Science.gov

Sample records for acoustic logging tools

  1. Acoustic paramagnetic logging tool

    DOEpatents

    Vail, III, William B.

    1988-01-01

    New methods and apparatus are disclosed which allow measurement of the presence of oil and water in geological formations using a new physical effect called the Acoustic Paramagnetic Logging Effect (APLE). The presence of petroleum in formation causes a slight increase in the earth's magnetic field in the vicinity of the reservoir. This is the phenomena of paramagnetism. Application of an acoustic source to a geological formation at the Larmor frequency of the nucleons present causes the paramagnetism of the formation to disappear. This results in a decrease in the earth3 s magnetic field in the vicinity of the oil bearing formation. Repetitively frequency sweeping the acoustic source through the Larmor frequency of the nucleons present (approx. 2 kHz) causes an amplitude modulation of the earth's magnetic field which is a consequence of the APLE. The amplitude modulation of the earth's magnetic field is measured with an induction coil gradiometer and provides a direct measure of the amount of oil and water in the excitation zone of the formation . The phase of the signal is used to infer the longitudinal relaxation times of the fluids present, which results in the ability in general to separate oil and water and to measure the viscosity of the oil present. Such measurements may be preformed in open boreholes and in cased well bores.

  2. Dual excitation acoustic paramagnetic logging tool

    DOEpatents

    Vail, III, William B.

    1989-01-01

    New methods and apparatus are disclosed which allow measurement of the presence of oil and water in gelogical formations using a new physical effect called the Acoustic Paramagnetic Logging Effect (APLE). The presence of petroleum in formation causes a slight increase in the earth's magnetic field in the vicinity of the reservoir. This is the phenomena of paramagnetism. Application of an acoustic source to a geological formation at the Larmor frequency of the nucleous present causes the paramagnetism of the formation to disappear. This results in a decrease in the earth's magnetic field in the vicinity of the oil bearing formation. Repetitively frequency sweeping the acoustic source through the Larmor frequency of the nucleons present (approx. 2 kHz) causes an amplitude modulation of the earth's magnetic field which is a consequence of the APLE. The amplitude modulation of the earth's magnetic field is measured with an induction coil gradiometer and provides a direct measure of the amount of oil and water in the excitation zone of the formation. The phase of the signal is used to infer the longitudinal relaxation times of the fluids present, which results in the ability in general to separate oil and water and to measure the viscosity of the oil present. Such measurements may be preformed in open boreholes and in cased well bores. The Dual Excitation Acoustic Paramagnetic Logging Tool employing two acoustic sources is also described.

  3. Dual excitation acoustic paramagnetic logging tool

    DOEpatents

    Vail, W.B. III.

    1989-02-14

    New methods and apparatus are disclosed which allow measurement of the presence of oil and water in geological formations using a new physical effect called the Acoustic Paramagnetic Logging Effect (APLE). The presence of petroleum in formation causes a slight increase in the earth's magnetic field in the vicinity of the reservoir. This is the phenomena of paramagnetism. Application of an acoustic source to a geological formation at the Larmor frequency of the nucleons present causes the paramagnetism of the formation to disappear. This results in a decrease in the earth's magnetic field in the vicinity of the oil bearing formation. Repetitively frequency sweeping the acoustic source through the Larmor frequency of the nucleons present (approx. 2 kHz) causes an amplitude modulation of the earth's magnetic field which is a consequence of the APLE. The amplitude modulation of the earth's magnetic field is measured with an induction coil gradiometer and provides a direct measure of the amount of oil and water in the excitation zone of the formation. The phase of the signal is used to infer the longitudinal relaxation times of the fluids present, which results in the ability in general to separate oil and water and to measure the viscosity of the oil present. Such measurements may be performed in open boreholes and in cased well bores. The Dual Excitation Acoustic Paramagnetic Logging Tool employing two acoustic sources is also described. 6 figs.

  4. Azimuthally acoustic logging tool to evaluate cementing quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Junqiang; Ju, Xiaodong; Qiao, Wenxiao; Men, Baiyong; Wang, Ruijia; Wu, Jinping

    2014-08-01

    An azimuthally sensitive acoustic bond tool (AABT) uses a phased arc array transmitter that can provide directionally focused radiation. The acoustic sonde consists of a phased arc array transmitter and two monopole receivers, the spaces from the transmitter being 0.91 m and 1.52 m, respectively. The transmitter includes eight transducer sub-units. By controlling the high-voltage firing signal phase for each transmitter, the radiation energy of the phased arc array transducer can be focused in a single direction. Compared with conventional monopole and dipole transmitters, the new transmitter provides cement quality evaluation with azimuthal sensitivity, which is not possible with conventional cement bond log/variable density log tools. Laboratory measurements indicate that the directivity curves for the phased arc array and those computed theoretically are consistent and show good agreement. We acquire measurements from a laboratory cistern and from the field to validate the reliability and applicability of the AABT. Results indicate that the AABT accurately evaluates the azimuthal cement quality of case-cement interfaces by imaging the amplitude of the first-arrival wave. This tool visualizes the size, position and orientation of channeling and holes. In the case of good case-cement bonding, the AABT also evaluates the azimuthal cementing quality of the cement formation interface by imaging the amplitude of formation waves.

  5. A synchronous serial bus for multidimensional array acoustic logging tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Men, Baiyong; Ju, Xiaodong; Lu, Junqiang; Qiao, Wenxiao

    2016-12-01

    In high-temperature and spatial borehole applications, a distributed structure is employed in a multidimensional array acoustic logging tool (MDALT) based on a phased array technique for electronic systems. However, new challenges, such as synchronous multichannel data acquisition, multinode real-time control and bulk data transmission in a limited interval, have emerged. To address these challenges, we developed a synchronous serial bus (SSB) in this study. SSB works in a half-duplex mode via a master-slave architecture. It also consists of a single master, several slaves, a differential clock line and a differential data line. The clock line is simplex, whereas the data line is half-duplex and synchronous to the clock line. A reliable communication between the master and the slaves with real-time adjustment of synchronisation is achieved by rationally designing the frame format and protocol of communication and by introducing a scramble code and a Hamming error-correcting code. The control logic of the master and the slaves is realized in field programmable gate array (FPGA) or complex programmable logic device (CPLD). The clock speed of SSB is 10 MHz, the effective data rate of the bulk data transmission is over 99%, and the synchronous errors amongst the slaves are less than 10 ns. Room-temperature test, high-temperature test (175 °C) and field test demonstrate that the proposed SSB is qualified for MDALT.

  6. Acoustic borehole logging

    SciTech Connect

    Medlin, W.L.; Manzi, S.J.

    1990-10-09

    This patent describes an acoustic borehole logging method. It comprises traversing a borehole with a borehole logging tool containing a transmitter of acoustic energy having a free-field frequency spectrum with at least one characteristic resonant frequency of vibration and spaced-apart receiver, repeatedly exciting the transmitter with a swept frequency tone burst of a duration sufficiently greater than the travel time of acoustic energy between the transmitter and the receiver to allow borehole cavity resonances to be established within the borehole cavity formed between the borehole logging tool and the borehole wall, detecting acoustic energy amplitude modulated by the borehole cavity resonances with the spaced-apart receiver, and recording an amplitude verses frequency output of the receiver in correlation with depth as a log of the borehole frequency spectrum representative of the subsurface formation comprising the borehole wall.

  7. Test-bench system for a borehole azimuthal acoustic reflection imaging logging tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xianping; Ju, Xiaodong; Qiao, Wenxiao; Lu, Junqiang; Men, Baiyong; Liu, Dong

    2016-06-01

    The borehole azimuthal acoustic reflection imaging logging tool (BAAR) is a new generation of imaging logging tool, which is able to investigate stratums in a relatively larger range of space around the borehole. The BAAR is designed based on the idea of modularization with a very complex structure, so it has become urgent for us to develop a dedicated test-bench system to debug each module of the BAAR. With the help of a test-bench system introduced in this paper, test and calibration of BAAR can be easily achieved. The test-bench system is designed based on the client/server model. The hardware system mainly consists of a host computer, an embedded controlling board, a bus interface board, a data acquisition board and a telemetry communication board. The host computer serves as the human machine interface and processes the uploaded data. The software running on the host computer is designed based on VC++. The embedded controlling board uses Advanced Reduced Instruction Set Machines 7 (ARM7) as the micro controller and communicates with the host computer via Ethernet. The software for the embedded controlling board is developed based on the operating system uClinux. The bus interface board, data acquisition board and telemetry communication board are designed based on a field programmable gate array (FPGA) and provide test interfaces for the logging tool. To examine the feasibility of the test-bench system, it was set up to perform a test on BAAR. By analyzing the test results, an unqualified channel of the electronic receiving cabin was discovered. It is suggested that the test-bench system can be used to quickly determine the working condition of sub modules of BAAR and it is of great significance in improving production efficiency and accelerating industrial production of the logging tool.

  8. A debugging system for azimuthally acoustic logging tools based on modular and hierarchical design ideas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, K.; Ju, X. D.; Lu, J. Q.; Men, B. Y.

    2016-08-01

    On the basis of modular and hierarchical design ideas, this study presents a debugging system for an azimuthally sensitive acoustic bond tool (AABT). The debugging system includes three parts: a personal computer (PC), embedded front-end machine and function expansion boards. Modular and hierarchical design ideas are conducted in all design and debug processes. The PC communicates with the front-end machine via the Internet, and the front-end machine and function expansion boards connect each other by the extended parallel bus. In this method, the three parts of the debugging system form stable and high-speed data communication. This study not only introduces the system-level debugging and sub-system level debugging of the tool but also the debugging of the analogue signal processing board, which is important and greatly used in logging tools. Experiments illustrate that the debugging system can greatly improve AABT verification and calibration efficiency and that, board-level debugging can examine and improve analogue signal processing boards. The design thinking is clear and the design structure is reasonable, thus making it easy to extend and upgrade the debugging system.

  9. Log-Tool

    SciTech Connect

    Goodall, John

    2012-05-21

    Log files are typically semi- or un-structured. To be useable for visualization and machine learning, they need to be parsed into a standard, structured format. Log-tool is a tool for facilitating the parsing, structuring, and routing of log files (e.g. intrusion detection long, web server logs, system logs). It consists of three main components: (1) Input – it will input data from files, standard input, and syslog, (2) Parser – it will parse the log file based on regular expressions into structured data (JSNO format), (3) Output – it will output structured data into commonly used formats, including Redis (a database), standard output, and syslog.

  10. Well Log ETL tool

    SciTech Connect

    Good, Jessica

    2013-08-01

    This is an executable python script which offers two different conversions for well log data: 1) Conversion from a BoreholeLASLogData.xls model to a LAS version 2.0 formatted XML file. 2) Conversion from a LAS 2.0 formatted XML file to an entry in the WellLog Content Model. Example templates for BoreholeLASLogData.xls and WellLogsTemplate.xls can be found in the package after download.

  11. Downhole memory-logging tools

    SciTech Connect

    Lysne, P.

    1992-01-01

    Logging technologies developed hydrocarbon resource evaluation have not migrated into geothermal applications even though data so obtained would strengthen reservoir characterization efforts. Two causative issues have impeded progress: (i) there is a general lack of vetted, high-temperature instrumentation, and (ii) the interpretation of log data generated in a geothermal formation is in its infancy. Memory-logging tools provide a path around the first obstacle by providing quality data at a low cost. These tools feature on-board computers that process and store data, and newer systems may be programmed to make decisions.'' Since memory tools are completely self-contained, they are readily deployed using the slick line found on most drilling locations. They have proven to be rugged, and a minimum training program is required for operator personnel. Present tools measure properties such as temperature and pressure, and the development of noise, deviation, and fluid conductivity logs based on existing hardware is relatively easy. A more complex geochemical tool aimed at a quantitative analysis of potassium, uranium and thorium will be available in about on year, and it is expandable into all nuclear measurements common in the hydrocarbon industry. A second tool designed to sample fluids at conditions exceeding 400{degrees}C is in the proposal stage. Partnerships are being formed between the geothermal industry, scientific drilling programs, and the national laboratories to define and develop inversion algorithms relating raw tool data to more pertinent information. 8 refs.

  12. Acoustic Logging Modeling by Refined Biot's Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plyushchenkov, Boris D.; Turchaninov, Victor I.

    An explicit uniform completely conservative finite difference scheme for the refined Biot's equations is proposed. This system is modified according to the modern theory of dynamic permeability and tortuosity in a fluid-saturated elastic porous media. The approximate local boundary transparency conditions are constructed. The acoustic logging device is simulated by the choice of appropriate boundary conditions on its external surface. This scheme and these conditions are satisfactory for exploring borehole acoustic problems in permeable formations in a real axial-symmetrical situation. The developed approach can be adapted for a nonsymmetric case also.

  13. Generalized collar waves in acoustic logging while drilling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiu-Ming; He, Xiao; Zhang, Xiu-Mei

    2016-12-01

    Tool waves, also named collar waves, propagating along the drill collars in acoustic logging while drilling (ALWD), strongly interfere with the needed P- and S-waves of a penetrated formation, which is a key issue in picking up formation P- and S-wave velocities. Previous studies on physical insulation for the collar waves designed on the collar between the source and the receiver sections did not bring to a satisfactory solution. In this paper, we investigate the propagation features of collar waves in different models. It is confirmed that there exists an indirect collar wave in the synthetic full waves due to the coupling between the drill collar and the borehole, even there is a perfect isolator between the source and the receiver. The direct collar waves propagating all along the tool and the indirect ones produced by echoes from the borehole wall are summarized as the generalized collar waves. Further analyses show that the indirect collar waves could be relatively strong in the full wave data. This is why the collar waves cannot be eliminated with satisfactory effect in many cases by designing the physical isolators carved on the tool. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11134011 and 11374322) and the Foresight Research Project, Institute of Acoustics, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  14. Measurement of stiffness of standing trees and felled logs using acoustics: A review.

    PubMed

    Legg, Mathew; Bradley, Stuart

    2016-02-01

    This paper provides a review on the use of acoustics to measure stiffness of standing trees, stems, and logs. An outline is given of the properties of wood and how these are related to stiffness and acoustic velocity throughout the tree. Factors are described that influence the speed of sound in wood, including the different types of acoustic waves which propagate in tree stems and lumber. Acoustic tools and techniques that have been used to measure the stiffness of wood are reviewed. The reasons for a systematic difference between direct and acoustic measurements of stiffness for standing trees, and methods for correction, are discussed. Other techniques, which have been used in addition to acoustics to try to improve stiffness measurements, are also briefly described. Also reviewed are studies which have used acoustic tools to investigate factors that influence the stiffness of trees. These factors include different silvicultural practices, geographic and environmental conditions, and genetics.

  15. Instruments and methods acoustic televiewer logging in glacier boreholes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morin, R.H.; Descamps, G.E.; Cecil, L.D.

    2000-01-01

    The acoustic televiewer is a geophysical logging instrument that is deployed in a water-filled borehole and operated while trolling. It generates a digital, magnetically oriented image of the borehole wall that is developed from the amplitudes and transit times of acoustic waves emitted from the tool and reflected at the water-wall interface. The transit-time data are also converted to radial distances, from which cross-sectional views of the borehole shape can be constructed. Because the televiewer is equipped with both a three-component magnetometer and a two-component inclinometer, the borehole's trajectory in space is continuously recorded as well. This instrument is routinely used in mining and hydrogeologic applications, but in this investigation it was deployed in two boreholes drilled into Upper Fremont Glacier, Wyoming, U.S.A. The acoustic images recorded in this glacial setting are not as clear as those typically obtained in rocks, due to a lower reflection coefficient for water and ice than for water and rock. Results indicate that the depth and orientation of features intersecting the boreholes can be determined, but that interpreting their physical nature is problematic and requires corroborating information from inspection of cores. Nevertheless, these data can provide some insight into englacial structural characteristics. Additional information derived from the cross-sectional geometry of the borehole, as well as from its trajectory, may also be useful in studies concerned with stress patterns and deformation processes.

  16. Precision pressure/temperature logging tool

    SciTech Connect

    Henfling, J.A.; Normann, R.A.

    1998-01-01

    Past memory logging tools have provided excellent pressure/temperature data when used in a geothermal environment, and they are easier to maintain and deploy than tools requiring an electric wireline connection to the surface. However, they are deficient since the tool operator is unaware of downhole conditions that could require changes in the logging program. Tools that make ``decisions`` based on preprogrammed scenarios can partially overcome this difficulty, and a suite of such memory tools has been developed at Sandia National Laboratories. The first tool, which forms the basis for future instruments, measures pressure and temperature. Design considerations include a minimization of cost while insuring quality data, size compatibility with diamond-cored holes, operation in holes to 425 C (800 F), transportability by ordinary passenger air service, and ease of operation. This report documents the development and construction of the pressure/temperature tool. It includes: (1) description of the major components; (2) calibration; (3) typical logging scenario; (4) tool data examples; and (5) conclusions. The mechanical and electrical drawings, along with the tool`s software, will be furnished upon request.

  17. Design of acoustic logging signal source of imitation based on field programmable gate array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, K.; Ju, X. D.; Lu, J. Q.; Men, B. Y.

    2014-08-01

    An acoustic logging signal source of imitation is designed and realized, based on the Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA), to improve the efficiency of examining and repairing acoustic logging tools during research and field application, and to inspect and verify acoustic receiving circuits and corresponding algorithms. The design of this signal source contains hardware design and software design,and the hardware design uses an FPGA as the control core. Four signals are made first by reading the Random Access Memory (RAM) data which are inside the FPGA, then dealing with the data by digital to analog conversion, amplification, smoothing and so on. Software design uses VHDL, a kind of hardware description language, to program the FPGA. Experiments illustrate that the ratio of signal to noise for the signal source is high, the waveforms are stable, and also its functions of amplitude adjustment, frequency adjustment and delay adjustment are in accord with the characteristics of real acoustic logging waveforms. These adjustments can be used to imitate influences on sonic logging received waveforms caused by many kinds of factors such as spacing and span of acoustic tools, sonic speeds of different layers and fluids, and acoustic attenuations of different cementation planes.

  18. Dewarless Logging Tool - 1st Generation

    SciTech Connect

    HENFLING,JOSEPH A.; NORMANN,RANDY A.

    2000-08-01

    This report focuses on Sandia National Laboratories' effort to create high-temperature logging tools for geothermal applications without the need for heat shielding. One of the mechanisms for failure in conventional downhole tools is temperature. They can only survive a limited number of hours in high temperature environments. For the first time since the evolution of integrated circuits, components are now commercially available that are qualified to 225 C with many continuing to work up to 300 C. These components are primarily based on Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI) technology. Sandia has developed and tested a simple data logger based on this technology that operates up to 300 C with a few limiting components operating to only 250 C without thermal protection. An actual well log to 240 C without shielding is discussed. The first prototype high-temperature tool measures pressure and temperature using a wire-line for power and communication. The tool is based around the HT83C51 microcontroller. A brief discussion of the background and status of the High Temperature Instrumentation program at Sandia, objectives, data logger development, and future project plans are given.

  19. Unique logging tool 'sees' into wellbore

    SciTech Connect

    Rambow, F.H.K.

    1985-07-01

    The borehole televiewer, an acoustic imaging device similar to sidescan sonar, was once limited to casing inspection and fracture detection. Recent improvements, including automatic gain control and computer-enhanced imaging, enable the televiewer to function as a high-resolution dipmeter and borehole geometry tool. It can easily differentiate between bedding planes and fractures and is able to detect small features, such as burrowing and vugs. The televiewer discriminates lithology and has been used to observe induced fracture growth during overpressurization. Images, even those made through heavy, oil-based muds and in extremely soft formations, rival core sample photographs for clarity and resolution.

  20. Acoustic fault injection tool (AFIT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoess, Jeffrey N.

    1999-05-01

    On September 18, 1997, Honeywell Technology Center (HTC) successfully completed a three-week flight test of its rotor acoustic monitoring system (RAMS) at Patuxent River Flight Test Center. This flight test was the culmination of an ambitious 38-month proof-of-concept effort directed at demonstrating the feasibility of detecting crack propagation in helicopter rotor components. The program was funded as part of the U.S. Navy's Air Vehicle Diagnostic Systems (AVDS) program. Reductions in Navy maintenance budgets and available personnel have dictated the need to transition from time-based to 'condition-based' maintenance. Achieving this will require new enabling diagnostic technologies. The application of acoustic emission for the early detection of helicopter rotor head dynamic component faults has proven the feasibility of the technology. The flight-test results demonstrated that stress-wave acoustic emission technology can detect signals equivalent to small fatigue cracks in rotor head components and can do so across the rotating articulated rotor head joints and in the presence of other background acoustic noise generated during flight operation. During the RAMS flight test, 12 test flights were flown from which 25 Gbyte of digital acoustic data and about 15 hours of analog flight data recorder (FDR) data were collected from the eight on-rotor acoustic sensors. The focus of this paper is to describe the CH-46 flight-test configuration and present design details about a new innovative machinery diagnostic technology called acoustic fault injection. This technology involves the injection of acoustic sound into machinery to assess health and characterize operational status. The paper will also address the development of the Acoustic Fault Injection Tool (AFIT), which was successfully demonstrated during the CH-46 flight tests.

  1. Homomorphic processing of the tube wave generated during acoustic logging

    SciTech Connect

    Ellefsen, K.J. ); Cheng, C.H. . Dept. of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences); Burns, D.R.

    1993-10-01

    The authors have developed a new method to process the tube wave, which is generated during acoustic logging, to obtain estimates for its wavenumber, attenuation coefficient, amplitude, and phase at every frequency. To improve the accuracy of the estimates, the method can use data from multiple sources and data collected at successive depths in the borehole. This new method has several advantages over other methods that are currently used to process acoustic logging data: the new method can obtain accurate estimates of the wavenumber and amplitude from only a few receivers; the receivers can be irregularly spaced; and no spurious estimates are generated. Nonetheless, this new method has one disadvantage compared to others: it can only estimate the parameters for one, high-amplitude wave like the tube wave. Also, like all other existing methods, the new method obtains only reasonable estimates for the attenuation coefficient when data from many receivers are processed.

  2. MultiLog: a tool for the control and output merging of multiple logging applications.

    PubMed

    Woodruff, Jonathan; Alexander, Jason

    2016-12-01

    MultiLog is a logging tool that controls, gathers, and combines the output, on-the-fly, from existing research and commercial logging applications or "loggers." Loggers record a specific set of user actions on a computing device, helping researchers to better understand environments or interactions, guiding the design of new or improved interfaces and applications. MultiLog reduces researchers' required implementation effort by simplifying the set-up of multiple loggers and seamlessly combining their output. This in turn increases the availability of logging systems to non-technical experimenters for both short-term and longitudinal observation studies. MultiLog supports two operating modes: "researcher mode" where experimenters configure multiple logging systems, and "deployment mode" where the system is deployed to user-study participants' systems. Researcher mode allows researchers to install, configure log filtering and obfuscation, observe near real-time event streams, and save configuration files ready for deployment. Deployment mode simplifies data collection from multiple loggers by running in the system tray at user log-in, starting loggers, combining their output, and securely uploading the data to a web-server. It also supports real-time browsing of log data, pausing of logging, and removal of log lines. Performance evaluations show that MultiLog does not adversely affect system performance, even when simultaneously running several logging systems. Initial studies show the system runs reliably over a period of 10 weeks.

  3. The Design Log: A New Informational Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spivak, Mayer

    1978-01-01

    The design log is a record of observations, diagnoses, prescriptions, and performance specifications for each space in a structure. It is a systematic approach to design that integrates information about user needs with traditional architectural programming and design. (Author/MLF)

  4. Use of Electromagnetic Acoustic Transducers (emats) for Cement Bond Logging of Gas Storage Wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolshakov, A. O.; Domangue, E. J.; Barolak, J. G.; Patterson, D. J.

    2008-02-01

    According to the Department of Energy (DOE), there are approximately 110 operators maintaining more than 17,000 gas storage wells in over 415 underground storage facilities across the USA. In virtually every application, steel casing, cemented into place, serves to isolate the well from the underground formations. The process of cementing wellbore casing provides two major benefits: 1) cement prevents gas migration between the casing and formation; 2) cement transfers stress from the casing to the formation, increasing the effective strength and working pressure of the casing. Current cement evaluation techniques use an acoustic wave generated and received by a logging tool within the wellbore to detect cement placed outside the casing. These techniques rely on fluid in the casing to provide acoustic coupling between the logging tool and the casing and therefore are unable to operate in gas-filled boreholes. This paper details efforts to confirm the validity and applicability of the use of EMATs for evaluating cement in gas-filled boreholes. The methods and techniques proposed for the cement bond logging using EMATs are confirmed and validated based on the results obtained from the numerical modeling and experiments with physical cement models. Partial funding for this investigation was provided by the DOE and Gas Storage Technology Consortium.

  5. New Data-Logging Tools--New Investigations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Laurence

    1997-01-01

    Presents examples of the types of investigations which exploit the tools now commonly featured in data-logging software. Emphasizes the importance of designing tasks that encourage pupils to think about the data and the principles which underpin worthwhile data-logging tasks. (Author/ASK)

  6. Method and apparatus for combined cement bond and acoustic well logging

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J. R. E.

    1985-01-22

    Method and apparatus are provided for measuring acoustic signals having amplitudes of widely varying magnitude during one traversal of the borehole corresponding to indications of cement bonding along a casing as well as acoustic travel time through an increment of the formation. Variable attenuators are provided associated with acoustic receivers disposed within the logging sonde wherein attenuation may be automatically adjusted as a function of acoustic transmitter-receiver trigger pulses transmitted downhole, depending upon whether a cement bond or other log of acoustic signal information having a substantially different magnitude is desired.

  7. Phase-based dispersion analysis for acoustic array borehole logging data.

    PubMed

    Assous, Said; Elkington, Peter; Linnett, Laurie

    2014-04-01

    A phase-based dispersion analysis method for velocity (slowness) extraction from guided waves recorded by an acoustic borehole logging tool in a geological formation is presented. The technique consists of acquiring waveforms from an array of receivers distributed along the tool and constructing the dispersion characteristic by processing in the frequency domain and exploiting phase information to measure the travel time for each frequency component. The approach is nonparametric and completely data-driven and provides high resolution estimates that do not rely on velocity guesses or assumptions regarding the type of modes. Results are free of the aliases and spurious modes which are characteristic of some prior approaches. Examples of dispersion estimation curves are presented using synthesized flexural waves and field data from wireline dipole sonic tools; results are compared with those from the weighted spectral semblance (WSS) and amplitude and phase slowness estimation (APES) methods to demonstrate the effectiveness and utility of the proposed method.

  8. Gas hydrate saturation from acoustic impedance and resistivity logs in the shenhu area, south china sea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, X.; Wu, S.; Lee, M.; Guo, Y.; Yang, S.; Liang, J.

    2011-01-01

    During the China's first gas hydrate drilling expedition -1 (GMGS-1), gas hydrate was discovered in layers ranging from 10 to 25 m above the base of gas hydrate stability zone in the Shenhu area, South China Sea. Water chemistry, electrical resistivity logs, and acoustic impedance were used to estimate gas hydrate saturations. Gas hydrate saturations estimated from the chloride concentrations range from 0 to 43% of the pore space. The higher gas hydrate saturations were present in the depth from 152 to 177 m at site SH7 and from 190 to 225 m at site SH2, respectively. Gas hydrate saturations estimated from the resistivity using Archie equation have similar trends to those from chloride concentrations. To examine the variability of gas hydrate saturations away from the wells, acoustic impedances calculated from the 3 D seismic data using constrained sparse inversion method were used. Well logs acquired at site SH7 were incorporated into the inversion by establishing a relation between the water-filled porosity, calculated using gas hydrate saturations estimated from the resistivity logs, and the acoustic impedance, calculated from density and velocity logs. Gas hydrate saturations estimated from acoustic impedance of seismic data are ???10-23% of the pore space and are comparable to those estimated from the well logs. The uncertainties in estimated gas hydrate saturations from seismic acoustic impedances were mainly from uncertainties associated with inverted acoustic impedance, the empirical relation between the water-filled porosities and acoustic impedances, and assumed background resistivity. ?? 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Graphical Acoustic Liner Design and Analysis Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howerton, Brian M. (Inventor); Jones, Michael G. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    An interactive liner design and impedance modeling tool comprises software utilized to design acoustic liners for use in constrained spaces, both regularly and irregularly shaped. A graphical user interface allows the acoustic channel geometry to be drawn in a liner volume while the surface impedance calculations are updated and displayed in real-time. A one-dimensional transmission line model may be used as the basis for the impedance calculations.

  10. Console Log Keeping Made Easier - Tools and Techniques for Improving Quality of Flight Controller Activity Logs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, David W.; Underwood, Debrah (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    At the Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) Payload Operations Integration Center (POIC) for International Space Station (ISS), each flight controller maintains detailed logs of activities and communications at their console position. These logs are critical for accurately controlling flight in real-time as well as providing a historical record and troubleshooting tool. This paper describes logging methods and electronic formats used at the POIC and provides food for thought on their strengths and limitations, plus proposes some innovative extensions. It also describes an inexpensive PC-based scheme for capturing and/or transcribing audio clips from communications consoles. Flight control activity (e.g. interpreting computer displays, entering data/issuing electronic commands, and communicating with others) can become extremely intense. It's essential to document it well, but the effort to do so may conflict with actual activity. This can be more than just annoying, as what's in the logs (or just as importantly not in them) often feeds back directly into the quality of future operations, whether short-term or long-term. In earlier programs, such as Spacelab, log keeping was done on paper, often using position-specific shorthand, and the other reader was at the mercy of the writer's penmanship. Today, user-friendly software solves the legibility problem and can automate date/time entry, but some content may take longer to finish due to individual typing speed and less use of symbols. File layout can be used to great advantage in making types of information easy to find, and creating searchable master logs for a given position is very easy and a real lifesaver in reconstructing events or researching a given topic. We'll examine log formats from several console position, and the types of information that are included and (just as importantly) excluded. We'll also look at when a summary or synopsis is effective, and when extensive detail is needed.

  11. Reliable data storage system design and implementation for acoustic logging while drilling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Xiaolong; Ju, Xiaodong; Wu, Xiling; Lu, Junqiang; Men, Baiyong; Yao, Yongchao; Liu, Dong

    2016-12-01

    Owing to the limitations of real-time transmission, reliable downhole data storage and fast ground reading have become key technologies in developing tools for acoustic logging while drilling (LWD). In order to improve the reliability of the downhole storage system in conditions of high temperature, intensive shake and periodic power supply, improvements were made in terms of hardware and software. In hardware, we integrated the storage system and data acquisition control module into one circuit board, to reduce the complexity of the storage process, by adopting the controller combination of digital signal processor and field programmable gate array. In software, we developed a systematic management strategy for reliable storage. Multiple-backup independent storage was employed to increase the data redundancy. A traditional error checking and correction (ECC) algorithm was improved and we embedded the calculated ECC code into all management data and waveform data. A real-time storage algorithm for arbitrary length data was designed to actively preserve the storage scene and ensure the independence of the stored data. The recovery procedure of management data was optimized to realize reliable self-recovery. A new bad block management idea of static block replacement and dynamic page mark was proposed to make the period of data acquisition and storage more balanced. In addition, we developed a portable ground data reading module based on a new reliable high speed bus to Ethernet interface to achieve fast reading of the logging data. Experiments have shown that this system can work stably below 155 °C with a periodic power supply. The effective ground data reading rate reaches 1.375 Mbps with 99.7% one-time success rate at room temperature. This work has high practical application significance in improving the reliability and field efficiency of acoustic LWD tools.

  12. Neutron logging tool readings and neutron parameters of formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czubek, Jan A.

    1995-03-01

    A case history of the calibration of neutron porosity tools is given in the paper. The calibration of neutron porosity tools is one of the most difficult, complicated, and time consuming tasks in the well logging operations in geophysics. A semi empirical approach to this problem is given in the paper. It is based on the correlation of the tool readings observed in known environments with the apparent neutron parameters sensed by the tools. The apparent neutron parameters are functions of the true neutron parameters of geological formations and of the borehole material, borehole diameter, and the tool position inside the borehole. The true integral neutron transport parameters are obtained by the multigroup diffusion approximation for slowing down of neutrons and by one thermal neutron group for the diffusion. In the latter, the effective neutron temperature is taken into account. The problem of the thermal neutron absorption cross section of rocks is discussed in detail from the point of view of its importance for the well logging results and for the experimental techniques being used.

  13. Final Report: Geothermal dual acoustic tool for measurement of rock stress

    SciTech Connect

    Normann, Randy A.

    2014-12-01

    This paper outlines the technology need for a rock formation stress measurement in future EGS wells. This paper reports on the results of work undertaken under a Phase I, DOE/SBIR on the feasibility to build an acoustic well logging tool for measuring rock formation stress.

  14. Final Report. Geothermal Dual Acoustic Tool for Measurement of Rock Stress

    SciTech Connect

    Normann, Randy A

    2014-12-01

    This paper outlines the technology need for a rock formation stress measurement in future EGS wells. This paper reports on the results of work undertaken under a Phase I, DOE/SBIR on the feasibility to build an acoustic well logging tool for measuring rock formation stress.

  15. Development of a Logging Tool for Muon Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suenaga, H.; Kiho, K.; Miyakawa, K.; Tanaka, H.

    2012-04-01

    A research for high level radioactive waste disposal should investigate geological structure and saturation change of rock mass around a disposal cavern. In the CO2 geological storage and the underground storage of crude oil, natural gas or liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), it is necessary to monitor an upward migration of a gaseous fluid which is stored in underground. For an investigation of slope stability, it is effective to evaluate a high saturation area in the ground's pore space as the area should be the same as that of a rainfall infiltration. Since these phenomena could be evaluated by a measurement of a density variation in underground rock, an application of muon radiography is highly prospective. The Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI) has a plan to conduct a field experiment to evaluate an applicability of the muon radiography to engineering geology in cooperation with Electric Power Development Co., Ltd. (J-POWER). The field experiment will be performed this year in slope topography. If the applicability will be revealed as a result of the field experiment, CRIEPI will start a research on development of a logging tool which can measure muon in a borehole. We plan to build a prototype of the logging tool in around three years and will put it into practical use in around five years.

  16. Acoustic-televiewer and acoustic-waveform logs used to characterize deeply buried basalt flows, Hanford site, Benton County, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paillet, Frederick L.

    1985-01-01

    Acoustic-waveform and acoustic-televiewer logs were obtained for a 400-meter interval of deeply buried basalt flows in three boreholes, and over shorter intervals in two additional boreholes located on the U.S. Department of Energy 's Hanford site in Benton County, Washington. Borehole-wall breakouts were observed in the unaltered interiors of a large part of individual basalt flows; however, several of the flows in one of the five boreholes had almost no breakouts. The distribution of breakouts observed on the televiewer logs correlated closely with the incidence of core disking in some intervals, but the correlation was not always perfect, perhaps because of the differences in the specific fracture mechanisms involved. Borehole-wall breakouts were consistently located on the east and west sides of the boreholes. The orientation is consistent with previous estimates of the principal horizontal-stress field in south-central Washington, if breakouts are assumed to form along the azimuth of the least principal stress. The distribution of breakouts repeatedly indicated an interval of breakout-free rock at the top and bottom of flows. Because breakouts frequently terminate at major low-angle fractures, the data indicate that fracturing may have relieved some of the horizontal stresses near flow tops and bottoms. Unaltered and unfractured basalt appeared to have a uniform compressional velocity of 6.0 + or - 0.1 km/sec and a uniform shear velocity of 3.35 + or - 0.1 km/sec throughout flow interiors. Acoustics-waveform logs also indicated that borehole-wall breakouts did not affect acoustic propagation along the borehole; so fracturing associated with the formation of breakouts appeared to be confined to a thin annulus of stress concentration around the borehole. Televiewer logs obtained before and after hydraulic fracturing in these boreholes indicated the extent of induced fractures, and also indicated minor changes to pre-existing fractures that may have been inflated

  17. The Learning Log as an Integrated Instructional Assessment Tool.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Topaz, Beverley

    1997-01-01

    Use of student learning logs is recommended as a means for both students and teacher to assess second-language learning. The approach encourages learners to analyze their learning difficulties and plan for overcoming them. Incorporated into portfolios, logs can be used to analyze progress. Sample log sheet and chart used as a framework for…

  18. Acoustic logging on ultralow density cement bonded quality evaluation in cased hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Shang, X.; Chen, T.; Tao, G.

    2011-12-01

    Cementing operation after drilling boreholes ensures oil and gas to be extracted effectively and avoids oil spill events such as BP Mexico oil leakage events. However, the loss of cement in deep formation due to its high density happens and raises issues. In order to overcome this problem, ultralow density cement or gas-based cements are used more and more commonly in recent years. Current acoustic evaluation tools, used to determine the cement bond quality, are designed for conventional high density cement. Therefore, they are not capable to image the ultralow density cement, whose acoustic properties are similar to borehole drilling mud. In this paper, a new acoustic technique is developed to image the ultralow density cement behind case. Finite difference method and analytical methods are used to simulate the wave-field of cased borehole which ultralow density cement bonded on. Based on the simulations, the optimal parameters of the evaluation tool design are proposed including spacing (from source to the nearest receiver and between the two neighboring receiver), frequency of source.

  19. Study of multi-acoustic channel supersonic Doppler flowmeter for measuring coal slurry-coal log pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yu; Yang, Jie; Tang, Jun

    2006-11-01

    Coal slurry-coal log pipeline is a new technology for long distance transportation of coal logs (cylindrical coal briquettes) by using coal slurry as carrier and pump as power set. Because of the difficulty of measuring flow rate of coal slurry-coal log pipeline, the study of measuring technology and the development of flowmeter are necessary. In consideration of the characteristics of transportation of coal logs in coal slurry pipeline, a non-contacting measuring method and the supersonic Doppler effect are selected and used. By detecting frequency drifts produced by reflecting supersonic wave from moving coal particles and coal logs in pipeline the flow rate of coal slurry-coal log pipeline (the total quantity of coal transported by the pipeline) can be measured. Based on the concept of liner concentration of coal logs in pipeline and characteristics of Doppler frequency drifts of coal particles and coal logs moved in pipeline, the measuring method of supersonic wave and the transportation principle of coal slurry-coal log pipeline are discussed and a multi-acoustic channel supersonic Doppler flowmeter is designed for measuring the total quantity of coal transported by pipeline. The flowmeter is composed of supersonic transducer, electron circuit, flow rate indication and integral calculation system. The multi-acoustic channel technique and a suitable acoustic wedge with a certain shape and special solid material are selected and used for increasing the measuring precision. In this paper the Doppler signal is measured and analyzed by using mixing-frequency technique and FPT (rapid Fourier transformation), and some designed circuits and signal measurement process are also offered.

  20. The Chemnitz LogAnalyzer: a tool for analyzing data from hypertext navigation research.

    PubMed

    Brunstein, Angela; Naumann, Anja; Krems, Josef F

    2005-05-01

    Computer-based studies usually produce log files as raw data. These data cannot be analyzed adequately with conventional statistical software. The Chemnitz LogAnalyzer provides tools for quick and comfortable visualization and analyses of hypertext navigation behavior by individual users and for aggregated data. In addition, it supports analogous analyses of questionnaire data and reanalysis with respect to several predefined orders of nodes of the same hypertext. As an illustration of how to use the Chemnitz LogAnalyzer, we give an account of one study on learning with hypertext. Participants either searched for specific details or read a hypertext document to familiarize themselves with its content. The tool helped identify navigation strategies affected by these two processing goals and provided comparisons, for example, of processing times and visited sites. Altogether, the Chemnitz LogAnalyzer fills the gap between log files as raw data of Web-based studies and conventional statistical software.

  1. Impact of focused gamma ray beam angle on the response of density logging tool.

    PubMed

    Wu, He; Zhang, Feng; Guo, Hongbo; Xin, Yi; Han, Zhongyue

    2017-05-01

    The response of the gamma-gamma density logging tool with different focused gamma ray beam angle is investigated by using the MCNP code. This work focuses on the four aspects of spatial distribution and energy spectrum of scattered gamma rays, measurement uncertainty, the depth of investigation, and vertical resolution of the logging tool. The results show that the density measurement accuracy can be improved when a relative larger collimator angle is employed, and the vertical resolution of the tool would not get worse.

  2. Software Tools for Acoustic Database Management

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-01

    key system requirements must be satis- fied. This report discusses these requirements, and describes the software tools developed by the WHOI...Source code listings are supplied. I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I ii I I I I Contents 1 1 Introduction 3 2 System Overview 5 3 3 Digital File...Format 7 4 Analog-to-Digital Conversion 9 4.1 CSTRM: A Batch Digitizing System .................. 11 5 Text Header Maintenance 15 5.1 HEADEDIT

  3. NUMERICAL STUDY OF ELECTROMAGNETIC WAVES GENERATED BY A PROTOTYPE DIELECTRIC LOGGING TOOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    To understand the electromagnetic waves generated by a prototype dielectric logging tool, a
    numerical study was conducted using both the finite-difference, time-domain method and a frequency- wavenumber method. When the propagation velocity in the borehole was greater than th...

  4. MONITOIRNG OF A CONTROLLED DNAPL SPILL USING A PROTOTYPE DIELECTRIC LOGGING TOOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U. S. Geological Survey (USGS) utilized their prototype dielectric logging tool to monitor a controlled Dense Non-Aqueous Phase Liquid (DNAPL) spill into a large tank located at the University of California Richmond Field Station (RFS) containing multiple sand and clayey sand...

  5. On replacing Am-Be neutron sources in compensated porosity logging tools.

    PubMed

    Peeples, Cody R; Mickael, Medhat; Gardner, Robin P

    2010-01-01

    Authors explored the direct replacement of Am-Be neutron sources in neutron porosity logging tools through Monte Carlo simulations using MCNP5. (252)Cf and electronic accelerator neutron sources based on the Deuterium-Tritium fusion reaction were considered. Between the sources, a tradeoff was noted between sensitivity to the presence of hydrogen and uncertainty due to counting statistics. It was concluded that both replacement sources as well as accelerator sources based on the Deuterium-Deuterium fusion reaction warrant further consideration as porosity log sources.

  6. Acoustic solitons: A robust tool to investigate the generation and detection of ultrafast acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Péronne, Emmanuel; Chuecos, Nicolas; Thevenard, Laura; Perrin, Bernard

    2017-02-01

    Solitons are self-preserving traveling waves of great interest in nonlinear physics but hard to observe experimentally. In this report an experimental setup is designed to observe and characterize acoustic solitons in a GaAs(001) substrate. It is based on careful temperature control of the sample and an interferometric detection scheme. Ultrashort acoustic solitons, such as the one predicted by the Korteweg-de Vries equation, are observed and fully characterized. Their particlelike nature is clearly evidenced and their unique properties are thoroughly checked. The spatial averaging of the soliton wave front is shown to account for the differences between the theoretical and experimental soliton profile. It appears that ultrafast acoustic experiments provide a precise measurement of the soliton velocity. It allows for absolute calibration of the setup as well as the response function analysis of the detection layer. Moreover, the temporal distribution of the solitons is also analyzed with the help of the inverse scattering method. It shows how the initial acoustic pulse profile which gives birth to solitons after nonlinear propagation can be retrieved. Such investigations provide a new tool to probe transient properties of highly excited matter through the study of the emitted acoustic pulse after laser excitation.

  7. A dielectric logging tool with insulated collar for formation fluid detection around borehole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bin; Li, Kang; Kong, Fan-Min; Zhao, Jia

    2015-08-01

    A dielectric tool with insulated collar for analyzing fluid saturation outside a borehole was introduced. The UWB (ultra-wideband) antenna mounted on the tool was optimized to launch a transient pulse. The broadband evaluation method provided more advantages when compared with traditional dielectric tools. The EM (electromagnetic) power distribution outside the borehole was studied, and it was shown that energy was propagated in two modes. Furthermore, the mechanism of the modes was discussed. In order to increase this tools' investigation depth, a novel insulated collar was introduced. In addition, operation in difference formations was discussed and this tool proved to be able to efficiently launch lateral EM waves. Response voltages indicated that the proposed scheme was able to evaluate the fluid saturation of reservoir formations and dielectric dispersion properties. It may be used as an alternative tool for imaging logging applications.

  8. True location and orientation of fractures logged with the acoustic televiewer (including programs to correct fracture orientation)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kierstein, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    The attitude of fractures measured on acoustic-televiewer logs may be misorientated by as much as 180 degrees in a drill hole that is deviated significantly from vertical, because of the effect of the vertical component of the magnetic field on the tilted magnetometer that is used to orient the log. A method has been developed to correct for the misorientation by analyzing the orientation of the magnetometer with respect to the magnetic-field vector acting at the magnetometer 's center. Computer programs were written to correct the attitude of fractures for both magnetic effects and hole deviation. For the reorientation of a single fracture, a stereographic solution is illustrated. Test results suggest that the fracture orientation can be corrected to plus or minus five degrees of true orientation, provided there are no other magnetic effects, such as magnetite in the rocks. (USGS)

  9. Pre- and post-stimulation characterization of geothermal well GRT-1, Rittershoffen, France: insights from acoustic image logs of hard fractured rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal, Jeanne; Genter, Albert; Schmittbuhl, Jean

    2016-08-01

    Geothermal well GRT-1 (Rittershoffen, Alsace) was drilled in 2012. Its open-hole section (extending down to a depth of 2.6 km) penetrated fractured sandstones and granite. In 2013, the well was subjected to Thermal, Chemical and Hydraulic (TCH) stimulation, which improved the injectivity index fivefold. The goal of the study was to assess the impact of the stimulation by comparing pre- and post-stimulation well-logging (acoustic and temperature [T] logs) and mud-logging data. This comparison revealed modifications of almost all the natural fractures. However, not all of these fractures are associated with permeability enhancement, and the post-stimulation T logs are important for characterizing this enhancement. Chemical alteration due to mechanical erosion at the tops and bottoms of the fractures was observed in the sandstones. These zones display indications of very small new permeability after the TCH stimulation. Because a major fault zone caved extensively where it crosses the borehole, it was not imaged in the acoustic logs. However, this originally permeable zone was enhanced as demonstrated by the T logs. Based on the natural injectivity of this fault zone, hydraulic erosion and thermal microcracking of its internal quartz veins are associated with this permeability enhancement. Although local changes in the borehole wall observed in the acoustic images cannot be directly linked to the improved injectivity index, the comparison of the acoustic image logs allows for identification of fracture zones impacted by the TCH stimulation.

  10. Simpler ISS Flight Control Communications and Log Keeping via Social Tools and Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, David W.; Cowart, Hugh; Stevens, Dan

    2012-01-01

    The heart of flight operations control involves a) communicating effectively in real time with other controllers in the room and/or in remote locations and b) tracking significant events, decisions, and rationale to support the next set of decisions, provide a thorough shift handover, and troubleshoot/improve operations. International Space Station (ISS) flight controllers speak with each other via multiple voice circuits or loops, each with a particular purpose and constituency. Controllers monitor and/or respond to several loops concurrently. The primary tracking tools are console logs, typically kept by a single operator and not visible to others in real-time. Information from telemetry, commanding, and planning systems also plays into decision-making. Email is very secondary/tertiary due to timing and archival considerations. Voice communications and log entries supporting ISS operations have increased by orders of magnitude because the number of control centers, flight crew, and payload operations have grown. This paper explores three developmental ground system concepts under development at Johnson Space Center s (JSC) Mission Control Center Houston (MCC-H) and Marshall Space Flight Center s (MSFC) Payload Operations Integration Center (POIC). These concepts could reduce ISS control center voice traffic and console logging yet increase the efficiency and effectiveness of both. The goal of this paper is to kindle further discussion, exploration, and tool development.

  11. Acoustic emission as a screening tool for ceramic matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojard, Greg; Goberman, Dan; Holowczak, John

    2017-02-01

    Ceramic matrix composites are composite materials with ceramic fibers in a high temperature matrix of ceramic or glass-ceramic. This emerging class of materials is viewed as enabling for efficiency improvements in many energy conversion systems. The key controlling property of ceramic matrix composites is a relatively weak interface between the matrix and the fiber that aids crack deflection and fiber pullout resulting in greatly increased toughness over monolithic ceramics. United Technologies Research Center has been investigating glass-ceramic composite systems as a tool to understand processing effects on material performance related to the performance of the weak interface. Changes in the interface have been shown to affect the mechanical performance observed in flexural testing and subsequent microstructural investigations have confirmed the performance (or lack thereof) of the interface coating. Recently, the addition of acoustic emission testing during flexural testing has aided the understanding of the characteristics of the interface and its performance. The acoustic emission onset stress changes with strength and toughness and this could be a quality tool in screening the material before further development and use. The results of testing and analysis will be shown and additional material from other ceramic matrix composite systems may be included to show trends.

  12. High-performance tools key to slimhole logging and perforating. Part 4

    SciTech Connect

    Boonen, P. ); Shook, R.A. ); Brunsman, B.J. )

    1995-01-01

    This is the fourth in a series of five articles identifying barriers to more widespread utilization of slimhole drilling and completion technologies for reducing the costs to drill and complete US gas wells. These articles summarize the results of a study funded by the Gas Research Institute (GRI) and are prepared by an industry team consisting of Maurer Engineering, BJ Services, Baker Oil Tools and Halliburton Energy Services. Previous articles discussed slimhole drilling, cementing and stimulation. The focus of this article is slimhole logging and perforating. It emphasizes the challenges that wireline companies meet in building and deploying high-performance, small-diameter tools. Part 5 of this series will discuss completion and workover tools. Parts 1, 2 and 3 were published in September, October and December 1994, respectively.

  13. Estimating pore-space gas hydrate saturations from well log acoustic data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Myung W.; Waite, William F.

    2008-01-01

    Relating pore-space gas hydrate saturation to sonic velocity data is important for remotely estimating gas hydrate concentration in sediment. In the present study, sonic velocities of gas hydrate–bearing sands are modeled using a three-phase Biot-type theory in which sand, gas hydrate, and pore fluid form three homogeneous, interwoven frameworks. This theory is developed using well log compressional and shear wave velocity data from the Mallik 5L-38 permafrost gas hydrate research well in Canada and applied to well log data from hydrate-bearing sands in the Alaskan permafrost, Gulf of Mexico, and northern Cascadia margin. Velocity-based gas hydrate saturation estimates are in good agreement with Nuclear Magneto Resonance and resistivity log estimates over the complete range of observed gas hydrate saturations.

