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Sample records for acoustic impulse technique

  1. Refinement and application of acoustic impulse technique to study nozzle transmission characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salikuddin, M.; Brown, W. H.; Ramakrishnan, R.; Tanna, H. K.

    1983-01-01

    An improved acoustic impulse technique was developed and was used to study the transmission characteristics of duct/nozzle systems. To accomplish the above objective, various problems associated with the existing spark-discharge impulse technique were first studied. These included (1) the nonlinear behavior of high intensity pulses, (2) the contamination of the signal with flow noise, (3) low signal-to-noise ratio at high exhaust velocities, and (4) the inability to control or shape the signal generated by the source, specially when multiple spark points were used as the source. The first step to resolve these problems was the replacement of the spark-discharge source with electroacoustic driver(s). These included (1) synthesizing on acoustic impulse with acoustic driver(s) to control and shape the output signal, (2) time domain signal averaging to remove flow noise from the contaminated signal, (3) signal editing to remove unwanted portions of the time history, (4) spectral averaging, and (5) numerical smoothing. The acoustic power measurement technique was improved by taking multiple induct measurements and by a modal decomposition process to account for the contribution of higher order modes in the power computation. The improved acoustic impulse technique was then validated by comparing the results derived by an impedance tube method. The mechanism of acoustic power loss, that occurs when sound is transmitted through nozzle terminations, was investigated. Finally, the refined impulse technique was applied to obtain more accurate results for the acoustic transmission characteristics of a conical nozzle and a multi-lobe multi-tube supressor nozzle.

  2. Bulk microstructure and local elastic properties of carbon nanocomposites studied by impulse acoustic microscopy technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, V.; Petronyuk, Yu.; Morokov, E.; Chernozatonskii, L.; Kuzhir, P.; Fierro, V.; Celzard, A.; Bellucci, S.; Bistarelli, S.; Mastrucci, M.; Tabacchioni, I.

    2016-05-01

    Bulk microstructure and elastic properties of epoxy-nanocarbon nanocomposites for diverse types and different content of carbon nanofiller has been studied by using impulse acoustic microscopy technique. It has been shown occurrence of various types of mesoscopic structure formed by nanoparticles inside the bulk of nanocomposite materials, including nanoparticle conglomerates and nanoparticle aerogel systems. In spite of the bulk microstructure, nanocarbon composites demonstrate elastic uniformity and negligible influence of nanofiller on elastic properties of carbon nanocomposite materials.

  3. Calculating room acoustic parameters from pseudo-impulsive acoustic sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    San Martin, Maria L.; Vela, Antonio; San Martin, Ricardo; Arana, Miguel A.

    2002-11-01

    The impulse response function provides complete information to predict the acoustic response of a room to an acoustic input of arbitrary characteristics. At this job study, small explosions of firecrackers are proposed to be used as pseudo-impulsive acoustics sources to determine some acoustic parameters of a room such as reverberation time, definition, and clarity, comparing these results to those obtained with other techniques. A previous characterization of these sources allows us to state that they can be used for this purpose because they are, in practice, omnidirectional, their temporary pattern is highly repetitive and their spectral power is, as well, repetitive and with enough power in octave bands from 125 Hz to 8 kHz. If the linear time-invariant system impulse response h(t) is known, output signal s(t) regarding any arbitrary signal s(t) can be obtained. For our pseudo-impulsive sources, the output signal s(t) has been taken as impulse response h(t). Using the integrated impulse response method suggested by Schroeder, it has been stated that both the mean values and standard deviations for some parameters are practically identical to results obtained with other usual techniques. (To be presented in Spanish.)

  4. A qualitative and quantitative investigation of the uncracked and cracked condition of concrete beams using impulse excitation, acoustic emission, and ultrasonic pulse velocity techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iliopoulos, S.; Iliopoulos, A.; Pyl, L.; Sol, H.; Aggelis, D. G.

    2014-04-01

    The Impulse Excitation Technique (IET) is a useful tool for characterizing the structural condition of concrete. Processing the obtained dynamic parameters (damping ratio, response frequency) as a function of response amplitude, clear and systematic differences appear between intact and cracked specimens, while factors like age and sustained load are also influential. Simultaneously, Acoustic Emission (AE) and Ultrasonic Pulse Velocity (UPV) techniques are used during the three point bending test of the beams in order to supply additional information on the level of damage accumulation which resulted in the specific dynamic behavior revealed by the IET test.

  5. Auditorium acoustics evaluation based on simulated impulse response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shuoxian; Wang, Hongwei; Zhao, Yuezhe

    2001-05-01

    The impulse responses and other acoustical parameters of Huangpu Teenager Palace in Guangzhou were measured. Meanwhile, the acoustical simulation and auralization based on software ODEON were also made. The comparison between the parameters based on computer simulation and measuring is given. This case study shows that auralization technique based on computer simulation can be used for predicting the acoustical quality of a hall at its design stage.

  6. What does See the Impulse Acoustic Microscopy inside Nanocomposites?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, V. M.; Petronyuk, Y. S.; Morokov, E. S.; Celzard, A.; Bellucci, S.; Kuzhir, P. P.

    The paper presents results of studying bulk microstructure in carbon nanocomposites by impulse acoustic microscopy technique. Nanocomposite materials are in the focus of interest because of their outstanding properties in minimal nanofiller content. Large surface area and high superficial activity cause strong interaction between nanoparticles that can result in formation of fractal conglomerates. This paper involves results of the first direct observation of nanoparticle conglomerates inside the bulk of epoxy-carbon nanocomposites. Diverse types of carbon nanofiller have been under investigation. The impulse acoustic microscope SIAM-1 (Acoustic Microscopy Lab, IBCP RAS) has been employed for 3D imaging bulk microstructure and measuring elastic properties of the nanocomposite specimens. The range of 50-200 MHz allows observing microstructure inside the entire specimen bulk. Acoustic images are obtained in the ultramicroscopic regime; they are formed by the Rayleigh type scattered radiation. It has been found the high-resolution acoustic vision (impulse acoustic microscopy) is an efficient technique to observe mesostructure formed by fractal cluster inside nanocomposites. The clusterization takes its utmost form in nanocomposites with graphite nanoplatelets as nanofiller. The nanoparticles agglomerate into micron-sized conglomerates distributed randomly over the material. Mesostructure in nanocomposites filled with carbon nanotubes is alternation of regions with diverse density of nanotube packing. Regions with alternative density of CNT packing are clearly seen in acoustical images as neighboring pixels of various brightness.

  7. Determination of acoustical transfer functions using an impulse method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacPherson, J.

    1985-02-01

    The Transfer Function of a system may be defined as the relationship of the output response to the input of a system. Whilst recent advances in digital processing systems have enabled Impulse Transfer Functions to be determined by computation of the Fast Fourier Transform, there has been little work done in applying these techniques to room acoustics. Acoustical Transfer Functions have been determined for auditoria, using an impulse method. The technique is based on the computation of the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) of a non-ideal impulsive source, both at the source and at the receiver point. The Impulse Transfer Function (ITF) is obtained by dividing the FFT at the receiver position by the FFT of the source. This quantity is presented both as linear frequency scale plots and also as synthesized one-third octave band data. The technique enables a considerable quantity of data to be obtained from a small number of impulsive signals recorded in the field, thereby minimizing the time and effort required on site. As the characteristics of the source are taken into account in the calculation, the choice of impulsive source is non-critical. The digital analysis equipment required for the analysis is readily available commercially.

  8. Acoustic radiation force impulse of the liver

    PubMed Central

    D’Onofrio, Mirko; Crosara, Stefano; De Robertis, Riccardo; Canestrini, Stefano; Demozzi, Emanuele; Gallotti, Anna; Pozzi Mucelli, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging is a new and promising ultrasound-based diagnostic technique that, evaluating the wave propagation speed, allows the assessment of the tissue stiffness. ARFI is implemented in the ultrasound scanner. By short-duration acoustic radiation forces (less than 1 ms), localized displacements are generated in a selected region of interest not requiring any external compression so reducing the operator dependency. The generated wave scan provides qualitative or quantitative (wave velocity values) responses. Several non-invasive methods for assessing the staging of fibrosis are used, in order to avoid liver biopsy. Liver function tests and transient elastography are non-invasive, sensitive and accurate tools for the assessment of liver fibrosis and for the discrimination between cirrhotic and non-cirrhotic liver. Many published studies analyse ARFI performance and feasibility in studying diffuse liver diseases and compare them to other diagnostic imaging modalities such as conventional ultrasonography and transient elastography. Solid focal liver lesions, both benign and malignant, are common findings during abdominal examinations. The accurate characterization and differential diagnosis are important aims of all the imaging modalities available today. Only few papers describe the application of ARFI technology in the study of solid focal liver lesions, with different results. In the present study, the existing literature, to the best of our knowledge, about ARFI application on diffuse and focal liver pathology has been evaluated and results and statistical analyses have been compared, bringing to the conclusion that ARFI can be used in the study of the liver with similar accuracy as transient elastography in diagnosing significant fibrosis or cirrhosis and has got some advantages in respect to transient elastography since it does not require separate equipment, better displays anatomical structures and measurements can be

  9. Numerical Techniques in Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J. (Compiler)

    1985-01-01

    This is the compilation of abstracts of the Numerical Techniques in Acoustics Forum held at the ASME's Winter Annual Meeting. This forum was for informal presentation and information exchange of ongoing acoustic work in finite elements, finite difference, boundary elements and other numerical approaches. As part of this forum, it was intended to allow the participants time to raise questions on unresolved problems and to generate discussions on possible approaches and methods of solution.

  10. Transthoracic Cardiac Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradway, David Pierson

    This dissertation investigates the feasibility of a real-time transthoracic Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) imaging system to measure myocardial function non-invasively in clinical setting. Heart failure is an important cardiovascular disease and contributes to the leading cause of death for developed countries. Patients exhibiting heart failure with a low left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) can often be identified by clinicians, but patients with preserved LVEF might be undetected if they do not exhibit other signs and symptoms of heart failure. These cases motivate development of transthoracic ARFI imaging to aid the early diagnosis of the structural and functional heart abnormalities leading to heart failure. M-Mode ARFI imaging utilizes ultrasonic radiation force to displace tissue several micrometers in the direction of wave propagation. Conventional ultrasound tracks the response of the tissue to the force. This measurement is repeated rapidly at a location through the cardiac cycle, measuring timing and relative changes in myocardial stiffness. ARFI imaging was previously shown capable of measuring myocardial properties and function via invasive open-chest and intracardiac approaches. The prototype imaging system described in this dissertation is capable of rapid acquisition, processing, and display of ARFI images and shear wave elasticity imaging (SWEI) movies. Also presented is a rigorous safety analysis, including finite element method (FEM) simulations of tissue heating, hydrophone intensity and mechanical index (MI) measurements, and thermocouple transducer face heating measurements. For the pulse sequences used in later animal and clinical studies, results from the safety analysis indicates that transthoracic ARFI imaging can be safely applied at rates and levels realizable on the prototype ARFI imaging system. Preliminary data are presented from in vivo trials studying changes in myocardial stiffness occurring under normal and abnormal

  11. Determination of Elastic Moduli of Fiber-Resin Composites Using an Impulse Excitation Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viens, Michael J.; Johnson, Jeffrey J.

    1996-01-01

    The elastic moduli of graphite/epoxy and graphite/cyanate ester composite specimens with various laminate lay-ups was determined using an impulse excitation/acoustic resonance technique and compared to those determined using traditional strain gauge and extensometer techniques. The stiffness results were also compared to those predicted from laminate theory using uniaxial properties. The specimen stiffnesses interrogated ranged from 12 to 30 Msi. The impulse excitation technique was found to be a relatively quick and accurate method for determining elastic moduli with minimal specimen preparation and no requirement for mechanical loading frames. The results of this investigation showed good correlation between the elastic modulus determined using the impulse excitation technique, strain gauge and extensometer techniques, and modulus predicted from laminate theory. The flexural stiffness determined using the impulse excitation was in good agreement with that predicted from laminate theory. The impulse excitation/acoustic resonance interrogation technique has potential as a quality control test.

  12. Model helicopter rotor high-speed impulsive noise: Measured acoustics and blade pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boxwell, D. A.; Schmitz, F. H.; Splettstoesser, W. R.; Schultz, K. J.

    1983-01-01

    A 1/17-scale research model of the AH-1 series helicopter main rotor was tested. Model-rotor acoustic and simultaneous blade pressure data were recorded at high speeds where full-scale helicopter high-speed impulsive noise levels are known to be dominant. Model-rotor measurements of the peak acoustic pressure levels, waveform shapes, and directively patterns are directly compared with full-scale investigations, using an equivalent in-flight technique. Model acoustic data are shown to scale remarkably well in shape and in amplitude with full-scale results. Model rotor-blade pressures are presented for rotor operating conditions both with and without shock-like discontinuities in the radiated acoustic waveform. Acoustically, both model and full-scale measurements support current evidence that above certain high subsonic advancing-tip Mach numbers, local shock waves that exist on the rotor blades ""delocalize'' and radiate to the acoustic far-field.

  13. Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) Imaging: a Review

    PubMed Central

    Nightingale, Kathy

    2012-01-01

    Acoustic radiation force based elasticity imaging methods are under investigation by many groups. These methods differ from traditional ultrasonic elasticity imaging methods in that they do not require compression of the transducer, and are thus expected to be less operator dependent. Methods have been developed that utilize impulsive (i.e. < 1 ms), harmonic (pulsed), and steady state radiation force excitations. The work discussed herein utilizes impulsive methods, for which two imaging approaches have been pursued: 1) monitoring the tissue response within the radiation force region of excitation (ROE) and generating images of relative differences in tissue stiffness (Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) imaging); and 2) monitoring the speed of shear wave propagation away from the ROE to quantify tissue stiffness (Shear Wave Elasticity Imaging (SWEI)). For these methods, a single ultrasound transducer on a commercial ultrasound system can be used to both generate acoustic radiation force in tissue, and to monitor the tissue displacement response. The response of tissue to this transient excitation is complicated and depends upon tissue geometry, radiation force field geometry, and tissue mechanical and acoustic properties. Higher shear wave speeds and smaller displacements are associated with stiffer tissues, and slower shear wave speeds and larger displacements occur with more compliant tissues. ARFI images have spatial resolution comparable to that of B-mode, often with greater contrast, providing matched, adjunctive information. SWEI images provide quantitative information about the tissue stiffness, typically with lower spatial resolution. A review these methods and examples of clinical applications are presented herein. PMID:22545033

  14. Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Measurement in Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Juhan; Oh, Young Taik; Joo, Dong Jin; Ma, Bo Gyoung; Lee, A-lan; Lee, Jae Geun; Song, Seung Hwan; Kim, Seung Up; Jung, Dae Chul; Chung, Yong Eun; Kim, Yu Seun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy (IF/TA) is a common cause of kidney allograft loss. Several noninvasive techniques developed to assess tissue fibrosis are widely used to examine the liver. However, relatively few studies have investigated the use of elastographic methods to assess transplanted kidneys. The aim of this study was to explore the clinical implications of the acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) technique in renal transplant patients. A total of 91 patients who underwent living donor renal transplantation between September 2010 and January 2013 were included in this prospective study. Shear wave velocity (SWV) was measured by ARFI at baseline and predetermined time points (1 week and 6 and 12 months after transplantation). Protocol biopsies were performed at 12 months. Instead of reflecting IF/TA, SWVs were found to be related to time elapsed after transplantation. Mean SWV increased continuously during the first postoperative year (P < 0.001). In addition, mixed model analysis showed no correlation existed between SWV and serum creatinine (r = −0.2426, P = 0.0771). There was also no evidence of a relationship between IF/TA and serum creatinine (odds ratio [OR] = 1.220, P = 0.7648). Furthermore, SWV temporal patterns were dependent on the kidney weight to body weight ratio (KW/BW). In patients with a KW/BW <3.5 g/kg, mean SWV continuously increased for 12 months, whereas it decreased after 6 months in those with a KW/BW ≥3.5 g/kg. No significant correlation was observed between SWV and IF/TA or renal dysfunction. However, SWV was found to be related to the time after transplantation. Renal hemodynamics influenced by KW/BW might impact SWV values. PMID:26426636

  15. Acoustic analysis by spherical microphone array processing of room impulse responses.

    PubMed

    Khaykin, Dima; Rafaely, Boaz

    2012-07-01

    Spherical microphone arrays have been recently used for room acoustics analysis, to detect the direction-of-arrival of early room reflections, and compute directional room impulse responses and other spatial room acoustics parameters. Previous works presented methods for room acoustics analysis using spherical arrays that are based on beamforming, e.g., delay-and-sum, regular beamforming, and Dolph-Chebyshev beamforming. Although beamforming methods provide useful directional selectivity, optimal array processing methods can provide enhanced performance. However, these algorithms require an array cross-spectrum matrix with a full rank, while array data based on room impulse responses may not satisfy this condition due to the single frame data. This paper presents a smoothing technique for the cross-spectrum matrix in the frequency domain, designed for spherical microphone arrays, that can solve the problem of low rank when using room impulse response data, therefore facilitating the use of optimal array processing methods. Frequency smoothing is shown to be performed effectively using spherical arrays, due to the decoupling of frequency and angular components in the spherical harmonics domain. Experimental study with data measured in a real auditorium illustrates the performance of optimal array processing methods such as MUSIC and MVDR compared to beamforming. PMID:22779475

  16. Acoustic techniques in nuclear safeguards

    SciTech Connect

    Olinger, C.T.; Sinha, D.N.

    1995-07-01

    Acoustic techniques can be employed to address many questions relevant to current nuclear technology needs. These include establishing and monitoring intrinsic tags and seals, locating holdup in areas where conventional radiation-based measurements have limited capability, process monitoring, monitoring containers for corrosion or changes in pressure, and facility design verification. These acoustics applications are in their infancy with respect to safeguards and nuclear material management, but proof-of-principle has been demonstrated in many of the areas listed.

  17. Image quality, tissue heating, and frame rate trade-offs in acoustic radiation force impulse imaging.

    PubMed

    Bouchard, Richard R; Dahl, Jeremy J; Hsu, Stephen J; Palmeri, Mark L; Trahey, Gregg E

    2009-01-01

    The real-time application of acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging requires both short acquisition times for a single ARFI image and repeated acquisition of these frames. Due to the high energy of pulses required to generate appreciable radiation force, however, repeated acquisitions could result in substantial transducer face and tissue heating. We describe and evaluate several novel beam sequencing schemes which, along with parallel-receive acquisition, are designed to reduce acquisition time and heating. These techniques reduce the total number of radiation force impulses needed to generate an image and minimize the time between successive impulses. We present qualitative and quantitative analyses of the trade-offs in image quality resulting from the acquisition schemes. Results indicate that these techniques yield a significant improvement in frame rate with only moderate decreases in image quality. Tissue and transducer face heating resulting from these schemes is assessed through finite element method modeling and thermocouple measurements. Results indicate that heating issues can be mitigated by employing ARFI acquisition sequences that utilize the highest track-to-excitation ratio possible. PMID:19213633

  18. Identifying Vulnerable Plaques with Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doherty, Joshua Ryan

    The rupture of arterial plaques is the most common cause of ischemic complications including stroke, the fourth leading cause of death and number one cause of long term disability in the United States. Unfortunately, because conventional diagnostic tools fail to identify plaques that confer the highest risk, often a disabling stroke and/or sudden death is the first sign of disease. A diagnostic method capable of characterizing plaque vulnerability would likely enhance the predictive ability and ultimately the treatment of stroke before the onset of clinical events. This dissertation evaluates the hypothesis that Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) imaging can noninvasively identify lipid regions, that have been shown to increase a plaque's propensity to rupture, within carotid artery plaques in vivo. The work detailed herein describes development efforts and results from simulations and experiments that were performed to evaluate this hypothesis. To first demonstrate feasibility and evaluate potential safety concerns, finite- element method simulations are used to model the response of carotid artery plaques to an acoustic radiation force excitation. Lipid pool visualization is shown to vary as a function of lipid pool geometry and stiffness. A comparison of the resulting Von Mises stresses indicates that stresses induced by an ARFI excitation are three orders of magnitude lower than those induced by blood pressure. This thesis also presents the development of a novel pulse inversion harmonic tracking method to reduce clutter-imposed errors in ultrasound-based tissue displacement estimates. This method is validated in phantoms and was found to reduce bias and jitter displacement errors for a marked improvement in image quality in vivo. Lastly, this dissertation presents results from a preliminary in vivo study that compares ARFI imaging derived plaque stiffness with spatially registered composition determined by a Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) gold standard

  19. Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) Imaging-Based Needle Visualization

    PubMed Central

    Rotemberg, Veronica; Palmeri, Mark; Rosenzweig, Stephen; Grant, Stuart; Macleod, David; Nightingale, Kathryn

    2011-01-01

    Ultrasound-guided needle placement is widely used in the clinical setting, particularly for central venous catheter placement, tissue biopsy and regional anesthesia. Difficulties with ultrasound guidance in these areas often result from steep needle insertion angles and spatial offsets between the imaging plane and the needle. Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) imaging leads to improved needle visualization because it uses a standard diagnostic scanner to perform radiation force based elasticity imaging, creating a displacement map that displays tissue stiffness variations. The needle visualization in ARFI images is independent of needle-insertion angle and also extends needle visibility out of plane. Although ARFI images portray needles well, they often do not contain the usual B-mode landmarks. Therefore, a three-step segmentation algorithm has been developed to identify a needle in an ARFI image and overlay the needle prediction on a coregistered B-mode image. The steps are: (1) contrast enhancement by median filtration and Laplacian operator filtration, (2) noise suppression through displacement estimate correlation coefficient thresholding and (3) smoothing by removal of outliers and best-fit line prediction. The algorithm was applied to data sets from horizontal 18, 21 and 25 gauge needles between 0–4 mm offset in elevation from the transducer imaging plane and to 18G needles on the transducer axis (in plane) between 10° and 35° from the horizontal. Needle tips were visualized within 2 mm of their actual position for both horizontal needle orientations up to 1.5 mm off set in elevation from the transducer imaging plane and on-axis angled needles between 10°–35° above the horizontal orientation. We conclude that segmented ARFI images overlaid on matched B-mode images hold promise for improved needle visibility in many clinical applications. PMID:21608445

  20. Error analysis of the impulse excitation of vibration measurement of acoustic velocities in steel samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raggio, Leandro Iglesias; Etcheverry, Javier; Sánchez, Gustavo; Bonadeo, Nicolás

    2010-01-01

    The knowledge of the acoustic velocities in solid materials is crucial for several nondestructive evaluation techniques such as wall thickness measurement, materials characterization, determination of the location of cracks and inclusions, TOFD, etc. The longitudinal wave velocity is easily measured using ultrasonic pulse-echo technique, while a simple and accurate way to measure the shear wave speed would be a useful addition to the commonly available tools. In this work we use the impulse excitation of vibration, a very well known technique to determine the elastic constants of solid materials from the measurement of the lowest resonant frequencies excited by an impulse, to determine both longitudinal and transversal sound velocities for steel samples. Significant differences were found when comparing the longitudinal wave velocity with the one determined by a standard pulse-echo technique. Part of the difference was tracked back to the use of analytical formulas for the resonant frequencies, and corrected through the use of accurate numerical simulations. In this paper the systematic analysis of the possible error sources is reported.

  1. Detection of impulsive sources from an aerostat-based acoustic array data collection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prather, Wayne E.; Clark, Robert C.; Strickland, Joshua; Frazier, Wm. Garth; Singleton, Jere

    2009-05-01

    An aerostat based acoustic array data collection system was deployed at the NATO TG-53 "Acoustic Detection of Weapon Firing" Joint Field Experiment conducted in Bourges, France during the final two weeks of June 2008. A variety of impulsive sources including mortar, artillery, gunfire, RPG, and explosive devices were fired during the test. Results from the aerostat acoustic array will be presented against the entire range of sources.

  2. Hazard from intense low-frequency acoustic impulses. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Price, G.R.

    1986-10-01

    It was predicted that because the ear is spectrally tuned, it should be most affected by intense impulses with spectral peaks near the frequency where it is tuned best (3.0 kHz for the human ear) and progressively less affected by impulses at lower frequencies. This prediction is counter to all the DRCs for impulse noise; therefore, an adequate test is essential. In order to augment the data on hearing loss to low-spectral-frequency impulses, three groups of cats (eight, nine, and ten animals) were exposed on one occasion to 50 impulses from a 105-mm howitzer at peak SPLs of 153, 159, and 166 dB. Threshold shifts were measured electrophysiologically on the day of exposure (CTS) and following a 2-month recovery period (PTS). Maximum PTSs appeared at 4 kHz (even though the spectral peak of the impulse had been at about 100 Hz), and CTSs recovered into PTSs about half as large. Furthermore, the group data, even small CTSs tended to have a permanent component. These data raise the question as to whether or not any threshold shift persisting an hour or two after exposure to high levels should be considered tolerable. When compared with data from rifle fire exposures, the data confirmed the earlier prediction that as the spectral frequency drops, hazard declines at the rate of a little more than 3 dB/oct, contrary to the rating by existing DRCs.

  3. Liver reserve function assessment by acoustic radiation force impulse imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiao-Lan; Liang, Li-Wei; Cao, Hui; Men, Qiong; Hou, Ke-Zhu; Chen, Zhen; Zhao, Ya-E

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the utility of liver reserve function by acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging in patients with liver tumors. METHODS: Seventy-six patients with liver tumors were enrolled in this study. Serum biochemical indexes, such as aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), serum albumin (ALB), total bilirubin (T-Bil), and other indicators were observed. Liver stiffness (LS) was measured by ARFI imaging, measurements were repeated 10 times, and the average value of the results was taken as the final LS value. Indocyanine green (ICG) retention was performed, and ICG-K and ICG-R15 were recorded. Child-Pugh (CP) scores were carried out based on patient’s preoperative biochemical tests and physical condition. Correlations among CP scores, ICG-R15, ICG-K and LS values were observed and analyzed using either the Pearson correlation coefficient or the Spearman rank correlation coefficient. Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare LS values of CP scores, and the receiver-operator characteristic (ROC) curve was used to analyze liver reserve function assessment accuracy. RESULTS: LS in the ICG-R15 10%-20% group was significantly higher than in the ICG-R15 < 10% group; and the difference was statistically significant (2.19 ± 0.27 vs 1.59 ± 0.32, P < 0.01). LS in the ICG-R15 > 20% group was significantly higher than in the ICG-R15 < 10% group; and the difference was statistically significant (2.92 ± 0.29 vs 1.59 ± 0.32, P < 0.01). The LS value in patients with CP class A was lower than in patients with CP class B (1.57 ± 0.34 vs 1.86 ± 0.27, P < 0.05), while the LS value in patients with CP class B was lower than in patients with CP class C (1.86 ± 0.27 vs 2.47 ± 0.33, P < 0.01). LS was positively correlated with ICG-R15 (r = 0.617, P < 0.01) and CP score (r = 0.772, P < 0.01). Meanwhile, LS was negatively correlated with ICG-K (r = -0.673, P < 0.01). AST, ALT and T-Bil were positively correlated with LS, while ALB was negatively

  4. Acoustic resonance techniques for quality control

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, D.N.

    1992-09-01

    Acoustic resonance based nondestructive techniques are described that can be used for both process and quality control in manufacturing. The Acoustic Resonance Spectroscopy (AS) technique is highlighted for its capability in fluid property (flow, density, viscosity, and speed of sound) monitoring. Possible applications of these noninvasive techniques for textile manufacturing are pointed out.

  5. Acoustic resonance techniques for quality control

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, D.N.

    1992-01-01

    Acoustic resonance based nondestructive techniques are described that can be used for both process and quality control in manufacturing. The Acoustic Resonance Spectroscopy (AS) technique is highlighted for its capability in fluid property (flow, density, viscosity, and speed of sound) monitoring. Possible applications of these noninvasive techniques for textile manufacturing are pointed out.

  6. Probing thermomechanics at the nanoscale: impulsively excited pseudosurface acoustic waves in hypersonic phononic crystals.

    PubMed

    Nardi, Damiano; Travagliati, Marco; Siemens, Mark E; Li, Qing; Murnane, Margaret M; Kapteyn, Henry C; Ferrini, Gabriele; Parmigiani, Fulvio; Banfi, Francesco

    2011-10-12

    High-frequency surface acoustic waves can be generated by ultrafast laser excitation of nanoscale patterned surfaces. Here we study this phenomenon in the hypersonic frequency limit. By modeling the thermomechanics from first-principles, we calculate the system's initial heat-driven impulsive response and follow its time evolution. A scheme is introduced to quantitatively access frequencies and lifetimes of the composite system's excited eigenmodes. A spectral decomposition of the calculated response on the eigemodes of the system reveals asymmetric resonances that result from the coupling between surface and bulk acoustic modes. This finding allows evaluation of impulsively excited pseudosurface acoustic wave frequencies and lifetimes and expands our understanding of the scattering of surface waves in mesoscale metamaterials. The model is successfully benchmarked against time-resolved optical diffraction measurements performed on one-dimensional and two-dimensional surface phononic crystals, probed using light at extreme ultraviolet and near-infrared wavelengths. PMID:21910426

  7. Probing Thermomechanics at the Nanoscale: Impulsively Excited Pseudosurface Acoustic Waves in Hypersonic Phononic Crystals

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    High-frequency surface acoustic waves can be generated by ultrafast laser excitation of nanoscale patterned surfaces. Here we study this phenomenon in the hypersonic frequency limit. By modeling the thermomechanics from first-principles, we calculate the system’s initial heat-driven impulsive response and follow its time evolution. A scheme is introduced to quantitatively access frequencies and lifetimes of the composite system’s excited eigenmodes. A spectral decomposition of the calculated response on the eigemodes of the system reveals asymmetric resonances that result from the coupling between surface and bulk acoustic modes. This finding allows evaluation of impulsively excited pseudosurface acoustic wave frequencies and lifetimes and expands our understanding of the scattering of surface waves in mesoscale metamaterials. The model is successfully benchmarked against time-resolved optical diffraction measurements performed on one-dimensional and two-dimensional surface phononic crystals, probed using light at extreme ultraviolet and near-infrared wavelengths. PMID:21910426

  8. An impulsive source with variable output and stable bandwidth for underwater acoustic experiments.

    PubMed

    McNeese, Andrew R; Wilson, Preston S; Sagers, Jason D; Knobles, David P

    2014-07-01

    The Combustive Sound Source (CSS) is being developed as an environmentally friendly source to be used in ocean acoustics research and surveys. It has the ability to maintain the same wide bandwidth signal over a 20 dB drop in source level. The CSS consists of a submersible combustion chamber filled with a fuel/oxidizer mixture. The mixture is ignited and the ensuing combustion and bubble activity radiates an impulsive, thus broadband, acoustic pulse. The ability to control pulse amplitude while maintaining bandwidth is demonstrated. PMID:24993239

  9. Acoustic radiation force impulse elastography for hepatocellular carcinoma-associated radiofrequency ablation

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Hee-Jin; Kang, Myong-Jin; Cho, Jin-Han; Oh, Jong-Young; Nam, Kyung-Jin; Han, Sang-Yeong; Lee, Sung Wook

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the potential usefulness of acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) images for evaluation of hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC)-associated radiofrequency ablation. METHODS: From January 2010 to June 2010, a total of 38 patients with HCC including recurred HCCs after RFA underwent ARFI elastography. The brightness of tumor was checked and the shear wave velocity was measured for the quantification of stiffness. According to the brightness, the tumors were classified as brighter, same color and darker compared with adjacent parenchyma. Using the same methods, 8 patients with recurred HCCs after RFA state were evaluated about the brightness compared with adjacent RFA ablation area. RESULTS: In the 38 patients with HCCs, 20 (52.6%) were brighter than surrounding cirrhotic parenchyma. Another 13 (34.2%) were darker. The others (5 cases, 13.2%) were seen as the same color as the adjacent liver parenchyma. Post-RFA lesions were darker than previous tumor and surrounding parenchyma in all 38 cases. However, recurred HCCs were brighter than the treated site in all 8 cases. CONCLUSION: Using ARFI technique is helpful for differential diagnosis in order to detect recurred HCCs more easily in patients with confusing status. PMID:21528062

  10. Testicular microlithiasis and preliminary experience of acoustic radiation force impulse imaging

    PubMed Central

    Osther, Palle Jørn Sloth; Rafaelsen, Søren Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Background Elastography of the testis can be used as a part of multiparametric examination of the scrotum. Purpose To determine the testicular stiffness using acoustic radiation force impulse imaging (ARFI) technique in men with testicular microlithiasis (TML). Material and Methods In 2013, 12 patients with diagnosed testicular microlithiasis in 2008 (mean age, 51 years; age range, 25–76 years) underwent a 5-year follow-up B-mode ultrasonography with three ARFI elastography measurements of each testis. We used a Siemens Acuson S3000 machine. Results No malignancy was found at the 5-year follow-up B-mode and elastography in 2013. However, we found an increase in TML; in the previous ultrasonography in 2008, eight men had bilateral TML, whereas in 2013, 10 men were diagnosed with bilateral TML. The mean elasticity of testicles with TML was 0.82 m/s (interquartile range [IQR], 0.72–0.88 m/s; range, 65–1.08 m/s). Conclusion Elastography velocity of testis with TML seems to be in the same velocity range as in men with normal testis tissue. PMID:27504193

  11. Acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging of zebrafish embryo by high-frequency coded excitation sequence.

    PubMed

    Park, Jinhyoung; Lee, Jungwoo; Lau, Sien Ting; Lee, Changyang; Huang, Ying; Lien, Ching-Ling; Kirk Shung, K

    2012-04-01

    Acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging has been developed as a non-invasive method for quantitative illustration of tissue stiffness or displacement. Conventional ARFI imaging (2-10 MHz) has been implemented in commercial scanners for illustrating elastic properties of several organs. The image resolution, however, is too coarse to study mechanical properties of micro-sized objects such as cells. This article thus presents a high-frequency coded excitation ARFI technique, with the ultimate goal of displaying elastic characteristics of cellular structures. Tissue mimicking phantoms and zebrafish embryos are imaged with a 100-MHz lithium niobate (LiNbO₃) transducer, by cross-correlating tracked RF echoes with the reference. The phantom results show that the contrast of ARFI image (14 dB) with coded excitation is better than that of the conventional ARFI image (9 dB). The depths of penetration are 2.6 and 2.2 mm, respectively. The stiffness data of the zebrafish demonstrate that the envelope is harder than the embryo region. The temporal displacement change at the embryo and the chorion is as large as 36 and 3.6 μm. Consequently, this high-frequency ARFI approach may serve as a remote palpation imaging tool that reveals viscoelastic properties of small biological samples. PMID:22101757

  12. Air Coupled Acoustic Thermography (acat) Inspection Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalameda, J. N.; Winfree, W. P.; Yost, W. T.

    2008-02-01

    The scope of this effort is to determine the viability of a new heating technique using a noncontact acoustic excitation source. Because of low coupling between air and the structure, a synchronous detection method is employed. Any reduction in the out of plane stiffness improves the acoustic coupling efficiency and as a result, defective areas have an increase in temperature relative to the surrounding area. Hence a new measurement system, based on air-coupled acoustic energy and synchronous detection is presented. An analytical model of a clamped circular plate is given, experimentally tested, and verified. Repeatability confirms the technique with a measurement uncertainty of +/-6.2 percent. The range of frequencies used was 800-2,000 Hertz. Acoustic excitation and consequent thermal detection of flaws in a helicopter blade is examined and results indicate that air coupled acoustic excitation enables the detection of core damage in sandwich honeycomb structures.

  13. Air Coupled Acoustic Thermography (ACAT) Inspection Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalameda, Joseph; Winfree, William P.; Yost, William T.

    2007-01-01

    The scope of this effort is to determine the viability of a new heating technique using a noncontact acoustic excitation source. Because of low coupling between air and the structure, a synchronous detection method is employed. Any reduction in the out of plane stiffness improves the acoustic coupling efficiency and as a result, defective areas have an increase in temperature relative to the surrounding area. Hence a new measurement system, based on air-coupled acoustic energy and synchronous detection is presented. An analytical model of a clamped circular plate is given, experimentally tested, and verified. Repeatability confirms the technique with a measurement uncertainty of plus or minus 6.2 percent. The range of frequencies used was 800-2,000 Hertz. Acoustic excitation and consequent thermal detection of flaws in a helicopter blade is examined and results indicate that air coupled acoustic excitation enables the detection of core damage in sandwich honeycomb structures.

  14. Impulse noise and acute acoustic trauma in Finnish conscripts. Number of shots fired and safe distances.

    PubMed

    Savolainen, S; Lehtomäki, K M

    1997-01-01

    This prospective study of acute acoustic trauma (AAT) from exposure to impulse noise during compulsory military service focused on three issues the number of shot or explosion impulses that the conscript was exposed to at the time of AAT, distance of injured ear from causal firearm, and the circumstances under which AAT occurred protected ears. The series includes 449 consecutive, verified cases of AAT seen at the Central Military Hospital in Helsinki, Finland, in the period 1989-1993. AAT usually occurred during combat training (87%) as a result of exposure to impulses from small arms (83%). In 41%. AAT was caused by a single shot or detonation impulse. As many as 92% of all AATs occurred within 2 m of the causal firearm. Fourteen percent were wearing hearing protectors when the accident took place, but every third had badly fitting protectors or had neglected safety regulations and used insufficient protection. Of all AATs caused by one noise impulse in protected ears. 83% were attributable to heavy arms and only 14% to small arms. The results of the study suggest that combined use of earmuffs and earplugs in association with a safe distance of over 5 m from the noise source gives adequate protection against AAT. However, for conscripts using certain heavy arms e.g. hazooka. more effective hearing protection should be developed. PMID:9187006

  15. Overview of geometrical room acoustic modeling techniques.

    PubMed

    Savioja, Lauri; Svensson, U Peter

    2015-08-01

    Computerized room acoustics modeling has been practiced for almost 50 years up to date. These modeling techniques play an important role in room acoustic design nowadays, often including auralization, but can also help in the construction of virtual environments for such applications as computer games, cognitive research, and training. This overview describes the main principles, landmarks in the development, and state-of-the-art for techniques that are based on geometrical acoustics principles. A focus is given to their capabilities to model the different aspects of sound propagation: specular vs diffuse reflections, and diffraction. PMID:26328688

  16. Acoustic Location of Lightning Using Interferometric Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erives, H.; Arechiga, R. O.; Stock, M.; Lapierre, J. L.; Edens, H. E.; Stringer, A.; Rison, W.; Thomas, R. J.

    2013-12-01

    Acoustic arrays have been used to accurately locate thunder sources in lightning flashes. The acoustic arrays located around the Magdalena mountains of central New Mexico produce locations which compare quite well with source locations provided by the New Mexico Tech Lightning Mapping Array. These arrays utilize 3 outer microphones surrounding a 4th microphone located at the center, The location is computed by band-passing the signal to remove noise, and then computing the cross correlating the outer 3 microphones with respect the center reference microphone. While this method works very well, it works best on signals with high signal to noise ratios; weaker signals are not as well located. Therefore, methods are being explored to improve the location accuracy and detection efficiency of the acoustic location systems. The signal received by acoustic arrays is strikingly similar to th signal received by radio frequency interferometers. Both acoustic location systems and radio frequency interferometers make coherent measurements of a signal arriving at a number of closely spaced antennas. And both acoustic and interferometric systems then correlate these signals between pairs of receivers to determine the direction to the source of the received signal. The primary difference between the two systems is the velocity of propagation of the emission, which is much slower for sound. Therefore, the same frequency based techniques that have been used quite successfully with radio interferometers should be applicable to acoustic based measurements as well. The results presented here are comparisons between the location results obtained with current cross correlation method and techniques developed for radio frequency interferometers applied to acoustic signals. The data were obtained during the summer 2013 storm season using multiple arrays sensitive to both infrasonic frequency and audio frequency acoustic emissions from lightning. Preliminary results show that

  17. Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Measurement in Renal Transplantation: A Prospective, Longitudinal Study With Protocol Biopsies.

    PubMed

    Lee, Juhan; Oh, Young Taik; Joo, Dong Jin; Ma, Bo Gyoung; Lee, A-lan; Lee, Jae Geun; Song, Seung Hwan; Kim, Seung Up; Jung, Dae Chul; Chung, Yong Eun; Kim, Yu Seun

    2015-09-01

    Interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy (IF/TA) is a common cause of kidney allograft loss. Several noninvasive techniques developed to assess tissue fibrosis are widely used to examine the liver. However, relatively few studies have investigated the use of elastographic methods to assess transplanted kidneys. The aim of this study was to explore the clinical implications of the acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) technique in renal transplant patients. A total of 91 patients who underwent living donor renal transplantation between September 2010 and January 2013 were included in this prospective study. Shear wave velocity (SWV) was measured by ARFI at baseline and predetermined time points (1 week and 6 and 12 months after transplantation). Protocol biopsies were performed at 12 months. Instead of reflecting IF/TA, SWVs were found to be related to time elapsed after transplantation. Mean SWV increased continuously during the first postoperative year (P < 0.001). In addition, mixed model analysis showed no correlation existed between SWV and serum creatinine (r = -0.2426, P = 0.0771). There was also no evidence of a relationship between IF/TA and serum creatinine (odds ratio [OR] = 1.220, P = 0.7648). Furthermore, SWV temporal patterns were dependent on the kidney weight to body weight ratio (KW/BW). In patients with a KW/BW < 3.5 g/kg, mean SWV continuously increased for 12 months, whereas it decreased after 6 months in those with a KW/BW ≥ 3.5 g/kg.No significant correlation was observed between SWV and IF/TA or renal dysfunction. However, SWV was found to be related to the time after transplantation. Renal hemodynamics influenced by KW/BW might impact SWV values. PMID:26426636

  18. Ejection of ferrofluid grains from a ferrofluid using nonlinear acoustic impulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manciu, Felicia S.; Manciu, Marian; Sen, Surajit

    2000-03-01

    We consider a model study of a dilute ferrofluid in a container with a flat base and an open top surface with monodisperse ferrofluid grains that form a stable colloid in water or oil. The grains are assumed to be under the influence of a strong, uniform, external magnetic field. It is well known that due to the influence of the field, such a system forms chains of ferrofluid grains between the base and the surface of the liquid. The phase-separated system is then subjected to non-linear acoustic impulses at its base. We show that for impulses of any magnitude, it is possible to generate non-dispersive bundles of energy through the chains. By carrying out detailed dynamical simulations of impulse propagation in the chains, we show that for appropriate impulse magnitudes, the ferrofluid grains in each of the chains, which are in the vicinity of the surface, will overcome the force due to surface tension and eject into air. Ferrofluid grains carry a coating of the host liquid, which can be colored for water-based ferrofluids and hence the system may potentially be used to design a nozzle-free inkjet printer. For ferrofluid grains of typical diameter of about 100 Angstroms, the proposed system could lead one to develop inkjet printers with dot sizes that are less than 200 Angstroms and hence to a printing system of unparalleled resolution. [1] S. Sen, M. Manciu and F.S. Manciu, Appl. Phys. Lett. 75, 1479 (1999).

  19. High-Resolution Analysis of Seismic Air Gun Impulses and Their Reverberant Field as Contributors to an Acoustic Environment.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Melania; Dugan, Peter J; Ponirakis, Dimitri W; Popescu, Marian; Shiu, Yu; Rice, Aaron N; Clark, Christopher W

    2016-01-01

    In September and October 2011, a seismic survey took place in Baffin Bay, Western Greenland, in close proximity to a marine protected area (MPA). As part of the mitigation effort, five bottom-mounted marine acoustic recording units (MARUs) collected data that were used for the purpose of measuring temporal and spectral features from each impulsive event, providing a high-resolution record of seismic reverberation persistent after the direct impulse. Results were compared with ambient-noise levels as computed after the seismic survey to evidence that as a consequence of a series of repeating seismic impulses, sustained elevated levels create the potential for masking. PMID:26610981

  20. Investigation of acoustic emission coupling techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jolly, W. D.

    1988-01-01

    A three-phase research program was initiated by NASA in 1983 to investigate the use of acoustic monitoring techniques to detect incipient failure in turbopump bearings. Two prototype acoustic coupler probes were designed and evaluated, and four units of the final probe design were fabricated. Success in this program could lead to development of an on-board monitor which could detect bearing damage in flight and reduce or eliminate the need for disassembly after each flight. This final report reviews the accomplishments of the first two phases and presents the results of fabrication and testing completed in the final phase of the research program.

  1. Where the ocean influences the impulse response and its effect on synchronous changes of acoustic travel time.

    PubMed

    Spiesberger, John L

    2011-12-01

    In 1983, sounds at 133 Hz, 0.06 s resolution were transmitted in the Pacific for five days at 2 min intervals over 3709 km between bottom-mounted instruments maintained with atomic clocks. In 1989, a technique was developed to measure changes in acoustic travel time with an accuracy of 135 microseconds at 2 min intervals for selected windows of travel time within the impulse response. The data have short-lived 1 to 10 ms oscillations of travel time with periods less than a few days. Excluding tidal effects, different windows exhibited significant synchronized changes in travel time for periods shorter than 10 h. In the 1980s, this phenomenon was not understood because internal waves have correlation lengths of a few kilometers which are smaller than the way sound was thought to sample the ocean along well-separated and distinct rays corresponding to different windows. The paradox's resolution comes from modern theories that replace the ray-picture with finite wavelength representations that predict sound can be influenced in the upper ocean over horizontal scales such as 20 km or more. Thus, different windows are influenced by the same short-scale fluctuations of sound speed. This conclusion is supported by the data and numerical simulations of the impulse response. PMID:22225021

  2. Using a signal cancellation technique involving impulse response to assess directivity of hearing aids.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yu-Hsiang; Bentler, Ruth A

    2009-12-01

    The directional microphone systems of modern digital hearing aids are capable of changing their spatial directivity pattern and/or the microphone mode in response to changes in the properties of environmental sounds. These adaptive/automatic features make measurement of a hearing aid's directivity in a given test environment very difficult. Assessing the directivity of such systems requires a signal that can record the system's response while not changing the system's directivity. This paper proposes a method using a signal cancellation technique involving impulse responses to acoustically assess a hearing aid's directivity (referred to as the IR method). The impulse is presumed to be undetectable to the adaptive/automatic system because it contains little energy and a short response could be recorded before the system actually reacts. In the current study, the IR method was evaluated by testing five adaptive/automatic directional hearing aids in noise of various intensities. The results revealed that the IR method was an accurate and repeatable way to assess slow-acting directional systems in noise of varying intensities and fast-acting systems in noise of high intensities. PMID:20000935

  3. Primary biliary cirrhosis degree assessment by acoustic radiation force impulse imaging and hepatic fibrosis indicators

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hai-Chun; Hu, Rong-Fei; Zhu, Ting; Tong, Ling; Zhang, Qiu-Qin

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the assessment of primary biliary cirrhosis degree by acoustic radiation force impulse imaging (ARFI) and hepatic fibrosis indicators. METHODS: One hundred and twenty patients who developed liver cirrhosis secondary to primary biliary cirrhosis were selected as the observation group, with the degree of patient liver cirrhosis graded by Child-Pugh (CP) score. Sixty healthy individuals were selected as the control group. The four indicators of hepatic fibrosis were detected in all research objects, including hyaluronic acid (HA), laminin (LN), type III collagen (PC III), and type IV collagen (IV-C). The liver parenchyma hardness value (LS) was then measured by ARFI technique. LS and the four indicators of liver fibrosis (HA, LN, PC III, and IV-C) were observed in different grade CP scores. The diagnostic value of LS and the four indicators of liver fibrosis in determining liver cirrhosis degree with PBC, whether used alone or in combination, were analyzed by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. RESULTS: LS and the four indicators of liver fibrosis within the three classes (A, B, and C) of CP scores in the observation group were higher than in the control group, with C class > B class > A class; the differences were statistically significant (P < 0.01). Although AUC values of LS within the three classes of CP scores were higher than in the four indicators of liver fibrosis, sensitivity and specificity were unstable. The ROC curves of LS combined with the four indicators of liver fibrosis revealed that: AUC and sensitivity in all indicators combined in the A class of CP score were higher than in LS alone, albeit with slightly decreased specificity; AUC and specificity in all indicators combined in the B class of CP score were higher than in LS alone, with unchanged sensitivity; AUC values (0.967), sensitivity (97.4%), and specificity (90%) of all indicators combined in the C class of CP score were higher than in LS alone (0.936, 92.1%, 83

  4. Renal elasticity quantification by acoustic radiation force impulse applied to the evaluation of kidney diseases: a review.

    PubMed

    Zaffanello, Marco; Piacentini, Giorgio; Bruno, Costanza; Brugnara, Milena; Fanos, Vassilios

    2015-04-01

    For centuries, clinicians have used palpation to evaluate abdominal organs. After exploring almost all the different methods of interaction between x-rays, ultrasound, and magnetic fields on tissues, recent interest has focused on the evaluation of their mechanical properties.Acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) is a recent, established ultrasound-based diagnostic technique that allows physicians to obtain a measure of the elastic properties of an organ. Shear wave velocity, obtained by the ARFI technique, depends on the elasticity of tissues.To date, there are studies on the ARFI technique applied to normal kidneys, chronic kidney diseases, and kidney transplants. Mechanical properties of the kidney, such as stiffness and deformity, depend on various conditions that alter its histology, in particular the amount of fibrosis in the renal parenchyma; urinary pressure and renal blood perfusion may be other important contributing factors. Unfortunately, the ARFI technique applied to native renal pathologies is still limited, and not all studies are comparable because they used different methods. Therefore, the results reported in recent literature encourage further improvement of this method and the drawing up of standardized guidelines of investigation. PMID:25738649

  5. Assessment of Impulse Noise Level and Acoustic Trauma in Military Personnel

    PubMed Central

    Rezaee, Maryam; Mojtahed, Mohammad; Ghasemi, Mohammad; Saedi, Babak

    2012-01-01

    Background: Military personnel are usually exposed to high levels of impulse noise (IN) which can lead to hearing loss. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of relatively low level exposure of impulse noise (IN) during shooting practice on hearing using pure tone audiometry (PTA) and transiently evoked otoacoustic emission (TEOAE) in military personnel. Materials and Methods: Forty male soldiers (mean age 20.08 years) were recruited for the study. Prior to their first shooting practice, PTA and TEOAE were recorded. After 15 minutes and one week post- practice PTA and TEOAE were compared. Results: Immediately after shooting practice significant differences in PTA at 500, 1000, and 4000 Hz were observed for the right ear and no significant difference at any frequency for the left ear. There was a significant difference in the amplitude of TEOAE 15 minutes after shooting practice at 500, 1000, 2000, 3000, and 4000 Hz in the right ear, while for the left ear the difference was significant at 1000 and 2000 Hz. One week after exposure a significant difference at 500 and 4000 Hz was found only in the right ear and a significant difference in the amplitude of TEOAE was observed at 500, 1000, 2000, 3000, and 4000 Hz. Conclusions: Even exposure lower than permissible levels may lead to acoustic trauma. TEOAE is more sensitive than PTA in detecting early hearing loss after military shooting exercises. Hearing protection equipment and appropriate surveillance programs are recommended. PMID:24749098

  6. Noninvasive In Vivo Characterization of Human Carotid Plaques with Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) Ultrasound: Comparison with Histology Following Endarterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Czernuszewicz, Tomasz J.; Homeister, Jonathon W.; Caughey, Melissa C.; Farber, Mark A.; Fulton, Joseph J.; Ford, Peter F.; Marston, William A.; Vallabhaneni, Raghuveer; Nichols, Timothy C.; Gallippi, Caterina M.

    2014-01-01

    Ischemic stroke from thromboembolic sources is linked to carotid artery atherosclerotic disease with a trend toward medical management in asymptomatic patients. Extent of disease is currently diagnosed by noninvasive imaging techniques that measure luminal stenosis, but it has been suggested that a better biomarker for determining risk of future thromboembolic events is plaque morphology and composition. Specifically, plaques that are composed of mechanically-soft lipid/necrotic regions covered by thin fibrous caps are the most vulnerable to rupture. An ultrasound technique that noninvasively interrogates the mechanical properties of soft tissue, called acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging, has been developed as a new modality for atherosclerotic plaque characterization using phantoms and atherosclerotic pigs, but the technique has yet to be validated in vivo in humans. In this preliminary study, in vivo ARFI imaging is presented in a case-study format from four patients undergoing clinically-indicated carotid endarterectomy and compared to histology. In two type Va plaques, characterized by lipid/necrotic cores covered by fibrous caps, mean ARFI displacements in focal regions were high relative to the surrounding plaque material, suggesting soft features covered by stiffer layers within the plaques. In two type Vb plaques, characterized by heavy calcification, mean ARFI peak displacements were low relative to the surrounding plaque and arterial wall, suggesting stiff tissue. This pilot study demonstrates the feasibility and challenges of transcutaneous ARFI for characterizing the material and structural composition of carotid atherosclerotic plaques via mechanical properties, in humans, in vivo. PMID:25619778

  7. The development and potential of acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging for carotid artery plaque characterization.

    PubMed

    Allen, Jason D; Ham, Katherine L; Dumont, Douglas M; Sileshi, Bantayehu; Trahey, Gregg E; Dahl, Jeremy J

    2011-08-01

    Stroke is the third leading cause of death and long-term disability in the USA. Currently, surgical intervention decisions in asymptomatic patients are based upon the degree of carotid artery stenosis. While there is a clear benefit of endarterectomy for patients with severe (> 70%) stenosis, in those with high/moderate (50-69%) stenosis the evidence is less clear. Evidence suggests ischemic stroke is associated less with calcified and fibrous plaques than with those containing softer tissue, especially when accompanied by a thin fibrous cap. A reliable mechanism for the identification of individuals with atherosclerotic plaques which confer the highest risk for stroke is fundamental to the selection of patients for vascular interventions. Acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging is a new ultrasonic-based imaging method that characterizes the mechanical properties of tissue by measuring displacement resulting from the application of acoustic radiation force. These displacements provide information about the local stiffness of tissue and can differentiate between soft and hard areas. Because arterial walls, soft tissue, atheromas, and calcifications have a wide range in their stiffness properties, they represent excellent candidates for ARFI imaging. We present information from early phantom experiments and excised human limb studies to in vivo carotid artery scans and provide evidence for the ability of ARFI to provide high-quality images which highlight mechanical differences in tissue stiffness not readily apparent in matched B-mode images. This allows ARFI to identify soft from hard plaques and differentiate characteristics associated with plaque vulnerability or stability. PMID:21447606

  8. Hepatic and Splenic Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Shear Wave Velocity Elastography in Children with Liver Disease Associated with Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Cañas, Teresa; Maciá, Araceli; Muñoz-Codoceo, Rosa Ana; Fontanilla, Teresa; González-Rios, Patricia; Miralles, María; Gómez-Mardones, Gloria

    2015-01-01

    Background. Liver disease associated with cystic fibrosis (CFLD) is the second cause of mortality in these patients. The diagnosis is difficult because none of the available tests are specific enough. Noninvasive elastographic techniques have been proven to be useful to diagnose hepatic fibrosis. Acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging is an elastography imaging system. The purpose of the work was to study the utility of liver and spleen ARFI Imaging in the detection of CFLD. Method. 72 patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) were studied and received ARFI imaging in the liver and in the spleen. SWV values were compared with the values of 60 healthy controls. Results. Comparing the SWV values of CFLD with the control healthy group, values in the right lobe were higher in patients with CFLD. We found a SWV RHL cut-off value to detect CFLD of 1.27 m/s with a sensitivity of 56.5% and a specificity of 90.5%. CF patients were found to have higher SWC spleen values than the control group. Conclusions. ARFI shear wave elastography in the right hepatic lobe is a noninvasive technique useful to detect CFLD in our sample of patients. Splenic SWV values are higher in CF patients, without any clinical consequence. PMID:26609528

  9. Acoustic Techniques for Structural Health Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frankenstein, B.; Augustin, J.; Hentschel, D.; Schubert, F.; Köhler, B.; Meyendorf, N.

    2008-02-01

    Future safety and maintenance strategies for industrial components and vehicles are based on combinations of monitoring systems that are permanently attached to or embedded in the structure, and periodic inspections. The latter belongs to conventional nondestructive evaluation (NDE) and can be enhanced or partially replaced by structural health monitoring systems. However, the main benefit of this technology for the future will consist of systems that can be differently designed based on improved safety philosophies, including continuous monitoring. This approach will increase the efficiency of inspection procedures at reduced inspection times. The Fraunhofer IZFP Dresden Branch has developed network nodes, miniaturized transmitter and receiver systems for active and passive acoustical techniques and sensor systems that can be attached to or embedded into components or structures. These systems have been used to demonstrate intelligent sensor networks for the monitoring of aerospace structures, railway systems, wind energy generators, piping system and other components. Material discontinuities and flaws have been detected and monitored during full scale fatigue testing. This paper will discuss opportunities and future trends in nondestructive evaluation and health monitoring based on new sensor principles and advanced microelectronics. It will outline various application examples of monitoring systems based on acoustic techniques and will indicate further needs for research and development.

  10. Modified impulse method for the measurement of the frequency response of acoustic filters to weakly nonlinear transient excitations

    PubMed

    Payri; Desantes; Broatch

    2000-02-01

    In this paper, a modified impulse method is proposed which allows the determination of the influence of the excitation characteristics on acoustic filter performance. Issues related to nonlinear propagation, namely wave steepening and wave interactions, have been addressed in an approximate way, validated against one-dimensional unsteady nonlinear flow calculations. The results obtained for expansion chambers and extended duct resonators indicate that the amplitude threshold for the onset of nonlinear phenomena is related to the geometry considered. PMID:10687682

  11. Transmitted sound field due to an impulsive line acoustic source bounded by a plate followed by a vortex sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miura, T.; Chao, C. C.

    1980-01-01

    The propagation of sound due to a line acoustic source in the moving stream across a semiinfinite vortex sheet which trails from a rigid plate is examined in a linear theory for the subsonic case. A solution for the transmitted sound field is obtained with the aid of multiple integral transforms and the Wiener-Hopf technique for both the steady state (time harmonic) and initial value (impulsive source) situations. The contour of inverse transform and hence the decomposition of the functions are determined through causality and radiation conditions. The solution obtained satisfies causality and the full Kutta conditions. The transmitted sound field is composed of two waves in both the stady state and initial value problems. One is the wave scattered from the edge of the plate which is associated with the bow wave and the instability wave. These waves exist in the downstream sectors. The other is the wave transmitted through the vortex sheet which is also associated with the instability wave. Regional divisions of the transmitted sound field are identified.

  12. Evaluation of Stiffness of the Spastic Lower Extremity Muscles in Early Spinal Cord Injury by Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Kang Hee

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate intrinsic viscoelastic changes using shear wave velocities (SWVs) of spastic lower extremity muscles in patients with early spinal cord injury (SCI) via acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging and to evaluate correlation between the SWV values and spasticity. Methods Eighteen patients with SCI within 3 months and 10 healthy adults participated. We applied the ARFI technique to measure SWV of gastrocnemius muscle (GCM) and long head of biceps femoris muscle. Spasticity of ankle and knee joint was assessed by original Ashworth Scale. Results Ten patients with SCI had spasticity. Patients with spasticity had significantly faster SWV for GCM and biceps femoris muscle than those without spasticity (Mann-Whitney U test, p=0.007 and p=0.008) and normal control (p=0.011 and p=0.037, respectively). The SWV values of GCM correlated with the ankle spasticity (Spearman rank teat, p=0.026). There was significant correlation between the SWV values for long head of biceps femoris muscle and knee spasticity (Spearman rank teat, p=0.022). Conclusion ARFI demonstrated a difference in muscle stiffness in the GCM between patients with spastic SCI and those without spasticity. This finding suggested that stiffness of muscles increased in spastic lower extremity of early SCI patients. ARFI imaging is a valuable tool for noninvasive assessment of the stiffness of the spastic muscle and has the potential to identify pathomechanical changes of the tissue associated with SCI. PMID:26161345

  13. Optical tracking of acoustic radiation force impulse-induced dynamics in a tissue-mimicking phantom

    PubMed Central

    Bouchard, Richard R.; Palmeri, Mark L.; Pinton, Gianmarco F.; Trahey, Gregg E.; Streeter, Jason E.; Dayton, Paul A.

    2009-01-01

    Optical tracking was utilized to investigate the acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI)-induced response, generated by a 5-MHz piston transducer, in a translucent tissue-mimicking phantom. Suspended 10-μm microspheres were tracked axially and laterally at multiple locations throughout the field of view of an optical microscope with 0.5-μm displacement resolution, in both dimensions, and at frame rates of up to 36 kHz. Induced dynamics were successfully captured before, during, and after the ARFI excitation at depths of up to 4.8 mm from the phantom’s proximal boundary. Results are presented for tracked axial and lateral displacements resulting from on-axis and off-axis (i.e., shear wave) acquisitions; these results are compared to matched finite element method modeling and independent ultrasonically based empirical results and yielded reasonable agreement in most cases. A shear wave reflection, generated by the proximal boundary, consistently produced an artifact in tracked displacement data later in time (i.e., after the initial ARFI-induced displacement peak). This tracking method provides high-frame-rate, two-dimensional tracking data and thus could prove useful in the investigation of complex ARFI-induced dynamics in controlled experimental settings. PMID:19894849

  14. Assessment of Placental Stiffness Using Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Elastography in Pregnant Women with Fetal Anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Göya, Cemil; Tunç, Senem; Teke, Memik; Hattapoğlu, Salih

    2016-01-01

    Objective We aimed to evaluate placental stiffness measured by acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) elastography in pregnant women in the second trimester with a normal fetus versus those with structural anomalies and non-structural findings. Materials and Methods Forty pregnant women carrying a fetus with structural anomalies diagnosed sonographically at 18–28 weeks of gestation comprised the study group. The control group consisted of 34 healthy pregnant women with a sonographically normal fetus at a similar gestational age. Placental shear wave velocity (SWV) was measured by ARFI elastography and compared between the two groups. Structural anomalies and non-structural findings were scored based on sonographic markers. Placental stiffness measurements were compared among fetus anomaly categories. Doppler parameters of umbilical and uterine arteries were compared with placental SWV measurements. Results All placental SWV measurements, including minimum SWV, maximum SWV, and mean SWV were significantly higher in the study group than the control group ([0.86 ± 0.2, 0.74 ± 0.1; p < 0.001], [1.89 ± 0.7, 1.59 ± 0.5; p = 0.04], and [1.26 ± 0.4, 1.09 ± 0.2; p = 0.01]), respectively. Conclusion Placental stiffness evaluated by ARFI elastography during the second trimester in pregnant women with fetuses with congenital structural anomalies is higher than that of pregnant women with normal fetuses. PMID:26957906

  15. Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The acoustics research activities of the DLR fluid-mechanics department (Forschungsbereich Stroemungsmechanik) during 1988 are surveyed and illustrated with extensive diagrams, drawings, graphs, and photographs. Particular attention is given to studies of helicopter rotor noise (high-speed impulsive noise, blade/vortex interaction noise, and main/tail-rotor interaction noise), propeller noise (temperature, angle-of-attack, and nonuniform-flow effects), noise certification, and industrial acoustics (road-vehicle flow noise and airport noise-control installations).

  16. Acoustic Measurements in Opera Houses: Comparison Between Different Techniques and Equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    FAUSTI, P.; FARINA, A.

    2000-04-01

    In room acoustics, many objective parameters to quantify subjective impressions have been introduced. These quantities can be measured by using a wide variety of powerful tools and equipment. The results can be influenced by the measurement techniques and instruments used. Furthermore, the results also depend on the measurement positions and on the condition of the hall (full, empty, etc.). The aim of this work is to define a tightly standardized measurement procedure for the collection of a complete objective description of an opera house's acoustics. In this paper some of the results obtained by the authors after measurements made in three different halls are presented. Comparisons were made both between different hardware and software tools (real-time analyzer, DAT, PC-board, source, microphones, post-processing software) and between different measurement methods (interrupted stationary noise, true-impulse, pseudo-random white noise with impulse-response doconvolution, sine sweep) as well as between different positions in the halls, with and without the presence of musicians and audience. The results have shown that the differences obtained when using different measurement techniques and equipment are not of significant importance. The only effective differences were found regarding the recording techniques, as the monaural measurements give appreciably different results from the average of left and right channel of binaural measurements. Slightly different results were alsofound between true impulsive sources (pistol shots, balloons) and omni-directional (dodecahedral) loudspeakers. Attention must be paid to the signal-to-noise ratio, as this can influence the correct calculation of some acoustical parameters. Some differences, not as great as expected, were found in the results with and without the musicians in the orchestra shell and with and without the audience in the hall. This is probably due to the high sound absorption that is typical in Italian opera

  17. Measurement of impulse peak insertion loss from two acoustic test fixtures and four hearing protector conditions with an acoustic shock tube

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, William J.; Fackler, Cameron J.; Berger, Elliott H.; Shaw, Peter B.; Stergar, Mike

    2015-01-01

    Impulse peak insertion loss (IPIL) was studied with two acoustic test fixtures and four hearing protector conditions at the E-A-RCAL Laboratory. IPIL is the difference between the maximum estimated pressure for the open-ear condition and the maximum pressure measured when a hearing protector is placed on an acoustic test fixture (ATF). Two models of an ATF manufactured by the French-German Research Institute of Saint-Louis (ISL) were evaluated with high-level acoustic impulses created by an acoustic shock tube at levels of 134 decibels (dB), 150 dB, and 168 dB. The fixtures were identical except that the E-A-RCAL ISL fixture had ear canals that were 3 mm longer than the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) ISL fixture. Four hearing protection conditions were tested: Combat Arms earplug with the valve open, ETYPlugs® earplug, TacticalPro headset, and a dual-protector ETYPlugs earplug with TacticalPro earmuff. The IPILs measured for the E-A-RCAL fixture were 1.4 dB greater than the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) ISL ATF. For the E-A-RCAL ISL ATF, the left ear IPIL was 2.0 dB greater than the right ear IPIL. For the NIOSH ATF, the right ear IPIL was 0.3 dB greater than the left ear IPIL. PMID:26356380

  18. Measurement of impulse peak insertion loss from two acoustic test fixtures and four hearing protector conditions with an acoustic shock tube.

