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Sample records for acoustic landmine detection

  1. CFAR detection algorithm for acoustic-seismic landmine detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matalkah, Ghaith M.; Matalgah, Mustafa M.; Sabatier, James M.

    2007-04-01

    Automating the detection process in acoustic-seismic landmine detection speeds up the detection process and eliminates the need for a human operator in the minefield. Previous automatic detection algorithms for acoustic landmine detection showed excellent results for detecting landmines in various environments. However, these algorithms use environment-specific noise-removal procedures that rely on training sets acquired over mine-free areas. In this work, we derive a new detection algorithm that adapts to varying conditions and employs environment-independent techniques. The algorithm is based on the generalized likelihood ratio (GLR) test and asymptotically achieves a constant false alarm rate (CFAR). The algorithm processes the magnitude and phase of the vibrational velocity and shows satisfying results of detecting landmines in gravel and dirt lanes.

  2. Linear and Nonlinear Acoustic Measurements of Buried Landmines: Detection Schemes Near Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabatier, James M.

    2003-03-01

    Measurements of the acoustic impedance of an anti-personnel and anti-tank plastic, blast-hardened landmines reveal resonances in the frequency range between 100 and 1000 Hz. The top surface resonances are due to its complicated mechanical structure vibrating in air. The lowest mode results from the blast hardened design of the landmine. Typically, a portion or cavity of the landmine is designed to absorb the shock from an explosion that is intended to detonate the landmine but still allow the landmine to trigger its explosive device when a slow steady pressure is applied. The mechanical design of the blast hardened aspects results in a high Q simple harmonic oscillator resonance of the top surface. At higher frequencies the top surface behaves like thin circular plate acoustic modes. When these landmines are buried in soils, the modes are mass loaded. Resonances from measurements of the normal component of the acoustically induced soil surface particle velocity are used for detection schemes. Since the interface between the top plate and the soil responds to pressure fluctuations nonlinearly, characteristics of landmines, the soil, and the interface are rich in nonlinear physics and allow for new methods of landmine detection not previously exploited.

  3. An experimental study on antipersonnel landmine detection using acoustic-to-seismic coupling.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Ning; Sabatier, James M

    2003-03-01

    An acoustic-to-seismic system to detect buried antipersonnel mines exploits airborne acoustic waves penetrating the surface of the ground. Acoustic waves radiating from a sound source above the ground excite Biot type I and II compressional waves in the porous soil. The type I wave and type II waves refract toward the normal and cause air and soil particle motion. If a landmine is buried below the surface of the insonified area, these waves are scattered or reflected by the target, resulting in distinct changes to the acoustically coupled ground motion. A scanning laser Doppler vibrometer measures the motion of the ground surface. In the past, this technique has been employed with remarkable success in locating antitank mines during blind field tests [Sabatier and Xiang, IEEE Trans. Geosci. Remote Sens. 39, 1146-1154 (2001)]. The humanitarian demining mission requires an ability to locate antipersonnel mines, requiring a surmounting of additional challenges due to a plethora of shapes and smaller sizes. This paper describes an experimental study on the methods used to locate antipersonnel landmines in recent field measurements. PMID:12656368

  4. An experimental study on antipersonnel landmine detection using acoustic-to-seismic coupling.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Ning; Sabatier, James M

    2003-03-01

    An acoustic-to-seismic system to detect buried antipersonnel mines exploits airborne acoustic waves penetrating the surface of the ground. Acoustic waves radiating from a sound source above the ground excite Biot type I and II compressional waves in the porous soil. The type I wave and type II waves refract toward the normal and cause air and soil particle motion. If a landmine is buried below the surface of the insonified area, these waves are scattered or reflected by the target, resulting in distinct changes to the acoustically coupled ground motion. A scanning laser Doppler vibrometer measures the motion of the ground surface. In the past, this technique has been employed with remarkable success in locating antitank mines during blind field tests [Sabatier and Xiang, IEEE Trans. Geosci. Remote Sens. 39, 1146-1154 (2001)]. The humanitarian demining mission requires an ability to locate antipersonnel mines, requiring a surmounting of additional challenges due to a plethora of shapes and smaller sizes. This paper describes an experimental study on the methods used to locate antipersonnel landmines in recent field measurements.

  5. Canadian landmine detection research program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFee, John E.; Das, Yogadhish; Faust, Anthony A.

    2003-09-01

    Defence R&D Canada (DRDC), an agency within the Department of National Defence, has been conducting research and development (R&D) on the detection of landmines for countermine operations and of unexploded ordnance (UXO) for range clearance since 1975. The Canadian Centre for Mine Action Technologies (CCMAT), located at DRDC Suffield, was formed in 1998 to carry out R&D related to humanitarian demining. The lead group responsible for formulating and executing both countermine and humanitarian R&D programs in detection is the Threat Detection Group at DRDC Suffield. This paper describes R&D for both programs under the major headings of remote minefield detection, close-in scanning detection, confirmation detection and teleoperated systems. Among DRDC's achievements in landmine and UXO detection R&D are pioneering work in electromagnetic and magnetic identification and classification; the first military-fielded multisensor, teleoperated vehicle-mounted landmine detection system; pioneering use of confirmation detectors for multisensor landmine detection systems; the first fielded thermal neutron activation landmine confirmation sensor; the first detection of landmines using a real-time hyperspectral imager; electrical impedance imaging detection of landmines and UXO and a unique neutron backscatter landmine imager.

  6. Wideband nonlinear time reversal seismo-acoustic method for landmine detection.

    PubMed

    Sutin, Alexander; Libbey, Brad; Fillinger, Laurent; Sarvazyan, Armen

    2009-04-01

    Acoustic and seismic waves provide a method to localize compliant mines by vibrating the top plate and a thin soil layer above the mine. This vibration is mostly linear, but also includes a small nonlinear deviation. The main goal of this paper is to introduce a method of processing that uses phase-inversion to observe nonlinear effects in a wide frequency band. The method extracts a nonlinear part of surface velocity from two similar broadcast signals of opposite sign by summing and cancelling the linear components and leaving the nonlinear components. This phase-inversion method is combined with time reversal focusing to provide increased seismic vibration and enhance the nonlinear effect. The experiments used six loudspeakers in a wood box placed over sand in which inert landmines were buried. The nonlinear surface velocity of the sand with a mine compared to the sand without a mine was greater as compared to a linear technique. PMID:19354365

  7. Landmine detection technology research in the Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schleijpen, H. M. A.

    2003-09-01

    This paper gives an overview of the activities on research and development in the technology area for landmine detection in the Netherlands. The main players, their projects and the long term and short term project goals are presented. The projects cover the range from military applications to humanitarian demining. In the "conventional" detection systems area the activities on Metal detection, Ground Penetrating Radar and Thermal Infrared are covered. Signal processing and Sensor fusion are key activities in this area and examples of these activities are shown as well. The focus for these techniques is on vehicle mounted and airborne multi-sensor systems. The activities are supported by more fundamental modeling of the interaction of sensors with the landmines and especially the effects of the environment of the mines on this interaction. In the area of more future oriented techniques the following techniques are discussed: forward looking Polarised Infrared for moving platforms, Neutron Backscattering techniques and Laser Vibrometry for acoustic detection.

  8. Nonlinear acoustic landmine detection: comparison of off-target soil background and on-target soil-mine nonlinear effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korman, Murray S.; Sabatier, James M.; Pauls, Kathleen E.; Genis, Sean A.

    2006-05-01

    When airborne sound at two primary tones, f I, f II (closely spaced near a resonance) excites the soil surface over a buried landmine, soil wave motion interacts with the landmine generating a scattered surface profile which can be measured over the "target." Profiles at the primaries f I, f II, and nonlinearly generated combination frequencies f I-(f II-f I) and f II+(f II-f I) , 2f I-(f II-f I), f I+f II and 2f II+(f II-f I) (among others) have been measured for a VS 2.2 plastic, inert, anti-tank landmine, buried at 3.6 cm in sifted loess soil and in a gravel road bed. [M.S. Korman and J.M. Sabatier, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 116, 3354-3369 (2004)]. It is observed that the "on target" to "off target" contrast ratio for the sum frequency component can be ~20 dB higher than for either primary. The vibration interaction between the top-plate interface of a buried plastic landmine and the soil above it appears to exhibit many characteristics of the mesoscopic/nanoscale nonlinear effects that are observed in geomaterials like sandstone. Near resonance, the bending (softening) of a family of increasing amplitude tuning curves, involving the vibration over the landmine, exhibits a linear relationship between the peak particle velocity and corresponding frequency. Tuning curve experiments are performed both on and off the mine in an effort to understand the nonlinearities in each case.

  9. Visual cues for landmine detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staszewski, James J.; Davison, Alan D.; Tischuk, Julia A.; Dippel, David J.

    2007-04-01

    Can human vision supplement the information that handheld landmine detection equipment provides its operators to increase detection rates and reduce the hazard of the task? Contradictory viewpoints exist regarding the viability of visual detection of landmines. Assuming both positions are credible, this work aims to reconcile them by exploring the visual information produced by landmine burial and how any visible signatures change as a function of time in a natural environment. Its objective is to acquire objective, foundational knowledge on which training could be based and subsequently evaluated. A representative set of demilitarized landmines were buried at a field site with bare soil and vegetated surfaces using doctrinal procedures. High resolution photographs of the ground surface were taken for approximately one month starting in April 2006. Photos taken immediately after burial show clearly visible surface signatures. Their features change with time and weather exposure, but the patterns they define persist, as photos taken a month later show. An analysis exploiting the perceptual sensitivity of expert observers showed signature photos to domain experts with instructions to identify the cues and patterns that defined the signatures. Analysis of experts' verbal descriptions identified a small set of easily communicable cues that characterize signatures and their changes over the duration of observation. Findings suggest that visual detection training is viable and has potential to enhance detection capabilities. The photos and descriptions generated offer materials for designing such training and testing its utility. Plans for investigating the generality of the findings, especially potential limiting conditions, are discussed.

  10. Thermal systems for landmine detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Angelo, Marco; Del Vecchio, Luca; Esposito, Salvatore; Balsi, Marco; Jankowski, Stanislaw

    2009-06-01

    This paper presents new techniques of landmine detection and localization using thermal methods. Described methods use both dynamical and static analysis. The work is based on datasets obtained from the Humanitarian Demining Laboratory of Università La Sapienza di Roma, Italy.

  11. A Comparative Study of Landmine Detection Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasban, H.; Zahran, O.; Elaraby, Sayed M.; El-Kordy, M.; Abd El-Samie, F. E.

    2010-09-01

    Several countries suffer from the existence of millions of buried landmines in their territories. These landmines have indefinite life, and may still cause horrific personal injuries and economic dislocation for decades after a war has finished. Therefore, there is a growing demand by these countries for reliable landmine inspection systems. There are several landmine detection techniques that can be used for this purpose. Each technique is suitable for detection under some conditions depending on the type of the landmine case, the explosive material, and the soil. This paper presents an overview of some of the existing landmine detection techniques. These techniques are briefly described and their merits and drawbacks are highlighted and compared. The purpose of this comparison is to shows the ideal conditions and the challenges for each technique. Furthermore, a comparison between landmine detection techniques from the points of view of cost, complexity, speed, safety, false alarm rate and effect of environmental conditions is presented.

  12. Sensor management for landmine detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marble, Jay A.; Hero, Alfred O.; Yagle, Andrew E.

    2005-06-01

    A method known as active sensing is applied to the problem of landmine detection. The platform utilizes two scanning sensor arrays composed of ground penetrating radar (GPR) and electromagnetic induction (EMI) metal detectors. Six simulated confirmation sensors are then dynamically deployed according to their ability to enhance information gain. Objects of interest are divided into ten class types: three classes are for metal landmines, three classes for plastic landmines, three classes for clutter objects, and one final class for background clutter. During the initial scan mode, a uniform probability is assumed for the ten classes. The scanning measurement assigns an updated probability based on the observations of the scanning sensors. At this point a confirmation sensor is chosen to re-interrogate the object. The confirmation sensor used is the one expected to produce the maximum information gain. A measure of entropy called the Renyi divergence is applied to the class probabilities to predict the information gain for each sensor. A time monitoring extension to the approach keeps track of time, and chooses the confirmation sensor based on a combination of maximum information gain and fastest processing time. Confusion matrices are presented for the scanning sensors showing the initial classification capability. Subsequent confusion matrices show the classification performance after applying active sensing myopically and with the time monitoring extension.

  13. Electrodynamic soil plate oscillator: Modeling nonlinear mesoscopic elastic behavior and hysteresis in nonlinear acoustic landmine detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korman, M. S.; Duong, D. V.; Kalsbeck, A. E.

    2015-10-01

    An apparatus (SPO), designed to study flexural vibrations of a soil loaded plate, consists of a thin circular elastic clamped plate (and cylindrical wall) supporting a vertical soil column. A small magnet attached to the center of the plate is driven by a rigid AC coil (located coaxially below the plate) to complete the electrodynamic soil plate oscillator SPO design. The frequency dependent mechanical impedance Zmech (force / particle velocity, at the plate's center) is inversely proportional to the electrical motional impedance Zmot. Measurements of Zmot are made using the complex output to input response of a Wheatstone bridge that has an identical coil element in one of its legs. Near resonance, measurements of Zmot (with no soil) before and after a slight point mass loading at the center help determine effective mass, spring, damping and coupling constant parameters of the system. "Tuning curve" behavior of real{ Zmot } and imaginary{ Zmot } at successively higher vibration amplitudes of dry sifted masonry sand are measured. They exhibit a decrease "softening" in resonance frequency along with a decrease in the quality Q factor. In soil surface vibration measurements a bilinear hysteresis model predicts the tuning curve shape for this nonlinear mesoscopic elastic SPO behavior - which also models the soil vibration over an actual plastic "inert" VS 1.6 buried landmine. Experiments are performed where a buried 1m cube concrete block supports a 12 inch deep by 30 inch by 30 inch concrete soil box for burying a VS 1.6 in dry sifted masonry sand for on-the-mine and off-the-mine soil vibration experiments. The backbone curve (a plot of the peak amplitude vs. corresponding resonant frequency from a family of tuning curves) exhibits mostly linear behavior for "on target" soil surface vibration measurements of the buried VS 1.6 or drum-like mine simulants for relatively low particle velocities of the soil. Backbone curves for "on target" measurements exhibit

  14. Bioreporter bacteria for landmine detection

    SciTech Connect

    Burlage, R.S.; Youngblood, T.; Lamothe, D.

    1998-04-01

    Landmines (and other UXO) gradually leak explosive chemicals into the soil at significant concentrations. Bacteria, which have adapted to scavenge low concentrations of nutrients, can detect these explosive chemicals. Uptake of these chemicals results in the triggering of specific bacterial genes. The authors have created genetically recombinant bioreporter bacteria that detect small concentrations of energetic chemicals. These bacteria are genetically engineered to produce a bioluminescent signal when they contact specific explosives. A gene for a brightly fluorescent compound can be substituted for increased sensitivity. By finding the fluorescent bacteria, you find the landmine. Detection might be accomplished using stand-off illumination of the minefield and GPS technology, which would result in greatly reduced risk to the deminers. Bioreporter technology has been proven at the laboratory scale, and will be tested under field conditions in the near future. They have created a bacterial strain that detects sub-micromolar concentrations of o- and p-nitrotoluene. Related bacterial strains were produced using standard laboratory protocols, and bioreporters of dinitrotoluene and trinitrotoluene were produced, screening for activity with the explosive compounds. Response time is dependent on the growth rate of the bacteria. Although frill signal production may require several hours, the bacteria can be applied over vast areas and scanned quickly, producing an equivalent detection speed that is very fast. This technology may be applicable to other needs, such as locating buried explosives at military and ordnance/explosive manufacturing facilities.

  15. LIBS for landmine detection and discrimination.

    PubMed

    Harmon, Russell S; DeLucia, Frank C; LaPointe, Aaron; Winkel, Raymond J; Miziolek, Andrzej W

    2006-07-01

    The concept of utilizing laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technology for landmine detection and discrimination has been evaluated using both laboratory LIBS and a prototype man-portable LIBS systems. LIBS spectra were collected for a suite of landmine casings, non-mine plastic materials, and "clutter-type" objects likely to be present in the soil of a conflict area or a former conflict area. Landmine casings examined included a broad selection of anti-personnel and anti-tank mines from different countries of manufacture. Other materials analyzed included rocks and soil, metal objects, cellulose materials, and different types of plastics. Two "blind" laboratory tests were conducted in which 100 broadband LIBS spectra were obtained for a mixed suite of landmine casings and clutter objects and compared with a previously-assembled spectral reference library. Using a linear correlation approach, "mine/no mine" determinations were correctly made for more than 90% of the samples in both tests. A similar test using a prototype man-portable LIBS system yielded an analogous result, validating the concept of using LIBS for landmine detection and discrimination. PMID:16724215

  16. Enhanced Landmine Detection from Low Resolution IR Image Sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tiesheng; Gu, Irene Yu-Hua; Tjahjadi, Tardi

    We deal with the problem of landmine field detection using low-resolution infrared (IR) image sequences measured from airborne or vehicle-borne passive IR cameras. The proposed scheme contains two parts: a) employ a multi-scale detector, i.e., a special type of isotropic bandpass filters, to detect landmine candidates in each frame; b) enhance landmine detection through seeking maximum consensus of corresponding landmine candidates over image frames. Experiments were conducted on several IR image sequences measured from airborne and vehicle-borne cameras, where some results are included. As shown in our experiments, the landmine signatures have been significantly enhanced using the proposed scheme, and automatic detection results are reasonably good. These methods can therefore be applied to assisting humanitarian demining work for landmine field detection.

  17. Progress in LIBS for landmine detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottfried, Jennifer L.; Harmon, Russell S.; La Pointe, Aaron

    2009-05-01

    The ability to interrogate objects buried in soil and ascertain their chemical composition in-situ would be an important capability enhancement for both military and humanitarian demining. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is a simple spark spectrochemical technique using a pulsed laser. Recent developments in broadband and man-portable LIBS provide the capability for the real-time detection at very high sensitivity of all elements in any target material because all chemical elements emit in the 200-940 nm spectral region. This technological advance offers a unique potential for the development of a rugged and reliable man-portable or robot-deployable chemical sensor that would be capable of both in-situ point probing and chemical sensing for landmine detection. Broadband LIBS data was acquired under laboratory conditions for more than a dozen different types of anti-personnel and anti-tank landmine casings from four countries plus a set of antitank landmine simulants. Subsequently, a statistical classification technique (partial least squares discriminant analysis, PLS-DA) was used to discriminate landmine casings from the simulants and to assign "unknown" spectra to a mine type based upon a library classification approach. Overall, a correct classification success of 99.0% was achieved, with a misclassification rate of only 1.8%. This performance illustrates the potential that LIBS has to be developed into a field-deployable device that could be utilized as a confirmatory sensor in landmine detection. The operational concept envisioned is a small LIBS system that is either man-portable or robot-deployed in which a micro-laser is contained in the handle of a deminer's probe, with laser light delivered and collected through an optical fiber in the tapered tip of the probe. In such a configuration, chemical analysis could be readily accomplished by LIBS after touching the buried object that one is interested in identifying and using real-time statistical

  18. Contribution of 3-D electrical resistivity tomography for landmines detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metwaly, M.; El-Qady, G.; Matsushima, J.; Szalai, S.; Al-Arifi, N. S. N.; Taha, A.

    2008-12-01

    Landmines are a type of inexpensive weapons widely used in the pre-conflicted areas in many countries worldwide. The two main types are the metallic and non-metallic (mostly plastic) landmines. They are most commonly investigated by magnetic, ground penetrating radar (GPR), and metal detector (MD) techniques. These geophysical techniques however have significant limitations in resolving the non-metallic landmines and wherever the host materials are conductive. In this work, the 3-D electric resistivity tomography (ERT) technique is evaluated as an alternative and/or confirmation detection system for both landmine types, which are buried in different soil conditions and at different depths. This can be achieved using the capacitive resistivity imaging system, which does not need direct contact with the ground surface. Synthetic models for each case have been introduced using metallic and non-metallic bodies buried in wet and dry environments. The inversion results using the L1 norm least-squares optimization method tend to produce robust blocky models of the landmine body. The dipole axial and the dipole equatorial arrays tend to have the most favorable geometry by applying dynamic capacitive electrode and they show significant signal strength for data sets with up to 5% noise. Increasing the burial depth relative to the electrode spacing as well as the noise percentage in the resistivity data is crucial in resolving the landmines at different environments. The landmine with dimension and burial depth of one electrode separation unit is over estimated while the spatial resolutions decrease as the burial depth and noise percentage increase.

  19. Controlled biological and biomimetic systems for landmine detection.

    PubMed

    Habib, Maki K

    2007-08-30

    Humanitarian demining requires to accurately detect, locate and deactivate every single landmine and other buried mine-like objects as safely and as quickly as possible, and in the most non-invasive manner. The quality of landmine detection affects directly the efficiency and safety of this process. Most of the available methods to detect explosives and landmines are limited by their sensitivity and/or operational complexities. All landmines leak with time small amounts of their explosives that can be found on surrounding ground and plant life. Hence, explosive signatures represent the robust primary indicator of landmines. Accordingly, developing innovative technologies and efficient techniques to identify in real-time explosives residue in mined areas represents an attractive and promising approach. Biological and biologically inspired detection technology has the potential to compete with or be used in conjunction with other artificial technology to complement performance strengths. Biological systems are sensitive to many different scents concurrently, a property that has proven difficult to replicate artificially. Understanding biological systems presents unique opportunities for developing new capabilities through direct use of trained bio-systems, integration of living and non-living components, or inspiring new design by mimicking biological capabilities. It is expected that controlled bio-systems, biotechnology and microbial techniques will contribute to the advancement of mine detection and other application domains. This paper provides directions, evaluation and analysis on the progress of controlled biological and biomimetic systems for landmine detection. It introduces and discusses different approaches developed, underlining their relative advantages and limitations, and highlighting trends, safety and ecology concern, and possible future directions. PMID:17662594

  20. Using Giant African Pouched Rats ("Cricetomys Gambianus") to Detect Landmines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poling, Alan; Weetjens, Bart J.; Cox, Christophe; Beyene, Negussie W.; Sully, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Within the past decade, giant pouched rats have been used successfully to detect landmines. This manuscript summarizes how these rats are trained and used operationally. The information provided is intended to be of practical value toward strengthening best practices in using "Cricetomys" for humanitarian purposes while simultaneously ensuring the…

  1. Testing of a locating discriminating metal detector for landmine detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, Nigel; Hawkins, Mark; Beech, Richard

    2006-05-01

    Conventional metal detectors are established and trusted tools for landmine detection, but their inability to precisely locate a target and discriminate mines from clutter leads to a high false alarm rate and slow rate of progress. This paper reports on developments to the Marmot advanced metal detector, which uses an array of coils to precisely locate a metal target in three dimensions and identify it. Recent developments allow the detector to calculate the magnetic polarizability tensor of a metal object. The magnetic polarizability tensor is unique to a particular target, and is a property of the metal's shape, size, conductivity, permeability and orientation. The eigenvalues of the magnetic polarizability tensor are compared to a library of values in the detector's software, representing common types of mine and clutter. In this way, Marmot can often quickly identify a detected object as a type of mine or a piece of clutter. This identification is independent of the target's orientation and, within limits, its position relative to the search head, thus providing the potential for a target recognition facility. This paper presents the results of tests to determine Marmot's ability to detect, precisely locate and identify common landmines. Tests have been conducted in air and in several types of soil. The instrument is a first step in developing the concept for landmine clearance. Issues for further investigation have been identified, including use of the instrument for identifying high metal content landmines, application of the soil rejection function and signal to noise issues.

  2. Explosives and landmine detection using an artificial olfactory system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Joel E.; Waggoner, L. Paul; Kauer, John S.

    2004-09-01

    We are developing a portable, artificial olfactory system based on multiple attributes of the sense of smell to identify air-borne odors, including those associated with buried landmines. Brief (1-2 sec) air samples are drawn over an array of optically-interrogated, cross-reactive chemical sensors. These consist of polymers with high sensitivity and relatively narrow specificity for nitroaromatics (Timothy Swager, MIT), as well as those with broader responses, thus permitting discrimination among substances that may be confused for nitroaromatics. Biologically-based pattern matching algorithms automatically identify odors as one of several to which the device has been trained. In discrimination tests, after training to one concentration of 6 odors, the device gave 95% correct identification when tested at the original plus three different concentrations. Thus, as required in real world applications, the device can identify odors at multiple concentrations without explicitly training on each. In sensitivity tests, the device showed 100% detection and no false alarms for the landmine-related compound DNT at concentrations as low as 500 pp-trillion (quantified by GC/MS) - 10 times lower than average canine behavioral thresholds. To investigate landmine detection capabilities, field studies were conducted at Ft. Leonard Wood, MO. In calibration tests, signals from buried PMA1A anti-personnel landmines were clearly discriminated from background. In a limited 9 site "blind" test, PMA1A detection was 100% with false alarms of 40%. Although requiring further development, these data indicate that a device with appropriate sensors and exploiting olfactory principles can detect and discriminate low concentration vapor signatures, including those of buried landmines.

  3. Detection of landmines using ground-penetrating radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoubir, Abdelhak M.; Iskander, D. R.; Chant, Ian J.; Carevic, Dragana

    1999-08-01

    The detection of anti-personnel landmines is very difficult due to the minimal content of metal in their structure, and thus, the inability to detect them with a metal detector. A promising alternative to metal detector technology is given by GPR systems. These have the potential to detect low- and non-metallic landmines and can be used to classify the targets. We propose two methods based on the bootstrap to detect changes in backscattering echoes. The first approach is parametric in which each signal is modelled by an AM-FM signal. The difference in the phase of the signal suggest possible existence of a target. The second approach is nonparametric where the existence of a target is indicated by the change in the average signal power. We apply the methods to real GPR data.

  4. LANDMARC - making land-mine detection and removal practical

    SciTech Connect

    Stull, S.

    1997-11-01

    While diplomats work to restrict the manufacture, sale, and use of land mines worldwide, a massive cleanup effort is needed to find and destroy the estimated 100 million land mines still buried in 65 countries. Land mines left behind from wars worldwide are one of the century`s main unsolved problems of war and remain the focus of humanitarian mine detection and removal primarily in Europe, Africa, Asia, and Central and South America. A combination of technologies from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is being directed toward the most daunting challenge presented by land mines - quickly determining the location of each individual land mine in an area so all of them can be removed. The Laboratory`s patented micropower impulse radar and advanced imaging technologies are being combined in a practical system called the Land-Mine Detection Advanced Radar Concept, or LANDMARC, that is making pivotal advances in meeting the challenge of land-mine detection.

  5. Nonlinear processing of radar data for landmine detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartosz, Elizabeth E.; DeJong, Keith; Duvoisin, Herbert A.; Solomon, Geoff Z.; Steinway, William J.; Warren, Albert

    2004-09-01

    Outstanding landmine detection has been achieved by the Handheld Standoff Mine Detection System (HSTAMIDS system) in government-run field tests. The use of anomaly detection using principal component analysis (PCA) on the return of ground penetrating radar (GPR) coupled with metal detection is the key to the success of the HSTAMIDS-like system algorithms. Indications of nonlinearities and asymmetries in Humanitarian Demining (HD) data point to modifications to the current PCA algorithm that might prove beneficial. Asymmetries in the distribution of PCA projections of field data have been quantified in Humanitarian Demining (HD) data. An initial correction for the observed asymmetries has improved the False Alarm Rate (FAR) on this data.

  6. Automated calibration methods for robotic multisensor landmine detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keranen, Joe G.; Miller, Jonathan; Schultz, Gregory; Topolosky, Zeke

    2007-04-01

    Both force protection and humanitarian demining missions require efficient and reliable detection and discrimination of buried anti-tank and anti-personnel landmines. Widely varying surface and subsurface conditions, mine types and placement, as well as environmental regimes challenge the robustness of the automatic target recognition process. In this paper we present applications created for the U.S. Army Nemesis detection platform. Nemesis is an unmanned rubber-tracked vehicle-based system designed to eradicate a wide variety of anti-tank and anti-personnel landmines for humanitarian demining missions. The detection system integrates advanced ground penetrating synthetic aperture radar (GPSAR) and electromagnetic induction (EMI) arrays, highly accurate global and local positioning, and on-board target detection/classification software on the front loader of a semi-autonomous UGV. An automated procedure is developed to estimate the soil's dielectric constant using surface reflections from the ground penetrating radar. The results have implications not only for calibration of system data acquisition parameters, but also for user awareness and tuning of automatic target recognition detection and discrimination algorithms.

  7. A militarily fielded thermal neutron activation sensor for landmine detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clifford, E. T. H.; McFee, J. E.; Ing, H.; Andrews, H. R.; Tennant, D.; Harper, E.; Faust, A. A.

    2007-08-01

    The Canadian Department of National Defence has developed a teleoperated, vehicle-mounted, multi-sensor system to detect anti-tank landmines on roads and tracks in peacekeeping operations. A key part of the system is a thermal neutron activation (TNA) sensor which is placed above a suspect location to within a 30 cm radius and confirms the presence of explosives via detection of the 10.835 MeV gamma ray associated with thermal neutron capture on 14N. The TNA uses a 100 μg252Cf neutron source surrounded by four 7.62 cm×7.62 cm NaI(Tl) detectors. The system, consisting of the TNA sensor head, including source, detectors and shielding, the high-rate, fast pulse processing electronics and the data processing methodology are described. Results of experiments to characterize detection performance are also described. The experiments have shown that anti-tank mines buried 10 cm or less can be detected in roughly a minute or less, but deeper mines and mines significantly displaced horizontally take considerably longer time. Mines as deep as 30 cm can be detected for long count times (1000 s). Four TNA detectors are now in service with the Canadian Forces as part of the four multi-sensor systems, making it the first militarily fielded TNA sensor and the first militarily fielded confirmation sensor for landmines. The ability to function well in adverse climatic conditions has been demonstrated, both in trials and operations.

  8. Sensor fusion for hand-held multisensor landmine detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Sanjeev; Chander, Venkat S.; Palit, Partha P.; Stanley, Joe; Mitchell, O. Robert

    2001-10-01

    Sensor fusion issues in a streamlined assimilation of multi-sensor information for landmine detection are discussed. In particular multi-sensor fusion in hand-held landmine detection system with ground penetrating radar (GPR) and metal detector sensors is investigated. The fusion architecture consists of feature extraction for individual sensors followed by a feed-forward neural network training to learn the feature space representation of the mine/no-mine classification. A correlation feature from GPR, and slope and energy feature from metal detector are used for discrimination. Various fusion strategies are discussed and results compared against each other and against individual sensors using ROC curves for the available multi-sensor data. Both feature level and decision level fusion have been investigated. Simple decision level fusion scheme based on Dempster-Shafer evidence accumulation, soft AND, MIN and MAX are compared. Feature level fusion using neural network training is shown to provide best results. However comparable performance is achieved using decision level sensor fusion based on Dempster-Shafer accumulation. It is noted that, the above simple feed-forward fusion scheme lacks a means to verify detections after a decision has been made. New detection algorithms that are more than anomaly detectors are needed. Preliminary results with features based on independent component analysis (ICA) show promising results towards this end.

  9. Investigation of microphones as near-ground sensors for seismic detection of buried landmines.

    PubMed

    Larson, Gregg D; Martin, James S; Scott, Waymond R

    2007-07-01

    Commercially available microphones were investigated as near-ground sensors to measure the acoustic pressure and the vertical pressure gradient of evanescent air-acoustic waves associated with audio-frequency seismic waves. Measurements in close proximity to the surface and the use of waveguides were found to improve the microphone signal's quality, the comparison of its seismic sensitivity to its sensitivity to propagating sound (ambient acoustic noise and nonseismic reverberation). Landmine images formed using microphone data collected in a laboratory experimental model clearly locate buried inert landmines but exhibit more clutter than images of the same objects formed with seismic displacement data collected using other techniques.

  10. Kalman detection of landmines in metal detector array data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abeynayake, Canicious G.; Chant, Ian J.; Nash, Graeme

    2003-09-01

    Tens of millions of mines are currently buried in a number of countries around the world. They cause injuries to civilians and economic damage to war-torn countries by restricting the civilian access to huge agricultural lands. Rapid Route and Area Mine Neutralisation System (RRAMNS) is a Capability Technology Demonstrator (CTD) conducted by Defence Science and Technology Organisation (DSTO) in Australia. The detection system consists of three sensors: a metal detector array, an array of ground penetrating radar (GPR), and forward looking infrared and visual imaging systems. The Kalman filter-based detection technique has previously been shown to be a powerful tool for detection of landmines from metal detector data. In this paper scalar Kalman filter-based detection algorithm has been extended to the multi-dimensional case. The new version of the detection technique has been successfully implemented in RRAMNS real-time mine detection system.

  11. Landmine detection and classification with complex-valued hybrid neural network using scattering parameters dataset.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chih-Chung; Bose, N K

    2005-05-01

    Neural networks have been applied to landmine detection from data generated by different kinds of sensors. Real-valued neural networks have been used for detecting landmines from scattering parameters measured by ground penetrating radar (GPR) after disregarding phase information. This paper presents results using complex-valued neural networks, capable of phase-sensitive detection followed by classification. A two-layer hybrid neural network structure incorporating both supervised and unsupervised learning is proposed to detect and then classify the types of landmines. Tests are also reported on a benchmark data. PMID:15941001

  12. Landmine detection using passive hyperspectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFee, John E.; Anger, Cliff; Achal, Steve; Ivanco, Tyler

    2007-04-01

    Airborne hyperspectral imaging has been studied since the late 1980s as a tool to detect minefields for military countermine operations and for level I clearance for humanitarian demining. Hyperspectral imaging employed on unmanned ground vehicles may also be used to augment or replace broadband imagers to detect individual mines. This paper will discuss the ability of different optical wavebands - the visible/near infrared (VNIR), shortwave infrared (SWIR) and thermal infrared (TIR) - to detect surface-laid and buried mines. The phenomenology that determines performance in the different bands is discussed. Hyperspectral imagers have usually been designed and built for general purpose remote sensing applications and often do not meet the requirements of mine detection. The DRDC mine detection research program has sponsored the development by Itres Research of VNIR, SWIR and TIR instruments specifically intended for mine detection. The requirements for such imagers are described, as well as the instruments. Some results of mine detection experiments are presented. To date, reliable day time detection of surface-laid mines in non-real-time, independent of solar angle, time of day and season has been demonstrated in the VNIR and SWIR. Real-time analysis, necessary for military applications, has been demonstrated from low speed ground vehicles and recently from airborne platforms. Reliable, repeatable detection of buried mines has yet to be demonstrated, although a recently completed TIR hyperspectral imager will soon be tested for such a capability.

  13. Feasibility of landmine detection using transgenic plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deyholos, Michael; Faust, Anthony A.; Miao, Minmin; Montoya, Rebecca; Donahue, D. Aaron

    2006-05-01

    Genetically modified plants that detect TNT and its degradation products are potentially powerful aids in humanitarian demining and detection of unexploded ordnance. Although the feasibility of TNT detection by plants and microorganisms has been demonstrated by several research teams world wide, thus far, none of these previously demonstrated systems has the sensitivity and specificity to be effective under field conditions. We are using two approaches to increase the potential effectiveness of these and related biological detection systems. First, we are expanding the repertoire of explosive-responsive promoters by conducting DNA microarray experiments with plants treated with TNT-degradation products, and characterizing the inducibility of reporter gene expression by these promoters. Second, we are evaluating the dynamics and limiting factors in the transmission of artificial signals from roots to shoots. This will increase the ability of soil-based TNT perception strategies to effect human-readable changes in shoot morphology as part of a practical plant-based explosives detection system.

  14. Genetic optimization of the HSTAMIDS landmine detection algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konduri, Ravi K.; Solomon, Geoff Z.; DeJong, Keith; Duvoisin, Herbert A.; Bartosz, Elizabeth E.

    2004-09-01

    CyTerra's dual sensor HSTAMIDS system has demonstrated exceptional landmine detection capabilities in extensive government-run field tests. Further optimization of the highly successful PentAD-class algorithms for Humanitarian Demining (HD) use (to enhance detection (Pd) and to lower the false alarm rate (FAR)) may be possible. PentAD contains several input parameters, making such optimization computationally intensive. Genetic algorithm techniques, which formerly provided substantial improvement in the detection performance of the metal detector sensor algorithm alone, have been applied to optimize the numerical values of the dual-sensor algorithm parameters. Genetic algorithm techniques have also been applied to choose among several sub-models and fusion techniques to potentially train the HSTAMIDS HD system in new ways. In this presentation we discuss the performance of the resulting algorithm as applied to field data.

  15. Terahertz imaging and spectroscopy for landmine detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitch, Michael J.; Schauki, Dunja; Kelly, Craig A.; Osiander, Robert

    2004-04-01

    Pulsed THz (100 GHz - 30 THz) Imaging Spectroscopy combines three ways of mine detection in one system, high resolution radar, depth ranging, and infrared spectroscopy. It allows minefield detection, single mine imaging, and near-zero false alarm due to the capabilities of explosives / plastic identification using spectroscopy with working distances to 1000 feet. We have previously demonstrated imaging capabilities with 1 mm spatial resolution on a rubber O-ring embedded in sand. The estimated transmission depth in moist sand is 1 to 3 cm, which should be sufficient for imaging anti-personnel mines. In this work, we present initial results investigating the feasibility of THz spectroscopy in the frequency range from 1 to 10 THz to detect and identify explosives and related compounds (ERCs). A major component of this effort is chemical modeling to obtain spectroscopic information on ERCs and environmental background. A time-domain THz system using femtosecond laser pulses is also being developed.

  16. Landmine detection using two-tapped joint orthogonal matching pursuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberg, Sean; Glenn, Taylor; Wilson, Joseph N.; Gader, Paul D.

    2012-06-01

    Joint Orthogonal Matching Pursuits (JOMP) is used here in the context of landmine detection using data obtained from an electromagnetic induction (EMI) sensor. The response from an object containing metal can be decomposed into a discrete spectrum of relaxation frequencies (DSRF) from which we construct a dictionary. A greedy iterative algorithm is proposed for computing successive residuals of a signal by subtracting away the highest matching dictionary element at each step. The nal condence of a particular signal is a combination of the reciprocal of this residual and the mean of the complex component. A two-tap approach comparing signals on opposite sides of the geometric location of the sensor is examined and found to produce better classication. It is found that using only a single pursuit does a comparable job, reducing complexity and allowing for real-time implementation in automated target recognition systems. JOMP is particularly highlighted in comparison with a previous EMI detection algorithm known as String Match.

  17. The application of Dempster-Shafer theory for landmine detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudigonda, Naga R.; Kacelenga, Ray; Erickson, David

    2003-04-01

    This paper explores the concepts of multisensor data fusion based on the Dempster-Shafer (DS) evidential theory in order to achieve a mine versus false-alarm (FA) classification of landmine targets. Initially, a decision-level DS algorithm is proposed to combine the evidence from multiple sensors of the landmine detection system developed by the General Dynamics Canada Limited (GD Canada). Subsequently, a feature-level DS fusion algorithm is employed to operate on a set of features reported by the ground penetrating radar (GPR) sensor of the system. The data used in the present study was acquired from the Aberdeen Proving Grounds (APG) test site in USA as part of the Ground Standoff Mine Detection System (GSTAMIDS) trials. The proposed decision-level DS algorithm yielded a probability of detection (pd) of 92.53% at a false-alarm rate (FAR) value of 0.0697 FAs/m2. The Pd and the FAR performance results achieved by using the decision-level DS algorithm are comparable with the results obtained using three other decision-level fusion algorithms that were previously developed by GD Canada based on heuristic, Bayesian inference, and Voting fusion concepts. On the other hand, the feature-level DS fusion, when tested with the information presented by the GPR sensor only, resulted in a higher Pd value of 78.54% as compared to the corresponding result of 61.43% obtained by using the heuristic algorithm. The GPR sensor is one of the three scanning sensors present on the system.

  18. Surface-contacting vibrometers for seismic landmine detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, James S.; Larson, Gregg D.; Scott, Waymond R., Jr.

    2005-06-01

    A technique has been developed that exploits remote seismic sources and local measurement of the surface displacement of the ground for the detection of buried landmines. Most of the previously reported investigation of this technique has focused on non-contact displacement sensors in order to ensure the safety of the operators of both handheld and vehicle-based systems. This is not inherently a constraint that requires a non-contact sensor, but rather one requiring a sensor that is non-intrusive (i.e. its presence does not alter the measured quantity). Current research is directed toward the development of autonomous and semi-autonomous robotic systems based on this technique. Here both unit cost and power consumption are issues of comparable importance to the survival of the sensor platform. Non-intrusive surface-contacting vibrometers are therefore a reasonable alternative. Several configurations have been studied for suitable vibrometers. The configuration that has shown the most promise is based on a commercial accelerometer coupled to the ground with a small normal force and isolated from the backing structure that is used to reposition it between measurements. It is a relatively simple matter to detect seismic motion with an accelerometer. The major issue in an effective implementation of the technique is to combine reproducibility with fidelity in the measurement. These are competing goals in that reproducibility is easily achieved with large normal forces, but fidelity requires that these be small. Sufficient reproducibility for imaging purposes has been achieved with normal forces that pose no danger of landmine detonation. Unlike reproducibility, fidelity is linked to both the nature of the imposed force and to its magnitude through the nonlinearity of the soil"s elasticity. Both continuous and incremental motions of the sensor platform have been studied, although incremental movement shows the most promise for the intended application.

  19. Research and Development of Landmine Detection System by a Compact Fusion Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshikawa, Kiyoshi; Masuda, Kai; Toku, Hisayuki; Nagasaki, Kazunobu; Mizutani, Toshiyuki; Takamatsu, Teruhisa; Imoto, Masaki; Yamamoto, Yasushi; Ohnishi, Masami; Osawa, Hodaka; Hotta, Eiki; Kohno, Toshiyuki; Okino, Akitoshi; Watanabe, Masato; Yamauchi, Kunihito; Yuura, Morimasa; Shiroya, Seiji; Misawa, Tsuyoshi; Mori, Takamasa

    2005-05-15

    Current results are described on the research and development of an advanced anti-personnel landmine detection system by using a compact discharge-type fusion neutron source called IECF (Inertial-Electrostatic Confinement Fusion). Landmines are to be identified through backscattering of neutrons, and specific-energy capture {gamma}-rays by hydrogen and nitrogen atoms in the landmine explosives.For this purpose, improvements in the IECF were made by various methods to achieve a drastic enhancement of neutron yields of more than 10{sup 8} n/s in pulsed operation. This required R and D on the power source, as well as analysis of envisaged detection systems with multi-sensors. The results suggest promising and practical features for humanitarian landmine detection, particularly, in Afghanistan.

  20. Landmine-detection rats: an evaluation of reinforcement procedures under simulated operational conditions.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, Amanda; Lalonde, Kate; Edwards, Timothy; Cox, Christophe; Weetjens, Bart; Poling, Alan

    2014-05-01

    Because the location of landmines is initially unknown, it is impossible to arrange differential reinforcement for accurate detection of landmines by pouched rats working on actual minefields. Therefore, provision must be made for maintenance of accurate responses by an alternative reinforcement strategy. The present experiment evaluated a procedure in which a plastic bag containing 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), the active ingredient in most landmines, was placed in contact with the ground in a disturbed area, then removed, to establish opportunities for reinforcement. Each of five rats continued to accurately detect landmines when extinction was arranged for landmine-detection responses and detections of TNT-contaminated locations were reinforced under a fixed-ratio 1 schedule. The results of this translational research study suggest that the TNT-contamination procedure is a viable option for arranging reinforcement opportunities for rats engaged in actual landmine-detection activities and the viability of this procedure is currently being evaluated on minefields in Angola and Mozambique.

  1. Chemical Sensing for Buried Landmines - Fundamental Processes Influencing Trace Chemical Detection

    SciTech Connect

    PHELAN, JAMES M.

    2002-05-01

    Mine detection dogs have a demonstrated capability to locate hidden objects by trace chemical detection. Because of this capability, demining activities frequently employ mine detection dogs to locate individual buried landmines or for area reduction. The conditions appropriate for use of mine detection dogs are only beginning to emerge through diligent research that combines dog selection/training, the environmental conditions that impact landmine signature chemical vapors, and vapor sensing performance capability and reliability. This report seeks to address the fundamental soil-chemical interactions, driven by local weather history, that influence the availability of chemical for trace chemical detection. The processes evaluated include: landmine chemical emissions to the soil, chemical distribution in soils, chemical degradation in soils, and weather and chemical transport in soils. Simulation modeling is presented as a method to evaluate the complex interdependencies among these various processes and to establish conditions appropriate for trace chemical detection. Results from chemical analyses on soil samples obtained adjacent to landmines are presented and demonstrate the ultra-trace nature of these residues. Lastly, initial measurements of the vapor sensing performance of mine detection dogs demonstrates the extreme sensitivity of dogs in sensing landmine signature chemicals; however, reliability at these ultra-trace vapor concentrations still needs to be determined. Through this compilation, additional work is suggested that will fill in data gaps to improve the utility of trace chemical detection.

  2. Dual sensor platforms for UXO/landmine detection using GPR and EMI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marble, Jay; Hong, Kevin

    2010-04-01

    Metal detectors and ground penetrating radar have become the standard sensors for buried landmine and UXO detection. Joint systems have existed since the late 90s. Recent system development has again led to the placement of MD and GPR sensors on ground vehicles for detection of in-road landmine and UXO objects. In this work, two prominent systems - one GPR and one metal detector - are operated on a test site populated with landmine and deep buried UXO. The strength of the GPR is the ability to detect plastic cased landmines while the strength of the metal detector is to detect deep buried UXO. The sensors' capabilities overlap in regards to metal cased landmines. A simple fusion approach is used to show how these two sensors can be used together to create a platform that carries the strengths of both sensors. The final alarm list averages the confidence values produced by each sensor. ROC curves are used to quantify the performance. Curves are presented for each sensor standing alone and for their fusion performance.

  3. Detection of metallic and plastic landmines using the GPR and 2-D resistivity techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metwaly, M.

    2007-12-01

    Low and non-metallic landmines are one of the most difficult subsurface targets to be detected using several geophysical techniques. Ground penetrating radar (GPR) performance at different field sites shows great success in detecting metallic landmines. However significant limitations are taking place in the case of low and non-metallic landmines. Electrical resistivity imaging (ERI) technique is tested to be an alternative or confirmation technique for detecting the metallic and non-metallic landmines in suspicious cleared areas. The electrical resistivity responses using forward modeling for metallic and non-metallic landmines buried in dry and wet environments utilizing the common electrode configurations have been achieved. Roughly all the utilized electrode arrays can establish the buried metallic and plastic mines correctly in dry and wet soil. The accuracy differs from one array to the other based on the relative resistivity contrast to the host soil and the subsurface distribution of current and potential lines as well as the amplitude of the noises in the data. The ERI technique proved to be fast and effective tool for detecting the non-metallic mines especially in the conductive environment whereas the performances of the other metal detector (MD) and GPR techniques show great limitation.

  4. SIRE: a MIMO radar for landmine/IED detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojowu, Ode; Wu, Yue; Li, Jian; Nguyen, Lam

    2013-05-01

    Multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) radar systems have been shown to have significant performance improvements over their single-input multiple-output (SIMO) counterparts. For transmit and receive elements that are collocated, the waveform diversity afforded by this radar is exploited for performance improvements. These improvements include but are not limited to improved target detection, improved parameter identifiability and better resolvability. In this paper, we present the Synchronous Impulse Reconstruction Radar (SIRE) Ultra-wideband (UWB) radar designed by the Army Research Lab (ARL) for landmine and improvised explosive device (IED) detection as a 2 by 16 MIMO radar (with collocated antennas). Its improvement over its SIMO counterpart in terms of beampattern/cross range resolution are discussed and demonstrated using simulated data herein. The limitations of this radar for Radio Frequency Interference (RFI) suppression are also discussed in this paper. A relaxation method (RELAX) combined with averaging of multiple realizations of the measured data is presented for RFI suppression; results show no noticeable target signature distortion after suppression. In this paper, the back-projection (delay and sum) data independent method is used for generating SAR images. A side-lobe minimization technique called recursive side-lobe minimization (RSM) is also discussed for reducing side-lobes in this data independent approach. We introduce a data-dependent sparsity based spectral estimation technique called Sparse Learning via Iterative Minimization (SLIM) as well as a data-dependent CLEAN approach for generating SAR images for the SIRE radar. These data-adaptive techniques show improvement in side-lobe reduction and resolution for simulated data for the SIRE radar.

  5. Evaluation of seismic noise for landmine detection system development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, James S.; Larson, Gregg D.; Scott, Waymond R., Jr.; McCall, George S., II

    2003-09-01

    For several years a system has been under development at Georgia Tech that uses seismic surface waves to detect and image buried landmines. The details of this system have been previously reported in the literature. Current work involves the transition from a laboratory experimental system to a field-operable experimental system with the ultimate goal of creating an integrated field-operable prototype. Several issues have arisen in the transition to field testing. One of these is the nature and magnitude of the noise levels that limit system performance at field sites and the relevance of these for predicting noise that might be encountered in a realistic demining scenario. Noise introduced to the system sensor (a radar-based, non-contact displacement sensor) can arise from many sources (both natural and manmade). It may be received through a variety of mechanisms in addition to the sensor's primary transduction mechanism. Moreover, even noise which is received through the primary transduction mechanism need not involve purely seismic motion of the ground that is being interrogated. It might instead represent motion of the sensor's support structure or the purely local coupling of airborne noise into surface motion. To understand these effects, measurements have been made using ground contacting sensors at four field sites where other system-related measurements have also been made. The nature of the noise measurements has required that refinements be made to both the sensors themselves (triaxial geophones) and to the data acquisition system used for the measurement of the system"s seismic interrogation signals (a 12-bit, PC-based digitizer).

  6. Ensemble hidden Markov models with application to landmine detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamdi, Anis; Frigui, Hichem

    2015-12-01

    We introduce an ensemble learning method for temporal data that uses a mixture of hidden Markov models (HMM). We hypothesize that the data are generated by K models, each of which reflects a particular trend in the data. The proposed approach, called ensemble HMM (eHMM), is based on clustering within the log-likelihood space and has two main steps. First, one HMM is fit to each of the N individual training sequences. For each fitted model, we evaluate the log-likelihood of each sequence. This results in an N-by-N log-likelihood distance matrix that will be partitioned into K groups using a relational clustering algorithm. In the second step, we learn the parameters of one HMM per cluster. We propose using and optimizing various training approaches for the different K groups depending on their size and homogeneity. In particular, we investigate the maximum likelihood (ML), the minimum classification error (MCE), and the variational Bayesian (VB) training approaches. Finally, to test a new sequence, its likelihood is computed in all the models and a final confidence value is assigned by combining the models' outputs using an artificial neural network. We propose both discrete and continuous versions of the eHMM. Our approach was evaluated on a real-world application for landmine detection using ground-penetrating radar (GPR). Results show that both the continuous and discrete eHMM can identify meaningful and coherent HMM mixture components that describe different properties of the data. Each HMM mixture component models a group of data that share common attributes. These attributes are reflected in the mixture model's parameters. The results indicate that the proposed method outperforms the baseline HMM that uses one model for each class in the data.

  7. Detection of Landmines by Neutron Backscattering: Effects of Soil Moisture on the Detection System

    SciTech Connect

    Baysoy, D. Y.; Subasi, M.

    2010-01-21

    Detection of buried land mines by using neutron backscattering technique (NBS) is a well established method. It depends on detecting a hydrogen anomaly in dry soil. Since a landmine and its plastic casing contain much more hydrogen atoms than the dry soil, this anomaly can be detected by observing a rise in the number of neutrons moderated to thermal or epithermal energy. But, the presence of moisture in the soil limits the effectiveness of the measurements. In this work, a landmine detection system using the NBS technique was designed. A series of Monte Carlo calculations was carried out to determine the limits of the system due to the moisture content of the soil. In the simulations, an isotropic fast neutron source ({sup 252}Cf, 100 mug) and a neutron detection system which consists of five {sup 3}He detectors were used in a practicable geometry. In order to see the effects of soil moisture on the efficiency of the detection system, soils with different water contents were tested.

  8. Investigations on landmine detection by neutron-based techniques.

    PubMed

    Csikai, J; Dóczi, R; Király, B

    2004-07-01

    Principles and techniques of some neutron-based methods used to identify the antipersonnel landmines (APMs) are discussed. New results have been achieved in the field of neutron reflection, transmission, scattering and reaction techniques. Some conclusions are as follows: The neutron hand-held detector is suitable for the observation of anomaly caused by a DLM2-like sample in different soils with a scanning speed of 1m(2)/1.5 min; the reflection cross section of thermal neutrons rendered the determination of equivalent thickness of different soil components possible; a simple method was developed for the determination of the thermal neutron flux perturbation factor needed for multi-elemental analysis of bulky samples; unfolded spectra of elastically backscattered neutrons using broad-spectrum sources render the identification of APMs possible; the knowledge of leakage spectra of different source neutrons is indispensable for the determination of the differential and integrated reaction rates and through it the dimension of the interrogated volume; the precise determination of the C/O atom fraction requires the investigations on the angular distribution of the 6.13MeV gamma-ray emitted in the (16)O(n,n'gamma) reaction. These results, in addition to the identification of landmines, render the improvement of the non-intrusive neutron methods possible.

  9. Pulsed Operation of a Compact Fusion Neutron Source Using a High-Voltage Pulse Generator Developed for Landmine Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Yamauchi, Kunihito; Watanabe, Masato; Okino, Akitoshi; Kohno, Toshiyuki; Hotta, Eiki; Yuura, Morimasa

    2005-05-15

    Preliminary experimental results of pulsed neutron source based on a discharge-type beam fusion called Inertial Electrostatic Confinement Fusion (IECF) for landmine detection are presented. In Japan, a research and development project for constructing an advanced anti-personnel landmine detection system by using IECF, which is effective not only for metal landmines but also for plastic ones, is now in progress. This project consists of some R and D topics, and one of them is R and D of a high-voltage pulse generator system specialized for landmine detection, which can be used in the severe environment such as that in the field in Afghanistan. Thus a prototype of the system for landmine detection was designed and fabricated in consideration of compactness, lightness, cooling performance, dustproof and robustness. By using this prototype pulse generator system, a conventional IECF device was operated as a preliminary experiment. As a result, it was confirmed that the suggested pulse generator system is suitable for landmine detection system, and the results follow the empirical law obtained by the previous experiments. The maximum neutron production rate of 2.0x10{sup 8} n/s was obtained at a pulsed discharge of -51 kV, 7.3 A.

  10. Comparative analysis of short and long GPR pulses for landmine detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temlioǧlu, Eyyup; Nazlı, Hakkı; Aksoy, Serkan

    2016-05-01

    Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) is one of the most popular subsurface sensing devices. It has a wide range of applications such as landmine detection, archeological investigations, road condition survey and so on. Hardware and software requirements of the GPR system are strongly dependent on type of applications. Principally, lower frequencies provide deeper penetration and low resolution, but higher frequencies are able to detect shallow objects with high resolution. As a fundamental design criterion, there is a trade-off between penetration depth and vertical resolution. In impulse radar, pulse duration (frequency related) is a key parameter because it affects the system detection performance. Specially, optimization of the pulse duration is a challenging problem for landmine detection because the GPR performance has been strongly affected from mine types, varying terrain and environmental conditions. In this work, two GPR systems with pulse durations of 650 ps and 870 ps are compared for evaluation of their detection performance. The pulses are tested with extensive data sets collected from different soil types by using surrogate mines and other objects. Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curves of the system is also calculated. It seems that the 650 ps pulse duration gives better performance than the 870 ps pulse duration for the shallow landmine detection.

  11. Polarization differences in airborne ground penetrating radar performance for landmine detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogaru, Traian; Le, Calvin

    2016-05-01

    The U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL) has investigated the ultra-wideband (UWB) radar technology for detection of landmines, improvised explosive devices and unexploded ordnance, for over two decades. This paper presents a phenomenological study of the radar signature of buried landmines in realistic environments and the performance of airborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) in detecting these targets as a function of multiple parameters: polarization, depression angle, soil type and burial depth. The investigation is based on advanced computer models developed at ARL. The analysis includes both the signature of the targets of interest and the clutter produced by rough surface ground. Based on our numerical simulations, we conclude that low depression angles and H-H polarization offer the highest target-to-clutter ratio in the SAR images and therefore the best radar performance of all the scenarios investigated.

  12. New Mexico Tech landmine, UXO, IED detection sensor test facility: measurements in real field soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendrickx, Jan M. H.; Alkov, Nicole; Hong, Sung-ho; Van Dam, Remke L.; Kleissl, Jan; Shannon, Heather; Meason, John; Borchers, Brian; Harmon, Russell S.

    2006-05-01

    Modeling studies and experimental work have demonstrated that the dynamic behavior of soil physical properties has a significant effect on most sensors for the detection of buried land mines. An outdoor test site has been constructed allowing full control over soil water content and continuous monitoring of important soil properties and environmental conditions. Time domain reflectometry sensors and thermistors measure soil water1 content and temperature, respectively, at different depths above and below the land mines as well as in homogeneous soil away from the land mines. During the two-year operation of the test-site, the soils have evolved to reflect real field soil conditions. This paper compares visual observations as well as ground-penetrating radar and thermal infrared measurements at this site taken immediately after construction in early 2004 with measurements from early 2006. The visual observations reveal that the 2006 soil surfaces exhibit a much higher spatial variability due to the development of mini-reliefs, "loose" and "connected" soil crusts, cracks in clay soils, and vegetation. Evidence is presented that the increased variability of soil surface characteristics leads to a higher natural spatial variability of soil surface temperatures and, thus, to a lower probability to detect landmines using thermal imagery. No evidence was found that the soil surface changes affect the GPR signatures of landmines under the soil conditions encountered in this study. The New Mexico Tech outdoor Landmine Detection Sensor Test Facility is easily accessible and anyone interested is welcome to use it for sensor testing.

  13. Observations on syntactic landmine detection using impulse ground-penetrating radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasif, Ahmed O.; Hintz, Kenneth J.

    2011-06-01

    We discuss some results and observations on applying syntactic pattern recognition (SPR) methodology for landmine detection using impulse ground-penetrating radar (GPR). In the SPR approach, the GPR A-scans are first converted into binary-valued strings by inverse filtering, followed by concavity detection to identify the peaks and valleys representing the locations of impedance discontinuities in the return signal. During the training phase, the characteristic binary strings for a particular landmine are found by looking at all the exemplars of that mine and selecting the collection of strings that yield the best detection results on these exemplars. These characteristic strings can be detected very efficiently using finite state machines (FSMs). Finally, the FSM detections are clustered to assign confidence to each detection, and discard sparse detections. Provided that the impulse GPR provides enough resolution in range, the SPR method can be a robust and high-speed solution for landmine detection and classification, because it aims to exploit the impedance discontinuity profile of the target, which is a description of the internal material structure of the target and little affected by external clutter. To evaluate the proposed methodology, the SPR scheme is applied to a set of impulse GPR data taken at a government test site. We suggest that coherent frequency-agile radar may be a better option for the SPR approach, since it addresses some of the drawbacks of a non-coherent impulse GPR caused by internally non-coherent within-channel signals which necessitate non-coherent integration and its attendant longer integration times, and non-coherent adjacent channels which severely limit the ability to do spatial, or at a minimum, cross-range processing if the GPR is in a linear array antenna.

  14. Physical model of soil and its implications for landmine detection interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsube, T. J.; Grunsky, E.; Das, Y.; DiLabio, R.; McNairn, H.; Connell-Madore, S.; Gauthier, E.; Scromeda, N.

    2006-05-01

    Many soil physical and chemical properties interfere with landmine detection. Prior knowledge of these properties would improve detection technology selection and increase demining safety and efficiency. Developments in rapid mapping of these properties over wide areas is essential to meet military and economic constraints. Fusion of multiple detection technologies is also essential to overcome detection signal interferences. For these purposes, rapid mapping by use of remote sensing is being tested, starting with electrical conductivity mapping by radar remote sensing. Laboratory induced-polarization (IP) is also being tested to develop techniques to discriminate between electromagnetic signals from metallic particles in landmines and in soil, for regions with detection interference. Key physical models of soil are being developed for fusion of various landmine detection systems and to explain remote sensing responses to soil. Radar satellite tests carried out over the Canadian Forces Base Suffield (CFBS; Alberta, Canada) in 2004 and 2005 indicated 10 areas for possible high clay content and electrical conductivity. Eight of these were validated by soil maps and Landsat clay images. Two had high organic content with physical characteristics not known at present. Studies on soil with fine-grained iron-oxide powder and on iron with varied degrees of corrosion show that spectral-IP is sensitive to iron or iron-oxides regardless of their state. Soil has layered structure consisting of various grain-size combinations, but its physical characteristics are significantly influenced by whether its clay content is above or below a critical clay content (15 to 25 %). Results of these tests are discussed in this paper with explanations using the soil physical model.

  15. Detection of landmines and UXO using advanced synthetic aperture radar technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiber, Eric; Peichl, Markus; Dill, Stephan; Heinzel, Andreas; Bischeltsrieder, Florian

    2016-05-01

    A main problem of effective landmine and UXO decontamination is efficient and reliable detection and localization of suspicious objects in reasonable time. This requirement demands for fast sensors investigating large areas with sufficient spatial resolution and sensitivity. Ground penetrating radar (GPR) is a suitable tool and is considered as a complementing sensor since nearly two decades. However, most GPRs operate in very close distance to ground in a rather punctual method of operation. In contrast, synthetic aperture radar (SAR) is a technique allowing fast and laminar stand-off investigation of an area. TIRAMI-SAR is imaging radar at lower microwaves for fast close-in detection of buried and unburied objects on a larger area. This allows efficient confirmation of a threat by investigating such regions of detection by other sensors. For proper object detection sufficient spatial resolution is required. Hence the SAR principle is applied. SAR for landmine/UXO detection can be applied by side-looking radar moved on safe ground along the area of interest, being typically the un-safe ground. Additionally, reliable detection of buried and unburied objects requires sufficient suppression of background clutter. For that purpose TIRAMI-SAR is using several antennas in multi-static configuration and wave polarization together with advanced SAR processing. The advantages and necessity of a multi-static antenna configuration for this kind of GPR approach is illustrated in the paper.

  16. Performance of a four parameter model for modeling landmine signatures in frequency domain wideband electromagnetic induction detection systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fails, Eric B.; Torrione, Peter A.; Scott, Waymond R., Jr.; Collins, Leslie M.

    2007-04-01

    This work explores possible performance enhancements for landmine detection algorithms using frequency domain wideband electromagnetic induction sensors. A pre-existing four parameter model for conducting objects based on empirically collected data for UXO is discussed, and its application for accurately modeling landmine signatures is also considered. Discrimination of mines versus clutter based on the extracted model parameters is considered. Furthermore, this work will compare the effectiveness of discrimination based on the four parameter model to a matched subspace detection algorithm. Experimental results using data from government run test sites will be presented.

  17. Camera-based platform and sensor motion tracking for data fusion in a landmine detection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Mark, Wannes; van den Heuvel, Johan C.; den Breejen, Eric; Groen, Frans C. A.

    2003-09-01

    Vehicles that serve in the role as landmine detection robots could be an important tool for demining former conflict areas. On the LOTUS platform for humanitarian demining, different sensors are used to detect a wide range of landmine types. Reliable and accurate detection depends on correctly combining the observations from the different sensors on the moving platform. Currently a method based on odometry is used to merge the readings from the sensors. In this paper a vision based approach is presented which can estimate the relative sensor pose and position together with the vehicle motion. To estimate the relative position and orientation of sensors, techniques from camera calibration are used. The platform motion is estimated from tracked features on the ground. A new approach is presented which can reduce the influence of tracking errors or other outliers on the accuracy of the ego-motion estimate. Overall, the new vision based approach for sensor localization leads to better estimates then the current odometry based method.

  18. On the use of a (252Cf-3He) assembly for landmine detection by the neutron back-scattering method.

    PubMed

    Elsheikh, N; Viesti, G; ElAgib, I; Habbani, F

    2012-04-01

    Experiments were carried out to optimize the performance of the neutron back-scattering (NBS) technique in landmine detection using an assembly consisting of three different layers placed above a (252)Cf neuron source, producing about 10(4)s(-1), in conjunction with a (3)He detector. The assembly was optimized experimentally. The selected assembly configuration was then examined against different (252)Cf stand-off distances and mine burial depths using dummy landmines. Furthermore, Monte Carlo simulations were performed to study the effect of the shield when a (252)Cf source in the range 10(4)-10(7)s(-1) was employed, and to optimize the geometry for future prototypes.

  19. Processing of radar data for landmine detection: nonlinear transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartosz, E. E.; Duvoisin, H.; Konduri, R.; Solomon, G. Z.

    2005-06-01

    The Handheld Standoff Mine Detection System (HSTAMIDS system) has achieved outstanding performance in government-run field tests due to its use of anomaly detection using principal component analysis (PCA) on the return of ground penetrating radar (GPR) coupled with metal detection. Indications of nonlinearities and asymmetries in Humanitarian Demining (HD) data point to modifications to the current PCA algorithm that might prove beneficial. Asymmetries in the distribution of PCA projections of field data have been quantified in Humanitarian Demining (HD) data. The data suggest a logarithmic correction to the data. Such a correction has been applied and has improved the FAR on this data set. The increase in performance is comparable to the increase shown using the simpler asymmetric rescaling method.

  20. Detecting landmines using weighted density distribution function features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, Ronald J.; Theera-Umpon, Nipon; Gader, Paul D.; Somanchi, Satish; Ho, Dominic K.

    2001-08-01

    Land mine detection using metal detector (MD) and ground penetrating radar (GPR) sensors in hand-held units is a difficult problem. Detection difficulties arise due to: 1) the varying composition and type of metal in land mines, 2) the time-varying nature of background and 3) the variation in height and velocity of the hand-held unit in data measurement. This research introduces new spatially distributed MD features for differentiating land mine signatures from background. The spatially distributed features involve correlating sequences of MD energy values with six weighted density distribution functions. These features are evaluated using a standard back propagation neural network on real data sets containing more than 2,300 mine encounters of different size, shape, content and metal composition that are measured under different soil conditions.

  1. Detection of shallow buried nonmetallic landmine and estimation of its depth at microwave X-band frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, K. C.; Singh, D.; Arora, M.

    2009-05-01

    Current methods of demining are mostly ground or vehicle based and therefore extremely time consuming, risky and also do not produce low false alarm rates. Detection of landmines using airborne and satellite based sensors are a viable risk free alternative. However extracting mine like features from data captured using airborne and satellite based sensors using signal and image processing techniques with low false alarm rates is a subject of active research. Microwave remote sensing in X-band (10 GHz, 3 cm) frequency has the capability for both subsurface penetration and resolution of landmines as well as non-lethal targets. In the present study, a set of experiments under laboratory conditions have been carried out using dummy landmines without explosives buried to different depths up to 10 cm in dry smooth sand. The data generated through the experiments is processed through a series of image processing steps and a region of interest segmented using Otsu and Maximum Entropy based thresholding methods. The region of interest is masked and the average observed backscatter containing the mine further processed through an electromagnetic model developed and optimized using genetic algorithm for estimation of depth. The method does not have any requirement of separate training and test data set to train the optimizer and validate the results. The results under laboratory conditions indicate satisfactory results both for detection of shallow buried landmines and estimation of depth.

  2. Landmine detection and imaging using Micropower Impulse Radar (MIR)

    SciTech Connect

    Azevedo, S.G.; Gravel, D.T.; Mast, J.E.; Warhus, J.P.

    1995-08-07

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has developed radar and imaging technologies with potential applications in mine detection by the armed forces and other agencies involved in determining efforts. These new technologies use a patented ultra-wideband (impulse) radar technology that is compact, low-cost, and low power. Designated as Micropower hnpulse Radar, these compact, self-contained radars can easily be assembled into arrays to form complete ground penetrating radar imaging systems. LLNL has also developed tomographic reconstruction and signal processing software capable of producing high-resolution 2-D and 3-D images of objects buried in materials like soil or concrete from radar data. Preliminary test results have shown that a radar imaging system using these technologies has the ability to image both metallic and plastic land mine surrogate targets buried in 5 to 10 cm of moist soil. In dry soil, the system can detect buried objects to a depth of 30 cm and more. This report describes our initial test results and plans for future work.

  3. Acoustic leak detection system

    SciTech Connect

    Peacock, M.J.

    1993-08-03

    An acoustic leak detection system is described for determining the location of leaks in storage tanks, comprising: (a) sensor means for detecting a leak signal; (b) data acquisition means for digitizing and storing leak signals meeting preset criterion; and (c) analysis means for analyzing the digitized signals and computing the location of the source of the leak signals.

  4. Application of multistatic inversion algorithms to landmine detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gürbüz, Ali Cafer; Counts, Tegan; Kim, Kangwook; McClellan, James H.; Scott, Waymond R., Jr.

    2006-05-01

    Multi-static ground-penetrating radar (GPR) uses an array of antennas to conduct a number of bistatic operations simultaneously. The multi-static GPR is used to obtain more information on the target of interest using angular diversity. An entirely computer controlled, multi-static GPR consisting of a linear array of six resistively-loaded vee dipoles (RVDs), a network analyzer, and a microwave switch matrix was developed to investigate the potential of multi-static inversion algorithms. The performance of a multi-static inversion algorithm is evaluated for targets buried in clean sand, targets buried under the ground covered by rocks, and targets held above the ground (in the air) using styrofoam supports. A synthetic-aperture, multi-static, time-domain GPR imaging algorithm is extended from conventional mono-static back-projection techniques and used to process the data. Good results are obtained for the clean surface and air targets; however, for targets buried under rocks, only the deeply buried targets could be accurately detected and located.

  5. Acoustic detection of pneumothorax

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansy, Hansen A.; Royston, Thomas J.; Balk, Robert A.; Sandler, Richard H.

    2003-04-01

    This study aims at investigating the feasibility of using low-frequency (<2000 Hz) acoustic methods for medical diagnosis. Several candidate methods of pneumothorax detection were tested in dogs. In the first approach, broadband acoustic signals were introduced into the trachea during end-expiration and transmitted waves were measured at the chest surface. Pneumothorax was found to consistently decrease pulmonary acoustic transmission in the 200-1200-Hz frequency band, while less change was observed at lower frequencies (p<0.0001). The ratio of acoustic energy between low (<220 Hz) and mid (550-770 Hz) frequency bands was significantly different in the control (healthy) and pneumothorax states (p<0.0001). The second approach measured breath sounds in the absence of an external acoustic input. Pneumothorax was found to be associated with a preferential reduction of sound amplitude in the 200- to 700-Hz range, and a decrease of sound amplitude variation (in the 300 to 600-Hz band) during the respiration cycle (p<0.01 for each). Finally, chest percussion was implemented. Pneumothorax changed the frequency and decay rate of percussive sounds. These results imply that certain medical conditions may be reliably detected using appropriate acoustic measurements and analysis. [Work supported by NIH/NHLBI #R44HL61108.

