impedance of an in-vacuum undulator: Measurement, simulation, and analytical estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smaluk, Victor; Fielder, Richard; Blednykh, Alexei; Rehm, Guenther; Bartolini, Riccardo

    2014-07-01

    One of the important issues of the in-vacuum undulator design is the coupling impedance of the vacuum chamber, which includes tapered transitions with variable gap size. To get complete and reliable information on the impedance, analytical estimate, numerical simulations and beam-based measurements have been performed at Diamond Light Source, a forthcoming upgrade of which includes introducing additional insertion device (ID) straights. The impedance of an already existing ID vessel geometrically similar to the new one has been measured using the orbit bump method. The measurement results in comparison with analytical estimations and numerical simulations are discussed in this paper.

  16. Microelectrical Impedance Spectroscopy for the Differentiation between Normal and Cancerous Human Urothelial Cell Lines: Real-Time Electrical Impedance Measurement at an Optimal Frequency

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yangkyu; Kim, Hyeon Woo; Yun, Joho; Seo, Seungwan; Park, Chang-Ju; Lee, Jeong Zoo; Lee, Jong-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To distinguish between normal (SV-HUC-1) and cancerous (TCCSUP) human urothelial cell lines using microelectrical impedance spectroscopy (μEIS). Materials and Methods. Two types of μEIS devices were designed and used in combination to measure the impedance of SV-HUC-1 and TCCSUP cells flowing through the channels of the devices. The first device (μEIS-OF) was designed to determine the optimal frequency at which the impedance of two cell lines is most distinguishable. The μEIS-OF trapped the flowing cells and measured their impedance at a frequency ranging from 5 kHz to 1 MHz. The second device (μEIS-RT) was designed for real-time impedance measurement of the cells at the optimal frequency. The impedance was measured instantaneously as the cells passed the sensing electrodes of μEIS-RT. Results. The optimal frequency, which maximized the average difference of the amplitude and phase angle between the two cell lines (p < 0.001), was determined to be 119 kHz. The real-time impedance of the cell lines was measured at 119 kHz; the two cell lines differed significantly in terms of amplitude and phase angle (p < 0.001). Conclusion. The μEIS-RT can discriminate SV-HUC-1 and TCCSUP cells by measuring the impedance at the optimal frequency determined by the μEIS-OF. PMID:26998490

  17. In vivo impedance measurements on nerves and surrounding skeletal muscles in rats and human body.

    PubMed

    Prokhorov, E; Llamas, F; Morales-Sánchez, E; González-Hernández, J; Prokhorov, A

    2002-05-01

    The aim of the work was to use impedance measurements to find the location of nerves under the human skin. In vivo impedance measurements were performed on exposed nervous and muscular tissues of rats. Similarly, the impedance measurements were also performed on the skin of six men, over the median nerve at the wrist, as well as 4-5 mm away from this location. Results obtained with rats have shown that the relative permittivity and conductivity of nerves are larger (by almost two orders of magnitude) than those observed for the muscular tissues surrounding the nerve. The results obtained on human skin in the frequency range of 20-200 kHz, when the electrodes were placed over the nerve, show lower resistance and higher capacitance than in the other areas measured. These preliminary results indicate that it may be possible to use impedance measurements to find the location of exposed nerves and also nerves under the skin.

  18. A bioelectrical impedance phase angle measuring system for assessment of nutritional status.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guanghao; Huo, Xiaolin; Wu, Changzhe; Zhang, Cheng; Duan, Zhongping

    2014-01-01

    Bioelectrical impedance phase angle has been recommended as a tool to assess nutrition state, but there are no measuring devices have been specially designed for hospital residents. In this study, a system was established for the measurement of bioelectrical impedance phase angle. The electrical composition, calculation method and measuring method of this system are presented in this paper. Experiments showed excellent performance of this system in measuring impedance made of resistors and capacitors. The designed system was also used to measure the bioelectrical impedance phase angle of both healthy subjects and patients with malnutrition, and the results demonstrated that the phase angle of patients with malnutrition is lower than that of healthy subjects (P < 0.01 for male and P < 0.05 for female). These results suggest that phase angle has the potential to be a useful tool for the quantitative assessment of nutritional status.

  19. Comparison of impedance measurements near the skin of newborns and adults.

    PubMed

    Amm, Bruce; Kao, Tzu-Jen; Newell, Jonathan; Isaacson, David; Saulnier, Gary; Shoudy, David; Boverman, Greg; Sahni, Rakesh; Weindler, Marilyn; Chong, David; DiBardino, David; Davenport, David; Ashe, Jeffrey

    2016-06-01

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is a non-invasive imaging technology that has been extensively studied for monitoring lung function of neonatal and adult subjects, especially in neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and intensive care unit (ICU) environments. The sources of the total impedance in these applications include internal organs, near-boundary tissues, electrode-skin impedance, electrodes and conducting wires. This total impedance must be considered for system design and setting voltage gain since it will contribute to the measured voltage. To adapt a single instrument for use on infants and adults, we studied the difference between the impedance near the skin in both classes of patients. We used a simultaneous multi-source EIT (SMS-EIT) system to make impedance measurements. Characteristic resistance was calculated for two different current patterns: one that is more sensitive to boundary region impedance and another that is more sensitive to interior changes. We present ratios of these resistances to assess the relative contribution of near-skin effects to the overall impedance. Twenty adult ICU subjects (10 male, 10 female, age: 49.05  ±  16.32 years (mean  ±  standard deviation)) and 45 neonates (23 male, 22 female, gestational age: 37.67  ±  2.11 weeks, postnatal age, 2.56  ±  2.67 d) were studied at Columbia University Medical Center. Impedance measurements at 10 kHz were collected for approximately one hour from each subject. The characteristic resistance ratio for each subject was computed and analyzed. The result shows the impedance at or near the skin of newborns is significantly higher than in adult subjects.

  20. Acoustic Measurement Of Periodic Motion Of Levitated Object

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, John L.; Barmatz, Martin B.

    1992-01-01

    Some internal vibrations, oscillations in position, and rotations of acoustically levitated object measured by use of microphone already installed in typical levitation chamber for tuning chamber to resonance and monitoring operation. Levitating acoustic signal modulated by object motion of lower frequency. Amplitude modulation detected and analyzed spectrally to determine amplitudes and frequencies of motions.

  1. Applications of acoustics in the measurement of coal slab thickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadden, W. J., Jr.; Mills, J. M.; Pierce, A. D.

    1980-01-01

    The determination of the possibility of employing acoustic waves at ultrasonic frequencies for measurements of thicknesses of slabs of coal backed by shale is investigated. Fundamental information concerning the acoustical properties of coal, and the relationship between these properties and the structural and compositional parameters used to characterize coal samples was also sought. The testing device, which utilizes two matched transducers, is described.

  2. Validation of Bragg grating measurements of acoustic plate waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Claire; Rajic, Nik; Rosalie, Cedric

    2008-04-01

    This paper reports on aspects of the design and validation of a Bragg grating sensor for acoustic plate wave detection. Advanced numerical modelling and an alternative experimental approach using Laser Vibrometry is used to validate the response of the Bragg measurements across a range of acoustic frequencies in a metal plate.

  3. Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test Instrumentation for Acoustic and Pressure Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargas, Magda B.; Counter, Douglas

    2011-01-01

    Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) is a 5% scale model test of the Ares I vehicle, launch pad and support structures conducted at MSFC to verify acoustic and ignition environments and evaluate water suppression systems Test design considerations 5% measurements must be scaled to full scale requiring high frequency measurements Users had different frequencies of interest Acoustics: 200 - 2,000 Hz full scale equals 4,000 - 40,000 Hz model scale Ignition Transient: 0 - 100 Hz full scale equals 0 - 2,000 Hz model scale Environment exposure Weather exposure: heat, humidity, thunderstorms, rain, cold and snow Test environments: Plume impingement heat and pressure, and water deluge impingement Several types of sensors were used to measure the environments Different instrument mounts were used according to the location and exposure to the environment This presentation addresses the observed effects of the selected sensors and mount design on the acoustic and pressure measurements

  4. Transthoracic electrical impedance during external defibrillation: comparison of measured and modelled waveforms.

    PubMed

    Al Hatib, F; Trendafilova, E; Daskalov, I

    2000-02-01

    The transthoracic electrical impedance is an important defibrillation parameter, affecting the defibrillating current amplitude and energy, and therefore the defibrillation efficiency. A close relationship between transthoracic impedance and defibrillation success rate was observed. Pre-shock measurements (using low amplitude high frequency current) of the impedance were considered a solution for selection of adequate shock voltages or for current-based defibrillation dosage. A recent approach, called 'impedance-compensating defibrillation' was implemented, where the pulse duration was controlled with respect to the impedance measured during the initial phase of the shock. These considerations raised our interest in reassessment of the transthoracic impedance characteristics and the corresponding measurement methods. The purpose of this work is to study the variations of the transthoracic impedance by a continuous measurement technique during the defibrillation shock and comparing the data with results obtained by modelling. Voltage and current impulse waveforms were acquired during cardioversion of patients with atrial fibrillation or flutter. The same type of defibrillation pulse was taken from dogs after induction of fibrillation. The electrodes were located in the anterior position, for both the patients and animals.

  5. Multi-dimensional analysis of subjective acoustical ratings and acoustical measures in existing concert halls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okano, Toshiyuki

    2004-05-01

    Correlations between subjective acoustical ratings and hall-averaged values of acoustical measures are studied among existing worldwide major concert halls. It was shown that the classified acoustical ratings by Beranek [Concert and Opera Halls, How They Sound (ASA, 1996)] are discriminated correctly by combining binaural quality index (BQI) with some other acoustical measures. BQI is determined by the arithmetic average of inter-aural cross correlation coefficient in three octave bands of 500, 1000, and 2000 Hz, subtracted from unity, calculated from the early 80-ms part of binaural impulse response. Considering that the upper limit value of BQI not to cause disturbing image shift is approximately 0.85 at individual seat [Okano, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 2219-2230 (2000)], the values of 0.6 or higher in hall averaged value of BQI, 0.85 or smaller in individual seat value of BQI, and approximately 5 dB or higher in strength factor at middle frequencies are proposed as design objectives to attain a high acoustical quality. It should be provided that other acoustical measures are also optimized. These target values will be very effective in studying room shape of halls, using scale models or computer models.

  6. High spatial resolution impedance measurement of EIS sensors for light addressable cell adhesion monitoring.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hui; Wang, Jun; Liu, Qingjun; Zhang, Wei; Cai, Hua; Wang, Ping

    2011-02-15

    In this paper, impedance measurement of electrolyte-insulator-semiconductor (EIS) structure with high spatial resolution was proposed to monitor cell adhesion. The light addressing ability of this work overcomes the geometrical restrict of cell culture on conventional impedance detection devices such as interdigitated electrode (IDE) and electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS). Instead of studying cells on predetermined sites of IDE and ECIS, cells cultured anywhere on EIS sensor surface can be addressed and selected as target cells. Principle and primary models for high resolution impedance detection were described and tested by experiments. The EIS sensor was investigated in terms of its intrinsic characteristics, like impedance behavior, voltage characteristic, frequency dependency and photovoltaic effect. Optimized working condition was studied for cell experiments. Cell adhesion under treatment of 0.1% Triton X-100 was monitored using rat kidney cells as the source. Results showed good sensitivity (10% change of impedance) and resolution (40 μm) for cell adhesion impedance detection and suggested this work should be suitable for monitoring cell impedance. Further improvements on sensitivity, spatial resolution were discussed as well as the further applications for single cell monitoring and cell adhesion imaging. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Cosmological implications of baryon acoustic oscillation measurements

    DOE PAGES

    Aubourg, Eric

    2015-12-01

    Here, we derive constraints on cosmological parameters and tests of dark energy models from the combination of baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) measurements with cosmic microwave background (CMB) data and a recent reanalysis of Type Ia supernova (SN) data. Particularly, we take advantage of high-precision BAO measurements from galaxy clustering and the Lyman-α forest (LyaF) in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). Treating the BAO scale as an uncalibrated standard ruler, BAO data alone yield a high confidence detection of dark energy; in combination with the CMB angular acoustic scale they further imply a nearly flat universe. Adding the CMB-calibratedmore » physical scale of the sound horizon, the combination of BAO and SN data into an “inverse distance ladder” yields a measurement of H0=67.3±1.1 km s-1 Mpc-1, with 1.7% precision. This measurement assumes standard prerecombination physics but is insensitive to assumptions about dark energy or space curvature, so agreement with CMB-based estimates that assume a flat ΛCDM cosmology is an important corroboration of this minimal cosmological model. For constant dark energy (Λ), our BAO+SN+CMB combination yields matter density Ωm=0.301±0.008 and curvature Ωk=-0.003±0.003. When we allow more general forms of evolving dark energy, the BAO+SN+CMB parameter constraints are always consistent with flat ΛCDM values at ≈1σ. And while the overall χ2 of model fits is satisfactory, the LyaF BAO measurements are in moderate (2–2.5σ) tension with model predictions. Models with early dark energy that tracks the dominant energy component at high redshift remain consistent with our expansion history constraints, and they yield a higher H0 and lower matter clustering amplitude, improving agreement with some low redshift observations. Expansion history alone yields an upper limit on the summed mass of neutrino species, Σmν<0.56 eV (95% confidence), improving to Σmν<0.25 eV if we include

  8. Cosmological implications of baryon acoustic oscillation measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Aubourg, Eric

    2015-12-01

    Here, we derive constraints on cosmological parameters and tests of dark energy models from the combination of baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) measurements with cosmic microwave background (CMB) data and a recent reanalysis of Type Ia supernova (SN) data. Particularly, we take advantage of high-precision BAO measurements from galaxy clustering and the Lyman-α forest (LyaF) in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). Treating the BAO scale as an uncalibrated standard ruler, BAO data alone yield a high confidence detection of dark energy; in combination with the CMB angular acoustic scale they further imply a nearly flat universe. Adding the CMB-calibrated physical scale of the sound horizon, the combination of BAO and SN data into an “inverse distance ladder” yields a measurement of H0=67.3±1.1 km s-1 Mpc-1, with 1.7% precision. This measurement assumes standard prerecombination physics but is insensitive to assumptions about dark energy or space curvature, so agreement with CMB-based estimates that assume a flat ΛCDM cosmology is an important corroboration of this minimal cosmological model. For constant dark energy (Λ), our BAO+SN+CMB combination yields matter density Ωm=0.301±0.008 and curvature Ωk=-0.003±0.003. When we allow more general forms of evolving dark energy, the BAO+SN+CMB parameter constraints are always consistent with flat ΛCDM values at ≈1σ. And while the overall χ2 of model fits is satisfactory, the LyaF BAO measurements are in moderate (2–2.5σ) tension with model predictions. Models with early dark energy that tracks the dominant energy component at high redshift remain consistent with our expansion history constraints, and they yield a higher H0 and lower matter clustering amplitude, improving agreement with some low redshift observations. Expansion history alone yields an upper limit on the summed mass of neutrino species,

  9. Cosmological implications of baryon acoustic oscillation measurements

    DOE PAGES

    Aubourg, Eric

    2015-12-01

    Here, we derive constraints on cosmological parameters and tests of dark energy models from the combination of baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) measurements with cosmic microwave background (CMB) data and a recent reanalysis of Type Ia supernova (SN) data. Particularly, we take advantage of high-precision BAO measurements from galaxy clustering and the Lyman-α forest (LyaF) in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). Treating the BAO scale as an uncalibrated standard ruler, BAO data alone yield a high confidence detection of dark energy; in combination with the CMB angular acoustic scale they further imply a nearly flat universe. Adding the CMB-calibratedmore » physical scale of the sound horizon, the combination of BAO and SN data into an “inverse distance ladder” yields a measurement of H0=67.3±1.1 km s-1 Mpc-1, with 1.7% precision. This measurement assumes standard prerecombination physics but is insensitive to assumptions about dark energy or space curvature, so agreement with CMB-based estimates that assume a flat ΛCDM cosmology is an important corroboration of this minimal cosmological model. For constant dark energy (Λ), our BAO+SN+CMB combination yields matter density Ωm=0.301±0.008 and curvature Ωk=-0.003±0.003. When we allow more general forms of evolving dark energy, the BAO+SN+CMB parameter constraints are always consistent with flat ΛCDM values at ≈1σ. And while the overall χ2 of model fits is satisfactory, the LyaF BAO measurements are in moderate (2–2.5σ) tension with model predictions. Models with early dark energy that tracks the dominant energy component at high redshift remain consistent with our expansion history constraints, and they yield a higher H0 and lower matter clustering amplitude, improving agreement with some low redshift observations. Expansion history alone yields an upper limit on the summed mass of neutrino species, Σmν<0.56 eV (95% confidence), improving to Σmν<0.25 eV if we include

  10. Cosmological implications of baryon acoustic oscillation measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Aubourg, Eric

    2015-12-01

    Here, we derive constraints on cosmological parameters and tests of dark energy models from the combination of baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) measurements with cosmic microwave background (CMB) data and a recent reanalysis of Type Ia supernova (SN) data. Particularly, we take advantage of high-precision BAO measurements from galaxy clustering and the Lyman-α forest (LyaF) in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). Treating the BAO scale as an uncalibrated standard ruler, BAO data alone yield a high confidence detection of dark energy; in combination with the CMB angular acoustic scale they further imply a nearly flat universe. Adding the CMB-calibrated physical scale of the sound horizon, the combination of BAO and SN data into an “inverse distance ladder” yields a measurement of H0=67.3±1.1 km s-1 Mpc-1, with 1.7% precision. This measurement assumes standard prerecombination physics but is insensitive to assumptions about dark energy or space curvature, so agreement with CMB-based estimates that assume a flat ΛCDM cosmology is an important corroboration of this minimal cosmological model. For constant dark energy (Λ), our BAO+SN+CMB combination yields matter density Ωm=0.301±0.008 and curvature Ωk=-0.003±0.003. When we allow more general forms of evolving dark energy, the BAO+SN+CMB parameter constraints are always consistent with flat ΛCDM values at ≈1σ. And while the overall χ2 of model fits is satisfactory, the LyaF BAO measurements are in moderate (2–2.5σ) tension with model predictions. Models with early dark energy that tracks the dominant energy component at high redshift remain consistent with our expansion history constraints, and they yield a higher H0 and lower matter clustering amplitude, improving agreement with some low redshift observations. Expansion history alone yields an upper limit on the summed mass of neutrino species,

  11. Generation of optimum pseudorandom signals for respiratory impedance measurements.

    PubMed

    Daróczy, B; Hantos, Z

    1990-02-01

    Spontaneous breathing may impair the reliability of forced oscillatory impedance estimates at low frequencies, especially when the oscillatory power is distributed among many frequency values. Since the amplitude of the external forcing is limited to avoid non-linearities, it is suggested that the total energy of a composite electrical signal driving the loudspeaker be maximized at a given amplitude by finding the optimum phase relationships of the signal components, and that the low-frequency components increase in energy at the expense of the less disturbed high-frequency region. In healthy children and adults and in obstructed patients, the coherences and the coefficients of variation of the respiratory system impedance (Zrs) at 2 and 3 Hz were studied in the case of three test signals of 2-15 Hz bandwidth. Signals T1 and T2 had a flat power spectrum, whereas the components of T3 decreased sharply between 2 and 5 Hz; T1 was generated by simple random selection of phase angles, while optimization for maximum energy was done for T2 and T3. Optimization alone (T2) increased the reliability of the Zrs estimates at all frequencies, whereas enhancement of the low-frequency power (T3) resulted in a radical improvement of the estimates at 2 and 3 Hz, without loss in reliability at higher frequencies.