  14. Seabird acoustic communication at sea: a new perspective using bio-logging devices

    PubMed Central

    Thiebault, Andréa; Pistorius, Pierre; Mullers, Ralf; Tremblay, Yann

    2016-01-01

    Most seabirds are very noisy at their breeding colonies, when aggregated in high densities. Calls are used for individual recognition and also emitted during agonistic interactions. When at sea, many seabirds aggregate over patchily distributed resources and may benefit from foraging in groups. Because these aggregations are so common, it raises the question of whether seabirds use acoustic communication when foraging at sea? We deployed video-cameras with built in microphones on 36 Cape gannets (Morus capensis) during the breeding season of 2010–2011 at Bird Island (Algoa Bay, South Africa) to study their foraging behaviour and vocal activity at sea. Group formation was derived from the camera footage. During ~42 h, calls were recorded on 72 occasions from 16 birds. Vocalization exclusively took place in the presence of conspecifics, and mostly in feeding aggregations (81% of the vocalizations). From the observation of the behaviours of birds associated with the emission of calls, we suggest that the calls were emitted to avoid collisions between birds. Our observations show that at least some seabirds use acoustic communication when foraging at sea. These findings open up new perspectives for research on seabirds foraging ecology and their interactions at sea. PMID:27492779

  15. Seabird acoustic communication at sea: a new perspective using bio-logging devices.

    PubMed

    Thiebault, Andréa; Pistorius, Pierre; Mullers, Ralf; Tremblay, Yann

    2016-08-05

    Most seabirds are very noisy at their breeding colonies, when aggregated in high densities. Calls are used for individual recognition and also emitted during agonistic interactions. When at sea, many seabirds aggregate over patchily distributed resources and may benefit from foraging in groups. Because these aggregations are so common, it raises the question of whether seabirds use acoustic communication when foraging at sea? We deployed video-cameras with built in microphones on 36 Cape gannets (Morus capensis) during the breeding season of 2010-2011 at Bird Island (Algoa Bay, South Africa) to study their foraging behaviour and vocal activity at sea. Group formation was derived from the camera footage. During ~42 h, calls were recorded on 72 occasions from 16 birds. Vocalization exclusively took place in the presence of conspecifics, and mostly in feeding aggregations (81% of the vocalizations). From the observation of the behaviours of birds associated with the emission of calls, we suggest that the calls were emitted to avoid collisions between birds. Our observations show that at least some seabirds use acoustic communication when foraging at sea. These findings open up new perspectives for research on seabirds foraging ecology and their interactions at sea.

  16. Seabird acoustic communication at sea: a new perspective using bio-logging devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiebault, Andréa; Pistorius, Pierre; Mullers, Ralf; Tremblay, Yann

    2016-08-01

    Most seabirds are very noisy at their breeding colonies, when aggregated in high densities. Calls are used for individual recognition and also emitted during agonistic interactions. When at sea, many seabirds aggregate over patchily distributed resources and may benefit from foraging in groups. Because these aggregations are so common, it raises the question of whether seabirds use acoustic communication when foraging at sea? We deployed video-cameras with built in microphones on 36 Cape gannets (Morus capensis) during the breeding season of 2010–2011 at Bird Island (Algoa Bay, South Africa) to study their foraging behaviour and vocal activity at sea. Group formation was derived from the camera footage. During ~42 h, calls were recorded on 72 occasions from 16 birds. Vocalization exclusively took place in the presence of conspecifics, and mostly in feeding aggregations (81% of the vocalizations). From the observation of the behaviours of birds associated with the emission of calls, we suggest that the calls were emitted to avoid collisions between birds. Our observations show that at least some seabirds use acoustic communication when foraging at sea. These findings open up new perspectives for research on seabirds foraging ecology and their interactions at sea.

  17. Forward modelling of multi-component induction logging tools in layered anisotropic dipping formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jie; Xu, Chenhao; Xiao, Jiaqi

    2013-10-01

    Multi-component induction logging provides great assistance in the exploration of thinly laminated reservoirs. The 1D parametric inversion following an adaptive borehole correction is the key step in the data processing of multi-component induction logging responses. To make the inversion process reasonably fast, an efficient forward modelling method is necessary. In this paper, a modelling method has been developed to simulate the multi-component induction tools in deviated wells drilled in layered anisotropic formations. With the introduction of generalized reflection coefficients, the analytic expressions of magnetic field in the form of a Sommerfeld integral were derived. The fast numerical computation of the integral has been completed by using the fast Fourier-Hankel transform and fast Hankel transform methods. The latter is so time efficient that it is competent enough for real-time multi-parameter inversion. In this paper, some simulated results have been presented and they are in excellent agreement with the finite difference method code's solution.

  18. A comprehensive tool to analyse dynamic log files from an Elekta-Synergy accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arumugam, Sankar; Xing, Aitang; Pagulayan, Claire; Holloway, Lois

    2014-03-01

    This study presents the development of a software tool 'Treat Check' to analyse the dynamic log files from an Elekta - Synergy accelerator. The software generates formatted output in the form of a plot presenting errors in various treatment delivery parameters such as gantry angle, Multi Leaf Collimator (MLC) leaf position, jaw position and Monitor Units (MU) for each of the control-points (CP) of the treatment beam. The plots are automatically saved in Portable Document Format (pdf). The software also has the functionality to introduce these treatment delivery errors into the original plan in the Pinnacle (Philips) treatment planning system (TPS) in order to assess the clinical impact of treatment delivery errors on delivered dose.

  19. DialBetics With a Multimedia Food Recording Tool, FoodLog

    PubMed Central

    Waki, Kayo; Aizawa, Kiyoharu; Kato, Shigeko; Fujita, Hideo; Lee, Hanae; Kobayashi, Haruka; Ogawa, Makoto; Mouri, Keisuke; Kadowaki, Takashi; Ohe, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Background: Diabetes self-management education is an essential element of diabetes care. Systems based on information and communication technology (ICT) for supporting lifestyle modification and self-management of diabetes are promising tools for helping patients better cope with diabetes. An earlier study had determined that diet improved and HbA1c declined for the patients who had used DialBetics during a 3-month randomized clinical trial. The objective of the current study was to test a more patient-friendly version of DialBetics, whose development was based on the original participants’ feedback about the previous version of DialBetics. Method: DialBetics comprises 4 modules: data transmission, evaluation, exercise input, and food recording and dietary evaluation. Food recording uses a multimedia food record, FoodLog. A 1-week pilot study was designed to determine if usability and compliance improved over the previous version, especially with the new meal-input function. Results: In the earlier 3-month, diet-evaluation study, HbA1c had declined a significant 0.4% among those who used DialBetics compared with the control group. In the current 1-week study, input of meal photos was higher than with the previous version (84.8 ± 13.2% vs 77.1% ± 35.1% in the first 2 weeks of the 3-month trial). Interviews after the 1-week study showed that 4 of the 5 participants thought the meal-input function improved; the fifth found input easier, but did not consider the result an improvement. Conclusions: DialBetics with FoodLog was shown to be an effective and convenient tool, its new meal-photo input function helping provide patients with real-time support for diet modification. PMID:25883164

  20. SpaceOps 2012 Plus 2: Social Tools to Simplify ISS Flight Control Communications and Log Keeping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowart, Hugh S.; Scott, David W.

    2014-01-01

    A paper written for the SpaceOps 2012 Conference (Simplify ISS Flight Control Communications and Log Keeping via Social Tools and Techniques) identified three innovative concepts for real time flight control communications tools based on social mechanisms: a) Console Log Tool (CoLT) - A log keeping application at Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) Payload Operations Integration Center (POIC) that provides "anywhere" access, comment and notifications features similar to those found in Social Networking Systems (SNS), b) Cross-Log Communication via Social Techniques - A concept from Johnsson Space Center's (JSC) Mission Control Center Houston (MCC-H) that would use microblogging's @tag and #tag protocols to make information/requests visible and/or discoverable in logs owned by @Destination addressees, and c) Communications Dashboard (CommDash) - A MSFC concept for a Facebook-like interface to visually integrate and manage basic console log content, text chat streams analogous to voice loops, text chat streams dedicated to particular conversations, generic and position-specific status displays/streams, and a graphically based hailing display. CoLT was deployed operationally at nearly the same time as SpaceOps 2012, the Cross- Log Communications idea is currently waiting for a champion to carry it forward, and CommDash was approved as a NASA Iinformation Technoloby (IT) Labs project. This paper discusses lessons learned from two years of actual CoLT operations, updates CommDash prototype development status, and discusses potential for using Cross-Log Communications in both MCC-H and/or POIC environments, and considers other ways for synergizing console applcations.

  1. Porosity calculations using a C/O logging tool with boron-lined NaI detectors.

    PubMed

    Metwally, Walid A

    2011-01-01

    In the present work, a boron lining is added to a NaI detector assembly to study the possibility of combining both the C/O tool and the thermal neutron porosity tool in one tool, both of which are commonly used tools in oil well logging. The combined tool proposed in this paper was modeled with the general purpose Monte Carlo N-particle (MCNP) transport code. The simulation results show a good porosity sensitivity (especially to low porosity values). The results also show a great reduction in the neutron flux incident on the detectors and consequently the reduction of detector activation by thermal neutrons.

  2. Numerical study of electromagnetic waves generated by a prototype dielectric logging tool

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellefsen, K.J.; Abraham, J.D.; Wright, D.L.; Mazzella, A.T.

    2004-01-01

    To understand the electromagnetic waves generated by a prototype dielectric logging tool, a numerical study was conducted using both the finite-difference, time-domain method and a frequency-wavenumber method. When the propagation velocity in the borehole was greater than that in the formation (e.g., an air-filled borehole in the unsaturated zone), only a guided wave propagated along the borehole. As the frequency decreased, both the phase and the group velocities of the guided wave asymptotically approached the phase velocity of a plane wave in the formation. The guided wave radiated electromagnetic energy into the formation, causing its amplitude to decrease. When the propagation velocity in the borehole was less than that in the formation (e.g., a water-filled borehole in the saturated zone), both a refracted wave and a guided wave propagated along the borehole. The velocity of the refracted wave equaled the phase velocity of a plane wave in the formation, and the refracted wave preceded the guided wave. As the frequency decreased, both the phase and the group velocities of the guided wave asymptotically approached the phase velocity of a plane wave in the formation. The guided wave did not radiate electromagnetic energy into the formation. To analyze traces recorded by the prototype tool during laboratory tests, they were compared to traces calculated with the finite-difference method. The first parts of both the recorded and the calculated traces were similar, indicating that guided and refracted waves indeed propagated along the prototype tool. ?? 2004 Society of Exploration Geophysicists. All rights reserved.

  3. Estimation of the Tool Condition by Applying the Wavelet Transform to Acoustic Emission Signals

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, M. P.; Piotrkowski, R.; Ruzzante, J. E.; D'Attellis, C. E.

    2007-03-21

    This work follows the search of parameters to evaluate the tool condition in machining processes. The selected sensing technique is acoustic emission and it is applied to a turning process of steel samples. The obtained signals are studied using the wavelet transformation. The tool wear level is quantified as a percentage of the final wear specified by the Standard ISO 3685. The amplitude and relevant scale obtained of acoustic emission signals could be related with the wear level.

  4. The fluid-compensated cement bond log

    SciTech Connect

    Nayfeh, T.H.; Leslie, H.D.; Wheelis, W.B.

    1984-09-01

    An experimental and numerical wave mechanics study of cement bond logs demonstrated that wellsite computer processing can now segregate wellbore fluid effects from the sonic signal response to changing cement strength. Traditionally, cement logs have been interpreted as if water were in the wellbore, without consideration of wellbore fluid effects. These effects were assumed to be negligible. However, with the increasing number of logs being run in completion fluids such as CaCl/sub 2/, ZnBr/sub 2/, and CaBr/sub 2/, large variations in cement bond logs became apparent. A Schlumberger internal paper showing that bond log amplitude is related to the acoustic impedance of the fluid in which the tool is run led to a comprehensive study of wellbore fluid effects. Numerical and experimental models were developed simulating wellbore geometry. Measurements were conducted in 5-, 7-, and 95/8-in. casings by varying the wellbore fluid densities, viscosities, and fluid types (acoustic impedance). Parallel numerical modeling was undertaken using similar parameters. The results showed that the bond log amplitude varied dramatically with the wellbore fluid's acoustic impedance; for example, there was a 70 percent increase in the signal amplitude for 11.5-lb/ gal CaCl/sub 2/ over the signal amplitude in water. This led to the development of a Fluid-Compensated Bond log that corrects the amplitude for acoustic impedance of varying wellbore fluids, thereby making the measurements more directly related to the cement quality.

  5. Acoustics as a tool to enhance physics education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neilsen, Tracianne B.; Gee, Kent L.

    2016-03-01

    The use of acoustics in physics pedagogy, whether in stand-alone courses, or as examples, analogies, or demonstrations in other contexts, can enhance student learning. At most, a typical physics student receives only a few weeks of instruction in acoustics, despite its potential ability to enhance class discussions of source, resonance, and traveling-wave phenomena in both introductory and advanced settings. A recent annotated bibliography, includes specific resources for incorporating acoustics-based demonstrations into physics courses. Acoustics analogies can be used to illustrate wave phenomena in advanced contexts, such as diffraction, scattering, refraction, reflection, method of images, resonance, dispersion, tunneling. This presentation will review the Resource Letter, highlighting specific demonstration ideas, as well as offer additional perspectives gained since its publication.

  6. EthoLog 2.2: a tool for the transcription and timing of behavior observation sessions.

    PubMed

    Ottoni, E B

    2000-08-01

    EthoLog is a tool that aids in the transcription and timing of behavior observation sessions--experimental or naturalistic, from video/audio tapes or registering real time. It was created with Visual Basic and runs on Windows (3.x/9x). The user types the key codes for the predefined behavioral categories, and EthoLog registers their sequence and timing and saves the resulting data in ASCII output files. A sequential analysis matrix can be generated from the sequential data. The output files may be edited, converted to plain text files for printing, or exported to a spreadsheet program, such as MS Excel, for further analyses.

  7. Methods and apparatus for measuring a length of cable suspending a well logging tool in a borehole

    SciTech Connect

    Broding, R.A.

    1986-07-01

    A system is described for measuring depth from the mouth of a borehole to a well logging tool connected to one end of an electrically conductive cable suspended in the borehole comprising: means for applying an initial electrical time pulse signal to one end of the cable, whereby the initial electrical time pulse signal propagates the length of the cable to one end of the cable to the well logging tool connected to the other end of the cable; means for detecting at the mouth of the borehole, which is intermediate both ends of the cable, the passage of the initial electrical time pulse signal along the length of the cable; means for detecting at the mouth of the borehole a subsequent electrical time pulse propagating along the length of the cable reflected from the other end of the cable; means for determining a time interval between the detection of the initial electrical time pulse signal at the mouth of the borehole and the detection of the subsequent electrical time pulse signal at the mouth of the borehole; and means for correlating the time interval with the depth to which the well logging tool is suspended in the borehole as measured from the mouth of the borehole.

  8. Acoustic Emission Methodology to Evaluate the Fracture Toughness in Heat Treated AISI D2 Tool Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostafavi, Sajad; Fotouhi, Mohamad; Motasemi, Abed; Ahmadi, Mehdi; Sindi, Cevat Teymuri

    2012-10-01

    In this article, fracture toughness behavior of tool steel was investigated using Acoustic Emission (AE) monitoring. Fracture toughness ( K IC) values of a specific tool steel was determined by applying various approaches based on conventional AE parameters, such as Acoustic Emission Cumulative Count (AECC), Acoustic Emission Energy Rate (AEER), and the combination of mechanical characteristics and AE information called sentry function. The critical fracture toughness values during crack propagation were achieved by means of relationship between the integral of the sentry function and cumulative fracture toughness (KICUM). Specimens were selected from AISI D2 cold-work tool steel and were heat treated at four different tempering conditions (300, 450, 525, and 575 °C). The results achieved through AE approaches were then compared with a methodology proposed by compact specimen testing according to ASTM standard E399. It was concluded that AE information was an efficient method to investigate fracture characteristics.

  9. Well log characterization of natural gas hydrates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collett, Timothy S.; Lee, Myung W.

    2011-01-01

    In the last 25 years we have seen significant advancements in the use of downhole well logging tools to acquire detailed information on the occurrence of gas hydrate in nature: From an early start of using wireline electrical resistivity and acoustic logs to identify gas hydrate occurrences in wells drilled in Arctic permafrost environments to today where wireline and advanced logging-while-drilling tools are routinely used to examine the petrophysical nature of gas hydrate reservoirs and the distribution and concentration of gas hydrates within various complex reservoir systems. The most established and well known use of downhole log data in gas hydrate research is the use of electrical resistivity and acoustic velocity data (both compressional- and shear-wave data) to make estimates of gas hydrate content (i.e., reservoir saturations) in various sediment types and geologic settings. New downhole logging tools designed to make directionally oriented acoustic and propagation resistivity log measurements have provided the data needed to analyze the acoustic and electrical anisotropic properties of both highly inter-bedded and fracture dominated gas hydrate reservoirs. Advancements in nuclear-magnetic-resonance (NMR) logging and wireline formation testing have also allowed for the characterization of gas hydrate at the pore scale. Integrated NMR and formation testing studies from northern Canada and Alaska have yielded valuable insight into how gas hydrates are physically distributed in sediments and the occurrence and nature of pore fluids (i.e., free-water along with clay and capillary bound water) in gas-hydrate-bearing reservoirs. Information on the distribution of gas hydrate at the pore scale has provided invaluable insight on the mechanisms controlling the formation and occurrence of gas hydrate in nature along with data on gas hydrate reservoir properties (i.e., permeabilities) needed to accurately predict gas production rates for various gas hydrate

  10. Intelligent front-end sample preparation tool using acoustic streaming.

    SciTech Connect

    Cooley, Erika J.; McClain, Jaime L.; Murton, Jaclyn K.; Edwards, Thayne L.; Achyuthan, Komandoor E.; Branch, Darren W.; Clem, Paul Gilbert; Anderson, John Mueller; James, Conrad D.; Smith, Gennifer; Kotulski, Joseph Daniel

    2009-09-01

    We have successfully developed a nucleic acid extraction system based on a microacoustic lysis array coupled to an integrated nucleic acid extraction system all on a single cartridge. The microacoustic lysing array is based on 36{sup o} Y cut lithium niobate, which couples bulk acoustic waves (BAW) into the microchannels. The microchannels were fabricated using Mylar laminates and fused silica to form acoustic-fluidic interface cartridges. The transducer array consists of four active elements directed for cell lysis and one optional BAW element for mixing on the cartridge. The lysis system was modeled using one dimensional (1D) transmission line and two dimensional (2D) FEM models. For input powers required to lyse cells, the flow rate dictated the temperature change across the lysing region. From the computational models, a flow rate of 10 {micro}L/min produced a temperature rise of 23.2 C and only 6.7 C when flowing at 60 {micro}L/min. The measured temperature changes were 5 C less than the model. The computational models also permitted optimization of the acoustic coupling to the microchannel region and revealed the potential impact of thermal effects if not controlled. Using E. coli, we achieved a lysing efficacy of 49.9 {+-} 29.92 % based on a cell viability assay with a 757.2 % increase in ATP release within 20 seconds of acoustic exposure. A bench-top lysing system required 15-20 minutes operating up to 58 Watts to achieve the same level of cell lysis. We demonstrate that active mixing on the cartridge was critical to maximize binding and release of nucleic acid to the magnetic beads. Using a sol-gel silica bead matrix filled microchannel the extraction efficacy was 40%. The cartridge based magnetic bead system had an extraction efficiency of 19.2%. For an electric field based method that used Nafion films, a nucleic acid extraction efficiency of 66.3 % was achieved at 6 volts DC. For the flow rates we tested (10-50 {micro}L/min), the nucleic acid extraction

  11. Cell Deformation by Single-beam Acoustic Trapping: A Promising Tool for Measurements of Cell Mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jae Youn; Kim, Jihun; Park, Jin Man; Lee, Changyang; Jung, Hayong; Lee, Jungwoo; Shung, K. Kirk

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a noncontact single-beam acoustic trapping method for the quantification of the mechanical properties of a single suspended cell with label-free. Experimentally results show that the single-beam acoustic trapping force results in morphological deformation of a trapped cell. While a cancer cell was trapped in an acoustic beam focus, the morphological changes of the immobilized cell were monitored using bright-field imaging. The cell deformability was then compared with that of a trapped polystyrene microbead as a function of the applied acoustic pressure for a better understanding of the relationship between the pressure and degree of cell deformation. Cell deformation was found to become more pronounced as higher pressure levels were applied. Furthermore, to determine if this acoustic trapping method can be exploited in quantifying the cell mechanics in a suspension and in a non-contact manner, the deformability levels of breast cancer cells with different degrees of invasiveness due to acoustic trapping were compared. It was found that highly-invasive breast cancer cells exhibited greater deformability than weakly-invasive breast cancer cells. These results clearly demonstrate that the single-beam acoustic trapping technique is a promising tool for non-contact quantitative assessments of the mechanical properties of single cells in suspensions with label-free. PMID:27273365

  12. Methods and apparatus to produce stick-slip motion of logging tool attached to a wireline drawn upward by a continuously rotating wireline drum

    DOEpatents

    Vail, III, William Banning; Momii, Steven Thomas

    1998-01-01

    Methods and apparatus are described to produce stick-slip motion of a logging tool within a cased well attached to a wireline that is drawn upward by a continuously rotating wireline drum. The stick-slip motion results in the periodic upward movement of the tool in the cased well described in terms of a dwell time during which time the tool is stationary, the move time during which time the tool moves, and the stroke that is upward distance that the tool translates during the "slip" portion of the stick-slip motion. This method of measurement is used to log the well at different vertical positions of the tool. Therefore, any typical "station-to-station logging tool" may be modified to be a "continuous logging tool", where "continuous" means that the wireline drum continually rotates while the tool undergoes stick-slip motion downhole and measurements are performed during the dwell times when the tool is momentarily stationary. The stick-slip methods of operation and the related apparatus are particularly described in terms of making measurements of formation resistivity from within a cased well during the dwell times when the tool is momentarily stationary during the periodic stick-slip motion of the logging tool.

  13. Methods and apparatus to produce stick-slip motion of logging tool attached to a wireline drawn upward by a continuously rotating wireline drum

    DOEpatents

    Vail, W.B. III; Momii, S.T.

    1998-02-10

    Methods and apparatus are described to produce stick-slip motion of a logging tool within a cased well attached to a wireline that is drawn upward by a continuously rotating wireline drum. The stick-slip motion results in the periodic upward movement of the tool in the cased well described in terms of a dwell time during which time the tool is stationary, the move time during which time the tool moves, and the stroke that is upward distance that the tool translates during the ``slip`` portion of the stick-slip motion. This method of measurement is used to log the well at different vertical positions of the tool. Therefore, any typical ``station-to-station logging tool`` may be modified to be a ``continuous logging tool,`` where ``continuous`` means that the wireline drum continually rotates while the tool undergoes stick-slip motion downhole and measurements are performed during the dwell times when the tool is momentarily stationary. The stick-slip methods of operation and the related apparatus are particularly described in terms of making measurements of formation resistivity from within a cased well during the dwell times when the tool is momentarily stationary during the periodic stick-slip motion of the logging tool. 12 figs.

  14. What's new in well logging and formation evaluation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prensky, S.

    2011-01-01

    A number of significant new developments is emerging in well logging and formation evaluation. Some of the new developments include an ultrasonic wireline imager, an electromagnetic free-point indicator, wired and fiber-optic coiled tubing systems, and extreme-temperature logging-while-drilling (LWD) tools. The continued consolidation of logging and petrophysical service providers in 2010 means that these innovations are increasingly being provided by a few large companies. Weatherford International has launched a slimhole cross-dipole tool as part of the company's line of compact logging tools. The 26-ft-long Compact Cross-Dipole Sonic (CXD) tool can be run as part of a quad-combo compact logging string. Halliburton has introduced a version of its circumferential acoustic scanning tool (CAST) that runs on monoconductor cable (CAST-M) to provide high-resolution images in open hole and in cased hole for casing and cement evaluation.

  15. Software tools for developing an acoustics multimedia CD-ROM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigelow, Todd W.; Wheeler, Paul A.

    2003-10-01

    A multimedia CD-ROM was developed to accompany the textbook, Science of Sound, by Tom Rossing. This paper discusses the multimedia elements included in the CD-ROM and the various software packages used to create them. PowerPoint presentations with an audio-track background were converted to web pages using Impatica. Animations of acoustic examples and quizzes were developed using Flash by Macromedia. Vegas Video and Sound Forge by Sonic Foundry were used for editing video and audio clips while Cleaner by Discreet was used to compress the clips for use over the internet. Math tutorials were presented as whiteboard presentations using Hitachis Starboard to create the graphics and TechSmiths Camtasia Studio to record the presentations. The CD-ROM is in a web-page format created with Macromedias Dreamweaver. All of these elements are integrated into a single course supplement that can be viewed by any computer with a web browser.

  16. Investigation of acoustic emission and surface treatment to improve tool materials and metal forming process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Deming

    Silicon nitride and WC-Co cermet tools are used for metal forming processes including extrusion and drawing. These materials are used to make tool dies which are exposed to deformation caused by friction and wear. Surface treatments such as ion implantation, laser blazing and coating have been found to improve surface properties, to optimize tribological behavior between the metal and die, as well as to extend service life of the tool dies. Early detection and continuous monitoring processes by non destructive testing (NDT) methods are needed in order to ensure the functionality of the wear process and extend the tool service life. Acoustic emission is one of the promising NDT methods for this application. The surface treatment chosen for this investigation was ion implantation. Three types of wear resistant materials with and without surface treatment were selected for this project; silicon nitride and two tungsten carbides (6% Cobalt and 10% Cobalt). This investigation was conducted using a pin-on-disk device for wear/friction tests of the selected materials with lubrication and/or without lubrication against both a stainless steel disk and an aluminum disk. The acoustic emissions generated during the experiments were recorded and analyzed. The results of this investigation showed that the ion implantation improved the tribological properties of the materials and reduced acoustic emission and coefficient of friction. A linear relationship between the average amplitude of the acoustic emission and the coefficient of friction of the tested materials was found. The investigation demonstrated that the acoustic emission method could be used to monitor the wear/friction processes.

  17. Tools for automated acoustic monitoring within the R package monitoR

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Katz, Jonathan; Hafner, Sasha D.; Donovan, Therese

    2016-01-01

    The R package monitoR contains tools for managing an acoustic-monitoring program including survey metadata, template creation and manipulation, automated detection and results management. These tools are scalable for use with small projects as well as larger long-term projects and those with expansive spatial extents. Here, we describe typical workflow when using the tools in monitoR. Typical workflow utilizes a generic sequence of functions, with the option for either binary point matching or spectrogram cross-correlation detectors.

  18. Data-driven automated acoustic analysis of human infant vocalizations using neural network tools

    PubMed Central

    Warlaumont, Anne S.; Oller, D. Kimbrough; Buder, Eugene H.; Dale, Rick; Kozma, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Acoustic analysis of infant vocalizations has typically employed traditional acoustic measures drawn from adult speech acoustics, such as f0, duration, formant frequencies, amplitude, and pitch perturbation. Here an alternative and complementary method is proposed in which data-derived spectrographic features are central. 1-s-long spectrograms of vocalizations produced by six infants recorded longitudinally between ages 3 and 11 months are analyzed using a neural network consisting of a self-organizing map and a single-layer perceptron. The self-organizing map acquires a set of holistic, data-derived spectrographic receptive fields. The single-layer perceptron receives self-organizing map activations as input and is trained to classify utterances into prelinguistic phonatory categories (squeal, vocant, or growl), identify the ages at which they were produced, and identify the individuals who produced them. Classification performance was significantly better than chance for all three classification tasks. Performance is compared to another popular architecture, the fully supervised multilayer perceptron. In addition, the network’s weights and patterns of activation are explored from several angles, for example, through traditional acoustic measurements of the network’s receptive fields. Results support the use of this and related tools for deriving holistic acoustic features directly from infant vocalization data and for the automatic classification of infant vocalizations. PMID:20370038

  19. Data-driven automated acoustic analysis of human infant vocalizations using neural network tools.

    PubMed

    Warlaumont, Anne S; Oller, D Kimbrough; Buder, Eugene H; Dale, Rick; Kozma, Robert

    2010-04-01

    Acoustic analysis of infant vocalizations has typically employed traditional acoustic measures drawn from adult speech acoustics, such as f(0), duration, formant frequencies, amplitude, and pitch perturbation. Here an alternative and complementary method is proposed in which data-derived spectrographic features are central. 1-s-long spectrograms of vocalizations produced by six infants recorded longitudinally between ages 3 and 11 months are analyzed using a neural network consisting of a self-organizing map and a single-layer perceptron. The self-organizing map acquires a set of holistic, data-derived spectrographic receptive fields. The single-layer perceptron receives self-organizing map activations as input and is trained to classify utterances into prelinguistic phonatory categories (squeal, vocant, or growl), identify the ages at which they were produced, and identify the individuals who produced them. Classification performance was significantly better than chance for all three classification tasks. Performance is compared to another popular architecture, the fully supervised multilayer perceptron. In addition, the network's weights and patterns of activation are explored from several angles, for example, through traditional acoustic measurements of the network's receptive fields. Results support the use of this and related tools for deriving holistic acoustic features directly from infant vocalization data and for the automatic classification of infant vocalizations.

  20. The Alpine Fault Hanging Wall Viewed from Within: Structural and Lithological Analysis of Acoustic Televiewer Logs in the DFDP-2B Borehole, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massiot, C.; Doan, M. L.; Celerier, B. P.; Mcnamara, D. D.; Little, T. A.; Schmitt, D. R.; Pezard, P. A.; Remaud, L.; Townend, J.; Sutherland, R.; Toy, V.

    2015-12-01

    The Alpine Fault is the major dextral transpressive fault forming the Australia-Pacific plate boundary in the South Island of New Zealand. The DFDP-2B borehole, drilled in late 2014, reached a depth of 893 m (measured depth) and provides an opportunity to describe the protolith and structure of ductilely deformed schists in the hangingwall of this active fault. A total of 19 km of wireline logging data were acquired in the borehole, including 4.8 km of borehole televiewer (BHTV) acoustic image logs. The high resolution of the BHTV logs and the borehole's inclination, which reached a maximum of 46° from vertical near the base of the hole, provide good conditions in which to intersect the predominant foliation, which dips SE at a high angle to the hole as well as other feature sets. Here, we present a detailed structural analysis and lithological interpretation of the BHTV logs from the 264-886 m interval. The borehole's inclination and the attenuation caused by the drilling mud reduces the image quality in places. However, some zones of poor image quality also concur with indications of permeable fractures and are related to fractured zones with localized borehole wall damage. Foliation can be regularly identified to a depth of 808 m (n=406). The mean orientation of foliation planes (dip of 57° towards 145) remains quite consistent throughout the drilled interval and is similar to that inferred for the structurally underlying Alpine Fault. Larger-scale changes in image amplitude suggest lithological or petrophysical variations not yet identified on cuttings. The majority of the 1650 planar features identified as fractures are subparallel to the foliation and may represent deformed veins or other mineral segregations that contribute to the foliation's internal structure. Other planar features have dominantly NW-SE strikes, approximately orthogonal to the foliation and are inferred to be fractures. Truncations or offsets are observed on ~20 features suggesting

  1. Initial Integration of Noise Prediction Tools for Acoustic Scattering Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nark, Douglas M.; Burley, Casey L.; Tinetti, Ana; Rawls, John W.

    2008-01-01

    This effort provides an initial glimpse at NASA capabilities available in predicting the scattering of fan noise from a non-conventional aircraft configuration. The Aircraft NOise Prediction Program, Fast Scattering Code, and the Rotorcraft Noise Model were coupled to provide increased fidelity models of scattering effects on engine fan noise sources. The integration of these codes led to the identification of several keys issues entailed in applying such multi-fidelity approaches. In particular, for prediction at noise certification points, the inclusion of distributed sources leads to complications with the source semi-sphere approach. Computational resource requirements limit the use of the higher fidelity scattering code to predict radiated sound pressure levels for full scale configurations at relevant frequencies. And, the ability to more accurately represent complex shielding surfaces in current lower fidelity models is necessary for general application to scattering predictions. This initial step in determining the potential benefits/costs of these new methods over the existing capabilities illustrates a number of the issues that must be addressed in the development of next generation aircraft system noise prediction tools.

  2. LIBSLog: Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) based logging tool for exploration of boreholes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zacny, K.; Chu, P.

    2012-12-01

    We present a novel downhole instrument, currently under development at Honeybee Robotics with SBIR funding from NASA. The device is designed to characterize elemental composition as a function of depth in terrestrial and non-terrestrial geological formations. The instrument consists of a miniaturized LIBS analyzer integrated in a 2" diameter drill string. While the drill provides subsurface access, the LIBS analyzer provides information on the elemental composition of the borehole wall. This instrument has a variety of space applications ranging from exploration of the Moon for which it was originally designed, to Mars and Europa. The system can also be deployed in a wireline configuration as a logging probe, called LIBSLog. The LIBSLog could be lowered into existing boreholes and scan the borehole wall with depth. Subsurface analysis is usually performed by sample acquisition through a drill or excavator, followed by sample preparation and subsequent sample presentation to an instrument or suite of instruments. An alternative approach consisting in bringing a miniaturized version of the instrument to the sample has many advantages over the traditional methodology, as it allows faster response, reduced probability of cross-contamination and a simplification in the sampling mechanisms. The results for lunar simulant NU-LHT-2M show a value for the concentration of iron ranging between 2.29% and 3.05% depending on the atomic line selected. The accepted value for the sample analyzed is 2.83%, showing the capability for the system in development to provide qualitative and semi-quantitative analysis in real-time.

  3. Tools and data acquisition of borehole geophysical logging for the Florida Power and Light Company Turkey Point Power Plant in support of a groundwater, surface-water, and ecological monitoring plan, Miami-Dade County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wacker, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    Borehole geophysical logs were obtained from selected exploratory coreholes in the vicinity of the Florida Power and Light Company Turkey Point Power Plant. The geophysical logging tools used and logging sequences performed during this project are summarized herein to include borehole logging methods, descriptions of the properties measured, types of data obtained, and calibration information.

  4. Feasibility of using acoustic emission to determine in-process tool wear

    SciTech Connect

    Lazarus, L.J.

    1996-04-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) was evaluated for its ability to predict and recognize failure of cutting tools during machining processes when the cutting tool rotates and the workpiece is stationary. AE output was evaluated with a simple algorithm. AE was able to detect drill failure when the transducer was mounted on the workpiece holding fixture. Drill failure was recognized as size was reduced to 0.0003 in. diameter. The ability to predict failure was reduced with drill size, drill material elasticity, and tool coating. AE output for the turning process on a lathe was compared to turning tool insert wear. The turning tool must have sufficient wear to produce a detectable change in AE output to predict insert failure.

  5. Simulations of a spectral gamma-ray logging tool response to a surface source distribution on the borehole wall

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, R.D.; Conaway, J.G.

    1991-12-01

    We have developed Monte Carlo and discrete ordinates simulation models for the large-detector spectral gamma-ray (SGR) logging tool in use at the Nevada Test Site. Application of the simulation models produced spectra for source layers on the borehole wall, either from potassium-bearing mudcakes or from plate-out of radon daughter products. Simulations show that the shape and magnitude of gamma-ray spectra from sources distributed on the borehole wall depend on radial position with in the air-filled borehole as well as on hole diameter. No such dependence is observed for sources uniformly distributed in the formation. In addition, sources on the borehole wall produce anisotropic angular fluxes at the higher scattered energies and at the source energy. These differences in borehole effects and in angular flux are important to the process of correcting SGR logs for the presence of potassium mudcakes; they also suggest a technique for distinguishing between spectral contributions from formation sources and sources on the borehole wall. These results imply the existence of a standoff effect not present for spectra measured in air-filled boreholes from formation sources. 5 refs., 11 figs.

  6. Correlating Petrophysical Well Logs Using Fractal-based Analysis to Identify Changes in the Signal Complexity Across Neutron, Density, Dipole Sonic, and Gamma Ray Tool Types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, L.; Gurrola, H.

    2015-12-01

    Typical petrophysical well log correlation is accomplished by manual pattern recognition leading to subjective correlations. The change in character in a well log is dependent upon the change in the response of the tool to lithology. The petrophysical interpreter looks for a change in one log type that would correspond to the way a different tool responds to the same lithology. To develop an objective way to pick changes in well log characteristics, we adapt a method of first arrival picking used in seismic data to analyze changes in the character of well logs. We chose to use the fractal method developed by Boschetti et al[1] (1996). This method worked better than we expected and we found similar changes in the fractal dimension across very different tool types (sonic vs density vs gamma ray). We reason the fractal response of the log is not dependent on the physics of the tool response but rather the change in the complexity of the log data. When a formation changes physical character in time or space the recorded magnitude in tool data changes complexity at the same time even if the original tool response is very different. The relative complexity of the data regardless of the tool used is dependent upon the complexity of the medium relative to tool measurement. The relative complexity of the recorded magnitude data changes as a tool transitions from one character type to another. The character we are measuring is the roughness or complexity of the petrophysical curve. Our method provides a way to directly compare different log types based on a quantitative change in signal complexity. For example, using changes in data complexity allow us to correlate gamma ray suites with sonic logs within a well and then across to an adjacent well with similar signatures. Our method creates reliable and automatic correlations to be made in data sets beyond the reasonable cognitive limits of geoscientists in both speed and consistent pattern recognition. [1] Fabio Boschetti

  7. Development of an Acoustic Signal Analysis Tool “Auto-F” Based on the Temperament Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modegi, Toshio

    The MIDI interface is originally designed for electronic musical instruments but we consider this music-note based coding concept can be extended for general acoustic signal description. We proposed applying the MIDI technology to coding of bio-medical auscultation sound signals such as heart sounds for retrieving medical records and performing telemedicine. Then we have tried to extend our encoding targets including vocal sounds, natural sounds and electronic bio-signals such as ECG, using Generalized Harmonic Analysis method. Currently, we are trying to separate vocal sounds included in popular songs and encode both vocal sounds and background instrumental sounds into separate MIDI channels. And also, we are trying to extract articulation parameters such as MIDI pitch-bend parameters in order to reproduce natural acoustic sounds using a GM-standard MIDI tone generator. In this paper, we present an overall algorithm of our developed acoustic signal analysis tool, based on those research works, which can analyze given time-based signals on the musical temperament scale. The prominent feature of this tool is producing high-precision MIDI codes, which reproduce the similar signals as the given source signal using a GM-standard MIDI tone generator, and also providing analyzed texts in the XML format.

  8. Monitoring of Acoustic Emissions Within Geothermal Areas in Iceland: A new Tool for Geothermal Exploration.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandsdóttir, B.; Gudmundsson, O.

    2007-12-01

    With increased emphasis on geothermal development new exploration methods are needed in order to improve general understanding of geothermal reservoirs, characterize their extent and assess the potential for sustainable power production. Monitoring of acoustic emissions within geothermal areas may provide a new tool to evaluate the spatial extent of geothermal fields and model rock-fluid interactions. Three-dimensional seismic data have been used to assess the spatial and temporal distribution of noise within several high-temperature geothermal fields in Iceland. Seismic noise in the 4-6 Hz range within the Svartsengi field can be attributed to steam hydraulics and pressure oscillations within the geothermal reservoirs. Seismic noise surveys compliment electrical resistivity soundings and TEM-surveys by providing information pertinent to the current geothermal activity and extent of steam fields within the uppermost crust of the geothermal reservoir. Information related to acoustic emissions can thus help define targets for future wells.

  9. A Tool Measuring Remaining Thickness of Notched Acoustic Cavities in Primary Reaction Control Thruster NDI Standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Yushi; Sun, Changhong; Zhu, Harry; Wincheski, Buzz

    2006-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking in the relief radius area of a space shuttle primary reaction control thruster is an issue of concern. The current approach for monitoring of potential crack growth is nondestructive inspection (NDI) of remaining thickness (RT) to the acoustic cavities using an eddy current or remote field eddy current probe. EDM manufacturers have difficulty in providing accurate RT calibration standards. Significant error in the RT values of NDI calibration standards could lead to a mistaken judgment of cracking condition of a thruster under inspection. A tool based on eddy current principle has been developed to measure the RT at each acoustic cavity of a calibration standard in order to validate that the standard meets the sample design criteria.

  10. Acoustic velocity log numerical simulation and saturation estimation of gas hydrate reservoir in Shenhu area, South China Sea.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Kun; Zou, Changchun; Xiang, Biao; Liu, Jieqiong

    2013-01-01

    Gas hydrate model and free gas model are established, and two-phase theory (TPT) for numerical simulation of elastic wave velocity is adopted to investigate the unconsolidated deep-water sedimentary strata in Shenhu area, South China Sea. The relationships between compression wave (P wave) velocity and gas hydrate saturation, free gas saturation, and sediment porosity at site SH2 are studied, respectively, and gas hydrate saturation of research area is estimated by gas hydrate model. In depth of 50 to 245 m below seafloor (mbsf), as sediment porosity decreases, P wave velocity increases gradually; as gas hydrate saturation increases, P wave velocity increases gradually; as free gas saturation increases, P wave velocity decreases. This rule is almost consistent with the previous research result. In depth of 195 to 220 mbsf, the actual measurement of P wave velocity increases significantly relative to the P wave velocity of saturated water modeling, and this layer is determined to be rich in gas hydrate. The average value of gas hydrate saturation estimated from the TPT model is 23.2%, and the maximum saturation is 31.5%, which is basically in accordance with simplified three-phase equation (STPE), effective medium theory (EMT), resistivity log (Rt), and chloride anomaly method.

  11. Acoustic Velocity Log Numerical Simulation and Saturation Estimation of Gas Hydrate Reservoir in Shenhu Area, South China Sea

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Kun; Zou, Changchun; Xiang, Biao; Liu, Jieqiong

    2013-01-01

    Gas hydrate model and free gas model are established, and two-phase theory (TPT) for numerical simulation of elastic wave velocity is adopted to investigate the unconsolidated deep-water sedimentary strata in Shenhu area, South China Sea. The relationships between compression wave (P wave) velocity and gas hydrate saturation, free gas saturation, and sediment porosity at site SH2 are studied, respectively, and gas hydrate saturation of research area is estimated by gas hydrate model. In depth of 50 to 245 m below seafloor (mbsf), as sediment porosity decreases, P wave velocity increases gradually; as gas hydrate saturation increases, P wave velocity increases gradually; as free gas saturation increases, P wave velocity decreases. This rule is almost consistent with the previous research result. In depth of 195 to 220 mbsf, the actual measurement of P wave velocity increases significantly relative to the P wave velocity of saturated water modeling, and this layer is determined to be rich in gas hydrate. The average value of gas hydrate saturation estimated from the TPT model is 23.2%, and the maximum saturation is 31.5%, which is basically in accordance with simplified three-phase equation (STPE), effective medium theory (EMT), resistivity log (Rt), and chloride anomaly method. PMID:23935407

  12. Fracture detection logging tool

    DOEpatents

    Benzing, William M.

    1992-06-09

    A method and apparatus by which fractured rock formations are identified and their orientation may be determined includes two orthogonal motion sensors which are used in conjunction with a downhole orbital vibrator. The downhole vibrator includes a device for orienting the sensors. The output of the sensors is displayed as a lissajou figure. The shape of the figure changes when a subsurface fracture is encountered in the borehole. The apparatus and method identifies fractures rock formations and enables the azimuthal orientation of the fractures to be determined.

  13. Comparative Study of the Routine Daily Usability of FoodLog: A Smartphone-based Food Recording Tool Assisted by Image Retrieval.

    PubMed

    Aizawa, Kiyoharu; Maeda, Kazuki; Ogawa, Makoto; Sato, Yohei; Kasamatsu, Mayumi; Waki, Kayo; Takimoto, Hidemi

    2014-03-01

    The health care field is focusing considerable attention on dietary control, which requires that individuals record what they eat. We have developed a novel smartphone application called FoodLog, a multimedia food recording tool that allows users to take photos of their meals and to produce textual food records. Unlike conventional smartphone-based food recording tools, FoodLog allows users to employ meal photos to help them to input textual descriptions based on image retrieval. In this study, we conducted usability experiments to evaluate the routine daily use of FoodLog systems with and without image-based assistance. We produced 2 food recording tools: FoodLog with image-based assistance (FL-I) and FoodLog with text input only (FL-T). We recruited 18 university students (age = 18-24 years), all of whom performed food recording for the first time. The participants used FoodLog on a daily basis for 1 month. In the subjective evaluation, FL-I had higher average scores for questions related to ease of use, fun, frequency of browsing, and intention to continue. In particular, the latter 3 factors received significantly higher scores with FL-I than with FL-T. In the quantitative evaluation, the daily average number of meal events and food records did not differ significantly between FL-I and FL-T. A detailed analysis of the individual records showed that 1 participant produced 3 times as many records using FL-I compared with FL-T. The subjective assessment showed that our new tool, which fully exploits the use of images, is a promising method for food recording.

  14. Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Jerry R.; Grosveld, Ferdinand

    2007-01-01

    The acoustics environment in space operations is important to maintain at manageable levels so that the crewperson can remain safe, functional, effective, and reasonably comfortable. High acoustic levels can produce temporary or permanent hearing loss, or cause other physiological symptoms such as auditory pain, headaches, discomfort, strain in the vocal cords, or fatigue. Noise is defined as undesirable sound. Excessive noise may result in psychological effects such as irritability, inability to concentrate, decrease in productivity, annoyance, errors in judgment, and distraction. A noisy environment can also result in the inability to sleep, or sleep well. Elevated noise levels can affect the ability to communicate, understand what is being said, hear what is going on in the environment, degrade crew performance and operations, and create habitability concerns. Superfluous noise emissions can also create the inability to hear alarms or other important auditory cues such as an equipment malfunctioning. Recent space flight experience, evaluations of the requirements in crew habitable areas, and lessons learned (Goodman 2003; Allen and Goodman 2003; Pilkinton 2003; Grosveld et al. 2003) show the importance of maintaining an acceptable acoustics environment. This is best accomplished by having a high-quality set of limits/requirements early in the program, the "designing in" of acoustics in the development of hardware and systems, and by monitoring, testing and verifying the levels to ensure that they are acceptable.

  15. New Tools for Research on Instruction and Instructional Policy: A Web-Based Teacher Log. A CTP Working Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Deborah Loewenberg; Camburn, Eric; Correnti, Richard; Phelps, Geoffrey; Wallace, Raven

    This paper discusses the initial development and testing of a Web-based instrument for collecting daily data on instruction. This teacher log was developed for use in the Study of Instructional Improvement, a longitudinal study on school improvement in high poverty areas. The researchers wanted to further develop the potential of teacher logs by…

  16. Numerical simulations of induction and MWD logging tools and data inversion method with X-window interface on a UNIX workstation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Xiang-Dong

    The purpose of this research is to simulate induction and measuring-while-drilling (MWD) logs. In simulation of logs, there are two tasks. The first task, the forward modeling procedure, is to compute the logs from known formation. The second task, the inversion procedure, is to determine the unknown properties of the formation from the measured field logs. In general, the inversion procedure requires the solution of a forward model. In this study, a stable numerical method to simulate induction and MWD logs is presented. The proposed algorithm is based on a horizontal eigenmode expansion method. Vertical propagation of modes is modeled by a three-layer module. The multilayer cases are treated as a cascade of these modules. The mode tracing algorithm possesses stable characteristics that are superior to other methods. This method is applied to simulate the logs in the formations with both vertical and horizontal layers, and also used to study the groove effects of the MWD tool. The results are very good. Two-dimensional inversion of induction logs is an nonlinear problem. Nonlinear functions of the apparent conductivity are expanded into a Taylor series. After truncating the high order terms in this Taylor series, the nonlinear functions are linearized. An iterative procedure is then devised to solve the inversion problem. In each iteration, the Jacobian matrix is calculated, and a small variation computed using the least-squares method is used to modify the background medium. Finally, the inverted medium is obtained. The horizontal eigenstate method is used to solve the forward problem. It is found that a good inverted formation can be obtained by using measurements. In order to help the user simulate the induction logs conveniently, a Wellog Simulator, based on the X-window system, is developed. The application software (FORTRAN codes) embedded in the Simulator is designed to simulate the responses of the induction tools in the layered formation with dipping beds

  17. Well log characterization of natural gas-hydrates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collett, Timothy S.; Lee, Myung W.

    2012-01-01

    In the last 25 years there have been significant advancements in the use of well-logging tools to acquire detailed information on the occurrence of gas hydrates in nature: whereas wireline electrical resistivity and acoustic logs were formerly used to identify gas-hydrate occurrences in wells drilled in Arctic permafrost environments, more advanced wireline and logging-while-drilling (LWD) tools are now routinely used to examine the petrophysical nature of gas-hydrate reservoirs and the distribution and concentration of gas hydrates within various complex reservoir systems. Resistivity- and acoustic-logging tools are the most widely used for estimating the gas-hydrate content (i.e., reservoir saturations) in various sediment types and geologic settings. Recent integrated sediment coring and well-log studies have confirmed that electrical-resistivity and acoustic-velocity data can yield accurate gas-hydrate saturations in sediment grain-supported (isotropic) systems such as sand reservoirs, but more advanced log-analysis models are required to characterize gas hydrate in fractured (anisotropic) reservoir systems. New well-logging tools designed to make directionally oriented acoustic and propagation-resistivity log measurements provide the data needed to analyze the acoustic and electrical anisotropic properties of both highly interbedded and fracture-dominated gas-hydrate reservoirs. Advancements in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) logging and wireline formation testing (WFT) also allow for the characterization of gas hydrate at the pore scale. Integrated NMR and formation testing studies from northern Canada and Alaska have yielded valuable insight into how gas hydrates are physically distributed in sediments and the occurrence and nature of pore fluids(i.e., free water along with clay- and capillary-bound water) in gas-hydrate-bearing reservoirs. Information on the distribution of gas hydrate at the pore scale has provided invaluable insight on the mechanisms

  18. Acoustic Emission Detection of Macro-Cracks on Engraving Tool Steel Inserts during the Injection Molding Cycle Using PZT Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Svečko, Rajko; Kusić, Dragan; Kek, Tomaž; Sarjaš, Andrej; Hančič, Aleš; Grum, Janez

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an improved monitoring system for the failure detection of engraving tool steel inserts during the injection molding cycle. This system uses acoustic emission PZT sensors mounted through acoustic waveguides on the engraving insert. We were thus able to clearly distinguish the defect through measured AE signals. Two engraving tool steel inserts were tested during the production of standard test specimens, each under the same processing conditions. By closely comparing the captured AE signals on both engraving inserts during the filling and packing stages, we were able to detect the presence of macro-cracks on one engraving insert. Gabor wavelet analysis was used for closer examination of the captured AE signals' peak amplitudes during the filling and packing stages. The obtained results revealed that such a system could be used successfully as an improved tool for monitoring the integrity of an injection molding process. PMID:23673677

  19. Design of a cased-hole-density logging tool. Phase 1. Topical report, June 1993-June 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Moake, G.L.; Madigan, W.P.

