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Sample records for acoustic impedance measurements

  1. Acoustic input impedance measurements on brass instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyle, Robert W., Jr.

    2002-11-01

    Measurement of the acoustic input impedance of a brass instrument can reveal something about the instrument's intonation, its reasonable playing range, its tone color, and perhaps whether the mouthpiece used for the impedance measurement is appropriate for the instrument. Such measurements are made at sound-presssure levels much lower than those encountered under playing conditions. Thus, impedance measurements may offer the only feasible way to infer something about the playing characteristics of instruments, typically museum specimens, that are too rare or too fragile to be played. In this paper the effects of some of the available choices of sound source and stimulus signal on measurement accuracy will be explored. Driver-transducer nonlinearity, source impedance, signal-to-noise ratio, and any necessary signal processing will be discussed.

  2. Measuring the Acoustic Impedance of Pipes and Musical Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeger, Herbert

    2007-05-01

    Using a small electret microphone and a piezo-buzzer we have constructed a simple impedance transducer to measure the input impedance of air columns, such as cylindrical pipes, as well as musical instruments. The input impedance of an air column is given as the ratio of the pressure to the volume flow of air at the input of the air column. The microphone serves as the pressure transducer, while the piezo-buzzer is controlled to provide a constant velocity amplitude. Therefore the microphone signal is proportional to the acoustical impedance and, if required, can be calibrated using a simple air column for which the impedance can be calculated. This impedance transducer is currently in use as demonstration equipment for a physical acoustics class. It is simple to use and robust, so that it is well-suited for an undergraduate introductory laboratory environment. This talk will discuss the function of the impedance transducer and show examples of the type of measurements that can be performed. To cite this abstract, use the following reference: http://meetings.aps.org/link/BAPS.2007.OSS07.C1.1

  3. Optimization of Acoustic Pressure Measurements for Impedance Eduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, M. G.; Watson, W. R.; Nark, D. M.

    2007-01-01

    As noise constraints become increasingly stringent, there is continued emphasis on the development of improved acoustic liner concepts to reduce the amount of fan noise radiated to communities surrounding airports. As a result, multiple analytical prediction tools and experimental rigs have been developed by industry and academia to support liner evaluation. NASA Langley has also placed considerable effort in this area over the last three decades. More recently, a finite element code (Q3D) based on a quasi-3D implementation of the convected Helmholtz equation has been combined with measured data acquired in the Langley Grazing Incidence Tube (GIT) to reduce liner impedance in the presence of grazing flow. A new Curved Duct Test Rig (CDTR) has also been developed to allow evaluation of liners in the presence of grazing flow and controlled, higher-order modes, with straight and curved waveguides. Upgraded versions of each of these two test rigs are expected to begin operation by early 2008. The Grazing Flow Impedance Tube (GFIT) will replace the GIT, and additional capabilities will be incorporated into the CDTR. The current investigation uses the Q3D finite element code to evaluate some of the key capabilities of these two test rigs. First, the Q3D code is used to evaluate the microphone distribution designed for the GFIT. Liners ranging in length from 51 to 610 mm are investigated to determine whether acceptable impedance eduction can be achieved with microphones placed on the wall opposite the liner. This analysis indicates the best results are achieved for liner lengths of at least 203 mm. Next, the effects of moving this GFIT microphone array to the wall adjacent to the liner are evaluated, and acceptable results are achieved if the microphones are placed off the centerline. Finally, the code is used to investigate potential microphone placements in the CDTR rigid wall adjacent to the wall containing an acoustic liner, to determine if sufficient fidelity can be

  4. Acoustic input impedance of the avian inner ear measured in ostrich (Struthio camelus).

    PubMed

    Muyshondt, Pieter G G; Aerts, Peter; Dirckx, Joris J J

    2016-09-01

    In both mammals and birds, the mechanical behavior of the middle ear structures is affected by the mechanical impedance of the inner ear. In this study, the aim was to quantify the acoustic impedance of the avian inner ear in the ostrich, which allows us to determine the effect on columellar vibrations and middle ear power flow in future studies. To determine the inner ear impedance, vibrations of the columella were measured for both the quasi-static and acoustic stimulus frequencies. In the frequency range of 0.3-4 kHz, we used electromagnetic stimulation of the ossicle and a laser Doppler vibrometer to measure the vibration response. At low frequencies, harmonic displacements were imposed on the columella using piezo stimulation and the resulting force response was measured with a force sensor. From these measurement data, the acoustic impedance of the inner ear could be determined. A simple RLC model in series of the impedance measurements resulted in a stiffness reactance of KIE = 0.20·10(12) Pa/m³, an inertial impedance of MIE = 0.652·10(6) Pa s(2)/m³, and a resistance of RIE = 1.57·10(9) Pa s/m. We found that values of the inner ear impedance in the ostrich are one to two orders in magnitude smaller than what is found in mammal ears. PMID:27473506

  5. Acoustic ground impedance meter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, A. J.

    1981-01-01

    A compact, portable instrument was developed to measure the acoustic impedance of the ground, or other surfaces, by direct pressure-volume velocity measurement. A Helmholz resonator, constructed of heavy-walled stainless steel but open at the bottom, is positioned over the surface having the unknown impedance. The sound source, a cam-driven piston of known stroke and thus known volume velocity, is located in the neck of the resonator. The cam speed is a variable up to a maximum 3600 rpm. The sound pressure at the test surface is measured by means of a microphone flush-mounted in the wall of the chamber. An optical monitor of the piston displacement permits measurement of the phase angle between the volume velocity and the sound pressure, from which the real and imaginary parts of the impedance can be evaluated. Measurements using a 5-lobed cam can be made up to 300 Hz. Detailed design criteria and results on a soil sample are presented.

  6. Mathematical justification of the acoustic method for measuring the impedance of the respiratory tract.

    PubMed

    Bogomolov, A V; Dragan, S P

    2015-01-01

    A new method for measuring a complex frequency-dependent acoustic impedance of the respiratory tract based on two-microphone method was developed. The measuring device consists of a waveguide connected through a mouthpiece to the patient's mouth. A sound field with a frequency range from 5 to 100 Hz is created in the waveguide. The impedance of the respiratory tract is determined at free respiration of the patient in the set frequency range; the duration of examination does not exceed 15 s. The criteria for the recognition of respiratory tract pathologies are proposed. PMID:26518558

  7. Measurement of acoustic impedance and reflectance in the human ear canal.

    PubMed

    Voss, S E; Allen, J B

    1994-01-01

    The pressure reflectance R (omega) is the transfer function which may be defined for a linear one-port network by the ratio of the reflected complex pressure divided by the incident complex pressure. The reflectance is a function that is closely related to the impedance of the 1-port. The energy reflectance R (omega) is defined as magnitude of [R]2. It represents the ratio of reflected to incident energy. In the human ear canal the energy reflectance is important because it is a measure of the inefficiency of the middle ear and cochlea, and because of the insight provided by its simple frequency domain interpretation. One may characterize the ear canal impedance by use of the pressure reflectance and its magnitude, sidestepping the difficult problems of (a) the unknown canal length from the measurement point to the eardrum, (b) the complicated geometry of the drum, and (c) the cross-sectional area changes in the canal as a function of distance. Reported here are acoustic impedance measurements, looking into the ear canal, measured on ten young adults with normal hearing (ages 18-24). The measurement point in the canal was approximately 0.85 cm from the entrance of the canal. From these measurements, the pressure reflectance in the canal is computed and impedance and reflectance measurements from 0.1 to 15.0 kHz are compared among ears. The average reflectance and the standard deviation of the reflectance for the ten subjects have been determined. The impedance and reflectance of two common ear simulators, the Brüel & Kjaer 4157 and the Industrial Research Products DB-100 (Zwislocki) coupler are also measured and compared to the average human measurements. All measurements are made using controls that assure a uniform accuracy in the acoustic calibration across subjects. This is done by the use of two standard acoustic resistors whose impedances are known. From the experimental results, it is concluded that there is significant subject variability in the magnitude

  8. Measurements and computational fluid dynamics predictions of the acoustic impedance of orifices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, J.; Rupp, J.; Garmory, A.; Carrotte, J. F.

    2015-09-01

    The response of orifices to incident acoustic waves, which is important for many engineering applications, is investigated with an approach combining both experimental measurements and numerical simulations. This paper presents experimental data on acoustic impedance of orifices, which is subsequently used for validation of a numerical technique developed for the purpose of predicting the acoustic response of a range of geometries with moderate computational cost. Measurements are conducted for orifices with length to diameter ratios, L/D, of 0.5, 5 and 10. The experimental data is obtained for a range of frequencies using a configuration in which a mean (or bias) flow passes from a duct through the test orifices before issuing into a plenum. Acoustic waves are provided by a sound generator on the upstream side of the orifices. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculations of the same configuration have also been performed. These have been undertaken using an unsteady Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) approach with a pressure based compressible formulation with appropriate characteristic based boundary conditions to simulate the correct acoustic behaviour at the boundaries. The CFD predictions are in very good agreement with the experimental data, predicting the correct trend with both frequency and orifice L/D in a way not seen with analytical models. The CFD was also able to successfully predict a negative resistance, and hence a reflection coefficient greater than unity for the L / D = 0.5 case.

  9. Accuracy of acoustic ear canal impedances: finite element simulation of measurement methods using a coupling tube.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Sebastian; Hudde, Herbert

    2009-06-01

    Acoustic impedances measured at the entrance of the ear canal provide information on both the ear canal geometry and the terminating impedance at the eardrum, in principle. However, practical experience reveals that measured results in the audio frequency range up to 20 kHz are frequently not very accurate. Measurement methods successfully tested in artificial tubes with varying area functions often fail when applied to real ear canals. The origin of these errors is investigated in this paper. To avoid mixing of systematical and other errors, no real measurements are performed. Instead finite element simulations focusing on the coupling between a connecting tube and the ear canal are regarded without simulating a particular measuring method in detail. It turns out that realistic coupling between the connecting tube and the ear canal causes characteristic shifts of the frequencies of measured pressure minima and maxima. The errors in minima mainly depend on the extent of the area discontinuity arising at the interface; the errors in maxima are determined by the alignment of the tube with respect to the ear canal. In summary, impedance measurements using coupling tubes appear questionable beyond 3 kHz. PMID:19507964

  10. Digital PIV Measurements of Acoustic Particle Displacements in a Normal Incidence Impedance Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphreys, William M., Jr.; Bartram, Scott M.; Parrott, Tony L.; Jones, Michael G.

    1998-01-01

    Acoustic particle displacements and velocities inside a normal incidence impedance tube have been successfully measured for a variety of pure tone sound fields using Digital Particle Image Velocimetry (DPIV). The DPIV system utilized two 600-mj Nd:YAG lasers to generate a double-pulsed light sheet synchronized with the sound field and used to illuminate a portion of the oscillatory flow inside the tube. A high resolution (1320 x 1035 pixel), 8-bit camera was used to capture double-exposed images of 2.7-micron hollow silicon dioxide tracer particles inside the tube. Classical spatial autocorrelation analysis techniques were used to ascertain the acoustic particle displacements and associated velocities for various sound field intensities and frequencies. The results show that particle displacements spanning a range of 1-60 microns can be measured for incident sound pressure levels of 100-130 dB and for frequencies spanning 500-1000 Hz. The ability to resolve 1 micron particle displacements at sound pressure levels in the 100 dB range allows the use of DPIV systems for measurement of sound fields at much lower sound pressure levels than had been previously possible. Representative impedance tube data as well as an uncertainty analysis for the measurements are presented.

  11. A Comparison Study of Normal-Incidence Acoustic Impedance Measurements of a Perforate Liner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, Todd; Liu, Fei; Cattafesta, Louis; Sheplak, Mark; Jones, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The eduction of the acoustic impedance for liner configurations is fundamental to the reduction of noise from modern jet engines. Ultimately, this property must be measured accurately for use in analytical and numerical propagation models of aircraft engine noise. Thus any standardized measurement techniques must be validated by providing reliable and consistent results for different facilities and sample sizes. This paper compares normal-incidence acoustic impedance measurements using the two-microphone method of ten nominally identical individual liner samples from two facilities, namely 50.8 mm and 25.4 mm square waveguides at NASA Langley Research Center and the University of Florida, respectively. The liner chosen for this investigation is a simple single-degree-of-freedom perforate liner with resonance and anti-resonance frequencies near 1.1 kHz and 2.2 kHz, respectively. The results show that the ten measurements have the most variation around the anti-resonance frequency, where statistically significant differences exist between the averaged results from the two facilities. However, the sample-to-sample variation is comparable in magnitude to the predicted cross-sectional area-dependent cavity dissipation differences between facilities, providing evidence that the size of the present samples does not significantly influence the results away from anti-resonance.

  12. Random and systematic measurement errors in acoustic impedance as determined by the transmission line method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrott, T. L.; Smith, C. D.

    1977-01-01

    The effect of random and systematic errors associated with the measurement of normal incidence acoustic impedance in a zero-mean-flow environment was investigated by the transmission line method. The influence of random measurement errors in the reflection coefficients and pressure minima positions was investigated by computing fractional standard deviations of the normalized impedance. Both the standard techniques of random process theory and a simplified technique were used. Over a wavelength range of 68 to 10 cm random measurement errors in the reflection coefficients and pressure minima positions could be described adequately by normal probability distributions with standard deviations of 0.001 and 0.0098 cm, respectively. An error propagation technique based on the observed concentration of the probability density functions was found to give essentially the same results but with a computation time of about 1 percent of that required for the standard technique. The results suggest that careful experimental design reduces the effect of random measurement errors to insignificant levels for moderate ranges of test specimen impedance component magnitudes. Most of the observed random scatter can be attributed to lack of control by the mounting arrangement over mechanical boundary conditions of the test sample.

  13. Acoustic impedance microscopy for biological tissue characterization.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Kazuto; Yoshida, Sachiko; Saijo, Yoshifumi; Hozumi, Naohiro

    2014-09-01

    A new method for two-dimensional acoustic impedance imaging for biological tissue characterization with micro-scale resolution was proposed. A biological tissue was placed on a plastic substrate with a thickness of 0.5mm. A focused acoustic pulse with a wide frequency band was irradiated from the "rear side" of the substrate. In order to generate the acoustic wave, an electric pulse with two nanoseconds in width was applied to a PVDF-TrFE type transducer. The component of echo intensity at an appropriate frequency was extracted from the signal received at the same transducer, by performing a time-frequency domain analysis. The spectrum intensity was interpreted into local acoustic impedance of the target tissue. The acoustic impedance of the substrate was carefully assessed prior to the measurement, since it strongly affects the echo intensity. In addition, a calibration was performed using a reference material of which acoustic impedance was known. The reference material was attached on the same substrate at different position in the field of view. An acoustic impedance microscopy with 200×200 pixels, its typical field of view being 2×2 mm, was obtained by scanning the transducer. The development of parallel fiber in cerebella cultures was clearly observed as the contrast in acoustic impedance, without staining the specimen. The technique is believed to be a powerful tool for biological tissue characterization, as no staining nor slicing is required. PMID:24852259

  14. Mechanical impedance and acoustic mobility measurement techniques of specifying vibration environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, G. C.

    1973-01-01

    Method has been developed for predicting interaction between components and corresponding support structures subjected to acoustic excitations. Force environments determined in spectral form are called force spectra. Force-spectra equation is determined based on one-dimensional structural impedance model.

  15. Measurement of cantilever vibration using impedance-loaded surface acoustic wave sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oishi, Masaki; Hamashima, Hiromitsu; Kondoh, Jun

    2016-07-01

    In this study, an impedance-loaded surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor was demonstrated to monitor the vibration frequency. Commercialized pressure sensors and a variable capacitor were chosen as external sensors, which were connected to a reflector on a SAW device. As the reflection coefficient of the reflector depended on the impedance, the echo amplitude was influenced by changes in the impedance of the external sensor. The vibration frequency of the cantilever was determined by monitoring the echo amplitude of the SAW device. Moreover, the attenuation constant of an envelope was estimated. The results of our feasibility study indicate that the impedance-loaded SAW sensor can be applied as a detector for structural health monitoring.

  16. Respiratory acoustic impedance in left ventricular failure.

    PubMed

    Depeursinge, F B; Feihl, F; Depeursinge, C; Perret, C H

    1989-12-01

    The measurement of respiratory acoustic impedance (Zrs) by forced pseudorandom noise provides a simple means of assessing respiratory mechanics in nonintubated intensive care patients. To characterize the lung mechanical alterations induced by acute vascular congestion of the lung, Zrs was measured in 14 spontaneously breathing patients hospitalized for acute left ventricular failure. The Zrs data in the cardiac patients were compared with those of 48 semirecumbent normal subjects and those of 23 sitting asthmatic patients during allergen-induced bronchospasm. In the patients with acute left ventricular failure, the Zrs abnormalities noted were an excessive frequency dependence of resistance from 10 to 20 Hz and an abnormally low reactance at all frequencies, abnormalities qualitatively similar to those observed in the asthmatic patients but of lesser magnitude. Acute lung vascular congestion modifies the acoustic impedance of the respiratory system. Reflex-induced bronchospasm might be the main mechanism altering respiratory acoustic impedance in acute left ventricular failure. PMID:2582846

  17. Measured and calculated acoustic attenuation rates of tuned resonator arrays for two surface impedance distribution models with flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrott, Tony L.; Abrahamson, A. Louis; Jones, Michael G.

    1988-01-01

    An experiment was performed to validate two analytical models for predicting low frequency attenuation of duct liner configurations built from an array of seven resonators that could be individually tuned via adjustable cavity depths. These analytical models had previously been developed for high frequency aero-engine inlet duct liner design. In the low frequency application, the liner surface impedance distribution is unavoidably spatially varying by virtue of available fabrication techniques. The characteristic length of this spatial variation may be a significant fraction of the acoustic wavelength. Comparison of measured and predicted attenuation rates and transmission losses for both modal decomposition and finite element propagation models were in good to excellent agreement for a test frequency range that included the first and second cavity resonance frequencies. This was true for either of two surface impedance distribution modeling procedures used to simplify the impedance boundary conditions. In the presence of mean flow, measurements revealed a fine scale structure of acoustic hot spots in the attenuation and phase profiles. These details were accurately predicted by the finite element model. Since no impedance changes due to mean flow were assumed, it is concluded that this fine scale structure was due to convective effects of the mean flow interacting with the surface impedance nonuniformities.

  18. Locating interfaces in vertically-layered materials and determining concentrations in mixed materials utilizing acoustic impedance measurements

    DOEpatents

    Langlois, G.N.

    1983-09-13

    Measurement of the relative and actual value of acoustic characteristic impedances of an unknown substance, location of the interfaces of vertically-layered materials, and the determination of the concentration of a first material mixed in a second material are disclosed. A highly damped ultrasonic pulse is transmitted into one side of a reference plate, such as a tank wall, where the other side of the reference plate is in physical contact with the medium to be measured. The amplitude of a return signal, which is the reflection of the transmitted pulse from the interface between the other side of the reference plate and the medium, is measured. The amplitude value indicates the acoustic characteristic impedance of the substance relative to that of the reference plate or relative to that of other tested materials. Discontinuities in amplitude with repeated measurements for various heights indicate the location of interfaces in vertically-layered materials. Standardization techniques permit the relative acoustic characteristic impedance of a substance to be converted to an actual value. Calibration techniques for mixtures permit the amplitude to be converted to the concentration of a first material mixed in a second material. 6 figs.

  19. Locating interfaces in vertically-layered materials and determining concentrations in mixed materials utilizing acoustic impedance measurements

    DOEpatents

    Langlois, Gary N.

    1983-09-13

    Measurement of the relative and actual value of acoustic characteristic impedances of an unknown substance, location of the interfaces of vertically-layered materials, and the determination of the concentration of a first material mixed in a second material. A highly damped ultrasonic pulse is transmitted into one side of a reference plate, such as a tank wall, where the other side of the reference plate is in physical contact with the medium to be measured. The amplitude of a return signal, which is the reflection of the transmitted pulse from the interface between the other side of the reference plate and the medium, is measured. The amplitude value indicates the acoustic characteristic impedance of the substance relative to that of the reference plate or relative to that of other tested materials. Discontinuities in amplitude with repeated measurements for various heights indicate the location of interfaces in vertically-layered materials. Standardization techniques permit the relative acoustic characteristic impedance of a substance to be converted to an actual value. Calibration techniques for mixtures permit the amplitude to be converted to the concentration of a first material mixed in a second material.

  20. Locating interfaces in vertically-layered materials and determining concentrations in mixed materials utilizing acoustic-impedance measurements. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Not Available

    1981-06-10

    Measurement of the relative and actual value of acoustic characteristic impedances of an unknown substance, location of the interfaces of vertically-layered materials, and the determination of the concentration of a first material mixed in a second material are presented. A highly damped ultrasonic pulse is transmitted into one side of a reference plate, such as a tank wall, where the other side of the reference plate is in physical contact with the medium to be measured. The amplitude of a return signal, which is the reflection of the transmitted pulse from the interface between the other side of the reference plate and the medium, is measured. The amplitude value indicates the acoustic characteristic impedance of the substance relative to that of the reference plate or relative to that of other tested materials. Discontinuities in amplitude with repeated measurements for various heights indicate the location of interfaces in vertically-layered materials. Standardization techniques permit the relative acoustic characteristic impedance of a substance to be converted to an actual value. Calibration techniques for mixtures permit the amplitude to be converted to the concentration of a first material mixed in a second material.

  1. Nonlinear acoustic impedance of thermoacoustic stack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Huan; Fan, Li; Xiao, Shu-yu; Tao, Sha; Qiu, Mei-chen; Zhang, Shu-yi; Zhang, Hui

    2012-09-01

    In order to optimize the performances of the thermoacoustic refrigerator working with the high sound pressure level, the nonlinear acoustic characteristics of the thermoacoustic stack in the resonant pipe are studied. The acoustic fluid impedance of the stack made of copper mesh and set up in a resonant pipe is measured in the acoustic fields with different intensities. It is found that when the sound pressure level in the pipe increases to a critical value, the resistance of the stack increases nonlinearly with the sound pressure, while the reactance of the stack keeps constant. Based on the experimental results, a theory model is set up to describe the acoustic characteristics of the stack, according to the rigid frame theory and Forchheimmer equation. Furthermore, the influences of the sound pressure level, operating frequency, volume porosity, and length of the stack on the nonlinear impedance of the stack are evaluated.

  2. Acoustic grazing flow impedance using waveguide principles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, D. L.

    1971-01-01

    A grazing flow apparatus was designed to measure the impedance of acoustic materials when installed in environments that subject the material to grazing airflow. The design of the apparatus and the data analysis technique is based on the solution of the convected wave equation in an infinite length waveguide.

  3. Modifying the acoustic impedance of polyurea-based composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nantasetphong, Wiroj; Amirkhizi, Alireza V.; Jia, Zhanzhan; Nemat-Nasser, Sia

    2013-04-01

    Acoustic impedance is a material property that depends on mass density and acoustic wave speed. An impedance mismatch between two media leads to the partial reflection of an acoustic wave sent from one medium to another. Active sonar is one example of a useful application of this phenomenon, where reflected and scattered acoustic waves enable the detection of objects. If the impedance of an object is matched to that of the surrounding medium, however, the object may be hidden from observation (at least directly) by sonar. In this study, polyurea composites are developed to facilitate such impedance matching. Polyurea is used due to its excellent blast-mitigating properties, easy casting, corrosion protection, abrasion resistance, and various uses in current military technology. Since pure polyurea has impedance higher than that of water (the current medium of interest), low mass density phenolic microballoon particles are added to create composite materials with reduced effective impedances. The volume fraction of particles is varied to study the effect of filler quantity on the acoustic impedance of the resulting composite. The composites are experimentally characterized via ultrasonic measurements. Computational models based on the method of dilute-randomly-distributed inclusions are developed and compared with the experimental results. These experiments and models will facilitate the design of new elastomeric composites with desirable acoustic impedances.

  4. Effects of Liner Geometry on Acoustic Impedance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Michael G.; Tracy, Maureen B.; Watson, Willie R.; Parrott, Tony L.

    2002-01-01

    Current aircraft engine nacelles typically contain acoustic liners consisting of perforated sheets bonded onto honeycomb cavities. Numerous models have been developed to predict the acoustic impedance of these liners in the presence of grazing flow, and to use that information with aeroacoustic propagation codes to assess nacelle liner noise suppression. Recent efforts have provided advances in impedance education methodologies that offer more accurate determinations of acoustic liner properties in the presence of grazing flow. The current report provides the results of a parametric study, in which a finite element method was used to assess the effects of variations of the following geometric parameters on liner impedance, with and without the presence of grazing flow: percent open area, sheet thickness, sheet thickness-to-hole diameter ratio and cavity depth. Normal incidence acoustic impedances were determined for eight acoustic liners, consisting of punched aluminum facesheets bonded to hexcell honeycomb cavities. Similar liners were tested in the NASA Langley Research Center grazing incidence tube to determine their response in the presence of grazing flow. The resultant data provide a quantitative assessment of the effects of these perforate, single-layer liner parameters on the acoustic impedance of the liner.

  5. Method of Adjusting Acoustic Impedances for Impedance-Tunable Acoustic Segments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Kennie H (Inventor); Nark, Douglas M. (Inventor); Jones, Michael G. (Inventor); Parrott, Tony L. (Inventor); Lodding, Kenneth N. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A method is provided for making localized decisions and taking localized actions to achieve a global solution. In an embodiment of the present invention, acoustic impedances for impedance-tunable acoustic segments are adjusted. A first acoustic segment through an N-th acoustic segment are defined. To start the process, the first acoustic segment is designated as a leader and a noise-reducing impedance is determined therefor. This is accomplished using (i) one or more metrics associated with the acoustic wave at the leader, and (ii) the metric(s) associated with the acoustic wave at the N-th acoustic segment. The leader, the N-th acoustic segment, and each of the acoustic segments exclusive of the leader and the N-th acoustic segment, are tuned to the noise-reducing impedance. The current leader is then excluded from subsequent processing steps. The designation of leader is then given one of the remaining acoustic segments, and the process is repeated for each of the acoustic segments through an (N-1)-th one of the acoustic segments.

  6. The point source method for reconstructing an inclusion from boundary measurements in electrical impedance tomography and acoustic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erhard, Klaus; Potthast, Roland

    2003-10-01

    We employ the point source method (PSM) for the reconstruction of some field u on parts of a domain Omega from the Cauchy data for the field on the boundary partialOmega of the domain. Then, the boundary condition for a perfectly conducting inclusion or a sound-soft object in Omega can be used to find the location and shape of the inhomogeneity. The results show that we can detect perfectly conducting inclusions in impedance tomography from the voltages for one injected current. For acoustic scattering a sound-soft object is found from the knowledge of one (total) field and its normal derivative on partialOmega. The work redesigns the PSM, which was first proposed in the framework of inverse scattering, to solve inverse boundary value problems. Numerical examples are provided for impedance tomography and the sound-soft acoustic boundary value problem.

  7. Comparison of Two Acoustic Waveguide Methods for Determining Liner Impedance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Michael G.; Watson, Willie R.; Tracy, Maureen B.; Parrott, Tony L.

    2001-01-01

    Acoustic measurements taken in a flow impedance tube are used to assess the relative accuracy of two waveguide methods for impedance eduction in the presence of grazing flow. The aeroacoustic environment is assumed to contain forward and backward-traveling acoustic waves, consisting of multiple modes, and uniform mean flow. Both methods require a measurement of the complex acoustic pressure profile over the length of the test liner. The Single Mode Method assumes that the sound pressure level and phase decay-rates of a single progressive mode can be extracted from this measured complex acoustic pressure profile. No a priori assumptions are made in the Finite Element. Method regarding the modal or reflection content in the measured acoustic pressure profile. The integrity of each method is initially demonstrated by how well their no-flow impedances match those acquired in a normal incidence impedance tube. These tests were conducted using ceramic tubular and conventional perforate liners. Ceramic tubular liners were included because of their impedance insensitivity to mean flow effects. Conversely, the conventional perforate liner was included because its impedance is known to be sensitive to mean flow velocity effects. Excellent comparisons between impedance values educed with the two waveguide methods in the absence of mean flow and the corresponding values educed with the normal incident impedance tube were observed. The two methods are then compared for mean flow Mach numbers up to 0.5, and are shown to give consistent results for both types of test liners. The quality of the results indicates that the Single Mode Method should be used when the measured acoustic pressure profile is clearly dominated by a single progressive mode, and the Finite Element Method should be used for all other cases.

  8. Estimating surface acoustic impedance with the inverse method.

    PubMed

    Piechowicz, Janusz

    2011-01-01

    Sound field parameters are predicted with numerical methods in sound control systems, in acoustic designs of building and in sound field simulations. Those methods define the acoustic properties of surfaces, such as sound absorption coefficients or acoustic impedance, to determine boundary conditions. Several in situ measurement techniques were developed; one of them uses 2 microphones to measure direct and reflected sound over a planar test surface. Another approach is used in the inverse boundary elements method, in which estimating acoustic impedance of a surface is expressed as an inverse boundary problem. The boundary values can be found from multipoint sound pressure measurements in the interior of a room. This method can be applied to arbitrarily-shaped surfaces. This investigation is part of a research programme on using inverse methods in industrial room acoustics. PMID:21939599

  9. Optimization and Control of Acoustic Liner Impedance with Bias Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Houston; Follet, Jesse

    2000-01-01

    Because communities are impacted by steady increases in aircraft traffic, aircraft noise continues to be a growing problem for the growth of commercial aviation. Research has focused on improving the design of specific high noise source areas of aircraft and on noise control measures to alleviate noise radiated from aircraft to the surrounding environment. Engine duct liners have long been a principal means of attenuating engine noise. The ability to control in-situ the acoustic impedance of a liner would provide a valuable tool to improve the performance of liners. The acoustic impedance of a liner is directly related to the sound absorption qualities of that liner. Increased attenuation rates, the ability to change liner acoustic impedance to match various operating conditions, or the ability to tune a liner to more precisely match design impedance represent some ways that in-situ impedance control could be useful. With this in mind, the research to be investigated will focus on improvements in the ability to control liner impedance using a mean flow through the liner which is referred to as bias flow.

  10. Impedance Measurement Box

    2014-11-20

    The IMB 50V software provides functionality for design of impedance measurement tests or sequences of tests, execution of these tests or sequences, processing measured responses and displaying and saving of the results. The software consists of a Graphical User Interface that allows configuration of measurement parameters and test sequencing, a core engine that controls test sequencing, execution of measurements, processing and storage of results and a hardware/software data acquisition interface with the IMB hardware system.

  11. Impedance matched joined drill pipe for improved acoustic transmission

    DOEpatents

    Moss, William C.

    2000-01-01

    An impedance matched jointed drill pipe for improved acoustic transmission. A passive means and method that maximizes the amplitude and minimize the temporal dispersion of acoustic signals that are sent through a drill string, for use in a measurement while drilling telemetry system. The improvement in signal transmission is accomplished by replacing the standard joints in a drill string with joints constructed of a material that is impedance matched acoustically to the end of the drill pipe to which it is connected. Provides improvement in the measurement while drilling technique which can be utilized for well logging, directional drilling, and drilling dynamics, as well as gamma-ray spectroscopy while drilling post shot boreholes, such as utilized in drilling post shot boreholes.

  12. Modal decomposition method for acoustic impedance testing in square ducts.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Todd; Cattafesta, Louis N; Sheplak, Mark

    2006-12-01

    Accurate duct acoustic propagation models are required to predict and reduce aircraft engine noise. These models ultimately rely on measurements of the acoustic impedance to characterize candidate engine nacelle liners. This research effort increases the frequency range of normal-incidence acoustic impedance testing in square ducts by extending the standard two-microphone method (TMM), which is limited to plane wave propagation, to include higher-order modes. The modal decomposition method (MDM) presented includes four normal modes in the model of the sound field, thus increasing the bandwidth from 6.7 to 13.5 kHz for a 25.4 mm square waveguide. The MDM characterizes the test specimen for normal- and oblique-incident acoustic impedance and mode scattering coefficients. The MDM is first formulated and then applied to the measurement of the reflection coefficient matrix for a ceramic tubular specimen. The experimental results are consistent with results from the TMM for the same specimen to within the 95% confidence intervals for the TMM. The MDM results show a series of resonances for the ceramic tubular material exhibiting a monotonic decrease in the resonant peaks of the acoustic resistance with increasing frequency, resembling a rigidly-terminated viscous tube, and also evidence of mode scattering is visible at the higher frequencies. PMID:17225402

  13. Impedance Measurement Box

    ScienceCinema

    Christophersen, Jon

    2013-05-28

    Energy storage devices, primarily batteries, are now more important to consumers, industries and the military. With increasing technical complexity and higher user expectations, there is also a demand for highly accurate state-of-health battery assessment techniques. IMB incorporates patented, proprietary, and tested capabilities using control software and hardware that can be part of an embedded monitoring system. IMB directly measures the wideband impedance spectrum in seconds during battery operation with no significant impact on service life. It also can be applied to batteries prior to installation, confirming health before entering active service, as well as during regular maintenance. For more information about this project, visit http://www.inl.gov/rd100/2011/impedance-measurement-box/

  14. Simulating Reflex Induced Changes in the Acoustic Impedance of the Ear.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sirlin, Mindy W.; Levitt, Harry

    1991-01-01

    A simple procedure for measuring changes in the acoustic impedance of the ear is described. The technique has several applications, including simulation using a standard coupler of changes in real ear impedance produced by the acoustic reflex, and calibration of response time of an otoadmittance meter. (Author/DB)

  15. Prediction of the acoustic impedance of duct liners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zorumski, W. E.; Tester, B. J.

    1976-01-01

    Recent research which contributes to the prediction of the acoustic impedance of duct liners is reviewed. This review includes the linear and nonlinear properties of sheet and bulk type materials and methods for the measurement of these properties. It also includes the effect of grazing flow on the acoustic properties of materials. Methods for predicting the properties of single or multilayered, point reacting or extended reaction, and flat or curved liners are discussed. Based on this review, methods for predicting the properties of the duct liners which are typically used in aircraft engines are recommended. Some areas of needed research are discussed briefly.

  16. Active acoustical impedance using distributed electrodynamical transducers.

    PubMed

    Collet, M; David, P; Berthillier, M

    2009-02-01

    New miniaturization and integration capabilities available from emerging microelectromechanical system (MEMS) technology will allow silicon-based artificial skins involving thousands of elementary actuators to be developed in the near future. SMART structures combining large arrays of elementary motion pixels coated with macroscopic components are thus being studied so that fundamental properties such as shape, stiffness, and even reflectivity of light and sound could be dynamically adjusted. This paper investigates the acoustic impedance capabilities of a set of distributed transducers connected with a suitable controlling strategy. Research in this domain aims at designing integrated active interfaces with a desired acoustical impedance for reaching an appropriate global acoustical behavior. This generic problem is intrinsically connected with the control of multiphysical systems based on partial differential equations (PDEs) and with the notion of multiscaled physics when a dense array of electromechanical systems (or MEMS) is considered. By using specific techniques based on PDE control theory, a simple boundary control equation capable of annihilating the wave reflections has been built. The obtained strategy is also discretized as a low order time-space operator for experimental implementation by using a dense network of interlaced microphones and loudspeakers. The resulting quasicollocated architecture guarantees robustness and stability margins. This paper aims at showing how a well controlled semidistributed active skin can substantially modify the sound transmissibility or reflectivity of the corresponding homogeneous passive interface. In Sec. IV, numerical and experimental results demonstrate the capabilities of such a method for controlling sound propagation in ducts. Finally, in Sec. V, an energy-based comparison with a classical open-loop strategy underlines the system's efficiency. PMID:19206865

  17. Fluid mechanical model of the acoustic impedance of small orifices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hersh, A. S.; Rogers, T.

    1975-01-01

    A fluid mechanical model of the acoustic behavior of small orifices is presented which predicts orifice impedance as a function of incident sound pressure level, frequency, and orifice geometry. Agreement between predicted and measured values (in both water and air) of orifice impedance is excellent. The model shows that (1) the acoustic flow in the immediate neighborhood of the orifice can be modelled as a locally spherical flow, (2) within this near field, the flow is, to a first approximation, unsteady and incompressible, and (3) at very low sound pressure levels, the orifice viscous resistance is directly related to the effect of boundary-layer displacement along the walls containing the orifice, and the orifice reactance is directly related to the inertia of the oscillating flow in the orifice neighborhood.-

  18. Monolithically compatible impedance measurement

    DOEpatents

    Ericson, Milton Nance; Holcomb, David Eugene

    2002-01-01

    A monolithic sensor includes a reference channel and at least one sensing channel. Each sensing channel has an oscillator and a counter driven by the oscillator. The reference channel and the at least one sensing channel being formed integrally with a substrate and intimately nested with one another on the substrate. Thus, the oscillator and the counter have matched component values and temperature coefficients. A frequency determining component of the sensing oscillator is formed integrally with the substrate and has an impedance parameter which varies with an environmental parameter to be measured by the sensor. A gating control is responsive to an output signal generated by the reference channel, for terminating counting in the at least one sensing channel at an output count, whereby the output count is indicative of the environmental parameter, and successive ones of the output counts are indicative of changes in the environmental parameter.

  19. Fluid mechanical model of the acoustic impedance of small orifices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hersh, A. S.; Rogers, T.

    1976-01-01

    A fluid mechanical model of the acoustic behavior of small orifices is presented which predicts orifice resistance and reactance as a function of incident sound pressure level, frequency, and orifice geometry. Agreement between predicted and measured values is excellent. The model shows the following: (1) The acoustic flow in immediate neighborhood of the orifice can be modeled as a locally spherical flow. Within this near field, the flow is, to a first approximation, unsteady and incompressible. (2) At very low sound pressure levels, the orifice viscous resistance is directly related to the effect of boundary-layer displacement along the walls containing the orifice, and the orifice reactance is directly related to the inertia of the oscillating flow in the neighborhood of the orifice. (3) For large values of the incident acoustic pressure, the impedance is dominated by nonlinear jet-like effects. (4) For low values of the pressure, the resistance and reactance are roughly equal.

  20. Acoustic characteristics of the medium with gradient change of impedance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Bo; Yang, Desen; Sun, Yu; Shi, Jie; Shi, Shengguo; Zhang, Haoyang

    2015-10-01

    The medium with gradient change of acoustic impedance is a new acoustic structure which developed from multiple layer structures. In this paper, the inclusion is introduced and a new set of equations is developed. It can obtain better acoustic properties based on the medium with gradient change of acoustic impedance. Theoretical formulation has been systematically addressed which demonstrates how the idea of utilizing this method. The sound reflection and absorption coefficients were obtained. At last, the validity and the correctness of this method are assessed by simulations. The results show that appropriate design of parameters of the medium can improve underwater acoustic properties.

  1. Manipulating Acoustic Wavefront by Inhomogeneous Impedance and Steerable Extraordinary Reflection

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jiajun; Li, Baowen; Chen, Zhining; Qiu, Cheng-Wei

    2013-01-01

    We unveil the connection between the acoustic impedance along a flat surface and the reflected acoustic wavefront, in order to empower a wide wariety of novel applications in acoustic community. Our designed flat surface can generate double reflections: the ordinary reflection and the extraordinary one whose wavefront is manipulated by the proposed impedance-governed generalized Snell's law of reflection (IGSL). IGSL is based on Green's function and integral equation, instead of Fermat's principle for optical wavefront manipulation. Remarkably, via the adjustment of the designed specific acoustic impedance, extraordinary reflection can be steered for unprecedented acoustic wavefront while that ordinary reflection can be surprisingly switched on or off. The realization of the complex discontinuity of the impedance surface has been proposed using Helmholtz resonators. PMID:23985717

  2. Manipulating acoustic wavefront by inhomogeneous impedance and steerable extraordinary reflection.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jiajun; Li, Baowen; Chen, Zhining; Qiu, Cheng-Wei

    2013-01-01

    We unveil the connection between the acoustic impedance along a flat surface and the reflected acoustic wavefront, in order to empower a wide wariety of novel applications in acoustic community. Our designed flat surface can generate double reflections: the ordinary reflection and the extraordinary one whose wavefront is manipulated by the proposed impedance-governed generalized Snell's law of reflection (IGSL). IGSL is based on Green's function and integral equation, instead of Fermat's principle for optical wavefront manipulation. Remarkably, via the adjustment of the designed specific acoustic impedance, extraordinary reflection can be steered for unprecedented acoustic wavefront while that ordinary reflection can be surprisingly switched on or off. The realization of the complex discontinuity of the impedance surface has been proposed using Helmholtz resonators. PMID:23985717

  3. Manipulating Acoustic Wavefront by Inhomogeneous Impedance and Steerable Extraordinary Reflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jiajun; Li, Baowen; Chen, Zhining; Qiu, Cheng-Wei

    2013-08-01

    We unveil the connection between the acoustic impedance along a flat surface and the reflected acoustic wavefront, in order to empower a wide wariety of novel applications in acoustic community. Our designed flat surface can generate double reflections: the ordinary reflection and the extraordinary one whose wavefront is manipulated by the proposed impedance-governed generalized Snell's law of reflection (IGSL). IGSL is based on Green's function and integral equation, instead of Fermat's principle for optical wavefront manipulation. Remarkably, via the adjustment of the designed specific acoustic impedance, extraordinary reflection can be steered for unprecedented acoustic wavefront while that ordinary reflection can be surprisingly switched on or off. The realization of the complex discontinuity of the impedance surface has been proposed using Helmholtz resonators.

  4. An analysis of the acoustic input impedance of the ear.

    PubMed

    Withnell, Robert H; Gowdy, Lauren E

    2013-10-01

    Ear canal acoustics was examined using a one-dimensional lossy transmission line with a distributed load impedance to model the ear. The acoustic input impedance of the ear was derived from sound pressure measurements in the ear canal of healthy human ears. A nonlinear least squares fit of the model to data generated estimates for ear canal radius, ear canal length, and quantified the resistance that would produce transmission losses. Derivation of ear canal radius has application to quantifying the impedance mismatch at the eardrum between the ear canal and the middle ear. The length of the ear canal was found, in general, to be longer than the length derived from the one-quarter wavelength standing wave frequency, consistent with the middle ear being mass-controlled at the standing wave frequency. Viscothermal losses in the ear canal, in some cases, may exceed that attributable to a smooth rigid wall. Resistance in the middle ear was found to contribute significantly to the total resistance. In effect, this analysis "reverse engineers" physical parameters of the ear from sound pressure measurements in the ear canal. PMID:23917695

  5. Active acoustical impedance using distributed electrodynamic transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collet, M.; Berthillier, M.; David, P.

    2006-03-01

    New miniaturization and integration capabilities available from the emerging MEMS technology will allow silicon-based artificial skins involving thousands of elementary actuators to be developed in the near future. SMART structures combining large arrays of elementary motion pixels coated with macroscopic components are thus being studied so that fundamental properties such as shape, stiffness, color, and even reflectivity of light and sound could be dynamically adjusted. This paper investigates acoustic impedance capabilities of a set of distributed transducers connected with suitable controlling laws. Basically, we search to design an integrated electro-mechanical system which presents a global behavior with appropriate acoustical characteristics. This problem is intrinsically connected with the control of multi physical system based on PDE and with the notion of multi-scaled physics when we dispose MEMS devices. By using specific techniques based on partial differential equation control theory, we have first build a simple boundary control equation able to annihilate wave reflection. The obtained control strategies can also be discretized to be implemented like a zero or first order spatial operator. Thus, we can use quasi-collocated transducers and their well-known poles-zeros interlacing property to guarantee robust stability. This paper aims at showing in a first part how a well controlled semi-distributed active skin can substantially modify transmissibility or reflectivity of the corresponding homogeneous wall. In a second part numerical and experimental results underline the capabilities of the method. Finally efficiency of such a device is compared theoretically with those obtained by classical x-filtered LMS strategy.

  6. Tests Of Shear-Flow Model For Acoustic Impedance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrot, Tony L.; Watson, Willie R.; Jones, Michael G.

    1992-01-01

    Tests described in report conducted to validate two-dimensional shear-flow analytical model for determination of acoustic impedance of acoustic liner in grazing-incidence, grazing-flow environment by use of infinite-waveguide method. Tests successful for both upstream and downstream propagations. Work has potential for utility in testing of engine ducts in commercial aircraft.

  7. Development of an Acoustic Impedance Tube Testbed for Material Sample Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doty, Benjamin J.; Kolaini, Ali R.

    2012-01-01

    Acoustic impedance tube method: uses Traveling wave amplitudes are measured on either side of a sample in a tube. Many acoustic properties of the sample can be calculated. It is Simple and inexpensive to set up, ideal for high volume optimization tests

  8. Validation of an Acoustic Impedance Prediction Model for Skewed Resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howerton, Brian M.; Parrott, Tony L.

    2009-01-01

    An impedance prediction model was validated experimentally to determine the composite impedance of a series of high-aspect ratio slot resonators incorporating channel skew and sharp bends. Such structures are useful for packaging acoustic liners into constrained spaces for turbofan noise control applications. A formulation of the Zwikker-Kosten Transmission Line (ZKTL) model, incorporating the Richards correction for rectangular channels, is used to calculate the composite normalized impedance of a series of six multi-slot resonator arrays with constant channel length. Experimentally, acoustic data was acquired in the NASA Langley Normal Incidence Tube over the frequency range of 500 to 3500 Hz at 120 and 140 dB OASPL. Normalized impedance was reduced using the Two-Microphone Method for the various combinations of channel skew and sharp 90o and 180o bends. Results show that the presence of skew and/or sharp bends does not significantly alter the impedance of a slot resonator as compared to a straight resonator of the same total channel length. ZKTL predicts the impedance of such resonators very well over the frequency range of interest. The model can be used to design arrays of slot resonators that can be packaged into complex geometries heretofore unsuitable for effective acoustic treatment.

  9. Duct wall impedance control as an advanced concept for acoustic impression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, P. D.; Tester, B. J.

    1975-01-01

    Models and tests on an acoustic duct liner system which has the property of controlled-variable acoustic impedance are described. This is achieved by a novel concept which uses the effect of steady air flow through a multi-layer, locally reacting, resonant-cavity absorber. The scope of this work was limited to a 'proof of concept.' The test of the concept was implemented by means of a small-scale, square-section flow duct facility designed specifically for acoustic measurements, with one side of the duct acoustically lined. The test liners were designed with the aid of previously established duct acoustic theory and a semi-empirical impedance model of the liner system. Over the limited range tested, the liner behaved primarily as predicted, exhibiting significant changes in resistance and reactance, thus providing the necessary concept validation.

  10. Effects of Flow Profile on Educed Acoustic Liner Impedance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Michael G.; Watson, Willie r.; Nark, Douglas M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents results of an investigation of the effects of shear flow profile on impedance eduction processes employed at NASA Langley. Uniform and 1-D shear-flow propagation models are used to educe the acoustic impedance of three test liners based on aeroacoustic data acquired in the Langley Grazing Flow Impedance Tube, at source levels of 130, 140 and 150 dB, and at centerline Mach numbers of 0.0, 0.3 and 0.5. A ceramic tubular, calibration liner is used to evaluate the propagation models, as this liner is expected to be insensitive to SPL, grazing flow Mach number, and flow profile effects. The propagation models are then used to investigate the effects of shear flow profile on acoustic impedances educed for two conventional perforate-over-honeycomb liners. Results achieved with the uniform-flow models follow expected trends, but those educed with the 1-D shear-flow model do not, even for the calibration liner. However, when the flow profile used with the shear-flow model is varied to increase the Mach number gradient near the wall, results computed with the shear-flow model are well matched to those achieved with the uniform-flow model. This indicates the effects of flow profile on educed acoustic liner impedance are small, but more detailed investigations of the flow field throughout the duct are needed to better understand these effects.

  11. Duct wall impedance control as an advanced concept for acoustic suppression enhancement. [engine noise reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, P. D.

    1978-01-01

    A systems concept procedure is described for the optimization of acoustic duct liner design for both uniform and multisegment types. The concept was implemented by the use of a double reverberant chamber flow duct facility coupled with sophisticated computer control and acoustic analysis systems. The optimization procedure for liner insertion loss was based on the concept of variable liner impedance produced by bias air flow through a multilayer, resonant cavity liner. A multiple microphone technique for in situ wall impedance measurements was used and successfully adapted to produce automated measurements for all liner configurations tested. The complete validation of the systems concept was prevented by the inability to optimize the insertion loss using bias flow induced wall impedance changes. This inability appeared to be a direct function of the presence of a higher order energy carrying modes which were not influenced significantly by the wall impedance changes.

  12. Tungsten Oxide Layers of High Acoustic Impedance for Fully Insulating Acoustic Reflectors.

    PubMed

    DeMiguel-Ramos, M; Diaz-Duran, Barbara; Munir, Junaid; Clement, Marta; Mirea, Teona; Olivares, Jimena; Iborra, Enrique

    2016-07-01

    Gravimetric sensors based on solidly mounted resonators require fully insulating acoustic reflectors to avoid parasitics when operating in liquid media. In this work, we propose a new high-acoustic impedance material, tungsten oxide ([Formula: see text]), for acoustic reflectors. We have optimized the sputtering conditions of [Formula: see text] to obtain nonconductive layers with mass density around [Formula: see text] and acoustic velocities for the shear and the longitudinal modes up to 2700 and 4500 m/s, respectively. Compared to other conventionally used high impedance layers, [Formula: see text] films display several manufacture advantages, such as high deposition rates, great reproducibility, and good adhesion to underlying substrates. We have demonstrated the applicability of [Formula: see text] in practical shear mode bulk acoustic wave resonators that display good performance in liquid environments. PMID:26571521

  13. Acoustic impedance rhinometry (AIR): a technique for monitoring dynamic changes in nasal congestion.

    PubMed

    Patuzzi, Robert; Cook, Alison

    2014-04-01

    We describe a simple and inexpensive method for monitoring nasal air flow resistance using measurement of the small-signal acoustic input impedance of the nasal passage, similar to the audiological measurement of ear drum compliance with acoustic tympanometry. The method requires generation of a fixed sinusoidal volume-velocity stimulus using ear-bud speakers, and an electret microphone to monitor the resultant pressure fluctuation in the nasal passage. Both are coupled to the nose via high impedance silastic tubing and a small plastic nose insert. The acoustic impedance is monitored in real-time using a laptop soundcard and custom-written software developed in LabView 7.0 (National Instruments). The compact, lightweight equipment and fast time resolution lends the technique to research into the small and rapid reflexive changes in nasal resistance caused by environmental and local neurological influences. The acoustic impedance rhinometry technique has the potential to be developed for use in a clinical setting, where the need exists for a simple and inexpensive objective nasal resistance measurement technique. PMID:24577261

  14. Tunable acoustic radiation pattern assisted by effective impedance boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Feng; Quan, Li; Wang, Li-Wei; Liu, Xiao-Zhou; Gong, Xiu-Fen

    2016-02-01

    The acoustic wave propagation from a two-dimensional subwavelength slit surrounded by metal plates decorated with Helmholtz resonators (HRs) is investigated both numerically and experimentally in this work. Owing to the presence of HRs, the effective impedance of metal surface boundary can be manipulated. By optimizing the distribution of HRs, the asymmetric effective impedance boundary will be obtained, which contributes to generating tunable acoustic radiation pattern such as directional acoustic beaming. These dipole-like radiation patterns have high radiation efficiency, no fingerprint of sidelobes, and a wide tunable range of the radiation pattern directivity angle which can be steered by the spatial displacements of HRs. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant Nos. 2012CB921504 and 2011CB707902), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No.11474160), the Fundamental Research Funds for Central Universities, China (Grant No. 020414380001), the State Key Laboratory of Acoustics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. SKLOA201401), the Priority Academic Program Development of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions, and the Scientific Research Foundation for the Returned Overseas Chinese Scholars, State Education Ministry.

  15. Air-ground interface: Surface waves, surface impedance and acoustic-to-seismic coupling coefficient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daigle, Gilles; Embleton, Tony

    1990-01-01

    In atmospheric acoustics, the subject of surface waves has been an area of discussion for many years. The existence of an acoustic surface wave is now well established theoretically. The mathematical solution for spherical wave propagation above an impedance boundary includes the possibility of a contribution that possesses all the standard properties for a surface wave. Surface waves exist when the surface is sufficiently porous, relative to its acoustical resistance, that it can influence the airborne particle velocity near the surface and reduce the phase velocity of sound waves in air at the surface. This traps some of the sound energy in the air to remain near the surface as it propagates. Above porous grounds, the existence of surface waves has eluded direct experimental confirmation (pulse experiments have failed to show a separate arrival expected from the reduced phase speed) and indirect evidence for its existence has appeared contradictory. The experimental evidence for the existence of an acoustical surface wave above porous boundaries is reviewed. Recent measurements including pulse experiments are also described. A few years ago the acoustic impedance of a grass-covered surface was measured in the frequency range 30 to 300 Hz. Here, further measurements on the same site are discussed. These measurements include core samples, a shallow refractive survey to determine the seismic velocities, and measurements of the acoustic-to-seismic coupling coefficient.

  16. Variance of speed of sound and correlation with acoustic impedance in canine corneas.

    PubMed

    Tang, Junhua; Liu, Jun

    2011-10-01

    The clinical standard for measuring corneal thickness is ultrasound pachymetry that assumes a constant speed of sound. The purpose of this study was to examine the variance of speed of sound and its relationship with acoustic impedance in healthy eyes of canines with a large age span. Corneal speed of sound and acoustic impedance were measured in 34 canine eyes at room temperature (21 ± 1°C). The mean speed of sound was 1577 ± 10 m/s ranging from 1553 to 1594 m/s. There was a strong correlation between speed of sound and acoustic impedance (R = 0.84, p < 0.001). Corneal speed of sound had a small variance in healthy canines over 1-year-old, but was significantly lower in younger canines suggesting an age effect. The strong correlation between corneal speed of sound and acoustic impedance may offer a potential means to noninvasively detect abnormal speed of sound for more accurate corneal thickness estimation. PMID:21821348

  17. Experimental validation of a two-dimensional shear-flow model for determining acoustic impedance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrott, Tony L.; Watson, Willie R.; Jones, Michael G.

    1987-01-01

    Tests were conducted to validate a two-dimensional shear-flow analytical model for determining the acoustic impedance of a liner test specimen in a grazing-incidence, grazing-flow environment. The tests were limited to a test specimen chosen to exhibit minimal effects of grazing flow so that the results obtained by using the shear-flow analytical model would be expected to match those obtained from normal-incidence impedance measurements. Impedances for both downstream and upstream sound propagation were generally consistent with those from normal-incidence measurements. However, sensitivity of the grazing-incidence impedance to small measurement or systematic errors in propagation constant varied dramatically over the range of test frequencies.

  18. Numerical analysis of acoustic impedance microscope utilizing acoustic lens transducer to examine cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Gunawan, Agus Indra; Hozumi, Naohiro; Takahashi, Kenta; Yoshida, Sachiko; Saijo, Yoshifumi; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Yamamoto, Seiji

    2015-12-01

    A new technique is proposed for non-contact quantitative cell observation using focused ultrasonic waves. This technique interprets acoustic reflection intensity into the characteristic acoustic impedance of the biological cell. The cells are cultured on a plastic film substrate. A focused acoustic beam is transmitted through the substrate to its interface with the cell. A two-dimensional (2-D) reflection intensity profile is obtained by scanning the focal point along the interface. A reference substance is observed under the same conditions. These two reflections are compared and interpreted into the characteristic acoustic impedance of the cell based on a calibration curve that was created prior to the observation. To create the calibration curve, a numerical analysis of the sound field is performed using Fourier Transforms and is verified using several saline solutions. Because the cells are suspended by two plastic films, no contamination is introduced during the observation. In a practical observation, a sapphire lens transducer with a center frequency of 300 MHz was employed using ZnO thin film. The objects studied were co-cultured rat-derived glial (astrocyte) cells and glioma cells. The result was the clear observation of the internal structure of the cells. The acoustic impedance of the cells was spreading between 1.62 and 1.72 MNs/m(3). Cytoskeleton was indicated by high acoustic impedance. The introduction of cytochalasin-B led to a significant reduction in the acoustic impedance of the glioma cells; its effect on the glial cells was less significant. It is believed that this non-contact observation method will be useful for continuous cell inspections. PMID:26163739

  19. A state feedback electro-acoustic transducer for active control of acoustic impedance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samejima, Toshiya

    2003-03-01

    In this paper, a new control system in which the acoustic impedance of an electro-acoustic transducer diaphragm can be actively varied by modifying design parameters is presented and its effectiveness is theoretically investigated. The proposed control system is based on a state-space description of the control system derived from an electrical equivalent circuit of an electro-acoustic transducer to which a differentiating circuit is connected, and is designed using modern control theory. The optimal quadratic regulator is used in the control system design, with its quadratic performance index formulated for producing desired acoustic impedance. Computer simulations indicate that the acoustic impedance of the diaphragm can be significantly varied over a wide frequency range that includes the range below the resonance frequency of the electro-acoustic transducer. A computer model of the proposed control system is used to illustrate its application to semi-active noise control in a duct. It is demonstrated that the proposed control system provides substantial reductions in the noise radiating from the outlet of the duct, both in the stiffness control range and in the mass control range.

  20. Evaluation of a multi-point method for determining acoustic impedance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Michael G.; Parrott, Tony L.

    1988-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to explore potential improvements provided by a Multi-Point Method (MPM) over the Standing Wave Method (SWM) and Two-Microphone Method (TMM) for determining acoustic impedance. A wave propagation model was developed to model the standing wave pattern in an impedance tube. The acoustic impedance of a test specimen was calculated from a best fit of this standing wave pattern to pressure measurements obtained along the impedance tube centerline. Three measurement spacing distributions were examined: uniform, random, and selective. Calculated standing wave patterns match the point pressure measurement distributions with good agreement for a reflection factor magnitude range of 0.004 to 0.999. Comparisons of results using 2, 3, 6, and 18 measurement points showed that the most consistent results are obtained when using at least 6 evenly spaced pressure measurements per half-wavelength. Also, data were acquired with broadband noise added to the discrete frequency noise and impedances were calculated using the MPM and TMM algorithms. The results indicate that the MPM will be superior to the TMM in the presence of significant broadband noise levels associated with mean flow.

  1. Evaluation of Parallel-Element, Variable-Impedance, Broadband Acoustic Liner Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Michael G.; Howerton, Brian M.; Ayle, Earl

    2012-01-01

    Recent trends in aircraft engine design have highlighted the need for acoustic liners that provide broadband sound absorption with reduced liner thickness. Three such liner concepts are evaluated using the NASA normal incidence tube. Two concepts employ additive manufacturing techniques to fabricate liners with variable chamber depths. The first relies on scrubbing losses within narrow chambers to provide acoustic resistance necessary for sound absorption. The second employs wide chambers that provide minimal resistance, and relies on a perforated sheet to provide acoustic resistance. The variable-depth chambers used in both concepts result in reactance spectra near zero. The third liner concept employs mesh-caps (resistive sheets) embedded at variable depths within adjacent honeycomb chambers to achieve a desired impedance spectrum. Each of these liner concepts is suitable for use as a broadband sound absorber design, and a transmission line model is presented that provides good comparison with their respective acoustic impedance spectra. This model can therefore be used to design acoustic liners to accurately achieve selected impedance spectra. Finally, the effects of increasing the perforated facesheet thickness are demonstrated, and the validity of prediction models based on lumped element and wave propagation approaches is investigated. The lumped element model compares favorably with measured results for liners with thin facesheets, but the wave propagation model provides good comparisons for a wide range of facesheet thicknesses.

  2. TRANSVERSE IMPEDANCE MEASUREMENT AT THE RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    ZHANG,S.Y.; HUANG,H.; CAMERON,P.; DREES,A.; FLILLER,R.; SATOGATA,T.

    2002-06-02

    The RHIC transverse impedance was measured during the last operation run. Measurement of the imaginary part of the broadband impedance was the main goal. No large difference between the two rings was found nor in either plane. The measured tune shift is larger than the expected by a factor of 2.5 to 3. Several other issues such as the real part impedance measurement are also presented.

  3. A finite element propagation model for extracting normal incidence impedance in nonprogressive acoustic wave fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Willie R.; Jones, Michael G.; Tanner, Sharon E.; Parrott, Tony L.

    1995-01-01

    A propagation model method for extracting the normal incidence impedance of an acoustic material installed as a finite length segment in a wall of a duct carrying a nonprogressive wave field is presented. The method recasts the determination of the unknown impedance as the minimization of the normalized wall pressure error function. A finite element propagation model is combined with a coarse/fine grid impedance plane search technique to extract the impedance of the material. Results are presented for three different materials for which the impedance is known. For each material, the input data required for the prediction scheme was computed from modal theory and then contaminated by random error. The finite element method reproduces the known impedance of each material almost exactly for random errors typical of those found in many measurement environments. Thus, the method developed here provides a means for determining the impedance of materials in a nonprogressirve wave environment such as that usually encountered in a commercial aircraft engine and most laboratory settings.

  4. Acoustic Treatment Design Scaling Methods. Volume 2; Advanced Treatment Impedance Models for High Frequency Ranges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraft, R. E.; Yu, J.; Kwan, H. W.

    1999-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study is to develop improved models for the acoustic impedance of treatment panels at high frequencies, for application to subscale treatment designs. Effects that cause significant deviation of the impedance from simple geometric scaling are examined in detail, an improved high-frequency impedance model is developed, and the improved model is correlated with high-frequency impedance measurements. Only single-degree-of-freedom honeycomb sandwich resonator panels with either perforated sheet or "linear" wiremesh faceplates are considered. The objective is to understand those effects that cause the simple single-degree-of- freedom resonator panels to deviate at the higher-scaled frequency from the impedance that would be obtained at the corresponding full-scale frequency. This will allow the subscale panel to be designed to achieve a specified impedance spectrum over at least a limited range of frequencies. An advanced impedance prediction model has been developed that accounts for some of the known effects at high frequency that have previously been ignored as a small source of error for full-scale frequency ranges.

  5. Microfabricated Thin Film Impedance Sensor & AC Impedance Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jinsong; Liu, Chung-Chiun

    2010-01-01

    Thin film microfabrication technique was employed to fabricate a platinum based parallel-electrode structured impedance sensor. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and equivalent circuit analysis of the small amplitude (±5 mV) AC impedance measurements (frequency range: 1 MHz to 0.1 Hz) at ambient temperature were carried out. Testing media include 0.001 M, 0.01 M, 0.1 M NaCl and KCl solutions, and alumina (∼3 μm) and sand (∼300 μm) particulate layers saturated with NaCl solutions with the thicknesses ranging from 0.6 mm to 8 mm in a testing cell, and the results were used to assess the effect of the thickness of the particulate layer on the conductivity of the testing solution. The calculated resistances were approximately around 20 MΩ, 4 MΩ, and 0.5 MΩ for 0.001 M, 0.01 M, and 0.1 M NaCl solutions, respectively. The presence of the sand particulates increased the impedance dramatically (6 times and 3 times for 0.001 M and 0.1 M NaCl solutions, respectively). A cell constant methodology was also developed to assess the measurement of the bulk conductivity of the electrolyte solution. The cell constant ranged from 1.2 to 0.8 and it decreased with the increase of the solution thickness. PMID:22219690

  6. Sensing the characteristic acoustic impedance of a fluid utilizing acoustic pressure waves

    PubMed Central

    Antlinger, Hannes; Clara, Stefan; Beigelbeck, Roman; Cerimovic, Samir; Keplinger, Franz; Jakoby, Bernhard

    2012-01-01

    Ultrasonic sensors can be used to determine physical fluid parameters like viscosity, density, and speed of sound. In this contribution, we present the concept for an integrated sensor utilizing pressure waves to sense the characteristic acoustic impedance of a fluid. We note that the basic setup generally allows to determine the longitudinal viscosity and the speed of sound if it is operated in a resonant mode as will be discussed elsewhere. In this contribution, we particularly focus on a modified setup where interferences are suppressed by introducing a wedge reflector. This enables sensing of the liquid's characteristic acoustic impedance, which can serve as parameter in condition monitoring applications. We present a device model, experimental results and their evaluation. PMID:23565036

  7. Far-infrared embedding impedance measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neikirk, D. P.; Rutledge, D. B.

    1984-01-01

    A technique which allows the measurement of detector embedding impedance has been developed. By using a bismuth microbolometer as a variable resistance load the impedance of one element in a bow-tie antenna array operating at 94 GHz was inferred. The technique is frequency insensitive, and could be used throughout the far-infrared.