  6. Surface-enhanced raman detection of 2,4-dinitrotoluene impurity vapor as a marker to locate landmines.

    PubMed

    Sylvia, J M; Janni, J A; Klein, J D; Spencer, K M

    2000-12-01

    Time, cost, and casualties associated with demining efforts underscore the need for improved detection techniques. Reduction in the number of false positives by directly detecting the explosive material, rather than casing material, is desirable. The desired field sensor must, at a minimum, demonstrate reproducibility, the necessary level of sensitivity, portability, instrumental stability, and fast system response times. Ideally, vibrational spectroscopic techniques have the potential to remove false positives, since every chemical has a unique bond structure. Herein, we demonstrate the capabilities of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy to detect the chemical vapor signature emanating from buried TNT-based landmines. We present reproducible results obtained from blind tests controlled by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) that demonstrate vapor detection of 2,4-dinitrotoluene at concentration levels of 5 ppb or less. The results presented used acquisition times of 30 s on a fieldable system and showed that SERS can be a significant improvement over current landmine detection methods. PMID:11128944

  7. Surface-enhanced raman detection of 2,4-dinitrotoluene impurity vapor as a marker to locate landmines.

    PubMed

    Sylvia, J M; Janni, J A; Klein, J D; Spencer, K M

    2000-12-01

    Time, cost, and casualties associated with demining efforts underscore the need for improved detection techniques. Reduction in the number of false positives by directly detecting the explosive material, rather than casing material, is desirable. The desired field sensor must, at a minimum, demonstrate reproducibility, the necessary level of sensitivity, portability, instrumental stability, and fast system response times. Ideally, vibrational spectroscopic techniques have the potential to remove false positives, since every chemical has a unique bond structure. Herein, we demonstrate the capabilities of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy to detect the chemical vapor signature emanating from buried TNT-based landmines. We present reproducible results obtained from blind tests controlled by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) that demonstrate vapor detection of 2,4-dinitrotoluene at concentration levels of 5 ppb or less. The results presented used acquisition times of 30 s on a fieldable system and showed that SERS can be a significant improvement over current landmine detection methods.

  8. Rapid Mapping of Soil Electrical Conductivity by Radar Satellite Remote Sensing for Landmine Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNairn, H.; Katsube, T. J.; Das, Y.; Holt, R. M.

    2005-05-01

    Many soil physical and chemical properties interfere with landmine detector signals. It has been shown that prior knowledge of the distribution of these properties would allow appropriate technology selection and increased demining operation effectiveness/efficiency. For this reason, economic and rapid mapping techniques using remote sensing for these properties over wide areas are considered. Since soil electrical conductivity (EC) interferes with the most widely used landmine detection systems, such as metal detectors and ground penetrating radar, it has been proposed to start with developing a rapid mapping technique for EC using remote sensing. Although airborne, ground EM systems, and laboratory analyses are proven methods for mapping EC, they generally lack the appropriate resolution required. In addition surveys by such methods are costly and time consuming for mapping large areas such as entire countries. Therefore, EC prediction by satellite imaging of soil moisture change using RADARSAT is being tested in eastern Alberta (Canada) and northern Mississippi (U.S.A.). Areas of little soil moisture change with time can be associated with high moisture retention and higher clay content, suggesting an association with higher EC. However, use of airborne and ground EM systems and laboratory analyses are recommended for validation of EC distributions mapped by remote sensing. Fusion of RADARSAT soil moisture images at varied dates are used to identify boundaries between high and low moisture retention areas in both the northern Mississippi and Alberta test sites to predict areas of high and low EC. These predictions are being validated by ground EM surveys, laboratory analyses and, in some cases, by various other methods such as soil and military traficability maps. Soil sample are collected across the high-low EC boundaries for laboratory analyses. Laboratory analyses consist of soil texture/mineralogy, moisture versus spectral EC, and strength tests.

  9. Improved landmine detection capability (ILDC): systematic approach to the detection of buried mines using passive IR imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simard, Jean-Robert

    1996-05-01

    In order to reduce the serious problem associated with the mining of important supply/communication roads by hostile parties during peacekeeping operations, the Canadian Department of National Defense has recently begun the development of a multi-sensor teleoperated mine detection vehicle, the Improved Landmine Detection Capability. One sensor identified as a serious candidate for that project is a passive IR camera. In the past, many organizations have assessed the efficiency of this technique of detection and reported widely fluctuating results. It is believed that the main reason for these fluctuations is associated with the ad hoc interpretations used by different researchers. In this paper, a more systematic analysis is presented which takes into account variables such as time of the day, time of the year, weather conditions, type of road and many others. A working model is proposed in order to facilitate the prediction of the IR signature of the buried land-mine and is compared with data acquired from multiple trials. These trials were done with live mines (without fuzes) and surrogates buried in different types of road (packed gravel and sand) and during different times of the day and different times of the year.

  10. Standoff detection of explosives and buried landmines using fluorescent bacterial sensor cells.

    PubMed

    Kabessa, Yossef; Eyal, Ori; Bar-On, Ofer; Korouma, Victor; Yagur-Kroll, Sharon; Belkin, Shimshon; Agranat, Aharon J

    2016-05-15

    A standoff detection scheme for buried landmines and concealed explosive charges is presented. The detection procedure consists of the following: Live bacterial sensor strains, genetically engineered to produce a dose-dependent amount of green fluorescent protein (GFP) in the presence of explosives' vapors, are encapsulated and spread on the suspected area. The fluorescence produced by the bacteria in response to traces of the explosive material in their microenvironment is remotely detected by a phase-locked optoelectronic sampling system. This scheme enables fast direct access to a large minefield area, while obviating the need to endanger personnel and equipment. Moreover, the employment of phase locking detection efficiently isolates the bacterial sensors' fluorescent output from the background optical signals. This facilitates the application of bacterial sensors in an outdoor environment, where control of background illumination is not possible. Using this system, we demonstrate standoff detection of 2,4-DNT both in aqueous solution and when buried in soil, by sensor bacteria either in liquid culture or agar-immobilized, respectively, at a distance of 50 m in a realistic optically noisy environment. PMID:26774094

  11. Standoff detection of explosives and buried landmines using fluorescent bacterial sensor cells.

    PubMed

    Kabessa, Yossef; Eyal, Ori; Bar-On, Ofer; Korouma, Victor; Yagur-Kroll, Sharon; Belkin, Shimshon; Agranat, Aharon J

    2016-05-15

    A standoff detection scheme for buried landmines and concealed explosive charges is presented. The detection procedure consists of the following: Live bacterial sensor strains, genetically engineered to produce a dose-dependent amount of green fluorescent protein (GFP) in the presence of explosives' vapors, are encapsulated and spread on the suspected area. The fluorescence produced by the bacteria in response to traces of the explosive material in their microenvironment is remotely detected by a phase-locked optoelectronic sampling system. This scheme enables fast direct access to a large minefield area, while obviating the need to endanger personnel and equipment. Moreover, the employment of phase locking detection efficiently isolates the bacterial sensors' fluorescent output from the background optical signals. This facilitates the application of bacterial sensors in an outdoor environment, where control of background illumination is not possible. Using this system, we demonstrate standoff detection of 2,4-DNT both in aqueous solution and when buried in soil, by sensor bacteria either in liquid culture or agar-immobilized, respectively, at a distance of 50 m in a realistic optically noisy environment.

  12. Rapid mapping of soil electrical conductivity by remote sensing: implication for landmine detection and vehicle mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsube, T. J.; McNairn, H.; Das, Y.; Gauthier, E.; Holt, R. M.; Singhroy, V.; DiLabio, R.; Connell-Madore, S.; Dyke, L.

    2005-06-01

    Many soil physical and chemical properties interfere with landmine detection signals. Since prior knowledge of these property distributions would allow appropriate technology selection and efficient demining operations, rapid mapping of these properties over wide areas are considered for meeting military and economic constraints. As soil electrical conductivity (EC) interferes with widely used detection systems, such as metal detectors and ground penetrating radar, we have started with developing a rapid mapping technique for EC using remote sensing. Electromagnetic surveys are proven methods for mapping EC, but do not provide all information required for demining. Therefore, EC prediction by imaging of soil moisture change using radar satellite imagery acquired by RADARSAT is being tested in eastern Alberta, Canada; northern Mississippi (U.S.A.). Areas of little soil moisture change with time are associated with high moisture retention and high clay content, suggesting higher EC. These soil characteristics are also associated with trafficability. RADARSAT soil moisture change detection images for eastern Alberta identified five areas with possible high moisture retention characteristics. Validation by soil and trafficability maps verified the predictions for more than half of the areas. Lack of some prediction accuracy is considered due to image acquisition timing and lack of physical property knowledge of some soil constituents.

  13. A neutron Albedo system with time rejection for landmine and IED detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovaltchouk, V. D.; Andrews, H. R.; Clifford, E. T. H.; Faust, A. A.; Ing, H.; McFee, J. E.

    2011-10-01

    A neutron Albedo system has been developed for imaging of buried landmines and improvised explosive devices (IEDs). It involves irradiating the ground with fast neutrons and subsequently detecting the thermalized neutrons that return. A scintillating 6Li loaded ZnS(Ag) screen with a sensitive area of 40 cm×40 cm is used as a thermal neutron detector. Scintillation light is captured by orthogonal arrays of wavelength-shifting fibers placed on either side of the scintillator surface and then transferred to X and Y multi-pixel PMTs. A timing circuit, used with pulsed neutron sources, records the time when a neutron detection takes place relative to an external synchronization pulse from the pulsed source. Experimental tests of the Albedo system performance have been done in a sand box with a 252Cf neutron source (no time gating) and with pulsed D-D (2.6 MeV) neutrons from the Defense R&D Ottawa Van de Graaff accelerator (with time gating). Information contained in the time evolution of the thermal neutron field provided improved detection capability and image reconstruction. The detector design is described and experimental results are discussed.

  14. Spectrum analysis of seismic surface waves and its applications in seismic landmine detection.

    PubMed

    Alam, Mubashir; McClellan, James H; Scott, Waymond R

    2007-03-01

    In geophysics, spectrum analysis of surface waves (SASW) refers to a noninvasive method for soil characterization. However, the term spectrum analysis can be used in a wider sense to mean a method for determining and identifying various modes of seismic surface waves and their properties such as velocity, polarization, etc. Surface waves travel along the free boundary of a medium and can be easily detected with a transducer placed on the free surface of the boundary. A new method based on vector processing of space-time data obtained from an array of triaxial sensors is proposed to produce high-resolution, multimodal spectra from surface waves. Then individual modes can be identified in the spectrum and reconstructed in the space-time domain; also, reflected waves can be separated easily from forward waves in the spectrum domain. This new SASW method can be used for detecting and locating landmines by analyzing the reflected waves for resonance. Processing examples are presented for numerically generated data, experimental data collected in a laboratory setting, and field data.

  15. On the origin of superparamagnetic minerals of tropical soils and their impact on landmine detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igel, Jan; Preetz, Holger; Altfelder, Sven

    2010-05-01

    successively with weathering for ultrabasic, basic/intermediate and acid igneous parent material, but, it tends to decrease for clay/clay slate and sandstone. Based on the above observations we conclude that the content of SP minerals depends on both: parent rock and alteration of the material. The total amount of SP minerals rises during weathering, regardless of the parent material. The process is either preferential accumulation of weathering resistant magnetic minerals, including the ultra-fine grained fraction, or neo-formation of new magnetic minerals. The increase of relative frequency dependence of igneous rocks is a clear indication that SP minerals are formed during soil genesis. However, for some sedimentary rocks, the amount of SP minerals is already high and is not subsequently increased further during weathering. Electromagnetic induction (EMI) based metal detectors are the most widely used sensing techniques in landmine clearance operations. They are negatively influenced by magnetic susceptibility and its frequency dependence. In particular tropical soils show to have a negative impact on EMI sensors. Besides, the tropics are the regions which are most affected by landmines where most of the humanitarian demining-activities concentrate. Currently, no soil classification system exists that helps to predict the influence of frequency dependent susceptibility on landmine detection. We deduce a system that can be used to predict the soil impact depending on parent material and weathering. Our system can be consulted by demining organisations to predict metal detector performance in tropical regions based on geologic and soil maps. Ultra-basic, basic and intermediate igneous rocks have a moderate influence on EMI detectors in average cases and a very severe influence in extreme cases. Soils developed from these rocks have a severe or very severe influence. In contrast, acid igneous rocks and sediments do not influence EMI detectors severely. Soils developed from

  16. Surface Electrical Conductivity Prediction by Soil Moisture and Electromagnetic Mapping Techniques: Implication for Landmine Detection Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsube, J.; McNairn, H.; Keating, P. K.; Das, Y.; Dyke, L.; Best, M. E.; Singhroy, V.; Connell-Madore, S.; Hunter, J.; Klassen, R.; Dilabio, R.; Moore, A.

    2004-05-01

    Electrical conductivity (EC) can be a source of significant signal interference in landmine detection, implying that there is a necessity for soil EC prediction in order to carry out safe demining operations in landmine affected countries in the world. A fundamental study on soil EC mechanisms and their relationship to moisture content has been carried out in order to increase the soil EC prediction accuracy when using data from various sensors, such as remote sensing, airborne and surficial electromagnetic (EM) methods. Results indicate that soil moisture consists of free water filling pore spaces and bound water which forms adsorbed water layers on the grain surfaces. The response of these two water phases to drying rates and EC are very different, to the extent that a moist clay poor soil may have low EC but a dry clay rich soil may have higher EC. This is a result of not only the bound water layers being a significant source of EC, but of the capillary component of the free water reacting differently to the different grain-sizes of the soil. The capillary water forms important electrical conductive bridges between the adsorbed water layers on the grains that constitute the soil. This implies that information on soil texture, mineralogy and their distribution are required for accurate EC prediction. Whereas information on these soil characteristics may be acquired by remote sensing and soil maps, soil moisture content is likely to vary from the time of data acquisition to that of demining operations, implying methods to predict these changes are required. In addition, soil type inhomogeniety, such as vertical and horizontal variation can also be a source of inaccuracies in moisture and EC predictions. However, these investigations also indicate that a wide band electrical frequency signal may have the possibility of providing information on, not only metallic mineral content, but on pore space, clay mineral type and water content. In addition, applications of

  17. Magnetic viscosity of tropical soils: classification and prediction as an aid for landmine detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igel, J.; Preetz, H.; Altfelder, S.

    2012-08-01

    assessing the impact of the subsurface on EMI sensors for landmine detection. In general, intermediate, felsic and sedimentary rocks have no influence on the detectors and only a weak influence in the most extreme cases. Soils derived from these rocks typically have no influence; however, they can have a very severe influence in a few cases. In contrast, ultramafic and mafic rocks typically have a moderate influence and a very severe influence in extreme cases, with the associated soils resulting in a severe influence in general. The deduced prognosis system can be used by demining organizations to help them predict metal detector performance in tropical regions on the basis of geologic and/or soil maps, which do not supply information on electromagnetic properties. In this way, such a system may eventually help with the planning of demining campaigns and selection of appropriate sensors.

  18. Soil moisture and electrical conductivity prediction and their implication for landmine detection technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsube, T. John; Keating, Pierre K.; McNairn, Heather; Das, Yogadhish; DiLabio, Ron; Singhroy, Vern; Connell-Madore, Shauna; Best, Mel E.; Hunter, James; Klassen, Rod; Dyke, Larry

    2004-09-01

    Physical properties, such as soil moisture, magnetic susceptibility and electrical conductivity (EC) are sources of signal interference for many landmine detectors. Soil EC mechanisms and their relationship to moisture are being studied to increase the soil EC prediction accuracy by radar remote sensing, airborne and ground electromagnetic (EM) methods. This is required for effective detection operations in problematic regions of the world. Results indicate that responses of free water and bound water to drying rates and EC are very different, to the extent that moist clay-poor soil may have lower EC compared to dryer clay-rich soil at certain moisture contents. These suggest that soil EC prediction should start with analyses of radar remote sensing data acquired on separate days, followed by high frequency airborne EM surveys, and validation by ground EM surveys and laboratory soil sample analyses. Due to the various expertise required, a team of relevant experts (e.g., geology, geophysics, remote sensing, petrophysics, agriculture, soil physics, electrical engineering and demining) should be organized to provide information on detector viability for demining in problematic areas in the world. It is also proposed to develop wide frequency band EM systems to provide much of the required information in one measurement.

  19. The Canadian Forces ILDS: a militarily fielded multisensor vehicle-mounted teleoperated landmine detection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFee, John E.; Russell, Kevin L.; Chesney, Robert H.; Faust, Anthony A.; Das, Yogadhish

    2006-05-01

    The Improved Landmine Detection System (ILDS) is intended to meet Canadian military mine clearance requirements in rear area combat situations and peacekeeping on roads and tracks. The system consists of two teleoperated vehicles and a command vehicle. The teleoperated protection vehicle precedes, clearing antipersonnel mines and magnetic and tilt rod-fuzed antitank mines. It consists of an armoured personnel carrier with a forward looking infrared imager, a finger plow or roller and a magnetic signature duplicator. The teleoperated detection vehicle follows to detect antitank mines. The purpose-built vehicle carries forward looking infrared and visible imagers, a 3 m wide, down-looking sensitive electromagnetic induction detector array and a 3 m wide down-looking ground probing radar, which scan the ground in front of the vehicle. Sensor information is combined using navigation sensors and custom navigation, registration, spatial correspondence and data fusion algorithms. Suspicious targets are then confirmed by a thermal neutron activation detector. The prototype, designed and built by Defence R&D Canada, was completed in October 1997. General Dynamics Canada delivered four production units, based on the prototype concept and technologies, to the Canadian Forces (CF) in 2002. ILDS was deployed in Afghanistan in 2003, making the system the first militarily fielded, teleoperated, multi-sensor vehicle-mounted mine detector and the first with a fielded confirmation sensor. Performance of the prototype in Canadian and independent US trials is summarized and recent results from the production version of the confirmation sensor are discussed. CF operations with ILDS in Afghanistan are described.

  20. DETECTING BARYON ACOUSTIC OSCILLATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Labatie, A.; Starck, J. L.

    2012-02-20

    Baryon acoustic oscillations (BAOs) are a feature imprinted in the galaxy distribution by acoustic waves traveling in the plasma of the early universe. Their detection at the expected scale in large-scale structures strongly supports current cosmological models with a nearly linear evolution from redshift z Almost-Equal-To 1000 and the existence of dark energy. In addition, BAOs provide a standard ruler for studying cosmic expansion. In this paper, we focus on methods for BAO detection using the correlation function measurement {xi}-hat. For each method, we want to understand the tested hypothesis (the hypothesis H{sub 0} to be rejected) and the underlying assumptions. We first present wavelet methods which are mildly model-dependent and mostly sensitive to the BAO feature. Then we turn to fully model-dependent methods. We present the method used most often based on the {chi}{sup 2} statistic, but we find that it has limitations. In general the assumptions of the {chi}{sup 2} method are not verified, and it only gives a rough estimate of the significance. The estimate can become very wrong when considering more realistic hypotheses, where the covariance matrix of {xi}-hat depends on cosmological parameters. Instead, we propose to use the {Delta}l method based on two modifications: we modify the procedure for computing the significance and make it rigorous, and we modify the statistic to obtain better results in the case of varying covariance matrix. We verify with simulations that correct significances are different from the ones obtained using the classical {chi}{sup 2} procedure. We also test a simple example of varying covariance matrix. In this case we find that our modified statistic outperforms the classical {chi}{sup 2} statistic when both significances are correctly computed. Finally, we find that taking into account variations of the covariance matrix can change both BAO detection levels and cosmological parameter constraints.

  1. A new integrated approach for characterizing the soil electromagnetic properties and detecting landmines using a hand-held vector network analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopera, Olga; Lambot, Sebastien; Slob, Evert; Vanclooster, Marnik; Macq, Benoit; Milisavljevic, Nada

    2006-05-01

    The application of ground-penetrating radar (GPR) in humanitarian demining labors presents two major challenges: (1) the development of affordable and practical systems to detect metallic and non-metallic antipersonnel (AP) landmines under different conditions, and (2) the development of accurate soil characterization techniques to evaluate soil properties effects and determine the performance of these GPR-based systems. In this paper, we present a new integrated approach for characterizing electromagnetic (EM) properties of mine-affected soils and detecting landmines using a low cost hand-held vector network analyzer (VNA) connected to a highly directive antenna. Soil characterization is carried out using the radar-antenna-subsurface model of Lambot et al.1 and full-wave inversion of the radar signal focused in the time domain on the surface reflection. This methodology is integrated to background subtraction (BS) and migration to enhance landmine detection. Numerical and laboratory experiments are performed to show the effect of the soil EM properties on the detectability of the landmines and how the proposed approach can ameliorate the GPR performance.

  2. Prediction of the effects of soil and target properties on the antipersonnel landmine detection performance of ground-penetrating radar: A Colombian case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopera, Olga; Milisavljevic, Nada

    2007-09-01

    The performance of ground-penetrating (GPR) radar is determined fundamentally by the soil electromagnetic (EM) properties and the target characteristics. In this paper, we predict the effects of such properties on the antipersonnel (AP) landmine detection performance of GPR in a Colombian scenario. Firstly, we use available soil geophysical information in existing pedotransfer models to calculate soil EM properties. The latter are included in a two-dimensional (2D), finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) modeling program in conjunction with the characteristics of AP landmines to calculate the buried target reflection. The approach is applied to two soils selected among Colombian mine-affected areas, and several local improvised explosive devices (IEDs) and AP landmines are modeled as targets. The signatures from such targets buried in the selected soils are predicted, considering different conditions. Finally, we show how the GPR can contribute in detecting low- and non-metallic targets in these Colombian soils. Such a system could be quite adequate for complementing humanitarian landmine detection by metal detectors.

  3. Results of the Development of Humanitarian Landmine Detection System by a Compact Fusion Neutron Source and Dual Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshikawa, Kiyoshi; Masuda, Kai; Takamatsu, Teruhisa; Yamamoto, Yasushi; Toku, Hisayuki; Fujimoto, Takashi; Hotta, Eiki; Yamauchi, Kunihito; Ohnishi, Masami; Osawa, Hodaka; Shiroya, Seiji; Misawa, Tsuyoshi; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki; Kubo, Yoshikazu; Doi, Toshiro

    2009-03-10

    A 5-year task is described on the research and development of the advanced humanitarian landmine detection system by using a compact discharge-type fusion neutron source called IECF (Inertial-Electrostatic Confinement Fusion) device and 3 dual sensors made of BGO and NaI(Tl). With 10{sup 7} D-D neutrons/s stably produced in steady-state mode, H-2.2 MeV, N-5.3, 10.8 MeV {gamma} rays from (n,{gamma}) reaction with hydrogen and nitrogen atoms in the explosives are measured for two kinds of explosives (TNT, RDX), under the conditions of three different buried depths, and soil moistures each. Final probabilities of detection for arid soil are found to be 100% in the present tests. The neutron backscattering method is also found to be efficient.

  4. Fusion of KLMS and blob based pre-screener for buried landmine detection using ground penetrating radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baydar, Bora; Akar, Gözde Bozdaǧi.; Yüksel, Seniha E.; Öztürk, Serhat

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, a decision level fusion using multiple pre-screener algorithms is proposed for the detection of buried landmines from Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) data. The Kernel Least Mean Square (KLMS) and the Blob Filter pre-screeners are fused together to work in real time with less false alarms and higher true detection rates. The effect of the kernel variance is investigated for the KLMS algorithm. Also, the results of the KLMS and KLMS+Blob filter algorithms are compared to the LMS method in terms of processing time and false alarm rates. Proposed algorithm is tested on both simulated data and real data collected at the field of IPA Defence at METU, Ankara, Turkey.

  5. Soil properties and performance of landmine detection by metal detector and ground-penetrating radar — Soil characterisation and its verification by a field test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Kazunori; Preetz, Holger; Igel, Jan

    2011-04-01

    Metal detectors have commonly been used for landmine detection, and ground-penetrating radar (GPR) is about to be deployed for this purpose. These devices are influenced by the magnetic and electric properties of soil, since both employ electromagnetic techniques. Various soil properties and their spatial distributions were measured and determined with geophysical methods in four soil types where a test of metal detectors and GPR systems took place. By analysing the soil properties, these four soils were classified based on the expected influence of each detection technique and predicted soil difficulty. This classification was compared to the detection performance of the detectors and a clear correlation between the predicted soil difficulty and performance was observed. The detection performance of the metal detector and target identification performance of the GPR systems degraded in soils that were expected to be problematic. Therefore, this study demonstrated that the metal detector and GPR performance for landmine detection can be assessed qualitatively by geophysical analyses.

  6. Development and Performance of an Ultrawideband Stepped-Frequency Radar for Landmine and Improvised Explosive Device (IED) Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phelan, Brian R.; Gallagher, Kyle A.; Sherbondy, Kelly D.; Ranney, Kenneth I.; Narayanan, Ram M.

    2014-11-01

    Under support from the Army Research Laboratory's Partnerships in Research Transition program, a stepped-frequency radar (SFR) is currently under development, which allows for manipulation of the radiated spectrum while still maintaining an effective ultra-wide bandwidth. The SFR is a vehicle-mounted forward-looking ground-penetrating radar designed for high-resolution detection of buried landmines and improvised explosive devices. The SFR can be configured to precisely excise prohibited or interfering frequency bands and also possesses frequency-hopping capabilities. This paper discusses the expected performance features of the SFR as derived from laboratory testing and characterization. Ghosts and artifacts appearing in the range profile arise from gaps in the operating band when the system is configured to omit specific frequencies. An analysis of these effects is discussed and our current solution is presented. Future prospects for the SFR are also discussed, including data collection campaigns at the Army's Adelphi Laboratory Center and the Countermine Test Site.

  7. LIBS: a new versatile field-deployable real-time detector system with potential for landmine detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmon, Russell S.; De Lucia, Frank C.; Winkel, Raymond J., Jr.; LaPointe, Aaron; Grossman, Scott L.; McNesby, Kevin L.; Miziolek, Andrzej W.

    2003-09-01

    Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is an atomic emission spectroscopic technique that utilizes a pulsed laser to create a microplasma on the target together with an array spectrometer to capture the transient light for elemental identification and quantification. LIBS has certain important characteristics that make it a very attractive sensor technology for military uses. Such attributes include that facts that LIBS (1) is relatively simple and straightforward, (2) requires no sample preparation, (3) generates a real-time response, and (4) only engages a very small sample (pg-ng) of matter in each laser shot and microplasma event, (5) has inherent high sensitivity, and (6) responds to all forms of unknowns, and, therefore, is particularly suited for the sensing of dangerous materials. Additionally, a LIBS sensor system can be inexpensive, configured to be man-portable, and designed for both in-situ point sensing and remote stand-off detection with distances of up to 20-25 meters. Broadband LIBS results covering the spectral region from 200-970 nm acquired at the Army Research Laboratory (ARL) under laboratory conditions for a variety of landmine casings and explosive materials. This data will illustrate the potential that LIBS has to be developed into a hand-deployable device that could be utilized as a confirmatory sensor in landmine detection. The concept envisioned is a backpack-size system in which an eyesafe micro-laser is contained in the handle of a deminer's probe and light is delivered and collected through an optical fiber in the tapered tip of the probe. In such a configuration, analyses can be made readily by touching the buried object that one is interested in identifying.

  8. An unmanned ground vehicle for landmine remediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasson, Steven R.; Guilberto, Jose; Ogg, Wade; Wedeward, Kevin; Bruder, Stephen; El-Osery, Aly

    2004-09-01

    Anti-tank (AT) landmines slow down and endanger military advances and present sizeable humanitarian problems. The remediation of these mines by direct human intervention is both dangerous and costly. The Intelligent Systems & Robotics Group (ISRG) at New Mexico Tech has provided a partial solution to this problem by developing an Unmanned Ground Vehicle (UGV) to remediate these mines without endangering human lives. This paper presents an overview of the design and operation of this UGV. Current results and future work are also described herein. To initiate the remediation process the UGV is given the GPS coordinates of previously detected landmines. Once the UGV autonomously navigates to an acceptable proximity of the landmine, a remote operator acquires control over a wireless network link using a joystick on a base station. Utilizing two cameras mounted on the UGV, the operator is able to accurately position the UGV directly over the landmine. The UGV houses a self-contained drill system equipped with its own processing resources, sensors, and actuators. The drill system deploys a neutralizing device over the landmine to neutralize it. One such device, developed by Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC), employs incendiary materials to melt through the container of the landmine and slowly burn the explosive material, thereby safely and remotely disabling the landmine.

  9. Context extraction for local fusion for landmine detection with multi-sensor systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frigui, Hichem; Gader, Paul D.; Ben Abdallah, Ahmed Chamseddine

    2009-05-01

    We present a local method for fusing the results of several landmine detectors using Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) and Wideband Electro-Magnetic Induction (WEMI) sensors. The detectors considered include Edge Histogram Descriptor (EHD), Hidden Markov Models (HMM), and Spectral Correlation Feature (SCF) for the GPR sensor, and a feature-based classifier for the metal detector. The above detectors use different types of features and different classification methods. Our approach, called Context Extraction for Local Fusion with Feature Discrimination(CELF-FD), is a local approach that adapts the fusion method to different regions of the feature space. It is based on a novel objective function that combines context identification and multi-algorithm fusion criteria into a joint objective function. The context identification component thrives to partition the input feature space into clusters and identify the relevant features within each cluster. The fusion component thrives to learns the optimal fusion parameters within each cluster. Results on large and diverse GPR and WEMI data collections show that the proposed method can identify meaningful and coherent clusters and that these clusters require different fusion parameters. Our initial experiments have also indicated that CELF-FD outperforms the original CELF algorithm and all individual detectors.

  10. Robust acoustic object detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amit, Yali; Koloydenko, Alexey; Niyogi, Partha

    2005-10-01

    We consider a novel approach to the problem of detecting phonological objects like phonemes, syllables, or words, directly from the speech signal. We begin by defining local features in the time-frequency plane with built in robustness to intensity variations and time warping. Global templates of phonological objects correspond to the coincidence in time and frequency of patterns of the local features. These global templates are constructed by using the statistics of the local features in a principled way. The templates have clear phonetic interpretability, are easily adaptable, have built in invariances, and display considerable robustness in the face of additive noise and clutter from competing speakers. We provide a detailed evaluation of the performance of some diphone detectors and a word detector based on this approach. We also perform some phonetic classification experiments based on the edge-based features suggested here.

  11. Acoustic detection of manatee vocalizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niezrecki, Christopher; Phillips, Richard; Meyer, Michael; Beusse, Diedrich O.

    2003-09-01

    The West Indian manatee (trichechus manatus latirostris) has become endangered partly because of a growing number of collisions with boats. A system to warn boaters of the presence of manatees, that can signal to boaters that manatees are present in the immediate vicinity, could potentially reduce these boat collisions. In order to identify the presence of manatees, acoustic methods are employed. Within this paper, three different detection algorithms are used to detect the calls of the West Indian manatee. The detection systems are tested in the laboratory using simulated manatee vocalizations from an audio compact disk. The detection method that provides the best overall performance is able to correctly identify ~96% of the manatee vocalizations. However, the system also results in a false alarm rate of ~16%. The results of this work may ultimately lead to the development of a manatee warning system that can warn boaters of the presence of manatees.

  12. Computational modeling of on-contact antennas for the detection and localization of anti-personnel landmines via ground penetrating radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hines, Margery Jeanne

    Ground-penetrating radar (GPR) is a mature technology which has developed into a popular tool for subsurface imaging; however its application in landmine detection is still in its infancy. Landmines are typically buried in dispersive soils below a rough surface where the effectiveness of conventional air-coupled GPR is limited. By utilizing ground-contact antennas the signal penetration is dramatically improved and data analysis is simplified. In order to canvas an area while achieving ground-contact with the antennas, this research proposes that the antennas be mounted to the bottom of the feet of a walking robotic platform developed by Square One Systems Design, called the Tri-Sphere Multi-Mode Mobility Platform. Using three antennas in both the transmitting and receiving modes, three unique bistatic GPR traces can be obtained from which a novel anti-personnel landmine detection and localization method is proposed. For each GPR trace, the target reflection is enhanced using circular polarization and is extracted using background removal. The full-path travel times are then determined by correlating the target reflections with a reference signal. These travel times are used to geometrically determine the target position to a single subsurface scattering point, which is identified as the potential target location. This detection method is fully autonomous, thereby allowing the robot to canvas a large amount of area and mark potential threats without any human interaction. Using a 3-dimensional finite-difference time domain model, GPR data is simulated for sixteen statistically different rough surfaces, nine different target locations, and two target casings, amounting to 288 unique simulations. The soil modeled is 10% wet Bosnian soil, which is both lossy and dispersive. For comparison, the various simulations are analyzed with both the exact simulated background response and the statistically approximated background response. Ultimately, using the approximated

  13. Acoustic resonance for nonmetallic mine detection

    SciTech Connect

    Kercel, S.W.

    1998-04-01

    The feasibility of acoustic resonance for detection of plastic mines was investigated by researchers at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s Instrumentation and Controls Division under an internally funded program. The data reported in this paper suggest that acoustic resonance is not a practical method for mine detection. Representative small plastic anti-personnel mines were tested, and were found to not exhibit detectable acoustic resonances. Also, non-metal objects known to have strong acoustic resonances were tested with a variety of excitation techniques, and no practical non-contact method of exciting a consistently detectable resonance in a buried object was discovered. Some of the experimental data developed in this work may be useful to other researchers seeking a method to detect buried plastic mines. A number of excitation methods and their pitfalls are discussed. Excitation methods that were investigated include swept acoustic, chopped acoustic, wavelet acoustic, and mechanical shaking. Under very contrived conditions, a weak response that could be attributed to acoustic resonance was observed, but it does not appear to be practical as a mine detection feature. Transfer properties of soil were investigated. Impulse responses of several representative plastic mines were investigated. Acoustic leakage coupling, and its implications as a disruptive mechanism were investigated.

  14. Acoustic leak detection and ultrasonic crack detection

    SciTech Connect

    Kupperman, D.S.; Claytor, T.N.; Groenwald, R.

    1983-10-01

    A program is under way to assess the effectiveness of current and proposed techniques for acoustic leak detection (ALD) in reactor coolant systems. An ALD facility has been constructed and tests have begun on five laboratory-grown cracks (three fatigue and two thermal-fatigue and two field-induced IGSCC specimens. After ultrasonic testing revealed cracks in the Georgia Power Co. HATCH-1 BWR recirculation header, the utility installed an ALD system. Data from HATCH-1 have given an indication of the background noise level at a BWR recirculation header sweepolet weld. The HATCH leak detection system was tested to determine the sensitivity and dynamic range. Other background data have been acquired at the Watts Bar Nuclear Reactor in Tennessee. An ANL waveguide system, including transducer and electronics, was installed and tested on an accumulator safety injection pipe. The possibility of using ultrasonic wave scattering patterns to discriminate between IGSCCs and geometric reflectors has been explored. Thirteen reflectors (field IGSCCs, graphite wool IGSCCs, weld roots, and slits) were examined. Work with cast stainless steel (SS) included sound velocity and attenuation in isotropic and anisotropic cast SS. Reducing anisotropy does not help reduce attenuation in large-grained material. Large artificial flaws (e.g., a 1-cm-deep notch with a 4-cm path) could not be detected in isotropic centrifugally cast SS (1 to 2-mm grains) by longitudinal or shear waves at frequencies of 1 MHz or greater, but could be detected with 0.5-MHz shear waves. 13 figures.

  15. Preliminary study of detection of buried landmines using a programmable hyperspectral imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFee, John E.; Ripley, Herb T.; Buxton, Roger; Thriscutt, Andrew M.

    1996-05-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine if buried mines could be detected by measuring the change in reflectance spectra of vegetation above mine burial sites. Mines were laid using hand methods and simulated mechanical methods and spectral images were obtained over a three month period using a casi hyperspectral imager scanned from a personnel lift. Mines were not detectable by measurement of the shift of the red edge of vegetative spectra. By calculating the linear correlation coefficient image, some mines in light vegetative cover (grass, grass/blueberries) were apparently detected, but mines buried in heavy vegetation cover (deep ferns) were not detectable. Due to problems with ground truthing, accurate probabilities of detection and false alarm rates were not obtained.

  16. Acoustic detection of melt particles

    SciTech Connect

    Costley, R.D. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The Reactor Safety Research Department at Sandia National Laboratories is investigating a type of Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA). In this particular type of accident, core meltdown occurs while the pressure within the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) is high. If one of the instrument tube penetrations in the lower head fails, melt particles stream through the cavity and into the containment vessel. This experiment, which simulates this type accident, was performed in the Surtsev Direct Heating Test Facility which is approximately a 1:10 linear scaling of a large dry containment volume. A 1:10 linear scale model of the reactor cavity was placed near the bottom of the Surtsey vessel so that the exit of the cavity was at the vertical centerline of the vessel. A pressure vessel used to create the simulated molten core debris was located at the scaled height of the RPV. In order to better understand how the melt leaves the cavity and streams into the containment an array of five acoustic sensors was placed directly in the path of the melt particles about 30 feet from the exit of the sealed cavity. Highly damped, broadband sensors were chosen to minimize ringing so that individual particle hits could be detected. The goal was to count the signals produced by the individual particle hits to get some idea of how the melt particles left the cavity. This document presents some of the results of the experiment. 9 figs.

  17. Landmine detection with Bayesian cross-categorization on point-wise, contextual and spatial features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Léveillé, Jasmin; Yu, Ssu-Hsin; Gandhe, Avinash

    2016-05-01

    Recently developed feature extraction methods proposed in the explosive hazard detection community have yielded many features that potentially provide complementary information for explosive detection. Finding the right combination of features that is most effective in distinguishing targets from clutter, on the other hand, is extremely challenging due to a large number of potential features to explore. Furthermore, sensors employed for mine and buried explosive hazard detection are typically sensitive to environmental conditions such as soil properties and weather as well as other operating parameters. In this work, we applied Bayesian cross-categorization (CrossCat) to a heterogeneous set of features derived from electromagnetic induction (EMI) sensor time-series for purposes of buried explosive hazard detection. The set of features used here includes simple, point-wise measurements such as the overall magnitude of the EMI response, contextual information such as soil type, and a new feature consisting of spatially aggregated Discrete Spectra of Relaxation Frequencies (DSRFs). Previous work showed that the DSRF characterizes target properties with some invariance to orientation and position. We have developed a novel approach to aggregate point-wise DSRF estimates. The spatial aggregation is based on the Bag-of-Words (BoW) model found in the machine learning and computer vision literatures and aims to enhance the invariance properties of point-wise DSRF estimates. We considered various refinements to the BoW model for purpose of buried explosive hazard detection and tested their usefulness as part of a Bayesian cross-categorization framework on data collected from two different sites. The results show improved performance over classifiers using only point-wise features.

  18. Preliminary experimental validation of a landmine detection system based on localized heating and sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balsi, M.; Corcione, M.; Dell'Omo, P.; Esposito, S.; Magliocchetti, L.

    2008-04-01

    In this paper we present results of experimental validation of a new methodology for anti-personnel mine (APM) detection for humanitarian demining, proposed by the authors and previously validated only by simulation. The technique is based on local heating and sensing by contactless thermometers (pyrometers). A large sand box (2.6m 3) has been realized and fitted with a cart moving on rails and holding instrumentation. Accurate mine surrogates have been hidden in the sand together with confounders. Preliminary measurements are consistent with simulations and prove validity of the approach.

  19. Humanitarian mine detection by acoustic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Kercel, S.W.

    1998-03-01

    The JASON Committee at MITRE Corp. was tasked by DARPA to inquire into suitable technologies for humanitarian mine detection. Acoustic resonance was one of the very few technologies that the JASONs determined might be promising for the task, but was as yet unexplored at the time that they conducted their inquiry. The objective of this Seed Money investigation into acoustic resonance was to determine if it would be feasible to use acoustic resonance to provide an improvement to present methods for humanitarian mine detection. As detailed in this report, acoustic resonance methods do not appear to be feasible for this task. Although acoustic resonant responses are relatively easy to detect when they exist, they are very difficult to excite by the non-contact means that must be used for buried objects. Despite many different attempts, this research did not discover any practical means of using sound to excite resonant responses in objects known to have strong resonances. The shaker table experiments did see an effect that might be attributable to the resonance of the object under test, but the effect was weak, and exploited the a priori knowledge of the resonant frequency of the object under test to distinguish it from the background. If experiments that used objects known to have strong acoustic resonances produced such marginal results, this does not seem to be a practical method to detect objects with weak resonances or non-existent resonances. The results of this work contribute to the ORNL countermine initiative. ORNL is exploring several unconventional mine detection technologies, and is proposed to explore others. Since this research has discovered some major pitfalls in non-metallic mine detection, this experience will add realism to other strategies proposed for mine detection technologies. The experiment provided hands-on experience with inert plastic mines under field conditions, and gives ORNL additional insight into the problems of developing practical

  20. Design and performance of an ultra-wideband stepped-frequency radar with precise frequency control for landmine and IED detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phelan, Brian R.; Sherbondy, Kelly D.; Ranney, Kenneth I.; Narayanan, Ram M.

    2014-05-01

    The Army Research Laboratory (ARL) has developed an impulse-based vehicle-mounted forward-looking ultra- wideband (UWB) radar for imaging buried landmines and improvised explosive devices (IEDs). However, there is no control of the radiated spectrum in this system. As part of ARL's Partnerships in Research Transition (PIRT) program, the above deficiency is addressed by the design of a Stepped-Frequency Radar (SFR) which allows for precise control over the radiated spectrum, while still maintaining an effective ultra-wide bandwidth. The SFR utilizes a frequency synthesizer which can be configured to excise prohibited and interfering frequency bands and also implement frequency-hopping capabilities. The SFR is designed to be a forward-looking ground- penetrating (FLGPR) Radar utilizing a uniform linear array of sixteen (16) Vivaldi notch receive antennas and two (2) Quad-ridge horn transmit antennas. While a preliminary SFR consisting of four (4) receive channels has been designed, this paper describes major improvements to the system, and an analysis of expected system performance. The 4-channel system will be used to validate the SFR design which will eventually be augmented in to the full 16-channel system. The SFR has an operating frequency band which ranges from 300 - 2000 MHz, and a minimum frequency step-size of 1 MHz. The radar system is capable of illuminating range swaths that have maximum extents of 30 to 150 meters (programmable). The transmitter has the ability to produce approximately -2 dBm/MHz average power over the entire operating frequency range. The SFR will be used to determine the practicality of detecting and classifying buried and concealed landmines and IEDs from safe stand-off distances.

  1. Improving Accuracy in Detecting Acoustic Onsets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duyck, Wouter; Anseel, Frederik; Szmalec, Arnaud; Mestdagh, Pascal; Tavernier, Antoine; Hartsuiker, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    In current cognitive psychology, naming latencies are commonly measured by electronic voice keys that detect when sound exceeds a certain amplitude threshold. However, recent research (e.g., K. Rastle & M. H. Davis, 2002) has shown that these devices are particularly inaccurate in precisely detecting acoustic onsets. In this article, the authors…

  2. Acoustic enhancement for photo detecting devices

    DOEpatents

    Thundat, Thomas G; Senesac, Lawrence R; Van Neste, Charles W

    2013-02-19

    Provided are improvements to photo detecting devices and methods for enhancing the sensitivity of photo detecting devices. A photo detecting device generates an electronic signal in response to a received light pulse. An electro-mechanical acoustic resonator, electrically coupled to the photo detecting device, damps the electronic signal and increases the signal noise ratio (SNR) of the electronic signal. Increased photo detector standoff distances and sensitivities will result.

  3. Acoustic emission beamforming for enhanced damage detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaskey, Gregory C.; Glaser, Steven D.; Grosse, Christian U.

    2008-03-01

    As civil infrastructure ages, the early detection of damage in a structure becomes increasingly important for both life safety and economic reasons. This paper describes the analysis procedures used for beamforming acoustic emission techniques as well as the promising results of preliminary experimental tests on a concrete bridge deck. The method of acoustic emission offers a tool for detecting damage, such as cracking, as it occurs on or in a structure. In order to gain meaningful information from acoustic emission analyses, the damage must be localized. Current acoustic emission systems with localization capabilities are very costly and difficult to install. Sensors must be placed throughout the structure to ensure that the damage is encompassed by the array. Beamforming offers a promising solution to these problems and permits the use of wireless sensor networks for acoustic emission analyses. Using the beamforming technique, the azmuthal direction of the location of the damage may be estimated by the stress waves impinging upon a small diameter array (e.g. 30mm) of acoustic emission sensors. Additional signal discrimination may be gained via array processing techniques such as the VESPA process. The beamforming approach requires no arrival time information and is based on very simple delay and sum beamforming algorithms which can be easily implemented on a wireless sensor or mote.

  4. Resonance vibrations of buried landmines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagrai, Andrei N.; Donskoy, Dimitri M.; Ekimov, Alexander E.

    2004-09-01

    Resonance behavior of many types of landmines was first experimentally discovered in 2000 (Donskoy et al. in Proceedings of SPIE Vol. 4394, pp. 575-582, 2001). Laboratory studies and field tests have shown that mine"s resonance response is a complex phenomenon dependent upon interaction between soil and mines and their respective properties. Although the resonance effect was successfully used by various research teams for detection of landmines, there were no thorough studies on various factors influencing buried mine's resonance response. This paper presents results of theoretical and experimental investigation of this problem including multi-modal structure of mine's vibration response, effect of burial depth and soil condition. In the modeling efforts we considered multiple modes of vibration of mine casing and represented them as oscillators with effective parameters. This approach allowed for simplification of analysis and expanding existing lump-element model to account for multiple vibration modes. The experimental tests were focused on studying the effects of burial depth and soil moisture content on resonance behavior of soil-mine system. The tests have shown that a resonance frequency initially decreases with burial depth, as expected. However, an anomalous resonance frequency increase was observed at greater depths; soil moisture even further increases the resonance frequency.

  5. Acoustic detectability of Rhynchophorus cruentatus (Coleoptera: Dryophthoridae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The palmetto weevil, Rhynchophorus cruentatus Fabricius, native to Florida, attacks palm trees. Like its economically destructive relatives, R. ferrugineus (Olivier) and R. palmarum L., it feeds internally and often is not detected until irreparable damage occurs. Acoustic methods previously used su...

  6. Acoustical Detection Of Leakage In A Combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puster, Richard L.; Petty, Jeffrey L.

    1993-01-01

    Abnormal combustion excites characteristic standing wave. Acoustical leak-detection system gives early warning of failure, enabling operating personnel to stop combustion process and repair spray bar before leak grows large enough to cause damage. Applicable to engines, gas turbines, furnaces, and other machines in which acoustic emissions at known frequencies signify onset of damage. Bearings in rotating machines monitored for emergence of characteristic frequencies shown in previous tests associated with incipient failure. Also possible to monitor for signs of trouble at multiple frequencies by feeding output of transducer simultaneously to multiple band-pass filters and associated circuitry, including separate trigger circuit set to appropriate level for each frequency.

  7. Acoustic detection of coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Semmlow, John; Rahalkar, Ketaki

    2007-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) occurs when the arteries to the heart (the coronary arteries) become blocked by deposition of plaque, depriving the heart of oxygen-bearing blood. This disease is arguably the most important fatal disease in industrialized countries, causing one-third to one-half of all deaths in persons between the ages of 35 and 64 in the United States. Despite the fact that early detection of CAD allows for successful and cost-effective treatment of the disease, only 20% of CAD cases are diagnosed prior to a heart attack. The development of a definitive, noninvasive test for detection of coronary blockages is one of the holy grails of diagnostic cardiology. One promising approach to detecting coronary blockages noninvasively is based on identifying acoustic signatures generated by turbulent blood flow through partially occluded coronary arteries. In fact, no other approach to the detection of CAD promises to be as inexpensive, simple to perform, and risk free as the acoustic-based approach. Although sounds associated with partially blocked arteries are easy to identify in more superficial vessels such as the carotids, sounds from coronary arteries are very faint and surrounded by noise such as the very loud valve sounds. To detect these very weak signals requires sophisticated signal processing techniques. This review describes the work that has been done in this area since the 1980s and discusses future directions that may fulfill the promise of the acoustic approach to detecting coronary artery disease.

  8. Acoustic Detection of Buried Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivansson, S.; Jacobsen, N.; Levonen, M.; Nilsson, B.; Moren, P.

    2001-12-01

    The capability to detect objects buried in the sea bottom is important for many reasons. For example bottom mines as well as dumped chemical munitions can be expected to have been buried by the sedimentation. Standard sub-bottom profilers that are routinely used for mapping sediment structures do not have good enough resolutions to detect small buried objects. Parametric sonar, with a much smaller lobe, is much more appropriate. In the report, we show results from measurements with a parametric sonar, mounted on a ROV (remotely operated vehicle). The measurements were made in the archipelago of Stockholm with a test object buried in clay. Two techniques were used to improve the detection capability, image processing and FARIM analysis. Concerning image processing, median filtering turns out to provide the best results. Isolated noisy pings are effectively suppressed in this way. FARIM analysis can be used to estimate roughness and impedance of the bottom. Our experiments show that a buried object can often be detected by an anomaly in the impedance estimate. Among three tested center frequencies for the emitted pulse, 5, 10 and 20 kHz, the highest frequency (20 kHz) turns out to provide the best detection capability. This is true for the image processing results as well as for the FARIM results. We have tried bistatic techniques to characterize a detected buried object. Sound pulses are emitted towards the object from one direction and the scattered energy is studied at another direction. We show computational results from a recently developed numerical model. The scattered field turns out to be very sensitive to the properties of the object.

  9. Tests of the HYDAD-D Landmine Detector on Dry Soil in Northern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavez, Cristian; Brooks, Frank D.; Smit, F. D.; Moreno, José; Altamirano, Luis; Soto, Leopoldo

    2010-08-01

    HYDAD is an acronym of HYdrogen Density Anomaly Detector. It is a device that detects hydrogen-rich objects by analysis the energy-moderation of fast neutrons by hydrogen [1]. A HYDAD-D was assembled at the Chilean Nuclear Energy Commission (CCHEN) guided by the South African developers, aimed to detecting landmines in arid soils. The device was tested under controlled conditions in dry soil equivalent to the mine fields of the frontier zones of the north of Chile. The tests were carried out in Arica, in collaboration with the Chilean Army, using antipersonnel landmines, antitank landmines and objects with a high Hydrogen content (e.g, water vessel, paraffin wax). The test results demonstrated that HYDAD-D can detect antipersonnel landmines as small as the M14 (mass 100 g, including only 29 g of TNT in a plastic container), in dry sand, at typical landmines bury-depths (less than 5 cm).

  10. Effect of Weather on the Predicted PMN Landmine Chemical Signature for Kabul, Afghanistan

    SciTech Connect

    WEBB, STEPHEN W.; PHELAN, JAMES M.

    2002-11-01

    Buried landmines are often detected through the chemical signature in the air above the soil surface by mine detection dogs. Environmental processes play a significant role in the chemical signature available for detection. Due to the shallow burial depth of landmines, the weather influences the release of chemicals from the landmine, transport through the soil to the surface, and degradation processes in the soil. The effect of weather on the landmine chemical signature from a PMN landmine was evaluated with the T2TNT code for Kabul, Afghanistan. Results for TNT and DNT gas-phase and soil solid-phase concentrations are presented as a function of time of the day and time of the year.

  11. Passive acoustic threat detection in estuarine environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borowski, Brian; Sutin, Alexander; Roh, Heui-Seol; Bunin, Barry

    2008-04-01

    The Maritime Security Laboratory (MSL) at Stevens Institute of Technology supports research in a range of areas relevant to harbor security, including passive acoustic detection of underwater threats. The difficulties in using passive detection in an urban estuarine environment include intensive and highly irregular ambient noise and the complexity of sound propagation in shallow water. MSL conducted a set of tests in the Hudson River near Manhattan in order to measure the main parameters defining the detection distance of a threat: source level of a scuba diver, transmission loss of acoustic signals, and ambient noise. The source level of the diver was measured by comparing the diver's sound with a reference signal from a calibrated emitter placed on his path. Transmission loss was measured by comparing noise levels of passing ships at various points along their routes, where their distance from the hydrophone was calculated with the help of cameras and custom software. The ambient noise in the Hudson River was recorded under varying environmental conditions and amounts of water traffic. The passive sonar equation was then applied to estimate the range of detection. Estimations were done for a subset of the recorded noise levels, and we demonstrated how variations in the noise level, attenuation, and the diver's source level influence the effective range of detection. Finally, we provided analytic estimates of how an array improves upon the detection distance calculated by a single hydrophone.

  12. Acoustic metamaterial for subwavelength edge detection

    PubMed Central

    Molerón, Miguel; Daraio, Chiara

    2015-01-01

    Metamaterials have demonstrated the possibility to produce super-resolved images by restoring propagative and evanescent waves. However, for efficient information transfer, for example, in compressed sensing, it is often desirable to visualize only the fast spatial variations of the wave field (carried by evanescent waves), as the one created by edges or small details. Image processing edge detection algorithms perform such operation, but they add time and complexity to the imaging process. Here we present an acoustic metamaterial that transmits only components of the acoustic field that are approximately equal to or smaller than the operating wavelength. The metamaterial converts evanescent waves into propagative waves exciting trapped resonances, and it uses periodicity to attenuate the propagative components. This approach achieves resolutions ∼5 times smaller than the operating wavelength and makes it possible to visualize independently edges aligned along different directions. PMID:26304739

  13. Acoustic detection and ranging using solvable chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corron, Ned J.; Stahl, Mark T.; Chase Harrison, R.; Blakely, Jonathan N.

    2013-06-01

    Acoustic experiments demonstrate a novel approach to ranging and detection that exploits the properties of a solvable chaotic oscillator. This nonlinear oscillator includes an ordinary differential equation and a discrete switching condition. The chaotic waveform generated by this hybrid system is used as the transmitted waveform. The oscillator admits an exact analytic solution that can be written as the linear convolution of binary symbols and a single basis function. This linear representation enables coherent reception using a simple analog matched filter and without need for digital sampling or signal processing. An audio frequency implementation of the transmitter and receiver is described. Successful acoustic ranging measurements in the presence of noise and interference from a second chaotic emitter are presented to demonstrate the viability of the approach.

  14. Acoustic detection and ranging using solvable chaos.

    PubMed

    Corron, Ned J; Stahl, Mark T; Harrison, R Chase; Blakely, Jonathan N

    2013-06-01

    Acoustic experiments demonstrate a novel approach to ranging and detection that exploits the properties of a solvable chaotic oscillator. This nonlinear oscillator includes an ordinary differential equation and a discrete switching condition. The chaotic waveform generated by this hybrid system is used as the transmitted waveform. The oscillator admits an exact analytic solution that can be written as the linear convolution of binary symbols and a single basis function. This linear representation enables coherent reception using a simple analog matched filter and without need for digital sampling or signal processing. An audio frequency implementation of the transmitter and receiver is described. Successful acoustic ranging measurements in the presence of noise and interference from a second chaotic emitter are presented to demonstrate the viability of the approach. PMID:23822484

  15. Detection and Classification of Whale Acoustic Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xian, Yin

    This dissertation focuses on two vital challenges in relation to whale acoustic signals: detection and classification. In detection, we evaluated the influence of the uncertain ocean environment on the spectrogram-based detector, and derived the likelihood ratio of the proposed Short Time Fourier Transform detector. Experimental results showed that the proposed detector outperforms detectors based on the spectrogram. The proposed detector is more sensitive to environmental changes because it includes phase information. In classification, our focus is on finding a robust and sparse representation of whale vocalizations. Because whale vocalizations can be modeled as polynomial phase signals, we can represent the whale calls by their polynomial phase coefficients. In this dissertation, we used the Weyl transform to capture chirp rate information, and used a two dimensional feature set to represent whale vocalizations globally. Experimental results showed that our Weyl feature set outperforms chirplet coefficients and MFCC (Mel Frequency Cepstral Coefficients) when applied to our collected data. Since whale vocalizations can be represented by polynomial phase coefficients, it is plausible that the signals lie on a manifold parameterized by these coefficients. We also studied the intrinsic structure of high dimensional whale data by exploiting its geometry. Experimental results showed that nonlinear mappings such as Laplacian Eigenmap and ISOMAP outperform linear mappings such as PCA and MDS, suggesting that the whale acoustic data is nonlinear. We also explored deep learning algorithms on whale acoustic data. We built each layer as convolutions with either a PCA filter bank (PCANet) or a DCT filter bank (DCTNet). With the DCT filter bank, each layer has different a time-frequency scale representation, and from this, one can extract different physical information. Experimental results showed that our PCANet and DCTNet achieve high classification rate on the whale

  16. Acoustic signal detection of manatee calls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niezrecki, Christopher; Phillips, Richard; Meyer, Michael; Beusse, Diedrich O.

    2003-04-01

    The West Indian manatee (trichechus manatus latirostris) has become endangered partly because of a growing number of collisions with boats. A system to warn boaters of the presence of manatees, that can signal to boaters that manatees are present in the immediate vicinity, could potentially reduce these boat collisions. In order to identify the presence of manatees, acoustic methods are employed. Within this paper, three different detection algorithms are used to detect the calls of the West Indian manatee. The detection systems are tested in the laboratory using simulated manatee vocalizations from an audio compact disc. The detection method that provides the best overall performance is able to correctly identify ~=96% of the manatee vocalizations. However the system also results in a false positive rate of ~=16%. The results of this work may ultimately lead to the development of a manatee warning system that can warn boaters of the presence of manatees.

  17. Fiber optic hydrophones for acoustic neutrino detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buis, E. J.; Doppenberg, E. J. J.; Lahmann, R.; Toet, P. M.; de Vreugd, J.

    2016-04-01

    Cosmic neutrinos with ultra high energies can be detected acoustically using hydrophones. The detection of these neutrinos may provide crucial information about then GZK mechanism. The flux of these neutrinos, however, is expected to be low, so that a detection volume is required more than a order of magnitude larger than what has presently been realized. With a large detection volume and a large number of hydrophones, there is a need for technology that is cheap and easy to deploy. Fiber optics provide a natural way for distributed sensing. In addition, a sensor has been designed and manufactured that can be produced cost-effectively on an industrial scale. Sensitivity measurements show that the sensor is able to reach the required sea-state zero level. For a proper interpretation of the expected bipolar signals, filtering techniques should be applied to remove the effects of the unwanted resonance peaks.

  18. Soldier/robot team acoustic detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Stuart H.; Scanlon, Michael V.

    2003-09-01

    The future battlefield will require an unprecedented level of automation in which soldier-operated, autonomous, and semi-autonomous ground, air, and sea platforms along with mounted and dismounted soldiers will function as a tightly coupled team. Sophisticated robotic platforms with diverse sensor suites will be an integral part of the Objective Force, and must be able to collaborate not only amongst themselves but also with their manned partners. The Army Research Laboratory has developed a robot-based acoustic detection system that will detect and localize on an impulsive noise event, such as a sniper's weapon firing. Additionally, acoustic sensor arrays worn on a soldier's helmet or equipment can enhance his situational awareness and RSTA capabilities. The Land Warrior or Objective Force Warrior body-worn computer can detect tactically significant impulsive signatures from bullets, mortars, artillery, and missiles or spectral signatures from tanks, helicopters, UAVs, and mobile robots. Time-difference-of-arrival techniques can determine a sound's direction of arrival, while head attitude sensors can instantly determine the helmet orientation at time of capture. With precision GPS location of the soldier, along with the locations of other soldiers, robots, or unattended ground sensors that heard the same event, triangulation techniques can produce an accurate location of the target. Data from C-4 explosions and 0.50-Caliber shots shows that both helmet and robot systems can localize on the same event. This provides an awesome capability - mobile robots and soldiers working together on an ever-changing battlespace to detect the enemy and improve the survivability, mobility, and lethality of our future warriors.

  19. Detection of explosive as an indicator of landmines: BIOSENS project methodology and field tests in Southeast Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crabbe, Stephen; Eng, Lars; Gardhagen, Peter; Berg, Anders

    2005-06-01

    The IST-2000-25348-BIOSENS project carried out a number of studies to assess the use of explosive detection technology for humanitarian demining. This paper presents sampling/collection technology developed, test methodology and results including comparisons with dogs and soil sampling. Findings are presented in terms of the detection of explosive from mines in the environment and demining.

  20. Acoustic detection of Immiscible Liquids in Sand

    SciTech Connect

    Geller, Jil T.; Kowalsky, Michael B.; Seifert, Patricia K.; Nihei, Kurt T.

    1999-03-01

    Laboratory cross-well P-wave transmission at 90 kHz was measured in a 61 cm diameter by 76 cm tall water-saturated sand pack, before and after introducing a non-aqueous phase organic liquid (NAPL) (n-dodecane). In one experiment NAPL was introduced to form a lens trapped by a low permeability layer; a second experiment considered NAPL residual trapped behind the front of flowing NAPL. The NAPL caused significant changes in the travel time and amplitude of first arrivals, as well as the generation of diffracted waves arriving after the direct wave. The spatial variations in NAPL saturation obtained from excavation at the end of the experiment correlated well with the observed variations in the P-wave amplitudes and travel times. NAPL residual saturation changes from NAPL flow channels of 3 to 4% were detectable and the 40 to 80% NAPL saturation in the NAPL lens was clearly visible at acoustic frequencies. The results of these experiments demonstrate that small NAPL saturations may be more easily detected with amplitude rather than travel time data, but that the relationships between the amplitude changes and NAPL saturation maybe more complex than those for velocity.

  1. Feature based passive acoustic detection of underwater threats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolkin, Rustam; Sutin, Alexander; Radhakrishnan, Sreeram; Bruno, Michael; Fullerton, Brian; Ekimov, Alexander; Raftery, Michael

    2006-05-01

    Stevens Institute of Technology is performing research aimed at determining the acoustical parameters that are necessary for detecting and classifying underwater threats. This paper specifically addresses the problems of passive acoustic detection of small targets in noisy urban river and harbor environments. We describe experiments to determine the acoustic signatures of these threats and the background acoustic noise. Based on these measurements, we present an algorithm for robustly discriminating threat presence from severe acoustic background noise. Measurements of the target's acoustic radiation signal were conducted in the Hudson River. The acoustic noise in the Hudson River was also recorded for various environmental conditions. A useful discriminating feature can be extracted from the acoustic signal of the threat, calculated by detecting packets of multi-spectral high frequency sound which occur repetitively at low frequency intervals. We use experimental data to show how the feature varies with range between the sensor and the detected underwater threat. We also estimate the effective detection range by evaluating this feature for hydrophone signals, recorded in the river both with and without threat presence.

  2. Thermal Acoustic Oscillation: Causes, Detection, Analysis and Prevention

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christie, Robert J.; Hartwig, Jason W.

    2014-01-01

    The presentation discusses the causes of Thermal Acoustic Oscillations, how it can be detected, analyzed and prevented. It also discusses where it can occur, where it doesn't occur and practical mitigation techniques.

  3. Rotor acoustic monitoring system (RAMS): a fatigue crack detection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoess, Jeffrey N.

    1996-05-01

    The Rotor Acoustic Monitoring System (RAMS) is an embedded structural health monitoring system to demonstrate the ability to detect rotor head fatigue cracks and provide early warning of propagating fatigue cracks in rotor components of Navy helicopters. The concept definition effort was performed to assess the feasibility of detecting rotor head fatigue cracks using bulk- wave wide-bandwidth acoustic emission technology. A wireless piezo-based transducer system is being designed to capture rotor fatigue data in real time and perform acoustic emission (AE) event detection, feature extraction, and classification. A flight test effort will be performed to characterize rotor acoustic background noise and flight environment characteristics. The long- term payoff of the RAMS technology includes structural integrity verification and leak detection for large industrial tanks, and nuclear plant cooling towers could be performed using the RAMS AE technology. A summary of the RAMS concept, bench-level AE fatigue testing, and results are presented.

  4. Acoustic detection probability of bottlenose dolphins, Tursiops truncatus, with static acoustic dataloggers in Cardigan Bay, Wales.

    PubMed

    Nuuttila, Hanna K; Thomas, Len; Hiddink, Jan G; Meier, Rhiannon; Turner, John R; Bennell, James D; Tregenza, Nick J C; Evans, Peter G H

    2013-09-01

    Acoustic dataloggers are used for monitoring the occurrence of cetaceans and can aid in fulfilling statutory monitoring requirements of protected species. Although useful for long-term monitoring, their spatial coverage is restricted, and for many devices the effective detection distance is not specified. A generalized additive mixed model (GAMM) was used to investigate the effects of (1) distance from datalogger, (2) animal behavior (feeding and traveling), and (3) group size on the detection probability of bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) with autonomous dataloggers (C-PODs) validated with visual observations. The average probability of acoustic detection for minutes with a sighting was 0.59 and the maximum detection distance ranged from 1343-1779 m. Minutes with feeding activity had higher acoustic detection rates and longer average effective detection radius (EDR) than traveling ones. The detection probability for single dolphins was significantly higher than for groups, indicating that their acoustic behavior may differ from those of larger groups in the area, making them more detectable. The C-POD is effective at detecting dolphin presence but the effects of behavior and group size on detectability create challenges for estimating density from detections as higher detection rate of feeding dolphins could yield erroneously high density estimates in feeding areas.

  5. Method and apparatus of spectro-acoustically enhanced ultrasonic detection for diagnostics

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan; Norton, Stephen J.

    2001-01-01

    An apparatus for detecting a discontinuity in a material includes a source of electromagnetic radiation has a wavelength and an intensity sufficient to induce an enhancement in contrast between a manifestation of an acoustic property in the material and of the acoustic property in the discontinuity, as compared to when the material is not irradiated by the electromagnetic radiation. An acoustic emitter directs acoustic waves to the discontinuity in the material. The acoustic waves have a sensitivity to the acoustic property. An acoustic receiver receives the acoustic waves generated by the acoustic emitter after the acoustic waves have interacted with the material and the discontinuity. The acoustic receiver also generates a signal representative of the acoustic waves received by the acoustic receiver. A processor, in communication with the acoustic receiver and responsive to the signal generated by the acoustic receiver, is programmed to generate informational output about the discontinuity based on the signal generated by the acoustic receiver.

  6. Acoustic mirror effect increases prey detection distance in trawling bats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siemers, Björn M.; Baur, Eric; Schnitzler, Hans-Ulrich

    2005-06-01

    Many different and phylogenetically distant species of bats forage for insects above water bodies and take insects from and close to the surface; the so-called ‘trawling behaviour’. Detection of surface-based prey by echolocation is facilitated by acoustically smooth backgrounds such as water surfaces that reflect sound impinging at an acute angle away from the bat and thereby render a prey object acoustically conspicuous. Previous measurements had shown that the echo amplitude of a target on a smooth surface is higher than that of the same target in mid-air, due to an acoustic mirror effect. In behavioural experiments with three pond bats (Myotis dasycneme), we tested the hypothesis that the maximum distances at which bats can detect prey are larger for prey on smooth surfaces than for the same prey in an airborne situation. We determined the moment of prey detection from a change in echolocation behaviour and measured the detection distance in 3D space from IR-video recordings using stereo-photogrammetry. The bats showed the predicted increase in detection distance for prey on smooth surfaces. The acoustic mirror effect therefore increases search efficiency and contributes to the acoustic advantages encountered by echolocating bats when foraging at low heights above smooth water surfaces. These acoustic advantages may have favoured the repeated evolution of trawling behaviour.

  7. Optically selective, acoustically resonant gas detecting transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimeff, J. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A gas analyzer is disclosed which responds to the resonant absorption or emission spectrum of a specific gas by producing an acoustic resonance in a chamber containing a sample of that gas, and which measures the amount of that emission or absorption by measuring the strength of that acoustic resonance, e.g., the maximum periodic pressure, velocity or density achieved. In the preferred embodiment, a light beam is modulated periodically at the acoustical resonance frequency of a closed chamber which contains an optically dense sample of the gas of interest. Periodic heating of the absorbing gas by the light beam causes a cyclic expansion, movement, and pressure within the gas. An amplitude is reached where the increased losses were the cyclic radiation energy received. A transducing system is inclined for converting the pressure variations of the resonant gas into electronic readout signals.

  8. Imaging of Acoustic Waves in Sand

    SciTech Connect

    Deason, Vance Albert; Telschow, Kenneth Louis; Watson, Scott Marshall

    2003-08-01

    There is considerable interest in detecting objects such as landmines shallowly buried in loose earth or sand. Various techniques involving microwave, acoustic, thermal and magnetic sensors have been used to detect such objects. Acoustic and microwave sensors have shown promise, especially if used together. In most cases, the sensor package is scanned over an area to eventually build up an image or map of anomalies. We are proposing an alternate, acoustic method that directly provides an image of acoustic waves in sand or soil, and their interaction with buried objects. The INEEL Laser Ultrasonic Camera utilizes dynamic holography within photorefractive recording materials. This permits one to image and demodulate acoustic waves on surfaces in real time, without scanning. A video image is produced where intensity is directly and linearly proportional to surface motion. Both specular and diffusely reflecting surfaces can be accomodated and surface motion as small as 0.1 nm can be quantitatively detected. This system was used to directly image acoustic surface waves in sand as well as in solid objects. Waves as frequencies of 16 kHz were generated using modified acoustic speakers. These waves were directed through sand toward partially buried objects. The sand container was not on a vibration isolation table, but sat on the lab floor. Interaction of wavefronts with buried objects showed reflection, diffraction and interference effects that could provide clues to location and characteristics of buried objects. Although results are preliminary, success in this effort suggests that this method could be applied to detection of buried landmines or other near-surface items such as pipes and tanks.

  9. Improvement of acoustic fall detection using Kinect depth sensing.

    PubMed

    Li, Yun; Banerjee, Tanvi; Popescu, Mihail; Skubic, Marjorie

    2013-01-01

    The latest acoustic fall detection system (acoustic FADE) has achieved encouraging results on real-world dataset. However, the acoustic FADE device is difficult to be deployed in real environment due to its large size. In addition, the estimation accuracy of sound source localization (SSL) and direction of arrival (DOA) becomes much lower in multi-interference environment, which will potentially result in the distortion of the source signal using beamforming (BF). Microsoft Kinect is used in this paper to address these issues by measuring source position using the depth sensor. We employ robust minimum variance distortionless response (MVDR) adaptive BF (ABF) to take advantage of well-estimated source position for acoustic FADE. A significant reduction of false alarms and improvement of detection rate are both achieved using the proposed fusion strategy on real-world data.

  10. Acoustic Detection of Phase Transitions at the Nanoscale

    DOE PAGES

    Vasudevan, Rama K.; Khassaf, Hamidreza; Cao, Ye; Zhang, Shujun; Tselev, Alexander; Carmichael, Ben D.; Okatan, Mahmut Baris; Jesse, Stephen; Chen, Long-Qing; Alpay, S. Pamir; et al

    2016-01-25

    On page 478, N. Bassiri-Gharb and co-workers demonstrate acoustic detection in nanoscale volumes by use of an atomic force microscope tip technique. Elastic changes in volume are measured by detecting changes in resonance of the cantilever. Also, the electric field in this case causes a phase transition, which is modeled by Landau theory.