  12. Simplified method for measuring the impedance of RF power sources - A concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oakley, E. C.

    1970-01-01

    Bolometer detector and bridge circuit measure the RF power. A varied bridge reference resistor achieves maximum power transfer allowing the output impedance of the RF source to be determined from the known circuit parameters.

  13. Evaluation of electrical impedance ratio measurements in accuracy of electronic apex locators

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Pil-Jong; Kim, Hong-Gee

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this paper was evaluating the ratios of electrical impedance measurements reported in previous studies through a correlation analysis in order to explicit it as the contributing factor to the accuracy of electronic apex locator (EAL). Materials and Methods The literature regarding electrical property measurements of EALs was screened using Medline and Embase. All data acquired were plotted to identify correlations between impedance and log-scaled frequency. The accuracy of the impedance ratio method used to detect the apical constriction (APC) in most EALs was evaluated using linear ramp function fitting. Changes of impedance ratios for various frequencies were evaluated for a variety of file positions. Results Among the ten papers selected in the search process, the first-order equations between log-scaled frequency and impedance were in the negative direction. When the model for the ratios was assumed to be a linear ramp function, the ratio values decreased if the file went deeper and the average ratio values of the left and right horizontal zones were significantly different in 8 out of 9 studies. The APC was located within the interval of linear relation between the left and right horizontal zones of the linear ramp model. Conclusions Using the ratio method, the APC was located within a linear interval. Therefore, using the impedance ratio between electrical impedance measurements at different frequencies was a robust method for detection of the APC. PMID:25984472

  14. Measuring Electrolyte Impedance and Noise Simultaneously by Triangular Waveform Voltage and Principal Component Analysis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shanzhi; Wang, Peng; Dong, Yonggui

    2016-04-22

    In order to measure the impedance variation process in electrolyte solutions, a method of triangular waveform voltage excitation is investigated together with principal component analysis (PCA). Using triangular waveform voltage as the excitation signal, the response current during one duty cycle is sampled to construct a measurement vector. The measurement matrix is then constructed by the measurement vectors obtained from different measurements. After being processed by PCA, the changing information of solution impedance is contained in the loading vectors while the response current and noise information is contained in the score vectors. The measurement results of impedance variation by the proposed signal processing method are independent of the equivalent impedance model. The noise-induced problems encountered during equivalent impedance calculation are therefore avoided, and the real-time variation information of noise in the electrode-electrolyte interface can be extracted at the same time. Planar-interdigitated electrodes are experimentally tested for monitoring the KCl concentration variation process. Experimental results indicate that the measured impedance variation curve reflects the changing process of solution conductivity, and the amplitude distribution of the noise during one duty cycle can be utilized to analyze the contact conditions of the electrode and electrolyte interface.

  15. Acoustic velocity measurements in materials using a regenerative method

    DOEpatents

    Laine, Edwin F.

    1986-01-01

    Acoustic energy is propagated through earth material between an electro-acoustic generator and a receiver which converts the received acoustic energy into electrical signals. A closed loop is formed by a variable gain amplifier system connected between the receiver and the generator. The gain of the amplifier system is increased until sustained oscillations are produced in the closed loop. The frequency of the oscillations is measured as an indication of the acoustic propagation velocity through the earth material. The amplifier gain is measured as an indication of the acoustic attenuation through the earth materials. The method is also applicable to the non-destructive testing of structural materials, such as steel, aluminum and concrete.

  16. Acoustic-velocity measurements in materials using a regenerative method

    DOEpatents

    Laine, E.F.

    1982-09-30

    Acoustic energy is propatated through earth material between an electro-acoustic generator and a receiver which converts the received acoustic energy into electrical signals. A closed loop is formed by a variable gain amplifier system connected between the receiver and the generator. The gain of the amplifier system is increased until sustained oscillations are produced in the closed loop. The frequency of the oscillations is measured as an indication of the acoustic propagation velocity through the earth material. The amplifier gain is measured as an indication of the acoustic attenuation through the earth materials. The method is also applicable to the non-destructive testing of structural materials, such as steel, aluminum and concrete.

  17. Comparison of segmental with whole-body impedance measurements in peritoneal dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Nescolarde, Lexa; Doñate, Teresa; Piccoli, Antonio; Rosell, Javier

    2008-09-01

    Segmental impedance measurements were obtained using nine electrode configurations in 21 male patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis PD before and after the fluid drainage. For each segment we analyzed the impedance Z and the impedance divided by the height H of the patient Z/H. Our objective was to compare different segmental measurements with whole-body measurements in peritoneal dialysis. The Wilcoxon test was used to analyze the change in impedance produced by a PD session. Pearson or Spearman correlation coefficients were used for continuous or discrete variables, respectively. Statistical significance was set at P<0.05. Similar results were obtained for Z and Z/H. The correlation coefficients between the real R and imaginary X(c) parts of segmental impedances after drainage were within the expected range for healthy population (0.46-0.70), but not before drainage for the abdomen (0.34) and the upper part of the leg (0.24). The correlation between the real part of whole-body and the real part of longitudinal segments in the limbs was high (r=0.807-0.879). Furthermore, the imaginary part of whole-body showed a high correlation with the imaginary part of all longitudinal segments (r=0.856-0.931). The high contribution of arm and leg impedances in the whole-body impedance produced high correlation between whole-body and segmental measurements in legs and arms. In agreement with other previous studies, a significant increase of the arm resistance was detected after fluid drainage. The drainage of fluids in PD patients produced significant changes in the measured real parts of impedance in all measured segments, but only the measurement in the abdomen showed a significant positive correlation (r=0.533) with the extracted fluid volume. This low correlation indicates that the individual assessment of fluid volumes using segmental measurements will be highly inaccurate.

  18. Transvers Impedance Measurements of the Modified DARHT-2Accelerator Cell Design

    SciTech Connect

    Briggs, Dick; Waldron, Will

    2005-11-30

    The DARHT-2 accelerator cells have been redesigned to make their high voltage performance more robust. At the outset of the DARHT-2 development program about 8 years ago, an extensive campaign was mounted to minimize the transverse impedance of the original cell design. Since the initial spec on the machine was a beam current of 4 kA, the control of beam-breakup (BBU) amplification with a 2 microsecond pulse length was considered to be one the most critical issues in the design. Even after advances in detector technology allowed the beam current requirement to be lowered to 2 kA, the goal for the standard cell impedance was kept at {approx}300 ohms/meter to allow for the possibility of future beam current upgrades to 4 kA without any modifications in the cells. The results of this campaign to minimize the transverse impedance are described in detail in Reference 1. After several iterations in the design of ferrite dampers and the anode finger stock shape, the measured (peak) impedance of the original standard cell was determined to be about 280 ohms/meter. (As a reference point, the measured impedance of the DARHT-1 cell is about 880 ohms/meter). This impedance provided such a wide safety margin against BBU amplification at 2 kA that it was felt that the cell redesign could focus on voltage holding without any detailed considerations of impacts on the transverse impedance. Now that a baseline design for the DARHT-2 cell has been established and tested, however, it was felt that a measurement of its impedance would be prudent. The results of these impedance measurements are presented in this note. The objective was mainly to do a ''quick check'' to ensure that there were no surprises, and to provide an estimate of the BBU frequencies and growth rates to the experimental test program.

  19. Measurement and mathematical simulation of acoustic characteristics of an artificially lengthened vocal tract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radolf, Vojtěch; Horáček, Jaromír; Dlask, Pavel; Otčenášek, Zdeněk; Geneid, Ahmed; Laukkanen, Anne-Maria

    2016-03-01

    Phonation into tubes is used for voice training and therapy. In the present study, the formant frequencies were estimated from measurements of the acoustic pressure and the acoustic input impedance for a plexiglass model of the vocal tract (VT) prolonged by a glass tube. Similar transfer function measurements were performed with a human VT in vivo. The experimental results matched the mathematical modelling and confirmed the legitimacy of assuming rigid walls in mathematical simulations of the acoustic characteristics of an artificial VT model prolonged by a tube. However, this study also proved a considerable influence from soft tissues in the yielding walls of human VT cavities on the first formant frequency, F1. The measured F1 for the VT model corresponded to the computed value of 78 Hz. The experiments in a human instead resulted in a much higher value of F1: about 200 Hz. The results confirm that a VT model with yielding walls must be considered for mathematical modelling of the occluded or semi-occluded human vocal tract, e.g. prolonged by tubes or straws. This is explained by an acoustic-structural interaction of the vocal tract cavities with a mechanical low-frequency resonance of the soft tissue in the larynx.

  20. Phase speed and attenuation in bubbly liquids inferred from impedance measurements near the individual bubble resonance frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Preston S.; Roy, Ronald A.; Carey, William M.

    2005-04-01

    In the ocean, natural and artificial processes generate clouds of bubbles that scatter and attenuate sound. Measurements have shown that at the individual bubble resonance frequency, sound propagation in this medium is highly attenuated and dispersive. The existing theory to explain this behavior is deemed adequate away from resonance. However, due to excessive attenuation near resonance, little experimental data exists for a comparison with model predictions. An impedance tube was developed specifically for exploring this regime. The effective medium phase speed and attenuation were inferred from measurements of the surface impedance of a layer of bubbly liquid composed of air bubbles and distilled water, for void fractions from 6.2×10-5 to 5.4×10-4 and bubble sizes centered around 0.62 mm in radius. Improved measurement speed, accuracy, and precision is possible with the new instrument, and both instantaneous and time-averaged measurements were obtained. The phase speed and attenuation at resonance was observed to be sensitive to the bubble population statistics and agreed with an existing model [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 85, 732-746 (1989)], within the uncertainty of the bubble population parameters. Agreement between the model and the data reported here is better than for the data that was available when the model was originally published. .

  1. Assessment of bolus transit with intraluminal impedance measurement in patients with esophageal motility disorders.

    PubMed

    Bogte, A; Bredenoord, A J; Oors, J; Siersema, P D; Smout, A J P M

    2015-10-01

    The clinical management of patients with non-obstructive dysphagia is notoriously difficult. Esophageal impedance measurement can be used to measure esophageal bolus transit without the use of radiation exposure to patients. However, validation of measurement of bolus transit with impedance monitoring has only been performed in healthy subjects with normal motility and not in patients with dysphagia and esophageal motility disorders. The aim was, therefore, to investigate the relationship between transit of swallowed liquid boluses in healthy controls and in patients with dysphagia. Twenty healthy volunteers and 20 patients with dysphagia underwent concurrent impedance measurement and videofluoroscopy. Each subject swallowed five liquid barium boluses. The ability of detecting complete or incomplete bolus transit by means of impedance measurement was assessed, using radiographic bolus transit as the gold standard. Impedance monitoring recognized stasis and transit in 80.5% of the events correctly, with 83.9% of bolus transit being recognized and 77.2% of stasis being recognized correctly. In controls 79.8% of all swallows were scored correctly, whereas in patients 81.3% of all swallows were scored correctly. Depending on the contractility pattern, between 77.0% and 94.3% of the swallows were scored correctly. Impedance measurement can be used to assess bolus clearance patterns in healthy subjects, but can also be used to reliably assess bolus transit in patients with dysphagia and motility disorders. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Development of high time resolution measurement system of frequency characteristics in bioelectrical impedance for biodynamic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Takao; Kusuhara, Toshimasa; Yamamoto, Yoshitake

    2006-11-01

    We have proposed biodynamic analysis using bioelectrical impedance at 50 kHz, which is measured with synchronous rectification method. In order to analyze impedance parameters in biodynamics, the measurement of frequency characteristics in bioelectrical impedance with a high time resolution are required. Therefore we have developed a high time resolution measurement system for bioelectrical impedance with 10 frequency points and time resolution of 1 ms. A voltage E A, which consisted of fundamental wave and 9 kinds of harmonic wave from 1 kHz to 1MHz, were converted to current. The current flowed through human body and a potential voltage, EV was detected in the measured part. After A/D conversion of EV and E A in the sampling frequency 2 MHz, data number 2048 points, the impedance were calculated using Fast Fourier Transform. The measured time 1.024 ms was the period of the fundamental wave and time resolution of this system. The specification is enough accuracy for measurement of bioelectrical impedance for biodynamic analysis.

  3. Rapid Impedance Spectrum Measurements for Onboard State-of-Health Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Jon P. Christophersen; John L. Morrison; Chinh D. Ho

    2012-06-01

    Rapid impedance measurements can provide a useful online tool for improved state-of-health estimation. A validation study has been initiated at the Idaho National Laboratory for a rapid impedance technique known as Harmonic Compensated Synchronous Detection. This technique enables capturing the impedance spectra over a broad frequency range within about ten seconds. Commercially available lithium-ion cells are being calendar-life aged at 50°C with reference performance tests at 30°C every 32.5 days to gauge degradation The cells have completed the first set of reference performance tests and preliminary results are presented. The spectra change as a function of temperature and depth-of-discharge condition, as expected. The data indicate that the rapid impedance measurement technique is a benign measurement tool that can be successfully used to gauge changes in the corresponding pulse resistance.

  4. Impedance measurement of vacuum chamber components for the Advance Photon Source(APS) Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Sangroula, M.; Lindberg, R.; Lill, R.; Sun, X.

    2017-01-01

    The proposed Advance Photon Source Upgrade (APS-U) employs a multi-bend achromat (MBA) lattice to increase the photon brightness by two to three orders of magnitude. One of the main design challenges of the upgrade is to minimize rf heating and collective instabilities associated with the impedance of small-aperture vacuum components. As part of this effort, my research focuses on impedance measurement and simulation of various MBA vacuum components. Here, we present the summary of the impedance contributions for the APS-U and describe our planned impedance measurement technique, including some measurement results for the non-evaporative getter (NEG)-coated copper chamber and simulation results for other critical components using a novel Goubau line (G-line) set up.

  5. Transverse and Longitudinal Impedance Measurements for the RKTBA Induction Accelerating Gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eylon, S.; Henestroza, E.; Kim, J.-S.; Houck, T.; Westenskow, G.; Yu, S.

    1997-05-01

    An induction accelerating gap design is being studied for Relativistic Klystron Two Beam Accelerator (RKTBA). The accelerating gap has to satisfy the following major requirements: hold-off of the applied 100 kV accelerating voltage pulse, low transverse impedance for beam break up minimization, low longitudinal impedance at the beam modulation frequency to minimize power absorption. To optimize the gap design various gap geometries, materials and novel insulating techniques will be explored. We shall report on the experimental effort to evaluate the RF properties of the accelerating gaps in a simple pillbox cavity structure. The experimental cavity setup was designed using the AMOS, MAFIA and URMEL numerical codes. We shall present results of the gap cavity transverse impedance measurements using the two wire measuring system. This will include also longitudinal impedance above beam tube cut off frequency using a single wire measuring system.

  6. Evaluation of a novel correction procedure to remove electrode impedance effects from broadband SIP measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huisman, Johan Alexander; Zimmermann, Egon; Esser, Odilia; Haegel, Franz-Hubert; Treichel, Andrea; Vereecken, Harry

    2016-12-01

    Broadband spectral induced polarization (SIP) measurements of the complex electrical resistivity can be affected by the contact impedance of the potential electrodes above 100 Hz. In this study, we present a correction procedure to remove electrode impedance effects from SIP measurements to improve the accuracy of broadband complex electrical resistivity measurements. The first step in this correction procedure is to estimate the electrode impedance using a measurement with reversed current and potential electrodes. In a second step, this estimated electrode impedance is used to correct SIP measurements based on a simplified electrical model of the SIP measurement system. We evaluated this new correction procedure using SIP measurements on water because of the well-defined dielectric properties. It was found that the difference between the corrected and expected phase of the complex electrical resistivity of water was below 0.1 mrad at 1 kHz for a wide range of electrode impedances. In addition, SIP measurements on a saturated unconsolidated sediment sample with two types of potential electrodes showed that the measured phase of the electrical resistivity was very similar (difference < 0.2 mrad) up to a frequency of 10 kHz after the effect of the different electrode impedances was removed. Finally, SIP measurements on variably saturated unconsolidated sand were made. Here, the plausibility of the phase of the electrical resistivity was improved for frequencies up to 1 kHz, but errors remained for higher frequencies due to the approximate nature of the electrode impedance estimates and some remaining unknown parasitic capacitances that led to current leakage. It was concluded that the proposed correction procedure for SIP measurements improved the accuracy of the phase measurements by an order of magnitude in the kHz frequency range. Further improvement of this accuracy requires a method to accurately estimate parasitic capacitances in situ.

  7. Circuits and methods for impedance determination using active measurement cancelation

    DOEpatents

    Jamison, David K.

    2016-12-13

    A delta signal and opposite delta signal are generated such that a sum of the two signals is substantially zero. The delta signal is applied across a first set of electrochemical cells. The opposite delta signal is applied across a second set of electrochemical cells series connected to the first set. A first held voltage is established as the voltage across the first set. A second held voltage is established as the voltage across the second set. A first delta signal is added to the first held voltage and applied to the first set. A second delta signal is added to the second held voltage and applied to the second set. The current responses due to the added delta voltages travel only into the set associated with its delta voltage. The delta voltages and the current responses are used to calculate the impedances of their associated cells.

  8. Sensitive immunodetection through impedance measurements onto gold functionalized electrodes.

    PubMed

    Ameur, S; Martelet, C; Jaffrezic-Renault, N; Chovelon, J M

    2000-01-01

    This article deals with a direct electrochemical method of detecting antigens using new methods of functionalization of gold electrodes. Based on the reacting ability of gold with sulfhydryl groups, three protocols for the fixation of antibodies have been explored. They are based on either the self-assembling properties of functional thiols bearing long alkyl chains or the possibility of a direct coupling of antibody moieties. Coverage rates as high as 97% can be reached. The analysis of the electrochemical impedance behavior of such layers can lead to a sensitive method for the direct detection of the antibody/antigen interaction. The addition of a redox couple in the tested solution, acting as an amplifier, allowed detection limits for the antigens as low as a few picograms/milliliter to be reached.

  9. A novel method for real-time skin impedance measurement during radiofrequency skin tightening treatments.

    PubMed

    Harth, Yoram; Lischinsky, Daniel

    2011-03-01

    The thermal effects of monopolar and bipolar radiofrequency (RF) have been proven to be beneficial in skin tightening. Nevertheless, these effects were frequently partial or unpredictable because of the uncontrolled nature of monopolar or unipolar RF and the superficial nature of energy flow for bipolar or tripolar configurations. One of the hypotheses for lack or predictability of efficacy of the first-generation RF therapy skin tightening systems is lack of adaptation of delivered power to differences in individual skin impedance. A novel multisource phase-controlled system was used (1 MHz, power range 0-65 W) for treatment and real-time skin impedance measurements in 24 patients (EndyMed PRO™; EndyMed, Cesarea, Israel). This system allows continuous real-time measurement of skin impedance delivering constant energy to the patient skin independent of changes in its impedance. More than 6000 unique skin impedance measurements on 22 patients showed an average session impedance range was 215-584 Ohm with an average of 369 Ohm (standard deviation of 49 Ohm). Analyzing individual pulses (total of 600 readings) showed a significant decrease in impedance during the pulse. These findings validate the expected differences in skin impedance between individual patients and in the same patients during the treatment pulse. Clinical study on 30 patients with facial skin aging using the device has shown high predictability of efficacy (86.7% of patients had good results or better at 3 months' follow-up [decrease of 2 or more grades in Fitzpatrick's wrinkle scale]). The real-time customization of energy according to skin impedance allows a significantly more accurate and safe method of nonablative skin tightening with more consistent and predictable results. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Validation of a Numerical Method for Determining Liner Impedance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Willie R.; Jones, Michael G.; Tanner, Sharon E.; Parrott, Tony L.