  8. Measurements of electrical impedance of biomedical objects.

    PubMed

    Frączek, Marcin; Kręcicki, Tomasz; Moron, Zbigniew; Krzywaźnia, Adam; Ociepka, Janusz; Rucki, Zbigniew; Szczepanik, Zdzisław

    2016-01-01

    Some basic problems related to measurements of electrical impedance of biological objects (bioimpedance) have been presented in this paper. Particularly problems arising from impedance occurring at the sensor-tissue interface (interfacial impedances) in contact measuring methods have been discussed. The influence of finite values of impedances of the current source and voltage measuring device has also been taken into consideration. A model of the impedance sensor for the four-electrode measurement method containing the interfacial, source and measuring device impedances has been given and its frequency characteristics obtained by the computer simulation have been presented. The influence of these impedances on the shape of frequency characteristic of the sensor model has been discussed. Measurements of bioimpedance of healthy and anomalous soft tissues have been described. Some experimental results, particularly the frequency characteristics of bioimpedance, have been shown. The presented results of measurement show that bioimpedance can be a valuable source of information about the tissues, so measurement of bioimpedance can be a useful supplement to other medical diagnostic methods. PMID:27151250

  9. Measuring acoustic habitats

    PubMed Central

    Merchant, Nathan D; Fristrup, Kurt M; Johnson, Mark P; Tyack, Peter L; Witt, Matthew J; Blondel, Philippe; Parks, Susan E

    2015-01-01

    1. Many organisms depend on sound for communication, predator/prey detection and navigation. The acoustic environment can therefore play an important role in ecosystem dynamics and evolution. A growing number of studies are documenting acoustic habitats and their influences on animal development, behaviour, physiology and spatial ecology, which has led to increasing demand for passive acoustic monitoring (PAM) expertise in the life sciences. However, as yet, there has been no synthesis of data processing methods for acoustic habitat monitoring, which presents an unnecessary obstacle to would-be PAM analysts. 2. Here, we review the signal processing techniques needed to produce calibrated measurements of terrestrial and aquatic acoustic habitats. We include a supplemental tutorial and template computer codes in matlab and r, which give detailed guidance on how to produce calibrated spectrograms and statistical analyses of sound levels. Key metrics and terminology for the characterisation of biotic, abiotic and anthropogenic sound are covered, and their application to relevant monitoring scenarios is illustrated through example data sets. To inform study design and hardware selection, we also include an up-to-date overview of terrestrial and aquatic PAM instruments. 3. Monitoring of acoustic habitats at large spatiotemporal scales is becoming possible through recent advances in PAM technology. This will enhance our understanding of the role of sound in the spatial ecology of acoustically sensitive species and inform spatial planning to mitigate the rising influence of anthropogenic noise in these ecosystems. As we demonstrate in this work, progress in these areas will depend upon the application of consistent and appropriate PAM methodologies. PMID:25954500

  10. Otosclerosis in a black child: diagnostic acoustic impedance studies.

    PubMed

    Schweitzer, V G; Lilly, D J

    1984-10-01

    Otosclerosis classically describes an osteodystrophic change in the bony labyrinth and stapes footplate, of autosomal dominant inheritance, reported rare under the age of 5, extremely "rare" in the Oriental and Black race, "non-existent" in the American Indian, and with a clinical incidence of 5 per 1000 Caucasians. The differential diagnosis of a non-effusion conductive hearing loss in a child should include otosclerosis, congenital malleus or footplate fixation, tympanosclerotic fixation, congenital cholesteatoma, lysis of the incus long process, Paget's disease, osteogenesis imperfecta, and fibromuscular hyperplasia of the renal artery. Presented is a case report of a 14-year-old black male with bilateral clinical otosclerosis and a persistent stapedial artery. Preoperative multiple-frequency tympanometry and Zwislocki acoustic reactance and resistance analysis demonstrated absence of the "W" resonance pattern on high-frequency tympanometry and the classic friction and stiffness patterns of otosclerotic fixation. Repeat multiple-frequency tympanometry testing post-stapedectomy demonstrated prosthesis articulation. Prosthesis position can be monitored postoperatively by these acoustic impedance studies. PMID:6500827

  11. Wireless Acoustic Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Paul D.; Dorland, Wade D.; Jolly, Ronald L.

    2007-01-01

    A prototype wireless acoustic measurement system (WAMS) is one of two main subsystems of the Acoustic Prediction/ Measurement Tool, which comprises software, acoustic instrumentation, and electronic hardware combined to afford integrated capabilities for predicting and measuring noise emitted by rocket and jet engines. The other main subsystem is described in the article on page 8. The WAMS includes analog acoustic measurement instrumentation and analog and digital electronic circuitry combined with computer wireless local-area networking to enable (1) measurement of sound-pressure levels at multiple locations in the sound field of an engine under test and (2) recording and processing of the measurement data. At each field location, the measurements are taken by a portable unit, denoted a field station. There are ten field stations, each of which can take two channels of measurements. Each field station is equipped with two instrumentation microphones, a micro- ATX computer, a wireless network adapter, an environmental enclosure, a directional radio antenna, and a battery power supply. The environmental enclosure shields the computer from weather and from extreme acoustically induced vibrations. The power supply is based on a marine-service lead-acid storage battery that has enough capacity to support operation for as long as 10 hours. A desktop computer serves as a control server for the WAMS. The server is connected to a wireless router for communication with the field stations via a wireless local-area network that complies with wireless-network standard 802.11b of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. The router and the wireless network adapters are controlled by use of Linux-compatible driver software. The server runs custom Linux software for synchronizing the recording of measurement data in the field stations. The software includes a module that provides an intuitive graphical user interface through which an operator at the control server

  12. Wireless Acoustic Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Paul D.; Dorland, Wade D.

    2005-01-01

    A prototype wireless acoustic measurement system (WAMS) is one of two main subsystems of the Acoustic Prediction/Measurement Tool, which comprises software, acoustic instrumentation, and electronic hardware combined to afford integrated capabilities for predicting and measuring noise emitted by rocket and jet engines. The other main subsystem is described in "Predicting Rocket or Jet Noise in Real Time" (SSC-00215-1), which appears elsewhere in this issue of NASA Tech Briefs. The WAMS includes analog acoustic measurement instrumentation and analog and digital electronic circuitry combined with computer wireless local-area networking to enable (1) measurement of sound-pressure levels at multiple locations in the sound field of an engine under test and (2) recording and processing of the measurement data. At each field location, the measurements are taken by a portable unit, denoted a field station. There are ten field stations, each of which can take two channels of measurements. Each field station is equipped with two instrumentation microphones, a micro-ATX computer, a wireless network adapter, an environmental enclosure, a directional radio antenna, and a battery power supply. The environmental enclosure shields the computer from weather and from extreme acoustically induced vibrations. The power supply is based on a marine-service lead-acid storage battery that has enough capacity to support operation for as long as 10 hours. A desktop computer serves as a control server for the WAMS. The server is connected to a wireless router for communication with the field stations via a wireless local-area network that complies with wireless-network standard 802.11b of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. The router and the wireless network adapters are controlled by use of Linux-compatible driver software. The server runs custom Linux software for synchronizing the recording of measurement data in the field stations. The software includes a module that

  13. Gas hydrate saturation from acoustic impedance and resistivity logs in the shenhu area, south china sea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, X.; Wu, S.; Lee, M.; Guo, Y.; Yang, S.; Liang, J.

    2011-01-01

    During the China's first gas hydrate drilling expedition -1 (GMGS-1), gas hydrate was discovered in layers ranging from 10 to 25 m above the base of gas hydrate stability zone in the Shenhu area, South China Sea. Water chemistry, electrical resistivity logs, and acoustic impedance were used to estimate gas hydrate saturations. Gas hydrate saturations estimated from the chloride concentrations range from 0 to 43% of the pore space. The higher gas hydrate saturations were present in the depth from 152 to 177 m at site SH7 and from 190 to 225 m at site SH2, respectively. Gas hydrate saturations estimated from the resistivity using Archie equation have similar trends to those from chloride concentrations. To examine the variability of gas hydrate saturations away from the wells, acoustic impedances calculated from the 3 D seismic data using constrained sparse inversion method were used. Well logs acquired at site SH7 were incorporated into the inversion by establishing a relation between the water-filled porosity, calculated using gas hydrate saturations estimated from the resistivity logs, and the acoustic impedance, calculated from density and velocity logs. Gas hydrate saturations estimated from acoustic impedance of seismic data are ???10-23% of the pore space and are comparable to those estimated from the well logs. The uncertainties in estimated gas hydrate saturations from seismic acoustic impedances were mainly from uncertainties associated with inverted acoustic impedance, the empirical relation between the water-filled porosities and acoustic impedances, and assumed background resistivity. ?? 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Effects of grazing flow on the steady-state flow resistance and acoustic impedance of thin porous-faced liners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hersh, A. S.; Walker, B.

    1978-01-01

    The effects of grazing flow on the steady state flow resistance and acoustic impedance of seven Feltmetal and three Rigimesh thin porous faced liners were studied. The steady-state flow resistance of the ten specimens was measured using standard fluid mechanical experimental techniques. The acoustic impedance was measured using the two microphone method. The principal findings of the study are that the effects of grazing flow were measured and found to be small; small differences were measured between steady-state and acoustic resistance, and a semi-empirical model was derived that correlated the steady-state resistance data of the seven Feltmetal liners and the face sheet reactance of both the Feltmetal and Rigimesh liners.

  15. Surface area measurement utilizing an acoustic bridge

    PubMed

    Torigoe; Ishii

    2000-05-01

    A new method is proposed for measuring the surface area of an object. The acoustic conductance of a cavity is proportional to the surface area of the cavity inner wall. The surface area of an object thus can be known from the measurement of the acoustic impedance of a chamber in which the object is placed. In order to measure the acoustic impedance accurately; the proposed method employs the acoustic bridge technique. The experimental device is composed of the following elements so arranged that their electric equivalents form a bridge circuit: a measuring chamber in which an object under test is placed and whose volume can be adjusted; a reference chamber whose inner surface area can be varied; a loudspeaker (the signal source) mounted between the two chambers; and a bypass channel at the midpoint of which a microphone (the null detector) is installed. This bridge balances when the volume and the inner surface area of each chamber become equal. The surface area of the object can then be known from the inner surface area of the reference chamber. Several experiments were performed with this device and the success of the proposed method was verified. PMID:10830378

  16. Constant current loop impedance measuring system that is immune to the effects of parasitic impedances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Karl F. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A constant current loop measuring system is provided for measuring a characteristic of an environment. The system comprises a first impedance positionable in the environment, a second impedance coupled in series with said first impedance and a parasitic impedance electrically coupled to the first and second impedances. A current generating device, electrically coupled in series with the first and second impedances, provides a constant current through the first and second impedances to produce first and second voltages across the first and second impedances, respectively, and a parasitic voltage across the parasitic impedance. A high impedance voltage measuring device measures a voltage difference between the first and second voltages independent of the parasitic voltage to produce a characteristic voltage representative of the characteristic of the environment.

  17. Optimization of Microphone Locations for Acoustic Liner Impedance Eduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, M. G.; Watson, W. R.; June, J. C.

    2015-01-01

    Two impedance eduction methods are explored for use with data acquired in the NASA Langley Grazing Flow Impedance Tube. The first is an indirect method based on the convected Helmholtz equation, and the second is a direct method based on the Kumaresan and Tufts algorithm. Synthesized no-flow data, with random jitter to represent measurement error, are used to evaluate a number of possible microphone locations. Statistical approaches are used to evaluate the suitability of each set of microphone locations. Given the computational resources required, small sample statistics are employed for the indirect method. Since the direct method is much less computationally intensive, a Monte Carlo approach is employed to gather its statistics. A comparison of results achieved with full and reduced sets of microphone locations is used to determine which sets of microphone locations are acceptable. For the indirect method, each array that includes microphones in all three regions (upstream and downstream hard wall sections, and liner test section) provides acceptable results, even when as few as eight microphones are employed. The best arrays employ microphones well away from the leading and trailing edges of the liner. The direct method is constrained to use microphones opposite the liner. Although a number of arrays are acceptable, the optimum set employs 14 microphones positioned well away from the leading and trailing edges of the liner. The selected sets of microphone locations are also evaluated with data measured for ceramic tubular and perforate-over-honeycomb liners at three flow conditions (Mach 0.0, 0.3, and 0.5). They compare favorably with results attained using all 53 microphone locations. Although different optimum microphone locations are selected for the two impedance eduction methods, there is significant overlap. Thus, the union of these two microphone arrays is preferred, as it supports usage of both methods. This array contains 3 microphones in the upstream

  18. Impedance measurement using a two-microphone, random-excitation method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seybert, A. F.; Parrott, T. L.

    1978-01-01

    The feasibility of using a two-microphone, random-excitation technique for the measurement of acoustic impedance was studied. Equations were developed, including the effect of mean flow, which show that acoustic impedance is related to the pressure ratio and phase difference between two points in a duct carrying plane waves only. The impedances of a honeycomb ceramic specimen and a Helmholtz resonator were measured and compared with impedances obtained using the conventional standing-wave method. Agreement between the two methods was generally good. A sensitivity analysis was performed to pinpoint possible error sources and recommendations were made for future study. The two-microphone approach evaluated in this study appears to have some advantages over other impedance measuring techniques.

  19. Protein Aggregation Measurement through Electrical Impedance Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Affanni, A.; Corazza, A.; Esposito, G.; Fogolari, F.; Polano, M.

    2013-09-01

    The paper presents a novel methodology to measure the fibril formation in protein solutions. We designed a bench consisting of a sensor having interdigitated electrodes, a PDMS hermetic reservoir and an impedance meter automatically driven by calculator. The impedance data are interpolated with a lumped elements model and their change over time can provide information on the aggregation process. Encouraging results have been obtained by testing the methodology on K-casein, a protein of milk, with and without the addition of a drug inhibiting the aggregation. The amount of sample needed to perform this measurement is by far lower than the amount needed by fluorescence analysis.

  20. Measurement of shear impedances of viscoelastic fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Sheen, Shuh-Haw; Chien, Hual-Te; Raptis, A.C.

    1996-12-31

    Shear-wave reflection coefficients from a solid/fluid interface are derived for non-Newtonian fluids that can be described by Maxwell, Voigt, and power-law fluid models. Based on model calculations, we have identified the measurable effects on the reflection coefficients due to fluid non-Newtonian behavior. The models are used to interpret the viscosity data obtained by a technique based on shear impedance measurement.

  1. Readout electrode assembly for measuring biological impedance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, L. D.; Moody, D. L., Jr. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    The invention comprises of a pair of readout ring electrodes which are used in conjunction with apparatus for measuring the electrical impedance between different points in the body of a living animal to determine the amount of blood flow therebetween. The readout electrodes have independently adjustable diameters to permit attachment around different parts of the body between which it is desired to measure electric impedance. The axial spacing between the electrodes is adjusted by a pair of rods which have a first pair of ends fixedly attached to one electrode and a second pair of ends slidably attached to the other electrode. Indicia are provided on the outer surface of the ring electrodes and on the surface of the rods to permit measurement of the circumference and spacing between the ring electrodes.

  2. Evaluation of a Variable-Impedance Ceramic Matrix Composite Acoustic Liner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, M. G.; Watson, W. R.; Nark, D. M.; Howerton, B. M.

    2014-01-01

    As a result of significant progress in the reduction of fan and jet noise, there is growing concern regarding core noise. One method for achieving core noise reduction is via the use of acoustic liners. However, these liners must be constructed with materials suitable for high temperature environments and should be designed for optimum absorption of the broadband core noise spectrum. This paper presents results of tests conducted in the NASA Langley Liner Technology Facility to evaluate a variable-impedance ceramic matrix composite acoustic liner that offers the potential to achieve each of these goals. One concern is the porosity of the ceramic matrix composite material, and whether this might affect the predictability of liners constructed with this material. Comparisons between two variable-depth liners, one constructed with ceramic matrix composite material and the other constructed via stereolithography, are used to demonstrate this material porosity is not a concern. Also, some interesting observations are noted regarding the orientation of variable-depth liners. Finally, two propagation codes are validated via comparisons of predicted and measured acoustic pressure profiles for a variable-depth liner.

  3. RF discharge impedance measurements using a new method to determine the stray impedances

    SciTech Connect

    Bakker, L.P.; Kroesen, G.M.W.; Hoog, F.J. de )

    1999-06-01

    The impedance of a capacitively coupled radio frequency discharge in a tubular fluorescent lamp filled with neon and mercury is measured. The stray impedances in the electrical network are determined using a new method that requires no extra instruments. The reflection of power is used to determine the stray impedances. Making use of a simple discharge impedance model, the electron density in the lamp is estimated.

  4. Analysis of Diffraction of Dominant Mode in an Acoustic Impedance Loaded Trifurcated Duct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayub, Muhammad; Hussain Tiwana, Mazhar; Mann, Amer Bilad

    2010-11-01

    The paper presents the analytical description of diffraction phenomena of sound at the opening of a two dimensional semi-infinite acoustically soft duct. This soft duct is symmetrically located inside an infinite duct with normal impedance boundary conditions in the case where the surface acoustic impedances of the upper and lower infinite plates are different from each other. A matrix Wiener- Hopf equation associated with a new canonical scattering problem is solved explicitly. A new kernel function arose for the problem and has been factorized. The graphical results are also presented which show how effectively the unwanted noise can be reduced by proper selection of different parameters.

  5. Tracheo-bronchial soft tissue and cartilage resonances in the subglottal acoustic input impedance.

    PubMed

    Lulich, Steven M; Arsikere, Harish

    2015-06-01

    This paper offers a re-evaluation of the mechanical properties of the tracheo-bronchial soft tissues and cartilage and uses a model to examine their effects on the subglottal acoustic input impedance. It is shown that the values for soft tissue elastance and cartilage viscosity typically used in models of subglottal acoustics during phonation are not accurate, and corrected values are proposed. The calculated subglottal acoustic input impedance using these corrected values reveals clusters of weak resonances due to soft tissues (SgT) and cartilage (SgC) lining the walls of the trachea and large bronchi, which can be observed empirically in subglottal acoustic spectra. The model predicts that individuals may exhibit SgT and SgC resonances to variable degrees, depending on a number of factors including tissue mechanical properties and the dimensions of the trachea and large bronchi. Potential implications for voice production and large pulmonary airway tissue diseases are also discussed. PMID:26093432

  6. Algorithmic Error Correction of Impedance Measuring Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Starostenko, Oleg; Alarcon-Aquino, Vicente; Hernandez, Wilmar; Sergiyenko, Oleg; Tyrsa, Vira

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes novel design concepts and some advanced techniques proposed for increasing the accuracy of low cost impedance measuring devices without reduction of operational speed. The proposed structural method for algorithmic error correction and iterating correction method provide linearization of transfer functions of the measuring sensor and signal conditioning converter, which contribute the principal additive and relative measurement errors. Some measuring systems have been implemented in order to estimate in practice the performance of the proposed methods. Particularly, a measuring system for analysis of C-V, G-V characteristics has been designed and constructed. It has been tested during technological process control of charge-coupled device CCD manufacturing. The obtained results are discussed in order to define a reasonable range of applied methods, their utility, and performance. PMID:22303177

  7. Techniques for beam impedance measurements above cutoff

    SciTech Connect

    Lambertson, G.R.; Jacob, A.F.; Rimmer, R.A.; Voelker, F.

    1990-08-01

    Methods for measuring beam impedance above cutoff have been very limited. For design work on the ALS we have developed two techniques that yield data in the frequency domain with high sensitivity. The first is an extension of the wire method; the second utilizes traveling TM waves to simulate the beam's fields at the wall, and thus avoids the mechanical difficulties of mounting the wire. It is also more sensitive than the other method but the interpretation is complicated by the presence of higher order modes. With either method we were able to detect resonant peaks smaller than 1 Ohm at 10 GHz.

  8. Experimental study of coupling impedance: Part I longitudinal impedance measurement techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Song, J.J.

    1991-10-22

    Beam coupling impedances for the 7-GeV APS storage ring have been numerically estimated. In order to confirm these calculations, measurements of the coupling impedance of various vacuum components around the main storage ring were done with a coaxial wire method. In this paper, the procedure of the longitudinal impedance measurement techniques will be described. As an example, sections of the Cu beam chamber, the Cu beam + antechambers, and the Al beam + antechambers were used as a device under test (DUT) to obtain the results. The transverse impedance measurements will be described in a separate paper.

  9. Underwater asymmetric acoustic transmission structure using the medium with gradient change of impedance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bo, Hu; Jie, Shi; Sheng-Guo, Shi; Yu, Sun; Zhong-Rui, Zhu

    2016-02-01

    We propose an underwater asymmetric acoustic transmission structure comprised of two media each with a gradient change of acoustic impedance. By gradually increasing the acoustic impedances of the media, the propagating direction of the acoustic wave can be continuously bent, resulting in allowing the acoustic wave to pass through along the positive direction and blocking acoustic waves from the negative one. The main advantages of this structure are that the asymmetric transmission effect of this structure can be realized and enhanced more easily in water. We investigate both numerically and experimentally the asymmetric transmission effect. The experimental results show that a highly efficient asymmetric acoustic transmission can be yielded within a remarkable broadband frequency range, which agrees well with the numerical prediction. It is of potential practical significance for various underwater applications such as reducing vibration and noise. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11204049 and 11204050), the Program for Changjiang Scholars and Innovative Research Team in University of Ministry of Education of China (Grant No. IRT1228), and the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (Grant Nos. 20122304120023 and 20122304120011).

  10. Bioelectrical impedance analysis. What does it measure?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoeller, D. A.

    2000-01-01

    Bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) has been proposed for measuring fat-free mass, total body water, percent fat, body cell mass, intracellular water, and extracellular water: a veritable laboratory in a box. Although it is unlikely that BIA is quite this versatile, correlations have been demonstrated between BIA and all of these body compartments. At the same time, it is known that all of the compartments are correlated among themselves. Because of this, it is difficult to determine whether BIA is specific for any or all of these compartments. To investigate this question, we induced acute changes in total body water and its compartments over a 3-h period. Using this approach, we demonstrated that multifrequency BIA, using the Cole-Cole model to calculate the zero frequency and infinite frequency resistance, measures extracellular and intracellular water.

  11. LDV measurement of bird ear vibrations to determine inner ear impedance and middle ear power flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muyshondt, Pieter G. G.; Pires, Felipe; Dirckx, Joris J. J.

    2016-06-01

    The mechanical behavior of the middle ear structures in birds and mammals is affected by the fluids in the inner ear (IE) that are present behind the oval window. In this study, the aim was to gather knowledge of the acoustic impedance of the IE in the ostrich, to be able to determine the effect on vibrations and power flow in the single-ossicle bird middle ear for future studies. To determine the IE impedance, vibrations of the ossicle were measured for both the quasi-static and acoustic stimulus frequencies. In the acoustic regime, vibrations were measured with a laser Doppler vibrometer and electromagnetic stimulation of the ossicle. The impedance of the inner ear could be determined by means of a simple RLC model in series, which resulted in a stiffness reactance of KIE = 0.20.1012 Pa/m3, an inertial impedance of MIE = 0.652.106 Pa s2/m3, and a resistance of RIE = 1.57.109 Pa s/m. The measured impedance is found to be considerably smaller than what is found for the human IE.

  12. On the Propagation of Plane Acoustic Waves in a Duct With Flexible and Impedance Walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frendi, Abdelkader; Vu, Bruce

    2003-01-01

    This Technical Memorandum (TM) discusses the harmonic and random plane acoustic waves propagating from inside a duct to its surroundings. Various duct surfaces are considered, such as rigid, flexible, and impedance. In addition, the effects of a mean flow are studied when the duct alone is considered. Results show a significant reduction in overall sound pressure levels downstream of the impedance wall for both mean flow and no mean flow cases and for a narrow duct. When a wider duct is used, the overall sound pressure level (OSPL) reduction downstream of the impedance wall is much smaller. In the far field, the directivity is such that the overall sound pressure level is reduced by about 5 decibels (dB) on the side of the impedance wall. When a flexible surface is used, the far field directivity becomes asymmetric with an increase in the OSPL on the side of the flexible surface of about 7 dB.

  13. Acoustic Liner Drag: Measurements on Novel Facesheet Perforate Geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howerton, Brian M.; Jones, Michael G.

    2016-01-01

    Interest in characterization of the aerodynamic drag of acoustic liners has increased in the past several years. This paper details experiments in the NASA Langley Grazing Flow Impedance Tube to quantify the relative drag of several perforate-over-honeycomb liner configurations at flow speeds of centerline flow Mach number equals 0.3 and 0.5. Various perforate geometries and orientations are investigated to determine their resistance factors using a static pressure drop approach. Comparison of these resistance factors gives a relative measurement of liner drag. For these same flow conditions, acoustic measurements are performed with tonal excitation from 400 to 3000 hertz at source sound pressure levels of 140 and 150 decibels. Educed impedance and attenuation spectra are used to determine the impact of variations in perforate geometry on acoustic performance.

  14. Fundamentals of Acoustics. Psychoacoustics and Hearing. Acoustical Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Begault, Durand R.; Ahumada, Al (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    These are 3 chapters that will appear in a book titled "Building Acoustical Design", edited by Charles Salter. They are designed to introduce the reader to fundamental concepts of acoustics, particularly as they relate to the built environment. "Fundamentals of Acoustics" reviews basic concepts of sound waveform frequency, pressure, and phase. "Psychoacoustics and Hearing" discusses the human interpretation sound pressure as loudness, particularly as a function of frequency. "Acoustic Measurements" gives a simple overview of the time and frequency weightings for sound pressure measurements that are used in acoustical work.

  15. Directional Reflective Surface Formed via Gradient-Impeding Acoustic Meta-Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Song, Kyungjun; Kim, Jedo; Hur, Shin; Kwak, Jun-Hyuk; Lee, Seong-Hyun; Kim, Taesung

    2016-01-01

    Artificially designed acoustic meta-surfaces have the ability to manipulate sound energy to an extraordinary extent. Here, we report on a new type of directional reflective surface consisting of an array of sub-wavelength Helmholtz resonators with varying internal coiled path lengths, which induce a reflection phase gradient along a planar acoustic meta-surface. The acoustically reshaped reflective surface created by the gradient-impeding meta-surface yields a distinct focal line similar to a parabolic cylinder antenna, and is used for directive sound beamforming. Focused beam steering can be also obtained by repositioning the source (or receiver) off axis, i.e., displaced from the focal line. Besides flat reflective surfaces, complex surfaces such as convex or conformal shapes may be used for sound beamforming, thus facilitating easy application in sound reinforcement systems. Therefore, directional reflective surfaces have promising applications in fields such as acoustic imaging, sonic weaponry, and underwater communication. PMID:27562634

  16. Directional Reflective Surface Formed via Gradient-Impeding Acoustic Meta-Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Song, Kyungjun; Kim, Jedo; Hur, Shin; Kwak, Jun-Hyuk; Lee, Seong-Hyun; Kim, Taesung

    2016-01-01

    Artificially designed acoustic meta-surfaces have the ability to manipulate sound energy to an extraordinary extent. Here, we report on a new type of directional reflective surface consisting of an array of sub-wavelength Helmholtz resonators with varying internal coiled path lengths, which induce a reflection phase gradient along a planar acoustic meta-surface. The acoustically reshaped reflective surface created by the gradient-impeding meta-surface yields a distinct focal line similar to a parabolic cylinder antenna, and is used for directive sound beamforming. Focused beam steering can be also obtained by repositioning the source (or receiver) off axis, i.e., displaced from the focal line. Besides flat reflective surfaces, complex surfaces such as convex or conformal shapes may be used for sound beamforming, thus facilitating easy application in sound reinforcement systems. Therefore, directional reflective surfaces have promising applications in fields such as acoustic imaging, sonic weaponry, and underwater communication. PMID:27562634

  17. Reflection of an acoustic line source by an impedance surface with uniform flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brambley, E. J.; Gabard, G.

    2014-10-01

    An exact analytic solution is derived for the 2D acoustic pressure field generated by a time-harmonic line mass source located above an impedance surface with uniform grazing flow. Closed-form asymptotic solutions in the far field are also provided. The analysis is valid for both locally-reacting and nonlocally-reacting impedances, as is demonstrated by analyzing a nonlocally reacting effective impedance representing the presence of a thin boundary layer over the surface. The analytic solution may be written in a form suggesting a generalization of the method of images to account for the impedance surface. The line source is found to excite surface waves on the impedance surface, some of which may be leaky waves which contradict the assumption of decay away from the surface predicted in previous analyses of surface waves with flow. The surface waves may be treated either (correctly) as unstable waves or (artificially) as stable waves, enabling comparison with previous numerical or mathematical studies which make either of these assumptions. The computer code for evaluating the analytic solution and far-field asymptotics is provided in the supplementary material. It is hoped this work will provide a useful benchmark solution for validating 2D numerical acoustic codes.

  18. Influence of exit impedance on finite difference solutions of transient acoustic mode propagation in ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J.

    1981-01-01

    The cutoff mode instability problem associated with a transient finite difference solution to the wave equation is explained. The steady-state impedance boundary condition is found to produce acoustic reflections during the initial transient, which cause finite instabilities in the cutoff modes. The stability problem is resolved by extending the duct length to prevent transient reflections. Numerical calculations are presented at forcing frequencies above, below, and nearly at the cutoff frequency, and exit impedance models are presented for use in the practical design of turbofan inlets.

  19. Multi-stage pulse tube cryocooler with acoustic impedance constructed to reduce transient cool down time and thermal loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gedeon, David R. (Inventor); Wilson, Kyle B. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    The cool down time for a multi-stage, pulse tube cryocooler is reduced by configuring at least a portion of the acoustic impedance of a selected stage, higher than the first stage, so that it surrounds the cold head of the selected stage. The surrounding acoustic impedance of the selected stage is mounted in thermally conductive connection to the warm region of the selected stage for cooling the acoustic impedance and is fabricated of a high thermal diffusivity, low thermal radiation emissivity material, preferably aluminum.

  20. A review of impedance measurements of whole cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Youchun; Xie, Xinwu; Duan, Yong; Wang, Lei; Cheng, Zhen; Cheng, Jing

    2016-03-15

    Impedance measurement of live biological cells is widely accepted as a label free, non-invasive and quantitative analytical method to assess cell status. This method is easy-to-use and flexible for device design and fabrication. In this review, three typical techniques for impedance measurement, i.e., electric cell-substrate impedance sensing, Impedance flow cytometry and electric impedance spectroscopy, are reviewed from the aspects of theory, to electrode design and fabrication, and applications. Benefiting from the integration of microelectronic and microfluidic techniques, impedance sensing methods have expanded their applications to nearly all aspects of biology, including living cell counting and analysis, cell biology research, cancer research, drug screening, and food and environmental safety monitoring. The integration with other techniques, the fabrication of devices for certain biological assays, and the development of point-of-need diagnosis devices is predicted to be future trend for impedance sensing techniques. PMID:26513290

  1. Acoustical Measurement Of Furnace Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parthasarathy, Shakkottai; Venkateshan, Shakkottai P.

    1989-01-01

    Simple probes withstand severe conditions, yet give spatially-resolved temperature readings. Prototype acoustical system developed to measure temperatures from ambient to 1,800 degree F in such structures as large industrial lime kilns and recovery-boiler furnaces. Pulses of sound reflected from obstructions in sensing tube. Speed of sound and temperature in each segment deduced from travel times of pulses.

  2. Influence of acoustic dominant mode propagation in a trifurcated lined duct with different impedances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayub, M.; Tiwana, M. H.; Mann, A. B.

    2010-03-01

    In this study, we analyzed the diffraction of the acoustic dominant mode in a parallel-plate trifurcated waveguide with normal impedance boundary conditions in the case where surface impedances of the upper and lower infinite plates are different from each other. The acoustic dominant mode is incident in a soft/hard semi-infinite duct located symmetrically in the infinite lined duct. The solution of the boundary value problem using Fourier transform leads to two simultaneous modified Wiener-Hopf equations that are uncoupled using the pole removal technique. Two infinite sets of unknown coefficients are involved in the solution, which satisfy two infinite systems of linear algebraic equations. These systems are solved numerically. The new kernel functions are factorized. Some graphical results showing the influence of sundry parameters of interest on the reflection coefficient are presented.

  3. Impedance measurements of the Spallation Neutron Source extraction kicker system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, H.

    2004-10-01

    Transverse coupling impedance measurements of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) beam extraction system were performed and the results are here reported. The SNS beam extraction system is composed from 14 subsystems, each of which consists of a vertical kicker magnet plus a pulse forming network (PFN). Impedance bench measurements were performed on one large and one small aperture magnet, stand-alone as well as assembled with the first-article production PFN. The impedance measuring methods to cover the interesting frequency range from below 1 to 100MHz are described in considerable detail. The upper frequency range is properly covered by the conventional twin-wire method but it had to be supplemented at the low-frequency end by a direct input impedance measurement at the magnet busbar. Required modifications of the PFN to maintain the impedance budget are discussed. The total impedance estimate was finally obtained by quadratic scaling with vertical aperture from the two tested kicker subsystems.

  4. Acoustic impedance studies in Triassic reservoirs in the Netherlands - application to development and exploration

    SciTech Connect

    Griffiths, M.; Ford, J.

    1995-08-01

    Simple and cost effective seismic forward modelling techniques have been used in conjunction with petrophysical and geological data to provide an integrated approach to understanding the seismic response of Triassic gas reservoirs onshore and offshore Netherlands. Analysis shows that for the Volpriehausen Sandstone in the offshore sector a relationship exists between reservoir acoustic impedance and porosity such that an increase in porosity leads to a decrease in acoustic impedance. Data can be sub-divided on the basis of fluid fill and cementation with trends for both gas and water cases. Regression analysis has defined the optimum relationship for each fluid case and these relationships have been used to predict the acoustic impedance profiles for a variety of reservoir scenarios. Modelling shows that the highest seismic amplitudes and the greatest relative amplitude variation with fluid fill are related to high porosity reservoir. In the onshore sector, analysis for the Roet Sandstone has shown that even small scale variations in reservoir properties can be recorded within the detail of the seismic response. Results from seismic forward modelling compare with amplitude variations observed in real data and suggest that, within the limitations of the dataset and methodology, the technique can be used to predict reservoir attributes from the seismic response. So far, the technique has been sucessfully applied to both exploration and field development projects.

  5. Acoustic impedance of micro perforated membranes: Velocity continuity condition at the perforation boundary.

    PubMed

    Li, Chenxi; Cazzolato, Ben; Zander, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    The classic analytical model for the sound absorption of micro perforated materials is well developed and is based on a boundary condition where the velocity of the material is assumed to be zero, which is accurate when the material vibration is negligible. This paper develops an analytical model for finite-sized circular micro perforated membranes (MPMs) by applying a boundary condition such that the velocity of air particles on the hole wall boundary is equal to the membrane vibration velocity (a zero-slip condition). The acoustic impedance of the perforation, which varies with its position, is investigated. A prediction method for the overall impedance of the holes and the combined impedance of the MPM is also provided. The experimental results for four different MPM configurations are used to validate the model and good agreement between the experimental and predicted results is achieved. PMID:26827008

  6. Transverse impedance measurement in RHIC and the AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Biancacci, Nicolo; Blaskiewicz, M.; Dutheil, Y.; Liu, C.; Mernick, M.; Minty, M.; White, S. M.

    2014-05-12

    The RHIC luminosity upgrade program aims for an increase of the polarized proton luminosity by a factor 2. To achieve this goal a significant increase in the beam intensity is foreseen. The beam coupling impedance could therefore represent a source of detrimental effects for beam quality and stability at high bunch intensities. For this reason it is essential to quantify the accelerator impedance budget and the major impedance sources, and possibly cure them. In this MD note we summarize the results of the 2013 transverse impedance measurements in the AGS and RHIC. The studies have been performed measuring the tune shift as a function of bunch intensity and deriving the total accelerator machine transverse impedance. For RHIC, we could obtain first promising results of impedance localization measurements as well.

  7. Scale Model Thruster Acoustic Measurement Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, R. Jeremy; Vargas, Magda B.

    2013-01-01

    Subscale rocket acoustic data is used to predict acoustic environments for full scale rockets. Over the last several years acoustic data has been collected during horizontal tests of solid rocket motors. Space Launch System (SLS) Scale Model Acoustic Test (SMAT) was designed to evaluate the acoustics of the SLS vehicle including the liquid engines and solid rocket boosters. SMAT is comprised of liquid thrusters scalable to the Space Shuttle Main engines (SSME) and Rocket Assisted Take Off (RATO) motors scalable to the 5-segment Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSTMV). Horizontal testing of the liquid thrusters provided an opportunity to collect acoustic data from liquid thrusters to characterize the acoustic environments. Acoustic data was collected during the horizontal firings of a single thruster and a 4-thruster (Quad) configuration. Presentation scope. Discuss the results of the single and 4-thruster acoustic measurements. Compare the measured acoustic levels of the liquid thrusters to the Solid Rocket Test Motor V - Nozzle 2 (SRTMV-N2).

  8. Investigation of the thickness effect to impedance analysis results AlGaN acoustic sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özen, Soner; Bilgiç, Eyüp; Gülmez, Gülay; Şenay, Volkan; Pat, Suat; Korkmaz, Şadan; Mohammadigharehbagh, Reza

    2016-03-01

    In this study, AlGaN acoustic sensors were deposited on aluminum metal substrate by thermionic vacuum arc (TVA) method, for the first time. Impedance analyses of the fabricated acoustic sensors were investigated for the determining of effect of the nano layer thickness. Thickness values are very close to each others. Fabricated sensors have been fabricated from AlGaN deposited on aluminum substrates. Gallium materials are used in many applications for optoelectronic device and semiconductor technology. Thermionic vacuum arc is the deposition technology for the variously materials and applications field. TVA production parameters and some properties of the deposited layers were investigated. TVA is the fast deposition technology for the gallium compounds and doped gallium compounds. Obtained results that AlGaN layer are very promising material for an acoustic sensor but also TVA is proper fast technology for the production.

  9. Impedance measurements for detecting pathogens attached to antibodies

    DOEpatents

    Miles, Robin R.; Venkateswaran, Kodumudi S.; Fuller, Christopher K.

    2004-12-28

    The use of impedance measurements to detect the presence of pathogens attached to antibody-coated beads. In a fluidic device antibodies are immobilized on a surface of a patterned interdigitated electrode. Pathogens in a sample fluid streaming past the electrode attach to the immobilized antibodies, which produces a change in impedance between two adjacent electrodes, which impedance change is measured and used to detect the presence of a pathogen. To amplify the signal, beads coated with antibodies are introduced and the beads would stick to the pathogen causing a greater change in impedance between the two adjacent electrodes.

  10. Measured longitudinal beam impedance of a Tevatron separator

    SciTech Connect

    James L Crisp; Brian J Fellenz

    2002-12-09

    Twenty two separators are currently installed in the Tevatron. The longitudinal impedance of one of these devices was recently measured with a stretched wire. The stretched wire technique can only measure impedance below the cutoff frequency (500MHz). The geometry of a separator is similar to an un-terminated stripline beam position detector. The separator plates occupy a 13.5'' ID vacuum tank, are 101'' long, 7.8'' wide, and have a 2'' gap between them. The differential characteristic impedance between the plates is estimated to be 81 {Gamma} and the common mode impedance plate to ground is about 42 {Gamma}.

  11. Comparison of Acoustic Impedance Eduction Techniques for Locally-Reacting Liners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, M. G.; Parrott, T. L.; Watson, W. R.

    2003-01-01

    Typical acoustic liners used in current aircraft inlets and aft-fan ducts consist of some type of perforated facesheet bonded to a honeycomb core. A number of techniques for determining the acoustic impedance of these locallyreacting liners have been developed over the last five decades. In addition, a number of models have been developed to predict the acoustic impedance of locallyreacting liners in the presence of grazing flow, and to use that information together with aeroacoustic propagation codes to assess the noise absorption provided by these liners. These prediction models have incorporated the results from databases acquired with specific impedance eduction techniques. Thus, while these prediction models are acceptable for liners that are similar to those tested in these databases, their application to new liner configurations must be viewed with caution. The primary purpose of this paper is to provide a comparison of impedance eduction techniques that have been implemented at various aerospace research laboratories in the United States (NASA Langley Research Center, General Electric Aircraft Engines, B. F. Goodrich and Boeing). A secondary purpose is to provide data for liner configurations that extend the porosity range beyond that which has been previously used in common aircraft engine nacelles. Two sets of liners were designed to study the effects of three parameters: perforate hole diameter, facesheet thickness and porosity. These two sets of liners were constructed for testing in each of the laboratories listed above. The first set of liners was designed to fit into the NASA Langley and Boeing test facilities. The second set was designed to fit into the General Electric Aircraft Engines and B. F. Goodrich test facilities. By using the same parent material, both sets of liners were identical to within the limits of material and fabrication variability. Baseline data were obtained in the normal incidence impedance tubes at NASA Langley and B. F

  12. Investigation of ground reflection and impedance from flyover noise measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapkis, R. L.; Marsh, A. H.

    1978-01-01

    An extensive series of flyover noise tests was conducted for the primary purpose of studying meteorological effects on propagation of aircraft noise. The test airplane, a DC 9-10, flew several level-flight passes at various heights over a taxiway. Two microphone stations were located under the flight path. A total of 37 runs was selected for analysis and processed to obtain a consistant set of 1/3 octave band sound pressure levels at half-second intervals. The goal of the present study was to use the flyover noise data to deduce acoustical reflection coefficients and hence, acoustical impedances.

  13. Plasma Diagnostics by Antenna Impedance Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swenson, C. M.; Baker, K. D.; Pound, E.; Jensen, M. D.

    1993-01-01

    The impedance of an electrically short antenna immersed in a plasma provides an excellent in situ diagnostic tool for electron density and other plasma parameters. By electrically short we mean that the wavelength of the free-space electromagnetic wave that would be excited at the driving frequency is much longer than the physical size of the antenna. Probes using this impedance technique have had a long history with sounding rockets and satellites, stretching back to the early 1960s. This active technique could provide information on composition and temperature of plasmas for comet or planetary missions. Advantages of the impedance probe technique are discussed and two classes of instruments built and flown by SDL-USU for determining electron density (the capacitance and plasma frequency probes) are described.

  14. Electrochemical impedance measurement of a carbon nanotube probe electrode.

    PubMed

    Inaba, Akira; Takei, Yusuke; Kan, Tetsuo; Matsumoto, Kiyoshi; Shimoyama, Isao

    2012-12-01

    We measured and analyzed the electrochemical impedance of carbon nanotube (CNT) probe electrodes fabricated through the physical separation of insulated CNT bridges. The fabricated CNT electrodes were free-standing CNTs that were completely covered with an insulator, except for their tips. Typical dimensions of the nanoelectrodes were 1-10 nm in CNT diameter, 80-300 nm in insulator diameter, 0.5-4 μm in exposed CNT length and 1-10 μm in probe length. The electrochemical impedance at frequencies ranging from 40 Hz to 1 MHz was measured in physiological saline. The measured impedance of the CNT electrode was constant at 32 MΩ at frequencies below 1 kHz and was inversely proportional to frequency at frequencies above 10 kHz. By means of comparison with the parasitic capacitive impedance of the insulator membrane, we confirmed that the electrode was sufficiently insulated such that the measured constant impedance was given by the exposed CNT tip. Consequently, we can use the CNT electrode for highly localized electrochemical impedance measurements below 1 kHz. Considering an equivalent circuit and the nanoscopic dimensions of the CNT electrode, we demonstrated that the constant impedance was governed by diffusion impedance, whereas the solution resistance, charge-transfer resistance and double-layer capacitance were negligible. PMID:23124171

  15. Influence of exit impedance on finite difference solutions of transient acoustic mode propagation in ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J.

    1981-01-01

    The time-dependent governing acoustic-difference equations and boundary conditions are developed and solved for sound propagation in an axisymmetric (cylindrical) hard-wall duct without flow and with spinning acoustic modes. The analysis begins with a harmonic sound source radiating into a quiescent duct. This explicit iteration method then calculates stepwise in real time to obtain the steady solutions of the acoustic field. The transient method did not converge to the steady-state solution for cutoff acoustic duct modes. This has implications as to its use in a variable-area duct, where modes may become cutoff in the smal-area portion of the duct. For single cutoff mode propagation the steady-state impedance boundary condition produced acoustic reflections during the initial transient that caused finite instabilities in the numerical calculations. The stability problem is resolved by reformulating the exit boundary condition. Example calculations show good agreement with exact analytical and numerical results for forcing frequencies above, below, and nearly at the cutoff frequency.

  16. Effect of Feeding and Suction on Gastric Impedance Spectroscopy Measurements.

    PubMed

    Beltran, Nohra E; Sánchez-Miranda, Gustavo; Sacristan, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    A specific device and system has been developed and tested for clinical monitoring of gastric mucosal reactance in the critically ill as an early warning of splanchnic hypoperfusion associated with shock and sepsis. This device has been proven effective in clinical trials and is expected to become commercially available next year. The system uses a combination nasogastric tube and impedance spectroscopy probe as a single catheter. Because this device has a double function, the question is: Does enteral feeding or suction affect the gastric reactance measurements? This study was designed to evaluate the effect of feeding and suction on the measurement of gastric impedance spectroscopy in healthy volunteers. Impedance spectra were obtained from the gastric wall epithelia of 18 subjects. The spectra were measured for each of the following conditions: postinsertion of gastric probe, during active suction, postactive suction, and during enteral feeding (236 ml of nutritional supplement). Impedance spectra were reproducible in all volunteers under all conditions tested. There was a slight increase in impedance parameters after suction, and a decrease in impedance after feeding; however, these observed differences were insignificant compared to patient-to-patient variability, and truly negligible compared with previously observed changes associated with splanchnic ischemia in critically ill patients. Our results demonstrate that suction or feeding when using the impedance spectro-metry probe/nasogastric tube does not significantly interfere with gastric impedance spectrometer measurements. PMID:26226020

  17. Information passage from acoustic impedance to seismogram: Perspectives from wavelet-based multiscale analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chun-Feng

    2004-07-01

    Traditional seismic interpretation of surface seismic data is focused primarily on seismic oscillation. Rich singularity information carried by, but deeply buried in, seismic data is often ignored. We show that wavelet-based singularity analysis reveals generic singularity information conducted from acoustic impedance to seismogram. The singularity exponents (known as Hölder exponent α) calculated from seismic data are independent of amplitude and robust to phase changes and noises. These unique properties of α offer potentially important application in many fields, especially in studying seismic data interpretation, processing, inversion, and wave attenuation.

  18. Impedance analysis of fibroblastic cell layers measured by electric cell-substrate impedance sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Chun-Min; Ferrier, Jack

    1998-06-01

    Impedance measurements of cell layers cultured on gold electrode surfaces obtained by electric cell-substrate impedance sensing provide morphological information such as junctional resistance and cell-substrate separation. Previously, a model that assumes that cells have a disklike shape and that electric currents flow radially underneath the ventral cell surface and then through the paracellular space has been used to theoretically calculate the impedance of the cell-covered electrode. In this paper we propose an extended model of impedance analysis for cell layers where cellular shape is rectangular. This is especially appropriate for normal fibroblasts in culture. To verify the model, we analyze impedance data obtained from four different kinds of fibroblasts that display a long rectangular shape. In addition, we measure the average cell-substrate separation of human gingival fibroblasts at different temperatures. At temperatures of 37, 22, and 4 °C, the average separation between ventral cell surface and substratum are 46, 55, and 89 nm, respectively.

  19. Measurement and simulation of the RHIC abort kicker longitudinal impedence

    SciTech Connect

    Abreu,N.P.; Hahn,H.; Choi, E.

    2009-09-01

    In face of the new upgrades for RHIC the longitudinal impedance of the machine plays an important role in setting the threshold for instabilities and the efficacy of some systems. In this paper we describe the measurement of the longitudinal impedance of the abort kicker for RHIC as well as computer simulations of the structure. The impedance measurement was done by the S{sub 21} wire method covering the frequency range from 9 kHz to 2.5 GHz. We observed a sharp resonance peak around 10 MHz and a broader peak around 20 MHz in both, the real and imaginary part, of the Z/n. These two peaks account for a maximum imaginary longitudinal impedance of j15 {Omega}, a value an order of magnitude larger than the estimated value of j0.2 {Omega}, which indicates that the kicker is one of the main sources of longitudinal impedance in the machine. A computer model was constructed for simulations in the CST MWS program. Results for the magnet input and the also the beam impedance are compared to the measurements. A more detail study of the system properties and possible changes to reduce the coupling impedance are presented.

  20. Damage detection technique by measuring laser-based mechanical impedance

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hyeonseok; Sohn, Hoon

    2014-02-18

    This study proposes a method for measurement of mechanical impedance using noncontact laser ultrasound. The measurement of mechanical impedance has been of great interest in nondestructive testing (NDT) or structural health monitoring (SHM) since mechanical impedance is sensitive even to small-sized structural defects. Conventional impedance measurements, however, have been based on electromechanical impedance (EMI) using contact-type piezoelectric transducers, which show deteriorated performances induced by the effects of a) Curie temperature limitations, b) electromagnetic interference (EMI), c) bonding layers and etc. This study aims to tackle the limitations of conventional EMI measurement by utilizing laser-based mechanical impedance (LMI) measurement. The LMI response, which is equivalent to a steady-state ultrasound response, is generated by shooting the pulse laser beam to the target structure, and is acquired by measuring the out-of-plane velocity using a laser vibrometer. The formation of the LMI response is observed through the thermo-mechanical finite element analysis. The feasibility of applying the LMI technique for damage detection is experimentally verified using a pipe specimen under high temperature environment.

  1. Damage detection technique by measuring laser-based mechanical impedance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyeonseok; Sohn, Hoon

    2014-02-01

    This study proposes a method for measurement of mechanical impedance using noncontact laser ultrasound. The measurement of mechanical impedance has been of great interest in nondestructive testing (NDT) or structural health monitoring (SHM) since mechanical impedance is sensitive even to small-sized structural defects. Conventional impedance measurements, however, have been based on electromechanical impedance (EMI) using contact-type piezoelectric transducers, which show deteriorated performances induced by the effects of a) Curie temperature limitations, b) electromagnetic interference (EMI), c) bonding layers and etc. This study aims to tackle the limitations of conventional EMI measurement by utilizing laser-based mechanical impedance (LMI) measurement. The LMI response, which is equivalent to a steady-state ultrasound response, is generated by shooting the pulse laser beam to the target structure, and is acquired by measuring the out-of-plane velocity using a laser vibrometer. The formation of the LMI response is observed through the thermo-mechanical finite element analysis. The feasibility of applying the LMI technique for damage detection is experimentally verified using a pipe specimen under high temperature environment.

  2. Plasma Impedance Spectrum Analyzer (PISA): an advanced impedance probe for measuring plasma density and other parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowland, D. E.; Pfaff, R. F.; Uribe, P.; Burchill, J.

    2006-12-01

    High-accuracy, high-cadence measurements of ionospheric electron density between 100 and a few x 106 / cc and electron temperature from 200 K to a few thousand K are of critical importance for understanding conductivity, Joule heating rates, and instability growth rates. We present results from the development of an impedance probe at NASA GSFC and show its strengths relative to other measurement techniques. Complementary measurement techniques such as Langmuir Probes, while providing extremely high measurement cadence, suffer from uncertainties in calibration, surface contamination effects, and wake/sheath effects. Impedance Probes function by measuring the phase shift between the voltage on a long antenna and the current flowing from the antenna into the plasma as a function of frequency. At frequencies for which the phase shift is zero, a plasma resonance is assumed to exist. These resonances depend on a variety of plasma parameters, including the electron density, electron temperature, and magnetic field strength, as well as the antenna geometry, angle between the antenna and the magnetic field, and sheath / Debye length effects, but do not depend on the surface properties of the antenna. Previous impedance probe designs which "lock" onto the upper hybrid resonance are susceptible to losing lock in low-density environments. Information about other resonances, including the series resonance (which strongly depends on temperature) and other resonances which may occur near the upper hybrid, confounding its identification, are typically not transmitted. The novel features of the GSFC Impedance Probe (PISA) include: 1) A white noise generator that stimulates a wide range of frequencies simultaneously, allowing the instrument to send down the entire impedance frequency spectrum every few milliseconds. This allows identification of all resonance frequencies, including the series resonance which depends on temperature. 2) DC bias voltage stepping to bring the antenna

  3. Correcting electrode impedance effects in broadband SIP measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huisman, Johan Alexander; Zimmermann, Egon; Esser, Odilia; Haegel, Franz-Hubert; Vereecken, Harry

    2016-04-01

    Broadband spectral induced polarization (SIP) measurements of the complex electrical resistivity can be affected by the contact impedance of the potential electrodes above 100 Hz. In this study, we present a correction procedure to remove electrode impedance effects from SIP measurements. The first step in this correction procedure is to estimate the electrode impedance using a measurement with reversed current and potential electrodes. In a second step, this estimated electrode impedance is used to correct SIP measurements based on a simplified electrical model of the SIP measurement system. We evaluated this new correction procedure using SIP measurements on water because of the well-defined dielectric properties. It was found that the difference between the corrected and expected phase of the complex electrical resistivity of water was below 0.1 mrad at 1 kHz for a wide range of electrode impedances. In addition, SIP measurements on a saturated unconsolidated sediment sample with two types of potential electrodes showed that the measured phase of the electrical resistivity was very similar (difference <0.2 mrad) up to a frequency of 10 kHz after the effect of the different electrode impedances was removed. Finally, SIP measurements on variably saturated unconsolidated sand were made. Here, the plausibility of the phase of the electrical resistivity was improved for frequencies up to 1 kHz, but errors remained for higher frequencies due to the approximate nature of the electrode impedance estimates and some remaining unknown parasitic capacitances that led to current leakage. It was concluded that the proposed correction procedure for SIP measurements improved the accuracy of the phase measurements by an order of magnitude in the kHz frequency range. Further improvement of this accuracy requires a method to accurately estimate parasitic capacitances in situ.

  4. Measured longitudinal beam impedance of booster gradient magnets

    SciTech Connect

    James L Crisp and Brian J. Fellenz

    2001-08-24

    The Booster gradient magnets have no vacuum pipe which forces the beam image current to flow along the laminated pole tips. Both D and F style magnets were measured with a stretched wire to determine the longitudinal beam impedance caused by these laminations. Results are compared to calculations done 30 years ago. The inductive part of the magnet impedance is interesting because it partially compensates for the negative inductance effects of space charge on the beam. An R/L circuit consisting of 37K{center_dot} in parallel with between 40 and 100uH is a reasonable approximation to the total impedance of Booster magnet laminations.

  5. Scatterer size and concentration estimation technique based on a 3D acoustic impedance map from histologic sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamou, Jonathan; Oelze, Michael L.; O'Brien, William D.; Zachary, James F.

    2001-05-01

    Accurate estimates of scatterer parameters (size and acoustic concentration) are beneficial adjuncts to characterize disease from ultrasonic backscatterer measurements. An estimation technique was developed to obtain parameter estimates from the Fourier transform of the spatial autocorrelation function (SAF). A 3D impedance map (3DZM) is used to obtain the SAF of tissue. 3DZMs are obtained by aligning digitized light microscope images from histologic preparations of tissue. Estimates were obtained for simulated 3DZMs containing spherical scatterers randomly located: relative errors were less than 3%. Estimates were also obtained from a rat fibroadenoma and a 4T1 mouse mammary tumor (MMT). Tissues were fixed (10% neutral-buffered formalin), embedded in paraffin, serially sectioned and stained with H&E. 3DZM results were compared to estimates obtained independently against ultrasonic backscatter measurements. For the fibroadenoma and MMT, average scatterer diameters were 91 and 31.5 μm, respectively. Ultrasonic measurements yielded average scatterer diameters of 105 and 30 μm, respectively. The 3DZM estimation scheme showed results similar to those obtained by the independent ultrasonic measurements. The 3D impedance maps show promise as a powerful tool to characterize ultrasonic scattering sites of tissue. [Work supported by the University of Illinois Research Board.

  6. Electrical impedance measurements: rapid method for detecting and monitoring microorganisms.

    PubMed Central

    Cady, P; Dufour, S W; Shaw, J; Kraeger, S J

    1978-01-01

    A conceptually simple and east-to-use technique is described that uses continuous impedance measurements for automated monitoring of microbial growth and metabolism. The method has been applied to a wide range of microorganisms. Optical clarity is not required. The sensitivity and reproducibility of the method are demonstrated. The mechanism whereby microbial growth alters the impedance of the medium is discussed, as well as potential applications of the method to clinical microbiology. Images PMID:348718

  7. Microbial Sulfate Reduction Measured by an Automated Electrical Impedance Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oremland, R. S.; Silverman, M. P.

    1979-01-01

    Electrical impedance measurements are used to investigate the rates of sulfate reduction by pure cultures of and sediments containing sulfur-reducing bacteria. Changes in the electrical impedance ratios of pure cultures of Desulfovibrio aestuarii and samples of reduced sediments from San Francisco Bay were measured by a Bactometer 32, and sulfate reduction was followed by measuring the incorporation of (S-35) sulfate into metal sulfides. The growth of the bacteria in pure culture is found to result in an increase of 0.2200 in the impedance ratio within 24 h, accompanied by increases in protein, ATP, sulfide and absorptance at 660 nm, all of which are inhibited by the addition of molybdate. Similar responses were observed in the sediments, although impedance ratio responses were not completely inhibited upon the addition of molybdate, due to the presence of nonsulfate-respiring microorganisms. Experiments conducted with sterile media and autoclaved sediments indicate that the presence of H2S together with iron is responsible for the impedance effect, and sulfate reduction rates ranging between 0.85 and 1.78 mmol/l per day are estimated for the sediments by the impedance technique.

  8. Feasibility of Bioelectrical Impedance Spectroscopy Measurement before and after Thoracentesis

    PubMed Central

    Weyer, Sören; Pauly, Karolin; Napp, Andreas; Dreher, Michael; Leonhardt, Steffen; Marx, Nikolaus; Schauerte, Patrick; Mischke, Karl

    2015-01-01

    Background. Bioelectrical impedance spectroscopy is applied to measure changes in tissue composition. The aim of this study was to evaluate its feasibility in measuring the fluid shift after thoracentesis in patients with pleural effusion. Methods. 45 participants (21 with pleural effusion and 24 healthy subjects) were included. Bioelectrical impedance was analyzed for “Transthoracic,” “Foot to Foot,” “Foot to Hand,” and “Hand to Hand” vectors in low and high frequency domain before and after thoracentesis. Healthy subjects were measured at a single time point. Results. The mean volume of removed pleural effusion was 1169 ± 513 mL. The “Foot to Foot,” “Hand to Hand,” and “Foot to Hand” vector indicated a trend for increased bioelectrical impedance after thoracentesis. Values for the low frequency domain in the “Transthoracic” vector increased significantly (P < 0.001). A moderate correlation was observed between the amount of removed fluid and impedance change in the low frequency domain using the “Foot to Hand” vector (r = −0.7). Conclusion. Bioelectrical impedance changes in correlation with the thoracic fluid level. It was feasible to monitor significant fluid shifts and loss after thoracentesis in the “Transthoracic” vector by means of bioelectrical impedance spectroscopy. The trial is registered with Registration Numbers IRB EK206/11 and NCT01778270. PMID:25861647

  9. Experimental verification of depolarization effects in bioelectrical impedance measurement.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaoyan; Lv, Xinqiang; Du, Meng

    2014-01-01

    The electrode polarization effects on bioelectrical impedance measurement at low-frequency cannot be ignored. In this paper, the bioelectrical data of mice livers are measured to specify the polarization effects on the bio-impedance measurement data. We firstly introduce the measurement system and methodology. Using the depolarization method, the corrected results are obtained. Besides, the specific effects of electrode polarization on bio-impedance measurement results are investigated using comparative analysis of the previous and posterior correction results from dielectric spectroscopy, Cole-Cole plot, conductivity and spectroscopy of dissipation tangent. Experimental results show that electrode polarization has a significant influence on the characteristic parameters of mouse liver tissues. To be specific, we see a low-frequency limit resistance R0 increase by 19.29%, a reactance peak XP increase by 8.50%, a low-frequency limit conductivity Kl decrease by 17.65% and a dissipation peak tangent decrease by 160%. PMID:25227082

  10. Smart mug to measure hand's geometrical mechanical impedance.

    PubMed

    Hondori, Hossein Mousavi; Tech, Ang Wei

    2011-01-01

    A novel device, which looks like a mug, has been proposed for measuring the impedance of human hand. The device is designed to have convenient size and light weight similar to an ordinary coffee mug. It contains a 2-axis inertia sensor to monitor vibration and a small motor to carry an eccentric mass (m=100 gr, r=2 cm, rpm=600). The centrifugal force due to the rotating mass applies a dynamic force to the hand that holds the mug. Correlation of the acceleration signals with the perturbing force gives the geometrical mechanical impedance. Experimental results on a healthy subject shows that impedance is posture dependant while it changes with the direction of the applied perturbing force. For nine postures the geometrical impedance is obtained all of which have elliptical shapes. The method can be used for assessment of spasticity and monitoring stability in patients with stroke or similar problems. PMID:22255230

  11. Whole-body impedance--what does it measure?

    PubMed

    Foster, K R; Lukaski, H C

    1996-09-01

    Although the bioelectrical impedance technique is widely used in human nutrition and clinical research, an integrated summary of the biophysical and bioelectrical bases of this approach is lacking. We summarize the pertinent electrical phenomena relevant to the application of the impedance technique in vivo and discuss the relations between electrical measurements and biological conductor volumes. Key terms in the derivation of bioelectrical impedance analysis are described and the relation between the electrical properties of tissues and tissue structure is discussed. The relation between the impedance of an object and its geometry, scale, and intrinsic electrical properties is also discussed. Correlations between whole-body impedance measurements and various bioconductor volumes, such as total body water and fat-free mass, are experimentally well established; however, the reason for the success of the impedence technique is much less clear. The bioengineering basis for the technique is critically presented and considerations are proposed that might help to clarify the method and potentially improve its sensitivity. PMID:8780354

  12. Flow Duct Data for Validation of Acoustic Liner Codes for Impedance Eduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahuja, K. K.; Munro, Scott; Gaeta, R. J., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    The objective of the study reported here was to acquire acoustic and flow data with hard and lined duct wall duct sections for validation of a liner prediction code being developed at NASA LaRC. Both the mean flowfield and acoustic flowfields were determined in a cross-plane of the rectangular duct. A flow duct facility with acoustic drivers connected to a rectangular (4.7 x 2.0 inch) source section and a linear acoustic liner mounted downstream of the source section was used in this study. The liner section was designed to allow liner materials to be placed on all 4 walls of the duct. The test liner was of the locally-reacting type and was made from a ceramic material. The material, consisting of a tubular structure, was provided by NASA LaRC. The liner was approximately 8.89 cm (3.5 inches) thick. For the current study, only the two "short" sides of the duct were lined with liner material. The other two sides were hard walls. Two especially built instrumentation sections were attached on either sides of the liner section to allow acoustic and flow measurements to be made upstream and downstream of the liner. The two instrumentation duct sections were built to allow measurement of acoustic and flow properties at planes perpendicular to flow upstream and downstream of the liner section. The instrumentation section was also designed to provide a streamwise gradient in acoustic (complex) pressure from which the acoustic particle velocity, needed for the model validation, can be computed. Flow measurements included pressure, temperature, and velocity profiles upstream of the liner section. The in-flow sound pressure levels and phases were obtained with a microphone probe equipped with a nose cone in two cross planes upstream of the liner and two cross plane downstream of the liner. In addition to the acoustic measurements at the cross planes. axial centerline acoustic data was acquired using an axially traversing microphone probe which was traversed from a location

  13. Acoustic Measurements of Small Solid Rocket Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargas, Magda B.; Kenny, R. Jeremy

    2010-01-01

    Rocket acoustic noise can induce loads and vibration on the vehicle as well as the surrounding structures. Models have been developed to predict these acoustic loads based on scaling existing solid rocket motor data. The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center acoustics team has measured several small solid rocket motors (thrust below 150,000 lbf) to anchor prediction models. This data will provide NASA the capability to predict the acoustic environments and consequent vibro-acoustic response of larger rockets (thrust above 1,000,000 lbf) such as those planned for the NASA Constellation program. This paper presents the methods used to measure acoustic data during the static firing of small solid rocket motors and the trends found in the data.