    1995-08-01

    The objective of this project is to design and develop a commercial, cased-hole density tool. The tool must be capable of measuring formation densities behind casing and cement. The project is divided into three phases. Phase 1 will determine the optimum tool design and evaluate its effectiveness.

  20. Evaluate cement with radioactive tracers, directional gamma ray logs

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-01

    Use of radioactive tracers to evaluate hydraulic fractures has recently been extended through the use of directional gamma ray measurements. The directional gamma ray logging tool determines the azimuthal direction of gamma rays from radioactive isotope-tagged fracture proppants to estimate the fracture direction in well-controlled circumstances. The technology also provides new ways of evaluating primary and squeeze cement jobs by enhancing information from directional gamma ray data with advanced image processing techniques. By tagging the cement with a uniform quantity per unit volume of radioactivity, different levels of gamma ray log response must be attributed to variances in cement quality. Cement evaluation with tracers can help detect: thin cement sheaths; light-weight or low compressive strength cements where the acoustic impedance is near that of water; gas cut cement where the acoustic signal is attenuated; wells with microannulus that cannot be pressured to obtain valid log data; poor casing centralization; and multiple cement stage placement. The paper describes the logging tool, operational procedures, and a log example.

  1. Acoustic holography as a metrological tool for characterizing medical ultrasound sources and fields

    PubMed Central

    Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.; Tsysar, Sergey A.; Khokhlova, Vera A.; Kreider, Wayne

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic holography is a powerful technique for characterizing ultrasound sources and the fields they radiate, with the ability to quantify source vibrations and reduce the number of required measurements. These capabilities are increasingly appealing for meeting measurement standards in medical ultrasound; however, associated uncertainties have not been investigated systematically. Here errors associated with holographic representations of a linear, continuous-wave ultrasound field are studied. To facilitate the analysis, error metrics are defined explicitly, and a detailed description of a holography formulation based on the Rayleigh integral is provided. Errors are evaluated both for simulations of a typical therapeutic ultrasound source and for physical experiments with three different ultrasound sources. Simulated experiments explore sampling errors introduced by the use of a finite number of measurements, geometric uncertainties in the actual positions of acquired measurements, and uncertainties in the properties of the propagation medium. Results demonstrate the theoretical feasibility of keeping errors less than about 1%. Typical errors in physical experiments were somewhat larger, on the order of a few percent; comparison with simulations provides specific guidelines for improving the experimental implementation to reduce these errors. Overall, results suggest that holography can be implemented successfully as a metrological tool with small, quantifiable errors. PMID:26428789

  2. Acoustic holography as a metrological tool for characterizing medical ultrasound sources and fields.

    PubMed

    Sapozhnikov, Oleg A; Tsysar, Sergey A; Khokhlova, Vera A; Kreider, Wayne

    2015-09-01

    Acoustic holography is a powerful technique for characterizing ultrasound sources and the fields they radiate, with the ability to quantify source vibrations and reduce the number of required measurements. These capabilities are increasingly appealing for meeting measurement standards in medical ultrasound; however, associated uncertainties have not been investigated systematically. Here errors associated with holographic representations of a linear, continuous-wave ultrasound field are studied. To facilitate the analysis, error metrics are defined explicitly, and a detailed description of a holography formulation based on the Rayleigh integral is provided. Errors are evaluated both for simulations of a typical therapeutic ultrasound source and for physical experiments with three different ultrasound sources. Simulated experiments explore sampling errors introduced by the use of a finite number of measurements, geometric uncertainties in the actual positions of acquired measurements, and uncertainties in the properties of the propagation medium. Results demonstrate the theoretical feasibility of keeping errors less than about 1%. Typical errors in physical experiments were somewhat larger, on the order of a few percent; comparison with simulations provides specific guidelines for improving the experimental implementation to reduce these errors. Overall, results suggest that holography can be implemented successfully as a metrological tool with small, quantifiable errors.

  3. Integrated high-resolution palynomorph biostratigraphy and wireline log analysis as a tool for basin analysis and depositional environment interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Norton, N.J. )

    1991-08-01

    In Cabinda, Angola, serious correlation problems are encountered in thick Cenomanian and Albian successions of mixed clastics and carbonates. Rapid lateral and vertical facies changes result from the close proximity of diverse depositional environments, ranging from shallow marginal marine to deep open marine. Lithological miscorrelations can result from reliance solely on wireline logs. Foraminiferal and nannofossil distributions are strongly modified by these facies by palynomorphs, particularly pollen and spores and some microplankton, are less subject to facies control. A stratigraphic framework within which the facies relationships can be correctly resolved is provided by a high-resolution palynomorph can be correctly resolved is provided by a high-resolution palynomorph biozonation. Palynomorph assemblages from 30 offshore wells were analyzed. Biozones are defined on selected first downhole occurrences (tops), concurrent ranges, and relative abundances of regional key zone forms. Palynomorphs were selected by the criteria: readily recognizable morphology, relative abundance, stratigraphic range, and known stratigraphic value. Fifteen biozones are defined: four are Cenomanian, ten are Albian, and one is Aptian. Specific environments that were identified in conventional cores produced characteristic populations of environmentally sensitive palynomorphs. These distinctive assemblages can now be used to identify open marine, upper shoreface to foreshore, shallow lagoon, and tidal flat environments in cuttings. Application of the high-resolution palynomorph biozonation is illustrated in a depositional setting characterized by rapid facies changes. Correlation using sonic, density, gamma ray, and resistivity logs is improved when constrained by the biozonal framework.

  4. A multi path, weather independent avalanche monitoring tool using distributed acoustic fiber optic sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokop, Alexander; Wirbel, Anna

    2013-04-01

    Information on avalanche activity is a paramount parameter in avalanche forecasting. When avalanches are released spontaneously, the risk of avalanches is very high. Triggering avalanches by artificial means, such as explosives launched from helicopter or avalanche towers, can also give information on the stability of the snow pack. Hence, monitoring of avalanches released naturally or artificially, is an important quantity in avalanche forecasting. This information is also needed when deciding whether to close or not endangered ski runs, roads or railway lines. So far monitoring systems lack certain benefits. Either they monitor only large avalanches, can only be used for single avalanche tracks or are weather/sight dependant. Therefore a new tool for avalanche- monitoring, a distributed fiber optic system, is for the first time installed and adapted for the purpose of monitoring snow avalanche activity. The method is based on an optical time domain reflectometer (OTDR) system, which dates back to the 1970`s and detects seismic vibrations and acoustic signals on a fiber optic cable that can have a length of up to 30 km. An appropriate test slope for this configuration has been found in the ski area of "Lech am Arlberg". In this work a detailed description of the theoretical background, the system implementation, the field installation, realization of tests and an investigation of the recorded data is presented. We conducted 100 tests and triggered 41 avalanches so far with a runout distances ranging from a few meters to approximately 250 meters, all of which were detected by the system, as well as the 59 not successful attempts of artificial triggering. Moreover we measured properly if critical infrastructure (in our case a ski run) was reached by the avalanches or not. The spatial distributed sensing approach allowed us to relate the amplitude and spectral content of the signals to avalanche size, avalanche speed and snow properties of the avalanches. In

  5. Digital Photography as an Educational Food Logging Tool in Obese Patients with Type 2 Diabetes: Lessons Learned from A Randomized, Crossover Pilot Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ehrmann, Brett J.; Anderson, Robert M.; Piatt, Gretchen A.; Funnell, Martha M.; Rashid, Hira; Shedden, Kerby; Douyon, Liselle

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this pilot study is to investigate the utility of, and areas of refinement for, digital photography as an educational tool for food logging in obese patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Methods Thirty-three patients aged 18-70 with T2DM, BMI at least 30 kg/m2, and A1C 7.5-9% were recruited from an endocrinology clinic and randomized to a week of food logging using a digital camera (DC) or paper diary (PD), crossing over for week two. Patients then viewed a presentation about dietary effects on blood glucose, using patient DC and blood glucose entries. Outcomes of adherence (based on number of weekly entries), changes in mean blood glucose and frequency of blood glucose checks, and patient satisfaction were compared between methods. Patient feedback on the DC intervention and presentation was also analyzed. Results Thirty patients completed the study. Adherence was identical across methods. The mean difference in number of entries was not significant between methods. This difference increased and neared statistical significance (favoring DC) among patients who were adherent for at least one week (21 entries, with 2 entries per day for 5 of 7 days, n=25). Mean blood glucose did not significantly decrease in either method. Patient satisfaction was similar between interventions. Feedback indicated concerns over photograph accuracy, forgetting to use the cameras, and embarrassment using them in public. Conclusion Though comparable to PD in adherence, blood glucose changes, and patient satisfaction in this pilot trial, patient feedback suggested specific areas of refinement to maximize utility of DC-based food logging as an educational tool in T2DM. PMID:24168836

  6. Surface gamma-ray logs as a correlation tool between outcrop and subsurface: Application to the Silurian-Devonian of west Texas and southern New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Colleary, W.M. ); Crafton, J.W. Gas Research Institute, Chicago, IL )

    1992-04-01

    Outcrop gamma-ray logs are an excellent tool for correlation between surface measured sections and subsurface well logs. The work presented here illustrates the utility of constructing such profiles and the applicability of this technique to carbonate sequences such as those of the Permian basin. Outcrop sections with gamma-ray profiles have been measured over the Silurian-Devonian section in three separate areas. These sections are located in the Sacramento Mountains of southern New Mexico, and the northern Franklin Mountains and Hueco Mountains of west Texas. A hand-held Scintrex Model BGS-4 Digital Scintillometer was used to measure surface gamma radiation while detailed stratigraphic sections were being measured and described. Data were collected at regularly spaced intervals along the section. The scintillometer detects natural radiation emitted by radioactive elements that occur in most clay minerals and generally are more abundant in shales than in sandstones or carbonates. The lithology of poorly exposed or covered units also may be inferred from surface gamma-ray profiles. Organic-rich black shales are particularly radioactive, as are condensed sections. The strength of this method does not lie in the absolute reading of gamma radiation. The value of this tool lies in recognizing patterns within each profile, directly relating these patterns to their associated facies, and correlating them with subsurface profiles.

  7. Tools to Compare Diving-Animal Kinematics with Acoustic Behavior and Exposure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-30

    vehicle. Bioacoustic Probes have been employed as simple seafloor recorders in several studies, including a behavioral study of beluga - whale habitat usage...2005. Miniature self-contained acoustic recorders applied in a survey of beluga - whale populations in Knik Arm, Alaska (abstract). J. Acoust. Soc. Am...blue whales . Mar. Ecol-Prog. Ser. 330:269–284. [published, refereed] Tang, D. 2005. Inverting for sandy sediment sound speed in very shallow water

  8. Well Logging and Logging Analysis of UHP metamorphic Rocks in CCSD Main Hole (0-2000m)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, H.; Niu, Y.; Wang, W.; Zhu, L.; Xu, D.; Wu, H.; Li, S.; Luo, M.

    2004-12-01

    CCSD logging engineering gather many modern high technologies and employs various advanced logging tools to survey the sidewall continuously. This can obtain various physical, chemical, geometrical, etc in-situ information of the borehole's profile. So well logging is one of the most important parts and pivotal technologies in the project of CCSD. The main logging methods in CCSD-MH(0-2000m) are laterolog (Rd,Rs), gamma ray(GR), nature gamma spectrometry(U, TH, K), density(DEN), photo electric section exponent (Pe), compensated neutron(CNL), multipole array acoustic (Vp, Vs, Vst), Simultaneous Acoustic-Resistivity-image(Star-II), temperature(T),magnetic susceptibility(MS), three component borehole magnetic and redox potential log,etc. The various metamorphic rocks can be classified by logging curves,and their physical parameters can be acquired by analyzing the response characters of various metamorphic rocks and by statistics. According to the logging cross plot, We can research the clustering of metamorphite's physical property. Five lithologic segments can be obtainend by logging curves. The GR, Th, U, K logging values of segment 1 is lower than the third, fourth and fiveth segment, higher than segment 2; The DEN, Pe values of segment 1 higher than the third, fourth and fiveth segments. The main rocks in segment 1,2,3,4,5 are eclogites, serpentinites, paragneiss, orthogneiss, and eclogites(containing silicon and muscovite ) respectively. Generally, eclogite contain rutile, silicon, muscovite, etc. minerals. These minerals have response obviously on log curves.There are rutile,ilmenite, pyrite mineralized, etc. Making use of DEN, Pe, susceptibility log values, these mineralized layers can be goodly demarcation. For example, on the rutile mineralzed layer, the logging curve response characters are of high density and Pe obviously. The key data of the synthetical seismic record is wave impedance. In this paper, Utilize the data of AC, DEN curves to calculate the

  9. Feasibility studies of a carbon/oxygen logging tool for evaluating the CO/sub 2/ content of the medium in nuclear device containment

    SciTech Connect

    West, H.I. Jr.; Glasgow, J.E.

    1983-12-01

    The feasibility of using oil-well bore-hole logging techniques for assaying the carbonate content of a potential shot site has been investigated. The procedure makes use of the detection of the 4439-keV ..gamma.. ray of carbon and the 6130-keV ..gamma.. ray of oxygen produced by the inelastic scattering of 14-MeV neutrons in the bore-hole medium. For the needs of the containment program, a sensitivity of detection of CO/sub 2/ to less than or equal to 0.02 weight fraction must be achieved. Laboratory measurements indicate that only with considerable development effort could a tool be made that would come close to achieving this goal.

  10. Passive acoustics as a monitoring tool for evaluating oyster reef restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenil Becerra, Hilde P.

    Oyster reefs are biodiverse communities that provide many ecological and commercial benefits. However, oyster reefs have declined around the world from human activities. Oyster reef restoration programs have begun to limit some of the decline, but the need for determining the success of a program has been problematic. Passive acoustic techniques can use naturally occurring sounds produced by organisms to assess biodiversity. Passive acoustics was utilized to compare the sounds in natural and restored oyster reefs, with special attention on snapping shrimp (Alpheus spp.) snap sounds, in the St. Lucie Estuary, Florida over a one year period. Season, estuary region, habitat and day period had an effect on sound production Passive acoustic monitoring of snapping shrimp sound production may be a useful non-destructive technique for monitoring the progress of oyster reef restoration projects once further correlations are established between environmental effects and sound production.

  11. Critical evaluation of a simple retention time predictor based on LogKow as a complementary tool in the identification of emerging contaminants in water.

    PubMed

    Bade, Richard; Bijlsma, Lubertus; Sancho, Juan V; Hernández, Felix

    2015-07-01

    There has been great interest in environmental analytical chemistry in developing screening methods based on liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry (LC-HRMS) for emerging contaminants. Using HRMS, compound identification relies on the high mass resolving power and mass accuracy attainable by these analyzers. When dealing with wide-scope screening, retention time prediction can be a complementary tool for the identification of compounds, and can also reduce tedious data processing when several peaks appear in the extracted ion chromatograms. There are many in silico, Quantitative Structure-Retention Relationship methods available for the prediction of retention time for LC. However, most of these methods use commercial software to predict retention time based on various molecular descriptors. This paper explores the applicability and makes a critical discussion on a far simpler and cheaper approach to predict retention times by using LogKow. The predictor was based on a database of 595 compounds, their respective LogKow values and a chromatographic run time of 18min. Approximately 95% of the compounds were found within 4.0min of their actual retention times, and 70% within 2.0min. A predictor based purely on pesticides was also made, enabling 80% of these compounds to be found within 2.0min of their actual retention times. To demonstrate the utility of the predictors, they were successfully used as an additional tool in the identification of 30 commonly found emerging contaminants in water. Furthermore, a comparison was made by using different mass extraction windows to minimize the number of false positives obtained.

  12. The Acoustic Properties of Vowels: A Tool for Improving Articulation and Comprehension of English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCombs, Candalene J.

    2006-01-01

    Correct pronunciation is often a later step in the process of teaching English as a second language. However, a focus on the correct articulation of vowels can significantly improve listening and comprehension skills as well as articulatory skills. Vowels and consonants differ in their acoustic properties. Unlike consonants, vowel sounds are…

  13. Taming Log Files from Game/Simulation-Based Assessments: Data Models and Data Analysis Tools. Research Report. ETS RR-16-10

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hao, Jiangang; Smith, Lawrence; Mislevy, Robert; von Davier, Alina; Bauer, Malcolm

    2016-01-01

    Extracting information efficiently from game/simulation-based assessment (G/SBA) logs requires two things: a well-structured log file and a set of analysis methods. In this report, we propose a generic data model specified as an extensible markup language (XML) schema for the log files of G/SBAs. We also propose a set of analysis methods for…

  14. Computational Aero-acoustics As a Tool For Turbo-machinery Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyson, Rodger W.

    2003-01-01

    This talk will provide an overview of the field of computational aero-acoustics and its use in fan noise prediction. After a brief history of computational fluid dynamics, some of the recent developments in computational aero-acoustics will be explored. Computational issues concerning sound wave production, propagation, and reflection in practical turbo-machinery applications will be discussed including: (a) High order/High Resolution Numerical Techniques. (b) High Resolution Boundary Conditions. [c] MIMD Parallel Computing. [d] Form of Governing Equations Useful for Simulations. In addition, the basic design of our Broadband Analysis Stator Simulator (BASS) code and its application to a 2 D rotor wake-stator interaction will be shown. An example of the noise produced by the wakes from a rotor impinging upon a stator cascade will be shown.

  15. Tools to Compare Diving-Animal Kinematics with Acoustic Behavior and Exposure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-30

    recorders applied in a survey of beluga - whale populations in Knik Arm, Alaska (abstract). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 117:2524. 3) Goldbogen, J.A., Calambokidis...LONG-TERM GOALS Intense international concern has arisen over the potential effects of anthropogenic sound on protected marine wildlife. To...instrumentation capable of monitoring free-ranging marine animals is an essential foundation for research on sound and marine wildlife. Tags, attached

  16. Tools to Compare Diving-Animal Kinematics with Acoustic Behavior and Exposure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-30

    field tests of the 3B were being planned, contacts with the Vancouver Aquarium began in hopes of conducting joint captive studies with beluga whales ...Bioacoustic Probes and Acousondes have been employed as simple seafloor recorders in several studies, including a behavioral study of beluga - whale ...survey of beluga - whale populations in Knik Arm, Alaska (abstract). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 117:2524. [published] Chadwick, W. W., K. V. Cashman, R. W

  17. Tools to Compare Diving-Animal Kinematics With Acoustic Behavior and Exposure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-30

    in several studies, including a behavioral study of beluga - whale habitat usage (Burgess et al., 2005), a geoacoustic study of sediment properties...of beluga - whale populations in Knik Arm, Alaska (abstract). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 117:2524. [published] Chadwick, W. W., K. V. Cashman, R. W. Embley...GOALS Intense international concern has arisen over the potential effects of anthropogenic sound on protected marine wildlife. To study this issue

  18. Tools to Compare Diving-Animal Kinematics With Acoustic Behavior and Exposure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-30

    Williams, and S. B. Blackwell. 2005. Miniature self-contained acoustic recorders applied in a survey of beluga - whale populations in Knik Arm, Alaska...GOALS Intense international concern has arisen over the potential effects of anthropogenic sound on protected marine wildlife. To study this issue...capable of monitoring free-ranging marine animals is an essential foundation for research on sound and marine wildlife. Tags, attached to marine

  19. Tools to Compare Diving-Animal Kinematics with Acoustic Behavior and Exposure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-30

    and S. B. Blackwell. 2005. Miniature self-contained acoustic recorders applied in a survey of beluga - whale populations in Knik Arm, Alaska (abstract...LONG-TERM GOALS Intense international concern has arisen over the potential effects of anthropogenic sound on protected marine wildlife. To...instrumentation capable of monitoring free-ranging marine animals is an essential foundation for research on sound and marine wildlife. Tags

  20. High resolution petrophysical and geomechanical logging of drill cores as a tool for the evaluation of dimension stone quality and durability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prikryl, Richard; Lokajíček, Tomáš; Weishauptová, Zuzana; Petružálek, Matěj

    2015-04-01

    Petrophysical and geomechanical properties are significant functional properties of natural stone. In the recent study, an approach employing the entire non-disturb parts of drill cores for determination of the key petrophysical and geomechanical parameters is presented. The drill cores have been obtained during exploration campaign for Carboniferous arkoses and arkosic sandstones to conglomerates in the Bohemian Massif (Czech Republic). The test procedure consists of the sequence of non-destructive methods including determination of index properties, ultrasonic characteristics (speed of longitudinal and transversal waves, recording of the full waveforms). Once non-destructively tested, the specimens are subjected to standard compressive and/or tensile tests encompassing recording of stress-strain behaviour. Broad range of values obtained reflects quite complex petrographical character of rocks investigated. Variable grain size, grain size homogeneity, degree of cementation, overall rock microfabric, and/or presence and distribution of inter- and intraparticle porosity seem to be determinative factors. Once calibrated for a particular petrographical characteristics, high resolution petrophysical and geomechanical logging (HRPGL) can serve as an effective tool for precise evaluation of exploitable natural stone quality.

  1. The Acoustic Analogy: A Powerful Tool in Aeroacoustics with Emphasis on Jet Noise Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farassat, F.; Doty, Michael J.; Hunter, Craig A.

    2004-01-01

    The acoustic analogy introduced by Lighthill to study jet noise is now over 50 years old. In the present paper, Lighthill s Acoustic Analogy is revisited together with a brief evaluation of the state-of-the-art of the subject and an exploration of the possibility of further improvements in jet noise prediction from analytical methods, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) predictions, and measurement techniques. Experimental Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) data is used both to evaluate turbulent statistics from Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) CFD and to propose correlation models for the Lighthill stress tensor. The NASA Langley Jet3D code is used to study the effect of these models on jet noise prediction. From the analytical investigation, a retarded time correction is shown that improves, by approximately 8 dB, the over-prediction of aft-arc jet noise by Jet3D. In experimental investigation, the PIV data agree well with the CFD mean flow predictions, with room for improvement in Reynolds stress predictions. Initial modifications, suggested by the PIV data, to the form of the Jet3D correlation model showed no noticeable improvements in jet noise prediction.

  2. Evaluation of uncertainty of the comprehensive interpretation of borehole logs by the multiple re-run statistical method.

    PubMed

    Woźnicka, U; Jarzyna, J; Krynicka, E

    2005-05-01

    Measurements of various physical quantities in a borehole by geophysical well logging tools are designed to determine these quantities for underground geological formations. Then, the raw data (logs) are combined in a comprehensive interpretation to obtain values of geological parameters. Estimating the uncertainty of calculated geological parameters, interpreted in such a way, is difficult, often impossible, when classical statistical methods are used. The method presented here permits an estimate of the uncertainty of a quantity to be obtained. The discussion of the dependence between the uncertainty of nuclear and acoustic tool responses, and the estimated uncertainty of the interpreted geological parameters (among others: porosity, water saturation, clay content) is presented.

  3. The UCB particle monitor: A tool for logging frequency of smoking and the intensity of second-hand smoke concentrations in the home

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semple, Sean; Apsley, Andrew; Moir, Gill; Henderson, George; Ayres, Jon

    2009-02-01

    Second-hand tobacco smoke (SHS) exposure generates a large public health burden. Recent legislation has moved to prohibit smoking in public places and there are concerns that this may lead to an increase in exposures in private homes. Measurement of SHS aerosol has tended to use active pumped samples or longer-term diffusive badges. Pumped methods are noisy and poorly tolerated in home settings while diffusive badges do not provide real-time data. The UCB particle monitor (UCB-PM) is a modified smoke-alarm device capable of logging changes in airborne particulate matter over extended periods and has been used successfully to measure biomass fuel smoke concentrations in developing world settings This study has examined the use of the UCB-PM to measure SHS aerosol in both controlled laboratory conditions and a pilot field trial over a 7 day period in a smoker's home. Comparisons with a pumped sampler (TSI Sidepak Personal Aerosol Monitor) indicate good agreement over a range of exposure concentrations but there is evidence of a threshold effect at approximately 0.5 mg/m3 of fine particulate measured as PM2.5. While this threshold effect undermines the ability of the device to provide useful data on the time-weighted average SHS concentration, the field trial indicates that that the UCB-PM has a sensitivity of about 71% and a specificity of 98%. The device has many advantages including zero noise operation, low cost and long battery life and may be a useful tool in quitting and smoke-free home intervention studies.

  4. Classical Experiments Revisited: Smartphones and Tablet PCs as Experimental Tools in Acoustics and Optics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, P.; Hirth, M.; Gröber, S.; Kuhn, J.; Müller, A.

    2014-01-01

    Smartphones and tablets are used as experimental tools and for quantitative measurements in two traditional laboratory experiments for undergraduate physics courses. The Doppler effect is analyzed and the speed of sound is determined with an accuracy of about 5% using ultrasonic frequency and two smartphones, which serve as rotating sound emitter…

  5. Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate Joint Industry Project Leg II logging-while-drilling data acquisition and analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collett, Timothy S.; Lee, Wyung W.; Zyrianova, Margarita V.; Mrozewski, Stefan A.; Guerin, Gilles; Cook, Ann E.; Goldberg, Dave S.

    2012-01-01

    One of the objectives of the Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate Joint Industry Project Leg II (GOM JIP Leg II) was the collection of a comprehensive suite of logging-while-drilling (LWD) data within gas-hydrate-bearing sand reservoirs in order to make accurate estimates of the concentration of gas hydrates under various geologic conditions and to understand the geologic controls on the occurrence of gas hydrate at each of the sites drilled during this expedition. The LWD sensors just above the drill bit provided important information on the nature of the sediments and the occurrence of gas hydrate. There has been significant advancements in the use of downhole well-logging tools to acquire detailed information on the occurrence of gas hydrate in nature: From using electrical resistivity and acoustic logs to identify gas hydrate occurrences in wells to where wireline and advanced logging-while-drilling tools are routinely used to examine the petrophysical nature of gas hydrate reservoirs and the distribution and concentration of gas hydrates within various complex reservoir systems. Recent integrated sediment coring and well-log studies have confirmed that electrical resistivity and acoustic velocity data can yield accurate gas hydrate saturations in sediment grain supported (isotropic) systems such as sand reservoirs, but more advanced log analysis models are required to characterize gas hydrate in fractured (anisotropic) reservoir systems. In support of the GOM JIP Leg II effort, well-log data montages have been compiled and presented in this report which includes downhole logs obtained from all seven wells drilled during this expedition with a focus on identifying and characterizing the potential gas-hydrate-bearing sedimentary section in each of the wells. Also presented and reviewed in this report are the gas-hydrate saturation and sediment porosity logs for each of the wells as calculated from available downhole well logs.

  6. Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate Joint Industry Project Leg II logging-while-drilling data acquisition and anaylsis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collett, Timothy S.; Lee, Myung W.; Zyrianova, Margarita V.; Mrozewski, Stefan A.; Guerin, Gilles; Cook, Ann E.; Goldberg, Dave S.

    2012-01-01

    One of the objectives of the Gulf of MexicoGasHydrateJointIndustryProjectLegII (GOM JIP LegII) was the collection of a comprehensive suite of logging-while-drilling (LWD) data within gas-hydrate-bearing sand reservoirs in order to make accurate estimates of the concentration of gashydrates under various geologic conditions and to understand the geologic controls on the occurrence of gashydrate at each of the sites drilled during this expedition. The LWD sensors just above the drill bit provided important information on the nature of the sediments and the occurrence of gashydrate. There has been significant advancements in the use of downhole well-logging tools to acquire detailed information on the occurrence of gashydrate in nature: From using electrical resistivity and acoustic logs to identify gashydrate occurrences in wells to where wireline and advanced logging-while-drilling tools are routinely used to examine the petrophysical nature of gashydrate reservoirs and the distribution and concentration of gashydrates within various complex reservoir systems. Recent integrated sediment coring and well-log studies have confirmed that electrical resistivity and acoustic velocity data can yield accurate gashydrate saturations in sediment grain supported (isotropic) systems such as sand reservoirs, but more advanced log analysis models are required to characterize gashydrate in fractured (anisotropic) reservoir systems. In support of the GOM JIP LegII effort, well-log data montages have been compiled and presented in this report which includes downhole logs obtained from all seven wells drilled during this expedition with a focus on identifying and characterizing the potential gas-hydrate-bearing sedimentary section in each of the wells. Also presented and reviewed in this report are the gas-hydrate saturation and sediment porosity logs for each of the wells as calculated from available downhole well logs.

  7. Development of nonlinear acoustic propagation analysis tool toward realization of loud noise environment prediction in aeronautics

    SciTech Connect

    Kanamori, Masashi Takahashi, Takashi Aoyama, Takashi

    2015-10-28

    Shown in this paper is an introduction of a prediction tool for the propagation of loud noise with the application to the aeronautics in mind. The tool, named SPnoise, is based on HOWARD approach, which can express almost exact multidimensionality of the diffraction effect at the cost of back scattering. This paper argues, in particular, the prediction of the effect of atmospheric turbulence on sonic boom as one of the important issues in aeronautics. Thanks to the simple and efficient modeling of the atmospheric turbulence, SPnoise successfully re-creates the feature of the effect, which often emerges in the region just behind the front and rear shock waves in the sonic boom signature.

  8. Development of nonlinear acoustic propagation analysis tool toward realization of loud noise environment prediction in aeronautics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanamori, Masashi; Takahashi, Takashi; Aoyama, Takashi

    2015-10-01

    Shown in this paper is an introduction of a prediction tool for the propagation of loud noise with the application to the aeronautics in mind. The tool, named SPnoise, is based on HOWARD approach, which can express almost exact multidimensionality of the diffraction effect at the cost of back scattering. This paper argues, in particular, the prediction of the effect of atmospheric turbulence on sonic boom as one of the important issues in aeronautics. Thanks to the simple and efficient modeling of the atmospheric turbulence, SPnoise successfully re-creates the feature of the effect, which often emerges in the region just behind the front and rear shock waves in the sonic boom signature.

  9. Detection of gas hydrate with downhole logs and assessment of gas hydrate concentrations (saturations) and gas volumes on the Blake Ridge with electrical resistivity log data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collett, T.S.; Ladd, J.

    2000-01-01

    Let 164 of the Ocean Drilling Program was designed to investigate the occurrence of gas hydrate in the sedimentary section beneath the Blake Ridge on the southeastern continental margin of North America. Site 994, and 997 were drilled on the Blake Ridge to refine our understanding of the in situ characteristics of natural gas hydrate. Because gas hydrate is unstable at surface pressure and temperature conditions, a major emphasis was placed on the downhole logging program to determine the in situ physical properties of the gas hydrate-bearing sediments. Downhole logging tool strings deployed on Leg 164 included the Schlumberger quad-combination tool (NGT, LSS/SDT, DIT, CNT-G, HLDT), the Formation MicroScanner (FMS), and the Geochemical Combination Tool (GST). Electrical resistivity (DIT) and acoustic transit-time (LSS/SDT) downhole logs from Sites 994, 995, and 997 indicate the presence of gas hydrate in the depth interval between 185 and 450 mbsf on the Blake Ridge. Electrical resistivity log calculations suggest that the gas hydrate-bearing sedimentary section on the Blake Ridge may contain between 2 and 11 percent bulk volume (vol%) gas hydrate. We have determined that the log-inferred gas hydrates and underlying free-gas accumulations on the Blake Ridge may contain as much as 57 trillion m3 of gas.

  10. Method for determining the minimum principle horizontal stress within a formation through use of a wireline retrievable circumferential acoustic scanning tool during an open hole microfrac test

    SciTech Connect

    Venditto, J.J.; McMechan, D.E.; Enderlin, M.B.

    1993-08-17

    A method is described for determining the magnitude of the minimum principle horizontal stress within a formation having an open hole well bore formed therein, comprising the steps of: supplying pressurized fracturing fluid to said well bore in a desired area of observation, said well bore exposing an interior surface of said formation; inserting a circumferential acoustic scanning tool into said well bore and positioning said tool in said area of observation, said acoustic scanning tool providing a viewable image of said interior surface of said formation; increasing the pressure on said fracturing fluid until fractures are initiated in said formation proximate the well bore; increasing the pressure acting on said fracturing fluid so as to cause said initiated fractures to further open; observing the interior surface of said formation during said opening of said previously initiated fractures; and noting the magnitude of the pressure acting on said fracturing fluid as said previously initiated fractures are opened.

  11. Geological well log analysis. Third ed

    SciTech Connect

    Pirson, S.J.

    1983-01-01

    Until recently, well logs have mainly been used for correlation, structural mapping, and quantitive evaluation of hydrocarbon bearing formations. This third edition of Geologic Well Log Analysis, however, describes how well logs can be used for geological studies and mineral exploration. This is done by analyzing well logs for numerous parameters and indices of significant mineral accumulation, primarily in sediments. Contents are: SP and Eh curves as redoxomorphic logs; sedimentalogical studies by log curve shapes; exploration for stratigraphic traps; continuous dipmeter as a structural tool; continuous dipmeter as a sedimentation tool; Paleo-facies logging and mapping; hydrogeology 1--hydrodynamics of compaction; hydrogeology 2--geostatic equilibrium; and hydrogeology 3--hydrodynamics of infiltration. Appendixes cover: Computer program for calculating the dip magnitude, azimuth, and the degree and orientation of the resistivity anisotrophy; a lithology computer program for calculating the curvature of a structure; and basic log analysis package for HP-41CV programmable calculator.

  12. Classical experiments revisited: smartphones and tablet PCs as experimental tools in acoustics and optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, P.; Hirth, M.; Gröber, S.; Kuhn, J.; Müller, A.

    2014-07-01

    Smartphones and tablets are used as experimental tools and for quantitative measurements in two traditional laboratory experiments for undergraduate physics courses. The Doppler effect is analyzed and the speed of sound is determined with an accuracy of about 5% using ultrasonic frequency and two smartphones, which serve as rotating sound emitter and stationary sound detector. Emphasis is put on the investigation of measurement errors in order to judge experimentally derived results and to sensitize undergraduate students to the methods of error estimates. The distance dependence of the illuminance of a light bulb is investigated using an ambient light sensor of a mobile device. Satisfactory results indicate that the spectrum of possible smartphone experiments goes well beyond those already published for mechanics.

  13. The copper-nickel concentration log: A tool for stratigraphic interpretation within the ultramafic and basal zones of the stillwater complex, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Drew, L.J.; Bawiec, W.J.; Page, N.J.; Schuenemeyer, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    An analogue to the electric well log was devised for copper-nickel concentration drill-hole data from the Basal and lower part of the Ultramafic zones of the Stillwater Complex using automated data processing. The copper-nickel concentration logs graphically represent intensity (concentration) values that reflect the distribution of the elements in sulfide and silicate minerals. Four major patterns are recognized by their characteristic variations in copper and nickel intensity: (1) relatively flat, low-level copper-intensity signatures associated with arcuate nickel-intensity patterns that correlate with rocks in the Peridotite member of the Ultramafic zone; (2) arcuate or bulb-like patterns of copper and nickel intensity that correlate closely with the Basal bronzite cumulate member of the Basal zone; (3) complex patterns consisting of intervals of low-intensity copper and moderate-intensity nickel, spikes of high nickel and copper intensity, and high copper intensity associated with low nickel intensity that correlate respectively with cordierite-pyroxene hornfels, massive sulfide, norites and mineralized diabase dikes in the Basal norite member; and (4) large intervals of extremely low copper and nickel intensity that correlate with quartz-orthopyroxene hornfels. The recognition and interpretation of these patterns allow two- and three-dimensional stratigraphic and lithologic reconstructions to be done by means of concentration-log correlations instead of variable quality lithologic logging. ?? 1985.

  14. Logs key to solving water production problems

    SciTech Connect

    Wyatt, D.F. Jr.; Crook, R.J.

    1995-11-20

    Water source identification is the first and most important step in controlling unwanted water production that can severely limit the productive life of a well and, thereby, decrease hydrocarbon recovery. Water-control treatments often fail because the source of the water problem is not identified, the wrong treatment is performed, or the correct treatment is performed incorrectly. Table 1 lists typical problems, means of identification and evaluation, and chemical treatments available for correcting the problem. Well logs can help diagnose downhole situations that can lead to unwanted water production, and the effectiveness of water-control treatments can be evaluated with cased and open hole logs. The paper discusses cement bond logs and the pulse echo tool for cement evaluation. Casing evaluation is carried out by mechanical caliper logs and electro magnetic tools. Reservoir monitoring with pulsed neutron logs and pulsed neutron spectrometry are discussed. Also discussed are production logging, radioactive tracer logging, and well tests.

  15. Understanding acoustic methods for cement bond logging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hua; Tao, Guo; Shang, Xuefeng

    2016-05-01

    Well cementation is important for oil/gas production, underground gas storage, and CO2 storage, since it isolates the reservoir layers from aquifers to increase well integrity and reduce environmental footprint. This paper analyzes wave modes of different sonic/ultrasonic methods for cement bonding evaluation. A Two dimensional finite difference method is then used to simulate the wavefield for the ultrasonic methods in the cased-hole models. Waveforms of pulse-echo method from different interfaces in a good bonded well are analyzed. Wavefield of the pitch-catch method for free casing, partial or full bonded models with ultra-low density cement are studied. Based on the studies, the modes in different methods are considered as follows: the zero-order symmetric Leaky-Lamb mode (S0) for sonic method, the first-order symmetric Leaky-Lamb mode (S1) for the pulse-echo method, and the zero-order anti-symmetric Leaky-Lamb mode (A0) for the pitch-catch method. For the sonic method, a directional transmitter in both the azimuth and axial directions can generate energy with a large incidence angle and azimuth resolution, which can effectively generate S0 and break out the azimuth limitation of the conventional sonic method. Although combination of pulse-echo and pitch-catch methods can determine the bonding condition of the third interface for the ultra-low density cement case, the pitch-catch cannot tell the fluid annulus thickness behind casing for the partial bonded cased-hole.

  16. Method for induced polarization logging

    SciTech Connect

    Vinegar, H.J.; Waxman, M.H.

    1987-04-14

    A method is described for generating a log of the formation phase shift, resistivity and spontaneous potential of an earth formation from data obtained from the earth formation with a multi-electrode induced polarization logging tool. The method comprises obtaining data samples from the formation at measurement points equally spaced in time of the magnitude and phase of the induced voltage and the magnitude and phase of the current supplied by a circuit through a reference resistance R/sub 0/ to a survey current electrode associated with the tool.

  17. Acoustic neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    Vestibular schwannoma; Tumor - acoustic; Cerebellopontine angle tumor; Angle tumor; Hearing loss - acoustic; Tinnitus - acoustic ... Acoustic neuromas have been linked with the genetic disorder neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2). Acoustic neuromas are uncommon.

  18. New developments in real-time processing of full waveform acoustic televiewer data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deltombe, Jean-Luc; Schepers, Reinhard

    2004-01-01

    The new full wave Acoustic Borehole Imager tool (ABI) is a multi-echo (amplitude and traveltime) system that gives optimum performance under a wide range of borehole conditions and is an improvement over existing single echo acoustic televiewer tools. The principle of the multi-echo system is the digital recording of each reflected acoustic wave train. Then, real-time processing of the acoustic data is made by a downhole Digital Signal Processor (DSP) to extract all valuable information, which is further compressed before transmission to the surface such that no special requirements are imposed on data transmission rates or on logging speed. Also, recording of the full acoustic waveform enables major improvements to the dynamic range of the system. Information about echoes from the tool's acoustic window provides the possibility to predict tool generated coherent noise and allows detection of echoes from the borehole wall, which are much smaller than coherent noise signals. When used in a PVC cased borehole, the system can be automatically adapted to record both the reflection at the casing and at the borehole wall. When used inside steel casing, the tool can detect echoes from the inner wall and the outer wall of the steel casing and the resulting data can used to calculate amount inner corrosion, outer corrosion, and remaining casing thickness. If the borehole casing was grouted with cement, information can be gathered about the presence and absence of cement and the quality of cement bonding.

  19. Logging-while-coring method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Goldberg, David S.; Myers, Gregory J.

    2007-11-13

    A method and apparatus for downhole coring while receiving logging-while-drilling tool data. The apparatus includes core collar and a retrievable core barrel. The retrievable core barrel receives core from a borehole which is sent to the surface for analysis via wireline and latching tool The core collar includes logging-while-drilling tools for the simultaneous measurement of formation properties during the core excavation process. Examples of logging-while-drilling tools include nuclear sensors, resistivity sensors, gamma ray sensors, and bit resistivity sensors. The disclosed method allows for precise core-log depth calibration and core orientation within a single borehole, and without at pipe trip, providing both time saving and unique scientific advantages.

  20. Logging-while-coring method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Goldberg, David S.; Myers, Gregory J.

    2007-01-30

    A method and apparatus for downhole coring while receiving logging-while-drilling tool data. The apparatus includes core collar and a retrievable core barrel. The retrievable core barrel receives core from a borehole which is sent to the surface for analysis via wireline and latching tool The core collar includes logging-while-drilling tools for the simultaneous measurement of formation properties during the core excavation process. Examples of logging-while-drilling tools include nuclear sensors, resistivity sensors, gamma ray sensors, and bit resistivity sensors. The disclosed method allows for precise core-log depth calibration and core orientation within a single borehole, and without at pipe trip, providing both time saving and unique scientific advantages.

  1. Well log evaluation of gas hydrate saturations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collett, Timothy S.

    1998-01-01

    The amount of gas sequestered in gas hydrates is probably enormous, but estimates are highly speculative due to the lack of previous quantitative studies. Gas volumes that may be attributed to a gas hydrate accumulation within a given geologic setting are dependent on a number of reservoir parameters; one of which, gas-hydrate saturation, can be assessed with data obtained from downhole well logging devices. The primary objective of this study was to develop quantitative well-log evaluation techniques which will permit the calculation of gas-hydrate saturations in gas-hydrate-bearing sedimentary units. The `standard' and `quick look' Archie relations (resistivity log data) yielded accurate gas-hydrate and free-gas saturations within all of the gas hydrate accumulations assessed in the field verification phase of the study. Compressional wave acoustic log data have been used along with the Timur, modified Wood, and the Lee weighted average acoustic equations to calculate accurate gas-hydrate saturations in this study. The well log derived gas-hydrate saturations calculated in the field verification phase of this study, which range from as low as 2% to as high as 97%, confirm that gas hydrates represent a potentially important source of natural gas.

  2. Well log evaluation of gas hydrate saturations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collett, T.S.

    1998-01-01

    The amount of gas sequestered in gas hydrates is probably enormous, but estimates are highly speculative due to the lack of previous quantitative studies. Gas volumes that may be attributed to a gas hydrate accumulation within a given geologic setting are dependent on a number of reservoir parameters; one of which, gas-hydrate saturation, can be assessed with data obtained from downhole well logging devices. The primary objective of this study was to develop quantitative well-log evaluation techniques which will permit the calculation of gas-hydrate saturations in gas-hydrate-bearing sedimentary units. The "standard" and "quick look" Archie relations (resistivity log data) yielded accurate gas-hydrate and free-gas saturations within all of the gas hydrate accumulations assessed in the field verification phase of the study. Compressional wave acoustic log data have been used along with the Timur, modified Wood, and the Lee weighted average acoustic equations to calculate accurate gas-hydrate saturations in all of the gas hydrate accumulations assessed in this study. The well log derived gas-hydrate saturations calculated in the field verification phase of this study, which range from as low as 2% to as high as 97%, confirm that gas hydrates represent a potentially important source of natural gas.

  3. Log N-log S in inconclusive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klebesadel, R. W.; Fenimore, E. E.; Laros, J.

    1983-01-01

    The log N-log S data acquired by the Pioneer Venus Orbiter Gamma Burst Detector (PVO) are presented and compared to similar data from the Soviet KONUS experiment. Although the PVO data are consistent with and suggestive of a -3/2 power law distribution, the results are not adequate at this state of observations to differentiate between a -3/2 and a -1 power law slope.

  4. Log processing systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bowlin, W.P.; Kneer, M.P.; Ballance, J.D.

    1989-11-07

    This patent describes an improvement in a computer controlled processing system for lumber production. It comprises: a computer, a sequence of processing stations for processing a log segment including; an excess material removing station for generating opposed flat side surfaces on the log segment. The flat side surfaces determined by the computer to become sides of boards to be severed from the log segments; a profiling station for forming profiled edges above and below the flat side surfaces to become the side edges of the boards to be severed from the log segment, and a severing station for severing the boards from the log segments, a conveyance means establishing a path of conveyance and having continuous control of the log segment on conveying the log segment along the path and through the above defined sequence of processing stations.

  5. Acoustic startle modification as a tool for evaluating auditory function of the mouse: Progress, pitfalls, and potential.

    PubMed

    Lauer, Amanda M; Behrens, Derik; Klump, Georg

    2017-03-19

    Acoustic startle response (ASR) modification procedures, especially prepulse inhibition (PPI), are increasingly used as behavioral measures of auditory processing and sensorimotor gating in rodents due to their perceived ease of implementation and short testing times. In practice, ASR and PPI procedures are extremely variable across animals, experimental setups, and studies, and the interpretation of results is subject to numerous caveats and confounding influences. We review considerations for modification of the ASR using acoustic stimuli, and we compare the sensitivity of PPI procedures to more traditional operant psychoacoustic techniques. We also discuss non-auditory variables that must be considered. We conclude that ASR and PPI measures cannot substitute for traditional operant techniques due to their low sensitivity. Additionally, a substantial amount of pilot testing must be performed to properly optimize an ASR modification experiment, negating any time benefit over operant conditioning. Nevertheless, there are some circumstances where ASR measures may be the only option for assessing auditory behavior, such as when testing mouse strains with early-onset hearing loss or learning impairments.

  6. Acoustic imaging system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kendall, J. M., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Tool detects noise sources by scanning sound "scene" and displaying relative location of noise-producing elements in area. System consists of ellipsoidal acoustic mirror and microphone and a display device.

  7. Multiple log potash assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, D. G.

    1993-10-01

    A five-mineral multiple-log potash assay technique has been successfully applied to evaluate potash-rich intervals in evaporite sequences. The technique is able to distinguish economic potash minerals from non-economic potash minerals and from other non-potash radioactive minerals. It can be applied on location, using a programmable calculator or microcomputer, providing near real-time logs of potash mineral concentrations. Log assay values show good agreement with core wet chemistry analyses.

  8. Spacecraft Internal Acoustic Environment Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Christopher; Chu, S. Reynold

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the project is to develop an acoustic modeling capability, based on commercial off-the-shelf software, to be used as a tool for oversight of the future manned Constellation vehicles to ensure compliance with acoustic requirements and thus provide a safe and habitable acoustic environment for the crews, and to validate developed models via building physical mockups and conducting acoustic measurements.

  9. The fluid-compensated cement bond log

    SciTech Connect

    Nayfeh, T.H.; Wheelis, W.B. Jr.; Leslie, H.D.

    1986-08-01

    Simulations of cement bond logging (CBL) have shown that wellbore fluid effects can be segregated from sonic-signal response to changing cement strengths. Traditionally, the effects have been considered negligible and the CBL's have been interpreted as if water were in the wellbore. However, large variations in CBL's have become apparent with the increasing number of logs run in completion fluids, such as CaCl/sub 2/, ZnBr/sub 2/, and CaBr/sub 2/. To study wellbore fluid effects, physical and numerical models were developed that simulated the wellbore geometry. Measurements were conducted in 5-, 7-, and 9 5/8-in. casings for a range of wellbore fluid types and for both densities and viscosities. Parallel numerical modeling used similar parameters. Results show that bond-log amplitudes varied dramatically with the wellbore fluid acoustic impedance-i.e., there was a 70% increase in signal amplitudes for 11.5 lbm/gal (1370-kg/m/sup 3/) CaCl/sub 2/ over the signal amplitude in water. This led to the development of a fluid-compensated bond log that corrects the amplitude for acoustic impedance of various wellbore fluids, thereby making the measurements more directly related to the cement quality.

  10. Acoustic transducer

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, Douglas S.

    2000-01-01

    An active acoustic transducer tool for use down-hole applications. The tool includes a single cylindrical mandrel including a shoulder defining the boundary of a narrowed portion over which is placed a sandwich-style piezoelectric tranducer assembly. The piezoelectric transducer assembly is prestressed by being placed in a thermal interference fit between the shoulder of the mandrel and the base of an anvil which is likewise positioned over the narrower portion of the mandrel. In the preferred embodiment, assembly of the tool is accomplished using a hydraulic jack to stretch the mandrel prior to emplacement of the cylindrical sandwich-style piezoelectric transducer assembly and anvil. After those elements are positioned and secured, the stretched mandrel is allowed to return substantially to its original (pre-stretch) dimensions with the result that the piezoelectric transducer elements are compressed between the anvil and the shoulder of the mandrel.

  11. Ulysses log 1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez, Raul Garcia

    1993-01-01

    The Ulysses Log tells the story of some intriguing problems that we (=The Spacecraft Team) have encountered. Ulysses was launched on 6 Oct. 1990, and it made the fastest trip to Jupiter (8 Feb. 1992). It is presently going out of the ecliptic. This paper presents log entries from the following areas: (1) ingenious maneuvers; (2) telecommunication problems; and (3) surprises.

  12. Numerical Modeling of Electroacoustic Logging Including Joule Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plyushchenkov, Boris D.; Nikitin, Anatoly A.; Turchaninov, Victor I.

    It is well known that electromagnetic field excites acoustic wave in a porous elastic medium saturated with fluid electrolyte due to electrokinetic conversion effect. Pride's equations describing this process are written in isothermal approximation. Update of these equations, which allows to take influence of Joule heating on acoustic waves propagation into account, is proposed here. This update includes terms describing the initiation of additional acoustic waves excited by thermoelastic stresses and the heat conduction equation with right side defined by Joule heating. Results of numerical modeling of several problems of propagation of acoustic waves excited by an electric field source with and without consideration of Joule heating effect in their statements are presented. From these results, it follows that influence of Joule heating should be taken into account at the numerical simulation of electroacoustic logging and at the interpretation of its log data.