  11. Measurements of Antarctic ice properties for acoustic neutrino detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nahnhauer, R.; Ice Cube Acoustic Neutrino Detection Group

    2008-11-01

    Detection of the faint flux of neutrinos from interactions of the highest energy charged cosmic particles with microwave background photons with a reasonable number of events would contribute to answering interesting questions of particle physics as well as astro-particle physics and cosmology. This needs however detector volumes 100 times larger than the biggest optical neutrino telescopes presently under construction. The use of at least two technologies with different systematics would help to fight the large background expected to hide the small signal. A hybrid optical-radio-acoustic array suggested around the IceCube observatory at the South Pole seems to be a promising option for such an experiment. This is the reason for an extensive evaluation of the acoustic properties of the ice at the Pole with the help of the South Pole Acoustic Test Setup SPATS. SPATS consists of four strings with seven acoustic stations each, deployed in the upper part of IceCube bore-holes down to 400 m to 500 m depth. Each acoustic station has an acoustic transmitter and three acoustic receivers. Data have been taken with since early 2007. During the last Austral summer in addition a movable transmitter was used in several water filled bore-holes aiming in particular for a relative calibration of the setup. Preliminary results are presented on speed of sound versus depth, noise behavior and attenuation length measurements

  12. Automatic detection of unattended changes in room acoustics.

    PubMed

    Frey, Johannes Daniel; Wendt, Mike; Jacobsen, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Previous research has shown that the human auditory system continuously monitors its acoustic environment, detecting a variety of irregularities (e.g., deviance from prior stimulation regularity in pitch, loudness, duration, and (perceived) sound source location). Detection of irregularities can be inferred from a component of the event-related brain potential (ERP), referred to as the mismatch negativity (MMN), even in conditions in which participants are instructed to ignore the auditory stimulation. The current study extends previous findings by demonstrating that auditory irregularities brought about by a change in room acoustics elicit a MMN in a passive oddball protocol (acoustic stimuli with differing room acoustics, that were otherwise identical, were employed as standard and deviant stimuli), in which participants watched a fiction movie (silent with subtitles). While the majority of participants reported no awareness for any changes in the auditory stimulation, only one out of 14 participants reported to have become aware of changing room acoustics or sound source location. Together, these findings suggest automatic monitoring of room acoustics.

  13. Acoustic Aspects of Photoacoustic Signal Generation and Detection in Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miklós, A.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper photoacoustic signal generation and detection in gases is investigated and discussed from the standpoint of acoustics. Four topics are considered: the effect of the absorption-desorption process of modulated and pulsed light on the heat power density released in the gas; the generation of the primary sound by the released heat in an unbounded medium; the excitation of an acoustic resonator by the primary sound; and finally, the generation of the measurable PA signal by a microphone. When light is absorbed by a molecule and the excess energy is relaxed by collisions with the surrounding molecules, the average kinetic energy, thus also the temperature of an ensemble of molecules (called "particle" in acoustics) will increase. In other words heat energy is added to the energy of the particle. The rate of the energy transfer is characterized by the heat power density. A simple two-level model of absorption-desorption is applied for describing the heat power generation process for modulated and pulsed illumination. Sound generation by a laser beam in an unbounded medium is discussed by means of the Green's function technique. It is shown that the duration of the generated sound pulse depends mostly on beam geometry. A photoacoustic signal is mostly detected in a photoacoustic cell composed of acoustic resonators, buffers, filters, etc. It is not easy to interpret the measured PA signal in such a complicated acoustic system. The acoustic response of a PA detector to different kinds of excitations (modulated cw, pulsed, periodic pulse train) is discussed. It is shown that acoustic resonators respond very differently to modulated cw excitation and to excitation by a pulse train. The microphone for detecting the PA signal is also a part of the acoustic system; its properties have to be taken into account by the design of a PA detector. The moving membrane of the microphone absorbs acoustic energy; thus, it may influence the resonance frequency and

  14. Soldier detection using unattended acoustic and seismic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naz, P.; Hengy, S.; Hamery, P.

    2012-06-01

    During recent military conflicts, as well as for security interventions, the urban zone has taken a preponderant place. Studies have been initiated in national and in international programs to stimulate the technical innovations for these specific scenarios. For example joint field experiments have been organized by the NATO group SET-142 to evaluate the capability for the detection and localization of snipers, mortars or artillery guns using acoustic devices. Another important operational need corresponds to the protection of military sites or buildings. In this context, unattended acoustic and seismic sensors are envisaged to contribute to the survey of specific points by the detection of approaching enemy soldiers. This paper describes some measurements done in an anechoic chamber and in free field to characterize typical sounds generated by the soldier activities (walking, crawling, weapon handling, radio communication, clothing noises...). Footstep, speech and some specific impulsive sounds are detectable at various distances from the source. Such detection algorithms may be easily merged with the existing weapon firing detection algorithms to provide a more generic "battlefield acoustic" early warning system. Results obtained in various conditions (grassy terrain, gravel path, road, forest) will be presented. A method to extrapolate the distances of detection has been developed, based on an acoustic propagation model and applied to the laboratory measurements.

  15. Numerical and Experimental Investigation of Soil Heterogeneity around Landmines in Natural Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallen, B.; Smits, K. M.; Howington, S. E.

    2015-12-01

    The environment in which landmines are placed is oftentimes highly heterogeneous. These heterogeneities such as differences in soil type, packing and moisture, combined with changes in surface and climate conditions can oftentimes mask the presence of the mine. Understanding the impact of heterogeneity on heat and mass transfer behavior in the vicinity of landmines is paramount to properly identifying landmine locations for demining operations. This study investigates the impact of soil heterogeneity on soil moisture and temperature distributions around buried objects with the goal of increasing our ability to model and predict the environmental conditions that are most dynamic to mine detection performance. A ten-day field experiment was conducted in which two anti-personnel landmines at different depths and a limestone block of comparable size were buried. The site was instrumented with a series of sensors, monitoring atmospheric, surface and subsurface conditions to include measurements of soil moisture, soil and air temperature, relative humidity, vapor concentration, and meteorological conditions such as wind speed and net radiation. Infrared thermal imaging was used to provide continuous profiles of surface temperature conditions. The soil was well characterized in the laboratory to provide good understanding of field conditions for numerical modeling efforts. Experimental results demonstrate the strongest thermal contrast between shallow landmine emplacement and the surrounding soil occurring as the sun approaches its zenith and two hours after sunset until the sun directly impacts the soil above the landmine. A finite-element model of fluid flow and heat transport through porous media is compared against experimental observations, capturing the diurnal variation. A validated model, like this one, offers the opportunity to improve landmine detection probabilities and reduce false alarms caused by environmental variability.

  16. Acoustic detection of UHE neutrinos - the ACORNE project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, L. F.; Perkin, J. D.; ACORNE Collaboration

    2008-11-01

    An interesting new possibility of detection of ultra-high energy (UHE) neutrinos is that of acoustic detection whereby the acoustic pressure pulse generated as a UHE neutrino interacts in a suitable medium such as water or ice is detected by an array of acoustic sensors. Recent years have seen something of a renaissance of this field and there are currently a number of activities worldwide to assess the potential of this technique. The UK-based ACORNE collaboration is one of these activities; ACORNE has access to the QinetiQ underwater acoustic range off Rona, an island off the North-West coast of Scotland. The poster will summarise ACORNE's R&D work, including simulation of the thermoacoustic emission of neutrino-induced particle cascades, reconstruction of event vertices and the effects of refraction, potential neutrino flux sensitivities from large area hydrophone arrays, a study transducer based calibration techniques and an analysis of the first acoustic data recorded by the Rona hydrophone array.

  17. Theoretical detection ranges for acoustic based manatee avoidance technology.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Richard; Niezrecki, Christopher; Beusse, Diedrich O

    2006-07-01

    The West Indian manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris) has become endangered partly because of watercraft collisions in Florida's coastal waterways. To reduce the number of collisions, warning systems based upon detecting manatee vocalizations have been proposed. One aspect of the feasibility of an acoustically based warning system relies upon the distance at which a manatee vocalization is detectable. Assuming a mixed spreading model, this paper presents a theoretical analysis of the system detection capabilities operating within various background and watercraft noise conditions. This study combines measured source levels of manatee vocalizations with the modeled acoustic properties of manatee habitats to develop a method for determining the detection range and hydrophone spacing requirements for acoustic based manatee avoidance technologies. In quiet environments (background noise approximately 70 dB) it was estimated that manatee vocalizations are detectable at approximately 250 m, with a 6 dB detection threshold, In louder environments (background noise approximately 100dB) the detection range drops to 2.5 m. In a habitat with 90 dB of background noise, a passing boat with a maximum noise floor of 120 dB would be the limiting factor when it is within approximately 100 m of a hydrophone. The detection range was also found to be strongly dependent on the manatee vocalization source level.

  18. Theoretical detection ranges for acoustic based manatee avoidance technology.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Richard; Niezrecki, Christopher; Beusse, Diedrich O

    2006-07-01

    The West Indian manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris) has become endangered partly because of watercraft collisions in Florida's coastal waterways. To reduce the number of collisions, warning systems based upon detecting manatee vocalizations have been proposed. One aspect of the feasibility of an acoustically based warning system relies upon the distance at which a manatee vocalization is detectable. Assuming a mixed spreading model, this paper presents a theoretical analysis of the system detection capabilities operating within various background and watercraft noise conditions. This study combines measured source levels of manatee vocalizations with the modeled acoustic properties of manatee habitats to develop a method for determining the detection range and hydrophone spacing requirements for acoustic based manatee avoidance technologies. In quiet environments (background noise approximately 70 dB) it was estimated that manatee vocalizations are detectable at approximately 250 m, with a 6 dB detection threshold, In louder environments (background noise approximately 100dB) the detection range drops to 2.5 m. In a habitat with 90 dB of background noise, a passing boat with a maximum noise floor of 120 dB would be the limiting factor when it is within approximately 100 m of a hydrophone. The detection range was also found to be strongly dependent on the manatee vocalization source level. PMID:16875213

  19. Acoustic firearm discharge detection and classification in an enclosed environment.

    PubMed

    Luzi, Lorenzo; Gonzalez, Eric; Bruillard, Paul; Prowant, Matthew; Skorpik, James; Hughes, Michael; Child, Scott; Kist, Duane; McCarthy, John E

    2016-05-01

    Two different signal processing algorithms are described for detection and classification of acoustic signals generated by firearm discharges in small enclosed spaces. The first is based on the logarithm of the signal energy. The second is a joint entropy. The current study indicates that a system using both signal energy and joint entropy would be able to both detect weapon discharges and classify weapon type, in small spaces, with high statistical certainty. PMID:27250165

  20. Wavelet-based acoustic emission detection method with adaptive thresholding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menon, Sunil; Schoess, Jeffrey N.; Hamza, Rida; Busch, Darryl

    2000-06-01

    Reductions in Navy maintenance budgets and available personnel have dictated the need to transition from time-based to 'condition-based' maintenance. Achieving this will require new enabling diagnostic technologies. One such technology, the use of acoustic emission for the early detection of helicopter rotor head dynamic component faults, has been investigated by Honeywell Technology Center for its rotor acoustic monitoring system (RAMS). This ambitious, 38-month, proof-of-concept effort, which was a part of the Naval Surface Warfare Center Air Vehicle Diagnostics System program, culminated in a successful three-week flight test of the RAMS system at Patuxent River Flight Test Center in September 1997. The flight test results demonstrated that stress-wave acoustic emission technology can detect signals equivalent to small fatigue cracks in rotor head components and can do so across the rotating articulated rotor head joints and in the presence of other background acoustic noise generated during flight operation. This paper presents the results of stress wave data analysis of the flight-test dataset using wavelet-based techniques to assess background operational noise vs. machinery failure detection results.

  1. Passive acoustic detection of deep-diving beaked whales.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, Walter M X; Harwood, John; Tyack, Peter L; Johnson, Mark P; Madsen, Peter T

    2008-11-01

    Beaked whales can remain submerged for an hour or more and are difficult to sight when they come to the surface to breathe. Passive acoustic detection (PAD) not only complements traditional visual-based methods for detecting these species but also can be more effective because beaked whales produce clicks regularly to echolocate on prey during deep foraging dives. The effectiveness of PAD for beaked whales depends not only on the acoustic behavior and output of the animals but also on environmental conditions and the quality of the passive sonar implemented. A primary constraint on the range at which beaked whale clicks can be detected involves their high frequencies, which attenuate rapidly, resulting in limited ranges of detection, especially in adverse environmental conditions. Given current knowledge of source parameters and in good conditions, for example, with a wind speed of 2 ms, a receiver close to the surface should be able to detect acoustically Cuvier's beaked whales with a high probability at distances up to 0.7 km, provided the listening duration exceeds the deep dive interval, about 2.5 h on average. Detection ranges beyond 4 km are unlikely and would require low ambient noise or special sound propagation conditions.

  2. Imaging and detection of mines from acoustic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witten, Alan J.; DiMarzio, Charles A.; Li, Wen; McKnight, Stephen W.

    1999-08-01

    A laboratory-scale acoustic experiment is described where a buried target, a hockey puck cut in half, is shallowly buried in a sand box. To avoid the need for source and receiver coupling to the host sand, an acoustic wave is generated in the subsurface by a pulsed laser suspended above the air-sand interface. Similarly, an airborne microphone is suspended above this interface and moved in unison with the laser. After some pre-processing of the data, reflections for the target, although weak, could clearly be identified. While the existence and location of the target can be determined by inspection of the data, its unique shape can not. Since target discrimination is important in mine detection, a 3D imaging algorithm was applied to the acquired acoustic data. This algorithm yielded a reconstructed image where the shape of the target was resolved.

  3. Acoustic detection of melolonthine larvae in Australian sugarcane.

    PubMed

    Mankin, R W; Samson, P R; Chandler, K J

    2009-08-01

    Decision support systems have been developed for risk analysis and management of root-feeding white grubs (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Melolonthinae) in Queensland, Australia, sugarcane (Saccharum spp.), based partly on manual inspection of soil samples. Acoustic technology was considered as a potential alternative to this laborious procedure. Field surveys were conducted to detect the major pests Dermolepida albohirtum (Waterhouse) near Mackay, and Antitrogus parvulus Britton near Bundaberg. Computer analyses were developed to identify distinctive scrapes and other sounds produced by D. albohirtum and Antitrogus species and to distinguish them from sounds of nondamaging white grubs (Rutelinae, Dynastinae), as well as from extraneous, wind-induced tapping signals. Procedures were considered for incorporating acoustic methods into surveys and sequential sampling plans. Digging up and inspecting sugarcane root systems requires 10-12 min per sample, but acoustic assessments can be obtained in 3-5 min, so labor and time could be reduced by beginning the surveys with acoustic sampling. In a typical survey conducted in a field with low population densities, sampling might terminate quickly after five negative acoustic samples, establishing a desired precision level of 0.25 but avoiding the effort of excavating and inspecting empty samples. With a high population density, sampling might terminate also if signals were detected in five samples, in which case it would be beneficial to excavate the samples and count the white grubs. In intermediate populations, it might be necessary to collect up to 20 samples to achieve desired precision, and acoustic methods could help determine which samples would be best to excavate. PMID:19736765

  4. Early Forest Fire Detection Using Radio-Acoustic Sounding System

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Yasar Guneri; Ince, Turker

    2009-01-01

    Automated early fire detection systems have recently received a significant amount of attention due to their importance in protecting the global environment. Some emergent technologies such as ground-based, satellite-based remote sensing and distributed sensor networks systems have been used to detect forest fires in the early stages. In this study, a radio-acoustic sounding system with fine space and time resolution capabilities for continuous monitoring and early detection of forest fires is proposed. Simulations show that remote thermal mapping of a particular forest region by the proposed system could be a potential solution to the problem of early detection of forest fires. PMID:22573967

  5. Neural dynamics of change detection in crowded acoustic scenes.

    PubMed

    Sohoglu, Ediz; Chait, Maria

    2016-02-01

    Two key questions concerning change detection in crowded acoustic environments are the extent to which cortical processing is specialized for different forms of acoustic change and when in the time-course of cortical processing neural activity becomes predictive of behavioral outcomes. Here, we address these issues by using magnetoencephalography (MEG) to probe the cortical dynamics of change detection in ongoing acoustic scenes containing as many as ten concurrent sources. Each source was formed of a sequence of tone pips with a unique carrier frequency and temporal modulation pattern, designed to mimic the spectrotemporal structure of natural sounds. Our results show that listeners are more accurate and quicker to detect the appearance (than disappearance) of an auditory source in the ongoing scene. Underpinning this behavioral asymmetry are change-evoked responses differing not only in magnitude and latency, but also in their spatial patterns. We find that even the earliest (~50 ms) cortical response to change is predictive of behavioral outcomes (detection times), consistent with the hypothesized role of local neural transients in supporting change detection.

  6. ACOUSTIC DETECTING AND LOCATING GAS PIPE LINE INFRINGEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    John L. Loth; Gary J. Morris; George M. Palmer; Richard Guiler; Patrick Browning

    2004-10-31

    The extensive network of high-pressure natural gas transmission pipelines covering the United States provides an important infrastructure for our energy independence. Early detection of pipeline leaks and infringements by construction equipment, resulting in corrosion fractures, presents an important aspect of our national security policy. The National Energy Technology Laboratory Strategic Center for Natural Gas (SCVG) is and has been funding research on various applicable techniques. The WVU research team has focused on monitoring pipeline background acoustic signals generated and transmitted by gas flowing through the gas inside the pipeline. In case of a pipeline infringement, any mechanical impact on the pipe wall, or escape of high-pressure gas, generates acoustic signals traveling both up and down stream through the gas. Sudden changes in flow noise are detectable with a Portable Acoustic Monitoring Package (PAMP), developed under this contract. It incorporates a pressure compensating microphone and a signal- recording device. Direct access to the gas inside the line is obtained by mounting such a PAMP, with a 1/2 inch NPT connection, to a pipeline pressure port found near most shut-off valves. An FFT of the recorded signal subtracted by that of the background noise recorded one-second earlier appears to sufficiently isolate the infringement signal to allow source interpretation. Using cell phones for data downloading might allow a network of such 1000-psi rated PAMP's to acoustically monitor a pipeline system and be trained by neural network software to positively identify and locate any pipeline infringement.

  7. ACOUSTIC DETECTING AND LOCATING GAS PIPE LINE INFRINGEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    John L. Loth; Gary J. Morris; George M. Palmer; Richard Guiler; Patrick Browning

    2004-12-01

    The extensive network of high-pressure natural gas transmission pipelines covering the United States provides an important infrastructure for our energy independence. Early detection of pipeline leaks and infringements by construction equipment, resulting in corrosion fractures, presents an important aspect of our national security policy. The National Energy Technology Laboratory Strategic Center for Natural Gas (SCVG) is and has been funding research on various applicable techniques. The WVU research team has focused on monitoring pipeline background acoustic signals generated and transmitted by gas flowing through the gas inside the pipeline. In case of a pipeline infringement, any mechanical impact on the pipe wall, or escape of high-pressure gas, generates acoustic signals traveling both up and down stream through the gas. Sudden changes in flow noise are detectable with a Portable Acoustic Monitoring Package (PAMP), developed under this contract. It incorporates a pressure compensating microphone and a signal- recording device. Direct access to the gas inside the line is obtained by mounting such a PAMP, with a 1/2 inch NPT connection, to a pipeline pressure port found near most shut-off valves. An FFT of the recorded signal subtracted by that of the background noise recorded one-second earlier appears to sufficiently isolate the infringement signal to allow source interpretation. Using cell phones for data downloading might allow a network of such 1000-psi rated PAMP's to acoustically monitor a pipeline system and be trained by neural network software to positively identify and locate any pipeline infringement.

  8. Robotic vehicle uses acoustic sensors for voice detection and diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Stuart H.; Scanlon, Michael V.

    2000-07-01

    An acoustic sensor array that cues an imaging system on a small tele- operated robotic vehicle was used to detect human voice and activity inside a building. The advantage of acoustic sensors is that it is a non-line of sight (NLOS) sensing technology that can augment traditional LOS sensors such as visible and IR cameras. Acoustic energy emitted from a target, such as from a person, weapon, or radio, will travel through walls and smoke, around corners, and down corridors, whereas these obstructions would cripple an imaging detection system. The hardware developed and tested used an array of eight microphones to detect the loudest direction and automatically setter a camera's pan/tilt toward the noise centroid. This type of system has applicability for counter sniper applications, building clearing, and search/rescue. Data presented will be time-frequency representations showing voice detected within rooms and down hallways at various ranges. Another benefit of acoustics is that it provides the tele-operator some situational awareness clues via low-bandwidth transmission of raw audio data for the operator to interpret with either headphones or through time-frequency analysis. This data can be useful to recognize familiar sounds that might indicate the presence of personnel, such as talking, equipment, movement noise, etc. The same array also detects the sounds of the robot it is mounted on, and can be useful for engine diagnostics and trouble shooting, or for self-noise emanations for stealthy travel. Data presented will characterize vehicle self noise over various surfaces such as tiles, carpets, pavement, sidewalk, and grass. Vehicle diagnostic sounds will indicate a slipping clutch and repeated unexpected application of emergency braking mechanism.

  9. Brief: Acoustic gas-kick detection with wellhead sonar

    SciTech Connect

    Bang, J.; Mjaaland, S.; Hendriks, P.; Jensen, L.K.

    1995-02-01

    The capability to detect gas kicks (gas influxes into a borehole) quickly as the borehole is being drilled is of the utmost importance for drilling safety and efficiency. In this paper a novel kick-detection system based on an acoustic pulse-echo technique is described. Computer simulations and full-scale experimental results show that this system can detect small gas influxes (typically < 1 bbl) at depths as great as 16,400 ft. The system, which has surface-based equipment, functions irrespective of mud circulation.

  10. Polarization lidar measurements of honeybees for locating buried landmines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Joseph A.; Seldomridge, Nathan L.; Dunkle, Dustin L.; Nugent, Paul W.; Spangler, Lee H.; Churnside, James H.; Wilson, James W.; Bromenshenk, Jerry J.; Henderson, Colin B.

    2005-08-01

    A polarization-sensitive lidar was used to detect honeybees trained to locate buried landmines by smell. Lidar measurements of bee location agree reasonably well with maps of chemical plume strength and bee density determined by visual and video counts, indicating that the bees are preferentially located near the explosives and that the lidar identifies the locations of higher bee concentration. The co-polarized lidar backscatter signal is more effective than the cross-polarized signal for bee detection. Laboratory measurements show that the depolarization ratio of scattered light is near zero for bee wings and up to approximately thirty percent for bee bodies.

  11. Neurobiology of acoustically mediated predator detection.

    PubMed

    Pollack, Gerald S

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound-driven avoidance responses have evolved repeatedly throughout the insecta as defenses against predation by echolocating bats. Although the auditory mechanics of ears and the properties of auditory receptor neurons have been studied in a number of groups, central neural processing of ultrasound stimuli has been examined in only a few cases. In this review, I summarize the neuronal basis for ultrasound detection and predator avoidance in crickets, tettigoniids, moths, and mantises, where central circuits have been studied most thoroughly. Several neuronal attributes, including steep intensity-response functions, high firing rates, and rapid spike conduction emerge as common themes of avoidance circuits. I discuss the functional consequences of these attributes, as well as the increasing complexity with which ultrasound stimuli are represented at successive levels of processing.

  12. A hydrophone prototype for ultra high energy neutrino acoustic detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotrufo, A.; Plotnikov, A.; Yershova, O.; Anghinolfi, M.; Piombo, D.

    2009-06-01

    The design of an air-backed fiber-optic hydrophone is presented. With respect to the previous models this prototype is optimized to provide a bandwidth sufficiently large to detect acoustic signals produced by high energy hadronic showers in water. In addiction to the geometrical configuration and to the choice of the materials, the preliminary results of the measured performances in air are presented.

  13. Dynamic template-matching-based processing for handheld landmine detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, K. C.; Gader, Paul D.

    2003-09-01

    This paper investigates the use of landmine templates in the GPR data to improve the detection accuracy for a hand-held mine detection unit. The proposed algorithm applies to the discrimination operating mode after the initial detection from the search mode. The proposed template matching-based algorithm extracts the mine templates from the data acquired during the first few sweeps, and correlates the templates from the data at subsequent sweeps to enhance the detection of landmine. The proposed technique does not have a time lag in producing detection values and a detection value is generated at each sample location. Experimental results show that the proposed template matching-based detector is able to increase the detection especially for low-metal anti-personnel mines. Based on the experiment performed over the data set collected at a test site, at 95% Pd, the proposed algorithm reduces the probability of false alarms by 66% for the low-metal anti-personnel mines and 30% for the low-metal anti-tank mines.

  14. Acoustic source separation for the detection of coronary artery sounds.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Daniel B; Roan, Michael J; Vlachos, Pavlos P

    2011-12-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the leading cause of death in the United States, being responsible for more than 20% of all deaths in the country. This is in large part due to the difficulty of diagnostic screening for CAD. Phonoangiography seeks to detect CAD via the acoustic signature associated with turbulent flow near an abnormally constricted, or stenosed, region. However, the usefulness of the technique is severely hindered by the low strength of the CAD signal compared to the background noise within the chest. In this work, acoustic finite element analysis (FEA) was performed on physiologically accurate chest geometries to demonstrate the feasibility of an original acoustic source separation methodology for isolating coronary sounds. This approach is based upon pseudoinversion of mixing matrices determined through a combination of experiment and computation. This allows calculation of the sound emitted by the coronary arteries based upon measurements of the acoustic velocity on the chest surface. This work demonstrates the feasibility of such a technique computationally and examines the vulnerability of the proposed approach to measurement errors. PMID:22225070

  15. Transducer Development and Characterization for Underwater Acoustic Neutrino Detection Calibration.

    PubMed

    Saldaña, María; Llorens, Carlos D; Felis, Ivan; Martínez-Mora, Juan Antonio; Ardid, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    A short bipolar pressure pulse with "pancake" directivity is produced and propagated when an Ultra-High Energy (UHE) neutrino interacts with a nucleus in water. Nowadays, acoustic sensor networks are being deployed in deep seas to detect this phenomenon as a first step toward building a neutrino telescope. In order to study the feasibility of the method, it is critical to have a calibrator that is able to mimic the neutrino signature. In previous works the possibility of using the acoustic parametric technique for this aim was proven. In this study, the array is operated at a high frequency and, by means of the parametric effect, the emission of the low-frequency acoustic bipolar pulse is generated mimicking the UHE neutrino acoustic pulse. To this end, the development of the transducer to be used in the parametric array is described in all its phases. The transducer design process, the characterization tests for the bare piezoelectric ceramic, and the addition of backing and matching layers are presented. The efficiencies and directivity patterns obtained for both primary and parametric beams confirm that the design of the proposed calibrator meets all the requirements for the emitter.

  16. Transducer Development and Characterization for Underwater Acoustic Neutrino Detection Calibration.

    PubMed

    Saldaña, María; Llorens, Carlos D; Felis, Ivan; Martínez-Mora, Juan Antonio; Ardid, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    A short bipolar pressure pulse with "pancake" directivity is produced and propagated when an Ultra-High Energy (UHE) neutrino interacts with a nucleus in water. Nowadays, acoustic sensor networks are being deployed in deep seas to detect this phenomenon as a first step toward building a neutrino telescope. In order to study the feasibility of the method, it is critical to have a calibrator that is able to mimic the neutrino signature. In previous works the possibility of using the acoustic parametric technique for this aim was proven. In this study, the array is operated at a high frequency and, by means of the parametric effect, the emission of the low-frequency acoustic bipolar pulse is generated mimicking the UHE neutrino acoustic pulse. To this end, the development of the transducer to be used in the parametric array is described in all its phases. The transducer design process, the characterization tests for the bare piezoelectric ceramic, and the addition of backing and matching layers are presented. The efficiencies and directivity patterns obtained for both primary and parametric beams confirm that the design of the proposed calibrator meets all the requirements for the emitter. PMID:27490547

  17. Transducer Development and Characterization for Underwater Acoustic Neutrino Detection Calibration

    PubMed Central

    Saldaña, María; Llorens, Carlos D.; Felis, Ivan; Martínez-Mora, Juan Antonio; Ardid, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    A short bipolar pressure pulse with “pancake” directivity is produced and propagated when an Ultra-High Energy (UHE) neutrino interacts with a nucleus in water. Nowadays, acoustic sensor networks are being deployed in deep seas to detect this phenomenon as a first step toward building a neutrino telescope. In order to study the feasibility of the method, it is critical to have a calibrator that is able to mimic the neutrino signature. In previous works the possibility of using the acoustic parametric technique for this aim was proven. In this study, the array is operated at a high frequency and, by means of the parametric effect, the emission of the low-frequency acoustic bipolar pulse is generated mimicking the UHE neutrino acoustic pulse. To this end, the development of the transducer to be used in the parametric array is described in all its phases. The transducer design process, the characterization tests for the bare piezoelectric ceramic, and the addition of backing and matching layers are presented. The efficiencies and directivity patterns obtained for both primary and parametric beams confirm that the design of the proposed calibrator meets all the requirements for the emitter. PMID:27490547

  18. Widespread passive acoustic detection of Yangtze finless porpoise using miniature stereo acoustic data-loggers: a review.

    PubMed

    Li, Songhai; Akamatsu, Tomonari; Dong, Lijun; Wang, Kexiong; Wang, Ding; Kimura, Satoko

    2010-09-01

    Data on distribution, abundance, ecology, and behavior are essential for conservation and management of endangered animals in the wild. Yangtze finless porpoise (Neophocaena phocaenoides asiaeorientalis) is an endangered small odontocete species, living exclusively in the Yangtze River and its connecting Poyang and Dongting Lakes. Frequent production of high-frequency bio-sonar signals allows the animal to be detectable using passive acoustic methods. Recently, a stereo acoustic event data-logger (A-tag) has been used extensively to detect the animal by using both fixed and mobile platforms. The passive acoustic monitoring methods were not only successful in detecting the presence of animals, but also in counting, localizing, and tracking phonating individuals. Underwater behavior observed acoustically helped to assess possible effects of vessels on the animals during acoustic surveys.

  19. Acoustic Emission Beamforming for Detection and Localization of Damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivey, Joshua Callen

    The aerospace industry is a constantly evolving field with corporate manufacturers continually utilizing innovative processes and materials. These materials include advanced metallics and composite systems. The exploration and implementation of new materials and structures has prompted the development of numerous structural health monitoring and nondestructive evaluation techniques for quality assurance purposes and pre- and in-service damage detection. Exploitation of acoustic emission sensors coupled with a beamforming technique provides the potential for creating an effective non-contact and non-invasive monitoring capability for assessing structural integrity. This investigation used an acoustic emission detection device that employs helical arrays of MEMS-based microphones around a high-definition optical camera to provide real-time non-contact monitoring of inspection specimens during testing. The study assessed the feasibility of the sound camera for use in structural health monitoring of composite specimens during tensile testing for detecting onset of damage in addition to nondestructive evaluation of aluminum inspection plates for visualizing stress wave propagation in structures. During composite material monitoring, the sound camera was able to accurately identify the onset and location of damage resulting from large amplitude acoustic feedback mechanisms such as fiber breakage. Damage resulting from smaller acoustic feedback events such as matrix failure was detected but not localized to the degree of accuracy of larger feedback events. Findings suggest that beamforming technology can provide effective non-contact and non-invasive inspection of composite materials, characterizing the onset and the location of damage in an efficient manner. With regards to the nondestructive evaluation of metallic plates, this remote sensing system allows us to record wave propagation events in situ via a single-shot measurement. This is a significant improvement over

  20. Acoustic sensors in the helmet detect voice and physiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scanlon, Michael V.

    2003-09-01

    The Army Research Laboratory has developed body-contacting acoustic sensors that detect diverse physiological sounds such as heartbeats and breaths, high quality speech, and activity. These sensors use an acoustic impedance-matching gel contained in a soft, compliant pad to enhance the body borne sounds, yet significantly repel airborne noises due to an acoustic impedance mismatch. The signals from such a sensor can be used as a microphone with embedded physiology, or a dedicated digital signal processor can process packetized data to separate physiological parameters from voice, and log parameter trends for performance surveillance. Acoustic sensors were placed inside soldier helmets to monitor voice, physiology, activity, and situational awareness clues such as bullet shockwaves from sniper activity and explosions. The sensors were also incorporated into firefighter breathing masks, neck and wrist straps, and other protective equipment. Heart rate, breath rate, blood pressure, voice and activity can be derived from these sensors (reports at www.arl.army.mil/acoustics). Having numerous sensors at various locations provides a means for array processing to reduce motion artifacts, calculate pulse transit time for passive blood pressure measurement, and the origin of blunt/penetrating traumas such as ballistic wounding. These types of sensors give us the ability to monitor soldiers and civilian emergency first-responders in demanding environments, and provide vital signs information to assess their health status and how that person is interacting with the environment and mission at hand. The Objective Force Warrior, Scorpion, Land Warrior, Warrior Medic, and other military and civilian programs can potentially benefit from these sensors.

  1. Fuel Line Based Acoustic Flame-Out Detection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puster, Richard L. (Inventor); Franke, John M. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    An acoustic flame-out detection system that renders a large high pressure combustor safe in the event of a flame-out and possible explosive reignition. A dynamic pressure transducer is placed in the fuel and detects the stabilizing fuel pressure oscillations, caused by the combustion process. An electric circuit converts the signal from the combustion vortices, and transmitted to the fuel flow to a series of pulses. A missing pulse detector counts the pulses and continuously resets itself. If three consecutive pulses are missing, the circuit closes the fuel valve. With fuel denied the combustor is shut down or restarted under controlled conditions.

  2. Acoustic Emission Detection of Impact Damage on Space Shuttle Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, William H.; Gorman, Michael R.; Madaras, Eric I.

    2004-01-01

    The loss of the Space Shuttle Columbia as a result of impact damage from foam debris during ascent has led NASA to investigate the feasibility of on-board impact detection technologies. AE sensing has been utilized to monitor a wide variety of impact conditions on Space Shuttle components ranging from insulating foam and ablator materials, and ice at ascent velocities to simulated hypervelocity micrometeoroid and orbital debris impacts. Impact testing has been performed on both reinforced carbon composite leading edge materials as well as Shuttle tile materials on representative aluminum wing structures. Results of these impact tests will be presented with a focus on the acoustic emission sensor responses to these impact conditions. These tests have demonstrated the potential of employing an on-board Shuttle impact detection system. We will describe the present plans for implementation of an initial, very low frequency acoustic impact sensing system using pre-existing flight qualified hardware. The details of an accompanying flight measurement system to assess the Shuttle s acoustic background noise environment as a function of frequency will be described. The background noise assessment is being performed to optimize the frequency range of sensing for a planned future upgrade to the initial impact sensing system.

  3. Advanced modeling of thermal NDT problems: from buried landmines to defects in composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vavilov, Vladimir P.; Burleigh, Douglas D.; Klimov, Alexey G.

    2002-03-01

    Advanced thermal models that can be used in the detection of buried landmines and the TNDT (thermographic nondestructive testing) of composites are discussed. The interdependence between surface temperature signals and various complex parameters, such as surface and volumetric moisture, the shape of a heat pulse, material anisotropy, etc., is demonstrated.

  4. Detection and tracking of drones using advanced acoustic cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busset, Joël.; Perrodin, Florian; Wellig, Peter; Ott, Beat; Heutschi, Kurt; Rühl, Torben; Nussbaumer, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    Recent events of drones flying over city centers, official buildings and nuclear installations stressed the growing threat of uncontrolled drone proliferation and the lack of real countermeasure. Indeed, detecting and tracking them can be difficult with traditional techniques. A system to acoustically detect and track small moving objects, such as drones or ground robots, using acoustic cameras is presented. The described sensor, is completely passive, and composed of a 120-element microphone array and a video camera. The acoustic imaging algorithm determines in real-time the sound power level coming from all directions, using the phase of the sound signals. A tracking algorithm is then able to follow the sound sources. Additionally, a beamforming algorithm selectively extracts the sound coming from each tracked sound source. This extracted sound signal can be used to identify sound signatures and determine the type of object. The described techniques can detect and track any object that produces noise (engines, propellers, tires, etc). It is a good complementary approach to more traditional techniques such as (i) optical and infrared cameras, for which the object may only represent few pixels and may be hidden by the blooming of a bright background, and (ii) radar or other echo-localization techniques, suffering from the weakness of the echo signal coming back to the sensor. The distance of detection depends on the type (frequency range) and volume of the noise emitted by the object, and on the background noise of the environment. Detection range and resilience to background noise were tested in both, laboratory environments and outdoor conditions. It was determined that drones can be tracked up to 160 to 250 meters, depending on their type. Speech extraction was also experimentally investigated: the speech signal of a person being 80 to 100 meters away can be captured with acceptable speech intelligibility.

  5. Target detection and identification using synthetic aperture acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knox, Mary; Tantum, Stacy; Collins, Leslie

    2014-05-01

    Recent research has shown that synthetic aperture acoustic (SAA) imaging may be useful for object identification. The goal of this work is to use SAA information to detect and identify four types of objects: jagged rocks, river rocks, small concave capped cylinders, and large concave capped cylinders. More specifically, we examine the use of frequency domain features extracted from the SAA images. We utilize Support Vector Machines (SVMs) for target detection, where an SVM is trained on target and non-target (background) examples for each target type. Assuming perfect target detection, we then compare multivariate Gaussian models for target identification. Experimental results show that SAA-based frequency domain features are able to detect and identify the four types of objects.

  6. Fiber-optic acoustic-emission sensors and detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borinski, Jason W.; Clark, Richard L., Jr.; Furrow, A. Paige C.; Duke, John C., Jr.; Horne, Michael R.

    2000-05-01

    Optical fiber sensors are rapidly emerging as viable alternatives to piezoelectric devices as effective means of detecting and quantifying acoustic emission (AE). Compared to traditional piezoelectric-based sensors, optical fiber sensors offer much smaller size, reduced weight, ability to operate at temperatures up to 2000 degrees Celsius, immunity to electromagnetic interference, resistance to corrosive environments, inherent safety within flammable environments, and the ability to multiplex multiple sensors on a single fiber. The authors have investigated low-profile fiber optic- based AE sensors for non-destructive evaluation (NDE) systems. In particular, broadband optical fiber sensors were developed for monitoring acoustic emission for NDE of pressurized composite vessels. The authors conducted experiments by surface attaching sensors to aluminum compact tension specimens using a piezoelectric transducer as a reference sensor. Both the fiber optic and piezoelectric sensors accurately measured a representative acoustic event. The response of the fiber optic AE sensors were also compared to existing piezoelectric sensors during pencil lead break tests on an aluminum panel. The results indicate that optical fiber AE sensors can be used as highly sensitive transducers in many applications where conventional piezoelectric transducers are not suited.

  7. Thermal Acoustic Oscillation: Causes, Detection, Analysis, and Prevention

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christie, R. J.; Hartwig, J. W.

    2014-01-01

    Thermal Acoustic Oscillations (TAO) can occur in cryogenic systems and produce significant sources of heat. This source of heat can increase the boil off rate of cryogenic propellants in spacecraft storage tanks and reduce mission life. This paper discusses the causes of TAO, how it can be detected, what analyses can be done to predict it, and how to prevent it from occurring.The paper provides practical insight into what can aggravate instability, practical methods for mitigation, and when TAO does not occur. A real life example of a cryogenic system with an unexpected heat source is discussed, along with how TAO was confirmed and eliminated.

  8. RELIABILITY OF THE DETECTION OF THE BARYON ACOUSTIC PEAK

    SciTech Connect

    MartInez, Vicent J.; Arnalte-Mur, Pablo; De la Cruz, Pablo; Saar, Enn; Tempel, Elmo; Pons-BorderIa, MarIa Jesus

    2009-05-01

    The correlation function of the distribution of matter in the universe shows, at large scales, baryon acoustic oscillations, which were imprinted prior to recombination. This feature was first detected in the correlation function of the luminous red galaxies of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Recently, the final release (DR7) of the SDSS has been made available, and the useful volume is about two times bigger than in the old sample. We present here, for the first time, the redshift-space correlation function of this sample at large scales together with that for one shallower, but denser volume-limited subsample drawn from the Two-Degree Field Redshift Survey. We test the reliability of the detection of the acoustic peak at about 100 h {sup -1} Mpc and the behavior of the correlation function at larger scales by means of careful estimation of errors. We confirm the presence of the peak in the latest data although broader than in previous detections.

  9. Simulation of detection and beamforming with acoustical ground sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, D. Keith; Sadler, Brian M.; Pham, Tien

    2002-08-01

    An interactive platform has been developed for simulating the detection and direction-finding performance of battlefield acoustic ground sensors. The simulations use the Acoustic Battlefield Aid (ABFA) as a computational engine to determine the signal propagation and resulting frequency-domain signal characteristics at the receiving sensor array. There are three components to the propagation predictions: the transmission loss (signal attenuation from target to sensor), signal saturation (degree of signal randomization), and signal coherence across the beamforming array. The transmission loss is predicted with a parabolic solution to the wave equation that accounts for sound refraction and ground interactions; signal saturation and coherence are predicted from the theory for line-of-sight wave propagation through turbulence. Based on these calculations, random frequency-domain signal samples are generated. The signal samples are then mixed with noise and fed to the selected detection or beamforming algorithm. After averaging over a number of trials, results are overlaid on a terrain map to show the sensor coverage. Currently available algorithms include the Neyman-Pearson criterion and Bayes risk minimization for detection, and the conventional, MVDR, and MUSIC beamformers. Users can readily add their own algorithms through a 'plug-in' interface. The interface requires only a text file listing the algorithm parameters and defaults, and a Matlab routine or Windows dynamic link library that implements the algorithm.

  10. Landmine research: technology solutions looking for problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trevelyan, James P.

    2004-09-01

    The global landmine problem came to the attention of researchers in the mid 1990's and by 1997 several advanced and expensive sensor research programs had started. Yet, by the end of 2003, there is little sign of a major advance in the technology available to humanitarian demining programs. Given the motivation and dedication of researchers, public goodwill to support such programs, and substantial research resources devoted to the problem, it is worth asking why these programs do not seem to have had an impact on demining costs or casualty rates. Perhaps there are factors that have been overlooked. This paper reviews several research programs to gain a deeper understanding of the problem. A possible explanation is that researchers have accepted mistaken ideas on the nature of the landmine problems that need to be solved. The paper provides several examples where the realities of minefield conditions are quite different to what researchers have been led to believe. Another explanation may lie in the political and economic realities that drive the worldwide effort to eliminate landmines. Most of the resources devoted to landmine clearance programs come from humanitarian aid budgets: landmine affected countries often contribute only a small proportion because they have different priorities based on realistic risk-based assessment of needs and political views of local people. Some aid projects have been driven by the need to find a market for demining technologies rather than by user needs. Finally, there is a common misperception that costs in less developed countries are intrinsically low, reflecting low rates paid for almost all classes of skilled labour. When actual productivity is taken into account, real costs can be higher than industrialized countries. The costs of implementing technological solutions (even using simple technologies) are often significantly under-estimated. Some political decisions may have discouraged thorough investigation of cost

  11. Comparison of the TACOM acoustic-detection-range prediction model and the UK Dstl acoustic prediction propagation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunney, Victoria; Mantey, Robert; Crile, James

    2002-08-01

    Acoustic signatures are being exploited more and more by new technology in the battlefield as a way of detecting and identifying potential targets. An understanding of the way in which the acoustic signature of a land platform propagates through the atmosphere enables one to target suppression techniques to those acoustic sources on the vehicle that will provide the greatest military benefit in terms of reducing the detection range of the platform. Dstl Chertsey (UK) and TACOM (US) have developed acoustic propagation models which can predict the far-field sound pressure levels (SPLs) and associated detection ranges of land platforms under a variety of meteorological conditions over different terrain types. The Acoustic Prediction Propagation Model (APPM), UK) and Acoustic Detection Range Prediction Model (ADRPM, US) have previously been compared and have been found to produce similar results for simple scenarios. With recent developments in both models, this comparison has been carried out again, looking at the introduction of Fast-Field Programs (FFP) to both models and, in more detail, the differences between the results at certain frequencies. This paper represents the results found from this comparison study, showing the differences, similarities and potential of these models for the future.

  12. A micromachined surface acoustic wave sensor for detecting inert gases

    SciTech Connect

    Ahuja, S.; Hersam, M.; Ross, C.; Chien, H.T.; Raptis, A.C.

    1996-12-31

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensors must be specifically designed for each application because many variables directly affect the acoustic wave velocity. In the present work, the authors have designed, fabricated, and tested an SAW sensor for detection of metastable states of He. The sensor consists of two sets of micromachined interdigitated transducers (IDTs) and delay lines fabricated by photolithography on a single Y-cut LiNbO{sub 3} substrate oriented for Z-propagation of the SAWs. One set is used as a reference and the other set employs a delay line coated with a titanium-based thin film sensitive to electrical conductivity changes when exposed to metastable states of He. The reference sensor is used to obtain a true frequency translation in relation to a voltage controlled oscillator. An operating frequency of 109 MHz has been used, and the IDT finger width is 8 {micro}m. Variation in electrical conductivity of the thin film at the delay line due to exposure to He is detected as a frequency shift in the assembly, which is then used as a measure of the amount of metastable He exposed to the sensing film on the SAW delay line. A variation in the He pressure versus frequency shifts indicates the extent of the metastable He interaction.

  13. Atypical Applications for Gas-coupled Laser Acoustic Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caron, J. N.; Kunapareddy, P.

    2014-06-01

    Gas-coupled laser acoustic detection (GCLAD) was primarily developed to sense laser-generated ultrasound in composite materials. In a typical setup, a laser beam is directed parallel to the material surface. Radiated ultrasound waves deflect or displace the probe beam resulting from changes in the air's index of refraction. A position-sensitive photodetector senses the beam movement, and produces a signal proportional to the ultrasound wave. In this paper, we discuss three applications of GCLAD that take advantage of the unique detection characteristics. Directivity patterns of ultrasound amplitude in water demonstrate the use of GCLAD as a directional hydrophone. We also demonstrate the sensing of waveforms from a gelatin. The gelatin mimics ultrasound propagation through skin tissues. Lastly, we show how GCLAD can be used as a line receiver for continuous laser generation of ultrasound. CLGU may enable ultrasound scanning at rates that are orders of magnitude faster than current methods.

  14. Field installation of an acoustic slug-detection system

    SciTech Connect

    Dhulesia, H.; Bernicot, M.; Romanet, T.

    1997-02-01

    A pipeline operating in the slug flow regime creates high fluctuations in gas and liquid flow rates at the outlet. The detection of slugs and the estimation of their length and velocity are necessary to minimize the upsets in the operation of downstream process facilities. A new method based on the acoustic principle has been developed by Total and Syminex with two variants--passive and active. The passive method gives the slug length and velocity, whereas the active method also gives the fluid density. The prototype of this system has been installed permanently on a 20-in. multiphase pipeline in Argentina. As this system detects the slugs and determines their characteristics approximately 2 minutes before they arrive at the first-stage separator, the operators take appropriate action in the case of arrival of an excessively long slug and, thus, avoid possible shutdowns. At a later stage, an automatic adjustment of the process control valves will be realized.

  15. Small arm fire acoustic detection and localization systems: gunfire detection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donzier, Alain; Cadavid, Sandra

    2005-05-01

    The Gunfire Detection System (GDS) is an acoustic passive sensor designed to rapidly detect, locate, and report on hostile fire from small arms upon detection of a blast wave from a bullet exiting the gun barrel and/or the supersonic wave of the bullet. Upon the detection of the muzzle blast and/or the acoustic shock wave caused by the moving bullet the GDS notifies the user and displays the azimuth, elevation and range to the gunfire origin (shooter). This information allows the GDS user to swiftly move, return fire or take other appropriate action. The paper presented examines the militarization process of a Commercial Off The Shelf (COTS) item and provides lessons learned.

  16. DETECTION OF DRUGSTORE BEETLES IN 9975 PACKAGES USING ACOUSTIC EMISSIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Shull, D.

    2013-03-04

    This report documents the initial feasibility tests performed using a commercial acoustic emission instrument for the purpose of detecting beetles in Department of Energy 9975 shipping packages. The device selected for this testing was a commercial handheld instrument and probe developed for the detection of termites, weevils, beetles and other insect infestations in wooden structures, trees, plants and soil. The results of two rounds of testing are presented. The first tests were performed by the vendor using only the hand-held instrument’s indications and real-time operator analysis of the audio signal content. The second tests included hands-free positioning of the instrument probe and post-collection analysis of the recorded audio signal content including audio background comparisons. The test results indicate that the system is promising for detecting the presence of drugstore beetles, however, additional work would be needed to improve the ease of detection and to automate the signal processing to eliminate the need for human interpretation. Mechanisms for hands-free positioning of the probe and audio background discrimination are also necessary for reliable detection and to reduce potential operator dose in radiation environments.

  17. Characterization of space dust using acoustic impact detection.

    PubMed

    Corsaro, Robert D; Giovane, Frank; Liou, Jer-Chyi; Burchell, Mark J; Cole, Michael J; Williams, Earl G; Lagakos, Nicholas; Sadilek, Albert; Anderson, Christopher R

    2016-08-01

    This paper describes studies leading to the development of an acoustic instrument for measuring properties of micrometeoroids and other dust particles in space. The instrument uses a pair of easily penetrated membranes separated by a known distance. Sensors located on these films detect the transient acoustic signals produced by particle impacts. The arrival times of these signals at the sensor locations are used in a simple multilateration calculation to measure the impact coordinates on each film. Particle direction and speed are found using these impact coordinates and the known membrane separations. This ability to determine particle speed, direction, and time of impact provides the information needed to assign the particle's orbit and identify its likely origin. In many cases additional particle properties can be estimated from the signal amplitudes, including approximate diameter and (for small particles) some indication of composition/morphology. Two versions of this instrument were evaluated in this study. Fiber optic displacement sensors are found advantageous when very thin membranes can be maintained in tension (solar sails, lunar surface). Piezoelectric strain sensors are preferred for thicker films without tension (long duration free flyers). The latter was selected for an upcoming installation on the International Space Station. PMID:27586768

  18. Characterization of space dust using acoustic impact detection.

    PubMed

    Corsaro, Robert D; Giovane, Frank; Liou, Jer-Chyi; Burchell, Mark J; Cole, Michael J; Williams, Earl G; Lagakos, Nicholas; Sadilek, Albert; Anderson, Christopher R

    2016-08-01

    This paper describes studies leading to the development of an acoustic instrument for measuring properties of micrometeoroids and other dust particles in space. The instrument uses a pair of easily penetrated membranes separated by a known distance. Sensors located on these films detect the transient acoustic signals produced by particle impacts. The arrival times of these signals at the sensor locations are used in a simple multilateration calculation to measure the impact coordinates on each film. Particle direction and speed are found using these impact coordinates and the known membrane separations. This ability to determine particle speed, direction, and time of impact provides the information needed to assign the particle's orbit and identify its likely origin. In many cases additional particle properties can be estimated from the signal amplitudes, including approximate diameter and (for small particles) some indication of composition/morphology. Two versions of this instrument were evaluated in this study. Fiber optic displacement sensors are found advantageous when very thin membranes can be maintained in tension (solar sails, lunar surface). Piezoelectric strain sensors are preferred for thicker films without tension (long duration free flyers). The latter was selected for an upcoming installation on the International Space Station.

  19. Determination of acoustic speed for improving leak detection and location in gas pipelines.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuaiyong; Wen, Yumei; Li, Ping; Yang, Jin; Yang, Lili

    2014-02-01

    The commonly used cross-correlation technique for leak location requires that the acoustic speed is known and invariable. In practice, the gas leakage-induced acoustic waves propagate along multiple paths including in-pipe gas and pipe wall, and the acoustic waves in different transmission paths exhibit different acoustic speeds and different dispersive behaviors, which bring a great challenge for leak detection and location in the gas pipelines. In this study, based on the vibration theory of cylindrical elastic thin shell, the wavenumber formulae in different transmission paths are derived to predict the acoustic speeds and the acoustical coupling between the in-pipe gas and the pipe wall is analyzed to determine the dominant transmission path. In addition, the velocity dispersions in the dominant transmission path are suppressed by selection of a characteristic frequency band of the gas leakage-induced acoustic waves. The theoretical predictions are verified in the experiment and the results show that the theoretical acoustic speed is slightly larger than the measured acoustic speed. Thus, the theoretical acoustic speed formula is modified considering the effect of the structural loss factor and consequently the location error using the modified acoustic speed is reduced by two times compared to that using the theoretical acoustic speed.

  20. Determination of acoustic speed for improving leak detection and location in gas pipelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shuaiyong; Wen, Yumei; Li, Ping; Yang, Jin; Yang, Lili

    2014-02-01

    The commonly used cross-correlation technique for leak location requires that the acoustic speed is known and invariable. In practice, the gas leakage-induced acoustic waves propagate along multiple paths including in-pipe gas and pipe wall, and the acoustic waves in different transmission paths exhibit different acoustic speeds and different dispersive behaviors, which bring a great challenge for leak detection and location in the gas pipelines. In this study, based on the vibration theory of cylindrical elastic thin shell, the wavenumber formulae in different transmission paths are derived to predict the acoustic speeds and the acoustical coupling between the in-pipe gas and the pipe wall is analyzed to determine the dominant transmission path. In addition, the velocity dispersions in the dominant transmission path are suppressed by selection of a characteristic frequency band of the gas leakage-induced acoustic waves. The theoretical predictions are verified in the experiment and the results show that the theoretical acoustic speed is slightly larger than the measured acoustic speed. Thus, the theoretical acoustic speed formula is modified considering the effect of the structural loss factor and consequently the location error using the modified acoustic speed is reduced by two times compared to that using the theoretical acoustic speed.

  1. ACOUSTIC DETECTING AND LOCATING GAS PIPE LINE INFRINGEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    John L Loth; Gary J. Morris; George M. Palmer; Richard Guiler; Deepak Mehra

    2003-04-01

    The West Virginia University natural gas transmission line leak detection research is only considering using readily available 1/2 inch pipeline access ports for the detection of leak generated signals. The main problem with leak signals is the low signal to noise ratio. One of the acoustic signals associated with gas escaping through a leak is only temporary and is in the form of a rarefaction wave originating when the leak is formed. Due to pipeline friction, over distance such a step function transitions to a ramp function. The ability to identify a leak by pipeline monitoring and signal processing depends a great deal on the quality and signal to noise ratio of the characteristics of the detectors used. Combinations of sensing devices are being used for the WVU sensor package and are contained in a removable sensor housing. The four sensors currently installed are a 1/2 inch 3 Hz-40 Khz microphone, an audible range moving coil sensor, a piezo-electric pressure transducer, and the WVU designed floating 3 inch diameter diaphragm to detect flow transient induced pressure ramp type signals. The WVU diaphragm sensor, which is currently under development, uses the same diaphragm principle as a high quality capacitance type microphone, but utilizes aerodynamic signal amplification. This type of amplification only amplifies the ramp-signal itself, not the random pipeline noise.

  2. Towards an Automated Acoustic Detection System for Free Ranging Elephants

    PubMed Central

    Zeppelzauer, Matthias; Hensman, Sean; Stoeger, Angela S.

    2015-01-01

    The human-elephant conflict is one of the most serious conservation problems in Asia and Africa today. The involuntary confrontation of humans and elephants claims the lives of many animals and humans every year. A promising approach to alleviate this conflict is the development of an acoustic early warning system. Such a system requires the robust automated detection of elephant vocalizations under unconstrained field conditions. Today, no system exists that fulfills these requirements. In this paper, we present a method for the automated detection of elephant vocalizations that is robust to the diverse noise sources present in the field. We evaluate the method on a dataset recorded under natural field conditions to simulate a real-world scenario. The proposed method outperformed existing approaches and robustly and accurately detected elephants. It thus can form the basis for a future automated early warning system for elephants. Furthermore, the method may be a useful tool for scientists in bioacoustics for the study of wildlife recordings. PMID:25983398

  3. Noncontact photo-acoustic defect detection in drug tablets.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Ivin; Cetinkaya, Cetin

    2007-08-01

    Quality assurance monitoring is of great importance in the pharmaceutical industry for the reason that if defects such as coating layer irregularities, internal cracks, and delamination are present in a drug tablet, the desired dose delivery and bioavailability can be compromised. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) established the Process Analytical Technology (PAT) initiative, in order to ensure efficient quality monitoring at each stage of the manufacturing process by the integration of analysis systems into the evaluation procedure. Improving consistency and predictability of tablet action by improving quality and uniformity of tablet coatings as well as ensuring core integrity is required. An ideal technique for quality monitoring would be noninvasive, nondestructive, have a short measurement time, intrinsically safe, and relatively inexpensive. In the proposed acoustic system, a pulsed laser is utilized to generate noncontact mechanical excitations and interferometric detection of transient vibrations of the drug tablets is employed for sensing. Two novel methods to excite vibrational modes in drug tablets are developed and employed: (i) a vibration plate excited by a pulsed-laser and (ii) pulsed laser-induced plasma generated shockwave expansion. Damage in coat and/or core of a tablet weakens its mechanical stiffness and, consequently, affects its acoustic response to an external dynamic force field. From the analysis of frequency spectra and the time-frequency spectrograms obtained under both mechanisms, it can be concluded that defective tablets can be effectively differentiated from the defect-free ones and the proposed proof-of-concept techniques have potential to provide a technology platform to be used in the greater PAT effort.

  4. Detection of prostate cancer with opto-acoustic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, Valeri G.; Ponomarev, Anatoly E.; Henrichs, P. M.; Motamedi, Massoud; Orihuela, Eduardo; Eyzaguirre, Eduardo; Oraevsky, Alexander A.

    2003-06-01

    The laser optoacoustic imaging system (LOIS) for prostate cancer detection, localization and characterization with 32-element transducer array was developed and tested. Each transducer was made of 50-μm thick PVDF film with dimensions of 1mm x 10 mm. The thickness of the PVDF film allowed 100-μm axial in-depth resolution. Cylindrical shape of the 5-cm long transducer array provided an improved lateral resolution of 0.35 mm. Original design of low noise preamplifiers and wide band amplifiers was employed. The system was optimized for contrast and sensitivity. An automatic recognition of the opto-acoustic signal detected from the irradiated surface was implemented in order to visualize the prostate surface and improve the accuracy of tumor localization. Radial back-projection algorithm adopting Radon transform was used for image reconstruction. The advantages and limitations various contrast enhancing filters applied to the whole image were studied and discussed. Images were acquired in real time with the rate of one frame per second. The system performance was evaluated initially via acquisition of two-dimensional optoacoustic images of small blood volumes in prostate tissue phantoms. Clinical ex-vivo studies of prostatectomy specimen were also performed and compared with transrectal ultrasound.

  5. Explosive hazard detection using synthetic aperture acoustic sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewster, E.; Keller, J. M.; Stone, K.; Popescu, M.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we develop an approach to detect explosive hazards designed to attack vehicles from the side of a road, using a side looking synthetic aperture acoustic (SAA) sensor. This is done by first processing the raw data using a back-projection algorithm to form images. Next, an RX prescreener creates a list of possible targets, each with a designated confidence. Initial experiments are performed on libraries of the highest confidence hits for both target and false alarm classes generated by the prescreener. Image chips are extracted using pixel locations derived from the target's easting and northing. Several feature types are calculated from each image chip, including: histogram of oriented gradients (HOG), and generalized column projection features where the column aggregator takes the form of the minimum, maximum, mean, median, mode, standard deviation, variance, and the one-dimensional fast Fourier transform (FFT). A support vector machine (SVM) classifier is then utilized to evaluate feature type performance during training and testing in order to determine whether the two classes are separable. This will be used to build an online detection system for road-side explosive hazards.

  6. Landmine associated injuries in children in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Can, Muhammet; Yildirimcan, Humeyra; Ozkalipci, Onder; Melek, Mehmet; Edirne, Yesim; Bicer, Umit; Uner, Huseyin Bulent

    2009-11-01

    This study aims to examine trends of injuries due to landmines and unexploded ordnance (UXO) and to determine problems during and after the treatment of children and adolescent victims in Turkey. Data from the records of 23 children injured from landmines and UXO were analyzed from April 2001 to October 2008. Cases consist of 21 (91.3%) males and two (8.7%) females with a mean age of 12.8 years. Cause of injury was landmine explosion in 20 (87.0%) and UXO in three (13.0%) cases. Injuries in upper and lower extremities were determined in eight (34.8%) children. Hand amputation was the result in 10 (43.5%) children where in two cases a leg, in one case an eye, in one case a hand and arm, in two cases a hand and leg, in one case an eye and a leg and in three cases a hand and eye were lost. One case of death was recorded from UXO with an autopsy performed. Contaminated areas in our region should be cleared according to international contracts to prevent injuries in children, centers providing rehabilitation services should be established and policies regarding social support for child victims should be ascertained.

  7. Aircraft IR/acoustic detection evaluation. Volume 2: Development of a ground-based acoustic sensor system for the detection of subsonic jet-powered aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraft, Robert E.

    1992-01-01

    The design and performance of a ground-based acoustic sensor system for the detection of subsonic jet-powered aircraft is described and specified. The acoustic detection system performance criteria will subsequently be used to determine target detection ranges for the subject contract. Although the defined system has never been built and demonstrated in the field, the design parameters were chosen on the basis of achievable technology and overall system practicality. Areas where additional information is needed to substantiate the design are identified.

  8. Landmines: The Hidden Crisis. For Middle School Grades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Jacquelyn S.

    Intended to make the issue of landmines pertinent and accessible to classroom teachers, this curriculum unit provides material to teach middle school students about the numbers and dangers of anti-personnel landmines placed around the world. By completing the unit, students demonstrate their achievement of several of the social studies standards…

  9. Systems and methods of monitoring acoustic pressure to detect a flame condition in a gas turbine

    DOEpatents

    Ziminsky, Willy Steve; Krull, Anthony Wayne; Healy, Timothy Andrew , Yilmaz, Ertan

    2011-05-17

    A method may detect a flashback condition in a fuel nozzle of a combustor. The method may include obtaining a current acoustic pressure signal from the combustor, analyzing the current acoustic pressure signal to determine current operating frequency information for the combustor, and indicating that the flashback condition exists based at least in part on the current operating frequency information.

  10. Investigation of acoustic sensors to detect coconut rhinoceros beetle in Guam

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The coconut rhinoceros beetle, Oryctes rhinoceros, was accidentally introduced into Guam last year and now threatens the Island’s forests and tourist industry. These large insects can be detected easily with acoustic sensors, and procedures are being developed to incorporate acoustic technology int...

  11. Multisensor mine detector for peacekeeping: improved landmine detector concept (ILDC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFee, John E.; Carruthers, Al

    1996-05-01

    The Improved Landmine Detector Concept Project was initiated in Autumn 1994 to develop a prototype vehicle mounted mine detector for low metal content and nonmetallic mines for a peacekeeping role on roads. The system will consist of a teleoperated vehicle carrying a highly sensitive electromagnetic induction (EMI) detector, an infrared imager (IR), ground probing radar (GPR), and a thermal neutron activation (TNA) detector for confirmation. The IR, EMI and TNA detectors have been under test since 1995 and the GPR will be received in June 1996. Results of performance trials of the individual detectors are discussed. Various design configurations and their tradeoffs are discussed. Fusion of data from the detectors to reduce false alarm rate and increase probability of detection, a key element to the success of the system, is discussed. An advanced development model of the system is expected to be complete by Spring 1997.

  12. Acoustic detection, tracking, and characterization of three tornadoes.

    PubMed

    Frazier, William Garth; Talmadge, Carrick; Park, Joseph; Waxler, Roger; Assink, Jelle

    2014-04-01

    Acoustic data recorded at 1000 samples per second by two sensor arrays located at ranges of 1-113 km from three tornadoes that occurred on 24 May 2011 in Oklahoma are analyzed. Accurate bearings to the tornadoes have been obtained using beamforming methods applied to the data at infrasonic frequencies. Beamforming was not viable at audio frequencies, but the data demonstrate the ability to detect significant changes in the shape of the estimated power spectral density in the band encompassing 10 Hz to approximately 100 Hz at distances of practical value from the sensors. This suggests that arrays of more closely spaced sensors might provide better bearing accuracy at practically useful distances from a tornado. Additionally, a mathematical model, based on established relationships of aeroacoustic turbulence, is demonstrated to provide good agreement to the estimated power spectra produced by the tornadoes at different times and distances from the sensors. The results of this analysis indicate that, qualitatively, an inverse relationship appears to exist between the frequency of an observed peak of the power spectral density and the reported tornado intensity.

  13. Acoustic detection, tracking, and characterization of three tornadoes.

    PubMed

    Frazier, William Garth; Talmadge, Carrick; Park, Joseph; Waxler, Roger; Assink, Jelle

    2014-04-01

    Acoustic data recorded at 1000 samples per second by two sensor arrays located at ranges of 1-113 km from three tornadoes that occurred on 24 May 2011 in Oklahoma are analyzed. Accurate bearings to the tornadoes have been obtained using beamforming methods applied to the data at infrasonic frequencies. Beamforming was not viable at audio frequencies, but the data demonstrate the ability to detect significant changes in the shape of the estimated power spectral density in the band encompassing 10 Hz to approximately 100 Hz at distances of practical value from the sensors. This suggests that arrays of more closely spaced sensors might provide better bearing accuracy at practically useful distances from a tornado. Additionally, a mathematical model, based on established relationships of aeroacoustic turbulence, is demonstrated to provide good agreement to the estimated power spectra produced by the tornadoes at different times and distances from the sensors. The results of this analysis indicate that, qualitatively, an inverse relationship appears to exist between the frequency of an observed peak of the power spectral density and the reported tornado intensity. PMID:25234974

  14. [INVITED] Laser generation and detection of ultrafast shear acoustic waves in solids and liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezeril, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this article is to provide an overview of the up-to-date findings related to ultrafast shear acoustic waves. Recent progress obtained for the laser generation and detection of picosecond shear acoustic waves in solids and liquids is reviewed. Examples in which the transverse isotropic symmetry of the sample structure is broken in order to permit shear acoustic wave generation through sudden laser heating are described in detail. Alternative photo-induced mechanisms for ultrafast shear acoustic generation in metals, semiconductors, insulators, magnetostrictive, piezoelectric and electrostrictive materials are reviewed as well. With reference to key experiments, an all-optical technique employed to probe longitudinal and shear structural dynamics in the GHz frequency range in ultra-thin liquid films is described. This technique, based on specific ultrafast shear acoustic transducers, has opened new perspectives that will be discussed for ultrafast shear acoustic probing of viscoelastic liquids at the nanometer scale.

  15. The role of gravity in ocean acoustics propagation and its implication to early tsunami detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Tiago; Lin, Ying-Tsong; Kadri, Usama

    2016-04-01

    Oceanic low frequency sound generated by submarine earthquake travels much faster than tsunamis and leaves pressure signatures that can act as tsunami precursors. In this regard, it is anticipated that the correct measurement and analysis of low frequency acoustics would enhance current early tsunami detection systems. In this work we model the low frequency acoustics generated by the 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake using the "Method of Normal Modes" and the "Acoustics-Gravity Wave" theory. Ocean acoustic theories usually neglect the effect of gravity. However, we show for rigid and elastic bottom conditions how gravity influences the acoustic normal mode propagation speed. Practically, our results can help in the real time characterization of low frequency sources in the ocean. This will enhance the robustness of early tsunami detection systems.

  16. Towards early ice detection on wind turbine blades using acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berbyuk, Viktor; Peterson, Bo; Möller, Jan

    2014-03-01

    The study focuses on the early detection of ice using controlled acoustic waves propagating in the wind turbine blades. An experimental set-up with a cold climate chamber, a composite test object used in turbine blades and equipment for glaze and rime ice production has been developed. Controlled acoustic waves are generated by magnetostrictive Terfenol-D based actuator. The propagation of three orthogonally polarized acoustic waves was studied by means of 6 accelerometers positioned, 3 each, in 2 holders on the 8 m long composite test object. The results show that for the considered composite test object the formation of ice, the ice mass, icing areas and the temperature have a significant influence on controlled acoustic waves propagation w.r.t. Fourier transform, amplitude attenuation and RMS values as indicators concluding that the proposed acoustic wave technique is a promising approach for ice detection.

  17. Application of acoustic emission to flaw detection in engineering materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moslehy, F. A.

    1990-01-01

    Monitoring of structures under operating loads to provide an early warning of possible failure to locate flaws in test specimens subjected to uniaxial tensile loading is presented. Test specimens used are mild steel prismatic bars with small holes at different locations. When the test specimen is loaded, acoustic emission data are automatically collected by two acoustic transducers located at opposite sides of the hole and processed by an acoustic emission analyzer. The processed information yields the difference in arrival times at the transducers, which uniquely determines the flaw location. By using this technique, flaws were located to within 8 percent of their true location. The use of acoustic emission in linear location to locate a flaw in a material is demonstrated. It is concluded that this one-dimensional application could be extended to the general flaw location problem through triangulation.

  18. Environmental fate and transport of chemical signatures from buried landmines -- Screening model formulation and initial simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Phelan, J.M.; Webb, S.W.

    1997-06-01

    The fate and transport of chemical signature molecules that emanate from buried landmines is strongly influenced by physical chemical properties and by environmental conditions of the specific chemical compounds. Published data have been evaluated as the input parameters that are used in the simulation of the fate and transport processes. A one-dimensional model developed for screening agricultural pesticides was modified and used to simulate the appearance of a surface flux above a buried landmine, estimate the subsurface total concentration, and show the phase specific concentrations at the ground surface. The physical chemical properties of TNT cause a majority of the mass released to the soil system to be bound to the solid phase soil particles. The majority of the transport occurs in the liquid phase with diffusion and evaporation driven advection of soil water as the primary mechanisms for the flux to the ground surface. The simulations provided herein should only be used for initial conceptual designs of chemical pre-concentration subsystems or complete detection systems. The physical processes modeled required necessary simplifying assumptions to allow for analytical solutions. Emerging numerical simulation tools will soon be available that should provide more realistic estimates that can be used to predict the success of landmine chemical detection surveys based on knowledge of the chemical and soil properties, and environmental conditions where the mines are buried. Additional measurements of the chemical properties in soils are also needed before a fully predictive approach can be confidently applied.

  19. Detection of respiratory compromise by acoustic monitoring, capnography, and brain function monitoring during monitored anesthesia care.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Pedro P; Tanaka, Maria; Drover, David R

    2014-12-01

    Episodes of apnea in sedated patients represent a risk of respiratory compromise. We hypothesized that acoustic monitoring would be equivalent to capnography for detection of respiratory pauses, with fewer false alarms. In addition, we hypothesized that the patient state index (PSI) would be correlated with the frequency of respiratory pauses and therefore could provide information about the risk of apnea during sedation. Patients undergoing sedation for surgical procedures were monitored for respiration rate using acoustic monitoring and capnography and for depth of sedation using the PSI. A clinician blinded to the acoustic and sedation monitor observed the capnograph and patient to assess sedation and episodes of apnea. Another clinician retrospectively reviewed the capnography and acoustic waveform and sound files to identify true positive and false positive respiratory pauses by each method (reference method). Sensitivity, specificity, and likelihood ratio for detection of respiratory pause was calculated for acoustic monitoring and capnography. The correlation of PSI with respiratory pause events was determined. For the 51 respiratory pauses validated by retrospective analysis, the sensitivity, specificity, and likelihood ratio positive for detection were 16, 96 %, and 3.5 for clinician observation; 88, 7 %, and 1.0 for capnography; and 55, 87 %, and 4.1 for acoustic monitoring. There was no correlation between PSI and respiratory pause events. Acoustic monitoring had the highest likelihood ratio positive for detection of respiratory pause events compared with capnography and clinician observation and, therefore, may provide the best method for respiration rate monitoring during these procedures. PMID:24420342

  20. Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Jerry R.; Grosveld, Ferdinand

    2007-01-01

    The acoustics environment in space operations is important to maintain at manageable levels so that the crewperson can remain safe, functional, effective, and reasonably comfortable. High acoustic levels can produce temporary or permanent hearing loss, or cause other physiological symptoms such as auditory pain, headaches, discomfort, strain in the vocal cords, or fatigue. Noise is defined as undesirable sound. Excessive noise may result in psychological effects such as irritability, inability to concentrate, decrease in productivity, annoyance, errors in judgment, and distraction. A noisy environment can also result in the inability to sleep, or sleep well. Elevated noise levels can affect the ability to communicate, understand what is being said, hear what is going on in the environment, degrade crew performance and operations, and create habitability concerns. Superfluous noise emissions can also create the inability to hear alarms or other important auditory cues such as an equipment malfunctioning. Recent space flight experience, evaluations of the requirements in crew habitable areas, and lessons learned (Goodman 2003; Allen and Goodman 2003; Pilkinton 2003; Grosveld et al. 2003) show the importance of maintaining an acceptable acoustics environment. This is best accomplished by having a high-quality set of limits/requirements early in the program, the "designing in" of acoustics in the development of hardware and systems, and by monitoring, testing and verifying the levels to ensure that they are acceptable.