    PubMed

    Murphy, William J; Fackler, Cameron J; Berger, Elliott H; Shaw, Peter B; Stergar, Mike

    2015-01-01

    Impulse peak insertion loss (IPIL) was studied with two acoustic test fixtures and four hearing protector conditions at the E-A-RCAL Laboratory. IPIL is the difference between the maximum estimated pressure for the open-ear condition and the maximum pressure measured when a hearing protector is placed on an acoustic test fixture (ATF). Two models of an ATF manufactured by the French-German Research Institute of Saint-Louis (ISL) were evaluated with high-level acoustic impulses created by an acoustic shock tube at levels of 134 decibels (dB), 150 dB, and 168 dB. The fixtures were identical except that the E-A-RCAL ISL fixture had ear canals that were 3 mm longer than the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) ISL fixture. Four hearing protection conditions were tested: Combat Arms earplug with the valve open, ETYPlugs ® earplug, TacticalPro headset, and a dual-protector ETYPlugs earplug with TacticalPro earmuff. The IPILs measured for the E-A-RCAL fixture were 1.4 dB greater than the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) ISL ATF. For the E-A-RCAL ISL ATF, the left ear IPIL was 2.0 dB greater than the right ear IPIL. For the NIOSH ATF, the right ear IPIL was 0.3 dB greater than the left ear IPIL. PMID:26356380

  19. Quantitative shear wave optical coherence elastography (SW-OCE) with acoustic radiation force impulses (ARFI) induced by phase array transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Shaozhen; Le, Nhan Minh; Wang, Ruikang K.; Huang, Zhihong

    2015-03-01

    Shear Wave Optical Coherence Elastography (SW-OCE) uses the speed of propagating shear waves to provide a quantitative measurement of localized shear modulus, making it a valuable technique for the elasticity characterization of tissues such as skin and ocular tissue. One of the main challenges in shear wave elastography is to induce a reliable source of shear wave; most of nowadays techniques use external vibrators which have several drawbacks such as limited wave propagation range and/or difficulties in non-invasive scans requiring precisions, accuracy. Thus, we propose linear phase array ultrasound transducer as a remote wave source, combined with the high-speed, 47,000-frame-per-second Shear-wave visualization provided by phase-sensitive OCT. In this study, we observed for the first time shear waves induced by a 128 element linear array ultrasound imaging transducer, while the ultrasound and OCT images (within the OCE detection range) were triggered simultaneously. Acoustic radiation force impulses are induced by emitting 10 MHz tone-bursts of sub-millisecond durations (between 50 μm - 100 μm). Ultrasound beam steering is achieved by programming appropriate phase delay, covering a lateral range of 10 mm and full OCT axial (depth) range in the imaging sample. Tissue-mimicking phantoms with agarose concentration of 0.5% and 1% was used in the SW-OCE measurements as the only imaging samples. The results show extensive improvements over the range of SW-OCE elasticity map; such improvements can also be seen over shear wave velocities in softer and stiffer phantoms, as well as determining the boundary of multiple inclusions with different stiffness. This approach opens up the feasibility to combine medical ultrasound imaging and SW-OCE for high-resolution localized quantitative measurement of tissue biomechanical property.

  20. The utility of acoustic radiation force impulse imaging in diagnosing acute appendicitis and staging its severity

    PubMed Central

    Göya, Cemil; Hamidi, Cihad; Okur, Mehmet Hanifi; İçer, Mustafa; Oğuz, Abdullah; Hattapoğlu, Salih; Çetinçakmak, Mehmet Güli; Teke, Memik

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of using acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging to diagnose acute appendicitis. METHODS Abdominal ultrasonography (US) and ARFI imaging were performed in 53 patients that presented with right lower quadrant pain, and the results were compared with those obtained in 52 healthy subjects. Qualitative evaluation of the patients was conducted by Virtual Touch™ tissue imaging (VTI), while quantitative evaluation was performed by Virtual Touch™ tissue quantification (VTQ) measuring the shear wave velocity (SWV). The severity of appendix inflammation was observed and rated using ARFI imaging in patients diagnosed with acute appendicitis. Alvarado scores were determined for all patients presenting with right lower quadrant pain. All patients diagnosed with appendicitis received appendectomies. The sensitivity and specificity of ARFI imaging relative to US was determined upon confirming the diagnosis of acute appendicitis via histopathological analysis. RESULTS The Alvarado score had a sensitivity and specificity of 70.8% and 20%, respectively, in detecting acute appendicitis. Abdominal US had 83.3% sensitivity and 80% specificity, while ARFI imaging had 100% sensitivity and 98% specificity, in diagnosing acute appendicitis. The median SWV value was 1.11 m/s (range, 0.6–1.56 m/s) for healthy appendix and 3.07 m/s (range, 1.37–4.78 m/s) for acute appendicitis. CONCLUSION ARFI imaging may be useful in guiding the clinical management of acute appendicitis, by helping its diagnosis and determining the severity of appendix inflammation. PMID:25323836

  1. Acoustic radiation force impulse imaging for assessing liver fibrosis in alcoholic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Kiani, Anita; Brun, Vanessa; Lainé, Fabrice; Turlin, Bruno; Morcet, Jeff; Michalak, Sophie; Le Gruyer, Antonia; Legros, Ludivine; Bardou-Jacquet, Edouard; Gandon, Yves; Moirand, Romain

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the performance of elastography by ultrasound with acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) in determining fibrosis stage in patients with alcoholic liver disease (ALD) undergoing alcoholic detoxification in relation to biopsy. METHODS: Eighty-three patients with ALD undergoing detoxification were prospectively enrolled. Each patient underwent ARFI imaging and a liver biopsy on the same day. Fibrosis was staged according to the METAVIR scoring system. The median of 10 valid ARFI measurements was calculated for each patient. RESULTS: Sixty-nine males and thirteen females (one patient excluded due to insufficient biopsy size) were assessed with a mean alcohol consumption of 132.4 ± 128.8 standard drinks per week and mean cumulative year duration of 17.6 ± 9.5 years. Sensitivity and specificity were respectively 82.4% (0.70-0.95) and 83.3% (0.73-0.94) (AUROC = 0.87) for F ≥ 2 with a cut-off value of 1.63m/s; 82.4% (0.64-1.00) and 78.5% (0.69-0.89) (AUROC = 0.86) for F ≥ 3 with a cut-off value of 1.84m/s; and 92.3% (0.78-1.00] and 81.6% (0.72-0.90) (AUROC = 0.89) for F = 4 with a cut-off value of 1.94 m/s. CONCLUSION: ARFI is an accurate, non-invasive and easy method for assessing liver fibrosis in patients with ALD undergoing alcoholic detoxification. PMID:27239119

  2. In vivo study of transverse carpal ligament stiffness using acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zhilei Liu; Vince, D Geoffrey; Li, Zong-Ming

    2013-01-01

    The transverse carpal ligament (TCL) forms the volar boundary of the carpal tunnel and may provide mechanical constraint to the median nerve, leading to carpal tunnel syndrome. Therefore, the mechanical properties of the TCL are essential to better understand the etiology of carpal tunnel syndrome. The purpose of this study was to investigate the in vivo TCL stiffness using acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging. The shear wave velocity (SWV) of the TCL was measured using Virtual Touch IQ(TM) software in 15 healthy, male subjects. The skin and the thenar muscles were also examined as reference tissues. In addition, the effects of measurement location and ultrasound transducer compression on the SWV were studied. The SWV of the TCL was dependent on the tissue location, with greater SWV values within the muscle-attached region than those outside of the muscle-attached region. The SWV of the TCL was significantly smaller without compression (5.21 ± 1.08 m/s) than with compression (6.62 ± 1.18 m/s). The SWV measurements of the skin and the thenar muscles were also affected by transducer compression, but to different extents than the SWV of the TCL. Therefore to standardize the ARFI imaging procedure, it is recommended that a layer of ultrasound gel be maintained to minimize the effects of tissue compression. This study demonstrated the feasibility of ARFI imaging for assessing the stiffness characteristics of the TCL in vivo, which has the potential to identify pathomechanical changes of the tissue. PMID:23861919

  3. Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Elastography for Focal Hepatic Tumors: Usefulness for Differentiating Hemangiomas from Malignant Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Eun; Bae, Kyung Soo; Han, Joon Koo; Choi, Byung Ihn

    2013-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study is to investigate whether acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) elastography with ARFI quantification and ARFI 2-dimensional (2D) imaging is useful for differentiating hepatic hemangiomas from malignant hepatic tumors. Materials and Methods One-hundred-and-one tumors in 74 patients were included in this study: 28 hemangiomas, 26 hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs), three cholangiocarcinomas (CCCs), 20 colon cancer metastases and 24 other metastases. B-mode ultrasound, ARFI 2D imaging, and ARFI quantification were performed in all tumors. Shear wave velocities (SWVs) of the tumors and the adjacent liver and their SWV differences were compared among the tumor groups. The ARFI 2D images were compared with B-mode images regarding the stiffness, conspicuity and size of the tumors. Results The mean SWV of the hemangiomas was significantly lower than the malignant hepatic tumor groups: hemangiomas, 1.80 ± 0.57 m/sec; HCCs, 2.66 ± 0.94 m/sec; CCCs, 3.27 ± 0.64 m/sec; colon cancer metastases, 3.70 ± 0.61 m/sec; and other metastases, 2.82 ± 0.96 m/sec (p < 0.05). The area under the receiver operating characteristics curve of SWV for differentiating hemangiomas from malignant tumors was 0.86, with a sensitivity of 96.4% and a specificity of 65.8% at a cut-off value of 2.73 m/sec (p < 0.05). In the ARFI 2D images, the malignant tumors except HCCs were stiffer and more conspicuous as compared with the hemangiomas (p < 0.05). Conclusion ARFI elastography with ARFI quantification and ARFI 2D imaging may be useful for differentiating hepatic hemangiomas from malignant hepatic tumors. PMID:24043967

  4. Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Elastography in the Diagnosis of Thyroid Nodules: Useful or Not Useful?

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi-Feng; Xu, Hui-Xiong; Xu, Jun-Mei; Liu, Chang; Guo, Le-Hang; Liu, Lin-Na; Zhang, Jing; Xu, Xiao-Hong; Qu, Shen; Xing, Mingzhao

    2015-10-01

    The goal of this study is to evaluate the diagnostic performance of acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) elastography for differentiating benign from malignant thyroid nodules. One hundred and seventy-four pathologically proven thyroid nodules (139 benign, 35 malignant) in 154 patients (mean age: 49.2 ± 12.1 y; range: 16-72 y) were included in this study. Conventional ultrasound (US) and ARFI elastography using virtual touch tissue imaging (VTI) and virtual touch tissue quantification (VTQ) were performed to examine the thyroid nodules. Two blinded readers with different amounts of experience independently scored the likelihood of malignancy on the basis of a five-point scale in three different image-reading sets. The diagnostic performances among different image-reading sets and between the two readers were compared. The diagnostic specificity of both readers improved significantly after reading the VTI images or both VTI and VTQ images (all p < 0.05). After review of the results of both VTI and VTQ, the numbers of correctly diagnosed nodules increased in nodules <1.0 cm for both readers and in both nodular goiter and papillary thyroid carcinoma for the junior reader (p < 0.05). The nodules with definite diagnoses (i.e., confidence levels including definite benign and definite malignant cases) increased after review of VTI and VTQ images versus conventional US for the senior reader (p < 0.05). In conclusion, adding ARFI elastography improves the specificity in diagnosing malignant thyroid nodules compared with conventional US on its own. ARFI elastography particularly facilitates the specific diagnosis for thyroid nodules smaller than 1.0 cm. ARFI elastography is also able to increase the diagnostic confidence of the readers. PMID:26119458

  5. Breast Lesions Evaluated by Color-Coded Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) Imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhou, JianQiao; Yang, ZhiFang; Zhan, WeiWei; Zhang, JingWen; Hu, Na; Dong, YiJie; Wang, YingYing

    2016-07-01

    The goal of our study was to investigate the value of color-coded Virtual Touch tissue imaging (VTI) using acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) technology in the characterization of breast lesions and to compare it with conventional ultrasound (US). Conventional US and color-coded VTI were performed in 196 solid breast lesions in 196 consecutive women (age range 17-91 y; mean 48.17 ± 14.46 y). A four-point scale VTI score was assigned for each lesion according to the color pattern both in the lesion and in the surrounding breast tissue. The mean VTI score was significantly higher for malignant lesions (3.80 ± 0.66, range 1-4) than for benign ones (2.02 ± 1.20, range 1-4) (p < 0.001), and the optimal cut-off value was between score 3 and score 4. The area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve for combined conventional US and VTI (0.945) was significantly higher than that for conventional US (0.902) and for VTI (0.871) (p = 0.0021 and p < 0.001, respectively). It was concluded that color-coded VTI with the proposed four-point scale score system combined with conventional US might have the potential to aid in the characterization of benign and malignant breast lesions. PMID:27131841

  6. The performance of acoustic radiation force impulse imaging in predicting liver fibrosis in chronic liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi-Hung; Yeh, Ming-Lun; Huang, Ching-I; Yang, Jeng-Fu; Liang, Po-Cheng; Huang, Chung-Feng; Dai, Chia-Yen; Lin, Zu-Yau; Chen, Shinn-Cherng; Huang, Jee-Fu; Yu, Ming-Lung; Chuang, Wan-Long

    2016-07-01

    Sonography-based noninvasive liver fibrosis assessment is promising in the prediction of treatment efficacy and prognosis in chronic liver disease (CLD) patients. Acoustic radiation force impulse imaging (ARFI) is a newly-developed transient elastography (TE) method integrated into a conventional ultrasound machine. The study aimed to assess the performance of ARFI imaging in the diagnosis of liver fibrosis in Taiwanese CLD patients. We also aimed to search for the optimal cut-off values in different fibrosis stages. A total of 60 CLD patients (40 males; mean age, 51.8±11 years) were consecutively included. They received standard ARFI measurement within 2 weeks at the time of liver biopsy. There were eight patients with Metavir fibrosis stage 0 (F0), 16 patients with F1, 20 patients with F2, eight patients with F3, and eight patients with F4, respectively. The mean values among patient with F0, F1, F2, F3, and F4 were 1.17±0.13, 1.30±0.17, 1.31±0.24, 2.01±0.45, and 2.69±0.91, respectively (p<0.001). The optimal cut-off ARFI value for significant fibrosis (F≥2) was 1.53 with the accuracy of 0.733, while it was 1.66 for advanced fibrosis (F≥3) with the accuracy of 0.957. Our study demonstrated that ARFI imaging is competent for fibrosis diagnosis, particularly in CLD patients with advanced fibrosis. PMID:27450025

  7. Acoustic waves from mechanical impulses due to fluorescence resonant energy (Förster) transfer: Blowing a whistle with light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zurita-Sánchez, J. R.; Henkel, C.

    2012-02-01

    We present a momentum transfer mechanism mediated by electromagnetic fields that originates in a system of two nearby molecules: one excited (donor D*) and the other in ground state (acceptor A). An intermolecular force related to fluorescence resonant energy or Förster transfer (FRET) arises in the unstable D*A molecular system, which differs from the equilibrium van der Waals interaction. Due to the its finite lifetime, a mechanical impulse is imparted to the relative motion in the system. We analyze the FRET impulse when the molecules are embedded in free space and find that its magnitude can be much greater than the single recoil photon momentum, getting comparable with the thermal momentum (Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution) at room temperature. In addition, we propose that this FRET impulse can be exploited in the generation of acoustic waves inside a film containing layers of donor and acceptor molecules, when a picosecond laser pulse excites the donors. This acoustic transient is distinguishable from that produced by thermal stress due to laser absorption, and may therefore play a role in photoacoustic spectroscopy. The effect can be seen as exciting a vibrating system like a string or organ pipe with light; it may be used as an opto-mechanical transducer.

  8. Single- and Multiple- Track Location Shear Wave and Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Imaging: Matched Comparison of Contrast, CNR, and Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Hollender, Peter J.; Rosenzweig, Stephen J.; Nightingale, Kathryn R.; Trahey, Gregg E.

    2014-01-01

    Acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging and shear wave elasticity imaging (SWEI) use the dynamic response of tissue to impulsive mechanical stimulus to characterize local elasticity. A variant of conventional, multiple track location SWEI (MTL-SWEI), denoted single track location SWEI (STL-SWEI) offers the promise of creating speckle-free shear wave images. This work compares the three imaging modalities using a high push and track beam density combined acquisition sequence to image inclusions of different sizes and contrasts. STL-SWEI is shown to have significantly higher CNR than MTL-SWEI, allowing for operation at higher resolution. ARFI and STL-SWEI perform similarly in the larger inclusions, with STL-SWEI providing better visualization of small targets ≤2.5 mm in diameter. The processing of each modality introduces different trade-offs between smoothness and resolution of edges and structures; these are discussed in detail. PMID:25701531

  9. Techniques for Primary Acoustic Thermometry to 800 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ripple, D. C.; Defibaugh, D. R.; Moldover, M. R.; Strouse, G. F.

    2003-09-01

    The NIST Primary Acoustic Thermometer will measure the difference between the International Temperature Scale of 1990 and the Kelvin Thermodynamic Scale throughout the range 273 K to 800 K with uncertainties of only a few millikelvins. The acoustic thermometer determines the frequencies of the acoustic resonances of pure argon gas contained within a spherical cavity with uncertainties approaching one part in 106. To achieve this small uncertainty at these elevated temperatures we developed new acoustic transducers and new techniques for the maintenance of gas purity and for temperature control. The new electro-acoustic transducers are based on the capacitance between a flexible silicon wafer and a rigid backing plate. Without the damping usually provided by polymers, mechanical vibrations caused unstable, spurious acoustic signals. We describe our techniques for suppression of these vibrations. Our acoustic thermometer allows the argon to be continuously flushed through the resonator, thereby preventing the build up of hydrogen that evolves from the stainless-steel resonator. We describe how the argon pressure is stabilized while flushing. The argon exiting from the resonator is analyzed with a customized gas chromatograph. Because the acoustic resonator was so large—it has an outer diameter of 20 cm—a sophisticated furnace, based on surrounding the resonator with three concentric aluminum shells, was designed to maintain thermal uniformity and stability of the resonator at a level of 1 mK. We describe the design, modeling, and operational characteristics of the furnace.

  10. Ecological Insights from Pelagic Habitats Acquired Using Active Acoustic Techniques.

    PubMed

    Benoit-Bird, Kelly J; Lawson, Gareth L

    2016-01-01

    Marine pelagic ecosystems present fascinating opportunities for ecological investigation but pose important methodological challenges for sampling. Active acoustic techniques involve producing sound and receiving signals from organisms and other water column sources, offering the benefit of high spatial and temporal resolution and, via integration into different platforms, the ability to make measurements spanning a range of spatial and temporal scales. As a consequence, a variety of questions concerning the ecology of pelagic systems lend themselves to active acoustics, ranging from organism-level investigations and physiological responses to the environment to ecosystem-level studies and climate. As technologies and data analysis methods have matured, the use of acoustics in ecological studies has grown rapidly. We explore the continued role of active acoustics in addressing questions concerning life in the ocean, highlight creative applications to key ecological themes ranging from physiology and behavior to biogeography and climate, and discuss emerging avenues where acoustics can help determine how pelagic ecosystems function. PMID:26515810

  11. Ecological Insights from Pelagic Habitats Acquired Using Active Acoustic Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benoit-Bird, Kelly J.; Lawson, Gareth L.

    2016-01-01

    Marine pelagic ecosystems present fascinating opportunities for ecological investigation but pose important methodological challenges for sampling. Active acoustic techniques involve producing sound and receiving signals from organisms and other water column sources, offering the benefit of high spatial and temporal resolution and, via integration into different platforms, the ability to make measurements spanning a range of spatial and temporal scales. As a consequence, a variety of questions concerning the ecology of pelagic systems lend themselves to active acoustics, ranging from organism-level investigations and physiological responses to the environment to ecosystem-level studies and climate. As technologies and data analysis methods have matured, the use of acoustics in ecological studies has grown rapidly. We explore the continued role of active acoustics in addressing questions concerning life in the ocean, highlight creative applications to key ecological themes ranging from physiology and behavior to biogeography and climate, and discuss emerging avenues where acoustics can help determine how pelagic ecosystems function.

  12. Combined Photoacoustic-Acoustic Technique for Crack Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakrzewski, J.; Chigarev, N.; Tournat, V.; Gusev, V.

    2010-01-01

    Nonlinear imaging of a crack by combination of a common photoacoustic imaging technique with additional acoustic loading has been performed. Acoustic signals at two different fundamental frequencies were launched in the sample, one photoacoustically through heating of the sample surface by the intensity-modulated scanning laser beam and another by a piezoelectrical transducer. The acoustic signal at mixed frequencies, generated due to system nonlinearity, has been detected by an accelerometer. Different physical mechanisms of the nonlinearity contributing to the contrast in linear and nonlinear photoacoustic imaging of the crack are discussed.

  13. A robust calibration technique for acoustic emission systems based on momentum transfer from a ball drop

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McLaskey, Gregory C.; Lockner, David A.; Kilgore, Brian D.; Beeler, Nicholas M.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a technique to estimate the seismic moment of acoustic emissions and other extremely small seismic events. Unlike previous calibration techniques, it does not require modeling of the wave propagation, sensor response, or signal conditioning. Rather, this technique calibrates the recording system as a whole and uses a ball impact as a reference source or empirical Green’s function. To correctly apply this technique, we develop mathematical expressions that link the seismic moment $M_{0}$ of internal seismic sources (i.e., earthquakes and acoustic emissions) to the impulse, or change in momentum $\\Delta p $, of externally applied seismic sources (i.e., meteor impacts or, in this case, ball impact). We find that, at low frequencies, moment and impulse are linked by a constant, which we call the force‐moment‐rate scale factor $C_{F\\dot{M}} = M_{0}/\\Delta p$. This constant is equal to twice the speed of sound in the material from which the seismic sources were generated. Next, we demonstrate the calibration technique on two different experimental rock mechanics facilities. The first example is a saw‐cut cylindrical granite sample that is loaded in a triaxial apparatus at 40 MPa confining pressure. The second example is a 2 m long fault cut in a granite sample and deformed in a large biaxial apparatus at lower stress levels. Using the empirical calibration technique, we are able to determine absolute source parameters including the seismic moment, corner frequency, stress drop, and radiated energy of these magnitude −2.5 to −7 seismic events.

  14. Evaluating the intensity of the acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) in intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) imaging: Preliminary in vitro results.

    PubMed

    Shih, Cho-Chiang; Lai, Ting-Yu; Huang, Chih-Chung

    2016-08-01

    The ability to measure the elastic properties of plaques and vessels is significant in clinical diagnosis, particularly for detecting a vulnerable plaque. A novel concept of combining intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) imaging and acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging has recently been proposed. This method has potential in elastography for distinguishing between the stiffness of plaques and arterial vessel walls. However, the intensity of the acoustic radiation force requires calibration as a standard for the further development of an ARFI-IVUS imaging device that could be used in clinical applications. In this study, a dual-frequency transducer with 11MHz and 48MHz was used to measure the association between the biological tissue displacement and the applied acoustic radiation force. The output intensity of the acoustic radiation force generated by the pushing element ranged from 1.8 to 57.9mW/cm(2), as measured using a calibrated hydrophone. The results reveal that all of the acoustic intensities produced by the transducer in the experiments were within the limits specified by FDA regulations and could still displace the biological tissues. Furthermore, blood clots with different hematocrits, which have elastic properties similar to the lipid pool of plaques, with stiffness ranging from 0.5 to 1.9kPa could be displaced from 1 to 4μm, whereas the porcine arteries with stiffness ranging from 120 to 291kPa were displaced from 0.4 to 1.3μm when an acoustic intensity of 57.9mW/cm(2) was used. The in vitro ARFI images of the artery with a blood clot and artificial arteriosclerosis showed a clear distinction of the stiffness distributions of the vessel wall. All the results reveal that ARFI-IVUS imaging has the potential to distinguish the elastic properties of plaques and vessels. Moreover, the acoustic intensity used in ARFI imaging has been experimentally quantified. Although the size of this two-element transducer is unsuitable for IVUS imaging, the

  15. Microwave de-embedding techniques applied to acoustics.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Charles M

    2005-07-01

    This paper describes the use of the microwave techniques of time domain reflectometry (TDR) and de-embedding in an acoustical application. Two methods of calibrating the reflectometer are presented to evaluate the consistency of the method. Measured and modeled S-parameters of woodwind instruments are presented. The raw measured data is de-embedded to obtain an accurate measurement. The acoustic TDR setup is described. PMID:16212248

  16. Improved acoustic viscosimeter technique. [for determining fluid shear viscosity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisch, M. R.; Moeller, R. P.; Carome, E. F.

    1976-01-01

    An improved technique has been developed for studies of the shear viscosity of fluids. It utilizes an acoustic resonator as a four-terminal electrical device; the resonator's amplitude response may be determined directly and simply related to the fluid's viscosity. The use of this technique is discussed briefly and data obtained in several fluids is presented.

  17. Nonlinear acoustic techniques for landmine detection.

    PubMed

    Korman, Murray S; Sabatier, James M

    2004-12-01

    Measurements of the top surface vibration of a buried (inert) VS 2.2 anti-tank plastic landmine reveal significant resonances in the frequency range between 80 and 650 Hz. Resonances from measurements of the normal component of the acoustically induced soil surface particle velocity (due to sufficient acoustic-to-seismic coupling) have been used in detection schemes. Since the interface between the top plate and the soil responds nonlinearly to pressure fluctuations, characteristics of landmines, the soil, and the interface are rich in nonlinear physics and allow for a method of buried landmine detection not previously exploited. Tuning curve experiments (revealing "softening" and a back-bone curve linear in particle velocity amplitude versus frequency) help characterize the nonlinear resonant behavior of the soil-landmine oscillator. The results appear to exhibit the characteristics of nonlinear mesoscopic elastic behavior, which is explored. When two primary waves f1 and f2 drive the soil over the mine near resonance, a rich spectrum of nonlinearly generated tones is measured with a geophone on the surface over the buried landmine in agreement with Donskoy [SPIE Proc. 3392, 221-217 (1998); 3710, 239-246 (1999)]. In profiling, particular nonlinear tonals can improve the contrast ratio compared to using either primary tone in the spectrum. PMID:15658688

  18. Acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging: Characterizing the mechanical properties of tissues using their transient response to localized force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nightingale, Kathryn R.; Palmeri, Mark L.; Congdon, Amy N.; Frinkely, Kristin D.; Trahey, Gregg E.

    2001-05-01

    Acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging utilizes brief, high energy, focused acoustic pulses to generate radiation force in tissue, and conventional diagnostic ultrasound methods to detect the resulting tissue displacements in order to image the relative mechanical properties of tissue. The magnitude and spatial extent of the applied force is dependent upon the transmit beam parameters and the tissue attenuation. Forcing volumes are on the order of 5 mm3, pulse durations are less than 1 ms, and tissue displacements are typically several microns. Images of tissue displacement reflect local tissue stiffness, with softer tissues (e.g., fat) displacing farther than stiffer tissues (e.g., muscle). Parametric images of maximum displacement, time to peak displacement, and recovery time provide information about tissue material properties and structure. In both in vivo and ex vivo data, structures shown in matched B-mode images are in good agreement with those shown in ARFI images, with comparable resolution. Potential clinical applications under investigation include soft tissue lesion characterization, assessment of focal atherosclerosis, and imaging of thermal lesion formation during tissue ablation procedures. Results from ongoing studies will be presented. [Work supported by NIH Grant R01 EB002132-03, and the Whitaker Foundation. System support from Siemens Medical Solutions USA, Inc.

  19. Evaluation of electroexplosive devices by nondestructive test techniques and impulsive waveform firings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menichelli, V. J.

    1972-01-01

    Special requirements of the space industry for more detailed knowledge of the quality and reliability of each electroexplosive device (EED) selected for use aboard a spacecraft are described. Statistical methods do not practically demonstrate the high reliability needed. To close this gap, nondestructive test techniques and instrumentation for 1-W/1-A no-fire devices have been developed. Several lots of squibs have been evaluated using these techniques and instrumentation. They yield data as to the quality and normal behavior of each electroexplosive device without firing or degrading the unit. Performance data were obtained by initiating the EED's with an impulsive waveform and sensing the initiation characteristics, sensitivity, and output.

  20. Acoustic source characterization of impulsive Strombolian eruptions from the Mount Erebus lava lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Jeffrey; Aster, Richard; Jones, Kyle R.; Kyle, Philip; McIntosh, Bill

    2008-11-01

    We invert for acoustic source volume outflux and momentum imparted to the atmosphere using an infrasonic network distributed about the erupting lava lake at Mount Erebus, Ross Island, Antarctica. By modeling these relatively simple eruptions as monopole point sources we estimate explosively ejected gas volumes that range from 1,000 m 3 to 24,000 m 3 for 312 lava lake eruptions recorded between January 6 and April 13, 2006. Though these volumes are compatible with bubble volumes at rupture (as estimated from explosion video records), departures from isotropic radiation are evident in the recorded acoustic wavefield for many eruptions. A point-source acoustic dipole component with arbitrary axis orientation and strength provides precise fit to the recorded infrasound. This dipole source axis, corresponding to the axis of inferred short-duration material jetting, varies significantly between events. Physical interpretation of dipole orientation as being indicative of eruptive directivity is corroborated by directional emissions of ejecta observed in Erebus eruption video footage. Although three azimuthally distributed stations are insufficient to fully characterize the eruptive acoustic source we speculate that a monopole with a minor amount of oriented dipole radiation may reasonably model the primary features of the recorded infrasound for these eruptions.

  1. Geo-Acoustic Doppler Spectroscopy: A Novel Acoustic Technique For Surveying The Seabed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckingham, Michael J.

    2010-09-01

    An acoustic inversion technique, known as Geo-Acoustic Doppler Spectroscopy, has recently been developed for estimating the geo-acoustic parameters of the seabed in shallow water. The technique is unusual in that it utilizes a low-flying, propeller-driven light aircraft as an acoustic source. Both the engine and propeller produce sound and, since they are rotating sources, the acoustic signature of each takes the form of a sequence of narrow-band harmonics. Although the coupling of the harmonics across the air-sea interface is inefficient, due to the large impedance mismatch between air and water, sufficient energy penetrates the sea surface to provide a useable underwater signal at sensors either in the water column or buried in the sediment. The received signals, which are significantly Doppler shifted due to the motion of the aircraft, will have experienced a number of reflections from the seabed and thus they contain information about the sediment. A geo-acoustic inversion of the Doppler-shifted modes associated with each harmonic yields an estimate of the sound speed in the sediment; and, once the sound speed has been determined, the known correlations between it and the remaining geo-acoustic parameters allow all of the latter to be computed. This inversion technique has been applied to aircraft data collected in the shallow water north of Scripps pier, returning values of the sound speed, shear speed, porosity, density and grain size that are consistent with the known properties of the sandy sediment in the channel.

  2. NEW NONLINEAR ACOUSTIC TECHNIQUES FOR NDE

    SciTech Connect

    J. A. TENCATE

    2000-09-01

    Acoustic nonlinearity in a medium may occur as a result of a variety of mechanisms. Some of the more common nonlinear effects may come from: (1) one or several cracks, volumetrically distributed due to age or fatigue or single disbonds or delamination; (2) imperfect grain-to-grain contacts, e.g., materials like concretes that are cemented together and have less than perfect bonds; (3) hard parts in a soft matrix, e.g., extreme duty materials like tungsten/copper alloys; or (4) atomic-scale nonlinearities. Nonlinear effects that arise from the first two mechanisms are considerably larger than the last two; thus, we have focused considerable attention on these. The most pervasive nonlinear measure of damage today is a second harmonic measurement. We show that for many cases of interest to NDE, a second harmonic measurement may not be the best choice. We examine the manifestations of nonlinearity in (nonlinear) materials with cracks and/or imperfect bonds and illustrate their applicability to NDE. For example, nonlinear resonance frequency shifts measured at increasing drive levels correlate strongly with the amount of ASR (alkali-silica reaction) damage of concrete cores. Memory effects (slow dynamics) also seem to correlate with the amount of damage.

  3. An improved acoustic microimaging technique with learning overcomplete representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guang-Ming; Harvey, David M.; Braden, Derek R.

    2005-12-01

    Advancements in integrated circuit (IC) package technology are increasingly leading to size shrinkage of modern microelectronic packages. This size reduction presents a challenge for the detection and location of the internal features/defects in the packages, which have approached the resolution limit of conventional acoustic microimaging, an important nondestructive inspection technique in the semiconductor industry. In this paper, to meet the challenge the learning overcomplete representation technique is pursued to decompose an ultrasonic A-scan signal into overcomplete representations over a learned overcomplete dictionary. Ultrasonic echo separation and reflectivity function estimation are then performed by exploiting the sparse representability of ultrasonic pulses. An improved acoustic microimaging technique is proposed by integrating these operations into the conventional acoustic microimaging technique. Its performance is quantitatively evaluated by elaborated experiments on ultrasonic A-scan signals using acoustic microimaging (AMI) error criteria. Results obtained both from simulated and measured A-scans are presented to demonstrate the superior axial resolution and robustness of the proposed technique.

  4. Simultaneous localization of multiple broadband non-impulsive acoustic sources in an ocean waveguide using the array invariant.

    PubMed

    Gong, Zheng; Ratilal, Purnima; Makris, Nicholas C

    2015-11-01

    The array invariant method, previously derived for instantaneous range and bearing estimation of a single broadband impulsive source in a horizontally stratified ocean waveguide, can be generalized to simultaneously localize multiple uncorrelated broadband noise sources that are not necessarily impulsive in the time domain by introducing temporal pulse compression and an image processing technique similar to the Radon transform. This can be done by estimating the range and bearing of broadband non-impulsive sources from measured beam-time migration lines of modal arrivals along a horizontal array arising from differences in modal group velocity and modal polar angle for each propagating mode. The generalized array invariant approach is used to estimate the range of a vertical source array and vocalizing humpback whales over wide areas from measurements made by a towed horizontal receiver array during the Gulf of Maine 2006 Experiment. The localization results are shown to have roughly 12% root-mean-squared errors from Global Positioning System measured ground truth positions for controlled source transmissions and less than 10% discrepancy from those obtained independently via moving array triangulation for vocalizing humpbacks, respectively. PMID:26627743

  5. Ejection of ferrofluid grains using nonlinear acoustic impulses[emdash] A particle dynamical study

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, S.; Manciu, M.; Manciu, F.S. )

    1999-09-01

    We consider a model dilute ferrofluid with the grains suspended in water (e.g.,[gamma]-Fe[sub 2]O[sub 3]) and subject the system to a strong, homogeneous magnetic field directed perpendicular to the surface such that there is chain formation along the field direction. We show that an appropriate impulse initiated at the base of the container might travel as a nondispersive soliton pulse with sufficient energy to overcome surface tension and eject the ferrofluid grain nearest to the liquid[endash]air interface. The proposed mechanism, if successfully realized in the laboratory, could help design a nozzle-free, ink-jet printer of unparalleled resolution. [copyright] [ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.

  6. An Acoustic Communication Technique of Nanorobot Swarms for Nanomedicine Applications.

    PubMed

    Loscrí, Valeria; Vegni, Anna Maria

    2015-09-01

    In this contribution, we present a communication paradigm among nanodevices, based on acoustic vibrations for medical applications. We consider a swarm of nanorobots able to communicate in a distributed and decentralized fashion, propelled in a biological environment (i.e., the human brain). Each nanorobot is intended to i) recognize a cancer cell, ii) destroy it, and then iii) forward information about the presence of cancer formation to other nanorobots, through acoustic signals. The choice of acoustic waves as communication mean is related to the application context, where it is not advisable either to use indiscriminate chemical substances or electromagnetic waves. The effectiveness of the proposed approach is assessed in terms of achievement of the objective (i.e., to destroy the majority of tumor cells), and the velocity of detection and destruction of cancer cells, through a comparison with other related techniques. PMID:25898028

  7. In-flight acoustic testing techniques using the YO-3A Acoustic Research Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, J. L.; Watts, M. E.

    1984-01-01

    This report discusses the flight testing techniques and equipment employed during air-to-air acoustic testing of helicopters at Ames Research Center. The in flight measurement technique used enables acoustic data to be obtained without the limitations of anechoic chambers or the multitude of variables encountered in ground based flyover testing. The air-to-air testing is made possible by the NASA YO-3A Acoustic Research Aircraft. This "Quiet Aircraft' is an acoustically instrumented version of a quiet observation aircraft manufactured for the military. To date, tests with the following aircraft have been conducted: YO-3A background noise; Hughes 500D; Hughes AH-64; Bell AH-1S; Bell AH-1G. Several system upgrades are being designed and implemented to improve the quality of data. This report will discuss not only the equipment involved and aircraft tested, but also the techniques used in these tests. In particular, formation flying position locations, and the test matrices will be discussed. Examples of data taken will also be presented.

  8. Modification of an impulse-factoring orbital transfer technique to account for orbit determination and maneuver execution errors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kibler, J. F.; Green, R. N.; Young, G. R.; Kelly, M. G.

    1974-01-01

    A method has previously been developed to satisfy terminal rendezvous and intermediate timing constraints for planetary missions involving orbital operations. The method uses impulse factoring in which a two-impulse transfer is divided into three or four impulses which add one or two intermediate orbits. The periods of the intermediate orbits and the number of revolutions in each orbit are varied to satisfy timing constraints. Techniques are developed to retarget the orbital transfer in the presence of orbit-determination and maneuver-execution errors. Sample results indicate that the nominal transfer can be retargeted with little change in either the magnitude (Delta V) or location of the individual impulses. Additonally, the total Delta V required for the retargeted transfer is little different from that required for the nominal transfer. A digital computer program developed to implement the techniques is described.

  9. Intraoperative neuromonitoring techniques in the surgical management of acoustic neuromas.

    PubMed

    Oh, Taemin; Nagasawa, Daniel T; Fong, Brendan M; Trang, Andy; Gopen, Quinton; Parsa, Andrew T; Yang, Isaac

    2012-09-01

    Unfavorable outcomes such as facial paralysis and deafness were once unfortunate probable complications following resection of acoustic neuromas. However, the implementation of intraoperative neuromonitoring during acoustic neuroma surgery has demonstrated placing more emphasis on quality of life and preserving neurological function. A modern review demonstrates a great degree of recent success in this regard. In facial nerve monitoring, the use of modern electromyography along with improvements in microneurosurgery has significantly improved preservation. Recent studies have evaluated the use of video monitoring as an adjunctive tool to further improve outcomes for patients undergoing surgery. Vestibulocochlear nerve monitoring has also been extensively studied, with the most popular techniques including brainstem auditory evoked potential monitoring, electrocochleography, and direct compound nerve action potential monitoring. Among them, direct recording remains the most promising and preferred monitoring method for functional acoustic preservation. However, when compared with postoperative facial nerve function, the hearing preservation is only maintained at a lower rate. Here, the authors analyze the major intraoperative neuromonitoring techniques available for acoustic neuroma resection. PMID:22937857

  10. Assessment of liver fibrosis with 2-D shear wave elastography in comparison to transient elastography and acoustic radiation force impulse imaging in patients with chronic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Gerber, Ludmila; Kasper, Daniela; Fitting, Daniel; Knop, Viola; Vermehren, Annika; Sprinzl, Kathrin; Hansmann, Martin L; Herrmann, Eva; Bojunga, Joerg; Albert, Joerg; Sarrazin, Christoph; Zeuzem, Stefan; Friedrich-Rust, Mireen

    2015-09-01

    Two-dimensional shear wave elastography (2-D SWE) is an ultrasound-based elastography method integrated into a conventional ultrasound machine. It can evaluate larger regions of interest and, therefore, might be better at determining the overall fibrosis distribution. The aim of this prospective study was to compare 2-D SWE with the two best evaluated liver elastography methods, transient elastography and acoustic radiation force impulse (point SWE using acoustic radiation force impulse) imaging, in the same population group. The study included 132 patients with chronic hepatopathies, in which liver stiffness was evaluated using transient elastography, acoustic radiation force impulse imaging and 2-D SWE. The reference methods were liver biopsy for the assessment of liver fibrosis (n = 101) and magnetic resonance imaging/computed tomography for the diagnosis of liver cirrhosis (n = 31). No significant difference in diagnostic accuracy, assessed as the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC), was found between the three elastography methods (2-D SWE, transient elastography, acoustic radiation force impulse imaging) for the diagnosis of significant and advanced fibrosis and liver cirrhosis in the "per protocol" (AUROCs for fibrosis stages ≥2: 0.90, 0.95 and 0.91; for fibrosis stage [F] ≥3: 0.93, 0.95 and 0.94; for F = 4: 0.92, 0.96 and 0.92) and "intention to diagnose" cohort (AUROCs for F ≥2: 0.87, 0.92 and 0.91; for F ≥3: 0.91, 0.93 and 0.94; for F = 4: 0.88, 0.90 and 0.89). Therefore, 2-D SWE, ARFI imaging and transient elastography seem to be comparably good methods for non-invasive assessment of liver fibrosis. PMID:26116161

  11. On the consideration of motion effects in the computation of impulse response for underwater acoustics inversion.

    PubMed

    Josso, Nicolas F; Ioana, Cornel; Mars, Jérôme I; Gervaise, Cédric; Stéphan, Yann

    2009-10-01

    The estimation of the impulse response (IR) of a propagation channel may be of great interest for a large number of underwater applications: underwater communications, sonar detection and localization, marine mammal monitoring, etc. It quantifies the distortions of the transmitted signal in the underwater channel and enables geoacoustic inversion. The propagating signal is usually subject to additional and undesirable distortions due to the motion of the transmitter-channel-receiver configuration. This paper shows the effects of the motion while estimating the IR by matched filtering between the transmitted and the received signals. A methodology to compare IR estimation with and without motion is presented. Based on this comparison, a method for motion effect compensation is proposed in order to reduce motion-induced distortions. The proposed methodology is applied to real data sets collected in 2007 by the Service Hydrographique et Océanographique de la Marine in a shallow water environment, proving its interest for motion effect analysis. Motion compensated estimation of IRs is computed from sources transmitting broadband linear frequency modulations moving at up to 12 knots in the shallow water environment of the Malta plateau, South of Sicilia. PMID:19813789

  12. Factors Influencing the Diagnostic Accuracy of Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Elastography in Patients with Chronic Hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Park, Mi Sung; Kim, Sun Wook; Yoon, Ki Tae; Kim, Seung Up; Park, Soo Young; Tak, Won Young; Kweon, Young Oh; Cho, Mong; Kim, Beom Kyung; Park, Jun Yong; Kim, Do Young; Ahn, Sang Hoon; Han, Kwang-Hyub

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims To determine factors predictive of discordance in staging liver fibrosis using liver biopsy (LB) and acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) elastography in patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB). Methods Consecutive patients with CHB who underwent LB and ARFI elastography on the same day from November 2010 to March 2013 were prospectively recruited from three tertiary hospitals. Results We analyzed 105 patients (median age of 47 years). The F0–1, F2, F3, and F4 fibrosis stages were identified in 27 (25.7%), 27 (25.7%), 21 (20.0%), and 30 (28.6%) patients, respectively. The areas under the receiver operating characteristics curves for ARFI elastography in assessing ≥F2, ≥F3, and F4 was 0.814, 0.848, and 0.752, respectively. The discordance of at least one stage between LB and ARFI was observed in 68 patients (64.8%) and of at least two stages in 16 patients (15.2%). In a multivariate analysis, advanced fibrosis stage (F3–4) was the only factor that was negatively correlated with one-stage discordance (p=0.042). Moreover, advanced fibrosis stage was negatively (p=0.016) correlated and body mass index (BMI) was positively (p=0.006) correlated with two-stage discordance. Conclusions Advanced fibrosis stage (F3–4) was a predictor of nondiscordance between LB and ARFI elastography; BMI also influenced the accuracy of ARFI elastography. PMID:26087790

  13. Prediction of Renal Allograft Acute Rejection Using a Novel Non-Invasive Model Based on Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse.

    PubMed

    Yang, Cheng; Jin, Yunjie; Wu, Shengdi; Li, Long; Hu, Mushuang; Xu, Ming; Rong, Ruiming; Zhu, Tongyu; He, Wanyuan

    2016-09-01

    Point shear wave elastography based on acoustic radiation force impulse is a novel technology used to quantify tissue stiffness by measuring shear wave speed. A total of 115 kidney transplantation recipients were consecutively enrolled in this prospective study. The patients were subdivided into two groups using 1 mo post-transplantation as the cutoff time for determining the development of acute rejection (AR). Shear wave speed was significantly higher in the AR group than in the non-AR group. We created a model called SEV, comprising shear wave speed, estimated glomerular filtration rate and kidney volume change, that could successfully discriminate patients with or without AR. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of SEV was 0.89, which was higher than values for other variables; it was even better in patients within 1 mo post-transplantation (0.954), but was lower than the estimated glomerular filtration rate in patients after 1 mo post-transplantation. Therefore, the SEV model may predict AR after renal transplantation with a high degree of accuracy, and it may be more useful in the early post-operative stage after renal transplantation. PMID:27267289

  14. Experimental source characterization techniques for studying the acoustic properties of perforates under high level acoustic excitation.

    PubMed

    Bodén, Hans

    2011-11-01

    This paper discusses experimental techniques for obtaining the acoustic properties of in-duct samples with non-linear acoustic characteristic. The methods developed are intended both for studies of non-linear energy transfer to higher harmonics for samples only accessible from one side such as wall treatment in aircraft engine ducts or automotive exhaust systems and for samples accessible from both sides such as perforates or other top sheets. When harmonic sound waves are incident on the sample nonlinear energy transfer results in sound generation at higher harmonics at the sample (perforate) surface. The idea is that these sources can be characterized using linear system identification techniques similar to one-port or two-port techniques which are traditionally used for obtaining source data for in-duct sources such as IC-engines or fans. The starting point will be so called polyharmonic distortion modeling which is used for characterization of nonlinear properties of microwave systems. It will be shown how acoustic source data models can be expressed using this theory. Source models of different complexity are developed and experimentally tested. The results of the experimental tests show that these techniques can give results which are useful for understanding non-linear energy transfer to higher harmonics. PMID:22087890

  15. The determination of acoustic reflection coefficients by using cepstral techniques, I: Experimental procedures and measurements of polyurethane foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolton, J. S.; Gold, E.

    1986-10-01

    The authors have previously outlined a transient free field technique, based on cepstral analysis, for the measurement of acoustic reflection coefficients. In this paper are described laboratory acoustical measurements of the normal incidence reflection coefficient of an absorbent material: emphasis is placed on practical aspects of the technique. Specifically, the origin of extraction noise, which distorts the reflector impulse response as it appears in the power cepstrum, is discussed and means of reducing it are described and implemented. Secondly, a means of identifying and removing the time delay introduced when the reflector impulse response is copied from the cepstrum is described; this procedure eliminates the need for highly accurate measurements of path length difference. The absorbent material tested was a commercial partially reticulated polyurethane foam. Bonded to one side of the foam was an impermeable polyurethane membrane, and the foam was measured in two configurations: first with its film covered face uppermost, then with its uncovered face uppermost. The broad frequency range of the measurements made possible by the cepstral technique has given a good picture of the properties of this material. These results will be considered in detail in a subsequent publication.

  16. [Assessment and analysis of the acoustic environment of soldiers exposed to impulse noise].

    PubMed

    Konopka, Wiesław; Pawlaczyk-Łuszczyńska, Małgorzata; Zalewski, Piotr; Miłoński, Jarosław

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the acoustic environment of soldiers attending a one year basic military service. The study material comprised 13 types of weapons used by this group of soldiers. During the target practice, the following parameters were measured separately for the right ear and the left ear: equivalent sound pressure level A (LA eq, Te); maximum sound pressure level A (LA F max) and peak sound pressure level C (LC peak). The measurements covered several single shots or a shot series. In addition, a spectroanalysis in 1/3-octave band frequency of 40-50,000 Hz, was conducted. There were following values of measurements in the direct vicinity of the ears: LA eq, Te fell within the range of 106.2-119.5 dB (mean, 112.2 dB) for the right ear and 104.2 dB-118.4 dB (mean, 113.2 dB) for the left ear; LA F max within the range of 124.5-132.3 dB (mean, 128.3 dB) for the right ear and 116.3-135.1 dB (mean, 128.1 dB) for the left ear; LC pcak within the range of 151.8-156.5 dB (mean, 154.8 dB/155 dB) for the right ear and 151.9-156.2 dB (mean, 155.4 dB) for the left ear. In the noise spectrum, components of audible frequencies predominated, 160-300 Hz (mainly for high caliber weapon); 1600-6300 Hz for the right ear and 2500-4000 Hz for the left peak (small caliber weapons); 6300-16,000 and ultrasonic 25,000-50,000 Hz. No significant differences were found in the measurements of the right ear and the left ear. PMID:12577807

  17. Acoustic source identification using a Generalized Weighted Inverse Beamforming technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Presezniak, Flavio; Zavala, Paulo A. G.; Steenackers, Gunther; Janssens, Karl; Arruda, Jose R. F.; Desmet, Wim; Guillaume, Patrick

    2012-10-01

    In the last years, acoustic source identification has gained special attention, mainly due to new environmental norms, urbanization problems and more demanding acoustic comfort expectation of consumers. From the current methods, beamforming techniques are of common use, since normally demands affordable data acquisition effort, while producing clear source identification in most of the applications. In order to improve the source identification quality, this work presents a method, based on the Generalized Inverse Beamforming, that uses a weighted pseudo-inverse approach and an optimization procedure, called Weighted Generalized Inverse Beamforming. To validate this method, a simple case of two compact sources in close vicinity in coherent radiation was investigated by numerical and experimental assessment. Weighted generalized inverse results are compared to the ones obtained by the conventional beamforming, MUltiple Signal Classification, and Generalized Inverse Beamforming. At the end, the advantages of the proposed method are outlined together with the computational effort increase compared to the Generalized Inverse Beamforming.

  18. Acoustical Characteristics of Mastication Sounds: Application of Speech Analysis Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brochetti, Denise

    Food scientists have used acoustical methods to study characteristics of mastication sounds in relation to food texture. However, a model for analysis of the sounds has not been identified, and reliability of the methods has not been reported. Therefore, speech analysis techniques were applied to mastication sounds, and variation in measures of the sounds was examined. To meet these objectives, two experiments were conducted. In the first experiment, a digital sound spectrograph generated waveforms and wideband spectrograms of sounds by 3 adult subjects (1 male, 2 females) for initial chews of food samples differing in hardness and fracturability. Acoustical characteristics were described and compared. For all sounds, formants appeared in the spectrograms, and energy occurred across a 0 to 8000-Hz range of frequencies. Bursts characterized waveforms for peanut, almond, raw carrot, ginger snap, and hard candy. Duration and amplitude of the sounds varied with the subjects. In the second experiment, the spectrograph was used to measure the duration, amplitude, and formants of sounds for the initial 2 chews of cylindrical food samples (raw carrot, teething toast) differing in diameter (1.27, 1.90, 2.54 cm). Six adult subjects (3 males, 3 females) having normal occlusions and temporomandibular joints chewed the samples between the molar teeth and with the mouth open. Ten repetitions per subject were examined for each food sample. Analysis of estimates of variation indicated an inconsistent intrasubject variation in the acoustical measures. Food type and sample diameter also affected the estimates, indicating the variable nature of mastication. Generally, intrasubject variation was greater than intersubject variation. Analysis of ranks of the data indicated that the effect of sample diameter on the acoustical measures was inconsistent and depended on the subject and type of food. If inferences are to be made concerning food texture from acoustical measures of mastication

  19. Impulse radar imaging for dispersive concrete using inverse adaptive filtering techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Arellano, J.; Hernandez, J.M.; Brase, J.

    1993-05-01

    This publication addresses applications of a delayed inverse model adaptive filter for modeled data obtained from short-pulse radar reflectometry. To determine the integrity of concrete, a digital adaptive filter was used, which allows compensation of dispersion and clutter generated by the concrete. A standard set of weights produced by an adaptive filter are used on modeled data to obtain the inverse-impulse response of the concrete. The data for this report include: Multiple target, nondispersive data; single-target, variable-size dispersive data; single-target, variable-depth dispersive data; and single-target, variable transmitted-pulse-width dispersive data. Results of this simulation indicate that data generated by the weights of the adaptive filter, coupled with a two-dimensional, synthetic-aperture focusing technique, successfully generate two-dimensional images of targets within the concrete from modeled data.

  20. Differentiation of benign and malignant focal liver lesions: value of virtual touch tissue quantification of acoustic radiation force impulse elastography.

    PubMed

    Guo, Le-Hang; Wang, Shu-Jun; Xu, Hui-Xiong; Sun, Li-Ping; Zhang, Yi-Feng; Xu, Jun-Mei; Wu, Jian; Fu, Hui-Jun; Xu, Xiao-Hong

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the value of virtual tissue quantification (VTQ) of acoustic radiation force impulse elastography for the differential diagnosis of benign and malignant focal liver lesions (FLLs). Thus, a total of 134 FLLs in 134 patients were included. VTQ measurement was performed for each lesion in which the shear wave velocity (SWV) was measured. The difference in SWV and SWV ratio of FLL to surrounding liver between malignant and benign FLLs was evaluated, and the cutoff value was investigated. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was plotted to evaluate the diagnostic performance. A total of 134 lesions including 55 (41.0%) malignant FLLs and 79 (59.0%) benign ones were analyzed. The SWV of malignant and benign FLLs was 2.95 ± 1.00 m/s and 1.69 ± 0.89 m/s, respectively. Significant difference in SWV was presented between malignant and benign FLLs (p < 0.001). The SWV ratio of each FLL to the surrounding liver parenchyma was 1.83 ± 1.32 for malignant and 1.26 ± 0.78 for benign FLLs (p < 0.001). The area under the ROC curve in distinguishing malignant from benign lesions was 0.824 for SWV and 0.660 for SWV ratio. The cutoff value for differential diagnosis was 2.13 m/s for SWV and 1.37 for SWV ratio. The associated sensitivity and specificity were 83.3 and 77.9% for SWV and 59.6 and 77.3% for SWV ratio, respectively. In conclusion, VTQ provides quantitative stiffness information of FLLs and is helpful in the differential diagnosis between malignant and benign FLLs, particularly for the patients who are not candidates for contrast-enhanced imaging such as CT, MRI or contrast-enhanced ultrasound. PMID:25691297

  1. A Novel Model to Predict Esophageal Varices in Patients with Compensated Cirrhosis Using Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Elastography

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yehyun; Kim, Seung Up; Park, Soo Young; Kim, Beom Kyung; Park, Jun Yong; Kim, Do Young; Ahn, Sang Hoon; Tak, Won Young; Kweon, Young Oh; Han, Kwang-Hyub

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims Few noninvasive methods can accurately identify esophageal varices (EVs) in patients with compensated cirrhosis. We developed and validated a novel, acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) elastography-based prediction model for high-risk EVs (HEVs) in patients with compensated cirrhosis. Methods A total of 143 patients with compensated cirrhosis between February, 2010 and February, 2013 (training set) and 148 between June, 2010 and May, 2013 (validation set) who underwent ARFI elastography and endoscopy were prospectively recruited. Independent predictors of HEVs were used to construct a prediction model. Results Based on multivariate analysis, we developed two new statistical models, a varices risk score and ARFI-spleen diameter-to-platelet ratio score (ASPS), the latter of which was calculated as ARFI velocity × spleen diameter/platelet count. The area under receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC) of the varices risk score and ASPS to predict HEVs were 0.935 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.882–0.970) and 0.946 (95% CI 0.895–0.977), respectively. When ASPS, a simpler model with a higher AUROC, was applied in the validation set, acceptable diagnostic accuracy for HEVs was observed (AUROC = 0.814 [95% CI 0.743–0.885]). To detect HEVs, a negative predictive value of 98.3% was achieved at ASPS <2.83, whereas a positive predictive value of 100% was achieved at ASPS >5.28. Conclusions ASPS, a novel noninvasive ARFI-based prediction model, can accurately identify HEVs in patients with compensated cirrhosis. ASPS <2.83 may safely rule out the presence of HEVs, whereas patients with ASPS >5.28 should be considered for endoscopic examinations or appropriate prophylactic treatment. PMID:25826654

  2. Acoustic radiation force impulse induced strain elastography and point shear wave elastography for evaluation of thyroid nodules

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xian; Guo, Le-Hang; Xu, Hui-Xiong; Gong, Xue-Hao; Liu, Bo-Ji; Xu, Jun-Mei; Zhang, Yi-Feng; Li, Xiao-Long; Li, Dan-Dan; Qu, Shen; Fang, Lin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the diagnostic performance of acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) induced strain elastography (SE), point shear wave elastography (p-SWE), and their combined use in differentiating thyroid nodules. This retrospective study included 155 thyroid nodules (94 benign and 61 malignant) in 136 patients. Ultrasound, ARFI-induced SE and p-SWE were performed on each nodule. Receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) analyses were performed to assess the diagnostic efficacy of ARFI-induced SE, p-SWE and their combined use to distinguish benign from malignant thyroid nodules with histological results used as the reference standard. The areas under the ROC for ARFI-induced SE, p-SWE, and their combined use were 0.828, 0.829, and 0.840, respectively (both P > 0.05). The specificity of ARFI-induced SE was higher than that of p-SWE as well as their combined use (both P < 0.05). The combination of the two methods significantly improved the diagnostic sensitivity and NPV compared with either ARFI-induced SE or p-SWE alone (both P < 0.05). For nodules ≤ 10 mm, the combination of the two methods significantly improved the diagnostic sensitivity only. For nodules > 10 mm, there were no significant differences in sensitivity and NPV among the three methods in differentiating thyroid nodules (all P > 0.05). In conclusions, ARFI-induced SE and p-SWE are both valuable tools for detecting malignant thyroid nodules. The combined use of ARFI-induced SE and p-SWE improves the diagnostic sensitivity and NPV significantly whereas ARFI-induced SE alone achieves the highest specificity. PMID:26379890

  3. Power cepstrum technique with application to model helicopter acoustic data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, R. M.; Burley, C. L.

    1986-01-01

    The application of the power cepstrum to measured helicopter-rotor acoustic data is investigated. A previously applied correction to the reconstructed spectrum is shown to be incorrect. For an exact echoed signal, the amplitude of the cepstrum echo spike at the delay time is linearly related to the echo relative amplitude in the time domain. If the measured spectrum is not entirely from the source signal, the cepstrum will not yield the desired echo characteristics and a cepstral aliasing may occur because of the effective sample rate in the frequency domain. The spectral analysis bandwidth must be less than one-half the echo ripple frequency or cepstral aliasing can occur. The power cepstrum editing technique is a useful tool for removing some of the contamination because of acoustic reflections from measured rotor acoustic spectra. The cepstrum editing yields an improved estimate of the free field spectrum, but the correction process is limited by the lack of accurate knowledge of the echo transfer function. An alternate procedure, which does not require cepstral editing, is proposed which allows the complete correction of a contaminated spectrum through use of both the transfer function and delay time of the echo process.

  4. Damage Detection and Analysis in CFRPs Using Acoustic Emission Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitlow, Travis Laron

    Real time monitoring of damage is an important aspect of life management of critical structures. Acoustic emission (AE) techniques allow for measurement and assessment of damage in real time. Acoustic emission parameters such as signal amplitude and duration were monitored during the loading sequences. Criteria that can indicate the onset of critical damage to the structure were developed. Tracking the damage as it happens gives a better analysis of the failure evolution that will allow for a more accurate determination of structural life. The main challenge is distinguishing between legitimate damage signals and "false positives" which are unrelated to damage growth. Such false positives can be related to electrical noise, friction, or mechanical vibrations. This research focuses on monitoring signals of damage growth in carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CFRPs) and separating the relevant signals from the false ones. In this Dissertation, acoustic emission signals from CFRP specimens were experimentally recorded and analyzed. The objectives of this work are: (1) perform static and fatigue loading of CFRP composite specimens and measure the associated AE signals, (2) accurately determine the AE parameters (energy, frequency, duration, etc.) of signals generated during failure of such specimens, (3) use fiber optic sensors to monitor the strain distribution of the damage zone and relate these changes in strain measurements to AE data.

  5. ZrN coatings deposited by high power impulse magnetron sputtering and cathodic arc techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Purandare, Yashodhan Ehiasarian, Arutiun; Hovsepian, Papken; Santana, Antonio

    2014-05-15

    Zirconium nitride (ZrN) coatings were deposited on 1 μm finish high speed steel and 316L stainless steel test coupons. Cathodic Arc (CA) and High Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering (HIPIMS) + Unbalanced Magnetron Sputtering (UBM) techniques were utilized to deposit coatings. CA plasmas are known to be rich in metal and gas ions of the depositing species as well as macroparticles (droplets) emitted from the arc sports. Combining HIPIMS technique with UBM in the same deposition process facilitated increased ion bombardment on the depositing species during coating growth maintaining high deposition rate. Prior to coating deposition, substrates were pretreated with Zr{sup +} rich plasma, for both arc deposited and HIPIMS deposited coatings, which led to a very high scratch adhesion value (L{sub C2}) of 100 N. Characterization results revealed the overall thickness of the coatings in the range of 2.5 μm with hardness in the range of 30–40 GPa depending on the deposition technique. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy and tribological experiments such as dry sliding wear tests and corrosion studies have been utilized to study the effects of ion bombardment on the structure and properties of these coatings. In all the cases, HIPIMS assisted UBM deposited coating fared equal or better than the arc deposited coatings, the reasons being discussed in this paper. Thus H+U coatings provide a good alternative to arc deposited where smooth, dense coatings are required and macrodroplets cannot be tolerated.

  6. Acoustic Techniques for Assessing the Optison Destruction Threshold

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Tyrone M.; Smith, Denise A. B.; Holland, Christy K.

    2007-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to identify the pressure threshold for the destruction of Optison (octafluoropropane contrast agent; Amersham Health, Princeton, NJ) using a laboratory-assembled 3.5-MHz pulsed ultrasound system and a clinical diagnostic ultrasound scanner. Methods A 3.5-MHz focused transducer and a linear array with a center frequency of 6.9 MHz were positioned confocally and at 90° to each other in a tank of deionized water. Suspensions of Optison (5–8 × 104 microbubbles/mL) were insonated with 2-cycle pulses from the 3.5-MHz transducer (peak rarefactional pressure, or Pr, from 0.0, or inactive, to 0.6 MPa) while being interrogated with fundamental B-mode imaging pulses (mechanical index, or MI, = 0.04). Scattering received by the 3.5-MHz transducer or the linear array was quantified as mean backscattered intensity or mean digital intensity, respectively, and fit with exponential decay functions (Ae−kt + N, where A + N was the amplitude at time 0; N, background echogenicity; and k, decay constant). By analyzing the decay constants statistically, a pressure threshold for Optison destruction due to acoustically driven diffusion was identified. Results The decay constants determined from quantified 3.5-MHz radio frequency data and B-mode images were in good agreement. The peak rarefactional pressure threshold for Optison destruction due to acoustically driven diffusion at 3.5 MHz was 0.15 MPa (MI = 0.08). Furthermore, the rate of Optison destruction increased with increasing 3.5-MHz exposure pressure output. Conclusions Optison destruction was quantified with a laboratory-assembled 3.5-MHz ultrasound system and a clinical diagnostic ultrasound scanner. The pressure threshold for acoustically driven diffusion was identified, and 3 distinct mechanisms of ultrasound contrast agent destruction were observed with acoustic techniques. PMID:17121946

  7. Comparison of ultrasound B-mode, strain imaging, acoustic radiation force impulse displacement and shear wave velocity imaging using real time clinical breast images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manickam, Kavitha; Machireddy, Ramasubba Reddy; Raghavan, Bagyam

    2016-04-01

    It has been observed that many pathological process increase the elastic modulus of soft tissue compared to normal. In order to image tissue stiffness using ultrasound, a mechanical compression is applied to tissues of interest and local tissue deformation is measured. Based on the mechanical excitation, ultrasound stiffness imaging methods are classified as compression or strain imaging which is based on external compression and Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) imaging which is based on force generated by focused ultrasound. When ultrasound is focused on tissue, shear wave is generated in lateral direction and shear wave velocity is proportional to stiffness of tissues. The work presented in this paper investigates strain elastography and ARFI imaging in clinical cancer diagnostics using real time patient data. Ultrasound B-mode imaging, strain imaging, ARFI displacement and ARFI shear wave velocity imaging were conducted on 50 patients (31 Benign and 23 malignant categories) using Siemens S2000 machine. True modulus contrast values were calculated from the measured shear wave velocities. For ultrasound B-mode, ARFI displacement imaging and strain imaging, observed image contrast and Contrast to Noise Ratio were calculated for benign and malignant cancers. Observed contrast values were compared based on the true modulus contrast values calculated from shear wave velocity imaging. In addition to that, student unpaired t-test was conducted for all the four techniques and box plots are presented. Results show that, strain imaging is better for malignant cancers whereas ARFI imaging is superior than strain imaging and B-mode for benign lesions representations.

  8. Parameters affecting different acoustic radiation force impulse applications in the diagnosis of fibrotic liver changes

    PubMed Central

    Galgenmueller, Sabrina; Jaeger, Heike; Kratzer, Wolfgang; Schmidt, Stefan A; Oeztuerk, Suemeyra; Haenle, Mark M; Mason, Richard A; Graeter, Tilmann

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the virtual touch tissue quantification (VTTQ) and virtual touch imaging quantification (VTIQ) techniques, and identify possible factors that may influence VTTQ and VTIQ measurements. METHODS: One hundred and eighty-six (104 women/82 men) of 323 subjects met the inclusion criteria (age > 18 years, no history of chronic or gastrointestinal disease, body-mass index (BMI) < 30 kg/m², a fasting period of at least three hours, no history of hepatotoxic pharmaceuticals, alcohol consumption < 24 g/d in men and < 12 g/d in women, and normal findings upon ultrasound examination of the abdomen). Measurements were taken at depths of 50 mm with VTTQ, 15 mm and 25 mm with VTIQ in the right hepatic lobe, and at 15 mm with only VTIQ in the left hepatic lobe. The examiner acquired six measurements per position, thereby giving 24 measurements in total. RESULTS: The 95% confidence intervals of mean were 1.23-1.29 m/s for VTTQ and 1.29-1.37 m/s, 1.17-1.23 m/s, and 1.48-1.57 m/s for VTIQ in a depth of 15 mm and 25 mm in the right hepatic lobe and 15 mm in the left hepatic lobe. Only superficial measurements in the right hepatic lobe with the VTIQ method exhibited an effect of age on shear wave velocity. Measurements acquired using the 6C1 probe with the VTTQ method showed no dependence on BMI. By comparison, BMI influenced measurements taken with the VTIQ method using the 9L4 probe in the superficial and deep areas of the right hepatic lobe, as well as in the left hepatic lobe (P = 0.0160, P = 0.0019, P = 0.0173, respectively). Gender influenced measurements at depths of 50 mm with VTTQ and 25 mm with VTIQ in the right hepatic lobe (P = 0.0001, P = 0.0269). Significant differences were found between measurements with the 6C1 (VTTQ) and 9L4 probes (VTIQ) (P = 0.0067), between superficial and deep measurements (P < 0.0001), and between the right and left lobes of the liver (P < 0.0001). CONCLUSION: Measurements in the right lobe and deep regions are preferable. Gender

  9. Acoustic Techniques for Thin Film Thickness Measurement in Semiconductor Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhardwaj, Sanjay

    In modern semiconductor manufacturing, process monitoring and control are important issues limited at the present time by a lack of sensors and instrumentation capable of measuring process parameters like film thickness. In order to address this problem, two novel systems for thin film thickness measurement in semiconductor processing based upon contacting acoustic techniques have been developed. Both of these systems couple acoustic energy into the wafer via a nondestructive Hertzian contact and achieve high resolution by exciting and receiving ultrasonic signals from a ZnO transducer with microwave frequency electronics. The basic physical mechanism for film thickness determination is to analyze reflected waves due to acoustic impedance mismatches between various material layers on a silicon substrate. The first system requires frontside contacting of a sapphire buffer rod to an opaque film deposited on a silicon wafer and involves the use of broadband, high frequency pulse-echo electronics in the 0.5-5 GHz range. With this system, ex-situ measurements of aluminum and gold thin films on a silicon substrate have been done in the 0.25-2.5 mum. range with 3-6% accuracy as compared to surface profilometer measurements. Possible applications for this system include using it as a post -deposition process monitor, generating film thickness contour maps, or examining multilayer structures. The second system requires backside contacting of a sapphire buffer rod to a silicon wafer, which is in a vacuum station, and involves monitoring the changes in phase of CW 1-2 GHz acoustic waves as a function of frontside film growth. Using this technique, in-situ indium and aluminum film thickness monitoring has been done in both evaporator and sputtering environments with a resolution of 40 A. Temperature experiments in an oven have shown a resolution of 0.05 K for the sapphire buffer rod. Finally, multistep processing has been done and a multilayer film structure has been measured

  10. Application of Acoustic Techniques for Characterization of Biological Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tittmann, Bernhard R.; Ebert, Anne

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) is emerging as a powerful tool in cell biology. Originally developed for high-resolution imaging purposes, the AFM also has unique capabilities as a nano-indenter to probe the dynamic viscoelastic material properties of living cells in culture. In particular, AFM elastography combines imaging and indentation modalities to map the spatial distribution of cell mechanical properties, which in turn reflect the structure and function of the underlying cytoskeleton. Such measurements have contributed to our understanding of cell mechanics and cell biology and appear to be sensitive to the presence of disease in individual cells. Examples of applications and considerations on the effective capability of ultrasonic AFM techniques on biological samples (both mammalian and plant) are reported in this chapter. Included in the discussion is scanning near-field ultrasound holography an acoustic technique which has been used to image structure and in particular nanoparticles inside cells. For illustration an example that is discussed in some detail is a technique for rapid in vitro single-cell elastography. The technique is based on atomic force acoustic microscopy (AFAM) but (1) requires only a few minutes of scan time, (2) can be used on live cells briefly removed from most of the nutrient fluid, (3) does negligible harm or damage to the cell, (4) provides semi-quantitative information on the distribution of modulus across the cell, and (5) yields data with 1-10 nm resolution. The technique is shown to enable rapid assessment of physical/biochemical signals on the cell modulus and contributes to current understanding of cell mechanics.