  14. Mode error analysis of impedance measurement using twin wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Liang-Sheng; Yoshiro, Irie; Liu, Yu-Dong; Wang, Sheng

    2015-03-01

    Both longitudinal and transverse coupling impedance for some critical components need to be measured for accelerator design. The twin wires method is widely used to measure longitudinal and transverse impedance on the bench. A mode error is induced when the twin wires method is used with a two-port network analyzer. Here, the mode error is analyzed theoretically and an example analysis is given. Moreover, the mode error in the measurement is a few percent when a hybrid with no less than 25 dB isolation and a splitter with no less than 20 dB magnitude error are used. Supported by Natural Science Foundation of China (11175193, 11275221)

  15. Calibration of ipsilateral stimulus transducer for acoustic reflex measurements.

    PubMed

    Olsen, S; Osterhammel, P A; Rasmussen, A N; Nielsen, L H

    1995-01-01

    Pure-tone Reference Equivalent Threshold Sound Pressure Level (RETSPL) of the ipsilateral stimulus receiver for acoustic reflex measurements on Madsen Electronics type Zodiac 901 impedance audiometer is provided. The results, obtained from 20 normal-hearing subjects, are achieved by comparing hearing threshold levels measured using a TDH 39 telephone (calibrated to ISO 389) with thresholds recorded using the ipsilateral stimulus insert phone. The calibration is referenced to an IEC-711 ear simulator and comprises the following frequencies: 125, 250, 500, 750, 1000, 1500, 2000, 3000, 4000, 6000, 8000 Hz. PMID:8552975

  16. Effect of grazing flow on the acoustic impedance of Helmholtz resonators consisting of single and clustered orifices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hersch, A. S.; Walker, B.

    1979-01-01

    A semiempirical fluid mechanical model is derived for the acoustic behavior of thin-walled single orifice Helmholtz resonators in a grazing flow environment. The incident and cavity sound fields are connected in terms of an orifice discharge coefficient whose values are determined experimentally using the two-microphone method. Measurements show that at high grazing flow speeds, acoustical resistance is almost linearly proportional to the grazing flow speed and almost independent of incident sound pressure. The corresponding values of reactance are much smaller and tend towards zero. For thicker-walled orifice plates, resistance and reactance were observed to be less sensitive to grazing flow as the ratio of plate thickness to orifice diameter increased. Loud tones were observed to radiate from a single orifice Helmholtz resonator due to interaction between the grazing flow shear layer and the resonator cavity. Measurements showed that the tones radiated at a Strouhal number equal to 0.26. The effects of grazing flow on the impedance of Helmholtz resonators consisting of clusters of orifices was also studied. In general, both resistance and reaction were found to be virtually independent of orifice relative spacing and number. These findings are valid with and without grazing flow.

  17. Contribution to classification of buried objects based on acoustic impedance matching.

    PubMed

    Stepanić, J; Wüstenberg, H; Krstelj, V; Mrasek, H

    2003-03-01

    Determination of material the buried objects are made of could contribute significantly to their recognition, or classification. This is important in detecting buried antipersonnel landmines within the context of humanitarian demining, as well as in a variety of other applications. In this article the concept has been formulated of the approach to buried object's material determination starting with ultrasonic impulse propagation analysis in a particular testing set configuration. The impulse propagates through a characterized transfer material in such a way that a part of it, a reflected wave, carries the information about the buried object's surface material acoustic impedance. The limit of resolution capability is theoretically analyzed and experimentally evaluated and the influencing factors described. Among these, the contact between clean surfaces of the transfer material and buried object is emphasized. PMID:12565075

  18. Minimization of sonic-boom parameters in real and isothermal atmospheres. [overpressure and acoustic impedance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darden, C. M.

    1975-01-01

    The procedure for sonic-boom minimization introduced by Seebass and George for an isothermal atmosphere was converted for use in the real atmosphere by means of the appropriate equations for sonic-boom pressure signature advance, ray-tube area, and acoustic impedance. Results of calculations using both atmospheres indicate that except for low Mach numbers or high altitudes, the isothermal atmosphere with a scale height of 7620 m (25 000 ft) gives a reasonable estimate of the values of overpressure, impulse, and characteristic overpressure obtained by using the real atmosphere. The results also show that for aircraft design studies, propagation of a known F-function, or minimization studies at low supersonic Mach numbers, the isothermal approximation is not adequate.

  19. A model for the pressure excitation spectrum and acoustic impedance of sound absorbers in the presence of grazing flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, E. J.

    1973-01-01

    The acoustic impedance of sound absorbers in the presence of grazing flow is essential information when analyzing sound propagation within ducts. A unification of the theory of the nonlinear acoustic resistance of Helmholtz resonators including grazing flow is presented. The nonlinear resistance due to grazing flow is considered to be caused by an exciting pressure spectrum produced by the interaction of the grazing flow and the jets flowing from the resonator orifices. With this exciting pressure spectrum the resonator can be treated in the same manner as a resonator without grazing flow but with an exciting acoustic spectrum.

  20. Comparison of acoustic and impedance methods with mask capnometry to assess respiration rate in obese patients recovering from general anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Frasca, D; Geraud, L; Charriere, J M; Debaene, B; Mimoz, O

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory depression, a potentially serious complication after general anaesthesia, can be detected promptly by close monitoring of both oxygen saturation and respiratory rate. Obese patients have morphological changes that may impair the reliability of monitoring devices. In this study, respiration rate was simultaneously recorded every second for up to 60 min using a computer in 30 adult obese patients (body mass index ≥ 35 kg.m(-2)), by three methods: acoustic; thoracic impedance; and capnometry via a facemask (Capnomask, reference method). Of the 99,771 data triplets collected, only 85,520 (86%) were included; 12,021 (84%) were not studied due to failure of capnometry and 2240 (16%) due to failure of the acoustic method. Compared with capnometry, bias was similar using both the acoustic method and impedance (-0.3 bpm vs. -0.6 bpm, respectively, p = 0.09), but limits of agreement were narrower for the acoustic method (±3.5 bpm vs. ±5.3 bpm, respectively, p = 0.0008). The proportion of respiration rate values obtained with the acoustic method and impedance that differed by at least 10% or 20% for more than 15 s were 11% vs. 23% and 2% vs. 6%, respectively (p = 0.0009 for both comparisons). The acoustic sensor was well tolerated, while the facemask was pulled off on several occasions by four (13%) agitated patients. In obese patients requiring close monitoring of respiration rate, the acoustic method may be more precise than thoracic impedance and better tolerated than capnometry with a facemask. PMID:25040754

  1. Density, ultrasound velocity, acoustic impedance, reflection and absorption coefficient determination of liquids via multiple reflection method.

    PubMed

    Hoche, S; Hussein, M A; Becker, T

    2015-03-01

    The accuracy of density, reflection coefficient, and acoustic impedance determination via multiple reflection method was validated experimentally. The ternary system water-maltose-ethanol was used to execute a systematic, temperature dependent study over a wide range of densities and viscosities aiming an application as inline sensor in beverage industries. The validation results of the presented method and setup show root mean square errors of: 1.201E-3 g cm(-3) (±0.12%) density, 0.515E-3 (0.15%) reflection coefficient and 1.851E+3 kg s(-1) m(-2) (0.12%) specific acoustic impedance. The results of the diffraction corrected absorption showed an average standard deviation of only 0.12%. It was found that the absorption change shows a good correlation to concentration variations and may be useful for laboratory analysis of sufficiently pure liquids. The main part of the observed errors can be explained by the observed noise, temperature variation and the low signal resolution of 50 MHz. In particular, the poor signal-to-noise ratio of the second reflector echo was found to be a main accuracy limitation. Concerning the investigation of liquids the unstable properties of the reference material PMMA, due to hygroscopicity, were identified to be an additional, unpredictable source of uncertainty. While dimensional changes can be considered by adequate methodology, the impact of the time and temperature dependent water absorption on relevant reference properties like the buffer's sound velocity and density could not be considered and may explain part of the observed deviations. PMID:25465962

  2. [An instrument for estimating human body composition using impedance measurement].

    PubMed

    Yin, J; Peng, C

    1997-03-01

    According to the impedance feature of biological tissue, the instrument was designed at 1, 5, 10, 50, 100kHz to measure human impedance, and then to calculate human FAT, FFM, FAT%, TBW, ECW, ICW and so on. A 8031 singlechip microprocessor contacuting used as a control center in the instrument. The part of electric circuit contacuting human body in the instrument was unreally earthing. The instrument was safty, effective, repeatable, and easily manpulative. Prelimintary clinical experiment showed the results measured with the instrument could effectively reflect practical, status of human composition. PMID:9647623

  3. Directional acoustic measurements by laser Doppler velocimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazumder, M. K.; Overbey, R. L.; Testerman, M. K.

    1976-01-01

    Laser Doppler velocimeters (LDVs) are used as velocity microphones to measure sound pressure level in the range from 90 to 130 dB, spectral components, and two-point correlation functions for acoustic-noise source identification. Close agreement between LDV and microphone data is observed. Directional sensitivity and the ability to measure remotely make LDVs useful tools for acoustic measurement where placement of any physical probe is difficult or undesirable, as in the diagnosis of jet noise.

  4. Bunch Length and Impedance Measurements at SPEAR3

    SciTech Connect

    Corbett, W.J.; Cheng, W.X.; Fisher, A.S.; Huang, X.; /SLAC

    2011-11-02

    Streak camera measurements were made at SPEAR3 to characterize longitudinal coupling impedance. For the nominal optics, data was taken at three rf voltages and a single-bunch current range of 0-20mA. Both bunchcentroid phase shift and bunch lengthening were recorded to extract values for resistive and reactive impedance. An (R+L) and a Q=1 model were then back-substituted into the Haissinski equation and compared with raw profile data. In the short bunch (low-{alpha}) mode, distribution 'bursting' was observed.

  5. Modeling of converter transformers using frequency domain terminal impedance measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yilu; Sebo, S.A.; Caldecott, R.; Kasten, D.G. ); Wright, S.E. )

    1993-01-01

    HVDC converter stations generate radio frequency (RF) electromagnetic (EM) noise which could interfere with adjacent communication and computer equipment, and carrier system operations. In order to calculate and predict the RF EM noise produced by the valve ignition of a converter station, it is essential to develop accurate models of station equipment over a broad frequency range. Models of all station equipment can be characterized by frequency dependent impedances. The paper describes the frequency dependent node-to-node impedance function (NIF) models of power system equipment based on systematic broad frequency range (50 Hz to 1MHz) external driving point impedance measurements, sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The regular structure, high accuracy, and virtually unlimited frequency range are important features of the NIF model. Examples of NIF model application in converter station RF EM noise calculations are presented.

  6. Antenna impedance measurements in a magnetized plasma. II. Dipole antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Blackwell, David D.; Walker, David N.; Messer, Sarah J.; Amatucci, William E.

    2007-09-15

    This paper presents experimental impedance measurements of a dipole antenna immersed in a magnetized plasma. The impedance was derived from the magnitude and phase of the reflected power using a network analyzer over a frequency range of 1 MHz-1 GHz. The plasma density was varied between 10{sup 7} and 10{sup 10} cm{sup -3} in weakly ({omega}{sub ce}<{omega}{sub pe}) and strongly ({omega}{sub ce}>{omega}{sub pe}) magnetized plasmas in the Space Physics Simulation Chamber at the Naval Research Laboratory. Over this range of plasma conditions the wavelength in the plasma varies from the short dipole limit ({lambda}>>L) to the long dipole limit ({lambda}{approx}L). As with previous impedance measurements, there are two resonant frequencies observed as frequencies where the impedance of the antenna is real. Measurements have indicated that in the short dipole limit the majority of the power deposition takes place at the lower resonance frequency which lies between the cyclotron frequency and the upper hybrid frequency. These measured curves agree very well with the analytic theory for a short dipole in a magnetoplasma. In the long dipole regime, in addition to the short dipole effects still being present, there is resonant energy deposition which peaks at much higher frequencies and correlates to 1/2 and 3/2 wavelength dipole resonances. The wavelengths in the plasma predicted by these resonances are consistent with the antenna radiating R and L-waves.

  7. Measuring the acoustic response of Helmholtz resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteiro, Martín; Marti, Arturo C.; Vogt, Patrik; Kasper, Lutz; Quarthal, Dominik

    2015-04-01

    Many experiments have been proposed to investigate acoustic phenomena in college and early undergraduate levels, in particular the speed of sound,1-9 by means of different methods, such as time of flight, transit time, or resonance in tubes. In this paper we propose to measure the acoustic response curves of a glass beaker filled with different gases, used as an acoustic resonator. We show that these curves expose many interesting peaks and features, one of which matches the resonance peak predicted for a Helmholtz resonator fairly well, and gives a decent estimate for the speed of sound in some cases. The measures are obtained thanks to the capabilities of smartphones.

  8. High Dynamic Range Complex Impedance Measurement System for Petrophysical Usage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, R.; He, X.; Yao, H.; Tan, S.; Shi, H.; Shen, R.; Yan, C.; Zeng, P.; He, L.; Qiao, N.; Xi, F.; Zhang, H.; Xie, J.

    2015-12-01

    Spectral induced polarization method (SIP) or complex resistivity method is increasing its application in metalliferous ore exploration, hydrocarbon exploration, underground water exploration, monitoring of environment pollution, and the evaluation of environment remediation. And the measurement of complex resistivity or complex impedance of rock/ore sample and polluted water plays a fundamental role in improving the application effect of SIP and the application scope of SIP. However, current instruments can't guaranty the accuracy of measurement when the resistance of sample is less than 10Ω or great than 100kΩ. A lot of samples, such as liquid, polluted sea water, igneous rock, limestone, and sandstone, can't be measured with reliable complex resistivity result. Therefore, this problem projects a shadow in the basic research and application research of SIP. We design a high precision measurement system from the study of measurement principle, sample holder, and measurement instrument. We design input buffers in a single board. We adopt operation amplifier AD549 in this system because of its ultra-high input impedance and ultra-low current noise. This buffer is good in acquiring potential signal across high impedance sample. By analyzing the sources of measurement error and errors generated by the measurement system, we propose a correction method to remove the error in order to achieve high quality complex impedance measurement for rock and ore samples. This measurement system can improve the measurement range of the complex impedance to 0.1 Ω ~ 10 GΩ with amplitude error less than 0.1% and phase error less than 0.1mrad when frequency ranges as 0.01 Hz ~ 1 kHz. We tested our system on resistors with resistance as 0.1Ω ~ 10 GΩ in frequency range as 1 Hz ~ 1000 Hz, and the measurement error is less than 0.1 mrad. We also compared the result with LCR bridge and SCIP, we can find that the bridge's measuring range only reaches 100 MΩ, SCIP's measuring range

  9. Perturbation measurement of waveguides for acoustic thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, H.; Feng, X. J.; Zhang, J. T.

    2013-09-01

    Acoustic thermometers normally embed small acoustic transducers in the wall bounding a gas-filled cavity resonator. At high temperature, insulators of transducers loss electrical insulation and degrade the signal-to-noise ratio. One essential solution to this technical trouble is to couple sound by acoustic waveguides between resonator and transducers. But waveguide will break the ideal acoustic surface and bring perturbations(Δf+ig) to the ideal resonance frequency. The perturbation model for waveguides was developed based on the first-order acoustic theory in this paper. The frequency shift Δf and half-width change g caused by the position, length and radius of waveguides were analyzed using this model. Six different length of waveguides (52˜1763 mm) were settled on the cylinder resonator and the perturbation (Δf+ig) were measured at T=332 K and p=250˜500 kPa. The experiment results agreed with the theoretical prediction very well.

  10. Rotating Microphone Rake Measures Spinning Acoustic Modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Konno, Kevin E.; Hausmann, Clifford R.

    1996-01-01

    Rotating rake of pressure transducers developed for use in experimental studies of sources and propagation of noise generated by subsonic fan engines. Pressure transducers used as microphones to measure acoustic modes generated by, and spin with, fans. Versatility of control software used in rake-drive system enables measurements of acoustic modes on wide range of test-engine configurations. Rake-drive hardware easily adapted to different engines because not mechanically coupled to engine under test.

  11. Multiscale analysis of the acoustic scattering by many scatterers of impedance type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Challa, Durga Prasad; Sini, Mourad

    2016-06-01

    We are concerned with the acoustic scattering problem, at a frequency {κ}, by many small obstacles of arbitrary shapes with impedance boundary condition. These scatterers are assumed to be included in a bounded domain {Ω} in {{R}^3} which is embedded in an acoustic background characterized by an eventually locally varying index of refraction. The collection of the scatterers {D_m, m=1,ldots,M} is modeled by four parameters: their number M, their maximum radius a, their minimum distance d and the surface impedances {λ_m, m=1,ldots,M}. We consider the parameters M, d and {λ_m}'s having the following scaling properties: {M:=M(a)=O(a^{-s}), d:=d(a)≈ a^t} and {λ_m:=λ_m(a)=λ_{m,0}a^{-β}}, as {a→ 0}, with non negative constants s, t and {β} and complex numbers {λ_{m, 0}}'s with eventually negative imaginary parts. We derive the asymptotic expansion of the far-fields with explicit error estimate in terms of a, as {a→ 0}. The dominant term is the Foldy-Lax field corresponding to the scattering by the point-like scatterers located at the centers {z_m}'s of the scatterers {D_m}'s with {λ_m \\vert partial D_m\\vert} as the related scattering coefficients. This asymptotic expansion is justified under the following conditions a ≤ a_0, \\vert Re (λ_{m,0})\\vert ≥ λ_-,quad \\vertλ_{m,0}\\vert ≤ λ_+,quad β < 1,quad 0 ≤ s ≤2-β,quads/3 ≤ t and the error of the approximation is {C a^{3-2β-s}}, as {a → 0}, where the positive constants {a_0, λ_-,λ_+} and C depend only on the a priori uniform bounds of the Lipschitz characters of the obstacles {D_m}'s and the ones of {M(a)a^s} and {d(a)/a^t}. We do not assume the periodicity in distributing the small scatterers. In addition, the scatterers can be arbitrary close since t can be arbitrary large, i.e., we can handle the mesoscale regime. Finally, for spherical scatterers, we can also allow the limit case {β=1} with a slightly better error of the approximation.

  12. a Modeling and Measurement Study of Acoustic Horns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Post, John Theodore

    Although acoustic horns have been in use for thousands of years, formal horn design only began approximately 80 years ago with the pioneering effort of A. G. Webster. In this dissertation, the improvements to Webster's original horn model are reviewed and the lack of analytical progress since Webster is noted. In an attempt to augment the traditional methods of analysis, a semi-analytical technique presented by Rayleigh is extended. Although Rayleigh's method is not based on one-dimensional wave propagation, it is found not to offer significant improvement over Webster's model. In order to be free of the limitations associated with analytical techniques, a numerical method based on boundary elements has been developed. It is suitable for solving radiation problems that can be modeled as a source in an infinite bafffe. The exterior boundary element formulation is exchanged for an interior formulation by placing a hemisphere over the baffled source and using an analytical expansion of the field in the exterior half space. The boundary element method is demonstrated by solving the baffled piston problem, and is then used to obtain the acoustic throat impedance and far-field directivity of axisymmetric horns having exponential and tractrix contours. Experiments are performed to measure the throat impedance and the far-field directivity of two axisymmetric horns mounted in a rigid baffle. An exponential horn and a tractrix horn with equal throat radius (2.54 cm), length (55.9 cm), and mouth radius (27.1 cm) are critically examined. A modern implementation of the "reaction on the source" method is compared with a new implementation of the two-microphone method for measuring acoustic impedance. The modified two-microphone method is found to be extremely simple and accurate, but the "reaction on the source" method has the advantage of in situ measurements. The far-field directivity is measured by a new technique that allows the far-field pressure to be calculated from the

  13. Determination of Complex Microcalorimeter Parameters with Impedance Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saab, T.; Bandler, S. R.; Chervenak, J.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Finkbeiner, F.; Iyomoto, N.; Kelley, R.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Lindeman, M. A.; Porter, F. S.; Sadleir, J.

    2005-01-01

    The proper understanding and modeling of a microcalorimeter s response requires the accurate knowledge of a handful of parameters, such as C, G, alpha, . . . . While a few of these, such 8s the normal state resistance and the total thermal conductance to the heat bath (G) are directly determined from the DC IV characteristics, some others, notoriously the heat capacity (C) and alpha, appear in degenerate combinations in most measurable quantities. The case of a complex microcalorimeter, i.e. one in which the absorber s heat capacity is connected by a finite thermal impedance to the sensor, and subsequently by another thermal impedance to the heat bath, results in an added ambiguity in the determination of the individual C's and G's. In general, the dependence of the microcalorimeter s complex impedance on these parameters varies with frequency. This variation allows us to determine the individual parameters by fitting the prediction of the microcalorimeter model to the impedance data. We describe in this paper our efforts at characterizing the Goddard X-ray microcalorimeters. Using the parameters determined with this method we them compare the pulse shape and noise spectra predicted by the microcalorimeter model to data taken with the same devices.

  14. Acoustic Measurements for Small Solid Rocket Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargas, Magda B.; Kenny, R. Jeremy

    2010-01-01

    Models have been developed to predict large solid rocket motor acoustic loads based on the scaling of small solid rocket motors. MSFC has measured several small solid rocket motors in horizontal and launch configurations to anchor these models. Solid Rocket Test Motor (SRTM) has ballistics similar to the Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) therefore a good choice for acoustic scaling. Acoustic measurements were collected during the test firing of the Insulation Configuration Extended Length (ICXL) 7,6, and 8 (in firing order) in order to compare to RSRM horizontal firing data. The scope of this presentation includes: Acoustic test procedures and instrumentation implemented during the three SRTM firings and Data analysis method and general trends observed in the data.

  15. Determination of soil moisture distribution from impedance and gravimetric measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ungar, Stephen G.; Layman, Robert; Campbell, Jeffrey E.; Walsh, John; Mckim, Harlan J.

    1992-01-01

    Daily measurements of the soil dielectric properties at 5 and 10 cm were obtained at five locations throughout the First ISLSCP Field Experiment (FIFE) test site during the 1987 intensive field campaigns (IFCs). An automated vector voltmeter was used to monitor the complex electrical impedance, at 10 MHz, of cylindrical volumes of soil delineated by specially designed soil moisture probes buried at these locations. The objective of this exercise was to test the hypothesis that the soil impedance is sensitive to the moisture content of the soil and that the imaginary part (that is, capacitive reactance) can be used to calculate the volumetric water content of the soil. These measurements were compared with gravimetric samples collected at these locations by the FIFE staff science team.

  16. Acoustic Doppler discharge-measurement system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simpson, Michael R.; Oltmann, Richard N.

    1990-01-01

    A discharge-measurement system that uses a vessel-mounted acoustic Doppler current profiler has been developed and tested by the U.S. Geological Survey. Discharge measurements using the system require a fraction of the time needed for conventional current-meter discharge measurements and do not require shore-based navigational aids or tag lines for positioning the vessel.

  17. Damage Diagnosis in Semiconductive Materials Using Electrical Impedance Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Richard W.; Hinton, Yolanda L.

    2008-01-01

    Recent aerospace industry trends have resulted in an increased demand for real-time, effective techniques for in-flight structural health monitoring. A promising technique for damage diagnosis uses electrical impedance measurements of semiconductive materials. By applying a small electrical current into a material specimen and measuring the corresponding voltages at various locations on the specimen, changes in the electrical characteristics due to the presence of damage can be assessed. An artificial neural network uses these changes in electrical properties to provide an inverse solution that estimates the location and magnitude of the damage. The advantage of the electrical impedance method over other damage diagnosis techniques is that it uses the material as the sensor. Simple voltage measurements can be used instead of discrete sensors, resulting in a reduction in weight and system complexity. This research effort extends previous work by employing finite element method models to improve accuracy of complex models with anisotropic conductivities and by enhancing the computational efficiency of the inverse techniques. The paper demonstrates a proof of concept of a damage diagnosis approach using electrical impedance methods and a neural network as an effective tool for in-flight diagnosis of structural damage to aircraft components.

  18. Drag Measurements of Porous Plate Acoustic Liners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolter, John D.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents the results of direct drag measurements on a variety of porous plate acoustic liners. The existing literature describes numerous studies of drag on porous walls with injection or suction, but relatively few of drag on porous plates with neither injection nor suction. Furthermore, the porosity of the porous plate in existing studies is much lower than typically used in acoustic liners. In the present work, the acoustic liners consisted of a perforated face sheet covering a bulk acoustic absorber material. Factors that were varied in the experiment were hole diameter, hole pattern, face sheet thickness, bulk material type, and size of the gap (if any) between the face sheet and the absorber material.

  19. Measuring Acoustic-Radiation Stresses in Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, John H.; Yost, W. T.

    1986-01-01

    System measures nonlinearity parameters of materials. Uses static strain generated by acoustic wave propagating in material. Since static strain is effectively "dc" component of waveform distortion, problems associated with phase-cancellation artifacts disappear. Further, sign of nonlinearity parameter obtained by simple inspection of measured signal polarity. These features make this system very amenable to use in field. System expected to become standard for acoustic-radiation-stress measurements for solids and liquids and for characterization of material properties related to strength and residual or applied stresses. Also expected to become standard for transducer calibration.

  20. Nuclear radiation-warning detector that measures impedance

    SciTech Connect

    Savignac, Noel Felix; Gomez, Leo S; Yelton, William Graham; Robinson, Alex; Limmer, Steven

    2013-06-04

    This invention is a nuclear radiation-warning detector that measures impedance of silver-silver halide on an interdigitated electrode to detect light or radiation comprised of alpha particles, beta particles, gamma rays, X rays, and/or neutrons. The detector is comprised of an interdigitated electrode covered by a layer of silver halide. After exposure to alpha particles, beta particles, X rays, gamma rays, neutron radiation, or light, the silver halide is reduced to silver in the presence of a reducing solution. The change from the high electrical resistance (impedance) of silver halide to the low resistance of silver provides the radiation warning that detected radiation levels exceed a predetermined radiation dose threshold.

  1. Effect of borehole design on electrical impedance tomography measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mozaffari, Amirpasha; Huisman, Johan Alexander; Treichel, Andrea; Zimmermann, Egon; Kelter, Matthias; Vereecken, Harry

    2015-04-01

    Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT) is a sophisticated non-invasive tool to investigate the subsurface in engineering and environmental studies. To increase the depth of investigation, EIT measurements can be made in boreholes. However, the presence of the borehole may affect EIT measurements. Here, we aim to investigate the effect of different borehole components on EIT measurements using 2,5-D and 3D finite element modeling and unstructured meshes. To investigate the effect of different borehole components on EIT measurements, a variety of scenarios were designed. In particular, the effect of the water-filled borehole, the PVC casing, and the gravel filter were investigated relative to complex resistivity simulations for a homogenous medium with chain and electrode modules. It was found that the results of the complex resistivity simulations were best understood using the sensitivity distribution of the electrode configuration under consideration. In all simulations, the sensitivity in the vicinity of the borehole was predominantly negative. Therefore, the introduction of the water-filled borehole caused an increase in the real part of the impedance, and a decrease (more negative) in the imaginary part of the simulated impedance. The PVC casing mostly enhanced the effect of the water-filled borehole described above, although this effect was less clear for some electrode configuration. The effect of the gravel filter mostly reduced the effect of the water-filled borehole with PVC casing. For EIT measurements in a single borehole, the highest simulated phase error was 12% for a Wenner configuration with electrode spacing of 0.33 m. This error decreased with increasing electrode spacing. In the case of cross-well configurations, the error in the phase shit was as high as 6%. Here, it was found that the highest errors occur when both current electrodes are located in the same borehole. These results indicated that cross-well measurements are less affected by the

  2. Permeability, electrical impedance, and acoustic velocities on reservoir rocks from the Geysers geothermal field

    SciTech Connect

    Boitnott, G.N.; Boyd, P.J.

    1996-01-24

    Previous measurements of acoustic velocities on NEGU- 17 cores indicate that saturation effects are significant enough to cause Vp/Vs anomalies observed in the field. In this study we report on the results of new measurements on core recently recovered from SB-15-D along with some additional measurements on the NEGU-17 cores. The measurements indicate correlations between mechanical, transport, and water storage properties of the matrix which may prove useful for reservoir assessment and management. The SB-15-D material is found to be similar to the NEGU-17 material in terms of acoustic velocities, being characterized by a notably weak pressure dependence on the velocities and a modest Vp/Vs signature of saturation. The effect of saturation on Vp/Vs appears to result in part from a chemo-mechanical weakening of the shear modulus due to the presence of water. Electrical properties of SB-15-D material are qualitatively similar to those of the NEGU-17 cores, although resistivities of SB-15-D cores are notably lower and dielectric permittivities higher than in their NEGU- 17 counterparts. While some limited correlations of measured properties with depth are noted, no clear change in character is observed within SB-15-D cores which can be associated with the proposed cap-rock/reservoir boundary.

  3. Measurement of complex acoustic intensity in an acoustic waveguide.

    PubMed

    Duan, Wenbo; Kirby, Ray; Prisutova, Jevgenija; Horoshenkov, Kirill V

    2013-11-01

    Acoustic intensity is normally treated as a real quantity, but in recent years, many articles have appeared in which intensity is treated as a complex quantity where the real (active) part is related to local mean energy flow and the imaginary (reactive) part to local oscillatory transport of energy. This offers the potential to recover additional information about a sound field and then to relate this to the properties of the sound source and the environment that surrounds it. However, this approach is applicable only to multi-modal sound fields, which places significant demands on the accuracy of the intensity measurements. Accordingly, this article investigates the accuracy of complex intensity measurements obtained using a tri-axial Microflown intensity probe by comparing measurement and prediction for sound propagation in an open flanged pipe. Under plane wave conditions, comparison between prediction and experiment reveals good agreement, but when a higher order mode is present, the reactive intensity field becomes complicated and agreement is less successful. It is concluded that the potential application of complex intensity as a diagnostic tool is limited by difficulties in measuring reactive intensity in complex sound fields when using current state of the art acoustic instrumentation. PMID:24180778

  4. Large area planar fiber optic accelerometers for measurement of acoustic velocity

    SciTech Connect

    Bucaro, J.A.; Lagakos, N.; Houston, B.H.; Kraus, L.

    1996-04-01

    Large area, flexible planar fiber optic accelerometers have been developed for use as acoustic velocity sensors in underwater applications. The devices use a specially designed optical fiber with specific jackets which suppress the fiber sensor{close_quote}s response to acoustic pressure. The sensor has been subjected to a variety of tests including direct acceleration response, direct pressure response, and response to flexural wave excitation when mounted to a {open_quote}{open_quote}hull simulator{close_quote}{close_quote} backing structure. A thorough analysis has been carried out to understand the dynamic responses and limitations of these sensor types. This work is motivated by the desire to measure spatially averaged acoustic velocity while suppressing higher wavenumber mechanical excitations. In conjunction with existing large area pressure sensors (or with suitable structural models), these devices would provide a powerful capability for the measurement and detection of acoustic fields near structures having general impedance properties. This would allow, for example, the decomposition of the acoustic field into backward and forward propagating waves near such a boundary, the determination of acoustic intensity, the detection of the acoustic field with high signal-to-noise ratios even near a soft, pressure release boundary, and determination of the impedance of the structure itself. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  5. Impedance analysis of nano thickness layered AlGaN acoustic sensor deposited by thermionic vacuum arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özen, Soner; Bilgiç, Eyüp; Gülmez, Gülay; Şenay, Volkan; Pat, Suat; Korkmaz, Şadan; Mohammadigharehbagh, Reza

    2016-03-01

    In this study, AlGaN acoustic sensor was deposited on aluminum metal substrate by thermionic vacuum arc (TVA) method for the first time. Gallium materials are used in many applications for optoelectronic device and semiconductor technology. Thermionic vacuum arc is the deposition technology for the variously materials and applications field. The thickness of the acoustic sensor is in deposited as nano layer. Impedance analyses were realized. Also, TVA production parameters and some properties of the deposited layers were investigated. TVA is a fast deposition technology for the gallium compounds and doped gallium compounds. Obtained results show that AlGaN materials are very promising materials. Moreover, these acoustic sensors have been produced by TVA technology.

  6. Body Fat Measurement: Weighing the Pros and Cons of Electrical Impedance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nash, Heyward L.

    1985-01-01

    Research technologists have developed electrical impedance units in response to demand for a convenient and reliable method of measuring body fat. Accuracy of impedance measures versus calipers and underwater weighing are discussed. (MT)

  7. Determination of time delay between ventricles contraction using impedance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewandowska, M.; Poliński, A.; Wtorek, J.

    2013-04-01

    The paper presents a novel approach to assessment of ventricular dyssynchrony basing on multichannel electrical impedance measurements. Using a proper placement of electrodes, the sensitivity approach allows estimating time difference between chambers contraction from over determined nonlinear system of equations. The theoretical considerations which include Finite Element Method simulations were verified using measurements on healthy 28 year's old woman. The nonlinear least squares method was applied to obtain a time difference between heart chambers contraction. The obtained value was in a good agreement with theoretical values found in literature.

  8. Study of surfactant-skin interactions by skin impedance measurements.

    PubMed

    Lu, Guojin; Moore, David J

    2012-02-01

    The stratum corneum (SC) plays a very critical physiological role as skin barrier in regulating water loss through the skin and protects the body from a wide range of physical and chemical exogenous insults. Surfactant-containing formulations can induce skin damage and irritation owing to surfactant absorption and penetration. It is generally accepted that reduction in skin barrier properties occurs only after surfactants have penetrated/permeated into the skin barrier. To mitigate the harshness of surfactant-based cleansing products, penetration/permeation of surfactants should be reduced. Skin impedance measurements have been taken in vitro on porcine skin using vertical Franz diffusion cells to investigate the impact of surfactants, temperature and pH on skin barrier integrity. These skin impedance results demonstrate excellent correlation with other published methods for assessing skin damage and irritation from different surfactant chemistry, concentration, pH, time of exposure and temperature. This study demonstrates that skin impedance can be utilized as a routine approach to screen surfactant-containing formulations for their propensity to compromise the skin barrier and hence likely lead to skin irritation. PMID:21923733

  9. Frequency domain impedance measurements of erythrocytes. Constant phase angle impedance characteristics and a phase transition.

    PubMed Central

    Bao, J Z; Davis, C C; Schmukler, R E

    1992-01-01

    We report measurements of the electrical impedance of human erythrocytes in the frequency range from 1 Hz to 10 MHz, and for temperatures from 4 to 40 degrees C. In order to achieve high sensitivity in this frequency range, we embedded the cells in the pores of a filter, which constrains the current to pass through the cells in the pores. Based on the geometry of the cells embedded in the filter a circuit model is proposed for the cell-filter saline system. A constant phase angle (CPA) element, i.e., an impedance of the form Z = A/(j omega)alpha, where A is a constant, j = square root of -1, omega is angular frequency, and 0 less than alpha less than 1 has been used to describe the ac response of the interface between the cell surface and the electrolyte solution, i.e., the electrical double layer. The CPA and other elements of the circuit model are determined by a complex nonlinear least squares (CNLS) fit, which simultaneously fits the real and imaginary parts of the experimental data to the circuit model. The specific membrane capacitance is determined to be 0.901 +/- 0.036 microF/cm2, and the specific cytoplasm conductivity to be 0.413 +/- 0.031 S/m at 26 degrees C. The temperature dependence of the cytoplasm conductivity, membrane capacitance, and CPA element has been obtained. The membrane capacitance increases markedly at approximately 37 degrees C, which suggests a phase transition in the cell membrane. PMID:1600086

  10. Frequency domain impedance measurements of erythrocytes. Constant phase angle impedance characteristics and a phase transition.

    PubMed

    Bao, J Z; Davis, C C; Schmukler, R E

    1992-05-01

    We report measurements of the electrical impedance of human erythrocytes in the frequency range from 1 Hz to 10 MHz, and for temperatures from 4 to 40 degrees C. In order to achieve high sensitivity in this frequency range, we embedded the cells in the pores of a filter, which constrains the current to pass through the cells in the pores. Based on the geometry of the cells embedded in the filter a circuit model is proposed for the cell-filter saline system. A constant phase angle (CPA) element, i.e., an impedance of the form Z = A/(j omega)alpha, where A is a constant, j = square root of -1, omega is angular frequency, and 0 less than alpha less than 1 has been used to describe the ac response of the interface between the cell surface and the electrolyte solution, i.e., the electrical double layer. The CPA and other elements of the circuit model are determined by a complex nonlinear least squares (CNLS) fit, which simultaneously fits the real and imaginary parts of the experimental data to the circuit model. The specific membrane capacitance is determined to be 0.901 +/- 0.036 microF/cm2, and the specific cytoplasm conductivity to be 0.413 +/- 0.031 S/m at 26 degrees C. The temperature dependence of the cytoplasm conductivity, membrane capacitance, and CPA element has been obtained. The membrane capacitance increases markedly at approximately 37 degrees C, which suggests a phase transition in the cell membrane. PMID:1600086

  11. Acoustic particle palpation for measuring tissue elasticity

    PubMed Central

    Koruk, Hasan; El Ghamrawy, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    We propose acoustic particle palpation—the use of sound to press a population of acoustic particles against an interface—as a method for measuring the qualitative and quantitative mechanical properties of materials. We tested the feasibility of this method by emitting ultrasound pulses across a tunnel of an elastic material filled with microbubbles. Ultrasound stimulated the microbubble cloud to move in the direction of wave propagation, press against the distal surface, and cause deformations relevant for elasticity measurements. Shear waves propagated away from the palpation site with a velocity that was used to estimate the material's Young's modulus. PMID:26869723

  12. Acoustic particle palpation for measuring tissue elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koruk, Hasan; El Ghamrawy, Ahmed; Pouliopoulos, Antonios N.; Choi, James J.

    2015-11-01

    We propose acoustic particle palpation—the use of sound to press a population of acoustic particles against an interface—as a method for measuring the qualitative and quantitative mechanical properties of materials. We tested the feasibility of this method by emitting ultrasound pulses across a tunnel of an elastic material filled with microbubbles. Ultrasound stimulated the microbubble cloud to move in the direction of wave propagation, press against the distal surface, and cause deformations relevant for elasticity measurements. Shear waves propagated away from the palpation site with a velocity that was used to estimate the material's Young's modulus.

  13. A new method for measuring osteoclast formation by electrical impedance.

    PubMed

    Emori, Haruka; Iwai, Shinichi; Ryu, Kakei; Amano, Hitoshi; Sambe, Takehiko; Kobayashi, Takahiro; Oguchi, Tatsunori; Ohura, Kiyoshi; Oguchi, Katsuji

    2015-06-01

    Osteoclasts are important target cells for osteoporosis treatment. Recently, a real-time cell analysis (RTCA) system was developed to observe cell morphology and adhesion; however, the use of RTCA to study osteoclastogenesis has not been reported. Here, we investigated whether osteoclast formation could be monitored in real-time using RTCA. The cell index determined via electrical impedance using RTCA, and the number of osteoclasts exhibited a significant positive correlation. RTCA was useful for determining the effect of (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate on the inhibition of bone resorption. We established a new method of measuring osteoclast formation in real-time using RTCA. PMID:26032840

  14. Crosstalk Compensation for a Rapid, Higher Resolution Impedance Spectrum Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Jon P. Christophersen; John L. Morrison; David M. Rose; William H. Morrison; Chester G. Motloch

    2012-03-01

    Batteries and other energy storage devices are playing larger roles in various industries (e.g., military, automotive, electric utilities, etc.) as the U.S. seeks to reduce its dependence on foreign energy resources. As such, there exists a significant need for accurate, robust state-of-health assessment techniques. Present techniques tend to focus on simple, passive monitoring of voltage and current at a given ambient temperature. However, this approach has the disadvantage of ignoring key elements of health, that is, changes in resistance growth and power fade. Impedance spectroscopy is considered a useful laboratory tool in gauging changes in the resistance and power performance, but it has not been widely considered as an onboard diagnostic tool due to the length of time required to complete the measurement. Cross-Talk Compensation (CTC) is a novel approach that enables rapid, high resolution impedance spectra measurements using a hardware platform that could be designed as an embedded system. This input signal consists of a sum-of-sines excitation current that has a known frequency spread and a duration of one period of the lowest frequency. The voltage response is then captured at a sufficiently fast sample rate. Previously developed rapid impedance spectrum measurement techniques either required a longer excitation signal or a sum-of-sines signal that was separated by harmonic frequencies to reduce or eliminate, respectively, the cross-talk interference in the calculated results. The distinct advantage of CTC, however, is that non-harmonic frequencies can now be included within the excitation signal while still keeping the signal duration at one period of the lowest frequency. Since the frequency spread of the input signal is known, the crosstalk interference between sinusoidal signals within the sum-of-sines at a given frequency of interest can be pre-determined and assigned to an error matrix. Consequently, the real and imaginary components of the

  15. Acoustic measurements of clay-size particles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Knowledge of sediment concentration is important in the study of streams and rivers. The work presented explores using high frequency (20 MHz) acoustic signal attenuation to measure the concentration of fine sediment particles (0.2-5.0 microns) in a fluvial environment. A small laboratory tank with...

  16. Acoustic Measurement of Potato Cannon Velocity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Courtney, Michael; Courtney, Amy

    2007-01-01

    Potato cannon velocity can be measured with a digitized microphone signal. A microphone is attached to the potato cannon muzzle, and a potato is fired at an aluminum target about 10 m away. Flight time can be determined from the acoustic waveform by subtracting the time in the barrel and time for sound to return from the target. The potato…

  17. Acoustical measurements in ancient Roman theatres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farnetani, Andrea; Fausti, Patrizio; Pompoli, Roberto; Prodi, Nicola

    2001-05-01

    The Greek and Roman theatres are among the most precious and spectacular items of cultural heritage in the Mediterranean countries. The theatres are famous not only for their impressive architecture, but also for the acoustic qualities. For this reason it is important to consider these theatres as an acoustical heritage and to study their sound field. Within the activities of the ERATO (identification Evaluation and Revival of the Acoustical heritage of ancient Theatres and Odea) project, acoustical measurements were taken in well-preserved ancient Roman theatres at Aspendos (Turkey) and Jerash (Jordan). Roman theatres have an impressive stage building that forms a back wall in the orchestra area, and it was found that, from the analysis of the acoustical parameters, the reverberation time (e.g., 1.7 s at middle frequencies in the theatre of Aspendos) is quite long compared not only with other open-space theatres but also with closed spaces. Contrary to modern halls the clarity is high and this fact, together with a low sound level in most of the seats, gives the sound field a unique character.

  18. Input impedance of brass instruments from velocity measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwigsen, Daniel O.

    2005-09-01

    A velocity sensor known as the Microflown measures particle velocity from a difference in temperature between two MEMS-scale wires. With a small precision microphone in a package the size of a matchstick, simultaneous measurement of particle velocity and pressure can be accomplished in a tiny space such as the mouthpiece of a brass instrument. Traditional measurements of input impedance rely on a constant flow provided by a capillary tube or feedback loop control of the driver. This velocity sensor eliminates these technical requirements. The apparatus and calibration procedures will be described, and results of measurements of several instruments will be presented. In an easily used device, this approach could benefit instrument designers, makers, and repair technicians.

  19. Auditory evoked field measurement using magneto-impedance sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, K.; Tajima, S.; Song, D.; Hamada, N.; Cai, C.; Uchiyama, T.

    2015-05-01

    The magnetic field of the human brain is extremely weak, and it is mostly measured and monitored in the magnetoencephalography method using superconducting quantum interference devices. In this study, in order to measure the weak magnetic field of the brain, we constructed a Magneto-Impedance sensor (MI sensor) system that can cancel out the background noise without any magnetic shield. Based on our previous studies of brain wave measurements, we used two MI sensors in this system for monitoring both cerebral hemispheres. In this study, we recorded and compared the auditory evoked field signals of the subject, including the N100 (or N1) and the P300 (or P3) brain waves. The results suggest that the MI sensor can be applied to brain activity measurement.

  20. Auditory evoked field measurement using magneto-impedance sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, K. Tajima, S.; Song, D.; Uchiyama, T.; Hamada, N.; Cai, C.

    2015-05-07

    The magnetic field of the human brain is extremely weak, and it is mostly measured and monitored in the magnetoencephalography method using superconducting quantum interference devices. In this study, in order to measure the weak magnetic field of the brain, we constructed a Magneto-Impedance sensor (MI sensor) system that can cancel out the background noise without any magnetic shield. Based on our previous studies of brain wave measurements, we used two MI sensors in this system for monitoring both cerebral hemispheres. In this study, we recorded and compared the auditory evoked field signals of the subject, including the N100 (or N1) and the P300 (or P3) brain waves. The results suggest that the MI sensor can be applied to brain activity measurement.

  1. System for simultaneous measurements of bilaterally symmetrical acupoints multifrequency impedances

    PubMed Central

    Su, Mi-Yong; Tan, Yong-Hong; Wang, Zi-Min; Gan, Cai-Jun; Chen, Shou-Hong

    2013-01-01

    Devices which can obtain comparable bilaterally symmetrical acupoints (BSA) multifrequency impedances (MFI) are often needed in the detection of the energy balance states of acupoints in traditional Chinese medicine. To satisfy these needs, a two-channel impedance measurement system has been introduced which is capable of accurately and simultaneously measuring BSA MFI. The system includes a set of five electrodes, two of which are injected with exciting current signal to synchronously and equally excite BSA; the other three electrodes are used as sensors to simultaneously sense the response signal from both sides. The system also includes a PC-based time-domain signal testing platform with arbitrary current waveform generation and three channels (one exciting current and two response voltages) simultaneously sampling, and a set of MFI simultaneously unbiased computing algorithms based on special odd multisine current signal input. Preliminary validating experiments suggest that the system allows accurate and synchronous measurement of BSA MFI at least in the frequency range of 10 Hz to 60 kHz, and the obtained BSA MFI are well comparable. PMID:24348077

  2. Determinants of pulmonary perfusion measured by electrical impedance tomography.

    PubMed

    Smit, Henk J; Vonk Noordegraaf, Anton; Marcus, J Tim; Boonstra, Anco; de Vries, Peter M; Postmus, Pieter E

    2004-06-01

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is a non-invasive imaging technique for detecting blood volume changes that can visualize pulmonary perfusion. The two studies reported here tested the hypothesis that the size of the pulmonary microvascular bed, rather than stroke volume (SV), determines the EIT signal. In the first study, the impedance changes relating to the maximal pulmonary pulsatile blood volume during systole (Delta Z(sys)) were measured in ten healthy subjects, ten patients diagnosed with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, who were considered to have a reduced pulmonary vascular bed, and ten heart failure patients with an assumed low cardiac output but with a normal lung parenchyma. Mean Delta Z(sys) (SD) in these groups was 261 (34)x10(-5), 196 (39)x10(-5) ( P<0.001) and 233 (61)x10(-5) arbitrary units (AU) (P=NS), respectively. In the second study, including seven healthy volunteers, Delta Z(sys) was measured at rest and during exercise on a recumbent bicycle while SV was measured by means of magnetic resonance imaging. The Delta Z(sys) at rest was 352 (53)x10(-5 ) and 345 (112)x10(-5 )AU during exercise (P=NS), whereas SV increased from 83 (21) to 105 (34) ml (P<0.05). The EIT signal likely reflects the size of the pulmonary microvascular bed, since neither a low cardiac output nor a change in SV of the heart appear to influence EIT. PMID:14985995

  3. Simultaneous backward data transmission and power harvesting in an ultrasonic transcutaneous energy transfer link employing acoustically dependent electric impedance modulation.

    PubMed

    Ozeri, Shaul; Shmilovitz, Doron

    2014-09-01

    The advancement and miniaturization of body implanted medical devices pose several challenges to Ultrasonic Transcutaneous Energy Transfer (UTET), such as the need to reduce the size of the piezoelectric resonator, and the need to maximize the UTET link power-transfer efficiency. Accordingly, the same piezoelectric resonator that is used for energy harvesting at the body implant, may also be used for ultrasonic backward data transfer, for instance, through impedance modulation. This paper presents physical considerations and design guidelines of the body implanted transducer of a UTET link with impedance modulation for a backward data transfer. The acoustic matching design procedure was based on the 2×2 transfer matrix chain analysis, in addition to the Krimholtz Leedom and Matthaei KLM transmission line model. The UTET power transfer was carried out at a frequency of 765 kHz, continuous wave (CW) mode. The backward data transfer was attained by inserting a 9% load resistance variation around its matched value (550 Ohm), resulting in a 12% increase in the acoustic reflection coefficient. A backward data transmission rate of 1200 bits/s was experimentally demonstrated using amplitude shift keying, simultaneously with an acoustic power transfer of 20 mW to the implant. PMID:24861424

  4. Detection of Chamber Conditioning Through Optical Emission and Impedance Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruden, Brett A.; Rao, M. V. V. S.; Sharma, Surendra P.; Meyyappan, Meyya

    2001-01-01

    During oxide etch processes, buildup of fluorocarbon residues on reactor sidewalls can cause run-to-run drift and will necessitate some time for conditioning and seasoning of the reactor. Though diagnostics can be applied to study and understand these phenomena, many of them are not practical for use in an industrial reactor. For instance, measurements of ion fluxes and energy by mass spectrometry show that the buildup of insulating fluorocarbon films on the reactor surface will cause a shift in both ion energy and current in an argon plasma. However, such a device cannot be easily integrated into a processing system. The shift in ion energy and flux will be accompanied by an increase in the capacitance of the plasma sheath. The shift in sheath capacitance can be easily measured by a common commercially available impedance probe placed on the inductive coil. A buildup of film on the chamber wall is expected to affect the production of fluorocarbon radicals, and thus the presence of such species in the optical emission spectrum of the plasma can be monitored as well. These two techniques are employed on a GEC (Gaseous Electronics Conference) Reference Cell to assess the validity of optical emission and impedance monitoring as a metric of chamber conditioning. These techniques are applied to experimental runs with CHF3 and CHF3/O2/Ar plasmas, with intermediate monitoring of pure argon plasmas as a reference case for chamber conditions.

  5. Acoustic measurements of gas density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shakkottai, P.; Kwack, E. Y.; Back, L. H.

    1990-01-01

    Sound transmission through gases in an enclosure is considered. Analytical results are given in terms of geometrical parameters, wave numbers, and source type for simple model problems, and are compared with data obtained by Haran (1983). It is concluded that density measurements can be made in a gas contained in an enclosure by measuring the sound pressure level at a receiver located near a dipole source driven at a constant velocity amplitude at low frequencies.

  6. An instrument for simultaneous EQCM impedance and SECM measurements.

    PubMed

    Gollas, B; Bartlett, P N; Denuault, G

    2000-01-15

    A novel combination of an electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance (EQCM) and a scanning electrochemical microscope (SECM) has been built. Unlike conventional EQCMs, the instrument described here allows rapid in situ measurement of the modulus of the quartz crystal's transfer function. Data analysis in the complex plane for the Butterworth-Van Dyke (BVD) equivalent circuit yields the real and the imaginary components R (damping resistance) and XL (reactive inductance) of the crystal's electroacoustic impedance around its resonant frequency of 10 MHz. The influence of different tip shapes of an approaching microelectrode on the electroacoustic impedance of the quartz crystal was studied and found to be minimal for certain geometries. The capability of the EQCM/SECM instrument was tested in cyclic voltammetric plating/stripping experiments using a copper(I) chloride solution of high concentration in 1 M HCl. Four parameters, XL, R, the substrate, and the tip current, can be recorded simultaneously. Depletion layer effects were observed and could be corrected for to yield accurate current efficiencies for potentiodynamic and potentiostatic copper plating. The amperometric response of the SECM tip positioned closely to the substrate reflects the concentration changes of electroactive ions in the diffusion layer of the substrate electrode. PMID:10658330

  7. Grinding process monitoring based on electromechanical impedance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchi, Marcelo; Guimarães Baptista, Fabricio; de Aguiar, Paulo Roberto; Bianchi, Eduardo Carlos

    2015-04-01

    Grinding is considered one of the last processes in precision parts manufacturing, which makes it indispensable to have a reliable monitoring system to evaluate workpiece surface integrity. This paper proposes the use of the electromechanical impedance (EMI) method to monitor the surface grinding operation in real time, particularly the surface integrity of the ground workpiece. The EMI method stands out for its simplicity and for using low-cost components such as PZT (lead zirconate titanate) piezoelectric transducers. In order to assess the feasibility of applying the EMI method to the grinding process, experimental tests were performed on a surface grinder using a CBN grinding wheel and a SAE 1020 steel workpiece, with PZT transducers mounted on the workpiece and its holder. During the grinding process, the electrical impedance of the transducers was measured and damage indices conventionally used in the EMI method were calculated and compared with workpiece wear, indicating the surface condition of the workpiece. The experimental results indicate that the EMI method can be an efficient and cost-effective alternative for monitoring precision workpieces during the surface grinding process.

  8. Acoustical concept for measuring particle size distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Mahler, D.S.; Kaufman, M.

    1981-02-01

    A new concept is investigated for measuring particle size and distribution for air pollution control applications. This study illustrates that the proposed device--the Acoustic Particulate Monitor (APM)--can measure total mass loading, mean particle diameter, and width of particle size distributions on an in-situ basis. The concept for such an instrument is based upon experimental and theoretical observations that the presence of dust in air causes a reduction in the speed of sound as a function of the transmitted frequency. These percentage reductions in the speed of sound are small and the research results illustrate how the accompanying shift in the acoustical phase is a highly sensitive method for detecting such effects. The magnitudes of the phase shift are related to mass loading. The frequency associated with the maximum phase shift is defined as the acoustic frequency, fA. Experimentally determining fA provides a measure of the mean particle size of the distribution. The detailed shape of the phase shift as a function of frequency is a measure of the spread in the size distribution of the entrained particulate. Experiments were performed using several configurations. Results were verified using direct mass measurements and microphotographs.

  9. Acoustic vs Interferometric Measurements of Lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arechiga, R. O.; Erives, H.; Sonnenfeld, R. G.; Stanley, M. A.; Rison, W.; Thomas, R. J.; Edens, H. E.; Lapierre, J. L.; Stock, M.; Jensen, D.; Morris, K.

    2015-12-01

    During the summer of 2015 we acquired acoustic and RF data on severalflashes from thunderstorms over Fort Morgan CO. and Langmuir Laboratoryin the Magdalena mountains of central New Mexico. The acoustic arrayswere located at a distance of roughly 150 m from the interferometers.Lightning mapping array and slow antenna data were also obtained. Theacoustic arrays consist of arrays of five audio-range and six infrasoundmicrophones operating at 50 KHz and 1 KHz respectively. The lightninginterferometer at Fort Morgan CO. consists of three flat-plate, 13" diameterantennas at the vertices of an equilateral 50 m per side triangle. Theinterferometer at Langmuir Laboratory consists of three 13" dishes separatedby about 15 m. Both interferometers, operating at 180 Megasamples persecond, use the analysis software and digitizer hardware pioneered byStanley, Stock et al. The high data rate allows for excellent spatialresolution of high speed (and typically high current) processes such asK-changes, return strokes and dart-leaders. In previous studies, we haveshown the usefulness of acoustic recordings to locate thunder sources aswell as infrasound pulses from lightning. This work will present acomparison of Acoustic and Interferometric measurements from lightning,using some interesting flashes, including a positive cloud to ground,that occurred in these campaigns.

  10. Acoustic Treatment Design Scaling Methods. Volume 4; Numerical Simulation of the Nonlinear Acoustic Impedance of a Perforated Plate Single-Degree-of-Freedom Resonator Using a Time-Domain Finite Difference Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraft, R. E.

    1999-01-01

    Single-degree-of-freedom resonators consisting of honeycomb cells covered by perforated facesheets are widely used as acoustic noise suppression liners in aircraft engine ducts. The acoustic resistance and mass reactance of such liners are known to vary with the intensity of the sound incident upon the panel. Since the pressure drop across a perforated liner facesheet increases quadratically with the flow velocity through the facesheet, this is known as the nonlinear resistance effect. In the past, two different empirical frequency domain models have been used to predict the Sound Pressure Level effect of the incident wave on the perforated liner impedance, one that uses the incident particle velocity in isolated narrowbands, and one that models the particle velocity as the overall velocity. In the absence of grazing flow, neither frequency domain model is entirely accurate in predicting the nonlinear effect that is measured for typical perforated sheets. The time domain model is developed in an attempt to understand and improve the model for the effect of spectral shape and amplitude of multi-frequency incident sound pressure on the liner impedance. A computer code for the time-domain finite difference model is developed and predictions using the models are compared to current frequency-domain models.

  11. Acoustic Techniques for Thin Film Thickness Measurement in Semiconductor Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhardwaj, Sanjay

    In modern semiconductor manufacturing, process monitoring and control are important issues limited at the present time by a lack of sensors and instrumentation capable of measuring process parameters like film thickness. In order to address this problem, two novel systems for thin film thickness measurement in semiconductor processing based upon contacting acoustic techniques have been developed. Both of these systems couple acoustic energy into the wafer via a nondestructive Hertzian contact and achieve high resolution by exciting and receiving ultrasonic signals from a ZnO transducer with microwave frequency electronics. The basic physical mechanism for film thickness determination is to analyze reflected waves due to acoustic impedance mismatches between various material layers on a silicon substrate. The first system requires frontside contacting of a sapphire buffer rod to an opaque film deposited on a silicon wafer and involves the use of broadband, high frequency pulse-echo electronics in the 0.5-5 GHz range. With this system, ex-situ measurements of aluminum and gold thin films on a silicon substrate have been done in the 0.25-2.5 mum. range with 3-6% accuracy as compared to surface profilometer measurements. Possible applications for this system include using it as a post -deposition process monitor, generating film thickness contour maps, or examining multilayer structures. The second system requires backside contacting of a sapphire buffer rod to a silicon wafer, which is in a vacuum station, and involves monitoring the changes in phase of CW 1-2 GHz acoustic waves as a function of frontside film growth. Using this technique, in-situ indium and aluminum film thickness monitoring has been done in both evaporator and sputtering environments with a resolution of 40 A. Temperature experiments in an oven have shown a resolution of 0.05 K for the sapphire buffer rod. Finally, multistep processing has been done and a multilayer film structure has been measured

  12. Acoustic levitation methods for density measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trinh, E. H.; Hsu, C. J.

    1986-12-01

    The capability of ultrasonic levitators operating in air to perform density measurements has been demonstrated. The remote determination of the density of ordinary liquids as well as low density solid metals can be carried out using levitated samples with size on the order of a few millimeters and at a frequency of 20 kHz. Two basic methods may be used. The first one is derived from a previously known technique developed for acoustic levitation in liquid media, and is based on the static equilibrium position of levitated samples in the earth's gravitational field. The second approach relies on the dynamic interaction between a levitated sample and the acoustic field. The first technique appears more accurate (1 percent uncertainty), but the latter method is directly applicable to a near gravity-free environment such as that found in space.

  13. Acoustic levitation methods for density measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, E. H.; Hsu, C. J.

    1986-01-01

    The capability of ultrasonic levitators operating in air to perform density measurements has been demonstrated. The remote determination of the density of ordinary liquids as well as low density solid metals can be carried out using levitated samples with size on the order of a few millimeters and at a frequency of 20 kHz. Two basic methods may be used. The first one is derived from a previously known technique developed for acoustic levitation in liquid media, and is based on the static equilibrium position of levitated samples in the earth's gravitational field. The second approach relies on the dynamic interaction between a levitated sample and the acoustic field. The first technique appears more accurate (1 percent uncertainty), but the latter method is directly applicable to a near gravity-free environment such as that found in space.

  14. Field Evaluation of Broadband Electrical Impedance Tomography Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelter, M.; Huisman, J. A.; Zimmermann, E.; Treichel, A.; Kemna, A.; Vereecken, H.

    2014-12-01

    Laboratory measurements of the complex electrical conductivity in a broad frequency range (i.e. mHz to kHz) using spectral induced polarization (SIP) measurements have shown great promise to characterize important hydrological properties (e.g. hydraulic conductivity) and biogeochemical processes. However, translating these findings to field applications remains challenging, and significant improvements in spectral electrical impedance tomography (EIT) are still required to obtain images of the complex electrical conductivity with sufficient accuracy in the field. The aim of this study is to present recent improvements in the inversion and processing of broadband field EIT measurements, and to evaluate the accuracy and spectral consistency of the obtained images of the real and imaginary part of the electrical conductivity. In a first case study, time-lapse surface EIT measurements were performed during an infiltration experiment to investigate the spectral complex electrical conductivity as a function of water content. State-of-the-art data processing and inversion approaches were used to obtain images of the complex electrical conductivity in a frequency range of 100 mHz to 1 kHz, and integral parameters were obtained using Debye decomposition. Results showed consistent spectral and spatial variation of the phase of the complex electrical conductivity in a broad frequency range, and a complex dependence on water saturation that was reasonably consistent with laboratory EIT measurements. In a second case study, borehole EIT measurements were made in a well-characterized aquifer. These measurements were inverted to obtain broadband images of the complex conductivity after correction for inductive and capacitive coupling using recently developed procedures. The results showed good correspondence with reference laboratory SIP measurements in a broad frequency bandwidth up to 1 kHz only after application of the correction procedures.

  15. Propagation of sound through the Earth's atmosphere. 1: Measurement of sound absorption in the air: 2: Measurement of ground impedance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meredith, R. W.; Becher, J.

    1981-01-01

    Parts were fabricated for the acoustic ground impedance meter and the instrument was tested. A rubber hose was used to connect the resonator neck to the chamber in order to suppress vibration from the volume velocity source which caused chatter. An analog to digital converter was successfully hardwired to the computer detection system. The cooling system for the resonant tube was modified to use liquid nitrogen cooling. This produced the required temperature for the tube, but the temperature gradients within each of the four tube sections reached unacceptable levels. Final measurements of the deexcitation of nitrogen by water vapor indicate that the responsible physical process is not the direct vibration-translation energy transfer, but is a vibration-vibration energy transfer.

  16. Outdoor measurements of spherical acoustic shock decay.

    PubMed

    Young, Sarah M; Gee, Kent L; Neilsen, Tracianne B; Leete, Kevin M

    2015-09-01

    Prior anechoic measurements of a small acetylene-oxygen balloon explosion were used to study spherical weak-shock decay over short ranges [Muhlestein et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 131, 2422-2430 (2012)]. Here, longer-range measurements conducted at the Bonneville Salt Flats with a larger balloon are described. Waveform and spectral characteristics and comparisons of the peak pressure decay with an analytical weak-shock model are presented. Weak shocks persist to at least 305 m, with an amplitude decay that is predicted reasonably well using the model. Deviations are discussed in the context of atmospheric effects and nonlinear ground reflections. PMID:26428831

  17. Measurements of thermo-acoustic coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pun, Winston

    The problem of combustion instabilities has existed since the early 1940s, when they were observed during the development of solid and liquid rocket engines. While various engineering solutions have served well in these fields, the problem is revisited in modern gas-turbine engines. The purpose of this work is to provide experimental measurements of laboratory devices that exhibit thermo-acoustic coupling, similar to the interaction observed during combustion instabilities, which will aid in the design and development of stable systems. Possibly the simplest device which exhibits these characteristics is a Rijke tube. An electrical, horizontally mounted, 1 m long version of the original Rijke tube is presented, with measurements taken during unstable and stable operation. An accurate stability boundary with uncertainty is determined for a heater position of x/L = ¼, as a function of mass flow rate and heater power. Hysteresis, not previously reported, is observed at flow rates above 3 g/s. A one-dimensional model of the stability boundary with linear acoustics is shown to have qualitative agreement with experimental data. A novel technique has also been devised which can provide insight into the local dynamic response of a flame to an acoustic field. In the experiments, a test chamber is acoustically excited by a pair of low-frequency drivers. The response of the flame is visualized by two techniques; chemiluminescence and planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) of the hydroxyl (OH) radical, both of which are well-known indicators for heat release in flames. The resulting images are phase-resolved and averaged to yield a qualitative picture of the fluctuation of the heat release. The images are correlated with a pressure transducer near the flame, which allows stability to be evaluated using Rayleigh's criterion and a combustion response function. This is the first known measurement of the combustion dynamics of a flame over a range of frequencies. Results

  18. Using impedance measurements for detecting pathogens trapped in an electric field

    DOEpatents

    Miles, Robin R.

    2004-07-20

    Impedance measurements between the electrodes in an electric field is utilized to detect the presence of pathogens trapped in the electric field. Since particles trapped in a field using the dielectiphoretic force changes the impedance between the electrodes by changing the dielectric material between the electrodes, the degree of particle trapping can be determined by measuring the impedance. This measurement is used to determine if sufficient pathogen have been collected to analyze further or potentially to identify the pathogen.