  13. Acoustic Remote Sensing of Volcanic Eruptions in Washington, Ecuador, and Colombia: New Tools for Covering Observational Gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garces, M.; Fee, D.; Steffke, A.; Matoza, R.; Hedlin, M.; Yepes, H.; McCormack, D.; Bass, H.; Hetzer, C.; Servranckx, R.

    2007-05-01

    Some volcanoes, particularly near population centers or in developed countries, have well developed ground- based monitoring systems. Yet there remain large portions of Earth's surface, particularly in remote areas or less-developed countries, where local ground-based surveillance systems are sparse, fragile, or non-existent. The Acoustic Surveillance for Hazardous Eruptions (ASHE) project aims to develop and evaluate the capability to use low frequency sound to provide robust, low-latency notifications of volcanic eruptions over large regions. We describe current field deployments of several small, autonomous infrasound arrays in Washington State (since October 2004) and Ecuador (since January 2006). The arrays in Washington have detected diverse eruption signals from Mount St. Helens, and the arrays in Ecuador have captured eruptions from Tungurahua and Sangay Volcanoes, as well as Galeras in Colombia. These stations send continuous real time data to a central facility where automatic analysis techniques for eruption detection are being prototyped. Plans are in place to send automated notification products on a test basis to a participating ICAO-designated Volcanic Ash Advisory Center for comparison and possible integration with their existing warning systems. These notifications would be coupled with more detailed real-time data products (presently provided in designated web pages), and could be used by responsible agencies to assess hazard and disseminate updated information.

  14. Extraction of features from ultrasound acoustic emissions: a tool to assess the hydraulic vulnerability of Norway spruce trunkwood?

    PubMed Central

    Rosner, Sabine; Klein, Andrea; Wimmer, Rupert; Karlsson, Bo

    2011-01-01

    Summary • The aim of this study was to assess the hydraulic vulnerability of Norway spruce (Picea abies) trunkwood by extraction of selected features of acoustic emissions (AEs) detected during dehydration of standard size samples. • The hydraulic method was used as the reference method to assess the hydraulic vulnerability of trunkwood of different cambial ages. Vulnerability curves were constructed by plotting the percentage loss of conductivity vs an overpressure of compressed air. • Differences in hydraulic vulnerability were very pronounced between juvenile and mature wood samples; therefore, useful AE features, such as peak amplitude, duration and relative energy, could be filtered out. The AE rates of signals clustered by amplitude and duration ranges and the AE energies differed greatly between juvenile and mature wood at identical relative water losses. • Vulnerability curves could be constructed by relating the cumulated amount of relative AE energy to the relative loss of water and to xylem tension. AE testing in combination with feature extraction offers a readily automated and easy to use alternative to the hydraulic method. PMID:16771986

  15. Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    ... search IRSA's site Unique Hits since January 2003 Acoustic Neuroma Click Here for Acoustic Neuroma Practice Guideline ... to microsurgery. One doctor's story of having an acoustic neuroma In August 1991, Dr. Thomas F. Morgan ...

  16. The Student Log: A Tool for Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bouton, Reine Dugas

    2003-01-01

    Students, especially first-year students, often have not developed the organizational skills necessary to keep track of all of their papers, exams, and grades in the same way that instructors, through their gradebooks, can immediately recite any information about a student's performance in the course. About five years ago, the author created a…

  17. Unconventional neutron sources for oil well logging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frankle, C. M.; Dale, G. E.

    2013-09-01

    Americium-Beryllium (AmBe) radiological neutron sources have been widely used in the petroleum industry for well logging purposes. There is strong desire on the part of various governmental and regulatory bodies to find alternate sources due to the high activity and small size of AmBe sources. Other neutron sources are available, both radiological (252Cf) and electronic accelerator driven (D-D and D-T). All of these, however, have substantially different neutron energy spectra from AmBe and thus cause significantly different responses in well logging tools. We report on simulations performed using unconventional sources and techniques to attempt to better replicate the porosity and carbon/oxygen ratio responses a well logging tool would see from AmBe neutrons. The AmBe response of these two types of tools is compared to the response from 252Cf, D-D, D-T, filtered D-T, and T-T sources.

  18. Acoustic Emission and Velocity Measurements using a Modular Borehole Prototype Tool to Provide Real Time Rock Mass Characterization.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, D. S.; Pettitt, W. S.; Young, R. P.

    2003-04-01

    Permanent changes to rock mass properties can occur due to the application of excavation or thermal induced stresses. This project involves the design of hardware and software for the long term monitoring of a rock volume, and the real time analysis and interpretation of induced microcracks and their properties. A set of borehole sondes have been designed with each sonde containing up to 6 sensor modules. Each piezoelectric sensor is dual mode allowing it to either transmit an ultrasonic pulse through a rock mass, or receive ultrasonic waveform data. Good coupling of the sensors with the borehole wall is achieved through a motorized clamping mechanism. The borehole sondes are connected to a surface interface box and digital acquisition system and controlled by a laptop computer. The system allows acoustic emission (AE) data to be recorded at all times using programmable trigger logic. The AE data is processed in real time for 3D source location and magnitude, with further analysis such as mechanism type available offline. Additionally the system allows velocity surveys to be automatically performed at pre-defined times. A modelling component of the project, using a 3D dynamic finite difference code, is investigating the effect that different microcrack distributions have on velocity waveform data in terms of time and frequency amplitude. The modelling codes will be validated using data recorded from laboratory tests on rocks with known crack fabrics, and then used in insitu experimental tests. This modelling information will be used to help interpret, in real time, microcrack characteristics such as crack density, size, and fluid content. The technology has applications in a number of branches of geotechnical and civil engineering including radioactive waste storage, mining, dams, bridges, and oil reservoir monitoring.

  19. EE-3A Logging Report

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, David W.

    1993-12-15

    Two logs of EE-3A were performed during the last couple of weeks. The first of which, was a Temperature/Casing-Collar Locator (CCL) log, which took place on Friday, December 10th., 1993. The second log was a Caliper log which was done in cooperation with the Dia-Log Company, of Odessa, TX. on Monday, December, 13th., 1993.

  20. 6. Log calving barn. Interior view showing log postandbeam support ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Log calving barn. Interior view showing log post-and-beam support system and animal stalls. - William & Lucina Bowe Ranch, Log Calving Barn, 230 feet south-southwest of House, Melrose, Silver Bow County, MT

  1. Acoustic visualizations using surface mapping.

    PubMed

    Siltanen, Samuel; Robinson, Philip W; Saarelma, Jukka; Pätynen, Jukka; Tervo, Sakari; Savioja, Lauri; Lokki, Tapio

    2014-06-01

    Sound visualizations have been an integral part of room acoustics studies for more than a century. As acoustic measurement techniques and knowledge of hearing evolve, acousticians need more intuitive ways to represent increasingly complex data. Microphone array processing now allows accurate measurement of spatio-temporal acoustic properties. However, the multidimensional data can be a challenge to display coherently. This letter details a method of mapping visual representations of acoustic reflections from a receiver position to the surfaces from which the reflections originated. The resulting animations are presented as a spatial acoustic analysis tool.

  2. A comparison of new ultrasonic cement and casing evaluation logs with standard cement bond logs

    SciTech Connect

    Sheives, T.C.; Tello, L.N.; Maki, V.E. Jr.; Standley, T.E.; Blankinship, T.J.

    1986-01-01

    New ultrasonic inspection techniques have been implemented to evaluate cement bond and casing conditions. These techniques, relying on state of the art downhole, high-speed waveform digitization, can successfully determine cement voids and channels and also provide accurate bond information in the presence of a microannulus. The downhole microprocessor controlled electronics transmits the digitized waveforms to the surface for computations and display. The downhole waveforms are then viewed by the operator in real time to insure proper log quality. Numerous log examples showing comparisons with the standard Cement Bond Log (CBL) demonstrate that the accuracy and resolution of the new approach provide much more information. Casing conditions are determined using both acoustic caliper measurements and a new casing thickness measurement technique. The acoustic caliper measurement not only determines accurately the casing inside diameter, but also detects the pipe gap at casing collars. The new measurement determines actual casing thickness variations due to internal or external pipe wear or corrosion. Experimental results along with log examples show the effectiveness and accuracy of measuring the actual casing thickness at the well site in real time.

  3. Acoustic telemetry.

    SciTech Connect

    Drumheller, Douglas Schaeffer; Kuszmaul, Scott S.

    2003-08-01

    Broadcasting messages through the earth is a daunting task. Indeed, broadcasting a normal telephone conversion through the earth by wireless means is impossible with todays technology. Most of us don't care, but some do. Industries that drill into the earth need wireless communication to broadcast navigation parameters. This allows them to steer their drill bits. They also need information about the natural formation that they are drilling. Measurements of parameters such as pressure, temperature, and gamma radiation levels can tell them if they have found a valuable resource such as a geothermal reservoir or a stratum bearing natural gas. Wireless communication methods are available to the drilling industry. Information is broadcast via either pressure waves in the drilling fluid or electromagnetic waves in the earth and well tubing. Data transmission can only travel one way at rates around a few baud. Given that normal Internet telephone modems operate near 20,000 baud, these data rates are truly very slow. Moreover, communication is often interrupted or permanently blocked by drilling conditions or natural formation properties. Here we describe a tool that communicates with stress waves traveling through the steel drill pipe and production tubing in the well. It's based on an old idea called Acoustic Telemetry. But what we present here is more than an idea. This tool exists, it's drilled several wells, and it works. Currently, it's the first and only acoustic telemetry tool that can withstand the drilling environment. It broadcasts one way over a limited range at much faster rates than existing methods, but we also know how build a system that can communicate both up and down wells of indefinite length.

  4. NMR logging apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Walsh, David O; Turner, Peter

    2014-05-27

    Technologies including NMR logging apparatus and methods are disclosed. Example NMR logging apparatus may include surface instrumentation and one or more downhole probes configured to fit within an earth borehole. The surface instrumentation may comprise a power amplifier, which may be coupled to the downhole probes via one or more transmission lines, and a controller configured to cause the power amplifier to generate a NMR activating pulse or sequence of pulses. Impedance matching means may be configured to match an output impedance of the power amplifier through a transmission line to a load impedance of a downhole probe. Methods may include deploying the various elements of disclosed NMR logging apparatus and using the apparatus to perform NMR measurements.

  5. 4. Log chicken house (far left foreground), log bunkhouse (far ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Log chicken house (far left foreground), log bunkhouse (far left background), one-room log cabin (left of center background), log root cellar (center), post-and-beam center in foreground, and blacksmith shop (far right foreground). View to southeast. - William & Lucina Bowe Ranch, County Road 44, 0.1 mile northeast of Big Hole River Bridge, Melrose, Silver Bow County, MT

  6. Geophysical well logging operations and log analysis in Geothermal Well Desert Peak No. B-23-1

    SciTech Connect

    Sethi, D.K.; Fertl, W.H.

    1980-03-01

    Geothermal Well Desert Peak No. B-23-1 was logged by Dresser Atlas during April/May 1979 to a total depth of 2939 m (9642 ft). A temperature of 209/sup 0/C (408/sup 0/F) was observed on the maximum thermometer run with one of the logging tools. Borehole tools rated to a maximum temperature of 204.4/sup 0/C (400/sup 0/F) were utilized for logging except for the Densilog tool, which was from the other set of borehole instruments, rated to a still higher temperature, i.e., 260/sup 0/C (500/sup 0/F). The quality of the logs recorded and the environmental effects on the log response have been considered. The log response in the unusual lithologies of igneous and metamorphic formations encountered in this well could be correlated with the drill cutting data. An empirical, statistical log interpretation approach has made it possible to obtain meaningful information on the rocks penetrated. Various crossplots/histograms of the corrected log data have been generated on the computer. These are found to provide good resolution between the lithological units in the rock sequence. The crossplotting techniques and the statistical approach were combined with the drill cutting descriptions in order to arrive at the lithological characteristics. The results of log analysis and recommendations for logging of future wells have been included.

  7. Spacecraft Internal Acoustic Environment Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, S. Reynold; Allen, Chris

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the project is to develop an acoustic modeling capability, based on commercial off-the-shelf software, to be used as a tool for oversight of the future manned Constellation vehicles. The use of such a model will help ensure compliance with acoustic requirements. Also, this project includes modeling validation and development feedback via building physical mockups and conducting acoustic measurements to compare with the predictions.

  8. Logs Perl Module

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, R. K.

    2007-04-04

    A perl module designed to read and parse the voluminous set of event or accounting log files produced by a Portable Batch System (PBS) server. This module can filter on date-time and/or record type. The data can be returned in a variety of formats.

  9. Log of Apollo 11.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.

    The major events of the first manned moon landing mission, Apollo 11, are presented in chronological order from launch time until arrival of the astronauts aboard the U.S.S. Hornet. The log is descriptive, non-technical, and includes numerous color photographs of the astronauts on the moon. (PR)

  10. Alaska's Logging Camp School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millward, Robert E.

    1999-01-01

    A visit to Ketchikan, Alaska, reveals a floating, one-teacher logging-camp school that uses multiage grouping and interdisciplinary teaching. There are 10 students. The school gym and playground, bunkhouse, fuel tanks, mess hall, and students' homes bob up and down and are often moved to other sites. (MLH)

  11. Logging on to Learn

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    A classroom lecture at Capistrano Connections Academy in Southern California involves booting up the home computer, logging on to a Web site, and observing a teacher conducting a PowerPoint presentation of that day's lesson entirely online. Through microphone headsets, students can watch on their home computers, respond to the teacher's questions,…

  12. Interactive Reflective Logs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deaton, Cynthia Minchew; Deaton, Benjamin E.; Leland, Katina

    2010-01-01

    The authors created an interactive reflective log (IRL) to provide teachers with an opportunity to use a journal approach to record, evaluate, and communicate student understanding of science concepts. Unlike a traditional journal, the IRL incorporates prompts to encourage students to discuss their understanding of science content and science…

  13. Geophysical borehole logging in the unsaturated zone, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schimschal, Ulrich; Nelson, Philip H.; ,

    1991-01-01

    Borehole geophysical logging for site characterization in the volcanic rocks at the proposed nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, requires data collection under rather unusual conditions. Logging tools must operate in rugose, dry holes above the water table in the unsaturated zone. Not all logging tools will operate in this environment, therefore; careful consideration must be given to selection and calibration. A sample suite of logs is presented that demonstrates correlation of geological formations from borehole to borehole, the definition of zones of altered mineralogy, and the quantitative estimates of rock properties. We show the results of an exploratory calculation of porosity and water saturation based upon density and epithermal neutron logs. Comparison of the results with a few core samples is encouraging, particularly because the logs can provide continuous data in boreholes where core samples are not available.

  14. Computer analysis of digital well logs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scott, James H.

    1984-01-01

    A comprehensive system of computer programs has been developed by the U.S. Geological Survey for analyzing digital well logs. The programs are operational on a minicomputer in a research well-logging truck, making it possible to analyze and replot the logs while at the field site. The minicomputer also serves as a controller of digitizers, counters, and recorders during acquisition of well logs. The analytical programs are coordinated with the data acquisition programs in a flexible system that allows the operator to make changes quickly and easily in program variables such as calibration coefficients, measurement units, and plotting scales. The programs are designed to analyze the following well-logging measurements: natural gamma-ray, neutron-neutron, dual-detector density with caliper, magnetic susceptibility, single-point resistance, self potential, resistivity (normal and Wenner configurations), induced polarization, temperature, sonic delta-t, and sonic amplitude. The computer programs are designed to make basic corrections for depth displacements, tool response characteristics, hole diameter, and borehole fluid effects (when applicable). Corrected well-log measurements are output to magnetic tape or plotter with measurement units transformed to petrophysical and chemical units of interest, such as grade of uranium mineralization in percent eU3O8, neutron porosity index in percent, and sonic velocity in kilometers per second.

  15. Petrographic image logging system

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, C.J.; Ulrich, M.R.; Maxwell, G.B. ); Adams, J.P. )

    1991-03-01

    The Petrographic Image Logging System (PILS) is a logging system data base for Macintosh computers that allows the merging of traditional wire-line, core, and mud log data with petrographic images. The system is flexible; it allows the user to record, manipulate, and display almost any type of character, graphic, and image information. Character and graphic data are linked and entry in either mode automatically generates the alternate mode. Character/graphic data may include such items as ROP, wire-line log data, interpreted lithologies, ditch cutting lith-percentages, porosity grade and type, grain size, core/DST information, and sample descriptions. Image data may include petrographic and SEM images of cuttings, core, and thin sections. All data are tied to depth. Data are entered quickly and easily in an interactive manner with a mouse, keyboard, and digitizing tablet or may be imported and immediately autoplotted from a variety of environments via modem, network, or removable disk. Color log displays, including petrographic images, are easily available on CRT or as hardcopy. The system consists of a petrographic microscope, video camera, Macintosh computer, video framegrabber and digitizing tablet. Hardcopy is scaleable and can be generated by a variety of color printing devices. The software is written in Supertalk, a color superset of the standard Apple Hypercard programming language, hypertalk. This system is being tested by Mobil in the lab and at the well site. Implementation has provided near 'real-time' core and cuttings images from drilling wells to the geologist back at the office.

  16. Log-Concavity and Strong Log-Concavity: a review

    PubMed Central

    Saumard, Adrien; Wellner, Jon A.

    2016-01-01

    We review and formulate results concerning log-concavity and strong-log-concavity in both discrete and continuous settings. We show how preservation of log-concavity and strongly log-concavity on ℝ under convolution follows from a fundamental monotonicity result of Efron (1969). We provide a new proof of Efron's theorem using the recent asymmetric Brascamp-Lieb inequality due to Otto and Menz (2013). Along the way we review connections between log-concavity and other areas of mathematics and statistics, including concentration of measure, log-Sobolev inequalities, convex geometry, MCMC algorithms, Laplace approximations, and machine learning. PMID:27134693

  17. Log-Concavity and Strong Log-Concavity: a review.

    PubMed

    Saumard, Adrien; Wellner, Jon A

    We review and formulate results concerning log-concavity and strong-log-concavity in both discrete and continuous settings. We show how preservation of log-concavity and strongly log-concavity on ℝ under convolution follows from a fundamental monotonicity result of Efron (1969). We provide a new proof of Efron's theorem using the recent asymmetric Brascamp-Lieb inequality due to Otto and Menz (2013). Along the way we review connections between log-concavity and other areas of mathematics and statistics, including concentration of measure, log-Sobolev inequalities, convex geometry, MCMC algorithms, Laplace approximations, and machine learning.

  18. Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    An acoustic neuroma is a benign tumor that develops on the nerve that connects the ear to the brain. ... can press against the brain, becoming life-threatening. Acoustic neuroma can be difficult to diagnose, because the ...

  19. Logged In and Zoned Out.

    PubMed

    Ravizza, Susan M; Uitvlugt, Mitchell G; Fenn, Kimberly M

    2017-02-01

    Laptop computers are widely prevalent in university classrooms. Although laptops are a valuable tool, they offer access to a distracting temptation: the Internet. In the study reported here, we assessed the relationship between classroom performance and actual Internet usage for academic and nonacademic purposes. Students who were enrolled in an introductory psychology course logged into a proxy server that monitored their online activity during class. Past research relied on self-report, but the current methodology objectively measured time, frequency, and browsing history of participants' Internet usage. In addition, we assessed whether intelligence, motivation, and interest in course material could account for the relationship between Internet use and performance. Our results showed that nonacademic Internet use was common among students who brought laptops to class and was inversely related to class performance. This relationship was upheld after we accounted for motivation, interest, and intelligence. Class-related Internet use was not associated with a benefit to classroom performance.

  20. Acoustic Seaglider

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-07

    a national naval responsibility. Acoustic sensors on mobile, autonomous platforms will enable basic research topics on temporal and spatial...problem and acoustic navigation and communications within the context of distributed autonomous persistent undersea surveillance sensor networks...Acoustic sensors on mobile, autonomous platforms will enable basic research topics on temporal and spatial coherence and the description of ambient

  1. Acoustic seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention relates to a sealing device having an acoustic resonator. The acoustic resonator is adapted to create acoustic waveforms to generate a sealing pressure barrier blocking fluid flow from a high pressure area to a lower pressure area. The sealing device permits noncontacting sealing operation. The sealing device may include a resonant-macrosonic-synthesis (RMS) resonator.

  2. Acoustic Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention relates to a sealing device having an acoustic resonator. The acoustic resonator is adapted to create acoustic waveforms to generate a sealing pressure barrier blocking fluid flow from a high pressure area to a lower pressure area. The sealing device permits noncontacting sealing operation. The sealing device may include a resonant-macrosonic-synthesis (RMS) resonator.

  3. Spreadsheet log analysis in subsurface geology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doveton, J.H.

    2000-01-01

    Most of the direct knowledge of the geology of the subsurface is gained from the examination of core and drill-cuttings recovered from boreholes drilled by the petroleum and water industries. Wireline logs run in these same boreholes generally have been restricted to tasks of lithostratigraphic correlation and thee location of hydrocarbon pay zones. However, the range of petrophysical measurements has expanded markedly in recent years, so that log traces now can be transformed to estimates of rock composition. Increasingly, logs are available in a digital format that can be read easily by a desktop computer and processed by simple spreadsheet software methods. Taken together, these developments offer accessible tools for new insights into subsurface geology that complement the traditional, but limited, sources of core and cutting observations.

  4. 2. Onroom log cabin (right), log root cellar (center), tworoom ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. On-room log cabin (right), log root cellar (center), two-room log cabin (left), and post-and-beam garage (background). View to southwest. - William & Lucina Bowe Ranch, County Road 44, 0.1 mile northeast of Big Hole River Bridge, Melrose, Silver Bow County, MT

  5. 12. Upstream view showing thelower log pond log chute in ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Upstream view showing thelower log pond log chute in the main channel of the Hudson River. The log chute in the dam can be seen in the background. Facing southwest. - Glens Falls Dam, 100' to 450' West of U.S. Route 9 Bridge Spanning Hudson River, Glens Falls, Warren County, NY

  6. Improved production log interpretation in horizontal wells using pulsed neutron logs

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, J.L.; Kohring, J.J.; North, R.J.

    1996-12-31

    Production log flow profiles provide a valuable tool to evaluate well and reservoir performance. Horizontal wellbores and their associated completion designs present several challenges to profile interpretation for conventional production logging sensors and techniques. A unique approach combining pulsed neutron capture (PNC) log data with conventional production logging measurements is providing improved flow profile answers in slotted liner, horizontal well completions on the North Slope of Alaska. Identifying and eliminating undesirable gas production is one of the chief goals of production logging on the North Slope. This process becomes difficult in horizontal wellbores as fluid segregation affects the area investigated by the various logging sensors and also the velocities of the individual phases. Typical slotted liner completions further complicate analysis as fluids are able to flow in the liner/openhole annulus. Analysis of PNC log data provides two good qualitative indicators of formation permeability. The first technique is derived from the difference of the formation sigma response before and after injecting a high-capture cross-section borax solution. The second technique uses the difference of the formation sigma response and the formation porosity measured while injecting the formation with crude or seawater. Further analysis of PNC log runs show that the two techniques closely correlate with production flow profiles under solution gas-oil ratio (GOR) conditions. These two techniques in combination with conventional production logging measurements of temperature, capacitance, pressure, and spinner improve flow profile results. PNC results can be combined with temperature and pressure data in the absence of valid spinner data to provide an approximate flow profile. These techniques have been used to successfully determine profiles in both cemented and slotted liner completions with GORs in excess of 15,000 scf/bbl.

  7. Grid Logging: Best Practices Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Tierney, Brian L; Tierney, Brian L; Gunter, Dan

    2008-04-01

    The purpose of this document is to help developers of Grid middleware and application software generate log files that will be useful to Grid administrators, users, developers and Grid middleware itself. Currently, most of the currently generated log files are only useful to the author of the program. Good logging practices are instrumental to performance analysis, problem diagnosis, and security auditing tasks such as incident tracing and damage assessment. This document does not discuss the issue of a logging API. It is assumed that a standard log API such as syslog (C), log4j (Java), or logger (Python) is being used. Other custom logging API or even printf could be used. The key point is that the logs must contain the required information in the required format. At a high level of abstraction, the best practices for Grid logging are: (1) Consistently structured, typed, log events; (2) A standard high-resolution timestamp; (3) Use of logging levels and categories to separate logs by detail and purpose; (4) Consistent use of global and local identifiers; and (5) Use of some regular, newline-delimited ASCII text format. The rest of this document describes each of these recommendations in detail.

  8. My Journey with Learning Logs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurst, Beth

    2005-01-01

    Learning logs, or reading response logs, have long been established as an effective reading strategy that helps students learn from text (Atwell, 1987; Blough & Berman, 1991; Calkins, 1986; Commander & Smith, 1996; Kuhrt & Farris, 1990; Reed, 1988; Sanders, 1985). In this paper, the author describes her experiences using learning logs as a…

  9. Using Web Logs in the Science Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duplichan, Staycle C.

    2009-01-01

    As educators we must ask ourselves if we are meeting the needs of today's students. The science world is adapting to our ever-changing society; are the methodology and philosophy of our educational system keeping up? In this article, you'll learn why web logs (also called blogs) are an important Web 2.0 tool in your science classroom and how they…

  10. Recent developments in the use of acoustic sensors and signal processing tools to target early infestations of Red Palm Weevil in agricultural environments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Much of the damage caused by red palm weevil larvae to date palms, ornamental palms, and palm offshoots could be mitigated by early detection and treatment of infestations. Acoustic technology has potential to enable early detection, but the short, high-frequency sound impulses produced by red palm ...

  11. Recent developments in the use of acoustic sensors and signal processing tools to target early infestations of red palm weevil (Coleopter: Curculionidae) in agricultural environments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Much of the damage caused by red palm weevil larvae to date palms, ornamental palms, and palm offshoots could be mitigated by early detection and treatment of infestations. Acoustic technology has potential to enable early detection, but the short, high-frequency sound impulses produced by red palm ...

  12. The Development of Automated Detection Techniques for Passive Acoustic Monitoring as a Tool for Studying Beaked Whale Distribution and Habitat Preferences in the California Current Ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yack, Tina M.

    The objectives of this research were to test available automated detection methods for passive acoustic monitoring and integrate the best available method into standard marine mammal monitoring protocols for ship based surveys. The goal of the first chapter was to evaluate the performance and utility of PAMGUARD 1.0 Core software for use in automated detection of marine mammal acoustic signals during towed array surveys. Three different detector configurations of PAMGUARD were compared. These automated detection algorithms were evaluated by comparing them to the results of manual detections made by an experienced bio-acoustician (author TMY). This study provides the first detailed comparisons of PAMGUARD automated detection algorithms to manual detection methods. The results of these comparisons clearly illustrate the utility of automated detection methods for odontocete species. Results of this work showed that the majority of whistles and click events can be reliably detected using PAMGUARD software. The second chapter moves beyond automated detection to examine and test automated classification algorithms for beaked whale species. Beaked whales are notoriously elusive and difficult to study, especially using visual survey methods. The purpose of the second chapter was to test, validate, and compare algorithms for detection of beaked whales in acoustic line-transect survey data. Using data collected at sea from the PAMGUARD classifier developed in Chapter 2 it was possible to measure the clicks from visually verified Baird's beaked whale encounters and use this data to develop classifiers that could discriminate Baird's beaked whales from other beaked whale species in future work. Echolocation clicks from Baird's beaked whales, Berardius bairdii, were recorded during combined visual and acoustic shipboard surveys of cetacean populations in the California Current Ecosystem (CCE) and with autonomous, long-term recorders at four different sites in the Southern

  13. Fractured-aquifer hydrogeology from geophysical logs; the passaic formation, New Jersey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morin, R.H.; Carleton, G.B.; Poirier, S.

    1997-01-01

    The Passaic Formation consists of gradational sequences of mudstone, siltstone, and sandstone, and is a principal aquifer in central New Jersey. Ground-water flow is primarily controlled by fractures interspersed throughout these sedimentary rocks and characterizing these fractures in terms of type, orientation, spatial distribution, frequency, and transmissivity is fundamental towards understanding local fluid-transport processes. To obtain this information, a comprehensive suite of geophysical logs was collected in 10 wells roughly 46 m in depth and located within a .05 km2 area in Hopewell Township, New Jersey. A seemingly complex, heterogeneous network of fractures identified with an acoustic televiewer was statistically reduced to two principal subsets corresponding to two distinct fracture types: (1) bedding-plane partings and (2) high-angle fractures. Bedding-plane partings are the most numerous and have an average strike of N84??W and dip of 20??N. The high-angle fractures are oriented subparallel to these features, with an average strike of N79??E and dip of 71??S, making the two fracture types roughly orthogonal. Their intersections form linear features that also retain this approximately east-west strike. Inspection of fluid temperature and conductance logs in conjunction with flowmeter measurements obtained during pumping allows the transmissive fractures to be distinguished from the general fracture population. These results show that, within the resolution capabilities of the logging tools, approximately 51 (or 18 percent) of the 280 total fractures are water producing. The bedding-plane partings exhibit transmissivities that average roughly 5 m2/day and that generally diminish in magnitude and frequency with depth. The high-angle fractures have average transmissivities that are about half those of the bedding-plane partings and show no apparent dependence upon depth. The geophysical logging results allow us to infer a distinct hydrogeologic structure

  14. Musical Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gough, Colin

    This chapter provides an introduction to the physical and psycho-acoustic principles underlying the production and perception of the sounds of musical instruments. The first section introduces generic aspects of musical acoustics and the perception of musical sounds, followed by separate sections on string, wind and percussion instruments.

  15. Seismic velocity deviation log: An effective method for evaluating spatial distribution of reservoir pore types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirmohamadi, Mohamad; Kadkhodaie, Ali; Rahimpour-Bonab, Hossain; Faraji, Mohammad Ali

    2017-04-01

    Velocity deviation log (VDL) is a synthetic log used to determine pore types in reservoir rocks based on a combination of the sonic log with neutron-density logs. The current study proposes a two step approach to create a map of porosity and pore types by integrating the results of petrographic studies, well logs and seismic data. In the first step, velocity deviation log was created from the combination of the sonic log with the neutron-density log. The results allowed identifying negative, zero and positive deviations based on the created synthetic velocity log. Negative velocity deviations (below - 500 m/s) indicate connected or interconnected pores and fractures, while positive deviations (above + 500 m/s) are related to isolated pores. Zero deviations in the range of [- 500 m/s, + 500 m/s] are in good agreement with intercrystalline and microporosities. The results of petrographic studies were used to validate the main pore type derived from velocity deviation log. In the next step, velocity deviation log was estimated from seismic data by using a probabilistic neural network model. For this purpose, the inverted acoustic impedance along with the amplitude based seismic attributes were formulated to VDL. The methodology is illustrated by performing a case study from the Hendijan oilfield, northwestern Persian Gulf. The results of this study show that integration of petrographic, well logs and seismic attributes is an instrumental way for understanding the spatial distribution of main reservoir pore types.

  16. Primary detection of hardwood log defects using laser surface scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Edward; Thomas, Liya; Mili, Lamine; Ehrich, Roger W.; Abbott, A. Lynn; Shaffer, Clifford

    2003-05-01

    The use of laser technology to scan hardwood log surfaces for defects holds great promise for improving processing efficiency and the value and volume of lumber produced. External and internal defect detection to optimize hardwood log and lumber processing is one of the top four technological needs in the nation"s hardwood industry. The location, type, and severity of defects on hardwood logs are the key indicators of log quality and value. These visual cues provide information about internal log characteristics and products for which the log is suitable. We scanned 162 logs with a high-resolution industrial four-head laser surface scanner. The resulting data sets contain hundreds of thousands of three-dimensional coordinate points. The size of the data and noise presented special problems during processing. Robust regression models were used to fit geometric shapes to the data. The estimated orthogonal distances between the fitted model and the log surface are converted to a two-dimensional image to facilitate defect detection. Using robust regression methods and standard image processing tools we have demonstrated that severe surface defects on hardwood logs can be detected using height and contour analyses of three-dimensional laser scan data.

  17. Predicting reservoir wettability via well logs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Cheng; Fu, Jinhua; Shi, Yujiang; Li, Gaoren; Mao, Zhiqiang

    2016-06-01

    Wettability is an important factor in controlling the distribution of oil and water. However, its evaluation has so far been a difficult problem because no log data can directly indicate it. In this paper, a new method is proposed for quantitatively predicting reservoir wettability via well log analysis. Specifically, based on the J function, diagenetic facies classification and the piecewise power functions, capillary pressure curves are constructed from conventional logs and a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) log respectively. Under the influence of wettability, the latter is distorted while the former remains unaffected. Therefore, the ratio of the median radius obtained from the two kinds of capillary pressure curve is calculated to reflect wettability, a quantitative relationship between the ratio and reservoir wettability is then established. According to the low-permeability core sample capillary pressure curve, NMR {{T}2} spectrum and contact angle experimental data from the bottom of the Upper Triassic reservoirs in western Ordos Basin, China, two kinds of constructing capillary pressure curve models and a predictive wettability model are calibrated. The wettability model is verified through the Amott wettability index and saturation exponent from resistivity measurement and their determined wettability levels are comparable, indicating that the proposed model is quite reliable. In addition, the model’s good application effect is exhibited in the field study. Thus, the quantitatively predicting reservoir wettability model proposed in this paper provides an effective tool for formation evaluation, field development and the improvement of oil recovery.

  18. An acousto-electric effect logging detector in boreholes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Junqiang; Ju, Xiaodong; Men, Baiyong; Zhao, Honglin; Qiao, Wenxiao; Duan, Wenxing

    2017-03-01

    An acousto-electric effect logging detector in boreholes is introduced. The detector can measure the first and second type of acousto-electric effect in the downhole. The acoustic transducer of the detector is composed of a transmitting transducer T and a receiving transducer array R1, R2, and R3, and the electrode is composed of power supply electrodes A and B, and measuring electrodes E1, E2, E3, and E4. The minimum spacing between the transmitter transducer T and the receiving transducer R1 is 2500 mm, and the spacing between the receiving transducer is 300 mm. The spacing of the power supply electrode is 1500 mm, and the spacing of the measuring electrode is 300 mm. The detector circuits include the acoustic transducer excitation circuit, power supply electrode excitation circuit, acoustic signal-processing and acquisition circuit, electrical signal-processing and acquisition circuit, system main control circuit, and telemetry interface circuit. Laboratory and field tests were conducted. The sound pressure of the acoustic transmitting transducer at 1 m is up to 70 kPa. The typical acousto-electric logging signal has been observed from the field test in the downhole formation.

  19. Logging with coiled tubing less effective than with drill pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Van Den Bosch, R. )

    1994-01-31

    Coiled tubing offered neither economic nor operational advantages over drill pipe for conveying logging tools in open hole shallow horizontal wells in Germany. In the past 2 years, Mobil Erdgas-Erdoel GMbH (MEEG) participated in completing eight shallow horizontal wells. These were medium-to-short radius wells at measured depths of between 850 and 2,000 m. The average horizontal section was 350 m. The logging tools were conveyed by coiled tubing or drill pipe. MEEG attempted to log five wells with coiled tubing-conveyed tools, four with 1 1/2-in. tubing. Total depth was reached reliably in only one well, the shallowest and with the shortest horizontal section. Simulation programs were unreliable for calculating the downhole forces of the coil/tool combination or predicting possible helical lockups. In wells with drill pipe-conveyed logs, the tool combination could always be pushed to total depth, and the operations were generally faster and cost less than logging with coiled tubing. Also, drill pipe allowed longer and heavier tool strings. For reliable operations, coiled tubing needs to be more rigid, rig-up/rig-down times need to be improved, and the simulation programs must be more reliable for predicting downhole lock-up.

  20. Interpretation of well logs in a carbonate aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    MacCary, L.M.

    1978-01-01

    This report describes the log analysis of the Randolph and Sabial core holes in the Edwards aquifer in Texas, with particular attention to the principles that can be applied generally to any carbonate system. The geologic and hydrologic data were obtained during the drilling of the two holes, from extensive laboratory analysis of the cores, and from numerous geophysical logs run in the two holes. Some logging methods are inherently superiors to others for the analysis of limestone and dolomite aquifers. Three such systems are the dentistry, neutron, and acoustic-velocity (sonic) logs. Most of the log analysis described here is based on the interpretation of suites of logs from these three systems. In certain instances, deeply focused resistivity logs can be used to good advantage in carbonate rock studies; this technique is used to computer the water resistivity in the Randolph core hole. The rocks penetrated by the Randolph core hole are typical of those carbonates that have undergone very little solution by recent ground-water circulation. There are few large solutional openings; the water is saline; and the rocks are dark, dolomitic, have pore space that is interparticle or intercrystalline, and contain unoxidized organic material. The total porosity of rocks in the saline zone is higher than that of rocks in the fresh-water aquifer; however, the intrinsic permeability is much less in the saline zone because there are fewer large solutional openings. The Sabinal core hole penetrates a carbonate environment that has experienced much solution by ground water during recent geologic time. The rocks have high secondary porosities controlled by sedimentary structures within the rock; the water is fresh; and the dominant rock composition is limestone. The relative percentages of limestone and dolomite, the average matrix (grain) densities of the rock mixtures , and the porosity of the rock mass can be calculated from density, neutron, and acoustic logs. With supporting

  1. Oracle Log Buffer Queueing

    SciTech Connect

    Rivenes, A S

    2004-12-08

    The purpose of this document is to investigate Oracle database log buffer queuing and its affect on the ability to load data using a specialized data loading system. Experiments were carried out on a Linux system using an Oracle 9.2 database. Previous experiments on a Sun 4800 running Solaris had shown that 100,000 entities per minute was an achievable rate. The question was then asked, can we do this on Linux, and where are the bottlenecks? A secondary question was also lurking, how can the loading be further scaled to handle even higher throughput requirements? Testing was conducted using a Dell PowerEdge 6650 server with four CPUs and a Dell PowerVault 220s RAID array with 14 36GB drives and 128 MB of cache. Oracle Enterprise Edition 9.2.0.4 was used for the database and Red Hat Linux Advanced Server 2.1 was used for the operating system. This document will detail the maximum observed throughputs using the same test suite that was used for the Sun tests. A detailed description of the testing performed along with an analysis of bottlenecks encountered will be made. Issues related to Oracle and Linux will also be detailed and some recommendations based on the findings.

  2. 3. Log bunkhouse (far left), log chicken house (left of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Log bunkhouse (far left), log chicken house (left of center), equipment shed (center), and workshop (far right). View to northwest. - William & Lucina Bowe Ranch, County Road 44, 0.1 mile northeast of Big Hole River Bridge, Melrose, Silver Bow County, MT

  3. Logging Concessions Enable Illegal Logging Crisis in the Peruvian Amazon

    PubMed Central

    Finer, Matt; Jenkins, Clinton N.; Sky, Melissa A. Blue; Pine, Justin

    2014-01-01

    The Peruvian Amazon is an important arena in global efforts to promote sustainable logging in the tropics. Despite recent efforts to achieve sustainability, such as provisions in the US–Peru Trade Promotion Agreement, illegal logging continues to plague the region. We present evidence that Peru's legal logging concession system is enabling the widespread illegal logging via the regulatory documents designed to ensure sustainable logging. Analyzing official government data, we found that 68.3% of all concessions supervised by authorities were suspected of major violations. Of the 609 total concessions, nearly 30% have been cancelled for violations and we expect this percentage to increase as investigations continue. Moreover, the nature of the violations indicate that the permits associated with legal concessions are used to harvest trees in unauthorized areas, thus threatening all forested areas. Many of the violations pertain to the illegal extraction of CITES-listed timber species outside authorized areas. These findings highlight the need for additional reforms. PMID:24743552

  4. Logging Concessions Enable Illegal Logging Crisis in the Peruvian Amazon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finer, Matt; Jenkins, Clinton N.; Sky, Melissa A. Blue; Pine, Justin

    2014-04-01

    The Peruvian Amazon is an important arena in global efforts to promote sustainable logging in the tropics. Despite recent efforts to achieve sustainability, such as provisions in the US-Peru Trade Promotion Agreement, illegal logging continues to plague the region. We present evidence that Peru's legal logging concession system is enabling the widespread illegal logging via the regulatory documents designed to ensure sustainable logging. Analyzing official government data, we found that 68.3% of all concessions supervised by authorities were suspected of major violations. Of the 609 total concessions, nearly 30% have been cancelled for violations and we expect this percentage to increase as investigations continue. Moreover, the nature of the violations indicate that the permits associated with legal concessions are used to harvest trees in unauthorized areas, thus threatening all forested areas. Many of the violations pertain to the illegal extraction of CITES-listed timber species outside authorized areas. These findings highlight the need for additional reforms.

  5. A novel method for quantitative geosteering using azimuthal gamma-ray logging.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Chao; Zhou, Cancan; Zhang, Feng; Hu, Song; Li, Chaoliu

    2015-02-01

    A novel method for quantitative geosteering by using azimuthal gamma-ray logging is proposed. Real-time up and bottom gamma-ray logs when a logging tool travels through a boundary surface with different relative dip angles are simulated with the Monte Carlo method. Study results show that response points of up and bottom gamma-ray logs when the logging tool moves towards a highly radioactive formation can be used to predict the relative dip angle, and then the distance from the drilling bit to the boundary surface is calculated.

  6. Well Logging with Californium-252

    SciTech Connect

    Boulogne, A.R.

    2003-01-06

    Californium-252 is an intense neutron emitter that has only recently become available for experimental well logging. The purpose of this research is to investigate the application of well logging to groundwater hydrology; however, most of the techniques and purposes are quite similar to applications in the petroleum industry.

  7. Geophysical well log analysis of fractured granitic rocks at Atikokan, Ontario, Canada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paillet, Frederick L.; Hess, A.E.

    1987-01-01

    Two boreholes, drilled to approximate depths of 750 and 1,260 m in a granitic intrusion located near Atikokan, Ontario, were studied by obtaining a full suite of conventional borehole geophysical logs. In addition, selected intervals in these boreholes were logged with a borehole acoustic televiewer that produces a high-resolution image of the borehole wall, an acoustic waveform-logging system using 34-kiloHertz magnetostrictive and 5-kiloHertz sparker sources, and a highly sensitive heat-pulse flowmeter. Emphasis was on identifying and characterizing fracture zones that represent groundwater conduits in deeper portions of the granite, and on characterizing the properties of the largest intervals of unfractured granite. Major fracture zones were indicated by correlating geophysical log anomalies detected on the suite of conventional logs (unpublished data from Atomic Energy of Canada). However, several other anomalies, were identified as mafic intrusions of approximately the same thickness as major fracture zones. Geophysical log anomalies were compared for all major fracture zones that could serve as significant groundwater conduits, and fracture zone permeability is estimated on the basis of acoustic tube-wave attenuation in these intervals. Acoustic televiewer logs obtained at depths below 1,000 m in the deeper well indicate that most of the few fractures identified on core at these depths do not remain open enough under in situ conditions to produce detectable anomalies in acoustic refraction. Flowmeter data indicate that some groundwater circulation occurs in the upper portion of both boreholes. Water in the shallower of the two holes was observed to flow at 2.0 L/min; most of this flow entered the borehole at a depth < 25 m, and no flow occurred below a depth of 100 m. Downflow at rates < 0.5 L/min was determined to enter the deeper borehole within 20 m of the surface, and to exist at various fractures down to a depth of 250 m. (Author 's abstract)

  8. Room Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuttruff, Heinrich; Mommertz, Eckard

    The traditional task of room acoustics is to create or formulate conditions which ensure the best possible propagation of sound in a room from a sound source to a listener. Thus, objects of room acoustics are in particular assembly halls of all kinds, such as auditoria and lecture halls, conference rooms, theaters, concert halls or churches. Already at this point, it has to be pointed out that these conditions essentially depend on the question if speech or music should be transmitted; in the first case, the criterion for transmission quality is good speech intelligibility, in the other case, however, the success of room-acoustical efforts depends on other factors that cannot be quantified that easily, not least it also depends on the hearing habits of the listeners. In any case, absolutely "good acoustics" of a room do not exist.

  9. Real-Time System Log Monitoring/Analytics Framework

    SciTech Connect

    Oral, H Sarp; Dillow, David A; Park, Byung H; Shipman, Galen M; Geist, Al; Gunasekaran, Raghul

    2011-01-01

    Analyzing system logs provides useful insights for identifying system/application anomalies and helps in better usage of system resources. Nevertheless, it is simply not practical to scan through the raw log messages on a regular basis for large-scale systems. First, the sheer volume of unstructured log messages affects the readability, and secondly correlating the log messages to system events is a daunting task. These factors limit large-scale system logs primarily for generating alerts on known system events, and post-mortem diagnosis for identifying previously unknown system events that impacted the systems performance. In this paper, we describe a log monitoring framework that enables prompt analysis of system events in real-time. Our web-based framework provides a summarized view of console, netwatch, consumer, and apsched logs in real- time. The logs are parsed and processed to generate views of applications, message types, individual/group of compute nodes, and in sections of the compute platform. Also from past application runs we build a statistical profile of user/application characteristics with respect to known system events, recoverable/non-recoverable error messages and resources utilized. The web-based tool is being developed for Jaguar XT5 at the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing facility.

  10. Comparing GPS, Log, Survey, and Accelerometry to Measure Physical Activity

    PubMed Central

    James, Peter; Weissman, Jennifer; Wolf, Jean; Mumford, Karen; Contant, Cheryl K.; Hwang, Wei-Ting; Taylor, Lynne; Glanz, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Both self-report and objective measures have strengths and limitations for studying physical activity (PA) and travel. We explored how objectively measured global positioning system (GPS) and accelerometer data matches with travel logs and questionnaires in predicting trip duration and PA. Methods In a study of PA and travel among residents in Atlanta, GA conducted in 2008–2009, 99 participants wore GPS devices and accelerometers, and recorded all trips in a log for 5 consecutive days. Participants also completed a self-administered questionnaire on PA and travel behaviors. Results There was good agreement between GPS and log for assessment of trip duration, although log measures overestimated trip duration (concordance correlation coefficient 0.53 [0.47, 0.59]; Bland-Altman estimate 0.76 [0.16, 3.71] comparing GPS to log). Log measures underestimated light PA and overestimated moderate PA compared to accelerometry when greater than zero moderate PA was reported. Conclusions It is often not feasible to deploy accelerometry or GPS devices in population research because these devices are expensive and require technical expertise and data processing. Questionnaires and logs provide inexpensive tools to assess PA and travel with reasonable concordance with objective measures. However, they have shortcomings in evaluating the presence and amount of light and moderate PA. Future questionnaires and logs should be developed to evaluate sensitivity to light and moderate PA. PMID:26685821

  11. Shape optimization: Good looks and acoustics too!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Antonio, Peter; Cox, Trevor J.; Haas, Steve

    2003-04-01

    One of the challenges in the architectural acoustic design of museums and other public spaces is to develop contemporary scattering surfaces that complement contemporary architecture in the way that statuary, coffered ceilings, columns, and relief ornamentation complemented classic architecture. Often acoustic surfaces satisfy the acoustics, but may or may not satisfy the aesthetics. One approach that has been successful employs a combination of boundary element and multidimensional optimization techniques. The architect supplies the desired shape motif and the acoustician supplies the acoustical performance requirements. The optimization program then provides an Arcousthetic surface, which simultaneously satisfies the architecture, the acoustics, and the aesthetics. The program can be used with diffusive or diffsorptive surfaces. Photos of installations using these acoustic tools and a description of the design of the National Museum of the American Indian will also be presented to illustrate the usefulness of these devices and their impact on architectural acoustics.

  12. Did you smooth your well logs the right way for seismic interpretation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duchesne, Mathieu J.; Gaillot, Philippe

    2011-12-01

    Correlations between physical properties and seismic reflection data are useful to determine the geological nature of seismic reflections and the lateral extent of geological strata. The difference in resolution between well logs and seismic data is a major hurdle faced by seismic interpreters when tying both data sets. In general, log data have a resolution of at least two orders of magnitude greater than seismic data. Smoothing physical property logs improves correlation at the seismic scale. Three different approaches were used and compared to smooth a density log: binomial filtering, seismic wavelet filtering and discrete wavelet transform (DWT) filtering. Regression plots between the density logs and the acoustic impedance show that the data smoothed with the DWT is the only method that preserves the original relationship between the raw density data and the acoustic impedance. Smoothed logs were then used to generate synthetic seismograms that were tied to seismic data at the borehole site. Best ties were achieved using the synthetic seismogram computed with the density log processed with the DWT. The good performance of the DWT is explained by its adaptive multi-scale characteristic which preserved significant local changes of density on the high-resolution data series that were also pictured at the seismic scale. Since synthetic seismograms are generated using smoothed logs, the choice of the smoothing method impacts on the quality of seismic-to-well ties. This ultimately can have economical implications during hydrocarbon exploration or exploitation phases.

  13. Integrated analysis of well logs and seismic data to estimate gas hydrate concentrations at Keathley Canyon, Gulf of Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, M.W.; Collett, T.S.

    2008-01-01

    Accurately detecting and quantifying gas hydrate or free gas in sediments from seismic data require downhole well-log data to calibrate the physical properties of the gas hydrate-/free gas-bearing sediments. As part of the Gulf of Mexico Joint Industry Program, a series of wells were either cored or drilled in the Gulf of Mexico to characterize the physical properties of gas hydrate-bearing sediments, to calibrate geophysical estimates, and to evaluate source and transport mechanisms for gas within the gas hydrates. Downhole acoustic logs were used sparingly in this study because of degraded log quality due to adverse wellbore conditions. However, reliable logging while drilling (LWD) electrical resistivity and porosity logs were obtained. To tie the well-log information to the available 3-D seismic data in this area, a velocity log was calculated from the available resistivity log at the Keathley Canyon 151-2 well, because the acoustic log or vertical seismic data acquired at the nearby Keathley Canyon 151-3 well were either of poor quality or had limited depth coverage. Based on the gas hydrate saturations estimated from the LWD resistivity log, the modified Biot-Gassmann theory was used to generate synthetic acoustic log and a synthetic seismogram was generated with a fairly good agreement with a seismic profile crossing the well site. Based on the well-log information, a faintly defined bottom-simulating reflection (BSR) in this area is interpreted as a reflection representing gas hydrate-bearing sediments with about 15% saturation overlying partially gas-saturated sediments with 3% saturation. Gas hydrate saturations over 30-40% are estimated from the resistivity log in two distinct intervals at 220-230 and 264-300 m below the sea floor, but gas hydrate was not physically recovered in cores. It is speculated that the poor recovery of cores and gas hydrate morphology are responsible for the lack of physical gas hydrate recovery.