  11. Comparison Study of Airway Reactivity Outcomes due to a Pharmacologic Challenge Test: Impulse Oscillometry versus Least Mean Squared Analysis Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Elena; Bullard, Charrell M.; Armani, Milena H.; Miller, Thomas L.; Shaffer, Thomas H.

    2013-01-01

    The technique of measuring transpulmonary pressure and respiratory airflow with manometry and pneumotachography using the least mean squared analysis (LMS) has been used broadly in both preclinical and clinical settings for the evaluation of neonatal respiratory function during tidal volume breathing for lung tissue and airway frictional mechanical properties measurements. Whereas the technique of measuring respiratory function using the impulse oscillation technique (IOS) involves the assessment of the relationship between pressure and flow using an impulse signal with a range of frequencies, requires less cooperation and provides more information on total respiratory system resistance (chest wall, lung tissue, and airways). The present study represents a preclinical animal study to determine whether these respiratory function techniques (LMS and IOS) are comparable in detecting changes in respiratory resistance derived from a direct pharmacological challenge. PMID:23691308

  12. Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Elastography: A Useful Tool for Differential Diagnosis of Thyroid Nodules and Recommending Fine-Needle Aspiration

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi-Feng; Xu, Jun-Mei; Xu, Hui-Xiong; Liu, Chang; Bo, Xiao-Wan; Li, Xiao-Long; Guo, Le-Hang; Liu, Bo-Ji; Liu, Lin-Na; Xu, Xiao-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To investigate the diagnostic performance of combined use of conventional ultrasound (US) and elastography, including conventional strain elastography such as elasticity imaging (EI) and acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) elastography, and to evaluate their usefulness in recommending fine-needle aspiration (FNA). A total of 556 pathologically proven thyroid nodules were evaluated by US, EI, and ARFI examinations in this study. Three blinded readers scored the likelihood of malignancy for 4 datasets (ie, US alone, US and EI, US and virtual touch tissue imaging [VTI], and US and virtual touch tissue quantification [VTQ]). The diagnostic performances of 4 datasets in differentiating malignant from benign thyroid nodules were evaluated. The decision-making changes for FNA recommendation in the indeterminate nodules or the probably benign nodules on conventional US were evaluated after review of elastography. The diagnostic performance in terms of area under the ROC curve did not show any change after adding EI, VTI, or VTQ for analysis; and no differences were found among different readers; however, the specificity and positive predictive value (PPV) improved significantly after adding VTI or VTQ for analysis in the senior reader. For the indeterminate nodules on US that were pathologically benign, VTQ made correct decision-making changes from FNA biopsy to follow-up in a mean of 82.6% nodules, which was significantly higher than those achieved by EI (46.8%) and VTI (54.4%) (both P < 0.05). With regard to the probably benign nodules on US that were pathologically malignant, EI made the highest correct decision-making change from follow-up to FNA biopsy in a mean of 62.6% nodules (compared with 41.5% on VTQ, P < 0.05). The results indicated that ARFI increases the specificity and PPV in diagnosing thyroid nodules. US combined VTQ might be helpful in reducing unnecessary FNA for indeterminate nodules on US whereas US combined EI is useful to detect

  13. The diagnosis value of acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) elastography for thyroid malignancy without highly suspicious features on conventional ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Bo-Ji; Lu, Feng; Xu, Hui-Xiong; Guo, Le-Hang; Li, Dan-Dan; Bo, Xiao-Wan; Li, Xiao-Long; Zhang, Yi-Feng; Xu, Jun-Mei; Xu, Xiao-Hong; Qu, Shen

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential diagnostic performance of acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) elastography in identifying malignancy in nodules that do not appear highly suspicious on conventional ultrasound (US). Methods: 330 pathologically confirmed thyroid nodules (40 malignant and 290 benign; mean size, 22.0±11.6 mm) not suspicious of malignancy on conventional US in 330 patients (mean age 52.8±11.7 years) underwent ARFI elastography before surgery. ARFI elastography included qualitative ARFI-induced strain elastography (SE) and quantitative point shear wave elastography (p-SWE). ARFI-induced SE image was assessed by SE score, while p-SWE was denoted with shear wave velocity (SWV, m/s). The diagnostic performance of four criteria sets was evaluated: criteria set 1 (ARFI-induced SE), criteria set 2 (p-SWE), criteria set 3 (either set 1 or 2), criteria set 4 (both set 1 and 2). Receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) analyses were performed to assess the diagnostic performance. Results: SE score ≥4 was more frequently found in malignant nodules (32/40) than in benign nodules (30/290, P<0.001). The mean SWV of malignant nodules (3.64±2.23 m/s) was significantly higher than that of benign nodules (2.02±0.69 m/s) (P<0.001). ARFI-induced SE (set 1) had a sensitivity of 80.0% (32/40) and a specificity of 89.7% (260/290) with a cut-off point of SE score ≥4; p-SWE (set 2) had a sensitivity of 80.0% (32/40) and a specificity of 57.9% (168/290) with a cut-off point of SWV ≥2.15 m/s. When ARFI-induced SE and p-SWE were combined, set 3 had the highest sensitivity (92.5%, 37/40) while set 4 had the highest specificity (95.2%, 276/290). Conclusion: ARFI elastography can be used for differential diagnosis of malignant thyroid nodules without highly suspicious features on US. The combination of ARFI-induced SE and p-SWE leads to improved sensitivity and specificity. PMID:26629025

  14. Detection of cavitation vortex in hydraulic turbines using acoustic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candel, I.; Bunea, F.; Dunca, G.; Bucur, D. M.; Ioana, C.; Reeb, B.; Ciocan, G. D.

    2014-03-01

    Cavitation phenomena are known for their destructive capacity in hydraulic machineries and are caused by the pressure decrease followed by an implosion when the cavitation bubbles find an adverse pressure gradient. A helical vortex appears in the turbine diffuser cone at partial flow rate operation and can be cavitating in its core. Cavity volumes and vortex frequencies vary with the under-pressure level. If the vortex frequency comes close to one of the eigen frequencies of the turbine, a resonance phenomenon may occur, the unsteady fluctuations can be amplified and lead to important turbine and hydraulic circuit damage. Conventional cavitation vortex detection techniques are based on passive devices (pressure sensors or accelerometers). Limited sensor bandwidths and low frequency response limit the vortex detection and characterization information provided by the passive techniques. In order to go beyond these techniques and develop a new active one that will remove these drawbacks, previous work in the field has shown that techniques based on acoustic signals using adapted signal content to a particular hydraulic situation, can be more robust and accurate. The cavitation vortex effects in the water flow profile downstream hydraulic turbines runner are responsible for signal content modifications. Basic signal techniques use narrow band signals traveling inside the flow from an emitting transducer to a receiving one (active sensors). Emissions of wide band signals in the flow during the apparition and development of the vortex embeds changes in the received signals. Signal processing methods are used to estimate the cavitation apparition and evolution. Tests done in a reduced scale facility showed that due to the increasing flow rate, the signal -- vortex interaction is seen as modifications on the received signal's high order statistics and bandwidth. Wide band acoustic transducers have a higher dynamic range over mechanical elements; the system's reaction time

  15. The acoustic spectrophonometer: a novel bioanalytical technique based on multifrequency acoustic devices.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, A C; Araya-Kleinsteuber, B; Sethi, R S; Mehta, H M; Lowe, C R

    2003-10-01

    A measurement technique similar to optical absorption spectroscopy but based on evanescent acoustic waves is described in this paper. This format employs a planar spiral coil to vibrate a single crystal of quartz from 6 to 400 MHz, in order to measure multifrequency acoustic spectra. Consistency with the defined Sauerbrey and Kanazawa terms K1 and K2 when applied to multiple frequencies was found for these specific operating conditions in terms of a significant fit between the measured and calculated values: For an IgG surface density of 13.5 ng mm(-2) the measured value of K1 is 22.5 x 10(-6) and the calculated value is 20.4 x 10(-6), whilst for glycerol viscous loadings of 5.131 cP the measured value of K2 is 0.47 and the calculated value is 0.54. Thus for these specific surface loadings the multifrequency data fits to the predictions of the Sauerbrey model to within 10% and to Kanazawa model within 13%. However collective frequency shifts for 5.131 cP solutions of sucrose, dextran and glucose were found to exhibit an unanticipated additional variability (R2 < 0.4) with frequency, but retained a square root of frequency dependency within a factor 2 of the interpolated K2 values. The response to the 5.131 cP dextran solution was found to be significantly below the other isoviscous solutions, with a substantially reduced frequency shift and K2 value than would be expected from its bulk viscosity. In comparison with these viscous solutions, IgG protein films consistently produced linear frequency shifts with little scatter (R2 > 0.96) that were proportional to the operating frequency, and fully consistent with the Sauerbrey model under these specific conditions. A t-test value of 14.52 was calculated from the variance and mean of the two groups, and demonstrates that the acoustic spectrophonometer can be used to distinguish between the acoustic impedance characteristics of two chemical systems that are not clearly differentiable at a single operating frequency. PMID

  16. Modern Techniques in Acoustical Signal and Image Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J V

    2002-04-04

    Acoustical signal processing problems can lead to some complex and intricate techniques to extract the desired information from noisy, sometimes inadequate, measurements. The challenge is to formulate a meaningful strategy that is aimed at performing the processing required even in the face of uncertainties. This strategy can be as simple as a transformation of the measured data to another domain for analysis or as complex as embedding a full-scale propagation model into the processor. The aims of both approaches are the same--to extract the desired information and reject the extraneous, that is, develop a signal processing scheme to achieve this goal. In this paper, we briefly discuss this underlying philosophy from a ''bottom-up'' approach enabling the problem to dictate the solution rather than visa-versa.

  17. The acoustic simulation and analysis of complicated reciprocating compressor piping systems, I: Analysis technique and parameter matrices of acoustic elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    To, C. W. S.

    1984-09-01

    This paper describes the mathematical formulation, equations, and procedures employed in the development of a comprehensive digital computer program for acoustic simulation and analysis of large and complicated piping systems. The analysis technique used is the transfer matrix method in which the piping system, with or without multiple inputs and outputs, is represented by a combination of discrete acoustic elements interconnected to one another at two stations such that the acoustic pressure and volume velocity at one station are uniquely related to those at the other by a two-by-two parameter matrix. Parameter matrices of 19 acoustic elements are included in this paper. By making use of these parameter matrices and the analysis technique, any complicated practical reciprocating compressor piping system can be modelled or analyzed.

  18. Computational and experimental techniques for coupled acoustic/structure interactions.

    SciTech Connect

    Sumali, Anton Hartono; Pierson, Kendall Hugh; Walsh, Timothy Francis; Dohner, Jeffrey Lynn; Reese, Garth M.; Day, David Minot

    2004-01-01

    This report documents the results obtained during a one-year Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) initiative aimed at investigating coupled structural acoustic interactions by means of algorithm development and experiment. Finite element acoustic formulations have been developed based on fluid velocity potential and fluid displacement. Domain decomposition and diagonal scaling preconditioners were investigated for parallel implementation. A formulation that includes fluid viscosity and that can simulate both pressure and shear waves in fluid was developed. An acoustic wave tube was built, tested, and shown to be an effective means of testing acoustic loading on simple test structures. The tube is capable of creating a semi-infinite acoustic field due to nonreflecting acoustic termination at one end. In addition, a micro-torsional disk was created and tested for the purposes of investigating acoustic shear wave damping in microstructures, and the slip boundary conditions that occur along the wet interface when the Knudsen number becomes sufficiently large.

  19. The application of acoustic emission technique to fatigue crack measurement. [in aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; Davis, W. T.; Crews, J. H., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    The applicability of acoustic emission technique to measure fatigue cracks in aluminum alloy specimens was investigated. There are several variables, such as the metallurgical and the physical treatment of the specimen, that can affect the level of acoustic activity of a fatigue specimen. It is therefore recommended that the acoustic emission technique be supplemented by other nondestructive evaluation methods to obtain quantitative data on crack growth.

  20. Measurement of transmission loss characteristics using acoustic intensity techniques at the KU-FRL Acoustic Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roskam, J.

    1983-01-01

    The transmission loss characteristics of panels using the acoustic intensity technique is presented. The theoretical formulation, installation of hardware, modifications to the test facility, and development of computer programs and test procedures are described. A listing of all the programs is also provided. The initial test results indicate that the acoustic intensity technique is easily adapted to measure transmission loss characteristics of panels. Use of this method will give average transmission loss values. The fixtures developed to position the microphones along the grid points are very useful in plotting the intensity maps of vibrating panels.

  1. Monitoring corrosion in prestressed concrete beams using acoustic emission technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ElBatanouny, Mohamed K.; Mangual, Jesé; Vélez, William; Ziehl, Paul H.; Matta, Fabio; González, Miguel

    2012-04-01

    Early detection of corrosion can help reduce the cost of maintenance and extend the service life of structures. Acoustic emission (AE) sensing has proven to be a promising method for early detection of corrosion in reinforced concrete members. A test program is presented composed of four medium-scale prestressed concrete T-beams. Three of the beams have a length of 16 ft. 4 in. (4.98 m), and one is 9 ft. 8 in. (2.95 m). In order to corrode the specimens a 3% NaCl solution was prepared, which is representative of sea salt concentration. The beams were subjected to wet-dry cycles to accelerate the corrosion process. Two of the specimens were pre-cracked prior to conditioning in order to examine the effect of crack presence. AE data was recorded continuously while half-cell potential measurements and corrosion rate by Linear Polarization Resistance (LPR) were measured daily. Corrosion current was also being acquired constantly to monitor any change in the concrete resistivity. Results indicate that the onset of corrosion may be identified using AE features, and were corroborated with measurements obtained from electrochemical techniques. Corroded areas were located using source triangulation. The results indicate that cracked specimens showed corrosion activity prior to un-cracked specimens and experienced higher corrosion rates. The level of corrosion was determined using corrosion rate results. Intensity analysis was used to link the corrosion rate and level to AE data.

  2. Acoustic emission strand burning technique for motor burning rate prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christensen, W. N.

    1978-01-01

    An acoustic emission (AE) method is being used to measure the burning rate of solid propellant strands. This method has a precision of 0.5% and excellent burning rate correlation with both subscale and large rocket motors. The AE procedure burns the sample under water and measures the burning rate from the acoustic output. The acoustic signal provides a continuous readout during testing, which allows complete data analysis rather than the start-stop clockwires used by the conventional method. The AE method helps eliminate such problems as inhibiting the sample, pressure increase and temperature rise, during testing.

  3. Comparison of acoustic and strain gauge techniques for crack closure measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buck, O.; Inman, R. V.; Frandsen, J. D.

    1976-01-01

    A quantitative study on the systems performances of the COD gauge and the acoustic transmission techniques to elastic deformation of part-through crack and compact tension specimens has been conducted. It is shown that the two instruments measure two completely different quantities: The COD gauge yields information on the length change of the specimen whereas the acoustic technique is sensitive directly to the amount of contract area between two surfaces, interfering with the acoustic signal. In another series of experiments, compression tests on parts with specifically prepared surfaces were performed so that the surface contact area could be correlated with the transmitted acoustic signal, as well as the acoustic with the COD gauge signal. A linear relation between contact area and COD gauge signal was obtained until full contact had been established.

  4. Identification of Linear and Nonlinear Aerodynamic Impulse Responses Using Digital Filter Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, Walter A.

    1997-01-01

    This paper discusses the mathematical existence and the numerically-correct identification of linear and nonlinear aerodynamic impulse response functions. Differences between continuous-time and discrete-time system theories, which permit the identification and efficient use of these functions, will be detailed. Important input/output definitions and the concept of linear and nonlinear systems with memory will also be discussed. It will be shown that indicial (step or steady) responses (such as Wagner's function), forced harmonic responses (such as Tbeodorsen's function or those from doublet lattice theory), and responses to random inputs (such as gusts) can all be obtained from an aerodynamic impulse response function. This paper establishes the aerodynamic impulse response function as the most fundamental, and, therefore, the most computationally efficient, aerodynamic function that can be extracted from any given discrete-time, aerodynamic system. The results presented in this paper help to unify the understanding of classical two-dimensional continuous-time theories with modem three-dimensional, discrete-time theories. First, the method is applied to the nonlinear viscous Burger's equation as an example. Next the method is applied to a three-dimensional aeroelastic model using the CAP-TSD (Computational Aeroelasticity Program - Transonic Small Disturbance) code and then to a two-dimensional model using the CFL3D Navier-Stokes code. Comparisons of accuracy and computational cost savings are presented. Because of its mathematical generality, an important attribute of this methodology is that it is applicable to a wide range of nonlinear, discrete-time problems.

  5. Identification of Linear and Nonlinear Aerodynamic Impulse Responses Using Digital Filter Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, Walter A.

    1997-01-01

    This paper discusses the mathematical existence and the numerically-correct identification of linear and nonlinear aerodynamic impulse response functions. Differences between continuous-time and discrete-time system theories, which permit the identification and efficient use of these functions, will be detailed. Important input/output definitions and the concept of linear and nonlinear systems with memory will also be discussed. It will be shown that indicial (step or steady) responses (such as Wagner's function), forced harmonic responses (such as Theodorsen's function or those from doublet lattice theory), and responses to random inputs (such as gusts) can all be obtained from an aerodynamic impulse response function. This paper establishes the aerodynamic impulse response function as the most fundamental, and, therefore, the most computationally efficient, aerodynamic function that can be extracted from any given discrete-time, aerodynamic system. The results presented in this paper help to unify the understanding of classical two-dimensional continuous-time theories with modern three-dimensional, discrete-time theories. First, the method is applied to the nonlinear viscous Burger's equation as an example. Next the method is applied to a three-dimensional aeroelastic model using the CAP-TSD (Computational Aeroelasticity Program - Transonic Small Disturbance) code and then to a two-dimensional model using the CFL3D Navier-Stokes code. Comparisons of accuracy and computational cost savings are presented. Because of its mathematical generality, an important attribute of this methodology is that it is applicable to a wide range of nonlinear, discrete-time problems.

  6. SUSPENDED-SEDIMENT MEASUREMENTS IN LABORATORY FLUMES USING ACOUSTIC TECHNIQUES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Automated measurement of suspended sediments is crucial to the study of sediment transport. The short duration, high-intensity flows that are responsible for a large fraction of sediment movement are best observed by continuous monitoring systems. Acoustic systems are ideal for continuous monitori...

  7. A survey on acoustic signature recognition and classification techniques for persistent surveillance systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirkhodaie, Amir; Alkilani, Amjad

    2012-06-01

    Application of acoustic sensors in Persistent Surveillance Systems (PSS) has received considerable attention over the last two decades because they can be rapidly deployed and have low cost. Conventional utilization of acoustic sensors in PSS spans a wide range of applications including: vehicle classification, target tracking, activity understanding, speech recognition, shooter detection, etc. This paper presents a current survey of physics-based acoustic signature classification techniques for outdoor sounds recognition and understanding. Particularly, this paper focuses on taxonomy and ontology of acoustic signatures resulted from group activities. The taxonomy and supportive ontology considered include: humanvehicle, human-objects, and human-human interactions. This paper, in particular, exploits applicability of several spectral analysis techniques as a means to maximize likelihood of correct acoustic source detection, recognition, and discrimination. Spectral analysis techniques based on Fast Fourier Transform, Discrete Wavelet Transform, and Short Time Fourier Transform are considered for extraction of features from acoustic sources. In addition, comprehensive overviews of most current research activities related to scope of this work are presented with their applications. Furthermore, future potential direction of research in this area is discussed for improvement of acoustic signature recognition and classification technology suitable for PSS applications.

  8. A hybrid SEA/modal technique for modeling structural-acoustic interior noise in rotorcraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayachandran, V.; Bonilha, M. W.

    2003-03-01

    This paper describes a hybrid technique that combines Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) predictions for structural vibration with acoustic modal summation techniques to predict interior noise levels in rotorcraft. The method was applied for predicting the sound field inside a mock-up of the interior panel system of the Sikorsky S-92 helicopter. The vibration amplitudes of the frame and panel systems were predicted using a detailed SEA model and these were used as inputs to the model of the interior acoustic space. The spatial distribution of the vibration field on individual panels, and their coupling to the acoustic space were modeled using stochastic techniques. Leakage and nonresonant transmission components were accounted for using space-averaged values obtained from a SEA model of the complete structural-acoustic system. Since the cabin geometry was quite simple, the modeling of the interior acoustic space was performed using a standard modal summation technique. Sound pressure levels predicted by this approach at specific microphone locations were compared with measured data. Agreement within 3 dB in one-third octave bands above 40 Hz was observed. A large discrepancy in the one-third octave band in which the first acoustic mode is resonant (31.5 Hz) was observed. Reasons for such a discrepancy are discussed in the paper. The developed technique provides a method for modeling helicopter cabin interior noise in the frequency mid-range where neither FEA nor SEA is individually effective or accurate.

  9. Acoustic waveguide technique for sensing incipient faults in underground power-transmission cables: including acousto-optic techniques. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Harrold, R.T.

    1981-09-01

    The feasibility of using acoustic waveguide techniques for sensing incipient faults in underground power transmission cables was determined. Theoretical and practical studies were made of both the acoustic emission spectrum signatures associated with cable incipient faults, and the attenuation of acoustic waves in waterfilled metal tubes used as waveguides. Based on critical data, it can be estimated that in favorable circumstances, the acoustic waveguide system would only be useful for sensing incipient faults in underground cables of approx. 800 meters (approx. 0.5 miles) or less in length. As underground power transmission cables are often several kilometers in length, it was clear at this stage of the study, that simple acoustic waveguide sensing techniques would not be adequate, and some modification would be needed. With DOE approval it was decided to investigate acousto-optic sensing techniques in order to extend the detection range. In particular, a system in which acoustic emissions from cable incipient faults impinge on a fiber-optic lightguide and locally change its refractive indes, and as a consequence, modulate laser light transmitted along the light guide. Experiments based on this concept were successful, and it has been demonstrated that it is possible to sense acoustic emissions with energy levels below one micro-joule. A practical test of this system in the laboratory using a section of compressed gas-insulated cable with an internal flashover was successfully carried out. Long distance fault sensing with this technique should be feasible as laser light can be transmitted several kilometers in fiber optic lightguides. It is believed that laser-acousto-optic fault sensing is a viable technique which, with development, could be applied for fault sensing in power cables and other apparatus.

  10. Acoustic holography: Problems associated with construction and reconstruction techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.

    1978-01-01

    The implications of the difference between the inspecting and interrogating radiations are discussed. For real-time, distortionless, sound viewing, it is recommended that infrared radiation of wavelength comparable to the inspecting sound waves be used. The infrared images can be viewed with (IR visible) converter phosphors. The real-time display of the visible image of the acoustically-inspected object at low sound levels such as are used in medical diagnosis is evaluated. In this connection attention is drawn to the need for a phosphor screen which is such that its optical transmission at any point is directly related to the incident electron beam intensity at that point. Such a screen, coupled with an acoustical camera, can enable instantaneous sound wave reconstruction.

  11. Acoustic temperature profile measurement technique for large combustion chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Venkateshan, S. P.; Shakkottai, P.; Kwack, E. Y.; Back, L. H.

    1989-05-01

    Measurement of times of flight of sound waves can be used to determinetemperatures in a gas. This paper describes a system, based on this principle,that is capable of giving the temperature profile in a nonisothermal gasvolume, for example, prevalent in a large furnace. The apparatus is simple,rugged, accurate, and capable of being automated for process controlapplications. It is basically an acoustic waveguide where the outsidetemperature profile is tranferred to a chosen gas contained inside theguide.

  12. Acoustic temperature profile measurement technique for large combustion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkateshan, S. P.; Shakkottai, P.; Kwack, E. Y.; Back, L. H.

    1989-01-01

    Measurement of times of flight of sound waves can be used to determine temperatures in a gas. This paper describes a system, based on this principle, that is capable of giving the temperature profile in a nonisothermal gas volume, for example, prevalent in a large furnace. The apparatus is simple, rugged, accurate, and capable of being automated for process control applications. It is basically an acoustic waveguide where the outside temperature profile is transferred to a chosen gas contained inside the guide.

  13. Autonomous Acoustic Receiver Deployment and Mooring Techniques for Use in Large Rivers and Estuaries

    SciTech Connect

    Titzler, P. Scott; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Carter, Jessica A.

    2010-08-01

    Autonomous acoustic receivers are often deployed across a range of aquatic habitats to study aquatic species. The Juvenile Salmon Telemetry System autonomous acoustic receiver packages we deployed in the Columbia River and its estuary were comprised of an acoustic receiver, acoustic release, and mooring line sections and were deployed directly on the river bottom. Detection ranges and reception data from past optimization deployments helped determine acoustic receiver spacing in order to achieve acceptable detection probabilities for juvenile salmon survival estimation. Methods used in 2005, which resulted in a high equipment loss rate, were modified and used between 2006 and 2008 to increase crew safety and optimize receiver deployment and recovery operations in a large river system. By eliminating surface buoys and taglines (for anchor recovery), we experienced a recovery success rate greater than previous acoustic receiver deployment techniques used in the Columbia River and elsewhere. This autonomous acoustic receiver system has optimized deployment, recovery, and servicing efficiency to successfully detect acoustic-tagged salmonids in a variety of river environments.

  14. Optical and acoustical measuring techniques. [for Doppler measurement of flow velocities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliff, W. C.

    1977-01-01

    The paper reviews the techniques of laser and acoustic Doppler measurement of fluid velocities in confined and free flows. The main mathematical relations are presented, and some systems are studied. Resolution properties of coaxial, bistatic, and pulsed CO2 laser Doppler velocimeter systems are compared. Schematics for pulsed and continuous wave acoustic Doppler systems are discussed. Both of these types of systems benefit from using a bistatic configuration instead of a coaxial system. The pulsed systems avoid contamination of source noise by not sampling until after the source noise has passed the receiver. Comparison of wind velocity measured with a pulsed acoustic Doppler and with a boundary layer profile is made.

  15. Combined acoustic radiation force impulse, aminotransferase to platelet ratio index and Forns index assessment for hepatic fibrosis grading in hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Chang-Feng; Xiao, Jia; Shan, Ling-Bo; Li, Han-Ying; Xiong, Yong-Jia; Yang, Gui-Lin; Liu, Jing; Yao, Si-Min; Li, Sha-Xi; Le, Xiao-Hua; Yuan, Jing; Zhou, Bo-Ping; Tipoe, George L; Liu, Ying-Xia

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the combined diagnostic accuracy of acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI), aspartate aminotransferase to platelet ratio index (APRI) and Forns index for a non-invasive assessment of liver fibrosis in patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB). METHODS: In this prospective study, 206 patients had CHB with liver fibrosis stages F0-F4 classified by METAVIR and 40 were healthy volunteers were measured by ARFI, APRI and Forns index separately or combined as indicated. RESULTS: ARFI, APRI or Forns index demonstrated a significant correlation with the histological stage (all P < 0.001). According to the AUROC of ARFI and APRI for evaluating fibrotic stages more than F2, ARFI showed an enhanced diagnostic accuracy than APRI (P < 0.05). The combined measurement of ARFI and APRI exhibited better accuracy than ARFI alone when evaluating ≥ F2 fibrotic stage (Z = 2.77, P = 0.006). Combination of ARFI, APRI and Forns index did not obviously improve the diagnostic accuracy compared to the combination of ARFI and APRI (Z = 0.958, P = 0.338). CONCLUSION: ARFI + APRI showed enhanced diagnostic accuracy than ARFI or APRI alone for significant liver fibrosis and ARFI + APRI + Forns index shows the same effect with ARFI + APRI. PMID:27190578

  16. Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Technology in the Differential Diagnosis of Solid Breast Masses with Different Sizes: Which Features Are Most Efficient?

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Min; Zhang, Hui-Ping; Xing, Jin-Fang; Shi, Qiu-Sheng; Gu, Ji-Ying; Li, Fan; Chen, Hui-Li; Zhang, Xue-Mei; Fang, Yun; Du, Lian-Fang

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate diagnostic performance of acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) technology for solid breast masses with different sizes and determine which features are most efficient. Materials and Methods. 271 solid breast masses in 242 women were examined with ARFI, and their shear wave velocities (SWVs), Virtual Touch tissue imaging (VTI) patterns, and area ratios (ARs) were measured and compared with their histopathological outcomes. Receiver operating characteristic curves (ROC) were calculated to assess diagnostic performance of ARFI for small masses (6–14 mm) and big masses (15–30 mm). Results. SWV of mass was shown to be positively associated with mass size (P < 0.001). For small masses, area under ROC (Az) of AR was larger than that of SWV (P < 0.001) and VTI pattern (P < 0.001); no significant difference was found between Az of SWV and that of VTI pattern (P = 0.906). For big masses, Az of VTI pattern was less than that of SWV (P = 0.008) and AR (P = 0.002); no significant difference was identified between Az of SWV and that of AR (P = 0.584). Conclusions. For big masses, SWV and AR are both efficient measures; nevertheless, for small masses, AR seems to be the best feature. PMID:26258138

  17. Kidney Shear Wave Speed Values in Subjects with and without Renal Pathology and Inter-Operator Reproducibility of Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Elastography (ARFI) - Preliminary Results

    PubMed Central

    Bob, Flaviu; Bota, Simona; Sporea, Ioan; Sirli, Roxana; Petrica, Ligia; Schiller, Adalbert

    2014-01-01

    Aim to assess the inter-operator reproducibility of kidney shear wave speed, evaluated by means of Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) elastography, and the factors which influence it. Methods Our prospective pilot study included 107 subjects with or without kidney pathology in which kidney shear wave speed was evaluated by means of ARFI elastography. Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was used to assess ARFI elastography reproducibility. Results A strong agreement was obtained between kidney shear wave speed measurements obtained by the two operators: ICC = 0.71 (right kidney) and 0.69 (left kidney). Smaller ICCs were obtained in “healthy subjects”, as compared to patients with kidney diseases (0.68 vs. 0.75), in women as compared with men (0.59 vs. 0.78), in subjects younger than 50 years as compared with those aged at least 50 years (0.63 vs. 0.71), in obese as compared with normal weight and overweight subjects (0.36 vs. 0.66 and 0.78) and in case of measurements depth <4 cm or >6 cm as compared with those performed at a depth of 4–6 cm from the skin (0.32 and 0.60 vs. 0.81). Conclusion ARFI elastography is a reproducible method for kidney shear wave speed assessment. PMID:25426849

  18. Assessment of the Stiffness of Major Salivary Glands in Primary Sjögren's Syndrome through Quantitative Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shanshan; Zhu, Jiaan; Zhang, Xia; He, Jing; Li, Jianguo

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of the study described here was to evaluate salivary gland stiffness in primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS) via acoustic radiation force impulse imaging, including Virtual Touch tissue quantification (VTQ) and Virtual Touch tissue imaging quantification (VTIQ). Twenty-one patients with pSS and 11 healthy patients were included, and the paired parotid and submandibular glands of all of the patients were examined using VTQ and VTIQ. Differences between the two groups were compared with independent and paired t-tests. The VTQ value for the parotid in the pSS group was significantly higher than that obtained for the control group (1.33 ± 0.22 and 1.18 ± 0.04 m/s, respectively, p < 0.01). The VTIQ values for the parotid and submandibular gland were both significantly higher in the pSS group than in the control group (p < 0.05). In the pSS group, a positive correlation was observed between the VTQ and VTIQ results for the parotid and submandibular glands. In summary, the stiffness of the major salivary glands in patients with pSS was increased compared with that of patients with normal glands. This finding indicates that VTQ and VTIQ imaging may be valuable adjuncts to gray-scale ultrasonography for the clinical diagnosis of pSS. PMID:26715188

  19. Effects of acoustic and EHF impulses on multipotent stromal cells during formation of bone marrow containing heterotopic organs in tissue engineered constructions.

    PubMed

    Chaikhalyan, R K; Yusupov, V I; Gorskaya, Yu F; Kuralesova, A I; Gerasimov, Yu V; Sviridov, A P; Tambiev, A Kh; Vorob'eva, N N; Shishkova, A G Grosheva V V; Moskvina, I L; Bagratashvili, V N

    2015-03-01

    We studied the effects of physical factors (acoustic impulses of laser-induced hydrodynamics, AILIH, and EHF-radiation) on the formation of heterotopic bone marrow organs. Suspension of precipitated mouse bone marrow cells was exposed to AILIH and EHF or their combinations (AILIH+EHF, EHF+AILIH). The developed tissue engineering constructions (gelatin sponges containing 107 nucleated bone marrow cells exposed to physical factors) were transplanted under the renal capsule of syngeneic mice. Analysis of newly formed hemopoietic organs was performed after 3 and 5 months. The total amount of hemopoietic cells, number of multipotent stromal cells, efficiency of colony formation from these cells, and weight of bone capsule of the transplants were measured. Microscopic study showed that 5-month transplants were significantly larger than 3-month transplants and contained 3-fold more hemopoietic cells (20-fold in the AILIH+EHF group). The number of multipotent stromal cells was maximum in EHF+AILIH group (by 2.2 times higher than in the control) and minimum in AILIH+EHF group. Exposure to EHF+AILIH had most pronounced effect on the formation of the bone marrow transplants. The weight of bone capsules more rapidly increased in gelatin sponges of 3-month transplants of EHF+AILIH and AILIH groups. These data suggest that the studied physical factors can be used for acceleration of rehabilitation process. PMID:25778661

  20. Applications of swept-frequency acoustic interferometry technique in chemical diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, D.N.; Springer, K.; Lizon, D.; Hasse, R.

    1996-09-01

    Swept-Frequency Acoustic Interferometry (SFAI) is a noninvasive fluid characterization technique currently being developed for chemical weapons treaty verification. The SFAI technique determines sound speed and sound attenuation in a fluid over a wide frequency range completely noninvasively from outside a container (e.g., pipe, tank, reactor vessel, etc.,). These acoustic parameters, along with their frequency-dependence, can be used to identify various chemicals. This technique can be adapted for a range of chemical diagnostic applications, particularly, in process control where monitoring of acoustic properties of chemicals may provide appropriate feedback information. Both experimental data and theoretical modeling are presented. Examples of several novel applications of the SFAI technique are discussed.

  1. Acoustic levitation as an IR spectroscopy sampling technique

    SciTech Connect

    Cronin, J. T.; Brill, T. B.

    1989-02-01

    Acoustic levitation of liquid droplets (/lt/4 mm diameter), bubbles,and solid particles is described as an unusual sampling techniquefor obtaining the infrared spectrum of samples that might be incompatiblewith conventional sample support methods, and for studies of materialsunder extreme conditions. Excellent FT-IR spectra were recorded ofbubbles of a concentrated aqueous nitrate solution, of mineral oil,and of an aqueous surfactant solution. Polymethacrylic acidpacking foam also produced a high-quality spectrum. Large aqueousdroplets and dense solids gave unsatisfactory spectra. The designof the levitator and various spectroscopic considerations are discussed.

  2. Investigation of pulmonary acoustic simulation: comparing airway model generation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, Brian; Dai, Zoujun; Peng, Ying; Mansy, Hansen A.; Sandler, Richard H.; Royston, Thomas

    2014-03-01

    Alterations in the structure and function of the pulmonary system that occur in disease or injury often give rise to measurable spectral, spatial and/or temporal changes in lung sound production and transmission. These changes, if properly quantified, might provide additional information about the etiology, severity and location of trauma, injury, or pathology. With this in mind, the authors are developing a comprehensive computer simulation model of pulmonary acoustics, known as The Audible Human Project™. Its purpose is to improve our understanding of pulmonary acoustics and to aid in interpreting measurements of sound and vibration in the lungs generated by airway insonification, natural breath sounds, and external stimuli on the chest surface, such as that used in elastography. As a part of this development process, finite element (FE) models were constructed of an excised pig lung that also underwent experimental studies. Within these models, the complex airway structure was created via two methods: x-ray CT image segmentation and through an algorithmic means called Constrained Constructive Optimization (CCO). CCO was implemented to expedite the segmentation process, as airway segments can be grown digitally. These two approaches were used in FE simulations of the surface motion on the lung as a result of sound input into the trachea. Simulation results were compared to experimental measurements. By testing how close these models are to experimental measurements, we are evaluating whether CCO can be used as a means to efficiently construct physiologically relevant airway trees.

  3. Identification of vibration excitations from acoustic measurements using near field acoustic holography and the force analysis technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pézerat, C.; Leclère, Q.; Totaro, N.; Pachebat, M.

    2009-10-01

    This study presents a method of using acoustic holography and the force analysis technique to identify vibration sources from radiated noise measurements. The structure studied is a plate excited by a shaker on which three measurements were performed: the first is a reference measurement of plate velocity obtained by scanning laser vibrometry, the second is based on sound pressure measurements in the near field of the structure, and the third is the measurement of normal acoustic velocities by using a p-U probe recently developed by Microflown Technologies. This was followed by the application of classical NAH, known as pressure-to-velocity holography and velocity-to-velocity holography to predict the plate velocity field from acoustic measurements at distances of 1 and 5 cm. Afterwards, the force analysis technique, also known as the RIFF technique, is applied with these five data sets. The principle is to inject the displacement field of the structure into its equation of motion and extract the resulting force distribution. This technique requires regularization done by a low-pass filter in the wavenumber domain. Apart from pressure-to-velocity holography at 5 cm, the reconstructed force distribution allows localizing the excitation point in the measurement area. FAT regularization is also shown to improve results as its cutoff wavenumber is optimized with the natural wavenumber of the plate. Lastly, quantitative force values are extracted from force distributions at all frequencies of the band 0-4 kHz studied and compared with the force spectrum measured directly by a piezoelectric sensor.

  4. Instantaneous Impulses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erlichson, Herman

    2000-01-01

    Describes an experiment that extends Newton's instantaneous-impulse method of orbital analysis to a graphical method of orbit determination. Discusses the experiment's usefulness for teaching both horizontal projectile motion and instantaneous impulse. (WRM)

  5. An acoustic levitation technique for the study of nonlinear oscillations of gas bubbles in liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, D. A.; Crum, L. A.

    1983-08-01

    A technique of acoustic levitation was developed for the study of individual gas bubbles in a liquid. Isopropyl alcohol and a mixture of glycerine and water (33-1/3% glycerine by volume) were the two liquids used in this research. Bubbles were levitated near the acoustic pressure antinode of an acoustic wave in the range of 20-22 kHz. Measurements were made of the levitation number as a function of the normalized radius of the bubbles. The levitation number is the ratio of the hydrostatic pressure gradient to the acoustic pressure gradient. These values were then compared to a nonlinear theory. Results were very much in agreement except for the region near the n=2 harmonic. An explanation for the discrepancy between theory and experiment appears to lie in the polytropic exponent associated with the gas in the interior of the bubble.

  6. Recent Insights into the Neurobiology of Impulsivity

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Marci R.; Potenza, Marc N.

    2014-01-01

    Impulsivity is associated with various psychopathologies, and elevated impulsivity is typically disadvantageous. This manuscript reviews recent investigations into the neurobiology of impulsivity using human imaging techniques and animal models. Both human imaging and preclinical pharmacological manipulations have yielded important insights into the neurobiological underpinnings of impulsivity. A more thorough understanding of the complex neurobiology underlying aspects of impulsivity may provide insight into new treatment options that target elevated impulsivity and psychopathologies such as addictions. PMID:25431750

  7. A Randomized Controlled Trial of a Novel Self-Help Technique for Impulse Control Disorders: A Study on Nail-Biting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moritz, Steffen; Treszl, Andras; Rufer, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Nail-biting is currently classified as an impulse control disorder not otherwise specified. Although seldom targeted as a primary symptom, nail-biting is often associated with somatic complications and decreased quality of life. The present study assessed the effectiveness of an innovative self-help technique, titled decoupling (DC). DC aims at…

  8. Single tracking location acoustic radiation force impulse viscoelasticity estimation (STL-VE): A method for measuring tissue viscoelastic parameters.

    PubMed

    Langdon, Jonathan H; Elegbe, Etana; McAleavey, Stephen A

    2015-07-01

    Single tracking location (STL) shear wave elasticity imaging (SWEI) is a method for detecting elastic differences between tissues. It has the advantage of intrinsic speckle bias suppression compared with multiple tracking location variants of SWEI. However, the assumption of a linear model leads to an overestimation of the shear modulus in viscoelastic media. A new reconstruction technique denoted single tracking location viscosity estimation (STL-VE) is introduced to correct for this overestimation. This technique utilizes the same raw data generated in STL-SWEI imaging. Here, the STL-VE technique is developed by way of a maximum likelihood estimation for general viscoelastic materials. The method is then implemented for the particular case of the Kelvin-Voigt Model. Using simulation data, the STL-VE technique is demonstrated and the performance of the estimator is characterized. Finally, the STL-VE method is used to estimate the viscoelastic parameters of ex vivo bovine liver. We find good agreement between the STL-VE results and the simulation parameters as well as between the liver shear wave data and the modeled data fit. PMID:26168170

  9. An acoustic-array based structural health monitoring technique for wind turbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aizawa, Kai; Poozesh, Peyman; Niezrecki, Christopher; Baqersad, Javad; Inalpolat, Murat; Heilmann, Gunnar

    2015-04-01

    This paper proposes a non-contact measurement technique for health monitoring of wind turbine blades using acoustic beamforming techniques. The technique works by mounting an audio speaker inside a wind turbine blade and observing the sound radiated from the blade to identify damage within the structure. The main hypothesis for the structural damage detection is that the structural damage (cracks, edge splits, holes etc.) on the surface of a composite wind turbine blade results in changes in the sound radiation characteristics of the structure. Preliminary measurements were carried out on two separate test specimens, namely a composite box and a section of a wind turbine blade to validate the methodology. The rectangular shaped composite box and the turbine blade contained holes with different dimensions and line cracks. An acoustic microphone array with 62 microphones was used to measure the sound radiation from both structures when the speaker was located inside the box and also inside the blade segment. A phased array beamforming technique and CLEAN-based subtraction of point spread function from a reference (CLSPR) were employed to locate the different damage types on both the composite box and the wind turbine blade. The same experiment was repeated by using a commercially available 48-channel acoustic ring array to compare the test results. It was shown that both the acoustic beamforming and the CLSPR techniques can be used to identify the damage in the test structures with sufficiently high fidelity.

  10. Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) and Transient Elastography (TE) for evaluation of liver fibrosis in HIV-HCV co-infected patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Transient elastography (TE) is widely used for non-invasive assessment of liver fibrosis in HIV-HCV co-infected patients. TE, however, cannot determine liver morphology. Acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging is a novel procedure enabling assessment of liver fibrosis during a conventional ultrasonographic examination. This study evaluated the correlation between liver fibrosis measurements by TE and ARFI. Methods Each of 46 HIV-HCV patients underwent both ARFI and TE within 6 months. Patients were evaluated by the “equivalent METAVIR” scoring system, using previously established cut-off values. Agreements between the ARFI and TE scores were estimated by Kappa coefficients, with Kappa values ≥0.40, ≥0.60, and ≥0.80 defined as moderate, good and very good agreement, respectively. Results ARFI and TE yielded "Equivalent Metavir" fibrosis scores of F1 in 26 and 31 patients, respectively; F2 in nine and seven, respectively; F3 in three and two, respectively; and F4 in eight and six, respectively. The two methods showed very good agreement in predicting overall stages [Kappa = 0.82] and for F ≥3 [Kappa = 0.80] and moderate agreement in predicting significant fibrosis F ≥2 [Kappa = 0.50]. Morphologic ultrasound analysis concomitant to ARFI detected two hepatocarcinomas. Conclusions ARFI showed promising results in the non-invasive assessment of liver fibrosis in HIV-HCV patients, with liver fibrosis staging similar to that of TE. Moreover, ARFI can assess morphology and fibrosis during the same session. PMID:25041708

  11. Evaluation of Transient Elastography, Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Imaging (ARFI), and Enhanced Liver Function (ELF) Score for Detection of Fibrosis in Morbidly Obese Patients

    PubMed Central

    Karlas, Thomas; Dietrich, Arne; Peter, Veronica; Wittekind, Christian; Lichtinghagen, Ralf; Garnov, Nikita; Linder, Nicolas; Schaudinn, Alexander; Busse, Harald; Prettin, Christiane; Keim, Volker; Tröltzsch, Michael; Schütz, Tatjana; Wiegand, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Background Liver fibrosis induced by non-alcoholic fatty liver disease causes peri-interventional complications in morbidly obese patients. We determined the performance of transient elastography (TE), acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging, and enhanced liver fibrosis (ELF) score for fibrosis detection in bariatric patients. Patients and Methods 41 patients (median BMI 47 kg/m2) underwent 14-day low-energy diets to improve conditions prior to bariatric surgery (day 0). TE (M and XL probe), ARFI, and ELF score were performed on days -15 and -1 and compared with intraoperative liver biopsies (NAS staging). Results Valid TE and ARFI results at day -15 and -1 were obtained in 49%/88% and 51%/90% of cases, respectively. High skin-to-liver-capsule distances correlated with invalid TE measurements. Fibrosis of liver biopsies was staged as F1 and F3 in n = 40 and n = 1 individuals. However, variations (median/range at d-15/-1) of TE (4.6/2.6–75 and 6.7/2.9–21.3 kPa) and ARFI (2.1/0.7–3.7 and 2.0/0.7–3.8 m/s) were high and associated with overestimation of fibrosis. The ELF score correctly classified 87.5% of patients. Conclusion In bariatric patients, performance of TE and ARFI was poor and did not improve after weight loss. The ELF score correctly classified the majority of cases and should be further evaluated. PMID:26528818

  12. Identifying Clinically Significant Prostate Cancers using 3-D In Vivo Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Imaging with Whole-Mount Histology Validation.

    PubMed

    Palmeri, Mark L; Glass, Tyler J; Miller, Zachary A; Rosenzweig, Stephen J; Buck, Andrew; Polascik, Thomas J; Gupta, Rajan T; Brown, Alison F; Madden, John; Nightingale, Kathryn R

    2016-06-01

    Overly aggressive prostate cancer (PCa) treatment adversely affects patients and places an unnecessary burden on our health care system. The inability to identify and grade clinically significant PCa lesions is a factor contributing to excessively aggressive PCa treatment, such as radical prostatectomy, instead of more focal, prostate-sparing procedures such as cryotherapy and high-dose radiation therapy. We have performed 3-D in vivo B-mode and acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging using a mechanically rotated, side-fire endorectal imaging array to identify regions suspicious for PCa in 29 patients being treated with radical prostatectomies for biopsy-confirmed PCa. Whole-mount histopathology analyses were performed to identify regions of clinically significant/insignificant PCa lesions, atrophy and benign prostatic hyperplasia. Regions of suspicion for PCa were reader-identified in ARFI images based on boundary delineation, contrast, texture and location. These regions of suspicion were compared with histopathology identified lesions using a nearest-neighbor regional localization approach. Of all clinically significant lesions identified on histopathology, 71.4% were also identified using ARFI imaging, including 79.3% of posterior and 33.3% of anterior lesions. Among the ARFI-identified lesions, 79.3% corresponded to clinically significant PCa lesions, with these lesions having higher indices of suspicion than clinically insignificant PCa. ARFI imaging had greater sensitivity for posterior versus anterior lesions because of greater displacement signal-to-noise ratio and finer spatial sampling. Atrophy and benign prostatic hyperplasia can cause appreciable prostate anatomy distortion and heterogeneity that confounds ARFI PCa lesion identification; however, in general, ARFI regions of suspicion did not coincide with these benign pathologies. PMID:26947445

  13. Application of finite element techniques in predicting the acoustic properties of turbofan inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majjigi, R. K.; Sigman, R. K.; Zinn, B. T.

    1978-01-01

    An analytical technique was developed for predicting the acoustic performance of turbofan inlets carrying a subsonic axisymmetric steady flow. The finite element method combined with the method of weighted residuals is used in predicting the acoustic properties of variable area, annular ducts with or without acoustic treatments along their walls. An approximate solution for the steady inviscid flow field is obtained using an integral method for calculating the incompressible potential flow field in the inlet with a correction to account for compressibility effects. The accuracy of the finite element technique was assessed by comparison with available analytical solutions for the problems of plane and spinning wave propagation through a hard walled annular cylinder with a constant mean flow.

  14. Noncontact technique for determining the thermal diffusivity coefficient on acoustically levitated liquid drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohsaka, K.; Rednikov, A.; Sadhal, S. S.

    2003-02-01

    We present a technique that can be used to determine the thermal diffusivity coefficient of undercooled liquids, which exist at temperatures below their freezing points. The technique involves levitation of a small amount of liquid in a flattened drop shape using an acoustic levitator and heating it with a laser beam. The heated drop is then subjected to natural cooling by heat loss from the surface. Due to acoustic streaming, the heat loss mainly occurs through the equator section of the drop. The measured cooling rate in combination with a radial heat conduction model allows us to calculate the thermal diffusivity coefficient of the drop. We demonstrate the feasibility of the technique using glycerin drops as a model liquid. The technique is well suited if the thermal diffusivity coefficient of the liquid in the normal state (i.e., above the freezing point) is known or can be measured by conventional techniques.

  15. Numerical techniques in linear duct acoustics - A status report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J.

    1980-01-01

    A review is presented covering both finite difference and finite element analysis of small amplitude (linear) sound propagation in straight and variable area ducts with flow, as might be found in a typical turbojet engine duct, muffer, or industrial ventilation system. Both 'steady' state and transient theories are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the advantages and limitations associated with the various numerical techniques. Examples of practical problems are given for which the numerical techniques have been applied.

  16. Resonant-type MEMS transducers excited by two acoustic emission simulation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozevin, Didem; Greve, David W.; Oppenheim, Irving J.; Pessiki, Stephen

    2004-07-01

    Acoustic emission testing is a passive nondestructive testing technique used to identify the onset and characteristics of damage through the detection and analysis of transient stress waves. Successful detection and implementation of acoustic emission requires good coupling, high transducer sensitivity and ability to discriminate noise from real signals. We report here detection of simulated acoustic emission signals using a MEMS chip fabricated in the multi-user polysilicon surface micromachining (MUMPs) process. The chip includes 18 different transducers with 10 different resonant frequencies in the range of 100 kHz to 1 MHz. It was excited by two different source simulation techniques; pencil lead break and impact loading. The former simulation was accomplished by breaking 0.5 mm lead on the ceramic package. Four transducer outputs were collected simultaneously using a multi-channel oscilloscope. The impact loading was repeated for five different diameter ball bearings. Traditional acoustic emission waveform analysis methods were applied to both data sets to illustrate the identification of different source mechanisms. In addition, a sliding window Fourier transform was performed to differentiate frequencies in time-frequency-amplitude domain. The arrival and energy contents of each resonant frequency were investigated in time-magnitude plots. The advantages of the simultaneous excitation of resonant transducers on one chip are discussed and compared with broadband acoustic emission transducers.

  17. Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Jerry R.; Grosveld, Ferdinand

    2007-01-01

    The acoustics environment in space operations is important to maintain at manageable levels so that the crewperson can remain safe, functional, effective, and reasonably comfortable. High acoustic levels can produce temporary or permanent hearing loss, or cause other physiological symptoms such as auditory pain, headaches, discomfort, strain in the vocal cords, or fatigue. Noise is defined as undesirable sound. Excessive noise may result in psychological effects such as irritability, inability to concentrate, decrease in productivity, annoyance, errors in judgment, and distraction. A noisy environment can also result in the inability to sleep, or sleep well. Elevated noise levels can affect the ability to communicate, understand what is being said, hear what is going on in the environment, degrade crew performance and operations, and create habitability concerns. Superfluous noise emissions can also create the inability to hear alarms or other important auditory cues such as an equipment malfunctioning. Recent space flight experience, evaluations of the requirements in crew habitable areas, and lessons learned (Goodman 2003; Allen and Goodman 2003; Pilkinton 2003; Grosveld et al. 2003) show the importance of maintaining an acceptable acoustics environment. This is best accomplished by having a high-quality set of limits/requirements early in the program, the "designing in" of acoustics in the development of hardware and systems, and by monitoring, testing and verifying the levels to ensure that they are acceptable.

  18. A pseudo-inverse algorithm for simultaneous measurements using multiple acoustical sources.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Ning; Li, Shu

    2007-03-01

    Simultaneous multiple acoustical sources measurement (SMASM) has been proposed for more effective and reliable identification of acoustical systems under critical conditions [N. Xiang and M. R. Schroeder, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 113, 2754-2761 (2003); N. Xiang, J. N. Daigle, and M. Kleiner, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 117, 1889-1894 (2005)]. This paper presents a pseudo-inverse algorithm for the SMASM correlation technique as an alternative way of extracting impulse responses of acoustical channels. Simulations and room acoustics experiments are carried out and the results prove the feasibility of the proposed algorithm. PMID:17407864

  19. Numerical techniques in linear duct acoustics, 1980-81 update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J.

    1981-01-01

    A review is presented covering finite element and finite difference analysis of small amplitude (linear) sound propagation in straight and variable area ducts. This review stresses the new work performed during the 1980-1981 time frame, although a brief discussion of earlier work is also included. Emphasis is placed on the latest state of the art in numerical techniques.

  20. Classifying multi-frequency fisheries acoustic data using a robust probabilistic classification technique.

    PubMed

    Anderson, C I H; Horne, J K; Boyle, J

    2007-06-01

    A robust probabilistic classification technique, using expectation maximization of finite mixture models, is used to analyze multi-frequency fisheries acoustic data. The number of clusters is chosen using the Bayesian Information Criterion. Probabilities of membership to clusters are used to classify each sample. The utility of the technique is demonstrated using two examples: the Gulf of Alaska representing a low-diversity, well-known system; and the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, a species-rich, relatively unknown system. PMID:17552574

  1. New graphical techniques for studying acoustic ray stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bódai, T.; Fenwick, A. J.; Wiercigroch, M.

    2009-07-01

    Alternatives to the standard Poincaré section are proposed to cater for some conditions arising in the study of chaotic ray propagation where the usual method of dimension reduction by the Poincaré section is inadequate because the driving is not periodic. There are three alternatives proposed which all use the same surface of intersection, but which differ in their use of the values of the dependent variables at the intersections of the rays with the surface. The new reduction techniques are used to examine ray behaviour in a harmonically perturbed Munk profile which supports ray chaos. It is found that all three techniques provide a graphical means of distinguishing between regular and irregular motions, and that the space of the mapping associated with one of them is partitioned into nonintersecting regular and chaotic regions as with the Poincaré section. A further model with quasiperiodic time dependence of the Hamiltonian is examined, and it turns out that the quasiperiodic nature of the motion is revealed as Lissajous curves by one technique.

  2. Acoustic impedance rhinometry (AIR): a technique for monitoring dynamic changes in nasal congestion.

    PubMed

    Patuzzi, Robert; Cook, Alison

    2014-04-01

    We describe a simple and inexpensive method for monitoring nasal air flow resistance using measurement of the small-signal acoustic input impedance of the nasal passage, similar to the audiological measurement of ear drum compliance with acoustic tympanometry. The method requires generation of a fixed sinusoidal volume-velocity stimulus using ear-bud speakers, and an electret microphone to monitor the resultant pressure fluctuation in the nasal passage. Both are coupled to the nose via high impedance silastic tubing and a small plastic nose insert. The acoustic impedance is monitored in real-time using a laptop soundcard and custom-written software developed in LabView 7.0 (National Instruments). The compact, lightweight equipment and fast time resolution lends the technique to research into the small and rapid reflexive changes in nasal resistance caused by environmental and local neurological influences. The acoustic impedance rhinometry technique has the potential to be developed for use in a clinical setting, where the need exists for a simple and inexpensive objective nasal resistance measurement technique. PMID:24577261

  3. Damage Source Identification of Reinforced Concrete Structure Using Acoustic Emission Technique

    PubMed Central

    Panjsetooni, Alireza; Bunnori, Norazura Muhamad; Vakili, Amir Hossein

    2013-01-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) technique is one of the nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques that have been considered as the prime candidate for structural health and damage monitoring in loaded structures. This technique was employed for investigation process of damage in reinforced concrete (RC) frame specimens. A number of reinforced concrete RC frames were tested under loading cycle and were simultaneously monitored using AE. The AE test data were analyzed using the AE source location analysis method. The results showed that AE technique is suitable to identify the sources location of damage in RC structures. PMID:23997681

  4. Annoyance of helicopter impulsive noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dambra, F.; Damongeot, A.

    1978-01-01

    Psychoacoustic studies of helicopter impulsive noise were conducted in order to qualify additional annoyance due to this feature and to develop physical impulsiveness descriptors to develop impulsivity correction methods. The currently proposed descriptors and methods of impulsiveness correction are compared using a multilinear regression analysis technique. It is shown that the presently recommended descriptor and correction method provides the best correlation with the subjective evaluations of real helicopter impulsive noises. The equipment necessary for data processing in order to apply the correction method is discussed.

  5. Head-to-Head Comparison between Collagen Proportionate Area and Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Elastography in Liver Fibrosis Quantification in Chronic Hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sheng-Hung; Peng, Cheng-Yuan; Lai, Hsueh-Chou; Chang, I-Ping; Lee, Chiung-Ju; Su, Wen-Pang; Lin, Chia-Hsin; Kao, Jung-Ta; Chuang, Po-Heng

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to compare the diagnostic performances of the collagen proportionate area (CPA) and liver stiffness measurement (LSM) for liver fibrosis quantification in chronic hepatitis C (CHC). Methods A total of 137 eligible consecutive Taiwanese patients (74 women and 63 men; age 21–80 years; median age 54 years), with CHC underwent LSM by using acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) elastography and an immediate percutaneous liver biopsy for METAVIR scoring. Liver tissue sections were stained using picrosirius red. Areas of the stained collagen and the tissue parenchyma were calculated in pixels. The ratio between the two areas was expressed as a CPA percentage. The result of LSM was presented as shear wave velocity (SWV). Results METAVIR fibrosis (F) stages were dichotomized using the CPA (%) and SWV (m/s), and the optimal cut-off values were 7.47 and 1.59 for F1 versus F2–4; 12.56 and 1.73 for F1, 2 versus F3, 4; 15.32 and 1.96 for F1–3 versus F4. To dichotomize F1 versus F2–4, the areas under receiver operating characteristic curves for the CPA was 0.9349 (95% confidence interval: 0.8943–0.9755) and for SWV was 0.8434 (0.7762–0.9105) (CPA versus SWV, P = 0.0063). For F1, 2 versus F3, 4, the CPA was 0.9436 (0.9091–0.9781); SWV was 0.8997 (0.8444–0.9551) (P = 0.1587). For F1–3 versus F4, the CPA was 0.8647 (0.7944–0.9349); SWV was 0.9036 (0.8499–0.9573) (P = 0.2585). The CPA could be predicted in a linear regression formula by using SWV and platelet count (R2 = 0.524). Conclusions The CPA and ARFI elastography are promising tools for liver fibrosis evaluation. The CPA was superior to ARFI elastography in the diagnosis of significant fibrosis (≥ F2). The CPA may be independent of severe necroinflammation, which may augment liver stiffness. PMID:26461105

  6. B-Mode and Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) Imaging of Prostate Zonal Anatomy: Comparison with 3T T2-Weighted MR Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Palmeri, Mark L.; Miller, Zachary A.; Glass, Tyler J.; Garcia-Reyes, Kirema; Gupta, Rajan T.; Rosenzweig, Stephen J.; Kauffman, Christopher; Polascik, Thomas J.; Buck, Andrew; Kulbacki, Evan; Madden, John; Lipman, Samantha L.; Rouze, Ned C.; Nightingale, Kathryn R.

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most common non-cutaneous malignancy among men in the United States and the second leading cause of cancer-related death. Multi-parametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) has gained recent popularity to characterize PCa. Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) imaging has the potential to aid PCa diagnosis and management by using tissue stiffness to evaluate prostate zonal anatomy and lesions. MR and B-mode/ARFI in vivo imaging datasets were compared with one another and with gross pathology measurements made immediately after radical prostatectomy. Images were manually segmented in 3D Slicer to delineate the central gland (CG) and prostate capsule, and 3D models were rendered to evaluate zonal anatomy dimensions and volumes. Both imaging modalities showed good correlation between estimated organ volume and gross pathologic weights. Ultrasound and MR total prostate volumes were well correlated (R2 = 0.77), but B-mode images yielded prostate volumes that were larger (16.82% ± 22.45%) than MR images, due to overestimation of the lateral dimension (18.4% ± 13.9%), with less significant differences in the other dimensions (7.4% ± 17.6%, anterior-to-posterior, and −10.8% ± 13.9%, apex-to-base). ARFI and MR CG volumes were also well correlated (R2 = 0.85). CG volume differences were attributed to ARFI underestimation of the apex-to-base axis (−28.8% ± 9.4%) and ARFI overestimation of the lateral dimension (21.5% ± 14.3%). B-mode/ARFI imaging yielded prostate volumes and dimensions that were well correlated with MR T2-weighted image (T2WI) estimates, with biases in the lateral dimension due to poor contrast caused by extraprostatic fat. B-mode combined with ARFI imaging is a promising low-cost, portable, real-time modality that can complement mpMRI for PCa diagnosis, treatment planning, and management. PMID:25060914

  7. A Risk Model for Predicting Central Lymph Node Metastasis of Papillary Thyroid Microcarcinoma Including Conventional Ultrasound and Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Elastography.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jun-Mei; Xu, Hui-Xiong; Li, Xiao-Long; Bo, Xiao-Wan; Xu, Xiao-Hong; Zhang, Yi-Feng; Guo, Le-Hang; Liu, Lin-Na; Qu, Shen

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to propose a new rating system using a risk model including conventional ultrasound (US) and acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) elastography for predicting central lymph node metastasis (LNM) in patients with papillary thyroid microcarcinoma (PTMC).A total of 252 patients with PTMCs were enrolled, who were preoperatively evaluated by US and ARFI elastography including virtual touch tissue imaging (VTI) and virtual touch tissue quantification (VTQ). Risk factors of independent variables for central LNM were analyzed by univariate and multivariate analyses. A multivariate analysis was performed to create a predicting model and rating system.Of the 252 patients, 72 (28.6%) had central LNMs. Multivariate analysis revealed that rare internal flow (odds ratio [OR]: 4.454), multiple suspicious foci on US (OR: 5.136), capsule involvement (OR: 20.632), and VTI area ratio (VAR) > 1 (OR: 5.621) were independent risk factors for central LNM. The final predicting model was obtained and the risk score (RS) was defined as 1.5 × (if rare internal flow) + 1.6 × (if multiple suspicious foci on US) + 1.7 × (if VAR > 1) + 3.0 × (if capsule involvement). The rating system was divided into 5 stages. Stage I, <1.5; Stage II, 1.5 to 3.0; Stage III, 3.1 to 4.7; Stage IV, 4.8 to 6.3; and Stage V, 6.4 to 7.8. The risk rates of central LNM were 3.4% (2/59) in Stage I, 13.3% (13/98) in Stage II, 54.2% (39/72) in Stage III, 72.2% (13/18) in Stage IV, and 100% (5/5) in Stage V (P < 0.001).The results indicated that rare internal flow, multiple suspicious foci, capsule involvement on US, and VAR > 1 on ARFI elastography are the risk factors for predicting central LNM. The risk model developed in the study clearly predicts the risk of central LNM in patients with PTMC and thus has a potential to avoid unnecessary central compartment node dissection. PMID:26817907

  8. Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Elastography: A Useful Tool for Differential Diagnosis of Thyroid Nodules and Recommending Fine-Needle Aspiration: A Diagnostic Accuracy Study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi-Feng; Xu, Jun-Mei; Xu, Hui-Xiong; Liu, Chang; Bo, Xiao-Wan; Li, Xiao-Long; Guo, Le-Hang; Liu, Bo-Ji; Liu, Lin-Na; Xu, Xiao-Hong

    2015-10-01

    To investigate the diagnostic performance of combined use of conventional ultrasound (US) and elastography, including conventional strain elastography such as elasticity imaging (EI) and acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) elastography, and to evaluate their usefulness in recommending fine-needle aspiration (FNA).A total of 556 pathologically proven thyroid nodules were evaluated by US, EI, and ARFI examinations in this study. Three blinded readers scored the likelihood of malignancy for 4 datasets (ie, US alone, US and EI, US and virtual touch tissue imaging [VTI], and US and virtual touch tissue quantification [VTQ]). The diagnostic performances of 4 datasets in differentiating malignant from benign thyroid nodules were evaluated. The decision-making changes for FNA recommendation in the indeterminate nodules or the probably benign nodules on conventional US were evaluated after review of elastography.The diagnostic performance in terms of area under the ROC curve did not show any change after adding EI, VTI, or VTQ for analysis; and no differences were found among different readers; however, the specificity and positive predictive value (PPV) improved significantly after adding VTI or VTQ for analysis in the senior reader. For the indeterminate nodules on US that were pathologically benign, VTQ made correct decision-making changes from FNA biopsy to follow-up in a mean of 82.6% nodules, which was significantly higher than those achieved by EI (46.8%) and VTI (54.4%) (both P < 0.05). With regard to the probably benign nodules on US that were pathologically malignant, EI made the highest correct decision-making change from follow-up to FNA biopsy in a mean of 62.6% nodules (compared with 41.5% on VTQ, P < 0.05).The results indicated that ARFI increases the specificity and PPV in diagnosing thyroid nodules. US combined VTQ might be helpful in reducing unnecessary FNA for indeterminate nodules on US whereas US combined EI is useful to detect the false negative

  9. B-mode and acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging of prostate zonal anatomy: comparison with 3T T2-weighted MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Palmeri, Mark L; Miller, Zachary A; Glass, Tyler J; Garcia-Reyes, Kirema; Gupta, Rajan T; Rosenzweig, Stephen J; Kauffman, Christopher; Polascik, Thomas J; Buck, Andrew; Kulbacki, Evan; Madden, John; Lipman, Samantha L; Rouze, Ned C; Nightingale, Kathryn R

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most common non-cutaneous malignancy among men in the United States and the second leading cause of cancer-related death. Multi-parametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) has gained recent popularity to characterize PCa. Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) imaging has the potential to aid PCa diagnosis and management by using tissue stiffness to evaluate prostate zonal anatomy and lesions. MR and B-mode/ARFI in vivo imaging datasets were compared with one another and with gross pathology measurements made immediately after radical prostatectomy. Images were manually segmented in 3D Slicer to delineate the central gland (CG) and prostate capsule, and 3D models were rendered to evaluate zonal anatomy dimensions and volumes. Both imaging modalities showed good correlation between estimated organ volume and gross pathologic weights. Ultrasound and MR total prostate volumes were well correlated (R(2) = 0.77), but B-mode images yielded prostate volumes that were larger (16.82% ± 22.45%) than MR images, due to overestimation of the lateral dimension (18.4% ± 13.9%), with less significant differences in the other dimensions (7.4% ± 17.6%, anterior-to-posterior, and -10.8% ± 13.9%, apex-to-base). ARFI and MR CG volumes were also well correlated (R(2) = 0.85). CG volume differences were attributed to ARFI underestimation of the apex-to-base axis (-28.8% ± 9.4%) and ARFI overestimation of the lateral dimension (21.5% ± 14.3%). B-mode/ARFI imaging yielded prostate volumes and dimensions that were well correlated with MR T2-weighted image (T2WI) estimates, with biases in the lateral dimension due to poor contrast caused by extraprostatic fat. B-mode combined with ARFI imaging is a promising low-cost, portable, real-time modality that can complement mpMRI for PCa diagnosis, treatment planning, and management. PMID:25060914

  10. Crack detection on wind turbine blades in an operating environment using vibro-acoustic modulation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S.; Adams, D. E.; Sohn, H.