  19. Saturation diving with heliox to 350 meters. Observation on hearing threshold, brainstem evoked response and acoustic impedance.

    PubMed

    Wang, L; Jiang, W; Gong, J H; Zheng, X Y

    1994-12-01

    Four divers were compressed to 350 m to observe changes in hearing threshold, brainstem evoked response and acoustic impedance. The divers experienced no tinnitus, impairment of hearing, earache during compression. Examination showed that the threshold of lower frequency range of hearing was elevated because of the masking effect of the noise in the hyperbaric chamber. Changes in waveform and latency of brainstem evoked response were due to changes in sound wave transmission affected by the chamber pressure and a poor ratio of signal to noise in the hyperbaric environment with heliox. All these changes were transient. After leaving the chamber, the hearing threshold and brainstem evoked response returned to normal. Besides, there were no changes in tympanogram, acoustic compliance and stapedius reflex before and after diving. This indicated the designed speed of compression and decompression in the experiment caused no damage to the divers' acoustic system, and the functions of their Eustachain tubes, middle and inner ears were normal during the diving test. PMID:7882734

  20. Measurement and calculation of individual head-related transfer functions using a boundary element model including the measurement and effect of skin and hair impedance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, Brian Fredrick Gray

    1998-12-01

    This research investigates various aspects of the Head- Related Transfer Function (HRTF), which is a description of the acoustic frequency filtering performed by the geometry of the head as a function of incident angle. The effects of this filtering are used in the brain to determine the location of sound sources in space. Initially, various methods for measuring the HRTF are examined, as well as several means of normalizing or equalizing the data. One method is chosen which best represents the informational content of the measured data for comparisons between experimental methods. The question as to whether the acoustic properties of skin and hair contribute to the HRTF is also examined. Measurements are made of the acoustic absorption and impedance of various skin and hair samples using a plane wave tube and two microphones. The limitations of this technique and published standards are also included. Finally, an individual HRTF is calculated using an optically generated surface mesh and a numerical boundary element (BEM) solution. The results of the impedance measurements are included in the calculations. Final analysis consists of comparing the various calculated HRTFs and measured HRTFs. Geometric variations in the head mesh such as removal of the pinna are also included. Good agreement is found given the assumptions made in the generation of the computational model (i.e. lack of torso) throughout the frequency range of the model, which extends from 1-6 kHz. Computational speed and size of the numerical problem limit the work to this region.

  1. Local impedance measurement of an electrode/single-pentacene-grain interface by frequency-modulation scanning impedance microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, Tomoharu; Yamada, Hirofumi; Kobayashi, Kei

    2015-08-07

    The device performances of organic thin film transistors are often limited by the metal–organic interface because of the disordered molecular layers at the interface and the energy barriers against the carrier injection. It is important to study the local impedance at the interface without being affected by the interface morphology. We combined frequency modulation atomic force microscopy with scanning impedance microscopy (SIM) to sensitively measure the ac responses of the interface to an ac voltage applied across the interface and the dc potential drop at the interface. By using the frequency-modulation SIM (FM-SIM) technique, we characterized the interface impedance of a Pt electrode and a single pentacene grain as a parallel circuit of a contact resistance and a capacitance. We found that the reduction of the contact resistance was caused by the reduction of the energy level mismatch at the interface by the FM-SIM measurements, demonstrating the usefulness of the FM-SIM technique for investigation of the local interface impedance without being affected by its morphology.

  2. Local impedance measurement of an electrode/single-pentacene-grain interface by frequency-modulation scanning impedance microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Tomoharu; Kobayashi, Kei; Yamada, Hirofumi

    2015-08-01

    The device performances of organic thin film transistors are often limited by the metal-organic interface because of the disordered molecular layers at the interface and the energy barriers against the carrier injection. It is important to study the local impedance at the interface without being affected by the interface morphology. We combined frequency modulation atomic force microscopy with scanning impedance microscopy (SIM) to sensitively measure the ac responses of the interface to an ac voltage applied across the interface and the dc potential drop at the interface. By using the frequency-modulation SIM (FM-SIM) technique, we characterized the interface impedance of a Pt electrode and a single pentacene grain as a parallel circuit of a contact resistance and a capacitance. We found that the reduction of the contact resistance was caused by the reduction of the energy level mismatch at the interface by the FM-SIM measurements, demonstrating the usefulness of the FM-SIM technique for investigation of the local interface impedance without being affected by its morphology.

  3. Analytic modeling, simulation and interpretation of broadband beam coupling impedance bench measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedermayer, U.; Eidam, L.; Boine-Frankenheim, O.

    2015-03-01

    First, a generalized theoretical approach towards beam coupling impedances and stretched-wire measurements is introduced. Applied to a circular symmetric setup, this approach allows to compare beam and wire impedances. The conversion formulas for TEM scattering parameters from measurements to impedances are thoroughly analyzed and compared to the analytical beam impedance solution. A proof of validity for the distributed impedance formula is given. The interaction of the beam or the TEM wave with dispersive material such as ferrite is discussed. The dependence of the obtained beam impedance on the relativistic velocity β is investigated and found as material property dependent. Second, numerical simulations of wakefields and scattering parameters are compared. The applicability of scattering parameter conversion formulas for finite device length is investigated. Laboratory measurement results for a circularly symmetric test setup, i.e. a ferrite ring, are shown and compared to analytic and numeric models. The optimization of the measurement process and error reduction strategies are discussed.

  4. Lorentz force electrical impedance tomography using magnetic field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zengin, Reyhan; Güneri Gençer, Nevzat

    2016-08-01

    In this study, magnetic field measurement technique is investigated to image the electrical conductivity properties of biological tissues using Lorentz forces. This technique is based on electrical current induction using ultrasound together with an applied static magnetic field. The magnetic field intensity generated due to induced currents is measured using two coil configurations, namely, a rectangular loop coil and a novel xy coil pair. A time-varying voltage is picked-up and recorded while the acoustic wave propagates along its path. The forward problem of this imaging modality is defined as calculation of the pick-up voltages due to a given acoustic excitation and known body properties. Firstly, the feasibility of the proposed technique is investigated analytically. The basic field equations governing the behaviour of time-varying electromagnetic fields are presented. Secondly, the general formulation of the partial differential equations for the scalar and magnetic vector potentials are derived. To investigate the feasibility of this technique, numerical studies are conducted using a finite element method based software. To sense the pick-up voltages a novel coil configuration (xy coil pairs) is proposed. Two-dimensional numerical geometry with a 16-element linear phased array (LPA) ultrasonic transducer (1 MHz) and a conductive body (breast fat) with five tumorous tissues is modeled. The static magnetic field is assumed to be 4 Tesla. To understand the performance of the imaging system, the sensitivity matrix is analyzed. The sensitivity matrix is obtained for two different locations of LPA transducer with eleven steering angles from -{{25}\\circ} to {{25}\\circ} at intervals of {{5}\\circ} . The characteristics of the imaging system are shown with the singular value decomposition (SVD) of the sensitivity matrix. The images are reconstructed with the truncated SVD algorithm. The signal-to-noise ratio in measurements is assumed 80 dB. Simulation studies

  5. Lorentz force electrical impedance tomography using magnetic field measurements.

    PubMed

    Zengin, Reyhan; Gençer, Nevzat Güneri

    2016-08-21

    In this study, magnetic field measurement technique is investigated to image the electrical conductivity properties of biological tissues using Lorentz forces. This technique is based on electrical current induction using ultrasound together with an applied static magnetic field. The magnetic field intensity generated due to induced currents is measured using two coil configurations, namely, a rectangular loop coil and a novel xy coil pair. A time-varying voltage is picked-up and recorded while the acoustic wave propagates along its path. The forward problem of this imaging modality is defined as calculation of the pick-up voltages due to a given acoustic excitation and known body properties. Firstly, the feasibility of the proposed technique is investigated analytically. The basic field equations governing the behaviour of time-varying electromagnetic fields are presented. Secondly, the general formulation of the partial differential equations for the scalar and magnetic vector potentials are derived. To investigate the feasibility of this technique, numerical studies are conducted using a finite element method based software. To sense the pick-up voltages a novel coil configuration (xy coil pairs) is proposed. Two-dimensional numerical geometry with a 16-element linear phased array (LPA) ultrasonic transducer (1 MHz) and a conductive body (breast fat) with five tumorous tissues is modeled. The static magnetic field is assumed to be 4 Tesla. To understand the performance of the imaging system, the sensitivity matrix is analyzed. The sensitivity matrix is obtained for two different locations of LPA transducer with eleven steering angles from [Formula: see text] to [Formula: see text] at intervals of [Formula: see text]. The characteristics of the imaging system are shown with the singular value decomposition (SVD) of the sensitivity matrix. The images are reconstructed with the truncated SVD algorithm. The signal-to-noise ratio in measurements is assumed 80 d

  6. Acoustics measurements in normal jet impingement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleis, S. J.

    1977-01-01

    The dependence of far field acoustic measurements for a uniform jet on nozzle to plate spacing for small dimensionless spacings (h/d - 0.75 to 3.0) was investigated. Spectra from a real time analyzer were read and processed by an HP 2116 minicomputer in on-line mode. Similar data was generated for a fully developed pipe flow exit condition jet to compare with other investigations. The data base for normal jet impingement was extended to smaller values of nozzle to plate spacing. The effects of slight noise heating (30 deg rise) of the jet on the far field noise produced by the impinging jet are demonstrated.

  7. Precision of Four Acoustic Bone Measurement Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Christopher; Rianon, Nahid; Feiveson, Alan; Shackelford, Linda; LeBlanc, Adrian

    2000-01-01

    Though many studies have quantified the precision of various acoustic bone measurement devices, it is difficult to directly compare the results among the studies, because they used disparate subject pools, did not specify the estimation methodology, or did not use consistent definitions for various precision characteristics. In this study, we used a repeated measures design protocol to directly determine the precision characteristics of four acoustic bone measurement devices: the Mechanical Response Tissue Analyzer (MRTA), the UBA-575+, the SoundScan 2000 (S2000), and the Sahara Ultrasound Bone Analyzer. Ten men and ten women were scanned on all four devices by two different operators at five discrete time points: Week 1, Week 2, Week 3, Month 3 and Month 6. The percent coefficient of variation (%CV) and standardized coefficient of variation were computed for the following precision characteristics: interoperator effect, operator-subject interaction, short-term error variance, and long-term drift. The MRTA had high interoperator errors for its ulnar and tibial stiffness measures and a large long-term drift in its tibial stiffness measurement. The UBA-575+ exhibited large short-term error variances and long-term drift for all three of its measurements. The S2000's tibial speed of sound measurement showed a high short-term error variance and a significant operator-subject interaction but very good values (less than 1%) for the other precision characteristics. The Sahara seemed to have the best overall performance, but was hampered by a large %CV for short-term error variance in its broadband ultrasound attenuation measure.

  8. Precision of Four Acoustic Bone Measurement Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Christopher; Feiveson, Alan H.; Shackelford, Linda; Rianon, Nahida; LeBlanc, Adrian

    2000-01-01

    Though many studies have quantified the precision of various acoustic bone measurement devices, it is difficult to directly compare the results among the studies, because they used disparate subject pools, did not specify the estimation methodology, or did not use consistent definitions for various precision characteristics. In this study, we used a repeated measures design protocol to directly determine the precision characteristics of four acoustic bone measurement devices: the Mechanical Response Tissue Analyzer (MRTA), the UBA-575+, the SoundScan 2000 (S2000), and the Sahara Ultrasound Done Analyzer. Ten men and ten women were scanned on all four devices by two different operators at five discrete time points: Week 1, Week 2, Week 3, Month 3 and Month 6. The percent coefficient of variation (%CV) and standardized coefficient of variation were computed for the following precision characteristics: interoperator effect, operator-subject interaction, short-term error variance, and long-term drift, The MRTA had high interoperator errors for its ulnar and tibial stiffness measures and a large long-term drift in its tibial stiffness measurement. The UBA-575+ exhibited large short-term error variances and long-term drift for all three of its measurements. The S2000's tibial speed of sound measurement showed a high short-term error variance and a significant operator-subject interaction but very good values ( < 1%) for the other precision characteristics. The Sahara seemed to have the best overall performance, but was hampered by a large %CV for short-term error variance in its broadband ultrasound attenuation measure.

  9. Outdoor synthetic aperture acoustic ground target measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, Steven; Ngaya, Therese-Ann; Vignola, Joe; Judge, John; Marble, Jay; Gugino, Peter; Soumekh, Mehrdad; Rosen, Erik

    2010-04-01

    A novel outdoor synthetic aperture acoustic (SAA) system consists of a microphone and loudspeaker traveling along a 6.3-meter rail system. This is an extension from a prior indoor laboratory measurement system in which selected targets were insonified while suspended in air. Here, the loudspeaker and microphone are aimed perpendicular to their direction of travel along the rail. The area next to the rail is insonified and the microphone records the reflected acoustic signal, while the travel of the transceiver along the rail creates a synthetic aperture allowing imaging of the scene. Ground surfaces consisted of weathered asphalt and short grass. Several surface-laid objects were arranged on the ground for SAA imaging. These included rocks, concrete masonry blocks, grout covered foam blocks; foliage obscured objects and several spherical canonical targets such as a bowling ball, and plastic and metal spheres. The measured data are processed and ground targets are further analyzed for characteristics and features amenable for discrimination. This paper includes a description of the measurement system, target descriptions, synthetic aperture processing approach and preliminary findings with respect to ground surface and target characteristics.

  10. Measurement of Silicone Rubber Using Impedance Change of a Quartz-Crystal Tuning-Fork Tactile Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Hideaki; Yamada, Yuuki

    2006-05-01

    Silicone rubber has been investigated experimentally using the impedance change (Δ R) of a quartz-crystal tuning-fork tactile sensor when its base is in contact with the surface of many kinds of rectangular silicone rubber plates in order to discover how viscosity and elasticity of silicone rubber may be separately determined. Eleven silicone rubber plates (the values of the rubber hardness are JIS85, 80, 70, 65, 60, 50, 45, 40, 35, 30, and 20) are investigated in this experiment. Δ R increases linearly according to acoustic impedance ρ C (ρ: density of silicone rubber, C: sound velocity of a longitudinal acoustic wave in silicone rubber). We compare Δ R with ρ C when C is calculated in three cases: in first, C is calculated using Young’s modulus of silicone rubber measured by a tensiometer; in second, using Young’s modulus which is converted by the shear modulus measured by a rotating viscometer using the Poisson ratio of silicone rubber, 0.49; in third, using a complex Young’s modulus which is converted by the complex shear modulus measured by a rotating viscometer. We investigated which case in the three described showed good linearity between Δ R and ρ C. In order to clarify how the longitudinal plane wave generated in the sensor’s base travels into the silicone rubber plate, Δ R is measured when the tactile sensor is in contact with the surface of the rectangular silicone rubber plates of varying thickness and a size.

  11. Measurement uncertainty in pulmonary vascular input impedance and characteristic impedance estimated from pulsed-wave Doppler ultrasound and pressure: clinical studies on 57 pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Tian, Lian; Hunter, Kendall S; Kirby, K Scott; Ivy, D Dunbar; Shandas, Robin

    2010-06-01

    Pulmonary vascular input impedance better characterizes right ventricular (RV) afterload and disease outcomes in pulmonary hypertension compared to the standard clinical diagnostic, pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR). Early efforts to measure impedance were not routine, involving open-chest measurement. Recently, the use of pulsed-wave (PW) Doppler-measured velocity to non-invasively estimate instantaneous flow has made impedance measurement more practical. One critical concern remains with clinical use: the measurement uncertainty, especially since previous studies only incorporated random error. This study utilized data from a large pediatric patient population to comprehensively examine the systematic and random error contributions to the total impedance uncertainty and determined the least error prone methodology to compute impedance from among four different methods. We found that the systematic error contributes greatly to the total uncertainty and that one of the four methods had significantly smaller propagated uncertainty; however, even when this best method is used, the uncertainty can be large for input impedance at high harmonics and for the characteristic impedance modulus. Finally, we found that uncertainty in impedance between normotensive and hypertensive patient groups displays no significant difference. It is concluded that clinical impedance measurement would be most improved by advancements in instrumentation, and the best computation method is proposed for future clinical use of the input impedance. PMID:20410558

  12. Acoustic systems for the measurement of streamflow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laenen, Antonius; Smith, Winchell

    1982-01-01

    Very little information is available concerning acoustic velocity meter (AVM) operation, performance, and limitations. This report provides a better understanding about the application of AVM instrumentation to streamflow measurment. Operational U.S. Geological Survey systems have proven that AVM equipment is accurate and dependable. AVM equipment has no practical upper limit of measureable velocity if sonic transducers are securely placed and adequately protected, and will measure velocitites as low as 0.1 meter per second which is normally less than the threshold level for mechanical or head-loss meters. In some situations the performance of AVM equipment may be degraded by multipath interference, signal bending, signal attenuation, and variable streamline orientation. Smaller, less-expensive, more conveniently operable microprocessor equipment is now available which should increase use of AVM systems in streamflow applications. (USGS)

  13. Electron density dependence of impedance probe plasma potential measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, D. N.; Blackwell, D. D.; Amatucci, W. E.

    2015-08-01

    In earlier works, we used spheres of various sizes as impedance probes in demonstrating a method of determining plasma potential, φp, when the probe radius is much larger than the Debye length, λD. The basis of the method in those works [Walker et al., Phys. Plasmas 13, 032108 (2006); ibid. 15, 123506 (2008); ibid. 17, 113503 (2010)] relies on applying a small amplitude signal of fixed frequency to a probe in a plasma and, through network analyzer-based measurements, determining the complex reflection coefficient, Γ, for varying probe bias, Vb. The frequency range of the applied signal is restricted to avoid sheath resonant effects and ion contributions such that ωpi ≪ ω ≪ ωpe, where ωpi is the ion plasma frequency and ωpe is the electron plasma frequency. For a given frequency and applied bias, both Re(Zac) and Im(Zac) are available from Γ. When Re(Zac) is plotted versus Vb, a minimum predicted by theory occurs at φp [Walker et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 113503 (2010)]. In addition, Im(Zac) appears at, or very near, a maximum at φp. As ne decreases and the sheath expands, the minimum becomes harder to discern. The purpose of this work is to demonstrate that when using network analyzer-based measurements, Γ itself and Im(Zac) and their derivatives are useful as accompanying indicators to Re(Zac) in these difficult cases. We note the difficulties encountered by the most commonly used plasma diagnostic, the Langmuir probe. Spherical probe data is mainly used in this work, although we present limited data for a cylinder and a disk. To demonstrate the effect of lowered density as a function of probe geometry, we compare the cylinder and disk using only the indicator Re(Zac).

  14. Measuring impedance in congestive heart failure: Current options and clinical applications

    PubMed Central

    Tang, W. H. Wilson; Tong, Wilson

    2011-01-01

    Measurement of impedance is becoming increasingly available in the clinical setting as a tool for assessing hemodynamics and volume status in patients with heart failure. The 2 major categories of impedance assessment are the band electrode method and the implanted device lead method. The exact sources of the impedance signal are complex and can be influenced by physiologic effects such as blood volume, fluid, and positioning. This article provides a critical review of our current understanding and promises of impedance measurements, the techniques that have evolved, as well as the evidence and limitations regarding their clinical applications in the setting of heart failure management. PMID:19249408

  15. Transient Thermal Impedance Measurements on Low-Temperature-Sintered Nanoscale Silver Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Yunhui; Wang, Tao; Cao, Xiao; Chen, Gang; Lu, Guo-Quan; Chen, Xu

    2012-11-01

    A measurement system for thermal impedance ( Z th) was developed to evaluate the transient thermal performance of sintered nanoscale silver joints. Five different temperature profiles for low-temperature sintering were evaluated by Z th measurements of the joints. The thermal impedance of the sintered samples was altered by the different sintering conditions. Samples that underwent heating profiles with a separate drying stage offered lower thermal impedance than those sintered directly. Exerting pressure of more than 1 MPa during sintering insignificantly improved the thermal impedance. Besides, the impedance could be lowered by extending the holding time of the drying stage and applying pressure as low as 1 MPa during sintering. Characterization of microstructures of the sintered layers was performed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). With more cracks present, the thermal impedance of the chip joints increased. The presence of cracks was possibly attributed to fast drying or the lack of a drying step.

  16. Identification of fluids and an interface between fluids by measuring complex impedance

    DOEpatents

    Lee, D.O.; Wayland, J.R. Jr.

    1989-12-05

    Complex impedance measured over a predefined frequency range is used to determine the identity of different oils in a column. The location of an interface between the oils is determined from the percent frequency effects of the complex impedance measured across the interface. 5 figs.

  17. Identification of fluids and an interface between fluids by measuring complex impedance

    DOEpatents

    Lee, David O.; Wayland, Jr., James R.

    1989-01-01

    Complex impedance measured over a predefined frequency range is used to determine the identity of different oils in a column. The location of an interface between the oils is determined from the percent frequency effects of the complex impedance measured across the interface.

  18. Construction of Tunnel Diode Oscillator for AC Impedance Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, J. H.; Kim, E.

    2014-03-01

    We construct a tunnel diode oscillator (TDO) to study electromagnetic response of a superconducting thin film. Highly sensitive tunnel diode oscillators allow us to detect extremely small changes in electromagnetic properties such as dielectric constant, ac magnetic susceptibility and magnetoresistance. A tunnel diode oscillator is a self-resonant oscillator of which resonance frequency is primarily determined by capacitance and inductance of a resonator. Amplitude of the signal depends on the quality factor of the resonator. The change in the impedance of the sample electromagnetic coupled to one of inductors in the resonator alters impedance of the inductor, and leads to the shift in the resonance frequency and the change of the amplitude.

  19. Acoustic Measurements of Rectangular Nozzles With Bevel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, James E.

    2012-01-01

    A series of convergent rectangular nozzles of aspect ratios 2:1, 4:1, and 8:1 were constructed with uniform exit velocity profiles. Additional nozzles were constructed that extended the wide lip on one side of these nozzles to form beveled nozzles. Far-field acoustic measurements were made and analyzed, and the results presented. The impact of aspect ratio on jet noise was similar to that of enhanced mixing devices: reduction in aft, peak frequency noise with an increase in broadside, high frequency noise. Azimuthally, it was found that rectangular jets produced more noise directed away from their wide sides than from their narrow sides. The azimuthal dependence decreased at aft angles where noise decreased. The effect of temperature, keeping acoustic Mach number constant, was minimal. Since most installations would have the observer on the wide size of the nozzle, the increased high frequency noise has a deleterious impact on the observer. Extending one wide side of the rectangular nozzle, evocative of an aft deck in an installed propulsion system, increased the noise of the jet with increasing length. The impact of both aspect ratio and bevel length were relatively well behaved, allowing a simple bilinear model to be constructed relative to a simple round jet.

  20. Measuring aeolian sand transport using acoustic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poortinga, Ate; van Rheenen, Hans; Ellis, Jean T.; Sherman, Douglas J.

    2015-03-01

    Acoustic sensors are frequently used to measure aeolian saltation. Different approaches are used to process the signals from these instruments. The goal of this paper is to describe and discuss a method to measure aeolian saltation with acoustic sensors. In a laboratory experiment, we measured the output from an advanced signal processing scheme on the circuit board of the saltiphone. We use a software implementation of this processing scheme to re-analyse data from four miniphones obtained during a field experiment. It is shown that a set of filters remove background noise outside the frequency spectrum of aeolian saltation (at 8 kHz), whereas signals within this frequency spectrum are amplified. The resulting analogue signal is a proxy of the energy. Using an AC pulse convertor, this signal can be converted into a digital and analogue count signal or an analogue energy signal, using a rectifier and integrator. Spatio-temporal correlation between field deployed miniphones increases by using longer integration times for signal processing. To quantify aeolian grain impact, it is suggested to use the analogue energy output, as this mode is able to detect changes in frequency and amplitude. The analogue and digital count signals are able to detect an increase in frequency, but are not able to detect an increase in signal amplitude. We propose a two-stage calibration scheme consisting of (1) a factory calibration, to set the frequency spectrum of the sensor and (2) a standardized drop-test conducted before and after the experiment to evaluate the response of the sensor.

  1. Measurement of acoustical characteristics of mosques in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Abdou, Adel A

    2003-03-01

    The study of mosque acoustics, with regard to acoustical characteristics, sound quality for speech intelligibility, and other applicable acoustic criteria, has been largely neglected. In this study a background as to why mosques are designed as they are and how mosque design is influenced by worship considerations is given. In the study the acoustical characteristics of typically constructed contemporary mosques in Saudi Arabia have been investigated, employing a well-known impulse response. Extensive field measurements were taken in 21 representative mosques of different sizes and architectural features in order to characterize their acoustical quality and to identify the impact of air conditioning, ceiling fans, and sound reinforcement systems on their acoustics. Objective room-acoustic indicators such as reverberation time (RT) and clarity (C50) were measured. Background noise (BN) was assessed with and without the operation of air conditioning and fans. The speech transmission index (STI) was also evaluated with and without the operation of existing sound reinforcement systems. The existence of acoustical deficiencies was confirmed and quantified. The study, in addition to describing mosque acoustics, compares design goals to results obtained in practice and suggests acoustical target values for mosque design. The results show that acoustical quality in the investigated mosques deviates from optimum conditions when unoccupied, but is much better in the occupied condition. PMID:12656385

  2. Measurement of acoustical characteristics of mosques in Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdou, Adel A.

    2003-03-01

    The study of mosque acoustics, with regard to acoustical characteristics, sound quality for speech intelligibility, and other applicable acoustic criteria, has been largely neglected. In this study a background as to why mosques are designed as they are and how mosque design is influenced by worship considerations is given. In the study the acoustical characteristics of typically constructed contemporary mosques in Saudi Arabia have been investigated, employing a well-known impulse response. Extensive field measurements were taken in 21 representative mosques of different sizes and architectural features in order to characterize their acoustical quality and to identify the impact of air conditioning, ceiling fans, and sound reinforcement systems on their acoustics. Objective room-acoustic indicators such as reverberation time (RT) and clarity (C50) were measured. Background noise (BN) was assessed with and without the operation of air conditioning and fans. The speech transmission index (STI) was also evaluated with and without the operation of existing sound reinforcement systems. The existence of acoustical deficiencies was confirmed and quantified. The study, in addition to describing mosque acoustics, compares design goals to results obtained in practice and suggests acoustical target values for mosque design. The results show that acoustical quality in the investigated mosques deviates from optimum conditions when unoccupied, but is much better in the occupied condition.

  3. Effect of grazing flow on the acoustic impedance of interacting cavity-backed orifices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hersh, A. S.; Walker, B.

    1977-01-01

    The two-microphone method was used to investigate the impedance of interacting cavity-backed orifices in the presence of a grazing flow; the investigation has relevance for the control of turbomachinery noise generated within jet engines. The number (varied from one to 16), the diameter, and the spacing of the orifices were the chief parameters studied in the experimental program. It was found that interactions between adjacent orifices, while increasing reactance, do not significantly alter resistance. In addition, the grazing flow appears to reduce the rate of increase of the reactance.

  4. Electron density dependence of impedance probe plasma potential measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, D. N.; Blackwell, D. D.; Amatucci, W. E.

    2015-08-15

    In earlier works, we used spheres of various sizes as impedance probes in demonstrating a method of determining plasma potential, φ{sub p}, when the probe radius is much larger than the Debye length, λ{sub D}. The basis of the method in those works [Walker et al., Phys. Plasmas 13, 032108 (2006); ibid. 15, 123506 (2008); ibid. 17, 113503 (2010)] relies on applying a small amplitude signal of fixed frequency to a probe in a plasma and, through network analyzer-based measurements, determining the complex reflection coefficient, Γ, for varying probe bias, V{sub b}. The frequency range of the applied signal is restricted to avoid sheath resonant effects and ion contributions such that ω{sub pi} ≪ ω ≪ ω{sub pe}, where ω{sub pi} is the ion plasma frequency and ω{sub pe} is the electron plasma frequency. For a given frequency and applied bias, both Re(Z{sub ac}) and Im(Z{sub ac}) are available from Γ. When Re(Z{sub ac}) is plotted versus V{sub b}, a minimum predicted by theory occurs at φ{sub p} [Walker et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 113503 (2010)]. In addition, Im(Z{sub ac}) appears at, or very near, a maximum at φ{sub p}. As n{sub e} decreases and the sheath expands, the minimum becomes harder to discern. The purpose of this work is to demonstrate that when using network analyzer-based measurements, Γ itself and Im(Z{sub ac}) and their derivatives are useful as accompanying indicators to Re(Z{sub ac}) in these difficult cases. We note the difficulties encountered by the most commonly used plasma diagnostic, the Langmuir probe. Spherical probe data is mainly used in this work, although we present limited data for a cylinder and a disk. To demonstrate the effect of lowered density as a function of probe geometry, we compare the cylinder and disk using only the indicator Re(Z{sub ac})

  5. Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Tests Instrumentation for Acoustic and Pressure Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargas, Magda B.; Counter, Douglas D.

    2011-01-01

    The Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) was a development test performed at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) East Test Area (ETA) Test Stand 116. The test article included a 5% scale Ares I vehicle model and tower mounted on the Mobile Launcher. Acoustic and pressure data were measured by approximately 200 instruments located throughout the test article. There were four primary ASMAT instrument suites: ignition overpressure (IOP), lift-off acoustics (LOA), ground acoustics (GA), and spatial correlation (SC). Each instrumentation suite incorporated different sensor models which were selected based upon measurement requirements. These requirements included the type of measurement, exposure to the environment, instrumentation check-outs and data acquisition. The sensors were attached to the test article using different mounts and brackets dependent upon the location of the sensor. This presentation addresses the observed effect of the sensors and mounts on the acoustic and pressure measurements.

  6. Extreme low frequency acoustic measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shams, Qamar A. (Inventor); Zuckerwar, Allan J. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention is an extremely low frequency (ELF) microphone and acoustic measurement system capable of infrasound detection in a portable and easily deployable form factor. In one embodiment of the invention, an extremely low frequency electret microphone comprises a membrane, a backplate, and a backchamber. The backchamber is sealed to allow substantially no air exchange between the backchamber and outside the microphone. Compliance of the membrane may be less than ambient air compliance. The backplate may define a plurality of holes and a slot may be defined between an outer diameter of the backplate and an inner wall of the microphone. The locations and sizes of the holes, the size of the slot, and the volume of the backchamber may be selected such that membrane motion is substantially critically damped.

  7. Nondestructive Determination of Moisture Content in Dry Fruits by Impedance and Phase angle measurements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Impedance (Z), and phase angle (') of a cylindrical parallel-plate capacitor with dry fruits between the plates was measured using a CI meter (Chari’s Impedance meter), at 1 and 9 MHz . Capacitance, C was derived from Z and ', and using the C, ', and Z values of a set of cherries whose moisture con...

  8. Cosmological implications of baryon acoustic oscillation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubourg, Éric; Bailey, Stephen; Bautista, Julian E.; Beutler, Florian; Bhardwaj, Vaishali; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Blanton, Michael; Blomqvist, Michael; Bolton, Adam S.; Bovy, Jo; Brewington, Howard; Brinkmann, J.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Burden, Angela; Busca, Nicolás G.; Carithers, William; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Comparat, Johan; Croft, Rupert A. C.; Cuesta, Antonio J.; Dawson, Kyle S.; Delubac, Timothée; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Ge, Jian; Le Goff, J.-M.; Gontcho, Satya Gontcho A.; Gott, J. Richard; Gunn, James E.; Guo, Hong; Guy, Julien; Hamilton, Jean-Christophe; Ho, Shirley; Honscheid, Klaus; Howlett, Cullan; Kirkby, David; Kitaura, Francisco S.; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Lee, Khee-Gan; Long, Dan; Lupton, Robert H.; Magaña, Mariana Vargas; Malanushenko, Viktor; Malanushenko, Elena; Manera, Marc; Maraston, Claudia; Margala, Daniel; McBride, Cameron K.; Miralda-Escudé, Jordi; Myers, Adam D.; Nichol, Robert C.; Noterdaeme, Pasquier; Nuza, Sebastián E.; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Oravetz, Daniel; Pâris, Isabelle; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Pan, Kaike; Pellejero-Ibanez, Marcos; Percival, Will J.; Petitjean, Patrick; Pieri, Matthew M.; Prada, Francisco; Reid, Beth; Rich, James; Roe, Natalie A.; Ross, Ashley J.; Ross, Nicholas P.; Rossi, Graziano; Rubiño-Martín, Jose Alberto; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Samushia, Lado; Santos, Ricardo Tanausú Génova; Scóccola, Claudia G.; Schlegel, David J.; Schneider, Donald P.; Seo, Hee-Jong; Sheldon, Erin; Simmons, Audrey; Skibba, Ramin A.; Slosar, Anže; Strauss, Michael A.; Thomas, Daniel; Tinker, Jeremy L.; Tojeiro, Rita; Vazquez, Jose Alberto; Viel, Matteo; Wake, David A.; Weaver, Benjamin A.; Weinberg, David H.; Wood-Vasey, W. M.; Yèche, Christophe; Zehavi, Idit; Zhao, Gong-Bo; BOSS Collaboration

    2015-12-01

    We derive constraints on cosmological parameters and tests of dark energy models from the combination of baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) measurements with cosmic microwave background (CMB) data and a recent reanalysis of Type Ia supernova (SN) data. In particular, we take advantage of high-precision BAO measurements from galaxy clustering and the Lyman-α forest (LyaF) in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). Treating the BAO scale as an uncalibrated standard ruler, BAO data alone yield a high confidence detection of dark energy; in combination with the CMB angular acoustic scale they further imply a nearly flat universe. Adding the CMB-calibrated physical scale of the sound horizon, the combination of BAO and SN data into an "inverse distance ladder" yields a measurement of H0=67.3 ±1.1 km s-1 Mpc-1 , with 1.7% precision. This measurement assumes standard prerecombination physics but is insensitive to assumptions about dark energy or space curvature, so agreement with CMB-based estimates that assume a flat Λ CDM cosmology is an important corroboration of this minimal cosmological model. For constant dark energy (Λ ), our BAO +SN +CMB combination yields matter density Ωm=0.301 ±0.008 and curvature Ωk=-0.003 ±0.003 . When we allow more general forms of evolving dark energy, the BAO +SN +CMB parameter constraints are always consistent with flat Λ CDM values at ≈1 σ . While the overall χ2 of model fits is satisfactory, the LyaF BAO measurements are in moderate (2 - 2.5 σ ) tension with model predictions. Models with early dark energy that tracks the dominant energy component at high redshift remain consistent with our expansion history constraints, and they yield a higher H0 and lower matter clustering amplitude, improving agreement with some low redshift observations. Expansion history alone yields an upper limit on the summed mass of neutrino species, ∑mν<0.56 eV (95% confidence), improving to ∑mν<0.25 eV if we include the

  9. Insulator-based DEP with impedance measurements for analyte detection

    DOEpatents

    Davalos, Rafael V.; Simmons, Blake A.; Crocker, Robert W.; Cummings, Eric B.

    2010-03-16

    Disclosed herein are microfluidic devices for assaying at least one analyte specie in a sample comprising at least one analyte concentration area in a microchannel having insulating structures on or in at least one wall of the microchannel which provide a nonuniform electric field in the presence of an electric field provided by off-chip electrodes; and a pair of passivated sensing electrodes for impedance detection in a detection area. Also disclosed are assay methods and methods of making.

  10. Acoustic systems for the measurement of streamflow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laenen, Antonius; Smith, Winchell

    1983-01-01

    The acoustic velocity meter (AVM), also referred to as an ultrasonic flowmeter, has been an operational tool for the measurement of streamflow since 1965. Very little information is available concerning AVM operation, performance, and limitations. The purpose of this report is to consolidate information in such a manner as to provide a better understanding about the application of this instrumentation to streamflow measurement. AVM instrumentation is highly accurate and nonmechanical. Most commercial AVM systems that measure streamflow use the time-of-travel method to determine a velocity between two points. The systems operate on the principle that point-to-point upstream travel-time of sound is longer than the downstream travel-time, and this difference can be monitored and measured accurately by electronics. AVM equipment has no practical upper limit of measurable velocity if sonic transducers are securely placed and adequately protected. AVM systems used in streamflow measurement generally operate with a resolution of ?0.01 meter per second but this is dependent on system frequency, path length, and signal attenuation. In some applications the performance of AVM equipment may be degraded by multipath interference, signal bending, signal attenuation, and variable streamline orientation. Presently used minicomputer systems, although expensive to purchase and maintain, perform well. Increased use of AVM systems probably will be realized as smaller, less expensive, and more conveniently operable microprocessor-based systems become readily available. Available AVM equipment should be capable of flow measurement in a wide variety of situations heretofore untried. New signal-detection techniques and communication linkages can provide additional flexibility to the systems so that operation is possible in more river and estuary situations.

  11. In situ measurement of tissue impedance using an inductive coupling interface circuit.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Hung-Wei; Chuang, Jia-min; Lu, Chien-Chi; Lin, Wei-Tso; Lin, Chii-Wann; Lin, Mu-Lien

    2013-06-01

    In this work, a method of an inductive coupling impedance measurement (ICIM) is proposed for measuring the nerve impedance of a dorsal root ganglion (DRG) under PRF stimulation. ICIM provides a contactless interface for measuring the reflected impedance by an impedance analyzer with a low excitation voltage of 7 mV. The paper develops a calibration procedure involving a 50-Ω reference resistor to calibrate the reflected resistance for measuring resistance of the nerve in the test. A de-embedding technique to build the equivalent transformer circuit model for the ICIM circuit is also presented. A batteryless PRF stimulator with ICIM circuit demonstrated good accuracy for the acute measurement of DRG impedance both in situ and in vivo. Besides, an in vivo animal experiment was conducted to show that the effectiveness of pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) stimulation in relieving pain gradually declined as the impedance of the stimulated nerve increased. The experiment also revealed that the excitation voltage for measuring impedance below 25 mV can prevent the excitation of a nonlinear response of DRG. PMID:23853322

  12. Method and means for measuring acoustic emissions

    DOEpatents

    Renken, Jr., Claus J.

    1976-01-06

    The detection of acoustic emissions emanating from an object is achieved with a capacitive transducer coupled to the object. The capacitive transducer is charged and then allowed to discharge with the rate of discharge being monitored. Oscillations in the rate of discharge about the normally exponential discharge curve for the capacitive transducer indicate the presence of acoustic emissions.

  13. Microelectrical Impedance Spectroscopy for the Differentiation between Normal and Cancerous Human Urothelial Cell Lines: Real-Time Electrical Impedance Measurement at an Optimal Frequency

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yangkyu; Kim, Hyeon Woo; Yun, Joho; Seo, Seungwan; Park, Chang-Ju; Lee, Jeong Zoo; Lee, Jong-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To distinguish between normal (SV-HUC-1) and cancerous (TCCSUP) human urothelial cell lines using microelectrical impedance spectroscopy (μEIS). Materials and Methods. Two types of μEIS devices were designed and used in combination to measure the impedance of SV-HUC-1 and TCCSUP cells flowing through the channels of the devices. The first device (μEIS-OF) was designed to determine the optimal frequency at which the impedance of two cell lines is most distinguishable. The μEIS-OF trapped the flowing cells and measured their impedance at a frequency ranging from 5 kHz to 1 MHz. The second device (μEIS-RT) was designed for real-time impedance measurement of the cells at the optimal frequency. The impedance was measured instantaneously as the cells passed the sensing electrodes of μEIS-RT. Results. The optimal frequency, which maximized the average difference of the amplitude and phase angle between the two cell lines (p < 0.001), was determined to be 119 kHz. The real-time impedance of the cell lines was measured at 119 kHz; the two cell lines differed significantly in terms of amplitude and phase angle (p < 0.001). Conclusion. The μEIS-RT can discriminate SV-HUC-1 and TCCSUP cells by measuring the impedance at the optimal frequency determined by the μEIS-OF. PMID:26998490

  14. Coupling impedance of an in-vacuum undulator. Measurement, simulation, and analytical estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Simaluk, Victor; Blednykh, Alexei; Fielder, Richard; Rehm, Guenther; Bartolini, Riccardo

    2014-07-25

    One of the important issues of the in-vacuum undulator design is the coupling impedance of the vacuum chamber, which includes tapered transitions with variable gap size. In order to get complete and reliable information on the impedance, analytical estimate, numerical simulations and beam-based measurements have been performed at Diamond Light Source, a forthcoming upgrade of which includes introducing additional insertion device (ID) straights. Moreover, the impedance of an already existing ID vessel geometrically similar to the new one has been measured using the orbit bump method. The measurement results in comparison with analytical estimations and numerical simulations are discussed in this paper.

  15. Skin-electrode impedance measurement during ECG acquisition: method’s validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casal, Leonardo; La Mura, Guillermo

    2016-04-01

    Skm-electrode impedance measurement can provide valuable information prior. dunng and post electrocardiographic (ECG) or electroencephalographs (EEG) acquisitions. In this work we validate a method for skm-electrode impedance measurement using test circuits with known resistance and capacitor values, at different frequencies for injected excitation current. Finally the method is successfully used for impedance measurement during ECG acquisition on a subject usmg 125 Hz and 6 nA square wave excitation signal at instrumentation amplifier mput. The method can be used for many electrodes configuration.

  16. Field Measurement of the Acoustic Nonlinearity Parameter in Turbine Blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinton, Yolanda L.; Na, Jeong K.; Yost, William T.; Kessel, Gregory L.

    2000-01-01

    Nonlinear acoustics techniques were used to measure fatigue in turbine blades in a power generation plant. The measurements were made in the field using a reference based measurement technique, and a reference sample previously measured in the laboratory. The acoustic nonlinearity parameter showed significant increase with fatigue in the blades, as indicated by service age and areas of increased stress. The technique shows promise for effectively measuring fatigue in field applications and predicting subsequent failures.

  17. Comparison of impedance measurements near the skin of newborns and adults.

    PubMed

    Amm, Bruce; Kao, Tzu-Jen; Newell, Jonathan; Isaacson, David; Saulnier, Gary; Shoudy, David; Boverman, Greg; Sahni, Rakesh; Weindler, Marilyn; Chong, David; DiBardino, David; Davenport, David; Ashe, Jeffrey

    2016-06-01

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is a non-invasive imaging technology that has been extensively studied for monitoring lung function of neonatal and adult subjects, especially in neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and intensive care unit (ICU) environments. The sources of the total impedance in these applications include internal organs, near-boundary tissues, electrode-skin impedance, electrodes and conducting wires. This total impedance must be considered for system design and setting voltage gain since it will contribute to the measured voltage. To adapt a single instrument for use on infants and adults, we studied the difference between the impedance near the skin in both classes of patients. We used a simultaneous multi-source EIT (SMS-EIT) system to make impedance measurements. Characteristic resistance was calculated for two different current patterns: one that is more sensitive to boundary region impedance and another that is more sensitive to interior changes. We present ratios of these resistances to assess the relative contribution of near-skin effects to the overall impedance. Twenty adult ICU subjects (10 male, 10 female, age: 49.05  ±  16.32 years (mean  ±  standard deviation)) and 45 neonates (23 male, 22 female, gestational age: 37.67  ±  2.11 weeks, postnatal age, 2.56  ±  2.67 d) were studied at Columbia University Medical Center. Impedance measurements at 10 kHz were collected for approximately one hour from each subject. The characteristic resistance ratio for each subject was computed and analyzed. The result shows the impedance at or near the skin of newborns is significantly higher than in adult subjects. PMID:27203362

  18. Development of an attachable piezoelectric impedance measuring device for structural health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhiwen; Jiang, Zhongwei; Morisaki, Tetsuya

    2005-12-01

    In this paper, we develop a field-portable small-size impedance measurement system for structural health monitoring. The system consists of a rectangle wave generator, computer (or microcomputer), AD converter and piezo-electric element. We present some experimental results for testing the torque loose in the bolt for a truss structure. The results indicate that an accuracy of the impedance measurement system proposed in this paper is almost as accurate as the commercial multipurpose impedance analyzer, and it could be used on the structures for health monitoring.

  19. Pulsed EMAT (Electromagnetic Acoustic Transducer) acoustic measurements on a horizontal continuous caster for internal temperature determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Donald M.

    1989-10-01

    Development of a Pulsed Electromagnetic Acoustic Transducer (EMAT) through transmission system for acoustic measurements on steel billets up to 1300 C was completed. Laboratory measurements of acoustic velocity were made, and used to determine the average internal temperature of hot stainless and carbon steel billets. Following the success of the laboratory system development, the laboratory EMAT system was subsequently tested successfully at the Baltimore Specialty Steel Co. on a horizontal continuous caster. Details of the sensor system development and the steel plant demonstration results are presented. Future directions for the high temperature pulsed EMAT internal temperature concept are discussed for potential material processing applications.

  20. The influence of acupuncture on the impedance measured by four electrodes on meridians.

    PubMed

    Zhang, W; Xu, R; Zhu, Z

    1999-01-01

    The impedance on the pericardium merdian near Quze (P3) and control points in 12 cases was measured by a four electrodes impedance instrument. The amplitude of impedance was recorded before, during and after needling the Neiguan. The result showed that the mean impedance on the meridian and control points before the needling were 52.8 +/- 11.0 (omega) and 61.7 +/- 10.3 (omega) respectively which had significant difference (P<0.05). During the needling, impedance decreased significantly on the meridian by 9.2 +/- 5.6 (omega) (P<0.001) while impedance decreased by only 0.12 +/- 2.4 (omega) on control points without significance (P>0.05). The impedance changed back to 51.1 +/- 11.3 (omega) and 59.9 +/- 11.0 (omega) on the meridian and control points respectively during the 5-10 minutes after withdrawing the needling. In some cases, impedance changed intermittently during the needling. The experiment implies that interstitial fluid increases during the needling by axon reflection and blood capillary expanding which may be one of the mechanisms of acupuncture regulation. PMID:10768415

  1. Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test Instrumentation for Acoustic and Pressure Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargas, Magda B.; Counter, Douglas

    2011-01-01

    Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) is a 5% scale model test of the Ares I vehicle, launch pad and support structures conducted at MSFC to verify acoustic and ignition environments and evaluate water suppression systems Test design considerations 5% measurements must be scaled to full scale requiring high frequency measurements Users had different frequencies of interest Acoustics: 200 - 2,000 Hz full scale equals 4,000 - 40,000 Hz model scale Ignition Transient: 0 - 100 Hz full scale equals 0 - 2,000 Hz model scale Environment exposure Weather exposure: heat, humidity, thunderstorms, rain, cold and snow Test environments: Plume impingement heat and pressure, and water deluge impingement Several types of sensors were used to measure the environments Different instrument mounts were used according to the location and exposure to the environment This presentation addresses the observed effects of the selected sensors and mount design on the acoustic and pressure measurements

  2. Measuring Electrolyte Impedance and Noise Simultaneously by Triangular Waveform Voltage and Principal Component Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shanzhi; Wang, Peng; Dong, Yonggui

    2016-01-01

    In order to measure the impedance variation process in electrolyte solutions, a method of triangular waveform voltage excitation is investigated together with principal component analysis (PCA). Using triangular waveform voltage as the excitation signal, the response current during one duty cycle is sampled to construct a measurement vector. The measurement matrix is then constructed by the measurement vectors obtained from different measurements. After being processed by PCA, the changing information of solution impedance is contained in the loading vectors while the response current and noise information is contained in the score vectors. The measurement results of impedance variation by the proposed signal processing method are independent of the equivalent impedance model. The noise-induced problems encountered during equivalent impedance calculation are therefore avoided, and the real-time variation information of noise in the electrode-electrolyte interface can be extracted at the same time. Planar-interdigitated electrodes are experimentally tested for monitoring the KCl concentration variation process. Experimental results indicate that the measured impedance variation curve reflects the changing process of solution conductivity, and the amplitude distribution of the noise during one duty cycle can be utilized to analyze the contact conditions of the electrode and electrolyte interface. PMID:27110787

  3. Measuring Electrolyte Impedance and Noise Simultaneously by Triangular Waveform Voltage and Principal Component Analysis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shanzhi; Wang, Peng; Dong, Yonggui

    2016-01-01

    In order to measure the impedance variation process in electrolyte solutions, a method of triangular waveform voltage excitation is investigated together with principal component analysis (PCA). Using triangular waveform voltage as the excitation signal, the response current during one duty cycle is sampled to construct a measurement vector. The measurement matrix is then constructed by the measurement vectors obtained from different measurements. After being processed by PCA, the changing information of solution impedance is contained in the loading vectors while the response current and noise information is contained in the score vectors. The measurement results of impedance variation by the proposed signal processing method are independent of the equivalent impedance model. The noise-induced problems encountered during equivalent impedance calculation are therefore avoided, and the real-time variation information of noise in the electrode-electrolyte interface can be extracted at the same time. Planar-interdigitated electrodes are experimentally tested for monitoring the KCl concentration variation process. Experimental results indicate that the measured impedance variation curve reflects the changing process of solution conductivity, and the amplitude distribution of the noise during one duty cycle can be utilized to analyze the contact conditions of the electrode and electrolyte interface. PMID:27110787

  4. Evaluation of electrical impedance ratio measurements in accuracy of electronic apex locators

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Pil-Jong; Kim, Hong-Gee

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this paper was evaluating the ratios of electrical impedance measurements reported in previous studies through a correlation analysis in order to explicit it as the contributing factor to the accuracy of electronic apex locator (EAL). Materials and Methods The literature regarding electrical property measurements of EALs was screened using Medline and Embase. All data acquired were plotted to identify correlations between impedance and log-scaled frequency. The accuracy of the impedance ratio method used to detect the apical constriction (APC) in most EALs was evaluated using linear ramp function fitting. Changes of impedance ratios for various frequencies were evaluated for a variety of file positions. Results Among the ten papers selected in the search process, the first-order equations between log-scaled frequency and impedance were in the negative direction. When the model for the ratios was assumed to be a linear ramp function, the ratio values decreased if the file went deeper and the average ratio values of the left and right horizontal zones were significantly different in 8 out of 9 studies. The APC was located within the interval of linear relation between the left and right horizontal zones of the linear ramp model. Conclusions Using the ratio method, the APC was located within a linear interval. Therefore, using the impedance ratio between electrical impedance measurements at different frequencies was a robust method for detection of the APC. PMID:25984472

  5. Applications of acoustics in the measurement of coal slab thickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadden, W. J., Jr.; Mills, J. M.; Pierce, A. D.

    1980-01-01

    The determination of the possibility of employing acoustic waves at ultrasonic frequencies for measurements of thicknesses of slabs of coal backed by shale is investigated. Fundamental information concerning the acoustical properties of coal, and the relationship between these properties and the structural and compositional parameters used to characterize coal samples was also sought. The testing device, which utilizes two matched transducers, is described.

  6. Acoustic Measurement of Suspended Fine Particle Concentrations by Attenuation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Knowledge of sediment concentration is important in the study of streams and rivers. The work presented explores the appropriate frequency and transducer spacing for acoustic measurement of suspended particles in the range of 0.1 – 64 microns. High frequency (20 MHz) acoustic signal attenuation wa...

  7. Stroboscopic and acoustic measures of inspiratory phonation.

    PubMed

    Kelly, C L; Fisher, K V

    1999-09-01

    Inspiratory phonation (IP) is the production of voice as air is taken into the lungs. Although IP is promoted as a laryngeal assessment and voice treatment technique, it has been described quantitatively in very few speakers. This study quantified changes in laryngeal adduction, fundamental frequency, and intensity during IP relative to expiratory phonation (EP). We hypothesized that IP would increase laryngeal abduction and fundamental frequency. The experiment was a within-subjects, repeated measures design with each subject serving as her own control. Participants were 10 females (ages 19-50 years) who underwent simultaneous transoral videostrobolaryngoscopy and acoustic voice recording. We found that membranous vocal fold contact decreased significantly during IP relative to EP, while the trends for change of ventricular fold squeeze during IP varied across individuals. Vocal fundamental frequency increased significantly during IP relative to EP, but intensity did not vary consistently across conditions. Without teaching or coaching, changes that occurred during IP did not carry over to EP produced immediately following IP within the same respiratory cycle. PMID:10498055

  8. Multi-dimensional analysis of subjective acoustical ratings and acoustical measures in existing concert halls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okano, Toshiyuki

    2001-05-01

    Correlations between subjective acoustical ratings and hall-averaged values of acoustical measures are studied among existing worldwide major concert halls. It was shown that the classified acoustical ratings by Beranek [Concert and Opera Halls, How They Sound (ASA, 1996)] are discriminated correctly by combining binaural quality index (BQI) with some other acoustical measures. BQI is determined by the arithmetic average of inter-aural cross correlation coefficient in three octave bands of 500, 1000, and 2000 Hz, subtracted from unity, calculated from the early 80-ms part of binaural impulse response. Considering that the upper limit value of BQI not to cause disturbing image shift is approximately 0.85 at individual seat [Okano, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 2219-2230 (2000)], the values of 0.6 or higher in hall averaged value of BQI, 0.85 or smaller in individual seat value of BQI, and approximately 5 dB or higher in strength factor at middle frequencies are proposed as design objectives to attain a high acoustical quality. It should be provided that other acoustical measures are also optimized. These target values will be very effective in studying room shape of halls, using scale models or computer models.

  9. Transvers Impedance Measurements of the Modified DARHT-2Accelerator Cell Design

    SciTech Connect

    Briggs, Dick; Waldron, Will

    2005-11-30

    The DARHT-2 accelerator cells have been redesigned to make their high voltage performance more robust. At the outset of the DARHT-2 development program about 8 years ago, an extensive campaign was mounted to minimize the transverse impedance of the original cell design. Since the initial spec on the machine was a beam current of 4 kA, the control of beam-breakup (BBU) amplification with a 2 microsecond pulse length was considered to be one the most critical issues in the design. Even after advances in detector technology allowed the beam current requirement to be lowered to 2 kA, the goal for the standard cell impedance was kept at {approx}300 ohms/meter to allow for the possibility of future beam current upgrades to 4 kA without any modifications in the cells. The results of this campaign to minimize the transverse impedance are described in detail in Reference 1. After several iterations in the design of ferrite dampers and the anode finger stock shape, the measured (peak) impedance of the original standard cell was determined to be about 280 ohms/meter. (As a reference point, the measured impedance of the DARHT-1 cell is about 880 ohms/meter). This impedance provided such a wide safety margin against BBU amplification at 2 kA that it was felt that the cell redesign could focus on voltage holding without any detailed considerations of impacts on the transverse impedance. Now that a baseline design for the DARHT-2 cell has been established and tested, however, it was felt that a measurement of its impedance would be prudent. The results of these impedance measurements are presented in this note. The objective was mainly to do a ''quick check'' to ensure that there were no surprises, and to provide an estimate of the BBU frequencies and growth rates to the experimental test program.

  10. Rapid Impedance Spectrum Measurements for Onboard State-of-Health Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Jon P. Christophersen; John L. Morrison; Chinh D. Ho

    2012-06-01

    Rapid impedance measurements can provide a useful online tool for improved state-of-health estimation. A validation study has been initiated at the Idaho National Laboratory for a rapid impedance technique known as Harmonic Compensated Synchronous Detection. This technique enables capturing the impedance spectra over a broad frequency range within about ten seconds. Commercially available lithium-ion cells are being calendar-life aged at 50°C with reference performance tests at 30°C every 32.5 days to gauge degradation The cells have completed the first set of reference performance tests and preliminary results are presented. The spectra change as a function of temperature and depth-of-discharge condition, as expected. The data indicate that the rapid impedance measurement technique is a benign measurement tool that can be successfully used to gauge changes in the corresponding pulse resistance.

  11. Sensitive immunodetection through impedance measurements onto gold functionalized electrodes.

    PubMed

    Ameur, S; Martelet, C; Jaffrezic-Renault, N; Chovelon, J M

    2000-01-01

    This article deals with a direct electrochemical method of detecting antigens using new methods of functionalization of gold electrodes. Based on the reacting ability of gold with sulfhydryl groups, three protocols for the fixation of antibodies have been explored. They are based on either the self-assembling properties of functional thiols bearing long alkyl chains or the possibility of a direct coupling of antibody moieties. Coverage rates as high as 97% can be reached. The analysis of the electrochemical impedance behavior of such layers can lead to a sensitive method for the direct detection of the antibody/antigen interaction. The addition of a redox couple in the tested solution, acting as an amplifier, allowed detection limits for the antigens as low as a few picograms/milliliter to be reached. PMID:11209460

  12. Acoustic-velocity measurements in materials using a regenerative method

    DOEpatents

    Laine, E.F.

    1982-09-30

    Acoustic energy is propatated through earth material between an electro-acoustic generator and a receiver which converts the received acoustic energy into electrical signals. A closed loop is formed by a variable gain amplifier system connected between the receiver and the generator. The gain of the amplifier system is increased until sustained oscillations are produced in the closed loop. The frequency of the oscillations is measured as an indication of the acoustic propagation velocity through the earth material. The amplifier gain is measured as an indication of the acoustic attenuation through the earth materials. The method is also applicable to the non-destructive testing of structural materials, such as steel, aluminum and concrete.

  13. Acoustic velocity measurements in materials using a regenerative method

    DOEpatents

    Laine, Edwin F.

    1986-01-01

    Acoustic energy is propagated through earth material between an electro-acoustic generator and a receiver which converts the received acoustic energy into electrical signals. A closed loop is formed by a variable gain amplifier system connected between the receiver and the generator. The gain of the amplifier system is increased until sustained oscillations are produced in the closed loop. The frequency of the oscillations is measured as an indication of the acoustic propagation velocity through the earth material. The amplifier gain is measured as an indication of the acoustic attenuation through the earth materials. The method is also applicable to the non-destructive testing of structural materials, such as steel, aluminum and concrete.

  14. Measurement and mathematical simulation of acoustic characteristics of an artificially lengthened vocal tract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radolf, Vojtěch; Horáček, Jaromír; Dlask, Pavel; Otčenášek, Zdeněk; Geneid, Ahmed; Laukkanen, Anne-Maria

    2016-03-01

    Phonation into tubes is used for voice training and therapy. In the present study, the formant frequencies were estimated from measurements of the acoustic pressure and the acoustic input impedance for a plexiglass model of the vocal tract (VT) prolonged by a glass tube. Similar transfer function measurements were performed with a human VT in vivo. The experimental results matched the mathematical modelling and confirmed the legitimacy of assuming rigid walls in mathematical simulations of the acoustic characteristics of an artificial VT model prolonged by a tube. However, this study also proved a considerable influence from soft tissues in the yielding walls of human VT cavities on the first formant frequency, F1. The measured F1 for the VT model corresponded to the computed value of 78 Hz. The experiments in a human instead resulted in a much higher value of F1: about 200 Hz. The results confirm that a VT model with yielding walls must be considered for mathematical modelling of the occluded or semi-occluded human vocal tract, e.g. prolonged by tubes or straws. This is explained by an acoustic-structural interaction of the vocal tract cavities with a mechanical low-frequency resonance of the soft tissue in the larynx.

  15. Validation of a Numerical Method for Determining Liner Impedance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Willie R.; Jones, Michael G.; Tanner, Sharon E.; Parrott, Tony L.

    1996-01-01

    This paper reports the initial results of a test series to evaluate a method for determining the normal incidence impedance of a locally reacting acoustically absorbing liner, located on the lower wall of a duct in a grazing incidence, multi-modal, non-progressive acoustic wave environment without flow. This initial evaluation is accomplished by testing the methods' ability to converge to the known normal incidence impedance of a solid steel plate, and to the normal incidence impedance of an absorbing test specimen whose impedance was measured in a conventional normal incidence tube. The method is shown to converge to the normal incident impedance values and thus to be an adequate tool for determining the impedance of specimens in a grazing incidence, multi-modal, nonprogressive acoustic wave environment for a broad range of source frequencies.

  16. Experimental investigation of microwave interaction with magnetoplasma in miniature multipolar configuration using impedance measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Dey, Indranuj Toyoda, Yuji; Yamamoto, Naoji; Nakashima, Hideki

    2014-09-15

    A miniature microwave plasma source employing both radial and axial magnetic fields for plasma confinement has been developed for micro-propulsion applications. Plasma is initiated by launching microwaves via a short monopole antenna to circumvent geometrical cutoff limitations. The amplitude and phase of the forward and reflected microwave power is measured to obtain the complex reflection coefficient from which the equivalent impedance of the plasma source is determined. Effect of critical plasma density condition is reflected in the measurements and provides insight into the working of the miniature plasma source. A basic impedance calculation model is developed to help in understanding the experimental observations. From experiment and theory, it is seen that the equivalent impedance magnitude is controlled by the coaxial discharge boundary conditions, and the phase is influenced primarily by the plasma immersed antenna impedance.

  17. Experimental investigation of microwave interaction with magnetoplasma in miniature multipolar configuration using impedance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Indranuj; Toyoda, Yuji; Yamamoto, Naoji; Nakashima, Hideki

    2014-09-01

    A miniature microwave plasma source employing both radial and axial magnetic fields for plasma confinement has been developed for micro-propulsion applications. Plasma is initiated by launching microwaves via a short monopole antenna to circumvent geometrical cutoff limitations. The amplitude and phase of the forward and reflected microwave power is measured to obtain the complex reflection coefficient from which the equivalent impedance of the plasma source is determined. Effect of critical plasma density condition is reflected in the measurements and provides insight into the working of the miniature plasma source. A basic impedance calculation model is developed to help in understanding the experimental observations. From experiment and theory, it is seen that the equivalent impedance magnitude is controlled by the coaxial discharge boundary conditions, and the phase is influenced primarily by the plasma immersed antenna impedance.

  18. Motion measurement of acoustically levitated object

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, John L. (Inventor); Barmatz, Martin B. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A system is described for determining motion of an object that is acoustically positioned in a standing wave field in a chamber. Sonic energy in the chamber is sensed, and variation in the amplitude of the sonic energy is detected, which is caused by linear motion, rotational motion, or drop shape oscillation of the object. Apparatus for detecting object motion can include a microphone coupled to the chamber and a low pass filter connected to the output of the microphone, which passes only frequencies below the frequency of sound produced by a transducer that maintains the acoustic standing wave field. Knowledge about object motion can be useful by itself, can be useful to determine surface tension, viscosity, and other information about the object, and can be useful to determine the pressure and other characteristics of the acoustic field.

  19. Scale Model Thruster Acoustic Measurement Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargas, Magda; Kenny, R. Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    The Space Launch System (SLS) Scale Model Acoustic Test (SMAT) is a 5% scale representation of the SLS vehicle, mobile launcher, tower, and launch pad trench. The SLS launch propulsion system will be comprised of the Rocket Assisted Take-Off (RATO) motors representing the solid boosters and 4 Gas Hydrogen (GH2) thrusters representing the core engines. The GH2 thrusters were tested in a horizontal configuration in order to characterize their performance. In Phase 1, a single thruster was fired to determine the engine performance parameters necessary for scaling a single engine. A cluster configuration, consisting of the 4 thrusters, was tested in Phase 2 to integrate the system and determine their combined performance. Acoustic and overpressure data was collected during both test phases in order to characterize the system's acoustic performance. The results from the single thruster and 4- thuster system are discussed and compared.

  20. A novel sensitive method of surface impedance measurement for small samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, C. C.

    1998-02-01

    We propose a novel sensitive method of surface impedance measurement for small samples utilizing a YIG delay line. We will give a full analysis of the relationship between the phase and amplitude of the signals to surface impedance. The sensitivity of this method will be fully addressed. The dispersion relations of magnetostatic waves guided by lossy ground planes will also be given as byproducts of the above analysis.

  1. Combined optical coherence phase microscopy and impedance sensing measurements of differentiating adipose derived stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagnaninchi, P. O.

    2010-02-01

    There is a growing interest in monitoring differentiating stem cells in 2D culture without the use of labelling agents. In this study we explore the feasibility of a multimodality method that combines impedance sensing (IS) and optical coherence phase microscopy (OCPM) to monitor the main biological events associated with adipose derived stem cells differentiation into different lineages. Adipose derived stem cells were cultured in Mesenpro RS medium on gold electrode arrays. The system (ECIS, Applied biophysics) is connected to a lock-in amplifier controlled by a computer, and the complex impedance is derived from the in phase and out of phase voltages. Multi-frequency measurements spanning from 500Hz to 100 kHz are recorded every 2 minutes. The Optical coherence phase microscope is build around a Thorlabs engine (930nm FWHM: 90nm) and connected to a custom build microscope probe. The IS and OCPM were successfully integrated. The electrode area (250um) was imaged with a lateral resolution of 1.5um during impedance measurements. Impedance sensing gave an average measurement of differentiation, as a change in impedance over the electrode area, whereas OCPM provides additional information on the cellular events occurring on top of the electrode. The information retrieved from OCPM will feed a mathematical model correlating cellular differentiation and impedance variation. In this study we have demonstrated the feasibility of integrating two non-invasive monitoring techniques that will be instrumental in designing stem cell based screening assays.