  1. Site specific probability of passive acoustic detection of humpback whale calls from single fixed hydrophones.

    PubMed

    Helble, Tyler A; D'Spain, Gerald L; Hildebrand, John A; Campbell, Gregory S; Campbell, Richard L; Heaney, Kevin D

    2013-09-01

    Passive acoustic monitoring of marine mammal calls is an increasingly important method for assessing population numbers, distribution, and behavior. A common mistake in the analysis of marine mammal acoustic data is formulating conclusions about these animals without first understanding how environmental properties such as bathymetry, sediment properties, water column sound speed, and ocean acoustic noise influence the detection and character of vocalizations in the acoustic data. The approach in this paper is to use Monte Carlo simulations with a full wave field acoustic propagation model to characterize the site specific probability of detection of six types of humpback whale calls at three passive acoustic monitoring locations off the California coast. Results show that the probability of detection can vary by factors greater than ten when comparing detections across locations, or comparing detections at the same location over time, due to environmental effects. Effects of uncertainties in the inputs to the propagation model are also quantified, and the model accuracy is assessed by comparing calling statistics amassed from 24,690 humpback units recorded in the month of October 2008. Under certain conditions, the probability of detection can be estimated with uncertainties sufficiently small to allow for accurate density estimates.

  2. Acoustic emission signal classification for gearbox failure detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shishino, Jun

    The purpose of this research is to develop a methodology and technique to determine the optimal number of clusters in acoustic emission (AE) data obtained from a ground test stand of a rotating H-60 helicopter tail gearbox by using mathematical algorithms and visual inspection. Signs of fatigue crack growth were observed from the AE signals acquired from the result of the optimal number of clusters in a data set. Previous researches have determined the number of clusters by visually inspecting the AE plots from number of iterations. This research is focused on finding the optimal number of clusters in the data set by using mathematical algorithms then using visual verification to confirm it. The AE data were acquired from the ground test stand that simulates the tail end of an H-60 Seahawk at Naval Air Station in Patuxant River, Maryland. The data acquired were filtered to eliminate durations that were greater than 100,000 is and 0 energy hit data to investigate the failure mechanisms occurring on the output bevel gear. From the filtered data, different AE signal parameters were chosen to perform iterations to see which clustering algorithms and number of outputs is the best. The clustering algorithms utilized are the Kohonen Self-organizing Map (SOM), k-mean and Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM). From the clustering iterations, the three cluster criterion algorithms were performed to observe the suggested optimal number of cluster by the criterions. The three criterion algorithms utilized are the Davies-Bouldin, Silhouette and Tou Criterions. After the criterions had suggested the optimal number of cluster for each data set, visual verification by observing the AE plots and statistical analysis of each cluster were performed. By observing the AE plots and the statistical analysis, the optimal number of cluster in the data set and effective clustering algorithms were determined. Along with the optimal number of clusters and effective clustering algorithm, the mechanisms

  3. A four-quadrant PVDF transducer for surface acoustic wave detection.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zimo; Dorantes-Gonzalez, Dante J; Chen, Kun; Yang, Fei; Jin, Baoyin; Li, Yanning; Chen, Zhi; Hu, Xiaotang

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, a polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) piezoelectric transducer was developed to detect laser-induced surface acoustic waves in a SiO(2)-thin film-Si-substrate structure. In order to solve the problems related to, firstly, the position of the probe, and secondly, the fact that signals at different points cannot be detected simultaneously during the detection process, a four-quadrant surface acoustic wave PVDF transducer was designed and constructed for the purpose of detecting surface acoustic waves excited by a pulse laser line source. The experimental results of the four-quadrant piezoelectric detection in comparison with the commercial nanoindentation technology were consistent, the relative error is 0.56%, and the system eliminates the piezoelectric surface wave detection direction deviation errors, improves the accuracy of the testing system by 1.30%, achieving the acquisition at the same time at different testing positions of the sample. PMID:23112612

  4. Method and apparatus for acoustic plate mode liquid-solid phase transition detection

    DOEpatents

    Blair, Dianna S.; Freye, Gregory C.; Hughes, Robert C.; Martin, Stephen J.; Ricco, Antonio J.

    1993-01-01

    A method and apparatus for sensing a liquid-solid phase transition event is provided which comprises an acoustic plate mode detecting element placed in contact with a liquid or solid material which generates a high-frequency acoustic wave that is attenuated to an extent based on the physical state of the material is contact with the detecting element. The attenuation caused by the material in contact with the acoustic plate mode detecting element is used to determine the physical state of the material being detected. The method and device are particularly suited for detecting conditions such as the icing and deicing of wings of an aircraft. In another aspect of the present invention, a method is provided wherein the adhesion of a solid material to the detecting element can be measured using the apparatus of the invention.

  5. Beaked whale (Mesoplodon densirostris) passive acoustic detection in increasing ambient noise.

    PubMed

    Ward, Jessica; Jarvis, Susan; Moretti, David; Morrissey, Ronald; Dimarzio, Nancy; Johnson, Mark; Tyack, Peter; Thomas, Len; Marques, Tiago

    2011-02-01

    Passive acoustic detection is being increasingly used to monitor visually cryptic cetaceans such as Blainville's beaked whales (Mesoplodon densirostris) that may be especially sensitive to underwater sound. The efficacy of passive acoustic detection is traditionally characterized by the probability of detecting the animal's sound emissions as a function of signal-to-noise ratio. The probability of detection can be predicted using accepted, but not necessarily accurate, models of the underwater acoustic environment. Recent field studies combining far-field hydrophone arrays with on-animal acoustic recording tags have yielded the location and time of each sound emission from tagged animals, enabling in-situ measurements of the probability of detection. However, tagging studies can only take place in calm seas and so do not reflect the full range of ambient noise conditions under which passive acoustic detection may be used. Increased surface-generated noise from wind and wave interaction degrades the signal-to-noise ratio of animal sound receptions at a given distance leading to a reduction in probability of detection. This paper presents a case study simulating the effect of increasing ambient noise on detection of M. densirostris foraging clicks recorded from a tagged whale swimming in the vicinity of a deep-water, bottom-mounted hydrophone array.

  6. Rehabilitation of landmine victims--the ultimate challenge.

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Nicolas E.; Walsh, Wendy S.

    2003-01-01

    Antipersonnel landmines are often used indiscriminately and frequently result in injury or death of non-combatants. In the last 65 years, over 110 million mines have been spread throughout the world into an estimated 70 countries. Landmine victims use a disproportionately high amount of medical resources; the vast majority of incidents occur in regions and countries without a sophisticated medical infrastructure and with limited resources, where rehabilitation is difficult in the best of circumstances. It is suggested that only a quarter of the patients with amputation secondary to landmines receive appropriate care. PMID:14710508

  7. Acoustic target detection and classification using neural networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, James A.; Conlon, Mark

    1993-01-01

    A neural network approach to the classification of acoustic emissions of ground vehicles and helicopters is demonstrated. Data collected during the Joint Acoustic Propagation Experiment conducted in July of l991 at White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico was used to train a classifier to distinguish between the spectrums of a UH-1, M60, M1 and M114. An output node was also included that would recognize background (i.e. no target) data. Analysis revealed specific hidden nodes responding to the features input into the classifier. Initial results using the neural network were encouraging with high correct identification rates accompanied by high levels of confidence.

  8. NATO TG-53: acoustic detection of weapon firing joint field experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Dale N.; Pham, Tien; Scanlon, Michael V.; Srour, Nassy; Reiff, Christian G.; Sim, Leng K.; Solomon, Latasha; Thompson, Dorothea F.

    2006-05-01

    In this paper, we discuss the NATO Task Group 53 (TG-53) acoustic detection of weapon firing field joint experiment at Yuma Proving Ground during 31 October to 4 November 2005. The participating NATO countries include France, the Netherlands, UK and US. The objectives of the joint experiments are: (i) to collect acoustic signatures of direct and indirect firings from weapons such as sniper, mortar, artillery and C4 explosives and (ii) to share signatures among NATO partners from a variety of acoustic sensing platforms on the ground and in the air distributed over a wide area.

  9. Exploring results of the possibility on detecting cosmic ray particles by acoustic way

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Y.; Yuan, Y.; Li, Y.; Chen, D.; Zheng, R.; Song, J.

    1985-01-01

    It has been demonstrated experimentally and theoretically that high energy particles produce detectable sounds in water. However, no one has been able to detect an acoustic signal generated by a high energy cosmic ray particle in water. Results show that transient ultrasonic signals in a large lake or reservoir are fairly complex and that the transient signals under water may arise mainly from sound radiation from microbubbles. This field is not explored in detail. Perhaps, the sounds created by cosmic ray particles hide in these ultrasonic signals. In order to develop the technique of acoustic detection, it is most important to make a thorough investigation of these ultrasonic signals in water.

  10. Damage Detection and Analysis in CFRPs Using Acoustic Emission Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitlow, Travis Laron

    Real time monitoring of damage is an important aspect of life management of critical structures. Acoustic emission (AE) techniques allow for measurement and assessment of damage in real time. Acoustic emission parameters such as signal amplitude and duration were monitored during the loading sequences. Criteria that can indicate the onset of critical damage to the structure were developed. Tracking the damage as it happens gives a better analysis of the failure evolution that will allow for a more accurate determination of structural life. The main challenge is distinguishing between legitimate damage signals and "false positives" which are unrelated to damage growth. Such false positives can be related to electrical noise, friction, or mechanical vibrations. This research focuses on monitoring signals of damage growth in carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CFRPs) and separating the relevant signals from the false ones. In this Dissertation, acoustic emission signals from CFRP specimens were experimentally recorded and analyzed. The objectives of this work are: (1) perform static and fatigue loading of CFRP composite specimens and measure the associated AE signals, (2) accurately determine the AE parameters (energy, frequency, duration, etc.) of signals generated during failure of such specimens, (3) use fiber optic sensors to monitor the strain distribution of the damage zone and relate these changes in strain measurements to AE data.

  11. Program plan: acoustic leak detection/location development at GE-ARSD

    SciTech Connect

    1980-02-01

    Provide the development and subsequent specification, design and testing of an acoustic leak protection system which will detect a leak within a LMFBR steam generator. The goal for this system is to be at least as rapid and no more expensive than the chemical leak detection system under development for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP).

  12. Sequential Model-Based Detection in a Shallow Ocean Acoustic Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J V

    2002-03-26

    A model-based detection scheme is developed to passively monitor an ocean acoustic environment along with its associated variations. The technique employs an embedded model-based processor and a reference model in a sequential likelihood detection scheme. The monitor is therefore called a sequential reference detector. The underlying theory for the design is developed and discussed in detail.

  13. A Summary Comparison of Active Acoustic Detections and Visual Observations of Marine Mammals in the Canadian Beaufort Sea.

    PubMed

    Pyć, Cynthia D; Geoffroy, Maxime; Knudsen, Frank R

    2016-01-01

    Fisheries sonar was used to determine the applicability of active acoustic monitoring (AAM) for marine mammal detection in the Canadian Beaufort Sea. During 170 h of simultaneous observation by marine mammal observers and active acoustic observation, 119 Balaena mysticetus (bowheads) and 4 Delphinapterus leucas (belugas) were visually sighted, while 59 acoustic signals of bowheads were detected by AAM operators. Observations and detection of seals were also recorded. Comparative results indicate that commercially available active acoustic systems can detect seals at distances up to 500 m and large baleen whales at distances up to 2 km.

  14. A Summary Comparison of Active Acoustic Detections and Visual Observations of Marine Mammals in the Canadian Beaufort Sea.

    PubMed

    Pyć, Cynthia D; Geoffroy, Maxime; Knudsen, Frank R

    2016-01-01

    Fisheries sonar was used to determine the applicability of active acoustic monitoring (AAM) for marine mammal detection in the Canadian Beaufort Sea. During 170 h of simultaneous observation by marine mammal observers and active acoustic observation, 119 Balaena mysticetus (bowheads) and 4 Delphinapterus leucas (belugas) were visually sighted, while 59 acoustic signals of bowheads were detected by AAM operators. Observations and detection of seals were also recorded. Comparative results indicate that commercially available active acoustic systems can detect seals at distances up to 500 m and large baleen whales at distances up to 2 km. PMID:26611045

  15. Leak detection by acoustic emissions monitoring: An experimental investigation of the acoustic properties of leaks and the attenuation characteristics of soil

    SciTech Connect

    Kilpatrick, J.F.; March, P.A.

    1994-05-27

    This study experimentally explored the conditions, equipment, and methodology necessary for the acoustic detection of small leaks of jet fuel (JP4) from underground storage tank (UST) systems. The study indicates that acoustic leak detection of very small leaks is feasible. In general, significant JP4 fuel leaks which occur across a 5 PSI (pounds per square inch) or greater pressure drop are acoustically active and can be detected with proper sensors and proper placement of sensors. The primary source of leak noise is turbulent flow through the leak orifice. At lower pressures, the leak flow becomes laminar, and the leak becomes virtually silent. With direct transducer contact on the pipe or tank wall and sufficient system pressure, leaks smaller than 0.1 GPH (gallons per hour) can be detected. Larger leaks can be detected through short distances in soil. However, sand, which is the most commonly used fill material for UST systems, provides significant acoustic attenuation. Consequently, waveguides must be used when monitoring distances exceeding about 1 foot of travel through sand. Sand acts to reduce background noise levels, providing an ideal environment for acoustic leak detection using sensors mounted directly on the pipe or tank wall. Leak detection, Acoustics, Underground storage tanks, Pipelines, Attenuation.

  16. Optical Generation And Spatially Distinct Interferometric Detection Of Ultrahigh Frequency Surface Acoustic Waves

    SciTech Connect

    David H. Hurley

    2006-05-01

    Generation and interferometric detection of 22 GHz surface acoustic waves (SAWs) using two laterally separated absorption gratings on a Si substrate are presented. Optical phase sensitive detection of SAWs is demonstrated using a modified Sagnac interferometer. The reflection characteristics of the suboptical wavelength grating necessitate the use of only linear polarization. This is accomplished by employing a Faraday rotator to ensure path reversal of the reference and signal pulses. The enhanced sensitivity of the interferometer is exploited to measure the acoustic disturbance on an identical absorption grating at a distance of ~4.5 µm from the generation site.

  17. Magnetic acoustic resonance immunoassay (MARIA): a multifrequency acoustic approach for the non-labelled detection of biomolecular interactions.

    PubMed

    Araya-Kleinsteuber, Bernardita; Roque, Ana C A; Kioupritzi, Eleftheria; Stevenson, Adrian C; Lowe, Christopher R

    2006-01-01

    A unique sensing platform, comprising an electromagnetic field detector and an acoustic resonator, has been used as a wireless system for remote sensing of biorecognition events. The MARS (Magnetic Acoustic Resonator Sensor) technique has proven useful for detecting the formation of protein multilayers derived from specific binding phenomena. The technique enables multifrequency analysis, without the need of electrodes attached to the sensing element, and also facilitates the in situ surface modification of the substrate for antibody attachment. The MARS sensor was utilized as the platform on which a standard immunoassay was carried out. Two different conditions for the attachment of the first antibody to the quartz surface were tested: (i) Adsorption of the antibody onto the surface of a bare quartz disc; (ii) covalent immobilization of the antibody to a chemically modified quartz surface. Both methods can be successfully utilized for the 'label-less' detection of the biorecognition event between goat IgG and anti-goat IgG by analysis of the multifrequency spectrum. Covalent attachment of the primary antibody results in a more efficient immobilization, with higher surface density, and a consistently enhanced response for the binding of the secondary antibody. This approach will be of interest to life scientists and biochemists that require high performance assay methodologies that do not use chemical labels.

  18. Helmet-mounted acoustic array for hostile fire detection and localization in an urban environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scanlon, Michael V.

    2008-04-01

    The detection and localization of hostile weapons firing has been demonstrated successfully with acoustic sensor arrays on unattended ground sensors (UGS), ground-vehicles, and unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). Some of the more mature systems have demonstrated significant capabilities and provide direct support to ongoing counter-sniper operations. The Army Research Laboratory (ARL) is conducting research and development for a helmet-mounted system to acoustically detect and localize small arms firing, or other events such as RPG, mortars, and explosions, as well as other non-transient signatures. Since today's soldier is quickly being asked to take on more and more reconnaissance, surveillance, & target acquisition (RSTA) functions, sensor augmentation enables him to become a mobile and networked sensor node on the complex and dynamic battlefield. Having a body-worn threat detection and localization capability for events that pose an immediate danger to the soldiers around him can significantly enhance their survivability and lethality, as well as enable him to provide and use situational awareness clues on the networked battlefield. This paper addresses some of the difficulties encountered by an acoustic system in an urban environment. Complex reverberation, multipath, diffraction, and signature masking by building structures makes this a very harsh environment for robust detection and classification of shockwaves and muzzle blasts. Multifunctional acoustic detection arrays can provide persistent surveillance and enhanced situational awareness for every soldier.

  19. Based on optical fiber Michelson interferometer for acoustic emission detection experimental research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Yijun; Qu, Dandan; Deng, Hu

    2013-08-01

    A type of Michelson interferometer with two optical fiber loop reflectors acoustic emission sensor is proposed in the article to detect the vibrations produced by ultrasonic waves propagating in a solid body. Two optical fiber loop reflectors are equivalent to the sensing arm and the reference arm instead of traditional Michelson interferometer end reflecter Theoretical analyses indicate that the sensitivity of the system has been remarkably increased because of the decrease of the losses of light energy. The best operating point of optical fiber sensor is fixed by theoretical derivation and simulation of computer, and the signal frequency which is detected by the sensor is the frequency of input signal. PZT (Piezoelectric Ceramic) is powered by signal generator as known ultrasonic source, The Polarization controller is used to make the reflected light interference,The fiber length is changed by adjusting the DC voltage on the PZT with the fiber loop to make the sensor system response that ΔΦ is closed to π/2. the signal basis frequency detected by the sensor is the frequency of the input signal. Then impacts the surface of the marble slab with home-made mechanical acoustic emission source. And detect it. and then the frequency characteristic of acoustic emission signal is obtained by Fourier technique. The experimental results indicate that the system can identify the frequency characteristic of acoustic emission signal, and it can be also used to detect the surface feeble vibration which is generated by ultrasonic waves propagating in material structure.

  20. Comparison between visual and passive acoustic detection of finless porpoises in the Yangtze River, China.

    PubMed

    Akamatsu, T; Wang, D; Wang, K; Wei, Z

    2001-04-01

    Recently, sonar signals and other sounds produced by cetaceans have been used for acoustic detection of individuals and groups in the wild. However, the detection probability ascertained by concomitant visual survey has not been demonstrated extensively. The finless porpoises (Neophocaena phocaenoides) have narrow band and high-frequency sonar signals, which are distinctive from background noises. Underwater sound monitoring with hydrophones (B&K8103) placed along the sides of a research vessel, concurrent with visual observations was conducted in the Yangtze River from Wuhan to Poyang Lake in 1998 in China. The peak to peak detection threshold was set at 133 dB re 1 ,EPa. With this threshold level, porpoises could be detected reliably within 300 m of the hydrophone. In a total of 774-km cruise, 588 finless porpoises were sighted by visual observation and 44 ,864 ultrasonic pulses were recorded by the acoustical observation system. The acoustic monitoring system could detect the presence of the finless porpoises 82% of the time. A false alarm in the system occurred with a frequency of 0.9%. The high-frequency acoustical observation is suggested as an effective method for field surveys of small cetaceans, which produce high-frequency sonar signals.

  1. Effect of passive acoustic sampling methodology on detecting bats after declines from white nose syndrome

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coleman, Laci S.; Ford, W. Mark; Dobony, Christopher A.; Britzke, Eric R.

    2014-01-01

    Concomitant with the emergence and spread of white-nose syndrome (WNS) and precipitous decline of many bat species in North America, natural resource managers need modified and/or new techniques for bat inventory and monitoring that provide robust occupancy estimates. We used Anabat acoustic detectors to determine the most efficient passive acoustic sampling design for optimizing detection probabilities of multiple bat species in a WNS-impacted environment in New York, USA. Our sampling protocol included: six acoustic stations deployed for the entire duration of monitoring as well as a 4 x 4 grid and five transects of 5-10 acoustic units that were deployed for 6-8 night sample durations surveyed during the summers of 2011-2012. We used Program PRESENCE to determine detection probability and site occupancy estimates. Overall, the grid produced the highest detection probabilities for most species because it contained the most detectors and intercepted the greatest spatial area. However, big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus) and species not impacted by WNS were detected easily regardless of sampling array. Endangered Indiana (Myotis sodalis) and little brown (Myotis lucifugus) and tri-colored bats (Perimyotis subflavus) showed declines in detection probabilities over our study, potentially indicative of continued WNS-associated declines. Identification of species presence through efficient methodologies is vital for future conservation efforts as bat populations decline further due to WNS and other factors.   

  2. Robotic vehicle uses acoustic array for detection and localization in urban environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Stuart H.; Scanlon, Michael V.

    2001-09-01

    Sophisticated robotic platforms with diverse sensor suites are quickly replacing the eyes and ears of soldiers on the complex battlefield. The Army Research Laboratory (ARL) in Adelphi, Maryland has developed a robot-based acoustic detection system that will detect an impulsive noise event, such as a sniper's weapon firing or door slam, and activate a pan-tilt to orient a visible and infrared camera toward the detected sound. Once the cameras are cued to the target, onboard image processing can then track the target and/or transmit the imagery to a remote operator for navigation, situational awareness, and target detection. Such a vehicle can provide reconnaissance, surveillance, and target acquisition for soldiers, law enforcement, and rescue personnel, and remove these people from hazardous environments. ARL's primary robotic platforms contain 16-in. diameter, eight-element acoustic arrays. Additionally, a 9- in. array is being developed in support of DARPA's Tactical Mobile Robot program. The robots have been tested in both urban and open terrain. The current acoustic processing algorithm has been optimized to detect the muzzle blast from a sniper's weapon, and reject many interfering noise sources such as wind gusts, generators, and self-noise. However, other detection algorithms for speech and vehicle detection/tracking are being developed for implementation on this and smaller robotic platforms. The collaboration between two robots, both with known positions and orientations, can provide useful triangulation information for more precise localization of the acoustic events. These robots can be mobile sensor nodes in a larger, more expansive, sensor network that may include stationary ground sensors, UAVs, and other command and control assets. This report will document the performance of the robot's acoustic localization, describe the algorithm, and outline future work.

  3. Detection of nonlinear picosecond acoustic pulses by time-resolved Brillouin scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Gusev, Vitalyi E.

    2014-08-14

    In time-resolved Brillouin scattering (also called picosecond ultrasonic interferometry), the time evolution of the spatial Fourier component of an optically excited acoustic strain distribution is monitored. The wave number is determined by the momentum conservation in photon-phonon interaction. For linear acoustic waves propagating in a homogeneous medium, the detected time-domain signal of the optical probe transient reflectivity shows a sinusoidal oscillation at a constant frequency known as the Brillouin frequency. This oscillation is a result of heterodyning the constant reflection from the sample surface with the Brillouin-scattered field. Here, we present an analytical theory for the nonlinear reshaping of a propagating, finite amplitude picosecond acoustic pulse, which results in a time-dependence of the observed frequency. In particular, we examine the conditions under which this information can be used to study the time-evolution of the weak-shock front speed. Depending on the initial strain pulse parameters and the time interval of its nonlinear transformation, our theory predicts the detected frequency to either be monotonically decreasing or oscillating in time. We support these theoretical predictions by comparison with available experimental data. In general, we find that picosecond ultrasonic interferometry of nonlinear acoustic pulses provides access to the nonlinear acoustic properties of a medium spanning most of the GHz frequency range.

  4. Object detection and tracking method of AUV based on acoustic vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tie-dong; Wan, Lei; Zeng, Wen-jing; Xu, Yu-ru

    2012-12-01

    This paper describes a new framework for object detection and tracking of AUV including underwater acoustic data interpolation, underwater acoustic images segmentation and underwater objects tracking. This framework is applied to the design of vision-based method for AUV based on the forward looking sonar sensor. First, the real-time data flow (underwater acoustic images) is pre-processed to form the whole underwater acoustic image, and the relevant position information of objects is extracted and determined. An improved method of double threshold segmentation is proposed to resolve the problem that the threshold cannot be adjusted adaptively in the traditional method. Second, a representation of region information is created in light of the Gaussian particle filter. The weighted integration strategy combining the area and invariant moment is proposed to perfect the weight of particles and to enhance the tracking robustness. Results obtained on the real acoustic vision platform of AUV during sea trials are displayed and discussed. They show that the proposed method can detect and track the moving objects underwater online, and it is effective and robust.

  5. Efficient source separation algorithms for acoustic fall detection using a microsoft kinect.

    PubMed

    Li, Yun; Ho, K C; Popescu, Mihail

    2014-03-01

    Falls have become a common health problem among older adults. In previous study, we proposed an acoustic fall detection system (acoustic FADE) that employed a microphone array and beamforming to provide automatic fall detection. However, the previous acoustic FADE had difficulties in detecting the fall signal in environments where interference comes from the fall direction, the number of interferences exceeds FADE's ability to handle or a fall is occluded. To address these issues, in this paper, we propose two blind source separation (BSS) methods for extracting the fall signal out of the interferences to improve the fall classification task. We first propose the single-channel BSS by using nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF) to automatically decompose the mixture into a linear combination of several basis components. Based on the distinct patterns of the bases of falls, we identify them efficiently and then construct the interference free fall signal. Next, we extend the single-channel BSS to the multichannel case through a joint NMF over all channels followed by a delay-and-sum beamformer for additional ambient noise reduction. In our experiments, we used the Microsoft Kinect to collect the acoustic data in real-home environments. The results show that in environments with high interference and background noise levels, the fall detection performance is significantly improved using the proposed BSS approaches.

  6. A novel algorithm for buried target detection evaluated on a collection of seismo-acoustic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malof, Jordan M.; Knox, Mary; Torrione, Peter A.; Collins, Leslie M.; Morton, Kenneth D.

    2014-06-01

    A recently validated technique for buried target detection relies on applying an acoustic stimulus signal to a patch of earth and then measuring its seismic (vibrational) response using a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV). Target detection in this modality often relies on estimating the acoustic-to-seismic coupling ratio (A/S ratio) of the ground, which is altered by the presence of a buried target. For this study, LDV measurements were collected over patches of earth under varying environmental conditions using a known stimulus. These observations are then used to estimate the performance of several methods to discriminate between target and non-target patches. The first part of the study compares the performance of human observers against a set of established seismo-acoustic features from the literature. The simple features are based on previous studies where statistics on the Fourier transform of the acoustic-to-seismic transfer function estimate are measured. The human observers generally offered much better detection performance than any established feature. One weakness of the Fourier features is their inability to utilize local spatiotemporal target cues. To address these weaknesses, a novel automatic detection algorithm is proposed which uses a multi-scale blob detector to identify suspicious regions in time and space. These suspicious spatiotemporal locations are then clustered and assigned a decision statistic based on the confidence and number of cluster members. This method is shown to improve performance over the established Fourier statistics, resulting in performance much closer to the human observers.

  7. Analysis of Landmine Fatalities and Injuries in the Kurdistan Region.

    PubMed

    Heshmati, Almas; Khayyat, Nabaz T

    2015-09-01

    This study analyzes landmine victim data in the Kurdistan Region during the period 1960 to 2005. A regression analysis is used to identify the determinants and impact of the probability of getting killed by mines and unexploded ordnances. The rates of killed/injured victims are explained using a set of socioeconomic variables. As the data are a repeated cross-section in which the individuals are observed when they are subjected to landmine incidents, and to account for the dynamic aspect of the process and heterogeneity by location as well as to control for unobserved location and time effects, a pseudo panel data are created where districts are observed over the entire time period forming a panel data. The results show that (a) males, children, and the elderly are more susceptible to a higher level of landmine risks; (b) landmine training and awareness programs do not reduce the rate of landmine mortality; and (c) the rate of incidents are declining over time. This result can be used in the planning, monitoring, and resource allocation for mine action, as well as labor market programs and rehabilitation activities. PMID:25315481

  8. Bacteria Murmur: Application of an Acoustic Biosensor for Plant Pathogen Detection

    PubMed Central

    Dimopoulou, Anastasia; Glynos, Paraskevas; Gizeli, Electra

    2015-01-01

    A multi-targeting protocol for the detection of three of the most important bacterial phytopathogens, based on their scientific and economic importance, was developed using an acoustic biosensor (the Quartz Crystal Microbalance) for DNA detection. Acoustic detection was based on a novel approach where DNA amplicons were monitored and discriminated based on their length rather than mass. Experiments were performed during real time monitoring of analyte binding and in a direct manner, i.e. without the use of labels for enhancing signal transduction. The proposed protocol improves time processing by circumventing gel electrophoresis and can be incorporated as a routine detection method in a diagnostic lab or an automated lab-on-a-chip system for plant pathogen diagnostics. PMID:26177507

  9. Bacteria Murmur: Application of an Acoustic Biosensor for Plant Pathogen Detection.

    PubMed

    Papadakis, George; Skandalis, Nicholas; Dimopoulou, Anastasia; Glynos, Paraskevas; Gizeli, Electra

    2015-01-01

    A multi-targeting protocol for the detection of three of the most important bacterial phytopathogens, based on their scientific and economic importance, was developed using an acoustic biosensor (the Quartz Crystal Microbalance) for DNA detection. Acoustic detection was based on a novel approach where DNA amplicons were monitored and discriminated based on their length rather than mass. Experiments were performed during real time monitoring of analyte binding and in a direct manner, i.e. without the use of labels for enhancing signal transduction. The proposed protocol improves time processing by circumventing gel electrophoresis and can be incorporated as a routine detection method in a diagnostic lab or an automated lab-on-a-chip system for plant pathogen diagnostics.

  10. Leak detection by acoustic emissions monitoring: An experimental investigation of the acoustic properties of leaks and the attenuation characteristics of soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilpatrick, James F.; March, Patrick A.

    1994-05-01

    This study experimentally explored the conditions, equipment, and methodology necessary for the acoustic detection of small leaks of jet fuel (JP4) from underground storage tank (UST) systems. The study indicates that acoustic leak detection of very small leaks is feasible. In general, significant JP4 fuel leaks which occur across a 5 PSI (pounds per square inch) or greater pressure drop are acoustically active and can be detected with proper sensors and proper placement of sensors. The primary source of leak noise is turbulent flow through the leak orifice. At lower pressures, the leak flow becomes laminar, and the leak becomes virtually silent. With direct transducer contact on the pipe or tank wall and sufficient system pressure, leaks smaller than 0.1 GPH (gallons per hour) can be detected. Larger leaks can be detected through short distances in soil. However, sand, which is the most commonly used fill material for UST systems, provides significant acoustic attenuation. Consequently, waveguides must be used when monitoring distances exceeding about 1 foot of travel through sand. Sand acts to reduce background noise levels, providing an ideal environment for acoustic leak detection using sensors mounted directly on the pipe or tank wall.

  11. Passive acoustic monitoring to detect spawning in large-bodied catostomids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Straight, Carrie A.; Freeman, Byron J.; Freeman, Mary C.

    2014-01-01

    Documenting timing, locations, and intensity of spawning can provide valuable information for conservation and management of imperiled fishes. However, deep, turbid or turbulent water, or occurrence of spawning at night, can severely limit direct observations. We have developed and tested the use of passive acoustics to detect distinctive acoustic signatures associated with spawning events of two large-bodied catostomid species (River Redhorse Moxostoma carinatum and Robust Redhorse Moxostoma robustum) in river systems in north Georgia. We deployed a hydrophone with a recording unit at four different locations on four different dates when we could both record and observe spawning activity. Recordings captured 494 spawning events that we acoustically characterized using dominant frequency, 95% frequency, relative power, and duration. We similarly characterized 46 randomly selected ambient river noises. Dominant frequency did not differ between redhorse species and ranged from 172.3 to 14,987.1 Hz. Duration of spawning events ranged from 0.65 to 11.07 s, River Redhorse having longer durations than Robust Redhorse. Observed spawning events had significantly higher dominant and 95% frequencies than ambient river noises. We additionally tested software designed to automate acoustic detection. The automated detection configurations correctly identified 80–82% of known spawning events, and falsely indentified spawns 6–7% of the time when none occurred. These rates were combined over all recordings; rates were more variable among individual recordings. Longer spawning events were more likely to be detected. Combined with sufficient visual observations to ascertain species identities and to estimate detection error rates, passive acoustic recording provides a useful tool to study spawning frequency of large-bodied fishes that displace gravel during egg deposition, including several species of imperiled catostomids.

  12. Theoretical detection threshold of the proton-acoustic range verification technique

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Moiz; Xiang, Liangzhong; Yousefi, Siavash; Xing, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Range verification in proton therapy using the proton-acoustic signal induced in the Bragg peak was investigated for typical clinical scenarios. The signal generation and detection processes were simulated in order to determine the signal-to-noise limits. Methods: An analytical model was used to calculate the dose distribution and local pressure rise (per proton) for beams of different energy (100 and 160 MeV) and spot widths (1, 5, and 10 mm) in a water phantom. In this method, the acoustic waves propagating from the Bragg peak were generated by the general 3D pressure wave equation implemented using a finite element method. Various beam pulse widths (0.1–10 μs) were simulated by convolving the acoustic waves with Gaussian kernels. A realistic PZT ultrasound transducer (5 cm diameter) was simulated with a Butterworth bandpass filter with consideration of random noise based on a model of thermal noise in the transducer. The signal-to-noise ratio on a per-proton basis was calculated, determining the minimum number of protons required to generate a detectable pulse. The maximum spatial resolution of the proton-acoustic imaging modality was also estimated from the signal spectrum. Results: The calculated noise in the transducer was 12–28 mPa, depending on the transducer central frequency (70–380 kHz). The minimum number of protons detectable by the technique was on the order of 3–30 × 106 per pulse, with 30–800 mGy dose per pulse at the Bragg peak. Wider pulses produced signal with lower acoustic frequencies, with 10 μs pulses producing signals with frequency less than 100 kHz. Conclusions: The proton-acoustic process was simulated using a realistic model and the minimal detection limit was established for proton-acoustic range validation. These limits correspond to a best case scenario with a single large detector with no losses and detector thermal noise as the sensitivity limiting factor. Our study indicated practical proton-acoustic range

  13. Theoretical detection threshold of the proton-acoustic range verification technique

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, Moiz; Yousefi, Siavash; Xing, Lei; Xiang, Liangzhong

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: Range verification in proton therapy using the proton-acoustic signal induced in the Bragg peak was investigated for typical clinical scenarios. The signal generation and detection processes were simulated in order to determine the signal-to-noise limits. Methods: An analytical model was used to calculate the dose distribution and local pressure rise (per proton) for beams of different energy (100 and 160 MeV) and spot widths (1, 5, and 10 mm) in a water phantom. In this method, the acoustic waves propagating from the Bragg peak were generated by the general 3D pressure wave equation implemented using a finite element method. Various beam pulse widths (0.1–10 μs) were simulated by convolving the acoustic waves with Gaussian kernels. A realistic PZT ultrasound transducer (5 cm diameter) was simulated with a Butterworth bandpass filter with consideration of random noise based on a model of thermal noise in the transducer. The signal-to-noise ratio on a per-proton basis was calculated, determining the minimum number of protons required to generate a detectable pulse. The maximum spatial resolution of the proton-acoustic imaging modality was also estimated from the signal spectrum. Results: The calculated noise in the transducer was 12–28 mPa, depending on the transducer central frequency (70–380 kHz). The minimum number of protons detectable by the technique was on the order of 3–30 × 10{sup 6} per pulse, with 30–800 mGy dose per pulse at the Bragg peak. Wider pulses produced signal with lower acoustic frequencies, with 10 μs pulses producing signals with frequency less than 100 kHz. Conclusions: The proton-acoustic process was simulated using a realistic model and the minimal detection limit was established for proton-acoustic range validation. These limits correspond to a best case scenario with a single large detector with no losses and detector thermal noise as the sensitivity limiting factor. Our study indicated practical proton-acoustic

  14. Standing tree decay detection by using acoustic tomography images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinosa, Luis F.; Arciniegas, Andres F.; Prieto, Flavio A.; Cortes, Yolima; Brancheriau, Loïc.

    2015-04-01

    The acoustic tomographic technique is used in the diagnosis process of standing trees. This paper presents a segmentation methodology to separate defective regions in cross-section tomographic images obtained with Arbotom® device. A set of experiments was proposed using two trunk samples obtained from a eucalyptus tree, simulating defects by drilling holes with known geometry, size and position and using different number of sensors. Also, tomographic images from trees presenting real defects were studied, by testing two different species with significant internal decay. Tomographic images and photographs from the trunk cross-section were processed to align the propagation velocity data with a corresponding region, healthy or defective. The segmentation was performed by finding a velocity threshold value to separate the defective region; a logistic regression model was fitted to obtain the value that maximizes a performance criterion, being selected the geometric mean. Accuracy segmentation values increased as the number of sensors augmented; also the position influenced the result, obtaining improved results in the case of centric defects.

  15. Acoustic detection of ice crystals in Antarctic waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penrose, John D.; Conde, M.; Pauly, T. J.

    1994-06-01

    During the voyage of the RSV Aurora Australis to the region of Prydz Bay, Antarctica in January-March 1991, ice crystals were encountered at depths from the surface to 125-m in the western area of the bay. On two occasions, crystals were retrieved by netting, and echo sounder records have been used to infer additional regions of occurrence. Acoustic target strength estimates made on the ice crystal assemblies encountered show significant spatial variation, which may relate to crystal size and/or aggregation. Data from a suite of conductivity-temperature-depth casts have been used to map regions of the study area where in situ water temperatures fell below the computed freezing point. Such regions correlate well with those selected on the basis of echogram type and imply that ice crystals occurred at depth over large areas of the bay during the cruise period. The ice crystal distribution described is consistent with that expected from a plume of supercooled water emerging from under the Amery Ice Shelf and forming part of the general circulation of the bay. The magnitude of the supercooled water plume is greater than those reported previously in the Prydz Bay region. If misinterpreted as biota on echo sounder records, ice crystals could significantly bias biomass estimates based on echo integration in this and potentially other areas.

  16. A potential means of using acoustic emission for crack detection under cyclic-load conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, A.; Klima, S. J.

    1973-01-01

    A preliminary investigation was conducted to assess the feasibility of monitoring acoustic emission signals from fatigue cracks during cyclic bend tests. Plate specimens of 6A1-4V titanium, 2219-T87 aluminum, and 18-Ni maraging steel were tested with and without crack starter notches. It was found that significant acoustic emission signals could be detected in the frequency range from 100 kHz to 400 kHz. Cracks emanating from starter notches were monitored by the ultrasonic pulse-echo technique and periodically measured by micro-optical examination. Methods used to reduce the effects of extraneous noises (i.e., machine noises, fretting) are described. A frequency spectrum analyzer was used to characterize the emissions and to evaluate methods used to acquire the signals (i.e., transducer location, bandwidth selection). The investigation indicated that it was possible to extract meaningful acoustic emission signals in a cyclic bend machine environment.

  17. Method and apparatus for detecting internal structures of bulk objects using acoustic imaging

    DOEpatents

    Deason, Vance A.; Telschow, Kenneth L.

    2002-01-01

    Apparatus for producing an acoustic image of an object according to the present invention may comprise an excitation source for vibrating the object to produce at least one acoustic wave therein. The acoustic wave results in the formation of at least one surface displacement on the surface of the object. A light source produces an optical object wavefront and an optical reference wavefront and directs the optical object wavefront toward the surface of the object to produce a modulated optical object wavefront. A modulator operatively associated with the optical reference wavefront modulates the optical reference wavefront in synchronization with the acoustic wave to produce a modulated optical reference wavefront. A sensing medium positioned to receive the modulated optical object wavefront and the modulated optical reference wavefront combines the modulated optical object and reference wavefronts to produce an image related to the surface displacement on the surface of the object. A detector detects the image related to the surface displacement produced by the sensing medium. A processing system operatively associated with the detector constructs an acoustic image of interior features of the object based on the phase and amplitude of the surface displacement on the surface of the object.

  18. Dual-frequency acoustic droplet vaporization detection for medical imaging.

    PubMed

    Arena, Christopher B; Novell, Anthony; Sheeran, Paul S; Puett, Connor; Moyer, Linsey C; Dayton, Paul A

    2015-09-01

    Liquid-filled perfluorocarbon droplets emit a unique acoustic signature when vaporized into gas-filled microbubbles using ultrasound. Here, we conducted a pilot study in a tissue-mimicking flow phantom to explore the spatial aspects of droplet vaporization and investigate the effects of applied pressure and droplet concentration on image contrast and axial and lateral resolution. Control microbubble contrast agents were used for comparison. A confocal dual-frequency transducer was used to transmit at 8 MHz and passively receive at 1 MHz. Droplet signals were of significantly higher energy than microbubble signals. This resulted in improved signal separation and high contrast-to-tissue ratios (CTR). Specifically, with a peak negative pressure (PNP) of 450 kPa applied at the focus, the CTR of B-mode images was 18.3 dB for droplets and -0.4 for microbubbles. The lateral resolution was dictated by the size of the droplet activation area, with lower pressures resulting in smaller activation areas and improved lateral resolution (0.67 mm at 450 kPa). The axial resolution in droplet images was dictated by the size of the initial droplet and was independent of the properties of the transmit pulse (3.86 mm at 450 kPa). In post-processing, time-domain averaging (TDA) improved droplet and microbubble signal separation at high pressures (640 kPa and 700 kPa). Taken together, these results indicate that it is possible to generate high-sensitivity, high-contrast images of vaporization events. In the future, this has the potential to be applied in combination with droplet-mediated therapy to track treatment outcomes or as a standalone diagnostic system to monitor the physical properties of the surrounding environment. PMID:26415125

  19. Automatic Acoustic Events Detection, Classification, and Semantic Annotation for Persistent Surveillance Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkilani, Amjad H. I.

    Acoustic surveillance and human behavior analysis represent some of the ongoing research topics in signal processing. Acoustic sensors offer a promising sensing modality, primarily because they can capture a huge amount of information from the environment. Moreover, they can be rapidly deployed and are low-cost. In the past, significant efforts have been devoted to detecting sounds of individual objects or events. However, the issue of understanding human activities based on sporadic acoustic sound events has received unequal attention in the literature and hence is not well understood. This dissertation presents an extensive literature survey on this topic and discusses existing advanced techniques for acoustic signal processing and pattern recognition. A novel theoretic framework (Acoustic Events Detection, Classification, and Annotation (AEDCA)) is proposed which accommodates sound events ontology for improved human activities recognition. Based on a generalized taxonomy, three sound categories signifying interaction of human with each other, with vehicles, and with other objects are introduced. In order to understand different type of human interactions salient sound events are preliminarily identified and classified based on trained set of data. To interlink salient events representing an ontology-based hypothesis, a Hidden Markov Model-Acoustic Activity Recognizer (HMM-AAR) is modeled to recognize spatiotemporally correlated events. Once such a connection is established, an annotation of perceived sound activity is generated. The performance of the AEDCA system was tested and measured experimentally in both indoor and outdoor environments. Appropriate confusion matrices are developed for the assessment of performance reliability, and computational efficiency of the AEDCA system. The obtained results are very promising and strongly demonstrate the AEDCA is both reliable and effective, and can be extended to future surveillance applications.

  20. Detection of land mines by amplified fluorescence quenching of polymer films: a man-portable chemical sniffer for detection of ultratrace concentrations of explosives emanating from land mines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    la Grone, Marcus J.; Cumming, Colin J.; Fisher, Mark E.; Fox, Michael J.; Jacob, Sheena; Reust, Dennis; Rockley, Mark G.; Towers, Eric

    2000-08-01

    The explosive charge within a landmine is the source for a mixture of chemical vapors that form a distinctive 'chemical signature' indicative of a landmine. The concentration of these compounds in the air over landmines is extremely low, well below the minimum detection limits of most field- portable chemical sensors. Described in this paper is a man- portable landmine detection system that has for the first time demonstrated the ability to detect landmines by direct sensing of the vapors of signature compounds in the air over landmines. The system utilizes fluorescent polymers developed by collaborators at the MIT. The sensor can detect ultra-trace concentrations of TNT vapor and other nitroaromatic compounds found in many landmine explosives. Thin films of the polymers exhibit intense fluorescence, but when exposed to vapors of nitroaromatic explosives the intensity of the light emitted from the films decreases. A single molecule of TNT binding to a receptor site quenches the fluorescence from many polymer repeat units, increasing the sensitivity by orders of magnitude. A sensor prototype has been develop that response in near real-time to low femtogram quantities of nitroaromatic explosives. The prototype is portable, lightweight, has low power consumption, is simple to operate, and is relatively inexpensive. Simultaneous field testing of the sensor and experienced canine landmine detection teams was recently completed. Although the testing was limited in scope, the performance of the senor met or exceeded that of the canines against buried landmines.

  1. Mapping soil magnetic properties in Bosnia and Herzegovina for landmine clearance operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannam, J. A.; Dearing, J. A.

    2008-10-01

    Electromagnetic properties of soils have negative impacts on metal detector performance during landmine clearance operations. In particular, topsoils with high concentrations of pedogenic viscous superparamagnetic minerals (magnetite/maghemite) as shown by high values of magnetic susceptibility and frequency dependent susceptibility limit the detector capability of identifying buried landmines. Thus a priori knowledge of the spatial extent of soils that may be problematic for landmine detection would aid strategic planning of clearance operations and ensure appropriate equipment is deployed. Here, we compare two approaches for estimating the broad magnetic properties of soils in Bosnia and Herzegovina: 1) an analogue approach, using data for magnetic susceptibility and frequency dependent susceptibility available for soil types from other temperate and Mediterranean regions; 2) magnetic measurements of a stratified sample of soil samples taken from the Bosnian National Soil Archive. The national soil magnetic maps produced estimate that the area of land inferred as problematic for metal detectors is 4% and 30% according to the analogue and measurement methods respectively. Combining soil type with soil parent material and climate explains the spatial variability of soil magnetic properties in terms of mechanisms of secondary ferrimagnetic mineral production and accumulation. The resulting maps indicate that the magnetic properties of dominant soils in northern Bosnia tend to be unproblematic for detectors, while in central Bosnia there is likely to be moderate detector interference. However, there is a high likelihood of dominant soils affecting detectors in southern and western Bosnia and Herzegovina, equivalent to ~ 30% of the total land area. The mapped outputs of susceptibility and frequency dependent susceptibility provide demining end-users with an indication of the likelihood of encountering problem soils in areas selected for clearance operations.

  2. Background noise cancellation for improved acoustic detection of manatee vocalizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zheng; Niezrecki, Christopher; Beusse, Diedrich O.

    2005-04-01

    The West Indian manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris) has become endangered partly because of an increase in the number of collisions with boats. A device to alert boaters of the presence of manatees, so that a collision can be avoided, is desired. Practical implementation of the technology is dependent on the hydrophone spacing and range of detection. These parameters are primarily dependent on the manatee vocalization strength, the decay of the signal strength with distance, and the background noise levels. An efficient method to extend the detection range by using background noise cancellation is proposed in this paper. An adaptive line enhancer (ALE) that can detect and track narrowband signals buried in broadband noise is implemented to cancel the background noise. The results indicate that the ALE algorithm can efficiently extract the manatee calls from the background noise. The improved signal-to-noise ratio of the signal can be used to extend the range of detection of manatee vocalizations and reduce the false alarm and missing detection rate in their natural habitat.

  3. Background noise cancellation for improved acoustic detection of manatee vocalizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zheng; Niezrecki, Christopher; Beusse, Diedrich O.

    2005-06-01

    The West Indian manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris) has become endangered partly because of an increase in the number of collisions with boats. A device to alert boaters of the presence of manatees, so that a collision can be avoided, is desired. A practical implementation of the technology is dependent on the hydrophone spacing and range of detection. These parameters are primarily dependent on the manatee vocalization strength, the decay of the signal's strength with distance, and the background noise levels. An efficient method to extend the detection range by using background noise cancellation is proposed in this paper. An adaptive line enhancer (ALE) that can detect and track narrow band signals buried in broadband noise is implemented to cancel the background noise. The results indicate that the ALE algorithm can efficiently extract the manatee calls from the background noise. The improved signal-to-noise ratio of the signal can be used to extend the range of detection of manatee vocalizations and reduce the false alarm and missing detection rate in their natural habitat. .

  4. Research on power-law acoustic transient signal detection based on wavelet transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jian-hui; Yang, Ri-jie; Wang, Wei

    2007-11-01

    Aiming at the characteristics of acoustic transient signal emitted from antisubmarine weapon which is being dropped into water (torpedo, aerial sonobuoy and rocket assisted depth charge etc.), such as short duration, low SNR, abruptness and instability, based on traditional power-law detector, a new method to detect acoustic transient signal is proposed. Firstly wavelet transform is used to de-noise signal, removes random spectrum components and improves SNR. Then Power- Law detector is adopted to detect transient signal. The simulation results show the method can effectively extract envelop characteristic of transient signal on the condition of low SNR. The performance of WT-Power-Law markedly outgoes that of traditional Power-Law detection method.

  5. Estimation of the detection probability for Yangtze finless porpoises (Neophocaena phocaenoides asiaeorientalis) with a passive acoustic method.

    PubMed

    Akamatsu, T; Wang, D; Wang, K; Li, S; Dong, S; Zhao, X; Barlow, J; Stewart, B S; Richlen, M

    2008-06-01

    Yangtze finless porpoises were surveyed by using simultaneous visual and acoustical methods from 6 November to 13 December 2006. Two research vessels towed stereo acoustic data loggers, which were used to store the intensity and sound source direction of the high frequency sonar signals produced by finless porpoises at detection ranges up to 300 m on each side of the vessel. Simple stereo beam forming allowed the separation of distinct biosonar sound source, which enabled us to count the number of vocalizing porpoises. Acoustically, 204 porpoises were detected from one vessel and 199 from the other vessel in the same section of the Yangtze River. Visually, 163 and 162 porpoises were detected from two vessels within 300 m of the vessel track. The calculated detection probability using acoustic method was approximately twice that for visual detection for each vessel. The difference in detection probabilities between the two methods was caused by the large number of single individuals that were missed by visual observers. However, the sizes of large groups were underestimated by using the acoustic methods. Acoustic and visual observations complemented each other in the accurate detection of porpoises. The use of simple, relatively inexpensive acoustic monitoring systems should enhance population surveys of free-ranging, echolocating odontocetes.

  6. Utility of acoustical detection of Coptotermes Formosanus (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The AED 2000 and 2010 are extremely sensitive listening devices which can effectively detect and monitor termite activity through a wave guide (e.g. bolt) both qualitatively and quantitatively. Experiments conducted with one to ten thousand termites from differing colonies infesting wood in buckets...

  7. Surface Generated Acoustic Wave Biosensors for the Detection of Pathogens: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Rocha-Gaso, María-Isabel; March-Iborra, Carmen; Montoya-Baides, Ángel; Arnau-Vives, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    This review presents a deep insight into the Surface Generated Acoustic Wave (SGAW) technology for biosensing applications, based on more than 40 years of technological and scientific developments. In the last 20 years, SGAWs have been attracting the attention of the biochemical scientific community, due to the fact that some of these devices - Shear Horizontal Surface Acoustic Wave (SH-SAW), Surface Transverse Wave (STW), Love Wave (LW), Flexural Plate Wave (FPW), Shear Horizontal Acoustic Plate Mode (SH-APM) and Layered Guided Acoustic Plate Mode (LG-APM) - have demonstrated a high sensitivity in the detection of biorelevant molecules in liquid media. In addition, complementary efforts to improve the sensing films have been done during these years. All these developments have been made with the aim of achieving, in a future, a highly sensitive, low cost, small size, multi-channel, portable, reliable and commercially established SGAW biosensor. A setup with these features could significantly contribute to future developments in the health, food and environmental industries. The second purpose of this work is to describe the state-of-the-art of SGAW biosensors for the detection of pathogens, being this topic an issue of extremely importance for the human health. Finally, the review discuses the commercial availability, trends and future challenges of the SGAW biosensors for such applications. PMID:22346725

  8. Fusion of acoustic measurements with video surveillance for estuarine threat detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunin, Barry; Sutin, Alexander; Kamberov, George; Roh, Heui-Seol; Luczynski, Bart; Burlick, Matt

    2008-04-01

    Stevens Institute of Technology has established a research laboratory environment in support of the U.S. Navy in the area of Anti-Terrorism and Force Protection. Called the Maritime Security Laboratory, or MSL, it provides the capabilities of experimental research to enable development of novel methods of threat detection in the realistic environment of the Hudson River Estuary. In MSL, this is done through a multi-modal interdisciplinary approach. In this paper, underwater acoustic measurements and video surveillance are combined. Stevens' researchers have developed a specialized prototype video system to identify, video-capture, and map surface ships in a sector of the estuary. The combination of acoustic noise with video data for different kinds of ships in Hudson River enabled estimation of sound attenuation in a wide frequency band. Also, it enabled the collection of a noise library of various ships that can be used for ship classification by passive acoustic methods. Acoustics and video can be used to determine a ship's position. This knowledge can be used for ship noise suppression in hydrophone arrays in underwater threat detection. Preliminary experimental results of position determination are presented in the paper.

  9. Detection of internal cracks in Manchego cheese using the acoustic impulse-response technique and ultrasounds.

    PubMed

    Conde, T; Mulet, A; Clemente, G; Benedito, J

    2008-03-01

    Nowadays, due to the more global nature of markets, the commercialization of cheese relies on the high quality of the product. Internal defects such as cracks or flaws may affect quality. Two different nondestructive inspection techniques (ultrasonic and acoustic experiments) were used to detect cracks in Manchego cheese. The existence of small eyes in this type of cheese limited the use of ultrasonic pulse-echo experiments due to high scattering, and only cracks close to the surface of the cheese could be detected. The acoustic impulse-response technique, however, allowed us to study wheel pieces with cracks located elsewhere in the cheese. Two different impact probes (A and B) were assayed. The energy content of the acoustic spectrum was higher for cracked wheel pieces (7,116 and 17,520 V Hz(1/2) for probes A and B, respectively) than for normal ones (6,841 and 16,821 V Hz(1/2)). The differences were mainly found for frequencies higher than 150 Hz, which made the centroid for cracked pieces higher (162 and 170 Hz for probes A and B, respectively) than that for normal cheeses (132 and 148 Hz for probes A and B, respectively). Discriminant functions were developed to classify wheel pieces, and the input variables used were the acoustic parameters from the spectrum and the principal components extracted from the whole spectrum. The best classification procedure used the principal components from the principal components analysis of the spectrum for probe B. In this case, the 50 wheel pieces used in this study were correctly classified. These results showed that a simple and low-cost acoustic impulse-response technique could be used to detect cheese cracks, formed at different moments of Manchego cheese maturation. PMID:18292247

  10. Can acoustic emission detect the initiation of fatigue cracks: Application to high-strength light alloys used in aeronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bathias, C.; Brinet, B.; Sertour, G.

    1978-01-01

    Acoustic emission was used for the detection of fatigue cracking in a number of high-strength light alloys used in aeronautical structures. Among the features studied were: the influence of emission frequency, the effect of surface oxidation, and the influence of grains. It was concluded that acoustic emission is an effective nondestructive technique for evaluating the initiation of fatigue cracking in such materials.

  11. Acoustic-sensor-based detection of damage in composite aircraft structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foote, Peter; Martin, Tony; Read, Ian

    2004-03-01

    Acoustic emission detection is a well-established method of locating and monitoring crack development in metal structures. The technique has been adapted to test facilities for non-destructive testing applications. Deployment as an operational or on-line automated damage detection technology in vehicles is posing greater challenges. A clear requirement of potential end-users of such systems is a level of automation capable of delivering low-level diagnosis information. The output from the system is in the form of "go", "no-go" indications of structural integrity or immediate maintenance actions. This level of automation requires significant data reduction and processing. This paper describes recent trials of acoustic emission detection technology for the diagnosis of damage in composite aerospace structures. The technology comprises low profile detection sensors using piezo electric wafers encapsulated in polymer film ad optical sensors. Sensors are bonded to the structure"s surface and enable acoustic events from the loaded structure to be located by triangulation. Instrumentation has been enveloped to capture and parameterise the sensor data in a form suitable for low-bandwidth storage and transmission.

  12. Trackline and point detection probabilities for acoustic surveys of Cuvier's and Blainville's beaked whales.

    PubMed

    Barlow, Jay; Tyack, Peter L; Johnson, Mark P; Baird, Robin W; Schorr, Gregory S; Andrews, Russel D; Aguilar de Soto, Natacha

    2013-09-01

    Acoustic survey methods can be used to estimate density and abundance using sounds produced by cetaceans and detected using hydrophones if the probability of detection can be estimated. For passive acoustic surveys, probability of detection at zero horizontal distance from a sensor, commonly called g(0), depends on the temporal patterns of vocalizations. Methods to estimate g(0) are developed based on the assumption that a beaked whale will be detected if it is producing regular echolocation clicks directly under or above a hydrophone. Data from acoustic recording tags placed on two species of beaked whales (Cuvier's beaked whale-Ziphius cavirostris and Blainville's beaked whale-Mesoplodon densirostris) are used to directly estimate the percentage of time they produce echolocation clicks. A model of vocal behavior for these species as a function of their diving behavior is applied to other types of dive data (from time-depth recorders and time-depth-transmitting satellite tags) to indirectly determine g(0) in other locations for low ambient noise conditions. Estimates of g(0) for a single instant in time are 0.28 [standard deviation (s.d.) = 0.05] for Cuvier's beaked whale and 0.19 (s.d. = 0.01) for Blainville's beaked whale.

  13. Acoustic Detection Of Loose Particles In Pressure Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwok, Lloyd C.

    1995-01-01

    Particle-impact-noise-detector (PIND) apparatus used in conjunction with computer program analyzing output of apparatus to detect extraneous particles trapped in pressure sensors. PIND tester essentially shaker equipped with microphone measuring noise in pressure sensor or other object being shaken. Shaker applies controlled vibration. Output of microphone recorded and expressed in terms of voltage, yielding history of noise subsequently processed by computer program. Data taken at sampling rate sufficiently high to enable identification of all impacts of particles on sensor diaphragm and on inner surfaces of sensor cavities.

  14. Ultrasound contrast agents for bleeding detection and acoustic hemostasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zderic, Vesna; Luo, Wenbo; Brayman, Andrew; Crum, Lawrence; Vaezy, Shahram

    2005-04-01

    Objective: To investigate the application of ultrasound contrast agents (UCA) in improving both therapeutic and diagnostic aspects of ultrasound-guided High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) therapy. Methods: Incisions (3 cm long, 0.5 cm deep) were made in rabbit livers (in anterior surface for HIFU treatment, or posterior surface for bleeding detection). UCA Optison (~0.1 ml/kg) was injected into mesenteric vein or ear vein. A HIFU applicator (5.5 MHz, 6400 W/cm2) was scanned manually over the incision until hemostasis was achieved. Occult bleeding was monitored with Doppler ultrasound. Results: The presence of Optison produced 37% reduction in hemostasis times normalized to initial bleeding rates. Gross and histological observations showed similar appearance of HIFU lesions produced in the presence of Optison and control HIFU lesions. The temperature reached 100°C in both HIFU only and HIFU+UCA treatments. Tension strength of hemostatic liver incisions was 0.9+/-0.5 N. Almost no bleeding could be detected before Optison injection. First appearance of contrast enhancement localized at the bleeding site was 15 s after Optison injection, and lasted for ~50 s. Conclusion: The presence of UCA during HIFU treatment of liver incisions resulted in shortening of HIFU application times and better visualization of bleeding sites.

  15. Use of an acoustic wave device to detect target analytes during chromatographic separations

    SciTech Connect

    Tom-Moy, M.; Doherty, T.P.; Baer, R.L.

    1995-12-01

    Hewlett-Packard Laboratories has developed a proprietary acoustic wave device which permits the detection of specific analyte in a flowing system. By coupling specific chemistry to the surface of the device, the mass loading of the target analyte is detected as a shift in phase is measured in real time. In process monitoring, the analyte of interest is isolated by passing the sample through a series of chromatographic columns. Conventional HPLC systems monitor the protein peaks using UV-VIS. The peaks are collected and biochemical assays are performed to determine the specific peak of interest. We have configured our acoustic sensors to make specific chemical measurements without the use of labeled reagents or enzymes to generate a real time signal of specific analyte as it elutes from the column. The output signal can be integrated over time to yield a concentration. Such a detector has the potential to increase productivity in process chromatography in biopharmaceutical applications.

  16. Marine mammal acoustic detections in the northeastern Chukchi Sea, September 2007-July 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannay, David E.; Delarue, Julien; Mouy, Xavier; Martin, Bruce S.; Leary, Del; Oswald, Julie N.; Vallarta, Jonathan

    2013-09-01

    Several cetacean and pinniped species use the northeastern Chukchi Sea as seasonal or year-round habitat. This area has experienced pronounced reduction in the extent of summer sea ice over the last decade, as well as increased anthropogenic activity, particularly in the form of oil and gas exploration. The effects of these changes on marine mammal species are presently unknown. Autonomous passive acoustic recorders were deployed over a wide area of the northeastern Chukchi Sea off the coast of Alaska from Cape Lisburne to Barrow, at distances from 8 km to 200 km from shore: up to 44 each summer and up to 8 each winter. Acoustic data were acquired at 16 kHz continuously during summer and on a duty cycle of 40 or 48 min within each 4-h period during winter. Recordings were analyzed manually and using automated detection and classification systems to identify calls. Bowhead (Balaena mysticetus) and beluga (Delphinapterus leucas) whale calls were detected primarily from April through June and from September to December during their migrations between the Bering and Beaufort seas. Summer detections were rare and usually concentrated off Wainwright and Barrow, Alaska. Gray (Eschrichtius robustus) whale calls were detected between July and October, their occurrence decreasing with increasing distance from shore. Fin (Balaenoptera physalus), killer (Orcinus orca), minke (Balaenoptera acutorostrata), and humpback (Megaptera novaeangliae) whales were detected sporadically in summer and early fall. Walrus (Odobenus rosmarus) was the most commonly detected species between June and October, primarily occupying the southern edge of Hanna Shoal and haul-outs near coastal recording stations off Wainwright and Point Lay. Ringed (Pusa hispida) and bearded (Erignathus barbatus) seals occur year-round in the Chukchi Sea. Ringed seal acoustic detections occurred throughout the year but detection numbers were low, likely due to low vocalization rates. Bearded seal acoustic detections

  17. First Detection of the Acoustic Oscillation Phase Shift Expected from the Cosmic Neutrino Background.

    PubMed

    Follin, Brent; Knox, Lloyd; Millea, Marius; Pan, Zhen

    2015-08-28

    The unimpeded relativistic propagation of cosmological neutrinos prior to recombination of the baryon-photon plasma alters gravitational potentials and therefore the details of the time-dependent gravitational driving of acoustic oscillations. We report here a first detection of the resulting shifts in the temporal phase of the oscillations, which we infer from their signature in the cosmic microwave background temperature power spectrum. PMID:26371637

  18. Monitoring the Ocean Acoustic Environment: A Model-Based Detection Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J.V.; Sullivan, E.J.

    2000-03-13

    A model-based approach is applied in the development of a processor designed to passively monitor an ocean acoustic environment along with its associated variations. The technique employs an adaptive, model-based processor embedded in a sequential likelihood detection scheme. The trade-off between state-based and innovations-based monitor designs is discussed, conceptually. The underlying theory for the innovations-based design is briefly developed and applied to a simulated data set.

  19. Improving the sensitivity of an interferometric fiber optic sensor for acoustic detection in rockfalls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenato, L.; Palmieri, L.; Autizi, E.; Galtarossa, A.; Pasuto, A.

    2013-12-01

    Being intrinsically EMI free and offering superior hostile environment operation, fiber optic sensor technology represents a valuable alternative to standard sensors technology in landslides monitoring. Here an improved design for a fiber optic sensor to be used for ultrasonic acoustic detection in rockfall monitoring is proposed. Basically, the original sensor consists of a fiber coil tightly wound on an aluminum flanged hollow mandrel that acts as the sensing arm of a Mach-Zehnder interferometer [1]. To further improve sensor sensitivity, the use of a special fiber, with polyimide coating and very large numerical aperture, has been proposed and tested. The polyimide coating, harder and thinner than standard coating, makes the fiber more sensitive to acoustic waves and increase the coupling efficiency between fiber and mandrel. At the same time, a fiber with very large numerical aperture allows for a much smaller bending radius and thus enables the design of a sensor with reduced size, or with the same external size but housing a longer fiber. Part of the research activity has been then focused toward the optimization of the shape and dimensions of the mandrel: to this aim, a large set of numerical simulations has been performed and they are here presented and discussed. The performance assessment gained with new sensors has been carried in a controlled scenario by using a block of trachyte in which the sensors have been screwed in internally threaded chemical anchors housed in holes drilled on one face of the block. Ultrasonic signals have been generated in a repeatable way by dropping a 5-mm-diameter steel ball along a steep slide. Experimental tests, carried out by firstly comparing the performance of a sensor made with special fiber with respect to the original one, have shown an increased sensitivity of almost 35 % in the detected acoustic energy. Further tests, carried out on a sensor with optimized dimensions and made with special fiber, have shown an

  20. A compact array calibrator to study the feasibility of acoustic neutrino detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardid, M.; Camarena, F.; Felis, I.; Herrero, A.; Llorens, C. D.; Martínez-Mora, J.; Saldaña, M.

    2016-04-01

    Underwater acoustic detection of ultra-high-energy neutrinos was proposed already in 1950s: when a neutrino interacts with a nucleus in water, the resulting particle cascade produces a pressure pulse that has a bipolar temporal structure and propagates within a flat disk-like volume. A telescope that consists of thousands of acoustic sensors deployed in the deep sea can monitor hundreds of cubic kilometres of water looking for these signals and discriminating them from acoustic noise. To study the feasibility of the technique it is critical to have a calibrator able to mimic the neutrino "signature" that can be operated from a vessel. Due to the axial-symmetry of the signal, their very directive short bipolar shape and the constraints of operating at sea, the development of such a calibrator is very challenging. Once the possibility of using the acoustic parametric technique for this aim was validated with the first compact array calibrator prototype, in this paper we describe the new design for such a calibrator composed of an array of piezo ceramic tube transducers emitting in axial direction.

  1. Acoustic Detection of Sediment-Laden Ice in the Bay of Fundy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dourado, N. P.

    2013-12-01

    In the winter, the tidal flats in the Bay of Fundy are littered with large muddy icebergs, supplied by remnants of ice shelves that form on the banks of tidal rivers. The encased sediment can render the blocks heavy enough to sink, where they can persist for many tidal cycles due to their size. There is a potential for this sediment-laden ice to pose a risk to tidal power infrastructure. Since the ice blocks cannot be seen once submerged, the risk of collision will be difficult to predict and manage. A sonar system, which transmits a sound pulse and records the subsequent echoes in the water column, can be used to detect submerged hazards. If echoes from different components of the ice, such as sediment or air inclusions, can be isolated, remote measurements of ice properties may be possible. A combination of acoustic models, parameterized using natural sediment laden ice, and acoustic backscatter measurements from idealized ice blocks will be used to assess the feasibility of acoustic monitoring of submerged ice hazards. Large muddy iceberg on Debert Beach,NS Idealized experiment; where acoustic backscatter from calibration targets encased in ice is measured.

  2. Acoustic indicators for targeted detection of stored product and urban insect pests by inexpensive infrared, acoustic, and vibrational detection of movement.

    PubMed

    Mankin, R W; Hodges, R D; Nagle, H T; Schal, C; Pereira, R M; Koehler, P G

    2010-10-01

    Crawling and scraping activity of three stored-product pests, Sitophilus oryzae (L.) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), Tribolium castaneum (Herbst) (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae), and Stegobium paniceum (L.) (Coleoptera: Anobiidae), and two urban pests, Blattella germanica (L.) (Blattodea: Blattellidae) and Cimex lectularius L. (Hemiptera: Cimicidae), were monitored individually by infrared sensors, microphones, and a piezoelectric sensor in a small arena to evaluate effects of insect locomotory behavior and size on the ability of an inexpensively constructed instrument to detect insects and distinguish among different species. Adults of all species could be detected when crawling or scraping. The smallest insects in the study, first-fourth-instar C. lectularius nymphs, could not be detected easily when crawling, but could be detected when scraping. Sound and vibration sensors detected brief, 3-10-ms impulses from all tested species, often grouped in distinctive trains (bursts), typical of impulses in previous acoustic detection experiments. To consider the potential for targeting or focusing detection on particular species of interest, indicators were developed to assess the likelihood of detection of C. lectularius. Statistically significant differences were found between C. lectularius and other species in distributions of three measured variables: infrared signal durations, sound impulse-burst durations, and sound pressure levels (energy) of impulses that best matched an averaged spectrum (profile) of scraping behavior. Thus, there is potential that signals collected by an inexpensive, polymodal-sensor instrument could be used in automated trapping systems to detect a targeted species, 0.1 mg or larger, in environments where servicing of traps is difficult or when timeliness of trapping information is important.

  3. Radar classification of landmines by time-frequency analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, D.; Nguyen, L.; Gaunaurd, G.

    2007-04-01

    A flying platform illuminates a land mine field with mixtures of various landmines (i.e., buried, on the surface, plastic or metallic) and some "confusers", with an ultra-wideband (UWB) radar. The polarimetric echoes returned by the mine field are mapped into an overall synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image, which is then analyzed pixel-by-pixel by modern time-frequency (t-f) techniques. The t-f analysis of any echo from any of the individual scatterers in the mine field can be performed using a number of t-f distributions, which in turn generate two-dimensional plots of each such scatterer in t-f space. These plots are richer in information than those in the original SAR image, and they offer a larger variety of clues useful for the discrimination of each type of mine from the others or from the confusers. Several t-f distributions are employed in the study, and it is found that some are better than others for the present purpose of target detection and classification. From the images obtained we can conclude that the Pseudo-Wigner-Ville and the Choi-Williams distributions provide the best discrimination results. It is also found that the larger mines such as those denoted here as of "type-1" are the easiest to identify. Using the above-mentioned distributions it follows that the distinction between actual mines and clutter objects (or "confusers") becomes clearer, particularly when the latter objects are metallic. Numerous images generated in this study confirm the above conclusions.