    2013-01-01

    As the wind power industry has grown rapidly in the recent decade, maintenance costs have become a significant concern. Due to the high repair costs for wind turbine blades, it is especially important to detect initial blade defects before they become structural failures leading to other potential failures in the tower or nacelle. This research presents a method of detecting cracks on wind turbine blades using the Vibo-Acoustic Modulation technique. Using Vibro-Acoustic Modulation, a crack detection test is conducted on a WHISPER 100 wind turbine in its operating environment. Wind turbines provide the ideal conditions in which to utilize Vibro-Acoustic Modulation because wind turbines experience large structural vibrations. The structural vibration of the wind turbine balde was used as a pumping signal and a PZT was used to generate the probing signal. Because the non-linear portion of the dynamic response is more sensitive to the presence of a crack than the environmental conditions or operating loads, the Vibro-Acoustic Modulation technique can provide a robust structural health monitoring approach for wind turbines. Structural health monitoring can significantly reduce maintenance costs when paired with predictive modeling to minimize unscheduled maintenance.

  11. Numerical and experimental investigation of a low-frequency measurement technique: differential acoustic resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Hanjun; Zhao, Jianguo; Tang, Genyang; Ma, Xiaoyi; Wang, Shangxu

    2016-06-01

    Differential acoustic resonance spectroscopy (DARS) has been developed to determine the elastic properties of saturated rocks within the kHz frequency range. This laboratory technique is based on considerations from perturbation theory, wherein the resonance frequencies of the resonant cavity with and without a perturbation sample are used to estimate the acoustic properties of the test sample. In order to better understand the operating mechanism of DARS and therefore optimize the procedure, it is important to develop an accurate and efficient numerical model. Accordingly, this study presents a new multiphysics model by coupling together considerations from acoustics, solid mechanics, and electrostatics. The numerical results reveal that the newly developed model can successfully simulate the acoustic pressure field at different resonance modes, and that it can accurately reflect the measurement process. Based on the understanding of the DARS system afforded by the numerical simulation, we refine the system configuration by utilizing cavities of different lengths and appropriate radii to broaden the frequency bandwidth and ensure testing accuracy. Four synthetic samples are measured to test the performance of the optimized DARS system, in conjunction with ultrasonic and static measurements. For nonporous samples, the estimated bulk moduli are shown to be independent of the different measurement methods (i.e. DARS or ultrasonic techniques). In contrast, for sealed porous samples, the differences in bulk moduli between the low- and high-frequency techniques can be clearly observed; this discrepancy is attributed to frequency dispersion. In summary, the optimized DARS system with an extended frequency range of 500–2000 Hz demonstrates considerable utility in investigating the frequency dependence of the acoustic properties of reservoir rocks.

  12. Development and validation of a MRgHIFU non-invasive tissue acoustic property estimation technique.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Sara L; Dillon, Christopher; Odéen, Henrik; Parker, Dennis; Christensen, Douglas; Payne, Allison

    2016-11-01

    MR-guided high-intensity focussed ultrasound (MRgHIFU) non-invasive ablative surgeries have advanced into clinical trials for treating many pathologies and cancers. A remaining challenge of these surgeries is accurately planning and monitoring tissue heating in the face of patient-specific and dynamic acoustic properties of tissues. Currently, non-invasive measurements of acoustic properties have not been implemented in MRgHIFU treatment planning and monitoring procedures. This methods-driven study presents a technique using MR temperature imaging (MRTI) during low-temperature HIFU sonications to non-invasively estimate sample-specific acoustic absorption and speed of sound values in tissue-mimicking phantoms. Using measured thermal properties, specific absorption rate (SAR) patterns are calculated from the MRTI data and compared to simulated SAR patterns iteratively generated via the Hybrid Angular Spectrum (HAS) method. Once the error between the simulated and measured patterns is minimised, the estimated acoustic property values are compared to the true phantom values obtained via an independent technique. The estimated values are then used to simulate temperature profiles in the phantoms, and compared to experimental temperature profiles. This study demonstrates that trends in acoustic absorption and speed of sound can be non-invasively estimated with average errors of 21% and 1%, respectively. Additionally, temperature predictions using the estimated properties on average match within 1.2 °C of the experimental peak temperature rises in the phantoms. The positive results achieved in tissue-mimicking phantoms presented in this study indicate that this technique may be extended to in vivo applications, improving HIFU sonication temperature rise predictions and treatment assessment. PMID:27441427

  13. On measurement of the acoustic nonlinearity parameter using the finite amplitude insertion substitution (FAIS) technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeqiri, Bajram; Cook, Ashley; Rétat, Lise; Civale, John; ter Haar, Gail

    2015-04-01

    The acoustic nonlinearity parameter, B/A, is an important parameter which defines the way a propagating finite amplitude acoustic wave progressively distorts when travelling through any medium. One measurement technique used to determine its value is the finite amplitude insertion substitution (FAIS) method which has been applied to a range of liquid, tissue and tissue-like media. Importantly, in terms of the achievable measurement uncertainties, it is a relative technique. This paper presents a detailed study of the method, employing a number of novel features. The first of these is the use of a large area membrane hydrophone (30 mm aperture) which is used to record the plane-wave component of the acoustic field. This reduces the influence of diffraction on measurements, enabling studies to be carried out within the transducer near-field, with the interrogating transducer, test cell and detector positioned close to one another, an attribute which assists in controlling errors arising from nonlinear distortion in any intervening water path. The second feature is the development of a model which estimates the influence of finite-amplitude distortion as the acoustic wave travels from the rear surface of the test cell to the detector. It is demonstrated that this can lead to a significant systematic error in B/A measurement whose magnitude and direction depends on the acoustic property contrast between the test material and the water-filled equivalent cell. Good qualitative agreement between the model and experiment is reported. B/A measurements are reported undertaken at (20 ± 0.5) °C for two fluids commonly employed as reference materials within the technical literature: Corn Oil and Ethylene Glycol. Samples of an IEC standardised agar-based tissue-mimicking material were also measured. A systematic assessment of measurement uncertainties is presented giving expanded uncertainties in the range ±7% to ±14%, expressed at a confidence level close to 95

  14. Theoretical detection threshold of the proton-acoustic range verification technique

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, Moiz; Yousefi, Siavash; Xing, Lei; Xiang, Liangzhong

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: Range verification in proton therapy using the proton-acoustic signal induced in the Bragg peak was investigated for typical clinical scenarios. The signal generation and detection processes were simulated in order to determine the signal-to-noise limits. Methods: An analytical model was used to calculate the dose distribution and local pressure rise (per proton) for beams of different energy (100 and 160 MeV) and spot widths (1, 5, and 10 mm) in a water phantom. In this method, the acoustic waves propagating from the Bragg peak were generated by the general 3D pressure wave equation implemented using a finite element method. Various beam pulse widths (0.1–10 μs) were simulated by convolving the acoustic waves with Gaussian kernels. A realistic PZT ultrasound transducer (5 cm diameter) was simulated with a Butterworth bandpass filter with consideration of random noise based on a model of thermal noise in the transducer. The signal-to-noise ratio on a per-proton basis was calculated, determining the minimum number of protons required to generate a detectable pulse. The maximum spatial resolution of the proton-acoustic imaging modality was also estimated from the signal spectrum. Results: The calculated noise in the transducer was 12–28 mPa, depending on the transducer central frequency (70–380 kHz). The minimum number of protons detectable by the technique was on the order of 3–30 × 10{sup 6} per pulse, with 30–800 mGy dose per pulse at the Bragg peak. Wider pulses produced signal with lower acoustic frequencies, with 10 μs pulses producing signals with frequency less than 100 kHz. Conclusions: The proton-acoustic process was simulated using a realistic model and the minimal detection limit was established for proton-acoustic range validation. These limits correspond to a best case scenario with a single large detector with no losses and detector thermal noise as the sensitivity limiting factor. Our study indicated practical proton-acoustic

  15. A functional technique based on the Euclidean algorithm with applications to 2-D acoustic diffractal diffusers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortés-Vega, Luis

    2015-09-01

    We built, based on the Euclidean algorithm, a functional technique, which allows to discover a direct proof of Chinese Remainder Theorem. Afterwards, by using this functional approach, we present some applications to 2-D acoustic diffractal diffusers. The novelty of the method is their functional algorithmic character, which improves ideas, as well as, other results of the author and his collaborators in a previous work.

  16. High precision micro-impulse measurements for micro-thrusters based on torsional pendulum and sympathetic resonance techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Daixian; Wu, Jianjun; Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Hua; He, Zhen

    2013-12-01

    A sympathetic resonance theory is analyzed and applied in a newly developed torsional pendulum to measure the micro-impulse produced by a μN s-class ablative pulsed plasma thruster. According to theoretical analysis on the dynamical behaviors of a torsional pendulum, the resonance amplification effect of micro-signals is presented. In addition, a new micro-impulse measurement method based on sympathetic resonance theory is proposed as an improvement of the original single pulse measurement method. In contrast with the single pulse measurement method, the advantages of sympathetic resonance method are significant. First, because of the magnification of vibration signals due to resonance processes, measurement precision for the sympathetic resonance method becomes higher especially in reducing reading error. With an increase in peak number, the relative errors induced by readout of voltage signals decrease to approximately ±1.9% for the sympathetic resonance mode, whereas the relative error in single pulse mode is estimated as ±13.4%. Besides, by using the resonance amplification effect the sympathetic resonance method makes it possible to measure an extremely low-impulse beyond the resolution of a thrust stand without redesigning or purchasing a new one. Moreover, because of the simple operational principle and structure the sympathetic resonance method is much more convenient and inexpensive to be implemented than other high-precision methods. Finally, the sympathetic resonance measurement method can also be applied in other thrust stands to improve further the ability to measure the low-impulse bits.

  17. High precision micro-impulse measurements for micro-thrusters based on torsional pendulum and sympathetic resonance techniques.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Daixian; Wu, Jianjun; Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Hua; He, Zhen

    2013-12-01

    A sympathetic resonance theory is analyzed and applied in a newly developed torsional pendulum to measure the micro-impulse produced by a μN s-class ablative pulsed plasma thruster. According to theoretical analysis on the dynamical behaviors of a torsional pendulum, the resonance amplification effect of micro-signals is presented. In addition, a new micro-impulse measurement method based on sympathetic resonance theory is proposed as an improvement of the original single pulse measurement method. In contrast with the single pulse measurement method, the advantages of sympathetic resonance method are significant. First, because of the magnification of vibration signals due to resonance processes, measurement precision for the sympathetic resonance method becomes higher especially in reducing reading error. With an increase in peak number, the relative errors induced by readout of voltage signals decrease to approximately ±1.9% for the sympathetic resonance mode, whereas the relative error in single pulse mode is estimated as ±13.4%. Besides, by using the resonance amplification effect the sympathetic resonance method makes it possible to measure an extremely low-impulse beyond the resolution of a thrust stand without redesigning or purchasing a new one. Moreover, because of the simple operational principle and structure the sympathetic resonance method is much more convenient and inexpensive to be implemented than other high-precision methods. Finally, the sympathetic resonance measurement method can also be applied in other thrust stands to improve further the ability to measure the low-impulse bits. PMID:24387474

  18. Swept frequency acoustic interferometry technique for chemical weapons verification and monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, D.N.; Anthony, B.W.; Lizon, D.C.

    1995-03-01

    Nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques are important for rapid on-site verification and monitoring of chemical munitions, such as artillery shells and bulk containers. Present NDE techniques provide only limited characterizations of such munitions. This paper describes the development of a novel noninvasive technique, swept-frequency acoustic interferometry (SFAI), that significantly enhances the capability of munitions characterizations. The SFAI technique allows very accurate and simultaneous determination of sound velocity and attenuation of chemical agents over a large frequency range inside artillery shells, in addition to determining agent density. The frequency-dependent sound velocity and attenuation can, in principle, provide molecular relaxation properties of the chemical agent. The same instrument also enables a direct fill-level measurement in bulk containers. Industrial and other applications of this general-purpose technique are also discussed.

  19. Acoustic signature recognition technique for Human-Object Interactions (HOI) in persistent surveillance systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkilani, Amjad; Shirkhodaie, Amir

    2013-05-01

    Handling, manipulation, and placement of objects, hereon called Human-Object Interaction (HOI), in the environment generate sounds. Such sounds are readily identifiable by the human hearing. However, in the presence of background environment noises, recognition of minute HOI sounds is challenging, though vital for improvement of multi-modality sensor data fusion in Persistent Surveillance Systems (PSS). Identification of HOI sound signatures can be used as precursors to detection of pertinent threats that otherwise other sensor modalities may miss to detect. In this paper, we present a robust method for detection and classification of HOI events via clustering of extracted features from training of HOI acoustic sound waves. In this approach, salient sound events are preliminary identified and segmented from background via a sound energy tracking method. Upon this segmentation, frequency spectral pattern of each sound event is modeled and its features are extracted to form a feature vector for training. To reduce dimensionality of training feature space, a Principal Component Analysis (PCA) technique is employed to expedite fast classification of test feature vectors, a kd-tree and Random Forest classifiers are trained for rapid classification of training sound waves. Each classifiers employs different similarity distance matching technique for classification. Performance evaluations of classifiers are compared for classification of a batch of training HOI acoustic signatures. Furthermore, to facilitate semantic annotation of acoustic sound events, a scheme based on Transducer Mockup Language (TML) is proposed. The results demonstrate the proposed approach is both reliable and effective, and can be extended to future PSS applications.

  20. Fabrication of capacitive acoustic resonators combining 3D printing and 2D inkjet printing techniques.

    PubMed

    Haque, Rubaiyet Iftekharul; Ogam, Erick; Loussert, Christophe; Benaben, Patrick; Boddaert, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    A capacitive acoustic resonator developed by combining three-dimensional (3D) printing and two-dimensional (2D) printed electronics technique is described. During this work, a patterned bottom structure with rigid backplate and cavity is fabricated directly by a 3D printing method, and then a direct write inkjet printing technique has been employed to print a silver conductive layer. A novel approach has been used to fabricate a diaphragm for the acoustic sensor as well, where the conductive layer is inkjet-printed on a pre-stressed thin organic film. After assembly, the resulting structure contains an electrically conductive diaphragm positioned at a distance from a fixed bottom electrode separated by a spacer. Measurements confirm that the transducer acts as capacitor. The deflection of the diaphragm in response to the incident acoustic single was observed by a laser Doppler vibrometer and the corresponding change of capacitance has been calculated, which is then compared with the numerical result. Observation confirms that the device performs as a resonator and provides adequate sensitivity and selectivity at its resonance frequency. PMID:26473878

  1. Fabrication of Capacitive Acoustic Resonators Combining 3D Printing and 2D Inkjet Printing Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Haque, Rubaiyet Iftekharul; Ogam, Erick; Loussert, Christophe; Benaben, Patrick; Boddaert, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    A capacitive acoustic resonator developed by combining three-dimensional (3D) printing and two-dimensional (2D) printed electronics technique is described. During this work, a patterned bottom structure with rigid backplate and cavity is fabricated directly by a 3D printing method, and then a direct write inkjet printing technique has been employed to print a silver conductive layer. A novel approach has been used to fabricate a diaphragm for the acoustic sensor as well, where the conductive layer is inkjet-printed on a pre-stressed thin organic film. After assembly, the resulting structure contains an electrically conductive diaphragm positioned at a distance from a fixed bottom electrode separated by a spacer. Measurements confirm that the transducer acts as capacitor. The deflection of the diaphragm in response to the incident acoustic single was observed by a laser Doppler vibrometer and the corresponding change of capacitance has been calculated, which is then compared with the numerical result. Observation confirms that the device performs as a resonator and provides adequate sensitivity and selectivity at its resonance frequency. PMID:26473878

  2. Acoustic levitation technique for containerless processing at high temperatures in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rey, Charles A.; Merkley, Dennis R.; Hammarlund, Gregory R.; Danley, Thomas J.

    1988-01-01

    High temperature processing of a small specimen without a container has been demonstrated in a set of experiments using an acoustic levitation furnace in the microgravity of space. This processing technique includes the positioning, heating, melting, cooling, and solidification of a material supported without physical contact with container or other surface. The specimen is supported in a potential energy well, created by an acoustic field, which is sufficiently strong to position the specimen in the microgravity environment of space. This containerless processing apparatus has been successfully tested on the Space Shuttle during the STS-61A mission. In that experiment, three samples wer successfully levitated and processed at temperatures from 600 to 1500 C. Experiment data and results are presented.

  3. Acoustic Biometric System Based on Preprocessing Techniques and Linear Support Vector Machines

    PubMed Central

    del Val, Lara; Izquierdo-Fuente, Alberto; Villacorta, Juan J.; Raboso, Mariano

    2015-01-01

    Drawing on the results of an acoustic biometric system based on a MSE classifier, a new biometric system has been implemented. This new system preprocesses acoustic images, extracts several parameters and finally classifies them, based on Support Vector Machine (SVM). The preprocessing techniques used are spatial filtering, segmentation—based on a Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM) to separate the person from the background, masking—to reduce the dimensions of images—and binarization—to reduce the size of each image. An analysis of classification error and a study of the sensitivity of the error versus the computational burden of each implemented algorithm are presented. This allows the selection of the most relevant algorithms, according to the benefits required by the system. A significant improvement of the biometric system has been achieved by reducing the classification error, the computational burden and the storage requirements. PMID:26091392

  4. Identification of a reflection boundary coefficient in an acoustic wave equation by optimal control techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Lenhart, S. |; Protopopescu, V.; Yong, J.

    1997-12-31

    The authors apply optimal control techniques to find approximate solutions to an inverse problem for the acoustic wave equation. The inverse problem (assumed here to have a solution) is to determine the boundary reflection coefficient from partial measurements of the acoustic signal. The sought reflection coefficient is treated as a control and the goal--quantified by an approximate functional--is to drive the model solution close to the experimental data by adjusting this coefficient. The problem is solved by finding the optimal control that minimizes the approximate functional. Then by driving the cost of the control to zero one proves that the corresponding sequence of optimal controls represents a converging sequence of estimates for the solution of the inverse problem. Compared to classical regularization methods (e.g., Tikhonov coupled with optimization schemes), their approach yields: (1) a systematic procedure to solve inverse problems of identification type and (ii) an explicit expression for the approximations of the solution.

  5. Acoustic Biometric System Based on Preprocessing Techniques and Linear Support Vector Machines.

    PubMed

    del Val, Lara; Izquierdo-Fuente, Alberto; Villacorta, Juan J; Raboso, Mariano

    2015-01-01

    Drawing on the results of an acoustic biometric system based on a MSE classifier, a new biometric system has been implemented. This new system preprocesses acoustic images, extracts several parameters and finally classifies them, based on Support Vector Machine (SVM). The preprocessing techniques used are spatial filtering, segmentation-based on a Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM) to separate the person from the background, masking-to reduce the dimensions of images-and binarization-to reduce the size of each image. An analysis of classification error and a study of the sensitivity of the error versus the computational burden of each implemented algorithm are presented. This allows the selection of the most relevant algorithms, according to the benefits required by the system. A significant improvement of the biometric system has been achieved by reducing the classification error, the computational burden and the storage requirements. PMID:26091392

  6. Optically measured explosive impulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biss, Matthew M.; McNesby, Kevin L.

    2014-06-01

    An experimental technique is investigated to optically measure the explosive impulse produced by laboratory-scale spherical charges detonated in air. Explosive impulse has historically been calculated from temporal pressure measurements obtained via piezoelectric transducers. The presented technique instead combines schlieren flow visualization and high-speed digital imaging to optically measure explosive impulse. Prior to an explosive event, schlieren system calibration is performed using known light-ray refractions and resulting digital image intensities. Explosive charges are detonated in the test section of a schlieren system and imaged by a high-speed digital camera in pseudo-streak mode. Spatiotemporal schlieren intensity maps are converted using an Abel deconvolution, Rankine-Hugoniot jump equations, ideal gas law, triangular temperature decay profile, and Schardin's standard photometric technique to yield spatiotemporal pressure maps. Temporal integration of individual pixel pressure profiles over the positive pressure duration of the shock wave yields the explosive impulse generated for a given radial standoff. Calculated explosive impulses are shown to exhibit good agreement between optically derived values and pencil gage pressure transducers.

  7. Video and acoustic camera techniques for studying fish under ice: a review and comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Robert P.; Brown, Richard S.; Hop, Haakon H.; Moulton, Larry

    2006-09-05

    Researchers attempting to study the presence, abundance, size, and behavior of fish species in northern and arctic climates during winter face many challenges, including the presence of thick ice cover, snow cover, and, sometimes, extremely low temperatures. This paper describes and compares the use of video and acoustic cameras for determining fish presence and behavior in lakes, rivers, and streams with ice cover. Methods are provided for determining fish density and size, identifying species, and measuring swimming speed and successful applications of previous surveys of fish under the ice are described. These include drilling ice holes, selecting batteries and generators, deploying pan and tilt cameras, and using paired colored lasers to determine fish size and habitat associations. We also discuss use of infrared and white light to enhance image-capturing capabilities, deployment of digital recording systems and time-lapse techniques, and the use of imaging software. Data are presented from initial surveys with video and acoustic cameras in the Sagavanirktok River Delta, Alaska, during late winter 2004. These surveys represent the first known successful application of a dual-frequency identification sonar (DIDSON) acoustic camera under the ice that achieved fish detection and sizing at camera ranges up to 16 m. Feasibility tests of video and acoustic cameras for determining fish size and density at various turbidity levels are also presented. Comparisons are made of the different techniques in terms of suitability for achieving various fisheries research objectives. This information is intended to assist researchers in choosing the equipment that best meets their study needs.

  8. Non-Invasive, Non-Contact Heart Monitoring of Hemodialysis Patients with a Micropower Impulse Radar Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, J; Levin, N; Poland, D; Welsh, P; Paulsen, C; Trebes, J; Rosenbury, R; Killip, T

    2002-02-01

    This report summarizes the LLNL LDRD funded portion of a collaborative project to demonstrate and clinically evaluate the micropower impulse radar technology as a means to non-invasively monitor the heart of chronic care patients undergoing hemodialysis. The development is based upon technologies and expertise unique to LLNL. The LLNL LDRD funded portion of this project was used to assist in the definition, design, construction, and evaluation of the prototype.

  9. Coupling of acoustic emission and electrochemical noise measurement techniques in slurry erosion-corrosion studies

    SciTech Connect

    Oltra, R.; Chapey, B.; Huet, F.; Renaud, L.

    1996-12-31

    This study deals with the measurement and the subsequent signal analysis of acoustic emission and current noise recorded during continuous slurry erosion of a metallic target in a corrosive environment. According to a phenomenologic model, the localized corrosion results from the repetitive damage caused by particle impacts. The fluctuations of the acoustic signal and of the electrochemical signal both can be modeled as a shot-noise-like process. The main purpose of this work is to compare two processing techniques for the fluctuating signals: time analysis (mean value) and spectral analysis (power spectral density [PSD] spectrum) to determine the more suitable signal treatment. Another purpose is also to quantify the balance between the mechanical wear and the corrosive damage of the abraded metallic target. It will be shown that the mean value of the RMS acoustic signal, A(t), and also the PSD of A(t), are related to the mechanical wear of the target and allow real-time measurement of the actual mechanical perturbation in terms of the mass of the ablated material.

  10. Techniques to assess acoustic-structure interaction in liquid rocket engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, R. Benjamin

    Acoustoelasticity is the study of the dynamic interaction between elastic structures and acoustic enclosures. In this dissertation, acoustoelasticity is considered in the context of liquid rocket engine design. The techniques presented here can be used to determine which forcing frequencies are important in acoustoelastic systems. With a knowledge of these frequencies, an analyst can either find ways to attenuate the excitation at these frequencies or alter the system in such a way that the prescribed excitations do result in a resonant condition. The end result is a structural component that is less susceptible to failure. The research scope is divided into three parts. In the first part, the dynamics of cylindrical shells submerged in liquid hydrogen (LH2) and liquid oxygen (LOX) are considered. The shells are bounded by rigid outer cylinders. This configuration gives rise to two fluid-filled cavities---an inner cylindrical cavity and an outer annular cavity. Such geometries are common in rocket engine design. The natural frequencies and modes of the fluid-structure system are computed by combining the rigid wall acoustic cavity modes and the in vacuo structural modes into a system of coupled ordinary differential equations. Eigenvalue veering is observed near the intersections of the curves representing natural frequencies of the rigid wall acoustic and the in vacuo structural modes. In the case of a shell submerged in LH2, system frequencies near these intersections are as much as 30% lower than the corresponding in vacuo structural frequencies. Due to its high density, the frequency reductions in the presence of LOX are even more dramatic. The forced responses of a shell submerged in LH2 and LOX while subject to a harmonic point excitation are also presented. The responses in the presence of fluid are found to be quite distinct from those of the structure in vacuo. In the second part, coupled mode theory is used to explore the fundamental features of

  11. Tomographic reconstruction of indoor spatial temperature distributions using room impulse responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bleisteiner, M.; Barth, M.; Raabe, A.

    2016-03-01

    Temperature can be estimated by acoustic travel time measurements along known sound paths. By using a multitude of known sound paths in combination with a tomographic reconstruction technique a spatial and temporal resolution of the temperature field can be achieved. Based on it, this article focuses on an experimental method in order to determine the spatially differentiated development of room temperature with only one loudspeaker and one microphone. The theory of geometrical room acoustics is being used to identify sound paths under consideration of reflections. The travel time along a specific sound path is derived from the room impulse response. Temporal variances in room impulse response can be attributed primarily to a change in air temperature and airflow. It is shown that in the absence of airflow a 3D acoustic monitoring of the room temperature can be realized with a fairly limited use of hardware.

  12. Noninvasive Measurement of Acoustic Properties of Fluids Using Ultrasonic Interferometry Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Han, W.; Sinha, D.N.; Springer, K.N.; Lizon, D.C.

    1997-06-15

    A swept-frequency ultrasonic interferometry technique is used for noninvasively determining acoustic properties of fluids inside containers. Measurements over a frequency range 1-15 MHz on six liquid chemicals are presented. Measurements were made with the liquid inside standard rectangular optical glass cells and stainless steel cylindrical shells. A theoretical model based on one-dimensional planar acoustic wave propagation through multi-layered media is employed for the interpretation of the observed resonance (interference) spectrum. Two analytical methods, derived from the transmission model are used for determination of sound speed, sound attenuation coefficient, and density of liquids from the relative amplitude and half-power peak width of the observed resonance peaks. Effects of the container material and geometrical properties, path-length, wall thickness are also studied. This study shows that the interferometry technique and the experimental method developed are capable of accurate determination of sound speed, sound attenuation, and density in fluids completely noninvasively. It is a capable and versatile fluid characterization technique and has many potential NDE applications.

  13. Study of fracture mechanisms of short fiber reinforced AS composite by acoustic emission technique

    SciTech Connect

    Kida, Sotoaki; Suzuki, Megumu

    1995-11-01

    The fracture mechanisms of short fiber reinforced AS composites are studied by acoustic emission technique for examining the effects of fiber contents. The loads P{sub b} and P{sub c} which the damage mechanisms change are obtained at the inflection points of the total AE energy curve the energy gradient method. The damages are generated by fiber breaking at the load point of P{sub b} and P{sub c} in B material, and by the fiber breaking and the debonding between resin and fiber at the load points of P{sub b} and P{sub c} in C material.

  14. Comparison of Acoustic Impedance Eduction Techniques for Locally-Reacting Liners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, M. G.; Parrott, T. L.; Watson, W. R.

    2003-01-01

    Typical acoustic liners used in current aircraft inlets and aft-fan ducts consist of some type of perforated facesheet bonded to a honeycomb core. A number of techniques for determining the acoustic impedance of these locallyreacting liners have been developed over the last five decades. In addition, a number of models have been developed to predict the acoustic impedance of locallyreacting liners in the presence of grazing flow, and to use that information together with aeroacoustic propagation codes to assess the noise absorption provided by these liners. These prediction models have incorporated the results from databases acquired with specific impedance eduction techniques. Thus, while these prediction models are acceptable for liners that are similar to those tested in these databases, their application to new liner configurations must be viewed with caution. The primary purpose of this paper is to provide a comparison of impedance eduction techniques that have been implemented at various aerospace research laboratories in the United States (NASA Langley Research Center, General Electric Aircraft Engines, B. F. Goodrich and Boeing). A secondary purpose is to provide data for liner configurations that extend the porosity range beyond that which has been previously used in common aircraft engine nacelles. Two sets of liners were designed to study the effects of three parameters: perforate hole diameter, facesheet thickness and porosity. These two sets of liners were constructed for testing in each of the laboratories listed above. The first set of liners was designed to fit into the NASA Langley and Boeing test facilities. The second set was designed to fit into the General Electric Aircraft Engines and B. F. Goodrich test facilities. By using the same parent material, both sets of liners were identical to within the limits of material and fabrication variability. Baseline data were obtained in the normal incidence impedance tubes at NASA Langley and B. F

  15. Efficient Fast Stereo Acoustic Echo Cancellation Based on Pairwise Optimal Weight Realization Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yukawa, Masahiro; Murakoshi, Noriaki; Yamada, Isao

    2006-12-01

    In stereophonic acoustic echo cancellation (SAEC) problem, fast and accurate tracking of echo path is strongly required for stable echo cancellation. In this paper, we propose a class of efficient fast SAEC schemes with linear computational complexity (with respect to filter length). The proposed schemes are based on pairwise optimal weight realization (POWER) technique, thus realizing a "best" strategy (in the sense of pairwise and worst-case optimization) to use multiple-state information obtained by preprocessing. Numerical examples demonstrate that the proposed schemes significantly improve the convergence behavior compared with conventional methods in terms of system mismatch as well as echo return loss enhancement (ERLE).

  16. Damage characterization in engineering materials using a combination of optical, acoustic, and thermal techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tragazikis, I. K.; Exarchos, D. A.; Dalla, P. T.; Matikas, T. E.

    2016-04-01

    This paper deals with the use of complimentary nondestructive methods for the evaluation of damage in engineering materials. The application of digital image correlation (DIC) to engineering materials is a useful tool for accurate, noncontact strain measurement. DIC is a 2D, full-field optical analysis technique based on gray-value digital images to measure deformation, vibration and strain a vast variety of materials. In addition, this technique can be applied from very small to large testing areas and can be used for various tests such as tensile, torsion and bending under static or dynamic loading. In this study, DIC results are benchmarked with other nondestructive techniques such as acoustic emission for damage localization and fracture mode evaluation, and IR thermography for stress field visualization and assessment. The combined use of these three nondestructive methods enables the characterization and classification of damage in materials and structures.

  17. Use of an ultrasonic-acoustic technique for nondestructive evaluation of fiber composite strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, A.; Bowles, K. J.

    1978-01-01

    This report describes the ultrasonic-acoustic technique used to measure a 'Stress Wave Factor'. In a prior study this factor was found effective in evaluating the interlaminar shear strength of fiber-reinforced composites. Details of the method used to measure the stress wave factor are described. In addition, frequency spectra of the stress waves are analyzed in order to clarify the nature of the wave phenomena involved. The stress wave factor can be measured with simple contact probes requiring only one-side access to a part. This is beneficial in nondestructive evaluations because the waves can run parallel to fiber directions and thus measure material properties in directions assumed by actual loads. Moreover, the technique can be applied where conventional through transmission techniques are impractical or where more quantitative data are required. The stress wave factor was measured for a series of graphite/polyimide composite panels and results obtained are compared with through transmission immersion ultrasonic scans.

  18. Fatigue damage monitoring for basalt fiber reinforced polymer composites using acoustic emission technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wentao; Li, Hui; Qu, Zhi

    2012-04-01

    Basalt fiber reinforced polymer (BFRP) is a structural material with superior mechanical properties. In this study, unidirectional BFRP laminates with 14 layers are made with the hand lay-up method. Then, the acoustic emission technique (AE) combined with the scanning electronic microscope (SEM) technique is employed to monitor the fatigue damage evolution of the BFRP plates in the fatigue loading tests. Time-frequency analysis using the wavelet transform technique is proposed to analyze the received AE signal instead of the peak frequency method. A comparison between AE signals and SEM images indicates that the multi-frequency peaks picked from the time-frequency curves of AE signals reflect the accumulated fatigue damage evolution and fatigue damage patterns. Furthermore, seven damage patterns, that is, matrix cracking, delamination, fiber fracture and their combinations, are identified from the time-frequency curves of the AE signals.

  19. Acoustic emission technique for monitoring the pyrolysis of composites for process control.

    PubMed

    Tittmann, B R; Yen, C E

    2008-11-01

    Carbonization is the first step in the heat and pressure treatment (pyrolysis) of composites in preparing carbon-carbon parts. These find many uses, including aircraft brakes, rocket nozzles and medical implants. This paper describes the acoustic emissions (AE) from various stages of the manufacturing process of carbon-carbon composites. This process involves carbonization at a high temperature and this results in both thermal expansion and volume change (due to pyrolysis in which a sacrificial polymer matrix is converted to carbon). Importantly the resultant matrix is porous and has a network of small intra-lamina cracks. The formation of these microcracks produces AE and this paper describes how this observation can be used to monitor (and eventually control) the manufacturing process. The aim is to speed up manufacture, which is currently time-consuming. The first section of the paper describes the design of unimodal waveguides to enable the AE to propagate to a cool environment where a transducer can be located. The second part of the paper describes various experimental observations of AE under a range of process conditions. In particular, this paper presents a technique based on detecting acoustic emissions and (1) uses wire waveguides to monitor parts within the autoclave to 800 degrees C, (2) monitors microcracking during pyrolysis, (3) uses a four-level threshold to distinguish between low- and high-amplitude cracking events, (4) recognizes the occurrence of harmful delaminations, and (5) guides the control of the heating rate for optimum efficiency of the pyrolysis process. In addition, supporting data are presented of in situ measurements of porosity, weight loss, cross-ply shrinkage, and mass spectroscopy of gases emitted. The process evolution is illustrated by the use of interrupted manufacturing cycle micrographs obtained by optical, scanning acoustic (SAM) and scanning electron (SEM) microscopy. The technique promotes in-process monitoring and

  20. Optimal Suturing Technique and Number of Sutures for Surgical Implantation of Acoustic Transmitters in Juvenile Salmonids

    SciTech Connect

    Deters, Katherine A.; Brown, Richard S.; Boyd, James W.; Eppard, M. B.; Seaburg, Adam

    2012-01-02

    The size reduction of acoustic transmitters has led to a reduction in the length of incision needed to implant a transmitter. Smaller suture knot profiles and fewer sutures may be adequate for closing an incision used to surgically implant an acoustic microtransmitter. As a result, faster surgery times and reduced tissue trauma could lead to increased survival and decreased infection for implanted fish. The objective of this study was to assess the effects of five suturing techniques on mortality, tag and suture retention, incision openness, ulceration, and redness in juvenile Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha implanted with acoustic microtransmitters. Suturing was performed by three surgeons, and study fish were held at two water temperatures (12°C and 17°C). Mortality was low and tag retention was high for all treatments on all examination days (7, 14, 21, and 28 days post-surgery). Because there was surgeon variation in suture retention among treatments, further analyses included only the one surgeon who received feedback training in all suturing techniques. Incision openness and tissue redness did not differ among treatments. The only difference observed among treatments was in tissue ulceration. Incisions closed with a horizontal mattress pattern had more ulceration than other treatments among fish held for 28 days at 17°C. Results from this study suggest that one simple interrupted 1 × 1 × 1 × 1 suture is adequate for closing incisions on fish under most circumstances. However, in dynamic environments, two simple interrupted 1 × 1 × 1 × 1 sutures should provide adequate incision closure. Reducing bias in survival and behavior tagging studies is important when making comparisons to the migrating salmon population. Therefore, by minimizing the effects of tagging on juvenile salmon (reduced tissue trauma and reduced surgery time), researchers can more accurately estimate survival and behavior.

  1. Acoustic puncture assist device versus loss of resistance technique for epidural space identification

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Amit Kumar; Goel, Nitesh; Chowdhury, Itee; Shah, Shagun Bhatia; Singh, Brijesh Pratap; Jakhar, Pradeep

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: The conventional techniques of epidural space (EDS) identification based on loss of resistance (LOR) have a higher chance of complications, patchy analgesia and epidural failure, which can be minimised by objective confirmation of space before catheter placement. Acoustic puncture assist device (APAD) technique objectively confirms EDS, thus enhancing success, with lesser complications. This study was planned with the objective to evaluate the APAD technique and compare it to LOR technique for EDS identification and its correlation with ultrasound guided EDS depth. Methods: In this prospective study, the lumbar vertebral spaces were scanned by the ultrasound for measuring depth of the EDS and later correlated with procedural depth measured by either of the technique (APAD or LOR). The data were subjected to descriptive statistics; the concordance correlation coefficient and Bland-Altman analysis with 95% confidence limits. Results: Acoustic dip in pitch and descent in pressure tracing on EDS localisation was observed among the patients of APAD group. Analysis of concordance correlation between the ultrasonography (USG) depth and APAD or LOR depth was significant (r ≥ 0.97 in both groups). Bland-Altman analysis revealed a mean difference of 0.171cm in group APAD and 0.154 cm in group LOR. The 95% limits of agreement for the difference between the two measurements were − 0.569 and 0.226 cm in APAD and − 0.530 to 0.222 cm in LOR group. Conclusion: We found APAD to be a precise tool for objective localisation of the EDS, co-relating well with the pre-procedural USG depth of EDS. PMID:27212720

  2. Estimation of Partial Discharge Parameters in GIS Using Acoustic Emission Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    GUPTA, N.; RAMU, T. S.

    2001-10-01

    Conventional electrical techniques for the monitoring of partial discharge (p.d.) activity in enclosed systems like gas insulated substations (GIS) have certain inherent limitations, which has prompted the exploration of non-electrical techniques. Acoustic detection of p.d. in a GIS is based on the retrieval and analysis of mechanical signals produced on the walls of the metallic enclosure due to electrical discharge activity within. A theoretical modelling of the process by which a discharge produced within the GIS sets up detectable signals on the walls of the enclosure seems to be lacking. The present work consists of the development of a model for the propagation of electrically induced acoustic waves through gaseous medium, and their effect on the walls of the GIS, giving adequate representation to fluid-structure coupling. A numerical simulation of the process is shown to yield important information about the proper type of instrumentation required for such non-invasive tests, and aid in designing robust strategies for locating the source of the discharge.

  3. Expansion Techniques of Embedding Audio Watermark Data Rate for Constructing Ubiquitous Acoustic Spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modegi, Toshio

    We are proposing “Ubiquitous Acoustic Spaces”, where each sound source can emit some address information with audio signals and make us automatically access to its related cyber space, using handheld devices such as cellphones. In order to realize this concept, we have considered three types of extraction methods, which were an acoustic modulation, an audio fingerprint, and an audio watermark technique. Then we have proposed a novel audio watermarking technique, which enables contactless asynchronous detection of embedded audio watermarks through speaker and microphone devices. However its embedding data rate was around 10 [bps], which was not sufficient for embedding generally used URL address texts. Therefore, we have extended the embedding frequency range and proposed a duplicated embedding algorithm, which uses both previously proposed frequency division method and temporal division method together. By these improvements, possible embedding data rate could be extended to 61.5 [bps], and we could extract watermarks through public telephone networks, even from a cell phone sound source. In this paper, we describe abstracts of our improved watermark embedding and extracting algorithms, and experimental results of watermark extraction precision on several audio signal capturing conditions.

  4. Using Complementary Acoustic and Optical Techniques for Quantitative Monitoring of Biomolecular Adsorption at Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Konradi, Rupert; Textor, Marcus; Reimhult, Erik

    2012-01-01

    The great wealth of different surface sensitive techniques used in biosensing, most of which claim to measure adsorbed mass, can at first glance look unnecessary. However, with each technique relying on a different transducer principle there is something to be gained from a comparison. In this tutorial review, different optical and acoustic evanescent techniques are used to illustrate how an understanding of the transducer principle of each technique can be exploited for further interpretation of hydrated and extended polymer and biological films. Some of the most commonly used surface sensitive biosensor techniques (quartz crystal microbalance, optical waveguide spectroscopy and surface plasmon resonance) are briefly described and five case studies are presented to illustrate how different biosensing techniques can and often should be combined. The case studies deal with representative examples of adsorption of protein films, polymer brushes and lipid membranes, and describe e.g., how to deal with strongly vs. weakly hydrated films, large conformational changes and ordered layers of biomolecules. The presented systems and methods are compared to other representative examples from the increasing literature on the subject. PMID:25586027

  5. Comparison of two underwater acoustic communications techniques for multi-user access

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hursky, Paul; Siderius, T. Martin; Kauaiex Group

    2001-05-01

    Frequency hopped frequency shift keying (FHFSK) and code division multiple access (CDMA) are two different modulation techniques for multiple users to communicate with a single receiver simultaneously. In July 2003, these two techniques were tested alongside each other in a shallow water coastal environment off the coast of Kauai. A variety of instruments were used to measure the prevailing oceanography, enabling detailed modeling of the channel. The channel was acoustically probed using LFM waveforms and m-sequences as well. We will present the results of demodulating the FHFSK and CDMA waveforms and discuss modeling the channel for the purpose of predicting multi-user communications performance. a)Michael B. Porter, Paul Hursky, Martin Siderius (SAIC), Mohsen Badiey (UD), Jerald Caruthers (USM), William S. Hodgkiss, Kaustubha Raghukumar (SIO), Dan Rouseff, Warren Fox (APL-UW), Christian de Moustier, Brian Calder, Barbara J. Kraft (UNH), Keyko McDonald (SPAWARSSC), Peter Stein, James K. Lewis, and Subramaniam Rajan (SSI).

  6. Acoustic resonance for nonmetallic mine detection

    SciTech Connect

    Kercel, S.W.

    1998-04-01

    The feasibility of acoustic resonance for detection of plastic mines was investigated by researchers at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s Instrumentation and Controls Division under an internally funded program. The data reported in this paper suggest that acoustic resonance is not a practical method for mine detection. Representative small plastic anti-personnel mines were tested, and were found to not exhibit detectable acoustic resonances. Also, non-metal objects known to have strong acoustic resonances were tested with a variety of excitation techniques, and no practical non-contact method of exciting a consistently detectable resonance in a buried object was discovered. Some of the experimental data developed in this work may be useful to other researchers seeking a method to detect buried plastic mines. A number of excitation methods and their pitfalls are discussed. Excitation methods that were investigated include swept acoustic, chopped acoustic, wavelet acoustic, and mechanical shaking. Under very contrived conditions, a weak response that could be attributed to acoustic resonance was observed, but it does not appear to be practical as a mine detection feature. Transfer properties of soil were investigated. Impulse responses of several representative plastic mines were investigated. Acoustic leakage coupling, and its implications as a disruptive mechanism were investigated.

  7. Experimental evaluation on the effectiveness of acoustic-laser technique towards the FRP-bonded concrete system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Qiwen; Lau, Denvid

    2015-04-01

    Nondestructive evaluation (NDE) is essential for the detection of defects in the externally bonded fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) concrete, especially such bonded system can be readily found in strengthened and retrofitted structures nowadays. Among all the current NDE methods, acoustic-laser technique is a non-contact methodology with a high applicability to detect near-surface defect in composite structures, which is very suitable to be used for detecting defect in FRP retrofitted and strengthened concrete structures. The methodology is based on the acoustic excitation on the target surface and the measurement of its vibration using laser beam. To our best knowledge, no comprehensive study has been conducted to examine how the acoustic location and other related parameters affect the measurement sensitivity. In fact, several operational parameters affecting the performance of the test system are discussed here including (i) distance between the acoustic source and the object, (ii) sound pressure level (SPL), (iii) angle of the laser beam incidence and (iv) angle of the acoustic incidence. Here, we perform a series of parametric studies against these four operational parameters. Based on our experimental measurements, all parameters show significant effects on the measurement sensitivity of the acoustic-laser technique. Recommendations on an optimal range of each concerned parameter are provided.

  8. Acoustic source location in the secondary mixing region of a jet-blown flap using a cross-correlation technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, R. S.; Maus, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the acoustic sources in the secondary mixing region of a laboratory-scale jet-flap was made using a causality correlation technique. The processed signal of a hot-film anemometer probe was cross correlated with the output signal of a far-field microphone. Axial acoustic source strength distributions were measured for three far-field microphone locations: plus or minus 45 deg in the flyover plane and 45 deg in the sideline plane. These measurements showed that the acoustic sources in the secondary mixing region are highly directional, radiating much more effectively to the -45 deg-microphone, located below the plane of the flap surface. A relative maximum in the acoustic source strength measured for the microphones in the flyover plane occurred very near the flap trailing edge, which may be due to an edge amplification effect predicted by the theoretical work of Ffowcs Williams and Hall.

  9. Development of an acoustic levitation technique to obtain foam material properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Li

    2003-10-01

    Aqueous foam is an impermanent form of matter in which a kind of gas, often air, is dispersed as an agglomeration of bubbles that are separated from each other by films of liquid. Foams are of tremendous economical importance in industry. Foam material properties are sensitive functions of the void fraction. A ``wet foam'' is a bubbly liquid that cannot support shearing motion; inside the wet foam the individual bubbles are free to move around. A ``transitional'' or ``critical foam'' is composed of bubbles whose dynamics are strongly interacting and whose surfaces may be in mechanical contact with each other. Finally, a ``dry foam'' is composed of bubbles who have a fixed position in a lattice for low to moderate straining rates. An acoustic levitation technique is developed which provides a noncontact means of estimating the properties of the foam by acoustically levitating aqueous foam drops and exciting their spheroidal modes oscillation. Assuming linear oscillation of foam drops, experimental data for frequency and damping show good agreement with a bubble dynamics-based theoretical model. Thesis advisor: R. Glynn Holt Copies of this thesis may be obtained by contacting the advisor, Glynn Holt, Dept. of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering, Boston University, 110 Cummington St., Boston, MA 02215. E-mail address: rgholt@bu.edu

  10. Innovative techniques for analyzing the three-dimensional behavioral results from acoustically tagged fish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steig, Tracey W.; Timko, Mark A.

    2005-04-01

    Acoustic tags were used to monitor the swimming patterns of downstream migrating salmon smolts approaching various dams on the Columbia River, USA. Downstream migrating yearling chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), sockeye (Oncorhynchus nerka), and sub-yearling chinook smolts were surgically implanted with acoustic tags. Fish were tracked in three-dimensions as they approached and passed into the turbine intakes, spillways, and surface bypass channel entrances at the dams during the 2004 spring and summer outmigrations. A number of advances in the analysis techniques and software have been made over the past few years. Some of these improvements include the development of various fish density algorithms, stream trace modeling analysis, and advances of three-dimensional animation programs. Three-dimensional tracks of fish approaching the turbine intakes, spillways, and surface bypass channel entrances will be presented. Concentrations of fish passage will be presented as three-dimensional fish densities superimposed over dam structures. Stream trace modeling animation will be presented showing predicted fish passage routes.

  11. Acoustic emission source location in complex structures using full automatic delta T mapping technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Jumaili, Safaa Kh.; Pearson, Matthew R.; Holford, Karen M.; Eaton, Mark J.; Pullin, Rhys

    2016-05-01

    An easy to use, fast to apply, cost-effective, and very accurate non-destructive testing (NDT) technique for damage localisation in complex structures is key for the uptake of structural health monitoring systems (SHM). Acoustic emission (AE) is a viable technique that can be used for SHM and one of the most attractive features is the ability to locate AE sources. The time of arrival (TOA) technique is traditionally used to locate AE sources, and relies on the assumption of constant wave speed within the material and uninterrupted propagation path between the source and the sensor. In complex structural geometries and complex materials such as composites, this assumption is no longer valid. Delta T mapping was developed in Cardiff in order to overcome these limitations; this technique uses artificial sources on an area of interest to create training maps. These are used to locate subsequent AE sources. However operator expertise is required to select the best data from the training maps and to choose the correct parameter to locate the sources, which can be a time consuming process. This paper presents a new and improved fully automatic delta T mapping technique where a clustering algorithm is used to automatically identify and select the highly correlated events at each grid point whilst the "Minimum Difference" approach is used to determine the source location. This removes the requirement for operator expertise, saving time and preventing human errors. A thorough assessment is conducted to evaluate the performance and the robustness of the new technique. In the initial test, the results showed excellent reduction in running time as well as improved accuracy of locating AE sources, as a result of the automatic selection of the training data. Furthermore, because the process is performed automatically, this is now a very simple and reliable technique due to the prevention of the potential source of error related to manual manipulation.

  12. Accumulated damage process of thermal sprayed coating under rolling contact by acoustic emission technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jia; Zhou, Zhen-yu; Piao, Zhong-yu

    2016-07-01

    The accumulated damage process of rolling contact fatigue (RCF) of plasma-sprayed coatings was investigated. The influences of surface roughness, loading condition, and stress cycle frequency on the accumulated damage status of the coatings were discussed. A ball-ondisc machine was employed to conduct RCF experiments. Acoustic emission (AE) technique was introduced to monitor the RCF process of the coatings. AE signal characteristics were investigated to reveal the accumulated damage process. Result showed that the polished coating would resist the asperity contact and remit accumulated damage. The RCF lifetime would then extend. Heavy load would aggravate the accumulated damage status and induce surface fracture. Wear became the main failure mode that reduced the RCF lifetime. Frequent stress cycle would aggravate the accumulated damage status and induce interface fracture. Fatigue then became the main failure mode that also reduced the RCF lifetime.

  13. Stellar acoustic radii, mean densities, and ages from seismic inversion techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buldgen, G.; Reese, D. R.; Dupret, M. A.; Samadi, R.

    2015-01-01

    Context. Determining stellar characteristics such as the radius, mass or age is crucial when studying stellar evolution or exoplanetary systems, or when characterising stellar populations in the Galaxy. Asteroseismology is the golden path to accurately obtain these characteristics. In this context, a key question is how to make these methods less model-dependent. Aims: Building on the previous work of Daniel Reese, we wish to extend the Substractive Optimally Localized Averages (SOLA) inversion technique to new stellar global characteristics beyond the mean density. The goal is to provide a general framework in which to estimate these characteristics as accurately as possible in low-mass main-sequence stars. Methods: First, we describe our framework and discuss the reliability of the inversion technique and possible sources of error. We then apply this methodology to the acoustic radius, an age indicator based on the sound speed derivative and the mean density, and compare it to estimates based on the average large and small frequency separations. These inversions are carried out for several test cases including various metallicities, different mixing-lengths, non-adiabatic effects, and turbulent pressure. Results: We observe that the SOLA method yields accurate results in all test cases whereas results based on the large and small frequency separations are less accurate and more sensitive to surface effects and structural differences in the models. If we include the surface corrections of Kjeldsen et al. (2008, ApJ, 683, L175), we obtain results of comparable accuracy for the mean density. Overall, the mean density and acoustic radius inversions are more robust than the inversions for the age indicator. Moreover, the current approach is limited to relatively young stars with radiative cores. Increasing the number of observed frequencies improves the reliability and accuracy of the method. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  14. Characterization of acoustic effects on flame structures by beam deflection technique

    SciTech Connect

    Bedat, B.; Kostiuk, L.W.; Cheng, R.K.

    1993-10-01

    This work shows that the acoustic effects are the causes of the small amplitude flame wrinkling and movements seen in all the different gravitational conditions. The comparison between the acoustic velocity and beam deflection spectra for the two conditions studied (glass beads and fiber glass) demonstrates clearly this flame/acoustic coupling. This acoustic study shows that the burner behaves like a Helmholtz resonator. The estimated resonance frequency corresponds well to the experimental measurements. The fiber glass damps the level of the resonance frequency and the flame motion. The changes shown in normalized beam deflection spectra give further support of this damping. This work demonstrates that the acoustics has a direct influence on flame structure in the laminar case and the preliminary results in turbulent case also show a strong coupling. The nature of this flame/acoustic coupling are still not well understood. Further investigation should include determining the frequency limits and the sensitivity of the flame to acoustic perturbations.

  15. A simulation technique for 3D MR-guided acoustic radiation force imaging

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Allison; de Bever, Josh; Farrer, Alexis; Coats, Brittany; Parker, Dennis L.; Christensen, Douglas A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: In magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) therapies, the in situ characterization of the focal spot location and quality is critical. MR acoustic radiation force imaging (MR-ARFI) is a technique that measures the tissue displacement caused by the radiation force exerted by the ultrasound beam. This work presents a new technique to model the displacements caused by the radiation force of an ultrasound beam in a homogeneous tissue model. Methods: When a steady-state point-source force acts internally in an infinite homogeneous medium, the displacement of the material in all directions is given by the Somigliana elastostatic tensor. The radiation force field, which is caused by absorption and reflection of the incident ultrasound intensity pattern, will be spatially distributed, and the tensor formulation takes the form of a convolution of a 3D Green’s function with the force field. The dynamic accumulation of MR phase during the ultrasound pulse can be theoretically accounted for through a time-of-arrival weighting of the Green’s function. This theoretical model was evaluated experimentally in gelatin phantoms of varied stiffness (125-, 175-, and 250-bloom). The acoustic and mechanical properties of the phantoms used as parameters of the model were measured using independent techniques. Displacements at focal depths of 30- and 45-mm in the phantoms were measured by a 3D spin echo MR-ARFI segmented-EPI sequence. Results: The simulated displacements agreed with the MR-ARFI measured displacements for all bloom values and focal depths with a normalized RMS difference of 0.055 (range 0.028–0.12). The displacement magnitude decreased and the displacement pattern broadened with increased bloom value for both focal depths, as predicted by the theory. Conclusions: A new technique that models the displacements caused by the radiation force of an ultrasound beam in a homogeneous tissue model theory has been rigorously validated through comparison

  16. A simulation technique for 3D MR-guided acoustic radiation force imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, Allison; Bever, Josh de; Farrer, Alexis; Coats, Brittany; Parker, Dennis L.; Christensen, Douglas A.

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: In magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) therapies, the in situ characterization of the focal spot location and quality is critical. MR acoustic radiation force imaging (MR-ARFI) is a technique that measures the tissue displacement caused by the radiation force exerted by the ultrasound beam. This work presents a new technique to model the displacements caused by the radiation force of an ultrasound beam in a homogeneous tissue model. Methods: When a steady-state point-source force acts internally in an infinite homogeneous medium, the displacement of the material in all directions is given by the Somigliana elastostatic tensor. The radiation force field, which is caused by absorption and reflection of the incident ultrasound intensity pattern, will be spatially distributed, and the tensor formulation takes the form of a convolution of a 3D Green’s function with the force field. The dynamic accumulation of MR phase during the ultrasound pulse can be theoretically accounted for through a time-of-arrival weighting of the Green’s function. This theoretical model was evaluated experimentally in gelatin phantoms of varied stiffness (125-, 175-, and 250-bloom). The acoustic and mechanical properties of the phantoms used as parameters of the model were measured using independent techniques. Displacements at focal depths of 30- and 45-mm in the phantoms were measured by a 3D spin echo MR-ARFI segmented-EPI sequence. Results: The simulated displacements agreed with the MR-ARFI measured displacements for all bloom values and focal depths with a normalized RMS difference of 0.055 (range 0.028–0.12). The displacement magnitude decreased and the displacement pattern broadened with increased bloom value for both focal depths, as predicted by the theory. Conclusions: A new technique that models the displacements caused by the radiation force of an ultrasound beam in a homogeneous tissue model theory has been rigorously validated through comparison

  17. Acoustic waveguide technique for sensing incipient faults in underground power-transmission cables: Including acousto-optic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrold, R. T.

    1981-09-01

    Theoretical and practical studies were made of both the acoustic emission, spectrum signatures associated with underground cable incipient faults, and the attenuation of acoustic waves in waterfilled metal tubes used as waveguided. Based on critical data, it can be estimated that in favorable circumstances, the acoustic waveguide system would only be useful for sensing incipient faults in underground cables of approx. 800 meters of less in length. A system were investigated which acoustic emissions from cable incipient faults impinge on a fiber-optic lightguide and locally change its refractive index and modulate laser light transmitted along the light guide. Experiments based on this concept show that is is possible t sense acoustic emissions with energy levels below on micro-joule. A test of this system using a section of compressed gas-insulated cable with an internal flashover was successfully carried out.

  18. Identification of the fragmentation of brittle particles during compaction process by the acoustic emission technique.

    PubMed

    Favretto-Cristini, Nathalie; Hégron, Lise; Sornay, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    Some nuclear fuels are currently manufactured by a powder metallurgy process that consists of three main steps, namely preparation of the powders, powder compaction, and sintering of the compact. An optimum between size, shape and cohesion of the particles of the nuclear fuels must be sought in order to obtain a compact with a sufficient mechanical strength, and to facilitate the release of helium and fission gases during irradiation through pores connected to the outside of the pellet after sintering. Being simple to adapt to nuclear-oriented purposes, the Acoustic Emission (AE) technique is used to control the microstructure of the compact by monitoring the compaction of brittle Uranium Dioxide (UO2) particles of a few hundred micrometers. The objective is to identify in situ the mechanisms that occur during the UO2 compaction, and more specifically the particle fragmentation that is linked to the open porosity of the nuclear matter. Three zones of acoustic activity, strongly related to the applied stress, can be clearly defined from analysis of the continuous signals recorded during the compaction process. They correspond to particle rearrangement and/or fragmentation. The end of the noteworthy fragmentation process is clearly defined as the end of the significant process that increases the compactness of the material. Despite the fact that the wave propagation strongly evolves during the compaction process, the acoustic signature of the fragmentation of a single UO2 particle and a bed of UO2 particles under compaction is well identified. The waveform, with a short rise time and an exponential-like decay of the signal envelope, is the most reliable descriptor. The impact of the particle size and cohesion on the AE activity, and then on the fragmentation domain, is analyzed through the discrete AE signals. The maximum amplitude of the burst signals, as well as the mean stress corresponding to the end of the recorded AE, increase with increasing mean diameter of

  19. Examination on the use of acoustic emission for monitoring metal forging process: A study using simulation technique

    SciTech Connect

    Mullins, W.M.; Malas, J.C. III; Venugopal, S.

    1997-05-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the feasibility of using acoustic emission as a monitoring technique for metal forging operations. From the sensor development paradigm proposed by McClean et al. the most likely approach to determining feasibility for application is through signal recognition. For this reason, signature prediction and analysis was chosen to determine the suitability for forging applications.

  20. A study of aluminum-lithium alloy solidification using acoustic emission techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Henkel, D.P.

    1991-01-01

    Physical phenomena associated with the solidification of an aluminum-lithium alloy, an aluminum-copper alloy, and ultra-pure aluminum have been characterized using acoustic emission (AE) techniques. This study has shown that repeatable patterns of AE activity may be correlated to microstructural changes that occur during solidification. The influence of the experimental system on generated signals has been examined in detail. Time and frequency domain analysis of the response of a boron nitride waveguide materials and three transducers has been performed. The analysis has been used to show how an AE signal from a solidifying metal is changed by each component of the detection system to produce a complex waveform. Acoustic emission during solidification has been studied using two methods: conventional and individual waveform analysis. Conventional analysis has shown that a period of high AE activity occurs in ultra-pure aluminum, an Al-Cu alloy and an Al-Li alloy as the last fraction of solid forms. A model is presented which attributes this activity to internal stresses caused by grain boundary formation. Another period of AE activity occurs in the two alloys as the first fraction of solid forms. This activity was not observed in the non-porous ultra-pure aluminum. A model is presented which attributes this activity to interdendritic porosity. A mixture of low and high intensity signals occurred during each period but specific trends in waveform characteristics were not identified. The waveform is dominated by resonant effects from the waveguide or, if high-pass filtering is used, the transfer function of the transducer controls the waveshape.

  1. Nondestructive Evaluation of Adhesively Bonded Joints by Acousto-Ultrasonic Technique and Acoustic Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nayeb-Hashemi, Hamid; Rossettos, J. N.

    1997-01-01

    Reliable applications of adhesively bonded joints require an effective nondestructive evaluation technique for their bond strength prediction. To properly evaluate factors affecting bond strength, effects of defects such as voids and disbonds on stress distribution in the overlap region must be understood. At the same time, in order to use acousto-ultrasonic (AU) technique to evaluate bond quality, the effect of these defects on dynamic response of single lap joints must be clear. The stress distribution in a single lap joint with and without defects (void or disbond) is analyzed. A bar-Theta parameter which contains adherend and adhesive thickness and properties is introduced. It is shown for bonded joints with bar-Theta greater than 10, that a symmetric void or disbond in the middle of overlap up to the 70 percent of overlap length has negligible effect on bond strength. In contrast frequency response analyses by a finite element technique showed that the dynamic response is affected significantly by the presence of voids or disbonds. These results have direct implication in the interpretations of AU results. Through transmission attenuation and a number of AU parameters for various specimens with and without defects are evaluated. It is found that although void and disbond have similar effects on bond strength (stress distribution), they have completely different effects on wave propagation characteristics. For steel-adhesive-steel specimens with voids, the attenuation changes are related to the bond strength. However, the attenuation changes for specimens with disbond are fairly constant over a disbond range. In order to incorporate the location of defects in AU parameters, a weighting function is introduced. Using an immersion system with focused transducers, a number of AU parameters are evaluated. It is found that by incorporating weighting functions in these parameters better sensitivities (AU parameters vs. bond strength) are achieved. Acoustic emission

  2. Use of acoustic velocity methodology and remote sensing techniques to measure unsteady flow on the lower Yazoo River in Mississippi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Turnipseed, D. Phil; Cooper, Lance M.; Davis, Angela A.

    1998-01-01

    Methodologies have been developed for computing continuous discharge during varied, non-uniform low and medium flows on the Yazoo River at the U.S. Geological Survey streamgage below Steele Bayou near Long Lake, Mississippi, using acoustic signal processing and conventional streamgaging techniques. Procedures were also developed to compute locations of discharges during future high flow events when the stream reach is subject to hi-directional and reverse flow caused by rising stages on the Mississippi River using a combination of acoustic equipment and remote sensing technology. A description of the study area is presented. Selected results of these methods are presented for the period from March through September 1997.

  3. Helicopter Model Rotor-Blade Vortex Interaction Impulsive Noise: Scalability and Parametric Variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boxwell, D. A.; Schmitz, F. H.; Splettstoesser, W. R.; Schultz, K. J.

    1987-01-01

    Acoustic data taken in the anechoic Deutsch-Niederlaendischer Windkanal (DNW) have documented the blade-vortex interaction (BVI) impulsive noise radiated from a 1/7-scale model main rotor of the AH-1 series helicopter. Averaged model-scale data were compared with averaged full-scale, in-flight acoustic data under similar non-dimensional test conditions using an improved data analysis technique. At low advance ratios (mu = 0.164 - 0.194), the BVI impulsive noise data scale remarkably well in level, waveform, and directivity patterns. At moderate advance ratios (mu = 0.224 - 0.270), the scaling deteriorates, suggesting that the model-scale rotor is not adequately simulating the full-scale BVI noise. Presently, no proved explanation of this discrepancy exists. Measured BVI noise radiation is highly sensitive to all of the four governing nondimensional parameters--hover tip Mach number, advance ratio, local inflow ratio, and thrust coefficient.

  4. Acoustic Microscopy for Visualization and Evaluation of Ceramic-ceramic Contact Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morokov, E. S.; Levin, V. M.; Petronyuk, Yu. S.; Podzorova, L. I.; Il'Icheva, A. A.; Lebedenko, I. Yu.; Anisimova, S. V.

    Impulse acoustic microscopy technique has been applied for investigation of features of ceramic-ceramic contact zone. At the interface the method allows to identified and localized detachment and extended partial contact area (kissing contact), shown distribution of the thickness of the interlayer and its homogeneity.