  2. A microchip integrating cell array positioning with in situ single-cell impedance measurement.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaoliang; Zhu, Rong; Zong, Xianli

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents a novel microarray chip integrating cell positioning with in situ, real-time and long-time impedance measurement on a single cell. The microchip integrates a plurality of quadrupole-electrode units (termed positioning electrodes) patterned into an array with pairs of planar electrodes (termed measuring electrodes) located at the centers of each quadrupole-electrode unit. The positioning electrodes are utilized to trap and position living cells onto the measuring electrodes based on negative dielectrophoresis (nDEP), while the measuring electrodes are used to measure impedances of the trapped single cells. Each measuring electrode has a small footprint area of 7 × 7 μm(2) to ensure inhabiting only one single cell on it. However, the electrode with a small surface area has a low double-layer capacitance when it is immersed in a liquid solution, thus generating a large double-layer impedance, which reduces the sensitivity for impedance measurement on the single cell. To enlarge the effective surface areas of the measuring electrodes, a novel surface-modification process is proposed to controllably construct gold nanostructures on the surfaces of the measuring electrodes while the positioning electrodes are unstained. The double layer capacitances of the modified electrodes are increased by about one order after surface-modification. The developed microchip is used to monitor the adhering behavior of a single HeLa cell by measuring its impedance spectra in real time. The measured impedance is analyzed and used to extract cellular electrical parameters, which demonstrated that the cell compresses the electrical double layer in the process of adherence and adheres onto the measuring electrodes after 4-5 hours. PMID:26282920

  3. Measuring the multi-frequency electrical impedance of the mouse gastrocnemius muscle using a tetrapolar technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Fogerson, P. M.; Rutkove, S. B.

    2010-04-01

    Electrical impedance methods can be used to evaluate and monitor neuromuscular disease states. Recently, we have applied tetrapolar surface electrical impedance methods to the gastrocnemius muscle of the rat for this purpose and substantial changes in the impedance parameters after sciatic nerve crush can be identified. In order to be able to study additional animal models of nerve and muscle disease, however, it would highly desirable to be able to perform such impedance measurements in the mouse. Yet the small size of the mouse presents a substantial technical challenge. In this study, we evaluate a basic approach for performing such measurements. A series of thin, stainless steel strip electrodes affixed to the gastrocnemius and interfaced via a separate connector to the Imp SFB7® (Impedimed, Inc), provided an effective means for obtaining impedance data in the 20-500 kHz range. After two weeks, test-retest reproducibility was good, with intra-class correlation coefficients as high 0.84 and variability as low as 12.86 ± 6.18% in the 15 mice studied. Using this approach, it may now be possible to study impedance changes in a variety of mouse models of neuromuscular disease, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, spinal muscular atrophy, muscular dystrophy and Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

  4. Optimally tuned resonant negative capacitance for piezoelectric shunt damping based on measured electromechanical impedance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salloum, Rogério; Heuss, Oliver; Götz, Benedict; Mayer, Dirk

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, a new tuning method for shunt damping with a series resistance, inductance and negative capacitance is proposed and its validity is investigated. It is based on the measured electromechanical impedance of a piezoelectric system, which is represented through an equivalent electrical circuit that takes into account the characteristics of the piezoelectric transducer and the host structure. Afterwards, an additional circuit representing the shunt is connected and the Norton equivalent impedance is obtained at the terminals that represent the mechanical mode of interest. During the tuning process, the optimal shunt parameters are found by minimizing the maximum absolute value of the Norton equivalent impedance over a defined frequency range through a numerical optimization. Taking benefit from the analogy between electrical impedance and mechanical admittance, the minimization of different mechanical responses (displacement, velocity or acceleration) is also proposed and the different optimum shunt parameters obtained are compared. In view of real technical applications, this method allows the integration of a real negative capacitance circuit, i.e., a negative impedance converter, rather than an ideal component. It is thus possible to use the impedance of this circuit and optimize the individual component values. Since this method is based on one simple measurement, it can be applied to arbitrary structures without the need of complex dynamic tests or expensive finite elements calculations. Finally, an experimental analysis is carried out in order to compare the damping performance of the proposed method and the conventional analytical method that minimizes a mechanical frequency response function.

  5. Measurements of the Release of Alpha Quartz: A New Standard for Impedance-Matching Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Boehly, T.R.; Miller, J.E.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Eggert, J.H.; Celliers, P.M.; Hicks, D.G.; Collins, G.W.

    2008-01-14

    Measurements of the release of alpha quartz into SiO2 aerogel are found to agree well with previous near-direct measurements for that aerogel Hugoniot. The results establish alpha quartz as an impedance-matching standard that, because of its transparency, enables higher-accuracy measurements and knowledge of the pressure profile in the pusher.

  6. Shock wave interaction with interfaces between materials having different acoustic impedances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, H.; Moosavi-Nejad, S.; Akiyama, H.; Menezes, V.

    2014-03-01

    We experimentally examined interaction of blast waves with water-air/air-water interfaces through high-speed-real-time visualization and measurement of pressure across the waves. The underwater shock wave, which was expected to reflect totally at the water-air interface, was observed transmitting a shock front to air. Transmission of a blast wave from air to water was also visualized and evaluated. Underwater shock waves are used in several medical/biological procedures, where such unforeseen transmissions can result in detriments. The details provide a guideline to evaluate blast wave transmissions, which can induce tissue and brain injuries. The results explain mechanisms behind blast-induced traumatic brain injury.

  7. Material Property Measurement in Hostile Environments using Laser Acoustics

    SciTech Connect

    Ken L. Telschow

    2004-08-01

    Acoustic methods are well known and have been used to measure various intrinsic material properties, such as, elastic coefficients, density, crystal axis orientation, microstructural texture, and residual stress. Extrinsic properties, such as, dimensions, motion variables or temperature are also readily determined from acoustic methods. Laser acoustics, employing optical generation and detection of elastic waves, has a unique advantage over other acoustic methods—it is noncontacting, uses the sample surface itself for transduction, requires no couplant or invasive sample surface preparation and can be utilized in any hostile environment allowing optical access to the sample surface. In addition, optical generation and detection probe beams can be focused to the micron scale and/or shaped to alter the transduction process with a degree of control not possible using contact transduction methods. Laser methods are amenable to both continuous wave and pulse-echo measurements and have been used from Hz to 100’s of GHz (time scales from sec to psec) and with amplitudes sufficient to fracture materials. This paper shall review recent applications of laser acoustic methods to determining material properties in hostile environments that preclude the use of contacting transduction techniques. Example environments include high temperature (>1000C) sintering and molten metal processing, thin film deposition by plasma techniques, materials moving at high velocity during the fabrication process and nuclear high radiation regions. Recent technological advances in solid-state lasers and telecommunications have greatly aided the development and implementation of laser acoustic methods, particularly at ultra high frequencies. Consequently, laser acoustic material property measurements exhibit high precision and reproducibility today. In addition, optical techniques provide methods of imaging acoustic motion that is both quantitative and rapid. Possible future directions for

  8. Correlation between T-Wave Alternans and Cardiac Volume Status via Intrathoracic Impedance Measurements.

    PubMed

    Dizon, Jose'; Hickey, Kathleen; Garan, Hasan

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. The presence of T-wave alternans (TWA) has been shown to correlate with a higher risk for sudden cardiac death. The mechanism of TWA may be related to abnormalities in intracellular calcium handling, which is a mechanism in heart failure and associated arrhythmias as well. However, an association between TWA and cardiac volume status has not been demonstrated. Methods Used. We report the case of a 54-year-old man with a dilated cardiomyopathy who had a biventricular defibrillator system implanted with intrathoracic impedance measurement capability. We performed baseline TWA testing, which was normal and was associated with normal clinical status and normal intrathoracic impedance. We followed intrathoracic impedance measurements, and when the measurement suggested volume overload eight months later, we repeated the TWA test. TWA was grossly positive, and volume overload was corroborated with clinical heart failure. The patient was diuresed, and when clinical status and intrathoracic impedance returned to normal a month later, we repeated TWA, which was again negative. Conclusion. This case demonstrates a correlation between cardiac volume status, as measured by intrathoracic impedance measurements, and TWA status. This data suggests that conditions of volume overload such as heart failure could be causally related to increased TWA, perhaps by the common mechanism of altered intracellular calcium handling. PMID:24826235

  9. Correlation between T-Wave Alternans and Cardiac Volume Status via Intrathoracic Impedance Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Dizon, Jose'; Hickey, Kathleen; Garan, Hasan

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. The presence of T-wave alternans (TWA) has been shown to correlate with a higher risk for sudden cardiac death. The mechanism of TWA may be related to abnormalities in intracellular calcium handling, which is a mechanism in heart failure and associated arrhythmias as well. However, an association between TWA and cardiac volume status has not been demonstrated. Methods Used. We report the case of a 54-year-old man with a dilated cardiomyopathy who had a biventricular defibrillator system implanted with intrathoracic impedance measurement capability. We performed baseline TWA testing, which was normal and was associated with normal clinical status and normal intrathoracic impedance. We followed intrathoracic impedance measurements, and when the measurement suggested volume overload eight months later, we repeated the TWA test. TWA was grossly positive, and volume overload was corroborated with clinical heart failure. The patient was diuresed, and when clinical status and intrathoracic impedance returned to normal a month later, we repeated TWA, which was again negative. Conclusion. This case demonstrates a correlation between cardiac volume status, as measured by intrathoracic impedance measurements, and TWA status. This data suggests that conditions of volume overload such as heart failure could be causally related to increased TWA, perhaps by the common mechanism of altered intracellular calcium handling. PMID:24826235

  10. Taking advantage of acoustic inhomogeneities in photoacoustic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da Silva, Anabela; Handschin, Charles; Riedinger, Christophe; Piasecki, Julien; Mensah, Serge; Litman, Amélie; Akhouayri, Hassan

    2016-03-01

    Photoacoustic offers promising perspectives in probing and imaging subsurface optically absorbing structures in biological tissues. The optical uence absorbed is partly dissipated into heat accompanied with microdilatations that generate acoustic pressure waves, the intensity which is related to the amount of fluuence absorbed. Hence the photoacoustic signal measured offers access, at least potentially, to a local monitoring of the absorption coefficient, in 3D if tomographic measurements are considered. However, due to both the diffusing and absorbing nature of the surrounding tissues, the major part of the uence is deposited locally at the periphery of the tissue, generating an intense acoustic pressure wave that may hide relevant photoacoustic signals. Experimental strategies have been developed in order to measure exclusively the photoacoustic waves generated by the structure of interest (orthogonal illumination and detection). Temporal or more sophisticated filters (wavelets) can also be applied. However, the measurement of this primary acoustic wave carries a lot of information about the acoustically inhomogeneous nature of the medium. We propose a protocol that includes the processing of this primary intense acoustic wave, leading to the quantification of the surrounding medium sound speed, and, if appropriate to an acoustical parametric image of the heterogeneities. This information is then included as prior knowledge in the photoacoustic reconstruction scheme to improve the localization and quantification.

  11. Acoustic beamforming through a thin plate using vibration measurements.

    PubMed

    Leclère, Quentin; Picard, Christophe

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this paper is to propose a methodology to localize acoustic sources from the measurement of airborne induced vibrations of a thin structure. Targeted applications are the identification of acoustic sources through a thin wall, with a potential filtration of the incident field, which may be of practical interest, for instance, when identifying exterior acoustic sources from the inside of a moving vehicle. Two methods are coupled here to achieve this purpose: the Force Analysis Technique (FAT), used to identify the parietal pressure field exciting the thin structure from vibration measurements, and beamforming, used for the localization of acoustic sources from the (FAT-)identified parietal pressure. The coupling of the two methods is studied first from a theoretical point of view, and an experimental proof of concept is then presented, showing the feasibility and relevance of the proposed approach. PMID:26093428

  12. New equivalent-electrical circuit model and a practical measurement method for human body impedance.

    PubMed

    Chinen, Koyu; Kinjo, Ichiko; Zamami, Aki; Irei, Kotoyo; Nagayama, Kanako

    2015-01-01

    Human body impedance analysis is an effective tool to extract electrical information from tissues in the human body. This paper presents a new measurement method of impedance using armpit electrode and a new equivalent circuit model for the human body. The lowest impedance was measured by using an LCR meter and six electrodes including armpit electrodes. The electrical equivalent circuit model for the cell consists of resistance R and capacitance C. The R represents electrical resistance of the liquid of the inside and outside of the cell, and the C represents high frequency conductance of the cell membrane. We propose an equivalent circuit model which consists of five parallel high frequency-passing CR circuits. The proposed equivalent circuit represents alpha distribution in the impedance measured at a lower frequency range due to ion current of the outside of the cell, and beta distribution at a high frequency range due to the cell membrane and the liquid inside cell. The calculated values by using the proposed equivalent circuit model were consistent with the measured values for the human body impedance. PMID:26406074

  13. The determination of the acoustic parameters of volcanic rocks from compressional velocity measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carroll, R.D.

    1969-01-01

    A statistical analysis was made of the relationship of various acoustic parameters of volcanic rocks to compressional wave velocities for data obtained in a volcanic region in Nevada. Some additional samples, chiefly granitic rocks, were also included in the study to extend the range of parameters and the variety of siliceous rock types sampled. Laboratory acoustic measurements obtained on 62 dry core samples were grouped with similar measurements obtained from geophysical logging devices at several depth intervals in a hole from which 15 of the core samples had been obtained. The effects of lithostatic and hydrostatic load on changing the rock acoustic parameters measured in the hole were noticeable when compared with the laboratory measurements on the same core. The results of the analyses determined by grouping all of the data, however, indicate that dynamic Young's, shear and bulk modulus, shear velocity, shear and compressional characteristic impedance, as well as amplitude and energy reflection coefficients may be reliably estimated on the basis of the compressional wave velocities of the rocks investigated. Less precise estimates can be made of density based on the rock compressional velocity. The possible extension of these relationships to include many siliceous rocks is suggested. ?? 1969.

  14. Acoustic levitator for containerless measurements on low temperature liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Benmore, Chris J; Weber, Richard; Neuefeind, Joerg C; Rey, Charles A A

    2009-01-01

    A single-axis acoustic levitator was constructed and used to levitate liquid and solid drops at temperatures from -40 to +40 C. The levitator consisted of: (i) two acoustic transducers mounted on a rigid vertical support that was bolted to an optical breadboard, (ii) a acoustic power supply that controlled acoustic intensity, relative phase of the drive to the transducers, and could modulate the acoustic forces at frequencies up to 1kHz, (iii) a video camera, and (iv) a system for providing a stream of controlled temperature gas flow over the sample. The acoustic transducers were operated at their resonant frequency of ~ 22 kHz and could produce sound pressure levels up to 160 dB. The force applied by the acoustic field could be modulated using a frequency generator to excite oscillations in the sample. Sample temperature was controlled using a modified Cryostream Plus and measured using thermocouples and an infrared thermal imager. The levitator was installed at x-ray beamline 11 ID-C at the Advanced Photon Source and used to investigate the structure of supercooled liquids.

  15. Acoustic levitator for structure measurements on low temperature liquid droplets.

    PubMed

    Weber, J K R; Rey, C A; Neuefeind, J; Benmore, C J

    2009-08-01

    A single-axis acoustic levitator was constructed and used to levitate liquid and solid drops of 1-3 mm in diameter at temperatures in the range -40 to +40 degrees C. The levitator comprised (i) two acoustic transducers mounted on a rigid vertical support that was bolted to an optical breadboard, (ii) an acoustic power supply that controlled acoustic intensity, relative phase of the drive to the transducers, and could modulate the acoustic forces at frequencies up to 1 kHz, (iii) a video camera, and (iv) a system for providing a stream of controlled temperature gas flow over the sample. The acoustic transducers were operated at their resonant frequency of approximately 22 kHz and could produce sound pressure levels of up to 160 dB. The force applied by the acoustic field could be modulated to excite oscillations in the sample. Sample temperature was controlled using a modified Cryostream Plus and measured using thermocouples and an infrared thermal imager. The levitator was installed at x-ray beamline 11 ID-C at the Advanced Photon Source and used to investigate the structure of supercooled liquids. PMID:19725664

  16. Crew Quarters (CQ) and Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) Measurement Facility Combined Impedance Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scully, Robert C.

    2011-01-01

    This report documents an investigation into observed failures associated with conducted susceptibility testing of Crew Quarters (CQ) hardware in the Johnson Space Center (JSC) Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) Measurement Facility, and the work accomplished to identify the source of the observed behavior. Investigation led to the conclusion that the hardware power input impedance was interacting with the facility power impedance leading to instability at the observed frequencies of susceptibility. Testing performed in other facilities did not show this same behavior, pointing back to the EMI Measurement Facility power as the potential root cause. A LISN emulating the Station power bus impedance was inserted into the power circuit, and the susceptibility was eliminated from the measurements.

  17. Classroom acoustics in Omaha, Nebraska: Measurements and outreach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowden, Erica E.; Wang, Lily M.; Bradley, David T.

    2002-11-01

    This project collected data detailing the current status of classroom acoustics while simultaneously increasing awareness of educational acoustics and exposure to acoustical engineering research in local schools. In 8 Omaha-area schools, 2 acoustical aspects which directly influence speech intelligibility were measured and studied: (1) background noise levels resulting from a building's mechanical systems; and (2) reverberation times within the classroom. Prior to each measurement session, a presentation on good classroom acoustic principles was presented to the teacher and students in that classroom. Subsequently, the teacher and students assisted the principal investigator and research assistants in the measurement of the acoustic data from their classroom. In total, 13 classrooms were studied, with the assistance of 425 middle and high school students in 14 different classes. The background noise results have been associated with commonly used noise criterion curves. Results are compared to recommended background noise levels and reverberation times suggested by ANSI standard S12.60-2002. The resulting database provides knowledge on the current status of classrooms in Omaha, and may be indicative of classroom situations across the midwestern United States.

  18. The development of the miniaturized waveform receiver with the function measuring Antenna Impedance in space plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, H.; Kojima, H.; Fukuhara, H.; Okada, S.; Yamakawa, H.

    2012-04-01

    Plasma wave is one of the most essential physical quantities in the solar terrestrial physics. The role of plasma wave receiver onboard satellites is to detect plasma waves in space with a good signal to noise ratio. There are two types of plasma wave receivers, the sweep frequency analyzer and the waveform capture. While the sweep frequency analyzer provides plasma wave spectra, the waveform capture obtains waveforms with phase information that is significant in studying nonlinear phenomena. Antenna sensors to observe electric fields of the plasma waves show different features in plasmas from in vacuum. The antenna impedances have specific characteristics in the frequency domain because of the dispersion of plasmas. These antenna impedances are expressed with complex number. We need to know not only the antenna impedances but also the transfer functions of plasma wave receiver's circuits in order to calibrate observed waveforms precisely. The impedances of the electric field antennas are affected by a state of surrounding plasmas. Since satellites run through various regions with different plasma parameters, we precisely should measure the antenna impedances onboard spacecraft. On the contrary, we can obtain the plasma density and by measuring the antenna impedances. Several formulas of the antenna impedance measurement system were proposed. A synchronous detection method is used on the BepiColombo Mercury Magnetospheric Orbiter (MMO), which will be launched in 2014. The digital data are stored in the onboard memory. They are read out and converted to the analog waveforms by D/A converter. They are fed into the input of the preamplifiers of antenna sensors through a resistor. We can calculate a transfer function of the circuit by applying the synchronous detection method to the output waveform from waveform receivers and digital data as a signal source. The size of this system is same as an A5 board. In recent years, Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC

  19. Rapid Impedance Spectrum Measurements for State-of-Health Assessment of Energy Storage Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Jon P. Christophersen; John L. Morrison; Chester G. Motloch; William H. Morrison

    2012-04-01

    Harmonic compensated synchronous detection (HCSD) is a technique that can be used to measure wideband impedance spectra within seconds based on an input sum-of-sines signal having a frequency spread separated by harmonics. The battery (or other energy storage device) is excited with a sum-of-sines current signal that has a duration of at least one period of the lowest frequency. The voltage response is then captured and synchronously detected at each frequency of interest to determine the impedance spectra. This technique was successfully simulated using a simplified battery model and then verified with commercially available Sanyo lithium-ion cells. Simulations revealed the presence of a start-up transient effect when only one period of the lowest frequency is included in the excitation signal. This transient effect appears to only influence the low-frequency impedance measurements and can be reduced when a longer input signal is used. Furthermore, lithium-ion cell testing has indicated that the transient effect does not seem to impact the charge transfer resistance in the mid-frequency region. The degradation rates for the charge transfer resistance measured from the HCSD technique were very similar to the changes observed from standardized impedance spectroscopy methods. Results from these studies, therefore, indicate that HCSD is a viable, rapid alternative approach to acquiring impedance spectra.

  20. An Analysis of Electrical Impedance Measurements Applied for Plant N Status Estimation in Lettuce (Lactuca sativa)

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Huerta, Rafael F.; de J. Ortiz-Melendez, Antonio; Guevara-Gonzalez, Ramon G.; Torres-Pacheco, Irineo; Herrera-Ruiz, Gilberto; Contreras-Medina, Luis M.; Prado-Olivarez, Juan; Ocampo-Velazquez, Rosalia V.

    2014-01-01

    Nitrogen plays a key role in crop yields. Hence, farmers may apply excessive N fertilizers to crop fields, inducing environmental pollution. Crop N monitoring methods have been developed to improve N fertilizer management, most of them based on leaf or canopy optical-property measurements. However, sensitivity to environmental interference remains an important drawback. Electrical impedance has been applied to determine the physiological and nutritional status of plant tissue, but no studies related to plant-N contents are reported. The objective of this article is to analyze how the electrical impedance response of plants is affected by their N status. Four sets of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) with a different N-source concentrations per set were used. Total nitrogen and electrical impedance spectra (in a 1 to 100 kHz frequency range) were measured five times per set, three times every other day. Minimum phase angles of impedance spectra were detected and analyzed, together with the frequency value in which they occurred, and their magnitude at that frequency. High and positive correlation was observed between plant N content and frequency values at minimum phase angle with no significant variations detected between days of measurement. These results suggest that electrical impedance can be sensitive to plant N status. PMID:25057134

  1. Studies of longitudinal profile of electron bunches and impedance measurements at Indus-2 synchrotron radiation source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garg, Akash Deep; Yadav, S.; Kumar, Mukesh; Shrivastava, B. B.; Karnewar, A. K.; Ojha, A.; Puntambekar, T. A.

    2016-04-01

    Indus-2 is a 3rd generation synchrotron radiation source at the Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology (RRCAT) in India. We study the longitudinal profile of electrons in Indus-2 by using dual sweep synchroscan streak camera at visible diagnostic beamline. In this paper, the longitudinal profiles of electron bunch are analyzed by filling beam current in a single bunch mode. These studies are carried at injection energy (550 MeV) and at ramped beam energy (2.5 GeV). The effects of the wakefield generated interactions between the circulating electrons and the surrounding vacuum chamber are analyzed in terms of measured effects on longitudinal beam distribution. The impedance of the storage ring is obtained by fitting the solutions of Haissinski equation to the measured bunch lengthening with different impedance models. The impedance of storage ring obtained by a series R+L impedance model indicates a resistance (R) of 1350±125 Ω, an inductance (L) of 180±25 nH and broadband impedance of 2.69 Ω. These results are also compared with the values obtained from measured synchronous phase advancing and scaling laws. These studies are very useful in better understanding and control of the electromagnetic interactions.

  2. Time-invariant measurement of time-varying bioimpedance using vector impedance analysis.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, B; Louarroudi, E; Pintelon, R

    2015-03-01

    When stepped-sine impedance spectroscopy measurements are carried out on (periodically) time-varying bio-systems, the inherent time-variant (time-periodic) parts are traditionally ignored or mitigated by filtering. The latter, however, lacks theoretical foundation and, in this paper, it is shown that it only works under certain specific conditions. Besides, we propose an alternative method, based on multisine signals, that exploits the non-stationary nature in time-varying bio-systems with a dominant periodic character, such as cardiovascular and respiratory systems, or measurements interfered with by their physiological activities. The novel method extracts the best—in a mean square sense—linear time-invariant (BLTI) impedance approximation ZBLTI(jω) of a periodically time-varying (PTV) impedance ZPTV(jω, t) as well as its time-periodic part. Relying on the geometrical interpretation of the BLTI concept, a new impedance analysis tool, called vector impedance analysis (VIA), is also presented. The theoretical and practical aspects are validated through measurements performed on a PTV dummy circuit and on an in vivo myocardial tissue. PMID:25700023

  3. In vivo measurement of mechanical impedance of bone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, D. R.; Thompson, G.

    1974-01-01

    System of measurement provides indications of ulnar properties independent of characteristics of surrounding soft tissue and other bones. Mechanical modal approximated ulnar response so average bending rigidity could be determined to provide direct index of bone resistance to bending loading.

  4. UNIVERSAL AUTO-CALIBRATION FOR A RAPID BATTERY IMPEDANCE SPECTRUM MEASUREMENT DEVICE

    SciTech Connect

    Jon P. Christophersen; John L. Morrison; William H. Morrison

    2014-03-01

    Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy has been shown to be a valuable tool for diagnostics and prognostics of energy storage devices such as batteries and ultra-capacitors. Although measurements have been typically confined to laboratory environments, rapid impedance spectrum measurement techniques have been developed for on-line, embedded applications as well. The prototype hardware for the rapid technique has been validated using lithium-ion batteries, but issues with calibration had also been identified. A new, universal automatic calibration technique was developed to address the identified issues while also enabling a more simplified approach. A single, broad-frequency range is used to calibrate the system and then scaled to the actual range and conditions used when measuring a device under test. The range used for calibration must be broad relative to the expected measurement conditions for the scaling to be successful. Validation studies were performed by comparing the universal calibration approach with data acquired from targeted calibration ranges based on the expected range of performance for the device under test. First, a mid-level shunt range was used for calibration and used to measure devices with lower and higher impedance. Next, a high excitation current level was used for calibration, followed by measurements using lower currents. Finally, calibration was performed over a wide frequency range and used to measure test articles with a lower set of frequencies. In all cases, the universal calibration approach compared very well with results acquired following a targeted calibration. Additionally, the shunts used for the automated calibration technique were successfully characterized such that the rapid impedance measurements compare very well with laboratory-scale measurements. These data indicate that the universal approach can be successfully used for onboard rapid impedance spectra measurements for a broad set of test devices and range of

  5. Verification of three-microphone impedance tube method for measurement of transmission loss in aerogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connick, Robert J.

    Accurate measurement of normal incident transmission loss is essential for the acoustic characterization of building materials. In this research, a method of measuring normal incidence sound transmission loss proposed by Salissou et al. as a complement to standard E2611-09 of the American Society for Testing and Materials [Standard Test Method for Measurement of Normal Incidence Sound Transmission of Acoustical Materials Based on the Transfer Matrix Method (American Society for Testing and Materials, New York, 2009)] is verified. Two sam- ples from the original literature are used to verify the method as well as a Filtros RTM sample. Following the verification, several nano-material Aerogel samples are measured.

  6. Hydrothermal vent flow and turbulence measurements with acoustic scintillation instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Iorio, D.; Xu, G.

    2009-12-01

    Acoustically derived measurements of hydrothermal vent flow and turbulence were obtained from the active black smoker Dante in the Main Endeavour vent field, using scintillation analysis from one-way transmissions. The scintillation transmitter and receiver array formed a 93 m acoustic path through the buoyant plume 20 m above the structure. The acoustic path was parallel to the valley sidewall where the M2 tidal currents are approximately aligned along ridge due to topographic steering by the valley walls and hence most of the plume displacement is expected to occur along the acoustic path. On one deployment, data were collected for 6.5 weeks and vertical velocities range from 0.1 to 0.2 m/s showing a strong dependence on the spring/neap tidal cycle. The refractive index fluctuations which can be paramaterized in terms of the root-mean-square temperature fluctuations also shows a strong tidal modulation during spring tide.

  7. Longitudinal impedance measurement of an RK-TBA induction accelerating gap

    SciTech Connect

    Eylon, S.; Henestroza, E.; Kim, J.-S.; Houck, T.L.; Westenskow, G.A.; Yu, S.S.

    1997-05-01

    Induction accelerating gap designs are being studied for Relativistic Klystron Two-Beam Accelerator (RK-TBA) applications. The accelerating gap has to satisfy the following major requirements: hold-off of the applied accelerating voltage pulse, low transverse impedance to limit beam breakup, low longitudinal impedance at the beam-modulation frequency to minimize power loss. Various gap geometries, materials and novel insulating techniques were explored to optimize the gap design. We report on the experimental effort to evaluate the rf properties of the accelerating gaps in a simple pillbox cavity structure. The experimental cavity setup was designed using the AMOS, MAFIA and URMEL numerical codes. Longitudinal impedance measurements above beam-tube cut-off frequency using a single-wire measuring system are presented.

  8. Shot Noise of a Quantum Dot Measured with Gigahertz Impedance Matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasler, T.; Jung, M.; Ranjan, V.; Puebla-Hellmann, G.; Wallraff, A.; Schönenberger, C.

    2015-11-01

    The demand for a fast high-frequency read-out of high-impedance devices, such as quantum dots, necessitates impedance matching. Here we use a resonant impedance-matching circuit (a stub tuner) realized by on-chip superconducting transmission lines to measure the electronic shot noise of a carbon-nanotube quantum dot at a frequency close to 3 GHz in an efficient way. As compared to wideband detection without impedance matching, the signal-to-noise ratio can be enhanced by as much as a factor of 800 for a device with an impedance of 100 k Ω . The advantage of the stub resonator concept is the ease with which the response of the circuit can be predicted, designed, and fabricated. We further demonstrate that all relevant matching circuit parameters can reliably be deduced from power-reflectance measurements and then used to predict the power-transmission function from the device through the circuit. The shot noise of the carbon-nanotube quantum dot in the Coulomb blockade regime shows an oscillating suppression below the Schottky value of 2 e I , as well as an enhancement in specific regions.

  9. Development of a new rapid measurement technique for fish embryo membrane permeability studies using impedance spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, T.; Wang, R.Y.; Bao, Q-Y.; Rawson, D.M.

    2006-01-01

    Information on fish embryo membrane permeability is vital in their cryopreservation. Whilst conventional volumetric measurement based assessment methods have been widely used in fish embryo membrane permeability studies, they are lengthy and reduce the capacity for multi-embryo measurement during an experimental run. A new rapid ‘real-time’ measurement technique is required to determine membrane permeability during cryoprotectant treatment. In this study, zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryo membrane permeability to cryoprotectants was investigated using impedance spectroscopy. An embryo holding cell, capable of holding up to 10 zebrafish embryos was built incorporating the original system electrods for measuring the impedance spectra. The holding cell was tested with deionised water and a series of KCl solutions with known conductance values to confirm the performance of the modified system. Untreated intact embryos were then tested to optimise the loading capacity and sensitivity of the system. To study the impedance changes of zebrafish embryos during cryoprotectant exposure, three, six or nine embryos at 50% epiboly stage were loaded into the holding cell in egg water, which was then removed and replaced by 0.5, 1.0, 2.0 or 3 M methanol or dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). The impedance changes of the loaded embryos in different cryoprotectant solutions were monitored over 30 min at 22 °C, immediately following embryo exposure to cryoprotectants, at the frequency range of 10–106 Hz. The impedance changes of the embryos in egg water were used as controls. Results from this study showed that the optimum embryo loading level was six embryos per cell for each experimental run. The optimum frequency was identified at 103.14 or 1380 Hz which provided good sensitivity and reproducibility. Significant impedance changes were detected after embryos were exposed to different concentrations of cryoprotectants. The results agreed well with those obtained from conventional

  10. Quantitative measurement of acoustic pressure in the focal zone of acoustic lens-line focusing using the Schlieren method.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xueping; Cheng, Qian; Xu, Zheng; Qian, Menglu; Han, Qingbang

    2016-04-01

    This paper proposes a theory and method for quantitative measurement of the acoustic lens-line focusing ultrasonic (ALLFU) field in its focal spot size and acoustic pressure using the Schlieren imaging technique. Using Fourier transformation, the relationship between the brightness of the Schlieren image and the acoustic pressure was introduced. The ALLFU field was simulated using finite element method and compared with the Schlieren acoustic field image. The measurement of the focal spot size was performed using the Schlieren method. The acoustic pressure in the focal zone of the ALLFU field and the transducer-transmitting voltage response were quantitatively determined by measuring the diffraction light fringe intensity. The results show that the brightness of the Schlieren image is a linear function of the acoustic intensity when the acousto-optic interaction length remains constant and the acoustic field is weak. PMID:27139646

  11. Field-Deployable Acoustic Digital Systems for Noise Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shams, Qamar A.; Wright, Kenneth D.; Lunsford, Charles B.; Smith, Charlie D.

    2000-01-01

    Langley Research Center (LaRC) has for years been a leader in field acoustic array measurement technique. Two field-deployable digital measurement systems have been developed to support acoustic research programs at LaRC. For several years, LaRC has used the Digital Acoustic Measurement System (DAMS) for measuring the acoustic noise levels from rotorcraft and tiltrotor aircraft. Recently, a second system called Remote Acquisition and Storage System (RASS) was developed and deployed for the first time in the field along with DAMS system for the Community Noise Flight Test using the NASA LaRC-757 aircraft during April, 2000. The test was performed at Airborne Airport in Wilmington, OH to validate predicted noise reduction benefits from alternative operational procedures. The test matrix was composed of various combinations of altitude, cutback power, and aircraft weight. The DAMS digitizes the acoustic inputs at the microphone site and can be located up to 2000 feet from the van which houses the acquisition, storage and analysis equipment. Digitized data from up to 10 microphones is recorded on a Jaz disk and is analyzed post-test by microcomputer system. The RASS digitizes and stores acoustic inputs at the microphone site that can be located up to three miles from the base station and can compose a 3 mile by 3 mile array of microphones. 16-bit digitized data from the microphones is stored on removable Jaz disk and is transferred through a high speed array to a very large high speed permanent storage device. Up to 30 microphones can be utilized in the array. System control and monitoring is accomplished via Radio Frequency (RF) link. This paper will present a detailed description of both systems, along with acoustic data analysis from both systems.

  12. Impedance spectroscopy for detection of mold in archives with an integrated reference measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papireddy Vinayaka, P.; Van Den Driesche, S.; Janssen, S.; Frodl, M.; Blank, R.; Cipriani, F.; Lang, W.; Vellekoop, M. J.

    2015-06-01

    In this work, we present a new miniaturized culture medium based sensor system where we apply an optical reference in an impedance measurement approach for the detection of mold in archives. The designed sensor comprises a chamber with pre-loaded culture medium which promotes the growth of archive mold species. Growth of mold is detected by measuring changes in the impedance of the culture medium caused due to increase in the pH (from 5.5 to 8) with integrated electrodes. Integration of the reference measurement helps in determining the sensitivity of the sensor. The colorimetric principle serves as a reference measurement that indicates a pH change after which further pH shifts can be determined using impedance measurement. In this context, some of the major archive mold species Eurotium amstelodami, Aspergillus penicillioides and Aspergillus restrictus have been successfully analyzed on-chip. Growth of Eurotium amstelodami shows a proportional impedance change of 10 % (12 chips tested) per day, with a sensitivity of 0.6 kΩ/pH unit.

  13. [A Digital System for Bioimpedance and Electrical Impedance Tomography Measurement System].

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaoyan; Gao, Nana; Huang, Huafang

    2015-06-01

    A digital system for bioimpedance and electrical impedance tomography (EIT) measurement controlled by an ATmega16 microcontroller was constructed in our laboratory. There are eight digital electrodes using AD5933 to measure the impedance of the targets, and the data is transmitted to the computer wirelessly through nRF24L01. The structure of the system, circuit design, system testing, vitro measurements of animals' tissues and electrical impedance tomography are introduced specifically in this paper. The experimental results showed that the system relative error was 0.42%, and the signal noise ratio was 76.3 dB. The system not only can be used to measure the impedance by any two electrodes within the frequency of 1-100 kHz in a sweep scanning, but also can reconstruct the images of EIT. The animal experiments showed that the data was valid and plots were fitting with Cole-Cole theory. The testing verified the feasibility and effectiveness of the system. The images reconstructed of a salt-water tank are satisfactory and match with the actual distribution of the tank. The system improves the effectiveness of the front-end measuring signal and the stability of the system greatly. PMID:26485981

  14. A new correction technique for measuring respiratory impedance through an endotracheal tube.

    PubMed

    Lorino, A M; Beydon, L; Mariette, C; Dahan, E; Lorino, H

    1996-05-01

    Measurement of respiratory impedance (Zrs) in intubated patients requires corrections for flow-dependent resistance and air compression inside the endotracheal tube (ET). The purpose of this study was to test a new correction technique for these effects. We therefore studied 110 patients in two conditions: breathing normally (C1), or breathing through an ET placed at the mouth (C2). In C1, we measured pressure and flow signals at the mouth, and in C2, at the ET inlet, during application of a pseudorandom forced excitation (4-32 Hz). In C1, respiratory impedance was calculated directly as Z1. In C2, pressure data were first corrected for the flow-dependent resistance of the ET, and respiratory impedance was then corrected both for gas compression inside the set-up and ET inertance (impedance Z2). Strong linear relationships were found between the reference and corrected estimates of the resistance at 6 Hz, the frequency dependence of resistance and the resonant frequency. The mean normalized distance between Z1 and Z2 observed in the patients over the 4-32 Hz frequency range was about 14% for resistance and 12% for reactance (-9% and -4%, respectively, when considering the algebraic value of the distance). This slight underestimation of both components of impedance might be due to an overcorrection of pressure for the flow-dependent resistance of the ET. We conclude that, in intubated patients, newly tested corrections for the mechanical contribution of the endotracheal tube may yield a fair estimate of respiratory impedance when pressure is measured at the inlet of the endotracheal tube. PMID:8793472

  15. Linear and Nonlinear Acoustic Measurements of Buried Landmines: Detection Schemes Near Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabatier, James M.

    2003-03-01

    Measurements of the acoustic impedance of an anti-personnel and anti-tank plastic, blast-hardened landmines reveal resonances in the frequency range between 100 and 1000 Hz. The top surface resonances are due to its complicated mechanical structure vibrating in air. The lowest mode results from the blast hardened design of the landmine. Typically, a portion or cavity of the landmine is designed to absorb the shock from an explosion that is intended to detonate the landmine but still allow the landmine to trigger its explosive device when a slow steady pressure is applied. The mechanical design of the blast hardened aspects results in a high Q simple harmonic oscillator resonance of the top surface. At higher frequencies the top surface behaves like thin circular plate acoustic modes. When these landmines are buried in soils, the modes are mass loaded. Resonances from measurements of the normal component of the acoustically induced soil surface particle velocity are used for detection schemes. Since the interface between the top plate and the soil responds to pressure fluctuations nonlinearly, characteristics of landmines, the soil, and the interface are rich in nonlinear physics and allow for new methods of landmine detection not previously exploited.

  16. Tissue electrical properties measured by bioelectrical impedance analysis among healthy and sportsmen population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapica, Dominik; Warchulińska, Joanna; Jakubiak, Monika; Teter, Mariusz; Mlak, Radosław; Hałabiś, Magdalena; Wójcik, Waldemar; Małecka-Massalska, Teresa

    2015-09-01

    Introduction: Bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) is a useful tool to asses human body composition and nutrition status; multi-frequency BIA has a higher accuracy than single-frequency BIA. In our study a difference of impedance values (Z) at 5, 100 and 200 kHz and Z200/Z5 index between professional athletes and control group were determined. Methods: In this research 105 people were tested, divided into control group (72 people: 35 males and 37 females) and professional athletes (33 people: 16 males and 17 females). Impedance was measured at three frequency values - 5, 100 and 200 kHz; with received values the Z200/Z5 index was calculated. Results: In most compared subgroups impedance values showed significantly lower values in athletes than in control group (5 kHz - males: p=0.136, females: p=0.001, 100 kHz - males: p=0.039, females: p<0.0001, 200 kHz - males: p=0.047, females: p<0.0001) Z200/Z5 index also showed lower value in athletes than in control group (p=0.016 for males, p<0.0001 for females). Conclusion: Lower values of impedance and Z200/Z5 index indicates a better nutrition status and general health condition of athletes than in control group.

  17. A direct-display oscillation method for measurement of respiratory impedance.

    PubMed

    Franetzki, M; Prestele, K; Korn, V

    1979-05-01

    The basic principle of the method described here is derived from a variant of the oscillation method. A reference impedance is connected to the mouth; between these two an oscillating flow is imposed. As a reference impedance we use a flexible tube, which acts as a virtually pure inductance or inertance. Respiration is hardly impeded. The only measured parameter is the alternating pressure in front of the mouth and this is easily picked up by a simple microphone. In contrast to former direct-display methods, the inertia and elasticity of the respiratory gas and the respiratory tract, i.e., airways including lungs and thorax, are also taken into account for the evaluation. The respiratory resistance is studied as a complex parameters, i.e., as an impedance. With the aid of diagrams or via electronic computation circuitry, the direct and continuous display of all impedance components such as its magnitude and phase, resistance, and reactance is possible. They can be read out as a function of time, respiratory flow, or volume. PMID:468614

  18. Electrode-Skin contact impedance: In vivo measurements on an ovine model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, D. T.; Kosobrodov, R.; Barry, M. A.; Chik, W.; Jin, C.; Oh, T. I.; Thiagalingam, A.; McEwan, A.

    2013-04-01

    The problem of electrical impedance between the skin and the electrode is an on-going challenge in bio-electronics. This is particularly true in the case of Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT), which uses a large number of skin-contact electrodes and is very sensitive to noise. In the present article, contact impedance is measured and compared for a range of electrodes placed on the thorax of an ovine model. The study has been approved by the Westmead Hospital Animal Ethics Committee. The electrode models that were employed in the research are Ag/AgCl electrodes (E1), commonly used for ECG and EIT measurements in both humans and animal models, stainless steel crocodile clips (E2), typically used on animal models, and novel multi-point dry electrodes in two modifications: bronze plated (E3) and nickel plated (E4). Further, since the contact impedance is mostly attributed to the acellular outer layer of the skin, in our experiment, we attempted to study the effect of this layer by comparing the results when the skin is intact and when electrodes are introduced underneath the skin through small cuts. This boundary effect was assessed by comparison of measurements obtained during E2 skin surface contact, and sub-cutaneous contact (E5). Twelve gauge intradermal needles were also tested as an electrode (E6). The full impedance spectrum, from 500 Hz to 300 kHz, was recorded, analysed and compared. As expected, the contact impedance in the more invasive cases, i.e the electrodes under the skin, is significantly lower than in the non-invasive cases. At the frequency of 50 kHz which is commonly used in lung EIT acquisition, electrodes E3, E4 and E6 demonstrated contact impedance of less than 200 Ω, compared to more than 400 Ω measured for electrodes E1, E2 and E5. In conclusion, the novel multipoint electrodes proved to be best suited for EIT purposes, because they are non-invasive and have lower contact impedance than Ag/AgCl and crocodile clips, in both invasive and

  19. RF impedance measurement status for the 7-GeV Advanced Photon Source (APS)

    SciTech Connect

    Song, J.J.; Kustom, R.L.

    1992-05-01

    Beam-coupling impedances (Z) for the 7-GeV APS storage ring have been numerically estimated. In order to confirm these calculations, the wire method with a synthetic pulse technique was used to measure the beam coupling impedance of various vacuum components around the main storage ring. A section of the beam+antechambers, a vacuum isolation valve with and without the RF shielding screen, an insertion device, and a photon absorber were used as a device under test (DUT) to obtain the results. The results were compared with the computer simulations and the Z or k-dependence on bunch lengths was studied.

  20. RF impedance measurement status for the 7-GeV Advanced Photon Source (APS)

    SciTech Connect

    Song, J.J.; Kustom, R.L.

    1992-01-01

    Beam-coupling impedances (Z) for the 7-GeV APS storage ring have been numerically estimated. In order to confirm these calculations, the wire method with a synthetic pulse technique was used to measure the beam coupling impedance of various vacuum components around the main storage ring. A section of the beam+antechambers, a vacuum isolation valve with and without the RF shielding screen, an insertion device, and a photon absorber were used as a device under test (DUT) to obtain the results. The results were compared with the computer simulations and the Z or k-dependence on bunch lengths was studied.

  1. On the reconstruction of boundary impedance of a heat conduction system from nonlocal measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jijun; Wang, Yuchan

    2016-07-01

    We consider the reconstruction of the Robin impedance coefficient of a heat conduction system in a two-dimensional spatial domain from the time-average measurement specified on the boundary. By applying the potential representation of a solution, this nonlinear inverse problem is transformed into an ill-posed integral system coupling the density function for potential and the unknown boundary impedance. The uniqueness as well as the conditional stability of this inverse problem is established from the integral system. Then we propose to find the boundary impedance by solving a non-convex regularizing optimization problem. The well-posedness of this optimization problem together with the convergence property of the minimizer is analyzed. Finally, based on the singularity decomposition of the potential representation of the solution, two iteration schemes with their numerical realizations are proposed to solve this optimization problem.

  2. Low cost soil sensor based on impedance spectroscopy for in-situ measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umar, Lazuardi; Setiadi, Rahmondia N.

    2015-04-01

    Soil moisture is a significant element in the water cycle, on an agricultural and in land interaction. In crop production, soil plays a key role as a physical support and a reservoir of water and nutrients. Decisions for optimized input rates of water are largely based on physical, chemical, and biological properties of soils. The aim of this work is to develop a low cost soil moisture sensor (SMS) based on impedance spectroscopy by means of magnitude ratio and phase difference detection method. Using impedance spectroscopy, more information can be delivered from real and imaginary part of the complex permittivity for several frequencies at the same moisture value. For this purpose, a probe has been designed which uses a simplified impedance measuring system to determine soil water content. The circuit sweeps at pre-programmed frequencies from 10 KHz to 10MHz with 10 mV AC amplitude. A local inceptisol soil of East Sumatra was especially selected for this investigation because measurements of soil moisture in peat swamp area were generally reported as challenging to analyze. Samples at defined soil moisture of 2%, 8%, 15% measured using commercial soil sensor Lutron PMS-714, was characterized. A model has been developed in order to correct the frequency influence upon the measurement. The results obtained by the sensor show good results with an overall mean error of 0.21% in impedance.

  3. Phase Angle Measurement in Healthy Human Subjects through Bio-Impedance Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Satish; Dutt, Aswini; Hemraj, Sandhya; Bhat, Shankar; Manipadybhima, Bhat

    2012-01-01

    Objective(s) Bioelectrical impedance is the measure of impedance of the body. Impedance consists of electric resistance and reactance. Phase angle (PA) is the tan value of the ratio of reactance versus electric resistance. PA depends on cell membrane integrity and on body cell mass. There exists a correlation between PA values and body cell mass. The objective of this study was to compare the PA values of normal individuals and their anthropometric measurements. Materials and Methods Anthropometric measurements, Bioelectrical impedance analysis and PA measurements were done using Bodystat Quadscan 4000 machine on 42 healthy subjects between the age group of 18 to 50 yrs at a private hospital, Bangalore, Karnataka, India for eight months. Kolmogrov-Smirnov and Pearson’s correlation tests were used for data analysis. Results The PA values were 7.321.17º in healthy subjects. PA values were significantly positively correlated with body mass index (BMI) (r= 0.011, P<0.001). The phase angle values for males and females were 7.43±0.98º and 7.05±1.1.58º, respectively. Conclusion PA values positively correlated with BMI indicating the nutritional status of the study group. PA values were similar to the values to found in other studies. PMID:23653848

  4. Measurement of Peak Esophageal Luminal Cross Sectional Area Utilizing Nadir Intraluminal Impedance

    PubMed Central

    Zifan, Ali; Ledgerwood-Lee, Melissa; Mittal, Ravinder K

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Multichannel intraluminal impedance (MII) is currently used to monitor gastroesophageal reflux and esophageal bolus clearance. We describe a novel methodology to measure maximal luminal CSA during bolus transport from MII measurements. METHODS Studies were conducted in-vitro (test tubes) and in-vivo (healthy subjects). Concurrent MII, HRM, and intraluminal ultrasound (US) were recorded 7 cm above the lower esophageal sphincter. Swallows with two concentrations of saline, 0.1N and 0.5N, of bolus volumes 5cc, 10cc and 15cc were performed. The CSA was estimated by solving two algebraic Ohm’s law equations, resulting from the two saline solutions. The CSA calculated from impedance method was compared with the CSA measured from the intraluminal US images. KEY RESULTS The CSA measured in duplicate from B-mode US images showed a mean difference between the two manual delineations to be near zero, and the repeatability coefficient was within 7.7% of the mean of the two CSA measurements. The calculated CSA from the impedance measurements strongly correlated with the US measured CSA (R2 ≅ 0.98). A detailed statistical analysis of the impedance and US measured CSA data indicated that the 95% limits of agreement between the two methods ranged from −9.1 to 13mm2. The root mean square error (RMS) of the two measurements was 4.8% of the mean US-measured CSA. CONCLUSIONS We describe a novel methodology to measure peak esophageal luminal CSA during peristalsis. Further studies are needed to determine if it is possible to measure patterns of luminal distension during peristalsis across the entire length of the esophagus. PMID:25930157

  5. Acoustic measurement study 40 by 80 foot subsonic wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    An acoustical study conducted during the period from September 1, 1973 to April 30, 1974 measured sound pressure levels and vibration amplitudes inside and outside of the subsonic tunnel and on the tunnel structure. A discussion of the technical aspects of the study, the field measurement and data reduction procedures, and results are presentd, and conclusions resulting from the study which bear upon near field and far field tunnel noise, upon the tunnel as an acoustical enclosure, and upon the sources of noise within the tunnel drive system are given.

  6. Acoustical measurement of the Salt Lake Mormon Tabernacle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rollins, Sarah; Leishman, Timothy W.

    2001-05-01

    An acoustical survey of the Salt Lake Mormon Tabernacle has been performed to assess the behavior of the hall in its current state. The tabernacle is a well-known historical building with a large elongated dome ceiling. This paper discusses the measurements used to characterize the hall. Several parameters derived from omnidirectional, directional, and binaural impulse response measurements are presented. Color maps of the parameters over audience seating areas reveal their spatial variations. These maps and the statistical properties of the parameters aid in clarifying the acoustical characteristics and anomalies of the hall.

  7. Bench-Top Impedance Measurements for a Rotatable Copper Collimator for the LHC Phase II Collimation Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Jeffrey Claiborne; Bane, Karl; Doyle, Eric; Keller, Lew; Lundgren, Steve; Markiewicz, Tom; Ng, Cho-Kuen; Xiao, Liling; /SLAC

    2010-08-26

    Simulations have been performed in Omega3P to study both trapped modes and impedance contributions of a rotatable collimator for the LHC phase II collimation upgrade. Bench-top stretched coil probe impedance methods are also being implemented for measurements on prototype components to directly measure the low frequency impedance contributions. The collimator design also calls for a RF contact interface at both jaw ends with contact resistance much less than a milliohm in order to limit transverse impedance. DC resistance measurements in a custom built test chamber have been performed to test the performance of this interface.

  8. End-point impedance measurements across dominant and nondominant hands and robotic assistance with directional damping.

    PubMed

    Erden, Mustafa Suphi; Billard, Aude

    2015-06-01

    The goal of this paper is to perform end-point impedance measurements across dominant and nondominant hands while doing airbrush painting and to use the results for developing a robotic assistance scheme. We study airbrush painting because it resembles in many ways manual welding, a standard industrial task. The experiments are performed with the 7 degrees of freedom KUKA lightweight robot arm. The robot is controlled in admittance using a force sensor attached at the end-point, so as to act as a free-mass and be passively guided by the human. For impedance measurements, a set of nine subjects perform 12 repetitions of airbrush painting, drawing a straight-line on a cartoon horizontally placed on a table, while passively moving the airbrush mounted on the robot's end-point. We measure hand impedance during the painting task by generating sudden and brief external forces with the robot. The results show that on average the dominant hand displays larger impedance than the nondominant in the directions perpendicular to the painting line. We find the most significant difference in the damping values in these directions. Based on this observation, we develop a "directional damping" scheme for robotic assistance and conduct a pilot study with 12 subjects to contrast airbrush painting with and without robotic assistance. Results show significant improvement in precision with both dominant and nondominant hands when using robotic assistance. PMID:25148680

  9. Measurement of thin films using very long acoustic wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clement, G. T.; Nomura, H.; Adachi, H.; Kamakura, T.

    2013-12-01

    A procedure for measuring material thickness by means of necessarily long acoustic wavelengths is examined. The approach utilizes a temporal phase lag caused by the impulse time of wave momentum transferred through a thin layer that is much denser than its surrounding medium. In air, it is predicted that solid or liquid layers below approximately 1/2000 of the acoustic wavelength will exhibit a phase shift with an arctangent functional dependence on thickness and layer density. The effect is verified for thin films on the scale of 10 μm using audible frequency sound (7 kHz). Soap films as thin as 100 nm are then measured using 40 kHz air ultrasound. The method's potential for imaging applications is demonstrated by combining the approach with near-field holography, resulting in reconstructions with sub-wavelength resolution in both the depth and lateral directions. Potential implications at very high and very low acoustic frequencies are discussed.

  10. Impedance measurements of the extraction kicker system for the rapid cycling synchrotron of China Spallation Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Liang-Sheng; Wang, Sheng; Liu, Yu-Dong; Li, Yong; Liu, Ren-Hong; Xiao, Ou-Zheng

    2016-04-01

    The fast extraction kicker system is one of the most important accelerator components and the main source of impedance in the Rapid Cycling Synchrotron of the China Spallation Neutron Source. It is necessary to understand the kicker impedance before its installation into the tunnel. Conventional and improved wire methods are employed in the impedance measurement. The experimental results for the kicker impedance are explained by comparison with simulation using CST PARTICLE STUDIO. The simulation and measurement results confirm that the window-frame ferrite geometry and the end plate are the important structures causing coupling impedance. It is proved in the measurements that the mismatching from the power form network to the kicker leads to a serious oscillation sideband of the longitudinal and vertical impedance and the oscillation can be reduced by ferrite absorbing material. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11175193, 11275221)

  11. Measurements of Middle Ear Pressure Gain and Cochlear Input Impedance in the Chinchilla

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slama, Michael C. C.; Ravicz, Michael E.; Nakajima, Hideko H.; Dong, Wei; Rosowski, John J.

    2009-02-01

    Measurements of middle ear conducted sound pressure in the cochlear vestibule PV have been performed in only a few species. Simultaneous measurements of sound-induced stapes velocity Vs are even more rare. We report simultaneous measurements of VS and PV in chinchillas. The VS measurements are performed using single-beam laser-Doppler vibrometry; PV is measured with fiber-optic pressure sensors like those described by Olson [1]. PV and VS have been measured in six animals, and the middle ear pressure gain (ratio of PV to the sound pressure in the ear canal) and the cochlear input impedance (ratio of PV to the product of VS and area of the footplate) computed. Our measurements of middle ear pressure gain are similar to published data in the chinchilla at stimulus frequencies of 500 Hz to 3 kHz, but are different at other frequencies. Our measurements of cochlear input impedance differ somewhat from previous estimates in the chinchilla and show a resistive input impedance up to at least 10 kHz.

  12. Acoustic Phase Measurements from Volume Scatter in the Ocean.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huston, Robert Delmar

    A primary goal of this thesis has been to demonstrate that stable, useful measurements of the orientation of the acoustic signal vector as a function of range and time can be obtained from ocean backscatter, and that this orientation, or acoustic phase, can be related to the local sound speed distribution. Consistent and useful measurement of absolute phase depends upon the positions of individual scatterers, which are normally random and sparse relative to the acoustic wavelength. This difficulty has been overcome by coherent super-position of echoes from successive transmissions, such that the effective density of acoustic targets progressively increases as the summation proceeds. The theoretical basis of this type of coherent processing has been developed and examined in the limiting case, in which it approximates a scatterer continuum for which an analytic expression has been found. The theory provides fundamental insights to the behaviour of both the amplitude and phase of volume scatter. As the ratio of coherent to incoherent signal increases with successive superposition of the echoes (coherent processing), the phase statistics evolve from a uniform to a nearly Gaussian distribution. Once the phase signal is bounded to within +/-45 ^circ, the basic requirement for a coherent 'volume mirror' has been met and reliable interferometric estimates are possible. The experimental work used a bistatic configuration with a multi-beam projector and narrow beam hydrophone operating at 215 kHz. The results confirm the theoretical concepts and demonstrate that within the quite limited range of environmental conditions that were studied, the coherently processed acoustic signals are consistent with independent measurements of the evolving sound speed profile. The main contribution of this thesis has been to lay a firm theoretical and experimental foundation for the use of volume backscatter in acoustic interferometer devices. Based on these results, the potential for new

  13. Comparison of impedance cardiography and dye dilution method for measuring cardiac output

    PubMed Central

    Spiering, W; van Es, P N; de Leeuw, P W

    1998-01-01

    Objective—To assess the degree of agreement between impedance cardiography, using the NCCOM3-R7 device, and the gold standard—the dye dilution method—both under basal conditions and after stimulation of cardiac output.
Patients—35 paired measurements in five healthy male volunteers.
Interventions—To obtain higher levels of cardiac output, cardiac performance was stimulated with a dopamine infusion.
Results—In 35 paired measurements, the mean of all the impedance values was higher than that of the dye dilution values, at 10.2 v 7.4 l/min (p < 0.0001). The mean discrepancy between the two methods was 3.3 l/min, and the mean bias −2.9 l/min, with limits of agreement of −9.0 and 3.2 l/min. A change in cardiac output could not adequately be predicted by the NCCOM3-R7. In 20 of 25 measurements obtained during continuous intravenous dopamine infusions there was a rise in dye dilution cardiac output (range 0.2 to 5.9 l/min). Neither the magnitude nor the direction of the change in dye dilution values corresponded with the change measured by impedance cardiography. The mean discrepancy here between the two methods was 1.8 l/min, and the mean bias −0.8 l/min, with limits of agreement of −4.9 and 3.3 l/min.
Conclusions—In healthy volunteers, impedance cardiography with NCCOM3-R7 is inadequate for assessing cardiac output when compared with the dye dilution method.

 Keywords: cardiac output;  impedance cardiography;  dye dilution PMID:9659188

  14. Interpulse multifrequency electrical impedance measurements during electroporation of adherent differentiated myotubes.

    PubMed

    García-Sánchez, Tomás; Azan, Antoine; Leray, Isabelle; Rosell-Ferrer, Javier; Bragós, Ramon; Mir, Lluis M

    2015-10-01

    In this study, electrical impedance spectroscopy measurements are performed during electroporation of monolayers of differentiated myotubes. The time resolution of the system (1 spectrum/ms) enable 860 full spectra (21 frequencies from 5 kHz to 1.3 MHz) to be acquired during the time gap between consecutive pulses (interpulse) of a classical electroporation treatment (8 pulses, 100 μs, 1 Hz). Additionally, the characteristics of the custom microelectrode assembly used allow the experiments to be performed directly in situ in standard 24 multi-well plates. The impedance response dynamics are studied for three different electric field intensities (400, 800 and 1200 V/cm). The multifrequency information, analysed with the Cole model, reveals a short-term impedance recovery after each pulse in accordance with the fast resealing of the cell membrane, and a long-term impedance decay over the complete treatment in accordance with an accumulated effect pulse after pulse. The analysis shows differences between the lowest electric field condition and the other two, suggesting that different mechanisms that may be related with the reversibility of the process are activated. As a result of the multifrequency information, the system is able to measure simultaneously the conductivity variations due to ion diffusion during electroporation. Finally, in order to reinforce the physical interpretation of the results, a complementary electrical equivalent model is used. PMID:26123676

  15. Measurement of Plasma Clotting Using Shear Horizontal Surface Acoustic Wave Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagayama, Tatsuya; Kondoh, Jun; Oonishi, Tomoko; Hosokawa, Kazuya

    2013-07-01

    The monitoring of blood coagulation is important during operation. In this study, a shear horizontal surface acoustic wave (SH-SAW) sensor is applied to monitor plasma clotting. An SH-SAW sensor with a metallized surface for mechanical perturbation detection can detect plasma clotting. As plasma clotting is a gel formation reaction, the SH-SAW sensor detects viscoelastic property changes. On the other hand, an SH-SAW sensor with a free surface for electrical perturbation detection detects only the liquid mixing effect. No electrical property changes due to plasma clotting are obtained using this sensor. A planar electrochemical sensor is also used to monitor plasma clotting. In impedance spectral analysis, plasma clotting is measured. However, in the measurement of time responses, no differences between clotting and nonclotting are obtained. Therefore, the SH-SAW sensor is useful for monitoring plasma clotting.

  16. Velocity and rotation measurements in acoustically levitated droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Abhishek; Basu, Saptarshi; Kumar, Ranganathan

    2012-10-01

    The velocity scale inside an acoustically levitated droplet depends on the levitator and liquid properties. Using Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV), detailed velocity measurements have been made in a levitated droplet of different diameters and viscosity. The maximum velocity and rotation are normalized using frequency and amplitude of acoustic levitator, and droplet viscosity. The non-dimensional data are fitted for micrometer- and millimeter-sized droplets levitated in different levitators for different viscosity fluids. It is also shown that the rotational speed of nanosilica droplets at an advanced stage of vaporization compares well with that predicted by exponentially fitted parameters.

  17. PROGRESS IN ACOUSTIC SUSPENDED-SEDIMENT MEASUREMENT RESEARCH

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An automatic acoustic pulse-echo distance measuring device (Field SedBed Monitor) was developed to collect bed height records in the Goodwin Creek Experimental Watershed. The bed material at the study site is composed of a mixture of sand and gravel with a median size of 8.3 mm. Using bed height re...

  18. SUSPENDED-SEDIMENT MEASUREMENTS IN LABORATORY FLUMES USING ACOUSTIC TECHNIQUES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Automated measurement of suspended sediments is crucial to the study of sediment transport. The short duration, high-intensity flows that are responsible for a large fraction of sediment movement are best observed by continuous monitoring systems. Acoustic systems are ideal for continuous monitori...

  19. Laboratory comparisons of acoustic and optical sensors for microbubble measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Ming Yang; Todoroff, Douglas; Cartmill, John

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a recent comparison between three microbubble size spectrum measurement systems. These systems are the light-scattering bubble counter, the photographic bubble-imaging system, and the acoustic resonator array. Good agreement was formed among these three systems over the bubble size range appropriate for each system.

  20. Acoustical Measurements of Selected Intonation Contours of French.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howie, John M.

    Recent studies of rising intonation contours in French, in particular the acoustical differences that serve to distinguish Yes/No questions from other rising intonations are reviewed. The preliminary results of a pilot study of rising intonations in French, in which average curves were obtained from spectrographic measurements of fundamental…

  1. Measurement of the total acoustic output power of HITU transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenderka, Klaus-V.; Beissner, Klaus

    2010-03-01

    The majority of High Intensity Therapeutic Ultrasound (HITU) applications use strongly focused ultrasound fields generating very high local intensities in the focal region. The metrology of these high-power ultrasound fields is a challenge for the established measurement procedures and devices. This paper describes the results of measurements by means of the radiation force for a total acoustic output power up to 400 W at 1.5 MHz and up to 200 W at 2.45 MHz. For this purpose, a radiation force balance set-up was adapted for the determination of large acoustic output powers. For two types of HITU transducers, the relationship between the total acoustic output power and the applied net electrical power was determined at close transducer-target distance. Further, dependence of the measured electro-acoustic radiation conductance on the transducer-target distance was investigated at reduced power levels, considering the appearance of focal anomalies. Concluding, a list of the main uncertainty contributions, and an estimate of the uncertainty for the used radiation force balance set-up is given for measurements at high power levels.

  2. A Comparative Study of Two Acoustic Measures of Hypernasality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogel, Adam P.; Ibrahim, Hasherah M.; Reilly, Sheena; Kilpatrick, Nicky

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This study aimed to compare 2 quantitative acoustic measures of nasality in children with cleft lip and palate (CLP) and healthy controls using formalized perceptual assessment as a guide. Method: Fifty participants (23 children with CLP and 27 age- and gender-matched healthy controls) aged between 4 and 12 years produced a variety of…

  3. Phase behaviour and phase separation kinetics measurement using acoustic arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khammar, M.; Shaw, J. M.