  14. New materials for fireplace logs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kieselback, D. J.; Smock, A. W.

    1971-01-01

    Fibrous insulation and refractory concrete are used for logs as well as fireproof walls, incinerator bricks, planters, and roof shingles. Insulation is lighter and more shock resistant than fireclay. Lightweight slag bonded with refractory concrete serves as aggregrate.

  15. Acoustic biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Fogel, Ronen; Seshia, Ashwin A.

    2016-01-01

    Resonant and acoustic wave devices have been researched for several decades for application in the gravimetric sensing of a variety of biological and chemical analytes. These devices operate by coupling the measurand (e.g. analyte adsorption) as a modulation in the physical properties of the acoustic wave (e.g. resonant frequency, acoustic velocity, dissipation) that can then be correlated with the amount of adsorbed analyte. These devices can also be miniaturized with advantages in terms of cost, size and scalability, as well as potential additional features including integration with microfluidics and electronics, scaled sensitivities associated with smaller dimensions and higher operational frequencies, the ability to multiplex detection across arrays of hundreds of devices embedded in a single chip, increased throughput and the ability to interrogate a wider range of modes including within the same device. Additionally, device fabrication is often compatible with semiconductor volume batch manufacturing techniques enabling cost scalability and a high degree of precision and reproducibility in the manufacturing process. Integration with microfluidics handling also enables suitable sample pre-processing/separation/purification/amplification steps that could improve selectivity and the overall signal-to-noise ratio. Three device types are reviewed here: (i) bulk acoustic wave sensors, (ii) surface acoustic wave sensors, and (iii) micro/nano-electromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS) sensors. PMID:27365040

  16. Acoustic biosensors.

    PubMed

    Fogel, Ronen; Limson, Janice; Seshia, Ashwin A

    2016-06-30

    Resonant and acoustic wave devices have been researched for several decades for application in the gravimetric sensing of a variety of biological and chemical analytes. These devices operate by coupling the measurand (e.g. analyte adsorption) as a modulation in the physical properties of the acoustic wave (e.g. resonant frequency, acoustic velocity, dissipation) that can then be correlated with the amount of adsorbed analyte. These devices can also be miniaturized with advantages in terms of cost, size and scalability, as well as potential additional features including integration with microfluidics and electronics, scaled sensitivities associated with smaller dimensions and higher operational frequencies, the ability to multiplex detection across arrays of hundreds of devices embedded in a single chip, increased throughput and the ability to interrogate a wider range of modes including within the same device. Additionally, device fabrication is often compatible with semiconductor volume batch manufacturing techniques enabling cost scalability and a high degree of precision and reproducibility in the manufacturing process. Integration with microfluidics handling also enables suitable sample pre-processing/separation/purification/amplification steps that could improve selectivity and the overall signal-to-noise ratio. Three device types are reviewed here: (i) bulk acoustic wave sensors, (ii) surface acoustic wave sensors, and (iii) micro/nano-electromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS) sensors.

  17. Using acoustic sensors to improve the efficiency of the forest value chain in Canada: a case study with laminated veneer lumber.

    PubMed

    Achim, Alexis; Paradis, Normand; Carter, Peter; Hernández, Roger E

    2011-01-01

    Engineered wood products for structural use must meet minimum strength and stiffness criteria. This represents a major challenge for the industry as the mechanical properties of the wood resource are inherently variable. We report on a case study that was conducted in a laminated veneer lumber (LVL) mill in order to test the potential of an acoustic sensor to predict structural properties of the wood resource prior to processing. A population of 266 recently harvested aspen logs were segregated into three sub-populations based on measurements of longitudinal acoustic speed in wood using a hand tool equipped with a resonance-based acoustic sensor. Each of the three sub-populations were peeled into veneer sheets and graded for stiffness with an ultrasonic device. The average ultrasonic propagation time (UPT) of each subpopulation was 418, 440 and 453 microseconds for the green, blue, and red populations, respectively. This resulted in contrasting proportions of structural veneer grades, indicating that the efficiency of the forest value chain could be improved using acoustic sensors. A linear regression analysis also showed that the dynamic modulus of elasticity (MOE) of LVL was strongly related to static MOE (R(2) = 0.83), which suggests that acoustic tools may be used for quality control during the production process.

  18. Using Acoustic Sensors to Improve the Efficiency of the Forest Value Chain in Canada: A Case Study with Laminated Veneer Lumber

    PubMed Central

    Achim, Alexis; Paradis, Normand; Carter, Peter; Hernández, Roger E.

    2011-01-01

    Engineered wood products for structural use must meet minimum strength and stiffness criteria. This represents a major challenge for the industry as the mechanical properties of the wood resource are inherently variable. We report on a case study that was conducted in a laminated veneer lumber (LVL) mill in order to test the potential of an acoustic sensor to predict structural properties of the wood resource prior to processing. A population of 266 recently harvested aspen logs were segregated into three sub-populations based on measurements of longitudinal acoustic speed in wood using a hand tool equipped with a resonance-based acoustic sensor. Each of the three sub-populations were peeled into veneer sheets and graded for stiffness with an ultrasonic device. The average ultrasonic propagation time (UPT) of each subpopulation was 418, 440 and 453 microseconds for the green, blue, and red populations, respectively. This resulted in contrasting proportions of structural veneer grades, indicating that the efficiency of the forest value chain could be improved using acoustic sensors. A linear regression analysis also showed that the dynamic modulus of elasticity (MOE) of LVL was strongly related to static MOE (R2 = 0.83), which suggests that acoustic tools may be used for quality control during the production process. PMID:22163922

  19. Oracle Management Tool Suite

    SciTech Connect

    Rivenes, Any

    2007-06-01

    The Oracle Management Tool Suite is used to automatically manage Oracle based systems. This includes startup and shutdown of databases and application servers as well as backup, space management, workload management and log file management.

  20. Tools to evaluate seafloor integrity: comparison of multi-device acoustic seafloor classifications for benthic macrofauna-driven patterns in the German Bight, southern North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holler, Peter; Markert, Edith; Bartholomä, Alexander; Capperucci, Ruggero; Hass, H. Christian; Kröncke, Ingrid; Mielck, Finn; Reimers, H. Christian

    2016-12-01

    To determine the spatial resolution of sediment properties and benthic macrofauna communities in acoustic backscatter, the suitability of four acoustic seafloor classification devices (single-beam echosounder with RoxAnn and QTC 5.5 seafloor classification system, sidescan sonar with QTC Swathview seafloor classification, and multi-beam echosounder with QTC Swathview seafloor classification) was compared in a study area of approx. 6 km2 northwest of the island of Helgoland in the German Bight, southern North Sea. This was based on a simple similarity index between simultaneous sidescan sonar, single-beam echosounder and multi-beam echosounder profiling spanning the period 2011-2014. The results show a high similarity between seafloor classifications based on sidescan sonar and RoxAnn single-beam systems, in turn associated with a lower similarity for the multi-beam echosounder system. Analyses of surface sediment samples at 39 locations along four transects (0.1 m2 Van Veen grab) revealed the presence of sandy mud (southern and western parts), coarse sand, gravel and cobbles. Rock outcrops were identified in the north-eastern and eastern parts. A typical Nucula nitidosa-Abra alba community was found in sandy muds to muddy sands in the northern part, whereas the southern part is characterised by widespread occurrence of the ophiuroid brittle star Amphiura filiformis. A transitional N. nitidosa-A. filiformis community was detected in the central part. Moreover, the southern part is characterised by a high abundance of A. filiformis and its commensal bivalve Kurtiella bidentata. The high number of A. filiformis feeding arms (up to ca. 6,800 per m2) can largely explain the gentle change of backscatter intensity along the tracks, because sediment composition and/or seafloor structures showed no significant variability.

  1. Using novel acoustic and visual mapping tools to predict the small-scale spatial distribution of live biogenic reef framework in cold-water coral habitats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Clippele, L. H.; Gafeira, J.; Robert, K.; Hennige, S.; Lavaleye, M. S.; Duineveld, G. C. A.; Huvenne, V. A. I.; Roberts, J. M.

    2017-03-01

    Cold-water corals form substantial biogenic habitats on continental shelves and in deep-sea areas with topographic highs, such as banks and seamounts. In the Atlantic, many reef and mound complexes are engineered by Lophelia pertusa, the dominant framework-forming coral. In this study, a variety of mapping approaches were used at a range of scales to map the distribution of both cold-water coral habitats and individual coral colonies at the Mingulay Reef Complex (west Scotland). The new ArcGIS-based British Geological Survey (BGS) seabed mapping toolbox semi-automatically delineated over 500 Lophelia reef `mini-mounds' from bathymetry data with 2-m resolution. The morphometric and acoustic characteristics of the mini-mounds were also automatically quantified and captured using this toolbox. Coral presence data were derived from high-definition remotely operated vehicle (ROV) records and high-resolution microbathymetry collected by a ROV-mounted multibeam echosounder. With a resolution of 0.35 × 0.35 m, the microbathymetry covers 0.6 km2 in the centre of the study area and allowed identification of individual live coral colonies in acoustic data for the first time. Maximum water depth, maximum rugosity, mean rugosity, bathymetric positioning index and maximum current speed were identified as the environmental variables that contributed most to the prediction of live coral presence. These variables were used to create a predictive map of the likelihood of presence of live cold-water coral colonies in the area of the Mingulay Reef Complex covered by the 2-m resolution data set. Predictive maps of live corals across the reef will be especially valuable for future long-term monitoring surveys, including those needed to understand the impacts of global climate change. This is the first study using the newly developed BGS seabed mapping toolbox and an ROV-based microbathymetric grid to explore the environmental variables that control coral growth on cold-water coral

  2. Tools to evaluate seafloor integrity: comparison of multi-device acoustic seafloor classifications for benthic macrofauna-driven patterns in the German Bight, southern North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holler, Peter; Markert, Edith; Bartholomä, Alexander; Capperucci, Ruggero; Hass, H. Christian; Kröncke, Ingrid; Mielck, Finn; Reimers, H. Christian

    2017-04-01

    To determine the spatial resolution of sediment properties and benthic macrofauna communities in acoustic backscatter, the suitability of four acoustic seafloor classification devices (single-beam echosounder with RoxAnn and QTC 5.5 seafloor classification system, sidescan sonar with QTC Swathview seafloor classification, and multi-beam echosounder with QTC Swathview seafloor classification) was compared in a study area of approx. 6 km2 northwest of the island of Helgoland in the German Bight, southern North Sea. This was based on a simple similarity index between simultaneous sidescan sonar, single-beam echosounder and multi-beam echosounder profiling spanning the period 2011-2014. The results show a high similarity between seafloor classifications based on sidescan sonar and RoxAnn single-beam systems, in turn associated with a lower similarity for the multi-beam echosounder system. Analyses of surface sediment samples at 39 locations along four transects (0.1 m2 Van Veen grab) revealed the presence of sandy mud (southern and western parts), coarse sand, gravel and cobbles. Rock outcrops were identified in the north-eastern and eastern parts. A typical Nucula nitidosa- Abra alba community was found in sandy muds to muddy sands in the northern part, whereas the southern part is characterised by widespread occurrence of the ophiuroid brittle star Amphiura filiformis. A transitional N. nitidosa- A. filiformis community was detected in the central part. Moreover, the southern part is characterised by a high abundance of A. filiformis and its commensal bivalve Kurtiella bidentata. The high number of A. filiformis feeding arms (up to ca. 6,800 per m2) can largely explain the gentle change of backscatter intensity along the tracks, because sediment composition and/or seafloor structures showed no significant variability.

  3. Apparatus for focused electrode induced polarization logging

    SciTech Connect

    Vinegar, H.J.; Waxman, M.H.

    1986-04-15

    An induced polarization logging tool is described for measuring parameters of a formation surrounding a borehole. The logging tool consists of: a non-conductive logging sonde; a plurality of electrodes disposed on the sonde, the electrodes including at least a survey current electrode and guard electrodes disposed on opposite sides of the survey current electrode, a non-polarizing voltage measuring electrode, a non-polarizing voltage reference electrode and a current return electrode, both the voltage reference and current return electrodes being located a greater distance from the survey current electrode than the guard electrodes; means connected to the survey current electrode and the guard electrodes for generating a signal representative of the potential difference in the formation between the survey current electrode and the guard electrodes; first control means directly coupled to the survey current electrode, the first control means controlling the current flow to the survey current electrode in response to the potential difference signal; a second control means directly coupled to the guard electrodes to control the current flow to the guard electrodes in response to the potential difference signal; a source of alternating current located at the surface, one end of the source being coupled to the two control means and the other to the current return electrode, the source supplying alternating current at various discrete frequencies between substantially 0.01 and 100 Hz; measurement means directly coupled to the voltage measurement and survey current electrodes to measure the amplitude and phase of the voltage induced in the formation and the amplitude and phase of the current flow to the survey electrode; and transmission means for transmitting the measurements to the surface.

  4. Theory of Acoustic Raman Modes in Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeWolf, Timothy; Gordon, Reuven

    2016-09-01

    We present a theoretical analysis that associates the resonances of extraordinary acoustic Raman (EAR) spectroscopy [Wheaton et al., Nat. Photonics 9, 68 (2015)] with the collective modes of proteins. The theory uses the anisotropic elastic network model to find the protein acoustic modes, and calculates Raman intensity by treating the protein as a polarizable ellipsoid. Reasonable agreement is found between EAR spectra and our theory. Protein acoustic modes have been extensively studied theoretically to assess the role they play in protein function; this result suggests EAR spectroscopy as a new experimental tool for studies of protein acoustic modes.

  5. Suppression through acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Kevin D.; Short, Kenneth R.; VanMeenen, Kirsten M.; Servatius, Richard J.

    2006-05-01

    This paper reviews research conducted by our laboratory exploring the possible use of acoustical stimuli as a tool for influencing behavior. Over the course of several programs, different types of acoustic stimuli have been evaluated for their effectiveness in disrupting targeting, balance, and high-order cognitive processes in both humans and animals. Escape responses are of particular use in this regard. An escape response serves not only as an objective measure of aversion, but as a potential substitute for ongoing behavior. We have also assessed whether the level of performance changes if the individual does not perform an escape response. In general these studies have both suggested certain types of sounds are more aversive or distracting than others. Although the laboratory development of additional stimuli needs to continue, we are taking the next step by testing some of the more effective stimuli in more applied experimental scenarios including those involving group dynamics.

  6. Well construction, lithology, and geophysical logs for boreholes in Bear Creek Valley near Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bailey, Z.C.; Hanchar, D.W.

    1988-01-01

    Twenty-four wells were constructed at nine sites at Bear Creek Valley to provide geologic and hydrologic information. Lithologic samples and suits of geophysical logs were obtained from the deepest boreholes at six of the sites. Two of these boreholes at the base of Chestnut Ridge were completed in the Maynardville Limestone and two were completed in the Nolichucky Shale. Two boreholes along Pine Ridge were completed in the Rome Formation. Zones of similar lithology within a borehole were delineated from rock cutting refined by examination of geophysical logs. The contact between the Maynardville Limestone and Nolichucky Shale was identified in two of the boreholes. Fractures and cavities were readily identifiable on the acoustic-televiewer and caliper logs. Distinct water-bearing intervals were also identified from the temperature, fluid resistance, and resistivity logs. Depths at which the drilling encounterd a thrust were identified in two boreholes in the Rome Formation from both rock cutting and geophysical logs. (USGS)

  7. Nonlinear Acoustics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-02-14

    Wester- velt. [60] Streaming. In 1831, Michael Faraday [61] noted that currents of air were set up in the neighborhood of vibrating plates-the first... ducei in the case of a paramettc amy (from Berktay an Leahy 141). C’ "". k•, SEC 10.1 NONLINEAR ACOUSTICS 345 The principal results of their analysis

  8. Preliminary report on geophysical well-logging activity on the Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Project, Imperial Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paillet, Frederick L.; Morin, R.H.; Hodges, H.E.

    1986-01-01

    The Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Project has culminated in a 10,564-ft deep test well, State 2-14 well, in the Imperial Valley of southern California. A comprehensive scientific program of drilling, coring, and downhole measurements, which was conducted for about 5 months, has obtained much scientific information concerning the physical and chemical processes associated with an active hydrothermal system. This report primarily focuses on the geophysical logging activities at the State 2-14 well and provides early dissemination of geophysical data to other investigators working on complementary studies. Geophysical-log data were obtained by a commercial logging company and by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). Most of the commercial logs were obtained during three visits to the site; only one commercial log was obtained below a depth of 6,000 ft. The commercial logs obtained were dual induction, natural gamma, compensated neutron formation density, caliper and sonic. The USGS logging effort consisted of four primary periods, with many logs extending below a depth of 6,000 ft. The USGS logs obtained were temperature, caliper, natural gamma, gamma spectral, epithermal neutron, acoustic velocity, full-waveform, and acoustic televiewer. Various problems occurred throughout the drilling phase of the Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Project that made successful logging difficult: (1) borehole constrictions, possibly resulting from mud coagulation, (2) maximum temperatures of about 300 C, and (3) borehole conditions unfavorable for logging because of numerous zones of fluid loss, cement plugs, and damage caused by repeated trips in and out of the hole. These factors hampered and compromised logging quality at several open-hole intervals. The quality of the logs was dependent on the degree of probe sophistication and sensitivity to borehole-wall conditions. Digitized logs presented were processed on site and are presented in increments of 1,000 ft. A summary of the numerous

  9. Moisture logging in cased boreholes using capture gamma-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Robert D.; Randall, Russell R.; Meisner, James E.; Boles, Jason L.; Reynolds, Kent D.

    1999-10-01

    A nuclear logging tool has been developed that determines the moisture content of subsurface earth formations by measuring the gamma rays produced by thermal neutron capture in hydrogen. The tool employs a 252Cf fast neutron source and a hyperpure germanium gamma-ray detector. The tool has demonstrated excellent sensitivity to changes in formation moisture content when used in air-filled boreholes cased with steel. The tool is also sensitive to other elements that produce neutron capture gamma rays, such as silicon, calcium, aluminum, sodium, chlorine, chromium, cadmium and mercury. Extensive computer modeling of the tool has been done to aid its design and in the interpretation of logging data taken under a variety of conditions. The logging tool has been calibrated for its moisture and chlorine response in a set of physical models and is now in use logging boreholes at the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site.

  10. Log Truck-Weighing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    ELDEC Corp., Lynwood, Wash., built a weight-recording system for logging trucks based on electronic technology the company acquired as a subcontractor on space programs such as Apollo and the Saturn launch vehicle. ELDEC employed its space-derived expertise to develop a computerized weight-and-balance system for Lockheed's TriStar jetliner. ELDEC then adapted the airliner system to a similar product for logging trucks. Electronic equipment computes tractor weight, trailer weight and overall gross weight, and this information is presented to the driver by an instrument in the cab. The system costs $2,000 but it pays for itself in a single year. It allows operators to use a truck's hauling capacity more efficiently since the load can be maximized without exceeding legal weight limits for highway travel. Approximately 2,000 logging trucks now use the system.

  11. Mail LOG: Program operating instructions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, D. K.

    1979-01-01

    The operating instructions for the software package, MAIL LOG, developed for the Scout Project Automatic Data System, SPADS, are provided. The program is written in FORTRAN for the PRIME 300 computer system. The MAIL LOG program has the following four modes of operation: (1) INPUT - putting new records into the data base (2) REVISE - changing or modifying existing records in the data base (3) SEARCH - finding special records existing in the data base (4) ARCHIVE - store or put away existing records in the data base. The output includes special printouts of records in the data base and results from the INPUT and SEARCH modes. The MAIL LOG data base consists of three main subfiles: Incoming and outgoing mail correspondence; Design Information Releases and Releases and Reports; and Drawings and Engineering orders.

  12. Acoustics as a tool for better characterization of ionic liquids: a comparative study of 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium bis[(trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl]imide room-temperature ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Zorębski, Edward; Geppert-Rybczyńska, Monika; Zorębski, Michał

    2013-04-11

    Acoustic properties of three (1-ethyl-, 1-butyl-, and 1-octyl-) 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium bis[(trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl] imide room-temperature ionic liquids are reported and discussed. The speeds of sound in RTILs were measured as a function of temperature in the range 288-323 K by means of a sing around method. The densities and isobaric heat capacities were determined from 288.15 to 363.15 K and from 293.15 to 323.15 K, respectively. The related properties, like isentropic and isothermal compressibilities, isobaric coefficients of thermal expansion, molar isochoric heat capacities, and internal pressures, were calculated. It was found that for some ionic liquids, temperature dependence of isobaric coefficients of thermal expansion is small and negative. All investigations were completed by the ultrasound absorption coefficient measurements in 1-ethyl- and 1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium bis[(trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl] imide as a function of frequency from 10 to 300 MHz at temperatures 293.15-298.15 K. The ultrasound absorption spectra indicate relaxation frequencies in the megahertz range.

  13. Effects of subsampling of passive acoustic recordings on acoustic metrics.

    PubMed

    Thomisch, Karolin; Boebel, Olaf; Zitterbart, Daniel P; Samaran, Flore; Van Parijs, Sofie; Van Opzeeland, Ilse

    2015-07-01

    Passive acoustic monitoring is an important tool in marine mammal studies. However, logistics and finances frequently constrain the number and servicing schedules of acoustic recorders, requiring a trade-off between deployment periods and sampling continuity, i.e., the implementation of a subsampling scheme. Optimizing such schemes to each project's specific research questions is desirable. This study investigates the impact of subsampling on the accuracy of two common metrics, acoustic presence and call rate, for different vocalization patterns (regimes) of baleen whales: (1) variable vocal activity, (2) vocalizations organized in song bouts, and (3) vocal activity with diel patterns. To this end, above metrics are compared for continuous and subsampled data subject to different sampling strategies, covering duty cycles between 50% and 2%. The results show that a reduction of the duty cycle impacts negatively on the accuracy of both acoustic presence and call rate estimates. For a given duty cycle, frequent short listening periods improve accuracy of daily acoustic presence estimates over few long listening periods. Overall, subsampling effects are most pronounced for low and/or temporally clustered vocal activity. These findings illustrate the importance of informed decisions when applying subsampling strategies to passive acoustic recordings or analyses for a given target species.

  14. Log-periodic route to fractal functions.

    PubMed

    Gluzman, S; Sornette, D

    2002-03-01

    Log-periodic oscillations have been found to decorate the usual power-law behavior found to describe the approach to a critical point, when the continuous scale-invariance symmetry is partially broken into a discrete-scale invariance symmetry. For Ising or Potts spins with ferromagnetic interactions on hierarchical systems, the relative magnitude of the log-periodic corrections are usually very small, of order 10(-5). In growth processes [diffusion limited aggregation (DLA)], rupture, earthquake, and financial crashes, log-periodic oscillations with amplitudes of the order of 10% have been reported. We suggest a "technical" explanation for this 4 order-of-magnitude difference based on the property of the "regular function" g(x) embodying the effect of the microscopic degrees of freedom summed over in a renormalization group (RG) approach F(x)=g(x)+mu(-1)F(gamma x) of an observable F as a function of a control parameter x. For systems for which the RG equation has not been derived, the previous equation can be understood as a Jackson q integral, which is the natural tool for describing discrete-scale invariance. We classify the "Weierstrass-type" solutions of the RG into two classes characterized by the amplitudes A(n) of the power-law series expansion. These two classes are separated by a novel "critical" point. Growth processes (DLA), rupture, earthquake, and financial crashes thus seem to be characterized by oscillatory or bounded regular microscopic functions that lead to a slow power-law decay of A(n), giving strong log-periodic amplitudes. If in addition, the phases of A(n) are ergodic and mixing, the observable presents self-affine nondifferentiable properties. In contrast, the regular function of statistical physics models with "ferromagnetic"-type interactions at equilibrium involves unbound logarithms of polynomials of the control variable that lead to a fast exponential decay of A(n) giving weak log-periodic amplitudes and smoothed observables.

  15. Acoustic transducer for acoustic microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T.; Chou, Ching H.

    1990-01-01

    A shear acoustic transducer-lens system in which a shear polarized piezoelectric material excites shear polarized waves at one end of a buffer rod having a lens at the other end which excites longitudinal waves in a coupling medium by mode conversion at selected locations on the lens.

  16. Acoustic transducer for acoustic microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Khuri-Yakub, B.T.; Chou, C.H.

    1990-03-20

    A shear acoustic transducer-lens system is described in which a shear polarized piezoelectric material excites shear polarized waves at one end of a buffer rod having a lens at the other end which excites longitudinal waves in a coupling medium by mode conversion at selected locations on the lens. 9 figs.

  17. Development of geothermal logging systems in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Lysne, P.

    1994-04-01

    Logging technologies developed for hydrocarbon resource evaluation have not migrated into geothermal applications even though data so obtained would strengthen reservoir characterization efforts. Two causative issues have impeded progress: (1) there is a general lack of vetted, high-temperature instrumentation, and (2) the interpretation of log data generated in a geothermal formation is in its infancy. Memory-logging tools provide a path around the first obstacle by providing quality data at a low cost. These tools feature on-board computers that process and store data, and newer systems may be programmed to make decisions. Since memory tools are completely self-contained, they are readily deployed using the slick line found on most drilling locations. They have proven to be rugged, and a minimum training program is required for operator personnel. Present tools measure properties such as temperature and pressure, and the development of noise, deviation, and fluid conductivity logs based on existing hardware is relatively easy. A more complex geochemical tool aimed at a quantitative analysis of (potassium, uranium and thorium) is in the calibration phase, and it is expandable into all nuclear measurements common in the hydrocarbon industry. A fluid sampling tool is in the design phase. All tools are designed for operation at conditions exceeding 400 C, and for deployment in the slim holes produced by mining-coring operations. Partnerships are being formed between the geothermal industry and scientific drilling programs to define and develop inversion algorithms relating raw tool data to more pertinent information. These cooperative efforts depend upon quality guidelines such as those under development within the international Ocean Drilling Program.

  18. 47 CFR 73.781 - Logs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Logs. 73.781 Section 73.781 Telecommunication... International Broadcast Stations § 73.781 Logs. The licensee or permittee of each international broadcast station must maintain the station log in the following manner: (a) In the program log: (1) An entry of...

  19. 47 CFR 73.781 - Logs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Logs. 73.781 Section 73.781 Telecommunication... International Broadcast Stations § 73.781 Logs. The licensee or permittee of each international broadcast station must maintain the station log in the following manner: (a) In the program log: (1) An entry of...

  20. 47 CFR 73.781 - Logs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Logs. 73.781 Section 73.781 Telecommunication... International Broadcast Stations § 73.781 Logs. The licensee or permittee of each international broadcast station must maintain the station log in the following manner: (a) In the program log: (1) An entry of...

  1. 29 CFR 1918.88 - Log operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Log operations. 1918.88 Section 1918.88 Labor Regulations...) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR LONGSHORING Handling Cargo § 1918.88 Log operations. (a) Working in holds. When loading logs into the holds of vessels and using dumper devices to roll logs into the...

  2. 29 CFR 1918.88 - Log operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Log operations. 1918.88 Section 1918.88 Labor Regulations...) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR LONGSHORING Handling Cargo § 1918.88 Log operations. (a) Working in holds. When loading logs into the holds of vessels and using dumper devices to roll logs into the...

  3. 29 CFR 1918.88 - Log operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Log operations. 1918.88 Section 1918.88 Labor Regulations...) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR LONGSHORING Handling Cargo § 1918.88 Log operations. (a) Working in holds. When loading logs into the holds of vessels and using dumper devices to roll logs into the...

  4. 29 CFR 1918.88 - Log operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Log operations. 1918.88 Section 1918.88 Labor Regulations...) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR LONGSHORING Handling Cargo § 1918.88 Log operations. (a) Working in holds. When loading logs into the holds of vessels and using dumper devices to roll logs into the...

  5. 47 CFR 73.781 - Logs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Logs. 73.781 Section 73.781 Telecommunication... International Broadcast Stations § 73.781 Logs. The licensee or permittee of each international broadcast station must maintain the station log in the following manner: (a) In the program log: (1) An entry of...

  6. 29 CFR 1918.88 - Log operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Log operations. 1918.88 Section 1918.88 Labor Regulations...) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR LONGSHORING Handling Cargo § 1918.88 Log operations. (a) Working in holds. When loading logs into the holds of vessels and using dumper devices to roll logs into the...

  7. 47 CFR 73.781 - Logs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Logs. 73.781 Section 73.781 Telecommunication... International Broadcast Stations § 73.781 Logs. The licensee or permittee of each international broadcast station must maintain the station log in the following manner: (a) In the program log: (1) An entry of...

  8. Statistical log analysis made practical

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, W.K.; Nelson, R.J. )

    1991-06-01

    This paper discusses the advantages of a statistical approach to log analysis. Statistical techniques use inverse methods to calculate formation parameters. The use of statistical techniques has been limited, however, by the complexity of the mathematics and lengthy computer time required to minimize traditionally used nonlinear equations.

  9. CRYPTOSPORIDIUM LOG INACTIVATION CALCULATION METHODS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Appendix O of the Surface Water Treatment Rule (SWTR) Guidance Manual introduces the CeffT10 (i.e., reaction zone outlet C value and T10 time) method for calculating ozone CT value and Giardia and virus log inactivation. The LT2ESWTR Pre-proposal Draft Regulatory Language for St...

  10. A New Approach to Logging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miles, Donna

    2001-01-01

    In response to high numbers of preventable fatal accidents in the logging industry, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) developed a week-long logger safety training program that includes hands-on learning of safety techniques in the woods. Reaching small operators has been challenging; outreach initiatives in Maine, North…

  11. Acoustic chaos

    SciTech Connect

    Lauterborn, W.; Parlitz, U.; Holzfuss, J.; Billo, A.; Akhatov, I.

    1996-06-01

    Acoustic cavitation, a complex, spatio-temporal dynamical system, is investigated with respect to its chaotic properties. The sound output, the {open_quote}{open_quote}noise{close_quote}{close_quote}, is subjected to time series analysis. The spatial dynamics of the bubble filaments is captured by high speed holographic cinematography and subsequent digital picture processing from the holograms. Theoretical models are put forward for describing the pattern formation. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  12. Medical Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beach, Kirk W.; Dunmire, Barbrina

    Medical acoustics can be subdivided into diagnostics and therapy. Diagnostics are further separated into auditory and ultrasonic methods, and both employ low amplitudes. Therapy (excluding medical advice) uses ultrasound for heating, cooking, permeablizing, activating and fracturing tissues and structures within the body, usually at much higher amplitudes than in diagnostics. Because ultrasound is a wave, linear wave physics are generally applicable, but recently nonlinear effects have become more important, even in low-intensity diagnostic applications.

  13. Assessment of geophysical logs from borehole USW G-2, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, P.H.; Schimschal, U.

    1993-05-01

    Commercial logging contractors, Western Atlas, Schlumberger, and Edcon obtained borehole geophysical logs at the site of a potential high level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Drill hole USW-G2 was picked for this test of suitable logging tools and logging technology, both representing state-of-the-art technology by these commercial companies. Experience gained by analysis of existing core data and a variety of logs obtained earlier by Birdwell and Dresser Atlas served as a guide to a choice of logs to be obtained. Logs were obtained in water-filled borehole in zeolitized tuff (saturated zone) and in air-filled borehole largely in unaltered welded tuff (unsaturated zone).

  14. Acoustic dose and acoustic dose-rate.

    PubMed

    Duck, Francis

    2009-10-01

    Acoustic dose is defined as the energy deposited by absorption of an acoustic wave per unit mass of the medium supporting the wave. Expressions for acoustic dose and acoustic dose-rate are given for plane-wave conditions, including temporal and frequency dependencies of energy deposition. The relationship between the acoustic dose-rate and the resulting temperature increase is explored, as is the relationship between acoustic dose-rate and radiation force. Energy transfer from the wave to the medium by means of acoustic cavitation is considered, and an approach is proposed in principle that could allow cavitation to be included within the proposed definitions of acoustic dose and acoustic dose-rate.

  15. Utilizing magnetic resonance imaging logs, openhole logs, and sidewall core analyses to evaluate shaly sands for water-free production

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, D.A.; Morganti, J.K.; White, H.J. ); Noblett, B.R. )

    1996-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) logging using the new C Series Magnetic Resonance Imaging Log (MRIL) system is rapidly enhancing formation evaluation throughout the industry. By measuring irreducible water saturations, permeabilities, and effective porosities, MRIL data can help petrophysicists evaluate low-resistivity pays. In these environments, conventional openhole logs may not define all of the pay intervals. The MRIL system can also reduce the number of unnecessary completions in zones of potentially high water cut. MRIL tool theory and log presentations used with conventional logs and sidewall cores are presented along with field examples. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis shows good correlation of varying grain size in sandstones with the T2 distribution and bulk volume irreducible water determined from the MRIL measurements. Analysis of each new well drilled in the study area shows how water-free production zones were defined. Because the MRIL data were not recorded on one of the wells, predictions from the conventional logs and the MRIL data collected on the other two wells were used to estimate productive zones in the first well. Discussion of additional formation characteristics, completion procedures, actual production, and predicted producibility of the shaly sands is presented. Integrated methodologies resulted in the perforation of 3 new wells for a gross initial potential of 690 BOPD and 0 BWPD.

  16. Utilizing magnetic resonance imaging logs, openhole logs, and sidewall core analyses to evaluate shaly sands for water-free production

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, D.A.; Morganti, J.K.; White, H.J.; Noblett, B.R.

    1996-12-31

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) logging using the new C Series Magnetic Resonance Imaging Log (MRIL) system is rapidly enhancing formation evaluation throughout the industry. By measuring irreducible water saturations, permeabilities, and effective porosities, MRIL data can help petrophysicists evaluate low-resistivity pays. In these environments, conventional openhole logs may not define all of the pay intervals. The MRIL system can also reduce the number of unnecessary completions in zones of potentially high water cut. MRIL tool theory and log presentations used with conventional logs and sidewall cores are presented along with field examples. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis shows good correlation of varying grain size in sandstones with the T2 distribution and bulk volume irreducible water determined from the MRIL measurements. Analysis of each new well drilled in the study area shows how water-free production zones were defined. Because the MRIL data were not recorded on one of the wells, predictions from the conventional logs and the MRIL data collected on the other two wells were used to estimate productive zones in the first well. Discussion of additional formation characteristics, completion procedures, actual production, and predicted producibility of the shaly sands is presented. Integrated methodologies resulted in the perforation of 3 new wells for a gross initial potential of 690 BOPD and 0 BWPD.

  17. Acoustic Tooth Cleaner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, J. S.

    1984-01-01

    Acoustically-energized water jet aids in plaque breakdown. Acoustic Wand includes acoustic transducer 1/4 wave plate, and tapered cone. Together elements energize solution of water containing mild abrasive injected into mouth to help prevent calculous buildup.

  18. Tracking the Inside Intruder Using Net Log on Debug Logging in Microsoft Windows Server Operating Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, CS

    2004-01-20

    In today's well-connected environments of the Internet, intranets, and extranets, protecting the Microsoft Windows network can be a daunting task for the security engineer. Intrusion Detection Systems are a must-have for most companies, but few have either the financial resources or the people resources to implement and maintain full-scale intrusion detection systems for their networks and hosts. Many will at least invest in intrusion detection for their Internet presence, but others have not yet stepped up to the plate with regard to internal intrusion detection. Unfortunately, most attacks will come from within. Microsoft Windows server operating systems are widely used across both large and small enterprises. Unfortunately, there is no intrusion detection built-in to the Windows server operating system. The security logs are valuable but can be difficult to manage even in a small to medium sized environment. So the question arises, can one effectively detect and identify an in side intruder using the native tools that come with Microsoft Windows Server operating systems? One such method is to use Net Logon Service debug logging to identify and track malicious user activity. This paper discusses how to use Net Logon debug logging to identify and track malicious user activity both in real-time and for forensic analysis.

  19. Rapid SAW Sensor Development Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, William C.; Atkinson, Gary M.

    2007-01-01

    The lack of integrated design tools for Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) devices has led us to develop tools for the design, modeling, analysis, and automatic layout generation of SAW devices. These tools enable rapid development of wireless SAW sensors. The tools developed have been designed to integrate into existing Electronic Design Automation (EDA) tools to take advantage of existing 3D modeling, and Finite Element Analysis (FEA). This paper presents the SAW design, modeling, analysis, and automated layout generation tools.

  20. Chemical logging of geothermal wells

    DOEpatents

    Allen, Charles A.; McAtee, Richard E.

    1981-01-01

    The presence of geothermal aquifers can be detected while drilling in geothermal formations by maintaining a chemical log of the ratio of the concentrations of calcium to carbonate and bicarbonate ions in the return drilling fluid. A continuous increase in the ratio of the concentrations of calcium to carbonate and bicarbonate ions is indicative of the existence of a warm or hot geothermal aquifer at some increased depth.

  1. Chemical logging of geothermal wells

    DOEpatents

    Allen, C.A.; McAtee, R.E.

    The presence of geothermal aquifers can be detected while drilling in geothermal formations by maintaining a chemical log of the ratio of the concentrations of calcium to carbonate and bicarbonate ions in the return drilling fluid. A continuous increase in the ratio of the concentrations of calcium to carbonate and bicarbonate ions is indicative of the existence of a warm or hot geothermal aquifer at some increased depth.

  2. Audit Log for Forensic Photography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neville, Timothy; Sorell, Matthew

    We propose an architecture for an audit log system for forensic photography, which ensures that the chain of evidence of a photograph taken by a photographer at a crime scene is maintained from the point of image capture to its end application at trial. The requirements for such a system are specified and the results of experiments are presented which demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed approach.

  3. Multicriteria evaluation of simulated logging scenarios in a tropical rain forest.

    PubMed

    Huth, Andreas; Drechsler, Martin; Köhler, Peter

    2004-07-01

    Forest growth models are useful tools for investigating the long-term impacts of logging. In this paper, the results of the rain forest growth model FORMIND were assessed by a multicriteria decision analysis. The main processes covered by FORMIND include tree growth, mortality, regeneration and competition. Tree growth is calculated based on a carbon balance approach. Trees compete for light and space; dying large trees fall down and create gaps in the forest. Sixty-four different logging scenarios for an initially undisturbed forest stand at Deramakot (Malaysia) were simulated. The scenarios differ regarding the logging cycle, logging method, cutting limit and logging intensity. We characterise the impacts with four criteria describing the yield, canopy opening and changes in species composition. Multicriteria decision analysis was used for the first time to evaluate the scenarios and identify the efficient ones. Our results plainly show that reduced-impact logging scenarios are more 'efficient' than the others, since in these scenarios forest damage is minimised without significantly reducing yield. Nevertheless, there is a trade-off between yield and achieving a desired ecological state of logged forest; the ecological state of the logged forests can only be improved by reducing yields and enlarging the logging cycles. Our study also demonstrates that high cutting limits or low logging intensities cannot compensate for the high level of damage caused by conventional logging techniques.

  4. Sonification of acoustic emission data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raith, Manuel; Große, Christian

    2014-05-01

    While loading different specimens, acoustic emissions appear due to micro crack formation or friction of already existing crack edges. These acoustic emissions can be recorded using suitable ultrasonic transducers and transient recorders. The analysis of acoustic emissions can be used to investigate the mechanical behavior of different specimens under load. Our working group has undertaken several experiments, monitored with acoustic emission techniques. Different materials such as natural stone, concrete, wood, steel, carbon composites and bone were investigated. Also the experimental setup has been varied. Fire-spalling experiments on ultrahigh performance concrete and pullout experiments on bonded anchors have been carried out. Furthermore uniaxial compression tests on natural stone and animal bone had been conducted. The analysis tools include not only the counting of events but the analysis of full waveforms. Powerful localization algorithms and automatic onset picking techniques (based on Akaikes Information Criterion) were established to handle the huge amount of data. Up to several thousand events were recorded during experiments of a few minutes. More sophisticated techniques like moment tensor inversion have been established on this relatively small scale as well. Problems are related to the amount of data but also to signal-to-noise quality, boundary conditions (reflections) sensor characteristics and unknown and changing Greens functions of the media. Some of the acoustic emissions recorded during these experiments had been transferred into audio range. The transformation into the audio range was done using Matlab. It is the aim of the sonification to establish a tool that is on one hand able to help controlling the experiment in-situ and probably adjust the load parameters according to the number and intensity of the acoustic emissions. On the other hand sonification can help to improve the understanding of acoustic emission techniques for training

  5. PsyAcoustX: A flexible MATLAB(®) package for psychoacoustics research.

    PubMed

    Bidelman, Gavin M; Jennings, Skyler G; Strickland, Elizabeth A

    2015-01-01

    The demands of modern psychophysical studies require precise stimulus delivery and flexible platforms for experimental control. Here, we describe PsyAcoustX, a new, freely available suite of software tools written in the MATLAB(®) environment to conduct psychoacoustics research on a standard PC. PsyAcoustX provides a flexible platform to generate and present auditory stimuli in real time and record users' behavioral responses. Data are automatically logged by stimulus condition and aggregated in an exported spreadsheet for offline analysis. Detection thresholds can be measured adaptively under basic and complex auditory masking tasks and other paradigms (e.g., amplitude modulation detection) within minutes. The flexibility of the module offers experimenters access to nearly every conceivable combination of stimulus parameters (e.g., probe-masker relations). Example behavioral applications are highlighted including the measurement of audiometric thresholds, basic simultaneous and non-simultaneous (i.e., forward and backward) masking paradigms, gap detection, and amplitude modulation detection. Examples of these measurements are provided including the psychoacoustic phenomena of temporal overshoot, psychophysical tuning curves, and temporal modulation transfer functions. Importantly, the core design of PsyAcoustX is easily modifiable, allowing users the ability to adapt its basic structure and create additional modules for measuring discrimination/detection thresholds for other auditory attributes (e.g., pitch, intensity, etc.) or binaural paradigms.

  6. Reservoir characterization of marine and permafrost associated gas hydrate accumulations with downhole well logs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collett, T.S.; Lee, M.W.

    2000-01-01

    Gas volumes that may be attributed to a gas hydrate accumulation depend on a number of reservoir parameters, one of which, gas-hydrate saturation, can be assessed with data obtained from downhole well-logging devices. This study demonstrates that electrical resistivity and acoustic transit-time downhole log data can be used to quantify the amount of gas hydrate in a sedimentary section. Two unique forms of the Archie relation (standard and quick look relations) have been used in this study to calculate water saturations (S(w)) [gas-hydrate saturation (S(h)) is equal to (1.0 - S(w))] from the electrical resistivity log data in four gas hydrate accumulations. These accumulations are located on (1) the Blake Ridge along the Southeastern continental margin of the United States, (2) the Cascadia continental margin off the pacific coast of Canada, (3) the North Slope of Alaska, and (4) the Mackenzie River Delta of Canada. Compressional wave acoustic log data have also been used in conjunction with the Timur, modified Wood, and the Lee weighted average acoustic equations to calculate gas-hydrate saturations in all four areas assessed.

  7. Acoustically Enhanced Electroplating Being Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oeftering, Richard C.

    2002-01-01

    In cooperation with the NASA Glenn Research Center, Alchemitron Corp. is developing the Acoustically Enhanced Electroplating Process (AEEP), a new technique of employing nonlinear ultrasonics to enhance electroplating. The applications range from electroplating full-panel electronic circuit boards to electroplating microelectronics and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) devices. In a conventional plating process, the surface area to be plated is separated from the nonplated areas by a temporary mask. The mask may take many forms, from a cured liquid coating to a simple tape. Generally, the mask is discarded when the plating is complete, creating a solid waste product that is often an environmental hazard. The labor and materials involved with the layout, fabrication, and tooling of masks is a primary source of recurring and nonrecurring production costs. The objective of this joint effort, therefore, is to reduce or eliminate the need for masks. AEEP improves selective plating processes by using directed beams of high-intensity acoustic waves to create nonlinear effects that alter the fluid dynamic and thermodynamic behavior of the plating process. It relies on two effects: acoustic streaming and acoustic heating. Acoustic streaming is observed when a high-intensity acoustic beam creates a liquid current within the beam. The liquid current can be directed as the beam is directed and, thus, users can move liquid around as desired without using pumps and nozzles. The current of the electroplating electrolyte, therefore, can be directed at distinct target areas where electroplating is desired. The current delivers fresh electrolyte to the target area while flushing away the spent electrolyte. This dramatically increases the plating rate in the target area. In addition, acoustic heating of both the liquid in the beam and the target surface increases the chemical reaction rate, which further increases the plating rate. The combined effects of acoustic streaming and

  8. Acoustic iridescence.

    PubMed

    Cox, Trevor J

    2011-03-01

    An investigation has been undertaken into acoustic iridescence, exploring how a device can be constructed which alter sound waves, in a similar way to structures in nature that act on light to produce optical iridescence. The main construction had many thin perforated sheets spaced half a wavelength apart for a specified design frequency. The sheets create the necessary impedance discontinuities to create backscattered waves, which then interfere to create strongly reflected sound at certain frequencies. Predictions and measurements show a set of harmonics, evenly spaced in frequency, for which sound is reflected strongly. And the frequency of these harmonics increases as the angle of observation gets larger, mimicking the iridescence seen in natural optical systems. Similar to optical systems, the reflections become weaker for oblique angles of reflection. A second construction was briefly examined which exploited a metamaterial made from elements and inclusions which were much smaller than the wavelength. Boundary element method predictions confirmed the potential for creating acoustic iridescence from layers of such a material.

  9. Acoustic transducer

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, D.S.

    1997-12-30

    An acoustic transducer is described comprising a one-piece hollow mandrel into the outer surface of which is formed a recess with sides perpendicular to the central axis of the mandrel and separated by a first distance and with a bottom parallel to the central axis and within which recess are a plurality of washer-shaped discs of a piezoelectric material and at least one disc of a temperature-compensating material with the discs being captured between the sides of the recess in a pre-stressed interference fit, typically at 2,000 psi of compressive stress. The transducer also includes a power supply and means to connect to a measurement device. The transducer is intended to be used for telemetry between a measurement device located downhole in an oil or gas well and the surface. The transducer is of an construction that is stronger with fewer joints that could leak fluids into the recess holding the piezoelectric elements than is found in previous acoustic transducers. 4 figs.

  10. Acoustic transducer

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, Douglas S.

    1997-01-01

    An acoustic transducer comprising a one-piece hollow mandrel into the outer surface of which is formed a recess with sides perpendicular to the central axis of the mandrel and separated by a first distance and with a bottom parallel to the central axis and within which recess are a plurality of washer-shaped discs of a piezoelectric material and at least one disc of a temperature-compensating material with the discs being captured between the sides of the recess in a pre-stressed interference fit, typically at 2000 psi of compressive stress. The transducer also includes a power supply and means to connect to a measurement device. The transducer is intended to be used for telemetry between a measurement device located downhole in an oil or gas well and the surface. The transducer is of an construction that is stronger with fewer joints that could leak fluids into the recess holding the piezoelectric elements than is found in previous acoustic transducers.

  11. Wireless Acoustic Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Paul D.; Dorland, Wade D.

    2005-01-01

    A prototype wireless acoustic measurement system (WAMS) is one of two main subsystems of the Acoustic Prediction/Measurement Tool, which comprises software, acoustic instrumentation, and electronic hardware combined to afford integrated capabilities for predicting and measuring noise emitted by rocket and jet engines. The other main subsystem is described in "Predicting Rocket or Jet Noise in Real Time" (SSC-00215-1), which appears elsewhere in this issue of NASA Tech Briefs. The WAMS includes analog acoustic measurement instrumentation and analog and digital electronic circuitry combined with computer wireless local-area networking to enable (1) measurement of sound-pressure levels at multiple locations in the sound field of an engine under test and (2) recording and processing of the measurement data. At each field location, the measurements are taken by a portable unit, denoted a field station. There are ten field stations, each of which can take two channels of measurements. Each field station is equipped with two instrumentation microphones, a micro-ATX computer, a wireless network adapter, an environmental enclosure, a directional radio antenna, and a battery power supply. The environmental enclosure shields the computer from weather and from extreme acoustically induced vibrations. The power supply is based on a marine-service lead-acid storage battery that has enough capacity to support operation for as long as 10 hours. A desktop computer serves as a control server for the WAMS. The server is connected to a wireless router for communication with the field stations via a wireless local-area network that complies with wireless-network standard 802.11b of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. The router and the wireless network adapters are controlled by use of Linux-compatible driver software. The server runs custom Linux software for synchronizing the recording of measurement data in the field stations. The software includes a module that

  12. Wireless Acoustic Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Paul D.; Dorland, Wade D.; Jolly, Ronald L.

    2007-01-01

    A prototype wireless acoustic measurement system (WAMS) is one of two main subsystems of the Acoustic Prediction/ Measurement Tool, which comprises software, acoustic instrumentation, and electronic hardware combined to afford integrated capabilities for predicting and measuring noise emitted by rocket and jet engines. The other main subsystem is described in the article on page 8. The WAMS includes analog acoustic measurement instrumentation and analog and digital electronic circuitry combined with computer wireless local-area networking to enable (1) measurement of sound-pressure levels at multiple locations in the sound field of an engine under test and (2) recording and processing of the measurement data. At each field location, the measurements are taken by a portable unit, denoted a field station. There are ten field stations, each of which can take two channels of measurements. Each field station is equipped with two instrumentation microphones, a micro- ATX computer, a wireless network adapter, an environmental enclosure, a directional radio antenna, and a battery power supply. The environmental enclosure shields the computer from weather and from extreme acoustically induced vibrations. The power supply is based on a marine-service lead-acid storage battery that has enough capacity to support operation for as long as 10 hours. A desktop computer serves as a control server for the WAMS. The server is connected to a wireless router for communication with the field stations via a wireless local-area network that complies with wireless-network standard 802.11b of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. The router and the wireless network adapters are controlled by use of Linux-compatible driver software. The server runs custom Linux software for synchronizing the recording of measurement data in the field stations. The software includes a module that provides an intuitive graphical user interface through which an operator at the control server

  13. Avian responses to selective logging shaped by species traits and logging practices.

    PubMed

    Burivalova, Zuzana; Lee, Tien Ming; Giam, Xingli; Şekercioğlu, Çağan Hakkı; Wilcove, David S; Koh, Lian Pin

    2015-06-07

    Selective logging is one of the most common forms of forest use in the tropics. Although the effects of selective logging on biodiversity have been widely studied, there is little agreement on the relationship between life-history traits and tolerance to logging. In this study, we assessed how species traits and logging practices combine to determine species responses to selective logging, based on over 4000 observations of the responses of nearly 1000 bird species to selective logging across the tropics. Our analysis shows that species traits, such as feeding group and body mass, and logging practices, such as time since logging and logging intensity, interact to influence a species' response to logging. Frugivores and insectivores were most adversely affected by logging and declined further with increasing logging intensity. Nectarivores and granivores responded positively to selective logging for the first two decades, after which their abundances decrease below pre-logging levels. Larger species of omnivores and granivores responded more positively to selective logging than smaller species from either feeding group, whereas this effect of body size was reversed for carnivores, herbivores, frugivores and insectivores. Most importantly, species most negatively impacted by selective logging had not recovered approximately 40 years after logging cessation. We conclude that selective timber harvest has the potential to cause large and long-lasting changes in avian biodiversity. However, our results suggest that the impacts can be mitigated to a certain extent through specific forest management strategies such as lengthening the rotation cycle and implementing reduced impact logging.