  5. Deep diving odontocetes foraging strategies and their prey field as determined by acoustic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giorli, Giacomo

    Deep diving odontocetes, like sperm whales, beaked whales, Risso's dolphins, and pilot whales are known to forage at deep depths in the ocean on squid and fish. These marine mammal species are top predators and for this reason are very important for the ecosystems they live in, since they can affect prey populations and control food web dynamics through top-down effects. The studies presented in this thesis investigate deep diving odontocetes. foraging strategies, and the density and size of their potential prey in the deep ocean using passive and active acoustic techniques. Ecological Acoustic Recorders (EAR) were used to monitor the foraging activity of deep diving odontocetes at three locations around the world: the Josephine Seamount High Sea Marine Protected Area (JHSMPA), the Ligurian Sea, and along the Kona coast of the island of Hawaii. In the JHSMPA, sperm whales. and beaked whales. foraging rates do not differ between night-time and day-time. However, in the Ligurian Sea, sperm whales switch to night-time foraging as the winter approaches, while beaked whales alternate between hunting mainly at night, and both at night and at day. Spatial differences were found in deep diving odontocetes. foraging activity in Hawaii where they forage most in areas with higher chlorophyll concentrations. Pilot whales (and false killer whales, clustered together in the category "blackfishes") and Risso's dolphins forage mainly at night at all locations. These two species adjust their foraging activity with the length of the night. The density and size of animals living in deep sea scattering layers was studied using a DIDSON imaging sonar at multiple stations along the Kona coast of Hawaii. The density of animals was affected by location, depth, month, and the time of day. The size of animals was influenced by station and month. The DIDSON proved to be a successful, non-invasive technique to study density and size of animals in the deep sea. Densities were found to be an

  6. Real-ear acoustical characteristics of impulse sound generated by golf drivers and the estimated risk to hearing: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Fei; Bardsley, Barry

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This study investigated real-ear acoustical characteristics in terms of the sound pressure levels (SPLs) and frequency responses in situ generated from golf club drivers at impact with a golf ball. The risk of hearing loss caused by hitting a basket of golf balls using various drivers was then estimated. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting The three driver clubs were chosen on the basis of reflection of the commonality and modern technology of the clubs. The participants were asked to choose the clubs in a random order and hit six two-piece range golf balls with each club. The experiment was carried out at a golf driving range in South Wales, UK. Participants 19 male amateur golfers volunteered to take part in the study, with an age range of 19–54 years. Outcome measures The frequency responses and peak SPLs in situ of the transient sound generated from the club at impact were recorded bilaterally and simultaneously using the GN Otometric Freefit wireless real-ear measurement system. A swing speed radar system was also used to investigate the relationship between noise level and swing speed. Results Different clubs generated significantly different real-ear acoustical characteristics in terms of SPL and frequency responses. However, they did not differ significantly between the ears. No significant correlation was found between the swing speed and noise intensity. On the basis of the SPLs measured in the present study, the percentage of daily noise exposure for hitting a basket of golf balls using the drivers described above was less than 2%. Conclusions The immediate danger of noise-induced hearing loss for amateur golfers is quite unlikely. However, it may be dangerous to hearing if the noise level generated by the golf clubs exceeded 116 dBA. PMID:24448845

  7. Detection and Prediction of Creep-Damage of Copper Using Nonlinear Acoustic Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayana, V. J. S.; Balasubramaniam, K.; Prakash, R. V.

    2010-02-01

    This paper describes the use of nonlinear acoustic techniques for the characterization of material damage gradient in 99.98% pure copper due to high temperature creep. Creep damage progression was monitored by conducting continuous and interrupted modes of creep tests. In case of continuous loading, nonlinear ultrasonic (NLU) measurements were conducted, after fracture at different locations along the gage length of the sample. For interrupted tests, the NLU measurements were conducted at different creep life fractions, through periodic interruption of creep test. The third harmonic was more sensitive to creep damage compared to second and static component nonlinearity. All samples show one peak in the nonlinear response at 25-45% of creep life. Finally, we presented the results of nonlinear response working at low power levels, since the interesting effect of accumulated dislocations. Using that effect we applied to creep damage detection. In this the NLU amplitude vs. input amplitude was observed to correlate well with the micro-void concentrations caused by creep conditions.

  8. Finite impulse response utilizing the principle of superposition.

    PubMed

    Carter, S E; Malocha, D C

    1997-01-01

    A critical parameter in any finite impulse response (FIR) design is the impulse response length, which must be optimized for the given design specifications in order to reduce the size of the filter. To this end, many design algorithms have been introduced, such as Remez exchange, linear programming, and least mean squares. A new algorithm has been derived that is simple, efficient, and accurate for the design of arbitrary filter specifications and requires fewer computations than many other FIR approaches. This paper provides the definition of the basic functions used for the design process. An overview of the design process is given and the design technique used to design filters with tailored passband and stopband responses to yield a near-optimum time length is presented. This design can be very useful when compensating for the effects of a second transducer or other second order effects in surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices. The effects of monotonically increasing sidelobes on the impulse response length are discussed and illustrated. The addition of arbitrary phase response to the filter design process is discussed. The results of the current FIR approach are discussed and compared with other design techniques. PMID:18244136

  9. Acoustic mode measurements in the inlet of a model turbofan using a continuously rotating rake: Data collection/analysis techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, David G.; Heidelberg, Laurence; Konno, Kevin

    1993-01-01

    The rotating microphone measurement technique and data analysis procedures are documented which are used to determine circumferential and radial acoustic mode content in the inlet of the Advanced Ducted Propeller (ADP) model. Circumferential acoustic mode levels were measured at a series of radial locations using the Doppler frequency shift produced by a rotating inlet microphone probe. Radial mode content was then computed using a least squares curve fit with the measured radial distribution for each circumferential mode. The rotating microphone technique is superior to fixed-probe techniques because it results in minimal interference with the acoustic modes generated by rotor-stator interaction. This effort represents the first experimental implementation of a measuring technique developed by T. G. Sofrin. Testing was performed in the NASA Lewis Low Speed Anechoic Wind Tunnel at a simulated takeoff condition of Mach 0.2. The design is included of the data analysis software and the performance of the rotating rake apparatus. The effect of experiment errors is also discussed.

  10. Acoustic Emission Technique for Characterizing Deformation and Fatigue Crack Growth in Austenitic Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raj, Baldev; Mukhopadhyay, C. K.; Jayakumar, T.

    2003-03-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) during tensile deformation and fatigue crack growth (FCG) of austenitic stainless steels has been studied. In AISI type 316 stainless steel (SS), AE has been used to detect micro plastic yielding occurring during macroscopic plastic deformation. In AISI type 304 SS, relation of AE with stress intensity factor and plastic zone size has been studied. In AISI type 316 SS, fatigue crack growth has been characterised using acoustic emission.

  11. Progress in acoustic holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hildebrand, B. P.

    1985-01-01

    The theory underlying the methods used in acoustic holography (the real-time liquid surface levitation and the scanning holography methods) and in electromagnetic holography, which uses electromagnetic impulses (radar) or electromagnetic waves (eddy current) is developed. These holographic techniques are illustrated with experimental results, including the use of the liquid surface levitation method for inspecting fiberglass laminate tubes, and examples of the time-of-flight holographic images, the coherent ultrasonic images, multifrequency ultrasonic images, and the synthetic aperture holography images obtained by the use of the scanning holography methodology. Other examples illustrate applications of radar holography and eddy current holography. These examples are used to refute some traditional negative comments on nonoptical holography.

  12. Surface acoustic wave technique for the characterization of porous properties of microporous silicate thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hietala, Susan Leslie

    1997-12-01

    Features of gas adsorption onto sol-gel derived microporous silicate thin films, for characterization of porous properties, are detailed using a surface acoustic wave (SAW) technique. Mass uptake and film effective modulus changes calculated from the SAW data are investigated in detail. The effects of stress and surface tension on the SAW sensor are calculated and found to be negligible in these experiments. Transient behavior recorded during nitrogen adsorption at 77 K is discussed in the context of mass uptake and effective modulus contributions. The time constant associated with the effective modulus calculation is consistent with that of diffusivity of nitrogen into a 5A zeolite. Further calculations indicate that the transient behavior is not due to thermal effects. A unique dual sensor SAW experiment to decouple the mass and effective modulus contributions to the frequency response was performed in conjunction with a Silicon beam-bending experiment. The beam-bending experiment results in a calculation of stress induced during adsorption of methanol on a microporous silicate thin film. The decoupled mass and effective modulus calculated from the SAW data have similar shaped isotherms, and are quite different from that of the stress developed in the Silicon beam. The total effective modulus change calculated from the SAW data is consistent with that calculated using Gassmann's equation. The SAW system developed for this work included unique electronics and customized hardware which is suitable for work under vacuum and at temperatures from 77K to 473K. This unique setup is suitable for running thin film samples on a Micromeritics ASAP 2000 Gas Adsorption unit in automatic mode. This setup is also general enough to be compatible with a custom gas adsorption unit and the beam bending apparatus, both using standard vacuum assemblies.

  13. Acoustic Techniques for Measuring Surface Sealing and Crusting of Agricultural Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickey, C. J.; Leary, D.; Dicarlo, D. A.

    2004-12-01

    The microtopography of soils is an important surface characteristic that effects water ponding, infiltration, and consequently soil erosion. During a rainstorm event the surface microtopography and soil matrix evolve, thereby altering the erosion and runoff dynamics. The impact of raindrops cause the breakdown of soil aggregates into smaller particles, which can then be deposited into the smaller depressions. The redistribution of soil particles on the surface during rainfall produce a thin surface layer often referred to as surface sealing or crusting. For the purpose of this presentation, surface sealing will be used to describe a reduction in the ability of fluid to flow across the surface. Surface crusting will be associated with the formation of a thin layer of higher stiffness or larger mechanical strength. The sensitivity of acoustics to the effects of sealing and crusting was examined by measuring the acoustic-to seismic (A/S) transfer function and acoustic reflectivity on two different soils in a dry, wetted and rained-on state. The A/S transfer function measurement involves the use of a suspended loud speaker to impinge acoustic energy from the air onto the sample and a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) is used to measure the induced surface particle velocity. Therefore, the A/S transfer function is a measure of the seismic energy that has been transferred into the soil from the airborne wave. The acoustic surface reflectivity is a measurement of the amount of acoustic energy reflected from the surface and requires the use of a microphone suspended above the surface. Results suggests that the seismic energy transferred (A/S transfer function) is sensitive to crust formation but is not as sensitive to sealing. The amount of reflected acoustic energy appears to be more sensitive to sealing than crusting.

  14. Comparison of acoustic and conventional flow measurement techniques at the Raccoon Mountain Pumped-Storage Plant: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    March, P.A.; Missimer, J.R.; Voss, A.; Pearson, H.S.

    1987-08-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) initiated a research project to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of using the acoustic method of flow measurement in hydroelectric power plant efficiency tests. As a portion of this program, the Tennessee Valley Authority's (TVA) Raccoon Mountain Pumped-Storage Plant was chosen as one of the sites to be tested. The primary objective of the TVA test was to compare the measurements of the Ocean Research Engineering (ORE), acoustic flowmeter installed on Unit 1 to the Volumetric and Winter-Kennedy Techniques for flow measurement. The Winter-Kennedy Technique is the standard flow measurement technique used in the plant. The Volumetric Technique consisted of accurate measurement of the upper reservoir volume over specified time increments. For calibration, the upper reservoir was initially drained and as it was being filled, aerial photographs were taken to obtain contour lines which were correlated with simultaneous stage measurements. The photographs were used to compute the differential volume of the reservoir associated with a change in stage. Six performance tests were conducted on Unit 1. During the tests no other units were operated. Five tests were conducted in the generating mode and one test was conducted in the pumping mode. The uncertainty in the measurements using the Volumetric Technique is of the order of 0.5 percent for changes of stage elevation in excess of two feet. The flowrate measured by the ORE acoustic flowmeter was consistently of the order of 1.5 percent lower than the flowrate determined from the Volumetric Technique in both the generating and pumping modes. 3 refs., 32 figs., 14 tabs.

  15. Acoustic emission non-destructive testing of structures using source location techniques.

    SciTech Connect

    Beattie, Alan G.

    2013-09-01

    The technology of acoustic emission (AE) testing has been advanced and used at Sandia for the past 40 years. AE has been used on structures including pressure vessels, fire bottles, wind turbines, gas wells, nuclear weapons, and solar collectors. This monograph begins with background topics in acoustics and instrumentation and then focuses on current acoustic emission technology. It covers the overall design and system setups for a test, with a wind turbine blade as the object. Test analysis is discussed with an emphasis on source location. Three test examples are presented, two on experimental wind turbine blades and one on aircraft fire extinguisher bottles. Finally, the code for a FORTRAN source location program is given as an example of a working analysis program. Throughout the document, the stress is on actual testing of real structures, not on laboratory experiments.

  16. Detection of stress corrosion cracking of high-strength steel used in prestressed concrete structures by acoustic emission technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramadan, S.; Gaillet, L.; Tessier, C.; Idrissi, H.

    2008-02-01

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of high-strength steel used in prestressed concrete structures was studied by acoustic emission technique (AE). A simulated concrete pore (SCP) solution at high-alkaline (pH ≈ 12) contaminated by sulphate, chloride, and thiocyanate ions was used. The evolution of the acoustic activity recorded during the tests shows the presence of several stages related respectively to cracks initiation due to the local corrosion imposed by corrosives species, cracks propagation and steel failure. Microscopic examinations pointed out that the wires exhibited a brittle fracture mode. The cracking was found to propagate in the transgranular mode. The role of corrosives species and hydrogen in the rupture mechanism of high-strength steel was also investigated. This study shows promising results for an potential use in situ of AE for real-time health monitoring of eutectoid steel cables used in prestressed concrete structures.

  17. A synchronized particle image velocimetry and infrared thermography technique applied to an acoustic streaming flow

    PubMed Central

    Sou, In Mei; Layman, Christopher N.; Ray, Chittaranjan

    2013-01-01

    Subsurface coherent structures and surface temperatures are investigated using simultaneous measurements of particle image velocimetry (PIV) and infrared (IR) thermography. Results for coherent structures from acoustic streaming and associated heating transfer in a rectangular tank with an acoustic horn mounted horizontally at the sidewall are presented. An observed vortex pair develops and propagates in the direction along the centerline of the horn. From the PIV velocity field data, distinct kinematic regions are found with the Lagrangian coherent structure (LCS) method. The implications of this analysis with respect to heat transfer and related sonochemical applications are discussed. PMID:24347810

  18. A synchronized particle image velocimetry and infrared thermography technique applied to an acoustic streaming flow.

    PubMed

    Sou, In Mei; Allen, John S; Layman, Christopher N; Ray, Chittaranjan

    2011-11-01

    Subsurface coherent structures and surface temperatures are investigated using simultaneous measurements of particle image velocimetry (PIV) and infrared (IR) thermography. Results for coherent structures from acoustic streaming and associated heating transfer in a rectangular tank with an acoustic horn mounted horizontally at the sidewall are presented. An observed vortex pair develops and propagates in the direction along the centerline of the horn. From the PIV velocity field data, distinct kinematic regions are found with the Lagrangian coherent structure (LCS) method. The implications of this analysis with respect to heat transfer and related sonochemical applications are discussed. PMID:24347810

  19. Benthic habitat mapping: A review of progress towards improved understanding of the spatial ecology of the seafloor using acoustic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Craig J.; Smith, Stephen J.; Lawton, Peter; Anderson, John T.

    2011-05-01

    This review examines the various strategies and methods used to produce benthic habitat maps using acoustic remote sensing techniques, coupled with in situ sampling. The applications of three acoustic survey techniques are examined in detail: single-beam acoustic ground discrimination systems, sidescan sonar systems, and multi-beam echo sounders. Over the past decade we have witnessed the nascence of the field of benthic habitat mapping and, on the evidence of the literature reviewed in this paper, have seen a rapid evolution in the level of sophistication in our ability to image and thus map seafloor habitats. As acoustic survey tools have become ever more complex, new methods have been tested to segment, classify and combine these data with biological ground truth sample data. Although the specific methods used to derive habitat maps vary considerably, the review indicates that studies can generally be categorized into one of three over-arching strategies; 1) Abiotic surrogate mapping; 2) Assemble first, predict later (unsupervised classification); 3) Predict first, assemble later (supervised classification). Whilst there is still no widely accepted agreement on the best way to produce benthic habitat maps, all three strategies provide valuable map resources to support management objectives. Whilst there is still considerable work to be done before we can answer many of the outstanding technological, methodological, ecological and theoretical questions that have been raised here, the review concludes that the advent of spatial ecological studies founded on high-resolution environmental data sets will undoubtedly help us to examine patterns in community and species distributions. This is a vital first step in unraveling ecological complexities and thus providing improved spatial information for management of marine systems.

  20. Estimating steatosis and fibrosis: Comparison of acoustic structure quantification with established techniques

    PubMed Central

    Karlas, Thomas; Berger, Joachim; Garnov, Nikita; Lindner, Franziska; Busse, Harald; Linder, Nicolas; Schaudinn, Alexander; Relke, Bettina; Chakaroun, Rima; Tröltzsch, Michael; Wiegand, Johannes; Keim, Volker

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To compare ultrasound-based acoustic structure quantification (ASQ) with established non-invasive techniques for grading and staging fatty liver disease. METHODS: Type 2 diabetic patients at risk of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (n = 50) and healthy volunteers (n = 20) were evaluated using laboratory analysis and anthropometric measurements, transient elastography (TE), controlled attenuation parameter (CAP), proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS; only available for the diabetic cohort), and ASQ. ASQ parameters mode, average and focal disturbance (FD) ratio were compared with: (1) the extent of liver fibrosis estimated from TE and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) fibrosis scores; and (2) the amount of steatosis, which was classified according to CAP values. RESULTS: Forty-seven diabetic patients (age 67.0 ± 8.6 years; body mass index 29.4 ± 4.5 kg/m²) with reliable CAP measurements and all controls (age 26.5 ± 3.2 years; body mass index 22.0 ± 2.7 kg/m²) were included in the analysis. All ASQ parameters showed differences between healthy controls and diabetic patients (P < 0.001, respectively). The ASQ FD ratio (logarithmic) correlated with the CAP (r = -0.81, P < 0.001) and 1H-MRS (r = -0.43, P = 0.004) results. The FD ratio [CAP < 250 dB/m: 107 (102-109), CAP between 250 and 300 dB/m: 106 (102-114); CAP between 300 and 350 dB/m: 105 (100-112), CAP ≥ 350 dB/m: 102 (99-108)] as well as mode and average parameters, were reduced in cases with advanced steatosis (ANOVA P < 0.05). However, none of the ASQ parameters showed a significant difference in patients with advanced fibrosis, as determined by TE and the NAFLD fibrosis score (P > 0.08, respectively). CONCLUSION: ASQ parameters correlate with steatosis, but not with fibrosis in fatty liver disease. Steatosis estimation with ASQ should be further evaluated in biopsy-controlled studies. PMID:25945002

  1. Validation and verification of the acoustic emission technique for structural health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagar, Daniel Omatsola

    The performance of the Acoustic Emission (AE) technique was investigated to establish its reliability in detecting and locating fatigue crack damage as well as distinguishing between different AE sources in potential SHM applications. Experiments were conducted to monitor the AE signals generated during fatigue crack growth in coupon 2014 T6 aluminium. The influence of stress ratio, stress range, sample geometry and whether or not the load spectrum was of constant or variable amplitude were all investigated. AE signals detected were correlated with values of applied cyclic load throughout the tests. Measurements of time difference of arrival were taken for assessment of errors in location estimates obtained using time of flight algorithms with a 1D location setup. At the onset of crack growth high AE Hit rates were observed for the first few millimetres after which they rapidly declined to minimal values for an extended period of crack growth. Another peak and then decline in AE Hit rates was observed for subsequent crack growth before yet another increase as the sample approached final failure.. AE signals were seen to occur in the lower two-thirds of the maximum load in the first few millimetres of crack growth before occurring at progressively smaller values as the crack length increased. A separate set of AE signals were observed close to the maximum cyclic stress throughout the entire crack growth process. At the failure crack length AE signals were generated across the entire loading range. Novel metrics were developed to statistically characterise variability of AE generation with crack growth and at particular crack lengths across different samples. A novel approach for fatigue crack length estimation was developed based on monitoring applied loads to the sample corresponding with generated AE signals. An acousto-ultrasonic method was used to calibrate the AE wave velocity in a representative wing-box structure which was used to successfully locate the

  2. Mechanical impedance and acoustic mobility measurement techniques of specifying vibration environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, G. C.

    1973-01-01

    Method has been developed for predicting interaction between components and corresponding support structures subjected to acoustic excitations. Force environments determined in spectral form are called force spectra. Force-spectra equation is determined based on one-dimensional structural impedance model.

  3. Effects of different analysis techniques and recording duty cycles on passive acoustic monitoring of killer whales.

    PubMed

    Riera, Amalis; Ford, John K; Ross Chapman, N

    2013-09-01

    Killer whales in British Columbia are at risk, and little is known about their winter distribution. Passive acoustic monitoring of their year-round habitat is a valuable supplemental method to traditional visual and photographic surveys. However, long-term acoustic studies of odontocetes have some limitations, including the generation of large amounts of data that require highly time-consuming processing. There is a need to develop tools and protocols to maximize the efficiency of such studies. Here, two types of analysis, real-time and long term spectral averages, were compared to assess their performance at detecting killer whale calls in long-term acoustic recordings. In addition, two different duty cycles, 1/3 and 2/3, were tested. Both the use of long term spectral averages and a lower duty cycle resulted in a decrease in call detection and positive pod identification, leading to underestimations of the amount of time the whales were present. The impact of these limitations should be considered in future killer whale acoustic surveys. A compromise between a lower resolution data processing method and a higher duty cycle is suggested for maximum methodological efficiency. PMID:23968036

  4. ACOUSTIC TECHNIQUES FOR THE MAPPING OF THE DISTRIBUTION OF CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    An overview of the last 30 years of analytical research into the acoustic properties of harbor marine sediments has allowed the extension of the original work of Hamilton (1970) into a production system for classifying the density and bulk physical properties of standard marine s...

  5. Teaching Emotional Intelligence to Impulsive-Aggressive Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henley, Martin; Long, Nicholas J.

    1999-01-01

    Describes complex issues involved in helping impulsive-aggressive youth who are devoid of emotional intelligence. Reviews anatomy of impulsivity and the irrational beliefs used as defense mechanisms by impulsive-aggressive students. Discusses two alternative intervention strategies, Life Space Crisis Intervention techniques and the Self Control…

  6. Prediction of ultrasound-mediated disruption of cell membranes using machine learning techniques and statistical analysis of acoustic spectra.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eva K; Gallagher, Richard J; Campbell, Ann Melissa; Prausnitz, Mark R

    2004-01-01

    Although biological effects of ultrasound must be avoided for safe diagnostic applications, ultrasound's ability to disrupt cell membranes has attracted interest as a method to facilitate drug and gene delivery. This paper seeks to develop "prediction rules" for predicting the degree of cell membrane disruption based on specified ultrasound parameters and measured acoustic signals. Three techniques for generating prediction rules (regression analysis, classification trees and discriminant analysis) are applied to data obtained from a sequence of experiments on bovine red blood cells. For each experiment, the data consist of four ultrasound parameters, acoustic measurements at 400 frequencies, and a measure of cell membrane disruption. To avoid over-training, various combinations of the 404 predictor variables are used when applying the rule generation methods. The results indicate that the variable combination consisting of ultrasound exposure time and acoustic signals measured at the driving frequency and its higher harmonics yields the best rule for all three rule generation methods. The methods used for deriving the prediction rules are broadly applicable, and could be used to develop prediciton rules in other scenarios involving different cell types or tissues. These rules and the methods used to derive them could be used for real-time feedback about ultrasound's biological effects. PMID:14723497

  7. Acoustically swept rotor. [helicopter noise reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitz, F. H.; Boxwell, D. A.; Vause, R. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    Impulsive noise reduction is provided in a rotor blade by acoustically sweeping the chord line from root to tip so that the acoustic radiation resulting from the summation of potential singularities used to model the flow about the blade tend to cancel for all times at an observation point in the acoustic far field.

  8. Multi-reflective acoustic wave device

    DOEpatents

    Andle, Jeffrey C.

    2006-02-21

    An acoustic wave device, which utilizes multiple localized reflections of acoustic wave for achieving an infinite impulse response while maintaining high tolerance for dampening effects, is disclosed. The device utilized a plurality of electromechanically significant electrodes disposed on most of the active surface. A plurality of sensors utilizing the disclosed acoustic wave mode device are also described.

  9. Signal recovery technique based on a physical method of underwater acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xinyi; Wu, Guoqing; Ma, Li

    2010-09-01

    In the underwater sound channel we often use an array to receive signals from distant sources. The received signals are often mixed with environmental interference. In the complex acoustic environment, received signals are distorted greatly and elongated in time. In many practical applications such as sound communications, sound remote sensing and active sonar signals, we hope to obtain the original signal's waveform. In general theory, the received signals are the convolution of emission signals and Green's function of environment. In unknown Green's function of environment, simply relying on the array to record the information to determine the sound source signal wave propagation features and the environment is not enough. However, in certain circumstances, based on a physics method of underwater acoustics, the spread of recovery technology is successful.

  10. A hybrid numerical technique for predicting the aerodynamic and acoustic fields of advanced turboprops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homicz, G. F.; Moselle, J. R.

    1985-01-01

    A hybrid numerical procedure is presented for the prediction of the aerodynamic and acoustic performance of advanced turboprops. A hybrid scheme is proposed which in principle leads to a consistent simultaneous prediction of both fields. In the inner flow a finite difference method, the Approximate-Factorization Alternating-Direction-Implicit (ADI) scheme, is used to solve the nonlinear Euler equations. In the outer flow the linearized acoustic equations are solved via a Boundary-Integral Equation (BIE) method. The two solutions are iteratively matched across a fictitious interface in the flow so as to maintain continuity. At convergence the resulting aerodynamic load prediction will automatically satisfy the appropriate free-field boundary conditions at the edge of the finite difference grid, while the acoustic predictions will reflect the back-reaction of the radiated field on the magnitude of the loading source terms, as well as refractive effects in the inner flow. The equations and logic needed to match the two solutions are developed and the computer program implementing the procedure is described. Unfortunately, no converged solutions were obtained, due to unexpectedly large running times. The reasons for this are discussed and several means to alleviate the situation are suggested.

  11. Genetics of impulsive behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Bevilacqua, Laura; Goldman, David

    2013-01-01

    Impulsivity, defined as the tendency to act without foresight, comprises a multitude of constructs and is associated with a variety of psychiatric disorders. Dissecting different aspects of impulsive behaviour and relating these to specific neurobiological circuits would improve our understanding of the etiology of complex behaviours for which impulsivity is key, and advance genetic studies in this behavioural domain. In this review, we will discuss the heritability of some impulsivity constructs and their possible use as endophenotypes (heritable, disease-associated intermediate phenotypes). Several functional genetic variants associated with impulsive behaviour have been identified by the candidate gene approach and re-sequencing, and whole genome strategies can be implemented for discovery of novel rare and common alleles influencing impulsivity. Via deep sequencing an uncommon HTR2B stop codon, common in one population, was discovered, with implications for understanding impulsive behaviour in both humans and rodents and for future gene discovery. PMID:23440466

  12. Behavioral components of impulsivity.

    PubMed

    Stahl, Christoph; Voss, Andreas; Schmitz, Florian; Nuszbaum, Mandy; Tüscher, Oliver; Lieb, Klaus; Klauer, Karl Christoph

    2014-04-01

    Acting in accord with long-term goals requires control of interfering impulses, the success of which depends on several different processes. Using a structural-equation modeling approach, we investigated 5 behavioral components of impulsivity: the control of stimulus interference, proactive interference, and response interference, as well as decisional and motivational impulsivity. Results support the existence of 5 correlated but separable components of impulsive behavior. The present study is the 1st to demonstrate the separability of stimulus and response interference. It also supports the notion that control of response-related interference is not a unitary construct: Response-selection demands were separable from those of withholding or stopping. Relations between behavioral impulsivity components and self-report measures of impulsivity were largely absent. We conclude that as the construct of impulsivity has been extended to describe an increasingly diverse set of phenomena and processes, it has become too broad to be helpful in guiding future research. PMID:23957282

  13. Measurement of the responses of polyurethane and CONFOR(TM) foams and the development of a system identification technique to estimate polyurethane foam parameters from experimental impulse responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundaram, Vaidyanadan

    Flexible polyurethane foam is the main cushioning element used in car seats. Optimization of an occupied seat's static and dynamic behavior requires models of foam that are accurate over a wide range of excitation and pre-compression conditions. Experiments were conducted to measure the response of foam over a wide range of excitation which include slowly varying uniaxial compression tests on a 3 inch cube foam sample, base excitation and impulse excitation test on a foam-mass system. The foam used was the same in all of the experiments, thus obtaining all the responses on the same foam sample which helps eliminate the sample to sample variation. Similar efforts were taken to conduct impulse and base excitation tests on CONFOR(TM) foam to help in future modeling efforts of CONFOR(TM) foam. All the experimental protocols and data pre-processing protocols along with results are presented. Previous researcher developed a linear model for a single-degree of freedom foam-mass system subjected to an impulsive excitation. Free response data from impulse tests on a foam-mass system with different masses was used to identify model parameters at various pre-compression levels (settling points). The free response of the system was modeled as a Prony series (sum of exponentials) whose parameters can be related to the parameters in the foam-mass system model. Models identified from tests at one settling point performed poorly when used to predict the response at other settling points. In this research, a method is described to estimate the parameters of a global model of the foam behavior from data gathered in a series of impulse tests at different settling points. The global model structure includes a nonlinear elastic term and a hereditary viscoelastic term. The model can be used to predict the settling point for each mass used and, by expanding the model about that settling point, local linear models of the response to impulsive excitation can be derived. From this analysis

  14. Localization of quenches and mechanical disturbances in the Mu2e transport solenoid prototype using acoustic emission technique

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Marchevsky, M.; Ambrosio, G.; Lamm, M.; Tartaglia, M. A.; Lopes, M. L.

    2016-02-12

    Acoustic emission (AE) detection is a noninvasive technique allowing the localization of the mechanical events and quenches in superconducting magnets. Application of the AE technique is especially advantageous in situations where magnet integrity can be jeopardized by the use of voltage taps or inductive pickup coils. As the prototype module of the transport solenoid (TS) for the Mu2e experiment at Fermilab represents such a special case, we have developed a dedicated six-channel AE detection system and accompanying software aimed at localizing mechanical events during the coil cold testing. The AE sensors based on transversely polarized piezoceramic washers combined with cryogenicmore » preamplifiers were mounted at the outer surface of the solenoid aluminum shell, with a 60° angular step around the circumference. Acoustic signals were simultaneously acquired at a rate of 500 kS/s, prefiltered and sorted based on their arrival time. Next, based on the arrival timing, angular and axial coordinates of the AE sources within the magnet structure were calculated. Furthermore, we present AE measurement results obtained during cooldown, spot heater firing, and spontaneous quenching of the Mu2e TS module prototype and discuss their relevance for mechanical stability assessment and quench localization.« less

  15. Advanced numerical technique for analysis of surface and bulk acoustic waves in resonators using periodic metal gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumenko, Natalya F.

    2014-09-01

    A numerical technique characterized by a unified approach for the analysis of different types of acoustic waves utilized in resonators in which a periodic metal grating is used for excitation and reflection of such waves is described. The combination of the Finite Element Method analysis of the electrode domain with the Spectral Domain Analysis (SDA) applied to the adjacent upper and lower semi-infinite regions, which may be multilayered and include air as a special case of a dielectric material, enables rigorous simulation of the admittance in resonators using surface acoustic waves, Love waves, plate modes including Lamb waves, Stonely waves, and other waves propagating along the interface between two media, and waves with transient structure between the mentioned types. The matrix formalism with improved convergence incorporated into SDA provides fast and robust simulation for multilayered structures with arbitrary thickness of each layer. The described technique is illustrated by a few examples of its application to various combinations of LiNbO3, isotropic silicon dioxide and silicon with a periodic array of Cu electrodes. The wave characteristics extracted from the admittance functions change continuously with the variation of the film and plate thicknesses over wide ranges, even when the wave nature changes. The transformation of the wave nature with the variation of the layer thicknesses is illustrated by diagrams and contour plots of the displacements calculated at resonant frequencies.

  16. A novel imaging technique based on the spatial coherence of backscattered waves: demonstration in the presence of acoustical clutter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahl, Jeremy J.; Pinton, Gianmarco F.; Lediju, Muyinatu; Trahey, Gregg E.

    2011-03-01

    In the last 20 years, the number of suboptimal and inadequate ultrasound exams has increased. This trend has been linked to the increasing population of overweight and obese individuals. The primary causes of image degradation in these individuals are often attributed to phase aberration and clutter. Phase aberration degrades image quality by distorting the transmitted and received pressure waves, while clutter degrades image quality by introducing incoherent acoustical interference into the received pressure wavefront. Although significant research efforts have pursued the correction of image degradation due to phase aberration, few efforts have characterized or corrected image degradation due to clutter. We have developed a novel imaging technique that is capable of differentiating ultrasonic signals corrupted by acoustical interference. The technique, named short-lag spatial coherence (SLSC) imaging, is based on the spatial coherence of the received ultrasonic wavefront at small spatial distances across the transducer aperture. We demonstrate comparative B-mode and SLSC images using full-wave simulations that include the effects of clutter and show that SLSC imaging generates contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) and signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) that are significantly better than B-mode imaging under noise-free conditions. In the presence of noise, SLSC imaging significantly outperforms conventional B-mode imaging in all image quality metrics. We demonstrate the use of SLSC imaging in vivo and compare B-mode and SLSC images of human thyroid and liver.

  17. Dislodgement and removal of dust-particles from a surface by a technique combining acoustic standing wave and airflow.

    PubMed

    Chen, Di; Wu, Junru

    2010-01-01

    It is known that there are many fine particles on the moon and Mars. Their existence may cause risk for the success of a long-term project for NASA, i.e., exploration and habitation of the moon and Mars. These dust-particles might cover the solar panels, making them fail to generate electricity, and they might also penetrate through seals on space suits, hatches, and vehicle wheels causing many incidents. The fine particles would be hazardous to human health if they were inhaled. Development of robust dust mitigation technology is urgently needed for the viable long-term exploration and habilitation of either the moon or Mars. A feasibility study to develop a dust removal technique, which may be used in space-stations or other enclosures for habitation, is reported. It is shown experimentally that the acoustic radiation force produced by a 13.8 kHz 128 dB sound-level standing wave between a 3 cm-aperture tweeter and a reflector separated by 9 cm is strong enough to overcome the van der Waals adhesive force between the dust-particles and the reflector-surface. Thus the majority of fine particles (>2 microm diameter) on a reflector-surface can be dislodged and removed by a technique combining acoustic levitation and airflow methods. The removal efficiency deteriorates for particles of less than 2 microm in size. PMID:20058949

  18. An electro-acoustical technique for the detection of knee joint noise.

    PubMed

    Chu, M L; Gradisar, I A; Railey, M R; Bowling, G F

    1976-01-01

    Distinguishing acoustical signatures of sound emitted by normal and pathological knee joints are picked up using a double microphone-differential amplifier setup. Extraneous background noise is minimized using the principle of "noise cancellation". Two identical sensitive condenser microphones and an F.M. recorder with flat responses in the audio range were used. Preliminary studies covering normal and diseased knee joints showed that their respective waveforms and spectral patterns are unique and proved to be a promising nondestructive diagnostic tool for early detection of knee joint cartilage damage. PMID:957922

  19. Acoustic-tomographical sounding technique in near-surface atmospheric layers - applicability and limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziemann, A.; Arnold, K.; Raabe, A.

    2003-04-01

    Acoustic tomography of the atmosphere is proposed as a ground-based remote sensing and imaging scheme that uses the sound propagation through the turbulent atmosphere. Measured travel-time values of sound signals between different fixed transmitters and receivers are used as initial line-integrated values to derive spatially averaged temperature and wind fields inside the atmospheric surface layer. Because each single measurement includes information on the properties of the atmospheric layer through which the sound propagates, a tomographic inversion algorithm is able to provide a spatial mapping of meteorological data derived from the measured acoustic parameters. To evaluate the certainty and the spatial resolution of the tomographically derived data, the data accuracy as well as the validity of applied simplifications have to be investigated. Thereby, the determination of the sound path under different atmospheric conditions plays an important role. For this purpose a ray-tracing model based on a generalized version of Snells law corresponding to the coupled influence of temperature and wind vector gradients on the sound-ray refraction is used. The simulated acoustic travel-time values will be compared with theoretical values of a straight-line sound propagation to estimate the validity of this approximation for the tomographically inverse algorithm. To investigate the possible spatial resolution and the reached certainty of the reconstructed meteorological fields, the geometrical properties of the measuring field and the measurement accuracy itself are essential. Generalized results of such investigations for different measurement geometries will be presented. The resulting spatially averaged meteorological quantities can be used for the evaluation of micrometeorological test sites. The application of acoustic tomography provides information on the temperature and wind field over surfaces with different land uses. First results from measuring campaigns within

  20. Prospects and Techniques for Eddy-Resolving Acoustic Tomography in the Eastern Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caruthers, J. W.; Nechaev, D.; Roman, D. A.; Sidorovskaia, N. A.; Ioup, G. E.; Ioup, J.; Yaremchuk, M.

    2007-05-01

    For several decades monitoring and modeling the dynamics and physical structure of the Gulf of Mexico have been major efforts undertaken by oceanographers of the United States and other American countries. There are very interesting physical oceanographic features in the Gulf, not the least of which are the Gulf Loop Current and the eddies it spawns. Satellite sensing of IR and altimeter imagery has been a major input to modeling those features. Such efforts are very important to the economy and well being of much of the United States and Mexico, including fisheries, mineral economies, hurricane strengths and paths in the summer, and severe snow storms in the eastern US in the winter. A major shortcoming of the present monitoring of the Gulf is the lack of subsurface input to the dynamic models of the Gulf. Acoustic tomography is a viable means of providing that missing input. Several universities have come together to investigate the prospects for establishing a Gulf Eddy Monitoring System (GEMS) for the deep eastern half of the Gulf using acoustic tomography. The group has conducted several acoustics experiments and propagation studies to determine the feasibility of long-range propagation in the eastern Gulf and the mitigation of adverse effects on marine mammal populations in that region under the Office of Naval Research project entitled the Littoral Acoustic Demonstration Center (LADC). The group has also convened an invited session for the 9th World Multiconference on Systemics, Cybernetics and Informatics (WMSCI 2005) Orlando, FL, July 2005. This paper discusses prospects for establishing the GEMS tomographic system, its technical characteristics, and its contributions to advancing the knowledge of the dynamics of the Gulf. This presentation will concentrate on the characteristics of a single-slice tomographic system, called GEMS Phase I, across the approaches to the DeSoto Canyon in the northeastern Gulf and its prospect for monitoring the movements of

  1. Program for Continued Development and Use of Ocean Acoustic/GPS Geodetic Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiess, Fred N.

    1997-01-01

    Under prior NASA grants our group, with collaboration from scientists at the CalTech Jet Propulsion Lab (JPL), visualized and carried out the initial development of a combined GPS and underwater acoustic (GPS/A) method for determining the location of points on the deep sea floor with accuracy relevant to studies of crustal deformation. Under an immediately preceding grant we built, installed and surveyed a set of the necessary seafloor marker precision transponders just seaward of the Cascadia Subduction Zone off British Columbia. The JPL group carried out processing of the GPS data.

  2. Impulsive action: emotional impulses and their control

    PubMed Central

    Frijda, Nico H.; Ridderinkhof, K. Richard; Rietveld, Erik

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a novel theoretical view on impulsive action, integrating thus far separate perspectives on non-reflective action, motivation, emotion regulation, and impulse control. We frame impulsive action in terms of directedness of the individual organism toward, away, or against other givens – toward future states and away from one’s present state. First, appraisal of a perceived or thought-of event or object on occasion, rapidly and without premonition or conscious deliberation, triggers a motive to modify one’s relation to that event or object. Situational specifics of the event as perceived and appraised motivate and guide selection of readiness for a particular kind of purposive action. Second, perception of complex situations can give rise to multiple appraisals, multiple motives, and multiple simultaneous changes in action readiness. Multiple states of action readiness may interact in generating action, by reinforcing or attenuating each other, thereby yielding impulse control. We show how emotion control can itself result from a motive state or state of action readiness. Our view links impulsive action mechanistically to states of action readiness, which is the central feature of what distinguishes one kind of emotion from another. It thus provides a novel theoretical perspective to the somewhat fragmented literature on impulsive action. PMID:24917835

  3. Damage Modes Recognition and Hilbert-Huang Transform Analyses of CFRP Laminates Utilizing Acoustic Emission Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    WenQin, Han; Ying, Luo; AiJun, Gu; Yuan, Fuh-Gwo

    2016-04-01

    Discrimination of acoustic emission (AE) signals related to different damage modes is of great importance in carbon fiber-reinforced plastic (CFRP) composite materials. To gain a deeper understanding of the initiation, growth and evolution of the different types of damage, four types of specimens for different lay-ups and orientations and three types of specimens for interlaminar toughness tests are subjected to tensile test along with acoustic emission monitoring. AE signals have been collected and post-processed, the statistical results show that the peak frequency of AE signal can distinguish various damage modes effectively. After a AE signal were decomposed by Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD) method, it may separate and extract all damage modes included in this AE signal apart from damage mode corresponding to the peak frequency. Hilbert-Huang Transform (HHT) of AE signals can clearly illustrate the frequency distribution of Intrinsic Mode Functions (IMF) components in time-scale in different damage stages, and can calculate accurate instantaneous frequency for damage modes recognition to help understanding the damage process.

  4. The hearing threshold of a harbor porpoise (Phocoena phocoena) for impulsive sounds (L).

    PubMed

    Kastelein, Ronald A; Gransier, Robin; Hoek, Lean; de Jong, Christ A F

    2012-08-01

    The distance at which harbor porpoises can hear underwater detonation sounds is unknown, but depends, among other factors, on the hearing threshold of the species for impulsive sounds. Therefore, the underwater hearing threshold of a young harbor porpoise for an impulsive sound, designed to mimic a detonation pulse, was quantified by using a psychophysical technique. The synthetic exponential pulse with a 5 ms time constant was produced and transmitted by an underwater projector in a pool. The resulting underwater sound, though modified by the response of the projection system and by the pool, exhibited the characteristic features of detonation sounds: A zero to peak sound pressure level of at least 30 dB (re 1 s(-1)) higher than the sound exposure level, and a short duration (34 ms). The animal's 50% detection threshold for this impulsive sound occurred at a received unweighted broadband sound exposure level of 60 dB re 1 μPa(2)s. It is shown that the porpoise's audiogram for short-duration tonal signals [Kastelein et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 128, 3211-3222 (2010)] can be used to estimate its hearing threshold for impulsive sounds. PMID:22894181

  5. Acoustic source location in a jet-blown flap using a cross-correlation technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, R. S.; Maus, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    The acoustic source strength distribution in a turbulent flow field was measured for two far field microphones at 45 deg above and below the plane of the flap surface. A processed signal from an inclined hot-film anemometry probe was cross correlated with the signal from the appropriate far field microphone. The contribution made by the sources associated with the fluctuating pressure on the flap surface to the sound received at far field microphone was estimated by cross correlating the processed signals of microphones which were embedded in the flap surface with the far field microphone signals. In addition, detailed fluid dynamic measurements were made in the flow field of the jet flap using dual sensor hot-film anemometry probes.

  6. Elastic Properties of Clay Minerals Determined by Atomic Force Acoustic Microscopy Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopycinska-Müller, M.; Prasad, M.; Rabe, U.; Arnold, W.

    Seismic wave propagation in geological formations is altered by the presence of clay minerals. Knowledge about the elastic properties of clay is therefore essential for the interpretation and modeling of the seismic response of clay-bearing formations. However, due to the layered structure of clay, it is very difficult to investigate its elastic properties. We measured elastic properties of clay using atomic force acoustic microscopy (AFAM). The forces applied during the experiments were not higher than 50 nN. The adhesion forces were measured from the pull-off forces and included into our calculations by means of the Derjaguin-Mueller-Toporov model for contact mechanics. The obtained values of the elastic modulus for clay varied from 10 to 17 GPa depending on various parameters that describe the dynamics of a vibrating beam

  7. Localization of acoustic emission sources in tensile and ct specimens using a broadband acquisition technique.

    PubMed

    Fleischmann, P; Rouby, D; Malaprade, G; Lanchon, I

    1981-11-01

    The acoustic emission sources in a conventional cylindrical tensile test sample of short transversely-cut carbon manganese steel are localized. There is not always a good correlation between the localization of the first signals and the zone which eventually fractures. During the Lüder's plateau, the ae signals are emitted in the deformation band and, in the hardening range, there is no significant ae in the gauge length of the sample. In ct samples precracked by fatigue, the signals are due to the growth of the plastic zone around the crack tip, and the plastic zone size, measured by source localization, agrees with those provided by models derived from fracture mechanics. PMID:7292774

  8. A Bayesian view on acoustic model-based techniques for robust speech recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maas, Roland; Huemmer, Christian; Sehr, Armin; Kellermann, Walter

    2015-12-01

    This article provides a unifying Bayesian view on various approaches for acoustic model adaptation, missing feature, and uncertainty decoding that are well-known in the literature of robust automatic speech recognition. The representatives of these classes can often be deduced from a Bayesian network that extends the conventional hidden Markov models used in speech recognition. These extensions, in turn, can in many cases be motivated from an underlying observation model that relates clean and distorted feature vectors. By identifying and converting the observation models into a Bayesian network representation, we formulate the corresponding compensation rules. We thus summarize the various approaches as approximations or modifications of the same Bayesian decoding rule leading to a unified view on known derivations as well as to new formulations for certain approaches.

  9. The application of finite element techniques to acoustic transmission in lined ducts with flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Astley, R. J.; Eversman, W.

    1979-01-01

    The finite element method (FEM) is used to analyze the propagation of sound in two-dimensional nonuniform ducts carrying a compressible subsonic mean flow. Galerkin and residual least squares (RLS) methods with natural and forced boundary conditions are considered. The accuracy of FEM results for the eigenvalue and transmission problems is assessed by comparison with alternative numerical schemes for nonuniform ducts. The results presented and those from associated investigations indicate that modal coupling is a significant feature of the acoustic field, especially at high Mach numbers. A multimodal model therefore appears to be essential if any reliable conclusions are to be drawn in the context of turbofan inlet regions. Improvements to the eigenvalue scheme following the implementation of higher-order Hermitian elements indicate a similar modification for the transmission problem.

  10. Study of acoustic fingerprinting of nitromethane and some triazole derivatives using UV 266 nm pulsed photoacoustic pyrolysis technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, K. S.; Chaudhary, A. K.; Yehya, F.; Kumar, A. Sudheer

    2015-08-01

    We report a comparative study of acoustic fingerprints of nitromethane, nitrobenzene and some nitro rich triazole derivatives using pulsed photoacoustic technique. UV 266 nm wavelength i.e. Fourth harmonic of Q-switched Nd: YAG laser having pulse duration 7 ns and 10 Hz repetition rate is employed to record the time resolved PA spectrum. The PA fingerprint is produced due to absorption of incident UV light by molecule itself and photo dissociation of nitromethane and nitrobenzene at room temperature while in case of triazole it is attributed to the combination of thermal and photo-dissociation process. The entire dissociation process follows the root of cleavage of C-NO2 bond to produce free NO, NO2 and other by product gases due to π∗ ← n excitation. In addition, we have studied the thermal stability criteria of nitro rich triazoles based on the quality factor of acoustic resonance frequencies of the PA cavity. We have also studied the effect of data acquisition time to ascertain the decay behavior of HEMs samples.

  11. Stochastic Impulse Control of Non-Markovian Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Djehiche, Boualem; Hamadene, Said Hdhiri, Ibtissam

    2010-02-15

    We consider a class of stochastic impulse control problems of general stochastic processes i.e. not necessarily Markovian. Under fairly general conditions we establish existence of an optimal impulse control. We also prove existence of combined optimal stochastic and impulse control of a fairly general class of diffusions with random coefficients. Unlike, in the Markovian framework, we cannot apply quasi-variational inequalities techniques. We rather derive the main results using techniques involving reflected BSDEs and the Snell envelope.

  12. Detection of coffee flavour ageing by solid-phase microextraction/surface acoustic wave sensor array technique (SPME/SAW).

    PubMed

    Barié, Nicole; Bücking, Mark; Stahl, Ullrich; Rapp, Michael

    2015-06-01

    The use of polymer coated surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor arrays is a very promising technique for highly sensitive and selective detection of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). We present new developments to achieve a low cost sensor setup with a sampling method enabling the highly reproducible detection of volatiles even in the ppb range. Since the VOCs of coffee are well known by gas chromatography (GC) research studies, the new sensor array was tested for an easy assessable objective: coffee ageing during storage. As reference method these changes were traced with a standard GC/FID set-up, accompanied by sensory panellists. The evaluation of GC data showed a non-linear characteristic for single compound concentrations as well as for total peak area values, disabling prediction of the coffee age. In contrast, the new SAW sensor array demonstrates a linear dependency, i.e. being capable to show a dependency between volatile concentration and storage time. PMID:25624226

  13. Non-Destructive Evaluation for Corrosion Monitoring in Concrete: A Review and Capability of Acoustic Emission Technique

    PubMed Central

    Zaki, Ahmad; Chai, Hwa Kian; Aggelis, Dimitrios G.; Alver, Ninel

    2015-01-01

    Corrosion of reinforced concrete (RC) structures has been one of the major causes of structural failure. Early detection of the corrosion process could help limit the location and the extent of necessary repairs or replacement, as well as reduce the cost associated with rehabilitation work. Non-destructive testing (NDT) methods have been found to be useful for in-situ evaluation of steel corrosion in RC, where the effect of steel corrosion and the integrity of the concrete structure can be assessed effectively. A complementary study of NDT methods for the investigation of corrosion is presented here. In this paper, acoustic emission (AE) effectively detects the corrosion of concrete structures at an early stage. The capability of the AE technique to detect corrosion occurring in real-time makes it a strong candidate for serving as an efficient NDT method, giving it an advantage over other NDT methods. PMID:26251904

  14. An investigation of the solidification of a metal and two n-paraffins using an acoustic technique.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, J. A.; Davila, J. R.

    1971-01-01

    A novel acoustic technique is described for following the motion of the solid-liquid interface during the freezing of mercury, n-hexadecane and n-octadecane where heat transfer is unidirectional. It is shown that the actual amount of solidification occurring in a given time differs from that predicted using a numerical solution to the transient heat conduction problem. The differences are small for mercury but large for the paraffins. They are interpreted in terms of the nature of the solid-liquid interface. Furthermore the experimental and predicted temperature distributions in the liquid and solid phases differ. These differences are extremely small for mercury. The data for the three materials conform to a relationship observed previously according to which the thickness of the solidified layer is a linear function of the square root of time.

  15. Non-Destructive Evaluation for Corrosion Monitoring in Concrete: A Review and Capability of Acoustic Emission Technique.

    PubMed

    Zaki, Ahmad; Chai, Hwa Kian; Aggelis, Dimitrios G; Alver, Ninel

    2015-01-01

    Corrosion of reinforced concrete (RC) structures has been one of the major causes of structural failure. Early detection of the corrosion process could help limit the location and the extent of necessary repairs or replacement, as well as reduce the cost associated with rehabilitation work. Non-destructive testing (NDT) methods have been found to be useful for in-situ evaluation of steel corrosion in RC, where the effect of steel corrosion and the integrity of the concrete structure can be assessed effectively. A complementary study of NDT methods for the investigation of corrosion is presented here. In this paper, acoustic emission (AE) effectively detects the corrosion of concrete structures at an early stage. The capability of the AE technique to detect corrosion occurring in real-time makes it a strong candidate for serving as an efficient NDT method, giving it an advantage over other NDT methods. PMID:26251904

  16. Wide aperture arrays for locating impulsive sound sources in air and underwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, Brian G.

    2006-05-01

    Passive ranging techniques are used in land-based acoustic surveillance systems and underwater sonar systems to localize sources that radiate acoustic energy into the environment. Passive ranging by wavefront curvature relies on the spherical expansion of the wavefronts as the acoustic energy propagates outwards from the source. A wide-aperture receiving array is used to sense the curvature of the wavefront by estimating the intersensor time delays as the wavefront traverses the array. The time delay estimates are used to calculate the range (which is equal to the radius of curvature of the wavefront) and bearing of the source. The wavefront curvature method is applied here to the passive ranging of sources of four different types of acoustic signals: underwater mechanical transients, underwater biological transients, continuous sound wave transmissions in air and impulsive sounds in air. The method provides precise range and bearing estimates of underwater signal sources. In comparison, large passive ranging errors are observed for in-air sources because the atmosphere is a nonstationary sound propagation medium. Atmospheric turbulence causes perturbations in the curvature of the acoustic wavefronts and leads to random fluctuations in the source position estimates on time scales ranging from seconds to minutes. Background noise at each sensor has only a small effect on the positional uncertainty of in-air sources with random fluctuations in the source position estimates occurring on subsecond time scales.

  17. Acoustic emissions generated in aged dental composites using a laser thermoacoustic technique.

    PubMed

    Lee, S Y; Lin, C T; Dong, D R; Huang, H M; Shih, Y H

    2000-09-01

    The heating up of dental composites by laser will produce acoustic emissions (AEs) that may be related to fracture mechanisms in the composites. It has been proved that the mechanical properties of dental composites are affected by storage in food simulating liquids, i.e. 75% ethanol, which has a solubility parameter approximating to that of bisphenol glycidyl dimethacrylate (BisGMA) resin. A new method was innovated to evaluate the laser-induced AEs in dental composites aged by 75% ethanol solution. Model systems (50/50 BisGMA/TEGDMA resin filled with 0% and 75 wt.% 5-10 microm silanized BaSiO6) as well as three commercial composites (Marathon One, Z100 and Herculite XRV) were used in this study. Nine samples acting as the control group were tested to establish the correlation of AEs to laser power. The effect of ageing by immersion in 75% ethanol on AEs and diametral tensile strength (DTS) was then evaluated. A quasi-continuous wave CO2 laser was used to heat up the composites. AEs of frequency 100-200 kHz were collected, filtered, recorded and processed using a 4610 Smart Acoustic Monitor. Burst patterns, which formally were assumed to be correlated to fracture mechanisms, were also identified from the data obtained at laser power > or = 5 W for commercial composites and > or = 4 W for model systems. Higher laser powers cause the AE to increase for all composites except unfilled model resin. AEs as a function of power for all aged systems were flat (< 100 events) below 4 W. Emissions then rose sharply to > 1000 events at 7.1 W. Statistically significant differences were found between the AEs obtained at 5 W (commercial composites) and those at 4.3 W (model systems) for material systems and storage times. Marathon One was less affected by the laser and an abrupt change in AE was found between days 0 and 7 of storage for all commercial composites. The AE value from the unfilled model resin was found to be significantly different from that of the model composites

  18. Dealing with Impulsivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neidhardt, Janet

    1987-01-01

    A mother recounts her neurologically impaired son's struggles and progress in combating impulsivity in his work and social habits. Now 23 years old, employed full-time, and off medication, the son is still impulsive, has problems with social skills, but has improved his self-image through a photography hobby. (CB)

  19. Acoustic puncture assist device: A novel technique to identify the epidural space

    PubMed Central

    Al-Mokaddam, MA; Al-Harbi, MK; El-Jandali, ST; Al-Zahrani, TA

    2016-01-01

    Background: Acoustic puncture assist device (APAD) is designed to detect and signal the loss of resistance during the epidural procedure. We aimed to evaluate this device in terms of successful identification of the epidural space and the incidence of accidental dural puncture. Patients and Methods: Following Institutional Review Board approval and written informed consent obtained from all patients, 200 adult patients (107 males) American Society of Anesthesiologists I-III who underwent lower limb orthopedic surgery under lumbar epidural anesthesia using APAD were enrolled in the study. APAD system was connected to the epidural needle using normal saline prefilled extension tube. Numbers of successful epidural attempts and accidental dural tap were documented. Results: The mean values of the depth of epidural space and the time to perform epidural puncture were 5.8 ± 1.0 cm and 3.3 ± 1.4 min, respectively. In 63% of patients, epidural puncture was successful from the first attempt and in 1% it was successful from the fourth attempt. Epidural anesthesia by APAD was successful in 198 cases (99 %). Dural tap occurred in 2 cases (1%). Conclusions: Using APAD, the success of identifying the epidural space was high and reliable. PMID:27051369

  20. A novel technique for acoustic emission monitoring in civil structures with global fiber optic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verstrynge, E.; Pfeiffer, H.; Wevers, M.

    2014-06-01

    The application of acoustic emission (AE)-based damage detection is gaining interest in the field of civil structural health monitoring. Damage progress can be detected and located in real time and the recorded AEs hold information on the fracture process which produced them. One of the drawbacks for on-site application in large-scale concrete and masonry structures is the relatively high attenuation of the ultrasonic signal, which limits the detection range of the AE sensors. Consequently, a large number of point sensors are required to cover a certain area. To tackle this issue, a global damage detection system, based on AE detection with a polarization-modulated, single mode fiber optic sensor (FOS), has been developed. The sensing principle, data acquisition and analysis in time and frequency domain are presented. During experimental investigations, this AE-FOS is applied for the first time as a global sensor for the detection of crack-induced AEs in a full-scale concrete beam. Damage progress is monitored during a cyclic four-point bending test and the AE activity, detected with the FOS, is related to the subsequent stages of damage progress in the concrete element. The results obtained with the AE-FOS are successfully linked to the mechanical behavior of the concrete beam and a qualitative correspondence is found with AE data obtained by a commercial system.

  1. Development of Methodology to Assess the Failure Behaviour of Bamboo Single Fibre by Acoustic Emission Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Md. Saiful; Gulshan, Fahmida; Ahsan, Qumrul; Wevers, Martine; Pfeiffer, Helge; van Vuure, Aart-Willem; Osorio, Lina; Verpoest, Ignaas

    2016-06-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) was used as a tool for detecting, evaluating and for better understanding of the damage mechanism and failure behavior in composites during mechanical loading. Methodology was developed for tensile test of natural fibres (bamboo single fibre). A series of experiments were performed and load drops (one or two) were observed in the load versus time graphs. From the observed AE parameters such as amplitude, energy, duration etc. significant information corresponding to the load drops were found. These AE signals from the load drop occurred from such failure as debonding between two elementary fibre or from join of elementary fibre at edge. The various sources of load at first load drop was not consistent for the different samples (for a particular sample the value is 8 N, stress: 517.51 MPa). Final breaking of fibre corresponded to saturated level AE amplitude of preamplifier (99.9 dB) for all samples. Therefore, it was not possible to determine the exact AE energy value for final breaking. Same methodology was used for tensile test of three single fibres, which gave clear indication of load drop before the final breaking of first and second fibre.

  2. Determination of Initial Crack Strength of Silicon Die Using Acoustic Emission Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Pei-Chi; Su, Yen-Fu; Yang, Shin-Yueh; Liang, Steven Y.; Chiang, Kuo-Ning

    2015-07-01

    The current market demand for high-efficiency, high-performance, small-sized electronic products has focused attention on the use of three-dimensional (3D) integrated circuits (IC) in the design of electronic packaging. Silicon wafers can be ground and polished to reduce their thickness and increase the chip stacking density. However, microcracks can result from the thinning and stacking process or during use of an electronic device over time; therefore, estimation of the cracking strength is an important issue in 3D IC packaging. This research combined the ball breaker test (BBT) with an acoustic emission (AE) system to measure the allowable force on a silicon die. To estimate the initial crack strength of a silicon die, the BBT was combined with finite-element (FE) analysis. The AE system can detect the initial crack and the subsequent bulk failure of the silicon die individually, thus avoiding overestimation of the die strength. In addition, the results of the modified ball breaker test showed that edge chipping did not affect the silicon die strength. However, the failure force and silicon die strength were reduced as the surface roughness of the test specimen increased. Thus, surface roughness must be controlled in the BBT to prevent underestimation of the silicon die strength.

  3. Acoustic Modifications of the Ames 40x80 Foot Wind Tunnel and Test Techniques for High-Speed Research Model Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soderman, Paul T.; Olson, Larry (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The NFAC 40- by 80- Foot Wind Tunnel at Ames is being refurbished with a new, deep acoustic lining in the test section which will make the facility nearly anechoic over a large frequency range. The modification history, key elements, and schedule will be discussed. Design features and expected performance gains will be described. Background noise reductions will be summarized. Improvements in aeroacoustic research techniques have been developed and used recently at NFAC on several wind tunnel tests of High Speed Research models. Research on quiet inflow microphones and struts will be described. The Acoustic Survey Apparatus in the 40x80 will be illustrated. A special intensity probe was tested for source localization. Multi-channel, high speed digital data acquisition is now used for acoustics. And most important, phased microphone arrays have been developed and tested which have proven to be very powerful for source identification and increased signal-to-noise ratio. Use of these tools for the HEAT model will be illustrated. In addition, an acoustically absorbent symmetry plane was built to satisfy the HEAT semispan aerodynamic and acoustic requirements. Acoustic performance of that symmetry plane will be shown.

  4. Impulsiveness in professional fighters.

    PubMed

    Banks, Sarah J; Mayer, Brittany; Obuchowski, Nancy; Shin, Wanyong; Lowe, Mark; Phillips, Michael; Modic, Michael; Bernick, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Sports involving repeated head trauma are associated with risk of neurodegenerative disorders such as chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). Among the behavioral manifestations of CTE is increased impulsiveness. Here, the authors investigate the relationship between impulsiveness and exposure to head trauma in a large group of active professional fighters. Fighters tended to report less impulsiveness than did non-fighting control respondents. Overall, greater fight exposure was associated with higher levels of a specific form of impulsiveness, although there were differences between mixed martial arts fighters and boxers. Fight exposure was associated with reduction in volume of certain brain structures, and these changes were also associated with impulsiveness patterns. Longitudinal studies of professional fighters are important to understand the risk for neuropsychiatric problems. PMID:24515676

  5. Numerical techniques in linear duct acoustics. [finite difference and finite element analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J.

    1980-01-01

    Both finite difference and finite element analyses of small amplitude (linear) sound propagation in straight and variable area ducts with flow, as might be found in a typical turboject engine duct, muffler, or industrial ventilation system, are reviewed. Both steady state and transient theories are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the advantages and limitations associated with the various numerical techniques. Examples of practical problems are given for which the numerical techniques have been applied.

  6. Adaptive impulsive cluster synchronization in community network with nonidentical nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Xiaoli; Gan, Luyining; Wu, Zhaoyan

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, cluster synchronization in community network with nonidentical nodes is investigated. Through introducing proper adaptive strategy into impulsive control scheme, adaptive impulsive controllers are designed for achieving the cluster synchronization. In this adaptive impulsive control scheme, for any given networks, the impulsive gains can adjust themselves to proper values according to the proposed adaptive strategy when the impulsive intervals are fixed. The impulsive instants can be estimated by solving a sequence of maximum value problems when the impulsive gains are fixed. Both community networks without and with coupling delay are considered. Based on the Lyapunov function method and mathematical analysis technique, two synchronization criteria are derived. Several numerical examples are performed to verify the effectiveness of the derived theoretical results.

  7. Molecularly Imprinted Polymer Integrated with a Surface Acoustic Wave Technique for Detection of Sulfamethizole.

    PubMed

    Ayankojo, Akinrinade George; Tretjakov, Aleksei; Reut, Jekaterina; Boroznjak, Roman; Öpik, Andres; Rappich, Jörg; Furchner, Andreas; Hinrichs, Karsten; Syritski, Vitali

    2016-01-19

    The synergistic effect of combining molecular imprinting and surface acoustic wave (SAW) technologies for the selective and label-free detection of sulfamethizole as a model antibiotic in aqueous environment was demonstrated. A molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) for sulfamethizole (SMZ) selective recognition was prepared in the form of a homogeneous thin film on the sensing surfaces of SAW chip by oxidative electropolymerization of m-phenylenediamine (mPD) in the presence of SMZ, acting as a template. Special attention was paid to the rational selection of the functional monomer using computational and spectroscopic approaches. SMZ template incorporation and its subsequent release from the polymer was supported by IR microscopic measurements. Precise control of the thicknesses of the SMZ-MIP and respective nonimprinted reference films (NIP) was achieved by correlating the electrical charge dosage during electrodeposition with spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements in order to ensure accurate interpretation of label-free responses originating from the MIP modified sensor. The fabricated SMZ-MIP films were characterized in terms of their binding affinity and selectivity toward the target by analyzing the binding kinetics recorded using the SAW system. The SMZ-MIPs had SMZ binding capacity approximately more than eight times higher than the respective NIP and were able to discriminate among structurally similar molecules, i.e., sulfanilamide and sulfadimethoxine. The presented approach for the facile integration of a sulfonamide antibiotic-sensing layer with SAW technology allowed observing the real-time binding events of the target molecule at nanomolar concentration levels and could be potentially suitable for cost-effective fabrication of a multianalyte chemosensor for analysis of hazardous pollutants in an aqueous environment. PMID:26704414

  8. A Neurogenetic Approach to Impulsivity

    PubMed Central

    Congdon, Eliza; Canli, Turhan

    2008-01-01

    Impulsivity is a complex and multidimensional trait that is of interest to both personality psychologists and to clinicians. For investigators seeking the biological basis of personality traits, the use of neuroimaging techniques such as positron emission tomography (PET) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) revolutionized personality psychology in less than a decade. Now, another revolution is under way, and it originates from molecular biology. Specifically, new findings in molecular genetics, the detailed mapping and the study of the function of genes, have shown that individual differences in personality traits can be related to individual differences within specific genes. In this article, we will review the current state of the field with respect to the neural and genetic basis of trait impulsivity. PMID:19012655

  9. Detection of Skin Disbond in Honeycombs and Coating Detachment by a Laser Acoustic Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blouin, A.; Campagne, B.; Néron, C.; Monchalin, J.-P.

    2007-03-01

    Many engineering structures are composite and include for example a protective coating or a bonded layer. A novel technique, close to laser-ultrasonics but significantly different, has been developed for the detection of disbonds between the coating or the bonded layer and the substrate. It is also applicable to the detection of core unbonds in honeycomb structures. The technique is based on the thermoelastic excitation by a pulsed laser of the top layer or top skin which is driven into vibration if it is detached from the substrate underneath. This vibration is then detected by a second laser coupled to a photorefractive interferometer. The technique can be made very flexible by using optical fiber coupling. One foresees its application to the in-service inspection of aerospace structures for the detection of core unbonds in honeycombs or near surface delaminations. Examples of application to honeycombs and to various coatings are presented.

  10. Monitoring of seafloor crustal deformation using GPS/Acoustic technique along the Nankai Trough, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, K.; Tadokoro, K.; Ikuta, R.; Watanabe, T.; Fujii, C.; Matsuhiro, K.; Sayanagi, K.

    2014-12-01

    Seafloor crustal deformation is crucial for estimating the interplate locking at the shallow subduction zone and has been carried out at subduction margins in Japan, e.g., Japan Trench and Nankai Trough [Sato et al., 2011; Tadokoro et al., 2012]. Iinuma et al. [2012] derived slip distributions during the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake using GPS/Acoustic data and on-land GPS data. The result showed that maximum slip is more than 85 m near the trench axis. The focal area along the Nankai trough extended to the trough axis affected this earthquake by cabinet office, government of Japan.  We monitored seafloor crustal deformation along the Nankai trough, Japan. Observation regions are at the eastern end of Nankai trough (named Suruga trough) and at the central Nankai trough. We established and monitored by two sites across the trough at each region. In the Suruga trough region, we repeatedly observed from 2005 to 2013. We observed 13 and 14 times at a foot wall side (SNE) and at a hanging wall side (SNW), respectively. We estimated the displacement velocities with relative to the Amurian plate from the result of repeated observation. The estimated displacement velocity vectors at SNE and SNW are 42±8 mm/y to N94±3˚W direction and 39±11 mm/y to N84±9˚W direction, respectively. The directions are the same as those measured at the on-land GPS stations. The magnitudes of velocity vector indicate significant shortening by approximately 4 mm/y between SNW and on-land GPS stations at hanging wall side of the Suruga Trough. This result shows that the plate interface at the northernmost Suruga trough is strongly locked. In the central Nankai trough region, we established new two stations across the central Nankai trough (Both stations are about 15km distance from trough) and observed only three times, August 2013, January 2014, and June 2014. We report the results of monitoring performed in this year.