    2011-10-01

    Speed of sound and acoustic wave attenuation are sensitive to fluid phase composition and to the presence of liquid-liquid interfaces. In this work, the use of an acoustic array comprising 64 elements as a non-intrusive sensor for liquid-liquid interface, phase separation kinetics measurement in bulk fluids, and local composition measurement in porous media is illustrated. Three benchmark examples: the phase behaviour of methanol + mixed hexanes and methanol + heptane mixtures at 25.0 °C and 1 bar, and Athabasca bitumen + heptane in a synthetic silica porous medium at 22.5 °C and 1 bar, illustrate the accuracy of liquid-liquid interface and potential research and industrial applications of the technique. Liquid-liquid interfaces can be detected independently using both speed of sound and acoustic wave attenuation measurements. The precision of the interface location measurement is 300 μm. As complete scans can be performed at a rate of 1 Hz, phase separation kinetics and diffusion of liquids within porous media are readily tracked. The technique is expected to find application where the fluids or porous media are opaque to visible light and where other imaging techniques are not readily applied, or are too costly. A current limitation is that the acoustic probes must be cooled to less than 315 K in order for them to operate.

  4. A new method for estimating shear-wave velocity in marine sediments from radiation impedance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Masao

    2005-11-01

    Shear-wave velocity is one of the important parameters that characterize the physical properties of marine sediments. In this study, a new method is proposed for measuring shear-wave velocity in marine sediments by using radiation impedance. Shear-wave velocities for three kinds of urethane rubber with different Japanese Industrial Standards hardness values were obtained by radiation impedance and time-of-flight measurement techniques. It was shown that the values of the shear-wave velocity measured by the radiation impedance method were consistent with those of time-of-flight measurements. It was then shown that the shear-wave velocities for air- and water-saturated beach sands are different. It was also found that the indicated shear-wave velocity is dependent on the vibrating plate radius because the instrument measures an average shear-wave velocity within a depth window beneath the plate; the larger the plate radius, the deeper the averaging window. Finally, measurements were made on two-layered media in which air-saturated beach sand or urethane rubber was covered with air-saturated clay, and the relationship between the thickness of the clay layer and the indicated shear-wave velocity was investigated.

  5. A field-deployable digital acoustic measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, David L.; Wright, Kenneth D., II; Rowland, Wayne D.

    1991-01-01

    A field deployable digital acoustic measurement system was developed to support acoustic research programs at the Langley Research Center. The system digitizes the acoustic inputs at the microphone, which can be located up to 1000 feet from the van which houses the acquisition, storage, and analysis equipment. Digitized data from up to 12 microphones is recorded on high density 8mm tape and is analyzed post-test by a microcomputer system. Synchronous and nonsynchronous sampling is available with maximum sample rates of 12,500 and 40,000 samples per second respectively. The high density tape storage system is capable of storing 5 gigabytes of data at transfer rates up to 1 megabyte per second. System overall dynamic range exceeds 83 dB.

  6. A compact wideband precision impedance measurement system based on digital auto-balancing bridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Binxin; Wang, Jinyu; Song, Guangdong; Zhang, Faxiang

    2016-05-01

    The ac impedance spectroscopy measurements are predominantly taken by using impedance analyzers based on analog auto-balancing bridge. However, those bench-top analyzers are generally complicated, bulky and expensive, thus limiting their usage in industrial field applications. This paper presents the development of a compact wideband precision measurement system based on digital auto-balancing bridge. The methods of digital auto-balancing bridge and digital lock-in amplifier are analyzed theoretically. The overall design and several key sections including null detector, direct digital synthesizer-based sampling clock, and digital control unit are introduced in detail. The results show that the system achieves a basic measurement accuracy of 0.05% with a frequency range of 20 Hz–2 MHz. The advantages of versatile measurement capacity, fast measurement speed, small size and low cost make it quite suitable for industrial field applications. It is demonstrated that this system is practical and effective by applying in determining the impedance-temperature characteristic of a motor starter PTC thermistor.

  7. Broadband acoustic scattering measurements of underwater unexploded ordnance (UXO).

    PubMed

    Bucaro, J A; Houston, B H; Saniga, M; Dragonette, L R; Yoder, T; Dey, S; Kraus, L; Carin, L

    2008-02-01

    In order to evaluate the potential for detection and identification of underwater unexploded ordnance (UXO) by exploiting their structural acoustic response, we carried out broadband monostatic scattering measurements over a full 360 degrees on UXO's (two mortar rounds, an artillery shell, and a rocket warhead) and false targets (a cinder block and a large rock). The measurement band, 1-140 kHz, includes a low frequency structural acoustics region in which the wavelengths are comparable to or larger than the target characteristic dimensions. In general, there are aspects that provide relatively high target strength levels ( approximately -10 to -15 dB), and from our experience the targets should be detectable in this structural acoustics band in most acoustic environments. The rigid body scattering was also calculated for one UXO in order to highlight the measured scattering features involving elastic responses. The broadband scattering data should be able to support feature-based separation of UXO versus false targets and identification of various classes of UXO as well. PMID:18247878

  8. Volumetric measurements of a spatially growing dust acoustic wave

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Jeremiah D.

    2012-11-15

    In this study, tomographic particle image velocimetry (tomo-PIV) techniques are used to make volumetric measurements of the dust acoustic wave (DAW) in a weakly coupled dusty plasma system in an argon, dc glow discharge plasma. These tomo-PIV measurements provide the first instantaneous volumetric measurement of a naturally occurring propagating DAW. These measurements reveal over the measured volume that the measured wave mode propagates in all three spatial dimensional and exhibits the same spatial growth rate and wavelength in each spatial direction.

  9. TECHNICAL NOTE: Portable audio electronics for impedance-based measurements in microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Paul; Sinton, David

    2010-08-01

    We demonstrate the use of audio electronics-based signals to perform on-chip electrochemical measurements. Cell phones and portable music players are examples of consumer electronics that are easily operated and are ubiquitous worldwide. Audio output (play) and input (record) signals are voltage based and contain frequency and amplitude information. A cell phone, laptop soundcard and two compact audio players are compared with respect to frequency response; the laptop soundcard provides the most uniform frequency response, while the cell phone performance is found to be insufficient. The audio signals in the common portable music players and laptop soundcard operate in the range of 20 Hz to 20 kHz and are found to be applicable, as voltage input and output signals, to impedance-based electrochemical measurements in microfluidic systems. Validated impedance-based measurements of concentration (0.1-50 mM), flow rate (2-120 µL min-1) and particle detection (32 µm diameter) are demonstrated. The prevailing, lossless, wave audio file format is found to be suitable for data transmission to and from external sources, such as a centralized lab, and the cost of all hardware (in addition to audio devices) is ~10 USD. The utility demonstrated here, in combination with the ubiquitous nature of portable audio electronics, presents new opportunities for impedance-based measurements in portable microfluidic systems.

  10. Sensitive Radio-Frequency Measurements of a Quantum Dot by Tuning to Perfect Impedance Matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ares, N.; Schupp, F. J.; Mavalankar, A.; Rogers, G.; Griffiths, J.; Jones, G. A. C.; Farrer, I.; Ritchie, D. A.; Smith, C. G.; Cottet, A.; Briggs, G. A. D.; Laird, E. A.

    2016-03-01

    Electrical readout of spin qubits requires fast and sensitive measurements, which are hindered by poor impedance matching to the device. We demonstrate perfect impedance matching in a radio-frequency readout circuit, using voltage-tunable varactors to cancel out parasitic capacitances. An optimized capacitance sensitivity of 1.6 aF /√{Hz } is achieved at a maximum source-drain bias of 170 -μ V root-mean-square and with a bandwidth of 18 MHz. Coulomb blockade in a quantum-dot is measured in both conductance and capacitance, and the two contributions are found to be proportional as expected from a quasistatic tunneling model. We benchmark our results against the requirements for single-shot qubit readout using quantum capacitance, a goal that has so far been elusive.

  11. Use of low-frequency electrical impedance measurements to determine phospholipid content in amniotic fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeLuca, F.; Cametti, C.; Zimatore, G.; Maraviglia, B.; Pachi', A.

    1996-09-01

    In this report we propose a new method for an in vitro test of the foetal lung maturity based on the measurement of the electrical conductivity of the overall amniotic fluid obtained from transabdominal amniocentesis, since this quantity can be linked to a first approximation in a very simple way to the phospholipid content. We have carried out measurements of 85 different samples of amniotic fluid as a function of gestation weeks and we have observed a pronounced change of the electrical conductivity that reflects the increase in the phospholipid concentration occurring at the end of normal pregnancies. The method could be further developed to obtain similar information on in vivo experiments by means of bioelectric impedance tomography, taking advantage of the frequency dependence of the tissue electrical impedance.

  12. Acoustic measurements of a large cavity in a wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheiman, J.

    1978-01-01

    Acoustic measurements were made with inside and far-field microphones. Correlation of measured frequencies with available theories indicates that existing theories are applicable over a broader range than previously shown. The cavity configuration with a partial covering downstream amplified tonal intensities. The frequency of the tones depended on cavity size, not on cavity open area. Introducing upstream disturbances decreased the amplitude of the cavity tones.

  13. Real-time measurement of glucose using chrono-impedance technique on a second generation biosensor.

    PubMed

    Mayorga Martinez, Carmen C; Treo, Ernesto F; Madrid, Rossana E; Felice, Carmelo C

    2011-11-15

    Chrono-impedance technique (CIT) was implemented as a new transduction method for real time measurement of glucose in a biosensor system based in carbon paste (CP)/Ferrocene (FC)/glucose oxidase (GOx). The system presents high selectivity because the optimal stimulation signal composed by a 165mV DC potential and 50mV(RMS) AC signal at 0.4Hz was used. The low DC potential used decreased the interfering species effect and the biosensor showed a linear impedance response toward glucose detection at concentrations from 0mM to 20mM,with 0.9853 and 0.9945 correlation coefficient for impedance module (|Z|) and phase (Φ), respectively. The results of quadruplicate sets reveal the high repeatability and reproducibility of the measurements with a relative standard deviation (RSD) less than 10%. CIT presented good accuracy (within 10% of the actual value) and precision did not exceed 15% of RSD for high concentration values and 20% for the low concentration ones. In addition, a high correlation coefficient (R(2)=0.9954) between chrono-impedance and colorimetric methods was obtained. On the other hand, when two samples prepared at the same conditions were measured in parallel with both methods (the measurement was repeated four times), it should be noticed that student's t-test produced no difference between the two mentioned methods (p=1). The biosensor system hereby presented is highly specific to glucose detection and shows a better linear range than the one reported on the previous article. PMID:21907557

  14. Minimal implementation of an AFE4300-based spectrometer for electrical impedance spectroscopy measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, B.; Praveen, A.; Bartolome, E.; Soundarapandian, K.; Bragos, R.

    2013-04-01

    The AFE4300 is a new low-cost on-chip impedance spectrometer developed by Texas Instruments able to handle multiple four electrode interface measurements. In this work, we present a brief description and characterization of this device and, besides its interesting features as a body-composition impedancemeter system; we evaluate its potential to develop minimal implementations for other biomedical applications. As the case study presented in this paper, its use to monitor ventilatory time-varying bioimpedance.

  15. Mass flow rate measurement in abrasive jets using acoustic emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivantsiv, V.; Spelt, J. K.; Papini, M.

    2009-09-01

    The repeatability of abrasive jet machining operations is presently limited by fluctuations in the mass flow rate due to powder compaction, stratification and humidity effects. It was found that the abrasive mass flow rate for a typical abrasive jet micromachining setup could be determined by using data from the acoustic emission of the abrasive jet impacting a flat plate. Two methods for extracting the mass flow rate from the acoustic emission were developed and compared. In the first method, the number of particle impacts per unit time was determined by a direct count of peaks in the acoustic emission signal. The second method utilizes the power spectrum density of the acoustic emission in a specific frequency range. Both measures were found to correlate strongly with the mass flow rate measured by weighing samples of blasted powder for controlled time periods. It was found that the peak count method permits measurement of the average frequency of the impacts and the mass flow rate, but can only be applied to flow rates in which the impact frequency is approximately one order of magnitude less than the frequency of the target plate ringing. The power spectrum density method of signal processing is applicable to relatively fine powders and to flow rates at which the average impact frequency is of the same order of magnitude as that of the ringing due to the impact. The acoustic emission technique can be used to monitor particle flow variations over a wide range of time periods and provides a straightforward and accurate means of process control.

  16. Deep Seafloor Acoustic Backscattering Measurements Using Sea Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Moustier, Christian

    backscattered acoustic energy level as well as in the inferred roughness character between these areas, de Moustier J.A.S.A., submitted . Although these simple characteristics are insufficient to determine the nature of the seafloor surveyed, they represent additional clues to help understand the geological processes under investigation. Further insight into these processes is afforded by the qualitative measure of acoustic backscatter inherent to a gray scale side looking sonar display. Such displays have been created with Sea Beam acoustic data. They contain a wealth of information not available in the bathymetric contours and are expected to become a very valuable addition to the Sea Beam system.

  17. Phase angle and impedance measurements for nondestructive moisture content determination of in-shell peanuts using a cylindrical sample holder

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A simple, low cost instrument that measures impedance and phase angle was used along with a parallel-plate capacitance system to estimate the moisture content (MC) of yellow corn. A sample of corn weighing about 100g was placed between the parallel-plate electrodes and the impedance and phase angle...

  18. Amplifier spurious input current components in electrode-electrolyte interface impedance measurements

    PubMed Central

    Felice, Carmelo J; Madrid, Rossana E; Valentinuzzi, Max E

    2005-01-01

    Background In Impedance Microbiology, the time during which the measuring equipment is connected to the bipolar cells is rather long, usually between 6 to 24 hrs for microorganisms with duplication times in the order of less than one hour and concentrations ranging from 101 to 107 [CFU/ml]. Under these conditions, the electrode-electrolyte interface impedance may show a slow drift of about 2%/hr. By and large, growth curves superimposed on such drift do not stabilize, are less reproducible, and keep on distorting all over the measurement of the temporal reactive or resistive records due to interface changes, in turn originated in bacterial activity. This problem has been found when growth curves were obtained by means of impedance analyzers or with impedance bridges using different types of operational amplifiers. Methods Suspecting that the input circuitry was the culprit of the deleterious effect, we used for that matter (a) ultra-low bias current amplifiers, (b) isolating relays for the selection of cells, and (c) a shorter connection time, so that the relays were maintained opened after the readings, to bring down such spurious drift to a negligible value. Bacterial growth curves were obtained in order to test their quality. Results It was demonstrated that the drift decreases ten fold when the circuit remained connected to the cell for a short time between measurements, so that the distortion became truly negligible. Improvement due to better-input amplifiers was not as good as by reducing the connection time. Moreover, temperature effects were insignificant with a regulation of ± 0.2 [°C]. Frequency did not influence either. Conclusion The drift originated either at the dc input bias offset current (Ios) of the integrated circuits, or in discrete transistors connected directly to the electrodes immersed in the cells, depending on the particular circuit arrangement. Reduction of the connection time was the best countermeasure. PMID:15796776

  19. Measurements of complex impedance in microwave high power systems with a new bluetooth integrated circuit.

    PubMed

    Roussy, Georges; Dichtel, Bernard; Chaabane, Haykel

    2003-01-01

    By using a new integrated circuit, which is marketed for bluetooth applications, it is possible to simplify the method of measuring the complex impedance, complex reflection coefficient and complex transmission coefficient in an industrial microwave setup. The Analog Devices circuit AD 8302, which measures gain and phase up to 2.7 GHz, operates with variable level input signals and is less sensitive to both amplitude and frequency fluctuations of the industrial magnetrons than are mixers and AM crystal detectors. Therefore, accurate gain and phase measurements can be performed with low stability generators. A mechanical setup with an AD 8302 is described; the calibration procedure and its performance are presented. PMID:15078067

  20. Development and study of an acoustic method of steam content measurement at the fuel assembly outlet of a reactor of an atomic heat generating station

    SciTech Connect

    Mel'nikov, V.I.; Khokhlov, V.N.; Usynin, G.B.; Baidakov, A.G.; Trusov, B.A.; Kut'in, L.N.

    1987-01-01

    When considering the applicability of acoustic methods to steam content determination in reactor conditions, several factors must be taken into account. Among these are a low sound conduction of two-phase steam-and-liquid medium, a high level of technological (parasitic) noise that arises from the equipment operation and coolant flow, and the extreme conditions that reduce the reliability of acoustic pickups or even rule out their durable stable functioning. Hence, in case of an NPP, traditional methods of exposure of a tested medium volume to ultrasound as well as passive methods involving detection of acoustic noise that arises from the coolant boiling turned out to be inefficient. Therefore, in recent years new methods of acoustic probing and acoustic impedance have been proposed for resolving the problem. The first one is based on indication of the sound conduction of a small medium volume (a local method). The second method involves determination of ultrasound attenuation in a waveguide that is passed over by the coolant flow (an integrated method). This work presents the results of a study of an acoustic impedance method and reports on the development of measuring equipment based on this method for steam content determination at the FA outlet of an AHGS reactor.

  1. Evaluation of indirect impedance for measuring microbial growth in complex food matrices.

    PubMed

    Johnson, N; Chang, Z; Bravo Almeida, C; Michel, M; Iversen, C; Callanan, M

    2014-09-01

    The suitability of indirect impedance to accurately measure microbial growth in real food matrices was investigated. A variety of semi-solid and liquid food products were inoculated with Bacillus cereus, Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, Lactobacillus plantarum, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Salmonella enteriditis, Candida tropicalis or Zygosaccharomyces rouxii and CO2 production was monitored using a conductimetric (Don Whitely R.A.B.I.T.) system. The majority (80%) of food and microbe combinations produced a detectable growth signal. The linearity of conductance responses in selected food products was investigated and a good correlation (R(2) ≥ 0.84) was observed between inoculum levels and times to detection. Specific growth rate estimations from the data were sufficiently accurate for predictive modeling in some cases. This initial evaluation of the suitability of indirect impedance to generate microbial growth data in complex food matrices indicates significant potential for the technology as an alternative to plating methods. PMID:24929710

  2. Microwave Surface Impedance Measurements of SrFe2(As,P)2 Single Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Hideyuki; Imai, Yoshinori; Maeda, Atsutaka; Kitagawa, Kentaro; Matsubayashi, Kazuyuki; Takigawa, Masashi; Uwatoko, Yoshiya

    2012-02-01

    Various pairing symmetries have been proposed concerning Fe-based superconductors both theoretically and experimentally. It was reported that LaFePO[1] and BaFe2(As,P)2[2] have line nodes in their superconducting gap. It is in sharp contrast to other Fe-based compounds such as LiFeAs[3] and Fe(Se,Te)[4]. To confirm whether line nodes in gap function is a common feature among P doped systems, we measured the microwave surface impedances of SrFe2(As,P)2 single crystals (Tc˜30K). Single crystals were grown by self-flux method. The surface impedances were measured using a cavity perturbation technique. The imaginary part of surface impedance, which is proportional to London penetration depth in the superconducting state, shows a power law, λ(T)-λ(0)T^n. The power law indicates low-energy quasiparticle excitation, and an exponent slightly smaller than 2 does not exclude the possibility of the existence of line nodes. [ 1 ] J. D. Fletcher et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 102 (2009) 147001.[ 2 ] K. Hashimoto et al., Phys. Rev. B 81 (2010) 220501(R).[ 3 ] Y. Imai et al., J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 80 (2011) 013704.[ 4 ] H. Takahashi et al., Phys. Rev. B 84. (2011) 132503.

  3. Effect of a spherical object in 4 electrode Focused Impedance Method (FIM): measurement and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abir, R.; Pettersen, F. J.; Martinsen, O. G.; Rabbani, K. S.

    2013-04-01

    Focused Impedance Method (FIM) gives enhanced localized sensitivity at the centre of a zone defined by a simple system of electrodes, of which a 4-electrode version with electrodes at the corners of a square region has been studied in detail in the present work. The present work studies the effect of a large sphere whose diameter almost equals the dimensions of the central focused zone, or, the Focused Impedance. The sphere is placed at different positions with respect to the centre of the system at the electrode plane. The study has been made using a phantom in which the electrodes are fixed on a side wall while an insulating ball is hung at various positions inside the saline and moved with respect to the electrodes in their vicinity. The same was then simulated by providing appropriate parameters in COMSOL multiphysics, a software package utilizing Finite Element Method, by providing appropriately matching parameters. The measured impedance decreases as the ball is moved away from the centre in the electrode plane or along the depth. The sensitivity also decreases with an increase in electrode spacing. Although the behaviours were similar in both the studies, simulated values by COMSOL deviated from the measured values significantly. It suggests that COMSOL may not give accurate simulations for large objects.

  4. Measurement of total respiratory impedance in infants by the forced oscillation technique.

    PubMed

    Desager, K N; Buhr, W; Willemen, M; van Bever, H P; de Backer, W; Vermeire, P A; Lándsér, F J

    1991-08-01

    The forced oscillation technique according to Làndsér et al. (J. Appl. Physiol. 41:101-106, 1976) was modified for use in infants. Adaptations, including a flexible tube to connect the infant to the measuring system and a bias flow to avoid rebreathing, did not influence impedance values. The linearity of the respiratory system was assessed and confirmed by 1) applying pseudo-random noise oscillations at three different amplitudes to 7 infants and 2) comparing in 12 infants impedance values obtained with pseudo-random noise and with sinusoidal oscillations at 12 and 32 Hz. Intersubject variability, averaged for all frequencies, was 6%. In 17 infants the relative error (+/- SD) between two series of five measurements within a time interval of 15 min was 0.5 +/- 5.7%. No statistically significant difference was found between impedance values before and after repositioning of the infant's head, whereas rotation resulted in a decrease in resistance and no effect on reactance. Our results indicate that the infant-adapted forced pseudo-random noise oscillation technique has the potential to give valuable information about ventilatory lung function in infants. PMID:1938751

  5. Nonlinear acoustic measurements ahead of a notch during fatigue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, R. W.; Mooers, R. D.; Hutson, A. L.; Sathish, S.; Blodgett, M. P.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents measurements of relative nonlinear acoustic parameter (βrel), ahead of a notch in Al 7075-T651 dog bone samples, subjected to fatigue. It is compared with crack growth measurements on the same samples. Measurements performed on two samples subjected to identical fatigue conditions that failed at vastly different number of fatigue cycles are described. The βrel measurement for both samples as a function of fatigue cycles was fit a Boltzmann curve. The role of changing βrel ahead of a notch is explored as a possible approach for remain life evaluation.

  6. Impedance measurement set-up based on off-the-shelf PXI modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettersen, F. J.; Martinsen, Ø. G.; Grimnes, S.; Høgetveit, J. O.

    2010-04-01

    As bioimpedance measurements are being done in an increasing variety of measurands and environments, measurement equipment must be flexible in use and easy to handle for the researcher. Measurement equipment used today is excellent for a range of uses, but it is often bulky, heavy, and not very flexible. A new compact and flexible measurement set-up based on off-the-shelf modules is described. The system is based on commercially available PXI-modules, one module that may be custom made, and custom software. The basis of the system is a PXI chassis with a power supply unit. The chassis is equipped with a controller module running software controlling the system, a signal generator, and a multichannel digitizer. All of this is commercially available. Both a custom made and a commercially available impedance interfaces were used. A LabVIEW program is controlling the measurement system, and provides a user interface. The LabVIEW program handles necessary signal conditioning and calibration. The measurement system is capable of doing frequency response measurements at frequencies up to 15 MHz. In addition to the two normal voltage pick-up electrodes used in four-electrode measurements, this system has the possibility to use 5 extra voltage pick-up electrodes. This simplifies exploration of segmental impedance, anisotropy, reciprocity, etc.

  7. Determining Transmission Loss from Measured External and Internal Acoustic Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scogin, Tyler; Smith, A. M.

    2012-01-01

    An estimate of the internal acoustic environment in each internal cavity of a launch vehicle is needed to ensure survivability of Space Launch System (SLS) avionics. Currently, this is achieved by using the noise reduction database of heritage flight vehicles such as the Space Shuttle and Saturn V for liftoff and ascent flight conditions. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is conducting a series of transmission loss tests to verify and augment this method. For this test setup, an aluminum orthogrid curved panel representing 1/8th of the circumference of a section of the SLS main structure was mounted in between a reverberation chamber and an anechoic chamber. Transmission loss was measured across the panel using microphones. Data measured during this test will be used to estimate the internal acoustic environments for several of the SLS launch vehicle internal spaces.

  8. Acoustics and Surface Pressure Measurements from Tandem Cylinder Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutcheson, Florence V.; Brooks, Thomas F.; Lockard, David P.; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Stead, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    Acoustic and unsteady surface pressure measurements from two cylinders in tandem configurations were acquired to study the effect of spacing, surface trip and freestream velocity on the radiated noise. The Reynolds number ranged from 1.15x10(exp 5) to 2.17x10(exp 5), and the cylinder spacing varied between 1.435 and 3.7 cylinder diameters. The acoustic and surface pressure spectral characteristics associated with the different flow regimes produced by the cylinders' wake interference were identified. The dependence of the Strouhal number, peak Sound Pressure Level and spanwise coherence on cylinder spacing and flow velocity was examined. Directivity measurements were performed to determine how well the dipole assumption for the radiation of vortex shedding noise holds for the largest and smallest cylinder spacing tested.

  9. Continuous Non-Invasive Monitoring of Tidal Volumes by Measurement of Tidal Impedance in Neonatal Piglets

    PubMed Central

    Kurth, Florian; Zinnow, Fabienne; Prakapenia, Alexandra; Dietl, Sabrina; Winkler, Stefan; Ifflaender, Sascha; Rüdiger, Mario; Burkhardt, Wolfram

    2011-01-01

    Background Electrical Impedance measurements can be used to estimate the content of intra-thoracic air and thereby give information on pulmonary ventilation. Conventional Impedance measurements mainly indicate relative changes, but no information concerning air-volume is given. The study was performed to test whether a 3-point-calibration with known tidal volumes (VT) during conventional mechanical ventilation (CMV) allows subsequent calculation of VT from total Tidal-Impedance (tTI) measurements using Quadrant Impedance Measurement (QIM). In addition the distribution of TI in different regions of the thorax was examined. Methodology and Principal Findings QIM was performed in five neonatal piglets during volume-controlled CMV. tTI values at three different VT (4, 6, 8 ml/kg) were used to establish individual calibration curves. Subsequently, each animal was ventilated with different patterns of varying VT (2–10 ml/kg) at different PEEP levels (0, 3, 6, 9, 12 cmH2O). VT variation was repeated after surfactant depletion by bronchoalveolar lavage. VT was calculated from tTI values (VTcalc) and compared to the VT delivered by the ventilator (VTPNT). Bland-Altman analysis revealed good agreement between VTcalc and VTPNT before (bias −0.08 ml; limits of agreement −1.18 to 1.02 ml at PEEP = 3 cmH2O) and after surfactant depletion (bias −0.17 ml; limits of agreement −1.57 to 1.22 ml at PEEP = 3 cmH2O). At higher PEEP levels VTcalc was lower than VTPNT, when only one fixed calibration curve (at PEEP 3 cmH2O) was used. With a new calibration curve at each PEEP level the method showed similar accuracy at each PEEP level. TI showed a homogeneous distribution over the four assessed quadrants with a shift toward caudal regions of the thorax with increasing VT. Conclusion Tidal Impedance values could be used for precise and accurate calculation of VT during CMV in this animal study, when calibrated at each PEEP level. PMID:21687746

  10. Electroless deposition of metallic silver from a choline chloride-based ionic liquid: a study using acoustic impedance spectroscopy, SEM and atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Andrew P; Nandhra, Satvinder; Postlethwaite, Stella; Smith, Emma L; Ryder, Karl S

    2007-07-28

    In this paper, we describe the first example of a sustained galvanic coating deposited on a surface from a non-aqueous liquid. We present the surface characterization of electroless silver deposits on copper substrates from a solution of Ag(+) ions in an ionic liquid based on a choline chloride (ChCl) eutectic. Through a study of these deposits and the mechanism of formation using acoustic impedance spectroscopy (QCM), probe microscopy (AFM) and electron microscopy (SEM/EDX), we demonstrate that sustained growth of the silver deposit is facilitated by the porous nature of the silver. This is in contrast to the dip-coating reaction of silver ions in aqueous media, where the reaction stops when surface coverage is reached. Electroless silver deposits of up to several microns have been obtained by dip coating in ionic liquids without the use of catalysts of strong inorganic acids. PMID:17622408

  11. Acoustic temperature profile measurement technique for large combustion chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Venkateshan, S. P.; Shakkottai, P.; Kwack, E. Y.; Back, L. H.

    1989-05-01

    Measurement of times of flight of sound waves can be used to determinetemperatures in a gas. This paper describes a system, based on this principle,that is capable of giving the temperature profile in a nonisothermal gasvolume, for example, prevalent in a large furnace. The apparatus is simple,rugged, accurate, and capable of being automated for process controlapplications. It is basically an acoustic waveguide where the outsidetemperature profile is tranferred to a chosen gas contained inside theguide.

  12. Acoustic temperature profile measurement technique for large combustion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkateshan, S. P.; Shakkottai, P.; Kwack, E. Y.; Back, L. H.

    1989-01-01

    Measurement of times of flight of sound waves can be used to determine temperatures in a gas. This paper describes a system, based on this principle, that is capable of giving the temperature profile in a nonisothermal gas volume, for example, prevalent in a large furnace. The apparatus is simple, rugged, accurate, and capable of being automated for process control applications. It is basically an acoustic waveguide where the outside temperature profile is transferred to a chosen gas contained inside the guide.

  13. Optical and acoustical measuring techniques. [for Doppler measurement of flow velocities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliff, W. C.

    1977-01-01

    The paper reviews the techniques of laser and acoustic Doppler measurement of fluid velocities in confined and free flows. The main mathematical relations are presented, and some systems are studied. Resolution properties of coaxial, bistatic, and pulsed CO2 laser Doppler velocimeter systems are compared. Schematics for pulsed and continuous wave acoustic Doppler systems are discussed. Both of these types of systems benefit from using a bistatic configuration instead of a coaxial system. The pulsed systems avoid contamination of source noise by not sampling until after the source noise has passed the receiver. Comparison of wind velocity measured with a pulsed acoustic Doppler and with a boundary layer profile is made.

  14. Effect of impedance and higher order chromaticity on the measurement of linear chromaticity

    SciTech Connect

    Ranjbar, V.H.; Tan, C.Y.; /Fermilab

    2011-08-01

    The combined effect of impedance and higher order chromaticity can act on the beam in a nontrivial manner which can cause a tune shift which depends on the relative momenta with respect to the 'on momentum' particle ({Delta}p/p). Experimentally, this tune shift affects the measurement of the linear chromaticity which is traditionally measured with a change of {Delta}p/p. The theory behind this effect will be derived in this paper. Computer simulations and experimental data from the Tevatron will be used to support the theory.

  15. Above-cutoff impedance measurements of pumping holes for the Collider Liner

    SciTech Connect

    Walling, L.; Barts, T.; Ruiz, E.; Turner, W.; Spayd, N.

    1994-04-01

    A holed liner was considered for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) Collider Ring because of vacuum problems caused by photon-induced desorption. The liner would serve to shield the cold surface of the beam tube from the synchrotron radiation and the holes (or slots) would allow distributed pumping by gas-absorption material that could be placed between the liner and the beam tube. The impedance of holes and slots in a liner were studied by means of simulations using both MAFIA and HFSS, analytical modelling, wire measurements and electron beam measurements.

  16. Circuit and Scattering Matrix Analysis of the Wire Measurement Method of Beam Impedance in Accelerating Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Roger M

    2003-05-23

    In order to measure the wakefield left behind multiple bunches of energetic electrons we have previously used the ASSET facility in the SLC [1]. However, in order to produce a more rapid and cost-effective determination of the wakefields we have designed a wire experimental method to measure the beam impedance and from the Fourier transform thereof, the wakefields. In this paper we present studies of the wire effect on the properties of X-band structures in study for the JLC/NLC (Japanese Linear Collider/Next Linear Collider) project. Simulations are made on infinite and finite periodical structures. The results are discussed.

  17. Method of utility-system source-impedance measurement for the industrial power engineer

    SciTech Connect

    Corvin, W C

    1982-05-24

    In general, the power company that delivers energy to an industrial power system will supply, upon request, information describing the utility source impedance at the point of interconnection with the industrial customer. this information is usually expressed as the maximum available short-circuit MVA (megavolt amperes) that the utility can deliver at some nominal voltage. For sizing the interrupting ratings of protective equipment, this number is important. However, better information is required for modeling the utility system under all conditions of system switching, generation, and loading. In this paper a method is described for measuring the utility source impedance that gives a more realistic representation of the utility at the point of interconnection. It is increasingly important that the industrial power engineer accurately view the power company as a power source of variable impedance. Industrial loads may operate and interact differently, depending on the relative stiffness of their power source. Electric utilities increasingly experience planned voltage reductions, brownouts, and temporary line-switching configurations that can leave the industrial customer with a power source far different from the one normally expected.

  18. Current density distribution in cylindrical Li-Ion cells during impedance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osswald, P. J.; Erhard, S. V.; Noel, A.; Keil, P.; Kindermann, F. M.; Hoster, H.; Jossen, A.

    2016-05-01

    In this work, modified commercial cylindrical lithium-ion cells with multiple separate current tabs are used to analyze the influence of tab pattern, frequency and temperature on electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. In a first step, the effect of different current tab arrangements on the impedance spectra is analyzed and possible electrochemical causes are discussed. In a second step, one terminal is used to apply a sinusoidal current while the other terminals are used to monitor the local potential distribution at different positions along the electrodes of the cell. It is observed that the characteristic decay of the voltage amplitude along the electrode changes non-linearly with frequency, where high-frequent currents experience a stronger attenuation along the current collector than low-frequent currents. In further experiments, the decay characteristic is controlled by the cell temperature, driven by the increasing resistance of the current collector and the enhanced kinetic and transport properties of the active material and electrolyte. Measurements indicate that the ac current distribution depends strongly on the frequency and the temperature. In this context, the challenges for electrochemical impedance spectroscopy as cell diagnostic technique for commercial cells are discussed.

  19. Measurements of Electrode Skin Impedances using Carbon Rubber Electrodes - First Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufmann, Steffen; Ardelt, Gunther; Ryschka, Martin

    2013-04-01

    Non-invasive bioimpedance measurement as a tool in biomedical engineering and life sciences allows conclusions about condition and composition of living tissue. For interfacing the electronic conduction of the instrumentation and the ionic conduction of the tissue, electrodes are needed. A crucial point is the uncertainty arising from the unknown, time-varying and current density depend Electrode Skin Impedance (ESI). This work presents ESI measurements using carbon rubber electrodes on different human test subjects. The measurements for this work are carried out by employing a high accuracy Bioimpedance Measurement System (BMS) developed by the authors group, which is based on a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) System on Chip (SoC). The system is able to measure magnitude and phase of complex impedances using a two- or four-electrode setup, with excitation currents from 60 μA to 5 mA in a frequency range from about 10 kHz to 300 kHz. Achieved overall measurement uncertainties are below 1%.

  20. Measurements of acoustic pressure at high amplitudes and intensities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crum, L. A.; Bailey, M. R.; Kaczkowski, P.; McAteer, J. A.; Pishchalnikov, Y. A.; Sapozhnikov, O. A.

    2004-01-01

    In our research group, we desire measurements of the large pressure amplitudes generated by the shock waves used in shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) and the large acoustic intensities used in High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU). Conventional piezoelectric or PVDF hydrophones can not be used for such measurements as they are damaged either by cavitation, in SWL applications, or heat, in HIFU applications. In order to circumvent these difficulties, we have utilized optical fiber hydrophones in SWL that do not cavitate, and small glass probes and a scattering technique for measurements of large HIFU intensities. Descriptions of these techniques will be given as well as some typical data.

  1. Flow velocity measurement with the nonlinear acoustic wave scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Didenkulov, Igor; Pronchatov-Rubtsov, Nikolay

    2015-10-28

    A problem of noninvasive measurement of liquid flow velocity arises in many practical applications. To this end the most often approach is the use of the linear Doppler technique. The Doppler frequency shift of signal scattered from the inhomogeneities distributed in a liquid relatively to the emitted frequency is proportional to the sound frequency and velocities of inhomogeneities. In the case of very slow flow one needs to use very high frequency sound. This approach fails in media with strong sound attenuation because acoustic wave attenuation increases with frequency and there is limit in increasing sound intensity, i.e. the cavitation threshold. Another approach which is considered in this paper is based on the method using the difference frequency Doppler Effect for flows with bubbles. This method is based on simultaneous action of two high-frequency primary acoustic waves with closed frequencies on bubbles and registration of the scattered by bubbles acoustic field at the difference frequency. The use of this method is interesting since the scattered difference frequency wave has much lower attenuation in a liquid. The theoretical consideration of the method is given in the paper. The experimental examples confirming the theoretical equations, as well as the ability of the method to be applied in medical diagnostics and in technical applications on measurement of flow velocities in liquids with strong sound attenuation is described. It is shown that the Doppler spectrum form depends on bubble concentration velocity distribution in the primary acoustic beams crossing zone that allows one to measure the flow velocity distribution.

  2. Flow velocity measurement with the nonlinear acoustic wave scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Didenkulov, Igor; Pronchatov-Rubtsov, Nikolay

    2015-10-01

    A problem of noninvasive measurement of liquid flow velocity arises in many practical applications. To this end the most often approach is the use of the linear Doppler technique. The Doppler frequency shift of signal scattered from the inhomogeneities distributed in a liquid relatively to the emitted frequency is proportional to the sound frequency and velocities of inhomogeneities. In the case of very slow flow one needs to use very high frequency sound. This approach fails in media with strong sound attenuation because acoustic wave attenuation increases with frequency and there is limit in increasing sound intensity, i.e. the cavitation threshold. Another approach which is considered in this paper is based on the method using the difference frequency Doppler Effect for flows with bubbles. This method is based on simultaneous action of two high-frequency primary acoustic waves with closed frequencies on bubbles and registration of the scattered by bubbles acoustic field at the difference frequency. The use of this method is interesting since the scattered difference frequency wave has much lower attenuation in a liquid. The theoretical consideration of the method is given in the paper. The experimental examples confirming the theoretical equations, as well as the ability of the method to be applied in medical diagnostics and in technical applications on measurement of flow velocities in liquids with strong sound attenuation is described. It is shown that the Doppler spectrum form depends on bubble concentration velocity distribution in the primary acoustic beams crossing zone that allows one to measure the flow velocity distribution.

  3. A new lithium-ion battery internal temperature on-line estimate method based on electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, J. G.; Sun, Z. C.; Wei, X. Z.; Dai, H. F.

    2015-01-01

    The power battery thermal management problem in EV (electric vehicle) and HEV (hybrid electric vehicle) has been widely discussed, and EIS (electrochemical impedance spectroscopy) is an effective experimental method to test and estimate the status of the battery. Firstly, an electrochemical-based impedance matrix analysis for lithium-ion battery is developed to describe the impedance response of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Then a method, based on electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurement, has been proposed to estimate the internal temperature of power lithium-ion battery by analyzing the phase shift and magnitude of impedance at different ambient temperatures. Respectively, the SoC (state of charge) and temperature have different effects on the impedance characteristics of battery at various frequency ranges in the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy experimental study. Also the impedance spectrum affected by SoH (state of health) is discussed in the paper preliminary. Therefore, the excitation frequency selected to estimate the inner temperature is in the frequency range which is significantly influenced by temperature without the SoC and SoH. The intrinsic relationship between the phase shift and temperature is established under the chosen excitation frequency. And the magnitude of impedance related to temperature is studied in the paper. In practical applications, through obtaining the phase shift and magnitude of impedance, the inner temperature estimation could be achieved. Then the verification experiments are conduced to validate the estimate method. Finally, an estimate strategy and an on-line estimation system implementation scheme utilizing battery management system are presented to describe the engineering value.

  4. Electrical impedance spectroscopy device for measurement of moisture gradients in wood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiitta, M.; Olkkonen, H.

    2002-08-01

    A prototype of the electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) device for the measurement of internal moisture gradients in wood was developed. The EIS device consists of a hand-held probe connected to a control unit interfaced with a portable personal computer and a power unit. In the measurement, parallel flat electrodes of the measuring probe are laid against the wood specimen and the sine wave excitation is applied in the frequency range 1-100 kHz. The measured amplitude and phase spectral data were analyzed using the model based on constant phase elements. A spectral analysis software package was designed for measurement of subsurface transverse moisture gradients. The EIS device was tested with many types of uniform, desorption, and absorption gradients in lumber, pulpwood, and log specimens from spruce, pine, and birch. The EIS device can be easily transferred in a small case allowing field measurements.

  5. In-situ physical properties measurements using crosswell acoustic data

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, P.A.; Albright, J.N.

    1985-01-01

    Crosswell acoustic surveys enable the in-situ measurements of elastic moduli, Poisson's ratio, porosity, and apparent seismic Q of gas-bearing low-permeability formations represented at the Department of Energy Multi-Well Experiment (MWX) site near Rifle, Colorado. These measurements, except for Q, are compared with laboratory measurements on core taken from the same depths at which the crosswell measurements are made. Seismic Q determined in situ is compared to average values for sandstone. Porosity was determined from crosswell data using the empirical relationship between acoustic velocity, porosity, and effective pressure developed by Domenico. Domenico, S.N., ''Rock Lithology and Porosity Determination from Shear and compressional Wave Velocity,'' Geophysics, Vol. 49, No. 9, Aug. 1984, pp. 1188-1195. In-situ porosities are significantly greater than the core-derived values. Sources of the discrepancy may arise from (i) the underestimation of porosity that can result when Boyle's Law measurements are made on low-permeability core and (ii) the application of Dominico's relationship, which is developed for clean sands, to the mixed sandstone and shale lithologies represented at the MWX site. Values for Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio derived from crosswell measurements are comparable to values obtained from core. Apparent seismic Q measured in situ between wells is lower than Q measured on core and clearly shows the heterogeneity of sandstone deposited in a fluvial environment. 16 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Body water measurement in growth disorders: a comparison of bioelectrical impedance and skinfold thickness techniques with isotope dilution.

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, J W; Greene, S A; Scrimgeour, C M; Rennie, M J

    1991-01-01

    Total body water was estimated as part of the assessment of body composition in children with growth disorders, using the newly commercially available method of bioelectrical impedance. This was undertaken to compare the precision and accuracy of the results with those derived from skinfold thickness against measurement of stable isotopically labelled water (H2(18)O) dilution as a standard. The comparisons were carried out to see to what extent the impedance method could be applied with confidence to assessment of children with growth disorders. Total body water was derived from impedance (I) using an association with height (Ht2/I). Impedance and skinfold thickness estimates of total body water were equally precise when compared with values obtained from H2(18)O dilution (limits of agreement -1.9 to +1.3 and -1.7 to +2.0 kg respectively). The mean intraobserver coefficient of variation for repeat measurements of impedance was 0.9% compared with 4.6% for skinfold thickness with an interobserver coefficient of variation for impedance of 2.8%. Bioelectrical impedance estimation of body composition is likely to be of value in the growth clinic when expertise in measurement of skinfold thickness is limited or repeated measurements are to be undertaken by different observers. PMID:2001107

  7. Visualized Multiprobe Electrical Impedance Measurements with STM Tips Using Shear Force Feedback Control

    PubMed Central

    Botaya, Luis; Coromina, Xavier; Samitier, Josep; Puig-Vidal, Manel; Otero, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Here we devise a multiprobe electrical measurement system based on quartz tuning forks (QTFs) and metallic tips capable of having full 3D control over the position of the probes. The system is based on the use of bent tungsten tips that are placed in mechanical contact (glue-free solution) with a QTF sensor. Shear forces acting in the probe are measured to control the tip-sample distance in the Z direction. Moreover, the tilting of the tip allows the visualization of the experiment under the optical microscope, allowing the coordination of the probes in X and Y directions. Meanwhile, the metallic tips are connected to a current–voltage amplifier circuit to measure the currents and thus the impedance of the studied samples. We discuss here the different aspects that must be addressed when conducting these multiprobe experiments, such as the amplitude of oscillation, shear force distance control, and wire tilting. Different results obtained in the measurement of calibration samples and microparticles are presented. They demonstrate the feasibility of the system to measure the impedance of the samples with a full 3D control on the position of the nanotips. PMID:27231911

  8. Measurement of Electrical Activation Energy in Black CVD Diamond Using Impedance Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Haitao; Williams, Oliver A.; Jackman, Richard B.

    Dc current-voltage (I-V) measurement, Hall measurement, Deep-level transient-spectroscopy (DLTS), and flatband capacitance measurement have been used to investigate electrical activation energies in diamond. However, the deviations still exist in the published activation energies obtained by these methods. In this paper, we report the first measurement of impedance on free-standing diamond films from 0.1Hz to 10MHz up to 300°C. A wide range of CVD materials have been investigated, but here we concentrate on `black' diamond grown by MWPECVD. The Cole-Cole (Z' via Z'') plots are well fitted to a RC parallel circuit model and the equivalent Resistance and Capacitance for the diamond films have been estimated using the Zview curve fitting. The results show only one single semicircle response at each temperature measured. It was found that the resistance decreases from 62 MΩ at room temperature to 4 KΩ at 300°C, with an activation energy around 0.15eV. The equivalent capacitance is maintained at the level of 102 pF up to 300°C suggesting that the diamond grain boundaries are dominating the conduction. At 400°C, the impedance at low frequencies shows a linear tail, which can be explained that the AC polarization of diamond/Au interface occurs.

  9. Visualized Multiprobe Electrical Impedance Measurements with STM Tips Using Shear Force Feedback Control.

    PubMed

    Botaya, Luis; Coromina, Xavier; Samitier, Josep; Puig-Vidal, Manel; Otero, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Here we devise a multiprobe electrical measurement system based on quartz tuning forks (QTFs) and metallic tips capable of having full 3D control over the position of the probes. The system is based on the use of bent tungsten tips that are placed in mechanical contact (glue-free solution) with a QTF sensor. Shear forces acting in the probe are measured to control the tip-sample distance in the Z direction. Moreover, the tilting of the tip allows the visualization of the experiment under the optical microscope, allowing the coordination of the probes in X and Y directions. Meanwhile, the metallic tips are connected to a current-voltage amplifier circuit to measure the currents and thus the impedance of the studied samples. We discuss here the different aspects that must be addressed when conducting these multiprobe experiments, such as the amplitude of oscillation, shear force distance control, and wire tilting. Different results obtained in the measurement of calibration samples and microparticles are presented. They demonstrate the feasibility of the system to measure the impedance of the samples with a full 3D control on the position of the nanotips. PMID:27231911

  10. Effect of Mild, Asymptomatic Obstructive Sleep Apnea on Daytime Heart Rate Variability and Impedance Cardiography Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Balachandran, Jay S.; Bakker, Jessie P.; Rahangdale, Shilpa; Yim-Yeh, Susie; Mietus, Joseph E.; Goldberger, Ary L.; Malhotra, Atul

    2011-01-01

    Dysregulation of autonomic nervous system dynamics is important in the pathophysiology of cardiovascular risk in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Heart rate variability (HRV) and impedance cardiography measures can estimate autonomic activity but have not gained traction clinically. We hypothesized that, even in a cohort of mild, asymptomatic OSA patients without overt cardiovascular disease, daytime HRV metrics and impedance cardiography measurements of pre-ejection period (PEP) would demonstrate increased sympathetic and decreased parasympathetic modulation compared with matched controls. Obese individuals (BMI ≥30 kg/m2) without any known cardiovascular or inflammatory comorbidities were recruited from the community. Subjects underwent standard in-laboratory polysomnograms (PSG), followed by simultaneous electrocardiography (ECG) and impedance cardiography recordings while supine, supine with paced breathing, and after standing. 74 subjects were studied, and 59% had OSA (apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) ≥10episodes/hr) with a median AHI of 25.8/hr. OSA subjects had significantly decreased daytime time- and frequency-domain HRV indices, but not significantly different PEP, when compared to controls. AHI was a significant independent predictor of time-domain HRV measures in all awake conditions, after controlling for age, gender, blood pressure, fasting cholesterol levels and hemoglobin A1C. In conclusion, our results demonstrate reductions in cardiac vagal modulation, as measured by multiple daytime time-domain markers of HRV, among asymptomatic OSA patients versus controls. Further prospective outcomes-based studies are needed to evaluate the applicability of these metrics for noninvasive screening of obese asymptomatic OSA patients, prior to the onset of overt cardiovascular disease. PMID:21945139

  11. Three-dimensional broadband intensity probe for measuring acoustical parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miah, Khalid Hossain

    Measuring different acoustical properties have been the key in reducing noise and improving the sound quality from various sources. In this report, a broadband (200 Hz -- 6.5 kHz) three-dimensional seven-microphone intensity probe system is developed to measure the sound intensity, and total energy density in different acoustical environments. Limitations of most commercial intensity probes in measuring the three-dimensional intensity for a broadband sound field was the main motivation in developing this probe. The finite-difference error and the phase mismatch error which are the two main errors associated with the intensity measurements are addressed in this report. As for the physical design, seven microphones were arranged in a two-concentric arrays with one microphone located at the center of the probe. The outer array is for low-frequencies (200 Hz -- 1.0 kHz), and the inner one is for high-frequencies (1.0 kHz -- 6.5 kHz). The screw adjustable center microphone is used for the microphone calibration, and as the reference microphone of the probe. The simultaneous calibrations of all the microphones in the probe were done in the anechoic room. Theories for the intensity and the energy densities calculations for the probe were derived from the existing four-microphone probe configuration. Reflection and diffraction effects on the intensity measurements due to the presence of the microphones, and the supporting structures were also investigated in this report. Directivity patterns of the calculated intensity showed the omnidirectional nature of the probe. The intensity, and total energy density were calculated and compared with the ideal values in the anechoic room environment. Characterization of sound fields in a reverberant enclosed space, and sound source identification are some applications that were investigated using this probe. Results of different measurements showed effectiveness of the probe as a tool to measure key acoustical properties in many

  12. Nonintrusive Monitoring and Control of Metallurgical Processes by Acoustic Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hao-Ling; Khajavi, Leili Tafaghodi; Barati, Mansoor

    2011-06-01

    The feasibility of developing a new online monitoring technique based on the characteristic acoustic response of gas bubbles in a liquid has been investigated. The method is intended to monitor the chemistry of the liquid through its relation to the bubble sound frequency. A low-temperature model consisting of water and alcohol mixtures was established, and the frequency of bubbles rising under varying concentrations of methanol was measured. It was shown that the frequency of the sound created by bubble pulsation varies with the percentage of alcohol in water. The frequency drops sharply with the increase in methanol content up to 20 wt pct, after which the decreases is gradual. Surface tension seems to be a critical liquid property affecting the sound frequency through its two-fold effects on the bubble size and the pulsation domain. The dependence between the frequency and the liquid composition suggests the feasibility of developing an acoustic-based technique for process control purposes.

  13. Acoustic ship signature measurements by cross-correlation method.

    PubMed

    Fillinger, Laurent; Sutin, Alexander; Sedunov, Alexander

    2011-02-01

    Cross-correlation methods were applied for the estimation of the power spectral density and modulation spectrum of underwater noise generated by moving vessels. The cross-correlation of the signal from two hydrophones allows the separation of vessel acoustic signatures in a busy estuary. Experimental data recorded in the Hudson River are used for demonstration that cross-correlation method measured the same ship noise and ship noise modulation spectra as conventional methods. The cross-correlation method was then applied for the separation of the acoustic signatures of two ships present simultaneously. Presented methods can be useful for ship traffic monitoring and small ship classification, even in noisy harbor environments. PMID:21361436

  14. Acoustic plethysmography measures breathing in unrestrained neonatal mice.

    PubMed

    Daubenspeck, J Andrew; Li, Aihua; Nattie, Eugene E

    2008-01-01

    Measurement of breathing volumes in neonatal mice is of growing importance in order to characterize the influence of development and genetic modifications on respiratory control to evaluate hypotheses concerned with human infant deficits that may affect sudden infant death syndrome, for example. Current techniques require undesirable physical constraints or incur possible artifacts specific to very small animals. We have examined the utility of a recently proposed approach using an acoustic resonance procedure that does not require undue physical constraint beyond placement in the acoustic plethysmograph. We show here that this approach can be applied to baby mice 5 days after birth and that it can be accurately calibrated. In addition, this approach should be useful to study unrestrained neonatal mice under conditions where body temperature approaches environmental temperature and barometric plethysmography cannot be used. PMID:17962574

  15. Determination of the elastic modulus of snow via acoustic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerling, Bastian; van Herwijnen, Alec; Löwe, Henning

    2016-04-01

    The elastic modulus of snow is a key quantity from the viewpoint of avalanche research and forecasting, snow engineering or materials science in general. Since it is a fundamental property, many measurements have been reported in the literature. Due to differences in measurement methods, there is a lot of variation in the reported values. Especially values derived via computer tomography (CT) based numerical calculations using finite element methods are not corresponding to the results of other methods. The central issue is that CT based moduli are purely elastic whereas other methods may include viscoelastic deformation. In order to avoid this discrepancy we derived the elastic modulus of snow via wave propagation measurements and compared our results with CT based calculations. We measured the arrival times of acoustic pulses propagating through the snow samples to determine the P-wave velocity and in turn derive the elastic modulus along the direction of wave propagation. We performed a series of laboratory experiments to derive the P-wave modulus of snow in relation to density. The P-wave modulus ranged from 10 to 280 MPa for a snow density between 150 and 370 kg/m³. The moduli derived from the acoustic measurements correlated well with the CT-based values and both exhibited a power law trend over the entire density range. Encouraged by these results we used the acoustic method to investigate the temporal evolution of the elastic modulus. The rate of increase was very close to values mentioned in literature on the sintering rate of snow. Overall, our results are a first but important step towards a new measurement method to attain the elastic properties of snow.

  16. Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The acoustics research activities of the DLR fluid-mechanics department (Forschungsbereich Stroemungsmechanik) during 1988 are surveyed and illustrated with extensive diagrams, drawings, graphs, and photographs. Particular attention is given to studies of helicopter rotor noise (high-speed impulsive noise, blade/vortex interaction noise, and main/tail-rotor interaction noise), propeller noise (temperature, angle-of-attack, and nonuniform-flow effects), noise certification, and industrial acoustics (road-vehicle flow noise and airport noise-control installations).

  17. Effect of grazing flow on the acoustic impedance of Helmholtz resonators consisting of single and clustered orifices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hersh, A. S.; Walker, B.; Bucka, M.

    1978-01-01

    A semiempirical fluid mechanical model is presented which predicts impedance of a Helmholtz resonator consisting of a single cavity-backed orifice as a function of grazing flow speed, boundary-layer thickness, incident sound amplitude and frequency, and resonator geometry. The incident and cavity sound fields are connected in terms of an orifice discharge coefficient. The effect of multiple orifices was studied experimentally. Interaction between orifices is important only for orifices aligned parallel to the grazing flow. Resistance was virtually independent of both orifice relative spacing and number. Reactance was found to be quite dependent upon orifice spacing but insensitive to the number of orifices.

  18. Relationships between bioelectric impedance and subcutaneous adipose tissue thickness measured by LIPOMETER and skinfold calipers in children.

    PubMed

    Jürimäe, T; Sudi, K; Payerl, D; Leppik, A; Jürimäe, J; Müller, R; Tafeit, E

    2003-09-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the relationships between bioelectrical impedance and thicknesses of adipose tissue measured by traditional skinfold caliper (double thickness) or a LIPOMETER device (single non-compressed thickness) in 9- to 12-year-old boys ( n=52) and girls ( n=44). In total, nine skinfolds (triceps, subscapular, biceps, iliac crest, supraspinale, abdominal, front thigh, medial calf, mid-axilla) were measured. Measurement for the thickness of subcutaneous adipose tissue layers (SAT-layers) by LIPOMETER were performed at 15 body sites (neck, triceps, biceps, upper back, front chest, lateral chest, upper abdomen, lower abdomen, lower back, hip, front thigh, lateral thigh, rear thigh, inner thigh, calf). Body bioelectrical impedance was measured with a multiple-frequency impedance device Multiscan-5000 (Bodystat, UK). Impedance at 50 kHz highly correlated with body mass ( r=-0.47 in boys, r=-0.46 in girls, r=-0.47 in total group). The relationship with body height was significant only in girls ( r=-0.42). Skinfold thicknesses measured by caliper did not correlate significantly with body impedance at 50 kHz. SAT-layers measured by LIPOMETER at triceps, front thigh, lateral thigh and rear thigh sites in boys and at the lateral thigh site in girls correlated significantly with body impedance measured at 50 kHz. Stepwise multiple regression analysis indicated that the iliac crest and front thigh skinfold thicknesses measured by caliper characterized only 5.7-12.0% of the impedance at 50 kHz in the total group ( n=96). From the measured 15 SAT-layers, the most significant was the lateral thigh layer which characterized 20.0%, 11.9% and 13.6% of the impedance at 50 kHz in boys, girls and the total group, respectively. It was concluded that the influence of subcutaneous adipose tissue on body impedance is relatively low in children. However, SAT-layers have a slightly higher influence on body impedance than skinfold thicknesses measured by caliper. The

  19. Predicting the intelligibility of deaf children's speech from acoustic measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchanski, Rosalie M.; Geers, Ann E.; Brenner, Christine M.; Tobey, Emily A.

    2001-05-01

    A weighted combination of speech-acoustic measures may provide an objective assessment of speech intelligibility in deaf children that could be used to evaluate the benefits of sensory aids and rehabilitation programs. This investigation compared the accuracy of two different approaches, multiple linear regression and a simple neural net. These two methods were applied to identical sets of acoustic measures, including both segmental (e.g., voice-onset times of plosives, spectral moments of fricatives, second formant frequencies of vowels) and suprasegmental measures (e.g., sentence duration, number and frequency of intersentence pauses). These independent variables were obtained from digitized recordings of deaf children's imitations of 11 simple sentences. The dependent measure was the percentage of spoken words from the 36 McGarr Sentences understood by groups of naive listeners. The two predictive methods were trained on speech measures obtained from 123 out of 164 8- and 9-year-old deaf children who used cochlear implants. Then, predictions were obtained using speech measures from the remaining 41 children. Preliminary results indicate that multiple linear regression is a better predictor of intelligibility than the neural net, accounting for 79% as opposed to 65% of the variance in the data. [Work supported by NIH.

  20. [Estimation of normal body volumes in children by the measurement of total electrical impedance (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Peyramond, D; Tholly, F; Bertoye, A

    1980-03-01

    The theoretical fluid volume of 41 normal children (mean age 8 years 9 months) was estimated from anthropometric data: height, weight, wrist circumference, and body surface. The correlation between this method and the conventional methods of determining total body water using tritiated water or of extracellular fluid volume using stable bromide or bromide 82 is very good. The real fluid volumes have been measured using total body electrical impedance at low frequency (Z5 kHz) and high frequency (Z1 MHz). The correlation of these results with those obtained by anthropometry is very satisfactory (r = 0.89; p < 0,001). PMID:7469697

  1. On the measurement of the thermal impedance in vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hader, J.; Wang, T.-L.; Moloney, J. V.; Heinen, B.; Koch, M.; Koch, S. W.; Kunert, B.; Stolz, W.

    2013-04-01

    A detailed and systematic analysis of the loss mechanisms in vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting lasers is presented with the goal to correctly determine the amount of pump power that is converted to heat. With this input, the accuracy of a recently proposed method for measuring the thermal impedance based on roll-over characteristics is shown to be very high for devices with and without dielectric coating. Potential errors arising from non-heating losses can be determined by performing experiments with different out-coupling mirrors.

  2. Measurement of lung function using Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT) during mechanical ventilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nebuya, Satoru; Koike, Tomotaka; Imai, Hiroshi; Noshiro, Makoto; Brown, Brian H.; Soma, Kazui

    2010-04-01

    The consistency of regional lung density measurements as estimated by Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT), in eleven patients supported by a mechanical ventilator, was validated to verify the feasibility of its use in intensive care medicine. There were significant differences in regional lung densities between the normal lung and diseased lungs associated with pneumonia, atelectasis and pleural effusion (Steel-Dwass test, p < 0.05). Temporal changes in regional lung density of patients with atelectasis were observed to be in good agreement with the results of clinical diagnosis. These results indicate that it is feasible to obtain a quantitative value for regional lung density using EIT.

  3. Velocity measurements in whole blood using acoustic resolution photoacoustic Doppler

    PubMed Central

    Brunker, Joanna; Beard, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Acoustic resolution photoacoustic Doppler velocimetry promises to overcome the spatial resolution and depth penetration limitations of current blood flow measuring methods. Despite successful implementation using blood-mimicking fluids, measurements in blood have proved challenging, thus preventing in vivo application. A common explanation for this difficulty is that whole blood is insufficiently heterogeneous relative to detector frequencies of tens of MHz compatible with deep tissue photoacoustic measurements. Through rigorous experimental measurements we provide new insight that refutes this assertion. We show for the first time that, by careful choice of the detector frequency and field-of-view, and by employing novel signal processing methods, it is possible to make velocity measurements in whole blood using transducers with frequencies in the tens of MHz range. These findings have important implications for the prospects of making deep tissue measurements of blood flow relevant to the study of microcirculatory abnormalities associated with cancer, diabetes, atherosclerosis and other conditions. PMID:27446707

  4. Velocity measurements in whole blood using acoustic resolution photoacoustic Doppler.

    PubMed

    Brunker, Joanna; Beard, Paul

    2016-07-01

    Acoustic resolution photoacoustic Doppler velocimetry promises to overcome the spatial resolution and depth penetration limitations of current blood flow measuring methods. Despite successful implementation using blood-mimicking fluids, measurements in blood have proved challenging, thus preventing in vivo application. A common explanation for this difficulty is that whole blood is insufficiently heterogeneous relative to detector frequencies of tens of MHz compatible with deep tissue photoacoustic measurements. Through rigorous experimental measurements we provide new insight that refutes this assertion. We show for the first time that, by careful choice of the detector frequency and field-of-view, and by employing novel signal processing methods, it is possible to make velocity measurements in whole blood using transducers with frequencies in the tens of MHz range. These findings have important implications for the prospects of making deep tissue measurements of blood flow relevant to the study of microcirculatory abnormalities associated with cancer, diabetes, atherosclerosis and other conditions. PMID:27446707

  5. A pseudo-inverse algorithm for simultaneous measurements using multiple acoustical sources.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Ning; Li, Shu

    2007-03-01

    Simultaneous multiple acoustical sources measurement (SMASM) has been proposed for more effective and reliable identification of acoustical systems under critical conditions [N. Xiang and M. R. Schroeder, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 113, 2754-2761 (2003); N. Xiang, J. N. Daigle, and M. Kleiner, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 117, 1889-1894 (2005)]. This paper presents a pseudo-inverse algorithm for the SMASM correlation technique as an alternative way of extracting impulse responses of acoustical channels. Simulations and room acoustics experiments are carried out and the results prove the feasibility of the proposed algorithm. PMID:17407864

  6. Impedance measurements on a spiral-wound nickel/metal hydride cell cycled in a simulated Leo orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Margaret A.

    1993-01-01

    A spiral-wound size C cell was cycled at 25 C in a low earth orbit (LEO) regime at 50 percent depth of discharge (DOD) with approximately five percent over-charge. The nominal capacity was 3.5 AH. The cell was cycled for 2000 cycles. Capacity checks and impedance measurements over the complete range of state of charge were made upon receipt and after 500, 1000, and 2000 cycles. The capacity of the cell was essentially unchanged until after the impedance measurements at 2000 cycles. Only small changes in the impedance parameters were observed, but there was somewhat more scatter in the data after 2000 cycles. When the cell was returned to LEO cycling after 2000 cycles, only 38 percent of the capacity could be obtained. It is believed that the cell failed because of an equipment failure at the end of the final impedance measurements which allowed an over-discharge.