  14. Avian responses to selective logging shaped by species traits and logging practices

    PubMed Central

    Burivalova, Zuzana; Lee, Tien Ming; Giam, Xingli; Şekercioğlu, Çağan Hakkı; Wilcove, David S.; Koh, Lian Pin

    2015-01-01

    Selective logging is one of the most common forms of forest use in the tropics. Although the effects of selective logging on biodiversity have been widely studied, there is little agreement on the relationship between life-history traits and tolerance to logging. In this study, we assessed how species traits and logging practices combine to determine species responses to selective logging, based on over 4000 observations of the responses of nearly 1000 bird species to selective logging across the tropics. Our analysis shows that species traits, such as feeding group and body mass, and logging practices, such as time since logging and logging intensity, interact to influence a species' response to logging. Frugivores and insectivores were most adversely affected by logging and declined further with increasing logging intensity. Nectarivores and granivores responded positively to selective logging for the first two decades, after which their abundances decrease below pre-logging levels. Larger species of omnivores and granivores responded more positively to selective logging than smaller species from either feeding group, whereas this effect of body size was reversed for carnivores, herbivores, frugivores and insectivores. Most importantly, species most negatively impacted by selective logging had not recovered approximately 40 years after logging cessation. We conclude that selective timber harvest has the potential to cause large and long-lasting changes in avian biodiversity. However, our results suggest that the impacts can be mitigated to a certain extent through specific forest management strategies such as lengthening the rotation cycle and implementing reduced impact logging. PMID:25994673

  15. Canonical acoustic thin-shell wormholes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jusufi, Kimet; Övgün, Ali

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, we model a canonical acoustic thin-shell wormhole (CATSW) in the framework of analogue gravity systems. In this model, we apply cut and paste technique to join together two spherically symmetric, analogue canonical acoustic solutions, and compute the analogue surface density/surface pressure of the fluid using the Darmois-Israel formalism. We study the stability analyses by using a linear barotropic fluid (LBF), Chaplygin fluid (CF), logarithmic fluid (LogF), polytropic fluid (PF) and finally Van der Waals Quintessence (VDWQ). We show that a kind of analog acoustic fluid with negative energy is required at the throat to keep the wormhole stable. It is argued that CATSW can be a stabile thin-shell wormhole if we choose a suitable parameter values.

  16. Data Mining of Network Logs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collazo, Carlimar

    2011-01-01

    The statement of purpose is to analyze network monitoring logs to support the computer incident response team. Specifically, gain a clear understanding of the Uniform Resource Locator (URL) and its structure, and provide a way to breakdown a URL based on protocol, host name domain name, path, and other attributes. Finally, provide a method to perform data reduction by identifying the different types of advertisements shown on a webpage for incident data analysis. The procedures used for analysis and data reduction will be a computer program which would analyze the URL and identify and advertisement links from the actual content links.

  17. Balloon logging with the inverted skyline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mosher, C. F.

    1975-01-01

    There is a gap in aerial logging techniques that has to be filled. The need for a simple, safe, sizeable system has to be developed before aerial logging will become effective and accepted in the logging industry. This paper presents such a system designed on simple principles with realistic cost and ecological benefits.

  18. 10 CFR 34.71 - Utilization logs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Utilization logs. 34.71 Section 34.71 Energy NUCLEAR... RADIOGRAPHIC OPERATIONS Recordkeeping Requirements § 34.71 Utilization logs. (a) Each licensee shall maintain utilization logs showing for each sealed source the following information: (1) A description, including...

  19. 10 CFR 34.71 - Utilization logs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Utilization logs. 34.71 Section 34.71 Energy NUCLEAR... RADIOGRAPHIC OPERATIONS Recordkeeping Requirements § 34.71 Utilization logs. (a) Each licensee shall maintain utilization logs showing for each sealed source the following information: (1) A description, including...

  20. 29 CFR 1917.18 - Log handling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Log handling. 1917.18 Section 1917.18 Labor Regulations...) MARINE TERMINALS Marine Terminal Operations § 1917.18 Log handling. (a) The employer shall ensure that structures (bunks) used to contain logs have rounded corners and rounded structural parts to avoid...

  1. 10 CFR 34.71 - Utilization logs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Utilization logs. 34.71 Section 34.71 Energy NUCLEAR... RADIOGRAPHIC OPERATIONS Recordkeeping Requirements § 34.71 Utilization logs. (a) Each licensee shall maintain utilization logs showing for each sealed source the following information: (1) A description, including...

  2. 10 CFR 34.71 - Utilization logs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Utilization logs. 34.71 Section 34.71 Energy NUCLEAR... RADIOGRAPHIC OPERATIONS Recordkeeping Requirements § 34.71 Utilization logs. (a) Each licensee shall maintain utilization logs showing for each sealed source the following information: (1) A description, including...

  3. 29 CFR 1917.18 - Log handling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Log handling. 1917.18 Section 1917.18 Labor Regulations...) MARINE TERMINALS Marine Terminal Operations § 1917.18 Log handling. (a) The employer shall ensure that structures (bunks) used to contain logs have rounded corners and rounded structural parts to avoid...

  4. 47 CFR 73.1820 - Station log.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Station log. 73.1820 Section 73.1820... Rules Applicable to All Broadcast Stations § 73.1820 Station log. (a) Entries must be made in the station log either manually by a person designated by the licensee who is in actual charge of...

  5. 47 CFR 87.109 - Station logs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Station logs. 87.109 Section 87.109... Operating Requirements and Procedures Operating Procedures § 87.109 Station logs. (a) A station at a fixed location in the international aeronautical mobile service must maintain a log in accordance with Annex...

  6. 10 CFR 34.71 - Utilization logs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Utilization logs. 34.71 Section 34.71 Energy NUCLEAR... RADIOGRAPHIC OPERATIONS Recordkeeping Requirements § 34.71 Utilization logs. (a) Each licensee shall maintain utilization logs showing for each sealed source the following information: (1) A description, including...

  7. 47 CFR 73.1820 - Station log.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Station log. 73.1820 Section 73.1820... Rules Applicable to All Broadcast Stations § 73.1820 Station log. (a) Entries must be made in the station log either manually by a person designated by the licensee who is in actual charge of...

  8. 47 CFR 73.1820 - Station log.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Station log. 73.1820 Section 73.1820... Rules Applicable to All Broadcast Stations § 73.1820 Station log. (a) Entries must be made in the station log either manually by a person designated by the licensee who is in actual charge of...

  9. 47 CFR 73.1820 - Station log.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Station log. 73.1820 Section 73.1820... Rules Applicable to All Broadcast Stations § 73.1820 Station log. (a) Entries must be made in the station log either manually by a person designated by the licensee who is in actual charge of...

  10. 47 CFR 87.109 - Station logs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Station logs. 87.109 Section 87.109... Operating Requirements and Procedures Operating Procedures § 87.109 Station logs. (a) A station at a fixed location in the international aeronautical mobile service must maintain a log in accordance with Annex...

  11. 47 CFR 73.1820 - Station log.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Station log. 73.1820 Section 73.1820... Rules Applicable to All Broadcast Stations § 73.1820 Station log. (a) Entries must be made in the station log either manually by a person designated by the licensee who is in actual charge of...

  12. 47 CFR 87.109 - Station logs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Station logs. 87.109 Section 87.109... Operating Requirements and Procedures Operating Procedures § 87.109 Station logs. (a) A station at a fixed location in the international aeronautical mobile service must maintain a log in accordance with Annex...

  13. 29 CFR 1917.18 - Log handling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Log handling. 1917.18 Section 1917.18 Labor Regulations...) MARINE TERMINALS Marine Terminal Operations § 1917.18 Log handling. (a) The employer shall ensure that structures (bunks) used to contain logs have rounded corners and rounded structural parts to avoid...

  14. 47 CFR 87.109 - Station logs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Station logs. 87.109 Section 87.109... Operating Requirements and Procedures Operating Procedures § 87.109 Station logs. (a) A station at a fixed location in the international aeronautical mobile service must maintain a log in accordance with Annex...

  15. 29 CFR 1917.18 - Log handling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Log handling. 1917.18 Section 1917.18 Labor Regulations...) MARINE TERMINALS Marine Terminal Operations § 1917.18 Log handling. (a) The employer shall ensure that structures (bunks) used to contain logs have rounded corners and rounded structural parts to avoid...

  16. 29 CFR 1917.18 - Log handling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Log handling. 1917.18 Section 1917.18 Labor Regulations...) MARINE TERMINALS Marine Terminal Operations § 1917.18 Log handling. (a) The employer shall ensure that structures (bunks) used to contain logs have rounded corners and rounded structural parts to avoid...

  17. 47 CFR 87.109 - Station logs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Station logs. 87.109 Section 87.109... Operating Requirements and Procedures Operating Procedures § 87.109 Station logs. (a) A station at a fixed location in the international aeronautical mobile service must maintain a log in accordance with Annex...

  18. Acoustic cryocooler

    DOEpatents

    Swift, Gregory W.; Martin, Richard A.; Radenbaugh, Ray

    1990-01-01

    An acoustic cryocooler with no moving parts is formed from a thermoacoustic driver (TAD) driving a pulse tube refrigerator (PTR) through a standing wave tube. Thermoacoustic elements in the TAD are spaced apart a distance effective to accommodate the increased thermal penetration length arising from the relatively low TAD operating frequency in the range of 15-60 Hz. At these low operating frequencies, a long tube is required to support the standing wave. The tube may be coiled to reduce the overall length of the cryocooler. One or two PTR's are located on the standing wave tube adjacent antinodes in the standing wave to be driven by the standing wave pressure oscillations. It is predicted that a heat input of 1000 W at 1000 K will maintian a cooling load of 5 W at 80 K.

  19. Acoustically-Evoked Auditory Change Complex in Children with Auditory Neuropathy Spectrum Disorder: A Potential Objective Tool for Identifying Cochlear Implant Candidates

    PubMed Central

    He, Shuman; Grose, John H.; Teagle, Holly F.B.; Woodard, Jennifer; Park, Lisa R.; Hatch, Debora R.; Roush, Patricia; Buchman, Craig A.

    2014-01-01

    recorded in all stimulation conditions from all subjects tested in this study. The presence/absence, peak latency and amplitude, and response width of the onset response did not correlate with aided PBK word scores. The objective GDTs measured with the ACC recordings from seventeen subjects ranged from 10 to 100 ms. The ACC was not recorded from two subjects for any gap durations tested in this study. There was a robust negative correlation between objective GDTs and aided PBK word scores. In general, subjects with prolonged objective GDTs showed low aided PBK word scores. GDTs measured using electrophysiological recordings of the ACC correlated well with those measured using psychophysical procedures in four of five subjects who were evaluated using both procedures. Conclusions: The clinical application of the onset response in predicting open-set speech-perception ability is relatively limited in children with ANSD. The ACC recordings can be used to objectively evaluate temporal resolution abilities in children with ANSD having no severe comorbidities, and who are older than 1.9 years. The ACC can potentially be used as an objective tool to identify poor performers among children with ANSD using properly fit amplification, and who are thus, cochlear implant candidates. PMID:25422994

  20. On Physical Properties Acquired in ODP Logging and Possible Future Extensions in Log Interpretation -Leg 196 Nankai Seismogenic Zone Drilling-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikada, H.; Henry, P.; Ienaga, M.

    2003-12-01

    Leg-196 was conducted in May through June 2001 and continuous logging was performed using LWD. After the leg, post cruise studies are on-going and various results are now being published by the on-board researchers. The subjects of these studies include fluid flow, formation of decollement, stress fields, overpressures, etc. Although there are number of issues to be investigated using logging tools available commercially, there exist the limitations in the current ODP in the utilization of tools, such as nuclear magnetoresonance tools, ultrasonic tools, core samplers, dynamic testers, microscanners with doubled number of electrodes, multi-level borehole seismic sensors, etc. In the course of the hardware development in the science community, we expect to use these logging tools and to think what will be achieved in science with increased acquirable number of physical properties. We now focus the issue in terms of the following concepts: logged physical properties as an interface between core and seismic data, and how seismolithological methods to be applied to seismogenic studies. Additional properties which may be obtained in the future include multi-lateral resistivity profile for plural depths of investigations, both free and bound porosities, effective permeability, borehole electrical images in 5 mm resolution with doubled coverage, seismic anisotropy, etc. Cluster analyses would also become possible and be stably applied to data. We believe these physical properties would surely extend what we do with data to certain possible directions: fracture analyses, underground fluid circulations, stress orientations and possibly quantitative stress analyses, etc. We would like to discuss what could have been obtained if there were other physical properties available using examples from the leg-196.

  1. Gas Hydrate Research Coring and Downhole Logging Operational Protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collett, T. S.; Riedel, M.; Malone, M.

    2006-12-01

    Recent gas hydrate deep coring and downhole logging projects, including ODP Leg 204, IODP Expedition 311, and the India NGHP-01 effort have contributed greatly to our understanding of the geologic controls on the occurrence of gas hydrate. These projects have also built on the relatively sparse history of gas hydrate drilling experience to collectively develop a unique operational protocol to examine and sample gas hydrate in nature. The ideal gas hydrate research drill site in recent history, consists of at least three drill holes, with the first hole dedicated to LWD/MWD downhole logging in order to identify intervals to be pressurized cored and to collect critical petrophysical data. The second hole is usually dedicated for continuous coring operations. The third hole is used for special downhole tool measurements such as pressure coring and wire line logging. There is a strong scientific need to obtain LWD/MWD data prior to coring. The coring operations are complemented by frequent deployment of the PCS/HYACINTH pressure core systems. It is essential to know what the gas hydrate concentrations and vertical distribution are before deploying the available pressure core systems in order to choose the optimum depths for pressure coring operations. The coring operations are also complemented by frequent sampling for interstitial water, headspace gas, and microbiological analyses. Although those samples will be taken at relatively regular depths, the sampling frequency can be adjusted if gas hydrate concentrations and distribution can be forward predicted through the analysis of the LWD/MWD pre-core logging surveys. After completing the LWD/MWD logging program, usually as a dedicated drilling leg, field efforts will switch to conventional and pressure-controlled coring operations at each of the sites drilled during the LWD/MWD campaign. The standard continuous core hole will usually include APC coring to an expected refusal depth of ~100 mbsf; each hole is usually

  2. Porosity Log Prediction Using Artificial Neural Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwi Saputro, Oki; Lazuardi Maulana, Zulfikar; Dzar Eljabbar Latief, Fourier

    2016-08-01

    Well logging is important in oil and gas exploration. Many physical parameters of reservoir is derived from well logging measurement. Geophysicists often use well logging to obtain reservoir properties such as porosity, water saturation and permeability. Most of the time, the measurement of the reservoir properties are considered expensive. One of method to substitute the measurement is by conducting a prediction using artificial neural network. In this paper, artificial neural network is performed to predict porosity log data from other log data. Three well from ‘yy’ field are used to conduct the prediction experiment. The log data are sonic, gamma ray, and porosity log. One of three well is used as training data for the artificial neural network which employ the Levenberg-Marquardt Backpropagation algorithm. Through several trials, we devise that the most optimal input training is sonic log data and gamma ray log data with 10 hidden layer. The prediction result in well 1 has correlation of 0.92 and mean squared error of 5.67 x10-4. Trained network apply to other well data. The result show that correlation in well 2 and well 3 is 0.872 and 0.9077 respectively. Mean squared error in well 2 and well 3 is 11 x 10-4 and 9.539 x 10-4. From the result we can conclude that sonic log and gamma ray log could be good combination for predicting porosity with neural network.

  3. Logs Wanted - Dead or Alive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuchardt, A.; Morche, D.

    2015-12-01

    Rivers cover only a small part of the Earth`s surface, yet they transfer sediment in globally significant quantities. In mountainous regions, the majority of the total channel length occurs in headwater streams. Those mountain channels are influenced in terms of sediment connectivity by processes on the slopes. For example in such a sediment routing system, sediment originating from debris flows on the slopes is delivered along sediment pathways to the channel system and can be transported further downstream as solid load. Interruption of instream coarse sediment connectivity is closely related to the existence of channel blocking barriers which also can be formed by biota. By storing sediment large wood (LW) log jams disrupt in-channel sediment connectivity. We present a study design in order to decipher the short to long term effects (c. 10-2-102 years) of sediment (dis)connectivity effects of large wood. The study areas are two basins in mountain ranges in Germany and Austria. In Austria the drainage area of the river Fugnitz was chosen which is located in the National Park Thayatal. The other drainage area of the river Sieber in Saxony-Anhalt, Germany, is located in the Harz National Park. Since studies on LW and its geomorphological effects in Central European rivers are still rare the main goals of the project are: •to identify important triggers for LW transport from slopes into the channels •to examine the spatial distribution and characterization of LW in main and slope channels by mapping and dGPS measurements •to determine the effects of LW on channel hydraulic parameters (e.g. slope, width, grains size composition, roughness) by field measurements of channel long profiles and cross section with dGPS and Wolman particle counts •to quantify the direct effects of LW on discharge and bed load transport by measuring flow velocity with an Ott-Nautilus current meter and to measure bed load up- and downstream of log jams using a portable Helley

  4. Analysis of geophysical well logs obtained in the State 2-14 borehole, Salton Sea geothermal area, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paillet, Frederick L.; Morin, R.H.

    1988-01-01

    A complete suite of conventional geophysical well logs was obtained in the upper part of a 3220-m-deep borehole drilled into geothermally altered alluvial sediments on the southeastern edge of the Salton Sea. Geophysical logs obtained in the State 2-14 borehole indicate that neutron porosity, gamma-gamma, and deep-induction logs provide useful information on lithologic trends with depth. The natural gamma log contains almost continuous, high-frequency fluctuations that obscure lithologic trends and that may be related to recent radioisotope redistribution and departure from radiometric equilibrium. Acoustic transit time logs give unrealistically low in situ compressional velocities ranging from 1.8 to 3.0 km/s, whereas acoustic waveform logs indicate that sediment compressional velocities range from less than 3.0 km/s shallower than 1000 m in depth to almost 5.0 km/s at depths greater than 2000 m. Analyses indicate that most log values lie between two lithologic end points: an electrically conductive claystone with moderate neutron porosity, but no effective porosity, and an electrically nonconductive, fully cemented siltstone that has small but finite porosity. -from Authors

  5. Leak checker data logging system

    DOEpatents

    Gannon, J.C.; Payne, J.J.

    1996-09-03

    A portable, high speed, computer-based data logging system for field testing systems or components located some distance apart employs a plurality of spaced mass spectrometers and is particularly adapted for monitoring the vacuum integrity of a long string of a superconducting magnets such as used in high energy particle accelerators. The system provides precise tracking of a gas such as helium through the magnet string when the helium is released into the vacuum by monitoring the spaced mass spectrometers allowing for control, display and storage of various parameters involved with leak detection and localization. A system user can observe the flow of helium through the magnet string on a real-time basis hour the exact moment of opening of the helium input valve. Graph reading can be normalized to compensate for magnet sections that deplete vacuum faster than other sections between testing to permit repetitive testing of vacuum integrity in reduced time. 18 figs.

  6. Leak checker data logging system

    DOEpatents

    Gannon, Jeffrey C.; Payne, John J.

    1996-01-01

    A portable, high speed, computer-based data logging system for field testing systems or components located some distance apart employs a plurality of spaced mass spectrometers and is particularly adapted for monitoring the vacuum integrity of a long string of a superconducting magnets such as used in high energy particle accelerators. The system provides precise tracking of a gas such as helium through the magnet string when the helium is released into the vacuum by monitoring the spaced mass spectrometers allowing for control, display and storage of various parameters involved with leak detection and localization. A system user can observe the flow of helium through the magnet string on a real-time basis hour the exact moment of opening of the helium input valve. Graph reading can be normalized to compensate for magnet sections that deplete vacuum faster than other sections between testing to permit repetitive testing of vacuum integrity in reduced time.

  7. Analysis of Web Proxy Logs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fei, Bennie; Eloff, Jan; Olivier, Martin; Venter, Hein

    Network forensics involves capturing, recording and analysing network audit trails. A crucial part of network forensics is to gather evidence at the server level, proxy level and from other sources. A web proxy relays URL requests from clients to a server. Analysing web proxy logs can give unobtrusive insights to the browsing behavior of computer users and provide an overview of the Internet usage in an organisation. More importantly, in terms of network forensics, it can aid in detecting anomalous browsing behavior. This paper demonstrates the use of a self-organising map (SOM), a powerful data mining technique, in network forensics. In particular, it focuses on how a SOM can be used to analyse data gathered at the web proxy level.

  8. Iso-acoustic focusing of cells for size-insensitive acousto-mechanical phenotyping

    PubMed Central

    Augustsson, Per; Karlsen, Jonas T.; Su, Hao-Wei; Bruus, Henrik; Voldman, Joel

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical phenotyping of single cells is an emerging tool for cell classification, enabling assessment of effective parameters relating to cells' interior molecular content and structure. Here, we present iso-acoustic focusing, an equilibrium method to analyze the effective acoustic impedance of single cells in continuous flow. While flowing through a microchannel, cells migrate sideways, influenced by an acoustic field, into streams of increasing acoustic impedance, until reaching their cell-type specific point of zero acoustic contrast. We establish an experimental procedure and provide theoretical justifications and models for iso-acoustic focusing. We describe a method for providing a suitable acoustic contrast gradient in a cell-friendly medium, and use acoustic forces to maintain that gradient in the presence of destabilizing forces. Applying this method we demonstrate iso-acoustic focusing of cell lines and leukocytes, showing that acoustic properties provide phenotypic information independent of size. PMID:27180912

  9. Evaluation of Non-Nuclear Techniques for Well Logging: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, Leonard J.; Griffin, Jeffrey W.; Harris, R. V.; Denslow, Kayte M.; Moran, Traci L.

    2011-08-01

    The focus of this study is the understanding of the technical obstacles that hinder the replacement of and the disadvantages from the loss of extensive interpretation experience based on data accumulated with AmBe. Enhanced acoustic and electromagnetic sensing methods in combination with non-isotope-based well logging techniques have the potential to complement and/or replace existing isotope-based techniques, providing the opportunity to reduce oil industry dependence on isotopic sources such as AmBe.

  10. Correlating Log Messages for System Diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Gunasekaran, Raghul; Dillow, David A; Shipman, Galen M; Maxwell, Don E; Hill, Jason J; Park, Byung H; Geist, Al

    2010-01-01

    In large-scale computing systems, the sheer volume of log data generated presents daunting challenges for debugging and monitoring of these systems. The Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility s premier simulation platform, the Cray XT5 known as Jaguar, can generate a few hundred thousand log entries in less than a minute for many system level events. Determining the root cause of such system events requires analyzing and interpretation of a large number of log messages. Most often, the log messages are best understood when they are interpreted collectively rather than individually. In this paper, we present our approach to interpreting log messages by identifying their commonalities and grouping them into clusters. Given a set of log messages within a time interval, we group the messages based on source, target, and/or error type, and correlate the messages with hardware and application information. We monitor the Lustre log messages in the XT5 console log and show that such grouping of log messages assists in detecting the source of system events. By intelligent grouping and correlation of events in the log, we are able to provide system administrators with meaningful information in a concise format for root cause analysis.

  11. Acoustic evaluation of cementing quality using obliquely incident ultrasonic signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Wen-Xing; Qiao, Wen-Xiao; Che, Xiao-Hua; Xie, Hui

    2014-09-01

    Ultrasonic cement bond logging is a widely used method for evaluating cementing quality. Conventional ultrasonic cement bond logging uses vertical incidence and cannot accurately evaluate lightweight cement bonding. Oblique incidence is a new technology for evaluating cement quality with improved accuracy for lightweight cements. In this study, we simulated models of acoustic impedance of cement and cementing quality using ultrasonic oblique incidence, and we obtained the relation between cementing quality, acoustic impedance of cement, and the acoustic attenuation coefficient of the A0-mode and S0-mode Lamb waves. Then, we simulated models of different cement thickness and we obtained the relation between cement thickness and the time difference of the arrival between the A0 and A0' modes.

  12. Acoustic source for generating an acoustic beam

    DOEpatents

    Vu, Cung Khac; Sinha, Dipen N.; Pantea, Cristian

    2016-05-31

    An acoustic source for generating an acoustic beam includes a housing; a plurality of spaced apart piezo-electric layers disposed within the housing; and a non-linear medium filling between the plurality of layers. Each of the plurality of piezoelectric layers is configured to generate an acoustic wave. The non-linear medium and the plurality of piezo-electric material layers have a matching impedance so as to enhance a transmission of the acoustic wave generated by each of plurality of layers through the remaining plurality of layers.

  13. Canonical Acoustics and Its Application to Surface Acoustic Wave on Acoustic Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jian Qi

    2016-08-01

    In a conventional formalism of acoustics, acoustic pressure p and velocity field u are used for characterizing acoustic waves propagating inside elastic/acoustic materials. We shall treat some fundamental problems relevant to acoustic wave propagation alternatively by using canonical acoustics (a more concise and compact formalism of acoustic dynamics), in which an acoustic scalar potential and an acoustic vector potential (Φ ,V), instead of the conventional acoustic field quantities such as acoustic pressure and velocity field (p,u) for characterizing acoustic waves, have been defined as the fundamental variables. The canonical formalism of the acoustic energy-momentum tensor is derived in terms of the acoustic potentials. Both the acoustic Hamiltonian density and the acoustic Lagrangian density have been defined, and based on this formulation, the acoustic wave quantization in a fluid is also developed. Such a formalism of acoustic potentials is employed to the problem of negative-mass-density assisted surface acoustic wave that is a highly localized surface bound state (an eigenstate of the acoustic wave equations). Since such a surface acoustic wave can be strongly confined to an interface between an acoustic metamaterial (e.g., fluid-solid composite structures with a negative dynamical mass density) and an ordinary material (with a positive mass density), it will give rise to an effect of acoustic field enhancement on the acoustic interface, and would have potential applications in acoustic device design for acoustic wave control.

  14. What Is an Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    ... ANAUSA.org Connect with us! What is an Acoustic Neuroma? Each heading slides to reveal information. Important ... Acoustic Neuroma Important Points To Know About an Acoustic Neuroma An acoustic neuroma, also called a vestibular ...

  15. Gravel-pack field examples of a new pulsed-neutron-activation logging technique

    SciTech Connect

    Caroll, J.F.; Smith, B.C. )

    1991-12-01

    Gravel packs traditionally have been evaluated with gamma/gamma density and neutron logging tools. These logging tools, particularly the density tools, do an acceptable job in most logging environments but have some limitations that affect their measurement resolution in attempts to define gravel-pack quality. The presence of high-density completion fluids significantly reduces the dynamic range of the conventional measurements. Low-contrast logging resolution is also encountered with the new matched-density gravel-pack systems that use matrix materials with densities near those of the completion fluids. This paper presents an alternative measurement of gravel-pack quality that is unaffected by the type of completion fluid present. The authors also present six field examples that demonstrate this new technique. Each example presents a different logging condition, e.g., heavy borehole fluid in a conventional gravel pack, gravel pack with sintered bauxite, two completions with Isopac gravel of different screen sizes, and multiple gravel-pack logs recorded before and after wireline repair work. Several of these examples show that neutron activation can be a useful method of gravel-pack analysis in some logging environments.

  16. The STAR ESL, electronic shift and handover log

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajdu, L.; Lauret, J.

    2008-07-01

    Keeping a clear and accurate experiment log is important for any scientific experiment. The concept is certainly not new but keeping accurate while useful records for a Nuclear Physics experiment such as the Solenoidal Tracker at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (STAR at RHIC) is not a priori a simple matter - STAR operates 24 hours a day for six months out of the year with more than 24 shift crews operating 16 different subsystems (some located remotely). To meet the challenge of not only logging the information but passing it in a concise manner from one shift to another, the STAR experiment has designed an Electronic Shift-Log (ESL), a flexible application written in Java and interfacing with the Data Acquisition tools, Quality Assurance reporting, Online shift crews or remote personnel and experts as well as including features such as shift change-over (or handover) forms, tailored to the sub-group of interest. We will present an overview of STAR's Electronic Log, a system that is clear, reliable, safe, consistent, easy to use and globally viewable in real time with secure connections.

  17. LOG PERIODIC DIPOLE ARRAY WITH PARASITIC ELEMENTS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The design and measured characteristics of dipole and monopole versions of a log periodic array with parasitic elements are discussed. In a dipole...for the elements to obtain log periodic performance of the anntenna. This design with parasitic elements lends itself to a monopole version of the...antenna which has a simplified feeding configuration. The result is a log periodic antenna design that can be used from high frequencies through microwave frequencies.

  18. Helicopter Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Exterior and interior noise problems are addressed both from the physics and engineering as well as the human factors point of view. The role of technology in closing the gap between what the customers and regulating agencies would like to have and what is available is explored. Noise regulation concepts, design, operations and testing for noise control, helicopter noise prediction, and research tools and measurements are among the topics covered.

  19. Planetary surface research with acoustic sounding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, C.; Seidensticker, K. J.

    2007-08-01

    Planetary space missions like Rosetta and ExoMars put more and more emphasis on the in-situ investigation of planetary surfaces. The use of mechanical vibrations in the audible frequency range provide a new means to study the structure and properties of the surface layers of terrestrial planets and minor bodies like comets. As the first of this new type of instruments, the Comet Acoustic Surface Sounding Experiment (CASSE) on the Rosetta Lander Philae intends to determine elastic parameters and the structure of the surface layer of the target comet. One drawback of CASSE is unknown possibly weak coupling to the cometary surface. A DFG project is being conducted at the DLR - Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt - to test the applicability of planetary penetration instruments like PLUTO, planetary sampling tool, developed for the Mars Express lander Beagle 2, or MUPUS, a heat probe instrument also on Philae, as stronger acoustic sources as well as to develop new methods for the analysis of acoustic data. From the analysis of the polarisation of the recorded acoustic signals it is possible to separate the mixture of different propagating wave types. These identified waves can be used for the determination of mechanical soil properties and near-surface layering. We also will present how acoustic receivers can be used to locate acoustic penetrators or nearby seismic sources using the travel time and/or the polarisation of the acoustic waves.

  20. Application of fullbore formation microimager logging in the evaluation of anisotropic resistivity in a thin interbed reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fei; Bian, Hui-yuan; Gao, Xu-hua; Pan, Bao-zhi

    2016-08-01

    Oil and gas reserves in sand-shale thin interbeds are extensive, but it is a challenge to achieve satisfactory precision in the identification of these interbeds using traditional logging data. Phasor induction and three-component induction logging are appropriate tools for the identification of sand-shale interbeds. Unfortunately, phasor induction data are expensive and three-component induction logging is rarely used in major domestic oil fields. As a result, evaluation of sand-shale thin interbeds heavily depends on a traditional logging suite, general image logging, array lateral logging and array induction logging, and so on. In this paper, we investigate the sand-shale thin interbed region in the northern part of the Sulige field. We propose a comprehensive method of anisotropic evaluation which is based on the combination of wellbore microresistivity image logging (fullbore formation microimage (FMI)) and high-resolution array induction logging (HRLA), where HRLA can be used instead of a traditional logging suite or high-resolution array lateral logging. The proposed method works well in the evaluation of thin interbeds in the northern part of the Sulige field. In this paper, the combination of FMI and deep resistivity of HRLA is used. It should be noted that it is possible to use deep resistivity of conventional laterolog or array induction log instead of HRLA.

  1. 47 CFR 80.409 - Station logs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... principal radiotelegraph operating room during the voyage. (c) Public coast station logs. Public coast... made comparing the radio station clock with standard time, including errors observed and...

  2. 47 CFR 80.409 - Station logs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... principal radiotelegraph operating room during the voyage. (c) Public coast station logs. Public coast... made comparing the radio station clock with standard time, including errors observed and...

  3. 47 CFR 80.409 - Station logs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... principal radiotelegraph operating room during the voyage. (c) Public coast station logs. Public coast... made comparing the radio station clock with standard time, including errors observed and...

  4. 47 CFR 80.409 - Station logs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... principal radiotelegraph operating room during the voyage. (c) Public coast station logs. Public coast... made comparing the radio station clock with standard time, including errors observed and...

  5. 47 CFR 80.409 - Station logs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... principal radiotelegraph operating room during the voyage. (c) Public coast station logs. Public coast... made comparing the radio station clock with standard time, including errors observed and...

  6. Optimal message log reclamation for independent checkpointing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Yi-Min; Fuchs, W. Kent

    1993-01-01

    Independent (uncoordinated) check pointing for parallel and distributed systems allows maximum process autonomy but suffers from possible domino effects and the associated storage space overhead for maintaining multiple checkpoints and message logs. In most research on check pointing and recovery, it was assumed that only the checkpoints and message logs older than the global recovery line can be discarded. It is shown how recovery line transformation and decomposition can be applied to the problem of efficiently identifying all discardable message logs, thereby achieving optimal garbage collection. Communication trace-driven simulation for several parallel programs is used to show the benefits of the proposed algorithm for message log reclamation.

  7. Symptoms of Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions to Ask Yourself ... Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions to Ask Yourself ...

  8. NPL closes acoustics department

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Extance, Andy

    2016-11-01

    The UK's National Physical Laboratory (NPL) has withdrawn funding for its acoustics, polymer and thermoelectrics groups, triggering concern among airborne acoustics specialists that the move could undermine the country's noise-management policies.

  9. Identifying the Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions to Ask Yourself ... Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions to Ask Yourself ...

  10. Flow rate logging seepage meter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reay, William G. (Inventor); Walthall, Harry G. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    An apparatus for remotely measuring and logging the flow rate of groundwater seepage into surface water bodies. As groundwater seeps into a cavity created by a bottomless housing, it displaces water through an inlet and into a waterproof sealed upper compartment, at which point, the water is collected by a collection bag, which is contained in a bag chamber. A magnet on the collection bag approaches a proximity switch as the collection bag fills, and eventually enables the proximity switch to activate a control circuit. The control circuit then rotates a three-way valve from the collection path to a discharge path, enables a data logger to record the time, and enables a pump, which discharges the water from the collection bag, through the three-way valve and pump, and into the sea. As the collection bag empties, the magnet leaves the proximity of the proximity switch, and the control circuit turns off the pump, resets the valve to provide a collection path, and restarts the collection cycle.

  11. Utterance Verification Using State-Level Log-Likelihood Ratio with Frame and State Selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Suk-Bong; Kim, Hoirin

    This paper suggests utterance verification system using state-level log-likelihood ratio with frame and state selection. We use hidden Markov models for speech recognition and utterance verification as acoustic models and anti-phone models. The hidden Markov models have three states and each state represents different characteristics of a phone. Thus we propose an algorithm to compute state-level log-likelihood ratio and give weights on states for obtaining more reliable confidence measure of recognized phones. Additionally, we propose a frame selection algorithm to compute confidence measure on frames including proper speech in the input speech. In general, phone segmentation information obtained from speaker-independent speech recognition system is not accurate because triphone-based acoustic models are difficult to effectively train for covering diverse pronunciation and coarticulation effect. So, it is more difficult to find the right matched states when obtaining state segmentation information. A state selection algorithm is suggested for finding valid states. The proposed method using state-level log-likelihood ratio with frame and state selection shows that the relative reduction in equal error rate is 18.1% compared to the baseline system using simple phone-level log-likelihood ratios.

  12. Rock Mass Characterization by High-Resolution Sonic and GSI Borehole Logging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agliardi, F.; Sapigni, M.; Crosta, G. B.

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the relationships between the in situ P-wave velocity (Vp) of rock masses, measured by borehole acoustic logging, and their Geological Strength Index (GSI), to support a reliable assessment of equivalent continuum rock mass properties at depth. We quantified both Vp and GSI in three deep boreholes drilled in a crystalline core complex of the central Italian Alps. The boreholes were driven up to 400 m in depth and provided high-quality drill cores in gneiss, schist and metasedimentary rocks with variable lithology. Geological and geomechanical logging was carried out for over 800 m of cores, and acoustic logging was performed for more than 600 m of borehole length. High-resolution core logging in terms of GSI was obtained using an original quantitative approach. Candidate empirical correlation functions linking Vp and GSI were tested by a two-step statistical analysis of the experimental dataset, including outlier removal and nonlinear regression analysis. We propose a sigmoid Vp-GSI equation valid over a depth range between 100 and 400 m. This accounts for extremely variable lithological, weathering and rock mass damage conditions, complementing existing shallow-depth approaches and showing potential for practical applications in different engineering settings.

  13. Acoustic emission frequency discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sugg, Frank E. (Inventor); Graham, Lloyd J. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    In acoustic emission nondestructive testing, broadband frequency noise is distinguished from narrow banded acoustic emission signals, since the latter are valid events indicative of structural flaws in the material being examined. This is accomplished by separating out those signals which contain frequency components both within and beyond (either above or below) the range of valid acoustic emission events. Application to acoustic emission monitoring during nondestructive bond verification and proof loading of undensified tiles on the Space Shuttle Orbiter is considered.

  14. Deep Water Ocean Acoustics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-17

    under-ice scattering , bathymetric diffraction and the application of the ocean acoustic Parabolic Equation to infrasound. 2. Tasks a. Task 1...QSR-14C0172-Ocean Acoustics -063015 Figure 10. Estimated reflection coefficient as a function of frequency by taking the difference of downgoing and...OASIS, INC. 1 Report No. QSR-14C0172-Ocean Acoustics -063015 Quarterly Progress Report Technical and Financial Deep Water Ocean Acoustics

  15. Deep Water Ocean Acoustics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-19

    OASIS, INC. 1 Report No. QSR-14C0172-Ocean Acoustics-093015 Quarterly Progress Report Technical and Financial Deep Water Ocean Acoustics...number. 1. REPORT DATE OCT 2015 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 01-07-2015 to 30-09-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Deep Water Ocean Acoustics...understanding of the impact of the ocean and seafloor environmental variability on deep- water (long-range) ocean acoustic propagation and to develop

  16. Shallow Water Acoustics Studies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Shallow Water Acoustics Studies James F. Lynch MS #12...N00014-14-1-0040 http://acoustics.whoi.edu/sw06/ LONG TERM GOALS The long term goals of our shallow water acoustics work are to: 1) understand the...nature of low frequency (10-1500 Hz) acoustic propagation, scattering and noise in shallow water when strong oceanic variability is present in the

  17. Range-Dependent Acoustic Propagation in Shallow Water with Elastic Bottom Effects

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Range-Dependent Acoustic Propagation in Shallow Water...bottom-interacting acoustic propagation including sediment anisotropy and anelasticty. OBJECTIVES The specific objectives of this research...are to develop practical theoretical and software tools for employing a fully elastic version of two-way coupled modes for modeling seismo- acoustic

  18. MO-A-BRD-07: Feasibility of X-Ray Acoustic Computed Tomography as a Tool for Calibration and In Vivo Dosimetry of Radiotherapy Electron and Photon Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Hickling, S; Hobson, M; El Naqa, I

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: This work simulates radiation-induced acoustic waves to assess the feasibility of x-ray acoustic computed tomography (XACT) as a dosimeter. XACT exploits the phenomenon that acoustic waves with amplitude proportional to the dose deposited are induced following a radiation pulse. After detecting these acoustic waves with an ultrasound transducer, an image of the dose distribution can be reconstructed in realtime. Methods: Monte Carlo was used to simulate the dose distribution for monoenergetic 6 MeV photon and 9 MeV electron beams incident on a water tank. The dose distribution for a prostate patient planned with a photon 4-field box technique was calculated using clinical treatment planning software. All three dose distributions were converted into initial pressure distributions, and transportation of the induced acoustic waves was simulated using an open-source toolkit. Ideal transducers were placed around the circumference of the target to detect the acoustic waves, and a time reversal reconstruction algorithm was used to obtain an XACT image of the dose for each radiation pulse. Results: For the photon water tank relative dosimetry case, it was found that the normalized acoustic signal amplitude agreed with the normalized dose at depths from 0 cm to 10 cm, with an average percent difference of 0.5%. For the reconstructed in-plane dose distribution of an electron water tank irradiation, all pixels passed a 3%–3 mm 2D gamma test. The reconstructed prostate dose distribution closely resembled the plan, with 89% of pixels passing a 3%–3 mm 2D gamma test. For all situations, the amplitude of the induced acoustic waves ranged from 0.01 Pa to 1 Pa. Conclusion: Based on the amplitude of the radiation-induced acoustic waves and accuracy of the reconstructed dose distributions, XACT is a feasible technique for dosimetry in both calibration and in vivo environments for photon and electron beams and merits further investigation. Funding from NSERC, CIHR and Mc

  19. Coding Acoustic Metasurfaces.

    PubMed

    Xie, Boyang; Tang, Kun; Cheng, Hua; Liu, Zhengyou; Chen, Shuqi; Tian, Jianguo

    2017-02-01

    Coding acoustic metasurfaces can combine simple logical bits to acquire sophisticated functions in wave control. The acoustic logical bits can achieve a phase difference of exactly π and a perfect match of the amplitudes for the transmitted waves. By programming the coding sequences, acoustic metasurfaces with various functions, including creating peculiar antenna patterns and waves focusing, have been demonstrated.

  20. Tutorial on architectural acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Neil; Talaske, Rick; Bistafa, Sylvio

    2002-11-01

    This tutorial is intended to provide an overview of current knowledge and practice in architectural acoustics. Topics covered will include basic concepts and history, acoustics of small rooms (small rooms for speech such as classrooms and meeting rooms, music studios, small critical listening spaces such as home theatres) and the acoustics of large rooms (larger assembly halls, auditoria, and performance halls).

  1. Limits of rapid log P determination methods for highly lipophilic and flexible compounds.

    PubMed

    Martel, Sophie; Begnaud, Frédéric; Schuler, William; Gillerat, Fabrice; Oberhauser, Nils; Nurisso, Alessandra; Carrupt, Pierre-Alain

    2016-04-07

    Lipophilicity is of crucial importance in many fields including pharmaceutical, environmental, cosmetic and food industries. Whereas different experimental strategies have been developed for rapid lipophilicity determination of new chemical entities, log P determination of highly lipophilic compounds is always challenging. In this study, three published chromatographic methods have been compared on a series of phenylalkanoic acids including the pro-perfume HaloscentD (HD-C12). Different log P values were obtained depending on the chromatographic method used for log P estimation. Molecular modelling suggested that log P variations may be due to the chromatographic conditions applied (isocratic or gradient mode, ratio methanol/water in the mobile phase), responsible of specific conformations of the molecule in solution. Thus, for flexible compounds, published methods have to be used with caution and considered as a good tool to estimate a log P range, depending on the molecular conformational state.

  2. Stratigraphy of the Devonian Chattanooga and Ohio shales and equivalents in the Appalachian basin: an example of long-range subsurface correlation using gamma-ray logs

    SciTech Connect

    Roen, J.B.

    1980-01-01

    The correlations discussed demonstrate the utility of the gamma-ray log for regional, basinwide stratigraphic studies. Through the use of these logs, suggested correlations based on paleontologic evidence (Hass, 1956) were confirmed and new correlations were established in the Appalachian basin across at least 700 miles. These logs used in conjunction with a few lithologic logs and gamma-ray profiles of surface sections (Ettensohn and others, 1979) have proven to be a useful tool for long-range stratigraphic studies.

  3. 40 CFR 90.412 - Data logging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Data logging. 90.412 Section 90.412....412 Data logging. (a) A computer or any other automatic data collection (ADC) device(s) may be used as long as the system meets the requirements of this subpart. (b) Determine from the data...

  4. 40 CFR 90.412 - Data logging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Data logging. 90.412 Section 90.412....412 Data logging. (a) A computer or any other automatic data collection (ADC) device(s) may be used as long as the system meets the requirements of this subpart. (b) Determine from the data...

  5. 40 CFR 90.412 - Data logging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Data logging. 90.412 Section 90.412....412 Data logging. (a) A computer or any other automatic data collection (ADC) device(s) may be used as long as the system meets the requirements of this subpart. (b) Determine from the data...

  6. 40 CFR 89.409 - Data logging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Data logging. 89.409 Section 89.409... Data logging. (a) A computer or any other automatic data processing device(s) may be used as long as the system meets the requirements of this subpart. (b) Determine from the data collection records...

  7. 40 CFR 91.412 - Data logging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Data logging. 91.412 Section 91.412... EMISSIONS FROM MARINE SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 91.412 Data logging. (a) A computer or any other automatic data collection (ADC) device(s) may be used as long as the system meets...

  8. 40 CFR 91.412 - Data logging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Data logging. 91.412 Section 91.412... EMISSIONS FROM MARINE SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 91.412 Data logging. (a) A computer or any other automatic data collection (ADC) device(s) may be used as long as the system meets...

  9. 40 CFR 89.409 - Data logging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Data logging. 89.409 Section 89.409... Data logging. (a) A computer or any other automatic data processing device(s) may be used as long as the system meets the requirements of this subpart. (b) Determine from the data collection records...

  10. 40 CFR 90.412 - Data logging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Data logging. 90.412 Section 90.412....412 Data logging. (a) A computer or any other automatic data collection (ADC) device(s) may be used as long as the system meets the requirements of this subpart. (b) Determine from the data...

  11. 40 CFR 89.409 - Data logging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Data logging. 89.409 Section 89.409... Data logging. (a) A computer or any other automatic data processing device(s) may be used as long as the system meets the requirements of this subpart. (b) Determine from the data collection records...

  12. 40 CFR 89.409 - Data logging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Data logging. 89.409 Section 89.409... Data logging. (a) A computer or any other automatic data processing device(s) may be used as long as the system meets the requirements of this subpart. (b) Determine from the data collection records...

  13. 40 CFR 91.412 - Data logging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Data logging. 91.412 Section 91.412... EMISSIONS FROM MARINE SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 91.412 Data logging. (a) A computer or any other automatic data collection (ADC) device(s) may be used as long as the system meets...

  14. 40 CFR 91.412 - Data logging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Data logging. 91.412 Section 91.412... EMISSIONS FROM MARINE SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 91.412 Data logging. (a) A computer or any other automatic data collection (ADC) device(s) may be used as long as the system meets...

  15. 40 CFR 89.409 - Data logging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Data logging. 89.409 Section 89.409... Data logging. (a) A computer or any other automatic data processing device(s) may be used as long as the system meets the requirements of this subpart. (b) Determine from the data collection records...

  16. 40 CFR 90.412 - Data logging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Data logging. 90.412 Section 90.412....412 Data logging. (a) A computer or any other automatic data collection (ADC) device(s) may be used as long as the system meets the requirements of this subpart. (b) Determine from the data...

  17. 40 CFR 91.412 - Data logging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Data logging. 91.412 Section 91.412... EMISSIONS FROM MARINE SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 91.412 Data logging. (a) A computer or any other automatic data collection (ADC) device(s) may be used as long as the system meets...

  18. Discover Presidential Log Cabins. Teacher's Discussion Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Park Service (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    Discover Presidential Log Cabins is a set of materials designed to help educate 6-8 grade students about the significance of three log cabin sites occupied by George Washington, Ulysses Grant, Abraham Lincoln, and Theodore Roosevelt. This teacher's discussion guide is intended for use as part of a larger, comprehensive social studies program, and…

  19. An overview of acoustic telemetry

    SciTech Connect

    Drumheller, D.S.

    1992-01-01

    Acoustic telemetry has been a dream of the drilling industry for the past 50 years. It offers the promise of data rates which are one-hundred times greater than existing technology. Such a system would open the door to true logging-while-drilling technology and bring enormous profits to its developers. The basic idea is to produce an encoded sound wave at the bottom of the well, let it propagate up the steel drillpipe, and extract the data from the signal at the surface. Unfortunately, substantial difficulties arise. The first difficult problem is to produce the sound wave. Since the most promising transmission wavelengths are about 20 feet, normal transducer efficiencies are quire low. Compounding this problem is the structural complexity of the bottomhole assembly and drillstring. For example, the acoustic impedance of the drillstring changes every 30 feet and produces an unusual scattering pattern in the acoustic transmission. This scattering pattern causes distortion of the signal and is often confused with signal attenuation. These problems are not intractable. Recent work has demonstrated that broad frequency bands exist which are capable of transmitting data at rates up to 100 bits per second. Our work has also identified the mechanism which is responsible for the observed anomalies in the patterns of signal attenuation. Furthermore in the past few years a body of experience has been developed in designing more efficient transducers for application to metal waveguides. The direction of future work is clear. New transducer designs which are more efficient and compatible with existing downhole power supplies need to be built and tested; existing field test data need to be analyzed for transmission bandwidth and attenuation; and the new and less expensive methods of collecting data on transmission path quality need to be incorporated into this effort. 11 refs.

  20. Indoor acoustic gain design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Concha-Abarca, Justo Andres

    2002-11-01

    The design of sound reinforcement systems includes many variables and usually some of these variables are discussed. There are criteria to optimize the performance of the sound reinforcement systems under indoor conditions. The equivalent acoustic distance, the necessary acoustic gain, and the potential acoustic gain are parameters which must be adjusted with respect to the loudspeaker array, electric power and directionality of loudspeakers, the room acoustics conditions, the distance and distribution of the audience, and the type of the original sources. The design and installation of front of the house and monitoring systems have individual criteria. This article is about this criteria and it proposes general considerations for the indoor acoustic gain design.