  4. High Sensitivity Detection of Broadband Acoustic Vibration Using Optical Demodulation Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhen

    Measuring the high frequency acoustic vibrations represents the fundamental interest in revealing the intrinsic dynamic characteristic of board range of systems, such as the growth of the fetus, blood flow in human palms, and vibrations of carbon nanotube. However, the acoustic wave detection capability is limited by the detection bandwidth and sensitivity of the commonly used piezoelectric based ultrasound detectors. To overcome these limitations, this thesis focuses on exploring the optical demodulation method for highly sensitive detection of broadband acoustic vibration. First, a transparent optical ultrasonic detector has been developed using micro-ring resonator (MRR) made of soft polymeric materials. It outperforms the traditional piezoelectric detectors with broader detection bandwidth, miniaturized size and wide angular sensitivity. Its ease of integration into photoacoustic microscopy system has resulted in the great improvement of the imaging resolution. A theoretic framework has been developed to establish the quantitative understanding of its unique distance and angular dependent detection characteristics and was subsequently validated experimentally. The developed theoretic framework provides a guideline to fully accounts for the trade-offs between axial and lateral resolution, working distance, and the field of view in developing optimal imaging performance for a wide range of biological and clinical applications. MRR-based ultrasonic detector is further integrated into confocal fluorescence microscopy to realize the simultaneous imaging of fluorescence and optical absorption of retinal pigment epithelium, achieving multi-contrast imaging at sub-cellular level. The needs to resolve the fine details of the biological specimen with the resolution beyond the diffraction limit further motivate the development of optical demodulated ultrasonic detection method based on near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM). The nano-focusing probe was developed

  5. Early detection of melanoma with the combined use of acoustic microscopy, infrared reflectance and Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karagiannis, Georgios T.; Grivas, Ioannis; Tsingotjidou, Anastasia; Apostolidis, Georgios K.; Grigoriadou, Ifigeneia; Dori, I.; Poulatsidou, Kyriaki-Nefeli; Doumas, Argyrios; Wesarg, Stefan; Georgoulias, Panagiotis

    2015-03-01

    Malignant melanoma is a form of skin cancer, with increasing incidence worldwide. Early diagnosis is crucial for the prognosis and treatment of the disease. The objective of this study is to develop a novel animal model of melanoma and apply a combination of the non-invasive imaging techniques acoustic microscopy, infrared (IR) and Raman spectroscopies, for the detection of developing tumors. Acoustic microscopy provides information about the 3D structure of the tumor, whereas, both spectroscopic modalities give qualitative insight of biochemical changes during melanoma development. In order to efficiently set up the final devices, propagation of ultrasonic and electromagnetic waves in normal skin and melanoma simulated structures was performed. Synthetic and grape-extracted melanin (simulated tumors), endermally injected, were scanned and compared to normal skin. For both cases acoustic microscopy with central operating frequencies of 110MHz and 175MHz were used, resulting to the tomographic imaging of the simulated tumor, while with the spectroscopic modalities IR and Raman differences among spectra of normal and melanin- injected sites were identified in skin depth. Subsequently, growth of actual tumors in an animal melanoma model, with the use of human malignant melanoma cells was achieved. Acoustic microscopy and IR and Raman spectroscopies were also applied. The development of tumors at different time points was displayed using acoustic microscopy. Moreover, the changes of the IR and Raman spectra were studied between the melanoma tumors and adjacent healthy skin. The most significant changes between healthy skin and the melanoma area were observed in the range of 900-1800cm-1 and 350-2000cm-1, respectively.

  6. Using multiple gears to assess acoustic detectability and biomass of fish species in lake superior

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yule, D.L.; Adams, J.V.; Stockwell, J.D.; Gorman, O.T.

    2007-01-01

    Recent predator demand and prey supply studies suggest that an annual daytime bottom trawl survey of Lake Superior underestimates prey fish biomass. A multiple-gear (acoustics, bottom trawl, and midwater trawl) nighttime survey has been recommended, but before abandoning a long-term daytime survey the effectiveness of night sampling of important prey species must be verified. We sampled three bottom depths (30, 60, and 120 m) at a Lake Superior site where the fish community included all commercially and ecologically important species. Day and night samples were collected within 48 h at all depths during eight different periods (one new and one full moon period during both early summer and late summer to early fall over 2 years). Biomass of demersal and benthic species was higher in night bottom trawl samples than in day bottom trawl samples. Night acoustic collections showed that pelagic fish typically occupied water cooler than 15°C and light levels less than 0.001 lx. Using biomass in night bottom trawls and acoustic biomass above the bottom trawl path, we calculated an index of acoustic detectability for each species. Ciscoes Coregonus artedi, kiyis C. kiyi, and rainbow smeltOsmerus mordax left the bottom at night, whereas bloaters C. hoyi stayed nearer the bottom. We compared the biomass of important prey species estimated with two survey types: day bottom trawls and night estimates of the entire water column (bottom trawl biomass plus acoustic biomass). The biomass of large ciscoes (>200 mm) was significantly greater when measured at night than when measured during daylight, but the differences for other sizes of important species did not vary significantly by survey type. Nighttime of late summer is a period when conditions for biomass estimation are largely invariant, and all important prey species can be sampled using a multiple-gear approach.

  7. Signal processing for passive detection and classification of underwater acoustic signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Kil Woo

    2011-12-01

    This dissertation examines signal processing for passive detection, classification and tracking of underwater acoustic signals for improving port security and the security of coastal and offshore operations. First, we consider the problem of passive acoustic detection of a diver in a shallow water environment. A frequency-domain multi-band matched-filter approach to swimmer detection is presented. The idea is to break the frequency contents of the hydrophone signals into multiple narrow frequency bands, followed by time averaged (about half of a second) energy calculation over each band. Then, spectra composed of such energy samples over the chosen frequency bands are correlated to form a decision variable. The frequency bands with highest Signal/Noise ratio are used for detection. The performance of the proposed approach is demonstrated for experimental data collected for a diver in the Hudson River. We also propose a new referenceless frequency-domain multi-band detector which, unlike other reference-based detectors, does not require a diver specific signature. Instead, our detector matches to a general feature of the diver spectrum in the high frequency range: the spectrum is roughly periodic in time and approximately flat when the diver exhales. The performance of the proposed approach is demonstrated by using experimental data collected from the Hudson River. Moreover, we present detection, classification and tracking of small vessel signals. Hydroacoustic sensors can be applied for the detection of noise generated by vessels, and this noise can be used for vessel detection, classification and tracking. This dissertation presents recent improvements aimed at the measurement and separation of ship DEMON (Detection of Envelope Modulation on Noise) acoustic signatures in busy harbor conditions. Ship signature measurements were conducted in the Hudson River and NY Harbor. The DEMON spectra demonstrated much better temporal stability compared with the full ship

  8. Reliability of void detection in structural ceramics by use of scanning laser acoustic microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, D. J.; Klima, S. J.; Kiser, J. D.; Baaklini, G. Y.

    1986-01-01

    The reliability of scanning laser acoustic microscopy (SLAM) for detecting surface voids in structural ceramic test specimens was statistically evaluated. Specimens of sintered silicon nitride and sintered silicon carbide, seeded with surface voids, were examined by SLAM at an ultrasonic frequency of 100 MHz in the as fired condition and after surface polishing. It was observed that polishing substantially increased void detectability. Voids as small as 100 micrometers in diameter were detected in polished specimens with 0.90 probability at a 0.95 confidence level. In addition, inspection times were reduced up to a factor of 10 after polishing. The applicability of the SLAM technique for detection of naturally occurring flaws of similar dimensions to the seeded voids is discussed. A FORTRAN program listing is given for calculating and plotting flaw detection statistics.

  9. Reliability of void detection in structural ceramics using scanning laser acoustic microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, D. J.; Klima, S. J.; Kiser, J. D.; Baaklini, G. Y.

    1985-01-01

    The reliability of scanning laser acoustic microscopy (SLAM) for detecting surface voids in structural ceramic test specimens was statistically evaluated. Specimens of sintered silicon nitride and sintered silicon carbide, seeded with surface voids, were examined by SLAM at an ultrasonic frequency of 100 MHz in the as fired condition and after surface polishing. It was observed that polishing substantially increased void detectability. Voids as small as 100 micrometers in diameter were detected in polished specimens with 0.90 probability at a 0.95 confidence level. In addition, inspection times were reduced up to a factor of 10 after polishing. The applicability of the SLAM technique for detection of naturally occurring flaws of similar dimensions to the seeded voids is discussed. A FORTRAN program listing is given for calculating and plotting flaw detection statistics.

  10. Reliability of void detection in structural ceramics by use of scanning laser acoustic microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, D.J.; Klima, S.J.; Kiser, J.D.; Baaklini, G.Y.

    1986-05-01

    The reliability of scanning laser acoustic microscopy (SLAM) for detecting surface voids in structural ceramic test specimens was statistically evaluated. Specimens of sintered silicon nitride and sintered silicon carbide, seeded with surface voids, were examined by SLAM at an ultrasonic frequency of 100 MHz in the as fired condition and after surface polishing. It was observed that polishing substantially increased void detectability. Voids as small as 100 micrometers in diameter were detected in polished specimens with 0.90 probability at a 0.95 confidence level. In addition, inspection times were reduced up to a factor of 10 after polishing. The applicability of the SLAM technique for detection of naturally occurring flaws of similar dimensions to the seeded voids is discussed. A FORTRAN program listing is given for calculating and plotting flaw detection statistics. 20 references.

  11. Detection and characterization of stainless steel SCC by the analysis of crack related acoustic emission.

    PubMed

    Kovač, Jaka; Legat, Andraž; Zajec, Bojan; Kosec, Tadeja; Govekar, Edvard

    2015-09-01

    In the paper the results of the acoustic emission (AE) based detection and characterization of stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) in stainless steel are presented. As supportive methods for AE interpretation, electrochemical noise, specimen elongation measurements, and digital imaging of the specimen surface were used. Based on the defined qualitative and quantitative time and power spectra characteristics of the AE bursts, a manual and an automatic procedure for the detection of crack related AE bursts were introduced. The results of the analysis of the crack related AE bursts indicate that the AE method is capable of detecting large scale cracks, where, apart from intergranular crack propagation, also some small ductile fractures occur. The sizes of the corresponding ductile fracture areas can be estimated based on a relative comparison of the energies of the detected AE bursts. It has also been shown that AE burst time and power spectra features can be successfully used for the automatic detection of SCC.

  12. Streptavidin Modified ZnO Film Bulk Acoustic Resonator for Detection of Tumor Marker Mucin 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Dan; Guo, Peng; Xiong, Juan; Wang, Shengfu

    2016-09-01

    A ZnO-based film bulk acoustic resonator has been fabricated using a magnetron sputtering technology, which was employed as a biosensor for detection of mucin 1. The resonant frequency of the thin-film bulk acoustic resonator was located near at 1503.3 MHz. The average electromechanical coupling factor {K}_{eff}^2 and quality factor Q were 2.39 % and 224, respectively. Using the specific binding system of avidin-biotin, the streptavidin was self-assembled on the top gold electrode as the sensitive layer to indirectly test the MUC1 molecules. The resonant frequency of the biosensor decreases in response to the mass loading in range of 20-500 nM. The sensor modified with the streptavidin exhibits a high sensitivity of 4642.6 Hz/nM and a good selectivity.

  13. Coherent Control of Optically Generated and Detected Picosecond Surface Acoustic Phonons

    SciTech Connect

    David H. Hurley

    2006-11-01

    Coherent control of elementary optical excitations is a key issue in ultrafast materials science. Manipulation of electronic and vibronic excitations in solids as well as chemical and biological systems on ultrafast time scales has attracted a great deal of attention recently. In semiconductors, coherent control of vibronic excitations has been demonstrated for bulk acoustic and optical phonons generated in superlattice structures. The bandwidth of these approaches is typically fully utilized by employing a 1-D geometry where the laser spot size is much larger than the superlattice repeat length. In this presentation we demonstrate coherent control of optically generated picosecond surface acoustic waves using sub-optical wavelength absorption gratings. The generation and detection characteristics of two material systems are investigated (aluminum absorption gratings on Si and GaAs substrates).

  14. Coherent control of optically generated and detected picosecond surface acoustic phonons

    SciTech Connect

    David Hurley

    2007-07-01

    Coherent control of electronic and phononic excitations in solids, as well as chemical and biological systems on ultrafast time scales is of current research interest. In semiconductors, coherent control of phonons has been demonstrated for acoustic and optical phonons generated in superlattice structures. The bandwidth of these approaches is typically fully utilized by employing a 1-D geometry where the laser spot size is much larger than the superlattice repeat length. In this article we demonstrate coherent control of optically generated picosecond surface acoustic phonons using sub-optical wavelength absorption gratings. The generation and detection characteristics of two material systems are investigated (aluminum absorption gratings on Si and GaAs substrates). Constructive and complete destructive interference conditions are demonstrated using two pump pulses derived from a single Michelson interferometer.

  15. Streptavidin Modified ZnO Film Bulk Acoustic Resonator for Detection of Tumor Marker Mucin 1.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Dan; Guo, Peng; Xiong, Juan; Wang, Shengfu

    2016-12-01

    A ZnO-based film bulk acoustic resonator has been fabricated using a magnetron sputtering technology, which was employed as a biosensor for detection of mucin 1. The resonant frequency of the thin-film bulk acoustic resonator was located near at 1503.3 MHz. The average electromechanical coupling factor [Formula: see text] and quality factor Q were 2.39 % and 224, respectively. Using the specific binding system of avidin-biotin, the streptavidin was self-assembled on the top gold electrode as the sensitive layer to indirectly test the MUC1 molecules. The resonant frequency of the biosensor decreases in response to the mass loading in range of 20-500 nM. The sensor modified with the streptavidin exhibits a high sensitivity of 4642.6 Hz/nM and a good selectivity.

  16. Streptavidin Modified ZnO Film Bulk Acoustic Resonator for Detection of Tumor Marker Mucin 1.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Dan; Guo, Peng; Xiong, Juan; Wang, Shengfu

    2016-12-01

    A ZnO-based film bulk acoustic resonator has been fabricated using a magnetron sputtering technology, which was employed as a biosensor for detection of mucin 1. The resonant frequency of the thin-film bulk acoustic resonator was located near at 1503.3 MHz. The average electromechanical coupling factor [Formula: see text] and quality factor Q were 2.39 % and 224, respectively. Using the specific binding system of avidin-biotin, the streptavidin was self-assembled on the top gold electrode as the sensitive layer to indirectly test the MUC1 molecules. The resonant frequency of the biosensor decreases in response to the mass loading in range of 20-500 nM. The sensor modified with the streptavidin exhibits a high sensitivity of 4642.6 Hz/nM and a good selectivity. PMID:27624339

  17. Preliminary Study on Acoustic Detection of Faults Experienced by a High-Bypass Turbofan Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyle, Devin K.

    2014-01-01

    The vehicle integrated propulsion research (VIPR) effort conducted by NASA and several partners provided an unparalleled opportunity to test a relatively low TRL concept regarding the use of far field acoustics to identify faults occurring in a high bypass turbofan engine. Though VIPR Phase II ground based aircraft installed engine testing wherein a multitude of research sensors and methods were evaluated, an array of acoustic microphones was used to determine the viability of such an array to detect failures occurring in a commercially representative high bypass turbofan engine. The failures introduced during VIPR testing included commanding the engine's low pressure compressor (LPC) exit and high pressure compressor (HPC) 14th stage bleed values abruptly to their failsafe positions during steady state

  18. Long-range acoustic detection and localization of blue whale calls in the northeast Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Stafford, K M; Fox, C G; Clark, D S

    1998-12-01

    Analysis of acoustic signals recorded from the U.S. Navy's SOund SUrveillance System (SOSUS) was used to detect and locate blue whale (Balaenoptera musculus) calls offshore in the northeast Pacific. The long, low-frequency components of these calls are characteristic of calls recorded in the presence of blue whales elsewhere in the world. Mean values for frequency and time characteristics from field-recorded blue whale calls were used to develop a simple matched filter for detecting such calls in noisy time series. The matched filter was applied to signals from three different SOSUS arrays off the coast of the Pacific Northwest to detect and associate individual calls from the same animal on the different arrays. A U.S. Navy maritime patrol aircraft was directed to an area where blue whale calls had been detected on SOSUS using these methods, and the presence of vocalizing blue whale was confirmed at the site with field recordings from sonobuoys.

  19. Uncertainty quantification of relative acoustic nonlinearity parameter of guided waves for damage detection in composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Ming; Mao, Zhu; Todd, Michael D.; Su, Zhongqing; Qing, Xinlin

    2015-03-01

    Nonlinear guided waves have been studied extensively for the characterization of micro-damage in plate-like structures, such as early-stage fatigue and thermal degradation in metals. Meanwhile, an increasing number of studies have reported the use of nonlinear acoustic techniques for detection of impact damage, fatigue, and thermal fatigue in composite structures. Among these techniques, the (relative) acoustic nonlinearity parameter, extracted from acousto-ultrasonic waves based on second-harmonic generation, has been considered one of the most popular tools for quantifying the detection of nonlinearity in inspected structures. Considering the complex nature of nonlinearities involved in composite materials (even under healthy conditions), and operational/environmental variability and measurement noise, the calculation of the relative acoustic nonlinearity parameter (RANP) from experimental data may suffer from considerable uncertainties, which may impair the quality of damage detection. In this study, we aim to quantify the uncertainty of the magnitude of the RANP estimator in the context of impact damage identification in unidirectional carbon fiber laminates. First, the principles of nonlinear ultrasonics are revisited briefly. A general probability density function of the RANP is then obtained through numerical evaluation in a theoretical setting. Using piezoelectric wavers, continuous sine waves are generated in the sample. Steady-state responses are acquired and processed to produce histograms of the RANP estimates before and after the impact damage. These observed histograms are consistent with the predicted distributions, and examination of the distributions demonstrates the significance of uncertainty quantification when using the RANP for damage detection in composite structures.

  20. Contribution to classification of buried objects based on acoustic impedance matching.

    PubMed

    Stepanić, J; Wüstenberg, H; Krstelj, V; Mrasek, H

    2003-03-01

    Determination of material the buried objects are made of could contribute significantly to their recognition, or classification. This is important in detecting buried antipersonnel landmines within the context of humanitarian demining, as well as in a variety of other applications. In this article the concept has been formulated of the approach to buried object's material determination starting with ultrasonic impulse propagation analysis in a particular testing set configuration. The impulse propagates through a characterized transfer material in such a way that a part of it, a reflected wave, carries the information about the buried object's surface material acoustic impedance. The limit of resolution capability is theoretically analyzed and experimentally evaluated and the influencing factors described. Among these, the contact between clean surfaces of the transfer material and buried object is emphasized. PMID:12565075

  1. Integrated acoustic emission/vibration sensor for detecting damage in aircraft drive train components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godínez-Azcuaga, Valery F.; Ozevin, Didem; Finlayson, Richard D.; Anastasopoulos, Athanasios; Tsimogiannis, Apostolos

    2007-04-01

    Diaphragm-type couplings are high misalignment torque and speed transfer components used in aircrafts. Crack development in such couplings, or in the drive train in general, can lead to component failure that can bring down an aircraft. Real time detection of crack formation and growth is important to prevent such catastrophic failures. However, there is no single Nondestructive Monitoring method available that is capable of assessing the early stages of crack growth in such components. While vibration based damage identification techniques are used, they cannot detect cracks until they reach a considerable size, which makes detection of the onset of cracking extremely difficult. Acoustic Emission (AE) can detect and monitor early stage crack growth, however excessive background noise can mask acoustic emissions produced by crack initiation. Fusion of the two mentioned techniques can increase the accuracy of measurement and minimize false alarms. However, a monitoring system combining both techniques could prove too large and heavy for the already restricted space available in aircrafts. In the present work, we will present a newly developed integrated Acoustic Emission/Vibration (AE/VIB) combined sensor which can operate in the temperature range of -55°F to 257°F and in high EMI environment. This robust AE/VIB sensor has a frequency range of 5 Hz-2 kHz for the vibration component and a range of 200-400 kHz for the acoustic emission component. The sensor weight is comparable to accelerometers currently used in flying aircraft. Traditional signal processing approaches are not effective due to high signal attenuation and strong background noise conditions, commonly found in aircraft drive train systems. As an alternative, we will introduce a new Supervised Pattern Recognition (SPR) methodology that allows for simultaneous processing of the signals detected by the AE/VIB sensor and their classification in near-real time, even in these adverse conditions. Finally, we

  2. Detection of Volatile Organics Using a Surface Acoustic Wave Array System

    SciTech Connect

    ANDERSON, LAWRENCE F.; BARTHOLOMEW, JOHN W.; CERNOSEK, RICHARD W.; COLBURN, CHRISTOPHER W.; CROOKS, R.M.; MARTINEZ, R.F.; OSBOURN, GORDON C.; RICCO, A.J.; STATON, ALAN W.; YELTON, WILLIAM G.

    1999-10-14

    A chemical sensing system based on arrays of surface acoustic wave (SAW) delay lines has been developed for identification and quantification of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The individual SAW chemical sensors consist of interdigital transducers patterned on the surface of an ST-cut quartz substrate to launch and detect the acoustic waves and a thin film coating in the SAW propagation path to perturb the acoustic wave velocity and attenuation during analyte sorption. A diverse set of material coatings gives the sensor arrays a degree of chemical sensitivity and selectivity. Materials examined for sensor application include the alkanethiol-based self-assembled monolayer, plasma-processed films, custom-synthesized conventional polymers, dendrimeric polymers, molecular recognition materials, electroplated metal thin films, and porous metal oxides. All of these materials target a specific chemical fi.mctionality and the enhancement of accessible film surface area. Since no one coating provides absolute analyte specificity, the array responses are further analyzed using a visual-empirical region-of-influence (VERI) pattern recognition algorithm. The chemical sensing system consists of a seven-element SAW array with accompanying drive and control electronics, sensor signal acquisition electronics, environmental vapor sampling hardware, and a notebook computer. Based on data gathered for individual sensor responses, greater than 93%-accurate identification can be achieved for any single analyte from a group of 17 VOCs and water.

  3. Shear horizontal surface acoustic wave microsensor for Class A viral and bacterial detection.

    SciTech Connect

    Branch, Darren W.; Huber, Dale L.; Brozik, Susan Marie; Edwards, Thayne L.

    2008-10-01

    The rapid autonomous detection of pathogenic microorganisms and bioagents by field deployable platforms is critical to human health and safety. To achieve a high level of sensitivity for fluidic detection applications, we have developed a 330 MHz Love wave acoustic biosensor on 36{sup o} YX Lithium Tantalate (LTO). Each die has four delay-line detection channels, permitting simultaneous measurement of multiple analytes or for parallel detection of single analyte containing samples. Crucial to our biosensor was the development of a transducer that excites the shear horizontal (SH) mode, through optimization of the transducer, minimizing propagation losses and reducing undesirable modes. Detection was achieved by comparing the reference phase of an input signal to the phase shift from the biosensor using an integrated electronic multi-readout system connected to a laptop computer or PDA. The Love wave acoustic arrays were centered at 330 MHz, shifting to 325-328 MHz after application of the silicon dioxide waveguides. The insertion loss was -6 dB with an out-of-band rejection of 35 dB. The amplitude and phase ripple were 2.5 dB p-p and 2-3{sup o} p-p, respectively. Time-domain gating confirmed propagation of the SH mode while showing suppression of the triple transit. Antigen capture and mass detection experiments demonstrate a sensitivity of 7.19 {+-} 0.74{sup o} mm{sup 2}/ng with a detection limit of 6.7 {+-} 0.40 pg/mm{sup 2} for each channel.

  4. Detection scheme for acoustic quantum radiation in Bose-Einstein condensates.

    PubMed

    Schützhold, Ralf

    2006-11-10

    Based on doubly detuned Raman transitions between (meta)stable atomic or molecular states and recently developed atom counting techniques, a detection scheme for sound waves in dilute Bose-Einstein condensates is proposed whose accuracy might reach down to the level of a few or even single phonons. This scheme could open up a new range of applications including the experimental observation of quantum radiation phenomena such as the Hawking effect in sonic black-hole analogues or the acoustic analogue of cosmological particle creation. PMID:17155600

  5. Acoustic Methods to Monitor Protein Crystallization and to Detect Protein Crystals in Suspensions of Agarose and Lipidic Cubic Phase.

    PubMed

    Ericson, Daniel L; Yin, Xingyu; Scalia, Alexander; Samara, Yasmin N; Stearns, Richard; Vlahos, Harry; Ellson, Richard; Sweet, Robert M; Soares, Alexei S

    2016-02-01

    Improvements needed for automated crystallography include crystal detection and crystal harvesting. A technique that uses acoustic droplet ejection to harvest crystals was previously reported. Here a method is described for using the same acoustic instrument to detect protein crystals and to monitor crystal growth. Acoustic pulses were used to monitor the progress of crystallization trials and to detect the presence and location of protein crystals. Crystals were detected, and crystallization was monitored in aqueous solutions and in lipidic cubic phase. Using a commercially available acoustic instrument, crystals measuring ~150 µm or larger were readily detected. Simple laboratory techniques were used to increase the sensitivity to 50 µm by suspending the crystals away from the plastic surface of the crystallization plate. This increased the sensitivity by separating the strong signal generated by the plate bottom that can mask the signal from small protein crystals. It is possible to further boost the acoustic reflection from small crystals by reducing the wavelength of the incident sound pulse, but our current instrumentation does not allow this option. In the future, commercially available sound-emitting transducers with a characteristic frequency near 300 MHz should detect and monitor the growth of individual 3 µm crystals.

  6. A real-time method for autonomous passive acoustic detection-classification of humpback whales.

    PubMed

    Abbot, Ted A; Premus, Vincent E; Abbot, Philip A

    2010-05-01

    This paper describes a method for real-time, autonomous, joint detection-classification of humpback whale vocalizations. The approach adapts the spectrogram correlation method used by Mellinger and Clark [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 107, 3518-3529 (2000)] for bowhead whale endnote detection to the humpback whale problem. The objective is the implementation of a system to determine the presence or absence of humpback whales with passive acoustic methods and to perform this classification with low false alarm rate in real time. Multiple correlation kernels are used due to the diversity of humpback song. The approach also takes advantage of the fact that humpbacks tend to vocalize repeatedly for extended periods of time, and identification is declared only when multiple song units are detected within a fixed time interval. Humpback whale vocalizations from Alaska, Hawaii, and Stellwagen Bank were used to train the algorithm. It was then tested on independent data obtained off Kaena Point, Hawaii in February and March of 2009. Results show that the algorithm successfully classified humpback whales autonomously in real time, with a measured probability of correct classification in excess of 74% and a measured probability of false alarm below 1%.

  7. ADRPM-VII applied to the long-range acoustic detection problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shalis, Edward; Koenig, Gerald

    1990-01-01

    An acoustic detection range prediction model (ADRPM-VII) has been written for IBM PC/AT machines running on the MS-DOS operating system. The software allows the user to predict detection distances of ground combat vehicles and their associated targets when they are involved in quasi-military settings. The program can also calculate individual attenuation losses due to spherical spreading, atmospheric absorption, ground reflection and atmospheric refraction due to temperature and wind gradients while varying parameters effecting the source-receiver problem. The purpose here is to examine the strengths and limitations of ADRPM-VII by modeling the losses due to atmospheric refraction and ground absorption, commonly known as excess attenuation, when applied to the long range detection problem for distances greater than 3 kilometers.

  8. Assisting the Visually Impaired: Obstacle Detection and Warning System by Acoustic Feedback

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Alberto; Yebes, J. Javier; Alcantarilla, Pablo F.; Bergasa, Luis M.; Almazán, Javier; Cela, Andrés

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this article is focused on the design of an obstacle detection system for assisting visually impaired people. A dense disparity map is computed from the images of a stereo camera carried by the user. By using the dense disparity map, potential obstacles can be detected in 3D in indoor and outdoor scenarios. A ground plane estimation algorithm based on RANSAC plus filtering techniques allows the robust detection of the ground in every frame. A polar grid representation is proposed to account for the potential obstacles in the scene. The design is completed with acoustic feedback to assist visually impaired users while approaching obstacles. Beep sounds with different frequencies and repetitions inform the user about the presence of obstacles. Audio bone conducting technology is employed to play these sounds without interrupting the visually impaired user from hearing other important sounds from its local environment. A user study participated by four visually impaired volunteers supports the proposed system. PMID:23247413

  9. Low power underwater acoustic DPSK detection: Theoretical prediction and experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunne, Andrew

    This thesis presents two methods of analyzing the effectiveness of a prototype differential phase-shift keying (DPSK) detection circuit. The first method is to make modifications to the existing hardware to reliably output and record the cross-correlation values of the DPSK detection process. The second method is to write a MATLAB detection algorithm which accurately simulates the detection results of the hardware system without the need of any electronics. These two systems were tested and verified with a bench test using computer generated DPSK signals. The hardware system was tested using real acoustic data from shallow and deep water at-sea tests to determine the effectiveness of the DPSK detection circuit in different ocean environments. The hydrophone signals from the tests were recorded so that the cross-correlation values could be verified using the MATLAB detector. As a result of this study, these two systems provided more insight into how well the DPSK detection prototype works and helped to identify ways of improving the detection reliability and overall performance of the prototype DPSK detection circuit.

  10. Novel methods for detecting buried explosive devices

    SciTech Connect

    Kercel, S.W.; Burlage, R.S.; Patek, D.R.; Smith, C.M.; Hibbs, A.D.; Rayner, T.J.

    1997-04-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Quantum Magnetics, Inc. (QM) are exploring novel landmine detection technologies. Technologies considered here include bioreporter bacteria, swept acoustic resonance, nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR), and semiotic data fusion. Bioreporter bacteria look promising for third-world humanitarian applications; they are inexpensive, and deployment does not require high-tech methods. Swept acoustic resonance may be a useful adjunct to magnetometers in humanitarian demining. For military demining, NQR is a promising method for detecting explosive substances; of 50,000 substances that have been tested, none has an NQR signature that can be mistaken for RDX or TNT. For both military and commercial demining, sensor fusion entails two daunting tasks, identifying fusible features in both present-day and emerging technologies, and devising a fusion algorithm that runs in real-time on cheap hardware. Preliminary research in these areas is encouraging. A bioreporter bacterium for TNT detection is under development. Investigation has just started in swept acoustic resonance as an approach to a cheap mine detector for humanitarian use. Real-time wavelet processing appears to be a key to extending NQR bomb detection into mine detection, including TNT-based mines. Recent discoveries in semiotics may be the breakthrough that will lead to a robust fused detection scheme.

  11. Novel methods for detecting buried explosive devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kercel, Stephen W.; Burlage, Robert S.; Patek, David R.; Smith, Cyrus M.; Hibbs, Andrew D.; Rayner, Timothy J.

    1997-07-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Quantum Magnetics, Inc. are exploring novel landmine detection technologies. Technologies considered here include bioreporter bacteria, swept acoustic resonance, nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR), and semiotic data fusion. Bioreporter bacteria look promising for third-world humanitarian applications; they are inexpensive, and deployment does not require high-tech methods. Swept acoustic resonance may be a useful adjunct to magnetometers in humanitarian demining. For military demining, NQR is a promising method for detecting explosive substances; of 50,000 substances that have been tested, one has an NQR signature that can be mistaken for RDX or TNT. For both military and commercial demining, sensor fusion entails two daunting tasks, identifying fusible features in both present-day and emerging technologies, and devising a fusion algorithm that runs in real-time on cheap hardware. Preliminary research in these areas is encouraging. A bioreporter bacterium for TNT detection is under development. Investigation has just started in swept acoustic resonance as an approach to a cheap mine detector for humanitarian use. Real-time wavelet processing appears to be a key to extending NQR bomb detection into mine detection, including TNT-based mines. Recent discoveries in semiotics may be the breakthrough that will lead to a robust fused detection scheme.

  12. To see or not to see: investigating detectability of Ganges River dolphins using a combined visual-acoustic survey.

    PubMed

    Richman, Nadia I; Gibbons, James M; Turvey, Samuel T; Akamatsu, Tomonari; Ahmed, Benazir; Mahabub, Emile; Smith, Brian D; Jones, Julia P G

    2014-01-01

    Detection of animals during visual surveys is rarely perfect or constant, and failure to account for imperfect detectability affects the accuracy of abundance estimates. Freshwater cetaceans are among the most threatened group of mammals, and visual surveys are a commonly employed method for estimating population size despite concerns over imperfect and unquantified detectability. We used a combined visual-acoustic survey to estimate detectability of Ganges River dolphins (Platanista gangetica gangetica) in four waterways of southern Bangladesh. The combined visual-acoustic survey resulted in consistently higher detectability than a single observer-team visual survey, thereby improving power to detect trends. Visual detectability was particularly low for dolphins close to meanders where these habitat features temporarily block the view of the preceding river surface. This systematic bias in detectability during visual-only surveys may lead researchers to underestimate the importance of heavily meandering river reaches. Although the benefits of acoustic surveys are increasingly recognised for marine cetaceans, they have not been widely used for monitoring abundance of freshwater cetaceans due to perceived costs and technical skill requirements. We show that acoustic surveys are in fact a relatively cost-effective approach for surveying freshwater cetaceans, once it is acknowledged that methods that do not account for imperfect detectability are of limited value for monitoring.

  13. To See or Not to See: Investigating Detectability of Ganges River Dolphins Using a Combined Visual-Acoustic Survey

    PubMed Central

    Richman, Nadia I.; Gibbons, James M.; Turvey, Samuel T.; Akamatsu, Tomonari; Ahmed, Benazir; Mahabub, Emile; Smith, Brian D.; Jones, Julia P. G.

    2014-01-01

    Detection of animals during visual surveys is rarely perfect or constant, and failure to account for imperfect detectability affects the accuracy of abundance estimates. Freshwater cetaceans are among the most threatened group of mammals, and visual surveys are a commonly employed method for estimating population size despite concerns over imperfect and unquantified detectability. We used a combined visual-acoustic survey to estimate detectability of Ganges River dolphins (Platanista gangetica gangetica) in four waterways of southern Bangladesh. The combined visual-acoustic survey resulted in consistently higher detectability than a single observer-team visual survey, thereby improving power to detect trends. Visual detectability was particularly low for dolphins close to meanders where these habitat features temporarily block the view of the preceding river surface. This systematic bias in detectability during visual-only surveys may lead researchers to underestimate the importance of heavily meandering river reaches. Although the benefits of acoustic surveys are increasingly recognised for marine cetaceans, they have not been widely used for monitoring abundance of freshwater cetaceans due to perceived costs and technical skill requirements. We show that acoustic surveys are in fact a relatively cost-effective approach for surveying freshwater cetaceans, once it is acknowledged that methods that do not account for imperfect detectability are of limited value for monitoring. PMID:24805782

  14. Numerical simulation of armored vehicles subjected to undercarriage landmine blasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdik, A.; Kilic, S. A.; Kilic, N.; Bedir, S.

    2016-07-01

    Landmine threats play a crucial role in the design of armored personnel carriers. Therefore, a reliable blast simulation methodology is valuable to the vehicle design development process. The first part of this study presents a parametric approach for the quantification of the important factors such as the incident overpressure, the reflected overpressure, the incident impulse, and the reflected impulse for the blast simulations that employ the Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian formulation. The effects of mesh resolution, mesh topology, and fluid-structure interaction (FSI) parameters are discussed. The simulation results are compared with the calculations of the more established CONventional WEaPons (CONWEP) approach based on the available experimental data. The initial findings show that the spherical topology provides advantages over the Cartesian mesh domains. Furthermore, the FSI parameters play an important role when coarse Lagrangian finite elements are coupled with fine Eulerian elements at the interface. The optimum mesh topology and the mesh resolution of the parametric study are then used in the landmine blast simulation. The second part of the study presents the experimental blast response of an armored vehicle subjected to a landmine explosion under the front left wheel in accordance with the NATO AEP-55 Standard. The results of the simulations show good agreement with the experimental measurements.

  15. Detection of explosive events by monitoring acoustically-induced geomagnetic perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, J P; Rock, D R; Shaeffer, D L; Warshaw, S I

    1999-10-07

    The Black Thunder Coal Mine (BTCM) near Gillette, Wyoming was used as a test bed to determine the feasibility of detecting explosion-induced geomagnetic disturbances with ground-based induction magnetometers. Two magnetic observatories were fielded at distances of 50 km and 64 km geomagnetically north from the northernmost edge of BTCM. Each observatory consisted of three separate but mutually orthogonal magnetometers, Global Positioning System (GPS) timing, battery and solar power, a data acquisition and storage system, and a three-axis seismometer. Explosions with yields of 1 to 3 kT of TNT equivalent occur approximately every three weeks at BTCM. We hypothesize that explosion-induced acoustic waves propagate upward and interact collisionally with the ionosphere to produce ionospheric electron density (and concomitant current density) perturbations which act as sources for geomagnetic disturbances. These disturbances propagate through an ionospheric Alfven waveguide that we postulate to be leaky (due to the imperfectly conducting lower ionospheric boundary). Consequently, wave energy may be observed on the ground. We observed transient pulses, known as Q-bursts, with pulse widths about 0.5 s and with spectral energy dominated by the Schumann resonances. These resonances appear to be excited in the earth-ionosphere cavity by Alfven solitons that may have been generated by the explosion-induced acoustic waves reaching the ionospheric E and F regions and that subsequently propagate down through the ionosphere to the atmosphere. In addition, we observe late time (> 800 s) ultra low frequency (ULF) geomagnetic perturbations that appear to originate in the upper F region ({approximately}300 km) and appear to be caused by the explosion-induced acoustic wave interacting with that part of the ionosphere. We suggest that explosion-induced Q-bursts may be discriminated from naturally occurring Q-bursts by association of the former with the late time explosion-induced ULF

  16. Acoustically detected hydrocarbon plumes rising from 2-km depths in Guaymas Basin, Gulf of California

    SciTech Connect

    Merewether, R.; Olsson, M.S.; Lonsdale, P.

    1985-03-10

    Plumes extending nearly 1000 m from the 1500--2000 m deep seafloor of Guaymas Basin were detected from below the 23.5-kHz inverted echo-sounder of the Scripps Deep Two vehicle. Individual sound reflectors (bubbles or drops) rise at approximately 17 cm/s in one plume. The Deep Tow side scan records provide more information on the plumes' structure at the altitude of the vehicle (75 m), where some form multiple side scan targets, one 20 m across. Near-bottom 4-kHz profiles show that plumes overlie young fault traces associated with extensional faulting at the basin's spreading centers of outcrops of tilted beds beside strike-slip faults. We infer from analysis of the Deep Tow observations, field relationships, and knowledge of the geology of this basin that the plumes are made of light hydrocarbons, perhaps mainly methane, that emanate from seabed seeps. One of the acoustically detected plumes was at a spreading-axis hydrothermal field, which has many buoyant, acoustically transparent thermal plumes, some of which are rich in dissolved hydrocarbons.

  17. Detection and display of acoustic window for guiding and training cardiac ultrasound users

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Sheng-Wen; Radulescu, Emil; Wang, Shougang; Thiele, Karl; Prater, David; Maxwell, Douglas; Rafter, Patrick; Dupuy, Clement; Drysdale, Jeremy; Erkamp, Ramon

    2014-03-01

    Successful ultrasound data collection strongly relies on the skills of the operator. Among different scans, echocardiography is especially challenging as the heart is surrounded by ribs and lung tissue. Less experienced users might acquire compromised images because of suboptimal hand-eye coordination and less awareness of artifacts. Clearly, there is a need for a tool that can guide and train less experienced users to position the probe optimally. We propose to help users with hand-eye coordination by displaying lines overlaid on B-mode images. The lines indicate the edges of blockages (e.g., ribs) and are updated in real time according to movement of the probe relative to the blockages. They provide information about how probe positioning can be improved. To distinguish between blockage and acoustic window, we use coherence, an indicator of channel data similarity after applying focusing delays. Specialized beamforming was developed to estimate coherence. Image processing is applied to coherence maps to detect unblocked beams and the angle of the lines for display. We built a demonstrator based on a Philips iE33 scanner, from which beamsummed RF data and video output are transferred to a workstation for processing. The detected lines are overlaid on B-mode images and fed back to the scanner display to provide users real-time guidance. Using such information in addition to B-mode images, users will be able to quickly find a suitable acoustic window for optimal image quality, and improve their skill.

  18. Applications of swept-frequency acoustic interferometer for nonintrusive detection and identification of chemical warfare compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, D.N.; Springer, K.; Han, W.; Lizon, D.; Kogan, S.

    1997-12-01

    Swept-Frequency Acoustic Interferometry (SFAI) is a nonintrusive liquid characterization technique developed specifically for detecting and identifying chemical warfare (CW) compounds inside sealed munitions. The SFAI technique can rapidly (less than 20 seconds) and accurately determine sound speed and sound attenuation of a liquid inside a container over a wide frequency range (1 kHz-15 MHz). From the frequency-dependent sound attenuation measurement, liquid density is determined. These three physical properties are used to uniquely identify the CW compounds. In addition, various chemical relaxation processes in liquids and particle size distribution in emulsions can also be determined from the frequency-dependent attenuation measurement. The SFAI instrument is battery-operated and highly portable (< 6 lb.). The instrument has many potential application in industry ranging from sensitive detection (ppm level) of contamination to process control. The theory of the technique will be described and examples of several chemical industry applications will be presented.

  19. Fissile and Non-Fissile Material Detection using Nuclear Acoustic Resonance Signatures

    SciTech Connect

    Herberg, J; Maxwell, R; Tittmann, B R; Lenahan, P M; Yerkes, S; Jayaraman, S

    2005-10-04

    This report reviews progress made on NA22 project LL251DP to develop a novel technique, Nuclear Acoustic Resonance (NAR), for remote, non-destructive, nonradiation-based detection of materials of interest to Nonproliferation Programs, including {sup 235}U and {sup 239}Pu. We have met all milestones and deliverables for FY05, as shown in Table 1. In short, we have developed a magnetic shield chamber and magnetic field, develop a digital lock-in amplifier computer to integrate both the ultrasound radiation with the detector, developed strain measurements, and begin to perform initial measurements to obtain a NAR signal from aluminum at room temperature and near the earth's magnetic field. The results obtained in FY05 further support the feasibility of successful demonstration of an NAR experiment for remote, non-destructive, non-radiation-based detection of materials of interest to Nonproliferation Programs.

  20. Acoustic detection and localization of small arms, influence of urban conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naz, P.; Marty, Ch.; Hengy, S.; Hamery, P.

    2008-04-01

    The detection and localization of small fire arms is envisaged by use of acoustic devices. This paper describes the capability to detect and localize snipers in open field and in urban conditions. This work was performed by ISL and DGA during various national and NATO trials. During recent military conflicts, as well as for security interventions, the urban zone has taken a prominent place. Experimental results measured in free-field conditions, compared with those measured in a village used for military training, show that the streets and houses can generate many reflections of the original gunshot, requiring new signal processing techniques to separate each contribution. For this purpose a specific numerical model has been developed. A few examples of experimental and numerical results obtained for the validation of this methodology will be presented.

  1. Generation and detection of gigahertz surface acoustic waves using an elastomeric phase-shift mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dongyao; Zhao, Peng; Zhao, Ji-Cheng; Cahill, David G.

    2013-10-01

    We describe a convenient approach for measuring the velocity vSAW of surface acoustic waves (SAWs) of the near-surface layer of a material through optical pump-probe measurements. The method has a lateral spatial resolution of <10 μm and is sensitive to the elastic constants of the material within ≈300 nm of the surface. SAWs with a wavelength of 700 nm and 500 nm are generated and detected using an elastomeric polydimethylsiloxane phase-shift mask which is fabricated using a commercially available Si grating as a mold. Time-domain electromagnetics calculations show, in agreement with experiment, that the efficiency of the phase-shift mask for generating and detecting SAWs decreases rapidly as the periodicity of the mask decreases below the optical wavelength. We validate the experimental approach using bulk and thin film samples with known elastic constants.

  2. Jitter reduction technique for acoustic radiation force impulse microscopy via photoacoustic detection

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Bong Jin; Yoon, Changhan; Man Park, Jin; Hwang, Jae Youn; Shung, K. Kirk

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a jitter noise reduction technique for acoustic radiation force impulse microscopy via photoacoustic detection (PA-ARFI), which promises to be capable of measuring cell mechanics. To reduce the jitter noise induced by Q-switched pulsed laser operated at high repetition frequency, photoacoustic signals from the surface of an ultrasound transducer are aligned by cross-correlation and peak-to-peak detection, respectively. Each method is then employed to measure the displacements of a target sample in an agar phantom and a breast cancer cell due to ARFI application, followed by the quantitative comparison between their performances. The suggested methods for PA-ARFI significantly reduce jitter noises, thus allowing us to measure displacements of a target cell due to ARFI application by less than 3 μm. PMID:26367579

  3. Detection of bioagents using a shear horizontal surface acoustic wave biosensor

    DOEpatents

    Larson, Richard S; Hjelle, Brian; Hall, Pam R; Brown, David C; Bisoffi, Marco; Brozik, Susan M; Branch, Darren W; Edwards, Thayne L; Wheeler, David

    2014-04-29

    A biosensor combining the sensitivity of surface acoustic waves (SAW) generated at a frequency of 325 MHz with the specificity provided by antibodies and other ligands for the detection of viral agents. In a preferred embodiment, a lithium tantalate based SAW transducer with silicon dioxide waveguide sensor platform featuring three test and one reference delay lines was used to adsorb antibodies directed against Coxsackie virus B4 or the negative-stranded category A bioagent Sin Nombre virus (SNV). Rapid detection of increasing concentrations of viral particles was linear over a range of order of magnitude for both viruses, and the sensor's selectivity for its target was not compromised by the presence of confounding Herpes Simplex virus type 1 The biosensor was able to delect SNV at doses lower than the load of virus typically found in a human patient suffering from hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS).

  4. An Amplitude-Based Estimation Method for International Space Station (ISS) Leak Detection and Localization Using Acoustic Sensor Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tian, Jialin; Madaras, Eric I.

    2009-01-01

    The development of a robust and efficient leak detection and localization system within a space station environment presents a unique challenge. A plausible approach includes the implementation of an acoustic sensor network system that can successfully detect the presence of a leak and determine the location of the leak source. Traditional acoustic detection and localization schemes rely on the phase and amplitude information collected by the sensor array system. Furthermore, the acoustic source signals are assumed to be airborne and far-field. Likewise, there are similar applications in sonar. In solids, there are specialized methods for locating events that are used in geology and in acoustic emission testing that involve sensor arrays and depend on a discernable phase front to the received signal. These methods are ineffective if applied to a sensor detection system within the space station environment. In the case of acoustic signal location, there are significant baffling and structural impediments to the sound path and the source could be in the near-field of a sensor in this particular setting.

  5. Detection and localization using an acoustic array on a small robotic platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Stuart H.; Scanlon, Michael V.

    2003-09-01

    The future battlefield will require an unprecedented level of automation in which soldier-operated autonomous and semi-autonomous ground, air and sea platforms along with mounted and dismounted soldiers will function as a tightly coupled team. Sophisticated robotic platforms with diverse sensor suites will be an integral part of the Objective Force, and must be able to collaborate not only amongst themselves but also with their manned partners. The Army Research Laboratory has developed a robot-based acoustic detection system that will detect and localize on an impulsive noise event, such as a sniper's weapon firing. Additionally, acoustic sensor arrays worn on a soldier's helmet or equipment can enhance his situational awareness and RSTA capabilities. The Land Warrior or Objective Force Warrior body-worn computer can detect tactically significant impulsive signatures from bullets, mortars, artillery, and missiles or spectral signatures from tanks, helicopters, UAVs, and mobile robots. Time-difference-of-arrival techniques can determine a sound's direction of arrival, while head attitude sensors can instantly determine the helmet orientation at time of capture. With precision GPS location of the soldier, along with the locations of other soldiers, robots, or unattended ground sensors that heard the same event, triangulation techniques can produce an accurate location of the target. Data from C-4 explosions and 0.50-Caliber shots shows that both helmet and robot systems can localize on the same event. This provides an awesome capability - mobile robots and soldiers working together on an ever-changing battlespace to detect the enemy and improve the survivability, mobility, and lethality of our future warriors.

  6. Detection of Delamination in Composite Beams Using Broadband Acoustic Emission Signatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okafor, A. C.; Chandrashekhara, K.; Jiang, Y. P.

    1996-01-01

    Delamination in composite structure may be caused by imperfections introduced during the manufacturing process or by impact loads by foreign objects during the operational life. There are some nondestructive evaluation methods to detect delamination in composite structures such as x-radiography, ultrasonic testing, and thermal/infrared inspection. These methods are expensive and hard to use for on line detection. Acoustic emission testing can monitor the material under test even under the presence of noise generated under load. It has been used extensively in proof-testing of fiberglass pressure vessels and beams. In the present work, experimental studies are conducted to investigate the use of broadband acoustic emission signatures to detect delaminations in composite beams. Glass/epoxy beam specimens with full width, prescribed delamination sizes of 2 inches and 4 inches are investigated. The prescribed delamination is produced by inserting Teflon film between laminae during the fabrication of composite laminate. The objectives of this research is to develop a method for predicting delamination size and location in laminated composite beams by combining smart materials concept and broadband AE analysis techniques. More specifically, a piezoceramic (PZT) patch is bonded on the surface of composite beams and used as a pulser. The piezoceramic patch simulates the AE wave source as a 3 cycles, 50KHz, burst sine wave. One broadband AE sensor is fixed near the PZT patch to measure the AE wave near the AE source. A second broadband AE sensor, which is used as a receiver, is scanned along the composite beams at 0.25 inch step to measure propagation of AE wave along the composite beams. The acquired AE waveform is digitized and processed. Signal strength, signal energy, cross-correlation of AE waveforms, and tracking of specific cycle of AE waveforms are used to detect delamination size and location.

  7. Impact of weighted density distribution function features on land mine detection using hand-held units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, Ronald J.; Somanchi, Satish; Gader, Paul D.

    2002-08-01

    Landmine detection using metal detector (MD) and ground penetrating radar (GPR) sensors in hand-held units is a difficult problem. Detection difficulties arise due to: 1) the varying composition and type of metal in landmines, 2) the time-varying nature of background and 3) the variation in height and velocity of the hand-held unit in data measurement. In prior research, spatially distributed MD features were explored for differentiating landmine signatures from background and non-landmine objects. These features were computed based on correlating sequences of MD energy values with six weighted density distribution functions. In this research the effectiveness of these features to detect landmines of varying metal composition and type is investigated. Experimental results are presented from statistical analysis for feature assessment. Preliminary experimental results are also presented for evaluating the impact on MD feature calculations from varying height and sweep rate of the hand-held unit for data acquisition.

  8. Acoustic penetration of the seabed, with particular application to the detection of non-metallic buried cables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Ruthven Clive Philip

    Damaged submarine fibre optic telecommunication cables are located by the use of remotely operated underwater vehicles. These are fitted with sensors which have the capability to detect the metal shielding in the cable cores. However, it is anticipated that the next generation of cables will have a much reduced metal content, their strength being derived from synthetic materials such as aramid fibres. This will make them practically invisible to present day detection systems. To this end, research has been conducted into the remote detection of a range of buried objects having a `low acoustic contrast' using, primarily, acoustic techniques, with particular emphasis being given to the detection of buried cables. This involved the design of a system to reliably detect a small diameter (cm scale), cylindrical target buried to a depth of up to 1 metre below the seabed from a height of 1 metre above the seabed at a sea depth of 1000 m. A purpose-built, laboratory-scale, automated sensing system comprising a bistatic arrangement of adjustable, focused transducers was constructed. This was used successfully in the high resolution imaging of a range of buried objects, proving an acoustic detection system to be a feasible solution. The experimental investigation focused on the areas of waveform optimisation, optimal filtering and clutter reduction, with the signal processing system being optimised to achieve maximum separation of the target signal from the background. The lack of an experimentally verified model to describe the transmission of acoustic waves into the seabed was a complicating factor. Therefore, the propagation of compressional waves into and within a sandy sediment was investigated. This study was of particular academic interest in light of recent work in which anomalous acoustic penetration of the seabed, where the grazing angle in the water column was sub-critical, has been observed. An experimental investigation showed that scattering from surface

  9. Shifting Gravel and the Acoustic Detection Range of Killer Whale Calls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassett, C.; Thomson, J. M.; Polagye, B. L.; Wood, J.

    2012-12-01

    In environments suitable for tidal energy development, strong currents result in large bed stresses that mobilize sediments, producing sediment-generated noise. Sediment-generated noise caused by mobilization events can exceed noise levels attributed to other ambient noise sources at frequencies related to the diameters of the mobilized grains. At a site in Admiralty Inlet, Puget Sound, Washington, one year of ambient noise data (0.02 - 30 kHz) and current velocity data are combined. Peak currents at the site exceed 3.5 m/s. During slack currents, vessel traffic is the dominant noise source. When currents exceed 0.85 m/s noise level increases between 2 kHz and 30 kHz are correlated with near-bed currents and bed stress estimates. Acoustic spectrum levels during strong currents exceed quiescent slack tide conditions by 20 dB or more between 2 and 30 kHz. These frequencies are consistent with sound generated by the mobilization of gravel and pebbles. To investigate the implications of sediment-generated noise for post-installation passive acoustic monitoring of a planned tidal energy project, ambient noise conditions during slack currents and strong currents are combined with the characteristics of Southern Resident killer whale (Orcinus orca) vocalizations and sound propagation modeling. The reduction in detection range is estimated for common vocalizations under different ambient noise conditions. The importance of sediment-generated noise for passive acoustic monitoring at tidal energy sites for different marine mammal functional hearing groups and other sediment compositions are considered.

  10. Calibrating passive acoustic monitoring: correcting humpback whale call detections for site-specific and time-dependent environmental characteristics.

    PubMed

    Helble, Tyler A; D'Spain, Gerald L; Campbell, Greg S; Hildebrand, John A

    2013-11-01

    This paper demonstrates the importance of accounting for environmental effects on passive underwater acoustic monitoring results. The situation considered is the reduction in shipping off the California coast between 2008-2010 due to the recession and environmental legislation. The resulting variations in ocean noise change the probability of detecting marine mammal vocalizations. An acoustic model was used to calculate the time-varying probability of detecting humpback whale vocalizations under best-guess environmental conditions and varying noise. The uncorrected call counts suggest a diel pattern and an increase in calling over a two-year period; the corrected call counts show minimal evidence of these features.

  11. Ambient pressure laser desorption and laser-induced acoustic desorption ion mobility spectrometry detection of explosives.

    PubMed

    Ehlert, Sven; Walte, Andreas; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2013-11-19

    The development of fast, mobile, and sensitive detection systems for security-relevant substances is of enormous importance. Because of the low vapor pressures of explosives and improvised explosive devices, adequate sampling procedures are crucial. Ion mobility spectrometers (IMSs) are fast and sensitive instruments that are used as detection systems for explosives. Ambient pressure laser desorption (APLD) and ambient pressure laser-induced acoustic desorption (AP-LIAD) are new tools suitable to evaporate explosives in order to detect them in the vapor phase. Indeed, the most important advantage of APLD or AP-LIAD is the capability to sample directly from the surface of interest without any transfer of the analyte to other surfaces such as wipe pads. A much more gentle desorption, compared to classical thermal-based desorption, is possible with laser-based desorption using very short laser pulses. With this approach the analyte molecules are evaporated in a very fast process, comparable to a shock wave. The thermal intake is reduced considerably. The functionality of APLD and AP-LIAD techniques combined with a hand-held IMS system is shown for a wide range of common explosives such as EGDN (ethylene glycol dinitrate), urea nitrate, PETN (pentaerythritol tetranitrate), HMTD (hexamethylene triperoxide diamine), RDX (hexogen), tetryl (2,4,6-trinitrophenylmethylnitramine), and TNT (trinitrotoluene). Detection limits down to the low nanogram range are obtained. The successful combination of IMS detection and APLD/AP-LIAD sampling is shown.

  12. Comparison of spatial frequency domain features for the detection of side attack explosive ballistics in synthetic aperture acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowdy, Josh; Anderson, Derek T.; Luke, Robert H.; Ball, John E.; Keller, James M.; Havens, Timothy C.

    2016-05-01

    Explosive hazards in current and former conflict zones are a threat to both military and civilian personnel. As a result, much effort has been dedicated to identifying automated algorithms and systems to detect these threats. However, robust detection is complicated due to factors like the varied composition and anatomy of such hazards. In order to solve this challenge, a number of platforms (vehicle-based, handheld, etc.) and sensors (infrared, ground penetrating radar, acoustics, etc.) are being explored. In this article, we investigate the detection of side attack explosive ballistics via a vehicle-mounted acoustic sensor. In particular, we explore three acoustic features, one in the time domain and two on synthetic aperture acoustic (SAA) beamformed imagery. The idea is to exploit the varying acoustic frequency profile of a target due to its unique geometry and material composition with respect to different viewing angles. The first two features build their angle specific frequency information using a highly constrained subset of the signal data and the last feature builds its frequency profile using all available signal data for a given region of interest (centered on the candidate target location). Performance is assessed in the context of receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves on cross-validation experiments for data collected at a U.S. Army test site on different days with multiple target types and clutter. Our preliminary results are encouraging and indicate that the top performing feature is the unrolled two dimensional discrete Fourier transform (DFT) of SAA beamformed imagery.

  13. Perceptual thresholds for detecting modifications applied to the acoustical properties of a violin.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Claudia; Cross, Ian; Moore, Brian C J; Woodhouse, Jim

    2007-12-01

    This study is the first step in the psychoacoustic exploration of perceptual differences between the sounds of different violins. A method was used which enabled the same performance to be replayed on different "virtual violins," so that the relationships between acoustical characteristics of violins and perceived qualities could be explored. Recordings of real performances were made using a bridge-mounted force transducer, giving an accurate representation of the signal from the violin string. These were then played through filters corresponding to the admittance curves of different violins. Initially, limits of listener performance in detecting changes in acoustical characteristics were characterized. These consisted of shifts in frequency or increases in amplitude of single modes or frequency bands that have been proposed previously to be significant in the perception of violin sound quality. Thresholds were significantly lower for musically trained than for nontrained subjects but were not significantly affected by the violin used as a baseline. Thresholds for the musicians typically ranged from 3 to 6 dB for amplitude changes and 1.5%-20% for frequency changes. Interpretation of the results using excitation patterns showed that thresholds for the best subjects were quite well predicted by a multichannel model based on optimal processing. PMID:18247771

  14. Perceptual thresholds for detecting modifications applied to the acoustical properties of a violin.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Claudia; Cross, Ian; Moore, Brian C J; Woodhouse, Jim

    2007-12-01

    This study is the first step in the psychoacoustic exploration of perceptual differences between the sounds of different violins. A method was used which enabled the same performance to be replayed on different "virtual violins," so that the relationships between acoustical characteristics of violins and perceived qualities could be explored. Recordings of real performances were made using a bridge-mounted force transducer, giving an accurate representation of the signal from the violin string. These were then played through filters corresponding to the admittance curves of different violins. Initially, limits of listener performance in detecting changes in acoustical characteristics were characterized. These consisted of shifts in frequency or increases in amplitude of single modes or frequency bands that have been proposed previously to be significant in the perception of violin sound quality. Thresholds were significantly lower for musically trained than for nontrained subjects but were not significantly affected by the violin used as a baseline. Thresholds for the musicians typically ranged from 3 to 6 dB for amplitude changes and 1.5%-20% for frequency changes. Interpretation of the results using excitation patterns showed that thresholds for the best subjects were quite well predicted by a multichannel model based on optimal processing.

  15. Optimization of an acoustic telemetry array for detecting transmitter-implanted fish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clements, S.; Jepsen, D.; Karnowski, M.; Schreck, C.B.

    2005-01-01

    The development of miniature acoustic transmitters and economical, robust automated receivers has enabled researchers to study the movement patterns and survival of teleosts in estuarine and ocean environments, including many species and age-classes that were previously considered too small for implantation. During 2001-2003, we optimized a receiver mooring system to minimize gear and data loss in areas where current action or wave action and acoustic noise are high. In addition, we conducted extensive tests to determine (1) the performance of a transmitter and receiver (Vemco, Ltd.) that are widely used, particularly in North America and Europe and (2) the optimal placement of receivers for recording the passage of fish past a point in a linear-flow environment. Our results suggest that in most locations the mooring system performs well with little loss of data; however, boat traffic remains a concern due to entanglement with the mooring system. We also found that the reception efficiency of the receivers depends largely on the method and location of deployment. In many cases, we observed a range of 0-100% reception efficiency (the percentage of known transmissions that are detected while the receiver is within range of the transmitter) when using a conventional method of mooring. The efficiency was improved by removal of the mounting bar and obstructions from the mooring line. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2005.

  16. Wideband excitation in nonlinear vibro-acoustic modulation for damage detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klepka, A.; Adamczyk, M.; Pieczonka, L.; Staszewski, W. J.

    2016-04-01

    The paper discusses the use of wideband excitation in nonlinear vibro-acoustic modulation technique (VAM) used for damage detection. In its original form, two mono-harmonic signals (low and high frequency) are used for excitation. The low frequency excitation is typically selected based on a modal analysis test and high frequency excitation is selected arbitrarily in the ultrasonic frequency range. This paper presents a different approach with use of wideband excitation signals. The proposed approach gives the possibility to simplify the testing procedure by omitting the modal test used to determine the value of low frequency excitation. Simultaneous use of wideband excitation for high frequency solves the ambiguity related to the selection of the frequency of acoustic wave. Broadband excitation signals require, however, more elaborate signal processing methods to determine the intensity of modulation for a given bandwidth. The paper discusses the proposed approach and the related signal processing procedure. Experimental validation of the proposed technique is performed on a laminated composite plate with a barely visible impact damage that was generated in an impact test. Piezoceramic actuators are used for vibration excitation and a scanning laser vibrometer is used for noncontact data acquisition.

  17. Detection of Acoustic Temporal Fine Structure by Cochlear Implant Listeners: Behavioral Results and Computational Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Imennov, Nikita S.; Won, Jong Ho; Drennan, Ward R.; Jameyson, Elyse; Rubinstein, Jay T.

    2013-01-01

    A test of within-channel detection of acoustic temporal fine structure (aTFS) cues is presented. Eight cochlear implant listeners (CI) were asked to discriminate between two Schroeder-phase (SP) complexes using a two-alternative, forced-choice task. Because differences between the acoustic stimuli are primarily constrained to their aTFS, successful discrimination reflects a combination of the subjects’ perception of and the strategy’s ability to deliver aTFS cues. Subjects were mapped with single-channel Continuous Interleaved Sampling (CIS) and Simultaneous Analog Stimulation (SAS) strategies. To compare within- and across- channel delivery of aTFS cues, a 16-channel clinical HiRes strategy was also fitted. Throughout testing, SAS consistently outperformed the CIS strategy (p ≤ 0.002). For SP stimuli with F0 =50 Hz, the highest discrimination scores were achieved with the HiRes encoding, followed by scores with the SAS and the CIS strategies, respectively. At 200 Hz, single-channel SAS performed better than HiRes (p = 0.022), demonstrating that under a more challenging testing condition, discrimination performance with a single-channel analog encoding can exceed that of a 16-channel pulsatile strategy. To better understand the intermediate steps of discrimination, a biophysical model was used to examine the neural discharges evoked by the SP stimuli. Discrimination estimates calculated from simulated neural responses successfully tracked the behavioral performance trends of single-channel CI listeners. PMID:23333260

  18. Site-targeted acoustic contrast agent detects molecular expression of tissue factor after balloon angioplasty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Christopher S.; Abendschein, Dana R.; Scherrer, David E.; Scott, Michael J.; Marsh, Jon N.; Wickline, Samuel A.; Lanza, Gregory M.

    2000-04-01

    Complex molecular signaling heralds the early stages of pathologies such as angiogenesis, inflammation, and cellular responses to mechanically damaged coronary arteries after balloon angioplasty. In previous studies, we have demonstrated acoustic enhancement of blood clot morphology with the use of a nongaseous, ligand-targeted acoustic nanoparticle emulsion delivered to areas of thrombosis both in vitro and in vivo. In this paper, we characterize the early expression of tissue factor which contributes to subsequent arterial restenosis. Tissue factor is a 42kd glycoprotein responsible for blood coagulation but also plays a well-described role in cancer metastasis, angiogenesis, and vascular restenosis. This study was designed to determine whether the targeted contrast agent could localize tissue factor expressed within the wall of balloon-injured arteries. Both carotid arteries of five pigs (20 kg) were injured using an 8 X 20 mm angioplasty balloon. The carotids were treated in situ with a perfluorocarbon nanoparticle emulsion covalently complexed to either specific anti-tissue factor polyclonal F(ab) fragments (treatment) or non-specific IgG F(ab) fragments (control). Intravascular ultrasound (30 MHz) images of the arteries were obtained before and after exposure to the emulsions. Tissue- factor targeted ultrasonic contrast agent acoustically enhanced the subintima and media at the site of balloon- induced injury compared with control contrast arteries (p less than 0.05). Immunohistochemical staining confirmed the presence of increased tissue factor at the sites of acoustic enhancement. Binding of the targeted agents was demonstrated in vitro by scanning electron microscope images of cultured smooth muscle cells that constitutively express tissue factor. This study demonstrates the concept of molecular imaging and localization of carotid arteries' tissue factor in vivo using a new, nanoparticulate emulsion. Enhancement of the visualization of the molecular

  19. Neural Mechanisms for Acoustic Signal Detection under Strong Masking in an Insect.

    PubMed

    Kostarakos, Konstantinos; Römer, Heiner

    2015-07-22

    Communication is fundamental for our understanding of behavior. In the acoustic modality, natural scenes for communication in humans and animals are often very noisy, decreasing the chances for signal detection and discrimination. We investigated the mechanisms enabling selective hearing under natural noisy conditions for auditory receptors and interneurons of an insect. In the studied katydid Mecopoda elongata species-specific calling songs (chirps) are strongly masked by signals of another species, both communicating in sympatry. The spectral properties of the two signals are similar and differ only in a small frequency band at 2 kHz present in the chirping species. Receptors sharply tuned to 2 kHz are completely unaffected by the masking signal of the other species, whereas receptors tuned to higher audio and ultrasonic frequencies show complete masking. Intracellular recordings of identified interneurons revealed two mechanisms providing response selectivity to the chirp. (1) Response selectivity is when several identified interneurons exhibit remarkably selective responses to the chirps, even at signal-to-noise ratios of -21 dB, since they are sharply tuned to 2 kHz. Their dendritic arborizations indicate selective connectivity with low-frequency receptors tuned to 2 kHz. (2) Novelty detection is when a second group of interneurons is broadly tuned but, because of strong stimulus-specific adaptation to the masker spectrum and "novelty detection" to the 2 kHz band present only in the conspecific signal, these interneurons start to respond selectively to the chirp shortly after the onset of the continuous masker. Both mechanisms provide the sensory basis for hearing at unfavorable signal-to-noise ratios. Significance statement: Animal and human acoustic communication may suffer from the same "cocktail party problem," when communication happens in noisy social groups. We address solutions for this problem in a model system of two katydids, where one species

  20. Detecting trihalomethanes using nanoporous-carbon coated surface-acoustic-wave sensors

    DOE PAGES

    Siegal, Michael P.; Mowry, Curtis D.; Pfeifer, Kent B.; Gallis, Dorina F. S.

    2015-03-07

    We study nanoporous-carbon (NPC) grown via pulsed laser deposition (PLD) as a sorbent coating on 96.5-MHz surface-acoustic-wave (SAW) devices to detect trihalomethanes (THMs), regulated byproducts from the chemical treatment of drinking water. Using both insertion-loss and isothermal-response measurements from known quantities of chloroform, the highest vapor pressure THM, we optimize the NPC mass-density at 1.05 ± 0.08 g/cm3 by controlling the background argon pressure during PLD. Precise THM quantities in a chlorobenzene solvent are directly injected into a separation column and detected as the phase-angle shift of the SAW device output compared to the drive signal. Using optimized NPC-coated SAWs,more » we study the chloroform response as a function of operating temperatures ranging from 10–50°C. Finally, we demonstrate individual responses from complex mixtures of all four THMs, with masses ranging from 10–2000 ng, after gas chromatography separation. As a result, estimates for each THM detection limit using a simple peak-height response evaluation are 4.4 ng for chloroform and 1 ng for bromoform; using an integrated-peak area response analysis improves the detection limits to 0.73 ng for chloroform and 0.003 ng bromoform.« less

  1. A surface acoustic wave bio-electronic nose for detection of volatile odorant molecules.

    PubMed

    Di Pietrantonio, F; Benetti, M; Cannatà, D; Verona, E; Palla-Papavlu, A; Fernández-Pradas, J M; Serra, P; Staiano, M; Varriale, A; D'Auria, S

    2015-05-15

    In this work, a "bio-electronic nose" for vapour phase detection of odorant molecules based on surface acoustic wave (SAW) resonators is presented. The biosensor system is composed of an array of five SAW resonators coated with three types of odorant-binding proteins (OBPs): the wild-type OBP from bovine (wtbOBP), a double-mutant of the OBP from bovine (dmbOBP), and the wild-type OBP from pig (wtpOBP). High resolution deposition of OBPs onto the active area of SAW resonators was implemented through laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT). The resonant frequency shifts of the SAW resonators after the deposition of the biomolecules confirmed the immobilisation of the proteins onto the Al/Au inter-digital transducers (IDTs). In addition, a low increase of insertion losses with a limited degradation of Q-factors is reported. The "bio-electronic nose" fabricated by LIFT is tested in nitrogen upon exposure to separated concentrations of R-(-)-1-octen-3-ol (octenol) and R-(-)-carvone (carvone) vapours. The "bio-electronic nose" showed low detection limits for the tested compounds (i.e. 0.48 ppm for the detection of octenol, and 0.74 ppm for the detection of carvone). In addition, the bio-sensing system was able to discriminate the octenol molecules from the carvone molecules, making it pertinent for the assessment of food contamination by moulds, or for the evaluation of indoor air quality in buildings. PMID:25256781

  2. Spatial scanning for anomaly detection in acoustic emission testing of an aerospace structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hensman, James; Worden, Keith; Eaton, Mark; Pullin, Rhys; Holford, Karen; Evans, Sam

    2011-10-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) monitoring of engineering structures potentially provides a convenient, cost-effective means of performing structural health monitoring. Networks of AE sensors can be easily and unobtrusively installed upon structures, giving the ability to detect and locate damage-related strain releases ('events') in the structure. Use of the technique is not widespread due to the lack of a simple and effective method for detecting abnormal activity levels: the sensitivity of AE sensor networks is such that events unrelated to damage are prevalent in most applications. In this publication, we propose to monitor AE activity in a structure using a spatial scanning statistic, developed and used effectively in the field of epidemiology. The technique is demonstrated on an aerospace structure - an Airbus A320 main landing gear fitting - undergoing fatigue loading, and the method is compared to existing techniques. Despite its simplicity, the scanning statistic proves to be an extremely effective tool in detecting the onset of damage in the structure: it requires little to no user intervention or expertise, is inexpensive to compute and has an easily interpretable output. Furthermore, the generic nature of the method allows the technique to be used in a variety of monitoring scenarios, to detect damage in a wide range of structures.