  7. An Acoustic Measure for Word Prominence in Spontaneous Speech

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dagen; Narayanan, Shrikanth

    2010-01-01

    An algorithm for automatic speech prominence detection is reported in this paper. We describe a comparative analysis on various acoustic features for word prominence detection and report results using a spoken dialog corpus with manually assigned prominence labels. The focus is on features such as spectral intensity and speech rate that are directly extracted from speech based on a correlation-based approach without requiring explicit linguistic or phonetic knowledge. Additionally, various pitch-based measures are studied with respect to their discriminating ability for prominence detection. A parametric scheme for modeling pitch plateau is proposed and this feature alone is found to outperform the traditional local pitch statistics. Two sets of experiments are used to explore the usefulness of the acoustic score generated using these features. The first set focuses on a more traditional way of word prominence detection based on a manually-tagged corpus. A 76.8% classification accuracy was achieved on a corpus of role-playing spoken dialogs. Due to difficulties in manually tagging speech prominence into discrete levels (categories), the second set of experiments focuses on evaluating the score indirectly. Specifically, through experiments on the Switchboard corpus, it is shown that the proposed acoustic score can discriminate between content word and function words in a statistically significant way. The relation between speech prominence and content/function words is also explored. Since prominent words tend to be predominantly content words, and since content words can be automatically marked from text-derived part of speech (POS) information, it is shown that the proposed acoustic score can be indirectly cross-validated through POS information. PMID:20454538

  8. Design of an Electrical Impedance Tomography Sensor for Flow Measurement in an Oscillatory Baffled Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilar, G.; Williams, R. A.; Wang, M.

    2007-06-01

    In this paper, a new application of electrical impedance tomography (EIT) for an advanced on-line measurement is presented. This application involves the design, manufacture and adaptation of an EIT sensor for the measurement in an oscillatory baffled reactor (OBR). The main goal is to develop of a novel measurement and modeling method for control of the OBR. The reactor itself enables the production of water-in-oil/oil-in water emulsions along with the use of chemical reagents for a variety of manufacturing processes. Use of electrical tomography facilitates detailed measurement of the concentration and flow of components in the reactor. The paper reports on design philosophy of the EIT for this application that has not, to our knowledge, been reported previously.

  9. Validation of bioelectrical-impedance analysis as a measurement of change in body composition in obesity

    SciTech Connect

    Kushner, R.F.; Kunigk, A.; Alspaugh, M.; Andronis, P.T.; Leitch, C.A.; Schoeller, D.A. )

    1990-08-01

    The bioelectrical-impedance-analysis (BIA) method accurately measures body composition in weight-stable subjects. This study validates the use of BIA to measure change in body composition. Twelve obese females underwent weight loss at a mean rate of 1.16 kg/wk. Body composition was measured by deuterium oxide dilution (D2O), BIA, and skinfold anthropometry (SFA) at baseline and at 5% decrements in weight. Highly significant correlations were obtained between D2O and BIA (r = 0.971) and between D2O and SFA (r = 0.932). Overall, BIA predicted change in fat-free mass with greater accuracy (to 0.4 kg) and precision (+/- 1.28 kg) than did anthropometry (to 0.8 kg and +/- 2.58 kg, respectively). We conclude that BIA is a useful clinical method for measuring change in body composition.

  10. Considerations on electrical impedance measurements of electrolyte solutions in a four-electrode cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaparro, C. V.; Herrera, L. V.; Meléndez, A. M.; Miranda, D. A.

    2016-02-01

    A tetrapolar probe to measure the electrical properties of electrolyte solutions was implemented with gold electrodes according to the van der Pauw method. Electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements of different concentrations of phosphate buffer saline (PBS) solution and an oral mucosal tissue sample dispersed in PBS were performed in the galvanostatic mode using a four-electrode cell (tetrapolar probe). Taking advantage of using a potentiostat/galvanostat for carrying out the electrical measurements, a simple and rapid method using a three-electrode electrochemical cell is described for: a) cleaning of electrodes, b) verification of surface chemical state of electrode material and c) choice of current supplied to electrodes for EIS measurements. Results of this research shown a depolarization effect due to the addition of oral mucosa tissue cells into the PBS solution.

  11. Measurement of noise and impedance of dry and wet textile electrodes, and textile electrodes with hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Puurtinen, Merja M; Komulainen, Satu M; Kauppinen, Pasi K; Malmivuo, Jaakko A V; Hyttinen, Jari A K

    2006-01-01

    Textile sensors, when embedded into clothing, can provide new ways of monitoring physiological signals, and improve the usability and comfort of such monitoring systems in the areas of medical, occupational health and sports. However, good electrical and mechanical contact between the electrode and the skin is very important, as it often determines the quality of the signal. This paper introduces a study where the properties of dry textile electrodes, textile electrodes moistened with water, and textile electrodes covered with hydrogel were studied with five different electrode sizes. The aim was to study how the electrode size and preparation of the electrode (dry electrode/wet electrode/electrode covered with hydrogel membrane) affect the measurement noise, and the skin-electrode impedance. The measurement noise and skin-electrode impedance were determined from surface biopotential measurements. These preliminary results indicate that noise level increases as the electrode size decreases. The noise level is high in dry textile electrodes, as expected. Yet, the noise level of wet textile electrodes is quite low and similar to that of textile electrodes covered with hydrogel. Hydrogel does not seem to improve noise properties, however it may have effects on movement artifacts. Thus, it is feasible to use textile embedded sensors in physiological monitoring applications when moistening or hydrogel is applied. PMID:17946734

  12. Monitoring of pipelines in nuclear power plants by measuring laser-based mechanical impedance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyeonseok; Sohn, Hoon; Yang, Suyoung; Yang, Jinyeol

    2014-06-01

    Using laser-based mechanical impedance (LMI) measurement, this study proposes a damage detection technique that enables structural health monitoring of pipelines under the high temperature and radioactive environments of nuclear power plants (NPPs). The applications of conventional electromechanical impedance (EMI) based techniques to NPPs have been limited, mainly due to the contact nature of piezoelectric transducers, which cannot survive under the high temperature and high radiation environments of NPPs. The proposed LMI measurement technique aims to tackle the limitations of the EMI techniques by utilizing noncontact laser beams for both ultrasound generation and sensing. An Nd:Yag pulse laser is used for ultrasound generation, and a laser Doppler vibrometer is employed for the measurement of the corresponding ultrasound responses. For the monitoring of pipes covered by insulation layers, this study utilizes optical fibers to guide the laser beams to specific target locations. Then, an outlier analysis is adopted for autonomous damage diagnosis. Validation of the proposed LMI technique is carried out on a carbon steel pipe elbow under varying temperatures. A corrosion defect chemically engraved in the specimen is successfully detected.

  13. Measurement of the volume of weights using an acoustic volumeter and the reliability of such measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobata, T.; Ueki, M.; Ooiwa, A.; Ishii, Y.

    2004-04-01

    For the precise measurement of the mass of a weight, buoyancy correction of air for the volume of a weight is necessary. Although hydrostatic weighing is the most accurate method currently used in determining volume, it is a relatively complicated process requiring the weight to be wetted in a reference fluid. Since more weights with high accuracy of mass are being used, a more sophisticated method of determining volume that satisfies uncertainty requirements has been demanded to improve the efficiency of calibration. In this paper, an acoustic volumeter is proposed for the measurement of the volume of weights. An acoustic volumeter can measure volume in atmosphere in a simple manner. Consequently, it is not necessary to consider the contamination and mass change due to the liquid used in the hydrostatic weighing method. In practical applications, a procedure for measuring the volume of weights ranging from 100 g to 10 kg using an acoustic volumeter is proposed. The volumes obtained using an acoustic volumeter were compared with those obtained by the hydrostatic weighing method, and the reliability of the measurement was evaluated with a relative uncertainty below the order of 1 × 10-3. From the measurement results, it was shown that the use of an acoustic volumeter is effective for the measurement of the volume of weights.

  14. Forced expiratory flow and oscillometric impedance measurement in evaluating airway obstruction.

    PubMed

    Wouters, E F; Mostert, R; Polko, A H; Visser, B F

    1990-05-01

    The application of forced oscillations has been introduced as a noninvasive method to measure the impedance of the respiratory system. Impedance can be partitioned into a real part or resistance and an imaginary part or reactance. The reactance depends on the elastic and inertial properties of the respiratory system. In the present study, resistance and reactance obtained in a frequency spectrum between 4 and 52 Hz were compared with maximal forced expiratory spirometry in 100 out-patients, aged 18-70 years. Resonant frequency and frequency dependence of resistance correlated significantly with selected parameters of the forced expiratory flow volume curve: correlation coefficient values ranged from 0.492 between frequency dependence and FVC and 0.668 between resonant frequency and FEV1. No correlation between average resistance and spirometric parameters reached a statistically significant level. No marked difference was observed between spirometric parameters depending on the early or effort-dependent portion and those parameters depending on the late or effort independent portion of the maximum forced expiration. It can be concluded that each measurement procedure reveals different but characteristic information about the mechanical behaviour and properties of the respiratory system. PMID:2218005

  15. Influence of cheek support on respiratory impedance measured by forced oscillation technique.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Akemi; Ito, Satoru; Suki, Béla; Matsubara, Hiroki; Hasegawa, Yoshinori

    2013-01-01

    The forced oscillation technique (FOT) is a useful tool to assess respiratory resistance and reactance during tidal breathing in patients with respiratory diseases, specifically asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Although the FOT has been clinically used, results of respiratory impedance can be affected by various factors such as upper airway artifact. We investigated the effects of cheek support on respiratory resistance and reactance measured by a commercially available FOT equipment MostGraph-01. Respiratory resistance at 20 Hz (R20) with support of the cheeks was significantly higher than those without the cheek support in healthy subjects. Two different cheek support protocols, support of the cheeks by subjects themselves and an operator, were compared in healthy volunteers and patients with respiratory diseases. The cheek support protocols significantly affected respiratory resistance at 5 Hz (R5) and reactance at 5 Hz (X5) in the patient group but not in the healthy subjects. Moreover, for X5, there was a significant interaction between cheek support protocols (by a subject or operator) and groups (healthy or diseased). In conclusion, during impedance measurements using the FOT, application of cheek support either by subjects or the operator is recommended to reduce upper airway artifacts, however, results obtained by two protocols may be different in patients with respiratory diseases. Contribution of the chest wall and position of the arms to the mechanical properties should be carefully considered in physiological studies in which the FOT is attempted. PMID:23961407

  16. AN ADVANCED CALIBRATION PROCEDURE FOR COMPLEX IMPEDANCE SPECTRUM MEASUREMENTS OF ADVANCED ENERGY STORAGE DEVICES

    SciTech Connect

    William H. Morrison; Jon P. Christophersen; Patrick Bald; John L. Morrison

    2012-06-01

    With the increasing demand for electric and hybrid electric vehicles and the explosion in popularity of mobile and portable electronic devices such as laptops, cell phones, e-readers, tablet computers and the like, reliance on portable energy storage devices such as batteries has likewise increased. The concern for the availability of critical systems in turn drives the availability of battery systems and thus the need for accurate battery health monitoring has become paramount. Over the past decade the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Montana Tech of the University of Montana (Tech), and Qualtech Systems, Inc. (QSI) have been developing the Smart Battery Status Monitor (SBSM), an integrated battery management system designed to monitor battery health, performance and degradation and use this knowledge for effective battery management and increased battery life. Key to the success of the SBSM is an in-situ impedance measurement system called the Impedance Measurement Box (IMB). One of the challenges encountered has been development of an accurate, simple, robust calibration process. This paper discusses the successful realization of this process.

  17. The contamination of acoustic pressure measurements by sensor oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Surry, J.; Kezele, D.; Risley, C.

    1996-04-01

    The significance of micromotion (sensor) noise contamination of low frequency, low level, ambient ocean acoustic measurements has been pursued experimentally and analytically. Oceanographic hydrophones are subject to small motions resulting from various phenomena; the present study focussed on a pressure-sensitive hydrophone exposed to vertical oscillations. While under such imposed motion, the responses from a pressure-sensitive hydrophone and a collocated accelerometer were analyzed relative to a stationary reference hydrophone. The imposed motion was vertical, colored noise (1 to 50 Hz) of various acceleration amplitudes (10 {mu}g to 10 mg), transmitted through an elastic isolation suspension. Formation of Frequency Response Functions between the measured transducer signals, demonstrated that a three component model of the hydrophone signal predicts the response-to-motion contamination of the acoustic signal. In the lower frequency range, the vertical motion through the static head gradient generates a signal similar to the response-to-acoustic signal, while in the upper frequency range, the hydrophone responds inertially to the motion. For acceleration greater than 30 {mu}g, these components masked the laboratory ambient sound, except in a narrow frequency band where the two motion related components canceled each other. The in-water acceleration sensitivity of the hydrophone was found to be higher than the measured in-air value, apparently due to two hydrodynamic effects: water mass loading predicted by a classical added-mass term and a greatly magnifying effect from an adjacent moving body. Extrapolating the results to a deep ocean environment, the hydrophone signals would be contaminated below 5 Hz. A spectral technique is demonstrated to remove both forms of motion contamination from laboratory data. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  18. Acoustic measurement of the Deepwater Horizon Macondo well flow rate

    PubMed Central

    Camilli, Richard; Di Iorio, Daniela; Bowen, Andrew; Reddy, Christopher M.; Techet, Alexandra H.; Yoerger, Dana R.; Whitcomb, Louis L.; Seewald, Jeffrey S.; Sylva, Sean P.; Fenwick, Judith

    2012-01-01

    On May 31, 2010, a direct acoustic measurement method was used to quantify fluid leakage rate from the Deepwater Horizon Macondo well prior to removal of its broken riser. This method utilized an acoustic imaging sonar and acoustic Doppler sonar operating onboard a remotely operated vehicle for noncontact measurement of flow cross-section and velocity from the well’s two leak sites. Over 2,500 sonar cross-sections and over 85,000 Doppler velocity measurements were recorded during the acquisition process. These data were then applied to turbulent jet and plume flow models to account for entrained water and calculate a combined hydrocarbon flow rate from the two leak sites at seafloor conditions. Based on the chemical composition of end-member samples collected from within the well, this bulk volumetric rate was then normalized to account for contributions from gases and condensates at initial leak source conditions. Results from this investigation indicate that on May 31, 2010, the well’s oil flow rate was approximately 0.10 ± 0.017 m3 s-1 at seafloor conditions, or approximately 85 ± 15 kg s-1 (7.4 ± 1.3 Gg d-1), equivalent to approximately 57,000 ± 9,800 barrels of oil per day at surface conditions. End-member chemical composition indicates that this oil release rate was accompanied by approximately an additional 24 ± 4.2 kg s-1 (2.1 ± 0.37 Gg d-1) of natural gas (methane through pentanes), yielding a total hydrocarbon release rate of 110 ± 19 kg s-1 (9.5 ± 1.6 Gg d-1). PMID:21903931

  19. Wide-Range Filter-Based Sinusoidal Wave Synthesizer for Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy Measurements.

    PubMed

    Chia-Ling Wei; Yi-Wen Wang; Bin-Da Liu

    2014-06-01

    A filter-based wide-range programmable sinusoidal wave synthesizer for electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurement is proposed. The adopted filter is implemented with switched-capacitor circuits, so its corner frequency is accurate and adjustable by changing its switching frequency. The proposed sine wave synthesizer is implemented by using a 0.35 μm 2P4M 3.3 V mixed-signal polycide process. According to the measured results, the output frequency of the proposed synthesizer is 40 mHz-40 kHz . The measured total harmonic distortion is 0.073% at 10 Hz and 0.075% at 10 kHz, both of which are better than that of a typical function generator. PMID:24043398

  20. Method and apparatus for sensing a target characteristic by measuring both impedance and resonant frequency of a tank circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laskowski, Edward L. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    An apparatus for sensing a target characteristic, such as relative distance between the apparatus and target, target thickness, target material, or lateral position between the apparatus and the target, includes a coil for directing an electro-magnetic field at the target. A voltage controlled oscillator energizes the coil at a resonant frequency which is functionally related to the target characteristic. The coil has an effective impedance value at resonance functionally related to the target characteristic. A frequency monitor measures the resonant frequency. An impedance monitor determines the impedance value when the drive frequency is at the resonant value. A PROM or controller determines the target characteristic in response to the measured resonant frequency and the determined impedance value. The PROM or controller provides a signal responsive to the determined target characteristic.

  1. In vivo bioimpedance measurement of healthy and ischaemic rat brain: implications for stroke imaging using electrical impedance tomography.

    PubMed

    Dowrick, T; Blochet, C; Holder, D

    2015-06-01

    In order to facilitate the imaging of haemorrhagic and ischaemic stroke using frequency difference electrical impedance tomography (EIT), impedance measurements of normal and ischaemic brain, and clotted blood during haemorrhage, were gathered using a four-terminal technique in an in vivo animal model, a first for ischaemic measurements. Differences of 5-10% in impedance were seen between the frequency spectrums of healthy and ischaemic brain, over the frequency range 0-3 kHz, while the spectrum of blood was predominately uniform. The implications of imaging blood/ischaemia in the brain using electrical impedance tomography are discussed, supporting the notion that it will be possible to differentiate stroke from haemorrhage. PMID:26006171

  2. Passive Wake Acoustics Measurements at Denver International Airport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Frank Y.; Wassaf, Hadi; Dougherty, Robert P.; Clark, Kevin; Gulsrud, Andrew; Fenichel, Neil; Bryant, Wayne H.

    2004-01-01

    From August to September 2003, NASA conducted an extensive measurement campaign to characterize the acoustic signal of wake vortices. A large, both spatially as well as in number of elements, phased microphone array was deployed at Denver International Airport for this effort. This paper will briefly describe the program background, the microphone array, as well as the supporting ground-truth and meteorological sensor suite. Sample results to date are then presented and discussed. It is seen that, in the frequency range processed so far, wake noise is generated predominantly from a very confined area around the cores.

  3. Ionosphere plasma electron parameters from radio frequency sweeping impedance probe measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, E.; Patra, S.

    2015-09-01

    In this work we will describe the technique of using an RF sweeping impedance probe (SIP) to measure the AC impedance of an electrically short monopole immersed in a plasma. We analyze the SIP measurements which are taken from the payload of the Storms sounding rocket, launched from Wallops Island, Virginia, in 2007. The scientific objective of the Storms mission was to concentrate on whether density irregularities observed in midlatitude spread F could arise from ionospheric coupling to terrestrial weather. As such, independent measurements of the electron density profile are crucial. Since the inherent nature of the SIP technique makes it relatively insensitive to errors introduced through spacecraft charging, probe contamination, and other DC effects, it is an ideal instrument to employ under disturbed plasma conditions. The instrument measures both the magnitude and phase of the AC impedance from 100 kHz to 20 MHz in 128 frequency steps, performing 45,776 sweeps over the entire flight. From these measurements we infer both the absolute electron density ne and the electron neutral collision frequencies νen throughout the flight trajectory. The SIP data can be approximately analyzed using a fluid formulation and thin sheath approximation particularly at altitudes below 200 km, which allows us to match the measurements to quasi-static analytical formulas. At about 265 km on the upleg, the magnitude data transitioned to a highly damped response with increasing altitude. The phase data, on the other hand, continued to indicate increased plasma density and reduced collisionality as expected. For a large portion of the flight, the payload of the Storms mission exhibited an uncontrolled coning motion, making the local magnetic field orientation with respect to the dipole difficult to decipher. Despite these difficulties, we were able to obtain robust estimates of the electron density profile, using the phase information from each sweep. In addition, the electron

  4. Measurement of stiffness of standing trees and felled logs using acoustics: A review.

    PubMed

    Legg, Mathew; Bradley, Stuart

    2016-02-01

    This paper provides a review on the use of acoustics to measure stiffness of standing trees, stems, and logs. An outline is given of the properties of wood and how these are related to stiffness and acoustic velocity throughout the tree. Factors are described that influence the speed of sound in wood, including the different types of acoustic waves which propagate in tree stems and lumber. Acoustic tools and techniques that have been used to measure the stiffness of wood are reviewed. The reasons for a systematic difference between direct and acoustic measurements of stiffness for standing trees, and methods for correction, are discussed. Other techniques, which have been used in addition to acoustics to try to improve stiffness measurements, are also briefly described. Also reviewed are studies which have used acoustic tools to investigate factors that influence the stiffness of trees. These factors include different silvicultural practices, geographic and environmental conditions, and genetics. PMID:26936543

  5. Noise suppression in curved glass shells using macro-fiber-composite actuators studied by the means of digital holography and acoustic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokrý, P.; Psota, P.; Steiger, K.; Václavík, J.; Doleček, R.; Lédl, V.; Šulc, M.

    2015-02-01

    The paper presents methods and experimental results of the semi-active control of noise transmission in a curved glass shell with attached piezoelectric macro fiber composite (MFC) actuators. The semi-active noise control is achieved via active elasticity control of piezoelectric actuators by connecting them to an active electric shunt circuit that has a negative effective capacitance. Using this approach, it is possible to suppress the vibration of the glass shell in the normal direction with respect to its surface and to increase the acoustic transmission loss of the piezoelectric MFC-glass composite structure. The effect of the MFC actuators connected to the negative capacitance shunt circuit on the surface distribution of the normal vibration amplitude is studied using frequency-shifted digital holography (FSDH). The principle of the used FSDH method is described in the paper. The frequency dependence of the acoustic transmission loss through the piezoelectric MFC-glass composite structure is estimated using measurements of the specific acoustic impedance of the curved glass shell. The specific acoustic impedance is measured using two microphones and a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV). The results from the LDV measurements are compared with the FSDH data. The results of the experiments show that using this approach, the acoustic transmission loss in a glass shell can be increased by 36 dB in the frequency range around 247 Hz and by 25 dB in the frequency range around 258 Hz. The experiments indicate that FSDH measurements provide an efficient tool that can be used for fast and accurate measurements of the acoustic transmission loss in large planar structures.

  6. Evaluation of human middle ear function via an acoustic power assessment.

    PubMed

    Allen, Jont B; Jeng, Patricia S; Levitt, Harry

    2005-01-01

    Measurements of middle ear (ME) acoustic power flow (power reflectance, power absorption, and transmittance) and normalized impedance (acoustic resistance, acoustic reactance, and impedance magnitude) were compared for their utility in clinical applications. Transmittance, a measure of the acoustic power absorbed by the ME, was found to have several important advantages over other measures of acoustic power flow. In addition to its simple and audiologically relevant physical interpretation (absorbed power), the normal transmittance curve has a simple shape that is visually similar to the ME transfer function. The acoustic impedance measures (resistance and reactance) provided important additional information about ME status and supplemented transmittance measurements. Together these measurements can help identify unusual conditions such as eardrum perforations. While this article is largely a review of the development of a commercial power reflectance measurement system, previously unpublished experimental results are presented. PMID:16470465

  7. Traveling-wave electrokinetic micropumps: velocity, electrical current, and impedance measurements.

    PubMed

    García-Sánchez, P; Ramos, A; Green, N G; Morgan, H

    2008-09-01

    An array of microelectrodes covered in an electrolyte and energized by a traveling-wave potential produces net movement of the fluid. Arrays of platinum microelectrodes of two different characteristic sizes have been studied. For both sizes of arrays, at low voltages (<2 V pp) the electrolyte flow is in qualitative agreement with the linear theory of ac electroosmosis. At voltages above a threshold, the direction of fluid flow is reversed. The electrical impedance of the electrode-electrolyte system was measured after the experiments, and changes in the electrical properties of the electrolyte were observed. Measurements of the electrical current during pumping of the electrolyte are also reported. Transient behaviors in both electrical current and fluid velocity were observed. The Faradaic currents probably generate conductivity gradients in the liquid bulk, which in turn give rise to electrical forces. These effects are discussed in relation to the fluid flow observations. PMID:18672919

  8. Estimation of Metabolism Characteristics for Heat-Injured Bacteria Using Dielectrophoretic Impedance Measurement Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amako, Eri; Enjoji, Takaharu; Uchida, Satoshi; Tochikubo, Fumiyoshi

    Constant monitoring and immediate control of fermentation processes have been required for advanced quality preservation in food industry. In the present work, simple estimation of metabolic states for heat-injured Escherichia coli (E. coli) in a micro-cell was investigated using dielectrophoretic impedance measurement (DEPIM) method. Temporal change in the conductance between micro-gap (ΔG) was measured for various heat treatment temperatures. In addition, the dependence of enzyme activity, growth capacity and membrane situation for E. coli on heat treatment temperature was also analyzed with conventional biological methods. Consequently, a correlation between ΔG and those biological properties was obtained quantitatively. This result suggests that DEPIM method will be available for an effective monitoring technique for complex change in various biological states of microorganisms.

  9. Biological impedance cross evaluation and imaging from composite measurements of magnetic and electrical methods.

    PubMed

    Ran, Peng; Xiao, Xiaoming; He, Wei; Li, Zhangyong

    2015-01-01

    Because of the need for rapid detection and location of diseases in clinical applications, this work proposes a composite measurement of magnetic induction tomography (MIT) and electrical impedance tomography (EIT). This paper is composed of the following aspects: portable and integral hardware design, stable dual constant-current sources, the composite detection method, cross-plane data acquirement, 3-dimensional image reconstruction and so on. A qualitative evaluation of conductivity, resolution and relative position error were taken by combining the EIT and MIT methods via the experiment model. The sensitivities of both methods were analyzed to improve the imaging results. The reconstruction results reveal that the system is capable of obtaining better physiological measurements, which is very useful in clinical monitoring, quick medical diagnosing and preliminary screening of community health. PMID:26405936

  10. A sapphire loaded TE011 cavity for surface impedance measurements: design, construction, and commissioning status

    SciTech Connect

    L. Phillips; G. K. Davis; J. R. Delayen; J. P. Ozelis; T. Plawski; H. Wang; G. Wu

    2005-07-10

    In order to measure the superconducting surface properties of niobium that are of interest to SRF applications, a facility which utilizes a Nb cavity operating in the TE011 mode at 7.65 GHz which provides a well-defined RF field on a disk shaped sample has been designed and fabricated. The RF losses due to the sample's surface impedance are determined by using a calorimetric technique. The system has the capability to measure such properties as Rs,(T), and penetration depth, which can then be correlated with surface properties and preparation processes. The design, fabrication, and results from initial commissioning operations will be discussed, along with the near term sample evaluation program.

  11. Focused Impedance Method (FIM) and Pigeon Hole Imaging (PHI) for localized measurements - a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddique-e Rabbani, K.

    2010-04-01

    This paper summarises up to date development in Focused Impedance Method (FIM) initiated by us. It basically involves taking the sum of two orthogonal tetra-polar impedance measurements around a common central region, giving a localized enhanced sensitivity. Although the basic idea requires 8 electrodes, versions with 6- and 4-electrodes were subsequently conceived and developed. The focusing effect has been verified in 2D and 3D phantoms and through numerical analysis. Dynamic stomach emptying, and ventilation of localized lung regions have been studied successfully suggesting further applications in monitoring of gastric acid secretion, artificial respiration, bladder emptying, etc. Multi-frequency FIM may help identify some diseases and disorders including certain cancers. FIM, being much simpler and having less number of electrodes, appears to have the potential to replace EIT for applications involving large and shallow organs. An enhancement of 6-electrode FIM led to Pigeon Hole Imaging (PHI) in a square matrix through backprojection in two orthogonal directions, good for localising of one or two well separated objects.

  12. Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Jerry R.; Grosveld, Ferdinand

    2007-01-01

    The acoustics environment in space operations is important to maintain at manageable levels so that the crewperson can remain safe, functional, effective, and reasonably comfortable. High acoustic levels can produce temporary or permanent hearing loss, or cause other physiological symptoms such as auditory pain, headaches, discomfort, strain in the vocal cords, or fatigue. Noise is defined as undesirable sound. Excessive noise may result in psychological effects such as irritability, inability to concentrate, decrease in productivity, annoyance, errors in judgment, and distraction. A noisy environment can also result in the inability to sleep, or sleep well. Elevated noise levels can affect the ability to communicate, understand what is being said, hear what is going on in the environment, degrade crew performance and operations, and create habitability concerns. Superfluous noise emissions can also create the inability to hear alarms or other important auditory cues such as an equipment malfunctioning. Recent space flight experience, evaluations of the requirements in crew habitable areas, and lessons learned (Goodman 2003; Allen and Goodman 2003; Pilkinton 2003; Grosveld et al. 2003) show the importance of maintaining an acceptable acoustics environment. This is best accomplished by having a high-quality set of limits/requirements early in the program, the "designing in" of acoustics in the development of hardware and systems, and by monitoring, testing and verifying the levels to ensure that they are acceptable.

  13. Preliminary measurements of thermal effects in the dust acoustic wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Jeremiah

    2009-11-01

    A complex (dusty) plasma (CDP) is a four-component system composed of ions, electrons, neutral particles and charged microparticles. The presence of the microparticles gives rise to new plasma phenomena, including collective modes such as the dust acoustic wave. Recent measurements of the dispersion relationship of this wave mode [E. Thomas, Jr., et. al., Phys. Plasmas 14, 123701 (2007), J.D. Williams, et. al., Phys. Plasmas 15, 043704 (2008)] have shown that, over a range of neutral gas pressures, it is necessary to include thermal effects to accurately fit the measured dispersion relations. In this work, initial measurements of the dispersion relation in a new dusty plasma experiment, the Wittenberg University DUsty Plasma Experiment (WUDUPE), will be presented. In particular, the dependence of the kinetic dust temperature on the neutral gas pressure will be presented.

  14. Real-time gastric motility monitoring using transcutaneous intraluminal impedance measurements (TIIM).

    PubMed

    Poscente, M D; Wang, G; Filip, D; Ninova, P; Yadid-Pecht, O; Andrews, C N; Mintchev, M P

    2014-02-01

    The stomach plays a critical role in digestion, processing ingested food mechanically and breaking it up into particles, which can be effectively and efficiently processed by the intestines. When the motility of the stomach is compromised, digestion is adversely affected. This can lead to a variety of disorders. Current diagnostic techniques for gastric motility disorders are seriously lacking, and are based more on eliminating other possibilities rather than on specific tests. Presently, gastric motility can be assessed by monitoring gastric emptying, food transit, intragastric pressures, etc. The associated tests are usually stationary and of relatively short duration. The present study proposes a new method of measuring gastric motility, utilizing the attenuation of an oscillator-induced electrical signal across the gastric tissue, which is modulated by gastric contractions. The induced high-frequency oscillator signal is generated within the stomach, and is picked up transluminally by cutaneous electrodes positioned on the abdominal area connected to a custom-designed data acquisition instrument. The proposed method was implemented in two different designs: first a transoral catheter was modified to emit the signal inside the stomach; and second, a gastric retentive pill was designed to emit the signal. Both implementations were applied in vivo on two mongrel dogs (25.50 kg and 25.75 kg). Gastric contractions were registered and quantitatively compared to recordings from force transducers sutured onto the serosa of the stomach. Gastric motility indices were calculated for each minute, with transluminal impedance measurements and the measurements from the force transducers showing statistically significant (p < 0.05) Pearson correlation coefficients (0.65 ± 0.08 for the catheter-based design and 0.77 ± 0.03 for the gastric retentive pill design). These results show that transcutaneous intraluminal impedance measurement has the potential with further research

  15. A new application of electrical impedance spectroscopy for measuring glucose metabolism: a phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhurjaty, Sreeram; Qiu, Yuchen; Tan, Maxine; Liu, Hong; Zheng, Bin

    2015-03-01

    Glucose metabolism relates to biochemical processes in living organisms and plays an important role in diabetes and cancer-metastasis. Although many methods are available for measuring glucose metabolism-activities, from simple blood tests to positron emission tomography, currently there is no robust and affordable device that enables monitoring of glucose levels in real-time. In this study we tested feasibility of applying a unique resonance-frequency based electronic impedance spectroscopy (REIS) device that has been, recently developed to measure and monitor glucose metabolism levels using a phantom study. In this new testing model, a multi-frequency electrical signal sequence is applied and scanned through the subject. When the positive reactance of an inductor inside the device cancels out the negative reactance of the capacitance of the subject, the electrical impedance reaches a minimum value and this frequency is defined as the resonance frequency. The REIS system has a 24-bit analog-to-digital signal convertor and a frequency-resolution of 100Hz. In the experiment, two probes are placed inside a 100cc container initially filled with distilled water. As we gradually added liquid-glucose in increments of 1cc (250mg), we measured resonance frequencies and minimum electrical signal values (where A/D was normalized to a full scale of 1V). The results showed that resonance frequencies monotonously decreased from 243kHz to 178kHz, while the minimum voltages increased from 405mV to 793mV as the added amount of glucose increased from 0 to 5cc. The study demonstrated the feasibility of applying this new REIS technology to measure and/or monitor glucose levels in real-time in future.

  16. Effects of microphone type on acoustic measures of voice.

    PubMed

    Parsa, V; Jamieson, D G; Pretty, B R

    2001-09-01

    Acoustic measures provide an objective means to describe pathological voices and are a routine component of the clinical voice examination. Because the voice sample is obtained using a microphone, microphone characteristics have the potential to influence the values of parameters obtained from a voice sample. This project examined how the choice of microphone affects key voice parameters and investigated how one might compensate for such microphone effects through filtering or by including additional parameters in the decision process. A database of 53 normal voice samples and 100 pathological voice samples was used in four experiments conducted in an anechoic chamber using four different microphones. One omnidirectional microphone and three cardioid microphones were used in these experiments. The original voice samples were presented to each microphone through a speaker located in an anechoic chamber, and the output of each microphone sampled to computer disk. Each microphone modified the frequency spectrum of the voice signal; this, in turn, affected the values of the voice parameters obtained. These microphone effects reduced the accuracy with which acoustic measures of voice could be used to discriminate pathological from normal voices. Discrimination performance improved when the microphone output was filtered to compensate for microphone frequency response. Performance also improved when spectral moment coefficient parameters were added to the vocal function parameters already in use. PMID:11575630

  17. Classification of heart valve condition using acoustic measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, G.

    1994-11-15

    Prosthetic heart valves and the many great strides in valve design have been responsible for extending the life spans of many people with serious heart conditions. Even though the prosthetic valves are extremely reliable, they are eventually susceptible to long-term fatigue and structural failure effects expected from mechanical devices operating over long periods of time. The purpose of our work is to classify the condition of in vivo Bjork-Shiley Convexo-Concave (BSCC) heart valves by processing acoustic measurements of heart valve sounds. The structural failures of interest for Bscc valves is called single leg separation (SLS). SLS can occur if the outlet strut cracks and separates from the main structure of the valve. We measure acoustic opening and closing sounds (waveforms) using high sensitivity contact microphones on the patient`s thorax. For our analysis, we focus our processing and classification efforts on the opening sounds because they yield direct information about outlet strut condition with minimal distortion caused by energy radiated from the valve disc.

  18. A theoretical study of the acoustic impedance of orifices in the presence of a steady grazing flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, E. J.

    1976-01-01

    An analysis of the oscillatory fluid flow in the vicinity of a circular orifice with a steady grazing flow is presented. The study is similar to that of Hersh and Rogers but with the addition of the grazing flow. Starting from the momentum and continuity equations, a considerably simplified system of partial differential equations is developed with the assumption that the flow can be described by an oscillatory motion superimposed upon the known steady flow. The equations are seen to be linear in the region where the grazing flow effects are dominant, and a solution and the resulting orifice impedance are presented for this region. The nonlinearity appears to be unimportant for the usual conditions found in aircraft noise suppressors. Some preliminary conclusions of the study are that orifice resistance is directly proportional to grazing flow velocity (known previously from experimental data) and that the orifice inductive (mass reactance) end correction is not a function of grazing flow. This latter conclusion is contrary to the widely held notion that grazing flow removes the effect of the orifice inductive end correction. This conclusion also implies that the experimentally observed total inductance reduction with grazing flow might be in the flow within the orifice rather than in the end correction.

  19. Development of impedance/external field potential dual measurement system for evaluation of electrophysiological properties of cells on microelectrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Fumimasa; Matsuura, Kenji; Hattori, Akihiro; Odaka, Masao; Sugio, Yoshihiro; Kurotobi, Hiromi; Terazono, Hideyuki; Yasuda, Kenji

    2015-06-01

    A combination of extracellular field potential (FP) and impedance measurement technologies for multielectrode array (MEA) chip architecture is developed for the simultaneous evaluation of information on the ion current and resistance of cells and microelectrodes. The simultaneous measurement system can not only evaluate the time course changes of characteristics in the MEAs but also clarification of the origin of the difference in the waveform of the field potentials of each cell on an microelectrode whether it is caused by the changes in the electrophysiological properties of cells or by the changes in the performance of an microelectrode (and cell-to-electrode contacts). The automatic impedance measurement technology in the system exploited the swiping of the wide frequency range of impedances of microelectrodes and calculated the true impedance of each microelectrode without significant effects on the cells on the MEA chip. Hence, the system can give us invisible cell-to-electrode contact information and its change, and also information on the degradation of the performance of microelectrodes during long-term cultivation and after the application of compounds into the MEA chip. The impedance spectrum measurement showed that (1) the increase in the impedance of microelectrodes correlated with its area decrease from 10-7 to 10-10 m2, (2) even the area of microelectrodes decreased from 10-8 to 10-10 m2, the noise level of field potential signals was independent and did not change, and (3) the attachment of cells on the microelectrode surface can be determined by a significant increase in impedance at 1 kHz corresponding to the width of the depolarization peak on the field potential recordings. These results indicate the potential to evaluate the cell-to-electrode contact and degradation of microelectrodes, which was not evaluated in conventional FP measurements only. These results also indicate that this method should be used for the evaluation of the changes in

  20. Measurement of the acoustic reflectivity of sirenia (Florida manatees) at 171 kHz.

    PubMed

    Jaffe, Jules S; Simonet, Fernando; Roberts, Paul L D; Bowles, Ann E

    2007-01-01

    The Florida manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris) is an endangered sirenian. At present, its adult population (approximately 2200) seems stable, but tenuous. Manatee-boat collisions are a significant proportion (approximately 25%) of mortalities. Here, the potential use of active sonar for detecting manatees by quantifying sonic reflectivity is explored. In order to estimate reflectivity two methods were used. One method measured live reflections from captive animals using a carefully calibrated acoustic and co-registered optical system. The other method consisted of the analysis of animal tissue in order to obtain estimates of the sound speed and density and to predict reflectivity. The impedance measurement predicts that for a lateral view, the tissue reflectivity is close to 0.13, with a critical grazing angle of 28 degrees. Data measured from live animals indicate that substantial reflections can be recorded, however in many instances observed "empirical target strengths" were less than an experimentally dependent -48-dB threshold. Conclusions favor the hypothesis that the animals reflect substantial amounts of sound; however, the reflections can often be specular, and therefore impractical for observation by a manatee detection sonar operating at 171 kHz. PMID:17297771

  1. Radio frequency current-voltage probe for impedance and power measurements in multi-frequency unmatched loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafleur, T.; Delattre, P. A.; Booth, J. P.; Johnson, E. V.; Dine, S.

    2013-01-01

    A broad-band, inline current-voltage probe, with a characteristic impedance of 50 Ω, is presented for the measurement of voltage and current waveforms, impedance, and power in rf systems. The probe, which uses capacitive and inductive sensors to determine the voltage and current, respectively, can be used for the measurement of single or multi-frequency signals into both matched and unmatched loads, over a frequency range of about 1-100 MHz. The probe calibration and impedance/power measurement technique are described in detail, and the calibrated probe results are compared with those obtained from a vector network analyzer and other commercial power meters. Use of the probe is demonstrated with the measurement of power into an unmatched capacitively coupled plasma excited by multi-frequency tailored voltage waveforms.

  2. Radio frequency current-voltage probe for impedance and power measurements in multi-frequency unmatched loads.

    PubMed

    Lafleur, T; Delattre, P A; Booth, J P; Johnson, E V; Dine, S

    2013-01-01

    A broad-band, inline current-voltage probe, with a characteristic impedance of 50 Ω, is presented for the measurement of voltage and current waveforms, impedance, and power in rf systems. The probe, which uses capacitive and inductive sensors to determine the voltage and current, respectively, can be used for the measurement of single or multi-frequency signals into both matched and unmatched loads, over a frequency range of about 1-100 MHz. The probe calibration and impedance/power measurement technique are described in detail, and the calibrated probe results are compared with those obtained from a vector network analyzer and other commercial power meters. Use of the probe is demonstrated with the measurement of power into an unmatched capacitively coupled plasma excited by multi-frequency tailored voltage waveforms. PMID:23387681

  3. Acoustic measurement of the surface tension of levitated drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, E. H.; Marston, P. L.; Robey, J. L.

    1988-01-01

    The measurement of the frequency of the fundamental mode of shape oscillation of acoustically levitated drops has been carried out to determine the surface tension of the drop material. Sound fields of about 20 kHz in frequency allow the suspension of drops a few millimeters in size, as well as the necessary drive for oscillations. The surface tension of water, hexadecane, silicone oil, and aqueous solutions of glycerin levitated in air has been measured, and the results have been compared with those obtained with standard ring tensiometry. The two sets of data are in good agreement, the largest discrepancy being about 10 percent. Uncertainties in the effects of the nonspherical static shape of drops levitated in the earth's gravitational field and the rotation state of the sample are the major contributors to the experimental error. A decrease of the resonance frequency of the fundamental mode indicates a soft nonlinearity as the oscillation amplitude increases.

  4. Acoustic measurement of the surface tension of levitated drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trinh, E. H.; Marston, P. L.; Robey, J. L.

    1988-07-01

    The measurement of the frequency of the fundamental mode of shape oscillation of acoustically levitated drops has been carried out to determine the surface tension of the drop material. Sound fields of about 20 kHz in frequency allow the suspension of drops a few millimeters in size, as well as the necessary drive for oscillations. The surface tension of water, hexadecane, silicone oil, and aqueous solutions of glycerin levitated in air has been measured, and the results have been compared with those obtained with standard ring tensiometry. The two sets of data are in good agreement, the largest discrepancy being about 10 percent. Uncertainties in the effects of the nonspherical static shape of drops levitated in the earth's gravitational field and the rotation state of the sample are the major contributors to the experimental error. A decrease of the resonance frequency of the fundamental mode indicates a soft nonlinearity as the oscillation amplitude increases.

  5. Evaluation of Grounding Impedance of a Complex Lightning Protective System Using Earth Ground Clamp Measurements and ATP Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mata, Carlos T.; Rakov, V. A.; Mata, Angel G.

    2010-01-01

    A new Lightning Protection System (LPS) was designed and built at Launch Complex 39B (LC39B), at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida, which consists of a catenary wire system (at a height of about 181 meters above ground level) supported by three insulators installed atop three towers in a triangular configuration. A total of nine downconductors (each about 250 meters long, on average) are connected to the catenary wire system. Each of the nine downconductors is connected to a 7.62-meter radius circular counterpoise conductor with six equally spaced 6-meter long vertical grounding rods. Grounding requirements at LC39B call for all underground and above ground metallic piping, enclosures, raceways, and cable trays, within 7.62 meters of the counterpoise, to be bounded to the counterpoise, which results in a complex interconnected grounding system, given the many metallic piping, raceways, and cable trays that run in multiple direction around LC39B. The complexity of this grounding system makes the fall of potential method, which uses multiple metallic rods or stakes, unsuitable for measuring the grounding impedances of the downconductors. To calculate the downconductors grounding impedance, an Earth Ground Clamp (a stakeless grounding resistance measuring device) and a LPS Alternative Transient Program (ATP) model are used. The Earth Ground Clamp is used to measure the loop impedance plus the grounding impedance of each downconductor and the ATP model is used to calculate the loop impedance of each downconductor circuit. The grounding impedance of the downconductors is then calculated by subtracting the ATP calculated loop impedances from the Earth Ground Clamp measurements.

  6. In Vivo Impedance of the Gerbil Cochlear Partition at Auditory Frequencies

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Wei; Olson, Elizabeth S.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The specific acoustic impedance of the cochlear partition was measured from 4 to 20 kHz in the basal turn of the gerbil cochlea, where the best frequency is ∼40 kHz. The acoustic impedance was found as the ratio of driving pressure to velocity response. It is the physical attribute that governs cochlear mechanics and has never before been directly measured, to our knowledge. The basilar membrane velocity was measured through the transparent round window membrane. Simultaneously, the intracochlear pressure was measured close to the stapes and quite close to the cochlear partition. The impedance phase was close to −90° and the magnitude decreased with frequency, consistent with stiffness-dominated impedance. The resistive component of the impedance was relatively small. Usually the resistance was negative at frequencies below 8 kHz; this unexpected finding might be due to other vibration modes within the cochlear partition. PMID:19720011

  7. Explanation of Anomalous Behavior Observed in Impedance Eduction Techniques Using Measured Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Willie R.; Jones, Michael G.

    2010-01-01

    Several enhancements that improve the accuracy and robustness of an impedance eduction technique that use an automatic optimizer are presented. These enhancements are then used to launch an intensive investigation into the cause of anomalous behavior that occurs for a small number of test conditions. This anomalous behavior is investigated for both a hardwall insert and a conventional liner. The primary conclusions of the study are that: (1) for the hard wall insert, the anomalies are due to narrow peaks in the objective function, (2) For the conventional liner, the anomalies are due to the presence of an extremely flat objective function, and (3) the anomalies appear to be triggered by inconsistencies between the duct propagation model and the measured data. At high frequencies, the duct propagation model may need to include the effects of higher-order duct modes, whereas at low frequencies, the effects of the mean boundary layer may have to be included.

  8. Acoustic Environment of Admiralty Inlet: Broadband Noise Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Jinshan; Deng, Zhiqun; Martinez, Jayson J.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Myers, Joshua R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Jones, Mark E.

    2011-09-30

    Admiralty Inlet has been selected as a potential tidal energy site. It is located near shipping lanes, is a highly variable acoustic environment, and is frequented by the highly endangered southern resident killer whale (SRKW). Resolving environmental impacts is the first step to receiving approval to deploy tidal turbines at Admiralty Inlet. Of particular concern is the potential for blade strike or other negative interactions between the SRKW and the tidal turbine. A variety of technologies including passive and active monitoring systems are being considered as potential tools to determine the presence of SRKW in the vicinity of the turbines. Broadband noise level measurements are critical for the determination of design and operation specifications of all marine and hydrokinetic energy capture technologies. Acoustic environment data at the proposed site was acquired at different depths using a cabled vertical line array (VLA) with four calibrated hydrophones. The sound pressure level (SPL) power spectrum density was estimated based on the fast Fourier transform. This study describes the first broadband SPL measurements for this site at different depths with frequency ranging from 10 kHz to 480 kHz in combination with other information. To understand the SPL caused by this bedload transport, three different pressure sensors with temperature and conductivity were also assembled on the VLA to measure the conditions at the hydrophone deployment depth. The broadband SPL levels at frequency ranges of 3 kHz to 7 kHz as a function of depth were estimated. Only the hydrophone at an average depth of 40 m showed the strong dependence of SPL with distance from the bottom, which was possibly caused by the cobbles shifting on the seabed. Automatic Identification System data were also studied to understand the SPL measurements.

  9. Measurement and Characterization of Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor Plume Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, Robert Jeremy

    2009-01-01

    NASA's current models to predict lift-off acoustics for launch vehicles are currently being updated using several numerical and empirical inputs. One empirical input comes from free-field acoustic data measured at three Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) static firings. The measurements were collected by a joint collaboration between NASA - Marshall Space Flight Center, Wyle Labs, and ATK Launch Systems. For the first time NASA measured large-thrust solid rocket motor plume acoustics for evaluation of both noise sources and acoustic radiation properties. Over sixty acoustic free-field measurements were taken over the three static firings to support evaluation of acoustic radiation near the rocket plume, far-field acoustic radiation patterns, plume acoustic power efficiencies, and apparent noise source locations within the plume. At approximately 67 m off nozzle centerline and 70 m downstream of the nozzle exit plan, the measured overall sound pressure level of the RSRM was 155 dB. Peak overall levels in the far field were over 140 dB at 300 m and 50-deg off of the RSRM thrust centerline. The successful collaboration has yielded valuable data that are being implemented into NASA's lift-off acoustic models, which will then be used to update predictions for Ares I and Ares V liftoff acoustic environments.

  10. Lack of Correlation of Vaginal Impedance Measurements with Hormone Levels in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    SINGLETARY, SYLVIA J.; KIRSCH, ALAN J.; WATSON, JULIE; KARIM, BAKTIAR O.; HUSO, DAVID L.; HURN, PATRICIA D.; MURPHY, STEPHANIE J.

    2005-01-01

    Hormone levels vary in female rats depending on estrous cycle stage. Vaginal cytology is a reliable method of staging female rats, but vaginal impedance offers an alternative depending on application. We sought to correlate vaginal impedance in cycling female rats with hormone levels. Vaginal cytology was the standard for comparison and verification of estrous cycle stage. Female rats (n = 41) were evaluated twice daily for 15 days via vaginal cytology and impedance to evaluate two or three estrous cycles per rat. During the last 5 days of the study, selected anesthetized sampling groups (n = 3 or 4 rats per group) were bled terminally at each time point to allow hormone determinations concurrently with vaginal cytology and impedance. Rats with abnormal vaginal smears or discharges (n = 5) were evaluated for reproductive tract histology. Rats classified in estrus by vaginal cytology had significantly higher vaginal impedance values than did nonestrus rats, but vaginal impedance and estrous cycle stage as determined by vaginal cytology did not correlate. Because of small sampling size in nonproestrus groups, correlation between vaginal impedance and hormone levels was evaluated only in proestrus rats (n = 22) and was nonsignificant. No correlation occurred between vaginal impedance and hormone levels in unstaged rats (n = 41). Two animals evaluated for reproductive tract histology showed evidence of pseudopregnancy. Vaginal impedance may be useful in distinguishing estrus from nonestrus rats but may be limited for chronic estrous cycle monitoring because of the possible risk of inducing pseudo pregnancy. PMID:16370578

  11. Validation of an Impedance Education Method in Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Willie R.; Jones, Michael G.; Parrott, Tony L.

    2004-01-01

    This paper reports results of a research effort to validate a method for educing the normal incidence impedance of a locally reacting liner, located in a grazing incidence, nonprogressive acoustic wave environment with flow. The results presented in this paper test the ability of the method to reproduce the measured normal incidence impedance of a solid steel plate and two soft test liners in a uniform flow. The test liners are known to be locally react- ing and exhibit no measurable amplitude-dependent impedance nonlinearities or flow effects. Baseline impedance spectra for these liners were therefore established from measurements in a conventional normal incidence impedance tube. A key feature of the method is the expansion of the unknown impedance function as a piecewise continuous polynomial with undetermined coefficients. Stewart's adaptation of the Davidon-Fletcher-Powell optimization algorithm is used to educe the normal incidence impedance at each Mach number by optimizing an objective function. The method is shown to reproduce the measured normal incidence impedance spectrum for each of the test liners, thus validating its usefulness for determining the normal incidence impedance of test liners for a broad range of source frequencies and flow Mach numbers. Nomenclature

  12. Parametric electrical impedance tomography for measuring bone mineral density in the pelvis using a computational model.

    PubMed

    Kimel-Naor, Shani; Abboud, Shimon; Arad, Marina

    2016-08-01

    Osteoporosis is defined as bone microstructure deterioration resulting a decrease of bone's strength. Measured bone mineral density (BMD) constitutes the main tool for Osteoporosis diagnosis, management, and defines patient's fracture risk. In the present study, parametric electrical impedance tomography (pEIT) method was examined for monitoring BMD, using a computerized simulation model and preliminary real measurements. A numerical solver was developed to simulate surface potentials measured over a 3D computerized pelvis model. Varying cortical and cancellous BMD were simulated by changing bone conductivity and permittivity. Up to 35% and 16% change was found in the real and imaginary modules of the calculated potential, respectively, while BMD changes from 100% (normal) to 60% (Osteoporosis). Negligible BMD relative error was obtained with SNR>60 [dB]. Position changes errors indicate that for long term monitoring, measurement should be taken at the same geometrical configuration with great accuracy. The numerical simulations were compared to actual measurements that were acquired from a healthy male subject using a five electrodes belt bioimpedance device. The results suggest that pEIT may provide an inexpensive easy to use tool for frequent monitoring BMD in small clinics during pharmacological treatment, as a complementary method to DEXA test. PMID:27185035

  13. High Frequency Electromagnetic Impedance Measurements For Characterization, Monitoring And Verification Efforts

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ki Ha; Becker, Alex

    2000-12-31

    Electromagnetic methods in exploration geophysics include many technologies capable of imaging the subsurface. The electromagnetic geophysical spectrum for shallow subsurface imaging is roughly 1 Hz to 500 MHz, with electrical resistivity and other geometric sounding methods located at the low frequency end and the familiar GPR method at the high end of the spectrum. Baseline studies (Pellerin et al., 1997) show that electromagnetic instrumentation in the mid- and low-frequencies (< 300 kHz) and GPR systems (> 30 MHz) are well developed in the commercial sector. In the high-frequency range of 300 kHz to 100 MHz developments have been quite recent and reside within the research community. Accurate theoretical numerical modeling algorithms are available for simulations and interpretation across the entire spectrum (Mackie and Madden, 1993; Pellerin et al., 1995; Pellerin et al., 1997; Alumbaugh and Newman, 1995; Lee et al., 1995, Newmann and Alumbaugh, 1997; Newmann, 1999; Sasaki, 1999, etc.), but instrumentation suitable for collecting calibrated field data in the important high-frequency range is critically lacking. Several attempts to develop reliable, accurate and calibrated instruments (Sternberg and Poulton, 1996; Stewart et al., 1994; Wright et el., 1996) have produced mixed results. We proposed to exploit the concept of electromagnetic impedance, the ratio of orthogonal horizontal electric to horizontal magnetic fields, to provide the necessary technology in the high-frequency band described above. The effective depth of investigation for surface impedance measurements depends on the frequency, and is commonly expressed in terms of the skin depth, the distance into the conductive half space at which the amplitude of the incoming wave has decreased to e-1 of its surface value. In order to achieve skin depths between 0.5 and 10 meters in material of resistivity between 1 and 100 ohm-m and relative permittivity between 1 and 30, frequencies bet ween about 300 k

  14. A new approach to the study of impedance characteristics of tympanic membrane.

    PubMed

    Bogomolov, A V; Dragan, S P

    2015-01-01

    A new approach to studying the tympanic membrane impedance characteristics, based on the analysis of polyharmonic acoustic signals reflected by the tympanic membrane, is described. For this purpose, the acoustic pressure and the phase difference between the acoustic vibrations in two sections of a waveguide sealingly connecting the external auditory meatus and a generator of polyharmonic audio signals is measured. By processing the results of measurements, the estimates of the frequency-dependent reflection coefficients, absorption coefficients, and components of the acoustic impedance of the tympanic membrane are calculated. The features that principally distinguish the developed approach from other approaches are the absence of the necessity to create a positive pressure in the external auditory meatus, the absence of ultrasonic radiation into the external auditory meatus and a high-intensity sound, and the possibility of direct measurement of the tympanic membrane impedance in the audio frequency range with any step. PMID:26518544

  15. Transfer impedance measurements of the space shuttle Solid Rocket Motor (SRM) joints, wire meshes and a carbon graphite motor case

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papazian, Peter B.; Perala, Rodney A.; Curry, John D.; Lankford, Alan B.; Keller, J. David

    1988-01-01

    Using three different current injection methods and a simple voltage probe, transfer impedances for Solid Rocket Motor (SRM) joints, wire meshes, aluminum foil, Thorstrand and a graphite composite motor case were measured. In all cases, the surface current distribution for the particular current injection device was calculated analytically or by finite difference methods. The results of these calculations were used to generate a geometric factor which was the ratio of total injected current to surface current density. The results were validated in several ways. For wire mesh measurements, results showed good agreement with calculated results for a 14 by 18 Al screen. SRM joint impedances were independently verified. The filiment wound case measurement results were validated only to the extent that their curve shape agrees with the expected form of transfer impedance for a homogeneous slab excited by a plane wave source.

  16. Ultrasonic Measurement of Microdisplacement Induced by Acoustic Radiation Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaoka, Ryo; Izumi, Takuya; Komatsu, Yosuke; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Saijo, Yoshifumi

    2013-07-01

    Quantitative evaluation of human skin aging is achieved by measuring the viscoelasticity of the skin. In the present study, microdisplacement induced by acoustic radiation force (ARF) is quantitatively measured by high-frequency ultrasonography (HFUS) and the result is confirmed by laser-Doppler velocimetry (LDV). Poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) with 1% cellulose particles was used as the biological phantom. A concave piezoelectric zirconate titanate (PZT) transducer with a diameter and focal length of 3 cm was used as an applicator to generate ARF. Microdisplacement at each depth of PVA was measured by the phased tracking method at 100 MHz of ultrasound with a repetition rate of 2000 Hz. When 80 tone-burst pulses were applied, the displacement measured by HFUS was 9 µm and the same result was obtained by LDV. As the displacement at each depth of PVA is measurable using ARF and the HFUS system, the system could be applied to measuring the viscoelasticity of the layered structure of the human skin.

  17. Application of acoustic doppler velocimeters for streamflow measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rehmel, M.

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) principally has used Price AA and Price pygmy mechanical current meters for measurement of discharge. New technologies have resulted in the introduction of alternatives to the Price meters. One alternative, the FlowTracker acoustic Doppler velocimeter, was designed by SonTek/YSI to make streamflow measurements in wadeable conditions. The device measures a point velocity and can be used with standard midsection method algorithms to compute streamflow. The USGS collected 55 quality-assurance measurements with the FlowTracker at 43 different USGS streamflow-gaging stations across the United States, with mean depths from 0.05to0.67m, mean velocities from 13 to 60 cm/s, and discharges from 0.02 to 12.4m3/s. These measurements were compared with Price mechanical current meter measurements. Analysis of the comparisons shows that the FlowTracker discharges were not statistically different from the Price meter discharges at a 95% confidence level. ?? 2007 ASCE.

  18. Acoustic resonant spectroscopy for characterization of thin polymer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tohmyoh, Hironori; Imaizumi, Takuya; Saka, Masumi

    2006-10-01

    An acoustic resonant spectroscopy technique for measuring the acoustic impedance, ultrasonic velocity, and density of micron-scale polymer films is developed. The method, which is based on spectral analysis, observes the acoustic resonance between water, the film, and a tungsten plate with high acoustic impedance in the frequency range of 20-70MHz. The interface between the film being examined and the plate is vacuum sealed, enabling us to characterize the low-density polyethylene film with acoustic impedances as low as about 1.9MNm-3s and the poly(vinyl chloride) film as thin as about 8μm. The error in the film density measurements is found to be less than 1%, and the validity of the technique is verified.

  19. Non-contact multi-frequency magnetic induction spectroscopy system for industrial-scale bio-impedance measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Toole, M. D.; Marsh, L. A.; Davidson, J. L.; Tan, Y. M.; Armitage, D. W.; Peyton, A. J.

    2015-03-01

    Biological tissues have a complex impedance, or bio-impedance, profile which changes with respect to frequency. This is caused by dispersion mechanisms which govern how the electromagnetic field interacts with the tissue at the cellular and molecular level. Measuring the bio-impedance spectra of a biological sample can potentially provide insight into the sample’s properties and its cellular structure. This has obvious applications in the medical, pharmaceutical and food-based industrial domains. However, measuring the bio-impedance spectra non-destructively and in a way which is practical at an industrial scale presents substantial challenges. The low conductivity of the sample requires a highly sensitive instrument, while the demands of industrial-scale operation require a fast high-throughput sensor of rugged design. In this paper, we describe a multi-frequency magnetic induction spectroscopy (MIS) system suitable for industrial-scale, non-contact, spectroscopic bio-impedance measurement over a bandwidth of 156 kHz-2.5 MHz. The system sensitivity and performance are investigated using calibration and known reference samples. It is shown to yield rapid and consistently sensitive results with good long-term stability. The system is then used to obtain conductivity spectra of a number of biological test samples, including yeast suspensions of varying concentration and a range of agricultural produce, such as apples, pears, nectarines, kiwis, potatoes, oranges and tomatoes.

  20. Measuring the dielectric properties of soil-organic mixtures using coaxial impedance dielectric reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francisca, Franco M.; Montoro, Marcos A.

    2012-05-01

    Contamination of soils with non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) is frequently produced by accidental spills and storage tanks or pipes leakage. The main goals dealing with soil and groundwater contamination include determining the extension of the affected zone, monitoring the contaminant plume and quantifying the pollution degree. The objective of this work is to evaluate the potential of dielectric permittivity measurements to detect the presence of NAPLs in sands. Tested samples were fine, medium, coarse and silty sand with different volumetric contents of water and paraffin oil. The dielectric permittivity was measured by means of a Coaxial Impedance Dielectric Reflectometry method in specimens with either known fluid content or at different stages during immiscible displacement tests. A simplified method was developed to quantify the amount of oil from dielectric permittivity measurements and effective mixture media models. Obtained results showed that groundwater contamination with NAPL and the monitoring of immiscible fluid displacement in saturated porous media can be clearly identified from dielectric measurements. Finally, very accurate results can be obtained when computing the contamination degree with the proposed method in comparison with the real volumetric content of NAPL (r2 > 90%).

  1. Measuring two phase flow parameters using impedance cross-correlation flow meter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhamedsalih, Y.; Lucas, G.

    2012-03-01

    This paper describes the design and implementation of an impedance cross correlation flow meter which can be used in solids-water pipe flows to measure the local solids volume fraction distribution and the local solids velocity distribution. The system is composed of two arrays of electrodes, separated by an axial distance of 50 mm and each array contains eights electrodes mounted over the internal circumference of the pipe carrying the flow. Furthermore every electrode in each array can be selected to be either"excitation", "measurement" or "earth". Changing the electrode configuration leads to a change in the electric field, and hence in the region of the flow cross section which is interrogated. The local flow velocity in the interrogated region is obtained by cross correlation between the two electrode arrays. Additionally, the local solids volume fraction can be obtained from the mean mixture conductivity in the region under interrogation. The system is being integrated with a microcontroller to measure the velocity distribution of the solids and the volume fraction distribution of the solids in order to create a portable flow meter capable of measuring the multi-phase flow parameters without the need of a PC to control it. Integration of the product of the local solids volume fraction and the local solids velocity in the flow cross section enables the solids volumetric flow rate to be determined.

  2. Assessing risk of thyroid cancer using resonance-frequency based electrical impedance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Bin; Tublin, Mitchell E.; Lederman, Dror; Klym, Amy H.; Brown, Erica D.; Gur, David

    2011-03-01

    The incidence of thyroid cancer has risen faster than many malignancies and has nearly doubled in the USA over the past 30 years. Palpable nodules and subclinical nodules detected by imaging are found in a large percentage of the USA population. Most of these (.>95%) are fortunately benign. This vast reservoir of nodules makes the detection and diagnosis of thyroid cancer a diagnostic dilemma. Ultrasound guided Fine Needle Aspiration Biopsy (FNAB) is excellent for triaging patients but up to 25% of FNABs are inconclusive. As a result, definitive diagnosis is often only possible with a diagnostic lobectomy; many thousands of these are performed in the USA annually for ultimately benign disease. It would be extremely beneficial if we could develop a non-invasive procedure that could assist the diagnostician in reliably predicting the likelihood of malignancy of otherwise indeterminate thyroid nodules, thereby reducing the number of these "exploratory/diagnostic" lobectomies performed under general anesthesia. Electrical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) was considered as a possible approach to address this problem. However, the diagnostic accuracy of EIS is too low for routine clinical use to date. In our group, we developed a substantially modified technology termed Resonance-frequency Electrical Impedance Spectroscopy (REIS), which yields usable information for classifying risk of having breast abnormalities. We preliminarily applied REIS to measure signals on participants having thyroid nodules aiming to assess whether we can assist in improving diagnosis of indeterminate thyroid nodules. In this study we present a new multi-probe based REIS device specifically designed for the assessment of indeterminate thyroid nodules. Our preliminary assessment presented here demonstrates the feasibility of using this proposed REIS device in a busy tertiary care center.

  3. Picosecond Acoustic Measurement of Anisotropic Properties of Thin Films

    SciTech Connect

    Perton, M.; Rossignol, C.; Chigarev, N.; Audoin, B.

    2007-03-21

    Properties of thin metallic films have been studied extensively by means of laser-picosecond ultrasonics. Generation of longitudinal and shear waves via thermoelastic mechanism and large source has been only demonstrated for waves vectors along the normal to the interface. However, such measurements cannot provide complete information about elastic properties of films. As it has been already shown for nanosecond ultrasonics, the knowledge of group or phase velocities in several directions for sources with small lateral size allows determining the stiffness tensor coefficients of a sample. The experimental set-up was prepared to obtain the thinnest size for the source to achieve acoustic diffraction. The identification of the stiffness tensor components, based on the inversion of the bulk waves phase velocities, is applied to signals simulated and experimentally recorded for a material with hexagonal properties. First estimation of stiffness tensor coefficients for thin metallic film 2.1 {mu}m has been performed.