  1. Designing and Piloting a Leadership Daily Practice Log: Using Logs to Study the Practice of Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spillane, James P.; Zuberi, Anita

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This article aims to validate the Leadership Daily Practice (LDP) log, an instrument for conducting research on leadership in schools. Research Design: Using a combination of data sources--namely, a daily practice log, observations, and open-ended cognitive interviews--the authors evaluate the validity of the LDP log. Participants: Formal…

  2. Nondestructive Acoustic Imaging Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, Volker

    Acoustic imaging techniques are used in the field of nondestructive testing of technical components to measure defects such as lack of side wall fusion or cracks in welded joints. Data acquisition is performed by a remote-controlled manipulator and a PC for the mass storage of the high-frequency time-of-flight data at each probe position. The quality of the acoustic images and the interpretation relies on the proper understanding of the transmitted wave fronts and the arrangement of the probes in pulse-echo mode or in pitch-and-catch arrangement. The use of the Synthetic Aperture Focusing Technique allows the depth-dependent resolution to be replaced by a depth-independent resolution and the signal-to-noise ratio to be improved. Examples with surface-connected cracks are shown to demonstrate the improved features. The localization accuracy could be improved by entering 2-dimensional or 3-dimensional reconstructed data into the environment of a 3-dimensional CAD drawing. The propagation of ultrasonic waves through austenitic welds is disturbed by the anisotropic and inhomogeneous structure of the material. The effect is more or less severe depending upon the longitudinal or shear wave modes. To optimize the performance of an inspection software tool, a 3-dimensional CAD-Ray program has been implemented, where the shape of the inhomogeneous part of a weld can be simulated together with the grain structure based on the elastic constants. Ray-tracing results are depicted for embedded and for surface-connected defects.

  3. Accuracy and borehole influences in pulsed neutron gamma density logging while drilling.

    PubMed

    Yu, Huawei; Sun, Jianmeng; Wang, Jiaxin; Gardner, Robin P

    2011-09-01

    A new pulsed neutron gamma density (NGD) logging has been developed to replace radioactive chemical sources in oil logging tools. The present paper describes studies of near and far density measurement accuracy of NGD logging at two spacings and the borehole influences using Monte-Carlo simulation. The results show that the accuracy of near density is not as good as far density. It is difficult to correct this for borehole effects by using conventional methods because both near and far density measurement is significantly sensitive to standoffs and mud properties.

  4. Device and method for generating a beam of acoustic energy from a borehole, and applications thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Vu, Cung Khac; Sinha, Dipen N; Pantea, Cristian; Nihei, Kurt T; Schmitt, Denis P; Skelt, Christopher

    2013-10-01

    In some aspects of the invention, a method of generating a beam of acoustic energy in a borehole is disclosed. The method includes generating a first acoustic wave at a first frequency; generating a second acoustic wave at a second frequency different than the first frequency, wherein the first acoustic wave and second acoustic wave are generated by at least one transducer carried by a tool located within the borehole; transmitting the first and the second acoustic waves into an acoustically non-linear medium, wherein the composition of the non-linear medium produces a collimated beam by a non-linear mixing of the first and second acoustic waves, wherein the collimated beam has a frequency based upon a difference between the first frequency and the second frequency; and transmitting the collimated beam through a diverging acoustic lens to compensate for a refractive effect caused by the curvature of the borehole.

  5. Tests show production logging problems in horizontal gas wells

    SciTech Connect

    Branagan, P. ); Knight, B.L. ); Aslakson, J. ); Middlebrook, M.L. )

    1994-01-10

    A study has concluded that production logging tools employed to evaluate multiphase horizontal well production behavior should be carefully screened as to their response characteristics in fully-segregated, two-phase flow. The study, performed at Marathon Oil Co.'s petroleum technology center in Littleton, Colo., indicated that gas in highly deviated well bores segregates rapidly in the presence of water, creating a downhole environment that produces sporadic responses from full bore and diverter spinners as well as density and holdup tools. Gas Research Institute (GRI), as part of its horizontal gas well completion technology program, initiated the full-scale laboratory study to determine the severity and consequences of multiphase flow on tool response from horizontal well production. The paper discusses background of the problem, the test objectives, test facility, experimental procedures, single-phase flow, two-phase flow, and recommendations.

  6. Convolution effect on TCR log response curve and the correction method for it

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Q.; Liu, L. J.; Gao, J.

    2016-09-01

    Through-casing resistivity (TCR) logging has been successfully used in production wells for the dynamic monitoring of oil pools and the distribution of the residual oil, but its vertical resolution has limited its efficiency in identification of thin beds. The vertical resolution is limited by the distortion phenomenon of vertical response of TCR logging. The distortion phenomenon was studied in this work. It was found that the vertical response curve of TCR logging is the convolution of the true formation resistivity and the convolution function of TCR logging tool. Due to the effect of convolution, the measurement error at thin beds can reach 30% or even bigger. Thus the information of thin bed might be covered up very likely. The convolution function of TCR logging tool was obtained in both continuous and discrete way in this work. Through modified Lyle-Kalman deconvolution method, the true formation resistivity can be optimally estimated, so this inverse algorithm can correct the error caused by the convolution effect. Thus it can improve the vertical resolution of TCR logging tool for identification of thin beds.

  7. Multipurpose Acoustic Sensor for Downhole Fluid Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Pantea, Cristian

    2012-05-04

    The projects objectives and purpose are to: (1) development a multipurpose acoustic sensor for downhole fluid monitoring in Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) reservoirs over typical ranges of pressures and temperatures and demonstrate its capabilities and performance for different EGS systems; (2) determine in real-time and in a single sensor package several parameters - temperature, pressure, fluid flow and fluid properties; (3) needed in nearly every phase of an EGS project, including Testing of Injection and Production Wells, Reservoir Validation, Inter-well Connectivity, Reservoir Scale Up and Reservoir Sustainability. (4) Current sensors are limited to operating at lower temperatures, but the need is for logging at high temperatures. The present project deals with the development of a novel acoustic-based sensor that can work at temperatures up to 374 C, in inhospitable environments.

  8. Low frequency acoustic and electromagnetic scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hariharan, S. I.; Maccamy, R. C.

    1983-01-01

    This paper deals with two classes of problems arising from acoustics and electromagnetics scattering in the low frequency stations. The first class of problem is solving Helmholtz equation with Dirichlet boundary conditions on an arbitrary two dimensional body while the second one is an interior-exterior interface problem with Helmholtz equation in the exterior. Low frequency analysis show that there are two intermediate problems which solve the above problems accurate to 0(k(2) log k) where k is the frequency. These solutions greatly differ from the zero frequency approximations. For the Dirichlet problem numerical examples are shown to verify the theoretical estimates.

  9. Low frequency acoustic and electromagnetic scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hariharan, S. I.; Maccamy, R. C.

    1986-01-01

    This paper deals with two classes of problems arising from acoustics and electromagnetics scattering in the low frequency stations. The first class of problem is solving Helmholtz equation with Dirichlet boundary conditions on an arbitrary two dimensional body while the second one is an interior-exterior interface problem with Helmholtz equation in the exterior. Low frequency analysis show that there are two intermediate problems which solve the above problems accurate to 0(k/2/ log k) where k is the frequency. These solutions greatly differ from the zero frequency approximations. For the Dirichlet problem numerical examples are shown to verify the theoretical estimates.

  10. Design of a programmable active acoustics metamaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smoker, Jason J.

    Metamaterials are artificial materials engineered to provide properties which may not be readily available in nature. The development of such class of materials constitutes a new area of research that has grown significantly over the past decade. Acoustic metamaterials, specifically, are even more novel than their electromagnetic counterparts arising only in the latter half of the decade. Acoustic metamaterials provide a new tool in controlling the propagation of pressure waves. However, physical design and frequency tuning, is still a large obstacle when creating a new acoustic metamaterial. This dissertation describes active and programmable design for acoustic metamaterials which allows the same basic physical design principles to be used for a variety of application. With cloaking technology being of a great interest to the US Navy, the proposed design approach would enable the development of a metamaterial with spatially changing effective parameters while retaining a uniform physical design features. The effective parameters would be controlled by tuning smart actuators embedded inside the metamaterial structure. Since this design is based on dynamic effective parameters that can be electrically controlled, material property ranges of several orders of magnitude could potentially be achieved without changing any physical parameters. With such unique capabilities, physically realizable acoustic cloaks can be achieved and objects treated with these active metamaterials can become acoustically invisible.

  11. AST Launch Vehicle Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houston, Janice; Counter, D.; Giacomoni, D.

    2015-01-01

    The liftoff phase induces acoustic loading over a broad frequency range for a launch vehicle. These external acoustic environments are then used in the prediction of internal vibration responses of the vehicle and components which result in the qualification levels. Thus, predicting these liftoff acoustic (LOA) environments is critical to the design requirements of any launch vehicle. If there is a significant amount of uncertainty in the predictions or if acoustic mitigation options must be implemented, a subscale acoustic test is a feasible pre-launch test option to verify the LOA environments. The NASA Space Launch System (SLS) program initiated the Scale Model Acoustic Test (SMAT) to verify the predicted SLS LOA environments and to determine the acoustic reduction with an above deck water sound suppression system. The SMAT was conducted at Marshall Space Flight Center and the test article included a 5% scale SLS vehicle model, tower and Mobile Launcher. Acoustic and pressure data were measured by approximately 250 instruments. The SMAT liftoff acoustic results are presented, findings are discussed and a comparison is shown to the Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) results.

  12. Nonblocking and orphan free message logging protocols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvisi, Lorenzo; Hoppe, Bruce; Marzullo, Keith

    1992-01-01

    Currently existing message logging protocols demonstrate a classic pessimistic vs. optimistic tradeoff. We show that the optimistic-pessimistic tradeoff is not inherent to the problem of message logging. We construct a message-logging protocol that has the positive features of both optimistic and pessimistic protocol: our protocol prevents orphans and allows simple failure recovery; however, it requires no blocking in failure-free runs. Furthermore, this protocol does not introduce any additional message overhead as compared to one implemented for a system in which messages may be lost but processes do not crash.

  13. Recognizing Patterns In Log-Polar Coordinates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiman, Carl F. R.

    1992-01-01

    Log-Hough transform is basis of improved method for recognition of patterns - particularly, straight lines - in noisy images. Takes advantage of rotational and scale invariance of mapping from Cartesian to log-polar coordinates, and offers economy of representation and computation. Unification of iconic and Hough domains simplifies computations in recognition and eliminates erroneous quantization of slopes attributable to finite spacing of Cartesian coordinate grid of classical Hough transform. Equally efficient recognizing curves. Log-Hough transform more amenable to massively parallel computing architectures than traditional Cartesian Hough transform. "In-place" nature makes it possible to apply local pixel-neighborhood processing.

  14. Acoustic Translation of an Acoustically Levitated Sample

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, M. B.; Allen, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    Acoustic-levitation apparatus uses only one acoustic mode to move sample from one region of chamber to another. Sample heated and cooled quickly by translation between hot and cold regions of levitation chamber. Levitated sample is raised into furnace region by raising plunger. Frequency of sound produced by transducers adjusted by feedback system to maintain (102) resonant mode, which levitates sample midway between transducers and plunger regardless of plunger position.

  15. A fast forward algorithm for real-time geosteering of azimuthal gamma-ray logging.

    PubMed

    Qin, Zhen; Pan, Heping; Wang, Zhonghao; Wang, Bintao; Huang, Ke; Liu, Shaohua; Li, Gang; Amara Konaté, Ahmed; Fang, Sinan

    2017-05-01

    Geosteering is an effective method to increase the reservoir drilling rate in horizontal wells. Based on the features of an azimuthal gamma-ray logging tool and strata spatial location, a fast forward calculation method of azimuthal gamma-ray logging is deduced by using the natural gamma ray distribution equation in formation. The response characteristics of azimuthal gamma-ray logging while drilling in the layered formation models with different thickness and position are simulated and summarized by using the method. The result indicates that the method calculates quickly, and when the tool nears a boundary, the method can be used to identify the boundary and determine the distance from the logging tool to the boundary in time. Additionally, the formation parameters of the algorithm in the field can be determined after a simple method is proposed based on the information of an offset well. Therefore, the forward method can be used for geosteering in the field. A field example validates that the forward method can be used to determine the distance from the azimuthal gamma-ray logging tool to the boundary for geosteering in real-time.

  16. Acoustic telemetry and fisheries management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crossin, Glenn T.; Heupel, Michelle R.; Holbrook, Christopher; Hussey, Nigel E.; Lowerre-Barbieri, Susan K; Nguyen, Vivian M.; Raby, Graham D.; Cooke, Steven J.

    2017-01-01

    This paper reviews the use of acoustic telemetry as a tool for addressing issues in fisheries management, and serves as the lead to the special Feature Issue of Ecological Applications titled “Acoustic Telemetry and Fisheries Management”. Specifically, we provide an overview of the ways in which acoustic telemetry can be used to inform issues central to the ecology, conservation, and management of exploited and/or imperiled fish species. Despite great strides in this area in recent years, there are comparatively few examples where data have been applied directly to influence fisheries management and policy. We review the literature on this issue, identify the strengths and weaknesses of work done to date, and highlight knowledge gaps and difficulties in applying empirical fish telemetry studies to fisheries policy and practice. We then highlight the key areas of management and policy addressed, as well as the challenges that needed to be overcome to do this. We conclude with a set of recommendations about how researchers can, in consultation with stock assessment scientists and managers, formulate testable scientific questions to address and design future studies to generate data that can be used in a meaningful way by fisheries management and conservation practitioners. We also urge the involvement of relevant stakeholders (managers, fishers, conservation societies, etc.) early on in the process (i.e. in the co-creation of research projects), so that all priority questions and issues can be addressed effectively.

  17. Acoustic Telemetry and Fisheries Management.

    PubMed

    Crossin, Glenn T; Heupel, Michelle R; Holbrook, Christopher M; Hussey, Nigel E; Lowerre-Barbieri, Susan K; Nguyen, Vivian M; Raby, Graham D; Cooke, Steven J

    2017-03-15

    This paper reviews the use of acoustic telemetry as a tool for addressing issues in fisheries management, and serves as the lead to the special Feature Issue of Ecological Applications titled "Acoustic Telemetry and Fisheries Management". Specifically, we provide an overview of the ways in which acoustic telemetry can be used to inform issues central to the ecology, conservation, and management of exploited and/or imperiled fish species. Despite great strides in this area in recent years, there are comparatively few examples where data have been applied directly to influence fisheries management and policy. We review the literature on this issue, identify the strengths and weaknesses of work done to date, and highlight knowledge gaps and difficulties in applying empirical fish telemetry studies to fisheries policy and practice. We then highlight the key areas of management and policy addressed, as well as the challenges that needed to be overcome to do this. We conclude with a set of recommendations about how researchers can, in consultation with stock assessment scientists and managers, formulate testable scientific questions to address and design future studies to generate data that can be used in a meaningful way by fisheries management and conservation practitioners. We also urge the involvement of relevant stakeholders (managers, fishers, conservation societies, etc.) early on in the process (i.e. in the co-creation of research projects), so that all priority questions and issues can be addressed effectively. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  18. Acoustic purification of extracellular microvesicles.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyungheon; Shao, Huilin; Weissleder, Ralph; Lee, Hakho

    2015-03-24

    Microvesicles (MVs) are an increasingly important source for biomarker discovery and clinical diagnostics. The small size of MVs and their presence in complex biological environment, however, pose technical challenges in sample preparation, particularly when sample volumes are small. We herein present an acoustic nanofilter system that size-specifically separates MVs in a continuous and contact-free manner. The separation uses ultrasound standing waves to exert differential acoustic force on MVs according to their size and density. By optimizing the design of the ultrasound transducers and underlying electronics, we were able to achieve a high separation yield and resolution. The "filter size-cutoff" can be controlled electronically in situ, which enables versatile MV-size selection. We applied the acoustic nanofilter to isolate nanoscale (<200 nm) vesicles from cell culture media as well as MVs in stored red blood cell products. With the capacity for rapid and contact-free MV isolation, the developed system could become a versatile preparatory tool for MV analyses.

  19. Evaluation of historical dry well surveillance logs

    SciTech Connect

    Price, R.K.

    1996-09-09

    Several dry well surveillance logs from 1975 through 1995 for the SX Tank Farm have been examined to identify potential subsurface zones of radioactive contaminant migration. Several dynamic conditions of the gamma-ray emitting radioactive contaminant shave been identified.

  20. Expansion of industrial logging in Central Africa.

    PubMed

    Laporte, Nadine T; Stabach, Jared A; Grosch, Robert; Lin, Tiffany S; Goetz, Scott J

    2007-06-08

    Industrial logging has become the most extensive land use in Central Africa, with more than 600,000 square kilometers (30%) of forest currently under concession. With use of a time series of satellite imagery for the period from 1976 to 2003, we measured 51,916 kilometers of new logging roads. The density of roads across the forested region was 0.03 kilometer per square kilometer, but areas of Gabon and Equatorial Guinea had values over 0.09 kilometer per square kilometer. A new frontier of logging expansion was identified within the Democratic Republic of Congo, which contains 63% of the remaining forest of the region. Tree felling and skid trails increased disturbance in selectively logged areas.

  1. Optimal message log reclamation for uncoordinated checkpointing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Yi-Min; Fuchs, W. K.

    1994-01-01

    Uncoordinated checkpointing for message-passing systems allows maximum process autonomy and general nondeterministic execution, but suffers from potential domino effect and the large space overhead for maintaining checkpoints and message logs. Traditionally, it has been assumed that only obsolete checkpoints and message logs before the global recovery line can be garbage-collected. Recently, an approach to identifying all garbage checkpoints based on recovery line transformation and decomposition has been developed. We show in this paper that the same approach can be applied to the problem of identifying all garbage message logs for systems requiring message logging to record in-transit messages. Communication trace-driven simulation for several parallel programs is used to evaluate the proposed algorithm.

  2. 32 CFR 700.845 - Maintenance of logs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Maintenance of logs. 700.845 Section 700.845... Commanding Officers Afloat § 700.845 Maintenance of logs. (a) A deck log and an engineering log shall be... Naval Operations. (b) A compass record shall be maintained as an adjunct to the deck log. An...

  3. 29 CFR 42.7 - Complaint/directed action logs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Complaint/directed action logs. 42.7 Section 42.7 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor COORDINATED ENFORCEMENT § 42.7 Complaint/directed action logs. (a) To... operation of a system of coordinated Complaint/Directed Action Logs (logs). The logs shall be maintained...

  4. 29 CFR 42.7 - Complaint/directed action logs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Complaint/directed action logs. 42.7 Section 42.7 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor COORDINATED ENFORCEMENT § 42.7 Complaint/directed action logs. (a) To... operation of a system of coordinated Complaint/Directed Action Logs (logs). The logs shall be maintained...

  5. 32 CFR 700.845 - Maintenance of logs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Maintenance of logs. 700.845 Section 700.845... Commanding Officers Afloat § 700.845 Maintenance of logs. (a) A deck log and an engineering log shall be... Naval Operations. (b) A compass record shall be maintained as an adjunct to the deck log. An...

  6. 32 CFR 700.845 - Maintenance of logs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Maintenance of logs. 700.845 Section 700.845... Commanding Officers Afloat § 700.845 Maintenance of logs. (a) A deck log and an engineering log shall be... Naval Operations. (b) A compass record shall be maintained as an adjunct to the deck log. An...

  7. 29 CFR 42.7 - Complaint/directed action logs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Complaint/directed action logs. 42.7 Section 42.7 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor COORDINATED ENFORCEMENT § 42.7 Complaint/directed action logs. (a) To... operation of a system of coordinated Complaint/Directed Action Logs (logs). The logs shall be maintained...

  8. 29 CFR 42.7 - Complaint/directed action logs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Complaint/directed action logs. 42.7 Section 42.7 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor COORDINATED ENFORCEMENT § 42.7 Complaint/directed action logs. (a) To... operation of a system of coordinated Complaint/Directed Action Logs (logs). The logs shall be maintained...

  9. Web Logs in the English Classroom: More Than Just Chat.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Will

    2003-01-01

    Details the use and appeal of Web logs to enhance classroom discussion and allow for outside involvement in the classroom. Defines a Web log, addresses discussing literature in a Web log, and describes the author's first attempts at using Web-log technology. Presents considerations for using Web logs as part of classroom instruction. (SG)

  10. 29 CFR 42.7 - Complaint/directed action logs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Complaint/directed action logs. 42.7 Section 42.7 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor COORDINATED ENFORCEMENT § 42.7 Complaint/directed action logs. (a) To... operation of a system of coordinated Complaint/Directed Action Logs (logs). The logs shall be maintained...

  11. 32 CFR 700.845 - Maintenance of logs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Maintenance of logs. 700.845 Section 700.845... Commanding Officers Afloat § 700.845 Maintenance of logs. (a) A deck log and an engineering log shall be... Naval Operations. (b) A compass record shall be maintained as an adjunct to the deck log. An...

  12. 32 CFR 700.845 - Maintenance of logs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Maintenance of logs. 700.845 Section 700.845... Commanding Officers Afloat § 700.845 Maintenance of logs. (a) A deck log and an engineering log shall be... Naval Operations. (b) A compass record shall be maintained as an adjunct to the deck log. An...

  13. Downhole Logging Measurements from IODP Expedition 313: an Overview and Future Directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inwood, J.; Lofi, J.; Scienceparty, E.

    2009-12-01

    Downhole geophysical measurements and images allow the characterization of the lithology and physical properties of the subsurface, thus making a powerful contribution to the evaluation of facies and sediment composition and to the recognition of key surfaces in siliciclastic successions. The mission-specific IODP Expedition 313 (May-July 2009) cored and logged sequences deposited on the New Jersey continental margin during the post-Eocene ice-house world. One of the aims of the Expedition is to evaluate sequence stratigraphic facies models that predict depositional environments, sediment compositions, and stratal geometries in response to sea-level change. 5800 m of wireline logging data were collected in three boreholes drilled to a composite total of 2062 m; here we present an overview of these data. Continuous through-pipe spectral gamma ray logs were acquired in each borehole and repeated in open hole intervals for calibration. Magnetic susceptibility, resistivity, sonic and acoustic image logs were obtained in open hole at key intervals and/or where borehole conditions allowed. Due to space limitations on the offshore platform, Exp313 cores were not split. Samples from core catchers, whole-round multi-sensor track measurements, vertical seismic profiles and these logging data comprise the full data set at the time of this writing. Preliminary analysis shows lateral and vertical changes in the physical properties of the sediments that enable us to distinguish depositional intervals at several scales (cms - tens of meters). Medium to high resolution acoustic images of the borehole walls reveal sedimentary characteristics even within intervals of low core recovery, and provide an accurate core-depth positioning of some key surfaces. Likewise, the continuous spectral gamma logs allow assessment of lithologies in intervals with incomplete core recovery, and show great promise of providing excellent log-core-seismic correlations once the cores are split and fully

  14. Azimuthal cement evaluation with an acoustic phased-arc array transmitter: numerical simulations and field tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Che, Xiao-Hua; Qiao, Wen-Xiao; Ju, Xiao-Dong; Wang, Rui-Jia

    2016-03-01

    We developed a novel cement evaluation logging tool, named the azimuthally acoustic bond tool (AABT), which uses a phased-arc array transmitter with azimuthal detection capability. We combined numerical simulations and field tests to verify the AABT tool. The numerical simulation results showed that the radiation direction of the subarray corresponding to the maximum amplitude of the first arrival matches the azimuth of the channeling when it is behind the casing. With larger channeling size in the circumferential direction, the amplitude difference of the casing wave at different azimuths becomes more evident. The test results showed that the AABT can accurately locate the casing collars and evaluate the cement bond quality with azimuthal resolution at the casing—cement interface, and can visualize the size, depth, and azimuth of channeling. In the case of good casing—cement bonding, the AABT can further evaluate the cement bond quality at the cement—formation interface with azimuthal resolution by using the amplitude map and the velocity of the formation wave.

  15. Selective Logging, Fire, and Biomass in Amazonia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houghton, R. A.

    1999-01-01

    Biomass and rates of disturbance are major factors in determining the net flux of carbon between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere, and neither of them is well known for most of the earth's surface. Satellite data over large areas are beginning to be used systematically to measure rates of two of the most important types of disturbance, deforestation and reforestation, but these are not the only types of disturbance that affect carbon storage. Other examples include selective logging and fire. In northern mid-latitude forests, logging and subsequent regrowth of forests have, in recent decades, contributed more to the net flux of carbon between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere than any other type of land use. In the tropics logging is also becoming increasingly important. According to the FAO/UNEP assessment of tropical forests, about 25% of total area of productive forests have been logged one or more times in the 60-80 years before 1980. The fraction must be considerably greater at present. Thus, deforestation by itself accounts for only a portion of the emissions carbon from land. Furthermore, as rates of deforestation become more accurately measured with satellites, uncertainty in biomass will become the major factor accounting for the remaining uncertainty in estimates of carbon flux. An approach is needed for determining the biomass of terrestrial ecosystems. 3 Selective logging is increasingly important in Amazonia, yet it has not been included in region-wide, satellite-based assessments of land-cover change, in part because it is not as striking as deforestation. Nevertheless, logging affects terrestrial carbon storage both directly and indirectly. Besides the losses of carbon directly associated with selective logging, logging also increases the likelihood of fire.

  16. Conversation Threads Hidden within Email Server Logs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palus, Sebastian; Kazienko, Przemysław

    Email server logs contain records of all email Exchange through this server. Often we would like to analyze those emails not separately but in conversation thread, especially when we need to analyze social network extracted from those email logs. Unfortunately each mail is in different record and those record are not tided to each other in any obvious way. In this paper method for discussion threads extraction was proposed together with experiments on two different data sets - Enron and WrUT..

  17. 3D GPR Imaging of Wooden Logs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halabe, Udaya B.; Pyakurel, Sandeep

    2007-03-01

    There has been a lack of an effective NDE technique to locate internal defects within wooden logs. The few available elastic wave propagation based techniques are limited to predicting E values. Other techniques such as X-rays have not been very successful in detecting internal defects in logs. If defects such as embedded metals could be identified before the sawing process, the saw mills could significantly increase their production by reducing the probability of damage to the saw blade and the associated downtime and the repair cost. Also, if the internal defects such as knots and decayed areas could be identified in logs, the sawing blade can be oriented to exclude the defective portion and optimize the volume of high valued lumber that can be obtained from the logs. In this research, GPR has been successfully used to locate internal defects (knots, decays and embedded metals) within the logs. This paper discusses GPR imaging and mapping of the internal defects using both 2D and 3D interpretation methodology. Metal pieces were inserted in a log and the reflection patterns from these metals were interpreted from the radargrams acquired using 900 MHz antenna. Also, GPR was able to accurately identify the location of knots and decays. Scans from several orientations of the log were collected to generate 3D cylindrical volume. The actual location of the defects showed good correlation with the interpreted defects in the 3D volume. The time/depth slices from 3D cylindrical volume data were useful in understanding the extent of defects inside the log.

  18. Nearfield Acoustical Holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayek, Sabih I.

    Nearfield acoustical holography (NAH) is a method by which a set of acoustic pressure measurements at points located on a specific surface (called a hologram) can be used to image sources on vibrating surfaces on the acoustic field in three-dimensional space. NAH data are processed to take advantage of the evanescent wavefield to image sources that are separated less that one-eighth of a wavelength.

  19. Deep Water Acoustics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-28

    Estimates of basin-wide sound speed ( temperature ) fields obtained by the combination of acoustic, altimetry, and other data types with ocean...of acoustic coherence at long ranges in the ocean. Estimates of basin-wide sound speed ( temperature ) fields obtained by the combination of acoustic...index.html Award Number N00014-13-1-0053 LONG-TERM GOALS The ultimate limitations to the performance of long-range sonar are due to ocean sound speed

  20. Acoustic Communications (ACOMMS) ATD

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-14

    Acoustic Communications (ACOMMS) ATD Tam Nguyen 2531 Jefferson Davis Hwy Arlington, VA 22242 phone: (703) 604-6013 ext 520 fax: (703) 604-6056...email: NguyenTL@navsea.navy.mil Award # N0001499PD30007 LONG-TERM GOALS The goal of the recently completed Acoustic Communications Advanced...Technology Demonstration program (ACOMMS ATD) was to demonstrate long range and moderate data rate underwater acoustic communications between a submarine

  1. Deep Water Ocean Acoustics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-30

    OASIS, INC. 1 Report No. QSR-14C0172-Ocean Acoustics-043016 Quarterly Progress Report Technical and Financial Deep Water Ocean Acoustics...understanding of the impact of the ocean and seafloor environmental variability on deep- water (long-range) ocean acoustic propagation and to...improve our understanding. During the past few years, the physics effects studied have been three-dimensional propagation on global scales, deep water

  2. A new interface linking the ODP Log and RIDGE Multibeam Databases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reagan, M.; Haxby, W.; Broglia, C.

    2001-12-01

    Over the past few years, a major effort has been undertaken by ODP Logging Services to create an easily accessible, on-line database of the log data collected during ODP cruises. The database currently consists of data from Legs 101-197 which can be retrieved using any web browser via the ODP Logging Services web site (http://www.ldeo.columbia.edu/BRG/ODP/DATA). Concurrently the RIDGE Multibeam Synthesis project at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory (LDEO) has been developing its own online database of multibeam data that can be accessed at http://coast.ldeo.columbia.edu. Recently the capabilities of these two databases have been combined using MapAPP, an interface developed by the RIDGE Multibeam Synthesis project and modified by ODP Logging Services for use with the log database. Both databases can be accessed with a simple menu selection. The interface allows for graphical searching and selection of sites in the regional context of the multibeam data using a java applet. It retains the easy download capabilities built into the log database, but also provides several new features including the ability to plot log curves `on the fly'. This capability can be used to display logs from a single hole, or to compare logs from several holes, thus providing a regional view of the data. The integration of this new graphical interface with the extensive content of the ODP Log Database provides users with a powerful tool for viewing and manipulating data. Future enhancements are anticipated to provide even greater capabilities and ease of use.

  3. Description of borehole geophysical and geologist logs, Berks Sand Pit Superfund Site, Longswamp Township, Berks County, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Low, Dennis J.; Conger, Randall W.

    2003-01-01

    Between October 2002 and January 2003, geophysical logging was conducted in six boreholes at the Berks Sand Pit Superfund Site, Longswamp Township, Berks County, Pa., to determine (1) the waterproducing zones, water-receiving zones, zones of vertical borehole flow, orientation of fractures, and borehole and casing depth; and (2) the hydraulic interconnection between the six boreholes and the site extraction well. The boreholes range in depth from 61 to 270 feet. Geophysical logging included collection of caliper, natural-gamma, single-point-resistance, fluid-temperature, fluid-flow, and acoustic-televiewer logs. Caliper and acoustic-televiewer logs were used to locate fractures, joints, and weathered zones. Inflections on fluid-temperature and single-point-resistance logs indicated possible water-bearing fractures, and flowmeter measurements verified these locations. Single-point-resistance, natural-gamma, and geologist logs provided information on stratigraphy. Flowmeter measurements were conducted while the site extraction well was pumping and when it was inactive to determine the hydraulic connections between the extraction well and the boreholes. Borehole geophysical logging and heatpulse flowmetering indicate active flow in the boreholes. Two of the boreholes are in ground-water discharge areas, two boreholes are in ground-water recharge areas, and one borehole is in an intermediate regime. Flow was not determined in one borehole. Heatpulse flowmetering, in conjunction with the geologist logs, indicates highly weathered zones in the granitic gneiss can be permeable and effective transmitters of water, confirming the presence of a two-tiered ground-water-flow system. The effort to determine a hydraulic connection between the site extraction well and six logged boreholes was not conclusive. Three boreholes showed decreases in depth to water after pumping of the site extraction well; in two boreholes, the depth to water increased. One borehole was cased its

  4. Classical problems in computational aero-acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardin, Jay C.

    1996-01-01

    In relation to the expected problems in the development of computational aeroacoustics (CAA), the preliminary applications were to classical problems where the known analytical solutions could be used to validate the numerical results. Such comparisons were used to overcome the numerical problems inherent in these calculations. Comparisons were made between the various numerical approaches to the problems such as direct simulations, acoustic analogies and acoustic/viscous splitting techniques. The aim was to demonstrate the applicability of CAA as a tool in the same class as computational fluid dynamics. The scattering problems that occur are considered and simple sources are discussed.

  5. Acoustic dispersive prism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esfahlani, Hussein; Karkar, Sami; Lissek, Herve; Mosig, Juan R.

    2016-01-01

    The optical dispersive prism is a well-studied element, which allows separating white light into its constituent spectral colors, and stands in nature as water droplets. In analogy to this definition, the acoustic dispersive prism should be an acoustic device with capability of splitting a broadband acoustic wave into its constituent Fourier components. However, due to the acoustical nature of materials as well as the design and fabrication difficulties, there is neither any natural acoustic counterpart of the optical prism, nor any artificial design reported so far exhibiting an equivalent acoustic behaviour. Here, based on exotic properties of the acoustic transmission-line metamaterials and exploiting unique physical behaviour of acoustic leaky-wave radiation, we report the first acoustic dispersive prism, effective within the audible frequency range 800 Hz–1300 Hz. The dispersive nature, and consequently the frequency-dependent refractive index of the metamaterial are exploited to split the sound waves towards different and frequency-dependent directions. Meanwhile, the leaky-wave nature of the structure facilitates the sound wave radiation into the ambient medium.

  6. Acoustic dispersive prism.

    PubMed

    Esfahlani, Hussein; Karkar, Sami; Lissek, Herve; Mosig, Juan R

    2016-01-07

    The optical dispersive prism is a well-studied element, which allows separating white light into its constituent spectral colors, and stands in nature as water droplets. In analogy to this definition, the acoustic dispersive prism should be an acoustic device with capability of splitting a broadband acoustic wave into its constituent Fourier components. However, due to the acoustical nature of materials as well as the design and fabrication difficulties, there is neither any natural acoustic counterpart of the optical prism, nor any artificial design reported so far exhibiting an equivalent acoustic behaviour. Here, based on exotic properties of the acoustic transmission-line metamaterials and exploiting unique physical behaviour of acoustic leaky-wave radiation, we report the first acoustic dispersive prism, effective within the audible frequency range 800 Hz-1300 Hz. The dispersive nature, and consequently the frequency-dependent refractive index of the metamaterial are exploited to split the sound waves towards different and frequency-dependent directions. Meanwhile, the leaky-wave nature of the structure facilitates the sound wave radiation into the ambient medium.

  7. Low frequency acoustic microscope

    DOEpatents

    Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T.

    1986-11-04

    A scanning acoustic microscope is disclosed for the detection and location of near surface flaws, inclusions or voids in a solid sample material. A focused beam of acoustic energy is directed at the sample with its focal plane at the subsurface flaw, inclusion or void location. The sample is scanned with the beam. Detected acoustic energy specularly reflected and mode converted at the surface of the sample and acoustic energy reflected by subsurface flaws, inclusions or voids at the focal plane are used for generating an interference signal which is processed and forms a signal indicative of the subsurface flaws, inclusions or voids.

  8. Acoustic dispersive prism

    PubMed Central

    Esfahlani, Hussein; Karkar, Sami; Lissek, Herve; Mosig, Juan R.

    2016-01-01

    The optical dispersive prism is a well-studied element, which allows separating white light into its constituent spectral colors, and stands in nature as water droplets. In analogy to this definition, the acoustic dispersive prism should be an acoustic device with capability of splitting a broadband acoustic wave into its constituent Fourier components. However, due to the acoustical nature of materials as well as the design and fabrication difficulties, there is neither any natural acoustic counterpart of the optical prism, nor any artificial design reported so far exhibiting an equivalent acoustic behaviour. Here, based on exotic properties of the acoustic transmission-line metamaterials and exploiting unique physical behaviour of acoustic leaky-wave radiation, we report the first acoustic dispersive prism, effective within the audible frequency range 800 Hz–1300 Hz. The dispersive nature, and consequently the frequency-dependent refractive index of the metamaterial are exploited to split the sound waves towards different and frequency-dependent directions. Meanwhile, the leaky-wave nature of the structure facilitates the sound wave radiation into the ambient medium. PMID:26739504

  9. New roles of LWD and wireline logging in scientific ocean drilling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanada, Y.; Kido, Y. N.; Moe, K.; Aoike, K.

    2014-12-01

    D/V Chikyu implemented by CDEX/JAMSTEC joined IODP from 2007. Various LWD (Logging While Drilling) and wireline logging have been carried out in many expeditions and for various purposes. Significant features of logging in Chikyu expeditions are many use of LWD than wireline logging, and riser dirlling. riser selected specific tools for each scientific target, and 3) carried out various borehole experiments. LWD has been more popular than wireline logging in Chikyu expeditions, because its advantages match theirs science targets. The advantages are followings. 1) LWD has more opportunities for measurement in unstable borehole, such as in the series of Nankai trough drilling expeditions. 2) LWD realtime data allows us to make realtime interpretation and operational decision. Realtime interpretation was required to set obsevartory at the properposition. 3) LWD before coring allows us to make a strategy of spot coring.We can design coring intervals for our interest and core length to improve core recovery.Riser drilling brings us merits for logging. One is hole stability (good hole condition) and the other is the use of large diameter tools. Controled drilling mud in riser drilling system prevent mud invasion to formation and mitigates collapse of borehole wall. They reduce the risk of tool stack and improve data quality. Large diameter of riser pipe enhances variation of tool seizes. A couple of new tools were used for new measurement and improvement of the data quality. For example, SonicScanner (trademark of Schulumberger) successfully measured compressional and share velocity in very low velocities at the soft sediment, where it has been difficult to measure them with conventional DSI tool (Exp319). The stress and pore pressure in the borehole were measured with the wireline logging tool, (Schlumberger MDT). The single probe tool enable to measure temporal formation fluid pressure. The double packer tool enable to fracture test by sealing and pumping in the

  10. Improving Fidelity of Launch Vehicle Liftoff Acoustic Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liever, Peter; West, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Launch vehicles experience high acoustic loads during ignition and liftoff affected by the interaction of rocket plume generated acoustic waves with launch pad structures. Application of highly parallelized Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis tools optimized for application on the NAS computer systems such as the Loci/CHEM program now enable simulation of time-accurate, turbulent, multi-species plume formation and interaction with launch pad geometry and capture the generation of acoustic noise at the source regions in the plume shear layers and impingement regions. These CFD solvers are robust in capturing the acoustic fluctuations, but they are too dissipative to accurately resolve the propagation of the acoustic waves throughout the launch environment domain along the vehicle. A hybrid Computational Fluid Dynamics and Computational Aero-Acoustics (CFD/CAA) modeling framework has been developed to improve such liftoff acoustic environment predictions. The framework combines the existing highly-scalable NASA production CFD code, Loci/CHEM, with a high-order accurate discontinuous Galerkin (DG) solver, Loci/THRUST, developed in the same computational framework. Loci/THRUST employs a low dissipation, high-order, unstructured DG method to accurately propagate acoustic waves away from the source regions across large distances. The DG solver is currently capable of solving up to 4th order solutions for non-linear, conservative acoustic field propagation. Higher order boundary conditions are implemented to accurately model the reflection and refraction of acoustic waves on launch pad components. The DG solver accepts generalized unstructured meshes, enabling efficient application of common mesh generation tools for CHEM and THRUST simulations. The DG solution is coupled with the CFD solution at interface boundaries placed near the CFD acoustic source regions. Both simulations are executed simultaneously with coordinated boundary condition data exchange.

  11. Theoretical studies of permeability inversion from seismoelectric logs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, H.; Guan, W.; Zhao, W.

    2012-04-01

    Permeability is one of the most important parameters for evaluating the level of difficulty in oil and gas exploitation. A quick, continuous and accurate in-situ estimate of reservoir permeability is highly significant. Stoneley wave logs have been used to determine formation permeability (Tang and Cheng, 1996). However, the inversion errors of this method are too big in low-permeability formations, especially in high-porosity and low-permeability formations resulting from the high clay content in pores. In this study, we propose to invert permeability by using the full waveforms of seismoelectric logs with low frequencies. This method is based on the relationship of permeability with the ratio of the electric excitation intensity to the pressure field's (REP) with respect to the Stoneley wave in seismoelectric logs. By solving the governing equations for electrokinetic coupled wavefields in homogeneous fluid-saturated porous media (Pride, 1994), we calculate the full waveforms of the borehole seismoelectric wavefields excited by a point pressure source and investigate frequency-dependent excitation intensities of the mode waves and excitation intensities of the real branch points in seismoelectric logs. It is found that the REP's phase, which reflects the phase discrepancy between the Stoneley-wave-induced electric field and the acoustic pressure, is sensitive to formation permeability. To check the relation between permeability and REP's phase qualitatively, an approximate expression of the tangent of the REP's argument is derived theoretically as tan(θEP) ≈-ωc/ω = -φη/ (2πfα ∞ρfκ0), where θEPdenotes the arguments of the REP and their principal value is the REP's phase,ω is the angular frequency,ωc is a critical angular frequency that separates the low-frequency viscous flow from the high-frequency inertial flow, φ is the porosity, α∞ is the tortuosity, κ0 is the Darcy permeability, ρf and η are the density and the viscosity of the pore

  12. Hybrid CFD/CAA Modeling for Liftoff Acoustic Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strutzenberg, Louise L.; Liever, Peter A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents development efforts at the NASA Marshall Space flight Center to establish a hybrid Computational Fluid Dynamics and Computational Aero-Acoustics (CFD/CAA) simulation system for launch vehicle liftoff acoustics environment analysis. Acoustic prediction engineering tools based on empirical jet acoustic strength and directivity models or scaled historical measurements are of limited value in efforts to proactively design and optimize launch vehicles and launch facility configurations for liftoff acoustics. CFD based modeling approaches are now able to capture the important details of vehicle specific plume flow environment, identifY the noise generation sources, and allow assessment of the influence of launch pad geometric details and sound mitigation measures such as water injection. However, CFD methodologies are numerically too dissipative to accurately capture the propagation of the acoustic waves in the large CFD models. The hybrid CFD/CAA approach combines the high-fidelity CFD analysis capable of identifYing the acoustic sources with a fast and efficient Boundary Element Method (BEM) that accurately propagates the acoustic field from the source locations. The BEM approach was chosen for its ability to properly account for reflections and scattering of acoustic waves from launch pad structures. The paper will present an overview of the technology components of the CFD/CAA framework and discuss plans for demonstration and validation against test data.

  13. 5. Log calving barn. Detail of wall corner showing half ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Log calving barn. Detail of wall corner showing half dovetail notching on hand-hewn logs. - William & Lucina Bowe Ranch, Log Calving Barn, 230 feet south-southwest of House, Melrose, Silver Bow County, MT

  14. 55. VIEW OF STEAMOPERATED LOG HOIST TO PUT IN COMING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    55. VIEW OF STEAM-OPERATED LOG HOIST TO PUT IN COMING LOGS INTO RALPH HULL LUMBER CO. LOG POND. PHOTOGRAPHER: UNKNOWN. DATE: 1942. COURTESY OF RALPH HULL. - Hull-Oakes Lumber Company, 23837 Dawson Road, Monroe, Benton County, OR

  15. Device and method for generating a beam of acoustic energy from a borehole, and applications thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Vu, Cung Khac; Sinha, Dipen N.; Pantea, Cristian; Nihei, Kurt T.; Schmitt, Denis P.; Skelt, Chirstopher

    2013-10-15

    In some aspects of the invention, a method of generating a beam of acoustic energy in a borehole is disclosed. The method includes generating a first acoustic wave at a first frequency; generating a second acoustic wave at a second frequency different than the first frequency, wherein the first acoustic wave and second acoustic wave are generated by at least one transducer carried by a tool located within the borehole; transmitting the first and the second acoustic waves into an acoustically non-linear medium, wherein the composition of the non-linear medium produces a collimated beam by a non-linear mixing of the first and second acoustic waves, wherein the collimated beam has a frequency based upon a difference between the first frequency range and the second frequency, and wherein the non-linear medium has a velocity of sound between 100 m/s and 800 m/s.

  16. When Workflow Management Systems and Logging Systems Meet: Analyzing Large-Scale Execution Traces

    SciTech Connect

    Gunter, Daniel

    2008-07-31

    This poster shows the benefits of integrating a workflow management system with logging and log mining capabilities. By combing two existing, mature technologies: Pegasus-WMS and Netlogger, we are able to efficiently process execution logs of earthquake science workflows consisting of hundreds of thousands to one million tasks. In particular we show results of processing logs of CyberShake, a workflow application running on the TeraGrid. Client-side tools allow scientists to quickly gather statistics about a workflow run and find out which tasks executed, where they were executed, what was their runtime, etc. These statistics can be used to understand the performance characteristics of a workflow and help tune the execution parameters of the workflow management system. This poster shows the scalability of the system presenting results of uploading task execution records into the system and by showing results of querying the system for overall workflow performance information.

  17. Volumetric Acoustic Vector Intensity Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klos, Jacob

    2006-01-01

    A new measurement tool capable of imaging the acoustic intensity vector throughout a large volume is discussed. This tool consists of an array of fifty microphones that form a spherical surface of radius 0.2m. A simultaneous measurement of the pressure field across all the microphones provides time-domain near-field holograms. Near-field acoustical holography is used to convert the measured pressure into a volumetric vector intensity field as a function of frequency on a grid of points ranging from the center of the spherical surface to a radius of 0.4m. The volumetric intensity is displayed on three-dimensional plots that are used to locate noise sources outside the volume. There is no restriction on the type of noise source that can be studied. The sphere is mobile and can be moved from location to location to hunt for unidentified noise sources. An experiment inside a Boeing 757 aircraft in flight successfully tested the ability of the array to locate low-noise-excited sources on the fuselage. Reference transducers located on suspected noise source locations can also be used to increase the ability of this device to separate and identify multiple noise sources at a given frequency by using the theory of partial field decomposition. The frequency range of operation is 0 to 1400Hz. This device is ideal for the study of noise sources in commercial and military transportation vehicles in air, on land and underwater.

  18. Numerical Analysis Of Three Component Induction Logging In Geothermal Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. David L. Alumbaugh

    2002-01-09

    This project is supporting the development of the ''Geo-Bilt'', geothermal electromagnetic-induction logging tool that is being built by ElectroManetic Instruments, Inc. The tool consists of three mutually orthogonal magnetic field antennas, and three-component magnetic field receivers located at different distances from the source. In its current configuration, the source that has a moment aligned along the borehole axis consists of a 1m long solenoid, while the two trans-axial sources consist of 1m by 8cm loops of wire. The receivers are located 2m and 5m away from the center of the sources, and five frequencies from 2 kHz to 40 kHz are being employed. This study is numerically investigating (1) the effect of the borehole on the measurements, and (2) the sensitivity of the tool to fracture zone-geometries that might be encountered in a geothermal field. The benefits of the results are that they will lead to a better understanding of the data that the tool produces during its testing phase and an idea of what the limitations of the tool are.

  19. Utilizing computer models for optimizing classroom acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinckley, Jennifer M.; Rosenberg, Carl J.

    2002-05-01

    The acoustical conditions in a classroom play an integral role in establishing an ideal learning environment. Speech intelligibility is dependent on many factors, including speech loudness, room finishes, and background noise levels. The goal of this investigation was to use computer modeling techniques to study the effect of acoustical conditions on speech intelligibility in a classroom. This study focused on a simulated classroom which was generated using the CATT-acoustic computer modeling program. The computer was utilized as an analytical tool in an effort to optimize speech intelligibility in a typical classroom environment. The factors that were focused on were reverberation time, location of absorptive materials, and background noise levels. Speech intelligibility was measured with the Rapid Speech Transmission Index (RASTI) method.

  20. The Acoustical Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Melissa

    Asserting that without an adequate acoustical environment, learning activities can be hindered, this paper reviews the literature on classroom acoustics, particularly noise, reverberation, signal-to-noise ratio, task performance, and recommendations for improvement. Through this review, the paper seeks to determine whether portable classrooms…

  1. Cystic acoustic schwannomas.

    PubMed

    Lunardi, P; Missori, P; Mastronardi, L; Fortuna, A

    1991-01-01

    Three cases with large space-occupying cysts in the cerebellopontine angle are reported. CT and MRI findings were not typical for acoustic schwannomas but at operation, besides the large cysts, small acoustic schwannomas could be detected and removed. The clinical and neuroradiological features of this unusual variety and the CT and MRI differential diagnosis of cerebellopontine angle lesions are discussed.

  2. Seasonal logging, process response, and geomorphic work

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohr, C.; Zimmermann, A.; Korup, O.; Iroume, A.; Francke, T.; Bronstert, A.

    2013-12-01

    Deforestation is a prominent anthropogenic cause of erosive overland flow and slope instability, boosting rates of soil erosion and concomitant sediment flux. Conventional methods of gauging or estimating post-logging sediment flux focus on annual timescales, but overlook potentially important process response on shorter intervals immediately following timber harvest. We resolve such dynamics from non-parametric Quantile Regression Forests (QRF) of high-frequency (3-min) measurements of stream discharge and sediment concentrations in similar-sized (~0.1 km2) forested Chilean catchments that were logged during either the rainy or the dry season. The method of QRF builds on the Random Forest algorithm, and combines quantile regression with repeated random sub-sampling of both cases and predictors which in turn provides model uncertainties. We find that, where no logging occurred, ~80% of the total sediment load was transported during extremely variable runoff events during only 5% of the monitoring period. Particularly dry-season logging dampened the role of these rare, extreme sediment-transport events by increasing load efficiency during more efficient moderate events. We conclude that QRF may reliably support forest management recommendations by providing robust simulations of post-logging response of water and sediment fluxes at high temporal resolution.

  3. Acoustic Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowling, David R.; Sabra, Karim G.

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic waves carry information about their source and collect information about their environment as they propagate. This article reviews how these information-carrying and -collecting features of acoustic waves that travel through fluids can be exploited for remote sensing. In nearly all cases, modern acoustic remote sensing involves array-recorded sounds and array signal processing to recover multidimensional results. The application realm for acoustic remote sensing spans an impressive range of signal frequencies (10-2 to 107 Hz) and distances (10-2 to 107 m) and involves biomedical ultrasound imaging, nondestructive evaluation, oil and gas exploration, military systems, and Nuclear Test Ban Treaty monitoring. In the past two decades, approaches have been developed to robustly localize remote sources; remove noise and multipath distortion from recorded signals; and determine the acoustic characteristics of the environment through which the sound waves have traveled, even when the recorded sounds originate from uncooperative sources or are merely ambient noise.