  11. Innovative acoustic reflection imaging techniques and application to clinical breast tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Steve P.

    Conventional ultrasound techniques use beam-formed, constant sound speed ray models for fast image reconstruction. However, these techniques are inadequate for the emerging new field of ultrasound tomography (UST). We present a new technique for reconstruction of reflection images from UST data. We have extended the planar Kirchhoff migration method used in geophysics, and combined it with sound speed and attenuation data obtained from the transmission signals to create reflection ultrasound images that are corrected for refractive and attenuative effects. The resulting techniques were applied to simulated numerical phantom data, physical phantom data and in-vivo breast data obtained with an experimental ring transducer prototype. Additionally, the ring transducer was customized to test compatibility with an existing ultrasound workstation. We were able to obtain independently recorded radio-frequency (RF) data for individual transmit-receive pair combinations for all 128 transducers. The signal data was then successfully reconstructed into reflection data using the Kirchhoff migration techniques. The results from the use of sound speed and attenuation corrections lead to significant improvements in image quality, particularly in dense tissues where the refractive and scattering effects are the greatest. The procedure was applied to a variety of breast densities and masses of different natures. The resulting reflection images successfully resolved boundaries and textures. The reflection characteristics of tomographic ultrasound maintain an indispensible position in the quantification of proper mass identification. The results of this project indicate the clinical significance of the invocation of properly compensated Kirchhoff based reconstruction method with the use of sound speed and attenuation parameters for the visualization and classification of masses and tissue.

  12. Visualization and characterization of the acoustic radiation force assisted displacement of particles using an OCT technique (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razani, Marjan; Zam, Azhar; Arezza, Nico J. J.; Wang, Yan J.; Kolios, Michael C.

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we present a technique to image the enhanced particle displacement generated using an acoustic radiation force (ARF) excitation source. A swept-source OCT (SS-OCT) system with a center wavelength of 1310nm, a bandwidth of ~100nm, and an A-scan rate of 100 kHz (MEMS-VCSEL OCT Thorlabs) was used to detect gold nanoparticle (70nm in diameter) displacement .ARF was applied after the nanoparticles passed through a porous membrane and diffused into a collagen (6% collagen) matrix. B-mode, M-B mode, 3D and Speckle Variance (SV) images were acquired before and after the ARF beam was on. Differential OCT speckle variance images with and without the ARF were used to measure the particle displacement. The images were used to detect the microscopic enhancement of nanoparticle displacement generated by the ARF. Using this OCT imaging technique, the extravasation of particles though a porous membrane and characterization of the enhanced particle displacement in a collagen gel after using an ARF excitation was achieved.

  13. Damage Characterization of Glass/Epoxy Composite Under Three-Point Bending Test Using Acoustic Emission Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pashmforoush, Farzad; Fotouhi, Mohamad; Ahmadi, Mehdi

    2012-07-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) technique is an efficient non-destructive method for detection and identification of various damage mechanisms in composite materials. Discrimination of AE signals related to different damage modes is of great importance in the use of this technique. For this purpose, integration of k-means algorithm and genetic algorithm (GA) was used in this study to cluster AE events of glass/epoxy composite during three-point bending test. Performing clustering analysis, three clusters with separate frequency ranges were obtained, each one representing a distinct damage mechanism. Furthermore, time-frequency analysis of AE signals was performed based on wavelet packet transform (WPT). In order to find the dominant components associated with different damage mechanisms, the energy distribution criterion was used. The frequency ranges of the dominant components were then compared with k-means genetic algorithm (KGA) outputs. Finally, SEM observation was utilized to validate the results. The obtained results indicate good performance of the proposed methods in the damage characterization of composite materials.

  14. A Dry Membrane Protection Technique to Allow Surface Acoustic Wave Biosensor Measurements of Biological Model Membrane Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Reder-Christ, Katrin; Schmitz, Patrick; Bota, Marian; Gerber, Ursula; Falkenstein-Paul, Hildegard; Fuss, Christian; Enachescu, Marius; Bendas, Gerd

    2013-01-01

    Model membrane approaches have attracted much attention in biomedical sciences to investigate and simulate biological processes. The application of model membrane systems for biosensor measurements is partly restricted by the fact that the integrity of membranes critically depends on the maintenance of an aqueous surrounding, while various biosensors require a preconditioning of dry sensors. This is for example true for the well-established surface acoustic wave (SAW) biosensor SAM®5 blue. Here, a simple drying procedure of sensor-supported model membranes is introduced using the protective disaccharide trehalose. Highly reproducible model membranes were prepared by the Langmuir-Blodgett technique, transferred to SAW sensors and supplemented with a trehalose solution. Membrane rehydration after dry incorporation into the SAW device becomes immediately evident by phase changes. Reconstituted model membranes maintain their full functionality, as indicated by biotin/avidin binding experiments. Atomic force microscopy confirmed the morphological invariability of dried and rehydrated membranes. Approximating to more physiological recognition phenomena, the site-directed immobilization of the integrin VLA-4 into the reconstituted model membrane and subsequent VCAM-1 ligand binding with nanomolar affinity were illustrated. This simple drying procedure is a novel way to combine the model membrane generation by Langmuir-Blodgett technique with SAW biosensor measurements, which extends the applicability of SAM®5 blue in biomedical sciences. PMID:24064603

  15. Impulse noise generated by starter pistols

    PubMed Central

    Meinke, Deanna K.; Finan, Donald S.; Soendergaard, Jacob; Flamme, Gregory A.; Murphy, William J.; Lankford, James E.; Stewart, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study describes signals generated by .22 and .32 caliber starter pistols in the context of noise-induced hearing loss risk for sports officials and athletes. Design Acoustic comparison of impulses generated from typical .22 and .32 caliber starter pistols firing blanks were made to impulses generated from comparable firearms firing both blanks and live rounds. Acoustic characteristics are described in terms of directionality and distance from the shooter in a simulated outdoor running track. Metrics include peak sound pressure levels (SPL), A-weighted equivalent 8-hour level (LeqA8), and maximum permissible number of individual shots, or maximum permissible exposures (MPE) for the unprotected ear. Results Starter pistols produce peak SPLs above 140 dB. The numbers of MPEs are as few as five for the .22-caliber starter pistol, and somewhat higher (≤25) for the .32-caliber pistol. Conclusion The impulsive sounds produced by starter pistols correspond to MPE numbers that are unacceptably small for unprotected officials and others in the immediate vicinity of the shooter. At the distances included in this study, the risk to athletes appears to be low (when referencing exposure criteria for adults), but the sound associated with the starter pistol will contribute to the athlete’s overall noise exposure. PMID:23373743

  16. Numerical spatial marching techniques in duct acoustics. [noise source calculation from far field pressure measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J.

    1979-01-01

    Direct calculation of the internal structure of a ducted noise source from farfield pressure measurements is regarded as an initial value problem, where the pressure and pressure gradient (farfield impedance) are assumed to be known along a line in the farfield. If pressure and impedance are known at the boundary of the farfield, the pressure can be uniquely determined in the vicinity of the inlet and inside the inlet ducting. A marching procedure is developed which, with this information obtained from measurements, enables a description of a ducted noise source. The technique uses a finite difference representation of the homogeneous Helmholtz equation.

  17. Development of Acoustic Model-Based Iterative Reconstruction Technique for Thick-Concrete Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Almansouri, Hani; Clayton, Dwight A; Kisner, Roger A; Polsky, Yarom; Bouman, Charlie; Santos-Villalobos, Hector J

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound signals have been used extensively for non-destructive evaluation (NDE). However, typical reconstruction techniques, such as the synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT), are limited to quasi-homogenous thin media. New ultrasonic systems and reconstruction algorithms are in need for one-sided NDE of non-homogenous thick objects. An application example space is imaging of reinforced concrete structures for commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs). These structures provide important foundation, support, shielding, and containment functions. Identification and management of aging and degradation of concrete structures is fundamental to the proposed long-term operation of NPPs. Another example is geothermal and oil/gas production wells. These multi-layered structures are composed of steel, cement, and several types of soil and rocks. Ultrasound systems with greater penetration range and image quality will allow for better monitoring of the well s health and prediction of high-pressure hydraulic fracturing of the rock. These application challenges need to be addressed with an integrated imaging approach, where the application, hardware, and reconstruction software are highly integrated and optimized. Therefore, we are developing an ultrasonic system with Model-Based Iterative Reconstruction (MBIR) as the image reconstruction backbone. As the first implementation of MBIR for ultrasonic signals, this paper document the first implementation of the algorithm and show reconstruction results for synthetically generated data.

  18. Development of Acoustic Model-Based Iterative Reconstruction Technique for Thick-Concrete Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Almansouri, Hani; Clayton, Dwight A; Kisner, Roger A; Polsky, Yarom; Bouman, Charlie; Santos-Villalobos, Hector J

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound signals have been used extensively for non-destructive evaluation (NDE). However, typical reconstruction techniques, such as the synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT), are limited to quasi-homogenous thin media. New ultrasonic systems and reconstruction algorithms are in need for one-sided NDE of non-homogenous thick objects. An application example space is imaging of reinforced concrete structures for commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs). These structures provide important foundation, support, shielding, and containment functions. Identification and management of aging and degradation of concrete structures is fundamental to the proposed long-term operation of NPPs. Another example is geothermal and oil/gas production wells. These multi-layered structures are composed of steel, cement, and several types of soil and rocks. Ultrasound systems with greater penetration range and image quality will allow for better monitoring of the well's health and prediction of high-pressure hydraulic fracturing of the rock. These application challenges need to be addressed with an integrated imaging approach, where the application, hardware, and reconstruction software are highly integrated and optimized. Therefore, we are developing an ultrasonic system with Model-Based Iterative Reconstruction (MBIR) as the image reconstruction backbone. As the first implementation of MBIR for ultrasonic signals, this paper document the first implementation of the algorithm and show reconstruction results for synthetically generated data.

  19. Development of acoustic model-based iterative reconstruction technique for thick-concrete imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almansouri, Hani; Clayton, Dwight; Kisner, Roger; Polsky, Yarom; Bouman, Charles; Santos-Villalobos, Hector

    2016-02-01

    Ultrasound signals have been used extensively for non-destructive evaluation (NDE). However, typical reconstruction techniques, such as the synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT), are limited to quasi-homogenous thin media. New ultrasonic systems and reconstruction algorithms are in need for one-sided NDE of non-homogenous thick objects. An application example space is imaging of reinforced concrete structures for commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs). These structures provide important foundation, support, shielding, and containment functions. Identification and management of aging and degradation of concrete structures is fundamental to the proposed long-term operation of NPPs. Another example is geothermal and oil/gas production wells. These multi-layered structures are composed of steel, cement, and several types of soil and rocks. Ultrasound systems with greater penetration range and image quality will allow for better monitoring of the well's health and prediction of high-pressure hydraulic fracturing of the rock. These application challenges need to be addressed with an integrated imaging approach, where the application, hardware, and reconstruction software are highly integrated and optimized. Therefore, we are developing an ultrasonic system with Model-Based Iterative Reconstruction (MBIR) as the image reconstruction backbone. As the first implementation of MBIR for ultrasonic signals, this paper document the first implementation of the algorithm and show reconstruction results for synthetically generated data.1

  20. Impulsivity and methamphetamine use.

    PubMed

    Semple, Shirley J; Zians, Jim; Grant, Igor; Patterson, Thomas L

    2005-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between methamphetamine (meth) use and impulsivity in a sample of 385 HIV-negative heterosexually identified meth users. Participants who scored highest on a self-report measure of impulsivity were compared with those who scored lower in terms of background characteristics, meth use patterns, use of alcohol and other illicit drugs, sexual risk behavior, and psychiatric health variables. Methamphetamine users in the high impulsivity group were younger, less educated, used larger quantities of meth, were more likely to be binge users, had a larger number of sexual partners, engaged in more unprotected vaginal and oral sex, and scored higher on the Beck Depression Inventory as compared with those in the low impulsivity group. In a logistic regression analysis, Beck depression was the factor that best distinguished between meth users who scored high and those who scored low on impulsivity. Neurophysiological pathways that may underlie the relationship between impulsivity and meth use are discussed. PMID:16135337

  1. A unique method to study acoustic transmission through ducts using signal synthesis and averaging of acoustic pulses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salikuddin, M.; Ramakrishnan, R.; Ahuja, K. K.; Brown, W. H.

    1981-01-01

    An acoustic impulse technique using a loudspeaker driver is developed to measure the acoustic properties of a duct/nozzle system. A signal synthesis method is used to generate a desired single pulse with a flat spectrum. The convolution of the desired signal and the inverse Fourier transform of the reciprocal of the driver's response are then fed to the driver. A signal averaging process eliminates the jet mixing noise from the mixture of jet noise and the internal noise, thereby allowing very low intensity signals to be measured accurately, even for high velocity jets. A theoretical analysis is carried out to predict the incident sound field; this is used to help determine the number and locations of the induct measurement points to account for the contributions due to higher order modes present in the incident tube method. The impulse technique is validated by comparing experimentally determined acoustic characteristics of a duct-nozzle system with similar results obtained by the impedance tube method. Absolute agreement in the comparisons was poor, but the overall shapes of the time histories and spectral distributions were much alike.

  2. Acoustic Emission Signal Processing Technique to Characterize Reactor In-Pile Phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Vivek Agarwal; Magdy Samy Tawfik; James A Smith

    2014-07-01

    Existing and developing advanced sensor technologies and instrumentation will allow non-intrusive in-pile measurement of temperature, extension, and fission gases when coupled with advanced signal processing algorithms. The transmitted measured sensor signals from inside to the outside of containment structure are corrupted by noise and are attenuated, thereby reducing the signal strength and signal-to-noise ratio. Identification and extraction of actual signal (representative of an in-pile phenomenon) is a challenging and complicated process. In this paper, empirical mode decomposition technique is proposed to reconstruct actual sensor signal by partially combining intrinsic mode functions. Reconstructed signal corresponds to phenomena and/or failure modes occurring inside the reactor. In addition, it allows accurate non-intrusive monitoring and trending of in-pile phenomena.

  3. Acoustic emission signal processing technique to characterize reactor in-pile phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, Vivek; Tawfik, Magdy S.; Smith, James A.

    2015-03-31

    Existing and developing advanced sensor technologies and instrumentation will allow non-intrusive in-pile measurement of temperature, extension, and fission gases when coupled with advanced signal processing algorithms. The transmitted measured sensor signals from inside to the outside of containment structure are corrupted by noise and are attenuated, thereby reducing the signal strength and the signal-to-noise ratio. Identification and extraction of actual signal (representative of an in-pile phenomenon) is a challenging and complicated process. In the paper, empirical mode decomposition technique is utilized to reconstruct actual sensor signal by partially combining intrinsic mode functions. Reconstructed signal will correspond to phenomena and/or failure modes occurring inside the reactor. In addition, it allows accurate non-intrusive monitoring and trending of in-pile phenomena.

  4. A study of aluminum-lithium alloy solidification using acoustic emission techniques. Ph.D. Thesis, 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henkel, Daniel P.

    1992-01-01

    Physical phenomena associated with the solidification of an aluminum lithium alloy was characterized using acoustic emission (AE) techniques. It is shown that repeatable patterns of AE activity may be correlated to microstructural changes that occur during solidification. The influence of the experimental system on generated signals was examined in the time and frequency domains. The analysis was used to show how an AE signal from solidifying aluminum is changed by each component in the detection system to produce a complex waveform. Conventional AE analysis has shown that a period of high AE activity occurs in pure aluminum, an Al-Cu alloy, and the Al-Li alloy, as the last fraction of solid forms. A model attributes this to the internal stresses of grain boundary formation. An additional period of activity occurs as the last fraction of solid forms, but only in the two alloys. A model attributes this to the formation of interdendritic porosity which was not present in the pure aluminum. The AE waveforms were dominated by resonant effects of the waveguide and the transducer.

  5. Scatterer size and concentration estimation technique based on a 3D acoustic impedance map from histologic sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamou, Jonathan; Oelze, Michael L.; O'Brien, William D.; Zachary, James F.

    2001-05-01

    Accurate estimates of scatterer parameters (size and acoustic concentration) are beneficial adjuncts to characterize disease from ultrasonic backscatterer measurements. An estimation technique was developed to obtain parameter estimates from the Fourier transform of the spatial autocorrelation function (SAF). A 3D impedance map (3DZM) is used to obtain the SAF of tissue. 3DZMs are obtained by aligning digitized light microscope images from histologic preparations of tissue. Estimates were obtained for simulated 3DZMs containing spherical scatterers randomly located: relative errors were less than 3%. Estimates were also obtained from a rat fibroadenoma and a 4T1 mouse mammary tumor (MMT). Tissues were fixed (10% neutral-buffered formalin), embedded in paraffin, serially sectioned and stained with H&E. 3DZM results were compared to estimates obtained independently against ultrasonic backscatter measurements. For the fibroadenoma and MMT, average scatterer diameters were 91 and 31.5 μm, respectively. Ultrasonic measurements yielded average scatterer diameters of 105 and 30 μm, respectively. The 3DZM estimation scheme showed results similar to those obtained by the independent ultrasonic measurements. The 3D impedance maps show promise as a powerful tool to characterize ultrasonic scattering sites of tissue. [Work supported by the University of Illinois Research Board.

  6. Patch nearfield acoustic holography combined with sound field separation technique applied to a non-free field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, ChuanXing; Jing, WenQian; Zhang, YongBin; Xu, Liang

    2015-02-01

    The conventional nearfield acoustic holography (NAH) is usually based on the assumption of free-field conditions, and it also requires that the measurement aperture should be larger than the actual source. This paper is to focus on the problem that neither of the above-mentioned requirements can be met, and to examine the feasibility of reconstructing the sound field radiated by partial source, based on double-layer pressure measurements made in a non-free field by using patch NAH combined with sound field separation technique. And also, the sensitivity of the reconstructed result to the measurement error is analyzed in detail. Two experiments involving two speakers in an exterior space and one speaker inside a car cabin are presented. The experimental results demonstrate that the patch NAH based on single-layer pressure measurement cannot obtain a satisfied result due to the influences of disturbing sources and reflections, while the patch NAH based on double-layer pressure measurements can successfully remove these influences and reconstruct the patch sound field effectively.

  7. Rate effect on mechanical properties of hydraulic concrete flexural-tensile specimens under low loading rates using acoustic emission technique.

    PubMed

    Su, Huaizhi; Hu, Jiang; Tong, Jianjie; Wen, Zhiping

    2012-09-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) waveform is generated by dislocation, microcracking and other irreversible changes in a concrete material. Based on the AE technique (AET), this paper focuses on strain rate effect on physical mechanisms of hydraulic concrete specimens during the entire fracture process of three point bending (TPB) flexural tests at quasi-static levels. More emphasis is placed on the influence of strain rate on AE hit rate and AE source location around peak stress. Under low strain rates, namely 0.77×10(-7)s(-1), 1×10(-7)s(-1) to 1×10(-6)s(-1) respectively, the results show that the tensile strength increases as the strain rate increases while the peak AE hit rate decreases. Meanwhile, the specimen under a relatively higher strain rate shows a relatively wider intrinsic process zone in a more diffuser manner, lots of distributed microcracks relatively decrease stress intensity, thus delay both microcracking localization and macrocrack propagation. These phenomena can be attributed to Stéfan effect. In addition, further tests, namely the combination of AE monitoring and strain measuring systems was designed to understand the correlation between AE event activity and microfracture (i.e., microcracking and microcracking localization). The relative variation trend of cumulative AE events accords well with that of the load-deformation curve. PMID:22534061

  8. Acoustic biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Fogel, Ronen; Seshia, Ashwin A.

    2016-01-01

    Resonant and acoustic wave devices have been researched for several decades for application in the gravimetric sensing of a variety of biological and chemical analytes. These devices operate by coupling the measurand (e.g. analyte adsorption) as a modulation in the physical properties of the acoustic wave (e.g. resonant frequency, acoustic velocity, dissipation) that can then be correlated with the amount of adsorbed analyte. These devices can also be miniaturized with advantages in terms of cost, size and scalability, as well as potential additional features including integration with microfluidics and electronics, scaled sensitivities associated with smaller dimensions and higher operational frequencies, the ability to multiplex detection across arrays of hundreds of devices embedded in a single chip, increased throughput and the ability to interrogate a wider range of modes including within the same device. Additionally, device fabrication is often compatible with semiconductor volume batch manufacturing techniques enabling cost scalability and a high degree of precision and reproducibility in the manufacturing process. Integration with microfluidics handling also enables suitable sample pre-processing/separation/purification/amplification steps that could improve selectivity and the overall signal-to-noise ratio. Three device types are reviewed here: (i) bulk acoustic wave sensors, (ii) surface acoustic wave sensors, and (iii) micro/nano-electromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS) sensors. PMID:27365040

  9. Acoustic biosensors.

    PubMed

    Fogel, Ronen; Limson, Janice; Seshia, Ashwin A

    2016-06-30

    Resonant and acoustic wave devices have been researched for several decades for application in the gravimetric sensing of a variety of biological and chemical analytes. These devices operate by coupling the measurand (e.g. analyte adsorption) as a modulation in the physical properties of the acoustic wave (e.g. resonant frequency, acoustic velocity, dissipation) that can then be correlated with the amount of adsorbed analyte. These devices can also be miniaturized with advantages in terms of cost, size and scalability, as well as potential additional features including integration with microfluidics and electronics, scaled sensitivities associated with smaller dimensions and higher operational frequencies, the ability to multiplex detection across arrays of hundreds of devices embedded in a single chip, increased throughput and the ability to interrogate a wider range of modes including within the same device. Additionally, device fabrication is often compatible with semiconductor volume batch manufacturing techniques enabling cost scalability and a high degree of precision and reproducibility in the manufacturing process. Integration with microfluidics handling also enables suitable sample pre-processing/separation/purification/amplification steps that could improve selectivity and the overall signal-to-noise ratio. Three device types are reviewed here: (i) bulk acoustic wave sensors, (ii) surface acoustic wave sensors, and (iii) micro/nano-electromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS) sensors. PMID:27365040

  10. Acoustic neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    Vestibular schwannoma; Tumor - acoustic; Cerebellopontine angle tumor; Angle tumor ... Acoustic neuromas have been linked with the genetic disorder neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2). Acoustic neuromas are uncommon.

  11. Attenuation of high-level impulses by earmuffs.

    PubMed

    Zera, Jan; Mlynski, Rafal

    2007-10-01

    Attenuation of high-level acoustic impulses (noise reduction) by various types of earmuffs was measured using a laboratory source of type A impulses and an artificial test fixture compatible with the ISO 4869-3 standard. The measurements were made for impulses of peak sound-pressure levels (SPLs) from 150 to 170 dB. The rise time and A duration of the impulses depended on their SPL and were within a range of 12-400 mus (rise time) and 0.4-1.1 ms (A duration). The results showed that earmuff peak level attenuation increases by about 10 dB when the impulse's rise time and the A duration are reduced. The results also demonstrated that the signals under the earmuff cup have a longer rise and A duration than the original impulses recorded outside the earmuff. Results of the measurements were used to check the validity of various hearing damage risk criteria that specify the maximum permissible exposure to impulse noise. The present data lead to the conclusion that procedures in which hearing damage risk is assessed only from signal attenuation, without taking into consideration changes in the signal waveform under the earmuff, tend to underestimate the risk of hearing damage. PMID:17902846

  12. Impulse-Momentum Diagrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosengrant, David

    2011-01-01

    Multiple representations are a valuable tool to help students learn and understand physics concepts. Furthermore, representations help students learn how to think and act like real scientists.2 These representations include: pictures, free-body diagrams,3 energy bar charts,4 electrical circuits, and, more recently, computer simulations and animations.5 However, instructors have limited choices when they want to help their students understand impulse and momentum. One of the only available options is the impulse-momentum bar chart.6 The bar charts can effectively show the magnitude of the momentum as well as help students understand conservation of momentum, but they do not easily show the actual direction. This paper highlights a new representation instructors can use to help their students with momentum and impulse—the impulse-momentum diagram (IMD).

  13. Partial discharge localization in power transformers based on the sequential quadratic programming-genetic algorithm adopting acoustic emission techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hua-Long; Liu, Hua-Dong

    2014-10-01

    Partial discharge (PD) in power transformers is one of the prime reasons resulting in insulation degradation and power faults. Hence, it is of great importance to study the techniques of the detection and localization of PD in theory and practice. The detection and localization of PD employing acoustic emission (AE) techniques, as a kind of non-destructive testing, plus due to the advantages of powerful capability of locating and high precision, have been paid more and more attention. The localization algorithm is the key factor to decide the localization accuracy in AE localization of PD. Many kinds of localization algorithms exist for the PD source localization adopting AE techniques including intelligent and non-intelligent algorithms. However, the existed algorithms possess some defects such as the premature convergence phenomenon, poor local optimization ability and unsuitability for the field applications. To overcome the poor local optimization ability and easily caused premature convergence phenomenon of the fundamental genetic algorithm (GA), a new kind of improved GA is proposed, namely the sequence quadratic programming-genetic algorithm (SQP-GA). For the hybrid optimization algorithm, SQP-GA, the sequence quadratic programming (SQP) algorithm which is used as a basic operator is integrated into the fundamental GA, so the local searching ability of the fundamental GA is improved effectively and the premature convergence phenomenon is overcome. Experimental results of the numerical simulations of benchmark functions show that the hybrid optimization algorithm, SQP-GA, is better than the fundamental GA in the convergence speed and optimization precision, and the proposed algorithm in this paper has outstanding optimization effect. At the same time, the presented SQP-GA in the paper is applied to solve the ultrasonic localization problem of PD in transformers, then the ultrasonic localization method of PD in transformers based on the SQP-GA is proposed. And

  14. Ballistic impulse gauge

    DOEpatents

    Ault, Stanley K.

    1993-01-01

    A gauge for detecting the impulse generated in sample materials by X-rays or other impulse producing mechanisms utilizes a pair of flat annular springs to support a plunger relative to a housing which may itself be supported by a pair of flat annular springs in a second housing. The plunger has a mounting plate mounted on one end and at the other, a position or velocity transducer is mounted. The annular springs consist of an outer ring and an inner ring with at least three arcuate members connecting the outer ring with the inner ring.

  15. Ballistic impulse gauge

    DOEpatents

    Ault, S.K.

    1993-12-21

    A gauge for detecting the impulse generated in sample materials by X-rays or other impulse producing mechanisms utilizes a pair of flat annular springs to support a plunger relative to a housing which may itself be supported by a pair of flat annular springs in a second housing. The plunger has a mounting plate mounted on one end and at the other, a position or velocity transducer is mounted. The annular springs consist of an outer ring and an inner ring with at least three arcuate members connecting the outer ring with the inner ring. 4 figures.

  16. Fat graft-assisted internal auditory canal closure after retrosigmoid transmeatal resection of acoustic neuroma: Technique for prevention of cerebrospinal fluid leakage.

    PubMed

    Azad, Tareq; Mendelson, Zachary S; Wong, Anni; Jyung, Robert W; Liu, James K

    2016-02-01

    The retrosigmoid transmeatal approach remains an important strategy in the surgical management of acoustic neuromas. Gross total resection of acoustic neuromas requires removal of tumor within the cerebellopontine angle as well as tumor involving the internal auditory canal (IAC). Drilling into the petrous bone of the IAC can expose petrous air cells, which can potentially result in a fistulous tract to the nasopharynx manifesting as cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) rhinorrhea. We describe our method of IAC closure using autologous fat graft and assessed the rates of postoperative CSF leakage. We performed a retrospective study of 24 consecutive patients who underwent retrosigmoid transmeatal resection of acoustic neuroma who underwent our method of fat graft-assisted IAC closure. We assessed rates of postoperative CSF leak (incisional leak, rhinorrhea, or otorrhea), pseudomeningocele formation, and occurrence of meningitis. Twenty-four patients (10 males, 14 females) with a mean age of 47 years (range 18-84) underwent fat graft-assisted IAC closure. No lumbar drains were used postoperatively. There were no instances of postoperative CSF leak (incisional leak, rhinorrhea, or otorrhea), pseudomeningocele formation, or occurrence of meningitis. There were no graft site complications. Our results demonstrate that autologous fat grafts provide a safe and effective method of IAC defect closure to prevent postoperative CSF leakage after acoustic tumor removal via a retrosigmoid transmeatal approach. The surgical technique and operative nuances are described. PMID:26482457

  17. Exponential stability preservation in semi-discretisations of BAM networks with nonlinear impulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamad, Sannay; Gopalsamy, K.

    2009-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the reliability of a discrete-time analogue in preserving the exponential convergence of a bidirectional associative memory (BAM) network that is subject to nonlinear impulses. The analogue derived from a semi-discretisation technique with the value of the time-step fixed is treated as a discrete-time dynamical system while its exponential convergence towards an equilibrium state is studied. Thereby, a family of sufficiency conditions governing the network parameters and the impulse magnitude and frequency is obtained for the convergence. As special cases, one can obtain from our results, those corresponding to the non-impulsive discrete-time BAM networks and also those corresponding to continuous-time (impulsive and non-impulsive) systems. A relation between the Lyapunov exponent of the non-impulsive system and that of the impulsive system involving the size of the impulses and the inter-impulse intervals is obtained.

  18. High signal-to-noise ratio acoustic sensor using phase shifted gratings interrogated by the Pound-Drever-Hall technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kung, Peter; Comanici, Maria I.

    2015-03-01

    Optical fiber is made of glass, an insulator, and thus it is immune to strong electromagnetic interference. Therefore, fiber optics is a technology ideally suitable for sensing of partial discharge (PD) both in transformers and generators. Extensive efforts have been used to develop a cost effective solution for detecting partial discharge, which generates acoustic emission, with signals ranging from 30 kHz to 200 kHz. The requirement is similar to fiber optics Hydro Phone, but at higher frequencies. There are several keys to success: there must be at least 60 dB signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) performance, which will ensure not only PD detection but later on provide diagnostics and also the ability to locate the origin of the events. Defects that are stationary would gradually degrade the insulation and result in total breakdown. Transformers currently need urgent attention: most of them are oil filled and are at least 30 to 50 years old, close to the end of life. In this context, an issue to be addressed is the safety of the personnel working close to the assets and collateral damage that could be caused by a tank explosion (with fire spilling over the whole facility). This paper will describe the latest achievement in fiber optics PD sensor technology: the use of phase shifted-fiber gratings with a very high speed interrogation method that uses the Pound-Drever-Hall technique. More importantly, this is based on a technology that could be automated, easy to install, and, eventually, available at affordable prices.

  19. High signal-to-noise acoustic sensor using phase-shifted gratings interrogated by the Pound-Drever-Hall technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kung, Peter; Comanici, Maria I.

    2014-11-01

    Optical fiber is made of glass, an insulator, and thus it is immune to strong electromagnetic interference. Therefore, fiber optics is a technology ideally suitable for sensing of partial discharge (PD) both in transformers and generators. Extensive efforts have been used to develop a cost effective solution for detecting partial discharge, which generates acoustic emission, with signals ranging from 30 kHz to 200 kHz. The requirement is similar to fiber optics Hydro Phone, but at higher frequencies. There are several keys to success: there must be at least 60 dB signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) performance, which will ensure not only PD detection but later on provide diagnostics and also the ability to locate the origin of the events. Defects that are stationary would gradually degrade the insulation and result in total breakdown. Transformers currently need urgent attention: most of them are oil filled and are at least 30 to 50 years old, close to the end of life. In this context, an issue to be addressed is the safety of the personnel working close to the assets and collateral damage that could be caused by a tank explosion (with fire spilling over the whole facility). This paper will describe the latest achievement in fiber optics PD sensor technology: the use of phase shifted-fiber gratings with a very high speed interrogation method that uses the Pound-Drever-Hall technique. More importantly, this is based on a technology that could be automated, easy to install, and, eventually, available at affordable prices.

  20. Impulse Testing of Corporate-Fed Patch Array Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, Neil F.

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses a novel method for detecting faults in antenna arrays. The method, termed Impulse Testing, was developed for corporate-fed patch arrays where the element is fed by a probe and is shorted at its center. Impulse Testing was devised to supplement conventional microwave measurements in order to quickly verify antenna integrity. The technique relies on exciting each antenna element in turn with a fast pulse (or impulse) that propagates through the feed network to the output port of the antenna. The resulting impulse response is characteristic of the path through the feed network. Using an oscilloscope, a simple amplitude measurement can be made to detect faults. A circuit model of the antenna elements and feed network was constructed to assess various fault scenarios and determine fault-detection thresholds. The experimental setup and impulse measurements for two patch array antennas are presented. Advantages and limitations of the technique are discussed along with applications to other antenna array topologies

  1. The Development of Automated Detection Techniques for Passive Acoustic Monitoring as a Tool for Studying Beaked Whale Distribution and Habitat Preferences in the California Current Ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yack, Tina M.

    California Bight (SCB). The preliminary measurement of the visually validated Baird's beaked whale echolocation signals recorded from the ship-based towed array were used as a basis for identifying Baird's signals in the seafloor-mounted autonomous recorder data. The passive acoustic detection algorithms for beaked whales developed using data from Chapters 2 and 3 were field tested during a three year period to test the reliability of acoustic beaked whale monitoring techniques and to use these methods to describe beaked whale habitat in the SCB. In 2009 and 2010, PAM methods using towed hydrophone arrays were tested. These methods proved highly effective for real-time detection of beaked whales in the SCB and were subsequently implemented in 2011 to successfully detect and track beaked whales during the ongoing Southern California Behavioral Response Study (SOCAL-BRS). The final step in this research was to utilize the passive acoustic detection techniques developed herin to predictively model beaked whale habitat use and preferences in the CCE. This chapter uses a multifaceted approach to model beaked whale encounter rates in the CCE. Beaked whale acoustic encounters are utilized to inform Generalized Additive Models (GAMs) of encounter rate for beaked whales in the CCE and compare these to visual based models. Acoustic and visual based models were independently developed for a small beaked whale group and Baird's beaked whales. Two models were evaluated for visual and acoustic encounters, one that also included Beaufort sea state as a predictor variable in addition to those listed and one that did not include Beaufort sea state. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  2. Impulse radar studfinder

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, T.E.

    1995-10-10

    An impulse radar studfinder propagates electromagnetic pulses and detects reflected pulses from a fixed range. Unmodulated pulses, about 200 ps wide, are emitted. A large number of reflected pulses are sampled and averaged. Background reflections are subtracted. Reflections from wall studs or other hidden objects are detected and displayed using light emitting diodes. 9 figs.

  3. Relativistic impulse dynamics.

    PubMed

    Swanson, Stanley M

    2011-08-01

    Classical electrodynamics has some annoying rough edges. The self-energy of charges is infinite without a cutoff. The calculation of relativistic trajectories is difficult because of retardation and an average radiation reaction term. By reconceptuallizing electrodynamics in terms of exchanges of impulses rather than describing it by forces and potentials, we eliminate these problems. A fully relativistic theory using photonlike null impulses is developed. Numerical calculations for a two-body, one-impulse-in-transit model are discussed. A simple relationship between center-of-mass scattering angle and angular momentum was found. It reproduces the Rutherford cross section at low velocities and agrees with the leading term of relativistic distinguishable-particle quantum cross sections (Møller, Mott) when the distance of closest approach is larger than the Compton wavelength of the particle. Magnetism emerges as a consequence of viewing retarded and advanced interactions from the vantage point of an instantaneous radius vector. Radiation reaction becomes the local conservation of energy-momentum between the radiating particle and the emitted impulse. A net action is defined that could be used in developing quantum dynamics without potentials. A reinterpretation of Newton's laws extends them to relativistic motion. PMID:21929132

  4. Impulse radar studfinder

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1995-01-01

    An impulse radar studfinder propagates electromagnetic pulses and detects reflected pulses from a fixed range. Unmodulated pulses, about 200 ps wide, are emitted. A large number of reflected pulses are sampled and averaged. Background reflections are subtracted. Reflections from wall studs or other hidden objects are detected and displayed using light emitting diodes.

  5. Entrainment and the cranial rhythmic impulse.

    PubMed

    McPartland, J M; Mein, E A

    1997-01-01

    Entrainment is the integration or harmonization of oscillators. All organisms pulsate with myriad electrical and mechanical rhythms. Many of these rhythms emanate from synchronized pulsating cells (eg, pacemaker cells, cortical neurons). The cranial rhythmic impulse is an oscillation recognized by many bodywork practitioners, but the functional origin of this impulse remains uncertain. We propose that the cranial rhythmic impulse is the palpable perception of entrainment, a harmonic frequency that incorporates the rhythms of multiple biological oscillators. It is derived primarily from signals between the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems. Entrainment also arises between organisms. The harmonizing of coupled oscillators into a single, dominant frequency is called frequency-selective entrainment. We propose that this phenomenon is the modus operandi of practitioners who use the cranial rhythmic impulse in craniosacral treatment. Dominant entrainment is enhanced by "centering," a technique practiced by many healers, for example, practitioners of Chinese, Tibetan, and Ayurvedic medicine. We explore the connections between centering, the cranial rhythmic impulse, and craniosacral treatment. PMID:8997803

  6. Fdtd Calculation of Linear Acoustic Phenomena and Its Application to Architectural Acoustics and Environmental Noise Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, S.

    The finite difference time domain (FDTD) method is widely used as an effective and powerful tool for analyzing acoustic problems. In architectural acoustics, impulse response is the most important quantity and therefore the FDTD method, by which the physical quantities are obtained in time domain, is more advantageous than other wave-based analysis methods, by many of which the calculation is performed in frequency domain. This paper reports application of the FDTD method to room acoustics and outdoor noise assessment.

  7. Implementation and Evaluation of Elastographic Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Salido, N.; Medina, L.; Cruza, J. F.; Camacho, J.

    Elastography is an ultrasound based imaging technique used to explore the elastic properties of tissues by detecting their mechanical response to an external or internal stimulus. Changes in elasticity are associated with some pathologies like cancer, and hence, elastography is an important tool for the diagnosis of these diseases. The present work addresses the implementation of an image compounding technique using one of these elastographic techniques and reports the results obtained with an elasticity tissue-mimic phantom. Our study includes Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Imaging (ARFI), which uses the acoustic radiation force (ARF) to produce the stimulus (internal force). The strain image is formed from longitudinal displacement calculation by means of a correlation algorithm. A spatial compounding image is generated by moving the array probe combining individual images, increasing the field of view and improving lesions evaluation. The final objective of this work is to integrate elastography in a multimodal imaging system aimed to the early diagnosis of breast cancer.

  8. Acoustic noise associated with the MOD-1 wind turbine: its source, impact, and control

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, N.D.; McKenna, H.E.; Hemphill, R.R.; Etter, C.L.; Garrelts, R.L.; Linn, N.C.

    1985-02-01

    This report summarizes extensive research by staff of the Solar Energy Research Institute and its subcontractors conducted to establish the origin and possible amelioration of acoustic disturbances associated with the operation of the DOE/NASA MOD-1 wind turbine installed in 1979 near Boone, North Carolina. Results have shown that the source of this acoustic annoyance was the transient, unsteady aerodynamic lift imparted to the turbine blades as they passed through the lee wakes of the large, cylindrical tower supports. Nearby residents were annoyed by the low-frequency, acoustic impulses propagated into the structures in which the complainants lived. The situation was aggravated further by a complex sound propagation process controlled by terrain and atmospheric focusing. Several techniques for reducing the abrupt, unsteady blade load transients were researched and are discussed in the report.

  9. Micropower impulse radar imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, M.S.

    1995-11-01

    From designs developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in radar and imaging technologies, there exists the potential for a variety of applications in both public and private sectors. Presently tests are being conducted for the detection of buried mines and the analysis of civil structures. These new systems use a patented ultra-wide band (impulse) radar technology known as Micropower Impulse Radar (GPR) imaging systems. LLNL has also developed signal processing software capable of producing 2-D and 3-D images of objects embedded in materials such as soil, wood and concrete. My assignment while at LLNL has focused on the testing of different radar configurations and applications, as well as assisting in the creation of computer algorithms which enable the radar to scan target areas of different geometeries.

  10. Occupational exposure to impulse noise associated with shooting.

    PubMed

    Lwow, Felicja; Jóźków, Paweł; Mędraś, Marek

    2011-01-01

    Shooting training is associated with exposure to a considerable amount of unique noise. We wanted to evaluate noise exposure during such training. Our observations especially apply to professional sport shooters, but they are also valid for shooting coaches/instructors. We collected acoustic signals in 10-, 25- and 50-m as well as open-air shooting ranges. The recorded material was analysed with orthogonal, adaptive parameterization by Shur. The mean duration of a single acoustic signal was 250-800 ms with the C-weighted sound peak pressure level of 138.2-165.2 dB. Shooters may be exposed to as many as 600-1350 acoustic impulses during a training unit. The actual load for the hearing organ of a professional shooter or a shooting coach is ~200 000 acoustic stimuli in a year-long training macrocycle. Orthogonal, adaptive parameterization by Shur makes safe scheduling of shooters' training possible. PMID:21375955

  11. Soldier/robot team acoustic detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Stuart H.; Scanlon, Michael V.

    2003-09-01

    The future battlefield will require an unprecedented level of automation in which soldier-operated, autonomous, and semi-autonomous ground, air, and sea platforms along with mounted and dismounted soldiers will function as a tightly coupled team. Sophisticated robotic platforms with diverse sensor suites will be an integral part of the Objective Force, and must be able to collaborate not only amongst themselves but also with their manned partners. The Army Research Laboratory has developed a robot-based acoustic detection system that will detect and localize on an impulsive noise event, such as a sniper's weapon firing. Additionally, acoustic sensor arrays worn on a soldier's helmet or equipment can enhance his situational awareness and RSTA capabilities. The Land Warrior or Objective Force Warrior body-worn computer can detect tactically significant impulsive signatures from bullets, mortars, artillery, and missiles or spectral signatures from tanks, helicopters, UAVs, and mobile robots. Time-difference-of-arrival techniques can determine a sound's direction of arrival, while head attitude sensors can instantly determine the helmet orientation at time of capture. With precision GPS location of the soldier, along with the locations of other soldiers, robots, or unattended ground sensors that heard the same event, triangulation techniques can produce an accurate location of the target. Data from C-4 explosions and 0.50-Caliber shots shows that both helmet and robot systems can localize on the same event. This provides an awesome capability - mobile robots and soldiers working together on an ever-changing battlespace to detect the enemy and improve the survivability, mobility, and lethality of our future warriors.

  12. SHOCKS-``COMPLICATEDNESS'' Impulse-Jerk (I-J): [a(t)];[m(t)] DEVIATIONS FROM/VS. ''(so MIScalled) `Complexity' as UTTER-SIMPLICITY!!!''(``SMCIUS!!!''): SHOCKS Burst Acoustic-Emission(BAE) ``COMPLICATED-NESS''-MEASURE(S)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Frederick; Siegel, Edward

    2011-06-01

    (so MIScalled) ''complexity'' associated BOTH [SCALE-Invarience Symmetry-RESTORING] AND X(w) (F-D-thm.) P(ω) ``1''/ ω ``1''/ω 1 . 000 ... ''pink'' Zipf-law Archimedes-HYPERBOLICITY INEVITABILITY BAE power-spectrum power-law decay algebraicity (or at least ``red'' Pareto-law X(ω) (F.-D.-thm.) P(ω) 1/ω (0 < # ≠ 1 . 000 ...)) . Their INTERCONNECT-ION? Simple-calculus [SCALE-Invariance Symmetry-RESTORING(S-I S-R)] LOGARITHM-function derivative: d ln(ω) / d ω= hence: d[S-I S-R](ω) /d ω= ; via Noether-theorem continuous-symmetries relation to conservation-laws is: [d[{inter-scale 4-current 4-divergence}/d ω =∑μ∂μ Jμ=0](ω) =1/. Hence (so MIScalled) ''complexity'' is inter-scale information-conservation(nano to meso to macro)[in amazing exact agreement with Anderson-Mandell-Selz[PhD, FAU(91); Fractals of Brain/Mind, G. Stamov ed.(94)]; experimental-psychology!!!], i.e. ``SMCIUS!!!'' VS. SHOCKS-''COMPLICATEDNESS'' NON: ``1''/ ω Zipf/(Pareto?); power-law; algebraicity; universality power-spectrum inverse-transform of time-series of shock's impulse-jerk(I-J)

  13. Comparison of Active Noise Control Structures in the Presence of Acoustical Feedback by Using THEH∞SYNTHESIS Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, M. R.; Lin, H. H.

    1997-10-01

    This study compares three control structures of active noise cancellation for ducts: feedback control, feedforward control, and hybrid control. These structures are compared in terms of performance, stability, and robustness by using a general framework of theH∞robust control theory. In addition, theH∞synthesis procedure automatically incorporates the acoustic feedback path that is usually a plaguing problem to feedforward control design. The controllers are implemented by using a digital signal processor and tested on a finite-length duct. In an experimental verification, the proposed controllers are also compared with the well-known filtered-uleast mean square (FULMS) controller. The advantages and disadvantages of each ANC structure as well as the adverse effects due to acoustic feedback are addressed.

  14. Dissociated neural substrates underlying impulsive choice and impulsive action.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiang; Chen, Chunhui; Cai, Ying; Li, Siyao; Zhao, Xiao; Zheng, Li; Zhang, Hanqi; Liu, Jing; Chen, Chuansheng; Xue, Gui

    2016-07-01

    There is a growing consensus that impulsivity is a multifaceted construct that comprises several components such as impulsive choice and impulsive action. Although impulsive choice and impulsive action have been shown to be the common characteristics of some impulsivity-related psychiatric disorders, surprisingly few studies have directly compared their neural correlates and addressed the question whether they involve common or distinct neural correlates. We addressed this important empirical gap using an individual differences approach that could characterize the functional relevance of neural networks in behaviors. A large sample (n=227) of college students was tested with the delay discounting and stop-signal tasks, and their performances were correlated with the neuroanatomical (gray matter volume, GMV) and functional (resting-state functional connectivity, RSFC) measures, using multivariate pattern analysis (MVPA) and 10-fold cross-validation. Behavioral results showed no significant correlation between impulsive choice measured by discounting rate (k) and impulsive action measured by stop signal reaction time (SSRT). The GMVs in the right frontal pole (FP) and left middle frontal gyrus (MFG) were predictive of k, but not SSRT. In contrast, the GMVs in the right inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), supplementary motor area (SMA), and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) could predict individuals' SSRT, but not k. RSFC analysis using the FP and right IFG as seed regions revealed two distinct networks that correspond well to the "waiting" and "stopping" systems, respectively. Furthermore, the RSFC between the FP and ventromedial prefrontal cortex (VMPFC) was predictive of k, whereas the RSFC between the IFG and pre-SMA was predictive of SSRT. These results demonstrate clearly neural dissociations between impulsive choice and impulsive action, provide new insights into the nature of impulsivity, and have implications for impulsivity-related disorders. PMID:27083527

  15. Impulsive Action but Not Impulsive Choice Determines Problem Gambling Severity

    PubMed Central

    Brevers, Damien; Cleeremans, Axel; Verbruggen, Frederick; Bechara, Antoine; Kornreich, Charles; Verbanck, Paul; Noël, Xavier

    2012-01-01

    Background Impulsivity is a hallmark of problem gambling. However, impulsivity is not a unitary construct and this study investigated the relationship between problem gambling severity and two facets of impulsivity: impulsive action (impaired ability to withhold a motor response) and impulsive choice (abnormal aversion for the delay of reward). Methods The recruitment includes 65 problem gamblers and 35 normal control participants. On the basis of DSM-IV-TR criteria, two groups of gamblers were distinguished: problem gamblers (n = 38) and pathological gamblers (n = 27) with similar durations of gambling practice. Impulsive action was assessed using a response inhibition task (the stop-signal task). Impulsive choice was estimated with the delay-discounting task. Possible confounds (e.g., IQ, mood, ADHD symptoms) were recorded. Results Both problem and pathological gamblers discounted reward at a higher rate than their controls, but only pathological gamblers showed abnormally low performance on the most demanding condition of the stop-signal task. None of the potential confounds covaried with these results. Conclusions These results suggest that, whereas abnormal impulsive choice characterizes all problem gamblers, pathological gamblers' impairments in impulsive action may represent an important developmental pathway of pathological gambling. PMID:23209796

  16. Impulse variability in isometric tasks.

    PubMed

    Carlton, L G; Kim, K H; Liu, Y T; Newell, K M

    1993-03-01

    An isometric elbow flexion task was used in two experiments that examined the influence of force-production characteristics on impulse variability. Impulse size was held constant while peak force, time to peak force, rate of force, and, hence, the shape of the criterion force-time curve were manipulated. The results indicated that changes in the force-time curve under conditions of equal impulse bring about systematic changes in impulse variability, and this effect is more pronounced for larger impulse conditions. The inability of existing functions to account for the peak force variability findings led to the generation of a new predicted force variability function. The proposed function accounts for changes in the standard deviation and coefficient of variation of peak force, impulse, and rate of force over a range of force-time conditions. PMID:12730039

  17. Signal processing in impulsive electromagnetic interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabin, Serena M.

    1993-06-01

    Statistical signal processing functions such as signal detection, estimation, and identification play a key role in the development of effective communications, radar, and sonar systems. For example, advanced statistical methods are emerging as being particularly important in digital communications systems operating in channels corrupted by interference from such phenomena as multiple-access noise, intentional jamming, and impulsive noise sources. Conventional demodulation methods, such as coherent matched filtering, often suffer serious performance degradation when subject to interference of these types; however, this degradation can frequently be eliminated through the use of more sophisticated signal processing techniques. During this reporting period, the focus of our work has been on the problem of obtaining optimum and efficient identification and detection procedures for impulsive channels. Of particular interest is the Middleton Class A noise model, which is a widely-accepted statistical-physical model for impulsive interference superimposed on a Gaussian background. The model has two basic parameters that can be adjusted to fit a wide variety of impulsive noise phenomena occurring in practice.

  18. Impulse Plasma In Surface Engineering - a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zdunek, K.; Nowakowska-Langier, K.; Chodun, R.; Okrasa, S.; Rabinski, M.; Dora, J.; Domanowski, P.; Halarowicz, J.

    2014-11-01

    The article describes the view of the plasma surface engineering, assuming the role of non-thermal energy effects in the synthesis of materials and coatings deposition. In the following study it was underlined that the vapor excitation through the application of an electric field during coatings deposition gives new possibilities for coatings formation. As an example the IPD method was chosen. During the IPD (Impulse Plasma Deposition) the impulse plasma is generated in the coaxial accelerator by strong periodic electrical pulses. The impulse plasma is distributed in the form of energetic plasma pockets. Due to the almost completely ionization of gas, the nucleation of new phases takes place on ions directly in the plasma itself. As a result the coatings of metastable materials with nano-amorphous structure and excellent adhesion to the non-heated intentionally substrates could be deposited. Recently the novel way of impulse plasma generation during the coatings deposition was proposed and developed by our group. An efficient tool for plasma process control, the plasma forming gas injection to the interelectrode space was used. Periodic changing the gas pressure results in increasing both the degree of dispersion and the dynamics of the plasma pulses. The advantage of the new technique in deposition of coatings with exceptionally good properties has been demonstrated in the industrial scale not only in the case of the IPD method but also in the case of very well known magnetron sputtering method.

  19. Ocean acoustic hurricane classification.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Joshua D; Makris, Nicholas C

    2006-01-01

    Theoretical and empirical evidence are combined to show that underwater acoustic sensing techniques may be valuable for measuring the wind speed and determining the destructive power of a hurricane. This is done by first developing a model for the acoustic intensity and mutual intensity in an ocean waveguide due to a hurricane and then determining the relationship between local wind speed and underwater acoustic intensity. From this it is shown that it should be feasible to accurately measure the local wind speed and classify the destructive power of a hurricane if its eye wall passes directly over a single underwater acoustic sensor. The potential advantages and disadvantages of the proposed acoustic method are weighed against those of currently employed techniques. PMID:16454274

  20. Impulse Control of Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menaldi, Jose-Luis; Sritharan, S. S.

    2000-11-01

    Impulse control corresponds to forcing the fluid at strategic times where the optimal instances of time as well as the strengths of the control are to be determined by control theory of Navier-Stokes equation. This subject can also be exactly rephrased as an optimal weather prediction problem where the initial data is updated at strategic times (in current variational data assimilation literature in meteorology one obtains the optimal initial data just once). The underlying mathematical structure is precisely resolved with very elegant explanations using infinite dimensional free boundary problems where the boundaries of the free boundary correspond to optimal instances.

  1. Exponential synchronization of coupled switched neural networks with mode-dependent impulsive effects.

    PubMed

    Wenbing Zhang; Yang Tang; Qingying Miao; Wei Du

    2013-08-01

    This paper investigates the synchronization problem of coupled switched neural networks (SNNs) with mode-dependent impulsive effects and time delays. The main feature of mode-dependent impulsive effects is that impulsive effects can exist not only at the instants coinciding with mode switching but also at the instants when there is no system switching. The impulses considered here include those that suppress synchronization or enhance synchronization. Based on switching analysis techniques and the comparison principle, the exponential synchronization criteria are derived for coupled delayed SNNs with mode-dependent impulsive effects. Finally, simulations are provided to illustrate the effectiveness of the results. PMID:24808570

  2. Experimental localization of an acoustic sound source in a wind-tunnel flow by using a numerical time-reversal technique.

    PubMed

    Padois, Thomas; Prax, Christian; Valeau, Vincent; Marx, David

    2012-10-01

    The possibility of using the time-reversal technique to localize acoustic sources in a wind-tunnel flow is investigated. While the technique is widespread, it has scarcely been used in aeroacoustics up to now. The proposed method consists of two steps: in a first experimental step, the acoustic pressure fluctuations are recorded over a linear array of microphones; in a second numerical step, the experimental data are time-reversed and used as input data for a numerical code solving the linearized Euler equations. The simulation achieves the back-propagation of the waves from the array to the source and takes into account the effect of the mean flow on sound propagation. The ability of the method to localize a sound source in a typical wind-tunnel flow is first demonstrated using simulated data. A generic experiment is then set up in an anechoic wind tunnel to validate the proposed method with a flow at Mach number 0.11. Monopolar sources are first considered that are either monochromatic or have a narrow or wide-band frequency content. The source position estimation is well-achieved with an error inferior to the wavelength. An application to a dipolar sound source shows that this type of source is also very satisfactorily characterized. PMID:23039435

  3. Open-loop dereverberation of multichannel room impulse responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Bowon; Hasegawa-Johnson, Mark A.; Goudeseune, Camille

    2003-04-01

    We are developing the audio display for a CAVE-type virtual reality theater, a 3-m cube with displays covering all six rigid faces. The user's headgear continuously reports ear positions so headphones would be possible, but we nevertheless prefer loudspeakers because this enhances the sense of total immersion. Because sounds produced at the loudspeakers are distorted by the room impulse responses, we therefore face the problem of controlling the sound at the listener's two ears. Our proposed solution consists of open-loop acoustic point control, i.e., dereverberation. The room impulse responses from each loudspeaker to each ear of the listener are inverted using multichannel inversion methods, to create exactly the desired sound field at the listener's ears. Because the actual room impulse responses cannot be measured in real time (as the listener walks around), instead the impulse responses simulated by the image-source method is used. A new evaluation criterion is proposed to quantitatively evaluate both the simulation and the open-loop dereverberation. The actual impulse responses used for this evaluation are measured with a starter pistol, since this best approximates the point source assumed by the image-source method.

  4. Acoustic mapping velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muste, M.; Baranya, S.; Tsubaki, R.; Kim, D.; Ho, H.; Tsai, H.; Law, D.

    2016-05-01

    Knowledge of sediment dynamics in rivers is of great importance for various practical purposes. Despite its high relevance in riverine environment processes, the monitoring of sediment rates remains a major and challenging task for both suspended and bed load estimation. While the measurement of suspended load is currently an active area of testing with nonintrusive technologies (optical and acoustic), bed load measurement does not mark a similar progress. This paper describes an innovative combination of measurement techniques and analysis protocols that establishes the proof-of-concept for a promising technique, labeled herein Acoustic Mapping Velocimetry (AMV). The technique estimates bed load rates in rivers developing bed forms using a nonintrusive measurements approach. The raw information for AMV is collected with acoustic multibeam technology that in turn provides maps of the bathymetry over longitudinal swaths. As long as the acoustic maps can be acquired relatively quickly and the repetition rate for the mapping is commensurate with the movement of the bed forms, successive acoustic maps capture the progression of the bed form movement. Two-dimensional velocity maps associated with the bed form migration are obtained by implementing algorithms typically used in particle image velocimetry to acoustic maps converted in gray-level images. Furthermore, use of the obtained acoustic and velocity maps in conjunction with analytical formulations (e.g., Exner equation) enables estimation of multidirectional bed load rates over the whole imaged area. This paper presents a validation study of the AMV technique using a set of laboratory experiments.

  5. Acoustic simulation in architecture with parallel algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaohong; Zhang, Xinrong; Li, Dan

    2004-03-01

    In allusion to complexity of architecture environment and Real-time simulation of architecture acoustics, a parallel radiosity algorithm was developed. The distribution of sound energy in scene is solved with this method. And then the impulse response between sources and receivers at frequency segment, which are calculated with multi-process, are combined into whole frequency response. The numerical experiment shows that parallel arithmetic can improve the acoustic simulating efficiency of complex scene.

  6. Impulsive phase transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canfield, Richard C.; Bely-Dubau, Francoise; Brown, John C.; Dulk, George A.; Emslie, A. Gordon; Enome, Shinzo; Gabriel, Alan H.; Kundu, Mukul R.; Melrose, Donald; Neidig, Donald F.

    1986-01-01

    The transport of nonthermal electrons is explored. The thick-target electron beam model, in which electrons are presumed to be accelerated in the corona and typically thermalized primarily in the chromosphere and photosphere, is supported by observations throughout the electromagnetic spectrum. At the highest energies, the anisotropy of gamma-ray emission above 10 MeV clearly indicates that these photons are emitted by anisotropically-directed particles. The timing of this high-energy gamma-radiation with respect to lower-energy hard X-radiation implies that the energetic particles have short life-times. For collisional energy loss, this means that they are stopped in the chromosphere or below. Stereoscopic (two-spacecraft) observations at hard X-ray energies (up to 350 keV) imply that these lower-energy (but certainly nonthermal) electrons are also stopped deep in the chromosphere. Hard X-ray images show that, in spatially resolved flares whose radiation consists of impulsive bursts, the impulsive phase starts with X-radiation that comes mostly from the foot-points of coronal loops whose coronal component is outlined by microwaves.

  7. Acoustic analysis of aft noise reduction techniques measured on a subsonic tip speed 50.8 cm (twenty inch) diameter fan. [quiet engine program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stimpert, D. L.; Clemons, A.

    1977-01-01

    Sound data which were obtained during tests of a 50.8 cm diameter, subsonic tip speed, low pressure ratio fan were analyzed. The test matrix was divided into two major investigations: (1) source noise reduction techniques; and (2) aft duct noise reduction with acoustic treatment. Source noise reduction techniques were investigated which include minimizing second harmonic noise by varying vane/blade ratio, variation in spacing, and lowering the Mach number through the vane row to lower fan broadband noise. Treatment in the aft duct which includes flow noise effects, faceplate porosity, rotor OGV treatment, slant cell treatment, and splitter simulation with variable depth on the outer wall and constant thickness treatment on the inner wall was investigated. Variable boundary conditions such as variation in treatment panel thickness and orientation, and mixed porosity combined with variable thickness were examined. Significant results are reported.

  8. Unique aspects of impulsive traits in substance use and overeating: specific contributions of common assessments of impulsivity

    PubMed Central

    Beaton, Derek; Abdi, Hervé; Filbey, Francesca M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Impulsivity is a complex trait often studied in substance abuse and overeating disorders, but the exact nature of impulsivity traits and their contribution to these disorders are still debated. Thus, understanding how to measure impulsivity is essential for comprehending addictive behaviors. Objectives Identify unique impulsivity traits specific to substance use and overeating. Methods Impulsive Sensation Seeking (ImpSS) and Barratt’s Impulsivity scales (BIS) Scales were analyzed with a non-parametric factor analytic technique (discriminant correspondence analysis) to identify group-specific traits on 297 individuals from five groups: Marijuana (n = 88), Nicotine (n = 82), Overeaters (n = 27), Marijuauna + Nicotine (n = 63), and Controls (n = 37). Results A significant overall factor structure revealed three components of impulsivity that explained respectively 50.19% (pperm<0.0005), 24.18% (pperm<0.0005), and 15.98% (pperm<0.0005) of the variance. All groups were significantly different from one another. When analyzed together, the BIS and ImpSS produce a multi-factorial structure that identified the impulsivity traits specific to these groups. The group specific traits are (1) Control: low impulse, avoids thrill-seeking behaviors; (2) Marijuana: seeks mild sensation, is focused and attentive; (3) Marijuana + Nicotine: pursues thrill-seeking, lacks focus and attention; (4) Nicotine: lacks focus and planning; (5) Overeating: lacks focus, but plans (short and long term). Conclusions Our results reveal impulsivity traits specific to each group. This may provide better criteria to define spectrums and trajectories – instead of categories – of symptoms for substance use and eating disorders. Defining symptomatic spectrums could be an important step forward in diagnostic strategies. PMID:25115831

  9. Geodesics in nonexpanding impulsive gravitational waves with Λ, part I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sämann, Clemens; Steinbauer, Roland; Lecke, Alexander; Podolský, Jiřˇí

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the geodesics in the entire class of nonexpanding impulsive gravitational waves propagating in an (anti-)de Sitter universe using the distributional form of the metric. Employing a five-dimensional embedding formalism and a general regularisation technique, we prove the existence and uniqueness of the geodesics crossing the wave impulse, leading to a completeness result. We also derive the explicit form of the geodesics, thereby confirming previous results derived in a heuristic approach.

  10. Energetic electrons in impulsive solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batchelor, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    A new analysis was made of a thermal flare model proposed by Brown, Melrose, and Spicer (1979) and Smith and Lilliequist (1979). They assumed the source of impulsive hard X-rays to be a plasma at a temperature of order 10 to the 8th power K, initially located at the apex of a coronal arch, and confined by ion-acoustic turbulence in a collisionless conduction front. Such a source would expand at approximately the ion-sound speed, C sub S = square root of (k T sub e/m sub i), until it filled the arch. Brown, Melrose, and Spicer and Smith and Brown (1980) argued that the source assumed in this model would not explain the simultaneous impulsive microwave emission. In contrast, the new results presented herein suggest that this model leads to the development of a quasi-Maxwellian distribution of electrons that explains both the hard X-ray and microwave emissions. This implies that the source sizes can be determined from observations of the optically-thick portions of microwave spectra and the temperatures obtained from associated hard X-ray observations. In this model, the burst emission would rise to a maximum in a time, t sub r, approximately equal to L/c sub s, where L is the half-length of the arch. New observations of these impulsive flare emissions were analyzed herein to test this prediction of the model. Observations made with the Solar Maximum Mission spacecraft and the Bern Radio Observatory are in good agreement with the model.

  11. Teaching about Impulse and Momentum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franklin, Bill

    2004-01-01

    This American Association of Physics Teachers/Physics Teaching Resource Agents (APPT/PTRA) spiral-bound manual features labs and demos physics teachers can use to give students hands-on opportunities to learn about impulse and momentum. "Make-and-take activities" include AAPT Apparatus Contest winners "An Air Impulse Rocket," "A Fan Driven…

  12. Nonsputtering impulse magnetron discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Khodachenko, G. V.; Mozgrin, D. V.; Fetisov, I. K.; Stepanova, T. V.

    2012-01-15

    Experiments with quasi-steady high-current discharges in crossed E Multiplication-Sign B fields in various gases (Ar, N{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, and SF{sub 6}) and gas mixtures (Ar/SF{sub 6} and Ar/O{sub 2}) at pressures from 10{sup -3} to 5 Torr in discharge systems with different configurations of electric and magnetic fields revealed a specific type of stable low-voltage discharge that does not transform into an arc. This type of discharge came to be known as a high-current diffuse discharge and, later, a nonsputtering impulse magnetron discharge. This paper presents results from experimental studies of the plasma parameters (the electron temperature, the plasma density, and the temperature of ions and atoms of the plasma-forming gas) of a high-current low-pressure diffuse discharge in crossed E Multiplication-Sign B fields.

  13. Damage analysis of CFRP-confined circular concrete-filled steel tubular columns by acoustic emission techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dongsheng; Chen, Zhi; Feng, Quanming; Wang, Yanlei

    2015-08-01

    Damage properties of carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) confined circular concrete-filled steel tubular (CCFT) columns were analyzed through acoustic emission (AE) signals. AE characteristic parameters were obtained through axial compression tests. The severity of damage to CFRP-CCFT columns was estimated using the growing trend of AE accumulated energy as basis. The bearing capacity of CFRP-CCFT columns and AE accumulated energy improved as CFRP layers increased. The damage process was studied using a number of crucial AE parameters. The cracks’ mode can be differentiated through the ratio of the rise time to the waveform amplitude and through average frequency analysis. With the use of intensity signal analysis, the damage process of the CFRP-CCFT columns can be classified into three levels that represent different degrees. Based on b-value analysis, the development of the obtained cracks can be defined. Thus, identifying an initial yielding and providing early warning is possible.

  14. Medium-frequency impulsive-thrust-activated liquid hydrogen reorientation with Geyser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Shyu, K. L.

    1992-01-01

    Efficient technique are studied for accomplishing propellant resettling through the minimization of propellant usage through impulsive thrust. A comparison between the use of constant-thrust and impulsive-thrust accelerations for the activation of propellant resettlement shows that impulsive thrust is superior to constant thrust for liquid reorientation in a reduced-gravity environment. This study shows that when impulsive thrust with 0.1-1.0-, and 10-Hz frequencies for liquid-fill levels in the range between 30-80 percent is considered, the selection of 1.0-Hz-frequency impulsive thrust over the other frequency ranges of impulsive thrust is the optimum. Characteristics of the slosh waves excited during the course of 1.0-Hz-frequency impulsive-thrust liquid reorientation were also analyzed.

  15. Application of the mechanical perturbation produced by traffic as a new approach of nonlinear acoustic technique for detecting microcracks in the concrete: A laboratory simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradi-Marani, F.; Kodjo, S. A.; Rivard, P.; Lamarche, C. P.