    1996-01-01

    This paper reports the initial results of a test series to evaluate a method for determining the normal incidence impedance of a locally reacting acoustically absorbing liner, located on the lower wall of a duct in a grazing incidence, multi-modal, non-progressive acoustic wave environment without flow. This initial evaluation is accomplished by testing the methods' ability to converge to the known normal incidence impedance of a solid steel plate, and to the normal incidence impedance of an absorbing test specimen whose impedance was measured in a conventional normal incidence tube. The method is shown to converge to the normal incident impedance values and thus to be an adequate tool for determining the impedance of specimens in a grazing incidence, multi-modal, nonprogressive acoustic wave environment for a broad range of source frequencies.

  11. Scale Model Thruster Acoustic Measurement Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargas, Magda; Kenny, R. Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    The Space Launch System (SLS) Scale Model Acoustic Test (SMAT) is a 5% scale representation of the SLS vehicle, mobile launcher, tower, and launch pad trench. The SLS launch propulsion system will be comprised of the Rocket Assisted Take-Off (RATO) motors representing the solid boosters and 4 Gas Hydrogen (GH2) thrusters representing the core engines. The GH2 thrusters were tested in a horizontal configuration in order to characterize their performance. In Phase 1, a single thruster was fired to determine the engine performance parameters necessary for scaling a single engine. A cluster configuration, consisting of the 4 thrusters, was tested in Phase 2 to integrate the system and determine their combined performance. Acoustic and overpressure data was collected during both test phases in order to characterize the system's acoustic performance. The results from the single thruster and 4- thuster system are discussed and compared.

  12. Motion measurement of acoustically levitated object

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, John L. (Inventor); Barmatz, Martin B. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A system is described for determining motion of an object that is acoustically positioned in a standing wave field in a chamber. Sonic energy in the chamber is sensed, and variation in the amplitude of the sonic energy is detected, which is caused by linear motion, rotational motion, or drop shape oscillation of the object. Apparatus for detecting object motion can include a microphone coupled to the chamber and a low pass filter connected to the output of the microphone, which passes only frequencies below the frequency of sound produced by a transducer that maintains the acoustic standing wave field. Knowledge about object motion can be useful by itself, can be useful to determine surface tension, viscosity, and other information about the object, and can be useful to determine the pressure and other characteristics of the acoustic field.

  13. Measurements of Impedance and Attenuation at CENELEC Bands for Power Line Communications Systems

    PubMed Central

    Cavdar, I. Hakki; Karadeniz, Engin

    2008-01-01

    Power line impedance is a very important parameter on the design of power line communications (PLC) modem architecture. Variations on the impedance of the power line affect the communications circuit performance. In order to determine impedance of the power lines, measurements were carried out in Turkey at frequencies ranging from 10 to 170 kHz, (CENELEC A,B,C,D bands). Measurements were conducted in three categories: rural, urban and the industrial power lines. Experimental results are presented in graphical form. The measured impedances were determined as 3-17 ohms, 1-17 ohms, and 1-21 ohms for rural, urban and the industrial lines, respectively. A set of the formulas between impedance and frequency are developed on the power lines using the regression analysis from the obtained empirical data. Signal attenuations on the power lines in the CENELEC band are also measured for rural, urban and industrial regions. Attenuation measurements are repeated for phase-neutral, phase-ground and the neutral-ground conductors. Signal attenuations are found to be 4-30 dB, for different power lines. To establish validity of obtained results for the design of PLC systems, the results are compared with previous investigations. The effects of some household appliances such as TV, PC, UPS, lighting and cooling systems on the impedances and the attenuations for power line communications systems are observed. Some suggestions and proposals are presented for PLC modem designers. PMID:27873974

  14. Influence of measurement procedure on quality of impedance spectra on lead-acid batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budde-Meiwes, Heide; Kowal, Julia; Sauer, Dirk Uwe; Karden, Eckhard

    Many battery simulation models, but also electrochemical interpretations are based on impedance spectroscopy. However, the impedance of a battery is influenced by various factors, e.g. in the case of a lead-acid battery: state of charge (SOC), charging or discharging, superimposed dc current, short-term history or homogeneity of the electrolyte. This paper analyses the impact of those factors on impedance spectra of lead-acid batteries. The results show that very detailed information about the conditions during the measurement is crucial for the correct interpretation of a spectrum.

  15. Articulatory-acoustic vowel space: Associations between acoustic and perceptual measures of clear speech.

    PubMed

    Whitfield, Jason A; Goberman, Alexander M

    2017-04-01

    The current investigation examined the relationship between perceptual ratings of speech clarity and acoustic measures of speech production. Included among the acoustic measures was the Articulatory-Acoustic Vowel Space (AAVS), which provides a measure of working formant space derived from continuously sampled formant trajectories in connected speech. Acoustic measures of articulation and listener ratings of speech clarity were obtained from habitual and clear speech samples produced by 10 neurologically healthy adults. Perceptual ratings of speech clarity were obtained from visual-analogue scale ratings and acoustic measures included the AAVS measure, articulation rate and percentage pause. Clear speech was characterised by a higher perceptual clarity rating, slower articulation rate, greater percentage pause and larger AAVS compared to habitual speech. Additionally, correlation analysis revealed a significant relationship between the perceptual clear speech effect and the relative clarity-related change in the AAVS and articulation rate measures. The current findings suggest that, along with speech rate measures, the recently introduced AAVS is sensitive to changes in speech clarity.

  16. A new contactless impedance sensor for void fraction measurement of gas-liquid two-phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Haifeng; Chang, Ya; Huang, Zhiyao; Wang, Baoliang; Li, Haiqing

    2016-12-01

    With impedance elimination principle and phase sensitive demodulation (PSD) technique, this work aims to develop a new contactless impedance sensor, which is suitable for the void fraction measurement of gas-liquid two-phase flow. The impedance elimination principle is used to overcome the unfavorable influences of the coupling capacitances, i.e. the capacitive reactances of the coupling capacitances are eliminated by the inductive reactance of an introduced inductor. PSD technique is used to implement the impedance measurement. Unlike the conventional conductance/impedance sensors which use the equivalent conductance (the real part of the impedance) or the amplitude of the impedance of gas-liquid two-phase flow, the new contactless impedance sensor makes full use of the total impedance information of gas-liquid two-phase flow (including the amplitude, the real part and the imaginary part of the impedance, especially the imaginary part) to implement the void fraction measurement. As a preliminary study, to verify the effectiveness of the new contactless impedance sensor, two prototypes (with different inner diameters of 17.0 mm and 22.0 mm) are developed and experiments are carried out. Two typical flow patterns (bubble flow and stratified flow) of gas-liquid two-phase flow are investigated. The experimental results show that the new contactless impedance sensor is successful and effective. Compared with the conventional conductance/impedance sensors, the new contactless impedance sensor can avoid polarization effect and electrochemical erosion effect. The total impedance information is used and the void fraction measurement performance of the new sensor is satisfactory. The experimental results also indicate that the imaginary part of the impedance of gas-liquid two-phase flow is very useful for the void fraction measurement. Making full use of the total impedance information of gas-liquid two-phase flow can effectively improve the void fraction measurement

  17. A novel instrument to measure acoustic resonances of the vocal tract during phonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epps, J.; Smith, J. R.; Wolfe, J.

    1997-10-01

    Acoustic resonances of the vocal tract give rise to formants (broad bands of acoustic power) in the speech signal when the vocal tract is excited by a periodic signal from the vocal folds. This paper reports a novel instrument which uses a real-time, non-invasive technique to measure these resonances accurately during phonation. A broadband acoustic current source is located just outside the mouth of the subject and the resulting acoustic pressure is measured near the lips. The contribution of the speech signal to the pressure spectrum is then digitally suppressed and the resonances are calculated from the input impedance of the vocal tract as a function of the frequency. The external excitation signal has a much smaller harmonic spacing than does the periodic signal from the vocal folds and consequently the resonances are determined much more accurately due to the closer sampling. This is particularly important for higher pitched voices and we demonstrate that this technique can be markedly superior to the curve-fitting technique of linear prediction. The superior frequency resolution of this instrument which results from external vocal tract excitation can provide the precise, stable, effective, articulatory feedback considered essential for some language-learning and speech-therapy applications.

  18. Comparison of acoustic and mechanical excitation for modal response measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musson, B. G.; Stevens, J. R.

    An acoustic field is examined as an alternate to mechanical excitation of a test specimen to measure modal response. A square, flat plate with clamped edges is used because classical analytical solutions to its modal analysis are readily available. A small hammer with a built-in force transducer is used to mechanically excite the plate, and the plate is excited with electro-pneumatic acoustic drivers coupled to a progressive-wave test fixture. Band limited random amplitude acoustic waves over a frequency range of 50 to 1000 Hz are applied at grazing incidence to the plate. The acoustic field is characterized and a microphone at a single fixed position is used to provide the reference forcing function. Results are compared with the analytical solutions and with the mechanically excited results. Conclusions are presented concerning the equivalence of acoustic and mechanical excitation for obtaining modal response.

  19. Experimental investigation of microwave interaction with magnetoplasma in miniature multipolar configuration using impedance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Indranuj; Toyoda, Yuji; Yamamoto, Naoji; Nakashima, Hideki

    2014-09-01

    A miniature microwave plasma source employing both radial and axial magnetic fields for plasma confinement has been developed for micro-propulsion applications. Plasma is initiated by launching microwaves via a short monopole antenna to circumvent geometrical cutoff limitations. The amplitude and phase of the forward and reflected microwave power is measured to obtain the complex reflection coefficient from which the equivalent impedance of the plasma source is determined. Effect of critical plasma density condition is reflected in the measurements and provides insight into the working of the miniature plasma source. A basic impedance calculation model is developed to help in understanding the experimental observations. From experiment and theory, it is seen that the equivalent impedance magnitude is controlled by the coaxial discharge boundary conditions, and the phase is influenced primarily by the plasma immersed antenna impedance.

  20. Experimental investigation of microwave interaction with magnetoplasma in miniature multipolar configuration using impedance measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Dey, Indranuj Toyoda, Yuji; Yamamoto, Naoji; Nakashima, Hideki

    2014-09-15

    A miniature microwave plasma source employing both radial and axial magnetic fields for plasma confinement has been developed for micro-propulsion applications. Plasma is initiated by launching microwaves via a short monopole antenna to circumvent geometrical cutoff limitations. The amplitude and phase of the forward and reflected microwave power is measured to obtain the complex reflection coefficient from which the equivalent impedance of the plasma source is determined. Effect of critical plasma density condition is reflected in the measurements and provides insight into the working of the miniature plasma source. A basic impedance calculation model is developed to help in understanding the experimental observations. From experiment and theory, it is seen that the equivalent impedance magnitude is controlled by the coaxial discharge boundary conditions, and the phase is influenced primarily by the plasma immersed antenna impedance.

  1. Drilling electrode for real-time measurement of electrical impedance in bone tissues.

    PubMed

    Dai, Yu; Xue, Yuan; Zhang, Jianxun

    2014-03-01

    In order to prevent possible damages to soft tissues, reliable monitoring methods are required to provide valuable information on the condition of the bone being cut. This paper describes the design of an electrical impedance sensing drill developed to estimate the relative position between the drill and the bone being drilled. The two-electrode method is applied to continuously measure the electrical impedance during a drill feeding movement: two copper wire brushes are used to conduct electricity in the rotating drill and then the drill is one electrode; a needle is inserted into the soft tissues adjacent to the bone being drilled and acts as another electrode. Considering that the recorded electrical impedance is correlated with the insertion depth of the drill, we theoretically calculate the electrode-tissue contact impedance and prove that the rate of impedance change varies considerably when the drill bit crosses the boundary between two different bone tissues. Therefore, the rate of impedance change is used to determine whether the tip of the drill is located in one of cortical bone, cancellous bone, and cortical bone near a boundary with soft tissue. In vitro experiments in porcine thoracic spines were performed to demonstrate the feasibility of the impedance sensing drill. The experimental results indicate that the drill, used with the proposed data-processing method, can provide accurate and reliable breakthrough detection in the bone-drilling process.

  2. Sensing fluid viscosity and density through mechanical impedance measurement using a whisker transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Feng; Ling, Shih-Fu

    2013-05-01

    This paper presents a new technique for fluid viscosity and density sensing through measuring the mechanical impedance of the fluid load applied on a sphere. A piezoelectric whisker transducer (WT) is proposed which acts simultaneously as both the actuator to excite the sphere tip to oscillate in the fluid and the sensor to measure the force, velocity and mechanical impedance. The relationship between mechanical impedance of the fluid load and electrical impedance of the WT is derived based on a transduction matrix model which characterizes the electro-mechanical transduction process of the WT in both directions. The mechanical impedance is further related to the fluid viscosity and density using a theoretical model. The establishment of this fluid-mechanical-electrical relationship allows the WT to extract the fluid viscosity and density conveniently and accurately just from its electrical impedance. Experimental studies are carried out to calibrate the WT and test its performance using glycerol-water mixtures. It is concluded that the WT is capable of providing results comparable to those of standard viscometers within a wide measurement range due to its low working frequency and large vibration amplitude. Its unique self-actuation-and-sensing feature makes it a suitable solution for online fluid sensing.

  3. Acoustic wayfinding: A method to measure the acoustic contrast of different paving materials for blind people.

    PubMed

    Secchi, Simone; Lauria, Antonio; Cellai, Gianfranco

    2017-01-01

    Acoustic wayfinding involves using a variety of auditory cues to create a mental map of the surrounding environment. For blind people, these auditory cues become the primary substitute for visual information in order to understand the features of the spatial context and orient themselves. This can include creating sound waves, such as tapping a cane. This paper reports the results of a research about the "acoustic contrast" parameter between paving materials functioning as a cue and the surrounding or adjacent surface functioning as a background. A number of different materials was selected in order to create a test path and a procedure was defined for the verification of the ability of blind people to distinguish different acoustic contrasts. A method is proposed for measuring acoustic contrast generated by the impact of a cane tip on the ground to provide blind people with environmental information on spatial orientation and wayfinding in urban places.

  4. Measurement of the Q value of an acoustic resonator.

    PubMed

    Biwa, Tetsushi; Ueda, Yuki; Nomura, Hiroshi; Mizutani, Uichiro; Yazaki, Taichi

    2005-08-01

    A cylindrical acoustic resonator was externally driven at the first resonance frequency by a compression driver. The acoustic energy stored in the resonator and the power dissipated per unit time were evaluated through the simultaneous measurements of acoustic pressure and velocity, in order to determine the Q value of the resonator. The resulting Q value, being employed as a measure of the damping in a resonator, was obtained as 36. However, the Q value determined from a frequency response curve known as a conventional technique turned out to be 25, which is 30% less than that obtained in the present method. By further applying these two methods in the case of a resonator having an acoustic load inside, we present an accurate measurement of the Q value of the resonator by making full use of its definition.

  5. FEM/BEM impedance and power analysis for measured LGS SH-SAW devices.

    PubMed

    Kenny, Thomas D; Pollard, Thomas B; Berkenpas, Eric; da Cunha, Mauricio Pereira

    2006-02-01

    Pure shear horizontal piezoelectrically active surface and bulk acoustic waves (SH-SAW and SH-BAW) exist along rotated Y-cuts, Euler angles (0 degrees, theta, 90 degrees), of trigonal class 32 group crystals, which include the LGX family of crystals (langasite, langatate, and langanite). In this paper both SH-SAW and SH-BAW generated by finite-length, interdigital transducers (IDTs) on langasite, Euler angles (0 degrees, 22 degrees, 90 degrees), are simulated using combined finite- and boundary-element methods (FEM/BEM). Aluminum and gold IDT electrodes ranging in thickness from 600 A to 2000 A have been simulated, fabricated, and tested, with both free and metalized surfaces outside the IDT regions considered. Around the device's operating frequency, the percent difference between the calculated IDT impedance magnitude using the FEM/BEM model and the measurements is better than 5% for the different metal layers and thicknesses considered. The proportioning of SH-SAW and SH-BAW power is analyzed as a function of the number of IDT electrodes; type of electrode metal; and relative thickness of the electrode film, h/wavelength, where wavelength is the SH-SAW wavelength. Simulation results show that moderate mechanical loading by gold electrodes increases the proportion of input power converted to SH-SAW. For example, with a split-electrode IDT, comprising 238 electrodes with a relative thickness h/wavelength = 0.63% and surrounded by an infinitesimally thin conducting film, nearly 9% more input power is radiated as SH-SAW when gold instead of aluminum electrodes are used.

  6. Material Property Measurement in Hostile Environments using Laser Acoustics

    SciTech Connect

    Ken L. Telschow

    2004-08-01

    Acoustic methods are well known and have been used to measure various intrinsic material properties, such as, elastic coefficients, density, crystal axis orientation, microstructural texture, and residual stress. Extrinsic properties, such as, dimensions, motion variables or temperature are also readily determined from acoustic methods. Laser acoustics, employing optical generation and detection of elastic waves, has a unique advantage over other acoustic methods—it is noncontacting, uses the sample surface itself for transduction, requires no couplant or invasive sample surface preparation and can be utilized in any hostile environment allowing optical access to the sample surface. In addition, optical generation and detection probe beams can be focused to the micron scale and/or shaped to alter the transduction process with a degree of control not possible using contact transduction methods. Laser methods are amenable to both continuous wave and pulse-echo measurements and have been used from Hz to 100’s of GHz (time scales from sec to psec) and with amplitudes sufficient to fracture materials. This paper shall review recent applications of laser acoustic methods to determining material properties in hostile environments that preclude the use of contacting transduction techniques. Example environments include high temperature (>1000C) sintering and molten metal processing, thin film deposition by plasma techniques, materials moving at high velocity during the fabrication process and nuclear high radiation regions. Recent technological advances in solid-state lasers and telecommunications have greatly aided the development and implementation of laser acoustic methods, particularly at ultra high frequencies. Consequently, laser acoustic material property measurements exhibit high precision and reproducibility today. In addition, optical techniques provide methods of imaging acoustic motion that is both quantitative and rapid. Possible future directions for

  7. A microchip integrating cell array positioning with in situ single-cell impedance measurement.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaoliang; Zhu, Rong; Zong, Xianli

    2015-10-07

    This paper presents a novel microarray chip integrating cell positioning with in situ, real-time and long-time impedance measurement on a single cell. The microchip integrates a plurality of quadrupole-electrode units (termed positioning electrodes) patterned into an array with pairs of planar electrodes (termed measuring electrodes) located at the centers of each quadrupole-electrode unit. The positioning electrodes are utilized to trap and position living cells onto the measuring electrodes based on negative dielectrophoresis (nDEP), while the measuring electrodes are used to measure impedances of the trapped single cells. Each measuring electrode has a small footprint area of 7 × 7 μm(2) to ensure inhabiting only one single cell on it. However, the electrode with a small surface area has a low double-layer capacitance when it is immersed in a liquid solution, thus generating a large double-layer impedance, which reduces the sensitivity for impedance measurement on the single cell. To enlarge the effective surface areas of the measuring electrodes, a novel surface-modification process is proposed to controllably construct gold nanostructures on the surfaces of the measuring electrodes while the positioning electrodes are unstained. The double layer capacitances of the modified electrodes are increased by about one order after surface-modification. The developed microchip is used to monitor the adhering behavior of a single HeLa cell by measuring its impedance spectra in real time. The measured impedance is analyzed and used to extract cellular electrical parameters, which demonstrated that the cell compresses the electrical double layer in the process of adherence and adheres onto the measuring electrodes after 4-5 hours.