  4. Acoustic suspension system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, M. C.; Wang, T. G. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    An acoustic levitation system is described, with single acoustic source and a small reflector to stably levitate a small object while the object is processed as by coating or heating it. The system includes a concave acoustic source which has locations on opposite sides of its axis that vibrate towards and away from a focal point to generate a converging acoustic field. A small reflector is located near the focal point, and preferably slightly beyond it, to create an intense acoustic field that stably supports a small object near the reflector. The reflector is located about one-half wavelength from the focal point and is concavely curved to a radius of curvature (L) of about one-half the wavelength, to stably support an object one-quarter wavelength (N) from the reflector.

  5. Virtual acoustics displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenzel, Elizabeth M.; Fisher, Scott S.; Stone, Philip K.; Foster, Scott H.

    1991-01-01

    The real time acoustic display capabilities are described which were developed for the Virtual Environment Workstation (VIEW) Project at NASA-Ames. The acoustic display is capable of generating localized acoustic cues in real time over headphones. An auditory symbology, a related collection of representational auditory 'objects' or 'icons', can be designed using ACE (Auditory Cue Editor), which links both discrete and continuously varying acoustic parameters with information or events in the display. During a given display scenario, the symbology can be dynamically coordinated in real time with 3-D visual objects, speech, and gestural displays. The types of displays feasible with the system range from simple warnings and alarms to the acoustic representation of multidimensional data or events.

  6. Cochlear bionic acoustic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Fuyin; Wu, Jiu Hui; Huang, Meng; Fu, Gang; Bai, Changan

    2014-11-01

    A design of bionic acoustic metamaterial and acoustic functional devices was proposed by employing the mammalian cochlear as a prototype. First, combined with the experimental data in previous literatures, it is pointed out that the cochlear hair cells and stereocilia cluster are a kind of natural biological acoustic metamaterials with the negative stiffness characteristics. Then, to design the acoustic functional devices conveniently in engineering application, a simplified parametric helical structure was proposed to replace actual irregular cochlea for bionic design, and based on the computational results of such a bionic parametric helical structure, it is suggested that the overall cochlear is a local resonant system with the negative dynamic effective mass characteristics. There are many potential applications in the bandboard energy recovery device, cochlear implant, and acoustic black hole.

  7. Acoustic integrated extinction

    PubMed Central

    Norris, Andrew N.

    2015-01-01

    The integrated extinction (IE) is defined as the integral of the scattering cross section as a function of wavelength. Sohl et al. (2007 J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 122, 3206–3210. (doi:10.1121/1.2801546)) derived an IE expression for acoustic scattering that is causal, i.e. the scattered wavefront in the forward direction arrives later than the incident plane wave in the background medium. The IE formula was based on electromagnetic results, for which scattering is causal by default. Here, we derive a formula for the acoustic IE that is valid for causal and non-causal scattering. The general result is expressed as an integral of the time-dependent forward scattering function. The IE reduces to a finite integral for scatterers with zero long-wavelength monopole and dipole amplitudes. Implications for acoustic cloaking are discussed and a new metric is proposed for broadband acoustic transparency. PMID:27547100

  8. Direct Field Acoustic Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larkin, Paul; Goldstein, Bob

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an update to the methods and procedures used in Direct Field Acoustic Testing (DFAT). The paper will discuss some of the recent techniques and developments that are currently being used and the future publication of a reference standard. Acoustic testing using commercial sound system components is becoming a popular and cost effective way of generating a required acoustic test environment both in and out of a reverberant chamber. This paper will present the DFAT test method, the usual setup and procedure and the development and use of a closed-loop, narrow-band control system. Narrow-band control of the acoustic PSD allows all standard techniques and procedures currently used in random control to be applied to acoustics and some examples are given. The paper will conclude with a summary of the development of a standard practice guideline that is hoped to be available in the first quarter of next year.

  9. Virtual acoustics displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenzel, Elizabeth M.; Fisher, Scott S.; Stone, Philip K.; Foster, Scott H.

    1991-03-01

    The real time acoustic display capabilities are described which were developed for the Virtual Environment Workstation (VIEW) Project at NASA-Ames. The acoustic display is capable of generating localized acoustic cues in real time over headphones. An auditory symbology, a related collection of representational auditory 'objects' or 'icons', can be designed using ACE (Auditory Cue Editor), which links both discrete and continuously varying acoustic parameters with information or events in the display. During a given display scenario, the symbology can be dynamically coordinated in real time with 3-D visual objects, speech, and gestural displays. The types of displays feasible with the system range from simple warnings and alarms to the acoustic representation of multidimensional data or events.

  10. Oil spill characterization in the hybrid polarity SAR domain using log-cumulants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espeseth, Martine M.; Skrunes, Stine; Brekke, Camilla; Salberg, Arnt-Børre; Jones, Cathleen E.; Holt, Benjamin

    2016-10-01

    Log-cumulants have proven to be an interesting tool for evaluating the statistical properties of potential oil spills in polarimetric Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data within the common horizontal (H) and vertical (V) polarization basis. The use of first, second, and third order sample log-cumulants has shown potential for evaluating the texture and the statistical distributions, as well as discriminating oil from look-alikes. Log-cumulants are cumulants derived in the log-domain and can be applied to both single-polarization and multipolarization SAR data. This study is the first to investigate the differences between hybrid-polarity (HP) and full-polarimetric (FP) modes based on the sample log-cumulants of various oil slicks and open water from nine Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR) scenes acquired off the coast of Norway in 2015. The sample log-cumulants calculated from the HP intensities show similar statistical behavior to the FP ones, resulting in a similar interpretation of the sample log-cumulants from HP and FP. Approximately eight hours after release the sample log-cumulants representing emulsion slicks have become more similar to the open water compared to plant oil. We find that the sample log-cumulants of the various oil slicks and open water varies between the scenes and also between the slicks and open water. This might be due to changes in ocean and wind condition, the initial slick properties, and/or the difference in the weathering process of the oil slicks.

  11. Acoustic Wave Filter Technology - A Review.

    PubMed

    Ruppel, Clemens

    2017-04-04

    Today, acoustic filters are the filter technology to meet the requirements with respect to performance dictated by the cellular phone standards and their form factor. Around 2 billion cellular phones are sold every year, and smart phones are of a very high percentage of approximately two thirds. Smart phones require a very high number of filter functions ranging from the low double-digit range up to almost triple digit numbers in the near future. In the frequency range up to 1 GHz surface acoustic wave (SAW) filters are almost exclusively employed, while in the higher frequency range bulk acoustic wave (BAW) and SAW filters are competing for their shares. Prerequisites for the success of acoustic filters were the availability of high quality substrates, advanced and highly reproducible fabrication technologies, optimum filter techniques, precise simulation software, and advanced design tools that allow the fast and efficient design according to customer specifications. The paper will try to focus on innovations leading to high volume applications of intermediate frequency (IF) and radio frequency (RF) acoustic filters, e.g., TV IF filters, IF filters for cellular phones, and SAW/BAW RF filters for the RF front-end of cellular phones.

  12. Calibration models for measuring moisture in unsaturated formations by neutron logging

    SciTech Connect

    Engelman, R.E.; Lewis, R.E.; Stromswold, D.C.

    1995-10-01

    Calibration models containing known amounts of hydrogen have been constructed to simulate unsaturated earth formations for calibrating neutron well logging tools. The models are made of dry mixtures of hydrated alumina (Al(OH){sub 3}) with either silica sand (SiO{sub 2}) or aluminum oxide (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}). Hydrogen in the hydrated alumina replaces the hydrogen in water for neutron scattering, making it possible to simulate partially saturated formations. The equivalent water contents for the models are 5%, 12%, 20%, and 40% by volume in seven tanks that have a diameter of 1.5 m and a height of 1.8 m. Steel casings of inside diameter 15.4 cm (for three models) and diameter 20.3 cm (for four models) allow logging tool access to simulate logging through cased boreholes.

  13. Lithologic logs and geophysical logs from test drilling in Palm Beach County, Florida, since 1974

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swayze, Leo J.; McGovern, Michael C.; Fischer, John N.

    1980-01-01

    Test-hole data that may be used to determine the hydrogeology of the zone of high permeability in Palm Beach County, Fla., are presented. Lithologic logs from 46 test wells and geophysical logs from 40 test wells are contained in this report. (USGS)

  14. LogSafe and Smart: Minnesota OSHA's LogSafe Program Takes Root.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honerman, James

    1999-01-01

    Logging is now the most dangerous U.S. occupation. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) developed specialized safety training for the logging industry but has been challenged to reach small operators. An OSHA-approved state program in Minnesota provides annual safety seminars to about two-thirds of the state's full-time…

  15. Relationships between log N-log S and celestial distribution of gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishimura, J.; Yamagami, T.

    1985-01-01

    The apparent conflict between log N-log S curve and isotropic celestial distribution of the gamma ray bursts is discussed. A possible selection effect due to the time profile of each burst is examined. It is shown that the contradiction is due to this selection effect of the gamma ray bursts.

  16. Acoustic (loudspeaker) facial EMG monitoring: II. Use of evoked EMG activity during acoustic neuroma resection.

    PubMed

    Prass, R L; Kinney, S E; Hardy, R W; Hahn, J F; Lüders, H

    1987-12-01

    Facial electromyographic (EMG) activity was continuously monitored via loudspeaker during eleven translabyrinthine and nine suboccipital consecutive unselected acoustic neuroma resections. Ipsilateral facial EMG activity was synchronously recorded on the audio channels of operative videotapes, which were retrospectively reviewed in order to allow detailed evaluation of the potential benefit of various acoustic EMG patterns in the performance of specific aspects of acoustic neuroma resection. The use of evoked facial EMG activity was classified and described. Direct local mechanical (surgical) stimulation and direct electrical stimulation were of benefit in the localization and/or delineation of the facial nerve contour. Burst and train acoustic patterns of EMG activity appeared to indicate surgical trauma to the facial nerve that would not have been appreciated otherwise. Early results of postoperative facial function of monitored patients are presented, and the possible value of burst and train acoustic EMG activity patterns in the intraoperative assessment of facial nerve function is discussed. Acoustic facial EMG monitoring appears to provide a potentially powerful surgical tool for delineation of the facial nerve contour, the ongoing use of which may lead to continued improvement in facial nerve function preservation through modification of dissection strategy.

  17. An Overview of Acoustic Telemetry

    SciTech Connect

    Drumheller, D.S.

    1992-03-24

    Acoustic telemetry has been a dream of the drilling industry for the past 50 years. It offers the promise of data rates which are one-hundred times greater than existing technology. Such a system would open the door to true logging-while-drilling technology and bring enormous profits to its developers. The oil and gas industry has led in most of the attempts to develop this type of telemetry system; however, very substantial efforts have also been made through government sponsored work in the geothermal industry. None of these previous attempts have lead to a commercial telemetry system. Conceptually, the problem looks easy. The basic idea is to produce an encoded sound wave at the bottom of the well, let it propagate up the steel drillpipe, and extract the data from the signal at the surface. Unfortunately, substantial difficulties arise. The first difficult problem is to produce the sound wave. Since the most promising transmission wavelengths are about 20 feet, normal transducer efficiencies are quite low. Compounding this problem is the structural complexity of the bottomhole assembly and drillstring. For example, the acoustic impedance of the drillstring changes every 30 feet and produces an unusual scattering pattern in the acoustic transmission. This scattering pattern causes distortion of the signal and is often confused with signal attenuation. These problems are not intractable. Recent work has demonstrated that broad frequency bands exist which are capable of transmitting data at rates up to 100 bits per second. Our work has also identified the mechanism which is responsible for the observed anomalies in the patterns of signal attenuation. Furthermore in the past few years a body of experience has been developed in designing more efficient transducers for application to metal Waveguides. The direction of future work is clear. New transducer designs which are more efficient and compatible with existing downhole power supplies need to be built and tested

  18. Development of pulsed neutron uranium logging instrument.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin-guang; Liu, Dan; Zhang, Feng

    2015-03-01

    This article introduces a development of pulsed neutron uranium logging instrument. By analyzing the temporal distribution of epithermal neutrons generated from the thermal fission of (235)U, we propose a new method with a uranium-bearing index to calculate the uranium content in the formation. An instrument employing a D-T neutron generator and two epithermal neutron detectors has been developed. The logging response is studied using Monte Carlo simulation and experiments in calibration wells. The simulation and experimental results show that the uranium-bearing index is linearly correlated with the uranium content, and the porosity and thermal neutron lifetime of the formation can be acquired simultaneously.

  19. Development of pulsed neutron uranium logging instrument

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xin-guang; Liu, Dan; Zhang, Feng

    2015-03-15

    This article introduces a development of pulsed neutron uranium logging instrument. By analyzing the temporal distribution of epithermal neutrons generated from the thermal fission of {sup 235}U, we propose a new method with a uranium-bearing index to calculate the uranium content in the formation. An instrument employing a D-T neutron generator and two epithermal neutron detectors has been developed. The logging response is studied using Monte Carlo simulation and experiments in calibration wells. The simulation and experimental results show that the uranium-bearing index is linearly correlated with the uranium content, and the porosity and thermal neutron lifetime of the formation can be acquired simultaneously.

  20. Compacting a Kentucky coal for quality logs

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Y.; Li, Z.; Mao, S.

    1999-07-01

    A Kentucky coal was found more difficult to be compacted into large size strong logs. Study showed that compaction parameters affecting the strength of compacted coal logs could be categorized into three groups. The first group is coal inherent properties such as elasticity and coefficient of friction, the second group is machine properties such as mold geometry, and the third group is the coal mixture preparation parameters such as particle size distribution. Theoretical analysis showed that an appropriate backpressure can reduce surface cracks occurring during ejection. This has been confirmed by the experiments conducted.

  1. MAIL LOG, program summary and specifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, D. K.

    1979-01-01

    The summary and specifications to obtain the software package, MAIL LOG, developed for the Scout Project Automatic Data System, SPADS are provided. The MAIL LOG program has four modes of operation: (1) input - putting new records into the data base; (2) revise - changing or modifying existing records in the data base; (3) search - finding special records existing in the data base; and (4) archive - store or put away existing records in the data base. The output includes special printouts of records in the data base and results from the input and search modes.

  2. Impedance matched joined drill pipe for improved acoustic transmission

    DOEpatents

    Moss, William C.

    2000-01-01

    An impedance matched jointed drill pipe for improved acoustic transmission. A passive means and method that maximizes the amplitude and minimize the temporal dispersion of acoustic signals that are sent through a drill string, for use in a measurement while drilling telemetry system. The improvement in signal transmission is accomplished by replacing the standard joints in a drill string with joints constructed of a material that is impedance matched acoustically to the end of the drill pipe to which it is connected. Provides improvement in the measurement while drilling technique which can be utilized for well logging, directional drilling, and drilling dynamics, as well as gamma-ray spectroscopy while drilling post shot boreholes, such as utilized in drilling post shot boreholes.

  3. Influence of environmental factors on activity patterns of Incisitermes minor (Isoptera: Kalotermitidae) in naturally infested logs.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Vernard R; Leighton, Shawn; Tabuchi, Robin; Baldwin, James A; Haverty, Michael I

    2013-02-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) activity patterns were measured from seven loquat [Eriobotrya japonica (Thunb.) Lindl.] logs, five containing live western drywood termite [Incisitermes minor (Hagen)] infestations, and two without an active drywood termite infestation. AE activity, as well as temperature, were monitored every 3 min under unrestricted ambient conditions in a small wooden building, under unrestricted ambient conditions but in constant darkness, or in a temperature-controlled cabined under constant darkness. Logs with active drywood termite infestations displayed similar diurnal cycles of AE activity that closely followed temperature with a peak of AE activity late in the afternoon (1700-1800 hours). When light was excluded from the building, a circadian pattern continued and apparently was driven by temperature. When the seven logs were kept at a relatively constant temperature (approximately 23 +/- 0.9 degrees C) and constant darkness, the pattern of activity was closely correlated with temperature, even with minimal changes in temperature. Temperature is the primary driver of activity of these drywood termites, but the effects are different when temperature is increasing or decreasing. At constant temperature, AE activity was highly correlated with the number of termites in the logs. The possible implications of these findings on our understanding of drywood termite biology and how this information may affect inspections and posttreatment evaluations are discussed.

  4. Statistics, Structures & Satisfied Customers: Using Web Log Data to Improve Site Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peacock, Darren

    This paper explores some of the ways in which the National Museum of Australia is using Web analysis tools to shape its future directions in the delivery of online services. In particular, it explores the potential of quantitative analysis, based on Web server log data, to convert these ephemeral traces of user experience into a strategic…

  5. Analysis of Large Data Logs: An Application of Poisson Sampling on Excite Web Queries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozmutlu, H. Cenk; Spink, Amanda; Ozmutlu, Seda

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the need for tools that allow effective analysis of search engine queries to provide a greater understanding of Web users' information seeking behavior and describes a study that developed an effective strategy for selecting samples from large-scale data sets. Reports on Poisson sampling with data logs from the Excite search engine.…

  6. Calculation of Monte Carlo importance functions for use in nuclear-well logging calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Soran, P.D.; McKeon, D.C.; Booth, T.E.; Schlumberger Well Services, Houston, TX; Los Alamos National Lab., NM )

    1989-07-01

    Importance sampling is essential to the timely solution of Monte Carlo nuclear-logging computer simulations. Achieving minimum variance (maximum precision) of a response in minimum computation time is one criteria for the choice of an importance function. Various methods for calculating importance functions will be presented, new methods investigated, and comparisons with porosity and density tools will be shown. 5 refs., 1 tab.

  7. Beyond Logging of Fingertip Actions: Analysis of Collaborative Learning Using Multiple Sources of Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avouris, N.; Fiotakis, G.; Kahrimanis, G.; Margaritis, M.; Komis, V.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, we discuss key requirements for collecting behavioural data concerning technology-supported collaborative learning activities. It is argued that the common practice of analysis of computer generated log files of user interactions with software tools is not enough for building a thorough view of the activity. Instead, more…

  8. Acoustic mapping velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muste, M.; Baranya, S.; Tsubaki, R.; Kim, D.; Ho, H.; Tsai, H.; Law, D.

    2016-05-01

    Knowledge of sediment dynamics in rivers is of great importance for various practical purposes. Despite its high relevance in riverine environment processes, the monitoring of sediment rates remains a major and challenging task for both suspended and bed load estimation. While the measurement of suspended load is currently an active area of testing with nonintrusive technologies (optical and acoustic), bed load measurement does not mark a similar progress. This paper describes an innovative combination of measurement techniques and analysis protocols that establishes the proof-of-concept for a promising technique, labeled herein Acoustic Mapping Velocimetry (AMV). The technique estimates bed load rates in rivers developing bed forms using a nonintrusive measurements approach. The raw information for AMV is collected with acoustic multibeam technology that in turn provides maps of the bathymetry over longitudinal swaths. As long as the acoustic maps can be acquired relatively quickly and the repetition rate for the mapping is commensurate with the movement of the bed forms, successive acoustic maps capture the progression of the bed form movement. Two-dimensional velocity maps associated with the bed form migration are obtained by implementing algorithms typically used in particle image velocimetry to acoustic maps converted in gray-level images. Furthermore, use of the obtained acoustic and velocity maps in conjunction with analytical formulations (e.g., Exner equation) enables estimation of multidirectional bed load rates over the whole imaged area. This paper presents a validation study of the AMV technique using a set of laboratory experiments.

  9. Acoustic cooling engine

    DOEpatents

    Hofler, Thomas J.; Wheatley, John C.; Swift, Gregory W.; Migliori, Albert

    1988-01-01

    An acoustic cooling engine with improved thermal performance and reduced internal losses comprises a compressible fluid contained in a resonant pressure vessel. The fluid has a substantial thermal expansion coefficient and is capable of supporting an acoustic standing wave. A thermodynamic element has first and second ends and is located in the resonant pressure vessel in thermal communication with the fluid. The thermal response of the thermodynamic element to the acoustic standing wave pumps heat from the second end to the first end. The thermodynamic element permits substantial flow of the fluid through the thermodynamic element. An acoustic driver cyclically drives the fluid with an acoustic standing wave. The driver is at a location of maximum acoustic impedance in the resonant pressure vessel and proximate the first end of the thermodynamic element. A hot heat exchanger is adjacent to and in thermal communication with the first end of the thermodynamic element. The hot heat exchanger conducts heat from the first end to portions of the resonant pressure vessel proximate the hot heat exchanger. The hot heat exchanger permits substantial flow of the fluid through the hot heat exchanger. The resonant pressure vessel can include a housing less than one quarter wavelength in length coupled to a reservoir. The housing can include a reduced diameter portion communicating with the reservoir. The frequency of the acoustic driver can be continuously controlled so as to maintain resonance.

  10. Acoustic sniper localization system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prado, Gervasio; Dhaliwal, Hardave; Martel, Philip O.

    1997-02-01

    Technologies for sniper localization have received increased attention in recent months as American forces have been deployed to various trouble spots around the world. Among the technologies considered for this task acoustics is a natural choice for various reasons. The acoustic signatures of gunshots are loud and distinctive, making them easy to detect even in high noise background environments. Acoustics provides a passive sensing technology with excellent range and non line of sight capabilities. Last but not least, an acoustic sniper location system can be built at a low cost with off the shelf components. Despite its many advantages, the performance of acoustic sensors can degrade under adverse propagation conditions. Localization accuracy, although good, is usually not accurate enough to pinpoint a sniper's location in some scenarios (for example which widow in a building or behind which tree in a grove). For these more demanding missions, the acoustic sensor can be used in conjunction with an infra red imaging system that detects the muzzle blast of the gun. The acoustic system can be used to cue the pointing system of the IR camera in the direction of the shot's source.

  11. Inversion of High Frequency Acoustic Data for Sediment Properties Needed for the Detection and Classification of UXOs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-26

    FINAL REPORT Inversion of High Frequency Acoustic Data for Sediment Properties Needed for the Detection and Classification of UXOs SERDP...2015 Inversion of High Frequency Acoustic Data for Sediment Properties Needed for the Detection and Classification of UXO’s W912HQ-12-C-0049 MR...the acoustic response of the environment as well as the environment’s effect on the acoustic response of munitions [1]. Simulation tools and

  12. The acoustic communities: Definition, description and ecological role.

    PubMed

    Farina, Almo; James, Philip

    2016-09-01

    An acoustic community is defined as an aggregation of species that produces sound by using internal or extra-body sound-producing tools. Such communities occur in aquatic (freshwater and marine) and terrestrial environments. An acoustic community is the biophonic component of a soundtope and is characterized by its acoustic signature, which results from the distribution of sonic information associated with signal amplitude and frequency. Distinct acoustic communities can be described according to habitat, the frequency range of the acoustic signals, and the time of day or the season. Near and far fields can be identified empirically, thus the acoustic community can be used as a proxy for biodiversity richness. The importance of ecoacoustic research is rapidly growing due to the increasing awareness of the intrusion of anthropogenic sounds (technophonies) into natural and human-modified ecosystems and the urgent need to adopt more efficient predictive tools to compensate for the effects of climate change. The concept of an acoustic community provides an operational scale for a non-intrusive biodiversity survey and analysis that can be carried out using new passive audio recording technology, coupled with methods of vast data processing and storage.

  13. A jet engine noise measurement and prediction tool.

    PubMed

    Frendi, Abdelkader; Dorland, Wade D; Maung, Thein; Nesman, Tom; Wang, Ten-See

    2002-11-01

    In this paper, the authors describe an innovative jet engine noise measurement and prediction tool. The tool measures sound-pressure levels and frequency spectra in the far field. In addition, the tool provides predicted results while the measurements are being made. The predictions are based on an existing computational fluid dynamics database coupled to an empirical acoustic radiation model based on the far-field approximation to the Lighthill acoustic analogy. Preliminary tests of this acoustic measurement and prediction tool produced very encouraging results.

  14. The room acoustic rendering equation.

    PubMed

    Siltanen, Samuel; Lokki, Tapio; Kiminki, Sami; Savioja, Lauri

    2007-09-01

    An integral equation generalizing a variety of known geometrical room acoustics modeling algorithms is presented. The formulation of the room acoustic rendering equation is adopted from computer graphics. Based on the room acoustic rendering equation, an acoustic radiance transfer method, which can handle both diffuse and nondiffuse reflections, is derived. In a case study, the method is used to predict several acoustic parameters of a room model. The results are compared to measured data of the actual room and to the results given by other acoustics prediction software. It is concluded that the method can predict most acoustic parameters reliably and provides results as accurate as current commercial room acoustic prediction software. Although the presented acoustic radiance transfer method relies on geometrical acoustics, it can be extended to model diffraction and transmission through materials in future.

  15. 1. GENERAL VIEW OF LOG POND AND BOOM FOR UNLOADING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. GENERAL VIEW OF LOG POND AND BOOM FOR UNLOADING CEDAR LOGS FROM TRUCKS AT LOG DUMP, ADJACENT TO MILL; TRUCKS FORMERLY USED TRIP STAKES, THOUGH FOR SAFER HANDLING OF LOGS WELDED STAKES ARE NOW REQUIRED; AS A RESULT LOADING IS NOW DONE WITH A CRANE - Lester Shingle Mill, 1602 North Eighteenth Street, Sweet Home, Linn County, OR

  16. 47 CFR 73.1840 - Retention of logs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Retention of logs. 73.1840 Section 73.1840... Rules Applicable to All Broadcast Stations § 73.1840 Retention of logs. (a) Any log required to be kept by station licensees shall be retained by them for a period of 2 years. However, logs...

  17. 32 CFR 700.846 - Status of logs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Status of logs. 700.846 Section 700.846 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY UNITED STATES NAVY REGULATIONS AND... Officers Afloat § 700.846 Status of logs. The deck log, the engineering log, the compass record,...

  18. 47 CFR 73.877 - Station logs for LPFM stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Station logs for LPFM stations. 73.877 Section... BROADCAST SERVICES Low Power FM Broadcast Stations (LPFM) § 73.877 Station logs for LPFM stations. The licensee of each LPFM station must maintain a station log. Each log entry must include the time and date...

  19. 47 CFR 73.782 - Retention of logs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Retention of logs. 73.782 Section 73.782... International Broadcast Stations § 73.782 Retention of logs. Logs of international broadcast stations shall be retained by the licensee or permittee for a period of two years: Provided, however, That logs...

  20. 32 CFR 700.846 - Status of logs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Status of logs. 700.846 Section 700.846 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY UNITED STATES NAVY REGULATIONS AND... Officers Afloat § 700.846 Status of logs. The deck log, the engineering log, the compass record,...

  1. 32 CFR 700.846 - Status of logs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Status of logs. 700.846 Section 700.846 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY UNITED STATES NAVY REGULATIONS AND... Officers Afloat § 700.846 Status of logs. The deck log, the engineering log, the compass record,...

  2. 47 CFR 73.1840 - Retention of logs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Retention of logs. 73.1840 Section 73.1840... Rules Applicable to All Broadcast Stations § 73.1840 Retention of logs. (a) Any log required to be kept by station licensees shall be retained by them for a period of 2 years. However, logs...

  3. 47 CFR 73.1840 - Retention of logs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Retention of logs. 73.1840 Section 73.1840... Rules Applicable to All Broadcast Stations § 73.1840 Retention of logs. (a) Any log required to be kept by station licensees shall be retained by them for a period of 2 years. However, logs...

  4. 33 CFR 207.370 - Big Fork River, Minn.; logging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... of navigation, parties engaged in handling logs upon the river shall have the right to sluice, drive, and float logs in such manner as may best suit their convenience: Provided, A sufficient channel is... force of men must accompany each log drive to prevent the formation of log jams and to maintain an...

  5. 47 CFR 73.782 - Retention of logs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Retention of logs. 73.782 Section 73.782... International Broadcast Stations § 73.782 Retention of logs. Logs of international broadcast stations shall be retained by the licensee or permittee for a period of two years: Provided, however, That logs...

  6. 47 CFR 73.877 - Station logs for LPFM stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Station logs for LPFM stations. 73.877 Section... BROADCAST SERVICES Low Power FM Broadcast Stations (LPFM) § 73.877 Station logs for LPFM stations. The licensee of each LPFM station must maintain a station log. Each log entry must include the time and date...

  7. 47 CFR 73.1840 - Retention of logs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Retention of logs. 73.1840 Section 73.1840... Rules Applicable to All Broadcast Stations § 73.1840 Retention of logs. (a) Any log required to be kept by station licensees shall be retained by them for a period of 2 years. However, logs...

  8. 33 CFR 207.370 - Big Fork River, Minn.; logging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... of navigation, parties engaged in handling logs upon the river shall have the right to sluice, drive, and float logs in such manner as may best suit their convenience: Provided, A sufficient channel is... force of men must accompany each log drive to prevent the formation of log jams and to maintain an...

  9. 47 CFR 73.782 - Retention of logs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Retention of logs. 73.782 Section 73.782... International Broadcast Stations § 73.782 Retention of logs. Logs of international broadcast stations shall be retained by the licensee or permittee for a period of two years: Provided, however, That logs...

  10. 32 CFR 700.846 - Status of logs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Status of logs. 700.846 Section 700.846 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY UNITED STATES NAVY REGULATIONS AND... Officers Afloat § 700.846 Status of logs. The deck log, the engineering log, the compass record,...

  11. 33 CFR 207.370 - Big Fork River, Minn.; logging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... of navigation, parties engaged in handling logs upon the river shall have the right to sluice, drive, and float logs in such manner as may best suit their convenience: Provided, A sufficient channel is... force of men must accompany each log drive to prevent the formation of log jams and to maintain an...

  12. 47 CFR 73.782 - Retention of logs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Retention of logs. 73.782 Section 73.782... International Broadcast Stations § 73.782 Retention of logs. Logs of international broadcast stations shall be retained by the licensee or permittee for a period of two years: Provided, however, That logs...

  13. 47 CFR 73.877 - Station logs for LPFM stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Station logs for LPFM stations. 73.877 Section... BROADCAST SERVICES Low Power FM Broadcast Stations (LPFM) § 73.877 Station logs for LPFM stations. The licensee of each LPFM station must maintain a station log. Each log entry must include the time and date...

  14. 47 CFR 73.1840 - Retention of logs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Retention of logs. 73.1840 Section 73.1840... Rules Applicable to All Broadcast Stations § 73.1840 Retention of logs. (a) Any log required to be kept by station licensees shall be retained by them for a period of 2 years. However, logs...

  15. 47 CFR 73.877 - Station logs for LPFM stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Station logs for LPFM stations. 73.877 Section... BROADCAST SERVICES Low Power FM Broadcast Stations (LPFM) § 73.877 Station logs for LPFM stations. The licensee of each LPFM station must maintain a station log. Each log entry must include the time and date...

  16. 47 CFR 73.877 - Station logs for LPFM stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Station logs for LPFM stations. 73.877 Section... BROADCAST SERVICES Low Power FM Broadcast Stations (LPFM) § 73.877 Station logs for LPFM stations. The licensee of each LPFM station must maintain a station log. Each log entry must include the time and date...

  17. 32 CFR 700.846 - Status of logs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Status of logs. 700.846 Section 700.846 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY UNITED STATES NAVY REGULATIONS AND... Officers Afloat § 700.846 Status of logs. The deck log, the engineering log, the compass record,...

  18. 33 CFR 207.370 - Big Fork River, Minn.; logging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... of navigation, parties engaged in handling logs upon the river shall have the right to sluice, drive, and float logs in such manner as may best suit their convenience: Provided, A sufficient channel is... force of men must accompany each log drive to prevent the formation of log jams and to maintain an...

  19. 33 CFR 207.370 - Big Fork River, Minn.; logging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... of navigation, parties engaged in handling logs upon the river shall have the right to sluice, drive, and float logs in such manner as may best suit their convenience: Provided, A sufficient channel is... force of men must accompany each log drive to prevent the formation of log jams and to maintain an...

  20. 47 CFR 73.782 - Retention of logs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Retention of logs. 73.782 Section 73.782... International Broadcast Stations § 73.782 Retention of logs. Logs of international broadcast stations shall be retained by the licensee or permittee for a period of two years: Provided, however, That logs...

  1. PRSEUS Acoustic Panel Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicolette, Velicki; Yovanof, Nicolette P.; Baraja, Jaime; Mathur, Gopal; Thrash, Patrick; Pickell, Robert

    2011-01-01

    This report describes the development of a novel structural concept, Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS), that addresses the demanding fuselage loading requirements for the Hybrid Wing or Blended Wing Body (BWB) airplane configuration with regards to acoustic response. A PRSEUS panel was designed and fabricated and provided to NASA-LaRC for acoustic response testing in the Structural Acoustics Loads and Transmission (SALT) facility). Preliminary assessments of the sound transmission characteristics of a PRSEUS panel subjected to a representative Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) operating environment were completed for the NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Program.

  2. Acoustic well cleaner

    DOEpatents

    Maki, Jr., Voldi E.; Sharma, Mukul M.

    1997-01-21

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for cleaning the wellbore and the near wellbore region. A sonde is provided which is adapted to be lowered into a borehole and which includes a plurality of acoustic transducers arranged around the sonde. Electrical power provided by a cable is converted to acoustic energy. The high intensity acoustic energy directed to the borehole wall and into the near wellbore region, redissolves or resuspends the material which is reducing the permeability of the formation and/or restricting flow in the wellbore.

  3. Acoustical heat pumping engine

    DOEpatents

    Wheatley, John C.; Swift, Gregory W.; Migliori, Albert

    1983-08-16

    The disclosure is directed to an acoustical heat pumping engine without moving seals. A tubular housing holds a compressible fluid capable of supporting an acoustical standing wave. An acoustical driver is disposed at one end of the housing and the other end is capped. A second thermodynamic medium is disposed in the housing near to but spaced from the capped end. Heat is pumped along the second thermodynamic medium toward the capped end as a consequence both of the pressure oscillation due to the driver and imperfect thermal contact between the fluid and the second thermodynamic medium.

  4. Acoustical heat pumping engine

    DOEpatents

    Wheatley, J.C.; Swift, G.W.; Migliori, A.

    1983-08-16

    The disclosure is directed to an acoustical heat pumping engine without moving seals. A tubular housing holds a compressible fluid capable of supporting an acoustical standing wave. An acoustical driver is disposed at one end of the housing and the other end is capped. A second thermodynamic medium is disposed in the housing near to but spaced from the capped end. Heat is pumped along the second thermodynamic medium toward the capped end as a consequence both of the pressure oscillation due to the driver and imperfect thermal contact between the fluid and the second thermodynamic medium. 2 figs.

  5. Utilizing magnetic resonance imaging logs, open hole logs and sidewall core analyses to evaluate shaly sands for water-free production

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, D.; Morganti, J.; White, H.

    1995-06-01

    NMR logging using the new C series Magnetic Resonance Imaging Logging (MRIL){trademark} is rapidly enhancing formation evaluation throughout the industry. By measuring irreducible water saturations, permeability and effective porosities, MRIL data can help petrophysicists evaluate low resistivity pays. In these instances, conventional open hole logs may not define all of the pay intervals. MRIL can also minimize unnecessary completions in zones of potentially high water-cut. This case study will briefly discuss MRIL tool theory and log presentations used with the conventional logs and sidewall cores. SEM analysis will show a good correlation of varying grain size sands with the T{sub 2} distribution and bulk volume irreducible from MRIL. Discussions of each well in the study area will show how water-free production zones were defined. Because the MRIL data was not recorded on one of the wells, the advanced petrophysical program HORIZON was used to predict the MRIL bulk volume irreducible and effective porosity to estimate productive zones. Discussion of additional formation characteristics, completion procedures, actual production and predicted producibility of the shaly sands will be presented.

  6. There's Life in Those Dead Logs!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biggs, Devin; Miller, Todd; Hall, Dee

    2006-01-01

    Although it is unspectacular in appearance, dead wood is one of the most ecologically important resources in forests. Fallen logs, dead standing trees, stumps, and even cavities in live trees fulfill a wide range of roles. Prominent among these is that they provide habitat for many organisms, especially insects. Fourth-grade students at Fox…

  7. Precision prediction of the log power spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Repp, A.; Szapudi, I.

    2017-01-01

    At translinear scales, the log power spectrum captures significantly more cosmological information than the standard power spectrum. At high wavenumbers k, the Fisher information in the standard power spectrum P(k) fails to increase in proportion to k, in part due to correlations between large- and small-scale modes. As a result, P(k) suffers from an information plateau on these translinear scales, so that analysis with the standard power spectrum cannot access the information contained in these small-scale modes. The log power spectrum PA(k), on the other hand, captures the majority of this otherwise lost information. Until now there has been no means of predicting the amplitude of the log power spectrum apart from cataloging the results of simulations. We here present a cosmology-independent prescription for the log power spectrum; this prescription displays accuracy comparable to that of Smith et al., over a range of redshifts and smoothing scales, and for wavenumbers up to 1.5 h Mpc-1.

  8. [Human development and log-periodic law].

    PubMed

    Cash, Roland; Chaline, Jean; Nottale, Laurent; Grou, Pierre

    2002-05-01

    We suggest applying the log-periodic law formerly used to describe various crisis phenomena, in biology (evolutionary leaps), inorganic systems (earthquakes), societies and economy (economic crisis, market crashes) to the various steps of human ontogeny. We find a statistically significant agreement between this model and the data.

  9. MAIL LOG, program theory, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, D. K.

    1979-01-01

    Information relevant to the MAIL LOG program theory is documented. The L-files for mail correspondence, design information release/report, and the drawing/engineering order are given. In addition, sources for miscellaneous external routines and special support routines are documented along with a glossary of terms.

  10. 29 CFR 1910.266 - Logging operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... other device is then hooked to the lifting or pulling machine. Danger tree. A standing tree that... delivery, such as, but not limited to, marking danger trees and trees/logs to be cut to length, felling... danger tree shall be felled, removed or avoided. Each danger tree, including lodged trees and...

  11. Data logging technology in ambulatory medical instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Anderson, R; Lyons, G M

    2001-05-01

    This paper reviews the advancements made in ambulatory data logging used in the study of human subjects since the inception of the analogue tape based data logger in the 1960s. Research into the area of ambulatory monitoring has been rejuvenated due to the development of novel storage technologies during the 1990s. Data logging systems that were previously impractical due to lack of processing power, practical size and cost are now available to the practitioner. An overview of the requirements of present day ambulatory data logging is presented and analogue tape, solid-state memory and disk drive storage recording systems that have been described in the literature are investigated in detail. It is proposed that digital based technology offers the best solution to the problems encountered during human based data logging. The appearance of novel digital storage media will continue the trend of increased recording durations, signal resolution and number of parameters thus allowing the momentum gained throughout the last several decades to continue.

  12. Modelling tropical forests response to logging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazzolla Gatti, Roberto; Di Paola, Arianna; Valentini, Riccardo; Paparella, Francesco

    2013-04-01

    Tropical rainforests are among the most threatened ecosystems by large-scale fragmentation due to human activity such as heavy logging and agricultural clearance. Although, they provide crucial ecosystem goods and services, such as sequestering carbon from the atmosphere, protecting watersheds and conserving biodiversity. In several countries forest resource extraction has experienced a shift from clearcutting to selective logging to maintain a significant forest cover and understock of living biomass. However the knowledge on the short and long-term effects of removing selected species in tropical rainforest are scarce and need to be further investigated. One of the main effects of selective logging on forest dynamics seems to be the local disturbance which involve the invasion of open space by weed, vines and climbers at the expense of the late-successional state cenosis. We present a simple deterministic model that describes the dynamics of tropical rainforest subject to selective logging to understand how and why weeds displace native species. We argue that the selective removal of tallest tropical trees carries out gaps of light that allow weeds, vines and climbers to prevail on native species, inhibiting the possibility of recovery of the original vegetation. Our results show that different regime shifts may occur depending on the type of forest management adopted. This hypothesis is supported by a dataset of trees height and weed/vines cover that we collected from 9 plots located in Central and West Africa both in untouched and managed areas.

  13. SNR characterization in distributed acoustic sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabai, Haniel; Eyal, Avishay

    2016-05-01

    In this paper we study the SNR associated with acoustic detection in Rayleigh-based Distributed Acoustic Sensing (DAS) systems. The study is focused on phase sensitive DAS due to its superiority in terms of linearity and sensitivity. Since DAS is based on coherent interference of backscattered light from multiple scatterers it is prone to signal fading. When left unresolved, the issue of signal fading renders the associated SNR randomly dependent on position and time. Hence, its proper measurement and characterization requires statistical tools. Here such tools are introduced and a methodology for finding the mean SNR and its distribution is implemented in both experiment and simulation. It is shown that the distribution of the DAS-SNR can be obtained from the distribution of backscattered power in OTDR and the mean DAS-SNR is proportional to the energy of the interrogation pulse.

  14. Electrofacies analysis for coal lithotype profiling based on high-resolution wireline log data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roslin, A.; Esterle, J. S.

    2016-06-01

    The traditional approach to coal lithotype analysis is based on a visual characterisation of coal in core, mine or outcrop exposures. As not all wells are fully cored, the petroleum and coal mining industries increasingly use geophysical wireline logs for lithology interpretation.This study demonstrates a method for interpreting coal lithotypes from geophysical wireline logs, and in particular discriminating between bright or banded, and dull coal at similar densities to a decimetre level. The study explores the optimum combination of geophysical log suites for training the coal electrofacies interpretation, using neural network conception, and then propagating the results to wells with fewer wireline data. This approach is objective and has a recordable reproducibility and rule set.In addition to conventional gamma ray and density logs, laterolog resistivity, microresistivity and PEF data were used in the study. Array resistivity data from a compact micro imager (CMI tool) were processed into a single microresistivity curve and integrated with the conventional resistivity data in the cluster analysis. Microresistivity data were tested in the analysis to test the hypothesis that the improved vertical resolution of microresistivity curve can enhance the accuracy of the clustering analysis. The addition of PEF log allowed discrimination between low density bright to banded coal electrofacies and low density inertinite-rich dull electrofacies.The results of clustering analysis were validated statistically and the results of the electrofacies results were compared to manually derived coal lithotype logs.

  15. Results of investigations at the Zunil geothermal field, Guatemala: Well logging and brine geochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, A.; Dennis, B.; Van Eeckhout, E.; Goff, F.; Lawton, R.; Trujillo, P.E.; Counce, D.; Archuleta, J. ); Medina, V. . Unidad de Desarollo Geotermico)

    1991-07-01

    The well logging team from Los Alamos and its counterpart from Central America were tasked to investigate the condition of four producing geothermal wells in the Zunil Geothermal Field. The information obtained would be used to help evaluate the Zunil geothermal reservoir in terms of possible additional drilling and future power plant design. The field activities focused on downhole measurements in four production wells (ZCQ-3, ZCQ-4, ZCQ-5, and ZCQ-6). The teams took measurements of the wells in both static (shut-in) and flowing conditions, using the high-temperature well logging tools developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Two well logging missions were conducted in the Zunil field. In October 1988 measurements were made in well ZCQ-3, ZCQ-5, and ZCQ-6. In December 1989 the second field operation logged ZCQ-4 and repeated logs in ZCQ-3. Both field operations included not only well logging but the collecting of numerous fluid samples from both thermal and nonthermal waters. 18 refs., 22 figs., 7 tabs.

  16. Acoustical properties of drill strings

    SciTech Connect

    Drumheller, D.S.

    1988-08-01

    The recovery of petrochemical and geothermal resources requires extensive drilling of wells to increasingly greater depths. Real-time collection and telemetry of data about the drilling process while it occurs thousands of feet below the surface is an effective way of improving the efficiency of drilling operations. Unfortunately, due to hostile down-hole environments, telemetry of this data is an extremely difficult problem. Currently, commercial systems transmit data to the surface by producing pressure pulses within the portion of the drilling mud enclosed in the hollow steel drill string. Transmission rates are between two and four data bits per second. Any system capable of raising data rates without increasing the complexity of the drilling process will have significant economic impact. One alternative system is based upon acoustical carrier waves generated within the drill string itself. If developed, this method would accommodate data rates up to 100 bits per second. Unfortunately, the drill string is a periodic structure of pipe and threaded tool joints, the transmission characteristics are very complex and exhibit a banded and dispersive structure. Over the past forty years, attempts to field systems based upon this transmission method have resulted in little success. This paper examines this acoustical transmission problem in great detail. The basic principles of acoustic wave propagation in the periodic structure of the drill string are examined through theory, laboratory experiment, and field test. The results indicate the existence of frequency bands which are virtually free of attenuation and suitable for data transmission at high bit rates. 9 refs., 38 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Seasonal logging, process response, and geomorphic work

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohr, C. H.; Zimmermann, A.; Korup, O.; Iroumé, A.; Francke, T.; Bronstert, A.

    2013-09-01

    Deforestation is a prominent anthropogenic cause of erosive overland flow and slope instability, boosting rates of soil erosion and concomitant sediment flux. Conventional methods of gauging or estimating post-logging sediment flux focus on annual timescales, but potentially overlook important geomorphic responses on shorter time scales immediately following timber harvest. Sediments fluxes are commonly estimated from linear regression of intermittent measurements of water and sediment discharge using sediment rating curves (SRCs). However, these often unsatisfactorily reproduce non-linear effects such as discharge-load hystereses. We resolve such important dynamics from non-parametric Quantile Regression Forests (QRF) of high-frequency (3 min) measurements of stream discharge and sediment concentrations in similar-sized (~ 0.1 km2) forested Chilean catchments that were logged during either the rainy or the dry season. The method of QRF builds on the Random Forest (RF) algorithm, and combines quantile regression with repeated random sub-sampling of both cases and predictors. The algorithm belongs to the family of decision-tree classifiers, which allow quantifying relevant predictors in high-dimensional parameter space. We find that, where no logging occurred, ~ 80% of the total sediment load was transported during rare but high magnitude runoff events during only 5% of the monitoring period. The variability of sediment flux of these rare events spans four orders of magnitude. In particular dry-season logging dampened the role of these rare, extreme sediment-transport events by increasing load efficiency during more moderate events. We show that QRFs outperforms traditional SRCs in terms of accurately simulating short-term dynamics of sediment flux, and conclude that QRF may reliably support forest management recommendations by providing robust simulations of post-logging response of water and sediment discharge at high temporal resolution.

  18. Seasonal logging, process response, and geomorphic work

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohr, C. H.; Zimmermann, A.; Korup, O.; Iroumé, A.; Francke, T.; Bronstert, A.

    2014-03-01

    Deforestation is a prominent anthropogenic cause of erosive overland flow and slope instability, boosting rates of soil erosion and concomitant sediment flux. Conventional methods of gauging or estimating post-logging sediment flux often focus on annual timescales but overlook potentially important process response on shorter intervals immediately following timber harvest. We resolve such dynamics with non-parametric quantile regression forests (QRF) based on high-frequency (3 min) discharge measurements and sediment concentration data sampled every 30-60 min in similar-sized (˜0.1 km2) forested Chilean catchments that were logged during either the rainy or the dry season. The method of QRF builds on the random forest algorithm, and combines quantile regression with repeated random sub-sampling of both cases and predictors. The algorithm belongs to the family of decision-tree classifiers, which allow quantifying relevant predictors in high-dimensional parameter space. We find that, where no logging occurred, ˜80% of the total sediment load was transported during extremely variable runoff events during only 5% of the monitoring period. In particular, dry-season logging dampened the relative role of these rare, extreme sediment-transport events by increasing load efficiency during more efficient moderate events. We show that QRFs outperform traditional sediment rating curves (SRCs) in terms of accurately simulating short-term dynamics of sediment flux, and conclude that QRF may reliably support forest management recommendations by providing robust simulations of post-logging response of water and sediment fluxes at high temporal resolution.

  19. Critical care procedure logging using handheld computers

    PubMed Central

    Carlos Martinez-Motta, J; Walker, Robin; Stewart, Thomas E; Granton, John; Abrahamson, Simon; Lapinsky, Stephen E

    2004-01-01

    Introduction We conducted this study to evaluate the feasibility of implementing an internet-linked handheld computer procedure logging system in a critical care training program. Methods Subspecialty trainees in the Interdepartmental Division of Critical Care at the University of Toronto received and were trained in the use of Palm handheld computers loaded with a customized program for logging critical care procedures. The procedures were entered into the handheld device using checkboxes and drop-down lists, and data were uploaded to a central database via the internet. To evaluate the feasibility of this system, we tracked the utilization of this data collection system. Benefits and disadvantages were assessed through surveys. Results All 11 trainees successfully uploaded data to the central database, but only six (55%) continued to upload data on a regular basis. The most common reason cited for not using the system pertained to initial technical problems with data uploading. From 1 July 2002 to 30 June 2003, a total of 914 procedures were logged. Significant variability was noted in the number of procedures logged by individual trainees (range 13–242). The database generated by regular users provided potentially useful information to the training program director regarding the scope and location of procedural training among the different rotations and hospitals. Conclusion A handheld computer procedure logging system can be effectively used in a critical care training program. However, user acceptance was not uniform, and continued training and support are required to increase user acceptance. Such a procedure database may provide valuable information that may be used to optimize trainees' educational experience and to document clinical training experience for licensing and accreditation. PMID:15469577

  20. Requirements-Driven Log Analysis Extended Abstract

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Havelund, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Imagine that you are tasked to help a project improve their testing effort. In a realistic scenario it will quickly become clear, that having an impact is diffcult. First of all, it will likely be a challenge to suggest an alternative approach which is significantly more automated and/or more effective than current practice. The reality is that an average software system has a complex input/output behavior. An automated testing approach will have to auto-generate test cases, each being a pair (i; o) consisting of a test input i and an oracle o. The test input i has to be somewhat meaningful, and the oracle o can be very complicated to compute. Second, even in case where some testing technology has been developed that might improve current practice, it is then likely difficult to completely change the current behavior of the testing team unless the technique is obviously superior and does everything already done by existing technology. So is there an easier way to incorporate formal methods-based approaches than the full edged test revolution? Fortunately the answer is affirmative. A relatively simple approach is to benefit from possibly already existing logging infrastructure, which after all is part of most systems put in production. A log is a sequence of events, generated by special log recording statements, most often manually inserted in the code by the programmers. An event can be considered as a data record: a mapping from field names to values. We can analyze such a log using formal methods, for example checking it against a formal specification. This separates running the system for analyzing its behavior. It is not meant as an alternative to testing since it does not address the important in- put generation problem. However, it offers a solution which testing teams might accept since it has low impact on the existing process. A single person might be assigned to perform such log analysis, compared to the entire testing team changing behavior.