    2012-05-01

    Very few nonlinear acoustics techniques are currently applied on real structures because their large scale implementation is difficult. Recently, a new method based on nonlinear acoustics has been proposed at the Université de Sherbrooke for the characterization of the damage associated with Alkali-Silica Reaction (ASR). This method consists in quantifying the influence of an external mechanical disturbance on the propagation of a continual ultrasonic wave that probes the material. In this method, the mechanical perturbation produced by an impact causes sudden opening of microcracks and, consequently, the velocity of the probe ultrasonic wave is suddenly reduced. Then it slowly and gradually returns to its initial level as the microcracks are closing. The objective of this study is: using waves generated by traffics in infrastructures in order to monitor microdefects due to damage mechanisms like ASR. This type of mechanical disturbance (by traffic loadings) is used as a source of low frequency-high amplitude waves for opening/closing of the microdefects in the bulk of concrete. This paper presents a laboratory set-up made of three large deep concrete slabs used to study the nonlinear behavior of concrete using the disturbance caused by simulated traffic. The traffic is simulated with a controlled high accuracy jack to produce a wave similar to that produced by traffic. Results obtained from this study will be used in the future to design an in-situ protocol for assessing ASR-affected structures.

  16. Elegant impulser developed for flat beam injection

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, M. J., LLNL

    1998-05-26

    The following report describes the design, construction, and checkout of a high-voltage (HV) impulser built for the heavy ion fusion (HIF) project [1]. The purpose of this impulser is to provide an adjustable diode voltage source of sufficient quality and level to allow the optimization of beam transport and accelerator sections of HIF [2, 3]. An elegant, low-impedance, high-energy storage capacitor circuit has been selected for this application. Circuit parameters of the retrofit to the diode region [4] have been included to provide the controlled rise time. The critical part of this circuit that is common to all candidates is the impedance matching component. The following report provides a description of the implemented circuit, the basic circuit variables for wave shaping, screening techniques revealing the weakest circuit component, and the resulting output of the injector.

  17. Coupling creep and damage in concrete under high sustained loading: Experimental investigation on bending beams and application of Acoustic Emission technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saliba, J.; Loukili, A.; Grondin, F.

    2010-06-01

    effect on concrete, probably because of the consolidation of the hardened cement paste. The influence of creep on fracture energy, fracture toughness, and characteristic length of concrete is also studied. The fracture energy and the characteristic length of concrete increases slightly when creep occurs prior to failure and the size of the fracture process zone increases too. The load-CMOD relationship is linear in the ascending portion and gradually drops off after the peak value in the descending portion. The length of the tail end portion of the softening curve increases with beams subjected to creep. Relatively more ductile fracture behavior was observed with beams subjected to creep. The contribution of non-destructive and instrumental investigation methods is currently exploited to check and measure the evolution of some negative structural phenomena, such as micro-and macro-cracking, finally resulting in a creep-like behaviour. Among these methods, the non-destructive technique based on acoustic Emission proves to be very effective, especially to check and measure micro-cracking that takes place inside a structure under mechanical loading. Thus as a part of the investigation quantitative acoustic emission techniques were applied to investigate microcracking and damage localization in concrete beams. The AE signals were captured with the AE WIN software and further analyzed with Noesis software analysis of acoustic emission data. AE waveforms were generated as elastic waves in concrete due to crack nucleation. And a multichannel data acquisition system was used to record the AE waveforms. During the three point bending tests, quantitative acoustic emission (AE) techniques were used to monitor crack growth and to deduce micro fracture mechanics in concrete beams before and after creep. Several specimens are experimented in order to match each cluster with corresponding damage mechanism of the material under loading. At the same time acoustic emission was used to

  18. Real-time measurement of protein adsorption on electrophoretically deposited hydroxyapatite coatings and magnetron sputtered metallic films using the surface acoustic wave technique.

    PubMed

    Meininger, M; Schmitz, T; Wagner, T; Ewald, A; Gbureck, U; Groll, J; Moseke, C

    2016-04-01

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) biosensors are highly sensitive for mass binding and are therefore used to detect protein-protein and protein-antibody interactions. Whilst the standard surface of the chips is a thin gold film, measurements on implant- or bone-like surfaces could significantly enhance the range of possible applications for this technique. The aim of this study was to establish methods to coat biosensor chips with Ti, TiN, and silver-doped TiN using physical vapor deposition as well as with hydroxyapatite by electrophoresis. To demonstrate that protein adsorption can be detected on these surfaces, binding experiments with fibronectin and fibronectin-specific antibodies have been performed with the coatings, which successfully proved the applicability of PVD and EPD for SAW biosensor functionalization. PMID:26838860

  19. Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    An acoustic neuroma is a benign tumor that develops on the nerve that connects the ear to the brain. ... can press against the brain, becoming life-threatening. Acoustic neuroma can be difficult to diagnose, because the ...

  20. The Computation and Analysis of Helicopter Impulsive Noise.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Yu.

    1994-01-01

    Helicopters have been proven to be economical and convenient vehicles with their ability to land, take -off and maneuver in areas inaccessible to fixed-wing aircraft. However, the noise they generate can severely restrict their usage in both civilian and military operations. When it occurs, helicopter impulsive noise is the loudest and the most annoying. The noise usually can be broken down to high -speed impulsive noise and blade-vortex interaction noise. The physical phenomena of helicopter blade-vortex interaction are especially complicated and include three-dimensional unsteady transonic flow and regions of vorticity. A computational and analytical study of the helicopter impulsive noise has been conducted herein, particularly of the blade-vortex interaction noise. The fundamental theory and noise mechanisms are introduced and discussed. The computational study includes two-dimensional and three -dimensional approaches. The two-dimensional unsteady transonic small disturbance model was extended to include viscous effects and monotone switches. The noise generation mechanisms due to the blade-vortex interaction are discussed. A rotating Kirchhoff method is developed to predict high-speed impulsive noise and blade-vortex interaction noise. A three-dimensional full potential CFD code was used for calculation of the nonlinear aerodynamic near-field, then a couple of extended Kirchhoff formulations with a rotational control surface are used to compute the far-field acoustic signals. The computed numerical results showed a good agreement with experimental results. The results also identify the important parameters for the impulsive noise control. This new rotating Kirchhoff method can be used to predict the helicopter impulsive noise accurately and is believed to be better in many ways than other existing methods.

  1. A novel closure based approach for fatigue crack length estimation using the acoustic emission technique in structural health monitoring applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagar, Daniel; Foote, Peter; Irving, Philip

    2014-10-01

    Use of Acoustic Emission (AE) for detecting and locating fatigue cracks in metallic structures is widely reported but studies investigating its potential for fatigue crack length estimation are scarce. Crack growth information enables prediction of the remaining useful life of a component using well established fracture mechanics principles. Hence, the prospects of AE for use in structural health monitoring applications would be significantly improved if it could be demonstrated not only as a means of detecting crack growth but also for estimation of crack lengths. A new method for deducing crack length has been developed based on correlations between AE signals generated during fatigue crack growth and corresponding cyclic loads. A model for crack length calculation was derived empirically using AE data generated during fatigue crack growth tests in 2 mm thick SEN aluminium 2014 T6 specimens subject to a tensile stress range of 52 MPa and an R ratio of 0.1. The model was validated using AE data generated independently in separate tests performed with a stress range of 27 MPa. The results showed that predictions of crack lengths over a range of 10 mm to 80 mm can be obtained with the mean of the normalised absolute errors ranging between 0.28 and 0.4. Predictions were also made using existing AE feature-based methods and the results compared to those obtained with the novel approach developed.

  2. Assessment of impact damage in Kevlar{reg_sign}-epoxy, filament-wound spherical test specimens by acoustic emission techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Whittaker, J.W.; Brosey, W.D.; Hamstad, M.A.

    1996-09-26

    The results of a study of the acoustic emission (AE) behavior of impact-damaged, spherical, composite test specimens subjected to thermal cycling and biaxial mechanical loading are presented. Seven Kevlar{reg_sign}-epoxy, filament-wound, spherical composite test specimens were subjected to different levels of impact damage. The seven specimens were a subset of a group of 77 specimens made with simulated fabrication-induced flaws. The specimens were subjected to two or three cycles of elevated temperature and then hydraulically pressurized to failure. The pressurization regime consisted of two cycles to different intermediate levels with a hold at each peak pressure level; a final pressurization to failure followed. The thermal and pressurization cycles were carefully designed to stimulate AE production under defined conditions. Both impacted and nonimpacted specimens produced thermo-AE (the term given to emission stimulated by thermal loading), but impacted specimens produced significantly more. Thermo-AE was produced primarily by damaged composite material. Damaged material produced emission as a function of both rising and falling temperature, but the effect was not repeatable. More seriously damaged specimens produced very large quantities of emission. Emission recorded during the static portion of the hydraulic loading cycles varied with load, time, and degree of damage. Static load AE behavior was quantified using a newly developed concept, the event-rate moment, and various correlations with residual strength were attempted. Correlations between residual strength, long-duration events, and even-rate moments were developed with varying degrees of success.

  3. Derivation of a Ritz series modeling technique for acoustic cavity-structural systems based on a constrained Hamilton's principle.

    PubMed

    Ginsberg, Jerry H

    2010-05-01

    Hamilton's principle for dynamic systems is adapted to describe the coupled response of a confined acoustic domain and an elastic structure that forms part or all of the boundary. A key part of the modified principle is the treatment of the surface traction as a Lagrange multiplier function that enforces continuity conditions at the fluid-solid interface. The structural displacement, fluid velocity potential, and traction are represented by Ritz series, where the usage of the velocity potential as the state variable for the fluid assures that the flow is irrotational. Designation of the coefficients of the potential function series as generalized velocities leads to corresponding series representations of the particle velocity, displacement, and pressure in the fluid, which in turn leads to descriptions of the mechanical energies and virtual work. Application of the calculus of variations to Hamilton's principle yields linear differential-algebraic equations whose form is identical to those governing mechanical systems that are subject to nonholonomic kinematic constraints. Criteria for selection of basis functions for the various Ritz series are illustrated with an example of a rectangular cavity bounded on one side by an elastic plate and conditions that change discontinuously on other sides. PMID:21117723

  4. Acoustic Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention relates to a sealing device having an acoustic resonator. The acoustic resonator is adapted to create acoustic waveforms to generate a sealing pressure barrier blocking fluid flow from a high pressure area to a lower pressure area. The sealing device permits noncontacting sealing operation. The sealing device may include a resonant-macrosonic-synthesis (RMS) resonator.

  5. Acoustic seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention relates to a sealing device having an acoustic resonator. The acoustic resonator is adapted to create acoustic waveforms to generate a sealing pressure barrier blocking fluid flow from a high pressure area to a lower pressure area. The sealing device permits noncontacting sealing operation. The sealing device may include a resonant-macrosonic-synthesis (RMS) resonator.

  6. On the Synchronization of Acoustic Gravity Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lonngren, Karl E.; Bai, Er-Wei

    Using the model proposed by Stenflo, we demonstrate that acoustic gravity waves found in one region of space can be synchronized with acoustic gravity waves found in another region of space using techniques from modern control theory.

  7. Origin of the sinus impulse.

    PubMed

    Schuessler, R B; Boineau, J P; Bromberg, B I

    1996-03-01

    It was generally accepted that the site of normal impulse origin within the atria was a single static focus within the sinus node. This review will examine how this model of impulse origin came about and has evolved. Early on, conflicting data suggested that the sinus node focus was not static and changed with interventions that changed heart rate, such as vagal stimulation. Furthermore, even with removal of the sinus node, a normal atrial rhythm was generated. High-resolution mapping in humans and dogs showed that the initiation of the impulse was dynamic and could be multicentric, with more than one focus initiating a single beat. Shifts in the site of origin correlated with changes in rate and were consistent with P wave changes routinely observed in the standard ECG. These studies suggested multiple pacemakers were responsible for impulse initiation. However, it was not clear how these widespread pacemakers were coordinated to function synchronously. Recent canine data suggest that the node may be partially insulated from the surrounding atrium, resulting in multicentric origin starting from a single site within the node. What has evolved is a model of impulse origin with a sinus node having discrete exit sites and a dominant pacemaker within the node that can shift to other nodal sites. Complex and changing conduction out of the node, coupled with extranodal pacemakers, which can assume dominance over the node, combine with the autonomic nervous system to control heart rate and the pattern of impulse origin within the atria. PMID:8867301

  8. Acoustic characteristics of 1/20-scale model helicopter rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shenoy, Rajarama K.; Kohlhepp, Fred W.; Leighton, Kenneth P.

    1986-01-01

    A wind tunnel test to study the effects of geometric scale on acoustics and to investigate the applicability of very small scale models for the study of acoustic characteristics of helicopter rotors was conducted in the United Technologies Research Center Acoustic Research Tunnel. The results show that the Reynolds number effects significantly alter the Blade-Vortex-Interaction (BVI) Noise characteristics by enhancing the lower frequency content and suppressing the higher frequency content. In the time domain this is observed as an inverted thickness noise impulse rather than the typical positive-negative impulse of BVI noise. At higher advance ratio conditions, in the absence of BVI, the 1/20 scale model acoustic trends with Mach number follow those of larger scale models. However, the 1/20 scale model acoustic trends appear to indicate stall at higher thrust and advance ratio conditions.

  9. Comparative Lightcraft Impulse Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mead, Franklin B., Jr.; Larson, C. W.; Kalliomaa, Wayne M.

    2001-11-01

    The impulse coupling coefficients, cm, of two radically different laser propulsion thruster concepts (lightcrafts), each 10 cm in diameter, have been measured under equal conditions using two different test stands. Lightcraft one is of toroidal shape and was provided by the U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL). A lightcraft of this shape and size has been used in free flight experiments at White Sands Missile Range, NM. Lightcraft two is bell (e.g., a paraboloid) shaped. With this type of lightcraft, the DLR previously conducted preliminary performance experiments, including vertical wire-bound flights in the laboratory. Both test stands were of the pendulum type. Test stand one was provided by the AFRL, and was a "rigid" pendulum, allowing motion in only one degree of freedom. The second test stand, a DLR design, suspended the lightcraft by thin wires and corresponded to a nearly perfect pendulum in the mathematical sense. All experiments employed the DLR electric-beam sustained, pulsed, CO(2) laser with pulse energies up to 400 J. The laser was operated with two configurations: 1) a stable resonator (flat beam profile); and, 2) an unstable resonator (ring shaped beam profile). All experiments were carried out in the open laboratory environment. Propellant, therefore, was either the surrounding air alone, or Delrin as an added solid propellant. For lightcraft one the cm value increased by a factor of three (450 N/MW) by adding Delrin. With lightcraft two, a comparable cm value of 590 N/MW was obtained. This corresponded to a Delrin loss of 60-SO ug/J. Results of cm as a function of the laser pulse energy for the various experimental conditions will be presented.

  10. Dopamine-agonists and impulsivity in Parkinson's disease: impulsive choices vs. impulsive actions.

    PubMed

    Antonelli, Francesca; Ko, Ji Hyun; Miyasaki, Janis; Lang, Anthony E; Houle, Sylvain; Valzania, Franco; Ray, Nicola J; Strafella, Antonio P

    2014-06-01

    The control of impulse behavior is a multidimensional concept subdivided into separate subcomponents, which are thought to represent different underlying mechanisms due to either disinhibitory processes or poor decision-making. In patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), dopamine-agonist (DA) therapy has been associated with increased impulsive behavior. However, the relationship among these different components in the disease and the role of DA is not well understood. In this imaging study, we investigated in PD patients the effects of DA medication on patterns of brain activation during tasks testing impulsive choices and actions. Following overnight withdrawal of antiparkinsonian medication, PD patients were studied with a H2 ((15)) O PET before and after administration of DA (1 mg of pramipexole), while they were performing the delay discounting task (DDT) and the GoNoGo Task (GNG). We observed that pramipexole augmented impulsivity during DDT, depending on reward magnitude and activated the medial prefrontal cortex and posterior cingulate cortex and deactivated ventral striatum. In contrast, the effect of pramipexole during the GNG task was not significant on behavioral performance and involved different areas (i.e., lateral prefrontal cortex). A voxel-based correlation analysis revealed a significant negative correlation between the discounting value (k) and the activation of medial prefrontal cortex and posterior cingulate suggesting that more impulsive patients had less activation in those cortical areas. Here we report how these different subcomponents of inhibition/impulsivity are differentially sensitive to DA treatment with pramipexole influencing mainly the neural network underlying impulsive choices but not impulsive action. PMID:24038587

  11. Debonding damage analysis in composite-masonry strengthening systems with polymer- and mortar-based matrix by means of the acoustic emission technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verstrynge, E.; Wevers, M.; Ghiassi, B.; Lourenço, P. B.

    2016-01-01

    Different types of strengthening systems, based on fiber reinforced materials, are under investigation for external strengthening of historic masonry structures. A full characterization of the bond behavior and of the short- and long-term failure mechanisms is crucial to ensure effective design, compatibility with the historic substrate and durability of the strengthening solution. Therein, non-destructive techniques are essential for bond characterization, durability assessment and on-site condition monitoring. In this paper, the acoustic emission (AE) technique is evaluated for debonding characterization and localization on fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) and steel reinforced grout-strengthened clay bricks. Both types of strengthening systems are subjected to accelerated ageing tests under thermal cycles and to single-lap shear bond tests. During the reported experimental campaign, AE data from the accelerated ageing tests demonstrated the thermal incompatibility between brick and epoxy-bonded FRP composites, and debonding damage was successfully detected, characterized and located. In addition, a qualitative comparison is made with digital image correlation and infrared thermography, in view of efficient on-site debonding detection.

  12. Matched-impulse-response processing for shallow-water localization and geoacoustic inversion

    PubMed

    Michalopoulou

    2000-11-01

    In this paper, impulse response matching is proposed for source localization and environmental inversion. The ocean impulse response is estimated using a cross-correlation procedure applied to data from the propagation of a broadband pulse in a shallow-water environment. Source localization and geoacoustic parameter estimation are then performed through time-domain correlations between the estimated impulse responses at spatially separated phones and synthetic replica impulse responses. The method is both spatially and temporally coherent. Parameter space search uses a hierarchical scheme designed to exploit the sensitivity of the acoustic field to the unknown parameters. Tested on the SWellEX-96 and synthetic data, the proposed method is shown to be more robust than conventional (linear), incoherent, broadband matched field processing. PMID:11108345

  13. Ocean acoustic reverberation tomography.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Robert A

    2015-12-01

    Seismic wide-angle imaging using ship-towed acoustic sources and networks of ocean bottom seismographs is a common technique for exploring earth structure beneath the oceans. In these studies, the recorded data are dominated by acoustic waves propagating as reverberations in the water column. For surveys with a small receiver spacing (e.g., <10 km), the acoustic wave field densely samples properties of the water column over the width of the receiver array. A method, referred to as ocean acoustic reverberation tomography, is developed that uses the travel times of direct and reflected waves to image ocean acoustic structure. Reverberation tomography offers an alternative approach for determining the structure of the oceans and advancing the understanding of ocean heat content and mixing processes. The technique has the potential for revealing small-scale ocean thermal structure over the entire vertical height of the water column and along long survey profiles or across three-dimensional volumes of the ocean. For realistic experimental geometries and data noise levels, the method can produce images of ocean sound speed on a smaller scale than traditional acoustic tomography. PMID:26723303

  14. Acoustic radiation force impulse elastography, FibroScan®, Forns' index and their combination in the assessment of liver fibrosis in patients with chronic hepatitis B, and the impact of inflammatory activity and steatosis on these diagnostic methods.

    PubMed

    Dong, Dao-Ran; Hao, Mei-Na; Li, Cheng; Peng, Ze; Liu, Xia; Wang, Gui-Ping; Ma, An-Lin

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the combination of certain serological markers (Forns' index; FI), FibroScan® and acoustic radiation force impulse elastography (ARFI) in the assessment of liver fibrosis in patients with hepatitis B, and to explore the impact of inflammatory activity and steatosis on the accuracy of these diagnostic methods. Eighty‑one patients who had been diagnosed with hepatitis B were recruited and the stage of fibrosis was determined by biopsy. The diagnostic accuracy of FI, FibroScan and ARFI, as well as that of the combination of these methods, was evaluated based on the conformity of the results from these tests with those of biopsies. The effect of concomitant inflammation on diagnostic accuracy was also investigated by dividing the patients into two groups based on the grade of inflammation (G<2 and G≥2). The overall univariate correlation between steatosis and the diagnostic value of the three methods was also evaluated. There was a significant association between the stage of fibrosis and the results obtained using ARFI and FibroScan (Kruskal‑Wallis; P<0.001 for all patients), and FI (t-test, P<0.001 for all patients). The combination of FI with ARFI/FibroScan increased the predictive accuracy with a fibrosis stage of S≥2 or cirrhosis. There was a significant correlation between the grade of inflammation and the results obtained using ARFI and FibroScan (Kruskal‑Wallis, P<0.001 for all patients), and FI (t-test; P<0.001 for all patients). No significant correlation was detected between the measurements obtained using ARFI, FibroScan and FI, and steatosis (r=‑0.100, P=0.407; r=0.170, P=0.163; and r=0.154, P=0.216, respectively). ARFI was shown to be as effective in the diagnosis of liver fibrosis as FibroScan or FI, and the combination of ARFI or FibroScan with FI may improve the accuracy of diagnosis. The presence of inflammatory activity, but not that of steatosis, may affect the diagnostic accuracy of

  15. Intelligent detection of impulse noise using multilayer neural network with multi-valued neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aizenberg, Igor; Wallace, Glen

    2012-03-01

    In this paper, we solve the impulse noise detection problem using an intelligent approach. We use a multilayer neural network based on multi-valued neurons (MLMVN) as an intelligent impulse noise detector. MLMVN was already used for point spread function identification and intelligent edge enhancement. So it is very attractive to apply it for solving another image processing problem. The main result, which is presented in the paper, is the proven ability of MLMVN to detect impulse noise on different images after a learning session with the data taken just from a single noisy image. Hence MLMVN can be used as a robust impulse detector. It is especially efficient for salt and pepper noise detection and outperforms all competitive techniques. It also shows comparable results in detection of random impulse noise. Moreover, for random impulse noise detection, MLMVN with the output neuron with a periodic activation function is used for the first time.

  16. Effects of Impulsive Pile-Driving Exposure on Fishes.

    PubMed

    Casper, Brandon M; Carlson, Thomas J; Halvorsen, Michele B; Popper, Arthur N

    2016-01-01

    Six species of fishes were tested under aquatic far-field, plane-wave acoustic conditions to answer several key questions regarding the effects of exposure to impulsive pile driving. The issues addressed included which sound levels lead to the onset of barotrauma injuries, how these levels differ between fishes with different types of swim bladders, the recovery from barotrauma injuries, and the potential effects exposure might have on the auditory system. The results demonstrate that the current interim criteria for pile-driving sound exposures are 20 dB or more below the actual sound levels that result in the onset of physiological effects on fishes. PMID:26610952

  17. Managing Auditory Risk from Acoustically Impulsive Chemical Demonstrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macedone, Jeffrey H.; Gee, Kent L.; Vernon, Julia A.

    2014-01-01

    Chemical demonstrations are an integral part of the process of how students construct meaning from chemical principles, but may introduce risks to students and presenters. Some demonstrations are known to be extremely loud and present auditory hazards; little has been done to assess the risks to educators and students. Using laboratory-grade…

  18. Topological Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhaoju; Gao, Fei; Shi, Xihang; Lin, Xiao; Gao, Zhen; Chong, Yidong; Zhang, Baile

    2015-03-01

    The manipulation of acoustic wave propagation in fluids has numerous applications, including some in everyday life. Acoustic technologies frequently develop in tandem with optics, using shared concepts such as waveguiding and metamedia. It is thus noteworthy that an entirely novel class of electromagnetic waves, known as "topological edge states," has recently been demonstrated. These are inspired by the electronic edge states occurring in topological insulators, and possess a striking and technologically promising property: the ability to travel in a single direction along a surface without backscattering, regardless of the existence of defects or disorder. Here, we develop an analogous theory of topological fluid acoustics, and propose a scheme for realizing topological edge states in an acoustic structure containing circulating fluids. The phenomenon of disorder-free one-way sound propagation, which does not occur in ordinary acoustic devices, may have novel applications for acoustic isolators, modulators, and transducers.

  19. Topological acoustics.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhaoju; Gao, Fei; Shi, Xihang; Lin, Xiao; Gao, Zhen; Chong, Yidong; Zhang, Baile

    2015-03-20

    The manipulation of acoustic wave propagation in fluids has numerous applications, including some in everyday life. Acoustic technologies frequently develop in tandem with optics, using shared concepts such as waveguiding and metamedia. It is thus noteworthy that an entirely novel class of electromagnetic waves, known as "topological edge states," has recently been demonstrated. These are inspired by the electronic edge states occurring in topological insulators, and possess a striking and technologically promising property: the ability to travel in a single direction along a surface without backscattering, regardless of the existence of defects or disorder. Here, we develop an analogous theory of topological fluid acoustics, and propose a scheme for realizing topological edge states in an acoustic structure containing circulating fluids. The phenomenon of disorder-free one-way sound propagation, which does not occur in ordinary acoustic devices, may have novel applications for acoustic isolators, modulators, and transducers. PMID:25839273

  20. The application of a time-domain deconvolution technique for identification of experimental acoustic-emission signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houghton, J. R.; Townsend, M. A.; Packman, P. F.

    1978-01-01

    A method is presented for the signature analysis of pulses by reconstructing in the time domain the shape of the pulse prior to its passing through the measurement system. This deconvolution technique is first evaluated using an idealized system and analytical pulse models and is shown to provide improved results. An experimental situation is then treated; system-component models are developed for the digitizer, tape recorder, filter, transducer and mechanical structure. To accommodate both calibration results and manufacturer's data, and to provide stable mathematical models entails considerable effort: some 30 parameters must be identified to model this system - which is still a substantial approximation - albeit of very high order. Experimental pulses generated by a ball drop, spark discharge and a tearing crack are then deconvoluted 'back through' the system as modeled, using this technique. These results are compared and indicate (a) that consistent shapes may be expected from a given type of source and (b) that some sources can be identified with greater clarity using the deconvolution approach.

  1. NDT&E using shearography with impulsive thermal stressing and clustering phase extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Y. H.; Ng, S. P.; Liu, L.; Li, C. L.; Chen, Y. S.; Hung, Y. Y.

    2009-07-01

    Shearography has been widely adopted for nondestructive testing and evaluation of various materials, especially in the rubber industry and aerospace industry. It detects flaws and defects by identifying deformation anomalies when the specimen is stressed by a certain means. Conventional stressing methods for shearography include pressurization, mechanical or acoustic loading and vibration excitation. These stressing techniques are favorably applied in various applications. In this study, we propose a novel impulsive thermal stressing method using high-power flash lamps for convenient nondestructive testing and evaluation in both laboratory and industrial environment. The proposed technique employs a high-energy heat flux to excite the specimen and detects the thermal deformation anomaly using a shearographic setup. By incorporating a novel clustering phase extraction method, the movement of the continuously deforming object is obtained using only one single deformed speckle image at each deformed stage, thus enabling both qualitative and quantitative measurement. Experiments conducted on various samples with cracks and debonds demonstrate the practicability of proposed technique for both laboratory and industrial applications.

  2. Wind turbine acoustic standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, D. G.; Shepherd, K. P.; Grosveld, F.

    1981-01-01

    A program is being conducted to develop noise standards for wind turbines which minimize annoyance and which can be used to design specifications. The approach consists of presenting wind turbine noise stimuli to test subjects in a laboratory listening chamber. The responses of the subjects are recorded for a range of stimuli which encompass the designs, operating conditions, and ambient noise levels of current and future installations. Results to date have established the threshold of detectability for a range of impulsive stimuli of the type associated with blade/tower wake interactions. The status of the ongoing psychoacoustic tests, the subjective data, and the approach to the development of acoustic criteria/standards are described.

  3. Acoustic neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    Vestibular schwannoma; Tumor - acoustic; Cerebellopontine angle tumor; Angle tumor ... 177. Battista RA. Gamma knife radiosurgery for vestibular schwannoma. Otolaryngol Clin North Am . 2009;42:635-654. ...

  4. Scanning Tomographic Acoustic Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wade, G.; Meyyappan, A.

    1988-07-01

    The technology for "seeing" with sound has an important and interesting history. Some of nature's creatures have been using sound waves for many millenia to image otherwise unobservable objects. The human species, lacking this natural ability, have overcome this deficiency by developing several different ultrasonic imaging techniques. acoustic microscopy is one such technique, which produces high resolution images of detailed structure of small objects in a non-destructive fashion. Two types of acoustic microscopes have evolved for industrial exploitation. They are the scanning laser acoustic microscope (SLAM) and the scanning acoustic microscope (SAM). In this paper, we review the principles of SLAM and describe how we use elements of SLAM to realize the scanning tomographic acoustic microscope (STAM). We describe the data acquisition process and the image reconstruction procedure. We also describe techniques to obtain projection data from different angles of wave incidence enabling us to reconstruct different planes of a complex specimen tomo-graphically. Our experimental results show that STAM is capable of producing high-quality high-resolution subsurface images.

  5. Acoustic Source Bearing Estimation (ASBE) computer program development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiese, Michael R.

    1987-01-01

    A new bearing estimation algorithm (Acoustic Source Analysis Technique - ASAT) and an acoustic analysis computer program (Acoustic Source Bearing Estimation - ASBE) are described, which were developed by Computer Sciences Corporation for NASA Langley Research Center. The ASBE program is used by the Acoustics Division/Applied Acoustics Branch and the Instrument Research Division/Electro-Mechanical Instrumentation Branch to analyze acoustic data and estimate the azimuths from which the source signals radiated. Included are the input and output from a benchmark test case.

  6. [The effects of acoustic overstimulation].

    PubMed

    Häusler, R

    2004-01-01

    Basic aspects of acoustic trauma are presented. Exposure to loud noise leads to an acoustic traumatization with a temporary threshold shift initially and, with increasing exposure, intensity and duration, a permanent hearing loss. Impulse sound such as hammer blows on metal, gun shots and other detonations reaching peak levels of 160 to 180 dB is particularly hazardous to the inner ear. Playing loud musical instruments such as trumpets or percussion may also lead to hearing damage. Less dangerous than often believed is listening to electronically amplified music with walkmen, at discos or rock concerts. The reason is that, while the sound level is quite high, the particularly dangerous sound peaks are absent, as loudspeakers usually have an output limit of 110-120 dB. Traffic noise (cars, trains, air planes) is usually not threatening to the ear, but it may represent a considerable subjective annoyance and a stress factor leading to psychosomatic disturbances (neurovegetative symptoms, sleeping disorders). An effective treatment for the acoustic trauma is still missing. The systematic and consequent prophylaxis either with individual ear protectors (plugs or ear muffs) or by reducing the noise level at the source by means of isolation, encapsulation, or by using motors that are less noisy remains very important. Increasing awareness of acoustic pollution and preventive means have led to a reduction in the incidence of the acoustic trauma in the last decades. PMID:14997996

  7. Acoustic Emission tomography based on simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique to visualize the damage source location in Q235B steel plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yu; Xu, Feiyun; Xu, Bingsheng

    2015-12-01

    Acoustic Emission (AE) tomography based on Simultaneous Algebraic Reconstruction Technique (SART), which combines the traditional location algorithm with the SART algorithm by using AE events as its signal sources, is a new visualization method for inspecting and locating the internal damages in the structure. In this paper, the proposed method is applied to examine and visualize two man-made damage source locations in the Q235B steel plate to validate its effectiveness. Firstly, the Q235B steel plate with two holes specimen is fabricated and the pencil lead break (PLB) signal is taken as the exciting source for AE tomography.Secondly, A 6-step description of the SART algorithm is provided and the three dimensional(3D)image contained the damage source locations is visualized by using the proposed algorithm in terms of a locally varying wave velocity distribution. It is shown that the AE tomography based on SART has great potential in the application of structure damage detection. Finally, to further improve the quality of 3D imaging, the Median Filter and the Adaptive Median Filter are used to reduce the noises resulting from AE tomography. The experiment results indicate that Median Filter is the optimal method to remove Salt & Pepper noises.

  8. Parameters Determination of Oscillatory Impulse Current Waveform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Shuji; Nishimura, Seisuke; Seki, Shingo

    This paper proposes numerical techniques to distil waveform parameters out of digitally measured data of oscillatory impulse current. The first method, to be used for liner circuit, based on a curve-fitting technique in which a smooth analytical curve is defined to fit the noise-superposed measured data. The waveform parameters are derived from the curve. The algorithm is examined its performance using a measured waveform data which is obtained from a circuit composed of linear elements only. It is not rare when impulse current is measured in a circuit with non-linear element, namely an arrester. After carefully observed behaviours of the circuit current when the non-linear element turns on and off, authors developed two algorithms capable to determine the parameters from the recorded data obtained from a circuit having a ZnO arrester. The developed algorithm processed the waveform data generated by TDG which is to be issued in 2009 as a part of IEC 61083-2. The details of the algorithm are to be demonstrated in the paper.

  9. Acoustic energy shaping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, T. G.; Elleman, D. D. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A suspended mass is shaped by melting all or a selected portion of the mass and applying acoustic energy in varying amounts to different portions of the mass. In one technique for forming an optical waveguide slug, a mass of oval section is suspended and only a portion along the middle of the cross-section is heated to a largely fluid consistency. Acoustic energy is applied to opposite edges of the oval mass to press the unheated opposite edge portions together so as to form bulges at the middle of the mass. In another technique for forming a ribbon of silicon for constructing solar cells, a cylindrical thread of silicon is drawn from a molten mass of silicon, and acoustic energy is applied to opposite sides of the molten thread to flatten it into a ribbon.

  10. Evaluation of damage progression and mechanical behavior under compression of bone cements containing core-shell nanoparticles by using acoustic emission technique.

    PubMed

    Pacheco-Salazar, O F; Wakayama, Shuichi; Sakai, Takenobu; Cauich-Rodríguez, J V; Ríos-Soberanis, C R; Cervantes-Uc, J M

    2015-06-01

    In this work, the effect of the incorporation of core-shell particles on the fracture mechanisms of the acrylic bone cements by using acoustic emission (AE) technique during the quasi-static compression mechanical test was investigated. Core-shell particles were composed of a poly(butyl acrylate) (PBA) rubbery core and a methyl methacrylate/styrene copolymer (P(MMA-co-St)) outer glassy shell. Nanoparticles were prepared with different core-shell ratio (20/80, 30/70, 40/60 and 50/50) and were incorporated into the solid phase of bone cement at several percentages (5, 10 and 15 wt%). It was observed that the particles exhibited a spherical morphology averaging ca. 125 nm in diameter, and the dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) thermograms revealed the desired structuring pattern of phases associated with core-shell structures. A fracture mechanism was proposed taking into account the detected AE signals and the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) micrographs. In this regard, core-shell nanoparticles can act as both additional nucleation sites for microcracks (and crazes) and to hinder the microcrack propagation acting as a barrier to its growth; this behavior was presented by all formulations. Cement samples containing 15 wt% of core-shell nanoparticles, either 40/60 or 50/50, were fractured at 40% deformation. This fact seems related to the coalescence of microcracks after they surround the agglomerates of core-shell nanoparticles to continue growing up. This work also demonstrated the potential of the AE technique to be used as an accurate and reliable detection tool for quasi-static compression test in acrylic bone cements. PMID:25792411

  11. Musical Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gough, Colin

    This chapter provides an introduction to the physical and psycho-acoustic principles underlying the production and perception of the sounds of musical instruments. The first section introduces generic aspects of musical acoustics and the perception of musical sounds, followed by separate sections on string, wind and percussion instruments.

  12. Children's Help Seeking and Impulsivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puustinen, Minna; Kokkonen, Marja; Tolvanen, Asko; Pulkkinen, Lea

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze the relationship between students' (100 children aged 8 to 12) help-seeking behavior and impulsivity. Help-seeking behavior was evaluated using a naturalistic experimental paradigm in which children were placed in a problem-solving situation and had the opportunity to seek help from the experimenter, if…

  13. Commentary on Hyperkinetic Impulse Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barkley, Russell A.

    2011-01-01

    Dr. Goldstein continues the laudable practice of reprinting articles of historical significance in the history of ADHD with this selective reprinting of material from the original article by Maurice Laufer, Eric Denhoff, and Gerald Solomons on hyperkinetic impulsive disorder (HID) in children. This article on HID is among the first articles to…

  14. Suppression of radiating harmonics Electro-Impulse Deicing (EIDI) systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zieve, Peter; Ng, James; Fiedberg, Robert

    1991-10-01

    The electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) of two different configurations of electromagnetic deicing systems is discussed. Both Electro-Impulse Deicing (EIDI) and Eddy Current Repulsion Deicing Strip (EDS) are investigated. With EIDI, rigid coils are mounted behind the wing; while with EDS, the impulse coils are built thin and flexible with printed circuit board technology. An important consideration in the certification of electromagnetic impulse deicing systems is electromagnetic compatibility (EMC). When the capacitor bank discharges, a large current pulse travels down a transmission line to the coil. The coil is one source of radiation. Another source is the cabling and connections to the coil. In work conducted for the FAA in 1988, it was found that excessive electromagnetic emissions resulted from the operation of a Low Voltage Electro-Impulse Deicer (LVEID) in conjunction with a composite wing. The goal of this project was to investigate and develop techniques for controlling emissions without the benefit of shielding. In this study it was determined that both EIDI and EDS could be brought within the RTCA/DO-160B standards through proper shielding and termination of the pulse power cable. An alternative topology of EDS with the impulse coil on the wing exterior surface did not meet the standard.

  15. Solar flare impulsive phase emission observed with SDO/EVE

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, Michael B.; Milligan, Ryan O.; Mathioudakis, Mihalis; Keenan, Francis P.

    2013-12-10

    Differential emission measures (DEMs) during the impulsive phase of solar flares were constructed using observations from the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) and the Markov-Chain Monte Carlo method. Emission lines from ions formed over the temperature range log T{sub e} = 5.8-7.2 allow the evolution of the DEM to be studied over a wide temperature range at 10 s cadence. The technique was applied to several M- and X-class flares, where impulsive phase EUV emission is observable in the disk-integrated EVE spectra from emission lines formed up to 3-4 MK and we use spatially unresolved EVE observations to infer the thermal structure of the emitting region. For the nine events studied, the DEMs exhibited a two-component distribution during the impulsive phase, a low-temperature component with peak temperature of 1-2 MK, and a broad high-temperature component from 7 to 30 MK. A bimodal high-temperature component is also found for several events, with peaks at 8 and 25 MK during the impulsive phase. The origin of the emission was verified using Atmospheric Imaging Assembly images to be the flare ribbons and footpoints, indicating that the constructed DEMs represent the spatially average thermal structure of the chromospheric flare emission during the impulsive phase.

  16. Acoustic/Seismic Wavenumber Integration Using the WKBJ Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langston, C. A.

    2011-12-01

    A practical computational problem in finding the response of a solid elastic layered system to an impulsive atmospheric pressure source using the wavenumber integration method is linking a smoothly varying atmospheric velocity model to a complexly layered earth model. Approximating the atmospheric model with thin layers introduces unrealistic reflections and reverberations into the pressure field of the incident acoustic wave. To overcome this, the WKBJ approximation is used to model discrete rays from an impulsive atmospheric source propagating in a smoothly varying atmosphere interacting with a layered earth model. The technique is applied to modeling near-site and local earth structure of the Mississippi embayment in the central U.S. from seismic waves excited by the sonic booms of Space Shuttle Discovery in 2007 and 2010. Use of the WKBJ approximation allows for much faster computational times and greater accuracy in defining an atmospheric model that can allow efficient modeling of relative arrival times and amplitudes of observed seismic waves. Results show that shuttle sonic booms can clearly excite large amplitude Rayleigh waves that propagate for 200km within the embayment and are affected by earth structure in the upper 2 km.

  17. Determining Equilibrium Position For Acoustical Levitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, M. B.; Aveni, G.; Putterman, S.; Rudnick, J.

    1989-01-01

    Equilibrium position and orientation of acoustically-levitated weightless object determined by calibration technique on Earth. From calibration data, possible to calculate equilibrium position and orientation in presence of Earth gravitation. Sample not levitated acoustically during calibration. Technique relies on Boltzmann-Ehrenfest adiabatic-invariance principle. One converts resonant-frequency-shift data into data on normalized acoustical potential energy. Minimum of energy occurs at equilibrium point. From gradients of acoustical potential energy, one calculates acoustical restoring force or torque on objects as function of deviation from equilibrium position or orientation.

  18. Analysis of an impulse response measured at the basilar membrane of the chinchilla.

    PubMed

    Wit, Hero P; Bell, Andrew

    2015-07-01

    In a recent paper [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 133, 2224-2239 (2013)], Shera and Cooper report on the impulse response of the basilar membrane (BM) of a chinchilla, a waveform which shows repetitive bursts. They explain the bursts in terms of repeated coherent reflection at BM discontinuities and partial reflection at the stapes ("coherent reflection filtering"). Here the same waveform is examined in detail, highlighting features which indicate that the coherent reflection model, with calls for the same repetitive process to act on each successive burst, does not fully account for the shape of the measured impulse response. PMID:26233010

  19. Characteristics of Impulsive Suicide Attempts and Attempters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Thomas R.; Swann, Alan C.; Powell, Kenneth E.; Potter, Lloyd B.; Kresnow, Marcie-jo; O'Carroll, Patrick W.

    2002-01-01

    Examined impulsive suicide attempts within a population-based, case-control study of nearly lethal suicide attempts among adolescents and young adults. Impulsive attempts were more likely among those who had been in a physical fight and less likely among those who were depressed. Findings suggest inadequate control of aggressive impulses as a…

  20. A STUDY OF METHODS OF CONTROLLING IMPULSES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    WHITESIDE, RAY

    THE PERSON LESS ABLE TO CONTROL HIS IMPULSES IS ALSO APT TO EXHIBIT SOCIALLY DISVALUED BEHAVIOR. VOCATIONAL AND ACADEMIC FAILURE IS A PARTIAL CONSEQUENCE OF IMPULSIVENESS AND LACK OF SELF-CONTROL. TO INVESTIGATE IMPULSE CONTROL, TWO INSTRUMENTS BELIEVED TO MEASURE ATTRIBUTES OF OPPOSITE POLES OF THIS CONCEPT (SEQUENTIAL TESTS OF EDUCATIONAL…

  1. Adolescent Impulsivity: Findings from a Community Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    d'Acremont, Mathieu; Van der Linden, Martial

    2005-01-01

    Impulsivity is central to several psychopathological states in adolescence. However, there is little consensus concerning the definition of impulsivity and its core dimensions. In response to this lack of consensus, Whiteside and Lynam (2001, "Pers. Individ. Differ." 30, 669-689) have developed the UPPS Impulsive Behavior Scale, which is able to…

  2. Opto-acoustic thrombolysis

    DOEpatents

    Celliers, Peter; Da Silva, Luiz; Glinsky, Michael; London, Richard; Maitland, Duncan; Matthews, Dennis; Fitch, Pat

    2000-01-01

    This invention is a catheter-based device for generating an ultrasound excitation in biological tissue. Pulsed laser light is guided through an optical fiber to provide the energy for producing the acoustic vibrations. The optical energy is deposited in a water-based absorbing fluid, e.g. saline, thrombolytic agent, blood or thrombus, and generates an acoustic impulse in the fluid through thermoelastic and/or thermodynamic mechanisms. By pulsing the laser at a repetition rate (which may vary from 10 Hz to 100 kHz) an ultrasonic radiation field can be established locally in the medium. This method of producing ultrasonic vibrations can be used in vivo for the treatment of stroke-related conditions in humans, particularly for dissolving thrombus or treating vasospasm. The catheter can also incorporate thrombolytic drug treatments as an adjunct therapy and it can be operated in conjunction with ultrasonic detection equipment for imaging and feedback control and with optical sensors for characterization of thrombus type and consistency.

  3. Opto-acoustic thrombolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Celliers, P.; Silva, L. Da; Glinsky, M.; London, R.; Maitland, D.; Matthews, D.; Fitch, P.

    2000-02-08

    This invention is a catheter-based device for generating an ultrasound excitation in biological tissue. Pulsed laser light is guided through an optical fiber to provide the energy for producing the acoustic vibrations. The optical energy is deposited in a water-based absorbing fluid, e.g. saline, thrombolytic agent, blood or thrombus, and generates an acoustic impulse in the fluid through thermoelastic and/or thermodynamic mechanisms. By pulsing the laser at a repetition rate (which may vary from 10 Hz to 100 kHz) an ultrasonic radiation field can be established locally in the medium. This method of producing ultrasonic vibrations can be used in vivo for the treatment of stroke-related conditions in humans, particularly for dissolving thrombus or treating vasospasm. The catheter can also incorporate thrombolytic drug treatments as an adjunct therapy and it can be operated in conjunction with ultrasonic detection equipment for imaging and feedback control and with optical sensors for characterization of thrombus type and consistency.

  4. Optical and Acoustical Techniques for Non-viral Gene Delivery to Mammalian Cells and In-situ Study of Cytoskeletal Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Zili

    surface acoustic waves, which not only achieved a high efficiency of cells permeabilization in a quick speed, but also allowed us to observe the permeabilization process in real time by microscope. This device is also compatible with biophotonics studies based on fs laser, which can be further developed as a powerful tool for optical gene delivery with the capability of precisely controlling the fluid on-chip by SAW. SAW devices could also achieve exogenous gene delivery through the cell membrane without the need of adding chemical agents. Our results showed that the membrane of mammalian adherent cells could be effectively perforated transiently by applying a SAW. The transfection of pEGFP plasmids into endothelial cells was carried out successfully via this SAW-induced cell perforation. The expression of GFP was observed after 24-hour incubation subsequent to the SAW treatment. In regard to the application of fs lasers in cellular and subcellular level studies, we applied the optical nanoscissoring technique based on fs lasers in biomechanical studies to study the mechanical properties of single SF in-situ. Integrated into a confocal microscope, the fs laser showed great power in manipulating targeted in-situ subcellular structures under real-time imaging without damaging nearby regions. Here, how oxidative challenges would alter the mechanical properties of SFs in myoblasts was firstly investigated using the optical nanoscissoring technique to comprehend the whole picture of muscle tissue injury and repair from the basics. The prestress of stress fibers after the oxidative challenges was found through our modified viscoelastic retraction model and experiment result.

  5. Application of an Aligned and Unaligned Signal Processing Technique to Investigate Tones and Broadband Noise in Fan and Contra-Rotating Open Rotor Acoustic Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, Jeffrey Hilton; Hultgren, Lennart S.

    2015-01-01

    The study of noise from a two-shaft contra-rotating open rotor (CROR) is challenging since the shafts are not phase locked in most cases. Consequently, phase averaging of the acoustic data keyed to a single shaft rotation speed is not meaningful. An unaligned spectrum procedure that was developed to estimate a signal coherence threshold and reveal concealed spectral lines in turbofan engine combustion noise is applied to fan and CROR acoustic data in this paper.

  6. Acoustic source localization.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Tribikram

    2014-01-01

    In this article different techniques for localizing acoustic sources are described and the advantages/disadvantages of these techniques are discussed. Some source localization techniques are restricted to isotropic structures while other methods can be applied to anisotropic structures as well. Some techniques require precise knowledge of the direction dependent velocity profiles in the anisotropic body while other techniques do not require that knowledge. Some methods require accurate values of the time of arrival of the acoustic waves at the receivers while other techniques can function without that information. Published papers introducing various techniques emphasize the advantages of the introduced techniques while ignoring and often not mentioning the limitations and weaknesses of the new techniques. What is lacking in the literature is a comprehensive review and comparison of the available techniques; this article attempts to do that. After reviewing various techniques the paper concludes which source localization technique should be most effective for what type of structure and what the current research needs are. PMID:23870388

  7. Search for acoustic signals from ultrahigh energy neutrinos in 1500 km{sup 3} of sea water

    SciTech Connect

    Kurahashi, Naoko; Gratta, Giorgio; Vandenbroucke, Justin

    2010-10-01

    An underwater acoustic sensor array spanning {approx}1500 km{sup 3} is used to search for cosmic-ray neutrinos of ultrahigh energies ( E{sub {nu}>}10{sup 18} eV). Approximately 328 million triggers accumulated over an integrated 130 days of data taking are analyzed. The sensitivity of the experiment is determined from a Monte Carlo simulation of the array using recorded noise conditions and expected waveforms. Two events are found to have properties compatible with showers in the energy range 10{sup 24} eVimpulsive backgrounds is limited, a flux upper limit is set providing the most sensitive limit on ultrahigh energy neutrinos using the acoustic technique.

  8. Signal processing in impulsive electromagnetic interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabin, Serena M.

    1991-06-01

    Statistical signal processing functions such as signal detection, estimating, and identification play a key role in the development of effective communications, radar, and sonar systems. For example, advanced statistical methods are emerging as being particularly important in digital communications systems operating in channels corrupted by interference from such phenomena as multiple-access noise, intentional jamming, and impulsive noise sources. Conventional demodulation methods, such as coherent matched filtering, often suffer serious performance degradation when subjected to interference of these types; however, this degradation can frequently be eliminated through the use of more sophisticated signal processing techniques. A central issue in the design of effective signal processing procedures for system operating in channels such as those noted above is that of channel identification. Although certain aspects of channel identification have been studied extensively, one area in which there is a pressing need for further research is that of identification of impulsive channels. Communication systems are seldom interfered with by white Gaussian noise alone, yet receiving systems in general use are those which are optimum for white Gaussian noise.

  9. Densitometry By Acoustic Levitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, Eugene H.

    1989-01-01

    "Static" and "dynamic" methods developed for measuring mass density of acoustically levitated solid particle or liquid drop. "Static" method, unknown density of sample found by comparison with another sample of known density. "Dynamic" method practiced with or without gravitational field. Advantages over conventional density-measuring techniques: sample does not have to make contact with container or other solid surface, size and shape of samples do not affect measurement significantly, sound field does not have to be know in detail, and sample can be smaller than microliter. Detailed knowledge of acoustic field not necessary.

  10. Acoustic tooth cleaner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, J. S. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    An acoustic oral hygiene unit is described that uses acoustic energy to oscillate mild abrasive particles in a water suspension which is then directed in a low pressure stream onto the teeth. The oscillating abrasives scrub the teeth clean removing food particles, plaque, calculous, and other foreign material from tooth surfaces, interproximal areas, and tooth-gingiva interface more effectively than any previous technique. The relatively low power output and the basic design makes the invention safe and convenient for everyday use in the home without special training. This invention replaces all former means of home dental prophylaxis, and requires no augmentation to fulfill all requirements for daily oral hygienic care.

  11. Investigations of incorporating source directivity into room acoustics computer models to improve auralizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigeant, Michelle C.

    Room acoustics computer modeling and auralizations are useful tools when designing or modifying acoustically sensitive spaces. In this dissertation, the input parameter of source directivity has been studied in great detail to determine first its effect in room acoustics computer models and secondly how to better incorporate the directional source characteristics into these models to improve auralizations. To increase the accuracy of room acoustics computer models, the source directivity of real sources, such as musical instruments, must be included in the models. The traditional method for incorporating source directivity into room acoustics computer models involves inputting the measured static directivity data taken every 10° in a sphere-shaped pattern around the source. This data can be entered into the room acoustics software to create a directivity balloon, which is used in the ray tracing algorithm to simulate the room impulse response. The first study in this dissertation shows that using directional sources over an omni-directional source in room acoustics computer models produces significant differences both in terms of calculated room acoustics parameters and auralizations. The room acoustics computer model was also validated in terms of accurately incorporating the input source directivity. A recently proposed technique for creating auralizations using a multi-channel source representation has been investigated with numerous subjective studies, applied to both solo instruments and an orchestra. The method of multi-channel auralizations involves obtaining multi-channel anechoic recordings of short melodies from various instruments and creating individual channel auralizations. These auralizations are then combined to create a total multi-channel auralization. Through many subjective studies, this process was shown to be effective in terms of improving the realism and source width of the auralizations in a number of cases, and also modeling different

  12. High levels of impulsivity in rats are not accompanied by sensorimotor gating deficits and locomotor hyperactivity.

    PubMed

    Feja, M; Lang, M; Deppermann, L; Yüksel, A; Wischhof, L

    2015-12-01

    High levels of impulsivity have been linked to a number of psychiatric disorders, including attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, drug abuse and schizophrenia. Additionally, schizophrenia patients commonly show deficits in another rather preattentive form of response inhibition, called sensorimotor gating. Given that higher-order functions, such as impulse control, are protected by early and preattentive processes, disturbed gating mechanisms may hamper more complex cognitive-executive functions. In the present study, we therefore tested whether high levels of impulsivity are accompanied by impaired sensorimotor gating in rats. High (HI) and low impulsive (LI) rats were identified based on the number of premature responses in the 5-choice serial reaction time task. Here, LI rats showed higher numbers of omission errors which may suggest attentional deficits while HI rats completed significantly less trials which could indicate a decrease in motivation. However, HI and LI rats did not differ in terms of impulsive decision-making in a delay-based decision-making T-maze task, prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle response (a measure of sensorimotor gating mechanisms) or locomotor activity levels. Overall, our data indicate that high motor impulsivity is not a suitable predictor of deficient sensorimotor gating and is further not necessarily associated with attentional deficits and/or locomotor hyperactivity in rats. PMID:26484709

  13. Measurement of impulse peak insertion loss for four hearing protection devices in field conditions

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, William J.; Flamme, Gregory A.; Meinke, Deanna K.; Sondergaard, Jacob; Finan, Donald S.; Lankford, James E.; Khan, Amir; Vernon, Julia; Stewart, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Objective In 2009, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposed an impulse noise reduction rating (NRR) for hearing protection devices based upon the impulse peak insertion loss (IPIL) methods in the ANSI S12.42-2010 standard. This study tests the ANSI S12.42 methods with a range of hearing protection devices measured in field conditions. Design The method utilizes an acoustic test fixture and three ranges for impulse levels: 130–134, 148–152, and 166–170 dB peak SPL. For this study, four different models of hearing protectors were tested: Bilsom 707 Impact II electronic earmuff, E·A·R Pod Express, E·A·R Combat Arms version 4, and the Etymotic Research, Inc. Electronic BlastPLG™ EB1. Study sample Five samples of each protector were fitted on the fixture or inserted in the fixture's ear canal five times for each impulse level. Impulses were generated by a 0.223 caliber rifle. Results The average IPILs increased with peak pressure and ranged between 20 and 38 dB. For some protectors, significant differences were observed across protector examples of the same model, and across insertions. Conclusions The EPA's proposed methods provide consistent and reproducible results. The proposed impulse NRR rating should utilize the minimum and maximum protection percentiles as determined by the ANSI S12.42-2010 methods. PMID:22176308

  14. High signal-to-noise ratio acoustic sensor using phase-shifted gratings interrogated by the Pound-Drever-Hall technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kung, Peter; Comanici, Maria I.

    2014-06-01

    Optical fiber is made of glass, an insulator, and thus it is immune to strong electromagnetic interference. Therefore, fiber optics is a technology ideally suitable for sensing of partial discharge (PD) both in transformers and generators. Extensive efforts have been used to develop a cost effective solution for detecting partial discharge, which generates acoustic emission, with signals ranging from 30 kHz to 200 kHz. The requirement is similar to fiber optics Hydro Phone, but at higher frequencies. There are several keys to success: there must be at least 60 dB signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) performance, which will ensure not only PD detection but later on provide diagnostics and also the ability to locate the origin of the events. Defects that are stationary would gradually degrade the insulation and result in total breakdown. Transformers currently need urgent attention: most of them are oil filled and are at least 30 to 50 years old, close to the end of life. In this context, an issue to be addressed is the safety of the personnel working close to the assets and collateral damage that could be caused by a tank explosion (with fire spilling over the whole facility). This paper will describe the latest achievement in fiber optics PD sensor technology: the use of phase shifted-fiber gratings with a very high speed interrogation method that uses the Pound-Drever-Hall technique. More importantly, this is based on a technology that could be automated, easy to install, and, eventually, available at affordable prices

  15. Measuring acoustic habitats

    PubMed Central

    Merchant, Nathan D; Fristrup, Kurt M; Johnson, Mark P; Tyack, Peter L; Witt, Matthew J; Blondel, Philippe; Parks, Susan E

    2015-01-01

    1. Many organisms depend on sound for communication, predator/prey detection and navigation. The acoustic environment can therefore play an important role in ecosystem dynamics and evolution. A growing number of studies are documenting acoustic habitats and their influences on animal development, behaviour, physiology and spatial ecology, which has led to increasing demand for passive acoustic monitoring (PAM) expertise in the life sciences. However, as yet, there has been no synthesis of data processing methods for acoustic habitat monitoring, which presents an unnecessary obstacle to would-be PAM analysts. 2. Here, we review the signal processing techniques needed to produce calibrated measurements of terrestrial and aquatic acoustic habitats. We include a supplemental tutorial and template computer codes in matlab and r, which give detailed guidance on how to produce calibrated spectrograms and statistical analyses of sound levels. Key metrics and terminology for the characterisation of biotic, abiotic and anthropogenic sound are covered, and their application to relevant monitoring scenarios is illustrated through example data sets. To inform study design and hardware selection, we also include an up-to-date overview of terrestrial and aquatic PAM instruments. 3. Monitoring of acoustic habitats at large spatiotemporal scales is becoming possible through recent advances in PAM technology. This will enhance our understanding of the role of sound in the spatial ecology of acoustically sensitive species and inform spatial planning to mitigate the rising influence of anthropogenic noise in these ecosystems. As we demonstrate in this work, progress in these areas will depend upon the application of consistent and appropriate PAM methodologies. PMID:25954500

  16. Emotion Regulation and Impulsivity in Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Schreiber, Liana R.N.; Grant, Jon E.; Odlaug, Brian L.

    2012-01-01

    Past research has linked both emotion regulation and impulsivity with the development and maintenance of addictions. However, no research has investigated the relationship between emotion regulation and impulsivity within young adults. In the present study, we analyzed 194 young adults (27.8% female; 21.3 ± 3.32 years old; 91.8% single; 85.1% Caucasian), grouping them as low, average, or high emotionally dysregulated, and compared self-reported impulsivity, impulsive behaviors (such as alcohol and substance use and gambling) and cognitive impulsivity. We hypothesized that those with high levels of emotion dysregulation would score higher on self-reported and cognitive impulsivity, and report more impulsive behaviors. Analysis indicated that compared to low, the high emotion dysregulation group scored significantly higher on two self-report measures of impulsivity, harm avoidance, and cognitive reasoning. No significant differences were found between groups in impulsive behaviors and cognitive impulsivity. Overall, this study highlights the relationship between emotion dysregulation and impulsivity, suggesting that emotion regulation may be an important factor to consider when assessing individuals at a higher risk for developing an addiction. PMID:22385661

  17. Room Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuttruff, Heinrich; Mommertz, Eckard

    The traditional task of room acoustics is to create or formulate conditions which ensure the best possible propagation of sound in a room from a sound source to a listener. Thus, objects of room acoustics are in particular assembly halls of all kinds, such as auditoria and lecture halls, conference rooms, theaters, concert halls or churches. Already at this point, it has to be pointed out that these conditions essentially depend on the question if speech or music should be transmitted; in the first case, the criterion for transmission quality is good speech intelligibility, in the other case, however, the success of room-acoustical efforts depends on other factors that cannot be quantified that easily, not least it also depends on the hearing habits of the listeners. In any case, absolutely "good acoustics" of a room do not exist.

  18. Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    ... slow growing tumor which arise primarily from the vestibular portion of the VIII cranial nerve and lie ... you have a "brain tumor" called acoustic neuroma (vestibular schwannoma). You think you are the only one ...

  19. Underwater Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuperman, William A.; Roux, Philippe

    It is well underwater established that sound waves, compared to electromagnetic waves, propagate long distances in the ocean. Hence, in the ocean as opposed to air or a vacuum, one uses sound navigation and ranging (SONAR) instead navigation and ranging (SONAR) of radar, acoustic communication instead of radio, and acoustic imaging and tomography instead of microwave or optical imaging or X-ray tomography. Underwater acoustics is the science of sound in water (most commonly in the ocean) and encompasses not only the study of sound propagation, but also the masking of sound signals by interfering phenomenon and signal processing for extracting these signals from interference. This chapter we will present the basics physics of ocean acoustics and then discuss applications.

  20. Surface Acoustic Wave Microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, Leslie Y.; Friend, James R.

    2014-01-01

    Fluid manipulations at the microscale and beyond are powerfully enabled through the use of 10-1,000-MHz acoustic waves. A superior alternative in many cases to other microfluidic actuation techniques, such high-frequency acoustics is almost universally produced by surface acoustic wave devices that employ electromechanical transduction in wafer-scale or thin-film piezoelectric media to generate the kinetic energy needed to transport and manipulate fluids placed in adjacent microfluidic structures. These waves are responsible for a diverse range of complex fluid transport phenomena - from interfacial fluid vibration and drop and confined fluid transport to jetting and atomization - underlying a flourishing research literature spanning fundamental fluid physics to chip-scale engineering applications. We highlight some of this literature to provide the reader with a historical basis, routes for more detailed study, and an impression of the field's future directions.

  1. Volumetric Imaging Using Acoustical Holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garlick, T. F.; Garlick, G. F.

    Transmission acoustical holography holds tremendous promise for medical imaging applications. As with optical holography, an image is obtained using the interference of two coherent acoustic sources, the transmitted object wave with a reference wave. Although resultant images are true holograms, depth can be difficult to quantify and an entire volume in one image can often result in "too much" information. Since Physicians/Radiologists are often interested in viewing a single plane at a time, techniques have been developed to generate acoustic holograms of "slices" within a volume. These primarily include focused transmission holography with spatial and frequency filtering techniques. These techniques along with an overview and current status of acoustical holography in medical imaging applications will be presented

  2. Electrochemical Processes Enhanced by Acoustic Liquid Manipulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oeftering, Richard C.

    2004-01-01

    Acoustic liquid manipulation is a family of techniques that employ the nonlinear acoustic effects of acoustic radiation pressure and acoustic streaming to manipulate the behavior of liquids. Researchers at the NASA Glenn Research Center are exploring new methods of manipulating liquids for a variety of space applications, and we have found that acoustic techniques may also be used in the normal Earth gravity environment to enhance the performance of existing fluid processes. Working in concert with the NASA Commercial Technology Office, the Great Lakes Industrial Technology Center, and Alchemitron Corporation (Elgin, IL), researchers at Glenn have applied nonlinear acoustic principles to industrial applications. Collaborating with Alchemitron Corporation, we have adapted the devices to create acoustic streaming in a conventional electroplating process.

  3. [Physiological-occupational assessment of acoustic load with equal energy but different time and informational characteristics].

    PubMed

    Suvorov, G A; Shkarinov, L N; Kravchenko, O K; Kur'erov, N N

    1999-01-01

    The article deals with results of experimental study comparing effects of 4 types of acoustic load--noise (constant and impulse) and music (electronic symphonic one and rap)--on hearing sensitivity, processes in nervous system and subjective evaluation. All types of acoustic load were equal in energy (on evaluation according to equivalent level during the experiment). The study included 2 levels of load--90 and 95 dB. The differences revealed demonstrate importance of impulse parameters of noise and musical load for reactions of acoustic analyzer and central nervous system. The experiments show that evaluation of harm caused by temporary and impulse noises should be based not only on assessment of specific (hearing) function, but also on parameters of central nervous system state. The authors found that music of certain acoustic and informational parameters may harm hearing function. PMID:10420710

  4. Acoustic Absorption in Porous Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuczmarski, Maria A.; Johnston, James C.

    2011-01-01

    An understanding of both the areas of materials science and acoustics is necessary to successfully develop materials for acoustic absorption applications. This paper presents the basic knowledge and approaches for determining the acoustic performance of porous materials in a manner that will help materials researchers new to this area gain the understanding and skills necessary to make meaningful contributions to this field of study. Beginning with the basics and making as few assumptions as possible, this paper reviews relevant topics in the acoustic performance of porous materials, which are often used to make acoustic bulk absorbers, moving from the physics of sound wave interactions with porous materials to measurement techniques for flow resistivity, characteristic impedance, and wavenumber.

  5. Acoustical scale modeling of roadway traffic noise

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, G.S.

    1980-03-01

    During the planning and design of any federally assisted highway project, noise levels must be predicted for the highway in its operational mode. The use of an acoustical scale modeling technique to predict roadway traffic noise is described. Literature pertaining to acoustical scale modeling of outdoor noise propagation, particularly roadway noise, is reviewed. Field and laboratory measurements validated the predictions of the acoustical scale modeling technique. (1 photo)

  6. On coating adhesion during impulse plasma deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowakowska-Langier, Katarzyna; Zdunek, Krzysztof; Chodun, Rafal; Okrasa, Sebastian; Kwiatkowski, Roch; Malinowski, Karol; Składnik-Sadowska, Elzbieta; Sadowski, Marek J.

    2014-05-01

    The impulse plasma deposition (IPD) technique is the only method of plasma surface engineering (among plasma-based technologies) that allows a synthesis of layers upon a cold unheated substrate and which ensures a good adhesion. This paper presents a study of plasma impacts upon a copper substrate surface during the IPD process. The substrate was exposed to pulsed N2/Al plasma streams during the synthesis of AlN layers. For plasma-material interaction diagnostics, the optical emission spectroscopy method was used. Our results show that interactions of plasma lead to sputtering of the substrate material. It seems that the obtained adhesion of the layers is the result of a complex surface mechanism combined with the effects of pulsed plasma energy impacts upon the unheated substrate. An example of such a result is the value of the critical load for the Al2O3 layer, which was measured by the scratch-test method to be above 40 N.

  7. Measurement of acoustical characteristics of mosques in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Abdou, Adel A

    2003-03-01

    The study of mosque acoustics, with regard to acoustical characteristics, sound quality for speech intelligibility, and other applicable acoustic criteria, has been largely neglected. In this study a background as to why mosques are designed as they are and how mosque design is influenced by worship considerations is given. In the study the acoustical characteristics of typically constructed contemporary mosques in Saudi Arabia have been investigated, employing a well-known impulse response. Extensive field measurements were taken in 21 representative mosques of different sizes and architectural features in order to characterize their acoustical quality and to identify the impact of air conditioning, ceiling fans, and sound reinforcement systems on their acoustics. Objective room-acoustic indicators such as reverberation time (RT) and clarity (C50) were measured. Background noise (BN) was assessed with and without the operation of air conditioning and fans. The speech transmission index (STI) was also evaluated with and without the operation of existing sound reinforcement systems. The existence of acoustical deficiencies was confirmed and quantified. The study, in addition to describing mosque acoustics, compares design goals to results obtained in practice and suggests acoustical target values for mosque design. The results show that acoustical quality in the investigated mosques deviates from optimum conditions when unoccupied, but is much better in the occupied condition. PMID:12656385

  8. Measurement of acoustical characteristics of mosques in Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdou, Adel A.

    2003-03-01

    The study of mosque acoustics, with regard to acoustical characteristics, sound quality for speech intelligibility, and other applicable acoustic criteria, has been largely neglected. In this study a background as to why mosques are designed as they are and how mosque design is influenced by worship considerations is given. In the study the acoustical characteristics of typically constructed contemporary mosques in Saudi Arabia have been investigated, employing a well-known impulse response. Extensive field measurements were taken in 21 representative mosques of different sizes and architectural features in order to characterize their acoustical quality and to identify the impact of air conditioning, ceiling fans, and sound reinforcement systems on their acoustics. Objective room-acoustic indicators such as reverberation time (RT) and clarity (C50) were measured. Background noise (BN) was assessed with and without the operation of air conditioning and fans. The speech transmission index (STI) was also evaluated with and without the operation of existing sound reinforcement systems. The existence of acoustical deficiencies was confirmed and quantified. The study, in addition to describing mosque acoustics, compares design goals to results obtained in practice and suggests acoustical target values for mosque design. The results show that acoustical quality in the investigated mosques deviates from optimum conditions when unoccupied, but is much better in the occupied condition.