  3. Detection of Adult Beetles Inside the Stored Wheat Mass Based on Their Acoustic Emissions.

    PubMed

    Eliopoulos, P A; Potamitis, I; Kontodimas, D Ch; Givropoulou, E G

    2015-12-01

    The efficacy of bioacoustics in detecting the presence of adult beetles inside the grain mass was evaluated in the laboratory. A piezoelectric sensor and a portable acoustic emission amplifier connected with a computer were used. Adults of the most common beetle pests of stored wheat have been detected in varying population densities (0.1, 0.5, 1, and 2 adults per kilogram of wheat). The verification of the presence of the insect individuals was achieved through automated signal parameterization and classification. We tried out two different ways to detect impulses: 1) by applying a Hilbert transform on the audio recording and 2) by subtracting a noise estimation of the recording from the spectral content of the recording, thus allowing the frequency content of possible impulses to emerge. Prediction for infestation was rated falsely negative in 60-74%, 48-60%, 0-28%, and 0-4% of the cases when actual population density was 0.1, 0.5, 1, and 2 adults per kilogram, respectively, irrespective of pest species. No significant differences were recorded in positive predictions among different species in almost all cases. The system was very accurate (72-100%) in detecting 1 or 2 insects per kilogram of hard wheat grain, which is the standard threshold for classifying a grain mass "clean" or "infested." Our findings are discussed on the basis of enhancing the use of bioacoustics in stored-product IPM framework.

  4. Simulation study of melanoma detection in human skin tissues by laser-generated surface acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kun; Fu, Xing; Dorantes-Gonzalez, Dante J.; Lu, Zimo; Li, Tingting; Li, Yanning; Wu, Sen; Hu, Xiaotang

    2014-07-01

    Air pollution has been correlated to an increasing number of cases of human skin diseases in recent years. However, the investigation of human skin tissues has received only limited attention, to the point that there are not yet satisfactory modern detection technologies to accurately, noninvasively, and rapidly diagnose human skin at epidermis and dermis levels. In order to detect and analyze severe skin diseases such as melanoma, a finite element method (FEM) simulation study of the application of the laser-generated surface acoustic wave (LSAW) technique is developed. A three-layer human skin model is built, where LSAW's are generated and propagated, and their effects in the skin medium with melanoma are analyzed. Frequency domain analysis is used as a main tool to investigate such issues as minimum detectable size of melanoma, filtering spectra from noise and from computational irregularities, as well as on how the FEM model meshing size and computational capabilities influence the accuracy of the results. Based on the aforementioned aspects, the analysis of the signals under the scrutiny of the phase velocity dispersion curve is verified to be a reliable, a sensitive, and a promising approach for detecting and characterizing melanoma in human skin.

  5. A surface acoustic wave bio-electronic nose for detection of volatile odorant molecules.

    PubMed

    Di Pietrantonio, F; Benetti, M; Cannatà, D; Verona, E; Palla-Papavlu, A; Fernández-Pradas, J M; Serra, P; Staiano, M; Varriale, A; D'Auria, S

    2015-05-15

    In this work, a "bio-electronic nose" for vapour phase detection of odorant molecules based on surface acoustic wave (SAW) resonators is presented. The biosensor system is composed of an array of five SAW resonators coated with three types of odorant-binding proteins (OBPs): the wild-type OBP from bovine (wtbOBP), a double-mutant of the OBP from bovine (dmbOBP), and the wild-type OBP from pig (wtpOBP). High resolution deposition of OBPs onto the active area of SAW resonators was implemented through laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT). The resonant frequency shifts of the SAW resonators after the deposition of the biomolecules confirmed the immobilisation of the proteins onto the Al/Au inter-digital transducers (IDTs). In addition, a low increase of insertion losses with a limited degradation of Q-factors is reported. The "bio-electronic nose" fabricated by LIFT is tested in nitrogen upon exposure to separated concentrations of R-(-)-1-octen-3-ol (octenol) and R-(-)-carvone (carvone) vapours. The "bio-electronic nose" showed low detection limits for the tested compounds (i.e. 0.48 ppm for the detection of octenol, and 0.74 ppm for the detection of carvone). In addition, the bio-sensing system was able to discriminate the octenol molecules from the carvone molecules, making it pertinent for the assessment of food contamination by moulds, or for the evaluation of indoor air quality in buildings.

  6. Detecting trihalomethanes using nanoporous-carbon coated surface-acoustic-wave sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Siegal, Michael P.; Mowry, Curtis D.; Pfeifer, Kent B.; Gallis, Dorina F. S.

    2015-03-07

    We study nanoporous-carbon (NPC) grown via pulsed laser deposition (PLD) as a sorbent coating on 96.5-MHz surface-acoustic-wave (SAW) devices to detect trihalomethanes (THMs), regulated byproducts from the chemical treatment of drinking water. Using both insertion-loss and isothermal-response measurements from known quantities of chloroform, the highest vapor pressure THM, we optimize the NPC mass-density at 1.05 ± 0.08 g/cm3 by controlling the background argon pressure during PLD. Precise THM quantities in a chlorobenzene solvent are directly injected into a separation column and detected as the phase-angle shift of the SAW device output compared to the drive signal. Using optimized NPC-coated SAWs, we study the chloroform response as a function of operating temperatures ranging from 10–50°C. Finally, we demonstrate individual responses from complex mixtures of all four THMs, with masses ranging from 10–2000 ng, after gas chromatography separation. As a result, estimates for each THM detection limit using a simple peak-height response evaluation are 4.4 ng for chloroform and 1 ng for bromoform; using an integrated-peak area response analysis improves the detection limits to 0.73 ng for chloroform and 0.003 ng bromoform.

  7. Detection of cells captured with antigens on shear horizontal surface-acoustic-wave sensors.

    PubMed

    Hao, Hsu-Chao; Chang, Hwan-You; Wang, Tsung-Pao; Yao, Da-Jeng

    2013-02-01

    Techniques to separate cells are widely applied in immunology. The technique to separate a specific antigen on a microfluidic platform involves the use of a shear horizontal surface-acoustic-wave (SH-SAW) sensor. With specific antibodies conjugated onto the surface of the SH-SAW sensors, this technique can serve to identify specific cells in bodily fluids. Jurkat cells, used as a target in this work, provide a model of cells in small abundance (1:1000) for isolation and purification with the ultimate goal of targeting even more dilute cells. T cells were separated from a mixed-cell medium on a chip (Jurkat cells/K562 cells, 1/1000). A novel microchamber was developed to capture cells during the purification, which required a large biosample. Cell detection was demonstrated through the performance of genetic identification on the chip.

  8. Fissile and Non-Fissile Material Detection using Nuclear Acoustic Resonance Signatures: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Herberg, J; Maxwell, R; Tittmann, B R; Lenahan, P M; Yerkes, S; Jayaraman, S B

    2006-11-02

    This is final report on NA-22 project LL251DP, where the goal was to develop a novel technique, Nuclear Acoustic Resonance (NAR), for remote, non-destructive, nonradiation-based detection of materials of interest to Nonproliferation Programs, including {sup 235}U and {sup 239}Pu. In short, we have developed a magnetic shield chamber and magnetic field, develop a digital lock-in amplifier computer to integrate both the ultrasound radiation with the detector, developed strain measurements, and begun to perform initial measurements to obtain a NAR signal from aluminum at room temperature and near the earth's magnetic field. Since our funding was cut in FY06, I will discuss where this project can go in the future with this technology.

  9. Phage-based magnetostrictive-acoustic microbiosensors for detecting bacillus anthracis spores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, J.; Yang, H.; Lakshmanan, R. S.; Guntupalli, R.; Huang, S.; Hu, J.; Petrenko, V. A.; Chin, B. A.

    2006-05-01

    Magnetostrictive particles (MSPs) as biosensor platform have been developed recently. The principle of MSPs as sensor platform is the same as that of other acoustic wave devices, such as quartz crystal microbalance. In this paper, the fabrication, characterization and performance of phage-based MSP biosensors for detecting Bacillus anthracis spores are reported. A commercially available magnetostrictive alloy was utilized to fabricate the sensor platform. The phage was immobilized onto the MSPs using physical adsorption technology. The following performance of the phage-based MSP sensors will be presented: sensitivity, response time, longevity, specificity and binding efficacy. The performance of the sensors at static and dynamic conditions was characterized. The experimental results are confirmed by microscopy photographs. The excellent performance including high sensitivity and rapid response is demonstrated. More importantly, it is experimentally found that the phage-based MSP sensors have a much better longevity than antibody-based sensors.

  10. Neural Mechanisms for Acoustic Signal Detection under Strong Masking in an Insect

    PubMed Central

    Römer, Heiner

    2015-01-01

    Communication is fundamental for our understanding of behavior. In the acoustic modality, natural scenes for communication in humans and animals are often very noisy, decreasing the chances for signal detection and discrimination. We investigated the mechanisms enabling selective hearing under natural noisy conditions for auditory receptors and interneurons of an insect. In the studied katydid Mecopoda elongata species-specific calling songs (chirps) are strongly masked by signals of another species, both communicating in sympatry. The spectral properties of the two signals are similar and differ only in a small frequency band at 2 kHz present in the chirping species. Receptors sharply tuned to 2 kHz are completely unaffected by the masking signal of the other species, whereas receptors tuned to higher audio and ultrasonic frequencies show complete masking. Intracellular recordings of identified interneurons revealed two mechanisms providing response selectivity to the chirp. (1) Response selectivity is when several identified interneurons exhibit remarkably selective responses to the chirps, even at signal-to-noise ratios of −21 dB, since they are sharply tuned to 2 kHz. Their dendritic arborizations indicate selective connectivity with low-frequency receptors tuned to 2 kHz. (2) Novelty detection is when a second group of interneurons is broadly tuned but, because of strong stimulus-specific adaptation to the masker spectrum and “novelty detection” to the 2 kHz band present only in the conspecific signal, these interneurons start to respond selectively to the chirp shortly after the onset of the continuous masker. Both mechanisms provide the sensory basis for hearing at unfavorable signal-to-noise ratios. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Animal and human acoustic communication may suffer from the same “cocktail party problem,” when communication happens in noisy social groups. We address solutions for this problem in a model system of two katydids, where one

  11. Site specific passive acoustic detection and densities of humpback whale calls off the coast of California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helble, Tyler Adam

    Passive acoustic monitoring of marine mammal calls is an increasingly important method for assessing population numbers, distribution, and behavior. Automated methods are needed to aid in the analyses of the recorded data. When a mammal vocalizes in the marine environment, the received signal is a filtered version of the original waveform emitted by the marine mammal. The waveform is reduced in amplitude and distorted due to propagation effects that are influenced by the bathymetry and environment. It is important to account for these effects to determine a site-specific probability of detection for marine mammal calls in a given study area. A knowledge of that probability function over a range of environmental and ocean noise conditions allows vocalization statistics from recordings of single, fixed, omnidirectional sensors to be compared across sensors and at the same sensor over time with less bias and uncertainty in the results than direct comparison of the raw statistics. This dissertation focuses on both the development of new tools needed to automatically detect humpback whale vocalizations from single-fixed omnidirectional sensors as well as the determination of the site-specific probability of detection for monitoring sites off the coast of California. Using these tools, detected humpback calls are "calibrated" for environmental properties using the site-specific probability of detection values, and presented as call densities (calls per square kilometer per time). A two-year monitoring effort using these calibrated call densities reveals important biological and ecological information on migrating humpback whales off the coast of California. Call density trends are compared between the monitoring sites and at the same monitoring site over time. Call densities also are compared to several natural and human-influenced variables including season, time of day, lunar illumination, and ocean noise. The results reveal substantial differences in call densities

  12. Acoustic detection of Oryctes rhinoceros (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Dynastinae) and Nasutitermes luzonicus (Isoptera: Termitidae) in palm trees of urban Guam

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adult and larval Oryctes rhinoceros (L) (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Dynastinae) were acoustically detected in live and dead palm trees and logs in recently invaded areas of Guam, along with Nasutitermes (Isoptera: Termitidae), and other small, sound-producing invertebrates and invertebrates. The sou...

  13. AE (Acoustic Emission) for Flip-Chip CGA/FCBGA Defect Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghaffarian, Reza

    2014-01-01

    C-mode scanning acoustic microscopy (C-SAM) is a nondestructive inspection technique that uses ultrasound to show the internal feature of a specimen. A very high or ultra-high-frequency ultrasound passes through a specimen to produce a visible acoustic microimage (AMI) of its inner features. As ultrasound travels into a specimen, the wave is absorbed, scattered or reflected. The response is highly sensitive to the elastic properties of the materials and is especially sensitive to air gaps. This specific characteristic makes AMI the preferred method for finding "air gaps" such as delamination, cracks, voids, and porosity. C-SAM analysis, which is a type of AMI, was widely used in the past for evaluation of plastic microelectronic circuits, especially for detecting delamination of direct die bonding. With the introduction of the flip-chip die attachment in a package; its use has been expanded to nondestructive characterization of the flip-chip solder bumps and underfill. Figure 1.1 compares visual and C-SAM inspection approaches for defect detection, especially for solder joint interconnections and hidden defects. C-SAM is specifically useful for package features like internal cracks and delamination. C-SAM not only allows for the visualization of the interior features, it has the ability to produce images on layer-by-layer basis. Visual inspection; however, is only superior to C-SAM for the exposed features including solder dewetting, microcracks, and contamination. Ideally, a combination of various inspection techniques - visual, optical and SEM microscopy, C-SAM, and X-ray - need to be performed in order to assure quality at part, package, and system levels. This reports presents evaluations performed on various advanced packages/assemblies, especially the flip-chip die version of ball grid array/column grid array (BGA/CGA) using C-SAM equipment. Both external and internal equipment was used for evaluation. The outside facility provided images of the key features

  14. Detection of third-hand smoke on clothing fibers with a surface acoustic wave gas sensor.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chi-Yung; Huang, Shih-Shen; Yang, Chia-Min; Tang, Kea-Tiong; Yao, Da-Jeng

    2016-01-01

    Third-hand smoke (THS) is a new cigarette-related issue defined as the residual contamination from cigarette smoke after a cigarette is extinguished. To detect THS on three commonly used clothing fibers-wool, cotton, and polyester, we applied two methods to measure the adsorption of THS: one was the gain of mass with an analytical balance after exposure to cigarette smoke; and the other was to detect the THS chemical compounds such as nicotine and 3-ethenylpyridine with a surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor composed of coated oxidized hollow mesoporous carbon nanospheres. In the mass measurement, the gain of mass decreased in the order wool, cotton, and polyester; the latter gain was about one tenth that of wool. In the SAW detection, the frequency shift decreased in the same order-wool, cotton, and polyester. The residence period of THS on natural fiber (wool and cotton) is greater than on synthetic polyester fiber. These two tests provide quantitative results of THS on varied clothing fibers, to assess their risk after exposure to cigarette smoke.

  15. Automatic Detection of Swallowing Events by Acoustical Means for Applications of Monitoring of Ingestive Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Sazonov, Edward S.; Makeyev, Oleksandr; Schuckers, Stephanie; Lopez-Meyer, Paulo; Melanson, Edward L.; Neuman, Michael R.

    2010-01-01

    Our understanding of etiology of obesity and overweight is incomplete due to lack of objective and accurate methods for Monitoring of Ingestive Behavior (MIB) in the free living population. Our research has shown that frequency of swallowing may serve as a predictor for detecting food intake, differentiating liquids and solids, and estimating ingested mass. This paper proposes and compares two methods of acoustical swallowing detection from sounds contaminated by motion artifacts, speech and external noise. Methods based on mel-scale Fourier spectrum, wavelet packets, and support vector machines are studied considering the effects of epoch size, level of decomposition and lagging on classification accuracy. The methodology was tested on a large dataset (64.5 hours with a total of 9,966 swallows) collected from 20 human subjects with various degrees of adiposity. Average weighted epoch recognition accuracy for intra-visit individual models was 96.8% which resulted in 84.7% average weighted accuracy in detection of swallowing events. These results suggest high efficiency of the proposed methodology in separation of swallowing sounds from artifacts that originate from respiration, intrinsic speech, head movements, food ingestion, and ambient noise. The recognition accuracy was not related to body mass index, suggesting that the methodology is suitable for obese individuals. PMID:19789095

  16. Defect-detection algorithm for noncontact acoustic inspection using spectrum entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, Kazuko; Akamatsu, Ryo; Sugimoto, Tsuneyoshi; Utagawa, Noriyuki; Kuroda, Chitose; Katakura, Kageyoshi

    2015-07-01

    In recent years, the detachment of concrete from bridges or tunnels and the degradation of concrete structures have become serious social problems. The importance of inspection, repair, and updating is recognized in measures against degradation. We have so far studied the noncontact acoustic inspection method using airborne sound and the laser Doppler vibrometer. In this method, depending on the surface state (reflectance, dirt, etc.), the quantity of the light of the returning laser decreases and optical noise resulting from the leakage of light reception arises. Some influencing factors are the stability of the output of the laser Doppler vibrometer, the low reflective characteristic of the measurement surface, the diffused reflection characteristic, measurement distance, and laser irradiation angle. If defect detection depends only on the vibration energy ratio since the frequency characteristic of the optical noise resembles white noise, the detection of optical noise resulting from the leakage of light reception may indicate a defective part. Therefore, in this work, the combination of the vibrational energy ratio and spectrum entropy is used to judge whether a measured point is healthy or defective or an abnormal measurement point. An algorithm that enables more vivid detection of a defective part is proposed. When our technique was applied in an experiment with real concrete structures, the defective part could be extracted more vividly and the validity of our proposed algorithm was confirmed.

  17. Application of gas-coupled laser acoustic detection to gelatins and underwater sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Caron, James N.; Kunapareddy, Pratima

    2014-02-18

    Gas-coupled Laser Acoustic Detection (GCLAD) has been used as a method to sense ultrasound waves in materials without contact of the material surface. To sense the waveform, a laser beam is directed parallel to the material surface and displaced or deflected when the radiated waveform traverses the beam. We present recent tests that demonstrate the potential of using this technique for detecting ultrasound in gelatin phantoms and in water. As opposed to interferometric detection, GCLAD operates independently of the optical surface properties of the material. This allows the technique to be used in cases where the material is transparent or semi-transparent. We present results on sensing ultrasound in gelatin phantoms that are used to mimic biological materials. As with air-coupled transducers, the frequency response of GCLAD at high frequencies is limited by the high attenuation of ultrasound in air. In contrast, water has a much lower attenuation. Here we demonstrate the use of a GCLAD-like system in water, measuring the directivity response at 1 MHz and sensing waveforms with higher frequency content.

  18. Line-focusing electromagnetic acoustic transducers for the detection of slit defects.

    PubMed

    Ogi, H; Hirao, M; Ohtani, T

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the design principles of a line-focusing electromagnetic acoustic transducer (LF-EMAT) and the results of a feasibility test for detecting slit-type defects in metals. The LF-EMAT excites shear vertical (SV) elastic waves and focuses them to a line in a metal body. It consists of a permanent magnet block and a meanderline coil, whose spacing is continuously varied so that the excited SV waves become coherent on a focal line after traveling oblique paths. The measured directivity of generation and reception show a sharp peak at the designed focal line. The LF-EMATs are then applied to detecting slit defects in the bottom surface of steel blocks, on which the focal lines are located. Portions of the scattered defect signals are received by the same EMAT. When operated at 4 MHz, the LF-EMATs are capable of detecting slits deeper than 0.05 mm. The sensitivity decreases with liftoff and the LF-EMATs are usable with liftoff up to 0.6 mm. PMID:18238430

  19. Standoff photoacoustic detections with high-sensitivity microphones and acoustic arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choa, Fow-Sen; Wang, Chen-Chia; Khurgin, Jacob; Samuels, Alan; Trivedi, Sudhir; Gupta, Deepa

    2016-05-01

    Standoff detection of dangerous chemicals like explosives, nerve gases, and harmful aerosols has continuously been an important subject due to the serious concern about terrorist threats to both overseas and homeland lives and facility. Compared with other currently available standoff optical detection techniques, like Raman, photo-thermal, laser induced breakdown spectroscopy,...etc., photoacoustic (PA) sensing has the advantages of background free and very high detection sensitivity, no need of back reflection surfaces, and 1/R instead of 1/R2 signal decay distance dependence. Furthermore, there is still a great room for PA sensitivity improvement by using different PA techniques, including lockin amplifier, employing new microphones, and microphone array techniques. Recently, we have demonstrated standoff PA detection of isopropanol vapor, solid phase TNT and RDX at a standoff distance. To further calibrate the detection sensitivity, we use nerve gas simulants that were generated and calibrated by a commercial vapor generator. For field operations, array of microphones and microphone-reflector pairs can be utilized to achieve noise rejection and signal enhancement. We have experimentally demonstrated signal enhancement and noise reduction using an array of 4 microphone/4 reflector system as well as an array of 16-microphone/1 reflector. In this work we will review and compare different standoff techniques and discuss the advantages of using different photoacoustic techniques. We will also discuss new advancement of using new types of microphone and the performance comparison of using different structure of microphone arrays and combining lock-in amplifier with acoustic arrays. Demonstration of out-door real-time operations with high power mid-IR laser and microphone array will be presented.

  20. PREFACE: ARENA 2006—Acoustic and Radio EeV Neutrino detection Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Lee

    2007-06-01

    The International Conference on Acoustic and Radio EeV Neutrino Activities, ARENA 2006 was jointly hosted by the Universities of Northumbria and Sheffield at the City of Newcastle Campus of the University of Northumbria in June 2006. ARENA 2006 was the latest in a series of meetings which have addressed, either separately or jointly, the use of radio and acoustic sensors for the detection of highly relativistic particles. Previous successful meetings have taken place in Los Angeles (RADHEP, 2000), Stanford (2003) and DESY Zeuthen (ARENA 2005). A total of 50 scientists from across Europe, the US and Japan attended the conference presenting status reports and results from a number of projects and initiatives spread as far afield as the Sweden and the South Pole. The talks presented at the meeting and the proceedings contained herein represent a `snapshot' of the status of the fields of acoustic and radio detection at the time of the conference. The three day meeting also included two invited talks by Dr Paula Chadwick and Dr Johannes Knapp who gave excellent summaries of the related astroparticle physics fields of high energy gamma ray detection and high energy cosmic ray detection respectively. As well as a full academic agenda there were social events including a Medieval themed conference banquet at Lumley Castle and a civic reception kindly provided by the Lord Mayor of Newcastle and hosted at the Mansion House. Thanks must go to the International Advisory Board members for their input and guidance, the Local Organising Committee for their hard work in bringing everything together and finally the delegates for the stimulating, enthusiastic and enjoyable spirit in which ARENA 2006 took place. Lee Thompson

    International Advisory Board

    G. Anton, ErlangenD. Besson, Kansas
    J. Blümer, KarlsruheA. Capone, Rome
    H. Falcke, BonnP. Gorham, Hawaii
    G. Gratta

    1. Pipe wall damage detection by electromagnetic acoustic transducer generated guided waves in absence of defect signals.

      PubMed

      Vasiljevic, Milos; Kundu, Tribikram; Grill, Wolfgang; Twerdowski, Evgeny

      2008-05-01

      Most investigators emphasize the importance of detecting the reflected signal from the defect to determine if the pipe wall has any damage and to predict the damage location. However, often the small signal from the defect is hidden behind the other arriving wave modes and signal noise. To overcome the difficulties associated with the identification of the small defect signal in the time history plots, in this paper the time history is analyzed well after the arrival of the first defect signal, and after different wave modes have propagated multiple times through the pipe. It is shown that the defective pipe can be clearly identified by analyzing these late arriving diffuse ultrasonic signals. Multiple reflections and scattering of the propagating wave modes by the defect and pipe ends do not hamper the defect detection capability; on the contrary, it apparently stabilizes the signal and makes it easier to distinguish the defective pipe from the defect-free pipe. This paper also highlights difficulties associated with the interpretation of the recorded time histories due to mode conversion by the defect. The design of electro-magnetic acoustic transducers used to generate and receive the guided waves in the pipe is briefly described in the paper.

    2. Detecting leaks in gas-filled pressure vessels using acoustic resonances.

      PubMed

      Gillis, K A; Moldover, M R; Mehl, J B

      2016-05-01

      We demonstrate that a leak from a large, unthermostatted pressure vessel into ambient air can be detected an order of magnitude more effectively by measuring the time dependence of the ratio p/f(2) than by measuring the ratio p/T. Here f is the resonance frequency of an acoustic mode of the gas inside the pressure vessel, p is the pressure of the gas, and T is the kelvin temperature measured at one point in the gas. In general, the resonance frequencies are determined by a mode-dependent, weighted average of the square of the speed-of-sound throughout the volume of the gas. However, the weighting usually has a weak dependence on likely temperature gradients in the gas inside a large pressure vessel. Using the ratio p/f(2), we measured a gas leak (dM/dt)/M ≈ - 1.3 × 10(-5) h(-1) = - 0.11 yr(-1) from a 300-liter pressure vessel filled with argon at 450 kPa that was exposed to sunshine-driven temperature and pressure fluctuations as large as (dT/dt)/T ≈ (dp/dt)/p ≈ 5 × 10(-2) h(-1) using a 24-hour data record. This leak could not be detected in a 72-hour record of p/T. (Here M is the mass of the gas in the vessel and t is the time.).

    3. Detecting leaks in gas-filled pressure vessels using acoustic resonances

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Gillis, K. A.; Moldover, M. R.; Mehl, J. B.

      2016-05-01

      We demonstrate that a leak from a large, unthermostatted pressure vessel into ambient air can be detected an order of magnitude more effectively by measuring the time dependence of the ratio p/f2 than by measuring the ratio p/T. Here f is the resonance frequency of an acoustic mode of the gas inside the pressure vessel, p is the pressure of the gas, and T is the kelvin temperature measured at one point in the gas. In general, the resonance frequencies are determined by a mode-dependent, weighted average of the square of the speed-of-sound throughout the volume of the gas. However, the weighting usually has a weak dependence on likely temperature gradients in the gas inside a large pressure vessel. Using the ratio p/f2, we measured a gas leak (dM/dt)/M ≈ - 1.3 × 10-5 h-1 = - 0.11 yr-1 from a 300-liter pressure vessel filled with argon at 450 kPa that was exposed to sunshine-driven temperature and pressure fluctuations as large as (dT/dt)/T ≈ (dp/dt)/p ≈ 5 × 10-2 h-1 using a 24-hour data record. This leak could not be detected in a 72-hour record of p/T. (Here M is the mass of the gas in the vessel and t is the time.)

    4. Influence of the vibro-acoustic sensor position on cavitation detection in a Kaplan turbine

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Schmidt, H.; Kirschner, O.; Riedelbauch, S.; Necker, J.; Kopf, E.; Rieg, M.; Arantes, G.; Wessiak, M.; Mayrhuber, J.

      2014-03-01

      Hydraulic turbines can be operated close to the limits of the operating range to meet the demand of the grid. When operated close to the limits, the risk increases that cavitation phenomena may occur at the runner and / or at the guide vanes of the turbine. Cavitation in a hydraulic turbine can cause material erosion on the runner and other turbine parts and reduce the durability of the machine leading to required outage time and related repair costs. Therefore it is important to get reliable information about the appearance of cavitation during prototype operation. In this experimental investigation the high frequency acoustic emissions and vibrations were measured at 20 operating points with different cavitation behaviour at different positions in a large prototype Kaplan turbine. The main goal was a comparison of the measured signals at different sensor positions to identify the sensitivity of the location for cavitation detection. The measured signals were analysed statistically and specific values were derived. Based on the measured signals, it is possible to confirm the cavitation limit of the examined turbine. The result of the investigation shows that the position of the sensors has a significant influence on the detection of cavitation.

    5. Detection of Cracking Levels in Brittle Rocks by Parametric Analysis of the Acoustic Emission Signals

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Moradian, Zabihallah; Einstein, Herbert H.; Ballivy, Gerard

      2016-03-01

      Determination of the cracking levels during the crack propagation is one of the key challenges in the field of fracture mechanics of rocks. Acoustic emission (AE) is a technique that has been used to detect cracks as they occur across the specimen. Parametric analysis of AE signals and correlating these parameters (e.g., hits and energy) to stress-strain plots of rocks let us detect cracking levels properly. The number of AE hits is related to the number of cracks, and the AE energy is related to magnitude of the cracking event. For a full understanding of the fracture process in brittle rocks, prismatic specimens of granite containing pre-existing flaws have been tested in uniaxial compression tests, and their cracking process was monitored with both AE and high-speed video imaging. In this paper, the characteristics of the AE parameters and the evolution of cracking sequences are analyzed for every cracking level. Based on micro- and macro-crack damage, a classification of cracking levels is introduced. This classification contains eight stages (1) crack closure, (2) linear elastic deformation, (3) micro-crack initiation (white patch initiation), (4) micro-crack growth (stable crack growth), (5) micro-crack coalescence (macro-crack initiation), (6) macro-crack growth (unstable crack growth), (7) macro-crack coalescence and (8) failure.

    6. A surface acoustic wave sensor functionalized with a polypyrrole molecularly imprinted polymer for selective dopamine detection.

      PubMed

      Maouche, Naima; Ktari, Nadia; Bakas, Idriss; Fourati, Najla; Zerrouki, Chouki; Seydou, Mahamadou; Maurel, François; Chehimi, Mohammed Mehdi

      2015-11-01

      A surface acoustic wave sensor operating at 104 MHz and functionalized with a polypyrrole molecularly imprinted polymer has been designed for selective detection of dopamine (DA). Optimization of pyrrole/DA ratio, polymerization and immersion times permitted to obtain a highly selective sensor, which has a sensitivity of 0.55°/mM (≈ 550 Hz/mM) and a detection limit of ≈ 10 nM. Morphology and related roughness parameters of molecularly imprinted polymer surfaces, before and after extraction of DA, as well as that of the non imprinted polymer were characterized by atomic force microscopy. The developed chemosensor selectively recognized dopamine over the structurally similar compound 4-hydroxyphenethylamine (referred as tyramine), or ascorbic acid,which co-exists with DA in body fluids at a much higher concentration. Selectivity tests were also carried out with dihydroxybenzene, for which an unexpected phase variation of order of 75% of the DA one was observed. Quantum chemical calculations, based on the density functional theory, were carried out to determine the nature of interactions between each analyte and the PPy matrix and the DA imprinted PPy polypyrrole sensing layer in order to account for the important phase variation observed during dihydroxybenzene injection. PMID:26095144

    7. Detecting leaks in gas-filled pressure vessels using acoustic resonances.

      PubMed

      Gillis, K A; Moldover, M R; Mehl, J B

      2016-05-01

      We demonstrate that a leak from a large, unthermostatted pressure vessel into ambient air can be detected an order of magnitude more effectively by measuring the time dependence of the ratio p/f(2) than by measuring the ratio p/T. Here f is the resonance frequency of an acoustic mode of the gas inside the pressure vessel, p is the pressure of the gas, and T is the kelvin temperature measured at one point in the gas. In general, the resonance frequencies are determined by a mode-dependent, weighted average of the square of the speed-of-sound throughout the volume of the gas. However, the weighting usually has a weak dependence on likely temperature gradients in the gas inside a large pressure vessel. Using the ratio p/f(2), we measured a gas leak (dM/dt)/M ≈ - 1.3 × 10(-5) h(-1) = - 0.11 yr(-1) from a 300-liter pressure vessel filled with argon at 450 kPa that was exposed to sunshine-driven temperature and pressure fluctuations as large as (dT/dt)/T ≈ (dp/dt)/p ≈ 5 × 10(-2) h(-1) using a 24-hour data record. This leak could not be detected in a 72-hour record of p/T. (Here M is the mass of the gas in the vessel and t is the time.). PMID:27250456

    8. Wear detection by means of wavelet-based acoustic emission analysis

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Baccar, D.; Söffker, D.

      2015-08-01

      Wear detection and monitoring during operation are complex and difficult tasks especially for materials under sliding conditions. Due to the permanent contact and repetitive motion, the material surface remains during tests non-accessible for optical inspection so that attrition of the contact partners cannot be easily detected. This paper introduces the relevant scientific components of reliable and efficient condition monitoring system for online detection and automated classification of wear phenomena by means of acoustic emission (AE) and advanced signal processing approaches. The related experiments were performed using a tribological system consisting of two martensitic plates, sliding against each other. High sensitive piezoelectric transducer was used to provide the continuous measurement of AE signals. The recorded AE signals were analyzed mainly by time-frequency analysis. A feature extraction module using a novel combination of Short-Time Fourier Transform (STFT) and Continuous Wavelet Transform (CWT) were used for the first time. A detailed correlation analysis between complex signal characteristics and the surface damage resulting from contact fatigue was investigated. Three wear process stages were detected and could be distinguished. To obtain quantitative and detailed information about different wear phases, the AE energy was calculated using STFT and decomposed into a suitable number of frequency levels. The individual energy distribution and the cumulative AE energy of each frequency components were analyzed using CWT. Results show that the behavior of individual frequency component changes when the wear state changes. Here, specific frequency ranges are attributed to the different wear states. The study reveals that the application of the STFT-/CWT-based AE analysis is an appropriate approach to distinguish and to interpret the different damage states occurred during sliding contact. Based on this results a new generation of condition monitoring

    9. Plate acoustic wave sensor for detection of small amounts of bacterial cells in micro-litre liquid samples.

      PubMed

      Anisimkin, V I; Kuznetsova, I Е; Kolesov, V V; Pyataikin, I I; Sorokin, V V; Skladnev, D A

      2015-09-01

      Ultrasonic acoustic waves propagating in thin piezoelectric plates with free faces are used for bacteria detection in micro-litre liquid samples deposited on one of the plate surface. The limits of the detection at normal conditions are as low as 0.04% for highly diluted rich cultural Luria-Bertani broth (LB-media) in distillate water, 0.07% for bacterial cells in distillate water, and 0.6% for bacterial cells in LB-media. For all analytes the most probable detection mechanism is the change in liquid conductivity. Because of no using any sorbent film the long-term stability of the detection is expected as very high.

    10. Study on the Sensitivity of Landmine Electrical Fuse Circuit Under the Interference of Natural Electromagnetic Pulse

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Qin, Dechun

      Landmine electrical fuse circuits on the battlefield will be interfered by natural electromagnetic pulse such as electrostatic discharge and lightning, which will undermine the circuit performance and trigger the early burst or mistaken burst of the landmines. In this paper, numerically simulation analysis is conducted on the electrostatic and lightning effects received by the landmine fuse circuit by means of building simulation model of the fuse circuit and analyzing the electric and magnetic field changes of the observation The mechanism of the influence of electrostatic discharge and lightning on the sensitivity of the fuse circuit is explored. The conclusion is that electrostatic effect cause the mistaken burst of the landmines by enabling the interference voltage to reach the components turn-on threshold and cause the circuit malfunction, and lighting effect by long period accumulation of energy.

    11. Mental health survey among landmine survivors in Siem Reap province, Cambodia.

      PubMed

      Lopes Cardozo, Barbara; Blanton, Curtis; Zalewski, Tami; Tor, Svang; McDonald, Laura; Lavelle, James; Brooks, Robert; Anderson, Mark; Mollica, Richard

      2012-01-01

      Many survivors of the Khmer Rouge period in Cambodia and the subsequent war with Vietnam have now returned to Cambodia. In this two-stage household cluster survey in Siem Reap Province in Cambodia, we explored the mental health consequences on 166 landmine injury survivors selected from 1000 household in 50 clusters and an oversample of all landmine survivors. We found a prevalence of anxiety of 62% for all respondents, 74% for depression, and 34% for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). These prevalences were statistically significantly higher than among the adult population who had not been injured by landmines. These data underscore the importance of providing mental health care services for the people in Siem Reap Province in Cambodia who have been injured by landmines. PMID:22873010

    12. Detections of Acoustic-Tagged Green Sturgeon in Baker Bay on the Lower Columbia River during September - November 2008

      USGS Publications Warehouse

      Parsley, Michael J.

      2009-01-01

      Acoustic transmitters implanted in green sturgeon (Acipenser medirostris) captured in rivers in California were detected by acoustic receivers deployed within and around Baker Bay. The receivers were deployed at eight locations in the Bay and adjacent navigation channels of the Lower Columbia River during a period of anticipated channel dredging. Three of the transmitters detected were confirmed to have been implanted into green sturgeon in previous years; two were from the Sacramento River and one was from the Klamath River. The transmitters (fish) were within detection range of the receivers for only a short period, which is consistent with findings of earlier studies that green sturgeon make rapid and extensive intra-estuary movements.

    13. A new sparse design method on phased array-based acoustic emission sensor for partial discharge detection

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Xie, Qing; Cheng, Shuyi; Lü, Fangcheng; Li, Yanqing

      2014-03-01

      The acoustic detecting performance of a partial discharge (PD) ultrasonic sensor array can be improved by increasing the number of array elements. However, it will increase the complexity and cost of the PD detection system. Therefore, a sparse sensor with an optimization design can be chosen to ensure good acoustic performance. In this paper, first, a quantitative method is proposed for evaluating the acoustic performance of a square PD ultrasonic array sensor. Second, a method of sparse design is presented to combine the evaluation method with the chaotic monkey algorithm. Third, an optimal sparse structure of a 3 × 3 square PD ultrasonic array sensor is deduced. It is found that, under different sparseness and sparse structure, the main beam width of the directivity function shows a small variation, while the sidelobe amplitude shows a bigger variation. For a specific sparseness, the acoustic performance under the optimal sparse structure is close to that using a full array. Finally, some simulations based on the above method show that, for certain sparseness, the sensor with the optimal sparse structure exhibits superior positioning accuracy compared to that with a stochastic one. The sensor array structure may be chosen according to the actual requirements for an actual engineering application.

    14. Photo-acoustic excitation and detection of guided ultrasonic waves in bone samples covered by a soft coating layer

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Zhao, Zuomin; Moilanen, Petro; Karppinen, Pasi; Määttä, Mikko; Karppinen, Timo; Hæggström, Edward; Timonen, Jussi; Myllylä, Risto

      2012-12-01

      Photo-acoustic (PA) excitation was combined with skeletal quantitative ultrasound (QUS) for multi-mode ultrasonic assessment of human long bones. This approach permits tailoring of the ultrasonic excitation and detection so as to efficiently detect the fundamental flexural guided wave (FFGW) through a coating of soft tissue. FFGW is a clinically relevant indicator of cortical thickness. An OPO laser with tunable optical wavelength, was used to excite a photo-acoustic source in the shaft of a porcine femur. Ultrasonic signals were detected by a piezoelectric transducer, scanning along the long axis of the bone, 20-50 mm away from the source. Five femurs were measured without and with a soft coating. The coating was made of an aqueous gelatin-intralipid suspension that optically and acoustically mimicked real soft tissue. An even coating thickness was ensured by using a specific mold. The optical wave length of the source (1250 nm) was tuned to maximize the amplitude of FFGW excitation at 50 kHz frequency. The experimentally determined FFGW phase velocity in the uncoated samples was consistent with that of the fundamental antisymmetric Lamb mode (A0). Using appropriate signal processing, FFGW was also identified in the coated bone samples, this time with a phase velocity consistent with that theoretically predicted for the first mode of a fluid-solid bilayer waveguide (BL1). Our results suggest that photo-acoustic quantitative ultrasound enables assessment of the thickness-sensitive FFGW in bone through a layer of soft tissue. Photo-acoustic characterization of the cortical bone thickness may thus become possible.

    15. Selective detection of elemental mercury vapor using a surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor.

      PubMed

      Kabir, K M Mohibul; Sabri, Ylias M; Matthews, Glenn I; Jones, Lathe A; Ippolito, Samuel J; Bhargava, Suresh K

      2015-08-21

      The detection of elemental mercury (Hg(0)) within industrial processes is extremely important as it is the first major step in ensuring the efficient operation of implemented mercury removal technologies. In this study, a 131 MHz surface acoustic wave (SAW) delay line sensor with gold electrodes was tested towards Hg(0) vapor (24 to 365 ppbv) with/without the presence of ammonia (NH3) and humidity (H2O), as well as volatile organic compounds (VOCs) such as acetaldehyde (MeCHO), ethylmercaptan (EM), dimethyl disulfide (DMDS) and methyl ethyl ketone (MEK), which are all common interfering gas species that co-exist in many industrial applications requiring mercury monitoring. The developed sensor exhibited a detection limit of 0.7 ppbv and 4.85 ppbv at 35 and 55 °C, respectively. Furthermore, a repeatability of 97% and selectivity of 92% in the presence of contaminant gases was exhibited by the sensor at the chosen operating temperature of 55 °C. The response magnitude of the developed SAW sensor towards different concentrations of Hg(0) vapor fitted well with the Langmuir extension isotherm (otherwise known as loading ratio correlation (LRC)) which is in agreement with our basic finite element method (FEM) work where an LRC isotherm was observed for a simplified model of the SAW sensor responding to different Hg contents deposited on the Au based electrodes. Overall, the results indicate that the developed SAW sensor can be a potential solution for online selective detection of low concentrations of Hg(0) vapor found in industrial stack effluents.

    16. Acoustically detected year-round presence of right whales in an urbanized migration corridor.

      PubMed

      Morano, Janelle L; Rice, Aaron N; Tielens, Jamey T; Estabrook, Bobbi J; Murray, Anita; Roberts, Bethany L; Clark, Christopher W

      2012-08-01

      Species' conservation relies on understanding their seasonal habitats and migration routes. North Atlantic right whales (Eubalaena glacialis), listed as endangered under the U.S. Endangered Species Act, migrate from the southeastern U.S. coast to Cape Cod Bay, Massachusetts, a federally designated critical habitat, from February through May to feed. The whales then continue north across the Gulf of Maine to northern waters (e.g., Bay of Fundy). To enter Cape Cod Bay, right whales must traverse an area of dense shipping and fishing activity in Massachusetts Bay, where there are no mandatory regulations for the protection of right whales or management of their habitat. We used passive acoustic recordings of right whales collected in Massachusetts Bay from May 2007 through October 2010 to determine the annual spatial and temporal distribution of the whales and their calling activity. We detected right whales in the bay throughout the year, in contrast to results from visual surveys. Right whales were detected on at least 24% of days in each month, with the exception of June 2007, in which there were no detections. Averaged over all years, right whale calls were most abundant from February through May. During this period, calls were most frequent between 17:00 and 20:00 local time; no diel pattern was apparent in other months. The spatial distribution of the approximate locations of calling whales suggests they may use Massachusetts Bay as a conduit to Cape Cod Bay in the spring and as they move between the Gulf of Maine and waters to the south in September through December. Although it is unclear how dependent right whales are on the bay, the discovery of their widespread presence in Massachusetts Bay throughout the year suggests this region may need to be managed to reduce the probability of collisions with ships and entanglement in fishing gear.

    17. Portable robotic platform for handheld landmine detection system

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Herman, Herman; McMahill, Jeffrey

      2004-09-01

      To support the development of advanced algorithms for hand-held detectors, it is desirable to collect data with a specific sweep rate, height and spacing. In addition, it is also important that the position of each data point produced by the detector is known. Since it is impossible for a human operator to precisely control these sweep parameters, we have developed a semi-autonomous robotic data collection system. It is designed as a portable robot with a 2-axis manipulator that can be used to sweep any hand-held detector at a precise sweep rate, height, and spacing. It is also equipped with an interface to the hand-held detector, so it can log the output data during the sweeping motion. It also tags the output data with the position data from the on-board positioning system. As a result, we can construct an accurate 2-D or 3-D grid of the detector's output as a function of horizontal and vertical position of the detector. The manipulator is also equipped with force sensing capability that can be used to sense terrain height or collision. To increase deployment flexibility, all functions of the robot are controlled through a wireless communication link by a hand-held computer with a maximum operating distance of at least 100m. Through the hand-held computer, the operator can move the robot, and program its behavior using a script based motion sequencer. The robot has been deployed successfully on several data acquisition activities, and successfully produced high-resolution 2-D map of the buried targets.

    18. Nonlinear detection of land mines using wide bandwidth time-reversal techniques

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Sutin, Alexander; Libbey, Brad; Kurtenoks, Victor; Fenneman, Douglas; Sarvazyan, Armen

      2006-05-01

      Time reversal acoustic (TRA) focusing allows concentration of elastic energy at a location in the soil being investigated to detect landmines. The TRA process is conducted by broadcasting a wide bandwidth signal and recording the surface vibration by a Laser Doppler Vibrometer (LDV). The system impulse response from speaker to the LDV output can then be computed by cross correlating the original and recorded signals for each channel. Each transducer re-radiates the time reversal impulse response. This provides efficient focusing of the seismic wave in both space and time, thus enhancing the nonlinear effects associated with soil and landmine vibrations. Using orthogonal initial signals the suggested TRA procedure can be implemented simultaneously with multiple transmitters to increase the scanning speed. The nonlinear effects were investigated using a phase inversion method where the TRA signal is broadcast a second time with an opposite sign and the two received signals are added in post processing. The summed signal contains mainly the results of nonlinear wave interaction and tends to cancel the linear response. Small scale land mine detection experiments were conducted using a laser Doppler vibrometer and an array of speakers in the frequency band 50-500Hz. They demonstrate that the TRA system provides high concentration of elastic wave energy in the tested area. The measurements of spectral density of the TRA focused signal reveal increased spectral density in the vicinity of mine resonance frequencies. The nonlinear TRA phase inversion method shows higher contrast between mine and no mine than the linear TRA method.

    19. Online Damage Detection on Metal and Composite Space Structures by Active and Passive Acoustic Methods

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Scheerer, M.; Cardone, T.; Rapisarda, A.; Ottaviano, S.; Ftancesconi, D.

      2012-07-01

      In the frame of ESA funded programme Future Launcher Preparatory Programme Period 1 “Preparatory Activities on M&S”, Aerospace & Advanced Composites and Thales Alenia Space-Italia, have conceived and tested a structural health monitoring approach based on integrated Acoustic Emission - Active Ultrasound Damage Identification. The monitoring methods implemented in the study are both passive and active methods and the purpose is to cover large areas with a sufficient damage size detection capability. Two representative space sub-structures have been built and tested: a composite overwrapped pressure vessel (COPV) and a curved, stiffened Al-Li panel. In each structure, typical critical damages have been introduced: delaminations caused by impacts in the COPV and a crack in the stiffener of the Al-Li panel which was grown during a fatigue test campaign. The location and severity of both types of damages have been successfully assessed online using two commercially available systems: one 6 channel AE system from Vallen and one 64 channel AU system from Acellent.

    20. Finite element method analysis of surface acoustic wave devices with microcavities for detection of liquids

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Senveli, Sukru U.; Tigli, Onur

      2013-12-01

      This paper introduces the use of finite element method analysis tools to investigate the use of a Rayleigh type surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor to interrogate minute amounts of liquids trapped in microcavities placed on the delay line. Launched surface waves in the ST-X quartz substrate couple to the liquid and emit compressional waves. These waves form a resonant cavity condition and interfere with the surface waves in the substrate. Simulations show that the platform operates in a different mechanism than the conventional mass loading of SAW devices. Based on the proposed detection mechanism, it is able to distinguish between variations of 40% and 90% glycerin based on phase relations while using liquid volumes smaller than 10 pl. Results from shallow microcavities show high correlation with sound velocity parameter of the liquid whereas deeper microcavities display high sensitivities with respect to glycerin concentration. Simulated devices yield a maximum sensitivity of -0.77°/(% glycerin) for 16 μm wavelength operation with 8 μm deep, 24 μm wide, and 24 μm long microcavities.

    1. Biological investigation using a shear horizontal surface acoustic wave sensor: small "click generated" DNA hybridization detection.

      PubMed

      Zerrouki, Chouki; Fourati, Najla; Lucas, Romain; Vergnaud, Julien; Fougnion, Jean-Marie; Zerrouki, Rachida; Pernelle, Christine

      2010-12-15

      We have used a 104 MHz lithium tantalate (LiTaO(3)) surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor to investigate DNA probes grafting and their further hybridization with natural and click generated (Cg-DNA) oligonucleotides. Natural DNA targets of different strand lengths, tosyl-di(tri, tetra) thymidine and azido-di(tri, tetra) thymidine oligonucleotides were tested. In our case, and besides the follow-up of a 34mer DNA hybridization, we detected complementarity between natural DNA probes and azido-tetra-thymidine for the first time, whereas previous hybridization studies reported a minimal of 10-mer oligonucleotides recognition length. We also demonstrated that contrarily to natural DNA, the synthesized oligonucleotides present stable bonds with complementary DNA strands. Frequency responses of both grafting and hybridization have shown the same shape: an exponential decay with different time constants, (187±1)s and (68±19) s for grafting and hybridization respectively. We have also shown that recognition between DNA strands and tetranucleotide analogues is comparable to natural 34mer DNA bases and presents the same time constant within uncertainties.

    2. Acoustic characteristics of voluntary expiratory sounds after swallow for detecting dysphagia.

      PubMed

      Yamashita, M; Yokoyama, K; Takei, Y; Furuya, N; Nakamichi, Y; Ihara, Y; Takahashi, K; Groher, M E

      2014-09-01

      This research was designed to investigate the acoustic characteristics of voluntary expiratory sounds after swallow for detecting dysphagia. Forty-nine patients with complaints of swallow difficulty received a videofluorographic (VF) examination. They were divided into three groups: nine who did not have any apparent disease (Group N), 22 patients with head and neck cancer (Group H&N) and 18 patients with other diseases including cerebrovascular disease (Group OD). After liquid barium swallows, they exhaled voluntarily without voicing. Videofluorographic findings were classified into four groups: normal (Normal), acceptable swallow (Acceptable), swallow with residue (Resid) and swallows with penetration or aspiration (Pen/Asp). The duration of expiratory sounds was measured on the time waveform. Frequency characteristics of expiratory sounds were obtained using one-third octave band analysis ranging from 62·5 to 2000·0 Hz of central frequency. The averaged level of the 1000·0-Hz band was chosen as the reference band level (RB level). The revised averaged level of each band was obtained by subtracting the RB level from the averaged level of each band. Zero decibel of the revised magnitude of the 125·0-Hz band was set as the critical value to differentiate dysphagia (Resid or Pen/Asp) from no dysphagia (Normal or Acceptable). Comparison of this assessment with VF findings showed a significant percentage agreement (85·4%). These results suggest that frequency characteristics of post-swallow expiratory sounds can differentiate dysphagia from no dysphagia among multiple dysphagic patient groups.

    3. A Detection of Baryon Acoustic Oscillations from the Distribution of Galaxy Clusters

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Hong, Tao; Han, J. L.; Wen, Z. L.

      2016-08-01

      We calculate the correlation function of 79,091 galaxy clusters in the redshift region of z≤slant 0.5, selected from the WH15 cluster catalog. With a weight of cluster mass, a significant baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) peak is detected on the correlation function with a significance of 3.7σ . By fitting the correlation function with a ΛCDM model curve, we find {D}v(z=0.331){r}d{fid}/{r}d=1261.5+/- 48 Mpc, which is consistent with the Planck 2015 cosmology. We find that the correlation function of the higher mass sub-sample shows a higher amplitude at small scales of r\\lt 80 {h}-1 {{Mpc}}, which is consistent with our previous result. The two-dimensional correlation function of this large sample of galaxy clusters shows a faint BAO ring with a significance of 1.8σ , from which we find that the distance scale parameters on directions across and along the line of sight are {α }σ =1.02+/- 0.06 and {α }π =0.94+/- 0.10, respectively.

    4. Acoustic emission detection with fiber optical sensors for dry cask storage health monitoring

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Lin, Bin; Bao, Jingjing; Yu, Lingyu; Giurgiutiu, Victor

      2016-04-01

      The increasing number, size, and complexity of nuclear facilities deployed worldwide are increasing the need to maintain readiness and develop innovative sensing materials to monitor important to safety structures (ITS). In the past two decades, an extensive sensor technology development has been used for structural health monitoring (SHM). Technologies for the diagnosis and prognosis of a nuclear system, such as dry cask storage system (DCSS), can improve verification of the health of the structure that can eventually reduce the likelihood of inadvertently failure of a component. Fiber optical sensors have emerged as one of the major SHM technologies developed particularly for temperature and strain measurements. This paper presents the development of optical equipment that is suitable for ultrasonic guided wave detection for active SHM in the MHz range. An experimental study of using fiber Bragg grating (FBG) as acoustic emission (AE) sensors was performed on steel blocks. FBG have the advantage of being durable, lightweight, and easily embeddable into composite structures as well as being immune to electromagnetic interference and optically multiplexed. The temperature effect on the FBG sensors was also studied. A multi-channel FBG system was developed and compared with piezoelectric based AE system. The paper ends with conclusions and suggestions for further work.

    5. Robust and reliable banknote authentification and print flaw detection with opto-acoustical sensor fusion methods

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Lohweg, Volker; Schaede, Johannes; Türke, Thomas

      2006-02-01

      The authenticity checking and inspection of bank notes is a high labour intensive process where traditionally every note on every sheet is inspected manually. However with the advent of more and more sophisticated security features, both visible and invisible, and the requirement of cost reduction in the printing process, it is clear that automation is required. As more and more print techniques and new security features will be established, total quality security, authenticity and bank note printing must be assured. Therefore, this factor necessitates amplification of a sensorial concept in general. We propose a concept for both authenticity checking and inspection methods for pattern recognition and classification for securities and banknotes, which is based on the concept of sensor fusion and fuzzy interpretation of data measures. In the approach different methods of authenticity analysis and print flaw detection are combined, which can be used for vending or sorting machines, as well as for printing machines. Usually only the existence or appearance of colours and their textures are checked by cameras. Our method combines the visible camera images with IR-spectral sensitive sensors, acoustical and other measurements like temperature and pressure of printing machines.

    6. Acoustic sensors using microstructures tunable with energy other than acoustic energy

      DOEpatents

      Datskos, Panagiotis G.

      2003-11-25

      A sensor for detecting acoustic energy includes a microstructure tuned to a predetermined acoustic frequency and a device for detecting movement of the microstructure. A display device is operatively linked to the movement detecting device. When acoustic energy strikes the acoustic sensor, acoustic energy having a predetermined frequency moves the microstructure, where the movement is detected by the movement detecting device.

    7. Acoustic sensors using microstructures tunable with energy other than acoustic energy

      DOEpatents

      Datskos, Panagiotis G.

      2005-06-07

      A sensor for detecting acoustic energy includes a microstructure tuned to a predetermined acoustic frequency and a device for detecting movement of the microstructure. A display device is operatively linked to the movement detecting device. When acoustic energy strikes the acoustic sensor, acoustic energy having a predetermined frequency moves the microstructure, where the movement is detected by the movement detecting device.

    8. Remote ballistic emplacement of an electro-optical and acoustic target detection and localization system

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      West, Aaron; Mellini, Mark

      2015-05-01

      Near real time situational awareness in uncontrolled non line of sight (NLOS) and beyond line of sight (BLOS) environments is critical in the asymmetric battlefield of future conflicts. The ability to detect and accurately locate hostile forces in difficult terrain or urban environments can dramatically increase the survivability and effectiveness of dismounted soldiers, especially when they are limited to the resources available only to the small unit. The Sensor Mortar Network (SMortarNet) is a 60mm Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (ISR) mortar designed to give the Squad near real time situational awareness in uncontrolled NLOS environments. SMortarNet is designed to track targets both acoustically and electro optically and can fuse tracks between, the acoustic, EO, and magnetic modalities on board. The system is linked to other mortar nodes and the user via a masterless frequency hopping spread spectrum ad-hoc mesh radio network. This paper will discuss SMortarNet in the context of a squad level dismounted soldier, its technical capabilities, and its benefit to the small unit Warfighter. The challenges with ballistic remote emplacement of sensitive components and the on board signal processing capabilities of the system will also be covered. The paper will also address how the sensor network can be integrated with existing soldier infrastructure, such as the NettWarrior platform, for rapid transition to soldier systems. Networks of low power sensors can have many forms, but the more practical networks for warfighters are ad hoc radio-based systems that can be rapidly deployed and can leverage a range of assets available at a given time. The low power long life networks typically have limited bandwidth and may have unreliable communication depending on the network health, which makes autonomous sensors a critical component of the network. SMortarNet reduces data to key information features at the sensor itself. The smart sensing approach enables

    9. Acoustic detection of Oryctes rhinoceros (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Dynastinae) and Nasutitermes luzonicus (Isoptera: Termitidae) in palm trees in urban Guam.

      PubMed

      Mankin, R W; Moore, A

      2010-08-01

      Adult and larval Oryctes rhinoceros (L.) (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Dynastinae) were acoustically detected in live and dead palm trees and logs in recently invaded areas of Guam, along with Nasutitermes luzonicus Oshima (Isoptera: Termitidae), and other small, sound-producing invertebrates and invertebrates. The low-frequency, long-duration sound-impulse trains produced by large, active O. rhinoceros and the higher frequency, shorter impulse trains produced by feeding N. luzonicus had distinctive spectral and temporal patterns that facilitated their identification and discrimination from background noise, as well as from roaches, earwigs, and other small sound-producing organisms present in the trees and logs. The distinctiveness of the O. rhinoceros sounds enables current usage of acoustic detection as a tactic in Guam's ongoing O. rhinoceros eradication program.

    10. Acoustic Emission Detection of Macro-Cracks on Engraving Tool Steel Inserts during the Injection Molding Cycle Using PZT Sensors

      PubMed Central

      Svečko, Rajko; Kusić, Dragan; Kek, Tomaž; Sarjaš, Andrej; Hančič, Aleš; Grum, Janez

      2013-01-01

      This paper presents an improved monitoring system for the failure detection of engraving tool steel inserts during the injection molding cycle. This system uses acoustic emission PZT sensors mounted through acoustic waveguides on the engraving insert. We were thus able to clearly distinguish the defect through measured AE signals. Two engraving tool steel inserts were tested during the production of standard test specimens, each under the same processing conditions. By closely comparing the captured AE signals on both engraving inserts during the filling and packing stages, we were able to detect the presence of macro-cracks on one engraving insert. Gabor wavelet analysis was used for closer examination of the captured AE signals' peak amplitudes during the filling and packing stages. The obtained results revealed that such a system could be used successfully as an improved tool for monitoring the integrity of an injection molding process. PMID:23673677

    11. The Correlation Function of Galaxy Clusters and Detection of Baryon Acoustic Oscillations

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Hong, T.; Han, J. L.; Wen, Z. L.; Sun, L.; Zhan, H.

      2012-04-01

      We calculate the correlation function of 13,904 galaxy clusters of z <= 0.4 selected from the cluster catalog of Wen et al. The correlation function can be fitted with a power-law model ξ(r) = (r/R 0)-γ on the scales of 10 h -1 Mpc <= r <= 50 h -1 Mpc, with a larger correlation length of R 0 = 18.84 ± 0.27 h -1 Mpc for clusters with a richness of R >= 15 and a smaller length of R 0 = 16.15 ± 0.13 h -1 Mpc for clusters with a richness of R >= 5. The power-law index of γ = 2.1 is found to be almost the same for all cluster subsamples. A pronounced baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) peak is detected at r ~ 110 h -1 Mpc with a significance of ~1.9σ. By analyzing the correlation function in the range of 20 h -1 Mpc <= r <= 200 h -1 Mpc, we find that the constraints on distance parameters are Dv (zm = 0.276) = 1077 ± 55(1σ) Mpc and h = 0.73 ± 0.039(1σ), which are consistent with the cosmology derived from Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) seven-year data. However, the BAO signal from the cluster sample is stronger than expected and leads to a rather low matter density Ω m h 2 = 0.093 ± 0.0077(1σ), which deviates from the WMAP7 result by more than 3σ. The correlation function of the GMBCG cluster sample is also calculated and our detection of the BAO feature is confirmed.

    12. THE CORRELATION FUNCTION OF GALAXY CLUSTERS AND DETECTION OF BARYON ACOUSTIC OSCILLATIONS

      SciTech Connect

      Hong, T.; Han, J. L.; Wen, Z. L.; Sun, L.; Zhan, H.

      2012-04-10

      We calculate the correlation function of 13,904 galaxy clusters of z {<=} 0.4 selected from the cluster catalog of Wen et al. The correlation function can be fitted with a power-law model {xi}(r) = (r/R{sub 0}){sup -{gamma}} on the scales of 10 h{sup -1} Mpc {<=} r {<=} 50 h{sup -1} Mpc, with a larger correlation length of R{sub 0} = 18.84 {+-} 0.27 h{sup -1} Mpc for clusters with a richness of R {>=} 15 and a smaller length of R{sub 0} = 16.15 {+-} 0.13 h{sup -1} Mpc for clusters with a richness of R {>=} 5. The power-law index of {gamma} = 2.1 is found to be almost the same for all cluster subsamples. A pronounced baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) peak is detected at r {approx} 110 h{sup -1} Mpc with a significance of {approx}1.9{sigma}. By analyzing the correlation function in the range of 20 h{sup -1} Mpc {<=} r {<=} 200 h{sup -1} Mpc, we find that the constraints on distance parameters are D{sub v} (z{sub m} = 0.276) = 1077 {+-} 55(1{sigma}) Mpc and h = 0.73 {+-} 0.039(1{sigma}), which are consistent with the cosmology derived from Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) seven-year data. However, the BAO signal from the cluster sample is stronger than expected and leads to a rather low matter density {Omega}{sub m} h{sup 2} = 0.093 {+-} 0.0077(1{sigma}), which deviates from the WMAP7 result by more than 3{sigma}. The correlation function of the GMBCG cluster sample is also calculated and our detection of the BAO feature is confirmed.

    13. Acoustic-Gravity Waves from Submarine Earthquakes - Towards AN Early Tsunami Detection System

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Oliveira, T. C. A.; Kadri, U.

      2015-12-01

      An uplift of the ocean bottom caused by a submarine earthquake can generate Acoustic-Gravity Waves (AGW), progressive compression-type waves that travel at near the speed of sound in water. Recent studies indicate that as AGW travel they leave measurable bottom pressure signatures, which can act as tsunami precursors. In this regard, it is anticipated that such utilization of AGW would enhance current early tsunami detection systems. To this end, there is an increasing need to characterize the spatio-temporal evolution of the pressure field induced by AGW in more realistic scenarios. We analyze and simulate the fundamental AGW modes generated by the 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake. We consider the first five AGW modes and show that they may all induce comparable temporal variations in pressure at different water depths in regions far from the epicenter. An example for the dynamic pressure induced by AGW is given in Figure 1. We show that the pressure field depends on the presence of the leading AGW modes. Each AGW mode becomes evanescent at a critical time, at which energy is transferred to the next higher modes. Consequently, the frequency associated with the most energetic mode changes as the leading mode varnishes. Correspondingly, the main pattern of the pressure field changes as the leading mode change. As an example, for a reference point located at 1000 Km from the epicenter, and 4km deep, the first five AGW become evanescent after 1.6, 4.6, 7.7, 10.8 and 13.8 hours, respectively. Our analysis and simulations shed light on the spatio-temporal evolution of the pressure field induced by AGW that radiate during submarine earthquakes. Practically, this can assist in the implementation of an AGW early tsunami detection system, starting from applying the appropriate earthquake models, to identifying the relevant measurement equipment and their optimal locations.

    14. Detection of bond failure in the anchorage zone of reinforced concrete beams via acoustic emission monitoring

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Abouhussien, Ahmed A.; Hassan, Assem A. A.

      2016-07-01

      In this study, acoustic emission (AE) monitoring was utilised to identify the onset of bond failure in reinforced concrete beams. Beam anchorage specimens were designed and tested to fail in bond in the anchorage zone. The specimens included four 250 × 250 × 1500 mm beams with four variable bonded lengths (100, 200, 300, and 400 mm). Meanwhile, an additional 250 × 250 × 2440 mm beam, with 200 mm bonded length, was tested to investigate the influence of sensor location on the identification of bond damage. All beams were tested under four-point loading setup and continuously monitored using three distributed AE sensors. These attached sensors were exploited to record AE signals resulting from both cracking and bond deterioration until failure. The variations in the number of AE hits and cumulative signal strength (CSS) versus test time were evaluated to achieve early detection of crack growth and bar slippage. In addition, AE intensity analysis was performed on signal strength of collected AE signals to develop two additional parameters: historic index (H (t)) and severity (S r). The analysis of these AE parameters enabled an early detection of both first cracks (at almost the mid-span of the beam) and bar slip in either of the anchorage zones at the beams’ end before their visual observation, regardless of sensor location. The results also demonstrated a clear correlation between the damage level in terms of crack development/measured free end bar slip and AE parameters (number of hits, CSS, H(t), and S r).

    15. Real-time detection of undersea mines: a complete screening and acoustic fusion processing system

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Sacramone, Anthony; Desai, Mukund N.

      1999-08-01

      A complete mine detection/classification (D/C) system has been specified and implemented, which runs in real-time, and has been exercised on the latest available dual-frequency side-scan sonar acoustic image sets. The compete DC system is comprised of a collection of algorithms that has been developed and evolved at Draper Laboratory over the past decade. The detection process consists of image normalization, enhancement, segmentation, and feature extraction algorithms. The enhancement algorithm is a variant of a Markov Random Field based anomaly screener developed in FY-94. The feature that were extracted were those derived in FY-93. A distance constrained matching algorithm, which was developed in FY-95, is used to generate a list of high and low frequency fused tokens. The classification process involves the evaluation of a hierarchy of three multi-layer perceptron neural networks: HF, LF, and HF/LF fused. Research performed in FY-95 also concentrated on the development of several variants of information fusion with hierarchical neural networks. The 'discriminant-combining' variant of fusion was selected as part of this DC system. In addition, a classification post- processing and decision node statistic modification step, which was developed in FY-96, was included. This paper will describe the algorithm that were implemented. However, the emphasis will be on the performance results of processing the latest available side-scan imagery, comparison of single sensor vs dual-frequency sensor results, and the issues that were encountered while exercising the DC system on the new data set.

    16. Multi-bearing defect detection with trackside acoustic signal based on a pseudo time-frequency analysis and Dopplerlet filter

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Zhang, Haibin; Lu, Siliang; He, Qingbo; Kong, Fanrang

      2016-03-01

      The diagnosis of train bearing defects based on the acoustic signal acquired by a trackside microphone plays a significant role in the transport system. However, the wayside acoustic signal suffers from the Doppler distortion due to the high moving speed and also contains the multi-source signals from different train bearings. This paper proposes a novel solution to overcome the two difficulties in trackside acoustic diagnosis. In the method a pseudo time-frequency analysis (PTFA) based on an improved Dopplerlet transform (IDT) is presented to acquire the time centers for different bearings. With the time centers, we design a series of Dopplerlet filters (DF) in time-frequency domain to work on the signal's time-frequency distribution (TFD) gained by the short time Fourier transform (STFT). Then an inverse STFT (ISTFT) is utilized to get the separated signals for each sound source which means bearing here. Later the resampling method based on certain motion parameters eliminates the Doppler Effect and finally the diagnosis can be made effectively according to the envelope spectrum of each separated signal. With the effectiveness of the technique validated by both simulated and experimental cases, the proposed wayside acoustic diagnostic scheme is expected to be available in wayside defective bearing detection.

    17. The utility of a long-term acoustic recording system for detecting white seabass Atractoscion nobilis spawning sounds.

      PubMed

      Aalbers, S A; Sepulveda, C A

      2012-11-01

      This study reports the use of a long-term acoustic recording system (LARS) to remotely monitor white seabass Atractoscion nobilis spawning sounds at three sites along the southern California coastline, adjacent to Camp Pendleton. On the basis of previous studies of A. nobilis sound production relative to periods of known spawning activity, LARS were set to continuously record ambient sounds for a 2 h period around sunset from April to June 2009. Acoustic analyses identified A. nobilis courtship sounds on 89, 28 and 45% of the days at the three locations, respectively. From 474 h of acoustic data, spawning-related sounds (chants) were detected on 19 occasions in 2009 with an additional 11 spawning chants recorded during a 2007 validation period. Most spawning chants occurred within 30 min of sunset during the months of May and June at a mean ±S.D. surface temperature of 18.2 ± 1.2° C. Consecutive daily spawning activity was not apparent at any sites in 2009. Atractoscion nobilis spawning chants were recorded at all three sites, suggesting that shallow rocky reefs which support kelp forests provide suitable A. nobilis spawning habitat. Results confirm the utility of passive acoustic recorders for identifying A. nobilis spawning periods and locations. PMID:23130687

    18. Application of a novel optical fiber sensor to detection of acoustic emissions by various damages in CFRP laminates

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Wu, Qi; Yu, Fengming; Okabe, Yoji; Kobayashi, Satoshi

      2015-01-01

      In this research, we applied a novel optical fiber sensor, phase-shifted fiber Bragg grating balanced sensor with high sensitivity and broad bandwidth, to acoustic emission (AE) detection in carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRPs). AE signals generated in the tensile testing of angle-ply and cross-ply CFRP laminates were both detected by the novel optical fiber sensor and traditional PZT sensors. The cumulative hits detected by both sensors coincided after applying simple data processing to eliminate the noise, and clearly exhibited Kaiser effect and Felicity effect. Typical AE signals detected by both sensors were discussed and were tried to relate to micro CFRP damages observed via microscope. These results demonstrate that this novel optical fiber sensor can reliably detect AE signals from various damages. It has the potential to be used in practical AE detection, as an alternative to the piezoelectric PZT sensor.

    19. PREFACE: ARENA 2006—Acoustic and Radio EeV Neutrino detection Activities

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Thompson, Lee

      2007-06-01

      The International Conference on Acoustic and Radio EeV Neutrino Activities, ARENA 2006 was jointly hosted by the Universities of Northumbria and Sheffield at the City of Newcastle Campus of the University of Northumbria in June 2006. ARENA 2006 was the latest in a series of meetings which have addressed, either separately or jointly, the use of radio and acoustic sensors for the detection of highly relativistic particles. Previous successful meetings have taken place in Los Angeles (RADHEP, 2000), Stanford (2003) and DESY Zeuthen (ARENA 2005). A total of 50 scientists from across Europe, the US and Japan attended the conference presenting status reports and results from a number of projects and initiatives spread as far afield as the Sweden and the South Pole. The talks presented at the meeting and the proceedings contained herein represent a `snapshot' of the status of the fields of acoustic and radio detection at the time of the conference. The three day meeting also included two invited talks by Dr Paula Chadwick and Dr Johannes Knapp who gave excellent summaries of the related astroparticle physics fields of high energy gamma ray detection and high energy cosmic ray detection respectively. As well as a full academic agenda there were social events including a Medieval themed conference banquet at Lumley Castle and a civic reception kindly provided by the Lord Mayor of Newcastle and hosted at the Mansion House. Thanks must go to the International Advisory Board members for their input and guidance, the Local Organising Committee for their hard work in bringing everything together and finally the delegates for the stimulating, enthusiastic and enjoyable spirit in which ARENA 2006 took place. Lee Thompson

      International Advisory Board

      G. Anton, ErlangenD. Besson, Kansas
      J. Blümer, KarlsruheA. Capone, Rome
      H. Falcke, BonnP. Gorham, Hawaii
      G. Gratta

    20. Detection of acoustic emission from cavitation in tissue during clinical extracorporeal lithotripsy.

      PubMed

      Coleman, A J; Choi, M J; Saunders, J E

      1996-01-01

      A 1-MHz focused hydrophone has been used to search for acoustic emission expected to arise from cavitation occurring in tissue during clinical extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy (ESWL). The hydrophone is acoustically coupled to the patient's skin and the focus directed at depth in tissue under ultrasound guidance. The measured amplitude-time variation of the acoustic emission from tissue near the shock-wave focus of the Storz Modulith SL20 lithotripter has been examined in four patients. There is evidence of increased amplitude acoustic emission at 1 MHz from regions within tissue that also appear hyperechoic in simultaneously acquired ultrasound images. The acoustic emission from these regions decays from an initial peak to the noise level in about 500 microseconds following each shock-wave pulse. Within this period, a second peak, often of higher amplitude than the first, is typically observed about 100 microseconds after the shockwave. The time between the initial and second peaks is found to increase with increasing shock-wave amplitude. The results are similar to those previously observed from cavitation induced by shock-wave exposure in water and indicate that the 1-MHz acoustic emission arises from inertial cavitation in tissue during clinical ESWL.