  8. On the use of The Bio-Impedance technique for Body Composition Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huerta-Franco, R.; Vargas-Luna, M.; González-Solís, J. L.; Gutiérrez-Juárez, G.

    2003-09-01

    Reviewing the methods and physical principles used in body composition measurements (BCM), it is evident that more accurate, reliable, and easily handled methods are required. The use of bio-impedance analysis (BIA) has been very useful in BCM. This technique, in the single frequency mode, has some commercial versions to perform BCM. However these apparatus have significant variability in the BCM values. The multi-frequency option of the bio-impedance technique has still a lot of challenges to overcome. We studied the variability of the body impedance spectrum (from 1 Hz to 1 MHz) in a group of subjects compared to the values obtained from commercial apparatus. We compared different anatomical body regions, some of them with less subcutaneous body fat (frontal, anterior tibial, knee, and frontal regions); others with more subcutaneous body fat (pectoral, abdominal, and internal calf regions). In order to model the bio-impedance spectrum, we analyzed layered samples with different thickness and material composition.

  9. Acoustic temperature measurement in a rocket noise field.

    PubMed

    Giraud, Jarom H; Gee, Kent L; Ellsworth, John E

    2010-05-01

    A 1 μm diameter platinum wire resistance thermometer has been used to measure temperature fluctuations generated during a static GEM-60 rocket motor test. Exact and small-signal relationships between acoustic pressure and acoustic temperature are derived in order to compare the temperature probe output with that of a 3.18 mm diameter condenser microphone. After preliminary plane wave tests yielded good agreement between the transducers within the temperature probe's ∼2 kHz bandwidth, comparison between the temperature probe and microphone data during the motor firing show that the ±∼3 K acoustic temperature fluctuations are a significant contributor to the total temperature variations.

  10. Measuring the multi-frequency electrical impedance of the mouse gastrocnemius muscle using a tetrapolar technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Fogerson, P. M.; Rutkove, S. B.

    2010-04-01

    Electrical impedance methods can be used to evaluate and monitor neuromuscular disease states. Recently, we have applied tetrapolar surface electrical impedance methods to the gastrocnemius muscle of the rat for this purpose and substantial changes in the impedance parameters after sciatic nerve crush can be identified. In order to be able to study additional animal models of nerve and muscle disease, however, it would highly desirable to be able to perform such impedance measurements in the mouse. Yet the small size of the mouse presents a substantial technical challenge. In this study, we evaluate a basic approach for performing such measurements. A series of thin, stainless steel strip electrodes affixed to the gastrocnemius and interfaced via a separate connector to the Imp SFB7® (Impedimed, Inc), provided an effective means for obtaining impedance data in the 20-500 kHz range. After two weeks, test-retest reproducibility was good, with intra-class correlation coefficients as high 0.84 and variability as low as 12.86 ± 6.18% in the 15 mice studied. Using this approach, it may now be possible to study impedance changes in a variety of mouse models of neuromuscular disease, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, spinal muscular atrophy, muscular dystrophy and Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

  11. Optimally tuned resonant negative capacitance for piezoelectric shunt damping based on measured electromechanical impedance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salloum, Rogério; Heuss, Oliver; Götz, Benedict; Mayer, Dirk

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, a new tuning method for shunt damping with a series resistance, inductance and negative capacitance is proposed and its validity is investigated. It is based on the measured electromechanical impedance of a piezoelectric system, which is represented through an equivalent electrical circuit that takes into account the characteristics of the piezoelectric transducer and the host structure. Afterwards, an additional circuit representing the shunt is connected and the Norton equivalent impedance is obtained at the terminals that represent the mechanical mode of interest. During the tuning process, the optimal shunt parameters are found by minimizing the maximum absolute value of the Norton equivalent impedance over a defined frequency range through a numerical optimization. Taking benefit from the analogy between electrical impedance and mechanical admittance, the minimization of different mechanical responses (displacement, velocity or acceleration) is also proposed and the different optimum shunt parameters obtained are compared. In view of real technical applications, this method allows the integration of a real negative capacitance circuit, i.e., a negative impedance converter, rather than an ideal component. It is thus possible to use the impedance of this circuit and optimize the individual component values. Since this method is based on one simple measurement, it can be applied to arbitrary structures without the need of complex dynamic tests or expensive finite elements calculations. Finally, an experimental analysis is carried out in order to compare the damping performance of the proposed method and the conventional analytical method that minimizes a mechanical frequency response function.

  12. Acoustical enhancement systems: Design criteria and evaluation of room acoustical parameters based on in situ measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Munster, Bjorn; Prinssen, Wim

    2003-10-01

    Acoustic enhancement systems have evolved significantly during the years. Where the early systems only aimed to increase the reverberation time in a hall, nowadays the increase of the reverberation time is only one of the features of such a system. Contrary and additionally to passive acoustics, an acoustic enhancement system enables a designer or acoustical consultant to change the acoustical characteristics of a hall in a more flexible way. Due to the sophisticated convolution processes and layout of such a system besides the reverberation time also, e.g., speech intelligibility and spaciousness can be improved or special effects can be added to shows. In this paper the applications of an enhancement system in general will be outlined in more detail. Furthermore, design criteria will be given which can be formulated for the installation of such a system. These criteria can be used to evaluate proposed designs, but also to estimate the required provisions to be included in the planning of a system installation. Besides, the paper describes the results of in situ measurements of one such system (SIAP) whereby the increase of the reverberation time is evaluated with respect to certain important room acoustical parameters, i.e., reverberant level, lateral efficiency and clarity.

  13. Influence of sodium chloride content in electrolyte solution on electrochemical impedance measurements of human dentin

    PubMed Central

    Eldarrat, Aziza; High, Alec; Kale, Girish

    2017-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of sodium chloride (NaCl) content in electrolyte solution on electrochemical impedance measurements of human dentin by employing electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Materials and Methods: Dentin samples were prepared from extracted molars. Electrochemical impedance measurements were carried out over a wide frequency range (0.01Hz-10MHz). After measurements, samples were characterized using scanning electron microscopy. Results: Electrochemical impedance measurements showed that the mean values of dentin electrical resistance were 4284, 2062, 1336, 53 and 48kΩ at different NaCl contents in electrolyte solution. One-way ANOVA test of mean values of dentin electrical resistance revealed a significant difference (P < 0.0001) as a function of NaCl content in electrolyte solution. Comparing electrical resistance values of dentin samples at 0.05% w/v and 0.9% w/v concentrations were found to be significantly different (P < 0.05 at 95% confidence level). Scanning electron microscopy revealed structure of dentin sample with intertubular dentin matrix and distribution of patent dentinal tubules. Conclusion: This in vitro study indicated, through electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements, that electrical resistance of dentin was affected by the concentration of NaCl in electrolyte solution. It is clear from the current study that NaCl concentration in electrolyte solution has a marked influence on dentin electrical resistance. Therefore, this baseline data need to be considered in any future study on dental samples. PMID:28348614

  14. Influence of sodium chloride content in electrolyte solution on electrochemical impedance measurements of human dentin.

    PubMed

    Eldarrat, Aziza; High, Alec; Kale, Girish

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of sodium chloride (NaCl) content in electrolyte solution on electrochemical impedance measurements of human dentin by employing electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Dentin samples were prepared from extracted molars. Electrochemical impedance measurements were carried out over a wide frequency range (0.01Hz-10MHz). After measurements, samples were characterized using scanning electron microscopy. Electrochemical impedance measurements showed that the mean values of dentin electrical resistance were 4284, 2062, 1336, 53 and 48kΩ at different NaCl contents in electrolyte solution. One-way ANOVA test of mean values of dentin electrical resistance revealed a significant difference (P < 0.0001) as a function of NaCl content in electrolyte solution. Comparing electrical resistance values of dentin samples at 0.05% w/v and 0.9% w/v concentrations were found to be significantly different (P < 0.05 at 95% confidence level). Scanning electron microscopy revealed structure of dentin sample with intertubular dentin matrix and distribution of patent dentinal tubules. This in vitro study indicated, through electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements, that electrical resistance of dentin was affected by the concentration of NaCl in electrolyte solution. It is clear from the current study that NaCl concentration in electrolyte solution has a marked influence on dentin electrical resistance. Therefore, this baseline data need to be considered in any future study on dental samples.

  15. The determination of the acoustic parameters of volcanic rocks from compressional velocity measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carroll, R.D.

    1969-01-01

    A statistical analysis was made of the relationship of various acoustic parameters of volcanic rocks to compressional wave velocities for data obtained in a volcanic region in Nevada. Some additional samples, chiefly granitic rocks, were also included in the study to extend the range of parameters and the variety of siliceous rock types sampled. Laboratory acoustic measurements obtained on 62 dry core samples were grouped with similar measurements obtained from geophysical logging devices at several depth intervals in a hole from which 15 of the core samples had been obtained. The effects of lithostatic and hydrostatic load on changing the rock acoustic parameters measured in the hole were noticeable when compared with the laboratory measurements on the same core. The results of the analyses determined by grouping all of the data, however, indicate that dynamic Young's, shear and bulk modulus, shear velocity, shear and compressional characteristic impedance, as well as amplitude and energy reflection coefficients may be reliably estimated on the basis of the compressional wave velocities of the rocks investigated. Less precise estimates can be made of density based on the rock compressional velocity. The possible extension of these relationships to include many siliceous rocks is suggested. ?? 1969.

  16. Energy flow measurements in acoustic waves in a duct.

    PubMed

    Biwa, Tetsushi

    2006-12-22

    Where, how much and how efficiently the energy conversion takes place in a regenerator of a thermoacoustic engine are expressed using the axial distribution of acoustic work flow and heat flow. As a first step in determining the energy flows inside the regenerator, measuring methods of the work flow are briefly described and the experimental results in an acoustic resonator are shown. Applicability of these methods to the regenerator is discussed.

  17. Acoustic levitator for containerless measurements on low temperature liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Benmore, Chris J; Weber, Richard; Neuefeind, Joerg C; Rey, Charles A A

    2009-01-01

    A single-axis acoustic levitator was constructed and used to levitate liquid and solid drops at temperatures from -40 to +40 C. The levitator consisted of: (i) two acoustic transducers mounted on a rigid vertical support that was bolted to an optical breadboard, (ii) a acoustic power supply that controlled acoustic intensity, relative phase of the drive to the transducers, and could modulate the acoustic forces at frequencies up to 1kHz, (iii) a video camera, and (iv) a system for providing a stream of controlled temperature gas flow over the sample. The acoustic transducers were operated at their resonant frequency of ~ 22 kHz and could produce sound pressure levels up to 160 dB. The force applied by the acoustic field could be modulated using a frequency generator to excite oscillations in the sample. Sample temperature was controlled using a modified Cryostream Plus and measured using thermocouples and an infrared thermal imager. The levitator was installed at x-ray beamline 11 ID-C at the Advanced Photon Source and used to investigate the structure of supercooled liquids.

  18. Effect of contralateral stimulation on acoustic reflectance measurements.

    PubMed

    Pichelli, Tathiany Silva; Soares, Jordana Costa; Cibin, Bruna Carla; Carvallo, Renata Mota Mamede

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic reflectance is an important tool in the assessment of middle ear afflictions, and the method is considered advantageous in relation to tympanometry. There has been a growing interest in the study of contralateral acoustic stimulation and its effect on the activation of the efferent auditory pathway. Studies have shown that the introduction of simultaneous stimulation in the contralateral ear generates alterations in auditory response patterns. To investigate the influence of contralateral stimulation on acoustic reflectance measurements. Case study of 30 subjects with normal hearing, of both genders, aged 18-30 years. The test and retest acoustic reflectance was conducted in the frequency range 200-6000Hz. The procedure was repeated with the simultaneous presence of contralateral white noise at 30dBNS. The analysis of the conditions of test, retest, and test with contralateral noise showed statistical difference at the frequency of 2kHz (p=0.011 and p=0.002 in test and retest, respectively) in the right ear. The activation of the auditory efferent pathways through contralateral acoustic stimulation produces alterations in response patterns of acoustic reflectance, increasing sound reflection and modifying middle ear acoustical energy transfer. Copyright © 2015 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  19. Non-invasive measurement of micro-area skin impedance in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dachao; Liang, Wenshuai; Liu, Tongkun; Yu, Haixia; Xu, Kexin

    2011-12-01

    Volume measurement of interstitial fluid transdermally extracted is important in continuous glucose monitoring instrument. The volume of transdermally extracted interstitial fluid could be determined by a skin permeability coefficient. If the skin impedance which is the indicator of skin permeability coefficient can be accurately measured, the volume of interstitial fluid can be calculated based on the relationship between the indicator and the skin permeability coefficient. The possibility of using the skin impedance to indicate the skin permeability coefficient is investigated. A correlation model between the skin impedance and the skin permeability coefficient is developed. A novel non-invasive method for in vivo, real-time, and accurate measurement of skin impedance within a micro skin area is brought forward. The proposed measurement method is based on the theory that organisms saliva and interstitial fluid are equipotential. An electrode is put on the surface of a micro skin area and another one is put in the mouth to be fully contacted with saliva of an animal in the experiments. The electrode in mouth is used to replace the implantable subcutaneous electrode for non-invasive measurement of skin impedance in vivo. A biologically compatible AC current with amplitude of 100mv and frequency of 10Hz is applied to stimulate the micro skin area by the two electrodes. And then the voltage and current between the two electrodes are measured to calculate the skin impedance within a micro skin area. The measurement results by electrode in mouth are compared with the results by subcutaneous electrode in animal experiments and they are consistent so the proposed measurement method is verified well. The effect of moisture and pressure for the measurement is also studied in the paper.

  20. Particle trapping and impedance measurement using bilayer electrodes integrated with microcavity structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guan-Ting; Liu, Chia-Feng; Jang, Ling-Sheng; Li, Shun-Lai; Wang, Min-Haw

    2017-03-01

    Traditional planar electrodes for single-particle impedance measurement have difficulty in trapping and positioning particles. This paper proposes a microfluidic device for single-particle trapping and impedance measurement with a microcavity configuration. A carbon dioxide (CO2) laser technique was used to fabricate the microcavity structure, which can capture 15 µm diameter particles without requiring additional trapping structures. The measurement electrodes on both sides of the microcavity were fabricated using electroplating and deposition techniques. The advantages of the microcavity structure and electrodes are discussed. The bottom electrode spreads into the microcavity to increase measurement sensitivity and shrink the exit aperture to around 10 µm for particle trapping. The experimental results show that the device successfully captured particles and distinguished the impedance of a particle from that of phosphate-buffered saline solution.

  1. Temperature-stable parallel-plate dielectric cell for broadband liquid impedance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzeo, Brian A.; Chandra, Satyan; Mellor, Brett L.; Arellano, Jesus

    2010-12-01

    A liquid impedance cell for broadband impedance measurements up to 110 MHz is presented. The design incorporates temperature control and minimizes parasitic capacitance and inductance. The cell is simple to fabricate and uses chemically resistant materials, stainless steel, and Teflon. This dielectric cell can be used in a variety of liquid measurements, particularly those related to impedance measurements of biological objects in solution. Temperature control is illustrated in measurements of the permittivity of deionized water from 5 to 55 °C. Numerical fitting procedures employed on the relaxation curves indicate good agreement with previous studies on beta-lactoglobulin and hen lysozyme. Titration capability is demonstrated through dielectric titration of hen lysozyme and beta-lactoglobulin.

  2. Classroom acoustics in Omaha, Nebraska: Measurements and outreach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowden, Erica E.; Wang, Lily M.; Bradley, David T.

    2002-11-01

    This project collected data detailing the current status of classroom acoustics while simultaneously increasing awareness of educational acoustics and exposure to acoustical engineering research in local schools. In 8 Omaha-area schools, 2 acoustical aspects which directly influence speech intelligibility were measured and studied: (1) background noise levels resulting from a building's mechanical systems; and (2) reverberation times within the classroom. Prior to each measurement session, a presentation on good classroom acoustic principles was presented to the teacher and students in that classroom. Subsequently, the teacher and students assisted the principal investigator and research assistants in the measurement of the acoustic data from their classroom. In total, 13 classrooms were studied, with the assistance of 425 middle and high school students in 14 different classes. The background noise results have been associated with commonly used noise criterion curves. Results are compared to recommended background noise levels and reverberation times suggested by ANSI standard S12.60-2002. The resulting database provides knowledge on the current status of classrooms in Omaha, and may be indicative of classroom situations across the midwestern United States.

  3. Software development with two port calibration techniques for RHIC impedance measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Mane, V.; Shea, T.

    1993-06-01

    The coupling impedance of accelerator devices is measured by simulating the beam with a central wire and measuring the scattering parameters of the system. The wire pipe system forms a mismatch with the 50 ohm transmission line. An integrated software environment has been developed in LabVIEW, for the Macintosh. The program measures the scattering parameters of some known standards, determines the connect scattering parameters of a device using TRL calibration technique and gives the impedance of the device. Its performance has been tested for some known microwave devices.

  4. Software development with two port calibration techniques for RHIC impedance measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Mane, V.; Shea, T.

    1993-01-01

    The coupling impedance of accelerator devices is measured by simulating the beam with a central wire and measuring the scattering parameters of the system. The wire pipe system forms a mismatch with the 50 ohm transmission line. An integrated software environment has been developed in LabVIEW, for the Macintosh. The program measures the scattering parameters of some known standards, determines the connect scattering parameters of a device using TRL calibration technique and gives the impedance of the device. Its performance has been tested for some known microwave devices.

  5. New equivalent-electrical circuit model and a practical measurement method for human body impedance.

    PubMed

    Chinen, Koyu; Kinjo, Ichiko; Zamami, Aki; Irei, Kotoyo; Nagayama, Kanako

    2015-01-01

    Human body impedance analysis is an effective tool to extract electrical information from tissues in the human body. This paper presents a new measurement method of impedance using armpit electrode and a new equivalent circuit model for the human body. The lowest impedance was measured by using an LCR meter and six electrodes including armpit electrodes. The electrical equivalent circuit model for the cell consists of resistance R and capacitance C. The R represents electrical resistance of the liquid of the inside and outside of the cell, and the C represents high frequency conductance of the cell membrane. We propose an equivalent circuit model which consists of five parallel high frequency-passing CR circuits. The proposed equivalent circuit represents alpha distribution in the impedance measured at a lower frequency range due to ion current of the outside of the cell, and beta distribution at a high frequency range due to the cell membrane and the liquid inside cell. The calculated values by using the proposed equivalent circuit model were consistent with the measured values for the human body impedance.