  4. Acoustic measurements of a full-scale coaxial helicopter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mosher, M.; Peterson, R. L.

    1983-01-01

    Acoustic data were obtained during a full-scale test of the XH-59A Advancing Blade Concept (ABC) Technology Demonstrator in the NASA Ames 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel. The XH-59A is a research helicopter with two coaxial rotors and hingeless blades. Performance, vibration, noise at various forward speeds, rotor lift coefficients, and rotor shaft angles of attack were investigated. In general, the noise level is shown to increase with rotor lift coefficient except under certain operating conditions where it is increased by significant impulsive blade/vortex interactions. The impulsivity appears to depend upon how the lift is distributed between the two rotors. The noise levels measured are shown to be slightly higher than on a modern conventional rotor tested in the same facility.

  5. Surface Acoustic Wave Vibration Sensors for Measuring Aircraft Flutter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, William C.; Moore, Jason P.; Juarez, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    Under NASA's Advanced Air Vehicles Program the Advanced Air Transport Technology (AATT) Project is investigating flutter effects on aeroelastic wings. To support that work a new method for measuring vibrations due to flutter has been developed. The method employs low power Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) sensors. To demonstrate the ability of the SAW sensor to detect flutter vibrations the sensors were attached to a Carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite panel which was vibrated at six frequencies from 1Hz to 50Hz. The SAW data was compared to accelerometer data and was found to resemble sine waves and match each other closely. The SAW module design and results from the tests are presented here.

  6. Effects of ingested atmospheric turbulence on measured tail rotor acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Signor, David B.; Yamauchi, Gloria K.; Mosher, Marianne; Hagen, Martin J.; George, Albert R.

    1992-01-01

    Results from an outdoor hover test of a full-scale Lynx tail rotor are presented. The investigation was designed to further the understanding of the acoustics of an isolated tail rotor hovering out-of-ground effect in atmospheric turbulence, without the effects of the main rotor wake or other helicopter components. Measurements include simultaneous rotor performance, noise, inflow, and far-field atmospheric turbulence. Results with grid-generated inflow turbulence are also presented. The effects of turbulence ingestion on rotor noise are quantified. Turbulence ingestion noise is found to be the dominant noise mechanism at locations near the rotor axis. At these locations, the sound radiated by the hovering rotor increases with both increasing atmospheric wind speed and ingested rms turbulent velocity.

  7. Measurements of atmospheric turbulence effects on tail rotor acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagen, Martin J.; Yamauchi, Gloria K.; Signor, David B.; Mosher, Marianne

    1994-01-01

    Results from an outdoor hover test of a full-scale Lynx tail rotor are presented. The investigation was designed to further the understanding of the acoustics of an isolated tail rotor hovering out-of-ground effect in atmospheric turbulence, without the effects of the main rotor wake or other helicopter components. Measurements include simultaneous rotor performance, noise, inflow, and far-field atmospheric turbulence. Results with grid-generated inflow turbulence are also presented. The effects of atmospheric turbulence ingestion on rotor noise are quantified. In contradiction to current theories, increasing rotor inflow and rotor thrust were found to increase turbulence ingestion noise. This is the final report of Task 13A--Helicopter Tail Rotor Noise, of the NASA/United Kingdom Defense Research Agency cooperative Aeronautics Research Program.

  8. Determination of particle size distributions from acoustic wave propagation measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Spelt, P.D.; Norato, M.A.; Sangani, A.S.; Tavlarides, L.L.

    1999-05-01

    The wave equations for the interior and exterior of the particles are ensemble averaged and combined with an analysis by Allegra and Hawley [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. {bold 51}, 1545 (1972)] for the interaction of a single particle with the incident wave to determine the phase speed and attenuation of sound waves propagating through dilute slurries. The theory is shown to compare very well with the measured attenuation. The inverse problem, i.e., the problem of determining the particle size distribution given the attenuation as a function of frequency, is examined using regularization techniques that have been successful for bubbly liquids. It is shown that, unlike the bubbly liquids, the success of solving the inverse problem is limited since it depends strongly on the nature of particles and the frequency range used in inverse calculations. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  9. Pulsed electro-acoustic (PEA) measurements of embedded charge distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennison, J. R.; Pearson, Lee H.

    2013-09-01

    Knowledge of the spatial distribution and evolution of embedded charge in thin dielectric materials has important applications in semiconductor, high-power electronic device, high-voltage DC power cable insulation, high-energy and plasma physics apparatus, and spacecraft industries. Knowing how, where, and how much charge accumulates and how it redistributes and dissipates can predict destructive charging effects. Pulsed Electro-acoustic (PEA) measurements— and two closely related methods, Pressure Wave Propagation (PWP) and Laser Intensity Modulation (LIMM)— nondestructively probe such internal charge distributions. We review the instrumentation, methods, theory and signal processing of simple PEA experiments, as well as the related PPW and LIMM methods. We emphasize system improvements required to achieve high spatial resolution for in vacuo measurements of thin dielectrics charged using electron beam injection.

  10. Method to detect the end-point for PCR DNA amplification using an ionically labeled probe and measuring impedance change

    DOEpatents

    Miles, Robin R.; Belgrader, Phillip; Fuller, Christopher D.

    2007-01-02

    Impedance measurements are used to detect the end-point for PCR DNA amplification. A pair of spaced electrodes are located on a surface of a microfluidic channel and an AC or DC voltage is applied across the electrodes to produce an electric field. An ionically labeled probe will attach to a complementary DNA segment, and a polymerase enzyme will release the ionic label. This causes the conductivity of the solution in the area of the electrode to change. This change in conductivity is measured as a change in the impedance been the two electrodes.

  11. Measurement of the Acoustic Nonlinearity Parameter for Biological Media.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobb, Wesley Nelson

    In vitro measurements of the acoustic nonlinearity parameter are presented for several biological media. With these measurements it is possible to predict the distortion of a finite amplitude wave in biological tissues of current diagnostic and research interest. The measurement method is based on the finite amplitude distortion of a sine wave that is emmitted by a piston source. The growth of the second harmonic component of this wave is measured by a piston receiver which is coaxial with and has the same size as the source. The experimental measurements and theory are compared in order to determine the nonlinearity parameter. The density, sound speed, and attenuation for the medium are determined in order to make this comparison. The theory developed for this study accounts for the influence of both diffraction and attenuation on the experimental measurements. The effects of dispersion, tissue inhomogeneity and gas bubbles within the excised tissues are studied. To test the measurement method, experimental results are compared with established values for the nonlinearity parameter of distilled water, ethylene glycol and glycerol. The agreement between these values suggests that the measurement uncertainty is (+OR-) 5% for liquids and (+OR-) 10% for solid tissues. Measurements are presented for dog blood and bovine serum albumen as a function of concentration. The nonlinearity parameters for liver, kidney and spleen are reported for both human and canine tissues. The values for the fresh tissues displayed little variation (6.8 to 7.8). Measurements for fixed, normal and cirrhotic tissues indicated that the nonlinearity parameter does not depend strongly on pathology. However, the values for fixed tissues were somewhat higher than those of the fresh tissues.

  12. Knowing more by fewer measurements: about the (In)ability of bioelectric impedance to enhance obesity research in children.

    PubMed

    Gelbrich, G; Reich, A; Müller, G; Kiess, W

    2005-03-01

    The prevalence of obesity is increasing worldwide. The implications for human health can already be observed in children. Consequently, it is desirable to provide good quantitative descriptions of the relationship of body fat and health risks, such as hypertension. Bioelectric impedance analysis has been frequently praised to be useful for assessing body fat. Devices to analyse body composition based on this technique seem to be selling well, while the real gain in information they provide is unclear. Here we show in a cohort of 2,218 schoolchildren that the body mass index (which is more easily and less costly to determine) is a better predictor of hypertension than the data delivered by impedance analysis. Moreover, we demonstrate that the output of a random number generator is competitive with impedance measurement for this purpose. It is explained by simple arguments from physics why the formulas for the computation of body fat from bioelectric impedance obliterate rather than clarify the relationship of obesity and hypertension. As a consequence, we suggest questioning the opinion propagated by others that bioelectric impedance analysis is a useful tool in field studies on body fat in children. Measurements requiring more effort (compared to simpler methods) should be proved to add worthwhile information, otherwise they should be avoided. PMID:15813605

  13. Total respiratory impedance measurement by forced oscillations: a noninvasive method to assess bronchial response in occupational medicine.

    PubMed

    Wouters, E F

    1990-01-01

    The forced oscillation technique is a noninvasive and effort-independent test to characterize the mechanical impedance of the respiratory system. By applying a complex signal, the frequency-dependent behavior of the respiratory system can be measured over an extended spectrum. For clinical practice, the input impedance is used most frequently; pressure and flow are measured at the same place. The impedance can be partitioned into a real part or resistance and an imaginary part or reactance. At low frequencies, reactance is determined by the capacitance of the system and at high frequencies by the inertial properties of the system. Equipment and impedance data in normal subjects and patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease are discussed. The frequency-dependent behavior of the respiratory system is described with the use of an electrical model characterized by partitioning of airway resistance and the presence of shunt compliance represented by the compliance of the intrathoracic airway walls. Influences of peripheral resistance, airway compliance, lung volumes, chest wall and pulmonary resistance, and resistance of the cheeks and upper airways are analyzed. Input impedance can be applied to the detection of bronchoconstriction and bronchodilation, but this technique is suitable for detecting early airway abnormalities caused by smoking or occupational hazards. PMID:2307147

  14. Measurement of nutritional status in simulated microgravity by bioelectrical impedance spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartok, Cynthia; Atkinson, Richard L.; Schoeller, Dale A.

    2003-01-01

    The potential of bioelectrical impedance spectroscopy (BIS) for assessing nutritional status in spaceflight was tested in two head-down-tilt bed-rest studies. BIS-predicted extracellular water (ECW), intracellular water (ICW), and total body water (TBW) measured using knee-elbow electrode placement were compared with deuterium and bromide dilution (DIL) volumes in healthy, 19- to 45-yr-old subjects. BIS was accurate during 44 h of head-down tilt with mean differences (BIS - DIL) of 0-0.1 kg for ECW, 0.3-0.5 for ICW, and 0.4-0.6 kg for TBW (n = 28). At 44 h, BIS followed the within-individual change in body water compartments with a relative prediction error (standard error of the estimate/baseline volume) of 2.0-3.6% of water space. In the second study, BIS did not detect an acute decrease (-1.41 +/- 0.91 kg) in ICW secondary to 48 h of a protein-free, 800 kcal/day diet (n = 18). BIS's insensitivity to ICW losses may be because they were predominantly (65%) localized to the trunk and/or because there was a general failure of BIS to measure ICW independently of ECW and TBW. BIS may have potential for measuring nutritional status during spaceflight, but its limitations in precision and insensitivity to acute ICW changes warrant further validation studies.

  15. Measurement of nutritional status in simulated microgravity by bioelectrical impedance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bartok, Cynthia; Atkinson, Richard L; Schoeller, Dale A

    2003-07-01

    The potential of bioelectrical impedance spectroscopy (BIS) for assessing nutritional status in spaceflight was tested in two head-down-tilt bed-rest studies. BIS-predicted extracellular water (ECW), intracellular water (ICW), and total body water (TBW) measured using knee-elbow electrode placement were compared with deuterium and bromide dilution (DIL) volumes in healthy, 19- to 45-yr-old subjects. BIS was accurate during 44 h of head-down tilt with mean differences (BIS - DIL) of 0-0.1 kg for ECW, 0.3-0.5 for ICW, and 0.4-0.6 kg for TBW (n = 28). At 44 h, BIS followed the within-individual change in body water compartments with a relative prediction error (standard error of the estimate/baseline volume) of 2.0-3.6% of water space. In the second study, BIS did not detect an acute decrease (-1.41 +/- 0.91 kg) in ICW secondary to 48 h of a protein-free, 800 kcal/day diet (n = 18). BIS's insensitivity to ICW losses may be because they were predominantly (65%) localized to the trunk and/or because there was a general failure of BIS to measure ICW independently of ECW and TBW. BIS may have potential for measuring nutritional status during spaceflight, but its limitations in precision and insensitivity to acute ICW changes warrant further validation studies. PMID:12562674

  16. Cancer Prognostics by Direct Detection of p53-Antibodies on Gold Surfaces by Impedance Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Prats-Alfonso, Elisabet; Sisquella, Xavier; Zine, Nadia; Gabriel, Gemma; Guimerà, Anton; del Campo, F. Javier; Villa, Rosa; Eisenberg, Adam H.; Mrksich, Milan; Errachid, Abdelhamid; Aguiló, Jordi; Albericio, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    The identification and measurement of biomarkers is critical to a broad range of methods that diagnose and monitor many diseases. Serum auto-antibodies are rapidly becoming interesting targets because of their biological and medical relevance. This paper describes a highly sensitive, label-free approach for the detection of p53-antibodies, a prognostic indicator in ovarian cancer as well as a biomarker in the early stages of other cancers. This approach uses impedance measurements on gold microelectrodes to measure antibody concentrations at the picomolar level in undiluted serum samples. The biosensor shows high selectivity as a result of the optimization of the epitopes responsible for the detection of p53-antibodies and was validated by several techniques including microcontact printing, self-assembled-monolayer desorption ionization (SAMDI) mass spectrometry, and adhesion pull-off force by atomic force microscopy (AFM). This transduction method will lead to fast and accurate diagnostic tools for the early detection of cancer and other diseases. PMID:22511467

  17. Measurement of Bubble Size Distribution Based on Acoustic Propagation in Bubbly Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiongjun; Hsiao, Chao-Tsung; Choi, Jin-Keun; Chahine, Georges

    2013-03-01

    Acoustic properties are strongly affected by bubble size distribution in a bubbly medium. Measurement of the acoustic transmission becomes increasingly difficulty as the void fraction of the bubbly medium increases due to strong attenuation, while acoustic reflection can be measured more easily with increasing void fraction. The ABS ACOUSTIC BUBBLE SPECTROMETER®\\copyright, an instrument for bubble size measurement that is under development tries to take full advantage of the properties of acoustic propagation in bubbly media to extract bubble size distribution. Properties of both acoustic transmission and reflection in the bubbly medium from a range of short single-frequency bursts of acoustic waves at different frequencies are measured in an effort to deduce the bubble size distribution. With the combination of both acoustic transmission and reflection, assisted with validations from photography, the ABS ACOUSTIC BUBBLE SPECTROMETER®\\copyright has the potential to measure bubble size distributions in a wider void fraction range. This work was sponsored by Department of Energy SBIR program

  18. Outcomes Measurement in Voice Disorders: Application of an Acoustic Index of Dysphonia Severity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Awan, Shaheen N.; Roy, Nelson

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this experiment was to assess the ability of an acoustic model composed of both time-based and spectral-based measures to track change following voice disorder treatment and to serve as a possible treatment outcomes measure. Method: A weighted, four-factor acoustic algorithm consisting of shimmer, pitch sigma, the ratio of…

  19. An acoustic method for the remote measurement of seagrass metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, M.; Lefebvre, A.; Manca, E.; Amos, C. L.

    2011-05-01

    Seagrass meadows are ecosystems of great ecological and economical value and their monitoring is an important task within coastal environmental management. In this paper, an acoustic mapping technique is presented using a profiling sonar. The method has been applied to three different sites with meadows of Zostera marina, Zostera noltii and Posidonia oceanica respectively, with the aim to test the method's applicability. From the backscatter data the seabed could be identified as the strongest scatterer along an acoustic beam. The presented algorithm was used to compute water depth, seagrass canopy height and seagrass coverage and to produce maps of the survey areas. Canopy height was estimated as the distance between the bed and the point where backscatter values decrease to water column values. The algorithm was extended from previous methods to account for a variety of meadow types. Seagrass coverage was defined as the percentage of beams in a sweep where the backscatter 5-10 cm above the bed was higher than a threshold value. This threshold value is dynamic and depends on the average backscatter value throughout the water column. The method is therefore applicable in a range of turbidity conditions. Comparison with results from other survey techniques (i.e. dive surveys, underwater videos) yielded a high correlation which indicates that the method is suited to measure seagrass coverage and height. Analysis of the data showed that each seagrass species has a characteristic canopy height and spatial coverage distribution. These differences were used to undertake a preliminary species identification, as each species has a typical canopy height and preferred depth range. Furthermore, the results show that these differences can be used to track boundaries between species remotely. Finally, the application of the meadow distribution pattern to the health of a meadow is discussed.

  20. An FPGA-based frequency response analyzer for multisine and stepped sine measurements on stationary and time-varying impedance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, B.; Fernandez, X.; Reig, S.; Bragos, R.

    2014-01-01

    We report the development of a field programmable gate array (FPGA) based frequency response analyzer (FRA) for impedance frequency response function (FRF) measurements using periodic excitations, i.e. sine waves and multisines. The stepped sine measurement uses two dedicated hardware-built digital embedded multiplier blocks to extract the phase and quadrature components of the output signal. The multisine FRF measurements compute the fast Fourier transform (FFT) of the input/output signals. In this paper, we describe its design, implementation and performance evaluation, performing electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements on phantoms. The stepped sine accuracy is 1.21% at 1 kΩ (1%), the precision is 35 mΩ and the total harmonic distortion plus noise (THD+N) is -120 dB. As for the multisine impedance FRF measurements, the magnitude and phase precision are, respectively, 0.23 Ω at 48.828 kHz and 0.021 deg at 8.087 MHz when measuring a resistor 505 Ω (1%). The magnitude accuracy is 0.55% at 8.087 MHz while the phase accuracy is 0.17 deg at 6.54 MHz. In all, the stepped sine signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is 84 dB and 65 dB at frequencies below and above 1 MHz respectively. The SNR for the multisine FRF measurements is above 65 dB (30 kHz-10 MHz). The FRA bandwidth is 610.4 mHz-12.5 MHz and the maximum FRF measurement rate exciting with multisines starting at 30 kHz is 200 spectra s-1. Based on its technical specifications and versatility, the FRA presented can be used in many applications, e.g. for getting insight quickly into the instantaneous impedance FRF of the time-varying impedance under test.

  1. Acoustics of the piezo-electric pressure probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dutt, G. S.

    1974-01-01

    Acoustical properties of a piezoelectric device are reported for measuring the pressure in the plasma flow from an MPD arc. A description and analysis of the acoustical behavior in a piezoelectric probe is presented for impedance matching and damping. The experimental results are presented in a set of oscillographic records.

  2. Two-Point Stretchable Electrode Array for Endoluminal Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy Measurements of Lipid-Laden Atherosclerotic Plaques.

    PubMed

    Packard, René R Sevag; Zhang, XiaoXiao; Luo, Yuan; Ma, Teng; Jen, Nelson; Ma, Jianguo; Demer, Linda L; Zhou, Qifa; Sayre, James W; Li, Rongsong; Tai, Yu-Chong; Hsiai, Tzung K

    2016-09-01

    Four-point electrode systems are commonly used for electric impedance measurements of biomaterials and tissues. We introduce a 2-point system to reduce electrode polarization for heterogeneous measurements of vascular wall. Presence of endoluminal oxidized low density lipoprotein (oxLDL) and lipids alters the electrochemical impedance that can be measured by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). We developed a catheter-based 2-point micro-electrode configuration for intravascular deployment in New Zealand White rabbits. An array of 2 flexible round electrodes, 240 µm in diameter and separated by 400 µm was microfabricated and mounted on an inflatable balloon catheter for EIS measurement of the oxLDL-rich lesions developed as a result of high-fat diet-induced hyperlipidemia. Upon balloon inflation, the 2-point electrode array conformed to the arterial wall to allow deep intraplaque penetration via alternating current (AC). The frequency sweep from 10 to 300 kHz generated an increase in capacitance, providing distinct changes in both impedance (Ω) and phase (ϕ) in relation to varying degrees of intraplaque lipid burden in the aorta. Aortic endoluminal EIS measurements were compared with epicardial fat tissue and validated by intravascular ultrasound and immunohistochemistry for plaque lipids and foam cells. Thus, we demonstrate a new approach to quantify endoluminal EIS via a 2-point stretchable electrode strategy. PMID:26857007

  3. Model helicopter rotor high-speed impulsive noise: Measured acoustics and blade pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boxwell, D. A.; Schmitz, F. H.; Splettstoesser, W. R.; Schultz, K. J.

    1983-01-01

    A 1/17-scale research model of the AH-1 series helicopter main rotor was tested. Model-rotor acoustic and simultaneous blade pressure data were recorded at high speeds where full-scale helicopter high-speed impulsive noise levels are known to be dominant. Model-rotor measurements of the peak acoustic pressure levels, waveform shapes, and directively patterns are directly compared with full-scale investigations, using an equivalent in-flight technique. Model acoustic data are shown to scale remarkably well in shape and in amplitude with full-scale results. Model rotor-blade pressures are presented for rotor operating conditions both with and without shock-like discontinuities in the radiated acoustic waveform. Acoustically, both model and full-scale measurements support current evidence that above certain high subsonic advancing-tip Mach numbers, local shock waves that exist on the rotor blades ""delocalize'' and radiate to the acoustic far-field.

  4. Microengineered Conductive Elastomeric Electrodes for Long-Term Electrophysiological Measurements with Consistent Impedance under Stretch

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Dinglong; Cheng, Tin Kei; Xie, Kai; Lam, Raymond H. W.

    2015-01-01

    In this research, we develop a micro-engineered conductive elastomeric electrode for measurements of human bio-potentials with the absence of conductive pastes. Mixing the biocompatible polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) silicone with other biocompatible conductive nano-particles further provides the material with an electrical conductivity. We apply micro-replica mold casting for the micro-structures, which are arrays of micro-pillars embedded between two bulk conductive-PDMS layers. These micro-structures can reduce the micro-structural deformations along the direction of signal transmission; therefore the corresponding electrical impedance under the physical stretch by the movement of the human body can be maintained. Additionally, we conduct experiments to compare the electrical properties between the bulk conductive-PDMS material and the microengineered electrodes under stretch. We also demonstrate the working performance of these micro-engineered electrodes in the acquisition of the 12-lead electrocardiographs (ECG) of a healthy subject. Together, the presented gel-less microengineered electrodes can provide a more convenient and stable bio-potential measurement platform, making tele-medical care more achievable with reduced technical barriers for instrument installation performed by patients/users themselves. PMID:26512662

  5. Microengineered Conductive Elastomeric Electrodes for Long-Term Electrophysiological Measurements with Consistent Impedance under Stretch.

    PubMed

    Hu, Dinglong; Cheng, Tin Kei; Xie, Kai; Lam, Raymond H W

    2015-01-01

    In this research, we develop a micro-engineered conductive elastomeric electrode for measurements of human bio-potentials with the absence of conductive pastes. Mixing the biocompatible polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) silicone with other biocompatible conductive nano-particles further provides the material with an electrical conductivity. We apply micro-replica mold casting for the micro-structures, which are arrays of micro-pillars embedded between two bulk conductive-PDMS layers. These micro-structures can reduce the micro-structural deformations along the direction of signal transmission; therefore the corresponding electrical impedance under the physical stretch by the movement of the human body can be maintained. Additionally, we conduct experiments to compare the electrical properties between the bulk conductive-PDMS material and the microengineered electrodes under stretch. We also demonstrate the working performance of these micro-engineered electrodes in the acquisition of the 12-lead electrocardiographs (ECG) of a healthy subject. Together, the presented gel-less microengineered electrodes can provide a more convenient and stable bio-potential measurement platform, making tele-medical care more achievable with reduced technical barriers for instrument installation performed by patients/users themselves. PMID:26512662

  6. Application of computer modelling and lead field theory in developing multiple aimed impedance cardiography measurements.

    PubMed

    Kauppinen, P; Kööbi, T; Kaukinen, S; Hyttinen, J; Malmivuo, J

    1999-01-01

    Conventional impedance cardiography (ICG) methods estimate parameters related to the function of the heart from a single waveform that reflects an integrated combination of complex sources. We have previously developed methods and tools for calculating measurement sensitivity distributions of ICG electrode configurations. In this study, the methods were applied to investigate the prospects of recording multiple aimed ICG waveforms utilizing the 12-lead electrocardiography (ECG) electrode locations. Three anatomically realistic volume conductor models were used: one based on Visible Human Man cryosection data and two on magnetic resonance (MR) images representing end diastolic and end systolic phases of the cardiac cycle. Based on the sensitivity distributions obtained, 236 electrode configurations were selected for preliminary clinical examination on 12 healthy volunteers and 9 valvular patients. The model study suggested that a variety of configurations had clearly enhanced sensitivity to the cardiovascular structures as compared to conventional ICGs. Simulation data and clinical experiments showed logical correspondence supporting the theoretically predicted differences between the configurations. Recorded 12-lead ICG signals had characteristic waveforms and landmarks not coinciding with those of conventional ICG. Furthermore, configurations showing resemblance to invasive data and morphological variations in disease are of interest. The results indicate the applicability of the modelling approach in developing ICG measurement configurations. However, the level of clinical relevance and potential of the 12-lead method remains to be explored in studies employing dynamic modelling and acquisition of invasive reference data. PMID:10627950

  7. RF impedance measurements on the DARHT-II accelerator intercell assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Fawley, William M.; Eylon, Shmuel; Briggs, Richard

    2003-05-05

    We report upon recent experimental measurements made of RF properties of the intercell assembly of the second axis accelerator[1] of Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test (DARHT) facility at LANL. The intercells provide both pumping and diagnostic access to the main DARHT-II beamline. Their design includes a pumping plenum separated from the main beam pipe by return current rods together with RF shielding provided by a copper-coated stainless steel mesh. Measurements using the twin lead technique (see Ref. [2]) at low frequencies (f < 200 MHz) suggest a constant value for the ratio h of the radial and azimuthal magnetic field components to which the transverse impedance is linearly related. We find that these results compare favorably to predictions from a simple analytic, lumped circuit model which includes the effects of the mesh and return current rods. We also present RF loop-to-loop frequency scans above beam pipe cutoff ({approx}600 MHz) showing the existence of many RF modes with relatively high Q's.

  8. Effect of Electrode Belt and Body Positions on Regional Pulmonary Ventilation- and Perfusion-Related Impedance Changes Measured by Electric Impedance Tomography.

    PubMed

    Ericsson, Elin; Tesselaar, Erik; Sjöberg, Folke

    2016-01-01

    Ventilator-induced or ventilator-associated lung injury (VILI/VALI) is common and there is an increasing demand for a tool that can optimize ventilator settings. Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) can detect changes in impedance caused by pulmonary ventilation and perfusion, but the effect of changes in the position of the body and in the placing of the electrode belt on the impedance signal have not to our knowledge been thoroughly evaluated. We therefore studied ventilation-related and perfusion-related changes in impedance during spontaneous breathing in 10 healthy subjects in five different body positions and with the electrode belt placed at three different thoracic positions using a 32-electrode EIT system. We found differences between regions of interest that could be attributed to changes in the position of the body, and differences in impedance amplitudes when the position of the electrode belt was changed. Ventilation-related changes in impedance could therefore be related to changes in the position of both the body and the electrode belt. Perfusion-related changes in impedance were probably related to the interference of major vessels. While these findings give us some insight into the sources of variation in impedance signals as a result of changes in the positions of both the body and the electrode belt, further studies on the origin of the perfusion-related impedance signal are needed to improve EIT further as a tool for the monitoring of pulmonary ventilation and perfusion. PMID:27253433

  9. Effect of Electrode Belt and Body Positions on Regional Pulmonary Ventilation- and Perfusion-Related Impedance Changes Measured by Electric Impedance Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Ericsson, Elin; Tesselaar, Erik; Sjöberg, Folke

    2016-01-01

    Ventilator-induced or ventilator-associated lung injury (VILI/VALI) is common and there is an increasing demand for a tool that can optimize ventilator settings. Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) can detect changes in impedance caused by pulmonary ventilation and perfusion, but the effect of changes in the position of the body and in the placing of the electrode belt on the impedance signal have not to our knowledge been thoroughly evaluated. We therefore studied ventilation-related and perfusion-related changes in impedance during spontaneous breathing in 10 healthy subjects in five different body positions and with the electrode belt placed at three different thoracic positions using a 32-electrode EIT system. We found differences between regions of interest that could be attributed to changes in the position of the body, and differences in impedance amplitudes when the position of the electrode belt was changed. Ventilation-related changes in impedance could therefore be related to changes in the position of both the body and the electrode belt. Perfusion-related changes in impedance were probably related to the interference of major vessels. While these findings give us some insight into the sources of variation in impedance signals as a result of changes in the positions of both the body and the electrode belt, further studies on the origin of the perfusion-related impedance signal are needed to improve EIT further as a tool for the monitoring of pulmonary ventilation and perfusion. PMID:27253433

  10. Passive Acoustic Tomography Tested for Measuring Gas Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fralick, Gustave C.; Kleppe, John

    2004-01-01

    The requirements of higher performance, better fuel economy, and lower emissions place an increasing premium on knowing the internal operating parameters of jet engines. One of the most important is the gas temperature in the post combustor section of the engine. Typically the gas temperature is measured with a thermocouple probe or by some optical technique such as Rayleigh scattering. Probes, while providing valuable information, have several limitations. The probe signal must be corrected for radiation and conduction losses, probes provide only a point measurement, and probes must be constructed of materials whose melting points are lower than the temperature of the environment into which they are inserted. Some of the disadvantages of probes are overcome by various optical techniques. Nothing needs to be inserted into the flow, and the temperature can be directly related to the signal by known physical laws. However, optical techniques require optical access (i.e., a window) and a light source (such as a laser), and they are very sensitive to the presence of particles in the flow. To overcome these problems, researchers from the NASA Glenn Research Center and The University of Nevada are developing a technique that uses sound instead of light to measure gas temperature. Like optical techniques, it is nonintrusive--no probe need be exposed to the combustion environment--and the temperature is directly related to a measured quantity--the speed of sound, which is proportional to the square root of the absolute temperature. The temperature profile inside the engine is constructed from the differences in arrival time between correlated signals from an array of microphones placed around the circumference of the engine. In much the same way as a complete picture of the inside of your body can be constructed from an array of x-ray photographs taken at different angles, the temperature profile in the engine is constructed from the angular array of microphones. It is

  11. Acoustic Measurements of an Uninstalled Spacecraft Cabin Ventilation Fan Prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, L. Danielle; Brown, Clifford A.; Shook, Tony D.; Winkel, James; Kolacz, John S.; Podboy, Devin M.; Loew, Raymond A.; Mirecki, Julius H.

    2012-01-01

    Sound pressure measurements were recorded for a prototype of a spacecraft cabin ventilation fan in a test in the NASA Glenn Acoustical Testing Laboratory. The axial fan is approximately 0.089 m (3.50 in.) in diameter and 0.223 m (9.00 in.) long and has nine rotor blades and eleven stator vanes. At design point of 12,000 rpm, the fan was predicted to produce a flow rate of 0.709 cu m/s (150 cfm) and a total pressure rise of 925 Pa (3.72 in. of water) at 12,000 rpm. While the fan was designed to be part of a ducted atmospheric revitalization system, no attempt was made to throttle the flow or simulate the installed configuration during this test. The fan was operated at six speeds from 6,000 to 13,500 rpm. A 13-microphone traversing array was used to collect sound pressure measurements along two horizontal planes parallel to the flow direction, two vertical planes upstream of the fan inlet and two vertical planes downstream of the fan exhaust. Measurements indicate that sound at blade passing frequency harmonics contribute significantly to the overall audible noise produced by the fan at free delivery conditions.

  12. Cosmological implications of baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazquez, Jose; BOSS Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    We present constraints on cosmological parameters and tests of dark models from the combination of baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) with cosmic microwave background (CMB) data and a reanalysis of Type Ia supernova (SN) data. In particular, we take of high-precision BAO measurements from galaxy clustering the Lyman-a forest (LyaF) in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Survey (BOSS). show that the flat LCDM model, that best describes the CMB data alone, is discrepant at 95% with the LyaF measurements. Hence, in order to reconcile them we consider models with more unusual histories of the dark energy, matter, or radiation components. In part we want to know what our combined data can place on interesting physical, such as neutrino masses, extra relativistic species, or dark energy that is dynamically significant at early times. But we also want to see whether any of these alternative models can resolve the discrepancy with the LyaF measurements at z = 2.34.

  13. Measurement of transmission loss characteristics using acoustic intensity techniques at the KU-FRL Acoustic Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roskam, J.

    1983-01-01

    The transmission loss characteristics of panels using the acoustic intensity technique is presented. The theoretical formulation, installation of hardware, modifications to the test facility, and development of computer programs and test procedures are described. A listing of all the programs is also provided. The initial test results indicate that the acoustic intensity technique is easily adapted to measure transmission loss characteristics of panels. Use of this method will give average transmission loss values. The fixtures developed to position the microphones along the grid points are very useful in plotting the intensity maps of vibrating panels.

  14. Experimental and Theoretical Measurements of Concentration Distributions in Acoustic Focusing Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, K A; Fisher, K; Jung, B; Ness, K; Mariella Jr., R P

    2008-06-16

    We describe a modeling approach to capture the particle motion within an acoustic focusing microfluidic device. Our approach combines finite element models for the acoustic forces with analytical models for the fluid motion and uses these force fields to calculate the particle motion in a Brownian dynamics simulation. We compare results for the model with experimental measurements of the focusing efficiency within a microfabricated device. The results show good qualitative agreement over a range of acoustic driving voltages and particle sizes.

  15. The application of acoustic emission technique to fatigue crack measurement. [in aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; Davis, W. T.; Crews, J. H., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    The applicability of acoustic emission technique to measure fatigue cracks in aluminum alloy specimens was investigated. There are several variables, such as the metallurgical and the physical treatment of the specimen, that can affect the level of acoustic activity of a fatigue specimen. It is therefore recommended that the acoustic emission technique be supplemented by other nondestructive evaluation methods to obtain quantitative data on crack growth.

  16. Phase angle and Impedance Measurements for Nondestructive Moisture Content Determination of In-Shell Peanuts Using a Cylindrical Sample Holder

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two parallel-plate electrodes were mounted inside a cylinder, made of a non-conducting material. The space between the plates was filled with peanut pods and the capacitance and phase angle of this system was measured with a prototype low-cost impedance meter, designed for this purpose. Measuremen...

  17. Determination of moisture content of in-shell peanuts by Parallel-Plate impedance measurements in cylindrical sample holder

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    . This paper describes a method to determine the moisture content of in-shell peanuts with a parallel-plate electrode system fitted inside a cylinder by using impedance measurements made on the system. Two parallel-plate electrodes were mounted inside a cylinder, made of acrylic material, and the s...

  18. Development of a high-speed impedance measurement system for dual-frequency capacitive-coupled pulsed-plasma.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hohyoung; Lee, Jeongbeom; Park, Gijung; Han, Yunseok; Lee, Youngwook; Cho, Gunhee; Kim, Hanam; Chang, Hongyoung; Min, Kyoungwook

    2015-08-01

    A high-speed impedance measurement system was developed, which enables the measurement of various characteristics of CW and pulsed plasmas with time resolution of less than a microsecond. For this system, a voltage and current sensor is implemented in a printed circuit board to sense the radio frequency signals. A digital board, which has a high-speed analog to digital converter and a field-programmable gate-array, is used to calculate the impedance of the signal. The final output of impedance is measured and stored with a maximum speed of 3 Msps. This sensor system was tested in a pulsed-plasma by applying it to the point between the matching box and the plasma chamber. The experimental equipment was constructed connecting the matching box, a 13.56 MHz generator, a 2 MHz generator that produced pulsed power, and a pulse-signal generator. From the temporal behavior of the measured impedance, we were able to determine the time intervals of transient states, especially of the initial active state. This information can be used to set the pulse frequency and duty for plasma processing. PMID:26329190

  19. Development of a high-speed impedance measurement system for dual-frequency capacitive-coupled pulsed-plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hohyoung; Lee, Jeongbeom; Park, Gijung; Han, Yunseok; Lee, Youngwook; Cho, Gunhee; Kim, Hanam; Chang, Hongyoung; Min, Kyoungwook

    2015-08-01

    A high-speed impedance measurement system was developed, which enables the measurement of various characteristics of CW and pulsed plasmas with time resolution of less than a microsecond. For this system, a voltage and current sensor is implemented in a printed circuit board to sense the radio frequency signals. A digital board, which has a high-speed analog to digital converter and a field-programmable gate-array, is used to calculate the impedance of the signal. The final output of impedance is measured and stored with a maximum speed of 3 Msps. This sensor system was tested in a pulsed-plasma by applying it to the point between the matching box and the plasma chamber. The experimental equipment was constructed connecting the matching box, a 13.56 MHz generator, a 2 MHz generator that produced pulsed power, and a pulse-signal generator. From the temporal behavior of the measured impedance, we were able to determine the time intervals of transient states, especially of the initial active state. This information can be used to set the pulse frequency and duty for plasma processing.

  20. Resonant Acoustic Measurement of Vapor Phase Transport Phenomenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuhmann, R. J.; Garrett, S. L.; Matson, J. V.

    2002-12-01

    A major impediment to accurate non steady-state diffusion measurements is the ability to accurately measure and track a rapidly changing gas concentration without disturbing the system. Non-destructive methods that do not interfere with system dynamics have been developed in the past. These methods, however, have tended to be cumbersome or inaccurate at low concentrations. A new experimental approach has been developed to measure gaseous diffusion in free air and through porous materials. The method combines the traditional non steady-state laboratory methodology with resonant acoustic gas analysis. A phase-locked-loop (PLL) resonance frequency tracker is combined with a thermally insulated copper resonator. A piston sealed with a metal bellows excites the fundamental standing wave resonance of the resonator. The PLL maintains a constant phase difference (typically 90§) between the accelerometer mounted on the piston and a microphone near the piston to track the resonance frequency in real time. A capillary or glass bead filled core is fitted into an o-ring sealed opening at the end of the resonator opposite the bellows. The rate at which the tracer gas is replaced by air within the resonator is controlled by the diffusion coefficient of the gas in free air through the capillary (DA) or by the effective diffusion coefficient of the gas through the core (De). The mean molecular weight of the gas mixture in the resonator is directly determined six times each minute from the ratio of the absolute temperature to the square of the fundamental acoustic resonance frequency. Average system stability (temperature divided by frequency squared) is better than 350 ppm. DA values for a 0.3-inch diameter capillary were in excellent agreement with published values. De values for porous media samples (0.5 mm glass beads) of four different lengths (1 through 4 inches) using three different tracer gases (He, CH4, Kr) will be reported. Comments will be offered regarding tracer gas

  1. Automated acoustic intensity measurements and the effect of gear tooth profile on noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atherton, William J.; Pintz, Adam; Lewicki, David G.

    1987-01-01

    Acoustic intensity measurements were made at NASA Lewis Research Center on a spur gear test apparatus. The measurements were obtained with the Robotic Acoustic Intensity Measurement System developed by Cleveland State University. This system provided dense spatial positioning, and was calibrated against a high quality acoustic intensity system. The measured gear noise compared gearsets having two different tooth profiles. The tests evaluated the sound field of the different gears for two speeds and three loads. The experimental results showed that gear tooth profile had a major effect on measured noise. Load and speed were found to have an effect on noise also.

  2. On the Use of Experimental Methods to Improve Confidence in Educed Impedance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Michael G.; Watson, Willie R.

    2011-01-01

    Results from impedance eduction methods developed by NASA Langley Research Center are used throughout the acoustic liner community. In spite of recent enhancements, occasional anomalies persist with these methods, generally at frequencies where the liner produces minimal attenuation. This investigation demonstrates an experimental approach to educe impedance with increased confidence over a desired frequency range, by combining results from successive tests with different cavity depths. A series of tests is conducted with three wire-mesh facesheets, for which the results should be weakly dependent on source sound pressure level and mean grazing flow speed. First, a raylometer is used to measure the DC flow resistance of each facesheet. These facesheets are then mounted onto a frame and a normal incidence tube is used to determine their respective acoustic impedance spectra. A comparison of the acoustic resistance component with the DC flow resistance for each facesheet is used to validate the measurement process. Next, each facesheet is successively mounted onto three frames with different cavity depths, and a grazing flow impedance tube is used to educe their respective acoustic impedance spectra with and without mean flow. The no-flow results are compared with those measured in the normal incidence tube to validate the impedance eduction method. Since the anti-resonance frequency varies with cavity depth, each sample provides robust results over a different frequency range. Hence, a combination of results can be used to determine the facesheet acoustic resistance. When combined with the acoustic reactance, observed to be weakly dependent on the source sound pressure level and grazing flow Mach number, the acoustic impedance can be educed with increased confidence. Representative results of these tests are discussed, and the complete database is available in electronic format upon request.

  3. Acoustic measurements of a liquefied cohesive sediment bed under waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosquera, R.; Groposo, V.; Pedocchi, F.

    2014-04-01

    In this article the response of a cohesive sediment deposit under the action of water waves is studied with the help of laboratory experiments and an analytical model. Under the same regular wave condition three different bed responses were observed depending on the degree of consolidation of the deposit: no bed motion, bed motion of the upper layer after the action of the first waves, and massive bed motion after several waves. The kinematic of the upper 3 cm of the deposit were measured with an ultrasound acoustic profiler, while the pore-water pressure inside the bed was simultaneously measured using several pore pressure sensors. A poro-elastic model was developed to interpret the experimental observations. The model showed that the amplitude of the shear stress increased down into the bed. Then it is possible that the lower layers of the deposit experience plastic deformations, while the upper layers present just elastic deformations. Since plastic deformations in the lower layers are necessary for pore pressure build-up, the analytical model was used to interpret the experimental results and to state that liquefaction of a self consolidated cohesive sediment bed would only occur if the bed yield stress falls within the range defined by the amplitude of the shear stress inside the bed.

  4. Analysis of Measured and Simulated Supraglottal Acoustic Waves.

    PubMed

    Fraile, Rubén; Evdokimova, Vera V; Evgrafova, Karina V; Godino-Llorente, Juan I; Skrelin, Pavel A

    2016-09-01

    To date, although much attention has been paid to the estimation and modeling of the voice source (ie, the glottal airflow volume velocity), the measurement and characterization of the supraglottal pressure wave have been much less studied. Some previous results have unveiled that the supraglottal pressure wave has some spectral resonances similar to those of the voice pressure wave. This makes the supraglottal wave partially intelligible. Although the explanation for such effect seems to be clearly related to the reflected pressure wave traveling upstream along the vocal tract, the influence that nonlinear source-filter interaction has on it is not as clear. This article provides an insight into this issue by comparing the acoustic analyses of measured and simulated supraglottal and voice waves. Simulations have been performed using a high-dimensional discrete vocal fold model. Results of such comparative analysis indicate that spectral resonances in the supraglottal wave are mainly caused by the regressive pressure wave that travels upstream along the vocal tract and not by source-tract interaction. On the contrary and according to simulation results, source-tract interaction has a role in the loss of intelligibility that happens in the supraglottal wave with respect to the voice wave. This loss of intelligibility mainly corresponds to spectral differences for frequencies above 1500 Hz. PMID:26377510

  5. Concentration measurements with Laser-Induced Thermal Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlamp, Stefan; Sobota, Thomas H.

    2001-03-01

    Laser-induced thermal acoustics (LITA) is used to measure the concentration of iodine vapor (40-150 ppm) in air instantaneously (1 μs), remotely, and non-intrusively. Two focused, pulsed intersecting laser beams inscribe a density grating in the fluid. A cw interrogation beam directed at the Bragg angle on the grating is scattered into a coherent signal beam whose intensity depends on the instantaneous density grating magnitude. The signal beam is detected by a photomultiplier tube and its history recorded by a digital storage oscilloscope. The species in question (e.g., I_2) and the dilution species are excited resonantly (by thermalization) and non-resonantly (by electrostriction), respectively. The signals show oscillations at (twice) the grating's Brillouin frequency for the case of thermalization (electrostriction). The ratio of the thermalization to the electrostriction grating magnitudes is proportional to the resonant species concentration. They are extracted by a least-squares fitting scheme. For good accuracy, the ratio must be of order unity. For this case, the standard error is 5%. The speed of sound (error <1%) and flow velocity (error <1%) can be measured simultaneously.

  6. The design evaluation of inductive power-transformer for personal rapid transit by measuring impedance

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Kyung-Hee; Lee, Byung-Song; Baek, Soo-Hyun

    2008-04-01

    The contact-less inductive power transformer (IPT) uses the principle of electromagnetic induction. The concept of the IPT for vehicles such as the personal rapid transit (PRT) system is proposed and some suggestions for power collector design of IPT to improve power transfer performance are presented in this paper. The aim of this paper is to recommend the concept of IPT for vehicles such as the PRT system and also to present some propositions for the power collector design of the IPT, which is to improve the power transfer performance. Generally, there are diverse methods to evaluate transfer performance of the traditional transformers. Although the principle of IPT is similar to that of the general transformer, it is impossible to apply the methods directly because of large air gap. The system must be compensated by resonant circuit due to the large air gap. Consequently, it is difficult to apply numerical formulas to the magnetic design of IPT systems. This paper investigates the magnetic design of a PRT system using three-dimensional magnetic modeling and measurements of the pick-up coupling coefficient and its impedances. In addition, how the use of Litz wire and leakage inductance is related will be observed through experiment and simulation.

  7. The Initial Systolic Time Interval in patients with spinal cord injury measured with impedance cardiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoekstra, Femke; Martinsen, Ørjan G.; Verdaasdonk, Rudolf M.; Janssen, Thomas W. J.; Meijer, Jan H.

    2012-12-01

    The Initial Systolic Time Interval (ISTI), obtained from the electrocardiogram and impedance cardiogram, is considered to be a measure for the time delay between the electrical and mechanical activity of the heart. This time delay is influenced by the sympathetic nerve system. Therefore, an observational study was performed in a group of patients (SCI) with spinal cord injuries. The relationship between the ISTI and the total heart cycle (RR-interval) was established by varying the RR-interval using an exercise stimulus to increase the heart rate. The slope of this relationship was observed to be significantly higher in the SCI-group as compared with a control group, although there was no difference in ISTI in the range of common heart rates during the test between the groups. This slope and the ISTI was observed to be significantly different in an acute patient having a recent spinal cord injury at a high level. Because of the variety in injury levels and incompleteness of the injuries further, more specific research is necessary to draw decisive conclusions with respect to the contribution of autonomic nervous control on the ISTI in SCI, although the present observations are notable.

  8. Association of Anthropometric and Bioelectrical Impedance Analysis Measures of Adiposity with High Molecular Weight Adiponectin Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Wei-Fang; Li, Yan; Sheng, Chang-Sheng; Huang, Qi-Fang; Kang, Yuan-Yuan; Zhang, Lu; Wang, Shuai; Cheng, Yi-Bang; Li, Fei-Ka; Wang, Ji-Guang

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the relationship between adiposity measures and plasma concentration of high molecular weight (HMW) adiponectin. Methods In a Chinese sample (n = 1081), we performed measurements of anthropometry and bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA). We defined overweight and obesity as a body mass index between 24 and 27.4 kg/m² and ≥ 27.5 kg/m², respectively, and central obesity as a waist circumference ≥ 90 cm in men and ≥ 80 cm in women. Plasma HMW adiponectin concentration was measured by the ELISA method. Results Plasma HMW adiponectin concentration was significantly (P < 0.0001) higher in women (n = 677, 2.47 μg/mL) than men (n = 404, 1.58 μg/mL) and correlated with advancing age in men (r = 0.28) and women (r = 0.29). In adjusted analyses, it was lower in the presence of overweight (n = 159, 1.26 μg/mL in men and n = 227, 2.15μg/mL in women) and obesity (n = 60, 1.31 μg/mL and n = 82, 2.10 μg/mL, respectively) than normal weight subjects (n = 185, 2.07μg/mL and n = 368, 2.94 μg/mL, respectively) and in the presence of central obesity (n = 106, 1.28 μg/mL and n = 331, 2.12 μg/mL, respectively) than subjects with a normal waist circumference (n = 298, 1.74 μg/mL and n = 346, 2.74 μg/mL, respectively). In multiple regression analyses stratified for gender, adjusted for confounders and considered separately each of the adiposity measures, all adiposity measures were significantly (r -0.18 to -0.31, P < 0.001) associated with plasma HMW adiponectin concentration. However, in further stratified and adjusted regression analyses considered stepwise all adiposity measures, only waist-to-hip ratio was significantly (P < 0.05) associated with plasma HMW adiponectin concentration in men (r = -0.10) and women (r = -0.15). Conclusions Anthropometric measures of obesity, such as waist-to-hip ratio, but not BIA measures, are independently associated with plasma adiponectin concentration. PMID:27227680

  9. A Miniaturized Plasma Impedance Probe For Ionospheric Absolute Electron Density and Electron-Neutral Collision Frequency Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patra, S.; Rao, A. J.; Jayaram, M.; Hamoui, M. E.; Spencer, E. A.; Winstead, C.

    2008-12-01

    A fully integrated, low power, miniaturized Plasma Impedance Probe (PIP) is developed for small satellite constellation missions to create a map of electron density in the ionosphere. Two alternative methods for deriving plasma parameters from impedance measurements are discussed. The first method employs a frequency sweep technique, while the second employs a pulse based technique. The pulse based technique is a new method that leads to faster measurements. The two techniques necessitate different specifications for the front end analog circuit design. Unlike previous PIP designs, the integrated PIP performs direct voltage/current sampling at the probe's terminal. The signal processing tasks are performed by an off-chip FPGA to compute the impedance of the probe in the surrounding plasma. The new design includes self- calibration algorithms in order to increase the accuracy and reliability of the probe for small satellite constellation missions. A new feature included in this instrument is that the plasma parameters are derived from impedance measurements directly on the FPGA, significantly reducing the bandwith of telemetered data down to ground.

  10. Cold vacuum chamber for diagnostics: Analysis of the measurements at the Diamond Light Source and impedance bench measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voutta, R.; Gerstl, S.; Casalbuoni, S.; Grau, A. W.; Holubek, T.; Saez de Jauregui, D.; Bartolini, R.; Cox, M. P.; Longhi, E. C.; Rehm, G.; Schouten, J. C.; Walker, R. P.; Migliorati, M.; Spataro, B.

    2016-05-01

    The beam heat load is an important input parameter needed for the cryogenic design of superconducting insertion devices. Theoretical models taking into account the different heating mechanisms of an electron beam to a cold bore predict smaller values than the ones measured with several superconducting insertion devices installed in different electron storage rings. In order to measure and possibly understand the beam heat load to a cold bore, a cold vacuum chamber for diagnostics (COLDDIAG) has been built. COLDDIAG is equipped with temperature sensors, pressure gauges, mass spectrometers as well as retarding field analyzers which allow to measure the beam heat load, total pressure, and gas content as well as the flux of particles hitting the chamber walls. COLDDIAG was installed in a straight section of the Diamond Light Source (DLS). In a previous paper the experimental equipment as well as the installation of COLDDIAG in the DLS are described [S. Gerstl et al., Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 17, 103201 (2014)]. In this paper we present an overview of all the measurements performed with COLDDIAG at the DLS and their detailed analysis, as well as impedance bench measurements of the cold beam vacuum chamber performed at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology after removal from the DLS. Relevant conclusions for the cryogenic design of superconducting insertion devices are drawn from the obtained results.

  11. Design and evaluation of a handheld impedance plethysmograph for measuring heart rate variability.

    PubMed

    Kristiansen, N K; Fleischer, J; Jensen, M S; Andersen, K S; Nygaard, H

    2005-07-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) analysis from 10s ECGs has been shown to be reliable. However, the short examination time warrants a user-friendly system that can be used for ad-hoc examinations without normal preparation, unlike ECG. A handheld device has been developed that can measure ultra-short HRV from impedance plethysmographic recordings of the pulse wave in distal superficial arteries. The prototype device was made user-friendly through a compact, pen-like design and the use of integrated metal electrodes that were especially designed for dry operation. The main signal processing was performed by a digital signal processor, where the discrete heart beats were detected using a correlation algorithm that could adapt to individual pulse wave shapes to account for biological variation. The novel device was evaluated in 20 mainly young volunteers, using 10 s time-correlated ECG recordings as the reference method. Agreement between the two methods in measuring heart rate and root mean square of successive differences in the heart beat interval (RMSSD) was analysed using correlation coefficients (Pearson's R2), mean differences with 95% confidence intervals and 95% limits of agreement, and Bland-Altman plots. The correlation between the two methods was R2 = 1.00 and R2 = 0.99 when heart rate and RMSSD were measured, respectively. The Bland-Altman plots showed suitable agreement between the novel device and standard 10 s ECGs, which was substantiated by 95% limits of agreement of the difference of +/- 0.1 beats min(-1) and approximately +/- 10 ms for heart rate and RMSSD, respectively. Therefore the evaluation showed no significant systematic error of the novel device compared with ECG. PMID:16255435

  12. [The evaluation of body composition in children by anthropometry and impedance measurement].

    PubMed

    Ferrante, E; Pitzalis, G; Deganello, F; Galastri, E; Sciarpelletti, R; Imperato, C

    1993-01-01

    Several anthropometric parameters (weight, height, thickness skinfolds, and body circumferences) together with the bioelectric impedance (BIA) were measured in a group of 407 healthy prepuberal children (205 males, mean age +/- SD: 6.8 +/- 1.6 years; 202 females, mean age +/- SD: 6.6 +/- 1.6 years) who did not practice any competitive sport. The group was divided into six weight classes (underweight to obese 3). The average values of the anthropometric data, BIA, FM (which is derived from the thickness skinfolds and BIA), TBW (derived from BIA), AFA and AMA (both derived from the forearm circumference and triceps skinfold) were all evaluated in relation to sex and weight classes. The average values of all the measured thickness skinfolds, FM and AFA were higher in the females. When considering the body circumferences, only the wrist circumference showed a statistically significant difference between sexes, being higher in males. In contrast both the rates waist/hips circumferences and waist/thigh circumferences were higher in males. As far as the BIA and FM average values is concerned, these were higher in females. The average value of FM derived from measuring the thickness skinfolds (males = 17.65 +/- 4.89%: females = 23.81 +/- 4.72% of body weight) proved higher than that one derived from BIA (males = 17 +/- 9.02%; females = 19.27 +/- 9.18%). The analysis of anthropometric and BIA data in relation to the weight classes showed significant variations of the mean values, except the rates waist/hips circumferences and waist/thigh circumferences. Therefore our data seem to exclude the presence of any difference of the fat distribution between sexes in paediatric age.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8255269

  13. Electromagnetic Subsurface Soundings at HF frequencies and Antenna Impedance Measurements on the Antarctic Continent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valerie, C.; Jean-Jacques, B.; Richard, N.; Michel, H.; Sebastien, B.; Francois, D.; Alain, R.

    2004-05-01

    In the frame of the NETLANDER project, a ground penetrating radar (GPR) dedicated to the exploration of the Martian subsurface has been developed. This GPR is designed for deep sounding down to a depth which is sufficient to allow possible detection of liquid water and thus operates mainly at a frequency of 2 MHz. Contrary to the normal mode of operation of subsurface radars which can be moved over the soil to be explored, the GPR of NETLANDER aims at performing 3D imaging of the underground reflecting structures even if it operates in a fixed position. This is achieved by retrieving not only the distance of the reflectors but also the direction of the backscattered waves by measuring the 2 horizontal electric components and the 3 magnetic components of the reflected waves. Two perpendicular dipoles each consisting in two 35-meters electric monopoles are used for both transmission and reception, while the receiving magnetic antenna can be successively directed along 3 mutually orthogonal directions. In addition, the perfect stability of the environment allows a very large number of coherent integrations to be performed, which provide a satisfactory sensitivity Ground tests were recently carried out on the Antarctic continent in 2004. Soundings at frequencies in the range 2-5 MHz have been performed with the NETLANDER monostatic GPR prototype and with the updated version of this instrument, which operates in a real bistatic mode. As expected the echoes due to interaction with the bedrock are detected and the magnetic component measurements provide information linked to the orientation of the reflecting structures. The first experimental results will be reported. We will present results on the electric antenna impedance measurements, which give information on the permittivity of the upper subsurface layer. We will also focus on the analysis of the backscattered signals using both electric and magnetic components of the received field. Comparisons with numerical

  14. Cost-effective broad-band electrical impedance spectroscopy measurement circuit and signal analysis for piezo-materials and ultrasound transducers.

    PubMed

    Lewis, George K; Lewis, George K; Olbricht, William

    2008-10-01

    This paper explains the circuitry and signal processing to perform electrical impedance spectroscopy on piezoelectric materials and ultrasound transducers. Here, we measure and compare the impedance spectra of 2-5 MHz piezoelectrics, but the methodology applies for 700 kHz-20 MHz ultrasonic devices as well. Using a 12 ns wide 5 volt pulsing circuit as an impulse, we determine the electrical impedance curves experimentally using Ohm's law and fast Fourier transform (FFT), and compare results with mathematical models. The method allows for rapid impedance measurement for a range of frequencies using a narrow input pulse, digital oscilloscope and FFT techniques. The technique compares well to current methodologies such as network and impedance analyzers while providing additional versatility in the electrical impedance measurement. The technique is theoretically simple, easy to implement and completed with ordinary laboratory instrumentation for minimal cost. PMID:19081773

  15. Experimental study of coaxial nozzle exhaust noise. [acoustic measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodykoontz, J. H.; Stone, J. R.

    1979-01-01

    Experimental results are presented for static acoustic model tests of various geometrical configurations of coaxial nozzles operating over a range of flow conditions. The geometrical configurations consisted of nozzles with coplanar and non-coplanar exit planes and various exhaust area ratios. Primary and secondary nozzle flows were varied independently over a range of nozzle pressure ratios from 1.4 to 3.0 and gas temperatures from 280 to 1100 K. Acoustic data are presented for the conventional mode of coaxial nozzle operation as well as for the inverted velocity profile mode. Comparisons are presented to show the effect of configuration and flow changes on the acoustic characteristics of the nozzles.

  16. Use of an acoustic helium analyzer for measuring lung volumes.

    PubMed

    Krumpe, P E; MacDannald, H J; Finley, T N; Schear, H E; Hall, J; Cribbs, D

    1981-01-01

    We have evaluated the use of an acoustic gas analyzer (AGA) for the measurement of total lung capacity (TLC) by single-breath helium dilution. The AGA has a rapid response time (0-90% response = 160 ms for 10% He), is linear for helium concentration of 0.1-10%, is stable over a wide range of ambient temperatures, and is small and portable. We plotted the output of the AGA vs. expired lung volume after a vital capacity breath of 10% He. However, since the AGA is sensitive to changes in speed of sound relative to air, the AGA output signal also reports an artifact due to alveolar gases. We corrected for this artifact by replotting a single-breath expiration after a vital capacity breath of room air. Mean alveolar helium concentration (HeA) was then measured by planimetry, using this alveolar gas curve as the base line. TLC was calculated using the HeA from the corrected AGA output and compared with TLC calculated from HeA simultaneously measured using a mass spectrometer (MS). In 12 normal subjects and 9 patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) TLC-AGA and TLC-MS were compared by linear regression analysis; correlation coefficient (r) was 0.973 for normals and 0.968 for COPD patients (P less than 0.001). This single-breath; estimation of TLC using the corrected signal of the AGA vs. Expired volume seems ideally suited for the measurement of subdivisions of lung volume in field studies. PMID:7204187

  17. The Belt voice: Acoustical measurements and esthetic correlates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bounous, Barry Urban

    This dissertation explores the esthetic attributes of the Belt voice through spectral acoustical analysis. The process of understanding the nature and safe practice of Belt is just beginning, whereas the understanding of classical singing is well established. The unique nature of the Belt sound provides difficulties for voice teachers attempting to evaluate the quality and appropriateness of a particular sound or performance. This study attempts to provide answers to the question "does Belt conform to a set of measurable esthetic standards?" In answering this question, this paper expands on a previous study of the esthetic attributes of the classical baritone voice (see "Vocal Beauty", NATS Journal 51,1) which also drew some tentative conclusions about the Belt voice but which had an inadequate sample pool of subjects from which to draw. Further, this study demonstrates that it is possible to scientifically investigate the realm of musical esthetics in the singing voice. It is possible to go beyond the "a trained voice compared to an untrained voice" paradigm when evaluating quantitative vocal parameters and actually investigate what truly beautiful voices do. There are functions of sound energy (measured in dB) transference which may affect the nervous system in predictable ways and which can be measured and associated with esthetics. This study does not show consistency in measurements for absolute beauty (taste) even among belt teachers and researchers but does show some markers with varying degrees of importance which may point to a difference between our cognitive learned response to singing and our emotional, more visceral response to sounds. The markers which are significant in determining vocal beauty are: (1) Vibrancy-Characteristics of vibrato including speed, width, and consistency (low variability). (2) Spectral makeup-Ratio of partial strength above the fundamental to the fundamental. (3) Activity of the voice-The quantity of energy being produced. (4

  18. Advances in Fast Response Acoustically Derived Air Temperature Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogoev, Ivan; Jacobsen, Larry; Horst, Thomas; Conrad, Benjamin

    2016-04-01

    Fast-response accurate air-temperature measurements are required when estimating turbulent fluxes of heat, water and carbon dioxide by open-path eddy-covariance technique. In comparison with contact thermometers like thermocouples, ultra-sonic thermometers do not suffer from solar radiation loading, water vapor condensation and evaporative cooling effects. Consequently they have the potential to provide more accurate true air temperature measurements. The absolute accuracy of the ultrasonic thermometer is limited by the following parameters: the distance between the transducer pairs, transducer delays associated with the electrical-acoustic signal conversion that vary with temperature, components of the wind vector that are normal to the ultrasonic paths, and humidity. The distance between the transducer pairs is commonly obtained by coordinate measuring machine. Improved accuracy demonstrated in this study results from increased stiffness in the anemometer head to better maintain the ultrasonic path-length distances. To further improve accuracy and account for changes in transducer delays and distance as a function of temperature, these parameters are characterized in a zero-wind chamber over the entire operating temperature range. When the sonic anemometer is combined with a co-located fast-response water vapor analyzer, like in the IRGASON instrument, speed of sound can be compensated for humidity effects on a point-by-point basis resulting in a true fast-response air temperature measurement. Laboratory test results show that when the above steps are implemented in the calibration of the ultrasonic thermometer air-temperature accuracy better than ±0.5 degrees Celsius can be achieved over the entire operating range. The approach is also validated in a field inter-comparison with an aspirated thermistor probe mounted in a radiation shield.

  19. Reflection and Scattering of Acoustical Waves from a Discontinuity in Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, J. P.; Leeman, S.; Nolan, E.; Lee, D.

    The reflection and transmission of a plane acoustical wave from a planar boundary at the interface between two homogeneous media of different acoustical properties is a classical problem in acoustics that has served as a basis for many developments in acoustics for over 100 years. This problem, detailed in virtually every textbook on acoustics, provides us with the acoustical analogue to Snell's Law in optics and gives us correspondingly simple results. Classical acoustics predicts that a reflection from a boundary occurs only if the characteristic acoustical impedances of the two media are different. Here we show that a reflection also occurs if the media have the same impedances but different absorption coefficients. Our analysis yields some surprising results. For example, a reflection will occur at a discontinuity in absorption even if the impedance is uniform and continuous across the interface. In addition, a discontinuity in impedance at an interface between two media that have constant and equal, but non-zero absorption, results in a reflection coefficient that is dependent on absorption as well as impedance. In general, reflection coefficients now become frequency dependent. To experimentally test our results, we measured the reflection at the interface between water and castor oil, two liquids with similar impedances but very different absorption coefficients. Measurement of the reflection coefficient between 1 and 50 MHz demonstrated a frequency dependence that was in good agreement with our analysis.

  20. Acoustic Absorption in Porous Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuczmarski, Maria A.; Johnston, James C.

    2011-01-01

    An understanding of both the areas of materials science and acoustics is necessary to successfully develop materials for acoustic absorption applications. This paper presents the basic knowledge and approaches for determining the acoustic performance of porous materials in a manner that will help materials researchers new to this area gain the understanding and skills necessary to make meaningful contributions to this field of study. Beginning with the basics and making as few assumptions as possible, this paper reviews relevant topics in the acoustic performance of porous materials, which are often used to make acoustic bulk absorbers, moving from the physics of sound wave interactions with porous materials to measurement techniques for flow resistivity, characteristic impedance, and wavenumber.