      1. Acoustic detection of biosonar activity of deep diving odontocetes at Josephine Seamount High Seas Marine Protected Area.

        PubMed

        Giorli, Giacomo; Au, Whitlow W L; Ou, Hui; Jarvis, Susan; Morrissey, Ronald; Moretti, David

        2015-05-01

        The temporal occurrence of deep diving cetaceans in the Josephine Seamount High Seas Marine Protected Area (JSHSMPA), south-west Portugal, was monitored using a passive acoustic recorder. The recorder was deployed on 13 May 2010 at a depth of 814 m during the North Atlantic Treaty Organization Centre for Maritime Research and Experimentation cruise "Sirena10" and recovered on 6 June 2010. The recorder was programmed to record 40 s of data every 2 min. Acoustic data analysis, for the detection and classification of echolocation clicks, was performed using automatic detector/classification systems: M3R (Marine Mammal Monitoring on Navy Ranges), a custom matlab program, and an operator-supervised custom matlab program to assess the classification performance of the detector/classification systems. M3R CS-SVM algorithm contains templates to detect beaked whales, sperm whales, blackfish (pilot and false killer whales), and Risso's dolphins. The detections of each group of odontocetes was monitored as a function of time. Blackfish and Risso's dolphins were detected every day, while beaked whales and sperm whales were detected almost every day. The hourly distribution of detections reveals that blackfish and Risso's dolphins were more active at night, while beaked whales and sperm whales were more active during daylight hours.

      2. Acoustic detection of biosonar activity of deep diving odontocetes at Josephine Seamount High Seas Marine Protected Area.

        PubMed

        Giorli, Giacomo; Au, Whitlow W L; Ou, Hui; Jarvis, Susan; Morrissey, Ronald; Moretti, David

        2015-05-01

        The temporal occurrence of deep diving cetaceans in the Josephine Seamount High Seas Marine Protected Area (JSHSMPA), south-west Portugal, was monitored using a passive acoustic recorder. The recorder was deployed on 13 May 2010 at a depth of 814 m during the North Atlantic Treaty Organization Centre for Maritime Research and Experimentation cruise "Sirena10" and recovered on 6 June 2010. The recorder was programmed to record 40 s of data every 2 min. Acoustic data analysis, for the detection and classification of echolocation clicks, was performed using automatic detector/classification systems: M3R (Marine Mammal Monitoring on Navy Ranges), a custom matlab program, and an operator-supervised custom matlab program to assess the classification performance of the detector/classification systems. M3R CS-SVM algorithm contains templates to detect beaked whales, sperm whales, blackfish (pilot and false killer whales), and Risso's dolphins. The detections of each group of odontocetes was monitored as a function of time. Blackfish and Risso's dolphins were detected every day, while beaked whales and sperm whales were detected almost every day. The hourly distribution of detections reveals that blackfish and Risso's dolphins were more active at night, while beaked whales and sperm whales were more active during daylight hours. PMID:25994682

      3. Quantitative surface acoustic wave detection based on colloidal gold nanoparticles and their bioconjugates.

        PubMed

        Chiu, Chi-Shun; Gwo, Shangjr

        2008-05-01

        The immobilization scheme of monodispersed gold nanoparticles (10-nm diameter) on piezoelectric substrate surfaces using organosilane molecules as cross-linkers has been developed for lithium niobate (LiNbO3) and silicon oxide (SiO2)/gold-covered lithium tantalate (LiTaO3) of Rayleigh and guided shear horizontal- (guided SH) surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensors. In this study, comparative measurements of gold nanoparticle adsorption kinetics using high-resolution field-emission scanning electron microscopy and SAW sensors allow the frequency responses of SAW sensors to be quantitatively correlated with surface densities of adsorbed nanoparticles. Using this approach, gold nanoparticles are used as the "nanosized mass standards" to scale the mass loading in a wide dynamical range. Rayleigh-SAW and guided SH-SAW sensors are employed here to monitor the surface mass changes on the device surfaces in gas and liquid phases, respectively. The mass sensitivity ( approximately 20 Hz.cm2/ng) of Rayleigh-SAW device (fundamental oscillation frequency of 113.3 MHz in air) is more than 2 orders of magnitude higher than that of conventional 9-MHz quartz crystal microbalance sensors. Furthermore, in situ (aqueous solutions), real-time measurements of adsorption kinetics for both citrate-stabilized gold nanoparticles and DNA-gold nanoparticle conjugates are also demonstrated by guided SH-SAW (fundamental oscillation frequency of 121.3 MHz). By comparing frequency shifts between the adsorption cases of gold nanoparticles and DNA-gold nanoparticle conjugates, the average number of bound oligonucleotides per gold nanoparticle can also be determined. The high mass sensitivity ( approximately 6 Hz.cm2/ng) of guided SH-SAW sensors and successful detection of DNA-gold nanoparticle conjugates paves the way for real-time biosensing in liquids using nanoparticle-enhanced SAW devices. PMID:18363384

      4. Molecularly Imprinted Polymer Integrated with a Surface Acoustic Wave Technique for Detection of Sulfamethizole.

        PubMed

        Ayankojo, Akinrinade George; Tretjakov, Aleksei; Reut, Jekaterina; Boroznjak, Roman; Öpik, Andres; Rappich, Jörg; Furchner, Andreas; Hinrichs, Karsten; Syritski, Vitali

        2016-01-19

        The synergistic effect of combining molecular imprinting and surface acoustic wave (SAW) technologies for the selective and label-free detection of sulfamethizole as a model antibiotic in aqueous environment was demonstrated. A molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) for sulfamethizole (SMZ) selective recognition was prepared in the form of a homogeneous thin film on the sensing surfaces of SAW chip by oxidative electropolymerization of m-phenylenediamine (mPD) in the presence of SMZ, acting as a template. Special attention was paid to the rational selection of the functional monomer using computational and spectroscopic approaches. SMZ template incorporation and its subsequent release from the polymer was supported by IR microscopic measurements. Precise control of the thicknesses of the SMZ-MIP and respective nonimprinted reference films (NIP) was achieved by correlating the electrical charge dosage during electrodeposition with spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements in order to ensure accurate interpretation of label-free responses originating from the MIP modified sensor. The fabricated SMZ-MIP films were characterized in terms of their binding affinity and selectivity toward the target by analyzing the binding kinetics recorded using the SAW system. The SMZ-MIPs had SMZ binding capacity approximately more than eight times higher than the respective NIP and were able to discriminate among structurally similar molecules, i.e., sulfanilamide and sulfadimethoxine. The presented approach for the facile integration of a sulfonamide antibiotic-sensing layer with SAW technology allowed observing the real-time binding events of the target molecule at nanomolar concentration levels and could be potentially suitable for cost-effective fabrication of a multianalyte chemosensor for analysis of hazardous pollutants in an aqueous environment. PMID:26704414

      5. Molecularly Imprinted Polymer Integrated with a Surface Acoustic Wave Technique for Detection of Sulfamethizole.

        PubMed

        Ayankojo, Akinrinade George; Tretjakov, Aleksei; Reut, Jekaterina; Boroznjak, Roman; Öpik, Andres; Rappich, Jörg; Furchner, Andreas; Hinrichs, Karsten; Syritski, Vitali

        2016-01-19

        The synergistic effect of combining molecular imprinting and surface acoustic wave (SAW) technologies for the selective and label-free detection of sulfamethizole as a model antibiotic in aqueous environment was demonstrated. A molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) for sulfamethizole (SMZ) selective recognition was prepared in the form of a homogeneous thin film on the sensing surfaces of SAW chip by oxidative electropolymerization of m-phenylenediamine (mPD) in the presence of SMZ, acting as a template. Special attention was paid to the rational selection of the functional monomer using computational and spectroscopic approaches. SMZ template incorporation and its subsequent release from the polymer was supported by IR microscopic measurements. Precise control of the thicknesses of the SMZ-MIP and respective nonimprinted reference films (NIP) was achieved by correlating the electrical charge dosage during electrodeposition with spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements in order to ensure accurate interpretation of label-free responses originating from the MIP modified sensor. The fabricated SMZ-MIP films were characterized in terms of their binding affinity and selectivity toward the target by analyzing the binding kinetics recorded using the SAW system. The SMZ-MIPs had SMZ binding capacity approximately more than eight times higher than the respective NIP and were able to discriminate among structurally similar molecules, i.e., sulfanilamide and sulfadimethoxine. The presented approach for the facile integration of a sulfonamide antibiotic-sensing layer with SAW technology allowed observing the real-time binding events of the target molecule at nanomolar concentration levels and could be potentially suitable for cost-effective fabrication of a multianalyte chemosensor for analysis of hazardous pollutants in an aqueous environment.

      6. Detecting Acoustic Emissions With/Without Dehydration of Serpentine Outside P-T Field of Conventional Brittle Failure

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Jung, H.; Fei, Y.; Silver, P. G.; Green, H. W.

        2005-12-01

        It is currently thought that earthquakes cannot be triggered at depths greater than ~60 km by unassisted brittle failure or frictional sliding, but could be triggered by dehydration embrittlement of hydrous minerals (Raleigh and Paterson, 1965; Green and Houston, 1995; Kirby, 1995; Jung et al., 2004). Using a new multianvil-based system for detecting acoustic emissions with four channels at high pressure and high temperature that was recently developed (Jung et al., 2005), we tested this hypothesis by deforming samples of serpentine. We found that acoustic emissions were detected not only during/after the dehydration of serpentine, but even in the absence of dehydration. These emissions occurred at high pressure and high temperature, and thus outside pressure-temperature field of conventional brittle failure. Backscattered-electron images of microstructures of the post-run specimen revealed fault slip at elevated pressure, with offsets of up to ~500 μm, even without dehydration. Analysis of P-wave travel times from the four sensors confirmed that the acoustic emissions originated from within the specimen during fault slip. These observations suggest that earthquakes can be triggered by slip along a fault containing serpentine at significantly higher pressure and temperature conditions than that previously thought, even without dehydration. They are thus consistent with faulting mechanisms that appeal to dehydration embrittlement, as well as those that rely solely on the rheology of non-dehydrated serpentine.

      7. A cabled acoustic telemetry system for detecting and tracking juvenile salmon: part 1. Engineering design and instrumentation.

        PubMed

        Weiland, Mark A; Deng, Z Daniel; Seim, Tom A; LaMarche, Brian L; Choi, Eric Y; Fu, Tao; Carlson, Thomas J; Thronas, Aaron I; Eppard, M Brad

        2011-01-01

        In 2001 the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (OR, USA), started developing the Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System, a nonproprietary sensing technology, to meet the needs for monitoring the survival of juvenile salmonids through eight large hydroelectric facilities within the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS). Initial development focused on coded acoustic microtransmitters and autonomous receivers that could be deployed in open reaches of the river for detection of the juvenile salmonids implanted with microtransmitters as they passed the autonomous receiver arrays. In 2006, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory began the development of an acoustic receiver system for deployment at hydropower facilities (cabled receiver) for detecting fish tagged with microtransmitters as well as tracking them in two or three dimensions for determining route of passage and behavior as the fish passed at the facility. The additional information on route of passage, combined with survival estimates, is used by the dam operators and managers to make structural and operational changes at the hydropower facilities to improve survival of fish as they pass the facilities through the FCRPS. PMID:22163918

      8. A cabled acoustic telemetry system for detecting and tracking juvenile salmon: Part 1. Engineering design and instrumentation

        SciTech Connect

        Weiland, Mark A.; Deng, Zhiqun; Seim, Thomas A.; Lamarche, Brian L.; Choi, Eric Y.; Fu, Tao; Carlson, Thomas J.; Thronas, Aaron I.; Eppard, Matthew B.

        2011-05-26

        The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers-Portland District started development of the Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS), a nonproprietary technology, in 2001 to meet the needs for monitoring the survival of juvenile salmonids through the 31 federal dams in the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS). Initial development focused on coded acoustic microtransmitters, and autonomous receivers that could be deployed in open reaches of the river for detection of the juvenile salmonids implanted with microtransmitters as they passed the autonomous receiver arrays. In 2006 the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was tasked with development of an acoustic receiver system for deployment at hydropower facilities (cabled receiver) for detecting fish tagged with microtransmitters as well as tracking them in 2 or 3-dimensions as the fish passed at the facility for determining route of passage. The additional route of passage information, combined with survival estimates, is used by the dam operators and managers to make structural and operational changes at the hydropower facilities to improve survival of fish as they pass the facilities and through the FCRPS.

      9. A cabled acoustic telemetry system for detecting and tracking juvenile salmon: part 1. Engineering design and instrumentation.

        PubMed

        Weiland, Mark A; Deng, Z Daniel; Seim, Tom A; LaMarche, Brian L; Choi, Eric Y; Fu, Tao; Carlson, Thomas J; Thronas, Aaron I; Eppard, M Brad

        2011-01-01

        In 2001 the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (OR, USA), started developing the Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System, a nonproprietary sensing technology, to meet the needs for monitoring the survival of juvenile salmonids through eight large hydroelectric facilities within the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS). Initial development focused on coded acoustic microtransmitters and autonomous receivers that could be deployed in open reaches of the river for detection of the juvenile salmonids implanted with microtransmitters as they passed the autonomous receiver arrays. In 2006, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory began the development of an acoustic receiver system for deployment at hydropower facilities (cabled receiver) for detecting fish tagged with microtransmitters as well as tracking them in two or three dimensions for determining route of passage and behavior as the fish passed at the facility. The additional information on route of passage, combined with survival estimates, is used by the dam operators and managers to make structural and operational changes at the hydropower facilities to improve survival of fish as they pass the facilities through the FCRPS.

      10. Detection of the baryon acoustic peak in the large-scale correlation function of SDSS luminous red galaxies

        SciTech Connect

        Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Zehavi, Idit; Hogg, David W.; Scoccimarro, Roman; Blanton, Michael R.; Nichol, Robert C.; Scranton, Ryan; Seo, Hee-Jong; Tegmark, Max; Zheng, Zheng; Anderson, Scott F.; Annis, Jim; Bahcall, Neta; Brinkmann, Jon; Burles, Scott; Castander, Francisco J.; Connolly, Andrew; Csabai, Istvan; Doi, Mamoru; Fukugita, Masataka; Frieman, Joshua A.; /Arizona U., Astron. Dept. - Steward Observ. /CCPP, New York /Portsmouth U., ICG /Pittsburgh U. /Pennsylvania U. /MIT /Princeton, Inst. Advanced Study /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept. /Fermilab /Princeton U. Observ. /Apache Point Observ. /Barcelona, IEEC /Eotvos U. /Tokyo U., Inst. Astron. /Tokyo U., ICRR /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr. /Johns Hopkins U. /Naval Observ., Flagstaff /Colorado U., CASA /Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci. /Michigan U.

        2005-01-01

        We present the large-scale correlation function measured from a spectroscopic sample of 46,748 luminous red galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The survey region covers 0.72h{sup -3} Gpc{sup 3} over 3816 square degrees and 0.16 < z < 0.47, making it the best sample yet for the study of large-scale structure. We find a well-detected peak in the correlation function at 100h{sup -1} Mpc separation that is an excellent match to the predicted shape and location of the imprint of the recombination-epoch acoustic oscillations on the low-redshift clustering of matter. This detection demonstrates the linear growth of structure by gravitational instability between z {approx} 1000 and the present and confirms a firm prediction of the standard cosmological theory. The acoustic peak provides a standard ruler by which we can measure the ratio of the distances to z = 0.35 and z = 1089 to 4% fractional accuracy and the absolute distance to z = 0.35 to 5% accuracy. From the overall shape of the correlation function, we measure the matter density {Omega}{sub m}h{sup 2} to 8% and find agreement with the value from cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies. Independent of the constraints provided by the CMB acoustic scale, we find {Omega}{sub m} = 0.273 {+-} 0.025 + 0.123(1 + w{sub 0}) + 0.137{Omega}{sub K}. Including the CMB acoustic scale, we find that the spatial curvature is {Omega}{sub K} = -0.010 {+-} 0.009 if the dark energy is a cosmological constant. More generally, our results provide a measurement of cosmological distance, and hence an argument for dark energy, based on a geometric method with the same simple physics as the microwave background anisotropies. The standard cosmological model convincingly passes these new and robust tests of its fundamental properties.

      11. Fiber Optic Sensor for Acoustic Detection of Partial Discharges in Oil-Paper Insulated Electrical Systems

        PubMed Central

        Posada-Roman, Julio; Garcia-Souto, Jose A.; Rubio-Serrano, Jesus

        2012-01-01

        A fiber optic interferometric sensor with an intrinsic transducer along a length of the fiber is presented for ultrasound measurements of the acoustic emission from partial discharges inside oil-filled power apparatus. The sensor is designed for high sensitivity measurements in a harsh electromagnetic field environment, with wide temperature changes and immersion in oil. It allows enough sensitivity for the application, for which the acoustic pressure is in the range of units of Pa at a frequency of 150 kHz. In addition, the accessibility to the sensing region is guaranteed by immune fiber-optic cables and the optical phase sensor output. The sensor design is a compact and rugged coil of fiber. In addition to a complete calibration, the in-situ results show that two types of partial discharges are measured through their acoustic emissions with the sensor immersed in oil. PMID:22666058

      12. Wideband acoustic activation and detection of droplet vaporization events using a capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer.

        PubMed

        Novell, Anthony; Arena, Christopher B; Oralkan, Omer; Dayton, Paul A

        2016-06-01

        An ongoing challenge exists in understanding and optimizing the acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV) process to enhance contrast agent effectiveness for biomedical applications. Acoustic signatures from vaporization events can be identified and differentiated from microbubble or tissue signals based on their frequency content. The present study exploited the wide bandwidth of a 128-element capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) array for activation (8 MHz) and real-time imaging (1 MHz) of ADV events from droplets circulating in a tube. Compared to a commercial piezoelectric probe, the CMUT array provides a substantial increase of the contrast-to-noise ratio. PMID:27369143

      13. The Biological Sensor for Detection of Bacterial Cells in Liquid Phase Based on Plate Acoustic Wave

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Borodina, Irina; Zaitsev, Boris; Shikhabudinov, Alexander; Guliy, Olga; Ignatov, Oleg; Teplykh, Andrey

        The interactions "bacterial cells - bacteriophages", "bacterial cells - antibodies" and "bacterial cells - mini- antibodies" directly in liquid phase were experimentally investigated with a help of acoustic sensor. The acoustic sensor under study represents two-channel delay line based on the plate of Y-X lithium niobate. One channel of delay line was electrically shorted, the second channel was electrically open. The liquid container was glued on plate surface between transducers of delay line. The dependencies of the change in phase and insertion loss on concentration of bacteriophages, antibodies, and mini- antibodies were obtained for both channels of delay line.

      14. Detection of transverse cracking in a hybrid composite laminate using acoustic emission

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Jong, Hwai-Jiang

        Transverse cracking detection in a uniaxially-loaded symmetric cross-ply hybrid laminate containing 0° IM7/8552 carbon/epoxy and a very thin 90° 52/8552 glass/epoxy layer is studied using the acoustic emission (AE) technique. By conducting modal-based AE experiments and analysis, we investigate some parameters that can be used as the waveform signatures to identify transverse crack growth in the hybrid laminate. Wave dispersion relations of the hybrid laminate are established, and a comparison with those from a material homogenization model based on the equivalent stiffness is made. It is found that material homogenization is not accurate for predicting wave dispersion in the hybrid laminate. Wave dispersion for a homogeneous IM7/8552 unidirectional plate is also constructed. Cut-off frequencies belonging to various wave modes are discussed concerning their significance in interpreting AE signals. The wave attenuation behaviors that exist in the hybrid laminate and in the homogeneous IM7/8552 plate are compared and discussed using the finite element method (FEM). The use of singular elements dealing with the high strain gradient near the crack tip is addressed for convergence purposes. It is shown by the FEM results and demonstrated in the AE experiments that wave attenuation in the cross-ply hybrid laminate is much stronger than in the plain IM7/8552 plate. A simple calibration method for the AE sensors is discussed. Some important aspects in conducting an AE experiment, such as the sensor averaging effect and sensor frequency response range, are addressed. A new source location method based on the waveform's first peak search and the associated primary frequency content is proposed. The accuracy of the source location method is verified by pencil-lead break experiments. The so-called symmetric energy fraction (SEF) of the AE signals in conjunction with the finite element analysis result in identification of the transverse cracking event. Lastly, a material

      15. Confined Mesoscopic Fluid-like Films Analyzed with Frequency Modulation and Acoustic Detection

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Fernandez Rodriguez, Rodolfo

        Complete understanding of the physics underlying the changes in viscoelasticity, relaxation time, and phase transitions that mesoscopic fluid-like systems undergo at solid-liquid interfaces or under confinement remains one of the major challenges in condensed matter physics. Moreover, studies of confined mesoscopic fluid films are relevant to technological areas like adhesion, wetting processes and nanotribology. This thesis addresses the interaction between two sliding solids interfaces separated by a nanometer sized gap, with emphasis on the role of the mesoscopic fluid film trapped between them. For this purpose we integrated two acoustic techniques, recently introduced by our group, into a sub-nanometer precision and thermal drift corrected scanning probe microscope (SPM): the shear-force/acoustic near-field Microscope (SANM) and the whispering gallery acoustic sensing (WGAS). The SANM monitors the sound waves originating in the probe-layer interaction while the motion of the probe is monitored by the WGAS. Additionally, we decouple the interaction forces by using frequency modulation and measure the local tunneling current to help establish the location of the substrate. Our results show a strong correlation between the elastic component of the probe's interaction and the SANM amplitude, as well as between the phase lag response of the fluid relative to the probe's excitation (represented by the SANM phase) and the onset of the probe-sample contact region. Frequency modulation SANM-WGAS brings a new acoustic sensing mechanism to the challenging characterization of fluid-like physical systems at the nanometer scale.

      16. Automated pattern analysis: A newsilent partner in insect acoustic detection studies

        Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

        This seminar reviews methods that have been developed for automated analysis of field-collected sounds used to estimate pest populations and guide insect pest management decisions. Several examples are presented of successful usage of acoustic technology to map insect distributions in field environ...

      17. A cabled acoustic telemetry system for detecting and tracking juvenile salmon: part 2. Three-dimensional tracking and passage outcomes.

        PubMed

        Deng, Z Daniel; Weiland, Mark A; Fu, Tao; Seim, Tom A; LaMarche, Brian L; Choi, Eric Y; Carlson, Thomas J; Eppard, M Brad

        2011-01-01

        In Part 1 of this paper, we presented the engineering design and instrumentation of the Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) cabled system, a nonproprietary sensing technology developed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (Oregon, USA) to meet the needs for monitoring the survival of juvenile salmonids through the hydroelectric facilities within the Federal Columbia River Power System. Here in Part 2, we describe how the JSATS cabled system was employed as a reference sensor network for detecting and tracking juvenile salmon. Time-of-arrival data for valid detections on four hydrophones were used to solve for the three-dimensional (3D) position of fish surgically implanted with JSATS acoustic transmitters. Validation tests demonstrated high accuracy of 3D tracking up to 100 m upstream from the John Day Dam spillway. The along-dam component, used for assigning the route of fish passage, had the highest accuracy; the median errors ranged from 0.02 to 0.22 m, and root mean square errors ranged from 0.07 to 0.56 m at distances up to 100 m. For the 2008 case study at John Day Dam, the range for 3D tracking was more than 100 m upstream of the dam face where hydrophones were deployed, and detection and tracking probabilities of fish tagged with JSATS acoustic transmitters were higher than 98%. JSATS cabled systems have been successfully deployed on several major dams to acquire information for salmon protection and for development of more "fish-friendly" hydroelectric facilities. PMID:22163919

      18. A cabled acoustic telemetry system for detecting and tracking juvenile salmon: part 2. Three-dimensional tracking and passage outcomes.

        PubMed

        Deng, Z Daniel; Weiland, Mark A; Fu, Tao; Seim, Tom A; LaMarche, Brian L; Choi, Eric Y; Carlson, Thomas J; Eppard, M Brad

        2011-01-01

        In Part 1 of this paper, we presented the engineering design and instrumentation of the Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) cabled system, a nonproprietary sensing technology developed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (Oregon, USA) to meet the needs for monitoring the survival of juvenile salmonids through the hydroelectric facilities within the Federal Columbia River Power System. Here in Part 2, we describe how the JSATS cabled system was employed as a reference sensor network for detecting and tracking juvenile salmon. Time-of-arrival data for valid detections on four hydrophones were used to solve for the three-dimensional (3D) position of fish surgically implanted with JSATS acoustic transmitters. Validation tests demonstrated high accuracy of 3D tracking up to 100 m upstream from the John Day Dam spillway. The along-dam component, used for assigning the route of fish passage, had the highest accuracy; the median errors ranged from 0.02 to 0.22 m, and root mean square errors ranged from 0.07 to 0.56 m at distances up to 100 m. For the 2008 case study at John Day Dam, the range for 3D tracking was more than 100 m upstream of the dam face where hydrophones were deployed, and detection and tracking probabilities of fish tagged with JSATS acoustic transmitters were higher than 98%. JSATS cabled systems have been successfully deployed on several major dams to acquire information for salmon protection and for development of more "fish-friendly" hydroelectric facilities.

      19. A Cabled Acoustic Telemetry System for Detecting and Tracking Juvenile Salmon: Part 2. Three-Dimensional Tracking and Passage Outcomes

        SciTech Connect

        Deng, Zhiqun; Weiland, Mark A.; Fu, Tao; Seim, Thomas A.; Lamarche, Brian L.; Choi, Eric Y.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Eppard, Matthew B.

        2011-05-26

        In Part 1 of this paper [1], we presented the engineering design and instrumentation of the Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) cabled system, a nonproprietary technology developed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District, to meet the needs for monitoring the survival of juvenile salmonids through the 31 dams in the Federal Columbia River Power System. Here in Part 2, we describe how the JSATS cabled system was employed as a reference sensor network for detecting and tracking juvenile salmon. Time-of-arrival data for valid detections on four hydrophones were used to solve for the three-dimensional (3D) position of fish surgically implanted with JSATS acoustic transmitters. Validation tests demonstrated high accuracy of 3D tracking up to 100 m from the John Day Dam spillway. The along-dam component, used for assigning the route of fish passage, had the highest accuracy; the median errors ranged from 0.06 to 0.22 m, and root mean square errors ranged from 0.05 to 0.56 m at distances up to 100 m. For the case study at John Day Dam during 2008, the range for 3D tracking was more than 100 m upstream of the dam face where hydrophones were deployed, and detection and tracking probabilities of fish tagged with JSATS acoustic transmitters were higher than 98%. JSATS cabled systems have been successfully deployed on several major dams to acquire information for salmon protection and for development of more “fish-friendly” hydroelectric facilities.

      20. A Cabled Acoustic Telemetry System for Detecting and Tracking Juvenile Salmon: Part 2. Three-Dimensional Tracking and Passage Outcomes

        PubMed Central

        Deng, Z. Daniel; Weiland, Mark A.; Fu, Tao; Seim, Tom A.; LaMarche, Brian L.; Choi, Eric Y.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Eppard, M. Brad

        2011-01-01

        In Part 1 of this paper, we presented the engineering design and instrumentation of the Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) cabled system, a nonproprietary sensing technology developed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (Oregon, USA) to meet the needs for monitoring the survival of juvenile salmonids through the hydroelectric facilities within the Federal Columbia River Power System. Here in Part 2, we describe how the JSATS cabled system was employed as a reference sensor network for detecting and tracking juvenile salmon. Time-of-arrival data for valid detections on four hydrophones were used to solve for the three-dimensional (3D) position of fish surgically implanted with JSATS acoustic transmitters. Validation tests demonstrated high accuracy of 3D tracking up to 100 m upstream from the John Day Dam spillway. The along-dam component, used for assigning the route of fish passage, had the highest accuracy; the median errors ranged from 0.02 to 0.22 m, and root mean square errors ranged from 0.07 to 0.56 m at distances up to 100 m. For the 2008 case study at John Day Dam, the range for 3D tracking was more than 100 m upstream of the dam face where hydrophones were deployed, and detection and tracking probabilities of fish tagged with JSATS acoustic transmitters were higher than 98%. JSATS cabled systems have been successfully deployed on several major dams to acquire information for salmon protection and for development of more “fish-friendly” hydroelectric facilities. PMID:22163919

      1. Multiple-pass laser beam deflection probe for detection of acoustic and weak shock waves in fluids

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Diaci, Janez; Možina, Janez

        1995-09-01

        We examine a novel laser beam deflection arrangement for detection of acoustic and weak shock waves in fluids. Novelty of the arrangement is folding of the probe beam by two parallel plane mirrors in such a way that the probe beam passes the wave propagation region several times before it reaches the deflection-detecting photodetector. In this way the probed wave interacts with several segments of the probing beam in sequence. A single oscilloscope trace of the photodetector output thus gives us the possibility to study the evolution of the probed wave at several distances from the source. To demonstrate the potentials of the arrangement we present wave forms of spherical blast waves detected in air during laser ablation of solid samples. We also discuss a simple theoretical model that qualitatively explains the most characteristic features of this arrangement.

      2. Acoustic Emission and Guided Ultrasonic Waves for Detection and Continuous Monitoring of Cracks in Light Water Reactor Components

        SciTech Connect

        Meyer, Ryan M.; Coble, Jamie B.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Watson, Bruce E.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Doctor, Steven R.; Bond, Leonard J.

        2012-06-28

        Acoustic emission (AE) and guided ultrasonic waves (GUW) are considered for continuous monitoring and detection of cracks in Light Water Reactor (LWR) components. In this effort, both techniques are applied to the detection and monitoring of fatigue crack growth in a full scale pipe component. AE results indicated crack initiation and rapid growth in the pipe, and significant GUW responses were observed in response to the growth of the fatigue crack. After initiation, the crack growth was detectable with AE for approximately 20,000 cycles. Signals associated with initiation and rapid growth where distinguished based on total rate of activity and differences observed in the centroid frequency of hits. An intermediate stage between initiation and rapid growth was associated with significant energy emissions, though few hits. GUW exhibit a nearly monotonic trend with crack length with an exception of measurements obtained at 41 mm and 46 mm.

      3. Accounting for false-positive acoustic detections of bats using occupancy models

        USGS Publications Warehouse

        Clement, Matthew J.; Rodhouse, Thomas J.; Ormsbee, Patricia C.; Szewczak, Joseph M.; Nichols, James D.

        2014-01-01

        4. Synthesis and applications. Our results suggest that false positives sufficient to affect inferences may be common in acoustic surveys for bats. We demonstrate an approach that can estimate occupancy, regardless of the false-positive rate, when acoustic surveys are paired with capture surveys. Applications of this approach include monitoring the spread of White-Nose Syndrome, estimating the impact of climate change and informing conservation listing decisions. We calculate a site-specific probability of occupancy, conditional on survey results, which could inform local permitting decisions, such as for wind energy projects. More generally, the magnitude of false positives suggests that false-positive occupancy models can improve accuracy in research and monitoring of bats and provide wildlife managers with more reliable information.

      4. Visualizing detecting low-frequency underwater acoustic signals by means of optical diffraction.

        PubMed

        Ren, Yao; Miao, Runcai; Su, Xiaoming; Chen, Hua

        2016-03-10

        A novel and simple technique based on the light diffraction effect for visualization of low-frequency underwater acoustic waves (LFUAWs) in real time has been developed in this paper. A cylindrical object has been put on the surface of the water. A low-frequency underwater longitudinal wave can be generated into a water surface transversal capillary wave around the cylinder by our technique. Modulating the phase of a laser beam reflected from a water surface by surface acoustic waves (SAWs) realizes the acousto-optic effect. Then, a steady and visible diffraction pattern is experimentally observed. A physical model of the SAW is established to verify the feasibility of our technique. An analytical expression of wavelength, wave amplitude, and excitation frequency has been derived to study the physical properties of LFUAWs, and it explains the experimental phenomenon very well. As a result, the technique is effective, easy, and practical for visualizing LFUAWs and has significance for applications. PMID:26974797

      5. Effects of using inclined parametric echosounding on sub-bottom acoustic imaging and advances in buried object detection

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Schneider von Deimling, Jens; Held, Philipp; Feldens, Peter; Wilken, Dennis

        2016-04-01

        This study reports an adaptation of a parametric echosounder system using 15 kHz as secondary frequency to investigate the angular response of sub-bottom backscatter strength of layered mud, providing a new method for enhanced acoustic detection of buried targets. Adaptions to achieve both vertical (0°) and non-vertical inclination (1-15°, 30°, 45° and 60°) comprise mechanical tilting of the acoustic transducer and electronic beam steering. Data were acquired at 18 m water depth at a study site characterized by a flat, muddy seafloor where a 0.1 m diameter power cable lies 1-2 m below the seafloor. Surveying the cable with vertical incidence revealed that the buried cable can hardly be discriminated against the backscatter strength of the layered mud. However, the backscatter strength of layered mud decreases strongly at >3±0.5° incidence and the layered mud echo pattern vanishes beyond 5°. As a consequence, the backscatter pattern of the buried cable is very pronounced in acoustic images gathered at 15°, 30°, 45° and 60° incidence. The size of the cable echo pattern increases linearly with incidence. These effects are attributed to reflection loss from layered mud at larger incidence and to the scattering of the 0.1 m diameter buried cable. Data analyses support the visual impression of superior detection of the cable with an up to 2.6-fold increase of the signal-to-noise ratio at 40° incidence compared to the vertical incidence case.

      6. Results from long-term detection of mixing layer height: ceilometer and comparison with Radio-Acoustic Sounding System

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Schäfer, Klaus; Emeis, Stefan; Jahn, Carsten; Tuma, Michael; Münkel, Christoph; Suppan, Peter

        2012-11-01

        The mixing layer height (MLH) is an important factor which influences exchange processes of ground level emissions. The continuous knowledge of MLH is supporting the understanding of processes directing air quality. If the MLH is located near to the ground, which occurs mainly during winter and night-time, air pollution can be high due to a strongly limited air mass dilution. Since 2006 different methods for long-term continuous remote sensing of mixing layer height (MLH) are operated in Augsburg. The Vaisala ceilometers LD40 and CL31 are used which are eye-safe commercial mini-lidar systems. The ceilometer measurements provide information about the range-dependent aerosol concentration; gradient minima within this profile mark the borders of mixed layers. Special software for these ceilometers provides routine retrievals of lower atmosphere layering from vertical profiles of laser backscatter data. The radiosonde data from the station Oberschleissheim near Munich (about 50 km away from Augsburg city) are also used for MLH determination. The profile behavior of relative humidity (strong decrease) and virtual potential temperature (inversion) of the radiosonde agree mostly well with the MLH indication from ceilometer laser backscatter density gradients. A RASS (Radio-Acoustic Sounding System) from Metek is applied which detects the height of a turbulent layer characterized by high acoustic backscatter intensities due to thermal fluctuations and a high variance of the vertical velocity component as well as the vertical temperature profile from the detection of acoustic signal propagation and thus temperature inversions which mark atmospheric layers. These data of RASS measurements are the input for a software-based determination of MLH. A comparison of the results of the remote sensing methods during simultaneous measurements was performed. The information content of the different remote sensing instruments for MLH in dependence from different weather classes was

      7. Acoustic detection and long-term monitoring of pygmy blue whales over the continental slope in southwest Australia.

        PubMed

        Gavrilova, Alexander N; McCauley, Robert D

        2013-09-01

        A 9-yr dataset of continuous sea noise recording made at the Cape Leeuwin station of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty hydroacoustic network in 2002-2010 was processed to detect calls from pygmy blue whales and to analyze diurnal, seasonal, and interannual variations in their vocal activity. Because the conventional spectrogram correlation method for recognizing whale calls in sea noise resulted in a too high false detection rate, alternative algorithms were tested and the most robust one applied to the multi-year dataset. The detection method was based on multivariate classification using two spectrogram features of transients in sea noise and Fisher's linear discriminant, which provided a misclassification rate of approximately 1% for missed and false detections at moderate sensitivity settings. An analysis of the detection results revealed a consistent seasonal pattern in the whale presence and considerable interannual changes with a steady increase in the number of calls detected in 2002-2006. An apparent diurnal pattern of whales' vocal activity was also observed. The acoustic detection range for pygmy blue whales was estimated to vary from about 50 km to nearly 200 km from the Cape Leeuwin station, depending on the ambient noise level, source level, and azimuth to a vocalizing whale. PMID:23968048

      8. Acoustic detection and long-term monitoring of pygmy blue whales over the continental slope in southwest Australia.

        PubMed

        Gavrilova, Alexander N; McCauley, Robert D

        2013-09-01

        A 9-yr dataset of continuous sea noise recording made at the Cape Leeuwin station of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty hydroacoustic network in 2002-2010 was processed to detect calls from pygmy blue whales and to analyze diurnal, seasonal, and interannual variations in their vocal activity. Because the conventional spectrogram correlation method for recognizing whale calls in sea noise resulted in a too high false detection rate, alternative algorithms were tested and the most robust one applied to the multi-year dataset. The detection method was based on multivariate classification using two spectrogram features of transients in sea noise and Fisher's linear discriminant, which provided a misclassification rate of approximately 1% for missed and false detections at moderate sensitivity settings. An analysis of the detection results revealed a consistent seasonal pattern in the whale presence and considerable interannual changes with a steady increase in the number of calls detected in 2002-2006. An apparent diurnal pattern of whales' vocal activity was also observed. The acoustic detection range for pygmy blue whales was estimated to vary from about 50 km to nearly 200 km from the Cape Leeuwin station, depending on the ambient noise level, source level, and azimuth to a vocalizing whale.

      9. Using Berrys phase for position-sensitive acoustical and stress detection

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Kuzyk, Mark G.

        2002-10-01

        Berry showed that a quantum system, upon an excursion around a closed path in phase space, can lead to a geometric phase. The polarization state of light in a fiber is a classical analog that is called the Pancharantnam phase. While most experiments have focused on esoteric issues, I show that, in theory, Berrys phase (or Pancharantnams phase) can be used to make a position-sensitive acoustical or stress sensor. 2002 Optical Society of America

      10. Acoustic events semantic detection, classification, and annotation for persistent surveillance applications

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Alkilani, Amjad; Shirkhodaie, Amir

        2014-06-01

        Understanding of group activity based on analysis of spatiotemporally correlated acoustic sound events has received a minimum attention in the literature and hence is not well understood. Identification of group sub-activities such as: Human-Vehicle Interactions (HVI), Human-Object Interactions (HOI), and Human-Human Interactions (HHI) can significantly improve Situational Awareness (SA) in Persistent Surveillance Systems (PSS). In this paper, salient sound events associated with group activities are preliminary identified and applied for training a Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM) whose features are employed as feature vectors for training of algorithms for acoustic sound recognition. In this paper, discrimination of salient sounds associated with the HVI, HHI, and HOI events is achieved via a Correlation Based Template Matching (CMTM) classifier. To interlinked salient events representing an ontology-based hypothesis, a Hidden Markov Model (HMM) is employed to recognize spatiotemporally correlated events. Once such a connection is established, then, the system generates an annotation of each perceived sound event. This paper discusses the technical aspects of this approach and presents the experimental results for several outdoor group activities monitored by an array of acoustic sensors.

      11. Hierarchical multilayer perceptron network-based fusion algorithms for detection/classification of mines using multiple acoustic images and magnetic data

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Bello, Martin G.

        1996-05-01

        Hierarchical neural network approaches have been developed first for combining high and low frequency (HF and LF) Side Scan Sonar imagery, and then for the combination of both acoustic images and Magnetic data. The adopted acoustic data fusion approach consists in a image-screening/HF, LF blob matching stage, followed by an information fusion/classification stage. Three variants of the information fusion/classification algorithm were conceived and evaluated based on `aggregate-feature-combining', `neural-network-discriminant-combining', and individual classifier `decision-based-combining', respectively. The `discriminant- combining' case yielded the best classification performance, and when compared with individual HF, LF classifier performance resulted in at least an order of magnitude reduction in the density of false alarms. Next, results are obtained for combining both acoustic and magnetic data using the described high and low frequency side scan sonar discriminant combining fusion algorithm as a starting point. In the next step, acoustic image pair `tokens' are associated with magnetic `tokens', resulting in three classes of resulting `tokens': `associated' acoustic-pair and magnetic tokens, isolated acoustic-pair tokens, and isolated magnetic `tokens'. Neural network output discriminants are derived for each of the three types of tokens mentioned above, and are employed to make classification decisions. The resulting Detection/Classification Algorithm is evaluated based on a combined ground truth obtained from both acoustic and magnetic sources.

      12. Simulation study and guidelines to generate Laser-induced Surface Acoustic Waves for human skin feature detection

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Li, Tingting; Fu, Xing; Chen, Kun; Dorantes-Gonzalez, Dante J.; Li, Yanning; Wu, Sen; Hu, Xiaotang

        2015-12-01

        Despite the seriously increasing number of people contracting skin cancer every year, limited attention has been given to the investigation of human skin tissues. To this regard, Laser-induced Surface Acoustic Wave (LSAW) technology, with its accurate, non-invasive and rapid testing characteristics, has recently shown promising results in biological and biomedical tissues. In order to improve the measurement accuracy and efficiency of detecting important features in highly opaque and soft surfaces such as human skin, this paper identifies the most important parameters of a pulse laser source, as well as provides practical guidelines to recommended proper ranges to generate Surface Acoustic Waves (SAWs) for characterization purposes. Considering that melanoma is a serious type of skin cancer, we conducted a finite element simulation-based research on the generation and propagation of surface waves in human skin containing a melanoma-like feature, determine best pulse laser parameter ranges of variation, simulation mesh size and time step, working bandwidth, and minimal size of detectable melanoma.

      13. Acoustic biosensors

        PubMed Central

        Fogel, Ronen; Seshia, Ashwin A.

        2016-01-01

        Resonant and acoustic wave devices have been researched for several decades for application in the gravimetric sensing of a variety of biological and chemical analytes. These devices operate by coupling the measurand (e.g. analyte adsorption) as a modulation in the physical properties of the acoustic wave (e.g. resonant frequency, acoustic velocity, dissipation) that can then be correlated with the amount of adsorbed analyte. These devices can also be miniaturized with advantages in terms of cost, size and scalability, as well as potential additional features including integration with microfluidics and electronics, scaled sensitivities associated with smaller dimensions and higher operational frequencies, the ability to multiplex detection across arrays of hundreds of devices embedded in a single chip, increased throughput and the ability to interrogate a wider range of modes including within the same device. Additionally, device fabrication is often compatible with semiconductor volume batch manufacturing techniques enabling cost scalability and a high degree of precision and reproducibility in the manufacturing process. Integration with microfluidics handling also enables suitable sample pre-processing/separation/purification/amplification steps that could improve selectivity and the overall signal-to-noise ratio. Three device types are reviewed here: (i) bulk acoustic wave sensors, (ii) surface acoustic wave sensors, and (iii) micro/nano-electromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS) sensors. PMID:27365040

      14. Acoustic biosensors.

        PubMed

        Fogel, Ronen; Limson, Janice; Seshia, Ashwin A

        2016-06-30

        Resonant and acoustic wave devices have been researched for several decades for application in the gravimetric sensing of a variety of biological and chemical analytes. These devices operate by coupling the measurand (e.g. analyte adsorption) as a modulation in the physical properties of the acoustic wave (e.g. resonant frequency, acoustic velocity, dissipation) that can then be correlated with the amount of adsorbed analyte. These devices can also be miniaturized with advantages in terms of cost, size and scalability, as well as potential additional features including integration with microfluidics and electronics, scaled sensitivities associated with smaller dimensions and higher operational frequencies, the ability to multiplex detection across arrays of hundreds of devices embedded in a single chip, increased throughput and the ability to interrogate a wider range of modes including within the same device. Additionally, device fabrication is often compatible with semiconductor volume batch manufacturing techniques enabling cost scalability and a high degree of precision and reproducibility in the manufacturing process. Integration with microfluidics handling also enables suitable sample pre-processing/separation/purification/amplification steps that could improve selectivity and the overall signal-to-noise ratio. Three device types are reviewed here: (i) bulk acoustic wave sensors, (ii) surface acoustic wave sensors, and (iii) micro/nano-electromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS) sensors. PMID:27365040

      15. Two-wavelength quadrature multipoint detection of partial discharge in power transformers using fiber Fabry-Perot acoustic sensors

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Dong, Bo; Han, Ming; Wang, Anbo

        2012-06-01

        A reliable and low-cost two-wavelength quadrature interrogating method has been developed to demodulate optical signals from diaphragm-based Fabry-Perot interferometric fiber optic sensors for multipoint partial discharge detection in power transformers. Commercial available fused-silica parts (a wafer, a fiber ferrule, and a mating sleeve) and a cleaved optical single mode fiber were bonded together to form an extrinsic Fabry-Perot acoustic sensor. Two lasers with center wavelengths separated by a quarter of the period of sensor interference fringes were used to probe acousticwave- induced diaphragm vibration. A coarse wavelength-division multiplexing (CWDM) add/drop multiplexer was used to separate the reflected two wavelengths before two photo detectors. Optical couplers were used to distribute mixed laser light to each sensor-detector module for multiplexing purpose. Sensor structure, detection system design and experiment results are presented.

      16. Gas-coupled laser acoustic detection as a non-contact line detector for photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Johnson, Jami L.; van Wijk, Kasper; Caron, James N.; Timmerman, Miriam

        2016-02-01

        Conventional contacting transducers for ultrasonic wave detection are highly sensitive and tuned for real-time imaging with fixed array geometries. However, optical detection provides an alternative to contacting transducers when a small sensor footprint, a large frequency bandwidth, or non-contacting detection is required. Typical optical detection relies on a Doppler-shifted reflection of light from the target, but gas coupled-laser acoustic detection (GCLAD) provides an alternative optical detection method for photoacoustic (PA) and ultrasound imaging that does not involve surface reflectivity. Instead, GCLAD is a line-detector that measures the deflection of an optical beam propagating parallel to the sample, as the refractive index of the air near the sample is affected by particle displacement on the sample surface. We describe the underlying principles of GCLAD and derive a formula for quantifying the surface displacement from a remote GCLAD measurement. We discuss a design for removing the location-dependent displacement bias along the probe beam and a method for measuring the attenuation coefficient of the surrounding air. GCLAD results are used to quantify the surface displacement in a laser-ultrasound experiment, which shows 94% agreement to line-integrated data from a commercial laser vibrometer point detector. Finally, we demonstrate the feasibility of PA imaging of an artery-sized absorber using a detector 5.8 cm from a phantom surface.

      17. Detection of acoustic emission from composite laminates using PVF2 transducers

        NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

        Stiffler, R.; Henneke, E. G., II; Herakovich, C. T.

        1983-01-01

        Polyvinylidene fluoride (PVF2), a semicrystalline polymer exhibiting piezoelectricity, is presently used as a sensing transducer in acoustic emission (AE) monitoring of several different composite laminate materials in order to obtain both quasi-static and fatigue loading results. AE signals obtained from PVF2 transducers are compared with those obtained by standard AE sensors. It is noted that PVF2 transducers may, through the application of spectral signal analysis, be able to distinguish between two distinct failure modes which have been observed in two composite laminates of the same material, but employing different lamina stacking sequences.

      18. A Directed Energy System for Defeat of Improvised Explosive Devices and Landmines

        SciTech Connect

        Boley, C; Fochs, S; Parker, J; Rotter, M; Rubenchik, A; Yamamoto, R

        2006-03-20

        We describe a laser system, built in our laboratory at LLNL, that has near-term, effective applications in exposing and neutralizing improvised explosive devices and landmines. We discuss experiments with this laser, demonstrating excavation capabilities and relevant material interactions. Model results are also described.

      19. Burst fracture of the lumbar vertebra due to a landmine injury: a case report

        PubMed Central

        Bilgic, Serkan; Kurklu, Mustafa; Yurttas, Yuksel; Ozkan, Huseyin; Sehirlioglu, Ali

        2009-01-01

        Introduction The reason we report this case is that spine injuries may well occur due to landmines similar to other injuries like traumatic limb amputations and more over they may be overlooked. Case presentation The patient was 29-years-old Turkish male and was a member of the military. He detonated the landmine that caused his injuries while in a conflict zone. He had a right below knee and left above knee traumatic amputations. He had also mild intermittent pain in his lower back. There were no focal neurological findings such as weakness, altered sensibility, or alteration in the function of the bowel or bladder. Radiographs of the lumbar spine revealed an L2 burst fracture. Computed tomography scans and magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbar spine demonstrated a burst fracture of the L2 vertebrae and moderate compression in the anterior portion of the thecal sac due to the fracture fragment. Because of the stabile nature of the L2 burst fracture and lack of neurological disturbance, operative decompression, instrumentation and fusion was not performed. After healing of the stumps, the patient was mobilized with immediate prostheses and a thoracolumbosacral brace. Conclusion Spine injuries should not be overlooked when evaluating patients after landmine explosions. After the patient has been stabilized, the secondary screening and radiographic evaluations should also comprise the thoracic, thoracolumbar and lumbar spine when treating patients after landmine injuries. PMID:19829776

      20. Passive acoustic detection and localization of whales: effects of shipping noise in Saguenay-St. Lawrence Marine Park.

        PubMed

        Simard, Yvan; Roy, Nathalie; Gervaise, Cédric

        2008-06-01

        The performance of large-aperture hydrophone arrays to detect and localize blue and fin whales' 15-85 Hz signature vocalizations under ocean noise conditions was assessed through simulations from a normal mode propagation model combined to noise statistics from 15 960 h of recordings in Saguenay-St. Lawrence Marine Park. The probability density functions of 2482 summer noise level estimates in the call bands were used to attach a probability of detection/masking to the simulated call levels as a function of whale depth and range for typical environmental conditions. Results indicate that call detection was modulated by the calling depth relative to the sound channel axis and by modal constructive and destructive interferences with range. Masking of loud infrasounds could reach 40% at 30 km for a receiver at the optimal depth. The 30 dB weaker blue whale D-call were subject to severe masking. Mapping the percentages of detection and localization allowed assessing the performance of a six-hydrophone array under mean- and low-noise conditions. This approach is helpful for optimizing hydrophone configuration in implementing passive acoustic monitoring arrays and building their detection function for whale density assessment, as an alternative to or in combination with the traditional undersampling visual methods. PMID:18537362

      1. Passive acoustic detection and localization of whales: effects of shipping noise in Saguenay-St. Lawrence Marine Park.

        PubMed

        Simard, Yvan; Roy, Nathalie; Gervaise, Cédric

        2008-06-01

        The performance of large-aperture hydrophone arrays to detect and localize blue and fin whales' 15-85 Hz signature vocalizations under ocean noise conditions was assessed through simulations from a normal mode propagation model combined to noise statistics from 15 960 h of recordings in Saguenay-St. Lawrence Marine Park. The probability density functions of 2482 summer noise level estimates in the call bands were used to attach a probability of detection/masking to the simulated call levels as a function of whale depth and range for typical environmental conditions. Results indicate that call detection was modulated by the calling depth relative to the sound channel axis and by modal constructive and destructive interferences with range. Masking of loud infrasounds could reach 40% at 30 km for a receiver at the optimal depth. The 30 dB weaker blue whale D-call were subject to severe masking. Mapping the percentages of detection and localization allowed assessing the performance of a six-hydrophone array under mean- and low-noise conditions. This approach is helpful for optimizing hydrophone configuration in implementing passive acoustic monitoring arrays and building their detection function for whale density assessment, as an alternative to or in combination with the traditional undersampling visual methods.

      2. Excitation and detection of shear horizontal waves with electromagnetic acoustic transducers for nondestructive testing of plates

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Ma, Qingzeng; Jiao, Jingpin; Hu, Ping; Zhong, Xi; Wu, Bin; He, Cunfu

        2014-03-01

        The fundamental shear horizontal(SH0) wave has several unique features that are attractive for long-range nondestructive testing(NDT). By a careful design of the geometric configuration, electromagnetic acoustic transducers(EMATs) have the capability to generate a wide range of guided wave modes, such as Lamb waves and shear-horizontal(SH) waves in plates. However, the performance of EMATs is influenced by their parameters. To evaluate the performance of periodic permanent magnet(PPM) EMATs, a distributed-line-source model is developed to calculate the angular acoustic field cross-section in the far-field. Numerical analysis is conducted to investigate the performance of such EMATs with different geometric parameters, such as period and number of magnet arrays, and inner and outer coil widths. Such parameters have a great influence on the directivity of the generated SH0 waves that arises mainly in the amplitude and width of both main and side lobes. According to the numerical analysis, these parameters are optimized to obtain better directivity. Optimized PPM EMATs are designed and used for NDT of strip plates. Experimental results show that the lateral boundary of the strip plate has no perceivable influence on SH0-wave propagation, thus validating their used in NDT. The proposed model predicts the radiation pattern of PPM EMATs, and can be used for their parameter optimization.

      3. Acoustic wave biosensor for the detection of the breast and prostate cancer metastasis biomarker protein PTHrP.

        PubMed

        Crivianu-Gaita, Victor; Aamer, Mohamed; Posaratnanathan, Roy T; Romaschin, Alexander; Thompson, Michael

        2016-04-15

        There are currently no biosensors that are able to reliably detect the process of cancer metastasis. We describe the first label-free real-time ultra-high frequency acoustic wave biosensor prototype capable of detecting the breast and prostate cancer metastasis biomarker, parathyroid hormone-related peptide (PTHrP). Two different linkers - 11-trichlorosilyl-undecanoic acid pentafluorophenyl ester (PFP) and S-(11-trichlorosilyl-undecanyl)-benzothiosulfonate (TUBTS) - were used to immobilize whole anti-PTHrP antibodies and Fab' fragments to surfaces as biorecognition elements. The biosensor surfaces were optimized using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and the ultra-high frequency electromagnetic piezoelectric acoustic sensor (EMPAS). One optimized whole antibody-based surface (PFP/protein G'/whole antibodies/ethanolamine) and one optimized Fab' fragment-based surface (TUBTS/Fab' fragments) were tested as biosensors. It was determined that an in-line injection of bovine serum albumin prior to analyte injection yielded the most minimally fouling surfaces. Each surface was tested with no mass amplification and with sandwich-type secondary antibody mass amplification. The whole antibody-based mass-amplified biosensor yielded the lowest limit of detection (61 ng/mL), highest sensitivity, and a linear range from 61 ng/mL to 100 μg/mL. However, the Fab' fragment-based biosensor displayed better regenerability as a loss of ~20% of the initial analyte signal intensity was observed with each subsequent injection. The whole antibody-based biosensor was only capable of producing an analyte signal in the first injection.

      4. Effective channel estimation and efficient symbol detection for multi-input multi-output underwater acoustic communications

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Ling, Jun

        Achieving reliable underwater acoustic communications (UAC) has long been recognized as a challenging problem owing to the scarce bandwidth available and the reverberant spread in both time and frequency domains. To pursue high data rates, we consider a multi-input multi-output (MIMO) UAC system, and our focus is placed on two main issues regarding a MIMO UAC system: (1) channel estimation, which involves the design of the training sequences and the development of a reliable channel estimation algorithm, and (2) symbol detection, which requires interference cancelation schemes due to simultaneous transmission from multiple transducers. To enhance channel estimation performance, we present a cyclic approach for designing training sequences with good auto- and cross-correlation properties, and a channel estimation algorithm called the iterative adaptive approach (IAA). Sparse channel estimates can be obtained by combining IAA with the Bayesian information criterion (BIC). Moreover, we present sparse learning via iterative minimization (SLIM) and demonstrate that SLIM gives similar performance to IAA but at a much lower computational cost. Furthermore, an extension of the SLIM algorithm is introduced to estimate the sparse and frequency modulated acoustic channels. The extended algorithm is referred to as generalization of SLIM (GoSLIM). Regarding symbol detection, a linear minimum mean-squared error based detection scheme, called RELAX-BLAST, which is a combination of vertical Bell Labs layered space-time (V-BLAST) algorithm and the cyclic principle of the RELAX algorithm, is presented and it is shown that RELAX-BLAST outperforms V-BLAST. We show that RELAX-BLAST can be implemented efficiently by making use of the conjugate gradient method and diagonalization properties of circulant matrices. This fast implementation approach requires only simple fast Fourier transform operations and facilitates parallel implementations. The effectiveness of the proposed MIMO schemes

      5. Large-scale investigation of plaster detachments in historical murals by acoustic stimulation and video-holographic detection

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Guelker, Gerd; Hinsch, Klaus D.; Joost, Holger

        2001-10-01

        In the conservation of historical murals an important issue is the detection of plaster or paint layers that detach from the supporting material and thus threaten to fall off. Commonly, walls are inspected by the acoustic response to a gentle finger-tapping (percussion method). Since this is a costly and cumbersome technique there is need for a metrological instrument serving the same purpose. In the last few years we have shown, that a time-average version of electronic speckle pattern interferometry (ESPI) with increased sensitivity in combination with acoustic excitation of the object can be a powerful tool for monitoring of loose areas. It offers full-field, video real time capability and has the advantage of non-contact and remote operation which, for example, is extremely useful in large buildings. Recently, a fully computer-based evaluation and control system was added to the system to assist in the introduction of the method as a generally approved tool in artwork monitoring. Principles of the method and instrumental features of the equipment are presented and some results and their interpretation obtained with the computerized system in the church and chapel at St. John's convent at Mnstair, Switzerland are demonstrated.

      6. An alternative quantitative acoustical and electrical method for detection of cell adhesion process in real-time.

        PubMed

        Le Guillou-Buffello, Delphine; Gindre, Marcel; Johnson, Paul; Laugier, Pascal; Migonney, Véronique

        2011-04-01

        Sauerbrey [(1956), Z Phys 55:206-222] showed that the shift in resonance frequency of thickness shear mode (TSM) of a quartz crystal sensor is proportional to the mass, which is deposited on it. However, new powerful electrical circuits were developed that are capable of operating TSM quartz crystal sensors in fluids which enabled this method to be introduced into electrochemical and biological applications. These applications include the detection of virus capsids, bacteria, mammalian cells, the interaction of DNA and RNA with complementary strands, specific recognition of protein ligands by immobilized receptors, and last but not least the study of complete immunosensors. Piezoelectric quartz transducers allow a label-free identification of molecules; they are more than mass sensors since the biosensor response is also influenced by the surface charge of adsorbed proteins, interfacial phenomena, surface roughness and viscoelastic properties of the adhered biomaterial. These new characteristics have recently been used to investigate cell, liposome, and protein adhesion onto surfaces, thus permitting the rapid determination of morphological cell changes as a response to pharmacological substances, and changes in the water content of biopolymers avoiding of time-consuming methods. We validated an alternative quantitative acoustical engineering for cell adhesion process monitored by the TSM. Shear acoustical results (motional resistance) are further correlated to cell counting procedures and are sensitive of adhesion processes in real-time.

      7. Online Doppler Effect Elimination Based on Unequal Time Interval Sampling for Wayside Acoustic Bearing Fault Detecting System.

        PubMed

        Ouyang, Kesai; Lu, Siliang; Zhang, Shangbin; Zhang, Haibin; He, Qingbo; Kong, Fanrang

        2015-08-27

        The railway occupies a fairly important position in transportation due to its high speed and strong transportation capability. As a consequence, it is a key issue to guarantee continuous running and transportation safety of trains. Meanwhile, time consumption of the diagnosis procedure is of extreme importance for the detecting system. However, most of the current adopted techniques in the wayside acoustic defective bearing detector system (ADBD) are offline strategies, which means that the signal is analyzed after the sampling process. This would result in unavoidable time latency. Besides, the acquired acoustic signal would be corrupted by the Doppler effect because of high relative speed between the train and the data acquisition system (DAS). Thus, it is difficult to effectively diagnose the bearing defects immediately. In this paper, a new strategy called online Doppler effect elimination (ODEE) is proposed to remove the Doppler distortion online by the introduced unequal interval sampling scheme. The steps of proposed strategy are as follows: The essential parameters are acquired in advance. Then, the introduced unequal time interval sampling strategy is used to restore the Doppler distortion signal, and the amplitude of the signal is demodulated as well. Thus, the restored Doppler-free signal is obtained online. The proposed ODEE method has been employed in simulation analysis. Ultimately, the ODEE method is implemented in the embedded system for fault diagnosis of the train bearing. The results are in good accordance with the bearing defects, which verifies the good performance of the proposed strategy.

      8. Online Doppler Effect Elimination Based on Unequal Time Interval Sampling for Wayside Acoustic Bearing Fault Detecting System

        PubMed Central

        Ouyang, Kesai; Lu, Siliang; Zhang, Shangbin; Zhang, Haibin; He, Qingbo; Kong, Fanrang

        2015-01-01

        The railway occupies a fairly important position in transportation due to its high speed and strong transportation capability. As a consequence, it is a key issue to guarantee continuous running and transportation safety of trains. Meanwhile, time consumption of the diagnosis procedure is of extreme importance for the detecting system. However, most of the current adopted techniques in the wayside acoustic defective bearing detector system (ADBD) are offline strategies, which means that the signal is analyzed after the sampling process. This would result in unavoidable time latency. Besides, the acquired acoustic signal would be corrupted by the Doppler effect because of high relative speed between the train and the data acquisition system (DAS). Thus, it is difficult to effectively diagnose the bearing defects immediately. In this paper, a new strategy called online Doppler effect elimination (ODEE) is proposed to remove the Doppler distortion online by the introduced unequal interval sampling scheme. The steps of proposed strategy are as follows: The essential parameters are acquired in advance. Then, the introduced unequal time interval sampling strategy is used to restore the Doppler distortion signal, and the amplitude of the signal is demodulated as well. Thus, the restored Doppler-free signal is obtained online. The proposed ODEE method has been employed in simulation analysis. Ultimately, the ODEE method is implemented in the embedded system for fault diagnosis of the train bearing. The results are in good accordance with the bearing defects, which verifies the good performance of the proposed strategy. PMID:26343657

      9. Numerical and experimental analysis of high frequency acoustic microscopy and infrared reflectance system for early detection of melanoma

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Karagiannis, Georgios; Apostolidis, Georgios; Georgoulias, Panagiotis

        2016-03-01

        Melanoma is a very malicious type of cancer as it metastasizes early and hence its late diagnosis leads to death. Consequently, early diagnosis of melanoma and its removal is considered the most effective way of treatment. We present a design of a high frequency acoustic microscopy and infrared reflectance system for the early detection of melanoma. Specifically, the identification of morphological changes related to carcinogenesis is required. In this work, we simulate of the propagation of the ultrasonic waves of the order of 100 MHz as well as of electromagnetic waves of the order of 100 THz in melanoma structures targeting to the estimation and optimization of the basic characteristics of the systems. The simulation results of the acoustic microscopy subsystem aim to provide information such as the geometry of the transducer, the center frequency of operation, the focal length where the power transmittance is optimum and the spot size in focal length. As far as the infrared is concerned the optimal frequency range and the spot illumination size of the external probe is provided. This information is next used to assemble a properly designed system which is applied to melanoma phantoms as well as real skin lesions. Finally, the measurement data are visualized to reveal the information of the experimented structures, proving noteworthy accuracy.

      10. Predicting the characteristics of thunder on Titan: A framework to assess the detectability of lightning by acoustic sensing

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Petculescu, Andi; Kruse, Roland

        2014-10-01

        The search for lightning is an important item on the agenda for the future exploration of Titan. Thunder, as a direct lightning signature, can be used, together with electromagnetic signals, to corroborate and quantify lightning. Using Cassini-Huygens data and model predictions, the main characteristics of thunder produced by a potential 20 km cloud-to-ground tortuous discharge are obtained and discussed. The acoustic power released right after the discharge decreases with increasing altitude, owing to the ambient pressure and temperature gradients. Ray tracing is used to propagate sound waves to the far field. Simulated thunder waveforms are characterized by fairly long codas—on the order of tens of seconds—arising from the small acoustic absorption (˜10-4dB/km). In the low-loss environment, the principal thunder arrival will likely have a large signal-to-noise ratio ensuring a high detection selectivity. The spectral content depends on the amount of energy released during the discharge. For an energy density of 5 kJ/m, the dominant contribution lies between 50 and 80 Hz; for 500 kJ/m, it shifts to lower frequencies between 10 and 30 Hz.

      11. Online Doppler Effect Elimination Based on Unequal Time Interval Sampling for Wayside Acoustic Bearing Fault Detecting System.

        PubMed

        Ouyang, Kesai; Lu, Siliang; Zhang, Shangbin; Zhang, Haibin; He, Qingbo; Kong, Fanrang

        2015-01-01

        The railway occupies a fairly important position in transportation due to its high speed and strong transportation capability. As a consequence, it is a key issue to guarantee continuous running and transportation safety of trains. Meanwhile, time consumption of the diagnosis procedure is of extreme importance for the detecting system. However, most of the current adopted techniques in the wayside acoustic defective bearing detector system (ADBD) are offline strategies, which means that the signal is analyzed after the sampling process. This would result in unavoidable time latency. Besides, the acquired acoustic signal would be corrupted by the Doppler effect because of high relative speed between the train and the data acquisition system (DAS). Thus, it is difficult to effectively diagnose the bearing defects immediately. In this paper, a new strategy called online Doppler effect elimination (ODEE) is proposed to remove the Doppler distortion online by the introduced unequal interval sampling scheme. The steps of proposed strategy are as follows: The essential parameters are acquired in advance. Then, the introduced unequal time interval sampling strategy is used to restore the Doppler distortion signal, and the amplitude of the signal is demodulated as well. Thus, the restored Doppler-free signal is obtained online. The proposed ODEE method has been employed in simulation analysis. Ultimately, the ODEE method is implemented in the embedded system for fault diagnosis of the train bearing. The results are in good accordance with the bearing defects, which verifies the good performance of the proposed strategy. PMID:26343657

      12. The Development of Automated Detection Techniques for Passive Acoustic Monitoring as a Tool for Studying Beaked Whale Distribution and Habitat Preferences in the California Current Ecosystem

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Yack, Tina M.

        The objectives of this research were to test available automated detection methods for passive acoustic monitoring and integrate the best available method into standard marine mammal monitoring protocols for ship based surveys. The goal of the first chapter was to evaluate the performance and utility of PAMGUARD 1.0 Core software for use in automated detection of marine mammal acoustic signals during towed array surveys. Three different detector configurations of PAMGUARD were compared. These automated detection algorithms were evaluated by comparing them to the results of manual detections made by an experienced bio-acoustician (author TMY). This study provides the first detailed comparisons of PAMGUARD automated detection algorithms to manual detection methods. The results of these comparisons clearly illustrate the utility of automated detection methods for odontocete species. Results of this work showed that the majority of whistles and click events can be reliably detected using PAMGUARD software. The second chapter moves beyond automated detection to examine and test automated classification algorithms for beaked whale species. Beaked whales are notoriously elusive and difficult to study, especially using visual survey methods. The purpose of the second chapter was to test, validate, and compare algorithms for detection of beaked whales in acoustic line-transect survey data. Using data collected at sea from the PAMGUARD classifier developed in Chapter 2 it was possible to measure the clicks from visually verified Baird's beaked whale encounters and use this data to develop classifiers that could discriminate Baird's beaked whales from other beaked whale species in future work. Echolocation clicks from Baird's beaked whales, Berardius bairdii, were recorded during combined visual and acoustic shipboard surveys of cetacean populations in the California Current Ecosystem (CCE) and with autonomous, long-term recorders at four different sites in the Southern

      13. Acoustic emission and guided ultrasonic waves for detection and continuous monitoring of cracks in light water reactor components

        SciTech Connect

        Meyer, R. M.; Coble, J.; Ramuhalli, P.; Watson, B.; Cumblidge, S. E.; Doctor, S. R.; Bond, L. J.

        2012-07-01

        Acoustic emission (AE) and guided ultrasonic waves (GUW) are considered for continuous monitoring and detection of cracks in Light Water Reactor (LWR) components. In this effort, both techniques are applied to the detection and monitoring of fatigue crack growth in a full scale pipe component. AE results indicated crack initiation and rapid growth in the pipe, and significant GUW responses were observed in response to the growth of the fatigue crack. After initiation, the crack growth was detectable with AE for approximately 20,000 cycles. Signals associated with initiation and rapid growth were distinguished based on total rate of activity and differences observed in the centroid frequency of hits. An intermediate stage between initiation and rapid growth was associated with significant energy emissions, though few hits. GUW exhibit a nearly monotonic trend with crack length with an exception of measurements obtained at crack lengths of 41 mm and 46 mm. Coupling variability and shadowing by the electro-discharge machining (EDM) starter notch set the lower limit of detectability. (authors)

      14. Low frequency acoustic microscope

        DOEpatents

        Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T.

        1986-11-04

        A scanning acoustic microscope is disclosed for the detection and location of near surface flaws, inclusions or voids in a solid sample material. A focused beam of acoustic energy is directed at the sample with its focal plane at the subsurface flaw, inclusion or void location. The sample is scanned with the beam. Detected acoustic energy specularly reflected and mode converted at the surface of the sample and acoustic energy reflected by subsurface flaws, inclusions or voids at the focal plane are used for generating an interference signal which is processed and forms a signal indicative of the subsurface flaws, inclusions or voids.

      15. Experimental Study of High-Range-Resolution Medical Acoustic Imaging for Multiple Target Detection by Frequency Domain Interferometry

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Kimura, Tomoki; Taki, Hirofumi; Sakamoto, Takuya; Sato, Toru

        2009-07-01

        We employed frequency domain interferometry (FDI) for use as a medical acoustic imager to detect multiple targets with high range resolution. The phase of each frequency component of an echo varies with the frequency, and target intervals can be estimated from the phase variance. This processing technique is generally used in radar imaging. When the interference within a range gate is coherent, the cross correlation between the desired signal and the coherent interference signal is nonzero. The Capon method works under the guiding principle that output power minimization cancels the desired signal with a coherent interference signal. Therefore, we utilize frequency averaging to suppress the correlation of the coherent interference. The results of computational simulations using a pseudoecho signal show that the Capon method with adaptive frequency averaging (AFA) provides a higher range resolution than a conventional method. These techniques were experimentally investigated and we confirmed the effectiveness of the proposed method of processing by FDI.