  6. Shock wave interaction with interfaces between materials having different acoustic impedances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, H.; Moosavi-Nejad, S.; Akiyama, H.; Menezes, V.

    2014-03-01

    We experimentally examined interaction of blast waves with water-air/air-water interfaces through high-speed-real-time visualization and measurement of pressure across the waves. The underwater shock wave, which was expected to reflect totally at the water-air interface, was observed transmitting a shock front to air. Transmission of a blast wave from air to water was also visualized and evaluated. Underwater shock waves are used in several medical/biological procedures, where such unforeseen transmissions can result in detriments. The details provide a guideline to evaluate blast wave transmissions, which can induce tissue and brain injuries. The results explain mechanisms behind blast-induced traumatic brain injury.

  7. Crew Quarters (CQ) and Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) Measurement Facility Combined Impedance Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scully, Robert C.

    2011-01-01

    This report documents an investigation into observed failures associated with conducted susceptibility testing of Crew Quarters (CQ) hardware in the Johnson Space Center (JSC) Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) Measurement Facility, and the work accomplished to identify the source of the observed behavior. Investigation led to the conclusion that the hardware power input impedance was interacting with the facility power impedance leading to instability at the observed frequencies of susceptibility. Testing performed in other facilities did not show this same behavior, pointing back to the EMI Measurement Facility power as the potential root cause. A LISN emulating the Station power bus impedance was inserted into the power circuit, and the susceptibility was eliminated from the measurements.

  8. Effect of Contralateral Noise on Acoustic Reflex Latency Measures.

    PubMed

    Prabhu, Prashanth; Divyashree, Koratagere Narayanaswamy; Neeraja, Raju; Akhilandeshwari, Sivaswami

    2015-12-01

    The present study was conducted to determine the effect of contralateral broadband noise on acoustic reflex latency (ARL). Acoustic reflex latency changes for 10 and 90% on- and off-time acoustic reflexes with contralateral broadband noise were measured in 30 adults with normal hearing. The results of the study demonstrate that there was a latency prolongation for reflex on-time (10 and 90%) and latency reduction for reflex off-time (10 and 90%). This effect was seen for 500, 1000, and 2000 Hz reflex-eliciting signals. The results also showed that there was no effect of gender on latency changes in acoustic reflexes. Latency changes may explain efferent auditory system mechanisms used for the protection of the cochlea and improvement in speech perception. Thus, contralateral changes of ARL can serve as an additional tool to assess the efferent system functioning.

  9. Relation between near field and far field acoustic measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bies, D. A.; Scharton, T. D.

    1974-01-01

    Several approaches to the problem of determining the far field directivity of an acoustic source located in a reverberant environment, such as a wind tunnel, are investigated analytically and experimentally. The decrease of sound pressure level with distance is illustrated; and the spatial extent of the hydrodynamic and geometric near fields, the far field, and the reverberant field are described. A previously-prosposed analytical technique for predicting the far field directivity of the acoustic source on the basis of near field data is investigated. Experiments are conducted with small acoustic sources and an analysis is performed to determine the variation with distance from the source of the directionality of the sound field. A novel experiment is conducted in which the sound pressure measured at various distances from an acoustic driver located in the NASA Ames 40 x 80 ft wind tunnel is crosscorrelated with the driver excitation voltage.

  10. Theoretical study of different attenuation measurement by acoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamdi, F.; Bouhedja, S.; Amrani, H.

    2013-10-01

    Many works are devoted to study the attenuation of surface waves in media, particularly, leaky surface acoustic waves (LSAW). In this work, a big part of the study is based on the intensity of the output signal, i.e., acoustic signature, V(z). The latter is obtained by the use of quantitative mode of acoustic microscopy in order to measure the velocity and the attenuation of those excited waves at the limit between the specimen and the coupling liquid. Our aim is to compare the attenuation values of the LSAW propagation in porous silicon obtained with three different methods. The first is obtained by resolving Viktorov equation. The second method is the spectral analysis acoustical signature V(z) curves. The third method uses the dark field. The obtained results are in a good agreement with those experiments.

  11. The development of the miniaturized waveform receiver with the function measuring Antenna Impedance in space plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, H.; Kojima, H.; Fukuhara, H.; Okada, S.; Yamakawa, H.

    2012-04-01

    Plasma wave is one of the most essential physical quantities in the solar terrestrial physics. The role of plasma wave receiver onboard satellites is to detect plasma waves in space with a good signal to noise ratio. There are two types of plasma wave receivers, the sweep frequency analyzer and the waveform capture. While the sweep frequency analyzer provides plasma wave spectra, the waveform capture obtains waveforms with phase information that is significant in studying nonlinear phenomena. Antenna sensors to observe electric fields of the plasma waves show different features in plasmas from in vacuum. The antenna impedances have specific characteristics in the frequency domain because of the dispersion of plasmas. These antenna impedances are expressed with complex number. We need to know not only the antenna impedances but also the transfer functions of plasma wave receiver's circuits in order to calibrate observed waveforms precisely. The impedances of the electric field antennas are affected by a state of surrounding plasmas. Since satellites run through various regions with different plasma parameters, we precisely should measure the antenna impedances onboard spacecraft. On the contrary, we can obtain the plasma density and by measuring the antenna impedances. Several formulas of the antenna impedance measurement system were proposed. A synchronous detection method is used on the BepiColombo Mercury Magnetospheric Orbiter (MMO), which will be launched in 2014. The digital data are stored in the onboard memory. They are read out and converted to the analog waveforms by D/A converter. They are fed into the input of the preamplifiers of antenna sensors through a resistor. We can calculate a transfer function of the circuit by applying the synchronous detection method to the output waveform from waveform receivers and digital data as a signal source. The size of this system is same as an A5 board. In recent years, Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC

  12. Rapid Impedance Spectrum Measurements for State-of-Health Assessment of Energy Storage Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Jon P. Christophersen; John L. Morrison; Chester G. Motloch; William H. Morrison

    2012-04-01

    Harmonic compensated synchronous detection (HCSD) is a technique that can be used to measure wideband impedance spectra within seconds based on an input sum-of-sines signal having a frequency spread separated by harmonics. The battery (or other energy storage device) is excited with a sum-of-sines current signal that has a duration of at least one period of the lowest frequency. The voltage response is then captured and synchronously detected at each frequency of interest to determine the impedance spectra. This technique was successfully simulated using a simplified battery model and then verified with commercially available Sanyo lithium-ion cells. Simulations revealed the presence of a start-up transient effect when only one period of the lowest frequency is included in the excitation signal. This transient effect appears to only influence the low-frequency impedance measurements and can be reduced when a longer input signal is used. Furthermore, lithium-ion cell testing has indicated that the transient effect does not seem to impact the charge transfer resistance in the mid-frequency region. The degradation rates for the charge transfer resistance measured from the HCSD technique were very similar to the changes observed from standardized impedance spectroscopy methods. Results from these studies, therefore, indicate that HCSD is a viable, rapid alternative approach to acquiring impedance spectra.

  13. Studies of longitudinal profile of electron bunches and impedance measurements at Indus-2 synchrotron radiation source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garg, Akash Deep; Yadav, S.; Kumar, Mukesh; Shrivastava, B. B.; Karnewar, A. K.; Ojha, A.; Puntambekar, T. A.

    2016-04-01

    Indus-2 is a 3rd generation synchrotron radiation source at the Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology (RRCAT) in India. We study the longitudinal profile of electrons in Indus-2 by using dual sweep synchroscan streak camera at visible diagnostic beamline. In this paper, the longitudinal profiles of electron bunch are analyzed by filling beam current in a single bunch mode. These studies are carried at injection energy (550 MeV) and at ramped beam energy (2.5 GeV). The effects of the wakefield generated interactions between the circulating electrons and the surrounding vacuum chamber are analyzed in terms of measured effects on longitudinal beam distribution. The impedance of the storage ring is obtained by fitting the solutions of Haissinski equation to the measured bunch lengthening with different impedance models. The impedance of storage ring obtained by a series R+L impedance model indicates a resistance (R) of 1350±125 Ω, an inductance (L) of 180±25 nH and broadband impedance of 2.69 Ω. These results are also compared with the values obtained from measured synchronous phase advancing and scaling laws. These studies are very useful in better understanding and control of the electromagnetic interactions.

  14. Measurement of bio-impedance with a smart needle to confirm percutaneous kidney access.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, D J; Sinkov, V A; Roberts, W W; Allaf, M E; Patriciu, A; Jarrett, T W; Kavoussi, L R; Stoianovici, D

    2001-10-01

    The traditional method of percutaneous renal access requires freehand needle placement guided by C-arm fluoroscopy, ultrasonography, or computerized tomography. This approach provides limited objective means for verifying successful access. We developed an impedance based percutaneous Smart Needle system and successfully used it to confirm collecting system access in ex vivo porcine kidneys. The Smart Needle consists of a modified 18 gauge percutaneous access needle with the inner stylet electrically insulated from the outer sheath. Impedance is measured between the exposed stylet tip and sheath using Model 4275 LCR meter (Hewlett-Packard, Sunnyvale, California). An ex vivo porcine kidney was distended by continuous gravity infusion of 100 cm. water saline from a catheter passed through the parenchyma into the collecting system. The Smart Needle was gradually inserted into the kidney to measure depth precisely using a robotic needle placement system, while impedance was measured continuously. The Smart Needle was inserted 4 times in each of 4 kidneys. When the needle penetrated the distended collecting system in 11 of 16 attempts, a characteristic sharp drop in resistivity was noted from 1.9 to 1.1 ohm m. Entry into the collecting system was confirmed by removing the stylet and observing fluid flow from the sheath. This characteristic impedance change was observed only at successful entry into the collecting system. A characteristic sharp drop in impedance signifies successful entry into the collecting system. The Smart Needle system may prove useful for percutaneous kidney access.

  15. An Analysis of Electrical Impedance Measurements Applied for Plant N Status Estimation in Lettuce (Lactuca sativa)

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Huerta, Rafael F.; de J. Ortiz-Melendez, Antonio; Guevara-Gonzalez, Ramon G.; Torres-Pacheco, Irineo; Herrera-Ruiz, Gilberto; Contreras-Medina, Luis M.; Prado-Olivarez, Juan; Ocampo-Velazquez, Rosalia V.

    2014-01-01

    Nitrogen plays a key role in crop yields. Hence, farmers may apply excessive N fertilizers to crop fields, inducing environmental pollution. Crop N monitoring methods have been developed to improve N fertilizer management, most of them based on leaf or canopy optical-property measurements. However, sensitivity to environmental interference remains an important drawback. Electrical impedance has been applied to determine the physiological and nutritional status of plant tissue, but no studies related to plant-N contents are reported. The objective of this article is to analyze how the electrical impedance response of plants is affected by their N status. Four sets of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) with a different N-source concentrations per set were used. Total nitrogen and electrical impedance spectra (in a 1 to 100 kHz frequency range) were measured five times per set, three times every other day. Minimum phase angles of impedance spectra were detected and analyzed, together with the frequency value in which they occurred, and their magnitude at that frequency. High and positive correlation was observed between plant N content and frequency values at minimum phase angle with no significant variations detected between days of measurement. These results suggest that electrical impedance can be sensitive to plant N status. PMID:25057134

  16. An analysis of electrical impedance measurements applied for plant N status estimation in lettuce (Lactuca sativa).

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Huerta, Rafael F; Ortiz-Melendez, Antonio de J; Guevara-Gonzalez, Ramon G; Torres-Pacheco, Irineo; Herrera-Ruiz, Gilberto; Contreras-Medina, Luis M; Prado-Olivarez, Juan; Ocampo-Velazquez, Rosalia V

    2014-06-27

    Nitrogen plays a key role in crop yields. Hence, farmers may apply excessive N fertilizers to crop fields, inducing environmental pollution. Crop N monitoring methods have been developed to improve N fertilizer management, most of them based on leaf or canopy optical-property measurements. However, sensitivity to environmental interference remains an important drawback. Electrical impedance has been applied to determine the physiological and nutritional status of plant tissue, but no studies related to plant-N contents are reported. The objective of this article is to analyze how the electrical impedance response of plants is affected by their N status. Four sets of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) with a different N-source concentrations per set were used. Total nitrogen and electrical impedance spectra (in a 1 to 100 kHz frequency range) were measured five times per set, three times every other day. Minimum phase angles of impedance spectra were detected and analyzed, together with the frequency value in which they occurred, and their magnitude at that frequency. High and positive correlation was observed between plant N content and frequency values at minimum phase angle with no significant variations detected between days of measurement. These results suggest that electrical impedance can be sensitive to plant N status.

  17. Measuring Stroke Volume: Impedance Cardiography vs Phase-Contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Borzage, Matthew; Heidari, Kimia; Chavez, Thomas; Seri, Istvan; Wood, John C; Blüml, Stefan

    2017-09-01

    Determination of cardiac output requires measurement of both heart rate and stroke volume. Techniques for measuring heart rate are widespread, and 1 technique for bedside monitoring of stroke volume is electrical impedance cardiography. To determine the accuracy and precision of stroke volume measured via impedance cardiography and whether the technique can be used to detect trends. Eleven healthy research participants (22-52 years old) were examined with simultaneous impedance cardiography and phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging at rest and during exercise. Bland-Altman analysis with repeated-measures correction was used to compare stroke volumes determined with the 2 methods. The suitability of impedance cardiography for detecting trends in stroke volume was analyzed by using the Critchley radial limits of agreement method. Phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging indicated a mean stroke volume of 87 (SD, 16) mL at rest; in 9 volunteers, it changed during exercise (P = .04 to P < .001); in 2 volunteers, it did not (P = .32, P = .06). For the range of stroke-volume measurements (60-122 mL), impedance cardiography yielded underestimates of stroke volumes at the low end (bias, -17 mL) and overestimates at the high end (bias, +17 mL; P < .001). Corresponding 95% limits of agreement were 64 mL, a 73% overestimate or underestimate of stroke volume at rest. Critchley radial limits of agreement indicated poor concordance of stroke-volume trends. Impedance cardiography had low accuracy and precision in measuring absolute stroke volume and was a poor detector of stroke-volume trends. ©2017 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  18. Measurements of electrical impedance and elastic wave velocity of reservoir rock under fluid-flow test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawayama, Kazuki; Kitamura, Keigo; Fujimitsu, Yasuhiro

    2017-04-01

    The estimation of water saturation under the ground is essential in geothermal fields, particularly for EGS (enhanced geothermal system). To estimate water saturation, recently, electromagnetic exploration using Magnetotelluric (MT) method has been applied in the geothermal fields. However, the relationship between electrical impedance obtained from this method and water saturation in the reservoir rock has not been well known. Our goal is to elucidate this basic relationship by fluid-flow experiments. As our first step to this goal, we developed the technique to measure and analyze the electrical impedance of the cracked rock in the geothermal reservoir. The fluid-flow test has been conducted as following procedures. At first, reservoir rock sample (pyroxene andesite, Makizono lava formation, Japan) was filled with nitrogen gas (Pp = 10 MPa) under 20 MPa of confining pressure. This nitrogen gas imitates the overheated steam in the geothermal fields. Then, brine (1wt.%-KCl, 1.75 S/m) which imitates the artificial recharge to the reservoir was injected to the samples. After flow rate of drainage fluid becomes stable, injection pressure was increased (11, 12, 14, 16, 18 MPa) and decreased (18, 16, 14, 12, 11 MPa) to vary the water saturation in the samples. During the test, water saturation, permeability, electrical impedance (10-2-105 Hz of frequency) and elastic wave velocity were measured. As a result of andesite, electrical impedance dramatically decreased from 105 to 103 Ω and P-wave velocity increased by 2% due to the brine injection. This remarkable change of the electrical impedance could be due to the replacement of pre-filled nitrogen gas to the brine. After the brine injection, electrical impedance decreased with injection pressure (small change of water saturation) by up to 40% while P-wave velocity was almost constant (less than 1%). This decrease of electrical impedance with injection pressure could be related to the flow to the narrow path (microcrack

  19. In vivo measurement of mechanical impedance of bone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, D. R.; Thompson, G.

    1974-01-01

    System of measurement provides indications of ulnar properties independent of characteristics of surrounding soft tissue and other bones. Mechanical modal approximated ulnar response so average bending rigidity could be determined to provide direct index of bone resistance to bending loading.

  20. UNIVERSAL AUTO-CALIBRATION FOR A RAPID BATTERY IMPEDANCE SPECTRUM MEASUREMENT DEVICE

    SciTech Connect

    Jon P. Christophersen; John L. Morrison; William H. Morrison

    2014-03-01

    Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy has been shown to be a valuable tool for diagnostics and prognostics of energy storage devices such as batteries and ultra-capacitors. Although measurements have been typically confined to laboratory environments, rapid impedance spectrum measurement techniques have been developed for on-line, embedded applications as well. The prototype hardware for the rapid technique has been validated using lithium-ion batteries, but issues with calibration had also been identified. A new, universal automatic calibration technique was developed to address the identified issues while also enabling a more simplified approach. A single, broad-frequency range is used to calibrate the system and then scaled to the actual range and conditions used when measuring a device under test. The range used for calibration must be broad relative to the expected measurement conditions for the scaling to be successful. Validation studies were performed by comparing the universal calibration approach with data acquired from targeted calibration ranges based on the expected range of performance for the device under test. First, a mid-level shunt range was used for calibration and used to measure devices with lower and higher impedance. Next, a high excitation current level was used for calibration, followed by measurements using lower currents. Finally, calibration was performed over a wide frequency range and used to measure test articles with a lower set of frequencies. In all cases, the universal calibration approach compared very well with results acquired following a targeted calibration. Additionally, the shunts used for the automated calibration technique were successfully characterized such that the rapid impedance measurements compare very well with laboratory-scale measurements. These data indicate that the universal approach can be successfully used for onboard rapid impedance spectra measurements for a broad set of test devices and range of

  1. Vertical impedance measurements on concrete bridge decks for assessing susceptibility of reinforcing steel to corrosion.

    PubMed

    Bartholomew, Paul D; Guthrie, W Spencer; Mazzeo, Brian A

    2012-08-01

    Corrosion is a pressing problem for aging concrete infrastructure, especially bridge decks. Because of its sensitivity to factors that affect corrosion of reinforcing steel in concrete, resistivity is an important structural health indicator for reinforced concrete structures. In this research, an instrument was developed to measure vertical impedance on concrete bridge decks. Measurements of vertical impedance on slabs prepared in the laboratory, on slabs removed from decommissioned bridge decks, and on an in-service bridge deck in the field demonstrate the utility of the new apparatus.

  2. Vertical impedance measurements on concrete bridge decks for assessing susceptibility of reinforcing steel to corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartholomew, Paul D.; Guthrie, W. Spencer; Mazzeo, Brian A.