  9. Reduction of high-speed impulsive noise by blade planform modification of a model helicopter rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conner, D. A.; Hoad, D. R.

    1982-01-01

    The reduction of high speed impulsive noise for the UH-1H helicopter was investigated by using an advanced main rotor system. The advanced rotor system had a tapered blade planform compared with the rectangular planform of the standard rotor system. Models of both the advanced main rotor system and the UH-1H standard main rotor system were tested at 1/4 scale in the 4 by 7 Meter Tunnel. In plane acoustic measurements of the high speed impulsive noise demonstrated that the advanced rotor system on the UH-1H helicopter reduced the high speed impulsive noise by up to 20 dB, with a reduction in overall sound pressure level of up to 5 dB.

  10. An overview of Arctic Ocean acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutt, Dan

    2012-11-01

    This paper presents a review of the underwater acoustics of the Arctic Ocean. It discusses the main features of the underwater acoustic environment and how they are so strongly affected by the presence of ice cover. The paper also discusses the history of Arctic Ocean acoustics research, how the motivation was originally military in character during the Cold War and how it changed to being driven by environmental considerations today. Originally, the physics of the Arctic Ocean was studied in order to predict its acoustic properties, and now acoustic techniques are used to help understand its physical environment.

  11. Investigation of reverberation synthesized by electro-acoustic enhancement systems, from a subjective and physical acoustic standpoint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Yasushi

    2002-05-01

    Current electro-acoustic enhancement technology enables wide control over concert hall acoustics. The goal of sound field synthesis in anechoic space is to reconstruct a specific sound field. However, applying acoustic enhancement technology to existing reverberant spaces is a less developed research direction. This presentation demonstrates a methodology of electro-acoustic enhancement using regenerative reverberation through SAAF (spatially averaged acoustic feedback), an acceptable variation of RT and SPL in enhanced acoustical conditions. That was presented by YAMAHA Acoustic Research Laboratories. SAAF technology can flatten amplitude peaks at the howling frequency of acoustical feedback loops by using time variant finite impulse response filters. Therefore it enables regeneration of reverberated sound by wide band feedback in frequency without coloration. This system has been applied to ``negative absorption control'' and loudness equalization of under-balcony seats in current concert halls, to optimize concert hall acoustics electronically instead of architecturally. Adjusted reverberation time in enhanced condition should be between 1.5 and 2.0 times higher than the natural RT (ex. RTon/Rtoff=1.8). The SPL increases about 1 dB to 3 dB based on measured results of more than 30 performing halls integrated with acoustic enhancement system in Japan. Examples of the major Japanese concert halls with acoustic enhancement systems are presented.

  12. Huge seafloor movements associated with the 2011 off the Pacific coast of Tohoku Earthquake observed by GPS/acoustic combination technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, T.; Sato, M.; Ujihara, N.; Watanabe, S.; Fujita, M.; Mochizuki, M.; Asada, A.

    2011-12-01

    The Hydrographic and Oceanographic Department, Japan Coast Guard, have been developing precise seafloor positioning systems using the GPS/acoustic combination technique under technical cooperation with the Institute of Industrial Science, the University of Tokyo and carrying out campaign observations along the major trenches in the Pacific Ocean, such as the Japan Trench and the Nankai Trough. The primary purpose of these observations is to detect and monitor the crustal deformation caused by the subduction of the oceanic plate near the plate boundary where huge earthquakes repeatedly occur. On 11 March 2011, a large interplate earthquake [Mw = 9.0] occurred at the plate boundary off Miyagi Prefecture, northeastern Japan. Various studies have been under way to understand the mechanism of occurrence of this earthquake. For example, the Geospatial Information Authority of Japan (GSI) has reported coseismic displacements on land, on the basis of the dense GPS network. The largest displacement has been detected at the Oshika peninsula, amounting to about 5 m toward ESE and about 1 m downward. Because the Oshika peninsula is located about 130 km away from the epicenter of the earthquake, it is preferable to measure crustal movements closer to the focal regions, that is, on the seafloor, to better constrain the focal mechanism of the event. In order to monitor crustal movements offshore, we have been carrying out seafloor geodetic observations. Five sea-floor reference points were installed off the Tohoku region between 2000 and 2004 with campaign observations carried out three times a year on average. After the event, we conducted observations at these sites. Comparison between before and after the event yielded coseismic displacements of 5 to 24 m toward ESE and -0.8 to 3 m upward. In particular, at reference point near the epicenter, we detected a huge coseismic displacement of about 24 m toward ESE and about 3 m upward. This is more than four times larger than that

  13. Geometrical acoustics and transonic helicopter sound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Isom, Morris; Purcell, Timothy W.; Strawn, Roger C.

    1987-01-01

    A new method is presented for predicting the impulsive noise generated by a transonic rotor blade. The method is a combined approach involving computational fluid dynamics and geometrical acoustics. A full-potential finite-difference method is used to obtain the pressure field close to the blade. A Kirchhoff integral formulation is then used to extend these finite-difference results into the far field. This Kirchhoff formula is based on geometrical acoustics approximations. It requires initial data across a plane at the sonic radius in a blade-fixed coordinate system. This data is provided by the finite-difference solution. Acoustic pressure predictions show good agreement with hover experimental data for cases with hover tip Mach numbers of 0.88 through 0.96. The cases above 0.92 tip Mach number are dominated by non-linear transonic effects seen as strong shocks on and off the blade tip. This paper gives the first successful predictions of far-field acoustic pressures for high-speed impulsive noise over a range of Mach numbers after delocalization.

  14. Multiple Modes of Impulsivity in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nombela, Cristina; Rittman, Timothy; Robbins, Trevor W.; Rowe, James B.

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive problems are a major factor determining quality of life of patients with Parkinson's disease. These include deficits in inhibitory control, ranging from subclinical alterations in decision-making to severe impulse control disorders. Based on preclinical studies, we proposed that Parkinson's disease does not cause a unified disorder of inhibitory control, but rather a set of impulsivity factors with distinct psychological profiles, anatomy and pharmacology. We assessed a broad set of measures of the cognitive, behavioural and temperamental/trait aspects of impulsivity. Sixty adults, including 30 idiopathic Parkinson's disease patients (Hoehn and Yahr stage I–III) and 30 healthy controls, completed a neuropsychological battery, objective behavioural measures and self-report questionnaires. Univariate analyses of variance confirmed group differences in nine out of eleven metrics. We then used factor analysis (principal components method) to identify the structure of impulsivity in Parkinson's disease. Four principal factors were identified, consistent with four different mechanisms of impulsivity, explaining 60% of variance. The factors were related to (1) tests of response conflict, interference and self assessment of impulsive behaviours on the Barrett Impulsivity Scale, (2) tests of motor inhibitory control, and the self-report behavioural approach system, (3) time estimation and delay aversion, and (4) reflection in hypothetical scenarios including temporal discounting. The different test profiles of these four factors were consistent with human and comparative studies of the pharmacology and functional anatomy of impulsivity. Relationships between each factor and clinical and demographic features were examined by regression against factor loadings. Levodopa dose equivalent was associated only with factors (2) and (3). The results confirm that impulsivity is common in Parkinson's disease, even in the absence of impulse control disorders, and that it is

  15. Cotton buds, momentum, and impulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Berg, Ed; Nuñez, Jover; Guirit, Alfredo; van Huis, Cor

    2000-01-01

    Here is a simple experiment demonstrating impulse and momentum that was picked up from a Japanese presenter at a physics teacher conference held in Cebu City. We have not been able to trace the experiment farther and have never seen it in print. After student-author Nuñez demonstrated it during an exam on conducting demonstrations, we converted the qualitative idea into a quanitative experiment and even discovered some possibilities for student research. The lab is also suitable as homework, since it uses universally available "equipment" — cotton buds (swabs), drinking straws, and a ruler.

  16. Impulsively started incompressible turbulent jet

    SciTech Connect

    Witze, P O

    1980-10-01

    Hot-film anemometer measurements are presented for the centerline velocity of a suddenly started jet of air. The tip penetration of the jet is shown to be proportional to the square-root of time. A theoretical model is developed that assumes the transient jet can be characterized as a spherical vortex interacting with a steady-state jet. The model demonstrates that the ratio of nozzle radius to jet velocity defines a time constant that uniquely characterizes the behavior and similarity of impulsively started incompressible turbulent jets.

  17. Recent MTI experiments using ARL's synchronous impulse reconstruction (SIRE) radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranney, Kenneth; Martone, Anthony; Nguyen, Lam; Stanton, Brian; Ressler, Marc; Wong, David; Koenig, Francois; Tran, Chi; Kirose, Getachew; Smith, Greg; Kappra, Karl; Sichina, Jeffrey

    2008-04-01

    The Army Research Laboratory (ARL) has recently developed the ground-based synchronous impulse reconstruction (SIRE) radar - a low-frequency radar capable of exploiting both a real antenna array and along-track integration techniques to increase the quality of processed imagery. We have already demonstrated the system's utility by imaging static scenes. In this paper we address the moving target indication (MTI) problem, and we demonstrate the impulse-based system's ability to both detect and locate slowly moving targets. We begin by briefly describing the SIRE system itself as well as the system configuration utilized in collecting the MTI data. Next we discuss the signal processing techniques employed to create the final MTI image. Finally, we present processed imagery illustrating the utility of the proposed method.

  18. Study Acoustic Emissions from Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, James; Workman,Gary

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this work will be to develop techniques for monitoring the acoustic emissions from carbon epoxy composite structures at cryogenic temperatures. Performance of transducers at temperatures ranging from ambient to cryogenic and the characteristics of acoustic emission from composite structures will be studied and documented. This entire effort is directed towards characterization of structures used in NASA propulsion programs such as the X-33.

  19. Simplified Rotation In Acoustic Levitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, M. B.; Gaspar, M. S.; Trinh, E. H.

    1989-01-01

    New technique based on old discovery used to control orientation of object levitated acoustically in axisymmetric chamber. Method does not require expensive equipment like additional acoustic drivers of precisely adjustable amplitude, phase, and frequency. Reflecting object acts as second source of sound. If reflecting object large enough, close enough to levitated object, or focuses reflected sound sufficiently, Rayleigh torque exerted on levitated object by reflected sound controls orientation of object.

  20. Stable And Oscillating Acoustic Levitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, Martin B.; Garrett, Steven L.

    1988-01-01

    Sample stability or instability determined by levitating frequency. Degree of oscillation of acoustically levitated object along axis of levitation chamber controlled by varying frequency of acoustic driver for axis above or below frequency of corresponding chamber resonance. Stabilization/oscillation technique applied in normal Earth gravity, or in absence of gravity to bring object quickly to rest at nominal levitation position or make object oscillate in desired range about that position.

  1. Comparison of the response of a heterodyne receiver to video-pulse and impulse-type signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caprio, S. J.

    1980-02-01

    This paper presents some of the limitations of available impulse generators and suggests a criterion to determine the useful frequency range for impulse generators based on the requirements in MIL-STD-461. This paper also discusses a technique that can be used to generate a transient response of a heterodyne receiver that closely approximates the impulse response of the receiver. The technique uses a video pulse from a commercial pulse generator. The transient response of the receiver, measured at IF, will differ from the true impulse response in IF phase only. Available data indicates that this technique may be useful to generate impulse-like responses for RF amplifiers and broad-band amplifiers that operate at frequencies as high as 100 GHz.

  2. Impulsive synchronization of networked nonlinear dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Haibo; Bi, Qinsheng

    2010-06-01

    In this Letter, we investigate the problem of impulsive synchronization of networked multi-agent systems, where each agent can be modeled as an identical nonlinear dynamical system. Firstly, an impulsive control protocol is designed for network with fixed topology based on the local information of agents. Then sufficient conditions are given to guarantee the synchronization of the networked nonlinear dynamical system by using algebraic graph theory and impulsive control theory. Furthermore, how to select the discrete instants and impulsive constants is discussed. The case that the topologies of the networks are switching is also considered. Numerical simulations show the effectiveness of our theoretical results.

  3. Impaired Decisional Impulsivity in Pathological Videogamers

    PubMed Central

    Irvine, Michael A.; Worbe, Yulia; Bolton, Sorcha; Harrison, Neil A.; Bullmore, Edward T.; Voon, Valerie

    2013-01-01

    Background Pathological gaming is an emerging and poorly understood problem. Impulsivity is commonly impaired in disorders of behavioural and substance addiction, hence we sought to systematically investigate the different subtypes of decisional and motor impulsivity in a well-defined pathological gaming cohort. Methods Fifty-two pathological gaming subjects and age-, gender- and IQ-matched healthy volunteers were tested on decisional impulsivity (Information Sampling Task testing reflection impulsivity and delay discounting questionnaire testing impulsive choice), and motor impulsivity (Stop Signal Task testing motor response inhibition, and the premature responding task). We used stringent diagnostic criteria highlighting functional impairment. Results In the Information Sampling Task, pathological gaming participants sampled less evidence prior to making a decision and scored fewer points compared with healthy volunteers. Gaming severity was also negatively correlated with evidence gathered and positively correlated with sampling error and points acquired. In the delay discounting task, pathological gamers made more impulsive choices, preferring smaller immediate over larger delayed rewards. Pathological gamers made more premature responses related to comorbid nicotine use. Greater number of hours played also correlated with a Motivational Index. Greater frequency of role playing games was associated with impaired motor response inhibition and strategy games with faster Go reaction time. Conclusions We show that pathological gaming is associated with impaired decisional impulsivity with negative consequences in task performance. Decisional impulsivity may be a potential target in therapeutic management. PMID:24146789

  4. The annoyance of impulsive helicopter noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karamcheti, K.

    1981-01-01

    A total of 96 impulsive and non-impulsive sounds were rated for annoyance by 10 subjects. The signals had the same amplitude spectrum with a maximum frequency of 4.75 kHz. By changing the phase of the spectral components different levels of impulsivity were obtained. The signals had coefficients of impulsivity of 10,8, 7,9, and -0.2 respectively. Further, signals had intensity levels 89 and 95 dBA, pulse repetition rates 10 and 20 Hz, and half the signals had pink noise added at a level 12 dBA lower than the level of the sound. The significant results were: The four females and six male subjects rated the impulsive sounds respectively 3.7 dB less annoying and 2.6 dB more annoying than the non-impulsive sounds. Overall, impulsivity had no effect. The hish pulse repetition rate increased annoyance by 2.2 dB. Addition of pink noise increased annoyance of the non-impulsive sounds 1.2 dB, but decreased the annoyance of the impulsive sounds 0.5 dB.

  5. Impulse Response Measurements Over Space-Earth Paths Using the GPS Coarse/Acquisition Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemmon, J. J.; Papazian, P. B.

    1995-01-01

    The impulse responses of radio transmission channels over space-earth paths were measured using the course/acquisition code signals from the Global Positioning System of satellites. The data acquisition system and signal processing techniques used to develop the impulse responses are described. Examples of impulse response measurements are presented. The results indicate that this measurement approach enables detection of multipath signals that are 20 dB or more below the power of the direct arrival. Channel characteristics that could be investigated with additional measurements and analyses are discussed.

  6. Development of hydroacoustical techniques for the monitoring and classification of benthic habitats in Puck Bay: Modeling of acoustic waves scattering by seagrass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raczkowska, A.; Gorska, N.

    2012-12-01

    Puck Bay is an area of high species biodiversity belonging to the Coastal Landscape Park of Baltic Sea Protected Areas (BSPA) and is also included in the list of the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) and covered by the protection program "Natura 2000". The underwater meadows of the Puck Bay are important for Europe's natural habitats due to their role in enhancing the productivity of marine ecosystems and providing shelter and optimal feeding conditions for many marine organisms. One of the dominant species comprising the underwater meadows of the Southern Baltic Sea is the seagrass Zostera marina. The spatial extent of underwater seagrass meadows is altered by pollution and eutrophication; therefore, to properly manage the area one must monitor its ecological state. Remote acoustic methods are useful tools for the monitoring of benthic habitats in many marine areas because they are non-invasive and allow researchers to obtain data from a large area in a short period of time. Currently there is a need to apply these methods in the Baltic Sea. Here we present an analysis of the mechanism of scattering of acoustic waves on seagrass in the Southern Baltic Sea based on the numerical modeling of acoustic wave scattering by the biological tissues of plants. The study was conducted by adapting a model developed on the basis of DWBA (Distorted Wave Born Approximation) developed by Stanton and Chu (2005) for fluid-like objects, including the characteristics of the Southern Baltic seagrass. Input data for the model, including the morphometry of seagrass leaves, their angle of inclination and the density plant cover, was obtained through the analysis of biological materials collected in the Puck Bay in the framework of a research project financed by the Polish Government (Development of hydroacoustic methods for studies of underwater meadows of Puck Bay, 6P04E 051 20). On the basis of the developed model, we have analyzed the dependence of the target strength of a single

  7. An OFDM Receiver with Frequency Domain Diversity Combined Impulsive Noise Canceller for Underwater Network.

    PubMed

    Saotome, Rie; Hai, Tran Minh; Matsuda, Yasuto; Suzuki, Taisaku; Wada, Tomohisa

    2015-01-01

    In order to explore marine natural resources using remote robotic sensor or to enable rapid information exchange between ROV (remotely operated vehicles), AUV (autonomous underwater vehicle), divers, and ships, ultrasonic underwater communication systems are used. However, if the communication system is applied to rich living creature marine environment such as shallow sea, it suffers from generated Impulsive Noise so-called Shrimp Noise, which is randomly generated in time domain and seriously degrades communication performance in underwater acoustic network. With the purpose of supporting high performance underwater communication, a robust digital communication method for Impulsive Noise environments is necessary. In this paper, we propose OFDM ultrasonic communication system with diversity receiver. The main feature of the receiver is a newly proposed Frequency Domain Diversity Combined Impulsive Noise Canceller. The OFDM receiver utilizes 20-28 KHz ultrasonic channel and subcarrier spacing of 46.875 Hz (MODE3) and 93.750 Hz (MODE2) OFDM modulations. In addition, the paper shows Impulsive Noise distribution data measured at a fishing port in Okinawa and at a barge in Shizuoka prefectures and then proposed diversity OFDM transceivers architecture and experimental results are described. By the proposed Impulsive Noise Canceller, frame bit error rate has been decreased by 20-30%. PMID:26351656

  8. An OFDM Receiver with Frequency Domain Diversity Combined Impulsive Noise Canceller for Underwater Network

    PubMed Central

    Saotome, Rie; Hai, Tran Minh; Matsuda, Yasuto; Suzuki, Taisaku; Wada, Tomohisa

    2015-01-01

    In order to explore marine natural resources using remote robotic sensor or to enable rapid information exchange between ROV (remotely operated vehicles), AUV (autonomous underwater vehicle), divers, and ships, ultrasonic underwater communication systems are used. However, if the communication system is applied to rich living creature marine environment such as shallow sea, it suffers from generated Impulsive Noise so-called Shrimp Noise, which is randomly generated in time domain and seriously degrades communication performance in underwater acoustic network. With the purpose of supporting high performance underwater communication, a robust digital communication method for Impulsive Noise environments is necessary. In this paper, we propose OFDM ultrasonic communication system with diversity receiver. The main feature of the receiver is a newly proposed Frequency Domain Diversity Combined Impulsive Noise Canceller. The OFDM receiver utilizes 20–28 KHz ultrasonic channel and subcarrier spacing of 46.875 Hz (MODE3) and 93.750 Hz (MODE2) OFDM modulations. In addition, the paper shows Impulsive Noise distribution data measured at a fishing port in Okinawa and at a barge in Shizuoka prefectures and then proposed diversity OFDM transceivers architecture and experimental results are described. By the proposed Impulsive Noise Canceller, frame bit error rate has been decreased by 20–30%. PMID:26351656

  9. Impulsivity and the Sexes: Measurement and Structural Invariance of the UPPS-P Impulsive Behavior Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cyders, Melissa A.

    2013-01-01

    Before it is possible to test whether men and women differ in impulsivity, it is necessary to evaluate whether impulsivity measures are invariant across sex. The UPPS-P Impulsive Behavior Scale (negative urgency, lack of premeditation, lack of perseverance, and sensation seeking, with added subscale of positive urgency) is one measure of five…

  10. Impulsive model for reactive collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marron, M. T.; Bernstein, R. B.

    1972-01-01

    A simple classical mechanical model of the reactive scattering of a structureless atom A and a quasi-diatomic BC is developed which takes full advantage of energy, linear and angular momentum conservation relations but introduces a minimum of further assumptions. These are as follows: (1) the vibrational degree of freedom of the reactant (BC) and product (AB) molecules is suppressed, so the change in vibrational energy is simply a parameter; (2) straight-line trajectories are assumed outside of a reaction shell; (3) within this zone, momentum transfer occurs impulsively (essentially instantaneously) following mass transfer; (4) the impulse, which may be either positive or negative, is directed along the BC axis, which may, however, assume all orientations with respect to the incident relative velocity. The model yields differential and total cross sections and product rotational energy distributions for a given collision exoergicity Q, or for any known distribution over Q. Numerical results are presented for several prototype reactions whose dynamics have been well-studied.

  11. Physics of thermo-acoustic sound generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daschewski, M.; Boehm, R.; Prager, J.; Kreutzbruck, M.; Harrer, A.

    2013-09-01

    We present a generalized analytical model of thermo-acoustic sound generation based on the analysis of thermally induced energy density fluctuations and their propagation into the adjacent matter. The model provides exact analytical prediction of the sound pressure generated in fluids and solids; consequently, it can be applied to arbitrary thermal power sources such as thermophones, plasma firings, laser beams, and chemical reactions. Unlike existing approaches, our description also includes acoustic near-field effects and sound-field attenuation. Analytical results are compared with measurements of sound pressures generated by thermo-acoustic transducers in air for frequencies up to 1 MHz. The tested transducers consist of titanium and indium tin oxide coatings on quartz glass and polycarbonate substrates. The model reveals that thermo-acoustic efficiency increases linearly with the supplied thermal power and quadratically with thermal excitation frequency. Comparison of the efficiency of our thermo-acoustic transducers with those of piezoelectric-based airborne ultrasound transducers using impulse excitation showed comparable sound pressure values. The present results show that thermo-acoustic transducers can be applied as broadband, non-resonant, high-performance ultrasound sources.

  12. Dynamic response and acoustic fatigue of stiffened composite structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soovere, J.

    1984-01-01

    The results of acoustic fatigue and dynamic response tests performed on L-1011 graphite-epoxy (GrE) aileron and panel components are reported. The aileron featured glass microballoons between the GrE skins. Tests yielded random fatigue data from double and single cantilever coupons and modal data from impedance hammer and loudspeaker impulses. Numerical and sample test data were obtained on combined acoustic and shear loads, acoustic and thermal loads, random fatigue and damping of the integrally stiffened and secondary bonded panels. The fatigue data indicate a fatigue life beyond 10 million cycles. The acoustic data suggested that noise transmission could be enhanced in the integrally stiffened panels, which were more acoustic-fatigue resistant than were the secondary bonded panels.

  13. Reliability and validity of measures of impulsive choice and impulsive action in smokers trying to quit.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Danielle E; Bold, Krysten W; Minami, Haruka; Yeh, Vivian M; Rutten, Emily; Nadkarni, Shruti G; Chapman, Gretchen B

    2016-04-01

    Cross-sectional research suggests that smokers are more impulsive than are nonsmokers, but few studies have examined relations between impulsiveness and later success in quitting smoking. The purpose of this study was to investigate the reliability and predictive validity of facets of impulsiveness in adult smokers trying to quit. Baseline behavioral measures of impulsive choice (assessed with a delay discounting task) and impulsive action (assessed with a measure of behavioral disinhibition) were used as predictors of smoking cessation success over 12 weeks. The sample included 116 adult (18 years old or older) daily smokers from central New Jersey. Impulsive choice, impulsive action, and self-reported impulsiveness were not significantly related to one another at baseline. Impulsive choice had high test-retest reliability from pre- to postquit, whereas impulsive action was less stable. Test-retest reliability from prequit to 3 weeks' postquit was moderated by achievement of 7-day abstinence. Baseline impulsive action was significantly negatively related to quitting for at least 1 day in the first 2 weeks of a quit attempt and of prolonged abstinence (no relapse over the next 10 weeks). Baseline impulsive choice was robustly associated with biochemically verified 7-day point-prevalence abstinence 12 weeks' postquit, such that those with lower delay discounting were more likely to achieve abstinence. Facets of impulsiveness appear to function largely independently in adult smokers, as indicated by their lack of intercorrelation, differential stability, and differential relations with abstinence. Impulsive action may impede initial quitting, whereas impulsive choice may be an obstacle to maintaining lasting abstinence. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26751623

  14. Reliability and Validity of Measures of Impulsive Choice and Impulsive Action in Smokers Trying to Quit

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Danielle E.; Bold, Krysten W.; Minami, Haruka; Yeh, Vivian M.; Rutten, Emily; Nadkarni, Shruti G.; Chapman, Gretchen B.

    2016-01-01

    Cross-sectional research suggests that smokers are more impulsive than are non-smokers, but few studies have examined relations between impulsiveness and later success in quitting smoking. The purpose of this study was to investigate the reliability and predictive validity of facets of impulsiveness in adult smokers trying to quit. Baseline behavioral measures of impulsive choice (assessed with a delay discounting task) and impulsive action (assessed with a measure of behavioral disinhibition) were used as predictors of smoking cessation success over 12 weeks. The sample included 116 adult (18 years old or older) daily smokers from central New Jersey. Impulsive choice, impulsive action, and self-reported impulsiveness were not significantly related to one another at baseline. Impulsive choice had high test-retest reliability from pre- to post-quit, whereas impulsive action was less stable. Test-retest reliability from pre-quit to three weeks post-quit was moderated by achievement of seven-day abstinence. Baseline impulsive action was significantly negatively related to quitting for at least one day in the first two weeks of a quit attempt and of prolonged abstinence (no relapse over the next 10 weeks). Baseline impulsive choice was robustly associated with biochemically verified seven-day point-prevalence abstinence 12 weeks post-quit, such that those with lower delay discounting were more likely to achieve abstinence. Facets of impulsiveness appear to function largely independently in adult smokers, as indicated by their lack of inter-correlation, differential stability, and differential relations with abstinence. Impulsive action may impede initial quitting, whereas impulsive choice may be an obstacle to maintaining lasting abstinence. PMID:26751623

  15. Multi-dimensional analysis of subjective acoustical ratings and acoustical measures in existing concert halls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okano, Toshiyuki

    2001-05-01

    Correlations between subjective acoustical ratings and hall-averaged values of acoustical measures are studied among existing worldwide major concert halls. It was shown that the classified acoustical ratings by Beranek [Concert and Opera Halls, How They Sound (ASA, 1996)] are discriminated correctly by combining binaural quality index (BQI) with some other acoustical measures. BQI is determined by the arithmetic average of inter-aural cross correlation coefficient in three octave bands of 500, 1000, and 2000 Hz, subtracted from unity, calculated from the early 80-ms part of binaural impulse response. Considering that the upper limit value of BQI not to cause disturbing image shift is approximately 0.85 at individual seat [Okano, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 2219-2230 (2000)], the values of 0.6 or higher in hall averaged value of BQI, 0.85 or smaller in individual seat value of BQI, and approximately 5 dB or higher in strength factor at middle frequencies are proposed as design objectives to attain a high acoustical quality. It should be provided that other acoustical measures are also optimized. These target values will be very effective in studying room shape of halls, using scale models or computer models.

  16. Controlling sound with acoustic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummer, Steven A.; Christensen, Johan; Alù, Andrea

    2016-03-01

    Acoustic metamaterials can manipulate and control sound waves in ways that are not possible in conventional materials. Metamaterials with zero, or even negative, refractive index for sound offer new possibilities for acoustic imaging and for the control of sound at subwavelength scales. The combination of transformation acoustics theory and highly anisotropic acoustic metamaterials enables precise control over the deformation of sound fields, which can be used, for example, to hide or cloak objects from incident acoustic energy. Active acoustic metamaterials use external control to create effective material properties that are not possible with passive structures and have led to the development of dynamically reconfigurable, loss-compensating and parity-time-symmetric materials for sound manipulation. Challenges remain, including the development of efficient techniques for fabricating large-scale metamaterial structures and converting laboratory experiments into useful devices. In this Review, we outline the designs and properties of materials with unusual acoustic parameters (for example, negative refractive index), discuss examples of extreme manipulation of sound and, finally, provide an overview of future directions in the field.

  17. Impulse response method for characterization of echogenic liposomesa)

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, Jason L.; Luan, Ying; van Rooij, Tom; Kooiman, Klazina; Huang, Shao-Ling; McPherson, David D.; Versluis, Michel; de Jong, Nico; Holland, Christy K.

    2015-01-01

    An optical characterization method is presented based on the use of the impulse response to characterize the damping imparted by the shell of an air-filled ultrasound contrast agent (UCA). The interfacial shell viscosity was estimated based on the unforced decaying response of individual echogenic liposomes (ELIP) exposed to a broadband acoustic impulse excitation. Radius versus time response was measured optically based on recordings acquired using an ultra-high-speed camera. The method provided an efficient approach that enabled statistical measurements on 106 individual ELIP. A decrease in shell viscosity, from 2.1 × 10−8 to 2.5 × 10−9 kg/s, was observed with increasing dilatation rate, from 0.5 × 106 to 1 × 107 s−1. This nonlinear behavior has been reported in other studies of lipid-shelled UCAs and is consistent with rheological shear-thinning. The measured shell viscosity for the ELIP formulation used in this study [κs = (2.1 ± 1.0) × 10−8 kg/s] was in quantitative agreement with previously reported values on a population of ELIP and is consistent with other lipid-shelled UCAs. The acoustic response of ELIP therefore is similar to other lipid-shelled UCAs despite loading with air instead of perfluorocarbon gas. The methods described here can provide an accurate estimate of the shell viscosity and damping for individual UCA microbubbles. PMID:25920822

  18. Temporal Preparation, Response Inhibition and Impulsivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Correa, Angel; Trivino, Monica; Perez-Duenas, Carolina; Acosta, Alberto; Lupianez, Juan

    2010-01-01

    Temporal preparation and impulsivity involve overlapping neural structures (prefrontal cortex) and cognitive functions (response inhibition and time perception), however, their interrelations had not been investigated. We studied such interrelations by comparing the performance of groups with low vs. high non-clinical trait impulsivity during a…

  19. Solar Impulse's Solar-Powered Plane

    ScienceCinema

    Moniz, Ernest; Piccard, Bertrand; Reicher, Dan

    2014-01-07

    Solar Impulse lands in Washington, DC at Washington Dulles International Airport as part of its journey across the United States. Secretary Ernest Moniz speaks about how advancements like those at the Department of Energy are leading the way for innovations like the solar-powered plane. Footage of the solar-powered plane courtesy of Solar Impulse.

  20. Impulsivity, School Context, and School Misconduct

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogel, Matt; Barton, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    Impulsivity holds a central place in the explanations of adolescent delinquency. Recent research suggests that neighborhood characteristics, particularly SES (socioeconomic status), perceived supervision, and collective efficacy, moderate the association between impulsivity and delinquency. However, findings to date have been equivocal, and the…

  1. Hyperkinetic Impulse Disorder in Children's Behavior Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laufer, Maurice W.; Denhoff, Eric; Solomons, Gerald

    2011-01-01

    A very common cause of children's behavior disorder disturbance is an entity described as the hyperkinetic impulse disorder. This is characterized by hyperactivity, short attention span and poor powers of concentration, irritability, impulsiveness, variability, and poor schoolwork. The existence of this complexity may lead to many psychological…

  2. Solar Impulse's Solar-Powered Plane

    SciTech Connect

    Moniz, Ernest; Piccard, Bertrand; Reicher, Dan

    2013-07-08

    Solar Impulse lands in Washington, DC at Washington Dulles International Airport as part of its journey across the United States. Secretary Ernest Moniz speaks about how advancements like those at the Department of Energy are leading the way for innovations like the solar-powered plane. Footage of the solar-powered plane courtesy of Solar Impulse.

  3. High-intensity drying processes: Impulse drying

    SciTech Connect

    Orloff, D.I.

    1989-05-01

    Impulse drying is an innovative process for drying paper that holds great promise for reducing the energy consumed during manufacture of paper and similar web products. Impulse drying occurs when a wet paper web passes through a press nip where one of the rolls is heated to a very high temperature. Steam generated by contact with the hot roll expands and displaces water from the sheet in a very efficient manner. The energy required for water removal is much lower than that required for conventional evaporative drying. Tests have been completed that elucidate the unique displacement mechanism of water removal in the impulse drying process. A pilot roll press has been designed, installed and used to examine impulse drying under conditions that simulate commercial press conditions. The results of this earlier work have been reported in three previous reports. During this report period October, 1987 to September, 1988, the pilot press was equipped with a second impulse drying roll to facilitate studies of surface uniformity in impulse dried paper. Studies have also been completed which examine the origins of sheet delamination that has been been encountered during impulse drying of certain heavyweight paper grades, and which investigate approaches to prevent delamination in these grades. Finally, an experimental plan has been formalized to examine impulse drying of lightweight grades which are candidates for early commercialization. 7 refs., 30 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Impulsivity and Psychoeducational Intervention in Hyperactive Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Ronald T.

    1980-01-01

    Two psychoeducational procedures were investigated for their effects on impulsivity in 120 hyperactive children in two groups: those receiving stimulant drug therapy and those not receiving stimulant drug therapy. Results indicated that the use of psychoeducational treatment approaches are of value in altering the impulsive responses of…

  5. Covert Suicidal Impulses in Maternally Deprived Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kliman, Gilbert; Lubin, Harriet

    This paper discusses the development of suicidal impulses in children who have lost their mothers due to abandonment or death. The paper is based on two psychoanalytic case studies, in which the children were in therapy when the first suicidal impulses emerged. A pattern is described in which bereaved children's intense wishes to have their…

  6. Anatomy of a SAR impulse response.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2007-08-01

    A principal measure of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) image quality is the manifestation in the SAR image of a spatial impulse, that is, the SAR's Impulse Response (IPR). IPR requirements direct certain design decisions in a SAR. Anomalies in the IPR can point to specific anomalous behavior in the radar's hardware and/or software.

  7. Acoustic transducer for acoustic microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T.; Chou, Ching H.

    1990-01-01

    A shear acoustic transducer-lens system in which a shear polarized piezoelectric material excites shear polarized waves at one end of a buffer rod having a lens at the other end which excites longitudinal waves in a coupling medium by mode conversion at selected locations on the lens.

  8. Acoustic transducer for acoustic microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Khuri-Yakub, B.T.; Chou, C.H.

    1990-03-20

    A shear acoustic transducer-lens system is described in which a shear polarized piezoelectric material excites shear polarized waves at one end of a buffer rod having a lens at the other end which excites longitudinal waves in a coupling medium by mode conversion at selected locations on the lens. 9 figs.

  9. Software for Acoustic Rendering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Joel D.

    2003-01-01

    SLAB is a software system that can be run on a personal computer to simulate an acoustic environment in real time. SLAB was developed to enable computational experimentation in which one can exert low-level control over a variety of signal-processing parameters, related to spatialization, for conducting psychoacoustic studies. Among the parameters that can be manipulated are the number and position of reflections, the fidelity (that is, the number of taps in finite-impulse-response filters), the system latency, and the update rate of the filters. Another goal in the development of SLAB was to provide an inexpensive means of dynamic synthesis of virtual audio over headphones, without need for special-purpose signal-processing hardware. SLAB has a modular, object-oriented design that affords the flexibility and extensibility needed to accommodate a variety of computational experiments and signal-flow structures. SLAB s spatial renderer has a fixed signal-flow architecture corresponding to a set of parallel signal paths from each source to a listener. This fixed architecture can be regarded as a compromise that optimizes efficiency at the expense of complete flexibility. Such a compromise is necessary, given the design goal of enabling computational psychoacoustic experimentation on inexpensive personal computers.

  10. Material and Phonon Engineering for Next Generation Acoustic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Nai-Kuei

    -wide bandwidth (˜10%) was achieved by implementing slanted finger transducers (SFIT) in thin film AIN. The impulse response and coupling of modes (COM) models commonly used for surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices were developed to design the operating frequency and bandwidth of the LWTs. These techniques enabled access to fast frequency solutions (impulse response method) and good pass-band ripple estimation (COM) for any piezoelectric Lamb-wave based device. The conventional and IABG unit cell designs were explored for the making of cavity resonators. A PnC cavity made with conventional design exhibits a Q of 675 at 665 MHz. Despite the low Q, its value is very high when the volume of the cavity is taken into account ( Q per unit volume of 3.1017/m3). In order to understand the limited value of Q a detailed finite element analysis is performed to unveil its dependence on the specific design of the transducer. The capabilities of the X-shaped PnCs were harvested for synthesizing a method to suppress the sidelobe response of an AIN Lamb wave (SFIT) delay line. 10 dB of sidelobe magnitude reduction was attained while leaving the pass-band unaltered. Although at a very preliminary stage, the theoretical and experimental work on AIN PnC has demonstrated that new acoustic capabilities are enabled by these metamaterials. Future electroacoustic devices that perform frequency control functions in a compact and low loss fashion can now be envisioned.

  11. The virtual microphone technique in active sound field control systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lampropoulos, Iraklis E.; Shimizu, Yasushi

    2003-04-01

    Active Sound Field Control (AFC) has been proven very useful in reverberation enhancement applications in large rooms. However, feedback control is required in order to eliminate peaks in the frequency response of the system. The present research closely follows the studies of Shimizu in AFC, in which smoothing of the rooms transfer function is achieved by averaging the impulse responses of multiple microphones. ``The virtual or rotating microphone technique'' reduces the number of microphones in the aforementioned AFC technology, while still achieving the same acoustical effects in the room. After the impulse responses at previously specified pairs of microphone positions are measured, the ratio of transfer functions for every pair is calculated, thus yielding a constant K. Next, microphones are removed and their impulse responses are reproduced by processing the incoming signal of each pair through a convolver, where the computed K constants have been previously stored. Band limiting, windowing and time variance effects are critical factors, in order to reduce incoherence effects and yield reliable approximations of inverse filters and consequently calculations of K. The project is implemented in a church lacking low frequency reverberation for music and makes use of 2 physical and 2 virtual microphones.

  12. On reactive high power impulse magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudmundsson, J. T.

    2016-01-01

    High power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) is an ionized physical vapor deposition (IPVD) technique that is particularly promising for reactive sputtering applications. However, there are few issues that have to be resolved before the full potential of this technique can be realized. Here we give an overview of the key experimental findings for the reactive HiPIMS discharge. An increase in the discharge current is commonly observed with increased partial pressure of the reactive gas or decreased repetition pulse frequency. There are somewhat conflicting claims regarding the hysteresis effect in the reactive HiPIMS discharge as some report reduction or elimination of the hysteresis effect while others claim a feedback control is essential. The ion energy distribution of the metal ion and the atomic ion of the reactive gas are similar and extend to very high energies while the ion energy distribution of the working gas and the molecular ion of the reactive gas are similar and are much less energetic.

  13. Helicopter impulsive noise - Theoretical and experimental status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitz, F. H.; Yu, Y. H.

    1986-01-01

    The theoretical and experimental status of helicopter impulsive noise is reviewed. The two major source mechanisms of helicopter impulsive noise are addressed: high-speed impulsive noise and blade-vortex interaction impulsive noise. A thorough physical explanation of both generating mechanism is presented together with model and full-scale measurements of the phenomena. Current theoretical prediction methods are compared with experimental findings of isolated rotor tests. The noise generating mechanism of high speed impulsive noise are fairly well understood - theory and experiment compare nicely over Mach number ranges typical of today's helicopters. For the case of blade-vortex interaction noise, understanding of noise generating mechanisms and theoretical comparison with experiment are less satisfactory. Several methods for improving theory-experiment are suggested.

  14. Impulse position control algorithms for nonlinear systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sesekin, A. N.; Nepp, A. N.

    2015-11-01

    The article is devoted to the formalization and description of impulse-sliding regime in nonlinear dynamical systems that arise in the application of impulse position controls of a special kind. The concept of trajectory impulse-sliding regime formalized as some limiting network element Euler polygons generated by a discrete approximation of the impulse position control This paper differs from the previously published papers in that it uses a definition of solutions of systems with impulse controls, it based on the closure of the set of smooth solutions in the space of functions of bounded variation. The need for the study of such regimes is the fact that they often arise when parry disturbances acting on technical or economic control system.

  15. Impulse position control algorithms for nonlinear systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sesekin, A. N.; Nepp, A. N.

    2015-11-30

    The article is devoted to the formalization and description of impulse-sliding regime in nonlinear dynamical systems that arise in the application of impulse position controls of a special kind. The concept of trajectory impulse-sliding regime formalized as some limiting network element Euler polygons generated by a discrete approximation of the impulse position control This paper differs from the previously published papers in that it uses a definition of solutions of systems with impulse controls, it based on the closure of the set of smooth solutions in the space of functions of bounded variation. The need for the study of such regimes is the fact that they often arise when parry disturbances acting on technical or economic control system.

  16. Helicopter impulsive noise - Theoretical and experimental status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitz, F. H.; Yu, Y. H.

    1986-01-01

    The theoretical and experimental status of helicopter impulsive noise is reviewed. The two major source mechanisms of helicopter impulsive noise are addressed: high-speed impulsive noise and blade-vortex interaction impulsive noise. A thorough physical explanation of both generating mechanisms is presented together with model and full-scale measurements of the phenomena. Current theoretical prediction methods are compared with experimental findings of isolated rotor tests. The noise generating mechanisms of high speed impulsive noise are fairly well understood - theory and experiment compare nicely over Mach number ranges typical of today's helicopters. For the case of blade-vortex interaction noise, understanding of noise generating mechanisms and theoretical comparison with experiment are less satisfactory. Several methods for improving theory/experiment are suggested.

  17. Helicopter impulsive noise: Theoretical and experimental status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitz, F. H.; Yu, Y. H.

    1983-01-01

    The theoretical and experimental status of helicopter impulsive noise is reviewed. The two major source mechanisms of helicopter impulsive noise are addressed: high-speed impulsive noise and blade-vortex interaction impulsive noise. A thorough physical explanation of both generating mechanism is presented together with model and full-scale measurements of the phenomena. Current theoretical prediction methods are compared with experimental findings of isolated rotor tests. The noise generating mechanism of high speed impulsive noise are fairly well understood - theory and experiment compare nicely over Mach number ranges typical of today's helicopters. For the case of blade-vortex interaction noise, understanding of noise generating mechanisms and theoretical comparison with experiment are less satisfactory. Several methods for improving theory-experiment are suggested.

  18. A Triadic Reflective-Impulsive-Interoceptive Awareness Model of General and Impulsive Information System Use: Behavioral Tests of Neuro-Cognitive Theory.

    PubMed

    Turel, Ofir; Bechara, Antoine

    2016-01-01

    This study examines a behavioral tripartite model developed in the field of addiction, and applies it here to understanding general and impulsive information technology use. It suggests that technology use is driven by two information-processing brain systems: reflective and impulsive, and that their effects on use are modulated by interoceptive awareness processes. The resultant reflective-impulsive-interoceptive awareness model is tested in two behavioral studies. Both studies employ SEM techniques to time-lagged self-report data from n 1 = 300 and n 2 = 369 social networking site users. Study 1 demonstrated that temptations augment the effect of habit on technology use, and reduce the effect of satisfaction on use. Study 2 showed that temptations strengthen the effect of habit on impulsive technology use, and weaken the effect of behavioral expectations on impulsive technology use. Hence, the results consistently support the notion that information technology users' behaviors are influenced by reflective and impulsive information processing systems; and that the equilibrium of these systems is determined, at least in part, by one's temptations. These results can serve as a basis for understanding the etiology of modern day addictions. PMID:27199834

  19. A Triadic Reflective-Impulsive-Interoceptive Awareness Model of General and Impulsive Information System Use: Behavioral Tests of Neuro-Cognitive Theory

    PubMed Central

    Turel, Ofir; Bechara, Antoine

    2016-01-01

    This study examines a behavioral tripartite model developed in the field of addiction, and applies it here to understanding general and impulsive information technology use. It suggests that technology use is driven by two information-processing brain systems: reflective and impulsive, and that their effects on use are modulated by interoceptive awareness processes. The resultant reflective-impulsive-interoceptive awareness model is tested in two behavioral studies. Both studies employ SEM techniques to time-lagged self-report data from n1 = 300 and n2 = 369 social networking site users. Study 1 demonstrated that temptations augment the effect of habit on technology use, and reduce the effect of satisfaction on use. Study 2 showed that temptations strengthen the effect of habit on impulsive technology use, and weaken the effect of behavioral expectations on impulsive technology use. Hence, the results consistently support the notion that information technology users' behaviors are influenced by reflective and impulsive information processing systems; and that the equilibrium of these systems is determined, at least in part, by one's temptations. These results can serve as a basis for understanding the etiology of modern day addictions. PMID:27199834

  20. Conversion of Impulse Voltage Generator Into Steep Wave Impulse Test-Equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Mohammed Zaid; Tanwar, Surender Singh; Dayama, Ravindra; Choudhary, Rahul Raj; Mangal, Ravindra

    This paper demonstrates the alternative measures to generate the Steep wave impulse by using Impulse Voltage Generator (IVG) for high voltage testing of porcelain insulators. The modification of IVG by incorporating compensation of resistor, inductor, and capacitor has been achieved and further performance of the modified system has been analyzed by applying the generated lightning impulse and analyzing the electrical characteristics of impulse waves under standard lightning and fast rise multiple lightning waveform to determine the effect to improve rise time. The advantageous results have been received and being reported such as increase in overshoot compensation, increase in capacitive and inductive load ranges. Such further reduces the duration of oscillations of standard impulse voltages. The reduction in oscillation duration of steep front impulse voltages may be utilized in up gradation of Impulse Voltage Generator System. Stray capacitance could further be added in order to get the minimized difference of measurement between simulation and the field establishment.

  1. Opto-acoustic cell permeation

    SciTech Connect

    Visuri, S R; Heredia, N

    2000-03-09

    Optically generated acoustic waves have been used to temporarily permeate biological cells. This technique may be useful for enhancing transfection of DNA into cells or enhancing the absorption of locally delivered drugs. A diode-pumped frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser operating at kHz repetition rates was used to produce a series of acoustic pulses. An acoustic wave was formed via thermoelastic expansion by depositing laser radiation into an absorbing dye. Generated pressures were measured with a PVDF hydrophone. The acoustic waves were transmitted to cultured and plated cells. The cell media contained a selection of normally- impermeable fluorescent-labeled dextran dyes. Following treatment with the opto-acoustic technique, cellular incorporation of dyes, up to 40,000 Molecular Weight, was noted. Control cells that did not receive opto-acoustic treatment had unremarkable dye incorporation. Uptake of dye was quantified via fluorescent microscopic analysis. Trypan Blue membrane exclusion assays and fluorescent labeling assays confirmed the vitality of cells following treatment. This method of enhanced drug delivery has the potential to dramatically reduce required drug dosages and associated side effects and enable revolutionary therapies.

  2. Acoustic agglomeration methods and apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, M. B. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    Methods are described for using acoustic energy to agglomerate fine particles on the order of one micron diameter that are suspended in gas, to provide agglomerates large enough for efficient removal by other techniques. The gas with suspended particles, is passed through the length of a chamber while acoustic energy at a resonant chamber mode is applied to set up one or more acoustic standing wave patterns that vibrate the suspended particles to bring them together so they agglomerate. Several widely different frequencies can be applied to efficiently vibrate particles of widely differing sizes. The standing wave pattern can be applied along directions transversed to the flow of the gas. The particles can be made to move in circles by applying acoustic energy in perpendicular directions with the energy in both directions being of the same wavelength but 90 deg out of phase.

  3. Leap and strike kinetics of an acoustically 'hunting' barn owl (Tyto alba).

    PubMed

    Usherwood, James R; Sparkes, Emily L; Weller, Renate

    2014-09-01

    Barn owls are effective hunters of small rodents. One hunting technique is a leap from the ground followed by a brief flight and a plummeting 'strike' onto an acoustically targeted - and potentially entirely hidden - prey. We used forceplate measurements to derive kinetics of the leap and strike. Leaping performance was similar to reported values for guinea fowl. This is likely achieved despite the owl's considerably smaller size because of its relatively long legs and use of wing upstroke. Strikes appear deliberately forceful: impulses could have been spread over larger periods during greater deflections of the centre of mass, as observed in leaping and an alighting landing measurement. The strike, despite forces around 150 times that of a mouse body weight, is not thought to be crucial to the kill; rather, forceful strikes may function primarily to enable rapid penetration of leaf litter or snow cover, allowing grasping of hidden prey. PMID:24948629

  4. Solar impulsive energetic electron events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Linghua

    The Sun is capable of accelerating ions from ~ tens of keV up to tens of GeV and electrons from ~ tens of eV up to hundreds of MeVs in transient events such as flares and fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs). The energized particles escaping into the interplanetary medium are referred to as Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) events. The great majority of SEP events are impulsive SEP events that are dominated by ~1-100 keV electrons and ~MeV/nucleon ion emissions, with enhanced 3 He/ 4 He ratios up to 10 4 times the coronal values (also called electron/ 3 He-rich SEP events). This thesis is focused on solar impulsive energetic electron events, the electron part of impulsive SEP events, using electron observations from the 3-D Plasma and Energetic Particle instrument (3DP) on the WIND spacecraft near the Earth. First, I present the first comprehensive statistical study of solar energetic electron events over almost one solar cycle. I find that the occurrence rate of solar electron events shows a strong solar-cycle variation; after correction for the background effect, the estimated occurrence frequency exhibits a good power-law distribution, and the estimated occurrence rate near the Earth is ~1000/year at solar maximum and ~30/year at solar minimum for the instrumental sensitivity (~2.9×10^-4 (cm 2 s str eV) -1 for the 40 keV channel) of WIND/3DP, about one order of magnitude larger than the observed occurrence rate. Solar energetic electron events have a one-to-one association with type III radio bursts and a poor association with flares, but a close association with 3 He- rich ion emissions. These 3 He-rich electron events also have a poor association with flares but a close (~ 60%) association with west-limb CMEs. Then I present two case studies: one investigating the temporal relationship between solar impulsive electrons and type III radio emissions, and the second studying the temporal relationship between solar impulsive electrons and 3 He- rich ions. For both

  5. Medical Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beach, Kirk; Dunmire, Barbrina

    Medical acoustics can be subdivided into diagnostics and therapy. Diagnostics are further separated into auditory and ultrasonic methods, and both employ low amplitudes. Therapy (excluding medical advice) uses ultrasound for heating, cooking, permeablizing, activating and fracturing tissues and structures within the body, usually at much higher amplitudes than in diagnostics. Because ultrasound is a wave, linear wave physics are generally applicable, but recently nonlinear effects have become more important, even in low-intensity diagnostic applications.

  6. Acoustic chaos

    SciTech Connect

    Lauterborn, W.; Parlitz, U.; Holzfuss, J.; Billo, A.; Akhatov, I.

    1996-06-01

    Acoustic cavitation, a complex, spatio-temporal dynamical system, is investigated with respect to its chaotic properties. The sound output, the {open_quote}{open_quote}noise{close_quote}{close_quote}, is subjected to time series analysis. The spatial dynamics of the bubble filaments is captured by high speed holographic cinematography and subsequent digital picture processing from the holograms. Theoretical models are put forward for describing the pattern formation. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  7. Scanning tomographic acoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hua

    2002-11-01

    This paper provides an overview of the design and development of the scanning tomographic acoustic microscopy (STAM). This research effort spans over a period of more than 12 years, which successfully elevated the acoustic microscopy from the traditional intensity-mapping mode to the level of holographic and tomographic imaging. The tomographic imaging capability of STAM was developed on the platform of the scanning laser acoustic microscope (SLAM), which operates in a coherent transmission mode with plane-wave illumination and scanning laser wavefield detection. The image formation techniques were based on the backward propagation method implemented in the plane-to-plane format. In this paper, the key elements of the design and development, including the modification of the data-acquisition hardware, implementation of image reconstruction algorithms for multiple-frequency and multiple-angle tomography, and the high-precision phase-correction and image registration techniques for the superposition of coherent sub-images, will be discussed. Results of full-scale experiments will also be included to demonstrate the capability of holographic and tomographic image formation in microscopic scale.

  8. Heavy ion fusion (HIF) impulse injector design, construction, and checkout

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, M. J., LLNL

    1998-05-04

    The following report describes the design, construction, and checkout of a high-voltage (HV) impulser built for the heavy ion fusion (HIF) project. The purpose of this impulser is to provide an adjustable diode voltage source of sufficient quality and level to allow the optimization of beam transport and accelerator sections of HIF. An elegant, low-impedance, high-energy storage capacitor circuit has been selected for this application. A retrofit to the diode region has been included to provide additional beam stability and a controlled rise time. The critical part of this circuit that is common to all candidates is the impedance matching component. The following report provides a description of the implemented circuit, the basic circuit variables for wave shaping, component screening techniques, resulting operating parameters, diode modifications, operating considerations, and fault protection.

  9. Acoustic emission from composite materials. [nondestructive tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Visconti, I. C.; Teti, R.

    1979-01-01

    The two basic areas where the acoustic emission (AE) technique can be applied are materials research and the evaluation of structural reliability. This experimental method leads to a better understanding of fracture mechanisms and is an NDT technique particularly well suited for the study of propagating cracks. Experiments are described in which acoustic emissions were unambiguously correlated with microstructural fracture mechanisms. The advantages and limitations of the AE technique are noted.

  10. Detection and localization using an acoustic array on a small robotic platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Stuart H.; Scanlon, Michael V.

    2003-09-01

    The future battlefield will require an unprecedented level of automation in which soldier-operated autonomous and semi-autonomous ground, air and sea platforms along with mounted and dismounted soldiers will function as a tightly coupled team. Sophisticated robotic platforms with diverse sensor suites will be an integral part of the Objective Force, and must be able to collaborate not only amongst themselves but also with their manned partners. The Army Research Laboratory has developed a robot-based acoustic detection system that will detect and localize on an impulsive noise event, such as a sniper's weapon firing. Additionally, acoustic sensor arrays worn on a soldier's helmet or equipment can enhance his situational awareness and RSTA capabilities. The Land Warrior or Objective Force Warrior body-worn computer can detect tactically significant impulsive signatures from bullets, mortars, artillery, and missiles or spectral signatures from tanks, helicopters, UAVs, and mobile robots. Time-difference-of-arrival techniques can determine a sound's direction of arrival, while head attitude sensors can instantly determine the helmet orientation at time of capture. With precision GPS location of the soldier, along with the locations of other soldiers, robots, or unattended ground sensors that heard the same event, triangulation techniques can produce an accurate location of the target. Data from C-4 explosions and 0.50-Caliber shots shows that both helmet and robot systems can localize on the same event. This provides an awesome capability - mobile robots and soldiers working together on an ever-changing battlespace to detect the enemy and improve the survivability, mobility, and lethality of our future warriors.

  11. Algebraic Approach to the Minimum-Cost Multi-Impulse Orbit-Transfer Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avendaño, M.; Martín-Molina, V.; Martín-Morales, J.; Ortigas-Galindo, J.

    2016-08-01

    We present a purely algebraic formulation (i.e. polynomial equations only) of the minimum-cost multi-impulse orbit transfer problem without time constraints, while keeping all the variables with a precise physical meaning. We apply general algebraic techniques to solve these equations (resultants, Gr\\"obner bases, etc.) in several situations of practical interest of different degrees of generality. For instance, we provide a proof of the optimality of the Hohmann transfer for the minimum fuel 2-impulse circular to circular orbit transfer problem, and we provide a general formula for the optimal 2-impulse in-plane transfer between two rotated elliptical orbits under a mild symmetry assumption on the two points where the impulses are applied (which we conjecture that can be removed).

  12. Maximization of the effective impulse delivered by a high-frequency/low-frequency planetary drill tool.

    PubMed

    Harkness, Patrick; Lucas, Margaret; Cardoni, Andrea

    2011-11-01

    Ultrasonic tools are used for a variety of cutting applications in surgery and the food industry, but when they are applied to harder materials, such as rock, their cutting performance declines because of the low effective impulse delivered by each vibration cycle. To overcome this problem, a technique known as high-frequency/low-frequency (or alternatively, ultrasonic/sonic) drilling is employed. In this approach, an ultrasonic step-horn is used to deliver an impulse to a free mass which subsequently moves toward a drilling bit, delivering the impulse on contact. The free mass then rebounds to complete the cycle. The horn has time between impacts to build significant vibration amplitude and thus delivers a much larger impulse to the free mass than could be delivered if it were applied directly to the target. To maximize the impulse delivered to the target by the cutting bit, both the momentum transfer from the ultrasonic horn to the free mass and the dynamics of the horn/free mass/cutting bit stack must be optimized. This paper uses finite element techniques to optimize the ultrasonic horns and numerical propagation of the stack dynamics to maximize the delivered effective impulse, validated in both cases by extensive experimental analysis. PMID:22083772

  13. Religiosity and Impulsivity in Mental Health

    PubMed Central

    Caribé, André C.; Rocha, Marlos Fernando Vasconcelos; Junior, Davi Félix Martins; Studart, Paula; Quarantini, Lucas C.; Guerreiro, Nicolau; Miranda-Scippa, Ângela

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Our aim is to evaluate the relationship between religiosity and impulsivity in patients with mental illness who had attempted suicide and in healthy individuals. This is a cross-sectional study that included 61 healthy individuals and 93 patients. The instruments used were a sociodemographic data questionnaire, the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview, the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale, and the Duke University Religion Index. The healthy individuals presented higher scores in the religiosity domains (organizational, p = 0.028; non-organizational, p = 0.000; intrinsic, p = 0.000). The patients presented higher scores in the impulsivity dimensions (attentional, p = 0.000; motor, p = 0.000; absence of planning, p = 0.000). In the patient group, intrinsic religiosity had a significant inverse relationship with total impulsivity (p = 0.023), attentional (p = 0.010), and absence of planning (p = 0.007), even after controlling for sociodemographic variables. Healthy individuals were more religious and less impulsive than patients. The relationship between religiosity, impulsiveness, and mental illness could be bidirectional; that is, just as mental illness might impair religious involvement, religiosity could diminish the expression of mental illness and impulsive behaviors. PMID:26020819

  14. Impulsive and non-impulsive suicide attempts in patients treated for alcohol dependence

    PubMed Central

    Wojnar, Marcin; Ilgen, Mark A.; Czyz, Ewa; Strobbe, Stephen; Klimkiewicz, Anna; Jakubczyk, Andrzej; Glass, Jennifer; Brower, Kirk J.

    2009-01-01

    Background Suicidal behavior has been recognized as an increasing problem among alcohol-dependent subjects. The aim of the study was to identify correlates of impulsive and non-impulsive suicide attempts among a treated population of alcohol-dependent patients. Methods A total of 154 patients with alcohol dependence consecutively admitted for addiction treatment participated in the study. Suicidal behavior was assessed together with severity of alcohol dependence, childhood abuse, impulsivity, and family history. A stop-signal procedure was used as a behavioral measure of impulsivity. Results and conclusions Lifetime suicide attempts were reported by 43% of patients in alcohol treatment; of which 62% were impulsive. Compared to patients without a suicide attempt, those with a non-impulsive attempt were more likely to have a history of sexual abuse (OR = 7.17), a family history of suicide (OR = 4.09), and higher scores on a personality measure of impulsiveness (OR = 2.27). The only significant factor that distinguished patients with impulsive suicide attempts from patients without a suicide attempt and from patients with a non-impulsive suicide attempt was a higher level of behavioral impulsivity (OR = 1.84 – 2.42). Limitations Retrospective self-report of suicide attempts and family history. Lack of diagnostic measure. PMID:18835498

  15. Acoustic detection of electron spin resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coufal, H.

    1981-07-01

    The ESR-signal of DPPH was recorded by detecting the modulation of the absorbed microwave power with a gas-coupled microphone. This photo-acoustic detection scheme is compared with conventional ESR-detection. Applications of the acoustical detection method to other modulation spectroscopic techniques, particularly NMR, are discussed.

  16. Norepinephrine and impulsivity: Effects of acute yohimbine

    PubMed Central

    Swann, Alan C.; Lijffijt, Marijn; Lane, Scott D.; Cox, Blake; Steinberg, Joel L.; Moeller, F. Gerard

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Rapid-response impulsivity, characterized by inability to withhold response to a stimulus until it is adequately appraised, is associated with risky behavior and may be increased in a state-dependent manner by norepinephrine. Objective We assessed effects of yohimbine, which increases norepinephrine release by blocking alpha-2 noradrenergic receptors, on plasma catecholamine metabolites, blood pressure, subjective symptoms, and laboratory-measured rapid-response impulsivity. Methods Subjects were twenty-three healthy controls recruited from the community, with normal physical examination and ECG, and negative history for hypertension, cardiovascular illness, and Axis I or II disorder. Blood pressure, pulse, and behavioral measures were obtained before and periodically after 0.4 mg/kg oral yohimbine or placebo in a randomized, counterbalanced design. Metabolites of norepinephrine (3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol, MHPG; vanillylmandelic acid, VMA) and dopamine (homovanillic acid, HVA) were measured by high pressure liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. Rapid-response impulsivity was measured by commission errors and reaction times on the Immediate Memory Task (IMT), a continuous performance test designed to measure impulsivity and attention. Results Yohimbine increased plasma MHPG and VMA but not HVA. Yohimbine increased systolic and diastolic blood pressure and pulse rate. On the IMT, yohimbine increased impulsive errors and impulsive response bias and accelerated reaction times. Yohimbine-associated increase in plasma MHPG correlated with increased impulsive response rates. Time courses varied; effects on blood pressure generally preceded those on metabolites and test performance. Conclusions These effects are consistent with increased rapid-response impulsivity after pharmacological noradrenergic stimulation in healthy controls. Labile noradrenergic responses, or increased sensitivity to norepinephrine, may increase risk for impulsive

  17. Material properties from acoustic radiation force step response

    PubMed Central

    Orescanin, Marko; Toohey, Kathleen S.; Insana, Michael F.

    2009-01-01

    An ultrasonic technique for estimating viscoelastic properties of hydrogels, including engineered biological tissues, is being developed. An acoustic radiation force is applied to deform the gel locally while Doppler pulses track the induced movement. The system efficiently couples radiation force to the medium through an embedded scattering sphere. A single-element, spherically-focused, circular piston element transmits a continuous-wave burst to suddenly apply and remove a radiation force to the sphere. Simultaneously, a linear array and spectral Doppler technique are applied to track the position of the sphere over time. The complex shear modulus of the gel was estimated by applying a harmonic oscillator model to measurements of time-varying sphere displacement. Assuming that the stress-strain response of the surrounding gel is linear, this model yields an impulse response function for the gel system that may be used to estimate material properties for other load functions. The method is designed to explore the force-frequency landscape of cell-matrix viscoelasticity. Reported measurements of the shear modulus of gelatin gels at two concentrations are in close agreement with independent rheometer measurements of the same gels. Accurate modulus measurements require that the rate of Doppler-pulse transmission be matched to a priori estimates of gel properties. PMID:19425636

  18. Psychosocial predictors of impulsivity in alcohol-dependent patients.

    PubMed

    Jakubczyk, Andrzej; Klimkiewicz, Anna; Mika, Katarzyna; Bugaj, Marcin; Konopa, Aleksandra; Podgórska, Anna; Brower, Kirk J; Wojnar, Marcin

    2013-01-01

    Impulsivity is an important risk factor of severe course of alcohol dependence. However, the significance of environmental determinants of impulsivity has been underestimated. The aim of this study was to identify psychosocial factors increasing the level of impulsivity in alcoholics. Levels of impulsivity were measured in 304 alcohol-dependent patients. The stop-signal task was used to assess behavioral impulsivity, and the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale, to measure global and cognitive impulsivity. Correlations between impulsivity and psychosocial variables were examined. A significant association between level of impulsivity and severity of psychopathological symptoms was observed. Patients who reported childhood sexual or physical abuse, lower social support, and more severe course of alcohol dependence were more impulsive, especially in the cognitive domain. When entered into a linear regression analysis model, severity of alcohol dependence, psychopathology, and childhood physical abuse remained significant. These results suggest that psychosocial variables are important factors associated with high levels of impulsivity in alcohol-dependent patients. PMID:23274294

  19. Application of an Aligned and Unaligned Signal Processing Technique to Investigate Tones and Broadband Noise in Fan and Contra-Rotating Open Rotor Acoustic Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, Jeffrey Hilton; Hultgren, Lennart S.

    2015-01-01

    The study of noise from a two-shaft contra-rotating open rotor (CROR) is challenging since the shafts are not phase locked in most cases. Consequently, phase averaging of the acoustic data keyed to a single shaft rotation speed is not meaningful. An unaligned spectrum procedure that was developed to estimate a signal coherence threshold and reveal concealed spectral lines in turbofan engine combustion noise is applied to fan and CROR acoustic data in this paper (also available as NASA/TM-2015-218865). The NASA Advanced Air Vehicles Program, Advanced Air Transport Technology Project, Aircraft Noise Reduction Subproject supported the current work. The fan and open rotor data were obtained under previous efforts supported by the NASA Quiet Aircraft Technology (QAT) Project and the NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Project of the Integrated Systems Research Program in collaboration with GE Aviation, respectively. The overarching goal of the Advanced Air Transport (AATT) Project is to explore and develop technologies and concepts to revolutionize the energy efficiency and environmental compatibility of fixed wing transport aircrafts. These technological solutions are critical in reducing the impact of aviation on the environment even as this industry and the corresponding global transportation system continue to grow.

  20. [Improvement in the objective diagnosis of hearing disorders by a new technique of simultaneous recording of acoustic and electrical responses of the auditory system].

    PubMed

    Hoth, S

    1999-10-01

    The measurements of transitory evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAE) and auditory brainstem responses (ABR) are widely used in objective audiometry for the diagnosis of conductive or sensorineural hearing losses. In some cases only one of these signals is required for a complete diagnosis, while other cases may require both methods to define findings. With conventional equipment the measurement of TEOAE and ABR is performed with different devices at different times. Devices for simultaneous recording of both signals are currently not available or described, although the physiological circumstances and apparatus requirements would favor such an approach. In the present work a prototype for the simultaneous measurement of TEOAE and ABR is presented and its application tested in 33 normal-hearing adults. The equipment used was based on a general purpose laboratory computer connected to an acoustic stimulator and a dual-channel data acquisition system. Stimuli were composed of click sequences for the cancellation of linear signal components and were presented by an ear canal probe (Otodynamics) which also picked up the microphone signal within the outer ear canal. The EEG activity containing the ABR was recorded through surface electrodes fixed at the patient's vertex and mastoid. Acoustic and electric signals were processed simultaneously, resulting in three independent records representing a non-linear TEOAE and the low and high level ABR. The main advantages of the new approach are an improvement in information output and enhancement in the accuracy of determining the site and extent of a hearing impairment. PMID:10550373