      16. Parameters effects study on pulse laser for the generation of surface acoustic waves in human skin detection applications

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Li, Tingting; Fu, Xing; Dorantes-Gonzalez, Dante J.; Chen, Kun; Li, Yanning; Wu, Sen

        2015-10-01

        Laser-induced Surface Acoustic Waves (LSAWs) has been promisingly and widely used in recent years due to its rapid, high accuracy and non-contact evaluation potential of layered and thin film materials. For now, researchers have applied this technology on the characterization of materials' physical parameters, like Young's Modulus, density, and Poisson's ratio; or mechanical changes such as surface cracks and skin feature like a melanoma. While so far, little research has been done on providing practical guidelines on pulse laser parameters to best generate SAWs. In this paper finite element simulations of the thermos-elastic process based on human skin model for the generation of LSAWs were conducted to give the effects of pulse laser parameters have on the generated SAWs. And recommendations on the parameters to generate strong SAWs for detection and surface characterization without cause any damage to skin are given.

      17. Sea surface signatures related to subaqueous dunes detected by acoustic and radar sensors

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Hennings, Ingo; Pasenau, Horst; Werner, Friedrich

        1993-08-01

        Side-scan sonar records and radar images of the Lister Tief in the German Bight of the North Sea have been analysed. The radar data show signatures on the sea surface which are related to irregularities in the submarine seabed. Some side-scan and radar data from the test area were taken at different dates, but at the same tidal phase and under comparable weather conditions. Existing one-dimensional models of the radar imaging mechanism predict extremes in radar backscatter above maximum slope regions of subaqueous dunes. However, the acoustic data obtained during the ebb tidal phase do not always show an enhanced background noise and backscattering strength modulation directly above maximum slopes of the dunes. A large variation of the position of background noise has been observed. The experimental acoustic data contradict the results of existing radar imaging models. The sonographs showed that regions with increased background noise at close range (<5 m) are often associated with signatures of enhanced backscatter at ranges farther away (<40 m) or at lower grazing angles (<30°). We conclude that the modulation of scattering strength can be attributed to regions of air bubbles generated by turbulence and breaking water waves. Simulations of the radar cross-section modulation above the large slopes of dunes are too large to remain within the bounds of the weak hydrodynamic interaction theory in the relaxation time approximation. Therefore, this theory is not applicable in the sea area of the Lister Tief. Furthermore, the hydrodynamic mechanism of standing waves or stationary surface deformations associated with dunes is discussed.

      18. Passive acoustic detection of closed-circuit underwater breathing apparatus in an operational port environment.

        PubMed

        Fillinger, L; Hunter, A J; Zampolli, M; Clarijs, M C

        2012-10-01

        Divers constitute a potential threat to waterside infrastructures. Active diver detection sonars are available commercially but present some shortcomings, particularly in highly reverberant environments. This has led to research on passive sonar for diver detection. Passive detection of open-circuit UBA (underwater breathing apparatus) has been demonstrated. This letter reports on the detection of a diver wearing closed-circuit UBA (rebreather) in an operational harbor. Beamforming is applied to a passive array of 10 hydrophones in a pseudo-random linear arrangement. Experimental results are presented demonstrating detection of the rebreather at ranges up to 120 m and are validated by GPS ground truth.

      19. Developments in Analytical Chemistry: Acoustically Levitated Drop Reactors for Enzyme Reaction Kinetics and Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube-Based Sensors for Detection of Toxic Organic Phosphonates

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Field, Christopher Ryan

        2009-01-01

        Developments in analytical chemistry were made using acoustically levitated small volumes of liquid to study enzyme reaction kinetics and by detecting volatile organic compounds in the gas phase using single-walled carbon nanotubes. Experience gained in engineering, electronics, automation, and software development from the design and…

      20. Fissile and Non-Fissile Material Detection Using Nuclear Acoustic Resonance Signatures

        SciTech Connect

        Bernhard R. Tittmann; P.M. Lenahan; David Spears; Rhys Williams

        2008-11-25

        The objective of this project is to develop anovel technique for remote, non-destructive, non-radiation-based detection of materials of interest to Nonproliferation Programs. We propse the development of a detection system based on magnetic resonance principles (NAR), which would work where radiation detection is not possible. The approach would be non-intrusive, penetrating, applicable to many materials of interest for Nonproliferation, and be able to identify the nuclear samples under investigation.

      1. A comparison of acoustic cavitation detection thresholds measured with piezo-electric and fiber-optic hydrophone sensors.

        PubMed

        Bull, Victoria; Civale, John; Rivens, Ian; Ter Haar, Gail

        2013-12-01

        A Fabry-Perot interferometer fiber-optic hydrophone (FOH) was investigated for use as an acoustic cavitation detector and compared with a piezo-ceramic passive cavitation detector (PCD). Both detectors were used to measure negative pressure thresholds for broadband emissions in 3% agar and ex vivo bovine liver simultaneously. FOH-detected half- and fourth-harmonic emissions were also studied. Three thresholds were defined and investigated: (i) onset of cavitation; (ii) 100% probability of cavitation; and (iii) a time-integrated threshold where broadband signals integrated over a 3-s exposure duration, averaged over 5-10 repeat exposures, become statistically significantly greater than noise. The statistical sensitiviy of FOH broadband detection was low compared with that of the PCD (0.43/0.31 in agar/liver). FOH-detected fourth-harmonic data agreed best with PCD broadband (sensitivity: 0.95/0.94, specificity: 0.89/0.76 in agar/liver). The FOH has potential as a cavitation detector, particularly in applications where space is limited or during magnetic resonance-guided studies.

      2. Acoustic Radiation Force Beam Sequence Performance for Detection and Material Characterization of Atherosclerotic Plaques: Preclinical, Ex Vivo Results

        PubMed Central

        Behler, Russell H.; Czernuszewicz, Tomasz J.; Wu, Chih-Da; Nichols, Timothy C.; Zhu, Hongtu; Homeister, Jonathon W.; Merricks, Elizabeth P.; Caughey, Melissa C.; Gallippi, Caterina M.

        2014-01-01

        This work presents preclinical data demonstrating performance of acoustic radiation force (ARF) based elasticity imaging with five different beam sequences for atherosclerotic plaque detection and material characterization. Twelve trained, blinded readers evaluated parametric images taken ex vivo under simulated in vivo conditions of 22 porcine femoral arterial segments. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was carried out to quantify reader performance using spatially-matched immunohistochemistry for validation. The beam sequences employed had high sensitivity and specificity for detecting Type III+ plaques (Sens: 85%, Spec: 79%), lipid pools (Sens: 80%, Spec: 86%), fibrous caps (Sens: 86%, spec: 82%), calcium (Sens: 96%, Spec: 85%), collagen (Sens: 78%, Spec: 77%), and disrupted internal elastic lamina (Sens: 92%, Spec: 75%). 1:1 single-receive tracking yielded the highest median areas under the ROC curve (AUC), but was not statistically significantly higher than 4:1 parallel-receive tracking. Excitation focal configuration did not result in statistically different AUCs. Overall, these results suggest ARF-based imaging is relevant to detecting and characterizing plaques and support its use for diagnosing and monitoring atherosclerosis. PMID:24297014

      3. Raman and photothermal spectroscopies for explosive detection

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Finot, Eric; Brulé, Thibault; Rai, Padmnabh; Griffart, Aurélien; Bouhélier, Alexandre; Thundat, Thomas

        2013-06-01

        Detection of explosive residues using portable devices for locating landmine and terrorist weapons must sat- isfy the application criteria of high reproducibility, specificity, sensitivity and fast response time. Vibrational spectroscopies such as Raman and infrared spectroscopies have demonstrated their potential to distinguish the members of the chemical family of more than 30 explosive materials. The characteristic chemical fingerprints in the spectra of these explosives stem from the unique bond structure of each compound. However, these spectroscopies, developed in the early sixties, suffer from a poor sensitivity. On the contrary, MEMS-based chemical sensors have shown to have very high sensitivity lowering the detection limit down to less than 1 picogram, (namely 10 part per trillion) using sensor platforms based on microcantilevers, plasmonics, or surface acoustic waves. The minimum amount of molecules that can be detected depends actually on the transducer size. The selectivity in MEMS sensors is usually realized using chemical modification of the active surface. However, the lack of sufficiently selective receptors that can be immobilized on MEMS sensors remains one of the most critical issues. Microcantilever based sensors offer an excellent opportunity to combine both the infrared photothermal spectroscopy in their static mode and the unique mass sensitivity in their dynamic mode. Optical sensors based on localized plasmon resonance can also take up the challenge of addressing the selectivity by monitoring the Surface Enhanced Raman spectrum down to few molecules. The operating conditions of these promising localized spectroscopies will be discussed in terms of reliability, compactness, data analysis and potential for mass deployment.

      4. Acoustics- Version 1.0

        2012-09-13

        This package contains modules that model acoustic sensors and acoustic sources (hearable) in Umbra. It is typically used to represent hearing in characters within Umbra. Typically, the acoustic sensors detect acoustic sources at a given point; however, it also contains the capability to detect bullet cracks by detecting the sound along the bullet path that is closest to the sensor. A memory module, acoustic memory, represents remembered sounds within a given character. Over time, themore » sounds are removed, as a character forgets what it has heard.« less

      5. Acoustics- Version 1.0

        SciTech Connect

        2012-09-13

        This package contains modules that model acoustic sensors and acoustic sources (hearable) in Umbra. It is typically used to represent hearing in characters within Umbra. Typically, the acoustic sensors detect acoustic sources at a given point; however, it also contains the capability to detect bullet cracks by detecting the sound along the bullet path that is closest to the sensor. A memory module, acoustic memory, represents remembered sounds within a given character. Over time, the sounds are removed, as a character forgets what it has heard.

      6. A novel data adaptive detection scheme for distributed fiber optic acoustic sensing

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Ölçer, Íbrahim; Öncü, Ahmet

        2016-05-01

        We introduce a new approach for distributed fiber optic sensing based on adaptive processing of phase sensitive optical time domain reflectometry (Φ-OTDR) signals. Instead of conventional methods which utilizes frame averaging of detected signal traces, our adaptive algorithm senses a set of noise parameters to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for improved detection performance. This data set is called the secondary data set from which a weight vector for the detection of a signal is computed. The signal presence is sought in the primary data set. This adaptive technique can be used for vibration detection of health monitoring of various civil structures as well as any other dynamic monitoring requirements such as pipeline and perimeter security applications.

      7. Detection of dead regions in the cochlea: relevance for combined electric and acoustic stimulation.

        PubMed

        Moore, Brian C J; Glasberg, Brian; Schlueter, Anne

        2010-01-01

        A dead region is a region in the cochlea where the inner hair cells and/or the auditory neurones are functioning very poorly, if at all. People who are being considered for a combination of a cochlear implant and a hearing aid typically have a dead region in the parts of the cochlea that normally respond to medium and high frequencies, but have some functional hearing at lower frequencies. For such people, it may be useful to determine the edge frequency, f(e), of any dead region. This may be relevant to choosing the most appropriate insertion depth of the electrode array, and to the way that frequencies in the input signal are mapped to acoustic and electric stimulation. It may also be helpful in interpreting the results of research studies. This paper reviews methods for diagnosing dead regions and defining the value of f(e). It is argued that the value of f(e) cannot be determined reliably from the audiogram, although a dead region is likely to be present at a given frequency when the hearing loss at that frequency is 70 dB or more. When a sinusoidal signal is reported as sounding highly distorted or noise-like, a dead region may be present at the signal frequency, but again this is not a reliable indicator. The TEN test is a simple clinical method for diagnosis of dead regions. Where this test gives a positive diagnosis, it is recommended that psychophysical tuning curves be measured to define the value of f(e) more precisely. PMID:19955720

      8. Acoustic detection of stress-corrosion cracking of nitrogen austenitic steels

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Filippov, Yu. I.; Sagaradze, V. V.; Zavalishin, V. A.; Pecherkina, N. L.; Kataeva, N. V.; Mushnikova, S. Yu.; Kostin, S. K.; Kalinin, G. Yu.

        2014-06-01

        Structural changes and resistance to the stress-corrosion cracking of the nitrogen-bearing austenitic steels 04Kh20N6G11M2AFB and 09Kh20N6G11M2AFB (with 0.04 and 0.09 wt % C, respectively) after different treatments, including thermomechanical action, quenching from 1200°C, and aging at 700°C for 2 and 10 h, have been studied. It has been shown that aging at 700°C of the air-melted austenitic steel 09Kh20N6G11M2AFB leads to a decrease in the strength of samples with an induced crack upon the cantilever bending in air and in a 3.5% aqueous solution of NaCl as compared to the strength of the steel 04Kh20N6G11M2AFB-EShP with a smaller carbon content after high-temperature mechanical treatment or quenching from 1200°C. The smallest resistance to stress-corrosion cracking is observed in the samples of 09Kh20N6G11M2AFB steel after 10 h of aging, which is accompanied by the most intense acoustic emission and by brittle intergranular fracture. This is explained by the high rate of the anodic dissolution of the metal near chromium-depleted grain boundaries due to the formation of continuous chains of grain-boundary chromium-containing precipitates of carbides and nitrides.

      9. Heterogeneous interplate coupling along the Nankai Trough, Japan, detected by GPS-acoustic seafloor geodetic observation

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Yokota, Yusuke; Ishikawa, Tadashi; Sato, Mariko; Watanabe, Shun-ichi; Saito, Hiroaki; Ujihara, Naoto; Matsumoto, Yoshihiro; Toyama, Shin-ichi; Fujita, Masayuki; Yabuki, Tetsuichiro; Mochizuki, Masashi; Asada, Akira

        2015-12-01

        The recurring devastating earthquake that occurs in the Nankai Trough subduction zone between the Philippine Sea plate and the Eurasian plate has the potential to cause an extremely dangerous natural disaster in the foreseeable future. Many previous studies have assumed interplate-coupling ratios for this region along the trench axis using onshore geodetic data in order to understand this recursive event. However, the offshore region that has the potential to drive a devastating tsunami cannot be resolved sufficiently because the observation network is biased to the land area. Therefore, the Hydrographic and Oceanographic Department of Japan constructed a geodetic observation network on the seafloor along the Nankai Trough using a GPS-acoustic combination technique and has used it to observe seafloor crustal movements directly above the Nankai Trough subduction zone. We have set six seafloor sites and cumulated enough data to determine the displacement rate from 2006 to January 2011. Our seafloor geodetic observations at these sites revealed a heterogeneous interplate coupling that has three particular features. The fast displacement rates observed in the easternmost area indicate strong interplate coupling (>75%) around not only the future Tokai earthquake source region but also the Paleo-Zenisu ridge. The slow displacement rates near the trench axis in the Kumano-nada Sea, a shallow part of the 1944 Tonankai earthquake source region, show a lower coupling ratio (50% to 75%). The slow displacement rate observed in the area shallower than the 1946 Nankaido earthquake source region off Cape Muroto-zaki reflects weakening interplate coupling (about 50%) probably due to a subducting seamount. Our observations above the subducting ridge and seamount indicate that the effect of a subducting seamount on an interplate-coupling region depends on various conditions such as the geometry of the seamount and the friction parameters on the plate boundary.

      10. Maintaining acoustic communication at a cocktail party: heterospecific masking noise improves signal detection through frequency separation

        PubMed Central

        Siegert, M. E.; Römer, H.; Hartbauer, M.

        2014-01-01

        SUMMARY We examined acoustic masking in a chirping katydid species of the Mecopoda elongata complex due to interference with a sympatric Mecopoda species where males produce continuous trills at high amplitudes. Frequency spectra of both calling songs range from 1 to 80 kHz; the chirper species has more energy in a narrow frequency band at 2 kHz and above 40 kHz. Behaviourally, chirper males successfully phase-locked their chirps to playbacks of conspecific chirps under masking conditions at signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) of −8 dB. After the 2 kHz band in the chirp had been equalised to the level in the masking trill, the breakdown of phase-locked synchrony occurred at a SNR of +7 dB. The remarkable receiver performance is partially mirrored in the selective response of a first-order auditory interneuron (TN1) to conspecific chirps under these masking conditions. However, the selective response is only maintained for a stimulus including the 2 kHz component, although this frequency band has no influence on the unmasked TN1 response. Remarkably, the addition of masking noise at 65 dB sound pressure level (SPL) to threshold response levels of TN1 for pure tones of 2 kHz enhanced the sensitivity of the response by 10 dB. Thus, the spectral dissimilarity between masker and signal at a rather low frequency appears to be of crucial importance for the ability of the chirping species to communicate under strong masking by the trilling species. We discuss the possible properties underlying the cellular/synaptic mechanisms of the ‘novelty detector’. PMID:24307713

      11. Early state damage detection of aluminum 7075-T6 plate based on acoustic emission

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Ozevin, Didem; Li, Zhong; Heidary, Zahra

        2011-04-01

        Aluminum alloy 7075-T6 is a commonly used material in aircraft industry. A crack usually initiates at the edge of a fastener hole, and it can affect the maintenance schedule and reduce the life of an aircraft structure significantly. The fatigue property of the material has been researched widely to develop methods and models for predicting fatigue crack growth under random loading. From the point of damage tolerance design, the inspection technique of a crack for an aircraft structure is very important because it can be used to determine the inspection period of the aircraft structure. The acoustic emission (AE) technique is a nondestructive testing (NDT) method that is able to monitor damage initiation and progression in real time. Understanding the early stage of AE signature due to the damage progression using small scale laboratory samples requires non-traditional data analysis approaches. In this study, 1mm thick Al-7075-T6 plates were tested under monotonic and fatigue loading. The initiation of damage progression using AE data was identified based on improved linear location algorithm and the result was verified using elasto-plastic finite element model. The improved location algorithm integrates dispersive characteristics of flexural waves and threshold independent approach to pick up the wave arrival time. In this paper, AE results in comparison with FE model under monotonic and fatigue loading will be presented. The comparison of traditional and improved location approaches will be shown. The approach for implementing the laboratory scale results in the large scale field testing will be discussed.

      12. Extraction of Target Scatterings from Received Transients on Target Detection Trial of Ambient Noise Imaging with Acoustic Lens

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Mori, Kazuyoshi; Ogasawara, Hanako; Nakamura, Toshiaki; Tsuchiya, Takenobu; Endoh, Nobuyuki

        2012-07-01

        We have already designed and fabricated an aspherical lens with an aperture diameter of 1.0 m to develop a prototype system for ambient noise imaging (ANI). It has also been verified that this acoustic lens realizes a directional resolution, which is a beam width of 1° at the center frequency of 120 kHz over the field of view from -7 to +7°. In this study, a sea trial of silent target detection using the prototype ANI system was conducted under only natural ocean ambient noise at Uchiura Bay, in November of 2010. There were many transients in the received sound. These transients were classified roughly into directly received noises and target scatterings. We proposed a classification method to extract transients of only target scatterings. By analyzing transients extracted as target scatterings, it was verified that the power spectrum density levels of the on-target directions were greater than those of the off-target directions in the higher frequency band over 60 kHz. These results showed that the targets are successfully detected under natural ocean ambient noise, mainly generated by snapping shrimps.

      13. Detection of defect parameters using nonlinear air-coupled emission by ultrasonic guided waves at contact acoustic nonlinearities.

        PubMed

        Delrue, Steven; Van Den Abeele, Koen

        2015-12-01

        Interaction of ultrasonic guided waves with kissing bonds (closed delaminations and incipient surface breaking cracks) gives rise to nonlinear features at the defect location. This causes higher harmonic frequency ultrasonic radiation into the ambient air, often referred to as Nonlinear Air-Coupled Emission (NACE), which may serve as a nonlinear tag to detect the defects. This paper summarizes the results of a numerical implementation and simulation study of NACE. The developed model combines a 3D time domain model for the nonlinear Lamb wave propagation in delaminated samples with a spectral solution for the nonlinear air-coupled emission. A parametric study is conducted to illustrate the potential of detecting defect location, size and shape by studying the NACE acoustic radiation patterns in different orientation planes. The simulation results prove that there is a good determination potential for the defect parameters, especially when the radiated frequency matches one of the resonance frequencies of the delaminated layer, leading to a Local Defect Resonance (LDR). PMID:26208725

      14. Acoustic detection and quantification of benthic egg beds of the squid Loligo opalescens in Monterey Bay, California.

        PubMed

        Foote, Kenneth G; Hanlon, Roger T; Lampietro, Pat J; Kvitek, Rikk G

        2006-02-01

        The squid Loligo opalescens is a key species in the nearshore pelagic community of California, supporting the most valuable state marine fishery, yet the stock biomass is unknown. In southern Monterey Bay, extensive beds occur on a flat, sandy bottom, water depths 20-60 m, thus sidescan sonar is a prima-facie candidate for use in rapid, synoptic, and noninvasive surveying. The present study describes development of an acoustic method to detect, identify, and quantify squid egg beds by means of high-frequency sidescan-sonar imagery. Verification of the method has been undertaken with a video camera carried on a remotely operated vehicle. It has been established that sidescan sonar images can be used to predict the presence or absence of squid egg beds. The lower size limit of detectability of an isolated egg bed is about 0.5 m with a 400-kHz sidescan sonar used with a 50-m range when towed at 3 knots. It is possible to estimate the abundance of eggs in a region of interest by computing the cumulative area covered by the egg beds according to the sidescan sonar image. In a selected quadrat one arc second on each side, the estimated number of eggs was 36.5 million. PMID:16521745

      15. Acoustic detection and quantification of benthic egg beds of the squid Loligo opalescens in Monterey Bay, California.

        PubMed

        Foote, Kenneth G; Hanlon, Roger T; Lampietro, Pat J; Kvitek, Rikk G

        2006-02-01

        The squid Loligo opalescens is a key species in the nearshore pelagic community of California, supporting the most valuable state marine fishery, yet the stock biomass is unknown. In southern Monterey Bay, extensive beds occur on a flat, sandy bottom, water depths 20-60 m, thus sidescan sonar is a prima-facie candidate for use in rapid, synoptic, and noninvasive surveying. The present study describes development of an acoustic method to detect, identify, and quantify squid egg beds by means of high-frequency sidescan-sonar imagery. Verification of the method has been undertaken with a video camera carried on a remotely operated vehicle. It has been established that sidescan sonar images can be used to predict the presence or absence of squid egg beds. The lower size limit of detectability of an isolated egg bed is about 0.5 m with a 400-kHz sidescan sonar used with a 50-m range when towed at 3 knots. It is possible to estimate the abundance of eggs in a region of interest by computing the cumulative area covered by the egg beds according to the sidescan sonar image. In a selected quadrat one arc second on each side, the estimated number of eggs was 36.5 million.

      16. Liquid Helium Acoustic Microscope.

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Steer, Andrew Paul

        Available from UMI in association with The British Library. In an acoustic microscope, images are generated by monitoring the intensity of the ultrasonic reflection, or echo, from the surface of a sample. In order to achieve this a pulse of acoustic energy is produced by the excitation of a thin film transducer. The pulse thus generated propagates through a crystal and is incident upon the acoustic lens surface, which is the boundary between the crystal and an acoustic coupling liquid. The acoustic lens is a converging element, and brings the ultrasonic beam to a focus within the liquid. A sample, placed at the focus, can act as a reflector, and the returned pulse then contains information regarding the acoustic reflectivity of this specimen. Acoustic pulses are repeatedly launched and detected while the acoustic lens is scanned over the surface of the sample. In this manner an acoustic image is constructed. Acoustic losses in room temperature liquid coupling media represent a considerable source of difficulty in the recovery of acoustic echo signals. At the frequencies of operation required in a microscope which is capable of high resolution, the ultrasonic attenuation is not only large but increases with the square of frequency. In superfluid liquid helium at temperatures below 0.1 K, however, the ultrasonic attenuation becomes negligible. Furthermore, the low sound velocity in liquid helium results in an increase in resolution, since the acoustic wavelength is proportional to velocity. A liquid helium acoustic microscope has been designed and constructed. Details of the various possible detection methods are given, and comparisons are made between them. Measurements of the performance of the system that was adopted are reported. The development of a cooled preamplifier is also described. The variation of reflected signal with object distance has been measured and compared with theoretical predictions. This variation is important in the analysis of acoustic

      17. Development of an acoustic wave based biosensor for vapor phase detection of small molecules

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Stubbs, Desmond

        For centuries scientific ingenuity and innovation have been influenced by Mother Nature's perfect design. One of her more elusive designs is that of the sensory olfactory system, an array of highly sensitive receptors responsible for chemical vapor recognition. In the animal kingdom this ability is magnified among canines where ppt (parts per trillion) sensitivity values have been reported. Today, detection dogs are considered an essential part of the US drug and explosives detection schemes. However, growing concerns about their susceptibility to extraneous odors have inspired the development of highly sensitive analytical detection tools or biosensors known as "electronic noses". In general, biosensors are distinguished from chemical sensors in that they use an entity of biological origin (e.g. antibody, cell, enzyme) immobilized onto a surface as the chemically-sensitive film on the device. The colloquial view is that the term "biosensors" refers to devices which detect the presence of entities of biological origin, such as proteins or single-stranded DNA and that this detection must take place in a liquid. Our biosensor utilizes biomolecules, specifically IgG monoclonal antibodies, to achieve molecular recognition of relatively small molecules in the vapor phase.

      18. Passive Acoustic Detection of Wind Turbine In-Flow Conditions for Active Control and Optimization

        SciTech Connect

        Murray, Nathan E.

        2012-03-12

        Wind is a significant source of energy; however, the human capability to produce electrical energy still has many hurdles to overcome. One of these is the unpredictability of the winds in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). The ABL is highly turbulent in both stable and unstable conditions (based on the vertical temperature profile) and the resulting fluctuations can have a dramatic impact on wind turbine operation. Any method by which these fluctuations could be observed, estimated, or predicted could provide a benefit to the wind energy industry as a whole. Based on the fundamental coupling of velocity fluctuations to pressure fluctuations in the nearly incompressible flow in the ABL, This work hypothesizes that a ground-based array of infrasonic pressure transducers could be employed to estimate the vertical wind profile over a height relevant for wind turbines. To analyze this hypothesis, experiments and field deployments were conducted. Wind tunnel experiments were performed for a thick turbulent boundary layer over a neutral or heated surface. Surface pressure and velocity probe measurements were acquired simultaneously. Two field deployments yielded surface pressure data from a 49 element array. The second deployment at the Reese Technology Center in Lubbock, TX, also included data from a smaller aperture, 96-element array and a 200-meter tall meteorological tower. Analysis of the data successfully demonstrated the ability to estimate the vertical velocity profile using coherence data from the pressure array. Also, dynamical systems analysis methods were successful in identifying and tracking a gust type event. In addition to the passive acoustic profiling method, this program also investigated a rapid response Doppler SODAR system, the optimization of wind turbine blades for enhanced power with reduced aeroacoustic noise production, and the implementation of a wireless health monitoring system for the wind turbine blades. Each of these other objectives

      19. Phantom Limb Sensation (PLS) and Phantom Limb Pain (PLP) among Young Landmine Amputees

        PubMed Central

        POOR ZAMANY NEJATKERMANY, Mahtab; MODIRIAN, Ehsan; SOROUSH, Mohammadreza; MASOUMI, Mehdi; HOSSEINI, Maryam

        2016-01-01

        Objective To determine the frequency of phantom limb sensation (PLS) and phantom limb pain (PLP) in children and young adults suffering landmine-related amputation. Materials & Methods All youths with amputation due to landmine explosions participated in this study. The proportions of patients with phantom limb sensation/pain, intensity and frequency of pain were reported. Chi square test was used to examine the relationship between variables. Comparison of PLP and PLS between upper and lower amputation was done by unpaired t-test. Results There were 38 male and 3 female with the mean age of 15.8±2.4yr. The mean interval between injury and follow-up was 90.7±39.6 months. Twelve (44.4%) upper limb amputees and 11 (26.8%) lower limb amputees had PLS. Nine (33.3%) upper limb amputees and 7 (17.1%) lower limb amputees experienced PLP. Of 27 upper limb amputees, 6 (14.6%) and among 15 lower limb amputees, 6 (14.6%) had both PLS and PLP. One case suffered amputation of upper and lower limbs and was experiencing PLS and PLP in both parts. PLS had a significant difference between the upper and lower amputated groups. Significant relationship was observed between age of casualty and duration of injury with PLP. Conclusion Phantom limb sensation and pain in young survivors of landmine explosions appear to be common, even years after amputation. PMID:27375755

      20. Landmine policy in the near-term: a framework for technology analysis and action

        SciTech Connect

        Eimerl, D., LLNL

        1997-08-01

        Any effective solution to the problem of leftover landmines and other post-conflict unexploded ordnance (UXO) must take into account the real capabilities of demining technologies and the availability of sufficient resources to carry out demining operations. Economic and operational factors must be included in analyses of humanitarian demining. These factors will provide a framework for using currently available resources and technologies to complete this task in a time frame that is both practical and useful. Since it is likely that reliable advanced technologies for demining are still several years away, this construct applies to the intervening period. It may also provide a framework for utilizing advanced technologies as they become available. This study is an economic system model for demining operations carried out by the developed nations that clarifies the role and impact of technology on the economic performance and viability of these operations. It also provides a quantitative guide to assess the performance penalties arising from gaps in current technology, as well as the potential advantages and desirable features of new technologies that will significantly affect the international community`s ability to address this problem. Implications for current and near-term landmine and landmine technology policies are drawn.

      1. Numerical simulation of the coupling of ultra-wide band electromagnetic pulse into landmine by aperture

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Gao, Zhen-Ru; Zhao, Hui-Chang; Yang, Li; Wang, Feng-Shan

        2015-09-01

        The modern landmine’s electronic fuse is susceptible to strong interference or can even be damaged by the ultra-wide band electromagnetic pulse (UWB-EMP). The finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method in lossy media with cylindrical coordinates is used to study the interactions of the UWB-EMP with the landmine. First, the coupling of UWB-EMP into the landmine shielding shell through an aperture is numerically simulated. Second, the coupled electromagnetic field of mine shells made of different shielding materials and with apertures of different sizes is plotted. Third, the aperture coupling laws of UWB-EMP into shells are analyzed and categorized. Such an algorithm is capable of effectively preventing ladder similar errors, and consequently improving the calculation precision, and in addition to adopting the message passing interface (MPI) parallel method to divide the total calculating range into more sub-ranges, the overall calculating efficiency is greatly increased. These calculations are surely a constructive reference for modern landmine design against electromagnetic damage. Project supported by the Postdoctoral Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 2014M552610).

      2. Acoustic detection of cracks in the anvil of a large-volume cubic high-pressure apparatus

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Yan, Zhaoli; Chen, Bin; Tian, Hao; Cheng, Xiaobin; Yang, Jun

        2015-12-01

        A large-volume cubic high-pressure apparatus with three pairs of tungsten carbide anvils is the most popular device for synthetic diamond production. Currently, the consumption of anvils is one of the important costs for the diamond production industry. If one of the anvils is fractured during the production process, the other five anvils in the apparatus may be endangered as a result of a sudden loss of pressure. It is of critical importance to detect and replace cracked anvils before they fracture for reduction of the cost of diamond production and safety. An acoustic detection method is studied in this paper. Two new features, nested power spectrum centroid and modified power spectrum variance, are proposed and combined with linear prediction coefficients to construct a feature vector. A support vector machine model is trained for classification. A sliding time window is proposed for decision-level information fusion. The experiments and analysis show that the recognition rate of anvil cracks is 95%, while the false-alarm rate is as low as 5.8 × 10-4 during a time window; this false-alarm rate indicates that at most one false alarm occurs every 2 months at a confidence level of 90%. An instrument to monitor anvil cracking was designed based on a digital signal processor and has been running for more than eight months in a diamond production field. In this time, two anvil-crack incidents occurred and were detected by the instrument correctly. In addition, no false alarms occurred.

      3. Acoustic detection of cracks in the anvil of a large-volume cubic high-pressure apparatus

        SciTech Connect

        Yan, Zhaoli Tian, Hao; Cheng, Xiaobin; Yang, Jun; Chen, Bin

        2015-12-15

        A large-volume cubic high-pressure apparatus with three pairs of tungsten carbide anvils is the most popular device for synthetic diamond production. Currently, the consumption of anvils is one of the important costs for the diamond production industry. If one of the anvils is fractured during the production process, the other five anvils in the apparatus may be endangered as a result of a sudden loss of pressure. It is of critical importance to detect and replace cracked anvils before they fracture for reduction of the cost of diamond production and safety. An acoustic detection method is studied in this paper. Two new features, nested power spectrum centroid and modified power spectrum variance, are proposed and combined with linear prediction coefficients to construct a feature vector. A support vector machine model is trained for classification. A sliding time window is proposed for decision-level information fusion. The experiments and analysis show that the recognition rate of anvil cracks is 95%, while the false-alarm rate is as low as 5.8 × 10{sup −4} during a time window; this false-alarm rate indicates that at most one false alarm occurs every 2 months at a confidence level of 90%. An instrument to monitor anvil cracking was designed based on a digital signal processor and has been running for more than eight months in a diamond production field. In this time, two anvil-crack incidents occurred and were detected by the instrument correctly. In addition, no false alarms occurred.

      4. Acoustic detection of cracks in the anvil of a large-volume cubic high-pressure apparatus.

        PubMed

        Yan, Zhaoli; Chen, Bin; Tian, Hao; Cheng, Xiaobin; Yang, Jun

        2015-12-01

        A large-volume cubic high-pressure apparatus with three pairs of tungsten carbide anvils is the most popular device for synthetic diamond production. Currently, the consumption of anvils is one of the important costs for the diamond production industry. If one of the anvils is fractured during the production process, the other five anvils in the apparatus may be endangered as a result of a sudden loss of pressure. It is of critical importance to detect and replace cracked anvils before they fracture for reduction of the cost of diamond production and safety. An acoustic detection method is studied in this paper. Two new features, nested power spectrum centroid and modified power spectrum variance, are proposed and combined with linear prediction coefficients to construct a feature vector. A support vector machine model is trained for classification. A sliding time window is proposed for decision-level information fusion. The experiments and analysis show that the recognition rate of anvil cracks is 95%, while the false-alarm rate is as low as 5.8 × 10(-4) during a time window; this false-alarm rate indicates that at most one false alarm occurs every 2 months at a confidence level of 90%. An instrument to monitor anvil cracking was designed based on a digital signal processor and has been running for more than eight months in a diamond production field. In this time, two anvil-crack incidents occurred and were detected by the instrument correctly. In addition, no false alarms occurred.

      5. Acoustic Longitudinal Field NIF Optic Feature Detection Map Using Time-Reversal & MUSIC

        SciTech Connect

        Lehman, S K

        2006-02-09

        We developed an ultrasonic longitudinal field time-reversal and MUltiple SIgnal Classification (MUSIC) based detection algorithm for identifying and mapping flaws in fused silica NIF optics. The algorithm requires a fully multistatic data set, that is one with multiple, independently operated, spatially diverse transducers, each transmitter of which, in succession, launches a pulse into the optic and the scattered signal measured and recorded at every receiver. We have successfully localized engineered ''defects'' larger than 1 mm in an optic. We confirmed detection and localization of 3 mm and 5 mm features in experimental data, and a 0.5 mm in simulated data with sufficiently high signal-to-noise ratio. We present the theory, experimental results, and simulated results.

      6. Acoustic detection of North Atlantic right whale contact calls using spectrogram-based statistics.

        PubMed

        Urazghildiiev, Ildar R; Clark, Christopher W

        2007-08-01

        This paper considers the problem of detection of contact calls produced by the critically endangered North Atlantic right whale, Eubalaena glacialis. To reduce computational time, the class of acceptable detectors is constrained by the detectors implemented as a bank of two-dimensional linear FIR filters and using the data spectrogram as the input. The closed form representations for the detectors are derived and the detection performance is compared with that of the generalized likelihood ratio test (GLRT) detector. The test results demonstrate that in the presence of impulsive noise, the spectrogram-based detector using the French hat wavelet as the filter kernel outperforms the GLRT detector and decreases computational time by a factor of 6. PMID:17672627

      7. Acoustical Detection of High-Density Krill Demersal Layers in the Submarine Canyons off Georges Bank.

        PubMed

        Greene, C H; Wiebe, P H; Burczynski, J; Youngbluth, M J

        1988-07-15

        High-density demersal layers of krill have been detected in the submarine canyons off Georges Bank by means of a high-frequency, dual-beam bioacoustical technique. Krill densities in these demersal layers were observed to be two to three orders of magnitude greater than the highest densities observed in water-column scattering layers. Such abundances may help explain the unusually high squid and demersal fish production estimates attributed to the Georges Bank ecosystem. PMID:17734865

      8. Semen quality detection using time of flight and acoustic wave sensors

        SciTech Connect

        Newton, M. I.; Evans, C. R.; Simons, J. J.; Hughes, D. C.

        2007-04-09

        The authors report a real-time technique for assessing the number of motile sperm in a semen sample. The time of flight technique uses a flow channel with detection at the end of the channel using quartz crystal microbalances. Data presented suggest that a simple rigid mass model may be used in interpreting the change in resonant frequency using an effective mass for the sperm.

      9. Acoustical Detection of High-Density Krill Demersal Layers in the Submarine Canyons off Georges Bank.

        PubMed

        Greene, C H; Wiebe, P H; Burczynski, J; Youngbluth, M J

        1988-07-15

        High-density demersal layers of krill have been detected in the submarine canyons off Georges Bank by means of a high-frequency, dual-beam bioacoustical technique. Krill densities in these demersal layers were observed to be two to three orders of magnitude greater than the highest densities observed in water-column scattering layers. Such abundances may help explain the unusually high squid and demersal fish production estimates attributed to the Georges Bank ecosystem.

      10. Signal/Image Processing of Acoustic Flaw Signatures for Detection and Localization

        SciTech Connect

        Candy, J V; Meyer, A W

        2001-06-01

        The timely, nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of critical optics in high energy, pulsed laser experiments is a crucial analysis that must be performed for the experiment to be successful. Failure to detect flaws of critical sizes in vacuum-loaded optical windows can result in a catastrophic failure jeopardizing the safety of both personnel and costly equipment. We discuss the development of signal/image processing techniques to both detect critical flaws and locate their position on the window. The data measured from two Orthogonal arrays of narrow beamwidth ultrasonic transducers are preprocessed using a model-based scheme based on the Green's function of the medium providing individual channel signatures. These signatures are then transformed to the two-dimensional image space using a power-based estimator. A 2D-replicant is then constructed based on the underlying physics of the material along with the geometry of the window. Correlating the replicant with the enhanced power image leads to the optimal 2D-matched filter solution detecting and localizing the flaw. Controlled experimental results on machined flaws are discussed.

      11. Dual-tree complex wavelet transform and SVD based acoustic noise reduction and its application in leak detection for natural gas pipeline

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Yu, Xuchao; Liang, Wei; Zhang, Laibin; Jin, Hao; Qiu, Jingwei

        2016-05-01

        During the last decades, leak detection for natural gas pipeline has become one of the paramount concerns of pipeline operators and researchers across the globe. However, acoustic wave method has been proved to be an effective way to identify and localize leakage for gas pipeline. Considering the fact that noises inevitably exist in the acoustic signals collected, noise reduction should be enforced on the signals for subsequent data mining and analysis. Thus, an integrated acoustic noise reduction method based on DTCWT and SVD is proposed in this study. The method is put forward based on the idea that noise reduction strategy should match the characteristics of the noisy signal. According to previous studies, it is known that the energy of acoustic signals collected under leaking condition is mainly concentrated in low-frequency portion (0-100 Hz). And ultralow-frequency component (0-5 Hz), which is taken as the characteristic frequency band in this study, can propagate a relatively longer distance and be captured by sensors. Therefore, in order to filter the noises and to reserve the characteristic frequency band, DTCWT is taken as the core to conduct multilevel decomposition and refining for acoustic signals and SVD is employed to eliminate noises in non-characteristic bands. Both simulation and field experiments show that DTCWT-SVD is an excellent method for acoustic noise reduction. At the end of this study, application in leakage localization shows that it becomes much easier and a little more accurate to estimate the location of leak hole after noise reduction by DTCWT-SVD.

      12. Molecularly imprinted polymer film interfaced with Surface Acoustic Wave technology as a sensing platform for label-free protein detection.

        PubMed

        Tretjakov, Aleksei; Syritski, Vitali; Reut, Jekaterina; Boroznjak, Roman; Öpik, Andres

        2016-01-01

        Molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP)-based synthetic receptors integrated with Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) sensing platform were applied for the first time for label-free protein detection. The ultrathin polymeric films with surface imprints of immunoglobulin G (IgG-MIP) were fabricated onto the multiplexed SAW chips using an electrosynthesis approach. The films were characterized by analyzing the binding kinetics recorded by SAW system. It was revealed that the capability of IgG-MIP to specifically recognize the target protein was greatly influenced by the polymer film thickness that could be easily optimized by the amount of the electrical charge consumed during the electrodeposition. The thickness-optimized IgG-MIPs demonstrated imprinting factors towards IgG in the range of 2.8-4, while their recognition efficiencies were about 4 and 10 times lower toward the interfering proteins, IgA and HSA, respectively. Additionally, IgG-MIP preserved its capability to recognize selectively the template after up to four regeneration cycles. The presented approach of the facile integration of the protein-MIP sensing layer with SAW technology allowed observing the real-time binding events of the target protein at relevant sensitivity levels and can be potentially suitable for cost effective fabrication of a biosensor for analysis of biological samples in multiplexed manner.

      13. Acoustic emission source location and damage detection in a metallic structure using a graph-theory-based geodesic approach

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Gangadharan, R.; Prasanna, G.; Bhat, M. R.; Murthy, C. R. L.; Gopalakrishnan, S.

        2009-11-01

        A geodesic-based approach using Lamb waves is proposed to locate the acoustic emission (AE) source and damage in an isotropic metallic structure. In the case of the AE (passive) technique, the elastic waves take the shortest path from the source to the sensor array distributed in the structure. The geodesics are computed on the meshed surface of the structure using graph theory based on Dijkstra's algorithm. By propagating the waves in reverse virtually from these sensors along the geodesic path and by locating the first intersection point of these waves, one can get the AE source location. The same approach is extended for detection of damage in a structure. The wave response matrix of the given sensor configuration for the healthy and the damaged structure is obtained experimentally. The healthy and damage response matrix is compared and their difference gives the information about the reflection of waves from the damage. These waves are backpropagated from the sensors and the above method is used to locate the damage by finding the point where intersection of geodesics occurs. In this work, the geodesic approach is shown to be suitable to obtain a practicable source location solution in a more general set-up on any arbitrary surface containing finite discontinuities. Experiments were conducted on aluminum specimens of simple and complex geometry to validate this new method.

      14. Normalization and source separation of acoustic emission signals for condition monitoring and fault detection of multi-cylinder diesel engines

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Wu, Weiliang; Lin, Tian Ran; Tan, Andy C. C.

        2015-12-01

        A signal processing technique is presented in this paper to normalize and separate the source of non-linear acoustic emission (AE) signals of a multi-cylinder diesel engine for condition monitoring applications and fault detection. The normalization technique presented in the paper overcomes the long-existing non-linearity problem of AE sensors so that responses measured by different AE sensors can be quantitatively analysed and compared. A source separation algorithm is also developed in the paper to separate the mixture of the normalized AE signals produced by a multi-cylinder diesel engine by utilising the system parameters (i.e., wave attenuation constant and the arrival time delay) of AE wave propagation determined by a standard pencil lead break test on the engine cylinder head. It is shown that the source separation algorithm is able to separate the signal interference of adjacent cylinders from the monitored cylinder once the wave attenuation constant and the arrival time delay along the propagation path are known. The algorithm is particularly useful in the application of AE technique for condition monitoring of small-size diesel engines where signal interference from the neighbouring cylinders is strong.

      15. Molecularly imprinted polymer film interfaced with Surface Acoustic Wave technology as a sensing platform for label-free protein detection.

        PubMed

        Tretjakov, Aleksei; Syritski, Vitali; Reut, Jekaterina; Boroznjak, Roman; Öpik, Andres

        2016-01-01

        Molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP)-based synthetic receptors integrated with Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) sensing platform were applied for the first time for label-free protein detection. The ultrathin polymeric films with surface imprints of immunoglobulin G (IgG-MIP) were fabricated onto the multiplexed SAW chips using an electrosynthesis approach. The films were characterized by analyzing the binding kinetics recorded by SAW system. It was revealed that the capability of IgG-MIP to specifically recognize the target protein was greatly influenced by the polymer film thickness that could be easily optimized by the amount of the electrical charge consumed during the electrodeposition. The thickness-optimized IgG-MIPs demonstrated imprinting factors towards IgG in the range of 2.8-4, while their recognition efficiencies were about 4 and 10 times lower toward the interfering proteins, IgA and HSA, respectively. Additionally, IgG-MIP preserved its capability to recognize selectively the template after up to four regeneration cycles. The presented approach of the facile integration of the protein-MIP sensing layer with SAW technology allowed observing the real-time binding events of the target protein at relevant sensitivity levels and can be potentially suitable for cost effective fabrication of a biosensor for analysis of biological samples in multiplexed manner. PMID:26703269

      16. An exploratory study of the perceived impact of health problems of landmine/UXO victims versus another disability group

        PubMed Central

        2012-01-01

        Background The purpose of this exploratory study is to pilot a biopsychosocial instrument called the Perceived Impact of Problem Profile (PIPP) on a cohort of landmine/Unexploded Ordnance (UXO) victims with lower limb disability versus a cohort of persons with similar disability due to other trauma or medical causes. The aim is to provide greater understanding of the psychosocial impact of landmine/UXO injury to inform victim assistance a interventions within Lao PDR. Methods This study employs a mixed methods design, which involved piloting the PIPP instrument through an interviewer administered questionnaire and demographic questionnaire. Fifty one participants were interviewed in both urban and rural locations within Lao PDR. Results An analysis of the data reveals significant differences in perceived impact for pain, anxiety and how recently the injury/illness occurred. Both groups complained of high levels of anxiety and depression; landmine/UXO victims who complained of anxiety and depression reported a much greater impact on life satisfaction and mood. Conclusion The perceived impact of the disability is greatest on psychosocial factors for both cohorts, but especially in landmine/UXO victims emphasising the need to focus on improving psychosocial interventions for landmine/UXO victims within Victim assistance programmes in Lao PDR. PMID:23016958

      17. Historical detection of atmospheric impacts by large bolides using acoustic-gravity waves

        SciTech Connect

        ReVelle, D.O.

        1995-05-01

        During the period from about 1960 to the early 1980`s a number of large bolides (meteor-fireballs) entered the atmosphere which were sufficiently large to generate blast waves during their drag interaction with the air. For example, the remnant of the blast wave from a single kiloton class event was subsequently detected by up to six ground arrays of microbarographs which were operated by the U.S. Air Force during this pre-satellite period. Data have also been obtained from other sources during this period as well and are also discussed in this summary of the historical data. The Air Force data have been analyzed in terms of their observable properties in order to infer the influx rate of NEO`s (near-Earth objects) in the energy range from 0.2 to 1100 kt. The determined influx is in reasonable agreement with that determined by other methods currently available such as Rabinowitz (1992), Ceplecha, (1992; 1994b) and by Chapman and Morrison (1994) despite the fact that due to sampling deficiencies only a portion of the {open_quotes}true{close_quotes} flux of large bodies has been obtained by this method, i.e., only sources at relatively low elevations have been detected. Thus the weak, fragile cometary bodies which do not penetrate the atmosphere as deeply are less likely to have been sampled by this type of detection system. Future work using the proposed C.T.B.T. (Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty) global scale infrasonic network will be likely to improve upon this early estimate of the global influx of NEO`s considerably.

      18. Acoustic and Doppler radar detection of buried land mines using high-pressure water jets

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Denier, Robert; Herrick, Thomas J.; Mitchell, O. Robert; Summers, David A.; Saylor, Daniel R.

        1999-08-01

        The goal of the waterjet-based mine location and identification project is to find a way to use waterjets to locate and differentiate buried objects. When a buried object is struck with a high-pressure waterjets, the impact will cause characteristic vibrations in the object depending on the object's shape and composition. These vibrations will be transferred to the ground and then to the water stream that is hitting the object. Some of these vibrations will also be transferred to the air via the narrow channel the waterjet cuts in the ground. Currently the ground vibrations are detected with Doppler radar and video camera sensing, while the air vibrations are detected with a directional microphone. Data is collected via a Labview based data acquisition system. This data is then manipulated in Labview to produce the associated power spectrums. These power spectra are fed through various signal processing and recognition routines to determine the probability of there being an object present under the current test location and what that object is likely to be. Our current test area consists of a large X-Y positioning system placed over approximately a five-foot circular test area. The positioning system moves both the waterjet and the sensor package to the test location specified by the Labview control software. Currently we are able to locate buried land mine models at a distance of approximately three inches with a high degree of accuracy.

      19. A smart sensor system for trace organic vapor detection using a temperature-controlled array of surface acoustic wave vapor sensors, automated preconcentrator tubes, and pattern recognition

        SciTech Connect

        Grate, J.W.; Rose-Pehrsson, S.L.; Klusty, M.; Wohltjen, H.

        1993-05-01

        A smart sensor system for the detection, of toxic organophosphorus and toxic organosulfur vapors at trace concentrations has been designed, fabricated, and tested against a wide variety of vapor challenges. The key features of the system are: An array of four surface acoustic wave (SAW) vapor sensors, temperature control of the vapor sensors, the use of pattern recognition to analyze the sensor data, and an automated sampling system including thermally-desorbed preconcentrator tubes (PCTs).

      20. Tone-deaf ears in moths may limit the acoustic detection of two-tone bats.

        PubMed

        Mora, Emanuel C; Fernández, Yohami; Hechavarría, Julio; Pérez, Martha

        2014-01-01

        Frequency alternation in the echolocation of insectivorous bats has been interpreted in relation to ranging and duty cycle, i.e. advantages for echolocation. The shifts in frequency of the calls of these so-called two-tone bats, however, may also play its role in the success of their hunting behavior for a preferred prey, the tympanate moth. How the auditory receptors (e.g. the A1 and A2 cells) in the moth's ear detect such frequency shifts is currently unknown. Here, we measured the auditory responses of the A1 cell in the noctuid Spodoptera frugiperda to the echolocation hunting sequence of Molossus molossus, a two-tone bat. We also manipulated the bat calls to control for the frequency shifts by lowering the frequency band of the search and approach calls. The firing response of the A1 receptor cell significantly decreases with the shift to higher frequencies during the search and approach phases of the hunting sequence of M. molossus; this could be explained by the receptor's threshold curve. The frequency dependence of the decrease in the receptor's response is supported by the results attained with the manipulated sequence: search and approach calls with the same minimum frequency are detected by the moth at the same threshold intensity. The two-tone bat M. molossus shows a call frequency alternation behavior that may enable it to overcome moth audition even in the mid-frequency range (i.e. 20-50 kHz) where moths hear best. PMID:24942265

      1. Tripling the detection view of high-frequency linear-array-based photoacoustic computed tomography by using two planar acoustic reflectors

        PubMed Central

        Li, Guo; Xia, Jun; Wang, Kun; Maslov, Konstantin; Anastasio, Mark A.

        2015-01-01

        Background Linear-array-based photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) suffers from a limited view. Circular scanning does increase the detection view angle but is time-consuming. Therefore, it is desirable to increase the detection view angle of linear-array-based PACT without sacrificing imaging speed. Methods Two planar acoustic reflectors placed at 120 degrees to each other were added to a linear-array-based PACT system. Each reflector redirects originally undetectable photoacoustic waves back to the transducer array elements, and together they triple the original detection view angle of the PACT system. Results Adding two reflectors increased the detection view angle from 80 to 240 degrees. As a comparison, a single-reflector PACT has a detection view angle of only 160 degrees. A leaf skeleton phantom with a rich vascular network was imaged with the double-reflector PACT, and most of its features were recovered. Conclusions The two acoustic reflectors triple the detection view angle of a linear-array-based PACT without compromising the original imaging speed. This nearly full-view detection capability produces higher-quality images than single-reflector PACT or conventional PACT without reflectors. PMID:25694954

      2. Battlefield Utility of Antipersonnel Landmines and Proposed Alternatives (Analysis in Support of the NATO SAS-023 APM Study)

        SciTech Connect

        Crandley, J F; Greenwalt, R J; Magnoli, D E; Randazzo, A S

        2002-02-05

        This study consists of work done in support of the U.S. delegation to the NATO SAS-023 Antipersonnel Landmine Study Group, supplemented by additional work done for the U.S. Office of the Secretary of Defense Antipersonnel Landmine Alternative Concept Exploration Program (Track III). It explores the battlefield utility of current antipersonnel landmines (APL) in both pure and mixed APL/antitank minefields and evaluates the value of military suggested non-materiel alternatives. The historical record is full of examples where the presence (or absence) of antipersonnel landmines made a critical difference in battle. The current generation of military thinkers and writers lack any significant combat experience employing either mixed or antipersonnel minefields, which leaves a critical gap in available expert advice for policy and decision-makers. Because of this lack of experienced-based professional military knowledge, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory analyzed the employment of antipersonnel landmines in tactical mixed minefields and in protective antipersonnel minefields. The scientific method was employed where hypotheses were generated from the tactics and doctrine of the antipersonnel landmine era and tested in a simulation laboratory. A high-resolution, U.S. Joint Forces Command combat simulation model (the Joint Conflict and Tactical Simulation--JCATS) was used as the laboratory instrument. A realistic European scenario was obtained from a multi-national USAREUR exercise and was approved by the SAS-023 panel members. Additional scenarios were provided by U.S. CINC conferences and were based on Southwest Asia and Northeast Asia. Weapons data was obtained from the U.S. family of Joint Munitions Effectiveness Manuals. The U.S. Army Materiel Systems Analysis Agency conducted a limited verification and validation assessment of JCATS for purposes of this study.

      3. Guided acoustic wave inspection system

        DOEpatents

        Chinn, Diane J.

        2004-10-05

        A system for inspecting a conduit for undesirable characteristics. A transducer system induces guided acoustic waves onto said conduit. The transducer system detects the undesirable characteristics of the conduit by receiving guided acoustic waves that contain information about the undesirable characteristics. The conduit has at least two sides and the transducer system utilizes flexural modes of propagation to provide inspection using access from only the one side of the conduit. Cracking is detected with pulse-echo testing using one transducer to both send and receive the guided acoustic waves. Thinning is detected in through-transmission testing where one transducer sends and another transducer receives the guided acoustic waves.

      4. Evaluation of annealing and double ion beam irradiation by a laser-induced and laser-detected surface acoustic wave diagnostic system

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Kitazawa, Sin-iti; Wakai, Eiichi; Aoto, Kazumi

        2016-10-01

        The effects of annealing and double ion irradiation on nuclear structural materials were investigated using a novel, non-destructive, non-contact diagnostic method. A laser-induced and laser-detected surface acoustic wave (SAW) was adopted as a diagnostic system. The SAWs propagation velocity and the SAWs vibration velocity along the normal direction of the surface were measured to investigate mechanical properties of the substrates. Change of the shear modulus was detected in the annealed substrates. Non-linear effect on amplitude of the excited SAW was observed on the double ion irradiated materials. The potential of the SAW diagnostic system for assessing nuclear structural materials was demonstrated.

      5. Acoustical standards in engineering acoustics

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Burkhard, Mahlon D.

        2001-05-01

        The Engineering Acoustics Technical Committee is concerned with the evolution and improvement of acoustical techniques and apparatus, and with the promotion of new applications of acoustics. As cited in the Membership Directory and Handbook (2002), the interest areas include transducers and arrays; underwater acoustic systems; acoustical instrumentation and monitoring; applied sonics, promotion of useful effects, information gathering and transmission; audio engineering; acoustic holography and acoustic imaging; acoustic signal processing (equipment and techniques); and ultrasound and infrasound. Evident connections between engineering and standards are needs for calibration, consistent terminology, uniform presentation of data, reference levels, or design targets for product development. Thus for the acoustical engineer standards are both a tool for practices, for communication, and for comparison of his efforts with those of others. Development of many standards depends on knowledge of the way products are put together for the market place and acoustical engineers provide important input to the development of standards. Acoustical engineers and members of the Engineering Acoustics arm of the Society both benefit from and contribute to the Acoustical Standards of the Acoustical Society.

      6. Acoustic sniper localization system

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Prado, Gervasio; Dhaliwal, Hardave; Martel, Philip O.

        1997-02-01

        Technologies for sniper localization have received increased attention in recent months as American forces have been deployed to various trouble spots around the world. Among the technologies considered for this task acoustics is a natural choice for various reasons. The acoustic signatures of gunshots are loud and distinctive, making them easy to detect even in high noise background environments. Acoustics provides a passive sensing technology with excellent range and non line of sight capabilities. Last but not least, an acoustic sniper location system can be built at a low cost with off the shelf components. Despite its many advantages, the performance of acoustic sensors can degrade under adverse propagation conditions. Localization accuracy, although good, is usually not accurate enough to pinpoint a sniper's location in some scenarios (for example which widow in a building or behind which tree in a grove). For these more demanding missions, the acoustic sensor can be used in conjunction with an infra red imaging system that detects the muzzle blast of the gun. The acoustic system can be used to cue the pointing system of the IR camera in the direction of the shot's source.

      7. Acoustic Neuroma

        MedlinePlus

        An acoustic neuroma is a benign tumor that develops on the nerve that connects the ear to the brain. The tumor ... press against the brain, becoming life-threatening. Acoustic neuroma can be difficult to diagnose, because the symptoms ...

      8. Effects of duty-cycled passive acoustic recordings on detecting the presence of beaked whales in the northwest Atlantic.

        PubMed

        Stanistreet, Joy E; Nowacek, Douglas P; Read, Andrew J; Baumann-Pickering, Simone; Moors-Murphy, Hilary B; Van Parijs, Sofie M

        2016-07-01

        This study investigated the effects of using duty-cycled passive acoustic recordings to monitor the daily presence of beaked whale species at three locations in the northwest Atlantic. Continuous acoustic records were subsampled to simulate duty cycles of 50%, 25%, and 10% and cycle period durations from 10 to 60 min. Short, frequent listening periods were most effective for assessing the daily presence of beaked whales. Furthermore, subsampling at low duty cycles led to consistently greater underestimation of Mesoplodon species than either Cuvier's beaked whales or northern bottlenose whales, leading to a potential bias in estimation of relative species occurrence. PMID:27475208

      9. Acoustic Detection of Rhynchophorus ferrugineus (Coleoptera: Dryophthoridae) and Oryctes elegans (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) in Phoenix dactylifera (Arecales: Arecacae) Trees and Offshoots in Saudi Arabian Orchards.

        PubMed

        Mankin, R W; Al-Ayedh, H Y; Aldryhim, Y; Rohde, B

        2016-04-01

        Rhynchophorus ferrugineus (Olivier) (Coleoptera: Dryophthoridae) larvae are cryptic, internal tissue-feeding pests of palm trees that are difficult to detect; consequently, infestations may remain hidden until they are widespread in an orchard. Infested trees and propagable offshoots that develop from axillary buds on the trunk frequently are transported inadvertently to previously uninfested areas. Acoustic methods can be used for scouting and early detection of R. ferrugineus, but until now have not been tested on multiple trees and offshoots in commercial date palm orchard environments. For this report, the acoustic detectability of R. ferrugineus was assessed in Saudi Arabian date palm orchards in the presence of commonly occurring wind, bird noise, machinery noise, and nontarget insects. Signal analyses were developed to detect R. ferrugineus and another insect pest, Oryctes elegans Prell (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae), frequently co-occurring in the orchards, and discriminate both from background noise. In addition, it was possible to distinguish R. ferrugineus from O. elegans in offshoots by differences in the temporal patterns of their sound impulses. As has been observed often with other insect pests, populations of the two species appeared clumped rather than uniform or random. The results are discussed in relation to development of automated methods that could assist orchard managers in quickly identifying infested trees and offshoots so that R. ferrugineus infestations can be targeted and the likelihood of transferring infested offshoots to uninfested areas can be reduced.

      10. Acoustic Detection of Rhynchophorus ferrugineus (Coleoptera: Dryophthoridae) and Oryctes elegans (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) in Phoenix dactylifera (Arecales: Arecacae) Trees and Offshoots in Saudi Arabian Orchards.

        PubMed

        Mankin, R W; Al-Ayedh, H Y; Aldryhim, Y; Rohde, B

        2016-04-01

        Rhynchophorus ferrugineus (Olivier) (Coleoptera: Dryophthoridae) larvae are cryptic, internal tissue-feeding pests of palm trees that are difficult to detect; consequently, infestations may remain hidden until they are widespread in an orchard. Infested trees and propagable offshoots that develop from axillary buds on the trunk frequently are transported inadvertently to previously uninfested areas. Acoustic methods can be used for scouting and early detection of R. ferrugineus, but until now have not been tested on multiple trees and offshoots in commercial date palm orchard environments. For this report, the acoustic detectability of R. ferrugineus was assessed in Saudi Arabian date palm orchards in the presence of commonly occurring wind, bird noise, machinery noise, and nontarget insects. Signal analyses were developed to detect R. ferrugineus and another insect pest, Oryctes elegans Prell (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae), frequently co-occurring in the orchards, and discriminate both from background noise. In addition, it was possible to distinguish R. ferrugineus from O. elegans in offshoots by differences in the temporal patterns of their sound impulses. As has been observed often with other insect pests, populations of the two species appeared clumped rather than uniform or random. The results are discussed in relation to development of automated methods that could assist orchard managers in quickly identifying infested trees and offshoots so that R. ferrugineus infestations can be targeted and the likelihood of transferring infested offshoots to uninfested areas can be reduced. PMID:26743218

      11. Performance comparison of an all-fiber-based laser Doppler vibrometer for remote acoustical signal detection using short and long coherence length lasers.

        PubMed

        Li, Rui; Madampoulos, Nicholas; Zhu, Zhigang; Xie, Liangping

        2012-07-20

        All-fiber laser Doppler vibrometer systems have great potential in the application of remote acoustic detection. However, due to the requirement for a long operating distance, a long coherence length laser is required, which can drive the system cost high. In this paper, a system using a short coherence length laser is proposed and demonstrated. Experimental analysis indicates that the multi-longitudinal modes of the laser cause detection noise and that the unequal length between two paths (local oscillator path and transmission path) increases the intensity and the frequency components of the noise. In order to reduce the noise, the optical length of the two paths needs to be balanced, within the coherence length of the source. We demonstrate that adopting a tunable optical delay to compensate the unequal length significantly reduces the noise. In a comparison of the detection results by using a short coherence laser and a long coherence laser, our developed system gives a good performance on the acoustic signal detection from three meters away.

      12. Acoustic Seal

        NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

        Steinetz, Bruce M. (Inventor)

        2006-01-01

        The invention relates to a sealing device having an acoustic resonator. The acoustic resonator is adapted to create acoustic waveforms to generate a sealing pressure barrier blocking fluid flow from a high pressure area to a lower pressure area. The sealing device permits noncontacting sealing operation. The sealing device may include a resonant-macrosonic-synthesis (RMS) resonator.

      13. Acoustic seal

        NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

        Steinetz, Bruce M. (Inventor)

        2006-01-01

        The invention relates to a sealing device having an acoustic resonator. The acoustic resonator is adapted to create acoustic waveforms to generate a sealing pressure barrier blocking fluid flow from a high pressure area to a lower pressure area. The sealing device permits noncontacting sealing operation. The sealing device may include a resonant-macrosonic-synthesis (RMS) resonator.

      14. Killing Fields: The Deadly Legacy of Landmines. Study Guide. Episode #738. America's Defense Monitor, Educational TV for the Classroom.

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Center for Defense Information, Washington, DC.

        This program explores the dangers of landmines as "weapons of mass destruction in slow motion." These hidden killers have been called the "perfect soldier"--never sleeping and never missing--yet kill thousands of people each year, many innocent civilians. The study guide offers questions to use before viewing the video, questions to follow the…

      15. Detecting vocal fatigue in student singers using acoustic measures of mean fundamental frequency, jitter, shimmer, and harmonics-to-noise ratio

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Sisakun, Siphan

        2000-12-01

        The purpose of this study is to explore the ability of four acoustic parameters, mean fundamental frequency, jitter, shimmer, and harmonics-to-noise ratio, to detect vocal fatigue in student singers. The participants are 15 voice students, who perform two distinct tasks, data collection task and vocal fatiguing task. The data collection task includes the sustained vowel /a/, reading a standard passage, and self-rate on a vocal fatigue form. The vocal fatiguing task is the vocal practice of musical scores for a total of 45 minutes. The four acoustic parameters are extracted using the software EZVoicePlus. The data analyses are performed to answer eight research questions. The first four questions relate to correlations of the self-rating scale and each of the four parameters. The next four research questions relate to differences in the parameters over time using one-factor repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA). The result yields a proposed acoustic profile of vocal fatigue in student singers. This profile is characterized by increased fundamental frequency; slightly decreased jitter; slightly decreased shimmer; and slightly increased harmonics-to-noise ratio. The proposed profile requires further investigation.

      16. Acoustically Induced Vibration of Structures: Reverberant Vs. Direct Acoustic Testing

        NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

        Kolaini, Ali R.; O'Connell, Michael R.; Tsoi, Wan B.

        2009-01-01

        Large reverberant chambers have been used for several decades in the aerospace industry to test larger structures such as solar arrays and reflectors to qualify and to detect faults in the design and fabrication of spacecraft and satellites. In the past decade some companies have begun using direct near field acoustic testing, employing speakers, for qualifying larger structures. A limited test data set obtained from recent acoustic tests of the same hardware exposed to both direct and reverberant acoustic field testing has indicated some differences in the resulting structural responses. In reverberant acoustic testing, higher vibration responses were observed at lower frequencies when compared with the direct acoustic testing. In the case of direct near field acoustic testing higher vibration responses appeared to occur at higher frequencies as well. In reverberant chamber testing and direct acoustic testing, standing acoustic modes of the reverberant chamber or the speakers and spacecraft parallel surfaces can strongly couple with the fundamental structural modes of the test hardware. In this paper data from recent acoustic testing of flight hardware, that yielded evidence of acoustic standing wave coupling with structural responses, are discussed in some detail. Convincing evidence of the acoustic standing wave/structural coupling phenomenon will be discussed, citing observations from acoustic testing of a simple aluminum plate. The implications of such acoustic coupling to testing of sensitive flight hardware will be discussed. The results discussed in this paper reveal issues with over or under testing of flight hardware that could pose unanticipated structural and flight qualification issues. Therefore, it is of paramount importance to understand the structural modal coupling with standing acoustic waves that has been observed in both methods of acoustic testing. This study will assist the community to choose an appropriate testing method and test setup in

      17. Acoustic emission intrusion detector

        DOEpatents

        Carver, Donald W.; Whittaker, Jerry W.

        1980-01-01

        An intrusion detector is provided for detecting a forcible entry into a secured structure while minimizing false alarms. The detector uses a piezoelectric crystal transducer to sense acoustic emissions. The transducer output is amplified by a selectable gain amplifier to control the sensitivity. The rectified output of the amplifier is applied to a Schmitt trigger circuit having a preselected threshold level to provide amplitude discrimination. Timing circuitry is provided which is activated by successive pulses from the Schmitt trigger which lie within a selected time frame for frequency discrimination. Detected signals having proper amplitude and frequency trigger an alarm within the first complete cycle time of a detected acoustical disturbance signal.

      18. Real-time monitoring of focused ultrasound blood-brain barrier opening via subharmonic acoustic emission detection: implementation of confocal dual-frequency piezoelectric transducers

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Tsai, Chih-Hung; Zhang, Jia-Wei; Liao, Yi-Yi; Liu, Hao-Li

        2016-04-01

        Burst-tone focused ultrasound exposure in the presence of microbubbles has been demonstrated to be effective at inducing temporal and local opening of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which promises significant clinical potential to deliver therapeutic molecules into the central nervous system (CNS). Traditional contrast-enhanced imaging confirmation after focused ultrasound (FUS) exposure serves as a post-operative indicator of the effectiveness of FUS-BBB opening, however, an indicator that can concurrently report the BBB status and BBB-opening effectiveness is required to provide effective feedback to implement this treatment clinically. In this study, we demonstrate the use of subharmonic acoustic emission detection with implementation on a confocal dual-frequency piezoelectric ceramic structure to perform real-time monitoring of FUS-BBB opening. A confocal dual-frequency (0.55 MHz/1.1 MHz) focused ultrasound transducer was designed. The 1.1 MHz spherically-curved ceramic was employed to deliver FUS exposure to induce BBB-opening, whereas the outer-ring 0.55 MHz ceramic was employed to detect the subharmonic acoustic emissions originating from the target position. In stage-1 experiments, we employed spectral analysis and performed an energy spectrum density (ESD) calculation. An optimized 0.55 MHz ESD level change was shown to effectively discriminate the occurrence of BBB-opening. Wideband acoustic emissions received from 0.55 MHz ceramics were also analyzed to evaluate its correlations with erythrocyte extravasations. In stage-2 real-time monitoring experiments, we applied the predetermined ESD change as a detection threshold in PC-controlled algorithm to predict the FUS exposure intra-operatively. In stage-1 experiment, we showed that subharmonic ESD presents distinguishable dynamics between intact BBB and opened BBB, and therefore a threshold ESD change level (5.5 dB) can be identified for BBB-opening prediction. Using this ESD change threshold detection as a

      19. Real-time monitoring of focused ultrasound blood-brain barrier opening via subharmonic acoustic emission detection: implementation of confocal dual-frequency piezoelectric transducers.

        PubMed

        Tsai, Chih-Hung; Zhang, Jia-Wei; Liao, Yi-Yi; Liu, Hao-Li

        2016-04-01

        Burst-tone focused ultrasound exposure in the presence of microbubbles has been demonstrated to be effective at inducing temporal and local opening of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which promises significant clinical potential to deliver therapeutic molecules into the central nervous system (CNS). Traditional contrast-enhanced imaging confirmation after focused ultrasound (FUS) exposure serves as a post-operative indicator of the effectiveness of FUS-BBB opening, however, an indicator that can concurrently report the BBB status and BBB-opening effectiveness is required to provide effective feedback to implement this treatment clinically. In this study, we demonstrate the use of subharmonic acoustic emission detection with implementation on a confocal dual-frequency piezoelectric ceramic structure to perform real-time monitoring of FUS-BBB opening. A confocal dual-frequency (0.55 MHz/1.1 MHz) focused ultrasound transducer was designed. The 1.1 MHz spherically-curved ceramic was employed to deliver FUS exposure to induce BBB-opening, whereas the outer-ring 0.55 MHz ceramic was employed to detect the subharmonic acoustic emissions originating from the target position. In stage-1 experiments, we employed spectral analysis and performed an energy spectrum density (ESD) calculation. An optimized 0.55 MHz ESD level change was shown to effectively discriminate the occurrence of BBB-opening. Wideband acoustic emissions received from 0.55 MHz ceramics were also analyzed to evaluate its correlations with erythrocyte extravasations. In stage-2 real-time monitoring experiments, we applied the predetermined ESD change as a detection threshold in PC-controlled algorithm to predict the FUS exposure intra-operatively. In stage-1 experiment, we showed that subharmonic ESD presents distinguishable dynamics between intact BBB and opened BBB, and therefore a threshold ESD change level (5.5 dB) can be identified for BBB-opening prediction. Using this ESD change threshold detection as a

      20. Simulation of Neutron Backscattering applied to organic material detection

        SciTech Connect

        Forero, N. C.; Cruz, A. H.; Cristancho, F.

        2007-10-26

        The Neutron Backscattering technique is tested when performing the task of localizing hydrogenated explosives hidden in soil. Detector system, landmine, soil and neutron source are simulated with Geant4 in order to obtain the number of neutrons detected when several parameters like mine composition, relative position mine-source and soil moisture are varied.0.