    2012-08-01

    Corrosion is a pressing problem for aging concrete infrastructure, especially bridge decks. Because of its sensitivity to factors that affect corrosion of reinforcing steel in concrete, resistivity is an important structural health indicator for reinforced concrete structures. In this research, an instrument was developed to measure vertical impedance on concrete bridge decks. Measurements of vertical impedance on slabs prepared in the laboratory, on slabs removed from decommissioned bridge decks, and on an in-service bridge deck in the field demonstrate the utility of the new apparatus.

  3. Biomolecule detection via target mediated nanoparticle aggregation and dielectrophoretic impedance measurement.

    PubMed

    Costanzo, Philip J; Liang, Enzhu; Patten, Timothy E; Collins, Scott D; Smith, Rosemary L

    2005-06-01

    A new biosensing system is described that is based on the aggregation of nanoparticles by a target biological molecule and dielectrophoretic impedance measurement of these aggregates. The aggregation process was verified within a microchannel via fluorescence microscopy, demonstrating that this process can be used in a real time sensor application. Positive dielectrophoresis is employed to capture the nanoparticle aggregates at the edge of thin film electrodes, where their presence is detected either by optical imaging via fluorescence microscopy or by measuring the change in electrical impedance between adjacent electrodes. The electrical detection mechanism demonstrates the potential for this method as a micro total analysis system (microTAS).

  4. Comparison of different coil positions for ventilation monitoring with contact-less magnetic impedance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordes, A.; Pollig, D.; Leonhardt, S.

    2010-04-01

    For monitoring the health status of individuals, proper monitoring of ventilation is desirable. Therefore, a continuous measurement technique is an advantage for many patients since it allows personal home care scenarios. As an example, monitoring of elderly people at home could enable them to live in their familiar environment on their own with the safety of a continuous monitoring. Therefore, a measurement technique without the restriction of mobility is required. Since it is possible to monitor ventilation with magnetic impedance measurements without conductive contact, this technique is well suited for the mentioned scenario. Integrated in a chair, a person's health state could be monitored in many situations, e.g. during meals, while watching TV or reading a book. In this paper, we compare different positions of coil arrays for a magnetic impedance measurement system integrated in a chair in order to monitor ventilation continuously. For limiting the costs and technical complexity of the magnetic impedance measurement system, we have a focus on coil configurations with one RF channel. To limit the needed space and thickness of the array in the backrest, planar gradiometer coil setups are investigated. All measurements will be performed with a new developed portable magnetic impedance measurement system and a standard office chair.

  5. Field-Deployable Acoustic Digital Systems for Noise Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shams, Qamar A.; Wright, Kenneth D.; Lunsford, Charles B.; Smith, Charlie D.

    2000-01-01

    Langley Research Center (LaRC) has for years been a leader in field acoustic array measurement technique. Two field-deployable digital measurement systems have been developed to support acoustic research programs at LaRC. For several years, LaRC has used the Digital Acoustic Measurement System (DAMS) for measuring the acoustic noise levels from rotorcraft and tiltrotor aircraft. Recently, a second system called Remote Acquisition and Storage System (RASS) was developed and deployed for the first time in the field along with DAMS system for the Community Noise Flight Test using the NASA LaRC-757 aircraft during April, 2000. The test was performed at Airborne Airport in Wilmington, OH to validate predicted noise reduction benefits from alternative operational procedures. The test matrix was composed of various combinations of altitude, cutback power, and aircraft weight. The DAMS digitizes the acoustic inputs at the microphone site and can be located up to 2000 feet from the van which houses the acquisition, storage and analysis equipment. Digitized data from up to 10 microphones is recorded on a Jaz disk and is analyzed post-test by microcomputer system. The RASS digitizes and stores acoustic inputs at the microphone site that can be located up to three miles from the base station and can compose a 3 mile by 3 mile array of microphones. 16-bit digitized data from the microphones is stored on removable Jaz disk and is transferred through a high speed array to a very large high speed permanent storage device. Up to 30 microphones can be utilized in the array. System control and monitoring is accomplished via Radio Frequency (RF) link. This paper will present a detailed description of both systems, along with acoustic data analysis from both systems.

  6. A Comparison of Impedance Measurement Techniques in Air.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-03-01

    the nature of the waveform being measured. At the maximum, the values of amplitude are changing very slowly (second crder) so that the measurement of...32K bytes by a memory module . The unit has a mass storage capability in the form of a magnetic tape reader/recorder. It also includes a 127 millimeter...the HP-5447B Digital Filter Module , HP-54410AL Analog -o Digital Converter, HP-5443A Keyboard and Control Module and -he 5441A Display Module . The

  7. Measuring the Six dof Driving Point Impedance Function and AN Application to RB Inertia Property Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witter, M. C.; Brown, D. L.; Blough, J. R.

    2000-01-01

    An accurate driving point measurement is imperative in structural dynamic testing. For example, it is used to derive modal scaling, for experimental correlation of finite element models, impedance modelling and extracting the rigid body (RB) inertia properties of an object. A typical driving point measurement gives the linear force/displacement relationship at a single degree of freedom (dof), but any point on an object actually has rotational dofs as well. For example these rotational dofs must be measured in an impedance model where moments are transmitted at the connection point of two substructures. By ignoring the rotations, an inaccurate model will result. In the past, dynamic sensing technology has been limited to the accurate measurement of translational dofs. While rotational sensors do exist, their accuracy is called into question for certain applications. Rotational dofs have tended to be ignored in the measurement process. Applications, which require their use, such as impedance modelling and RB inertia property estimation, have suffered as a result. A process/sensor is being developed to accurately measure the driving point impedance function in all six dofs. The sensor as well as a calibration procedure will be presented here. In order to verify the validity of the calibration and measurement procedure, a new method for measuring the RB inertia properties of an object will be presented. This new method requires an accurate six dof driving point impedance measurement to provide accurate results. The inertia properties of an automotive brake rotor will be measured and compared with the results of a traditional pendulous swing test.

  8. Longitudinal impedance measurement of an RK-TBA induction accelerating gap

    SciTech Connect

    Eylon, S.; Henestroza, E.; Kim, J.-S.; Houck, T.L.; Westenskow, G.A.; Yu, S.S.

    1997-05-01

    Induction accelerating gap designs are being studied for Relativistic Klystron Two-Beam Accelerator (RK-TBA) applications. The accelerating gap has to satisfy the following major requirements: hold-off of the applied accelerating voltage pulse, low transverse impedance to limit beam breakup, low longitudinal impedance at the beam-modulation frequency to minimize power loss. Various gap geometries, materials and novel insulating techniques were explored to optimize the gap design. We report on the experimental effort to evaluate the rf properties of the accelerating gaps in a simple pillbox cavity structure. The experimental cavity setup was designed using the AMOS, MAFIA and URMEL numerical codes. Longitudinal impedance measurements above beam-tube cut-off frequency using a single-wire measuring system are presented.

  9. Broadband electrical impedance matching for piezoelectric ultrasound transducers.

    PubMed

    Huang, Haiying; Paramo, Daniel

    2011-12-01

    This paper presents a systematic method for designing broadband electrical impedance matching networks for piezoelectric ultrasound transducers. The design process involves three steps: 1) determine the equivalent circuit of the unmatched piezoelectric transducer based on its measured admittance; 2) design a set of impedance matching networks using a computerized Smith chart; and 3) establish the simulation model of the matched transducer to evaluate the gain and bandwidth of the impedance matching networks. The effectiveness of the presented approach is demonstrated through the design, implementation, and characterization of impedance matching networks for a broadband acoustic emission sensor. The impedance matching network improved the power of the acquired signal by 9 times.

  10. Acoustic harmonic generation measurement applications: Detection of tight cracks in powder metallurgy compacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnard, D. J.; Foley, J. C.

    2000-05-01

    Standard linear ultrasonic testing techniques have long been employed for locating and characterizing relatively open cracks in a wide variety of materials, from metallic alloys and ceramics to composites. In all these materials, the detection of open cracks easily accomplished because the void between the two crack surfaces provides sufficient acoustic impedance mismatch to reflect the incident energy. Closed or partially closed cracks, however, may often go undetected because contacting interfaces allow transmission of ultrasound. In the green (unsintered) state, powder metallurgy compacts typically contain high residual stresses that have the ability to close cracks formed during the compaction process, a result of oxide films, improper powder lubricant, mold design, etc. After sintering, the reduction of residual stresses may no longer be sufficient to close the crack. Although the crack may be more easily detected, it is obvious most desirable to discover defects prior to sintering. It has been shown that the displacements of an interface may be highly nonlinear if a stress wave of sufficient intensity propagates across it, a result of the stress wave either opening or closing the interface. Current efforts involve the application of nonlinear acoustic techniques, in particular acoustic harmonic generation measurements, for the detection and characterization of tightly closed cracks in powder metallurgy parts. A description of the equipment and the measurement technique will be discussed and initial experimental results on sintered and green compacts will be presented.—This work was performed at the Ames Laboratory, Iowa State University under USDOE Contract No. W-7405-ENG-82.

  11. On acoustic intensity measurements in the presence of mean flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munro, D. H.; Ingard, K. U.

    1979-01-01

    A theoretical analysis demonstrates that the technique of measuring acoustic intensity by means of cross correlation between nearby microphones cannot, in general, be extended to situations in which there is mean flow. However, it may be possible to use this technique to measure intensities in ducts with mean flow at frequencies below their cutoff frequencies.

  12. Normative Study of Wideband Acoustic Immittance Measures in Newborn Infants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aithal, Sreedevi; Kei, Joseph; Aithal, Venkatesh; Manuel, Alehandrea; Myers, Joshua; Driscoll, Carlie; Khan, Asaduzzaman

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to describe normative aspects of wideband acoustic immittance (WAI) measures obtained from healthy White neonates. Method: In this cross-sectional study, wideband absorbance (WBA), admittance magnitude, and admittance phase were measured under ambient pressure condition in 326 ears from 203 neonates (M age…

  13. Approach to Eliminate Couplant-Effect in Acoustic Nonlinearity Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, L.; Kulkarni, S. S.; Achenbach, J. D.; Krishnaswamy, S.

    2006-03-06

    An approach to eliminate couplant-effect in acoustic nonlinearity measurements for fatigued components is proposed in this paper. Measurements are performed on a fatigued steel 4340 specimen using both the conventional and proposed techniques. It is observed that the coefficients of variation of the nonlinearity parameter obtained using the proposed technique is approximately half of that obtained using the conventional technique.

  14. An Electronic Measurement Instrumentation of the Impedance of a Loaded Fuel Cell or Battery

    PubMed Central

    Aglzim, El-Hassane; Rouane, Amar; El-Moznine, Reddad

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we present an inexpensive electronic measurement instrumentation developed in our laboratory, to measure and plot the impedance of a loaded fuel cell or battery. Impedance measurements were taken by using the load modulation method. This instrumentation has been developed around a VXI system stand which controls electronic cards. Software under Hpvee® was developed for automatic measurements and the layout of the impedance of the fuel cell on load. The measurement environment, like the ambient temperature, the fuel cell temperature, the level of the hydrogen, etc…, were taken with several sensors that enable us to control the measurement. To filter the noise and the influence of the 50Hz, we have implemented a synchronous detection which filters in a very narrow way around the useful signal. The theoretical result obtained by a simulation under Pspice® of the method used consolidates the choice of this method and the possibility of obtaining correct and exploitable results. The experimental results are preliminary results on a 12V vehicle battery, having an inrush current of 330A and a capacity of 40Ah (impedance measurements on a fuel cell are in progress, and will be the subject of a forthcoming paper). The results were plotted at various nominal voltages of the battery (12.7V, 10V, 8V and 5V) and with two imposed currents (0.6A and 4A). The Nyquist diagram resulting from the experimental data enable us to show an influence of the load of the battery on its internal impedance. The similitude in the graph form and in order of magnitude of the values obtained (both theoretical and practical) enables us to validate our electronic measurement instrumentation. One of the future uses for this instrumentation is to integrate it with several control sensors, on a vehicle as an embedded system to monitor the degradation of fuel cell membranes.

  15. Piezo-sensor self-diagnostics using electrical impedance measurements.

    SciTech Connect

    Park, G. H.; Farrar, C. R.; Rutherford, A. C.; Robertson, A. N.

    2004-01-01

    This paper present the piezoelectric sensor self-diagnostic procedure that performs in-situ monitoring of the operational status of piezoelectric materials (PZT) used for sensors and actuators in structural health monitoring (SHM) applications. The use of active-sensing piezoelectric materials has received considerable attention in the SHM community. A critical aspect of the piezoelectric active-sensing technologies is that usually large numbers of distributed sensors and actuators are needed to perform the required monitoring process. The sensor/actuator self-diagnostic procedure, where the sensors/actuators are confirmed to be functioning properly during operation, is therefore a critical component to successfully complete the SHM process and to minimize the false indication regarding the structural health. The basis of this procedure is to track the changes in the capacitive value of piezoelectric materials resulting from the sensor failure, which is manifested in the imaginary part of the measured electrical admittances. Furthermore, through the analytical and experimental investigation, it is confirmed that the bonding layer between the PZT and a host structure significantly contributes to the measured capacitive values. Therefore, by monitoring the imaginary part of the admittances, one can quantitatively assess the degradation of the mechanical/electrical properties of the PZT and its attachment to a host structure. This paper concludes with an experimental example to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed sensor-diagnostic procedure.

  16. Impedance spectroscopy for detection of mold in archives with an integrated reference measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papireddy Vinayaka, P.; Van Den Driesche, S.; Janssen, S.; Frodl, M.; Blank, R.; Cipriani, F.; Lang, W.; Vellekoop, M. J.

    2015-06-01

    In this work, we present a new miniaturized culture medium based sensor system where we apply an optical reference in an impedance measurement approach for the detection of mold in archives. The designed sensor comprises a chamber with pre-loaded culture medium which promotes the growth of archive mold species. Growth of mold is detected by measuring changes in the impedance of the culture medium caused due to increase in the pH (from 5.5 to 8) with integrated electrodes. Integration of the reference measurement helps in determining the sensitivity of the sensor. The colorimetric principle serves as a reference measurement that indicates a pH change after which further pH shifts can be determined using impedance measurement. In this context, some of the major archive mold species Eurotium amstelodami, Aspergillus penicillioides and Aspergillus restrictus have been successfully analyzed on-chip. Growth of Eurotium amstelodami shows a proportional impedance change of 10 % (12 chips tested) per day, with a sensitivity of 0.6 kΩ/pH unit.

  17. ARL Acoustic Measurement in Buildings 518 and 520 at APG

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-04-01

    ARL Acoustic Measurements in Buildings 518 and 520 at APG by Angélique A. Scharine , Phuong Tran, and Mary Binseel ARL-MR-0580 April...Proving Ground, MD 21005-5425 ARL-MR-0580 April 2004 ARL Acoustic Measurements in Buildings 518 and 520 at APG Angélique A. Scharine ...5e. TASK NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Angélique A. Scharine , Phuong Tran, and Mary Binseel (all of ARL) 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING

  18. An optoacoustic point source for acoustic scale model measurements.

    PubMed

    Bolaños, Javier Gómez; Pulkki, Ville; Karppinen, Pasi; Hæggström, Edward

    2013-04-01

    A massless acoustic source is proposed for scale model work. This source is generated by focusing a pulsed laser beam to rapidly heat the air at the focal point. This produces an expanding small plasma ball which generates a sonic impulse that may be used as an acoustic point source. Repeatability, frequency response, and directivity of the source were measured to show that it can serve as a massless point source. The impulse response of a rectangular space was determined using this type of source. A good match was found between the predicted and the measured impulse responses of the space.

  19. Acoustical measurement of the Salt Lake Mormon Tabernacle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rollins, Sarah; Leishman, Timothy W.

    2004-05-01

    An acoustical survey of the Salt Lake Mormon Tabernacle has been performed to assess the behavior of the hall in its current state. The tabernacle is a well-known historical building with a large elongated dome ceiling. This paper discusses the measurements used to characterize the hall. Several parameters derived from omnidirectional, directional, and binaural impulse response measurements are presented. Color maps of the parameters over audience seating areas reveal their spatial variations. These maps and the statistical properties of the parameters aid in clarifying the acoustical characteristics and anomalies of the hall.

  20. Acoustic measurement study 40 by 80 foot subsonic wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    An acoustical study conducted during the period from September 1, 1973 to April 30, 1974 measured sound pressure levels and vibration amplitudes inside and outside of the subsonic tunnel and on the tunnel structure. A discussion of the technical aspects of the study, the field measurement and data reduction procedures, and results are presentd, and conclusions resulting from the study which bear upon near field and far field tunnel noise, upon the tunnel as an acoustical enclosure, and upon the sources of noise within the tunnel drive system are given.

  1. The effective ratio of acoustic impedance in predicting stress and velocity of wave propagation in viscoelastic material (standard linear solid model)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musa, Abu Bakar

    2013-09-01

    The study is about impact of a short elastic rod(or slug) on a stationary semi-infinite viscoelastic rod. The viscoelastic materials are modeled as standard linear solid which involve three material parameters and the motion is treated as one-dimensional. We first establish the governing equations pertaining to the impact of viscoelastic materials subject to certain boundary conditions for the case when an elastic slug moving at a speed V impacts a semi-infinite stationary viscoelastic rod. The objective is to predict stresses and velocities at the interface following wave transmissions and reflections in the slug after the impact using viscoelastic discontinuity. If the stress at the interface becomes tensile and the velocity changes its sign, then the slug and the rod part company. If the stress at the interface is compressive after the impact, the slug and the rod remain in contact. In the process of predicting the stress and velocity of wave propagation using viscoelastic discontinuity, the Z-effective which is the effective ratio of acoustic impedance plays important role. It can be shown that effective ratio of acoustic impedance can help us to determine whether the slug and the rod move together or part company after the impact. After modeling the impact and solve the governing system of partial differential equations in the Laplace transform domain. We invert the Laplace transformed solution numerically to obtain the stresses and velocities at the interface for several viscosity time constants and ratios of acoustic impedances. In inverting the Laplace transformed equations, we used the complex inversion formula because there is a branch cut and infinitely many poles within the Bromwich contour. In the discontinuity analysis, we look at the moving discontinuities in stress and velocity using the impulse-momentum relation and kinematical condition of compatibility. Finally, we discussed the relationship of the stresses and velocities using numeric and the

  2. Tissue electrical properties measured by bioelectrical impedance analysis among healthy and sportsmen population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapica, Dominik; Warchulińska, Joanna; Jakubiak, Monika; Teter, Mariusz; Mlak, Radosław; Hałabiś, Magdalena; Wójcik, Waldemar; Małecka-Massalska, Teresa

    2015-09-01

    Introduction: Bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) is a useful tool to asses human body composition and nutrition status; multi-frequency BIA has a higher accuracy than single-frequency BIA. In our study a difference of impedance values (Z) at 5, 100 and 200 kHz and Z200/Z5 index between professional athletes and control group were determined. Methods: In this research 105 people were tested, divided into control group (72 people: 35 males and 37 females) and professional athletes (33 people: 16 males and 17 females). Impedance was measured at three frequency values - 5, 100 and 200 kHz; with received values the Z200/Z5 index was calculated. Results: In most compared subgroups impedance values showed significantly lower values in athletes than in control group (5 kHz - males: p=0.136, females: p=0.001, 100 kHz - males: p=0.039, females: p<0.0001, 200 kHz - males: p=0.047, females: p<0.0001) Z200/Z5 index also showed lower value in athletes than in control group (p=0.016 for males, p<0.0001 for females). Conclusion: Lower values of impedance and Z200/Z5 index indicates a better nutrition status and general health condition of athletes than in control group.

  3. Tissue type determination by impedance measurement: A bipolar and monopolar comparison

    PubMed Central

    Sharp, Jack; Bouazza-Marouf, Kaddour; Noronha, Dorita; Gaur, Atul

    2017-01-01

    Background: In certain medical applications, it is necessary to be able to determine the position of a needle inside the body, specifically with regards to identifying certain tissue types. By measuring the electrical impedance of specific tissue types, it is possible to determine the type of tissue the tip of the needle (or probe) is at. Materials and Methods: Two methods have been investigated for electric impedance detection; bipolar and monopolar. Commercially available needle electrodes are of a monopolar type. Although many patents exist on the bipolar setups, these have not as yet been commercialized. This paper reports a comparison of monopolar and bipolar setups for tissue type determination. In vitro experiments were carried out on pork to compare this investigation with other investigations in this field. Results: The results show that both monopolar and bipolar setups are capable of determining tissue type. However, the bipolar setup showed slightly better results; the difference between the different soft tissue type impedances was greater compared to the monopolar method. Conclusion: Both monopolar and bipolar electrical impedance setups work very similarly in inhomogeneous volumes such as biological tissue. There is a clear potential for clinical applications with impedance-based needle guidance, with both the monopolar and bipolar setups. It is, however, worth noting that the bipolar setup is more versatile. PMID:28217047

  4. RF impedance measurement status for the 7-GeV Advanced Photon Source (APS)

    SciTech Connect

    Song, J.J.; Kustom, R.L.

    1992-01-01

    Beam-coupling impedances (Z) for the 7-GeV APS storage ring have been numerically estimated. In order to confirm these calculations, the wire method with a synthetic pulse technique was used to measure the beam coupling impedance of various vacuum components around the main storage ring. A section of the beam+antechambers, a vacuum isolation valve with and without the RF shielding screen, an insertion device, and a photon absorber were used as a device under test (DUT) to obtain the results. The results were compared with the computer simulations and the Z or k-dependence on bunch lengths was studied.

  5. RF impedance measurement status for the 7-GeV Advanced Photon Source (APS)

    SciTech Connect

    Song, J.J.; Kustom, R.L.

    1992-05-01

    Beam-coupling impedances (Z) for the 7-GeV APS storage ring have been numerically estimated. In order to confirm these calculations, the wire method with a synthetic pulse technique was used to measure the beam coupling impedance of various vacuum components around the main storage ring. A section of the beam+antechambers, a vacuum isolation valve with and without the RF shielding screen, an insertion device, and a photon absorber were used as a device under test (DUT) to obtain the results. The results were compared with the computer simulations and the Z or k-dependence on bunch lengths was studied.

  6. Electrode-Skin contact impedance: In vivo measurements on an ovine model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, D. T.; Kosobrodov, R.; Barry, M. A.; Chik, W.; Jin, C.; Oh, T. I.; Thiagalingam, A.; McEwan, A.

    2013-04-01

    The problem of electrical impedance between the skin and the electrode is an on-going challenge in bio-electronics. This is particularly true in the case of Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT), which uses a large number of skin-contact electrodes and is very sensitive to noise. In the present article, contact impedance is measured and compared for a range of electrodes placed on the thorax of an ovine model. The study has been approved by the Westmead Hospital Animal Ethics Committee. The electrode models that were employed in the research are Ag/AgCl electrodes (E1), commonly used for ECG and EIT measurements in both humans and animal models, stainless steel crocodile clips (E2), typically used on animal models, and novel multi-point dry electrodes in two modifications: bronze plated (E3) and nickel plated (E4). Further, since the contact impedance is mostly attributed to the acellular outer layer of the skin, in our experiment, we attempted to study the effect of this layer by comparing the results when the skin is intact and when electrodes are introduced underneath the skin through small cuts. This boundary effect was assessed by comparison of measurements obtained during E2 skin surface contact, and sub-cutaneous contact (E5). Twelve gauge intradermal needles were also tested as an electrode (E6). The full impedance spectrum, from 500 Hz to 300 kHz, was recorded, analysed and compared. As expected, the contact impedance in the more invasive cases, i.e the electrodes under the skin, is significantly lower than in the non-invasive cases. At the frequency of 50 kHz which is commonly used in lung EIT acquisition, electrodes E3, E4 and E6 demonstrated contact impedance of less than 200 Ω, compared to more than 400 Ω measured for electrodes E1, E2 and E5. In conclusion, the novel multipoint electrodes proved to be best suited for EIT purposes, because they are non-invasive and have lower contact impedance than Ag/AgCl and crocodile clips, in both invasive and

  7. On the reconstruction of boundary impedance of a heat conduction system from nonlocal measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jijun; Wang, Yuchan

    2016-07-01

    We consider the reconstruction of the Robin impedance coefficient of a heat conduction system in a two-dimensional spatial domain from the time-average measurement specified on the boundary. By applying the potential representation of a solution, this nonlinear inverse problem is transformed into an ill-posed integral system coupling the density function for potential and the unknown boundary impedance. The uniqueness as well as the conditional stability of this inverse problem is established from the integral system. Then we propose to find the boundary impedance by solving a non-convex regularizing optimization problem. The well-posedness of this optimization problem together with the convergence property of the minimizer is analyzed. Finally, based on the singularity decomposition of the potential representation of the solution, two iteration schemes with their numerical realizations are proposed to solve this optimization problem.

  8. Development of high impedance measurement system for water leakage detection in implantable neuroprosthetic devices.

    PubMed

    Yousif, Aziz; Kelly, Shawn K

    2016-08-01

    There has been a push for a greater number of channels in implantable neuroprosthetic devices; but, that number has largely been limited by current hermetic packaging technology. Microfabricated packaging is becoming reality, but a standard testing system is needed to prepare these devices for clinical trials. Impedance measurements of electrodes built into the packaging layers may give an early warning of device failure and predict device lifetime. Because the impedance magnitudes of such devices can be on the order of gigaohms, a versatile system was designed to accommodate ultra-high impedances and allow future integrated circuit implementation in current neural prosthetic technologies. Here we present the circuitry, control software, and preliminary testing results of our designed system.

  9. Estimating body fat by using bioelectrical-impedance measurements: a preliminary assessment.

    Treesearch

    M.G. Raphael; H.J. Harlow; S.W. Buskirk

    1991-01-01

    We evaluated a technique for measuring body fat content of marten (Martes americana) by using a noninvasive bioelectrical-impedance device with four electrodes to introduce a current into the body. Instantaneous readings of resistance were significantly correlated with fat-free mass (determined from solvent extraction) of carcasses of 17 skinned (r...

  10. Comparison of human uterine cervical electrical impedance measurements derived using two tetrapolar probes of different sizes

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Saurabh V; Walker, Dawn C; Brown, Brian H; Anumba, Dilly OC

    2006-01-01

    Background We sought to compare uterine cervical electrical impedance spectroscopy measurements employing two probes of different sizes, and to employ a finite element model to predict and compare the fraction of electrical current derived from subepithelial stromal tissue. Methods Cervical impedance was measured in 12 subjects during early pregnancy using 2 different sizes of the probes on each subject. Results Mean cervical resistivity was significantly higher (5.4 vs. 2.8 Ωm; p < 0.001) with the smaller probe in the frequency rage of 4–819 kHz. There was no difference in the short-term intra-observer variability between the two probes. The cervical impedance measurements derived in vivo followed the pattern predicted by the finite element model. Conclusion Inter-electrode distance on the probes for measuring cervical impedance influences the tissue resistivity values obtained. Determining the appropriate probe size is necessary when conducting clinical studies of resistivity of the cervix and other human tissues. PMID:17125510

  11. End tidal carbon dioxide measurement using an electro acoustic sensor.

    PubMed

    Folke, M; Hok, B; Ekstrom, M; Backlund, Y

    2004-01-01

    End tidal carbon dioxide measurement with an electro-acoustic sensor is demonstrated. The sensor consists of an acoustic resonator coupled to a low cost electro-acoustic element. By simultaneous measurements with a reference sensor, the new device was tested on subjects performing exercise, hypo- and hyperventilation whereby the CO2concentration ranged from 2.1 to 7.0 kPa. The output from the experimental device correlated well with the reference CO2readings with a correlation coefficient of 0.976. Response time for expiration less than 0.8 seconds was noted. The new device could be useful in situations where selectivity to other gases is not important.

  12. Measurement of Peak Esophageal Luminal Cross Sectional Area Utilizing Nadir Intraluminal Impedance

    PubMed Central

    Zifan, Ali; Ledgerwood-Lee, Melissa; Mittal, Ravinder K

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Multichannel intraluminal impedance (MII) is currently used to monitor gastroesophageal reflux and esophageal bolus clearance. We describe a novel methodology to measure maximal luminal CSA during bolus transport from MII measurements. METHODS Studies were conducted in-vitro (test tubes) and in-vivo (healthy subjects). Concurrent MII, HRM, and intraluminal ultrasound (US) were recorded 7 cm above the lower esophageal sphincter. Swallows with two concentrations of saline, 0.1N and 0.5N, of bolus volumes 5cc, 10cc and 15cc were performed. The CSA was estimated by solving two algebraic Ohm’s law equations, resulting from the two saline solutions. The CSA calculated from impedance method was compared with the CSA measured from the intraluminal US images. KEY RESULTS The CSA measured in duplicate from B-mode US images showed a mean difference between the two manual delineations to be near zero, and the repeatability coefficient was within 7.7% of the mean of the two CSA measurements. The calculated CSA from the impedance measurements strongly correlated with the US measured CSA (R2 ≅ 0.98). A detailed statistical analysis of the impedance and US measured CSA data indicated that the 95% limits of agreement between the two methods ranged from −9.1 to 13mm2. The root mean square error (RMS) of the two measurements was 4.8% of the mean US-measured CSA. CONCLUSIONS We describe a novel methodology to measure peak esophageal luminal CSA during peristalsis. Further studies are needed to determine if it is possible to measure patterns of luminal distension during peristalsis across the entire length of the esophagus. PMID:25930157

  13. Non-Contact Measurement of the Electrical Impedance of Biological Tissue

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    NON-CONTACT MEASUREMENT OF THE ELECTRICAL IMPEDANCE OF BIOLOGICAL TISSUE C.H. Riedel and O.Dössel Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Universität...currents. Keywords—contact-free measurement, electrical im- pedance, coil systems I. Introduction The non-invasive method of measuring the impe- dance...can give information of the electrical characte- ristics of tissue. In some cases the conductivity gra- dient can be an important value. The

  14. Bimodal schwa: Evidence from acoustic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamane-Tanaka, Noriko; Gick, Bryan; Bird, Sonya

    2004-05-01

    The question of whether schwa is targeted or targetless has been the subject of much debate (Browman et al., 1992; Browman and Goldstein, 1995; Gick, 1999, 2002). Gick (2002) found that there is a pharyngeal constriction during schwa relative to rest position, and concluded that schwa is not targetless. This experiment further showed a ``bimodal'' pattern in schwa in a nonrhotic speaker, indicating that the subject has distinct schwas in lexical words and function words. The present study examines the existence of the ``bimodal'' pattern in schwas in nonrhotic dialects through an acoustic experiment. It is predicted that there is a significant difference in formant values between lexical schwas and function schwas. Results to date indicate a significant difference in them between schwas in lexical versus function words, both between historical schwas and those derived from final /r/ reduction. Data from several additional nonrhotic subjects will be presented. Implications for intrusive r as well as for the phonological treatment of function words will be discussed. [Work funded by NSERC and SSHRC.

  15. Bench-Top Impedance Measurements for a Rotatable Copper Collimator for the LHC Phase II Collimation Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Jeffrey Claiborne; Bane, Karl; Doyle, Eric; Keller, Lew; Lundgren, Steve; Markiewicz, Tom; Ng, Cho-Kuen; Xiao, Liling; /SLAC

    2010-08-26

    Simulations have been performed in Omega3P to study both trapped modes and impedance contributions of a rotatable collimator for the LHC phase II collimation upgrade. Bench-top stretched coil probe impedance methods are also being implemented for measurements on prototype components to directly measure the low frequency impedance contributions. The collimator design also calls for a RF contact interface at both jaw ends with contact resistance much less than a milliohm in order to limit transverse impedance. DC resistance measurements in a custom built test chamber have been performed to test the performance of this interface.

  16. Error correction algorithm for high accuracy bio-impedance measurement in wearable healthcare applications.

    PubMed

    Kubendran, Rajkumar; Lee, Seulki; Mitra, Srinjoy; Yazicioglu, Refet Firat

    2014-04-01

    Implantable and ambulatory measurement of physiological signals such as Bio-impedance using miniature biomedical devices needs careful tradeoff between limited power budget, measurement accuracy and complexity of implementation. This paper addresses this tradeoff through an extensive analysis of different stimulation and demodulation techniques for accurate Bio-impedance measurement. Three cases are considered for rigorous analysis of a generic impedance model, with multiple poles, which is stimulated using a square/sinusoidal current and demodulated using square/sinusoidal clock. For each case, the error in determining pole parameters (resistance and capacitance) is derived and compared. An error correction algorithm is proposed for square wave demodulation which reduces the peak estimation error from 9.3% to 1.3% for a simple tissue model. Simulation results in Matlab using ideal RC values show an average accuracy of for single pole and for two pole RC networks. Measurements using ideal components for a single pole model gives an overall and readings from saline phantom solution (primarily resistive) gives an . A Figure of Merit is derived based on ability to accurately resolve multiple poles in unknown impedance with minimal measurement points per decade, for given frequency range and supply current budget. This analysis is used to arrive at an optimal tradeoff between accuracy and power. Results indicate that the algorithm is generic and can be used for any application that involves resolving poles of an unknown impedance. It can be implemented as a post-processing technique for error correction or even incorporated into wearable signal monitoring ICs.

  17. End-point impedance measurements across dominant and nondominant hands and robotic assistance with directional damping.

    PubMed

    Erden, Mustafa Suphi; Billard, Aude

    2015-06-01

    The goal of this paper is to perform end-point impedance measurements across dominant and nondominant hands while doing airbrush painting and to use the results for developing a robotic assistance scheme. We study airbrush painting because it resembles in many ways manual welding, a standard industrial task. The experiments are performed with the 7 degrees of freedom KUKA lightweight robot arm. The robot is controlled in admittance using a force sensor attached at the end-point, so as to act as a free-mass and be passively guided by the human. For impedance measurements, a set of nine subjects perform 12 repetitions of airbrush painting, drawing a straight-line on a cartoon horizontally placed on a table, while passively moving the airbrush mounted on the robot's end-point. We measure hand impedance during the painting task by generating sudden and brief external forces with the robot. The results show that on average the dominant hand displays larger impedance than the nondominant in the directions perpendicular to the painting line. We find the most significant difference in the damping values in these directions. Based on this observation, we develop a "directional damping" scheme for robotic assistance and conduct a pilot study with 12 subjects to contrast airbrush painting with and without robotic assistance. Results show significant improvement in precision with both dominant and nondominant hands when using robotic assistance.

  18. Method and device for bio-impedance measurement with hard-tissue applications.

    PubMed

    Guimerà, A; Calderón, E; Los, P; Christie, A M

    2008-06-01

    Bio-impedance measurements can be used to detect and monitor several properties of living hard-tissues, some of which include bone mineral density, bone fracture healing or dental caries detection. In this paper a simple method and hardware architecture for hard tissue bio-impedance measurement is proposed. The key design aspects of such architecture are discussed and a commercial handheld ac impedance device is presented that is fully certified to international medical standards. It includes a 4-channel multiplexer and is capable of measuring impedances from 10 kOmega to 10 MOmega across a frequency range of 100 Hz to 100 kHz with a maximum error of 5%. The device incorporates several user interface methods and a Bluetooth link for bi-directional wireless data transfer. Low-power design techniques have been implemented, ensuring the device exceeds 8 h of continuous use. Finally, bench test results using dummy cells consisting of parallel connected resistors and capacitors, from 10 kOmega to 10 MOmega and from 20 pF to 100 pF, are discussed.

  19. On-chip measurements of cell compressibility via acoustic radiation.

    PubMed

    Hartono, Deny; Liu, Yang; Tan, Pei Lin; Then, Xin Yi Sherlene; Yung, Lin-Yue Lanry; Lim, Kian-Meng

    2011-12-07

    Measurements of mechanical properties of biological cells are of great importance because changes in these properties can be strongly associated with the progression of cell differentiation and cell diseases. Although state of the art methods, such as atomic force microscopy, optical tweezers and micropipette aspiration, have been widely used to measure the mechanical properties of biological cells, all these methods involve direct contact with the cell and the measurements could be affected by the contact or any local deformation. In addition, all these methods typically deduced the Young's modulus of the cells based on their measurements. Herein, we report a new method for fast and direct measurement of the compressibility or bulk modulus of various cell lines on a microchip. In this method, the whole cell is exposed to acoustic radiation force without any direct contact. The method exploits the formation of an acoustic standing wave within a straight microchannel. When the polystyrene beads and cells are introduced into the channel, the acoustic radiation force moves them to the acoustic pressure node and the movement speed is dependent on the compressibility. By fitting the experimental and theoretical trajectories of the beads and the cells, the compressibility of the cells can be obtained. We find that the compressibility of various cancer cells (MCF-7: 4.22 ± 0.19 × 10(-10) Pa(-1), HEPG2: 4.28 ± 0.12 × 10(-10) Pa(-1), HT-29: 4.04 ± 0.16 × 10(-10) Pa(-1)) is higher than that of normal breast cells (3.77 ± 0.09 × 10(-10) Pa(-1)) and fibroblast cells (3.78 ± 0.17 × 10(-10) Pa(-1)). This work demonstrates a novel acoustic-based method for on-chip measurements of cell compressibility, complementing existing methods for measuring the mechanical properties of biological cells.

  20. Measurement of Plasma Clotting Using Shear Horizontal Surface Acoustic Wave Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagayama, Tatsuya; Kondoh, Jun; Oonishi, Tomoko; Hosokawa, Kazuya

    2013-07-01

    The monitoring of blood coagulation is important during operation. In this study, a shear horizontal surface acoustic wave (SH-SAW) sensor is applied to monitor plasma clotting. An SH-SAW sensor with a metallized surface for mechanical perturbation detection can detect plasma clotting. As plasma clotting is a gel formation reaction, the SH-SAW sensor detects viscoelastic property changes. On the other hand, an SH-SAW sensor with a free surface for electrical perturbation detection detects only the liquid mixing effect. No electrical property changes due to plasma clotting are obtained using this sensor. A planar electrochemical sensor is also used to monitor plasma clotting. In impedance spectral analysis, plasma clotting is measured. However, in the measurement of time responses, no differences between clotting and nonclotting are obtained. Therefore, the SH-SAW sensor is useful for monitoring plasma clotting.

  1. Measurement of respiratory impedance by impulse oscillometry--effects of endotracheal tubes.

    PubMed

    Kuhnle, G E; Brandt, T; Roth, U; Goetz, A E; Smith, H J; Peter, K

    2000-12-01

    Impulse Oscillometry is a new, noninvasive method to measure respiratory impedance, i.e. airway resistance and reactance at different oscillation frequencies. These parameters are potentially useful for the monitoring of respiratory mechanics in the critically ill patent with respiratory dysfunction. The endotracheal tube, used to mechanically ventilate these patients, however, represents an additional nonlinear impedance that introduces artifacts into the measurements. The objective of this work was therefore to investigate the effects of clinically available endotracheal tubes on resistance and reactance of an in vitro analogue of the respiratory system. Additionally, the effects of decreasing the compressible gas volume in this experimental model, as a simulation of decreased lung capacity and compliance, was investigated. Impulse oscillometric measurements of the test analogue gave highly reproducible results with and without an endotracheal tube. The tubes had significant influence on the measurement of the test object at all frequencies investigated. Changes of low frequent reactance were negligible - at least if repetitive measurements of the same system are performed - for realistic measurement of airway resistance, a correction of the tube impedance or measurement of the pressure distal of the tube is required. Resistance increased and low frequent reactance decreased significantly with decreasing gas volume. These changes were of magnitudes higher than the variations due to the introduction of the endotracheal tubes. Our results suggest that changes of respiratory reactance measured with impulse oscillometry may be used as a monitoring parameter in intubated patients.

  2. Measurements of Middle Ear Pressure Gain and Cochlear Input Impedance in the Chinchilla

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slama, Michael C. C.; Ravicz, Michael E.; Nakajima, Hideko H.; Dong, Wei; Rosowski, John J.

    2009-02-01

    Measurements of middle ear conducted sound pressure in the cochlear vestibule PV have been performed in only a few species. Simultaneous measurements of sound-induced stapes velocity Vs are even more rare. We report simultaneous measurements of VS and PV in chinchillas. The VS measurements are performed using single-beam laser-Doppler vibrometry; PV is measured with fiber-optic pressure sensors like those described by Olson [1]. PV and VS have been measured in six animals, and the middle ear pressure gain (ratio of PV to the sound pressure in the ear canal) and the cochlear input impedance (ratio of PV to the product of VS and area of the footplate) computed. Our measurements of middle ear pressure gain are similar to published data in the chinchilla at stimulus frequencies of 500 Hz to 3 kHz, but are different at other frequencies. Our measurements of cochlear input impedance differ somewhat from previous estimates in the chinchilla and show a resistive input impedance up to at least 10 kHz.

  3. Comparison of impedance cardiography and dye dilution method for measuring cardiac output

    PubMed Central

    Spiering, W; van Es, P N; de Leeuw, P W

    1998-01-01

    Objective—To assess the degree of agreement between impedance cardiography, using the NCCOM3-R7 device, and the gold standard—the dye dilution method—both under basal conditions and after stimulation of cardiac output.
Patients—35 paired measurements in five healthy male volunteers.
Interventions—To obtain higher levels of cardiac output, cardiac performance was stimulated with a dopamine infusion.
Results—In 35 paired measurements, the mean of all the impedance values was higher than that of the dye dilution values, at 10.2 v 7.4 l/min (p < 0.0001). The mean discrepancy between the two methods was 3.3 l/min, and the mean bias −2.9 l/min, with limits of agreement of −9.0 and 3.2 l/min. A change in cardiac output could not adequately be predicted by the NCCOM3-R7. In 20 of 25 measurements obtained during continuous intravenous dopamine infusions there was a rise in dye dilution cardiac output (range 0.2 to 5.9 l/min). Neither the magnitude nor the direction of the change in dye dilution values corresponded with the change measured by impedance cardiography. The mean discrepancy here between the two methods was 1.8 l/min, and the mean bias −0.8 l/min, with limits of agreement of −4.9 and 3.3 l/min.
Conclusions—In healthy volunteers, impedance cardiography with NCCOM3-R7 is inadequate for assessing cardiac output when compared with the dye dilution method.

 Keywords: cardiac output;  impedance cardiography;  dye dilution PMID:9659188

  4. Measurement of acoustic output power in a traveling wave engine.

    PubMed

    Miwa, M; Sumi, T; Biwa, T; Ueda, Y; Yazaki, T

    2006-12-22

    We built and tested a double-loop thermoacoustic cooler consisting of an engine-loop, a branch resonator, and a cooler-loop. The cooling power of 6.4 W was obtained at the cooling temperature of 0 degrees C, when the input heat power of 416 W was supplied to the engine-loop. We measured the acoustic power and found that the output power emitted from the engine-loop was 12 W, and that the input acoustic power entering the cooler-loop was 6 W.

  5. Acoustic absorbance measurements in neonates exposed to smoking during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Pucci, Beatriz Paloma Corrêa; Roque, Nayara Michelle Costa de Freitas; Gamero, Marcella Scigliano; Durante, Alessandra Spada

    2017-04-01

    To analyze acoustic absorbance using wideband tympanometry in neonates exposed to passive smoking during pregnancy. A study comprising 54 neonates in the control group (CG - unexposed) and 19 in the study group (SG - exposed) was carried out. Subjects were submitted to the wideband tympanometry test and subsequent analysis of absorbance of 17 frequencies. Low frequencies had a lower level of absorbance compared to high frequencies for both ambient and peak pressures, with no difference between the groups. No effect of passive smoking on acoustic absorbance measurements in neonates was observed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Advances in non-invasive measures of vocal acoustics.

    PubMed

    LaBlance, G R; Steckol, K F; Cooper, M H

    1991-10-01

    Objective assessment of vocal pitch, loudness, and quality is a crucial adjunct to endoscopy in the diagnosis and treatment of vocal pathology. Historically, this assessment was made through subjective, perceptual measures that were questionable in terms of validity and reliability. Recent advances in electronic technology now permit objective analysis of the acoustic characteristics of voice. Kay Elemetric's Visi-Pitch, DSP 5500 Digital Spectrograph, and Nasometer are representative of these new instruments and are used as illustrations in the discussion of the assessment of speech acoustics.

  7. High-frequency attenuation measurements using an acoustic microscope.

    PubMed

    Gracewski, S M; Waag, R C; Schenk, E A

    1988-06-01

    An acoustic microscope was used to measure excess attenuation of aqueous solutions of sugars and proteins at 1.0 GHz. Interference pattern spacing and peak amplitude reduction of V(z) curves, obtained with these solutions as the acoustic microscope coupling liquid, were related to the solution wavespeed and attenuation, respectively. Consistent with published results for lower frequencies, solutions with molecular weight greater than 10,000 had a higher specific absorption than those with a molecular weight less than 1000 and within these two molecular weight ranges specific absorption was independent of concentration.

  8. Acoustic ship signature measurements by cross-correlation method.

    PubMed

    Fillinger, Laurent; Sutin, Alexander; Sedunov, Alexander

    2011-02-01

    Cross-correlation methods were applied for the estimation of the power spectral density and modulation spectrum of underwater noise generated by moving vessels. The cross-correlation of the signal from two hydrophones allows the separation of vessel acoustic signatures in a busy estuary. Experimental data recorded in the Hudson River are used for demonstration that cross-correlation method measured the same ship noise and ship noise modulation spectra as conventional methods. The cross-correlation method was then applied for the separation of the acoustic signatures of two ships present simultaneously. Presented methods can be useful for ship traffic monitoring and small ship classification, even in noisy harbor environments.

  9. Measurement of the total acoustic output power of HITU transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenderka, Klaus-V.; Beissner, Klaus

    2010-03-01

    The majority of High Intensity Therapeutic Ultrasound (HITU) applications use strongly focused ultrasound fields generating very high local intensities in the focal region. The metrology of these high-power ultrasound fields is a challenge for the established measurement procedures and devices. This paper describes the results of measurements by means of the radiation force for a total acoustic output power up to 400 W at 1.5 MHz and up to 200 W at 2.45 MHz. For this purpose, a radiation force balance set-up was adapted for the determination of large acoustic output powers. For two types of HITU transducers, the relationship between the total acoustic output power and the applied net electrical power was determined at close transducer-target distance. Further, dependence of the measured electro-acoustic radiation conductance on the transducer-target distance was investigated at reduced power levels, considering the appearance of focal anomalies. Concluding, a list of the main uncertainty contributions, and an estimate of the uncertainty for the used radiation force balance set-up is given for measurements at high power levels.

  10. Voice Acoustical Measurement of the Severity of Major Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cannizzaro, Michael; Harel, Brian; Reilly, Nicole; Chappell, Phillip; Snyder, Peter J.

    2004-01-01

    A number of empirical studies have documented the relationship between quantifiable and objective acoustical measures of voice and speech, and clinical subjective ratings of severity of Major Depression. To further explore this relationship, speech samples were extracted from videotape recordings of structured interviews made during the…

  11. A Comparative Study of Two Acoustic Measures of Hypernasality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogel, Adam P.; Ibrahim, Hasherah M.; Reilly, Sheena; Kilpatrick, Nicky

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This study aimed to compare 2 quantitative acoustic measures of nasality in children with cleft lip and palate (CLP) and healthy controls using formalized perceptual assessment as a guide. Method: Fifty participants (23 children with CLP and 27 age- and gender-matched healthy controls) aged between 4 and 12 years produced a variety of…

  12. Field-Deployable Acoustic Digital Systems for Noise Measurement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-01-01

    October 1997. 3. David L. Gray, Kenneth D. Wright and Wayne D. Rowland “A Field Deployable Digital Acoustic Measurement System”, Proceedings of the NASA ... Technology 2000 conference, Washington D.C. 4. Kenneth D. Wright, Scott Martinson, and Toby Comeaux “A Remote Acquisition and Storage System” A Remote

  13. Measuring acoustic properties of materials and jet nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, P. D.; Plumblee, H. E.; Salikuddin, M.

    1980-01-01

    Method measures acoustic properties of sound-absorbent materials and jet-nozzle system. Advantages of impulse method over other methods are that test time and complication are reduced. Results obtained from impulse method have been compared with those from existing methods, both experimental and theoretical, and show excellent agreement.

  14. A Comparative Study of Two Acoustic Measures of Hypernasality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogel, Adam P.; Ibrahim, Hasherah M.; Reilly, Sheena; Kilpatrick, Nicky

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This study aimed to compare 2 quantitative acoustic measures of nasality in children with cleft lip and palate (CLP) and healthy controls using formalized perceptual assessment as a guide. Method: Fifty participants (23 children with CLP and 27 age- and gender-matched healthy controls) aged between 4 and 12 years produced a variety of…

  15. Particle densitometer based on the acoustical resonance measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Vetter, A.A.

    1990-10-01

    Work continued on development of a particle densitometer based on the Acoustical Resonance Measurement to monitor pneumatically conveyed particle mass loading. During this quarter, the closed-loop test system was used for testing and an open-loop test system was constructed. 3 figs.

  16. Voice Acoustical Measurement of the Severity of Major Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cannizzaro, Michael; Harel, Brian; Reilly, Nicole; Chappell, Phillip; Snyder, Peter J.

    2004-01-01

    A number of empirical studies have documented the relationship between quantifiable and objective acoustical measures of voice and speech, and clinical subjective ratings of severity of Major Depression. To further explore this relationship, speech samples were extracted from videotape recordings of structured interviews made during the…

  17. Laboratory comparisons of acoustic and optical sensors for microbubble measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Ming Yang; Todoroff, Douglas; Cartmill, John

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a recent comparison between three microbubble size spectrum measurement systems. These systems are the light-scattering bubble counter, the photographic bubble-imaging system, and the acoustic resonator array. Good agreement was formed among these three systems over the bubble size range appropriate for each system.

  18. A field-deployable digital acoustic measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, David L.; Wright, Kenneth D., II; Rowland, Wayne D.

    1991-01-01

    A field deployable digital acoustic measurement system was developed to support acoustic research programs at the Langley Research Center. The system digitizes the acoustic inputs at the microphone, which can be located up to 1000 feet from the van which houses the acquisition, storage, and analysis equipment. Digitized data from up to 12 microphones is recorded on high density 8mm tape and is analyzed post-test by a microcomputer system. Synchronous and nonsynchronous sampling is available with maximum sample rates of 12,500 and 40,000 samples per second respectively. The high density tape storage system is capable of storing 5 gigabytes of data at transfer rates up to 1 megabyte per second. System overall dynamic range exceeds 83 dB.

  19. Measurement of acoustic attenuation in South Pole ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    IceCube Collaboration; Abbasi, R.; Abdou, Y.; Abu-Zayyad, T.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Andeen, K.; Auffenberg, J.; Bai, X.; Baker, M.; Barwick, S. W.; Bay, R.; Bazo Alba, J. L.; Beattie, K.; Beatty, J. J.; Bechet, S.; Becker, J. K.; Becker, K.-H.; Benabderrahmane, M. L.; Berdermann, J.; Berghaus, P.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Bertrand, D.; Besson, D. Z.; Bissok, M.; Blaufuss, E.; Boersma, D. J.; Bohm, C.; Böser, S.; Botner, O.; Bradley, L.; Braun, J.; Buitink, S.; Carson, M.; Chirkin, D.; Christy, B.; Clem, J.; Clevermann, F.; Cohen, S.; Colnard, C.; Cowen, D. F.; D'Agostino, M. V.; Danninger, M.; de Clercq, C.; Demirörs, L.; Depaepe, O.; Descamps, F.; Desiati, P.; de Vries-Uiterweerd, G.; Deyoung, T.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; Dreyer, J.; Dumm, J. P.; Duvoort, M. R.; Ehrlich, R.; Eisch, J.; Ellsworth, R. W.; Engdegård, O.; Euler, S.; Evenson, P. A.; Fadiran, O.; Fazely, A. R.; Feusels, T.; Filimonov, K.; Finley, C.; Foerster, M. M.; Fox, B. D.; Franckowiak, A.; Franke, R.; Gaisser, T. K.; Gallagher, J.; Ganugapati, R.; Geisler, M.; Gerhardt, L.; Gladstone, L.; Glüsenkamp, T.; Goldschmidt, A.; Goodman, J. A.; Grant, D.; Griesel, T.; Groß, A.; Grullon, S.; Gunasingha, R. M.; Gurtner, M.; Gustafsson, L.; Ha, C.; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Han, K.; Hanson, K.; Helbing, K.; Herquet, P.; Hickford, S.; Hill, G. C.; Hoffman, K. D.; Homeier, A.; Hoshina, K.; Hubert, D.; Huelsnitz, W.; Hülß, J.-P.; Hulth, P. O.; Hultqvist, K.; Hussain, S.; Imlay, R. L.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobsen, J.; Japaridze, G. S.; Johansson, H.; Joseph, J. M.; Kampert, K.-H.; Kappes, A.; Karg, T.; Karle, A.; Kelley, J. L.; Kemming, N.; Kenny, P.; Kiryluk, J.; Kislat, F.; Klein, S. R.; Knops, S.; Köhne, J.-H.; Kohnen, G.; Kolanoski, H.; Köpke, L.; Koskinen, D. J.; Kowalski, M.; Kowarik, T.; Krasberg, M.; Krings, T.; Kroll, G.; Kuehn, K.; Kuwabara, T.; Labare, M.; Lafebre, S.; Laihem, K.; Landsman, H.; Lauer, R.; Lehmann, R.; Lennarz, D.; Lünemann, J.; Madsen, J.; Majumdar, P.; Maruyama, R.; Mase, K.; Matis, H. S.; Matusik, M.; Meagher, K.; Merck, M.; Mészáros, P.; Meures, T.; Middell, E.; Milke, N.; Montaruli, T.; Morse, R.; Movit, S. M.; Nahnhauer, R.; Nam, J. W.; Naumann, U.; Nießen, P.; Nygren, D. R.; Odrowski, S.; Olivas, A.; Olivo, M.; Ono, M.; Panknin, S.; Paul, L.; Pérez de Los Heros, C.; Petrovic, J.; Piegsa, A.; Pieloth, D.; Porrata, R.; Posselt, J.; Price, P. B.; Prikockis, M.; Przybylski, G. T.; Rawlins, K.; Redl, P.; Resconi, E.; Rhode, W.; Ribordy, M.; Rizzo, A.; Rodrigues, J. P.; Roth, P.; Rothmaier, F.; Rott, C.; Roucelle, C.; Ruhe, T.; Rutledge, D.; Ruzybayev, B.; Ryckbosch, D.; Sander, H.-G.; Sarkar, S.; Schatto, K.; Schlenstedt, S.; Schmidt, T.; Schneider, D.; Schukraft, A.; Schultes, A.; Schulz, O.; Schunck, M.; Seckel, D.; Semburg, B.; Seo, S. H.; Sestayo, Y.; Seunarine, S.; Silvestri, A.; Slipak, A.; Spiczak, G. M.; Spiering, C.; Stamatikos, M.; Stanev, T.; Stephens, G.; Stezelberger, T.; Stokstad, R. G.; Stoyanov, S.; Strahler, E. A.; Straszheim, T.; Sullivan, G. W.; Swillens, Q.; Taboada, I.; Tamburro, A.; Tarasova, O.; Tepe, A.; Ter-Antonyan, S.; Tilav, S.; Toale, P. A.; Tosi, D.; Turčan, D.; van Eijndhoven, N.; Vandenbroucke, J.; van Overloop, A.; van Santen, J.; Voigt, B.; Walck, C.; Waldenmaier, T.; Wallraff, M.; Walter, M.; Wendt, C.; Westerhoff, S.; Whitehorn, N.; Wiebe, K.; Wiebusch, C. H.; Wikström, G.; Williams, D. R.; Wischnewski, R.; Wissing, H.; Woschnagg, K.; Xu, C.; Xu, X. W.; Yanez, J. P.; Yodh, G.; Yoshida, S.; Zarzhitsky, P.; IceCube Collaboration

    2011-01-01

    Using the South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS) and a retrievable transmitter deployed in holes drilled for the IceCube experiment, we have measured the attenuation of acoustic signals by South Pole ice at depths between 190 m and 500 m. Three data sets, using different acoustic sources, have been analyzed and give consistent results. The method with the smallest systematic uncertainties yields an amplitude attenuation coefficient α = 3.20 ± 0.57 km-1 between 10 and 30 kHz, considerably larger than previous theoretical estimates. Expressed as an attenuation length, the analyses give a consistent result for λ ≡ 1/α of ˜300 m with 20% uncertainty. No significant depth or frequency dependence has been found.

  20. Measurement of acoustic shielding by a turbulent jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, J. C.; Fratello, D. J.

    1985-01-01

    The acoustic shielding properties of a turbulent jet have been investigated experimentally. The experimental arrangement consisted of an acoustic point source and a turbulent shielding jet. The source and jet parameters investigated include the source frequency, source spectrum, jet velocity, jet heating by simulation and the lateral and longitudinal source positions with respect to the shielding jet. It is found that the maximum sound attenuation provided by the shielding jet depends on the balance between refraction and diffraction. Over the frequency range investigated, the redistribution of sound by the shielding air jet is power conserving. Comparison between measurement and prediction based on an idealized cylindrical uniform jet model indicates that the spreading and decay of the flow field in real jets are important. Comparisons between the present data trends and those reported for jet-by-jet shielding suggest that the major effects observed in the latter are acoustical rather than aerodynamical.